Science.gov

Sample records for flaw density examinations

  1. Fabrication Flaw Density and Distribution in Piping Weldments

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, Steven R.

    2009-09-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission supported the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop empirical data on the density and distribution of fabrication flaws in nuclear reactor components. These data are needed to support probabilistic fracture mechanics calculations and studies on component structural integrity. PNNL performed nondestructive examination inspections and destructive testing on archived piping welds to determine the fabrication flaw size and distribution characteristics of the flaws in nuclear power plant piping weldments. Eight different processes and product forms in piping weldments were studied including wrought stainless steel and dissimilar metal weldments. Parametric analysis using an exponential fit was performed on the data. Results were created as a function of the through-wall size of the fabrication flaws as well as the length distribution. The results are compared and contrasted with those developed for reactor pressure vessel processes and product forms. The most significant findings were that the density of fabrication flaws versus through-wall size was higher in piping weldments than that for the reactor pressure vessel weldments, and the density of fabrication flaws versus through-wall size in both reactor pressure vessel weld repairs and piping weldments were greater than the density in the original weldments. Curves showing these distributions are presented.

  2. Fabrication Flaw Density and Distribution in Weld Repairs

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, Steven R.

    2009-09-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing a generalized flaw distribution for the population of nuclear reactor pressure vessels and for piping welds in the U. S. operating reactors. The purpose of the generalized flaw distribution is to predict component-specific flaw densities. The estimates of fabrication flaws are intended for use in fracture mechanics structural integrity assessments. Structural integrity assessments, such as estimating the frequency of loss-of-coolant accidents, are performed by computer codes that require, as input, accurate estimates of flaw densities. Welds from four different cancelled reactor pressure vessels and a collection of archived pipes have been studied to develop empirical estimates of fabrication flaw densities. This paper describes the fabrication flaw distribution and characterization in the repair weld metal of vessels and piping. This work indicates that large flaws occur in these repairs which are complex in composition and sometimes include cracks on the ends of the repair cavities. Parametric analysis using an exponential fit is performed on the data. Construction records where available were reviewed. It is difficult to make conclusions due to the limited number of construction records reviewed. However, the records reviewed to date show a significant change in repair frequency over the years when the components in this study were fabricated. A description of repair flaw morphology is provided with a discussion of fracture mechanics significance.

  3. Fabrication Flaw Density and Distribution In Repairs to Reactor Pressure Vessel and Piping Welds

    SciTech Connect

    GJ Schuster, FA Simonen, SR Doctor

    2008-04-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing a generalized fabrication flaw distribution for the population of nuclear reactor pressure vessels and for piping welds in U.S. operating reactors. The purpose of the generalized flaw distribution is to predict component-specific flaw densities. The estimates of fabrication flaws are intended for use in fracture mechanics structural integrity assessments. Structural integrity assessments, such as estimating the frequency of loss-of-coolant accidents, are performed by computer codes that require, as input, accurate estimates of flaw densities. Welds from four different reactor pressure vessels and a collection of archived pipes have been studied to develop empirical estimates of fabrication flaw densities. This report describes the fabrication flaw distribution and characterization in the repair weld metal of vessels and piping. This work indicates that large flaws occur in these repairs. These results show that repair flaws are complex in composition and sometimes include cracks on the ends of the repair cavities. Parametric analysis using an exponential fit is performed on the data. The relevance of construction records is established for describing fabrication processes and product forms. An analysis of these records shows there was a significant change in repair frequency over the years when these components were fabricated. A description of repair flaw morphology is provided with a discussion of fracture mechanics significance. Fabrication flaws in repairs are characterized using optimized-access, high-sensitivity nondestructive ultrasonic testing. Flaw characterizations are then validated by other nondestructive evaluation techniques and complemented by destructive testing.

  4. Towards teaching science for social responsibility: An examination of flaws in science, technology and society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Roger T.; Price, Ronald F.

    1991-12-01

    In this paper we continue our search for a socially responsible science education by an examination of the trends in the Science, Technology and Society movement. These trends reflect differing ideological perspectives and result in courses which serve different ends. We identify two major flaws in the movement that inhibits the realization of a schooling in science dedicated to democracy. We propose skills necessary for citizens to participate in debate over issues surrounding the impact of science and technology on society and a teaching stategy to help develop them.

  5. Progress in evaluation and improvement in nondestructive examination reliability for inservice inspection of Light Water Reactors (LWRs) and characterize fabrication flaws in reactor pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, S.R.; Bowey, R.E.; Good, M.S.; Friley, J.R.; Kurtz, R.J.; Simonen, F.A.; Taylor, T.T.; Heasler, P.G.; Andersen, E.S.; Diaz, A.A.; Greenwood, M.S.; Hockey, R.L.; Schuster, G.J.; Spanner, J.C.; Vo, T.V.

    1991-10-01

    This paper is a review of the work conducted under two programs. One (NDE Reliability Program) is a multi-year program addressing the reliability of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) for the inservice inspection (ISI) of light water reactor components. This program examines the reliability of current NDE, the effectiveness of evolving technologies, and provides assessments and recommendations to ensure that the NDE is applied at the right time, in the right place with sufficient effectiveness that defects of importance to structural integrity will be reliably detected and accurately characterized. The second program (Characterizing Fabrication Flaws in Reactor Pressure Vessels) is assembling a data base to quantify the distribution of fabrication flaws that exist in US nuclear reactor pressure vessels with respect to density, size, type, and location. These programs will be discussed as two separate sections in this report. 4 refs., 7 figs.

  6. The effects of violating standard item writing principles on tests and students: the consequences of using flawed test items on achievement examinations in medical education.

    PubMed

    Downing, Steven M

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to study the effects of violations of standard multiple-choice item writing principles on test characteristics, student scores, and pass-fail outcomes. Four basic science examinations, administered to year-one and year-two medical students, were randomly selected for study. Test items were classified as either standard or flawed by three independent raters, blinded to all item performance data. Flawed test questions violated one or more standard principles of effective item writing. Thirty-six to sixty-five percent of the items on the four tests were flawed. Flawed items were 0-15 percentage points more difficult than standard items measuring the same construct. Over all four examinations, 646 (53%) students passed the standard items while 575 (47%) passed the flawed items. The median passing rate difference between flawed and standard items was 3.5 percentage points, but ranged from -1 to 35 percentage points. Item flaws had little effect on test score reliability or other psychometric quality indices. Results showed that flawed multiple-choice test items, which violate well established and evidence-based principles of effective item writing, disadvantage some medical students. Item flaws introduce the systematic error of construct-irrelevant variance to assessments, thereby reducing the validity evidence for examinations and penalizing some examinees.

  7. Unit-Sphere Anisotropic Multiaxial Stochastic-Strength Model Probability Density Distribution for the Orientation of Critical Flaws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Noel

    2013-01-01

    Models that predict the failure probability of monolithic glass and ceramic components under multiaxial loading have been developed by authors such as Batdorf, Evans, and Matsuo. These "unit-sphere" failure models assume that the strength-controlling flaws are randomly oriented, noninteracting planar microcracks of specified geometry but of variable size. This report develops a formulation to describe the probability density distribution of the orientation of critical strength-controlling flaws that results from an applied load. This distribution is a function of the multiaxial stress state, the shear sensitivity of the flaws, the Weibull modulus, and the strength anisotropy. Examples are provided showing the predicted response on the unit sphere for various stress states for isotropic and transversely isotropic (anisotropic) materials--including the most probable orientation of critical flaws for offset uniaxial loads with strength anisotropy. The author anticipates that this information could be used to determine anisotropic stiffness degradation or anisotropic damage evolution for individual brittle (or quasi-brittle) composite material constituents within finite element or micromechanics-based software

  8. Calculation of Weibull strength parameters, Batdorf flaw density constants and related statistical quantities using PC-CARES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szatmary, Steven A.; Gyekenyesi, John P.; Nemeth, Noel N.

    1990-01-01

    This manual describes the operation and theory of the PC-CARES (Personal Computer-Ceramic Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures) computer program for the IBM PC and compatibles running PC-DOS/MS-DOR OR IBM/MS-OS/2 (version 1.1 or higher) operating systems. The primary purpose of this code is to estimate Weibull material strength parameters, the Batdorf crack density coefficient, and other related statistical quantities. Included in the manual is the description of the calculation of shape and scale parameters of the two-parameter Weibull distribution using the least-squares analysis and maximum likelihood methods for volume- and surface-flaw-induced fracture in ceramics with complete and censored samples. The methods for detecting outliers and for calculating the Kolmogorov-Smirnov and the Anderson-Darling goodness-of-fit statistics and 90 percent confidence bands about the Weibull line, as well as the techniques for calculating the Batdorf flaw-density constants are also described.

  9. A STRUCTURAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT OF FLAWS DETECTED DURING ULTRASONIC EXAMINATION OF TANK 15

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B; James Elder, J

    2008-08-21

    Ultrasonic (UT) inspection of Tank 15 was conducted between April and July 2007 in accordance with the Tank 15 UT inspection plan. This was a planned re-inspection of this tank, the previous one was performed in 2002. Ten cracks were characterized in the previous examination. The re-inspection was performed to verify the present models and understanding for stress corrosion cracking. During this re-examination, one indication that was initially reported as a 'possible perpendicular crack <25% through wall' in 2002, was clearly shown not to be a crack. Additionally, examination of a new area immediately adjacent to other cracks along a vertical weld revealed three new cracks. It is not known when these new cracks formed as they could very well have been present in 2002 as well. Therefore, a total of twelve cracks were evaluated during the re-examination. A critical review of the information describing stress corrosion crack behavior for the SRS waste tanks, as well as a summary review of the service history of Tank 15, was performed. Each crack was then evaluated for service exposure history, consistency of the crack behavior with the current understanding of stress corrosion cracking, and present and future impact to the structural integrity of the tank. Crack instability calculations were performed on each crack for a bounding waste removal loading condition in Tank 15. In all cases, the crack behavior was determined to be consistent with the previous understanding of stress corrosion cracking in the SRS waste tank environment. The length of the cracks was limited due to the short-range nature of the residual stresses near seam, repair and attachment welds. Of the twelve cracks, nine were located in the vapor space above the sludge layer, including the three new cracks. Comparison of the crack lengths measured in 2002 and 2007 revealed that crack growth had occurred in four of the six previously measured vapor space cracks. However, the growth remained within the

  10. Evaluation of Manual Ultrasonic Examinations Applied to Detect Flaws in Primary System Dissimilar Metal Welds at North Anna Power Station

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael T.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2012-06-01

    During a recent inservice inspection (ISI) of a dissimilar metal weld (DMW) in an inlet (hot leg) steam generator nozzle at North Anna Power Station Unit 1, several axially oriented flaws went undetected by the licensee's manual ultrasonic testing (UT) technique. The flaws were subsequently detected as a result of outside diameter (OD) surface machining in preparation for a full structural weld overlay. The machining operation uncovered the existence of two through-wall flaws, based on the observance of primary water leaking from the DMW. Further ultrasonic tests were then performed, and a total of five axially oriented flaws, classified as primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC), were detected in varied locations around the weld circumference.

  11. Final Assessment of Manual Ultrasonic Examinations Applied to Detect Flaws in Primary System Dissimilar Metal Welds at North Anna Power Station

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael T.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Crawford, Susan L.; Prowant, Matthew S.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2014-03-24

    PNNL conducted a technical assessment of the NDE issues and protocols that led to missed detections of several axially oriented flaws in a steam generator primary inlet dissimilar metal weld at North Anna Power Station, Unit 1 (NAPS-1). This particular component design exhibits a significant outside-diameter (OD) taper that is not included as a blind performance demonstration mock-up within the industry’s Performance Demonstration Initiative, administered by EPRI. For this reason, the licensee engaged EPRI to assist in the development of a technical justification to support the basis for a site-specific qualification. The service-induced flaws at NAPS-1 were eventually detected as a result of OD surface machining in preparation for a full structural weld overlay. The machining operation uncovered the existence of two through-wall flaws, based on the observance of primary water leaking from the dissimilar metal weld. A total of five axially oriented flaws were detected in varied locations around the weld circumference. The field volumetric examination that was conducted at NAPS-1 was a non-encoded, real-time manual ultrasonic examination. PNNL conducted both an initial assessment, and subsequently, a more rigorous technical evaluation (reported here), which has identified an array of NDE issues that may have led to the subject missed detections. These evaluations were performed through technical reviews and discussions with NRC staff, EPRI NDE Center personnel, industry and ISI vendor personnel, and ultrasonic transducer manufacturers, and laboratory tests, to better understand the underlying issues at North Anna.

  12. Study Thermographic Flaw Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.; Workman, Gary L.

    1996-01-01

    The development of thermographic inspection methods for use on aerospace structures is under investigation. Several different material systems, structural geometries and defect types have been included in this study so as to establish a baseline from which future Infrared Thermography(IRT) testing can be made. This study examines various thermal loading techniques in an attempt to enhance the likelihood of capturing and identifying critically sized flaws under 'non laboratory' actual working conditions. Qualification techniques and calibration standards are also being investigated to standardize the thermographic method. In conjunction with the thermographic inspections, advanced image processing techniques including digital filtering and neural networks have been investigated to increase the ability of detecting and sizing flaws. Here, the digitized thermographic images are mathematically manipulated through various filtering techniques and/or artificial neural mapping schemes to enhance its overall quality, permitting accurate flaw identification even when the signal-to-noise ratio is low.

  13. Study Thermographic Flaw Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.; Workman, Gary L.

    1996-01-01

    The development of thermographic inspection methods for use on aerospace structures is under investigation. Several different material systems, structural geometries and defect types have been included in this study so as to establish a baseline from which future IRT testing can be made. This study examines various thermal loading techniques in an attempt to enhance the likelihood of capturing and identifying critically sized flaws under 'non-laboratory' actual working conditions. Qualification techniques and calibration standards are also being investigated to standardize the thermographic method. In conjunction with the thermographic inspections, advanced image processing techniques including digital filtering and neural networks have been investigated to increase the ability of 91 detecting and sizing flaws. Here, the digitized thermographic images are mathematically manipulated through various filtering techniques and/or artificial neural mapping schemes to enhance its overall quality, permitting accurate flaw identification even when the signal-to-noise ratio is low.

  14. In-service Inspection Ultrasonic Testing of Reactor Pressure Vessel Welds for Assessing Flaw Density and Size Distribution per 10 CFR 50.61a, Alternate Fracture Toughness Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Edmund J.; Anderson, Michael T.; Norris, Wallace

    2012-09-17

    Pressurized thermal shock (PTS) events are system transients in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) in which there is a rapid operating temperature cool-down that results in cold vessel temperatures with or without repressurization of the vessel. The rapid cooling of the inside surface of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) causes thermal stresses that can combine with stresses caused by high pressure. The aggregate effect of these stresses is an increase in the potential for fracture if a pre-existing flaw is present in a material susceptible to brittle failure. The ferritic, low alloy steel of the reactor vessel beltline adjacent to the core, where neutron radiation gradually embrittles the material over the lifetime of the plant, can be susceptible to brittle fracture. The PTS rule, described in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Section 50.61 (§50.61), “Fracture Toughness Requirements for Protection against Pressurized Thermal Shock Events,” adopted on July 23, 1985, establishes screening criteria to ensure that the potential for a reactor vessel to fail due to a PTS event is deemed to be acceptably low. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) completed a research program that concluded that the risk of through-wall cracking due to a PTS event is much lower than previously estimated. The NRC subsequently developed a rule, §50.61a, published on January 4, 2010, entitled “Alternate Fracture Toughness Requirements for Protection Against Pressurized Thermal Shock Events” (75 FR 13). Use of the new rule by licensees is optional. The §50.61a rule differs from §50.61 in that it requires licensees who choose to follow this alternate method to analyze the results from periodic volumetric examinations required by the ASME Code, Section XI, Rules for Inservice Inspection (ISI) of Nuclear Power Plants. These analyses are intended to determine if the actual flaw density and size distribution in the licensee’s reactor vessel beltline welds are bounded

  15. Calculation of Weibull strength parameters and Batdorf flow-density constants for volume- and surface-flaw-induced fracture in ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, Shantaram S.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1988-01-01

    The calculation of shape and scale parameters of the two-parameter Weibull distribution is described using the least-squares analysis and maximum likelihood methods for volume- and surface-flaw-induced fracture in ceramics with complete and censored samples. Detailed procedures are given for evaluating 90 percent confidence intervals for maximum likelihood estimates of shape and scale parameters, the unbiased estimates of the shape parameters, and the Weibull mean values and corresponding standard deviations. Furthermore, the necessary steps are described for detecting outliers and for calculating the Kolmogorov-Smirnov and the Anderson-Darling goodness-of-fit statistics and 90 percent confidence bands about the Weibull distribution. It also shows how to calculate the Batdorf flaw-density constants by uing the Weibull distribution statistical parameters. The techniques described were verified with several example problems, from the open literature, and were coded. The techniques described were verified with several example problems from the open literature, and were coded in the Structural Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation (SCARE) design program.

  16. Flaw detection and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Wilks, Robert S.; Sturges, Jr., Robert H.

    1983-01-01

    The invention provides a method of and apparatus for optically inspecting nuclear fuel pellets for surface flaws. The inspection system includes a prism and lens arrangement for scanning the surface of each pellet as the same is rotated. The resulting scan produces data indicative of the extent and shape of each flaw which is employed to generate a flaw quality index for each detected flaw. The flaw quality indexes from all flaws are summed and compared with an acceptable surface quality index. The result of the comparison is utilized to control the acceptance or rejection of the pellet.

  17. Evaluation on the Feasibility of Using Ultrasonic Testing of Reactor Pressure Vessel Welds for Assessing Flaw Density/Distribution per 10 CFR 50.61a, Alternate Fracture Toughness Requirements for Protection Against Pressurized Thermal Shock

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Edmund J.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2014-06-10

    This technical letter report provides the status of an assessment undertaken by PNNL at the request of the NRC to verify the capability of periodic ASME-required volumetric examinations of reactor vessels to characterize the density and distribution of flaws of interest for applying §50.61a on a plant-by-plant basis. The PTS rule, described in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Section 50.61 (§50.61), "Fracture Toughness Requirements for Protection against Pressurized Thermal Shock Events," establishes screening criteria to ensure that the potential for a reactor vessel to fail due to a PTS event is deemed to be acceptably low. Recently, the NRC completed a research program that concluded that the risk of through-wall cracking due to a PTS event is much lower than previously estimated. The NRC subsequently developed and promulgated an alternate PTS rule, §50.61a, that can be implemented by PWR licensees. The §50.61a rule differs from §50.61 in that it requires licensees who choose to follow this alternate method to analyze the results from periodic volumetric examinations required by the ASME Code, Section XI, Rules for Inservice Inspection (ISI) of Nuclear Power Plants.

  18. Detection and Characterization of Flaws in Sprayed on Foam Insulation with Pulsed Terahertz Frequency Electromagnetic Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winfree, William P.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2005-01-01

    The detection and repair of flaws such as voids and delaminations in the sprayed on foam insulation of the external tank reduces the probability of foam debris during shuttle ascent. The low density of sprayed on foam insulation along with it other physical properties makes detection of flaws difficult with conventional techniques. An emerging technology that has application for quantitative evaluation of flaws in the foam is pulsed electromagnetic waves at terahertz frequencies. The short wavelengths of these terahertz pulses make them ideal for imaging flaws in the foam. This paper examines the application of terahertz pulses for flaw detection in foam characteristic of the foam insulation of the external tank. Of particular interest is the detection of voids and delaminations, encapsulated in the foam or at the interface between the foam and a metal backing. The technique is shown to be capable of imaging small voids and delaminations through as much as 20 cm of foam. Methods for reducing the temporal responses of the terahertz pulses to improve flaw detection and yield quantitative characterizations of the size and location of the flaws are discussed.

  19. Critical flaw size in silicon nitride ball bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levesque, George Arthur

    Aircraft engine and bearing manufacturers have been aggressively pursuing advanced materials technology systems solutions to meet main shaft-bearing needs of advanced military aircraft engines. Ceramic silicon nitride hybrid bearings are being developed for such high performance applications. Though silicon nitride exhibits many favorable properties such as high compressive strength, high hardness, a third of the density of steel, low coefficient of thermal expansion, and high corrosion and temperature resistance, they also have low fracture toughness and are susceptible to failure from fatigue spalls emanating from pre-existing surface flaws that can grow under rolling contact fatigue (RCF). Rolling elements and raceways are among the most demanding components in aircraft engines due to a combination of high cyclic contact stresses, long expected component lifetimes, corrosive environment, and the high consequence of fatigue failure. The cost of these rolling elements increases exponentially with the decrease in allowable flaw size for service applications. Hence the range of 3D non-planar surface flaw geometries subject to RCF is simulated to determine the critical flaw size (CFS) or the largest allowable flaw that does not grow under service conditions. This dissertation is a numerical and experimental investigation of surface flaws in ceramic balls subjected to RCF and has resulted in the following analyses: Crack Shape Determination: the nucleation of surface flaws from ball impact that occurs during the manufacturing process is simulated. By examining the subsurface Hertzian stresses between contacting spheres, their applicability to predicting and characterizing crack size and shape is established. It is demonstrated that a wide range of cone and partial cone cracks, observed in practice, can be generated using the proposed approaches. RCF Simulation: the procedure and concerns in modeling nonplanar 3D cracks subject to RCF using FEA for stress intensity

  20. Inspection of surface flaws by comparator microscopy.

    PubMed

    Baker, L R

    1988-11-15

    The increasing attention paid in recent years to control of surface quality has exposed the lack of objectivity of existing standards relating to flaws such as digs and scratches. The present requirements of the customer and supplier of optical components for improved standards are discussed, and recent attempts to satisfy these requirements are reviewed. It is concluded that a technique, described as comparator microscopy, in which a width of line or slit is identified which removes from a transmitted or reflected beam the same amount of light as the flaw under examination, has much in its favor in terms of user needs. The method, which is under consideration as the basis of an ISO standard, is described, and results are presented indicating how this concept of line-equivalent width can be used to compare different national standard flaws. Extending this technique to measure flaws and polish on-machine is suggested as a future possibility.

  1. EVALUATION OF ULTRASONIC PHASED-ARRAY FOR DETECTION OF PLANAR FLAWS IN HIGH-DENSITY POLYETHYLENE (HDPE) BUTT-FUSION JOINTS

    SciTech Connect

    Prowant, Matthew S.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Moran, Traci L.; Jacob, Rick E.; Hartman, Trenton S.; Crawford, Susan L.; Mathews, Royce; Neill, Kevin J.; Cinson, Anthony D.

    2016-09-21

    The desire to use high-density polyethylene (HDPE) piping in buried Class 3 service and cooling water systems in nuclear power plants is primarily motivated by the material’s high resistance to corrosion relative to that of steel and metal alloys. The rules for construction of Class 3 HDPE pressure piping systems were originally published in Code Case N-755 and were recently incorporated into the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (ASME BPVC) Section III as Mandatory Appendix XXVI (2015 Edition). The requirements for HDPE examination are guided by criteria developed for metal pipe and are based on industry-led HDPE research or conservative calculations.

  2. Fluorescent Detection of Flaws.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    In a method for detecting flaws in the surface of a workpiece, initially microcapsules containing a fluorescent dye are deposited on the surface...After removal of excess microcapsules from the surface in order to reduce background fluorescence, the surface is visually inspected under ultraviolet

  3. Using flaw implants to qualify nuclear NDE personnel

    SciTech Connect

    Pherigo, G.L.; Pherigo, A.L.

    1994-12-31

    Intentionally flawed piping and vessel specimens are now required to simulate potential flawed conditions in nuclear power plants. These specimens will be used in a practical examination ``Performance Demonstration`` to verify the capabilities of ultrasonic testing (UT) personnel, procedures and equipment. ASME Section 11, Appendix 8, ``Performance Demonstration for Ultrasonic Examination Systems,`` was introduced into the Code to help substantiate the capability of NDE to detect and size flaws in nuclear power plant components. This paper is a brief discussion of some of the current methods used to implant flaws and will describe and evaluate the manufacturing techniques used to implant thermal fatigue cracks in stainless steel pipe and carbon steel vessel material. The accurate placement of flaw implants is critical and this paper will describe in some detail the tolerances applied to the flaw implant technology.

  4. Midland reactor pressure vessel flaw distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Foulds, J.R.; Kennedy, E.L.; Rosinski, S.T.

    1993-12-01

    The results of laboratory nondestructive examination (NDE), and destructive cross-sectioning of selected weldment sections of the Midland reactor pressure vessel were analyzed per a previously developed methodology in order to develop a flaw distribution. The flaw distributions developed from the NDE results obtained by two different ultrasonic test (UT) inspections (Electric Power Research Institute NDE Center and Pacific Northwest Laboratories) were not statistically significantly different. However, the distribution developed from the NDE Center`s (destructive) cross-sectioning-based data was found to be significantly different than those obtained through the UT inspections. A fracture mechanics-based comparison of the flaw distributions showed that the cross-sectioning-based data, conservatively interpreted (all defects considered as flaws), gave a significantly lower vessel failure probability when compared with the failure probability values obtained using the UT-based distributions. Given that the cross-sectioning data were reportedly biased toward larger, more significant-appearing (by UT) indications, it is concluded that the nondestructive examinations produced definitively conservative results. In addition to the Midland vessel inspection-related analyses, a set of twenty-seven numerical simulations, designed to provide a preliminary quantitative assessment of the accuracy of the flaw distribution method used here, were conducted. The calculations showed that, in more than half the cases, the analysis produced reasonably accurate predictions.

  5. NCLB Transfer Policy Seen as Flawed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrie, Caroline

    2005-01-01

    This article examines what some people see as flaws in the transfer policy provision of the No Child Left Behind law. Advocates of the policy are calling for providing schools with incentives to accept transfers and for giving parents more time, information, and options, among other changes. States need to hold districts' feet to the fire, those…

  6. The Effects of Violating Standard Item Writing Principles on Tests and Students: The Consequences of Using Flawed Test Items on Achievement Examinations in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downing, Steven M.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to study the effects of violations of standard multiple-choice item writing principles on test characteristics, student scores, and pass-fail outcomes. Four basic science examinations, administered to year-one and year-two medical students, were randomly selected for study. Test items were classified as either…

  7. Signal Processing Variables for Optimization of Flaw Detection in Composites Using Ultrasonic Guided Wave Scanning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Cosgriff, Laura M.; Martin, Richard E.; Teemer, LeTarrie

    2004-01-01

    This study analyzes the effect of signal processing variables on the ability of the ultrasonic guided wave scan method at NASA Glenn Research Center to distinguish various flaw conditions in ceramic matrix composites samples. In the ultrasonic guided wave scan method, several time- and frequency-domain parameters are calculated from the ultrasonic guided wave signal at each scan location to form images. The parameters include power spectral density, centroid mean time, total energy (zeroth moment), centroid frequency, and ultrasonic decay rate. A number of signal processing variables are available to the user when calculating these parameters. These signal processing variables include 1) the time portion of the time-domain waveform processed, 2) integration type for the properties requiring integrations, 3) bounded versus unbounded integrations, 4) power spectral density window type, 5) and the number of time segments chosen if using the short-time fourier transform to calculate ultrasonic decay rate. Flaw conditions examined included delamination, cracking, and density variation.

  8. Influence of initial flaws on the mechanical properties of nacre.

    PubMed

    Anup, S

    2015-06-01

    Nacre is a bio-composite made up of hard mineral and soft protein, and has excellent mechanical properties. This paper examines the effect of naturally occurring defects (initial flaws) in nacre on its mechanical properties such as toughness and strength. A random fuse model is developed incorporating initial flaws. Numerical simulations show that initial flaws affect different mechanical properties at different rates. The variation in the experimentally obtained mechanical properties of nacre reported in the literature is shown to be due to initial flaws. The stress in the mineral and protein increases due to initial flaws, but by different amounts. The results obtained in this study are useful for gaining insight into the failure of nacre and development of nacre-inspired composites.

  9. Practical aspects of using Hertzian ring crack initiation to measure surface flaw densities in glasses: influence of humidity, friction and searched areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tandon, Rajan; Paliwal, Bhasker; Gibson, Cory

    2013-07-01

    Ring crack initiation loads on glass, using spherical Tungsten carbide (WC) and glass (G) indenters, are measured and analysed. Our measurements demonstrate that environmental humidity plays a key role in determining the load to fracture; experiments conducted without controlling this variable cannot be used to obtain material properties. The role of friction is explicitly considered for dissimilar (WC-G) elastic contacts. For this material pair, the stresses at fracture are well described by a boundary lubrication value of friction coefficient. The fracture loads are used in a fracture-mechanics formulation to calculate crack sizes on glass surfaces. The 'searched-area' concept for dissimilar contacts is described, and used to provide crack density values for these surfaces.

  10. Probabilistic simulation for flaw acceptance by dye-penetrant inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, D. A.; Keremes, J. J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper examines the problems encountered in assessing the reliability of dye-penetrant nondestructive inspection (NDI) techniques in preventing failures due to undetected surface flaws, as well as from flaw acceptance (Fitness-For-Purpose). A Monte Carlo simulation procedure which includes the major variables of the problem is presented as a means of quantifying reliability. Some issues associated with distribution selection are examined. A methodology for selecting the penetrant type and flaw acceptance size for the specific components analyzed using the simulation is proposed. Current methodology limitations are discussed along with possible future effort. Penetrant selection and acceptable sizes of detected flaws are based on a probabilistic assessment of the effect of component and dye-penetrant system variables on structural reliability.

  11. Magnetoresistive flux focusing eddy current flaw detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor); Simpson, John W. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A giant magnetoresistive flux focusing eddy current device effectively detects deep flaws in thick multilayer conductive materials. The probe uses an excitation coil to induce eddy currents in conducting material perpendicularly oriented to the coil's longitudinal axis. A giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensor, surrounded by the excitation coil, is used to detect generated fields. Between the excitation coil and GMR sensor is a highly permeable flux focusing lens which magnetically separates the GMR sensor and excitation coil and produces high flux density at the outer edge of the GMR sensor. The use of feedback inside the flux focusing lens enables complete cancellation of the leakage fields at the GMR sensor location and biasing of the GMR sensor to a location of high magnetic field sensitivity. In an alternate embodiment, a permanent magnet is positioned adjacent to the GMR sensor to accomplish the biasing. Experimental results have demonstrated identification of flaws up to 1 cm deep in aluminum alloy structures. To detect deep flaws about circular fasteners or inhomogeneities in thick multilayer conductive materials, the device is mounted in a hand-held rotating probe assembly that is connected to a computer for system control, data acquisition, processing and storage.

  12. Magnetoresistive Flux Focusing Eddy Current Flaw Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor); Simpson, John W. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A giant magnetoresistive flux focusing eddy current device effectively detects deep flaws in thick multilayer conductive materials. The probe uses an excitation coil to induce eddy currents in conducting material perpendicularly oriented to the coil s longitudinal axis. A giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensor, surrounded by the excitation coil, is used to detect generated fields. Between the excitation coil and GMR sensor is a highly permeable flux focusing lens which magnetically separates the GMR sensor and excitation coil and produces high flux density at the outer edge of the GMR sensor. The use of feedback inside the flux focusing lens enables complete cancellation of the leakage fields at the GMR sensor location and biasing of the GMR sensor to a location of high magnetic field sensitivity. In an alternate embodiment, a permanent magnet is positioned adjacent to the GMR sensor to accomplish the biasing. Experimental results have demonstrated identification of flaws up to 1 cm deep in aluminum alloy structures. To detect deep flaws about circular fasteners or inhomogeneities in thick multi-layer conductive materials, the device is mounted in a hand-held rotating probe assembly that is connected to a computer for system control, data acquisition, processing and storage.

  13. Grounding Moralism: Moral Flaws and Aesthetic Properties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smuts, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    Can moral flaws lessen an artwork's aesthetic value? Answering yes to this question requires both that artworks can be morally flawed and that moral flaws within a work of art can have an aesthetic impact. For present purposes, the author will assume that artworks can be morally flawed by such means as endorsing immoral perspectives, culpably…

  14. Determination of Flaw Size from Thermographic Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winfree, William P.; Howell, Patricia A.; Zalameda, Joseph N.

    2014-01-01

    Conventional methods for reducing the pulsed thermographic responses of delaminations tend to overestimate the size of the flaw. Since the heat diffuses in the plane parallel to the surface, the resulting temperature profile over the flaw is larger than the flaw. A variational method is presented for reducing the thermographic data to produce an estimated size for the flaw that is much closer to the true size of the flaw. The size is determined from the spatial thermal response of the exterior surface above the flaw and a constraint on the length of the contour surrounding the flaw. The technique is applied to experimental data acquired on a flat bottom hole composite specimen.

  15. School Funding's Tragic Flaw

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Kevin; Roza, Marguerite

    2008-01-01

    This report examines funding disparities between two seemingly similar schools in Virginia and North Carolina. It finds that the federal, state, and local policies designed to distribute education funds systematically provide more money to higher-income students and wealthier schools. (Contains 5 figures.) [This report was also produced by the…

  16. Flawed Mathematical Conceptualizations: Marlon's Dilemma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Lauretta

    2013-01-01

    Adult developmental mathematics students often work under great pressure to complete the mathematics sequences designed to help them achieve success (Bryk & Treisman, 2010). Results of a teaching experiment demonstrate how the ability to reason can be impeded by flaws in students' mental representations of mathematics. The earnestness of the…

  17. Numerical simulations of electromagnetic behavior and AC loss in rectangular bulk superconductor with an elliptical flaw under AC magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Jing; Zhou, Youhe

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a finite element model based on the H-formulation to solve the electromagnetic behavior and AC loss in rectangular bulk superconductor with an elliptical flaw in AC external field condition. Both the interior flaw and the edge flaw are considered. A modified E-J power law which is valid for an arbitrary current density range is adopted in order to predict the strong local enhancement of the current density in the vicinity of the flaw tip. The results for the usual E-J power law are calculated for comparison as well. The simulation results show that the existence of the flaw significantly blocks the flow of the induced current and forces the current to redistribute around it. Meanwhile, the strong local enhancement of the current density is observed in the vicinity of the flaw tip. Furthermore, the influences of the size and position of the flaw on the local enhancement of the current density in the vicinity of the flaw tip are investigated. In addition, it is found that the influence of the flaw on the AC loss of the sample is slight for both cases of the interior flaw and the edge flaw.

  18. Flaw depth sizing using guided waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobb, Adam C.; Fisher, Jay L.

    2016-02-01

    Guided wave inspection technology is most often applied as a survey tool for pipeline inspection, where relatively low frequency ultrasonic waves, compared to those used in conventional ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods, propagate along the structure; discontinuities cause a reflection of the sound back to the sensor for flaw detection. Although the technology can be used to accurately locate a flaw over long distances, the flaw sizing performance, especially for flaw depth estimation, is much poorer than other, local NDE approaches. Estimating flaw depth, as opposed to other parameters, is of particular interest for failure analysis of many structures. At present, most guided wave technologies estimate the size of the flaw based on the reflected signal amplitude from the flaw compared to a known geometry reflection, such as a circumferential weld in a pipeline. This process, however, requires many assumptions to be made, such as weld geometry and flaw shape. Furthermore, it is highly dependent on the amplitude of the flaw reflection, which can vary based on many factors, such as attenuation and sensor installation. To improve sizing performance, especially depth estimation, and do so in a way that is not strictly amplitude dependent, this paper describes an approach to estimate the depth of a flaw based on a multimodal analysis. This approach eliminates the need of using geometric reflections for calibration and can be used for both pipeline and plate inspection applications. To verify the approach, a test set was manufactured on plate specimens with flaws of different widths and depths ranging from 5% to 100% of total wall thickness; 90% of these flaws were sized to within 15% of their true value. A description of the initial multimodal sizing strategy and results will be discussed.

  19. Examining Periodic Solar-Wind Density Structures Observed in the SECCHI Heliospheric Imagers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viall, Nicholeen M.; Spence, Harlan E.; Vourlidas, Angelos; Howard, Russell

    2010-01-01

    We present an analysis of small-scale, periodic, solar-wind density enhancements (length scales as small as approximately equals 1000 Mm) observed in images from the Heliospheric Imager (HI) aboard STEREO-A. We discuss their possible relationship to periodic fluctuations of the proton density that have been identified at 1 AU using in-situ plasma measurements. Specifically, Viall, Kepko, and Spence examined 11 years of in-situ solar-wind density measurements at 1 AU and demonstrated that not only turbulent structures, but also nonturbulent, periodic density structures exist in the solar wind with scale sizes of hundreds to one thousand Mm. In a subsequent paper, Viall, Spence, and Kasper analyzed the alpha-to-proton solar-wind abundance ratio measured during one such event of periodic density structures, demonstrating that the plasma behavior was highly suggestive that either temporally or spatially varying coronal source plasma created those density structures. Large periodic density structures observed at 1 AU, which were generated in the corona, can be observable in coronal and heliospheric white-light images if they possess sufficiently high density contrast. Indeed, we identify such periodic density structures as they enter the HI field of view and follow them as they advect with the solar wind through the images. The smaller, periodic density structures that we identify in the images are comparable in size to the larger structures analyzed in-situ at 1 AU, yielding further evidence that periodic density enhancements are a consequence of coronal activity as the solar wind is formed.

  20. The HMDS Coating Flaw Removal Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Monticelli, M V; Nostrand, M C; Mehta, N; Kegelmeyer, L; Johnson, M A; Fair, J; Widmayer, C

    2008-10-24

    In many high energy laser systems, optics with HMDS sol gel antireflective coatings are placed in close proximity to each other making them particularly susceptible to certain types of strong optical interactions. During the coating process, halo shaped coating flaws develop around surface digs and particles. Depending on the shape and size of the flaw, the extent of laser light intensity modulation and consequent probability of damaging downstream optics may increase significantly. To prevent these defects from causing damage, a coating flaw removal tool was developed that deploys a spot of decane with a syringe and dissolves away the coating flaw. The residual liquid is evacuated leaving an uncoated circular spot approximately 1mm in diameter. The resulting uncoated region causes little light intensity modulation and thus has a low probability of causing damage in optics downstream from the mitigated flaw site.

  1. SAFT inspections for developing empirical database of fabrication flaws in nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doctor, Steven R.; Schuster, George J.; Pardini, Allan F.

    1998-03-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing a methodology for estimating the size and density distribution of fabrication flaws in U.S. nuclear reactor pressure vessels. This involves the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of reactor pressure vessel materials and the destructive validation of the flaws found. NDE has been performed on reactor pressure vessel material made by Babcock & Wilcox and Combustion Engineering. A metallographic analysis is being performed to validate the flaw density and size distributions estimated from the 2500 indications of fabrication flaws that were detected and characterized in the very sensitive SAFT-UT (synthetic aperture focusing technique for ultrasonic testing) inspection data from the Pressure Vessel Research User Facility (PVRUF) vessel at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Research plans are also described for expanding the work to include other reactor pressure vessel materials.

  2. Examining the impact of the precision of address geocoding on estimated density of crime locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Yutaka; Shimada, Takahito

    2006-10-01

    This study examines the impact of the precision of address geocoding on the estimated density of crime locations in a large urban area of Japan. The data consist of two separate sets of the same Penal Code offenses known to the police that occurred during a nine-month period of April 1, 2001 through December 31, 2001 in the central 23 wards of Tokyo. These two data sets are derived from older and newer recording system of the Tokyo Metropolitan Police Department (TMPD), which revised its crime reporting system in that year so that more precise location information than the previous years could be recorded. Each of these data sets was address-geocoded onto a large-scale digital map, using our hierarchical address-geocoding schema, and was examined how such differences in the precision of address information and the resulting differences in address-geocoded incidence locations affect the patterns in kernel density maps. An analysis using 11,096 pairs of incidences of residential burglary (each pair consists of the same incidents geocoded using older and newer address information, respectively) indicates that the kernel density estimation with a cell size of 25×25 m and a bandwidth of 500 m may work quite well in absorbing the poorer precision of geocoded locations based on data from older recording system, whereas in several areas where older recording system resulted in very poor precision level, the inaccuracy of incident locations may produce artifactitious and potentially misleading patterns in kernel density maps.

  3. Critical Initial Flaw Size Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawicke, David S.; Raju, Ivatury S.; Cheston, Derrick J.

    2008-01-01

    An independent assessment was conducted to determine the critical initial flaw size (CIFS) for the flange-to-skin weld in the Ares I-X Upper Stage Simulator (USS). The USS consists of several "tuna can" segments that are approximately 216 inches in diameter, 115 inches tall, and 0.5 inches thick. A 6 inch wide by 1 inch thick flange is welded to the skin and is used to fasten adjacent tuna cans. A schematic of a "tuna can" and the location of the flange-to-skin weld are shown in Figure 1. Gussets (shown in yellow in Figure 1) are welded to the skin and flange every 10 degrees around the circumference of the "tuna can". The flange-to-skin weld is a flux core butt weld with a fillet weld on the inside surface, as illustrated in Figure 2. The welding process may create loss of fusion defects in the weld that could develop into fatigue cracks and jeopardize the structural integrity of the Ares I-X vehicle. The CIFS analysis was conducted to determine the largest crack in the weld region that will not grow to failure within 4 lifetimes, as specified by NASA standard 5001 & 5019 [1].

  4. Ultrasonic beam fluctuation and flaw signal variance in inhomogeneous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, S.; Roberts, R.; Margetan, F.

    2000-05-01

    This paper examines the effect of forward scattering on ultrasonic beam propagation and flaw signal amplitude in inhomogeneous material microstructures. A beam propagating through a weakly-scattering, randomly inhomogeneous medium will display random fluctuations in amplitude and phase, attributable to forward scattering. Correspondingly, the signal received from a given flaw at a given position in the beam volume will fluctuate as the beam and flaw are simultaneously scanned throughout the volume of an inhomogeneous host medium. These effects have been prominently observed in the inspection of titanium. For example, maps of beam amplitude profiles after transmission through titanium reveal severe distortion of beam amplitude and phase. Similarly, signals from "identical" flat bottom holes (FBH) at equal depths but different lateral positions in titanium display a random variation in amplitude. Interestingly, it has been noted that this FBH signal variance varies inversely to the beam diameter, that is, signal variance normalized to the mean signal amplitude is a minimum when the flaw is in the focal zone of a focused bearn. As this observation has great significance to the inspection of titanium, a model, prediction of this phenomenon is being sought. In the work reported here, beam propagation is formulated as a volumetric integral equation employing the Green function for the homogeneous spatial mean of the medium. The integral equation is solved using iterative methods. Preliminary work considering scalar two-dimensional propagation in inhomogeneous media has predicted a flaw signal variance that displays an inverse relation to beam diameter, thus reproducing the qualitative behavior seen in experimental data in titanium. Current work is extending the preliminary two-dimensional scalar result to three-dimensional elasticity, representing propagation in an actual titanium microstructure. Progress on this effort will be reported.

  5. Ultrasonic Flaw Detection of Cracks and Machined Flaws as Observed Through Austenitic Stainless Steel Piping Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael T.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Crawford, Susan L.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Diaz, Aaron A.

    2009-07-01

    Piping welds in the pressure boundary of light water reactors (LWRs) are subject to a volumetric examination based on Section XI of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. Due to access limitations and high background radiation levels, the technique used is primarily ultrasonic rather than radiographic. Many of the austenitic welds in safety-related piping systems provide limited access to both sides of the weld, so a far-side examination is necessary. Historically, far-side inspections have performed poorly because of the coarse and elongated grains that make up the microstructures of austenitic weldments. The large grains cause the ultrasound to be scattered, attenuated, and redirected. Additionally, grain boundaries or weld geometry may reflect coherent ultrasonic echoes, making flaw detection and discrimination a more challenging endeavor. Previous studies conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on ultrasonic far-side examinations in austenitic piping welds involved the application of conventional transducers, use of low-frequency Synthetic Aperture Focusing Techniques (SAFT), and ultrasonic phased-array (PA) methods on specimens containing implanted thermal fatigue cracks and machined reflectors [1-2]. From these studies, PA inspection provided the best results, detecting nearly all of the flaws from the far side. These results were presented at the Fifth International Conference on NDE in Relation to Structural Integrity for Nuclear and Pressurised Components in 2006. This led to an invitation to examine field-removed specimens containing service-induced intergranular stress corrosion cracks (IGSCC) at the Electric Power Research Institute’s (EPRI) Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Center, in Charlotte, North Carolina. Results from this activity are presented.

  6. Quantitative flaw characterization with ultrasonic phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Brady John

    Ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) is a critical diagnostic tool in many industries. It is used to characterize potentially dangerous flaws in critical components for aerospace, automotive, and energy applications. The use of phased array transducers allows for the extension of traditional techniques and the introduction of new methods for quantitative flaw characterization. An equivalent flaw sizing technique for use in time-of-flight diffraction setups is presented that provides an estimate of the size and orientation of isolated cracks, surface-breaking cracks, and volumetric flaws such as voids and inclusions. Experimental validation is provided for the isolated crack case. A quantitative imaging algorithm is developed that corrects for system effects and wave propagation, making the images formed directly related to the properties of the scatterer present. Simulated data is used to form images of cylindrical and spherical inclusions. The contributions of different signals to the image formation process are discussed and examples of the quantitative nature of the images are shown.

  7. NON-DESTRUCTIVE FLAW DETECTION APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Stateman, M.J.; Holloway, H.R.

    1957-12-17

    An apparatus is described for the non-destructive detection of flaws in electrical conducting articles. The particular feature of the detection apparatus is that a flaw in the front or back of the test article will not be masked by signals caused by the passage of the end and front of the article through the detection apparatus. The present invention alleviates the above problem by mounting detection coils on directly opposite sides of the test passageway so that the axes of the pickup coils are perpendicular to the axis of an energizing coil through which the article is passed. A flaw in the article will cause a change in the voltage induced in one pickup coil, but passage of the end or front of the article will not produce unequal signals. The signals are compared in appropriate electrical circuitry to actuate a recorder only when unequal signals are present, indicating the presence of a flaw.

  8. ULTRASONIC FLAW DETECTION METHOD AND MEANS

    DOEpatents

    Worlton, D.C.

    1961-08-15

    A method of detecting subsurface flaws in an object using ultrasonic waves is described. An ultnasonic wave of predetermined velocity and frequency is transmitted to engage the surface of the object at a predetermined angle of inci dence thereto. The incident angle of the wave to the surface is determined with respect to phase velocity, incident wave velocity, incident wave frequency, and the estimated depth of the flaw so that Lamb waves of a particular type and mode are induced only in the portion of the object between the flaw and the surface. These Lamb waves are then detected as they leave the object at an angle of exit equal to the angle of incidence. No waves wlll be generated in the object and hence received if no flaw exists beneath the surface. (AEC)

  9. Thermography And Ultrasonics Find Flaws In Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.; Zalameda, Joseph N.; Smith, Barry T.; Winfree, William P.

    1993-01-01

    Flaws first located in infrared imagery, then probed ultrasonically to reveal details. Thermographic and ultrasonic techniques, applied sequentially, constitute basis of developmental method of nondestructive inspection of structures made of lightweight composite materials like carbon-fiber/epoxy-matrix laminates. Method enables rapid detection and evaluation of damage and other flaws in composite structures. Does not require access to both sides of structure to be inspected.

  10. A taxonomy of reasoning flaws in the anti-vaccine movement.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Robert M; Targonski, Paul V; Poland, Gregory A

    2007-04-20

    In a scholarly analysis of widely held misconceptions, Gilovich provides a classification scheme of common flaws in reasoning seen in contemporary society. He broadly categorizes these flaws as having cognitive determinants or in having motivational and social determinants. In this survey, the authors examine the various claims against routine childhood and adult vaccines as made by the more public and more organized entities of the anti-vaccine movement as well as those made apparent by surveys of parents and other groups of individuals. The claims illustrate the breadth of reasoning flaws while providing a basis for anticipating and correcting them.

  11. Automatic inspection technique for optical surface flaws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, GuoGuang; Gao, Wenliang; Cheng, Shangyi

    1991-01-01

    Industrial inspection of optical component surface flaws requires objective, high efficient and fast measurement methods and instruments. In this paper, a novel method, which is practical for on- line inspecting optical component surface flaws in manufacturing industry, is discribed. Laser beam goes through a lean- placed mirror with a slot in center onto the surface of the specimen. The imformation of surface flaws is obtained through analysing the frequency spectrum of reflective light which is detected by a photomultiplier, the specimen scanning control and signal processing are finished by a low - cost and handy single- board microcomputer. The theory that applies the scanning frequency spectrum method , the method for determining flaw size and measuring sensitivity as well as control model for various specimen are analysed in detail .A system has been built according to the idea discribed above. By using the system, several specimen are measured, the comparison and analysis between exprimental results and actual flaw conditions are given. The minimum detectable flaw is 3 micrometer, the measuring error is also given.

  12. Quantifying Flaw Characteristics from IR NDE Data

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W; Philips, N R; Burke, M W; Robbins, C L

    2003-02-14

    Work is presented which allows flaw characteristics to be quantified from the transient IR NDE signature. The goal of this effort was to accurately determine the type, size and depth of flaws revealed with IR NDE, using sonic IR as the example IR NDE technique. Typically an IR NDE experiment will result in a positive qualitative indication of a flaw such as a cold or hot spot in the image, but will not provide quantitative data thereby leaving the practitioner to make educated guesses as to the source of the signal. The technique presented here relies on comparing the transient IR signature to exact heat transfer analytical results for prototypical flaws, using the flaw characteristics as unknown fitting parameters. A nonlinear least squares algorithm is used to evaluate the fitting parameters, which then provide a direct measure of the flaw characteristics that can be mapped to the imaged surface for visual reference. The method uses temperature data for the heat transfer analysis, so radiometric calibration of the IR signal is required. The method provides quantitative data with a single thermal event (e.g. acoustic pulse or flash), as compared to phase-lock techniques that require many events. The work has been tested with numerical data but remains to be validated by experimental data, and that effort is underway.

  13. Full waveform inversion for ultrasonic flaw identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidl, Robert; Rank, Ernst

    2017-02-01

    Ultrasonic Nondestructive Testing is concerned with detecting flaws inside components without causing physical damage. It is possible to detect flaws using ultrasound measurements but usually no additional details about the flaw like position, dimension or orientation are available. The information about these details is hidden in the recorded experimental signals. The idea of full waveform inversion is to adapt the parameters of an initial simulation model of the undamaged specimen by minimizing the discrepancy between these simulated signals and experimentally measured signals of the flawed specimen. Flaws in the structure are characterized by a change or deterioration in the material properties. Commonly, full waveform inversion is mostly applied in seismology on a larger scale to infer mechanical properties of the earth. We propose to use acoustic full waveform inversion for structural parameters to visualize the interior of the component. The method is adapted to US NDT by combining multiple similar experiments on the test component as the typical small amount of sensors is not sufficient for a successful imaging. It is shown that the combination of simulations and multiple experiments can be used to detect flaws and their position, dimension and orientation in emulated simulation cases.

  14. Residual Stresses and Critical Initial Flaw Size Analyses of Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brust, Frederick W.; Raju, Ivatury, S.; Dawocke, David S.; Cheston, Derrick

    2009-01-01

    An independent assessment was conducted to determine the critical initial flaw size (CIFS) for the flange-to-skin weld in the Ares I-X Upper Stage Simulator (USS). A series of weld analyses are performed to determine the residual stresses in a critical region of the USS. Weld residual stresses both increase constraint and mean stress thereby having an important effect on the fatigue life. The purpose of the weld analyses was to model the weld process using a variety of sequences to determine the 'best' sequence in terms of weld residual stresses and distortions. The many factors examined in this study include weld design (single-V, double-V groove), weld sequence, boundary conditions, and material properties, among others. The results of this weld analysis are included with service loads to perform a fatigue and critical initial flaw size evaluation.

  15. Technical Letter Report Development of Flaw Size Distribution Tables Including Effects of Flaw Depth Sizing Errors for Draft 10CFR 50.61a (Alternate PTS Rule) JCN-N6398, Task 4

    SciTech Connect

    Simonen, Fredric A.; Gosselin, Stephen R.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2013-04-22

    This document describes a new method to determine whether the flaws in a particular reactor pressure vessel are consistent with the assumptions regarding the number and sizes of flaws used in the analyses that formed the technical justification basis for the new voluntary alternative Pressurized Thermal Shock (PTS) rule (Draft 10 CFR 50.61a). The new methodology addresses concerns regarding prior methodology because ASME Code Section XI examinations do not detect all fabrication flaws, they have higher detection performance for some flaw types, and there are flaw sizing errors always present (e.g., significant oversizing of small flaws and systematic under sizing of larger flaws). The new methodology allows direct comparison of ASME Code Section XI examination results with values in the PTS draft rule Tables 2 and 3 in order to determine if the number and sizes of flaws detected by an ASME Code Section XI examination are consistent with those assumed in the probabilistic fracture mechanics calculations performed in support of the development of 10 CFR 50.61a.

  16. Freezing of the Hard Spheres: Re-Examination of the Weighted-Density-Functional Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Masayuki

    1995-11-01

    Freezing of the hard spheres is re-examined using the modifiedweighted-density approximation (MWDA) of Denton and Ashcroft and thegeneralized effective-liquid approximation (GELA) of Lutsko andBaus. It is found that one owes part of success of these theories tothe use of the Percus-Yevick (PY) direct correlation function and thecorresponding equation of state of uniform fluids as the input data inthese theories. In fact, if one uses virtually \\lq\\lqexact” inputdata in place of the PY ones, the free energies of the solid phase aresomewhat lowered and predicted freezing properties worsen. It isargued that this unfavorable feature of the MWDA and the GELA becomesmuch more serious when these theories are applied to the referencehard spheres in the thermodynamic perturbation approach to freezing ofsystems with long-ranged potentials.

  17. Flaw tolerance promoted by dissipative deformation mechanisms between material building blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verho, Tuukka; Buehler, Markus J.

    2014-09-01

    Novel high-performance composite materials often draw inspiration from natural materials such as bone or mollusc shells. A prime feature of such composites is that they are, like their natural counterparts, quasibrittle. They are tolerant to material flaws up to a certain characteristic flaw-tolerant size scale, exhibiting high strength and toughness, but start to behave in a brittle manner when sufficiently large flaws are present. Here, we establish that better flaw tolerance can be achieved by maximizing fracture toughness relative to the maximum elastic energy available in the material, and we demonstrate this concept with simple two-dimensional coarse-grained simulations where the transition from brittle to quasibrittle behaviour is examined.

  18. Window flaw detection by backscatter lighting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crockett, L. K.; Minton, F. R.

    1978-01-01

    Portable fiber-optic probe detects tiny flaws in transparent materials. Probe transmits light through surface to illuminate interior of material by backscattering off its edges. Light-sensitive contact paper records scratch pattern. Technique can be used for rapid visual checks. Flexible fiber optics are safely used in explosive or flammable areas; they present no hazard of breakage or contamination in controlled environments.

  19. Prevention of design flaws in multicomputer systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Multicomputer configurations and redundancy management techniques used in various airborne systems were investigated to determine methods to prevent and/or treat generic design flaws. The findings are intended for use in the design of a computer system for use in the space shuttle orbiter.

  20. Steam generator tube integrity flaw acceptance criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Cochet, B.

    1997-02-01

    The author discusses the establishment of a flaw acceptance criteria with respect to flaws in steam generator tubing. The problem is complicated because different countries take different approaches to the problem. The objectives in general are grouped in three broad areas: to avoid the unscheduled shutdown of the reactor during normal operation; to avoid tube bursts; to avoid excessive leak rates in the event of an accidental overpressure event. For each degradation mechanism in the tubes it is necessary to know answers to an array of questions, including: how well does NDT testing perform against this problem; how rapidly does such degradation develop; how well is this degradation mechanism understood. Based on the above information it is then possible to come up with a policy to look at flaw acceptance. Part of this criteria is a schedule for the frequency of in-service inspection and also a policy for when to plug flawed tubes. The author goes into a broad discussion of each of these points in his paper.

  1. Total and High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol in Adults: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2011-2012

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Service NCHS Total and High-density Lipoprotein Cholesterol in Adults: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, ... 2012, 12.9% of adults had high total cholesterol, 17.4% had low HDL cholesterol, and 69. ...

  2. Statistical flaw characterization through Bayesian shape inversion from scattered wave observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahan, Jerry A.; Criner, Amanda K.

    2016-02-01

    A method is discussed to characterize the shape of a flaw from noisy far-field measurements of a scattered wave. The scattering model employed is a two-dimensional Helmholtz equation which quantifies scattering due to interrogating signals from various physical phenomena such as acoustics or electromagnetics. The well-known inherent ill-posedness of the inverse scattering problem is addressed via Bayesian regularization. The method is loosely related to the approach described in [1] which uses the framework of [2] to prove the well-posedness of the infinite-dimensional problem and derive estimates of the error for a particular discretization approach. The method computes the posterior probability density for the flaw shape from the scattered field observations, taking into account prior assumptions which are used to describe any a priori knowledge of the flaw. We describe the computational approach to the forward problem as well as the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) based approach to approximating the posterior. We present simulation results for some hypothetical flaw shapes with varying levels of observation error and arrangement of observation points. The results show how the posterior probability density can be used to visualize the shape of the flaw taking into account the quantitative confidence in the quality of the estimation and how various arrangements of the measurements and interrogating signals affect the estimation

  3. Examining the specific entropy (density of adiabatic invariants) of the outer electron radiation belt

    SciTech Connect

    Borovsky, Joseph E; Denton, Michael H

    2008-01-01

    Using temperature and number-density measurements of the energetic-electron population from multiple spacecraft in geosynchronous orbit, the specific entropy S = T/n{sup 2/3} of the outer electron radiation belt is calculated. Then 955,527 half-hour-long data intervals are statistically analyzed. Local-time and solar-cycle variations in S are examined. The median value of the specific entropy (2.8 x 10{sup 7} eVcm{sup 2}) is much larger than the specific entropy of other particle populations in and around the magnetosphere. The evolution of the specific entropy through high-speed-stream-driven geomagnetic storms and through magnetic-cloud-driven geomagnetic storms is studied using superposed-epoch analysis. For high-speed-stream-driven storms, systematic variations in the entropy associated with electron loss and gain and with radiation-belt heating are observed in the various storm phases. For magnetic-cloud-driven storms, multiple trigger choices for the data superpositions reveal the effects of interplanetary shock arrival, sheath driving, cloud driving, and recovery phase. The specific entropy S = T/n{sup 2/3} is algebraically expressed in terms of the first and second adiabatic invariants of the electrons: this allows a relativistic expression for S in terms of T and n to be derived. For the outer electron radiation belt at geosynchronous orbit, the relativistic corrections to the specific entropy expression are -15%.

