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Sample records for flexible catalytic loop

  1. A flexible loop as a functional element in the catalytic mechanism of nucleoside hydrolase from Trypanosoma vivax.

    PubMed

    Vandemeulebroucke, An; De Vos, Stefan; Van Holsbeke, Els; Steyaert, Jan; Versées, Wim

    2008-08-08

    The nucleoside hydrolase of Trypanosoma vivax hydrolyzes the N-glycosidic bond of purine nucleosides. Structural and kinetic studies on this enzyme have suggested a catalytic role for a flexible loop in the vicinity of the active sites. Here we present the analysis of the role of this flexible loop via the combination of a proline scan of the loop, loop deletion mutagenesis, steady state and pre-steady state analysis, and x-ray crystallography. Our analysis reveals that this loop has an important role in leaving group activation and product release. The catalytic role involves the entire loop and could only be perturbed by deletion of the entire loop and not by single site mutagenesis. We present evidence that the loop closes over the active site during catalysis, thereby ordering a water channel that is involved in leaving group activation. Once chemistry has taken place, the loop dynamics determine the rate of product release.

  2. Computational Investigation of the pH Dependence of Loop Flexibility and Catalytic Function in Glycoside Hydrolases*

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Lintao; Crowley, Michael F.; Himmel, Michael E.; Beckham, Gregg T.

    2013-01-01

    Cellulase enzymes cleave glycosidic bonds in cellulose to produce cellobiose via either retaining or inverting hydrolysis mechanisms, which are significantly pH-dependent. Many fungal cellulases function optimally at pH ∼5, and their activities decrease dramatically at higher or lower pH. To understand the molecular-level implications of pH in cellulase structure, we use a hybrid, solvent-based, constant pH molecular dynamics method combined with pH-based replica exchange to determine the pKa values of titratable residues of a glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 6 cellobiohydrolase (Cel6A) and a GH family 7 cellobiohydrolase (Cel7A) from the fungus Hypocrea jecorina. For both enzymes, we demonstrate that a bound substrate significantly affects the pKa values of the acid residues at the catalytic center. The calculated pKa values of catalytic residues confirm their proposed roles from structural studies and are consistent with the experimentally measured apparent pKa values. Additionally, GHs are known to impart a strained pucker conformation in carbohydrate substrates in active sites for catalysis, and results from free energy calculations combined with constant pH molecular dynamics suggest that the correct ring pucker is stable near the optimal pH for both Cel6A and Cel7A. Much longer molecular dynamics simulations of Cel6A and Cel7A with fixed protonation states based on the calculated pKa values suggest that pH affects the flexibility of tunnel loops, which likely affects processivity and substrate complexation. Taken together, this work demonstrates several molecular-level effects of pH on GH enzymes important for cellulose turnover in the biosphere and relevant to biomass conversion processes. PMID:23504310

  3. Conformational Flexibility of a Short Loop near the Active Site of the SARS-3CLpro is Essential to Maintain Catalytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunmei; Teng, Xin; Qi, Yifei; Tang, Bo; Shi, Hailing; Ma, Xiaomin; Lai, Luhua

    2016-01-01

    The SARS 3C-like proteinase (SARS-3CLpro), which is the main proteinase of the SARS coronavirus, is essential to the virus life cycle. This enzyme has been shown to be active as a dimer in which only one protomer is active. However, it remains unknown how the dimer structure maintains an active monomer conformation. It has been observed that the Ser139-Leu141 loop forms a short 310-helix that disrupts the catalytic machinery in the inactive monomer structure. We have tried to disrupt this helical conformation by mutating L141 to T in the stable inactive monomer G11A/R298A/Q299A. The resulting tetra-mutant G11A/L141T/R298A/Q299A is indeed enzymatically active as a monomer. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed that the L141T mutation disrupts the 310-helix and helps to stabilize the active conformation. The coil-310-helix conformational transition of the Ser139-Leu141 loop serves as an enzyme activity switch. Our study therefore indicates that the dimer structure can stabilize the active conformation but is not a required structure in the evolution of the active enzyme, which can also arise through simple mutations. PMID:26879383

  4. Conformational Flexibility of a Short Loop near the Active Site of the SARS-3CLpro is Essential to Maintain Catalytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunmei; Teng, Xin; Qi, Yifei; Tang, Bo; Shi, Hailing; Ma, Xiaomin; Lai, Luhua

    2016-02-16

    The SARS 3C-like proteinase (SARS-3CLpro), which is the main proteinase of the SARS coronavirus, is essential to the virus life cycle. This enzyme has been shown to be active as a dimer in which only one protomer is active. However, it remains unknown how the dimer structure maintains an active monomer conformation. It has been observed that the Ser139-Leu141 loop forms a short 3(10)-helix that disrupts the catalytic machinery in the inactive monomer structure. We have tried to disrupt this helical conformation by mutating L141 to T in the stable inactive monomer G11A/R298A/Q299A. The resulting tetra-mutant G11A/L141T/R298A/Q299A is indeed enzymatically active as a monomer. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed that the L141T mutation disrupts the 3(10)-helix and helps to stabilize the active conformation. The coil-3(10)-helix conformational transition of the Ser139-Leu141 loop serves as an enzyme activity switch. Our study therefore indicates that the dimer structure can stabilize the active conformation but is not a required structure in the evolution of the active enzyme, which can also arise through simple mutations.

  5. Conformational Flexibility of a Short Loop near the Active Site of the SARS-3CLpro is Essential to Maintain Catalytic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunmei; Teng, Xin; Qi, Yifei; Tang, Bo; Shi, Hailing; Ma, Xiaomin; Lai, Luhua

    2016-02-01

    The SARS 3C-like proteinase (SARS-3CLpro), which is the main proteinase of the SARS coronavirus, is essential to the virus life cycle. This enzyme has been shown to be active as a dimer in which only one protomer is active. However, it remains unknown how the dimer structure maintains an active monomer conformation. It has been observed that the Ser139-Leu141 loop forms a short 310-helix that disrupts the catalytic machinery in the inactive monomer structure. We have tried to disrupt this helical conformation by mutating L141 to T in the stable inactive monomer G11A/R298A/Q299A. The resulting tetra-mutant G11A/L141T/R298A/Q299A is indeed enzymatically active as a monomer. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed that the L141T mutation disrupts the 310-helix and helps to stabilize the active conformation. The coil-310-helix conformational transition of the Ser139-Leu141 loop serves as an enzyme activity switch. Our study therefore indicates that the dimer structure can stabilize the active conformation but is not a required structure in the evolution of the active enzyme, which can also arise through simple mutations.

  6. Deployable radiator with flexible line loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keeler, Bryan V. (Inventor); Lehtinen, Arthur Mathias (Inventor); McGee, Billy W. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Radiator assembly (10) for use on a spacecraft (12) is provided including at least one radiator panel assembly (26) repeatably movable between a panel stowed position (28) and a panel deployed position (36), at least two flexible lines (40) in fluid communication with the at least one radiator panel assembly (26) and repeatably movable between a stowage loop (42) and a flattened deployed loop (44).

  7. Leaping of a flexible loop on water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ho-Young; Yang, Eun Jin; Lee, Min-Hee; Shin, Bongsu

    2008-11-01

    Small aquatic arthropods, such as water striders and fishing spiders, are able to leap on water to a height several times their body length. We study a simple model using a floating flexible loop to provide fundamental understanding and mimicking principle of the leaping on water. Motion of a loop, initially bent into an ellipse from equilibrium circular shape using a thin thread, is visualized with a high speed camera upon cutting the thread with a laser. We find that the loop may merely oscillate while afloat, penetrate into the water, or soar into air depending on the hydrophobicity, the bending stiffness, the weight and the degree of initial deflection of the loop. We also construct a scaling law for the leaping height by balancing the initial elastic bending energy with the loop's translational and vibrational energy and a loss imparted to the water in the forms of interfacial, kinetic and viscous energy.

  8. Catalytic Combustor for Fuel-Flexible Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    W. R. Laster; E. Anoshkina; P. Szedlacsek

    2006-03-31

    Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse is conducting a three-year program to develop an ultra low NOx, fuel flexible catalytic combustor for gas turbine application in IGCC. The program is defined in three phases: Phase 1-Implementation Plan, Phase 2-Validation Testing and Phase 3-Field Testing. The Phase 1 program has been completed. Phase II was initiated in October 2004. In IGCC power plants, the gas turbine must be capable of operating on syngas as a primary fuel and an available back-up fuel such as natural gas. In this program the Rich Catalytic Lean (RCL{trademark}) technology is being developed as an ultra low NOx combustor. In this concept, ultra low NOx is achieved by stabilizing a lean premix combustion process by using a catalytic reactor to react part of the fuel, increasing the fuel/air mixture temperature. In Phase 1, the feasibility of the catalytic concept for syngas application has been evaluated and the key technology issues identified. In Phase II the catalytic concept will be demonstrated through subscale testing. Phase III will consist of full-scale combustor basket testing on natural gas and syngas.

  9. Catalytic Combustor for Fuel-Flexible Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    W. R. Laster; E. Anoshkina

    2008-01-31

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse has conducted a three-year program to develop an ultra low NOx, fuel flexible catalytic combustor for gas turbine application in IGCC. The program is defined in three phases: Phase 1 - Implementation Plan, Phase 2 - Validation Testing and Phase 3 - Field Testing. Both Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the program have been completed. In IGCC power plants, the gas turbine must be capable of operating on syngas as a primary fuel and an available back-up fuel such as natural gas. In this program the Rich Catalytic Lean (RCLTM) technology is being developed as an ultra low NOx combustor. In this concept, ultra low NOx is achieved by stabilizing a lean premix combustion process by using a catalytic reactor to oxidize a portion of the fuel, increasing the temperature of fuel/air mixture prior to the main combustion zone. In Phase 1, the feasibility of the catalytic concept for syngas application has been evaluated and the key technology issues identified. In Phase II the technology necessary for the application of the catalytic concept to IGCC fuels was developed through detailed design and subscale testing. Phase III (currently not funded) will consist of full-scale combustor basket testing on natural gas and syngas.

  10. Catalytic Combustor for Fuel-Flexible Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Laster, W. R.; Anoshkina, E.

    2008-01-31

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse has conducted a three-year program to develop an ultra low NOx, fuel flexible catalytic combustor for gas turbine application in IGCC. The program is defined in three phases: Phase 1- Implementation Plan, Phase 2- Validation Testing and Phase 3 – Field Testing. Both Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the program have been completed. In IGCC power plants, the gas turbine must be capable of operating on syngas as a primary fuel and an available back-up fuel such as natural gas. In this program the Rich Catalytic Lean (RCLTM) technology is being developed as an ultra low NOx combustor. In this concept, ultra low NOx is achieved by stabilizing a lean premix combustion process by using a catalytic reactor to oxidize a portion of the fuel, increasing the temperature of fuel/air mixture prior to the main combustion zone. In Phase 1, the feasibility of the catalytic concept for syngas application has been evaluated and the key technology issues identified. In Phase II the technology necessary for the application of the catalytic concept to IGCC fuels was developed through detailed design and subscale testing. Phase III (currently not funded) will consist of full-scale combustor basket testing on natural gas and syngas.

  11. The pepsin residue glycine-76 contributes to active-site loop flexibility and participates in catalysis.

    PubMed Central

    Okoniewska, M; Tanaka, T; Yada, R Y

    2000-01-01

    Glycine residues are known to contribute to conformational flexibility of polypeptide chains, and have been found to contribute to flexibility of some loops associated with enzymic catalysis. A comparison of porcine pepsin in zymogen, mature and inhibited forms revealed that a loop (a flap), consisting of residues 71--80, located near the active site changed its position upon substrate binding. The loop residue, glycine-76, has been implicated in the catalytic process and thought to participate in a hydrogen-bond network aligning the substrate. This study investigated the role of glycine-76 using site-directed mutagenesis. Three mutants, G76A, G76V and G76S, were constructed to increase conformational restriction of a polypeptide chain. In addition, the serine mutant introduced a hydrogen-bonding potential at position 76 similar to that observed in human renin. All the mutants, regardless of amino acid size and polarity, had lower catalytic efficiency and activated more slowly than the wild-type enzyme. The slower activation process was associated directly with altered proteolytic activity. Consequently, it was proposed that a proteolytic cleavage represents a limiting step of the activation process. Lower catalytic efficiency of the mutants was explained as a decrease in the flap flexibility and, therefore, a different pattern of hydrogen bonds responsible for substrate alignment and flap conformation. The results demonstrated that flap flexibility is essential for efficient catalytic and activation processes. PMID:10861225

  12. Dynamics of closed-loop systems containing flexible bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tadikonda, Sivakumar S. K.; Singh, Ramendra P.

    1991-01-01

    An important characteristic of flexible multibody systems containing closed-loop topologies is that the component modes used to describe individual bodies will no longer be independent because of loop closure constraints. Thus, the issue of component modal selection becomes even more complicated. In addition, the foreshortening effect that has been studied extensively in the literature in the context of open-loop topologies will also be present in these constraint equations. Simulation results presented demonstrate the effects of modal selection and foreshortening on the dynamic response of closed-loop flexible systems.

  13. Dynamics of closed-loop systems containing flexible bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tadikonda, Sivakumar S. K.; Singh, Ramendra P.

    1991-01-01

    An important characteristic of flexible multibody systems containing closed-loop topologies is that the component modes used to describe individual bodies will no longer be independent because of loop closure constraints. Thus, the issue of component modal selection becomes even more complicated. In addition, the foreshortening effect that has been studied extensively in the literature in the context of open-loop topologies will also be present in these constraint equations. Simulation results presented demonstrate the effects of modal selection and foreshortening on the dynamic response of closed-loop flexible systems.

  14. The flexible loop of human FEN1 endonuclease is required for flap cleavage during DNA replication and repair

    PubMed Central

    Storici, Francesca; Henneke, Ghislaine; Ferrari, Elena; Gordenin, Dmitry A.; Hübscher, Ulrich; Resnick, Michael A.

    2002-01-01

    The conserved, structure-specific flap endonuclease FEN1 cleaves 5′ DNA flaps that arise during replication or repair. To address in vivo mechanisms of flap cleavage, we developed a screen for human FEN1 mutants that are toxic when expressed in yeast. Two targets were revealed: the flexible loop domain and the catalytic site. Toxic mutants caused G2 arrest and cell death and were unable to repair methyl methanesulfonate lesions. All the mutant proteins retained flap binding. Unlike the catalytic site mutants, which lacked cleavage of any 5′ flaps, the loop mutants exhibited partial ability to cut 5′ flaps when an adjacent single nucleotide 3′ flap was present. We suggest that the flexible loop is important for efficient cleavage through positioning the 5′ flap and the catalytic site. PMID:12411510

  15. Efficient Algorithms to Explore Conformation Spaces of Flexible Protein Loops

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Peggy; Dhanik, Ankur; Marz, Nathan; Propper, Ryan; Kou, Charles; Liu, Guanfeng; van den Bedem, Henry; Latombe, Jean-Claude; Halperin-Landsberg, Inbal; Altman, Russ Biagio

    2009-01-01

    Several applications in biology—e.g., incorporation of protein flexibility in ligand docking algorithms, interpretation of fuzzy X-ray crystallographic data, and homology modeling—require computing the internal parameters of a flexible fragment (usually, a loop) of a protein in order to connect its termini to the rest of the protein without causing any steric clash inside the loop and with the rest of the protein. One must often sample many such conformations in order to explore and adequately represent the conformational range of the studied loop. While sampling must be fast, it is made difficult by the fact that two conflicting constraints—kinematic closure and clash avoidance—must be satisfied concurrently. This paper describes two efficient and complementary sampling algorithms to explore the space of closed clash-free conformations of a flexible protein loop. The “seed sampling” algorithm samples broadly from this space, while the “deformation sampling” algorithm uses seed conformations as starting points to explore the conformation space around them at a finer grain. Computational results are presented for various loops ranging from 5 to 25 residues. More specific results also show that the combination of the sampling algorithms with a functional site prediction software (FEATURE) makes it possible to compute and recognize calcium-binding loop conformations. The sampling algorithms are implemented in a toolkit, called LoopTK, which is available at https://simtk.org/home/looptk. PMID:18989041

  16. Efficient algorithms to explore conformation spaces of flexible protein loops.

    PubMed

    Yao, Peggy; Dhanik, Ankur; Marz, Nathan; Propper, Ryan; Kou, Charles; Liu, Guanfeng; van den Bedem, Henry; Latombe, Jean-Claude; Halperin-Landsberg, Inbal; Altman, Russ Biagio

    2008-01-01

    Several applications in biology - e.g., incorporation of protein flexibility in ligand docking algorithms, interpretation of fuzzy X-ray crystallographic data, and homology modeling - require computing the internal parameters of a flexible fragment (usually, a loop) of a protein in order to connect its termini to the rest of the protein without causing any steric clash. One must often sample many such conformations in order to explore and adequately represent the conformational range of the studied loop. While sampling must be fast, it is made difficult by the fact that two conflicting constraints - kinematic closure and clash avoidance - must be satisfied concurrently. This paper describes two efficient and complementary sampling algorithms to explore the space of closed clash-free conformations of a flexible protein loop. The "seed sampling" algorithm samples broadly from this space, while the "deformation sampling" algorithm uses seed conformations as starting points to explore the conformation space around them at a finer grain. Computational results are presented for various loops ranging from 5 to 25 residues. More specific results also show that the combination of the sampling algorithms with a functional site prediction software (FEATURE) makes it possible to compute and recognize calcium-binding loop conformations. The sampling algorithms are implemented in a toolkit (LoopTK), which is available at https://simtk.org/home/looptk.

  17. Two tandem flexible loops in a viscous flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Huilin; Wei, Heng; Huang, Haibo; Lu, Xi-yun

    2017-02-01

    Interaction between two tandem flexible loops with tension and bending stiffness in a viscous flow is investigated by numerical simulations. In most cases, the heads of the loops facing the oncoming flow are fixed but flapping around the head is allowed. The effect of the gap distance between the two passive flapping loops (G) on the drag coefficient is investigated in detail. Here, for the first time, the sudden drag force reduction at a specific G, i.e., Gc for the downstream loop has been found in the two tandem flexible loops system. It is different from the drag "jump" behavior in the two tandem rigid cylinder system. Although the drag is partially associated with the flapping amplitude, the drag force reduction of the downstream loop may be mainly attributed to flow regimes transition or vortices merging mode transition. The vortices merging is also analysed from a Lagrangian viewpoint, which gives insight into the mechanism. The effects of Reynolds number (20 ≤ Re ≤100 ) , bending coefficient (10-4≤K ≤2 ×10-2 ) , and tension coefficient (10 ≤S ≤1000 ) are also investigated and the relevant mechanism is explored. If the head of the downstream loop is set free to move laterally, the critical distance (Gc) where the sudden drag reduction occurs would further decrease compared to the fixed case, which is due to the early shedding regime transition.

