Science.gov

Sample records for flexible aircraft maintenance

  1. Automation tools for flexible aircraft maintenance.

    SciTech Connect

    Prentice, William J.; Drotning, William D.; Watterberg, Peter A.; Loucks, Clifford S.; Kozlowski, David M.

    2003-11-01

    This report summarizes the accomplishments of the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project 26546 at Sandia, during the period FY01 through FY03. The project team visited four DoD depots that support extensive aircraft maintenance in order to understand critical needs for automation, and to identify maintenance processes for potential automation or integration opportunities. From the visits, the team identified technology needs and application issues, as well as non-technical drivers that influence the application of automation in depot maintenance of aircraft. Software tools for automation facility design analysis were developed, improved, extended, and integrated to encompass greater breadth for eventual application as a generalized design tool. The design tools for automated path planning and path generation have been enhanced to incorporate those complex robot systems with redundant joint configurations, which are likely candidate designs for a complex aircraft maintenance facility. A prototype force-controlled actively compliant end-effector was designed and developed based on a parallel kinematic mechanism design. This device was developed for demonstration of surface finishing, one of many in-contact operations performed during aircraft maintenance. This end-effector tool was positioned along the workpiece by a robot manipulator, programmed for operation by the automated planning tools integrated for this project. Together, the hardware and software tools demonstrate many of the technologies required for flexible automation in a maintenance facility.

  2. Robots for Aircraft Maintenance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center charged USBI (now Pratt & Whitney) with the task of developing an advanced stripping system based on hydroblasting to strip paint and thermal protection material from Space Shuttle solid rocket boosters. A robot, mounted on a transportable platform, controls the waterjet angle, water pressure and flow rate. This technology, now known as ARMS, has found commercial applications in the removal of coatings from jet engine components. The system is significantly faster than manual procedures and uses only minimal labor. Because the amount of "substrate" lost is minimal, the life of the component is extended. The need for toxic chemicals is reduced, as is waste disposal and human protection equipment. Users of the ARMS work cell include Delta Air Lines and the Air Force, which later contracted with USBI for development of a Large Aircraft Paint Stripping system (LARPS). LARPS' advantages are similar to ARMS, and it has enormous potential in military and civil aircraft maintenance. The technology may also be adapted to aircraft painting, aircraft inspection techniques and paint stripping of large objects like ships and railcars.

  3. An advanced maintenance free aircraft battery system

    SciTech Connect

    Beutler, J.; Green, J.; Kulin, T.

    1996-11-01

    This paper describes an advanced aircraft battery system designed to provide 20 years of maintenance free operation with the flexibility for use on all US Air Force aircraft. System, battery, and charger/analyzer requirements are identified. The final design approach and test results are also presented. There are two general approaches to reduce the maintenance cost of batteries. One approach is to develop a disposable battery system, such that after some time interval the battery is simply replaced. The other approach, the subject of this paper, is to develop a battery that does not require any scheduled maintenance for the design life of the aircraft. This approach is currently used in spacecraft applications where battery maintenance is not practical.

  4. Improvement of aircraft maintenance methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladimirov, N. I.

    The papers presented in this volume provide an overview of recent theoretical and experimental research aimed at improving the maintenance of aircraft, developing advanced diagnostic techniques, and increasing the efficiency and safety of flight operations. Topics discussed include design characteristics of the functional systems of aircraft and prediction of their technical condition, a probability analysis of a method for diagnosing gas turbine engines on the basis of thermogasdynamic parameters, characteristics of fatigue crack growth under the service-spectrum loading of the tail boom, and the accuracy of nonparametric reliability estimates under varying operation conditions. Papers are also presented on ways of reducing the aeration of hydraulic fluids in aircraft, evaluation of the efficiency of the pilot's control activity in a flight simulator, and using control charts for the analysis of the performance of aviation specialists. (For individual items see A93-18327 to A93-18351)

  5. A Qualitative Analysis of SAC Aircraft Maintenance.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    A122 815 A QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS OF SAC AIRCRAFT MRINTENANCE(U) 112 AIR FORCE INST OF TECH WRIGHT-PRTTERSON AFB OH SCHOOL OF SYSTEMS AND LOGISTICS D...Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio ’ ; " ... ..... ... ... . .. .. A QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS OF SAC AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE Douglas P. Cook, Captain... QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS OF SAC Master’s Thesis AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(q) S. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(a) Douglas

  6. Human factors in aircraft maintenance and inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, William T.

    1992-01-01

    The events which have led to the intensive study of aircraft structural problems have contributed in no less measure to the study of human factors which influence aircraft maintenance and inspection. Initial research emphasis on aging aircraft maintenance and inspection has since broadened to include all aircraft types. Technicians must be equally adept at repairing old and new aircraft. Their skills must include the ability to repair sheet metal and composite materials; control cable and fly-by-wire systems; round dials and glass cockpits. Their work performance is heavily influenced by others such as designers, technical writers, job card authors, schedulers, and trainers. This paper describes the activities concerning aircraft and maintenance human factors.

  7. Human factors in aircraft maintenance and inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, William T.

    1992-01-01

    The events which have led to the intensive study of aircraft structural problems have contributed in no less measure to the study of human factors which influence aircraft maintenance and inspection. Initial research emphasis on aging aircraft maintenance and inspection has since broadened to include all aircraft types. Technicians must be equally adept at repairing old and new aircraft. Their skills must include the ability to repair sheet metal and composite materials; control cable and fly-by-wire systems; round dials and glass cockpits. Their work performance is heavily influenced by others such as designers, technical writers, job card authors, schedulers, and trainers. This paper describes the activities concerning aircraft and maintenance human factors.

  8. Aircraft Electronics Maintenance Training Simulator. Curriculum Outlines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackhawk Technical Coll., Janesville, WI.

    Instructional materials are provided for nine courses in an aircraft electronics maintenance training program. Courses are as follows: aviation basic electricity, direct current and alternating current electronics, basic avionic installations, analog electronics, digital electronics, microcomputer electronics, radio communications, aircraft…

  9. Maintenance cost study of rotary wing aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The feasibility was studied of predicting rotary wing operation maintenance costs by using several aircraft design factors for the aircraft dynamic systems. The dynamic systems considered were engines, drives and transmissions, rotors, and flight controls. Multiple regression analysis was used to correlate aircraft design and operational factors with manhours per flight hour, and equations for each dynamic system were developed. Results of labor predictions using the equations compare favorably with actual values.

  10. 14 CFR 183.27 - Designated aircraft maintenance inspectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Designated aircraft maintenance inspectors...: Privileges § 183.27 Designated aircraft maintenance inspectors. A designated aircraft maintenance inspector (DAMI) may approve maintenance on civil aircraft used by United States military flying clubs in foreign...

  11. 14 CFR 183.27 - Designated aircraft maintenance inspectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Designated aircraft maintenance inspectors...: Privileges § 183.27 Designated aircraft maintenance inspectors. A designated aircraft maintenance inspector (DAMI) may approve maintenance on civil aircraft used by United States military flying clubs in...

  12. 14 CFR 183.27 - Designated aircraft maintenance inspectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Designated aircraft maintenance inspectors...: Privileges § 183.27 Designated aircraft maintenance inspectors. A designated aircraft maintenance inspector (DAMI) may approve maintenance on civil aircraft used by United States military flying clubs in...

  13. 14 CFR 183.27 - Designated aircraft maintenance inspectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Designated aircraft maintenance inspectors...: Privileges § 183.27 Designated aircraft maintenance inspectors. A designated aircraft maintenance inspector (DAMI) may approve maintenance on civil aircraft used by United States military flying clubs in...

  14. 14 CFR 183.27 - Designated aircraft maintenance inspectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Designated aircraft maintenance inspectors...: Privileges § 183.27 Designated aircraft maintenance inspectors. A designated aircraft maintenance inspector (DAMI) may approve maintenance on civil aircraft used by United States military flying clubs in foreign...

  15. Trajectory Control for Very Flexible Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-30

    total airspeed and the classic aircraft longitudinal , lateral, and vertical velocity components are u positive out the nose, v positive out the right...wing flexibility is a secondary and minimal contribution to aircraft longitudinal motion. Using this assumption and the previous assumptions of

  16. Infrared thermographic diagnostic aid to aircraft maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delo, Michael; Delo, Steve

    2007-04-01

    Thermographic data can be used as a supplement to aircraft maintenance operations in both back shop and flight line situations. Aircraft systems such as electrical, propulsion, environmental, pitot static and hydraulic/pneumatic fluid, can be inspected using a thermal infrared (IR) imager. Aircraft systems utilize electro-hydraulic, electro-mechanical, and electro-pneumatic mechanisms, which, if accessible, can be diagnosed for faults using infrared technology. Since thermographs are images of heat, rather than light, the measurement principle is based on the fact that any physical object (radiating energy at infrared wavelengths within the IR portion of the electro-magnetic spectrum), can be imaged with infrared imaging equipment. All aircraft systems being tested with infrared are required to be energized for troubleshooting, so that valuable baseline data from fully operational aircraft can be collected, archived and referenced for future comparisons.

  17. Flight Controller Software Protects Lightweight Flexible Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2015-01-01

    Lightweight flexible aircraft may be the future of aviation, but a major problem is their susceptibility to flutter-uncontrollable vibrations that can destroy wings. Armstrong Flight Research Center awarded SBIR funding to Minneapolis, Minnesota-based MUSYN Inc. to develop software that helps program flight controllers to suppress flutter. The technology is now available for aircraft manufacturers and other industries that use equipment with automated controls.

  18. 14 CFR 91.1109 - Aircraft maintenance: Inspection program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Aircraft maintenance: Inspection program... Ownership Operations Program Management § 91.1109 Aircraft maintenance: Inspection program. Each program manager must establish an aircraft inspection program for each make and model program aircraft and ensure...

  19. 14 CFR 91.1109 - Aircraft maintenance: Inspection program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Aircraft maintenance: Inspection program... Ownership Operations Program Management § 91.1109 Aircraft maintenance: Inspection program. Each program manager must establish an aircraft inspection program for each make and model program aircraft and...

  20. 14 CFR 91.1109 - Aircraft maintenance: Inspection program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Aircraft maintenance: Inspection program... Ownership Operations Program Management § 91.1109 Aircraft maintenance: Inspection program. Each program manager must establish an aircraft inspection program for each make and model program aircraft and...

  1. 14 CFR 91.1109 - Aircraft maintenance: Inspection program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Aircraft maintenance: Inspection program... Ownership Operations Program Management § 91.1109 Aircraft maintenance: Inspection program. Each program manager must establish an aircraft inspection program for each make and model program aircraft and...

  2. 14 CFR 91.1109 - Aircraft maintenance: Inspection program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aircraft maintenance: Inspection program... Ownership Operations Program Management § 91.1109 Aircraft maintenance: Inspection program. Each program manager must establish an aircraft inspection program for each make and model program aircraft and ensure...

  3. Licencing and Training Reform in the Australian Aircraft Maintenance Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampson, Ian; Fraser, Doug

    2016-01-01

    The training and licencing of aircraft maintenance engineers fulfils a crucial protective function since it is they who perform and supervise aircraft maintenance and certify that planes are safe afterwards. In Australia, prior to training reform, a trades-based system of aircraft maintenance engineer training existed in an orderly relation with…

  4. Licencing and Training Reform in the Australian Aircraft Maintenance Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampson, Ian; Fraser, Doug

    2016-01-01

    The training and licencing of aircraft maintenance engineers fulfils a crucial protective function since it is they who perform and supervise aircraft maintenance and certify that planes are safe afterwards. In Australia, prior to training reform, a trades-based system of aircraft maintenance engineer training existed in an orderly relation with…

  5. Aircraft Maintenance Wartime Command and Control: The Might to Fight.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-01

    activities on the flight line. The model is also flexible enough to be used by fight -in-place units, those units deploying from CONUS, and those...MIGHT TO FIGHT (U) AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLL MAXWELL UNCLSSIFED RFB AL P A PEVER APR 88 RCSC-88-2li5 / 151 N 7 UNCL ARCA FTNEACEMR IECOMN N CO6...COMMANI) AND STAFF COLLEGE ,STUDENT REPORT AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE DTIC WARTIME COMMAND AND CONTROL: ELW -TE THE MIGHT TO FIGHT I I MAJOR POLLY A. PEYER

  6. A manpower scheduling heuristic for aircraft maintenance application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sze, San-Nah; Sze, Jeeu-Fong; Chiew, Kang-Leng

    2012-09-01

    This research studies a manpower scheduling for aircraft maintenance, focusing on in-flight food loading operation. A group of loading teams with flexible shifts is required to deliver and upload packaged meals from the ground kitchen to aircrafts in multiple trips. All aircrafts must be served within predefined time windows. The scheduling process takes into account of various constraints such as meal break allocation, multi-trip traveling and food exposure time limit. Considering the aircrafts movement and predefined maximum working hours for each loading team, the main objective of this study is to form an efficient roster by assigning a minimum number of loading teams to the aircrafts. We proposed an insertion based heuristic to generate the solutions in a short period of time for large instances. This proposed algorithm is implemented in various stages for constructing trips due to the presence of numerous constraints. The robustness and efficiency of the algorithm is demonstrated in computational results. The results show that the insertion heuristic more efficiently outperforms the company's current practice.

  7. Rigid and Flexible Pavement Aircraft Tie-Downs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    AFRL-RX-TY-TR-2010-0093 RIGID AND FLEXIBLE PAVEMENT AIRCRAFT TIE-DOWNS Christopher Jackson and Athar Saeed Applied Research Associates...MAR-2010 Rigid and Flexible Pavement Aircraft Tie-Downs FA4819-09-C-0028 62102F 4915 D1 4915D14E *Jackson, Christopher J.; *Saeed, Athar; **Lackey...tie-downs, although additional testing is necessary before recommending this option. rigid pavement aircraft tie-downs, flexible pavement aircraft

  8. 14 CFR 121.701 - Maintenance log: Aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Maintenance log: Aircraft. 121.701 Section... REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Records and Reports § 121.701 Maintenance log... have made, a record of that action in the airplane's maintenance log. (b) Each certificate holder...

  9. 14 CFR 121.701 - Maintenance log: Aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Maintenance log: Aircraft. 121.701 Section... REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Records and Reports § 121.701 Maintenance log... have made, a record of that action in the airplane's maintenance log. (b) Each certificate holder...

  10. 14 CFR 121.701 - Maintenance log: Aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Maintenance log: Aircraft. 121.701 Section... REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Records and Reports § 121.701 Maintenance log... have made, a record of that action in the airplane's maintenance log. (b) Each certificate holder...

  11. 14 CFR 121.701 - Maintenance log: Aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Maintenance log: Aircraft. 121.701 Section... REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Records and Reports § 121.701 Maintenance log... have made, a record of that action in the airplane's maintenance log. (b) Each certificate holder...

  12. Space shuttle recommendations based on aircraft maintenance experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spears, J. M.; Fox, C. L.

    1972-01-01

    Space shuttle design recommendations based on aircraft maintenance experience are developed. The recommendations are specifically applied to the landing gear system, nondestructive inspection techniques, hydraulic system design, materials and processes, and program support.

  13. Aircraft Maintenance Organizational Structure Changes: An Antecedent Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE CHANGES: AN ANTECEDENT MODEL ...ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE CHANGES: AN ANTECEDENT MODEL THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department of Operational Sciences Graduate School of...AN ANTECEDENT MODEL Jeffrey M. Durand, BS Captain, USAF Approved

  14. 14 CFR 121.701 - Maintenance log: Aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maintenance log: Aircraft. 121.701 Section 121.701 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED...: Aircraft. (a) Each person who takes action in the case of a reported or observed failure or malfunction of...

  15. Aircraft maintenance. Citations from the International Aerospace Abstracts data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zollars, G. F.

    1980-01-01

    These citations from the international literature concern various aspects of aircraft maintenance. Both military and civil aviation experience are included. Articles cited concern airline operations, engine and avionics reliability, the use of automatic test equipment, maintenance scheduling, and reliability engineering. This updated bibliography contains 347 citations, 85 of which are new additions to the previous edition.

  16. Determining Production Capability in Aircraft Maintenance: A Regression Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    Research ............... ................... 26 MAC Aircraft Maintenance ... ............ .. 26 AFLC Depot Level Maintenance ... .......... ... 29 TAC A -10... a foundation in productivity by first establishing what productivity measurement is and then explaining its concepts and organizational levels of...productivity performance without establishing meaningful objective measures. Managers cannot hold people accountable to a level of productivity

  17. Aircraft maintenance. Citations from the International Aerospace Abstracts data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zollars, G. F.

    1980-01-01

    These citations from the international literature concern various aspects of aircraft maintenance. Both military and civil aviation experience are included. Articles cited concern airline operations, engine and avionics reliability, the use of automatic test equipment, maintenance scheduling, and reliability engineering. This updated bibliography contains 347 citations, 85 of which are new additions to the previous edition.

  18. Inertial Force Coupling to Nonlinear Aeroelasticity of Flexible Wing Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.; Ting, Eric

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the inertial force effect on nonlinear aeroelasticity of flexible wing aircraft. The geometric are nonlinearity due to rotational and tension stiffening. The effect of large bending deflection will also be investigated. Flutter analysis will be conducted for a truss-braced wing aircraft concept with tension stiffening and inertial force coupling.

  19. Structural risk assessment and aircraft fleet maintenance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Herb, Jr.; Saff, C. R.; Christian, Tom F.

    1990-01-01

    In the present analysis, deterministic flaw growth analysis is used to project the failure distributions from inspection data. Inspection data is reported for each critical point in the aircraft. The data will indicate either a crack of a specific size or no crack. The crack length may be either less than, equal to, or greater than critical size for that location. Non-critical length cracks are projected to failure using the crack growth characteristics for that location to find the life when it will be at critical length. Greater-than-critical length cracks are projected back to determine the life at failure, that is, when it was at critical length. The same process is used as in the case of a non-critical crack except that the projection goes the other direction. These points, along with the critical length cracks are used to determine the failure distribution. To be able to use data from different aircraft to build a common failure distribution, a consistent life variable must be used. Aircraft life varies with the severity of the usage; therefore the number of flight hours for a particular aircraft must be modified by its usage factor to obtain a normalized life which can be compared with that from other aircraft.

  20. Aviation Maintenance Technology. General. G102 Fundamentals of Aircraft Maintenance. Instructor Material.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    These instructor materials for an aviation maintenance technology course contain four instructional modules. The modules cover the following topics: identifying basic components of aircraft, performing aircraft cleaning and corrosion control, interpreting blueprints and drawing sketches, identifying structural materials, and performing basic…

  1. Aviation Maintenance Technology. General. G102 Fundamentals of Aircraft Maintenance. Instructor Material.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    These instructor materials for an aviation maintenance technology course contain four instructional modules. The modules cover the following topics: identifying basic components of aircraft, performing aircraft cleaning and corrosion control, interpreting blueprints and drawing sketches, identifying structural materials, and performing basic…

  2. 77 FR 59873 - Airworthiness Directives; Cessna Aircraft Company Airplanes; Initial Regulatory Flexibility Analysis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-01

    ... Directives; Cessna Aircraft Company Airplanes; Initial Regulatory Flexibility Analysis AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Availability of an Initial Regulatory Flexibility Analysis... Flexibility Analysis for the previously published proposed airworthiness directive (AD) on Cessna Aircraft...

  3. Maintenance cost study of rotary wing aircraft, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The Navy's maintenance and materials management data base was used in a study to determine the feasibility of predicting unscheduled maintenance costs for the dynamic systems of military rotary wing aircraft. The major operational and design variables were identified and the direct maintenance man hours per flight hour were obtained by step-wise multiple regression analysis. Five nonmilitary helicopter users were contacted to supply data on which variables were important factors in civil applications. These uses included offshore oil exploration and support, police and fire department rescue and enforcement, logging and heavy equipment movement, and U.S. Army military operations. The equations developed were highly effective in predicting unscheduled direct maintenance man hours per flying hours for military aircraft, but less effective for commercial or public service helicopters, probably because of the longer mission durations and the much higher utilization of civil users.

  4. The Aircraft and Munitions Maintenance Officer Professional Development Guide.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-01

    The purpose of this guide is to provide a single reference source on aircraft and munitions maintenance officer professional development . It is...intended for use by junior officers in planning their own professional development , by senior officers as a counselling tool, and by prospective entrants...maintenance officers more aware of the need for professional development and how to go about it. It is not intended as a blueprint for success nor is it

  5. Immersive Learning Simulations in Aircraft Maintenance Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-15

    Kyrgyzstan. Colonel Rushlau holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Wood and Fiber Utilization from Michigan Technological University and a Master’s Degree in...modern aircraft parts and systems are partly computer based technology themselves, they are ideal for simulation. Finally, although hands-on...their studies that “the savings are more likely to be achieved, and the improvements in training quality more easily justified, when technology is

  6. Job Attitudes of USAF Aircraft Maintenance Personnel.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-01

    equipped, and professionally motivated maintenance personnel is no less important to putting a bomb on a target than having these same cualities ...proper background on this subject. According to a Department of Health , Education, and Welfare Report in 1973, work is an activity that produces some

  7. Human factors in maintenance: impact on aircraft mishap frequency and severity.

    PubMed

    Krulak, David C

    2004-05-01

    Aviation mishaps caused by maintenance factors vary in severity, but can cost untold sums in lives and equipment lost. This study proposes to demonstrate that certain specific maintenance-related human factors are significantly correlated with both mishap frequency and severity. Using information from the Maintenance Error Information Management System (MEIMS), 1,016 aircraft mishaps caused by human factors in maintenance were examined. These mishaps were previously categorized using the Human Factors Analysis and Classification System-Maintenance Extension (HFACS-ME). Frequency analysis was used to determine the most common HFACS-ME factors seen in aircraft mishaps. Logistic regression techniques were used to describe the relationship between the dichotomized outcome of mishap severity and the human factors found in the HFACS-ME. Inadequate supervision, attention/memory errors, and judgment/decision errors were the factors found most often in aircraft mishaps. The factors of inadequate design, inadequate adaptability/flexibility, inadequate lighting/light, confining workspace, and attention/memory error increased odds of being associated with a higher severity mishap. Emphasis in training and education placed in the first three factors mentioned may reduce overall number of mishaps. Concentrating resources on the final five factors may decrease the number of severe mishaps.

  8. A Telerobotics Architecture for Aircraft Maintenance and Remanufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backes, P. G.; Zimmerman, W.; Leahy, M. B., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The application of telerobotics to aircraft depot maintenance and remanufacturing is described and a telerobotics architecture for the application is discussed. Telerobotics will enhance process quality and could potentially decrease turn-around time and costs while moving human operatiors from hazardous work areas to safe and comfortable operator control stations.

  9. Flexible connector for use in aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakeman, Thomas G. (Inventor); Hauser, Ambrose A. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    The invention concerns a connector, in an aircraft engine, for mounting a ring to a turbine rotor which the ring surrounds. The ring carries propeller blades, and the connector transmits both thrust and torque loads between the ring and the rotor, without significant deformation. However, the connector does deform in order to accommodate differential thermal growth between the ring and the rotor.

  10. AGFATL- ACTIVE GEAR FLEXIBLE AIRCRAFT TAKEOFF AND LANDING ANALYSIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgehee, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    The Active Gear, Flexible Aircraft Takeoff and Landing Analysis program, AGFATL, was developed to provide a complete simulation of the aircraft takeoff and landing dynamics problem. AGFATL can represent an airplane either as a rigid body with six degrees of freedom or as a flexible body with multiple degrees of freedom. The airframe flexibility is represented by the superposition of up to twenty free vibration modes on the rigid-body motions. The analysis includes maneuver logic and autopilots programmed to control the aircraft during glide slope, flare, landing, and takeoff. The program is modular so that performance of the aircraft in flight and during landing and ground maneuvers can be studied separately or in combination. A program restart capability is included in AGFATL. Effects simulated in the AGFATL program include: (1) flexible aircraft control and performance during glide slope, flare, landing roll, and takeoff roll under conditions of changing winds, engine failures, brake failures, control system failures, strut failures, restrictions due to runway length, and control variable limits and time lags; (2) landing gear loads and dynamics for up to five gears; (3) single and multiple engines (maximum of four) including selective engine reversing and failure; (4) drag chute and spoiler effects; (5) wheel braking (including skid-control) and selective brake failure; (6) aerodynamic ground effects; (7) aircraft carrier operations; (8) inclined runways and runway perturbations; (9) flexible or rigid airframes; 10) rudder and nose gear steering; and 11) actively controlled landing gear shock struts. Input to the AGFATL program includes data which describe runway roughness; vehicle geometry, flexibility and aerodynamic characteristics; landing gear(s); propulsion; and initial conditions such as attitude, attitude change rates, and velocities. AGFATL performs a time integration of the equations of motion and outputs comprehensive information on the airframe

  11. Handling Qualities of Large Flexible Aircraft. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poopaka, S.

    1980-01-01

    The effects on handling qualities of elastic modes interaction with the rigid body dynamics of a large flexible aircraft are studied by a mathematical computer simulation. An analytical method to predict the pilot ratings when there is a severe modes interactions is developed. This is done by extending the optimal control model of the human pilot response to include the mode decomposition mechanism into the model. The handling qualities are determined for a longitudinal tracking task using a large flexible aircraft with parametric variations in the undamped natural frequencies of the two lowest frequency, symmetric elastic modes made to induce varying amounts of mode interaction.

  12. AGFATL- ACTIVE GEAR FLEXIBLE AIRCRAFT TAKEOFF AND LANDING ANALYSIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgehee, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    The Active Gear, Flexible Aircraft Takeoff and Landing Analysis program, AGFATL, was developed to provide a complete simulation of the aircraft takeoff and landing dynamics problem. AGFATL can represent an airplane either as a rigid body with six degrees of freedom or as a flexible body with multiple degrees of freedom. The airframe flexibility is represented by the superposition of up to twenty free vibration modes on the rigid-body motions. The analysis includes maneuver logic and autopilots programmed to control the aircraft during glide slope, flare, landing, and takeoff. The program is modular so that performance of the aircraft in flight and during landing and ground maneuvers can be studied separately or in combination. A program restart capability is included in AGFATL. Effects simulated in the AGFATL program include: (1) flexible aircraft control and performance during glide slope, flare, landing roll, and takeoff roll under conditions of changing winds, engine failures, brake failures, control system failures, strut failures, restrictions due to runway length, and control variable limits and time lags; (2) landing gear loads and dynamics for up to five gears; (3) single and multiple engines (maximum of four) including selective engine reversing and failure; (4) drag chute and spoiler effects; (5) wheel braking (including skid-control) and selective brake failure; (6) aerodynamic ground effects; (7) aircraft carrier operations; (8) inclined runways and runway perturbations; (9) flexible or rigid airframes; 10) rudder and nose gear steering; and 11) actively controlled landing gear shock struts. Input to the AGFATL program includes data which describe runway roughness; vehicle geometry, flexibility and aerodynamic characteristics; landing gear(s); propulsion; and initial conditions such as attitude, attitude change rates, and velocities. AGFATL performs a time integration of the equations of motion and outputs comprehensive information on the airframe

  13. Examining the Relationship Between Passenger Airline Aircraft Maintenance Outsourcing and Aircraft Safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaghan, Kari L.

    The problem addressed was the concern for aircraft safety rates as they relate to the rate of maintenance outsourcing. Data gathered from 14 passenger airlines: AirTran, Alaska, America West, American, Continental, Delta, Frontier, Hawaiian, JetBlue, Midwest, Northwest, Southwest, United, and USAir covered the years 1996 through 2008. A quantitative correlational design, utilizing Pearson's correlation coefficient, and the coefficient of determination were used in the present study to measure the correlation between variables. Elements of passenger airline aircraft maintenance outsourcing and aircraft accidents, incidents, and pilot deviations within domestic passenger airline operations were analyzed, examined, and evaluated. Rates of maintenance outsourcing were analyzed to determine the association with accident, incident, and pilot deviation rates. Maintenance outsourcing rates used in the evaluation were the yearly dollar expenditure of passenger airlines for aircraft maintenance outsourcing as they relate to the total airline aircraft maintenance expenditures. Aircraft accident, incident, and pilot deviation rates used in the evaluation were the yearly number of accidents, incidents, and pilot deviations per miles flown. The Pearson r-values were calculated to measure the linear relationship strength between the variables. There were no statistically significant correlation findings for accidents, r(174)=0.065, p=0.393, and incidents, r(174)=0.020, p=0.793. However, there was a statistically significant correlation for pilot deviation rates, r(174)=0.204, p=0.007 thus indicating a statistically significant correlation between maintenance outsourcing rates and pilot deviation rates. The calculated R square value of 0.042 represents the variance that can be accounted for in aircraft pilot deviation rates by examining the variance in aircraft maintenance outsourcing rates; accordingly, 95.8% of the variance is unexplained. Suggestions for future research include

  14. Modeling procedures for handling qualities evaluation of flexible aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Govindaraj, K. S.; Eulrich, B. J.; Chalk, C. R.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents simplified modeling procedures to evaluate the impact of flexible modes and the unsteady aerodynamic effects on the handling qualities of Supersonic Cruise Aircraft (SCR). The modeling procedures involve obtaining reduced order transfer function models of SCR vehicles, including the important flexible mode responses and unsteady aerodynamic effects, and conversion of the transfer function models to time domain equations for use in simulations. The use of the modeling procedures is illustrated by a simple example.

  15. Modeling procedures for handling qualities evaluation of flexible aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Govindaraj, K. S.; Eulrich, B. J.; Chalk, C. R.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents simplified modeling procedures to evaluate the impact of flexible modes and the unsteady aerodynamic effects on the handling qualities of Supersonic Cruise Aircraft (SCR). The modeling procedures involve obtaining reduced order transfer function models of SCR vehicles, including the important flexible mode responses and unsteady aerodynamic effects, and conversion of the transfer function models to time domain equations for use in simulations. The use of the modeling procedures is illustrated by a simple example.

  16. A Hierarchy of Objectives and Related Performance Indicators for Aircraft Maintenance Organizations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    MAINTENANCE, *MANAGEMENT PLANNING AND CONTROL ), (* AIRCRAFT , *LOGISTICS), MANAGEMENT PLANNING AND CONTROL, DATA PROCESSING, OPERATIONAL READINESS, INVENTORY CONTROL, MANPOWER, QUESTIONNAIRES, THESES

  17. 40 CFR 141.804 - Aircraft water system operations and maintenance plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Aircraft Drinking Water Rule § 141.804 Aircraft water system operations and maintenance plan. (a) Each air carrier must develop and implement an aircraft water system operations and maintenance plan for each aircraft water system that it...

  18. Aircraft Maintenance Effectiveness Simulation (AMES) Model.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    80.8 1~2 At ’U........... M. 4.,M7 ’ * ,kAJ1’#-W;4&.- 4 5 * -44 !n 1 4 4 .. ~ vyz *~>A& r~pK~~ r ~yt~v~z4q AWIM(TRIS RDAA TAEWX 4 tA4k Unclassified...RRS .... ............. .. 32 4 Example of Maintenance Manhour Summary ... ............. . 34 5 Examples of Additional Status Reports... 5 Remove/Replace (RR) Jobs ...... ................. 99 A-6 Troubleshooting (TS) Jobs ...... .................. 101 A-7 No Defect (ND) Jobs

  19. 14 CFR 91.1443 - CAMP: Airworthiness release or aircraft maintenance log entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... maintenance log entry. 91.1443 Section 91.1443 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... aircraft maintenance log entry. (a) No program aircraft maintained under a CAMP may be operated after... release; or (2) An appropriate entry in the aircraft maintenance log. (b) The airworthiness release or...

  20. 14 CFR 135.443 - Airworthiness release or aircraft maintenance log entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... maintenance log entry. 135.443 Section 135.443 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... release or aircraft maintenance log entry. (a) No certificate holder may operate an aircraft after... (2) An appropriate entry in the aircraft maintenance log. (b) The airworthiness release or log...

  1. 14 CFR 135.443 - Airworthiness release or aircraft maintenance log entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... maintenance log entry. 135.443 Section 135.443 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... release or aircraft maintenance log entry. (a) No certificate holder may operate an aircraft after... (2) An appropriate entry in the aircraft maintenance log. (b) The airworthiness release or log...

  2. 14 CFR 91.1443 - CAMP: Airworthiness release or aircraft maintenance log entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... maintenance log entry. 91.1443 Section 91.1443 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... aircraft maintenance log entry. (a) No program aircraft maintained under a CAMP may be operated after... release; or (2) An appropriate entry in the aircraft maintenance log. (b) The airworthiness release or...

  3. 14 CFR 135.443 - Airworthiness release or aircraft maintenance log entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... maintenance log entry. 135.443 Section 135.443 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... release or aircraft maintenance log entry. (a) No certificate holder may operate an aircraft after... (2) An appropriate entry in the aircraft maintenance log. (b) The airworthiness release or log...

  4. 14 CFR 91.1443 - CAMP: Airworthiness release or aircraft maintenance log entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... maintenance log entry. 91.1443 Section 91.1443 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... aircraft maintenance log entry. (a) No program aircraft maintained under a CAMP may be operated after... release; or (2) An appropriate entry in the aircraft maintenance log. (b) The airworthiness release or...

  5. 14 CFR 135.443 - Airworthiness release or aircraft maintenance log entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... maintenance log entry. 135.443 Section 135.443 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... release or aircraft maintenance log entry. (a) No certificate holder may operate an aircraft after... (2) An appropriate entry in the aircraft maintenance log. (b) The airworthiness release or log...

  6. A Grounded Theory Study of Aircraft Maintenance Technician Decision-Making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norcross, Robert

    Aircraft maintenance technician decision-making and actions have resulted in aircraft system errors causing aircraft incidents and accidents. Aircraft accident investigators and researchers examined the factors that influence aircraft maintenance technician errors and categorized the types of errors in an attempt to prevent similar occurrences. New aircraft technology introduced to improve aviation safety and efficiency incur failures that have no information contained in the aircraft maintenance manuals. According to the Federal Aviation Administration, aircraft maintenance technicians must use only approved aircraft maintenance documents to repair, modify, and service aircraft. This qualitative research used a grounded theory approach to explore the decision-making processes and actions taken by aircraft maintenance technicians when confronted with an aircraft problem not contained in the aircraft maintenance manuals. The target population for the research was Federal Aviation Administration licensed aircraft and power plant mechanics from across the United States. Nonprobability purposeful sampling was used to obtain aircraft maintenance technicians with the experience sought in the study problem. The sample population recruitment yielded 19 participants for eight focus group sessions to obtain opinions, perceptions, and experiences related to the study problem. All data collected was entered into the Atlas ti qualitative analysis software. The emergence of Aircraft Maintenance Technician decision-making themes regarding Aircraft Maintenance Manual content, Aircraft Maintenance Technician experience, and legal implications of not following Aircraft Maintenance Manuals surfaced. Conclusions from this study suggest Aircraft Maintenance Technician decision-making were influenced by experience, gaps in the Aircraft Maintenance Manuals, reliance on others, realizing the impact of decisions concerning aircraft airworthiness, management pressures, and legal concerns

  7. Finite element methods for the nonlinear motion of flexible aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Victor P.

    Conventional strategies in aeroelasticity and flight dynamics for studying aircraft involve making broad assumptions based more on analytical or computational convenience rather than on physical reality. Typically in aeroelastic analyses, the study of the interaction between aircraft flexibility and aerodynamic forces, the aircraft or structural component in question is constrained in a way that is not representative of realistic flight conditions. In flight dynamics, the study of the maneuvering of aircraft, it is common to consider the vehicle as perfectly rigid. In both disciplines it is well known that such contrivances can produce incorrect results. To address these shortcomings, a finite element formulation is developed for analyzing the dynamics of flexible aircraft undergoing arbitrarily large rotation and translation. The formulation is derived in a set of body-attached axes, a frame of reference conducive to analyzing the motion and control of aircraft, and considers the structure as a whole. Several implementation issues are addressed and mitigated, including finite element interpolating functions, the use of eigenvectors as the basis for nonlinear deformation, inclusion of geometrically nonlinear effects in the strain energy, and enforcement of kinematic constraints. Numerical examples illustrate the capabilities of the latter two aspects, and a free-flying aeroelastic model problem demonstrates the overall potential of the proposed formulation. The development is approached in a general way so that the methodology can be applied to any structure that may be modeled by finite elements.

  8. Unsafe acts and unsafe outcomes in aircraft maintenance.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Alan; Williamson, Ann

    2002-10-10

    Road safety studies using the Driver Behaviour Questionnaire (DBQ) have provided support for a three-way distinction between violations, skill-based errors and mistakes, and have indicated that a tendency to commit driving violations is associated with an increased risk of accident involvement. The aims of this study were to examine whether the three-way distinction of unsafe acts is applicable in the context of aircraft maintenance, and whether involvement in maintenance safety occurrences can be predicted on the basis of self-reported unsafe acts. A Maintenance Behaviour Questionnaire (MBQ) was developed to explore patterns of unsafe acts committed by aircraft maintenance mechanics. The MBQ was completed anonymously by over 1300 Australian aviation mechanics, who also provided information on their involvement in workplace accidents and incidents. Four factors were identified: routine violations, skill-based errors, mistakes and exceptional violations. Violations and mistakes were related significantly to the occurrence of incidents that jeopardized the quality of aircraft maintenance, but were not related to workplace injuries. Skill-based errors, while not related to work quality incidents, were related to workplace injuries. The results are consistent with the three-way typology of unsafe acts described by Reason et al. (1990) and with the DBQ research indicating an association between self-reported violations and accidents. The current findings suggest that interventions addressed at maintenance quality incidents should take into account the role of violations and mistakes, and the factors that promote them. In contrast, interventions directed at reducing workplace injury are likely to require a focus on skill-based errors.

  9. Unsafe acts and unsafe outcomes in aircraft maintenance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hobbs, Alan; Williamson, Ann

    2002-01-01

    Road safety studies using the Driver Behaviour Questionnaire (DBQ) have provided support for a three-way distinction between violations, skill-based errors and mistakes, and have indicated that a tendency to commit driving violations is associated with an increased risk of accident involvement. The aims of this study were to examine whether the three-way distinction of unsafe acts is applicable in the context of aircraft maintenance, and whether involvement in maintenance safety occurrences can be predicted on the basis of self-reported unsafe acts. A Maintenance Behaviour Questionnaire (MBQ) was developed to explore patterns of unsafe acts committed by aircraft maintenance mechanics. The MBQ was completed anonymously by over 1300 Australian aviation mechanics, who also provided information on their involvement in workplace accidents and incidents. Four factors were identified: routine violations, skill-based errors, mistakes and exceptional violations. Violations and mistakes were related significantly to the occurrence of incidents that jeopardized the quality of aircraft maintenance, but were not related to workplace injuries. Skill-based errors, while not related to work quality incidents, were related to workplace injuries. The results are consistent with the three-way typology of unsafe acts described by Reason et al. (1990) and with the DBQ research indicating an association between self-reported violations and accidents. The current findings suggest that interventions addressed at maintenance quality incidents should take into account the role of violations and mistakes, and the factors that promote them. In contrast, interventions directed at reducing workplace injury are likely to require a focus on skill-based errors.

  10. Modeling Flexible Aircraft for Flight Control Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    body variahlos. control surface deflections, or gust variables as well as structur l m -,,- 4hapes. 1-12 As indicated by Arrows 3 and 11 in Figure 1-1...flexibility matrix is used, it i:: m - , i,ticable to define it for a structure that is supported in a statical1y d--’,iiate way. 1-27 !* CDMS GEOMETRY...dynamicist chooses as his reduced set of degrees of freedom m ,,tly translational deflections along the major axes of the str,,t,,, : on a wing

  11. Flexible aircraft flying and ride qualities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashkenas, I. L.; Magdaleno, R. E.; Mcruer, D. T.

