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Sample records for flexible carbon nanotube

  1. Carbon Nanotube Based Flexible Supercapacitors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Electrochemical double layer capacitors are fabricated using carbon nanotube (CNT)/paper flexible electrodes. An extensive...TERMS Carbon nanotube, supercapacitor, electrochemical double layer capacitor 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU 18...layer capacitors (Supercapacitors) are expected to play a significant role in future hybrid power systems due to their high specific power, cycle

  2. Carbon Nanotube Flexible and Stretchable Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Le; Wang, Chuan

    2015-08-01

    The low-cost and large-area manufacturing of flexible and stretchable electronics using printing processes could radically change people's perspectives on electronics and substantially expand the spectrum of potential applications. Examples range from personalized wearable electronics to large-area smart wallpapers and from interactive bio-inspired robots to implantable health/medical apparatus. Owing to its one-dimensional structure and superior electrical property, carbon nanotube is one of the most promising material platforms for flexible and stretchable electronics. Here in this paper, we review the recent progress in this field. Applications of single-wall carbon nanotube networks as channel semiconductor in flexible thin-film transistors and integrated circuits, as stretchable conductors in various sensors, and as channel material in stretchable transistors will be discussed. Lastly, state-of-the-art advancement on printing process, which is ideal for large-scale fabrication of flexible and stretchable electronics, will also be reviewed in detail.

  3. Carbon Nanotube Flexible and Stretchable Electronics.

    PubMed

    Cai, Le; Wang, Chuan

    2015-12-01

    The low-cost and large-area manufacturing of flexible and stretchable electronics using printing processes could radically change people's perspectives on electronics and substantially expand the spectrum of potential applications. Examples range from personalized wearable electronics to large-area smart wallpapers and from interactive bio-inspired robots to implantable health/medical apparatus. Owing to its one-dimensional structure and superior electrical property, carbon nanotube is one of the most promising material platforms for flexible and stretchable electronics. Here in this paper, we review the recent progress in this field. Applications of single-wall carbon nanotube networks as channel semiconductor in flexible thin-film transistors and integrated circuits, as stretchable conductors in various sensors, and as channel material in stretchable transistors will be discussed. Lastly, state-of-the-art advancement on printing process, which is ideal for large-scale fabrication of flexible and stretchable electronics, will also be reviewed in detail.

  4. Flexible microdevices based on carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Ashante'; Cannon, Andrew; Lee, Jungchul; King, William P.; Graham, Samuel

    2006-12-01

    This work reports the fabrication and testing of flexible carbon nanotube microdevices made using hot embossing material transfer. Both micro-plasma and photodetector devices were made using as-grown unpurified multi-wall carbon nanotubes printed on PMMA substrates. Optical detectors were fabricated by attaching metal wires and monitoring the resistance as a function of light exposure. The electrical resistance of the nanotubes showed a strong sensitivity to light exposure which was also enhanced by heating the devices. While such processes in MWCNTs are not fully understood, the addition of thermal energy is believed to generate additional free charge carriers in the nanotubes. The plasma-generating microdevices consisted of a thin layer of thermoplastic polymer having the CNT electrode on one side and a metal electrode on the reverse side. The devices were electrically tested under atmospheric conditions with 0.01-1 kV ac and at 2.5 kHz, with the plasma igniting near 0.7 kV. The fabrication of these flexible organic devices demonstrates the ability to pattern useful carbon nanotube microdevices in low-cost thermoplastic polymers.

  5. Flexible, transparent electrodes using carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We prepare thin single-walled carbon nanotube networks on a transparent and flexible substrate with different densities, using a very simple spray method. We measure the electric impedance at different frequencies Z(f) in the frequency range of 40 Hz to 20 GHz using two different methods: a two-probe method in the range up to 110 MHz and a coaxial (Corbino) method in the range of 10 MHz to 20 GHz. We measure the optical absorption and electrical conductivity in order to optimize the conditions for obtaining optimum performance films with both high electrical conductivity and transparency. We observe a square resistance of 1 to 8.5 kΩ for samples showing 65% to 85% optical transmittance, respectively. For some applications, we need flexibility and not transparency: for this purpose, we deposit a thick film of single-walled carbon nanotubes on a flexible silicone substrate by spray method from an aqueous suspension of carbon nanotubes in a surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulphate), thereby obtaining a flexible conducting electrode showing an electrical resistance as low as 200 Ω/sq. When stretching up to 10% and 20%, the electrical resistance increases slightly, recovering the initial value for small elongations up to 10%. We analyze the stretched and unstretched samples by Raman spectroscopy and observe that the breathing mode on the Raman spectra is highly sensitive to stretching. The high-energy Raman modes do not change, which indicates that no defects are introduced when stretching. Using this method, flexible conducting films that may be transparent are obtained just by employing a very simple spray method and can be deposited on any type or shape of surface. PMID:23074999

  6. Fully printed flexible carbon nanotube photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Suoming; Cai, Le; Wang, Tongyu; Miao, Jinshui; Sepúlveda, Nelson; Wang, Chuan

    2017-03-01

    Here, we report fully printed flexible photodetectors based on single-wall carbon nanotubes and the study of their electrical characteristics under laser illumination. Due to the photothermal effect and the use of high purity semiconducting carbon nanotubes, the devices exhibit gate-voltage-dependent photoresponse with the positive photocurrent or semiconductor-like behavior (conductivity increases at elevated temperatures) under positive gate biases and the negative photocurrent or metal-like behavior (conductivity decreases at elevated temperatures) under negative gate biases. Mechanism for such photoresponse is attributed to the different temperature dependencies of carrier concentration and carrier mobility, which are two competing factors that ultimately determine the photothermal effect-based photoresponse. The photodetectors built on the polyimide substrate also exhibit superior mechanical compliance and stable photoresponse after thousands of bending cycles down to a curvature radius as small as 3 mm. Furthermore, due to the low thermal conductivity of the plastic substrate, the devices show up to 6.5 fold improvement in responsivity compared to the devices built on the silicon substrate. The results presented here provide a viable path to low cost and high performance flexible photodetectors fabricated entirely by the printing process.

  7. Carbon nanotube based pressure sensor for flexible electronics

    SciTech Connect

    So, Hye-Mi; Sim, Jin Woo; Kwon, Jinhyeong; Yun, Jongju; Baik, Seunghyun; Chang, Won Seok

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • The electromechanical change of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes. • Fabrication of CNT field-effect transistor on flexible substrate. • CNT based FET integrated active pressure sensor. • The integrated device yields an increase in the source-drain current under pressure. - Abstract: A pressure sensor was developed based on an arrangement of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) supported by a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix. The VACNTs embedded in the PDMS matrix were structurally flexible and provided repeated sensing operation due to the high elasticities of both the polymer and the carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The conductance increased in the presence of a loading pressure, which compressed the material and induced contact between neighboring CNTs, thereby producing a dense current path and better CNT/metal contacts. To achieve flexible functional electronics, VACNTs based pressure sensor was integrated with field-effect transistor, which is fabricated using sprayed semiconducting carbon nanotubes on plastic substrate.

  8. Tuning carbon nanotube assembly for flexible, strong and conductive films.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanjie; Li, Min; Gu, Yizhuo; Zhang, Xiaohua; Wang, Shaokai; Li, Qingwen; Zhang, Zuoguang

    2015-02-21

    Carbon nanotubes are ideal scaffolds for designing and architecting flexible graphite films with tunable mechanical, electrical and thermal properties. Herein, we demonstrate that the assembly of aligned carbon nanotubes with different aggregation density and morphology leads to different mechanical properties and anisotropic electrical conduction along the films. Using drying evaporation under tension treatment, the carbon nanotubes can be assembled into strong films with tensile strength and Young's modulus as high as 3.2 GPa and 124 GPa, respectively, leading to a remarkable toughness of 54.38 J g(-1), greatly outperforming conventional graphite films, spider webs and even Kevlar fiber films. Different types of solvents may result in the assembly of CNTs with different aggregation morphology and therefore different modulus. In addition, we reveal that the high density assembly of aligned CNTs correlates with better electric conduction along the axial direction, enabling these flexible graphite films to be both strong and conductive.

  9. Tuning carbon nanotube assembly for flexible, strong and conductive films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanjie; Li, Min; Gu, Yizhuo; Zhang, Xiaohua; Wang, Shaokai; Li, Qingwen; Zhang, Zuoguang

    2015-02-01

    Carbon nanotubes are ideal scaffolds for designing and architecting flexible graphite films with tunable mechanical, electrical and thermal properties. Herein, we demonstrate that the assembly of aligned carbon nanotubes with different aggregation density and morphology leads to different mechanical properties and anisotropic electrical conduction along the films. Using drying evaporation under tension treatment, the carbon nanotubes can be assembled into strong films with tensile strength and Young's modulus as high as 3.2 GPa and 124 GPa, respectively, leading to a remarkable toughness of 54.38 J g-1, greatly outperforming conventional graphite films, spider webs and even Kevlar fiber films. Different types of solvents may result in the assembly of CNTs with different aggregation morphology and therefore different modulus. In addition, we reveal that the high density assembly of aligned CNTs correlates with better electric conduction along the axial direction, enabling these flexible graphite films to be both strong and conductive.Carbon nanotubes are ideal scaffolds for designing and architecting flexible graphite films with tunable mechanical, electrical and thermal properties. Herein, we demonstrate that the assembly of aligned carbon nanotubes with different aggregation density and morphology leads to different mechanical properties and anisotropic electrical conduction along the films. Using drying evaporation under tension treatment, the carbon nanotubes can be assembled into strong films with tensile strength and Young's modulus as high as 3.2 GPa and 124 GPa, respectively, leading to a remarkable toughness of 54.38 J g-1, greatly outperforming conventional graphite films, spider webs and even Kevlar fiber films. Different types of solvents may result in the assembly of CNTs with different aggregation morphology and therefore different modulus. In addition, we reveal that the high density assembly of aligned CNTs correlates with better electric conduction

  10. An active, flexible carbon nanotube microelectrode array for recording electrocorticograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yung-Chan; Hsu, Hui-Lin; Lee, Yu-Tao; Su, Huan-Chieh; Yen, Shiang-Jie; Chen, Chang-Hsiao; Hsu, Wei-Lun; Yew, Tri-Rung; Yeh, Shih-Rung; Yao, Da-Jeng; Chang, Yen-Chung; Chen, Hsin

    2011-06-01

    A variety of microelectrode arrays (MEAs) has been developed for monitoring intra-cortical neural activity at a high spatio-temporal resolution, opening a promising future for brain research and neural prostheses. However, most MEAs are based on metal electrodes on rigid substrates, and the intra-cortical implantation normally causes neural damage and immune responses that impede long-term recordings. This communication presents a flexible, carbon-nanotube MEA (CMEA) with integrated circuitry. The flexibility allows the electrodes to fit on the irregular surface of the brain to record electrocorticograms in a less invasive way. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) further improve both the electrode impedance and the charge-transfer capacity by more than six times. Moreover, the CNTs are grown on the polyimide substrate directly to improve the adhesion to the substrate. With the integrated recording circuitry, the flexible CMEA is proved capable of recording the neural activity of crayfish in vitro, as well as the electrocorticogram of a rat cortex in vivo, with an improved signal-to-noise ratio. Therefore, the proposed CMEA can be employed as a less-invasive, biocompatible and reliable neuro-electronic interface for long-term usage.

  11. Flexible Carbon Nanotube Films for High Performance Strain Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Kanoun, Olfa; Müller, Christian; Benchirouf, Abderahmane; Sanli, Abdulkadir; Dinh, Trong Nghia; Al-Hamry, Ammar; Bu, Lei; Gerlach, Carina; Bouhamed, Ayda

    2014-01-01

    Compared with traditional conductive fillers, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have unique advantages, i.e., excellent mechanical properties, high electrical conductivity and thermal stability. Nanocomposites as piezoresistive films provide an interesting approach for the realization of large area strain sensors with high sensitivity and low manufacturing costs. A polymer-based nanocomposite with carbon nanomaterials as conductive filler can be deposited on a flexible substrate of choice and this leads to mechanically flexible layers. Such sensors allow the strain measurement for both integral measurement on a certain surface and local measurement at a certain position depending on the sensor geometry. Strain sensors based on carbon nanostructures can overcome several limitations of conventional strain sensors, e.g., sensitivity, adjustable measurement range and integral measurement on big surfaces. The novel technology allows realizing strain sensors which can be easily integrated even as buried layers in material systems. In this review paper, we discuss the dependence of strain sensitivity on different experimental parameters such as composition of the carbon nanomaterial/polymer layer, type of polymer, fabrication process and processing parameters. The insights about the relationship between film parameters and electromechanical properties can be used to improve the design and fabrication of CNT strain sensors. PMID:24915183

  12. Flexible strain sensor based on carbon nanotube rubber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin-Ho; Kim, Young-Ju; Baek, Woon Kyung; Lim, Kwon Taek; Kang, Inpil

    2010-04-01

    Electrically conducting rubber composites (CRC) with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) filler have received much attention as potential materials for sensors. In this work, Ethylene propylene diene M-class rubber (EPDM)/CNT composites as a novel nano sensory material were prepared to develop flexible strain sensors that can measure large deformation of flexible structures. The EPDM/CNT composites were prepared by using a Brabender mixer with multi-walled CNTs and organo-clay. A strain sensor made of EPDM/CNT composite was attached to the surface of a flexible beam and change of resistance of the strain sensor was measured with respect to the beam deflection. Resistance of the sensor was change quite linearly under the bending and compressive large beam deflection. Upon external forces, CRC deformation takes place with the micro scale change of inter-electrical condition in rubber matrix due to the change of contact resistance, and CRC reveals macro scale piezoresistivity. It is anticipated that the CNT/EPDM fibrous strain sensor can be eligible to develop a biomimetic artificial neuron that can continuously sense deformation, pressure and shear force.

  13. Carbon Nanotube/Polymer Nanocomposites Flexible Stress and Strain Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Jin Ho; Sauti, Godfrey; Park, Cheol; Scholl, Jonathan A.; Lowther, Sharon E.; Harrison, Joycelyn S.

    2008-01-01

    Conformable stress and strain sensors are required for monitoring the integrity of airframe structures as well as for sensing the mechanical stimuli in prosthetic arms. For this purpose, we have developed a series of piezoresistive single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/polymer nanocomposites. The electromechanical coupling of pressure with resistance changes in these nanocomposites is exceptionally greater than that of metallic piezoresistive materials. In fact, the piezoresistive stress coefficient (pi) of a SWCNT/polymer nanocomposite is approximately two orders of magnitude higher than that of a typical metallic piezoresistive. The piezoresistive stress coefficient is a function of the nanotube concentration wherein the maximum value occurs at a concentration just above the percolation threshold concentration (phi approx. 0.05 %). This response appears to originate from a change in intrinsic resistivity under compression/tension. A systematic study of the effect of the modulus of the polymer matrix on piezoresistivity allowed us to make flexible and conformable sensors for biomedical applications. The prototype haptic sensors using these nanocomposites are demonstrated. The piezocapacitive properties of SWCNT/polymer are also characterized by monitoring the capacitance change under pressure.

  14. Flexible carbon nanotube sensors for nerve agent simulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattanach, Kyle; Kulkarni, Rashmi D.; Kozlov, Mikhail; Manohar, Sanjeev K.

    2006-08-01

    Chemiresistor-based vapour sensors made from network films of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) bundles on flexible plastic substrates (polyethylene terephthalate, PET) can be used to detect chemical warfare agent simulants for the nerve agents Sarin (diisopropyl methylphosphonate, DIMP) and Soman (dimethyl methylphosphonate, DMMP). Large, reproducible resistance changes (75-150%), are observed upon exposure to DIMP or DMMP vapours, and concentrations as low as 25 ppm can be detected. Robust sensor response to simulant vapours is observed even in the presence of large equilibrium concentrations of interferent vapours commonly found in battle-space environments, such as hexane, xylene and water (10 000 ppm each), suggesting that both DIMP and DMMP vapours are capable of selectively displacing other vapours from the walls of the SWNTs. Response to these interferent vapours can be effectively filtered out by using a 2 µm thick barrier film of the chemoselective polymer polyisobutylene (PIB) on the SWNT surface. These network films are composed of a 1-2 µm thick non-woven mesh of SWNT bundles (15-30 nm diameter), whose sensor response is qualitatively and quantitatively different from previous studies on individual SWNTs, or a network of individual SWNTs, suggesting that vapour sorption at interbundle sites could be playing an important role. This study also shows that the line patterning method used in device fabrication to obtain any desired pattern of films of SWNTs on flexible substrates can be used to rapidly screen simulants at high concentrations before developing more complicated sensor systems.

  15. Multifunctional Flexible Composites Based on Continuous Carbon Nanotube Fiber

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-28

    fibers [1] The mechanical and electrical behavior of carbon nanotube fibers spun continuously from an aerogel is discussed. These fibers exhibit moderate...loading, demonstrates their potential for sensing applications in advanced composite materials. Insight into the failure behavior of the aerogel -spun...nanotube fibers is reported-the aerogel -spun fibers are observed to undergo mild to severe kinking due to tensile failure. This kinking is attributed to

  16. Flexible power fabrics made of carbon nanotubes for harvesting thermoelectricity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Suk Lae; Choi, Kyungwho; Tazebay, Abdullah; Yu, Choongho

    2014-03-25

    Thermoelectric energy conversion is very effective in capturing low-grade waste heat to supply electricity particularly to small devices such as sensors, wireless communication units, and wearable electronics. Conventional thermoelectric materials, however, are often inadequately brittle, expensive, toxic, and heavy. We developed both p- and n-type fabric-like flexible lightweight materials by functionalizing the large surfaces and junctions in carbon nanotube (CNT) mats. The poor thermopower and only p-type characteristics of typical CNTs have been converted into both p- and n-type with high thermopower. The changes in the electronic band diagrams of the CNTs were experimentally investigated, elucidating the carrier type and relatively large thermopower values. With our optimized device design to maximally utilize temperature gradients, an electrochromic glucose sensor was successfully operated without batteries or external power supplies, demonstrating self-powering capability. While our fundamental study provides a method of tailoring electronic transport properties, our device-level integration shows the feasibility of harvesting electrical energy by attaching the device to even curved surfaces like human bodies.

  17. High Efficiency Flexible Battery Based on Graphene-carbon Nanotube Hybrid Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-26

    nanotube field emitter structure on three- dimensional micro-channeled copper, Appl. Phys. Lett. (2012) 1 7. Carbon Nanostructures in Lithium Ion...device, Lahiri, W. Choi, Carbon 49. 1614 (2010) 13. Large-area graphene on polymer film for flexible and transparent anode in field emission ...Yang B, Liu X, Chen J, Journal of Power Sources 267: 19–25 (2014) 3. Large Scale Patternable 3-Dimensional Carbon Nanotube -Graphene Structure for

  18. A High-Flux, Flexible Membrane with Parylene-encapsulated Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H G; In, J; Kim, S; Fornasiero, F; Holt, J K; Grigoropoulos, C P; Noy, A; Bakajin, O

    2008-03-14

    We present fabrication and characterization of a membrane based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and parylene. Carbon nanotubes have shown orders of magnitude enhancement in gas and water permeability compared to estimates generated by conventional theories [1, 2]. Large area membranes that exhibit flux enhancement characteristics of carbon nanotubes may provide an economical solution to a variety of technologies including water desalination [3] and gas sequestration [4]. We report a novel method of making carbon nanotube-based, robust membranes with large areas. A vertically aligned dense carbon nanotube array is infiltrated with parylene. Parylene polymer creates a pinhole free transparent film by exhibiting high surface conformity and excellent crevice penetration. Using this moisture-, chemical- and solvent-resistant polymer creates carbon nanotube membranes that promise to exhibit high stability and biocompatibility. CNT membranes are formed by releasing a free-standing film that consists of parylene-infiltrated CNTs, followed by CNT uncapping on both sides of the composite material. Thus fabricated membranes show flexibility and ductility due to the parylene matrix material, as well as high permeability attributed to embedded carbon nanotubes. These membranes have a potential for applications that may require high flux, flexibility and durability.

  19. Carbon-nanotube/silver networks in nitrile butadiene rubber for highly conductive flexible adhesives.

    PubMed

    Ma, Rujun; Kwon, Seoyoung; Zheng, Qing; Kwon, Hyeok Yong; Kim, Jae Il; Choi, Hyouk Ryeol; Baik, Seunghyun

    2012-07-03

    An adhesive with high conductivity, flexibility, cyclability, oxidation resistance, and good adhesion is developed using microscale silver flakes, multiwalled carbon nanotubes decorated with nanoscale silver particles, and nitrile butadiene rubber. Light-emitting-diode chips are attached to the conductive, flexible adhesive pattern on a poly(ethylene terephthalate) substrate as a visual demonstration. The brightness is invariant during bending tests.

  20. Carbon nanotube network thin-film transistors on flexible/stretchable substrates

    DOEpatents

    Takei, Kuniharu; Takahashi, Toshitake; Javey, Ali

    2016-03-29

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus for flexible thin-film transistors. In one aspect, a device includes a polymer substrate, a gate electrode disposed on the polymer substrate, a dielectric layer disposed on the gate electrode and on exposed portions of the polymer substrate, a carbon nanotube network disposed on the dielectric layer, and a source electrode and a drain electrode disposed on the carbon nanotube network.

  1. Flexible symmetric supercapacitors based on vertical TiO2 and carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, C. J.; Chang, Pai-Chun; Lu, Jia G.

    2010-03-01

    Highly conducting and porous carbon nanotubes are widely used as electrodes in double-layer-effect supercapacitors. In this presentation, vertical TiO2 nanotube array is fabricated by anodization process and used as supercapacitor electrode utilizing its compact density, high surface area and porous structure. By spin coating carbon nanotube networks on vertical TiO2 nanotube array as electrodes with 1M H2SO4 electrolyte in between, the specific capacitance can be enhanced by 30% compared to using pure carbon nanotube network alone because of the combination of double layer effect and redox reaction from metal oxide materials. Based on cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge-discharge measurements, this type of hybrid electrode has proven to be suitable for high performance supercapacitor application and maintain desirable cycling stability. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy technique shows that the electrode has good electrical conductivity. Furthermore, we will discuss the prospect of extending this energy storage approach in flexible electronics.

  2. Carbon Nanotubes Versus Graphene as Flexible Transparent Electrodes in Inverted Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Il; Yoon, Jungjin; Ahn, Namyoung; Atwa, Mohamed; Delacou, Clement; Anisimov, Anton; Kauppinen, Esko I; Choi, Mansoo; Maruyama, Shigeo; Matsuo, Yutaka

    2017-10-10

    Transparent carbon electrodes composed of single-walled carbon nanotubes or graphene were used as the bottom electrode in flexible inverted perovskite solar cells. Their photovoltaic performance and mechanical resilience were compared and analyzed using various techniques. Whereas a conventional inverted perovskite solar cells using indium tin oxide showed a power conversion efficiency of 17.8%, the carbon nanotube- and graphene-based cells showed efficiencies of 12.8% and 14.2%, respectively. A thin layer of MoO3 was used for its stable doping effect. The difference in photovoltaic performance between the carbon nanotube- and graphene-based cells was due to the inferior morphology and lower transmittance of the carbon nanotube films compared with the graphene films. Raman spectroscopy and four-probe measurements after strain application revealed that the graphene-based cells were more susceptible to strain than the carbon nanotube-based cells for a given magnitude of strain. Cyclic flexural testing also showed higher resilience of the carbon nanotube-based cells compared with graphene-based cells, though the difference was marginal. Overall, graphene is a better option than carbon nanotubes as the bottom transparent electrode in perovskite solar cells. However, the transfer step for graphene has lower reproducibility, and thus the development of better graphene transfer methods would help maximize the current capacity of graphene-based cells.

  3. Flexible field emission of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes/reduced graphene hybrid films.

    PubMed

    Lee, Duck Hyun; Lee, Jin Ah; Lee, Won Jong; Kim, Sang Ouk

    2011-01-03

    The outstanding flexible field emission properties of carbon hybrid films made of vertically aligned N-doped carbon nanotubes grown on mechanically compliant reduced graphene films are demonstrated. The bottom-reduced graphene film substrate enables the conformal coating of the hybrid film on flexible device geometry and ensures robust mechanical and electrical contact even in a highly deformed state. The field emission properties are precisely examined in terms of the control of the bending radius, the N-doping level, and the length or wall-number of the carbon nanotubes and analyzed with electric field simulations. This high-performance flexible carbon field emitter is potentially useful for diverse, flexible field emission devices.

  4. High-performance carbon nanotube thin-film transistors on flexible paper substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Na; Yun, Ki Nam; Yu, Hyun-Yong; Lee, Cheol Jin; Shim, Joon Hyung

    2015-03-09

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are promising materials as active channels for flexible transistors owing to their excellent electrical and mechanical properties. However, flexible SWCNT transistors have never been realized on paper substrates, which are widely used, inexpensive, and recyclable. In this study, we fabricated SWCNT thin-film transistors on photo paper substrates. The devices exhibited a high on/off current ratio of more than 10{sup 6} and a field-effect mobility of approximately 3 cm{sup 2}/V·s. The proof-of-concept demonstration indicates that SWCNT transistors on flexible paper substrates could be applied as low-cost and recyclable flexible electronics.

  5. Single-walled carbon nanotube networks for flexible and printed electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaumseil, Jana

    2015-07-01

    Networks of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) can be processed from solution and have excellent mechanical properties. They are highly flexible and stretchable. Depending on the type of nanotubes (semiconducting or metallic) they can be used as replacements for metal or transparent conductive oxide electrodes or as semiconducting layers for field-effect transistors (FETs) with high carrier mobilities. They are thus competitive alternatives to other solution-processable materials for flexible and printed electronics. This review introduces the basic properties of SWNTs, current methods for dispersion and separation of metallic and semiconducting SWNTs and techniques to deposit and pattern dense networks from dispersion. Recent examples of applications of carbon nanotubes as conductors and semiconductors in (opto-)electronic devices and integrated circuits will be discussed.

  6. A review of carbon nanotube- and graphene-based flexible thin-film transistors.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dong-Ming; Liu, Chang; Ren, Wen-Cai; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2013-04-22

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene have attracted great attention for numerous applications for future flexible electronics, owing to their supreme properties including exceptionally high electronic conductivity and mechanical strength. Here, the progress of CNT- and graphene-based flexible thin-film transistors from material preparation, device fabrication techniques to transistor performance control is reviewed. State-of-the-art fabrication techniques of thin-film transistors are divided into three categories: solid-phase, liquid-phase, and gas-phase techniques, and possible scale-up approaches to achieve realistic production of flexible nanocarbon-based transistors are discussed. In particular, the recent progress in flexible all-carbon nanomaterial transistor research is highlighted, and this all-carbon strategy opens up a perspective to realize extremely flexible, stretchable, and transparent electronics with a relatively low-cost and fast fabrication technique, compared to traditional rigid silicon, metal and metal oxide electronics.

  7. Phonon dispersion and quantization tuning of strained carbon nanotubes for flexible electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Gautreau, Pierre; Chu, Yanbiao; Basaran, Cemal; Ragab, Tarek

    2014-06-28

    Graphene and carbon nanotubes are materials with large potentials for applications in flexible electronics. Such devices require a high level of sustainable strain and an understanding of the materials electrical properties under strain. Using supercell theory in conjunction with a comprehensive molecular mechanics model, the full band phonon dispersion of carbon nanotubes under uniaxial strain is studied. The results suggest an overall phonon softening and open up the possibility of phonon quantization tuning with uniaxial strain. The change in phonon quantization and the resulting increase in electron-phonon and phonon-phonon scattering rates offer further explanation and theoretical basis to the experimental observation of electrical properties degradation for carbon nanotubes under uniaxial strain.

  8. Capacitive tunnels in single-walled carbon nanotube networks on flexible substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, M. Z.; Iqbal, M. W.; Eom, Jonghwa; Ahmad, Muneer; Ferrer-Anglada, Núria

    2012-03-01

    We report the analysis of single-walled carbon nanotube networks, which are expected to be suitable as miniaturized flexible radio frequency RC filters and also have important implications for high frequency devices. The surface morphology obtained by atomic force microscopy shows that most of the growth on polypropylene carbonate substrate is homogeneous. The large value of peak intensity ratio of G and D band in Raman spectra indicates the high purity network. Nyquist plots of carbon nanotube networks on a flexible substrate are close to real circles, indicating that the material is conducting, and suggest a simple equivalent circuit having a resistor in parallel with a capacitor. The Bode plots give the dependence of real and imaginary impedances on frequency. While at high frequency, the impedance decreases, due to generation of capacitance between a single-walled carbon nanotube; at low frequency, it shows the normal behavior, having constant value. The tunnels among different carbon nanotubes are capable of storing electric charge. The accumulative capacitances of tunnels for three varied concentrations are calculated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy simulations to fit the observed Nyquist plots.

  9. A review of fabrication and applications of carbon nanotube film-based flexible electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Steve; Vosguerichian, Michael; Bao, Zhenan

    2013-02-01

    Flexible electronics offer a wide-variety of applications such as flexible circuits, flexible displays, flexible solar cells, skin-like pressure sensors, and conformable RFID tags. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are a promising material for flexible electronics, both as the channel material in field-effect transistors (FETs) and as transparent electrodes, due to their high intrinsic carrier mobility, conductivity, and mechanical flexibility. In this feature article, we review the recent progress of CNTs in flexible electronics by describing both the processing and the applications of CNT-based flexible devices. To employ CNTs as the channel material in FETs, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are used. There are generally two methods of depositing SWNTs on flexible substrates--transferring CVD-grown SWNTs or solution-depositing SWNTs. Since CVD-grown SWNTs can be highly aligned, they often outperform solution-processed SWNT films that are typically in the form of random network. However, solution-based SWNTs can be printed at a large-scale and at low-cost, rendering them more appropriate for manufacturing. In either case, the removal of metallic SWNTs in an effective and a scalable manner is critical, which must still be developed and optimized. Nevertheless, promising results demonstrating SWNT-based flexible circuits, displays, RF-devices, and biochemical sensors have been reported by various research groups, proving insight into the exciting possibilities of SWNT-based FETs. In using carbon nanotubes as transparent electrodes (TEs), two main strategies have been implemented to fabricate highly conductive, transparent, and mechanically compliant films--superaligned films of CNTs drawn from vertically grown CNT forests using the ``dry-drawing'' technique and the deposition or embedding of CNTs onto flexible or stretchable substrates. The main challenge for CNT based TEs is to fabricate films that are both highly conductive and transparent. These CNT based TEs have

  10. Carbon nanotube active-matrix backplanes for mechanically flexible visible light and X-ray imagers.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Toshitake; Yu, Zhibin; Chen, Kevin; Kiriya, Daisuke; Wang, Chuan; Takei, Kuniharu; Shiraki, Hiroshi; Chen, Teresa; Ma, Biwu; Javey, Ali

    2013-01-01

    We report visible light and X-ray imagers on lightweight and mechanically flexible plastic substrates. The process involves solution processing of organic photodetectors on top of an active-matrix backplane consisting of carbon nanotube thin-film transistors. The system takes advantage of the high mobility of nanotube transistors for low operating voltages and efficient light absorption of organic bulk-heterojunctions for high imaging sensitivity. With this highly scalable process scheme, 18 × 18 pixel-array flexible imagers (physical size of 2 cm × 1.5 cm) with high performance are successfully demonstrated. In addition, as the absorption peak of the adopted organic photodiodes covers the green band of the light spectrum, X-ray imaging is readily demonstrated by placing a scintillator film on top of the flexible imagers.

  11. Photodetectors based on single-walled carbon nanotubes and thiamonomethinecyanine J-aggregates on flexible substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorov, I. V. Emel’yanov, A. V.; Romashkin, A. V.; Bobrinetskiy, I. I.

    2015-09-15

    The present paper is devoted to observations of the photoresistive effect in multilayer structures with a sensitive layer of J-aggregates of thiamonomethinecyanine polymethine dye and a transparent electrode of a conductive carbon-nanotube network on a flexible polyethylenenaphtalate substrate. The effect of narrow-band emission with a wavelength of 465 nm on a change in the conductivity of the fabricated structures is studied. The prepared samples are studied by atomic-force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and spectrophotometry methods. It is shown that these structures are photosensitive to the indicated spectral region, and the dye layer is a film of dye J-aggregates. The change in the sample conductivity upon exposure to light one hundred times exceeds the dark conductivity. In general, the principal possibility of developing a photoresistive detector based on J-aggregates of cyanine dyes on flexible supports on account of the use of transparent and conductive carbon-nanotube layers is shown.

  12. Fully integrated patterned carbon nanotube strain sensors on flexible sensing skin substrates for structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Andrew R.; Kurata, Masahiro; Nishino, Hiromichi; Lynch, Jerome P.

    2016-04-01

    New advances in nanotechnology and material processing is creating opportunities for the design and fabrication of a new generation of thin film sensors that can used to assess structural health. In particular, thin film sensors attached to large areas of the structure surface has the potential to provide spatially rich data on the performance and health of a structure. This study focuses on the development of a fully integrated strain sensor that is fabricated on a flexible substrate for potentially use in sensing skins. This is completed using a carbon nanotube-polymer composite material that is patterned on a flexible polyimide substrate using optical lithography. The piezoresistive carbon nanotube elements are integrated into a complete sensing system by patterning copper electrodes and integrating off-the-shelf electrical components on the flexible film for expanded functionality. This diverse material utilization is realized in a versatile process flow to illustrate a powerful toolbox for sensing severity, location, and failure mode of damage on structural components. The fully integrated patterned carbon nanotube strain sensor is tested on a quarter-scale, composite beam column connection. The results and implications for future structural damage detection are discussed.

  13. Printing Highly Controlled Suspended Carbon Nanotube Network on Micro-patterned Superhydrophobic Flexible Surface

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bo; Wang, Xin; Jung, Hyun Young; Kim, Young Lae; Robinson, Jeremy T.; Zalalutdinov, Maxim; Hong, Sanghyun; Hao, Ji; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Wan, Kai-Tak; Jung, Yung Joon

    2015-01-01

    Suspended single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) offer unique functionalities for electronic and electromechanical systems. Due to their outstanding flexible nature, suspended SWCNT architectures have great potential for integration into flexible electronic systems. However, current techniques for integrating SWCNT architectures with flexible substrates are largely absent, especially in a manner that is both scalable and well controlled. Here, we present a new nanostructured transfer paradigm to print scalable and well-defined suspended nano/microscale SWCNT networks on 3D patterned flexible substrates with micro- to nanoscale precision. The underlying printing/transfer mechanism, as well as the mechanical, electromechanical, and mechanical resonance properties of the suspended SWCNTs are characterized, including identifying metrics relevant for reliable and sensitive device structures. Our approach represents a fast, scalable and general method for building suspended nano/micro SWCNT architectures suitable for flexible sensing and actuation systems. PMID:26511284

  14. Carbon nanotubes/holey graphene hybrid film as binder-free electrode for flexible supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Deng, Lingjuan; Gu, Yuanzi; Gao, Yihong; Ma, Zhanying; Fan, Guang

    2017-05-15

    The practical application of graphene (GR) has still been hindered because of its unsatisfied physical and chemical properties resulting from the irreversible agglomerates. Preparation of GR-based materials with designed porosities is essential for its practical application. In this work, a facile and scalable method is developed to synthesize carbon nanotubes/holey graphene (CNT/HGR) flexible film using functional CNT and HGR as precursors. Owing to the existence of the small amount CNT, the CNT-5/HGR flexible film with a 3D conductive interpenetrated architecture exhibit significantly improved ion diffusion rate compared to that of the HGR. Moreover, CNT-5/HGR flexible film can be used as binder-free supercapacitor electrodes with ultrahigh specific capacitances of 268Fg(-1), excellent rate capabilities, and superior cycling stabilities. CNT-5/HGR flexible film could be used to fabricate high-performance flexible supercapacitors electrodes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Printing Highly Controlled Suspended Carbon Nanotube Network on Micro-patterned Superhydrophobic Flexible Surface.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Wang, Xin; Jung, Hyun Young; Kim, Young Lae; Robinson, Jeremy T; Zalalutdinov, Maxim; Hong, Sanghyun; Hao, Ji; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Wan, Kai-Tak; Jung, Yung Joon

    2015-10-29

    Suspended single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) offer unique functionalities for electronic and electromechanical systems. Due to their outstanding flexible nature, suspended SWCNT architectures have great potential for integration into flexible electronic systems. However, current techniques for integrating SWCNT architectures with flexible substrates are largely absent, especially in a manner that is both scalable and well controlled. Here, we present a new nanostructured transfer paradigm to print scalable and well-defined suspended nano/microscale SWCNT networks on 3D patterned flexible substrates with micro- to nanoscale precision. The underlying printing/transfer mechanism, as well as the mechanical, electromechanical, and mechanical resonance properties of the suspended SWCNTs are characterized, including identifying metrics relevant for reliable and sensitive device structures. Our approach represents a fast, scalable and general method for building suspended nano/micro SWCNT architectures suitable for flexible sensing and actuation systems.

  16. Twisted aligned carbon nanotube/silicon composite fiber anode for flexible wire-shaped lithium-ion battery.

    PubMed

    Lin, Huijuan; Weng, Wei; Ren, Jing; Qiu, Longbin; Zhang, Zhitao; Chen, Peining; Chen, Xuli; Deng, Jue; Wang, Yonggang; Peng, Huisheng

    2014-02-26

    Twisted, aligned carbon nanotube/silicon composite fibers with remarkable mechanical and electronic properties are designed to develop novel flexible lithium-ion batteries with a high cyclic stability. The core-sheath architecture and the aligned structure of the composite nanotube offer excellent combined properties. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Electronic Durability of Flexible Transparent Films from Type-Specific Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J; Iyer, S; Bernhardt, A; Huh, JY; Hudson, S; Fagan, J; Hobbie, E.

    2011-12-11

    The coupling between mechanical flexibility and electronic performance is evaluated for thin films of metallic and semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) deposited on compliant supports. Percolated networks of type-purified SWCNTs are assembled as thin conducting coatings on elastic polymer substrates, and the sheet resistance is measured as a function of compression and cyclic strain through impedance spectroscopy. The wrinkling topography, microstructure and transparency of the films are independently characterized using optical microscopy, electron microscopy, and optical absorption spectroscopy. Thin films made from metallic SWCNTs show better durability as flexible transparent conductive coatings, which we attribute to a combination of superior mechanical performance and higher interfacial conductivity.

  18. Transparent and flexible high-performance supercapacitors based on single-walled carbon nanotube films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanninen, Petri; Dang Luong, Nguyen; Hoang Sinh, Le; Anoshkin, Ilya V.; Tsapenko, Alexey; Seppälä, Jukka; Nasibulin, Albert G.; Kallio, Tanja

    2016-06-01

    Transparent and flexible energy storage devices have garnered great interest due to their suitability for display, sensor and photovoltaic applications. In this paper, we report the application of aerosol synthesized and dry deposited single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) thin films as electrodes for an electrochemical double-layer capacitor (EDLC). SWCNT films exhibit extremely large specific capacitance (178 F g-1 or 552 μF cm-2), high optical transparency (92%) and stability for 10 000 charge/discharge cycles. A transparent and flexible EDLC prototype is constructed with a polyethylene casing and a gel electrolyte.

  19. Interface engineered carbon nanotubes with SiO2 for flexible infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhenlong; Gao, Min; Pan, Taisong; Wei, Xianhua; Chen, Chonglin; Lin, Yuan

    2017-08-01

    Nitrogen-doped/non-doped carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were integrated on SiO2/Si and PMMA substrates for understanding the infrared sensing mechanisms. The nanotube structures on SiO2 substrates exhibit a much shorter response time (about 40 ms) than those directly on PMMA substrates (about 1200 ms), indicating the interface effects between CNTs and the substrates. The infrared responses for both structures show a linear relationship with the light power density even at the radiation power as low as 0.1 mW/mm2. Moreover, a new concept flexible IR detector was designed and fabricated by transferring the CNTs/SiO2 structure onto the PMMA substrate, which exhibits both short response time (50 ms) and good flexibility. The successful detection of human finger movements indicates the practical applications of the CNT-based detectors for the detection of weak thermal or far infrared radiation.

  20. Fabrication of flexible transparent conductive films from long double-walled carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Imazu, Naoki; Fujigaya, Tsuyohiko; Nakashima, Naotoshi

    2014-01-01

    The fabrication of flexible transparent conducting films (TCFs) is important for the development of the next-generation flexible devices. In this study, we used double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) as the starting material and described a fabrication method of flexible TCFs. We have determined in a quantitative way that the key factors are the length and the dispersion states of the DWCNTs as well as the weight-ratios of dispersant polymer/DWCNTs. By controlling such factors, we have readily fabricated a flexible highly transparent (94% transmittance) and conductive (surface resistivity = 320 Ω sq−1) DWCNT film without adding any chemical doping that is often used to reduce the surface resistivity. By applying a wet coating, we have succeeded in the fabrication of large-scale conducting transparent DWCNT films based on the role-to-role method. PMID:27877666

  1. Rigid versus Flexible Ligands on Carbon Nanotubes for the Enhanced Sensitivity of Cobalt Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Gou, Pingping; Kraut, Nadine D.; Feigel, Ian Matthew; Star, Alexander

    2013-02-26

    Carbon nanotubes have shown great promise in the fabrication of ultra-compact and highly sensitive chemical and biological sensors. Additional chemical functionalization schemes can controllably improve selectivity of the carbon nanotube-based sensors; however the exact transduction mechanism is still under debate. In this article we detail the synthesis and selective response of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) functionalized with polyazomethine (PAM) polymer towards the application of a specific trace metal ion detector. The response of the polymer system was compared to shape persistent macrocycle (MAC) comprised of identical ion coordination ligands. While ion detection with rigid MAC/SWNT chemiresistor was comparable to bare SWNT, flexible PAM offers significant SWNT signal amplification, allowing for picomolar detection of Co{sup 2+} ions with both selectivity and a fast response. We hypothesized that rearrangement of the flexible PAM on the SWNT network is a sensing mechanism which allows for ultrasensitive detection of metal ions. The electron transfer and polymer rearrangement on the SWNT was studied by a combination of optical spectroscopy and electrical measurements - ultimately allowing for a better understanding of fundamental mechanisms that prompt device response.

  2. Flexible pulses from carbon nanotubes mode-locked fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ling-Zhen; Yang, Yi; Wang, Juan-Fen

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrate a flexible erbium-doped pulsed fiber laser which achieves the wavelength and pulse width tuning by adjusting an intracavity filter. The intracavity filter is flexible to achieve any of the different wavelengths and bandwidths in the tuning range. The wavelength and width of pulse can be tuned in a range of ˜ 20 nm and from ˜ 0.8 ps to 87 ps, respectively. The flexible pulsed fiber laser can be accurately controlled, which is insensitive to environmental disturbance. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61575137) and the Program on Social Development by Department of Science and Technology of Shanxi Province, China (Grant No. 20140313023-3).

  3. Binder-free Carbon Nanotube Flexible Solid State Supercapacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adu, Kofi; Ma, Danhao; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Wang, Cheng-Yu; Lueking, Angela; Randell, Clive

    2015-03-01

    We present a post synthesis self-assemble protocol that transforms the trillions of CNTs in powder form into densely packed flexible, robust and binder-free macroscopic membranes with hierarchical pore structure. The binder-free CNT membranes could be as thin as <10 μm with mass density greater than that of water (1.0g/cc). As the thickness of the CNT membrane is increased, we observed a gradual transition from high flexibility to buckling and brittleness in the flexural properties of the CNT membranes. We have demonstrated the use of the CNT membranes as electrode in two-electrode 1M H2SO4 aqueous double layer supercapacitor that shows very high power density ~ 1040 kW/kg based on the mass of both electrodes and time constant of ~ 15 ms with no degradation in performance even after 10,000 cycles. Furthermore, we will show the designing of flexible 3-stack bipolar solid-state ultracapacitor and present results on energy/power densities, voltage, cyclability, temperature stability in relation to flexibility and weight. Preliminary results indicate high temperature stability >85°C and CV voltage ~ 3V with very low leakage current ~ 10nA. This Work is Supported by Penn State Altoona Undergraduate Research Sponsored Program and Penn State Materials Research Institute, University Park

  4. Directed-Assembly of Carbon Nanotubes on Soft Substrates for Flexible Biosensor Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyoung Woo; Koh, Juntae; Lee, Byung Yang; Kim, Tae Hyun; Lee, Joohyung; Hong, Seunghun; Yi, Mihye; Jhon, Young Min

    2009-03-01

    We developed a method to selectively assemble and align carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on soft substrates for flexible biosensors. In this strategy, thin oxide layer was deposited on soft substrates via low temperature plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, and linker-free assembly process was applied onto the oxide surface where the assembly of carbon nanotubes was guided by methyl-terminated molecular patterns on the oxide surface. The electrical characterization of the fabricated CNT devices exhibited typical p-type gating effect and 1/f noise behavior. The bare oxide regions near CNTs were functionalized with glutamate oxidase to fabricate selective biosensors to detect two forms of glutamate substances existing in different situations: L-glutamic acid, a neuro-transmitting material, and monosodium glutamate, a food additive.

  5. Directed assembly of carbon nanotubes on soft substrates for use as a flexible biosensor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Juntae; Yi, Mihye; Lee, Byung Yang; Kim, Tae Hyun; Lee, Joohyung; Jhon, Young Min; Hong, Seunghun

    2008-12-01

    We have developed a method to selectively assemble and align carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on soft substrates for use as flexible biosensors. In this strategy, a thin oxide layer was deposited on soft substrates via low temperature plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, and a linker-free assembly process was applied on the oxide surface where the assembly of carbon nanotubes was guided by methyl-terminated molecular patterns on the oxide surface. The electrical characterization of the fabricated CNT devices exhibited a typical p-type gating effect and 1/f noise behavior. The bare oxide regions near CNTs were functionalized with glutamate oxidase to fabricate selective biosensors to detect two forms of glutamate substances existing in different situations: L-glutamic acid, a neurotransmitting material, and monosodium glutamate, a food additive.

  6. Conducting, transparent and flexible substrates obtained from interfacial thin films of double-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Souza, Victor H R; Flahaut, Emmanuel; Zarbin, Aldo J G

    2017-09-15

    Conducting and transparent interfacial thin films have been prepared from double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNT) and further deposited over glass and plastic (polyethylene terephtalate-PET) substrates. The morphology, vibrational structure as well as the optical and electrical properties have been evaluated. The influence of the DWCNT purifying treatment, the amount of carbon nanotubes used to prepare the thin films, and the annealing of the films at different temperatures has been evaluated to optimize both electrical and optical properties. Values of sheet resistance ranging from 0.53 to 27.8 kΩ □(-1) and transmittance at 550nm from 59 to 90% have been achieved. Similar behavior obtained for films deposited on PET or glass substrates indicate a good reproducibility of the method, besides the high potential for further applications on flexible devices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Textile electrodes woven by carbon nanotube-graphene hybrid fibers for flexible electrochemical capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Huhu; Dong, Zelin; Hu, Chuangang; Zhao, Yang; Hu, Yue; Qu, Liangti; Chen, Nan; Dai, Liming

    2013-03-01

    Functional graphene-based fibers are promising as new types of flexible building blocks for the construction of wearable architectures and devices. Unique one-dimensional (1D) carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and 2D graphene (CNT/G) hybrid fibers with a large surface area and high electrical conductivity have been achieved by pre-intercalating graphene fibers with Fe3O4 nanoparticles for subsequent CVD growth of CNTs. The CNT/G hybrid fibers can be further woven into textile electrodes for the construction of flexible supercapacitors with a high tolerance to the repeated bending cycles. Various other applications, such as catalysis, separation, and adsorption, can be envisioned for the CNT/G hybrid fibers.Functional graphene-based fibers are promising as new types of flexible building blocks for the construction of wearable architectures and devices. Unique one-dimensional (1D) carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and 2D graphene (CNT/G) hybrid fibers with a large surface area and high electrical conductivity have been achieved by pre-intercalating graphene fibers with Fe3O4 nanoparticles for subsequent CVD growth of CNTs. The CNT/G hybrid fibers can be further woven into textile electrodes for the construction of flexible supercapacitors with a high tolerance to the repeated bending cycles. Various other applications, such as catalysis, separation, and adsorption, can be envisioned for the CNT/G hybrid fibers. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Electrochemical measurement of graphene fibers. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr00320e

  8. Stretchable and flexible high-strain sensors made using carbon nanotubes and graphite films on natural rubber.

    PubMed

    Tadakaluru, Sreenivasulu; Thongsuwan, Wiradej; Singjai, Pisith

    2014-01-06

    Conventional metallic strain sensors are flexible, but they can sustain maximum strains of only ~5%, so there is a need for sensors that can bear high strains for multifunctional applications. In this study, we report stretchable and flexible high-strain sensors that consist of entangled and randomly distributed multiwall carbon nanotubes or graphite flakes on a natural rubber substrate. Carbon nanotubes/graphite flakes were sandwiched in natural rubber to produce these high-strain sensors. Using field emission scanning electron microscopy, the morphology of the films for both the carbon nanotube and graphite sensors were assessed under different strain conditions (0% and 400% strain). As the strain was increased, the films fractured, resulting in an increase in the electrical resistance of the sensor; this change was reversible. Strains of up to 246% (graphite sensor) and 620% (carbon nanotube sensor) were measured; these values are respectively ~50 and ~120 times greater than those of conventional metallic strain sensors.

  9. Cellulose nanofibril/reduced graphene oxide/carbon nanotube hybrid aerogels for highly flexible and all-solid-state supercapacitors

    Treesearch

    Qifeng Zheng; Zhiyong Cai; Zhenqiang Ma; Shaoqin Gong

    2015-01-01

    A novel type of highly flexible and all-solid-state supercapacitor that uses cellulose nanofibril (CNF)/reduced graphene oxide (RGO)/carbon nanotube (CNT) hybrid aerogels as electrodes and H2SO4 poly (vinyl alcohol) PVA gel as the electrolyte was developed and is reported here. These flexible solid-state supercapacitors...

  10. Flexible and Robust Thermoelectric Generators Based on All-Carbon Nanotube Yarn without Metal Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jaeyoo; Jung, Yeonsu; Yang, Seung Jae; Oh, Jun Young; Oh, Jinwoo; Jo, Kiyoung; Son, Jeong Gon; Moon, Seung Eon; Park, Chong Rae; Kim, Heesuk

    2017-08-22

    As practical interest in flexible/or wearable power-conversion devices increases, the demand for high-performance alternatives to thermoelectric (TE) generators based on brittle inorganic materials is growing. Herein, we propose a flexible and ultralight TE generator (TEG) based on carbon nanotube yarn (CNTY) with excellent TE performance. The as-prepared CNTY shows a superior electrical conductivity of 3147 S/cm due to increased longitudinal carrier mobility derived from a highly aligned structure. Our TEG is innovative in that the CNTY acts as multifunctions in the same device. The CNTY is alternatively doped into n- and p-types using polyethylenimine and FeCl3, respectively. The highly conductive CNTY between the doped regions is used as electrodes to minimize the circuit resistance, thereby forming an all-carbon TEG without additional metal deposition. A flexible TEG based on 60 pairs of n- and p-doped CNTY shows the maximum power density of 10.85 and 697 μW/g at temperature differences of 5 and 40 K, respectively, which are the highest values among reported TEGs based on flexible materials. We believe that the strategy proposed here to improve the power density of flexible TEG by introducing highly aligned CNTY and designing a device without metal electrodes shows great potential for the flexible/or wearable power-conversion devices.

  11. Inkjet printing of flexible high-performance carbon nanotube transparent conductive films by ``coffee ring effect''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimoni, Allon; Azoubel, Suzanna; Magdassi, Shlomo

    2014-09-01

    Transparent and flexible conductors are a major component in many modern optoelectronic devices, such as touch screens for smart phones, displays, and solar cells. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) offer a good alternative to commonly used conductive materials, such as metal oxides (e.g. ITO) for flexible electronics. The production of transparent conductive patterns, and arrays composed of connected CNT ``coffee rings'' on a flexible substrate poly(ethylene terephthalate), has been reported. Direct patterning is achieved by inkjet printing of an aqueous dispersion of CNTs, which self-assemble at the rim of evaporating droplets. After post-printing treatment with hot nitric acid, the obtained TCFs are characterized by a sheet resistance of 156 Ω sq-1 and transparency of 81% (at 600 nm), which are the best reported values obtained by inkjet printing of conductive CNTs. This makes such films very promising as transparent conductors for various electronic devices, as demonstrated by using an electroluminescent device.

  12. Carbon Nanotubes and Graphene for Flexible Electrochemical Energy Storage: from Materials to Devices.

    PubMed

    Wen, Lei; Li, Feng; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2016-06-01

    Flexible electrochemical energy storage (FEES) devices have received great attention as a promising power source for the emerging field of flexible and wearable electronic devices. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene have many excellent properties that make them ideally suited for use in FEES devices. A brief definition of FEES devices is provided, followed by a detailed overview of various structural models for achieving different FEES devices. The latest research developments on the use of CNTs and graphene in FEES devices are summarized. Finally, future prospects and important research directions in the areas of CNT- and graphene-based flexible electrode synthesis and device integration are discussed. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Preparation of flexible carbon nanotube ropes for low-voltage heat generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Bao Jun; Liu, Ting; Huang, Zhi Juan; Chen, De Ming; Zhu, Yi Song; Zhou, Cai Ying; Li, Ye Sheng; Yin, Yan Hong; Wu, Zi Ping

    2017-03-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) ropes (˜1.5 mm in diameter and ˜3000 mm in length) possessing a high degree of flexibility were prepared by twisting CNT socks with the use of rotating motors. Such ropes were not only highly flexible but also dense and homogenous. The structure also allowed the ropes to be easily manipulated without any damage. When the ropes were employed as a heat generator, white incandescence on the rope could be clearly observed even at a low voltage. The properties of the ropes were also validated by observing that water could be boiled after heating for several minutes at a voltage of 15 V. Furthermore, the content of elements in the water before and after heating was unchanged, which demonstrated the structural stability of the ropes. The results indicated the excellent heat transfer performance of the flexible ropes and exhibited potential for use in portable and safe heat generator technology.

  14. Ultra-thin and high-response transparent and flexible heater based on carbon nanotube film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeji; Lee, Hye Ryoung; Saito, Takeshi; Nishi, Yoshio

    2017-04-01

    We demonstrated transparent and flexible heaters based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) using solution and room temperature processing. The direct film fabrication and curing onto a plastic substrate requiring no transfer processing enable a low-cost potential and large-scale fabrication of devices while restraining defects and damage to the transparent and flexible SWNT heaters. The developed ultra-thin heaters show high saturation temperature and extremely high response speed, as indicated by reaching over 100 °C within 1 s at an input voltage of 7 V. The temperature-power performance achieved 187 °C/W.cm2. The transparent and flexible heater with low driving voltage and high response speed is expected to have innovative thermal applications such as portable medical sensors and devices.

  15. Medium-scale carbon nanotube thin-film integrated circuits on flexible plastic substrates.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qing; Kim, Hoon-sik; Pimparkar, Ninad; Kulkarni, Jaydeep P; Wang, Congjun; Shim, Moonsub; Roy, Kaushik; Alam, Muhammad A; Rogers, John A

    2008-07-24

    The ability to form integrated circuits on flexible sheets of plastic enables attributes (for example conformal and flexible formats and lightweight and shock resistant construction) in electronic devices that are difficult or impossible to achieve with technologies that use semiconductor wafers or glass plates as substrates. Organic small-molecule and polymer-based materials represent the most widely explored types of semiconductors for such flexible circuitry. Although these materials and those that use films or nanostructures of inorganics have promise for certain applications, existing demonstrations of them in circuits on plastic indicate modest performance characteristics that might restrict the application possibilities. Here we report implementations of a comparatively high-performance carbon-based semiconductor consisting of sub-monolayer, random networks of single-walled carbon nanotubes to yield small- to medium-scale integrated digital circuits, composed of up to nearly 100 transistors on plastic substrates. Transistors in these integrated circuits have excellent properties: mobilities as high as 80 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), subthreshold slopes as low as 140 m V dec(-1), operating voltages less than 5 V together with deterministic control over the threshold voltages, on/off ratios as high as 10(5), switching speeds in the kilohertz range even for coarse (approximately 100-microm) device geometries, and good mechanical flexibility-all with levels of uniformity and reproducibility that enable high-yield fabrication of integrated circuits. Theoretical calculations, in contexts ranging from heterogeneous percolative transport through the networks to compact models for the transistors to circuit level simulations, provide quantitative and predictive understanding of these systems. Taken together, these results suggest that sub-monolayer films of single-walled carbon nanotubes are attractive materials for flexible integrated circuits, with many potential areas of

  16. Flexible and lightweight thermoelectric generators composed of carbon nanotube-polystyrene composites printed on film substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suemori, Kouji; Hoshino, Satoshi; Kamata, Toshihide

    2013-10-01

    A flexible thermoelectric generator (TEG) was fabricated on a polyethylene naphthalate film substrate using a printing process. The thermoelectric material used in this study, a composite material consisting of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and polystyrene, contained approximately 35 vol. % of voids. Because of the reduction in the density of the CNT-polystyrene composite caused by the voids, the TEG was remarkably lightweight (weight per unit area: ≈15.1 mg/cm2). The TEG generated approximately 55 mW/m2 of power at a temperature difference of 70 °C.

  17. Synthesis and properties of flexible nanocable with carbon nanotube @ polymer hierarchical structure.

    PubMed

    Ren, Junwen; Wang, Xiaoguang; Ramasubramanian, Lakshmi Narayan; Dong, Chengye; Cheng, Yonghong; Yu, Demei; Shan, Zhiwei

    2017-03-03

    A multi-functional polymer-carbon nanotube (CNT) nanocable with a hierarchical structure is fabricated by grafting poly (glycidyl methacrylate) (PGMA) from the CNT surface via activators regenerated by electron transfer atom transfer radical polymerization. Multiple CNTs are arranged in parallel in the fabricated nanocable and exhibit strong binding force with sheathing PGMA. In situ mechanical and electrical tests conducted on an individual nanocable reveal its high flexibility and excellent surface insulation, with an electrical resistance of approximately 1 GΩ. On increasing the voltage to the nanocable's electrical breakdown point, nanoscale electrical trees are observed. Such degradation behavior is discussed in the wider context of breakdown mechanisms in polymer based CNTs.

  18. All-printed carbon nanotube finFETs on plastic substrates for high-performance flexible electronics.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jingsheng; Guo, Chun Xian; Chan-Park, Mary B; Li, Chang Ming

    2012-01-17

    The performance of all-printed flexible electronics is still much lower than silicon devices and significantly limits their commercially viable production. All-printed flexible carbon nanotube (CNT) fin field-effect transistors (FETs) with dielectric-wrapped CNT network are demonstrated with remarkable performance, making it possible to mass-produce high-performance, all-printed flexible electronics on large-area substrates. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Flexible, Stretchable, and Rechargeable Fiber-Shaped Zinc-Air Battery Based on Cross-Stacked Carbon Nanotube Sheets.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yifan; Zhang, Ye; Guo, Ziyang; Ren, Jing; Wang, Yonggang; Peng, Huisheng

    2015-12-14

    The fabrication of flexible, stretchable and rechargeable devices with a high energy density is critical for next-generation electronics. Herein, fiber-shaped Zn-air batteries, are realized for the first time by designing aligned, cross-stacked and porous carbon nanotube sheets simultaneously that behave as a gas diffusion layer, a catalyst layer, and a current collector. The combined remarkable electronic and mechanical properties of the aligned carbon nanotube sheets endow good electrochemical properties. They display excellent discharge and charge performances at a high current density of 2 A g(-1) . They are also flexible and stretchable, which is particularly promising to power portable and wearable electronic devices.

  20. Textile electrodes woven by carbon nanotube-graphene hybrid fibers for flexible electrochemical capacitors.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Huhu; Dong, Zelin; Hu, Chuangang; Zhao, Yang; Hu, Yue; Qu, Liangti; Chen, Nan; Dai, Liming

    2013-04-21

    Functional graphene-based fibers are promising as new types of flexible building blocks for the construction of wearable architectures and devices. Unique one-dimensional (1D) carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and 2D graphene (CNT/G) hybrid fibers with a large surface area and high electrical conductivity have been achieved by pre-intercalating graphene fibers with Fe3O4 nanoparticles for subsequent CVD growth of CNTs. The CNT/G hybrid fibers can be further woven into textile electrodes for the construction of flexible supercapacitors with a high tolerance to the repeated bending cycles. Various other applications, such as catalysis, separation, and adsorption, can be envisioned for the CNT/G hybrid fibers.