  18. Role of the NC-loop in catalytic activity and stability in lipase from Fervidobacterium changbaicum.

    PubMed

    Li, Binchun; Yang, Guangyu; Wu, Lie; Feng, Yan

    2012-01-01

    Flexible NC-loops between the catalytic domain and the cap domain of the α/β hydrolase fold enzymes show remarkable diversity in length, sequence, and configuration. Recent investigations have suggested that the NC-loop might be involved in catalysis and substrate recognition in many enzymes from the α/β hydrolase fold superfamily. To foster a deep understanding of its role in catalysis, stability, and divergent evolution, we here systemically investigated the function of the NC-loop (residues 131-151) in a lipase (FClip1) from thermophilic bacterium Fervidobacterium changbaicum by loop deletion, alanine-scanning mutagenesis and site-directed mutagenesis. We found that the upper part of the NC-loop (residues 131-138) was of great importance to enzyme catalysis. Single substitutions in this region could fine-tune the activity of FClip1 as much as 41-fold, and any deletions from this region rendered the enzyme completely inactive. The lower part of the NC-loop (residues 139-151) was capable of enduring extensive deletions without loss of activity. The shortened mutants in this region were found to show both improved activity and increased stability simultaneously. We therefore speculated that the NC-loop, especially the lower part, would be a perfect target for enzyme engineering to optimize the enzymatic properties, and might present a hot zone for the divergent evolution of α/β hydrolases. Our findings may provide an opportunity for better understanding of the mechanism of divergent evolution in the α/β hydrolase fold superfamily, and may also guide the design of novel biocatalysts for industrial applications.

  19. Propylene loop heat pipe with a lightweight, flexible, deployable radiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krotiuk, William J.; Crowley, Christopher J.; Rozzi, Jay C.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the design and fabrication of a propylene Loop Heat Pipe (LHP) with a flexible, deployable radiator intended to provide a lightweight spacecraft thermal management system. The paper presents the results of testing the LHP in an environmental chamber and in a thermal-vacuum chamber. Observations regarding operational and startup characteristics of the LHP are provided, and a comparison of design calculations to test results is presented. .

  20. Two strategies to engineer flexible loops for improved enzyme thermostability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haoran; Yan, Yihan; Zhang, Cheng; Dalby, Paul A.

    2017-02-01

    Flexible sites are potential targets for engineering the stability of enzymes. Nevertheless, the success rate of the rigidifying flexible sites (RFS) strategy is still low due to a limited understanding of how to determine the best mutation candidates. In this study, two parallel strategies were applied to identify mutation candidates within the flexible loops of Escherichia coli transketolase (TK). The first was a “back to consensus mutations” approach, and the second was computational design based on ΔΔG calculations in Rosetta. Forty-nine single variants were generated and characterised experimentally. From these, three single-variants I189H, A282P, D143K were found to be more thermostable than wild-type TK. The combination of A282P with H192P, a variant constructed previously, resulted in the best all-round variant with a 3-fold improved half-life at 60 °C, 5-fold increased specific activity at 65 °C, 1.3-fold improved kcat and a Tm increased by 5 °C above that of wild type. Based on a statistical analysis of the stability changes for all variants, the qualitative prediction accuracy of the Rosetta program reached 65.3%. Both of the two strategies investigated were useful in guiding mutation candidates to flexible loops, and had the potential to be used for other enzymes.

  1. Two strategies to engineer flexible loops for improved enzyme thermostability

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Haoran; Yan, Yihan; Zhang, Cheng; Dalby, Paul A.

    2017-01-01

    Flexible sites are potential targets for engineering the stability of enzymes. Nevertheless, the success rate of the rigidifying flexible sites (RFS) strategy is still low due to a limited understanding of how to determine the best mutation candidates. In this study, two parallel strategies were applied to identify mutation candidates within the flexible loops of Escherichia coli transketolase (TK). The first was a “back to consensus mutations” approach, and the second was computational design based on ΔΔG calculations in Rosetta. Forty-nine single variants were generated and characterised experimentally. From these, three single-variants I189H, A282P, D143K were found to be more thermostable than wild-type TK. The combination of A282P with H192P, a variant constructed previously, resulted in the best all-round variant with a 3-fold improved half-life at 60 °C, 5-fold increased specific activity at 65 °C, 1.3-fold improved kcat and a Tm increased by 5 °C above that of wild type. Based on a statistical analysis of the stability changes for all variants, the qualitative prediction accuracy of the Rosetta program reached 65.3%. Both of the two strategies investigated were useful in guiding mutation candidates to flexible loops, and had the potential to be used for other enzymes. PMID:28145457

  2. Two strategies to engineer flexible loops for improved enzyme thermostability.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haoran; Yan, Yihan; Zhang, Cheng; Dalby, Paul A

    2017-02-01

    Flexible sites are potential targets for engineering the stability of enzymes. Nevertheless, the success rate of the rigidifying flexible sites (RFS) strategy is still low due to a limited understanding of how to determine the best mutation candidates. In this study, two parallel strategies were applied to identify mutation candidates within the flexible loops of Escherichia coli transketolase (TK). The first was a "back to consensus mutations" approach, and the second was computational design based on ΔΔG calculations in Rosetta. Forty-nine single variants were generated and characterised experimentally. From these, three single-variants I189H, A282P, D143K were found to be more thermostable than wild-type TK. The combination of A282P with H192P, a variant constructed previously, resulted in the best all-round variant with a 3-fold improved half-life at 60 °C, 5-fold increased specific activity at 65 °C, 1.3-fold improved kcat and a Tm increased by 5 °C above that of wild type. Based on a statistical analysis of the stability changes for all variants, the qualitative prediction accuracy of the Rosetta program reached 65.3%. Both of the two strategies investigated were useful in guiding mutation candidates to flexible loops, and had the potential to be used for other enzymes.

  3. New Insights into the Role of T3 Loop in Determining Catalytic Efficiency of GH28 Endo-Polygalacturonases

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Tao; Meng, Kun; Luo, Huiying; Turunen, Ossi; Zhang, Lujia; Cheng, Yanli; Su, Xiaoyun; Ma, Rui; Shi, Pengjun; Wang, Yaru; Yang, Peilong; Yao, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Intramolecular mobility and conformational changes of flexible loops have important roles in the structural and functional integrity of proteins. The Achaetomium sp. Xz8 endo-polygalacturonase (PG8fn) of glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 28 is distinguished for its high catalytic activity (28,000 U/mg). Structure modeling indicated that PG8fn has a flexible T3 loop that folds partly above the substrate in the active site, and forms a hydrogen bond to the substrate by a highly conserved residue Asn94 in the active site cleft. Our research investigates the catalytic roles of Asn94 in T3 loop which is located above the catalytic residues on one side of the substrate. Molecular dynamics simulation performed on the mutant N94A revealed the loss of the hydrogen bond formed by the hydroxyl group at O34 of pentagalacturonic acid and the crucial ND2 of Asn94 and the consequent detachment and rotation of the substrate away from the active site, and that on N94Q caused the substrate to drift away from its place due to the longer side chain. In line with the simulations, site-directed mutagenesis at this site showed that this position is very sensitive to amino acid substitutions. Except for the altered Km values from 0.32 (wild type PG8fn) to 0.75–4.74 mg/ml, all mutants displayed remarkably lowered kcat (~3–20,000 fold) and kcat/Km (~8–187,500 fold) values and significantly increased △(△G) values (5.92–33.47 kJ/mol). Taken together, Asn94 in the GH28 T3 loop has a critical role in positioning the substrate in a correct way close to the catalytic residues. PMID:26327390

  4. Computational evaluation of the dynamic fluctuations of peripheral loops enclosing the catalytic tunnel of a family 7 cellobiohydrolase.

    PubMed

    Granum, David M; Schutt, Timothy C; Maupin, C Mark

    2014-05-22

    The size and character of the peripheral loops enclosing the active site for cellulase enzymes is believed to play a major role in dictating many critical enzymatic properties. For many cellulases it is observed that fully enclosed active sites forming a tunnel are more conducive to cellobiohydrolase activity and the ability to processively move along the substrate. Conversely, a more open active site groove is indicative of endoglucanase activity. For both cellobiohydrolases and endoglucanases, the loop regions have been implicated in the ability of the enzyme to bind substrate, influence the pKa of active site residues, modulate the catalytic activity, and influence thermal stability. Reported here are constant pH molecular dynamics (CpHMD) simulations that investigate the role of dynamic fluctuations, substrate interactions, and residue pKa values for the peripheral loops enclosing the active site of the cellobiohydrolase Melanocarpus albomyces Cel7B. Two highly flexible loop regions in the free enzyme have been identified, which impact the overall dynamical motions of the enzyme. Charge interactions between Asp198 and Asp367, which reside on two adjacent loops, were found to influence the overall loop conformations and dynamics. In the presence of a substrate the protonation of Asp367, Asp198, and Tyr370 were found to stabilize substrate binding and control the movement of two peripheral loops onto the active site containing the substrate (i.e., clamping down). The substrate-induced response of the loop regions secures the cellulose polymer in the catalytic tunnel and creates an environment that is conducive to hydrolysis of the glycosidic bond.

  5. Loop 3 of Fungal Endoglucanases of Glycoside Hydrolase Family 12 Modulates Catalytic Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hong; Shi, Pengjun; Liu, Yun; Xia, Wei; Wang, Xiaoyu; Cao, Huifang; Ma, Rui; Luo, Huiying

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 12 comprises enzymes with a wide range of activities critical for the degradation of lignocellulose. However, the important roles of the loop regions of GH12 enzymes in substrate specificity and catalytic efficiency remain poorly understood. This study examined how the loop 3 region affects the enzymatic properties of GH12 glucanases using NfEG12A from Neosartorya fischeri P1 and EG (PDB 1KS4) from Aspergillus niger. Acidophilic and thermophilic NfEG12A had the highest catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km, 3,001 and 263 ml/mg/s toward lichenin and carboxymethyl cellulose sodium [CMC-Na], respectively) known so far. Based on the multiple-sequence alignment and homology modeling, two specific sequences (FN and STTQA) were identified in the loop 3 region of GH12 endoglucanases from fungi. To determine their functions, these sequences were introduced into NfEG12A, or the counterpart sequence STTQA was removed from EG. These modifications had no effects on the optimal pH and temperature or substrate specificity but changed the catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) of these enzymes (in descending order, NfEG12A [100%], NfEG12A-FN [140%], and NfEG12A-STTQA [190%]; EG [100%] and EGΔSTTQA [41%]). Molecular docking and dynamic simulation analyses revealed that the longer loop 3 in GH12 may strengthen the hydrogen-bond interactions between the substrate and protein, thereby increasing the turnover rate (kcat). This study provides a new insight to understand the vital roles of loop 3 for GH12 endoglucanases in catalysis. IMPORTANCE Loop structures play critical roles in the substrate specificity and catalytic hydrolysis of GH12 enzymes. Three typical loops exist in these enzymes. Loops 1 and 2 are recognized as the catalytic loops and are closely related to the substrate specificity and catalytic efficiency. Loop 3 locates in the −1 or +1 subsite and varies a lot in amino acid composition, which may play a role in catalysis. In this study, two GH

  6. Investigation of Catalytic Loop Structure, Dynamics and Function Relationship of Yersinia Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase by Temperature-Jump Relaxation Spectroscopy and X-ray Structural Determination

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Shan; Ho, Meng-Chiao; Zhadin, Nickolay; Deng, Hua; Callender, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Yersinia Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase (YopH) is the most efficient enzyme amongst all PTPases and YopH is hyperactive compared to human PTPases, interferes with mammalian cellular pathways to achieve the pathogenicity of Yersinia. Two properties related to the catalytic loop structure differences have been proposed to affect its dynamics and enzyme efficiency. One is the ability of the loop to form stabilizing interactions to bound ligand after loop closure, which has long been recognized. In addition, the loop flexibility/mobility was suggested in a previous study to be a factor as well, based on the observation that incremental changes in PTPase loop structure by single point mutations to alanine often induce incremental changes in enzyme catalytic efficiency. In this study, the temperature jump relaxation spectroscopy (T-jump) has been used to discern the subtle changes of the loop dynamics due to point loop mutations. As expected, our results suggest a correlation between loop dynamics and the size of the residue on the catalytic loop. The stabilization of the enzyme-ligand complex is often enthalpy driven, achieved by formation of additional favorable hydrogen bonding/ionic interactions after loop closure. Interestingly, our T-jump and X-ray crystallography studies on YopH suggest that the elimination of some ligand-protein interactions by mutation does not necessarily destabilize the ligand-enzyme complex after loop closure since the increased entropy in the forms of more mobile protein residues may be sufficient to compensate the free energy loss due to lost interactions and may even lead to enhanced efficiency of the enzyme catalysis. How these competing loop properties may affect loop dynamics and enzyme function are discussed. PMID:22564106

  7. Relations between the loop transposition of DNA G-quadruplex and the catalytic function of DNAzyme.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Mingpan; Zhou, Jun; Jia, Guoqing; Ai, Xuanjun; Mergny, Jean-Louis; Li, Can

    2017-08-01

    The structures of DNA G-quadruplexes are essential for their functions in vivo and in vitro. Our present study revealed that sequential order of the three G-quadruplex loops, that is, loop transposition, could be a critical factor to determinate the G-quadruplex conformation and consequently improved the catalytic function of G-quadruplex based DNAzyme. In the presence of 100mM K(+), loop transposition induced one of the G-quadruplex isomers which shared identical loops but differed in the sequential order of loops into a hybrid topology while the others into predominately parallel topologies. (1)D NMR spectroscopy and mutation analysis suggested that the hydrogen bonding from loops residues with nucleotides in flanking sequences may be responsible for the stabilization of the different conformations. A well-known DNAzyme consisting of G-quadruplex and hemin (Ferriprotoporphyrin IX chloride) was chosen to test the catalytic function. We found that the loop transposition could enhance the reaction rate obviously by increasing the hemin binding affinity to G-quadruplex. These findings disclose the relations between the loop transposition, G-quadruplex conformation and catalytic function of DNAzyme. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Fuel Flexible, Low Emission Catalytic Combustor for Opportunity Fuel Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Eteman, Shahrokh

    2013-06-30

    Limited fuel resources, increasing energy demand and stringent emission regulations are drivers to evaluate process off-gases or process waste streams as fuels for power generation. Often these process waste streams have low energy content and/or highly reactive components. Operability of low energy content fuels in gas turbines leads to issues such as unstable and incomplete combustion. On the other hand, fuels containing higher-order hydrocarbons lead to flashback and auto-ignition issues. Due to above reasons, these fuels cannot be used directly without modifications or efficiency penalties in gas turbine engines. To enable the use of these wide variety of fuels in gas turbine engines a rich catalytic lean burn (RCL®) combustion system was developed and tested in a subscale high pressure (10 atm.) rig. The RCL® injector provided stability and extended turndown to low Btu fuels due to catalytic pre-reaction. Previous work has shown promise with fuels such as blast furnace gas (BFG) with LHV of 85 Btu/ft3 successfully combusted. This program extends on this work by further modifying the combustor to achieve greater catalytic stability enhancement. Fuels containing low energy content such as weak natural gas with a Lower Heating Value (LHV) of 6.5 MJ/m3 (180 Btu/ft3 to natural gas fuels containing higher hydrocarbon (e.g ethane) with LHV of 37.6 MJ/m3 (1010 Btu/ft3) were demonstrated with improved combustion stability; an extended turndown (defined as the difference between catalytic and non-catalytic lean blow out) of greater than 250oF was achieved with CO and NOx emissions lower than 5 ppm corrected to 15% O2. In addition, for highly reactive fuels the catalytic region preferentially pre-reacted the higher order hydrocarbons with no events of flashback or auto-ignition allowing a stable and safe operation with low NOx and CO emissions.

  9. Catalytic roles of flexible regions at the active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco)

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.; Harpel, M.R.; Chen, Yuh-Ru; Larson, E.M.; Larimer, F.W.

    1995-12-31

    Chemical and mutagenesis studies of Rubisco have identified Lys329 and Glu48 as active-site residues that are located in distinct, interacting domains from adjacent subunits. Crystallographic analyses have shown that Lys329 is the apical residue in a 12-residue flexible loop (loop 6) of the {Beta},{alpha}-barrel domain of the active site and that Glu48 resides at the end of helix B of the N-terminal domain of the active site. When phosphorylated ligands are bound by the enzyme, loop 6 adopts a closed conformation and, in concert with repositioning of helix B, thereby occludes the active site from the external environment. In this closed conformation, the {gamma}-carboxylate of Glu48 and the {epsilon}-amino group of Lys329 engage in intersubunit electrostatic interaction. By use of appropriate site-directed mutants of Rhodospirillum rubrum Rubisco, we are addressing several issues: the catalytic roles of Lys329 and Glu48, the functional significance of the intersubunit salt bridge comprised of these two residues, and the roles of loop 6 and helix B in stabilizing labile reaction intermediates. Characterization of novel products derived from misprocessing of D-ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) by the mutant proteins have illuminated the structure of the key intermediate in the normal oxygenase pathway.

  10. Fuel-Flexible, Low-Emissions Catalytic Combustor for Opportunity Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    2009-11-01

    Precision Combustion, Inc. will develop a unique, fuel-flexible Rich Catalytic Lean-Burn (RCL®) injector with catalytic combustor capable of enabling ultralow-emission, lean premixed combustion of a wide range of gaseous opportunity fuels. This will broaden the range of opportunity fuels that can be utilized to include low- and ultralow-Btu gases, such as digester and blast furnace gases, and fuels containing reactive species, such as refinery, wellhead, and industrial byproduct gases.

  11. Flexible macrocycles as versatile supports for catalytically active metal clusters

    DOE PAGES

    Ryan, Jason D.; Gagnon, Kevin J.; Teat, Simon J.; ...

    2016-02-12

    Here we present three structurally diverse clusters stabilised by the same macrocyclic polyphenol; t-butylcalix[8]arene. This work demonstrates the range of conformations the flexible ligand is capable of adopting, highlighting its versatility in metal coordination. In addition, a Ti complex displays activity for the ring-opening polymerisation of lactide

  12. Flexible macrocycles as versatile supports for catalytically active metal clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Jason D.; Gagnon, Kevin J.; Teat, Simon J.; McIntosh, Ruaraidh D.

    2016-02-12

    Here we present three structurally diverse clusters stabilised by the same macrocyclic polyphenol; t-butylcalix[8]arene. This work demonstrates the range of conformations the flexible ligand is capable of adopting, highlighting its versatility in metal coordination. In addition, a Ti complex displays activity for the ring-opening polymerisation of lactide

  13. Role of enzyme-substrate flexibility in catalytic activity: an evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed

    Demetrius, L

    1998-09-21

    Site-directed mutagenesis has proved an effective experimental technique to investigate catalytic mechanisms and to determine relations between enzyme structure and function. This article invokes an analytical model based on evolution by mutation and natural selection-Nature's analogue of site-directed mutagenesis-to derive a set of general rules relating enzyme structure and activity. The catalysts are described in terms of the structural parameters, rigidity and flexibility, and the functional variables, reaction rate and substrate specificity. The evolutionary model predicts the following structure-activity relations: (a) rigid enzyme-flexible substrate: large variation in reaction rates, broad substrate specificity; (b) rigid enzyme-rigid substrate: diffusion controlled rates, absolute specificity; (c) flexible enzyme-rigid substrate: intermediate reaction rates, group specificity; (d) flexible enzyme-flexible substrate: slow rates, absolute specificity. Spectroscopic methods and X-ray crystallography now yield important characteristics of enzyme-substrate complexes such as molecular flexibility. The evolutionary analysis we have exploited provides general principles for inferring catalytic activity from structural studies of enzyme-substrate complexes.