  4. A Comparison of Ultrasonic Flaw Responses as Observed through Austenitic Stainless Steel Piping Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael T.; Crawford, Susan L.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2008-01-01

    A study was conducted to assess ultrasonic techniques for detection and sizing of flaws from the opposite side of wrought austenitic piping welds. A series of stainless steel specimens with implanted flaws were examined using phased-array ultrasonic probes. These examinations were conducted from both sides of the full-penetration structural piping welds, with emphasis on comparing the responses from the far-side inspection. The types of flaws examined include thermal fatigue cracks, saw cuts, and service-induced intergranular stress corrosion cracks (IGSCC). The flaws were examined using three phased-array probes: a 2-MHz shear-wave probe, a 1.5-MHz longitudinal-wave probe, and a “mini” 2-MHz longitudinal-wave probe. The sound fields for each probe were modeled in stainless steel to assure proper insonification at the depths and angles used in the tests. This paper describes the results of the sound field modeling, and compares the responses of the various flaws from the near and far side of the welds.

  5. Reliably Detectable Flaw Size for NDE Methods that Use Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshti, Ajay M.

    2017-01-01

    Probability of detection (POD) analysis is used in assessing reliably detectable flaw size in nondestructive evaluation (NDE). MIL-HDBK-1823 and associated mh1823 POD software gives most common methods of POD analysis. In this paper, POD analysis is applied to an NDE method, such as eddy current testing, where calibration is used. NDE calibration standards have known size artificial flaws such as electro-discharge machined (EDM) notches and flat bottom hole (FBH) reflectors which are used to set instrument sensitivity for detection of real flaws. Real flaws such as cracks and crack-like flaws are desired to be detected using these NDE methods. A reliably detectable crack size is required for safe life analysis of fracture critical parts. Therefore, it is important to correlate signal responses from real flaws with signal responses form artificial flaws used in calibration process to determine reliably detectable flaw size.

  6. Procedure for flaw detection in cast stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Kupperman, David S.

    1988-01-01

    A method of ultrasonic flaw detection in cast stainless steel components incorporating the steps of determining the nature of the microstructure of the cast stainless steel at the site of the flaw detection measurements by ultrasonic elements independent of the component thickness at the site; choosing from a plurality of flaw detection techniques, one such technique appropriate to the nature of the microstructure as determined and detecting flaws by use of the chosen technique.

  7. Apparatus and method for detecting flaws in conductive material

    SciTech Connect

    Hockey, Ronald L.; Riechers, Douglas M.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is an improved sensing unit for detecting flaws in conductive material wherein the sensing coil is positioned away from a datum of either the datum point, the datum orientation, or a combination thereof. Position of the sensing coil away from a datum increases sensitivity for detecting flaws having a characteristic volume less than about 1 mm.sup.3, and further permits detection of subsurface flaws. Use of multiple sensing coils permits quantification of flaw area or volume.

  8. Apparatus and method for detecting flaws in conductive material

    SciTech Connect

    Hockey, R.L.; Riechers, D.M.

    1999-11-16

    The present invention is an improved sensing unit for detecting flaws in conductive material wherein the sensing coil is positioned away from a datum of either the datum point, the datum orientation, or a combination thereof. Position of the sensing coil away from a datum increases sensitivity for detecting flaws having a characteristic volume less than about 1 mm{sup 3}, and further permits detection of subsurface flaws. Use of multiple sensing coils permits quantification of flaw area or volume.

  9. Effect of Flaw Removal on Billets in Rolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Kazunari; Shinohara, Tetsuo

    2007-05-01

    High-quality wires, which are used for components such as valve springs of automobiles, are fabricated by rolling and drawing. Even a minute flaw on the surface of the wire leads to a significant decrease in fatigue strength. It is possible to decrease the number of surface flaws during some of the rolling processes; however in most cases, it is difficult to remove flaws. Under such circumstances, high-quality wires are fabricated, at many wire manufacturing factories, by rolling and drawing after removing surface flaws on the raw material. However, the flaw removal process is carried out relying on the experience of onsite workers; many of the mechanisms underlying flaw removal have not been clarified. In this study, billet and wire that have traces formed during flaw removal were subjected to rolling to investigate the behavior of deformation and the recovery of the flaw-removal traces. When flaw-removal traces exist on a billet surface that comes into contact with the roll used in rolling, the traces are removed without difficulty. However, when the flaw-removal traces exist on a surface that does not come into contact with the roll, the traces tend to become wrinkles due to compression from the upper and lower directions. Therefore, when removing the surface flaw on billet before rolling, it is important to remove flaw part thinly.

  10. The Dangerous Myth of Emerging Adulthood: An Evidence-Based Critique of a Flawed Developmental Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Côté, James E.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the theory of emerging adulthood, introduced into the literature by Arnett (2000), in terms of its methodological and evidential basis, and finds it to be unsubstantiated on numerous grounds. Other, more convincing, formulations of variations in the transition to adulthood are examined. Most flawed academic theories are…

  11. Experimental quantum key distribution with source flaws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Feihu; Wei, Kejin; Sajeed, Shihan; Kaiser, Sarah; Sun, Shihai; Tang, Zhiyuan; Qian, Li; Makarov, Vadim; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2015-09-01

    Decoy-state quantum key distribution (QKD) is a standard technique in current quantum cryptographic implementations. Unfortunately, existing experiments have two important drawbacks: the state preparation is assumed to be perfect without errors and the employed security proofs do not fully consider the finite-key effects for general attacks. These two drawbacks mean that existing experiments are not guaranteed to be proven to be secure in practice. Here, we perform an experiment that shows secure QKD with imperfect state preparations over long distances and achieves rigorous finite-key security bounds for decoy-state QKD against coherent attacks in the universally composable framework. We quantify the source flaws experimentally and demonstrate a QKD implementation that is tolerant to channel loss despite the source flaws. Our implementation considers more real-world problems than most previous experiments, and our theory can be applied to general discrete-variable QKD systems. These features constitute a step towards secure QKD with imperfect devices.

  12. Flaws Identification Using Eddy Current Differential Transducer and Artificial Neural Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Chady, T.; Lopato, P.

    2006-03-06

    In this paper we present a multi-frequency excitation eddy current differential transducer and dynamic neural models which were used to detect and identify artificial flaws in thin conducting plates. Plates are made of Inconel600. EDM notches have relative depth from 10% to 80% and length from 2 mm to 7 mm. All flaws were located on the opposite surface of the examined specimen. Measured signals were used as input for training and verifying dynamic neural networks with a moving window. Wide range of ANN (Artificial Neural Network) structures are examined for different window length and different number of frequency components in excitation signal. Observed trends are presented in this paper.

  13. Ultrasonic Imaging and Automated Flaw Detection System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-01

    imager sold by Searle Ultrasound. An LSI-11 microcomputer is interfaced to the imager with custom designed modules. Ultrasonic image data is loaded...phased array ultrasonic imager, an LSI-11 microcomputer , and an assortment of custom-designed electronic modules. There is also a CRT display terminal...AD CONTRACTOR REPORT ARCCB-CR-86011 ULTRASONIC IMAGING AND AUTOMATED FLAW DETECTION SYSTEM L. JONES DTIC3ZLECTE J. F. MC DONALD JUNCTE G.P

  14. Fabrication Flaws in Reactor Pressure Vessel Repair Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, George J.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2007-12-01

    This paper describes the fabrication flaw distribution and characterization in the repair weld metal of reactor pressure vessels. This work indicates that the large flaws occur in these repairs. These results show that repair flaws are complex in composition and sometimes include cracks on the repair ends. Parametric analysis using an exponential fit is performed on the data. A description of repair flaw morphology is provided. Fabrication flaws in repairs are characterized using high sensitivity nondestructive ultrasonic testing, validation by other nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques, and complemented by destructive testing.

  15. Glass breaking strength: The role of surface flaws and treatments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, D.

    1985-01-01

    Although the intrinsic strength of silicon dioxide glass is of the order of 10 to the 6th power lb/sq in, the practical strength is roughly two orders of magnitude below this theoretical limit, and depends almost entirely on the surface condition of the glass, that is, the number and size of flaws and the residual surface compression (temper) in the glass. Glass parts always fail in tension when these flaws grow under sustained loading to some critical size. Research associated with glass encapsulated crystalline-Si photovoltaic (PV) modules has greatly expanded our knowledge of glass breaking strength and developed sizeable data base for commercially available glass types. A detailed design algorithm is developed for thickness sizing of rectangular glass plates subject to pressure loads. Additional studies examine the strength of glass under impact loading conditions such as that caused by hail. Although the fundamentals of glass breakage are directly applicable to thin film modules, the fracture strength of typical numerical glass must be replaced with data that reflect the high temperature tin oxide processing, laser scribing, and edge processing peculiar to thin film modules. The fundamentals of glass breakage applicable to thin film modules and preliminary fracture strength data for a variety of 1 ft square glass specimens representing preprocessed and post processed sheets from current amorphous-Si module manufacturers are presented.

  16. The detection of flaws in austenitic welds using the decomposition of the time-reversal operator

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Laura J.; Mulholland, Anthony J.; Gachagan, Anthony; Harvey, Gerry; Bird, Colin

    2016-01-01

    The non-destructive testing of austenitic welds using ultrasound plays an important role in the assessment of the structural integrity of safety critical structures. The internal microstructure of these welds is highly scattering and can lead to the obscuration of defects when investigated by traditional imaging algorithms. This paper proposes an alternative objective method for the detection of flaws embedded in austenitic welds based on the singular value decomposition of the time-frequency domain response matrices. The distribution of the singular values is examined in the cases where a flaw exists and where there is no flaw present. A lower threshold on the singular values, specific to austenitic welds, is derived which, when exceeded, indicates the presence of a flaw. The detection criterion is successfully implemented on both synthetic and experimental data. The datasets arising from welds containing a flaw are further interrogated using the decomposition of the time-reversal operator (DORT) method and the total focusing method (TFM), and it is shown that images constructed via the DORT algorithm typically exhibit a higher signal-to-noise ratio than those constructed by the TFM algorithm. PMID:27274683

  17. Deep Flaw Detection with Giant Magnetoresistive (GMR) Based Self-Nulling Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz; Namkung, Min

    2004-01-01

    In this paper a design modification to the Very-Low Frequency GMR Based Self-Nulling Probe has been presented to enable improved signal to noise ratio for deeply buried flaws. The design change consists of incorporating a feedback coil in the center of the flux focusing lens. The use of the feedback coil enables cancellation of the leakage fields in the center of the probe and biasing of the GMR sensor to a location of high magnetic field sensitivity. The effect of the feedback on the probe output was examined, and experimental results for deep flaw detection were presented. The experimental results show that the modified probe is capable of clearly identifying flaws up to 1 cm deep in aluminum alloy structures.

  18. High-temperature flaw assessment procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggles, M.B. ); Takahashi, Y. ); Ainsworth, R.A. )

    1991-08-01

    Described is the background work performed jointly by the Electric Power Research Institute in the United States, the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry in Japan and Nuclear Electric plc in the United Kingdom with the purpose of developing a high-temperature flaw assessment procedure for reactor components. Existing creep-fatigue crack-growth models are reviewed, and the most promising methods are identified. Sources of material data are outlined, and results of the fundamental deformation and crack-growth tests are discussed. Results of subcritical crack-growth exploratory tests, creep-fatigue crack-growth tests under repeated thermal transient conditions, and exploratory failure tests are presented and contrasted with the analytical modeling. Crack-growth assessment methods are presented and applied to a typical liquid-metal reactor component. The research activities presented herein served as a foundation for the Flaw Assessment Guide for High-Temperature Reactor Components Subjected to Creep-Fatigue Loading published separately. 30 refs., 108 figs., 13 tabs.

  19. Growth and stability of interacting surface flaws of arbitrary shape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murakami, Y.; Nemat-Nasser, S.

    1983-01-01

    Growth regimes of interacting surface flaws of arbitrary shape are analyzed with the aid of the body force method, and the stability of the process is assessed on the basis of the variation of the load during the growth. It is shown that irregularly shaped flaws are often associated with very high stress intensity factors locally, which tend to change as the flaws grow into more regular shapes. Several examples of various flaw shapes are worked out for illustration, and it is shown that a simple formula seems to provide an accurate estimate of the maximum stress intensity factor for surface flaws of various shapes, which are not very slender. The formula involves the overall maximum tension, as well as the area of the projection of the flaw on the plane normal to the maximum tension.

  20. Reliability after inspection. [of flaws on laminate surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    The investigation is concerned with the derivation of relationships between the probability of having manufacturing defects, the probability of detecting a flaw, and the final reliability. Equations for the simple situation in which only one flaw can be present are used to introduce the relationships in a Bayes' theorem approach to the assessment of the final reliability. Situations which are prevalent in composites manufacturing are considered. Attention is given to a case involving the random occurrence of flaws on a laminate surface.

  1. Density Relaxation of Liquid-Vapor Critical Fluids Examined in Earth's Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, R. Allen

    2000-01-01

    This work shows quantitatively the pronounced differences between the density equilibration of very compressible dense fluids in Earth's gravity and those in microgravity. The work was performed onsite at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field and is complete. Full details are given in references 1 and 2. Liquid-vapor critical fluids (e.g., water) at their critical temperature and pressure, are very compressible. They collapse under their own weight in Earth's gravity, allowing only a thin meniscus-like layer with the critical pressure to survive. This critical layer, however, greatly slows down the equilibration process of the entire sample. A complicating feature is the buoyancy-driven slow flows of layers of heavier and lighter fluid. This work highlights the incomplete understanding of the hydrodynamics involved in these fluids.

  2. Profitable failure: antidepressant drugs and the triumph of flawed experiments.

    PubMed

    McGoey, Linsey

    2010-01-01

    Drawing on an analysis of Irving Kirsch and colleagues' controversial 2008 article in "PLoS [Public Library of Science] Magazine" on the efficacy of SSRI antidepressant drugs such as Prozac, I examine flaws within the methodologies of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that have made it difficult for regulators, clinicians and patients to determine the therapeutic value of this class of drug. I then argue, drawing analogies to work by Pierre Bourdieu and Michael Power, that it is the very limitations of RCTs -- their inadequacies in producing reliable evidence of clinical effects -- that help to strengthen assumptions of their superiority as methodological tools. Finally, I suggest that the case of RCTs helps to explore the question of why failure is often useful in consolidating the authority of those who have presided over that failure, and why systems widely recognized to be ineffective tend to assume greater authority at the very moment when people speak of their malfunction.

  3. Origin of flaw-tolerance in nacre

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zaiwang; Li, Xiaodong

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decades, our understanding of nacre's toughening origin has long stayed at the level of crack deflection along the biopolymer interface between aragonite platelets. It has been widely thought that the ceramic aragonite platelets in nacre invariably remain shielded from the propagating crack. Here we report an unexpected experimental observation that the propagating crack, surprisingly, invades the aragonite platelet following a zigzag crack propagation trajectory. The toughening origin of previously-thought brittle aragonite platelet is ascribed to its unique nanoparticle-architecture, which tunes crack propagation inside the aragonite platelet in an intergranular manner. For comparison, we also investigated the crack behavior in geologic aragonite mineral (pure monocrystal) and found that the crack propagates in a cleavage fashion, in sharp contrast with the intergranular cracking in the aragonite platelet of nacre. These two fundamentally different cracking mechanisms uncover a new toughening strategy in nacre's hierarchical flaw-tolerance design. PMID:23603788

  4. Origin of flaw-tolerance in nacre.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zaiwang; Li, Xiaodong

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decades, our understanding of nacre's toughening origin has long stayed at the level of crack deflection along the biopolymer interface between aragonite platelets. It has been widely thought that the ceramic aragonite platelets in nacre invariably remain shielded from the propagating crack. Here we report an unexpected experimental observation that the propagating crack, surprisingly, invades the aragonite platelet following a zigzag crack propagation trajectory. The toughening origin of previously-thought brittle aragonite platelet is ascribed to its unique nanoparticle-architecture, which tunes crack propagation inside the aragonite platelet in an intergranular manner. For comparison, we also investigated the crack behavior in geologic aragonite mineral (pure monocrystal) and found that the crack propagates in a cleavage fashion, in sharp contrast with the intergranular cracking in the aragonite platelet of nacre. These two fundamentally different cracking mechanisms uncover a new toughening strategy in nacre's hierarchical flaw-tolerance design.

  5. Origin of flaw-tolerance in nacre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zaiwang; Li, Xiaodong

    2013-04-01

    Over the past decades, our understanding of nacre's toughening origin has long stayed at the level of crack deflection along the biopolymer interface between aragonite platelets. It has been widely thought that the ceramic aragonite platelets in nacre invariably remain shielded from the propagating crack. Here we report an unexpected experimental observation that the propagating crack, surprisingly, invades the aragonite platelet following a zigzag crack propagation trajectory. The toughening origin of previously-thought brittle aragonite platelet is ascribed to its unique nanoparticle-architecture, which tunes crack propagation inside the aragonite platelet in an intergranular manner. For comparison, we also investigated the crack behavior in geologic aragonite mineral (pure monocrystal) and found that the crack propagates in a cleavage fashion, in sharp contrast with the intergranular cracking in the aragonite platelet of nacre. These two fundamentally different cracking mechanisms uncover a new toughening strategy in nacre's hierarchical flaw-tolerance design.

  6. Quantitative flaw characterization with scanning laser acoustic microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, E. R.; Roth, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    Surface roughness and diffraction are two factors that have been observed to affect the accuracy of flaw characterization with scanning laser acoustic microscopy. In accuracies can arise when the surface of the test sample is acoustically rough. It is shown that, in this case, Snell's law is no longer valid for determining the direction of sound propagation within the sample. The relationship between the direction of sound propagation within the sample, the apparent flaw depth, and the sample's surface roughness is investigated. Diffraction effects can mask the acoustic images of minute flaws and make it difficult to establish their size, depth, and other characteristics. It is shown that for Fraunhofer diffraction conditions the acoustic image of a subsurface defect corresponds to a two-dimensional Fourier transform. Transforms based on simulated flaws are used to infer the size and shape of the actual flaw.

  7. Quantitative flaw characterization with scanning laser acoustic microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Generazio, E.R.; Roth, D.J.

    1986-06-01

    Surface roughness and diffraction are two factors that have been observed to affect the accuracy of flaw characterization with scanning laser acoustic microscopy. Inaccuracies can arise when the surface of the test sample is acoustically rough. It is shown that, in this case, Snell's law is no longer valid for determining the direction of sound propagation within the sample. The relationship between the direction of sound propagation within the sample, the apparent flaw depth, and the sample's surface roughness is investigated. Diffraction effects can mask the acoustic images of minute flaws and make it difficult to establish their size, depth, and other characteristics. It is shown that for Fraunhofer diffraction conditions the acoustic image of a subsurface defect corresponds to a two-dimensional Fourier transform. Transforms based on simulated flaws are used to infer the size and shape of the actual flaw. 15 references.

  8. Quantitative flaw characterization with scanning laser acoustic microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, E. R.; Roth, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    Surface roughness and diffraction are two factors that have been observed to affect the accuracy of flaw characterization with scanning laser acoustic microscopy. Inaccuracies can arise when the surface of the test sample is acoustically rough. It is shown that, in this case, Snell's law is no longer valid for determining the direction of sound propagation within the sample. The relationship between the direction of sound propagation within the sample, the apparent flaw depth, and the sample's surface roughness is investigated. Diffraction effects can mask the acoustic images of minute flaws and make it difficult to establish their size, depth, and other characteristics. It is shown that for Fraunhofer diffraction conditions the acoustic image of a subsurface defect corresponds to a two-dimensional Fourier transform. Transforms based on simulated flaws are used to infer the size and shape of the actual flaw.

  9. Development of Natural Flaw Samples for Evaluating Nondestructive Testing Methods for Foam Thermal Protection Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Davis, Jason; Farrington, Seth; Walker, James

    2007-01-01

    Low density polyurethane foam has been an important insulation material for space launch vehicles for several decades. The potential for damage from foam breaking away from the NASA External Tank was not realized until the foam impacts on the Columbia Orbiter vehicle caused damage to its Leading Edge thermal protection systems (TPS). Development of improved inspection techniques on the foam TPS is necessary to prevent similar occurrences in the future. Foamed panels with drilled holes for volumetric flaws and Teflon inserts to simulate debonded conditions have been used to evaluate and calibrate nondestructive testing (NDT) methods. Unfortunately the symmetric edges and dissimilar materials used in the preparation of these simulated flaws provide an artificially large signal while very little signal is generated from the actual defects themselves. In other words, the same signal are not generated from the artificial defects in the foam test panels as produced when inspecting natural defect in the ET foam TPS. A project to create more realistic voids similar to what actually occurs during manufacturing operations was began in order to improve detection of critical voids during inspections. This presentation describes approaches taken to create more natural voids in foam TPS in order to provide a more realistic evaluation of what the NDT methods can detect. These flaw creation techniques were developed with both sprayed foam and poured foam used for insulation on the External Tank. Test panels with simulated defects have been used to evaluate NDT methods for the inspection of the External Tank. A comparison of images between natural flaws and machined flaws generated from backscatter x-ray radiography, x-ray laminography, terahertz imaging and millimeter wave imaging show significant differences in identifying defect regions.

  10. The behavior of shallow flaws in reactor pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Rolfe, S.T. )

    1991-11-01

    Both analytical and experimental studies have shown that the effect of crack length, a, on the elastic-plastic toughness of structural steels is significant. The objective of this report is to recommend those research investigations that are necessary to understand the phenomenon of shallow behavior as it affects fracture toughness so that the results can be used properly in the structural margin assessment of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) with flaws. Preliminary test results of A 533 B steel show an elevated crack-tip-opening displacement (CTOD) toughness similar to that observed for structural steels tested at the University of Kansas. Thus, the inherent resistance to fracture initiation of A 533 B steel with shallow flaws appears to be higher than that used in the current American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) design curves based on testing fracture mechanics specimens with deep flaws. If this higher toughness of laboratory specimens with shallow flaws can be transferred to a higher resistance to failure in RPV design or analysis, then the actual margin of safety in nuclear vessels with shallow flaws would be greater than is currently assumed on the basis of deep-flaw test results. This elevation in toughness and greater resistance to fracture would be a very desirable situation, particularly for the pressurized-thermal shock (PTS) analysis in which shallow flaws are assumed to exist. Before any advantage can be taken of this possible increase in initiation toughness, numerous factors must be analyzed to ensure the transferability of the data. This report reviews those factors and makes recommendations of studies that are needed to assess the transferability of shallow-flaw toughness test results to the structural margin assessment of RPV with shallow flaws. 14 refs., 8 figs.

  11. Subsurface flaw detection in metals by photoacoustic microscopya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, R. L.; Pouch, J. J.; Wong, Y. H.; Favro, L. D.; Kuo, P. K.; Rosencwaig, Allan

    1980-02-01

    The scanning photoacoustic microscope (SPAM) is used in both the conventional and phase-contrast modes to detect a well-characterized subsurface flaw in Al. The physical mechanism is that of thermal diffusion, with a subsurface probe depth and flaw resolution length of approximately one thermal-diffusion length. Comparison of the dependences of the photoacoustic signal upon chopping frequency from the different regions of the sample confirm that the differential signal from the flaw corresponds to a transition from thermally thick to thermally thin boundary conditions. Experimental results are in good agreement with calculations based upon a three-dimensional thermal-diffusion model.

  12. Estimating probable flaw distributions in PWR steam generator tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Gorman, J.A.; Turner, A.P.L.

    1997-02-01

    This paper describes methods for estimating the number and size distributions of flaws of various types in PWR steam generator tubes. These estimates are needed when calculating the probable primary to secondary leakage through steam generator tubes under postulated accidents such as severe core accidents and steam line breaks. The paper describes methods for two types of predictions: (1) the numbers of tubes with detectable flaws of various types as a function of time, and (2) the distributions in size of these flaws. Results are provided for hypothetical severely affected, moderately affected and lightly affected units. Discussion is provided regarding uncertainties and assumptions in the data and analyses.

  13. Ultrasonic detection of flaws in fusion butt welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, B. T.; Hanna, K. J.; Tooley, W. M.

    1970-01-01

    Reliable and accurate Delta technique, a nondestructive ultrasonics method, uses redirection of energy to detect randomly oriented imperfections in fusion butt welds. Data on flaws can be read from either an oscilloscope or a printout.

  14. Effect of thermal profile on cyclic flaw growth in aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engstrom, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    Surface flawed and single edge notch tension specimens of 2219-T851 and -T87 aluminum were tested to determine static fracture characteristics and base line (constant amplitude, constant temperature) cyclic flaw growth behavior. Subsequent testing was then conducted in which flawed specimens were subjected to a thermal profile in which the applied stress was varied simultaneously with the temperature. The profile used represents a simplified space shuttle orbiter load/temperature flight cycle. Test temperatures included the range from 144K (-200 F) up to 450K (350 F). The measured flaw growth rates obtained from the thermal profile tests were then compared with rates predicted by assuming linear cumulative damage of base line rates.

  15. Examination of Post-stroke Alteration in Motor Unit Firing Behavior Using High Density Surface EMG Decomposition

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoyan; Holobar, Aleš; Gazzoni, Marco; Merletti, Roberto; Rymer, William Z.; Zhou, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in high density surface electromyogram (EMG) decomposition have made it a feasible task to discriminate single motor unit activity from surface EMG interference patterns, thus providing a noninvasive approach for examination of motor unit control properties. In the current study we applied high density surface EMG recording and decomposition techniques to assess motor unit firing behavior alterations post-stroke. Surface EMG signals were collected using a 64-channel 2-dimensional electrode array from the paretic and contralateral first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscles of nine hemiparetic stroke subjects at different isometric discrete contraction levels between 2 N to 10 N with a 2 N increment step. Motor unit firing rates were extracted through decomposition of the high density surface EMG signals, and compared between paretic and contralateral muscles. Across the nine tested subjects, paretic FDI muscles showed decreased motor unit firing rates compared with contralateral muscles at different contraction levels. Regression analysis indicated a linear relation between the mean motor unit firing rate and the muscle contraction level for both paretic and contralateral muscles (p < 0.001), with the former demonstrating a lower increment rate (0.32 pulses per second (pps)/N) compared with the latter (0.67 pps/N). The coefficient of variation (CoV, averaged over the contraction levels) of the motor unit firing rates for the paretic muscles (0.21 ± 0.012) was significantly higher than for the contralateral muscles (0.17 ± 0.014) (p < 0.05). This study provides direct evidence of motor unit firing behavior alterations post-stroke using surface EMG, which can be an important factor contributing to hemiparetic muscle weakness. PMID:25389239

  16. High-density polyethylene facial implants show surface oxidation in SEM and EDX examination: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Draenert, G F; Doeblinger, M; Draenert, M; Gosau, M

    2009-05-01

    Previous histopathological studies on explanted Medpor high-density polyethylene (HDPE) facial implants indicated signs of material destruction and claimed to observe phagocytized HDPE particles within the tissue samples beside the usual type IV reaction with severe fibrosis. We examined new and explanted Medpor material with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). The implant surface of three patient-derived specimens showed significantly higher oxygenation in EDX analysis and morphological changes in SEM compared to the new unused material directly after opening of the package and after 1 year of exposure to air. Our preliminary findings indicate a possible oxidative biocorrosion in HDPE surgical implants. Further studies should confirm these pilot project results.

  17. Method and apparatus for detecting flaws and defects in heat seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rai, Kula R. (Inventor); Lew, Thomas M. (Inventor); Sinclair, Robert B. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Flaws and defects in heat seals formed between sheets of translucent film are identified by optically examining consecutive lateral sections of the seal along the seal length. Each lateral seal section is illuminated and an optical sensor array detects the intensity of light transmitted through the seal section for the purpose of detecting and locating edges in the heat seal. A line profile for each consecutive seal section is derived having an amplitude proportional to the change in light intensity across the seal section. Instances in the derived line profile where the amplitude is greater than a threshold level indicate the detection of a seal edge. The detected edges in each derived line profile are then compared to a preset profile edge standard to identify the existence of a flaw or defect.

  18. Influence of Flaws of Wire Rod Surface, Inclusions and Voids on Wire Breaks in Superfine Wire Drawing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Kazunari; Norasethasopon, Somchai; Shinohara, Tetsuo; Ido, Ryuta

    By means of the finite element analysis (FEA), this study analyzed wire breaks that occurred in the drawing fine wires containing flaws on the wire surface, inclusion and void. The deformation behavior of an inclusion was examined, in which the inclusion's location is assumed to be on the center axis of the wire, and the cause of wire breaks and their prevention method were clarified. It was found that an inclusion diameter/wire diameter ratio of 0.4 or higher increases the likelihood of wire breaks occurring. When the inclusion is not assumed to be in the center axis of the wire, it was also found that necking and wire breaks appear more frequently. FEA showed that a flaw grows with each processing step, when a small circumferential flaw is placed on the wire rod surface, and eventually becomes a surface defect, which is called a check mark in practice.

  19. Application and assessment of ultrasonic inspection methods for flaw detection and characterization of manganese steel frogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinson, A.; Diaz, A.; Prowant, M.

    2011-04-01

    Ultrasonic nondestructive examination (NDE) has a long and successful history of application across a wide array of industries, including nuclear, aerospace, and transportation sectors. In coarse-grained, cast Manganese (Mn) steel frog components, NDE/inspection challenges are encountered both in-field (after the frogs have been installed on a rail line) and at the manufacturing facilities during post-fabrication QA/QC activities. Periodically inherently flawed frogs are received from a manufacturer, and put into service, as most railroad operators do not have a means to conduct pre-service examinations on received components. Accordingly, there is a need for a pre-service inspection system that can provide a rapid, cost-effective and non-intrusive inspection capability for detection of defects, flaws, and other anomalies in frog components, in order to avoid premature initiation of cracks or failures of these components during service. This study focused on evaluating use of a volumetric phased-array ultrasonic testing (PA-UT) method to monitor fabrication quality assurance. In this preliminary assessment of using PA-UT, data were acquired at a frequency of 2.0 MHz on a known, flawed Mn steel frog component directly from a manufacturing facility. The component contained flaws commonly found as a result of the manufacturing process of these cast rail components. The data were analyzed and the anomalies were detected, localized and characterized. Results were compared against baseline radiographic data. A detection metric was reported in the form of signal-to-noise values.

  20. Development of a methodology for the assessment of shallow-flaw fracture in nuclear reactor pressure vessels: Generation of biaxial shallow-flaw fracture toughness data

    SciTech Connect

    McAfee, W.J.; Bass, B.R.; Bryson, J.W.

    1998-07-01

    A technology to determine shallow-flaw fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels is being developed for application to the safety assessment of RPVs containing postulated shallow-surface flaws. Shallow-flaw fracture toughness of RPV material has been shown to be higher than that for deep flaws, because of the relaxation of crack-tip constraint. This report describes the preliminary test results for a series of cruciform specimens with a uniform depth surface flaw. These specimens are all of the same size with the same depth flaw. Temperature and biaxial load ratio are the independent variables. These tests demonstrated that biaxial loading could have a pronounced effect on shallow-flaw fracture toughness in the lower transition temperature region for RPV materials. Through that temperature range, the effect of full biaxial (1:1) loading on uniaxial, shallow-flaw toughness varied from no effect near the lower shelf to a reduction of approximately 58% at higher temperatures.

  1. Experimental Examination of Intraspecific Density-Dependent Competition during the Breeding Period in Monarch Butterflies (Danaus plexippus)

    PubMed Central

    Flockhart, D. T. Tyler; Martin, Tara G.; Norris, D. Ryan

    2012-01-01

    A central goal of population ecology is to identify the factors that regulate population growth. Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) in eastern North America re-colonize the breeding range over several generations that result in population densities that vary across space and time during the breeding season. We used laboratory experiments to measure the strength of density-dependent intraspecific competition on egg laying rate and larval survival and then applied our results to density estimates of wild monarch populations to model the strength of density dependence during the breeding season. Egg laying rates did not change with density but larvae at high densities were smaller, had lower survival, and weighed less as adults compared to lower densities. Using mean larval densities from field surveys resulted in conservative estimates of density-dependent population reduction that varied between breeding regions and different phases of the breeding season. Our results suggest the highest levels of population reduction due to density-dependent intraspecific competition occur early in the breeding season in the southern portion of the breeding range. However, we also found that the strength of density dependence could be almost five times higher depending on how many life-stages were used as part of field estimates. Our study is the first to link experimental results of a density-dependent reduction in vital rates to observed monarch densities in the wild and show that the effects of density dependent competition in monarchs varies across space and time, providing valuable information for developing robust, year-round population models in this migratory organism. PMID:22984614

  2. Experimental examination of intraspecific density-dependent competition during the breeding period in monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus).

    PubMed

    Flockhart, D T Tyler; Martin, Tara G; Norris, D Ryan

    2012-01-01

    A central goal of population ecology is to identify the factors that regulate population growth. Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) in eastern North America re-colonize the breeding range over several generations that result in population densities that vary across space and time during the breeding season. We used laboratory experiments to measure the strength of density-dependent intraspecific competition on egg laying rate and larval survival and then applied our results to density estimates of wild monarch populations to model the strength of density dependence during the breeding season. Egg laying rates did not change with density but larvae at high densities were smaller, had lower survival, and weighed less as adults compared to lower densities. Using mean larval densities from field surveys resulted in conservative estimates of density-dependent population reduction that varied between breeding regions and different phases of the breeding season. Our results suggest the highest levels of population reduction due to density-dependent intraspecific competition occur early in the breeding season in the southern portion of the breeding range. However, we also found that the strength of density dependence could be almost five times higher depending on how many life-stages were used as part of field estimates. Our study is the first to link experimental results of a density-dependent reduction in vital rates to observed monarch densities in the wild and show that the effects of density dependent competition in monarchs varies across space and time, providing valuable information for developing robust, year-round population models in this migratory organism.

  3. Determination of Flaw Type and Location Using an Expert Module in Ultrasonic Nondestructive Testing for Weld Inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahriari, D.; Zolfaghari, A.; Masoumi, F.

    2011-01-01

    Nondestructive evaluation is explained as nondestructive testing, nondestructive inspection, and nondestructive examination. It is a desire to determine some characteristic of the object or to determine whether the object contains irregularities, discontinuities, or flaws. Ultrasound based inspection techniques are used extensively throughout industry for detection of flaws in engineering materials. The range and variety of imperfections encountered is large, and critical assessment of location, size, orientation and type is often difficult. In addition, increasing quality requirements of new standards and codes of practice relating to fitness for purpose are placing higher demands on operators. Applying of an expert knowledge-based analysis in ultrasonic examination is a powerful tool that can help assure safety, quality, and reliability; increase productivity; decrease liability; and save money. In this research, an expert module system is coupled with ultrasonic examination (A-Scan Procedure) to determine and evaluate type and location of flaws that embedded during welding parts. The processing module of this expert system is implemented based on EN standard to classify welding defects, acceptance condition and measuring of their location via echo static pattern and image processing. The designed module introduces new system that can automate evaluating of the results of A-scan method according to EN standard. It can simultaneously recognize the number and type of defects, and determine flaw position during each scan.

  4. Apparent viscoelastic anisotropy as measured from nondestructive oscillatory tests can reflect the presence of a flaw in cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Yeni, Yener N; Christopherson, Gregory T; Turner, A Simon; Les, Clifford M; Fyhrie, David P

    2004-04-01

    There is evidence that damage, viscoelastic stiffness properties, and postyield mechanical properties are related in bone tissue. Our objective was to test whether presence of a flaw would have an influence on the apparent viscoelastic properties of bone. Examining the effect of flaw orientation on apparent viscoelastic properties and utilization of dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) as a nondestructive means for detection of damage were our secondary objectives. Cortical bone beams (2 x 2 x 19 mm) machined from the cranial cortex of the radii of six Warhill sheep were used. The specimens were placed in a DMA machine and baseline measurements of storage modulus (E1) and loss factor (tan delta), once for loads in the craniocaudal and once in the mediolateral directions, were performed using a three-point bending configuration for a frequency range of 1-10 Hz. Craniocaudal/mediolateral measurement ratio was calculated as a measure of anisotropy for tan delta and E1. After cutting a thin through-thickness macroscopic notch on the caudal surface at the center of each beam, oscillatory tests were repeated. Two-way repeated measures analysis of variance followed by Tukey's test was used with group (craniocaudal, mediolateral, notched craniocaudal, and notched mediolateral measurements) and frequency as factors. Regression analysis and analysis of covariance were used for examining the relationship between viscoelastic parameters and frequency. Tan delta and E1 were not different between craniocaudal and mediolateral measurements before the flaw was introduced (p > 0.8 and p = 1, respectively). In the presence of the flaw, tan delta was significantly increased (p < 0.003) whereas E1 was significantly reduced (p < 0.001) for craniocaudal measurements. Tan delta and E1 were nearly isotropic in the tested directions before the introduction of a flaw into the bone tissue. Introduction of a flaw resulted in increased tan delta and E1 anisotropy. Presence of a notch resulted in

  5. Improved Flaw Detection and Characterization with Difference Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winfree, William P.; Zalameda, Joseph N.; Howell, Patricia A.

    2011-01-01

    Flaw detection and characterization with thermographic techniques in graphite polymer composites is often limited by localized variations in the thermographic response. Variations in properties such as acceptable porosity, variations in fiber volume content and surface polymer thickness result in variations in the thermal response that in general cause significant variations in the initial thermal response. These variations result in a noise floor that increases the difficulty of detecting and characterizing deeper flaws. The paper investigates comparing thermographic responses taken before and after a change in state in a composite to improve the detection of subsurface flaws. A method is presented for registration of the responses before finding the difference. A significant improvement in the detectability is achieved by comparing the differences in response. Examples of changes in state due to application of a load and impact are presented.

  6. VKORC1 Common Variation and Bone Mineral Density in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Dana C.; Brown-Gentry, Kristin; Rieder, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Osteoporosis, defined by low bone mineral density (BMD), is common among postmenopausal women. The distribution of BMD varies across populations and is shaped by both environmental and genetic factors. Because the candidate gene vitamin K epoxide reductase complex subunit 1 (VKORC1) generates vitamin K quinone, a cofactor for the gamma-carboxylation of bone-related proteins such as osteocalcin, we hypothesized that VKORC1 genetic variants may be associated with BMD and osteoporosis in the general population. To test this hypothesis, we genotyped six VKORC1 SNPs in 7,159 individuals from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III). NHANES III is a nationally representative sample linked to health and lifestyle variables including BMD, which was measured using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) on four regions of the proximal femur. In adjusted models stratified by race/ethnicity and sex, SNPs rs9923231 and rs9934438 were associated with increased BMD (p = 0.039 and 0.024, respectively) while rs8050894 was associated with decreased BMD (p = 0.016) among non-Hispanic black males (n = 619). VKORC1 rs2884737 was associated with decreased BMD among Mexican-American males (n = 795; p = 0.004). We then tested for associations between VKORC1 SNPs and osteoporosis, but the results did not mirror the associations observed between VKORC1 and BMD, possibly due to small numbers of cases. This is the first report of VKORC1 common genetic variation associated with BMD, and one of the few reports available that investigate the genetics of BMD and osteoporosis in diverse populations. PMID:21179439

  7. VKORC1 common variation and bone mineral density in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Dana C; Brown-Gentry, Kristin; Rieder, Mark J

    2010-12-13

    Osteoporosis, defined by low bone mineral density (BMD), is common among postmenopausal women. The distribution of BMD varies across populations and is shaped by both environmental and genetic factors. Because the candidate gene vitamin K epoxide reductase complex subunit 1 (VKORC1) generates vitamin K quinone, a cofactor for the gamma-carboxylation of bone-related proteins such as osteocalcin, we hypothesized that VKORC1 genetic variants may be associated with BMD and osteoporosis in the general population. To test this hypothesis, we genotyped six VKORC1 SNPs in 7,159 individuals from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III). NHANES III is a nationally representative sample linked to health and lifestyle variables including BMD, which was measured using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) on four regions of the proximal femur. In adjusted models stratified by race/ethnicity and sex, SNPs rs9923231 and rs9934438 were associated with increased BMD (p=0.039 and 0.024, respectively) while rs8050894 was associated with decreased BMD (p=0.016) among non-Hispanic black males (n=619). VKORC1 rs2884737 was associated with decreased BMD among Mexican-American males (n=795; p=0.004). We then tested for associations between VKORC1 SNPs and osteoporosis, but the results did not mirror the associations observed between VKORC1 and BMD, possibly due to small numbers of cases. This is the first report of VKORC1 common genetic variation associated with BMD, and one of the few reports available that investigate the genetics of BMD and osteoporosis in diverse populations.

  8. Relationship between pulmonary function and bone mineral density in the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    PubMed Central

    Lee, In Seon; Leem, Ah Young; Lee, Sang Hoon; Rhee, Yumie; Ha, Yoon; Kim, Young Sam

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Osteoporosis is common in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients. The relationship between osteoporosis and COPD has been primarily reported in patients with moderate to severe COPD, but there is no report in the general population. The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between bone mineral density (BMD) and lung function in the general Korean population. Methods: This study was based on data acquired from the Fourth and Fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (KNHANES IV and V), conducted from 2008 to 2010. The study population included 4,501 subjects (aged ≥ 50 years) who underwent both spirometry and BMD. The study populations were divided into two groups by sex to correct for the effects of gender on BMD. All female participants were postmenopausal women. Results: The BMD values of the femur neck, total femur, and L-spine tended to decrease with degree of airflow limitation in both genders. To correct confounding factors, data were analyzed and adjusted for age, body mass index, fat free mass index, body fat percentage, smoking amount, parathyroid hormone levels, daily calcium and phosphorus intake, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels. While the BMD of the femur neck, total femur, and L-spine was reduced significantly as age and ALP increased, the correlation between airway obstruction and BMD of all regions disappeared in both genders. Conclusions: In the general population aged 50 years and older, diminution of BMD is not associated with airway obstruction. Further investigation along other factors is needed to determine the possible role of pulmonary function and BMD. PMID:27604798

  9. Surface flaw detection in structural ceramics by scanning photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khandelwal, P. K.; Heitman, P. W.; Wakefield, T. D.; Silversmith, A. J.

    1980-01-01

    Laser-scanned photoacoustic spectroscopy has been used to detect tightly closed surface cracks in three structural ceramic materials: sintered silicon nitride, reaction-bonded silicon nitride, and sintered silicon carbide. It is found that the amplitude of the photoacoustic signal from the flaws is greater for the silicon nitrides than for silicon carbide, which is attributed to the lower thermal diffusivity of silicon nitride as well as differences in the grain size distribution and chemical composition. Signal amplitude, reproducibility, and signal-to-noise ratio are acceptable for effective flaw detection

  10. Interdisciplinary Program for Quantitative Flaw Definition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-09-17

    energy experiment and theory for a 1/8 inch g* ^ ^ al80 excellent for the as\\he function of scattered y^’ y/gTSl scattered angl. is 15° same...reflector as a function ^J^SJ-T-! theory is also very good (Figure 8). Ihe agreement between "•«"!■£ I for a .245 circular reflector, as...Panel Fiber plys/cm Fiber Resin Volume Fractions Fiber (%) Resin (%) Voids (%) Densities : Fiber P-Xgm/cc) r Matrix P„ (gm/cc) n Composite

  11. Flaw detection in mine hoist transportation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Poffenroth, D.N.

    1983-10-01

    One concern of the Mine Safety and Health Administration is the structural integrity of steel wire ropes used on mine personnel hoists and elevators. Failure of such ropes has resulted in loss of life and property. Although thorough and regular visual examinations are performed, hoist ropes may still fail from undetected internal wear, corrosion, and broken wires. To complement visual examinations, nondestructive rope inspection techniques have been developed to determine deterioration and removal criteria. The techniques use electromagnetic and permanent-magnet test instruments designed by a Canadian firm. This paper describes the operating principles, field and laboratory testing of these nondestructive testing instruments, and discusses the feasibility of using this type of testing as a supplement to visual examination and destructive tests.

  12. Five Flaws of Staff Development and the Future Beyond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargreaves, Andy

    2007-01-01

    Student learning and development do not occur without teacher learning and development. Not any teacher development will do, though. The old flaws of weak and wayward staff development are well-known--no staff development, in which trial and error are assumed to be enough; staff development that is all ideas and no implementation, i.e. the…

  13. Detection of flaws in hazelnuts using VIS/NIR spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The feasibility of VIS/NIR spectroscopy for detection of flaws in hazelnut kernels was demonstrated. Feature datasets comprising raw absorbance values, raw absorbance Ratios (Abs['1] : Abs['2]) and Differences (Abs['1] – Abs['2]) for all possible pairs of wavelengths from 306.5 nm to 1710.9 nm were ...

  14. Major email security flaws discovered: how to protect your data.

    PubMed

    James, J S

    1998-08-21

    AIDS organizations need to pay special attention to possible flaws in email systems that may compromise confidentiality of client information. Three email software programs are singled out as particularly vulnerable. Information for finding instructions on fixing the software programs is provided.

  15. Bayesian flaw characterization from eddy current measurements with grain noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahan, Jerry A.; Aldrin, John C.; Shell, Eric; Oneida, Erin

    2017-02-01

    The Bayesian approach to inference from measurement data has the potential to provide highly reliable characterizations of flaw geometry by quantifying the confidence in the estimate results. The accuracy of these confidence estimates depends on the accuracy of the model for the measurement error. Eddy current measurements of electrically anisotropic metals, such as titanium, exhibit a phenomenon called grain noise in which the measurement error is spatially correlated even with no flaw present. We show that the most commonly used statistical model for the measurement error, which fails to account for this correlation, results in overconfidence in the flaw geometry estimates from eddy current data, thereby reducing the effectiveness of the Bayesian approach. We then describe a method of modeling the grain noise as a Gaussian process (GP) using spectral mixture kernels, a type of non-parametric model for the covariance kernel of a GP This provides a broadly applicable, data-driven way of modeling correlation in measurement error. Our results show that incorporation of this noise model results in a more reliable estimate of the flaw and better agreement with the available validation data.

  16. Ultrasonic imaging of material flaws exploiting multipath information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xizhong; Zhang, Yimin D.; Demirli, Ramazan; Amin, Moeness G.

    2011-05-01

    In this paper, we consider ultrasonic imaging for the visualization of flaws in a material. Ultrasonic imaging is a powerful nondestructive testing (NDT) tool which assesses material conditions via the detection, localization, and classification of flaws inside a structure. Multipath exploitations provide extended virtual array apertures and, in turn, enhance imaging capability beyond the limitation of traditional multisensor approaches. We utilize reflections of ultrasonic signals which occur when encountering different media and interior discontinuities. The waveforms observed at the physical as well as virtual sensors yield additional measurements corresponding to different aspect angles. Exploitation of multipath information addresses unique issues observed in ultrasonic imaging. (1) Utilization of physical and virtual sensors significantly extends the array aperture for image enhancement. (2) Multipath signals extend the angle of view of the narrow beamwidth of the ultrasound transducers, allowing improved visibility and array design flexibility. (3) Ultrasonic signals experience difficulty in penetrating a flaw, thus the aspect angle of the observation is limited unless access to other sides is available. The significant extension of the aperture makes it possible to yield flaw observation from multiple aspect angles. We show that data fusion of physical and virtual sensor data significantly improves the detection and localization performance. The effectiveness of the proposed multipath exploitation approach is demonstrated through experimental studies.

  17. How will species respond to climate change? Examining the effects of temperature and population density on an herbivorous insect.

    PubMed

    Laws, Angela Nardoni; Belovsky, Gary E

    2010-04-01

    An important challenge facing ecologists is to understand how climate change may affect species performance and species interactions. However, predicting how changes in abiotic variables associated with climate change may affect species performance also depends on the biotic context, which can mediate species responses to climatic change. We conducted a 3-yr field experiment to determine how the herbivorous grasshopper Camnula pellucida (Scudder) responds to manipulations of temperature and population density. Grasshopper survival and fecundity decreased with density, indicating the importance of intraspecific competition. Female fecundity tended to increase with temperature, whereas grasshopper survival exhibited a unimodal response to temperature, with highest survival at intermediate temperatures. Grasshopper performance responses to temperature also depended on density. Peak survival in the low-density treatment occurred in warmer conditions than for the high-density treatment, indicating that the intensity of intraspecific competition varies with temperature. Our data show that changes to the temperature regimen can alter grasshopper performance and determine the intensity of intraspecific competition. However, the effects of temperature on grasshopper performance varied with density. Our data indicate the importance of the biotic context in mediating species responses to climatic factors associated with global change.

  18. The frequency of item writing flaws in multiple-choice questions used in high stakes nursing assessments.

    PubMed

    Tarrant, Marie; Knierim, Aimee; Hayes, Sasha K; Ware, James

    2006-12-01

    Multiple-choice questions are a common assessment method in nursing examinations. Few nurse educators, however, have formal preparation in constructing multiple-choice questions. Consequently, questions used in baccalaureate nursing assessments often contain item-writing flaws, or violations to accepted item-writing guidelines. In one nursing department, 2770 MCQs were collected from tests and examinations administered over a five-year period from 2001 to 2005. Questions were evaluated for 19 frequently occurring item-writing flaws, for cognitive level, for question source, and for the distribution of correct answers. Results show that almost half (46.2%) of the questions contained violations of item-writing guidelines and over 90% were written at low cognitive levels. Only a small proportion of questions were teacher generated (14.1%), while 36.2% were taken from testbanks and almost half (49.4%) had no source identified. MCQs written at a lower cognitive level were significantly more likely to contain item-writing flaws. While there was no relationship between the source of the question and item-writing flaws, teacher-generated questions were more likely to be written at higher cognitive levels (p<0.001). Correct answers were evenly distributed across all four options and no bias was noted in the placement of correct options. Further training in item-writing is recommended for all faculty members who are responsible for developing tests. Pre-test review and quality assessment is also recommended to reduce the occurrence of item-writing flaws and to improve the quality of test questions.

  19. The frequency of item writing flaws in multiple-choice questions used in high stakes nursing assessments.

    PubMed

    Tarrant, Marie; Knierim, Aimee; Hayes, Sasha K; Ware, James

    2006-12-01

    Multiple-choice questions are a common assessment method in nursing examinations. Few nurse educators, however, have formal preparation in constructing multiple-choice questions. Consequently, questions used in baccalaureate nursing assessments often contain item-writing flaws, or violations to accepted item-writing guidelines. In one nursing department, 2770 MCQs were collected from tests and examinations administered over a five-year period from 2001 to 2005. Questions were evaluated for 19 frequently occurring item-writing flaws, for cognitive level, for question source, and for the distribution of correct answers. Results show that almost half (46.2%) of the questions contained violations of item-writing guidelines and over 90% were written at low cognitive levels. Only a small proportion of questions were teacher generated (14.1%), while 36.2% were taken from testbanks and almost half (49.4%) had no source identified. MCQs written at a lower cognitive level were significantly more likely to contain item-writing flaws. While there was no relationship between the source of the question and item-writing flaws, teachergenerated questions were more likely to be written at higher cognitive levels (p<0.001). Correct answers were evenly distributed across all four options and no bias was noted in the placement of correct options. Further training in item-writing is recommended for all faculty members who are responsible for developing tests. Pre-test review and quality assessment is also recommended to reduce the occurrence of item-writing flaws and to improve the quality of test questions.

  20. A Density Functional Theory Examination of the Local Conformational Energetics of Normal and Epigenetically Modified Duplex DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusufaly, Tahir; Olson, Wilma

    2013-03-01

    We report density functional theory calculations of various local regions of duplex DNA, including hydrogen bonded base pairs, stacked nearest-neighbor bases, and sugar-phosphate backbones. Special attention is given to the methylation of 5-cytosine, an epigenetic modification believed to play a key role in eukaryotic gene regulation. Energetically stable molecular conformations are identified and their elastic properties analyzed. Our results are compared with previous ab initio studies and high-resolution crystalline structural data.

  1. Examination of phencyclidine hydrochloride via cryogenic terahertz spectroscopy, solid-state density functional theory, and X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Hakey, Patrick M; Hudson, Matthew R; Allis, Damian G; Ouellette, Wayne; Korter, Timothy M

    2009-11-19

    The terahertz (THz) spectrum of phencyclidine hydrochloride from 7.0 to 100.0 cm(-1) has been measured at cryogenic (78.4 K) temperature. The complete structural analysis and vibrational assignment of the compound have been performed employing solid-state density functional theory utilizing eight generalized gradient approximation density functionals and both solid-state and isolated-molecule methods. The structural results and the simulated spectra display the substantial improvement obtained by using solid-state simulations to accurately assign and interpret solid-state THz spectra. A complete assignment of the spectral features in the measured THz spectrum has been completed at a VWN-BP/DNP level of theory, with the VWN-BP density functional providing the best-fit solid-state simulation of the experimentally observed spectrum. The cryogenic THz spectrum contains eight spectral features that, at the VWN-BP/DNP level, consist of 15 infrared-active vibrational modes. Of the calculated modes, external crystal vibrations are predicted to account for 42% of the total spectral intensity.

  2. On flaw tolerance of nacre: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yue; Zhao, Hong-Ping; Feng, Xi-Qiao

    2014-03-06

    As a natural composite, nacre has an elegant staggered 'brick-and-mortar' microstructure consisting of mineral platelets glued by organic macromolecules, which endows the material with superior mechanical properties to achieve its biological functions. In this paper, a microstructure-based crack-bridging model is employed to investigate how the strength of nacre is affected by pre-existing structural defects. Our analysis demonstrates that owing to its special microstructure and the toughening effect of platelets, nacre has a superior flaw-tolerance feature. The maximal crack size that does not evidently reduce the tensile strength of nacre is up to tens of micrometres, about three orders higher than that of pure aragonite. Through dimensional analysis, a non-dimensional parameter is proposed to quantify the flaw-tolerance ability of nacreous materials in a wide range of structural parameters. This study provides us some inspirations for optimal design of advanced biomimetic composites.

  3. NON-DESTRUCTIVE METHOD AND MEANS FOR FLAW DETECTION

    DOEpatents

    Hochschild, R.

    1959-03-10

    BS>An improved method is presented for the nondestructive detection of flaws in olectrictilly conductivc articles using magnetic field. According to thc method a homogoneous mignetic field is established in the test article;it right angle" to the artyicle. A probe is aligned with its axis transverse to the translates so hat th4 probe scans the surface of the test article while the axis of the robe is transverse to the direction of translation of the article. In this manner any output current obtained in thc probe is an indication of the size and location of a flaw in the article under test, with a miiiimum of signal pick- up in the probe from the established magnetic field.

  4. On flaw tolerance of nacre: a theoretical study

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yue; Zhao, Hong-Ping; Feng, Xi-Qiao

    2014-01-01

    As a natural composite, nacre has an elegant staggered ‘brick-and-mortar’ microstructure consisting of mineral platelets glued by organic macromolecules, which endows the material with superior mechanical properties to achieve its biological functions. In this paper, a microstructure-based crack-bridging model is employed to investigate how the strength of nacre is affected by pre-existing structural defects. Our analysis demonstrates that owing to its special microstructure and the toughening effect of platelets, nacre has a superior flaw-tolerance feature. The maximal crack size that does not evidently reduce the tensile strength of nacre is up to tens of micrometres, about three orders higher than that of pure aragonite. Through dimensional analysis, a non-dimensional parameter is proposed to quantify the flaw-tolerance ability of nacreous materials in a wide range of structural parameters. This study provides us some inspirations for optimal design of advanced biomimetic composites. PMID:24402917

  5. Marine Corps Body Composition Program: The Flawed Measurement System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-07

    Marine Corps’ Body Composition Program (BCP) is designed to shift focus in the weight control program from height/weight to body fat measurements in...Marine’s body fat percentage is the least accurate of all methods currently being utilized in the medical world. It’s a flaw that is easily... Body fat will be estimated using the circumference- based method with one set of measurements for each gender (Males: height, neck circumference, and

  6. Flaw Tolerance In Lap Shear Brazed Joints. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Len; Flom, Yury

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents results of the second part of an on-going effort to gain better understanding of defect tolerance in braze joints. In the first part of this three-part series, we mechanically tested and modeled the strength of the lap joints as a function of the overlap distance. A failure criterion was established based on the zone damage theory, which predicts the dependence of the lap joint shear strength on the overlap distance, based on the critical size of a finite damage zone or an overloaded region in the joint. In this second part of the study, we experimentally verified the applicability of the damage zone criterion on prediction of the shear strength of the lap joint and introduced controlled flaws into the lap joints. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the lap joint strength as a function of flaw size and its location through mechanical testing and nonlinear finite element analysis (FEA) employing damage zone criterion for definition of failure. The results obtained from the second part of the investigation confirmed that the failure of the ductile lap shear brazed joints occurs when the damage zone reaches approximately 10% of the overlap width. The same failure criterion was applicable to the lap joints containing flaws.