    1984-01-01

    A brief analytic exposition is presented to illustrate a central principle in flexible mode control, some of the pertinent pilot centered requirements are listed and discussed. The desired features of the control methodology are exposed and the methodology to be used is selected. The example Boeing supplied characteristics are discussed and approximated with a reduced order model and a simplified treatment of unsteady aerodynamics. The closed loop flight control system design follows, along with first level assessments of resulting handling and ride quality characteristics. Some of these do not meet the postulated requirements and remain problems to be solved possibly by further analysis or future simulation.

  12. Analysis of a Proposal to Consolidate Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Capabilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    A Page 2 APPENDIX B NEC COMMONALITY of NAS NORTH ISLAND and NAS MIRAMAR AIRCRAFT INTERMEDIATE MAINTENANCE DEPARTMENTS RATE PNEC PRINCIPLE NEC...TOTAL: 5 2 AMH GENERAL HYDRAULICS 7 12 AMH 7212 STATIONARY HYDRAULICS TEST STAND OPERATOR 23 31 AMH TOTAL: 30 43 Appendix B Page 1 RATE PNEC PRINCIPLE...TECH 14 AT 6623 CI ASA-27 SACE TEST BENCH TECH 2 AT 6625 USM-449(V) AAI & 5500 SERIES ATE TECH 1 Appendix B Page 2 RATE PNEC PRINCIPLE NEC

  13. AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE ENABLED JOINT CONCEPT FOR ENTRY OPERATIONS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-04-06

    decades old paradigm of fighting from a well-established or at a minimum a well- resourced air base. The air base was looked at as a weapons system in...equipment (aircraft and support equipment) and the abilities and knowledge of the maintenance technicians your training program should meet your...Positions are grouped on similarity of functions and requirements for knowledge , education, training, experience, ability, and other common criteria

  14. Coupled nonlinear aeroelasticity and flight dynamics of fully flexible aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Weihua

    This dissertation introduces an approach to effectively model and analyze the coupled nonlinear aeroelasticity and flight dynamics of highly flexible aircraft. A reduced-order, nonlinear, strain-based finite element framework is used, which is capable of assessing the fundamental impact of structural nonlinear effects in preliminary vehicle design and control synthesis. The cross-sectional stiffness and inertia properties of the wings are calculated along the wing span, and then incorporated into the one-dimensional nonlinear beam formulation. Finite-state unsteady subsonic aerodynamics is used to compute airloads along lifting surfaces. Flight dynamic equations are then introduced to complete the aeroelastic/flight dynamic system equations of motion. Instead of merely considering the flexibility of the wings, the current work allows all members of the vehicle to be flexible. Due to their characteristics of being slender structures, the wings, tail, and fuselage of highly flexible aircraft can be modeled as beams undergoing three dimensional displacements and rotations. New kinematic relationships are developed to handle the split beam systems, such that fully flexible vehicles can be effectively modeled within the existing framework. Different aircraft configurations are modeled and studied, including Single-Wing, Joined-Wing, Blended-Wing-Body, and Flying-Wing configurations. The Lagrange Multiplier Method is applied to model the nodal displacement constraints at the joint locations. Based on the proposed models, roll response and stability studies are conducted on fully flexible and rigidized models. The impacts of the flexibility of different vehicle members on flutter with rigid body motion constraints, flutter in free flight condition, and roll maneuver performance are presented. Also, the static stability of the compressive member of the Joined-Wing configuration is studied. A spatially-distributed discrete gust model is incorporated into the time simulation

  15. Flexible body dynamic stability for high performance aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goforth, E. A.; Youssef, H. M.; Apelian, C. V.; Schroeder, S. C.

    1991-01-01

    Dynamic equations which include the effects of unsteady aerodynamic forces and a flexible body structure were developed for a free flying high performance fighter aircraft. The linear and angular deformations are assumed to be small in the body reference frame, allowing the equations to be linearized in the deformation variables. Equations for total body dynamics and flexible body dynamics are formulated using the hybrid coordinate method and integrated in a state space format. A detailed finite element model of a generic high performance fighter aircraft is used to generate the mass and stiffness matrices. Unsteady aerodynamics are represented by a rational function approximation of the doublet lattice matrices. The equations simplify for the case of constant angular rate of the body reference frame, allowing the effect of roll rate to be studied by computing the eigenvalues of the system. It is found that the rigid body modes of the aircraft are greatly affected by introducing a constant roll rate, while the effect on the flexible modes is minimal for this configuration.

  16. Real-time flexible preventive maintenance scheduling.

    PubMed

    Kendall, E B; Cronk, J W; White, R N

    1993-01-01

    There are still obstacles to overcome as we enter the programming phase of this project. We envision an automated system, similar to an expert system, that performs the interval/history analysis and makes the changes. Initially a field will need to be added to the inventory to denote whether a device belongs to one of the previously described groups that are exempt from interval changes. An intermediate step will be the formatting of a periodic report showing equipment that meets the change criteria as described in the two rules. For now, the actual changes would be reviewed and made by our management and technical staff. This report would be retained as documentation of the basis for each change, for our own benefit and to meet JCAHO requirements. We are still discussing whether the repair count should include all repairs (user error, abuse, unpredictable failure, etc.) or just those that are "significant and preventable" and could have been averted by PM. This is perhaps a question whose answer might vary from hospital to hospital, depending upon size and patient mix. With more emphasis being placed on process outcomes, on quality of work, and on getting the most benefit for our efforts, we believe our flexible, real-time PM scheduling program is a major step in the right direction. It is outcome-driven and it focuses resources where they are needed the most.

  17. Identifying Human Factors Issues in Aircraft Maintenance Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veinott, Elizabeth S.; Kanki, Barbara G.; Shafto, Michael G. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Maintenance operations incidents submitted to the Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) between 1986-1992 were systematically analyzed in order to identify issues relevant to human factors and crew coordination. This exploratory analysis involved 95 ASRS reports which represented a wide range of maintenance incidents. The reports were coded and analyzed according to the type of error (e.g, wrong part, procedural error, non-procedural error), contributing factors (e.g., individual, within-team, cross-team, procedure, tools), result of the error (e.g., aircraft damage or not) as well as the operational impact (e.g., aircraft flown to destination, air return, delay at gate). The main findings indicate that procedural errors were most common (48.4%) and that individual and team actions contributed to the errors in more than 50% of the cases. As for operational results, most errors were either corrected after landing at the destination (51.6%) or required the flight crew to stop enroute (29.5%). Interactions among these variables are also discussed. This analysis is a first step toward developing a taxonomy of crew coordination problems in maintenance. By understanding what variables are important and how they are interrelated, we may develop intervention strategies that are better tailored to the human factor issues involved.

  18. Awareness grows of importance of human factors issues in aircraft maintenance and inspection.

    PubMed

    1996-01-01

    Until recently, the role of human factors in maintenance operations was not adequately addressed. That is changing, because it is clear that human error in aircraft maintenance can have a serious impact on flight safety.

  19. Commercial Aircraft Maintenance Experience Relating to Engine External Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soditus, Sharon M.

    2006-01-01

    Airlines are extremely sensitive to the amount of dollars spent on maintaining the external engine hardware in the field. Analysis reveals that many problems revolve around a central issue, reliability. Fuel and oil leakage due to seal failure and electrical fault messages due to wire harness failures play a major role in aircraft delays and cancellations (D&C's) and scheduled maintenance. Correcting these items on the line requires a large investment of engineering resources and manpower after the fact. The smartest and most cost effective philosophy is to build the best hardware the first time. The only way to do that is to completely understand and model the operating environment, study the field experience of similar designs and to perform extensive testing.

  20. 40 CFR 141.804 - Aircraft water system operations and maintenance plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Aircraft Drinking Water Rule § 141.804 Aircraft water system operations and maintenance plan. (a) Each air carrier must develop and... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aircraft water system operations and...

  1. 40 CFR 141.804 - Aircraft water system operations and maintenance plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Aircraft Drinking Water Rule § 141.804 Aircraft water system operations and maintenance plan. (a) Each air carrier must develop and... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aircraft water system operations and...

  2. 40 CFR 141.804 - Aircraft water system operations and maintenance plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Aircraft Drinking Water Rule § 141.804 Aircraft water system operations and maintenance plan. (a) Each air carrier must develop and... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aircraft water system operations and...

  3. 40 CFR 141.804 - Aircraft water system operations and maintenance plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Aircraft Drinking Water Rule § 141.804 Aircraft water system operations and maintenance plan. (a) Each air carrier must develop and... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aircraft water system operations and...

  4. Skills, rules and knowledge in aircraft maintenance: errors in context

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hobbs, Alan; Williamson, Ann

    2002-01-01

    Automatic or skill-based behaviour is generally considered to be less prone to error than behaviour directed by conscious control. However, researchers who have applied Rasmussen's skill-rule-knowledge human error framework to accidents and incidents have sometimes found that skill-based errors appear in significant numbers. It is proposed that this is largely a reflection of the opportunities for error which workplaces present and does not indicate that skill-based behaviour is intrinsically unreliable. In the current study, 99 errors reported by 72 aircraft mechanics were examined in the light of a task analysis based on observations of the work of 25 aircraft mechanics. The task analysis identified the opportunities for error presented at various stages of maintenance work packages and by the job as a whole. Once the frequency of each error type was normalized in terms of the opportunities for error, it became apparent that skill-based performance is more reliable than rule-based performance, which is in turn more reliable than knowledge-based performance. The results reinforce the belief that industrial safety interventions designed to reduce errors would best be directed at those aspects of jobs that involve rule- and knowledge-based performance.

  5. Skills, rules and knowledge in aircraft maintenance: errors in context.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Alan; Williamson, Ann

    2002-03-15

    Automatic or skill-based behaviour is generally considered to be less prone to error than behaviour directed by conscious control. However, researchers who have applied Rasmussen's skill-rule-knowledge human error framework to accidents and incidents have sometimes found that skill-based errors appear in significant numbers. It is proposed that this is largely a reflection of the opportunities for error which workplaces present and does not indicate that skill-based behaviour is intrinsically unreliable. In the current study, 99 errors reported by 72 aircraft mechanics were examined in the light of a task analysis based on observations of the work of 25 aircraft mechanics. The task analysis identified the opportunities for error presented at various stages of maintenance work packages and by the job as a whole. Once the frequency of each error type was normalized in terms of the opportunities for error, it became apparent that skill-based performance is more reliable than rule-based performance, which is in turn more reliable than knowledge-based performance. The results reinforce the belief that industrial safety interventions designed to reduce errors would best be directed at those aspects of jobs that involve rule- and knowledge-based performance.

  6. Skills, rules and knowledge in aircraft maintenance: errors in context

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hobbs, Alan; Williamson, Ann

    2002-01-01

    Automatic or skill-based behaviour is generally considered to be less prone to error than behaviour directed by conscious control. However, researchers who have applied Rasmussen's skill-rule-knowledge human error framework to accidents and incidents have sometimes found that skill-based errors appear in significant numbers. It is proposed that this is largely a reflection of the opportunities for error which workplaces present and does not indicate that skill-based behaviour is intrinsically unreliable. In the current study, 99 errors reported by 72 aircraft mechanics were examined in the light of a task analysis based on observations of the work of 25 aircraft mechanics. The task analysis identified the opportunities for error presented at various stages of maintenance work packages and by the job as a whole. Once the frequency of each error type was normalized in terms of the opportunities for error, it became apparent that skill-based performance is more reliable than rule-based performance, which is in turn more reliable than knowledge-based performance. The results reinforce the belief that industrial safety interventions designed to reduce errors would best be directed at those aspects of jobs that involve rule- and knowledge-based performance.

  7. Deployable flexible ventral fins for use as an emergency spin recovery device in aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burk, S. M., Jr. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A flexible fin device for mounting on an aircraft to effect spin recovery is described. The device may be selectively deployed to provide a triangular planform of flexible material to provide spin recovery, and retracted for compact storage during non-use. A single flexible fin may be deflected in a specific direction depending on direction of spin rotation, or two flexible fins forming an inverted V configuration may be used. The device is mounted on the underbody of the aircraft.

  8. Associations between errors and contributing factors in aircraft maintenance.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Alan; Williamson, Ann

    2003-01-01

    In recent years cognitive error models have provided insights into the unsafe acts that lead to many accidents in safety-critical environments. Most models of accident causation are based on the notion that human errors occur in the context of contributing factors. However, there is a lack of published information on possible links between specific errors and contributing factors. A total of 619 safety occurrences involving aircraft maintenance were reported using a self-completed questionnaire. Of these occurrences, 96% were related to the actions of maintenance personnel. The types of errors that were involved, and the contributing factors associated with those actions, were determined. Each type of error was associated with a particular set of contributing factors and with specific occurrence outcomes. Among the associations were links between memory lapses and fatigue and between rule violations and time pressure. Potential applications of this research include assisting with the design of accident prevention strategies, the estimation of human error probabilities, and the monitoring of organizational safety performance.

  9. Associations between errors and contributing factors in aircraft maintenance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hobbs, Alan; Williamson, Ann

    2003-01-01

    In recent years cognitive error models have provided insights into the unsafe acts that lead to many accidents in safety-critical environments. Most models of accident causation are based on the notion that human errors occur in the context of contributing factors. However, there is a lack of published information on possible links between specific errors and contributing factors. A total of 619 safety occurrences involving aircraft maintenance were reported using a self-completed questionnaire. Of these occurrences, 96% were related to the actions of maintenance personnel. The types of errors that were involved, and the contributing factors associated with those actions, were determined. Each type of error was associated with a particular set of contributing factors and with specific occurrence outcomes. Among the associations were links between memory lapses and fatigue and between rule violations and time pressure. Potential applications of this research include assisting with the design of accident prevention strategies, the estimation of human error probabilities, and the monitoring of organizational safety performance.

  10. Flight control synthesis for flexible aircraft using Eigenspace assignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, J. B.; Schmidt, D. K.

    1986-01-01

    The use of eigenspace assignment techniques to synthesize flight control systems for flexible aircraft is explored. Eigenspace assignment techniques are used to achieve a specified desired eigenspace, chosen to yield desirable system impulse residue magnitudes for selected system responses. Two of these are investigated. The first directly determines constant measurement feedback gains that will yield a close-loop system eigenspace close to a desired eigenspace. The second technique selects quadratic weighting matrices in a linear quadratic control synthesis that will asymptotically yield the close-loop achievable eigenspace. Finally, the possibility of using either of these techniques with state estimation is explored. Application of the methods to synthesize integrated flight-control and structural-mode-control laws for a large flexible aircraft is demonstrated and results discussed. Eigenspace selection criteria based on design goals are discussed, and for the study case it would appear that a desirable eigenspace can be obtained. In addition, the importance of state-space selection is noted along with problems with reduced-order measurement feedback. Since the full-state control laws may be implemented with dynamic compensation (state estimation), the use of reduced-order measurement feedback is less desirable. This is especially true since no change in the transient response from the pilot's input results if state estimation is used appropriately. The potential is also noted for high actuator bandwidth requirements if the linear quadratic synthesis approach is utilized. Even with the actuator pole location selected, a problem with unmodeled modes is noted due to high bandwidth. Some suggestions for future research include investigating how to choose an eigenspace that will achieve certain desired dynamics and stability robustness, determining how the choice of measurements effects synthesis results, and exploring how the phase relationships between desired

  11. Model Order Reduction of Aeroservoelastic Model of Flexible Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yi; Song, Hongjun; Pant, Kapil; Brenner, Martin J.; Suh, Peter

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a holistic model order reduction (MOR) methodology and framework that integrates key technological elements of sequential model reduction, consistent model representation, and model interpolation for constructing high-quality linear parameter-varying (LPV) aeroservoelastic (ASE) reduced order models (ROMs) of flexible aircraft. The sequential MOR encapsulates a suite of reduction techniques, such as truncation and residualization, modal reduction, and balanced realization and truncation to achieve optimal ROMs at grid points across the flight envelope. The consistence in state representation among local ROMs is obtained by the novel method of common subspace reprojection. Model interpolation is then exploited to stitch ROMs at grid points to build a global LPV ASE ROM feasible to arbitrary flight condition. The MOR method is applied to the X-56A MUTT vehicle with flexible wing being tested at NASA/AFRC for flutter suppression and gust load alleviation. Our studies demonstrated that relative to the fullorder model, our X-56A ROM can accurately and reliably capture vehicles dynamics at various flight conditions in the target frequency regime while the number of states in ROM can be reduced by 10X (from 180 to 19), and hence, holds great promise for robust ASE controller synthesis and novel vehicle design.

  12. Aircraft components structural health monitoring using flexible ultrasonic transducer arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W.-L.; Jen, C.-K.; Kobayashi, M.; Mrad, N.

    2011-04-01

    A damage detection capability based on a flexible ultrasonic transducer (FUT) array bonded onto a planar and a curved surface is presented. The FUT array was fabricated on a 75 μm titanium substrate using sol-gel spray technique. Room temperature curable adhesive is used as the bonding agent and ultrasonic couplant between the transducer and the test article. The bonding agent was successfully tested for aircraft environmental temperatures between -80 °C and 100 °C. For a planar test article, selected FUT arrays were able to detect fasteners damage within a planar distance of 176 mm, when used in the pulse-echo mode. Such results illustrate the effectiveness of the developed FUT transducer as compared to commercial 10MHz ultrasonic transducer (UT). These FUT arrays were further demonstrated on a curved test article. Pulse-echo measurements confirmed the reflected echoes from the specimen. Such measurement was not possible with commercial UTs due to the curved nature of the test article and its accessibility, thus demonstrating the suitability and superiority of the developed flexible ultrasonic transducer capability.

  13. Cancer incidence and mortality in aircraft maintenance workers.

    PubMed

    D'Este, Catherine; Attia, John R; Brown, Anthony M; Gibson, Richard; Gibberd, Robert; Tavener, Meredith; Guest, Maya; Horsley, Keith; Harrex, Warren; Ross, James

    2008-01-01

    A cancer incidence and mortality study was conducted in response to health concerns raised by workers from F-111 aircraft deseal/reseal fuel tank maintenance programs, to determine whether personnel exposed to deseal/reseal had an excess of cancers and mortality. Number of deaths and cancers for individuals involved in F-111 DSRS activities were matched against two Air Force comparison groups. Analyses were weighted to adjust for differences in age, exposure period and rank. Eight hundred seventy-three exposed, 7,577 comparison group one, and 9,408 comparison group two individuals were matched against death and cancer data, with 431 cancers and 431 deaths. Cancer incidence was higher in the exposed group, with marginally significant increases of 40-50% (cancer incidence rate ratio range 1.45-1.62). Exposed group mortality was significantly lower than both comparison groups, likely due to survivor bias in the exposed group (mortality rate ratio range 0.33-0.44). On the balance of probabilities, there is an increased risk of cancer associated with participation in F-111 deseal/reseal activities. 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc

  14. Neuropsychological health in F-111 aircraft maintenance workers.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Peter W; Gibson, Richard; Tavener, Meredith; Attia, John R; D'Este, Catherine; Guest, Maya; Brown, Anthony M; Lee, Stephen J; Horsley, Keith; Harrex, Warren; Ross, James

    2006-09-01

    To contrast subjective and objective measures of neuropsychological health in F-111 aircraft Deseal/Reseal maintenance personnel, against two appropriate comparison groups. Exposed and comparison participants completed a postal questionnaire which included a validated memory questionnaire and additional questions relating to possible cognitive symptoms. They also underwent a comprehensive neuropsychological assessment and screening for a past or current disturbance of mood. Multiple linear or logistic regression was conducted for each outcome using exposure group and potential confounders as explanatory variables. There was a strong and consistent excess of self-reported cognitive problems among the exposed group relative to the comparison groups including a 2.8-4.3-fold increase in self-reported symptoms of forgetfulness, loss of concentration and difficulty finding the right word. On detailed neuropsychological testing, the exposed group performed significantly worse than comparisons on tests of psychomotor speed, executive functioning, and new learning/memory. These findings could not be accounted for by disturbances of mood or other potential confounders. There was a strong and consistent increase in self-reported cognitive problems among the exposed, and small but significant exposure-specific differences on objective tests of cognitive functioning. The findings are consistent with the development of adverse neuropsychiatric changes related to occupational exposure to solvents.

  15. Modified Dynamic Inversion to Control Large Flexible Aircraft: What's Going On?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Irene M.

    1999-01-01

    High performance aircraft of the future will be designed lighter, more maneuverable, and operate over an ever expanding flight envelope. One of the largest differences from the flight control perspective between current and future advanced aircraft is elasticity. Over the last decade, dynamic inversion methodology has gained considerable popularity in application to highly maneuverable fighter aircraft, which were treated as rigid vehicles. This paper explores dynamic inversion application to an advanced highly flexible aircraft. An initial application has been made to a large flexible supersonic aircraft. In the course of controller design for this advanced vehicle, modifications were made to the standard dynamic inversion methodology. The results of this application were deemed rather promising. An analytical study has been undertaken to better understand the nature of the made modifications and to determine its general applicability. This paper presents the results of this initial analytical look at the modifications to dynamic inversion to control large flexible aircraft.

  16. Sexual function in F-111 maintenance workers: the study of health outcomes in aircraft maintenance personnel.

    PubMed

    Brown, Anthony; Gibson, Richard; Tavener, Meredith; Guest, Maya; D'Este, Catherine; Byles, Julie; Attia, John; Horsley, Keith; Harrex, Warren; Ross, James

    2009-06-01

    In Australia, four formal F-111 fuel tank deseal/reseal (DSRS) repair programs were implemented over more than two decades, each involving different processes and using a range of hazardous substances. However, health concerns were raised by a number of workers. The "Study of Health Outcomes in Aircraft Maintenance Personnel" was commissioned by the Australian Department of Defence to investigate potential adverse health outcomes as a result of being involved in the deseal/reseal processes. To compare measures of sexual function in F-111 aircraft fuel tank DSRS maintenance workers, against two appropriate comparison groups. Exposed and comparison participants completed a postal questionnaire which included general questions of health and health behavior, and two specific questions on sexual functioning. They also completed the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) questionnaire. Logistic regression was used to explore exposure status and outcome while adjusting for potential confounders. The three outcomes of interest for this study were the proportion of participants with erectile dysfunction (ED) according to the IIEF, the proportion with self-reported loss of interest in sex, and the proportion with self-reported problems with sexual functioning. Compared with each of the comparison groups, a larger proportion of the exposed group reported sexual problems and were classified as having ED according to the IIEF. In logistic regression, the odds of all three outcomes were higher for exposed participants relative to each comparison group and after adjustment for potentially confounding variables including anxiety and depression. There was a consistent problem with sexual functioning in the exposed group that is not explained by anxiety and depression, and it appears related to DSRS activities.

  17. Changes in the mean hearing threshold levels in military aircraft maintenance conscripts.

    PubMed

    Park, Won-Ju; Moon, Jai-Dong

    2016-11-01

    Aircraft maintenance crews are constantly exposed to severe aircraft noise. The purpose of this study was to verify whether noise from aircraft adversely affects the hearing threshold levels (HTLs) of aircraft maintenance conscripts during their 2 years of mandatory military service. This study included 3,000 male aircraft maintenance conscripts who work in the military runway area. We measured and analyzed HTLs at 2-4 kHz. The duration of exposure to noise increased with an increase in rank; however, HTLs showed a tendency to decrease. We attributed such contradicting results to the learning effect and adaptation to military service. However, we suspected that sudden deafness in 6 conscripts (0.2%) was due to loud noise in the runway area during military service. The effectiveness of the hearing conservation program for short-term military service personnel could be increased by focusing on preventing sudden deafness and preenlistment baseline audiogram tests.

  18. Stability Result For Dynamic Inversion Devised to Control Large Flexible Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Irene M.

    2001-01-01

    High performance aircraft of the future will be designed lighter, more maneuverable, and operate over an ever expanding flight envelope. One of the largest differences from the flight control perspective between current and future advanced aircraft is elasticity. Over the last decade, dynamic inversion methodology has gained considerable popularity in application to highly maneuverable fighter aircraft, which were treated as rigid vehicles. This paper is an initial attempt to establish global stability results for dynamic inversion methodology as applied to a large, flexible aircraft. This work builds on a previous result for rigid fighter aircraft and adds a new level of complexity that is the flexible aircraft dynamics, which cannot be ignored even in the most basic flight control. The results arise from observations of the control laws designed for a new generation of the High-Speed Civil Transport aircraft.

  19. Challenges to United States Tactical Air Force Aircraft Maintenance Personnel: Past, Present and Future

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    bidders, but only the Wrights were able to meet their proposed delivery date. Scott never signed his contract. He knew the construction of an aircraft...Wright Brothers, for training on the Wright Flyer. They received flight training and were schooled in aircraft construction and maintenance as well...caused a generally lax post-war approach to any cleaning efforts (10:190-191). Further, as aircraft construction materials changed, corrosion became a

  20. Improving Legacy Aircraft Systems Through Condition-Based Maintenance: An H-60 Case Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    Gear Shock Strut Main Rotor Blades Rotor Brake Power Plant System Air Turbine Starter Fuel Dump System Operational Check Flight Controls Main...Inspection and Repair Process ...........................................21 a. Scheduled Maintenance...operates the aircraft. The intermediate and depot levels refer to higher levels of maintenance that focus on inspecting and repairing equipment that

  1. Testing, Validation, and Verification of an Expert System Advisor for Aircraft Maintenance Scheduling (ESAAMS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-01

    experience when assigning priorities for both scheduled and unscheduled maintenance. An Expert System Advisor for Aircraft Maintenance Scheduling...ESAAMS) is being implemented at the Naval Postgraduate School. This thesis examines what should be included within an expert system test plan and

  2. Flight Dynamics of Flexible Aircraft with Aeroelastic and Inertial Force Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.; Tuzcu, Ilhan

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an integrated flight dynamic modeling method for flexible aircraft that captures coupled physics effects due to inertial forces, aeroelasticity, and propulsive forces that are normally present in flight. The present approach formulates the coupled flight dynamics using a structural dynamic modeling method that describes the elasticity of a flexible, twisted, swept wing using an equivalent beam-rod model. The structural dynamic model allows for three types of wing elastic motion: flapwise bending, chordwise bending, and torsion. Inertial force coupling with the wing elasticity is formulated to account for aircraft acceleration. The structural deflections create an effective aeroelastic angle of attack that affects the rigid-body motion of flexible aircraft. The aeroelastic effect contributes to aerodynamic damping forces that can influence aerodynamic stability. For wing-mounted engines, wing flexibility can cause the propulsive forces and moments to couple with the wing elastic motion. The integrated flight dynamics for a flexible aircraft are formulated by including generalized coordinate variables associated with the aeroelastic-propulsive forces and moments in the standard state-space form for six degree-of-freedom flight dynamics. A computational structural model for a generic transport aircraft has been created. The eigenvalue analysis is performed to compute aeroelastic frequencies and aerodynamic damping. The results will be used to construct an integrated flight dynamic model of a flexible generic transport aircraft.

  3. 14 CFR 129.14 - Maintenance program and minimum equipment list requirements for U.S.-registered aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ....S.-REGISTERED AIRCRAFT ENGAGED IN COMMON CARRIAGE General § 129.14 Maintenance program and minimum... maintenance program and approved aircraft minimum equipment list to the FAA office prescribed in paragraph (b... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maintenance program and minimum equipment...

  4. 22 CFR 151.11 - Notification of ownership, maintenance or use of vessel and/or aircraft; evidence of insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... AND PERSONNEL § 151.11 Notification of ownership, maintenance or use of vessel and/or aircraft... State in writing of the ownership, maintenance or other regular use of a vessel or aircraft in the... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Notification of ownership, maintenance or use...

  5. 14 CFR 129.14 - Maintenance program and minimum equipment list requirements for U.S.-registered aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ....S.-REGISTERED AIRCRAFT ENGAGED IN COMMON CARRIAGE General § 129.14 Maintenance program and minimum... maintenance program and approved aircraft minimum equipment list to the FAA office prescribed in paragraph (b... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Maintenance program and minimum equipment...

  6. An Investigation of the Influence of Advanced Aircraft Diagnostics on the Technological Sophistication of Maintenance Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    AD-A258 988 AFIT/GLM/LSM/9 2S-9 AN INVESTIGATION OF THE INFLUENCE OF ADVANCED AIRCRAFT DIAGNOSTICS ON THE TECHNOLOGICAL SOPHISTICATION OF MAINTENANCE ...DIAGNOSTICS ON THE TECHNOLOGICAL SOPHISTICATION OF MAINTENANCE PERSONNEL THESIS Presented to the Faculty of the School of Systems and Logistics of the Air...diagnostic systems will have on the maintenance worker’s technological capabilities. Four investigative questions guided the project: 1. What effect

  7. Task Analysis - Aircraft Structural Maintenance AFSC 458X2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-08-01

    PARTS USING ULTRASONIC CLEANERS 10346 CLEAN AIRCRAFT PARTS USING VAPOR DEGREASERS 10359 SPRAY CLEAN AIRCRAFT PARTS 10360 SPRAY CLEAN SUPPORT EQUIPMENT...tasks are as follows: ACTIVITIES: A summary of the actions performed during the task. We identified activities which: (a) summarize major parts of the...FASTENER HOLES 21 USE REAMING TOOLS 13 USE PNEUMATIC RIVET GUNS 12 APPLY PARTING AGENTS 11 USE MICROSHAVER 7 OPERATE HEATING/CURING EQUIPMENT 6 USE

  8. An optimization method for condition based maintenance of aircraft fleet considering prognostics uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Feng, Qiang; Chen, Yiran; Sun, Bo; Li, Songjie

    2014-01-01

    An optimization method for condition based maintenance (CBM) of aircraft fleet considering prognostics uncertainty is proposed. The CBM and dispatch process of aircraft fleet is analyzed first, and the alternative strategy sets for single aircraft are given. Then, the optimization problem of fleet CBM with lower maintenance cost and dispatch risk is translated to the combinatorial optimization problem of single aircraft strategy. Remain useful life (RUL) distribution of the key line replaceable Module (LRM) has been transformed into the failure probability of the aircraft and the fleet health status matrix is established. And the calculation method of the costs and risks for mission based on health status matrix and maintenance matrix is given. Further, an optimization method for fleet dispatch and CBM under acceptable risk is proposed based on an improved genetic algorithm. Finally, a fleet of 10 aircrafts is studied to verify the proposed method. The results shows that it could realize optimization and control of the aircraft fleet oriented to mission success.

  9. An Optimization Method for Condition Based Maintenance of Aircraft Fleet Considering Prognostics Uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yiran; Sun, Bo; Li, Songjie

    2014-01-01

    An optimization method for condition based maintenance (CBM) of aircraft fleet considering prognostics uncertainty is proposed. The CBM and dispatch process of aircraft fleet is analyzed first, and the alternative strategy sets for single aircraft are given. Then, the optimization problem of fleet CBM with lower maintenance cost and dispatch risk is translated to the combinatorial optimization problem of single aircraft strategy. Remain useful life (RUL) distribution of the key line replaceable Module (LRM) has been transformed into the failure probability of the aircraft and the fleet health status matrix is established. And the calculation method of the costs and risks for mission based on health status matrix and maintenance matrix is given. Further, an optimization method for fleet dispatch and CBM under acceptable risk is proposed based on an improved genetic algorithm. Finally, a fleet of 10 aircrafts is studied to verify the proposed method. The results shows that it could realize optimization and control of the aircraft fleet oriented to mission success. PMID:24892046

  10. Flight dynamics simulation modeling and control of a large flexible tiltrotor aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juhasz, Ondrej

    A high order rotorcraft mathematical model is developed and validated against the XV-15 and a Large Civil Tiltrotor (LCTR) concept. The mathematical model is generic and allows for any rotorcraft configuration, from single main rotor helicopters to coaxial and tiltrotor aircraft. Rigid-body and inflow states, as well as flexible wing and blade states are used in the analysis. The separate modeling of each rotorcraft component allows for structural flexibility to be included, which is important when modeling large aircraft where structural modes affect the flight dynamics frequency ranges of interest, generally 1 to 20 rad/sec. Details of the formulation of the mathematical model are given, including derivations of structural, aerodynamic, and inertial loads. The linking of the components of the aircraft is developed using an approach similar to multibody analyses by exploiting a tree topology, but without equations of constraints. Assessments of the effects of wing flexibility are given. Flexibility effects are evaluated by looking at the nature of the couplings between rigid-body modes and wing structural modes and vice versa. The effects of various different forms of structural feedback on aircraft dynamics are analyzed. A proportional-integral feedback on the structural acceleration is deemed to be most effective at both improving the damping and reducing the overall excitation of a structural mode. A model following control architecture is then implemented on full order flexible LCTR models. For this aircraft, the four lowest frequency structural modes are below 20 rad/sec, and are thus needed for control law development and analysis. The impact of structural feedback on both Attitude-Command, Attitude-Hold (ACAH) and Translational Rate Command (TRC) response types are investigated. A rigid aircraft model has optimistic performance characteristics, and a control system designed for a rigid aircraft could potentially destabilize a flexible one. The various

  11. Repair and maintenance of fiber optic data links on Navy aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fryland, Eric

    1992-02-01

    This paper will examine the problems and concerns of repairing fiber optic data links on carrier based Navy aircraft and will present the results of fiber optic splice testing that was performed aboard the USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) in January 1991. Mechanical splicing of 50/125 micrometer fiber was performed at the various Navy maintenance levels in order to quantify the effects of the aircraft carrier environment on fiber optic splicing. Results, conclusions and recommendations will be given.

  12. Aviation Maintenance Technology. Airframe. A204. Aircraft Welding. Instructor Material.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This teacher's guide is designed to aid teachers in leading students through a module on aircraft welding on airframes. The module contains four units that cover the following topics: (1) gas welding and cutting; (2) brazing and soldering; (3) shielded metal arc welding; and (4) gas tungsten arc welding. Each unit follows a standardized format…

  13. Aviation Maintenance Technology. Airframe. A204. Aircraft Welding. Instructor Material.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This teacher's guide is designed to aid teachers in leading students through a module on aircraft welding on airframes. The module contains four units that cover the following topics: (1) gas welding and cutting; (2) brazing and soldering; (3) shielded metal arc welding; and (4) gas tungsten arc welding. Each unit follows a standardized format…

  14. Coupled nonlinear flight dynamics, aeroelasticity, and control of very flexible aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shearer, Christopher M.

    Flight dynamics and control of rigid aircraft motion coupled with linearized structural dynamics has been studied for several decades. However, new requirements for very flexible aircraft are challenging the validity of most rigid body coupled linearized structural motion formulations, due to the presence of large elastic motions. This dissertation presents, the flight dynamics, integration, and control of the six degree-of-freedom equations of motion of a reference point on a very flexible aircraft coupled with the aeroelastic equations which govern the geometrically nonlinear structural response of the vehicle. A low-order strain-based nonlinear structural analysis coupled with unsteady finite-state potential flow aerodynamics form the basis for the aeroelastic formulation. The nonlinear beam structural model is based upon the finite strain approach. Kinematic differential equations are used to provide orientation and position of the fixed reference point. The resulting governing differential equations are non-linear, first- and second-order differential algebraic equations and provide a low-order complete nonlinear aircraft formulation. The resulting equations are integrated using an implicit Modified Newmark Method. The method incorporates both first- and second-order nonlinear equations without the necessity of transforming second-order equations to first-order form. The method also incorporates a Newton-Raphson sub-iteration scheme to reduce residual error. Due to the inherent flexibility of these aircraft, the low order structural modes couple directly with the rigid body modes. This creates a system which cannot be separated as in traditional control schemes. Trajectory control techniques are developed based upon a combination of linear and nonlinear inner-loop tracking and an outer-loop nonlinear transformation from desired trajectories to reference frame velocities. Numerical simulations are presented validating the proposed integration scheme and the

  15. Examining the Impact of Quality Assurance Manning Practices in USAF Aircraft Maintenance Units

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    or… • 652 - GBU-31 JDAMS ( Joint Direct Attack Munitions) at $37,670 each, or… • 722,763 – man-hours at $34 per hour Maintenance-related mishaps...process. The two most often used for Air Combat Command (ACC) aircraft maintenance/munitions units are the Logistics Composite Model (LCOM) and the...uses the LCOM. The LCOM is a discrete-event computer simulation used to model manpower and other logistical requirements by considering employment of

  16. Peripheral neuropathy in military aircraft maintenance workers in Australia.

    PubMed

    Guest, Maya; Attia, John R; D'este, Catherine A; Boggess, May M; Brown, Anthony M; Gibson, Richard E; Tavener, Meredith A; Ross, James; Gardner, Ian; Harrex, Warren

    2011-04-01

    This study aimed to examine possible persisting peripheral neuropathy in a group who undertook fuel tank repairs on F-111 aircraft, relative to two contemporaneous comparison groups. Vibration perception threshold (VPT) was tested using biothesiometry in 614 exposed personnel, compared with two unexposed groups (513 technical trades and 403 nontrades). Regression modeling was used to examine associations, adjusting for possible confounders. We observed that 26% of participants had chronic persistent increased VPT in the great toe. In contrast, statistically significant higher VPT of the great toe was observed in the comparison groups; however, the effect was small, about 1/4 the magnitude of diabetes. Age, height, and diabetes were all significant and strong predictors in most models. This study highlights chronic persisting peripheral neuropathy in a population of aircraft maintainers.

  17. Effects of Inertial and Geometric Nonlinearities in the Simulation of Flexible Aircraft Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bun Tse, Bosco Chun

    This thesis examines the relative importance of the inertial and geometric nonlinearities in modelling the dynamics of a flexible aircraft. Inertial nonlinearities are derived by employing an exact definition of the velocity distribution and lead to coupling between the rigid body and elastic motions. The geometric nonlinearities are obtained by applying nonlinear theory of elasticity to the deformations. Peters' finite state unsteady aerodynamic model is used to evaluate the aerodynamic forces. Three approximate models obtained by excluding certain combinations of nonlinear terms are compared with that of the complete dynamics equations to obtain an indication of which terms are required for an accurate representation of the flexible aircraft behavior. A generic business jet model is used for the analysis. The results indicate that the nonlinear terms have a significant effect for more flexible aircraft, especially the geometric nonlinearities which leads to increased damping in the dynamics.

  18. Optimum Wing Shape Determination of Highly Flexible Morphing Aircraft for Improved Flight Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Weihua; Swei, Sean Shan-Min; Zhu, Guoming G.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, optimum wing bending and torsion deformations are explored for a mission adaptive, highly flexible morphing aircraft. The complete highly flexible aircraft is modeled using a strain-based geometrically nonlinear beam formulation, coupled with unsteady aerodynamics and six-degrees-of-freedom rigid-body motions. Since there are no conventional discrete control surfaces for trimming the flexible aircraft, the design space for searching the optimum wing geometries is enlarged. To achieve high performance flight, the wing geometry is best tailored according to the specific flight mission needs. In this study, the steady level flight and the coordinated turn flight are considered, and the optimum wing deformations with the minimum drag at these flight conditions are searched by utilizing a modal-based optimization procedure, subject to the trim and other constraints. The numerical study verifies the feasibility of the modal-based optimization approach, and shows the resulting optimum wing configuration and its sensitivity under different flight profiles.

  19. Analysis of flexible aircraft longitudinal dynamics and handling qualities. Volume 1: Analysis methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, M. R.; Schmidt, D. S.

    1985-01-01

    As aircraft become larger and lighter due to design requirements for increased payload and improved fuel efficiency, they will also become more flexible. For highly flexible vehicles, the handling qualities may not be accurately predicted by conventional methods. This study applies two analysis methods to a family of flexible aircraft in order to investigate how and when structural (especially dynamic aeroelastic) effects affect the dynamic characteristics of aircraft. The first type of analysis is an open loop model analysis technique. This method considers the effects of modal residue magnitudes on determining vehicle handling qualities. The second method is a pilot in the loop analysis procedure that considers several closed loop system characteristics. Volume 1 consists of the development and application of the two analysis methods described above.