  14. HIPK2 catalytic activity and subcellular localization are regulated by activation-loop Y354 autophosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Siepi, Francesca; Gatti, Veronica; Camerini, Serena; Crescenzi, Marco; Soddu, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    HIPK2 (homeodomain-interacting protein kinase-2) binds to and phosphorylates, at Ser and Thr residues, a large number of targets involved in cell division and cell fate decision in response to different physiological or stress stimuli. Inactivation of HIPK2 has been observed in human and mouse cancers supporting its role as a tumor suppressor. Despite the biological relevance of this kinase, very little is known on how HIPK2 becomes catalytically active. Based on sequence homologies, HIPK2 has been taxonomically classified as a subfamily member of the dual-specificity tyrosine-regulated kinases (DYRKs) and the activation-loop Y354 of HIPK2 has been found phosphorylated in different cells; however, the relevance of this Y phosphorylation is presently unknown. Here, we show that HIPK2, which is extensively phosphorylated at S/T sites throughout its functional domains, becomes catalytically active by autophosphorylation at the activation-loop Y354. In particular, we found that, in analogy to DYRKs, HIPK2-Y354 phosphorylation is an autocatalytic event and its prevention, through Y354 substitution with non-phosphorylatable amino acids or by using the kinase inhibitor purvalanol A, induces a strong reduction of the HIPK2 S/T-kinase activity on different substrates. Interestingly, at variance from DYRKs, inhibition of HIPK2-Y354 phosphorylation induces a strong out-of-target Y-kinase activity in cis and a strong cytoplasmic relocalization of the kinase. Together, these results demonstrate that the catalytic activity, substrate specificity, and subcellular localization of HIPK2 are regulated by autophosphorylation of its activation-loop Y354. PMID:23485397

  15. Closed loop control of a robot assisted smart flexible needle for percutaneous intervention.

    PubMed

    Maria Joseph, F O; Hutapea, P; Dicker, A; Yu, Y; Podder, T

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents the experimental evaluation of a coordinated control system for a robot and robot-driven shape memory alloy (SMA) actuated smart flexible needle capable of following a curved path for percutaneous intervention. The robot driving the needle is considered the outer loop and the non-linear SMA actuated flexible needle system comprises the inner loop. The two feedback control loops are coordinated in such a way that the robot drives the needle while monitoring the needle's actual deflection against a preplanned ideal trajectory, so that the needle tip reaches the target location within an acceptable accuracy. In air and in water experimental results are presented to validate the ability of the proposed coordinated controller to track the overall desired trajectory which includes the combined trajectory of the robot driver and the needle.

  16. Effects of FGFR2 kinase activation loop dynamics on catalytic activity

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The structural mechanisms by which receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) regulate catalytic activity are diverse and often based on subtle changes in conformational dynamics. The regulatory mechanism of one such RTK, fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) kinase, is still unknown, as the numerous crystal structures of the unphosphorylated and phosphorylated forms of the kinase domains show no apparent structural change that could explain how phosphorylation could enable catalytic activity. In this study, we use several enhanced sampling molecular dynamics (MD) methods to elucidate the structural changes to the kinase’s activation loop that occur upon phosphorylation. We show that phosphorylation favors inward motion of Arg664, while simultaneously favoring outward motion of Leu665 and Pro666. The latter structural change enables the substrate to bind leading to its resultant phosphorylation. Inward motion of Arg664 allows it to interact with the γ-phosphate of ATP as well as the substrate tyrosine. We show that this stabilizes the tyrosine and primes it for the catalytic phosphotransfer, and it may lower the activation barrier of the phosphotransfer reaction. Our work demonstrates the value of including dynamic information gleaned from computer simulation in deciphering RTK regulatory function. PMID:28151998

  17. Effects of FGFR2 kinase activation loop dynamics on catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Karp, Jerome M; Sparks, Samuel; Cowburn, David

    2017-02-01

    The structural mechanisms by which receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) regulate catalytic activity are diverse and often based on subtle changes in conformational dynamics. The regulatory mechanism of one such RTK, fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) kinase, is still unknown, as the numerous crystal structures of the unphosphorylated and phosphorylated forms of the kinase domains show no apparent structural change that could explain how phosphorylation could enable catalytic activity. In this study, we use several enhanced sampling molecular dynamics (MD) methods to elucidate the structural changes to the kinase's activation loop that occur upon phosphorylation. We show that phosphorylation favors inward motion of Arg664, while simultaneously favoring outward motion of Leu665 and Pro666. The latter structural change enables the substrate to bind leading to its resultant phosphorylation. Inward motion of Arg664 allows it to interact with the γ-phosphate of ATP as well as the substrate tyrosine. We show that this stabilizes the tyrosine and primes it for the catalytic phosphotransfer, and it may lower the activation barrier of the phosphotransfer reaction. Our work demonstrates the value of including dynamic information gleaned from computer simulation in deciphering RTK regulatory function.

  18. Distributed flow sensing for closed-loop speed control of a flexible fish robot.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feitian; Lagor, Francis D; Yeo, Derrick; Washington, Patrick; Paley, Derek A

    2015-10-23

    Flexibility plays an important role in fish behavior by enabling high maneuverability for predator avoidance and swimming in turbulent flow. This paper presents a novel flexible fish robot equipped with distributed pressure sensors for flow sensing. The body of the robot is molded from soft, hyperelastic material, which provides flexibility. Its Joukowski-foil shape is conducive to modeling the fluid analytically. A quasi-steady potential-flow model is adopted for real-time flow estimation, whereas a discrete-time vortex-shedding flow model is used for higher-fidelity simulation. The dynamics for the flexible fish robot yield a reduced model for one-dimensional swimming. A recursive Bayesian filter assimilates pressure measurements to estimate flow speed, angle of attack, and foil camber. The closed-loop speed-control strategy combines an inverse-mapping feedforward controller based on an average model derived for periodic actuation of angle-of-attack and a proportional-integral feedback controller utilizing the estimated flow information. Simulation and experimental results are presented to show the effectiveness of the estimation and control strategy. The paper provides a systematic approach to distributed flow sensing for closed-loop speed control of a flexible fish robot by regulating the flapping amplitude.

  19. The central loop of Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase is flexible and functionally passive.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Josh T; Dabrowski, Michael J; Kung, Irene; Atkins, William M

    2005-04-15

    Bacterial glutamine synthetases (GSs) are dodecameric aggregates comprised of two face-to-face hexameric rings, which form a cylindrical aqueous channel. Available crystal structures indicate that each subunit provides a 'central loop' that protrudes into this channel. Residues on either side of this loop contribute directly to substrate or metal ion cofactor binding. Although it has been suggested that this conspicuous structural feature may be functionally important, a systematic structure-function analysis of this loop has not been done. Here, we examine the behavior of a cysteine mutant, E165C, which yields inter-subunit disulfide bonds connecting the central loops. The inter-subunit disulfide bonds are readily detected by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Based on molecular models, the disulfide bonds would form only if the engineered cysteines on adjacent subunits moved approximately 5 A. Surprisingly, inter-subunit disulfide bonds between the central loops caused no detectable changes in the KMs for glutamate or ATP, nor the KD for either ATP or the transition state analog (L)-methionine sulfoximine (MSOX). Furthermore, covalent and quantitative adduction of the E165C mutant with iodo-acetamido-pyrene yielded nearly fully active enzyme bearing fluorescent pyrene excimers. The relative contribution of pyrene monomers to excimers in the steady state fluorescence is temperature dependent, suggesting thermal equilibrium between loop conformational states. However, the monomer-excimer ratio is independent of ligands such as MSOX, glutamate, or Mn2+. These results validate the suspected flexibility of the central loop, but raise significant doubt about its direct functional role in GS catalysis via conformational switching, including the proposed regulation of GS via ADP-ribosylation within this loop.

  20. Understanding the function of conserved variations in the catalytic loops of fungal glycoside hydrolase family 12.

    PubMed

    Damásio, André R L; Rubio, Marcelo V; Oliveira, Leandro C; Segato, Fernando; Dias, Bruno A; Citadini, Ana P; Paixão, Douglas A; Squina, Fabio M

    2014-08-01

    Enzymes that cleave the xyloglucan backbone at unbranched glucose residues have been identified in GH families 5, 7, 12, 16, 44, and 74. Fungi produce enzymes that populate 20 of 22 families that are considered critical for plant biomass deconstruction. We searched for GH12-encoding genes in 27 Eurotiomycetes genomes. After analyzing 50 GH12-related sequences, the conserved variations of the amino acid sequences were examined. Compared to the endoglucanases, the endo-xyloglucanase-associated YSG deletion at the negative subsites of the catalytic cleft with a SST insertion at the reducing end of the substrate-binding crevice is highly conserved. In addition, a highly conserved alanine residue was identified in all xyloglucan-specific enzymes, and this residue is substituted by arginine in more promiscuous glucanases. To understand the basis for the xyloglucan specificity displayed by certain GH12 enzymes, two fungal GH12 endoglucanases were chosen for mutagenesis and functional studies: an endo-xyloglucanase from Aspergillus clavatus (AclaXegA) and an endoglucanase from A. terreus (AtEglD). Comprehensive molecular docking studies and biochemical analyses were performed, revealing that mutations at the entrance of the catalytic cleft in AtEglD result in a wider binding cleft and the alteration of the substrate-cleavage pattern, implying that a trio of residues coordinates the interactions and binding to linear glycans. The loop insertion at the crevice-reducing end of AclaXegA is critical for catalytic efficiency to hydrolyze xyloglucan. The understanding of the structural elements governing endo-xyloglucanase activity on linear and branched glucans will facilitate future enzyme modifications with potential applications in industrial biotechnology.

  1. Glutamate Racemase Dimerization Inhibits Dynamic Conformational Flexibility and Reduces Catalytic Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Mehboob, Shahila; Guo, Liang; Fu, Wentao; Mittal, Anuradha; Yau, Tiffany; Truong, Kent; Johlfs, Mary; Long, Fei; Fung, Leslie W.-M.; Johnson, Michael E.

    2009-09-15

    Glutamate racemase (RacE) is a bacterial enzyme that converts L-glutamate to D-glutamate, an essential precursor for peptidoglycan synthesis. In prior work, we have shown that both isoforms cocrystallize with D-glutamate as dimers, and the enzyme is in a closed conformation with limited access to the active site [May, M., et al. (2007) J. Mol. Biol. 371, 1219-1237]. The active site of RacE2 is especially restricted. We utilize several computational and experimental approaches to understand the overall conformational dynamics involved during catalysis when the ligand enters and the product exits the active site. Our steered molecular dynamics simulations and normal-mode analysis results indicate that the monomeric form of the enzyme is more flexible than the native dimeric form. These results suggest that the monomeric enzyme might be more active than the dimeric form. We thus generated site-specific mutations that disrupt dimerization and find that the mutants exhibit significantly higher catalytic rates in the D-Glu to L-Glu reaction direction than the native enzyme. Low-resolution models restored from solution X-ray scattering studies correlate well with the first six normal modes of the dimeric form of the enzyme, obtained from NMA. Thus, along with the local active site residues, global domain motions appear to be implicated in the catalytically relevant structural dynamics of this enzyme and suggest that increased flexibility may accelerate catalysis. This is a novel observation that residues distant from the catalytic site restrain catalytic activity through formation of the dimer structure.

  2. Promotion of enzyme flexibility by dephosphorylation and coupling to the catalytic mechanism of a phosphohexomutase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yingying; Villar, Maria T; Artigues, Antonio; Beamer, Lesa J

    2014-02-21

    The enzyme phosphomannomutase/phosphoglucomutase (PMM/PGM) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa catalyzes an intramolecular phosphoryl transfer across its phosphosugar substrates, which are precursors in the synthesis of exoproducts involved in bacterial virulence. Previous structural studies of PMM/PGM have established a key role for conformational change in its multistep reaction, which requires a dramatic 180° reorientation of the intermediate within the active site. Here hydrogen-deuterium exchange by mass spectrometry and small angle x-ray scattering were used to probe the conformational flexibility of different forms of PMM/PGM in solution, including its active, phosphorylated state and the unphosphorylated state that occurs transiently during the catalytic cycle. In addition, the effects of ligand binding were assessed through use of a substrate analog. We found that both phosphorylation and binding of ligand produce significant effects on deuterium incorporation. Phosphorylation of the conserved catalytic serine has broad effects on residues in multiple domains and is supported by small angle x-ray scattering data showing that the unphosphorylated enzyme is less compact in solution. The effects of ligand binding are generally manifested near the active site cleft and at a domain interface that is a site of conformational change. These results suggest that dephosphorylation of the enzyme may play two critical functional roles: a direct role in the chemical step of phosphoryl transfer and secondly through propagation of structural flexibility. We propose a model whereby increased enzyme flexibility facilitates the reorientation of the reaction intermediate, coupling changes in structural dynamics with the unique catalytic mechanism of this enzyme.

  3. Characterizing Solution Surface Loop Conformational Flexibility of the GM2 Activator Protein

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    GM2AP has a β-cup topology with numerous X-ray structures showing multiple conformations for some of the surface loops, revealing conformational flexibility that may be related to function, where function is defined as either membrane binding associated with ligand binding and extraction or interaction with other proteins. Here, site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and molecular dynamic (MD) simulations are used to characterize the mobility and conformational flexibility of various structural regions of GM2AP. A series of 10 single cysteine amino acid substitutions were generated, and the constructs were chemically modified with the methanethiosulfonate spin label. Continuous wave (CW) EPR line shapes were obtained and subsequently simulated using the microscopic order macroscopic disorder (MOMD) program. Line shapes for sites that have multiple conformations in the X-ray structures required two spectral components, whereas spectra of the remaining sites were adequately fit with single-component parameters. For spin labeled sites L126C and I66C, spectra were acquired as a function of temperature, and simulations provided for the determination of thermodynamic parameters associated with conformational change. Binding to GM2 ligand did not alter the conformational flexibility of the loops, as evaluated by EPR and NMR spectroscopies. These results confirm that the conformational flexibility observed in the surface loops of GM2AP crystals is present in solution and that the exchange is slow on the EPR time scale (>ns). Furthermore, MD simulation results are presented and agree well with the conformational heterogeneity revealed by SDSL. PMID:25127419

  4. Crystal Structures of Trypanosoma cruzi UDP-Galactopyranose Mutase Implicate Flexibility of the Histidine Loop in Enzyme Activation

    PubMed Central

    Dhatwalia, Richa; Singh, Harkewal; Oppenheimer, Michelle; Sobrado, Pablo; Tanner, John J.

    2012-01-01

    Chagas disease is a neglected tropical disease caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Here we report crystal structures of the galactofuranose biosynthetic enzyme UDP-galactopyranose mutase (UGM) from T. cruzi, which are the first structures of this enzyme from a protozoan parasite. UGM is an attractive target for drug design because galactofuranose is absent in humans but is an essential component of key glycoproteins and glycolipids in trypanosomatids. Analysis of the enzyme-UDP noncovalent interactions and sequence alignments suggests that substrate recognition is exquisitely conserved among eukaryotic UGMs and distinct from that of bacterial UGMs. This observation has implications for inhibitor design. Activation of the enzyme via reduction of the FAD induces profound conformational changes, including a 2.3-Å movement of the histidine loop (Gly60-Gly61-His62), rotation and protonation of the imidazole of His62, and cooperative movement of residues located on the si face of the FAD. Interestingly, these changes are substantially different from those described for Aspergillus fumigatus UGM, which is 45 % identical to T. cruzi UGM. The importance of Gly61 and His62 for enzymatic activity was studied with the site-directed mutant enzymes G61A, G61P, and H62A. These mutations lower the catalytic efficiency by factors of 10–50, primarily by decreasing kcat. Considered together, the structural, kinetic, and sequence data suggest that the middle Gly of the histidine loop imparts flexibility that is essential for activation of eukaryotic UGMs. Our results provide new information about UGM biochemistry and suggest a unified strategy for designing inhibitors of UGMs from the eukaryotic pathogens. PMID:22646091

  5. Crystal Structures of Trypanosoma cruzi UDP-Galactopyranose Mutase Implicate Flexibility of the Histidine Loop in Enzyme Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Dhatwalia, Richa; Singh, Harkewal; Oppenheimer, Michelle; Sobrado, Pablo; Tanner, John J.

    2012-11-01

    Chagas disease is a neglected tropical disease caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Here we report crystal structures of the galactofuranose biosynthetic enzyme UDP-galactopyranose mutase (UGM) from T. cruzi, which are the first structures of this enzyme from a protozoan parasite. UGM is an attractive target for drug design because galactofuranose is absent in humans but is an essential component of key glycoproteins and glycolipids in trypanosomatids. Analysis of the enzyme-UDP noncovalent interactions and sequence alignments suggests that substrate recognition is exquisitely conserved among eukaryotic UGMs and distinct from that of bacterial UGMs. This observation has implications for inhibitor design. Activation of the enzyme via reduction of the FAD induces profound conformational changes, including a 2.3 {angstrom} movement of the histidine loop (Gly60-Gly61-His62), rotation and protonation of the imidazole of His62, and cooperative movement of residues located on the si face of the FAD. Interestingly, these changes are substantially different from those described for Aspergillus fumigatus UGM, which is 45% identical to T. cruzi UGM. The importance of Gly61 and His62 for enzymatic activity was studied with the site-directed mutant enzymes G61A, G61P, and H62A. These mutations lower the catalytic efficiency by factors of 10-50, primarily by decreasing k{sub cat}. Considered together, the structural, kinetic, and sequence data suggest that the middle Gly of the histidine loop imparts flexibility that is essential for activation of eukaryotic UGMs. Our results provide new information about UGM biochemistry and suggest a unified strategy for designing inhibitors of UGMs from the eukaryotic pathogens.

  6. Experimental Study of Flexible Plate Vibration Control by Using Two-Loop Sliding Mode Control Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jingyu; Lin, Jiahui; Liu, Yuejun; Yang, Kang; Zhou, Lanwei; Chen, Guoping

    2016-06-01

    It is well known that intelligent control theory has been used in many research fields, novel modeling method (DROMM) is used for flexible rectangular active vibration control, and then the validity of new model is confirmed by comparing finite element model with new model. In this paper, taking advantage of the dynamics of flexible rectangular plate, a two-loop sliding mode (TSM) MIMO approach is introduced for designing multiple-input multiple-output continuous vibration control system, which can overcome uncertainties, disturbances or unstable dynamics. An illustrative example is given in order to show the feasibility of the method. Numerical simulations and experiment confirm the effectiveness of the proposed TSM MIMO controller.

  7. Experimental Study of Flexible Plate Vibration Control by Using Two-Loop Sliding Mode Control Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jingyu; Lin, Jiahui; Liu, Yuejun; Yang, Kang; Zhou, Lanwei; Chen, Guoping

    2017-08-01

    It is well known that intelligent control theory has been used in many research fields, novel modeling method (DROMM) is used for flexible rectangular active vibration control, and then the validity of new model is confirmed by comparing finite element model with new model. In this paper, taking advantage of the dynamics of flexible rectangular plate, a two-loop sliding mode (TSM) MIMO approach is introduced for designing multiple-input multiple-output continuous vibration control system, which can overcome uncertainties, disturbances or unstable dynamics. An illustrative example is given in order to show the feasibility of the method. Numerical simulations and experiment confirm the effectiveness of the proposed TSM MIMO controller.

  8. Design and Measurements of a Hybrid RF-MEMS Reconfigurable Loop Antenna on a Flexible Substrate (PREPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    AFRL-RY-WP-TP-2010-1147 DESIGN AND MEASUREMENTS OF A HYBRID RF-MEMS RECONFIGURABLE LOOP ANTENNA ON A FLEXIBLE SUBSTRATE (PREPRINT) Nelson... Antenna on a Flexible Substrate Nelson Sepulveda(1), Dimitrios E. Anagnostou* (2), Rafael A. Rodriguez-Solis(1), and John L. Ebel(3) (1... antenna was designed, fabricated (on a flexible substrate) and measured. The design concepts and measurement results are presented and discussed

  9. Trains, tails and loops of partially adsorbed semi-flexible filaments.

    PubMed

    Welch, David; Lettinga, M P; Ripoll, Marisol; Dogic, Zvonimir; Vliegenthart, Gerard A

    2015-10-14

    Polymer adsorption is a fundamental problem in statistical mechanics that has direct relevance to diverse disciplines ranging from biological lubrication to stability of colloidal suspensions. We combine experiments with computer simulations to investigate depletion induced adsorption of semi-flexible polymers onto a hard-wall. Three dimensional filament configurations of partially adsorbed F-actin polymers are visualized with total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. This information is used to determine the location of the adsorption/desorption transition and extract the statistics of trains, tails and loops of partially adsorbed filament configurations. In contrast to long flexible filaments which primarily desorb by the formation of loops, the desorption of stiff, finite-sized filaments is largely driven by fluctuating filament tails. Simulations quantitatively reproduce our experimental data and allow us to extract universal laws that explain scaling of the adsorption-desorption transition with relevant microscopic parameters. Our results demonstrate how the adhesion strength, filament stiffness, length, as well as the configurational space accessible to the desorbed filament can be used to design the characteristics of filament adsorption and thus engineer properties of composite biopolymeric materials.