  7. Flaw Tolerance in Lap Shear Brazed Joints. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flom, Yury; Wang, Liqin; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Vacuum brazing is a viable process to achieve strong permanent and hermetic joints in space. As in any joining process, brazed Joints have various imperfections and defects. It is important to understand the impact that flaws have on the load carrying capacity and performance of the brazed joints. This study focuses on the behavior of lap shear joints due to their engineering importance in brazed aerospace structures. In Part 1 an average shear strength capabilitY and failure modes of the single lap joints are explored. Specimens comprised of 0.090 inch thick 347 stainless steel sheet brazed with pure silver are tested in accordance with the AWS C3.2 standard. Comparison of the measured loads and average shear stresses at failure with the Finite Element Analysis (FEA) of the same specimens as a function of the overlap lengths shows excellent correlation between the experimental and calculated values for the defect-free lap joints. In Part 2, various flaws will be introduced in the test specimens to simulate lack of braze coverage in the lap joints. Mechanical testing and FEA will be performed on these joints to verify if behavior of ductile ]appoints containing flaws is similar to the joints with the reduced braze area. Finally, in Part 3, the results obtained in Part 1 and 2 will be applied to the brazed assembly to evaluate a load carrying capability of the structural lap joint containing defects.

  8. Building better flaws for thermographic qualification and quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, James L.; Russell, Samuel S.; Workman, Gary L.

    1996-11-01

    The concurrent inspection of calibrated test panels manufactured with artificially created, although realistically behaving flaws is essential to providing confidence in the thermographic inspection process of advanced composite structure. For honeycomb type composite structures of principle interest is identifying delamination and disbond type defects along the bondline between the core and faceplate, as well as within the faceplate itself. To ensure that these types of flaws will be caught during the inspection cycle of a structural component the test panels must have similar behaving artificial defects. A common practice for the manufacture of artificial flaws in test panels is the use of embedded Teflon tape, or other release agents, for force an unbond condition within the laminate. These procedures though, yield results that are questionable, since one is not sure whether or not the inspection process is identifying the unbond or the inserted materials. Several fabrication methods are compared and contrasted in this paper, for controlling the degree of disbond to simulate defects resulting from mishandling or manufacturing errors without the need for inserting foreign materials in the laminate. These results are also compared to those obtained by inspecting a composite inter-tank test structure which used Teflon tape as the means to simulate critically sized defects.

  9. Seven Pervasive Statistical Flaws in Cognitive Training Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, David; Kirk, Ian J.; Waldie, Karen E.

    2016-01-01

    The prospect of enhancing cognition is undoubtedly among the most exciting research questions currently bridging psychology, neuroscience, and evidence-based medicine. Yet, convincing claims in this line of work stem from designs that are prone to several shortcomings, thus threatening the credibility of training-induced cognitive enhancement. Here, we present seven pervasive statistical flaws in intervention designs: (i) lack of power; (ii) sampling error; (iii) continuous variable splits; (iv) erroneous interpretations of correlated gain scores; (v) single transfer assessments; (vi) multiple comparisons; and (vii) publication bias. Each flaw is illustrated with a Monte Carlo simulation to present its underlying mechanisms, gauge its magnitude, and discuss potential remedies. Although not restricted to training studies, these flaws are typically exacerbated in such designs, due to ubiquitous practices in data collection or data analysis. The article reviews these practices, so as to avoid common pitfalls when designing or analyzing an intervention. More generally, it is also intended as a reference for anyone interested in evaluating claims of cognitive enhancement. PMID:27148010

  10. Ultrasonic stress measurement using PC based and commercial flaw detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Auteliano A.; Bray, Don E.

    2000-09-01

    The determination of the stress field inside metallic parts is one of the most important challenges to the designer. Although the prediction of the stress distribution can be done by several numerical and empirical methods, the real stress value is almost always unknown. Several destructive and nondestructive techniques have been tested to accomplish this task, including the application of x rays, saw cut, neutron diffraction and so on, but none of them seems to have a suitable correlation between cost and applicability. Ultrasonic techniques have been used for flaw detection since the 1950s. The main application was in the identification of cracks and voids. In this work we present the application of ultrasound in the evaluation of a one-dimensional stress field using the longitudinal critically refracted waves (LCR). A new ultrasonic LCR probe is presented and its performance is evaluated using PC based instrumentation. Also, the LCR waves' sensitivity is verified using a low cost commercial flaw detector. The results show that the technique can be applied to quantify the magnitude of the stresses in bars, using either the PC based or the commercial flaw detector system, as long as the high sensitivity longitudinal critically refracted waves are used.

  11. Experimental study on crack coalescence mechanisms of pre-existing flaws under blast loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Zhong-wen; Yang, Ren-shu; Ma, Xin-min; Guo, Dong-ming

    2008-11-01

    The PMMA model transmission-type experiment of dynamic caustics was carried out to simulate the fracture blasting process of material containing pre-existing flaws using the dynamic caustic-test system. The mechanism of the fracture coalescence among four prefabricated flaws with echelon geometry distribution was studied under blast loading. The experiment results show that two wing cracks respectively coalescing with the flaw F2 and flaw F3 appear at both tips of the flaw F1 closest to the blasthole. Whereas the flaw F4 doesn't produce wing cracks, the flaw F2 and flaw F3 also respectively generate two wing cracks which don't link up the flaw F4. Crack propagation is greatly affected by preexisting flaws. During the whole fracture process, the wing crack velocity oscillates with the increase of crack propagating time. The value of dynamic stress intensity factor reaches the maximum in a moment and then gradually decreases. The changes of dynamic stress intensity factor also oscillate in the whole time. Furthermore, the value of dynamic stress intensity factor KdII is smaller than that of dynamic stress intensity factor KdI. The results of the present research can provide the theoretical basis for the study on blasting of rock containing flaws.

  12. Modeling the X-ray Process, and X-ray Flaw Size Parameter for POD Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshti, Ajay M.

    2014-01-01

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) method reliability can be determined by a statistical flaw detection study called probability of detection (POD) study. In many instances, the NDE flaw detectability is given as a flaw size such as crack length. The flaw is either a crack or behaving like a crack in terms of affecting the structural integrity of the material. An alternate approach is to use a more complex flaw size parameter. The X-ray flaw size parameter, given here, takes into account many setup and geometric factors. The flaw size parameter relates to X-ray image contrast and is intended to have a monotonic correlation with the POD. Some factors such as set-up parameters, including X-ray energy, exposure, detector sensitivity, and material type that are not accounted for in the flaw size parameter may be accounted for in the technique calibration and controlled to meet certain quality requirements. The proposed flaw size parameter and the computer application described here give an alternate approach to conduct the POD studies. Results of the POD study can be applied to reliably detect small flaws through better assessment of effect of interaction between various geometric parameters on the flaw detectability. Moreover, a contrast simulation algorithm for a simple part-source-detector geometry using calibration data is also provided for the POD estimation.

  13. Modeling the X-Ray Process, and X-Ray Flaw Size Parameter for POD Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khoshti, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) method reliability can be determined by a statistical flaw detection study called probability of detection (POD) study. In many instances the NDE flaw detectability is given as a flaw size such as crack length. The flaw is either a crack or behaving like a crack in terms of affecting the structural integrity of the material. An alternate approach is to use a more complex flaw size parameter. The X-ray flaw size parameter, given here, takes into account many setup and geometric factors. The flaw size parameter relates to X-ray image contrast and is intended to have a monotonic correlation with the POD. Some factors such as set-up parameters including X-ray energy, exposure, detector sensitivity, and material type that are not accounted for in the flaw size parameter may be accounted for in the technique calibration and controlled to meet certain quality requirements. The proposed flaw size parameter and the computer application described here give an alternate approach to conduct the POD studies. Results of the POD study can be applied to reliably detect small flaws through better assessment of effect of interaction between various geometric parameters on the flaw detectability. Moreover, a contrast simulation algorithm for a simple part-source-detector geometry using calibration data is also provided for the POD estimation.

  14. Fracture and Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of Surface Flaws and Flaws Originating at Fastener Holes. Volume 1. Results and Discussion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-05-01

    to the number of overloads. The dark bands are illustrated in Figure 41 where the fracture surfaces of the three flaws in Specimen SPOTA -2 are shown...Specimen SPOTA -2 was subjected to five tensile over- loads having peak stress levels of 36 ksi, including one at the outset of the test and one every...upper part of Figure 72. An unplanned change in overload frequency during the testing of Specimen SPOTA -1 yielded an interesting result. The first

  15. Applicability of a Conservative Margin Approach for Assessing NDE Flaw Detectability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshti, ajay M.

    2007-01-01

    Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) procedures are required to detect flaws in structures with a high percentage detectability and high confidence. Conventional Probability of Detection (POD) methods are statistical in nature and require detection data from a relatively large number of flaw specimens. In many circumstances, due to the high cost and long lead time, it is impractical to build the large set of flaw specimens that is required by the conventional POD methodology. Therefore, in such situations it is desirable to have a flaw detectability estimation approach that allows for a reduced number of flaw specimens but provides a high degree of confidence in establishing the flaw detectability size. This paper presents an alternative approach called the conservative margin approach (CMA). To investigate the applicability of the CMA approach, flaw detectability sizes determined by the CMA and POD approaches have been compared on actual datasets. The results of these comparisons are presented and the applicability of the CMA approach is discussed.

  16. Total and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in adults: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2011-2012.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Margaret D; Kit, Brian K; Lacher, David A; Yoon, Sung Sug

    2013-10-01

    High levels of total cholesterol and low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (the "good cholesterol") are risk factors for coronary heart disease (1–5). To identify persons who may be at risk for developing coronary heart disease, adults are advised to have their cholesterol checked at least once every 5 years (i.e., to be screened for cholesterol) (6). A previous study reported declining trends in the percentage of adults with high total cholesterol during 1999–2010 (7). This report presents estimates of the percentages of adults aged 20 and over with high total cholesterol, low HDL cholesterol, and screened for cholesterol, based on data from 2011–2012, and compares them with corresponding estimates from 2009–2010. Analysis is based on measured cholesterol only and does not take into account whether lipid-lowering medications were taken.

  17. Experiments in ultrasonic flaw detection using a MEMS transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Akash; Greve, David W.; Oppenheim, Irving J.

    2003-08-01

    In earlier work we developed a MEMS phased array transducer, fabricated in the MUMPs process, and we reported on initial experimental studies in which the device was affixed into contact with solids. We demonstrated the successful detection of signals from a conventional ultrasonic source, and the successful localization of the source in an off-axis geometry using phased array signal processing. We now describe the predicted transmission and coupling characteristics for such devices in contact with solids, demonstrating reasonable agreement with experimental behavior. We then describe the results of flaw detection experiments, as well as results for fluid-coupled detectors.

  18. MOEs for Drug Interdiction: Simple Tests Expose Critical Flaws

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    DTIC gN In MOEs for Drug Interdiction: Simple Tests Expose Critical Flaws Michael R. Anderberg 92-15393 92 6 1 2 0 5 3 U CENTER FOR NAVAL ANALYSES ...ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER Center for Naval Analyses CRM 91-48 4401 Ford Avenue Alexandria, Virginia 22302-0268 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND...S%& 2MS.18 ECENTER FOR NAVAL ANALYSES 4401 Ford Avenue • Post Office Box 16268 • Alexandria, Virginia 22302-0268 * (703) 824-2000 10 October 1991

  19. Flaw Growth in Complex Structure. Volume 1. Technical Discussion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-12-01

    SJ2a a+R) (29)I 1.1215 By definition the corner flaw correction factor ’co times K1 () (from(co) Ths Equation (18)) equals K I Thus, K (co)KI co - K...STRUCTURE WHILE INTACT *ASSUMED INITIAL DAMAGE SIZE aLT DIM TYPICAL INSPECTIONT,, INTER VAL T,~ I DESIGN [lES:GN LIFETIME L ET ME . REQUIRED MINIMUM 4F...INSPECTABILITY T THROUGH PERIOD XTX FE In-Flight Evident Return to Base PFE 2GE Ground Evident 1 Flight P GE 2WV Walkaround 50 Flights PWV SV Special

  20. A Taxonomy of Computer Program Security Flaws, with Examples

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-11-19

    Books, New York. NY, 1992). 2. N.G. Leveson and C.S. Turner, "An Investigation of the Therac - 25 Accidents," UCI 17? 92- 108. Inf. and Comp. Sci. Dept...Trojar, horse in the sense defined above, but the two terms are usually distinguished 119]. Thompson [ 25 ] describes a method for building a Trojan horse...Thompson’s example [ 25 ] and a limited defense posed by McDermott [301). A Taxonomy of Computer Program Security Flaws 11 The original designers and

  1. MILITARY RESEARCH: Researchers Target Flaws in Ballistic Missile Defense Plan.

    PubMed

    Malakoff, D; Cho, A

    2000-06-16

    More than three dozen scientists journeyed to Washington, D.C., this week to warn lawmakers that a proposed $60 billion U.S. missile defense system, designed to knock incoming warheads out of the sky, is technically flawed because it can't pick out real warheads from decoys. Pentagon officials heatedly deny a new report by one scientist that contractors have rigged trials to hide the problem, although they admit that some tests were simplified to save time. In the wake of these events, a leading Democrat is urging President Bill Clinton to delay a pending decision on building the system.

  2. Transnitrosylation products of the dipeptide cysteinyl-cysteine: an examination by tandem mass spectrometry and density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Butler, Matias; Michael Siu, K W; Hopkinson, Alan C

    2016-02-17

    The fragmentation pathways of protonated mono- and di-nitrosylated derivatives from the dipeptide Cys-Cys obtained by electrospray were examined. Protonated mononitrosylated dipeptide upon loss of ˙NO formed a radical cation, which in turn shows two fragment ions, one from the loss of HS˙ and the other from a neutral loss giving a radical cation of formula C2H5NS˙(+). Protonated dinitrosylated dipeptide dissociated by losing both ˙NO molecules, forming a cyclic structure with a vicinal disulfide bridge whose major dissociation channel was the loss of CO. After CO loss, two pathways were observed (loss of NH3 and C2H3NS) which were preceded by proton exchange occurring between one β-carbon and the nitrogen atom. DFT calculations did not show significant differences in the energies involved for the loss of the NO radical from either of the cysteine residues of the protonated di-nitrosylated dipeptide. Upon loss of the first NO radical, the thiyl radical afforded the vicinal disulfide product with a small barrier through radical substitution of the remaining NO moiety. The calculated relative energy barriers for the different channels are in good agreement with experimental observations. Structures of the ions obtained after dissociation are suggested on the basis of the proposed mechanisms.

  3. Elastic-Plastic Fracture Mechanics Analysis of Critical Flaw Size in ARES I-X Flange-to-Skin Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chell, G. Graham; Hudak, Stephen J., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Ares 1 Upper Stage Simulator (USS) is being fabricated from welded A516 steel. In order to insure the structural integrity of these welds it is of interest to calculate the critical initial flaw size (CIFS) to establish rational inspection requirements. The CIFS is in turn dependent on the critical final flaw size (CFS), as well as fatigue flaw growth resulting from transportation, handling and service-induced loading. These calculations were made using linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM), which are thought to be conservative because they are based on a lower bound, so called elastic, fracture toughness determined from tests that displayed significant plasticity. Nevertheless, there was still concern that the yield magnitude stresses generated in the flange-to-skin weld by the combination of axial stresses due to axial forces, fit-up stresses, and weld residual stresses, could give rise to significant flaw-tip plasticity, which might render the LEFM results to be non-conservative. The objective of the present study was to employ Elastic Plastic Fracture Mechanics (EPFM) to determine CFS values, and then compare these values to CFS values evaluated using LEFM. CFS values were calculated for twelve cases involving surface and embedded flaws, EPFM analyses with and without plastic shakedown of the stresses, LEFM analyses, and various welding residual stress distributions. For the cases examined, the computed CFS values based on elastic analyses were the smallest in all instances where the failures were predicted to be controlled by the fracture toughness. However, in certain cases, the CFS values predicted by the elastic-plastic analyses were smaller than those predicted by the elastic analyses; in these cases the failure criteria were determined by a breakdown in stress intensity factor validity limits for deep flaws (a greater than 0.90t), rather than by the fracture toughness. Plastic relaxation of stresses accompanying shakedown always increases the

  4. Gun bore flaw image matching based on improved SIFT descriptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Luan; Xiong, Wei; Zhai, You

    2013-01-01

    In order to increase the operation speed and matching ability of SIFT algorithm, the SIFT descriptor and matching strategy are improved. First, a method of constructing feature descriptor based on sector area is proposed. By computing the gradients histogram of location bins which are parted into 6 sector areas, a descriptor with 48 dimensions is constituted. It can reduce the dimension of feature vector and decrease the complexity of structuring descriptor. Second, it introduce a strategy that partitions the circular region into 6 identical sector areas starting from the dominate orientation. Consequently, the computational complexity is reduced due to cancellation of rotation operation for the area. The experimental results indicate that comparing with the OpenCV SIFT arithmetic, the average matching speed of the new method increase by about 55.86%. The matching veracity can be increased even under some variation of view point, illumination, rotation, scale and out of focus. The new method got satisfied results in gun bore flaw image matching. Keywords: Metrology, Flaw image matching, Gun bore, Feature descriptor

  5. Rotating flux-focusing eddy current probe for flaw detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Fulton, James P. (Inventor); Nath, Shridhar C. (Inventor); Simpson, John W. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A flux-focusing electromagnetic sensor which uses a ferromagnetic flux-focusing lens simplifies inspections and increases detectability of fatigue cracks about circular fasteners and other circular inhomogeneities in high conductivity material. The unique feature of the device is the ferrous shield isolating a high-turn pick-up coil from an excitation coil, The use of the magnetic shield is shown to produce a null voltage output across the receiving coil in the presence of an unflawed sample. A redistribution of the current flow in the sample caused by the presence of flaws, however, eliminates the shielding condition and a large output voltage is produced, yielding a clear unambiguous flaw signal. By rotating the probe in a path around a circular fastener such as a rivet while maintaining a constant distance between the probe and the center of a rivet, the signal due to current flow about the rivet can be held constant. Any further changes in the current distribution, such as due to a fatigue crack at the rivet joint, can be detected as an increase in the output voltage above that due to the flow about the rivet head.

  6. Method for fabricating prescribed flaws in the interior of metals

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, David K.; Thompson, Donald O.

    1989-03-07

    The method for fabricating a metal body having a flaw of predetermined size and shape located therein comprises placing half of the metal powder required to make the metal body in the die of a press and pressing it to create a flat upper surface thereon. A piece of copper foil is cut to the size and shape of the desired interior crack and placed on the upper surface of the powder and centered in position. The remaining powder is then placed in the die to cover the copper foil. The powder is first cold pressed and removed from the press. The powder metal piece is then sintered in a furnace at a temperature above the melting point of the copper and below the melting point of the metal. It is then removed from the furnace, cooled to room temperature, and placed back in the die and pressed further. This procedure results in an interior flaw or crack. Modified forms of the method involve using a press-sinter-press-sinter cycle with the first sinter being below the melting point of the copper and the second sinter being above the melting point of the copper and below the melting point of the metal.

  7. Eddy current probe and method for flaw detection in metals

    DOEpatents

    Watjen, John P.

    1987-06-23

    A flaw detecting system is shown which includes a probe having a pair of ferrite cores with in-line gaps in close proximity to each other. An insulating, non-magnetic, non-conducting holder fills the gaps and supports the ferrite cores in a manner such that the cores form a generally V-shape. Each core is provided with an excitation winding and a detection winding. The excitation windings are connected in series or parallel with an rf port for connection thereof to a radio frequency source. The detection windings, which are differentially wound, are connected in series circuit to a detector port for connection to a voltage measuring instrument. The ferrite cores at the in-line gaps directly engage the metal surface of a test piece, and the probe is scanned along the test piece. In the presence of a flaw in the metal surface the detection winding voltages are unbalanced, and the unbalance is detected by the voltage measuring instrument. The insulating holder is provided with a profile which conforms to that of a prominent feature of the test piece to facilitate movement of the probe along the feature, typically an edge or a corner.

  8. Eddy current probe and method for flaw detection in metals

    DOEpatents

    Watjen, J.P.

    1987-06-23

    A flaw detecting system is shown which includes a probe having a pair of ferrite cores with in-line gaps in close proximity to each other. An insulating, non-magnetic, non-conducting holder fills the gaps and supports the ferrite cores in a manner such that the cores form a generally V-shape. Each core is provided with an excitation winding and a detection winding. The excitation windings are connected in series or parallel with an rf port for connection thereof to a radio frequency source. The detection windings, which are differentially wound, are connected in series circuit to a detector port for connection to a voltage measuring instrument. The ferrite cores at the in-line gaps directly engage the metal surface of a test piece, and the probe is scanned along the test piece. In the presence of a flaw in the metal surface the detection winding voltages are unbalanced, and the unbalance is detected by the voltage measuring instrument. The insulating holder is provided with a profile which conforms to that of a prominent feature of the test piece to facilitate movement of the probe along the feature, typically an edge or a corner. 9 figs.

  9. Classification of flaw severity using pattern recognition for guided wave-based structural health monitoring.

    PubMed

    Miller, Corey A; Hinders, Mark K

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the authors present a formal classification routine to characterize flaw severity in an aircraft-grade aluminum plate using Lamb waves. A rounded rectangle flat-bottom hole is incrementally introduced into the plate, and at each depth multi-mode Lamb wave signals are collected to study the changes in received signal due to mode conversion and scattering from the flaw. Lamb wave tomography reconstructions are used to locate and size the flaw at each depth, however information about the severity of the flaw is obscured when the flaw becomes severe enough that scattering effects dominate. The dynamic wavelet fingerprint is then used to extract features from the raw Lamb wave signals, and supervised pattern classification techniques are used to identify flaw severity with up to 80.7% accuracy for a training set and up to 51.7% accuracy on a series of validation data sets extracted from independent plate samples.

  10. Digital ultrasonics signal processing: Flaw data post processing use and description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buel, V. E.

    1981-01-01

    A modular system composed of two sets of tasks which interprets the flaw data and allows compensation of the data due to transducer characteristics is described. The hardware configuration consists of two main units. A DEC LSI-11 processor running under the RT-11 sngle job, version 2C-02 operating system, controls the scanner hardware and the ultrasonic unit. A DEC PDP-11/45 processor also running under the RT-11, version 2C-02, operating system, stores, processes and displays the flaw data. The software developed the Ultrasonics Evaluation System, is divided into two catagories; transducer characterization and flaw classification. Each category is divided further into two functional tasks: a data acquisition and a postprocessor ask. The flaw characterization collects data, compresses its, and writes it to a disk file. The data is then processed by the flaw classification postprocessing task. The use and operation of a flaw data postprocessor is described.

  11. Digital ultrasonics signal processing: Flaw data post processing use and description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buel, V. E.

    1981-09-01

    A modular system composed of two sets of tasks which interprets the flaw data and allows compensation of the data due to transducer characteristics is described. The hardware configuration consists of two main units. A DEC LSI-11 processor running under the RT-11 sngle job, version 2C-02 operating system, controls the scanner hardware and the ultrasonic unit. A DEC PDP-11/45 processor also running under the RT-11, version 2C-02, operating system, stores, processes and displays the flaw data. The software developed the Ultrasonics Evaluation System, is divided into two catagories; transducer characterization and flaw classification. Each category is divided further into two functional tasks: a data acquisition and a postprocessor ask. The flaw characterization collects data, compresses its, and writes it to a disk file. The data is then processed by the flaw classification postprocessing task. The use and operation of a flaw data postprocessor is described.

  12. Fatigue flaw growth behavior in stiffened and unstiffened panels loaded in biaxial tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, E. J.

    1973-01-01

    The effect was investigated of biaxial loading on the flaw growth rate of 2219-T87 aluminum alloy that would be typical of Space Shuttle cryogenic tankage design. The stress distribution and stress concentration factors for several integrally stiffened panels under various loading conditions were obtained. The flaw growth behavior of both stiffened and unstiffened panels under biaxial loading conditions was determined. The effect of a complex stress state was studied by introducing flaws in fillet areas of biaxially loaded stiffened panels.

  13. Assessment of item-writing flaws in multiple-choice questions.

    PubMed

    Nedeau-Cayo, Rosemarie; Laughlin, Deborah; Rus, Linda; Hall, John

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the quality of multiple-choice questions used in a hospital's e-learning system. Constructing well-written questions is fraught with difficulty, and item-writing flaws are common. Study results revealed that most items contained flaws and were written at the knowledge/comprehension level. Few items had linked objectives, and no association was found between the presence of objectives and flaws. Recommendations include education for writing test questions.

  14. High-temperature flaw assessment procedure: A state-of-the-art survey

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggles, M.B.; Takahashi, Y.

    1989-05-01

    High-temperature crack growth under cyclic, static, and combined loading is received with an emphasis on fracture mechanics aspects. Experimental studies of the effects of loading history, microstructure, temperature, and environment on crack growth behavior are described and interpreted. The experimental evidence is used to examine crack growth parameters and theoretical models for fatigue, creep, and creep-fatigue crack propagation at elevated temperatures. The limitations of both elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics for high-temperature subcritical crack growth are assessed. Existing techniques for modeling critical crack growth/ligament instability failure are also presented. Related topics of defect modeling and engineering flaw assessment procedures, nondestructive evaluation methods, and probabilistic failure analysis are briefly discussed. 142 refs., 33 figs.

  15. Is signal detection theory fundamentally flawed? A response to Balakrishnan (1998a, 1998b, 1999).

    PubMed

    Treisman, Michel

    2002-12-01

    For nearly 50 years, signal detection theory (SDT; Green & Swvets, 1966; Macmillan & Creelman, 1991) has been of central importance in the development of psychophysics and other areas of psychology. The theory has recently been challenged by Balakrishnan (1998b), who argues that, within SDT, an alternative index is "better justified" than d' and who claims to show (1998a, 1999) that SDT is fundamentally flawed and should be rejected. His evidence is based on new nonparametric measures that he has introduced and applied to experimental data. He believes his results show that basic assumptions of SDT are not supported-in particular, that payoff and probability manipulations do not affect the position of the decision criterion. In view of the importance of SDT in psychology, these claims deserve careful examination. They are critically reviewed here. It appears that it is Balakrishnans arguments that fail, and not SDT

  16. Physics-based method to validate and repair flaws in protein structures.

    PubMed

    Martin, Osvaldo A; Arnautova, Yelena A; Icazatti, Alejandro A; Scheraga, Harold A; Vila, Jorge A

    2013-10-15

    A method that makes use of information provided by the combination of (13)C(α) and (13)C(β) chemical shifts, computed at the density functional level of theory, enables one to (i) validate, at the residue level, conformations of proteins and detect backbone or side-chain flaws by taking into account an ensemble average of chemical shifts over all of the conformations used to represent a protein, with a sensitivity of ∼90%; and (ii) provide a set of (χ1/χ2) torsional angles that leads to optimal agreement between the observed and computed (13)C(α) and (13)C(β) chemical shifts. The method has been incorporated into the CheShift-2 protein validation Web server. To test the reliability of the provided set of (χ1/χ2) torsional angles, the side chains of all reported conformations of five NMR-determined protein models were refined by a simple routine, without using NOE-based distance restraints. The refinement of each of these five proteins leads to optimal agreement between the observed and computed (13)C(α) and (13)C(β) chemical shifts for ∼94% of the flaws, on average, without introducing a significantly large number of violations of the NOE-based distance restraints for a distance range ≤ 0.5 , in which the largest number of distance violations occurs. The results of this work suggest that use of the provided set of (χ1/χ2) torsional angles together with other observables, such as NOEs, should lead to a fast and accurate refinement of the side-chain conformations of protein models.

  17. Detecting flaws in Portland cement concrete using TEM horn antennae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Qadi, Imad L.; Riad, Sedki M.; Su, Wansheng; Haddad, Rami H.

    1996-11-01

    To understand the dielectric properties of PCC and better correlate them with type and severity of PCC internal defects, a study was conducted to evaluate PCC complex permittivity and magnetic permeability over a wideband of frequencies using both time domain and frequency domain techniques. Three measuring devices were designed and fabricated: a parallel plate capacitor, a coaxial transmission line, and transverse electromagnetic (TEM) horn antennae. The TEM horn antenna covers the microwave frequencies. The measurement technique involves a time domain setup that was verified by a frequency domain measurement. Portland cement concrete slabs, 60 by 75 by 14 cm, were cast; defects include delamination, delamination filled with water, segregation, and chloride contamination. In this paper, measurements using the TEM horn antennae and the feasibility of detecting flaws at microwave frequency are presented.

  18. Natural stiffening increases flaw tolerance of biological fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giesa, Tristan; Pugno, Nicola M.; Buehler, Markus J.

    2012-10-01

    Many fibers in biomaterials such as tendon, elastin, or silk feature a nonlinear stiffening behavior of the stress-strain relationship, where the rigidity of the material increases severely as the material is being stretched. Here we show that such nonlinear stiffening is beneficial for a fiber's ability to withstand cracks, leading to a flaw tolerant state in which stress concentrations around cracks are diminished. Our findings, established by molecular mechanics and the derivation of a theoretical scaling law, explain experimentally observed fiber sizes in a range of biomaterials and point to the importance of nonlinear stiffening to enhance their fracture properties. Our study suggests that nonlinear stiffening provides a mechanism by which nanoscale mechanical properties can be scaled up, providing a means towards bioinspired fibrous material and structural design.

  19. Experimental characterization of yield induced by surface flaws.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francis, P. H.; Davidson, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    Recent experimental findings related to the surface deformation and plastic zones associated with a deep surface flaw in Mode I tension loading are surveyed. Results of front and back surface dimpling, as determined by replica profiling and interferometry, are presented. The stresses required to initiate back surface dimpling are inversely related both to the crack depth and to the crack length. The plastic zone at the crack tip is described using results obtained from Fe-3Si specimens which have been studied with the electrolytic etching technique. It is shown that the plastic zone may be identified with a state of plane strain around the entire crack perimeter, except for the very thin layer near the crack tips on the front surface, where the deformation state approximates plane stress.

  20. Extensive burn injury caused by fundamental electronic cigarette design flaw

    PubMed Central

    Bohr, S.; Almarzouqi, F.; Pallua, N.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Currently, electronic cigarette (EC) devices are widely used as an alternative to conventional smoking. The underlying technical principle is an electric coil-based vaporizer unit, which vaporizes various solutions for inhalation purposes with a rechargeable lithium battery unit as power source. We report a case of extensive burn injury resulting from the thermal explosion of a battery unit within an EC device. Though internal thermal instabilities of lithium ion batteries are a known safety issue, the unique feature here is a pronounced amplification of the extent of burn injury due to an additional scalding burn mechanism that resulted from heating of the liquid reservoir adjacent to the battery. Thus, we demonstrate a relevant design flaw in various EC devices, which in the authors’ opinion needs to be addressed both by manufacturers and safety regulations. PMID:28149256

  1. 'Moral distress'--time to abandon a flawed nursing construct?

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Megan-Jane; Hutchinson, Alison

    2015-02-01

    Moral distress has been characterised in the nursing literature as a major problem affecting nurses in all healthcare systems. It has been portrayed as threatening the integrity of nurses and ultimately the quality of patient care. However, nursing discourse on moral distress is not without controversy. The notion itself is conceptually flawed and suffers from both theoretical and practical difficulties. Nursing research investigating moral distress is also problematic on account of being methodologically weak and disparate. Moreover, the ultimate purpose and significance of the research is unclear. In light of these considerations, it is contended that the notion of moral distress ought to be abandoned and that concerted attention be given to advancing inquiries that are more conducive to improving the quality and safety of moral decision-making, moral conduct and moral outcomes in nursing and healthcare domains.

  2. Commentary: Flawed scientific-evidence standards delay diesel regulations.

    PubMed

    Pusateri, Antoinette; Shrader-Frechette, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    Of 188 government-monitored air toxics, diesel particulate matter (DPM) causes seven times more cancer than all the other 187 air toxics combined, including benzene, lead, and mercury. Yet, DPM is the only air toxic not regulated more stringently under the Clean Air Act, as a hazardous air pollutant (HAP). One reason is that regulators use flawed standards of scientific evidence. The article argues (1) that DPM meets all six specified evidentiary criteria, any one of which is sufficient for HAP regulation and (2) that regulators' standards of evidence for denying HAP status to DPM (no DPM unit-risk estimate, inadequate dose-response data, alleged weak mechanistic data) err logically and scientifically, set the evidence bar too high, delay regulation, and allow 21,000 avoidable DPM deaths annually in the U.S.

  3. Flaw Tolerance in Lap Shear Brazed Joints. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flom, Yury; Wang, Li-Qin

    2003-01-01

    Furnace brazing is a joining process used in the aerospace and other industries to produce strong permanent and hermetic structural joints. As in any joining process, brazed joints have various imperfections and defects. At the present time, our understanding of the influence of the internal defects on the strength of the brazed joints is not adequate. The goal of this 3-part investigation is to better understand the properties and failure mechanisms of the brazed joints containing defects. This study focuses on the behavior of the brazed lap shear joints because of their importance in manufacturing aerospace structures. In Part 1, an average shear strength capability and failure modes of the single lap joints are explored. Stainless steel specimens brazed with pure silver are tested in accordance with the AWS C3.2 standard. Comparison of the failure loads and the ultimate shear strength with the Finite Element Analysis (FEA) of the same specimens as a function of the overlap widths shows excellent correlation between the experimental and calculated values for the defect-free lap joints. A damage zone criterion is shown to work quite well in understanding the failure of the braze joints. In Part 2, the findings of the Part 1 will be verified on the larger test specimens. Also, various flaws will be introduced in the test specimens to simulate lack of braze coverage in the lap joints. Mechanical testing and FEA will be performed on these joints to verify that behavior of the flawed ductile lap joints is similar to joints with a reduced braze area. Finally, in Part 3, the results obtained in Parts 1 and 2 will be applied to the actual brazed structure to evaluate the load-carrying capability of a structural lap joint containing discontinuities. In addition, a simplified engineering procedure will be offered for the laboratory testing of the lap shear specimens.

  4. Current Activities Assessing Butt Fusion Joint Integrity in High Density Polyethylene Piping

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Susan L.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Doctor, Steven R.; Denslow, Kayte M.

    2012-09-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington, conducted initial studies to evaluate the effectiveness of nondestructive examinations (NDE) coupled with mechanical testing for assessing butt fusion joint integrity in high density polyethylene (HDPE) pipe. The work provided insightful information to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on the effectiveness of volumetric inspection techniques for detecting lack of fusion (LOF) conditions in the fusion joints. HDPE has been installed on a limited basis in American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Class 3, buried piping systems at several operating U.S. nuclear power plants and has been proposed for use in new construction. A comparison was made between the results from ultrasonic and microwave nondestructive examinations and the results from mechanical destructive evaluations, specifically the high-speed tensile test and the side-bend test, for determining joint integrity. The data comparison revealed that none of the NDE techniques detected all of the lack-of-fusion conditions that were revealed by the destructive tests. Follow-on work has recently been initiated at PNNL to accurately characterize the NDE responses from machined flaws of varying size and location in PE 4710 materials as well as the LOF condition. This effort is directed at quantifying the ability of volumetric NDE techniques to detect flaws in relation to the critical flaw size associated with joint integrity. A status of these latest investigations is presented.

  5. No Failure of Imagination: Examining Foundational Flaws in America’s Homeland Security Enterprise

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    terrorism reduce the term’s usefulness. To one side of the socio-political spectrum terrorism definitions are invalid because, in the words of Noam ... Chomsky (2010), “the concept of “terrorism” must somehow be crafted to include their terrorism against us, while excluding our terrorism against

  6. Electrophoretically active sol-gel processes to backfill, seal, and/or densify porous, flawed, and/or cracked coatings on electrically conductive material

    DOEpatents

    Panitz, Janda K.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Neiser, Richard A.; Moffatt, William C.

    1999-01-01

    Electrophoretically active sol-gel processes to fill, seal, and/or density porous, flawed, and/or cracked coatings on electrically conductive substrates. Such coatings may be dielectrics, ceramics, or semiconductors and, by the present invention, may have deposited onto and into them sol-gel ceramic precursor compounds which are subsequently converted to sol-gel ceramics to yield composite materials with various tailored properties.

  7. Electrophoretically active sol-gel processes to backfill, seal, and/or densify porous, flawed, and/or cracked coatings on electrically conductive material

    DOEpatents

    Panitz, J.K.; Reed, S.T.; Ashley, C.S.; Neiser, R.A.; Moffatt, W.C.

    1999-07-20

    Electrophoretically active sol-gel processes to fill, seal, and/or density porous, flawed, and/or cracked coatings on electrically conductive substrates. Such coatings may be dielectrics, ceramics, or semiconductors and, by the present invention, may have deposited onto and into them sol-gel ceramic precursor compounds which are subsequently converted to sol-gel ceramics to yield composite materials with various tailored properties. 6 figs.

  8. Stress intensity factors for long, deep surface flaws in plates under extensional fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harms, A. E.; Smith, C. W.

    1973-01-01

    Using a singular solution for a part circular crack, a Taylor Series Correction Method (TSCM) was verified for extracting stress intensity factors from photoelastic data. Photoelastic experiments were then conducted on plates with part circular and flat bottomed cracks for flaw depth to thickness ratios of 0.25, 0.50 and 0.75 and for equivalent flaw depth to equivalent ellipse length values ranging from 0.066 to 0.319. Experimental results agreed well with the Smith theory but indicated that the use of the ''equivalent'' semi-elliptical flaw results was not valid for a/2c less than 0.20. Best overall agreement for the moderate (a/t approximately 0.5) to deep flaws (a/t approximatelly 0.75) and a/2c greater than 0.15 was found with a semi-empirical theory, when compared on the basis of equivalent flaw depth and area.

  9. Holographic and ultrasonic detection of bond flaws in aluminum panels reinforced with boron-epoxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platt, R. J., Jr.; Thurston, L. B., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental investigation was made of the application of holographic interferometry to the nondestructive detection of unbonded areas (flaws) in bonded panels. Flaw detection results were compared with results obtained with an ultrasonic flaw detector. Holography, with panel deformation accomplished by a reduction in ambient pressure, is less sensitive for flaws beneath 5 and 10 plies of boron-epoxy than the ultrasonic method, though it does have its operational advantages. A process for the manufacture of bonded panels which incorporate known unbonded areas was also developed. The unbonded areas were formed without the use of foreign materials, which makes the method suitable for the construction of reference standards for bonded panels whenever needed for the proper setup of ultrasonic flaw-detection instruments.

  10. Assessment of strength limiting flaws in ceramic heat exchanger components: Phase 1, Final report, September 28, 1984-June 30, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, T.; Snyder, J.

    1986-10-01

    Assurance of energy efficient design lifetimes of high temperature structural ceramics requires the ability to specify acceptance criteria and to test to those criteria. These criteria will be established through nondestructive testing, to determine which defects are detectable, together with fracture mechanics, to calculate effects of indetectable flaws. The first phase of this program is to examine heat exchanger material with four test methods which have shown promise for use in ceramics; ultrasonic scanning, microfocus x-ray, Scanning Laser Acoustic Microscope, and Acoustic Holography. The capabilities, limits, and potential for improvement of these are presented in this report. Destructive testing, material sectioning, and fractography are included. 24 refs., 68 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. Lifetime Predictions of a Titanium Silicate Glass with Machined Flaws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis S.; Nettles, Alan T.; Cagle, Holly

    2003-01-01

    A dynamic fatigue study was performed on a Titanium Silicate glass to assess its susceptibility to delayed failure and to compare the results with those of a previous study. Fracture mechanics techniques were used to analyze the results for the purpose of making lifetime predictions. The material strength and lifetime was seen to increase due to the removal of residual stress through grinding and polishing. Influence on time-to-failure is addressed for the case with and without residual stress present. Titanium silicate glass otherwise known as ultra-low expansion (ULE)* glass is a candidate for use in applications requiring low thermal expansion characteristics such as telescope mirrors. The Hubble Space Telescope s primary mirror was manufactured from ULE glass. ULE contains 7.5% titanium dioxide which in combination with silica results in a homogenous glass with a linear expansion coefficient near zero. delayed failure . This previous study was based on a 230/270 grit surface. The grinding and polishing process reduces the surface flaw size and subsurface damage, and relieves residual stress by removing the material with successively smaller grinding media. This results in an increase in strength of the optic during the grinding and polishing sequence. Thus, a second study was undertaken using samples with a surface finish typically achieved for mirror elements, to observe the effects of surface finishing on the time-to-failure predictions. An allowable stress can be calculated for this material based upon modulus of rupture data; however, this does not take into account the problem of delayed failure, most likely due to stress corrosion, which can significantly shorten lifetime. Fortunately, a theory based on fracture mechanics has been developed enabling lifetime predictions to be made for brittle materials susceptible to delayed failure. Knowledge of the factors governing the rate of subcritical flaw growth in a given environment enables the development of

  12. Pre-referral rectal artesunate in severe malaria: flawed trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Immediate injectable treatment is essential for severe malaria. Otherwise, the afflicted risk lifelong impairment or death. In rural areas of Africa and Asia, appropriate care is often miles away. In 2009, Melba Gomes and her colleagues published the findings of a randomized, placebo-controlled trial of rectal artesunate for suspected severe malaria in such remote areas. Enrolling nearly 18,000 cases, the aim was to evaluate whether, as patients were in transit to a health facility, a pre-referral artesunate suppository blocked disease progression sufficiently to reduce these risks. The affirmative findings of this, the only trial on the issue thus far, have led the WHO to endorse rectal artesunate as a pre-referral treatment for severe malaria. In the light of its public health importance and because its scientific quality has not been assessed for a systematic review, our paper provides a detailed evaluation of the design, conduct, analysis, reporting, and practical features of this trial. Results We performed a checklist-based and an in-depth evaluation of the trial. The evaluation criteria were based on the CONSORT statement for reporting clinical trials, the clinical trial methodology literature, and practice in malaria research. Our main findings are: The inclusion and exclusion criteria and the sample size justification are not stated. Many clearly ineligible subjects were enrolled. The training of the recruiters does not appear to have been satisfactory. There was excessive between center heterogeneity in design and conduct. Outcome evaluation schedule was not defined, and in practice, became too wide. Large gaps in the collection of key data were evident. Primary endpoints were inconsistently utilized and reported; an overall analysis of the outcomes was not done; analyses of time to event data had major flaws; the stated intent-to-treat analysis excluded a third of the randomized subjects; the design-indicated stratified or multi

  13. Regional percent fat and bone mineral density in Korean adolescents: the Fourth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES IV-3), 2009.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kayoung

    2013-01-01

    The effects of total and regional (trunk, arm, and leg) percent fat on total and regional (arm, leg, rib, thoracic spine, lumbar spine, proximal femur, and pelvis) bone mineral density (BMD) in Korean adolescents were examined using the Fourth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2009. Percent fat and BMD were measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry in a population-based sample of 710 Korean adolescents (365 boys and 345 girls), aged 10-19 years. After adjusting for age, height, weight, serum vitamin D, dietary calcium intake, and menarche for girls in complex sampling linear regression analysis, higher total and regional percent fat were associated with low total BMD and BMD in all regions in boys aged 13-16 years, while the associations were inconsistent for early and late adolescent boys. In girls, the inverse associations were more consistent for those aged 17-19 years than for younger girls. While most of total and regional percent fat were negatively associated with BMD of thoracic and lumbar spine and femur in boys, most of these relationships were not significant in girls. The negative association with total BMD was consistent for trunk percent fat but variable for arm and leg percent fat according to age subgroup and gender. In conclusion, the unfavorable effect of regional percent fat on all regional BMD is more consistent in boys aged 13-16 years and in girls aged 17-19 years, while the relationship appears to be gender and age subgroup-specific.

  14. What went wrong? The flawed concept of cerebrospinal venous insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Valdueza, José M; Doepp, Florian; Schreiber, Stephan J; van Oosten, Bob W; Schmierer, Klaus; Paul, Friedemann; Wattjes, Mike P

    2013-05-01

    In 2006, Zamboni reintroduced the concept that chronic impaired venous outflow of the central nervous system is associated with multiple sclerosis (MS), coining the term of chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency ('CCSVI'). The diagnosis of 'CCSVI' is based on sonographic criteria, which he found exclusively fulfilled in MS. The concept proposes that chronic venous outflow failure is associated with venous reflux and congestion and leads to iron deposition, thereby inducing neuroinflammation and degeneration. The revival of this concept has generated major interest in media and patient groups, mainly driven by the hope that endovascular treatment of 'CCSVI' could alleviate MS. Many investigators tried to replicate Zamboni's results with duplex sonography, magnetic resonance imaging, and catheter angiography. The data obtained here do generally not support the 'CCSVI' concept. Moreover, there are no methodologically adequate studies to prove or disprove beneficial effects of endovascular treatment in MS. This review not only gives a comprehensive overview of the methodological flaws and pathophysiologic implausibility of the 'CCSVI' concept, but also summarizes the multimodality diagnostic validation studies and open-label trials of endovascular treatment. In our view, there is currently no basis to diagnose or treat 'CCSVI' in the care of MS patients, outside of the setting of scientific research.

  15. Medical equipment donations in Haiti: flaws in the donation process.

    PubMed

    Dzwonczyk, Roger; Riha, Chris

    2012-04-01

    The magnitude 7.0 earthquake that struck Haiti on 12 January 2010 devastated the capital city of Port-au-Prince and the surrounding area. The area's hospitals suffered major structural damage and material losses. Project HOPE sought to rebuild the medical equipment and clinical engineering capacity of the country. A team of clinical engineers from the United States of America and Haiti conducted an inventory and assessment of medical equipment at seven public hospitals affected by the earthquake. The team found that only 28% of the equipment was working properly and in use for patient care; another 28% was working, but lay idle for technical reasons; 30% was not working, but repairable; and 14% was beyond repair. The proportion of equipment in each condition category was similar regardless of whether the equipment was present prior to the earthquake or was donated afterwards. This assessment points out the flaws that existed in the medical equipment donation process and reemphasizes the importance of the factors, as delineated by the World Health Organization more than a decade ago, that constitute a complete medical equipment donation.

  16. Light-induced stress relief to improve flaw tolerance in network polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Kevin N.; Dunn, Martin L.; Scott, Timothy F.; Turpin, Lucas P.; Qi, H. Jerry

    2010-03-15

    We demonstrate the ability to use photoactivated stress relaxation to improve flaw tolerance in network polymers. Unlike most self-healing polymers, which effectively close flaws by locally introducing healing agents (such as uncured resins), here light is used to relax elevated stresses around a flaw before it reaches a critical state, which reduces the threat that the flaw poses to the structural integrity of the material. In this study, we fabricate specimens with well-defined flaws and uniaxially stretch them to failure. By irradiating the specimens with UV light (365 nm) before failure, the nominal strain at failure is increased by 70% and the corresponding nominal stress is increased by 30% compared with nonirradiated specimens. To better understand the phenomena that occur at the multiaxial stress state at the flaw, we model the photomechanics using a recently developed finite element approach that accurately describes the light propagation, photochemistry, radical-induced network evolution, and the mechanical behavior of the material. Model predictions agree well with the experimental results and elucidate the role that photoinduced stress relaxation has on improving flaw tolerance.

  17. Usability Flaws in Medication Alerting Systems: Impact on Usage and Work System

    PubMed Central

    Ammenwerth, E.; Roehrer, E.; Pelayo, S.; Vasseur, F.; Beuscart-Zéphir, M.-C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objectives Previous research has shown that medication alerting systems face usability issues. There has been no previous attempt to systematically explore the consequences of usability flaws in such systems on users (i.e. usage problems) and work systems (i.e. negative outcomes). This paper aims at exploring and synthesizing the consequences of usability flaws in terms of usage problems and negative outcomes on the work system. Methods A secondary analysis of 26 papers included in a prior systematic review of the usability flaws in medication alerting was performed. Usage problems and negative outcomes were extracted and sorted. Links between usability flaws, usage problems, and negative outcomes were also analyzed. Results Poor usability generates a large variety of consequences. It impacts the user from a cognitive, behavioral, emotional, and attitudinal perspective. Ultimately, usability flaws have negative consequences on the workflow, the effectiveness of the technology, the medication management process, and, more importantly, patient safety. Only few complete pathways leading from usability flaws to negative outcomes were identified. Conclusion Usability flaws in medication alerting systems impede users, and ultimately their work system, and negatively impact patient safety. Therefore, the usability dimension may act as a hidden explanatory variable that could explain, at least partly, the (absence of) intended outcomes of new technology. PMID:26123906

  18. Light-induced stress relief to improve flaw tolerance in network polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Kevin N.; Dunn, Martin L.; Scott, Timothy F.; Turpin, Lucas P.; Qi, H. Jerry

    2010-03-01

    We demonstrate the ability to use photoactivated stress relaxation to improve flaw tolerance in network polymers. Unlike most self-healing polymers, which effectively close flaws by locally introducing healing agents (such as uncured resins), here light is used to relax elevated stresses around a flaw before it reaches a critical state, which reduces the threat that the flaw poses to the structural integrity of the material. In this study, we fabricate specimens with well-defined flaws and uniaxially stretch them to failure. By irradiating the specimens with UV light (365 nm) before failure, the nominal strain at failure is increased by 70% and the corresponding nominal stress is increased by 30% compared with nonirradiated specimens. To better understand the phenomena that occur at the multiaxial stress state at the flaw, we model the photomechanics using a recently developed finite element approach that accurately describes the light propagation, photochemistry, radical-induced network evolution, and the mechanical behavior of the material. Model predictions agree well with the experimental results and elucidate the role that photoinduced stress relaxation has on improving flaw tolerance.

  19. Numerical Study on Coalescence of Pre-Existing Flaw Pairs in Rock-Like Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huan-Qiang; Wong, Louis Ngai Yuen

    2014-11-01

    The present numerical study, which is an extension of our previous numerical analysis on cracking processes of a single pre-existing flaw, focuses on the coalescence of two pre-existing parallel open flaws in rock subjected to a uniaxial compressive loading. To facilitate a systematic investigation, the arrangements of the flaw pair are classified into 11 categories. Simulations engaging AUTODYN are conducted on each category. The numerical results are compared with some published physical experimental test results. Eleven typical coalescence patterns are obtained, which are in good agreement with the experimental results, which include two coalescence patterns obtained in flaw pair arrangements (II) and (VIII″) not being reported in previous studies. The information gathered in the simulations helps identify the type (tensile/shear) of each crack segment involved in the coalescence. Most of the coalescence cracks initiate at or around the flaw tips, except those in flaw pair arrangements (II) and (IX') with a very short ligament length, in which the coalescence cracks initiate on the flaw surfaces away from the flaw tip regions. Based on the numerical simulation results, the properties of the 11 coalescence patterns are obtained. Except those in flaw pair arrangements (II) and (IX'), the other coalescence patterns can be interpreted with respect to the basic crack types—tensile wing crack, horsetail crack and anti-wing crack. In addition, based on the type of crack segments involved in coalescence, namely tensile and shear, the coalescence can be classified into T mode (tensile mode), S mode (shear mode) and TS mode (mixed tensile-shear mode).

  20. Vitamin A intake, serum vitamin D and bone mineral density: analysis of the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES, 2008-2011).

    PubMed

    Joo, Nam-Seok; Yang, Sung-Won; Song, Byeng Chun; Yeum, Kyung-Jin

    2015-03-10

    The association of high vitamin A intake and low bone mineral density (BMD) is still controversial. To determine the association of dietary vitamin A intake and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentration with BMD, a total of 6481 subjects (2907 men and 3574 women) aged ≥50 years from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2008-2011) were divided into groups according to dietary vitamin A intake (tertiles) and serum 25(OH)D (<50, 50-75, >75 nmol/L), and evaluated for BMD after adjusting for relevant variables. Mean dietary vitamin A intakes were 737 and 600 μg RE (Retinol Equivalents) in men and women, respectively. Total hip and femoral neck BMD in men and lumbar spine BMD in women were both positively correlated with dietary vitamin A intake in subjects with serum 25(OH)D >75 nmol/L. Among men with serum 25(OH)D <50 nmol/L, both the top (mean 1353 μg RE) and bottom (mean 218 μg RE) tertiles of dietary vitamin A intake had lower BMD than the middle group (mean 577 μg RE). In this population, BMD was the highest among men and women with serum 25(OH)D = 50-75 nmol/L and that there were no differences in BMD by vitamin A intake in these vitamin D adequate groups. This cross-sectional study indicates that vitamin A intake does not affect bone mineral density as long as the serum 25(OH)D concentration is maintained in the moderate level of 50-75 nmol/L.

  1. Characterization of constraint effects on flaw growth. [in graphite-epoxy composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeung, P. C.; Stinchcomb, W. W.; Reifsnider, K. L.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental results have been presented for the case of a flawed unidirectional lamina constrained by off-axis unflawed plies under static and fatigue loading. Flaw growth in the interior of the laminate, around the embedded flaw, was followed by nondestructive testing methods including video-thermographs and ultrasonic C-scan schemes. Two aspects of the results were distinctive. There was an effort of lamination on damage development which was independent of the presence of the notch, and effects which were directly related to the influence of the notch on the local situation. The results are compared with sectioning studies, surface replication, and stiffness change measurements.

  2. Racial differences in the relationship between vitamin D, bone mineral density, and parathyroid hormone in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    PubMed Central

    Farwell, W. R.; Kermah, D.; Taylor, E. N.

    2011-01-01

    Summary It is unclear whether optimal levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) in whites are the same as in minorities. In adult participants of NHANES, the relationships between 25(OH)D, bone mineral density (BMD), and parathyroid hormone (PTH) differed in blacks as compared to whites and Mexican-Americans, suggesting that optimal 25(OH)D levels for bone and mineral metabolism may differ by race. Introduction Blacks and Hispanics have lower 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations than whites. However, it is unclear whether 25(OH)D levels considered “optimal” for bone and mineral metabolism in whites are the same as those in minority populations. Methods We examined the relationships between 25(OH)D and parathyroid hormone in 8,415 adult participants (25% black and 24% Mexican-American) in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys 2003–2004 and 2005–2006; and between 25(OH)D and bone mineral density in 4,206 adult participants (24% black and 24% Mexican-American) in the 2003–2004 sample. Results Blacks and Mexican-Americans had significantly lower 25(OH)D and higher PTH concentrations than whites (P<0.01 for both). BMD significantly decreased (P<0.01) as serum 25(OH)D and calcium intake declined among whites and Mexican-Americans, but not among blacks (P=0.2). The impact of vitamin D deficiency (25 (OH)D≤20 ng/ml) on PTH levels was modified by race/ethnicity (P for interaction, 0.001). Whereas inverse relationships between 25(OH)D and PTH were observed above and below a 25(OH)D level of 20 ng/ml in whites and Mexican-Americans, an inverse association between 25(OH)D and PTH was only observed below this threshold in blacks, with the slope of the relationship being essentially flat (P=0.7) above this cut-point, suggesting that PTH may be maximally suppressed at lower 25(OH)D levels in blacks than in whites or Mexican-Americans. Conclusions The relationships between 25(OH)D, BMD, and PTH may differ by race among US adults. Whether race

  3. A comparison of 1D and 1.5D arrays for imaging volumetric flaws in small bore pipework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, T. S.; Wilcox, P. D.; Nixon, A. D.

    2015-03-01

    1.5D arrays can be seen as a potentially ideal compromise between 1D arrays and 2D matrix arrays in terms of focusing capability, element density, weld coverage and data processing time. This paper presents an initial study of 1D and 1.5D arrays for high frequency (15MHz) imaging of volumetric flaws in small-bore (30-60mm outer diameter) thin-walled (3-8mm) pipework. A combination of 3D modelling and experimental work is used to determine Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) improvement with a strong relationship between SNR and the longer dimension of element size observed. Similar behavior is demonstrated experimentally rendering a 1mm diameter Flat Bottom Hole (FBH) in Copper-Nickel alloy undetectable using a larger array element. A 3-5dB SNR increase is predicted when using a 1.5D array assuming a spherical reflector and a 2dB increase was observed on experimental trials with a FBH. It is argued that this improvement is likely to be a lower bound estimate due to the specular behavior of a FBH with future trials planned on welded samples with realistic flaws.

  4. Flaw strength distributions and statistical parameters for ceramic fibers: The normal distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    R'Mili, M.; Godin, N.; Lamon, J.

    2012-05-01

    The present paper investigates large sets of ceramic fibre failure strengths (500 to 1000 data) produced using tensile tests on tows that contained either 500 or 1000 filaments. The probability density function was determined through acoustic emission monitoring which allowed detection and counting of filament fractures. The statistical distribution of filament strengths was described using the normal distribution. The Weibull equation was then fitted to this normal distribution for estimation of statistical parameters. A perfect agreement between both distributions was obtained, and a quite negligible scatter in statistical parameters was observed, as opposed to the wide variability that is reported in the literature. Thus it was concluded that flaw strengths are distributed normally and that the statistical parameters that were derived are the true ones. In a second step, the conventional method of estimation of Weibull parameters was applied to these sets of data and, then, to subsets selected randomly. The influence of other factors involved in the conventional method of determination of statistical parameters is discussed. It is demonstrated that selection of specimens, sample size, and method of construction of so-called Weibull plots are responsible for statistical parameters variability.

  5. An Ecology of Prestige in New York City: Examining the Relationships Among Population Density, Socio-economic Status, Group Identity, and Residential Canopy Cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grove, J. Morgan; Locke, Dexter H.; O'Neil-Dunne, Jarlath P. M.