  20. Integrated Flight Mechanic and Aeroelastic Modelling and Control of a Flexible Aircraft Considering Multidimensional Gust Input

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-05-01

    INTEGRATED FLIGHT MECHANIC AND AEROELASTIC MODELLING AND CONTROL OF A FLEXIBLE AIRCRAFT CONSIDERING MULTIDIMENSIONAL GUST INPUT Patrick Teufel, Martin Hanel...the lateral separation distance have been developed by ’ = matrix of two dimensional spectrum function Eichenbaum 4 and are described by Bessel...Journal of Aircraft, Vol. 30, No. 5, Sept.-Oct. 1993 Relations to Risk Sensitivity, System & Control Letters 11, [4] Eichenbaum F.D., Evaluation of 3D

  1. Using Intelligent Simulation to Enhance Human Performance in Aircraft Maintenance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, William B.; Norton, Jeffrey E.

    1992-01-01

    Human factors research and development investigates the capabilities and limitations of the human within a system. Of the many variables affecting human performance in the aviation maintenance system, training is among the most important. The advent of advanced technology hardware and software has created intelligent training simulations. This paper describes one advanced technology training system under development for the Federal Aviation Administration.

  2. The Maintenance Costs of Aging Aircraft: Insights from Commercial Aviation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    9 Ramsey, French, and Sperry (1998) Used Commercial Data to Estimate KC...French and Sperry (Boeing) 1998 + Multiple Air Force and Commercial Programmed depot maintenance (PDM) man- hours Panel Francis and Shaw...in on-equipment2 workloads over approxi- mately the same period of time. Ramsey, French, and Sperry (1998) Used Commercial Data to Estimate KC-135

  3. Current and Future Research in Active Control of Lightweight, Flexible Structures Using the X-56 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, John J.; Bosworth, John T.; Burken, John J.; Suh, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    The X-56 Multi-Utility Technology Testbed aircraft system is a versatile experimental research flight platform. The system was primarily designed to investigate active control of lightweight flexible structures, but is reconfigurable and capable of hosting a wide breadth of research. Current research includes flight experimentation of a Lockheed Martin designed active control flutter suppression system. Future research plans continue experimentation with alternative control systems, explore the use of novel sensor systems, and experiments with the use of novel control effectors. This paper describes the aircraft system, current research efforts designed around the system, and future planned research efforts that will be hosted on the aircraft system.

  4. Flexible Twist for Pitch Control in a High Altitude Long Endurance Aircraft with Nonlinear Response

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    Information dominance is the key motivator for employing high-altitude long-endurance (HALE) aircraft to provide continuous coverage in the theaters of operation A joined-wing configuration of such a craft gives the advantage of a platform for higher resolution sensors. Design challenges emerge with structural flexibility that arise from a long-endurance aircraft design. The goal was to demonstrate that scaling the nonlinear response of a full-scale finite element model of a high-altitude long-endurance (HALE) aircraft was possible if the model was aeroelastically and

  5. Hearing status among aircraft maintenance personnel in a commercial airline company.

    PubMed

    Smedje, Greta; Lunden, Maria; Gärtner, Lotta; Lundgren, Håkan; Lindgren, Torsten

    2011-01-01

    The aim was to study subjective and objective hearing loss in a population of aircraft maintenance workers and identify predictors. A total of 327 aircraft maintenance personnel answered a self-administered work environment questionnaire (response rate 76%) and underwent audiometric test. The mean values for the hearing threshold at 3, 4, and 6 kHz for the ear with the most hearing loss were compared with a Swedish population database of persons not occupationally exposed to noise. Equivalent noise exposure during a working day was measured. Relationships between subjective and objective hearing loss and possible predictors (age, years of employment, self-reported exposure to solvents, blood pressure, and psycho-social factors) were analyzed by multiple logistic regression. At younger ages (<40 years), aircraft maintenance workers had higher hearing thresholds (1-3 dB) compared to the reference group, but such a difference was not found in older employees. Relationships were found between age and objective hearing loss, and between exposure to solvents and reported subjective hearing loss. Equivalent noise exposure during working days were 70-91 dB(A) with a maximal noise level of 119 dB(A). Aircraft maintenance workers are exposed to equivalent noise levels above the Swedish occupational standard, including some very high peak exposures. Younger employees have a higher age-matched hearing threshold level compared with a reference group. Thus, there is a need for further preventive measures.

  6. Vocational Training and European Standardisation of Qualifications: The Case of Aircraft Maintenance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haas, Joachim; Ourtau, Maurice

    2009-01-01

    Initiatives to standardise the conditions for practising certain regulated activities are being taken at European level, particularly in light of the free movement of people and the recognition of qualifications in Member states. This paper looks at the introduction of european licences for aircraft maintenance engineers. It follows an in-depth…

  7. A performance improvement case study in aircraft maintenance and its implications for hazard identification.

    PubMed

    Ward, Marie; McDonald, Nick; Morrison, Rabea; Gaynor, Des; Nugent, Tony

    2010-02-01

    Aircraft maintenance is a highly regulated, safety critical, complex and competitive industry. There is a need to develop innovative solutions to address process efficiency without compromising safety and quality. This paper presents the case that in order to improve a highly complex system such as aircraft maintenance, it is necessary to develop a comprehensive and ecologically valid model of the operational system, which represents not just what is meant to happen, but what normally happens. This model then provides the backdrop against which to change or improve the system. A performance report, the Blocker Report, specific to aircraft maintenance and related to the model was developed gathering data on anything that 'blocks' task or check performance. A Blocker Resolution Process was designed to resolve blockers and improve the current check system. Significant results were obtained for the company in the first trial and implications for safety management systems and hazard identification are discussed. Statement of Relevance: Aircraft maintenance is a safety critical, complex, competitive industry with a need to develop innovative solutions to address process and safety efficiency. This research addresses this through the development of a comprehensive and ecologically valid model of the system linked with a performance reporting and resolution system.

  8. Artificial Intelligence/Robotics Applications to Navy Aircraft Maintenance.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-01

    AD-A143 219 ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE/ROBOTICS APPLICATIONS TO NAVV T7T AIRCRAFT HAINTENANCE(U) SRI INTERNATIONAL HENLO PARK CA D R BROWN ET AL...34^! * -.’.-. v.’: ;- • ’_*-••.-. - - m i i • i >«••»......» i 0> CO < Final Report ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE/ROBOTICS APPLICATIONS TO NAVY...8217• . . i * • ’ * ’ ** ’.- *_» "-_ _* _- _• -J> . „• „ (ss3 QB e 25 f//w/ Report ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE/ROBOTICS APPLICATIONS TO NAVY

  9. [Characteristics of a negative effect of aviation noise on hearing organ of aircraft maintenance personnel].

    PubMed

    Zinkin, V N; Soldatov, S K; Sheshegov, P M

    2007-01-01

    Otolaryngological examination was carried out of 80 engineers and technicians engaged in maintenance of aircrafts in the airports. They are continuously exposed to occupational aviation noise and therefore are at risk for chronic neurosensory hypoacusis. Pure tone audiogram registers in them a rise in hearing thresholds throughout the whole band of frequencies studied. This means that aviation maintenance staff is exposed to noise containing highly intensive infrasound and high-frequency components. The detected pathology directly correlated with duration of exposure to noise. Development of neurosensory hypoacusis in aviation maintenance specialists starts earlier than in other specialists exposed to noise.

  10. Damage detection in aircraft structures using dynamically measured static flexibility matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, N.A.; Peterson, L.D.; James, G.H.; Doebling, S.W.

    1996-02-01

    Two methods for detecting the location of structural damage in an aircraft fuselage using modal test data are presented. Both methods use the dynamically measured static flexibility matrix, which is assembled from a combination of measured modal vectors, frequencies, and driving point residual flexibilities. As a consequence, neither method requires a mode-to-mode correlation, and both avoid tedious modal discrimination and selection. The first method detects damage as a softening in the point flexibility components, which are the diagonal entries in the flexibility matrix. The second method detects damage from the disassembled elemental stiffnesses as determined using a presumed connectivity. Vibration data from a laser vibrometer is used to measure the modal mechanics of a DC9 aircraft fuselage before and after induced weakening in a longitudinal stringer. Both methods are shown to detect the location of the damage, primarily because the normal stiffness of the reinforced shell of the fuselage is localized to a few square centimeters.

  11. Aircraft Maintenance Officers: A Look to the Future

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-01

    munitions p-rasornneI progress to a combined Maintenance Staff Off icer ani, •_ hopefully, to Aerospace Maintenace Director. GSiven triz pattern of...AFLMC) analysis of this area concluded that AFSC 40XX authorizations were "top heavy" and that only "changes in authorizations and/or the methods ...than correct the prwo:n em at the source, the Air Force has elected to use wor, around methods to make the aberrations tolerable. Thus resu L= rn

  12. Human Factors Issues In Aircraft Maintenance And Inspection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-01

    establish a proper working environment for maintenance personnel and to understand those features of this environment which either enhance or degrade the...meeting as part of a broad effort to enhance communications between the FAA and industry as well as among different groups concerned with human factors...frequently is subject to miscommunications. I have seen misdirected communications from the operator back to the Government which were sent to the wrong

  13. Logistics of Aircraft Maintenance During the Korean War

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    reader with the impression there were no major logistics problems during the Korean War. Yet, people who served in Korea during the war testify to the...in the Korean War the Fifth Air Force wing commanders in Korea were vigorously compelled to decide between accomplishing maintenance following the...inter-island air transport. At the start of the war the MATS supported cargo operations in the Korea and Japan area. Three months after the Korean

  14. Use of augmented reality in aircraft maintenance operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marchi, L.; Ceruti, A.; Testoni, N.; Marzani, A.; Liverani, A.

    2014-03-01

    This paper illustrates a Human-Machine Interface based on Augmented Reality (AR) conceived to provide to maintenance operators the results of an impact detection methodology. In particular, the implemented tool dynamically interacts with a head portable visualization device allowing the inspector to see the estimated impact position on the structure. The impact detection methodology combines the signals collected by a network of piezosensors bonded on the structure to be monitored. Then a signal processing algorithm is applied to compensate for dispersion the acquired guided waves. The compensated waveforms yield to a robust estimation of guided waves difference in distance of propagation (DDOP), used to feed hyperbolic algorithms for impact location determination. The output of the impact methodology is passed to an AR visualization technology that is meant to support the inspector during the on-field inspection/diagnosis as well as the maintenance operations. The inspector, in fact, can see interactively in real time the impact data directly on the surface of the structure. Here the proposed approach is tested on the engine cowling of a Cessna 150 general aviation airplane. Preliminary results confirm the feasibility of the method and its exploitability in maintenance practice.

  15. Effects of Structural Flexibility on Aircraft-Engine Mounts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, W. H.

    1986-01-01

    Analysis extends technique for design of widely used type of vibration-isolating mounts for aircraft engines, in which rubber mounting pads located in plane behind center of gravity of enginepropeller combination. New analysis treats problem in statics. Results of simple approach useful in providing equations for design of vibrationisolating mounts. Equations applicable in usual situation in which engine-mount structure itself relatively light and placed between large mass of engine and other heavy components of airplane.

  16. Integrated Model Reduction and Control of Aircraft with Flexible Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swei, Sean Shan-Min; Zhu, Guoming G.; Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an integrated approach to the modeling and control of aircraft with exible wings. The coupled aircraft rigid body dynamics with a high-order elastic wing model can be represented in a nite dimensional state-space form. Given a set of desired output covariance, a model reduction process is performed by using the weighted Modal Cost Analysis (MCA). A dynamic output feedback controller, which is designed based on the reduced-order model, is developed by utilizing output covariance constraint (OCC) algorithm, and the resulting OCC design weighting matrix is used for the next iteration of the weighted cost analysis. This controller is then validated for full-order evaluation model to ensure that the aircraft's handling qualities are met and the uttering motion of the wings suppressed. An iterative algorithm is developed in CONDUIT environment to realize the integration of model reduction and controller design. The proposed integrated approach is applied to NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM) for demonstration.

  17. Aviation Maintenance (Aircraft Mechanics & Aircraft & Instrument Repair Personnel). Aviation Careers Series. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaharevitz, Walter

    This booklet, one in a series on aviation careers, outlines career opportunities in aviation maintenance. The booklet provides the following information about aviation maintenance jobs: nature of the work, working conditions, where the jobs are, wages and benefits, opportunities for advancement, requirements to enter the job, opportunities for…

  18. Handling qualities of large flexible control-configured aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swaim, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    The approach to an analytical study of flexible airplane longitudinal handling qualities was to parametrically vary the natural frequencies of two symmetric elastic modes to induce mode interactions with the rigid body dynamics. Since the structure of the pilot model was unknown for such dynamic interactions, the optimal control pilot modeling method is being applied and used in conjunction with pilot rating method.

  19. Psychosocial indicators among aircraft maintenance workers with and without neck and shoulder musculoskeletal symptoms.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, A; Nogueira, H; Diniz, A; Barbieri, D

    2012-01-01

    In the aircraft maintenance industry, most of workers performs manual handling tasks of different materials, varying from small objects up to large pieces of the aircraft. It can increase the occurrence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs), which are strongly associated with high physical demands required by the task. Moreover, psychosocial demands are considered as risk factors for musculoskeletal disorders in both the upper limbs and lumbar spine. Thus, the objective of this study was to assess psychosocial indicators among aircraft maintenance workers according to the presence of neck and shoulder musculoskeletal symptoms. Eighty workers of an aircraft maintenance company were evaluated (32.69 ± 8.25 years, 79.8 ± 13.4 kg, 175 ± 7 cm). According to physical examination, 50 workers were classified as asymptomatic (AS - 4.1 ± 3.17 positive signs) whilst 30 workers were classified as symptomatic (SS - 26.72 ± 11.44 positive signs). AS and SS have shown similar profile of demand (p = 0.62), control (p = 0.66) and social support (p = 0.74) according to the Job Content Questionnaire. However, the groups are different when considering work engagement variables. In general, SS have higher scores than AS (p < 0.05).

  20. Analysis of flexible aircraft longitudinal dynamics and handling qualities. Volume 2: Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, M. R.; Schmidt, D. K.

    1985-01-01

    Two analysis methods are applied to a family of flexible aircraft in order to investigate how and when structural (especially dynamic aeroelastic) effects affect the dynamic characteristics of aircraft. The first type of analysis is an open loop modal analysis technique. This method considers the effect of modal residue magnitudes on determining vehicle handling qualities. The second method is a pilot in the loop analysis procedure that considers several closed loop system characteristics. Both analyses indicated that dynamic aeroelastic effects caused a degradation in vehicle tracking performance, based on the evaluation of some simulation results. Volume 2 consists of the presentation of the state variable models of the flexible aircraft configurations used in the analysis applications mode shape plots for the structural modes, numerical results from the modal analysis frequency response plots from the pilot in the loop analysis and a listing of the modal analysis computer program.

  1. Impairment of color vision in aircraft maintenance workers.

    PubMed

    Guest, Maya; D'Este, Catherine; Attia, John; Boggess, May; Brown, Anthony; Tavener, Meredith; Gibson, Richard; Gardner, Ian; Harrex, Warren; Ross, James

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine possible persisting effects to color vision in a group from the Royal Australian Air Force who had exposure to formulations containing neurotoxins during F-111 fuel tank maintenance, relative to two contemporaneous comparison groups. Color vision was tested in 512 exposed personnel, 458 technical-trade comparisons, and 330 non-technical comparisons using the Ishihara test plates and the Lanthony D-15 Desaturated Color disk arrangement test. Participants were excluded if they failed the Ishihara test as this indicates congenital color blindness. From the Lanthony results, the type of color deficient vision (CDV) was diagnosed, and additionally, the Bowman's color confusion index (CCI) was calculated. Regression models were used to examine whether there was an association between color vision deficiencies and F-111 fuel tank maintenance, adjusting for possible confounders. The CCI ranged from 1 to 2.8 (median 1.2, quartiles 1.1, 1.4) in the 2,600 eyes tested. Forty five percent of all participants had blue-yellow CDV in at least one eye. Deficiencies of this nature are caused by environmental exposures. Logistic regression demonstrated statistically significant differences in CCI category in the exposed group versus technical group (odds ratio 1.7: 95% CI 1.3-2.0) and a blue-yellow confusion in the exposed group versus technical group (odds ratio 1.4: 95% CI 1.1-1.7). No differences were observed between the exposed group and the non-technical group. The results indicate reduced color discrimination among the exposed subjects compared to one of two control groups. The findings may be due to previous exposure to solvents among the air force personnel.

  2. ACFA 2020 - An FP7 project on active control of flexible fuel efficient aircraft configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, R.

    2013-12-01

    This paper gives an overview about the project ACFA 2020 which is funded by the European Commission within the 7th framework program. The acronym ACFA 2020 stands for Active Control for Flexible Aircraft 2020. The project is dealing with the design of highly fuel efficient aircraft configurations and, in particular, on innovative active control concepts with the goal to reduce loads and structural weight. Major focus lays on blended wing body (BWB) aircraft. Blended wing body type aircraft configurations are seen as the most promising future concept to fulfill the so-called ACARE (Advisory Council for Aeronautics Research in Europe) vision 2020 goals in regards to reduce fuel consumption and external noise. The paper discusses in some detail the overall goals and how they are addressed in the workplan. Furthermore, the major achievements of the project are outlined and a short outlook on the remaining work is given.

  3. Validation of a Flexible Aircraft Take-Off and Landing Analysis (FATOLA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carden, H. D.; Mcgehee, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    Modifications to improve the analytical simulation capabilities of a multi-degree-of-freedom flexible aircraft take-off and landing analysis (FATOLA) computer program are discussed. The FATOLA program was used to simulate the landing behavior of a stiff body X-24B reentry research vehicle and of a flexible body supersonic cruise YF-12A research airplane. The analytical results were compared with flight test data, and correlations of vehicle motions, attitudes, forces, and accelerations during the landing impact and rollout were good. For the YF-12A airplane, airframe flexibility was found to be important for nose gear loading. Based upon the correlation study presented, the versatility and validity of the FATOLA program for the study of landing dynamics of aircraft are confirmed.

  4. Restructuring Depot Maintenance Occupational Series to Improve Flexibility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    Optimal Fraction of Flexible Servers (Chakravarthy & Agnihothri, 2005) ....... 9 Figure 2: Cross Training Employment Matrix (McCreery & Krajewski , 1999...coefficient. This coefficient is the “potential efficiencies gained as a result of consolidation, given as a percentage of original manpower levels.” ( p . 16...how do we ensure we don’t lose the depth of knowledge of experts when we cross-train—is directly addressed by McCreery and Krajewski , in “Improving

  5. Constraint Maintenance with Preferences and Underlying Flexible Solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bresina, John; Jonsson, Ari; Morris, Paul; Rajan, Kanna

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes an aspect of the constraint reasoning mechanism. that is part of a ground planning system slated to be used for the Mars Exploration Rovers mission, where two rovers are scheduled to land on Mars in January of 2003. The planning system combines manual planning software from JPL with an automatic planning/scheduling system from NASA Ames Research Center, and is designed to be used in a mixed-initiative mode. Among other things, this means that after a plan has been produced, the human operator can perform extensive modifications under the supervision of the automated. system. For each modification to an activity, the automated system must adjust other activities as needed to ensure that constraints continue to be satisfied. Thus, the system must accommodate change in an interactive setting. Performance is of critical importance for interactive use. This is achieved by maintaining an underlying flexible solution to the temporal constraints, while the system presents a fixed schedule to the user. Adjustments are then a matter of constraint propagation rather than completely re-solving the problem. However, this begs the important question of which fixed schedule (among the ones sanctioned by the underlying flexible solution) should be presented to the user.Our approach uses least-change and other preferences as a prism through which the user views the flexible solution.

  6. Constraint Maintenance with Preferences and Underlying Flexible Solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bresina, John; Jonsson, Ari; Morris, Paul; Rajan, Kanna

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes an aspect of the constraint reasoning mechanism. that is part of a ground planning system slated to be used for the Mars Exploration Rovers mission, where two rovers are scheduled to land on Mars in January of 2003. The planning system combines manual planning software from JPL with an automatic planning/scheduling system from NASA Ames Research Center, and is designed to be used in a mixed-initiative mode. Among other things, this means that after a plan has been produced, the human operator can perform extensive modifications under the supervision of the automated. system. For each modification to an activity, the automated system must adjust other activities as needed to ensure that constraints continue to be satisfied. Thus, the system must accommodate change in an interactive setting. Performance is of critical importance for interactive use. This is achieved by maintaining an underlying flexible solution to the temporal constraints, while the system presents a fixed schedule to the user. Adjustments are then a matter of constraint propagation rather than completely re-solving the problem. However, this begs the important question of which fixed schedule (among the ones sanctioned by the underlying flexible solution) should be presented to the user.Our approach uses least-change and other preferences as a prism through which the user views the flexible solution.

  7. A Survey of the Aircraft Maintenance Industry to Solicit Perceptions Regarding the Effectiveness of Recent Graduates of F.A.A. Approved Maintenance Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brian, Benjamin H.

    A study examined the perceptions of employers in the aircraft maintenance industry regarding the effectiveness of recent graduates of Federal Aeronautics Administration (FAA)-approved maintenance schools. Of the 100 employers who were contacted, 68 returned usable surveys. Based on responses, it was concluded that the views of employers in the…

  8. Exposure to fall hazards and safety climate in the aircraft maintenance industry.

    PubMed

    Neitzel, Richard L; Seixas, Noah S; Harris, Michael J; Camp, Janice

    2008-01-01

    Falls represent a significant occupational hazard, particularly in industries with dynamic work environments. This paper describes rates of noncompliance with fall hazard prevention requirements, perceived safety climate and worker knowledge and beliefs, and the association between fall exposure and safety climate measures in commercial aircraft maintenance activities. Walkthrough observations were conducted on aircraft mechanics at two participating facilities (Sites A and B) to ascertain the degree of noncompliance. Mechanics at each site completed questionnaires concerning fall hazard knowledge, personal safety beliefs, and safety climate. Questionnaire results were summarized into safety climate and belief scores by workgroup and site. Noncompliance rates observed during walkthroughs were compared to the climate-belief scores, and were expected to be inversely associated. Important differences were seen in fall safety performance between the sites. The study provided a characterization of aircraft maintenance fall hazards, and also demonstrated the effectiveness of an objective hazard assessment methodology. Noncompliance varied by height, equipment used, location of work on the aircraft, shift, and by safety system. Although the expected relationship between safety climate and noncompliance was seen for site-average climate scores, workgroups with higher safety climate scores had greater observed noncompliance within Site A. Overall, use of engineered safety systems had a significant impact on working safely, while safety beliefs and climate also contributed, though inconsistently. The results of this study indicate that safety systems are very important in reducing noncompliance with fall protection requirements in aircraft maintenance facilities. Site-level fall safety compliance was found to be related to safety climate, although an unexpected relationship between compliance and safety climate was seen at the workgroup level within site. Finally, observed

  9. Structural Aspects of Flexible Aircraft Control (les Aspects structuraux du controle actif et flexible des aeronefs)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-05-01

    Integrated Fin Design" AGARD Report 784 Integrated Design Analysis and Optimisation of Aircraft Structures [5] ASTROS THEORETICAL MANUAL 1-8 D.J...100 Volume III, February 1978). 10-9 6) Adamczak, D., "Combat Aircraft Synthesis Program", Internal AFRL User’s Manual February 1994. 7) Williams, J.E...and Vukelich, S.R., "The USAF Stability and Control Digital Datcom: Volume 1, User’s Manual ", AFFDL-TR-79-3032, April 1979. Williams, J.E., and

  10. A Performance Measurement System for the Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department Officer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-06-01

    Air Station or ship and performs intermediate level maintenance on aircraft remuovable V components such as engines, avionic ec•uipment, ejection...seats, etc. In resource management terminolcgy, a shore-based AIMD is Al a cost center of a Naval Air Station which is designated as a responsibility...parent Naval Air Station . Thus, the purpose of the management control process is to accomplish the stated organizational objectives, effectively and

  11. Depression Prevalence and Exposure to Organophosphate Esters in Aircraft Maintenance Workers.

    PubMed

    Hardos, Jennifer E; Whitehead, Lawrence W; Han, Inkyu; Ott, Darrin K; Waller, D Kim

    2016-08-01

    Previous studies found that aircraft maintenance workers may be exposed to organophosphates in hydraulic fluid and engine oil. Studies have also illustrated a link between long-term low-level organophosphate pesticide exposure and depression. A questionnaire containing the Patient Health Questionnaire 8 depression screener was e-mailed to 52,080 aircraft maintenance workers (with N = 4801 complete responses) in a cross-sectional study to determine prevalence and severity of depression and descriptions of their occupational exposures. There was no significant difference between reported depression prevalence and severity in similar exposure groups in which aircraft maintenance workers were exposed or may have been exposed to organophosphate esters compared to similar exposure groups in which they were not exposed. However, a dichotomous measure of the prevalence of depression was significantly associated with self-reported exposure levels from low (OR: 1.21) to moderate (OR: 1.68) to high exposure (OR: 2.70) and with each exposure route including contact (OR: 1.68), inhalation (OR: 2.52), and ingestion (OR: 2.55). A self-reported four-level measure of depression severity was also associated with a self-reported four-level measure of exposure. Based on self-reported exposures and outcomes, an association is observed between organophosphate exposure and depression; however, we cannot assume that the associations we observed are causal because some workers may have been more likely to report exposure to organophosphate esters and also more likely to report depression. Future studies should consider using a larger sample size, better methods for characterizing crew chief exposures, and bioassays to measure dose rather than exposure. Hardos JE, Whitehead LW, Han I, Ott DK, Waller DK. Depression prevalence and exposure to organophosphate esters in aircraft maintenance workers. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2016; 87(8):712-717.

  12. Development of a maintenance free lead acid battery for inertial navigation systems in large military aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.R.; Vutetakis, D.G.

    1995-07-01

    Historically, Aircraft Inertial Navigation System (INS) Batteries have utilized vented nickel-cadmium batteries for emergency DC power. The US Navy and Air Force developed separate systems during their respective INS Developments. The Navy contracted with Litton Industries to produce the LTN-72 and Air Force contracted with Delco to produce the Carousel IV INS for the large cargo and specialty aircraft applications. Over the years, a total of eight different battery national stock numbers (NSNs) have entered the stock system along with 75 battery spare part NSNs. The Standard Hardware Acquisition and Reliability Program is working with the Aircraft Battery Group at Naval Surface Warfare Center Crane Division, Naval Air Systems Command (AIR 536), Wright Laboratory, Battelle Memorial Institute, and Concorde Battery Corporation to produce a standard INS battery. This paper discusses the approach taken to determine whether the battery should be replaced and to select the replacement chemistry. The paper also discusses the battery requirements, aircraft that the battery is compatible with, and status of Navy flight evaluation. Projected savings in avoided maintenance in Navy and air Force INS Systems is projected to be $14.7 million per year with a manpower reduction of 153 maintenance personnel. The new INS battery is compatible with commercially sold INS systems which represents 66% of the systems sold.

  13. Maintenance-free lead acid battery for inertial navigation systems aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, William R.; Vutetakis, David G.

    1995-05-01

    Historically, Aircraft Inertial Navigation System (INS) Batteries have utilized vented nickel-cadmium batteries for emergency DC power. The United States Navy and Air Force developed separate systems during their respective INS developments. The Navy contracted with Litton Industries to produce the LTN-72 and Air Force contracted with Delco to produce the Carousel IV INS for the large cargo and specialty aircraft applications. Over the years, a total of eight different battery national stock numbers (NSNs) have entered the stock system along with 75 battery spare part NSNs. The Standard Hardware Acquisition and Reliability Program is working with the Aircraft Battery Group at Naval Surface Warfare Center Crane Division, Naval Air Systems Command (AIR 536), Wright Laboratory, Battelle Memorial Institute, and Concorde Battery Corporation to produce a standard INS battery. This paper discusses the approach taken to determine whether the battery should be replaced and to select the replacement chemistry. The paper also discusses the battery requirements, aircraft that the battery is compatible with, and status of Navy flight evaluation. Projected savings in avoided maintenance in Navy and Air Force INS Systems is projected to be $14.7 million per year with a manpower reduction of 153 maintenance personnel. The new INS battery is compatible with commercially sold INS systems which represents 66 percent of the systems sold.

  14. Fuzzy Model-based Pitch Stabilization and Wing Vibration Suppression of Flexible Wing Aircraft.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayoubi, Mohammad A.; Swei, Sean Shan-Min; Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a fuzzy nonlinear controller to regulate the longitudinal dynamics of an aircraft and suppress the bending and torsional vibrations of its flexible wings. The fuzzy controller utilizes full-state feedback with input constraint. First, the Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy linear model is developed which approximates the coupled aeroelastic aircraft model. Then, based on the fuzzy linear model, a fuzzy controller is developed to utilize a full-state feedback and stabilize the system while it satisfies the control input constraint. Linear matrix inequality (LMI) techniques are employed to solve the fuzzy control problem. Finally, the performance of the proposed controller is demonstrated on the NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM).

  15. The potential risk of communication media in conveying critical information in the aircraft maintenance organisation: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukri, S. Ahmad; Millar, R. M.; Gratton, G.; Garner, M.

    2016-10-01

    In the world of aircraft maintenance organisation, verbal and written communication plays a pivotal role in transferring critical information in relation to aircraft safety and efficiency. The communication media used to convey the critical information between departments at an aircraft maintenance organisation have potential risk in misunderstanding of the information. In this study, technical and non-technical personnel from five different departments at an aircraft maintenance organisation were interviewed on the communication media they normally utilised to communicate six different work procedures that are closely related to aircraft safety and efficiency. This is to discover which communication media pose higher risk in misunderstanding critical information. The findings reveal that written communication pose higher risk of misinterpretation compared with verbal communication when conveying critical information between departments.

  16. Blood lead level and types of aviation fuel in aircraft maintenance crew.

    PubMed

    Park, Won-Ju; Gu, Hye-Min; Lee, Suk-Ho

    2013-10-01

    This study inquired into any significant difference in blood lead levels (BLLs) among aircraft maintenance crews at the air-bases, each with a different aviation fuel in use, and confirmed an environmental impact of leaded aviation gasoline (AVGAS). This study included a total of 256 male aircraft maintenance personnel, among whom 105 used only AVGAS as their aviation fuel, while 151 used only jet propellant 8 (JP-8), a kerosene variety. BLLs were measured and the data on related factors were obtained. The arithmetic and geometric means of BLLs of the personnel at the airbases that used only AVGAS were 4.20 microg x dl(-1) and 4.01 microg x dl(-1) and that used only JP-8 were 3.79 microg x dl(-1) and 3.57 microg x dl(-1), respectively. The BLLs of the maintenance crew of the main workspace that was located within a 200-m distance from the runway were higher than those of the main workspace that was located 200 m or farther from the runway. The longer the work hours in the runway or the longer the work duration, the higher the BLLs of the maintenance crew. This investigation exposed the fact that a body's BLL could be increased by AVGAS emissions through the examination of aircraft maintenance crew. This result is in agreement with results of previous studies that suggest proximity to an airport may be associated with elevated BLLs for adults and children. Collectively, the results of the current study and previous research suggest that long-duration inhabitation and/or activities in close proximity to an air facility should be limited given that lead poses known health risks.

  17. Integrated modeling and control of flexible aircraft wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehr, Dagmara Anna

    Structural control for vibration reduction has important applications in many research areas, including the effect of earthquakes on buildings and aerodynamic forces on aircraft stability and performance. Both passive and active control techniques have been implemented, with the best solution usually involving a passive approach followed by an active one. This thesis presents an integrated modeling and controller design approach. Modal Cost Analysis (MCA) and Output Covariance Constraint (OCC) control are used to reduce a high-order aeroelastic wing model to establish the best controller for the reduced-order model, with a constraint on the covariance of the vibration outputs. MCA seeks to keep the modes that have the highest contribution to a given cost function. Using iterations on the two processes will allow a lower-order controller to be designed and result in the same performance. The OCC and MCA methods and their respective algorithms are presented, and an approach to integrate the two procedures is given. NASA's model used in this thesis is applied to the MCA and OCC algorithms using MATLAB. A 40 th-order wing model is derived. The model reduction technique initially reduces the system to a 12th order one. A simulation of the OCC algorithm is performed on the reduced-order model and applied to the full-order model. The controller resulting in the best closed-loop performance is shown to significantly reduce the vibrations due to wind. A corresponding weighting matrix used in OCC is then used for a second round of MCA to further reduce the model to an 8th order model. A lower-order controller designed for this second model is shown to similarly reduce the output vibrations.

  18. Depot Maintenance: Navy Has Revised Its Estimated Workforce Cost for Basing an Aircraft Carrier at Mayport, Florida (Briefing charts)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-03

    issues, the House report directed GAO to provide an assessment of the readiness and cost impacts of the aircraft carrier homeporting and maintenance...homeporting an aircraft carrier at Mayport warrant the production of an independent cost estimate—an industry and a government cost- estimating best...GAO-11-257R Depot Maintenance United States Government Accountability Office Washington, DC 20548 March 3, 2011

  19. The passing of the shift in aircraft maintenance - a task that produces deaths.

    PubMed

    Campos, Reginaldo; Martins, Edgard; Soares, Marcelo M

    2012-01-01

    Maintenance tasks, especially in heavy maintenance, may not be completed in a single shift. Aircraft maintenance technicians often take work in progress by colleagues, and spend the incomplete work for a change of team. The need for accuracy and efficiency of information transfer in many cases, without having time to have a meeting to pass the service is a crucial aspect of maintenance work. The ideal shift change can occur normally before delivery and continues to proceed normally after delivery. Although a shift change create challenges for communication, they also offer opportunities to detect and correct errors, where the task of delivery is an opportunity to identify the problem and fix it. In this case, the task was done correctly the first round, however, a problem began when the second round took. One example is a case in which the first round have removed a defective part for replacement and let the component of aircraft at end of turn with problems. Instead of ordering and installation of an operational component, the second round was then reinstall the faulty component, not realizing he had information about the problem attached.

  20. The passing of the shift in aircraft maintenance--a task that produces deaths.

    PubMed

    Campos, Reginaldo; Martins, Edgard; Soares, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    Maintenance tasks, especially in heavy maintenance, may not be completed in a single shift. Aircraft maintenance technicians often take work in progress by colleagues, and spend the incomplete work for a change of team. The need for accuracy and efficiency of information transfer in many cases, without having time to have a meeting to pass the service is a crucial aspect of maintenance work. The ideal shift change can occur normally before delivery and continues to proceed normally after delivery. Although a shift change create challenges for communication, they also offer opportunities to detect and correct errors, where the task of delivery is an opportunity to identify the problem and fix it. In this case, the task was done correctly the first round, however, a problem began when the second round took. One example is a case in which the first round have removed a defective part for replacement and let the component of aircraft at end of turn with problems. Instead of ordering and installation of an operational component, the second round was then reinstall the faulty component, not realizing he had information about the problem attached.

  1. Influence of landing gear flexibility on aircraft performance during ground roll

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivaramakrishnan, M. M.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis is made of the influence of landing gear deflection characteristics on aircraft performance on the ground up to rotation. A quasi-steady dynamic equilibrium state is assumed, including other simplifying assumptions such as calm air conditions and normal aircraft lift and drag. Ground incidence is defined as the angle made by the mean aerodynamic chord of the wing with respect to the ground plane, and equations are given for force and balance which determine the quasi-equilibrium conditions for the aircraft during ground roll. Results indicate that the landing gear deflections lead to a substantial increase in the angle of attack, and the variation in the ground incidence due to landing gear flexibility could be as much as + or - 50%, and the reduction in tail load requirements almost 25%.

  2. Treatment outcome for flexible dosing buprenorphine maintenance treatment.

    PubMed

    Fareed, Ayman; Vayalapalli, Sreedevi; Casarella, Jennifer; Drexler, Karen

    2012-03-01

    Achieving the best treatment outcome with the least cost should be the goal for buprenorphine office-based treatment. We conducted an observational retrospective chart review to compare the treatment outcome for patients (n = 56) receiving high dose of buprenorphine (above 16 mg daily) and patients (n = 21) receiving moderate doses (8-16 mg daily). The percentages of the first four urine drug screens (UDS) positive for opiates were significantly higher for the high-dose group than for the moderate-dose group (F = 7.93, df = 7, p < .0001). However, the percentages of the most recent four UDS positive for opiates were not statistically significant (F = .62, df = 7, p = .74). The difference in the percentages of the first and last UDS for the high-dose group showed significant reduction from admission to most recently but there was no significant difference for the moderate-dose group (t = 3.1, df = 105, p = .002 for the high-dose group and t = 1.1, df = 40, p = .27 for the moderate-dose group). Using flexible buprenorphine dosing schedule with the option of titrating the dose up to 32 mg daily may offer better treatment outcome for patients who would not respond to the lower dose range.

  3. Static Aeroelastic and Longitudinal Trim Model of Flexible Wing Aircraft Using Finite-Element Vortex-Lattice Coupled Solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, Eric; Nguyen, Nhan; Trinh, Khanh

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a static aeroelastic model and longitudinal trim model for the analysis of a flexible wing transport aircraft. The static aeroelastic model is built using a structural model based on finite-element modeling and coupled to an aerodynamic model that uses vortex-lattice solution. An automatic geometry generation tool is used to close the loop between the structural and aerodynamic models. The aeroelastic model is extended for the development of a three degree-of-freedom longitudinal trim model for an aircraft with flexible wings. The resulting flexible aircraft longitudinal trim model is used to simultaneously compute the static aeroelastic shape for the aircraft model and the longitudinal state inputs to maintain an aircraft trim state. The framework is applied to an aircraft model based on the NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM) with wing structures allowed to flexibly deformed referred to as the Elastically Shaped Aircraft Concept (ESAC). The ESAC wing mass and stiffness properties are based on a baseline "stiff" values representative of current generation transport aircraft.

  4. Flexible twist for pitch control in a high altitude long endurance aircraft with nonlinear response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, Vanessa L.

    Information dominance is the key motivator for employing high-altitude long-endurance (HALE) aircraft to provide continuous coverage in the theaters of operation. A joined-wing configuration of such a craft gives the advantage of a platform for higher resolution sensors. Design challenges emerge with structural flexibility that arise from a long-endurance aircraft design. The goal of this research was to demonstrate that scaling the nonlinear response of a full-scale finite element model was possible if the model was aeroelastically and "nonlinearly" scaled. The research within this dissertation showed that using the first three modes and the first bucking modes was not sufficient for proper scaling. In addition to analytical scaling several experiments were accomplished to understand and overcome design challenges of HALE aircraft. One such challenge is combated by eliminating pitch control surfaces and replacing them with an aft-wing twist concept. This design option was physically realized through wind tunnel measurement of forces, moments and pressures on a subscale experimental model. This design and experiment demonstrated that pitch control with aft-wing twist is feasible. Another challenge is predicting the nonlinear response of long-endurance aircraft. This was addressed by experimental validation of modeling nonlinear response on a subscale experimental model. It is important to be able to scale nonlinear behavior in this type of craft due to its highly flexible nature. The validation accomplished during this experiment on a subscale model will reduce technical risk for full-scale development of such pioneering craft. It is also important to experimentally reproduce the air loads following the wing as it deforms. Nonlinearities can be attributed to these follower forces that might otherwise be overlooked. This was found to be a significant influence in HALE aircraft to include the case study of the FEM and experimental models herein.