  10. Crystal structure of Deinococcus radiodurans RecQ helicase catalytic core domain: the interdomain flexibility.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng-Chia; Huang, Chi-Hung; Yang, Chia Shin; Way, Tzong-Der; Chang, Ming-Chung; Chen, Yeh

    2014-01-01

    RecQ DNA helicases are key enzymes in the maintenance of genome integrity, and they have functions in DNA replication, recombination, and repair. In contrast to most RecQs, RecQ from Deinococcus radiodurans (DrRecQ) possesses an unusual domain architecture that is crucial for its remarkable ability to repair DNA. Here, we determined the crystal structures of the DrRecQ helicase catalytic core and its ADP-bound form, revealing interdomain flexibility in its first RecA-like and winged-helix (WH) domains. Additionally, the WH domain of DrRecQ is positioned in a different orientation from that of the E. coli RecQ (EcRecQ). These results suggest that the orientation of the protein during DNA-binding is significantly different when comparing DrRecQ and EcRecQ.

  11. Chloroperoxidase-Catalyzed Epoxidation of Cis-β-Methylstyrene:Distal Pocket Flexibility Tunes Catalytic Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Morozov, Alexander N.; Chatfield, David C.

    2012-01-01

    Chloroperoxidase, the most versatile heme protein, has a hybrid active site pocket that shares structural features with peroxidases and cytochrome P450s. The simulation studies presented here show that the enzyme possesses a remarkable ability to efficiently utilize its hybrid structure, assuming structurally different peroxidase-like and P450-like distal pocket faces and thereby enhancing the inherent catalytic capability of the active center. We find that during epoxidation of cis-β-methylstyrene (CBMS), the native peroxidase-like aspect of the distal pocket is diminished as the polar Glu183 side chain is displaced away from the active center and the distal pocket takes on a more hydrophobic, P450-like, aspect. The P450-like distal pocket provides a significant enthalpic stabilization of ~4 kcal/mol of the 14 kcal/mol reaction barrier for gas-phase epoxidation of CMBS by an oxyferryl heme-thiolate species. This stabilization comes from breathing of the distal pocket. As until recently the active site of chloroperoxidase was postulated to be inflexible, these results suggest a new conceptual understanding of the enzyme’s versatility: catalytic reactivity is tuned by flexibility of the distal pocket. PMID:23020548

  12. Flexibility in surface-exposed loops in a virus capsid mediates escape from antibody neutralization.

    PubMed

    Kolawole, Abimbola O; Li, Ming; Xia, Chunsheng; Fischer, Audrey E; Giacobbi, Nicholas S; Rippinger, Christine M; Proescher, Jody B G; Wu, Susan K; Bessling, Seneca L; Gamez, Monica; Yu, Chenchen; Zhang, Rebecca; Mehoke, Thomas S; Pipas, James M; Wolfe, Joshua T; Lin, Jeffrey S; Feldman, Andrew B; Smith, Thomas J; Wobus, Christiane E

    2014-04-01

    New human norovirus strains emerge every 2 to 3 years, partly due to mutations in the viral capsid that allow escape from antibody neutralization and herd immunity. To understand how noroviruses evolve antibody resistance, we investigated the structural basis for the escape of murine norovirus (MNV) from antibody neutralization. To identify specific residues in the MNV-1 protruding (P) domain of the capsid that play a role in escape from the neutralizing monoclonal antibody (MAb) A6.2, 22 recombinant MNVs were generated with amino acid substitutions in the A'B' and E'F' loops. Six mutations in the E'F' loop (V378F, A382K, A382P, A382R, D385G, and L386F) mediated escape from MAb A6.2 neutralization. To elucidate underlying structural mechanisms for these results, the atomic structure of the A6.2 Fab was determined and fitted into the previously generated pseudoatomic model of the A6.2 Fab/MNV-1 virion complex. Previously, two distinct conformations, A and B, of the atomic structures of the MNV-1 P domain were identified due to flexibility in the two P domain loops. A superior stereochemical fit of the A6.2 Fab to the A conformation of the MNV P domain was observed. Structural analysis of our observed escape mutants indicates changes toward the less-preferred B conformation of the P domain. The shift in the structural equilibrium of the P domain toward the conformation with poor structural complementarity to the antibody strongly supports a unique mechanism for antibody escape that occurs via antigen flexibility instead of direct antibody-antigen binding. Human noroviruses cause the majority of all nonbacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. New epidemic strains arise in part by mutations in the viral capsid leading to escape from antibody neutralization. Herein, we identify a series of point mutations in a norovirus capsid that mediate escape from antibody neutralization and determine the structure of a neutralizing antibody. Fitting of the antibody structure into the

  13. Identifying Functional Requirements for Flexible Airspace Management Concept Using Human-In-The-Loop Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Paul U.; Bender, Kim; Pagan, Danielle

    2011-01-01

    Flexible Airspace Management (FAM) is a mid- term Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) concept that allows dynamic changes to airspace configurations to meet the changes in the traffic demand. A series of human-in-the-loop (HITL) studies have identified procedures and decision support requirements needed to implement FAM. This paper outlines a suggested FAM procedure and associated decision support functionality based on these HITL studies. A description of both the tools used to support the HITLs and the planned NextGen technologies available in the mid-term are presented and compared. The mid-term implementation of several NextGen capabilities, specifically, upgrades to the Traffic Management Unit (TMU), the initial release of an en route automation system, the deployment of a digital data communication system, a more flexible voice communications network, and the introduction of a tool envisioned to manage and coordinate networked ground systems can support the implementation of the FAM concept. Because of the variability in the overall deployment schedule of the mid-term NextGen capabilities, the dependency of the individual NextGen capabilities are examined to determine their impact on a mid-term implementation of FAM. A cursory review of the different technologies suggests that new functionality slated for the new en route automation system is a critical enabling technology for FAM, as well as the functionality to manage and coordinate networked ground systems. Upgrades to the TMU are less critical but important nonetheless for FAM to be fully realized. Flexible voice communications network and digital data communication system could allow more flexible FAM operations but they are not as essential.

  14. Disparate Degrees of Hypervariable Loop Flexibility Control T-Cell Receptor Cross-Reactivity, Specificity, and Binding Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Daniel R.; Borbulevych, Oleg Y.; Piepenbrink, Kurt H.; Corcelli, Steven A.; Baker, Brian M.

    2012-06-19

    {alpha}{beta} T-cell receptors (TCRs) recognize multiple antigenic peptides bound and presented by major histocompatibility complex molecules. TCR cross-reactivity has been attributed in part to the flexibility of TCR complementarity-determining region (CDR) loops, yet there have been limited direct studies of loop dynamics to determine the extent of its role. Here we studied the flexibility of the binding loops of the {alpha}{beta} TCR A6 using crystallographic, spectroscopic, and computational methods. A significant role for flexibility in binding and cross-reactivity was indicated only for the CDR3{alpha} and CDR3{beta} hypervariable loops. Examination of the energy landscapes of these two loops indicated that CDR3{beta} possesses a broad, smooth energy landscape, leading to rapid sampling in the free TCR of a range of conformations compatible with different ligands. The landscape for CDR3{alpha} is more rugged, resulting in more limited conformational sampling that leads to specificity for a reduced set of peptides as well as the major histocompatibility complex protein. In addition to informing on the mechanisms of cross-reactivity and specificity, the energy landscapes of the two loops indicate a complex mechanism for TCR binding, incorporating elements of both conformational selection and induced fit in a manner that blends features of popular models for TCR recognition.

  15. Efficient Computation of Closed-loop Frequency Response for Large Order Flexible Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maghami, Peiman G.; Giesy, Daniel P.

    1997-01-01

    An efficient and robust computational scheme is given for the calculation of the frequency response function of a large order, flexible system implemented with a linear, time invariant control system. Advantage is taken of the highly structured sparsity of the system matrix of the plant based on a model of the structure using normal mode coordinates. The computational time per frequency point of the new computational scheme is a linear function of system size, a significant improvement over traditional, full-matrix techniques whose computational times per frequency point range from quadratic to cubic functions of system size. This permits the practical frequency domain analysis of systems of much larger order than by traditional, full-matrix techniques. Formulations are given for both open and closed loop loop systems. Numerical examples are presented showing the advantages of the present formulation over traditional approaches, both in speed and in accuracy. Using a model with 703 structural modes, a speed-up of almost two orders of magnitude was observed while accuracy improved by up to 5 decimal places.

  16. Substitutions in a flexible loop of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase hinder the conformational change and unmask hydrogen transfer.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, S; Park, D H; Plapp, B V

    1999-10-19

    When horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase binds coenzyme, a rotation of about 10 degrees brings the catalytic domain closer to the coenzyme binding domain and closes the active site cleft. The conformational change requires that a flexible loop containing residues 293-298 in the coenzyme binding domain rearranges so that the coenzyme and some amino acid residues from the catalytic domain can be accommodated. The change appears to control the rate of dissociation of the coenzyme and to be necessary for installation of the proton relay system. In this study, directed mutagenesis produced the activated Gly293Ala/Pro295Thr enzyme. X-ray crystallography shows that the conformations of both free and complexed forms of the mutated enzyme and wild-type apoenzyme are very similar. Binding of NAD(+) and 2,2, 2-trifluoroethanol do not cause the conformational change, but the nicotinamide ribose moiety and alcohol are not in a fixed position. Although the Gly293Ala and Pro295Thr substitutions do not disturb the apoenzyme structure, molecular modeling shows that the new side chains cannot be accommodated in the closed native holoenzyme complex without steric alterations. The mutated enzyme may be active in the "open" conformation. The turnover numbers with ethanol and acetaldehyde increase 1.5- and 5.5-fold, respectively, and dissociation constants for coenzymes and other kinetic constants increase 40-2,000-fold compared to those of the native enzyme. Substrate deuterium isotope effects on the steady state V or V/K(m) parameters of 4-6 with ethanol or benzyl alcohol indicate that hydrogen transfer is a major rate-limiting step in catalysis. Steady state oxidation of benzyl alcohol is most rapid above a pK of about 9 for V and V/K(m) and is 2-fold faster in D(2)O than in H(2)O. The results are consistent with hydride transfer from a ground state zinc alkoxide that forms a low-barrier hydrogen bond with the hydroxyl group of Ser48.

  17. Crystallographic and NMR evidence for flexibility in oligosaccharyltransferases and its catalytic significance.

    PubMed

    Nyirenda, James; Matsumoto, Shunsuke; Saitoh, Takashi; Maita, Nobuo; Noda, Nobuo N; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Kohda, Daisuke

    2013-01-08

    Oligosaccharyltransferase (OST) is a membrane-bound enzyme that catalyzes the transfer of an oligosaccharide to an asparagine residue in glycoproteins. It possesses a binding pocket that recognizes Ser and Thr residues at the +2 position in the N-glycosylation consensus, Asn-X-Ser/Thr. We determined the crystal structures of the C-terminal globular domains of the catalytic subunits of two archaeal OSTs. A comparison with previously determined structures identified a segment with remarkable conformational plasticity, induced by crystal contact effects. We characterized its dynamic properties in solution by (15)N NMR relaxation analyses. Intriguingly, the mobile region contains the +2 Ser/Thr-binding pocket. In agreement, the flexibility restriction forced by an engineered disulfide crosslink abolished the enzymatic activity, and its cleavage fully restored activity. These results suggest the necessity of multiple conformational states in the reaction. The dynamic nature of the Ser/Thr pocket could facilitate the efficient scanning of N-glycosylation sequons along nascent polypeptide chains.

  18. Mutational Analysis of Sclerostin Shows Importance of the Flexible Loop and the Cystine-Knot for Wnt-Signaling Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Boschert, Verena; van Dinther, Maarten; Weidauer, Stella; van Pee, Katharina; Muth, Eva-Maria; ten Dijke, Peter; Mueller, Thomas D.

    2013-01-01

    The cystine-knot containing protein Sclerostin is an important negative regulator of bone growth and therefore represents a promising therapeutic target. It exerts its biological task by inhibiting the Wnt (wingless and int1) signaling pathway, which participates in bone formation by promoting the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells to osteoblasts. The core structure of Sclerostin consists of three loops with the first and third loop (Finger 1 and Finger 2) forming a structured β-sheet and the second loop being unstructured and highly flexible. Biochemical data showed that the flexible loop is important for binding of Sclerostin to Wnt co-receptors of the low-density lipoprotein related-protein family (LRP), by interacting with the Wnt co-receptors LRP5 or -6 it inhibits Wnt signaling. To further examine the structural requirements for Wnt inhibition, we performed an extensive mutational study within all three loops of the Sclerostin core domain involving single and multiple mutations as well as truncation of important regions. By this approach we could confirm the importance of the second loop and especially of amino acids Asn92 and Ile94 for binding to LRP6. Based on a Sclerostin variant found in a Turkish family suffering from Sclerosteosis we generated a Sclerostin mutant with cysteines 84 and 142 exchanged thereby removing the third disulfide bond of the cystine-knot. This mutant binds to LRP6 with reduced binding affinity and also exhibits a strongly reduced inhibitory activity against Wnt1 thereby showing that also elements outside the flexible loop are important for inhibition of Wnt by Sclerostin. Additionally, we examined the effect of the mutations on the inhibition of two different Wnt proteins, Wnt3a and Wnt1. We could detect clear differences in the inhibition of these proteins, suggesting that the mechanism by which Sclerostin antagonizes Wnt1 and Wnt3a is fundamentally different. PMID:24312339

  19. Removing the invariant salt bridge of parvalbumin increases flexibility in the AB-loop structure.

    PubMed

    Hoh, François; Cavé, Adrien; Strub, Marie Paule; Banères, Jean Louis; Padilla, André

    2009-08-01

    Parvalbumins (PVs) are calcium-buffer proteins that belong to the EF-hand family. Their N-terminal domain consists of two antiparallel helices A and B that make up a flat hydrophobic surface that is associated with the opposite side of the CD and EF binding sites. A single conserved Arg75-Glu81 salt bridge is buried in this hydrophobic interface. The structure of a rat PV mutant in which Arg75 was replaced by alanine was solved by molecular replacement. Unexpectedly, a large distance deviation of 7.8 A was observed for the AB loop but not for the residues that flank the R75A mutation. The thermal stability of the calcium-loaded form is lower (T(m) = 352.0 K; DeltaT(m) = -11.4 K) than that of the wild-type protein and the apo mutant is unfolded at room temperature. Weaker calcium or magnesium affinities were also measured for the R75A mutant (Ca(2+): K(1) = 4.21 x 10(7) M(-1), K(2) = 6.18 x 10(6) M(-1); Mg(2+): K(1) = 2.98 x 10(4) M(-1), K(2) = 3.09 x 10(3) M(-1)). Finally, comparison of the B factors showed an increase in the flexibility of the AB loop that is consistent with this region being more exposed to solvent in the mutant. The mutant structure therefore demonstrates the role of the salt bridge in attaching the nonbinding AB domain to the remaining protein core. Normal-mode analysis indeed indicated an altered orientation of the AB domain with regard to the CD-EF binding domains.

  20. Effect of charge distribution in a flexible loop on the bioluminescence color of firefly luciferases.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Ali; Hosseinkhani, Saman; Naderi-Manesh, Hossein; Sadeghizadeh, Majid; Alipour, Bagher Said

    2009-01-27

    Firefly luciferase is a monooxygenase that catalyzes the ATP-dependent conversion of firefly luciferin into a luciferyl-adenylate, which is oxidized to an electronically excited oxyluciferin in a multistep reaction and produces visible light with a remarkable quantum yield. The bioluminescence color of firefly luciferases is determined by the luciferase structure and assay conditions. Among different beetles, only luciferase from Phrixotrix railroad worm (Ph(RE)) emits red bioluminescence, naturally. The presence of Arg353 in Ph(RE) luciferase, which corresponds to the deleted residue in the other luciferases, is an important distinctive structural feature of it. Insertion of Arg356 into a green-emitter luciferase (Lampyris turkestanicus), corresponding to Arg353 in Phrixotrix hirtus, changed the emitted light from green to red. To further clarify the effect of this position on the light shift mechanism, four residues with similar sizes but different charges (Arg, Lys, Glu, and Gln) were inserted into Photinus pyralis luciferase, using site-specific insertion mutagenesis. Insertion of a residue with a positive side chain (Arg356 and Lys356) changed the light color to red, while insertion of a residue with a negative side chain (Glu356) had little effect on color. Insertion of a neutral residue (Gln356) at this position was performed without any change in bioluminescence spectra. Insertion of positively charged residues in this loop took place with a series of structural changes which were confirmed by fluorescence spectroscopy and homology modeling. Homology modeling reveals the appearance of a bulge in a flexible loop (T352-P359) upon mutation which shifts to the left side with a color change from green to red.

  1. Automated stopped-in-dual-loop flow analysis system for catalytic determination of vanadium in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Teshima, Norio; Kuno, Masami; Ueda, Minoru; Ueda, Hisashi; Ohno, Shinsuke; Sakai, Tadao

    2009-07-15

    An automated stopped-in-dual-loop flow analysis (SIDL-FA) system is proposed for the determination of vanadium in drinking water. The chemistry is based on the vanadium-catalyzed oxidation reaction of p-anisidine by bromate in the presence of Tiron as an activator to produce a dye (lambda(max)=510 nm). A SIDL-FA system basically consists of a selection valve, three pumps (one is for delivering of standard/sample, and others are for reagents), two six-way injection valves, a spectrophotometric detector and a data acquisition device. A 100-microL coiled loop around a heated device is fitted onto each six-way injection valve. A well-mixed solution containing reagents and standard/sample is loaded into the first loop on a six-way valve, and then the same solution is loaded into the second loop on another six-way valve. The solutions are isolated by switching these two six-way valves, so that the catalytic reaction can be promoted. The net waste can be zero in this stage, because all pumps are turned off. Then each resulting solution is dispensed to the detector with suitable time lag. A touchscreen controller is developed to automatically carry out the original SIDL-FA protocol. The proposed SIDL-FA method allows vanadium to be quantified in the range of 0.1-2 microg L(-1) and is applied to the determination of vanadium in drinking water samples.