    2014-09-01

    Several social theories have been proposed to explain the uneven distribution of vegetation in urban residential areas: population density, social stratification, luxury effect, and ecology of prestige. We evaluate these theories using a combination of demographic and socio-economic predictors of vegetative cover on all residential lands in New York City. We use diverse data sources including the City's property database, time-series demographic and socio-economic data from the US Census, and land cover data from the University of Vermont's Spatial Analysis Lab (SAL). These data are analyzed using a multi-model inferential, spatial econometrics approach. We also examine the distribution of vegetation within distinct market categories using Claritas' Potential Rating Index for Zipcode Markets (PRIZM™) database. These categories can be disaggregated, corresponding to the four social theories. We compare the econometric and categorical results for validation. Models associated with ecology of prestige theory are more effective for predicting the distribution of vegetation. This suggests that private, residential patterns of vegetation, reflecting the consumption of environmentally relevant goods and services, are associated with different lifestyles and lifestages. Further, our spatial and temporal analyses suggest that there are significant spatial and temporal dependencies that have theoretical and methodological implications for understanding urban ecological systems. These findings may have policy implications. Decision makers may need to consider how to most effectively reach different social groups in terms of messages and messengers in order to advance land management practices and achieve urban sustainability.

  6. An ecology of prestige in New York City: examining the relationships among population density, socio-economic status, group identity, and residential canopy cover.

    PubMed

    Grove, J Morgan; Locke, Dexter H; O'Neil-Dunne, Jarlath P M

    2014-09-01

    Several social theories have been proposed to explain the uneven distribution of vegetation in urban residential areas: population density, social stratification, luxury effect, and ecology of prestige. We evaluate these theories using a combination of demographic and socio-economic predictors of vegetative cover on all residential lands in New York City. We use diverse data sources including the City's property database, time-series demographic and socio-economic data from the US Census, and land cover data from the University of Vermont's Spatial Analysis Lab (SAL). These data are analyzed using a multi-model inferential, spatial econometrics approach. We also examine the distribution of vegetation within distinct market categories using Claritas' Potential Rating Index for Zipcode Markets (PRIZM™) database. These categories can be disaggregated, corresponding to the four social theories. We compare the econometric and categorical results for validation. Models associated with ecology of prestige theory are more effective for predicting the distribution of vegetation. This suggests that private, residential patterns of vegetation, reflecting the consumption of environmentally relevant goods and services, are associated with different lifestyles and lifestages. Further, our spatial and temporal analyses suggest that there are significant spatial and temporal dependencies that have theoretical and methodological implications for understanding urban ecological systems. These findings may have policy implications. Decision makers may need to consider how to most effectively reach different social groups in terms of messages and messengers in order to advance land management practices and achieve urban sustainability.

  7. Optimal range of triglyceride values to estimate serum low density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration in Korean adults: the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2009.

    PubMed

    Hwang, You-Cheol; Ahn, Hong-Yup; Jeong, In-Kyung; Ahn, Kyu Jeung; Chung, Ho Yeon

    2012-12-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the validity of Friedewald's formula and to propose a range of triglyceride values over which the formula can be used without significant error. This was a cross-sectional analysis of 1,929 subjects (946 males and 983 females) aged 20 yr and older using data of the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey in 2009. Estimated total number was considered to be 10,633,655 (5,846,384 males and 4,787,271 females). Calculated and directly-measured low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) values were highly correlated (r = 0.96); however, significant differences were observed between the directly-measured and calculated LDL-C concentrations. Subjects in the underestimated group (10.5%) had higher dysmetabolic profiles than those in the overestimated group (11.4%). Although serum triglyceride level showed the greatest independent association with differences between the calculated and directly-measured LDL-C concentrations, no statistically significant differences were noted when triglyceride concentration was between 36 and 298 mg/dL (93.2%). In conclusion, Friedewald's formula accurately estimates directly-measured serum LDL-C concentration in Korean adults. However, the formula can be applied to subjects with serum triglyceride concentrations from 36 to 298 mg/dL without significant error.

  8. On the initial flaw sizes of uPVC pipe materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H.S. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1993-12-20

    It is well known that flaws in unplasticized poly(vinyl chloride) (uPVC) pipes are generated during processing. The flaws include inclusions, gas bubbles, and results from poor fusion between PVC grains and extrusion additives. uPVC pipes are often used for water reticulation, subjected to an alternating pressure superimposed on a mean pressure. uPVC pipe samples have been found to fail in fatigue from a small semicircular flaw on the inside bore of the pipe. In designing uPVC pipes against fatigue failure due to pressure variation, it is essential to determine the initial flaw size. Truss attempted to estimate the lifespan of uPVC pipes and showed that predictions and experimental data are in good agreement.

  9. Fracture characteristics of structural aerospace alloys containing deep surface flaws. [aluminum-titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, J. N.; Bixler, W. D.; Finger, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    Conditions controlling the growth and fracture of deep surface flaws in aerospace alloys were investigated. Static fracture tests were performed on 7075-T651 and 2219-T87 aluminum, and 6Ai-4V STA titanium . Cyclic flaw growth tests were performed on the two latter alloys, and sustain load tests were performed on the titanium alloy. Both the cyclic and the sustain load tests were performed with and without a prior proof overload cycle to investigate possible growth retardation effects. Variables included in all test series were thickness, flaw depth-to-thickness ratio, and flaw shape. Results were analyzed and compared with previously developed data to determine the limits of applicability of available modified linear elastic fracture solutions.

  10. The probability of flaw detection and the probability of false calls in nondestructive evaluation equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temple, Enoch C.

    1994-01-01

    The space industry has developed many composite materials that have high durability in proportion to their weights. Many of these materials have a likelihood for flaws that is higher than in traditional metals. There are also coverings (such as paint) that develop flaws that may adversely affect the performance of the system in which they are used. Therefore there is a need to monitor the soundness of composite structures. To meet this monitoring need, many nondestructive evaluation (NDE) systems have been developed. An NDE system is designed to detect material flaws and make flaw measurements without destroying the inspected item. Also, the detection operation is expected to be performed in a rapid manner in a field or production environment. Some of the most recent video-based NDE methodologies are shearography, holography, thermography, and video image correlation.

  11. Simulation of the Thermographic Response of Near Surface Flaws in Reinforced Carbon-Carbon Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winfree, William P.; Howell, Patricia A.; Burke, Eric R.

    2009-01-01

    Thermographic inspection is a viable technique for detecting in-service damage in reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) composites that are used for thermal protection in the leading edge of the shuttle orbiter. A thermographic technique for detection of near surface flaws in RCC composite structures is presented. A finite element model of the heat diffusion in structures with expected flaw configurations is in good agreement with the experimental measurements.

  12. Investigation on Mechanical Behaviors of Sandstone with Two Preexisting Flaws under Triaxial Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Da; Gu, Dongming; Yang, Chao; Huang, Runqiu; Fu, Guoyang

    2016-02-01

    Triaxial compression experiments on sandstone samples with two preexisting closed non-overlapping flaws were performed to investigate the deformation and strength behaviors. Three types of preexisting closed flaw pair in sandstone samples, i.e., parallel low-dip (type B), parallel high-dip (type C), and composite high- and low-dip (type D), were considered as the typical arrangements of the non-overlapping crack pair. A general rule has been found that the arrangement of the flaw pair has greater impact on the rock deformation, strength, and crack coalescence pattern than the confining pressure (5-20 MPa). Experimental results showed that, compared with intact sandstone samples, the postpeak stress-strain curves of flawed samples distinctly demonstrate stress fluctuation. In particular, the unique prepeak stress-strain curves of the specimens with a low-dip flaw pair (type B) present oblique Z-shape with a double-peak stress. The stress for crack initiation σ ci, the critical stress of dilation σ cd, and the peak strength σ c of precracked sandstone samples are significantly lower than those of intact rock. The present numerical study, which is an extension of the test analysis, focuses on identifying the crack nature (tensile or shear) and coalescence process. These simulated crack coalescence patterns are in good agreement with the laboratory test results. The cracks of the precracked samples that contained flaws with small inclination angle (associated with either type B or type D) generally initiate at the inner flaw tips and eventually lead to simple direct shear coalescence. However, complex indirect shear coalescence appears in the model containing a steep preexisting flaw pair (associated with type B specimen), even though no coalescence occurs when σ 3 = 5 MPa.

  13. SIMULATIONS OF THE THERMOGRAPHIC RESPONSE OF NEAR SURFACE FLAWS IN REINFORCED CARBON-CARBON PANELS

    SciTech Connect

    Winfree, William P.; Howell, Patricia A.; Burke, Eric R.

    2010-02-22

    Thermographic inspection is a viable technique for detecting in-service damage in reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) composites that are used for thermal protection in the leading edge of the shuttle orbiter. A thermographic technique for detection of near surface flaws in RCC composite structures is presented. A finite element model of the heat diffusion in structures with expected flaw configurations is in good agreement with the experimental measurements.

  14. Reconstruction of Flaw Profiles Using Neural Networks and Multi-Frequency Eddy Current System

    SciTech Connect

    Chady, T.; Caryk, M.

    2005-04-09

    The objective of this paper is to identify profiles of flaws in conducting plates. To solve this problem, application of a multi-frequency eddy current system (MFES) and artificial neural networks is proposed. Dynamic feed-forward neural networks with various architectures are investigated. Extended experiments with all neural models are carried out in order to select the most promising configuration. Data utilized for the experiments were obtained from the measurements performed on the Inconel plates with EDM flaws.

  15. Development of an optical fiber interferometer for detection of surface flaws in aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, John A.

    1991-01-01

    The main objective was to demonstrate the potential of using an optical fiber interferometer (OFI) to detect surface flaws in aluminum samples. Standard ultrasonic excitation was used to generate Rayleigh surface waves. After the waves interacted with a defect, the modified responses were detected using the OFI and the results were analyzed for time-of-flight and frequency content to predict the size and location of the flaws.

  16. Equivalent flaw time-of-flight diffraction sizing with ultrasonic phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Brady J.; Schmerr, Lester W., Jr.; Sedov, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasonic phased array transducers can be used to extend traditional time-of-flight diffraction (TOFD) crack sizing, resulting in more quantitative information about the crack being obtained. Traditional TOFD yields a single length parameter, while the equivalent flaw time-of-flight diffraction crack sizing method (EFTOFD) described here uses data from multiple look-angles to fit an equivalent degenerate ellipsoid to the crack. The size and orientation of the equivalent flaw can be used to estimate the actual crack size.

  17. Demodex Mite Density Determinations by Standardized Skin Surface Biopsy and Direct Microscopic Examination and Their Relations with Clinical Types and Distribution Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Chul Hyun; Yun, Jeong Hwan; Baek, Jin Ok; Roh, Joo Young

    2017-01-01

    Background Demodicosis is a parasitic skin disease caused by Demodex mites, and the determination of mite density per square centimeter is important to diagnose demodicosis. Standardized skin surface biopsy (SSSB) and direct microscopic examination (DME) are commonly used to determine Demodex mites density (Dd). However, no study has previously compared these two methods with respect to clinical types and distribution patterns of demodicosis. Objective The aim of this study was to compare the value of SSSB and DME findings in reference to the clinical types and distribution patterns of demodicosis. Methods The medical records of 35 patients diagnosed with demodicosis between December 2011 and June 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Demodicosis was classified according to four clinical types (pityriasis folliculorum, rosacea type, acne type, and perioral type) and three distribution patterns (diffuse pattern, U-zone pattern, and T-zone pattern). Two samples, one for SSSB and one for DME, were obtained from a lesion of each patient. Results In all patients, mean Dd and the proportion with a high Dd (>5D/cm2) by DME (14.5±3.3, 80.0%, respectively) were higher than by SSSB (5.5±1.3, 37.1%, respectively; p<0.01, p=0.02, respectively). In terms of clinical types, for rosacea type, mean Dd and proportion with a high Dd by DME (12.4±3.5, 84.6%, respectively) were significantly greater than those determined by SSSB (3.6±1.2, 23.1%; p=0.04, p=0.04, respectively). In terms of distribution pattern, for the diffuse pattern, mean Dd and the proportion with a high Dd by DME (17.5±3.7, 100%, respectively) were significantly higher than those determined by SSSB (6.0±2.7, 26.7%; p<0.01, p<0.01, respectively). Conclusion The results of our study revealed that DME is a more sensitive method for detecting Demodex than SSSB, especially in patients with diffuse pattern and suspected rosacea type. Further research is needed to confirm this finding. PMID:28392639

  18. Identify Structural Flaw Location and Type with an Inverse Algorithm of Resonance Inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Wei; Lai, Canhai; Sun, Xin

    2015-10-20

    To evaluate the fitness-for-service of a structural component and to quantify its remaining useful life, aging and service-induced structural flaws must be quantitatively determined in service or during scheduled maintenance shutdowns. Resonance inspection (RI), a non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique, distinguishes the anomalous parts from the good parts based on changes in the natural frequency spectra. Known for its numerous advantages, i.e., low inspection cost, high testing speed, and broad applicability to complex structures, RI has been widely used in the automobile industry for quality inspection. However, compared to other contemporary direct visualization-based NDE methods, a more widespread application of RI faces a fundamental challenge because such technology is unable to quantify the flaw details, e.g. location, dimensions, and types. In this study, the applicability of a maximum correlation-based inverse RI algorithm developed by the authors is further studied for various flaw cases. It is demonstrated that a variety of common structural flaws, i.e. stiffness degradation, voids, and cracks, can be accurately retrieved by this algorithm even when multiple different types of flaws coexist. The quantitative relations between the damage identification results and the flaw characteristics are also developed to assist the evaluation of the actual state of health of the engineering structures.

  19. Research on testing field flaws of image intensifier based on spatio-temporal SNR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Bin; Liu, Bingqi; Wu, Dongsheng

    2010-10-01

    Image intensifier is the kernel of low-light-level device. The field flaw is one of the important index parameters of the image intensifier. Traditionally the statistic number of the image intensifier's field flaws is calculated through the people's eyes by the aid of an optical microscope, which main limitation is subjective and inefficient. With the broad application of the high-powered CCD and digital imaging processing method in testing performance of image intensifier, the method of appraising SNR based on spatio-temporal noise theory can accurately reflect the spatio-temporal heterogeneous of fluorescence's output image and fulfill the requirements of digital and automatic test. The limitation of the flaws' shape and position can be disregard and the accurate flaws' inspection can be realized rapidly by this method. In this paper, the main factors of forming the field flaws are analyzed and the mathematic model of spatio-temporal SNR is deduced. The hardware devices of the test system for image intensifier's spatio-temporal SNR are discussed. The spatio-temporal SNR of Gen image intensifier is tested by this test system and the test software based on Visual C++ and Matlab. The digital and automatic test of a factitious field flaw is realized by the theory of spatio-temporal SNR. The test precision can achieve pixel level. The experimental results show that this new method is rational, reliable and visualized.

  20. Formation and ridging of flaw leads in the eastern Canadian Beaufort Sea. Special Session C06 on: “Physical, biological and biogeochemical processes associated with young thin ice types”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prinsenberg, S. J.

    2009-12-01

    Formation and ridging of flaw leads in the eastern Canadian Beaufort Sea. Simon Prinsenberg1 and Yves Graton2 1Bedford Inst. of Oceanography, Fisheries and Oceans Canada P.O. Box1006, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, B2Y 4A2, Canada prinsenbergs@mar.dfo-mpo.gc.ca 2Inst. National de la Recherche Scientifique-Eau, INRS-ETE University of Quebec at Quebec City, Quebec yvesgratton@eteinrs.ca During the winter of 2008, the flaw lead south of Banks Island repeatedly opened and closed representing an elongated region where periodically the large ice growth stimulates the densification of the surface layer due to salt rejection and instigates a local circulation pattern that will affect the biological processes of the region. Helicopter-borne sensors were available to monitor the aftermath of one of the rapid closing of the flaw lead into extensive elongated rubble field using a Canadian Ice breaker, CCGS Amundsen, as a logistic base. After the wind reversed a new open flaw lead 20km wide restarting a new flaw lead formation cycle. Ice thickness and surface roughness data were collected from the rubble field and adjacent open flaw lead with an Electromagnetic-Laser system. The strong wind event of April 4-5 2009 generated a large linear 1.5km wide ice rubble field up to 8-10m thick when the 60cm thick, 18km wide flaw lead was crunched into land-fast by the 1.5m thick offshore pack ice. It is expected that during rapid ice growth in a flaw lead, salt rejection increase the density of the surface water layer producing a surface depression (Low) and cyclonic circulation. In contrast at depth, the extra surface dense water produces a high in the horizontal pressure field and anti-cyclonic circulation which remains after the rapid ice growth within the flaw lead stops. One of such remnants may have been observed during the CFL-IPY winter survey.

  1. Z-score discordance and contributing factors in healthy premenopausal women with low bone mineral density: the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2008-9.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyeong Hye; Lim, Jung Soo; Kim, Kyoung Min; Rhee, Yumie; Lim, Sung-Kil

    2016-11-01

    The premenopausal period is important for bone health and prevention of future fractures, but measuring bone mineral density (BMD) at only one site may not be sufficient to determine therapeutic strategies for low BMD in premenopausal women due to the presence of Z-score discordance. In this study, we investigated Z-score discordance in addition to contributing factors of idiopathic low BMD in healthy premenopausal Korean women. We studied 3003 premenopausal women aged 18-50 years, without secondary causes for low BMD and history of fragility fracture, who had participated in the Fourth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (2008-2009). Low body mass index (BMI), low vitamin D level, and low body muscle mass were associated with low BMD even in premenopausal women. Risk factors differed depending on the anatomic site. Low BMI and low vitamin D level were risk factors for low femoral neck BMD (FN-BMD), but not for low lumbar spine BMD (LS-BMD). Only total muscle mass had a slight effect on low LS-BMD. Z-score discordance was much higher than expected, in 75 and 73.8 % of the low LS-BMD and low FN-BMD groups, respectively. Our findings suggest the need to consider BMD discordance in premenopausal women and also to provide information on correctable factors affecting low BMD in younger populations. Long-term follow-up is needed to evaluate the possible effect of Z-score discordance on the prognosis of osteoporosis and subsequent fracture risk.

  2. Relationship between breast-feeding and bone mineral density among Korean women in the 2010 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Ui Hyang; Choi, Chang Jin; Choi, Whan Seok; Kim, Kyung Soo

    2016-01-01

    Breast-feeding has the deleterious effect of hypoestrogenemia coupled with loss of calcium in the maternal bone mass. It is not clear whether changes in bone metabolism in lactating women lead to changes in maternal bone mineral density (BMD) over a longer period. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between the duration of breast-feeding and BMD in healthy South Korean women. We analyzed data from the 2010 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, a cross-sectional survey of Korean citizens. A total of 1342 women older than 19 years were selected for analysis. In postmenopausal women, the duration of breast-feeding per child was associated with low lumbar spine BMD after adjustment for age, body mass index, smoking, alcohol intake, physical activity, serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level, and daily intake of calcium and calories (P < 0.05, P trend < 0.005). Prolonged breast-feeding for more than 1 year per child was associated with a deleterious effect on lumbar spine BMD compared with never breast-feeding or a shorter duration of breast-feeding (P < 0.05). These effects were not shown in premenopausal women or in femur BMD. In conclusion, the duration of breast-feeding per child is negatively correlated with lumbar spine BMD in postmenopausal women, but not in premenopausal women. Although the cause of the different results between postmenopausal and premenopausal women is not clear, our findings suggest that proper protective strategies should be recommended during prolonged breast-feeding to maintain bone health later in life.

  3. Relationship between Blood Mercury Concentration and Bone Mineral Density in Korean Men in the 2008–2010 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yang Hee; Seo, Min Seok; Yim, Hyung Ji; Cho, Mi Ra

    2016-01-01

    Background The results of previous studies on the association between blood mercury (Hg) and bone mineral density (BMD) are inconsistent. We therefore used a large-scale nationwide representative sample of Korean men to investigate the relationship between these two parameters. Methods A nationwide cross-sectional study was conducted using data from the 2008 to 2010 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey to evaluate the relationship between blood Hg and BMD and the prevalence of osteopenia or osteoporosis in 1,190 men over 50 years of age. BMD was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Osteopenia and osteoporosis were diagnosed for each body site according to World Health Organization T-score criteria. Results After adjusting for age, body mass index, caloric energy and calcium intake, vitamin D levels, fish consumption, alcohol consumption, smoking, and exercise, quartiles of blood Hg were positively associated with femur neck T-scores in multiple linear regression analysis (β=0.06, P-value=0.03). Compared with the lowest blood Hg quartile, the odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for diagnosis of osteopenia or osteoporosis in the second and fourth quartiles were 0.63 (0.41–0.99) and 0.57 (0.36–0.91), respectively, in the femur neck after adjusting for the same co-variables. Conclusion High blood Hg levels were associated with reduced odds of decreased femur neck BMD in Korean men. However, subgroup analysis did not show a significant protective effect of blood Hg on osteoporotic fractures. Further research is necessary to clarify the association between blood Hg and BMD. PMID:27688860

  4. A two-scale algorithm for detection of multiple flaws in structures modeled with XFEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hao; Waisman, Haim; Betti, Raimondo

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a novel algorithm for detection of multiple flaws in structures as an inverse process, where the forward problem is based on eXtended Finite Element Method (XFEM). The proposed algorithm can be applied to quantify any flaw with arbitrary shape and size (e.g., cracks, voids, or their combination) whose number is unknown beforehand, and is shown to be significantly more efficient than other methods proposed in the literature. The basic concept is to employ a two-scale optimization framework, where first a coarse flaw region is detected and then fine scale convergence is used to zoom in on the flaw. Both optimization steps rely on a forward problem in which an XFEM model with both circular and elliptical enrichments is used. The advantage of XFEM is in the alleviation of costly remeshing techniques when candidate flaws keep updating with the optimization process. The proposed hierarchical optimizers include both heuristic and gradient-based algorithms, such as the discrete artificial bee colony (DABC) algorithms and the Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (BFGS) method. In details, the first step employs a DABC optimization as a coarse-scale search where the optimizer is limited to specific solutions that correspond to locations and shapes of flaws, thus converting a continuous optimization problem into a discrete optimization with a small number of choices. The results of the first step provide local subdomains and rough identified flaw parameters, which can be considered as search space reduction and initial guess for a fine tuning optimization step. This solution zooming is carried out by the BFGS method and leads to a fast converging method as illustrated on two benchmark detection examples.

  5. Reference Values for The Triglyceride to High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Ratio and Non-High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol in Korean Children and Adolescents: The Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys 2007–2013

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Young Suk; Baek, Joon Woo; Kang, Min Jae; Oh, Yeon Jeong; Yang, Seung

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Cholesterol levels vary throughout childhood and adolescence. The aim of the present study was to evaluate and identify age- and gender-specific reference values for serum lipid concentrations including non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C) and the triglyceride to HDL-C ratio (TG/HDL-C ratio) in apparently healthy Korean children and adolescents. Methods: A total of 6197 participants aged 10 to 19 years old from the 2007–2013 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were analyzed. Serum lipid concentrations were evaluated according to age and gender. Results: The overall mean concentration of non-HDL-C was 105.5 ± 25.6 mg/dL, with a significant gender difference: 103.3 ± 26.1 mg/dL in boys and 107.9 ± 24.7 mg/dL in girls (p = 0.028). The median values of non-HDL-C concentrations in boys and girls, respectively, were 111 and 112 mg/dL in the 10-year-old age group, 95 and 103 mg/dL in the 15-year-old age group, and 109 and 103 mg/dL in the 19-year-old age group. The overall mean TG/HDL-C ratio was 1.74 ± 1.22, and there were no significant gender differences: 1.77 ± 1.25 in boys and 1.72 ± 1.22 in girls (p = 0.183). The median values of the TG/HDL-C ratio in boys and girls were 1.16 and 1.00 in the 10-year-olds, 1.54 and 0.95 in the 15-year-olds, and 1.74 and 0.84 in the 19-year-olds, respectively. Conclusions: Age- and gender-specific reference values for non-HDL-C and for the TG/HDL-C ratio in children and adolescents could provide valuable information for individualized interpretations of lipid profiles and interventions as well as for strategies to prevent and manage childhood and adolescent dyslipidemia. PMID:27373984

  6. Experimental study on cracking behaviour of moulded gypsum containing two non-parallel overlapping flaws under uniaxial compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afolagboye, Lekan Olatayo; He, Jianming; Wang, Sijing

    2016-12-01

    Failure of rock mass that is subjected to compressive loads occurs from initiation, propagation, and linkage of new cracks from preexisting fissures. Our research investigates the cracking behaviour and coalescence process in a brittle material with two non-parallel overlapping flaws using a high-speed camera. The coalescence tensile crack and tensile wing cracks were the first cracks to occur from the preexisting flaws. The initiation stresses of the primary cracks at the two tips of each flaw were simultaneous and decreased with reduced flaw inclination angle. The following types of coalescence cracks were identified between the flaws: primary tensile coalescence crack, tensile crack linkage, shear crack linkage, mixed tensile-shear crack, and indirect crack coalescence. Coalescence through tensile linkage occurred mostly at pre-peak stress. In contrast, coalescence through shear or mixed tensile-shear cracks occurred at higher stress. Overall, this study indicates that the geometry of preexisting flaws affect crack initiation and coalescence behaviour.

  7. Signal denoising and ultrasonic flaw detection via overcomplete and sparse representations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guang-Ming; Harvey, David M; Braden, Derek R

    2008-11-01

    Sparse signal representations from overcomplete dictionaries are the most recent technique in the signal processing community. Applications of this technique extend into many fields. In this paper, this technique is utilized to cope with ultrasonic flaw detection and noise suppression problem. In particular, a noisy ultrasonic signal is decomposed into sparse representations using a sparse Bayesian learning algorithm and an overcomplete dictionary customized from a Gabor dictionary by incorporating some a priori information of the transducer used. Nonlinear postprocessing including thresholding and pruning is then applied to the decomposed coefficients to reduce the noise contribution and extract the flaw information. Because of the high compact essence of sparse representations, flaw echoes are packed into a few significant coefficients, and noise energy is likely scattered all over the dictionary atoms, generating insignificant coefficients. This property greatly increases the efficiency of the pruning and thresholding operations and is extremely useful for detecting flaw echoes embedded in background noise. The performance of the proposed approach is verified experimentally and compared with the wavelet transform signal processor. Experimental results to detect ultrasonic flaw echoes contaminated by white Gaussian additive noise or correlated noise are presented in the paper.

  8. Simulating the X-Ray Image Contrast to Set-Up Techniques with Desired Flaw Detectability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshti, Ajay M.

    2015-01-01

    The paper provides simulation data of previous work by the author in developing a model for estimating detectability of crack-like flaws in radiography. The methodology is being developed to help in implementation of NASA Special x-ray radiography qualification, but is generically applicable to radiography. The paper describes a method for characterizing X-ray detector resolution for crack detection. Applicability of ASTM E 2737 resolution requirements to the model are also discussed. The paper describes a model for simulating the detector resolution. A computer calculator application, discussed here, also performs predicted contrast and signal-to-noise ratio calculations. Results of various simulation runs in calculating x-ray flaw size parameter and image contrast for varying input parameters such as crack depth, crack width, part thickness, x-ray angle, part-to-detector distance, part-to-source distance, source sizes, and detector sensitivity and resolution are given as 3D surfaces. These results demonstrate effect of the input parameters on the flaw size parameter and the simulated image contrast of the crack. These simulations demonstrate utility of the flaw size parameter model in setting up x-ray techniques that provide desired flaw detectability in radiography. The method is applicable to film radiography, computed radiography, and digital radiography.

  9. Development of flaw acceptance criteria for aging management of spent nuclear fuel multi-purpose canisters

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Poh -Sang; Sindelar, Robert L.

    2015-03-09

    A typical multipurpose canister (MPC) is made of austenitic stainless steel and is loaded with spent nuclear fuel assemblies. The canister may be subject to service-induced degradation when it is exposed to aggressive atmospheric environments during a possibly long-term storage period if the permanent repository is yet to be identified and readied. Because heat treatment for stress relief is not required for the construction of an MPC, stress corrosion cracking may be initiated on the canister surface in the welds or in the heat affected zone. An acceptance criteria methodology is being developed for flaw disposition should the crack-like defects be detected by periodic in-service Inspection. The first-order instability flaw sizes has been determined with bounding flaw configurations, that is, through-wall axial or circumferential cracks, and part-through-wall long axial flaw or 360° circumferential crack. The procedure recommended by the American Petroleum Institute (API) 579 Fitness-for-Service code (Second Edition) is used to estimate the instability crack length or depth by implementing the failure assessment diagram (FAD) methodology. The welding residual stresses are mostly unknown and are therefore estimated with the API 579 procedure. It is demonstrated in this paper that the residual stress has significant impact on the instability length or depth of the crack. The findings will limit the applicability of the flaw tolerance obtained from limit load approach where residual stress is ignored and only ligament yielding is considered.

  10. Development of flaw acceptance criteria for aging management of spent nuclear fuel multiple-purpose canisters

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, P.; Sindelar, R.

    2015-03-09

    A typical multipurpose canister (MPC) is made of austenitic stainless steel and is loaded with spent nuclear fuel assemblies. The canister may be subject to service-induced degradation when it is exposed to aggressive atmospheric environments during a possibly long-term storage period if the permanent repository is yet to be identified and readied. Because heat treatment for stress relief is not required for the construction of an MPC, stress corrosion cracking may be initiated on the canister surface in the welds or in the heat affected zone. An acceptance criteria methodology is being developed for flaw disposition should the crack-like defects be detected by periodic In-service Inspection. The first-order instability flaw sizes has been determined with bounding flaw configurations, that is, through-wall axial or circumferential cracks, and part-through-wall long axial flaw or 360° circumferential crack. The procedure recommended by the American Petroleum Institute (API) 579 Fitness-for-Service code (Second Edition) is used to estimate the instability crack length or depth by implementing the failure assessment diagram (FAD) methodology. The welding residual stresses are mostly unknown and are therefore estimated with the API 579 procedure. It is demonstrated in this paper that the residual stress has significant impact on the instability length or depth of the crack. The findings will limit the applicability of the flaw tolerance obtained from limit load approach where residual stress is ignored and only ligament yielding is considered.

  11. Application of elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics methods to surface flaws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccabe, Donald E.; Ernst, Hugo A.; Newman, James C., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Fuel tanks that are a part of the External Tank assembly for the Space Shuttle are made of relatively thin 2219-T87 aluminum plate. These tanks contain about 917 m of fusion weld seam, all of which is nondestructively inspected for flaws and all those found are repaired. The tanks are subsequently proof-tested to a pressure that is sufficiently severe to cause weld metal yielding in a few local regions of the weld seam. The work undertaken in the present project was to develop a capability to predict flaw growth from undetected surface flaws that are assumed to be located in the highly stressed regions. The technical challenge was to develop R-curve prediction capability for surface cracks in specimens that contain the flaws of unusual sizes and shapes deemed to be of interest. The test techniques developed and the elastic-plastic analysis concepts adopted are presented. The flaws of interest were quite small surface cracks that were narrow-deep ellipses that served to exacerbate the technical difficulties involved.

  12. Application of elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics methods to surface flaws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCabe, Donald E.; Ernst, Hugo A.; Newman, James C., Jr.

    Fuel tanks that are a part of the External Tank assembly for the Space Shuttle are made of relatively thin 2219-T87 aluminum plate. These tanks contain about 917 m of fusion weld seam, all of which is nondestructively inspected for flaws and all those found are repaired. The tanks are subsequently proof-tested to a pressure that is sufficiently severe to cause weld metal yielding in a few local regions of the weld seam. The work undertaken in the present project was to develop a capability to predict flaw growth from undetected surface flaws that are assumed to be located in the highly stressed regions. The technical challenge was to develop R-curve prediction capability for surface cracks in specimens that contain the flaws of unusual sizes and shapes deemed to be of interest. The test techniques developed and the elastic-plastic analysis concepts adopted are presented. The flaws of interest were quite small surface cracks that were narrow-deep ellipses that served to exacerbate the technical difficulties involved.

  13. Ultrasonic Phased Array Evaluations Of Implanted And In-Situ Grown Flaws In Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Pressurizer Surge Line Piping

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Susan L.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Moran, Traci L.; Prowant, Matthew S.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2011-07-31

    A set of circumferentially oriented thermal fatigue cracks (TFCs) were implanted into three cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) pressurizer (PZR) surge-line specimen welds (pipe-to-elbow configuration) that were salvaged from a U.S. commercial nuclear power plant that had not been operated. Thus, these welds were fabricated using vintage CASS materials that were formed in the 1970s. Additionally, in-situ grown TFCs were placed in the adjacent CASS base material of one of these specimens. Ultrasonic phased-array responses from both types of flaws (implanted and in-situ grown) were analyzed for detection and characterization based on sizing and signal-to-noise determination. Multiple probes were employed covering the 0.8 to 2.0 MHz frequency range. To further validate the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) findings, an independent in-service inspection (ISI) supplier evaluated the flaws with their American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code, Section XI, Appendix VIII-qualified procedure. The results obtained by PNNL personnel compared favorably to the ISI supplier results. All examined flaws were detected and sized within the ASME Code-allowable limits.

  14. Determination of Flaw Size and Depth From Temporal Evolution of Thermal Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winfree, William P.; Zalameda, Joseph N.; Cramer, Elliott; Howell, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    Simple methods for reducing the pulsed thermographic responses of flaws have tended to be based on either the spatial or temporal response. This independent assessment limits the accuracy of characterization. A variational approach is presented for reducing the thermographic data to produce an estimated size for a flaw that incorporates both the temporal and spatial response to improve the characterization. The size and depth are determined from both the temporal and spatial thermal response of the exterior surface above a flaw and constraints on the length of the contour surrounding the delamination. Examples of the application of the technique to simulation and experimental data acquired are presented to investigate the limitations of the technique.

  15. Pipe Axial Flaw Failure Criteria (PAFFC): Version 1.0 user`s manual and software

    SciTech Connect

    Leis, B.N.; Ghadiali, N.D.

    1994-05-04

    This topical report is the technical manual and basis for delivery of the software tided Pipe Axial Flaw Failure Criterion. This criterion was developed under SI Task 1. 13 for the Line Pipe Research Supervisory Committee of the Pipeline Research Committee. This software has been given the acronym PAFFC, which follows from the underlined letters in the title for this code. The purpose of PAFFC is to determine the failure conditions associated with a single external axial flaw in a gas transmission pipeline. Failure is determined concurrently in terms of two independent failure processes - fracture and/or net-section (plastic) collapse of the ligament between the flaw and the inside surface of the pipe.

  16. Investigation and characterization of constraint effects on flaw growth during fatigue loading of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stinchcomb, W. W.; Reifsnider, K. L.; Yeung, P.; Gibbins, M. N.

    1979-01-01

    An investigative program is presented in an attempt to add to the current understanding of constraint effects on the response of composite materials under cyclic loading. The objectives were: (1) to use existing data and to develop additional data in order to establish an understanding and quantitative description of flaw growth in unidirectional lamina under cyclic loading at different load direction to fiber direction angles; (2) to establish a similar understanding and description of flaw growth in lamina which are embedded in laminates between other unflawed lamina; (3) to determine the nature of the influence of constraint on flaw growth by quantitatively comparing the results of the tests; and (4) to develop a model and philosophy of constraints effects based on our investigative results.

  17. Characterization of flaws in a tube bundle mock-up for reliability studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kupperman, D.S.; Bakhtiari, S.

    1997-02-01

    As part of an assessment of in-service inspection of steam generator tubes, the authors will assemble a steam generator mock-up for round robin studies and use as a test bed in evaluating emerging technologies. Progress is reported on the characterization of flaws that will be part of the mock-up. Eddy current and ultrasonic techniques are being evaluated as a means to characterize the flaws in the mock-up tubes before final assembly. Twenty Inconel 600 tubes with laboratory-grown cracks, typical of those to be used in the mock-up, were provided by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for laboratory testing. After the tubes were inspected with eddy current and ultrasonic techniques, they were destructively analyzed to establish the actual depths, lengths, and profiles of the cracks. The analysis of the results will allow the best techniques to be used for characterizing the flaws in the mock-up tubes.

  18. Potential change in flaw geometry of an initially shallow finite-length surface flaw during a pressurized-thermal-shock transient

    SciTech Connect

    Shum, D.K.; Bryson, J.W.; Merkle, J.G.

    1993-09-01

    This study presents preliminary estimates on whether an shallow, axially oriented, inner-surface finite-length flaw in a PWR-RPV would tend to elongate in the axial direction and/or deepen into the wall of the vessel during a postulated PTS transient. Analysis results obtained based on the assumptions of (1) linear-elastic material response, and (2) cladding with same toughness as the base metal, indicate that a nearly semicircular flaw would likely propagate in the axial direction followed by propagation into the wall of the vessel. Note that these results correspond to initiation within the lower-shelf fracture toughness temperature range, and that their general validity within the lower-transition temperature range remains to be determined. The sensitivity of the numerical results aid conclusions to the following analysis assumptions are evaluated: (1) reference flaw geometry along the entire crack front and especially within the cladding region; (2) linear-elastic vs elastic-plastic description of material response; and (3) base-material-only vs bimaterial cladding-base vessel-model assumption. The sensitivity evaluation indicates that the analysis results are very sensitive to the above assumptions.

  19. Shape Reconstruction of Three-Dimensional Flaw by the Measurement from the Side of Cylindrical Specimen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, M.; Kitahara, M.

    2004-02-01

    The three-dimensional Born and Kirchhoff inversions are modified to the convenient form for cylindrical structures. Moving the measurement plane along the axis of the cylinder, cross-sectional images are obtained by the modified method. The three-dimensional flaw shape is reconstructed by piling up the cross-sectional images. Cement paste and concrete cylinders with flaw models are prepared and ultrasonic measurements are carried out. The measured wave data are fed into the inversion method and the performance of the shape reconstruction is confirmed.

  20. Numerical Simulation of Scattered Waves from Flaws for Ultrasonic Array Transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, S.; Kono, N.; Nakahata, K.

    2007-03-01

    To enhance the detectability in the phased array UT, it is essential to have well knowledge on the characteristics of ultrasonic waves from array transducers. This paper proposes a mathematical model of the array transducer and a simulation tool to predict the flaw echoes. The modeling of an array transducer is based on the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld integral and the scattered waves from flaws are calculated with the fast multipole BEM (FMBEM). By using the FMBEM, we can solve large scale scattering problems with relatively low computational cost. Here we focus on the transient wave analysis, in which a pulse-shaped wave is used for exciting elements of the array transducer.

  1. Bone mineral density among Korean females aged 20-50 years: influence of age at menarche (The Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2008-2011).

    PubMed

    Chang, H K; Chang, D-G; Myong, J-P; Kim, J-H; Lee, S-J; Lee, Y S; Lee, H-N; Lee, K H; Park, D C; Kim, C J; Hur, S Y; Park, J S; Park, T C

    2017-03-14

    To evaluate a possible correlation between bone mineral density (BMD) and age at menarche, the present study used the BMD dataset of the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey IV-V (KNHANES IV-V). Age at menarche had a small but significant association with BMD of the lumbar spine in premenopausal Korean females, aged 20-50 years.

  2. Impact of calcium and vitamin D insufficiencies on serum parathyroid hormone and bone mineral density: analysis of the 4th & 5th Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The relative contributions of calcium and vitamin D to calcium metabolism and bone mineral density (BMD) have been examined previously, but not in a population with very low calcium intake. To determine the relative importance of dietary calcium intake and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concent...

  3. DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION OF MATERIALS PROPERTIES FOR FLAW STABILITY ANALYSIS IN EXTREME ENVIRONMENT SERVICE

    SciTech Connect

    Sindelar, R; Ps Lam, P; Andrew Duncan, A; Bruce Wiersma, B; Karthik Subramanian, K; James Elder, J

    2007-04-18

    Discovery of aging phenomena in the materials of a structure may arise after its design and construction that impact its structural integrity. This condition can be addressed through a demonstration of integrity with the material-specific degraded conditions. Two case studies of development of fracture and crack growth property data, and their application in development of in-service inspection programs for nuclear structures in the defense complex are presented. The first case study covers the development of fracture toughness properties in the form of J-R curves for rolled plate Type 304 stainless steel with Type 308 stainless steel filler in the application to demonstrate the integrity of the reactor tanks of the heavy water production reactors at the Savannah River Site. The fracture properties for the base, weld, and heat-affected zone of the weldments irradiated at low temperatures (110-150 C) up to 6.4 dpa{sub NRT} and 275 appm helium were developed. An expert group provided consensus for application of the irradiated properties for material input to acceptance criteria for ultrasonic examination of the reactor tanks. Dr. Spencer H. Bush played a lead advisory role in this work. The second case study covers the development of fracture toughness for A285 carbon steel in high level radioactive waste tanks. The approach in this case study incorporated a statistical experimental design for material testing to address metallurgical factors important to fracture toughness. Tolerance intervals were constructed to identify the lower bound fracture toughness for material input to flaw disposition through acceptance by analysis.

  4. Areal power density: A preliminary examination of underground heat transfer in a potential Yucca Mountain repository and recommendations for thermal design approaches; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Hertel, E.S. Jr.; Ryder, E.E.

    1991-11-01

    The design of the potential Yucca Mountain repository is subject to many thermal goals related to the compliance of the site with federal regulations. This report summarizes a series of sensitivity studies that determined the expected temperatures near the potential repository. These sensitivity studies were used to establish an efficient loading scheme for the spent fuel canisters and a maximum areal power density based strictly on thermal goals. Given the current knowledge of the site, a design-basis areal power density of 80 kW/acre can be justified based on thermal goals only. Further analyses to investigate the impacts of this design-basis APD on mechanical and operational aspects of the potential repository must be undertaken before a final decision is made.

  5. Cracking Process and Stress Field Evolution in Specimen Containing Combined Flaw Under Uniaxial Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ting; Lin, Baiquan; Yang, Wei; Zou, Quanle; Kong, Jia; Yan, Fazhi

    2016-08-01

    Hydraulic slotting, an efficient technique for underground enhanced coal bed methane (ECBM) recovery, has been widely used in China. However, its pressure relief mechanism is unclear. Thus far, only limited research has been conducted on the relationships among the mechanical properties, flaw parameters, and crack propagation patterns of coal after hydraulic slotting. In addition, because of the limitations of test methods, an in-depth information is not available for this purpose. In this work, numerical models of specimens containing combined flaws are established based on particle flow code method. Our results provide insights into the effects of flaw inclination angle on the mechanical properties, crack propagation patterns, and temporal and spatial evolution rules of stress field in specimens containing combined flaws during the loading process. Besides, based on the initiation position and underlying mechanism, three types of crack initiation modes are identified from the failure processes of specimens. Finally, the crack propagation pattern is quantitatively described by the fractal dimension, which is found to be inversely proportional to the uniaxial compressive strength and elastic modulus of the specimen. To verify the rationality of the numerical simulation results, laboratory tests were conducted and their results match well with those obtained from the numerical simulation.

  6. Three-dimensional dynamic thermal imaging of structural flaws by dual-band infrared computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Del Grande, N.K.; Dolan, K.W.; Durbin, P.F.; Gorvad, M.R.; Kornblum, B.T.; Perkins, D.E.; Schneberk, D.J.; Shapiro, A.B.

    1993-04-01

    We discuss three-dimensional (3D) dynamic thermal imaging of structure flaws using dual-band infrared (DBIR) computed tomography. Conventional thermography provides single-band infrared images which are difficult to interpret. Standard procedures yield imprecise (or qualitative) information about subsurface flaw sites which are typically masked by surface clutter. We use a DBIR imaging unique pioneered at LLNL to capture the time history of surface temperature difference for flash-heated targets. We relate these patterns to the location, size, shape and depth of subsurface flaws. We have demonstrated temperature accuracies of 0.2{degree}C, timing synchronizations of 3 ms (after onset of heat flash) and intervals of 42 ms, between images, during an 8 s cooling (and hearing) interval characterizing the front (and back) surface temperature-time history of an epoxy-glue disbond site in a flash-heated aluminum lap joint. This type of disbond played a significant role in causing damage to the Aloha Aircraft fuselage on the aged Boeing 737 jetliner. By ratioing DBIR images (near 5 and 10 micron), we located surface temperature patterns (generated by weak heat flow anomalies at subsurface flaw sites) and removed the emissivity mask (from surface roughness variations). We compared measurements with calculations from the three-dimensional, finite element computer code: TOPAZ3D. We combined infrared, ultrasound and x-ray imaging methods to characterize the lap joint disbond site spatial, bond quality, and material differences.

  7. On the tensile strength of a fiberreinforced ceramic composite containing a crack-like flaw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budiansky, Bernard; Cui, Yingqing Lawrence

    1994-01-01

    T HE TENSILE STRENGTH of a fiber-reinforced ceramic composite containing a through-the-fiber flaw in the form of a sharp crack is studied. The strength of a brittle unreinforced ceramic containing a sharp crack of length 2 a0, subjected to uniaxial load in the direction normal to the crack plane, is given by linear elastic fracture mechanics as σ s = Km/√π a0, where km is the fracture toughness of the material. However, for a fiber-reinforced ceramic, the strength can only be determined on the basis of a full analysis of crack growth in the matrix and the failure of crack-bridging fibers. The tensile strength of a flawed ceramic material that is reinforced by fibers aligned in the direction perpendicular to the flaw surfaces is studied in this paper. Crack-bridging fibers are assumed to slip relative to the matrix when a critical interface shear stress is reached. The orthotropy of the composite produced by the presence of aligned fibers is rigorously accounted for in the analysis. The dependence of the composite tensile strength on fiber tensile strength, matrix toughness, flaw-size and frictional shear stress at the fiber-matrix interface is determined and described in terms of a universal set of non-dimensional parameters.

  8. Anisotropic determination and correction for ultrasonic flaw detection by spectral analysis

    DOEpatents

    Adler, Laszlo; Von Cook, K.; Simpson, Jr., William A.; Lewis, D. Kent

    1978-01-01

    The anisotropic nature of a material is determined by measuring the velocity of an ultrasonic longitudinal wave and a pair of perpendicular ultrasonic shear waves through a sample of the material each at a plurality of different angles in three planes orthogonal to each other. The determined anisotropic nature is used as a correction factor in a spectral analyzing system of flaw determination.

  9. Apparatus and method for detecting and/or measuring flaws in conductive material

    DOEpatents

    Hockey, Ronald L.; Riechers, Douglas M.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention uses a magnet and sensor coil unilaterial and in relative motion to a conductive material, to measure perturbation or variation in the magnetic field in the presence of a flaw. A liftoff compensator measures a distance between the conductive material and the magnet.

  10. Flawed Implementation or Inconsistent Logics? Lessons from Higher Education Reform in Ukraine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Marta A.

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates two competing explanations of why reforms associated with the Bologna process brought disappointing results in Ukraine. The lack of anticipated benefits from the reforms may stem either from a flawed implementation of the Bologna process, or from more fundamental differences between the models of higher education…

  11. Active role of the liquid phase of developer in revealing surface flaws by capillary methods

    SciTech Connect

    Prokhorenko, P.P.; Dezhkunov, N.V.; Stoicheva, I.V.

    1988-08-01

    The article investigates the interaction of two chemically nonreacting liquids after they have been brought into contact with each other in a capillary. It is established that the liquid phase of the developer is not only a passive carrier of the developing component but also exerts an active influence on the process of development, and consequently, on the detectability of flaws.

  12. Analysis of unclad and sub-clad semi-elliptical flaws in pressure vessel steels

    SciTech Connect

    Irizarry-Quinones, H.; Macdonald, B.D.; McAfee, W.J.

    1996-06-01

    This study was conducted to support warm prestressing experiments on unclad and sub-clad flawed beams loaded in pure bending. Two cladding yield strengths were investigated: 0.6 Sy and 0.8 Sy, where Sy is the yield strength of the base metal. Cladding and base metal were assumed to be stress free at the stress relief temperature for the 3D elastic-plastic finite element analysis used to model the experiments. The model results indicated that when cooled from the stress relief temperature, the cladding was put in tension due to its greater coefficient of thermal expansion. When cooled, the cladding exhibited various amounts of tensile yielding. The degree of yielding depended on the amount of cooling and the strength of the cladding relative to that of the base metal. When subjected to tensile bending stress, the sub-clad flaw elastic-plastic stress intensity factor, K{sub I}(J), was at first dominated by crack closing force due to tensile yielding in the cladding. Thus, imposed loads initially caused no increase in K{sub I}(J) near the clad-base interface. However, K{sub I}(J) at the flaw depth was little affected. When the cladding residual stress was overcome, K{sub I}(J) gradually increased until the cladding began to flow. Thereafter, the rate at which K{sub I}(J) increased with load was the same as that of an unclad beam. A plastic zone corrected K{sub I} approximation for the unclad flaw was found by the superposition of standard Newman and Raju solutions with those due to a cladding crack closure force approximated by the Kaya and Erdogan solution. These elastic estimates of the effect of cladding in reducing the crack driving force were quite in keeping with the 3D elastic-plastic finite element solution for the sub-clad flaw. The results were also compared with the analysis of clad beam experiments by Keeney and the conclusions by Miyazaki, et al. A number of sub-clad flaw specimens not subjected to warm prestressing were thought to have suffered degraded

  13. An experimental study of the effect of stainless steel cladding on the structural integrity of flawed steel plates in bending

    SciTech Connect

    Iskander, S.K.; Nanstad, R.K.; Robinson, G.C.; Oland, C.B.

    1989-01-01

    A small crack near the inner surface of clad nuclear reactor pressure vessels is an important consideration in the safety assessment of the structural integrity of the vessel. Experimental results from tests on large clad and unclad plate specimens with surface flaws have shown that (1) a tough surface layer composed of cladding and/or heat-affected zone has arrested running flaws in clad plates under conditions where unclad plates have ruptured, and (2) the residual load-bearing capacity of clad plates with large subclad flaws significantly exceeded that of an unclad plate. The fracture surfaces of unclad plates suggest that the flaw evolves through alternately tunneling then breaking to the surface. In the case of clad plates, it is hypothesized that the tough, strong surface layer inhibits the tunneled flaw from propagating to the surface.

  14. Effects of proof loads and combined mode loadings on fracture and flaw growth characteristics of aerospace alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    This experimental program was undertaken to determine the effects of (1) combined tensile and bending loadings, (2) combined tensile and shear loadings, and (3) proof overloads on fracture and flaw growth characteristics of aerospace alloys. Tests were performed on four alloys: 2219-T87 aluminum, 5Al-2.5Sn (ELl) titanium, 6Al-4V beta STA titanium and high strength 4340 steel. Tests were conducted in room air, gaseous nitrogen at -200F (144K), liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen. Flat center cracked and surface flawed specimens, cracked tube specimens, circumferentially notched round bar and surface flawed cylindrical specimens were tested. The three-dimensional photoelastic technique of stress freezing and slicing was used to determine stress intensity factors for surface flawed cylindrical specimens subjected to tension or torsion. Results showed that proof load/temperature histories used in the tests have a small beneficial effect or no effect on subsequent fracture strength and flaw growth rates.

  15. Effect of Combined Loading Due to Bending and Internal Pressure on Pipe Flaw Evaluation Criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Naoki; Sakai, Shinsuke

    Considering a rule for the rationalization of maintenance of Light Water Reactor piping, reliable flaw evaluation criteria are essential for determining how a detected flaw will be detrimental to continuous plant operation. Ductile fracture is one of the dominant failure modes that must be considered for carbon steel piping and can be analyzed by elastic-plastic fracture mechanics. Some analytical efforts have provided various flaw evaluation criteria using load correction factors, such as the Z-factors in the JSME codes on fitness-for-service for nuclear power plants and the section XI of the ASME boiler and pressure vessel code. The present Z-factors were conventionally determined, taking conservativity and simplicity into account; however, the effect of internal pressure, which is an important factor under actual plant conditions, was not adequately considered. Recently, a J-estimation scheme, LBB.ENGC for the ductile fracture analysis of circumferentially through-wall-cracked pipes subjected to combined loading was developed for more accurate prediction under more realistic conditions. This method explicitly incorporates the contributions of both bending and tension due to internal pressure by means of a scheme that is compatible with an arbitrary combined-loading history. In this study, the effect of internal pressure on the flaw evaluation criteria was investigated using the new J-estimation scheme. The Z-factor obtained in this study was compared with the presently used Z-factors, and the predictability of the current flaw evaluation criteria was quantitatively evaluated in consideration of the internal pressure.

  16. Fatigue loading and R-curve behavior of a dental glass-ceramic with multiple flaw distributions

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Gaurav V.; Duan, Yuanyuan; Bona, Alvaro Della; Hill, Thomas J.; John, Kenneth St.; Griggs, Jason A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To determine the effects of surface finish and mechanical loading on the rising toughness curve (R-curve) behavior of a fluorapatite glass-ceramic (IPS e.max ZirPress) and to determine a statistical model for fitting fatigue lifetime data with multiple flaw distributions. Materials and Methods Rectangular beam specimens were fabricated by pressing. Two groups of specimens (n=30) with polished (15 μm) or air abraded surface were tested under rapid monotonic loading in oil. Additional polished specimens were subjected to cyclic loading at 2 Hz (n=44) and 10 Hz (n=36). All fatigue tests were performed using a fully articulated four-point flexure fixture in 37°C water. Fractography was used to determine the critical flaw size and estimate fracture toughness. To prove the presence of R-curve behavior, non-linear regression was used. Forward stepwise regression was performed to determine the effects on fracture toughness of different variables, such as initial flaw type, critical flaw size, critical flaw eccentricity, cycling frequency, peak load, and number of cycles. Fatigue lifetime data were fit to an exclusive flaw model. Results There was an increase in fracture toughness values with increasing critical flaw size for both loading methods (rapid monotonic loading and fatigue). The values for the fracture toughness ranged from 0.75 to 1.1 MPa·m1/2 reaching a plateau at different critical flaw sizes based on loading method. Significance Cyclic loading had a significant effect on the R-curve behavior. The fatigue lifetime distribution was dependent on the flaw distribution, and it fit well to an exclusive flaw model. PMID:24034441

  17. 2012 drug packaging review: many dangerous, reportable flaws.

    PubMed

    2013-05-01

    Drug packaging plays an important role in protecting and providing information to patients. The packaging examined by Prescrire in 2012, on the whole, still fails to perform all of these functions effectively. Two issues are especially worrisome. First, packaging too often poses a danger to children. In addition, too many patient leaflets provide incomplete information about adverse effects, thus failing to properly protect the most vulnerable patients. Yet, the method Prescrire used to analyse drug packaging shows that it is not difficult to detect and anticipate risks. It is up to healthcare professionals to take advantage of the method, to protect patients from, and report, dangerous packaging.

  18. The effect of sample matrix on electron density, electron temperature and gas temperature in the argon inductively coupled plasma examined by Thomson and Rayleigh scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanselman, D. S.; Sesi, N. N.; Huang, M.; Hieftje, G. M.

    1994-05-01

    Spatially-resolved electron temperature ( Te), electron number density ( ne) and gas-kinetic temperature ( Tg) maps of the inductively coupled plasma (ICP) have been obtained for two central-gas flow rates, four heights above the load coil (ALC) and in the presence and absence of interferants with a wide range of first ionization potentials. The radial profiles demonstrate how the directly measured fundamental parameters neTe and Tg can be significantly enhanced and/or depressed with added interferent, depending upon plasma operating conditions and observation region. In general, the magnitude of ne, and Te change is found to be an inverse function of interferent ionization potential; furthermore, ne enhancements in the central channel might be the result of electron redistribution from high to low electron density regions rather than from ionization of the matrix. The large measured increases in ne cannot be attributed solely to matrix ionization, especially when measurement uncertainties and the probable over-estimation in calculated ne, enhancements are taken into account. Changes in ne and Te have been correlated with axial Ca atom and ion emission profiles. A brief review of the mechanisms most likely involved in interelement matrix interferences is given within the context of the present study. This article is an electronic publication in Spectrochimica Acta Electronica (SAE), the electronic section of Spectrochimica Acta Part B (SAB). The hardcopy text is accompanied by a disk for the Macintosh computer with data files stored in ASCII format. The main article discusses the scientific aspects of the subject and gives an interpretation of the results contained in the data files.

  19. Using modern plant trait relationships between observed and theoretical maximum stomatal conductance and vein density to examine patterns of plant macroevolution.

    PubMed

    McElwain, Jennifer C; Yiotis, Charilaos; Lawson, Tracy

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the drivers of geological-scale patterns in plant macroevolution is limited by a hesitancy to use measurable traits of fossils to infer palaeoecophysiological function. Here, scaling relationships between morphological traits including maximum theoretical stomatal conductance (gmax ) and leaf vein density (Dv ) and physiological measurements including operational stomatal conductance (gop ), saturated (Asat ) and maximum (Amax ) assimilation rates were investigated for 18 extant taxa in order to improve understanding of angiosperm diversification in the Cretaceous. Our study demonstrated significant relationships between gop , gmax and Dv that together can be used to estimate gas exchange and the photosynthetic capacities of fossils. We showed that acquisition of high gmax in angiosperms conferred a competitive advantage over gymnosperms by increasing the dynamic range (plasticity) of their gas exchange and expanding their ecophysiological niche space. We suggest that species with a high gmax (> 1400 mmol m(-2) s(-1) ) would have been capable of maintaining a high Amax as the atmospheric CO2 declined through the Cretaceous, whereas gymnosperms with a low gmax would experience severe photosynthetic penalty. Expansion of the ecophysiological niche space in angiosperms, afforded by coordinated evolution of high gmax , Dv and increased plasticity in gop , adds further functional insights into the mechanisms driving angiosperm speciation.