  1. Flexible carbon nanotube/mono-crystalline Si thin-film solar cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Flexible heterojunction solar cells were fabricated from carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and mono-crystalline Si thin films at room temperature. The Si thin films with thickness less than 50 μm are prepared by chemically etching Si wafer in a KOH solution. The initial efficiency of the thin-film solar cell varies from approximately 3% to 5%. After doping with a few drops of 1 M HNO3, the efficiency increases to 6% with a short-circuit current density of 16.8 mA/cm2 and a fill factor of 71.5%. The performance of the solar cells depends on the surface state and thickness of Si thin films, as well as the interface of CNT/Si. The flexible CNT/Si thin-film solar cells exhibit good stability in bending-recovery cycles. PMID:25258617

  2. Inkjet Printing of Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Tortorich, Ryan P.; Choi, Jin-Woo

    2013-01-01

    In an attempt to give a brief introduction to carbon nanotube inkjet printing, this review paper discusses the issues that come along with preparing and printing carbon nanotube ink. Carbon nanotube inkjet printing is relatively new, but it has great potential for broad applications in flexible and printable electronics, transparent electrodes, electronic sensors, and so on due to its low cost and the extraordinary properties of carbon nanotubes. In addition to the formulation of carbon nanotube ink and its printing technologies, recent progress and achievements of carbon nanotube inkjet printing are reviewed in detail with brief discussion on the future outlook of the technology.

  3. Inkjet Printing of Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Tortorich, Ryan P; Choi, Jin-Woo

    2013-07-29

    In an attempt to give a brief introduction to carbon nanotube inkjet printing, this review paper discusses the issues that come along with preparing and printing carbon nanotube ink. Carbon nanotube inkjet printing is relatively new, but it has great potential for broad applications in flexible and printable electronics, transparent electrodes, electronic sensors, and so on due to its low cost and the extraordinary properties of carbon nanotubes. In addition to the formulation of carbon nanotube ink and its printing technologies, recent progress and achievements of carbon nanotube inkjet printing are reviewed in detail with brief discussion on the future outlook of the technology.

  4. Water flow in carbon nanotubes: The effect of tube flexibility and thermostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sam, Alan; Kannam, Sridhar Kumar; Hartkamp, Remco; Sathian, Sarith P.

    2017-06-01

    Although the importance of temperature control in nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations is widely accepted, the consequences of the thermostatting approach in the case of strongly confined fluids are underappreciated. We show the strong influence of the thermostatting method on the water transport in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by considering simulations in which the system temperature is controlled via the walls or via the fluid. Streaming velocities and mass flow rates are found to depend on the tube flexibility and on the thermostatting algorithm, with flow rates up to 20% larger when the walls are flexible. The larger flow rates in flexible CNTs are explained by a lower friction coefficient between water and the wall. Despite the lower friction, a larger solid-fluid interaction energy is found for flexible CNTs than for rigid ones. Furthermore, a comparison of thermostat schemes has shown that the Berendsen and Nosé-Hoover thermostats result in very similar transport rates, while lower flow rates are found under the influence of the Langevin thermostat. These findings illustrate the significant influence of the thermostatting methods on the simulated confined fluid transport.

  5. Flexible single-walled carbon nanotube/polycellulose papers for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin; Li, Linlin; Wong, Chui Ling; Madhavi, Srinivasan

    2012-12-14

    Flexible and highly conductive single-walled carbon nanotube/polycellulose papers (SWCNT/PPs) were developed as current collectors for lithium-ion batteries by a simple and scalable process. The flexible electrodes based on SWCNT/PP conductors consisted of a unique three-dimensional interwoven structure of electrode materials and cellulose fibers with CNTs and exhibited flexibility, good electrochemical performance and excellent cyclic stability. Full cells using Li(4)Ti(5)O(12) and LiFePO(4) electrodes based on SWCNT/PPs showed a first discharge capacity of 153.5 mA h g(-1) with Coulombic efficiencies of 90.6% at 0.1 C and discharge capacity of 102.6 mA h g(-1) at high rate (10 C). Full cells based SWCNT/PP conductors showed higher capacities and lower electrochemical interfacial resistance compared to metallic current collectors. Half cells using anatase TiO(2) hierarchical spheres based on SWCNT/PP conductors also exhibited outstanding electrochemical performance, verifying the stability of SWCNT/PP conductors to various electrode materials. Our results demonstrated the potential versatility of composite electrodes and conductive SWCNT/PPs for flexible and portable micropower devices.

  6. Strain Sensing Characteristics of Rubbery Carbon Nanotube Composite for Flexible Sensors.

    PubMed

    Choi, Gyong Rak; Park, Hyung-ki; Huh, Hoon; Kim, Young-Ju; Ham, Heon; Kim, Hyoun Woo; Lim, Kwon Taek; Kim, Sung Yong; Kang, Inpil

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the piezoresistive properties of CNT (Carbon Nanotube)/EPDM composite are characterized for the applications of a flexible sensor. The CNT/EPDM composites were prepared by using a Brabender mixer with MWCNT (Multi-walled Carbon Nanotube) and organoclay. The static and quasi-dynamic voltage output responses of the composite sensor were also experimentally studied and were compared with those of a conventional foil strain gage. The voltage output by using a signal processing system was fairly stable and it shows somehow linear responses at both of loading and unloading cases with hysteresis. The voltage output was distorted under a quasi-dynamic test due to its unsymmetrical piezoresistive characteristics. The CNT/EPDM sensor showed quite tardy response to its settling time test under static deflections and that would be a hurdle for its real time applications. Furthermore, since the CNT/EPDM sensor does not have directional voltage output to tension and compression, it only could be utilized as a mono-directional force sensor such as a compressive touch sensor.

  7. Flexible Batteries: Hierarchical Assemblies of Carbon Nanotubes for Ultraflexible Li-Ion Batteries (Adv. Mater. 31/2016).

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Shahab; Copic, Davor; George, Chandramohan; De Volder, Michael

    2016-08-01

    An advanced battery architecture composed of 3D carbon nanotube (CNT) current collectors is used to mitigate stresses in flexible batteries. On Page 6705, C. George, M. De Volder, and co-workers describe the fabrication process and characteristics of this new generation of ultraflexible batteries, which show high rate and cyclablility. These batteries may find applications in the powering of flexible displays and logics.

  8. Synthesis and properties of flexible nanocable with carbon nanotube @ polymer hierarchical structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Junwen; Wang, Xiaoguang; Narayan Ramasubramanian, Lakshmi; Dong, Chengye; Cheng, Yonghong; Yu, Demei; Shan, Zhiwei

    2017-03-01

    A multi-functional polymer–carbon nanotube (CNT) nanocable with a hierarchical structure is fabricated by grafting poly (glycidyl methacrylate) (PGMA) from the CNT surface via activators regenerated by electron transfer atom transfer radical polymerization. Multiple CNTs are arranged in parallel in the fabricated nanocable and exhibit strong binding force with sheathing PGMA. In situ mechanical and electrical tests conducted on an individual nanocable reveal its high flexibility and excellent surface insulation, with an electrical resistance of approximately 1 GΩ. On increasing the voltage to the nanocable’s electrical breakdown point, nanoscale electrical trees are observed. Such degradation behavior is discussed in the wider context of breakdown mechanisms in polymer based CNTs.

  9. One step shift towards flexible supercapacitors based on carbon nanotubes - A review

    SciTech Connect

    Yar, A. E-mail: johndennis@petronas.com.my E-mail: asad-032@yahoo.com Dennis, J. O. E-mail: johndennis@petronas.com.my E-mail: asad-032@yahoo.com Mohamed, N. M. E-mail: johndennis@petronas.com.my E-mail: asad-032@yahoo.com Mumtaz, A. E-mail: johndennis@petronas.com.my E-mail: asad-032@yahoo.com Irshad, M. I. E-mail: johndennis@petronas.com.my E-mail: asad-032@yahoo.com; Ahmad, F.

    2014-10-24

    Supercapacitors have emerged as prominent energy storage devices that offer high energy density compared to conventional capacitors and high power density which is not found in batteries. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) because of their high surface area and tremendous electrical properties are used as electrode material for supercapacitors. In this review we focused on the factors like surface area, role of the electrolyte and techniques adopted to improve performance of CNTs based supercapacitors. The supercapacitors are widely tested in liquid electrolytes which are normally hazardous in nature, toxic, flammable and their leakage has safety concerns. This review also focuses on research which is replacing these unsafe electrolytes by solid electrolytes with the combination of low cost CNTs deposited flexible supports for supercapacitors.

  10. High-performance flexible nanoporous Si-carbon nanotube paper anodes for micro-battery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biserni, Erika; Scarpellini, Alice; Li Bassi, Andrea; Bruno, Paola; Zhou, Yun; Xie, Ming

    2016-06-01

    Nanoporous Si has been grown by pulsed laser deposition on a free-standing carbon nanotube (CNT) paper sheet for micro-battery anodes. The Si deposition shows conformal coverage on the CNT paper, and the Si-CNT paper anodes demonstrate high areal capacity of ˜1000 μAh cm-2 at a current density of 54 μA cm-2, while 69% of its initial capacity is preserved when the current density is increased by a factor 10. Excellent stability without capacity decay up to 1000 cycles at a current density of 1080 μA cm-2 is also demonstrated. After bending along the diameter of the circular paper disc many times, the Si-CNT paper anodes preserve the same morphology and show promising electrochemical performance, indicating that nanoporous Si-CNT paper anodes can find application for flexible micro-batteries.

  11. Highly flexible, mechanically robust superconducting wire consisting of NbN-carbon-nanotube nanofibril composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong-Gyun; Kang, Haeyong; Kim, Joonggyu; Lee, Young Hee; Suh, Dongseok

    A flexible superconducting fiber is prepared by twisting carbon nanotube (CNT) sheets coated with sputter-deposited niobium nitride (NbN) layer to form the shape of yarn. Twisted CNT yarn, which has been extensively studied due to its high flexibility as well as excellent mechanical properties, and NbN, which is a superconducting material with high transition temperature (Tc) and critical magnetic field (Hc), are combined together by the deposition of NbN layer on free-standing CNT-sheet substrate followed by the biscrolling process. We tried many experimental conditions to investigate the superconducting properties of NbN-CNT yarn as a function of NbN thickness and number of CNT-sheet layers, and found out that the superconducting property of NbN on CNT-sheet can be comparable to that of NbN thin film on the normal solid substrate. In addition, the superconducting property survived even under the condition of severe mechanical deformation such as knotting. These results show the potential application of this technology as a large-scale fabrication method of flexible, mechanically robust, high performance superconducting wire. This work is supported by the Institute for Basic Science (IBS-R011-D1), and by the National Research Foundation (BSR-2013R1A1A1076063) funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning, Republic of Korea.

  12. Medium scale carbon nanotube thin film integrated circuits on flexible plastic substrates

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, John A; Cao, Qing; Alam, Muhammad; Pimparkar, Ninad

    2015-02-03

    The present invention provides device components geometries and fabrication strategies for enhancing the electronic performance of electronic devices based on thin films of randomly oriented or partially aligned semiconducting nanotubes. In certain aspects, devices and methods of the present invention incorporate a patterned layer of randomly oriented or partially aligned carbon nanotubes, such as one or more interconnected SWNT networks, providing a semiconductor channel exhibiting improved electronic properties relative to conventional nanotubes-based electronic systems.

  13. Rigid/flexible transparent electronics based on separated carbon nanotube thin-film transistors and their application in display electronics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jialu; Wang, Chuan; Zhou, Chongwu

    2012-08-28

    Transparent electronics has attracted numerous research efforts in recent years because of its promising commercial impact in a wide variety of areas such as transparent displays. High optical transparency as well as good electrical performance is required for transparent electronics. Preseparated, semiconducting enriched carbon nanotubes are excellent candidates for this purpose due to their excellent mobility, high percentage of semiconducting nanotubes, and room-temperature processing compatibility. Here we report fully transparent transistors based on separated carbon nanotube networks. Using a very thin metal layer together with indium tin oxide as source and drain contacts, excellent electrical performance as well as high transparency (~82%) has been achieved (350-800 nm). Also, devices on flexible substrates are fabricated, and only a very small variation in electric characteristics is observed during a flexibility test. Furthermore, an organic light-emitting diode control circuit with significant output light intensity modulation has been demonstrated with transparent, separated nanotube thin-film transistors. Our results suggest the promising future of separated carbon nanotube based transparent electronics, which can serve as the critical foundation for next-generation transparent display applications.

  14. Flexible and stretchable lithium-ion batteries and supercapacitors based on electrically conducting carbon nanotube fiber springs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ye; Bai, Wenyu; Cheng, Xunliang; Ren, Jing; Weng, Wei; Chen, Peining; Fang, Xin; Zhang, Zhitao; Peng, Huisheng

    2014-12-22

    The construction of lightweight, flexible and stretchable power systems for modern electronic devices without using elastic polymer substrates is critical but remains challenging. We have developed a new and general strategy to produce both freestanding, stretchable, and flexible supercapacitors and lithium-ion batteries with remarkable electrochemical properties by designing novel carbon nanotube fiber springs as electrodes. These springlike electrodes can be stretched by over 300 %. In addition, the supercapacitors and lithium-ion batteries have a flexible fiber shape that enables promising applications in electronic textiles.

  15. Patterning of single-walled carbon nanotube films on flexible, transparent plastic substrates.

    PubMed

    Han, Kwi Nam; Li, Cheng Ai; Bui, Minh-Phuong Ngoc; Seong, Gi Hun

    2010-01-05

    We report a simple patterning method for single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) films on flexible, transparent poly(ethylene terephthalate) using an O(2)-plasma technique in a capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) system. The homogeneous SWCNT films in a large area were fabricated by the vacuum filtration method. The plasma patterning process of SWCNT films includes conventional photolithography and subsequent O(2)-plasma treatment. During the plasma treatment, SWCNTs underneath the patterned photoresist polymer are protected from etching and damage by O(2)-plasma while the exposed SWCNTs are destroyed. The morphological changes and the effect of plasma treatment on the chemical properties of SWCNT films were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The physical properties of SWCNT films such as transparency and conductivity were systematically characterized under various plasma conditions. In an electrochemiluminescence reaction, the SWCNT films patterned by the CCP system-based O(2)-plasma treatment could be used as flexible and transparent electrodes.

  16. Carbon Nanotube Nanocomposites with Highly Enhanced Strength and Conductivity for Flexible Electric Circuits.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Ji-Young; Kim, Han-Sem; Kim, Jeong Hun; Shin, Ueon Sang; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2015-07-21

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have an important role in nanotechnology due to their unique properties, retaining the inherent material flexibility, superior strength, and electrical conductivity, unless the bottleneck of CNTs persists and the aggregated structure is overcome. Here, we report on the highly enhanced mechanical and electrical properties of the CNT-chitosan nanocomposites through homogeneous dispersion of CNTs into chitosan solution using a high-pressure homogenizer. The optimal condition is a 50% (w/w) chitosan-CNT film, providing about 7 nm thickness of homogeneous chitosan layer on CNTs, a good tensile strength of 51 MPa, high electrical conductivity under 16 Ω/sq, and a stable bending and folding performance. This CNT-chitosan nanocomposite with highly enhanced properties is an amenable material to fabricate structures of various shapes such as films, sensors, and circuits and also enables a simple and cost-effective approach to improve the performance of a device that presents the first flexible and soft electric circuits yet reported using only CNT-chitosan as the conductor.

  17. Growth of spin-capable multi-walled carbon nanotubes and flexible transparent sheet films.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hoon-Sik; Jeon, Sang Koo; Kwon, Oh-Heon; Lee, Seek Cheol; Kim, Chang Soo; Nahm, Seung Hoon

    2012-04-01

    Iron-catalyzed spin-capable multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were grown on a SiO2 wafer by chemical vapor deposition, which was carried out at 780 degrees C using C2H2 and H2 gases. We fabricated a flexible transparent film using the spun MWCNTs. The MWCNT sheets were produced by being continuously pulled out from well-aligned MWCNTs grown on a substrate. The MWCNT sheet films were manufactured by simply carrying out direct coating on a flexible film or glass. The thickness of the sheet film decreased remarkably when alcohol was sprayed on the surface of the sheet. The alcohol spraying increased the transmittance and decreased the electrical resistance of the MWCNT sheet films. The sheets obtained after alcohol spraying had a resistance of -699 omega and a transmittance of 81%-85%. The MWCNT sheet films were heated by applying direct current. The transparent heaters showed a rapid thermal response and uniform distribution of temperature. In addition, we tested the field emission of the sheet films. The sheet films showed a turn-on voltage of -1.45 V/microm during field emission.

  18. Stretchable and Flexible High-Strain Sensors Made Using Carbon Nanotubes and Graphite Films on Natural Rubber

    PubMed Central

    Tadakaluru, Sreenivasulu; Thongsuwan, Wiradej; Singjai, Pisith

    2014-01-01

    Conventional metallic strain sensors are flexible, but they can sustain maximum strains of only ∼5%, so there is a need for sensors that can bear high strains for multifunctional applications. In this study, we report stretchable and flexible high-strain sensors that consist of entangled and randomly distributed multiwall carbon nanotubes or graphite flakes on a natural rubber substrate. Carbon nanotubes/graphite flakes were sandwiched in natural rubber to produce these high-strain sensors. Using field emission scanning electron microscopy, the morphology of the films for both the carbon nanotube and graphite sensors were assessed under different strain conditions (0% and 400% strain). As the strain was increased, the films fractured, resulting in an increase in the electrical resistance of the sensor; this change was reversible. Strains of up to 246% (graphite sensor) and 620% (carbon nanotube sensor) were measured; these values are respectively ∼50 and ∼120 times greater than those of conventional metallic strain sensors. PMID:24399158

  19. Carbon nanotube network film directly grown on carbon cloth for high-performance solid-state flexible supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Cheng; Liu, Jinping

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have received increasing attention as electrode materials for high-performance supercapacitors. We herein present a straightforward method to synthesize CNT films directly on carbon cloths as electrodes for all-solid-state flexible supercapacitors (AFSCs). The as-made highly conductive electrodes possess a three-dimensional (3D) network architecture for fast ion diffusion and good flexibility, leading to an AFSC with a specific capacitance of 106.1 F g-1, an areal capacitance of 38.75 mF cm-2, an ultralong cycle life of 100 000 times (capacitance retention: 99%), a good rate capability (can scan at 1000 mV s-1, at which the capacitance is still ˜37.8% of that at 5 mV s-1), a high energy density (2.4 μW h cm-2) and a high power density (19 mW cm-2). Moreover, our AFSC maintains excellent electrochemical attributes even with serious shape deformation (bending, folding, etc), high mechanical pressure (63 kPa) and a wide temperature window (up to 100 ° C). After charging for only 5 s, three such AFSC devices connected in series can efficiently power a red round LED for 60 s. Our work could pave the way for the design of practical AFSCs, which are expected to be used for various flexible portable/wearable electronic devices in the future.

  20. Carbon nanotube network film directly grown on carbon cloth for high-performance solid-state flexible supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Cheng; Liu, Jinping

    2014-01-24

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have received increasing attention as electrode materials for high-performance supercapacitors. We herein present a straightforward method to synthesize CNT films directly on carbon cloths as electrodes for all-solid-state flexible supercapacitors (AFSCs). The as-made highly conductive electrodes possess a three-dimensional (3D) network architecture for fast ion diffusion and good flexibility, leading to an AFSC with a specific capacitance of 106.1 F g−1, an areal capacitance of 38.75 mF cm−2, an ultralong cycle life of 100,000 times (capacitance retention: 99%), a good rate capability (can scan at 1000 mV s−1, at which the capacitance is still ~37.8% of that at 5 mV s−1), a high energy density (2.4 μW h cm−2) and a high power density (19 mW cm−2). Moreover, our AFSC maintains excellent electrochemical attributes even with serious shape deformation (bending, folding, etc), high mechanical pressure (63 kPa) and a wide temperature window (up to 100° C). After charging for only 5 s, three such AFSC devices connected in series can efficiently power a red round LED for 60 s. Our work could pave the way for the design of practical AFSCs, which are expected to be used for various flexible portable/wearable electronic devices in the future.

  1. Remarkably enhanced thermal transport based on a flexible horizontally-aligned carbon nanotube array film

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Lin; Wang, Xiaotian; Su, Guoping; Tang, Dawei; Zheng, Xinghua; Zhu, Jie; Wang, Zhiguo; Norris, Pamela M.; Bradford, Philip D.; Zhu, Yuntian

    2016-01-01

    It has been more than a decade since the thermal conductivity of vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) arrays was reported possible to exceed that of the best thermal greases or phase change materials by an order of magnitude. Despite tremendous prospects as a thermal interface material (TIM), results were discouraging for practical applications. The primary reason is the large thermal contact resistance between the CNT tips and the heat sink. Here we report a simultaneous sevenfold increase in in-plane thermal conductivity and a fourfold reduction in the thermal contact resistance at the flexible CNT-SiO2 coated heat sink interface by coupling the CNTs with orderly physical overlapping along the horizontal direction through an engineering approach (shear pressing). The removal of empty space rapidly increases the density of transport channels, and the replacement of the fine CNT tips with their cylindrical surface insures intimate contact at CNT-SiO2 interface. Our results suggest horizontally aligned CNT arrays exhibit remarkably enhanced in-plane thermal conductivity and reduced out-of-plane thermal conductivity and thermal contact resistance. This novel structure makes CNT film promising for applications in chip-level heat dissipation. Besides TIM, it also provides for a solution to anisotropic heat spreader which is significant for eliminating hot spots. PMID:26880221

  2. Carbon nanotube/polymer composite electrodes for flexible, attachable electrochemical DNA sensors.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianfeng; Lee, Eun-Cheol

    2015-09-15

    All-solution-processed, easily-made, flexible multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based electrodes were fabricated and used for electrochemical DNA sensors. These electrodes could serve as a recognition layer for DNA, without any surface modification, through π-π interactions between the MWCNTs and DNA, greatly simplifying the fabrication process for DNA sensors. The electrodes were directly connected to an electrochemical analyzer in the differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) and cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurements, where methylene blue was used as a redox indicator. Since neither functional groups nor probe DNA were immobilized on the surfaces of the electrodes, the sensor can be easily regenerated by washing these electrodes with water. The limit of detection was found to be 1.3 × 10(2)pM (S/N=3), with good DNA sequence differentiation ability. Fast fabrication of a DNA sensor was also achieved by cutting and attaching the MWCNT-PDMS composite electrodes at an analyte solution-containable region. Our results pave the way for developing user-fabricated easily attached DNA sensors at low costs.

  3. Strain on field effect transistors with single–walled–carbon nanotube network on flexible substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, T. G.; Kim, U. J.; Lee, E. H.; Hwang, J. S.; Hwang, S. W. E-mail: sangsig@korea.ac.kr; Kim, S. E-mail: sangsig@korea.ac.kr

    2013-12-07

    We have systematically analyzed the effect of strain on the electrical properties of flexible field effect transistors with a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) network on a polyethersulfone substrate. The strain was applied and estimated at the microscopic scale (<1 μm) by using scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with indigenously designed special bending jig. Interestingly, the strain estimated at the microscopic scale was found to be significantly different from the strain calculated at the macroscopic scale (centimeter-scale), by a factor of up to 4. Further in-depth analysis using SEM indicated that the significant difference in strain, obtained from two different measurement scales (microscale and macroscale), could be attributed to the formation of cracks and tears in the SWCNT network, or at the junction of SWCNT network and electrode during the strain process. Due to this irreversible morphological change, the electrical properties, such as on current level and field effect mobility, lowered by 14.3% and 4.6%, respectively.

  4. Lightweight, Flexible, High-Performance Carbon Nanotube Cables Made by Scalable Flow Coating.

    PubMed

    Mirri, Francesca; Orloff, Nathan D; Forster, Aaron M; Ashkar, Rana; Headrick, Robert J; Bengio, E Amram; Long, Christian J; Choi, April; Luo, Yimin; Walker, Angela R Hight; Butler, Paul; Migler, Kalman B; Pasquali, Matteo

    2016-02-01

    Coaxial cables for data transmission are ubiquitous in telecommunications, aerospace, automotive, and robotics industries. Yet, the metals used to make commercial cables are unsuitably heavy and stiff. These undesirable traits are particularly problematic in aerospace applications, where weight is at a premium and flexibility is necessary to conform with the distributed layout of electronic components in satellites and aircraft. The cable outer conductor (OC) is usually the heaviest component of modern data cables; therefore, exchanging the conventional metallic OC for lower weight materials with comparable transmission characteristics is highly desirable. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have recently been proposed to replace the metal components in coaxial cables; however, signal attenuation was too high in prototypes produced so far. Here, we fabricate the OC of coaxial data cables by directly coating a solution of CNTs in chlorosulfonic acid (CSA) onto the cable inner dielectric. This coating has an electrical conductivity that is approximately 2 orders of magnitude greater than the best CNT OC reported in the literature to date. This high conductivity makes CNT coaxial cables an attractive alternative to commercial cables with a metal (tin-coated copper) OC, providing comparable cable attenuation and mechanical durability with a 97% lower component mass.

  5. Controlled manipulation of flexible carbon nanotubes through shape-dependent pushing by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Seung-Cheol; Qian, Xiaoping

    2013-09-17

    A systematic approach to manipulating flexible carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has been developed on the basis of atomic force microscope (AFM) based pushing. Pushing CNTs enables efficient transport and precise location of individual CNTs. A key issue for pushing CNTs is preventing defective distortion in repetitive bending and unbending deformation. The approach presented here controls lateral movement of an AFM tip to bend CNTs without permanent distortion. The approach investigates possible defects caused by tensile strain of the outer tube under uniform bending and radial distortion by kinking. Using the continuum beam model and experimental bending tests, dependency of maximum bending strain on the length of bent CNTs and radial distortion on bending angles at a bent point have been demonstrated. Individual CNTs are manipulated by limiting the length of bent CNTs and the bending angle. In our approach, multiwalled CNTs with 5-15 nm diameter subjected to bending deformation produce no outer tube breakage under uniform bending and reversible radial deformation with bending angles less than 110°. The lateral tip movement is determined by a simple geometric model that relies on the shape of multiwalled CNTs. The model effectively controls deforming CNT length and bending angle for given CNT shape. Experimental results demonstrate successful manipulation of randomly dispersed CNTs without visual defects. This approach to pushing can be extended to develop a wide range of CNT based nanodevice applications.

  6. Synergistic interactions between silver decorated graphene and carbon nanotubes yield flexible composites to attenuate electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patangrao Pawar, Shital; Kumar, Sachin; Jain, Shubham; Gandi, Mounika; Chatterjee, Kaushik; Bose, Suryasarathi

    2017-01-01

    The need of today’s highly integrated electronic devices, especially working in the GHz frequencies, is to protect them from unwanted interference from neighbouring devices. Hence, lightweight, flexible, easy to process microwave absorbers were designed here by dispersing conductive multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) and silver nanoparticles decorated onto two-dimensional graphene sheets (rGO@Ag) in poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL). In this study, we have shown how dielectric losses can be tuned in the nanocomposites by rGO@Ag nano-hybrid; an essential criterion for energy dissipation within a material resulting in effective shielding of the incoming electromagnetic (EM) radiation. Herein, the conducting pathway for nomadic charge transfer in the PCL matrix was established by MWNTs and the attenuation was tuned by multiple scattering due to the large specific surface area of rGO@Ag. The latter was possible because of the fine dispersion state of the Ag nanoparticles which otherwise often agglomerate if mixed separately. The effect of individual nanoparticles on microwave attenuation was systematically assessed here. It was observed that this strategy resulted in strikingly enhanced microwave attenuation in PCL nanocomposites in contrast to addition of individual particles. For instance, PCL nanocomposites containing both MWNTs and rGO@Ag manifested in a SET of -37 dB and, interestingly, at arelatively smaller fraction. The SE shown by this particular composite makes it a potential candidate for many commercial applications as reflected by its exceptional absorption capability (91.3%).

  7. Remarkably enhanced thermal transport based on a flexible horizontally-aligned carbon nanotube array film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Lin; Wang, Xiaotian; Su, Guoping; Tang, Dawei; Zheng, Xinghua; Zhu, Jie; Wang, Zhiguo; Norris, Pamela M.; Bradford, Philip D.; Zhu, Yuntian

    2016-02-01

    It has been more than a decade since the thermal conductivity of vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) arrays was reported possible to exceed that of the best thermal greases or phase change materials by an order of magnitude. Despite tremendous prospects as a thermal interface material (TIM), results were discouraging for practical applications. The primary reason is the large thermal contact resistance between the CNT tips and the heat sink. Here we report a simultaneous sevenfold increase in in-plane thermal conductivity and a fourfold reduction in the thermal contact resistance at the flexible CNT-SiO2 coated heat sink interface by coupling the CNTs with orderly physical overlapping along the horizontal direction through an engineering approach (shear pressing). The removal of empty space rapidly increases the density of transport channels, and the replacement of the fine CNT tips with their cylindrical surface insures intimate contact at CNT-SiO2 interface. Our results suggest horizontally aligned CNT arrays exhibit remarkably enhanced in-plane thermal conductivity and reduced out-of-plane thermal conductivity and thermal contact resistance. This novel structure makes CNT film promising for applications in chip-level heat dissipation. Besides TIM, it also provides for a solution to anisotropic heat spreader which is significant for eliminating hot spots.

  8. Insect-machine interface: a carbon nanotube-enhanced flexible neural probe.

    PubMed

    Tsang, W M; Stone, Alice L; Otten, David; Aldworth, Zane N; Daniel, Tom L; Hildebrand, John G; Levine, Richard B; Voldman, Joel

    2012-03-15

    We developed microfabricated flexible neural probes (FNPs) to provide a bi-directional electrical link to the moth Manduca sexta. These FNPs can deliver electrical stimuli to, and capture neural activity from, the insect's central nervous system. They are comprised of two layers of polyimide with gold sandwiched in between in a split-ring geometry that incorporates the bi-cylindrical anatomical structure of the insect's ventral nerve cord. The FNPs provide consistent left and right abdominal stimulation both across animals and within an individual animal. The features of the stimulation (direction, threshold charge) are aligned with anatomical features of the moth. We also have used these FNPs to record neuronal activity in the ventral nerve cord of the moth. Finally, by integrating carbon nanotube (CNT)-Au nanocomposites into the FNPs we have reduced the interfacial impedance between the probe and the neural tissue, thus reducing the magnitude of stimulation voltage. This in turn allows use of the FNPs with a wireless stimulator, enabling stimulation and flight biasing of freely flying moths. Together, these FNPs present a potent new platform for manipulating and measuring the neural circuitry of insects, and for other nerves in humans and other animals with similar dimensions as the ventral nerve cord of the moth.

  9. A Flexible Platform Containing Graphene Mesoporous Structure and Carbon Nanotube for Hydrogen Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rujing; Li, Xiao; Zhang, Li; Lin, Shuyuan

    2016-01-01

    It is of great significance to design a platform with large surface area and high electrical conductivity for poorly conductive catalyst for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), such as molybdenum sulfide (MoSx), a promising and cost‐effective nonprecious material. Here, the design and preparation of a free‐standing and tunable graphene mesoporous structure/single‐walled carbon nanotube (GMS/SWCNT) hybrid membrane is reported. Amorphous MoSx is electrodeposited on this platform through a wet chemical process under mild temperature. For MoSx@GMS/SWCNT hybrid electrode with a low catalyst loading of 32 μg cm−2, the onset potential is near 113 mV versus reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE) and a high current density of ≈71 mA cm−2 is achieved at 250 mV versus RHE. The excellent HER performance can be attributed to the large surface area for MoSx deposition, as well as the efficient electron transport and abundant active sites on the amorphous MoSx surface. This novel catalyst is found to outperform most previously reported MoSx‐based HER catalysts. Moreover, the flexibility of the electrode facilitates its stable catalytic performance even in extremely distorted states. PMID:27980998

  10. Lightweight, flexible, high-performance carbon nanotube cables made by scalable flow coating

    DOE PAGES

    Mirri, Francesca; Orloff, Nathan D.; Forser, Aaron M.; ...

    2016-01-21

    Coaxial cables for data transmission are ubiquitous in telecommunications, aerospace, automotive, and robotics industries. Yet, the metals used to make commercial cables are unsuitably heavy and stiff. These undesirable traits are particularly problematic in aerospace applications, where weight is at a premium and flexibility is necessary to conform with the distributed layout of electronic components in satellites and aircraft. The cable outer conductor (OC) is usually the heaviest component of modern data cables; therefore, exchanging the conventional metallic OC for lower weight materials with comparable transmission characteristics is highly desirable. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have recently been proposed to replace themore » metal components in coaxial cables; however, signal attenuation was too high in prototypes produced so far. Here, we fabricate the OC of coaxial data cables by directly coating a solution of CNTs in chlorosulfonic acid (CSA) onto the cable inner dielectric. This coating has an electrical conductivity that is approximately 2 orders of magnitude greater than the best CNT OC reported in the literature to date. In conclusion, this high conductivity makes CNT coaxial cables an attractive alternative to commercial cables with a metal (tin-coated copper) OC, providing comparable cable attenuation and mechanical durability with a 97% lower component mass.« less

  11. Lightweight, flexible, high-performance carbon nanotube cables made by scalable flow coating

    SciTech Connect

    Mirri, Francesca; Orloff, Nathan D.; Forser, Aaron M.; Ashkar, Rana; Headrick, Robert J.; Bengio, E. Amram; Long, Christian J.; Choi, April; Luo, Yimin; Hight Walker, Angela R.; Butler, Paul; Migler, Kalman B.; Pasquali, Matteo

    2016-01-21

    Coaxial cables for data transmission are ubiquitous in telecommunications, aerospace, automotive, and robotics industries. Yet, the metals used to make commercial cables are unsuitably heavy and stiff. These undesirable traits are particularly problematic in aerospace applications, where weight is at a premium and flexibility is necessary to conform with the distributed layout of electronic components in satellites and aircraft. The cable outer conductor (OC) is usually the heaviest component of modern data cables; therefore, exchanging the conventional metallic OC for lower weight materials with comparable transmission characteristics is highly desirable. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have recently been proposed to replace the metal components in coaxial cables; however, signal attenuation was too high in prototypes produced so far. Here, we fabricate the OC of coaxial data cables by directly coating a solution of CNTs in chlorosulfonic acid (CSA) onto the cable inner dielectric. This coating has an electrical conductivity that is approximately 2 orders of magnitude greater than the best CNT OC reported in the literature to date. In conclusion, this high conductivity makes CNT coaxial cables an attractive alternative to commercial cables with a metal (tin-coated copper) OC, providing comparable cable attenuation and mechanical durability with a 97% lower component mass.

  12. Hybrid ternary rice paper-manganese oxide-carbon nanotube nanocomposites for flexible supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wenchao; Zhang, Kaixi; Wei, Li; Yu, Dingshan; Wei, Jun; Chen, Yuan

    2013-10-01

    Modern portable electronic devices create a strong demand for flexible energy storage devices. Paper based nanocomposites are attractive as sustainable materials for such applications. Here, we directly explored the hydroxyl chemistry of cellulose fibers to synthesize hybrid ternary nanocomposites, comprised of rice paper, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and manganese oxide nanoparticles. The functional groups on cellulose fibers can react with adsorbed permanganate ions, resulting in uniform deposition of manganese oxide nanoparticles. SWCNTs coated on top of manganese oxide nanoparticles form a highly conductive network connecting individual manganese oxide particles. By using the hybrid ternary composites as electrodes, the assembled two-electrode supercapacitors demonstrated high capacitance (260.2 F g-1), energy (9.0 W h kg-1), power (59.7 kW kg-1), and cycle stability (12% drop after 3000 cycles). In addition, the nanocomposites show good strength and excellent mechanical flexibility, and their capacitance shows negligible changes after bending more than 100 times. These findings suggest that opportunities exist to further explore the rich chemistry of cellulose fibers for innovative energy applications.Modern portable electronic devices create a strong demand for flexible energy storage devices. Paper based nanocomposites are attractive as sustainable materials for such applications. Here, we directly explored the hydroxyl chemistry of cellulose fibers to synthesize hybrid ternary nanocomposites, comprised of rice paper, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and manganese oxide nanoparticles. The functional groups on cellulose fibers can react with adsorbed permanganate ions, resulting in uniform deposition of manganese oxide nanoparticles. SWCNTs coated on top of manganese oxide nanoparticles form a highly conductive network connecting individual manganese oxide particles. By using the hybrid ternary composites as electrodes, the assembled two

  13. Direct and Dry Deposited Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Films Doped with MoO(x) as Electron-Blocking Transparent Electrodes for Flexible Organic Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Il; Cui, Kehang; Chiba, Takaaki; Anisimov, Anton; Nasibulin, Albert G; Kauppinen, Esko I; Maruyama, Shigeo; Matsuo, Yutaka

    2015-07-01

    Organic solar cells have been regarded as a promising electrical energy source. Transparent and conductive carbon nanotube film offers an alternative to commonly used ITO in photovoltaics with superior flexibility. This communication reports carbon nanotube-based indium-free organic solar cells and their flexible application. Direct and dry deposited carbon nanotube film doped with MoO(x) functions as an electron-blocking transparent electrode, and its performance is enhanced further by overcoating with PSS. The single-walled carbon nanotube organic solar cell in this work shows a power conversion efficiency of 6.04%. This value is 83% of the leading ITO-based device performance (7.48%). Flexible application shows 3.91% efficiency and is capable of withstanding a severe cyclic flex test.

  14. Fully integrated carbon nanotube composite thin film strain sensors on flexible substrates for structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, A. R.; Lynch, J. P.; Kurata, M.; Law, K. H.

    2017-09-01

    Multifunctional thin film materials have opened many opportunities for novel sensing strategies for structural health monitoring. While past work has established methods of optimizing multifunctional materials to exhibit sensing properties, comparatively less work has focused on their integration into fully functional sensing systems capable of being deployed in the field. This study focuses on the advancement of a scalable fabrication process for the integration of multifunctional thin films into a fully integrated sensing system. This is achieved through the development of an optimized fabrication process that can create a broad range of sensing systems using multifunctional materials. A layer-by-layer deposited multifunctional composite consisting of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) in a polyvinyl alcohol and polysodium-4-styrene sulfonate matrix are incorporated with a lithography process to produce a fully integrated sensing system deposited on a flexible substrate. To illustrate the process, a strain sensing platform consisting of a patterned SWNT-composite thin film as a strain-sensitive element within an amplified Wheatstone bridge sensing circuit is presented. Strain sensing is selected because it presents many of the design and processing challenges that are core to patterning multifunctional thin film materials into sensing systems. Strain sensors fabricated on a flexible polyimide substrate are experimentally tested under cyclic loading using standard four-point bending coupons and a partial-scale steel frame assembly under lateral loading. The study reveals the material process is highly repeatable to produce fully integrated strain sensors with linearity and sensitivity exceeding 0.99 and 5 {{V}}/{ε }, respectively. The thin film strain sensors are robust and are capable of high strain measurements beyond 3000 μ {ε }.

  15. Continuous production of flexible carbon nanotube-based transparent conductive films.

    PubMed

    Fraser, I Stuart; Motta, Marcelo S; Schmidt, Ron K; Windle, Alan H

    2010-08-01

    This work shows a simple, single-stage, scalable method for the continuous production of high-quality carbon nanotube-polymer transparent conductive films from carbon feedstock. Besides the ease of scalability, a particular advantage of this process is that the concentration of nanotubes in the films, and thus transparency and conductivity, can be adjusted by changing simple process parameters. Therefore, films can be readily prepared for any application desired, ranging from solar cells to flat panel displays. Our best results show a surface resistivity of the order of 300 Ω square(-1) for a film with 80% transparency, which is promising at this early stage of process development.

  16. Continuous production of flexible carbon nanotube-based transparent conductive films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, I. Stuart; Motta, Marcelo S.; Schmidt, Ron K.; Windle, Alan H.

    2010-08-01

    This work shows a simple, single-stage, scalable method for the continuous production of high-quality carbon nanotube-polymer transparent conductive films from carbon feedstock. Besides the ease of scalability, a particular advantage of this process is that the concentration of nanotubes in the films, and thus transparency and conductivity, can be adjusted by changing simple process parameters. Therefore, films can be readily prepared for any application desired, ranging from solar cells to flat panel displays. Our best results show a surface resistivity of the order of 300 Ω square-1 for a film with 80% transparency, which is promising at this early stage of process development.

  17. Screen printing as a scalable and low-cost approach for rigid and flexible thin-film transistors using separated carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xuan; Chen, Haitian; Gu, Xiaofei; Liu, Bilu; Wang, Wenli; Cao, Yu; Wu, Fanqi; Zhou, Chongwu

    2014-12-23

    Semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes are very promising materials in printed electronics due to their excellent mechanical and electrical property, outstanding printability, and great potential for flexible electronics. Nonetheless, developing scalable and low-cost approaches for manufacturing fully printed high-performance single-wall carbon nanotube thin-film transistors remains a major challenge. Here we report that screen printing, which is a simple, scalable, and cost-effective technique, can be used to produce both rigid and flexible thin-film transistors using separated single-wall carbon nanotubes. Our fully printed top-gated nanotube thin-film transistors on rigid and flexible substrates exhibit decent performance, with mobility up to 7.67 cm2 V(-1) s(-1), on/off ratio of 10(4)∼10(5), minimal hysteresis, and low operation voltage (<10 V). In addition, outstanding mechanical flexibility of printed nanotube thin-film transistors (bent with radius of curvature down to 3 mm) and driving capability for organic light-emitting diode have been demonstrated. Given the high performance of the fully screen-printed single-wall carbon nanotube thin-film transistors, we believe screen printing stands as a low-cost, scalable, and reliable approach to manufacture high-performance nanotube thin-film transistors for application in display electronics. Moreover, this technique may be used to fabricate thin-film transistors based on other materials for large-area flexible macroelectronics, and low-cost display electronics.

  18. Carbon nanotube/Prussian blue thin films as cathodes for flexible, transparent and ITO-free potassium secondary battery.

    PubMed

    Nossol, Edson; Souza, Victor H R; Zarbin, Aldo J G

    2016-09-15

    Thin films of either unpurified single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) or iron-filled multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) were deposited through the liquid-liquid interfacial route over plastic substrates, yielding transparent, flexible and ITO-free electrodes. The iron species presented in both electrodes (inside of the MWCNT cavities or outside of the SWCNT bundles, related to the catalyst remaining of the growth process) were employed as reactant to the electrosynthesis of Prussian blue (PB), yielding carbon nanotubes/Prussian blue nanocomposite thin films, which were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge/discharge measurements. The nanocomposite films were employed as cathodes for flexible, transparent and ITO-free potassium batteries, showing reversible charge/discharge behavior and specific capacitance of 8.3mAhcm(-3) and 2.7mAhcm(-3) for SWCNT/PB and MWCNT/PB, respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. High-performance and compact-designed flexible thermoelectric modules enabled by a reticulate carbon nanotube architecture.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenbin; Fan, Qingxia; Zhang, Qiang; Cai, Le; Li, Kewei; Gu, Xiaogang; Yang, Feng; Zhang, Nan; Wang, Yanchun; Liu, Huaping; Zhou, Weiya; Xie, Sishen

    2017-03-24

    It is a great challenge to substantially improve the practical performance of flexible thermoelectric modules due to the absence of air-stable n-type thermoelectric materials with high-power factor. Here an excellent flexible n-type thermoelectric film is developed, which can be conveniently and rapidly prepared based on the as-grown carbon nanotube continuous networks with high conductivity. The optimum n-type film exhibits ultrahigh power factor of ∼1,500 μW m(-1) K(-2) and outstanding stability in air without encapsulation. Inspired by the findings, we design and successfully fabricate the compact-configuration flexible TE modules, which own great advantages compared with the conventional π-type configuration modules and well integrate the superior thermoelectric properties of p-type and n-type carbon nanotube films resulting in a markedly high performance. Moreover, the research results are highly scalable and also open opportunities for the large-scale production of flexible thermoelectric modules.

  20. High-performance and compact-designed flexible thermoelectric modules enabled by a reticulate carbon nanotube architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wenbin; Fan, Qingxia; Zhang, Qiang; Cai, Le; Li, Kewei; Gu, Xiaogang; Yang, Feng; Zhang, Nan; Wang, Yanchun; Liu, Huaping; Zhou, Weiya; Xie, Sishen

    2017-03-01

    It is a great challenge to substantially improve the practical performance of flexible thermoelectric modules due to the absence of air-stable n-type thermoelectric materials with high-power factor. Here an excellent flexible n-type thermoelectric film is developed, which can be conveniently and rapidly prepared based on the as-grown carbon nanotube continuous networks with high conductivity. The optimum n-type film exhibits ultrahigh power factor of ~1,500 μW m-1 K-2 and outstanding stability in air without encapsulation. Inspired by the findings, we design and successfully fabricate the compact-configuration flexible TE modules, which own great advantages compared with the conventional π-type configuration modules and well integrate the superior thermoelectric properties of p-type and n-type carbon nanotube films resulting in a markedly high performance. Moreover, the research results are highly scalable and also open opportunities for the large-scale production of flexible thermoelectric modules.

  1. Transparent electronics based on transfer printed aligned carbon nanotubes on rigid and flexible substrates.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Fumiaki N; Chang, Hsiao-Kang; Ryu, Koungmin; Chen, Po-Chiang; Badmaev, Alexander; Gomez De Arco, Lewis; Shen, Guozhen; Zhou, Chongwu

    2009-01-27

    We report high-performance fully transparent thin-film transistors (TTFTs) on both rigid and flexible substrates with transfer printed aligned nanotubes as the active channel and indium-tin oxide as the source, drain, and gate electrodes. Such transistors have been fabricated through low-temperature processing, which allowed device fabrication even on flexible substrates. Transparent transistors with high effective mobilities (approximately 1300 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)) were first demonstrated on glass substrates via engineering of the source and drain contacts, and high on/off ratio (3 x 10(4)) was achieved using electrical breakdown. In addition, flexible TTFTs with good transparency were also fabricated and successfully operated under bending up to 120 degrees . All of the devices showed good transparency (approximately 80% on average). The transparent transistors were further utilized to construct a fully transparent and flexible logic inverter on a plastic substrate and also used to control commercial GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with light intensity modulation of 10(3). Our results suggest that aligned nanotubes have great potential to work as building blocks for future transparent electronics.

  2. Effect of Continuous Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Thermal and Mechanical Properties of Flexible Composite Film

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Ji Eun; Kim, Seong Yun; Lee, Seung Hee

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the effect of continuous multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on the thermal and mechanical properties of composites, we propose a fabrication method for a buckypaper-filled flexible composite film prepared by a two-step process involving buckypaper fabrication using vacuum filtration of MWCNTs, and composite film fabrication using the dipping method. The thermal conductivity and tensile strength of the composite film filled with the buckypaper exhibited improved results, respectively 76% and 275% greater than those of the individual MWCNT-filled composite film. It was confirmed that forming continuous MWCNT fillers is an important factor which determines the physical characteristics of the composite film. In light of the study findings, composite films using buckypaper as a filler and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) as a flexible matrix have sufficient potential to be applied as a heat-dissipating material, and as a flexible film with high thermal conductivity and excellent mechanical properties. PMID:28335310

  3. Effect of Continuous Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Thermal and Mechanical Properties of Flexible Composite Film.

    PubMed

    Cha, Ji Eun; Kim, Seong Yun; Lee, Seung Hee

    2016-10-12

    To investigate the effect of continuous multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on the thermal and mechanical properties of composites, we propose a fabrication method for a buckypaper-filled flexible composite film prepared by a two-step process involving buckypaper fabrication using vacuum filtration of MWCNTs, and composite film fabrication using the dipping method. The thermal conductivity and tensile strength of the composite film filled with the buckypaper exhibited improved results, respectively 76% and 275% greater than those of the individual MWCNT-filled composite film. It was confirmed that forming continuous MWCNT fillers is an important factor which determines the physical characteristics of the composite film. In light of the study findings, composite films using buckypaper as a filler and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) as a flexible matrix have sufficient potential to be applied as a heat-dissipating material, and as a flexible film with high thermal conductivity and excellent mechanical properties.

  4. Carbon nanotube composite materials

    DOEpatents

    O'Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2015-03-24

    A material consisting essentially of a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes dissolved in a solvent. Un-functionalized carbon nanotube concentrations up to 30 wt % and hydroxylated carbon nanotube concentrations up to 40 wt % can be used with even small concentrations of each (less than 2 wt %) useful in producing enhanced conductivity properties of formed thin films.

  5. Rubber-based substrates modified with carbon nanotubes inks to build flexible electrochemical sensors.

    PubMed

    Cuartero, María; del Río, Jonathan Sabaté; Blondeau, Pascal; Ortuño, Joaquín A; Rius, F Xavier; Andrade, Francisco J

    2014-05-27

    The development of a solid-contact potentiometric sensor based on conducting rubbers using a carbon nanotubes ink is described here. Commercial rubbers are turned into conductive ones by a simple and versatile method, i.e. painting an aqueous dispersion of single-walled carbon nanotubes on the polymer surface. On this substrate, both the working ion-selective electrode and the reference electrode are built in order to form an integrated potentiometric cell. As a proof-of-principle, selective potassium electrodes are fully characterized giving comparable performances to conventional electrodes (sensitivity, selectivity, stability, linear range, limit of detection and reproducibility). As an application of the rubber-based electrodes, a bracelet was constructed to measure potassium levels in artificial sweat. Since rubbers are ubiquitous in our quotidian life, this approach offers great promise for the generation of chemical information through daily objects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Flexible Transparent Films Based on Nanocomposite Networks of Polyaniline and Carbon Nanotubes for High-Performance Gas Sensing.

    PubMed

    Wan, Pengbo; Wen, Xuemei; Sun, Chaozheng; Chandran, Bevita K; Zhang, Han; Sun, Xiaoming; Chen, Xiaodong

    2015-10-28

    A flexible, transparent, chemical gas sensor is assembled from a transparent conducting film of carbon nanotube (CNT) networks that are coated with hierarchically nanostructured polyaniline (PANI) nanorods. The nanocomposite film is synthesized by in-situ, chemical oxidative polymerization of aniline in a functional multiwalled CNT (FMWCNT) suspension and is simultaneously deposited onto a flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate. An as-prepared flexible transparent chemical gas sensor exhibits excellent transparency of 85.0% at 550 nm using the PANI/FMWCNT nanocomposite film prepared over a reaction time of 8 h. The sensor also shows good flexibility, without any obvious decrease in performance after 500 bending/extending cycles, demonstrating high-performance, portable gas sensing at room temperature. This superior performance could be attributed to the improved electron transport and collection due to the CNTs, resulting in reliable and efficient sensing, as well as the high surface-to-volume ratio of the hierarchically nanostructured composites. The excellent transparency, improved sensing performance, and superior flexibility of the device, may enable the integration of this simple, low-cost, gas sensor into handheld flexible transparent electronic circuitry and optoelectronic devices. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Selective Light-Induced Patterning of Carbon Nanotube/Silver Nanoparticle Composite To Produce Extremely Flexible Conductive Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Inhyuk; Woo, Kyoohee; Zhong, Zhaoyang; Lee, Eonseok; Kang, Dongwoo; Jeong, Sunho; Choi, Young-Man; Jang, Yunseok; Kwon, Sin; Moon, Jooho

    2017-02-22

    Recently, highly flexible conductive features have been widely demanded for the development of various electronic applications, such as foldable displays, deformable lighting, disposable sensors, and flexible batteries. Herein, we report for the first time a selective photonic sintering-derived, highly reliable patterning approach for creating extremely flexible carbon nanotube (CNT)/silver nanoparticle (Ag NP) composite electrodes that can tolerate severe bending (20 000 cycles at a bending radius of 1 mm). The incorporation of CNTs into a Ag NP film can enhance not only the mechanical stability of electrodes but also the photonic-sintering efficiency when the composite is irradiated by intense pulsed light (IPL). Composite electrodes were patterned on various plastic substrates by a three-step process comprising coating, selective IPL irradiation, and wiping. A composite film selectively exposed to IPL could not be easily wiped from the substrate, because interfusion induced strong adhesion to the underlying polymer substrate. In contrast, a nonirradiated film adhered weakly to the substrate and was easily removed, enabling highly flexible patterned electrodes. The potential of our flexible electrode patterns was clearly demonstrated by fabricating a light-emitting diode circuit and a flexible transparent heater with unimpaired functionality under bending, rolling, and folding.

  8. Assessing the improved performance of freestanding, flexible graphene and carbon nanotube hybrid foams for lithium ion battery anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohn, Adam P.; Oakes, Landon; Carter, Rachel; Chatterjee, Shahana; Westover, Andrew S.; Share, Keith; Pint, Cary L.

    2014-04-01

    We demonstrate the fabrication of three-dimensional freestanding foams of hybrid graphene-single-walled carbon nanotube nanomanufactured materials with reversible capacities of 2640 mA h g-1 at 0.186 A g-1 and 236 mA h g-1 at 27.9 A g-1. The Li storage behavior of this material is compared against other nanostructures in similar flexible foam platforms including graphene, ultra-thin graphite, and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), and we elucidate the improved hybrid material performance due to the decoupling of lithium storage reaction energetics dictated by the SWNTs from the total storage capacity of the hybrid material. This work demonstrates a route to develop mechanically robust all-carbon electrodes with the potential for reversible Li-ion storage capacity approaching silicon, power capability of the best supercapacitors, and based on a material simultaneously usable as a charge collector and anode.We demonstrate the fabrication of three-dimensional freestanding foams of hybrid graphene-single-walled carbon nanotube nanomanufactured materials with reversible capacities of 2640 mA h g-1 at 0.186 A g-1 and 236 mA h g-1 at 27.9 A g-1. The Li storage behavior of this material is compared against other nanostructures in similar flexible foam platforms including graphene, ultra-thin graphite, and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), and we elucidate the improved hybrid material performance due to the decoupling of lithium storage reaction energetics dictated by the SWNTs from the total storage capacity of the hybrid material. This work demonstrates a route to develop mechanically robust all-carbon electrodes with the potential for reversible Li-ion storage capacity approaching silicon, power capability of the best supercapacitors, and based on a material simultaneously usable as a charge collector and anode. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: ESI is available that includes (i) SEM and photographs of ultra-thin graphite foams, (ii) Raman

  9. Carbon nanotube network varactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Generalov, A. A.; Anoshkin, I. V.; Erdmanis, M.; Lioubtchenko, D. V.; Ovchinnikov, V.; Nasibulin, A. G.; Räisänen, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    Microelectromechanical system (MEMS) varactors based on a freestanding layer of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films were designed, fabricated and tested. The freestanding SWCNT film was employed as a movable upper patch in the parallel plate capacitor of the MEMS. The measurements of the SWCNT varactors show very high tunability, nearly 100%, of the capacitance with a low actuation voltage of 10 V. The functionality of the varactor is improved by implementing a flexible nanocellulose aerogel filling.

  10. A flexible and implantable microelectrode arrays using high-temperature grown vertical carbon nanotubes and a biocompatible polymer substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Wenwen; Chen, Chaoyang; Feng, Zhaoying; Xu, Yong; Zhou, Chengpeng; Masurkar, Nirul; Cavanaugh, John; Ming-Cheng Cheng, Mark

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a novel microelectrode arrays using high-temperature grown vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) integrated on a flexible and biocompatible parylene substrate. A simple microfabrication process is proposed to unite the high quality vertical CNTs grown at high temperature with the heat sensitive parylene substrate in a highly controllable manner. Briefly, the CNTs electrode is encapsulated by two layers of parylene and the device is released using xenon difluoride (XeF2). The process is compatible with wafer-scale post complementary metal oxide semiconductor integration. Lower impedance and larger interfacial capacitance have been demonstrated using CNTs compared to a Pt electrode. The flexible CNT electrodes have been utilized for extracellular neuronal recording and stimulation in rats. The signal-to-noise ratio of the device is about 12.5. The threshold voltage for initiating action potential is about 0.5 V.

  11. A flexible and implantable microelectrode arrays using high-temperature grown vertical carbon nanotubes and a biocompatible polymer substrate.

    PubMed

    Yi, Wenwen; Chen, Chaoyang; Feng, Zhaoying; Xu, Yong; Zhou, Chengpeng; Masurkar, Nirul; Cavanaugh, John; Cheng, Mark Ming-Cheng

    2015-03-27

    This paper presents a novel microelectrode arrays using high-temperature grown vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) integrated on a flexible and biocompatible parylene substrate. A simple microfabrication process is proposed to unite the high quality vertical CNTs grown at high temperature with the heat sensitive parylene substrate in a highly controllable manner. Briefly, the CNTs electrode is encapsulated by two layers of parylene and the device is released using xenon difluoride (XeF2). The process is compatible with wafer-scale post complementary metal oxide semiconductor integration. Lower impedance and larger interfacial capacitance have been demonstrated using CNTs compared to a Pt electrode. The flexible CNT electrodes have been utilized for extracellular neuronal recording and stimulation in rats. The signal-to-noise ratio of the device is about 12.5. The threshold voltage for initiating action potential is about 0.5 V.

  12. Flexible, Low-Cost Sensor Based on Electrolyte Gated Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistor for Organo-Phosphate Detection.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Vijay Deep; Joshi, Saumya; Becherer, Markus; Lugli, Paolo

    2017-05-18

    A flexible enzymatic acetylcholinesterase biosensor based on an electrolyte-gated carbon nanotube field effect transistor is demonstrated. The enzyme immobilization is done on a planar gold gate electrode using 3-mercapto propionic acid as the linker molecule. The sensor showed good sensing capability as a sensor for the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, with a sensitivity of 5.7 μA/decade, and demonstrated excellent specificity when tested against interfering analytes present in the body. As the flexible sensor is supposed to suffer mechanical deformations, the endurance of the sensor was measured by putting it under extensive mechanical stress. The enzymatic activity was inhibited by more than 70% when the phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) buffer was spiked with 5 mg/mL malathion (an organophosphate) solution. The biosensor was successfully challenged with tap water and strawberry juice, demonstrating its usefulness as an analytical tool for organophosphate detection.

  13. Separation of Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes for Flexible and Stretchable Electronics Using Polymer Removable Method.

    PubMed

    Lei, Ting; Pochorovski, Igor; Bao, Zhenan

    2017-04-18

    Electronics that are soft, conformal, and stretchable are highly desirable for wearable electronics, prosthetics, and robotics. Among the various available electronic materials, single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and their network have exhibited high mechanical flexibility and stretchability, along with comparable electrical performance to traditional rigid materials, e.g. polysilicon and metal oxides. Unfortunately, SWNTs produced en masse contain a mixture of semiconducting (s-) and metallic (m-) SWNTs, rendering them unsuitable for electronic applications. Moreover, the poor solubility of SWNTs requires the introduction of insulating surfactants to properly disperse them into individual tubes for device fabrication. Compared to other SWNT dispersion and separation methods, e.g., DNA wrapping, density gradient ultracentrifugation, and gel chromatography, polymer wrapping can selectively disperse s-SWNTs with high selectivity (>99.7%), high concentration (>0.1 mg/mL), and high yield (>20%). In addition, this method only requires simple sonication and centrifuge equipment with short processing time down to 1 h. Despite these advantages, the polymer wrapping method still faces two major issues: (i) The purified s-SWNTs usually retain a substantial amount of polymers on their surface even after thorough rinsing. The low conductivity of the residual polymers impedes the charge transport in SWNT networks. (ii) Conjugated polymers used for SWNT wrapping are expensive. Their prices ($100-1000/g) are comparable or even higher than those of SWNTs ($10-300/g). These utilized conjugated polymers represent a large portion of the overall separation cost. In this Account, we summarize recent progresses in polymer design for selective dispersion and separation of SWNTs. We focus particularly on removable and/or recyclable polymers that enable low-cost and scalable separation methods. First, different separation methods are compared to show the advantages of the polymer

  14. All-solid-state flexible supercapacitors based on papers coated with carbon nanotubes and ionic-liquid-based gel electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yu Jin; Chung, Haegeun; Han, Chi-Hwan; Kim, Woong

    2012-02-17

    All-solid-state flexible supercapacitors were fabricated using carbon nanotubes (CNTs), regular office papers, and ionic-liquid-based gel electrolytes. Flexible electrodes were made by coating CNTs on office papers by a drop-dry method. The gel electrolyte was prepared by mixing fumed silica nanopowders with ionic liquid, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([EMIM][NTf(2)]). This supercapacitor showed high power and energy performance as a solid-state flexible supercapacitor. The specific capacitance of the CNT electrodes was 135 F g(-1) at a current density of 2 A g(-1), when considering the mass of active materials only. The maximum power and energy density of the supercapacitors were 164 kW kg(-1) and 41 Wh kg(-1), respectively. Interestingly, the solid-state supercapacitor with the gel electrolyte showed comparable performance to the supercapacitors with ionic-liquid electrolyte. Moreover, the supercapacitor showed excellent stability and flexibility. The CNT/paper- and gel-based supercapacitors may hold great potential for low-cost and high-performance flexible energy storage applications.