  2. Poly(dA:dT)-rich DNAs are highly flexible in the context of DNA looping.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Stephanie; Chen, Yi-Ju; Phillips, Rob

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale DNA deformation is ubiquitous in transcriptional regulation in prokaryotes and eukaryotes alike. Though much is known about how transcription factors and constellations of binding sites dictate where and how gene regulation will occur, less is known about the role played by the intervening DNA. In this work we explore the effect of sequence flexibility on transcription factor-mediated DNA looping, by drawing on sequences identified in nucleosome formation and ligase-mediated cyclization assays as being especially favorable for or resistant to large deformations. We examine a poly(dA:dT)-rich, nucleosome-repelling sequence that is often thought to belong to a class of highly inflexible DNAs; two strong nucleosome positioning sequences that share a set of particular sequence features common to nucleosome-preferring DNAs; and a CG-rich sequence representative of high G+C-content genomic regions that correlate with high nucleosome occupancy in vivo. To measure the flexibility of these sequences in the context of DNA looping, we combine the in vitro single-molecule tethered particle motion assay, a canonical looping protein, and a statistical mechanical model that allows us to quantitatively relate the looping probability to the looping free energy. We show that, in contrast to the case of nucleosome occupancy, G+C content does not positively correlate with looping probability, and that despite sharing sequence features that are thought to determine nucleosome affinity, the two strong nucleosome positioning sequences behave markedly dissimilarly in the context of looping. Most surprisingly, the poly(dA:dT)-rich DNA that is often characterized as highly inflexible in fact exhibits one of the highest propensities for looping that we have measured. These results argue for a need to revisit our understanding of the mechanical properties of DNA in a way that will provide a basis for understanding DNA deformation over the entire range of biologically relevant

  3. Structural Study of a Flexible Active Site Loop in Human Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase and Its Functional Implications.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, Lucía; Lewis-Ballester, Ariel; Roitberg, Adrián; Estrin, Darío A; Yeh, Syun-Ru; Marti, Marcelo A; Capece, Luciana

    2016-05-17

    Human indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase catalyzes the oxidative cleavage of tryptophan to N-formyl kynurenine, the initial and rate-limiting step in the kynurenine pathway. Additionally, this enzyme has been identified as a possible target for cancer therapy. A 20-amino acid protein segment (the JK loop), which connects the J and K helices, was not resolved in the reported hIDO crystal structure. Previous studies have shown that this loop undergoes structural rearrangement upon substrate binding. In this work, we apply a combination of replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations and site-directed mutagenesis experiments to characterize the structure and dynamics of this protein region. Our simulations show that the JK loop can be divided into two regions: the first region (JK loop(C)) displays specific and well-defined conformations and is within hydrogen bonding distance of the substrate, while the second region (JK loop(N)) is highly disordered and exposed to the solvent. The peculiar flexible nature of JK loop(N) suggests that it may function as a target for post-translational modifications and/or a mediator for protein-protein interactions. In contrast, hydrogen bonding interactions are observed between the substrate and Thr379 in the highly conserved "GTGG" motif of JK loop(C), thereby anchoring JK loop(C) in a closed conformation, which secures the appropriate substrate binding mode for catalysis. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments confirm the key role of this residue, highlighting the importance of the JK loop(C) conformation in regulating the enzymatic activity. Furthermore, the existence of the partially and totally open conformations in the substrate-free form suggests a role of JK loop(C) in controlling substrate and product dynamics.

  4. On the modeling, and open loop control of a rotating thin flexible beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choura, Slim; Jayasuriya, Suhada; Medick, Matthew A.

    1989-12-01

    A set of governing differential equations is derived for the inplane motion of a rotating thin flexible beam. The beam is assumed to be linearly elastic and is connected to a rigid hub driven by a torque motor. Both flexural and extensional effects are included in the derivation. This coupling due to flexure and extension is usually neglected in studies dealing with the control of such a system. Models for typical control studies are often derived by utilizing an assumed mode approach where the mode shapes are obtained by solving the Euler-Bernoulli beam equation for flexural vibrations, with clamped-free or pinned-free boundary conditions. The coupled equations developed in this paper are used to demonstrate that typical models in control studies give satisfactory results up to a critical rotational speed. For the case where these coupled equations are specialized to simple flexure only, valid for low angular speeds, a unique feedforward control strategy can be derived. This is an open loop control strategy that enables total elimination of an a priori specified vibratory mode from the gross motion in a finite critical time.

  5. Intrinsic flexibility of snRNA hairpin loops facilitates protein binding

    PubMed Central

    Rau, Michael; Stump, W. Tom; Hall, Kathleen B.

    2012-01-01

    Stem–loop II of U1 snRNA and Stem–loop IV of U2 snRNA typically have 10 or 11 nucleotides in their loops. The fluorescent nucleobase 2-aminopurine was used as a substitute for the adenines in each loop to probe the local and global structures and dynamics of these unusually long loops. Using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence, we find that, while the bases in the loops are stacked, they are able to undergo significant local motion on the picosecond/nanosecond timescale. In addition, the loops have a global conformational change at low temperatures that occurs on the microsecond timescale, as determined using laser T-jump experiments. Nucleobase and loop motions are present at temperatures far below the melting temperature of the hairpin stem, which may facilitate the conformational change required for specific protein binding to these RNA loops. PMID:23012481

  6. Increasing the conformational entropy of the Ω-loop lid domain in PEPCK impairs catalysis and decreases catalytic fidelity†

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Troy A.; Holyoak, Todd

    2010-01-01

    Many studies have shown that the dynamic motions of individual protein segments can play an important role in enzyme function. Recent structural studies on the gluconeogenic enzyme PEPCK demonstrate that PEPCK contains a 10-residue Ω-loop domain that acts as an active site lid. Based upon these structural studies we have previously proposed a model for the mechanism of PEPCK catalysis in which the conformation of this mobile lid-domain is energetically coupled to ligand binding resulting in the closed conformation of the lid, necessary for correct substrate positioning, becoming more energetically favorable as ligands associate with the enzyme. Here we test this model by the introduction of a point mutation (A467G) into the center of the Ω-loop lid that is designed to increase the entropic penalty for lid closure. Structural and kinetic characterization of this mutant enzyme demonstrates that the mutation has decreased the favorability of the enzyme adapting the closed lid conformation. As a consequence of this shift in the equilibrium defining the conformation of the active site lid, the enzyme’s ability to stabilize the reaction intermediate is reduced resulting in catalytic defect. This stabilization is initially surprising, as the lid domain makes no direct contacts with the enolate intermediate formed during the reaction. Furthermore, during the conversion of OAA to PEP, the destabilization of the lid closed conformation results in the reaction becoming decoupled as the enolate intermediate is protonated rather than phosphorylated resulting in the formation of pyruvate. Taken together, the structural and kinetic characterization of A467G-PEPCK support our model of the role of the active site lid in catalytic function and demonstrate that the shift in the lowest energy conformation between open and closed lid states is a function of the free energy available to the enzyme through ligand binding and the entropic penalty for ordering of the ten-residue Ω-loop

  7. Increasing the conformational entropy of the Omega-loop lid domain in phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase impairs catalysis and decreases catalytic fidelity .

    PubMed

    Johnson, Troy A; Holyoak, Todd

    2010-06-29

    Many studies have shown that the dynamic motions of individual protein segments can play an important role in enzyme function. Recent structural studies of the gluconeogenic enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) demonstrate that PEPCK contains a 10-residue Omega-loop domain that acts as an active site lid. On the basis of these structural studies, we have previously proposed a model for the mechanism of PEPCK catalysis in which the conformation of this mobile lid domain is energetically coupled to ligand binding, resulting in the closed conformation of the lid, necessary for correct substrate positioning, becoming more energetically favorable as ligands associate with the enzyme. Here we test this model by introducing a point mutation (A467G) into the center of the Omega-loop lid that is designed to increase the entropic penalty for lid closure. Structural and kinetic characterization of this mutant enzyme demonstrates that the mutation has decreased the favorability of the enzyme adapting the closed lid conformation. As a consequence of this shift in the equilibrium defining the conformation of the active site lid, the enzyme's ability to stabilize the reaction intermediate is weakened, resulting in catalytic defect. This stabilization is initially surprising, as the lid domain makes no direct contacts with the enolate intermediate formed during the reaction. Furthermore, during the conversion of OAA to PEP, the destabilization of the lid-closed conformation results in the reaction becoming decoupled as the enolate intermediate is protonated rather than phosphorylated, resulting in the formation of pyruvate. Taken together, the structural and kinetic characterization of A467G-PEPCK supports our model of the role of the active site lid in catalytic function and demonstrates that the shift in the lowest-energy conformation between open and closed lid states is a function of the free energy available to the enzyme through ligand binding and the entropic

  8. The Ω-loop lid domain of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase is essential for catalytic function

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Troy A.; Holyoak, Todd

    2012-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) is an essential metabolic enzyme operating in the gluconeogenesis and glyceroneogenesis pathways. Recent studies have demonstrated that the enzyme contains a mobile active site lid domain that transitions between an open/disorded conformation to a closed/ordered conformation as the enzyme progresses through the catalytic cycle. The understanding of how this mobile domain functions in catalysis is incomplete. Previous studies show that the closure of the lid domain stabilizes the reaction intermediate and protects the reactive intermediate from spurious protonation and thus contributes to the fidelity of the enzyme. In order to more fully investigate the roles of the lid domain in PEPCK function we created three mutations that replaced the 11-residue lid domain with one, two or three glycine residues. Kinetic analysis of the mutant enzymes demonstrates that none of the enzyme constructs exhibit any measurable kinetic activity resulting in a decrease in the catalytic parameters by at least 106. Structural characterization of the mutants in complexes representing the catalytic cycle suggest that the inactivity is due to a role for the lid domain in the formation of the fully closed state of the enzyme that is required for catalytic function. In the absence of the lid domain, the enzyme is unable to achieve the fully closed state and is rendered inactive despite possessing all of the residues and substrates required for catalytic function. This work demonstrates how enzyme catalytic function can be abolished through the alteration of conformational equilibria despite all elements required for chemical conversion of substrates to products remaining intact. PMID:23127136

  9. The Ω-loop lid domain of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase is essential for catalytic function.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Troy A; Holyoak, Todd

    2012-11-27

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) is an essential metabolic enzyme operating in the gluconeogenesis and glyceroneogenesis pathways. Recent studies have demonstrated that the enzyme contains a mobile active site lid domain that undergoes a transition between an open, disorded conformation and a closed, ordered conformation as the enzyme progresses through the catalytic cycle. The understanding of how this mobile domain functions in catalysis is incomplete. Previous studies showed that the closure of the lid domain stabilizes the reaction intermediate and protects the reactive intermediate from spurious protonation and thus contributes to the fidelity of the enzyme. To more fully investigate the roles of the lid domain in PEPCK function, we introduced three mutations that replaced the 11-residue lid domain with one, two, and three glycine residues. Kinetic analysis of the mutant enzymes demonstrates that none of the enzyme constructs exhibit any measurable kinetic activity, resulting in a decrease in the catalytic parameters of at least 10(6). Structural characterization of the mutants in complexes representing the catalytic cycle suggests that the inactivity is due to a role for the lid domain in the formation of the fully closed state of the enzyme that is required for catalytic function. In the absence of the lid domain, the enzyme is unable to achieve the fully closed state and is rendered inactive despite possessing all of the residues and substrates required for catalytic function. This work demonstrates how enzyme catalytic function can be abolished through the alteration of conformational equilibria despite all the elements required for chemical conversion of substrates to products remaining intact.

  10. Switch-Loop Flexibility Affects Transport of Large Drugs by the Promiscuous AcrB Multidrug Efflux Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Hi-jea; Müller, Reinke T.

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug efflux transporters recognize a variety of structurally unrelated compounds for which the molecular basis is poorly understood. For the resistance nodulation and cell division (RND) inner membrane component AcrB of the AcrAB-TolC multidrug efflux system from Escherichia coli, drug binding occurs at the access and deep binding pockets. These two binding areas are separated by an 11-amino-acid-residue-containing switch loop whose conformational flexibility is speculated to be essential for drug binding and transport. A G616N substitution in the switch loop has a distinct and local effect on the orientation of the loop and on the ability to transport larger drugs. Here, we report a distinct phenotypical pattern of drug recognition and transport for the G616N variant, indicating that drug substrates with minimal projection areas of >70 Å2 are less well transported than other substrates. PMID:24914123

  11. A flexible fiber displacement sensor with tunable resolution and dynamic range based on a few-mode fiber loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xin; Lu, Ping; Liu, Deming; Zhang, Jiangshan; Jiang, Shibin

    2017-02-01

    In this article, we propose a fiber displacement sensor based on a few mode fiber loop sandwiched between two single mode fibers (SMF). The proposed sensor is flexible due to the tunable resolution and dynamic range. The FMF is coiled to a fiber loop by making a knot. The in-line MZI sensing structure is fixed on a two dimensional (2D) translation stages. By moving one stage while another stage is fixed, the displacement is applied on the sensing structure. The resolution of the translation stage is 10μm. The few mode fiber loop acts as the transducer for the displacement sensing. The displacement will change the radius of the few mode fiber loop, which leads to a wavelength shift of the interference pattern. When the fiber loop has different initial radius, the same displacement will cause a different curvature variation. So the sensitivity of the wavelength shift to the displacement is dependent on the initial radius. A smaller initial radius of the loop will lead to a larger sensitivity, higher resolution but smaller dynamic range, so it is proper for micro displacement sensing. On the contrary is the lager initial radius that is proper for sensing in a large dynamic range. By simply adjusting the initial radius of the transducer loop, different sensitivity and resolution can be reached. Experimental results show the sensitivities of 0.267nm/mm, 0.384nm/mm, 0.749nm/mm and 1.06nm/mm for initial loop radius of 1.9cm, 1.5cm, 1cm and 0.75cm, respectively.

  12. Conformational flexibility of loops of myosin enhances the global bias in the actin-myosin interaction landscape.

    PubMed

    Nie, Qing-Miao; Sasai, Masaki; Terada, Tomoki P

    2014-04-14

    A long-standing controversy on the mechanism of an actomyosin motor is the role of the Brownian motion of the myosin head in force generation. In order to shed light on this problem, we calculate free-energy landscapes of interaction between an actin filament and the head (S1) of myosin II by using a coarse-grained model of actomyosin. The results show that the free-energy landscape has a global gradient toward the strong-binding site on actin filament, which explains the biased Brownian motion of myosin S1 observed in a single-molecule experiment [Kitamura et al., Nature, 1999, 397, 129 and Biophysics, 2005, 1, 1]. The distinct global gradient in the landscape is brought about only when the conformation of loop 2 at the actin interface of myosin S1 is flexible. The conformational flexibility of loop 3 also contributes to the gradient in the landscape by compensating the role of loop 2. Though the structure of loop 2 is expanded in the weak-binding state, loop 2 shows the larger fluctuation of compaction and expansion due to the actin-myosin interactions as myosin S1 moves toward the strong-binding site on actin filament. Hence, the increase in the compaction-expansion fluctuation of loop 2, the stronger binding of myosin to actin, and the biased Brownian motion of myosin S1 are coupled with each other and should take place in a concurrent way. This predicted coupling should provide opportunities to further test the hypothesis of the biased Brownian motion in actomyosin.

  13. Two Gd(III) coordination polymers based on a flexible tricarboxylate: Syntheses, structures, luminescence and catalytic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yu; Zhu, Min; Liu, Pan; Xia, Li; Wu, Yunlong; Xie, Jimin

    2017-02-01

    Two Gadolinium coordination polymers {[Gd·(TTTA)·(H2O)2]·2H2O}n (1) and [Gd·(TTTA)·DMF]n (2) have been synthesized based on Gd(NO3)3·6H2O and the flexible tripodal ligand 2,2‧,2″-[1,3,5-triazine-2,4,6-triyltris(thio)]tris-acetic acid (H3TTTA) under hydrothermal conditions. In the structure of 1, the tridentate TTTA3- ligands connect the dimeric metal centers into an infinite one dimensional chain. While 2 shows a two dimensional network with tridentate TTTA3- ligands. The two complexes all quench the emission spectra after coordinated to the Gd3+ ions. The catalytic results indicate that two complexes show excellent activities for the cyanosilylation of benzaldehyde and its derivatives. Besides, 2 is better than 1 in the catalytic reactions due to more possibility of metal open sites.

  14. Flexibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphrey, L. Dennis

    1981-01-01

    Flexibility is an important aspect of all sports and recreational activities. Flexibility can be developed and maintained by stretching exercises. Exercises designed to develop flexibility in ankle joints, knees, hips, and the lower back are presented. (JN)

  15. Flexibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphrey, L. Dennis

    1981-01-01

    Flexibility is an important aspect of all sports and recreational activities. Flexibility can be developed and maintained by stretching exercises. Exercises designed to develop flexibility in ankle joints, knees, hips, and the lower back are presented. (JN)

  16. A Catalytically Essential Motif in External Loop 5 of the Bacterial Oligosaccharyltransferase PglB*

    PubMed Central

    Lizak, Christian; Gerber, Sabina; Zinne, Daria; Michaud, Gaëlle; Schubert, Mario; Chen, Fan; Bucher, Monika; Darbre, Tamis; Zenobi, Renato; Reymond, Jean-Louis; Locher, Kaspar P.

    2014-01-01

    Asparagine-linked glycosylation is a post-translational protein modification that is conserved in all domains of life. The initial transfer of a lipid-linked oligosaccharide (LLO) onto acceptor asparagines is catalyzed by the integral membrane protein oligosaccharyltransferase (OST). The previously reported structure of a single-subunit OST enzyme, the Campylobacter lari protein PglB, revealed a partially disordered external loop (EL5), whose role in catalysis was unclear. We identified a new and functionally important sequence motif in EL5 containing a conserved tyrosine residue (Tyr293) whose aromatic side chain is essential for catalysis. A synthetic peptide containing the conserved motif can partially but specifically rescue in vitro activity of mutated PglB lacking Tyr293. Using site-directed disulfide cross-linking, we show that disengagement of the structurally ordered part of EL5 is an essential step of the glycosylation reaction, probably by allowing sequon binding or glyco-product release. Our findings define two distinct mechanistic roles of EL5 in OST-catalyzed glycosylation. These functions, exerted by the two halves of EL5, are independent, because the loop can be cleaved by specific proteolysis with only slight reduction in activity. PMID:24275651

  17. A catalytically essential motif in external loop 5 of the bacterial oligosaccharyltransferase PglB.

    PubMed

    Lizak, Christian; Gerber, Sabina; Zinne, Daria; Michaud, Gaëlle; Schubert, Mario; Chen, Fan; Bucher, Monika; Darbre, Tamis; Zenobi, Renato; Reymond, Jean-Louis; Locher, Kaspar P

    2014-01-10

    Asparagine-linked glycosylation is a post-translational protein modification that is conserved in all domains of life. The initial transfer of a lipid-linked oligosaccharide (LLO) onto acceptor asparagines is catalyzed by the integral membrane protein oligosaccharyltransferase (OST). The previously reported structure of a single-subunit OST enzyme, the Campylobacter lari protein PglB, revealed a partially disordered external loop (EL5), whose role in catalysis was unclear. We identified a new and functionally important sequence motif in EL5 containing a conserved tyrosine residue (Tyr293) whose aromatic side chain is essential for catalysis. A synthetic peptide containing the conserved motif can partially but specifically rescue in vitro activity of mutated PglB lacking Tyr293. Using site-directed disulfide cross-linking, we show that disengagement of the structurally ordered part of EL5 is an essential step of the glycosylation reaction, probably by allowing sequon binding or glyco-product release. Our findings define two distinct mechanistic roles of EL5 in OST-catalyzed glycosylation. These functions, exerted by the two halves of EL5, are independent, because the loop can be cleaved by specific proteolysis with only slight reduction in activity.