  5. The Design of a Prototype Personal Computer Database for the Expert System Advisor for Aircraft Maintenance Scheduling (ESAAMS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    The Expert System Advisor for Aircraft Maintenance Scheduling (ESAAMS) was originally proposed in 1985 to assist in the scheduling of maintenance...critical maintenance decision making process. This theis addresses the design of the ESAAMS database which is of paramount importance to the expert ... system . Research on the use of the Naval Aviation Logistics Data Analysis (NALDA) database for a personal computer-based database, is documented. Review of

  6. Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    Company, Washington, DC Boeing Commercial Aircraft Division, Seattle, WA and Long Beach, CA Boeing Military Aircraft and Missile Division, St. Louis, MO and... aircraft ; military fixed-wing aircraft ; rotorcraft (helicopters and tiltrotor aircraft ); and aircraft jet engines. Two companies dominate the commercial... aircraft business, Boeing and Airbus. Four companies dominate the military fixed-wing market, Boeing, Lockheed Martin, BAE Systems, and European

  7. The adaptation of sustainable biojet fuels and its effect on aircraft engine maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd Noh, H.; Rodrigo, G. A.; Rahman, N. A. Abdul

    2016-10-01

    Aviation industries are looking into several resources for renewable and sustainable energy. Among those attention is focused in biojet fuel. This paper engages the issue of biojet fuel emissions that increase the environmental concern in the air transport sector. The paper presents the use of biojet fuel and its effect on aircraft engine maintenance through preliminary data collections, and a review of its development process in operations for time and goal. As conclusion, airlines management needs to adapt and adopt the transition to alternative fuels, especially given the global biofuel trend emerging due to the authority approval.

  8. An Overview of Modifications Applied to a Turbulence Response Analysis Method for Flexible Aircraft Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, Christie J.

    2013-01-01

    A software program and associated methodology to study gust loading on aircraft exists for a classification of geometrically simplified flexible configurations. This program consists of a simple aircraft response model with two rigid and three flexible symmetric degrees of freedom and allows for the calculation of various airplane responses due to a discrete one-minus-cosine gust as well as continuous turbulence. Simplifications, assumptions, and opportunities for potential improvements pertaining to the existing software program are first identified, then a revised version of the original software tool is developed with improved methodology to include more complex geometries, additional excitation cases, and output data so as to provide a more useful and accurate tool for gust load analysis. Revisions are made in the categories of aircraft geometry, computation of aerodynamic forces and moments, and implementation of horizontal tail mode shapes. In order to improve the original software program to enhance usefulness, a wing control surface and horizontal tail control surface is added, an extended application of the discrete one-minus-cosine gust input is employed, a supplemental continuous turbulence spectrum is implemented, and a capability to animate the total vehicle deformation response to gust inputs in included. These revisions and enhancements are implemented and an analysis of the results is used to validate the modifications.

  9. Statistical estimation of service cracks and maintenance cost for aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, J.-N.

    1975-01-01

    A method is developed for the statistical estimation of the number of cracks to be repaired in service as well as the repair and the maintenance costs. The present approach accounts for the statistical distribution of the initial crack size, the statistical nature of the NDI technique used for detecting the crack, and the renewal process for the crack propagation of repaired cracks. The mean and the standard deviation of the cumulative number of cracks to be repaired are computed as a function of service time. The statistics of the costs of repair and maintenance, expressed in terms of the percentage of the cost of replacement, are estimated as a function of service time. The results of the present study provide relevant information for the decision of fleet management, the estimation of life cycle cost, and procurement specifications. The present study is essential to the design and cost optimization of aircraft structures.

  10. Statistical estimation of service cracks and maintenance cost for aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, J.-N.

    1975-01-01

    A method is developed for the statistical estimation of the number of cracks to be repaired in service as well as the repair and the maintenance costs. The present approach accounts for the statistical distribution of the initial crack size, the statistical nature of the NDI technique used for detecting the crack, and the renewal process for the crack propagation of repaired cracks. The mean and the standard deviation of the cumulative number of cracks to be repaired are computed as a function of service time. The statistics of the costs of repair and maintenance, expressed in terms of the percentage of the cost of replacement, are estimated as a function of service time. The results of the present study provide relevant information for the decision of fleet management, the estimation of life cycle cost, and procurement specifications. The present study is essential to the design and cost optimization of aircraft structures.

  11. Integrated Approach to the Dynamics and Control of Maneuvering Flexible Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, Martin R. (Technical Monitor); Meirovitch, Leonard; Tuzcu, Ilhan

    2003-01-01

    This work uses a fundamental approach to the problem of simulating the flight of flexible aircraft. To this end, it integrates into a single formulation the pertinent disciplines, namely, analytical dynamics, structural dynamics, aerodynamics, and controls. It considers both the rigid body motions of the aircraft, three translations (forward motion, sideslip and plunge) and three rotations (roll, pitch and yaw), and the elastic deformations of every point of the aircraft, as well as the aerodynamic, propulsion, gravity and control forces. The equations of motion are expressed in a form ideally suited for computer processing. A perturbation approach yields a flight dynamics problem for the motions of a quasi-rigid aircraft and an 'extended aeroelasticity' problem for the elastic deformations and perturbations in the rigid body motions, with the solution of the first problem entering as an input into the second problem. The control forces for the flight dynamics problem are obtained by an 'inverse' process and the feedback controls for the extended aeroservoelasticity problem are determined by the LQG theory. A numerical example presents time simulations of rigid body perturbations and elastic deformations about 1) a steady level flight and 2) a level steady turn maneuver.

  12. FCAP - A new tool for the evaluation of active control technology. [Flight Control Analysis Program for flexible aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, R. B.; Morino, L.

    1975-01-01

    A computer program has been developed for the evaluation of flight control systems designed for flexible aircraft. This Flight Control Analysis Program (FCAP) is designed in a modular fashion to incorporate sensor, actuator, and control logic element dynamics as well as aircraft dynamics and aerodynamics for complex configurations. Formulation of the total aircraft dynamic system is accomplished in matrix form by casting the equations in state vector format. The system stability and performance are determined in either the frequency or time domain using classical analysis techniques. The aerodynamic method used also permits evaluation of the flutter characteristics of the aircraft.

  13. Exposure of aircraft maintenance technicians to organophosphates from hydraulic fluids and turbine oils: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Birgit Karin; Koslitz, Stephan; Weiss, Tobias; Broding, Horst Christoph; Brüning, Thomas; Bünger, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Hydraulic fluids and turbine oils contain organophosphates like tricresyl phosphate isomers, triphenyl phosphate and tributyl phosphate from very small up to high percentages. The aim of this pilot study was to determine if aircraft maintenance technicians are exposed to relevant amounts of organophosphates. Dialkyl and diaryl phosphate metabolites of seven organophosphates were quantified in pre- and post-shift spot urine samples of technicians (N=5) by GC-MS/MS after solid phase extraction and derivatization. Pre- and post shift values of tributyl phosphate metabolites (dibutyl phosphate (DBP): median pre-shift: 12.5 μg/L, post-shift: 23.5 μg/L) and triphenyl phosphate metabolites (diphenyl phosphate (DPP): median pre-shift: 2.9 μg/L, post-shift: 3.5 μg/L) were statistically higher than in a control group from the general population (median DBP: <0.25 μg/L, median DPP: 0.5 μg/L). No tricresyl phosphate metabolites were detected. The aircraft maintenance technicians were occupationally exposed to tributyl and triphenyl phosphate but not to tricresyl phosphate, tri-(2-chloroethyl)- and tri-(2-chloropropyl)-phosphate. Further studies are necessary to collect information on sources, routes of uptake and varying exposures during different work tasks, evaluate possible health effects and to set up appropriate protective measures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Musculoskeletal disorders and psychosocial risk factors among workers of the aircraft maintenance industry.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Helen Cristina; Diniz, Ana Carolina Parise; Barbieri, Dechristian França; Padula, Rosimeire Simprini; Carregaro, Rodrigo Luiz; de Oliveira, Ana Beatriz

    2012-01-01

    During the recent decades Brazil has experienced an exponential growth in the aviation sector resulting in an increasing workforce. The aircraft maintenance industry stands out, where the workers have to handle different kind of objects. The aim of this study was to evaluate psychosocial indicators as well as musculoskeletal symptoms and disorders among aircraft maintenance workers. One hundred and one employees were evaluated (32.69 ± 8.25 yr, 79.8 ± 13.4 kg, and 1.75 ± 0.07 m). Musculoskeletal symptoms and disorders were assessed through the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ) and a standardized physical examination. The Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ) and the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES) were applied to evaluate psychosocial indicators. Results of the NMQ indicate the lower back as the most affected body region. On the other hand, the physical examination has shown clinical diagnosis of shoulder disorders. Neck, upper back and ankle/foot were also reported as painful sites. Most of workers have active work-demand profile and high work engagement levels. We suggest that musculoskeletal symptoms may be related to high biomechanical demand of the tasks performed by workers, what must be further investigated.

  15. A modal analysis of flexible aircraft dynamics with handling qualities implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, D. K.

    1983-01-01

    A multivariable modal analysis technique is presented for evaluating flexible aircraft dynamics, focusing on meaningful vehicle responses to pilot inputs and atmospheric turbulence. Although modal analysis is the tool, vehicle time response is emphasized, and the analysis is performed on the linear, time-domain vehicle model. In evaluating previously obtained experimental pitch tracking data for a family of vehicle dynamic models, it is shown that flexible aeroelastic effects can significantly affect pitch attitude handling qualities. Consideration of the eigenvalues alone, of both rigid-body and aeroelastic modes, does not explain the simulation results. Modal analysis revealed, however, that although the lowest aeroelastic mode frequency was still three times greater than the short-period frequency, the rigid-body attitude response was dominated by this aeroelastic mode. This dominance was defined in terms of the relative magnitudes of the modal residues in selected vehicle responses.

  16. A modal analysis of flexible aircraft dynamics with handling qualities implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, D. K.

    1983-01-01

    A multivariable modal analysis technique is presented for evaluating flexible aircraft dynamics, focusing on meaningful vehicle responses to pilot inputs and atmospheric turbulence. Although modal analysis is the tool, vehicle time response is emphasized, and the analysis is performed on the linear, time-domain vehicle model. In evaluating previously obtained experimental pitch tracking data for a family of vehicle dynamic models, it is shown that flexible aeroelastic effects can significantly affect pitch attitude handling qualities. Consideration of the eigenvalues alone, of both rigid-body and aeroelastic modes, does not explain the simulation results. Modal analysis revealed, however, that although the lowest aeroelastic mode frequency was still three times greater than the short-period frequency, the rigid-body attitude response was dominated by this aeroelastic mode. This dominance was defined in terms of the relative magnitudes of the modal residues in selected vehicle responses.

  17. Maintenance problems associated with the operation of the F402 /Pegasus/ engine in the AV-8A /Harrier/ aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, C. W.; Hood, W. E.

    1981-01-01

    The U.S. Marine Corp (USMC) has been operating the only V/STOL attack aircraft in the western world since 1971. Some of the maintenance problems experienced are related to the unique V/STOL design criteria of the Pegasus engine. However, the major part of the required maintenance effort is found to involve the more conventional engine problems. A description of the aircraft engine is provided and the problems resulting from V/STOL design demands are examined. Attention is given to the fuel system control, the engine air bleed, foreign object damage to the hp compressor, and the engine exhaust system.

  18. A Summary of Revisions Applied to a Turbulence Response Analysis Method for Flexible Aircraft Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, Christie J.; Perry, Boyd, III; Silva, Walter A.; Newman, Brett

    2014-01-01

    A software program and associated methodology to study gust loading on aircraft exists for a classification of geometrically simplified flexible configurations. This program consists of a simple aircraft response model with two rigid and three flexible symmetric degrees-of - freedom and allows for the calculation of various airplane responses due to a discrete one-minus- cosine gust as well as continuous turbulence. Simplifications, assumptions, and opportunities for potential improvements pertaining to the existing software program are first identified, then a revised version of the original software tool is developed with improved methodology to include more complex geometries, additional excitation cases, and additional output data so as to provide a more useful and precise tool for gust load analysis. In order to improve the original software program to enhance usefulness, a wing control surface and horizontal tail control surface is added, an extended application of the discrete one-minus-cosine gust input is employed, a supplemental continuous turbulence spectrum is implemented, and a capability to animate the total vehicle deformation response to gust inputs is included. These revisions and enhancements are implemented and an analysis of the results is used to validate the modifications.

  19. An observed relationship between vestibular function and auditory thresholds in aircraft-maintenance workers.

    PubMed

    Guest, Maya; Boggess, May; D'Este, Catherine; Attia, John; Brown, Anthony

    2011-02-01

    We sought to examine the vestibular function and whether an association exists between vestibular function and hearing thresholds in a group of military aircraft-maintenance workers with exposures to high levels of noise and organic solvents, relative to two different comparison groups. Vestibular function (using functional reach) and hearing (with pure-tone audiometry) were assessed in 601 exposed personnel, compared with two unexposed groups (500 technical trade and 391 nontrade). Linear regression model showed that functional reach was slightly better for the comparison groups than the exposed group, with only one group being statistically significant, and there was a significant association between vestibular function and auditory thresholds at 500 and 1000 Hz. This study has demonstrated a relationship between low-frequency hearing loss, vestibular dysfunction, anxiety, and depression in an occupational population.

  20. 22 CFR 151.11 - Notification of ownership, maintenance or use of vessel and/or aircraft; evidence of insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Notification of ownership, maintenance or use of vessel and/or aircraft; evidence of insurance. 151.11 Section 151.11 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE DIPLOMATIC PRIVILEGES AND IMMUNITIES COMPULSORY LIABILITY INSURANCE FOR DIPLOMATIC...

  1. 22 CFR 151.11 - Notification of ownership, maintenance or use of vessel and/or aircraft; evidence of insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Notification of ownership, maintenance or use of vessel and/or aircraft; evidence of insurance. 151.11 Section 151.11 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE DIPLOMATIC PRIVILEGES AND IMMUNITIES COMPULSORY LIABILITY INSURANCE FOR DIPLOMATIC...

  2. 22 CFR 151.11 - Notification of ownership, maintenance or use of vessel and/or aircraft; evidence of insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Notification of ownership, maintenance or use of vessel and/or aircraft; evidence of insurance. 151.11 Section 151.11 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE DIPLOMATIC PRIVILEGES AND IMMUNITIES COMPULSORY LIABILITY INSURANCE FOR DIPLOMATIC...

  3. Validation of an Active Gear, Flexible Aircraft Take-off and Landing analysis (AGFATL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgehee, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    The results of an analytical investigation using a computer program for active gear, flexible aircraft take off and landing analysis (AGFATL) are compared with experimental data from shaker tests, drop tests, and simulated landing tests to validate the AGFATL computer program. Comparison of experimental and analytical responses for both passive and active gears indicates good agreement for shaker tests and drop tests. For the simulated landing tests, the passive and active gears were influenced by large strut binding friction forces. The inclusion of these undefined forces in the analytical simulations was difficult, and consequently only fair to good agreement was obtained. An assessment of the results from the investigation indicates that the AGFATL computer program is a valid tool for the study and initial design of series hydraulic active control landing gear systems.

  4. Piloted Simulation Assessment of the Impact of Flexible Structures on Handling Qualities of Generic Supersonic Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stringer, Mary T.; Cowen, Brandon; Hoffler, Keith D.; Couch, Jesse C.; Ogburn, Marilyn E.; Diebler, Corey G.

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center Cockpit Motion Facility (CMF) was used to conduct a piloted simulation assessment of the impact of flexible structures on flying qualities. The CMF was used because of its relatively high bandwidth, six degree-of-freedom motion capability. Previous studies assessed and attempted to mitigate the effects of multiple dynamic aeroservoelastic modes (DASE). Those results indicated problems existed, but the specific cause and effect was difficult to ascertain. The goal of this study was to identify specific DASE frequencies, damping ratios, and gains that cause degradation in handling qualities. A generic aircraft simulation was developed and designed to have Cooper-Harper Level 1 handling qualities when flown without DASE models. A test matrix of thirty-six DASE modes was implemented. The modes had frequencies ranging from 1 to 3.5 Hz and were applied to each axis independently. Each mode consisted of a single axis, frequency, damping, and gain, and was evaluated individually by six subject pilots with test pilot backgrounds. Analysis completed to date suggests that a number of the DASE models evaluated degrade the handling qualities of this class of aircraft to an uncontrollable condition.

  5. Validation of a Flexible Aircraft TakeOff and Landing Analysis /FATOLA/ computer program using flight landing data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carden, H. D.; Mcgehee, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    A multiple-degree-of-freedom takeoff and landing analysis, Flexible Aircraft TakeOff and Landing Analysis computer program (FATOLA), was used to predict the landing behavior of a rigid-body X-24B reentry research vehicle and of a flexible-body modified-delta-wing supersonic YF-12 research aircraft. The analytical predictions were compared with flight test data for both research vehicles. Predicted time histories of vehicle motion and attitude, landing-gear strut stroke, and axial force transmitted from the landing gear to the airframe during the landing impact and rollout compared well with the actual time histories. Based on the comparisons presented, the versatility and validity of the FATOLA program for predicting landing dynamics of aircraft has been demonstrated.

  6. Architecture and Key Techniques of Augmented Reality Maintenance Guiding System for Civil Aircrafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    hong, Zhou; Wenhua, Lu

    2017-01-01

    Augmented reality technology is introduced into the maintenance related field for strengthened information in real-world scenarios through integration of virtual assistant maintenance information with real-world scenarios. This can lower the difficulty of maintenance, reduce maintenance errors, and improve the maintenance efficiency and quality of civil aviation crews. Architecture of augmented reality virtual maintenance guiding system is proposed on the basis of introducing the definition of augmented reality and analyzing the characteristics of augmented reality virtual maintenance. Key techniques involved, such as standardization and organization of maintenance data, 3D registration, modeling of maintenance guidance information and virtual maintenance man-machine interaction, are elaborated emphatically, and solutions are given.

  7. A framework for the design of a voice-activated, intelligent, and hypermedia-based aircraft maintenance manual

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patankar, Manoj Shashikant

    Federal Aviation Regulations require Aviation Maintenance Technicians (AMTs) to refer to approved maintenance manuals when performing maintenance on airworthy aircraft. Because these manuals are paper-based, larger the size of the aircraft, more cumbersome are the manuals. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) recognized the difficulties associated with the use of large manuals and conducted studies on the use of electronic media as an alternative to the traditional paper format. However, these techniques do not employ any artificial intelligence technologies and the user interface is limited to either a keyboard or a stylus pen. The primary emphasis of this research was to design a generic framework that would allow future development of voice-activated, intelligent, and hypermedia-based aircraft maintenance manuals. A prototype (VIHAMS-Voice-activated, Intelligent, and Hypermedia-based Aircraft Maintenance System) was developed, as a secondary emphasis, using the design and development techniques that evolved from this research. An evolutionary software design approach was used to design the proposed framework and the structured rapid prototyping technique was used to produce the VIHAMS prototype. VoiceAssist by Creative Labs was used to provide the voice interface so that the users (AMTs) could keep their hands free to work on the aircraft while maintaining complete control over the computer through discrete voice commands. KnowledgePro for Windows sp{TM}, an expert system shell, provided "intelligence" to the prototype. As a result of this intelligence, the system provided expert guidance to the user. The core information contained in conventional manuals was available in a hypermedia format. The prototype's operating hardware included a notebook computer with a fully functional audio system. An external microphone and the built-in speaker served as the input and output devices (along with the color monitor), respectively. Federal Aviation Administration

  8. Male reproductive effects of solvent and fuel exposure during aircraft maintenance.

    PubMed

    Lemasters, G K; Olsen, D M; Yiin, J H; Lockey, J E; Shukla, R; Selevan, S G; Schrader, S M; Toth, G P; Evenson, D P; Huszar, G B

    1999-01-01

    Few studies have addressed the effects of mixed, low-level exposures to complex mixtures on a man's reproductive potential. In this prospective study, each subject was evaluated before first exposure and at 15 and 30 weeks after exposures had begun. A total of 50 men working on aircraft maintenance at an Air Force installation were included in the study. In addition, eight unexposed men were concurrently sampled. Industrial hygiene (IH) sampling and expired breath samples were collected for jet fuel as measured by total napthas, benzene--a component of jet fuel, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, methyl ethyl ketone, xylenes, toluene, and methylene chloride. Sperm production, structure, and function (sperm concentration, sperm motion, viability, morphology, morphometrics, and stability of sperm chromatin) were evaluated. Exposures were low. All mean IH measures were below 6 ppm, which is less than 10% of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration standard for all chemicals except benzene. Sheet metal workers had the highest mean breath levels for both total solvents (24 ppb) and fuels (28.3 ppb). For most sperm measures, mean values remained in the normal range throughout the 30 weeks of exposure. When jobs were analyzed by exposure groups, some adverse changes were observed. The paint shop group had a significant decline in motility of 19.5% at 30 weeks. Internal dose measures, however, did not show a significant association with spermatogenic changes.

  9. A maintenance model for k-out-of-n subsystems aboard a fleet of advanced commercial aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    Proposed highly reliable fault-tolerant reconfigurable digital control systems for a future generation of commercial aircraft consist of several k-out-of-n subsystems. Each of these flight-critical subsystems will consist of n identical components, k of which must be functioning properly in order for the aircraft to be dispatched. Failed components are recoverable; they are repaired in a shop. Spares are inventoried at a main base where they may be substituted for failed components on planes during layovers. Penalties are assessed when failure of a k-out-of-n subsystem causes a dispatch cancellation or delay. A maintenance model for a fleet of aircraft with such control systems is presented. The goals are to demonstrate economic feasibility and to optimize.

  10. Physical Performance Characteristics of Military Aircraft Maintenance Personnel Resistant to Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders of the Hand and Wrist

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    development of guidelines to maintain upper extremity health and prevent injury in future aircraft maintainers. 19 CHAPTER 3 METHODS The Human Investigation...Pegboard Test in assessing patients after traumatic hand injury . WORK: A Journal of Prevention , Assessment & Rehabilitation, 11(3), 315-320. Spijkerman, D...at the wrist and another 23% at the hand and fingers. Upper extremity injuries or illnesses accounted for 29% of the lost workdays for maintenance

  11. 14 CFR 43.3 - Persons authorized to perform maintenance, preventive maintenance, rebuilding, and alterations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE, PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE, REBUILDING, AND... maintain, rebuild, alter, or perform preventive maintenance on an aircraft, airframe, aircraft engine... under part 61 may perform preventive maintenance on any aircraft owned or operated by that pilot which...

  12. Genotoxic changes after low-level solvent and fuel exposure on aircraft maintenance personnel.

    PubMed

    Lemasters, G K; Livingston, G K; Lockey, J E; Olsen, D M; Shukla, R; New, G; Selevan, S G; Yiin, J H

    1997-07-01

    Individuals may be exposed to solvent mixtures and fuel either at work or home, through air, water and food contamination. Few studies have addressed the genotoxic effects of mixed, low-level exposure to fuel and solvent. This was an optimally designed study where each subject was sampled prior to exposure and after 15 and 30 weeks while exposed, in a repeated measures design with each subject serving as his own control. Fifty men aged between 18 and 50, working on aircraft equipment operation and maintenance at a military installation were included. Eight unexposed men were concurrently sampled. Sister-chromatid exchanges (SCE) and micronuclei (MN) frequency were measured in conjunction with air sampling and expired breath analysis for jet fuel (JP-4), 1,1,1-trichloroethane, methyl ethyl ketone, xylenes, toluene and methylene chloride. Exposure levels measured by industrial hygiene were very low (all means <6 p.p.m.), <10% of the OSHA standard. Expired breath levels were also low, <25 p.p.b. A small but statistically significant increase in the frequency of SCE occurred after 30 weeks of exposure for sheet metal workers (P = 0.003) and for painters (P = 0.05). The MN frequency in the sheet metal workers initially showed a statistically significant increase, but by 30 weeks had decreased. Cigarette smoking, alcohol and caffeine use were not associated with changes from baseline for either MN or SCE. Smokers, however, had significantly higher values of SCEs at baseline than did nonsmokers. In summary, these findings suggest that small increases in SCEs in particular, may serve as a sensitive biologic indicator of low level hydrocarbon exposure in as much as statistically significant changes occurred in the highest exposed groups but not in the low or no exposure groups. Chance occurrence or exposures to other occupational or non-occupational agents cannot be eliminated as a cause of the study findings.

  13. The effect of low versus high approach-motivated positive affect on the balance between maintenance and flexibility.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liting; Xu, Baihua

    2016-05-27

    Successful goal-directed behavior in a constantly changing environment requires a balance between maintenance and flexibility. Although some studies have found that positive affect influences this balance differently than neutral affect, one recent study found that motivational intensity of positive affective states influences this balance in a cognitive set-shifting paradigm. However, working memory updating and set shifting are interrelated but distinct components of cognitive control. The present study examined the effect of low versus high approach-motivated positive affect on the balance between maintenance and flexibility in working memory. A simple cuing paradigm (the AX Continuous Performance Task) was employed, and neutral affect and high and low approach-motivated positive affect were induced using affective pictures. The results revealed that, relative to neutral affect, low approach-motivated positive affect attenuated maintenance and increased flexibility, whereas high approach-motivated positive affect promoted maintenance and decreased flexibility. These findings offer further evidence that the effects of positive affect on cognitive control are modulated by approach motivational intensity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The Effect of Functional Flow Diagrams on the Technical System Understanding of Apprentice Aircraft Maintenance Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Scott D.; Satchwell, Richard E.

    A quasiexperimental study involved 18 male students enrolled in an aircraft systems course at the University of Illinois. The control group of 10 students studied 39 schematic diagrams of aircraft systems. The treatment group of eight students studied the same schematic diagrams plus conceptual diagrams of the systems. Otherwise, the instruction…

  15. Integrated Flight/Structural Mode Control for Very Flexible Aircraft Using L1 Adaptive Output Feedback Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Che, Jiaxing; Cao, Chengyu; Gregory, Irene M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores application of adaptive control architecture to a light, high-aspect ratio, flexible aircraft configuration that exhibits strong rigid body/flexible mode coupling. Specifically, an L(sub 1) adaptive output feedback controller is developed for a semi-span wind tunnel model capable of motion. The wind tunnel mount allows the semi-span model to translate vertically and pitch at the wing root, resulting in better simulation of an aircraft s rigid body motion. The control objective is to design a pitch control with altitude hold while suppressing body freedom flutter. The controller is an output feedback nominal controller (LQG) augmented by an L(sub 1) adaptive loop. A modification to the L(sub 1) output feedback is proposed to make it more suitable for flexible structures. The new control law relaxes the required bounds on the unmatched uncertainty and allows dependence on the state as well as time, i.e. a more general unmatched nonlinearity. The paper presents controller development and simulated performance responses. Simulation is conducted by using full state flexible wing models derived from test data at 10 different dynamic pressure conditions. An L(sub 1) adaptive output feedback controller is designed for a single test point and is then applied to all the test cases. The simulation results show that the L(sub 1) augmented controller can stabilize and meet the performance requirements for all 10 test conditions ranging from 30 psf to 130 psf dynamic pressure.

  16. Aircraft

    DOEpatents

    Hibbs, Bart D.; Lissaman, Peter B. S.; Morgan, Walter R.; Radkey, Robert L.

    1998-01-01

    This disclosure provides a solar rechargeable aircraft that is inexpensive to produce, is steerable, and can remain airborne almost indefinitely. The preferred aircraft is a span-loaded flying wing, having no fuselage or rudder. Travelling at relatively slow speeds, and having a two-hundred foot wingspan that mounts photovoltaic cells on most all of the wing's top surface, the aircraft uses only differential thrust of its eight propellers to turn. Each of five sections of the wing has one or more engines and photovoltaic arrays, and produces its own lift independent of the other sections, to avoid loading them. Five two-sided photovoltaic arrays, in all, are mounted on the wing, and receive photovoltaic energy both incident on top of the wing, and which is incident also from below, through a bottom, transparent surface. The aircraft is capable of a top speed of about ninety miles per hour, which enables the aircraft to attain and can continuously maintain altitudes of up to sixty-five thousand feet. Regenerative fuel cells in the wing store excess electricity for use at night, such that the aircraft can sustain its elevation indefinitely. A main spar of the wing doubles as a pressure vessel that houses hydrogen and oxygen gasses for use in the regenerative fuel cell. The aircraft has a wide variety of applications, which include weather monitoring and atmospheric testing, communications, surveillance, and other applications as well.

  17. Aircraft

    DOEpatents

    Hibbs, B.D.; Lissaman, P.B.S.; Morgan, W.R.; Radkey, R.L.

    1998-09-22

    This disclosure provides a solar rechargeable aircraft that is inexpensive to produce, is steerable, and can remain airborne almost indefinitely. The preferred aircraft is a span-loaded flying wing, having no fuselage or rudder. Travelling at relatively slow speeds, and having a two-hundred foot wingspan that mounts photovoltaic cells on most all of the wing`s top surface, the aircraft uses only differential thrust of its eight propellers to turn. Each of five sections of the wing has one or more engines and photovoltaic arrays, and produces its own lift independent of the other sections, to avoid loading them. Five two-sided photovoltaic arrays, in all, are mounted on the wing, and receive photovoltaic energy both incident on top of the wing, and which is incident also from below, through a bottom, transparent surface. The aircraft is capable of a top speed of about ninety miles per hour, which enables the aircraft to attain and can continuously maintain altitudes of up to sixty-five thousand feet. Regenerative fuel cells in the wing store excess electricity for use at night, such that the aircraft can sustain its elevation indefinitely. A main spar of the wing doubles as a pressure vessel that houses hydrogen and oxygen gases for use in the regenerative fuel cell. The aircraft has a wide variety of applications, which include weather monitoring and atmospheric testing, communications, surveillance, and other applications as well. 31 figs.

  18. Retrospective cohort mortality study of workers at an aircraft maintenance facility. I. Epidemiological results.

    PubMed

    Spirtas, R; Stewart, P A; Lee, J S; Marano, D E; Forbes, C D; Grauman, D J; Pettigrew, H M; Blair, A; Hoover, R N; Cohen, J L

    1991-08-01

    A retrospective cohort study of 14,457 workers at an aircraft maintenance facility was undertaken to evaluate mortality associated with exposures in their workplace. The purpose was to determine whether working with solvents, particularly trichloroethylene, posed any excess risk of mortality. The study group consisted of all civilian employees who worked for at least one year at Hill Air Force Base, Utah, between 1 January 1952 and 31 December 1956. Work histories were obtained from records at the National Personnel Records Centre, St. Louis, Missouri, and the cohort was followed up for ascertainment of vital state until 31 December 1982. Observed deaths among white people were compared with the expected number of deaths, based on the Utah white population, and adjusted for age, sex, and calendar period. Significant deficits occurred for mortality from all causes (SMR 92, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 90-95), all malignant neoplasms (SMR 90, 95% CI 83-97), ischaemic heart disease (SMR 93, 95% CI 88-98), non-malignant respiratory disease (SMR 87, 95% CI 76-98), and accidents (SMR 61, 95% CI 52-70). Mortality was raised for multiple myeloma (MM) in white women (SMR 236, 95% CI 87-514), non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) in white women (SMR 212, 95% CI 102-390), and cancer of the biliary passages and liver in white men dying after 1980 (SMR 358, 95% CI 116-836). Detailed analysis of the 6929 employees occupationally exposed to trichloroethylene, the most widely used solvent at the base during the 1950s and 1960s, did not show any significant or persuasive association between several measures of exposure to trichloroethylene and any excess of cancer. Women employed in departments in which fabric cleaning and parachute repair operations were performed had more deaths than expected from MM and NHL. The inconsistent mortality patterns by sex, multiple and overlapping exposures, and small numbers made it difficult to ascribe these excesses to any particular substance

  19. Retrospective cohort mortality study of workers at an aircraft maintenance facility. I. Epidemiological results.

    PubMed Central

    Spirtas, R; Stewart, P A; Lee, J S; Marano, D E; Forbes, C D; Grauman, D J; Pettigrew, H M; Blair, A; Hoover, R N; Cohen, J L

    1991-01-01

    A retrospective cohort study of 14,457 workers at an aircraft maintenance facility was undertaken to evaluate mortality associated with exposures in their workplace. The purpose was to determine whether working with solvents, particularly trichloroethylene, posed any excess risk of mortality. The study group consisted of all civilian employees who worked for at least one year at Hill Air Force Base, Utah, between 1 January 1952 and 31 December 1956. Work histories were obtained from records at the National Personnel Records Centre, St. Louis, Missouri, and the cohort was followed up for ascertainment of vital state until 31 December 1982. Observed deaths among white people were compared with the expected number of deaths, based on the Utah white population, and adjusted for age, sex, and calendar period. Significant deficits occurred for mortality from all causes (SMR 92, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 90-95), all malignant neoplasms (SMR 90, 95% CI 83-97), ischaemic heart disease (SMR 93, 95% CI 88-98), non-malignant respiratory disease (SMR 87, 95% CI 76-98), and accidents (SMR 61, 95% CI 52-70). Mortality was raised for multiple myeloma (MM) in white women (SMR 236, 95% CI 87-514), non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) in white women (SMR 212, 95% CI 102-390), and cancer of the biliary passages and liver in white men dying after 1980 (SMR 358, 95% CI 116-836). Detailed analysis of the 6929 employees occupationally exposed to trichloroethylene, the most widely used solvent at the base during the 1950s and 1960s, did not show any significant or persuasive association between several measures of exposure to trichloroethylene and any excess of cancer. Women employed in departments in which fabric cleaning and parachute repair operations were performed had more deaths than expected from MM and NHL. The inconsistent mortality patterns by sex, multiple and overlapping exposures, and small numbers made it difficult to ascribe these excesses to any particular substance

  20. Comparison of the Job Satisfaction of Aircraft and Munitions Maintenance Officers in Centralized and Decentralized Maintenance Organizations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    8217 . ’ ’ ’ . ... . ....., • .- . , ,- . List of Figures Figure Page 1. Porter and Lawler’s Theoretical Model ... ...... 7 2. Porter and Lawler’s Revised...Diagram of the Theoretical Model .................. 11 3. Herzberg, Mausner, and Synderman Comparison .. of Satisfiers and Dissatisfiers...those assigned to decentralized maintenance organizations, and if a relation- ship exists, to develop a model illustrating the relation- ship of

  1. Flexibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphrey, L. Dennis

    1981-01-01

    Flexibility is an important aspect of all sports and recreational activities. Flexibility can be developed and maintained by stretching exercises. Exercises designed to develop flexibility in ankle joints, knees, hips, and the lower back are presented. (JN)

  2. Flexibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphrey, L. Dennis

    1981-01-01

    Flexibility is an important aspect of all sports and recreational activities. Flexibility can be developed and maintained by stretching exercises. Exercises designed to develop flexibility in ankle joints, knees, hips, and the lower back are presented. (JN)

  3. 14 CFR 91.1443 - CAMP: Airworthiness release or aircraft maintenance log entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... certificated mechanic. (c) Notwithstanding paragraph (b)(3) of this section, after maintenance, preventive... its manual that the signature of an authorized certificated mechanic or repairman constitutes that...

  4. Mental health in F-111 maintenance workers: the study of Health Outcomes in Aircraft Maintenance Personnel (SHOAMP) general health and medical study.

    PubMed

    Attia, John R; D'Este, Catherine; Schofield, Peter W; Brown, Anthony M; Gibson, Richard; Tavener, Meredith; Horsley, Keith; Harrex, Warren; Ross, James

    2006-07-01

    We sought to contrast mood disorder symptoms in F-111 aircraft Deseal/Reseal maintenance personnel with appropriate comparisons. Participants completed a comprehensive health assessment, including measures of mood disorder, self-reported mood symptom questionnaire items, and review of anxiolytic and depression medication. Multiple logistic regression was conducted for each outcome using exposure group and potential confounders as explanatory variables. There was high agreement between self-reported mood disturbance and objective tests. The exposed group was more likely to self-report previous diagnoses of depression/anxiety, had higher use of antidepressant medications, and had increased risk of diagnosis of depression/anxiety. Results were consistently strong against both comparison groups, with the exposed more likely to have mental distress and social dysfunction when compared with the Australian population. There is robust evidence for an association between F-111 Deseal/Reseal exposure and impaired mental health.

  5. 14 CFR 43.3 - Persons authorized to perform maintenance, preventive maintenance, rebuilding, and alterations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE, PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE, REBUILDING, AND... aircraft, airframe, aircraft engine, propeller, appliance, or component part to which this part applies... a pilot certificate issued under part 61 may perform preventive maintenance on any aircraft owned or...

  6. How performance-contingent reward prospect modulates cognitive control: Increased cue maintenance at the cost of decreased flexibility.

    PubMed

    Hefer, Carmen; Dreisbach, Gesine

    2017-10-01

    Growing evidence suggests that reward prospect promotes cognitive stability in terms of increased context or cue maintenance. In 3 Experiments, using different versions of the AX-continuous performance task, we investigated whether this reward effect comes at the cost of decreased cognitive flexibility. Experiment 1 shows that the reward induced increase of cue maintenance perseverates even when reward is no longer available. Experiment 2 shows that this reward effect not only survives the withdrawal of reward but also delays the adaptation to changed task conditions that make cue usage maladaptive. And finally in Experiment 3, it is shown that this reduced flexibility to adapt is observed in a more demanding modified version of the AX-continuous performance task and is even stronger under conditions of sustained reward. Taken together, all 3 Experiments thus speak to the idea that the prospect of reward increases cue maintenance and thereby cognitive stability. This increased cognitive stability however comes at the cost of decreased flexibility in terms of delayed adaptation to new reward and task conditions. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    national power. But with the recent events such as the war with Iraq, the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) outbreak, some major carriers... TITLE AND SUBTITLE 2003 Industry Studies: Aircraft 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER

  8. Aviation Maintenance Technology. Airframe. A203. Aircraft Fabric Covering, Painting, and Finishing. Instructor Material.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This teacher's guide is designed to aid teachers in leading students through a module on airframe building and repair, including fabric covering, painting, and finishing. The module contains two units that cover the following topics: (1) inspecting, testing, and installing aircraft fabric coverings and (2) applying dope, paint, and trim. Each unit…

  9. 14 CFR 91.1443 - CAMP: Airworthiness release or aircraft maintenance log entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... were inspected by an authorized person who determined that the work was satisfactorily completed; (iii) No known condition exists that would make the aircraft unairworthy; (iv) So far as the work performed... in the program manager's manual; (2) Include a certification that— (i) The work was performed...

  10. Aviation Maintenance Technology. Airframe. A203. Aircraft Fabric Covering, Painting, and Finishing. Instructor Material.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This teacher's guide is designed to aid teachers in leading students through a module on airframe building and repair, including fabric covering, painting, and finishing. The module contains two units that cover the following topics: (1) inspecting, testing, and installing aircraft fabric coverings and (2) applying dope, paint, and trim. Each unit…

  11. 14 CFR 43.9 - Content, form, and disposition of maintenance, preventive maintenance, rebuilding, and alteration...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE... preventive maintenance, rebuilds, or alters an aircraft, airframe, aircraft engine, propeller, appliance, or... maintenance, preventive maintenance, rebuilding, and alteration records (except inspections performed in...

  12. 14 CFR 43.9 - Content, form, and disposition of maintenance, preventive maintenance, rebuilding, and alteration...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE... preventive maintenance, rebuilds, or alters an aircraft, airframe, aircraft engine, propeller, appliance, or... maintenance, preventive maintenance, rebuilding, and alteration records (except inspections performed in...

  13. Ride comfort control in large flexible aircraft. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, M. E.

    1971-01-01

    The problem of ameliorating the discomfort of passengers on a large air transport subject to flight disturbances is examined. The longitudinal dynamics of the aircraft, including effects of body flexing, are developed in terms of linear, constant coefficient differential equations in state variables. A cost functional, penalizing the rigid body displacements and flexure accelerations over the surface of the aircraft is formulated as a quadratic form. The resulting control problem, to minimize the cost subject to the state equation constraints, is of a class whose solutions are well known. The feedback gains for the optimal controller are calculated digitally, and the resulting autopilot is simulated on an analog computer and its performance evaluated.