  20. Current erosion indices—flawed or valid? Summary

    PubMed Central

    Amaechi, Bennett T.; Dugmore, Christopher; Holbrook, Peter; Nunn, June; Schiffner, Ulrich; Lussi, Adrian; Ganss, Carolina

    2008-01-01

    The problem of erosive tooth wear appears increasingly to be encountered by clinicians and researchers. An adequate way of defining and recording erosive tooth wear is essential in order to assess the extent of this clinical phenomenon, both on an individual level and in the population, and for the adequate provision of preventive and therapeutic measures. Well-established erosion indices have been used in most of these studies, although in many cases modifications have been made to suit the different research aims. This use of different indices is one reason why it still cannot be claimed that there is enough current knowledge on this clinical phenomenon. This article summarises the proceedings of a workshop to discuss the topic of dental erosion indices. The result of the workshop is the proposal for a new scoring system (Basic Erosive Wear Examination, BEWE) designed for use both within the research field and for dental clinicians, with the aims of standardising assessment of erosion for international comparisons, raising awareness and providing guidelines for treatment of erosive tooth wear in dental practice. PMID:18228058

  1. Detection of flaws on surface of civil infrastructures and their profiling using imaging system with laser displacement sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri, Paritosh; Kharkovsky, Sergey

    2016-04-01

    Civil infrastructures such as buildings, bridges, roads and pipelines are the integral part of people's lives and their failure can have large public safety and economic consequences. Early detection of flaws in civil infrastructures and their appropriate retrofitting will aid in preventing this failure. Flaws such as cracks and impact damages initially occur on the surface and propagate inside the materials causing further degradation. There is a need to develop systems that can detect these surface flaws. Developing a system with one sensing technique which can detect the flaws is a challenging task since infrastructures are made up of diverse materials such as concrete, metal, plastics, composite and timber that have different electrical and mechanical properties. It is also desired that non-plain surfaces with complex profiles can be interrogated and surface flaws can be detected. We have proposed an imaging system capable of interrogating structures with complex surface profiles for the purpose of detection and evaluation of surface flaws such as cracks and impact damages using laser displacement sensor (LDS). The developed system consists of LDS mounted on the scanner which is able to perform raster scan over the specimen under test. The reading of displacement from the sensor head to the laser spot on the surface of the test material is then used to generate images which can be used to detect the surface flaws. The proof of concept is given by testing specimens made of metal, concrete and plastics with complex surface profiles.

  2. Modeling of crack initiation, intensity, and growth rates from flaws in welded steel structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaxton, Eric Alan

    2000-10-01

    The intent of this dissertation is to develop a method to model the effects of pitting corrosion or mechanical damage on the strength and fatigue life of a welded structure. The problem was first examined when pitting corrosion was discovered in a 5,200 gallon capacity pressure vessel at John F. Kennedy Space Center. Other similar corrosion and mechanical damage is often encountered in service and a general method to model internal defects and crack-like flaws in welded structures is needed. The severity of the defect was modeled by finite element methods. Defect intensity and crack growth rate are both modeled using the finite element method developed here. Existing published solutions and fracture mechanics testing was performed to verify the modeling method. Welded structures such as pressure vessels have a metallurgical discontinuity between the parent metal and the heat affected zone and also between the heat-affected zone and the weld filler material. An added complexity is the fact that, in general, the mechanical and fracture mechanics properties of these three zones are different. The welded area also will have some level of residual stress resulting from the differential cooling and solidification after welding. The residual stresses created by solidification and cooling will be incorporated into the finite element model. The results will be checked by measuring the actual stresses on the test specimen. The unique contribution of this research is a finite element based tool, which provides a numerically efficient method to evaluate strength, resistance to fracture, and remaining life of a welded structure with surface damage. The new method is based on the theoretical square root displacement field, fitted to the local nodal point displacements, in the vicinity of the crack front. A linear finite element formulation is utilized, along with relatively coarse meshes, to accurately predict stress intensities. This new method is accurate for both two and

  3. Development of portable phased array UT system for real-time flaw imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, M.

    1995-08-01

    Many functions and features of phased array UT technology must be useful for NDE in the industrial field. Some phased array UT systems have been developed for the inspection of nuclear pressure vessel and turbine components. However, phased array UT is still a special NDE technique and it has not been used widely in the past. The reasons of that are system size, cost, operator performance, equipment design and others. TOSHIBA has newly developed PC controlled portable phased array system to solve those problems. The portable phased array UT system is very compact and light but it is able to drive up to 32-channel linear array probe, to display real-time linear/sector B-scan, to display accumulated B-scan with an encoder and to display profile overlaid B-scan. The first applications were turbine component inspections for precise flaw investigation and flaw image data recording.

  4. Characterization of Service Induced Flaws on the Far Side of Austenitic Welds Using Phased Array Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael T.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.

    2004-01-01

    Conventional ultrasonic testing methods continue to exhibit problems for applications involving coarse-grained structures. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is evaluating the capabilities and limitations of phased array (PA) technology to detect service-type flaws in these coarse-grained materials. The work is being sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Research. Work to determine detection capabilities through welds with varied grain structures is being explored to provide a better understanding of the acoustic properties of these welded structures. Piping specimens with welds fabricated in vertical and horizontal positions to simulate field conditions have been studied. The insights gained from the austenitic piping will be applied to dissimilar metal weld configurations, corrosion resistant clad piping and cast stainless steels. This paper presents results for using PA ultrasonic technology to determine the effectiveness of detecting and accurately characterizing flaws on the far-side of austenitic piping welds.

  5. Radially Focused Eddy Current Sensor for Detection of Longitudinal Flaws in Metallic Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Simpson, John W. (Inventor); Fulton, James P. (Inventor); Nath, Shridhar C. (Inventor); Todhunter, Ronald G. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A radially focused eddy current sensor detects longitudinal flaws in a metal tube. A drive coil induces eddy currents within the wall of the metal tube. A pick-up cod is spaced apart from the drive coil along the length of the metal tube. The pick@up coil is positioned with one end thereof lying adjacent the wall of the metal tube such that the pick-up coil's longitudinal axis is perpendicular to the wall of the metal tube. To isolate the pick-up coil from the magnetic flux of the drive coil and the flux from the induced eddy currents. except the eddy currents diverted by a longitudinal flaw. an electrically conducting material high in magnetic permeability surrounds all of the pick-up coil except its one end that is adjacent the walls of the metal tube. The electrically conducting material can extend into and through the drive coil in a coaxial relationship therewith.

  6. Detection of Real Flaw using Uniform Eddy Current Multi-probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuoka, Katsuhiro; Hashimoto, Mitsuo

    The establishment of the nondestructive inspection technology with plant structures has been stimulated by the recent occurrence of cracks in the nuclear power plant structures. In this research, a uniform eddy current multi-probe to apply to the complex structure and inspect the cracks at high-speed data acquisition was developed. Pick-up coils of the developed probe were arranged on a flexible printed circuit board. This probe was able to obtain clear signal for an EDM (electro-discharge machining) slit with 0.5 mm depth and distinguish EDM slits arranged at 2 mm intervals. It was confirmed that the SCC (stress corrosion cracking) of real flaw was able to be detected with developed uniform eddy current multi-probe by using the ferrite core for the exciting coil and considering the impedance matching of the exciting coil and the flaw detection device.

  7. Indentation flaw formation and strength response of silicon nitride ceramics at low indentation loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Salem, Jonathan A.

    1992-01-01

    The configuration and the strength response of indentation flaws in silicon nitrides are described as a function of indentation loads primarily near the threshold level. Test materials under consideration include 30 vol percent SiC whisker-reinforced composite silicon nitride and similar monolithic silicon nitride. The results of strength testing show that, at indentation loads less than or equal to 1.96, a number of the specimens fail from the intrinsic flaws of the materials rather than from the indent sites, causing a distinct trend to reach a plateau, at a level corresponding to the as-received strength of the material. The ratio of the mirror constant to the fracture toughness for the composite and monolithic materials is found to be 1.44 and 1.51, respectively.

  8. Investigation of flaw geometry and loading effects on plane strain fracture in metallic structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, L. R.; Finger, R. W.

    1971-01-01

    The effects on fracture and flaw growth of weld-induced residual stresses, combined bending and tension stresses, and stress fields adjacent to circular holes in 2219-T87 aluminum and 5AI-2.5Sn(ELI) titanium alloys were evaluated. Static fracture tests were conducted in liquid nitrogen; fatigue tests were performed in room air, liquid nitrogen, and liquid hydrogen. Evaluation of results was based on linear elastic fracture mechanics concepts and was directed to improving existing methods of estimating minimum fracture strength and fatigue lives for pressurized structure in spacecraft and booster systems. Effects of specimen design in plane-strain fracture toughness testing were investigated. Four different specimen types were tested in room air, liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen environments using the aluminum and titanium alloys. Interferometry and holograph were used to measure crack-opening displacements in surface-flawed plexiglass test specimens. Comparisons were made between stress intensities calculated using displacement measurements, and approximate analytical solutions.

  9. Flaw Stability Considering Residual Stress for Aging Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel Multiple-Purpose Canisters

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Poh-Sang; Sindelar, Robert L.

    2016-04-28

    A typical multipurpose canister (MPC) is made of austenitic stainless steel and is loaded with spent nuclear fuel assemblies. Because heat treatment for stress relief is not required for the construction of the MPC, the canister is susceptible to stress corrosion cracking in the weld or heat affected zone regions under long-term storage conditions. Logic for flaw acceptance is developed should crack-like flaws be detected by Inservice Inspection. The procedure recommended by API 579-1/ASME FFS-1, Fitness-for-Service, is used to calculate the instability crack length or depth by failure assessment diagram. It is demonstrated that the welding residual stress has a strong influence on the results.

  10. Flaw Stability Considering Residual Stress for Aging Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel Multiple-Purpose Canisters

    DOE PAGES

    Lam, Poh-Sang; Sindelar, Robert L.

    2016-04-28

    A typical multipurpose canister (MPC) is made of austenitic stainless steel and is loaded with spent nuclear fuel assemblies. Because heat treatment for stress relief is not required for the construction of the MPC, the canister is susceptible to stress corrosion cracking in the weld or heat affected zone regions under long-term storage conditions. Logic for flaw acceptance is developed should crack-like flaws be detected by Inservice Inspection. The procedure recommended by API 579-1/ASME FFS-1, Fitness-for-Service, is used to calculate the instability crack length or depth by failure assessment diagram. It is demonstrated that the welding residual stress has amore » strong influence on the results.« less

  11. Computational Reduction of Specimen Noise to Enable Improved Thermography Characterization of Flaws in Graphite Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winfree, William P.; Howell, Patricia A.; Zalameda, Joseph N.

    2014-01-01

    Flaw detection and characterization with thermographic techniques in graphite polymer composites are often limited by localized variations in the thermographic response. Variations in properties such as acceptable porosity, fiber volume content and surface polymer thickness result in variations in the thermal response that in general cause significant variations in the initial thermal response. These result in a "noise" floor that increases the difficulty of detecting and characterizing deeper flaws. A method is presented for computationally removing a significant amount of the "noise" from near surface porosity by diffusing the early time response, then subtracting it from subsequent responses. Simulations of the thermal response of a composite are utilized in defining the limitations of the technique. This method for reducing the data is shown to give considerable improvement characterizing both the size and depth of damage. Examples are shown for data acquired on specimens with fabricated delaminations and impact damage.

  12. Observations on the behavior of surface flaws in the presence of cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Iskander, S.K.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1988-01-01

    A small crack near the inner surface of clad nuclear reactor pressure vessels (RPV) is an important consideration in the safety assessment of the structural integrity of the vessel. Four-point bend tests on large plate specimens, six clad and two unclad, were performed to determine the effect, if any, of stainless steel cladding upon the propagation of small surface cracks subjected to stress states similar to those produced by pressurized thermal shock conditions. Results of tests at temperature 10 and 60/degree/C below the nil-ductility-transition temperature (NDT) have shown that (1) a tough surface layer composed of cladding and/or heat-affected zone has arrested running flaws in clad plates under conditions where unclad plates have ruptured, and (2) the residual load-bearing capacity of clad plates with large subclad flaws significantly exceeded that of an unclad plate. 6 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Probabilistic fatigue life prediction using ultrasonic inspection data considering equivalent initial flaw size uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, X.; Zhang, J.; Kadau, K.; Zhou, S. K.

    2013-01-01

    This study presents a systematical method for probabilistic fatigue life prediction using ultrasonic inspection data. A probabilistic model to correlate the ultrasonic inspection reported size and the actual size is proposed based on historical data of rotor flaw sizing. Both of the reported size and the actual size are quantified in terms of the equivalent reflector diameter. The equivalent initial flaw size (EIFS) is then calculated based on the actual size for fatigue propagation analysis. All major uncertainties, such as EIFS uncertainty, fatigue crack growth model parameter uncertainty, and experimental data measurement uncertainty are explicitly included in the fatigue life prediction. Bayesian parameter estimation is used to estimate fatigue crack growth model parameters and measurement uncertainties using a limited number of fatigue testing data points. The overall procedure is demonstrated using a Cr-Mo-V rotor segment with ultrasonic inspection data. Interpretations of the probabilistic prediction results are given.

  14. Improved multi-directional eddy current inspection test apparatus for detecting flaws in metal articles

    DOEpatents

    Nance, Roy A.; Hartley, William H.; Caffarel, Alfred J.

    1984-01-01

    Apparatus is described for detecting flaws in a tubular workpiece in a single scan. The coils of a dual coil bobbin eddy current inspection probe are wound at a 45.degree. angle to the transverse axis of the probe, one coil having an angular position about the axis about 90.degree. relative to the angular position of the other coil, and the angle of intersection of the planes containing the coils being about 60.degree..

  15. Cyclic Fatigue of Brittle Materials with an Indentation-Induced Flaw System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Salem, Jonathan A.

    1996-01-01

    The ratio of static to cyclic fatigue life, or 'h ratio', was obtained numerically for an indentation flaw system subjected to sinusoidal loading conditions. Emphasis was placed on developing a simple, quick lifetime prediction tool. The solution for the h ratio was compared with experimental static and cyclic fatigue data obtained from as-indented 96 wt.% alumina specimens tested in room-temperature distilled water.

  16. Flaw-induced plastic-flow dynamics in bulk metallic glasses under tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. H.; Yue, T. M.; Tsui, C. P.; Chan, K. C.

    2016-10-01

    Inheriting amorphous atomic structures without crystalline lattices, bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are known to have superior mechanical properties, such as high strength approaching the ideal value, but are susceptible to catastrophic failures. Understanding the plastic-flow dynamics of BMGs is important for achieving stable plastic flow in order to avoid catastrophic failures, especially under tension, where almost all BMGs demonstrate limited plastic flow with catastrophic failure. Previous findings have shown that the plastic flow of BMGs displays critical dynamics under compression tests, however, the plastic-flow dynamics under tension are still unknown. Here we report that power-law critical dynamics can also be achieved in the plastic flow of tensile BMGs by introducing flaws. Differing from the plastic flow under compression, the flaw-induced plastic flow under tension shows an upward trend in the amplitudes of the load drops with time, resulting in a stable plastic-flow stage with a power-law distribution of the load drop. We found that the flaw-induced plastic flow resulted from the stress gradients around the notch roots, and the stable plastic-flow stage increased with the increase of the stress concentration factor ahead of the notch root. The findings are potentially useful for predicting and avoiding the catastrophic failures in tensile BMGs by tailoring the complex stress fields in practical structural-applications.

  17. Flaw Sizing in Pipes Using Long-Range Guided Wave Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanderson, R. M.; Catton, P. P.

    2011-06-01

    The absence of adequate inspection data from difficult-to-access areas on pipelines, such as cased-road crossings, makes determination of fitness for continued service and compliance with increasingly stringent regulatory requirements problematic. Screening for corrosion using long-range guided wave testing is a relatively new inspection technique. The complexity of the possible modes of vibration means the technique can be difficult to implement effectively but this also means that it has great potential for both detecting and characterizing flaws. The ability to determine flaw size would enable the direct application of standard procedures for determining fitness-for-service, such as ASME B31G, RSTRENG, or equivalent for tens of metres of pipeline from a single inspection location. This paper presents a new technique for flaw sizing using guided wave inspection data. The technique has been developed using finite element models and experimentally validated on 6″ Schedule 40 steel pipe. Some basic fitness-for-service assessments have been carried out using the measured values and the maximum allowable operating pressure was accurately determined.

  18. Stress analysis and damage evaluation of flawed composite laminates by hybrid-numerical methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Yii-Ching

    1992-01-01

    Structural components in flight vehicles is often inherited flaws, such as microcracks, voids, holes, and delamination. These defects will degrade structures the same as that due to damages in service, such as impact, corrosion, and erosion. It is very important to know how a structural component can be useful and survive after these flaws and damages. To understand the behavior and limitation of these structural components researchers usually do experimental tests or theoretical analyses on structures with simulated flaws. However, neither approach has been completely successful. As Durelli states that 'Seldom does one method give a complete solution, with the most efficiency'. Examples of this principle is seen in photomechanics which additional strain-gage testing can only average stresses at locations of high concentration. On the other hand, theoretical analyses including numerical analyses are implemented with simplified assumptions which may not reflect actual boundary conditions. Hybrid-Numerical methods which combine photomechanics and numerical analysis have been used to correct this inefficiency since 1950's. But its application is limited until 1970's when modern computer codes became available. In recent years, researchers have enhanced the data obtained from photoelasticity, laser speckle, holography and moire' interferometry for input of finite element analysis on metals. Nevertheless, there is only few of literature being done on composite laminates. Therefore, this research is dedicated to this highly anisotropic material.

  19. Flaw-induced plastic-flow dynamics in bulk metallic glasses under tension

    PubMed Central

    Chen, S. H.; Yue, T. M.; Tsui, C. P.; Chan, K. C.

    2016-01-01

    Inheriting amorphous atomic structures without crystalline lattices, bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are known to have superior mechanical properties, such as high strength approaching the ideal value, but are susceptible to catastrophic failures. Understanding the plastic-flow dynamics of BMGs is important for achieving stable plastic flow in order to avoid catastrophic failures, especially under tension, where almost all BMGs demonstrate limited plastic flow with catastrophic failure. Previous findings have shown that the plastic flow of BMGs displays critical dynamics under compression tests, however, the plastic-flow dynamics under tension are still unknown. Here we report that power-law critical dynamics can also be achieved in the plastic flow of tensile BMGs by introducing flaws. Differing from the plastic flow under compression, the flaw-induced plastic flow under tension shows an upward trend in the amplitudes of the load drops with time, resulting in a stable plastic-flow stage with a power-law distribution of the load drop. We found that the flaw-induced plastic flow resulted from the stress gradients around the notch roots, and the stable plastic-flow stage increased with the increase of the stress concentration factor ahead of the notch root. The findings are potentially useful for predicting and avoiding the catastrophic failures in tensile BMGs by tailoring the complex stress fields in practical structural-applications. PMID:27779221

  20. Vitamin D and Depression: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Comparing Studies with and without Biological Flaws

    PubMed Central

    Spedding, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Efficacy of Vitamin D supplements in depression is controversial, awaiting further literature analysis. Biological flaws in primary studies is a possible reason meta-analyses of Vitamin D have failed to demonstrate efficacy. This systematic review and meta-analysis of Vitamin D and depression compared studies with and without biological flaws. The systematic review followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. The literature search was undertaken through four databases for randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Studies were critically appraised for methodological quality and biological flaws, in relation to the hypothesis and study design. Meta-analyses were performed for studies according to the presence of biological flaws. The 15 RCTs identified provide a more comprehensive evidence-base than previous systematic reviews; methodological quality of studies was generally good and methodology was diverse. A meta-analysis of all studies without flaws demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in depression with Vitamin D supplements (+0.78 CI +0.24, +1.27). Studies with biological flaws were mainly inconclusive, with the meta-analysis demonstrating a statistically significant worsening in depression by taking Vitamin D supplements (−1.1 CI −0.7, −1.5). Vitamin D supplementation (≥800 I.U. daily) was somewhat favorable in the management of depression in studies that demonstrate a change in vitamin levels, and the effect size was comparable to that of anti-depressant medication. PMID:24732019

  1. Overview of the program to assess the reliability of emerging nondestructive techniques open testing and study of flaw type effect on NDE response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Komura, Ichiro; Kim, Kyung-cho; Zetterwall, Tommy; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Prokofiev, Iouri

    2016-02-01

    In February 2012, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) executed agreements with VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Nuclear Regulatory Authority of Japan (NRA, former JNES), Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS), Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM), and Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI) to establish the Program to Assess the Reliability of Emerging Nondestructive Techniques (PARENT). The goal of PARENT is to investigate the effectiveness of current emerging and perspective novel nondestructive examination procedures and techniques to find flaws in nickel-alloy welds and base materials. This is done by conducting a series of open and blind international round-robin tests on a set of large-bore dissimilar metal welds (LBDMW), small-bore dissimilar metal welds (SBDMW), and bottom-mounted instrumentation (BMI) penetration weld test blocks. The purpose of blind testing is to study the reliability of more established techniques and included only qualified teams and procedures. The purpose of open testing is aimed at a more basic capability assessment of emerging and novel technologies. The range of techniques applied in open testing varied with respect to maturity and performance uncertainty and were applied to a variety of simulated flaws. This paper will include a brief overview of the PARENT blind and open testing techniques and test blocks and present some of the blind testing results.

  2. Characteristics of Ferromagnetic Flux Focusing Lens in the Development of Surface/Subsurface Flaw Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz; Fulton, Jim; Nath, Shridhar; Namkung, Min; Simpson, John

    1993-01-01

    Electromagnetic NDE techniques have in the past steered away from the use of ferromagnetic materials. Although their high permeabilities lead to increased field levels, the properties of ferrous elements in the presence of alternating magnetic fields are difficult to determine. In addition, their use leads to losses which can be minimized through the use of low conductivity ferrites. In fact, the eddy current probes which do incorporate ferromagnetic materials have focused on these losses and the shielding which can be obtained by surrounding a probe with a high permeability, conducting material. Eddy current probes enclosed in conducting and magnetic shields have been used to prevent the generated fields from interacting with materials in the vicinity of the probe, such as when testing near material boundaries. A recent invention has used ferromagnetic shielding to magnetically separate individual concentric eddy current probes in order to eliminate cross-talk between the probes so that simultaneous detection of different types of flaws at different depths can be achieved. In contrast to the previous uses of ferromagnetic materials purely as magnetic shields, an electromagnetic flaw detector recently developed at NASA Langley Research Center takes advantage of the flux focusing properties of a ferromagnetic mild steel in order to produce a simple, effective device for the non-destructive evaluation of conducting materials. The Flux Focusing Eddy Current Probe has been shown to accurately measure material thickness and fatigue damage. The straight forward flaw response of the probe makes the device ideal for rapid inspection of large structures, and has lead to its incorporation in a computer controlled search routine to locate fatigue crack tips and monitor experimental fatigue crack growth experiments.

  3. Dynamic Strength and Fracturing Behavior of Single-Flawed Prismatic Marble Specimens Under Impact Loading with a Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xibing; Zhou, Tao; Li, Diyuan

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic impact tests are performed on prismatic marble specimens containing a single flaw using a modified split-Hopkinson pressure bar device. The effects of pre-existing flaws with different flaw angles and lengths on the dynamic mechanical properties are analyzed. The results demonstrate that the dynamic strength of marble is influenced by the flaw geometry. The dynamic fracturing process of flawed specimens is monitored and characterized with the aid of a high-speed camera. Cracking of marble specimens with a single pre-existing flaw under impact loading is analyzed based on experimental investigations. Cracking involves two major stages: formation of white patches and development of macrocracks. Six typical crack types are identified on the basis of their trajectories and initiation mechanisms. The presence of an artificial flaw may change the failure mode of marble from splitting-dominated for an intact specimen to shear-dominated for a flawed specimen under dynamic loading. Nevertheless, the geometry of the flaws appears to have a slight influence on the failure modes of flawed specimens under impact loading.

  4. Metallic-like photoluminescence and absorption in fused silica surface flaws

    SciTech Connect

    Laurence, T A; Bude, J D; Shen, N; Feldman, T; Miller, P; Steele, W A; Suratwala, T

    2008-09-11

    Using high-sensitivity confocal time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) techniques, we report an ultra-fast PL (40ps-5ns) from impurity-free surface flaws on fused silica, including polished, indented or fractured surfaces of fused silica, and from laser-heated evaporation pits. This PL is excited by the single photon absorption of sub-band gap light, and is especially bright in fractures. Regions which exhibit this PL are strongly absorptive well below the band gap, as evidenced by a propensity to damage with 3.5eV ns-scale laser pulses.

  5. Probabilistic Estimation of Critical Flaw Sizes in the Primary Structure Welds of the Ares I-X Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, Shantaram S.; Hoge, Peter A.; Patel, B. M.; Nagpal, Vinod K.

    2009-01-01

    The primary structure of the Ares I-X Upper Stage Simulator (USS) launch vehicle is constructed of welded mild steel plates. There is some concern over the possibility of structural failure due to welding flaws. It was considered critical to quantify the impact of uncertainties in residual stress, material porosity, applied loads, and material and crack growth properties on the reliability of the welds during its pre-flight and flight. A criterion--an existing maximum size crack at the weld toe must be smaller than the maximum allowable flaw size--was established to estimate the reliability of the welds. A spectrum of maximum allowable flaw sizes was developed for different possible combinations of all of the above listed variables by performing probabilistic crack growth analyses using the ANSYS finite element analysis code in conjunction with the NASGRO crack growth code. Two alternative methods were used to account for residual stresses: (1) The mean residual stress was assumed to be 41 ksi and a limit was set on the net section flow stress during crack propagation. The critical flaw size was determined by parametrically increasing the initial flaw size and detecting if this limit was exceeded during four complete flight cycles, and (2) The mean residual stress was assumed to be 49.6 ksi (the parent material s yield strength) and the net section flow stress limit was ignored. The critical flaw size was determined by parametrically increasing the initial flaw size and detecting if catastrophic crack growth occurred during four complete flight cycles. Both surface-crack models and through-crack models were utilized to characterize cracks in the weld toe.

  6. Fan beam and double crosshole Lamb wave tomography for mapping flaws in aging aircraft structures.

    PubMed

    Malyarenko, E V; Hinders, M K

    2000-10-01

    As the worldwide aviation fleet continues to age, methods for accurately predicting the presence of structural flaws-such as hidden corrosion and disbonds-that compromise airworthiness become increasingly necessary. Ultrasonic guided waves, Lamb waves, allow large sections of aircraft structures to be rapidly inspected. However, extracting quantitative information from Lamb wave data has always involved highly trained personnel with a detailed knowledge of mechanical waveguide physics. The work summarized here focuses on a variety of different tomographic reconstruction techniques to graphically represent the Lamb wave data in quantitative maps that can be easily interpreted by technicians. Because the velocity of Lamb waves depends on thickness, for example, the traveltimes of the fundamental Lamb modes can be converted into a thickness map of the inspection region. This article describes two potentially practical implementations of Lamb wave tomographic imaging techniques that can be optimized for in-the-field testing of large-area aircraft structures. Laboratory measurements discussed here demonstrate that Lamb wave tomography using either a ring of transducers with fan beam reconstructions, or a square array of transducers with algebraic reconstruction tomography, is appropriate for detecting flaws in multilayer aircraft materials. The speed and fidelity of the reconstruction algorithms as well as practical considerations for person-portable array-based systems are discussed in this article.

  7. Flux-focusing eddy current probe and rotating probe method for flaw detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wincheski, Buzz A.; Fulton, James P.; Nath, Shridhar C.; Simpson, John W.; Namkung, Min

    1994-11-01

    A flux-focusing electromagnetic sensor which uses a ferromagnetic flux-focusing lens simplifies inspections and increases detectability of fatigue cracks about circular fasteners and other circular inhomogeneities in high conductivity material. The unique feature of the device is the ferrous shield isolating a high-turn pick-up coil from an excitation coil. The use of the magnetic shield is shown to produce a null voltage output across the receiving coil in the presence of an unflawed sample. A redistribution of the current flow in the sample caused by the presence of flaws, however, eliminates the shielding condition and a large output voltage is produced, yielding a clear unambiguous flaw signal. By rotating the probe in a path around a circular fastener such as a rivet while maintaining a constant distance between the probe and the center of a rivet, the signal due to current flow about the rivet can be held constant. Any further changes in the current distribution, such as due to a fatigue crack at the rivet joint, can be detected as an increase in the output voltage above that due to the flow about the rivet head.

  8. Myths, Artifacts, and Fatal Flaws: Identifying Limitations and Opportunities in Vitamin C Research

    PubMed Central

    Michels, Alexander J.; Frei, Balz

    2013-01-01

    Research progress to understand the role of vitamin C (ascorbic acid) in human health has been slow in coming. This is predominantly the result of several flawed approaches to study design, often lacking a full appreciation of the redox chemistry and biology of ascorbic acid. In this review, we summarize our knowledge surrounding the limitations of common approaches used in vitamin C research. In human cell culture, the primary issues are the high oxygen environment, presence of redox-active transition metal ions in culture media, and the use of immortalized cell lines grown in the absence of supplemental ascorbic acid. Studies in animal models are also limited due to the presence of endogenous ascorbic acid synthesis. Despite the use of genetically altered rodent strains lacking synthesis capacity, there are additional concerns that these models do not adequately recapitulate the effects of vitamin C deprivation and supplementation observed in humans. Lastly, several flaws in study design endemic to randomized controlled trials and other human studies greatly limit their conclusions and impact. There also is anecdotal evidence of positive and negative health effects of vitamin C that are widely accepted but have not been substantiated. Only with careful attention to study design and experimental detail can we further our understanding of the possible roles of vitamin C in promoting human health and preventing or treating disease. PMID:24352093

  9. Analysis of the Mutual Inductance between Two Parallel Plates for the Detection of Surface Flaws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namking, M.; Clendenin, C. G.; Fulton, J. P.; Wincheski, B.

    1992-01-01

    There has recently been much effort behind the development of NDE methods applicable to the detection of surface/subsurface flaws in thin metallic structures with a rapid scan capability. One such method, an electromagnetic technique using a current-sheet parallel to the surface of a specimen in order to induce eddy current flow shows a high potential for satisfying the rapid scan requirement stated above. The technique is based on the detection of flaw-induced magnetic field components normal to the specimen surface by an appropriate detection mechanism positioned above the current-sheet as shown schematically in Fig. 1. As indicated in this figure, the current-sheet separates the source of the normal magnetic field components from the detector in such a way that the electric and magnetic properties of the current-sheet can be a major factor affecting the strength of the detected signals. The purpose of the present study is, therefore, to perform a detailed investigation on the effect of the material properties of the current-sheet on the detected signal strength and to establish a simple theoretical model for the detection mechanism.

  10. Wavelet analysis applied to thermographic data for the detection of sub-superficial flaws in mosaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sfarra, Stefano; Regi, Mauro

    2016-06-01

    Up to now, the sun-pulse recorded during the heating (day) and cooling (night) phases has not yet been analyzed by using the infrared thermography (IRT) method through the complex wavelet transform (CWT) technique. CWT can be used with the sun-pulse data in a similar way as the discrete Fourier transform (DFT). In addition, CWT preserves the time information of the signal both in the phasegrams and in the amplitudegrams. In this work, a mosaic sample containing artificial flaws positioned at different depths was inspected into the long wave IR spectrum. It is possible to observe that by comparing defective and defect-free areas, a difference in phase during the thermal diffusion appears. The signal reference, measured on the defect-free area, was subtracted from the other measurement points. The resulting signal thermal contrast, representing the difference of the temporal evolutions of the surface temperature above the defective and defect-free positions, was also plotted. Subsequently, the wavelet phase contrast was computed. The solar radiation influencing the sample was estimated bearing in mind the sun path in the sky, the mosaic orientation and the inclination with respect to its local geographical coordinates. Finally, the ambient parameters have been recorded by a control unit. Although the CWT technique did not provided a sound visualization of the shape of the flaws, it permitted to reflect on the heat release coming from the bituminous material behind the statumen layer. Indeed, it is not atypical to find inclined mosaics to be restored.

  11. Flaws in design, analysis and interpretation of Pfizer's antifungal trials of voriconazole and uncritical subsequent quotations

    PubMed Central

    Jørgensen, Karsten J; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2006-01-01

    We have previously described how a series of trials sponsored by Pfizer of its antifungal drug, fluconazole, in cancer patients with neutropenia handicapped the control drug, amphotericin B, by flaws in design and analysis. We describe similar problems in two pivotal trials of Pfizer's new antifungal agent, voriconazole, published in a prestigious journal. In a non-inferiority trial, voriconazole was significantly inferior to liposomal amphothericin B, but the authors concluded that voriconazole was a suitable alternative. The second trial used amphothericin B deoxycholate as comparator, but handicapped the drug by not requiring pre-medication to reduce infusion-related toxicity or substitution with electrolytes and fluid to reduce nephrotoxicity, although the planned duration of treatment was 84 days. Voriconazole was given for 77 days on average, but the comparator for only 10 days, which precludes a meaningful comparison. In a random sample of 50 references to these trials, we found that the unwarranted conclusions were mostly uncritically propagated. It was particularly surprising that relevant criticism raised by the FDA related to the first trial was only quoted once, and that none of the articles noted the obvious flaws in the design of the second trial. We suggest that editors ensure that the abstract reflects fairly on the remainder of the paper, and that journals do not impose any time limit for accepting letters that point out serious weaknesses in a study that have not been noted before. PMID:16542031

  12. Insensitivity to Flaws Leads to Damage Tolerance in Brittle Architected Meta-Materials.

    PubMed

    Montemayor, L C; Wong, W H; Zhang, Y-W; Greer, J R

    2016-02-03

    Cellular solids are instrumental in creating lightweight, strong, and damage-tolerant engineering materials. By extending feature size down to the nanoscale, we simultaneously exploit the architecture and material size effects to substantially enhance structural integrity of architected meta-materials. We discovered that hollow-tube alumina nanolattices with 3D kagome geometry that contained pre-fabricated flaws always failed at the same load as the pristine specimens when the ratio of notch length (a) to sample width (w) is no greater than 1/3, with no correlation between failure occurring at or away from the notch. Samples with (a/w) > 0.3, and notch length-to-unit cell size ratios of (a/l) > 5.2, failed at a lower peak loads because of the higher sample compliance when fewer unit cells span the intact region. Finite element simulations show that the failure is governed by purely tensile loading for (a/w) < 0.3 for the same (a/l); bending begins to play a significant role in failure as (a/w) increases. This experimental and computational work demonstrates that the discrete-continuum duality of architected structural meta-materials may give rise to their damage tolerance and insensitivity of failure to the presence of flaws even when made entirely of intrinsically brittle materials.

  13. Insensitivity to Flaws Leads to Damage Tolerance in Brittle Architected Meta-Materials

    PubMed Central

    Montemayor, L. C.; Wong, W. H.; Zhang, Y.-W.; Greer, J. R.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular solids are instrumental in creating lightweight, strong, and damage-tolerant engineering materials. By extending feature size down to the nanoscale, we simultaneously exploit the architecture and material size effects to substantially enhance structural integrity of architected meta-materials. We discovered that hollow-tube alumina nanolattices with 3D kagome geometry that contained pre-fabricated flaws always failed at the same load as the pristine specimens when the ratio of notch length (a) to sample width (w) is no greater than 1/3, with no correlation between failure occurring at or away from the notch. Samples with (a/w) > 0.3, and notch length-to-unit cell size ratios of (a/l) > 5.2, failed at a lower peak loads because of the higher sample compliance when fewer unit cells span the intact region. Finite element simulations show that the failure is governed by purely tensile loading for (a/w) < 0.3 for the same (a/l); bending begins to play a significant role in failure as (a/w) increases. This experimental and computational work demonstrates that the discrete-continuum duality of architected structural meta-materials may give rise to their damage tolerance and insensitivity of failure to the presence of flaws even when made entirely of intrinsically brittle materials. PMID:26837581

  14. Detection of sub-horizontal flaws in concrete using the synthetic aperture focusing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Zahra

    Concrete deteriorates over time due to environmental changes and/or poor construction processes which can eventually lead to partial or total failure of a structure. Deterioration in concrete manifests itself in different forms such as: freeze and thaw, chemical attack, surface and internal flaws. Concrete and shotcrete linings are widely used as support systems in underground excavations. Surprisingly, a fragmented, damaged shotcrete support system can actually create a less stable environment than the unsupported rock mass. Detection of internal flaws remains a difficult task as they are not always observable on the surface. Yet, the potential to expand and cause damage to the structure is omnipresent. The focus of this work is to locate and characterize two main and common features in concrete structures, (1) sub-horizontal cracks; (2) rock-concrete interfaces. Traditionally, this has been difficult to detect by currently available NDT methods. To obtain high resolution images of cracks in concrete, an extension of the ultrasonic nondestructive technique known as Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique (SAFT) has been used. However, in order to achieve our research objective, we developed a modified SAFT code in this work. The results of this study demonstrate that the resolving power of our modified 3D SAFT algorithm can provide an accurate profile of both a rock-concrete interface and/or cracks with angles varying from 5 to 15 degrees within concrete slabs having thicknesses of up to twenty centimetres.

  15. Flaw Shape Reconstruction from SH-Wave Array Ultrasonic Data Using Time Domain Linearized Inverse Scattering Method

    SciTech Connect

    Kimoto, K.; Hirose, S.

    2005-04-09

    A linearized inverse scattering method, so called the Kirchhoff inversion, is formulated in time domain for SH-waves measured by a contact ultrasonic transducer and tested using experimental data. The data for reconstruction are experimentally obtained by measuring ultrasonic echoes from artificial flaws in steel plate specimens. For an efficient and accurate data collection, a contact SH-wave linear array transducer is used. The shapes of the artificial flaws are reconstructed by the Kirchhoff inversion and the conventional SAFT (Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique) using the waves from a single ray path. Comparison of the two methods shows that the Kirchhoff inversion works well for experimental data and outperforms SAFT although only an illuminated portion of the flaw boundaries is reconstructed by either method. In order to gain more information on the flaw boundaries, the Kirchhoff inversion which takes into account multiple ray paths is also tested with the same experimental data. As a result, it is shown that a larger part of the flaw boundaries can be visualized by considering the multiple ray paths.

  16. Evaluation of constraint methodologies applied to a shallow-flaw cruciform bend specimen tested under biaxial loading conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, B.R.; McAfee, W.J.; Williams, P.T.; Pennell, W.E.

    1998-01-01

    A technology to determine shallow-flaw fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels is being developed for application to the safety assessment of RPVs containing postulated shallow surface flaws. Matrices of cruciform beam tests were developed to investigate and quantify the effects of temperature, biaxial loading, and specimen size on fracture initiation toughness of two-dimensional (constant depth), shallow surface flaws. The cruciform beam specimens were developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to introduce a prototypic, far-field. out-of-plane biaxial stress component in the test section that approximates the nonlinear stresses resulting from pressurized-thermal-shock or pressure-temperature loading of an RPV. Tests were conducted under biaxial load ratios ranging from uniaxial to equibiaxial. These tests demonstrated that biaxial loading can have a pronounced effect on shallow-flaw fracture toughness in the lower transition temperature region for RPV materials. The cruciform fracture toughness data were used to evaluate fracture methodologies for predicting the observed effects of biaxial loading on shallow-flaw fracture toughness. Initial emphasis was placed on assessment of stress-based methodologies. namely, the J-Q formulation, the Dodds-Anderson toughness scaling model, and the Weibull approach. Applications of these methodologies based on the hydrostatic stress fracture criterion indicated an effect of loading-biaxiality on fracture toughness, the conventional maximum principal stress criterion indicated no effect.

  17. Failure behavior of internally pressurized flawed and unflawed steam generator tubing at high temperatures -- Experiments and comparison with model predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, S.; Shack, W.J.; Diercks, D.R.; Mruk, K.; Franklin, J.; Knoblich, L.

    1998-03-01

    This report summarizes experimental work performed at Argonne National Laboratory on the failure of internally pressurized steam generator tubing at high temperatures ({le} 700 C). A model was developed for predicting failure of flawed and unflawed steam generator tubes under internal pressure and temperature histories postulated to occur during severe accidents. The model was validated by failure tests on specimens with part-through-wall axial and circumferential flaws of various lengths and depths, conducted under various constant and ramped internal pressure and temperature conditions. The failure temperatures predicted by the model for two temperature and pressure histories, calculated for severe accidents initiated by a station blackout, agree very well with tests performed on both flawed and unflawed specimens.

  18. A comparative study of experimental and finite element analysis on submillimeter flaws by laser and ultrasonic excited thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai; Fernandes, Henrique; Yu, Lingyao; Hassler, Ulf; Genest, Marc; Robitaille, François; Joncas, Simon; Sheng, Yunlong; Maldague, Xavier

    2016-05-01

    Stitching is used to reduce dry-core and reinforce T-joint structure. However, it might cause new types of flaws, especially submillimeter flaws. In this paper, new approaches including micro-VT, lock-in micro-LLT and micro-LST based on both lock-in and pulse methods are used to detect submillimeter flaws in stitched CFRP. A comparison of laser excitation thermography and micro-VT on micro-porosities is conducted. Micro-CT is used to validate the infrared results. Then, a finite element analysis (FEA) is performed. The geometrical model needed for finite element discretization was developed from micro-CT measurements. The model is validated for the experimental results. Finally a comprehensive experimental and simulation comparison of micro-LLT and micro-LST based on both lock-in and pulse methods is conducted.

  19. Flaw growth behavior in thick welded plates of 2219-T87 aluminum at room and cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, R. G.; Glorioso, S. V.; Medlock, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    Axial load fatigue and fracture tests were conducted on thick welded plates of 2219-T87 aluminum alloy to determine the tensile strength properties and the flaw growth behavior in electron beam, gas metal arc, and pulse current gas tungsten arc welds for plates 6.35 centimeters (2.5 in.) thick. The tests were conducted in room temperature air and in liquid nitrogen environments. Specimens were tested in both the as-welded and the aged after welding conditions. The experimental crack growth rate were correlated with theoretical crack growth rate predictions for semielliptical surface flaws.

  20. Experimental constraints on the energy budget of dynamic gouge formation: effects of rock strength, material heterogeneity, and initial flaw characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Ashley; Barber, Troy; Borjas, Christopher; Ghaffari, Hamed

    2016-04-01

    Fault core materials are characterized by substantial grain size reduction relative to host and damage zone rocks. The properties of these materials control fault strength and frictional behavior, and they record valuable information about rupture and slip processes. At high strain rates and large stress amplitudes characteristic of earthquake rupture tips, rock failure passes through a fragmentation transition from discrete fracture to pulverization; therefore much of the observed grain size reduction at the leading edge of propagating earthquake ruptures. Past examinations of particle size distributions in gouge formed in the cores of natural faults have led to contrasting conclusions that during a single event, the energy associated with creation of new surface area during this grain size reduction can be as large as 50%, or as little as <1% of the earthquake energy budget; however these estimates are difficult to confirm due to (A) challenges associated with accurate particle size measurement and (B) uncertainty regarding the variety of (not-necessarily coseismic) physico-chemical processes that may contribute to the observed grain size reduction. Here we study the micromechanics and energy budget of dynamic rock fragmentation under impulsive compressive loads using a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar. We present new experimental results on Arkansas Novaculite and Westerly Granite coupled with microstructural observations and BET surface area measurements of post-mortem specimens. We show that the energy partitioned into creation of new surface areas approaches a significant portion of the total dissipated energy during our experiments, but this partitioning can be buffered by the presence of flaws and/or significant material heterogeneity. The results of this work have important implications for lithologic controls on gouge formation and energy partitioning during earthquakes.

  1. Gun shows and gun violence: fatally flawed study yields misleading results.

    PubMed

    Wintemute, Garen J; Hemenway, David; Webster, Daniel; Pierce, Glenn; Braga, Anthony A

    2010-10-01

    A widely publicized but unpublished study of the relationship between gun shows and gun violence is being cited in debates about the regulation of gun shows and gun commerce. We believe the study is fatally flawed. A working paper entitled "The Effect of Gun Shows on Gun-Related Deaths: Evidence from California and Texas" outlined this study, which found no association between gun shows and gun-related deaths. We believe the study reflects a limited understanding of gun shows and gun markets and is not statistically powered to detect even an implausibly large effect of gun shows on gun violence. In addition, the research contains serious ascertainment and classification errors, produces results that are sensitive to minor specification changes in key variables and in some cases have no face validity, and is contradicted by 1 of its own authors' prior research. The study should not be used as evidence in formulating gun policy.

  2. Sampling flies or sampling flaws? Experimental design and inference strength in forensic entomology.

    PubMed

    Michaud, J-P; Schoenly, Kenneth G; Moreau, G

    2012-01-01

    Forensic entomology is an inferential science because postmortem interval estimates are based on the extrapolation of results obtained in field or laboratory settings. Although enormous gains in scientific understanding and methodological practice have been made in forensic entomology over the last few decades, a majority of the field studies we reviewed do not meet the standards for inference, which are 1) adequate replication, 2) independence of experimental units, and 3) experimental conditions that capture a representative range of natural variability. Using a mock case-study approach, we identify design flaws in field and lab experiments and suggest methodological solutions for increasing inference strength that can inform future casework. Suggestions for improving data reporting in future field studies are also proposed.

  3. Computer analysis of two-dimensional fatigue flaw-growth problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, R. G.; Kavanaugh, H. C.; Stuckey, B.

    1972-01-01

    A description is given of a computer program for analyzing the crack propagation in cyclic loaded structures. By using equations for the stress intensity factors for surface and embedded flaws, the capability of ascertaining lengthwise crack growth as well as crack growth through the thickness of the structure was determined. Equations used are written in general form so that many other types of crack growth problems, such as through the thickness type cracks, can be analyzed. Provisions have been made in the computer program to analyze crack growth for repeated blocks of variable-amplitude fatigue load spectra. Additional features of the computer program include a variable print interval and a variable integration interval to minimize computer printout and computer run time. A source listing and instructions for using the computer program are included.

  4. Solar-stimulated flaw and water incursion detection in fiberglass structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schivley, James D.

    1994-03-01

    Fiberglass is a combination of glass fiber reinforcing material and plastic resin. The advantages far outweigh the disadvantages that are commonly found in commercial structures. Fiberglass does not suffer from dry rot or worms as found with wood; from rust, a common problem with steel; or from electrolysis, common problems with both steel and aluminum. However, compared to steel, fiberglass has low fatigue and buckling strengths. This can cause delaminations where stress concentrations are located. Many other factors contribute to delaminations that are invisible to the eye. For this reason an IR thermographic procedure was developed to detect these delaminations and other flaws in fiberglass structures. Due to the confidentiality of this project, neither the name of client or the location of this fiberglass structure will be reviled in this paper.

  5. A new flaw inspection technique based on infrared thermal images under Joule effect heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakagami, Takahide; Ogura, Keiji

    1992-11-01

    A new nondestructive inspection technique using infrared thermography was proposed, in which the thermal image of the surface temperature on a heated sample was used to identify flaws and defects. Joule effect heating by an electric current was employed to heat the sample instantaneously. Both numerical and experimental studies were conducted on the resolution and the availability in the detection of the through-thickness and surface cracks embedded in steel plates. The results showed that a singular concentration was observed at the crack tips in the surface temperature field in the transient stage of heat conduction, and the cracks were found to be sensitively detected from such a singular temperature field in the early transient stage. This technique was also applied to the inspection of the delamination defect in carbon-fiber reinforced plastics.

  6. Fatigue flaw growth assessment and inclusion of stratification to the LBB assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Samohyl, P.

    1997-04-01

    The application of the LBB requires also fatigue flaw growth assessment. This analysis was performed for PWR nuclear power plants types VVER 440/230, VVER 440/213c, VVER 1000/320. Respecting that these NPP`s were designed according to Russian codes that differ from US codes it was needed to compare these approaches. Comparison with our experimental data was accomplished, too. Margins of applicability of the US methods and their modifications for the materials used for construction of Czech and Slovak NPP`s are shown. Computer code accomplishing the analysis according to described method is presented. Some measurement and calculations show that thermal stratifications in horizontal pipelines can lead to additive loads that are not negligible and can be dangerous. An attempt to include these loads induced by steady-state stratification was made.

  7. Solar-stimulated flaw and water incursion detection in fiberglass structures

    SciTech Connect

    Schivley, J.D.

    1994-12-31

    Fiberglass is a combination of glass fiber reinforcing material and plastic resin. The advantages far outweigh the disadvantages that are commonly found in commercial structures. Fiberglass does not suffer from dry rot or worms as found with wood; from rust, a common problem with steel; or from electrolysis, common problems with both steel and aluminum. However, compared to steel, fiberglass has low fatigue and buckling strengths. This can cause delaminations where stress concentrations are located. Many other factors contribute to delaminations which are ``invisible`` to the eye. For this reason an infrared thermographic procedure was developed to detect these delaminates and other flaws in fiberglass structures. Due to the confidentiality of this project, neither the name of client or the location of this fiberglass structure will be revealed in this paper. At the time of publication, authorization has not been obtained to release photographs or drawings.

  8. Ear examination

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003340.htm Ear examination To use the sharing features on this page, ... ear References King EF, Couch ME. History, physical examination, and the preoperative evaluation. In: Flint PW, Haughey ...

  9. Analysis and Test of Deep Flaws in Thin Sheets of Aluminum and Titanium. Volume 2: Crack Opening Displacement and Stress-Strain Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finger, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    Static fracture tests were performed on surface flawed specimens of aluminum and titanium alloys. A simulated proof overload cycle was applied prior to all of the cyclic tests. Variables included in each test series were flaw shapes and thickness. Additionally, test temperature was a variable for the aluminum test series. The crack opening displacement and stress-strain data obtained are presented.

  10. Unfit for Human Consumption: The Problem of Flawed Writing in Criminal Justice and What to Do about It.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbons, Don C.

    1995-01-01

    Provides an account of the processes that are involved in the production of "Crime and Delinquency." Asserts that flawed writing in criminology and criminal justice appears to be a systemic rather than an individual one. Suggests to authors or prospective authors ways in which writing can be improved. (LKS)

  11. The detection of tightly closed flaws by nondestructive testing (NDT) methods. [fatigue crack formation in aluminum alloy test specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rummel, W. D.; Rathke, R. A.; Todd, P. H., Jr.; Mullen, S. J.

    1975-01-01

    Liquid penetrant, ultrasonic, eddy current and X-radiographic techniques were optimized and applied to the evaluation of 2219-T87 aluminum alloy test specimens in integrally stiffened panel, and weld panel configurations. Fatigue cracks in integrally stiffened panels, lack-of-fusion in weld panels, and fatigue cracks in weld panels were the flaw types used for evaluation. A 2319 aluminum alloy weld filler rod was used for all welding to produce the test specimens. Forty seven integrally stiffened panels containing a total of 146 fatigue cracks, ninety three lack-of-penetration (LOP) specimens containing a total of 239 LOP flaws, and one-hundred seventeen welded specimens containing a total of 293 fatigue cracks were evaluated. Nondestructive test detection reliability enhancement was evaluated during separate inspection sequences in the specimens in the 'as-machined or as-welded', post etched and post proof loaded conditions. Results of the nondestructive test evaluations were compared to the actual flaw size obtained by measurement of the fracture specimens after completing all inspection sequences. Inspection data were then analyzed to provide a statistical basis for determining the flaw detection reliability.

  12. Contribution to the leak before break behavior of piping made of high tough material and containing circumferential flaws

    SciTech Connect

    Stadtmueller, W.; Sturm, D.

    1996-12-31

    Since 1993 MPA Stuttgart is engaged in two new research projects in the field of Leak-Before-Break (LBB) behavior of austenitic piping. The pipes are fabricated in the dimensions O.D. {times} t = 219 x 14 mm resp. 331 x 32 mm and prepared with fatigue precracked, circumferential flaws of various depth and up to a crack length equivalent to 2{alpha} = 270 deg. The flaw location is in the base material or in site-made girth welds. The pipes are loaded with internal pressure and external bending moment at room temperature. In this paper the results of the tested pipes with 219 mm diameter containing through-wall flaws are represented as a comparison with the results of applied analytical methods. On these pipes the crack initiation clearly occurred before maximum bending moment, which was attained under full yielding conditions even in case of the 180 deg through-wall flaw. With the applied analytical methods crack initiation as well as maximum load could be assessed in a realistic manner.

  13. Fracture assessment of HSST Plate 14 shallow-flaw cruciform bend specimens tested under biaxial loading conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, B.R.; McAfee, W.J.; Williams, P.T.; Pennell, W.E.

    1998-06-01

    A technology to determine shallow-flaw fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels is being developed for application to the safety assessment of RPVs containing postulated shallow surface flaws. Matrices of cruciform beam tests were developed to investigate and quantify the effects of temperature, biaxial loading, and specimen size on fracture initiation toughness of two-dimensional (constant depth), shallow, surface flaws. The cruciform beam specimens were developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to introduce a far-field, out-of-plane biaxial stress component in the test section that approximates the nonlinear stresses resulting from pressurized-thermal-shock or pressure-temperature loading of an RPV. Tests were conducted under biaxial load ratios ranging from uniaxial to equibiaxial. These tests demonstrated that biaxial loading can have a pronounced effect on shallow-flaw fracture toughness in the lower transition temperature region for an RPV material. The cruciform fracture toughness data were used to evaluate fracture methodologies for predicting the observed effects of biaxial loading on shallow-flaw fracture toughness. Initial emphasis was placed on assessment of stress-based methodologies, namely, the J-Q formulation, the Dodds-Anderson toughness scaling model, and the Weibull approach. Applications of these methodologies based on the hydrostatic stress fracture criterion indicated an effect of loading-biaxiality on fracture toughness; the conventional maximum principal stress criterion indicated no effect. A three-parameter Weibull model based on the hydrostatic stress criterion is shown to correlate the experimentally observed biaxial effect on cleavage fracture toughness by providing a scaling mechanism between uniaxial and biaxial loading states.

  14. A scanning laser source and a microcantilever ultrasound receiver for detection of surface flaws in microdevices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Younghoon; Krishnaswamy, Sridhar

    2005-05-01

    In recent work at Northwestern University, we have shown that near-field scattering of ultrasound generated by a Scanning Laser Source (SLS) can be used to effectively identify surface flaws in macroscale structures. In past work, the laser ultrasound source was in the near-field of a scatterer and a piezoelectric detector was used to measure the ultrasound in the far field. It was observed that distinct variations are observed in the far-field signals as the SLS scans past surface-breaking flaws. These changes were attributed to the near-field scatterer redirecting parts of the ultrasonic beam (which might otherwise have gone into the bulk of the object) towards the far-field detector. We now propose an extension of the SLS approach to map defects in microdevices by bringing both the generator and the receiver to the near-field scattering region of the defects. For the purpose of near-field ultrasound measurement, the receiving transducer has to be made very small as well. To facilitate this, silicon microcantilever probes are fabricated and their acoustical characteristics are first investigated. Silicon cantilevers with tip and chip body are fabricated using isotropic reactive ion etching and anisotropic KOH etching. To characterize the free cantilever vibration, the chip body with the microcantilever is excited by an ultrasonic transducer and a Michelson interferometer is used to monitor the cantilever motion. The fundamental frequency of the microcantilever is measured and compared with analytically calculated fundamental frequency assuming the cross sections of the cantilevers are rectangular. Next, the performance of the fabricated microcantilevers as ultrasound detectors is investigated. The microcantilever is used essentially as a profilometer by contacting it to the specimen surface. Surface and bulk acoustic waves are generated with specific narrowband frequencies and the surface ultrasonic displacements are detected using the microcantilever probe. Next

  15. Certain Grain Foods Can Be Meaningful Contributors to Nutrient Density in the Diets of U.S. Children and Adolescents: Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2009–2012

    PubMed Central

    Papanikolaou, Yanni; Fulgoni, Victor L.

    2017-01-01

    Grain foods may play an important role in delivering nutrients to the diet of children and adolescents. The present study determined grain food sources of energy/nutrients in U.S. children and adolescents using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2009–2012. Analyses of grain food sources were conducted using a 24-h recall in participants 2–18 years old (N = 6109). Sources of nutrients contained in grain foods were determined using U.S. Department of Agriculture nutrient composition databases and excluded mixed dishes. Mean energy and nutrient intakes from the total diet and from various grain foods were adjusted for the sample design using appropriate weights. All grains provided 14% ± 0.2% kcal/day (263 ± 5 kcal/day), 22.5% ± 0.3% (3 ± 0.1 g/day) dietary fiber, 39.3% ± 0.5% (238 ± 7 dietary folate equivalents (DFE)/day) folate and 34.9% ± 0.5% (5.6 ± 0.1 mg/day) iron in the total diet in children and adolescents. The current analyses showed that certain grain foods, in particular breads, rolls and tortillas, ready-to-eat cereals and quick breads and bread products, are meaningful contributors of folate, iron, thiamin, niacin and dietary fiber, a nutrient of public health concern as outlined by the 2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Thus, specific grain foods contribute to nutrient density and have the potential to increase the consumption of several under-consumed nutrients in children and adolescents. PMID:28230731

  16. Marine Protected Dramas: The Flaws of the Brazilian National System of Marine Protected Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhardinger, Leopoldo C.; Godoy, Eduardo A. S.; Jones, Peter J. S.; Sales, Gilberto; Ferreira, Beatrice P.