  15. Encapsulate-and-peel: fabricating carbon nanotube CMOS integrated circuits in a flexible ultra-thin plastic film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Pingqi; Zhang, Qing

    2014-02-01

    Fabrication of single-walled carbon nanotube thin film (SWNT-TF) based integrated circuits (ICs) on soft substrates has been challenging due to several processing-related obstacles, such as printed/transferred SWNT-TF pattern and electrode alignment, electrical pad/channel material/dielectric layer flatness, adherence of the circuits onto the soft substrates etc. Here, we report a new approach that circumvents these challenges by encapsulating pre-formed SWNT-TF-ICs on hard substrates into polyimide (PI) and peeling them off to form flexible ICs on a large scale. The flexible SWNT-TF-ICs show promising performance comparable to those circuits formed on hard substrates. The flexible p- and n-type SWNT-TF transistors have an average mobility of around 60 cm2 V-1 s-1, a subthreshold slope as low as 150 mV dec-1, operating gate voltages less than 2 V, on/off ratios larger than 104 and a switching speed of several kilohertz. The post-transfer technique described here is not only a simple and cost-effective pathway to realize scalable flexible ICs, but also a feasible method to fabricate flexible displays, sensors and solar cells etc.

  16. Directly-Grown Hierarchical Carbon Nanotube@Polypyrrole Core-Shell Hybrid for High-Performance Flexible Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Yesi, Yesi; Shown, Indrajit; Ganguly, Abhijit; Ngo, Trung Truc; Chen, Li-Chyong; Chen, Kuei-Hsien

    2016-02-19

    A hierarchical carbon nanotube-polypyrrole (CNT-PPy) core-shell composite was fabricated by growing CNTs directly on carbon cloth (CC) as a skeleton followed by electropolymerization of PPy with controlled polymerization time. Direct fabrication of electroactive (CNT-PPy) materials on the flexible CC electrode could reduce the interfacial resistance between the electrode and electrolyte and improve the ion diffusion. The supercapacitor electrode based on optimized PPy/CNT-CC exhibits excellent electrochemical performance, with the highest gravimetric capacitance being roughly 1038 F g(-1) per active mass of PPy and up to 486.1 F g(-1) per active mass of the PPy/CNT composite. Notably, excellent flexibility and cycle stability up to 10 000 cycles with only 18 % capacitance loss was achieved. At the same time, the fabricated asymmetric supercapacitor (PPy/CNT-CC∥CNT-CC) shows the maximum power density of 10 962 W kg(-1) at an energy density of 3.9 Wh kg(-1) under the operating potential of 1.4 V. The overall high cycle stability and high performance of the fabricated PPy/CNT-CC flexible electrode is due to the novel binder-free direct growth process. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Carbon fiber/Co9S8 nanotube arrays hybrid structures for flexible quantum dot-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wenxi; Chen, Chang; Ye, Meidan; Lv, Miaoqiang; Lin, Changjian

    2014-04-07

    Recently, hybrid carbon materials and inorganic nanocrystals have received an intensive amount of attention and have opened up an exciting new field in the design and fabrication of high-performance catalysts. Here we present a novel kind of hybrid counter electrode (CE) consisting of a carbon fiber (CF) and Co9S8 nanotube arrays (NTs) for fiber-shaped flexible quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs). The growth mechanisms of Co(CO3)0.35Cl0.20(OH)1.10 nanowire arrays (NWs) on the CFs were discussed, and the catalytic activity of the CF, Pt and Co9S8/CF hybrid structure (Co9S8@CF) were elucidated systematically as well. An absolute energy conversion efficiency of 3.79% has been demonstrated under 100 mW cm(-2) AM 1.5 illumination by using Co9S8@CF as a CE. This work not only demonstrates an innovative approach for growing cobalt sulfide NTs on flexible substrates that can be applied in flexible devices for energy harvesting and storage, but also provides a kind of hybrid structure and high-efficiency CE for QDSSCs.

  18. Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lin, Yuehe; Yantasee, Wassana; Liu, Guodong; Lu, Fang; Tu, Yi

    2008-11-18

    The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

  19. Cellulose nanofibril/reduced graphene oxide/carbon nanotube hybrid aerogels for highly flexible and all-solid-state supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qifeng; Cai, Zhiyong; Ma, Zhenqiang; Gong, Shaoqin

    2015-02-11

    A novel type of highly flexible and all-solid-state supercapacitor that uses cellulose nanofibril (CNF)/reduced graphene oxide (RGO)/carbon nanotube (CNT) hybrid aerogels as electrodes and H2SO4/poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) gel as the electrolyte was developed and is reported here. These flexible solid-state supercapacitors were fabricated without any binders, current collectors, or electroactive additives. Because of the porous structure of the CNF/RGO/CNT aerogel electrodes and the excellent electrolyte absorption properties of the CNFs present in the aerogel electrodes, the resulting flexible supercapacitors exhibited a high specific capacitance (i.e., 252 F g(-1) at a discharge current density of 0.5 A g(-1)) and a remarkable cycle stability (i.e., more than 99.5% of the capacitance was retained after 1000 charge-discharge cycles at a current density of 1 A g(-1)). Furthermore, the supercapacitors also showed extremely high areal capacitance, areal power density, and energy density (i.e., 216 mF cm(-2), 9.5 mW cm(-2), and 28.4 μWh cm(-2), respectively). In light of its excellent electrical performance, low cost, ease of large-scale manufacturing, and environmental friendliness, the CNF/RGO/CNT aerogel electrodes may have a promising application in the development of flexible energy-storage devices.

  20. Development of 3D carbon nanotube interdigitated finger electrodes on polymer substrate for flexible capacitive sensor application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chih-Fan; Wang, Jhih-Yu; Liu, Yu-Chia; Tsai, Ming-Han; Fang, Weileun

    2013-11-01

    This study reports a novel approach to the implementation of 3D carbon nanotube (CNT) interdigitated finger electrodes on flexible polymer, and the detection of strain, bending curvature, tactile force and proximity distance are demonstrated. The merits of the presented CNT-based flexible sensor are as follows: (1) the silicon substrate is patterned to enable the formation of 3D vertically aligned CNTs on the substrate surface; (2) polymer molding on the silicon substrate with 3D CNTs is further employed to transfer the 3D CNTs to the flexible polymer substrate; (3) the CNT-polymer composite (˜70 μm in height) is employed to form interdigitated finger electrodes to increase the sensing area and initial capacitance; (4) other structures such as electrical routings, resistors and mechanical supporters are also available using the CNT-polymer composite. The preliminary fabrication results demonstrate a flexible capacitive sensor with 50 μm high CNT interdigitated electrodes on a poly-dimethylsiloxane substrate. The tests show that the typical capacitance change is several dozens of fF and the gauge factor is in the range of 3.44-4.88 for strain and bending curvature measurement; the sensitivity of the tactile sensor is 1.11% N-1 a proximity distance near 2 mm away from the sensor can be detected.

  1. Logic circuits composed of flexible carbon nanotube thin-film transistor and ultra-thin polymer gate dielectric.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dongil; Yoon, Jinsu; Lee, Juhee; Lee, Byung-Hyun; Seol, Myeong-Lok; Bae, Hagyoul; Jeon, Seung-Bae; Seong, Hyejeong; Im, Sung Gap; Choi, Sung-Jin; Choi, Yang-Kyu

    2016-05-17

    Printing electronics has become increasingly prominent in the field of electronic engineering because this method is highly efficient at producing flexible, low-cost and large-scale thin-film transistors. However, TFTs are typically constructed with rigid insulating layers consisting of oxides and nitrides that are brittle and require high processing temperatures, which can cause a number of problems when used in printed flexible TFTs. In this study, we address these issues and demonstrate a method of producing inkjet-printed TFTs that include an ultra-thin polymeric dielectric layer produced by initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) at room temperature and highly purified 99.9% semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Our integrated approach enables the production of flexible logic circuits consisting of CNT-TFTs on a polyethersulfone (PES) substrate that have a high mobility (up to 9.76 cm(2) V(-1) sec(-)1), a low operating voltage (less than 4 V), a high current on/off ratio (3 × 10(4)), and a total device yield of 90%. Thus, it should be emphasized that this study delineates a guideline for the feasibility of producing flexible CNT-TFT logic circuits with high performance based on a low-cost and simple fabrication process.

  2. Single-walled carbon nanotube based pH sensors on a flexible parylene-C substrate.

    PubMed

    Yang, C F; Chen, C L; Busnaina, A; Dokmeci, M R

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a suspended Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube (SWNT) based pH sensor utilizing a low temperature Dielectrophoretic (DEP) assembly process on a flexible parylene-C substrate. Parylene-C, a light weight, flexible and inert material, is compatible with many microfabrication processes. Furthermore, utilizing parylene-C as a flexible substrate, one can readily create a suspended microplatform utilizing an O2 plasma etch process. Suspended nanobridges have larger exposed surface areas and may potentially have enhanced sensitivity for sensing applications. Fabricating these structures on a thin (10 microm) parylene-C substrate allows their utilization as flexible devices or in wearable sensor applications. We have successfully assembled suspended SWNT nanobridges across a spacing of 4 microm. The electrical characterization results from the assembled SWNTs yield ohmic behavior with a measured two-terminal resistance of approximately 17Komega. Furthermore, the conductometric measurements of the SWNT sensors have demonstrated that corresponding to an increase in pH value, the resistance of SWNTs has decreased due to the OH- group that attached on to the wall of the SWNTs and changed the electrical properties of the SWNTs. These novel suspended nanostructures can be used as potential candidates in nanosensor applications.

  3. Logic circuits composed of flexible carbon nanotube thin-film transistor and ultra-thin polymer gate dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dongil; Yoon, Jinsu; Lee, Juhee; Lee, Byung-Hyun; Seol, Myeong-Lok; Bae, Hagyoul; Jeon, Seung-Bae; Seong, Hyejeong; Im, Sung Gap; Choi, Sung-Jin; Choi, Yang-Kyu

    2016-05-01

    Printing electronics has become increasingly prominent in the field of electronic engineering because this method is highly efficient at producing flexible, low-cost and large-scale thin-film transistors. However, TFTs are typically constructed with rigid insulating layers consisting of oxides and nitrides that are brittle and require high processing temperatures, which can cause a number of problems when used in printed flexible TFTs. In this study, we address these issues and demonstrate a method of producing inkjet-printed TFTs that include an ultra-thin polymeric dielectric layer produced by initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) at room temperature and highly purified 99.9% semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Our integrated approach enables the production of flexible logic circuits consisting of CNT-TFTs on a polyethersulfone (PES) substrate that have a high mobility (up to 9.76 cm2 V‑1 sec‑1), a low operating voltage (less than 4 V), a high current on/off ratio (3 × 104), and a total device yield of 90%. Thus, it should be emphasized that this study delineates a guideline for the feasibility of producing flexible CNT-TFT logic circuits with high performance based on a low-cost and simple fabrication process.

  4. Logic circuits composed of flexible carbon nanotube thin-film transistor and ultra-thin polymer gate dielectric

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dongil; Yoon, Jinsu; Lee, Juhee; Lee, Byung-Hyun; Seol, Myeong-Lok; Bae, Hagyoul; Jeon, Seung-Bae; Seong, Hyejeong; Im, Sung Gap; Choi, Sung-Jin; Choi, Yang-Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Printing electronics has become increasingly prominent in the field of electronic engineering because this method is highly efficient at producing flexible, low-cost and large-scale thin-film transistors. However, TFTs are typically constructed with rigid insulating layers consisting of oxides and nitrides that are brittle and require high processing temperatures, which can cause a number of problems when used in printed flexible TFTs. In this study, we address these issues and demonstrate a method of producing inkjet-printed TFTs that include an ultra-thin polymeric dielectric layer produced by initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) at room temperature and highly purified 99.9% semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Our integrated approach enables the production of flexible logic circuits consisting of CNT-TFTs on a polyethersulfone (PES) substrate that have a high mobility (up to 9.76 cm2 V−1 sec−1), a low operating voltage (less than 4 V), a high current on/off ratio (3 × 104), and a total device yield of 90%. Thus, it should be emphasized that this study delineates a guideline for the feasibility of producing flexible CNT-TFT logic circuits with high performance based on a low-cost and simple fabrication process. PMID:27184121

  5. Development of 3D carbon nanotube interdigitated finger electrodes on polymer substrate for flexible capacitive sensor application.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chih-Fan; Wang, Jhih-Yu; Liu, Yu-Chia; Tsai, Ming-Han; Fang, Weileun

    2013-11-08

    This study reports a novel approach to the implementation of 3D carbon nanotube (CNT) interdigitated finger electrodes on flexible polymer, and the detection of strain, bending curvature, tactile force and proximity distance are demonstrated. The merits of the presented CNT-based flexible sensor are as follows: (1) the silicon substrate is patterned to enable the formation of 3D vertically aligned CNTs on the substrate surface; (2) polymer molding on the silicon substrate with 3D CNTs is further employed to transfer the 3D CNTs to the flexible polymer substrate; (3) the CNT-polymer composite (~70 μm in height) is employed to form interdigitated finger electrodes to increase the sensing area and initial capacitance; (4) other structures such as electrical routings, resistors and mechanical supporters are also available using the CNT-polymer composite. The preliminary fabrication results demonstrate a flexible capacitive sensor with 50 μm high CNT interdigitated electrodes on a poly-dimethylsiloxane substrate. The tests show that the typical capacitance change is several dozens of fF and the gauge factor is in the range of 3.44-4.88 for strain and bending curvature measurement; the sensitivity of the tactile sensor is 1.11% N(-1); a proximity distance near 2 mm away from the sensor can be detected.

  6. Multiwalled carbon nanotube/polydimethylsiloxane composite films as high performance flexible electric heating elements

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Jing; Jeong, Young Gyu

    2014-08-04

    High performance elastomeric electric heating elements were prepared by incorporating various contents of pristine multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix by using an efficient solution-casting and curing technique. The pristine MWCNTs were identified to be uniformly dispersed in the PDMS matrix and the electrical percolation of MWCNTs was evaluated to be at ∼0.27 wt. %, where the electrical resistivity of the MWCNT/PDMS composite films dropped remarkably. Accordingly, the composite films with higher MWCNT contents above 0.3 wt. % exhibit excellent electric heating performance in terms of temperature response rapidity and electric energy efficiency at constant applied voltages. In addition, the composite films, which were thermally stable up to 250 °C, showed excellent heating-cooling cyclic performance, which was associated with operational stability in actual electric heating applications.

  7. Highly flexible and transparent dielectric elastomer actuators using silver nanowire and carbon nanotube hybrid electrodes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ye Rim; Kwon, Hyungho; Lee, Do Hoon; Lee, Byung Yang

    2017-09-27

    We demonstrate a dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA) with a high areal strain value of 146% using hybrid electrodes of silver nanowires (AgNWs) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The addition of a very small amount of SWCNTs (∼35 ng mm(-2)) to a highly resistive AgNW network resulted in a remarkable reduction of the electrode sheet resistance by three orders, increasing the breakdown field by 183% and maximum strain, while maintaining the reduction of optical transmittance within 11%. The DEA based on our transparent and stretchable hybrid electrodes can be easily fabricated by a simple vacuum filtration and transfer process of the electrode film on a pre-strained dielectric elastomer membrane. We expect that our approach will be useful in the future for fabricating stretchable and transparent electrodes in various soft electronic devices.

  8. Fabrication of air-stable n-type carbon nanotube thin-film transistors on flexible substrates using bilayer dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guanhong; Li, Qunqing; Jin, Yuanhao; Zhao, Yudan; Xiao, Xiaoyang; Jiang, Kaili; Wang, Jiaping; Fan, Shoushan

    2015-10-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) thin-film transistors hold great potential for flexible electronics. However, fabrication of air-stable n-type devices by methods compatible with standard photolithography on flexible substrates is challenging. Here, we demonstrated that by using a bilayer dielectric structure of MgO and atomic layer deposited (ALD) Al2O3 or HfO2, air-stable n-type devices can be obtained. The mechanism for conduction type conversion was elucidated and attributed to the hole depletion in SWNT, the decrease of the trap state density by MgO assimilating adsorbed water molecules in the vicinity of SWNT, and the energy band bending because of the positive fixed charges in the ALD layer. The key advantage of the method is the relatively low temperature (120 or 90 °C) required here for the ALD process because we need not employ this step to totally remove the absorbates on the SWNTs. This advantage facilitates the integration of both p-type and n-type transistors through a simple lift off process and compact CMOS inverters were demonstrated. We also demonstrated that the doping of SWNTs in the channel plays a more important role than the Schottky barriers at the metal contacts in carbon nanotube thin-film transistors, unlike the situation in individual SWNT-based transistors.Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) thin-film transistors hold great potential for flexible electronics. However, fabrication of air-stable n-type devices by methods compatible with standard photolithography on flexible substrates is challenging. Here, we demonstrated that by using a bilayer dielectric structure of MgO and atomic layer deposited (ALD) Al2O3 or HfO2, air-stable n-type devices can be obtained. The mechanism for conduction type conversion was elucidated and attributed to the hole depletion in SWNT, the decrease of the trap state density by MgO assimilating adsorbed water molecules in the vicinity of SWNT, and the energy band bending because of the positive fixed

  9. A flexible alkaline rechargeable Ni/Fe battery based on graphene foam/carbon nanotubes hybrid film.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jilei; Chen, Minghua; Zhang, Lili; Jiang, Jian; Yan, Jiaxu; Huang, Yizhong; Lin, Jianyi; Fan, Hong Jin; Shen, Ze Xiang

    2014-12-10

    The development of portable and wearable electronics has promoted increasing demand for high-performance power sources with high energy/power density, low cost, lightweight, as well as ultrathin and flexible features. Here, a new type of flexible Ni/Fe cell is designed and fabricated by employing Ni(OH)2 nanosheets and porous Fe2O3 nanorods grown on lightweight graphene foam (GF)/carbon nanotubes (CNTs) hybrid films as electrodes. The assembled f-Ni/Fe cells are able to deliver high energy/power densities (100.7 Wh/kg at 287 W/kg and 70.9 Wh/kg at 1.4 kW/kg, based on the total mass of active materials) and outstanding cycling stabilities (retention 89.1% after 1000 charge/discharge cycles). Benefiting from the use of ultralight and thin GF/CNTs hybrid films as current collectors, our f-Ni/Fe cell can exhibit a volumetric energy density of 16.6 Wh/l (based on the total volume of full cell), which is comparable to that of thin film battery and better than that of typical commercial supercapacitors. Moreover, the f-Ni/Fe cells can retain the electrochemical performance with repeated bendings. These features endow our f-Ni/Fe cells a highly promising candidate for next generation flexible energy storage systems.

  10. Fully Packaged Carbon Nanotube Supercapacitors by Direct Ink Writing on Flexible Substrates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bolin; Jiang, Yizhou; Tang, Xiaohui; Pan, Yayue; Hu, Shan

    2017-08-30

    The ability to print fully packaged integrated energy storage components (e.g., supercapacitors) is of critical importance for practical applications of printed electronics. Due to the limited variety of printable materials, most studies on printed supercapacitors focus on printing the electrode materials but rarely the full-packaged cell. This work presents for the first time the printing of a fully packaged single-wall carbon nanotube-based supercapacitor with direct ink writing (DIW) technology. Enabled by the developed ink formula, DIW setup, and cell architecture, the whole printing process is mask free, transfer free, and alignment free with precise and repeatable control on the spatial distribution of all constituent materials. Studies on cell design show that a wider electrode pattern and narrower gap distance between electrodes lead to higher specific capacitance. The as-printed fully packaged supercapacitors have energy and power performances that are among the best in recently reported planar carbon-based supercapacitors that are only partially printed or nonprinted.

  11. Flexible logic circuits based on top-gate thin film transistors with printed semiconductor carbon nanotubes and top electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Weiwei; Liu, Zhen; Zhao, Jianwen; Xu, Wenya; Gu, Weibing; Zhang, Xiang; Qian, Long; Cui, Zheng

    2014-11-01

    In this report printed thin film transistors and logic circuits on flexible substrates are reported. The top-gate thin film transistors were made of the sorted semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (sc-SWCNTs) ink as channel material and printed silver lines as top electrodes and interconnect. 5 nm HfOx thin films pre-deposited on PET substrates by atomic layer deposition (ALD) act as the adhesion layers to significantly improve the immobilization efficiency of sc-SWCNTs and environmental stability. The immobilization mechanism was investigated in detail. The flexible partially-printed top-gate SWCNT TFTs display ambipolar characteristics with slightly strong p-type when using 50 nm HfOx thin films as dielectric layer, as well as the encapsulation layer by atomic layer deposition (ALD) at 120 °C. The hole mobility, on/off ratio and subthreshold swing (SS) are ~46.2 cm2 V-1 s-1, 105 and 109 mV per decade, respectively. Furthermore, partially-printed TFTs show small hysteresis, low operating voltage (2 V) and high stability in air. Flexible partially-printed inverters show good performance with voltage gain up to 33 with 1.25 V supply voltage, and can work at 10 kHz. The frequency of flexible partially-printed five-stage ring oscillators can reach 1.7 kHz at supply voltages of 2 V with per stage delay times of 58.8 μs. This work paves a way to achieve printed SWCNT advanced logic circuits and systems on flexible substrates.In this report printed thin film transistors and logic circuits on flexible substrates are reported. The top-gate thin film transistors were made of the sorted semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (sc-SWCNTs) ink as channel material and printed silver lines as top electrodes and interconnect. 5 nm HfOx thin films pre-deposited on PET substrates by atomic layer deposition (ALD) act as the adhesion layers to significantly improve the immobilization efficiency of sc-SWCNTs and environmental stability. The immobilization mechanism

  12. Flexible logic circuits based on top-gate thin film transistors with printed semiconductor carbon nanotubes and top electrodes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weiwei; Liu, Zhen; Zhao, Jianwen; Xu, Wenya; Gu, Weibing; Zhang, Xiang; Qian, Long; Cui, Zheng

    2014-12-21

    In this report printed thin film transistors and logic circuits on flexible substrates are reported. The top-gate thin film transistors were made of the sorted semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (sc-SWCNTs) ink as channel material and printed silver lines as top electrodes and interconnect. 5 nm HfOx thin films pre-deposited on PET substrates by atomic layer deposition (ALD) act as the adhesion layers to significantly improve the immobilization efficiency of sc-SWCNTs and environmental stability. The immobilization mechanism was investigated in detail. The flexible partially-printed top-gate SWCNT TFTs display ambipolar characteristics with slightly strong p-type when using 50 nm HfO(x) thin films as dielectric layer, as well as the encapsulation layer by atomic layer deposition (ALD) at 120 °C. The hole mobility, on/off ratio and subthreshold swing (SS) are ∼ 46.2 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), 10(5) and 109 mV per decade, respectively. Furthermore, partially-printed TFTs show small hysteresis, low operating voltage (2 V) and high stability in air. Flexible partially-printed inverters show good performance with voltage gain up to 33 with 1.25 V supply voltage, and can work at 10 kHz. The frequency of flexible partially-printed five-stage ring oscillators can reach 1.7 kHz at supply voltages of 2 V with per stage delay times of 58.8 μs. This work paves a way to achieve printed SWCNT advanced logic circuits and systems on flexible substrates.

  13. Flexible nanohybrid microelectrode based on carbon fiber wrapped by gold nanoparticles decorated nitrogen doped carbon nanotube arrays: In situ electrochemical detection in live cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Xiao, Jian; Sun, Yimin; Wang, Lu; Dong, Xulin; Ren, Jinghua; He, Wenshan; Xiao, Fei

    2017-09-22

    The rapidly growing demand for in situ real-time monitoring of chemical information in vitro and in vivo has attracted tremendous research efforts into the design and construction of high-performance biosensor devices. Herein, we develop a new type of flexible nanohybrid microelectrode based on carbon fiber wrapped by gold nanoparticles decorated nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube arrays, and explore its practical application in in situ electrochemical detection of cancer biomarker H2O2 secreted from live cancer cells. Our results demonstrate that carbon fiber material with microscale size and fascinating mechanical properties can be used as a robust and flexible microelectrode substrate in the electrochemical biosensor system. And the highly ordered nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube arrays that grown on carbon fiber possess high surface area-to-volume ratio and abundant active sites, which facilitate the loading of high-density and uniformly dispersed gold nanoparticles on it. Benefited from the unique microstructure and excellent electrocatalytic properties of different components in the nanohybrid fiber microelectrode, an effective electrochemical sensing platform based on it has been built up for the sensitive and selective detection of H2O2, the detection limit is calculated to be 50nM when the signal-to-noise ratio is 3:1, and the linear dynamic range is up to 4.3mM, with a high sensitivity of 142µAcm(-2)mM(-1). These good sensing performances, coupled with its intrinsic mechanical flexibility and biocompatibility, allow for its use in in situ real-time tracking H2O2 secreted from breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MBA-MD-231, and evaluating the sensitivity of different cancer cells to chemotherapy or radiotherapy treatments, which hold great promise for clinic application in cancer diagnose and management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Printing nanotube/nanowire for flexible microsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tortorich, Ryan P.; Choi, Jin-Woo

    2014-04-01

    Printing has become an emerging manufacturing technology for mechanics, electronics, and consumer products. Additionally, both nanotubes and nanowires have recently been used as materials for sensors and electrodes due to their unique electrical and mechanical properties. Printed electrodes and conductive traces particularly offer versatility of fabricating low-cost, disposable, and flexible electrical devices and microsystems. While various printing methods such as screen printing have been conventional methods for printing conductive traces and electrodes, inkjet printing has recently attracted great attention due to its unique advantages including no template requirement, rapid printing at low cost, on-demand printing capability, and precise control of the printed material. Computer generated conductive traces or electrode patterns can simply be printed on a thin film substrate with proper conductive ink consisting of nanotubes or nanowires. However, in order to develop nanotube or nanowire ink, there are a few challenges that need to be addressed. The most difficult obstacle to overcome is that of nanotube/nanowire dispersion within a solution. Other challenges include adjusting surface tension and controlling viscosity of the ink as well as treating the surface of the printing substrate. In an attempt to pave the way for nanomaterial inkjet printing, we present a method for preparing carbon nanotube ink as well as its printing technique. A fully printed electrochemical sensor using inkjet-printed carbon nanotube electrodes is also demonstrated as an example of the possibilities for this technology.

  15. Flexible Carbon Nanotube Modified Separator for High-Performance Lithium-Sulfur Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bin; Wu, Xiaomeng; Wang, Shan; Tang, Zhen; Yang, Quanling; Hu, Guo-Hua; Xiong, Chuanxi

    2017-01-01

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries have become promising candidates for electrical energy storage systems due to their high theoretical specific energy density, low cost and environmental friendliness. However, there are some technical obstacles of lithium-sulfur batteries to be addressed, such as the shuttle effect of polysulfides. Here, we introduced organically modified carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as a coating layer for the separator to optimize structure and enhance the performance of the Li-S battery. The results showed that the cell with a CNTs-coated separator exhibited an excellent cycling performance. Compared to the blank separator, the initial discharge capacity and the capacity after 100 cycles for the CNTs-coated separator was increased by 115% and 161%, respectively. Besides, according to the rate capability test cycling from 0.1C to 2C, the battery with a CNTs-coated separator still released a capacity amounting to 90.2% of the initial capacity, when the current density returned back to 0.1C. It is believed that the organically modified CNTs coating effectively suppresses the shuttle effect during the cycling. The employment of a CNTs-coated separator provides a promising approach for high-performance lithium-sulfur batteries. PMID:28933721

  16. Totally embedded hybrid thin films of carbon nanotubes and silver nanowires as flat homogenous flexible transparent conductors

    PubMed Central

    Pillai, Suresh Kumar Raman; Wang, Jing; Wang, Yilei; Sk, Md Moniruzzaman; Prakoso, Ari Bimo; Rusli; Chan-Park, Mary B.

    2016-01-01

    There is a great need for viable alternatives to today’s transparent conductive film using largely indium tin oxide. We report the fabrication of a new type of flexible transparent conductive film using silver nanowires (AgNW) and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) networks which are fully embedded in a UV curable resin substrate. The hybrid SWCNTs-AgNWs film is relatively flat so that the RMS roughness of the top surface of the film is 3 nm. Addition of SWCNTs networks make the film resistance uniform; without SWCNTs, sheet resistance of the surface composed of just AgNWs in resin varies from 20 Ω/sq to 107 Ω/sq. With addition of SWCNTs embedded in the resin, sheet resistance of the hybrid film is 29 ± 5 Ω/sq and uniform across the 47 mm diameter film discs; further, the optimized film has 85% transparency. Our lamination-transfer UV process doesn’t need solvent for sacrificial substrate removal and leads to good mechanical interlocking of the nano-material networks. Additionally, electrochemical study of the film for supercapacitors application showed an impressive 10 times higher current in cyclic voltammograms compared to the control without SWCNTs. Our fabrication method is simple, cost effective and enables the large-scale fabrication of flat and flexible transparent conductive films. PMID:27929125

  17. Effects of Operating Temperature on Droplet Casting of Flexible Polymer/Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Composite Gas Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Chiou, Jin-Chern; Wu, Chin-Cheng; Huang, Yu-Chieh; Chang, Shih-Cheng; Lin, Tse-Mei

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the performance of a flexible polymer/multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) composite sensor array as a function of operating temperature. The response magnitudes of a cost-effective flexible gas sensor array equipped with a heater were measured with respect to five different operating temperatures (room temperature, 40 °C, 50 °C, 60 °C, and 70 °C) via impedance spectrum measurement and sensing response experiments. The selected polymers that were droplet cast to coat a MWCNT conductive layer to form two-layer polymer/MWCNT composite sensing films included ethyl cellulose (EC), polyethylene oxide (PEO), and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). Electrical characterization of impedance, sensing response magnitude, and scanning electron microscope (SEM) morphology of each type of polymer/MWCNT composite film was performed at different operating temperatures. With respect to ethanol, the response magnitude of the sensor decreased with increasing operating temperatures. The results indicated that the higher operating temperature could reduce the response and influence the sensitivity of the polymer/MWCNT gas sensor array. The morphology of polymer/MWCNT composite films revealed that there were changes in the porous film after volatile organic compound (VOC) testing. PMID:28025507

  18. A flexible gas sensor based on single-walled carbon nanotube-Fe2O3 composite film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Chunfei; Shang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Ying; Xu, Jie; Zhang, Yingjiu; Li, Xinjian; Cao, Anyuan

    2017-05-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have potential for creating high performance gas sensors, but the number of gases that can be detected is still limited and the sensitivity needs further improvement. Here, large-area SWNT films directly synthesized by chemical vapor deposition are configured into gas sensors for a range of toxic gases such as NH3, NO, and NO2. In particular, a SWNT-Fe2O3 composite film obtained via a simple annealing process produces a stable response to H2S and shows enhanced sensitivity to NO2 and at room temperature, compared with pristine SWNT films. Formation of uniform Fe2O3 nanoparticles throughout the porous film is responsible for improved performance and enabling sensing to more gases, and removes conventional steps such as chemical functionalization or doping. Flexible sensors that can be bent to large angles repeatedly are also demonstrated. SWNT films containing a large amount of residual catalyst can be directly manufactured into large-area, flexible or wearable, thin film or textile-configured sensors for various toxic gases.

  19. Totally embedded hybrid thin films of carbon nanotubes and silver nanowires as flat homogenous flexible transparent conductors.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Suresh Kumar Raman; Wang, Jing; Wang, Yilei; Sk, Md Moniruzzaman; Prakoso, Ari Bimo; Rusli; Chan-Park, Mary B

    2016-12-08

    There is a great need for viable alternatives to today's transparent conductive film using largely indium tin oxide. We report the fabrication of a new type of flexible transparent conductive film using silver nanowires (AgNW) and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) networks which are fully embedded in a UV curable resin substrate. The hybrid SWCNTs-AgNWs film is relatively flat so that the RMS roughness of the top surface of the film is 3 nm. Addition of SWCNTs networks make the film resistance uniform; without SWCNTs, sheet resistance of the surface composed of just AgNWs in resin varies from 20 Ω/sq to 10(7 )Ω/sq. With addition of SWCNTs embedded in the resin, sheet resistance of the hybrid film is 29 ± 5 Ω/sq and uniform across the 47 mm diameter film discs; further, the optimized film has 85% transparency. Our lamination-transfer UV process doesn't need solvent for sacrificial substrate removal and leads to good mechanical interlocking of the nano-material networks. Additionally, electrochemical study of the film for supercapacitors application showed an impressive 10 times higher current in cyclic voltammograms compared to the control without SWCNTs. Our fabrication method is simple, cost effective and enables the large-scale fabrication of flat and flexible transparent conductive films.

  20. Totally embedded hybrid thin films of carbon nanotubes and silver nanowires as flat homogenous flexible transparent conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillai, Suresh Kumar Raman; Wang, Jing; Wang, Yilei; Sk, Md Moniruzzaman; Prakoso, Ari Bimo; Rusli; Chan-Park, Mary B.

    2016-12-01

    There is a great need for viable alternatives to today’s transparent conductive film using largely indium tin oxide. We report the fabrication of a new type of flexible transparent conductive film using silver nanowires (AgNW) and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) networks which are fully embedded in a UV curable resin substrate. The hybrid SWCNTs-AgNWs film is relatively flat so that the RMS roughness of the top surface of the film is 3 nm. Addition of SWCNTs networks make the film resistance uniform; without SWCNTs, sheet resistance of the surface composed of just AgNWs in resin varies from 20 Ω/sq to 107 Ω/sq. With addition of SWCNTs embedded in the resin, sheet resistance of the hybrid film is 29 ± 5 Ω/sq and uniform across the 47 mm diameter film discs; further, the optimized film has 85% transparency. Our lamination-transfer UV process doesn’t need solvent for sacrificial substrate removal and leads to good mechanical interlocking of the nano-material networks. Additionally, electrochemical study of the film for supercapacitors application showed an impressive 10 times higher current in cyclic voltammograms compared to the control without SWCNTs. Our fabrication method is simple, cost effective and enables the large-scale fabrication of flat and flexible transparent conductive films.

  1. Novel Strategy for One-Pot Synthesis of Gold Nanoplates on Carbon Nanotube Sheet As an Effective Flexible SERS Substrate.

    PubMed

    Xin, Wenbo; Yang, Jenn-Ming; Li, Chao; Goorsky, Mark S; Carlson, Larry; De Rosa, Igor M

    2017-02-22

    In this work, we demonstrate a novel route for one-pot synthesis of two-dimensional gold nanoplates (2-D AuNPLs) on carbon nanotube (CNT) sheet. Well-defined AuNPLs are grafted onto CNT sheet via a facile hydrothermal reduction process, during which bromine ions are employed as the surfactant for gold anisotropic growth. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows large-scale AuNPLs with micrometer-scaled length and sub-100 nm thickness are deposited uniformly on the CNT sheet. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results confirm the synthesized AuNPLs are single-crystalline with preferential {111} orientation. Based on the CNT sheet/AuNPLs hybrid, we have fabricated a flexible surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate, which can effectively detect the analyte Rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) at the concentration as low as 1 × 10(-7) M. The excellent SERS performance of this novel flexible substrate is mainly attributed to nanoscaled gaps between the neighbors, large surface area with roughness, and their sharp edges and corners.

  2. Functionalization of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korneva, Guzeliya

    Carbon nanotubes have unique properties that make them attractive for different engineering applications. However, because of their chemical inertness, carbon nanotubes have to be functionalized in order to acquire additional physico-chemical properties. Large multiwalled carbon nanotubes are different from fullerenes and singlewalled nanotubes because the stresses in their walls are almost relaxed while most chemical methods for fullerene functionalization exploit this effect of stressed bonds. The objective of this work is to develop new methods for functionalization of multiwalled carbon nanotubes. This work is dedicated to study two functionalization methods. The first deals with physico-chemical functionalization by filling the nanotube interior with colloidal suspensions. Irreversible adsorption of functional nanoparticles on the nanotube wall leads to the nanotube functionalization. The second method is purely chemical functionalization, which uses the reaction of cyclopropanation to break pi-bonds in the benzene rings of the nanotubes with formation of new σ-bonds with deprotonated malonate. This so-called Bingel reaction has been used in fullerene chemistry and in this work was applied for the first time to functionalize multiwalled carbon nanotubes. While capillary filling of carbon nanotubes was known long ago, the research community was skeptical about possibility of engulfing nanoparticles into nanotubes by capillary forces. We developed and implemented capillary method to fill nanotubes with different nanoparticles. Using this method, magnetic carbon nanotubes were produced for the first time. Synthesized nanotubes have very high magnetic moment and allow to manipulate them by magnetic field. These magnetic nanotubes have been successfully used in fabrication of carbon nanotube-tipped pipettes for biological probes. The Bingel reaction was studied on three sets of multiwalled carbon nanotubes with diameters: 20nm, 100nm, and 300nm. To estimate the

  3. Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebron, Marisabel; Mintz, Eric; Meador, Michael A.; Hull, David R.; Scheiman, Daniel A.; Willis, Peter; Smalley, Richard E.

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have created a great deal of excitement in the Materials Science community because of their outstanding mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties. Use of carbon nanotubes as reinforcements for polymers could lead to a new class of composite materials with properties, durability, and performance far exceeding that of conventional fiber reinforced composites. Organized arrays of carbon nanotubes, e.g., nanotube monolayers, could find applications as thermal management materials, light emitting devices, and sensor arrays. Carbon nanotubes could also be used as templates upon which nanotubes from other materials could be constructed. Successful use of carbon nanotubes in any of these potential applications requires the ability to control the interactions of nanotubes with each other and with other materials, e.g., a polymer matrix. One approach to achieving this control is to attach certain chemical groups to the ends and/or side-walls of the nanotubes. The nature of these chemical groups can be varied to achieve the desired result, such as better adhesion between the nanotubes and a polymer. Under a joint program between NASA Glenn, Clark Atlanta University, and Rice University researchers are working on developing a chemistry "tool-kit" that will enable the functionalization of carbon nanotubes with a variety of chemical groups. Recent results of this effort will be discussed.

  4. Multiwalled carbon nanotube coated polyester fabric as textile based flexible counter electrode for dye sensitized solar cell.

    PubMed

    Arbab, Alvira Ayoub; Sun, Kyung Chul; Sahito, Iftikhar Ali; Qadir, Muhammad Bilal; Jeong, Sung Hoon

    2015-05-21

    Textile wearable electronics offers the combined advantages of both electronics and textile characteristics. The essential properties of these flexible electronics such as lightweight, stretchable, and wearable power sources are in strong demand. Here, we have developed a facile route to fabricate multi walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) coated polyester fabric as a flexible counter electrode (CE) for dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). A variety of MWCNT and enzymes with different structures were used to generate individual enzyme-dispersed MWCNT (E-MWCNT) suspensions by non-covalent functionalization. A highly concentrated colloidal suspension of E-MWCNT was deposited on polyester fabric via a simple tape casting method using an air drying technique. In view of the E-MWCNT coating, the surface structure is represented by topologically randomly assembled tubular graphene units. This surface morphology has a high density of colloidal edge states and oxygen-containing surface groups which execute multiple catalytic sites for iodide reduction. A highly conductive E-MWCNT coated fabric electrode with a surface resistance of 15 Ω sq(-1) demonstrated 5.69% power conversion efficiency (PCE) when used as a flexible CE for DSSCs. High photo voltaic performance of our suggested system of E-MWCNT fabric-based DSSCs is associated with high sheet conductivity, low charge transfer resistance (RCT), and excellent electro catalytic activity (ECA). Such a conductive fabric demonstrated stable conductivity against bending cycles and strong mechanical adhesion of E-MWCNT on polyester fabric. Moreover, the polyester fabric is hydrophobic and, therefore, has good sealing capacity and retains the polymer gel electrolyte without seepage. This facile E-MWCNT fabric CE configuration provides a concrete fundamental background towards the development of textile-integrated solar cells.

  5. Reinforced Carbon Nanotubes.

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifen; Wen, Jian Guo; Lao, Jing Y.; Li, Wenzhi

    2005-06-28

    The present invention relates generally to reinforced carbon nanotubes, and more particularly to reinforced carbon nanotubes having a plurality of microparticulate carbide or oxide materials formed substantially on the surface of such reinforced carbon nanotubes composite materials. In particular, the present invention provides reinforced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) having a plurality of boron carbide nanolumps formed substantially on a surface of the reinforced CNTs that provide a reinforcing effect on CNTs, enabling their use as effective reinforcing fillers for matrix materials to give high-strength composites. The present invention also provides methods for producing such carbide reinforced CNTs.

  6. Sorting of large-diameter semiconducting carbon nanotube and printed flexible driving circuit for organic light emitting diode (OLED)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenya; Zhao, Jianwen; Qian, Long; Han, Xianying; Wu, Liangzhuan; Wu, Weichen; Song, Minshun; Zhou, Lu; Su, Wenming; Wang, Chao; Nie, Shuhong; Cui, Zheng

    2014-01-01

    A novel approach was developed to sort a large-diameter semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube (sc-SWCNT) based on copolyfluorene derivative with high yield. High purity sc-SWCNTs inks were obtained by wrapping arc-discharge SWCNTs with poly[2,7-(9,9-dioctylfluorene)-alt-4,7-bis(thiophen-2-yl)benzo-2,1,3-thiadiazole] (PFO-DBT) aided by sonication and centrifugation in tetrahydrofuran (THF). The sorted sc-SWCNT inks and nanosilver inks were used to print top-gated thin-film transistors (TFTs) on flexible substrates with an aerosol jet printer. The printed TFTs demonstrated low operating voltage, small hysteresis, high on-state current (up to 10-3 A), high mobility and on-off ratio. An organic light emitting diode (OLED) driving circuit was constructed based on the printed TFTs, which exhibited high on-off ratio up to 104 and output current up to 3.5 × 10-4 A at Vscan = -4.5 V and Vdd = 0.8 V. A single OLED was switched on with the driving circuit, showing the potential as backplanes for active matrix OLED applications.A novel approach was developed to sort a large-diameter semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube (sc-SWCNT) based on copolyfluorene derivative with high yield. High purity sc-SWCNTs inks were obtained by wrapping arc-discharge SWCNTs with poly[2,7-(9,9-dioctylfluorene)-alt-4,7-bis(thiophen-2-yl)benzo-2,1,3-thiadiazole] (PFO-DBT) aided by sonication and centrifugation in tetrahydrofuran (THF). The sorted sc-SWCNT inks and nanosilver inks were used to print top-gated thin-film transistors (TFTs) on flexible substrates with an aerosol jet printer. The printed TFTs demonstrated low operating voltage, small hysteresis, high on-state current (up to 10-3 A), high mobility and on-off ratio. An organic light emitting diode (OLED) driving circuit was constructed based on the printed TFTs, which exhibited high on-off ratio up to 104 and output current up to 3.5 × 10-4 A at Vscan = -4.5 V and Vdd = 0.8 V. A single OLED was switched on with the driving

  7. Controlled growth of carbon nanotube-graphene hybrid materials for flexible and transparent conductors and electron field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Duc Dung; Tai, Nyan-Hwa; Chen, Szu-Ying; Chueh, Yu-Lun

    2012-01-01

    We report a versatile synthetic process based on rapid heating and cooling chemical vapor deposition for the growth of carbon nanotube (CNT)-graphene hybrid materials where the thickness of graphene and density of CNTs are properly controlled. Graphene films are demonstrated as an efficient barrier layer for preventing poisoning of iron nanoparticles, which catalyze the growth of CNTs on copper substrates. Based on this method, the opto-electronic and field emission properties of graphene integrated with CNTs can be remarkably tailored. A graphene film exhibits a sheet resistance of 2.15 kΩ sq-1 with a transmittance of 85.6% (at 550 nm), while a CNT-graphene hybrid film shows an improved sheet resistance of 420 Ω sq-1 with an optical transmittance of 72.9%. Moreover, CNT-graphene films are demonstrated as effective electron field emitters with low turn-on and threshold electric fields of 2.9 and 3.3 V μm-1, respectively. The development of CNT-graphene films with a wide range of tunable properties presented in this study shows promising applications in flexible opto-electronic, energy, and sensor devices.

  8. Flexible, thorn-like ZnO-multiwalled carbon nanotube hybrid paper for efficient ultraviolet sensing and photocatalyst applications.

    PubMed

    Shao, Dali; Sun, Hongtao; Gao, Jian; Xin, Guoqing; Aguilar, Mark Anthony; Yao, Tiankai; Koratkar, Nikhil; Lian, Jie; Sawyer, Shayla

    2014-11-21

    We report fabrication of a flexible, thorn-like ZnO-multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) hybrid paper with high aspect ratio for efficient ultraviolet (UV) sensing and photocatalyst applications. The thorn-like ZnO-MWCNT hybrid paper was synthesized via atomic layer deposition (ALD) of a uniform ZnO thin film on the outside surface of the MWCNT followed by hydrothermal growth of ZnO branches. The hybrid paper achieved very high surface to volume ratio, which is favorable for photodetector and photocatalyst applications. A photodetector fabricated from the hybrid paper demonstrates a high sensitivity to UV light with a maximum photoresponsivity of 45.1 A W(-1) at 375 nm, corresponding to an external quantum efficiency as high as 14927%. The rise time and fall time of the UV photodetector are 29 ms and 33 ms, respectively, indicating fast transient response characteristics for the device. The high photoresponsivity and fast transient response are attributed to efficient carrier transport and collection efficiency of the hybrid paper. Besides, the thorn-like ZnO-MWCNT hybrid paper demonstrates excellent photocatalytic performance under UV irradiation, enabling photo-degradation of organic dyes such as Rhodamine B (RhB) within 90 minutes, with good recyclability.

  9. Controlled growth of carbon nanotube-graphene hybrid materials for flexible and transparent conductors and electron field emitters.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duc Dung; Tai, Nyan-Hwa; Chen, Szu-Ying; Chueh, Yu-Lun

    2012-01-21

    We report a versatile synthetic process based on rapid heating and cooling chemical vapor deposition for the growth of carbon nanotube (CNT)-graphene hybrid materials where the thickness of graphene and density of CNTs are properly controlled. Graphene films are demonstrated as an efficient barrier layer for preventing poisoning of iron nanoparticles, which catalyze the growth of CNTs on copper substrates. Based on this method, the opto-electronic and field emission properties of graphene integrated with CNTs can be remarkably tailored. A graphene film exhibits a sheet resistance of 2.15 kΩ sq(-1) with a transmittance of 85.6% (at 550 nm), while a CNT-graphene hybrid film shows an improved sheet resistance of 420 Ω sq(-1) with an optical transmittance of 72.9%. Moreover, CNT-graphene films are demonstrated as effective electron field emitters with low turn-on and threshold electric fields of 2.9 and 3.3 V μm(-1), respectively. The development of CNT-graphene films with a wide range of tunable properties presented in this study shows promising applications in flexible opto-electronic, energy, and sensor devices.

  10. Carbon nanotube/metal-sulfide composite flexible electrodes for high-performance quantum dot-sensitized solar cells and supercapacitors

    PubMed Central

    Muralee Gopi, Chandu V. V.; Ravi, Seenu; Rao, S. Srinivasa; Eswar Reddy, Araveeti; Kim, Hee-Je

    2017-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) and metal sulfides have attracted considerable attention owing to their outstanding properties and multiple application areas, such as electrochemical energy conversion and energy storage. Here we describes a cost-effective and facile solution approach to the preparation of metal sulfides (PbS, CuS, CoS, and NiS) grown directly on CNTs, such as CNT/PbS, CNT/CuS, CNT/CoS, and CNT/NiS flexible electrodes for quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) and supercapacitors (SCs). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy confirmed that the CNT network was covered with high-purity metal sulfide compounds. QDSSCs equipped with the CNT/NiS counter electrode (CE) showed an impressive energy conversion efficiency (η) of 6.41% and remarkable stability. Interestingly, the assembled symmetric CNT/NiS-based polysulfide SC device exhibited a maximal energy density of 35.39 W h kg−1 and superior cycling durability with 98.39% retention after 1,000 cycles compared to the other CNT/metal-sulfides. The elevated performance of the composites was attributed mainly to the good conductivity, high surface area with mesoporous structures and stability of the CNTs and the high electrocatalytic activity of the metal sulfides. Overall, the designed composite CNT/metal-sulfide electrodes offer an important guideline for the development of next level energy conversion and energy storage devices. PMID:28422182

  11. Carbon nanotube/metal-sulfide composite flexible electrodes for high-performance quantum dot-sensitized solar cells and supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muralee Gopi, Chandu V. V.; Ravi, Seenu; Rao, S. Srinivasa; Eswar Reddy, Araveeti; Kim, Hee-Je

    2017-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) and metal sulfides have attracted considerable attention owing to their outstanding properties and multiple application areas, such as electrochemical energy conversion and energy storage. Here we describes a cost-effective and facile solution approach to the preparation of metal sulfides (PbS, CuS, CoS, and NiS) grown directly on CNTs, such as CNT/PbS, CNT/CuS, CNT/CoS, and CNT/NiS flexible electrodes for quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) and supercapacitors (SCs). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy confirmed that the CNT network was covered with high-purity metal sulfide compounds. QDSSCs equipped with the CNT/NiS counter electrode (CE) showed an impressive energy conversion efficiency (η) of 6.41% and remarkable stability. Interestingly, the assembled symmetric CNT/NiS-based polysulfide SC device exhibited a maximal energy density of 35.39 W h kg-1 and superior cycling durability with 98.39% retention after 1,000 cycles compared to the other CNT/metal-sulfides. The elevated performance of the composites was attributed mainly to the good conductivity, high surface area with mesoporous structures and stability of the CNTs and the high electrocatalytic activity of the metal sulfides. Overall, the designed composite CNT/metal-sulfide electrodes offer an important guideline for the development of next level energy conversion and energy storage devices.

  12. Sorting of large-diameter semiconducting carbon nanotube and printed flexible driving circuit for organic light emitting diode (OLED).

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenya; Zhao, Jianwen; Qian, Long; Han, Xianying; Wu, Liangzhuan; Wu, Weichen; Song, Minshun; Zhou, Lu; Su, Wenming; Wang, Chao; Nie, Shuhong; Cui, Zheng

    2014-01-01

    A novel approach was developed to sort a large-diameter semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube (sc-SWCNT) based on copolyfluorene derivative with high yield. High purity sc-SWCNTs inks were obtained by wrapping arc-discharge SWCNTs with poly[2,7-(9,9-dioctylfluorene)-alt-4,7-bis(thiophen-2-yl)benzo-2,1,3-thiadiazole] (PFO-DBT) aided by sonication and centrifugation in tetrahydrofuran (THF). The sorted sc-SWCNT inks and nanosilver inks were used to print top-gated thin-film transistors (TFTs) on flexible substrates with an aerosol jet printer. The printed TFTs demonstrated low operating voltage, small hysteresis, high on-state current (up to 10(-3) A), high mobility and on-off ratio. An organic light emitting diode (OLED) driving circuit was constructed based on the printed TFTs, which exhibited high on-off ratio up to 10(4) and output current up to 3.5 × 10(-4) A at V(scan) = -4.5 V and Vdd = 0.8 V. A single OLED was switched on with the driving circuit, showing the potential as backplanes for active matrix OLED applications.

  13. Nanomechanics of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Kis, Andras; Zettl, Alex

    2008-05-13

    Some of the most important potential applications of carbon nanotubes are related to their mechanical properties. Stiff sp2 bonds result in a Young's modulus close to that of diamond, while the relatively weak van der Waals interaction between the graphitic shells acts as a form of lubrication. Previous characterization of the mechanical properties of nanotubes includes a rich variety of experiments involving mechanical deformation of nanotubes using scanning probe microscopes. These results have led to promising prototypes of nanoelectromechanical devices such as high-performance nanomotors, switches and oscillators based on carbon nanotubes.

  14. Fully Screen-Printed, Large-Area, and Flexible Active-Matrix Electrochromic Displays Using Carbon Nanotube Thin-Film Transistors.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xuan; Lau, Christian; Liu, Yihang; Wu, Fanqi; Gui, Hui; Liu, Qingzhou; Ma, Yuqiang; Wan, Haochuan; Amer, Moh R; Zhou, Chongwu

    2016-11-22

    Semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes are ideal semiconductors for printed electronics due to their advantageous electrical and mechanical properties, intrinsic printability in solution, and desirable stability in air. However, fully printed, large-area, high-performance, and flexible carbon nanotube active-matrix backplanes are still difficult to realize for future displays and sensing applications. Here, we report fully screen-printed active-matrix electrochromic displays employing carbon nanotube thin-film transistors. Our fully printed backplane shows high electrical performance with mobility of 3.92 ± 1.08 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), on-off current ratio Ion/Ioff ∼ 10(4), and good uniformity. The printed backplane was then monolithically integrated with an array of printed electrochromic pixels, resulting in an entirely screen-printed active-matrix electrochromic display (AMECD) with good switching characteristics, facile manufacturing, and long-term stability. Overall, our fully screen-printed AMECD is promising for the mass production of large-area and low-cost flexible displays for applications such as disposable tags, medical electronics, and smart home appliances.

  15. Carbon nanotube terahertz detector.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaowei; Fujimura, Naoki; Lloyd, J Meagan; Erickson, Kristopher J; Talin, A Alec; Zhang, Qi; Gao, Weilu; Jiang, Qijia; Kawano, Yukio; Hauge, Robert H; Léonard, François; Kono, Junichiro

    2014-07-09

    Terahertz (THz) technologies are promising for diverse areas such as medicine, bioengineering, astronomy, environmental monitoring, and communications. However, despite decades of worldwide efforts, the THz region of the electromagnetic spectrum still continues to be elusive for solid state technology. Here, we report on the development of a powerless, compact, broadband, flexible, large-area, and polarization-sensitive carbon nanotube THz detector that works at room temperature. The detector is sensitive throughout the entire range of the THz technology gap, with responsivities as high as ∼2.5 V/W and polarization ratios as high as ∼5:1. Complete thermoelectric and opto-thermal characterization together unambiguously reveal the photothermoelectric origin of the THz photosignal, triggered by plasmonic absorption and collective antenna effects, and suggest that judicious design of thermal management and quantum engineering of Seebeck coefficients will lead to further enhancement of device performance.

  16. Hemotoxicity of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Bussy, Cyrill; Methven, Laura; Kostarelos, Kostas

    2013-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes may enter into the bloodstream and interact with blood components indirectly via translocation following unintended exposure or directly after an intended administration for biomedical purposes. Once introduced into systemic circulation, nanotubes will encounter various proteins, biomolecules or cells which have specific roles in the homeostasis of the circulatory system. It is therefore essential to determine whether those interactions will lead to adverse effects or not. Advances in the understanding of how carbon nanotubes interact with blood proteins, the complement system, red blood cells and the hemostatic system are reviewed in this article. While many studies on carbon nanotube health risk assessment and their biomedical applications have appeared in the last few years, reports on the hemocompatibility of these nanomaterials remain surprisingly limited. Yet, defining the hemotoxicological profile is a mandatory step toward the development of clinically-relevant medications or contrast agents based on carbon nanotubes.

  17. Aligned carbon nanotube-silicon sheets: a novel nano-architecture for flexible lithium ion battery electrodes.

    PubMed

    Fu, Kun; Yildiz, Ozkan; Bhanushali, Hardik; Wang, Yongxin; Stano, Kelly; Xue, Leigang; Zhang, Xiangwu; Bradford, Philip D

    2013-09-25

    Aligned carbon nanotube sheets provide an engineered scaffold for the deposition of a silicon active material for lithium ion battery anodes. The sheets are low-density, allowing uniform deposition of silicon thin films while the alignment allows unconstrained volumetric expansion of the silicon, facilitating stable cycling performance. The flat sheet morphology is desirable for battery construction.

  18. Applications of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Zhou, Otto Z.

    Carbon nanotubes have attracted the fancy of many scientists worldwide. The small dimensions, strength and the remarkable physical properties of these structures make them a very unique material with a whole range of promising applications. In this review we describe some of the important materials science applications of carbon nanotubes. Specifically we discuss the electronic and electrochemical applications of nanotubes, nanotubes as mechanical reinforcements in high performance composites, nanotube-based field emitters, and their use as nanoprobes in metrology and biological and chemical investigations, and as templates for the creation of other nanostructures. Electronic properties and device applications of nanotubes are treated elsewhere in the book. The challenges that ensue in realizing some of these applications are also discussed from the point of view of manufacturing, processing, and cost considerations.

  19. Three-Dimensional Flexible Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Logic Circuits Based On Two-Layer Stacks of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Networks.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yudan; Li, Qunqing; Xiao, Xiaoyang; Li, Guanhong; Jin, Yuanhao; Jiang, Kaili; Wang, Jiaping; Fan, Shoushan

    2016-02-23

    We have proposed and fabricated stable and repeatable, flexible, single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) thin film transistor (TFT) complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuits based on a three-dimensional (3D) structure. Two layers of SWCNT-TFT devices were stacked, where one layer served as n-type devices and the other one served as p-type devices. On the basis of this method, it is able to save at least half of the area required to construct an inverter and make large-scale and high-density integrated CMOS circuits easier to design and manufacture. The 3D flexible CMOS inverter gain can be as high as 40, and the total noise margin is more than 95%. Moreover, the input and output voltage of the inverter are exactly matched for cascading. 3D flexible CMOS NOR, NAND logic gates, and 15-stage ring oscillators were fabricated on PI substrates with high performance as well. Stable electrical properties of these circuits can be obtained with bending radii as small as 3.16 mm, which shows that such a 3D structure is a reliable architecture and suitable for carbon nanotube electrical applications in complex flexible and wearable electronic devices.

  20. Superior performance of highly flexible solid-state supercapacitor based on the ternary composites of graphene oxide supported poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Haihan; Zhai, Hua-Jin; Han, Gaoyi

    2016-08-01

    Ternary composite electrodes based on carbon nanotubes thin films (CNFs)-loaded graphene oxide (GO) supported poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)- carbon nanotubes (GO/PEDOT-CNTs) have been prepared via a facile one-step electrochemical codeposition method. The effect of long and short CNTs-incorporated composites (GO/PEDOT-lCNTs and GO/PEDOT-sCNTs) on the electrochemical behaviors of the electrodes is investigated and compared. Electrochemical measurements indicate that the incorporation of CNTs effectively improves the electrochemical performances of the GO/PEDOT electrodes. Long CNTs-incorporated GO/PEDOT-lCNTs electrodes have more superior electrochemical behaviors with respect to the short CNTs-incorporated GO/PEDOT-lCNTs electrodes, which can be attributed to the optimized composition and specific microstructures of the former. To verify the feasibility of the prepared composite electrodes for utilization as flexible supercapacitor, a solid-state supercapacitor using the CNFs-loaded GO/PEDOT-lCNTs electrodes is fabricated and tested. The device shows lightweight, ultrathin, and highly flexible features, which also has a high areal and volumetric specific capacitance (33.4 m F cm-2 at 10 mV s-1 and 2.7 F cm-3 at 0.042 A cm-3), superior rate capability, and excellent cycle stability (maintaining 97.5% for 5000 cycles). This highly flexible solid-state supercapacitor has great potential for applications in flexible electronics, roll-up display, and wearable devices.