  18. A functional role for a flexible loop containing Glu182 in the class II fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zgiby, S; Plater, A R; Bates, M A; Thomson, G J; Berry, A

    2002-01-11

    Class II fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolases (FBP-aldolases) catalyse the zinc-dependent, reversible aldol condensation of dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (G3P) to form fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (FBP). Analysis of the structure of the enzyme from Escherichia coli in complex with a transition state analogue (phosphoglycolohydroxamate, PGH) suggested that substrate binding caused a conformational change in the beta5-alpha7 loop of the enzyme and that this caused the relocation of two glutamate residues (Glu181 and Glu182) into the proximity of the active site. Site-directed mutagenesis of these two glutamate residues (E181A and E182A) along with another active site glutamate (Glu174) was carried out and the mutant enzymes characterised using steady-state kinetics. Mutation of Glu174 (E174A) resulted in an enzyme which was severely crippled in catalysis, in agreement with its position as a zinc ligand in the enzyme's structure. The E181A mutant showed the same properties as the wild-type enzyme indicating that the residue played no major role in substrate binding or enzyme catalysis. In contrast, mutation of Glu182 (E182A) demonstrated that Glu182 is important in the catalytic cycle of the enzyme. Furthermore, the measurement of deuterium kinetic isotope effects using [1(S)-(2)H]DHAP showed that, for the wild-type enzyme, proton abstraction was not the rate determining step, whereas in the case of the E182A mutant this step had become rate limiting, providing evidence for the role of Glu182 in abstraction of the C1 proton from DHAP in the condensation direction of the reaction. Glu182 lies in a loop of polypeptide which contains four glycine residues (Gly176, Gly179, Gly180 and Gly184) and a quadruple mutant (where each glycine was converted to alanine) showed that flexibility of this loop was important for the correct functioning of the enzyme, probably to change the microenvironment of Glu182 in order to perturb its pK(a) to a value

  19. Enhanced complexity and catalytic efficiency in the hydrolysis of phosphate diesters by rationally designed helix-loop-helix motifs.

    PubMed

    Razkin, Jesus; Lindgren, Johan; Nilsson, Helena; Baltzer, Lars

    2008-08-11

    HJ1, a 42-residue peptide that folds into a helix-loop-helix motif and dimerizes to form a four-helix bundle, successfully catalyzes the cleavage of "early stage" DNA model substrates in an aqueous solution at pH 7.0, with a rate enhancement in the hydrolysis of heptyl 4-nitrophenyl phosphate of over three orders of magnitude over that of the imidazole-catalyzed reaction, k(2)(HJ1)/k(2)(Im) = 3135. The second-order rate constant, k(2)(HJ1) was determined to be 1.58x10(-4) M(-1) s(-1). The catalyst successfully assembles residues that in a single elementary reaction step are capable of general-acid and general-base catalysis as well as transition state stabilization and proximity effects. The reactivity achieved with the HJ1 polypeptide, rationally designed to catalyze the hydrolysis of phosphodiesters, is based on two histidine residues flanked by four arginines and two adjacent tyrosine residues, all located on the surface of a helix-loop-helix motif. The introduction of Tyr residues close to the catalytic site improves efficiency, in the cleavage of activated aryl alkyl phosphates as well as less activated dialkyl phosphates. HJ1 is also effective in the cleavage of an RNA-mimic substrate, uridine-3'-2,2,2-trichloroethyl phosphate (leaving group pK(a) = 12.3) with a second-order rate constant of 8.23x10(-4) M(-1) s(-1) in aqueous solution at pH 7.0, some 500 times faster than the reaction catalyzed by imidazole, k(2)(HJ1)/k(2)(Im) = 496.

  20. Donor-driven conformational flexibility in a real-life catalytic dicopper(ii) peroxo complex.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, A; Herres-Pawlis, S

    2016-03-07

    The conformers of the real-life tyrosinase model [Cu2O2{HC(3-tBuPz)2(Py)}2](2+) which displays catalytic hydroxylation reactivity were investigated by density functional theory (DFT) studies including second-order perturbation theory and charge decomposition analysis (CDA). We elucidated the donor competition between pyrazolyl and pyridinyl moieties and found that pyrazolyl units are the stronger donors in bis(pyrazolyl)pyridinylmethane copper complexes. Geometry optimisations and TD-DFT calculations on all conformers proved to be robust in the prediction of the experimental data: the XAS distances and both charge-transfer bands are well reproduced. The CDA analyses gave insights into the electronic structure of the real-life peroxo dicopper species. The donor interplay as well as the multitude of interactions within two prototypical conformers have now been dissected in detail for the first time for a catalytic real-life system without simplifications. We find that the N donor interactions to the core are extremely stabilising and that in the conformer with both pyrazolyl units in equatorial position, these interactions are more stabilising than the axial ones. In the conformer with pyridinyl/pyrazolyl equator, the picture is more mixed but the general trend keeps consistent. We relate the extraordinary catalytic activity of the [Cu2O2{HC(3-tBuPz)2(Py)}2](2+) system to the subtle interplay of the different donor moieties.

  1. Flexible non-nucleotide linkers as loop replacements in short double helical RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Pils, Werner; Micura, Ronald

    2000-01-01

    Ethylene glycol oligomers have been studied systematically as non-nucleotide loop replacements in short hairpin oligoribonucleotides. Structural optimization concerns the length of the linkers and is based on the thermodynamic stabilities of the corresponding duplexes. The optimum linker is derived from heptakis (ethylene glycol) provided that the duplex end to be bridged comprises solely the terminal base pair; the optimum linker is derived from hexakis(ethylene glycol) if a dangling unpaired nucleotide is incorporated into the loop. Moreover, these linkers have been compared to other commonly used linker types which consist of repeating units of tris- or tetrakis(ethylene glycol) phosphate, or of 3-hydroxypropane-1-phosphate. In all cases, the correlation between linker length and duplex stability is independent of the kind of counter ions used (Na+, Na+/Mg2+, K+ or Li+). Furthermore, all duplexes with non-nucleotide loop replacements are less stable than those with the corresponding standard nucleotide loop. The results corroborate that the linkers are solvent-exposed and do not specifically interfere with the terminal nucleotides at the bridged duplex end. PMID:10756183

  2. The flexible cytoplasmic loop 3 contributes to the substrate affinity of human monocarboxylate transporters.

    PubMed

    Futagi, Yuya; Sasaki, Shotaro; Kobayashi, Masaki; Narumi, Katsuya; Furugen, Ayako; Iseki, Ken

    2017-10-01

    Human monocarboxylate transporters (hMCTs/SLC16As) mediate the transport of small molecular weight monocarboxylates. Among hMCTs, hMCT1 exhibits high-affinity l-lactate transport and broad substrate recognition, whereas hMCT4 shows highly specific substrate recognition and low-affinity l-lactate transport, indicating that hMCT1 and hMCT4 have different roles in the body. However, the molecular mechanism of transporter-mediated substrate transport remains unknown. The aim of this study is to identify the domain, which determines the substrate selectivity and affinity of hMCT1 and hMCT4. We constructed a chimera, hMCT4/1, in which the cytoplasmic loop 3 (TM6/7loop) region of hMCT4 was replaced by the corresponding region of hMCT1. Xenopus laevis oocyte heterologous expression system was used to characterize functional features of the chimera. We have demonstrated that the substrate affinity of hMCT1 and hMCT4 depends on the TM6/7loop. Non-conserved His237 residue in the TM6/7loop functions as a regulatory moiety of the substrate affinity. In contrast, the substrate selectivity of the transporters did not depend on the TM6/7loop, suggesting that the domain is not directly involved in substrate recognition. Our study provides important insights into the structures and functions of hMCT1 and hMCT4 transporters. These findings contribute to the development of novel hMCT1 and/or hMCT4 inhibitors as anticancer agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Falcon: a highly flexible open-source software for closed-loop neuroscience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciliberti, Davide; Kloosterman, Fabian

    2017-08-01

    Objective. Closed-loop experiments provide unique insights into brain dynamics and function. To facilitate a wide range of closed-loop experiments, we created an open-source software platform that enables high-performance real-time processing of streaming experimental data. Approach. We wrote Falcon, a C++ multi-threaded software in which the user can load and execute an arbitrary processing graph. Each node of a Falcon graph is mapped to a single thread and nodes communicate with each other through thread-safe buffers. The framework allows for easy implementation of new processing nodes and data types. Falcon was tested both on a 32-core and a 4-core workstation. Streaming data was read from either a commercial acquisition system (Neuralynx) or the open-source Open Ephys hardware, while closed-loop TTL pulses were generated with a USB module for digital output. We characterized the round-trip latency of our Falcon-based closed-loop system, as well as the specific latency contribution of the software architecture, by testing processing graphs with up to 32 parallel pipelines and eight serial stages. We finally deployed Falcon in a task of real-time detection of population bursts recorded live from the hippocampus of a freely moving rat. Main results. On Neuralynx hardware, round-trip latency was well below 1 ms and stable for at least 1 h, while on Open Ephys hardware latencies were below 15 ms. The latency contribution of the software was below 0.5 ms. Round-trip and software latencies were similar on both 32- and 4-core workstations. Falcon was used successfully to detect population bursts online with ~40 ms average latency. Significance. Falcon is a novel open-source software for closed-loop neuroscience. It has sub-millisecond intrinsic latency and gives the experimenter direct control of CPU resources. We envisage Falcon to be a useful tool to the neuroscientific community for implementing a wide variety of closed-loop experiments, including those

  4. Falcon: a highly flexible open-source software for closed-loop neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Ciliberti, Davide; Kloosterman, Fabian

    2017-05-26

    Closed-loop experiments provide unique insights into brain dynamics and function. To facilitate a wide range of closed-loop experiments, we created an open-source software platform that enables high-performance real-time processing of streaming experimental data. We wrote Falcon, a C++ multi-threaded software in which the user can load and execute an arbitrary processing graph. Each node of a Falcon graph is mapped to a single thread and nodes communicate with each other through thread-safe buffers. The framework allows for easy implementation of new processing nodes and data types. Falcon was tested both on a 32-core and a 4-core workstation. Streaming data was read from either a commercial acquisition system (Neuralynx) or the open-source Open Ephys hardware, while closed-loop TTL pulses were generated with a USB module for digital output. We characterized the round-trip latency of our Falcon-based closed-loop system, as well as the specific latency contribution of the software architecture, by testing processing graphs with up to 32 parallel pipelines and eight serial stages. We finally deployed Falcon in a task of real-time detection of population bursts recorded live from the hippocampus of a freely moving rat. On Neuralynx hardware, round-trip latency was well below 1 ms and stable for at least 1 h, while on Open Ephys hardware latencies were below 15 ms. The latency contribution of the software was below 0.5 ms. Round-trip and software latencies were similar on both 32- and 4-core workstations. Falcon was used successfully to detect population bursts online with ~40 ms average latency. Falcon is a novel open-source software for closed-loop neuroscience. It has sub-millisecond intrinsic latency and gives the experimenter direct control of CPU resources. We envisage Falcon to be a useful tool to the neuroscientific community for implementing a wide variety of closed-loop experiments, including those requiring use of complex data structures and real

  5. Hierarchical structured MnO2@SiO2 nanofibrous membranes with superb flexibility and enhanced catalytic performance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueqin; Dou, Lvye; Yang, Liu; Yu, Jianyong; Ding, Bin

    2017-02-15

    Constructing nanostructured catalyst-embedded ceramic fibrous membranes would facilitate the remediation or preliminary treatment of dyeing wastewater, however, most of such membranes are brittle with low deformation resistance, thus, restricting their widely applications. Herein, the flexible and hierarchical nanostructured MnO2-immobilized SiO2 nanofibrous membranes (MnO2@SiO2 NFM) were fabricated by combining the electrospinning technique with hydrothermal method. The morphologies of membranes could be regulated from nanowires and nanoflower to mace-like structure via varying concentration of reactants. The resultant MnO2@SiO2 NFM could cooperate with hydrogen peroxide to form a Fenton-like reagent for the degradation of methylene blue (MB). The resultant membrane exhibited prominent catalytic performance towards MB, including high degradation degree of 95% within 40min, fast degradation rate of 0.0865min(-1), and excellent reusability in 5 cycles. Moreover, the membranes could be used in a wide pH range of 0 to 14 and the degradation degree reached 76% during dynamic filtration process with a flux of 490,000Lm(-2)h(-1). The successful fabricating of such membrane with extraordinary catalytic performance would provide a platform for preparing high-performance catalysts for remediation of dyeing wastewater. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Synthesis and evaluation of novel 3-C-alkylated-Neu5Ac2en derivatives as probes of influenza virus sialidase 150-loop flexibility.

    PubMed

    Rudrawar, Santosh; Kerry, Philip S; Rameix-Welti, Marie-Anne; Maggioni, Andrea; Dyason, Jeffrey C; Rose, Faith J; van der Werf, Sylvie; Thomson, Robin J; Naffakh, Nadia; Russell, Rupert J M; von Itzstein, Mark

    2012-11-21

    Novel 3-C-alkylated-Neu5Ac2en derivatives have been designed to target the expanded active site cavity of influenza virus sialidases with an open 150-loop, currently seen in X-ray crystal structures of influenza A virus group-1 (N1, N4, N5, N8), but not group-2 (N2, N9), sialidases. The compounds show selectivity for inhibition of H5N1 and pdm09 H1N1 sialidases over an N2 sialidase, providing evidence of the relative 150-loop flexibility of these sialidases. In a complex with N8 sialidase, the C3 substituent of 3-phenylally-Neu5Ac2en occupies the 150-cavity while the central ring and the remaining substituents bind the active site as seen for the unsubstituted template. This new class of inhibitors, which can 'trap' the open 150-loop form of the sialidase, should prove useful as probes of 150-loop flexibility.

  7. Coupled rotor-flexible fuselage vibration reduction using open loop higher harmonic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papavassiliou, I.; Friedmann, P. P.; Venkatesan, C.

    1991-01-01

    A fundamental study of vibration prediction and vibration reduction in helicopters using active controls was performed. The nonlinear equations of motion for a coupled rotor/flexible fuselage system have been derived using computer algebra on a special purpose symbolic computer facility. The trim state and vibratory response of the helicopter are obtained in a single pass by applying the harmonic balance technique and simultaneously satisfying the trim and the vibratory response of the helicopter for all rotor and fuselage degrees of freedom. The influence of the fuselage flexibility on the vibratory response is studied. It is shown that the conventional single frequency higher harmonic control is capable of reducing either the hub loads or only the fuselage vibrations but not both simultaneously. It is demonstrated that for simultaneous reduction of hub shears and fuselae vibrations a new scheme called multiple higher harmonic control is required.

  8. Closed-Loop Control Techniques for Active Vibration Suppression of a Flexible Mechanical System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villaverde Huertas, Vladímir; Rohaľ-Ilkiv, Boris

    2012-12-01

    This paper investigates the problem of vibration attenuation of a lightly damped mechanical system using piezoelectric actuation. First of all, an explicit predictive controller will be designed using the Matlab multi-parametric toolbox. Then, we will explore the positive position feedback technique and test the discrete-time PPF controller using an xPC target real-time system. On the other hand, we will realize the modal analysis of the analyzed flexible system in order to determine the frequency corresponding to the first mode shape. This frequency will be utilized as PPF controller frequency. Moreover, the state-space model of the flexible mechanical system will be obtained using the Matlab system identification toolbox applying the subspace identification approach.

  9. Coupled rotor-flexible fuselage vibration reduction using open loop higher harmonic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papavassiliou, I.; Friedmann, P. P.; Venkatesan, C.

    1991-01-01

    A fundamental study of vibration prediction and vibration reduction in helicopters using active controls was performed. The nonlinear equations of motion for a coupled rotor/flexible fuselage system have been derived using computer algebra on a special purpose symbolic computer facility. The trim state and vibratory response of the helicopter are obtained in a single pass by applying the harmonic balance technique and simultaneously satisfying the trim and the vibratory response of the helicopter for all rotor and fuselage degrees of freedom. The influence of the fuselage flexibility on the vibratory response is studied. It is shown that the conventional single frequency higher harmonic control is capable of reducing either the hub loads or only the fuselage vibrations but not both simultaneously. It is demonstrated that for simultaneous reduction of hub shears and fuselae vibrations a new scheme called multiple higher harmonic control is required.

  10. A flexible loop-type flow modulator for comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Tranchida, Peter Quinto; Purcaro, Giorgia; Visco, Alessandro; Conte, Lanfranco; Dugo, Paola; Dawes, Peter; Mondello, Luigi

    2011-05-27

    The present investigation is focused on a simple flow modulator (FM), for comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC). The interface is stable at high temperatures, and consists of a metallic disc (located inside the GC oven) with seven ports, which are connected to an auxiliary pressure source via two branches, to the first and second dimension, to a waste branch (linked to a needle valve) and to an exchangeable modulation loop (2 ports). The ports are connected via micro-channels, etched on one of the inner surfaces of the disc. Modulation is achieved using a two-way electrovalve, connected on one side to the additional pressure source, and to the two metal branches, on the other. An FM enantio-GC×polar-GC method (using a flame ionization detector) was optimized (a 40-μL loop was employed), for the analysis of essential oils. As an example, an application on spearmint oil is shown; the method herein proposed was subjected to validation. Finally, an FM GC×GC diesel experiment was carried out, using an apolar-polar column combination, to demonstrate the effectiveness of the modulator in the analysis of a totally different sample-type. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The Role of Flexible Loops in Folding, Trafficking and Activity of Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporters.

    PubMed

    Aseervatham, Jaya; Tran, Lucky; Machaca, Khaled; Boudker, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Equilibrative nucleoside transporters (ENTs) are integral membrane proteins, which reside in plasma membranes of all eukaryotic cells and mediate thermodynamically downhill transport of nucleosides. This process is essential for nucleoside recycling, and also plays a key role in terminating adenosine-mediated cellular signaling. Furthermore, ENTs mediate the uptake of many drugs, including anticancer and antiviral nucleoside analogues. The structure and mechanism, by which ENTs catalyze trans-membrane transport of their substrates, remain unknown. To identify the core of the transporter needed for stability, activity, and for its correct trafficking to the plasma membrane, we have expressed human ENT deletion mutants in Xenopus laevis oocytes and determined their localization, transport properties and susceptibility to inhibition. We found that the carboxyl terminal trans-membrane segments are essential for correct protein folding and trafficking. In contrast, the soluble extracellular and intracellular loops appear to be dispensable, and must be involved in the fine-tuning of transport regulation.

  12. Flexible Airspace Management (FAM) Research 2010 Human-in-the-Loop Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Paul U.; Brasil, Connie; Homola, Jeffrey; Kessell, Angela; Prevot, Thomas; Smith, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    A human-in-the-Ioop (HITL) simulation was conducted to assess potential user and system benefits of Flexible Airspace Management (FAM) concept, as well as designing role definitions, procedures, and tools to support the FAM operations in the mid-term High Altitude Airspace (HAA) environment. The study evaluated the benefits and feasibility of flexible airspace reconfiguration in response to traffic overload caused by weather deviations, and compared them to those in a baseline condition without the airspace reconfiguration. The test airspace consisted of either four sectors in one Area of Specialization or seven sectors across two Areas. The test airspace was assumed to be at or above FL340 and fully equipped Vvith data communications (Data Comm). Other assumptions were consistent with those of the HAA concept. Overall, results showed that FAM operations with multiple Traffic Management Coordinators, Area Supervisors, and controllers worked remarkably well. The results showed both user and system benefits, some of which include the increased throughput, decreased flight distance, more manageable sector loads, and better utilized airspace. Also, the roles, procedures, airspace designs, and tools were all very well received. Airspace configuration options that resulted from a combination of algorithm-generated airspace configurations with manual modifications were well acceptec and posed little difficuIty and/or workload during airspace reconfiguration process. The results suggest a positive impact of FAM operations in HAA. Further investigation would be needed to evaluate if the benefits and feasibility would extend in either non-HAA or mixed equipage environment.