  14. Increasing Aircraft Carrier Forward Presence: Changing the Length of the Maintenance Cycle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    midlife refueling complex over- haul (RCOH) after approximately 23 years. Increased deploy- ments could deplete reactor fuel sooner than expected...NOTE: CVN = aircraft carrier, nuclear. a As of fall 2007, the Vinson is at Northrop Grumman Newport News for her midlife RCOH. She will be homeported...interval PIA 0 Months 18 24 42 48 66 76.5 DPIAPIA Operating interval COH-1 Past, Current, and Potential Carrier Cycles 9 and DPIA2s after the midlife

  15. 78 FR 64417 - Airworthiness Directives; Twin Commander Aircraft LLC Airplanes; Initial Regulatory Flexibility...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-29

    ... Commander Aircraft LLC Models 690, 690A, and 690B airplanes. AD 2013-09-05 requires inspection for cracking... window channels, aft cabin pressure web, external wing to fuselage fillets, and fasteners; repair or..., the vertical channels, the upper picture window channels, aft cabin pressure web, external wing...

  16. Test and Evaluation of Ultrasonic Additive Manufacturing (UAM) for a Large Aircraft Maintenance Shelter (LAMS) Baseplate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-26

    to machine . A new manufacturing process is emerging called additive manufacturing (AM) and its beginnings can be traced to the 1980s. AM, as...opposed to subtractive manufacturing , builds a design up layer by layer into a component saving time and machining cost in addition to granting a wide...TEST AND EVALUATION OF ULTRASONIC ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING (UAM) FOR A LARGE AREA MAINTENANCE

  17. Hearing impairment in F-111 maintenance workers: the study of health outcomes in aircraft maintenance personnel (SHOAMP) general health and medical study.

    PubMed

    Guest, Maya; Boggess, May; Attia, John; D'Este, Catherine; Brown, Anthony; Gibson, Richard; Tavener, Meredith; Gardner, Ian; Harrex, Warren; Horsley, Keith; Ross, James

    2010-11-01

    We sought to examine hearing loss in a group from the Royal Australian Air Force who undertook fuel tank maintenance on F-111 aircraft, with exposure to formulations containing ototoxins, relative to two different comparison groups. Using pure-tone audiometry, hearing thresholds were assessed in 614 exposed personnel, 513 technical-trade comparisons (different base, same job), and 403 non-technical comparisons (same base, different job). We calculated percentage loss of hearing (PLH) and used regression models to examine whether there was an association between PLH and F-111 fuel tank maintenance, adjusting for possible confounders. In addition, the difference between the observed hearing thresholds and the expected thresholds based on an otologically normal population (ISO-7029-2003) was determined. The PLH ranged from nil to 96 (median 1.5, quartiles 0.3, 5.5). A logistic regression model showed no statistically significant difference in PLH among the three exposure groups (exposed vs. non-technical controls 1.1: 95% CI 0.7, 2.0 and exposed vs. technical OR 0.9: 95% CI 0.6, 1.3). The model also highlighted a number of other risk factors for PLH including age, tinnitus, smoking, depression, and use of depression medications. However, at all eight frequencies measured, all populations had lower than expected hearing thresholds based on published ISO-7029 medians. Although there was no difference in PLH between the three exposure groups, the study did reveal a high degree of hearing loss between the 3 groups and a normal population. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. CREW CHIEF: A computer graphics simulation of an aircraft maintenance technician

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aume, Nilss M.

    1990-01-01

    Approximately 35 percent of the lifetime cost of a military system is spent for maintenance. Excessive repair time is caused by not considering maintenance during design. Problems are usually discovered only after a mock-up has been constructed, when it is too late to make changes. CREW CHIEF will reduce the incidence of such problems by catching design defects in the early design stages. CREW CHIEF is a computer graphic human factors evaluation system interfaced to commercial computer aided design (CAD) systems. It creates a three dimensional man model, either male or female, large or small, with various types of clothing and in several postures. It can perform analyses for physical accessibility, strength capability with tools, visual access, and strength capability for manual materials handling. The designer would produce a drawing on his CAD system and introduce CREW CHIEF in it. CREW CHIEF's analyses would then indicate places where problems could be foreseen and corrected before the design is frozen.

  19. Aircraft Thrust/Power Management can Save Defense Fuel, Reduce Engine Maintenance Costs, and Improve Readiness.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-29

    reduce maintenance costs. Iii’ (See p. 8.) - I The services also lack effective thrust/power coPv management programs. Thrust/power management...variances to determine the causes and take corrective action if warranted. 14 The Navy established a research and development activity at the Naval Air...stated that while funding is avail- able to conduct research , implementation of the most costly ideas must compete with other priorities for limited

  20. Corrosion Tracking and Prediction for C-141A Aircraft Maintenance Scheduling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-04-01

    sufficiently so that an effective model could be developed. Potential cost benefits are far larger than those needed to effect the changes, hence the...1970-December 31, 1974 .... ............. 23 5. Authorized C-141A maintenance and inspection programs in effect between 1970 and 1976 ....... .. 25 6...cause- effect relationships. The present study is an effort of this type. It will be recognized that the first and fourth approaches represent opposite

  1. Effect of structural flexibility on the design of vibration-isolating mounts for aircraft engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, W. H.

    1984-01-01

    Previous analyses of the design of vibration-isolating mounts for a rear-mounted engine to decouple linear and rotational oscillations are extended to take into account flexibility of the engine-mount structure. Equations and curves are presented to allow the design of mount systems and to illustrate the results for a range of design conditions.

  2. Development of Mechanistic Flexible Pavement Design Concepts for the Heavyweight F-15 Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    greater) was noted at 1264 coverages. Test Point 9 - Subgrade shear cracks became visible on the surface of the test section at 40 coverages. Inability...Materials," Properties of Flexible Pavement Materials, ASTM STP 807, J.J. Emery, Ed., American Society for Testing and Materials, pp. 55-64, 1983

  3. The longitudinal equations of motion of a tilt prop/rotor aircraft including the effects of wing and prop/rotor blade flexibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtiss, H. C., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The equations of motion for the longitudinal dynamics of a tilting prop/rotor aircraft are developed. The analysis represents an extension of the equations of motion. The effects of the longitudinal degrees of freedom of the body (pitch, heave and horizontal velocity) are included. The results of body freedom can be added to the equations of motion for the flexible wing propeller combination.

  4. Cognitive Flexibility in Preschoolers: The Role of Representation Activation and Maintenance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chevalier, Nicolas; Blaye, Agnes

    2008-01-01

    Preschoolers' lack of cognitive flexibility has often been attributed to perseverative processing. This study investigates alternative potential sources of difficulty such as deficits in activating previously ignored information and in maintaining currently relevant information. In Experiment 1, a new task tapping attentional switching was…

  5. Adapting Strategic Aircraft Assets to a Changing World: Technology Insertion to Provide Flexibility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-01

    mission, thereby adding to the crew’s flexibility. A Playback Video Recorder . The current 35-mm video recorder has poor quality and has little analytical...to record multiple video sources (if other sensors were added to the B-i), and, if well engineered, the possibility of in-flight playback . The...postfight analysis by using a 35-mm video recorder to capture radar images and a magnetic tape to record selected navigation parameters. The video

  6. A Methodology for Estimating the Effect of Aircraft Carrier Operational Cycles on the Maintenance Industrial Base

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    o rk er s...8,000 10,000 12,000 W o rk er s Period Ju n 12 De c 1 1 Ju n 11 De c 1 0 Ju n 10 De c 0 9 Ju n 09 De c 0 8 Ju n 08 De c 0 7 Ju n 07 De c 0 6 Ju n...g e n u m b er o f ca rr ie rs , b y re ad in es s st at e 3.63 1.48 3.52 2.37 3.25 1.41 4.21 2.13 3.16 1.17 4.72 1.95 Maintenance Training

  7. Comparison of internal dose measures of solvents in breath, blood and urine and genotoxic changes in aircraft maintenance personnel.

    PubMed

    Lemasters, G K; Lockey, J E; Olsen, D M; Selevan, S G; Tabor, M W; Livingston, G K; New, G R

    1999-02-01

    Solvents and fuels are in widespread use both in civilian and military populations. 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA), xylene, toluene, methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) and methylene chloride are found in a variety of compounds including degreasing agents, paints, coatings, pesticides and paint strippers. Toluene and xylene are also found in fuels, which are complex mixtures of hundreds of agents. The purpose of this investigation was twofold. The first was to determine the optimum medium to measure internal dose of solvents comparing blood, urine and breath. The second was to determine if low level exposures were associated with genotoxic changes after a short-term exposure of fifteen or thirty weeks. To accomplish the first goal a pilot study was initiated involving eight volunteers who worked in aircraft maintenance including sheet metal, painting and assembly mechanic jobs. Industrial hygiene measurements were evaluated over 30 working days. Breath, blood and a 24-hour urine sample were collected twice to compare internal dose parameters. To achieve the second goal, 58 newly hired subjects were monitored prior to exposure and over 30 weeks to determine if there were genotoxic changes as a result of solvent and/or fuel exposure as measured by sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) and micronuclei (MN). Exposure groups included workers involved in sheet metal (fuel cell) activities, painting, fueling operations and flight line. Results of the pilot study demonstrated that industrial hygiene air samples and internal breath measures taken on the same day were highly correlated for measuring TCA (r = 0.93) and toluene (r = 0.90) but was not as well correlated for the other compounds. Breath measures were more sensitive for measuring low level exposure than were either analytes in blood or 24-hour urine samples; these latter two measures were usually below the limit of detection. A small but statistically significant increase in the frequency of SCEs occurred after 30 weeks of

  8. Coupled Vortex-Lattice Flight Dynamic Model with Aeroelastic Finite-Element Model of Flexible Wing Transport Aircraft with Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap for Drag Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Ting, Eric; Nguyen, Daniel; Dao, Tung; Trinh, Khanh

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a coupled vortex-lattice flight dynamic model with an aeroelastic finite-element model to predict dynamic characteristics of a flexible wing transport aircraft. The aircraft model is based on NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM) with representative mass and stiffness properties to achieve a wing tip deflection about twice that of a conventional transport aircraft (10% versus 5%). This flexible wing transport aircraft is referred to as an Elastically Shaped Aircraft Concept (ESAC) which is equipped with a Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap (VCCTEF) system for active wing shaping control for drag reduction. A vortex-lattice aerodynamic model of the ESAC is developed and is coupled with an aeroelastic finite-element model via an automated geometry modeler. This coupled model is used to compute static and dynamic aeroelastic solutions. The deflection information from the finite-element model and the vortex-lattice model is used to compute unsteady contributions to the aerodynamic force and moment coefficients. A coupled aeroelastic-longitudinal flight dynamic model is developed by coupling the finite-element model with the rigid-body flight dynamic model of the GTM.

  9. Effect of exposure to a mixture of solvents and noise on hearing and balance in aircraft maintenance workers.

    PubMed

    Prasher, Deepak; Al-Hajjaj, Haifa; Aylott, Susan; Aksentijevic, Aleksander

    2005-01-01

    Aircraft maintenance workers are exposed to a mixture of solvents in the presence of intermittent noise. For this study these workers exposed to solvent mix and noise, were compared with mill workers exposed to noise alone, printed circuit board operatives exposed to solvents alone and those exposed to none who acted as controls. Tympanometry, acoustic reflex thresholds, transient and distortion product otoacoustic emissions, auditory brainstem potentials, nystagmography and posturography were examined. There was a significant effect on pure tone thresholds for both noise and solvents+noise. The distortion product otoacoustic emissions declined with frequency and exhibited lower DP amplitude with noise compared to solvents and noise group. The transient emissions showed a similar effect. Over 32% of subjects with solvent and noise exposure had abnormalities of the auditory brainstem responses in terms of interwave interval prolongation. The mean acoustic reflex thresholds showed a pattern of differences which differentiate noise from solvent and noise groups. The contralateral pathway appears to be differentially affected by solvent exposure. 32% of subjects in the solvents and noise group had an abnormal posturographic finding. In the solvents and noise group 74% had abnormalities of saccades, 56% of pursuit and 45% of optokinetic nystagmus.

  10. NASA DC-8 Ground Support Technician Joe Niquette performs routine maintenance on the DC-8 aircraft in Punta Arenas, Chile

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-17

    NASA DC-8 Ground Support Technician Joe Niquette performs routine maintenance on the DC-8 aircraft at Carlos Ibanez del Campo International Airport in Punta Arenas, Chile. AirSAR 2004 is a three-week expedition by an international team of scientists that is using an all-weather imaging tool, called the Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AirSAR) which is located onboard NASA's DC-8 airborne laboratory. Scientists from many parts of the world including NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory are combining ground research done in several areas in Central and South America with NASA's AirSAR technology to improve and expand on the quality of research they are able to conduct. In South America and Antarctica, AirSAR will collect imagery and data to help determine the contribution of Southern Hemisphere glaciers to sea level rise due to climate change. In Patagonia, researchers found this contribution had more than doubled from 1995 to 2000, compared to the previous 25 years. AirSAR data will make it possible to determine whether that trend is decreasing, continuing or accelerating. AirSAR will also provide reliable information on ice shelf thickness to measure the contribution of the glaciers to sea level.

  11. The Feasibility of Implementing an Expert System for Aircraft Maintenance Discrepancy Scheduling with the Naval Aviation Logistics Command Management Information system (NALCOMIS).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    priority rating is medium c. Rule .gOBJECT: BOOK I. sWOTS ENIR-IE9- Title A Guide To Expert Systems * Author Waterman, Donald A. Publisher Addison...responsibility of the MCO. It also falls to him to maintain historical aircraft files and monitor 3M documentation. VIDS boards and material...Reduce awaiting parts inventory levels at the SSC. - Reduce the administrative burden of maintenance personnel in meeting 3M system requirements

  12. Evaluation of various surface-sealing techniques for the preventative maintenance of flexible pavements. Research report(Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Musselman, J.A.; Leitner, E.B.; Murphy, K.H.; Page, G.C.

    1989-02-01

    The selection of an appropriate surface-seal technique for the preventative maintenance of flexible pavements has been a major concern among the various highway agencies for a number of years. In an effort to better equip the engineer in making decisions concerning the selection of the most cost-effective method of pavement maintenance, seven of the different surface-sealing techniques currently available in Florida were constructed in the fall of 1984 for evaluation. The only major problems encountered at the time of construction was the loss of cover material in the sand seal, mineral seal, and surface-treatment sections and raveling in the slurry seal section. These problems are believed to have been caused by traffic on the roadway before adequate curing had occurred. The test sections were evaluated immediately after construction and at 6 months, 1 year, 2 years, and 3 years, with the evaluation consisting of rut-depth measurements, crack survey, dynamic deflection measurements, rideability, and friction testing. At the conclusion of 3 years, the cost-effectiveness of each section was determined.

  13. Roll maneuvering of flexible aircraft with distributed-parameter actuation via modal synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oz, Hayrani; Khot, Narendra S.

    1999-06-01

    The focus is on obtaining and identifying optimal distributed- parameter-control equivalent actuation profiles for desired roll maneuvers by a modal synthesis approach. The solution for distributed-parameter-control of an aeroelastic system is developed by synthesis of modal-state-space controllers designed via the globally power optimal Independent Modal- Space Control (IMSC) technique. The desired maneuver (set- point) control performance is achieved by a modal-performance- output synthesis (MPOS) approach. The MPOS approach requires that each independent modal controller be allocated a desired portion of the total desired output performance. In view of this, a modal performance-output allocation optimization problem is also defined, which minimizes a hybrid measure of control power and elastic strain energy of the structure during aeroelastic control. Insight to distributed-parameter- control equivalent actuation solutions are sought by considering the aeroservoelastic interactions among vehicle motion, aerodynamics, structural flexibility and control actuators from the perspective of work-energy, control power, and control loading requirements. The modal synthesis approach is illustrated for a flight vehicle wing design to achieve a 90 deg/sec roll-rate in a Mach 2 flight condition at altitude (20000 ft) via distributed-parameter equivalent actuation. The preliminary results indicate that such a roll-rate maneuver can be accomplished via distributed-parameter actuation with feasible levels of control power, work-energy, and control loadings through eliciting favorable aeroservoelastic interactions.

  14. Multi-Objective Flight Control for Drag Minimization and Load Alleviation of High-Aspect Ratio Flexible Wing Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Ting, Eric; Chaparro, Daniel; Drew, Michael; Swei, Sean

    2017-01-01

    As aircraft wings become much more flexible due to the use of light-weight composites material, adverse aerodynamics at off-design performance can result from changes in wing shapes due to aeroelastic deflections. Increased drag, hence increased fuel burn, is a potential consequence. Without means for aeroelastic compensation, the benefit of weight reduction from the use of light-weight material could be offset by less optimal aerodynamic performance at off-design flight conditions. Performance Adaptive Aeroelastic Wing (PAAW) technology can potentially address these technical challenges for future flexible wing transports. PAAW technology leverages multi-disciplinary solutions to maximize the aerodynamic performance payoff of future adaptive wing design, while addressing simultaneously operational constraints that can prevent the optimal aerodynamic performance from being realized. These operational constraints include reduced flutter margins, increased airframe responses to gust and maneuver loads, pilot handling qualities, and ride qualities. All of these constraints while seeking the optimal aerodynamic performance present themselves as a multi-objective flight control problem. The paper presents a multi-objective flight control approach based on a drag-cognizant optimal control method. A concept of virtual control, which was previously introduced, is implemented to address the pair-wise flap motion constraints imposed by the elastomer material. This method is shown to be able to satisfy the constraints. Real-time drag minimization control is considered to be an important consideration for PAAW technology. Drag minimization control has many technical challenges such as sensing and control. An initial outline of a real-time drag minimization control has already been developed and will be further investigated in the future. A simulation study of a multi-objective flight control for a flight path angle command with aeroelastic mode suppression and drag

  15. 14 CFR 43.7 - Persons authorized to approve aircraft, airframes, aircraft engines, propellers, appliances, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... maintenance, preventive maintenance, rebuilding, or alteration. 43.7 Section 43.7 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE, PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE..., propellers, appliances, or component parts for return to service after maintenance, preventive maintenance...

  16. Aircraft Ground Operation, Servicing, Fluid Lines and Fittings, Mechanics Privileges and Limitations, and Maintenance Publications, Forms and Records (Course Outline), Aviation Mechanics 1 (Power and Frame): 9073.02.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    The course outline consists of five instructional blocks of several units each: (1) Aircraft Ground Operation and Servicing; (2) Fluid Lines and Fittings; (3) Mechanics Requirements, Privileges and Limitations; (4) Maintenance Publications; and, (5) Maintenance forms and Records. It is a basic course of knowledge and skills necessary to any…

  17. 14 CFR 43.5 - Approval for return to service after maintenance, preventive maintenance, rebuilding, or alteration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... change in the aircraft operating limitations or flight data contained in the approved aircraft flight... FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE, PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE..., rebuilding, or alteration. No person may approve for return to service any aircraft, airframe,...

  18. 14 CFR 43.5 - Approval for return to service after maintenance, preventive maintenance, rebuilding, or alteration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... change in the aircraft operating limitations or flight data contained in the approved aircraft flight... FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE, PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE..., rebuilding, or alteration. No person may approve for return to service any aircraft, airframe,...

  19. Mortality and cancer incidence of aircraft maintenance workers exposed to trichloroethylene and other organic solvents and chemicals: extended follow up.

    PubMed

    Blair, A; Hartge, P; Stewart, P A; McAdams, M; Lubin, J

    1998-03-01

    To extend the follow up of a cohort of 14,457 aircraft maintenance workers to the end of 1990 to evaluate cancer risks from potential exposure to trichloroethylene and other chemicals. The cohort comprised civilians employed for at least one year between 1952 and 1956, of whom 5727 had died by 31 December 1990. Analyses compared the mortality of the cohort with the general population of Utah and the mortality and cancer incidence of exposed workers with those unexposed to chemicals, while adjusting for age, sex and calendar time. In the combined follow up period (1952-90), mortality from all causes and all cancer was close to expected (standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) 97 and 96, respectively). Significant excesses occurred for ischaemic heart disease (SMR 108), asthma (SMR 160), and cancer of the bone (SMR 227), whereas significant deficits occurred for cerebrovascular disease (SMR 88), accidents (SMR 70), and cancer of the central nervous system (SMR 64). Workers exposed to trichloroethylene showed non-significant excesses for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (relative risk (RR) 2.0), and cancers of the oesophagus (RR 5.6), colon (RR 1.4), primary liver (RR 1.7), breast (RR 1.8), cervix (RR 1.8), kidney (RR 1.6), and bone (RR 2.1). None of these cancers showed an exposure-response gradient and RRs among workers exposed to other chemicals but not trichloroethylene often had RRs as large as workers exposed to trichloroethylene. Workers exposed to solvents other than trichloroethylene had slightly increased mortality from asthma, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, multiple myeloma, and breast cancer. These findings do not strongly support a causal link with trichloroethylene because the associations were not significant, not clearly dose-related, and inconsistent between men and women. Because findings from experimental investigations and other epidemiological studies on solvents other than trichloroethylene provide some biological plausibility, the suggested links between these

  20. Enhanced Aircraft Platform Availability Through Advanced Maintenance Concepts and Technologies (Amelioration de la disponibilite des plateformes d’aeronefs au moyen de concepts de maintenance et de technologies evolues)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    was by invitation only. Most of the participants were senior engineers and managers with relevant hands-on experience from industry, the Armed Forces...availability. • Metrics, key performance indicators, and modelling of aircraft availability. • Maintenance/support management concepts and technologies...été entreprises ces quarante dernières années par certaines nations de l’OTAN avec pour objectifs de réduire les coûts et d’améliorer la

  1. Functional maintenance and structural flexibility of microbial communities perturbed by simulated intense rainfall in a pilot-scale membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yuya; Hori, Tomoyuki; Navarro, Ronald R; Habe, Hiroshi; Ogata, Atsushi

    2016-07-01

    Intense rainfall is one of the most serious and common natural events, causing the excessive inflow of rainwater into wastewater treatment plants. However, little is known about the impacts of rainwater dilution on the structure and function of the sludge microorganisms. Here, high-throughput sequencing of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes was implemented to describe the microbial community dynamics during the simulated intense rainfall situation (event i) in which approximately 45 % of the sludge biomass was artificially overflowed by massive water supply in a pilot-scale membrane bioreactor. Thereafter, we investigated the functional and structural responses of the perturbed microbial communities to subsequent conditional changes, i.e., an increase in organic loading rate from 225 to 450 mg chemical oxygen demand (COD) l(-1) day(-1) (event ii) and an addition of a microbiota activator (event iii). Due to the event i, the COD removal declined to 78.2 %. This deterioration coincided with the decreased microbial diversity and the proliferation of the oligotrophic Aquabacterium sp. During the succeeding events ii and iii, the sludge biomass increased and the COD removal became higher (86.5-97.4 %). With the apparent recovery of the reactor performance, microbial communities became diversified and the compositions dynamically changed. Notably, various bacterial micropredators were highly enriched under the successive conditions, most likely being involved in the flexible reorganization of microbial communities. These results indicate that the activated sludge harbored functionally redundant microorganisms that were able to thrive and proliferate along with the conditional changes, thereby contributing to the functional maintenance of the membrane bioreactor.

  2. [The algorithm for the medical maintenance of the aircraft personnel suffering from chronic sensorineural impairment of hearing].

    PubMed

    Pankova, V B; Skryabina, L Yu; Barkhatova, O A

    2016-01-01

    The present study was designed to systematize the causes underlying the development of chronic sensorineural impairment of hearing in the aircraft personnel engaged in commercial aviation of the Russian Federation. A detailed clinical and audiological picture of chronic sensorineural loss of hearing in the aircraft personnel is presented with special reference to the criteria accepted in the civil aviationfor the evaluation of professional suitability and occupational selection in terms of hearing conditions. The study has demonstrated the paramount importance of the aviation medical expertise for the flight safety control in civil aviation. We analyzed the results of the audiological examination of the aircraft personnel suffering from chronic sensorineural impairment of hearing and proposed the algorithm for the rehabilitation of such subjects taking into consideration the stage of the chronic process.

  3. 14 CFR 43.7 - Persons authorized to approve aircraft, airframes, aircraft engines, propellers, appliances, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... maintenance, preventive maintenance, rebuilding, or alteration. 43.7 Section 43.7 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE, PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE..., propellers, appliances, or component parts for return to service after maintenance, preventive...

  4. 14 CFR 43.7 - Persons authorized to approve aircraft, airframes, aircraft engines, propellers, appliances, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... maintenance, preventive maintenance, rebuilding, or alteration. 43.7 Section 43.7 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE, PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE..., propellers, appliances, or component parts for return to service after maintenance, preventive...

  5. Relationship between the Initial Duty Assignment and Successive Assignments in the Aircraft Maintenance Officer Career Field (AFSC 4024).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    Civil Engineering Officers Composite assignment trends (1-3 above) allow discussion of a particular career field in total. The composite trends for...Force Occupational Measurement Center, Lackland AFB TX, 1976. AD A023 727. Fanta , Lieutenant Colonel John, USAF. "Case Studies in Maintenance Management

  6. 14 CFR 43.3 - Persons authorized to perform maintenance, preventive maintenance, rebuilding, and alterations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE, PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE, REBUILDING, AND... a pilot certificate issued under part 61 may perform preventive maintenance on any aircraft owned or... pilot certificate may perform preventive maintenance on an aircraft owned or operated by that pilot and...

  7. A study of foreign object damage (FOD) and prevention method at the airport and aircraft maintenance area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussin, R.; Ismail, N.; Mustapa, S.

    2016-10-01

    Foreign object damage (FOD) is common risk for aviation industry since long time ago and it has contributed to many terrible incidents and fatalities. The cost of FOD cases every year is very high, which is around RM 1.2 billion. Therefore, a proper technique and strategy has to be taken by the designated organizations including airlines to further eliminate the FOD occurrences. It is not easy to control FOD due to some circumstances such as inappropriate working behaviour, poor working environment, insufficient technology and also disorganized housekeeping system. The main purpose of this research is to discuss and explain further about FOD and the techniques to prevent FOD. FOD is a universal concern in aviation industry and it is one of the reasons that contribute to aircraft failure and unwanted damages such as fatalities and causalities. Throughout this research, many information related to FOD problems and their impact on aviation industry are gathered and presented.

  8. A flexible computer aid for conceptual design based on constraint propagation and component-modeling. [of aircraft in three dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolb, Mark A.

    1988-01-01

    The Rubber Airplane program, which combines two symbolic processing techniques with a component-based database of design knowledge, is proposed as a computer aid for conceptual design. Using object-oriented programming, programs are organized around the objects and behavior to be simulated, and using constraint propagation, declarative statements designate mathematical relationships among all the equation variables. It is found that the additional level of organizational structure resulting from the arrangement of the design information in terms of design components provides greater flexibility and convenience.

  9. A flexible computer aid for conceptual design based on constraint propagation and component-modeling. [of aircraft in three dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolb, Mark A.

    1988-01-01

    The Rubber Airplane program, which combines two symbolic processing techniques with a component-based database of design knowledge, is proposed as a computer aid for conceptual design. Using object-oriented programming, programs are organized around the objects and behavior to be simulated, and using constraint propagation, declarative statements designate mathematical relationships among all the equation variables. It is found that the additional level of organizational structure resulting from the arrangement of the design information in terms of design components provides greater flexibility and convenience.

  10. 14 CFR 91.407 - Operation after maintenance, preventive maintenance, rebuilding, or alteration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... flies the aircraft, makes an operational check of the maintenance performed or alteration made, and logs the flight in the aircraft records. (c) The aircraft does not have to be flown as required...

  11. NASA DC-8 Ground Support Technicians Mark Corlew and Mike Lakowski perform routine maintenance on the aircraft in Punta Arenas, Chile

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-17

    NASA DC-8 Ground Support Technicians Mark Corlew and Mike Lakowski perform routine maintenance on the aircraft at Carlos Ibanez del Campo International Airport in Punta Arenas, Chile. AirSAR 2004 is a three-week expedition by an international team of scientists that is using an all-weather imaging tool, called the Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AirSAR) which is located onboard NASA's DC-8 airborne laboratory. Scientists from many parts of the world including NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory are combining ground research done in several areas in Central and South America with NASA's AirSAR technology to improve and expand on the quality of research they are able to conduct. In South America and Antarctica, AirSAR will collect imagery and data to help determine the contribution of Southern Hemisphere glaciers to sea level rise due to climate change. In Patagonia, researchers found this contribution had more than doubled from 1995 to 2000, compared to the previous 25 years. AirSAR data will make it possible to determine whether that trend is decreasing, continuing or accelerating. AirSAR will also provide reliable information on ice shelf thickness to measure the contribution of the glaciers to sea level.

  12. NASA Dryden DC-8 maintenance crew members inspect the aircraft prior to take-off for an AirSAR 2004 flight

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-06

    NASA Dryden DC-8 maintenance crew members inspect the aircraft prior to take-off. L-R; Scott Silver, Paul Ristrim and Mike Lakowski. AirSAR 2004 Mesoamerica is a three-week expedition by an international team of scientists that uses an all-weather imaging tool, called the Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AirSAR) which is located onboard NASA's DC-8 airborne laboratory. Scientists from many parts of the world including NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory are combining ground research done in several areas in Central America with NASA's AirSAR technology to improve and expand on the quality of research they are able to conduct. The radar, developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, can penetrate clouds and also collect data at night. Its high-resolution sensors operate at multiple wavelengths and modes, allowing AirSAR to see beneath treetops, through thin sand, and dry snow pack. AirSAR's 2004 campaign is a collaboration of many U.S. and Central American institutions and scientists, including NASA; the National Science Foundation; the Smithsonian Institution; National Geographic; Conservation International; the Organization of Tropical Studies; the Central American Commission for Environment and Development; and the Inter-American Development Bank.

  13. Structural maintenance of chromosomes flexible hinge domain containing 1 (SMCHD1) promotes non-homologous end joining and inhibits homologous recombination repair upon DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mengfan; Li, Yujing; Zhang, Xiya; Deng, Tingting; Zhou, Zhifen; Ma, Wenbin; Songyang, Zhou

    2014-12-05

    Structural maintenance of chromosomes flexible hinge domain containing 1 (SMCHD1) has been shown to be involved in gene silencing and DNA damage. However, the exact mechanisms of how SMCHD1 participates in DNA damage remains largely unknown. Here we present evidence that SMCHD1 recruitment to DNA damage foci is regulated by 53BP1. Knocking out SMCHD1 led to aberrant γH2AX foci accumulation and compromised cell survival upon DNA damage, demonstrating the critical role of SMCHD1 in DNA damage repair. Following DNA damage induction, SMCHD1 depletion resulted in reduced 53BP1 foci and increased BRCA1 foci, as well as less efficient non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and elevated levels of homologous recombination (HR). Taken together, these results suggest an important function of SMCHD1 in promoting NHEJ and repressing HR repair in response to DNA damage. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. 14 CFR 43.7 - Persons authorized to approve aircraft, airframes, aircraft engines, propellers, appliances, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE, PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE... holder of a repairman certificate (light-sport aircraft) with a maintenance rating may approve an... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Persons authorized to approve aircraft...

  15. 14 CFR 135.433 - Maintenance and preventive maintenance training program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Maintenance and preventive maintenance... SUCH AIRCRAFT Maintenance, Preventive Maintenance, and Alterations § 135.433 Maintenance and preventive maintenance training program. Each certificate holder or a person performing maintenance or...

  16. 14 CFR 43.17 - Maintenance, preventive maintenance, and alterations performed on U.S. aeronautical products by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE... ratings may, with respect to a U.S.-registered aircraft located in Canada, perform maintenance, preventive..., preventive maintenance, and alterations performed under this section, except that an Aircraft Maintenance...

  17. Homebuilt aircraft crashes.

    PubMed

    Hasselquist, A; Baker, S P

    1999-06-01

    While the number of general aviation crashes has decreased over the 5 yr prior to 1993, the total number of homebuilt aircraft crashes has increased by nearly 25%. Research was undertaken to analyze these crashes and identify causal factors or unique problems associated with homebuilt aircraft. Some 200 National Transportation Safety Board computer records and two-page descriptive briefs were analyzed for homebuilt aircraft crashes during 1993. Using descriptive epidemiology, variables were looked at in detail and comparisons were made with general aviation crashes during the-same year. Despite accounting for only 3% of all hours flown in general aviation certified aircraft for 1993, homebuilt aircraft accounted for 10% of the crashes and experienced a higher fatal crash rate. Crashes due to mechanical failure and crashes on takeoff and climb were more common in homebuilt aircraft as compared with general aviation. Other significant causal factors for homebuilt aircraft crashes included: minimal flight time in type specific aircraft, improper maintenance and improper design or assembly. Greater emphasis needs to be placed on educating homebuilt aircraft owners in the importance of following Federal Aviation Administration guidelines for certification and air worthiness testing. Understanding the aircraft's specifications and design limitations prior to the initial flight and properly maintaining the aircraft should also help to reverse the trend in the number of these crashes and subsequent lives lost. A system for assuring that all home-built aircraft are certified and more accurate reporting of flight hours are needed for accurate tracking of homebuilt aircraft crash rates.

  18. An Aircraft Lifecycle Approach for the Cost-Benefit Analysis of Prognostics and Condition-Based Maintenance-Based on Discrete-Event Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-02

    and/or the implementation of PHM during an early aircraft design stage. In general, prognostic systems provide early detection of the precursor...Leao et al., 2007). Further benefits require consideration of PHM in the certification phase or already in the aircraft design phase. Significant...simulation and assessment tool is modeled in MATLAB©. Aircraft type and operator specific XML -files are used to configure and control the lifecycle analyses

  19. 14 CFR 91.407 - Operation after maintenance, preventive maintenance, rebuilding, or alteration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... maintenance, preventive maintenance, rebuilding, or alteration. (a) No person may operate any aircraft that... flies the aircraft, makes an operational check of the maintenance performed or alteration made, and logs... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Operation after maintenance, preventive...

  20. 14 CFR 91.1425 - CAMP: Maintenance, preventive maintenance, and alteration programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... maintenance, and alteration programs. Each program manager who maintains program aircraft under a CAMP must..., preventive maintenance, or alterations; and (c) Each aircraft released to service is airworthy and has been... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false CAMP: Maintenance, preventive maintenance...

  1. 14 CFR 91.415 - Changes to aircraft inspection programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES GENERAL OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES Maintenance, Preventive Maintenance, and Alterations § 91.415 Changes to aircraft inspection programs. (a) Whenever...

  2. 14 CFR 91.415 - Changes to aircraft inspection programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES GENERAL OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES Maintenance, Preventive Maintenance, and Alterations § 91.415 Changes to aircraft inspection programs. (a) Whenever...

  3. Human Factors in Aircraft Maintenance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-03-01

    significant effect on the design of new systems but it can also mitigate problems found in the sub-optimal designs of current systems. 2. Human Factors...and parts 3. Airplane design and configuration 4. Job and task 5. Technical knowledge and skills 6. Factors affecting individual performance-e.g...software failures (e.g. documentation design ) were found. Note that there are typically multiple latent failures for each hazard pattern, so that

  4. Aircraft Maintenance Experience Design Handbook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-09-11

    Ecuations RUn: 15 Parameters Considered_ and Relected: Fuselage volume pressurized, ECS weight, maximum takeoff weight and KVA. Comment: Empty weight...SYSTEM - WUC 47 ••: None. Z.A&Ctil Parameters:Noe AjMk~m-.gL Regression Ecuations Run: 11 Parameters C-col.dered and Re jected: Flight hours per... Plank , J. D. Cross Index Manual ’cuipment Cross Index Programa (EcPJ. ILSO4-25-1M-76, Naval Aviation Integrated Logistics - Support Center (ILS-04

  5. Estimating Aircraft Depot Maintenance Costs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    14CV4CO n1 DI 40’Cw4’CO 0N4’I’C’ m wN m 0. CI 4- . D ’C Ma C’ M’C 0 7t ’C Ifm %4 C’ on 0 ’C 4,4 In I .? c’ ’C 0% C’ N .4 N .4 ’CO 0 ( CnIf ’CO 0 0 cn1ý (44

  6. The Symmetrical Structure of Structural Maintenance of Chromosomes (SMC) and MukB Proteins: Long, Antiparallel Coiled Coils, Folded at a Flexible Hinge

    PubMed Central

    Melby, Thomas E.; Ciampaglio, Charles N.; Briscoe, Gina; Erickson, Harold P.

    1998-01-01

    Structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) proteins function in chromosome condensation and several other aspects of DNA processing. They are large proteins characterized by an NH2-terminal nucleotide triphosphate (NTP)-binding domain, two long segments of coiled coil separated by a hinge, and a COOH-terminal domain. Here, we have visualized by EM the SMC protein from Bacillus subtilis (BsSMC) and MukB from Escherichia coli, which we argue is a divergent SMC protein. Both BsSMC and MukB show two thin rods with globular domains at the ends emerging from the hinge. The hinge appears to be quite flexible: the arms can open up to 180°, separating the terminal domains by 100 nm, or close to near 0°, bringing the terminal globular domains together. A surprising observation is that the ∼300–amino acid–long coiled coils are in an antiparallel arrangement. Known coiled coils are almost all parallel, and the longest antiparallel coiled coils known previously are 35–45 amino acids long. This antiparallel arrangement produces a symmetrical molecule with both an NH2- and a COOH-terminal domain at each end. The SMC molecule therefore has two complete and identical functional domains at the ends of the long arms. The bifunctional symmetry and a possible scissoring action at the hinge should provide unique biomechanical properties to the SMC proteins. PMID:9744887

  7. 14 CFR 135.425 - Maintenance, preventive maintenance, and alteration programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Maintenance, Preventive Maintenance, and Alterations § 135.425 Maintenance, preventive maintenance, and alteration programs. Each certificate holder shall have an inspection program and... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maintenance, preventive maintenance, and...

  8. 14 CFR 135.423 - Maintenance, preventive maintenance, and alteration organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Maintenance, Preventive Maintenance, and Alterations § 135.423 Maintenance, preventive maintenance, and alteration organization. (a) Each certificate holder that performs any of its... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maintenance, preventive maintenance, and...

  9. 14 CFR 135.437 - Authority to perform and approve maintenance, preventive maintenance, and alterations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Maintenance, Preventive Maintenance, and Alterations § 135.437 Authority to perform and approve maintenance, preventive maintenance, and alterations... maintenance, preventive maintenance, and alterations. 135.437 Section 135.437 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL...

  10. 14 CFR 135.423 - Maintenance, preventive maintenance, and alteration organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Maintenance, Preventive Maintenance, and Alterations § 135.423 Maintenance, preventive maintenance, and alteration organization. (a) Each certificate holder that performs any of its... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Maintenance, preventive maintenance, and...

  11. 14 CFR 135.425 - Maintenance, preventive maintenance, and alteration programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Maintenance, Preventive Maintenance, and Alterations § 135.425 Maintenance, preventive maintenance, and alteration programs. Each certificate holder shall have an inspection program and... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Maintenance, preventive maintenance, and...

  12. 14 CFR 135.437 - Authority to perform and approve maintenance, preventive maintenance, and alterations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Maintenance, Preventive Maintenance, and Alterations § 135.437 Authority to perform and approve maintenance, preventive maintenance, and alterations... maintenance, preventive maintenance, and alterations. 135.437 Section 135.437 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL...

  13. 14 CFR 135.437 - Authority to perform and approve maintenance, preventive maintenance, and alterations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... maintenance, preventive maintenance, and alterations. 135.437 Section 135.437 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Maintenance, Preventive Maintenance, and Alterations § 135.437 Authority to perform and approve maintenance, preventive maintenance, and...

  14. 14 CFR 135.423 - Maintenance, preventive maintenance, and alteration organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Maintenance, preventive maintenance, and... ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Maintenance, Preventive Maintenance, and Alterations § 135.423 Maintenance, preventive maintenance, and alteration organization. (a) Each certificate holder that performs any of...

  15. 14 CFR 135.425 - Maintenance, preventive maintenance, and alteration programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Maintenance, preventive maintenance, and... ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Maintenance, Preventive Maintenance, and Alterations § 135.425 Maintenance, preventive maintenance, and alteration programs. Each certificate holder shall have an inspection program...