  1. Three-dimensional SnO2@TiO2 double-shell nanotubes on carbon cloth as a flexible anode for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haifeng; Ren, Weina; Cheng, Chuanwei

    2015-07-01

    In this study, three-dimensional SnO2@TiO2 double-shell nanotubes on carbon cloth are synthesized by a combination of the hydrothermal method for ZnO nanorods and a subsequent SnO2 and TiO2 thin film coating with atomic layer deposition (ALD). The as-prepared SnO2@TiO2 double-shell nanotubes are further tested as a flexible anode for Li ion batteries. The SnO2@TiO2 double-shell nanotubes/carbon cloth electrode exhibited a high initial discharge capacity (e.g. 778.8 mA h g-1 at a high current density of 780 mA g-1) and good cycling performance, which could be attributed to the 3D double-layer nanotube structure. The interior space of the stable TiO2 hollow tube can accommodate the large internal stress caused by volume expansion of SnO2 and protect SnO2 from pulverization and exfoliation.

  2. Three-dimensional SnO₂@TiO₂ double-shell nanotubes on carbon cloth as a flexible anode for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haifeng; Ren, Weina; Cheng, Chuanwei

    2015-07-10

    In this study, three-dimensional SnO2@TiO2 double-shell nanotubes on carbon cloth are synthesized by a combination of the hydrothermal method for ZnO nanorods and a subsequent SnO2 and TiO2 thin film coating with atomic layer deposition (ALD). The as-prepared SnO2@TiO2 double-shell nanotubes are further tested as a flexible anode for Li ion batteries. The SnO2@TiO2 double-shell nanotubes/carbon cloth electrode exhibited a high initial discharge capacity (e.g. 778.8 mA h g(-1) at a high current density of 780 mA g(-1)) and good cycling performance, which could be attributed to the 3D double-layer nanotube structure. The interior space of the stable TiO2 hollow tube can accommodate the large internal stress caused by volume expansion of SnO2 and protect SnO2 from pulverization and exfoliation.

  3. Filling carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugarte, D.; Stöckli, T.; Bonard, J. M.; Châtelain, A.; de Heer, W. A.

    Filling hollow carbon nanotubes with chosen materials opens new possibilities of generating nearly one-dimensional nanostrutures. One simple approach to fill nanotubes is to use capillarity forces. Here, we have studied the wetting and capillarity by metal salts. First, nanotubes were opened by oxidation in air; subsequently, nanotubes were immersed in molten salts. We have observed a size-dependence filling indicating a lowering of the cavity-salt interface energy with decreasing diameter. By expressing the wetting conditions as a function of polarizabilities, it is possible to predict the threshold diameter for capillary filling of different materials.

  4. Transparent, Flexible Strain Sensor Based on a Solution-Processed Carbon Nanotube Network.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jieun; Lim, Meehyun; Yoon, Jinsu; Kim, Min Seong; Choi, Bongsik; Kim, Dong Myong; Kim, Dae Hwan; Park, Inkyu; Choi, Sung-Jin

    2017-08-09

    The demands for transparent, flexible electronic devices are continuously increasing due to their potential applications to the human body. In particular, skin-like, transparent, flexible strain sensors have been developed to realize multifunctional human-machine interfaces. Here, we report a sandwich-like structured strain sensor with excellent optical transparency based on highly purified, solution-processed, 99% metallic CNT-polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composite thin films. Our CNT-PDMS composite strain sensors are mechanically compliant, physically robust, and easily fabricated. The fabricated strain sensors exhibit a high optical transparency of over 92% in the visible range with acceptable sensing performances in terms of sensitivity, hysteresis, linearity, and drift. We also found that the sensitivity and linearity of the strain sensors can be controlled by the number of CNT sprays; hence, our sensor can be applied and controlled based on the need of individual applications. Finally, we investigated the detections of human activities and emotions by mounting our transparent strain sensor on various spots of human skins.

  5. Transport in Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datta, S.; Xue, Yong-Qinag; Anantram, M. P.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    This presentation discusses coupling between carbon nanotubes (CNT), simple metals (FEG) and a graphene sheet. The graphene sheet did not couple well with FEG, but the combination of a graphene strip and CNT did couple well with most simple metals.

  6. Carbon nanotubes: Fibrillar pharmacology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostarelos, Kostas

    2010-10-01

    The mechanisms by which chemically functionalized carbon nanotubes flow in blood and are excreted through the kidneys illustrate the unconventional behaviour of these fibrillar nanostructures, and the opportunities they offer as components for the design of advanced delivery vehicles.

  7. Flexible MXene/Carbon Nanotube Composite Paper with High Volumetric Capacitance

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Meng-Qiang; Ren, Chang E.; Ling, Zheng; Lukatskaya, Maria R.; Zhang, Chuanfang; Van Aken, Katherine L.; Barsoum, Michel W.; Gogotsi, Yury

    2014-11-18

    Electrochemical capacitors attract attention because of their high power densities and long cycle lives. Moreover, with increasing demand for portable and wearable electronics, recent research has focused primarily on improving the energy density per unit of volume of electrochemical capacitors. But, the volumetric capacitances of carbon-based electrodes is limited at around 60 F cm -3 for commercial devices, and at best in the range of 300 F cm -3 for low-density porous carbons (<0.5–1 g cm -3 ). Although extremely high capacitances of 1000–1500 F cm -3 can be achieved for hydrated ruthenium oxide, RuO 2 , its high cost limits its wide-spread applications.

  8. Flexible MXene/Carbon Nanotube Composite Paper with High Volumetric Capacitance

    DOE PAGES

    Zhao, Meng-Qiang; Ren, Chang E.; Ling, Zheng; ...

    2014-11-18

    Electrochemical capacitors attract attention because of their high power densities and long cycle lives. Moreover, with increasing demand for portable and wearable electronics, recent research has focused primarily on improving the energy density per unit of volume of electrochemical capacitors. But, the volumetric capacitances of carbon-based electrodes is limited at around 60 F cm -3 for commercial devices, and at best in the range of 300 F cm -3 for low-density porous carbons (<0.5–1 g cm -3 ). Although extremely high capacitances of 1000–1500 F cm -3 can be achieved for hydrated ruthenium oxide, RuO 2 , its high costmore » limits its wide-spread applications.« less

  9. Integrated fast assembly of free-standing lithium titanate/carbon nanotube/cellulose nanofiber hybrid network film as flexible paper-electrode for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shaomei; Feng, Xin; Song, Yuanyuan; Xue, Xin; Liu, Hongjiang; Miao, Miao; Fang, Jianhui; Shi, Liyi

    2015-05-27

    A free-standing lithium titanate (Li4Ti5O12)/carbon nanotube/cellulose nanofiber hybrid network film is successfully assembled by using a pressure-controlled aqueous extrusion process, which is highly efficient and easily to scale up from the perspective of disposable and recyclable device production. This hybrid network film used as a lithium-ion battery (LIB) electrode has a dual-layer structure consisting of Li4Ti5O12/carbon nanotube/cellulose nanofiber composites (hereinafter referred to as LTO/CNT/CNF), and carbon nanotube/cellulose nanofiber composites (hereinafter referred to as CNT/CNF). In the heterogeneous fibrous network of the hybrid film, CNF serves simultaneously as building skeleton and a biosourced binder, which substitutes traditional toxic solvents and synthetic polymer binders. Of importance here is that the CNT/CNF layer is used as a lightweight current collector to replace traditional heavy metal foils, which therefore reduces the total mass of the electrode while keeping the same areal loading of active materials. The free-standing network film with high flexibility is easy to handle, and has extremely good conductivity, up to 15.0 S cm(-1). The flexible paper-electrode for LIBs shows very good high rate cycling performance, and the specific charge/discharge capacity values are up to 142 mAh g(-1) even at a current rate of 10 C. On the basis of the mild condition and fast assembly process, a CNF template fulfills multiple functions in the fabrication of paper-electrode for LIBs, which would offer an ever increasing potential for high energy density, low cost, and environmentally friendly flexible electronics.

  10. Carbon Nanotube Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Klinger, Colin; Patel, Yogeshwari; Postma, Henk W. Ch.

    2012-01-01

    We present proof-of-concept all-carbon solar cells. They are made of a photoactive side of predominantly semiconducting nanotubes for photoconversion and a counter electrode made of a natural mixture of carbon nanotubes or graphite, connected by a liquid electrolyte through a redox reaction. The cells do not require rare source materials such as In or Pt, nor high-grade semiconductor processing equipment, do not rely on dye for photoconversion and therefore do not bleach, and are easy to fabricate using a spray-paint technique. We observe that cells with a lower concentration of carbon nanotubes on the active semiconducting electrode perform better than cells with a higher concentration of nanotubes. This effect is contrary to the expectation that a larger number of nanotubes would lead to more photoconversion and therefore more power generation. We attribute this to the presence of metallic nanotubes that provide a short for photo-excited electrons, bypassing the load. We demonstrate optimization strategies that improve cell efficiency by orders of magnitude. Once it is possible to make semiconducting-only carbon nanotube films, that may provide the greatest efficiency improvement. PMID:22655070

  11. Carbon nanotube solar cells.

    PubMed

    Klinger, Colin; Patel, Yogeshwari; Postma, Henk W Ch

    2012-01-01

    We present proof-of-concept all-carbon solar cells. They are made of a photoactive side of predominantly semiconducting nanotubes for photoconversion and a counter electrode made of a natural mixture of carbon nanotubes or graphite, connected by a liquid electrolyte through a redox reaction. The cells do not require rare source materials such as In or Pt, nor high-grade semiconductor processing equipment, do not rely on dye for photoconversion and therefore do not bleach, and are easy to fabricate using a spray-paint technique. We observe that cells with a lower concentration of carbon nanotubes on the active semiconducting electrode perform better than cells with a higher concentration of nanotubes. This effect is contrary to the expectation that a larger number of nanotubes would lead to more photoconversion and therefore more power generation. We attribute this to the presence of metallic nanotubes that provide a short for photo-excited electrons, bypassing the load. We demonstrate optimization strategies that improve cell efficiency by orders of magnitude. Once it is possible to make semiconducting-only carbon nanotube films, that may provide the greatest efficiency improvement.

  12. Aligned carbon nanotube-based flexible gel substrates for engineering bio-hybrid tissue actuators.

    PubMed

    Shin, Su Ryon; Shin, Courtney; Memic, Adnan; Shadmehr, Samaneh; Miscuglio, Mario; Jung, Hyun Young; Jung, Sung Mi; Bae, Hojae; Khademhosseini, Ali; Tang, Xiaowu Shirley; Dokmeci, Mehmet R

    2015-07-20

    Muscle-based biohybrid actuators have generated significant interest as the future of biorobotics but so far they move without having much control over their actuation behavior. Integration of microelectrodes into the backbone of these systems may enable guidance during their motion and allow precise control over these actuators with specific activation patterns. Here, we addressed this challenge by developing aligned CNT forest microelectrode arrays and incorporated them into scaffolds for stimulating the cells. Aligned CNTs were successfully embedded into flexible and biocompatible hydrogel exhibiting excellent anisotropic electrical conductivity. Bioactuators were then engineered by culturing cardiomyocytes on the CNT microelectrode-integrated hydrogel constructs. The resulting cardiac tissue showed homogeneous cell organization with improved cell-to-cell coupling and maturation, which was directly related to the contractile force of muscle tissue. This centimeter-scale bioactuator has excellent mechanical integrity, embedded microelectrodes and is capable of spontaneous actuation behavior. Furthermore, we demonstrated that a biohybrid machine can be controlled by an external electrical field provided by the integrated CNT microelectrode arrays. In addition, due to the anisotropic electrical conductivity of the electrodes provided from aligned CNTs, significantly different excitation thresholds were observed in different configurations such as the ones in parallel vs. perpendicular direction to the CNT alignment.

  13. Oxygen Evolution Assisted Fabrication of Highly Loaded Carbon Nanotube/MnO2 Hybrid Films for High-Performance Flexible Pseudosupercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongyuan; Zeng, Sha; Chen, Minghai; Zhang, Yongyi; Zheng, Lianxi; Li, Qingwen

    2016-04-01

    To date, it has been a great challenge to design high-performance flexible energy storage devices for sufficient loading of redox species in the electrode assemblies, with well-maintained mechanical robustness and enhanced electron/ionic transport during charge/discharge cycles. An electrochemical activation strategy is demonstrated for the facile regeneration of carbon nanotube (CNT) film prepared via floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition strategy into a flexible, robust, and highly conductive hydrogel-like film, which is promising as electrode matrix for efficient loading of redox species and the fabrication of high-performance flexible pseudosupercapacitors. The strong and conductive CNT films can be effectively expanded and activated by electrochemical anodic oxygen evolution reaction, presenting greatly enhanced internal space and surface wettability with well-maintained strength, flexibility, and conductivity. The as-formed hydrogel-like film is quite favorable for electrochemical deposition of manganese dioxide (MnO2 ) with loading mass up to 93 wt% and electrode capacitance kept around 300 F g(-1) (areal capacitance of 1.2 F cm(-2) ). This hybrid film was further used to assemble a flexible symmetric pseudosupercapacitor without using any other current collectors and conductive additives. The assembled flexible supercapacitors exhibited good rate performance, with the areal capacitance of more than 300 mF cm(-2) , much superior to other reported MnO2 based flexible thin-film supercapacitors. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Templated Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siochik Emilie J. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method of growing carbon nanotubes uses a synthesized mesoporous si lica template with approximately cylindrical pores being formed there in. The surfaces of the pores are coated with a carbon nanotube precu rsor, and the template with the surfaces of the pores so-coated is th en heated until the carbon nanotube precursor in each pore is convert ed to a carbon nanotube.

  15. Carbon nanotube array based sensor

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Christopher L.; Noy, Aleksandr; Swierkowski, Stephan P.; Fisher, Karl A.; Woods, Bruce W.

    2005-09-20

    A sensor system comprising a first electrode with an array of carbon nanotubes and a second electrode. The first electrode with an array of carbon nanotubes and the second electrode are positioned to produce an air gap between the first electrode with an array of carbon nanotubes and the second electrode. A measuring device is provided for sensing changes in electrical capacitance between the first electrode with an array of carbon nanotubes and the second electrode.

  16. High-power and high-energy-density flexible pseudocapacitor electrodes made from porous CuO nanobelts and single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaojun; Shi, Wenhui; Zhu, Jixin; Kharistal, Daniel Julian; Zhao, Weiyun; Lalia, Boor Singh; Hng, Huey Hoon; Yan, Qingyu

    2011-03-22

    We report a simple wet-chemical process to prepare porous CuO nanobelts (NBs) with high surface area and small crystal grains. These CuO NBs were mixed with carbon nanotubes in an appropriate ratio to fabricate pseudocapacitor electrodes with stable cycling performances, which showed a series of high energy densities at different power densities, for example, 130.2, 92, 44, 25, and 20.8 W h kg(-1) at power densities of 1.25, 6.25, 25, and 50 k Wh kg(-1), respectively. CuO-on-single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) flexible hybrid electrodes were also fabricated using the SWCNT films as current collectors. These flexible electrodes showed much higher specific capacitance than that of electrodes made of pure SWCNTs and exhibited more stable cycling performance, for example, effective specific capacitances of >62 F g(-1) for the hybrid electrodes after 1000 cycles in 1 M LiPF6/EC:DEC at a current density of 5 A g(-1) and specific capacitance of only 23.6 F g(-1) for pure SWCNT electrodes under the same testing condition.

  17. Dielectric behavior of a flexible three-phase polyimide/BaTiO3/multi-walled carbon nanotube composite film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junli; Qi, Shengli; Sun, Yiyi; Tian, Guofeng; Wu, Dezhen

    2016-11-01

    A three-phase composite film was produced by inserting multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and BaTiO3 nanoparticles into polyimide (PI). The combination of in-situ polymerization and water-based preparation involved in the experiment ensured fillers’ homogeneous dispersion in the matrix, which led to flexible shape of the composite films. The dielectric properties of composite films as a function of the frequency and the volume fraction of MWCNTs were studied. Such composite film displayed a high dielectric constant (314.07), low dielectric loss and excellent flexibility at 100Hz in the neighborhood of percolation threshold (9.02 vol%) owing to the special microcapacitor structure. The experimental results were highly consistent with the power law of percolation theory.

  18. Underwater Acoustic Carbon Nanotube Thermophone

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-23

    Attorney Docket No. 300042 1 of 10 UNDERWATER ACOUSTIC CARBON NANOTUBE THERMOPHONE STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The invention...the Invention [0003] The present invention is an acoustically transparent carbon nanotube underwater acoustic source which acts as a thermophone...development of underwater acoustic carbon nanotube (CNT) yarn sheets capable of producing high acoustic output at low frequencies with broad bandwidth. An

  19. Carbon Nanotube Underwater Acoustic Thermophone

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-23

    Attorney Docket No. 300009 1 of 8 A CARBON NANOTUBE UNDERWATER ACOUSTIC THERMOPHONE STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The...the Invention [0003] The present invention is an acoustically transparent carbon nanotube thermophone. (2) Description of the Prior Art [0004...amplitude of the resulting sound waves. [0006] Recently, there has been development of underwater acoustic carbon nanotube (CNT) yarn sheets capable

  20. Transparent conducting oxide-free nitrogen-doped graphene/reduced hydroxylated carbon nanotube composite paper as flexible counter electrodes for dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jindan; Yu, Mei; Li, Songmei; Meng, Yanbing; Wu, Xueke; Liu, Jianhua

    2016-12-01

    Three-dimensional nitrogen-doped graphene/reduced hydroxylated carbon nanotube composite aerogel (NG/CNT-OH) with unique hierarchical porosity and mechanical stability is developed through a two-step hydrothermal reaction. With plenty of exposed active sites and efficient multidimensional transport pathways of electrons and ions, NG/CNT-OH exhibits great electrocatalytic performances for I-/I3- redox couple. The subsequent compressed NG/CNT-OH papers possess high electrical conductivity and good flexibility, thus generating high-performance flexible counter electrodes (CEs) with transparent conducting oxide free (TCO-free) for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The flexible NG/CNT-OH electrodes show good stability and the DSSCs with the optimized NG/CNT-OH CE had higher short-circuit current density (13.62 mA cm-2) and cell efficiency (6.36%) than DSSCs using Pt CE, whereas those of the DSSCs using Pt CE were only 12.81 mA cm-2 and 5.74%, respectively. Increasing the ratio of hydroxylated carbon nanotubes (CNT-OH) to the graphene oxide (GO) in the reactant would lead to less content of doped N, but better diffusion of electrolyte in the CEs because of more complete GO etching reaction. The design strategy presents a facile and cost effective way to synthesis three-dimensional graphene/CNT composite aerogel with excellent performance, and it can be potentially used as flexible TCO-free CE in other power conversion or energy storage devices.

  1. One-step fabrication of free-standing flexible membranes reinforced with self-assembled arrays of carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Grilli, S.; Coppola, S.; Vespini, V.; Pagliarulo, V.; Ferraro, P.; Nasti, G.; Carfagna, C.

    2014-10-13

    Here, we report on a single step approach for fabricating free-standing polymer membranes reinforced with arrayed self-assembled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The CNTs are self-assembled spontaneously by electrode-free DC dielectrophoresis based on surface charge templates. The electrical charge template is generated through the pyroelectric effect onto periodically poled lithium niobate ferroelectric crystals. A thermal stimulus enables simultaneously the self-assembly of the CNTs and the cross-linking of the host polymer. Examples of thin polydimethylsiloxane membranes reinforced with CNT patterns are shown.

  2. Sorting Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ming

    2017-02-01

    Sorting of single-wall carbon nanotubes by their electronic and atomic structures in liquid phases is reviewed in this chapter. We first introduce the sorting problem, and then provide an overview of several sorting methodologies, following roughly the chronological order of their development over the past 15 years or so. Major methods discussed include ion-exchange chromatography, density-gradient ultracentrifugation, selective extraction in organic solvents, gel chromatography, and aqueous two-phase extraction. A main focus of the review is on the common mechanisms underlining all sorting processes. We propose that differences in solvation among different nanotube species are the ultimate driving force of sorting, and we corroborate this proposal by presenting analysis on how the differences are realized in electronic-structure-based sorting and atomic-structure-based sorting. In the end, we offer some suggestions on future directions that may grow out of carbon nanotube sorting. In particular, the prospect of expanding the function of DNA/carbon nanotube hybrid to control inter-particle interactions both inside and outside the nanotube is discussed.

  3. Copper-philic carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belgamwar, Sachin U.; Sharma, Niti Nipun

    2016-04-01

    Carbon nanotube is having poor wet-ability with copper metal. Wet-ability of carbon nanotube was improved by exposing and creating more active sites on the surface of carbon nanotube. Carbon nanotubes were subjected to the prolong ultrasonication treatment of 20×103 Hz and 500W, which helped in disentanglement of carbon nanotube agglomerates and in breaking the weak bonds like pentagonal or heptagonal structure on the surface and on the CNT cap. Disentanglement of the carbon nanotube, resulted in exposing the defective sites on the surface and breaking of weak bonds, which assisted in creating the new defects on the surface. This process results in generates more active sites on the surface and it helps in improving the wet-ability of the carbon nanotube in copper.

  4. Transport Through Carbon Nanotube Wires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anantram, M. P.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation deals with the use of carbon nanotubes as a transport system. Contact, defects, tubular bend, phonons, and mechanical deformations all contribute to reflection within the nanotube wire. Bragg reflection, however, is native to an ideal energy transport system. Transmission resistance depends primarily on the level of energy present. Finally, the details regarding coupling between carbon nanotubes and simple metals are presented.

  5. Flexible carbon nanotube/polypropylene composite plate decorated with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) as efficient counter electrodes for dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jeng-Yu; Wang, Wei-Yen; Chou, Shu-Wei

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we fabricate an efficient, flexible and low-cost counter electrode (CE) composed of a plasma-etched carbon nanotubes/polypropylene (designated as ECP) composite plate decorated with poly(3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene) (PEDOT) for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). The PEDOT-decorated monolithic ECP CEs are fabricated via series of processes including high-temperature refluxing, thermal compression, oxygen plasma etching, and electropolymerization. The bottom ECP plate is used to replace conventional transparent conducting oxide (TCO) as a conductive substrate, and the top PEDOT layer is employed as catalyst for I3- reduction. According to the extensive electrochemical measurements, the as-fabricated flexible PEDOT coated ECP CE demonstrates a Pt-like electrocatalytic for I3- reduction. The DSC based on the flexible PEDOT-decorated ECP CE yields impressive energy conversion efficiency of 6.82% (or 6.77% even after the bending test), which is comparable to that of the DSC using the Pt CE (7.20%) under similar device architecture conditions. Therefore, the PEDOT-decorated ECP based CEs show the possibility of serving as low-cost and flexible CEs for efficient DSCs.

  6. Carbon nanotube filters.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, A; Srivastava, O N; Talapatra, S; Vajtai, R; Ajayan, P M

    2004-09-01

    Over the past decade of nanotube research, a variety of organized nanotube architectures have been fabricated using chemical vapour deposition. The idea of using nanotube structures in separation technology has been proposed, but building macroscopic structures that have controlled geometric shapes, density and dimensions for specific applications still remains a challenge. Here we report the fabrication of freestanding monolithic uniform macroscopic hollow cylinders having radially aligned carbon nanotube walls, with diameters and lengths up to several centimetres. These cylindrical membranes are used as filters to demonstrate their utility in two important settings: the elimination of multiple components of heavy hydrocarbons from petroleum-a crucial step in post-distillation of crude oil-with a single-step filtering process, and the filtration of bacterial contaminants such as Escherichia coli or the nanometre-sized poliovirus ( approximately 25 nm) from water. These macro filters can be cleaned for repeated filtration through ultrasonication and autoclaving. The exceptional thermal and mechanical stability of nanotubes, and the high surface area, ease and cost-effective fabrication of the nanotube membranes may allow them to compete with ceramic- and polymer-based separation membranes used commercially.

  7. Carbon nanotube filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, A.; Srivastava, O. N.; Talapatra, S.; Vajtai, R.; Ajayan, P. M.

    2004-09-01

    Over the past decade of nanotube research, a variety of organized nanotube architectures have been fabricated using chemical vapour deposition. The idea of using nanotube structures in separation technology has been proposed, but building macroscopic structures that have controlled geometric shapes, density and dimensions for specific applications still remains a challenge. Here we report the fabrication of freestanding monolithic uniform macroscopic hollow cylinders having radially aligned carbon nanotube walls, with diameters and lengths up to several centimetres. These cylindrical membranes are used as filters to demonstrate their utility in two important settings: the elimination of multiple components of heavy hydrocarbons from petroleum-a crucial step in post-distillation of crude oil-with a single-step filtering process, and the filtration of bacterial contaminants such as Escherichia coli or the nanometre-sized poliovirus (~25 nm) from water. These macro filters can be cleaned for repeated filtration through ultrasonication and autoclaving. The exceptional thermal and mechanical stability of nanotubes, and the high surface area, ease and cost-effective fabrication of the nanotube membranes may allow them to compete with ceramic- and polymer-based separation membranes used commercially.

  8. Carbon nanotubes for microelectronics?

    PubMed

    Graham, Andrew P; Duesberg, Georg S; Seidel, Robert V; Liebau, Maik; Unger, Eugen; Pamler, Werner; Kreupl, Franz; Hoenlein, Wolfgang

    2005-04-01

    Despite all prophecies of its end, silicon-based microelectronics still follows Moore's Law and continues to develop rapidly. However, the inherent physical limits will eventually be reached. Carbon nanotubes offer the potential for further miniaturization as long as it is possible to selectively deposit them with defined properties.

  9. Adhered Supported Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Dale F.; Craft, Benjamin J.; Jaffe, Stephen M.

    2001-02-01

    Carbon nanotubes (NTs) in excess of 200 μm long are grown by catalytic pyrolysis of hydrocarbon vapors. The nanotubes grow continuously without the typical extinction due to catalyst encapsulation. A woven metal mesh supports the nanotubes creating a metal supported nanotube (MSNT) structure. The 140 μm wide mesh openings are completely filled by 70 nm diameter multiwalled nanotubes (MWNTs). The MWNTs are straight, uniform and highly crystalline. Their wall thickness is about 10 nm (30 graphite layers). The adherent NTs are not removed from the support in a Scotch tape pull test. A 12.5 cm2 capacitor made from two MSNT structures immersed in 1 M KCl has a capacitance of 0.35 F and an equivalent series resistance of 0.18 Ω. Water flows through the MSNT at a flow velocity of 1 cm/min with a pressure drop of 15 inches of water. With the support removed, the MWNTs naturally form a carbon nanocomposite (CNC) paper with a specific area of 80 m2/gm, a bulk density of 0.21 g/cm3, an open pore fraction of 0.81, and a resistivity of 0.16 Ω-cm.

  10. Nitrogen doping in carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ewels, C P; Glerup, M

    2005-09-01

    Nitrogen doping of single and multi-walled carbon nanotubes is of great interest both fundamentally, to explore the effect of dopants on quasi-1D electrical conductors, and for applications such as field emission tips, lithium storage, composites and nanoelectronic devices. We present an extensive review of the current state of the art in nitrogen doping of carbon nanotubes, including synthesis techniques, and comparison with nitrogen doped carbon thin films and azofullerenes. Nitrogen doping significantly alters nanotube morphology, leading to compartmentalised 'bamboo' nanotube structures. We review spectroscopic studies of nitrogen dopants using techniques such as X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy and Raman studies, and associated theoretical models. We discuss the role of nanotube curvature and chirality (notably whether the nanotubes are metallic or semiconducting), and the effect of doping on nanotube surface chemistry. Finally we review the effect of nitrogen on the transport properties of carbon nanotubes, notably its ability to induce negative differential resistance in semiconducting tubes.

  11. The Toxicology of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donaldson, Ken; Poland, Craig; Duffin, Rodger; Bonner, James

    2012-06-01

    1. Carbon nanotube structure, synthesis and applications C. Singh and W. Song; 2. The aerodynamic behaviour and pulmonary deposition of carbon nanotubes A. Buckley, R. Smith and R Maynard; 3. Utilising the concept of the biologically effective dose to define the particle and fibre hazards of carbon nanotubes K. Donaldson, R. Duffin, F. Murphy and C. Poland; 4. CNT, biopersistence and the fibre paradigm D. Warheit and M. DeLorme; 5. Length-dependent retention of fibres in the pleural space C. Poland, F. Murphy and K. Donaldson; 6. Experimental carcinogenicity of carbon nanotubes in the context of other fibres K. Unfried; 7. Fate and effects of carbon nanotubes following inhalation J. Ryman-Rasmussen, M. Andersen and J. Bonner; 8. Responses to pulmonary exposure to carbon nanotubes V. Castranova and R. Mercer; 9. Genotoxicity of carbon nanotubes R. Schins, C. Albrecht, K. Gerloff and D. van Berlo; 10. Carbon nanotube-cellular interactions; macrophages, epithelial and mesothelial cells V. Stone, M. Boyles, A. Kermanizadeh, J. Varet and H. Johnston; 11. Systemic health effects of carbon nanotubes following inhalation J. McDonald; 12. Dosimetry and metrology of carbon nanotubes L. Tran, L. MacCalman and R. Aitken; Index.

  12. Hybrid fibers made of molybdenum disulfide, reduced graphene oxide, and multi-walled carbon nanotubes for solid-state, flexible, asymmetric supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Sun, Gengzhi; Zhang, Xiao; Lin, Rongzhou; Yang, Jian; Zhang, Hua; Chen, Peng

    2015-04-07

    One of challenges existing in fiber-based supercapacitors is how to achieve high energy density without compromising their rate stability. Owing to their unique physical, electronic, and electrochemical properties, two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials, e.g., molybdenum disulfide (MoS2 ) and graphene, have attracted increasing research interest and been utilized as electrode materials in energy-related applications. Herein, by incorporating MoS2 and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanosheets into a well-aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) sheet followed by twisting, MoS2 -rGO/MWCNT and rGO/MWCNT fibers are fabricated, which can be used as the anode and cathode, respectively, for solid-state, flexible, asymmetric supercapacitors. This fiber-based asymmetric supercapacitor can operate in a wide potential window of 1.4 V with high Coulombic efficiency, good rate and cycling stability, and improved energy density.

  13. Carbon Nanotube Purification and Functionalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebron, Marisabel; Mintz, Eric; Smalley, Richard E.; Meador, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have the potential to significantly enhance the mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of polymers. However, dispersion of carbon nanotubes in a polymer matrix is hindered by the electrostatic forces that cause them to agglomerate. Chemical modification of the nanotubes is necessary to minimize these electrostatic forces and promote adhesion between the nanotubes and the polymer matrix. In a collaborative research program between Clark Atlanta University, Rice University, and NASA Glenn Research Center several approaches are being explored to chemically modify carbon nanotubes. The results of this research will be presented.

  14. Carbon Nanotube Purification and Functionalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebron, Marisabel; Mintz, Eric; Smalley, Richard E.; Meador, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have the potential to significantly enhance the mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of polymers. However, dispersion of carbon nanotubes in a polymer matrix is hindered by the electrostatic forces that cause them to agglomerate. Chemical modification of the nanotubes is necessary to minimize these electrostatic forces and promote adhesion between the nanotubes and the polymer matrix. In a collaborative research program between Clark Atlanta University, Rice University, and NASA Glenn Research Center several approaches are being explored to chemically modify carbon nanotubes. The results of this research will be presented.

  15. Flexible CMOS-Like Circuits Based on Printed P-Type and N-Type Carbon Nanotube Thin-Film Transistors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiang; Zhao, Jianwen; Dou, Junyan; Tange, Masayoshi; Xu, Weiwei; Mo, Lixin; Xie, Jianjun; Xu, Wenya; Ma, Changqi; Okazaki, Toshiya; Cui, Zheng

    2016-09-01

    P-type and n-type top-gate carbon nanotube thin-film transistors (TFTs) can be selectively and simultaneously fabricated on the same polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate by tuning the types of polymer-sorted semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube (sc-SWCNT) inks, along with low temperature growth of HfO2 thin films as shared dielectric layers. Both the p-type and n-type TFTs show good electrical properties with on/off ratio of ≈10(5) , mobility of ≈15 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) , and small hysteresis. Complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS)-like logic gates and circuits based on as-prepared p-type and n-type TFTs have been achieved. Flexible CMOS-like inverters exhibit large noise margin of 84% at low voltage (1/2 Vdd = 1.5 V) and maximum voltage gain of 30 at Vdd of 1.5 V and low power consumption of 0.1 μW. Both of the noise margin and voltage gain are one of the best values reported for flexible CMOS-like inverters at Vdd less than 2 V. The printed CMOS-like inverters work well at 10 kHz with 2% voltage loss and delay time of ≈15 μs. A 3-stage ring oscillator has also been demonstrated on PET substrates and the oscillation frequency of 3.3 kHz at Vdd of 1 V is achieved.

  16. Apparatus for the laser ablative synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Michael W.; Jordan, Kevin

    2010-02-16

    An RF-induction heated side-pumped synthesis chamber for the production of carbon nanotubes. Such an apparatus, while capable of producing large volumes of carbon nanotubes, concurrently provides a simplified apparatus that allows for greatly reduced heat up and cool down times and flexible flowpaths that can be readily modified for production efficiency optimization.

  17. Production of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Journet, C.; Bernier, P.

    Carbon nanostructures such as single-walled and multi-walled nanotubes (SWNTs and MWNTs) or graphitic polyhedral nanoparticles can be produced using various methods. Most of them are based on the sublimation of carbon under an inert atmosphere, such as the electric arc discharge process, the laser ablation method, or the solar technique. But chemical methods can also be used to synthesize these kinds of carbon materials: the catalytic decomposition of hydrocarbons, the production by electrolysis, the heat treatment of a polymer, the low temperature solid pyrolysis, or the in situ catalysis.

  18. Tuning the threshold voltage of carbon nanotube transistors by n-type molecular doping for robust and flexible complementary circuits

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huiliang; Wei, Peng; Li, Yaoxuan; Han, Jeff; Lee, Hye Ryoung; Naab, Benjamin D.; Liu, Nan; Wang, Chenggong; Adijanto, Eric; Tee, Benjamin C.-K.; Morishita, Satoshi; Li, Qiaochu; Gao, Yongli; Cui, Yi; Bao, Zhenan

    2014-01-01

    Tuning the threshold voltage of a transistor is crucial for realizing robust digital circuits. For silicon transistors, the threshold voltage can be accurately controlled by doping. However, it remains challenging to tune the threshold voltage of single-wall nanotube (SWNT) thin-film transistors. Here, we report a facile method to controllably n-dope SWNTs using 1H-benzoimidazole derivatives processed via either solution coating or vacuum deposition. The threshold voltages of our polythiophene-sorted SWNT thin-film transistors can be tuned accurately and continuously over a wide range. Photoelectron spectroscopy measurements confirmed that the SWNT Fermi level shifted to the conduction band edge with increasing doping concentration. Using this doping approach, we proceeded to fabricate SWNT complementary inverters by inkjet printing of the dopants. We observed an unprecedented noise margin of 28 V at VDD = 80 V (70% of 1/2VDD) and a gain of 85. Additionally, robust SWNT complementary metal−oxide−semiconductor inverter (noise margin 72% of 1/2VDD) and logic gates with rail-to-rail output voltage swing and subnanowatt power consumption were fabricated onto a highly flexible substrate. PMID:24639537

  19. Lightweight, flexible and thin Fe3O4-loaded, functionalized multi walled carbon nanotube buckypapers for enhanced X-band electromagnetic interference shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaskara Rao, B. V.; Chengappa, Mithali; Kale, S. N.

    2017-04-01

    Electromagnetic interference (EMI) is undesirable and uncontrolled interference with the signal of intelligence. This is controlled by using either novel materials, or appropriate electronic design or a combination of both. In this context, functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (FMWCNTs) have been proposed to use as EM shielding materials because of their promising electromagnetic properties, high flexibility, and high electrical conductivity. The non-functionalised MWCNTs does not demonstrate high shielding of electromagnetic waves but with acid functionalisation and further loading with optimized nanoparticles of Fe3O4, enhanced absorption (15.85 dB), enhanced reflection (9.43 dB), resulted in high total specific shielding effectiveness of around 49.56 dB (g cm-3)-1. All samples were light weight, flexible, thin and self-standing in the form of a buckypaper of thickness of 50 µm and density of 0.51 g cm-3. These buckypapers could be promising materials for electromagnetic shielding via both absorption and reflection. A fine amalgamated system of MWCNTs with half metallic Fe3O4, resulting in enhanced conductivity, in an extremely thin and flexible matrix, is considered to be the main contribution to these high shielding effectiveness values.

  20. Carbon nanotubes on a substrate

    DOEpatents

    Gao, Yufei [Kennewick, WA; Liu, Jun [West Richland, WA

    2002-03-26

    The present invention includes carbon nanotubes whose hollow cores are 100% filled with conductive filler. The carbon nanotubes are in uniform arrays on a conductive substrate and are well-aligned and can be densely packed. The uniformity of the carbon nanotube arrays is indicated by the uniform length and diameter of the carbon nanotubes, both which vary from nanotube to nanotube on a given array by no more than about 5%. The alignment of the carbon nanotubes is indicated by the perpendicular growth of the nanotubes from the substrates which is achieved in part by the simultaneous growth of the conductive filler within the hollow core of the nanotube and the densely packed growth of the nanotubes. The present invention provides a densely packed carbon nanotube growth where each nanotube is in contact with at least one nearest-neighbor nanotube. The substrate is a conductive substrate coated with a growth catalyst, and the conductive filler can be single crystals of carbide formed by a solid state reaction between the substrate material and the growth catalyst. The present invention further provides a method for making the filled carbon nanotubes on the conductive substrates. The method includes the steps of depositing a growth catalyst onto the conductive substrate as a prepared substrate, creating a vacuum within a vessel which contains the prepared substrate, flowing H2/inert (e.g. Ar) gas within the vessel to increase and maintain the pressure within the vessel, increasing the temperature of the prepared substrate, and changing the H2/Ar gas to ethylene gas such that the ethylene gas flows within the vessel. Additionally, varying the density and separation of the catalyst particles on the conductive substrate can be used to control the diameter of the nanotubes.

  1. Method of manufacturing carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benavides, Jeanette M. (Inventor); Leidecker, Henning W. (Inventor); Frazier, Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A process for manufacturing carbon nanotubes, including a step of inducing electrical current through a carbon anode and a carbon cathode under conditions effective to produce the carbon nanotubes, wherein the carbon cathode is larger than the carbon anode. Preferably, a welder is used to induce the electrical current via an arc welding process. Preferably, an exhaust hood is placed on the anode, and the process does not require a closed or pressurized chamber. The process provides high-quality, single-walled carbon nanotubes, while eliminating the need for a metal catalyst.

  2. Carbon nanotube IR detectors (SV)

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, F. L.

    2012-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) and Lockheed Martin Corporation (LMC) collaborated to (1) evaluate the potential of carbon nanotubes as channels in infrared (IR) photodetectors; (2) assemble and characterize carbon nanotube electronic devices and measure the photocurrent generated when exposed to infrared light;(3) compare the performance of the carbon nanotube devices with that of traditional devices; and (4) develop and numerically implement models of electronic transport and opto-electronic behavior of carbon nanotube infrared detectors. This work established a new paradigm for photodetectors.

  3. Carbon Nanotubes Toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellucci, Stefano

    We describe current and possible future developments in nanotechnology for biological and medical applications. Nanostructured, composite materials for drug delivery, biosensors, diagnostics and tumor therapy are reviewed as examples, placing special emphasis on silica composites. Carbon nanotubes are discussed as a primary example of emerging nanomaterials for many of the above-mentioned applications. Toxicity effects of this novel nanomaterial are discussed and the need for further study of potential hazards for human health, professionally exposed workers and the environment is motivated.

  4. Carbon Nanotubes Based Quantum Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Jian-Ping

    1999-01-01

    This document represents the final report for the NASA cooperative agreement which studied the application of carbon nanotubes. The accomplishments are reviewed: (1) Wrote a review article on carbon nanotubes and its potentials for applications in nanoscale quantum devices. (2) Extensive studies on the effects of structure deformation on nanotube electronic structure and energy band gaps. (3) Calculated the vibrational spectrum of nanotube rope and the effect of pressure. and (4) Investigate the properties of Li intercalated nanotube ropes and explore their potential for energy storage materials and battery applications. These studies have lead to four publications and seven abstracts in international conferences.

  5. Carbon Nanotubes Based Quantum Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Jian-Ping

    1999-01-01

    This document represents the final report for the NASA cooperative agreement which studied the application of carbon nanotubes. The accomplishments are reviewed: (1) Wrote a review article on carbon nanotubes and its potentials for applications in nanoscale quantum devices. (2) Extensive studies on the effects of structure deformation on nanotube electronic structure and energy band gaps. (3) Calculated the vibrational spectrum of nanotube rope and the effect of pressure. and (4) Investigate the properties of Li intercalated nanotube ropes and explore their potential for energy storage materials and battery applications. These studies have lead to four publications and seven abstracts in international conferences.

  6. Transport in Carbon Nanotube Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoo, K. H.; Chelikowsky, James R.

    2008-03-01

    There is growing interest in the use of carbon nanotube thin films as transparent electrical conductors and thin-film transistors owing to their high optical transmittance, low sheet resistivity, and ease of fabrication. [1,2] A major contribution to the sheet resistivity originates at nanotube junctions, as electrical contact is typically poor between adjacent nanotubes. It is thus important to characterize carbon nanotube junctions in order to understand the conduction properties of nanotube thin films. To this end, we have performed ab initio density functional theory calculations to investigate the structural, electronic and transport properties of carbon nanotube junctions as a function of nanotube chirality and contact geometry [1] Z. Wu et al., Science 305, 1273 (2004) [2] E. S. Snow, J. P. Novak, P. M. Campbell, and D. Park, Appl. Phys. Lett. 82, 2145 (2003).

  7. Bundled and densified carbon nanotubes (CNT) fabrics as flexible ultra-light weight Li-ion battery anode current collectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yehezkel, Shani; Auinat, Mahmud; Sezin, Nina; Starosvetsky, David; Ein-Eli, Yair

    2016-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) fabrics were studied and evaluated as anode current collectors, replacing the traditional copper foil current collector in Li-ion batteries. Glavanostatic measurements reveal high values of irreversible capacities (as high as 28%), resulted mainly from the formation of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer at the CNT fabric surface. Various pre-treatments to the CNT fabric prior to active anode material loading have shown that the lowest irreversible capacity is achieved by immersing and washing the CNT fabric with iso-propanol (IPA), which dramatically modified the fabric surface. Additionally, the use of very thin CNT fabrics (5 μm) results in a substantial irreversible capacity minimization. A combination of IPA rinse action and utilization of the thinnest CNT fabric provides the lowest irreversible capacity of 13%. The paper describes innovative and rather simple techniques towards a complete implementation of CNT fabric as an anode current collector in Li-ion batteries, instead of the relatively heavy and expensive copper foil, enabling an improvement in the gravimetric and volumetric energy densities of such advanced batteries.

  8. Laser ablative synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Michael W.; Jordan, Kevin; Park, Cheol

    2010-03-02

    An improved method for the production of single walled carbon nanotubes that utilizes an RF-induction heated side-pumped synthesis chamber for the production of such. Such a method, while capable of producing large volumes of carbon nanotubes, concurrently permits the use of a simplified apparatus that allows for greatly reduced heat up and cool down times and flexible flowpaths that can be readily modified for production efficiency optimization. The method of the present invention utilizes a free electron laser operating at high average and peak fluence to illuminate a rotating and translating graphite/catalyst target to obtain high yields of SWNTs without the use of a vacuum chamber.

  9. Optoelectronics with Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Megumi

    2011-12-01

    The carbon nanotube is a promising material for future micro- and nano-scale electronics because of its unique electronic properties, high carrier mobility and extraordinary capacity for high current density. In particular, semiconducting carbon nanotubes are direct bandgap materials with a typical energy gap in the order of 1 eV, which means they emit light in the near-infrared range, making them an attractive option in telecommunications applications. However, there have been few systematic investigations of electrically-induced light emission (i.e. electroluminescence) from carbon nanotubes, and their emission properties are not well understood. In this dissertation, we explore the characteristics of electroluminescence in three different types of carbon-nanotube devices. The first is a single-tube field-effect transistor (CNTFET), whose emission has previously been found to have a very broad spectral shape and low emission efficiency. We analyze the spectral shape in detail, which reveals that a high electric field near metal contacts contributes most to the bias-dependent component of broadening, in addition to smaller contributions from tube nonuniformity, inelastic scattering of phonons, high temperature, etc. In the second part of the study, single-tube light-emitting diodes are constructed by employing a split top-gate scheme. The split gate creates p- and n-doped regions electrostatically, so that electrons and holes combine between the two sections and can decay radiatively. This configuration creates electron-hole pairs under much lower electric fields and gives us a greater control over carrier distribution in the device channel, resulting in much narrower spectral linewidths and an emission intensity several orders of magnitude larger than that of CNTFETs. The much better signal-to-noise also leads to the observation of emission from defect-induced states. Finally, we extend the idea of the single-tube p-n diode and fabricate CNT film diodes from many

  10. Flexible White Organic Light-Emitting Diodes Based on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube:Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/Poly(styrene sulfonate) Transparent Conducting Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Beibei; Li, Fushan; Lin, Zhixiao; Wu, Chaoxing; Guo, Tailiang; Liu, Wenbin; Su, Yang; Du, Jinhong

    2012-07-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotube:poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/poly(styrene sulfonate) hybrid film (SWCNT:PEDOT/PSS) hybrid conducting film was obtained by using spray-coating technique, based on which a white flexible organic light emitting diode (FOLED) was fabricated with the structure of SWCNT:PEDOT/PSS/N,N-diphenyl-N,N-bis(1-napthyl)-1,1-biphenyl-4,4-diamine/5,6,11,12-tetraphenylnaphthacene:4,4'-bis(2,2'-diphenylvinyl)-1,1'-biphenyl/4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline/LiF/Al. The hybrid film exhibited superior surface morphology, electrical conductivity to the pure SWCNT network. The as-fabricated FOLED showed a stable white emission that is close to the equi-energy white point upon bending, and the light-emitting efficiency of the device was significantly improved by using the hybrid film as anode. The hybrid film holds promise for application in flexible lighting and display.

  11. Thin and flexible all-solid supercapacitor prepared from novel single wall carbon nanotubes/polyaniline thin films obtained in liquid-liquid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, Victor Hugo Rodrigues; Oliveira, Marcela Mohallem; Zarbin, Aldo José Gorgatti

    2014-08-01

    The present work describes for the first time the synthesis and characterization of single wall carbon nanotubes/polyaniline (SWNTs/PAni) nanocomposite thin films in a liquid-liquid interface, as well as the subsequent construction of a flexible all-solid supercapacitor. Different SWNTs/PAni nanocomposites were prepared by varying the ratio of SWNT to aniline, and the samples were characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, Raman and UV-Vis spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The pseudo-capacitive behavior of the nanocomposites was evaluated by charge/discharge galvanostatic measurements. The presence of the SWNTs affected the electronic and vibrational properties of the polyaniline and also improved the pseudo-capacitive behavior of the conducting polymer. A very thin and flexible all-solid device was manufactured using two electrodes (polyethylene terephthalate-PET covered with the SWNT/PAni nanocomposite separated by a H2SO4-PVA gel electrolyte). The pseudo-capacitive behavior was characterized by a volumetric specific capacitance of approximately 76.7 F cm-3, even under mechanical deformation, indicating that this nanocomposite has considerable potential for application in new-generation energy storage devices.

  12. High performance of carbon nanotubes/silver nanowires-PET hybrid flexible transparent conductive films via facile pressing-transfer technique.

    PubMed

    Jing, Mao-Xiang; Han, Chong; Li, Min; Shen, Xiang-Qian

    2014-01-01

    To obtain low sheet resistance, high optical transmittance, small open spaces in conductive networks, and enhanced adhesion of flexible transparent conductive films, a carbon nanotube (CNT)/silver nanowire (AgNW)-PET hybrid film was fabricated by mechanical pressing-transfer process at room temperature. The morphology and structure were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM), the optical transmittance and sheet resistance were tested by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis) spectrophotometer and four-point probe technique, and the adhesion was also measured by 3M sticky tape. The results indicate that in this hybrid nanostructure, AgNWs form the main conductive networks and CNTs as assistant conductive networks are filled in the open spaces of AgNWs networks. The sheet resistance of the hybrid films can reach approximately 20.9 to 53.9 Ω/□ with the optical transmittance of approximately 84% to 91%. The second mechanical pressing step can greatly reduce the surface roughness of the hybrid film and enhance the adhesion force between CNTs, AgNWs, and PET substrate. This process is hopeful for large-scale production of high-end flexible transparent conductive films.

  13. Free-standing reduced graphene oxide/MnO2-reduced graphene oxide-carbon nanotube nanocomposite flexible membrane as an anode for improving lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Ye, Daixin; Shi, Bin; Liu, Wen; Guo, Rui; Pei, Haijuan; Xie, Jingying

    2017-03-15

    To solve the barriers of poor rate capability and inferior cycling stability for the MnO2 anode in lithium ion batteries, we present a highly flexible membrane anode employing two-dimensional (2D) reduced graphene oxide sheets (rGO) and a three-dimensional (3D) MnO2-reduced graphene oxide-carbon nanotube nanocomposite (MGC) by a vacuum filtration and thermal annealing approach. All the components in the 2D/3D thin film anode have a synergistic effect on the improved performance. The initial discharge specific capacity of the electrode with the MnO2 content of 56 wt% was 1656.8 mA h g(-1) and remains 1172.5 mA h g(-1) after 100 cycles at a density of 100 mA g(-1). On enhancing the density to 200 mA g(-1), the membrane-electrode still exhibits a large reversible discharging capacity of ∼948.9 mA h g(-1) after 300 cycles. Moreover, the flexible Li-ion battery with a large area also shows excellent electrochemical performance in different bending positions, which provides the potential for wearable energy storage devices.

  14. Effect of Methanol Addition on the Resistivity and Morphology of PEDOT:PSS Layers on Top of Carbon Nanotubes for Use as Flexible Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weijia; Ruderer, Matthias A; Metwalli, Ezzeldin; Guo, Shuai; Herzig, Eva M; Perlich, Jan; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter

    2015-04-29

    Overcoating carbon nanotube (CNT) films on flexible poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) foils with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) ( PSS) layers reduces the surface roughness, which is interesting for use in organic electronics. Adding methanol to the PSS aqueous solution used for spin coating of the PSS layer improves the wetting behavior of the CNT/PET surface. Samples with different volume fractions of methanol (0, 33, 50, 67, and 75 vol %) are compared with respect to the transmission, horizontal, and vertical resistivity. With grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering, the film morphologies are probed, which is challenging because of the substrate flexibility. At 50 vol %, methanol optimum conditions are achieved with the resistivity close to that of the bare CNT/PET substrates because of the best contact between the PSS film and CNT surface. At lower methanol ratios, the PSS films cannot adapt the CNT morphology, and at higher methanol ratios, they rupture into domains and no continuous PSS layers are formed.

  15. Carbon nanotube Archimedes screws.

    PubMed

    Oroszlány, László; Zólyomi, Viktor; Lambert, Colin J

    2010-12-28

    Recently, nanomechanical devices composed of a long stationary inner carbon nanotube and a shorter, slowly rotating outer tube have been fabricated. In this paper, we study the possibility of using such devices as nanoscale transducers of motion into electricity. When the outer tube is chiral, we show that such devices act like quantum Archimedes screws, which utilize mechanical energy to pump electrons between reservoirs. We calculate the pumped charge from one end of the inner tube to the other, driven by the rotation of a chiral outer nanotube. We show that the pumped charge can be greater than one electron per 360° rotation, and consequently, such a device operating with a rotational frequency of 10 MHz, for example, would deliver a current of ≈1 pAmp.

  16. Carbon nanotubes: opportunities and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Hongjie

    2002-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes are graphene sheets rolled-up into cylinders with diameters as small as one nanometer. Extensive work carried out worldwide in recent years has revealed the intriguing electrical and mechanical properties of these novel molecular scale wires. It is now well established that carbon nanotubes are ideal model systems for studying the physics in one-dimensional solids and have significant potential as building blocks for various practical nanoscale devices. Nanotubes have been shown to be useful for miniaturized electronic, mechanical, electromechanical, chemical and scanning probe devices and materials for macroscopic composites. Progress in nanotube growth has facilitated the fundamental study and applications of nanotubes. Gaining control over challenging nanotube growth issues is critical to the future advancement of nanotube science and technology, and is being actively pursued by researchers.

  17. Half-metallic carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyu Won; Lee, Cheol Eui

    2012-04-17

    Half-metallicity in carbon nanotubes is achieved and controlled by hydrogen adsorption patterns. The edge states in carbon nanotubes are unstable under an electric field due to the spin-conserving electron transfer between the edges, but a large enough transfer barrier between the edge states, obtained by controlling the adsorption patterns, renders the CNTs half-metallic.

  18. Carbon nanotubes as liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shanju; Kumar, Satish

    2008-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes are the best of known materials with a combination of excellent mechanical, electronic, and thermal properties. To fully exploit individual nanotube properties for various applications, the grand challenge is to fabricate macroscopic ordered nanotube assemblies. Liquid-crystalline behavior of the nanotubes provides a unique opportunity toward reaching this challenge. In this Review, the recent developments in this area are critically reviewed by discussing the strategies for fabricating liquid-crystalline phases, addressing the solution properties of liquid-crystalline suspensions, and exploiting the practical techniques of liquid-crystal routes to prepare macroscopic nanotube fibers and films.

  19. Carbon nanotube sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Liming

    2002-07-01

    Measurement represents one of the oldest methods used by human beings to better understand and control the world. Many measurement systems are primarily physical sensors, which measure time, temperature, weight, distance, and various other physical parameters. The need for cheaper, faster, and more accurate meansurements has been a driving force for the development of new systems and technologies for measurements of materials, both chemical and biological. In fact, chemical and biological sensors (or biosensors) are the evolved products of physical measurement technologies. Chemical sensors are measurement devices that convert a chemical or physical change of a specific analyte into a measurable signal, whose magnitude is normally proportional to the concentration of the analyte. On the other hand, biosensors are a subset of chemical sensors that employ a biological sensing element connected to a transducer to recognize the physiochemical change and to produce the measurable signal from particular analytes, which are not necessary to be biological materials themselves, although sometimes they are. Depending on the basis of the transduction principle, chemical and biological sensors can be classified into three major classes with different transducers: sensors with electrical transducers, sensors with optical transducers, and sensors with other transducers (e.g. mass change). The unique properties of carbon nanotubes have led to their use in areas as diverse as sensors, actuators, field-emitting flat panel displays, energy and gas storages (Dai and Mau, 2001). As we shall see below, the principles for carbon nanotube sensors to detect the nature of gases and to determine their concentrations are based on change in electrical properties induced by charge transfer with the gas molecules (e.g. O2, H2, CO2) or in mass due to physical adsorption. This article provides a status report on the research and development of carbon nanotube sensors.

  20. Studies of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caneba, Gerard T.

    2005-01-01

    The fellowship experience for this summer for 2004 pertains to carbon nanotube coatings for various space-related applications. They involve the following projects: (a) EMI protection films from HiPco-polymers, and (b) Thermal protection nanosilica materials. EMI protection films are targeted to be eventually applied onto casings of laptop computers. These coatings are composites of electrically-conductive SWNTs and compatible polymers. The substrate polymer will be polycarbonate, since computer housings are typically made of carbon composites of this type of polymer. A new experimental copolymer was used last year to generate electrically-conductive and thermal films with HiPco at 50/50 wt/wt composition. This will be one of the possible formulations. Reference films will be base polycarbonate and neat HiPco onto polycarbonate films. Other coating materials that will be tried will be based on HiPco composites with commercial enamels (polyurethane, acrylic, polyester), which could be compatible with the polycarbonate substrate. Nanosilica fibers are planned for possible use as thermal protection tiles on the shuttle orbiter. Right now, microscale silica is used. Going to the nanoscale will increase the surface-volume-per-unit-area of radiative heat dissipation. Nanoscale carbon fibers/nanotubes can be used as templates for the generation of nanosilica. A sol-gel operation is employed for this purpose.

  1. Teslaphoresis of Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Bornhoeft, Lindsey R; Castillo, Aida C; Smalley, Preston R; Kittrell, Carter; James, Dustin K; Brinson, Bruce E; Rybolt, Thomas R; Johnson, Bruce R; Cherukuri, Tonya K; Cherukuri, Paul

    2016-04-26

    This paper introduces Teslaphoresis, the directed motion and self-assembly of matter by a Tesla coil, and studies this electrokinetic phenomenon using single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Conventional directed self-assembly of matter using electric fields has been restricted to small scale structures, but with Teslaphoresis, we exceed this limitation by using the Tesla coil's antenna to create a gradient high-voltage force field that projects into free space. CNTs placed within the Teslaphoretic (TEP) field polarize and self-assemble into wires that span from the nanoscale to the macroscale, the longest thus far being 15 cm. We show that the TEP field not only directs the self-assembly of long nanotube wires at remote distances (>30 cm) but can also wirelessly power nanotube-based LED circuits. Furthermore, individualized CNTs self-organize to form long parallel arrays with high fidelity alignment to the TEP field. Thus, Teslaphoresis is effective for directed self-assembly from the bottom-up to the macroscale.

  2. Functionalization of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N. (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Method and system for functionalizing a collection of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A selected precursor gas (e.g., H.sub.2 or F.sub.2 or C.sub.nH.sub.m) is irradiated to provide a cold plasma of selected target particles, such as atomic H or F, in a first chamber. The target particles are directed toward an array of CNTs located in a second chamber while suppressing transport of ultraviolet radiation to the second chamber. A CNT array is functionalized with the target particles, at or below room temperature, to a point of saturation, in an exposure time interval no longer than about 30 sec.

  3. Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N. (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Method and system for functionalizing a collection of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A selected precursor gas (e.g., H2, or F2, or CnHm) is irradiated to provide a cold plasma of selected target particles, such as atomic H or F, in a first chamber. The target particles are directed toward an array of CNTs located in a second chamber while suppressing transport of ultraviolet radiation to the second chamber. A CNT array is functionalized with the target particles, at or below room temperature, to a point of saturation, in an exposure time interval no longer than about 30 sec.

  4. Carbon Nanotube Interconnect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jun (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Method and system for fabricating an electrical interconnect capable of supporting very high current densities ( 10(exp 6)-10(exp 10) Amps/sq cm), using an array of one or more carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The CNT array is grown in a selected spaced apart pattern, preferably with multi-wall CNTs, and a selected insulating material, such as SiOw, or SiuNv is deposited using CVD to encapsulate each CNT in the array. An exposed surface of the insulating material is planarized to provide one or more exposed electrical contacts for one or more CNTs.

  5. Carbon Nanotubes for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyyappan, Meyya

    2000-01-01

    The potential of nanotube technology for NASA missions is significant and is properly recognized by NASA management. Ames has done much pioneering research in the last five years on carbon nanotube growth, characterization, atomic force microscopy, sensor development and computational nanotechnology. NASA Johnson Space Center has focused on laser ablation production of nanotubes and composites development. These in-house efforts, along with strategic collaboration with academia and industry, are geared towards meeting the agency's mission requirements. This viewgraph presentation (including an explanation for each slide) outlines the research focus for Ames nanotechnology, including details on carbon nanotubes' properties, applications, and synthesis.

  6. Continuous carbon nanotube reinforced composites.

    PubMed

    Ci, L; Suhr, J; Pushparaj, V; Zhang, X; Ajayan, P M

    2008-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes are considered short fibers, and polymer composites with nanotube fillers are always analogues of random, short fiber composites. The real structural carbon fiber composites, on the other hand, always contain carbon fiber reinforcements where fibers run continuously through the composite matrix. With the recent optimization in aligned nanotube growth, samples of nanotubes in macroscopic lengths have become available, and this allows the creation of composites that are similar to the continuous fiber composites with individual nanotubes running continuously through the composite body. This allows the proper utilization of the extreme high modulus and strength predicted for nanotubes in structural composites. Here, we fabricate such continuous nanotube polymer composites with continuous nanotube reinforcements and report that under compressive loadings, the nanotube composites can generate more than an order of magnitude improvement in the longitudinal modulus (up to 3,300%) as well as damping capability (up to 2,100%). It is also observed that composites with a random distribution of nanotubes of same length and similar filler fraction provide three times less effective reinforcement in composites.