  13. A smallest 6 kda metalloprotease, mini-matrilysin, in living world: a revolutionary conserved zinc-dependent proteolytic domain- helix-loop-helix catalytic zinc binding domain (ZBD)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Aim of this study is to study the minimum zinc dependent metalloprotease catalytic folding motif, helix B Met loop-helix C, with proteolytic catalytic activities in metzincin super family. The metzincin super family share a catalytic domain consisting of a twisted five-stranded β sheet and three long α helices (A, B and C). The catalytic zinc is at the bottom of the cleft and is ligated by three His residues in the consensus sequence motif, HEXXHXXGXXH, which is located in helix B and part of the adjacent Met turn region. An interesting question is - what is the minimum portion of the enzyme that still possesses catalytic and inhibitor recognition?” Methods We have expressed a 60-residue truncated form of matrilysin which retains only the helix B-Met turn-helix C region and deletes helix A and the five-stranded β sheet which form the upper portion of the active cleft. This is only 1/4 of the full catalytic domain. The E. coli derived 6 kDa MMP-7 ZBD fragments were purified and refolded. The proteolytic activities were analyzed by Mca-Pro-Leu-Gly-Leu-Dpa-Ala-Arg-NH2 peptide assay and CM-transferrin zymography analysis. SC44463, BB94 and Phosphoramidon were computationally docked into the 3day structure of the human MMP7 ZBD and TAD and thermolysin using the docking program GOLD. Results This minimal 6 kDa matrilysin has been refolded and shown to have proteolytic activity in the Mca-Pro-Leu-Gly-Leu-Dpa-Ala-Arg-NH2 peptide assay. Triton X-100 and heparin are important factors in the refolding environment for this mini-enzyme matrilysin. This minienzyme has the proteolytic activity towards peptide substrate, but the hexamer and octamer of the mini MMP-7 complex demonstrates the CM-transferrin proteolytic activities in zymographic analysis. Peptide digestion is inhibited by SC44463, specific MMP7 inhibitors, but not phosphorimadon. Interestingly, the mini MMP-7 can be processed by autolysis and producing ~ 6 ~ 7 kDa fragments. Thus

  14. Free-energy calculations for semi-flexible macromolecules: Applications to DNA knotting and looping

    SciTech Connect

    Giovan, Stefan M.; Scharein, Robert G.; Hanke, Andreas; Levene, Stephen D.

    2014-11-07

    We present a method to obtain numerically accurate values of configurational free energies of semiflexible macromolecular systems, based on the technique of thermodynamic integration combined with normal-mode analysis of a reference system subject to harmonic constraints. Compared with previous free-energy calculations that depend on a reference state, our approach introduces two innovations, namely, the use of internal coordinates to constrain the reference states and the ability to freely select these reference states. As a consequence, it is possible to explore systems that undergo substantially larger fluctuations than those considered in previous calculations, including semiflexible biopolymers having arbitrary ratios of contour length L to persistence length P. To validate the method, high accuracy is demonstrated for free energies of prime DNA knots with L/P = 20 and L/P = 40, corresponding to DNA lengths of 3000 and 6000 base pairs, respectively. We then apply the method to study the free-energy landscape for a model of a synaptic nucleoprotein complex containing a pair of looped domains, revealing a bifurcation in the location of optimal synapse (crossover) sites. This transition is relevant to target-site selection by DNA-binding proteins that occupy multiple DNA sites separated by large linear distances along the genome, a problem that arises naturally in gene regulation, DNA recombination, and the action of type-II topoisomerases.

  15. Free-energy calculations for semi-flexible macromolecules: Applications to DNA knotting and looping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovan, Stefan M.; Scharein, Robert G.; Hanke, Andreas; Levene, Stephen D.

    2014-11-01

    We present a method to obtain numerically accurate values of configurational free energies of semiflexible macromolecular systems, based on the technique of thermodynamic integration combined with normal-mode analysis of a reference system subject to harmonic constraints. Compared with previous free-energy calculations that depend on a reference state, our approach introduces two innovations, namely, the use of internal coordinates to constrain the reference states and the ability to freely select these reference states. As a consequence, it is possible to explore systems that undergo substantially larger fluctuations than those considered in previous calculations, including semiflexible biopolymers having arbitrary ratios of contour length L to persistence length P. To validate the method, high accuracy is demonstrated for free energies of prime DNA knots with L/P = 20 and L/P = 40, corresponding to DNA lengths of 3000 and 6000 base pairs, respectively. We then apply the method to study the free-energy landscape for a model of a synaptic nucleoprotein complex containing a pair of looped domains, revealing a bifurcation in the location of optimal synapse (crossover) sites. This transition is relevant to target-site selection by DNA-binding proteins that occupy multiple DNA sites separated by large linear distances along the genome, a problem that arises naturally in gene regulation, DNA recombination, and the action of type-II topoisomerases.

  16. Critical Role of a Loop at C-Terminal Domain on the Conformational Stability and Catalytic Efficiency of Chondroitinase ABC I.

    PubMed

    Akram Shirdel, S; Khalifeh, Khosrow; Golestani, Abolfazl; Ranjbar, Bijan; Khajeh, Khosro

    2015-08-01

    We used a combination of protein engineering and spectroscopic methods to investigate the effect of a long length loop on the conformational stability and activity of chondroitinase ABC I. This study involves manipulation of interactions around Asp(689) as a key residue in the central region of the loop containing residues 681-695 located at C-terminal domain of the enzyme. According to the equilibrium unfolding experiments and considering thermodynamic m value and ΔG(H2O), we found that the folded state of H700N, L701T, and H700N/L701T are more compact relative to the folded state of wild-type protein and they become stabilized upon mutation. However, the compactness and stability of other variants are less than those of wild-type protein. According to enzyme activity measurements, we found that the catalytic efficiency of structurally stabilized variants is decreased, while that of destabilized mutants is improved.

  17. A Continuous-Adaptive DDRx Interface with Flexible Round-Trip-Time and Full Self Loop-Backed AC Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haraguchi, Masaru; Osawa, Tokuya; Yamazaki, Akira; Morishima, Chikayoshi; Morihara, Toshinori; Morooka, Yoshikazu; Okuno, Yoshihiro; Arimoto, Kazutami

    This paper describes new DDRx SDRAM interface architecture suitable for system-on-chip (SOC) implementation. Our test chip fabricated in a 90-nm CMOS process adopts three key schemes and achieves 960 Mb/s/pin operations with 32 bits width. One of new schemes is to suppress timing skew with rising-edge signal transmission I/O circuit and look-up table type impedance calibration circuit. DQS round-trip-time, propagation delay from rising edge of system clock in SOC to arrival of DQS at input PAD of SOC during read operation, becomes longer than one clock cycle time as for DDR2 interface and beyond. Flexible DQS round-trip-time scheme can allow wide range up to N/2 cycles in N bits burst read operation. In addition, full self loop-backed test scheme is also proposed to measure AC timing parameters without high-end tester. The architecture reported in this paper can be continuously adaptive to realize higher data-rate and cost-efficient DDRx-SDRAM interface for various kinds of SOC.

  18. Zinc ion coordination as a modulating factor of the ZnuA histidine-rich loop flexibility: A molecular modeling and fluorescence spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Castelli, Silvia; Stella, Lorenzo; Petrarca, Patrizia; Battistoni, Andrea; Desideri, Alessandro; Falconi, Mattia

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fluorescence data indicate that the His-loop of ZnuA interacts with Zn{sup +2} ions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ZnuA structural model proposed validates these spectroscopic findings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is proposed that a zinc loaded His-loop may facilitate the ZnuA-ZnuB recognition. -- Abstract: ZnuA is the soluble component of the high-affinity ZnuABC zinc transporter belonging to the ATP-binding cassette-type periplasmic Zn-binding proteins. The zinc transporter ZnuABC is composed by three proteins: ZnuB, the membrane permease, ZnuC, the ATPase component and ZnuA, the soluble periplasmic metal-binding protein which captures Zn and delivers it to ZnuB. The ZnuA protein contains a charged flexible loop, rich in histidines and acidic residues, showing significant species-specific differences. Various studies have established that this loop contributes to the formation of a secondary zinc binding site, which has been proposed to be important in the acquisition of periplasmic Zn for its delivery to ZnuB or for regulation of zinc uptake. Due to its high mobility the structure of the histidine-rich loop has never been solved by X-ray diffraction studies. In this paper, through a combined use of molecular modeling, mutagenesis and fluorescence spectroscopy, we confirm the presence of two zinc binding sites characterized by different affinities for the metal ion and show that the flexibility of the loop is modulated by the binding of the zinc ions to the protein. The data obtained by fluorescence spectroscopy have then be used to validate a 3D model including the unsolved histidine-rich loop.

  19. Improving the reversibility of thermal denaturation and catalytic efficiency of Bacillus licheniformis α-amylase through stabilizing a long loop in domain B

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhu; Duan, Xuguo; Chen, Sheng; Wu, Jing

    2017-01-01

    The reversibility of thermal denaturation and catalytic efficiency of Bacillus licheniformis α-amylase were improved through site-directed mutagenesis. By using multiple sequence alignment and PoPMuSiC algorithm, Ser187 and Asn188, which located within a long loop in Domain B of Bacillus licheniformis α-amylase, were selected for mutation. In addition, Ala269, which is adjacent to Ser187 and Asn188, was also investigated. Seven mutants carrying the mutations S187D, N188T, N188S, A269K, A269K/S187D, S187D/N188T, and A269K/S187D/N188T were generated and characterized. The most thermostable mutant, A269K/S187D/N188T, exhibited a 9-fold improvement in half-life at 95°C and pH 5.5, compared with that of the wild-type enzyme. Mutant A269K/S187D/N188T also exhibited improved catalytic efficiency. The catalytic efficiency of mutant A269K/S187D/N188T reached 5.87×103±0.17 g·L-1·s-1 at pH 5.5, which is 1.84-fold larger than the corresponding value determined for the wild-type enzyme. Furthermore, the structure analysis showed that immobilization of the loop containing Ser187 and Asn188 plays a significant role in developing the properties of Bacillus licheniformis α-amylase. PMID:28253342

  20. The Q-loop disengages from the first intracellular loop during the catalytic cycle of the multidrug ABC transporter BmrA.

    PubMed

    Dalmas, Olivier; Orelle, Cédric; Foucher, Anne-Emmanuelle; Geourjon, Christophe; Crouzy, Serge; Di Pietro, Attilio; Jault, Jean-Michel

    2005-11-04

    The ATP-binding cassette is the most abundant family of transporters including many medically relevant members and gathers both importers and exporters involved in the transport of a wide variety of substrates. Although three high resolution three-dimensional structures have been obtained for a prototypic exporter, MsbA, two have been subjected to much criticism. Here, conformational changes of BmrA, a multidrug bacterial transporter structurally related to MsbA, have been studied. A three-dimensional model of BmrA, based on the "open" conformation of Escherichia coli MsbA, was probed by simultaneously introducing two cysteine residues, one in the first intracellular loop of the transmembrane domain and the other in the Q-loop of the nucleotide-binding domain (NBD). Intramolecular disulfide bonds could be created in the absence of any effectors, which prevented both drug transport and ATPase activity. Interestingly, addition of ATP/Mg plus vanadate strongly prevented this bond formation in a cysteine double mutant, whereas ATP/Mg alone was sufficient when the ATPase-inactive E504Q mutation was also introduced, in agreement with additional BmrA models where the ATP-binding sites are positioned at the NBD/NBD interface. Furthermore, cross-linking between the two cysteine residues could still be achieved in the presence of ATP/Mg plus vanadate when homobifunctional cross-linkers separated by more than 13 Angstrom were added. Altogether, these results give support to the existence, in the resting state, of a monomeric conformation of BmrA similar to that found within the open MsbA dimer and show that a large motion is required between intracellular loop 1 and the nucleotide-binding domain for the proper functioning of a multidrug ATP-binding cassette transporter.

  1. The thermodynamic signature of ligand binding to histone deacetylase-like amidohydrolases is most sensitive to the flexibility in the L2-loop lining the active site pocket.

    PubMed

    Meyners, Christian; Krämer, Andreas; Yildiz, Özkan; Meyer-Almes, Franz-Josef

    2017-07-01

    The analysis of the thermodynamic driving forces of ligand-protein binding has been suggested to be a key component for the selection and optimization of active compounds into drug candidates. The binding enthalpy as deduced from isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is usually interpreted assuming single-step binding of a ligand to one conformation of the target protein. Although successful in many cases, these assumptions are oversimplified approximations of the reality with flexible proteins and complicated binding mechanism in many if not most cases. The relationship between protein flexibility and thermodynamic signature of ligand binding is largely understudied. Directed mutagenesis, X-ray crystallography, enzyme kinetics and ITC methods were combined to dissect the influence of loop flexibility on the thermodynamics and mechanism of ligand binding to histone deacetylase (HDAC)-like amidohydrolases. The general ligand-protein binding mechanism comprises an energetically demanding gate opening step followed by physical binding. Increased flexibility of the L2-loop in HDAC-like amidohydrolases facilitates access of ligands to the binding pocket resulting in predominantly enthalpy-driven complex formation. The study provides evidence for the great importance of flexibility adjacent to the active site channel for the mechanism and observed thermodynamic driving forces of molecular recognition in HDAC like enzymes. The flexibility or malleability in regions adjacent to binding pockets should be given more attention when designing better drug candidates. The presented case study also suggests that the observed binding enthalpy of protein-ligand systems should be interpreted with caution, since more complicated binding mechanisms may obscure the significance regarding potential drug likeness. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Structural analysis of the PP2C phosphatase tPphA from Thermosynechococcus elongatus: a flexible flap subdomain controls access to the catalytic site.

    PubMed

    Schlicker, Christine; Fokina, Oleksandra; Kloft, Nicole; Grüne, Tim; Becker, Stefan; Sheldrick, George M; Forchhammer, Karl

    2008-02-15

    The homologue of the phosphoprotein PII phosphatase PphA from Thermosynechococcus elongatus, termed tPphA, was identified and its structure was resolved in two different space groups, C222(1) and P4(1)2(1)2, at a resolution of 1.28 and 3.05 A, respectively. tPphA belongs to a large and widely distributed subfamily of Mg(2+)/Mn(2+)-dependent phosphatases of the PPM superfamily characterized by the lack of catalytic and regulatory domains. The core structure of tPphA shows a high degree of similarity to the two PPM structures identified so far. In contrast to human PP2C, but similar to Mycobacterium tuberculosis phosphatase PstP, the catalytic centre exhibits a third metal ion in addition to the dinuclear metal centre universally conserved in all PPM members. The fact that the third metal is only liganded by amino acids, which are universally conserved in all PPM members, implies that the third metal could be general for all members of this family. As a specific feature of tPphA, a flexible subdomain, previously recognized as a flap domain, could be revealed. Comparison of different structural isomers of tPphA as well as site-specific mutagenesis implied that the flap domain is involved in substrate binding and catalytic activity. The structural arrangement of the flap domain was accompanied by a large side-chain movement of an Arg residue (Arg169) at the basis of the flap. Mutation of this residue strongly impaired protein stability as well as catalytic activity, emphasizing the importance of this amino acid for the regional polysterism of the flap subdomain and confirming the assumption that flap domain flexibility is involved in catalysis.

  3. Flexibility of Catalytic Zinc Coordination in Thermolysin and HDAC8: A Born-Oppenheimer ab initio QM/MM Molecular Dynamics Study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ruibo; Hu, Po; Wang, Shenglong; Cao, Zexing; Zhang, Yingkai

    2009-01-01

    Abstracs The different coordination modes and fast ligand exchange of zinc coordination has been suggested to be one key catalytic feature of the zinc ion which makes it an invaluable metal in biological catalysis. However, partly due to the well known difficulties for zinc to be characterized by spectroscopy methods, evidence for dynamic nature of the catalytic zinc coordination has so far mainly been indirect. In this work, Born-Oppenheimer ab initio QM/MM molecular dynamics simulation has been employed, which allows for a first-principle description of the dynamics of the metal active site while properly including effects of the heterogeneous and fluctuating protein environment. Our simulations have provided direct evidence regarding inherent flexibility of the catalytic zinc coordination shell in Thermolysin (TLN) and Histone Deacetylase 8 (HDAC8). We have observed different coordination modes and fast ligand exchange during the picosecond's time-scale. For TLN, the coordination of the carboxylate group of Glu166 to Zinc is found to continuously change between monodentate and bidentate manner dynamically; while for HDAC8, the flexibility mainly comes from the coordination to a non-amino-acid ligand. Such distinct dynamics in the zinc coordination shell between two enzymes suggests that the catalytic role of Zinc in TLN and HDAC8 is likely to be different in spite of the fact that both catalyze the hydrolysis of amide bond. Meanwhile, considering that such Born-Oppenheimer ab initio QM/MM MD simulations are very much desired but are widely considered to be too computationally expensive to be feasible, our current study demonstrates the viability and powerfulness of this state-of-the-art approach in simulating metalloenzymes. PMID:20161624

  4. A Distal Disulfide Bridge in OXA-1 β-Lactamase Stabilizes the Catalytic Center and Alters the Dynamics of the Specificity Determining Ω Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Simakov, Nikolay; Leonard, David A.; Smith, Jeremy C.; Wymore, Troy; Szarecka, Agnieszka

    2016-09-26

    Widespread antibiotic resistance, particularly when mediated by broad-spectrum β-lactamases, has major implications for public health. Substitutions in the active site often allow broad-spectrum enzymes to accommodate diverse types of β-lactams. Substitutions observed outside the active site are thought to compensate for the loss of thermal stability. The OXA-1 clade of class D β-lactamases contains a pair of conserved cysteines located outside the active site that forms a disulfide bond in the periplasm. In this paper, the effect of the distal disulfide bond on the structure and dynamics of OXA-1 was investigated via 4 μs molecular dynamics simulations. The results reveal that the disulfide promotes the preorganized orientation of the catalytic residues and affects the conformation of the functionally important Ω loop. Furthermore, principal component analysis reveals differences in the global dynamics between the oxidized and reduced forms, especially in the motions involving the Ω loop. A dynamical network analysis indicates that, in the oxidized form, in addition to its role in ligand binding, the KTG family motif is a central hub of the global dynamics. Finally, as activity of OXA-1 has been measured only in the reduced form, we suggest that accurate assessment of its functional profile would require oxidative conditions mimicking periplasm.

  5. A Distal Disulfide Bridge in OXA-1 β-Lactamase Stabilizes the Catalytic Center and Alters the Dynamics of the Specificity Determining Ω Loop.

    PubMed

    Simakov, Nikolay; Leonard, David A; Smith, Jeremy C; Wymore, Troy; Szarecka, Agnieszka

    2017-04-20

    Widespread antibiotic resistance, particularly when mediated by broad-spectrum β-lactamases, has major implications for public health. Substitutions in the active site often allow broad-spectrum enzymes to accommodate diverse types of β-lactams. Substitutions observed outside the active site are thought to compensate for the loss of thermal stability. The OXA-1 clade of class D β-lactamases contains a pair of conserved cysteines located outside the active site that forms a disulfide bond in the periplasm. Here, the effect of the distal disulfide bond on the structure and dynamics of OXA-1 was investigated via 4 μs molecular dynamics simulations. The results reveal that the disulfide promotes the preorganized orientation of the catalytic residues and affects the conformation of the functionally important Ω loop. Furthermore, principal component analysis reveals differences in the global dynamics between the oxidized and reduced forms, especially in the motions involving the Ω loop. A dynamical network analysis indicates that, in the oxidized form, in addition to its role in ligand binding, the KTG family motif is a central hub of the global dynamics. As activity of OXA-1 has been measured only in the reduced form, we suggest that accurate assessment of its functional profile would require oxidative conditions mimicking periplasm.