    2011-04-01

    This article discusses the current problems and issues associated with the implementation of a National System of Marine Protected Areas in Brazil. MPA managers and higher governmental level authorities were interviewed about their perceptions of the implementation of a national MPA strategy and the recent changes in the institutional arrangement of government marine conservation agencies. Interviewees' narratives were generally pessimistic and the National System was perceived as weak, with few recognizable marine conservation outcomes on the ground. The following major flaws were identified: poor inter-institutional coordination of coastal and ocean governance; institutional crisis faced by the national government marine conservation agency; poor management within individual MPAs; problems with regional networks of marine protected areas; an overly bureaucratic management and administrative system; financial shortages creating structural problems and a disconnect between MPA policy and its delivery. Furthermore, a lack of professional motivation and a pessimistic atmosphere was encountered during many interviews, a malaise which we believe affects how the entire system is able to respond to crises. Our findings highlight the need for a better understanding of the role of `leadership' in the performance of socio-ecological systems (such as MPA networks), more effective official evaluation mechanisms, more localized audits of (and reforms if necessary to) Brazil's federal biodiversity conservation agency (ICMBio), and the need for political measures to promote state leadership and support. Continuing to focus on the designation of more MPAs whilst not fully addressing these issues will achieve little beyond fulfilling, on paper, Brazil's international marine biodiversity commitments.

  17. Toward smart aerospace structures: design of a piezoelectric sensor and its analog interface for flaw detection.

    PubMed

    Boukabache, Hamza; Escriba, Christophe; Fourniols, Jean-Yves

    2014-10-31

    Structural health monitoring using noninvasive methods is one of the major challenges that aerospace manufacturers face in this decade. Our work in this field focuses on the development and the system integration of millimetric piezoelectric sensors/ actuators to generate and measure specific guided waves. The aim of the application is to detect mechanical flaws on complex composite and alloy structures to quantify efficiently the global structures' reliability. The study begins by a physical and analytical analysis of a piezoelectric patch. To preserve the structure's integrity, the transducers are directly pasted onto the surface which leads to a critical issue concerning the interfacing layer. In order to improve the reliability and mitigate the influence of the interfacing layer, the global equations of piezoelectricity are coupled with a load transfer model. Thus we can determine precisely the shear strain developed on the surface of the structure. To exploit the generated signal, a high precision analog charge amplifier coupled to a double T notch filter were designed and scaled. Finally, a novel joined time-frequency analysis based on a wavelet decomposition algorithm is used to extract relevant structures signatures. Finally, this paper provides examples of application on aircraft structure specimens and the feasibility of the system is thus demonstrated.

  18. The competing roles of microstructure and flaw size on the fatigue limit of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGreevy, Timothy Edward

    1998-12-01

    Slip band and crack formation, propagation, and arrest are the active mechanisms in the fatigue process as was first observed in 1903. However, engineers relied on macroscopic properties such as hardness and tensile strength to predict fatigue limits since analytical tools to model the process did not exist. Many empirical modifications to the fatigue limit have since been made to account for variables such as surface roughness, state of stress, inclusion content, environmental effects, etc. A method is proposed to qualitatively and quantitatively predict the effects of several of these parameters on the fatigue limit of metals, specifically steels. Research includes the development and verification of an analytical model that addresses the fatigue process, namely the threshold condition of non-propagating cracks. Two parameters are identified to govern the fatigue resistance: non-propagating crack size and crack barrier strength. The concept of three defect types associated with three different flaw dominated fatigue regimes is introduced. Furthermore, application of the model to fatigue mechanisms in high strength steels, synergistic effects of surface finish and intergranular cracks, competition between surface and subsurface fatigue nucleation, and unexplained observations and scatter in fatigue behavior is demonstrated. Overall, the model is proven as a simple and robust tool for qualifying and statistically quantifying material behavior. In addition, the model can be implemented in material screening, selection, and processing as well as a guide for future material research and design.

  19. Toward Smart Aerospace Structures: Design of a Piezoelectric Sensor and Its Analog Interface for Flaw Detection

    PubMed Central

    Boukabache, Hamza; Escriba, Christophe; Fourniols, Jean-Yves

    2014-01-01

    Structural health monitoring using noninvasive methods is one of the major challenges that aerospace manufacturers face in this decade. Our work in this field focuses on the development and the system integration of millimetric piezoelectric sensors/ actuators to generate and measure specific guided waves. The aim of the application is to detect mechanical flaws on complex composite and alloy structures to quantify efficiently the global structures' reliability. The study begins by a physical and analytical analysis of a piezoelectric patch. To preserve the structure's integrity, the transducers are directly pasted onto the surface which leads to a critical issue concerning the interfacing layer. In order to improve the reliability and mitigate the influence of the interfacing layer, the global equations of piezoelectricity are coupled with a load transfer model. Thus we can determine precisely the shear strain developed on the surface of the structure. To exploit the generated signal, a high precision analog charge amplifier coupled to a double T notch filter were designed and scaled. Finally, a novel joined time-frequency analysis based on a wavelet decomposition algorithm is used to extract relevant structures signatures. Finally, this paper provides examples of application on aircraft structure specimens and the feasibility of the system is thus demonstrated. PMID:25365457

  20. Convective Origin Gavitational Currents In The Flaw Polynyas of The Laptev Sea Caused By Intensive Freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovin, P.

    Against the background of low winter air temperatures in the Arctic each opening of a quasi-steady flaw polynya causes the burst of the local freezing. Intensive brine ejec- tion in the water column leads to vigorous 3-D turbulent convection. While reaching the seasonal pycnocline by Richardson numbers Ri>10, the 3-D convective turbulent layer poorly interacts with the pycnocline and spreads off the polynya limits under fast ice as a 3-D gravitational turbulent current. Initial, local scheme of baroclinic currents is formed near the fast ice edge, while a compensation counter-current is generated to the polynya in the upper quasi-uniform layer. Henceforward, it transforms into a quasi- 2D mesoscale current is formed because of baroclinic instability and the Cori- olis force. Direction of the quasi-2D mesoscale current in quasi-stationary conditions coincides with orientation of the fast ice edge. It is of a large-scale, and it develops along the whole length of the polynya. The proposed system of formation and evolu- tion of the gravitational currents in the region of the polynya is based on the results of laboratory modeling and in many traits is supported by observational data in the regions of polynyas in the Laptev Sea

  1. Exploring the hand hygiene competence of student nurses: a case of flawed self assessment.

    PubMed

    Cole, Mark

    2009-05-01

    Hand hygiene remains the single most effective measure to prevent hospital acquired infection and yet poor compliance is reported repeatedly. Nurses represent the largest labour group and perform the greatest amount of direct patient care in the contemporary National Health Service. They receive their initial hand hygiene training in the pre-registration curriculum within a competence framework based on knowledge, skills and attitudes. The pre-eminent training method is one that delivers behavioural competence, making the tacit assumption that compliance will follow. In this study a mixed methods approach demonstrated that students overestimated their knowledge and skills, found it difficult to give an objective account of their performance, and reported an improbable level of compliance. The reasons why people can be self serving in their judgements may be due to information processing errors, exacerbated by the model of education and training. Flawed self assessments may present major barriers to improved performance if students view their compliance as better than it actually is. Conceptualising hand hygiene as a taxonomy of learning and introducing the cognitive strategies of reflection and self assessment would better enable students to problem solve, seek out new information, draw on past experience and gain greater and deeper understanding of the complex topic of hand hygiene behaviour.

  2. The flaws of laser Doppler in negative-pressure wound therapy research.

    PubMed

    Kairinos, Nicolas; McKune, Andrew; Solomons, Michael; Hudson, Donald A; Kahn, Delawir

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies, using modalities other than laser Doppler, have indicated that perfusion during negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is reduced, contrary to world literature. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether the measuring technique of the laser Doppler could be influenced by the compressive nature of NPWT dressings and whether this could explain the conflicting findings. A hypothesis that it may be possible for laser Doppler to record similar readings to those obtained during NPWT by merely compressing tissues manually was tested on 12 NPWT dressings, with each undergoing an alternating series of manual compressive forces and NPWT (-125 mmHg). During the periods of NPWT (n = 12), the mean perfusion recording increased in five experiments, reduced in six, and remained unchanged in one. During the period when manual pressure was applied (n = 12), there was a mean increase in perfusion in six experiments and a reduction in six. The type of change in perfusion (increase or decrease) was the same for both NPWT and manual pressure in 10 of the 12 experiments. In conclusion, laser Doppler can incorrectly record increased perfusion when tissues are compressed, implying that it is flawed in the field of NPWT research as tissues are always compressed to some degree by the NPWT dressing.

  3. Flaws detection and localization in weld structure using the topological energy method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubeigt, Emma; Mensah, Serge; Rakotonarivo, Sandrine; Chaix, Jean-François; Gobillot, Gilles; Baqué, François

    2017-02-01

    The non-destructive testing of austenitic welds using ultrasound plays an important role in the assessment of the structural integrity and safety of critical structures in a nuclear reactor. The bedspring and the deck are complex welded structures of very restricted access; the ability to reliably detect and locate defects like cracks is therefore a difficult challenge. Ultrasonic testing is a well-recognized non-invasive technique which exhibits high characterization performances in homogeneous media (steel). However, its capabilities are hampered when operating in heterogeneous and anisotropic austenitic welds because of deviation and splitting of the ultrasonic beam. In order to rise to this important challenge, a model-based method is proposed, which takes into account a prior knowledge corresponding to the welding procedure specifications that condition the austenitic grains orientation within the weld and thus the wave propagation. The topological imaging method implemented is a differential approach which, compares signals from the reference defect-free medium to the inspected medium. It relies on combinations of two computed ultrasonic fields, one forward and one adjoint. Numerical simulations and experiments have been carried out to validate the practical relevance of this approach to detect and locate a flaw in a weld.

  4. Marine protected dramas: the flaws of the Brazilian National System of Marine Protected Areas.

    PubMed

    Gerhardinger, Leopoldo C; Godoy, Eduardo A S; Jones, Peter J S; Sales, Gilberto; Ferreira, Beatrice P

    2011-04-01

    This article discusses the current problems and issues associated with the implementation of a National System of Marine Protected Areas in Brazil. MPA managers and higher governmental level authorities were interviewed about their perceptions of the implementation of a national MPA strategy and the recent changes in the institutional arrangement of government marine conservation agencies. Interviewees' narratives were generally pessimistic and the National System was perceived as weak, with few recognizable marine conservation outcomes on the ground. The following major flaws were identified: poor inter-institutional coordination of coastal and ocean governance; institutional crisis faced by the national government marine conservation agency; poor management within individual MPAs; problems with regional networks of marine protected areas; an overly bureaucratic management and administrative system; financial shortages creating structural problems and a disconnect between MPA policy and its delivery. Furthermore, a lack of professional motivation and a pessimistic atmosphere was encountered during many interviews, a malaise which we believe affects how the entire system is able to respond to crises. Our findings highlight the need for a better understanding of the role of 'leadership' in the performance of socio-ecological systems (such as MPA networks), more effective official evaluation mechanisms, more localized audits of (and reforms if necessary to) Brazil's federal biodiversity conservation agency (ICMBio), and the need for political measures to promote state leadership and support. Continuing to focus on the designation of more MPAs whilst not fully addressing these issues will achieve little beyond fulfilling, on paper, Brazil's international marine biodiversity commitments.

  5. THE CHOICE OF OPTIMAL STRUCTURE OF ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK CLASSIFIER INTENDED FOR CLASSIFICATION OF WELDING FLAWS

    SciTech Connect

    Sikora, R.; Chady, T.; Baniukiewicz, P.; Caryk, M.; Piekarczyk, B.

    2010-02-22

    Nondestructive testing and evaluation are under continuous development. Currently researches are concentrated on three main topics: advancement of existing methods, introduction of novel methods and development of artificial intelligent systems for automatic defect recognition (ADR). Automatic defect classification algorithm comprises of two main tasks: creating a defect database and preparing a defect classifier. Here, the database was built using defect features that describe all geometrical and texture properties of the defect. Almost twenty carefully selected features calculated for flaws extracted from real radiograms were used. The radiograms were obtained from shipbuilding industry and they were verified by qualified operator. Two weld defect's classifiers based on artificial neural networks were proposed and compared. First model consisted of one neural network model, where each output neuron corresponded to different defect group. The second model contained five neural networks. Each neural network had one neuron on output and was responsible for detection of defects from one group. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of the neural networks classifiers, the mean square errors were calculated for test radiograms and compared.

  6. Cross-polarization confocal imaging of subsurface flaws in silicon nitride.

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Z.; Sun, J. G.; Pei, Z.

    2011-03-01

    A cross-polarization confocal microscopy (CPCM) method was developed to image subsurface flaws in optically translucent silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) ceramics. Unlike conventional confocal microscopy, which measures reflected light so is applicable only to transparent and semi-transparent materials, CPCM detects scattered light from subsurface while filtering out the reflected light from ceramic surface. For subsurface imaging, the refractive-index mismatch between imaging (air) and imaged (ceramic) medium may cause image distortion and reduce resolution in the depth direction. This effect, characterized by an axial scaling factor (ASF), was analyzed and experimentally determined for glass and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} materials. The experimental CPCM system was used to image Hertzian C-cracks generated by various indentation loads in the subsurface of a Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} specimen. It was demonstrated that CPCM may provide detailed information of subsurface cracks, such as crack angle and path, and subsurface microstructural variations.

  7. Phased Array Ultrasonic Examination of Reactor Coolant System (Carbon Steel-to-CASS) Dissimilar Metal Weld Mockup Specimen

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, S. L.; Cinson, A. D.; Diaz, A. A.; Anderson, M. T.

    2015-11-23

    In the summer of 2009, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff traveled to the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) NDE Center in Charlotte, North Carolina, to conduct phased-array ultrasonic testing on a large bore, reactor coolant pump nozzle-to-safe-end mockup. This mockup was fabricated by FlawTech, Inc. and the configuration originated from the Port St. Lucie nuclear power plant. These plants are Combustion Engineering-designed reactors. This mockup consists of a carbon steel elbow with stainless steel cladding joined to a cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) safe-end with a dissimilar metal weld and is owned by Florida Power & Light. The objective of this study, and the data acquisition exercise held at the EPRI NDE Center, were focused on evaluating the capabilities of advanced, low-frequency phased-array ultrasonic testing (PA-UT) examination techniques for detection and characterization of implanted circumferential flaws and machined reflectors in a thick-section CASS dissimilar metal weld component. This work was limited to PA-UT assessments using 500 kHz and 800 kHz probes on circumferential flaws only, and evaluated detection and characterization of these flaws and machined reflectors from the CASS safe-end side only. All data were obtained using spatially encoded, manual scanning techniques. The effects of such factors as line-scan versus raster-scan examination approaches were evaluated, and PA-UT detection and characterization performance as a function of inspection frequency/wavelength, were also assessed. A comparative assessment of the data is provided, using length-sizing root-mean-square-error and position/localization results (flaw start/stop information) as the key criteria for flaw characterization performance. In addition, flaw signal-to-noise ratio was identified as the key criterion for detection performance.

  8. Automated Flaw Detection Scheme For Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Weld Specimens Using Hilbert Huang Transform Of Ultrasonic Phased Array Data

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, T.; Majumdar, Shantanu; Udpa, L.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Crawford, Susan L.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work is to develop processing algorithms to detect and localize the flaws using NDE ultrasonic data. Data was collected using cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) weld specimens on-loan from the U.S. nuclear power industry’s Pressurized Water Reactor Owners Group (PWROG) specimen set. Each specimen consists of a centrifugally cast stainless steel (CCSS) pipe section welded to a statically cast (SCSS) or wrought (WRSS) section. The paper presents a novel automated flaw detection and localization scheme using low frequency ultrasonic phased array inspection signals in the weld and heat affected zone of the base materials. The major steps of the overall scheme are preprocessing and region of interest (ROI) detection followed by the Hilbert Huang transform (HHT) of A-scans in the detected ROIs. HHT offers time-frequency-energy distribution for each ROI. The accumulation of energy in a particular frequency band is used as a classification feature for the particular ROI.

  9. Non-destructive evaluation means and method of flaw reconstruction utilizing an ultrasonic multi-viewing transducer data acquistion system

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Donald O.; Wormley, Samuel J.

    1989-03-28

    A multi-viewing ultrasound transducer acquisition system for non-destructive evaluation, flaw detection and flaw reconstruction in materials. A multiple transducer assembly includes a central transducer surrounded by a plurality of perimeter transducers, each perimeter transducer having an axis of transmission which can be angularly oriented with respect to the axis of transmission of the central transducer to intersect the axis of transmission of the central transducer. A control apparatus automatically and remotely positions the transducer assembly with respect to the material by a positioning apparatus and adjusts the pe GRANT REFERENCE This invention was conceived and reduced to practice at least in part under a grant from the Department of Energy under Contract No. W-7407-ENG-82.

  10. Use of flawed multiple-choice items by the New England Journal of Medicine for continuing medical education.

    PubMed

    Stagnaro-Green, Alex S; Downing, Steven M

    2006-09-01

    Physicians in the United States are required to complete a minimum number of continuing medical education (CME) credits annually. The goal of CME is to ensure that physicians maintain their knowledge and skills throughout their medical career. The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) provides its readers with the opportunity to obtain weekly CME credits. Deviation from established item-writing principles may result in a decrease in validity evidence for tests. This study evaluated the quality of 40 NEJM MCQs using the standard evidence-based principles of effective item writing. Each multiple-choice item reviewed had at least three item flaws, with a mean of 5.1 and a range of 3 to 7. The results of this study demonstrate that the NEJM uses flawed MCQs in its weekly CME program.

  11. Intrinsic tensile properties of cocoon silk fibres can be estimated by removing flaws through repeated tensile tests

    PubMed Central

    Rajkhowa, Rangam; Kaur, Jasjeet; Wang, Xungai; Batchelor, Warren

    2015-01-01

    Silk fibres from silkworm cocoons have lower strength than spider silk and have received less attention as a source of high-performance fibres. In this work, we have used an innovative procedure to eliminate the flaws gradually of a single fibre specimen by retesting the unbroken portion of the fibre, after each fracture test. This was done multiple times so that the final test may provide the intrinsic fibre strength. During each retest, the fibre specimen began to yield once the failure load of the preceding test was exceeded. For each fibre specimen, a composite curve was constructed from multiple tests. The composite curves and analysis show that strengths of mass-produced Muga and Eri cocoon silk fibres increased from 446 to 618 MPa and from 337 to 452 MPa, respectively. Similarly, their toughness increased from 84 to 136 MJ m−3 and from 61 to 104 MJ m−3, respectively. Composite plots produced significantly less inter-specimen variations compared to values from single tests. The fibres with reduced flaws as a result of retests in the tested section have a tensile strength and toughness comparable to naturally spun dragline spider silk with a reported strength of 574 MPa and toughness of 91–158 MJ m−3, which is used as a benchmark for developing high-performance fibres. This retesting approach is likely to provide useful insights into discrete flaw distributions and intrinsic mechanical properties of other fatigue-resistant materials. PMID:25948613

  12. Development of a method to characterize high-protein dairy powders using an ultrasonic flaw detector.

    PubMed

    Hauser, M; Amamcharla, J K

    2016-02-01

    Dissolution behavior of high-protein dairy powders plays a critical role for achieving functional and nutritional characteristics of a finished food product. Current methods for evaluating powder dissolution properties are time consuming, difficult to reproduce, and subjective. Ultrasound spectroscopy is a rapid and precise method, but requires expensive equipment and skilled technicians to carry out the tests. In the present study, an ultrasonic flaw detector (UFD) was used as an economical alternative to characterize the powder dissolution properties. The objective of study was to develop a method to characterize the dissolution behavior of milk protein concentrate (MPC) using a UFD. The experimental setup included a UFD connected to a 1-MHz immersion transducer that was kept a constant distance from a reflector plate. To validate the method, 2 batches of MPC80 from a commercial manufacturer were procured and stored at 25 and 40°C for 4 wk. Focus beam reflectance measurement and solubility index were used as reference methods. Relative ultrasound velocity and ultrasound attenuation were acquired during the dissolution of MPC samples. To characterize the MPC dissolution, 4 parameters including standard deviation of relative velocity, area under the attenuation curve, and peak attenuation were extracted from ultrasound data. As the storage temperature and time increased, the area under the attenuation curve and peak height decreased, indicating a loss of solubility. The proposed UFD-based method was able to capture the changes in dissolution of MPC during storage at 25 and 40°C. It was observed that a high-quality MPC had a low standard deviation and a larger area under the attenuation curve. As the MPC aged at 40°C, the particle dispersion rate decreased and, consequently, an increase in standard deviation and reduction in area were observed. Overall, the UFD can be a low-cost method to characterize the dissolution behavior of high-protein dairy powders.

  13. Development of a probe for inner profile measurement and flaw detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshizawa, Toru; Wakayama, Toshitaka; Kamakura, Yoshihisa

    2011-08-01

    It is one of the important necessities to precisely measure the inner diameter and/or the inner profile of pipes, tubes and other objects similar in shape. Especially in mechanical engineering field, there are many requests from automobile industry because the inner surface of engine blocks and other die casts are strongly required to be inspected and measured by non-contact methods (not by the naked eyes inspection using a borescope). If the inner diameter is large enough like water pipes or drain pipes, complicated and large equipment may be applicable. However, small pipes with a diameter ranging from 10mm to 100mm are difficult to be inspected by such a large instrument as is used for sewers inspection. And we have proposed an instrument which has no moving elements such as a rotating mirror or a prism for scanning a beam. Our measurement method is based on optical sectioning using triangulation. This optically sectioned profile of an inner wall of pipe-like objects is analyzed to produce numerical data of inner diameter or profile. Here, we report recent development of the principle and applications of the optical instrument with a simple and compact configuration. In addition to profile measurement, we found flaws and defects on the inner wall were also detected by using the similar principle. Up to now, we have developed probes with the diameter of 8mm to 25mm for small size objects and another probe (80 mm in diameter) for such a larger container with the dimensional size of 600mm.

  14. Nosocomial infections from contaminated endoscopes: a flawed automated endoscope washer. An investigation using molecular epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, C J; Stolz, S M; Maki, D G

    1991-09-16

    Approximately 1 year after purchase of one manufacturer's automated endoscope washing machine, we began to detect heavy contamination of upper gastrointestinal (UGI) endoscopes cultured after cleaning and disinfection in the washer. During the first 6 months of 1988, 77% of surveillance cultures (20-mL flush through the biopsy channel) were positive for gram-negative bacilli (median concentration, 10(5) cfu/mL), most frequently Pseudomonas aeruginosa serotype 10. During the first 19 months of use of the washer, nosocomial post-UGI endoscopy colonization or infections with P. aeruginosa increased 36%. Investigations show that endoscope contamination derives from a flaw in the design of the EW-10 washer: the detergent holding tank, inlet water hose, and air vents cannot be reliably disinfected and contain heavy biofilms that recontaminate the machine after it has been disinfected, as specified by the manufacturer, with glutaraldehyde. Only by rinsing machine-cleansed endoscopes with 70% alcohol followed by forced air drying has reliable disinfection been achieved. Since adaptation of terminal alcohol treatment and drying, post-UGI endoscopy colonization or infection by P. aeruginosa has declined threefold (p less than 0.001). Testing in other centers using the manufacturer's EW-10 or EW-20 washer has shown similar contamination. In three centers, including our own, postendoscopy infections by machine-associated type 10 P. aeruginosa have been confirmed by demonstrating concordance between isolates from contaminated machines or endoscopes and from infected patients by immunoblot of whole cell lysates and by pulsed-field electrophoresis of DraI endonuclease-digested genomic DNA. This problem reaffirms the vulnerability to microbial contamination of water-containing apparatus and equipment in patient care and points up the critical importance of engineering design to prevent contamination.

  15. Combined effects of weld-induced residual stresses and flaws on the fracture strength of Ti-5Al-2.5Sn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, L. R.

    1973-01-01

    The combined effects of weld-induced residual stresses and flaws on fracture strength were experimentally evaluated by testing Ti-5Al-2.5Sn surface flawed specimens at -320F (-195C) in liquid nitrogen. Flaws were located in weld metal with crack planes either parallel to or perpendicular to gas tungsten arc weld centerlines, and in base metal with the crack plane perpendicular to the rolling direction. Tests were conducted using two different flaw sizes to effect fracture stresses at two different levels including one level either at or near, and one level well below the tensile yield strength. Three different residual stress levels were generated, measured, and tested. Results were evaluated using modified linear elastic fracture mechanics theory.

  16. Least Squares Best Fit Method for the Three Parameter Weibull Distribution: Analysis of Tensile and Bend Specimens with Volume or Surface Flaw Failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Bernard

    1996-01-01

    Material characterization parameters obtained from naturally flawed specimens are necessary for reliability evaluation of non-deterministic advanced ceramic structural components. The least squares best fit method is applied to the three parameter uniaxial Weibull model to obtain the material parameters from experimental tests on volume or surface flawed specimens subjected to pure tension, pure bending, four point or three point loading. Several illustrative example problems are provided.

  17. Density Visualization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keiter, Richard L.; Puzey, Whitney L.; Blitz, Erin A.

    2006-01-01

    Metal rods of high purity for many elements are now commercially available and may be used to construct a display of relative densities. We have constructed a display with nine metal rods (Mg, Al, Ti, V, Fe, Cu, Ag, Pb, and W) of equal mass whose densities vary from 1.74 to 19.3 g cm[superscript -3]. The relative densities of the metals may be…

  18. A comparative assessment of the wall thickness margin taking into account the initial flaws in steam line elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladshtein, V. I.

    2011-02-01

    A procedure for estimating the wall thickness margin for operation during a specified design service life under creep conditions if the metal of articles contains initial flaws is presented. The analysis is carried out taking as an example parts of steam lines made of two different grades of steel: a cast elbow with the size d = 426 × 30 mm made of 15Kh1M1FL low-alloy steel and a pipe bend with the size d = 219 × 32 mm made of EI-756 12% chromium steel. The calculated assessments are compared with the results obtained from long-term operation.

  19. Asteroid Densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britt, D. T.; Yeomans, D.; Housen, K.; Consolmagno, G.

    2005-01-01

    This data set contains a tabulation of asteroid masses, diameters, and bulk densities compiled by D. T. Britt and published in Table 1 of Britt, et al. (2002) [BRITTETAL2002] in the 'Asteroids III' volume.

  20. Electromagnetic methods for measuring materials properties of cylindrical rods and array probes for rapid flaw inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Haiyan

    2005-01-01

    field in the presence of a finite a two-layer rod and a conductive tube. The results are in very good agreement with those obtained by using a 2D finite element code. In the third part, a new probe technology with enhanced flaw detection capability is described. The new probe can reduce inspection time through the use of multiple Hall sensors. A prototype Hall array probe has been built and tested with eight individual Hall sensor ICs and a racetrack coil. Electronic hardware was developed to interface the probes to an oscilloscope or an eddy current instrument. To achieve high spatial resolution and to limit the overall probe size, high-sensitivity Hall sensor arrays were fabricated directly on a wafer using photolithographic techniques and then mounted in their unencapsulated form. The electronic hardware was then updated to interface the new probes to a laptop computer.

  1. Fundamental Flaws In The Derivation Of Stevens' Law For Taste Within Norwich's Entropy Theory of Perception

    SciTech Connect

    Nizami, Lance

    2010-03-01

    Norwich's Entropy Theory of Perception (1975-present) is a general theory of perception, based on Shannon's Information Theory. Among many bold claims, the Entropy Theory presents a truly astounding result: that Stevens' Law with an Index of 1, an empirical power relation of direct proportionality between perceived taste intensity and stimulus concentration, arises from theory alone. Norwich's theorizing starts with several extraordinary hypotheses. First, 'multiple, parallel receptor-neuron units' without collaterals 'carry essentially the same message to the brain', i.e. the rate-level curves are identical. Second, sensation is proportional to firing rate. Third, firing rate is proportional to the taste receptor's 'resolvable uncertainty'. Fourth, the 'resolvable uncertainty' is obtained from Shannon's Information Theory. Finally, 'resolvable uncertainty' also depends upon the microscopic thermodynamic density fluctuation of the tasted solute. Norwich proves that density fluctuation is density variance, which is proportional to solute concentration, all based on the theory of fluctuations in fluid composition from Tolman's classic physics text, 'The Principles of Statistical Mechanics'. Altogether, according to Norwich, perceived taste intensity is theoretically proportional to solute concentration. Such a universal rule for taste, one that is independent of solute identity, personal physiological differences, and psychophysical task, is truly remarkable and is well-deserving of scrutiny. Norwich's crucial step was the derivation of density variance. That step was meticulously reconstructed here. It transpires that the appropriate fluctuation is Tolman's mean-square fractional density fluctuation, not density variance as used by Norwich. Tolman's algebra yields a 'Stevens Index' of -1 rather than 1. As 'Stevens Index' empirically always exceeds zero, the Index of -1 suggests that it is risky to infer psychophysical laws of sensory response from information theory

  2. Fundamental Flaws In The Derivation Of Stevens' Law For Taste Within Norwich's Entropy Theory of Perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nizami, Lance

    2010-03-01

    Norwich's Entropy Theory of Perception (1975-present) is a general theory of perception, based on Shannon's Information Theory. Among many bold claims, the Entropy Theory presents a truly astounding result: that Stevens' Law with an Index of 1, an empirical power relation of direct proportionality between perceived taste intensity and stimulus concentration, arises from theory alone. Norwich's theorizing starts with several extraordinary hypotheses. First, "multiple, parallel receptor-neuron units" without collaterals "carry essentially the same message to the brain," i.e. the rate-level curves are identical. Second, sensation is proportional to firing rate. Third, firing rate is proportional to the taste receptor's "resolvable uncertainty." Fourth, the "resolvable uncertainty" is obtained from Shannon's Information Theory. Finally, "resolvable uncertainty" also depends upon the microscopic thermodynamic density fluctuation of the tasted solute. Norwich proves that density fluctuation is density variance, which is proportional to solute concentration, all based on the theory of fluctuations in fluid composition from Tolman's classic physics text, "The Principles of Statistical Mechanics." Altogether, according to Norwich, perceived taste intensity is theoretically proportional to solute concentration. Such a universal rule for taste, one that is independent of solute identity, personal physiological differences, and psychophysical task, is truly remarkable and is well-deserving of scrutiny. Norwich's crucial step was the derivation of density variance. That step was meticulously reconstructed here. It transpires that the appropriate fluctuation is Tolman's mean-square fractional density fluctuation, not density variance as used by Norwich. Tolman's algebra yields a "Stevens Index" of -1 rather than 1. As "Stevens Index" empirically always exceeds zero, the Index of -1 suggests that it is risky to infer psychophysical laws of sensory response from information theory

  3. Density-dependent covariant energy density functionals

    SciTech Connect

    Lalazissis, G. A.

    2012-10-20

    Relativistic nuclear energy density functionals are applied to the description of a variety of nuclear structure phenomena at and away fromstability line. Isoscalar monopole, isovector dipole and isoscalar quadrupole giant resonances are calculated using fully self-consistent relativistic quasiparticle randomphase approximation, based on the relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubovmodel. The impact of pairing correlations on the fission barriers in heavy and superheavy nuclei is examined. The role of pion in constructing desnity functionals is also investigated.

  4. New reference data on bone mineral density and the prevalence of osteoporosis in Korean adults aged 50 years or older: the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2008-2010.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Shik; Bae, Su-Hyun; Lee, Seung Hwa; Lee, Jungun; Lee, Dong Ryul

    2014-11-01

    This cross-sectional study was performed to investigate the reference values for bone mineral density (BMD) measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and the prevalence of osteoporosis in the Korean population by applying domestic reference data. In total, 25,043 Korean adults ≥20 yr of age (11,792 men and 13,251 women) participated in the study. The BMDs of the total hip, femoral neck, and lumbar spine were measured by DXA (Discovery-W, Hologic Inc.), and subjects with a BMD - 2.5 standard deviations or lower than the mean BMD for young adults (20-29 yr old) were considered to have osteoporosis. When applying the new reference values determined in this study from Korean subjects, the overall prevalence of osteoporosis increased in men aged ≥50 yr compared with that provided by the DXA manufacturer from Japanese subjects (12.2% vs. 7.8%, P<0.001) and decreased in postmenopausal women aged ≥50 yr (32.9% vs. 38.7%, P<0.001). According to the findings of this study, use of the reference values provided by the DXA manufacturer has resulted in the underdiagnosis of osteoporosis in Korean men and the overdiagnosis of osteoporosis in Korean women. Our data will serve as valuable reference standards for the diagnosis and management for osteoporosis in the Korean population.

  5. Determination of Critical Flaw Size in Gun Launch 40-mm GRENADE

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    fuze components. " Johnson - Cook model parameters were used and are not available for open dissemination. Boundary Conditions, Loads, and Constraints...Introduction 1 Modeling and Simulation 1 Modeling Approach 1 Model Geometry 1 Material Properties and Assignments 3 Boundary Conditions, Loads, and...been omitted in the model in order to save computation time. The absent mass was accounted for by increasing the density of the housing material , thus

  6. Growth of an Ultrathin Zirconia Film on Pt3Zr Examined by High-Resolution X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, Temperature-Programmed Desorption, Scanning Tunneling Microscopy, and Density Functional Theory

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Ultrathin (∼3 Å) zirconium oxide films were grown on a single-crystalline Pt3Zr(0001) substrate by oxidation in 1 × 10–7 mbar of O2 at 673 K, followed by annealing at temperatures up to 1023 K. The ZrO2 films are intended to serve as model supports for reforming catalysts and fuel cell anodes. The atomic and electronic structure and composition of the ZrO2 films were determined by synchrotron-based high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HR-XPS) (including depth profiling), low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Oxidation mainly leads to ultrathin trilayer (O–Zr–O) films on the alloy; only a small area fraction (10–15%) is covered by ZrO2 clusters (thickness ∼0.5–10 nm). The amount of clusters decreases with increasing annealing temperature. Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) of CO was utilized to confirm complete coverage of the Pt3Zr substrate by ZrO2, that is, formation of a closed oxide overlayer. Experiments and DFT calculations show that the core level shifts of Zr in the trilayer ZrO2 films are between those of metallic Zr and thick (bulklike) ZrO2. Therefore, the assignment of such XPS core level shifts to substoichiometric ZrOx is not necessarily correct, because these XPS signals may equally well arise from ultrathin ZrO2 films or metal/ZrO2 interfaces. Furthermore, our results indicate that the common approach of calculating core level shifts by DFT including final-state effects should be taken with care for thicker insulating films, clusters, and bulk insulators. PMID:25688293

  7. Growth of an Ultrathin Zirconia Film on Pt3Zr Examined by High-Resolution X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, Temperature-Programmed Desorption, Scanning Tunneling Microscopy, and Density Functional Theory.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Choi, Joong-Il Jake; Mayr-Schmölzer, Wernfried; Weilach, Christian; Rameshan, Christoph; Mittendorfer, Florian; Redinger, Josef; Schmid, Michael; Rupprechter, Günther

    2015-02-05

    Ultrathin (∼3 Å) zirconium oxide films were grown on a single-crystalline Pt3Zr(0001) substrate by oxidation in 1 × 10(-7) mbar of O2 at 673 K, followed by annealing at temperatures up to 1023 K. The ZrO2 films are intended to serve as model supports for reforming catalysts and fuel cell anodes. The atomic and electronic structure and composition of the ZrO2 films were determined by synchrotron-based high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HR-XPS) (including depth profiling), low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Oxidation mainly leads to ultrathin trilayer (O-Zr-O) films on the alloy; only a small area fraction (10-15%) is covered by ZrO2 clusters (thickness ∼0.5-10 nm). The amount of clusters decreases with increasing annealing temperature. Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) of CO was utilized to confirm complete coverage of the Pt3Zr substrate by ZrO2, that is, formation of a closed oxide overlayer. Experiments and DFT calculations show that the core level shifts of Zr in the trilayer ZrO2 films are between those of metallic Zr and thick (bulklike) ZrO2. Therefore, the assignment of such XPS core level shifts to substoichiometric ZrO x is not necessarily correct, because these XPS signals may equally well arise from ultrathin ZrO2 films or metal/ZrO2 interfaces. Furthermore, our results indicate that the common approach of calculating core level shifts by DFT including final-state effects should be taken with care for thicker insulating films, clusters, and bulk insulators.

  8. The Food and Drug Administration has the legal basis to restrict promotion of flawed comparative effectiveness research.

    PubMed

    Kesselheim, Aaron S; Avorn, Jerry

    2012-10-01

    Under Food and Drug Administration (FDA) policy, communications by prescription drug manufacturers must be backed by "substantial evidence" from "adequate and well-controlled investigations." But numerous exceptions permit manufacturer promotion based on data other than randomized trials. The observational research presented in the Hemikrane hypothetical case in this month's Health Affairs is methodologically flawed and also does not meet any of these exceptions. Therefore, plausible scientific and policy rationales support rules restricting the company's communication of its findings. The FDA's current reluctance to authorize promotional claims based on observational research is understandable. Further work is required to define the characteristics of high-quality observational research. However, as this field matures, higher-quality observational studies could meet the legal standard of an "adequate and well-controlled investigation." At that point, the FDA will need to issue formal guidance to minimize confusion on what kinds of observational research can meet its evidentiary standards.

  9. Multi-Canister overpack ultrasonic examination of closure weld

    SciTech Connect

    SMITH, K.E.

    1998-11-03

    The method used for non-destructive examination of the closure weld must provide adequate assurance that the weld is structurally sound for the pressure and lifting loads to be imposed, and must be consistent with NRC equivalency requirements established for the SNF Project. Given the large flaw size that would need to exist before the structural integrity of the weld is challenged, liquid penetrant testing of the root and final passes provides adequate assurance of weld quality to meet structural loads. In addition, the helium leak test provides confirmation that the containment boundary is intact and leaktight. While UT examination does provide additional evidence of weld integrity, the value of that additional evidence for this particular application does not justify performing UT examination, given the additional financial and ALARA costs associated with performing the examination.

  10. Flaws in current human training protocols for spontaneous Brain-Computer Interfaces: lessons learned from instructional design

    PubMed Central

    Lotte, Fabien; Larrue, Florian; Mühl, Christian

    2013-01-01

    While recent research on Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCI) has highlighted their potential for many applications, they remain barely used outside laboratories. The main reason is their lack of robustness. Indeed, with current BCI, mental state recognition is usually slow and often incorrect. Spontaneous BCI (i.e., mental imagery-based BCI) often rely on mutual learning efforts by the user and the machine, with BCI users learning to produce stable ElectroEncephaloGraphy (EEG) patterns (spontaneous BCI control being widely acknowledged as a skill) while the computer learns to automatically recognize these EEG patterns, using signal processing. Most research so far was focused on signal processing, mostly neglecting the human in the loop. However, how well the user masters the BCI skill is also a key element explaining BCI robustness. Indeed, if the user is not able to produce stable and distinct EEG patterns, then no signal processing algorithm would be able to recognize them. Unfortunately, despite the importance of BCI training protocols, they have been scarcely studied so far, and used mostly unchanged for years. In this paper, we advocate that current human training approaches for spontaneous BCI are most likely inappropriate. We notably study instructional design literature in order to identify the key requirements and guidelines for a successful training procedure that promotes a good and efficient skill learning. This literature study highlights that current spontaneous BCI user training procedures satisfy very few of these requirements and hence are likely to be suboptimal. We therefore identify the flaws in BCI training protocols according to instructional design principles, at several levels: in the instructions provided to the user, in the tasks he/she has to perform, and in the feedback provided. For each level, we propose new research directions that are theoretically expected to address some of these flaws and to help users learn the BCI skill more

  11. Binomial level densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuker, A. P.

    2001-08-01

    It is shown that nuclear level densities in a finite space are described by a continuous binomial function, determined by the first three moments of the Hamiltonian, and the dimensionality of the underlying vector space. Experimental values for 55Mn, 56Fe, and 60Ni are very well reproduced by the binomial form, which turns out to be almost perfectly approximated by Bethe's formula with backshift. A proof is given for which binomial densities reproduce the low moments of Hamiltonians of any rank: A strong form of the famous central limit result of Mon and French. Conditions under which the proof may be extended to the full spectrum are examined.

  12. Charter Schools: Another Flawed Educational Reform? The Series on School Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarason, Seymour B.

    This book examines why most charter schools will fail. It opens with a historical overview, describing the fate and significance of the precursor to charter schools: President Nixon's Experimental Schools Program. It then turns to the author's personal experiences in educational theory and practice, presenting and discussing the essential features…

  13. "You Are a Flaw in the Pattern": Difference, Autonomy and Bullying in YA Fiction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez-Ropero, Lourdes

    2012-01-01

    Though portrayals of bullying in children's books stretch back to Victorian public school stories, this article sees a new subgenre about bullying in young adult novels emerging in the post-Columbine years. Selected works by Jerry Spinelli, Walter Dean Myers, Jaime Adoff, Carol Plum-Ucci and Rita Williams-Garcia are examined, although the article…

  14. Ethical Issues in Covering Teen Suicide Stories: Deadly Dilemmas and Fatal Flaws.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willey, Susan

    A study examined news coverage by "The Saint Petersburg Times" of a local double teen suicide in August 1993. Focusing on how the story was covered, the study explored the newspaper's decision-making process, analyzing the process in relation to standard philosophical methods in ethics and recognized journalistic principles. As background,…

  15. SOP - Determination of Requirement Density

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, John G.; Martz, Jr., Harry E.

    2010-10-26

    The purpose of this Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) is to give guidelines on how to determine the density of a sample that will be used as the requirement density. This will be the requirement density of record for the specimens examined by Micro CT and EDS measurements. This density will then be set as the formulation requirement for radiography measurements. This SOP is referred to in TP 48— Preparation of Hydrogen Peroxide/Icing Sugar Specimens for X-ray Measurements by J. G. Reynolds and H. E. Martz.

  16. Densities and temperatures in the polar thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, L. J.

    1977-01-01

    The atomic oxygen density at 120 km, the 630 nm airglow temperature, the helium density at 300 km and the molecular nitrogen density near 400 km were examined as functions of geomagnetic latitude, geomagnetic time, season and magnetic activity level. The long-term averages of these quantities were examined so as to provide a baseline of these thermospheric parameters from which future studies may be made for comparison. The hours around magnetic noon are characterized by low temperatures, high 0 and He densities, and median nitrogen densities. The pre-midnight hours exhibit high temperatures, high He density, low nitrogen density and median 0 densities. The post-midnight sector shows low 0 and He densities, median temperatures and high nitrogen densities. These results are compared to recent models and observations and are discussed with respect to their causes due to divergence of the wind field and energy deposition in the thermosphere.

  17. Lost in the chaos: Flawed literature should not generate new disorders.

    PubMed

    Van Rooij, Antonius J; Kardefelt-Winther, Daniel

    2017-03-17

    The paper by Kuss, Griffiths, and Pontes (2016) titled "Chaos and confusion in DSM-5 diagnosis of Internet Gaming Disorder: Issues, concerns, and recommendations for clarity in the field" examines issues relating to the concept of Internet Gaming Disorder. We agree that there are serious issues and extend their arguments by suggesting that the field lacks basic theory, definitions, patient research, and properly validated and standardized assessment tools. As most studies derive data from survey research in functional populations, they exclude people with severe functional impairment and provide only limited information on the hypothesized disorder. Yet findings from such studies are widely used and often exaggerated, leading many to believe that we know more about the problem behavior than we do. We further argue that video game play is associated with several benefits and that formalizing this popular hobby as a psychiatric disorder is not without risks. It might undermine children's right to play or encourage repressive treatment programs, which ultimately threaten children's right to protection against violence. While Kuss et al. (2016) express support for the formal implementation of a disorder, we argue that before we have a proper evidence base, a sound theory, and validated assessment tools, it is irresponsible to support a formal category of disorder and doing so would solidify a confirmatory approach to research in this area.

  18. Statistics of Data Fitting: Flaws and Fixes of Polynomial Analysis of Channeled Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karstens, William; Smith, David

    2013-03-01

    Starting from general statistical principles, we have critically examined Baumeister's procedure* for determining the refractive index of thin films from channeled spectra. Briefly, the method assumes that the index and interference fringe order may be approximated by polynomials quadratic and cubic in photon energy, respectively. The coefficients of the polynomials are related by differentiation, which is equivalent to comparing energy differences between fringes. However, we find that when the fringe order is calculated from the published IR index for silicon* and then analyzed with Baumeister's procedure, the results do not reproduce the original index. This problem has been traced to 1. Use of unphysical powers in the polynomials (e.g., time-reversal invariance requires that the index is an even function of photon energy), and 2. Use of insufficient terms of the correct parity. Exclusion of unphysical terms and addition of quartic and quintic terms to the index and order polynomials yields significantly better fits with fewer parameters. This represents a specific example of using statistics to determine if the assumed fitting model adequately captures the physics contained in experimental data. The use of analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Durbin-Watson statistic to test criteria for the validity of least-squares fitting will be discussed. *D.F. Edwards and E. Ochoa, Appl. Opt. 19, 4130 (1980). Supported in part by the US Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Physics under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  19. Ares I-X Upper Stage Simulator Structural Analyses Supporting the NESC Critical Initial Flaw Size Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Phillips, Dawn R.; Raju, Ivatury S.

    2008-01-01

    The structural analyses described in the present report were performed in support of the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) Critical Initial Flaw Size (CIFS) assessment for the ARES I-X Upper Stage Simulator (USS) common shell segment. The structural analysis effort for the NESC assessment had three thrusts: shell buckling analyses, detailed stress analyses of the single-bolt joint test; and stress analyses of two-segment 10 degree-wedge models for the peak axial tensile running load. Elasto-plastic, large-deformation simulations were performed. Stress analysis results indicated that the stress levels were well below the material yield stress for the bounding axial tensile design load. This report also summarizes the analyses and results from parametric studies on modeling the shell-to-gusset weld, flange-surface mismatch, bolt preload, and washer-bearing-surface modeling. These analyses models were used to generate the stress levels specified for the fatigue crack growth assessment using the design load with a factor of safety.

  20. Nonlinear imaging (NIM) of flaws in a complex composite stiffened panel using a constructive nonlinear array (CNA) technique.

    PubMed

    Malfense Fierro, Gian Piero; Meo, Michele

    2017-02-01

    Recently, there has been high interest in the capabilities of nonlinear ultrasound techniques for damage/defect detection as these techniques have been shown to be quite accurate in imaging some particular type of damage. This paper presents a Constructive Nonlinear Array (CNA) method, for the detection and imaging of material defects/damage in a complex composite stiffened panel. CNA requires the construction of an ultrasound array in a similar manner to standard phased arrays systems, which require multiple transmitting and receiving elements. The method constructively phase-match multiple captured signals at a particular position given multiple transmit positions, similar to the total focusing method (TFM) method. Unlike most of the ultrasonic linear techniques, a longer excitation signal was used to achieve a steady-state excitation at each capturing position, so that compressive and tensile stress at defect/crack locations increases the likelihood of the generation of nonlinear elastic waves. Moreover, the technique allows the reduction of instrumentation nonlinear wave generation by relying on signal attenuation to naturally filter these errors. Experimental tests were carried out on a stiffened panel with manufacturing defects. Standard industrial linear ultrasonic test were carried out for comparison. The proposed new method allows to image damages/defects in a reliable and reproducible manner and overcomes some of the main limitations of nonlinear ultrasound techniques. In particular, the effectiveness and robustness of CNA and the advantages over linear ultrasonic were clearly demonstrated allowing a better resolution and imaging of complex and realistic flaws.

  1. Nondestructive examination of the TRMM RCS propellant tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Free, James M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper assesses the feasibility of using eddy current nondestructive examination of determine flaw sizes in completely assembled hydrazine propellant tanks. The study was performed by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center for the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) project to help determine whether existing propellant tanks could meet the fracture analysis requirements of the current pressure vessel specification, MIL-STD-1522A and, therefore be used on the TRMM spacecraft. After evaluating several nondestructive test methods, eddy current testing was selected as the most promising method for determining flaw sizes on external and internal surfaces of completely assembled tanks. Tests were conducted to confirm the detection capability of the eddy current NDE, procedures were developed to inspect two candidate tanks, and the test support equipment was designed. The non-spherical tank eddy current NDE test program was terminated when the decision was made to procure new tanks for the TRMM propulsion subsystem. The information on the development phase of this test program is presented in this paper as a reference for future investigation on the subject.

  2. Ultrasonic examination of JBK-75 strip material

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, K.V.; Cunningham, R.A. Jr.; Lewis, J.C.; McClung, R.W.

    1982-12-01

    An ultrasonic inspection system was assembled to inspect the JBK-75 stainless steel sheath material (for the Large Coil Project) for the Westinghouse-Airco superconducting magnet program. The mechanical system provided for handling the 180-kg (400-lb) coils of strip material (1.6 mm thick by 78 mm wide by 90 to 120 m long (0.064 by 3.07 in. by 300 to 400 ft)), feeding the strip through the ultrasonic inspection and cleaning stations, and respooling the coils. We inspected 54 coils of strip for both longitudinal and laminar flaws. Simulated flaws were used to calibrate both inspections. Saw-cut notches (0.28 mm deep (0.011 in., about 17% of the strip thickness)) were used to calibrate the longitudinal flaw inspections; 1.59-mm-diam (0.063-in.) flat-bottom holes drilled halfway through a calibration strip were used to calibrate the laminar flaw tests.

  3. Postirradiation examination of beryllium pebbles

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, D.S.

    1998-03-01

    Postirradiation examinations of COBRA-1A beryllium pebbles irradiated in the EBR-II fast reactor at neutron fluences which generated 2700--3700 appm helium have been performed. Measurements included density change, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The major change in microstructure is development of unusually shaped helium bubbles forming as highly non-equiaxed thin platelet-like cavities on the basal plane. Measurement of the swelling due to cavity formation was in good agreement with density change measurements.

  4. Automated flaw detection scheme for cast austenitic stainless steel weld specimens using Hilbert-Huang transform of ultrasonic phased array data

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Tariq; Majumdar, Shantanu; Udpa, Lalita; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Crawford, Susan; Diaz, Aaron; Anderson, Michael T.

    2012-05-17

    The objective of this work is to develop processing algorithms to detect and localize flaws using ultrasonic phased-array data. Data was collected on cast austenitic stainless stell (CASS) weld specimens onloan from the U.S. nuclear power industry' Pressurized Walter Reactor Owners Group (PWROG) traveling specimen set. Each specimen consists of a centrifugally cast stainless stell (CCSS) pipe section welded to a statically cst(SCSS) or wrought (WRSS) section. The paper presents a novel automated flaw detection and localization scheme using low frequency ultrasonic phased array inspection singals from the weld and heat affected zone of the based materials. The major steps of the overall scheme are preprocessing and region of interest (ROI) detection followed by the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) of A-scans in the detected ROIs. HHT offers time-frequency-energy distribution for each ROI. The Accumulation of energy in a particular frequency band is used as a classification feature for the particular ROI.

  5. Automated flaw detection scheme for cast austenitic stainless stell weld specimens using Hilbert-Huang transform of ultrasonic phased array data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Tariq; Majumdar, Shantanu; Udpa, Lalita; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Crawford, Susan; Diaz, Aaron; Anderson, Michael T.

    2012-05-01

    The objective of this work is to develop processing algorithms to detect and localize flaws using ultrasonic phased-array data. Data was collected on cast austenitic stainless stell (CASS) weld specimens onloan from the U.S. nuclear power industry' Pressurized Walter Reactor Owners Group (PWROG) traveling specimen set. Each specimen consists of a centrifugally cast stainless stell (CCSS) pipe section welded to a statically cst(SCSS) or wrought (WRSS) section. The paper presents a novel automated flaw detection and localization scheme using low frequency ultrasonic phased array inspection singals from the weld and heat affected zone of the based materials. The major steps of the overall scheme are preprocessing and region of interest (ROI) detection followed by the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) of A-scans in the detected ROIs. HHT offers time-frequency-energy distribution for each ROI. The Accumulation of energy in a particular frequency band is used as a classification feature for the particular ROI.

  6. Effects of fabrication flaws on crack initiation and arrest properties of 9% nickel steel used in LNG (liquefied natural gas) storage tanks. Final report, March 1982-December 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, C.R.; Marschall, C.; Nakagaki, M.; Wilkowski, G.; Smith, R.

    1986-03-01

    During LNG tank construction, weld discontinuities (flaws) are sometimes unintentionally produced within welded joints. The project was part of an international effort to assess the effects of these discontinuities upon crack-initiation propagation, and arrest in 9 percent nickel steel. This was undertaken because doubt persists regarding whether sufficient testing of 9% nickel has been carried out to assure LNG tank safety. In order to accomplish the goals of the project, the research included (1) the preparation of a bibliography detailing the discontinuities commonly associated with welding, (2) conducting parent plate characterization tests, (3) development of methods for the laboratory production of weld flaws, (4) performance of crack arrest tests, and (5) an assessment of the effect of different weld heat inputs on the fracture energy of standard Charpy V-notch specimens.

  7. THE INCLUSION OF INNER SURFACE BREAKING FLAWS IN PROBABILISTIC FRACTURE MECHANICS ANALYSES OF REACTOR VESSELS SUBJECTED TO PLANNED NORMAL COOL-DOWN TRANSIENTS1

    SciTech Connect

    Dickson, Terry L; Kirk, Mark

    2008-01-01

    The current regulations, as set forth by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), to insure that lightwater nuclear reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) maintain their structural integrity when subjected to planned reactor startup (heat-up) and shutdown (cool-down) transients are specified in Appendix G to 10 CFR Part 50, which incorporates by reference Appendix G to Section XI of the ASME Code. The technical basis for these regulations contains many aspects that are now broadly recognized by the technical community as being unnecessarily conservative and some plants are finding it increasingly difficult to comply with the current regulations. Consequently, a goal of current NRC research is to derive a technical basis for a risk-informed revision to the current requirements that reduces the conservatism and also is consistent with the methods previously used to develop a risk-informed revision to the regulations for accidental transients such as pressurized thermal shock (PTS). Previous publications have been successful in illustrating potential methods to provide a risk-informed relaxation to the current regulations for normal transients. Thus far, probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) analyses have been performed at 60 effective full power years (EFPY) for one of the reactors evaluated as part of the PTS re-evaluation project. In these previous analyses/publications, consistent with the assumptions utilized for this particular reactor in the PTS reevaluation, all flaws for this reactor were postulated to be embedded. The objective of this paper is to review the analysis results and conclusions from previous publications on this subject and to attempt to modify/generalize these conclusions to include RPVs postulated to contain only inner-surface breaking flaws or a combination of embedded flaws and inner-surface breaking flaws.

  8. A FRAMEWORK TO DEVELOP FLAW ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA FOR STRUCTURAL INTEGRITY ASSESSMENT OF MULTIPURPOSE CANISTERS FOR EXTENDED STORAGE OF USED NUCLEAR FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, P.; Sindelar, R.; Duncan, A.; Adams, T.

    2014-04-07

    A multipurpose canister (MPC) made of austenitic stainless steel is loaded with used nuclear fuel assemblies and is part of the transfer cask system to move the fuel from the spent fuel pool to prepare for storage, and is part of the storage cask system for on-site dry storage. This weld-sealed canister is also expected to be part of the transportation package following storage. The canister may be subject to service-induced degradation especially if exposed to aggressive environments during possible very long-term storage period if the permanent repository is yet to be identified and readied. Stress corrosion cracking may be initiated on the canister surface in the welds or in the heat affected zone because the construction of MPC does not require heat treatment for stress relief. An acceptance criteria methodology is being developed for flaw disposition should the crack-like defects be detected by periodic Inservice Inspection. The external loading cases include thermal accident scenarios and cask drop conditions with the contribution from the welding residual stresses. The determination of acceptable flaw size is based on the procedure to evaluate flaw stability provided by American Petroleum Institute (API) 579 Fitness-for-Service (Second Edition). The material mechanical and fracture properties for base and weld metals and the stress analysis results are obtained from the open literature such as NUREG-1864. Subcritical crack growth from stress corrosion cracking (SCC), and its impact on inspection intervals and acceptance criteria, is not addressed.

  9. Comparative study on submillimeter flaws in stitched T-joint carbon fiber reinforced polymer by infrared thermography, microcomputed tomography, ultrasonic c-scan and microscopic inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai; Hassler, Ulf; Genest, Marc; Fernandes, Henrique; Robitaille, Francois; Ibarra-Castanedo, Clemente; Joncas, Simon; Maldague, Xavier

    2015-10-01

    Stitching is used to reduce dry-core (incomplete infusion of T-joint core) and reinforce T-joint structure. However, it may cause new types of flaws, especially submillimeter flaws. Microscopic inspection, ultrasonic c-scan, pulsed thermography, vibrothermography, and laser spot thermography are used to investigate the internal flaws in a stitched T-joint carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) matrix composites. Then, a new microlaser line thermography is proposed. Microcomputed tomography (microCT) is used to validate the infrared results. A comparison between microlaser line thermography and microCT is performed. It was concluded that microlaser line thermography can detect the internal submillimeter defects. However, the depth and size of the defects can affect the detection results. The microporosities with a diameter of less than 54 μm are not detected in the microlaser line thermography results. Microlaser line thermography can detect the microporosity (a diameter of 0.162 mm) from a depth of 90 μm. However, it cannot detect the internal microporosity (a diameter of 0.216 mm) from a depth of 0.18 mm. The potential causes are given. Finally, a comparative study is conducted.