  7. Advanced carbon nanotubes functionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setaro, A.

    2017-10-01

    Similar to graphene, carbon nanotubes are materials made of pure carbon in its sp2 form. Their extended conjugated π-network provides them with remarkable quantum optoelectronic properties. Frustratingly, it also brings drawbacks. The π–π stacking interaction makes as-produced tubes bundle together, blurring all their quantum properties. Functionalization aims at modifying and protecting the tubes while hindering π–π stacking. Several functionalization strategies have been developed to circumvent this limitation in order for nanotubes applications to thrive. In this review, we summarize the different approaches established so far, emphasizing the balance between functionalization efficacy and the preservation of the tubes’ properties. Much attention will be given to a functionalization strategy overcoming the covalent–noncovalent dichotomy and to the implementation of two advanced functionalization schemes: (a) conjugation with molecular switches, to yield hybrid nanosystems with chemo-physical properties that can be tuned in a controlled and reversible way, and; (b) plasmonic nanosystems, whose ability to concentrate and enhance the electromagnetic fields can be taken advantage of to enhance the optical response of the tubes.

  8. Carbon nanotube biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Tîlmaciu, Carmen-Mihaela; Morris, May C.

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical, and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites, or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we describe their structural and physical properties, functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility, and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers. PMID:26579509

  9. Carbon Nanotube Biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilmaciu, Carmen-Mihaela; Morris, May

    2015-10-01

    Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we will describe their structural and physical properties, discuss functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers.

  10. Carbon nanotubes on a spider silk scaffold.

    PubMed

    Steven, Eden; Saleh, Wasan R; Lebedev, Victor; Acquah, Steve F A; Laukhin, Vladimir; Alamo, Rufina G; Brooks, James S

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the compatibility between spider silk and conducting materials is essential to advance the use of spider silk in electronic applications. Spider silk is tough, but becomes soft when exposed to water. Here we report a strong affinity of amine-functionalised multi-walled carbon nanotubes for spider silk, with coating assisted by a water and mechanical shear method. The nanotubes adhere uniformly and bond to the silk fibre surface to produce tough, custom-shaped, flexible and electrically conducting fibres after drying and contraction. The conductivity of coated silk fibres is reversibly sensitive to strain and humidity, leading to proof-of-concept sensor and actuator demonstrations.

  11. Carbon nanotubes on a spider silk scaffold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steven, Eden; Saleh, Wasan R.; Lebedev, Victor; Acquah, Steve F. A.; Laukhin, Vladimir; Alamo, Rufina G.; Brooks, James S.

    2013-09-01

    Understanding the compatibility between spider silk and conducting materials is essential to advance the use of spider silk in electronic applications. Spider silk is tough, but becomes soft when exposed to water. Here we report a strong affinity of amine-functionalised multi-walled carbon nanotubes for spider silk, with coating assisted by a water and mechanical shear method. The nanotubes adhere uniformly and bond to the silk fibre surface to produce tough, custom-shaped, flexible and electrically conducting fibres after drying and contraction. The conductivity of coated silk fibres is reversibly sensitive to strain and humidity, leading to proof-of-concept sensor and actuator demonstrations.

  12. Carbon nanotubes on a spider silk scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Steven, Eden; Saleh, Wasan R.; Lebedev, Victor; Acquah, Steve F. A.; Laukhin, Vladimir; Alamo, Rufina G.; Brooks, James S.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the compatibility between spider silk and conducting materials is essential to advance the use of spider silk in electronic applications. Spider silk is tough, but becomes soft when exposed to water. Here we report a strong affinity of amine-functionalised multi-walled carbon nanotubes for spider silk, with coating assisted by a water and mechanical shear method. The nanotubes adhere uniformly and bond to the silk fibre surface to produce tough, custom-shaped, flexible and electrically conducting fibres after drying and contraction. The conductivity of coated silk fibres is reversibly sensitive to strain and humidity, leading to proof-of-concept sensor and actuator demonstrations. PMID:24022336

  13. Atomic transportation via carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quan

    2009-01-01

    The transportation of helium atoms in a single-walled carbon nanotube is reported via molecular dynamics simulations. The efficiency of the atomic transportation is found to be dependent on the type of the applied loading and the loading rate as well as the temperature in the process. Simulations show the transportation is a result of the van der Waals force between the nanotube and the helium atoms through a kink propagation initiated in the nanotube.

  14. Method for synthesizing carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Fan, Hongyou

    2012-09-04

    A method for preparing a precursor solution for synthesis of carbon nanomaterials, where a polar solvent is added to at least one block copolymer and at least one carbohydrate compound, and the precursor solution is processed using a self-assembly process and subsequent heating to form nanoporous carbon films, porous carbon nanotubes, and porous carbon nanoparticles.

  15. Carbon nanotubes in hyperthermia therapy

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ravi; Torti, Suzy V.

    2013-01-01

    Thermal tumor ablation therapies are being developed with a variety of nanomaterials, including single-and multiwalled carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted interest due to their potential for simultaneous imaging and therapy. In this review, we highlight in vivo applications of carbon nanotube-mediated thermal therapy (CNMTT) and examine the rationale for use of this treatment in recurrent tumors or those resistant to conventional cancer therapies. Additionally, we discuss strategies to localize and enhance the cancer selectivity of this treatment and briefly examine issues relating the toxicity and long term fate of CNTs. PMID:23933617

  16. Carbon nanotubes in hyperthermia therapy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ravi; Torti, Suzy V

    2013-12-01

    Thermal tumor ablation therapies are being developed with a variety of nanomaterials, including single- and multiwalled carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted interest due to their potential for simultaneous imaging and therapy. In this review, we highlight in vivo applications of carbon nanotube-mediated thermal therapy (CNMTT) and examine the rationale for use of this treatment in recurrent tumors or those resistant to conventional cancer therapies. Additionally, we discuss strategies to localize and enhance the cancer selectivity of this treatment and briefly examine issues relating the toxicity and long term fate of CNTs.

  17. Carbon nanotubes as vaccine scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Scheinberg, David A.; McDevitt, Michael R.; Dao, Tao; Mulvey, Justin J.; Feinberg, Evan; Alidori, Simone

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes display characteristics that are potentially useful in their development as scaffolds for vaccine compositions. These features include stability in vivo, lack of intrinsic immunogenicity, low toxicity, and the ability to be appended with multiple copies of antigens. In addition, the particulate nature of carbon nanotubes and their unusual properties of rapid entry into antigen-presenting cells, such as dendritic cells, make them especially useful as carriers of antigens. Early attempts demonstrating carbon nanotube-based vaccines can be used in both infectious disease settings and cancer are promising. PMID:23899863

  18. Method for producing carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Jonathan; Perry, William L.; Chen, Chun-Ku

    2006-02-14

    Method for producing carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes were prepared using a low power, atmospheric pressure, microwave-generated plasma torch system. After generating carbon monoxide microwave plasma, a flow of carbon monoxide was directed first through a bed of metal particles/glass beads and then along the outer surface of a ceramic tube located in the plasma. As a flow of argon was introduced into the plasma through the ceramic tube, ropes of entangled carbon nanotubes, attached to the surface of the tube, were produced. Of these, longer ropes formed on the surface portion of the tube located in the center of the plasma. Transmission electron micrographs of individual nanotubes revealed that many were single-walled.

  19. Carbon nanotubes: engineering biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Gualdrón, Diego A; Burgos, Juan C; Yu, Jiamei; Balbuena, Perla B

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are cylinder-shaped allotropic forms of carbon, most widely produced under chemical vapor deposition. They possess astounding chemical, electronic, mechanical, and optical properties. Being among the most promising materials in nanotechnology, they are also likely to revolutionize medicine. Among other biomedical applications, after proper functionalization carbon nanotubes can be transformed into sophisticated biosensing and biocompatible drug-delivery systems, for specific targeting and elimination of tumor cells. This chapter provides an introduction to the chemical and electronic structure and properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes, followed by a description of the main synthesis and post-synthesis methods. These sections allow the reader to become familiar with the specific characteristics of these materials and the manner in which these properties may be dependent on the specific synthesis and post-synthesis processes. The chapter ends with a review of the current biomedical applications of carbon nanotubes, highlighting successes and challenges.

  20. Enhanced rate performance of flexible and stretchable linear supercapacitors based on polyaniline@Au@carbon nanotube with ultrafast axial electron transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiang; Ding, Jianning; Zhou, Xiaoshuang; Zhang, Yang; Zhu, Wenjun; Liu, Zunfen; Ge, Shanhai; Yuan, Ningyi; Fang, Shaoli; Baughman, Ray H.

    2017-02-01

    Linear supercapacitors suffer a severe loss of capacity at high rates due to the trade-off of radial ion diffusion and axial electron transport. Optimizing axial conductivity of electrodes is a key to circumvent this trade-off. We report here the synthesis of Au nanograin decorated aligned multiwall carbon nanotube (CNT) sheets, followed by the incorporation of polyaniline (PANI). The embedded Au nanograins results in fast radial ion diffusion and enhance axial electron transport in the linear electrodes. The flexible linear solid supercapacitor fabricated by twisting two PANI@Au@CNT yarns exhibits an outstanding electrochemical performance with a total volumetric capacitance of ∼6 F cm-3 at scan rate up to 10 V s-1. Diameter of the electrode has little effect on volumetric capacitance even at high scan rates because of its high electrical conductivity. Highly stretchable supercapacitors with high rate performance and excellent cycling and stretching stability have been also fabricated using buckled linear electrodes made by wrapping PANI@Au@CNT sheet on elastic rubber fibers. The stretchable linear supercapacitor possesses a stable total volumetric capacitance of up to ∼0.2 F cm-3 at scan rate of 1 V s-1 and at 400% strain, and remarkable capacitance retention of about 95% over 1000 stretch/release cycles.

  1. Scalability of carbon-nanotube-based thin film transistors for flexible electronic devices manufactured using an all roll-to-roll gravure printing system

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Hyunmo; Lee, Wookyu; Choi, Younchang; Sun, Junfeng; Bak, Jina; Noh, Jinsoo; Subramanian, Vivek; Azuma, Yasuo; Majima, Yutaka; Cho, Gyoujin

    2015-01-01

    To demonstrate that roll-to-roll (R2R) gravure printing is a suitable advanced manufacturing method for flexible thin film transistor (TFT)-based electronic circuits, three different nanomaterial-based inks (silver nanoparticles, BaTiO3 nanoparticles and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs)) were selected and optimized to enable the realization of fully printed SWNT-based TFTs (SWNT-TFTs) on 150-m-long rolls of 0.25-m-wide poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET). SWNT-TFTs with 5 different channel lengths, namely, 30, 80, 130, 180, and 230 μm, were fabricated using a printing speed of 8 m/min. These SWNT-TFTs were characterized, and the obtained electrical parameters were related to major mechanical factors such as web tension, registration accuracy, impression roll pressure and printing speed to determine whether these mechanical factors were the sources of the observed device-to-device variations. By utilizing the electrical parameters from the SWNT-TFTs, a Monte Carlo simulation for a 1-bit adder circuit, as a reference, was conducted to demonstrate that functional circuits with reasonable complexity can indeed be manufactured using R2R gravure printing. The simulation results suggest that circuits with complexity, similar to the full adder circuit, can be printed with a 76% circuit yield if threshold voltage (Vth) variations of less than 30% can be maintained. PMID:26411839

  2. Scalability of carbon-nanotube-based thin film transistors for flexible electronic devices manufactured using an all roll-to-roll gravure printing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Hyunmo; Lee, Wookyu; Choi, Younchang; Sun, Junfeng; Bak, Jina; Noh, Jinsoo; Subramanian, Vivek; Azuma, Yasuo; Majima, Yutaka; Cho, Gyoujin

    2015-09-01

    To demonstrate that roll-to-roll (R2R) gravure printing is a suitable advanced manufacturing method for flexible thin film transistor (TFT)-based electronic circuits, three different nanomaterial-based inks (silver nanoparticles, BaTiO3 nanoparticles and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs)) were selected and optimized to enable the realization of fully printed SWNT-based TFTs (SWNT-TFTs) on 150-m-long rolls of 0.25-m-wide poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET). SWNT-TFTs with 5 different channel lengths, namely, 30, 80, 130, 180, and 230 μm, were fabricated using a printing speed of 8 m/min. These SWNT-TFTs were characterized, and the obtained electrical parameters were related to major mechanical factors such as web tension, registration accuracy, impression roll pressure and printing speed to determine whether these mechanical factors were the sources of the observed device-to-device variations. By utilizing the electrical parameters from the SWNT-TFTs, a Monte Carlo simulation for a 1-bit adder circuit, as a reference, was conducted to demonstrate that functional circuits with reasonable complexity can indeed be manufactured using R2R gravure printing. The simulation results suggest that circuits with complexity, similar to the full adder circuit, can be printed with a 76% circuit yield if threshold voltage (Vth) variations of less than 30% can be maintained.

  3. Cross-linking multiwall carbon nanotubes using PFPA to build robust, flexible and highly aligned large-scale sheets and yarns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Yoku; Nakamura, Kazumichi; Miyasaka, Yuta; Nakano, Takayuki; Kletetschka, Gunther

    2016-03-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotube (CNT) structures, including unidirectionally aligned sheets and spun yarns, were fabricated by direct dry-spinning methods from spinnable CNT arrays. We improved the mechanical properties of the CNT structures. CNTs were tailored in sheets and yarns using perfluorophenyl azide (PFPA) as a binding agent. The azide group of PFPA bonds to graphene crystal surfaces under UV radiation exposed for 1 h. For the CNT sheet, Young’s modulus increased from 1.6 to 32.9 GPa and tensile strength increased from 35.9 MPa to 144.5 MPa. For the CNT yarns Young’s modulus increased from 29.5 to 78.0 GPa and tensile strength increased from 639.1 to 675.6 MPa. With this treatment, the CNT sheets became more robust and more flexible materials. Since cross-linking of CNTs by PFPA is a simple and rapid process, it is suitable for fabrication of enhanced CNT materials.

  4. Binder-free flexible LiMn2O4/carbon nanotube network as high power cathode for rechargeable hybrid aqueous battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiao; Wu, Xianwen; Doan, The Nam Long; Tian, Ye; Zhao, Hongbin; Chen, P.

    2016-09-01

    Highly flexible LiMn2O4/carbon nanotube (CNT) electrodes are developed and used as a high power cathode for the Rechargeable Hybrid Aqueous Battery (ReHAB). LiMn2O4 particles are entangled into CNT networks, forming a self-supported free-standing hybrid films. Such hybrid films can be used as electrodes of ARLB without using any additional binders. The binder-free LiMn2O4/CNT electrode exhibits good mechanical properties, high conductivity, and effective charge transport. High-rate capability and high cycling stability are obtained. Typically, the LiMn2O4/CNT electrode achieves a discharge capacity of 72 mAh g-1 at the large-current of 20 C (1 C = 120 mAh g-1), and exhibits good cycling performance and high reversibility: Coulombic efficiency of almost 100% over 300 charge-discharge cycles at 4 C. By reducing the weight, and improving the large-current rate capability simultaneously, the LiMn2O4/CNT electrode can highly enhance the energy/power density of ARLB and hold potential to be used in ultrathin, lightweight electronic devices.

  5. Eraser-based eco-friendly fabrication of a skin-like large-area matrix of flexible carbon nanotube strain and pressure sensors.

    PubMed

    Sahatiya, Parikshit; Badhulika, Sushmee

    2017-03-03

    This paper reports a new type of electronic, recoverable skin-like pressure and strain sensor, produced on a flexible, biodegradable pencil-eraser substrate and fabricated using a solvent-free, low-cost and energy efficient process. Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) film, the strain sensing element, was patterned on pencil eraser with a rolling pin and a pre-compaction mechanical press. This induces high interfacial bonding between the MWCNTs and the eraser substrate, which enables the sensor to achieve recoverability under ambient conditions. The eraser serves as a substrate for strain sensing, as well as acting as a dielectric for capacitive pressure sensing, thereby eliminating the dielectric deposition step, which is crucial in capacitive-based pressure sensors. The strain sensing transduction mechanism is attributed to the tunneling effect, caused by the elastic behavior of the MWCNTs and the strong mechanical interlock between MWCNTs and the eraser substrate, which restricts slippage of MWCNTs on the eraser thereby minimizing hysteresis. The gauge factor of the strain sensor was calculated to be 2.4, which is comparable to and even better than most of the strain and pressure sensors fabricated with more complex designs and architectures. The sensitivity of the capacitive pressure sensor was found to be 0.135 MPa(-1).To demonstrate the applicability of the sensor as artificial electronic skin, the sensor was assembled on various parts of the human body and corresponding movements and touch sensation were monitored. The entire fabrication process is scalable and can be integrated into large areas to map spatial pressure distributions. This low-cost, easily scalable MWCNT pin-rolled eraser-based pressure and strain sensor has huge potential in applications such as artificial e-skin in flexible electronics and medical diagnostics, in particular in surgery as it provides high spatial resolution without a complex nanostructure architecture.

  6. Eraser-based eco-friendly fabrication of a skin-like large-area matrix of flexible carbon nanotube strain and pressure sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahatiya, Parikshit; Badhulika, Sushmee

    2017-03-01

    This paper reports a new type of electronic, recoverable skin-like pressure and strain sensor, produced on a flexible, biodegradable pencil-eraser substrate and fabricated using a solvent-free, low-cost and energy efficient process. Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) film, the strain sensing element, was patterned on pencil eraser with a rolling pin and a pre-compaction mechanical press. This induces high interfacial bonding between the MWCNTs and the eraser substrate, which enables the sensor to achieve recoverability under ambient conditions. The eraser serves as a substrate for strain sensing, as well as acting as a dielectric for capacitive pressure sensing, thereby eliminating the dielectric deposition step, which is crucial in capacitive-based pressure sensors. The strain sensing transduction mechanism is attributed to the tunneling effect, caused by the elastic behavior of the MWCNTs and the strong mechanical interlock between MWCNTs and the eraser substrate, which restricts slippage of MWCNTs on the eraser thereby minimizing hysteresis. The gauge factor of the strain sensor was calculated to be 2.4, which is comparable to and even better than most of the strain and pressure sensors fabricated with more complex designs and architectures. The sensitivity of the capacitive pressure sensor was found to be 0.135 MPa-1.To demonstrate the applicability of the sensor as artificial electronic skin, the sensor was assembled on various parts of the human body and corresponding movements and touch sensation were monitored. The entire fabrication process is scalable and can be integrated into large areas to map spatial pressure distributions. This low-cost, easily scalable MWCNT pin-rolled eraser-based pressure and strain sensor has huge potential in applications such as artificial e-skin in flexible electronics and medical diagnostics, in particular in surgery as it provides high spatial resolution without a complex nanostructure architecture.

  7. Oscillating carbon nanotori along carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilder, Tamsyn A.; Hill, James M.

    2007-03-01

    The discovery of carbon nanostructures, such as nanotubes and C60 fullerenes, has given rise to a number of potential nanoscale devices. One such device is the gigahertz oscillator, comprising an inner shell sliding inside an outer shell of a multiwalled carbon nanotube, and which, at least theoretically, generates oscillatory frequencies in the gigahertz range. Following the concept of these gigahertz oscillators and the recent discovery of “fullerene crop circles,” here we propose the notion of a nanotorus-nanotube oscillator comprising a carbon nanotorus which is sucked by the van der Waals force onto the carbon nanotube, and subsequently oscillates along the nanotube axis due to the equal and opposite pulselike forces acting at either end of the nanotube. Assuming a continuum approach, where the interatomic interactions are replaced by uniform atomic surface densities, and assuming that the geometry of the nanotube and nanotorus is such that the nanotorus always remains symmetrically situated around the nanotube, we present the basic mechanics of such a system, including the determination of the suction and acceptance energies, and the frequency of the resulting oscillatory motion. In contrast to the previously studied gigahertz nanoscale oscillators, here the oscillatory frequencies are shown to be in the megahertz range. Our study, although purely theoretical must necessarily precede any experimental implementation of such oscillatory systems.

  8. Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N. (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Method and system for functionalizing a collection of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A selected precursor gas (e.g., H2 or F2 or CnHm) is irradiated to provide a cold plasma of selected target species particles, such as atomic H or F, in a first chamber. The target species particles are d irected toward an array of CNTs located in a second chamber while suppressing transport of ultraviolet radiation to the second chamber. A CNT array is functionalized with the target species particles, at or below room temperature, to a point of saturation, in an exposure time interval no longer than about 30 sec. *Discrimination against non-target species is provided by (i) use of a target species having a lifetime that is much greater than a lifetime of a non-target species and/or (2) use of an applied magnetic field to discriminate between charged particle trajectories for target species and for non-target species.

  9. Nanomechanics of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasamy, Mouli; Kumar, Prashanth S.; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2017-04-01

    This review focusses on introducing the mechanics in carbon nanotubes (CNT), and the major applications of CNT and its composites in biomedicine. It emphasizes the nanomechanics of these materials by reviewing the widely followed experimental methods, theoretical models, simulations, classification, segregation and applications the aforementioned materials. First, several mechanical properties contributing to the classification of the CNT, for various biomedicine applications, are discussed in detail to provide a cursory glance at the uses of CNT. The mechanics of CNT discussed in this paper include: elasticity, stress, tension, compression, nano-scale mechanics. In addition to these basic properties, a brief introduction about nanoscale composites is given. Second, a brief review on some of the major applications of CNT in biomedicine including drug delivery, therapeutics, diagnostics and regenerative medicine is given.

  10. Carbon Nanotube based Nanotechnolgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyyappan, M.

    2000-10-01

    Carbon nanotube(CNT) was discovered in the early 1990s and is an off-spring of C60(the fullerene or buckyball). CNT, depending on chirality and diameter, can be metallic or semiconductor and thus allows formation of metal-semiconductor and semiconductor-semiconductor junctions. CNT exhibits extraordinary electrical and mechanical properties and offers remarkable potential for revolutionary applications in electronics devices, computing and data storage technology, sensors, composites, storage of hydrogen or lithium for battery development, nanoelectromechanical systems(NEMS), and as tip in scanning probe microscopy(SPM) for imaging and nanolithography. Thus the CNT synthesis, characterization and applications touch upon all disciplines of science and engineering. A common growth method now is based on CVD though surface catalysis is key to synthesis, in contrast to many CVD applications common in microelectronics. A plasma based variation is gaining some attention. This talk will provide an overview of CNT properties, growth methods, applications, and research challenges and opportunities ahead.

  11. Carbon nanotube electron gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Cattien V. (Inventor); Ribaya, Bryan P. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An electron gun, an electron source for an electron gun, an extractor for an electron gun, and a respective method for producing the electron gun, the electron source and the extractor are disclosed. Embodiments provide an electron source utilizing a carbon nanotube (CNT) bonded to a substrate for increased stability, reliability, and durability. An extractor with an aperture in a conductive material is used to extract electrons from the electron source, where the aperture may substantially align with the CNT of the electron source when the extractor and electron source are mated to form the electron gun. The electron source and extractor may have alignment features for aligning the electron source and the extractor, thereby bringing the aperture and CNT into substantial alignment when assembled. The alignment features may provide and maintain this alignment during operation to improve the field emission characteristics and overall system stability of the electron gun.

  12. Carbon Nanotube Electron Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Cattien V. (Inventor); Ribaya, Bryan P. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An electron gun, an electron source for an electron gun, an extractor for an electron gun, and a respective method for producing the electron gun, the electron source and the extractor are disclosed. Embodiments provide an electron source utilizing a carbon nanotube (CNT) bonded to a substrate for increased stability, reliability, and durability. An extractor with an aperture in a conductive material is used to extract electrons from the electron source, where the aperture may substantially align with the CNT of the electron source when the extractor and electron source are mated to form the electron gun. The electron source and extractor may have alignment features for aligning the electron source and the extractor, thereby bringing the aperture and CNT into substantial alignment when assembled. The alignment features may provide and maintain this alignment during operation to improve the field emission characteristics and overall system stability of the electron gun.

  13. Carbon nanotube biconvex microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Butt, Haider Ahmed, Rajib; Yetisen, Ali K.; Yun, Seok Hyun; Dai, Qing

    2015-03-23

    Developing highly efficient microcavities with predictive narrow-band resonance frequencies using the least amount of material will allow the applications in nonlinear photonic devices. We have developed a microcavity array that comprised multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) organized in a biconvex pattern. The finite element model allowed designing microcavity arrays with predictive transmission properties and assessing the effects of the microarray geometry. The microcavity array demonstrated negative index and produced high Q factors. 2–3 μm tall MWCNTs were patterned as biconvex microcavities, which were separated by 10 μm in an array. The microcavity was iridescent and had optical control over the diffracted elliptical patterns with a far-field pattern, whose properties were predicted by the model. It is anticipated that the MWCNT biconvex microcavities will have implications for the development of highly efficient lenses, metamaterial antennas, and photonic circuits.

  14. Toxicity of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Xu, Yuanzhi; Yang, Zhi; Huang, Renhuan; Chen, Jing; Wang, Raorao; Lin, Yunfeng

    2013-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) find their extensive application as a promising material in medicine due to unique characteristics. However, such materials have been accompanied with potentially hazardous effects on human health. The toxicity of CNTs may vary depending on their structural characteristics, surface properties and chemical composition. To gain insight into the toxicity of CNTs in vivo and in vitro, we summarize contributing factors for the toxic effects of CNTs in this review. In addition, we elaborate on the toxic effects and mechanisms in target sites at systemic, organic, cellular, and biomacromolecule levels. Various issues are reported to be effected when exposed to CNTs including (1) blood circulation, (2) lymph circulation, (3) lung, (4) heart, (5) kidney, (6) spleen, (7) bone marrow, and (8) blood brain barrier. Though there have been published reports on the toxic effects of CNTs to date, more studies will still be needed to gain full understanding of their potential toxicity and underlying mechanisms.

  15. Carbon nanotube optical mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peter C.; Rabin, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    We report the fabrication of imaging quality optical mirrors with smooth surfaces using carbon nanotubes (CNT) embedded in an epoxy matrix. CNT/epoxy is a multifunctional composite material that has sensing capabilities and can be made to incorporate self-actuation. Moreover, as the precursor is a low density liquid, large and lightweight mirrors can be fabricated by processes such as replication, spincasting, and three-dimensional printing. Therefore, the technology holds promise for the development of a new generation of lightweight, compact "smart" telescope mirrors with figure sensing and active or adaptive figure control. We report on measurements made of optical and mechanical characteristics, active optics experiments, and numerical modeling. We discuss possible paths for future development.

  16. Fabrication of flexible, transparent and conductive films from single-walled carbon nanotubes with high aspect ratio using poly((furfuryl methacrylate)-co-(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate)) as a new polymeric dispersant.

    PubMed

    Lee, Taeheon; Kim, Byunghee; Kim, Sumin; Han, Jong Hun; Jeon, Heung Bae; Lee, Young Sil; Paik, Hyun-Jong

    2015-04-21

    We synthesized poly((furfuryl methacrylate)-co-(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate)) (p(FMA-co-DMAEMA)) for the dispersion of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) while maintaining their high aspect ratios. The nanotubes' length and height were 2.0 μm and 2 nm, as determined by transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, respectively. Transparent conductive films (TCFs) were fabricated by individually dispersed long SWCNTs onto a flexible polyethylene terephthalate substrate. The sheet resistance (Rs) was 210 Ω □(-1) with 81% transmittance at a wavelength of 550 nm. To reduce their Rs, the TCFs were treated with HNO3 and SOCl2. After treatment, the TCFs had an Rs of 85.75 Ω □(-1) at a transmittance of 85%. The TCFs exhibited no appreciable change over 200 repeated bending cycles. Dispersing SWCNTs with this newly synthesized polymer is an effective way to fabricate a transparent, highly conductive and flexible film.

  17. Fabrication of flexible, transparent and conductive films from single-walled carbon nanotubes with high aspect ratio using poly((furfuryl methacrylate)-co-(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate)) as a new polymeric dispersant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taeheon; Kim, Byunghee; Kim, Sumin; Han, Jong Hun; Jeon, Heung Bae; Lee, Young Sil; Paik, Hyun-Jong

    2015-04-01

    We synthesized poly((furfuryl methacrylate)-co-(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate)) (p(FMA-co-DMAEMA)) for the dispersion of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) while maintaining their high aspect ratios. The nanotubes' length and height were 2.0 μm and 2 nm, as determined by transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, respectively. Transparent conductive films (TCFs) were fabricated by individually dispersed long SWCNTs onto a flexible polyethylene terephthalate substrate. The sheet resistance (Rs) was 210 Ω □-1 with 81% transmittance at a wavelength of 550 nm. To reduce their Rs, the TCFs were treated with HNO3 and SOCl2. After treatment, the TCFs had an Rs of 85.75 Ω □-1 at a transmittance of 85%. The TCFs exhibited no appreciable change over 200 repeated bending cycles. Dispersing SWCNTs with this newly synthesized polymer is an effective way to fabricate a transparent, highly conductive and flexible film.

  18. Selective functionalization of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strano, Michael S. (Inventor); Usrey, Monica (Inventor); Barone, Paul (Inventor); Dyke, Christopher A. (Inventor); Tour, James M. (Inventor); Kittrell, W. Carter (Inventor); Hauge, Robert H. (Inventor); Smalley, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward methods of selectively functionalizing carbon nanotubes of a specific type or range of types, based on their electronic properties, using diazonium chemistry. The present invention is also directed toward methods of separating carbon nanotubes into populations of specific types or range(s) of types via selective functionalization and electrophoresis, and also to the novel compositions generated by such separations.

  19. Functional materials based on carbon nanotubes: Carbon nanotube actuators and noncovalent carbon nanotube modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fifield, Leonard S.

    Carbon nanotubes have attractive inherent properties that encourage the development of new functional materials and devices based on them. The use of single wall carbon nanotubes as electromechanical actuators takes advantage of the high mechanical strength, surface area and electrical conductivity intrinsic to these molecules. The work presented here investigates the mechanisms that have been discovered for actuation of carbon nanotube paper: electrostatic, quantum chemical charge injection, pneumatic and viscoelastic. A home-built apparatus for the measurement of actuation strain is developed and utilized in the investigation. An optical fiber switch, the first demonstrated macro-scale device based on the actuation of carbon nanotubes, is described and its performance evaluated. Also presented here is a new general process designed to modify the surface of carbon nanotubes in a non-covalent, non-destructive way. This method can be used to impart new functionalities to carbon nanotube samples for a variety of applications including sensing, solar energy conversion and chemical separation. The process described involves the achievement of large degrees of graphitic surface coverage with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons through the use of supercritical fluids. These molecules are bifunctional agents that anchor a desired chemical group to the aromatic surface of the carbon nanotubes without adversely disrupting the conjugated backbone that gives rise the attractive electronic and physical properties of the nanotubes. Both the nanotube functionalization work and the actuator work presented here emphasize how an understanding and control of nanoscale structure and phenomena can be of vital importance in achieving desired performance for active materials. Opportunities for new devices with improved function over current state-of-the-art can be envisioned and anticipated based on this understanding and control.

  20. Nanotechnology with Carbon Nanotubes: Mechanics, Chemistry, and Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Nanotechnology of carbon nanotubes. The contents include: 1) Nanomechanics examples; 2) Experimental validation of nanotubes in composites; 3) Anisotropic plastic collapse; 4) Spatio-temporal scales, yielding single-wall nanotubes; 5) Side-wall functionalization of nanotubes; 6) multi-wall Y junction carbon nanotubes; 7) Molecular electronics with Nanotube junctions; 8) Single-wall carbon nanotube junctions; welding; 9) biomimetic dendritic neurons: Carbon nanotube, nanotube electronics (basics), and nanotube junctions for Devices,

  1. Industrially Feasible Approach to Transparent, Flexible, and Conductive Carbon Nanotube Films: Cellulose-Assisted Film Deposition Followed by Solution and Photonic Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeji; Chikamatsu, Masayuki; Azumi, Reiko; Saito, Takeshi; Minami, Nobutsugu

    2013-02-01

    We report that single-walled nanotube (SWNT) films with precisely controlled thicknesses and transmittances can be produced through the doctor-blade method using SWNT-polymer inks. The matrix polymer around SWNTs were successfully removed by either solution curing or photonic curing at room temperature, which are advantageous processes enabling direct film formation on plastic substrates. Sheet resistances as low as 68-240 Ω/sq at T=89-98% were obtained. Furthermore, the SWNT film on poly(ethylene naphthalate) exhibited superior flexibility and stability in a flexure endurance test. The method may open a wide range of opportunities for flexible electrical devices.

  2. Filling carbon nanotubes with particles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byong M; Qian, Shizhi; Bau, Haim H

    2005-05-01

    The filling of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with fluorescent particles was studied experimentally and theoretically. The fluorescent signals emitted by the particles were visible through the walls of the nanotubes, and the particles inside the tubes were observable with an electron microscope. Taking advantage of the template-grown carbon nanotubes' transparency to fluorescent light, we measured the filling rate of the tubes with particles at room conditions. Liquids such as ethylene glycol, water, and ethylene glycol/water mixtures, laden with 50 nm diameter fluorescent particles, were brought into contact with 500 nm diameter CNTs. The liquid and the particles' transport were observed, respectively, with optical and fluorescence microscopy. The CNTs were filled controllably with particles by the complementary action of capillary forces and the evaporation of the liquid. The experimental results were compared and favorably agreed with theoretical predictions. This is the first report on fluorescence studies of particle transport in carbon nanotubes.

  3. Free-standing and flexible LiMnTiO4/carbon nanotube cathodes for high performance lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Yinhua; Zhang, Xingyu; Zhang, Xu; Yang, Le; Zhang, Xinyi; Chen, Haosen; Yang, Meng; Fang, Daining

    2016-07-01

    A flexible, free-standing, and light-weight LiMnTiO4/MWCNT electrode has been prepared by vacuum filtration method for the first time. The as-prepared flexible LiMnTiO4/MWCNT electrode possesses a three-dimensional braiding structure in which LiMnTiO4 particles are well embedded in the twining CNT networks. The novel LiMnTiO4/MWCNT electrodes show tensile strength of 1.34 MPa and 2.04 MPa, when the percentages of MWCNTs reach to 30% and 50%, respectively. This novel flexible electrode exhibits a superior electrochemical property, especially at rate capability and cycling stability. The LiMnTiO4/MWCNT electrode can deliver capacity of 161 mAh g-1 (86.4% retention) after 50 cycles at 0.5C rate. Since the high conductivity from MWCNT networks, the LiMnTiO4/MWCNT electrode can still maintain a capacity of 77 mAh g-1 at 5C rate, which is much higher than that of the conventional electrode fabricated by slurry casting method on Al foil. The features of free-standing, light-weight, and excellent electrochemical performance indicate the potential of using the LiMnTiO4/MWCNT cathode in new-generation flexible lithium ion batteries.

  4. Carbon Nanotube Purification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delzeit, Lance D. (Inventor); Delzeit, Clement J. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A method for cleaning or otherwise removing amorphous carbon and other residues that arise in growth of a carbon nanotube (CNT) array. The CNT array is exposed to a plurality of hydroxyls or hydrogen, produced from a selected vapor or liquid source such as H2O or H2O2. and the hydroxyls or hydrogen (neutral or electrically charged) react with the residues to produce partly or fully dissolved or hydrogenated or hydroxylizated products that can be removed or separated from the CNT array. The hydroxyls or hydrogen can be produced by heating the CNT array, residue and selected vapor or liquid source or by application of an electromagnetic excitation signal with a selected frequency or range of frequencies to dissociate the selected vapor or liquid. The excitation frequency can be chirped to cover a selected range of frequencies corresponding to dissociation of the selected vapor or liquid. Sonication may be uscd to supplement dissociation of the H2O and/or H2O2.

  5. Properties of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masood, Samina; Bullmore, Daniel; Duran, Michael; Jacobs, Michael

    2012-10-01

    Different synthesizing methods are used to create various nanostructures of carbon; we are mainly interested in single and multi-wall carbon nanotubes, (SWCNTs) and (MWCNTs) respectively. The properties of these tubes are related to their synthetic methods, chirality, and diameter. The extremely sturdy structure of CNTs, with their distinct thermal and electromagnetic properties, suggests a tremendous use of these tubes in electronics and medicines. Here, we analyze various physical properties of SWCNTs with a special emphasis on electromagnetic and chemical properties. By examining their electrical properties, we demonstrate the viability of discrete CNT based components. After considering the advantages of using CNTs over microstructures, we make a case for the advancement and development of nanostructures based electronics. As for current CNT applications, it's hard to overlook their use and functionality in the development of cancer treatment. Whether the tubes are involved in chemotherapeutic drug delivery, molecular imaging and targeting, or photodynamic therapy, we show that the remarkable properties of SWCNTs can be used in advantageous ways by many different industries.

  6. Carbon Nanotubes for Polymer Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anctil, Annick; Dileo, Roberta; Schauerman, Chris; Landi, Brian; Raffaelle, Ryne

    2007-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes are being investigated for optical absorption, exciton dissociation, and carrier transport in polymer photovoltaic devices. In the present work, single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were synthesized by an Alexandrite pulsed laser vaporization reactor at standard conditions and purified based upon our previously reported TOP procedure. The SWNTs were dispersed in polymer composites for pure MEH-PPV, pure P3HT, and [C60]-PCBM-P3HT (1:1 by weight) as a function of nanotube weight loading (0.1 -- 5% w/w). The AM0 current-voltage measurements for structures sandwiched between PEDOT/PSS coated ITO substrates and an evaporated aluminum contact demonstrate the dramatic effect of SWNT content on the short circuit current density, with conversions efficiencies consistently greater than 1%. The temperature coefficient for nanotube-containing polymer photovoltaics has been compared to conventional PCBM-P3HT devices, and the general relationship of increasing efficiency with increasing temperature is observed. However, the necessity to control nanotube percolation to prevent device shunting has led to recent developments which focus on controlling nanotube length through oxidative cutting, the deposition of intrinsic polymer layers, and the use of aligned carbon nanotube arrays for preferential charge transport.

  7. Synergistically enhanced stability of highly flexible silver nanowire/carbon nanotube hybrid transparent electrodes by plasmonic welding.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jongsoo; Woo, Ju Yeon; Kim, Ju Tae; Lee, Byung Yang; Han, Chang-Soo

    2014-07-23

    Here, we report highly transparent and flexible AgNW/SWCNT hybrid networks on PET substrates combined with plasmonic welding for securing ultrahigh stability in mechanical and electrical properties under severe bending. Plasmonic welding produces local heating and welding at the junction of AgNWs and leads strong adhesion between AgNW and SWCNT as well as between hybrid structure and substrate. The initial sheet resistance of plasmon treated AgNW/SWCNT hybrid film was 26 Ω sq(-1), with >90% optical transmittance over the wavelength range 400-2700 nm. Following 200 cycles of convex/concave bending with a bending radius of 5 mm, the sheet resistance changed from 26 to 29 Ω sq(-1). This hybrid structure combined with the plasmonic welding process provided excellent stability, low resistance, and high transparency, and is suitable for highly flexible electronics applications, including touch panels, solar cells, and OLEDs.

  8. Probing Photosensitization by Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) photosensitize the production of reactive oxygen species that can damage organisms by biomembrane oxidation or mediate CNTs' environmental transformations. The photosensitized nature of derivatized carbon nanotubes from various synthetic methods, and thus ...

  9. Probing Photosensitization by Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) photosensitize the production of reactive oxygen species that can damage organisms by biomembrane oxidation or mediate CNTs' environmental transformations. The photosensitized nature of derivatized carbon nanotubes from various synthetic methods, and thus ...

  10. Ultrastrong single-walled carbon nanotubes/ graphene oxide nanosheets hybrid network films as flexible electrode for energy storage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Li, Cheng; Wang, Dong; Dong, Zhihui; Zhang, Feng Xing; Jin, Jian

    2013-08-01

    Homogeneous free-standing SWCNT/GO hybrid network films were fabricated using vacuum filtration method and their performances to be used as flexible electrodes in electrochemical capacitors were studied. Firstly, the SWCNT/GO hybrid films were treated under different temperature to investigate the influence of oxygen-containing groups on GO nanosheets on capacitive performance of them. Our results showed that the content of oxygen-containing groups had great influence on the capacitive performance of SWCNT/GO hybrid films and that the film annealed at 250 degrees C under 5% H2/Ar flow displayed an optimal capacitive performance. For the film with SWCNT/GO mass ratio of 1:4, specific capacitances of 171.85, 162.9, 148.98, 133.8, 112.8 and 82.24 F/g corresponding to discharge current of 5, 10, 20, 40, 80 and 160 A/g, respectively, were achieved. Secondly, the influence of mass ratio of SWCNT/GO on capacitive performance of SWCNT/GO hybrid films was also demonstrated. The hybrid films exhibited extremely high mechanical strength with tensile strength up to 461 MPa and specific capacitance of 105.2 F/g at current density of 5 A/g in case of 1:1 mass ratio of SWCNT/GO. A higher specific capacitance of 206.7 F/s at discharge current of 5A/g was obtained for the films with SWCNT/GO mass ratio of 1:8. Our SWCNT/GO hybrid network films showed good flexibility and durability over 2000 bending cycles test, indicating the potential to be used in flexible energy-storage devices.

  11. Carbon Nanotube Based Molecular Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash; Menon, Madhu

    1998-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes and the nanotube heterojunctions have recently emerged as excellent candidates for nanoscale molecular electronic device components. Experimental measurements on the conductivity, rectifying behavior and conductivity-chirality correlation have also been made. While quasi-one dimensional simple heterojunctions between nanotubes with different electronic behavior can be generated by introduction of a pair of heptagon-pentagon defects in an otherwise all hexagon graphene sheet. Other complex 3- and 4-point junctions may require other mechanisms. Structural stability as well as local electronic density of states of various nanotube junctions are investigated using a generalized tight-binding molecular dynamics (GDBMD) scheme that incorporates non-orthogonality of the orbitals. The junctions investigated include straight and small angle heterojunctions of various chiralities and diameters; as well as more complex 'T' and 'Y' junctions which do not always obey the usual pentagon-heptagon pair rule. The study of local density of states (LDOS) reveal many interesting features, most prominent among them being the defect-induced states in the gap. The proposed three and four pointjunctions are one of the smallest possible tunnel junctions made entirely of carbon atoms. Furthermore the electronic behavior of the nanotube based device components can be taylored by doping with group III-V elements such as B and N, and BN nanotubes as a wide band gap semiconductor has also been realized in experiments. Structural properties of heteroatomic nanotubes comprising C, B and N will be discussed.

  12. Carbon Nanotube Based Molecular Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash; Menon, Madhu

    1998-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes and the nanotube heterojunctions have recently emerged as excellent candidates for nanoscale molecular electronic device components. Experimental measurements on the conductivity, rectifying behavior and conductivity-chirality correlation have also been made. While quasi-one dimensional simple heterojunctions between nanotubes with different electronic behavior can be generated by introduction of a pair of heptagon-pentagon defects in an otherwise all hexagon graphene sheet. Other complex 3- and 4-point junctions may require other mechanisms. Structural stability as well as local electronic density of states of various nanotube junctions are investigated using a generalized tight-binding molecular dynamics (GDBMD) scheme that incorporates non-orthogonality of the orbitals. The junctions investigated include straight and small angle heterojunctions of various chiralities and diameters; as well as more complex 'T' and 'Y' junctions which do not always obey the usual pentagon-heptagon pair rule. The study of local density of states (LDOS) reveal many interesting features, most prominent among them being the defect-induced states in the gap. The proposed three and four pointjunctions are one of the smallest possible tunnel junctions made entirely of carbon atoms. Furthermore the electronic behavior of the nanotube based device components can be taylored by doping with group III-V elements such as B and N, and BN nanotubes as a wide band gap semiconductor has also been realized in experiments. Structural properties of heteroatomic nanotubes comprising C, B and N will be discussed.

  13. Multiscale Modeling with Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, A

    2006-02-21

    Technologically important nanomaterials come in all shapes and sizes. They can range from small molecules to complex composites and mixtures. Depending upon the spatial dimensions of the system and properties under investigation computer modeling of such materials can range from equilibrium and nonequilibrium Quantum Mechanics, to force-field-based Molecular Mechanics and kinetic Monte Carlo, to Mesoscale simulation of evolving morphology, to Finite-Element computation of physical properties. This brief review illustrates some of the above modeling techniques through a number of recent applications with carbon nanotubes: nano electromechanical sensors (NEMS), chemical sensors, metal-nanotube contacts, and polymer-nanotube composites.

  14. Removal of some impurities from carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yongcheng; Zhou, Gumin; Wang, Guoping; Qu, Meizhen; Yu, Zuolong

    2003-07-01

    A non-destructive mild oxidation method of removing some impurities from as-grown carbon nanotubes (CNTs), including single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), by H 2O 2 oxidation and HCl treatment, has been investigated, and somewhat pure carbon nanotubes have been prepared. The CNTs from which some impurities were removed have been evaluated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and temperature programmed oxidation and gas chromatography (TPO-GC).

  15. Carbon Nanotube Aluminum Matrix Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    replacement of air space with the polymer matrix. A similar affinity is not known to exist between CNTs and aluminum , where the wetting angle between...Carbon Nanotube Aluminum Matrix Composites by Brent J. Carey, Jerome T. Tzeng, and Shashi Karna ARL-TR-5252 August 2010...Nanotube Aluminum Matrix Composites Brent J. Carey, Jerome T. Tzeng, and Shashi Karna Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, ARL

  16. Aerosol printed carbon nanotube strain sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Bradley; Yoon, Hwan-Sik

    2012-04-01

    In recent years, printed electronics have received attention as a method to produce low-cost macro electronics on flexible substrates. In this regard, inkjet and aerosol printing have been the primary printing methods for producing passive electrical components, transistors, and a number of sensors. In this research, a custom aerosol printer was utilized to create a strain sensor capable of measuring static and dynamic strain. The proposed sensor was created by aerosol printing a multiwall carbon nanotube solution onto an aluminum beam covered with an insulating layer. After printing the carbon nanotube-based sensor, the sensor was tested under quasi-static and vibration strain conditions, and the results are presented. The results show that the printed sensor could potentially serve as an effective method for measuring dynamic strain of structural components.

  17. Printed Carbon Nanotube Electronics and Sensor Systems.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kevin; Gao, Wei; Emaminejad, Sam; Kiriya, Daisuke; Ota, Hiroki; Nyein, Hnin Yin Yin; Takei, Kuniharu; Javey, Ali

    2016-06-01

    Printing technologies offer large-area, high-throughput production capabilities for electronics and sensors on mechanically flexible substrates that can conformally cover different surfaces. These capabilities enable a wide range of new applications such as low-cost disposable electronics for health monitoring and wearables, extremely large format electronic displays, interactive wallpapers, and sensing arrays. Solution-processed carbon nanotubes have been shown to be a promising candidate for such printing processes, offering stable devices with high performance. Here, recent progress made in printed carbon nanotube electronics is discussed in terms of materials, processing, devices, and applications. Research challenges and opportunities moving forward from processing and system-level integration points of view are also discussed for enabling practical applications.

  18. Large-Scale Processing of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finn, John; Sridhar, K. R.; Meyyappan, M.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Scale-up difficulties and high energy costs are two of the more important factors that limit the availability of various types of nanotube carbon. While several approaches are known for producing nanotube carbon, the high-powered reactors typically produce nanotubes at rates measured in only grams per hour and operate at temperatures in excess of 1000 C. These scale-up and energy challenges must be overcome before nanotube carbon can become practical for high-consumption structural and mechanical applications. This presentation examines the issues associated with using various nanotube production methods at larger scales, and discusses research being performed at NASA Ames Research Center on carbon nanotube reactor technology.

  19. EDITORIAL: Focus on Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-09-01

    The study of carbon nanotubes, since their discovery by Iijima in 1991, has become a full research field with significant contributions from all areas of research in solid-state and molecular physics and also from chemistry. This Focus Issue in New Journal of Physics reflects this active research, and presents articles detailing significant advances in the production of carbon nanotubes, the study of their mechanical and vibrational properties, electronic properties and optical transitions, and electrical and transport properties. Fundamental research, both theoretical and experimental, represents part of this progress. The potential applications of nanotubes will rely on the progress made in understanding their fundamental physics and chemistry, as presented here. We believe this Focus Issue will be an excellent guide for both beginners and experts in the research field of carbon nanotubes. It has been a great pleasure to edit the many excellent contributions from Europe, Japan, and the US, as well from a number of other countries, and to witness the remarkable effort put into the manuscripts by the contributors. We thank all the authors and referees involved in the process. In particular, we would like to express our gratitude to Alexander Bradshaw, who invited us put together this Focus Issue, and to Tim Smith and the New Journal of Physics staff for their extremely efficient handling of the manuscripts. Focus on Carbon Nanotubes Contents <;A article="1367-2630/5/1/117">Transport theory of carbon nanotube Y junctions R Egger, B Trauzettel, S Chen and F Siano The tubular conical helix of graphitic boron nitride F F Xu, Y Bando and D Golberg Formation pathways for single-wall carbon nanotube multiterminal junctions Inna Ponomareva, Leonid A Chernozatonskii, Antonis N Andriotis and Madhu Menon Synthesis and manipulation of carbon nanotubes J W Seo, E Couteau

  20. EDITORIAL: Focus on Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-09-01

    The study of carbon nanotubes, since their discovery by Iijima in 1991, has become a full research field with significant contributions from all areas of research in solid-state and molecular physics and also from chemistry. This Focus Issue in New Journal of Physics reflects this active research, and presents articles detailing significant advances in the production of carbon nanotubes, the study of their mechanical and vibrational properties, electronic properties and optical transitions, and electrical and transport properties. Fundamental research, both theoretical and experimental, represents part of this progress. The potential applications of nanotubes will rely on the progress made in understanding their fundamental physics and chemistry, as presented here. We believe this Focus Issue will be an excellent guide for both beginners and experts in the research field of carbon nanotubes. It has been a great pleasure to edit the many excellent contributions from Europe, Japan, and the US, as well from a number of other countries, and to witness the remarkable effort put into the manuscripts by the contributors. We thank all the authors and referees involved in the process. In particular, we would like to express our gratitude to Alexander Bradshaw, who invited us put together this Focus Issue, and to Tim Smith and the New Journal of Physics staff for their extremely efficient handling of the manuscripts. Focus on Carbon Nanotubes Contents Transport theory of carbon nanotube Y junctions R Egger, B Trauzettel, S Chen and F Siano The tubular conical helix of graphitic boron nitride F F Xu, Y Bando and D Golberg Formation pathways for single-wall carbon nanotube multiterminal junctions Inna Ponomareva, Leonid A Chernozatonskii, Antonis N Andriotis and Madhu Menon Synthesis and manipulation of carbon nanotubes J W Seo, E Couteau, P Umek, K Hernadi, P Marcoux, B Lukic, Cs Mikó, M Milas, R Gaál and L Forró Transitional behaviour in the transformation from active end

  1. Dispersions of Carbon nanotubes in Polymer Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, Kristopher Eric (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Lillehei, Peter T. (Inventor); Lowther, Sharon E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Dispersions of carbon nanotubes exhibiting long term stability are based on a polymer matrix having moieties therein which are capable of a donor-acceptor complexation with carbon nanotubes. The carbon nanotubes are introduced into the polymer matrix and separated therein by standard means. Nanocomposites produced from these dispersions are useful in the fabrication of structures, e.g., lightweight aerospace structures.

  2. Passive Mode Carbon Nanotube Underwater Acoustic Transducer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-20

    300151 1 of 14 PASSIVE MODE CARBON NANOTUBE UNDERWATER ACOUSTIC TRANSDUCER STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The invention described...0003] The present invention is an acoustically transparent carbon nanotube transducer that can operate in a passive acoustic mode for data...acoustic carbon nanotube (CNT) yarn sheets capable of producing high acoustic output at low frequencies with broad bandwidth. An underwater acoustic

  3. NMR investigations of hydrogen in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, M.; Goze-Bac, C.; Krämer, S.; Mehring, M.; Roth, S.; Bernier, P.

    2002-10-01

    We report proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) measurements on hydrogen loaded single walled carbon nanotubes. The carbon nanotubes were produced with different kinds of catalysts and hydrogen loaded under 23 bar hydrogen pressure. The hydrogen adsorption properties of the carbon nanotube materials were investigated by temperature dependent analysis of the 1H-NMR spectra.

  4. Carbon nanotube macroelectronics: toward system-on-plastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chuan; Takei, Kuniharu; Takahashi, Toshitakei; Javey, Ali

    2013-05-01

    We report solution-based processing of high-purity semiconducting carbon nanotube networks that has led to low-cost fabrication of large quantity of thin-film transistors (TFTs) with excellent yield and highly uniform, respectable performance on mechanically flexible substrates. Based on the semiconducting carbon nanotube TFTs, a wide range of macro-scale system-level electronics have been demonstrated including flexible integrated circuits, flexible full-color active-matrix organic light-emitting diode display, and smart interactive skin sensor that can simultaneously map and respond to the outside stimulus. Our work shows carbon nanotubes' immense promise as a low-cost and scalable TFT technology for nonconventional electronic systems with excellent performances.

  5. Hydrodynamic properties of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Walther, J H; Werder, T; Jaffe, R L; Koumoutsakos, P

    2004-06-01

    We study water flowing past an array of single walled carbon nanotubes using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. For carbon nanotubes mounted with a tube spacing of 16.4 x 16.4 nm and diameters of 1.25 and 2.50 nm, respectively, we find drag coefficients in reasonable agreement with the macroscopic, Stokes-Oseen solution. The slip length is -0.11 nm for the 1.25 nm carbon nanotube, and 0.49 for the 2.50 nm tube for a flow speed of 50 m/s, respectively, and 0.28 nm for the 2.50 nm tube at 200 m/s. A slanted flow configuration with a stream- and spanwise velocity component of 100 ms(-1) recovers the two-dimensional results, but exhibits a significant 88 nm slip along the axis of the tube. These results indicate that slip depends on the particular flow configuration.

  6. An overview of carbon materials for flexible electrochemical capacitors.

    PubMed

    He, Yongmin; Chen, Wanjun; Gao, Caitian; Zhou, Jinyuan; Li, Xiaodong; Xie, Erqing

    2013-10-07

    Under the background of the quick development of lightweight, flexible, and wearable electronic devices in our society, a flexible and highly efficient energy management strategy is needed for their counterpart energy-storage systems. Among them, flexible electrochemical capacitors (ECs) have been considered as one of the most promising candidates because of their significant advantages in power and energy densities, and unique properties of being flexible, lightweight, low-cost, and environmentally friendly compared with current energy storage devices. In a common EC, carbon materials play an irreplaceable and principal role in its energy-storage performance. Up till now, most progress towards flexible ECs technologies has mostly benefited from the continuous development of carbon materials. As a result, in view of the dual remarkable highlights of ECs and carbon materials, a summary of recent research progress on carbon-based flexible EC electrode materials is presented in this review, including carbon fiber (CF, consisting of carbon microfiber-CMF and carbon nanofiber-CNF) networks, carbon nanotube (CNT) and graphene coatings, CNT and/or graphene papers (or films), and freestanding three-dimensional (3D) flexible carbon-based macroscopic architectures. Furthermore, some promising carbon materials for great potential applications in flexible ECs are introduced. Finally, the trends and challenges in the development of carbon-based electrode materials for flexible ECs and their smart applications are analyzed.

  7. Carbon nanotube-polymer composite actuators

    DOEpatents

    Gennett, Thomas; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Landi, Brian J.; Heben, Michael J.

    2008-04-22

    The present invention discloses a carbon nanotube (SWNT)-polymer composite actuator and method to make such actuator. A series of uniform composites was prepared by dispersing purified single wall nanotubes with varying weight percents into a polymer matrix, followed by solution casting. The resulting nanotube-polymer composite was then successfully used to form a nanotube polymer actuator.

  8. Gears Based on Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Richard; Han, Jie; Globus, Al; Deardorff, Glenn

    2005-01-01

    Gears based on carbon nanotubes (see figure) have been proposed as components of an emerging generation of molecular- scale machines and sensors. In comparison with previously proposed nanogears based on diamondoid and fullerene molecules, the nanotube-based gears would have simpler structures and are more likely to be realizable by practical fabrication processes. The impetus for the practical development of carbon-nanotube- based gears arises, in part, from rapid recent progress in the fabrication of carbon nanotubes with prescribed diameters, lengths, chiralities, and numbers of concentric shells. The shafts of the proposed gears would be made from multiwalled carbon nanotubes. The gear teeth would be rigid molecules (typically, benzyne molecules), bonded to the nanotube shafts at atomically precise positions. For fabrication, it may be possible to position the molecular teeth by use of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) or other related techniques. The capability to position individual organic molecules at room temperature by use of an STM tip has already been demonstrated. Routes to the chemical synthesis of carbon-nanotube-based gears are also under investigation. Chemical and physical aspects of the synthesis of molecular scale gears based on carbon nanotubes and related molecules, and dynamical properties of nanotube- based gears, have been investigated by computational simulations using established methods of quantum chemistry and molecular dynamics. Several particularly interesting and useful conclusions have been drawn from the dynamical simulations performed thus far: The forces acting on the gears would be more sensitive to local molecular motions than to gross mechanical motions of the overall gears. Although no breakage of teeth or of chemical bonds is expected at temperatures up to at least 3,000 K, the gears would not work well at temperatures above a critical range from about 600 to about 1,000 K. Gear temperature could probably be controlled by

  9. CMOS Integrated Carbon Nanotube Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, M. S.; Lerner, B.; Boselli, A.; Lamagna, A.; Obregon, P. D. Pareja; Julian, P. M.; Mandolesi, P. S.; Buffa, F. A.

    2009-05-23

    Recently carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been gaining their importance as sensors for gases, temperature and chemicals. Advances in fabrication processes simplify the formation of CNT sensor on silicon substrate. We have integrated single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with complementary metal oxide semiconductor process (CMOS) to produce a chip sensor system. The sensor prototype was designed and fabricated using a 0.30 um CMOS process. The main advantage is that the device has a voltage amplifier so the electrical measure can be taken and amplified inside the sensor. When the conductance of the SWCNTs varies in response to media changes, this is observed as a variation in the output tension accordingly.

  10. Magnetoresistance of multiwall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Li; Kang, N.; Kong, W. J.; Hu, J. S.; Pan, Z. W.; Xie, S. S.

    2002-03-01

    We have investigated the magnetoresistance of multiwall carbon nanotubes bundles. At temperatures above 15 K, the magnetoresistance was found to follow exactly a scaling law as predicted by the theory of two-dimensional (2D) weak localization. Below 15 K, the 2D weak localization behavior is modified due to the formation of a Coulomb gap. This modification does not fit to those theories which treat electron-electron interaction as a perturbation. Altshular-Aronov-Spivak (AAS) resistance oscillation was observed in milli-Kelvin temperature range. The results will be discussed in terms of the interplay between electron-electron interaction and disorder scattering in multiwall carbon nanotube.

  11. Continuum percolation of carbon nanotubes in polymeric and colloidal media.

    PubMed

    Kyrylyuk, Andriy V; van der Schoot, Paul

    2008-06-17

    We apply continuum connectedness percolation theory to realistic carbon nanotube systems and predict how bending flexibility, length polydispersity, and attractive interactions between them influence the percolation threshold, demonstrating that it can be used as a predictive tool for designing nanotube-based composite materials. We argue that the host matrix in which the nanotubes are dispersed controls this threshold through the interactions it induces between them during processing and through the degree of connectedness that must be set by the tunneling distance of electrons, at least in the context of conductivity percolation. This provides routes to manipulate the percolation threshold and the level of conductivity in the final product. We find that the percolation threshold of carbon nanotubes is very sensitive to the degree of connectedness, to the presence of small quantities of longer rods, and to very weak attractive interactions between them. Bending flexibility or tortuosity, on the other hand, has only a fairly weak impact on the percolation threshold.

  12. Modified carbon nanotubes and methods of forming carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Heintz, Amy M.; Risser, Steven; Elhard, Joel D.; Moore, Bryon P.; Liu, Tao; Vijayendran, Bhima R.

    2016-06-14

    In this invention, processes which can be used to achieve stable doped carbon nanotubes are disclosed. Preferred CNT structures and morphologies for achieving maximum doping effects are also described. Dopant formulations and methods for achieving doping of a broad distribution of tube types are also described.