  16. 14 CFR 135.437 - Authority to perform and approve maintenance, preventive maintenance, and alterations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... maintenance, preventive maintenance, and alterations. 135.437 Section 135.437 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Maintenance, Preventive Maintenance, and Alterations § 135.437 Authority to perform and approve maintenance, preventive maintenance, and...

  17. 14 CFR 135.425 - Maintenance, preventive maintenance, and alteration programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Maintenance, preventive maintenance, and... ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Maintenance, Preventive Maintenance, and Alterations § 135.425 Maintenance, preventive maintenance, and alteration programs. Each certificate holder shall have an inspection program...

  18. 14 CFR 135.437 - Authority to perform and approve maintenance, preventive maintenance, and alterations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... maintenance, preventive maintenance, and alterations. 135.437 Section 135.437 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Maintenance, Preventive Maintenance, and Alterations § 135.437 Authority to perform and approve maintenance, preventive maintenance, and...

  19. 14 CFR 135.423 - Maintenance, preventive maintenance, and alteration organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Maintenance, preventive maintenance, and... ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Maintenance, Preventive Maintenance, and Alterations § 135.423 Maintenance, preventive maintenance, and alteration organization. (a) Each certificate holder that performs any of...

  20. 14 CFR 135.425 - Maintenance, preventive maintenance, and alteration programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Maintenance, preventive maintenance, and... ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Maintenance, Preventive Maintenance, and Alterations § 135.425 Maintenance, preventive maintenance, and alteration programs. Each certificate holder shall have an inspection program...

  1. 14 CFR 91.405 - Maintenance required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., and Alterations § 91.405 Maintenance required. Each owner or operator of an aircraft— (a) Shall have... of this chapter; (b) Shall ensure that maintenance personnel make appropriate entries in the aircraft maintenance records indicating the aircraft has been approved for return to service; (c) Shall have any...

  2. Cost Implications of the Broad Area Maritime Surveillance Unmanned Aircraft System for the Navy Flying Hour Program and Operation and Maintenance Budget

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    shown in Table 28. 58 Aircraft Type PRE Costs $FY10 (Million) PRL Costs $FY10 (Million) Fire Scout $16.1 $4.0 SH -60B $0.9 $1.3 SH - 60F $1.0 $1.5...complexity of new aircraft systems, evident in the PRE and PRL cost estimates for new manned aircraft systems in development such as the F-35, P- 8, SH ...60S and SH -60R (OPNAV N432 analyst, personal communication, August 20, 2010). A comparison of the Fire Scout and SH -60 T/M/S PRL and PRE costs is

  3. 41 CFR 102-33.170 - What standards must we establish or require (contractually, where applicable) for maintenance of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... establish or require (contractually, where applicable) for maintenance of our Government aircraft? 102-33... AIRCRAFT Managing Government Aircraft and Aircraft Parts Maintenance § 102-33.170 What standards must we establish or require (contractually, where applicable) for maintenance of our Government aircraft? For...

  4. Effects of genetic polymorphisms of CYP1A1, CYP2E1, GSTM1, and GSTT1 on the urinary levels of 1-hydroxypyrene and 2-naphthol in aircraft maintenance workers.

    PubMed

    Lee, C Y; Lee, J Y; Kang, J W; Kim, H

    2001-09-15

    This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of genetic polymorphisms of the cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) and 2E1 (CYP2E1), and glutathione S-transferases mu (GSTM1) and theta (GSTT1) on urinary 1-hydroxypyrene and 2-naphthol levels, and to estimate the level of exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in aircraft maintenance workers. In 218 Korean aircraft maintenance workers, the geometric means of urinary 1-hydroxypyrene and 2-naphthol were 0.32 and 3.25 micromol/mol creatinine, respectively. These urinary concentrations were approximately at the upper limit of the general population. Mean urinary 2-naphthol concentrations were significantly different between smokers and non-smokers. CYP1A1 and GSTM1 were statistically significant in analyses on both 1-hydroxypyrene and 2-naphthol levels among smokers. The results suggest that smoking has more profound effects on urinary PAH metabolites than does genetic polymorphisms in this population, and that CYP1A1 and GSTM1 activity might be related to the metabolism of 1-hydroxypyrene and 2-naphthol.

  5. 14 CFR 125.245 - Organization required to perform maintenance, preventive maintenance, and alteration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Maintenance § 125.245 Organization required to perform maintenance, preventive maintenance, and alteration. The certificate holder must ensure that each person with whom it... maintenance, preventive maintenance, and alteration. 125.245 Section 125.245 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL...

  6. 14 CFR 125.245 - Organization required to perform maintenance, preventive maintenance, and alteration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Maintenance § 125.245 Organization required to perform maintenance, preventive maintenance, and alteration. The certificate holder must ensure that each person with whom it... maintenance, preventive maintenance, and alteration. 125.245 Section 125.245 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL...

  7. 14 CFR 91.407 - Operation after maintenance, preventive maintenance, rebuilding, or alteration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Operation after maintenance, preventive... OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES Maintenance, Preventive Maintenance, and Alterations § 91.407 Operation after maintenance, preventive maintenance, rebuilding, or alteration. (a) No person may operate any aircraft...

  8. 14 CFR 91.407 - Operation after maintenance, preventive maintenance, rebuilding, or alteration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Operation after maintenance, preventive... OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES Maintenance, Preventive Maintenance, and Alterations § 91.407 Operation after maintenance, preventive maintenance, rebuilding, or alteration. (a) No person may operate any aircraft...

  9. 14 CFR 91.407 - Operation after maintenance, preventive maintenance, rebuilding, or alteration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Operation after maintenance, preventive... OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES Maintenance, Preventive Maintenance, and Alterations § 91.407 Operation after maintenance, preventive maintenance, rebuilding, or alteration. (a) No person may operate any aircraft that...

  10. Aircraft Environmental System Mechanic, 2-9. Block IV--Utility Systems and Flight Line Maintenance. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This publication contains a teaching guide and student instructional materials for conducting a high school or adult vocational education course to train persons to perform duties as an aircraft environmental systems mechanic. The instructional design for this course is self-paced and/or small group-paced. Instructor materials contained in the…

  11. Cryogenics maintenance strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruzat, Fabiola

    2012-09-01

    ALMA is an interferometer composed of 66 independent systems, with specific maintenance requirements for each subsystem. To optimize the observation time and reduce downtime maintenance, requirements are very demanding. One subsystem with high maintenance efforts is cryogenics and vacuum. To organize the maintenance, the Cryogenic and Vacuum department is using and implementing different tools. These are monitoring and problem reporting systems and CMMS. This leads to different maintenance approaches: Preventive Maintenance, Corrective Maintenance and Condition Based Maintenance. In order to coordinate activities with other departments the preventive maintenance schedule is kept as flexible as systems allow. To cope with unavoidable failures, the team has to be prepared to work under any condition with the spares on time. Computerized maintenance management system (CMMS) will help to manage inventory control for reliable spare part handling, the correct record of work orders and traceability of maintenance activities. For an optimized approach the department is currently evaluating where preventive or condition based maintenance applies to comply with the individual system demand. Considering the change from maintenance contracts to in-house maintenance will help to minimize costs and increase availability of parts. Due to increased number of system and tasks the cryo team needs to grow. Training of all staff members is mandatory, in depth knowledge must be built up by doing complex maintenance activities in the Cryo group, use of advanced computerized metrology systems.

  12. Mission management aircraft operations manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This manual prescribes the NASA mission management aircraft program and provides policies and criteria for the safe and economical operation, maintenance, and inspection of NASA mission management aircraft. The operation of NASA mission management aircraft is based on the concept that safety has the highest priority. Operations involving unwarranted risks will not be tolerated. NASA mission management aircraft will be designated by the Associate Administrator for Management Systems and Facilities. NASA mission management aircraft are public aircraft as defined by the Federal Aviation Act of 1958. Maintenance standards, as a minimum, will meet those required for retention of Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) airworthiness certification. Federal Aviation Regulation Part 91, Subparts A and B, will apply except when requirements of this manual are more restrictive.

  13. Aircraft wiring program status report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beach, Rex

    1995-01-01

    In this Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC) Aircraft Division status report, the general and wire and cable component activities, the systems engineering activities, the aircraft wiring lead maintenance activities, the NAVAIR/NASA interface activities, and the Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Commission recommendations are presented.

  14. Aircraft wiring program status report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, Rex

    1995-11-01

    In this Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC) Aircraft Division status report, the general and wire and cable component activities, the systems engineering activities, the aircraft wiring lead maintenance activities, the NAVAIR/NASA interface activities, and the Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Commission recommendations are presented.

  15. 14 CFR 43.5 - Approval for return to service after maintenance, preventive maintenance, rebuilding, or alteration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... maintenance, preventive maintenance, rebuilding, or alteration. 43.5 Section 43.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE, PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE, REBUILDING, AND ALTERATION § 43.5 Approval for return to service after maintenance, preventive maintenance...

  16. 14 CFR 43.5 - Approval for return to service after maintenance, preventive maintenance, rebuilding, or alteration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... maintenance, preventive maintenance, rebuilding, or alteration. 43.5 Section 43.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE, PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE, REBUILDING, AND ALTERATION § 43.5 Approval for return to service after maintenance, preventive maintenance...

  17. 14 CFR 43.5 - Approval for return to service after maintenance, preventive maintenance, rebuilding, or alteration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... maintenance, preventive maintenance, rebuilding, or alteration. 43.5 Section 43.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE, PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE, REBUILDING, AND ALTERATION § 43.5 Approval for return to service after maintenance, preventive maintenance...

  18. 14 CFR 135.419 - Approved aircraft inspection program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: COMMUTER AND ON DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Maintenance, Preventive Maintenance, and Alterations § 135.419 Approved aircraft inspection program. (a... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Approved aircraft inspection program. 135...

  19. 14 CFR 135.419 - Approved aircraft inspection program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Approved aircraft inspection program. 135... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: COMMUTER AND ON DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Maintenance, Preventive Maintenance, and Alterations § 135.419 Approved aircraft inspection program....

  20. 14 CFR 135.419 - Approved aircraft inspection program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Approved aircraft inspection program. 135... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: COMMUTER AND ON DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Maintenance, Preventive Maintenance, and Alterations § 135.419 Approved aircraft inspection program....

  1. 14 CFR 135.419 - Approved aircraft inspection program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Approved aircraft inspection program. 135... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: COMMUTER AND ON DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Maintenance, Preventive Maintenance, and Alterations § 135.419 Approved aircraft inspection program....

  2. 14 CFR 135.419 - Approved aircraft inspection program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Approved aircraft inspection program. 135... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: COMMUTER AND ON DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Maintenance, Preventive Maintenance, and Alterations § 135.419 Approved aircraft inspection program. (a...

  3. Enhanced Aircraft Platform Availability Through Advanced Maintenance Concepts and Technologies (Amelioration de la Disponibilite des Plateformes D’Aeronefs par L’Utilisation des Technologies et des Concepts Evolues de Maintenance)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    David Elford MOD DPA-DLO United Kingdom Mr. Richard Eustace Defence Science and Technology Organisation (DSTO) Australia Oberstleut nant Dirk...d’équipements de soutien qui peuvent être utilisées pour réduire le besoin en maintenance et les immobilisations associées. Le courant dominant de la R&D en...Defence Materiel in Operational Condition). In a statement to the Defence Commission of the French National Assembly in 2005 [12], General Richard

  4. 14 CFR 91.1425 - CAMP: Maintenance, preventive maintenance, and alteration programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false CAMP: Maintenance, preventive maintenance... RULES Fractional Ownership Operations Program Management § 91.1425 CAMP: Maintenance, preventive maintenance, and alteration programs. Each program manager who maintains program aircraft under a CAMP must...

  5. Zero gravity testing of flexible solar arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, D. T.; Young, L. E.

    1981-01-01

    Zero gravity testing in the KC-135 aircraft of flat fold flexible solar array test specimens sufficiently demonstrated the adequacy of the panel design. The aircraft flight crew provided invaluable assistance and significantly contributed to the design and development of the flexible solar array, and ultimately to the potential success of the solar electric propulsion solar array shuttle flight experiment program.

  6. Aviation Maintenance Technology. Course Content Guides. FAA Approved Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shrawder, Jack; And Others

    Course content guides are provided for the 30 courses in this aviation maintenance technology curriculum approved by the Federal Aviation Administration. Course titles are physics for technicians; aircraft information, regulations, and procedures; aircraft assembly; fundamentals of aircraft electronics; aircraft electrical components; aircraft…

  7. 14 CFR 91.1439 - CAMP: Maintenance recording requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... with the aircraft at the time the aircraft is sold. (c) The program manager must make all maintenance... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false CAMP: Maintenance recording requirements... Ownership Operations Program Management § 91.1439 CAMP: Maintenance recording requirements. (a) Each program...

  8. Detection of structural deterioration and associated airline maintenance problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henniker, H. D.; Mitchell, R. G.

    1972-01-01

    Airline operations involving the detection of structural deterioration and associated maintenance problems are discussed. The standard approach to the maintenance and inspection of aircraft components and systems is described. The frequency of inspections and the application of preventive maintenance practices are examined. The types of failure which airline transport aircraft encounter and the steps taken to prevent catastrophic failure are reported.

  9. General aviation avionics equipment maintenance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, C. D.; Tommerdahl, J. B.

    1978-01-01

    Maintenance of general aviation avionics equipment was investigated with emphasis on single engine and light twin engine general aviation aircraft. Factors considered include the regulatory agencies, avionics manufacturers, avionics repair stations, the statistical character of the general aviation community, and owners and operators. The maintenance, environment, and performance, repair costs, and reliability of avionics were defined. It is concluded that a significant economic stratification is reflected in the maintenance problems encountered, that careful attention to installations and use practices can have a very positive impact on maintenance problems, and that new technologies and a general growth in general aviation will impact maintenance.

  10. Current and future inspection and maintenance challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagat, Pramode K.; Bessette, Lorence; Leonelli, Fredrick

    1996-11-01

    Ever-increasing diversity of civilian aircraft inventory and continued technological advancements in aircraft materials, aircraft flight control equipment, testing equipment, and software methodologies are impacting aircraft inspection and maintenance practices. Current procedures deal mainly with issues related to structural and electrical or electronic integrity to assure continued airworthiness of operational aircraft. Techniques and methodologies for these are widely available, and training needs are well defined. Advances in technology, however, are yielding new and different aircraft, which require more sophisticated electronic instruments for navigation and control.A major issue is the continued reliability and airworthiness of avionics and development of adequate safeguards for these aircraft. Built-in test equipment, maintenance across terminals, and data bases defining inspection needs that are based on operational data, and software integrity, are also rapidly becoming important considerations in aircraft maintenance. In this era of declining funds and personnel resources, a cost-effective approach requires a fresh look at all phases of the current inspection and maintenance practices, including oversight and management. This paper provides a perspective on issues and challenges facing a civilian regulatory agency, specifically, the aircraft maintenance division in the FAA.

  11. 14 CFR 91.1111 - Maintenance training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maintenance training. 91.1111 Section 91... Operations Program Management § 91.1111 Maintenance training. The program manager must ensure that all employees who are responsible for maintenance related to program aircraft undergo appropriate initial and...

  12. Effects of vocationally oriented medical rehabilitation for aircraft maintenance personnel--a preliminary study of long-term effects with 5-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Holopainen, Kaj; Nevala, Nina; Kuronen, Pentti; Arokoski, Jari P A

    2004-12-01

    Changes in the physical capacity, musculoskeletal symptoms, and perceived work ability of Finnish Air Force maintenance personnel were studied after vocationally oriented medical rehabilitation (VOMR). Twenty persons with chronic musculoskeletal symptoms in their back or neck took part in VOMR courses. The measurements were carried out at the beginning of the rehabilitation course and after two follow-up periods (0.5 and 5 years). The subjects worked most of the time in a bent position and often with their backs twisted and their arms above their shoulders. The severity of low-back pain and the number of days of sick leave decreased significantly (p < 0.05-0.01) during the 5-years follow-up. Also the exercise breaks at work increased (p < 0.01). After half a year of medical rehabilitation the measured range of the cervical spine and the dynamic and endurance strength of the upper and lower extremities was greater (p < 0.05-0.001) than at the beginning of the rehabilitation. There were no statistically significant differences in the use of physical therapy, experienced work strain, physical exercise or maximal oxygen consumption during the follow-up. This is a preliminary follow-up study lasting 5 years showed some significant changes in physical capacity, musculoskeletal symptoms and work ability. However, controlled studies are needed to evaluate these preliminary findings of this kind of rehabilitation model.

  13. 14 CFR 43.17 - Maintenance, preventive maintenance, and alterations performed on U.S. aeronautical products by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... person holding a valid Transport Canada Civil Aviation Maintenance Engineer license and appropriate... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE... aeronautical product under airworthiness regulation by Transport Canada Civil Aviation. U.S....

  14. 14 CFR 43.17 - Maintenance, preventive maintenance, and alterations performed on U.S. aeronautical products by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... person holding a valid Transport Canada Civil Aviation Maintenance Engineer license and appropriate... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE... aeronautical product under airworthiness regulation by Transport Canada Civil Aviation. U.S....

  15. 14 CFR 43.17 - Maintenance, preventive maintenance, and alterations performed on U.S. aeronautical products by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... person holding a valid Transport Canada Civil Aviation Maintenance Engineer license and appropriate... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE... aeronautical product under airworthiness regulation by Transport Canada Civil Aviation. U.S....

  16. 14 CFR 145.205 - Maintenance, preventive maintenance, and alterations performed for certificate holders under...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maintenance, preventive maintenance, and... foreign persons operating a U.S.-registered aircraft in common carriage under part 129. 145.205 Section...) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES REPAIR STATIONS Operating Rules § 145.205 Maintenance, preventive...

  17. 14 CFR 145.205 - Maintenance, preventive maintenance, and alterations performed for certificate holders under...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Maintenance, preventive maintenance, and... foreign persons operating a U.S.-registered aircraft in common carriage under part 129. 145.205 Section...) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES REPAIR STATIONS Operating Rules § 145.205 Maintenance, preventive...

  18. 14 CFR 91.327 - Aircraft having a special airworthiness certificate in the light-sport category: Operating...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... certificated repairman with a light-sport aircraft maintenance rating, an appropriately rated mechanic, or an... (light-sport aircraft) with a maintenance rating, an appropriately rated mechanic, or an appropriately... certificated repairman with a light-sport aircraft maintenance rating, an appropriately rated mechanic, or an...

  19. 14 CFR 135.441 - Transfer of maintenance records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS: COMMUTER AND ON DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Maintenance, Preventive Maintenance, and Alterations § 135.441 Transfer of maintenance records. Each certificate holder... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Transfer of maintenance records. 135.441...

  20. 14 CFR 135.439 - Maintenance recording requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS: COMMUTER AND ON DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Maintenance, Preventive Maintenance, and Alterations § 135.439 Maintenance recording requirements. (a) Each certificate... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maintenance recording requirements. 135.439...

  1. 14 CFR 135.441 - Transfer of maintenance records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS: COMMUTER AND ON DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Maintenance, Preventive Maintenance, and Alterations § 135.441 Transfer of maintenance records. Each certificate holder... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Transfer of maintenance records. 135.441...

  2. 14 CFR 135.439 - Maintenance recording requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS: COMMUTER AND ON DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Maintenance, Preventive Maintenance, and Alterations § 135.439 Maintenance recording requirements. (a) Each certificate... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Maintenance recording requirements. 135.439...

  3. 14 CFR 91.421 - Rebuilt engine maintenance records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Rebuilt engine maintenance records. 91.421..., Preventive Maintenance, and Alterations § 91.421 Rebuilt engine maintenance records. (a) The owner or operator may use a new maintenance record, without previous operating history, for an aircraft engine...

  4. 14 CFR 135.441 - Transfer of maintenance records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS: COMMUTER AND ON DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Maintenance, Preventive Maintenance, and Alterations § 135.441 Transfer of maintenance records. Each certificate holder... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Transfer of maintenance records....

  5. 14 CFR 135.441 - Transfer of maintenance records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS: COMMUTER AND ON DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Maintenance, Preventive Maintenance, and Alterations § 135.441 Transfer of maintenance records. Each certificate holder... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Transfer of maintenance records....

  6. 14 CFR 135.439 - Maintenance recording requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS: COMMUTER AND ON DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Maintenance, Preventive Maintenance, and Alterations § 135.439 Maintenance recording requirements. (a) Each certificate... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Maintenance recording requirements....

  7. 14 CFR 135.439 - Maintenance recording requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS: COMMUTER AND ON DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Maintenance, Preventive Maintenance, and Alterations § 135.439 Maintenance recording requirements. (a) Each certificate... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Maintenance recording requirements....

  8. 14 CFR 135.441 - Transfer of maintenance records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS: COMMUTER AND ON DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Maintenance, Preventive Maintenance, and Alterations § 135.441 Transfer of maintenance records. Each certificate holder... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Transfer of maintenance records....

  9. 14 CFR 135.439 - Maintenance recording requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS: COMMUTER AND ON DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Maintenance, Preventive Maintenance, and Alterations § 135.439 Maintenance recording requirements. (a) Each certificate... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Maintenance recording requirements....

  10. Aircraft Availability: An Acquisition Decision Strategy.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    FORCE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY C.2 W right- Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 983 1 5 063 AIRCRAFT AVAILABILITY : AN ACQUISITION DECISION STRATEGY LaRita M...Subtitle) 5. TYPE OF REPORT A PERIOD COVERED AIRCRAFT AVAILABILITY : AN ACQUISITION Masters ThesisDECISIONr STRATEGY DECISION STRATEGY 6. PERFORMING ORG...Research and AIR FORCE I;ួ,,- "-" \\:,3L0ZGY (ATC’ 19. KEY 1 0A 4 5 .. Maintenance Time Reduction Mission Cycle Availability Aircraft Battle Damage

  11. Prepositioned Trailers for Aircraft Battle Damage Support

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-03-01

    skilled as the ABDR team members were, many repairs could not have been accomplished without major module replacement spares ( Feiler , 1989:17...battle damaged aircraft using techniques learned in the ABDR technician course ( Feiler , 1989:13). ABDR Assessor- aircraft maintenance technician who is...Air University Review, (March-April 1966). Feiler , Robert L. Analysis of the United States Air Force Aircraft Battle Damage Repair Engineer

  12. Aircraft Dynamic Response to Damaged Runways.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    translation freedoms, - Aircraft flexible normal modes. - Nose and main gear lever rotations. - Several tyre models. - Brake torque time- history ... history of a force or acceleration (see Figure 3) at som point of interest on the aircraft. Figure 3 also shows a comparison of computed versus measured...EXPERIMENTAL PSA CBA 0 5 10 TIME ISECI Fix.3 Plotted time history vertical accelerations READ PROFILE READ AIRCRAFT CONFIGURATION DELTA = 0 ~1

  13. 14 CFR 91.415 - Changes to aircraft inspection programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES GENERAL OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES Maintenance, Preventive Maintenance, and Alterations § 91.415 Changes to aircraft inspection programs. (a) Whenever the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Changes to aircraft inspection programs. 91...

  14. 77 FR 42225 - Airworthiness Directives; PILATUS AIRCRAFT LTD. Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-18

    ... specified in the Aircraft Maintenance Manual (AMM) under Chapter 4. Prompted by a crack found on one wing of... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; PILATUS AIRCRAFT... (AD) for all PILATUS AIRCRAFT LTD. Models PC 12, PC 12/45, PC 12/47, and PC 12/47E airplanes that...

  15. 14 CFR 91.415 - Changes to aircraft inspection programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Changes to aircraft inspection programs. 91..., Preventive Maintenance, and Alterations § 91.415 Changes to aircraft inspection programs. (a) Whenever the Administrator finds that revisions to an approved aircraft inspection program under § 91.409(f)(4) or §...

  16. 14 CFR 91.415 - Changes to aircraft inspection programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Changes to aircraft inspection programs. 91..., Preventive Maintenance, and Alterations § 91.415 Changes to aircraft inspection programs. (a) Whenever the Administrator finds that revisions to an approved aircraft inspection program under § 91.409(f)(4) or §...

  17. Flexible Heating Head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert L.; Johnson, Samuel D.; Coultrip, Robert H.; Phillips, W. Morris

    1994-01-01

    United States Air Force is investigating method of repairing aircraft by use of adhesive bonding with induction heating to cure adhesive. Fast-acting and reliable induction heating device that is lightweight, portable, and easy to use needed for such applications. Newly developed flexible heating head lightweight and conforms to complex, curved surfaces. Incorporates principles and circuitry of toroid joining gun described in "Toroid Joining Gun for Fittings and Couplings" (LAR-14278). Concentrates heat in local area through induction heating. Flexible heating head contains tank circuit, connected via cable to source of power.

  18. Flexible Heating Head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert L.; Johnson, Samuel D.; Coultrip, Robert H.; Phillips, W. Morris

    1994-01-01

    United States Air Force is investigating method of repairing aircraft by use of adhesive bonding with induction heating to cure adhesive. Fast-acting and reliable induction heating device that is lightweight, portable, and easy to use needed for such applications. Newly developed flexible heating head lightweight and conforms to complex, curved surfaces. Incorporates principles and circuitry of toroid joining gun described in "Toroid Joining Gun for Fittings and Couplings" (LAR-14278). Concentrates heat in local area through induction heating. Flexible heating head contains tank circuit, connected via cable to source of power.

  19. 14 CFR 135.421 - Additional maintenance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... engine aircraft to be used in passenger-carrying IFR operations, written maintenance instructions... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Additional maintenance requirements. 135... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: COMMUTER AND ON DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT...

  20. 14 CFR 135.421 - Additional maintenance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... engine aircraft to be used in passenger-carrying IFR operations, written maintenance instructions... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Additional maintenance requirements. 135... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: COMMUTER AND ON DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT...

  1. 14 CFR 33.90 - Initial maintenance inspection test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Initial maintenance inspection test. 33.90 Section 33.90 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.90 Initial...

  2. 14 CFR 43.10 - Disposition of life-limited aircraft parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE, PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE, REBUILDING, AND ALTERATION § 43.10 Disposition of life-limited aircraft parts. (a) Definitions used in this section. For the purposes of this section the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Disposition of life-limited aircraft parts...

  3. Improved portable lighting for visual aircraft inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Shagam, R.N.; Lerner, J.; Shie, R.

    1995-04-01

    The most common tool used by aircraft inspectors is the personal flashlight. While it is compact and very portable, it is generally typified by poor beam quality which can interfere with the ability for an inspector to detect small defects and anomalies, such as cracks and corrosion sites, which may be indicators of major structural problems. A Light Shaping Diffuser{trademark} (LSD) installed in a stock flashlight as a replacement to the lens can improve the uniformity of an average flashlight and improve the quality of the inspection. Field trials at aircraft maintenance facilities have demonstrated general acceptance of the LSD by aircraft inspection and maintenance personnel.

  4. Flexible-Wing-Based Micro Air Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ifju, Peter G.; Jenkins, David A.; Ettinger, Scott; Lian, Yong-Sheng; Shyy, Wei; Waszak, Martin R.

    2002-01-01

    This paper documents the development and evaluation of an original flexible-wing-based Micro Air Vehicle (MAV) technology that reduces adverse effects of gusty wind conditions and unsteady aerodynamics, exhibits desirable flight stability, and enhances structural durability. The flexible wing concept has been demonstrated on aircraft with wingspans ranging from 18 inches to 5 inches. Salient features of the flexible-wing-based MAV, including the vehicle concept, flexible wing design, novel fabrication methods, aerodynamic assessment, and flight data analysis are presented.

  5. Aircraft Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Albion H. (Inventor); Uden, Edward (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention is an aircraft wing design that creates a bell shaped span load, which results in a negative induced drag (induced thrust) on the outer portion of the wing; such a design obviates the need for rudder control of an aircraft.

  6. Determination of the flight equipment maintenance costs of commuter airlines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Labor and materials costs associated with maintaining and operating 12 commuter airlines carrying an average of from 42 to 1,100 passengers daily in a variety of aircraft types were studied to determine the total direct maintenance cost per flight hour for the airframe, engine, and avionics and other instruments. The distribution of maintenance costs are analyzed for two carriers, one using turboprop aircraft and the other using piston engine aircraft.

  7. Technical Documentation Challenges in Aviation Maintenance: A Proceedings Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    Repair, and Overhaul organizations ( MROs ) where each aircraft must be maintained by maintenance documentation specific to the aircraft owner and...registry number. This means that an MRO is likely to have different work instructions for each aircraft in the shop, even though they are the same...documentation for aviation maintenance. All 28 attendees possessed considerable expertise from either operations or science, including MROs , Original

  8. Productivity Measurement in Aircraft Maintenance Organizations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-01

    Quality Management (TQH) application of W. Edwards Deming and the Theory of Constraints as developed by Eliyahu Goldratt are examined. Deming’s...Management Accounting Sy=j s Champaign-Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1981. 38. Goldratt , Eliyahu and Robert Fox. "Revolutionizing the Factory Floor...56. Goldratt , Eliyahu and James Cox. Thle .G2al. NY: North River Press, 1984. 57. Ishikawa, Kaoru. What is Total Quality Control the Japanese FAX NJ

  9. Privatization of Aircraft Maintenance: Maximizing Contract Effectiveness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-01

    application process has received increased emphasis. This lesson learned should serve as a constant reminder of how important this phase of the management...A-76 Cost Studies Lessons Learned ... ......... .59 APPENDIX 2: Lessons Learned at Columbus AFB A-76 Conversion .. ........ .. 110 LIST OF REFERENCES...Buried within these studies is sometimes a passing note on lessons learned with that specific contracting experience. A review of such studies

  10. A Model of Aircraft Maintenance Officer Turnover.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    depends on the relative strength of forces. Each force is hypothesized to be equal to the algebraic sum of the product of the val- ences and expectancies... dependent and the independent variables. The null hypothesis stated that a linear relationship did not exist. The significance of the relationship of the...RESPONDENTS’ MARITAL STATUS . . . . . .. . 67 4-8. RESPONDENTS’ NUMBER OF SUPPORTED DEPENDENTS 67 4-9. RESPONDENTS’ TENURE AT PRESENT ASSIGNMENT . 68 4-10

  11. Aircraft Structural Maintenance AFSC 458X2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    Donald J. Cochran, Inventory Development Specialist, developed the survey instrument; Captain Douglas K. Eads, Occupational Ana- lyst, analyzed the data...0767 INSTALL OR REMOVE PULL-THROUGH BLIND RIVETS 68 M694 REMOVE DAMAGED AREAS USING AVATION SNIPS 68 F256 APPLY AERODYNAMIC SMOOTHING COMPOUNDS 66 0740

  12. Strategy for Aircraft Maintenance in the Pacific

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-01

    Its Meaning for Tomorrow’s Air Force." Air Force Jo4rnal of Logistics, Fall 1986, 18-21. 8. Brown , Lieutenant Colonel Kenneth N., Jr. "Strategic...Frank S. "Thunderbolts, Eggshells , and Tethers." Air Force Journal of Logistics, Summer 1986, 2-5. 24. Handy, Captain Gurnie H., Jr. and Captain Ronald

  13. Composite components on commercial aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dexter, H. B.

    1980-01-01

    Commercial aircraft manufacturers are making production commitments to composite structure for future aircraft and modifications to current production aircraft. Flight service programs with advanced composites sponsored by NASA during the past 10 years are described. Approximately 2.5 million total composite component flight hours have been accumulated since 1970 on both commercial transports and helicopters. Design concepts with significant mass savings were developed, appropriate inspection and maintenance procedures were established, and satisfactory service was achieved for the various composite components. A major NASA/U.S. industry technology program to reduce fuel consumption of commercial transport aircraft through the use of advanced composites was undertaken. Ground and flight environmental effects on the composite materials used in the flight service programs supplement the flight service evaluation.

  14. 14 CFR 43.7 - Persons authorized to approve aircraft, airframes, aircraft engines, propellers, appliances, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... data approved by the Administrator. (e) The holder of an air carrier operating certificate or an... holder of a repairman certificate (light-sport aircraft) with a maintenance rating may approve an aircraft issued a special airworthiness certificate in light-sport category for return to service,...

  15. 14 CFR 121.709 - Airworthiness release or aircraft log entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airworthiness release or aircraft log entry... Airworthiness release or aircraft log entry. (a) No certificate holder may operate an aircraft after maintenance... appropriate entry in the aircraft log. (b) The airworthiness release or log entry required by paragraph (a)...

  16. 14 CFR 121.709 - Airworthiness release or aircraft log entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Airworthiness release or aircraft log entry... Airworthiness release or aircraft log entry. (a) No certificate holder may operate an aircraft after maintenance... appropriate entry in the aircraft log. (b) The airworthiness release or log entry required by paragraph (a)...

  17. 14 CFR 121.709 - Airworthiness release or aircraft log entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airworthiness release or aircraft log entry... Airworthiness release or aircraft log entry. (a) No certificate holder may operate an aircraft after maintenance... appropriate entry in the aircraft log. (b) The airworthiness release or log entry required by paragraph (a)...

  18. 14 CFR 121.709 - Airworthiness release or aircraft log entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Airworthiness release or aircraft log entry... Airworthiness release or aircraft log entry. (a) No certificate holder may operate an aircraft after maintenance... appropriate entry in the aircraft log. (b) The airworthiness release or log entry required by paragraph (a)...

  19. 14 CFR 121.709 - Airworthiness release or aircraft log entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airworthiness release or aircraft log entry... Airworthiness release or aircraft log entry. (a) No certificate holder may operate an aircraft after maintenance... appropriate entry in the aircraft log. (b) The airworthiness release or log entry required by paragraph (a)...

  20. Structural integrity in aircraft.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardrath, H. F.

    1973-01-01

    The paper reviews briefly the current design philosophies for achieving long, efficient, and reliable service in aircraft structures. The strengths and weaknesses of these design philosophies and their demonstrated records of success are discussed. The state of the art has not been developed to the point where designing can be done without major test inspection and maintenance programs. A broad program of research is proposed through which a viable computerized design scheme will be provided during the next decade. The program will organize and correlate existing knowledge on fatigue and fracture behavior, identify gaps in this knowledge, and guide specific research to upgrade design capabilities.

  1. Aircraft Disinsection

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Some countries may require aircraft coming from countries where certain insects or insect-borne diseases are present, such as malaria and Zika virus, to be treated with insecticide. Find out about regulation of pesticides for this treatment.

  2. Modal Filtering for Control of Flexible Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suh, Peter M.; Mavris, Dimitri N.

    2013-01-01

    Modal regulators and deformation trackers are designed for an open-loop fluttering wing model. The regulators are designed with modal coordinate and accelerometer inputs respectively. The modal coordinates are estimated with simulated fiber optics. The robust stability of the closed-loop systems is compared in a structured singular-value vector analysis. Performance is evaluated and compared in a gust alleviation and flutter suppression simulation. For the same wing and flight condition two wing-shape-tracking control architectures are presented, which achieve deformation control at any point on the wing.

  3. 75 FR 62002 - Airworthiness Directives; Pilatus Aircraft Ltd. Models PC-6, PC-6-H1, PC-6-H2, PC-6/350, PC-6/350...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-07

    ... maintenance requirements and/or airworthiness limitations developed by Pilatus Aircraft Ltd and approved by... correct an unsafe condition for the specified products. The MCAI states: The current Aircraft Maintenance... maintenance requirements and/or airworthiness limitations developed by Pilatus Aircraft Ltd and approved by...

  4. 76 FR 5467 - Airworthiness Directives; Pilatus Aircraft Ltd. Models PC-6, PC-6-H1, PC-6-H2, PC-6/350, PC-6/350...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-01

    ... maintenance requirements and/or airworthiness limitations developed by Pilatus Aircraft Ltd and approved by... maintenance requirements and/or airworthiness limitations developed by Pilatus Aircraft Ltd and approved by... the wing strut fittings and the spherical bearings following the Aircraft Maintenance Manual and the...

  5. Aircraft Steels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-19

    NAWCADPAX/TR-2009/ 12 AIRCRAFT STEELS by E. U. Lee R. Taylor C. Lei H. C. Sanders 19 February 2009...MARYLAND NAWCADPAX/TR-2009/ 12 19 February 2009 AIRCRAFT STEELS by E. U. Lee R. Taylor C. Lei H. C. Sanders...Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39-18 NAWCADPAX/TR-2009/ 12 ii SUMMARY Five high strength and four stainless steels have been studied, identifying their

  6. Brominated flame retardant exposure of aircraft personnel.

    PubMed

    Strid, Anna; Smedje, Greta; Athanassiadis, Ioannis; Lindgren, Torsten; Lundgren, Håkan; Jakobsson, Kristina; Bergman, Åke

    2014-12-01

    The use of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in aircraft is the result of high fire safety demands. Personnel working in or with aircraft might therefore be exposed to several BFRs. Previous studies have reported PBDE exposure in flight attendants and in passengers. One other group that may be subjected to significant BFR exposure via inhalation, are the aircraft maintenance workers. Personnel exposure both during flights and maintenance of aircraft, are investigated in the present study. Several BFRs were present in air and dust sampled during both the exposure scenarios; PBDEs, hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD), decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) and 1,2-bis (2,4,6-tribromophenoxy) ethane. PBDEs were also analyzed in serum from pilots/cabin crew, maintenance workers and from a control group of individuals without any occupational aircraft exposure. Significantly higher concentrations of PBDEs were found in maintenance workers compared to pilots/cabin crew and control subjects with median total PBDE concentrations of 19, 6.8 and 6.6 pmol g(-1) lipids, respectively. Pilots and cabin crew had similar concentrations of most PBDEs as the control group, except for BDE-153 and BDE-154 which were significantly higher. Results indicate higher concentrations among some of the pilots compared to the cabin crew. It is however, evident that the cabin personnel have lower BFR exposures compared to maintenance workers that are exposed to such a degree that their blood levels are significantly different from the control group. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Helicopter Drive System on-Condition Maintenance Capability (UH-1/AH-1)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-07-01

    DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS 52 6.2 STUDY TO DETERMINE SUPPORT REQUIREMENTS FOR A FLEET OF AIRCRAFT WITH DYNAMIC COMPONENT OVERHAUL PERFORMED ON CONDITION...DRIVE SYSTEM COMPONENTS AND THEIR EFFECTIVITY 64 2 AIRCRAFT TECHNICAL MANUALS USED DURING THE STUDY 66 3 DRIVE SYSTEM COMPONENTS DA2410 RECORDS...records on UH-1 and AH-1 aircraft - U. S. Army Depot Maintenance Manuals for UH-1 and AH-1 aircraft listed in Table 2 - U. S. Army preventive maintenance

  8. Aircraft Accident Survivability: Rotary Wing Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    struts, stroking seats, and occupant restraint systems can affect the likelihood of survival following an aircraft accident . Energy attenuating...AIRCRAFT ACCIDENT SURVIVABILITY: ROTARY WING AIRCRAFT Elizabeth B. Motley Naval Air Warfare Center Patuxent River, MD ABSTRACT The...intent of this paper is to explore the premise of aircraft accident survivability focusing primarily on military rotary wing aircraft. Human tolerance

  9. 14 CFR 125.247 - Inspection programs and maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... CAPACITY OF 6,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Maintenance § 125.247 Inspection programs and maintenance. (a) No person may operate an airplane subject to this part unless (1... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Inspection programs and maintenance. 125...

  10. 14 CFR 125.247 - Inspection programs and maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... CAPACITY OF 6,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Maintenance § 125.247 Inspection programs and maintenance. (a) No person may operate an airplane subject to this part unless (1... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Inspection programs and maintenance. 125...

  11. 14 CFR 125.249 - Maintenance manual requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... CAPACITY OF 6,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Maintenance § 125.249 Maintenance manual requirements. (a) Each certificate holder's manual required by § 125.71 of this part shall... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Maintenance manual requirements. 125.249...