  10. The role of personality traits in self-rated oral health and preferences for different types of flawed smiles.

    PubMed

    Montero, J; Gómez Polo, C; Rosel, E; Barrios, R; Albaladejo, A; López-Valverde, A

    2016-01-01

    Symmetric, aligned and luminous smiles are usually classified as 'beautiful' and aesthetic. However, smile perception is not strictly governed by standardised rules. Personal traits may influence the perception of non-ideal smiles. We aimed to determine the influence of personality traits in self-rated oral health and satisfaction and in the aesthetic preference for different strategically flawed smiles shown in photographs. Smiles with dark teeth, with uneven teeth, with lip asymmetry and dental asymmetry were ordered from 1 to 4 as a function of the degree of beauty by 548 participants, of which 50·7% were females with a mean age of 41·5 ± 17·6 years (range: 16-89 years). Self-assessment and oral satisfaction were recorded on a Likert scale. Personality was measured by means of the Big Five Inventory (extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism and openness), and the Life Orientation Test was used to measure optimism and pessimism. Of the four photographs with imperfect smiles, dental asymmetry was the most highly assessed in 63% of the sample, and the worst was lip asymmetry, in 43·7% of the sample. Some personality traits (above all conscientiousness and openness) were significantly correlated with the position assigned to the photographs with dental and lip asymmetry or with misaligned teeth. The extraversion, agreeableness and openness traits were correlated with the self-perceptions of oral health and aesthetics of the participants. Dental asymmetry seems to be better tolerated than lip asymmetry. Personality traits are weakly but significantly correlated with the aesthetic preference and oral health values, conscientiousness and openness being the most relevant domains in this sense.

  11. High bone density masks architectural deficiencies in an individual with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Dudley-Javoroski, Shauna; Amelon, Ryan; Liu, Yinxiao; Saha, Punam K; Shields, Richard K

    2014-05-01

    Context Spinal cord injury (SCI) causes a decline of bone mineral density (BMD) in the paralyzed extremities via the gradual degradation and resorption of trabecular elements. Clinical tools that report BMD may not offer insight into trabecular architecture flaws that could affect bone's ability to withstand loading. We present a case of a woman with a 30-year history of SCI and abnormally high distal femur BMD. Findings Peripheral quantitative-computed tomography-based BMD for this subject was ∼20% higher than previously published non-SCI values. Computed tomography (CT) revealed evidence of sclerotic bone deposition in the trabecular envelope, most likely due to glucocorticoid-induced osteonecrosis. Volumetric topologic analysis of trabecular architecture indicated that the majority of the bone mineral was organized into thick, plate-like structures rather than a multi-branched trabecular network. Visual analysis of the CT stack confirmed that the sclerotic bone regions were continuous with the cortex at only a handful of points. Conclusions Conventional clinical BMD analysis could have led to erroneous assumptions about this subject's bone quality. CT-based analysis revealed that this subject's high BMD masked underlying architectural flaws. For patients who received prolonged glucocorticoid therapy, excessively high BMD should be viewed with caution. The ability of this subject's bone to resist fracture is, in our view, extremely suspect. A better understanding of the mechanical competency of this very dense, but architecturally flawed bone would be desirable before this subject engaged in activities that load the limbs.

  12. Simultaneous density contrast is bidirectional.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hua-Chun; Baker, Curtis L; Kingdom, Frederick A A

    2016-11-01

    Simultaneous density contrast, or SDC, is the phenomenon in which the perceived density of a textured region is altered by a surround of different density (Mackay, 1973). SDC provides an experimental tool to investigate mechanisms of density coding, yet has not been systematically examined. We measured SDC with a 2AFC staircase procedure in which human observers judged which of two patterns, one with and one without a surround, appeared more dense. We used a range of surround densities varying from very sparse to very dense (0-76.8 dots/deg2), and two center test densities (6.4 and 12.8 dots/deg2). Psychometric functions were used to estimate both the points of subjective equality (PSE) and their precision. Unexpectedly we find a bidirectional SDC effect across the five observers: Not only does a denser surround reduce perceived density of the center, but a sparser surround enhances its perceived density. We also show that SDC is not mediated by either contrast-contrast or spatial-frequency contrast. Our results suggest the presence of multiple channels selective for texture density, with lateral inhibitory interactions between them.

  13. Shearing dynamics and jamming density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson, Peter; Vâgberg, Daniel; Teitel, Stephen

    2009-03-01

    We study the effect of a shearing dynamics on the properties of a granular system, by examining how the jamming density depends on the preparation of the starting configurations. Whereas the jamming density at point J was obtained by relaxing random configurations [O'Hern et al, Phys. Rev. E 68, 011306 (2003)], we apply this method to configurations obtained after shearing the system at a certain shear rate. We find that the jamming density increases somewhat and that this effect is more pronounced for configurations produced at smaller shear rates. Different measures of the order of the jammed configurations are also discussed.

  14. Examination Management and Examination Malpractice: The Nexus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogunji, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Examination malpractice or cheating has become a global phenomenon. In different countries of the world today, developed and developing, academic dishonesty especially cheating in examinations has heightened and taken frightening dimension. In many countries of the world this phenomenon has become a serious matter of concern that has left many…

  15. Is food allergen analysis flawed? Health and supply chain risks and a proposed framework to address urgent analytical needs.

    PubMed

    Walker, M J; Burns, D T; Elliott, C T; Gowland, M H; Mills, E N Clare

    2016-01-07

    Food allergy is an increasing problem for those affected, their families or carers, the food industry and for regulators. The food supply chain is highly vulnerable to fraud involving food allergens, risking fatalities and severe reputational damage to the food industry. Many facets are being pursued to ameliorate the difficulties including better food labelling and the concept of thresholds of elicitation of allergy symptoms as risk management tools. These efforts depend to a high degree on the ability reliably to detect and quantify food allergens; yet all current analytical approaches exhibit severe deficiencies that jeopardise accurate results being produced particularly in terms of the risks of false positive and false negative reporting. If we fail to realise the promise of current risk assessment and risk management of food allergens through lack of the ability to measure food allergens reproducibly and with traceability to an international unit of measurement, the analytical community will have failed a significant societal challenge. Three distinct but interrelated areas of analytical work are urgently needed to address the substantial gaps identified: (a) a coordinated international programme for the production of properly characterised clinically relevant reference materials and calibrants for food allergen analysis; (b) an international programme to widen the scope of proteomics and genomics bioinformatics for the genera containing the major allergens to address problems in ELISA, MS and DNA methods; (c) the initiation of a coordinated international programme leading to reference methods for allergen proteins that provide results traceable to the SI. This article describes in more detail food allergy, the risks of inapplicable or flawed allergen analyses with examples and a proposed framework, including clinically relevant incurred allergen concentrations, to address the currently unmet and urgently required analytical requirements. Support for the

  16. Investigation into the use of smartphone as a machine vision device for engineering metrology and flaw detection, with focus on drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razdan, Vikram; Bateman, Richard

    2015-05-01

    This study investigates the use of a Smartphone and its camera vision capabilities in Engineering metrology and flaw detection, with a view to develop a low cost alternative to Machine vision systems which are out of range for small scale manufacturers. A Smartphone has to provide a similar level of accuracy as Machine Vision devices like Smart cameras. The objective set out was to develop an App on an Android Smartphone, incorporating advanced Computer vision algorithms written in java code. The App could then be used for recording measurements of Twist Drill bits and hole geometry, and analysing the results for accuracy. A detailed literature review was carried out for in-depth study of Machine vision systems and their capabilities, including a comparison between the HTC One X Android Smartphone and the Teledyne Dalsa BOA Smart camera. A review of the existing metrology Apps in the market was also undertaken. In addition, the drilling operation was evaluated to establish key measurement parameters of a twist Drill bit, especially flank wear and diameter. The methodology covers software development of the Android App, including the use of image processing algorithms like Gaussian Blur, Sobel and Canny available from OpenCV software library, as well as designing and developing the experimental set-up for carrying out the measurements. The results obtained from the experimental set-up were analysed for geometry of Twist Drill bits and holes, including diametrical measurements and flaw detection. The results show that Smartphones like the HTC One X have the processing power and the camera capability to carry out metrological tasks, although dimensional accuracy achievable from the Smartphone App is below the level provided by Machine vision devices like Smart cameras. A Smartphone with mechanical attachments, capable of image processing and having a reasonable level of accuracy in dimensional measurement, has the potential to become a handy low-cost Machine vision

  17. Sixth Form Examining Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schools Council, London (England).

    The methods of examining in the sixth form of secondary education in England and Wales is the basis for discussion by subject committees of the Schools Council. Special reference is made to internal examinations, oral assessments, teacher's assessments, the relaxing of the time limits for examination, and the use of aids during examinations. The…

  18. Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis in the post-CORAL era part 2: new directions in Transcatheter Nephron Salvage following flawed revascularization trials.

    PubMed

    Sag, Alan Alper; Sos, Thomas A; Benli, Caghan; Sal, Oguzhan; Rossignol, Patrick; Ortiz, Alberto; Solak, Yalcin; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2016-04-01

    Unlike endovascular therapeutic studies for atherosclerosis in many other vascular beds, major trials regarding endovascular renovascular revascularization have resulted in a stagnating equipoise. However, every major trial completed for this topic thus far has suffered from major methodological flaws that limit the validity and external generalizability of their results. Furthermore, certain patient populations who are known to benefit from renovascular revascularization may never be studied because they cannot be ethically withheld from life-saving treatment. Forthcoming percutaneous techniques may one day complement angioplasty and stenting in a burgeoning era of cellular modulation and endovascular-directed renal regeneration.

  19. Density: A Discovery Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieck, William

    1994-01-01

    Describes an activity that allows students to discover the concept of density and that density is a determining physical property of a pure substance. Makes suggestions to further enhance students' understanding of density. (ZWH)

  20. Examination Involving Students as Peer Examiners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ljungman, Anders G.; Silen, Charlotte

    2008-01-01

    The main interest in this article is students' involvement in assessment as a part of growth towards self-directedness in learning. In order to enhance students' development of autonomy in learning, a project involving "older" students as peer examiners for "younger" students was designed and carried out. Students in the sixth semester in a…

  1. Rod examination gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Bacvinskas, W.S.; Bayer, J.E.; Davis, W.W.; Fodor, G.; Kikta, T.J.; Matchett, R.L.; Nilsen, R.J.; Wilczynski, R.

    1991-12-31

    The present invention is directed to a semi-automatic rod examination gauge for performing a large number of exacting measurements on radioactive fuel rods. The rod examination gauge performs various measurements underwater with remote controlled machinery of high reliability. The rod examination gauge includes instruments and a closed circuit television camera for measuring fuel rod length, free hanging bow measurement, diameter measurement, oxide thickness measurement, cladding defect examination, rod ovality measurement, wear mark depth and volume measurement, as well as visual examination. A control system is provided including a programmable logic controller and a computer for providing a programmed sequence of operations for the rod examination and collection of data.

  2. Does Neighborhood Density Influence Repetition Latency for Nonwords? Separating the Effects of Density and Duration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipinski, J.; Gupta, P.

    2005-01-01

    Twelve experiments examined the effect of neighborhood density on repetition latency for nonwords. Previous reports have indicated that nonwords from high density neighborhoods are repeated with shorter latency than nonwords from low density neighborhoods (e.g., Vitevitch & Luce, 1998). Experiment 1 replicated these previously reported results;…

  3. Wood's lamp examination

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003386.htm Wood's lamp examination To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A Wood's lamp examination is a test that uses ultraviolet ( ...

  4. Examine Your Skin

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Store In Memory Melanoma Info Melanoma Facts Melanoma Prevention Sunscreen Suggestions Examine Your Skin Newly Diagnosed? Understanding ... video. UPDATED: November 23, 2016 Melanoma Facts Melanoma Prevention Sunscreen Suggestions Examine Your Skin Newly Diagnosed? Understanding ...

  5. The preparticipation physical examination.

    PubMed

    Pedraza, Jaime; Jardeleza, Julie Ann

    2013-12-01

    This article reviews the components of the preparticipation physical examination. It looks at some of the key elements of the history and the physical examination that help determine whether an athlete can participate in an organized sport.

  6. Shallow Flaws Under Biaxial Loading Conditions, Part II: Application of a Weibull Stress Analysis of the Cruciform Bend Specimen Using a Hydrostatic Stress Criterion

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, B.R.; McAfee, W.J.; Williams, P.T.

    1999-08-01

    Cruciform beam fracture mechanics specimensl have been developed in the Heavy Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to introduce a prototypic, far- field, out-of-plane biaxird bending stress component in the test section that approximates the nonlinear biaxial stresses resulting from pressurized-thernxd-shock or pressure-temperature loading of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV). Matrices of cruciform beam tests were developed to investigate and quantify the effects of temperature, biaxial loading, and specimen size on fracture initiation toughness of two-dimensional (constant depth), shtdlow, surface flaws. Tests were conducted under biaxial load ratios ranging from uniaxial to equibiaxial. These tests demonstrated that biaxial loading can have a pronounced effect on shallow-flaw fracture toughness in the lower transition temperature region for RPV materials. Two and three- parameter Weibull models have been calibrated using a new scheme (developed at the University of Illinois) that maps toughness data from test specimens with distinctly different levels of crack-tip constraint to a small scale yielding (SSY) Weibull stress space. These models, using the new hydrostatic stress criterion in place of the more commonly used maximum principal stress in the kernel of the OW integral definition, have been shown to correlate the experimentally observed biaxiaI effect in cruciform specimens, thereby providing a scaling mechanism between uniaxial and biaxial loading states.

  7. Periodic solar wind density structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viall, Nicholeen Mary

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation addresses a specific aspect of the Sun-Earth connection: we show that coronal activity creates periodic density structures in the solar wind which convect radially outward and interact with Earth's magnetosphere. First, we analyze 11 years (1995-2005) of in situ solar wind density observations from the Wind spacecraft and find that periodic density structures occur at particular sets of radial length-scales more often than others. This indicates that these density fluctuations, which have radial length-scales of hundreds of megameters, cannot be attributed entirely to turbulence. Next, we analyze their effect on Earth's magnetosphere. Though these structures are not waves in the solar wind rest frame, they appear at discrete frequencies in Earth's reference frame. They compress the magnetosphere as they convect past, driving global magnetospheric oscillations at the same discrete frequencies as the periodic density structures. Last, we investigate source regions and mechanisms of the periodic solar wind density structures. We analyze the alpha particle to proton abundance ratio during events of periodic density structures. In many events, the proton and alpha density fluctuations are anti- correlated, which strongly argues for either temporally or spatially varying coronal source plasma. We examine white light images of the solar wind taken with SECCHI HI1 on the STEREO spacecraft and find periodic density structures as near to the Sun as 15 solar radii. The smallest resolvable periodic structures that we identify are of comparable length to those found at 1 AU, providing further evidence that at least some periodic density structures are generated in the solar corona as the solar wind is formed. Guided by the properties observed during previous studies and the characteristics established through the work presented here, we examine possible candidate mechanisms in the solar corona that can form periodic density structures. We conclude that

  8. Physics 300 Provincial Examination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manitoba Dept. of Education and Training, Winnipeg.

    This document consists of the physics 300 provincial examination (English version), a separate "provincial summary report" on the results of giving the test, and a separate French language version of the examination. This physics examination contains a 53-item multiple choice section and an 12 item free response section. Subsections of…

  9. Capabilities of Ultrasonic Phased Arrays for Far-Side Examinations of Austenitic Stainless Steel Piping Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael T.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2006-10-01

    A study was conducted to assess the ability of advanced ultrasonic techniques to detect and accurately determine the size of flaws from the far-side of wrought austenitic piping welds. Far-side inspections of nuclear system austenitic piping welds are currently performed on a “best effort” basis and do not conform to ASME Code Section XI Appendix VIII performance demonstration requirements for near side inspection. For this study, four circumferential welds in 610mm (24inch) diameter, 36mm (1.42inch) thick ASTM A-358, Grade 304 vintage austenitic stainless steel pipe were examined. The welds were fabricated with varied welding parameters; both horizontal and vertical pipe orientations were used, with air and water backing, to simulate field welding conditions. A series of saw cuts, electro-discharge machined (EDM) notches, and implanted fatigue cracks were placed into the heat affected zones of the welds. The saw cuts and notches ranged in depth from 7.5% to 28.4% through-wall. The implanted cracks ranged in depth from 5% through-wall to 64% through-wall. The welds were examined with phased array technology at 2.0 MHz, and compared to conventional ultrasonic techniques as a baseline. The examinations showed that phased-array methods were able to detect and accurately length-size, but not depth size, the notches and flaws through the welds. The ultrasonic results were insensitive to the different welding techniques used in each weld.

  10. Maps of current density using density-functional methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soncini, A.; Teale, A. M.; Helgaker, T.; de Proft, F.; Tozer, D. J.

    2008-08-01

    The performance of several density-functional theory (DFT) methods for the calculation of current densities induced by a uniform magnetic field is examined. Calculations are performed using the BLYP and KT3 generalized-gradient approximations, together with the B3LYP hybrid functional. For the latter, both conventional and optimized effective potential (OEP) approaches are used. Results are also determined from coupled-cluster singles-and-doubles (CCSD) electron densities by a DFT constrained search procedure using the approach of Wu and Yang (WY). The current densities are calculated within the CTOCD-DZ2 distributed origin approach. Comparisons are made with results from Hartree-Fock (HF) theory. Several small molecules for which correlation is known to be especially important in the calculation of magnetic response properties are considered-namely, O3, CO, PN, and H2CO. As examples of aromatic and antiaromatic systems, benzene and planarized cyclooctatetraene molecules are considered, with specific attention paid to the ring current phenomenon and its Kohn-Sham orbital origin. Finally, the o-benzyne molecule is considered as a computationally challenging case. The HF and DFT induced current maps show qualitative differences, while among the DFT methods the maps show a similar qualitative structure. To assess quantitative differences in the calculated current densities with different methods, the maximal moduli of the induced current densities are compared and integration of the current densities to yield shielding constants is performed. In general, the maximal modulus is reduced in moving from HF to B3LYP and BLYP, and further reduced in moving to KT3, OEP(B3LYP), and WY(CCSD). The latter three methods offer the most accurate shielding constants in comparison with both experimental and ab initio data and hence the more reliable route to DFT calculation of induced current density in molecules.

  11. Medical examiner variability.

    PubMed

    Hinchcliffe, R

    1997-01-01

    There are undoubtedly many factors that contribute to inter-examiner variability relevant to the use of medical practitioners in justiciable matters. One source of variability with regard to claims relating to hearing disorders could well be the training and 'calibration' of medical examiners. A tentative analysis of the examination papers and of the declared roles of the specialties that provide these examiners lends support to such a thesis. One solution would be to train special specialists for medicolegal work, as envisaged by Boyarsky for forensic urology (Boyarsky, 1996). At the same time there is the need to change the role-perception of many examiners. There is also the need for medical examiners to express honest, unbiased opinions. There are also problems inherent in the litigation process which does not promote the interactive and adaptive processes between experts that characterise scientific discussions and enquiry.

  12. Density perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Palenik, Mark C.; Dunlap, Brett I.

    2015-07-28

    Despite the fundamental importance of electron density in density functional theory, perturbations are still usually dealt with using Hartree-Fock-like orbital equations known as coupled-perturbed Kohn-Sham (CPKS). As an alternative, we develop a perturbation theory that solves for the perturbed density directly, removing the need for CPKS. This replaces CPKS with a true Hohenberg-Kohn density perturbation theory. In CPKS, the perturbed density is found in the basis of products of occupied and virtual orbitals, which becomes ever more over-complete as the size of the orbital basis set increases. In our method, the perturbation to the density is expanded in terms of a series of density basis functions and found directly. It is possible to solve for the density in such a way that it makes the total energy stationary even if the density basis is incomplete.

  13. Paediatric short case examination.

    PubMed

    Isaacs, David

    2014-11-01

    The short case is a highly artificial scenario, in which the examination candidate is given little or no history and instructed to examine one system or one aspect of a patient and draw conclusions. Despite their artificiality, short cases test clinical skills which senior paediatricians value and consider essential qualities of a competent physician. This article presents some general suggestions on an approach to doing short case examinations.

  14. Spatially explicit analyses unveil density dependence.

    PubMed Central

    Veldtman, Ruan; McGeoch, Melodie A.

    2004-01-01

    Density-dependent processes are fundamental in the understanding of species population dynamics. Whereas the benefits of considering the spatial dimension in population biology are widely acknowledged, the implications of doing so for the statistical detection of spatial density dependence have not been examined. The outcome of traditional tests may therefore differ from those that include ecologically relevant locational information on both the prey species and natural enemy. Here, we explicitly incorporate spatial information on individual counts when testing for density dependence between an insect herbivore and its parasitoids. The spatially explicit approach used identified significant density dependence more frequently and in different instances than traditional methods. The form of density dependence detected also differed between methods. These results demonstrate that the explicit consideration of patch location in density-dependence analyses is likely to significantly alter current understanding of the prevalence and form of spatial density dependence in natural populations. PMID:15590593

  15. Examining the knee joint.

    PubMed

    Monk, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    Appropriate history taking and examination can ensure accurate diagnosis of common knee problems, and rapid and effective interventions or referral to orthopaedic specialists. This article describes the anatomy of the knee joint and discusses relevant history taking, the examination process, special tests and radiology, as well as common knee injuries and their management.

  16. Examination Syllabus Comparisons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallatratt, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    A study was conducted based on an analysis of computer study courses leading to CSE and 0-level examinations. Several findings are discussed and questions about future developments are raised. Syllabus content (including history, hardware, basic computer science, programming, applications, and implications), format, and examinations are among the…

  17. Spectral and spatial nondestructive examination of dielectric materials with THz time domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckmann, J.; von Chrzanowski, L. S.; Fratzscher, D.; Ewert, U.

    2012-05-01

    A time domain spectrometer T-ray 2000® operating in the range of 0.2-2 THz was used for Time of Flight measurements. A series of ethanol water mixtures from 10% to 90% were produced subsequently filled in polystyrene cells and analyzed in the T-ray 2000 TDS system in the reflection mode. The reflectivity of the material liquid interface is strongly influenced by the ethanol concentration in water. The reciprocal reflection coefficient of the material liquid interface was found to be a useful discriminating feature for further Probably of Detection calculations which can be used for the performance evaluation of potential THz bottle scanners. THz pulse echo (PE) measurements were performed in comparison to the established ultra sound PE technique for flaw detection of plastics. Synthetic aperture reconstructions were applied for simulated data to reconstruct the flaw shape. The results were compared with B-scan images of a high density polyethylene (HDPE) test cylinder. Existing restrictions on the quality of the back projected images and limits of the existing model are discussed in detail.

  18. Capabilities of Ultrasonic Techniques for Far-Side Examinations of Austenitic Stainless Steel Piping Welds.

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael T.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2007-01-01

    A study was conducted to assess the ability of advanced ultrasonic techniques to detect and accurately length-size flaws from the far-side of wrought austenitic piping welds. Far-side inspections of nuclear system piping welds are currently performed on a “best effort” basis and do not conform to ASME Code Section XI Appendix VIII performance demonstration requirements. For this study, austenitic stainless steel specimens with flaws located on the far-side of full penetration structural welds were used. The welds were fabricated with varied welding parameters to simulate as-built conditions in the components, and were examined with phased array technology at 2.0 MHz, and low-frequency/Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique (SAFT) methods in the 250-400 kHz regime. These results were compared to conventional ultrasonic techniques as a baseline. The examinations showed that both phased-array and low-frequency/SAFT were able to reliably detect and length-size, but not depth size, notches and implanted fatigue cracks through the welds.

  19. Information geometric density estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ke; Marchand-Maillet, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    We investigate kernel density estimation where the kernel function varies from point to point. Density estimation in the input space means to find a set of coordinates on a statistical manifold. This novel perspective helps to combine efforts from information geometry and machine learning to spawn a family of density estimators. We present example models with simulations. We discuss the principle and theory of such density estimation.

  20. Flaw criticality of circular disbond defects in compressive laminates. M.S. Thesis. Interim Report, 1980 - 1981; [graphite-epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, J. D.

    1981-01-01

    The compressive behavior of T300/5208 graphite-epoxy laminates containing circular delaminations was studied to determine the flaw criticality of two types of implanted defect, Kapton bag and Teflon film, on several laminate configurations. Defect size was varied. Results, presented in the form of residual strength curves, indicate that the Teflon film defect reduced strength more than the Kapton bad defect in 12-ply samples, but that two laminates (+ or - 45) sub 2s and (90/+ or - 45) sub s were insensitive to any implanted defect. A clear thickness effect was shown to exist for the (o/+ pr 45) sub ns laminate and was attributed to failure mode transition. The analytically predicted buckling loads show excellent agreement with experimental results and are useful in predicting failure mode transition.

  1. An analytical hierarchical model explaining the robustness and flaw-tolerance of the interlocking barb-barbule structure of bird feathers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qiang; Gorb, Stanislav; Kovalev, Alexander; Li, Zhiyong; Pugno, Nicola

    2016-10-01

    Feathers can fulfill their aerodynamic function only if the pennaceous vane forms an airfoil stabilized by robust interlocking between barbules. Thus, revealing the robustness of the interlocking mechanical behavior of the barbules is very important to understand the function and long-term resilience of bird feathers. This paper, basing on the small- and large-beam deflection solutions, presents a hierarchical mechanical model for deriving the critical delamination conditions of the interlocking barbules between two adjacent barbs in bird feathers. The results indicate a high robustness and flaw-tolerant design of the structure. This work contributes to the understanding of the mechanical behavior of the robust interlocking barb-barbule structure of the bird feather, and provides a basis for design of feather-inspired materials with robust interlocking mechanism, such as advanced bio-inspired micro-zipping devices.

  2. Bone Density Test

    MedlinePlus

    Tests and Procedures Bone density test By Mayo Clinic Staff A bone density test determines if you have osteoporosis — a disease that causes bones to ... your bones could be quite weak. A bone density test enhances the accuracy of calculating your risk ...

  3. [Social geriatric examination].

    PubMed

    Sipsma, D H

    1983-12-01

    The method of social-geriatric examination is described. This type of examination by an ambulatory team takes place at the patient's home. The examination is firstly directed to the interactions in the human-environmental system. By means of a scheme as an aid the interactions can be analyzed. This analysis, how people are dealing with each other and with need for care and with care, precedes the analysis of the chain of interacting unfavourable conditions of social, mental and physical nature, which are responsible for the disturbance of the balance of the system. This disturbance is signaled by way of the primary health care system to the geriatric examination circuit of which the social-geriatric team functions as first receiver of those signals.

  4. The Flawed Characters in the Campaign: Prestige Newspaper Assessments of the 1992 Presidential Candidates' Integrity and Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Erika G.

    1995-01-01

    Examines coverage in three leading newspapers, finding that explicit assessments of the 1992 presidential candidates' character were present in seven percent of all news articles and one-third of op-ed items, with the vast majority unfavorable. Shows that Bill Clinton was consistently assessed as a "slippery obfuscator," George Bush as…

  5. Epidemiologic studies of isoflavones & mammographic density.

    PubMed

    Maskarinec, Gertraud; Verheus, Martijn; Tice, Jeffrey A

    2010-01-01

    Isoflavones, phytoestrogens in soy beans with estrogen-like properties, have been examined for their cancer protective effects. Mammographic density is a strong predictor of breast cancer. This review summarizes studies that have examined the association between isoflavones and breast density. Observational investigations in Hawaii and Singapore suggest slightly lower breast density among women of Asian descent with regular soy intake, but two larger studies from Japan and Singapore did not observe a protective effect. The findings from seven randomized trials with primarily Caucasian women indicate that soy or isoflavones do not modify mammographic density. Soy foods and isoflavone supplements within a nutritional range do not appear to modify breast cancer risk as assessed by mammographic density.

  6. Grade Retention: A Three Part Series. Policy Briefs. Grade Retention: A Flawed Education Strategy [and] Cost-Benefit Analysis of Grade Retention [and] Grade Retention: The Gap between Research and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xia, Claire; Glennie, Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    This document compiles a series of three policy briefs focused on the subject of grade retention. The first brief, "Grade Retention: A Flawed Education Strategy," suggests educators and policymakers caution the use of grade retention as a remedy for poor student performance. As concluded by the majority of past studies, grade retention is a failed…

  7. Density functional theory of complex transition densities.

    PubMed

    Ernzerhof, Matthias

    2006-09-28

    We present an extension of Hohenberg-Kohn-Sham density functional theory to the domain of complex local potentials and complex electron densities. The approach is applicable to resonance (Siegert) [Phys. Rev. 56, 750 (1939)] states and other scattering and transport problems that can be described by a normalized state of a Hamiltonian containing a complex local potential. Such Hamiltonians are non-Hermitian and their eigenvalues are in general complex, the imaginary part being inversely proportional to the lifetime of the system. The one-to-one correspondence between complex local potentials nu and complex electron densities rho is established provided that the complex variables are sufficiently close to real local potentials and densities of nondegenerate ground states. We show that the exchange-correlation functionals, contributing to the complex energy, are determined through analytic continuation of their ground-state-theory counterparts. This implies that the exchange-correlation effects on the lifetime of a resonance are, under appropriate conditions, already determined by the functionals of the ground-state theory.

  8. Partition Density Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasserman, Adam

    2012-02-01

    Partition Density Functional Theory (PDFT) is a formally exact method for obtaining molecular properties from self-consistent calculations on isolated fragments [1,2]. For a given choice of fragmentation, PDFT outputs the (in principle exact) molecular energy and density, as well as fragment densities that sum to the correct molecular density. I describe our progress understanding the behavior of the fragment energies as a function of fragment occupations, derivative discontinuities, practical implementation, and applications of PDFT to small molecules. I also discuss implications for ground-state Density Functional Theory, such as the promise of PDFT to circumvent the delocalization error of approximate density functionals. [4pt] [1] M.H. Cohen and A. Wasserman, J. Phys. Chem. A, 111, 2229(2007).[0pt] [2] P. Elliott, K. Burke, M.H. Cohen, and A. Wasserman, Phys. Rev. A 82, 024501 (2010).

  9. Why Density Dependent Propulsion?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A.

    2011-01-01

    In 2004 Khoury and Weltman produced a density dependent cosmology theory they call the Chameleon, as at its nature, it is hidden within known physics. The Chameleon theory has implications to dark matter/energy with universe acceleration properties, which implies a new force mechanism with ties to the far and local density environment. In this paper, the Chameleon Density Model is discussed in terms of propulsion toward new propellant-less engineering methods.

  10. Partly Tailored Examinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedard, R.

    1974-01-01

    A type of examination in which additional questions are provided was used for Grade 12 Algebra and College 1 Introductory Calculus. An hypothesis was formulated that this procedure should reveal additional knowledge which whould be reflected in superior average scores for the class group. (Editor)

  11. Examining the decomposed brain.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, James Mackintosh

    2014-12-01

    Examination of the decomposed brain is a largely neglected area of forensic neuropathology. However, careful examination often yields valuable information that may assist in criminal proceedings. Decomposition encompasses the processes of autolysis, putrefaction, and decay. Most decomposed brains will be affected by both autolysis and putrefaction, resulting in a brain that may, at one end of the spectrum, be almost normal or, at the other end, pulpified, depending on the conditions in which the body remained after death and the postmortem interval. Naked eye examination may detect areas of hemorrhage and also guides appropriate sampling for histology. Histological appearances are often better than what would be predicted from the state of the brain. Histology often confirms macroscopic abnormalities and may also reveal other features such as ischemic injury. Silver staining demonstrates neuritic plaques, and immunocytochemistry for β-amyloid precursor protein and other molecules produces results comparable with those seen in well-preserved fixed brains. The usefulness of information derived from the examination of the decomposed brain in criminal proceedings is illustrated with 6 case reports drawn from the author's own practice.

  12. Biorhythms: An Empirical Examination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunz, Phillip R.

    1984-01-01

    Examines the theory of biorhythms using data from 727 deaths, 319 marriages, and data from students who kept track of their feelings and abilities, either having a biorhythm to follow or not knowing about the theory. None of the data sets provided confirmation of the theory. (JAC)

  13. Examining College Writing Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncheon, Julia C.; Tierney, William G.

    2014-01-01

    Increasing postsecondary access depends in large part on enhancing underrepresented students' writing ability, or college writing readiness. However, what exactly constitutes college-level writing is not clear-cut, complicating efforts to improve secondary preparation. This article examines recent efforts to define postsecondary writing,…

  14. Scientist Examines Tornado Vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In this Quick Time movie, a scientist examines what appears to be a tornado vortex (blue) coming out of a thunderstorm. The scientist uses 3D glasses to be able to see in 3 dimensions the different flows going out into the vortex. Earth science and weather studies are an important ongoing function of NASA and its affiliates.

  15. Martian drainage densities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, M.H.; Chuang, F.C.

    1997-01-01

    Drainage densities on Mars range from zero over large areas of volcanic plains to 0.3-0.5 km-1 locally on some volcanoes. These values refer to geologic units, not to drainage basins, as is normal for terrestrial drainage densities. The highest values are close to the lowest terrestrial values derived by similar techniques. Drainage densities were determined for every geologic unit portrayed on the 1:15,000,000 geologic map of Mars. Except for volcanoes the geologic unit with the highest drainage density is the dissected Noachian plains with a drainage density of 0.0074 km-1. The average drainage density for Noachian units is 0.0032 km-1, for Hesperian units is 0.00047 km-1, and for Amazonian units is 0.00007 km-1, excluding the volcanoes. These values are 2-3 orders of magnitude lower than typical terrestrial densities as determined by similar techniques from Landsat images. The low drainage densities, despite a cumulative record that spans billions of years, indicate that compared with the Earth, the channel-forming processes have been very inefficient or have operated only rarely or that the surface is extremely permeable. The high drainage density on volcanoes is attributed to a local cause, such as hydrothermal activity, rather than to a global cause such as climate change. Copyright. Published in 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. Two new density correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, M.C.H.; Monroy, M.R.

    1986-01-01

    The Liquid density predicted by the Peng-Robinson (P-R) equation of state is often off by 10% or more at temperature and pressure conditions encountered in most reservoirs. To improve the density predictions, two new density correlations have been developed. The first correlation is based on the chain-of-rotators (COR) equation of state and the second is based on the three-parameter Peng-Robinson (PR3) equation of state. The COR correlation is applicable to wider pressure and temperature ranges, but is computationally expensive. It is suited for interpreting fluid-analysis data, where no extensive phase-behavior calculations are needed. On the other hand, the PR3 correlation is more limited in its application range, but is computationally more efficient. It is particularly suited for compositional reservoir simulation where many density calculations are repeatedly carried out. In general, both correlations are comparable to the Standing-Katz correlation for liquid-density calculation and comparable to the P-R equation of state for vapor-density calculation. However, they are superior to the Standing-Katz correlation for liquid mixtures near critical points or liquid mixtures at high pressures. Overall, the COR equation of state gives an average prediction error of 1.9% for liquid densities and 2.7% for vapor densities, and the PR3 gives an average prediction error of less than 2% for both liquid and vapor densities.

  17. Visualization of electronic density

    DOE PAGES

    Grosso, Bastien; Cooper, Valentino R.; Pine, Polina; ...

    2015-04-22

    An atom’s volume depends on its electronic density. Although this density can only be evaluated exactly for hydrogen-like atoms, there are many excellent numerical algorithms and packages to calculate it for other materials. 3D visualization of charge density is challenging, especially when several molecular/atomic levels are intertwined in space. We explore several approaches to 3D charge density visualization, including the extension of an anaglyphic stereo visualization application based on the AViz package to larger structures such as nanotubes. We will describe motivations and potential applications of these tools for answering interesting questions about nanotube properties.

  18. Nondestructive examination of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) reaction control subsystem (RCS) propellant tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Free, James M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper assesses the feasibility of using eddy current nondestructive examination to determine flaw sizes in completely assembled hydrazine propellant tanks. The study was performed by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center for the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) project to help determine whether existing propellant tanks could meet the fracture analysis requirements of the current pressure vessel specification, MIL-STD-1522A and, therefore be used on the TRMM spacecraft. After evaluating several nondestructive test methods, eddy current testing was selected as the most promising method for determining flaw sizes on external and internal surfaces of completely assembled tanks. Tests were conducted to confirm the detection capability of the eddy current NDE, procedures were developed to inspect two candidate tanks, and the test support equipment was designed. The non-spherical tank eddy current NDE test program was terminated when the decision was made to procure new tanks for the TRMM propulsion subsystem. The information on the development phase of this test program is presented in this paper as a reference for future investigation on the subject.

  19. Examining Cyber Command Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    its mission in its newest warlare domain , cyberspace, some have questioned its choices with regard to command and control of its cyber forces. This...thesis examines historical cases of new warlare domains and how the Department of Defense structured the command and control elements of its forces...dedicated to the air and space domains . It explores the current cyber command and control construct, and looks at two others that would likely be

  20. Dental physical examination.

    PubMed

    Baker, G J

    1998-08-01

    The objectives of the equine dental physical examination are to detect and quantify oral and dental disorders, to propose and carry out their treatment, and to implement management programs. The veterinarian should be able to offer a prognosis and to detail any future treatment or management plans that may be required. These objectives should take into account the cost of these procedures, and the veterinarian should be prepared to offer a cost-benefit analysis of the problem and the proposed cures.

  1. Density dependent neurodynamics.

    PubMed

    Halnes, Geir; Liljenström, Hans; Arhem, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The dynamics of a neural network depends on density parameters at (at least) two different levels: the subcellular density of ion channels in single neurons, and the density of cells and synapses at a network level. For the Frankenhaeuser-Huxley (FH) neural model, the density of sodium (Na) and potassium (K) channels determines the behaviour of a single neuron when exposed to an external stimulus. The features of the onset of single neuron oscillations vary qualitatively among different regions in the channel density plane. At a network level, the density of neurons is reflected in the global connectivity. We study the relation between the two density levels in a network of oscillatory FH neurons, by qualitatively distinguishing between three regions, where the mean network activity is (1) spiking, (2) oscillating with enveloped frequencies, and (3) bursting, respectively. We demonstrate that the global activity can be shifted between regions by changing either the density of ion channels at the subcellular level, or the connectivity at the network level, suggesting that different underlying mechanisms can explain similar global phenomena. Finally, we model a possible effect of anaesthesia by blocking specific inhibitory ion channels.

  2. Holographic Dark Energy Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadat, Hassan

    2011-06-01

    In this article we consider the cosmological model based on the holographic dark energy. We study dark energy density in Universe with arbitrary spatially curvature described by the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker metric. We use Chevallier-Polarski-Linder parametrization to specify dark energy density.

  3. Density in a Bottle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roser, Charles E.; McCluskey, Catherine L.

    1998-01-01

    Explains how the Canadian soft drink Orbitz can be used for explorations of density in the classroom. The drink has colored spheres suspended throughout that have a density close to that of the liquid. Presents a hands-on activity that can be easily done in two parts. (DDR)

  4. Variable Density Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1931-01-01

    Variable Density Tunnel in operation. Man at far right is probably Harold J. 'Cannonball' Tuner, longtime safety officer, who started with Curtiss in the teens. This view of the Variable Density Tunnel clearly shows the layout of the Tunnel's surroundings, as well as the plumbing and power needs of the this innovative research tool.

  5. A SURVEY OF CORONAL CAVITY DENSITY PROFILES

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, J.; Gibson, S. E.

    2009-08-01

    Coronal cavities are common features of the solar corona that appear as darkened regions at the base of coronal helmet streamers in coronagraph images. Their darkened appearance indicates that they are regions of lowered density embedded within the comparatively higher density helmet streamer. Despite interfering projection effects of the surrounding helmet streamer (which we refer to as the cavity rim), Fuller et al. have shown that under certain conditions it is possible to use a Van de Hulst inversion of white-light polarized brightness (pB) data to calculate the electron density of both the cavity and cavity rim plasma. In this article, we apply minor modifications to the methods of Fuller et al. in order to improve the accuracy and versatility of the inversion process, and use the new methods to calculate density profiles for both the cavity and cavity rim in 24 cavity systems. We also examine trends in cavity morphology and how departures from the model geometry affect our density calculations. The density calculations reveal that in all 24 cases the cavity plasma has a flatter density profile than the plasma of the cavity rim, meaning that the cavity has a larger density depletion at low altitudes than it does at high altitudes. We find that the mean cavity density is over four times greater than that of a coronal hole at an altitude of 1.2 R{sub sun} and that every cavity in the sample is over twice as dense as a coronal hole at this altitude. Furthermore, we find that different cavity systems near solar maximum span a greater range in density at 1.2 R{sub sun} than do cavity systems near solar minimum, with a slight trend toward higher densities for systems nearer to solar maximum. Finally, we found no significant correlation of cavity density properties with cavity height-indeed, cavities show remarkably similar density depletions-except for the two smallest cavities that show significantly greater depletion.

  6. Visual examination apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, R. F.; Fitzgerald, J. W.; Rositano, S. A. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An automated visual examination apparatus for measuring visual sensitivity and mapping blind spot location is described. The apparatus includes a projection system for displaying to a patient a series of visual stimuli, a response switch enabling him to indicate his reaction to the stimuli, and a recording system responsive to both the visual stimuli per se and the patient's response. The recording system provides a correlated permanent record of both stimuli and response from which a substantive and readily apparent visual evaluation can be made.

  7. Hot cell examination table

    DOEpatents

    Gaal, Peter S.; Ebejer, Lino P.; Kareis, James H.; Schlegel, Gary L.

    1991-01-01

    A table for use in a hot cell or similar controlled environment for use in examining specimens. The table has a movable table top that can be moved relative to a table frame. A shaft is fixedly mounted to the frame for axial rotation. A shaft traveler having a plurality of tilted rollers biased against the shaft is connected to the table top such that rotation of the shaft causes the shaft traveler to roll along the shaft. An electromagnetic drive is connected to the shaft and the frame for controllably rotating the shaft.

  8. Experimental variable-density mixing statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerashchenko, Sergiy; Prestridge, Katherine

    2013-11-01

    Velocity and density statistics are studied experimentally for variable density mixing of a heavy fluid jet into air coflow at two Atwood numbers. The effect of buoyancy is found to be important for most turbulent quantities measured. The high At jet with larger Reynolds number shows reduced lateral spreading compared to the low At jet of smaller Reynolds number. Some universal features of variable density mixing are elucidated from PDFs of density and density gradients. The low Atwood number PDFs show fast and uniform mixing. High Atwood number PDFs of density have skewness toward the larger densities, indicating reduced rate of mixing of pure heavy fluid due to its inertia. This skewness is related to strong local compression events that can lead to enhanced molecular mixing. Turbulent kinetic energy decreases with distance from the jet for low Atwood number but increases for high Atwood number due to flow acceleration and generation of extra shear and turbulence. This is clearly a buoyancy-mediated effect. Statistical characteristics of mixing such as Favre-averaged Reynolds stress and its anisotropy, turbulent mass flux velocity, density-specific volume correlation, density power spectra are also examined in the near and far field from the jet.

  9. Examining hydrogen transitions.

    SciTech Connect

    Plotkin, S. E.; Energy Systems

    2007-03-01

    This report describes the results of an effort to identify key analytic issues associated with modeling a transition to hydrogen as a fuel for light duty vehicles, and using insights gained from this effort to suggest ways to improve ongoing modeling efforts. The study reported on here examined multiple hydrogen scenarios reported in the literature, identified modeling issues associated with those scenario analyses, and examined three DOE-sponsored hydrogen transition models in the context of those modeling issues. The three hydrogen transition models are HyTrans (contractor: Oak Ridge National Laboratory), MARKAL/DOE* (Brookhaven National Laboratory), and NEMS-H2 (OnLocation, Inc). The goals of these models are (1) to help DOE improve its R&D effort by identifying key technology and other roadblocks to a transition and testing its technical program goals to determine whether they are likely to lead to the market success of hydrogen technologies, (2) to evaluate alternative policies to promote a transition, and (3) to estimate the costs and benefits of alternative pathways to hydrogen development.

  10. Assessment of density in enriched colony cages: Egg quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enriched colony cage production systems are becoming more prevalent in the US. A study was undertaken to determine the impact of housing density on hen health, well-being, egg production and quality. Six densities were examined with 8 housing replicates per density. Egg quality was assessed at hen a...

  11. Density of Spray-Formed Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin M. McHugh; Volker Uhlenwinkel; Nils Ellendr

    2008-06-01

    Spray Forming is an advanced materials processing technology that transforms molten metal into a near-net-shape solid by depositing atomized droplets onto a substrate. Depending on the application, the spray-formed material may be used in the as-deposited condition or it may undergo post-deposition processing. Regardless, the density of the as-deposited material is an important issue. Porosity is detrimental because it can significantly reduce strength, toughness, hardness and other properties. While it is not feasible to achieve fully-dense material in the as-deposited state, density greater than 99% of theoretical density is possible if the atomization and impact conditions are optimized. Thermal conditions at the deposit surface and droplet impact angle are key processing parameters that influence the density of the material. This paper examines the factors that contribute to porosity formation during spray forming and illustrates that very high as-deposited density is achieved by optimizing processing parameters.

  12. Holographic pair and charge density waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremonini, Sera; Li, Li; Ren, Jie

    2017-02-01

    We examine a holographic model in which a U (1 ) symmetry and translational invariance are broken spontaneously at the same time. Our construction provides an example of a system with pair-density wave order, in which the superconducting order parameter is spatially modulated but has a zero average. In addition, the charge density oscillates at twice the frequency of the scalar condensate. Depending on the choice of parameters, the model also admits a state with coexisting superconducting and charge-density wave orders, in which the scalar condensate has a uniform component.

  13. Communications satellite needs examined

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supharat

    1985-02-01

    Thailand can use a communications satellite to provide various forms of international and domestic telecommunications services such as telephone, teleprinter, telephotograph, television and radio service. This can be done in a manner that is just as efficient as using a microwave radio and underwater and optical fiber cable system. A communications satellite is also superior in terms of flexibility and speed in putting it into operation with no restrictions on distance, routes or geographical characteristics. A ground radio transmitter-receiver station can be built anywhere radio waves from the satellite can be picked up. Costs of launching a satellite into orbit and procedures involved from a regulatory point of view are examined. Initiatives taken to provide Thailand with its own satellites are highlighted.

  14. Bone mineral density test

    MedlinePlus

    ... density test; Bone densitometry; DEXA scan; DXA; Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry; p-DEXA; Osteoporosis-BMD ... most common and accurate way uses a dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scan. DEXA uses low- ...

  15. Density on Dry Land.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Libarkin, Julie C.; Crockett, Cynthia D.; Sadler, Philip M.

    2003-01-01

    Presents activities to dispel student misconceptions about density, particularly as it applies to buoyancy. Finds that misconceptions fall under three categories: (1) size; (2) shape; and (3) material. (NB)

  16. Critical Density Interaction Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Young, P; Baldis, H A; Cheung, P; Rozmus, W; Kruer, W; Wilks, S; Crowley, S; Mori, W; Hansen, C

    2001-02-14

    Experiments have been performed to study the propagation of intense laser pulses to high plasma densities. The issue of self-focusing and filamentation of the laser pulse as well as developing predictive capability of absorption processes and x-ray conversion efficiencies is important for numerous programs at the Laboratory, particularly Laser Program (Fast Ignitor and direct-drive ICF) and D&NT (radiography, high energy backlighters and laser cutting). Processes such as resonance absorption, profile modification, linear mode conversion, filamentation and stimulated Brillouin scattering can occur near the critical density and can have important effects on the coupling of laser light to solid targets. A combination of experiments have been used to study the propagation of laser light to high plasma densities and the interaction physics of intense laser pulses with solid targets. Nonparaxial fluid codes to study nonstationary behavior of filamentation and stimulated Brillouin scattering at high densities have also been developed as part of this project.

  17. Bone density scan (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... bone the higher the risk of fractures. A bone scan, along with a patient's medical history, is a ... and whether any preventative treatment is needed. A bone density scan has the advantage of being painless and exposing ...

  18. Nutrient Density Scores.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickinson, Annette; Thompson, William T.

    1979-01-01

    Announces a nutrient density food scoring system called the Index of Nutritional Quality (INQ). It expresses the ratio between the percent RDA of a nutrient and the percent daily allowance of calories in a food. (Author/SA)

  19. Numerical estimation of densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascasibar, Y.; Binney, J.

    2005-01-01

    We present a novel technique, dubbed FIESTAS, to estimate the underlying density field from a discrete set of sample points in an arbitrary multidimensional space. FIESTAS assigns a volume to each point by means of a binary tree. Density is then computed by integrating over an adaptive kernel. As a first test, we construct several Monte Carlo realizations of a Hernquist profile and recover the particle density in both real and phase space. At a given point, Poisson noise causes the unsmoothed estimates to fluctuate by a factor of ~2 regardless of the number of particles. This spread can be reduced to about 1dex (~26 per cent) by our smoothing procedure. The density range over which the estimates are unbiased widens as the particle number increases. Our tests show that real-space densities obtained with an SPH kernel are significantly more biased than those yielded by FIESTAS. In phase space, about 10 times more particles are required in order to achieve a similar accuracy. As a second application we have estimated phase-space densities in a dark matter halo from a cosmological simulation. We confirm the results of Arad, Dekel & Klypin that the highest values of f are all associated with substructure rather than the main halo, and that the volume function v(f) ~f-2.5 over about four orders of magnitude in f. We show that a modified version of the toy model proposed by Arad et al. explains this result and suggests that the departures of v(f) from power-law form are not mere numerical artefacts. We conclude that our algorithm accurately measures the phase-space density up to the limit where discreteness effects render the simulation itself unreliable. Computationally, FIESTAS is orders of magnitude faster than the method based on Delaunay tessellation that Arad et al. employed, making it practicable to recover smoothed density estimates for sets of 109 points in six dimensions.

  20. Atmospheric density models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, A. C.

    1977-01-01

    An atmospheric model developed by Jacchia, quite accurate but requiring a large amount of computer storage and execution time, was found to be ill-suited for the space shuttle onboard program. The development of a simple atmospheric density model to simulate the Jacchia model was studied. Required characteristics including variation with solar activity, diurnal variation, variation with geomagnetic activity, semiannual variation, and variation with height were met by the new atmospheric density model.

  1. Population Density Modeling Tool

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-05

    of fatalities per loss. (2) where: POCA = Probability of Casualty (fatalities per loss) LCA = Lethal Crash Area of Aircraft (square...miles) Population Density = The average population density within the Potential Crash Area (PCA) (people per square miles) The LCA ...component in equation 2 has been previously calculated in the 3PRAT. The methodology used to determine the LCA is outlined in the report: Crash Lethality

  2. Negative Ion Density Fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Igor Kaganovich

    2000-12-18

    Negative ions tend to stratify in electronegative plasmas with hot electrons (electron temperature Te much larger than ion temperature Ti, Te > Ti ). The boundary separating a plasma containing negative ions, and a plasma, without negative ions, is usually thin, so that the negative ion density falls rapidly to zero-forming a negative ion density front. We review theoretical, experimental and numerical results giving the spatio-temporal evolution of negative ion density fronts during plasma ignition, the steady state, and extinction (afterglow). During plasma ignition, negative ion fronts are the result of the break of smooth plasma density profiles during nonlinear convection. In a steady-state plasma, the fronts are boundary layers with steepening of ion density profiles due to nonlinear convection also. But during plasma extinction, the ion fronts are of a completely different nature. Negative ions diffuse freely in the plasma core (no convection), whereas the negative ion front propagates towards the chamber walls with a nearly constant velocity. The concept of fronts turns out to be very effective in analysis of plasma density profile evolution in strongly non-isothermal plasmas.

  3. Capabilities of Ultrasonic Techniques for the Far-Side Examination of Austenitic Stainless Steel Piping Welds.

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael T.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2006-02-01

    A study was conducted to assess the ability of advanced ultrasonic techniques to detect and accurately determine the size of flaws from the far-side of wrought austenitic piping welds. Far-side inspections of nuclear system piping welds are currently performed on a “best effort” basis and do not conform to ASME Code Section XI Appendix VIII performance demonstration requirements. For this study, four circumferential welds in 610mm diameter, 36mm thick ASTM A-358, Grade 304 vintage austenitic stainless steel pipe were examined. The welds were fabricated with varied welding parameters; both horizontal and vertical pipe orientations were used, with air and water backing, to simulate field welding conditions. A series of saw cuts, electro-discharge machined (EDM) notches, and implanted fatigue cracks were placed into the heat affected zones of the welds. The saw cuts and notches ranged in depth from 7.5% to 28.4% through-wall. The implanted cracks ranged in depth from 5% through-wall to 64% through-wall. The welds were examined with phased array technology at 2.0 MHz, and with low-frequency/Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique (SAFT) methods in the 250-400 kHz regime. These results were compared to conventional ultrasonic techniques as a baseline. The examinations showed that both phased-array and low-frequency/SAFT were able to detect and accurately length-size, but not depth size, the notches and flaws through the welds. The ultrasonic results were insensitive to the different welding techniques used in each weld.

  4. Examining maintenance responsibilities.

    PubMed

    Lam, K C

    2001-06-01

    This paper has examined the important responsibilities of the two organisations involved in the provision of maintenance service for the vital building services in many of our highly serviced buildings. The issues raised could be put to beneficial use in both clients and maintenance providers. All in all, the clients should work closely with their maintenance providers. Engineering services in buildings will not perform satisfactorily and efficiently if both parties do not work together and understand the maintenance tasks based on a business partnering mode. Put forward is the view that the management of the activities involved in the operation and maintenance process is a "shared commitment/involvement" between the client and the maintenance provider. It is obvious that many factors can influence the continued effectiveness of a quality maintenance scheme set up by client and provider. Some of these factors are: Change in key personnel Updates in technology Amendments to engineering practice Implementation of legislative requirements Changes in operation by client or provider Change of use of building Passage of time These factors must be fully reviewed by both parties from time to time, and necessary actions taken. A cooperative team working relationship and improved communication should be fostered by the client and his provider for the best management of services maintenance. This arrangement will contribute to better building services systems with continuous improvement; improved value for clients and higher return for the maintenance provider.

  5. Diagnosis and complementary examinations.

    PubMed

    Menghini, Moreno; Duncan, Jacque L

    2014-01-01

    Development of neuroprotective therapies requires an understanding of the mechanisms of retinal degeneration and a way to monitor response to treatment. With the increasing availability of genetic testing, precise characterization of the retinal degeneration phenotype is essential. This chapter covers standard and innovative diagnostic techniques and complementary examinations needed for the evaluation and treatment of retinal degenerative diseases. It aims to provide an overview of functional and structural diagnostic tools for the evaluation of retinal degenerative diseases, but is not intended as a comprehensive reference. Subjective assessment of visual function includes psychophysical tests, such as perimetry and microperimetry. Electrophysiology tests, such as the electroretinogram and electro-oculogram, are crucial in the assessment of retinal degenerative diseases and provide an objective assessment of global photoreceptor and retinal pigment epithelial cell function. Retinal structural measures are correlated with measures of retinal function to characterize the disease phenotype, including fundus photography using color, near-infrared, and autofluorescence imaging. Ocular perfusion can be assessed using fluorescein, indocyanine green, and noninvasive angiography. Optical coherence tomography provides information about retinal structure. Resolution of all images of retinal structure can be improved using adaptive optics, which permits visualization of individual photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelial cells in the macula.

  6. Self-similarity and universality of void density profiles in simulation and SDSS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadathur, S.; Hotchkiss, S.; Diego, J. M.; Iliev, I. T.; Gottlöber, S.; Watson, W. A.; Yepes, G.

    2015-06-01

    The stacked density profile of cosmic voids in the galaxy distribution provides an important tool for the use of voids for precision cosmology. We study the density profiles of voids identified using the ZOBOV watershed transform algorithm in realistic mock luminous red galaxy (LRG) catalogues from the Jubilee simulation, as well as in void catalogues constructed from the SDSS LRG and Main Galaxy samples. We compare different methods for reconstructing density profiles scaled by the void radius and show that the most commonly used method based on counts in shells and simple averaging is statistically flawed as it underestimates the density in void interiors. We provide two alternative methods that do not suffer from this effect; one based on Voronoi tessellations is also easily able to account from artefacts due to finite survey boundaries and so is more suitable when comparing simulation data to observation. Using this method, we show that the most robust voids in simulation are exactly self-similar, meaning that their average rescaled profile does not depend on the void size. Within the range of our simulation, we also find no redshift dependence of the mean profile. Comparison of the profiles obtained from simulated and real voids shows an excellent match. The mean profiles of real voids also show a universal behaviour over a wide range of galaxy luminosities, number densities and redshifts. This points to a fundamental property of the voids found by the watershed algorithm, which can be exploited in future studies of voids.

  7. Pseudopotentials from electron density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, Á.; Andrejkovics, I.

    1996-05-01

    A method is introduced that allows the construction of pseudopotentials in the density-functional theory. This method is based on a procedure worked out by one of the authors [J. Phys. B 26, 43 (1993); Philos. Mag. B 69, 779 (1994)] for determining Kohn-Sham potentials, one-electron orbitals, and energies from the electron density. The Hartree-Fock densities of Bunge, Barrientos, and Bunge [At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 53, 114 (1993)] are used to obtain the Kohn-Sham potentials of the Li, Na, and K atoms, and then Phillips-Kleinman-type [Phys. Rev. 116, 287 (1959); 118, 1153 (1960)] pseudopotentials are calculated. The arbitrariness of the pseudo-orbital is removed by minimization of the kinetic energy.

  8. Density matrix perturbation theory.

    PubMed

    Niklasson, Anders M N; Challacombe, Matt

    2004-05-14

    An orbital-free quantum perturbation theory is proposed. It gives the response of the density matrix upon variation of the Hamiltonian by quadratically convergent recursions based on perturbed projections. The technique allows treatment of embedded quantum subsystems with a computational cost scaling linearly with the size of the perturbed region, O(N(pert.)), and as O(1) with the total system size. The method allows efficient high order perturbation expansions, as demonstrated with an example involving a 10th order expansion. Density matrix analogs of Wigner's 2n+1 rule are also presented.

  9. Holographic charge density waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donos, Aristomenis; Gauntlett, Jerome P.

    2013-06-01

    We show that strongly coupled holographic matter at finite charge density can exhibit charge density wave phases which spontaneously break translation invariance while preserving time-reversal and parity invariance. We show that such phases are possible within Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory in general spacetime dimensions. We also discuss related spatially modulated phases when there is an additional coupling to a second vector field, possibly with nonzero mass. We discuss how these constructions, and others, should be associated with novel spatially modulated ground states.