  13. Hydrogen storage in carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Hirscher, M; Becher, M

    2003-01-01

    The article gives a comprehensive overview of hydrogen storage in carbon nanostructures, including experimental results and theoretical calculations. Soon after the discovery of carbon nanotubes in 1991, different research groups succeeded in filling carbon nanotubes with some elements, and, therefore, the question arose of filling carbon nanotubes with hydrogen by possibly using new effects such as nano-capillarity. Subsequently, very promising experiments claiming high hydrogen storage capacities in different carbon nanostructures initiated enormous research activity. Hydrogen storage capacities have been reported that exceed the benchmark for automotive application of 6.5 wt% set by the U.S. Department of Energy. However, the experimental data obtained with different methods for various carbon nanostructures show an extreme scatter. Classical calculations based on physisorption of hydrogen molecules could not explain the high storage capacities measured at ambient temperature, and, assuming chemisorption of hydrogen atoms, hydrogen release requires temperatures too high for technical applications. Up to now, only a few calculations and experiments indicate the possibility of an intermediate binding energy. Recently, serious doubt has arisen in relation to several key experiments, causing considerable controversy. Furthermore, high hydrogen storage capacities measured for carbon nanofibers did not survive cross-checking in different laboratories. Therefore, in light of today's knowledge, it is becoming less likely that at moderate pressures around room temperature carbon nanostructures can store the amount of hydrogen required for automotive applications.

  14. Synthesis, assembly, and applications of single-walled carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Koungmin

    This dissertation presents the synthesis and assembly of aligned carbon nanotubes, and their applications in both nano-electronics such as transistor and integrated circuits and macro-electronics in energy conversion devices as transparent conducting electrodes. Also, the high performance chemical sensor using metal oxide nanowire has been demonstrated. Chapter 1 presents a brief introduction of carbon nanotube, followed by discussion of a new synthesis technique using nanosphere lithography to grow highly aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes atop quartz and sapphire substrates. This method offers great potential to produce carbon nanotube arrays with simultaneous control over the nanotube orientation, position, density, diameter and even chirality. Chapter 3 introduces the wafer-scale integration and assembly of aligned carbon nanotubes, including full-wafer scale synthesis and transfer of massively aligned carbon nanotube arrays, and nanotube device fabrication on 4 inch Si/SiO2 wafer to yield submicron channel transistors with high on-current density ˜ 20 muA/mum and good on/off ratio and CMOS integrated circuits. In addition, various chemical doping methods for n-type nanotube transistors are studied to fabricate CMOS integrated nanotube circuits such as inverter, NAND and NOR logic devices. Furthermore, defect-tolerant circuit design for NAND and NOR is proposed and demonstrated to guarantee the correct operation of logic circuit, regardless of the presence of mis-aligned or mis-positioned nanotubes. Carbon nanotube flexible electronics and smart textiles for ubiquitous computing and sensing are demonstrated in chapter 4. A facile transfer printing technique has been introduced to transfer massively aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes from the original sapphire/quartz substrates to virtually any other substrates, including glass, silicon, polymer sheets, and even fabrics. The characterization of transferred nanotubes reveals that the transferred

  15. Effect of Carbon Nanotubes on Mammalian Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Michelle; Ahmed, Asma; Black, Melanie; Kawamoto, Nicole; Lucas, Jessica; Pagala, Armie; Pham, Tram; Stankiewicz, Sara; Chen, Howard

    2010-03-01

    Carbon Nanotubes possess extraordinary electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties. Research on applying the carbon nanotubes for ultrasensitive detection, disease diagnosis, and drug delivery is rapidly developing. While the fundamental and technological findings on carbon nanotubes show great promise, it is extremely important to investigate the effect of the carbon nanotubes on human health. In our experiments, we introduce purified carbon nanotubes in suspension to ovary cells cultured from Hamsters. These cells are chosen since they show robust morphological changes associated with cytotoxicity that can easily be observed under a light microscope. We will discuss the toxicity of carbon nanotubes by characterizing the cell morphology and viability as a function of time and the concentration of carbon nanotube suspension.

  16. Carbon Nanotube Material Quality Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yowell, Leonard; Arepalli, Sivaram; Sosa, Edward; Niolaev, Pavel; Gorelik, Olga

    2006-01-01

    The nanomaterial activities at NASA Johnson Space Center focus on carbon nanotube production, characterization and their applications for aerospace systems. Single wall carbon nanotubes are produced by arc and laser methods. Characterization of the nanotube material is performed using the NASA JSC protocol developed by combining analytical techniques of SEM, TEM, UV-VIS-NIR absorption, Raman, and TGA. A possible addition of other techniques such as XPS, and ICP to the existing protocol will be discussed. Changes in the quality of the material collected in different regions of the arc and laser production chambers is assessed using the original JSC protocol. The observed variations indicate different growth conditions in different regions of the production chambers.

  17. Plasma CVD of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delzeit, Lance; Cruden, B.; Hash, D.; Meyyappan, M.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes(CNT) exhibit remarkable mechanical and unique electronic properties and thus have created excitement in the research community about their potential in electronics, computing, sensor and structural applications. Realization of these applications critically depends on the ability to control the properties(such as diameter, chirality) as well purity. We have investigated CNT growth using an inductively coupled plasma(ICP) process using hydrocarbon feedstock. The catalyst required for nanotube growth consists of thin sputtered layers of aluminum and iron(10 nm each) and aligned carbon nanotubes have been obtained. Optical emission diagnostics as well as a plasma modeling effort have been undertaken to understand growth mechanisms. This presentation will discuss growth characteristics under various pressure, power and feedgas compositions and our understanding from modeling and diagnostics.

  18. Strain Sensitivity in Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Multifunctional Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, D. M. (Technical Monitor); Smits, Jan M., VI

    2005-01-01

    Single walled carbon nanotubes represent the future of structural aerospace vehicle systems due to their unparalleled strength characteristics and demonstrated multifunctionality. This multifunctionality rises from the CNT's unique capabilities for both metallic and semiconducting electron transport, electron spin polarizability, and band gap modulation under strain. By incorporating the use of electric field alignment and various lithography techniques, a single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) test bed for measurement of conductivity/strain relationships has been developed. Nanotubes are deposited at specified locations through dielectrophoresis. The circuit is designed such that the central, current carrying section of the nanotube is exposed to enable atomic force microscopy and manipulation in situ while the transport properties of the junction are monitored. By applying this methodology to sensor development a flexible single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) based strain sensitive device has been developed. Studies of tensile testing of the flexible SWNT device vs conductivity are also presented, demonstrating the feasibility of using single walled HiPCO (high-pressure carbon monoxide) carbon nanotubes as strain sensing agents in a multi-functional materials system.

  19. Conductance Oscillations in Squashed Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehrez, H.; Anantram, M. P.; Svizhenko, A.

    2003-01-01

    A combination of molecular dynamics and electrical conductance calculations are used to probe the electromechanical properties of squashed metallic carbon nanotubes. We find that the conductance and bandgap of armchair nanotubes show oscillations upon squashing. The physical origin of these oscillations is attributed to interaction of carbon atoms with a fourth neighbor. Squashing of armchair and zigzag nanotubes ultimately leads to metallic behavior.

  20. Supported lipid bilayer/carbon nanotube hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xinjian; Moran-Mirabal, Jose M.; Craighead, Harold G.; McEuen, Paul L.

    2007-03-01

    Carbon nanotube transistors combine molecular-scale dimensions with excellent electronic properties, offering unique opportunities for chemical and biological sensing. Here, we form supported lipid bilayers over single-walled carbon nanotube transistors. We first study the physical properties of the nanotube/supported lipid bilayer structure using fluorescence techniques. Whereas lipid molecules can diffuse freely across the nanotube, a membrane-bound protein (tetanus toxin) sees the nanotube as a barrier. Moreover, the size of the barrier depends on the diameter of the nanotube-with larger nanotubes presenting bigger obstacles to diffusion. We then demonstrate detection of protein binding (streptavidin) to the supported lipid bilayer using the nanotube transistor as a charge sensor. This system can be used as a platform to examine the interactions of single molecules with carbon nanotubes and has many potential applications for the study of molecular recognition and other biological processes occurring at cell membranes.

  1. Carbon Nanotubes and Human Cells?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, G. Angela

    2005-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes that were chemically altered to be water soluble are shown to enter fibroblasts, T cells, and HL60 cells. Nanoparticles adversely affect immortalized HaCaT human keratinocyte cultures, indicating that they may enter cells.

  2. Terahertz detection and carbon nanotubes

    ScienceCinema

    Leonard, Francois

    2016-07-12

    Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories, along with collaborators from Rice University and the Tokyo Institute of Technology, are developing new terahertz detectors based on carbon nanotubes that could lead to significant improvements in medical imaging, airport passenger screening, food inspection and other applications.

  3. Terahertz detection and carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, Francois

    2014-06-11

    Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories, along with collaborators from Rice University and the Tokyo Institute of Technology, are developing new terahertz detectors based on carbon nanotubes that could lead to significant improvements in medical imaging, airport passenger screening, food inspection and other applications.

  4. Carbon Nanotubes and Human Cells?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, G. Angela

    2005-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes that were chemically altered to be water soluble are shown to enter fibroblasts, T cells, and HL60 cells. Nanoparticles adversely affect immortalized HaCaT human keratinocyte cultures, indicating that they may enter cells.

  5. Thermoelectrics: Carbon nanotubes get high

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crispin, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    Waste heat can be converted to electricity by thermoelectric generators, but their development is hindered by the lack of cheap materials with good thermoelectric properties. Now, carbon-nanotube-based materials are shown to have improved properties when purified to contain only semiconducting species and then doped.

  6. Functionalized carbon nanotubes containing isocyanate groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chungui; Ji, Lijun; Liu, Huiju; Hu, Guangjun; Zhang, Shimin; Yang, Mingshu; Yang, Zhenzhong

    2004-12-01

    Functionalized carbon nanotubes containing isocyanate groups can extend the nanotube chemistry, and may promote their many potential applications such as in polymer composites and coatings. This paper describes a facile method to prepare functionalized carbon nanotubes containing highly reactive isocyanate groups on its surface via the reaction between toluene 2,4-diisocyanate and carboxylated carbon nanotubes. Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed that reactive isocyanate groups were covalently attached to carbon nanotubes. The content of isocyanate groups were determined by chemical titration and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA).

  7. Functionalized carbon nanotubes containing isocyanate groups

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Chungui; Ji Lijun; Liu Huiju; Hu Guangjun; Zhang Shimin; Yang Mingshu . E-mail: yms@iccas.ac.cn; Yang Zhenzhong . E-mail: yangzz@iccas.ac.cn

    2004-12-01

    Functionalized carbon nanotubes containing isocyanate groups can extend the nanotube chemistry, and may promote their many potential applications such as in polymer composites and coatings. This paper describes a facile method to prepare functionalized carbon nanotubes containing highly reactive isocyanate groups on its surface via the reaction between toluene 2,4-diisocyanate and carboxylated carbon nanotubes. Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed that reactive isocyanate groups were covalently attached to carbon nanotubes. The content of isocyanate groups were determined by chemical titration and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA)

  8. Conductance of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datta, Supriyo; Anatram, M. P.

    1998-01-01

    The recent report of quantized conductance in a 4 m long multiwalled nanotube (MWNT) raises the exciting possibility of ballistic transport at room temperature over relatively long distances. We argue that this is made possible by the special symmetry of the eigenstates of the lowest propagating modes in metallic nanotubes which suppresses backscattering. This unusual effect is absent for the higher propagating modes so that transport is not ballistic once the bias exceeds the cut-off energy for the higher modes, which is estimated to be approximately 75 meV for nanotubes of diameter approximately 15 nm. Also, we show that the symmetry of the eigenstates can significantly affect their coupling to the reservoir and hence the contact resistance. A simple model is presented that can be used to understand the observed conductance-voltage characteristics.

  9. Carbon nanotube electronics--moving forward.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chuan; Takei, Kuniharu; Takahashi, Toshitake; Javey, Ali

    2013-04-07

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) possess fascinating electrical properties and offer new entries into a wide range of novel electronic applications that are unattainable with conventional Si-based devices. The field initially focused on the use of individual or parallel arrays of nanotubes as the channel material for ultra-scaled nanoelectronic devices. However, the challenge in the deterministic assembly has proven to be a major technological barrier. In recent years, solution deposition of semiconductor-enriched SWNT networks has been actively explored for high performance and uniform thin-film transistors (TFTs) on mechanically rigid and flexible substrates. This presents a unique niche for nanotube electronics by overcoming their limitations and taking full advantage of their superb chemical and physical properties. This review focuses on the large-area processing and electronic properties of SWNT TFTs. A wide range of applications in conformal integrated circuits, radio-frequency electronics, artificial skin sensors, and displays are discussed--with emphasis on large-area systems where nm-scale accuracy in the assembly of nanotubes is not required. The demonstrations show SWNTs' immense promise as a low-cost and scalable TFT technology for nonconventional electronic systems with excellent device performances.

  10. Peel test of spinnable carbon nanotube webs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandoker, Noman; Hawkins, Stephen C.; Ibrahim, Raafat; Huynh, Chi P.

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents results of peel tests with spinnable carbon nanotube webs. Peel tests were performed to study the effect of orientation angles on interface energies between nanotubes. In absence of any binding agent the interface energy represents the Van Der Waals energies between the interacting nanotubes. Therefore, the effect of the orientations on Van Der Waals energies between carbon nanotubes is obtained through the peel test. It is shown that the energy for crossed nanotubes at 90° angle is lower than the energy for parallel nanotubes at 0° angle. This experimental observation was validated by hypothetical theoretical calculations.

  11. Carbon nanotubes by the metallocene route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Rahul; Govindaraj, A.; Rao, C. N. R.

    1997-03-01

    Pyrolysis of metallocenes such as ferrocene, cobaltocene and nickelocene, is shown to yield carbon nanotubes and metal-filled onion-like structures. Pyrolysis of benzene in the presence of a metallocene gives high yields of nanotubes, the wall thickness of the nanotubes depending on the metallocene content. Pyrolysis of benzene in the absence of any metal however gives monodispersed nanospheres of carbon rather than nanotubes.

  12. From carbon nanotubes to carbon atomic chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casillas García, Gilberto; Zhang, Weijia; José-Yacamán, Miguel

    2010-10-01

    Carbyne is a linear allotrope of carbon. It is formed by a linear arrangement of carbon atoms with sp-hybridization. We present a reliable and reproducible experiment to obtain these carbon atomic chains using few-layer-graphene (FLG) sheets and a HRTEM. First the FLG sheets were synthesized from worm-like exfoliated graphite and then drop-casted on a lacey-carbon copper grid. Once in the TEM, two holes are opened near each other in a FLG sheet by focusing the electron beam into a small spot. Due to the radiation, the carbon atoms rearrange themselves between the two holes and form carbon fibers. The beam is concentrated on the carbon fibers in order excite the atoms and induce a tension until multi wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) is formed. As the radiation continues the MWCNT breaks down until there is only a single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT). Then, when the SWCNT breaks, an atomic carbon chain is formed, lasts for several seconds under the radiation and finally breaks. This demonstrates the stability of this carbon structure.

  13. Carbon nanotube network embroidered graphene films for monolithic all-carbon electronics.

    PubMed

    Shi, Enzheng; Li, Hongbian; Yang, Long; Hou, Junfeng; Li, Yuanchang; Li, Li; Cao, Anyuan; Fang, Ying

    2015-01-27

    A unique cage growth of graphene is developed by using carbon nanotube (CNT) spider webs as porous templates, resulting in CNT/graphene hybrids with high conductivity and mechanical flexibility. Furthermore, monolithic all-carbon transistors with graphene as active elements and CNT/graphene hybrids as contacts and interconnects are directly formed by chemical synthesis, and flexible all-carbon bioelectronics are subsequently demonstrated for in vivo mapping of cardiac signals.

  14. Carbon-Nanotube Schottky Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manohara, Harish; Wong, Eric; Schlecht, Erich; Hunt, Brian; Siegel, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Schottky diodes based on semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes are being developed as essential components of the next generation of submillimeter-wave sensors and sources. Initial performance predictions have shown that the performance characteristics of these devices can exceed those of the state-of-the-art solid-state Schottky diodes that have been the components of choice for room-temperature submillimeter-wave sensors for more than 50 years. For state-of-the-art Schottky diodes used as detectors at frequencies above a few hundred gigahertz, the inherent parasitic capacitances associated with their semiconductor junction areas and the resistances associated with low electron mobilities limit achievable sensitivity. The performance of such a detector falls off approximately exponentially with frequency above 500 GHz. Moreover, when used as frequency multipliers for generating signals, state-of-the-art solid-state Schottky diodes exhibit extremely low efficiencies, generally putting out only micro-watts of power at frequencies up to 1.5 THz. The shortcomings of the state-of-the-art solid-state Schottky diodes can be overcome by exploiting the unique electronic properties of semiconducting carbon nanotubes. A single-walled carbon nanotube can be metallic or semiconducting, depending on its chirality, and exhibits high electron mobility (recently reported to be approx.= 2x10(exp 5)sq cm/V-s) and low parasitic capacitance. Because of the narrowness of nanotubes, Schottky diodes based on carbon nanotubes have ultra-small junction areas (of the order of a few square nanometers) and consequent junction capacitances of the order of 10(exp -18) F, which translates to cutoff frequency >5 THz. Because the turn-on power levels of these devices are very low (of the order of nano-watts), the input power levels needed for pumping local oscillators containing these devices should be lower than those needed for local oscillators containing state-of-the-art solid

  15. Quantum transport in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laird, Edward A.; Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Steele, Gary A.; Grove-Rasmussen, Kasper; Nygârd, Jesper; Flensberg, Karsten; Kouwenhoven, Leo P.

    2015-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes are a versatile material in which many aspects of condensed matter physics come together. Recent discoveries have uncovered new phenomena that completely change our understanding of transport in these devices, especially the role of the spin and valley degrees of freedom. This review describes the modern understanding of transport through nanotube devices. Unlike in conventional semiconductors, electrons in nanotubes have two angular momentum quantum numbers, arising from spin and valley freedom. The interplay between the two is the focus of this review. The energy levels associated with each degree of freedom, and the spin-orbit coupling between them, are explained, together with their consequences for transport measurements through nanotube quantum dots. In double quantum dots, the combination of quantum numbers modifies the selection rules of Pauli blockade. This can be exploited to read out spin and valley qubits and to measure the decay of these states through coupling to nuclear spins and phonons. A second unique property of carbon nanotubes is that the combination of valley freedom and electron-electron interactions in one dimension strongly modifies their transport behavior. Interaction between electrons inside and outside a quantum dot is manifested in SU(4) Kondo behavior and level renormalization. Interaction within a dot leads to Wigner molecules and more complex correlated states. This review takes an experimental perspective informed by recent advances in theory. As well as the well-understood overall picture, open questions for the field are also clearly stated. These advances position nanotubes as a leading system for the study of spin and valley physics in one dimension where electronic disorder and hyperfine interaction can both be reduced to a low level.

  16. Carbon nanotube coatings as chemical absorbers

    DOEpatents

    Tillotson, Thomas M.; Andresen, Brian D.; Alcaraz, Armando

    2004-06-15

    Airborne or aqueous organic compound collection using carbon nanotubes. Exposure of carbon nanotube-coated disks to controlled atmospheres of chemical warefare (CW)-related compounds provide superior extraction and retention efficiencies compared to commercially available airborne organic compound collectors. For example, the carbon nanotube-coated collectors were four (4) times more efficient toward concentrating dimethylmethyl-phosphonate (DMMP), a CW surrogate, than Carboxen, the optimized carbonized polymer for CW-related vapor collections. In addition to DMMP, the carbon nanotube-coated material possesses high collection efficiencies for the CW-related compounds diisopropylaminoethanol (DIEA), and diisopropylmethylphosphonate (DIMP).

  17. Morphing Carbon Nanotube Microstructures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-20

    would operate by swelling of an active material in a direction locally perpendicular to the CNTs. This shape change, in combination with the mechanical... materials and active surfaces. 15.  SUBJECT TERMS Morphing Structures, Plant-mimetic Design, Cabon Nanotube, Active Polymers 16.  SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF...and it was proposed that morphing CNT microstructures would operate by swelling of an active material in a direction locally perpendicular to the

  18. Interfacial heat flow in carbon nanotube suspensions.

    PubMed

    Huxtable, Scott T; Cahill, David G; Shenogin, Sergei; Xue, Liping; Ozisik, Rahmi; Barone, Paul; Usrey, Monica; Strano, Michael S; Siddons, Giles; Shim, Moonsub; Keblinski, Pawel

    2003-11-01

    The enormous amount of basic research into carbon nanotubes has sparked interest in the potential applications of these novel materials. One promising use of carbon nanotubes is as fillers in a composite material to improve mechanical behaviour, electrical transport and thermal transport. For composite materials with high thermal conductivity, the thermal conductance across the nanotube-matrix interface is of particular interest. Here we use picosecond transient absorption to measure the interface thermal conductance (G) of carbon nanotubes suspended in surfactant micelles in water. Classical molecular dynamics simulations of heat transfer from a carbon nanotube to a model hydrocarbon liquid are in agreement with experiment. Our findings indicate that heat transport in a nanotube composite material will be limited by the exceptionally small interface thermal conductance (G approximately 12 MW m(-2) K(-1)) and that the thermal conductivity of the composite will be much lower than the value estimated from the intrinsic thermal conductivity of the nanotubes and their volume fraction.

  19. Multifunctional Carbon Nanotube Sensors for Environmental Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu

    As a one dimensional material, a Single-walled Carbon Nanotube (SWNT) is made of a rolled up graphene sheet. With a diameter of 1˜2 nm, the SWNTs exhibit many unique properties, such as high aspect ratios, ballistic carrier transport, high mechanical strength and thermal stability. These properties enable SWNTs to have superior performances in various applications including electronics and sensors. SWNT based sensors are extremely sensitive to slight electrostatic changes in their environment and have a fast response where conductance of an SWNT is observed to change in less than 2 sec upon exposure. In addition, SWNT sensors have size advantage over traditional sensors. Hence, SWNTs have been widely explored as active sensing elements for chemical and biomolecule detection. Despite high sensitivities observed from nanotube sensors, one drawback is their lack of selectivity. The conductance of SWNTs is susceptible to many gas molecules in air, including oxygen and moisture which are abundantly present in the ambient environment. Due to this nonspecificity, the presence of any type of gas vapors can possibly interfere with the induced signals from the target gas vapors and hence reduce S/N ratio during detection. To minimize the effects of undesirable interference signals from the environment, several functionalization methods have been developed to customize the affinities of SWNTs to specific targets, including metal nano particles, conducting polymers and biomolecules. The objective of this thesis is to utilize SWNTs in environmental applications. The proposed research topics include: investigating the sensing characteristics of RNA oligomers on carbon nanotubes; analyzing the sensing characteristics of DNA with different sequence lengths on carbon nanotubes; integration of DNA decorated SWNTs onto CMOS chip for toxic and explosive gas monitoring; building nanosensor array based on multi-functionalized SWNTs for air quality monitoring and exploring the sensing

  20. Method of making carbon nanotube composite materials

    DOEpatents

    O'Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2014-05-20

    The present invention is a method of making a composite polymeric material by dissolving a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes and optionally additives in a solvent to make a solution and removing at least a portion of the solvent after casting onto a substrate to make thin films. The material has enhanced conductivity properties due to the blending of the un-functionalized and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes.

  1. High Performance Multiwall Carbon Nanotube Bolometers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-21

    REPORT High performance multiwall carbon nanotube bolometers 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: High infrared bolometric photoresponse has...been observed in multiwall carbon nanotube MWCNT films at room temperature. The observed detectivity D in exceeding 3.3 106 cm Hz1/2 /W on MWCNT film...U.S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS carbon nanotube, infrared detector, bolometer

  2. Nanotube electronics: large-scale assembly of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Rao, Saleem G; Huang, Ling; Setyawan, Wahyu; Hong, Seunghun

    2003-09-04

    Nanoscale electronic devices made from carbon nanotubes, such as transistors and sensors, are much smaller and more versatile than those that rely on conventional microelectronic chips, but their development for mass production has been thwarted by difficulties in aligning and integrating the millions of nanotubes required. Inspired by biomolecular self-assembly processes, we have created chemically functionalized patterns on a surface, to which pre-grown nanotubes in solution can align themselves in huge numbers. This method allows wafer-scale fabrication of millions of carbon-nanotube circuits with single-nanotube precision, and may enable nanotube-based devices, such as computer chips and high-density sensor arrays, to be produced industrially.

  3. Carbon Nanotubes: Molecular Electronic Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash; Menon, Madhu

    1997-01-01

    The carbon Nanotube junctions have recently emerged as excellent candidates for use as the building blocks in the formation of nanoscale molecular electronic networks. While the simple joint of two dissimilar tubes can be generated by the introduction of a pair of heptagon-pentagon defects in an otherwise perfect hexagonal graphene sheet, more complex joints require other mechanisms. In this work we explore structural characteristics of complex 3-point junctions of carbon nanotubes using a generalized tight-binding molecular-dynamics scheme. The study of pi-electron local densities of states (LDOS) of these junctions reveal many interesting features, most prominent among them being the defect-induced states in the gap.

  4. Carbon Nanotubes: Molecular Electronic Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash; Menon, Madhu

    1997-01-01

    The carbon Nanotube junctions have recently emerged as excellent candidates for use as the building blocks in the formation of nanoscale molecular electronic networks. While the simple joint of two dissimilar tubes can be generated by the introduction of a pair of heptagon-pentagon defects in an otherwise perfect hexagonal graphene sheet, more complex joints require other mechanisms. In this work we explore structural characteristics of complex 3-point junctions of carbon nanotubes using a generalized tight-binding molecular-dynamics scheme. The study of pi-electron local densities of states (LDOS) of these junctions reveal many interesting features, most prominent among them being the defect-induced states in the gap.

  5. Torsional carbon nanotube artificial muscles.

    PubMed

    Foroughi, Javad; Spinks, Geoffrey M; Wallace, Gordon G; Oh, Jiyoung; Kozlov, Mikhail E; Fang, Shaoli; Mirfakhrai, Tissaphern; Madden, John D W; Shin, Min Kyoon; Kim, Seon Jeong; Baughman, Ray H

    2011-10-28

    Rotary motors of conventional design can be rather complex and are therefore difficult to miniaturize; previous carbon nanotube artificial muscles provide contraction and bending, but not rotation. We show that an electrolyte-filled twist-spun carbon nanotube yarn, much thinner than a human hair, functions as a torsional artificial muscle in a simple three-electrode electrochemical system, providing a reversible 15,000° rotation and 590 revolutions per minute. A hydrostatic actuation mechanism, as seen in muscular hydrostats in nature, explains the simultaneous occurrence of lengthwise contraction and torsional rotation during the yarn volume increase caused by electrochemical double-layer charge injection. The use of a torsional yarn muscle as a mixer for a fluidic chip is demonstrated.

  6. Torsional Carbon Nanotube Artificial Muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foroughi, Javad; Spinks, Geoffrey M.; Wallace, Gordon G.; Oh, Jiyoung; Kozlov, Mikhail E.; Fang, Shaoli; Mirfakhrai, Tissaphern; Madden, John D. W.; Shin, Min Kyoon; Kim, Seon Jeong; Baughman, Ray H.

    2011-10-01

    Rotary motors of conventional design can be rather complex and are therefore difficult to miniaturize; previous carbon nanotube artificial muscles provide contraction and bending, but not rotation. We show that an electrolyte-filled twist-spun carbon nanotube yarn, much thinner than a human hair, functions as a torsional artificial muscle in a simple three-electrode electrochemical system, providing a reversible 15,000° rotation and 590 revolutions per minute. A hydrostatic actuation mechanism, as seen in muscular hydrostats in nature, explains the simultaneous occurrence of lengthwise contraction and torsional rotation during the yarn volume increase caused by electrochemical double-layer charge injection. The use of a torsional yarn muscle as a mixer for a fluidic chip is demonstrated.

  7. Multilayer Film Assembly of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassell, Alan M.; Meyyappan, M.; Han, Jie; Arnold, J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    An approach to assemble multilayers of carbon nanotubes on a substrate is presented. Chemical vapor deposition using a transition metal catalyst formulation is used to grow the nanotubes. Results show a bilayer assembly of nanotubes each with a different density of tubes.

  8. Mechanical behavior of ultralong multiwalled carbon nanotube mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deck, Christian P.; Flowers, Jason; McKee, Gregg S. B.; Vecchio, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been a subject of great interest partially due to their potential for exceptional material properties. Improvements in synthesis methods have facilitated the production of ultralong CNT mats, with lengths in the millimeter range. The increased length of these ultralong mats has, in return, opened the way to greater flexibility to probe their mechanical response. In this work, mats of dense, well-aligned, multiwalled carbon nanotubes were grown with a vapor-phase chemical vapor deposition technique using ferrocene and benzene as reactants, and subsequently tested in both tension and compression using two methods, in a thermomechanical analyzer and in situ inside a scanning electron microscope. In compression, measured stiffness was very low, due to buckling of the nanotubes. In tension, the nanotube mats behaved considerably stiffer; however, they were still more compliant than expected for nanotubes (˜1TPa). Analysis of both the growth method used and the nanotube mat fracture surface suggests that the mats grown in this method are not composed of continuous nanotubes and their strengths actually closely match those of woven nanotube yarns and ropes.

  9. Thermal conductivity of deformed carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Wei-Rong; Zhang, Mao-Ping; Zheng, Dong-Qin; Ai, Bao-Quan

    2011-04-01

    We investigate the thermal conductivity of four types of deformed carbon nanotubes by using the nonequilibrium molecular dynamics method. It is reported that various deformations have different influences on the thermal properties of carbon nanotubes. For bending carbon nanotubes, the thermal conductivity is independent of the bending angle. However, the thermal conductivity increases lightly with xy-distortion and decreases rapidly with z-distortion. The thermal conductivity does not change with the screw ratio before the breaking of carbon nanotubes, but it decreases sharply after the critical screw ratio.

  10. From carbon nanobells to nickel nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, S.; Srikanth, V. V. S. S.; Maik, D.; Zhang, G. Y.; Staedler, T.; Jiang, X.

    2009-01-01

    A generic strategy is proposed to prepare one dimensional (1D) metallic nanotubes by using 1D carbon nanostructures as the initial templates. Following the strategy, nickel (Ni) nanotubes are prepared by using carbon nanobells (CNBs) as the initial templates. CNBs are first prepared by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique. Carbon/nickel core/shell structures are then prepared by electroplating the CNBs in a nickel-Watts electrolytic cell. In the final step, the carbon core is selectively removed by employing hydrogen plasma etching to obtain Ni nanotubes. The mechanism leading to Ni nanotubes is briefly discussed.

  11. Flexure modes in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahan, G. D.; Jeon, Gun Sang

    2004-08-01

    Phonons are calculated for single wall carbon nanotubes. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors are presented for armchair and zig-zag tubes. The model contains just three adjustable spring constants: two for first and second nearest neighbor directed bonds, and a third for radial bond-bending interactions. There are four low frequency modes at long wavelength: a longitudinal acoustical, a torsional mode, and two flexure modes.

  12. Carbon Nanotube Field Emission Arrays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    deposition (PE-CVD), which is a hybrid of plasma based and thermal based synthesis, and silicon carbide ( SiC ) surface decomposition which, though a true...fabrication method. 2.4.3.2. Surface Decomposition The fabrication of carbon nanotubes by surface decomposition of silicon carbide offers some unique...CNTs are vertically aligned and attached to the remaining silicon carbide substrate. Surface decomposition is achieved through high temperatures in a

  13. Nanospot welding of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirayama, H.; Kawamoto, Y.; Ohshima, Y.; Takayanagi, K.

    2001-08-01

    Single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) bundles protruding from the SWNT layers on self-aligned Sn apexes were brought to a distance of 30 nm by a scanning tunneling microscope inside a transmission electron microscope. A straight bundle on the tip could be observed in situ in contact electrostatically with a looped bundle on the sample by applying tip bias voltages above 2.0 V. The bundles were welded at the nanometer size contact area by local Joule heating.

  14. Carbon Nanotube Assemblies for Transparent Conducting Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, Matthew P; Gerhardt, Rosario

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this chapter is to introduce readers to the fundamental and practical aspects of nanotube assemblies made into transparent conducting networks and discuss some practical aspects of their characterization. Transparent conducting coatings (TCC) are an essential part of electro-optical devices, from photovoltaics and light emitting devices to electromagnetic shielding and electrochromic widows. The market for organic materials (including nanomaterials and polymers) based TCCs is expected to show a growth rate of 56.9% to reach nearly 20.3billionin2015,whilethemarketfortraditionalinorganictransparentelectronicswillexperiencegrowthwithratesof6.7103 billion in 2015. Emerging flexible electronic applications have brought additional requirements of flexibility and low cost for TCC. However, the price of indium (the major component in indium tin oxide TCC) continues to increase. On the other hand, the price of nanomaterials has continued to decrease due to development of high volume, quality production processes. Additional benefits come from the low cost, nonvacuum deposition of nanomaterials based TCC, compared to traditional coatings requiring energy intensive vacuum deposition. Among the materials actively researched as alternative TCC are nanoparticles, nanowires, and nanotubes with high aspect ratio as well as their composites. The figure of merit (FOM) can be used to compare TCCs made from dissimilar materials and with different transmittance and conductivity values. In the first part of this manuscript, we will discuss the seven FOM parameters that have been proposed, including one specifically intended for flexible applications. The approach for how to measure TCE electrical properties, including frequency dependence, will also be discussed. We will relate the macroscale electrical characteristics of TCCs to the nanoscale parameters of conducting networks. The fundamental aspects of nanomaterial assemblies in conducting networks will also be addressed

  15. Carbon nanotubes: properties, synthesis, purification, and medical applications

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Current discoveries of different forms of carbon nanostructures have motivated research on their applications in various fields. They hold promise for applications in medicine, gene, and drug delivery areas. Many different production methods for carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been introduced; functionalization, filling, doping, and chemical modification have been achieved, and characterization, separation, and manipulation of individual CNTs are now possible. Parameters such as structure, surface area, surface charge, size distribution, surface chemistry, and agglomeration state as well as purity of the samples have considerable impact on the reactivity of carbon nanotubes. Otherwise, the strength and flexibility of carbon nanotubes make them of potential use in controlling other nanoscale structures, which suggests they will have a significant role in nanotechnology engineering. PMID:25170330

  16. Carbon nanotubes: properties, synthesis, purification, and medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eatemadi, Ali; Daraee, Hadis; Karimkhanloo, Hamzeh; Kouhi, Mohammad; Zarghami, Nosratollah; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl; Abasi, Mozhgan; Hanifehpour, Younes; Joo, Sang Woo

    2014-08-01

    Current discoveries of different forms of carbon nanostructures have motivated research on their applications in various fields. They hold promise for applications in medicine, gene, and drug delivery areas. Many different production methods for carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been introduced; functionalization, filling, doping, and chemical modification have been achieved, and characterization, separation, and manipulation of individual CNTs are now possible. Parameters such as structure, surface area, surface charge, size distribution, surface chemistry, and agglomeration state as well as purity of the samples have considerable impact on the reactivity of carbon nanotubes. Otherwise, the strength and flexibility of carbon nanotubes make them of potential use in controlling other nanoscale structures, which suggests they will have a significant role in nanotechnology engineering.

  17. Torsional electromechanical quantum oscillations in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen-Karni, Tzahi; Segev, Lior; Srur-Lavi, Onit; Cohen, Sidney R.; Joselevich, Ernesto

    2006-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes can be distinctly metallic or semiconducting depending on their diameter and chirality. Here we show that continuously varying the chirality by mechanical torsion can induce conductance oscillations, which can be attributed to metal-semiconductor periodic transitions. The phenomenon is observed in multiwalled carbon nanotubes, where both the torque and the current are shown to be carried predominantly by the outermost wall. The oscillation period with torsion is consistent with the theoretical shifting of the corners of the first Brillouin zone of graphene across different sub-bands allowed in the nanotube. Beyond a critical torsion, the conductance irreversibly drops due to torsional failure, allowing us to determine the torsional strength of carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes could be ideal torsional springs for nanoscopic pendulums, because electromechanical detection of motion could replace the microscopic detection techniques used at present. Our experiments indicate that carbon nanotubes could be used as electronic sensors of torsional motion in nanoelectromechanical systems.

  18. Carbon nanotubes - curse or blessing.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, J-P; Roesslein, M; Buerki-Thurnherr, T; Wick, P

    2011-01-01

    Although nanotechnology is a relatively new scientific field, quite many different products are already introduced in the market containing nanosized particles. A special class of nanosized materials namely the carbon nanotubes (CNT) possesses outstanding new properties and extraordinary potential for creating new products. Carbon nanotubes are already used in various consumer products, industrial applications and science. It is not as this time clear how CNT are able to affect human health since most types of CNTs differ significantly in terms of structural characteristics (morphology, size, shape and length), surface properties (surface chemistry and surface charge) and chemical composition. This review provides an overview about contradicting reports that are found in the literature. We summarize the studies that report about nontoxic as well as toxic effects of CNT in-vitro and in-vivo. We describe how carbon nanotubes can readily be degraded under certain conditions. Another phenomenon is that despite the observed toxic effects which may occur to cells, organs and animals after uptake of CNT, intensive research investigations were undertaken in order to use these outstanding materials in medical applications. The second part of this review starts with a short description of the main principles in metrology. Observed conflicts were discussed in CNT toxicity assays into terms of measurement science or metrology issues. It was demonstrated that any specification of a measurand is only valid within the given framework. This means that many of the published results are within their measurement framework correct, but there are no means to compare them outside this framework.

  19. LDRD final report on carbon nanotube composites

    SciTech Connect

    Cahill, P.A.; Rand, P.B.

    1997-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes and their composites were examined using computational and experimental techniques in order to modify the mechanical and electrical properties of resins. Single walled nanotubes were the focus of the first year effort; however, sufficient quantities of high purity single walled nanotubes could not be obtained for mechanical property investigations. The unusually high electrical conductivity of composites loaded with <1% of multiwalled nanotubes is useful, and is the focus of continuing, externally funded, research.

  20. Imaging single carbon nanotubes with thermal radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yuwei; Singer, Scott; Bergstrom, Raymond; Regan, B. C.

    2009-03-01

    We have constructed tiny light bulbs, visible to the naked eye, using individual carbon nanotubes as filaments. A nanotube is suspended over a hole in a solid silicon substrate, and is heated to incandescence with electrical current. Diffraction-limited optical microscopy identifies the nanotube position and orientation, and allows direct comparison with high-resolution transmission electron micrographs of the same nanotube. Our current progress toward quantitative pyrometry will be described.

  1. Engineering carbon nanotubes and nanotube circuits using electrical breakdown.

    PubMed

    Collins, P G; Arnold, M S; Avouris, P

    2001-04-27

    Carbon nanotubes display either metallic or semiconducting properties. Both large, multiwalled nanotubes (MWNTs), with many concentric carbon shells, and bundles or "ropes" of aligned single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs), are complex composite conductors that incorporate many weakly coupled nanotubes that each have a different electronic structure. Here we demonstrate a simple and reliable method for selectively removing single carbon shells from MWNTs and SWNT ropes to tailor the properties of these composite nanotubes. We can remove shells of MWNTs stepwise and individually characterize the different shells. By choosing among the shells, we can convert a MWNT into either a metallic or a semiconducting conductor, as well as directly address the issue of multiple-shell transport. With SWNT ropes, similar selectivity allows us to generate entire arrays of nanoscale field-effect transistors based solely on the fraction of semiconducting SWNTs.

  2. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes plastic NH3 gas sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isa, Siti S. Mat; Ramli, Muhammad M.; Jamlos, M. F.; Hambali, N. A. M. Ahmad; Isa, M. Mohamad; Kasjoo, S. R.; Ahmad, N.; Nor, N. I. M.; Khalid, N.

    2017-03-01

    Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs) functionalized -COOH was used as the sensing material. The MWCNTs suspension was then deposited on the plastic substrate using vacuum filtration method, hence created uniform thin film carbon nanotubes network. Plastic membrane was chosen as the substrate in order to produce flexible, lightweight, wearable and low cost sensor. This device was exposed to ammonia gas (NH3) at two different concentrations; 19.2 and 231.4 ppm. The device shows high sensitivity at 23.4 % when exposed to 231.4 ppm NH3 and less sensitivity at 4.39 % for 19.2 ppm NH3 exposure.

  3. Improved Process for Fabricating Carbon Nanotube Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, R.; Nguyen, C.; Cassell, A.; Delzeit, L.; Meyyappan, M.; Han, Jie

    2003-01-01

    An improved process has been developed for the efficient fabrication of carbon nanotube probes for use in atomic-force microscopes (AFMs) and nanomanipulators. Relative to prior nanotube tip production processes, this process offers advantages in alignment of the nanotube on the cantilever and stability of the nanotube's attachment. A procedure has also been developed at Ames that effectively sharpens the multiwalled nanotube, which improves the resolution of the multiwalled nanotube probes and, combined with the greater stability of multiwalled nanotube probes, increases the effective resolution of these probes, making them comparable in resolution to single-walled carbon nanotube probes. The robust attachment derived from this improved fabrication method and the natural strength and resiliency of the nanotube itself produces an AFM probe with an extremely long imaging lifetime. In a longevity test, a nanotube tip imaged a silicon nitride surface for 15 hours without measurable loss of resolution. In contrast, the resolution of conventional silicon probes noticeably begins to degrade within minutes. These carbon nanotube probes have many possible applications in the semiconductor industry, particularly as devices are approaching the nanometer scale and new atomic layer deposition techniques necessitate a higher resolution characterization technique. Previously at Ames, the use of nanotube probes has been demonstrated for imaging photoresist patterns with high aspect ratio. In addition, these tips have been used to analyze Mars simulant dust grains, extremophile protein crystals, and DNA structure.

  4. Electrochemical Detection of p-Aminophenol by Flexible Devices Based on Multi-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Dispersed in Electrochemically Modified Nafion

    PubMed Central

    Scandurra, Graziella; Antonella, Arena; Ciofi, Carmine; Saitta, Gaetano; Lanza, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    A conducting composite prepared by dispersing multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) into a host matrix consisting of Nafion, electrochemically doped with copper, has been prepared, characterized and used to modify one of the gold electrodes of simply designed electrochemical cells having copier grade transparency sheets as substrates. Electrical measurements performed in deionized water show that the Au/Nafion/Au-MWCNTs–Nafion:Cu cells can be successfully used in order to detect the presence of p-aminophenol (PAP) in water, without the need for any supporting electrolyte. The intensity of the redox peaks arising when PAP is added to deionized water is found to be linearly related to the analyte in the range from 0.2 to 1.6 μM, with a detection limit of 90 nM and a sensitivity of 7 μA·(μM−1)·cm−2. PMID:24854357

  5. Electrochemical detection of p-aminophenol by flexible devices based on multi-wall carbon nanotubes dispersed in electrochemically modified Nafion.

    PubMed

    Scandurra, Graziella; Antonella, Arena; Ciofi, Carmine; Saitta, Gaetano; Lanza, Maurizio

    2014-05-21

    A conducting composite prepared by dispersing multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) into a host matrix consisting of Nafion, electrochemically doped with copper, has been prepared, characterized and used to modify one of the gold electrodes of simply designed electrochemical cells having copier grade transparency sheets as substrates. Electrical measurements performed in deionized water show that the Au/Nafion/Au-MWCNTs-Nafion:Cu cells can be successfully used in order to detect the presence of p-aminophenol (PAP) in water, without the need for any supporting electrolyte. The intensity of the redox peaks arising when PAP is added to deionized water is found to be linearly related to the analyte in the range from 0.2 to 1.6 µM, with a detection limit of 90 nM and a sensitivity of 7 µA·(µM(-1))·cm(-2).

  6. Carbon nanotubes and graphene towards soft electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Sang Hoon; Lee, Young Hee

    2014-04-01

    Although silicon technology has been the main driving force for miniaturizing device dimensions to improve cost and performance, the current application of Si to soft electronics (flexible and stretchable electronics) is limited due to material rigidity. As a result, various prospective materials have been proposed to overcome the rigidity of conventional Si technology. In particular, nano-carbon materials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene are promising due to outstanding elastic properties as well as an excellent combination of electronic, optoelectronic, and thermal properties compared to conventional rigid silicon. The uniqueness of these nano-carbon materials has opened new possibilities for soft electronics, which is another technological trend in the market. This review covers the recent progress of soft electronics research based on CNTs and graphene. We discuss the strategies for soft electronics with nano-carbon materials and their preparation methods (growth and transfer techniques) to devices as well as the electrical characteristics of transparent conducting films (transparency and sheet resistance) and device performances in field effect transistor (FET) (structure, carrier type, on/off ratio, and mobility). In addition to discussing state of the art performance metrics, we also attempt to clarify trade-off issues and methods to control the trade-off on/off versus mobility). We further demonstrate accomplishments of the CNT network in flexible integrated circuits on plastic substrates that have attractive characteristics. A future research direction is also proposed to overcome current technological obstacles necessary to realize commercially feasible soft electronics.

  7. Lipid Bilayers Covalently Anchored to Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Dayani, Yasaman; Malmstadt, Noah

    2012-01-01

    The unique physical and electrical properties of carbon nanotubes make them an exciting material for applications in various fields such as bioelectronics and biosensing. Due to the poor water solubility of carbon nanotubes, functionalization for such applications has been a challenge. Of particular need are functionalization methods for integrating carbon nanotubes with biomolecules and constructing novel hybrid nanostructures for bionanoelectronic applications. We present a novel method for the fabrication of dispersible, biocompatible carbon nanotube-based materials. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are covalently modified with primary amine-bearing phospholipids in a carbodiimide-activated reaction. These modified carbon nanotubes have good dispersibility in nonpolar solvents. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy shows peaks attributable to the formation of amide bonds between lipids and the nanotube surface. Simple sonication of lipid-modified nanotubes with other lipid molecules leads to the formation of a uniform lipid bilayer coating the nanotubes. These bilayer-coated nanotubes are highly dispersible and stable in aqueous solution. Confocal fluorescence microscopy shows labeled lipids on the surface of bilayer-modified nanotubes. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows the morphology of dispersed bilayer-coated MWCNTs. Fluorescence quenching of lipid-coated MWCNTs confirms the bilayer configuration of the lipids on the nanotube surface and fluorescence anisotropy measurements show that the bilayer is fluid above the gel-to-liquid transition temperature. The membrane protein α-hemolysin spontaneously inserts into the MWCNT-supported bilayer, confirming the biomimetic membrane structure. These biomimetic nanostructures are a promising platform for the integration of carbon nanotube-based materials with biomolecules. PMID:22568448

  8. Lipid bilayers covalently anchored to carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Dayani, Yasaman; Malmstadt, Noah

    2012-05-29

    The unique physical and electrical properties of carbon nanotubes make them an exciting material for applications in various fields such as bioelectronics and biosensing. Due to the poor water solubility of carbon nanotubes, functionalization for such applications has been a challenge. Of particular need are functionalization methods for integrating carbon nanotubes with biomolecules and constructing novel hybrid nanostructures for bionanoelectronic applications. We present a novel method for the fabrication of dispersible, biocompatible carbon nanotube-based materials. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are covalently modified with primary amine-bearing phospholipids in a carbodiimide-activated reaction. These modified carbon nanotubes have good dispersibility in nonpolar solvents. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy shows peaks attributable to the formation of amide bonds between lipids and the nanotube surface. Simple sonication of lipid-modified nanotubes with other lipid molecules leads to the formation of a uniform lipid bilayer coating the nanotubes. These bilayer-coated nanotubes are highly dispersible and stable in aqueous solution. Confocal fluorescence microscopy shows labeled lipids on the surface of bilayer-modified nanotubes. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows the morphology of dispersed bilayer-coated MWCNTs. Fluorescence quenching of lipid-coated MWCNTs confirms the bilayer configuration of the lipids on the nanotube surface, and fluorescence anisotropy measurements show that the bilayer is fluid above the gel-to-liquid transition temperature. The membrane protein α-hemolysin spontaneously inserts into the MWCNT-supported bilayer, confirming the biomimetic membrane structure. These biomimetic nanostructures are a promising platform for the integration of carbon nanotube-based materials with biomolecules.

  9. Plasticity and Kinky Chemistry of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Dzegilenko, Fedor

    2000-01-01

    Since their discovery in 1991, carbon nanotubes have been the subject of intense research interest based on early predictions of their unique mechanical, electronic, and chemical properties. Materials with the predicted unique properties of carbon nanotubes are of great interest for use in future generations of aerospace vehicles. For their structural properties, carbon nanotubes could be used as reinforcing fibers in ultralight multifunctional composites. For their electronic properties, carbon nanotubes offer the potential of very high-speed, low-power computing elements, high-density data storage, and unique sensors. In a continuing effort to model and predict the properties of carbon nanotubes, Ames accomplished three significant results during FY99. First, accurate values of the nanomechanics and plasticity of carbon nanotubes based on quantum molecular dynamics simulations were computed. Second, the concept of mechanical deformation catalyzed-kinky-chemistry as a means to control local chemistry of nanotubes was discovered. Third, the ease of nano-indentation of silicon surfaces with carbon nanotubes was established. The elastic response and plastic failure mechanisms of single-wall nanotubes were investigated by means of quantum molecular dynamics simulations.

  10. CARBON NANOTUBES: PROPERTIES AND APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, John, E.

    2009-07-24

    Carbon nanotubes were discovered in 1991 as a minority byproduct of fullerene synthesis. Remarkable progress has been made in the ensuing years, including the discovery of two basic types of nanotubes (single-wall and multi-wall), great strides in synthesis and purification, elucidation of many fundamental physical properties, and important steps towards practical applications. Both the underlying science and technological potential of SWNT can profitably be studied at the scale of individual tubes and on macroscopic assemblies such as fibers. Experiments on single tubes directly reveal many of the predicted quantum confinement and mechanical properties. Semiconductor nanowires have many features in common with nanotubes, and many of the same fundamental and practical issues are in play – quantum confinement and its effect on properties; possible device structures and circuit architectures; thermal management; optimal synthesis, defect morphology and control, etc. In 2000 we began a small effort in this direction, conducted entirely by undergraduates with minimal consumables support from this grant. With DOE-BES approval, this grew into a project in parallel with the carbon nanotube work, in which we studied of inorganic semiconductor nanowire growth, characterization and novel strategies for electronic and electromechanical device fabrication. From the beginnings of research on carbon nanotubes, one of the major applications envisioned was hydrogen storage for fuel-cell powered cars and trucks. Subsequent theoretical models gave mixed results, the most pessimistic indicating that the fundamental H2-SWNT interaction was similar to flat graphite (physisorption) with only modest binding energies implying cryogenic operation at best. New material families with encouraging measured properties have emerged, and materials modeling has gained enormously in predictive power, sophistication, and the ability to treat a realistically representative number of atoms. One of

  11. Covalent Sidewall Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiang, I.W.; Saini, R. K.; Mickelson, E. T.; Billups, W. E.; Hauge, R. H.; Margrave, J. L.

    2001-01-01

    Progress of fluorination of single-wall carbon nanotubes is being reported. Covalent attachment of alkyl groups including methyl, n-butyl and n-hexyl groups to the sidewalls of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) has been achieved. Quantitative measurement of the alkylation was done by thermal gravimetric analysis. FTIR, Raman and UV-Vis-NIR were used to characterize these alkylated SWNTs. Application of these nanotubes are being investigated-fibers, composites, batteries, lubricants, etc.

  12. Covalent Sidewall Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiang, I.W.; Saini, R. K.; Mickelson, E. T.; Billups, W. E.; Hauge, R. H.; Margrave, J. L.

    2001-01-01

    Progress of fluorination of single-wall carbon nanotubes is being reported. Covalent attachment of alkyl groups including methyl, n-butyl and n-hexyl groups to the sidewalls of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) has been achieved. Quantitative measurement of the alkylation was done by thermal gravimetric analysis. FTIR, Raman and UV-Vis-NIR were used to characterize these alkylated SWNTs. Application of these nanotubes are being investigated-fibers, composites, batteries, lubricants, etc.

  13. Amorphous Carbon-Boron Nitride Nanotube Hybrids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jae Woo (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Wise, Kristopher E. (Inventor); Lin, Yi (Inventor); Connell, John (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method for joining or repairing boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). In joining BNNTs, the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures. In repairing BNNTs, the damaged site of the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures at the damage site.

  14. Longitudinal solitons in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astakhova, T. Yu.; Gurin, O. D.; Menon, M.; Vinogradov, G. A.

    2001-07-01

    We present results on soliton excitations in carbon nanotubes (CNT's) using Brenner's many-body potential. Our numerical simulations demonstrate high soliton stability in (10,10) CNT's. The interactions of solitons and solitary excitation with CNT defect are found to be inelastic if the excitations and defects length scales are comparable, resulting in a substantial part of soliton energy being distributed inhomogeneously over the defect bonds. In these solitary-excitation-cap collisions the local energy of a few bonds in the cap can exceed the average energy by an order of magnitude and more. This phenomenon, denoted the ``Tsunami effect,'' can contribute dynamically to the recently proposed ``kinky chemistry.'' We also present results of changes in the local density of states and variations in the atomic partial charges estimated at different time instants of the solitary-excitation Tsunami at the nanotube cap.

  15. A Tunable Carbon Nanotube Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazonova, Vera

    2005-03-01

    Nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) hold promise for a number of scientific and technological applications. Carbon nanotubes (NT) are perhaps the ultimate material for realizing a NEMS device as they are the stiffest material known, have low density, ultrasmall cross sections and can be defect-free. Equally important, a nanotube can act as a transistor and thus is able to sense its own motion. Here, we report the electrical actuation and detection of the guitar-string oscillation modes of doubly-clamped NT oscillators. We observed resonance frequencies in the 5MHz to 150MHz range with quality factors in the 50 to 100 range. We showed that the resonance frequencies can be widely tuned by a gate voltage. We also report on the temperature dependence of the quality factor and present a discussion of possible loss mechanisms.

  16. Nanotube liquid crystal elastomers: photomechanical response and flexible energy conversion of layered polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaoming; King, Benjamin C; Loomis, James; Campo, Eva M; Hegseth, John; Cohn, Robert W; Terentjev, Eugene; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2014-09-05

    Elastomeric composites based on nanotube liquid crystals (LCs) that preserve the internal orientation of nanotubes could lead to anisotropic physical properties and flexible energy conversion. Using a simple vacuum filtration technique of fabricating nanotube LC films and utilizing a transfer process to poly (dimethyl) siloxane wherein the LC arrangement is preserved, here we demonstrate unique and reversible photomechanical response of this layered composite to excitation by near infra-red (NIR) light at ultra-low nanotube mass fractions. On excitation by NIR photons, with application of small or large pre-strains, significant expansion or contraction of the sample occurs, respectively, that is continuously reversible and three orders of magnitude larger than in pristine polymer. Schlieren textures were noted in these LC composites confirming long range macroscopic nematic order of nanotubes within the composites. Order parameters of LC films ranged from S(optical) = 0.51-0.58 from dichroic measurements. Film concentrations, elastic modulus and photomechanical stress were all seen to be related to the nematic order parameter. For the same nanotube concentration, the photomechanical stress was almost three times larger for the self-assembled LC nanotube actuator compared to actuator based on randomly oriented carbon nanotubes. Investigation into the kinetics of photomechanical actuation showed variation in stretching exponent β with pre-strains, concentration and orientation of nanotubes. Maximum photomechanical stress of ∼ 0.5 MPa W(-1) and energy conversion of ∼ 0.0045% was achieved for these layered composites. The combination of properties, namely, optical anisotropy, reversible mechanical response to NIR excitation and flexible energy conversion all in one system accompanied with low cost makes nanotube LC elastomers important for soft photochromic actuation, energy conversion and photo-origami applications.

  17. Nanotube liquid crystal elastomers: photomechanical response and flexible energy conversion of layered polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiaoming; King, Benjamin C.; Loomis, James; Campo, Eva M.; Hegseth, John; Cohn, Robert W.; Terentjev, Eugene; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2014-09-01

    Elastomeric composites based on nanotube liquid crystals (LCs) that preserve the internal orientation of nanotubes could lead to anisotropic physical properties and flexible energy conversion. Using a simple vacuum filtration technique of fabricating nanotube LC films and utilizing a transfer process to poly (dimethyl) siloxane wherein the LC arrangement is preserved, here we demonstrate unique and reversible photomechanical response of this layered composite to excitation by near infra-red (NIR) light at ultra-low nanotube mass fractions. On excitation by NIR photons, with application of small or large pre-strains, significant expansion or contraction of the sample occurs, respectively, that is continuously reversible and three orders of magnitude larger than in pristine polymer. Schlieren textures were noted in these LC composites confirming long range macroscopic nematic order of nanotubes within the composites. Order parameters of LC films ranged from Soptical = 0.51-0.58 from dichroic measurements. Film concentrations, elastic modulus and photomechanical stress were all seen to be related to the nematic order parameter. For the same nanotube concentration, the photomechanical stress was almost three times larger for the self-assembled LC nanotube actuator compared to actuator based on randomly oriented carbon nanotubes. Investigation into the kinetics of photomechanical actuation showed variation in stretching exponent β with pre-strains, concentration and orientation of nanotubes. Maximum photomechanical stress of ˜0.5 MPa W-1 and energy conversion of ˜0.0045% was achieved for these layered composites. The combination of properties, namely, optical anisotropy, reversible mechanical response to NIR excitation and flexible energy conversion all in one system accompanied with low cost makes nanotube LC elastomers important for soft photochromic actuation, energy conversion and photo-origami applications.

  18. Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Joseph; Gilbert, Matthew; Naab, Fabian; Savage, Lauren; Holland, Wayne; Duggan, Jerome; McDaniel, Floyd

    2004-10-01

    Hydrogen as a fuel source is an attractive, relatively clean alternative to fossil fuels. However, a major limitation in its use for the application of automobiles has been the requirement for an efficient hydrogen storage medium. Current hydrogen storage systems are: physical storage in high pressure tanks, metal hydride, and gas-on-solid absorption. However, these methods do not fulfill the Department of Energy's targeted requirements for a usable hydrogen storage capacity of 6.5 wt.%, operation near ambient temperature and pressure, quick extraction and refueling, reliability and reusability.Reports showing high capacity hydrogen storage in single-walled carbon nanotubes originally prompted great excitement in the field, but further research has shown conflicting results. Results for carbon nanostructures have ranged from less than 1 wt.% to 70 wt.%. The wide range of adsorption found in previous experiments results from the difficulty in measuring hydrogen in objects just nanometers in size. Most previous experiments relied on weight analysis and residual gas analysis to determine the amount of hydrogen being adsorbed by the CNTs. These differing results encouraged us to perform our own analysis on single-walled (SWNTs), double-walled (DWNTs), and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), as well as carbon fiber. We chose to utilize direct measurement of hydrogen in the materials using elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA). This work was supported by the National Science Foundation's Research Experience for Undergraduates and the University of North Texas.

  19. Terahertz Science and Technology of Macroscopically Aligned Carbon Nanotube Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kono, Junichiro

    One of the outstanding challenges in nanotechnology is how to assemble individual nano-objects into macroscopic architectures while preserving their extraordinary properties. For example, the one-dimensional character of electrons in individual carbon nanotubes leads to extremely anisotropic transport, optical, and magnetic phenomena, but their macroscopic manifestations have been limited. Here, we describe methods for preparing macroscopic films, sheets, and fibers of highly aligned carbon nanotubes and their applications to basic and applied terahertz studies. Sufficiently thick films act as ideal terahertz polarizers, and appropriately doped films operate as polarization-sensitive, flexible, powerless, and ultra-broadband detectors. Together with recently developed chirality enrichment methods, these developments will ultimately allow us to study dynamic conductivities of interacting one-dimensional electrons in macroscopic single crystals of single-chirality single-wall carbon nanotubes.

  20. Carbon nanotube electrodes in organic transistors.

    PubMed

    Valitova, Irina; Amato, Michele; Mahvash, Farzaneh; Cantele, Giovanni; Maffucci, Antonio; Santato, Clara; Martel, Richard; Cicoira, Fabio

    2013-06-07

    The scope of this Minireview is to provide an overview of the recent progress on carbon nanotube electrodes applied to organic thin film transistors. After an introduction on the general aspects of the charge injection processes at various electrode-semiconductor interfaces, we discuss the great potential of carbon nanotube electrodes for organic thin film transistors and the recent achievements in the field.