  12. Simulating F-22 Heavy Maintenance and Modifications Workforce Multi-skilling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    Force aircraft maintenance depots face complex operating environments due to the diversity of aircraft or mission design series ( MDS ) maintained by...each depot and the variability of maintenance requirements for each MDS . Further complicating their operations is the variability of maintenance ac...tions required from one aircraft to another within each MDS and a highly specialized workforce that has inherent inflexibility to compensate for the

  13. Medication use in a group of aircraft mechanics.

    PubMed

    Sneeder, W H

    2000-11-01

    Aeromedical studies of human factors have focused on the pilot and pilot error rather than on aircraft maintenance workers and maintenance error. This is a report of a survey on medication use in a group of U.S. Air Force aircraft mechanics. A questionnaire was used to retrospectively examine aircraft mechanic medication use, side effects experienced, and return to work. Of those surveyed, 67% (26/39) returned to work while taking medication that could potentially impair job performance. For flying safety reasons, occupational medicine education for aircraft mechanics and their supervisors should address on-the-job use of prescribed medication and self-medication.

  14. Flexible Ablators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stackpoole, Margaret M. (Inventor); Ghandehari, Ehson M. (Inventor); Thornton, Jeremy J. (Inventor); Covington, Melmoth Alan (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A low-density article comprising a flexible substrate and a pyrolizable material impregnated therein, methods of preparing, and devices using the article are disclosed. The pyrolizable material pyrolizes above 350 C and does not flow at temperatures below the pyrolysis temperature. The low-density article remains flexible after impregnation and continues to remain flexible when the pyrolizable material is fully pyrolized.

  15. Preventative Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Migliorino, James

    Boards of education must be convinced that spending money up front for preventive maintenance will, in the long run, save districts' tax dollars. A good program of preventive maintenance can minimize disruption of service; reduce repair costs, energy consumption, and overtime; improve labor productivity and system equipment reliability; handle…

  16. Preventative Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Migliorino, James

    Boards of education must be convinced that spending money up front for preventive maintenance will, in the long run, save districts' tax dollars. A good program of preventive maintenance can minimize disruption of service; reduce repair costs, energy consumption, and overtime; improve labor productivity and system equipment reliability; handle…

  17. Maintenance Downtime

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-07-10

    ... will be unavailable March 5, 2013 8:00 am to 5:00 pm due to database maintenance. Date(s):  Tuesday, March 5, 2013 ... will be unavailable March 5, 2013 8:00 am to 5:00 pm due to database maintenance. ...

  18. Maintenance Budgeting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, J. McCree

    Three methods for the preparation of maintenance budgets are discussed--(1) a traditional method, inconclusive and obsolete, based on gross square footage, (2) the formula approach method based on building classification (wood-frame, masonry-wood, masonry-concrete) with maintenance cost factors for each type plus custodial service rates by type of…

  19. Software Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cannon, Glenn; Jobe, Holly

    Proper cleaning and storage of audiovisual aids is outlined in this brief guide. Materials and equipment needed for first line maintenance are listed, as well as maintenance procedures for records, audio and video tape, film, filmstrips, slides, realia, models, prints, graphics, maps, and overhead transparencies. A 15-item quiz on software…

  20. Floor Maintenance: Tips from the Experts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Shannon

    2001-01-01

    Presents advice from three university maintenance directors on what they see as the most important parts involved in keeping floors in top shape. Training, staff motivation, flexible scheduling, and proper use of supplies are addressed. (GR)

  1. Carbon-monoxide Indicators for Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Womack, S H J; Peterson, J B

    1936-01-01

    Several improvements that have been made on commercially available carbon-monoxide indicators to make them more suitable for aircraft use are described. These improvements include an automatic flow regulator, which permits the use of a simplified instrument on aircraft where a source of suction is available, and a more reliable alarm attachment. A field method for testing instruments on standard samples of carbon monoxide is described. Performance data and instructions in operation and maintenance are given.

  2. Comparison of onboard aircraft Nicad battery chargers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickinson, J. D.

    1980-01-01

    A test was conducted at the Applied Technology Laboratory at Fort Eustis, Virginia to establish the performance characteristics of several onboard aircraft NiCad battery chargers. The test assessed performance characteristics of chargers from Utah Research and Development Company, Aerospace Avionics Corp., Eldec Corp., and Chrysler Corp. These performance characteristics were also compared to the battery performance associated with a simulated aircraft bus charging source. Adjunct tests investigated battery maintenance procedures.

  3. Lifecycle Information of Aircraft Engine Components

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-14

    commercial aircraft, the industry generated a number of potential RFID-based applications for airlines, air- freight carriers, aircraft maintenance and...adoption of RFID technologies to track serially controlled items requires careful planning and design. Data overload and data noise also affect the...performance of RFID systems. Data overload results from continuously scanning the RFID tags within reader range and sending the repeated information

  4. Spring 2008 Industry Study: Aircraft Industry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    on maintenance, refurbishment, and upgrades of existing aircraft to earn money and maintain their expertise. Because USAF tankers have historically...which would use satellite-based air traffic management , digital non-voice communication, and advanced networking to significantly reduce flight time...further reduce noise and emissions. Workforce Management Issues. The aerospace industry in the US, of which the aircraft industry is the largest part

  5. Aircraft cybernetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The use of computers for aircraft control, flight simulation, and inertial navigation is explored. The man-machine relation problem in aviation is addressed. Simple and self-adapting autopilots are described and the assets and liabilities of digital navigation techniques are assessed.

  6. Overview of Innovative Aircraft Power and Propulsion Systems and Their Applications for Planetary Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colozza, Anthony; Landis, Geoffrey; Lyons, Valerie

    2003-01-01

    Planetary exploration may be enhanced by the use of aircraft for mobility. This paper reviews the development of aircraft for planetary exploration missions at NASA and reviews the power and propulsion options for planetary aircraft. Several advanced concepts for aircraft exploration, including the use of in situ resources, the possibility of a flexible all-solid-state aircraft, the use of entomopters on Mars, and the possibility of aerostat exploration of Titan, are presented.

  7. Depot Maintenance: Executed Workload and Maintenance Operations at DOD Depots

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-02-03

    level maintenance on a wide range of vehicles and other military assets , including helicopters, combat vehicles, ships, aircraft, engines, and software... capital investments, process improvements, and public-private partnerships in enclosure I. To perform our work, we reviewed 10 U.S.C. § 2464 and DOD... capital investments.7 This non-generalizable sample was selected to ensure a mix of military services (at least one per type of site—Army depot, Navy

  8. Identification of cytoplasmic subdomains that control pH-sensing of the Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE1): pH-maintenance, ATP-sensitive, and flexible loop domains.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, T; Schmitt, B; Pouysségur, J; Wakabayashi, S; Shigekawa, M

    1997-02-01

    To precisely identify the cytoplasmic subdomains that are responsible for the intracellular pH (pHi)-sensitivity, ATP depletion-induced inhibition and Ca2+ activation of the Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE1), we generated a set of deletion mutants of carboxyl-terminated cytoplasmic domain and expressed them in the exchanger-deficient cell line PS120. We evaluated pHi-sensitivity of these mutants by measuring the resting pHi in cells placed in an acidic medium (pH 6.0) and pHi-dependence of 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl)amiloride-sensitive 22Na+ uptake. Detailed analysis revealed that the cytoplasmic domain of NHE1 is consists of at least four subdomains in terms of pHi-sensitivity of the unstimulated NHE1: I, aa 516-590/595; II, aa 596-635; III aa 636-659; and IV, aa 660-815. Subdomains II and IV were silent for pHi-sensitivity. Subdomain I had a pHi-maintenance function, preserving pHi-sensitivity in a physiological range, whereas subdomain III, overlapping with the high affinity calmodulin (CaM)-binding site, exhibited an autoinhibitory function. Deletion of subdomain I abolished the decrease of pHi-sensitivity induced by cell ATP depletion, indicating that domain I plays a crucial role in this phenomenon. Deletion of subdomain III rendered the inhibition by ATP depletion less efficient, suggesting the possible interaction between subdomains I and III. On the other hand, tandem elongation of subdomain II by insertion did not affect either the inhibitory function of domain III or the removal of this inhibition by ionomycin or thrombin. However, deletion of subdomain II partially abolished the inhibitory effect of subdomain III. Subdomain II thus seems to function as a mobile "flexible loop," permitting the CaM-binding subdomain III to exert its normal function. These findings, together with our previous data, support a concept that cell ATP, Ca2+, and growth factors regulate NHE1 via a mechanism involving direct or indirect interactions of specific cytoplasmic subdomains with the

  9. Static Aeroelasticity in Combat Aircraft.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    aircraft design. Fuselage flexibility is, in general , a secondary consideration. The relatively high density of this structural component, designed to...representation of the structure. An effective beam representation of the total panel stiffness is generally applicable and appropriate for these needs and...loading effect Is to produce zero wing lift, but a large leading-edge-up wing torque. Aeroelastically, a significant wing lift is generated as the

  10. Scorpion: Close Air Support (CAS) aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Chris; Cheng, Rendy; Koehler, Grant; Lyon, Sean; Paguio, Cecilia

    1991-01-01

    The objective is to outline the results of the preliminary design of the Scorpion, a proposed close air support aircraft. The results obtained include complete preliminary analysis of the aircraft in the areas of aerodynamics, structures, avionics and electronics, stability and control, weight and balance, propulsion systems, and costs. A conventional wing, twin jet, twin-tail aircraft was chosen to maximize the desirable characteristics. The Scorpion will feature low speed maneuverability, high survivability, low cost, and low maintenance. The life cycle cost per aircraft will be 17.5 million dollars. The maximum takeoff weight will be 52,760 pounds. Wing loading will be 90 psf. The thrust to weight will be 0.6 lbs/lb. This aircraft meets the specified mission requirements. Some modifications have been suggested to further optimize the design.

  11. Corrosion Maintenance and Experimental Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    drawings, specifications, or other data are used for any purpose other than in connection with a definitely related Government procurement operation...furnished, or in any way supplied the said drawings, specifications, or other data , is not to be re- garded by implication or otherwise as in any manner...in ) evaluation of corrosion inhibitor effectiveness for aircraft rinsing, (2) improvements o AFLC’s Maintenance Data Collection System (MDCS), (3

  12. Transforming The Munitions And Missile Maintenance Officer Career Field

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-01

    maintenance portions were merged with aircraft maintenance officers and the EOD portion was merged with Civil Engineering (CE).29 However, this was...1 AIR STAFF AND COMMAND COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY TRANSFORMING THE MUNITIONS AND MISSILE MAINTENANCE OFFICER CAREER FIELD By Joseph O...ABSTRACT The current construct of Air Force Specialty Code 21M, Munitions and Missile Maintenance Officer was a direct result of both the unauthorized

  13. Novel methods for aircraft corrosion monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossi, Richard H.; Criswell, Thomas L.; Ikegami, Roy; Nelson, James; Normand, Eugene; Rutherford, Paul S.; Shrader, John E.

    1995-07-01

    Monitoring aging aircraft for hidden corrosion is a significant problem for both military and civilian aircraft. Under a Wright Laboratory sponsored program, Boeing Defense & Space Group is investigating three novel methods for detecting and monitoring hidden corrosion: (1) atmospheric neutron radiography, (2) 14 MeV neutron activation analysis and (3) fiber optic corrosion sensors. Atmospheric neutron radiography utilizes the presence of neutrons in the upper atmosphere as a source for interrogation of the aircraft structure. Passive track-etch neutron detectors, which have been previously placed on the aircraft, are evaluated during maintenance checks to assess the presence of corrosion. Neutrons generated by an accelerator are used via activation analysis to assess the presence of distinctive elements in corrosion products, particularly oxygen. By using fast (14 MeV) neutrons for the activation, portable, high intensity sources can be employed for field testing of aircraft. The third novel method uses fiber optics as part of a smart structure technology for corrosion detection and monitoring. Fiber optic corrosion sensors are placed in the aircraft at locations known to be susceptible to corrosion. Periodic monitoring of the sensors is used to alert maintenance personnel to the presence and degree of corrosion at specific locations on the aircraft. During the atmospheric neutron experimentation, we identified a fourth method referred to as secondary emission radiography (SER). This paper discusses the development of these methods.

  14. 14 CFR 43.10 - Disposition of life-limited aircraft parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE, PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE, REBUILDING, AND ALTERATION § 43.10 Disposition of... specified in the type design, the Instructions for Continued Airworthiness, or the maintenance manual. Life... temporarily removed and reinstalled for the purpose of performing maintenance, no disposition under...

  15. 14 CFR 43.10 - Disposition of life-limited aircraft parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE, PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE, REBUILDING, AND ALTERATION § 43.10 Disposition of... specified in the type design, the Instructions for Continued Airworthiness, or the maintenance manual. Life... temporarily removed and reinstalled for the purpose of performing maintenance, no disposition under...

  16. Navy composite maintenance and repair experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donnellan, T. M.; Cochran, R. C.; Rosenzweig, E. L.; Trabocco, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    The Navy has been a strong proponent of composites for aircraft structure. Fleet use of composites started with the F-14 in the early 1970's and has steadily increased. This experience base provides sufficient information to allow an evaluation of the maintenance performance of polymer composites in service. A summary is presented of the Navy's experience with maintenance of composite structure. The general types of damage experienced in the fleet as well as specific examples of composite damage to aircraft is described. The impact of future designs on supportability is also discussed.

  17. Operational Interventions to Maintenance Error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanki, Barbara G.; Walter, Diane; Dulchinos, VIcki

    1997-01-01

    A significant proportion of aviation accidents and incidents are known to be tied to human error. However, research of flight operational errors has shown that so-called pilot error often involves a variety of human factors issues and not a simple lack of individual technical skills. In aircraft maintenance operations, there is similar concern that maintenance errors which may lead to incidents and accidents are related to a large variety of human factors issues. Although maintenance error data and research are limited, industry initiatives involving human factors training in maintenance have become increasingly accepted as one type of maintenance error intervention. Conscientious efforts have been made in re-inventing the team7 concept for maintenance operations and in tailoring programs to fit the needs of technical opeRAtions. Nevertheless, there remains a dual challenge: 1) to develop human factors interventions which are directly supported by reliable human error data, and 2) to integrate human factors concepts into the procedures and practices of everyday technical tasks. In this paper, we describe several varieties of human factors interventions and focus on two specific alternatives which target problems related to procedures and practices; namely, 1) structured on-the-job training and 2) procedure re-design. We hope to demonstrate that the key to leveraging the impact of these solutions comes from focused interventions; that is, interventions which are derived from a clear understanding of specific maintenance errors, their operational context and human factors components.

  18. Operational Interventions to Maintenance Error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanki, Barbara G.; Walter, Diane; Dulchinos, VIcki

    1997-01-01

    A significant proportion of aviation accidents and incidents are known to be tied to human error. However, research of flight operational errors has shown that so-called pilot error often involves a variety of human factors issues and not a simple lack of individual technical skills. In aircraft maintenance operations, there is similar concern that maintenance errors which may lead to incidents and accidents are related to a large variety of human factors issues. Although maintenance error data and research are limited, industry initiatives involving human factors training in maintenance have become increasingly accepted as one type of maintenance error intervention. Conscientious efforts have been made in re-inventing the team7 concept for maintenance operations and in tailoring programs to fit the needs of technical opeRAtions. Nevertheless, there remains a dual challenge: 1) to develop human factors interventions which are directly supported by reliable human error data, and 2) to integrate human factors concepts into the procedures and practices of everyday technical tasks. In this paper, we describe several varieties of human factors interventions and focus on two specific alternatives which target problems related to procedures and practices; namely, 1) structured on-the-job training and 2) procedure re-design. We hope to demonstrate that the key to leveraging the impact of these solutions comes from focused interventions; that is, interventions which are derived from a clear understanding of specific maintenance errors, their operational context and human factors components.

  19. Flexible HVAC System for Lab or Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedan, Jonathan

    2001-01-01

    Discusses an effort to design a heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system flexible enough to accommodate an easy conversion of classrooms to laboratories and dry labs to wet labs. The design's energy efficiency and operations and maintenance are examined. (GR)

  20. Flexible HVAC System for Lab or Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedan, Jonathan

    2001-01-01

    Discusses an effort to design a heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system flexible enough to accommodate an easy conversion of classrooms to laboratories and dry labs to wet labs. The design's energy efficiency and operations and maintenance are examined. (GR)

  1. Eclipse program QF-106 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This photo shows two QF-106 aircraft that were used for the Eclipse project, both parked at the Mojave Airport in Mojave, California. In 1997 and 1998, the Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards, California, supported and hosted a Kelly Space & Technology, Inc. project called Eclipse, which sought to demonstrate the feasibility of a reusable tow-launch vehicle concept. The project goal was to successfully tow, inflight, a modified QF-106 delta-wing aircraft with an Air Force C-141A transport aircraft. This would demonstrate the possibility of towing and launching an actual launch vehicle from behind a tow plane. Dryden was the responsible test organization and had flight safety responsibility for the Eclipse project. Dryden provided engineering, instrumentation, simulation, modification, maintenance, range support, and research pilots for the test program. The Air Force Flight Test Center (AFFTC), Edwards, California, supplied the C-141A transport aircraft and crew and configured the aircraft as needed for the tests. The AFFTC also provided the concept and detail design and analysis as well as hardware for the tow system and QF-106 modifications. Dryden performed the modifications to convert the QF-106 drone into the piloted EXD-01 (Eclipse eXperimental Demonstrator -01) experimental aircraft. Kelly Space & Technology hoped to use the results gleaned from the tow test in developing a series of low-cost, reusable launch vehicles. These tests demonstrated the validity of towing a delta-wing aircraft having high wing loading, validated the tow simulation model, and demonstrated various operational procedures, such as ground processing of in-flight maneuvers and emergency abort scenarios.

  2. Eclipse program QF-106 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This photo shows two QF-106 aircraft that were used for the Eclipse project, both parked at the Mojave Airport in Mojave, California. In 1997 and 1998, the Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards, California, supported and hosted a Kelly Space & Technology, Inc. project called Eclipse, which sought to demonstrate the feasibility of a reusable tow-launch vehicle concept. The project goal was to successfully tow, inflight, a modified QF-106 delta-wing aircraft with an Air Force C-141A transport aircraft. This would demonstrate the possibility of towing and launching an actual launch vehicle from behind a tow plane. Dryden was the responsible test organization and had flight safety responsibility for the Eclipse project. Dryden provided engineering, instrumentation, simulation, modification, maintenance, range support, and research pilots for the test program. The Air Force Flight Test Center (AFFTC), Edwards, California, supplied the C-141A transport aircraft and crew and configured the aircraft as needed for the tests. The AFFTC also provided the concept and detail design and analysis as well as hardware for the tow system and QF-106 modifications. Dryden performed the modifications to convert the QF-106 drone into the piloted EXD-01 (Eclipse eXperimental Demonstrator -01) experimental aircraft. Kelly Space & Technology hoped to use the results gleaned from the tow test in developing a series of low-cost, reusable launch vehicles. These tests demonstrated the validity of towing a delta-wing aircraft having high wing loading, validated the tow simulation model, and demonstrated various operational procedures, such as ground processing of in-flight maneuvers and emergency abort scenarios.

  3. Aircraft Corrosion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    materials still under development which look promising for the future. Classical corrosion control involves attacking the problem from three standpoints...effective- ness CONTROL BOX MECHANICAL AND Intermittent operation and faulty frequency ELECTRICAL TUNING LINKAGE selection. AND MOTOR CONTACTS WATER TRAPS...F.Fink 7 CORROSION CONTROL MEASURES FOR MILITARY AIRCRAFT - PRESENT UK REQUIREMENTS AND FUTURE DEVELOPMENTS by V.C.R.McLoughlin 8 CORROSION PREVENTION

  4. Aircraft Ducting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Templeman Industries developed the Ultra-Seal Ducting System, an environmental composite air duct with a 50 percent weight savings over current metallic ducting, but could not find a commercial facility with the ability to test it. Marshall Space Flight Center conducted a structural evaluation of the duct, equivalent to 86 years of take-offs and landings in an aircraft. Boeing Commercial Airplane Group and McDonnell Douglas Corporation are currently using the ducts.

  5. Turboprop aircraft against terrorism: a SWOT analysis of turboprop aircraft in CAS operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavuz, Murat; Akkas, Ali; Aslan, Yavuz

    2012-06-01

    Today, the threat perception is changing. Not only for countries but also for defence organisations like NATO, new threat perception is pointing terrorism. Many countries' air forces become responsible of fighting against terorism or Counter-Insurgency (COIN) Operations. Different from conventional warfare, alternative weapon or weapon systems are required for such operatioins. In counter-terrorism operations modern fighter jets are used as well as helicopters, subsonic jets, Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS), turboprop aircraft, baloons and similar platforms. Succes and efficiency of the use of these platforms can be determined by evaluating the conditions, the threats and the area together. Obviously, each platform has advantages and disadvantages for different cases. In this research, examples of turboprop aircraft usage against terrorism and with a more general approach, turboprop aircraft for Close Air Support (CAS) missions from all around the world are reviewed. In this effort, a closer look is taken at the countries using turboprop aircraft in CAS missions while observing the fields these aircraft are used in, type of operations, specifications of the aircraft, cost and the maintenance factors. Thus, an idea about the convenience of using these aircraft in such operations can be obtained. A SWOT analysis of turboprop aircraft in CAS operations is performed. This study shows that turboprop aircraft are suitable to be used in counter-terrorism and COIN operations in low threat environment and is cost benefical compared to jets.

  6. Fourth NASA Workshop on Computational Control of Flexible Aerospace Systems, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Lawrence W., Jr. (Compiler)

    1991-01-01

    A collection of papers presented at the Fourth NASA Workshop on Computational Control of Flexible Aerospace Systems is given. The papers address modeling, systems identification, and control of flexible aircraft, spacecraft and robotic systems.

  7. Civil Applications For New V/STOL and STOL Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albers, James A.; Zuk, John

    1990-01-01

    New designs offer benefits in congested urban areas and remote regions. Report explores potential uses in civil aviation of advanced rotorcraft, vertical/short-takeoff-and-landing (V/STOL) aircraft, and short-takeoff-and-landing (STOL) aircraft. Future opportunities overcome formidable geographic barriers and lack of major airport facilities, bringing fast, flexible transportation to remote areas. Aircraft relieves congestion at airports in densely populated areas by utilizing pads and short runways without interfering with large-air-carrier traffic.

  8. Optimizing Maintenance Manpower for USMC F/A-18 Squadrons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    Flight FOD Foreign Object Damage FMC Full Mission Capable FRC Fleet Readiness Center GAMS Generic Algebraic Modeling System I-Level Intermediate...Maintenance Inspection RBA Ready Basic Aircraft T&R Training and Readiness TACAIR Tactical Aircraft TFSMS Total Force Structure Management System...United States Marine Corps (USMC) aviation, squadrons are short of the requisite number of Ready Basic Aircraft (RBA) to sustain required levels of

  9. Aviation Maintenance Technology. General. G104 Technical Mechanics. Instructor Material.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    These instructor materials for an aviation maintenance technology course contain five instructional modules. The modules cover the following topics: performing aircraft ground handling and servicing, using hand and power tools and precision measuring instruments, identifying and selecting aircraft hardware, fabricating and installing rigid and…

  10. 14 CFR 33.90 - Initial maintenance inspection test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.90 Initial maintenance inspection test. Each applicant, except an applicant for an engine being type certificated through amendment... one of the following tests on an engine that substantially conforms to the type design to establish...

  11. 14 CFR 33.90 - Initial maintenance inspection test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.90 Initial maintenance inspection test. Each applicant, except an applicant for an engine being type certificated through amendment... one of the following tests on an engine that substantially conforms to the type design to establish...

  12. 14 CFR 33.90 - Initial maintenance inspection test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.90 Initial maintenance inspection test. Each applicant, except an applicant for an engine being type certificated through amendment... one of the following tests on an engine that substantially conforms to the type design to establish...

  13. Aviation Maintenance Technology. General. G104 Technical Mechanics. Instructor Material.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    These instructor materials for an aviation maintenance technology course contain five instructional modules. The modules cover the following topics: performing aircraft ground handling and servicing, using hand and power tools and precision measuring instruments, identifying and selecting aircraft hardware, fabricating and installing rigid and…

  14. 2001 Industry Studies: Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-01

    transnational alliances. Additional Topics The Aircraft Industry, Globalization, and E - commerce - CDR Mike Steinmetz, USN The effect of the...information age, globalization, and e - commerce is pervasive throughout the domestic and international aircraft industry. From advanced collaborative aircraft...Magazine Department of Commerce General Electric Aircraft Engines Merrill Lynch Aerospace Marketing Teal Group 3 INTRODUCTION The aircraft industry is

  15. Flexibility Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    These brief guidelines for a muscular flexibility program state that the purpose of such a program is to increase the range of motion in order to avoid injuries and eliminate awkwardness in physical activities. A flexibility program is described as an extension of the warm-up period and should be an ongoing, permanent effort to lengthen muscles. A…

  16. Flexible Scheduling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Harold S.; Bechard, Joseph E.

    A flexible schedule allows teachers to change group size, group composition, and class length according to the purpose of the lesson. This pamphlet presents various "master" schedules for flexible scheduling: (1) Simple block schedules, (2) back-to-back schedules, (3) interdisciplinary schedules, (4) school-wide block schedules, (5) open-lab…

  17. 22 CFR 151.10 - Minimum limits of insurance for aircraft and/or vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Minimum limits of insurance for aircraft and/or... aircraft and/or vessels. Insurance in respect of vessels and/or aircraft shall provide limits of liability adequate in light of reasonably foreseeable risks from the ownership, maintenance, or other regular use of...

  18. 14 CFR 91.319 - Aircraft having experimental certificates: Operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...— (1) Tow a glider that is a light-sport aircraft or unpowered ultralight vehicle in accordance with... glider that is a light-sport aircraft or unpowered ultralight vehicle for compensation or hire or to... repairman (light-sport aircraft) with a maintenance rating, an appropriately rated mechanic, or an...

  19. 14 CFR 61.45 - Practical tests: Required aircraft and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... the U.S. Armed Forces; (B) The aircraft is airworthy under the maintenance standards of the U.S. Armed Forces; and (C) The applicant has a letter from his or her commanding officer authorizing the use of the.... Except for lighter-than-air aircraft, and a glider without an engine, an aircraft used for a...

  20. 14 CFR 125.411 - Airworthiness release or maintenance record entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... prepared— (1) An airworthiness release; or (2) An entry in the aircraft maintenance records in accordance... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airworthiness release or maintenance record... CAPACITY OF 6,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Records and Reports...

  1. 14 CFR 125.411 - Airworthiness release or maintenance record entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... prepared— (1) An airworthiness release; or (2) An entry in the aircraft maintenance records in accordance... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airworthiness release or maintenance record... CAPACITY OF 6,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Records and Reports...

  2. Educating with Aircraft Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Hobie

    1976-01-01

    Described is utilization of aircraft models, model aircraft clubs, and model aircraft magazines to promote student interest in aerospace education. The addresses for clubs and magazines are included. (SL)

  3. Educating with Aircraft Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Hobie

    1976-01-01

    Described is utilization of aircraft models, model aircraft clubs, and model aircraft magazines to promote student interest in aerospace education. The addresses for clubs and magazines are included. (SL)

  4. 76 FR 1990 - Airworthiness Directives; Pilatus Aircraft Ltd. Models PC-6, PC-6-H1, PC-6-H2, PC-6/350, PC-6/350...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-12

    ... requirement for the ``Mild Corrosion Severity Zone''. In addition, some editorial changes have been made for... PC- 6 Aircraft Maintenance Manual (AMM) Chapter 5 limitations which have included the same repetitive... Aircraft Ltd. Pilatus PC-6 Aircraft Maintenance Manual, dated November 30, 2008 (referenced as revision...

  5. Control of Next Generation Aircraft and Wind Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The first part of this talk will describe some of the exciting new next generation aircraft that NASA is proposing for the future. These aircraft are being designed to reduce aircraft fuel consumption and environmental impact. Reducing the aircraft weight is one approach that will be used to achieve these goals. A new control framework will be presented that enables lighter, more flexible aircraft to maintain aircraft handling qualities, while preventing the aircraft from exceeding structural load limits. The second part of the talk will give an overview of utility-scale wind turbines and their control. Results of collaboration with Dr. Balas will be presented, including new theory to adaptively control the turbine in the presence of structural modes, with the focus on the application of this theory to a high-fidelity simulation of a wind turbine.

  6. WHC Maintenance

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-04-28

    ISS019-E-011464 (28 April 2009) --- Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) astronaut Koichi Wakata, Expedition 19/20 flight engineer, performs in-flight maintenance on the waste and hygiene compartment located in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station.

  7. WHC Maintenance

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-04-28

    ISS019-E-011471 (28 April 2009) --- Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) astronaut Koichi Wakata, Expedition 19/20 flight engineer, performs in-flight maintenance on the waste and hygiene compartment located in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station.

  8. Flexible Sigmoidoscopy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Task Force (USPSTF). Most doctors recommend colonoscopy to screen for colon cancer because colonoscopy shows the entire colon and can remove colon polyps. However, preparing for and performing a flexible sigmoidoscopy may take less time and you may ...

  9. Flexible Straws.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prentice, Gerard

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the use of flexible straws for teaching properties of figures and families of shapes. Describes a way to make various two- or three-dimensional geometric shapes. Lists eight advantages of the method. (YP)

  10. Flexible Parsing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-22

    grammaticality. The primary objective of this project Is to develop flexible computer q parsing techniques which can deal with the various kinds of...0143 6. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT . TASK Computer Science Department Carnegie-Nellon University PE61102F; 2304...spontaneously, the, often do not adhere strictly to commonly accepted standards of grammaticalitf. The primary objective of this proJect is to develop flexible

  11. Classification of Aircraft Maneuvers for Fault Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oza, Nikunj; Tumer, Irem Y.; Tumer, Kagan; Huff, Edward M.; Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Automated fault detection is an increasingly important problem in aircraft maintenance and operation. Standard methods of fault detection assume the availability of either data produced during all possible faulty operation modes or a clearly-defined means to determine whether the data provide a reasonable match to known examples of proper operation. In the domain of fault detection in aircraft, the first assumption is unreasonable and the second is difficult to determine. We envision a system for online fault detection in aircraft, one part of which is a classifier that predicts the maneuver being performed by the aircraft as a function of vibration data and other available data. To develop such a system, we use flight data collected under a controlled test environment, subject to many sources of variability. We explain where our classifier fits into the envisioned fault detection system as well as experiments showing the promise of this classification subsystem.

  12. Maneuver Classification for Aircraft Fault Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oza, Nikunj C.; Tumer, Irem Y.; Tumer, Kagan; Huff, Edward M.

    2003-01-01

    Automated fault detection is an increasingly important problem in aircraft maintenance and operation. Standard methods of fault detection assume the availability of either data produced during all possible faulty operation modes or a clearly-defined means to determine whether the data provide a reasonable match to known examples of proper operation. In the domain of fault detection in aircraft, identifying all possible faulty and proper operating modes is clearly impossible. We envision a system for online fault detection in aircraft, one part of which is a classifier that predicts the maneuver being performed by the aircraft as a function of vibration data and other available data. To develop such a system, we use flight data collected under a controlled test environment, subject to many sources of variability. We explain where our classifier fits into the envisioned fault detection system as well as experiments showing the promise of this classification subsystem.

  13. Classification of Aircraft Maneuvers for Fault Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oza, Nikunj C.; Tumer, Irem Y.; Tumer, Kagan; Huff, Edward M.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Automated fault detection is an increasingly important problem in aircraft maintenance and operation. Standard methods of fault detection assume the availability of either data produced during all possible faulty operation modes or a clearly-defined means to determine whether the data is a reasonable match to known examples of proper operation. In our domain of fault detection in aircraft, the first assumption is unreasonable and the second is difficult to determine. We envision a system for online fault detection in aircraft, one part of which is a classifier that predicts the maneuver being performed by the aircraft as a function of vibration data and other available data. We explain where this subsystem fits into our envisioned fault detection system as well its experiments showing the promise of this classification subsystem.

  14. The drive for Aircraft Energy Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, R. L., Jr.; Maddalon, D. V.

    1984-01-01

    NASA's Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) program, which began in 1976, has mounted a development effort in four major transport aircraft technology fields: laminar flow systems, advanced aerodynamics, flight controls, and composite structures. ACEE has explored two basic methods for achieving drag-reducing boundary layer laminarization: the use of suction through the wing structure (via slots or perforations) to remove boundary layer turbulence, and the encouragement of natural laminar flow maintenance through refined design practices. Wind tunnel tests have been conducted for wide bodied aircraft equipped with high aspect ratio supercritical wings and winglets. Maneuver load control and pitch-active stability augmentation control systems reduce fuel consumption by reducing the drag associated with high aircraft stability margins. Composite structures yield lighter airframes that in turn call for smaller wing and empennage areas, reducing induced drag for a given payload. In combination, all four areas of development are expected to yield a fuel consumption reduction of 40 percent.

  15. Emerging nondestructive inspection methods for aging aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Beattie, A; Dahlke, L; Gieske, J

    1994-01-01

    This report identifies and describes emerging nondestructive inspection (NDI) methods that can potentially be used to inspect commercial transport and commuter aircraft for structural damage. The nine categories of emerging NDI techniques are: acoustic emission, x-ray computed tomography, backscatter radiation, reverse geometry x-ray, advanced electromagnetics, including magnetooptic imaging and advanced eddy current techniques, coherent optics, advanced ultrasonics, advanced visual, and infrared thermography. The physical principles, generalized performance characteristics, and typical applications associated with each method are described. In addition, aircraft inspection applications are discussed along with the associated technical considerations. Finally, the status of each technique is presented, with a discussion on when it may be available for use in actual aircraft maintenance programs. It should be noted that this is a companion document to DOT/FAA/CT-91/5, Current Nondestructive Inspection Methods for Aging Aircraft.

  16. The drive for Aircraft Energy Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, R. L., Jr.; Maddalon, D. V.

    1984-01-01

    NASA's Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) program, which began in 1976, has mounted a development effort in four major transport aircraft technology fields: laminar flow systems, advanced aerodynamics, flight controls, and composite structures. ACEE has explored two basic methods for achieving drag-reducing boundary layer laminarization: the use of suction through the wing structure (via slots or perforations) to remove boundary layer turbulence, and the encouragement of natural laminar flow maintenance through refined design practices. Wind tunnel tests have been conducted for wide bodied aircraft equipped with high aspect ratio supercritical wings and winglets. Maneuver load control and pitch-active stability augmentation control systems reduce fuel consumption by reducing the drag associated with high aircraft stability margins. Composite structures yield lighter airframes that in turn call for smaller wing and empennage areas, reducing induced drag for a given payload. In combination, all four areas of development are expected to yield a fuel consumption reduction of 40 percent.

  17. 14 CFR 91.421 - Rebuilt engine maintenance records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Rebuilt engine maintenance records. 91.421 Section 91.421 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... operator may use a new maintenance record, without previous operating history, for an aircraft engine...

  18. 14 CFR 91.421 - Rebuilt engine maintenance records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Rebuilt engine maintenance records. 91.421 Section 91.421 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... operator may use a new maintenance record, without previous operating history, for an aircraft engine...

  19. 14 CFR 91.421 - Rebuilt engine maintenance records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rebuilt engine maintenance records. 91.421 Section 91.421 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... operator may use a new maintenance record, without previous operating history, for an aircraft engine...

  20. 14 CFR 91.421 - Rebuilt engine maintenance records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Rebuilt engine maintenance records. 91.421 Section 91.421 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... operator may use a new maintenance record, without previous operating history, for an aircraft engine...

  1. Advanced Propulsion System Studies for General Aviation Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisenberg, Joseph D. (Technical Monitor); Elliott, Kathryn A.; Huebner, Steven R.

    2003-01-01

    In this study, new technology engines were defined in two power classes: a 200 hp class, for a light, 4-place personal aircraft, and a 1500 pound thrust class for a twin-engined, 6 place business jet type aircraft. The engines were evaluated for retrofitting suitable current production aircraft for comparison to the existing engines. The engines were evaluated for performance using a typical mission for each aircraft, as well as a variant mission to further appraise performance.Issues of cost, safety, maintenance, and reliability were also addressed. Manufacturing plans were then constructed.

  2. Flexible ultrasonic array system for inspecting thick composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankle, Robert S.; Rose, Douglas N.

    1995-06-01

    Composite materials, which have commonly been used in recreational boats, are now being applied to more challenging marine applications. The high specific stiffness and strength of composites translates into increased range and payload. Composites offer the added benefits of corrosion and erosion resistance, fatigue and wear resistance, reduced signature, and reduced maintenance and life cycle costs as compared to traditional metallic structures. Although ultrasonic techniques are typically used to inspect composite structures, thick composites, such as those used in marine applications, are difficult to inspect with ordinary ultrasonic methods. An ultrasonic inspection system is being developed for the US Army to inspect thick composite materials for future armored vehicles. This system is an extension of the existing PARIS flexible array ultrasonic inspection system, which was originally developed for inspecting thin composite aircraft structures. The extension is designed to increase ultrasonic penetration by 1) fabricating an array that operates at lower frequency and higher voltage, and 2) employing a synthetic pulse technique. The flexible array can rapidly inspect large areas and produce images of the inspection results that are easy to interpret. This paper describes the ultrasonic inspection system and presents examples of inspection results from both thick and thin composite materials.

  3. Problems with aging wiring in Naval aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Frank J.

    1994-01-01

    The Navy is experiencing a severe aircraft electrical wiring maintenance problem as a result of the extensive use of an aromatic polyimide insulation that is deteriorating at a rate that was unexpected when this wire was initially selected. This problem has significantly affected readiness, reliability, and safety and has greatly increased the cost of ownership of Naval aircraft. Failures in wire harnesses have exhibited arcing and burning that will propagate drastically, to the interruption of many electrical circuits from a fault initiated by the failure of deteriorating wires. There is an urgent need for a capability to schedule aircraft rewiring in an orderly manner with a logically derived determination of which aircraft have aged to the point of absolute necessity. Excessive maintenance was demonstrated to result from the accelerated aging due to the parameters of moisture, temperature, and strain that exist in the Naval Aircraft environment. Laboratory studies have demonstrated that MIL-W-81381 wire insulation when aged at high humidities followed the classical Arrhenius thermal aging relationship. In an extension of the project a multifactor formula was developed that is now capable of predicting life under varying conditions of these service parameters. An automated test system has also been developed to analyze the degree of deterioration that has occurred in wires taken from an aircraft in order to obtain an assessment of remaining life. Since it is both physically and financially impossible to replace the wiring in all the Navy's aircraft at once, this system will permit expedient scheduling so that those aircraft that are most probable to have wiring failure problems can be overhauled first.

  4. Problems with aging wiring in Naval aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Frank J.

    1994-09-01

    The Navy is experiencing a severe aircraft electrical wiring maintenance problem as a result of the extensive use of an aromatic polyimide insulation that is deteriorating at a rate that was unexpected when this wire was initially selected. This problem has significantly affected readiness, reliability, and safety and has greatly increased the cost of ownership of Naval aircraft. Failures in wire harnesses have exhibited arcing and burning that will propagate drastically, to the interruption of many electrical circuits from a fault initiated by the failure of deteriorating wires. There is an urgent need for a capability to schedule aircraft rewiring in an orderly manner with a logically derived determination of which aircraft have aged to the point of absolute necessity. Excessive maintenance was demonstrated to result from the accelerated aging due to the parameters of moisture, temperature, and strain that exist in the Naval Aircraft environment. Laboratory studies have demonstrated that MIL-W-81381 wire insulation when aged at high humidities followed the classical Arrhenius thermal aging relationship. In an extension of the project a multifactor formula was developed that is now capable of predicting life under varying conditions of these service parameters. An automated test system has also been developed to analyze the degree of deterioration that has occurred in wires taken from an aircraft in order to obtain an assessment of remaining life. Since it is both physically and financially impossible to replace the wiring in all the Navy's aircraft at once, this system will permit expedient scheduling so that those aircraft that are most probable to have wiring failure problems can be overhauled first.