  10. High-Density Lipoprotein - A Hero, a Mirage, or a Witness?

    PubMed

    Sviridov, Dmitri

    2014-01-01

    Negative relationship between plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels and risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a firmly established medical fact, but attempts to reproduce protective properties of HDL by pharmacologically elevating HDL levels were mostly unsuccessful. This conundrum presents a fundamental question: were the approaches used to raise HDL flawed or the protective effects of HDL are an epiphenomenon? Recent attempts to elevate plasma HDL were universally based on reducing HDL catabolism by blocking reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). Here, we argue that this mode of HDL elevation may be mechanistically different to natural mechanisms and thus be counterproductive. We further argue that independently of whether HDL is a driving force or a surrogate measure of the rate of RCT, approaches aimed at increasing HDL supply, rather than reducing its catabolism, would be most beneficial for speeding up RCT and improving protection against CVD.

  11. Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westphal, A.; Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examation Team: http://www. ssl. berkeley. edu/~westphal/ISPE/

    2011-12-01

    A. J. Westphal, C. Allen, A. Ansari, S. Bajt, R. S. Bastien, H. A. Bechtel, J. Borg, F. E. Brenker, J. Bridges, D. E. Brownlee, M. Burchell, M. Burghammer, A. L. Butterworth, A. M. Davis, P. Cloetens, C. Floss, G. Flynn, D. Frank, Z. Gainsforth, E. Grün, P. R. Heck, J. K. Hillier, P. Hoppe, G. Huss, J. Huth, B. Hvide, A. Kearsley, A. J. King, B. Lai, J. Leitner, L. Lemelle, H. Leroux, R. Lettieri, W. Marchant, L. R. Nittler, R. Ogliore, F. Postberg, M. C. Price, S. A. Sandford, J.-A. Sans Tresseras, T. Schoonjans, S. Schmitz, G. Silversmit, A. Simionovici, V. A. Solé, R. Srama, T. Stephan, V. Sterken, J. Stodolna, R. M. Stroud, S. Sutton, M. Trieloff, P. Tsou, A. Tsuchiyama, T. Tyliszczak, B. Vekemans, L. Vincze, D. Zevin, M. E. Zolensky, >29,000 Stardust@home dusters ISPE author affiliations are at http://www.ssl.berkeley.edu/~westphal/ISPE/. In 2000 and 2002, a ~0.1m2 array of aerogel tiles and alumi-num foils onboard the Stardust spacecraft was exposed to the interstellar dust (ISD) stream for an integrated time of 200 days. The exposure took place in interplanetary space, beyond the orbit of Mars, and thus was free of the ubiquitous orbital debris in low-earth orbit that precludes effective searches for interstellar dust there. Despite the long exposure of the Stardust collector, <<100 ISD particles are expected to have been captured. The particles are thought to be ~1μm or less in size, and the total ISD collection is probably <10-6 by mass of the collection of cometary dust parti-cles captured in the Stardust cometary dust collector from the coma of the Jupiter-family comet Wild 2. Thus, although the first solid sample from the local interstellar medium is clearly of high interest, the diminutive size of the particles and the low numbers of particles present daunting challenges. Nevertheless, six recent developments have made a Preliminary Examination (PE) of this sample practical: (1) rapid automated digital optical scanning microscopy for three

  12. Herbicide dissipation from low density polyethylene mulch

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field and laboratory studies were conducted to examine herbicide dissipation when applied to low density polyethylene (LDPE) mulch for dry scenarios vs. washing off with water. In field studies, halosulfuron, paraquat, carfentrazone, glyphosate, and flumioxazin were applied to black 1.25-mil LDPE at...

  13. Topics in global convergence of density estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devroye, L.

    1982-01-01

    The problem of estimating a density f on R sup d from a sample Xz(1),...,X(n) of independent identically distributed random vectors is critically examined, and some recent results in the field are reviewed. The following statements are qualified: (1) For any sequence of density estimates f(n), any arbitrary slow rate of convergence to 0 is possible for E(integral/f(n)-fl); (2) In theoretical comparisons of density estimates, integral/f(n)-f/ should be used and not integral/f(n)-f/sup p, p 1; and (3) For most reasonable nonparametric density estimates, either there is convergence of integral/f(n)-f/ (and then the convergence is in the strongest possible sense for all f), or there is no convergence (even in the weakest possible sense for a single f). There is no intermediate situation.

  14. Magnetic fields and density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Salsbury Jr., Freddie

    1999-02-01

    A major focus of this dissertation is the development of functionals for the magnetic susceptibility and the chemical shielding within the context of magnetic field density functional theory (BDFT). These functionals depend on the electron density in the absence of the field, which is unlike any other treatment of these responses. There have been several advances made within this theory. The first of which is the development of local density functionals for chemical shieldings and magnetic susceptibilities. There are the first such functionals ever proposed. These parameters have been studied by constructing functionals for the current density and then using the Biot-Savart equations to obtain the responses. In order to examine the advantages and disadvantages of the local functionals, they were tested numerically on some small molecules.

  15. Material and Optical Densities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluck, Paul

    2007-01-01

    The bending of a laser beam in a medium with a density and refractive index gradient in the same direction has been described previously. When a transparent container is half filled with a salt or sugar solution and an equal amount of water is floated on top of it, then diffusion will create a concentration gradient from top to bottom. A laser…

  16. Multiple density layered insulator

    DOEpatents

    Alger, Terry W.

    1994-01-01

    A multiple density layered insulator for use with a laser is disclosed wh provides at least two different insulation materials for a laser discharge tube, where the two insulation materials have different thermoconductivities. The multiple layer insulation materials provide for improved thermoconductivity capability for improved laser operation.

  17. Multiple density layered insulator

    DOEpatents

    Alger, T.W.

    1994-09-06

    A multiple density layered insulator for use with a laser is disclosed which provides at least two different insulation materials for a laser discharge tube, where the two insulation materials have different thermoconductivities. The multiple layer insulation materials provide for improved thermoconductivity capability for improved laser operation. 4 figs.

  18. Energy in density gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Vranjes, J.; Kono, M.

    2015-01-15

    Inhomogeneous plasmas and fluids contain energy stored in inhomogeneity and they naturally tend to relax into lower energy states by developing instabilities or by diffusion. But the actual amount of energy in such inhomogeneities has remained unknown. In the present work, the amount of energy stored in a density gradient is calculated for several specific density profiles in a cylindrical configuration. This is of practical importance for drift wave instability in various plasmas, and, in particular, in its application in models dealing with the heating of solar corona because the instability is accompanied with stochastic heating, so the energy contained in inhomogeneity is effectively transformed into heat. It is shown that even for a rather moderate increase of the density at the axis in magnetic structures in the corona by a factor 1.5 or 3, the amount of excess energy per unit volume stored in such a density gradient becomes several orders of magnitude greater than the amount of total energy losses per unit volume (per second) in quiet regions in the corona. Consequently, within the life-time of a magnetic structure such energy losses can easily be compensated by the stochastic drift wave heating.

  19. Low Bone Density

    MedlinePlus

    ... Media Kit NOF Events Blog Advocacy NOF Store Shopping Cart Home › Patients › Diagnosis Information › Bone Density Exam/ ... Media Kit NOF Events Blog Advocacy NOF Store Shopping Cart Contact Us Privacy Policy Legal Disclaimer Medical ...

  20. Pack Density Limitations of Hybrid Parachutes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwicker, Matthew L.; Sinclair, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    The development and testing of the Orion crew capsule parachute system has provided a unique opportunity to study dense parachute packing techniques and limits, in order to establish a new baseline for future programs. The density of parachute packs has a significant influence on vibration loads, retention system stresses, and parachute mortar performance. Material compositions and pack densities of existing designs for space capsule recovery were compared, using the pack density of the Apollo main parachutes as the current baseline. The composition of parachutes has changed since Apollo, incorporating new materials such as Kevlar , Vectran , Teflon and Spectra . These materials have different specific densities than Nylon, so the densities of hybrid parachute packs cannot be directly compared to Nylon parachutes for determination of feasibility or volume allocation. Six parachute packs were evaluated in terms of weighted average solid density in order to achieve a non-dimensional comparison of packing density. Means of mitigating damage due to packing pressure and mortar firing were examined in light of the Capsule Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) and Apollo experience. Parachute design improvements including incorporation of modern materials and manufacturing processes serves to make CPAS the new knowledge base on which future spacecraft parachute systems will be built.

  1. Uranus satellites - Densities and composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Torrence V.; Brown, Robert H.; Pollack, James B.

    1987-01-01

    Homogeneous and core-differentiated silicate/ice models of the Uranian satellites Miranda, Ariel, Umbriel, Titania, and Oberon are examined in the light of imaging observations and mass and density determinations obtained during the Voyager 2 encounter with Uranus in January 1986. The data and model predictions are compared in extensive tables and graphs and discussed in detail. The mass fractions of silicates in Oberon and Titania are found to be between 0.42 and 0.65, about the same as the average for the satellites of Jupiter and Saturn but significantly higher than that for the smaller Saturnian satellites or that predicted by current solar-nebula models. It is suggested that the satellites formed by accretion of material from their primary planets' outer envelopes. The observed rock/ice fractions are attributed to solar-nebula CO and solid-organics abundances and to preferential dissolution of H2O in outer-envelope planetesimals.

  2. Density functional theory: Foundations reviewed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryachko, Eugene S.; Ludeña, Eduardo V.

    2014-11-01

    Guided by the above motto (quotation), we review a broad range of issues lying at the foundations of Density Functional Theory, DFT, a theory which is currently omnipresent in our everyday computational study of atoms and molecules, solids and nano-materials, and which lies at the heart of modern many-body computational technologies. The key goal is to demonstrate that there are definitely the ways to improve DFT. We start by considering DFT in the larger context provided by reduced density matrix theory (RDMT) and natural orbital functional theory (NOFT), and examine the implications that N-representability conditions on the second-order reduced density matrix (2-RDM) have not only on RDMT and NOFT but, also, by extension, on the functionals of DFT. This examination is timely in view of the fact that necessary and sufficient N-representability conditions on the 2-RDM have recently been attained. In the second place, we review some problems appearing in the original formulation of the first Hohenberg-Kohn theorem which is still a subject of some controversy. In this vein we recall Lieb's comment on this proof and the extension to this proof given by Pino et al. (2009), and in this context examine the conditions that must be met in order that the one-to-one correspondence between ground-state densities and external potentials remains valid for finite subspaces (namely, the subspaces where all Kohn-Sham solutions are obtained in practical applications). We also consider the issue of whether the Kohn-Sham equations can be derived from basic principles or whether they are postulated. We examine this problem in relation to ab initio DFT. The possibility of postulating arbitrary Kohn-Sham-type equations, where the effective potential is by definition some arbitrary mixture of local and non-local terms, is discussed. We also deal with the issue of whether there exists a universal functional, or whether one should advocate instead the construction of problem

  3. Density equalisation in supercooled high- and low-density water mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    English, Niall J.; Kusalik, Peter G.; Tse, John S.

    2013-08-01

    The temporal evolution of two model high-density/low-density (HDL/LDL) interfaces was examined from molecular dynamics (MD) calculations at temperatures close to the predicted second critical point of water for three water models. In all cases, interfacial density equalisation occurred rapidly showing no preference for inhomogenous distribution. A uniform density (of ca. 0.99-1.067 g/cm3, depending on the potential) was always observed at the interface, indicating the free energy of water in low- and high-density forms is metastable, and that LDL and HDL should not coexist as independent entities at thermodynamic equilibrium. It is reckoned that previous MD studies supporting the "two-liquid" model have an explicit, if inappropriate, assumption of mechanical equilibrium between the two phases. The present result challenges the notion that a second critical point exists, and that LDL/HDL mixtures could be even kinetically metastable.

  4. Airborne Crowd Density Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meynberg, O.; Kuschk, G.

    2013-10-01

    This paper proposes a new method for estimating human crowd densities from aerial imagery. Applications benefiting from an accurate crowd monitoring system are mainly found in the security sector. Normally crowd density estimation is done through in-situ camera systems mounted on high locations although this is not appropriate in case of very large crowds with thousands of people. Using airborne camera systems in these scenarios is a new research topic. Our method uses a preliminary filtering of the whole image space by suitable and fast interest point detection resulting in a number of image regions, possibly containing human crowds. Validation of these candidates is done by transforming the corresponding image patches into a low-dimensional and discriminative feature space and classifying the results using a support vector machine (SVM). The feature space is spanned by texture features computed by applying a Gabor filter bank with varying scale and orientation to the image patches. For evaluation, we use 5 different image datasets acquired by the 3K+ aerial camera system of the German Aerospace Center during real mass events like concerts or football games. To evaluate the robustness and generality of our method, these datasets are taken from different flight heights between 800 m and 1500 m above ground (keeping a fixed focal length) and varying daylight and shadow conditions. The results of our crowd density estimation are evaluated against a reference data set obtained by manually labeling tens of thousands individual persons in the corresponding datasets and show that our method is able to estimate human crowd densities in challenging realistic scenarios.

  5. Directional Acoustic Density Sensor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-13

    fluctuations of fluid density at a point . (2) DESCRIPTION OF THE PRIOR ART [0004] Conventional vector sensors measure particle velocity, v (vx,Vytvz...dipole-type or first order sensor that is realized by measuring particle velocity at a point , (which is the vector sensor sensing approach for...underwater sensors), or by measuring the gradient of the acoustic pressure at two closely spaced (less than the wavelength of an acoustic wave) points as it

  6. High power density targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellemoine, Frederique

    2013-12-01

    In the context of new generation rare isotope beam facilities based on high-power heavy-ion accelerators and in-flight separation of the reaction products, the design of the rare isotope production targets is a major challenge. In order to provide high-purity beams for science, high resolution is required in the rare isotope separation. This demands a small beam spot on the production target which, together with the short range of heavy ions in matter, leads to very high power densities inside the target material. This paper gives an overview of the challenges associated with this high power density, discusses radiation damage issues in targets exposed to heavy ion beams, and presents recent developments to meet some of these challenges through different projects: FAIR, RIBF and FRIB which is the most challenging. Extensive use of Finite Element Analysis (FEA) has been made at all facilities to specify critical target parameters and R&D work at FRIB successfully retired two major risks related to high-power density and heavy-ion induced radiation damage.

  7. Misclassification of Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) Mammographic Density and Implications for Breast Density Reporting Legislation.

    PubMed

    Gard, Charlotte C; Aiello Bowles, Erin J; Miglioretti, Diana L; Taplin, Stephen H; Rutter, Carolyn M

    2015-01-01

    USA states have begun legislating mammographic breast density reporting to women, requiring that women undergoing screening mammography who have dense breast tissue (Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System [BI-RADS] density c or d) receive written notification of their breast density; however, the impact that misclassification of breast density will have on this reporting remains unclear. The aim of this study was to assess reproducibility of the four-category BI-RADS density measure and examine its relationship with a continuous measure of percent density. We enrolled 19 radiologists, experienced in breast imaging, from a single integrated health care system. Radiologists interpreted 341 screening mammograms at two points in time 6 months apart. We assessed intra- and interobserver agreement in radiologists'; interpretations of BI-RADS density and explored whether agreement depended upon radiologist characteristics. We examined the relationship between BI-RADS density and percent density in a subset of 282 examinations. Intraradiologist agreement was moderate to substantial, with kappa varying across radiologists from 0.50 to 0.81 (mean = 0.69, 95% CI [0.63, 0.73]). Intraradiologist agreement was higher for radiologists with ≥10 years experience interpreting mammograms (difference in mean kappa = 0.10, 95% CI [0.01, 0.24]). Interradiologist agreement varied widely across radiologist pairs from slight to substantial, with kappa ranging from 0.02 to 0.72 (mean = 0.46, 95% CI [0.36, 0.55]). Of 145 examinations interpreted as "nondense" (BI-RADS density a or b) by the majority of radiologists, 82.8% were interpreted as "dense" (BI-RADS density c or d) by at least one radiologist. Of 187 examinations interpreted as "dense" by the majority of radiologists, 47.1% were interpreted as "nondense" by at least one radiologist. While the examinations of almost half of the women in our study were interpreted clinically as having BI-RADS density c or d, only about 10% of

  8. Gedanken densities and exact constraints in density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Perdew, John P.; Ruzsinszky, Adrienn; Sun, Jianwei; Burke, Kieron

    2014-05-14

    Approximations to the exact density functional for the exchange-correlation energy of a many-electron ground state can be constructed by satisfying constraints that are universal, i.e., valid for all electron densities. Gedanken densities are designed for the purpose of this construction, but need not be realistic. The uniform electron gas is an old gedanken density. Here, we propose a spherical two-electron gedanken density in which the dimensionless density gradient can be an arbitrary positive constant wherever the density is non-zero. The Lieb-Oxford lower bound on the exchange energy can be satisfied within a generalized gradient approximation (GGA) by bounding its enhancement factor or simplest GGA exchange-energy density. This enhancement-factor bound is well known to be sufficient, but our gedanken density shows that it is also necessary. The conventional exact exchange-energy density satisfies no such local bound, but energy densities are not unique, and the simplest GGA exchange-energy density is not an approximation to it. We further derive a strongly and optimally tightened bound on the exchange enhancement factor of a two-electron density, which is satisfied by the local density approximation but is violated by all published GGA's or meta-GGA’s. Finally, some consequences of the non-uniform density-scaling behavior for the asymptotics of the exchange enhancement factor of a GGA or meta-GGA are given.

  9. Examiners' perceptions of the objective structured clinical examination in colposcopy.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, N S

    2013-02-01

    Certification in Colposcopy by the British Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology (BSCCP) and the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists is a formal pre- requisite to the practice of colposcopy within the UK. This certification is awarded after passing an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). The aim of the project is to explore examiners' perceptions of the OSCE examination in colposcopy and consider whether it is the right tool to differentiate between safe and unsafe practice in colposcopy. A case study research methodology was employed for the project, and questionnaires were sent to 30 examiners for OSCE in Colposcopy. The project also included conducting semi-structured interviews with two examiners, two trainees and a senior manager of the BSCCP. The questionnaire had a response rate of 28 (94%). The satisfaction rate among the examiners about the standard of questions in OSCE in Colposcopy was 93%, and 89% of the examiners would allow a candidate passing the examination to carry out a clinic in their absence. A total of 26 (94%) examiners thought that the examination was fit for purpose. It was suggested that testing of practical skills should also be made part of the examination. It seems OSCE in Colposcopy is perceived well both by the examiners and the candidates.

  10. Interpreting Examiners' Annotations on Examination Papers: A Sociocultural Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Martin; Shaw, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    In Ireland and the UK it is accepted practice that agencies with formal responsibility for delivering school examinations allow examination candidates, and in many cases their teachers, to see their examination papers once they have been marked. Returned papers can carry various pieces of information; as well as the total score given for a…

  11. Density Gradients in Chemistry Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, P. J.

    1972-01-01

    Outlines experiments in which a density gradient might be used to advantage. A density gradient consists of a column of liquid, the composition and density of which varies along its length. The procedure can be used in analysis of solutions and mixtures and in density measures of solids. (Author/TS)

  12. US RERTR FUEL DEVELOPMENT POST IRRADIATION EXAMINATION RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    A. B. Robinson; D. M. Wachs; D. E. Burkes; D. D. Keiser

    2008-10-01

    Post irradiation examinations of irradiated RERTR plate type fuel at the Idaho National Laboratory have led to in depth characterization of fuel behavior and performance. Both destructive and non-destructive examination capabilities at the Hot Fuels Examination Facility (HFEF) as well as recent results obtained are discussed herein. New equipment as well as more advanced techniques are also being developed to further advance the investigation into the performance of the high density U-Mo fuel.

  13. Study of low density air transportation concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, H. M.

    1972-01-01

    Low density air transport refers to air service to sparsely populated regions. There are two major objectives. The first is to examine those characteristics of sparsely populated areas which pertain to air transportation. This involves determination of geographical, commercial and population trends, as well as those traveler characteristics which affect the viability of air transport in the region. The second objective is to analyze the technical, economic and operational characteristics of low density air service. Two representative, but diverse arenas, West Virginia and Arizona, were selected for analysis: The results indicate that Arizona can support air service under certain assumptions whereas West Virginia cannot.

  14. Examination of SR101 shipping packages

    SciTech Connect

    Daugherty, W. L.

    2015-03-01

    Four SR101 shipping packages were removed from service and provided for disassembly and examination of the internal fiberboard assemblies. These packages were 20 years old, and had experienced varying levels of degradation. Two of the packages were successfully disassembled and fiberboard samples were removed from these packages and tested. Mechanical and thermal property values are generally comparable to or higher than baseline values measured on fiberboard from 9975 packages, which differs primarily in the specified density range. While baseline data for the SR101 material is not available, this comparison with 9975 material suggests that the material properties of the SR101 fiberboard have not significantly degraded.

  15. A comparison of breast self-examination and clinical examination.

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, T. C.; Penn, N. E.; Giebink, J.; Bastien, R.

    1994-01-01

    Twenty-six female college students were trained to examine their breasts using the Mammacare Method. After training, participants were asked to demonstrate their breast self-examination technique for a competency evaluation. On average, 85% of the components of the palpation technique were correctly included in the participants' self-examinations, indicating that they had been trained competently. Breast self-examiners then were asked to palpate three breast models in search of embedded lumps. Thirteen health professionals were asked to examine the same breast models for lumps. The examination of the models by self-examiners was compared to that by health professionals. Breast self-examiners took longer to examine each model, and on average correctly identified significantly more lumps than health professionals. The two groups did not differ in number of false-positive findings. These results indicate that women adequately trained to perform breast self-examination can perform breast examinations at least as accurately as health professionals. PMID:8151721

  16. Curve Fitting of the Corporate Recovery Rates: The Comparison of Beta Distribution Estimation and Kernel Density Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rongda; Wang, Ze

    2013-01-01

    Recovery rate is essential to the estimation of the portfolio’s loss and economic capital. Neglecting the randomness of the distribution of recovery rate may underestimate the risk. The study introduces two kinds of models of distribution, Beta distribution estimation and kernel density distribution estimation, to simulate the distribution of recovery rates of corporate loans and bonds. As is known, models based on Beta distribution are common in daily usage, such as CreditMetrics by J.P. Morgan, Portfolio Manager by KMV and Losscalc by Moody’s. However, it has a fatal defect that it can’t fit the bimodal or multimodal distributions such as recovery rates of corporate loans and bonds as Moody’s new data show. In order to overcome this flaw, the kernel density estimation is introduced and we compare the simulation results by histogram, Beta distribution estimation and kernel density estimation to reach the conclusion that the Gaussian kernel density distribution really better imitates the distribution of the bimodal or multimodal data samples of corporate loans and bonds. Finally, a Chi-square test of the Gaussian kernel density estimation proves that it can fit the curve of recovery rates of loans and bonds. So using the kernel density distribution to precisely delineate the bimodal recovery rates of bonds is optimal in credit risk management. PMID:23874558

  17. Curve fitting of the corporate recovery rates: the comparison of Beta distribution estimation and kernel density estimation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rongda; Wang, Ze

    2013-01-01

    Recovery rate is essential to the estimation of the portfolio's loss and economic capital. Neglecting the randomness of the distribution of recovery rate may underestimate the risk. The study introduces two kinds of models of distribution, Beta distribution estimation and kernel density distribution estimation, to simulate the distribution of recovery rates of corporate loans and bonds. As is known, models based on Beta distribution are common in daily usage, such as CreditMetrics by J.P. Morgan, Portfolio Manager by KMV and Losscalc by Moody's. However, it has a fatal defect that it can't fit the bimodal or multimodal distributions such as recovery rates of corporate loans and bonds as Moody's new data show. In order to overcome this flaw, the kernel density estimation is introduced and we compare the simulation results by histogram, Beta distribution estimation and kernel density estimation to reach the conclusion that the Gaussian kernel density distribution really better imitates the distribution of the bimodal or multimodal data samples of corporate loans and bonds. Finally, a Chi-square test of the Gaussian kernel density estimation proves that it can fit the curve of recovery rates of loans and bonds. So using the kernel density distribution to precisely delineate the bimodal recovery rates of bonds is optimal in credit risk management.

  18. High Energy Density Capacitors

    SciTech Connect

    2010-07-01

    BEEST Project: Recapping is developing a capacitor that could rival the energy storage potential and price of today’s best EV batteries. When power is needed, the capacitor rapidly releases its stored energy, similar to lightning being discharged from a cloud. Capacitors are an ideal substitute for batteries if their energy storage capacity can be improved. Recapping is addressing storage capacity by experimenting with the material that separates the positive and negative electrodes of its capacitors. These separators could significantly improve the energy density of electrochemical devices.

  19. Discrete density of states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydin, Alhun; Sisman, Altug

    2016-03-01

    By considering the quantum-mechanically minimum allowable energy interval, we exactly count number of states (NOS) and introduce discrete density of states (DOS) concept for a particle in a box for various dimensions. Expressions for bounded and unbounded continua are analytically recovered from discrete ones. Even though substantial fluctuations prevail in discrete DOS, they're almost completely flattened out after summation or integration operation. It's seen that relative errors of analytical expressions of bounded/unbounded continua rapidly decrease for high NOS values (weak confinement or high energy conditions), while the proposed analytical expressions based on Weyl's conjecture always preserve their lower error characteristic.

  20. Physical examination of the shoulder.

    PubMed

    King, Joseph J; Wright, Thomas W

    2014-10-01

    This article summarizes the overall assessment of the shoulder joint and seeks to help direct clinicians to diagnose shoulder pathology using standard and specific physical examinations. The history and standard examination can prompt the examiner to focus on specific tests to further evaluate the shoulder and limit the differential diagnoses. An appropriate and directed shoulder physical examination allows the clinician to focus on further diagnostic strategies and treatment options for the patient.

  1. Case study of the propagation of a small flaw under PWR loading conditions and comparison with the ASME code design life. Comparison of ASME Code Sections III and XI

    SciTech Connect

    Yahr, G.T.; Gwaltney, R.C.; Richardson, A.K.; Server, W.L.

    1986-01-01

    A cooperative study was performed by EG and G Idaho, Inc., and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to investigate the degree of conservatism and consistency in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section III fatigue evaluation procedure and Section XI flaw acceptance standards. A single, realistic, sample problem was analyzed to determine the significance of certain points of criticism made of an earlier parametric study by staff members of the Division of Engineering Standards of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The problem was based on a semielliptical flaw located on the inside surface of the hot-leg piping at the reactor vessel safe-end weld for the Zion 1 pressurized-water reactor (PWR). Two main criteria were used in selecting the problem; first, it should be a straight pipe to minimize the computational expense; second, it should exhibit as high a cumulative usage factor as possible. Although the problem selected has one of the highest cumulative usage factors of any straight pipe in the primary system of PWRs, it is still very low. The Code Section III fatigue usage factor was only 0.00046, assuming it was in the as-welded condition, and fatigue crack-growth analyses predicted negligible crack growth during the 40-year design life. When the analyses were extended past the design life, the usage factor was less than 1.0 when the flaw had propagated to failure. The current study shows that the criticism of the earlier report should not detract from the conclusion that if a component experiences a high level of cyclic stress corresponding to a fatigue usage factor near 1.0, very small cracks can propagate to unacceptable sizes.

  2. External Examining: Fit for Purpose?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloxham, Sue; Price, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    In a context of international concern about academic standards, the practice of external examining is widely admired for its role in defending standards. Yet a contradiction exists between this faith in examining and continuing concerns about standards. This article argues that external examining rests on assumptions about standards which are…

  3. Timing of the Medical Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christian, Cindy W.

    2011-01-01

    The medical examination of the sexually abused child may have evidentiary, medical, and therapeutic purposes, and the timing of the examination requires consideration of each of these objectives. In cases of acute sexual assault, emergent examinations may be needed to identify injury, collect forensic evidence, and provide infection and pregnancy…

  4. Oblique dust density waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piel, Alexander; Arp, Oliver; Menzel, Kristoffer; Klindworth, Markus

    2007-11-01

    We report on experimental observations of dust density waves in a complex (dusty) plasma under microgravity. The plasma is produced in a radio-frequency parallel-plate discharge (argon, p=15Pa, U=65Vpp). Different sizes of dust particles were used (3.4 μm and 6.4μm diameter). The low-frequency (f 11Hz) dust density waves are naturally unstable modes, which are driven by the ion flow in the plasma. Surprisingly, the wave propagation direction is aligned with the ion flow direction in the bulk plasma but becomes oblique at the boundary of the dust cloud with an inclination of 60^o with respect to the plasma boundary. The experimental results are compared with a kinetic model in the electrostatic approximation [1] and a fluid model [2]. Moreover, the role of dust surface waves is discussed. [1] M. Rosenberg, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 14, 631 (1996) [2] A. Piel et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 205009 (2006)

  5. Gluon density in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ayala, A.L.; Ducati, M.B.G.; Levin, E.M.

    1996-10-01

    In this talk we present our detailed study (theory and numbers) on the shadowing corrections to the gluon structure functions for nuclei. Starting from rather controversial information on the nucleon structure function which is originated by the recent HERA data, we develop the Glauber approach for the gluon density in a nucleus based on Mueller formula and estimate the value of the shadowing corrections in this case. Then we calculate the first corrections to the Glauber approach and show that these corrections are big. Based on this practical observation we suggest the new evolution equation which takes into account the shadowing corrections and solve it. We hope to convince you that the new evolution equation gives a good theoretical tool to treat the shadowing corrections for the gluons density in a nucleus and, therefore, it is able to provide the theoretically reliable initial conditions for the time evolution of the nucleus-nucleus cascade. The initial conditions should be fixed both theoretically and phenomenologically before to attack such complicated problems as the mixture of hard and soft processes in nucleus-nucleus interactions at high energy or the theoretically reliable approach to hadron or/and parton cascades for high energy nucleus-nucleus interaction. 35 refs., 24 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Thermosphere Density Variability, Drag Coefficients, and Precision Satellite Orbits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-29

    complex satellites. 1 Introduction Atmospheric density and drag coefficient modeling have long been among the greatest uncertainties in the...limitation of existing theories for satellite drag coefficients. In addition, the research will examine whether modern computational fluids...2005) gives an introduction to the neutral atmosphere and the time varying effects on the thermospheric and exospheric density. These time varying

  7. 46 CFR 189.40-3 - Drydock examination, internal structural examination, cargo tank internal examination, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Drydock examination, internal structural examination, cargo tank internal examination, and underwater survey intervals. 189.40-3 Section 189.40-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS INSPECTION...

  8. Mixing in plasma and low density jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russ, S.; Strykowski, P. J.; Pfender, E.

    1994-04-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the mechanisms which produce the large entrainment measured near the exit of thermal plasma torches. A research facility was constructed to examine low density jet behavior under similar dimensionless conditions as those produced by thermal plasma spray torches; the Reynolds number based on jet diameter and average properties was 1000, and the ratio of jet to ambient density was 0.07. This very low density jet produced organized vortex structures which were partially responsible for the rapid entrainment of external air. The formation of these organized structures could be disrupted by introducing turbulence, but the rapid entrainment process was not significantly affected. The structure of the jet produced by a commercial plasma torch was examined and compared to the low density research jet. At low gas flow rates the plasma jet also displayed the formation of coherent vortex structures, the passage frequency of which compared favorably with that measured in the low density research jet. At higher gas flow rates the shear layer of the plasma jet rapidly broke down producing relatively small scale turbulence. Visualizations of the hot plasma core were compared against measurements of the torch voltage fluctuations caused by arc instabilities. At low flow rates the arc voltage fluctuations were quite low and the plume was very steady. At higher flow rates the arc voltage fluctuations increased and produced “surging” and “whipping” in the hot potential core. It is believed that this low frequency unsteadiness is partially responsible for the rapid entrainment measured in plasma torches.

  9. DC electric field effects during measurements of monopolar charge density and net space charge density near HVDC power lines

    SciTech Connect

    Misakian, M.; McKnight, R.H. )

    1989-10-01

    The influence of a dc electric field on the measurement of monopolar charge densities using an aspirator-type ion counter and the measurement of net space charge density using a Faraday cage or filter is examined. Optimum configurations which minimize the effect of the electric field are identified for each type of instrumentation. Key Words: Electric field, Faraday cage, filter, ion counter, measurement, measurement errors, monopolar charge density, net space charge.

  10. Microvessel and astroglial cell densities in the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, M; Akagi, N; Goto, H; Watanabe, H; Nakanishi, M; Hirose, Y; Watanabe, M

    1992-01-01

    In order to study the factors responsible for glucose uptake in the mouse hippocampus, microvessel and astroglial cell densities were measured and compared in each laminal region. Microvessel density was examined on histologically prepared sections after injection of Indian ink and measured by means of an image analyser. Astroglial cell density was determined after the cells were stained immunohistochemically. Microvessel and astroglial cell densities were determined in 10 different hippocampal structures. Microvessel and astroglial cell densities were strongly correlated in all layers except the pyramidal cell layers. The highest density of perfused microvessels was found in the stratum lacunosum-moleculare, compared with other regions, and the lowest values were found in the stratum lucidum and dentate granular cell layer. Among pyramidal cell layers, microvessel density in sector CA3a was significantly higher than that in CA1. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:1452486

  11. Physical examination during space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, B. A. Jr; Billica, R. D.; Bishop, S. L.; Blackwell, T.; Layne, C. S.; Harm, D. L.; Sandoz, G. R.; Rosenow, E. C. 3rd

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop techniques for conducting a physical examination in microgravity and to describe and document the physiologic changes noted with use of a modified basic physical examination. DESIGN: On the basis of data gathered from physical examinations on KC-135 flights, three physical variables were assessed serially in astronauts during two shuttle missions (of 8- and 10-day duration, respectively). Preflight, in-flight, and postflight examinations were conducted by trained physician-astronauts or flight surgeons, who used this modified examination. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Five male and two female crewmembers participated in the "hands-on" physical examination of all physiologic systems except the genitourinary system. Level of edema, intensity of bowel sounds, and peripheral reflexes were assessed and graded. RESULTS: This investigation identified unique elements of a physical examination performed during space flight that will assist in the development of standard methods for conducting examinations of astronauts in weightlessness. In addition, demonstrable changes induced by microgravity were noted in most physiologic systems examined. CONCLUSION: The data support the hypothesis that the microgravity examination differs from that conducted on earth or in a 1g environment. In addition, alterations in the physiologic response can be detected with use of hands-on technique. These data are invaluable in the development of optimal medical care for humans in space.

  12. Low density microcellular foams

    DOEpatents

    LeMay, James D.

    1991-01-01

    Disclosed is a process of producing microcellular foam which comprises the steps of: (a) selecting a multifunctional epoxy oligomer resin; (b) mixing said epoxy resin with a non-reactive diluent to form a resin-diluent mixture; (c) forming a diluent containing cross-linked epoxy gel from said resin-diluent mixture; (d) replacing said diluent with a solvent therefore; (e) replacing said solvent with liquid carbon dioxide; and (f) vaporizing off said liquid carbon dioxide under supercritical conditions, whereby a foam having a density in the range of 35-150 mg/cc and cell diameters less than about 1 .mu.m is produced. Also disclosed are the foams produced by the process.

  13. Low density microcellular foams

    DOEpatents

    LeMay, J.D.

    1991-11-19

    Disclosed is a process of producing microcellular foam which comprises the steps of: (a) selecting a multifunctional epoxy oligomer resin; (b) mixing said epoxy resin with a non-reactive diluent to form a resin-diluent mixture; (c) forming a diluent containing cross-linked epoxy gel from said resin-diluent mixture; (d) replacing said diluent with a solvent therefore; (e) replacing said solvent with liquid carbon dioxide; and (f) vaporizing off said liquid carbon dioxide under supercritical conditions, whereby a foam having a density in the range of 35-150 mg/cc and cell diameters less than about 1 [mu]m is produced. Also disclosed are the foams produced by the process. 8 figures.

  14. Low density microcellular foams

    DOEpatents

    LeMay, James D.

    1992-01-01

    Disclosed is a process of producing microcellular from which comprises the steps of: (a) selecting a multifunctional epoxy oligomer resin; (b) mixing said epoxy resin with a non-reactive diluent to form a resin-diluent mixture; (c) forming a diluent containing cross-linked epoxy gel from said resin-diluent mixture; (d) replacing said diluent with a solvent therefore; (e) replacing said solvent with liquid carbon dioxide; and (f) vaporizing off said liquid carbon dioxide under supercritical conditions, whereby a foam having a density in the range of 35-150 mg/cc and cell diameters less than about 1 .mu.m is produced. Also disclosed are the foams produced by the process.

  15. Low density microcellular foams

    DOEpatents

    Aubert, J.H.; Clough, R.L.; Curro, J.G.; Quintana, C.A.; Russick, E.M.; Shaw, M.T.

    1985-10-02

    Low density, microporous polymer foams are provided by a process which comprises forming a solution of polymer and a suitable solvent followed by rapid cooling of the solution to form a phase-separated system and freeze the phase-separated system. The phase-separated system comprises a polymer phase and a solvent phase, each of which is substantially continuous within the other. The morphology of the polymer phase prior to and subsequent to freezing determine the morphology of the resultant foam. Both isotropic and anisotropic foams can be produced. If isotropic foams are produced, the polymer and solvent are tailored such that the solution spontaneously phase-separates prior to the point at which any component freezes. The morphology of the resultant polymer phase determines the morphology of the reusltant foam and the morphology of the polymer phase is retained by cooling the system at a rate sufficient to freeze one or both components of the system before a change in morphology can occur. Anisotropic foams are produced by forming a solution of polymer and solvent that will not phase separate prior to freezing of one or both components of the solution. In such a process, the solvent typically freezes before phase separation occurs. The morphology of the resultant frozen two-phase system determines the morphology of the resultant foam. The process involves subjecting the solution to essentially one-dimensional cooling. Foams having a density of less than 0.1 g/cc and a uniform cell size of less than 10 ..mu..m and a volume such that the foams have a length greater than 1 cm are provided.

  16. Low density microcellular foams

    DOEpatents

    Aubert, James H.; Clough, Roger L.; Curro, John G.; Quintana, Carlos A.; Russick, Edward M.; Shaw, Montgomery T.

    1987-01-01

    Low density, microporous polymer foams are provided by a process which comprises forming a solution of polymer and a suitable solvent followed by rapid cooling of the solution to form a phase-separated system and freeze the phase-separated system. The phase-separated system comprises a polymer phase and a solvent phase, each of which is substantially continuous within the other. The morphology of the polymer phase prior to and subsequent to freezing determine the morphology of the resultant foam. Both isotropic and anisotropic foams can be produced. If isotropic foams are produced, the polymer and solvent are tailored such that the solution spontaneously phase-separates prior to the point at which any component freezes. The morphology of the resultant polymer phase determines the morphology of the resultant foam and the morphology of the polymer phase is retained by cooling the system at a rate sufficient to freeze one or both components of the system before a change in morphology can occur. Anisotropic foams are produced by forming a solution of polymer and solvent that will not phase separate prior to freezing of one or both components of the solution. In such a process, the solvent typically freezes before phase separation occurs. The morphology of the resultant frozen two-phase system determines the morphology of the resultant foam. The process involves subjecting the solution to essentially one-dimensional cooling. Means for subjecting such a solvent to one-dimensional cooling are also provided. Foams having a density of less than 0.1 g/cc and a uniform cell size of less than 10 .mu.m and a volume such that the foams have a length greater than 1 cm are provided.

  17. Density Threshold for Edge Poloidal Flow Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, N.; Ware, A. S.; Newman, D. E.; Hidalgo, C.

    2004-11-01

    A numerical transport model is used to examine a density threshold for the onset of an edge poloidal velocity shear layer in toroidal devices. This work is motivated by recent experimental results from the TJ-II stellarator which indicate a critical density threshold for the development of an edge poloidal velocity shear layer [1]. Edge shear-flow layers are commonly observed in toroidal confinement devices, even in L-mode discharges. The numerical transport model has been used to examine internal transport barriers and front propagation of internal transport barriers [2]. The transport model couples together density, ion temperature, electron temperature, poloidal flow, toroidal flow, radial electric field, and a fluctuation envelope equation which includes a shear-suppression factor. In this work, we present results from a series of cases using parameters that are typical of TJ-II discharges. The dependence of the critical density threshold on flow damping and Reynolds stress drive is investigated. [1] C. Hidalgo, M. A. Pedrosa, L. Garcia, and A. Ware, "Direct experimental evidence of coupling between sheared flows development and increasing in level of turbulence in the TJ-II stellarator", submitted to Phys. Rev. E. [2] D. E. Newman, B. A. Carreras, D. Lopez-Bruna, P. H. Diamond, and V. B. Lebedev, Phys. Plasmas 5, 938 (1998).

  18. EXAMINATION OF THE PATELLOFEMORAL JOINT.

    PubMed

    Manske, Robert C; Davies, George J

    2016-12-01

    Patellofemoral pain is one of the leading causes of knee pain in athletes. The many causes of patellofemoral pain make diagnosis unpredictable and examination and treatment difficult. This clinical commentary discusses a detailed physical examination routine for the patient with patellofemoral pain. Critically listening and obtaining a detailed medical history followed by a clearly structured physical examination will allow the physical therapist to diagnose most forms of patellofemoral pain. This clinical commentary goes one step further by suggesting an examination scheme and order in which it should be performed during the examination process. This step-by-step guide will be helpful for the student or novice therapist and serve as review for those that are already well versed in patellofemoral examination.

  19. EXAMINATION OF THE PATELLOFEMORAL JOINT

    PubMed Central

    Davies, George J.

    2016-01-01

    Patellofemoral pain is one of the leading causes of knee pain in athletes. The many causes of patellofemoral pain make diagnosis unpredictable and examination and treatment difficult. This clinical commentary discusses a detailed physical examination routine for the patient with patellofemoral pain. Critically listening and obtaining a detailed medical history followed by a clearly structured physical examination will allow the physical therapist to diagnose most forms of patellofemoral pain. This clinical commentary goes one step further by suggesting an examination scheme and order in which it should be performed during the examination process. This step-by-step guide will be helpful for the student or novice therapist and serve as review for those that are already well versed in patellofemoral examination. PMID:27904788

  20. Physical examination: how to examine the arm with arteriovenous fistula.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Clemente Neves; Apóstolo, João Luís; Figueiredo, Maria Henriqueta; Martins, Maria Manuela; Dias, Vanessa Filipa

    2013-04-01

    Physical examination has demonstrated its effectiveness in identifying complications of arteriovenous fistula (AVF). It should be initiated at the stage prior to the construction of the AVF and continue in its accomplishment, maturation, and subsequent use in the treatment of hemodialysis. Nurses should incorporate the physical examination in their practices, in order to preserve the vascular net of patients and assist in the recognition of complications of AVF. It is intended to describe aspects of the physical examination that enable the identification of the AVF complications including: infection, accessory veins, venous stenosis, steal syndrome, high-output cardiac failure, and venous hypertension.

  1. Neighborhood density effects in spoken word recognition in Spanish.

    PubMed

    Vitevitch, Michael S; Rodríguez, Eva

    2004-01-01

    The present work examined the relationships among familiarity ratings, frequency of occurrence, neighborhood density, and word length in a corpus of Spanish words. The observed relationships were similar to the relationships found among the same variables in English. An auditory lexical decision task was then performed to examine the influence of word frequency, neighborhood density, and neighborhood frequency on spoken word recognition in Spanish. In contrast to the competitive effect of phonological neighborhoods typically observed in English, a facilitative effect of neighborhood density and neighborhood frequency was found in Spanish. Implications for models of spoken word recognition and language disorders are discussed.

  2. Neighborhood density effects in spoken word recognition in Spanish

    PubMed Central

    VITEVITCH, MICHAEL S.; RODRÍGUEZ, EVA

    2008-01-01

    The present work examined the relationships among familiarity ratings, frequency of occurrence, neighborhood density, and word length in a corpus of Spanish words. The observed relationships were similar to the relationships found among the same variables in English. An auditory lexical decision task was then performed to examine the influence of word frequency, neighborhood density, and neighborhood frequency on spoken word recognition in Spanish. In contrast to the competitive effect of phonological neighborhoods typically observed in English, a facilitative effect of neighborhood density and neighborhood frequency was found in Spanish. Implications for models of spoken word recognition and language disorders are discussed. PMID:19018293

  3. Assessment and Examinations in Armenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bethell, George; Harutyunyan, Karine

    2008-01-01

    This profile describes traditional assessment practices in Armenia--many of which are typical of those formerly practised throughout the Soviet Union--and the ongoing efforts to reform formal examinations and school-based evaluation techniques. The extraordinarily high stakes associated with the examination currently used to select applicants for…

  4. Examining the Pledge of Allegiance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Leisa A.

    2008-01-01

    To prepare students for effective citizenship, the author examines the Pledge of Allegiance and explores its meaning, history, and role in American history. The author includes quotes presenting different views of the U.S. Pledge of Allegiance and examples of pledges from different countries. Teachers are encouraged to have students examine their…

  5. Physical examination of the hand.

    PubMed

    Kenney, Raymond J; Hammert, Warren C

    2014-11-01

    Examination of the hand is an essential piece of a hand surgeon's skill set. This current concepts review presents a systematic process of performing a comprehensive physical examination of the hand including vascular, sensory, and motor assessments. Evaluations focused on specific hand diseases and injuries are also discussed. This information can be useful for any health care provider treating patients with hand conditions.

  6. The neuro-ophthalmological examination.

    PubMed

    Rucker, Janet C; Kennard, Christopher; Leigh, R John

    2011-01-01

    The neuro-ophthalmological examination constitutes one of the most refined and exact components of the clinical examination, often allowing precise diagnosis and formulation of a treatment plan even within the compass of the first visit. This chapter briefly highlights important features in the neuro-ophthalmological history and then presents detailed information on the important components of a comprehensive neuro-ophthalmological examination. Covered examination topics include visual acuity, visual field testing, color vision, external eye exam, pupils, ophthalmoscopy, and eye movements. The final section discusses ancillary tests that supplement the bedside neuro-ophthalmological examination, including formal visual field analysis, electroretinography, fluorescein angiography, ocular coherence tomography, visual-evoked potentials, neuroimaging, and quantitative eye movement recordings.

  7. History of neurologic examination books.

    PubMed

    Boes, Christopher J

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to create an annotated list of textbooks dedicated to teaching the neurologic examination. Monographs focused primarily on the complete neurologic examination published prior to 1960 were reviewed. This analysis was limited to books with the word "examination" in the title, with exceptions for the texts of Robert Wartenberg and Gordon Holmes. Ten manuals met the criteria. Works dedicated primarily to the neurologic examination without a major emphasis on disease description or treatment first appeared in the early 1900s. Georg Monrad-Krohn's "Blue Book of Neurology" ("Blue Bible") was the earliest success. These treatises served the important purpose of educating trainees on proper neurologic examination technique. They could make a reputation and be profitable for the author (Monrad-Krohn), highlight how neurology was practiced at individual institutions (McKendree, Denny-Brown, Holmes, DeJong, Mayo Clinic authors), and honor retiring mentors (Mayo Clinic authors).

  8. Carbon nanotube growth density control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delzeit, Lance D. (Inventor); Schipper, John F. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Method and system for combined coarse scale control and fine scale control of growth density of a carbon nanotube (CNT) array on a substrate, using a selected electrical field adjacent to a substrate surface for coarse scale density control (by one or more orders of magnitude) and a selected CNT growth temperature range for fine scale density control (by multiplicative factors of less than an order of magnitude) of CNT growth density. Two spaced apart regions on a substrate may have different CNT growth densities and/or may use different feed gases for CNT growth.

  9. Low-density lipoprotein density determination by electric conductivity.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Higuero, José A; Salvador, Ana M; Arrondo, José L R; Milicua, José Carlos G

    2011-10-15

    The predominance of small dense low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles is associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease. A simple but precise method has been developed, based on electrical conductivity of an isopycnic gradient of KBr, to obtain density values of human LDL fraction. The results obtained can distinguish LDL density populations and their subfractions from different patients. These data were corroborated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) (structure) and light-scattering analyses (size).

  10. Density limit experiments on FTU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucella, G.; Tudisco, O.; Apicella, M. L.; Apruzzese, G.; Artaserse, G.; Belli, F.; Bin, W.; Boncagni, L.; Botrugno, A.; Buratti, P.; Calabrò, G.; Castaldo, C.; Cianfarani, C.; Cocilovo, V.; Dimatteo, L.; Esposito, B.; Frigione, D.; Gabellieri, L.; Giovannozzi, E.; Granucci, G.; Marinucci, M.; Marocco, D.; Martines, E.; Mazzitelli, G.; Mazzotta, C.; Nowak, S.; Ramogida, G.; Romano, A.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Zeng, L.; Zuin, M.

    2013-08-01

    One of the main problems in tokamak fusion devices concerns the capability to operate at a high plasma density, which is observed to be limited by the appearance of catastrophic events causing loss of plasma confinement. The commonly used empirical scaling law for the density limit is the Greenwald limit, predicting that the maximum achievable line-averaged density along a central chord depends only on the average plasma current density. However, the Greenwald density limit has been exceeded in tokamak experiments in the case of peaked density profiles, indicating that the edge density is the real parameter responsible for the density limit. Recently, it has been shown on the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade (FTU) that the Greenwald density limit is exceeded in gas-fuelled discharges with a high value of the edge safety factor. In order to understand this behaviour, dedicated density limit experiments were performed on FTU, in which the high density domain was explored in a wide range of values of plasma current (Ip = 500-900 kA) and toroidal magnetic field (BT = 4-8 T). These experiments confirm the edge nature of the density limit, as a Greenwald-like scaling holds for the maximum achievable line-averaged density along a peripheral chord passing at r/a ≃ 4/5. On the other hand, the maximum achievable line-averaged density along a central chord does not depend on the average plasma current density and essentially depends on the toroidal magnetic field only. This behaviour is explained in terms of density profile peaking in the high density domain, with a peaking factor at the disruption depending on the edge safety factor. The possibility that the MARFE (multifaced asymmetric radiation from the edge) phenomenon is the cause of the peaking has been considered, with the MARFE believed to form a channel for the penetration of the neutral particles into deeper layers of the plasma. Finally, the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) analysis has shown that also the central line

  11. Using Passive and Active Acoustics to Examine Relationships of Cetacean and Prey Densities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    mounted on a glider running on two California Cooperative Oceanic Fisheries Investigations (CalCOFI) lines and passive as well as active acoustic...Southwest Fisheries Science Center. WORK COMPLETED A preliminary experiment was carried out (see section Results) that documented sound production

  12. Observations of Student Behavior in Nonclassroom Settings: A Multilevel Examination of Location, Density, and School Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cash, Anne H.; Bradshaw, Catherine P.; Leaf, Philip J.

    2015-01-01

    Observational methods are increasingly used to assess the impact of school-based interventions. Yet, few studies have used observations in nonclassroom settings, such as hallways or the cafeteria, or explored aspects of the school context that may be related to the observed behavior. The current study used a multilevel approach to examine…

  13. Comparison of density determination of liquid samples by density meters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchner, C.; Wolf, H.; Vámossy, C.; Lorefice, S.; Lenard, E.; Spohr, I.; Mares, G.; Perkin, M.; Parlic-Risovic, T.; Grue, L.-L.; Tammik, K.; van Andel, I.; Zelenka, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrostatic density determinations of liquids as reference material are mainly performed by National Metrology Institutes to provide means for calibrating or checking liquid density measuring instruments such as oscillation-type density meters. These density meters are used by most of the metrology institutes for their calibration and scientific work. The aim of this project was to compare the results of the liquid density determination by oscillating density meters of the participating laboratories. The results were linked to CCM.D.K-2 partly via Project EURAMET.M.D.K-2 (1019) "Comparison of liquid density standards" by hydrostatic weighing piloted by BEV in 2008. In this comparison pentadecane, water and of oil with a high viscosity were measured at atmospheric pressure using oscillation type density meter. The temperature range was from 15 °C to 40 °C. The measurement results were in some cases discrepant. Further studies, comparisons are essential to explore the capability and uncertainty of the density meters Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  14. Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination (ISPE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westphal, A. J.; Allen, C.; Bajt, S.; Basset, R.; Bastien, R.; Bechtel, H.; Bleuet, P.; Borg, J.; Brenker, F.; Bridges, J.; Brownlee, D. E.; Burchell, M.; Burghammer, M.; Butterworth, A. L.; Cloetens, P.; Cody, G.; Ferroir, T.; Floss, C.; Flynn, G. J.; Frank, D.; Gainsforth, Z.; Grün, E.; Hoppe, P.; Kearsley, A.; Lemelle, L.; Leroux, H.; Lettieri, R.; Marchant, W.; Mendez, B.; Nittler, L. R.; Ogliore, R.; Postberg, F.; Sandford, S. A.; Schmitz, S.; Silversmit, G.; Simionovici, A.; Srama, R.; Stadermann, F. J.; Stephan, T.; Stroud, R. M.; Susini, J.; Sutton, S.; Trieloff, M.; Tsou, P.; Tsuchiyama, A.; Tyliczszak, T.; Vekemans, B.; Vincze, L.; Warren, J.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2009-03-01

    The Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination (ISPE) is a three-year effort to characterize the Stardust interstellar dust collection and collector using non-destructive techniques. We summarize the status of the ISPE.

  15. History of neurologic examination books

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to create an annotated list of textbooks dedicated to teaching the neurologic examination. Monographs focused primarily on the complete neurologic examination published prior to 1960 were reviewed. This analysis was limited to books with the word “examination” in the title, with exceptions for the texts of Robert Wartenberg and Gordon Holmes. Ten manuals met the criteria. Works dedicated primarily to the neurologic examination without a major emphasis on disease description or treatment first appeared in the early 1900s. Georg Monrad-Krohn's “Blue Book of Neurology” (“Blue Bible”) was the earliest success. These treatises served the important purpose of educating trainees on proper neurologic examination technique. They could make a reputation and be profitable for the author (Monrad-Krohn), highlight how neurology was practiced at individual institutions (McKendree, Denny-Brown, Holmes, DeJong, Mayo Clinic authors), and honor retiring mentors (Mayo Clinic authors). PMID:25829645

  16. Examining Children's Models of Seed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jewell, Natalie

    2002-01-01

    Reports research that examines children's models of seed. Explores the conceptions held by children (N=75) of germination and seed formation. Concludes that children hold a restricted meaning for the term 'seed'. (DDR)

  17. S8DR shield examination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, D. G.; Mccurnin, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    The SNAP 8 developmental reactor lithium hydride shield was examined after being irradiated for over 7000 hours at relatively low temperature. A crack was located in the seam weld of the containment vessel, probably the result of hot short cracking under thermal stress. The LiH was visually examined at two locations and its appearance was typical of low temperature irradiated LiH. The adherence of the chrome oxide emittance coating was found to be excellent.

  18. [Examining victims of interpersonal violence].

    PubMed

    Laberke, Patrick J; Martinez, Rosa Maria; Mauf, Sabrina; Bartsch, Christine

    2015-01-14

    Interpersonal violence represents a widespread phenomenon with a high prevalence. Consequences of these acts of violence are serious and extensive to the victims and from a socio-economic point of view. Physical examination of the victims is a key aspect in the medic-legal expertise. This article describes the basic principles and the standard procedures in conjunction with the examination of violent crime victims.

  19. Statistics of primordial density perturbations from discrete seed masses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, Robert J.; Bertschinger, Edmund

    1991-01-01

    The statistics of density perturbations for general distributions of seed masses with arbitrary matter accretion is examined. Formal expressions for the power spectrum, the N-point correlation functions, and the density distribution function are derived. These results are applied to the case of uncorrelated seed masses, and power spectra are derived for accretion of both hot and cold dark matter plus baryons. The reduced moments (cumulants) of the density distribution are computed and used to obtain a series expansion for the density distribution function. Analytic results are obtained for the density distribution function in the case of a distribution of seed masses with a spherical top-hat accretion pattern. More generally, the formalism makes it possible to give a complete characterization of the statistical properties of any random field generated from a discrete linear superposition of kernels. In particular, the results can be applied to density fields derived by smoothing a discrete set of points with a window function.

  20. High Power Density Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascak, Daniel J.

    2004-01-01

    With the growing concerns of global warming, the need for pollution-free vehicles is ever increasing. Pollution-free flight is one of NASA's goals for the 21" Century. , One method of approaching that goal is hydrogen-fueled aircraft that use fuel cells or turbo- generators to develop electric power that can drive electric motors that turn the aircraft's propulsive fans or propellers. Hydrogen fuel would likely be carried as a liquid, stored in tanks at its boiling point of 20.5 K (-422.5 F). Conventional electric motors, however, are far too heavy (for a given horsepower) to use on aircraft. Fortunately the liquid hydrogen fuel can provide essentially free refrigeration that can be used to cool the windings of motors before the hydrogen is used for fuel. Either High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) or high purity metals such as copper or aluminum may be used in the motor windings. Superconductors have essentially zero electrical resistance to steady current. The electrical resistance of high purity aluminum or copper near liquid hydrogen temperature can be l/lOO* or less of the room temperature resistance. These conductors could provide higher motor efficiency than normal room-temperature motors achieve. But much more importantly, these conductors can carry ten to a hundred times more current than copper conductors do in normal motors operating at room temperature. This is a consequence of the low electrical resistance and of good heat transfer coefficients in boiling LH2. Thus the conductors can produce higher magnetic field strengths and consequently higher motor torque and power. Designs, analysis and actual cryogenic motor tests show that such cryogenic motors could produce three or more times as much power per unit weight as turbine engines can, whereas conventional motors produce only 1/5 as much power per weight as turbine engines. This summer work has been done with Litz wire to maximize the current density. The current is limited by the amount of heat it