  1. Multiscale Simulations of Carbon Nanotubes and Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2005-11-01

    We present molecular dynamics and hybrid continuum/atomistic simulations of carbon nanotubes in liquid environments with an emphasis on aqueous solutions. We emphasize computational issues such as interaction potentials and coupling techniques and their influence on the simulated physics. We present results from simulations of water flows inside and outside doped and pure carbon nanotubes and discuss their implications for experimental studies.

  2. Ophthalmologial Applications of Carbon Nanotube Nanotechology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loftus, David; Girten, Beverly (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The development of an implantable device consisting of an array of carbon nanotubes on a silicon chip for restoration of vision in patients with macular degeneration and other retinal disorders is presented. The use of carbon nanotube bucky paper for retinal cell transplantation is proposed. This paper is in viewgraph form.

  3. Light emission in silicon from carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Gaufrès, Etienne; Izard, Nicolas; Noury, Adrien; Le Roux, Xavier; Rasigade, Gilles; Beck, Alexandre; Vivien, Laurent

    2012-05-22

    The use of optics in microelectronic circuits to overcome the limitation of metallic interconnects is more and more considered as a viable solution. Among future silicon compatible materials, carbon nanotubes are promising candidates thanks to their ability to emit, modulate, and detect light in the wavelength range of silicon transparency. We report the first integration of carbon nanotubes with silicon waveguides, successfully coupling their emission and absorption properties. A complete study of this coupling between carbon nanotubes and silicon waveguides was carried out, which led to the demonstration of the temperature-independent emission from carbon nanotubes in silicon at a wavelength of 1.3 μm. This represents the first milestone in the development of photonics based on carbon nanotubes on silicon.

  4. Carbon Nanotube Thin-Film Antennas.

    PubMed

    Puchades, Ivan; Rossi, Jamie E; Cress, Cory D; Naglich, Eric; Landi, Brian J

    2016-08-17

    Multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) dipole antennas have been successfully designed, fabricated, and tested. Antennas of varying lengths were fabricated using flexible bulk MWCNT sheet material and evaluated to confirm the validity of a full-wave antenna design equation. The ∼20× improvement in electrical conductivity provided by chemically doped SWCNT thin films over MWCNT sheets presents an opportunity for the fabrication of thin-film antennas, leading to potentially simplified system integration and optical transparency. The resonance characteristics of a fabricated chlorosulfonic acid-doped SWCNT thin-film antenna demonstrate the feasibility of the technology and indicate that when the sheet resistance of the thin film is >40 ohm/sq no power is absorbed by the antenna and that a sheet resistance of <10 ohm/sq is needed to achieve a 10 dB return loss in the unbalanced antenna. The dependence of the return loss performance on the SWCNT sheet resistance is consistent with unbalanced metal, metal oxide, and other CNT-based thin-film antennas, and it provides a framework for which other thin-film antennas can be designed.

  5. Nanocapillarity and chemistry in carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Ugarte, D.; Chatelain, A.; Heer, W.A. de

    1996-12-13

    Open carbon nanotubes were filled with molten silver nitrate by capillary forces. Only those tubes with inner diameters of 4 nanometers or more were filled, suggesting a capillarity size dependence as a result of the lowering of the nanotube-salt interface energy with increasing curvature of the nanotube walls. Nanotube cavities should also be less chemically reactive than graphite and may serve as nanosize test tubes. This property has been illustrated by monitoring the decomposition of silver nitrate within nanotubes in situ in an electron microscope, which produced chains of silver nanobeads separated by high-pressure gas pockets. 32 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Supported Lipid Bilayer/Carbon Nanotube Hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xinjian; Moran-Mirabal, Jose; Craighead, Harold; McEuen, Paul

    2007-03-01

    We form supported lipid bilayers on single-walled carbon nanotubes and use this hybrid structure to probe the properties of lipid membranes and their functional constituents. We first demonstrate membrane continuity and lipid diffusion over the nanotube. A membrane-bound tetanus toxin protein, on the other hand, sees the nanotube as a diffusion barrier whose strength depends on the diameter of the nanotube. Finally, we present results on the electrical detection of specific binding of streptavidin to biotinylated lipids with nanotube field effect transistors. Possible techniques to extract dynamic information about the protein binding events will also be discussed.

  7. Epitaxial Approaches to Carbon Nanotube Organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismach, Ariel

    Carbon nanotubes have unique electronic, mechanical, optical and thermal properties, which make them ideal candidates as building blocks in nano-electronic and electromechanical systems. However, their organization into well-defined geometries and arrays on surfaces remains a critical challenge for their integration into functional nanosystems. In my PhD, we developed a new approach for the organization of carbon nanotubes directed by crystal surfaces. The principle relies on the guided growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) by atomic features presented on anisotropic substrates. We identified three different modes of surface-directed growth (or 'nanotube epitaxy'), in which the growth of carbon nanotubes is directed by crystal substrates: We first observed the nanotube unidirectional growth along atomic steps ('ledge-directed epitaxy') and nanofacets ('graphoepitaxy') on the surface of miscut C-plane sapphire and quartz. The orientation along crystallographic directions ('lattice-directed epitaxy') was subsequently observed by other groups on different crystals. We have proposed a "wake growth" mechanism for the nanotube alignment along atomic steps and nanofacets. In this mechanism, the catalyst nanoparticle slides along the step or facet, leaving the nanotube behind as a wake. In addition, we showed that the combination of surface-directed growth with external forces, such as electric-field and gas flow, can lead to the simultaneous formation of complex nanotube structures, such as grids and serpentines. The "wake growth" model, which explained the growth of aligned nanotubes, could not explain the formation of nanotube serpentines. For the latter, we proposed a "falling spaghetti" mechanism, in which the nanotube first grows by a free-standing process, aligned in the direction of the gas flow, then followed by absorption on the stepped surface in an oscillatory manner, due to the competition between the drag force caused by the gas flow on the suspended

  8. Atomic Entanglement in Carbon Nanotubes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarev, Igor; Vlahovic, Branislav

    2006-03-01

    The development of materials that may host quantum coherent states is a critical research problem for the nearest future. Recent progress in the growth of centimeter-long small-diameter single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNs)[1] and successful experiments on the encapsulation of single atoms into CNs[2], stimulate the study of dynamical quantum processes in atomically doped CN systems. We have recently shown[3] that atomic states may be strongly coupled to vacuum surface photonic modes in the CN, thus forming quasi-1D cavity polaritons similar to those observed for quantum dots in semiconductor nanocavities[4], which were recently suggested to be a possible way to produce the excitonic qubit entanglement[5]. Here, we show that, being strongly coupled to the (resonator-like) cylindrical nanotube environment, the two atomic quasi-1D polaritons can be easily entangled as well, thus challenging a novel alternative approach towards quantum information transfer over centimeter-long distances. [1]L.X.Zheng et al, Proc. Nanotech 2005 (May 8-12, 2005, Anaheim, CA, USA), vol.3, p.126. [2]G.-H.Jeong et al, Phys. Rev. B68,075410(2003). [3]I.V.Bondarev and Ph.Lambin, in: Trends in Nanotubes Reasearch (NovaScience, NY, 2005); Phys. Rev. B70,035407(2004); Phys. Rev. B72,035451(2005). [4]T.Yoshie et al, Nature 432,200(2004). [5]S.Hughes, Phys. Rev. Lett.94,227402(2005).

  9. Carbon nanotube growth density control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delzeit, Lance D. (Inventor); Schipper, John F. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Method and system for combined coarse scale control and fine scale control of growth density of a carbon nanotube (CNT) array on a substrate, using a selected electrical field adjacent to a substrate surface for coarse scale density control (by one or more orders of magnitude) and a selected CNT growth temperature range for fine scale density control (by multiplicative factors of less than an order of magnitude) of CNT growth density. Two spaced apart regions on a substrate may have different CNT growth densities and/or may use different feed gases for CNT growth.

  10. Coated carbon nanotube array electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifeng; Wen, Jian; Chen, Jinghua; Huang, Zhongping; Wang, Dezhi

    2006-12-12

    The present invention provides conductive carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode materials comprising aligned CNT substrates coated with an electrically conducting polymer, and the fabrication of electrodes for use in high performance electrical energy storage devices. In particular, the present invention provides conductive CNTs electrode material whose electrical properties render them especially suitable for use in high efficiency rechargeable batteries. The present invention also provides methods for obtaining surface modified conductive CNT electrode materials comprising an array of individual linear, aligned CNTs having a uniform surface coating of an electrically conductive polymer such as polypyrrole, and their use in electrical energy storage devices.

  11. Coated carbon nanotube array electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifeng [Newton, MA; Wen, Jian [Newton, MA; Chen, Jinghua [Chestnut Hill, MA; Huang, Zhongping [Belmont, MA; Wang, Dezhi [Wellesley, MA

    2008-10-28

    The present invention provides conductive carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode materials comprising aligned CNT substrates coated with an electrically conducting polymer, and the fabrication of electrodes for use in high performance electrical energy storage devices. In particular, the present invention provides conductive CNTs electrode material whose electrical properties render them especially suitable for use in high efficiency rechargeable batteries. The present invention also provides methods for obtaining surface modified conductive CNT electrode materials comprising an array of individual linear, aligned CNTs having a uniform surface coating of an electrically conductive polymer such as polypyrrole, and their use in electrical energy storage devices.

  12. Carbon nanotube interaction with DNA.

    PubMed

    Lu, Gang; Maragakis, Paul; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2005-05-01

    We investigate a system consisting of B-DNA and an array of (10,0) carbon nanotubes periodically arranged to fit into the major groove of the DNA. We obtain an accurate electronic structure of the combined system, which reveals that it is semiconducting and that the bands on either end of the gap are derived exclusively from one of the two components. We discuss in detail how this system can be used as either an electronic switch involving transport through both components, or as a device for ultrafast DNA sequencing.

  13. Computer generated holograms for carbon nanotube arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montelongo, Yunuen; Butt, Haider; Butler, Tim; Wilkinson, Timothy D.; Amaratunga, Gehan A. J.

    2013-05-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes are highly diffractive structures in the optical regime. Their metallic character and large scattering cross-section allow their usage as diffractive elements in Fraunhofer holograms. This work elaborates some important features of the far field diffraction patterns produced from periodic arrays of nanotubes. A theoretical approach for the interaction of arrays of nanotubes with light is presented and a computer generated hologram is calculated by means of periodical patterns. Based on the results, fabrication of carbon nanotube arrays (in holographic patterns) was performed. Experimentally measured diffraction patterns were in good agreement with the calculations.

  14. Computer generated holograms for carbon nanotube arrays.

    PubMed

    Montelongo, Yunuen; Butt, Haider; Butler, Tim; Wilkinson, Timothy D; Amaratunga, Gehan A J

    2013-05-21

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes are highly diffractive structures in the optical regime. Their metallic character and large scattering cross-section allow their usage as diffractive elements in Fraunhofer holograms. This work elaborates some important features of the far field diffraction patterns produced from periodic arrays of nanotubes. A theoretical approach for the interaction of arrays of nanotubes with light is presented and a computer generated hologram is calculated by means of periodical patterns. Based on the results, fabrication of carbon nanotube arrays (in holographic patterns) was performed. Experimentally measured diffraction patterns were in good agreement with the calculations.

  15. Capillarity and Wetting of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dujardin, E.; Ebbesen, T. W.; Hiura, H.; Tanigaki, K.

    1994-09-01

    The wetting and capillarity of carbon nanotubes were studied in detail here. Nanotubes are not "super-straws," although they can be wet and filled by substances having low surface tension, such as sulfur, selenium, and cesium, with an upper limit to this tension less than 200 millinewtons per meter. This limit implies that typical pure metals will not be drawn into the inner cavity of nanotubes through capillarity, whereas water and organic solvents will. These results have important implications for the further use of carbon nanotubes in experiments on a nanometer scale.

  16. Capillarity and wetting of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Dujardin, E; Ebbesen, T W; Hiura, H; Tanigaki, K

    1994-09-23

    The wetting and capillarity of carbon nanotubes were studied in detail here. Nanotubes are not "super-straws," although they can be wet and filled by substances having low surface tension, such as sulfur, selenium, and cesium, with an upper limit to this tension less than 200 millinewtons per meter. This limit implies that typical pure metals will not be drawn into the inner cavity of nanotubes through capillarity, whereas water and organic solvents will. These results have important implications for the further use of carbon nanotubes in experiments on a nanometer scale.

  17. Electrical Switching in Metallic Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Young-Woo; Ihm, Jisoon; Cohen, Marvin L.; Louie, Steven G.; Choi, Hyoung Joon

    2005-11-01

    We present first-principles calculations of quantum transport which show that the resistance of metallic carbon nanotubes can be changed dramatically with homogeneous transverse electric fields if the nanotubes have impurities or defects. The change of the resistance is predicted to range over more than 2 orders of magnitude with experimentally attainable electric fields. This novel property has its origin that backscattering of conduction electrons by impurities or defects in the nanotubes is strongly dependent on the strength and/or direction of the applied electric fields. We expect this property to open a path to new device applications of metallic carbon nanotubes.

  18. Investigation of growth dynamics of carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with defined properties is required for both fundamental investigations and practical applications. The revealing and thorough understanding of the growth mechanism of SWCNTs is the key to the synthesis of nanotubes with required properties. This paper reviews the current status of the research on the investigation of growth dynamics of carbon nanotubes. The review starts with the consideration of the peculiarities of the growth mechanism of carbon nanotubes. The physical and chemical states of the catalyst during the nanotube growth are discussed. The chirality selective growth of nanotubes is described. The main part of the review is dedicated to the analysis and systematization of the reported results on the investigation of growth dynamics of nanotubes. The studies on the revealing of the dependence of the growth rate of nanotubes on the synthesis parameters are reviewed. The correlation between the lifetime of catalyst and growth rate of nanotubes is discussed. The reports on the calculation of the activation energy of the nanotube growth are summarized. Finally, the growth properties of inner tubes inside SWCNTs are considered. PMID:28503394

  19. Carbon nanotube materials characterization and devices design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weifeng

    The objective of this research is to characterize the electrical and mechanical properties of Carbon Nanotube (CNT) materials, and explore possible device applications for these materials. In order to achieve this goal, different forms of Carbon Nanotube materials---including Carbon Nanotubes, Carbon Nanotube Arrays, Carbon Nanotube Ribbon, Carbon Nanotube Thread, and sub-micrometer Carbon Nanotube Thread---were tested under a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) using a Micromanipulator (MM). Video and sound recording of the testing in the microscope provided new understanding how thread is formed and how nanotube materials fail. As-produced and thermally treated nanotubes were also tested. The main electrical parameters measured were electrical resistivity and maximum current density. The main mechanical property measured was strength. Together, these parameters are helping to determine the strongest and most conductive forms of CNT material. Putting nanotube materials into application is the ultimate goal of this continuing research. Several aggressive application ideas were investigated in a preliminary way in this work. In biomedical applications, a bundle of CNTs was formed for use as an electrode for accurate biosensing. A simple robot was designed using CNT electrical fiber. The robot was powered by two solenoids and could act as an in-body sensor and actuator to perform some impossible tasks from the viewpoint of current medical technology. In aerospace engineering, CNT materials could replace copper wire to reduce the weight of aircraft. Based on the excellent mechanical properties of CNT materials, a challenging idea is to use CNT material to build elevators to move payloads to outer space without using rockets. This dissertation makes contributions in the characterization of nanotube materials and in the design of miniature electromagnetic devices.

  20. Systematic Conversion of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes into n-type Thermoelectric Materials by Molecular Dopants

    PubMed Central

    Nonoguchi, Yoshiyuki; Ohashi, Kenji; Kanazawa, Rui; Ashiba, Koji; Hata, Kenji; Nakagawa, Tetsuya; Adachi, Chihaya; Tanase, Tomoaki; Kawai, Tsuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Thermoelectrics is a challenging issue for modern and future energy conversion and recovery technology. Carbon nanotubes are promising active thermoelectic materials owing to their narrow bandgap energy and high charge carrier mobility, and they can be integrated into flexible thermoelectrics that can recover any waste heat. We here report air-stable n-type single walled carbon nanotubes with a variety of weak electron donors in the range of HOMO level between ca. −4.4 eV and ca. −5.6 eV, in which partial uphill electron injection from the dopant to the conduction band of single walled carbon nanotubes is dominant. We display flexible films of the doped single walled carbon nanotubes possessing significantly large thermoelectric effect, which is applicable to flexible ambient thermoelectric modules. PMID:24276090

  1. Systematic Conversion of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes into n-type Thermoelectric Materials by Molecular Dopants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonoguchi, Yoshiyuki; Ohashi, Kenji; Kanazawa, Rui; Ashiba, Koji; Hata, Kenji; Nakagawa, Tetsuya; Adachi, Chihaya; Tanase, Tomoaki; Kawai, Tsuyoshi

    2013-11-01

    Thermoelectrics is a challenging issue for modern and future energy conversion and recovery technology. Carbon nanotubes are promising active thermoelectic materials owing to their narrow bandgap energy and high charge carrier mobility, and they can be integrated into flexible thermoelectrics that can recover any waste heat. We here report air-stable n-type single walled carbon nanotubes with a variety of weak electron donors in the range of HOMO level between ca. -4.4 eV and ca. -5.6 eV, in which partial uphill electron injection from the dopant to the conduction band of single walled carbon nanotubes is dominant. We display flexible films of the doped single walled carbon nanotubes possessing significantly large thermoelectric effect, which is applicable to flexible ambient thermoelectric modules.

  2. Development of Carbon-Nanotube/Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Thomas A.

    2005-01-01

    A report presents a short discussion of one company's effort to develop composites of carbon nanotubes in epoxy and other polymer matrices. The focus of the discussion is on the desirability of chemically modifying carbon nanotubes to overcome their inherent chemical nonreactivity and thereby enable the formation of strong chemical bonds between nanotubes and epoxies (or other polymeric matrix materials or their monomeric precursors). The chemical modification is effected in a process in which discrete functional groups are covalently attached to the nanotube surfaces. The functionalization process was proposed by the company and demonstrated in practice for the first time during this development effort. The covalently attached functional groups are capable of reacting with the epoxy or other matrix resin to form covalent bonds. Furthermore, the company uses this process to chemically modify the nanotube surfaces, affording tunable adhesion to polymers and solubility in select solvents. Flat-sheet composites containing functionalized nanotubes demonstrate significantly improved mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties.

  3. Stress Calculations for Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halicioglu, Timur; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Atomic stresses were calculated for carbon nanotubes under strain conditions. Graphitic tubules with radii ranging from approximately 2 to 11 Angstroms and two different tubule structures with varying atomic orientations were included in the calculations. Elongations and contractions were applied in the axial direction and atomic stress values were calculated for infinitely long tubules. The calculations were carried out using Brenner's function which was developed for carbon species. Results indicate that the stress is tensile in the radial direction while it is compressive in the tangential direction. Variations in stress values in the direction of the cylindrical aids were investigated as a function of applied strain. Furthermore, using the stress-strain curve (calculated based on atomic considerations), the values of Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio for nanotubules were also estimated.

  4. Pointwise plucking of suspended carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jun; Ouyang, Wengen; Li, Xiaopei; Jin, Zhong; Yang, Leijing; Chen, Changqing; Zhang, Jin; Li, Yan; Warner, Jamie H; Peng, Lian-Mao; Zheng, Quanshui; Zhu, Jing

    2012-07-11

    Vibration of nanotubes/wires is significant for fundamental and applied researches. However, it remains challenging to control the vibration with point-level precision. Herein, individual suspended carbon nanotubes are plucked point by point to vibrate in scanning electron microscope with the electron beam as a nanoscale pointer. The vibration is directly imaged, and its images fit well with simulations from the plucking mechanism. This demonstrates a new way to manipulate the nanotube vibration with unprecedented precision.

  5. A Tester for Carbon Nanotube Mode Lockers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yong-Won; Yamashita, Shinji

    2007-05-01

    We propose and demonstrate a tester for laser pulsating operation of carbon nanotubes employing a circulator with the extra degree of freedom of the second port to access diversified nanotube samples. The nanotubes are deposited onto the end facet of a dummy optical fiber by spray method that guarantees simple sample loading along with the minimized perturbation of optimized laser cavity condition. Resultant optical spectra, autocorrelation traces and pulse train of the laser outputs with qualified samples are presented.

  6. Peculiarities of homooligonucleotides wrapping around carbon nanotubes: molecular dynamics modeling.

    PubMed

    Karachevtsev, Maxim V; Karachevtsev, Victor A

    2011-07-28

    Spontaneous adsorption of homooligonucleotides dC(25), dT(25), dG(25), and dA(25) on the surface of the carbon nanotube (16,0) has been simulated by the molecular dynamics method. It was demonstrated that the rate of pyrimidine oligonucleotide wrapping around the nanotube is higher than that of purine ones which do not form a complete pitch even after the maximum simulation time (50 ns). This behavior can be explained by a stronger self-stacking between the purines than pyrimidines, which prevents the reorientation of the polymer required for the acquisition of a more energetically favored conformation on the nanotube. Estimations obtained from modeling allowed to establish the oligonucleotide row which demonstrates decreasing interaction energies between oligonucleotides and the carbon nanotube: d(T)(25) > d(C)(25) > d(A)(25) ≈ d(G)(25). It was shown that the temperature growth increases the rate of oligonucleotides to reach the maximum binding energy mainly due to the destruction of nitrogen base self-stacking. Ribonucleic oligonucleotides r(C)(25), r(A)(25), and r(G)(25) do not make a pitch around the nanotube for 50 ns. The presence of the additional hydroxyl group in ribose restricts the conformational flexibility of ribonucleic oligonucleotides in comparison with their deoxy analogues and this reduces the possibility of rapid occupation of the stable conformation on the nanotube surface. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  7. Enzymatic degradation of multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yong; Allen, Brett L; Star, Alexander

    2011-09-01

    Because of their unique properties, carbon nanotubes and, in particular, multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) have been used for the development of advanced composite and catalyst materials. Despite their growing commercial applications and increased production, the potential environmental and toxicological impacts of MWNTs are not fully understood; however, many reports suggest that they may be toxic. Therefore, a need exists to develop protocols for effective and safe degradation of MWNTs. In this article, we investigated the effect of chemical functionalization of MWNTs on their enzymatic degradation with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). We investigated HRP/H(2)O(2) degradation of purified, oxidized, and nitrogen-doped MWNTs and proposed a layer-by-layer degradation mechanism of nanotubes facilitated by side wall defects. These results provide a better understanding of the interaction between HRP and carbon nanotubes and suggest an eco-friendly way of mitigating the environmental impact of nanotubes.

  8. Characterization of Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Nickel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, Hansel; Hudson, Steve; Bhat, Biliyar; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are cylindrical molecules composed of carbon atoms in a regular hexagonal arrangement. If nanotubes can be uniformly dispersed in a supporting matrix to form structural materials, the resulting structures could be significantly lighter and stronger than current aerospace materials. Work is currently being done to develop an electrolyte-based self-assembly process that produces a Carbon Nanotube/Nickel composite material with high specific strength. This process is expected to produce a lightweight metal matrix composite material, which maintains it's thermal and electrical conductivities, and is potentially suitable for applications such as advanced structures, space based optics, and cryogenic tanks.

  9. Carbon nanotube fiber spun from wetted ribbon

    DOEpatents

    Zhu, Yuntian T; Arendt, Paul; Zhang, Xiefei; Li, Qingwen; Fu, Lei; Zheng, Lianxi

    2014-04-29

    A fiber of carbon nanotubes was prepared by a wet-spinning method involving drawing carbon nanotubes away from a substantially aligned, supported array of carbon nanotubes to form a ribbon, wetting the ribbon with a liquid, and spinning a fiber from the wetted ribbon. The liquid can be a polymer solution and after forming the fiber, the polymer can be cured. The resulting fiber has a higher tensile strength and higher conductivity compared to dry-spun fibers and to wet-spun fibers prepared by other methods.

  10. Methods for producing reinforced carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifen [Newton, MA; Wen, Jian Guo [Newton, MA; Lao, Jing Y [Chestnut Hill, MA; Li, Wenzhi [Brookline, MA

    2008-10-28

    Methods for producing reinforced carbon nanotubes having a plurality of microparticulate carbide or oxide materials formed substantially on the surface of such reinforced carbon nanotubes composite materials are disclosed. In particular, the present invention provides reinforced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) having a plurality of boron carbide nanolumps formed substantially on a surface of the reinforced CNTs that provide a reinforcing effect on CNTs, enabling their use as effective reinforcing fillers for matrix materials to give high-strength composites. The present invention also provides methods for producing such carbide reinforced CNTs.

  11. Carbon nanotube strain sensors for wearable patient monitoring applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Jose K.; Aryasomayajula, Lavanya; Whitchurch, Ashwin; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2008-03-01

    Wearable health monitoring systems have recently attracted widespread interest for their application in long term patient monitoring. Wireless wearable technology enables continuous observation of patients while they perform their normal everyday activities. This involves the development of flexible and conformable sensors that could be easily integrated to the smart fabrics. Carbon nanotubes are found to be one of the ideal candidate materials for the design of multifunctional e-textiles because of their capability to change conductance based on any mechanical deformation as well as surface functionalization. This paper presents the development and characterization of a carbon nanotube (CNT)-polymer nanocomposite flexible strain sensor for wearable health monitoring applications. These strain sensors can be used to measure the respiration rhythm which is a vital signal required in health monitoring. A number of strain sensor prototypes with different CNT compositions have been fabricated and their characteristics for both static as well as dynamic strain have been measured.

  12. Printing graphene-carbon nanotube-ionic liquid gel on graphene paper: Towards flexible electrodes with efficient loading of PtAu alloy nanoparticles for electrochemical sensing of blood glucose.

    PubMed

    He, Wenshan; Sun, Yimin; Xi, Jiangbo; Abdurhman, Abduraouf Alamer Mohamed; Ren, Jinghua; Duan, Hongwei

    2016-01-15

    The increasing demands for portable, wearable, and implantable sensing devices have stimulated growing interest in innovative electrode materials. In this work, we have demonstrated that printing a conductive ink formulated by blending three-dimensional (3D) porous graphene-carbon nanotube (CNT) assembly with ionic liquid (IL) on two-dimensional (2D) graphene paper (GP), leads to a freestanding GP supported graphene-CNT-IL nanocomposite (graphene-CNT-IL/GP). The incorporation of highly conductive CNTs into graphene assembly effectively increases its surface area and improves its electrical and mechanical properties. The graphene-CNT-IL/GP, as freestanding and flexible substrates, allows for efficient loading of PtAu alloy nanoparticles by means of ultrasonic-electrochemical deposition. Owing to the synergistic effect of PtAu alloy nanoparticles, 3D porous graphene-CNT scaffold, IL binder and 2D flexible GP substrate, the resultant lightweight nanohybrid paper electrode exhibits excellent sensing performances in nonenzymatic electrochemical detection of glucose in terms of sensitivity, selectivity, reproducibility and mechanical properties.

  13. Carbon Nanotubes for Human Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Carl D.; Files, Brad; Yowell, Leonard

    2003-01-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes offer the promise of a new class of revolutionary materials for space applications. The Carbon Nanotube Project at NASA Johnson Space Center has been actively researching this new technology by investigating nanotube production methods (arc, laser, and HiPCO) and gaining a comprehensive understanding of raw and purified material using a wide range of characterization techniques. After production and purification, single wall carbon nanotubes are processed into composites for the enhancement of mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties. This "cradle-to-grave" approach to nanotube composites has given our team unique insights into the impact of post-production processing and dispersion on the resulting material properties. We are applying our experience and lessons-learned to developing new approaches toward nanotube material characterization, structural composite fabrication, and are also making advances in developing thermal management materials and electrically conductive materials in various polymer-nanotube systems. Some initial work has also been conducted with the goal of using carbon nanotubes in the creation of new ceramic materials for high temperature applications in thermal protection systems. Human space flight applications such as advanced life support and fuel cell technologies are also being investigated. This discussion will focus on the variety of applications under investigation.

  14. Covalent enzyme immobilization onto carbon nanotubes using a membrane reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voicu, Stefan Ioan; Nechifor, Aurelia Cristina; Gales, Ovidiu; Nechifor, Gheorghe

    2011-05-01

    Composite porous polysulfone-carbon nanotubes membranes were prepared by dispersing carbon nanotubes into a polysulfone solution followed by the membrane formation by phase inversion-immersion precipitation technique. The carbon nanotubes with amino groups on surface were functionalized with different enzymes (carbonic anhydrase, invertase, diastase) using cyanuric chloride as linker between enzyme and carbon nanotube. The composite membrane was used as a membrane reactor for a better dispersion of carbon nanotubes and access to reaction centers. The membrane also facilitates the transport of enzymes to active carbon nanotubes centers for functionalization (amino groups). The functionalized carbon nanotubes are isolated by dissolving the membranes after the end of reaction. Carbon nanotubes with covalent immobilized enzymes are used for biosensors fabrications. The obtained membranes were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Thermal analysis, FT-IR Spectroscopy, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, and functionalized carbon nanotubes were characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy.

  15. Applications and production of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafner, Jason Howard

    Carbon nanotubes, a recently discovered form of carbon fiber with structural perfection similar to that of a fullerene molecule, have interesting electronic, chemical and mechanical properties due to their size and structure. Nanotubes have great potential as a bulk material for strong, lightweight composite materials, and as individual nano-scale tools or devices. Initial work on applications with individual multiwalled nanotubes as field emission sources and scanning force microscopy tips is described. The nanotubes display intriguing field emission behavior interpreted as the nanotube unraveling under the influence of the electric field. The unraveling process is believed to result in facile field emission from linear atomic carbon chains at the end of the nanotube. Such atomic wires represent an excellent field emitter. The work on multiwalled nanotube SFM tips was equally encouraging. The high aspect ratio of the nanotube allows it to image deep trenches inaccessible to commercially available Si pyramidal tips, and it reduces the interaction with the ambient water layer on the sample which perturbs image quality. The most remarkable advantage of nanotube SFM tips is a result of their mechanical properties. It was found that the nanotubes will remain rigid during normal imaging, but conveniently buckle to the side if circumstances arise which create large forces known to damage the tip and sample. This feature makes the tip more durable than Si tips, and is especially important for soft biological samples. In these two applications, as well as others, and in the measurements of novel nanotube properties, high quality, small diameter (0.5 to 2 nm) diameter single-walled nanotubes are most interesting. Such material can be produced slowly and in small amounts by catalytic arc vaporization and catalytic laser vaporization of graphite. It is well known that nanotubes can be mass produced by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD), but the product consists only

  16. Importance of polypyrrole in constructing 3D hierarchical carbon nanotube@MnO2 perfect core-shell nanostructures for high-performance flexible supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jinyuan; Zhao, Hao; Mu, Xuemei; Chen, Jiayi; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Yaling; He, Yongmin; Zhang, Zhenxing; Pan, Xiaojun; Xie, Erqing

    2015-09-21

    This study reports the preparation of 3D hierarchical carbon nanotube (CNT) @MnO2 core-shell nanostructures under the assistance of polypyrrole (PPy). The as-prepared CNT@PPy@MnO2 core-shell structures show a perfect coating of MnO2 on each CNT and, more importantly, a robust bush-like pseudocapacitive shell to effectively increase the specific surface area and enhance the ion accessibility. As expected, a high specific capacity of 490-530 F g(-1) has been achieved from CNT@PPy@MnO2 single electrodes. And about 98.5% of the capacity is retained after 1000 charge/discharge cycles at a current density of 5 A g(-1). Furthermore, the assembled asymmetric CNT@PPy@MnO2//AC capacitors show the maximum energy density of 38.42 W h kg(-1) (2.24 mW h cm(-3)) at a power density of 100 W kg(-1) (5.83 mW cm(-3)), and they maintain 59.52% of the initial value at 10,000 W kg(-1) (0.583 W cm(-3)). In addition, the assembled devices show high cycling stabilities (89.7% after 2000 cycles for asymmetric and 87.2% for symmetric), and a high bending stability (64.74% after 200 bending tests). This ability to obtain high energy densities at high power rates while maintaining high cycling stability demonstrates that this well-designed structure could be a promising electrode material for high-performance supercapacitors.

  17. Catalytic CVD Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes: Towards High Yield and Low Temperature Growth

    PubMed Central

    Magrez, Arnaud; Seo, Jin Won; Smajda, Rita; Mionić, Marijana; Forró, László

    2010-01-01

    The catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) is currently the most flexible and economically attractive method for the growth of carbon nanotubes. Although its principle is simple, the precisely controlled growth of carbon nanotubes remains very complex because many different parameters influence the growth process. In this article, we review our recent results obtained on the synthesis of carbon nanotubes via CCVD. We discuss the role of the catalyst and the catalyst support. Our recent results obtained from the water assisted growth and the equimolar C2H2-CO2 reaction are also discussed. Both procedures lead to significantly enhanced carbon nanotube growth. In particular, the latter allows growing carbon nanotubes on diverse substrate materials at low temperatures. PMID:28883358

  18. Flightweight Carbon Nanotube Magnet Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, J. N.; Schmidt, H. J.; Ruoff, R. S.; Chandrasekhar, V.; Dikin, D. A.; Litchford, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    Virtually all plasma-based systems for advanced airborne/spaceborne propulsion and power depend upon the future availability of flightweight magnet technology. Unfortunately, current technology for resistive and superconducting magnets yields system weights that tend to counteract the performance advantages normally associated with advanced plasma-based concepts. The ongoing nanotechnology revolution and the continuing development of carbon nanotubes (CNT), however, may ultimately relieve this limitation in the near future. Projections based on recent research indicate that CNTs may achieve current densities at least three orders of magnitude larger than known superconductors and mechanical strength two orders of magnitude larger than steel. In fact, some published work suggests that CNTs are superconductors. Such attributes imply a dramatic increase in magnet performance-to-weight ratio and offer real hope for the construction of true flightweight magnets. This Technical Publication reviews the technology status of CNTs with respect to potential magnet applications and discusses potential techniques for using CNT wires and ropes as a winding material and as an integral component of the containment structure. The technology shortfalls are identified and a research and technology strategy is described that addresses the following major issues: (1) Investigation and verification of mechanical and electrical properties, (2) development of tools for manipulation and fabrication on the nanoscale, (3) continuum/molecular dynamics analysis of nanotube behavior when exposed to practical bending and twisting loads, and (4) exploration of innovative magnet fabrication techniques that exploit the natural attributes of CNTs.

  19. Multiwall carbon nanotube microcavity arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Rajib; Butt, Haider; Rifat, Ahmmed A.; Yetisen, Ali K.; Yun, Seok Hyun; Dai, Qing

    2016-03-21

    Periodic highly dense multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) arrays can act as photonic materials exhibiting band gaps in the visible regime and beyond terahertz range. MWCNT arrays in square arrangement for nanoscale lattice constants can be configured as a microcavity with predictable resonance frequencies. Here, computational analyses of compact square microcavities (≈0.8 × 0.8 μm{sup 2}) in MWCNT arrays were demonstrated to obtain enhanced quality factors (≈170–180) and narrow-band resonance peaks. Cavity resonances were rationally designed and optimized (nanotube geometry and cavity size) with finite element method. Series (1 × 2 and 1 × 3) and parallel (2 × 1 and 3 × 1) combinations of microcavities were modeled and resonance modes were analyzed. Higher order MWCNT microcavities showed enhanced resonance modes, which were red shifted with increasing Q-factors. Parallel microcavity geometries were also optimized to obtain narrow-band tunable filtering in low-loss communication windows (810, 1336, and 1558 nm). Compact series and parallel MWCNT microcavity arrays may have applications in optical filters and miniaturized optical communication devices.

  20. Deconvoluting hepatic processing of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alidori, Simone; Bowman, Robert L.; Yarilin, Dmitry; Romin, Yevgeniy; Barlas, Afsar; Mulvey, J. Justin; Fujisawa, Sho; Xu, Ke; Ruggiero, Alessandro; Riabov, Vladimir; Thorek, Daniel L. J.; Ulmert, Hans David S.; Brea, Elliott J.; Behling, Katja; Kzhyshkowska, Julia; Manova-Todorova, Katia; Scheinberg, David A.; McDevitt, Michael R.

    2016-07-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes present unique opportunities for drug delivery, but have not advanced into the clinic. Differential nanotube accretion and clearance from critical organs have been observed, but the mechanism not fully elucidated. The liver has a complex cellular composition that regulates a range of metabolic functions and coincidently accumulates most particulate drugs. Here we provide the unexpected details of hepatic processing of covalently functionalized nanotubes including receptor-mediated endocytosis, cellular trafficking and biliary elimination. Ammonium-functionalized fibrillar nanocarbon is found to preferentially localize in the fenestrated sinusoidal endothelium of the liver but not resident macrophages. Stabilin receptors mediate the endocytic clearance of nanotubes. Biocompatibility is evidenced by the absence of cell death and no immune cell infiltration. Towards clinical application of this platform, nanotubes were evaluated for the first time in non-human primates. The pharmacologic profile in cynomolgus monkeys is equivalent to what was reported in mice and suggests that nanotubes should behave similarly in humans.

  1. Purification of Carbon Nanotubes: Alternative Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Files, Bradley; Scott, Carl; Gorelik, Olga; Nikolaev, Pasha; Hulse, Lou; Arepalli, Sivaram

    2000-01-01

    Traditional carbon nanotube purification process involves nitric acid refluxing and cross flow filtration using surfactant TritonX. This is believed to result in damage to nanotubes and surfactant residue on nanotube surface. Alternative purification procedures involving solvent extraction, thermal zone refining and nitric acid refiuxing are used in the current study. The effect of duration and type of solvent to dissolve impurities including fullerenes and P ACs (polyaromatic compounds) are monitored by nuclear magnetic reasonance, high performance liquid chromatography, and thermogravimetric analysis. Thermal zone refining yielded sample areas rich in nanotubes as seen by scanning electric microscopy. Refluxing in boiling nitric acid seem to improve the nanotube content. Different procedural steps are needed to purify samples produced by laser process compared to arc process. These alternative methods of nanotube purification will be presented along with results from supporting analytical techniques.

  2. Carbon Nanotube Composites: Strongest Engineering Material Ever?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayeaux, Brian; Nikolaev, Pavel; Proft, William; Nicholson, Leonard S. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The primary goal of the carbon nanotube project at Johnson Space Center (JSC) is to fabricate structural materials with a much higher strength-to-weight ratio than any engineered material today, Single-wall nanotubes present extraordinary mechanical properties along with new challenges for materials processing. Our project includes nanotube production, characterization, purification, and incorporation into applications studies. Now is the time to move from studying individual nanotubes to applications work. Current research at JSC focuses on structural polymeric materials to attempt to lower the weight of spacecraft necessary for interplanetary missions. These nanoscale fibers present unique new challenges to composites engineers. Preliminary studies show good nanotube dispersion and wetting by the epoxy materials. Results of tensile strength tests will also be reported. Other applications of nanotubes are also of interest for energy storage, gas storage, nanoelectronics, field emission, and biomedical uses.

  3. Carbon Nanotube Composites: Strongest Engineering Material Ever?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayeaux, Brian; Nikolaev, Pavel; Proft, William; Nicholson, Leonard S. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The primary goal of the carbon nanotube project at Johnson Space Center (JSC) is to fabricate structural materials with a much higher strength-to-weight ratio than any engineered material today, Single-wall nanotubes present extraordinary mechanical properties along with new challenges for materials processing. Our project includes nanotube production, characterization, purification, and incorporation into applications studies. Now is the time to move from studying individual nanotubes to applications work. Current research at JSC focuses on structural polymeric materials to attempt to lower the weight of spacecraft necessary for interplanetary missions. These nanoscale fibers present unique new challenges to composites engineers. Preliminary studies show good nanotube dispersion and wetting by the epoxy materials. Results of tensile strength tests will also be reported. Other applications of nanotubes are also of interest for energy storage, gas storage, nanoelectronics, field emission, and biomedical uses.

  4. Double-walled carbon nanotube solar cells.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jinquan; Jia, Yi; Shu, Qinke; Gu, Zhiyi; Wang, Kunlin; Zhuang, Daming; Zhang, Gong; Wang, Zhicheng; Luo, Jianbin; Cao, Anyuan; Wu, Dehai

    2007-08-01

    We directly configured double-walled carbon nanotubes as energy conversion materials to fabricate thin-film solar cells, with nanotubes serving as both photogeneration sites and a charge carriers collecting/transport layer. The solar cells consist of a semitransparent thin film of nanotubes conformally coated on a n-type crystalline silicon substrate to create high-density p-n heterojunctions between nanotubes and n-Si to favor charge separation and extract electrons (through n-Si) and holes (through nanotubes). Initial tests have shown a power conversion efficiency of >1%, proving that DWNTs-on-Si is a potentially suitable configuration for making solar cells. Our devices are distinct from previously reported organic solar cells based on blends of polymers and nanomaterials, where conjugate polymers generate excitons and nanotubes only serve as a transport path.

  5. A Thermal Model for Carbon Nanotube Interconnects

    PubMed Central

    Mohsin, Kaji Muhammad; Srivastava, Ashok; Sharma, Ashwani K.; Mayberry, Clay

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we have studied Joule heating in carbon nanotube based very large scale integration (VLSI) interconnects and incorporated Joule heating influenced scattering in our previously developed current transport model. The theoretical model explains breakdown in carbon nanotube resistance which limits the current density. We have also studied scattering parameters of carbon nanotube (CNT) interconnects and compared with the earlier work. For 1 µm length single-wall carbon nanotube, 3 dB frequency in S12 parameter reduces to ~120 GHz from 1 THz considering Joule heating. It has been found that bias voltage has little effect on scattering parameters, while length has very strong effect on scattering parameters. PMID:28348333

  6. Fabrication of porous carbon nanotube network.

    PubMed

    Su, Jun-Wei; Fu, Shu-Juan; Gwo, Shangjr; Lin, Kuan-Jiuh; Lin, Kuna-Jiuh

    2008-11-21

    We used the spin-coating method combined with ultrasonic atomization as a continuous, one-step process to generate a two-dimensional honeycomb network that was constructed from pure multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

  7. Carbon nanotube heat-exchange systems

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Terry Joseph; Heben, Michael J.

    2008-11-11

    A carbon nanotube heat-exchange system (10) and method for producing the same. One embodiment of the carbon nanotube heat-exchange system (10) comprises a microchannel structure (24) having an inlet end (30) and an outlet end (32), the inlet end (30) providing a cooling fluid into the microchannel structure (24) and the outlet end (32) discharging the cooling fluid from the microchannel structure (24). At least one flow path (28) is defined in the microchannel structure (24), fluidically connecting the inlet end (30) to the outlet end (32) of the microchannel structure (24). A carbon nanotube structure (26) is provided in thermal contact with the microchannel structure (24), the carbon nanotube structure (26) receiving heat from the cooling fluid in the microchannel structure (24) and dissipating the heat into an external medium (19).

  8. Carbon nanotube polymer composition and devices

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Gao [Oakland, CA; Johnson, Stephen [Richmond, CA; Kerr, John B [Oakland, CA; Minor, Andrew M [El Cerrito, CA; Mao, Samuel S [Castro Valley, CA

    2011-06-14

    A thin film device and compound having an anode, a cathode, and at least one light emitting layer between the anode and cathode, the at least one light emitting layer having at least one carbon nanotube and a conductive polymer.

  9. Carbon Nanotube Based Light Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, russell A. (Inventor); Smits, Jan M. (Inventor); Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony Neal (Inventor); Ingram, JoAnne L. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A light sensor substrate comprises a base made from a semi-conductive material and topped with a layer of an electrically non-conductive material. A first electrode and a plurality of carbon nanotube (CNT)-based conductors are positioned on the layer of electrically non-conductive material with the CNT-based conductors being distributed in a spaced apart fashion about a periphery of the first electrode. Each CNT-based conductor is coupled on one end thereof to the first electrode and extends away from the first electrode to terminate at a second free end. A second or gate electrode is positioned on the non-conductive material layer and is spaced apart from the second free end of each CNT-based conductor. Coupled to the first and second electrode is a device for detecting electron transfer along the CNT-based conductors resulting from light impinging on the CNT-based conductors.

  10. Putting Rings around Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Emilio M

    2017-07-18

    In the last five years, we have developed synthetic methods towards encapsulation of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) into organic macrocycles, to form rotaxane-type molecules. These are the first examples of mechanically interlocked SWNT derivatives (MINTs). In this article, the motivation to continue developing the chemistry of SWNTs at a time well past their hype is discussed and our synthetic strategy and characterization methodology is explained in detail, stressing the general aspects. In particular, special emphasis is placed on the importance of adequate control experiments and bulk spectroscopic and analytical data to determine the structure of SWNT derivatives, as opposed to relying only (or mostly) on microscopy. Also our experimental results are used as pretext to reflect on more general/conceptual issues pertaining to the chemistry of SWNTs and mechanically interlocked molecules. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Functionalized carbon nanotubes: biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Vardharajula, Sandhya; Ali, Sk Z; Tiwari, Pooja M; Eroğlu, Erdal; Vig, Komal; Dennis, Vida A; Singh, Shree R

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are emerging as novel nanomaterials for various biomedical applications. CNTs can be used to deliver a variety of therapeutic agents, including biomolecules, to the target disease sites. In addition, their unparalleled optical and electrical properties make them excellent candidates for bioimaging and other biomedical applications. However, the high cytotoxicity of CNTs limits their use in humans and many biological systems. The biocompatibility and low cytotoxicity of CNTs are attributed to size, dose, duration, testing systems, and surface functionalization. The functionalization of CNTs improves their solubility and biocompatibility and alters their cellular interaction pathways, resulting in much-reduced cytotoxic effects. Functionalized CNTs are promising novel materials for a variety of biomedical applications. These potential applications are particularly enhanced by their ability to penetrate biological membranes with relatively low cytotoxicity. This review is directed towards the overview of CNTs and their functionalization for biomedical applications with minimal cytotoxicity. PMID:23091380

  12. Photonics based on carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Among direct-bandgap semiconducting nanomaterials, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) exhibit strong quasi-one-dimensional excitonic optical properties, which confer them a great potential for their integration in future photonics devices as an alternative solution to conventional inorganic semiconductors. In this paper, we will highlight SWCNT optical properties for passive as well as active applications in future optical networking. For passive applications, we directly compare the efficiency and power consumption of saturable absorbers (SAs) based on SWCNT with SA based on conventional multiple quantum wells. For active applications, exceptional photoluminescence properties of SWCNT, such as excellent light-emission stabilities with temperature and excitation power, hold these nanometer-scale materials as prime candidates for future active photonics devices with superior performances. PMID:23803293

  13. Carbon Nanotube Tape Vibrating Gyroscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis Stephen (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A vibrating gyroscope includes a piezoelectric strip having length and width dimensions. The piezoelectric strip includes a piezoelectric material and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) substantially aligned and polled along the strip's length dimension. A spindle having an axis of rotation is coupled to the piezoelectric strip. The axis of rotation is parallel to the strip's width dimension. A first capacitance sensor is mechanically coupled to the spindle for rotation therewith. The first capacitance sensor is positioned at one of the strip's opposing ends and is spaced apart from one of the strip's opposing faces. A second capacitance sensor is mechanically coupled to the spindle for rotation therewith. The second capacitance sensor is positioned at another of the strip's opposing ends and is spaced apart from another of the strip's opposing faces. A voltage source applies an AC voltage to the piezoelectric strip.

  14. Biaxially stretchable carbon nanotube transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Meng-Yin; Zhao, Juan; Curley, Nicholas J.; Chang, Tzu-Hsuan; Ma, Zhenqiang; Arnold, Michael S.

    2017-09-01

    Biaxially stretchable field effect transistors (FETs) fabricated on elastomeric substrates are demonstrated incorporating a buckled network of polymer-wrapped semiconducting carbon nanotubes in the channel and a buckled layer of an ion gel as the gate dielectric. The FETs maintain an on/off ratio of >104 and a field-effect mobility of >5 cm2 V-1 s-1 for biaxial elongation up to 67% or uniaxial elongation either parallel or perpendicular to the channel. The performance is stable for at least 10 000 stretch-release cycles. Failure analysis shows that the extent of elongation is limited only by the magnitude of the pre-strain used during fabrication. This work is important because deformable FETs are needed for future technologies including stretchable electronics and displays.

  15. Bending Instabilities of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestre, N.; Camotim, D.

    This paper presents an investigation on the buckling behaviour of single-walled carbon nanotubes (NTs) under bending and unveils several aspects concerning the dependence of critical bending curvature on the NT length. The buckling results are obtained by means of non-linear shell finite element analyses using ABAQUS code. It is shown that eigenvalue analyses do not give a correct prediction of the critical curvature of NTs under bending. Conversely, incremental-iterative non-linear analyses provide a better approximation to the molecular dynamics results due to the progressive ovalization of the NT cross-section under bending. For short NTs, the limit curvature drops with the increasing length mostly due to the decreasing influence of end effects. For moderate to long tubes, the limit curvature remains practically constant and independent on the tube length. An approximate formula based on the Brazier expression is proposed to predict the limit curvature.

  16. Functionalized carbon nanotubes: biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Vardharajula, Sandhya; Ali, Sk Z; Tiwari, Pooja M; Eroğlu, Erdal; Vig, Komal; Dennis, Vida A; Singh, Shree R

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are emerging as novel nanomaterials for various biomedical applications. CNTs can be used to deliver a variety of therapeutic agents, including biomolecules, to the target disease sites. In addition, their unparalleled optical and electrical properties make them excellent candidates for bioimaging and other biomedical applications. However, the high cytotoxicity of CNTs limits their use in humans and many biological systems. The biocompatibility and low cytotoxicity of CNTs are attributed to size, dose, duration, testing systems, and surface functionalization. The functionalization of CNTs improves their solubility and biocompatibility and alters their cellular interaction pathways, resulting in much-reduced cytotoxic effects. Functionalized CNTs are promising novel materials for a variety of biomedical applications. These potential applications are particularly enhanced by their ability to penetrate biological membranes with relatively low cytotoxicity. This review is directed towards the overview of CNTs and their functionalization for biomedical applications with minimal cytotoxicity.

  17. Carbon nanotubes as field emitter.

    PubMed

    Zou, Rujia; Hu, Junqing; Song, Yuelin; Wang, Na; Chen, Huihui; Chen, Haihua; Wu, Jianghong; Sun, Yangang; Chen, Zhigang

    2010-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have recently emerged as a promising material of electron field emitters. They exhibit extraordinary field emission properties because of their high electrical conductivity, high aspect ratio "needle like" shape for optimum geometrical field enhancement, and remarkable thermal stability. In this Review, we emphasize the estimation and influencing factors of CNTs' emission properties, and discuss in detail the emission properties of macroscopic CNT cathodes, especially fabricated by transplant methods, and describe recent progress on understanding of CNT field emitters and analyze issues related to applications of CNT based cold cathodes in field emission display (FED). We foresee that CNT-FED will take an important place in display technologies in the near future.

  18. Lateral force microscopy of multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Lievonen, J; Ahlskog, M

    2009-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes are usually imaged with the atomic force microscope (AFM) in non-contact mode. However, in many applications, such as mechanical manipulation or elasticity measurements, contact mode is used. The forces affecting the nanotube are then considerable and not fully understood. In this work lateral forces were measured during contact mode imaging with an AFM across a carbon nanotube. We found that, qualitatively, both magnitude and sign of the lateral forces to the AFM tip were independent of scan direction and can be concluded to arise from the tip slipping on the round edges of the nanotube. The dependence on the normal force applied to the tip and on the ratio between nanotube diameter and tip radius was studied. We show that for small values of this ratio, the lateral force signal can be explained with a simple geometrical model.

  19. [Hygienic evaluation of multilayer carbon nanotubes].

    PubMed

    Haliullin, T O; Zalyalov, R R; Shvedova, A A; Tkachov, A G

    2015-01-01

    The authors demonstrate that traditional methods evaluating work conditions on contemporary innovative enterprises producing nanomaterials assess these conditions as harmless and safe. At the same time, special investigation methods enable to reveal new hazards for workers' health: the study results prove that workers engaged into multilayer carbon nanotubes production are exposed to multilayer carbon nanotubes aerosols in concentrations exceeding internationally acceptable levels of 1 μg/ml (NIOSH)--that can harm the workers' health.

  20. Controlled Deposition and Alignment of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smits, Jan M. (Inventor); Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Ingram, JoAnne L. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony Neal (Inventor); Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A carbon nanotube (CNT) attraction material is deposited on a substrate in the gap region between two electrodes on the . substrate. An electric potential is applied to the two electrodes. The CNT attraction material is wetted with a solution defined by a carver liquid having carbon nanotubes (CNTs) suspended therein. A portion of the CNTs align with the electric field and adhere to The CNT attraction material. The carrier liquid and any CNTs not adhered to the CNT attraction material are then removed.

  1. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    DOEpatents

    Ivanov, Ilia N; Geohegan, David Bruce

    2013-10-29

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  2. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    DOEpatents

    Ivanov, Ilia N.; Geohegan, David B.

    2017-09-12

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  3. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    DOEpatents

    Ivanov, Ilia N.; Geohegan, David B.

    2016-10-25

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  4. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    DOEpatents

    Ivanov, Ilia N.; Geohegan, David B.

    2016-11-15

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  5. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    DOEpatents

    Ivanov, Ilia N.; Geohegan, David B.

    2016-12-13

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  6. Controlled Deposition and Alignment of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smits, Jan M. (Inventor); Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Patry, JoAnne L. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony Neal (Inventor); Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A carbon nanotube (CNT) attraction material is deposited on a substrate in the gap region between two electrodes on the substrate. An electric potential is applied to the two electrodes. The CNT attraction material is wetted with a solution defined by a carrier liquid having carbon nanotubes (CNTs) suspended therein. A portion of the CNTs align with the electric field and adhere to the CNT attraction material. The carrier liquid and any CNTs not adhered to the CNT attraction material are then removed.

  7. Electromechanical instability in suspended carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, L Magnus; Gorelik, Leonid Y; Shekhter, Robert I; Jonson, Mats

    2005-06-01

    We have theoretically investigated electromechanical properties of freely suspended carbon nanotubes when a current is injected into the tubes using a scanning tunneling microscope. We show that a shuttle-like electromechanical instability can occur if the bias voltage exceeds a dissipation-dependent threshold value. An instability results in large amplitude vibrations of the carbon nanotube bending mode, which modify the current-voltage characteristics of the system.

  8. Analysis of Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect-Transistors (FETs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Toshishige

    1999-01-01

    This five page presentation is grouped into 11 numbered viewgraphs, most of which contain one or more diagrams. Some of the diagrams are accompanied by captions, including: 2) Nanotube FET by Delft, IBM; 3) Nanotube FET/Standard MOSFET; 5) Saturation with carrier-carrier; 7) Electronic properties of carbon nanotube; 8) Theoretical nanotube FET characteristics; 11) Summary: Delft and IBM nanotube FET analysis.

  9. Interfaces Between Carbon Nanotubes and Nickel Nanoparticles in Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bai; Liu, Lirui

    2013-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) filled with metals can be used in capacitors, sensors, rechargeable batteries, and so on. Their interface significantly affects the properties of the composites. Here, we show that three kinds of interfaces between crystalline Ni and CNTs exist, namely, ordered, distorted, and disordered. They presented lattice states of Ni atoms near the interface, whereas the (111)Ni plane was parallel to the CNTs' surface and appeared apart in a smaller or bigger angle. The coherent face-centered cubic (f.c.c)/hexagonal close-packed structure (h.c.p) boundary was formed between the crystalline Ni and CNTs at the ordered interface, in which the match was (111)Ni//(0001)Carbon. We suggested a dislocation model for the coherent interface. The model explained why the angle between (200)Ni and the CNTs' inner surface was 52.9° rather than the theoretical value of 54.75°. The (1)/(2)[11\\bar {1}] dislocation was formed to fit the coherent relationship. Thus, Ni lattice shrinkage occurred. Further study indicated that the formation mechanism of crystalline Ni in CNTs was through heterogeneous nucleation on the inner wall surface and growth of the crystal nucleus.

  10. Should carbon nanotubes be degasified before filling?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaban, Vitaly

    2010-11-01

    The filling of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with water and acetonitrile in the presence of adsorbed argon at room temperature and atmospheric pressure was investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The adsorbed gas was found to be an important factor which influences the solvent penetration inside the smallest nanotubes. However, for CNTs with a diameter of more than 1.5 nm, including CNT(11, 11), the role of gas is negligible although it cannot be spontaneously removed. At 298 K acetonitrile fills pristine carbon nanotubes more than 10 times faster than water due to its higher mobility and less surface tension in spite of a larger polarity of the molecule.

  11. Filling of carbon nanotubes and nanofibres

    PubMed Central

    Gately, Reece D

    2015-01-01

    Summary The reliable production of carbon nanotubes and nanofibres is a relatively new development, and due to their unique structure, there has been much interest in filling their hollow interiors. In this review, we provide an overview of the most common approaches for filling these carbon nanostructures. We highlight that filled carbon nanostructures are an emerging material for biomedical applications. PMID:25821693

  12. Method for manufacturing high quality carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benavides, Jeanette M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A non-catalytic process for the production of carbon nanotubes includes supplying an electric current to a carbon anode and a carbon cathode which have been securely positioned in the open atmosphere with a gap between them. The electric current creates an electric arc between the carbon anode and the carbon cathode, which causes carbon to be vaporized from the carbon anode and a carbonaceous residue to be deposited on the carbon cathode. Inert gas is pumped into the gap to flush out oxygen, thereby preventing interference with the vaporization of carbon from the anode and preventing oxidation of the carbonaceous residue being deposited on the cathode. The anode and cathode are cooled while electric current is being supplied thereto. When the supply of electric current is terminated, the carbonaceous residue is removed from the cathode and is purified to yield carbon nanotubes.

  13. Highly sensitive integrated pressure sensor with horizontally oriented carbon nanotube network.

    PubMed

    Mohammad Haniff, Muhammad Aniq Shazni; Lee, Hing Wah; Bien, Daniel Chia Sheng; Teh, Aun Shih; Azid, Ishak Abdul

    2014-01-28

    This paper presents a functionalized, horizontally oriented carbon nanotube network as a sensing element to enhance the sensitivity of a pressure sensor. The synthesis of horizontally oriented nanotubes from the AuFe catalyst and their deposition onto a mechanically flexible substrate via transfer printing are studied. Nanotube formation on thermally oxidized Si (100) substrates via plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition controls the nanotube coverage and orientation on the flexible substrate. These nanotubes can be simply transferred to the flexible substrate without changing their physical structure. When tested under a pressure range of 0 to 50 kPa, the performance of the fabricated pressure sensor reaches as high as approximately 1.68%/kPa, which indicates high sensitivity to a small change of pressure. Such sensitivity may be induced by the slight contact in isolated nanotubes. This nanotube formation, in turn, enhances the modification of the contact and tunneling distance of the nanotubes upon the deformation of the network. Therefore, the horizontally oriented carbon nanotube network has great potential as a sensing element for future transparent sensors.

  14. Method for nano-pumping using carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Insepov, Zeke [Darien, IL; Hassanein, Ahmed [Bolingbrook, IL

    2009-12-15

    The present invention relates generally to the field of nanotechnology, carbon nanotubes and, more specifically, to a method and system for nano-pumping media through carbon nanotubes. One preferred embodiment of the invention generally comprises: method for nano-pumping, comprising the following steps: providing one or more media; providing one or more carbon nanotubes, the one or more nanotubes having a first end and a second end, wherein said first end of one or more nanotubes is in contact with the media; and creating surface waves on the carbon nanotubes, wherein at least a portion of the media is pumped through the nanotube.

  15. Carbon-Nanotube Fibers for Wearable Devices and Smart Textiles.

    PubMed

    Di, Jiangtao; Zhang, Xiaohua; Yong, Zhenzhong; Zhang, Yongyi; Li, Da; Li, Ru; Li, Qingwen

    2016-12-01

    Carbon-nanotube (CNT) fibers integrate such properties as high mechanical strength, extraordinary structural flexibility, high thermal and electrical conductivities, novel corrosion and oxidation resistivities, and high surface area, which makes them a very promising candidate for next-generation smart textiles and wearable devices. A brief review of the preparation of CNT fibers and recently developed CNT-fiber-based flexible and functional devices, which include artificial muscles, electrochemical double-layer capacitors, lithium-ion batteries, solar cells, and memristors, is presented. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Bending properties of carbon nanotubes encapsulating solid nanowires.