  5. Periodontal maintenance.

    PubMed

    Tan, A E S

    2009-09-01

    The main goal of periodontal therapy is to establish an oral environment compatible with periodontal health by the physical disruption of the plaque biofilm and adjunctive chemical means if required. Implicit in this objective is the ongoing requirement of detection and interception of new and recurrent disease, which continues at selected intervals for the life of the dentition after the initial ("active") phase of periodontal treatment. This concept of ongoing periodontal maintenance therapy has been embraced as the mandatory requirement for favourable periodontal outcomes based on institutional clinical trials and in practice-based studies in various parts of the world. This review examines the ramifications of periodontal maintenance therapy based upon a multi-level assessment of logistic issues and risk factors at three levels: (1) The patient level - treatment time; patient attendance compliance; and homecare measures, antiseptics/antibiotics and smoking. (2) The level of the individual tooth - tooth loss; and evaluation of success versus survival. (3) The level of each tooth surface ("site") - probing depth, loss of attachment and bleeding on probing; and changes in clinical attachment levels. In spite of the diversity of studies conducted, there is agreement on the efficacy of periodontal maintenance therapy when compared with studies on untreated populations and in treated cases that were not maintained.

  6. WEST ELEVATION OF USAIR MAINTENANCE HANGAR AT GREATER BUFFALO INTERNATIONAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    WEST ELEVATION OF USAIR MAINTENANCE HANGAR AT GREATER BUFFALO INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT. A BOEING 737-200 HAS BEEN TOWED IN FOR AN OVERNIGHT (BALANCE) CHECK. THE TAIL DOCK STANDS ARE IN POSITION AT THE REAR OF THE AIRCRAFT TO FACILITATE INSPECTION. MAINTENANCE CREWS PERFORM NIGHTLY SERVICE ON UP TO 6 AIRCRAFT. THE NORMAL SEQUENCE OF 12 ROUTINE CHECKS COVERS SEVEN BASIC AREAS: INTERIOR, EXTERIOR, WINGS, LANDING GEAR, TAIL, AUXILIARY POWER UNIT (APU), AND ENGINES. THE WORK FORCE CONSISTS OF 5 INSPECTORS, 3 LEAD MECHANICS, AND 24 MECHANICS; NIGHTLY SCHEDULES ARE COORDINATED BY A PLANNER. - Greater Buffalo International Airport, Maintenance Hangar, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  7. Aircraft Electric Secondary Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Technologies resulted to aircraft power systems and aircraft in which all secondary power is supplied electrically are discussed. A high-voltage dc power generating system for fighter aircraft, permanent magnet motors and generators for aircraft, lightweight transformers, and the installation of electric generators on turbine engines are among the topics discussed.

  8. Aircraft. [Soviet technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The physical principles of flight, and the consideration of atmospheric composition and aerodynamic forces in the design and construction of various types of aircraft are discussed. Flight characteristics are described for helicopters, rotary-wing aircraft, short and vertical takeoff aircraft, and tailess or variable geometry wing aircraft. Flow characteristics at various speeds are also discussed.

  9. Aircraft Attitude Control by Fuzzy Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Akio; Matsuba, Takashi

    The fuzzy control law to improve dutch roll characteristics of aircraft was designed and its control performance was evaluated. First, the control law was designed for a small-high speed aircraft at low altitude and low-speed flight conditions. The control law was then applied to flight conditions from minimum speed to supersonic speed and from sea level to high altitude. The control performance for these conditions was evaluated. Furthermore, this control law was adapted to a large transport aircraft with no parameter changes. The evaluation showed good control performance to improve the dutch roll characteristics under all flight conditions for both small high-speed aircraft and large transport aircraft without the parameter changes. This means that the fuzzy control proved to provide effective flexible application to aircraft stability augmentation. If an aircraft in actual flight is in strong air turbulence, inputs to the fuzzy controller may exceed the limit of its effective range. To cope with this problem, the countermeasures were introduced, their methods tested, and their effectiveness proved.

  10. Aircraft empennage structural detail design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meholic, Greg; Brown, Rhonda; Hall, Melissa; Harvey, Robert; Singer, Michael; Tella, Gustavo

    1993-01-01

    This project involved the detailed design of the aft fuselage and empennage structure, vertical stabilizer, rudder, horizontal stabilizer, and elevator for the Triton primary flight trainer. The main design goals under consideration were to illustrate the integration of the control systems devices used in the tail surfaces and their necessary structural supports as well as the elevator trim, navigational lighting system, electrical systems, tail-located ground tie, and fuselage/cabin interface structure. Accommodations for maintenance, lubrication, adjustment, and repairability were devised. Weight, fabrication, and (sub)assembly goals were addressed. All designs were in accordance with the FAR Part 23 stipulations for a normal category aircraft.

  11. Flexible flatfoot

    PubMed Central

    Atik, Aziz; Ozyurek, Selahattin

    2014-01-01

    While being one of the most frequent parental complained deformities, flatfoot does not have a universally accepted description. The reasons of flexible flatfoot are still on debate, but they must be differentiated from rigid flatfoot which occurs secondary to other pathologies. These children are commonly brought up to a physician without any complaint. It should be kept in mind that the etiology may vary from general soft tissue laxities to intrinsic foot pathologies. Every flexible flatfoot does not require radiological examination or treatment if there is no complaint. Otherwise further investigation and conservative or surgical treatment may necessitate. PMID:28058304

  12. Piping Flexibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A NASA computer program aids Hudson Engineering Corporation, Houston, Texas, in the design and construction of huge petrochemical processing plants like the one shown, which is located at Ju'aymah, Saudi Arabia. The pipes handling the flow of chemicals are subject to a variety of stresses, such as weight and variations in pressure and temperature. Hudson Engineering uses a COSMIC piping flexibility analysis computer program to analyze stresses and unsure the necessary strength and flexibility of the pipes. This program helps the company realize substantial savings in reduced engineering time.

  13. Vibrational Effects of Turbopump Housing Flexibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenwick, J. R.; Tarn, R. B.

    1986-01-01

    Methods of computer simulation of turbopump vibrations described in report. For aircraft and aerospace service, high-speed, high-performance turbomachinery should be as light in weight as possible. Certain amount of mass needed in turbomachine housing for stiffness. Report addresses question of how much extra weight is necessary. Analyses shows under certain conditions, flexible housing more stable than rigid one.

  14. Flexible Blades for Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Madeline Carlisle; Macphee, David; Harris, Caleb

    2016-11-01

    Previous research has shown that windmills with flexible blades are more efficient than those with rigid blades. Flexibility offers passive pitch control, preferable to active pitch control which is costly and requires maintenance. Flexible blades morph such that the blade more closely resembles its design point at part load and over load. The lift-to-drag ratios on individual blades was investigated. A mold was designed and machined from an acrylic slab for the casting of blades with a NACA 0012 cross section. A flexible blade was cast from silicone and a rigid blade was cast from polyurethane. Each of these blades was tested in a wind tunnel, cantilever mounted, spanning the whole test section. The angle of attack was varied by rotating the mount. All tests were performed at the same wind speed. A load cell within the mount measured forces on the blade, from which the lift and drag forces were calculated. The stall point for the flexible blade occurred later than for the rigid blade, which agrees with previous research. Lift-to-drag ratios were larger for the flexible blade at all angles of attack tested. Flexible blades seem to be a viable option for passive pitch control. Future research will include different airfoil cross sections, wind speeds, and blade materials. Funding from NSF REU site Grant EEC 1358991 is greatly appreciated.

  15. EDF experiences in maintenance and condition monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Zwingelstein, G.; Godin, R. )

    1989-01-01

    Maintenance is one of the key elements in a reliable, economic and flexible electricity generation program. Electricite de France, operating more than 100 units (fossil and nuclear), defined several years ago and applies a policy for its maintenance activities. The development of new maintenance concepts such as preventive,condition-directed or predictive maintenance has led EDF to undertake a research program in these areas. This paper presents the current status of the maintenance policy, the research and development program for valves, rotating machines, instrumentation and control systems. In conclusion, comments are made on the trends and the future organization of the maintenance activities taking into account the integrated diagnostic and on-line monitoring center.

  16. Flexible Answers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seeley, James

    1997-01-01

    Describes how schools are investigating single-ply roofing systems for new and retrofit construction. Discusses some of the considerations in seaming together a single-ply roof, steps in choosing roofing material and a roofing contractor, warranty advice, and the importance of keeping records on roof maintenance. (RJM)

  17. Coexistence Analysis of Civil Unmanned Aircraft Systems at Low Altitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuzhe

    2016-11-01

    The requirement of unmanned aircraft systems in civil areas is growing. However, provisioning of flight efficiency and safety of unmanned aircraft has critical requirements on wireless communication spectrum resources. Current researches mainly focus on spectrum availability. In this paper, the unmanned aircraft system communication models, including the coverage model and data rate model, and two coexistence analysis procedures, i. e. the interference and noise ratio criterion and frequency-distance-direction criterion, are proposed to analyze spectrum requirements and interference results of the civil unmanned aircraft systems at low altitudes. In addition, explicit explanations are provided. The proposed coexistence analysis criteria are applied to assess unmanned aircraft systems' uplink and downlink interference performances and to support corresponding spectrum planning. Numerical results demonstrate that the proposed assessments and analysis procedures satisfy requirements of flexible spectrum accessing and safe coexistence among multiple unmanned aircraft systems.

  18. Pulsed Holographic Nondestructive Testing On Aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagot, Hubert; Smigielski, Paul; Albe, Felix; Arnaud, Jean-Louis

    1983-06-01

    An holographic camera composed of two ruby lasers was built at ISL. It provides double exposure holograms with an adjustable time interval ranging from few ns to infinity. Various aircraft structures were first tested at ISL in laboratory conditions: honeycomb panels, wings ... The industrial tests on a military aircraft in maintenance checking were performed in a hangar of the SNIAS at Saint-Nazaire: wings, trap-door of the rear landing gear, air-brake... Electromechanical shocks were used to make the structure vibrate and to allow a fast trigger of the lasers. This avoids disturbance due to ambiant noises and vibrations.

  19. Methadone maintenance.

    PubMed

    Russell-Taylor, W J

    1975-07-01

    Management of heroin addiction with oral methadone continues to create controversy. Since the first Dole-Nyswander experiments were reported almost a decade ago, methadone maintenance programs have been started in every major city in North America at an estimated public cost in the hundreds of millions of tax dollars. By the end of 1972, the United States alone spending at an annual rate in excess of $250 million, and an expenditure rate in excess of one billion dollars was occurring by the end of 1973. Despite the FDA investigational New Drug status of methadone when used for this purpose, objective data have still not been generated to substantiate the worth of Narcotic Substitution Therapy. Iatrogenic consequences are on the increase, and scepticism is growing among most pharmacologists. A critical evaluation of the entire methadone maintenance approach is being advocated by many and being attempted by some. Data currently being generated at the Philadelphia General Hospital suggest that many patients may have been better managed without methadone.

  20. Optimal maintenance of a multi-unit system under dependencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Ho-Joon

    same end-goals as Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM). RCM was first introduced to the aircraft industry in an attempt to bridge the gap between the empirically-driven and theory-driven approaches to establishing optimal maintenance policies. Under RCM, qualitative processes that enable the prioritizing of functions based on the criticality and influence would be combined with mathematical modeling to obtain the optimal maintenance policies. Where this thesis work deviates from RCM is its proposal to directly apply quantitative processes to model the reliability measures in optimal maintenance problem. First, Monte Carlo (MC) simulation, in conjunction with a pre-determined Design of Experiments (DOE) table, can be used as a numerical means of obtaining the corresponding discrete simulated outcomes of the reliability measures based on the combination of decision variables (e.g., periodic preventive maintenance interval, trigger age for opportunistic maintenance, etc.). These discrete simulation results can then be regressed as Response Surface Equations (RSEs) with respect to the decision variables. Such an approach to represent the reliability measures with continuous surrogate functions (i.e., the RSEs) not only enables the application of the numerical optimization technique to solve for optimal maintenance policies, but also obviates the need to make mathematical assumptions or impose over-simplifications on the structure of a multi-unit system for the sake of mathematical tractability. The applicability of the proposed methodology to a real-world optimal maintenance problem is showcased through its application to a Time Limited Dispatch (TLD) of Full Authority Digital Engine Control (FADEC) system. In broader terms, this proof-of-concept exercise can be described as a constrained optimization problem, whose objective is to identify the optimal system inspection interval that guarantees a certain level of availability for a multi-unit system. A variety of

  1. Augmented reality application utility for aviation maintenance work instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourcho, John Bryan

    Current aviation maintenance work instructions do not display information effectively enough to prevent costly errors and safety concerns. Aircraft are complex assemblies of highly interrelated components that confound troubleshooting and can make the maintenance procedure difficult (Drury & Gramopadhye, 2001). The sophisticated nature of aircraft maintenance necessitates a revolutionized training intervention for aviation maintenance technicians (United States General Accounting Office, 2003). Quite simply, the paper based job task cards fall short of offering rapid access to technical data and the system or component visualization necessary for working on complex integrated aircraft systems. Possible solutions to this problem include upgraded standards for paper based task cards and the use of integrated 3D product definition used on various mobile platforms (Ropp, Thomas, Lee, Broyles, Lewin, Andreychek, & Nicol, 2013). Previous studies have shown that incorporation of 3D graphics in work instructions allow the user to more efficiently and accurately interpret maintenance information (Jackson & Batstone, 2008). For aircraft maintenance workers, the use of mobile 3D model-based task cards could make current paper task card standards obsolete with their ability to deliver relevant, synchronized information to and from the hangar. Unlike previous versions of 3D model-based definition task cards and paper task cards, which are currently used in the maintenance industry, 3D model based definition task cards have the potential to be more mobile and accessible. Utilizing augmented reality applications on mobile devices to seamlessly deliver 3D product definition on mobile devices could increase the efficiency, accuracy, and reduce the mental workload for technicians when performing maintenance tasks (Macchiarella, 2004). This proposal will serve as a literary review of the aviation maintenance industry, the spatial ability of maintenance technicians, and benefits of

  2. 14 CFR 91.1411 - Continuous airworthiness maintenance program use by fractional ownership program manager.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... airworthiness maintenance program use by fractional ownership program manager. Fractional ownership program aircraft may be maintained under a continuous airworthiness maintenance program (CAMP) under §§ 91.1413... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Continuous airworthiness maintenance...

  3. 14 CFR 91.1437 - CAMP: Authority to perform and approve maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Ownership Operations Program Management § 91.1437 CAMP: Authority to perform and approve maintenance. A program manager who maintains program aircraft under a CAMP may employ maintenance personnel, or make... maintenance. 91.1437 Section 91.1437 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...

  4. 14 CFR 91.1411 - Continuous airworthiness maintenance program use by fractional ownership program manager.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... airworthiness maintenance program use by fractional ownership program manager. Fractional ownership program aircraft may be maintained under a continuous airworthiness maintenance program (CAMP) under §§ 91.1413... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Continuous airworthiness maintenance...

  5. 14 CFR 91.1437 - CAMP: Authority to perform and approve maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Ownership Operations Program Management § 91.1437 CAMP: Authority to perform and approve maintenance. A program manager who maintains program aircraft under a CAMP may employ maintenance personnel, or make... maintenance. 91.1437 Section 91.1437 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...

  6. Soil analyses and evaluations at the impact dynamics research facility for two full-scale aircraft crash tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, R. Y. K.

    1977-01-01

    The aircraft structural crash behavior and occupant survivability for aircraft crashes on a soil surface was studied. The results of placement, compaction, and maintenance of two soil test beds are presented. The crators formed by the aircraft after each test are described.

  7. 41 CFR 102-36.345 - May we dispose of excess Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Parts (FSCAP)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Parts (FSCAP)? 102-36.345 Section 102-36.345 Public Contracts and... Requires Special Handling Aircraft and Aircraft Parts § 102-36.345 May we dispose of excess Flight Safety... appropriate Criticality Code on the SF 120, and ensure that all available historical and maintenance...

  8. 41 CFR 102-36.345 - May we dispose of excess Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Parts (FSCAP)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Parts (FSCAP)? 102-36.345 Section 102-36.345 Public Contracts and... Requires Special Handling Aircraft and Aircraft Parts § 102-36.345 May we dispose of excess Flight Safety... appropriate Criticality Code on the SF 120, and ensure that all available historical and maintenance...

  9. 41 CFR 102-36.345 - May we dispose of excess Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Parts (FSCAP)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Parts (FSCAP)? 102-36.345 Section 102-36.345 Public Contracts and... Requires Special Handling Aircraft and Aircraft Parts § 102-36.345 May we dispose of excess Flight Safety... appropriate Criticality Code on the SF 120, and ensure that all available historical and maintenance...

  10. 41 CFR 102-36.345 - May we dispose of excess Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Parts (FSCAP)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Parts (FSCAP)? 102-36.345 Section 102-36.345 Public Contracts and... Requires Special Handling Aircraft and Aircraft Parts § 102-36.345 May we dispose of excess Flight Safety... appropriate Criticality Code on the SF 120, and ensure that all available historical and maintenance...

  11. PORTFOLIO OF POTENTIAL STRATEGIES IN AERONAUTIC MAINTENANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Rolet, S.

    2010-02-22

    EADS divisions aim more and more at developing services associated to their platforms. EADS divisions, like Airbus and Eurocopter, are investigating on services associated to their platforms in order to add them value. One possible service consists in structural maintenance operation assistance, especially for NDT operations performed by the customer. EADS Innovation Works envisages three different and complementary enhanced structural maintenance categories. Enhanced NDT improves standard NDT operation environment. This is made possible by the existence of 'smart' NDT tools that are computer based and therefore able to support other functions. These functions range from local smart data processing and display to remote expert assisted operation. Passive Sensor Network relies on sensors permanently installed on aircraft structure. Interrogation of sensors is performed on ground and off line (while structure is not loaded except by its own weight). It can be done at arbitrary times in order to determine structure health. The aim is to give easy access to some hidden ''hot spots,'' to reduce human factor in structure health assessment and optimize maintenance. Structural Health Monitoring goes a step beyond Passive Sensor Network, because interrogation units are on board the aircraft and may be connected to aircraft network. It allows to use on-line techniques such as adapted acoustic emission and to automatically raise an alarm when a defect appears in the structure. This paper presents these different ways of improving structural maintenance operations in service, with their respective advantages and limitations.

  12. Portfolio of Potential Strategies in Aeronautic Maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolet, S.

    2010-02-01

    EADS divisions aim more and more at developing services associated to their platforms. EADS divisions, like Airbus and Eurocopter, are investigating on services associated to their platforms in order to add them value. One possible service consists in structural maintenance operation assistance, especially for NDT operations performed by the customer. EADS Innovation Works envisages three different and complementary enhanced structural maintenance categories. Enhanced NDT improves standard NDT operation environment. This is made possible by the existence of "smart" NDT tools that are computer based and therefore able to support other functions. These functions range from local smart data processing and display to remote expert assisted operation. Passive Sensor Network relies on sensors permanently installed on aircraft structure. Interrogation of sensors is performed on ground and off line (while structure is not loaded except by its own weight). It can be done at arbitrary times in order to determine structure health. The aim is to give easy access to some hidden "hot spots," to reduce human factor in structure health assessment and optimize maintenance. Structural Health Monitoring goes a step beyond Passive Sensor Network, because interrogation units are on board the aircraft and may be connected to aircraft network. It allows to use on-line techniques such as adapted acoustic emission and to automatically raise an alarm when a defect appears in the structure. This paper presents these different ways of improving structural maintenance operations in service, with their respective advantages and limitations.

  13. Propulsion controlled aircraft computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cogan, Bruce R. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A low-cost, easily retrofit Propulsion Controlled Aircraft (PCA) system for use on a wide range of commercial and military aircraft consists of an propulsion controlled aircraft computer that reads in aircraft data including aircraft state, pilot commands and other related data, calculates aircraft throttle position for a given maneuver commanded by the pilot, and then displays both current and calculated throttle position on a cockpit display to show the pilot where to move throttles to achieve the commanded maneuver, or is automatically sent digitally to command the engines directly.

  14. Underwater maintenance guide: A guide to diving and remotely operated vehicle operations for nuclear maintenance personnel

    SciTech Connect

    Jenco, J. and Associates, Inc., Covington, LA )

    1990-12-01

    This Underwater Maintenance Guide has been developed to provide utility plant personnel with a single-source reference to underwater services. These services, which include both manned diving and remotely-operated vehicle operations, are required to perform certain underwater maintenance functions at nuclear power generating stations. This Guide provides an introduction to those underwater services and their general operations, as well as overviews of specific work tasks which have been identified thus far. This information is intended to familiarize utility maintenance personnel with the general scope and capabilities of underwater services, without encroaching upon the contractor's flexibility to develop responses to individual maintenance tasks.

  15. Innovations in Aircraft Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Boeing 777 carries with it basic and applied research, technology, and aerodynamic knowledge honed at several NASA field centers. Several Langley Research Center innovations instrumental to the development of the aircraft include knowledge of how to reduce engine and other noise for passengers and terminal residents, increased use of lightweight aerospace composite structures for increased fuel efficiency and range, and wind tunnel tests confirming the structural integrity of 777 wing-airframe integration. Test results from Marshall Space Flight Center aimed at improving the performance of the Space Shuttle engines led to improvements in the airplane's new, more efficient jet engines. Finally, fostered by Ames Research Center, the Boeing 777 blankets that protect areas of the plane from high temperatures and fire have a lineage to Advanced Flexible Reusable Surface Insulation used on certain areas of the Space Shuttle. According to Boeing Company estimates, the 777 has captured three-quarters of new orders for airplanes in its class since the program was launched.

  16. Lightning Discharges to Aircraft and Associated Meteorological Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, L P

    1946-01-01

    A summary is given of information on atmospheric electrical discharges to aircraft and associated meteorological conditions. Information is given that is designed to give a fairly comprehensive view of the underlying principles of meteorology and atmospheric electricity. Of special interest to pilots are lists of procedures of flight conduct and aircraft maintenance recommended foe avoiding or minimizing the hazards of disruptive electrical discharges and other severe conditions near thunderstorms.

  17. Pollution Emission Analysis of Selected Air Force Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-04-29

    percent for large non-combat tranaport engines) are proposed. Eraoke numbers wlilch will ensure Invisible aircraft smoke plumes are specified. The...standards are being violated, as well as being significant sources of smoke , ,••(3) that maintenance of the national ambient sir quality BlSndards...and reduced impact of smoke emission requires that air- craft and aircraft engines be Bubjected to a program of control compatible with their

  18. Unmanned aircraft systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Unmanned platforms have become increasingly more common in recent years for acquiring remotely sensed data. These aircraft are referred to as Unmanned Airborne Vehicles (UAV), Remotely Piloted Aircraft (RPA), Remotely Piloted Vehicles (RPV), or Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS), the official term used...

  19. Valuing Flexibility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-09

    Bunker   Buster ”  of  Desert  Storm  (evolved  into  GBU...modular   muni=ons  to  achieve   opera=onal  flexibility   •  Various  configura=ons  are   allowable  based  on   warhead ...28)   –  New   warhead  “module”  used  in  conjunc=on  with  exis=ng  guidance  and  fuze   modules   – 

  20. Performance of rotating-wing aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohenemser, K

    1938-01-01

    Up to the present there has been no coordinated presentation from which the influence of the constants essential for the performance of rotating-wing aircraft could be obtained in a systematic manner. The attempt at such a survey is made in the following, whereby nonessential factors, such as effect of blade form, blade profile, blade number, and blade twist on the performances are disregarded. Even the torsional flexibility of the blades is overlooked.

  1. Rotor blade construction for circulation control aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Sr., Donald R. (Inventor); Krauss, Timothy A. (Inventor); Sedlak, Matthew (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A circulation control aircraft rotor blade having a spanwise Coanda surface 16 and a plurality of spanwise extending flexible composite material panels 18 cooperating with the surface to define slots for the discharge of compressed air from within the blade with each panel having first flexure means 60 associated with screw adjustments 36 for establishing a slot opening preload and second flexure means 62 associated with screw adjustments 38 for establishing a slot maximum opening.

  2. Staffing for Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    UAS-specific MOS as degrading the community’s capability to retain experience and corporate knowledge because augmentees from the manned aviation ...munitions and weapons attached to the aircraft and used to strike targets. B. UAS Missions The inherent flexibility of aviation , combined with the...and moral standards of society at large.” 14 Ibid., 7. 8 between the Republic of the Marshall Islands and the United States, or the Compact of Free

  3. Deployment of a wireless corrosion monitoring system for aircraft applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demo, J.; Andrews, C.; Friedersdorf, F.; Morgan, A.; Jostes, L.

    With its extremely negative effects on critical military assets, corrosion continues to be one of the top maintenance cost drivers for the Department of Defense. As of 2010, an estimated $22.9B was required to cover the costs associated with corrosion in the DoD annually. Proper management of corrosion on high value military assets such as aircraft can significantly reduce costs associated with maintenance, component removal, and aircraft availability. This paper will discuss the design, validation, and deployment of a wireless, flight qualified corrosion monitoring system as well as analysis of data collected during field trials.

  4. Optimal Specialization and Allocation of Maintenance Manpower

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-01

    listed below. Relaxation of some of these assumptions is considered as the model development progresses. 1. The enterprise employs a fixed inventory of N...this general model . 1.4 Literature Review The published literature generally associated with the disciplines of in- dustrial engineering, management...maintenance rates and spare engine supply to the availability of a fleet of aircraft [36]. Taylor and Jackson considered the movement of P finite

  5. Computer-Assisted Microcomputer Preventive Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ives, David J.

    1993-01-01

    Proposes a solution to the problem of preventive microcomputer maintenance in libraries. The strategy involves a batch program, small paper form, simple WordPerfect macro, and on-diskette log form which saves time, quickly generates standard reports, increases efficiency, eliminates most paperwork, and offers the flexibility for modification and…

  6. Ultrasonic Measurement of Aircraft Strut Hydraulic Fluid Level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G.

    2002-01-01

    An ultrasonic method is presented for non-intrusively measuring hydraulic fluid level in aircraft struts in the field quickly and easily without modifying the strut or aircraft. The technique interrogates the strut with ultrasonic waves generated and received by a removable ultrasonic transducer hand-held on the outside of the strut in a fashion that is in the presence or absence of hydraulic fluid inside the strut. This technique was successfully demonstrated on an A-6 aircraft strut on the carriage at the Aircraft Landing Dynamics Research Facility at NASA Langley Research Center. Conventional practice upon detection of strut problem symptoms is to remove aircraft from service for extensive maintenance to determine fluid level. No practical technique like the method presented herein for locating strut hydraulic fluid level is currently known to be used.

  7. Applications of advanced electric/electronic technology to conventional aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heimbold, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    The desirability of seven advanced technologies as applied to three commercial aircraft of 1985 to 1995 was investigated. Digital fly by wire, multiplexing, ring laser gyro, integrated avionics, all electric airplane, electric load management, and fiber optics were considered for 500 passenger, 50 passenger, and 30 passenger aircraft. The major figure of merit used was Net Value of Technology based on procurement and operating cost over the life of the aircraft. An existing computer program, ASSET, was used to resize the aircraft and evalute fuel usage and maintenance costs for each candidate configuration. Conclusions were that, for the 500 passenger aircraft, all candidates had a worthwhile payoff with the all electric airplane having a large payoff.

  8. Small transport aircraft technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, L. J.

    1983-01-01

    Information on commuter airline trends and aircraft developments is provided to upgrade the preliminary findings of a NASA-formed small transport aircraft technology (STAT) team, established to determine whether the agency's research and development programs could help commuter aircraft manufacturers solve technical problems related to passenger acceptance and use of 19- to 50-passenger aircraft. The results and conclusions of the full set of completed STAT studies are presented. These studies were performed by five airplane manufacturers, five engine manufacturers, and two propeller manufacturers. Those portions of NASA's overall aeronautics research and development programs which are applicable to commuter aircraft design are summarized. Areas of technology that might beneficially be expanded or initiated to aid the US commuter aircraft manufacturers in the evolution of improved aircraft for the market are suggested.

  9. Rating aircraft on energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddalon, D. V.

    1974-01-01

    Questions concerning the energy efficiency of aircraft compared to ground transport are considered, taking into account as energy intensity the energy consumed per passenger statute mile. It is found that today's transport aircraft have an energy intensity potential comparable to that of ground modes. Possibilities for improving the energy density are also much better in the case of aircraft than in the case of ground transportation. Approaches for potential reductions in aircraft energy consumption are examined, giving attention to steps for increasing the efficiency of present aircraft and to reductions in energy intensity obtainable by the introduction of new aircraft utilizing an advanced technology. The use of supercritical aerodynamics is discussed along with the employment of composite structures, advances in propulsion systems, and the introduction of very large aircraft. Other improvements in fuel economy can be obtained by a reduction of skin-friction drag and a use of hydrogen fuel.

  10. Maintenance Business Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Matt

    2002-01-01

    Discusses maintenance business plans, statements which provide accountability for facilities maintenance organizations' considerable budgets. Discusses the plan's components: statement of plan objectives, macro and detailed description of the facility assets, maintenance function descriptions, description of key performance indicators, milestone…

  11. Maintenance Management Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sternloff, Robert E.

    1987-01-01

    Current trends in park maintenance are overviewed, including maintenance impact statements, avoidance of cost through efficient use and national resource conservation, horticultural accomplishments that influence maintenance management, and vandalism prevention. (CB)

  12. Maintenance Management Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sternloff, Robert E.

    1987-01-01

    Current trends in park maintenance are overviewed, including maintenance impact statements, avoidance of cost through efficient use and national resource conservation, horticultural accomplishments that influence maintenance management, and vandalism prevention. (CB)

  13. Daedalus Project's Light Eagle - Human powered aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The Michelob Light Eagle is seen here in flight over Rogers Dry Lake at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The Light Eagle and Daedalus human powered aircraft were testbeds for flight research conducted at Dryden between January 1987 and March 1988. These unique aircraft were designed and constructed by a group of students, professors, and alumni of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology within the context of the Daedalus project. The construction of the Light Eagle and Daedalus aircraft was funded primarily by the Anheuser Busch and United Technologies Corporations, respectively, with additional support from the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum, MIT, and a number of other sponsors. To celebrate the Greek myth of Daedalus, the man who constructed wings of wax and feathers to escape King Minos, the Daedalus project began with the goal of designing, building and testing a human-powered aircraft that could fly the mythical distance, 115 km. To achieve this goal, three aircraft were constructed. The Light Eagle was the prototype aircraft, weighing 92 pounds. On January 22, 1987, it set a closed course distance record of 59 km, which still stands. Also in January of 1987, the Light Eagle was powered by Lois McCallin to set the straight distance, the distance around a closed circuit, and the duration world records for the female division in human powered vehicles. Following this success, two more aircraft were built, the Daedalus 87 and Daedalus 88. Each aircraft weighed approximately 69 pounds. The Daedalus 88 aircraft was the ship that flew the 199 km from the Iraklion Air Force Base on Crete in the Mediterranean Sea, to the island of Santorini in 3 hours, 54 minutes. In the process, the aircraft set new records in distance and endurance for a human powered aircraft. The specific areas of flight research conducted at Dryden included characterizing the rigid body and flexible dynamics of the Light Eagle, investigating sensors for an

  14. Daedalus Project's Light Eagle - Human powered aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The Michelob Light Eagle is seen here in flight over Rogers Dry Lake at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The Light Eagle and Daedalus human powered aircraft were testbeds for flight research conducted at Dryden between January 1987 and March 1988. These unique aircraft were designed and constructed by a group of students, professors, and alumni of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology within the context of the Daedalus project. The construction of the Light Eagle and Daedalus aircraft was funded primarily by the Anheuser Busch and United Technologies Corporations, respectively, with additional support from the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum, MIT, and a number of other sponsors. To celebrate the Greek myth of Daedalus, the man who constructed wings of wax and feathers to escape King Minos, the Daedalus project began with the goal of designing, building and testing a human-powered aircraft that could fly the mythical distance, 115 km. To achieve this goal, three aircraft were constructed. The Light Eagle was the prototype aircraft, weighing 92 pounds. On January 22, 1987, it set a closed course distance record of 59 km, which still stands. Also in January of 1987, the Light Eagle was powered by Lois McCallin to set the straight distance, the distance around a closed circuit, and the duration world records for the female division in human powered vehicles. Following this success, two more aircraft were built, the Daedalus 87 and Daedalus 88. Each aircraft weighed approximately 69 pounds. The Daedalus 88 aircraft was the ship that flew the 199 km from the Iraklion Air Force Base on Crete in the Mediterranean Sea, to the island of Santorini in 3 hours, 54 minutes. In the process, the aircraft set new records in distance and endurance for a human powered aircraft. The specific areas of flight research conducted at Dryden included characterizing the rigid body and flexible dynamics of the Light Eagle, investigating sensors for an

  15. Reduction of Maintenance Error Through Focused Interventions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanki, Barbara G.; Walter, Diane; Rosekind, Mark R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    It is well known that a significant proportion of aviation accidents and incidents are tied to human error. In flight operations, research of operational errors has shown that so-called "pilot error" often involves a variety of human factors issues and not a simple lack of individual technical skills. In aircraft maintenance operations, there is similar concern that maintenance errors which may lead to incidents and accidents are related to a large variety of human factors issues. Although maintenance error data and research are limited, industry initiatives involving human factors training in maintenance have become increasingly accepted as one type of maintenance error intervention. Conscientious efforts have been made in re-inventing the "team" concept for maintenance operations and in tailoring programs to fit the needs of technical operations. Nevertheless, there remains a dual challenge: to develop human factors interventions which are directly supported by reliable human error data, and to integrate human factors concepts into the procedures and practices of everyday technical tasks. In this paper, we describe several varieties of human factors interventions and focus on two specific alternatives which target problems related to procedures and practices; namely, 1) structured on-the-job training and 2) procedure re-design. We hope to demonstrate that the key to leveraging the impact of these solutions comes from focused interventions; that is, interventions which are derived from a clear understanding of specific maintenance errors, their operational context and human factors components.

  16. Reduction of Maintenance Error Through Focused Interventions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanki, Barbara G.; Walter, Diane; Rosekind, Mark R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    It is well known that a significant proportion of aviation accidents and incidents are tied to human error. In flight operations, research of operational errors has shown that so-called "pilot error" often involves a variety of human factors issues and not a simple lack of individual technical skills. In aircraft maintenance operations, there is similar concern that maintenance errors which may lead to incidents and accidents are related to a large variety of human factors issues. Although maintenance error data and research are limited, industry initiatives involving human factors training in maintenance have become increasingly accepted as one type of maintenance error intervention. Conscientious efforts have been made in re-inventing the "team" concept for maintenance operations and in tailoring programs to fit the needs of technical operations. Nevertheless, there remains a dual challenge: to develop human factors interventions which are directly supported by reliable human error data, and to integrate human factors concepts into the procedures and practices of everyday technical tasks. In this paper, we describe several varieties of human factors interventions and focus on two specific alternatives which target problems related to procedures and practices; namely, 1) structured on-the-job training and 2) procedure re-design. We hope to demonstrate that the key to leveraging the impact of these solutions comes from focused interventions; that is, interventions which are derived from a clear understanding of specific maintenance errors, their operational context and human factors components.

  17. FLEXIBLE COUPLING

    DOEpatents

    Babelay, E.F.

    1962-02-13

    A flexible shaft coupling for operation at speeds in excess of 14,000 rpm is designed which requires no lubrication. A driving sleeve member and a driven sleeve member are placed in concentric spaced relationship. A torque force is transmitted to the driven member from the driving member through a plurality of nylon balls symmetrically disposed between the spaced sleeves. The balls extend into races and recesses within the respective sleeve members. The sleeve members have a suitable clearance therebetween and the balls have a suitable radial clearance during operation of the coupling to provide a relatively loose coupling. These clearances accommodate for both parallel and/or angular misalignments and avoid metal-tometal contact between the sleeve members during operation. Thus, no lubrication is needed, and a minimum of vibrations is transmitted between the sleeve members. (AEC)

  18. Air Force KC-X Tanker Aircraft Program: Background and Issues for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-07

    Force is expected late next month.... Sen. Richard Shelby, R- Ala ., a Northrop supporter, and Rep. Norman Dicks, D-Wash., a Boeing supporter, have sent...maintenance and forecasted modernization programs in avionics and aircraft systems. Additionally, the Department anticipates depot maintenance costs...slat tracks Xian Aircraft Co. (AVIC- 1) Peoples Republic of China avionics access doors Source: Teal Group Note: Commercial variants of both

  19. Eclipse program C-141A aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This photograph shows the Air Force C-141A that was used in the Eclipse project as a tow vehicle. The project used a QF-106 interceptor aircraft to simulate a future orbiter, which would be towed to a high altitude and released to fire its own engines and carry a payload into space. In 1997 and 1998, the Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards, California, supported and hosted a Kelly Space & Technology, Inc. project called Eclipse, which sought to demonstrate the feasibility of a reusable tow-launch vehicle concept. The project goal was to successfully tow, inflight, a modified QF-106 delta-wing aircraft with an Air Force C-141A transport aircraft. This would demonstrate the possibility of towing and launching an actual launch vehicle from behind a tow plane. Dryden was the responsible test organization and had flight safety responsibility for the Eclipse project. Dryden provided engineering, instrumentation, simulation, modification, maintenance, range support, and research pilots for the test program. The Air Force Flight Test Center (AFFTC), Edwards, California, supplied the C-141A transport aircraft and crew and configured the aircraft as needed for the tests. The AFFTC also provided the concept and detail design and analysis as well as hardware for the tow system and QF-106 modifications. Dryden performed the modifications to convert the QF-106 drone into the piloted EXD-01 (Eclipse eXperimental Demonstrator-01) experimental aircraft. Kelly Space & Technology hoped to use the results gleaned from the tow test in developing a series of low-cost, reusable launch vehicles. These tests demonstrated the validity of towing a delta-wing aircraft having high wing loading, validated the tow simulation model, and demonstrated various operational procedures, such as ground processing of in-flight maneuvers and emergency abort scenarios.

  20. Eclipse program C-141A aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This photograph shows the Air Force C-141A that was used in the Eclipse project as a tow vehicle. The project used a QF-106 interceptor aircraft to simulate a future orbiter, which would be towed to a high altitude and released to fire its own engines and carry a payload into space. In 1997 and 1998, the Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards, California, supported and hosted a Kelly Space & Technology, Inc. project called Eclipse, which sought to demonstrate the feasibility of a reusable tow-launch vehicle concept. The project goal was to successfully tow, inflight, a modified QF-106 delta-wing aircraft with an Air Force C-141A transport aircraft. This would demonstrate the possibility of towing and launching an actual launch vehicle from behind a tow plane. Dryden was the responsible test organization and had flight safety responsibility for the Eclipse project. Dryden provided engineering, instrumentation, simulation, modification, maintenance, range support, and research pilots for the test program. The Air Force Flight Test Center (AFFTC), Edwards, California, supplied the C-141A transport aircraft and crew and configured the aircraft as needed for the tests. The AFFTC also provided the concept and detail design and analysis as well as hardware for the tow system and QF-106 modifications. Dryden performed the modifications to convert the QF-106 drone into the piloted EXD-01 (Eclipse eXperimental Demonstrator-01) experimental aircraft. Kelly Space & Technology hoped to use the results gleaned from the tow test in developing a series of low-cost, reusable launch vehicles. These tests demonstrated the validity of towing a delta-wing aircraft having high wing loading, validated the tow simulation model, and demonstrated various operational procedures, such as ground processing of in-flight maneuvers and emergency abort scenarios.