    PubMed

    Danailov, D; Keblinski, P; Nayak, S; Ajayan, P M

    2002-10-01

    Using empirical potentials and atomistic simulations, we model three-point bend tests of single-walled carbon nanotubes encapsulating metal nanowires. The presence of a metal nanowire inside the nanotube greatly suppresses the tube-buckling instability. Increasing tube diameter leads to an increase in the bending strength; however, in contrast to hollow tubes, there is no decrease in the maximum deflection before buckling. Analysis of the principal bending vibrational mode shows a lowering of the frequency, associated with increased tube inertia. Remarkably, metal-filled tubes exhibit strong damping of oscillations whereas unfilled single-walled and multiwalled tubes show no damping. Our studies demonstrate the benefits of filling tubes with solids to modify bending strength and flexibility, suggesting applications for nanotube-based elements in micromechanical devices or nanoprobes.

  17. Fast readout of carbon nanotube mechanical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meerwaldt, Harold; Singh, Vibhor; Schneider, Ben; Schouten, Raymond; van der Zant, Herre; Steele, Gary

    2013-03-01

    We perform fast readout measurements of carbon nanotube mechanical resonators. Using an electronic mixing scheme, we can detect the amplitude of the mechanical motion with an intermediate frequency (IF) of 46 MHz and a timeconstant of 1 us, up to 5 orders of magnitude faster than before. Previous measurements suffered from a low bandwidth due to the combination of the high resistance of the carbon nanotube and a large stray capacitance. We have increased the bandwidth significantly by using a high-impedance, close-proximity HEMT amplifier. The increased bandwidth should allow us to observe the nanotube's thermal motion and its transient response, approaching the regime of real-time detection of the carbon nanotube's mechanical motion.

  18. Carbon nanotubes/TiO2 nanotubes hybrid supercapacitor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Wen, Zhenhai; Li, Jinghong

    2007-09-01

    The rational selection and assembly of materials are central issues in the development of energy conversion and storage applications. Incorporating the utilization of carbon nanotubes cathode and TiO2 nanotubes anode in energy storage, a nonaqueous hybrid supercapacitor was developed in order to significantly increase the energy density of the supercapacitor. The electrochemical performance of the hybrid supercapacitor is characterized by charge/discharge test and cyclic voltam-mograms. According to the voltage value, the energy density of the asymmetric supercapacitor, by applying a potential varying from 0 to 2.8 V, is found to be 14.4 Wh/kg at upwards of 10 C, which is twice more than for the conventional symmetric supercapacitor utilizing carbon nanotubes, while maintaining desirable cycling stability and rate capability.

  19. Carbon Nanotube Based Microfluidic Elements for Filtration and Concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Bakajin, O; Ben-Barak, N; Peng, J; Noy, A

    2003-06-25

    We have developed a method for integration of patterned arrays of carbon nanotubes or the ''nanotube mesh'' into microfabricated channels. The method includes standard lithographic methods for patterning and etching the substrate, followed by catalyst patterning, CVD deposition of nanotubes, and anodic bonding of coverslip top. We will describe a carbon nanotube filtering device fabricated using this method and discuss the use of carbon nanotube arrays as molecular concentration and separation media.

  20. Static and dynamic wetting measurements of single carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Barber, Asa H; Cohen, Sidney R; Wagner, H Daniel

    2004-05-07

    Individual carbon nanotubes were immersed and removed from various organic liquids using atomic force microscopy. The carbon nanotube-liquid interactions could be monitored in situ, and accurate measurements of the contact angle between liquids and the nanotube surface were made. These wetting data were used to produce Owens and Wendt plots giving the dispersive and polar components of the nanotube surface.

  1. Polymerization initated at sidewalls of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tour, James M. (Inventor); Hudson, Jared L. (Inventor); Krishnamoorti, Ramanan (Inventor); Yurekli, Koray (Inventor); Mitchell, Cynthia A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention is directed to aryl halide (such as aryl bromide) functionalized carbon nanotubes that can be utilized in anionic polymerization processes to form polymer-carbon nanotube materials with improved dispersion ability in polymer matrices. In this process the aryl halide is reacted with an alkyllithium species or is reacted with a metal to replace the aryl-bromine bond with an aryl-lithium or aryl-metal bond, respectively. It has further been discovered that other functionalized carbon nanotubes, after deprotonation with a deprotonation agent, can similarly be utilized in anionic polymerization processes to form polymer-carbon nanotube materials. Additionally or alternatively, a ring opening polymerization process can be performed. The resultant materials can be used by themselves due to their enhanced strength and reinforcement ability when compared to their unbound polymer analogs. Additionally, these materials can also be blended with pre-formed polymers to establish compatibility and enhanced dispersion of nanotubes in otherwise hard to disperse matrices resulting in significantly improved material properties. The resultant polymer-carbon nanotube materials can also be used in drug delivery processes due to their improved dispersion ability and biodegradability, and can also be used for scaffolding to promote cellular growth of tissue.

  2. Studying the Dependency of Interfacial Formation with Carbon Nanotube

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-27

    Mirabbaszadeh, K., Interaction between single-walled carbon nanotubes and polymers: A molecular dynamics simulation study with reactive force field ...AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2014-0240 STUDYING THE DEPENDENCY OF INTERFACIAL FORMATION WITH CARBON NANOTUBE MARILYN MINUS NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY Final Report 08...was focused on understanding the capabilities of polymeric materials to form interfacial structures around carbon nanotubes and other nano- carbon

  3. Acrylonitrile, an advantageous precursor to synthesize nitrogen doped carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Elguézabal, A.; Román-Aguirre, M.; De la Torre, L.; Zaragoza, E. A.

    2017-05-01

    The nitrogen doped carbon nanotubes present specific characteristics that offer better performance than pure carbon nanotubes for application like biomedicine, hydrogen adsorption and electrocataytic devices. This work present a simple method to obtain well-aligned nitrogen doped multi wall carbon nanotubes, which present open channels with diameter around 50 nm. These carbon nanotubes are obtained using acrylonitrile as carbon and nitrogen source, which offers some advantages on the use of other precursors like ammonia, pyridine, benzylamine, acetonitrile or melamine.

  4. Nanoprocessing and nanomeasurements of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xiwei

    A piezoelectric nanomanipulator inside a Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) specimen holder has been developed, which is capable of manipulating a probe three-dimensionally in translation ranges wider than 40 mum with a positional control precision better than 0.4 nm, and meanwhile allows applying electrical potential across the probe and a sample. The nanomanipulator in TEM permits handling objects of small size with nanometer resolution under real-time TEM inspection, measuring the mechanical and electrical properties of the sample at specified locations, and, at the same time, analyzing the structures of the sample using various TEM techniques. The nanomanipulator in TEM was exploited as an effective tool to measure the electron transport properties of individual carbon nanotubes in contact with a copper probe, and to process multi-walled carbon nanotubes precisely by varieties of approaches, such as nano-welding, nano-cutting, peeling off the outer shells of multi-walled nanotubes. These approaches provide a controllable and reliable method to tailor carbon nanotubes into highly desirable geometry with an ideal number of the shells for many practical applications. The nanomanipulator in TEM was also used to study the field emission of carbon nanotubes by mounting single characterized nanotubes on the probe as the field emitters. It was found that the effective energy barrier for emitting electrons from nanotube tips is lower than the work function of graphite, which is responsible for the good field emission characteristics of carbon nanotubes as well as their high aspect ratio. The strong attractive interaction between carbon nanotube tips and in-situ carbon nanowire growth induced by a high electrical field were first observed using the nanomanipulator in TEM. Electron holography was employed to investigate the nanoscale features of carbon nanotubes and their particulate derivatives. Reconstructed phase images of holograms offer a quantitative means to

  5. Lysozyme binds onto functionalized carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Bomboi, Francesca; Tardani, Franco; Gazzoli, Delia; Bonincontro, Adalberto; La Mesa, Camillo

    2013-08-01

    Single walled carbon nanotubes have singular physicochemical properties making them attractive in a wide range of applications. Studies on carbon nanotubes and biological macromolecules exist in literature. However, ad hoc investigations are helpful to better understand the interaction mechanisms. We report on a system consisting of single walled carbon nanotubes and lysozyme. The phenomenology of nanotube-protein interactions and its effects on protein conformation were determined. We investigated the formation of oxidized nanotube-lysozyme conjugates, by studying the effect of both protein concentration and pH. Electrophoretic mobility, dielectric spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering were used to determine the interaction pathways, monitoring the surface charge density and the size of the complexes. The results allowed identifying the conditions of surface saturation at different pH values. The secondary structure of nanotube-adsorbed protein was controlled by circular dichroism; it was observed that it substantially retains its native conformation. Interestingly, we found that the interactions among oxidized nanotubes and lysozyme molecules are mainly of electrostatic nature and easily tunable by varying the pH of the solutions.

  6. Oscillatory characteristics of carbon nanotubes inside carbon nanotube bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, R.; Alipour, A.; Sadeghi, F.

    2012-12-01

    This article presents a comprehensive study on the mechanics of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) oscillating in CNT bundles. Using the continuum approximation along with Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential function, new semi-analytical expressions in terms of double integrals are presented to evaluate van der Waals (vdW) potential energy and interaction force upon which the equation of motion is directly solved. The obtained potential expression enables one to arrive at a new semi-analytical formula for the exact evaluation of oscillation frequency. Also, an algebraic frequency formula is extracted on the basis of the simplifying assumption of constant vdW force. Based on the present expressions, a thorough study on various aspects of operating frequencies under different system parameters is given, which permits fresh insight into the problem. The strong dependence of oscillation frequency on system parameters, such as the extrusion distance and initial velocity of the core as initial conditions for the motion is indicated. Interestingly, a specific initial velocity is found at which the oscillation frequency is independent of the core length. In addition, a relation between this specific initial velocity and the escape velocity is disclosed.

  7. Modeling of carbon nanotubes and carbon nanotube-polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, G.; Kumar, S.

    2016-01-01

    In order to meet stringent environmental, safety and performance requirements from respective regulatory bodies, various technology-based industries are promoting the use of advanced carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced lightweight and high strength polymer nanocomposites (PNCs) as a substitute to conventional materials both in structural and non-structural applications. The superior mechanical properties of PNCs made up of CNTs or bundles of CNTs can be attributed to the interfacial interaction between the CNTs and matrix, CNT's morphologies and to their uniform dispersion in the matrix. In PNCs, CNTs physically bond with polymeric matrix at a level where the assumption of continuum level interactions is not applicable. Modeling and prediction of mechanical response and failure behavior of CNTs and their composites becomes a complex task and is dealt with the help of up-scale modeling strategies involving multiple spatial and temporal scales in hierarchical or concurrent manner. Firstly, the article offers an insight into various modeling techniques in studying the mechanical response of CNTs; namely, equivalent continuum approach, quasi-continuum approach and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. In the subsequent steps, these approaches are combined with analytical and numerical micromechanics models in a multiscale framework to predict the average macroscopic response of PNCs. The review also discusses the implementation aspects of these computational approaches, their current status and associated challenges with a future outlook.

  8. Single-wall-carbon-nanotube/single-carbon-chain molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Börrnert, Felix; Börrnert, Carina; Gorantla, Sandeep; Liu, Xianjie; Bachmatiuk, Alicja; Joswig, Jan-Ole; Wagner, Frank R.; Schäffel, Franziska; Warner, Jamie H.; Schönfelder, Ronny; Rellinghaus, Bernd; Gemming, Thomas; Thomas, Jürgen; Knupfer, Martin; Büchner, Bernd; Rümmeli, Mark H.

    2010-02-01

    Stable junctions between a single carbon chain and two single-wall carbon nanotubes were produced via coalescence of functionalized fullerenes filled into a single-wall carbon nanotube and directly imaged by in situ transmission electron microscopy. First principles quantum chemical calculations support the observed stability of such molecular junctions. They also show that short carbon chains bound to other carbon structures are cumulenes and stable semiconductors due to Peierls-like distortion. Junctions like this can be regarded as archetypical building blocks for all-carbon molecular electronics.

  9. Carbon nanotube ecotoxicity in amphibians: assessment of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and comparison with double-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Mouchet, Florence; Landois, Perine; Puech, Pascal; Pinelli, Eric; Flahaut, Emmanuel; Gauthier, Laury

    2010-08-01

    The potential impact of industrial multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) was investigated under normalized laboratory conditions according to the International Standard micronucleus assay ISO 21427-1 for 12 days of half-static exposure to 0.1, 1, 10 and 50 mg/l of MWNTs in water. Three different end points were carried out for 12 days of exposure: mortality, growth inhibition and micronuclei induction in erythrocytes of the circulating blood of larvae. Raman spectroscopy analysis was used to study the presence of carbon nanotubes in the biological samples. Considering the high diversity of carbon nanotubes according to their different characteristics, MWNTs were analyzed in Xenopus larvae, comparatively to double-walled carbon nanotubes used in a previous study in similar conditions. Growth inhibition in larvae exposed to 50 mg/l of MWNTs was evidenced; however, no genetoxicity (micronucleus assay) was noticed, at any concentration. Carbon nanotube localization in the larvae leads to different possible hypothesis of mechanisms explaining toxicity in Xenopus.

  10. Carbon Nanotube-Based Synthetic Gecko Tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhinojwala, Ali

    2008-03-01

    Wall-climbing geckos have unique ability to attach to different surfaces without the use of any viscoelastic glues. On coming in contact with any surface, the micron-size gecko foot-hairs deform, enabling molecular contact over large areas, thus translating weak van der Waals (vdW) interactions into enormous shear forces. We will present our recent results on the development of synthetic gecko tape using aligned carbon nanotubes to mimic the keratin hairs found on gecko feet. The patterned carbon nanotube-based gecko tape can support a shear stress (36 N/cm^2) nearly four times higher than the gecko foot and sticks to a variety of surfaces, including Teflon. Both the micron-size setae (replicated by nanotube bundles) and nanometer-size spatulas (individual nanotubes) are necessary to achieve macroscopic shear adhesion and to translate the weak vdW interactions into high shear forces. The carbon nanotube based tape offers an excellent synthetic option as a dry conductive reversible adhesive in microelectronics, robotics and space applications. The mechanism behind these large shear forces and self-cleaning properties of these carbon nanotube based synthetic gecko tapes will be discussed. This work was performed in collaboration with graduate students Liehui Ge, and Sunny Sethi, and collaborators from RPI; Lijie Ci and Professor Pulickel Ajayan.

  11. Carbon Nanotube Suspensions: some underlying issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windle, Alan

    2006-03-01

    Entropy of mixing of rigid particles in a suspending medium is determined on a per-particle basis and thus, for a given weight fraction will decrease with increasing particle size. In the case of carbon nanotubes, the entropy contribution to mixing will thus be small compared with the interparticle forces which comprise the enthalpic energy contribution to any thermodynamic equilibrium. These forces will generally be short range with the exception of electrostatic forces in the cases that the particles carry a charge. The ability to form carbon nanotube suspensions depends on both the chemical affinity between the medium and the tubes and, it appears, the size of the medium molecules. Surface treatments of the nanotubes have been developed both using covalently attached functional groups and surfactants, and each strategy has been successfully applied to both multi and single wall CNTs. Because carbon nanotubes are long, thin, rigid and comparatively straight, they have been shown to self assemble into liquid crystalline phases showing all the attributes of conventional systems. The relationship between such CNT systems and the conventional ‘Flory’ phase diagram will be described, as will the exploitation of these phase equilibria to fractionate nanotubes on the basis of mesogenicity. The use of liquid crystalline phases as a basis for the processing of carbon nanotubes into aligned assemblies such as fibres will also be outlined.

  12. Electrostatic gating in carbon nanotube aptasensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Han Yue; Alsager, Omar A.; Zhu, Bicheng; Travas-Sejdic, Jadranka; Hodgkiss, Justin M.; Plank, Natalie O. V.

    2016-07-01

    Synthetic DNA aptamer receptors could boost the prospects of carbon nanotube (CNT)-based electronic biosensors if signal transduction can be understood and engineered. Here, we report CNT aptasensors for potassium ions that clearly demonstrate aptamer-induced electrostatic gating of electronic conduction. The CNT network devices were fabricated on flexible substrates via a facile solution processing route and non-covalently functionalised with potassium binding aptamers. Monotonic increases in CNT conduction were observed in response to increasing potassium ion concentration, with a level of detection as low as 10 picomolar. The signal was shown to arise from a specific aptamer-target interaction that stabilises a G-quadruplex structure, bringing high negative charge density near the CNT channel. Electrostatic gating is established via the specificity and the sign of the current response, and by observing its suppression when higher ionic strength decreases the Debye length at the CNT-water interface. Sensitivity towards potassium and selectivity against other ions is demonstrated in both resistive mode and real time transistor mode measurements. The effective device architecture presented, along with the identification of clear response signatures, should inform the development of new electronic biosensors using the growing library of aptamer receptors.Synthetic DNA aptamer receptors could boost the prospects of carbon nanotube (CNT)-based electronic biosensors if signal transduction can be understood and engineered. Here, we report CNT aptasensors for potassium ions that clearly demonstrate aptamer-induced electrostatic gating of electronic conduction. The CNT network devices were fabricated on flexible substrates via a facile solution processing route and non-covalently functionalised with potassium binding aptamers. Monotonic increases in CNT conduction were observed in response to increasing potassium ion concentration, with a level of detection as low as 10

  13. Carbon nanotubes: Synthesis, integration and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Jing

    Ever since their discovery in 1991, carbon nanotubes have captured the attention of researchers worldwide due to their remarkable structural, electrical and mechanical properties. They not only offer an ideal playground for fundamental research but also render great potential for all kinds of applications, including future electronic devices, sensors, exceptionally strong materials, flat-panel displays, hydrogen fuel cells, and so on. This thesis reports the study of nanotube properties and some of its applications. It is divided into three parts: (1) The chemical synthesis of individual single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) via chemical vapor deposition of methane; (2) the integration of individual SWNT into electronic circuits; (3) The studies on the electrical properties of these nanotubes, and the exploration of their potential applications. In order to facilitate the studies and applications of nanotubes, great efforts have been made towards their synthesis and production. Our approach is the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method, through which we can produce individual SWNTs with high quality and high yield. However, the nanotubes produced directly using CVD (and other methods like laser ablation and arc discharge) are always tangled and bundled up together, and buried inside the graphitized bulk catalyst, which renders the manipulation and characterization a difficult task. We solved this problem by combining the chemical synthesis and conventional nanofabrication techniques together with selectively growing nanotubes at specific sites. Therefore, individual carbon nanotubes can be easily integrated into electrical circuits. Theoretical studies have shown nanotubes possess unique electronic properties; a SWNT be metallic, semiconducting or semi-metallic depending on its helicity. In our experimental studies we have observed all the 3 types of behaviors and confirmed the theoretical predictions. We also investigated the realization of various nanotube functional

  14. Selective Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes: Part II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyyappan, Meyya; Khare, Bishun

    2010-01-01

    An alternative method of low-temperature plasma functionalization of carbon nanotubes provides for the simultaneous attachment of molecular groups of multiple (typically two or three) different species or different mixtures of species to carbon nanotubes at different locations within the same apparatus. This method is based on similar principles, and involves the use of mostly the same basic apparatus, as those of the methods described in "Low-Temperature Plasma Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes" (ARC-14661-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 5 (May 2004), page 45. The figure schematically depicts the basic apparatus used in the aforementioned method, with emphasis on features that distinguish the present alternative method from the other. In this method, one exploits the fact that the composition of the deposition plasma changes as the plasma flows from its source in the precursor chamber toward the nanotubes in the target chamber. As a result, carbon nanotubes mounted in the target chamber at different flow distances (d1, d2, d3 . . .) from the precursor chamber become functionalized with different species or different mixtures of species. In one series of experiments to demonstrate this method, N2 was used as the precursor gas. After the functionalization process, the carbon nanotubes from three different positions in the target chamber were examined by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy to identify the molecular groups that had become attached. On carbon nanotubes from d1 = 1 cm, the attached molecular groups were found to be predominantly C-N and C=N. On carbon nanotubes from d2 = 2.5 cm, the attached molecular groups were found to be predominantly C-(NH)2 and/or C=NH2. (The H2 was believed to originate as residual hydrogen present in the nanotubes.) On carbon nanotubes from d3 = 7 cm no functionalization could be detected - perhaps, it was conjectured, because this distance is downstream of the plasma source, all of the free ions and free radicals of

  15. A carbon nanotube wall membrane for water treatment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byeongho; Baek, Youngbin; Lee, Minwoo; Jeong, Dae Hong; Lee, Hong H; Yoon, Jeyong; Kim, Yong Hyup

    2015-05-14

    Various forms of carbon nanotubes have been utilized in water treatment applications. The unique characteristics of carbon nanotubes, however, have not been fully exploited for such applications. Here we exploit the characteristics and corresponding attributes of carbon nanotubes to develop a millimetre-thick ultrafiltration membrane that can provide a water permeability that approaches 30,000 l m(-2) h(-1) bar(-1), compared with the best water permeability of 2,400 l m(-2) h(-1) bar(-1) reported for carbon nanotube membranes. The developed membrane consists only of vertically aligned carbon nanotube walls that provide 6-nm-wide inner pores and 7-nm-wide outer pores that form between the walls of the carbon nanotubes when the carbon nanotube forest is densified. The experimental results reveal that the permeance increases as the pore size decreases. The carbon nanotube walls of the membrane are observed to impede bacterial adhesion and resist biofilm formation.

  16. Methods for Gas Sensing with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Anupama B. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Methods for gas sensing with single-walled carbon nanotubes are described. The methods comprise biasing at least one carbon nanotube and exposing to a gas environment to detect variation in temperature as an electrical response.

  17. A carbon nanotube wall membrane for water treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byeongho; Baek, Youngbin; Lee, Minwoo; Jeong, Dae Hong; Lee, Hong H.; Yoon, Jeyong; Kim, Yong Hyup

    2015-05-01

    Various forms of carbon nanotubes have been utilized in water treatment applications. The unique characteristics of carbon nanotubes, however, have not been fully exploited for such applications. Here we exploit the characteristics and corresponding attributes of carbon nanotubes to develop a millimetre-thick ultrafiltration membrane that can provide a water permeability that approaches 30,000 l m-2 h-1 bar-1, compared with the best water permeability of 2,400 l m-2 h-1 bar-1 reported for carbon nanotube membranes. The developed membrane consists only of vertically aligned carbon nanotube walls that provide 6-nm-wide inner pores and 7-nm-wide outer pores that form between the walls of the carbon nanotubes when the carbon nanotube forest is densified. The experimental results reveal that the permeance increases as the pore size decreases. The carbon nanotube walls of the membrane are observed to impede bacterial adhesion and resist biofilm formation.

  18. Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Polymers for Radiation Shielding Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thibeault, S. (Technical Monitor); Vaidyanathan, Ranji

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the use of Extrusion Freeform Fabrication (EEF) for the fabrication of carbon nanotubes. The presentation addresses TGA analysis, Raman spectroscopy, radiation tests, and mechanical properties of the carbon nanotubes.

  19. Release characteristics of selected carbon nanotube polymer composites

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are commonly used in polymer formulations to improve strength, conductivity, and other attributes. A developing concern is the potential for carbon nanotube polymer nanocomposites to release nanoparticles into the environment as the polymer ...

  20. Release characteristics of selected carbon nanotube polymer composites

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are commonly used in polymer formulations to improve strength, conductivity, and other attributes. A developing concern is the potential for carbon nanotube polymer nanocomposites to release nanoparticles into the environment as the polymer ...

  1. Electrical Switching in Metallic Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hyoung Joon; Son, Young-Woo; Ihm, Jisoon; Cohen, Marvin L.; Louie, Steven G.

    2006-03-01

    We present first-principles calculations of quantum transport which show that the resistance of metallic carbon nanotubes can be changed dramatically with homogeneous transverse electric fields if the nanotubes have impurities or defects. The change of the resistance is predicted to range over more than two orders of magnitude with experimentally attainable electric fields. This novel property has its origin that backscattering of conduction electrons by impurities or defects in the nanotubes is strongly dependent on the strength and/or direction of the applied electric fields. We expect that this property will open a path to new device applications of metallic carbon nanotubes. Ref.) Young-Woo Son et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 216602 (2005).

  2. Carbon Nanotube Tower-Based Supercapacitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A supercapacitor system, including (i) first and second, spaced apart planar collectors, (ii) first and second arrays of multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) towers or single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) towers, serving as electrodes, that extend between the first and second collectors where the nanotube towers are grown directly on the collector surfaces without deposition of a catalyst and without deposition of a binder material on the collector surfaces, and (iii) a porous separator module having a transverse area that is substantially the same as the transverse area of at least one electrode, where (iv) at least one nanotube tower is functionalized to permit or encourage the tower to behave as a hydrophilic structure, with increased surface wettability.

  3. Carbon Nanotube-Based Permeable Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, J K; Park, H G; Bakajin, O; Noy, A; Huser, T; Eaglesham, D

    2004-04-06

    A membrane of multiwalled carbon nanotubes embedded in a silicon nitride matrix was fabricated for use in studying fluid mechanics on the nanometer scale. Characterization by fluorescent tracer diffusion and scanning electron microscopy suggests that the membrane is void-free near the silicon substrate on which it rests, implying that the hollow core of the nanotube is the only conduction path for molecular transport. Assuming Knudsen diffusion through this nanotube membrane, a maximum helium transport rate (for a pressure drop of 1 atm) of 0.25 cc/sec is predicted. Helium flow measurements of a nanoporous silicon nitride membrane, fabricated by sacrificial removal of carbon, give a flow rate greater than 1x10{sup -6} cc/sec. For viscous, laminar flow conditions, water is estimated to flow across the nanotube membrane (under a 1 atm pressure drop) at up to 2.8x10{sup -5} cc/sec (1.7 {micro}L/min).

  4. Carbon Nanotubes and Chronic Granulomatous Disease

    PubMed Central

    Barna, Barbara P.; Judson, Marc A.; Thomassen, Mary Jane

    2014-01-01

    Use of nanomaterials in manufactured consumer products is a rapidly expanding industry and potential toxicities are just beginning to be explored. Combustion-generated multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) or nanoparticles are ubiquitous in non-manufacturing environments and detectable in vapors from diesel fuel, methane, propane, and natural gas. In experimental animal models, carbon nanotubes have been shown to induce granulomas or other inflammatory changes. Evidence suggesting potential involvement of carbon nanomaterials in human granulomatous disease, has been gathered from analyses of dusts generated in the World Trade Center disaster combined with epidemiological data showing a subsequent increase in granulomatous disease of first responders. In this review we will discuss evidence for similarities in the pathophysiology of carbon nanotube-induced pulmonary disease in experimental animals with that of the human granulomatous disease, sarcoidosis. PMID:25525507

  5. Functionalized carbon nanotubes for potential medicinal applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Bai, Yuhong; Yan, Bing

    2010-06-01

    Functionalized carbon nanotubes display unique properties that enable a variety of medicinal applications, including the diagnosis and treatment of cancer, infectious diseases and central nervous system disorders, and applications in tissue engineering. These potential applications are particularly encouraged by their ability to penetrate biological membranes and relatively low toxicity. High aspect ratio, unique optical property and the likeness as small molecule make carbon nanotubes an unusual allotrope of element carbon. After functionalization, carbon nanotubes display potentials for a variety of medicinal applications, including the diagnosis and treatment of cancer, infectious diseases and central nervous system disorders, and applications in tissue engineering. These potential applications are particularly encouraged by their ability to penetrate biological membranes and relatively low toxicity.

  6. Electromagnetic SERS effect in carbon nanotube systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarev, I. V.; Gulyuk, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    Quantum electrodynamics theory of the resonance Raman scattering is developed for an atom in a close proximity to a carbon nanotube. The theory describes both weak and strong atomic coupling to nanotube plasmon near fields, and predicts a dramatic enhancement of the Raman intensity in the strong coupling regime. This resonance scattering is a manifestation of the surface enhanced Raman scattering effect, and can be used in designing efficient nanotube based optical sensing substrates for single atom detection, precision spontaneous emission control, and manipulation.

  7. Magnetic Susceptibility of Collapsed Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Tsuneya

    2017-02-01

    The orbital magnetic susceptibility is calculated in collapsed carbon nanotubes within an effective-mass scheme for two magnetic-field configurations, perpendicular and parallel to the flattened plane. The response is diamagnetic in both directions and is much larger for the perpendicular configuration, with some rare exceptions. In chiral nanotubes, calculated results show small and almost negligible effects of collapsing except for some modification due to change in the effective magnetic field. In nonchiral zigzag and armchair nanotubes, the susceptibility is strongly modified, depending on relative displacement of two layers in the flattened region.

  8. Carbon nanotube filaments in household light bulbs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jinquan; Zhu, Hongwei; Wu, Dehai; Wei, Bingqing

    2004-06-01

    Household light bulbs made from macroscopic single-walled and double-walled carbon nanotube filaments were fabricated and tested. The nanotube bulbs are found to possess several interesting features when compared to a conventional tungsten filament in safelight (36 V, 40 W), such as lower threshold voltage for light emission and higher brightness at high voltages. Electrically induced excited peaks at 407, 417, 655 nm were identified to be an intrinsic property of nanotubes and these peaks are observed to become stronger in the light emission spectra at high temperatures which cannot be explained easily with the concept of blackbody emission.

  9. Carbon nanotube polymer composites for photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scardaci, V.; Rozhin, A. G.; Hennrich, F.; Milne, W. I.; Ferrari, A. C.

    2007-03-01

    We report the fabrication of high optical quality single wall carbon nanotube polyvinyl alcohol composites and their application in nanotube based photonic devices. These show a broad absorption of semiconductor tubes centred at ∼1.55 μm, the spectral range of interest for optical communications. The films are used as mode-lockers in an erbium doped fibre laser, achieving ∼700 fs mode-locked pulses. Raman spectroscopy shows no damage after a long time continuous laser operation.

  10. Superconductivity in the Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ieong, Chao

    This is an experimental study of the superconductivity of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs)--more specifically the CNTs studied is 0.4 nm diameter single-wall CNTs existing inside the channels of the AFI zeolite crystal, abbreviated as CNT AFI--by probing the magnetization property of this CNT AFI system. These human engineered 4-Angstrom CNTs, which is a nanoscale and low-dimensional material, are approaching the limit set by nature, and superconductivity in the CNTs in general is theoretically (microscopic or first-principles) both interesting and challenging. Hence, empirical studies are important in providing useful guiding information. The magnetization and specific-heat studies could provide convincing evidences supporting or critiquing the electrical transport results of the CNT AFI system. But probing the superconductivity in this system, as the superconducting signal is very small in a large background, is another challenge. Therefore the high-resolution calorimetry and magnetometry techniques detailedin this thesis are invaluable. With improved method of fabrication to increase the CNTs content inside the channels of the AFI crystallites, the empirical results [Nanoscale 4, 21-41 (2012)]were markedly different from those published in 2001 [Science 292, 2462 (2001)]. The magnetization results of this thesis largely agree with the results from the electrical transport study [Phys. Rev. B 81, 174530 (2010)], but there is some result that raises doubt in the critical current interpretation there. Lastly, there is still some electrical transport result of this system that has not been explained convincingly and is of interest.

  11. Elastomer Reinforced with Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Jared L.; Krishnamoorti, Ramanan

    2009-01-01

    Elastomers are reinforced with functionalized, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) giving them high-breaking strain levels and low densities. Cross-linked elastomers are prepared using amine-terminated, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), with an average molecular weight of 5,000 daltons, and a functionalized SWNT. Cross-link densities, estimated on the basis of swelling data in toluene (a dispersing solvent) indicated that the polymer underwent cross-linking at the ends of the chains. This thermally initiated cross-linking was found to occur only in the presence of the aryl alcohol functionalized SWNTs. The cross-link could have been via a hydrogen-bonding mechanism between the amine and the free hydroxyl group, or via attack of the amine on the ester linage to form an amide. Tensile properties examined at room temperature indicate a three-fold increase in the tensile modulus of the elastomer, with rupture and failure of the elastomer occurring at a strain of 6.5.

  12. Bending fracture in carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Wen-Shyong; Lu, Hsin-Fang

    2008-12-10

    A novel approach was adopted to incur bending fracture in carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Expanded graphite (EG) was made by intercalating and exfoliating natural graphite flakes. The EG was deposited with nickel particles, from which CNTs were grown by chemical vapor deposition. The CNTs were tip-grown, and their roots were fixed on the EG flakes. The EG flakes were compressed, and many CNTs on the surface were fragmented due to the compression-induced bending. Two major modes of the bending fracture were observed: cone-shaped and shear-cut. High-resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to examine the crack growth within the graphene layers. The bending fracture is characterized by two-region crack growth. An opening crack first appears around the outer-tube due to the bending-induced tensile stress. The crack then branches to grow along an inclined direction toward the inner-tube due to the presence of the shear stress in between graphene layers. An inner-tube pullout with inclined side surface is formed. The onset and development of the crack in these two regions are discussed.

  13. Does water dope carbon nanotubes?

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Robert A.; Payne, Michael C.; Mostofi, Arash A.

    2014-10-28

    We calculate the long-range perturbation to the electronic charge density of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as a result of the physisorption of a water molecule. We find that the dominant effect is a charge redistribution in the CNT due to polarisation caused by the dipole moment of the water molecule. The charge redistribution is found to occur over a length-scale greater than 30 Å, highlighting the need for large-scale simulations. By comparing our fully first-principles calculations to ones in which the perturbation due to a water molecule is treated using a classical electrostatic model, we estimate that the charge transfer between CNT and water is negligible (no more than 10{sup −4} e per water molecule). We therefore conclude that water does not significantly dope CNTs, a conclusion that is consistent with the poor alignment of the relevant energy levels of the water molecule and CNT. Previous calculations that suggest water n-dopes CNTs are likely due to the misinterpretation of Mulliken charge partitioning in small supercells.

  14. Carbon nanotube fiber terahertz polarizer

    SciTech Connect

    Zubair, Ahmed; Tsentalovich, Dmitri E.; Young, Colin C.; Heimbeck, Martin S.; Everitt, Henry O.; Pasquali, Matteo; Kono, Junichiro

    2016-04-04

    Conventional, commercially available terahertz (THz) polarizers are made of uniformly and precisely spaced metallic wires. They are fragile and expensive, with performance characteristics highly reliant on wire diameters and spacings. Here, we report a simple and highly error-tolerant method for fabricating a freestanding THz polarizer with nearly ideal performance, reliant on the intrinsically one-dimensional character of conduction electrons in well-aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The polarizer was constructed on a mechanical frame over which we manually wound acid-doped CNT fibers with ultrahigh electrical conductivity. We demonstrated that the polarizer has an extinction ratio of ∼−30 dB with a low insertion loss (<0.5 dB) throughout a frequency range of 0.2–1.1 THz. In addition, we used a THz ellipsometer to measure the Müller matrix of the CNT-fiber polarizer and found comparable attenuation to a commercial metallic wire-grid polarizer. Furthermore, based on the classical theory of light transmission through an array of metallic wires, we demonstrated the most striking difference between the CNT-fiber and metallic wire-grid polarizers: the latter fails to work in the zero-spacing limit, where it acts as a simple mirror, while the former continues to work as an excellent polarizer even in that limit due to the one-dimensional conductivity of individual CNTs.

  15. Thermal Transport in Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christman, Jeremy; Moore, Andrew; Khatun, Mahfuza

    2011-10-01

    Recent advances in nanostructure technology have made it possible to create small devices at the nanoscale. Carbon nanotubes (CNT's) are among the most exciting building blocks of nanotechnology. Their versatility and extremely desirable properties for electronic and other devices have driven intense research and development efforts in recent years. A review of electrical and thermal conduction of the structures will be presented. The theoretical investigation is mainly based on molecular dynamics. Green Kubo relation is used for the study of thermal conductivity. Results include kinetic energy, potential energy, heat flux autocorrelation function, and heat conduction of various CNT structures. Most of the computation and simulation has been conducted on the Beowulf cluster at Ball State University. Various software packages and tools such as Visual Molecular Dynamics (VMD), Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator (LAMMPS), and NanoHUB, the open online resource at Purdue University have been used for the research. The work has been supported by the Indiana Academy of Science Research Fund, 2010-2011.

  16. Detecting Lyme disease using antibody-functionalized carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dailey, Jennifer; Lerner, Mitchell; Goldsmith, Brett; Brisson, Dustin; Johnson, A. T. Charlie

    2011-03-01

    We combine antibodies for Lyme flagellar protein with carbon nanotube transistors to create an electronic sensor capable of definitive detection of Lyme disease. Over 35,000 cases of Lyme disease are reported in the United States each year, of which more than 23 percent are originally misdiagnosed. Rational design of the coupling of the biological system to the electronic system gives us a flexible sensor platform which we can apply to several biological systems. By coupling these antibodies to carbon nanotubes in particular, we allow for fast, sensitive, highly selective, electronic detection. Unlike antibody or biomarker detection, bacterial protein detection leads to positive identification of both early and late stage bacterial infections, and is easily expandable to environmental monitoring.

  17. Different Technical Applications of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdalla, S.; Al-Marzouki, F.; Al-Ghamdi, Ahmed A.; Abdel-Daiem, A.

    2015-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been of great interest because of their simplicity and ease of synthesis. The novel properties of nanostructured carbon nanotubes such as high surface area, good stiffness, and resilience have been explored in many engineering applications. Research on carbon nanotubes have shown the application in the field of energy storage, hydrogen storage, electrochemical supercapacitor, field-emitting devices, transistors, nanoprobes and sensors, composite material, templates, etc. For commercial applications, large quantities and high purity of carbon nanotubes are needed. Different types of carbon nanotubes can be synthesized in various ways. The most common techniques currently practiced are arc discharge, laser ablation, and chemical vapor deposition and flame synthesis. The purification of CNTs is carried out using various techniques mainly oxidation, acid treatment, annealing, sonication, filtering chemical functionalization, etc. However, high-purity purification techniques still have to be developed. Real applications are still under development. This paper addresses the current research on the challenges that are associated with synthesis methods, purification methods, and dispersion and toxicity of CNTs within the scope of different engineering applications, energy, and environmental impact.

  18. Chemical reactions confined within carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Miners, Scott A; Rance, Graham A; Khlobystov, Andrei N

    2016-08-22

    In this critical review, we survey the wide range of chemical reactions that have been confined within carbon nanotubes, particularly emphasising how the pairwise interactions between the catalysts, reactants, transition states and products of a particular molecular transformation with the host nanotube can be used to control the yields and distributions of products of chemical reactions. We demonstrate that nanoscale confinement within carbon nanotubes enables the control of catalyst activity, morphology and stability, influences the local concentration of reactants and products thus affecting equilibria, rates and selectivity, pre-arranges the reactants for desired reactions and alters the relative stability of isomeric products. We critically evaluate the relative advantages and disadvantages of the confinement of chemical reactions inside carbon nanotubes from a chemical perspective and describe how further developments in the controlled synthesis of carbon nanotubes and the incorporation of multifunctionality are essential for the development of this ever-expanding field, ultimately leading to the effective control of the pathways of chemical reactions through the rational design of multi-functional carbon nanoreactors.

  19. Different Technical Applications of Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, S; Al-Marzouki, F; Al-Ghamdi, Ahmed A; Abdel-Daiem, A

    2015-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been of great interest because of their simplicity and ease of synthesis. The novel properties of nanostructured carbon nanotubes such as high surface area, good stiffness, and resilience have been explored in many engineering applications. Research on carbon nanotubes have shown the application in the field of energy storage, hydrogen storage, electrochemical supercapacitor, field-emitting devices, transistors, nanoprobes and sensors, composite material, templates, etc. For commercial applications, large quantities and high purity of carbon nanotubes are needed. Different types of carbon nanotubes can be synthesized in various ways. The most common techniques currently practiced are arc discharge, laser ablation, and chemical vapor deposition and flame synthesis. The purification of CNTs is carried out using various techniques mainly oxidation, acid treatment, annealing, sonication, filtering chemical functionalization, etc. However, high-purity purification techniques still have to be developed. Real applications are still under development. This paper addresses the current research on the challenges that are associated with synthesis methods, purification methods, and dispersion and toxicity of CNTs within the scope of different engineering applications, energy, and environmental impact.

  20. Measurement Challenges for Carbon Nanotube Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sosa, Edward; Arepalli, Sivaram; Nikolaev, Pasha; Gorelik, Olga; Yowell, Leonard

    2006-01-01

    The advances in large scale applications of carbon nanotubes demand a reliable supply of raw and processed materials. It is imperative to have a consistent quality control of these nanomaterials to distinguish material inconsistency from the modifications induced by processing of nanotubes for any application. NASA Johnson Space Center realized this need five years back and started a program to standardize the characterization methods. The JSC team conducted two workshops (2003 and 2005) in collaboration with NIST focusing on purity and dispersion measurement issues of carbon nanotubes [1]. In 2004, the NASA-JSC protocol was developed by combining analytical techniques of SEM, TEM, UV-VIS-NIR absorption, Raman, and TGA [2]. This protocol is routinely used by several researchers across the world as a first step in characterizing raw and purified carbon nanotubes. A suggested practice guide consisting of detailed chapters on TGA, Raman, electron microscopy and NIR absorption is in the final stages and is undergoing revisions with input from the nanotube community [3]. The possible addition of other techniques such as XPS, and ICP to the existing protocol will be presented. Recent activities at ANSI and ISO towards implementing these protocols as nanotube characterization standards will be discussed.

  1. A comparative study on the lithium-ion storage performances of carbon nanotubes and tube-in-tube carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yi-Jun; Liu, Xi; Cui, Guanglei; Zhu, Bo; Weinberg, Gisela; Schlögl, Robert; Maier, Joachim; Su, Dang Sheng

    2010-03-22

    A comparative study of the electrochemical performances of carbon nanotubes and tube-in-tube carbon nanotubes reveals a dependence effect of lithium-ion storage behavior on the detailed nanostructure of carbon nanotubes. In particular, the impurity that graphitic particles or graphene fragments inherently present in carbon nanotubes plays a crucial role in the lithium-ion storage capacity of the carbon nanotubes. Compared to acid-washed carbon nanotubes, the assembly of graphitic impurity fragments in the tube-in-tube structures hinders lithium-ion diffusion, thus drastically decreasing the rate performance of lithium-ion storage. Significantly, our results indicate that the lithium-ion storage capacity of carbon nanotubes as anode electrodes can be improved or controlled by optimizing the microstructure composition of impurity graphitic nanoparticles or graphene fragments in the matrix of the carbon nanotubes.

  2. Bulk Cutting of Carbon Nanotubes Using Electron Beam Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziegler, Kirk J. (Inventor); Rauwald, Urs (Inventor); Hauge, Robert H. (Inventor); Schmidt, Howard K. (Inventor); Smalley, Richard E. (Inventor); Kittrell, W. Carter (Inventor); Gu, Zhenning (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    According to some embodiments, the present invention provides a method for attaining short carbon nanotubes utilizing electron beam irradiation, for example, of a carbon nanotube sample. The sample may be pretreated, for example by oxonation. The pretreatment may introduce defects to the sidewalls of the nanotubes. The method is shown to produces nanotubes with a distribution of lengths, with the majority of lengths shorter than 100 tun. Further, the median length of the nanotubes is between about 20 nm and about 100 nm.

  3. Formation of Carbon Nanotubes in a Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alford, J. M.; Mason, G. R.; Feikema, D. A.

    2001-01-01

    Even though nanotube science has become one of the worlds most rapidly advancing areas of research, very little is known about the processes involved in nanotube synthesis. To study the formation of carbon nanotubes in an environment unhindered by the buoyancy induced flows generated by the high temperatures necessary to vaporize carbon and grow nanotubes, we have designed a miniature carbon arc apparatus that can produce carbon nanotubes under microgravity conditions. During the first phase of this project, we designed, built, and successfully tested the mini carbon arc in both 1g and 2.2 sec drop tower microgravity conditions. We have demonstrated that microgravity can eliminate the strong convective flows from the carbon arc and we have successfully produced single-walled carbon nanotubes in microgravity. We believe that microgravity processing will allow us to better understand the nanotube formation process and eventually allow us to grow nanotubes that are superior to ground-based production.

  4. Proton Damage Effects on Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-19

    PROTON DAMAGE EFFECTS ON CARBON NANOTUBE FIELD-EFFECT TRANSISTORS THESIS Evan R. Kemp, Ctr...United States. AFIT-ENP-T-14-J-39 PROTON DAMAGE EFFECTS ON CARBON NANOTUBE FIELD-EFFECT TRANSISTORS THESIS Presented to...PROTON DAMAGE EFFECTS ON CARBON NANOTUBE FIELD-EFFECT TRANSISTORS Evan R. Kemp, BS Ctr, USAF Approved: // Signed

  5. Carbon Nanotube/Graphene Supercapacitors Containing Manganese Oxide Nanoparticles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    Carbon Nanotube/Graphene Supercapacitors Containing Manganese Oxide Nanoparticles by Matthew Ervin, Vinay Raju, Mary Hendrickson, and...Laboratory Adelphi, MD 20783-1197 ARL-TR-6289 December 2012 Carbon Nanotube/Graphene Supercapacitors Containing Manganese Oxide...From - To) October 2011 to September 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Carbon Nanotube/Graphene Supercapacitors Containing Manganese Oxide Nanoparticles

  6. Mechanics of Carbon Nanotubes and their Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, Chenyu; Cho, K. J.; Srivastava, Deepak; Tang, Harry (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Contents include the folloving: carbon nanotube (CNT): structures, application of carbon nanotubes, simulation method, Elastic properties of carbon nanotubes, yield strain of CNT, yielding under tensile stress, yielding: strain-rate and temperature dependence, yield strain under tension, yielding at realistic conditions, nano fibers, polymer CNT composite, force field, density dependency on temperature, diffusion coefficients, young modulus, and conclusions.

  7. Autonomous Experimentation of Carbon Nanotube Using Response Surface Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-26

    copyright protection in the United States. AFIT-ENS-MS-15-M-113 AUTOMONOUS EXPERIMENTATION OF CARBON NANOTUBE GROWTH USING RESPONSE SURFACE...UNLIMITED. AFIT-ENS-MS-15-M-113 AUTOMONOUS EXPERIMENTATION OF CARBON NANOTUBE GROWTH USING RESPONSE SURFACE METHODS William Adorno III, BS...Laboratory (AFRL) utilizes the Adaptive Rapid Experimentation and Spectroscopy (ARES) system to synthesize carbon nanotubes . The AFRL researchers

  8. High-performance, mechanically flexible, and vertically integrated 3D carbon nanotube and InGaZnO complementary circuits with a temperature sensor.

    PubMed

    Honda, Wataru; Harada, Shingo; Ishida, Shohei; Arie, Takayuki; Akita, Seiji; Takei, Kuniharu

    2015-08-26

    A vertically integrated inorganic-based flexible complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) inverter with a temperature sensor with a high inverter gain of ≈50 and a low power consumption of <7 nW mm(-1) is demonstrated using a layer-by-layer assembly process. In addition, the negligible influence of the mechanical flexibility on the performance of the CMOS inverter and the temperature dependence of the CMOS inverter characteristics are discussed.

  9. Interaction of pristine and functionalized carbon nanotubes with lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Baoukina, Svetlana; Monticelli, Luca; Tieleman, D Peter

    2013-10-10

    Carbon nanotubes are widely used in a growing number of applications. Their interactions with biological materials, cell membranes in particular, is of interest in applications including drug delivery and for understanding the toxicity of carbon nanotubes. We use extensive molecular dynamics simulations with the MARTINI model to study the interactions of model nanotubes of different thickness, length, and patterns of chemical modification with model membranes. In addition, we characterize the interactions of small bundles of carbon nanotubes with membrane models. Short pristine carbon nanotubes readily insert into membranes and adopt an orientation parallel to the plane of the membrane in the center of the membrane. Larger aggregates and functionalized nanotubes exhibit a range of possible interactions. The distribution and orientation of carbon nanotubes can be controlled by functionalizing the nanotubes. Free energy calculations provide thermodynamic insight into the preferred orientations of different nanotubes and quantify structural defects in the lipid matrix.

  10. Graphene-carbon nanotube hybrid materials and use as electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Tour, James M.; Zhu, Yu; Li, Lei; Yan, Zheng; Lin, Jian

    2016-09-27

    Provided are methods of making graphene-carbon nanotube hybrid materials. Such methods generally include: (1) associating a graphene film with a substrate; (2) applying a catalyst and a carbon source to the graphene film; and (3) growing carbon nanotubes on the graphene film. The grown carbon nanotubes become covalently linked to the graphene film through carbon-carbon bonds that are located at one or more junctions between the carbon nanotubes and the graphene film. In addition, the grown carbon nanotubes are in ohmic contact with the graphene film through the carbon-carbon bonds at the one or more junctions. The one or more junctions may include seven-membered carbon rings. Also provided are the formed graphene-carbon nanotube hybrid materials.

  11. Template-mediated synthesis and bio-functionalization of flexible lignin-based nanotubes and nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caicedo, Hector M.; Dempere, Luisa A.; Vermerris, Wilfred

    2012-03-01

    Limitations of cylindrical carbon nanotubes based on the buckminsterfullerene structure as delivery vehicles for therapeutic agents include their chemical inertness, sharp edges and toxicological concerns. As an alternative, we have developed lignin-based nanotubes synthesized in a sacrificial template of commercially available alumina membranes. Lignin is a complex phenolic plant cell wall polymer that is generated as a waste product from paper mills and biorefineries that process lignocellulosic biomass into fuels and chemicals. We covalently linked isolated lignin to the inner walls of activated alumina membranes and then added layers of dehydrogenation polymer onto this base layer via a peroxidase-catalyzed reaction. By using phenolic monomers displaying different reactivities, we were able to change the thickness of the polymer layer deposited within the pores, resulting in the synthesis of nanotubes with a wall thickness of approximately 15 nm or nanowires with a nominal diameter of 200 nm. These novel nanotubes are flexible and can be bio-functionalized easily and specifically, as shown by in vitro assays with biotin and Concanavalin A. Together with their intrinsic optical properties, which can also be varied as a function of their chemical composition, these lignin-based nanotubes are expected to enable a variety of new applications including as delivery systems that can be easily localized and imaged after uptake by living cells.

  12. Template-mediated synthesis and bio-functionalization of flexible lignin-based nanotubes and nanowires.

    PubMed

    Caicedo, Hector M; Dempere, Luisa A; Vermerris, Wilfred

    2012-03-16

    Limitations of cylindrical carbon nanotubes based on the buckminsterfullerene structure as delivery vehicles for therapeutic agents include their chemical inertness, sharp edges and toxicological concerns. As an alternative, we have developed lignin-based nanotubes synthesized in a sacrificial template of commercially available alumina membranes. Lignin is a complex phenolic plant cell wall polymer that is generated as a waste product from paper mills and biorefineries that process lignocellulosic biomass into fuels and chemicals. We covalently linked isolated lignin to the inner walls of activated alumina membranes and then added layers of dehydrogenation polymer onto this base layer via a peroxidase-catalyzed reaction. By using phenolic monomers displaying different reactivities, we were able to change the thickness of the polymer layer deposited within the pores, resulting in the synthesis of nanotubes with a wall thickness of approximately 15 nm or nanowires with a nominal diameter of 200 nm. These novel nanotubes are flexible and can be bio-functionalized easily and specifically, as shown by in vitro assays with biotin and Concanavalin A. Together with their intrinsic optical properties, which can also be varied as a function of their chemical composition, these lignin-based nanotubes are expected to enable a variety of new applications including as delivery systems that can be easily localized and imaged after uptake by living cells.

  13. Carbon nanotube suspensions, dispersions, & composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Trevor John

    Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) are amazing structures that hold the potential to revolutionize many areas of scientific research. CNTs can be behave both as semiconductors and metals, can be grown in highly ordered arrays and patterns or in random orientation, and can be comprised of one graphene cylinder (single wall nanotube, SWNT) or several concentric graphene cylinders (multi-wall nanotube, MWNT). Although these structures are usually only a few nanometers wide, they can be grown up to centimeter lengths, and in massive quantities. CNTs can be produced in a variety of processes ranging from repeated combustion of organic material such as dried grass, arc-discharge with graphite electrodes, laser ablation of a graphitic target, to sophisticated chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques. CNTs are stronger than steel but lighter than aluminum, and can be more conductive than copper or semiconducting like silicon. This variety of properties has been matched by the wide variety of applications that have been developed for CNTs. Many of these applications have been limited by the inability of researchers to tame these structures, and incorporating CNTs into existing technologies can be exceedingly difficult and prohibitively expensive. It is therefore the aim of the current study to develop strategies for the solution processing and deposition of CNTs and CNT-composites, which will enable the use of CNTs in existing and emerging technologies. CNTs are not easily suspended in polar solvents and are extremely hydrophobic materials, which has limited much of the solution processing to organic solvents, which also cannot afford high quality dispersions of CNTs. The current study has developed a variety of aqueous CNT solutions that employ surfactants, water-soluble polymers, or both to create suspensions of CNTs. These CNT 'ink' solutions were deposited with a variety of techniques that have afforded many interesting structures, both randomly oriented as well as highly

  14. Single Nanotube Spectral Imaging To Determine Molar Concentrations of Isolated Carbon Nanotube Species.

    PubMed

    Galassi, Thomas V; Jena, Prakrit V; Roxbury, Daniel; Heller, Daniel A

    2017-01-17

    Electronic and biological applications of carbon nanotubes can be highly dependent on the species (chirality) of nanotube, purity, and concentration. Existing bulk methods, such as absorbance spectroscopy, can quantify sp(2) carbon based on spectral bands, but nanotube length distribution, defects, and carbonaceous impurities can complicate quantification of individual particles. We present a general method to relate the optical density of a photoluminescent nanotube sample to the number of individual nanotubes. By acquiring 3-dimensional images of nanotubes embedded in a gel matrix with a reducing environment, we quantified all emissive nanotubes in a volume. Via spectral imaging, we assessed structural impurities and precisely determined molar concentrations of the (8,6) and (9,4) nanotube species. We developed an approach to obtain the molarity of any structurally enriched semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube preparation on a per-nanotube basis.

  15. Polymer-assisted direct deposition of uniform carbon nanotube bundle networks for high performance transparent electrodes.

    PubMed

    Hellstrom, Sondra L; Lee, Hang Woo; Bao, Zhenan

    2009-06-23

    Flexible transparent electrodes are crucial for touch screen, flat panel display, and solar cell technologies. While carbon nanotube network electrodes show promise, characteristically poor dispersion properties have limited their practicality. We report that addition of small amounts of conjugated polymer to nanotube dispersions enables straightforward fabrication of uniform network electrodes by spin-coating and simultaneous tuning of parameters such as bundle size and density. After treatment in thionyl chloride, electrodes have sheet resistances competitive with other reported carbon nanotube based transparent electrodes to date.

  16. Carbon nanotube and graphene nanoribbon-coated conductive Kevlar fibers.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Changsheng; Lu, Wei; Zhu, Yu; Sun, Zhengzong; Yan, Zheng; Hwang, Chi-Chau; Tour, James M

    2012-01-01

    Conductive carbon material-coated Kevlar fibers were fabricated through layer-by-layer spray coating. Polyurethane was used as the interlayer between the Kevlar fiber and carbon materials to bind the carbon materials to the Kevlar fiber. Strongly adhering single-walled carbon nanotube coatings yielded a durable conductivity of 65 S/cm without significant mechanical degradation. In addition, the properties remained stable after bending or water washing cycles. The coated fibers were analyzed using scanning electron microcopy and a knot test. The as-produced fiber had a knot efficiency of 23%, which is more than four times higher than that of carbon fibers. The spray-coating of graphene nanoribbons onto Kevlar fibers was also investigated. These flexible coated-Kevlar fibers have the potential to be used for conductive wires in wearable electronics and battery-heated armors.

  17. Electrostatic gating in carbon nanotube aptasensors.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Han Yue; Alsager, Omar A; Zhu, Bicheng; Travas-Sejdic, Jadranka; Hodgkiss, Justin M; Plank, Natalie O V

    2016-07-14

    Synthetic DNA aptamer receptors could boost the prospects of carbon nanotube (CNT)-based electronic biosensors if signal transduction can be understood and engineered. Here, we report CNT aptasensors for potassium ions that clearly demonstrate aptamer-induced electrostatic gating of electronic conduction. The CNT network devices were fabricated on flexible substrates via a facile solution processing route and non-covalently functionalised with potassium binding aptamers. Monotonic increases in CNT conduction were observed in response to increasing potassium ion concentration, with a level of detection as low as 10 picomolar. The signal was shown to arise from a specific aptamer-target interaction that stabilises a G-quadruplex structure, bringing high negative charge density near the CNT channel. Electrostatic gating is established via the specificity and the sign of the current response, and by observing its suppression when higher ionic strength decreases the Debye length at the CNT-water interface. Sensitivity towards potassium and selectivity against other ions is demonstrated in both resistive mode and real time transistor mode measurements. The effective device architecture presented, along with the identification of clear response signatures, should inform the development of new electronic biosensors using the growing library of aptamer receptors.

  18. Bio-inspired Hybrid Carbon Nanotube Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Hyeob; Kwon, Cheong Hoon; Lee, Changsun; An, Jieun; Phuong, Tam Thi Thanh; Park, Sun Hwa; Lima, Márcio D.; Baughman, Ray H.; Kang, Tong Mook; Kim, Seon Jeong

    2016-01-01

    There has been continuous progress in the development for biomedical engineering systems of hybrid muscle generated by combining skeletal muscle and artificial structure. The main factor affecting the actuation performance of hybrid muscle relies on the compatibility between living cells and their muscle scaffolds during cell culture. Here, we developed a hybrid muscle powered by C2C12 skeletal muscle cells based on the functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) sheets coated with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) to achieve biomimetic actuation. This hydrophilic hybrid muscle is physically durable in solution and responds to electric field stimulation with flexible movement. Furthermore, the biomimetic actuation when controlled by electric field stimulation results in movement similar to that of the hornworm by patterned cell culture method. The contraction and relaxation behavior of the PEDOT/MWCNT-based hybrid muscle is similar to that of the single myotube movement, but has faster relaxation kinetics because of the shape-maintenance properties of the freestanding PEDOT/MWCNT sheets in solution. Our development provides the potential possibility for substantial innovation in the next generation of cell-based biohybrid microsystems. PMID:27220918

  19. Bio-inspired Hybrid Carbon Nanotube Muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae Hyeob; Kwon, Cheong Hoon; Lee, Changsun; An, Jieun; Phuong, Tam Thi Thanh; Park, Sun Hwa; Lima, Márcio D.; Baughman, Ray H.; Kang, Tong Mook; Kim, Seon Jeong

    2016-05-01

    There has been continuous progress in the development for biomedical engineering systems of hybrid muscle generated by combining skeletal muscle and artificial structure. The main factor affecting the actuation performance of hybrid muscle relies on the compatibility between living cells and their muscle scaffolds during cell culture. Here, we developed a hybrid muscle powered by C2C12 skeletal muscle cells based on the functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) sheets coated with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) to achieve biomimetic actuation. This hydrophilic hybrid muscle is physically durable in solution and responds to electric field stimulation with flexible movement. Furthermore, the biomimetic actuation when controlled by electric field stimulation results in movement similar to that of the hornworm by patterned cell culture method. The contraction and relaxation behavior of the PEDOT/MWCNT-based hybrid muscle is similar to that of the single myotube movement, but has faster relaxation kinetics because of the shape-maintenance properties of the freestanding PEDOT/MWCNT sheets in solution. Our development provides the potential possibility for substantial innovation in the next generation of cell-based biohybrid microsystems.

  20. Detection of gas atoms with carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Arash, B.; Wang, Q.

    2013-01-01

    Owning to their unparalleled sensitivity resolution, nanomechanical resonators have excellent capabilities in design of nano-sensors for gas detection. The current challenge is to develop new designs of the resonators for differentiating distinct gas atoms with a recognizably high sensitivity. In this work, the characteristics of impulse wave propagation in carbon nanotube-based sensors are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations to provide a new method for detection of noble gases. A sensitivity index based on wave velocity shifts in a single-walled carbon nanotube, induced by surrounding gas atoms, is defined to explore the efficiency of the nano-sensor. The simulation results indicate that the nano-sensor is able to differentiate distinct noble gases at the same environmental temperature and pressure. The inertia and the strengthening effects by the gases on wave characteristics of carbon nanotubes are particularly discussed, and a continuum mechanics shell model is developed to interpret the effects.