  6. A Distal Disulfide Bridge in OXA-1 β-Lactamase Stabilizes the Catalytic Center and Alters the Dynamics of the Specificity Determining Ω Loop

    DOE PAGES

    Simakov, Nikolay; Leonard, David A.; Smith, Jeremy C.; ...

    2016-09-26

    Widespread antibiotic resistance, particularly when mediated by broad-spectrum β-lactamases, has major implications for public health. Substitutions in the active site often allow broad-spectrum enzymes to accommodate diverse types of β-lactams. Substitutions observed outside the active site are thought to compensate for the loss of thermal stability. The OXA-1 clade of class D β-lactamases contains a pair of conserved cysteines located outside the active site that forms a disulfide bond in the periplasm. In this paper, the effect of the distal disulfide bond on the structure and dynamics of OXA-1 was investigated via 4 μs molecular dynamics simulations. The results revealmore » that the disulfide promotes the preorganized orientation of the catalytic residues and affects the conformation of the functionally important Ω loop. Furthermore, principal component analysis reveals differences in the global dynamics between the oxidized and reduced forms, especially in the motions involving the Ω loop. A dynamical network analysis indicates that, in the oxidized form, in addition to its role in ligand binding, the KTG family motif is a central hub of the global dynamics. Finally, as activity of OXA-1 has been measured only in the reduced form, we suggest that accurate assessment of its functional profile would require oxidative conditions mimicking periplasm.« less

  7. Numerical Analysis of a Flexible Dual Loop Coil and its Experimental Validation for pre-Clinical Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Rodents at 7 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solis-Najera, S.; Vazquez, F.; Hernandez, R.; Marrufo, O.; Rodriguez, A. O.

    2016-12-01

    A surface radio frequency coil was developed for small animal image acquisition in a pre-clinical magnetic resonance imaging system at 7 T. A flexible coil composed of two circular loops was developed to closely cover the object to be imaged. Electromagnetic numerical simulations were performed to evaluate its performance before the coil construction. An analytical expression of the mutual inductance for the two circular loops as a function of the separation between them was derived and used to validate the simulations. The RF coil is composed of two circular loops with a 5 cm external diameter and was tuned to 300 MHz and 50 Ohms matched. The angle between the loops was varied and the Q factor was obtained from the S11 simulations for each angle. B1 homogeneity was also evaluated using the electromagnetic simulations. The coil prototype was designed and built considering the numerical simulation results. To show the feasibility of the coil and its performance, saline-solution phantom images were acquired. A correlation of the simulations and imaging experimental results was conducted showing a concordance of 0.88 for the B1 field. The best coil performance was obtained at the 90° aperture angle. A more realistic phantom was also built using a formaldehyde-fixed rat phantom for ex vivo imaging experiments. All images showed a good image quality revealing clearly defined anatomical details of an ex vivo rat.

  8. Intracellular segment between transmembrane helices S0 and S1 of BK channel α subunit contains two amphipathic helices connected by a flexible loop

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Pan; Li, Dong; Lai, Chaohua; Zhang, Longhua; Tian, Changlin

    2013-08-02

    Highlights: •The loop between S0 and S1 of BK channel was overexpressed and purified in DPC. •NMR studies indicated BK-IS1 contained two helices connected by a flexible loop. •Mg{sup 2+} titration of BK-IS1 indicated two possible binding sites of divalent ions. -- Abstract: The BK channel, a tetrameric potassium channel with very high conductance, has a central role in numerous physiological functions. The BK channel can be activated by intracellular Ca{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+}, as well as by membrane depolarization. Unlike other tetrameric potassium channels, the BK channel has seven transmembrane helices (S0–S6) including an extra helix S0. The intracellular segment between S0 and S1 (BK-IS1) is essential to BK channel functions and Asp99 in BK-IS1 is reported to be responsible for Mg{sup 2+} coordination. In this study, BK-IS1 (44–113) was over-expressed using a bacterial system and purified in the presence of detergent micelles for multidimensional heteronuclear nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structural studies. Backbone resonance assignment and secondary structure analysis showed that BK-IS1 contains two amphipathic helices connected by a 36-residue loop. Amide {sup 1}H–{sup 15}N heteronuclear NOE analysis indicated that the loop is very flexible, while the two amphipathic helices are possibly stabilized through interaction with the membrane. A solution NMR-based titration assay of BK-IS1 was performed with various concentrations of Mg{sup 2+}. Two residues (Thr45 and Leu46) with chemical shift changes were observed but no, or very minor, chemical shift difference was observed for Asp99, indicating a possible site for binding divalent ions or other modulation partners.

  9. Facile fabrication of all-solid-state flexible interdigitated MnO2 supercapacitor via in-situ catalytic solution route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Xiao; Zeng, Zhigang; Guo, Erjuan; Shi, Xiaobo; Zhou, Haijun; Wang, Xiaohong

    2016-09-01

    With the rapid development of wearable and portable electronics, the demand for all-solid-state flexible energy storage devices with high performance, long-term cycling stability and bending stability has been aroused. Physical and chemical method for preparing thin-film materials has enabled planar flexible supercapacitors (SCs) to be fabricated for a variety of applications. In this work, we report on the facile fabrication of an all-solid-state flexible interdigitated supercapacitor with a convenient and efficient two-step method. 3-D nanostructured α-MnO2 has been prepared on the surface of interdigitated Pt metal pattern on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate as high-performance electrode material via in-situ catalytic solution route without any assistance of template or surfactant. The SCs are fabricated with PVA/H3PO4 as solid-state electrolyte, which exhibited good electrochemical performance with areal capacitance as much as 20 mF cm-2 at a scan rate of 10 mV s-1, relatively high energy density (3.6 × 10-7 Wh cm-2-1.9 × 10-6 Wh cm-2) and power density (9 × 10-5 W cm-2-1.6 × 10-4 W cm-2), and excellent long-term cycling stability with capacitance retention of 82.2% (10,000 times charge and discharge), and bending stability with capacitance retention of 89.6%.

  10. Structure of Trypanosoma brucei glutathione synthetase: Domain and loop alterations in the catalytic cycle of a highly conserved enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Fyfe, Paul K.; Alphey, Magnus S.; Hunter, William N.

    2010-01-01

    Glutathione synthetase catalyses the synthesis of the low molecular mass thiol glutathione from l-γ-glutamyl-l-cysteine and glycine. We report the crystal structure of the dimeric enzyme from Trypanosoma brucei in complex with the product glutathione. The enzyme belongs to the ATP-grasp family, a group of enzymes known to undergo conformational changes upon ligand binding. The T. brucei enzyme crystal structure presents two dimers in the asymmetric unit. The structure reveals variability in the order and position of a small domain, which forms a lid for the active site and serves to capture conformations likely to exist during the catalytic cycle. Comparisons with orthologous enzymes, in particular from Homo sapiens and Saccharomyces cerevisae, indicate a high degree of sequence and structure conservation in part of the active site. Structural differences that are observed between the orthologous enzymes are assigned to different ligand binding states since key residues are conserved. This suggests that the molecular determinants of ligand recognition and reactivity are highly conserved across species. We conclude that it would be difficult to target the parasite enzyme in preference to the host enzyme and therefore glutathione synthetase may not be a suitable target for antiparasitic drug discovery. PMID:20045436

  11. Stopped-in-loop flow analysis system for successive determination of trace vanadium and iron in drinking water using their catalytic reactions.

    PubMed

    Ayala Quezada, Alejandro; Ohara, Keisuke; Ratanawimarnwong, Nuanlaor; Nacapricha, Duangjai; Murakami, Hiroya; Teshima, Norio; Sakai, Tadao

    2015-11-01

    An automated stopped-in-loop flow analysis (SILFA) system is proposed for the successive catalytic determination of vanadium and iron. The determination of vanadium was based on the p-anisidine oxidation by potassium bromate in the presence of Tiron as an activator to form a reddish dye, which has an absorption maximum at 510 nm. The selectivity of the vanadium determination was greatly improved by adding diphosphate as a masking agent of iron. For the iron determination, an iron-catalyzed oxidative reaction of p-anisidine by hydrogen peroxide with 1,10-phenanthroline as an activator to produce a reddish dye (510 nm) was employed. The SILFA system consisted of two peristaltic pumps, two six-port injection valves, a four-port selection valve, a heater device, a spectrophotometric detector and a data acquisition device. One six-port injection valve was used for the isolation of a mixed solution of standard/sample and reagent to promote each catalytic reaction, and another six-port injection valve was used for switching the reagent for vanadium or iron to achieve selective determination of each analyte. The above mentioned four-port selection valve was used to select standard solutions or sample. These three valves and the two peristaltic pumps were controlled by a built-in programmable logic controller in a touchscreen controller. The obtained results showed that the proposed SILFA monitoring system constituted an effective approach for the selective determination of vanadium and iron. The limits of detection, 0.052 and 0.55 µg L(-1), were obtained for vanadium and iron, respectively. The proposed system was successfully applied to drinking water samples without any preconcentration procedures.

  12. The regulatory subunit of Escherichia coli aspartate carbamoyltransferase may influence homotropic cooperativity and heterotropic interactions by a direct interaction with the loop containing residues 230-245 of the catalytic chain.

    PubMed Central

    Newton, C J; Kantrowitz, E R

    1990-01-01

    A recent x-ray structure of aspartate carbamoyltransferase (carbamoyl-phosphate: L-aspartate carbamoyl-transferase, EC 2.1.3.2) with phosphonoacetamide bound [Gouaux, J. E. & Lipscomb, W. N. (1990) Biochemistry 29, 389-402] shows an interaction between Asp-236 of the catalytic chain and Lys-143 of the regulatory chain. Asp-236 is part of the loop containing residues 230-245 (240s) of the catalytic chain that undergoes a significant conformational change between the tight and the relaxed states of the enzyme. Furthermore, side-chain interactions between the 240s loop and other portions of the enzyme have been shown to be important for the low activity and low affinity of the tight state and the high activity and high affinity of the relaxed state. To determine whether the intersubunit link between Lys-143 of the regulatory chain and Asp-236 of the catalytic chain is important for either homotropic cooperativity and/or the heterotropic interactions in aspartate carbamoyltransferase, site-specific mutagenesis was used to replace Asp-236 with alanine. The mutant enzyme exhibits full activity and a loss of both homotropic cooperativity and heterotropic interactions. Furthermore, the aspartate concentration at half the maximal observed specific activity is reduced by approximately 8-fold. The mutant enzyme exhibits normal thermal stability but drastically altered reactivity toward p-hydroxymercuribenzoate. The catalytic subunit of the mutant and wild-type enzymes have very similar properties. These results, in conjunction with previous experiments, suggest that the intersubunit link involving Asp-236 is involved in the stabilization of the 240s loop in its tight-state position and that the regulatory subunits exert their effect on the catalytic subunits by influencing the position of the 240s loop. PMID:2179954

  13. The 1.59Å resolution structure of the minor pseudopilin EpsH of Vibrio cholerae reveals a long flexible loop.

    PubMed

    Raghunathan, Kannan; Vago, Frank S; Grindem, David; Ball, Terry; Wedemeyer, William J; Bagdasarian, Michael; Arvidson, Dennis N

    2014-02-01

    The type II secretion complex exports folded proteins from the periplasm to the extracellular milieu. It is used by the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae to export several proteins, including its major virulence factor, cholera toxin. The pseudopilus is an essential component of the type II secretion system and likely acts as a piston to push the folded proteins across the outer membrane through the secretin pore. The pseudopilus is composed of the major pseudopilin, EpsG, and four minor pseudopilins, EpsH, EpsI, EpsJ and EpsK. We determined the x-ray crystal structure of the head domain of EpsH at 1.59Å resolution using molecular replacement with the previously reported EpsH structure, 2qv8, as the template. Three additional N-terminal amino acids present in our construct prevent an artifactual conformation of residues 160-166, present in one of the two monomers of the 2qv8 structure. Additional crystal contacts stabilize a long flexible loop comprised of residues 104-135 that is more disordered in the 2qv8 structure but is partially observed in our structure in very different positions for the two EpsH monomers in the asymmetric unit. In one of the conformations the loop is highly extended. Modeling suggests the highly charged loop is capable of contacting EpsG and possibly secreted protein substrates, suggesting a role in specificity of pseudopilus assembly or secretion function.

  14. Alteration of the flexible loop in 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase boosts enthalpy-driven inhibition by fosmidomycin.

    PubMed

    Kholodar, Svetlana A; Tombline, Gregory; Liu, Juan; Tan, Zhesen; Allen, C Leigh; Gulick, Andrew M; Murkin, Andrew S

    2014-06-03

    1-Deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR), which catalyzes the first committed step in the 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis used by Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other infectious microorganisms, is absent in humans and therefore an attractive drug target. Fosmidomycin is a nanomolar inhibitor of DXR, but despite great efforts, few analogues with comparable potency have been developed. DXR contains a strictly conserved residue, Trp203, within a flexible loop that closes over and interacts with the bound inhibitor. We report that while mutation to Ala or Gly abolishes activity, mutation to Phe and Tyr only modestly impacts kcat and Km. Moreover, pre-steady-state kinetics and primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects indicate that while turnover is largely limited by product release for the wild-type enzyme, chemistry is significantly more rate-limiting for W203F and W203Y. Surprisingly, these mutants are more sensitive to inhibition by fosmidomycin, resulting in Km/Ki ratios up to 19-fold higher than that of wild-type DXR. In agreement, isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that fosmidomycin binds up to 11-fold more tightly to these mutants. Most strikingly, mutation strongly tips the entropy-enthalpy balance of total binding energy from 50% to 75% and 91% enthalpy in W203F and W203Y, respectively. X-ray crystal structures suggest that these enthalpy differences may be linked to differences in hydrogen bond interactions involving a water network connecting fosmidomycin's phosphonate group to the protein. These results confirm the importance of the flexible loop, in particular Trp203, in ligand binding and suggest that improved inhibitor affinity may be obtained against the wild-type protein by introducing interactions with this loop and/or the surrounding structured water network.

  15. Structure of the Neisserial Outer Membrane Protein Opa60: Loop Flexibility Essential to Receptor Recognition and Bacterial Engulfment

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The structure and dynamics of Opa proteins, which we report herein, are responsible for the receptor-mediated engulfment of Neisseria gonorrheae or Neisseria meningitidis by human cells and can offer deep understanding into the molecular recognition of pathogen–host receptor interactions. Such interactions are vital to understanding bacterial pathogenesis as well as the mechanism of foreign body entry to a human cell, which may provide insights for the development of targeted pharmaceutical delivery systems. The size and dynamics of the extracellular loops of Opa60 required a hybrid refinement approach wherein membrane and distance restraints were used to generate an initial NMR structural ensemble, which was then further refined using molecular dynamics in a DMPC bilayer. The resulting ensemble revealed that the extracellular loops, which bind host receptors, occupy compact conformations, interact with each other weakly, and are dynamic on the nanosecond time scale. We predict that this conformational sampling is critical for enabling diverse Opa loop sequences to engage a common set of receptors. PMID:24813921

  16. Decoupled and linear quadratic regulator control of a large, flexible space antenna with an observer in the control loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamer, H. A.; Johnson, K. G.; Young, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    An analysis is performed to compare decoupled and linear quadratic regulator (LQR) procedures for the control of a large, flexible space antenna. Control objectives involve: (1) commanding changes in the rigid-body modes, (2) nulling initial disturbances in the rigid-body modes, or (3) nulling initial disturbances in the first three flexible modes. Control is achieved with two three-axis control-moment gyros located on the antenna column. Results are presented to illustrate various effects on control requirements for the two procedures. These effects include errors in the initial estimates of state variables, variations in the type, number, and location of sensors, and deletions of state-variable estimates for certain flexible modes after control activation. The advantages of incorporating a time lag in the control feedback are also illustrated. In addition, the effects of inoperative-control situations are analyzed with regard to control requirements and resultant modal responses. Comparisons are included which show the effects of perfect state feedback with no residual modes (ideal case). Time-history responses are presented to illustrate the various effects on the control procedures.

  17. Porphyrin Binding to Gun4 Protein, Facilitated by a Flexible Loop, Controls Metabolite Flow through the Chlorophyll Biosynthetic Pathway.

    PubMed

    Kopečná, Jana; Cabeza de Vaca, Israel; Adams, Nathan B P; Davison, Paul A; Brindley, Amanda A; Hunter, C Neil; Guallar, Victor; Sobotka, Roman

    2015-11-20

    In oxygenic phototrophs, chlorophylls, hemes, and bilins are synthesized by a common branched pathway. Given the phototoxic nature of tetrapyrroles, this pathway must be tightly regulated, and an important regulatory role is attributed to magnesium chelatase enzyme at the branching between the heme and chlorophyll pathway. Gun4 is a porphyrin-binding protein known to stimulate in vitro the magnesium chelatase activity, but how the Gun4-porphyrin complex acts in the cell was unknown. To address this issue, we first performed simulations to determine the porphyrin-docking mechanism to the cyanobacterial Gun4 structure. After correcting crystallographic loop contacts, we determined the binding site for magnesium protoporphyrin IX. Molecular modeling revealed that the orientation of α6/α7 loop is critical for the binding, and the magnesium ion held within the porphyrin is coordinated by Asn-211 residue. We also identified the basis for stronger binding in the Gun4-1 variant and for weaker binding in the W192A mutant. The W192A-Gun4 was further characterized in magnesium chelatase assay showing that tight porphyrin binding in Gun4 facilitates its interaction with the magnesium chelatase ChlH subunit. Finally, we introduced the W192A mutation into cells and show that the Gun4-porphyrin complex is important for the accumulation of ChlH and for channeling metabolites into the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway.

  18. Porphyrin Binding to Gun4 Protein, Facilitated by a Flexible Loop, Controls Metabolite Flow through the Chlorophyll Biosynthetic Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Kopečná, Jana; Cabeza de Vaca, Israel; Adams, Nathan B. P.; Davison, Paul A.; Brindley, Amanda A.; Hunter, C. Neil; Guallar, Victor; Sobotka, Roman

    2015-01-01

    In oxygenic phototrophs, chlorophylls, hemes, and bilins are synthesized by a common branched pathway. Given the phototoxic nature of tetrapyrroles, this pathway must be tightly regulated, and an important regulatory role is attributed to magnesium chelatase enzyme at the branching between the heme and chlorophyll pathway. Gun4 is a porphyrin-binding protein known to stimulate in vitro the magnesium chelatase activity, but how the Gun4-porphyrin complex acts in the cell was unknown. To address this issue, we first performed simulations to determine the porphyrin-docking mechanism to the cyanobacterial Gun4 structure. After correcting crystallographic loop contacts, we determined the binding site for magnesium protoporphyrin IX. Molecular modeling revealed that the orientation of α6/α7 loop is critical for the binding, and the magnesium ion held within the porphyrin is coordinated by Asn-211 residue. We also identified the basis for stronger binding in the Gun4-1 variant and for weaker binding in the W192A mutant. The W192A-Gun4 was further characterized in magnesium chelatase assay showing that tight porphyrin binding in Gun4 facilitates its interaction with the magnesium chelatase ChlH subunit. Finally, we introduced the W192A mutation into cells and show that the Gun4-porphyrin complex is important for the accumulation of ChlH and for channeling metabolites into the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. PMID:26446792

  19. Intracellular segment between transmembrane helices S0 and S1 of BK channel α subunit contains two amphipathic helices connected by a flexible loop.

    PubMed

    Shi, Pan; Li, Dong; Lai, Chaohua; Zhang, Longhua; Tian, Changlin

    2013-08-02

    The BK channel, a tetrameric potassium channel with very high conductance, has a central role in numerous physiological functions. The BK channel can be activated by intracellular Ca(2+) and Mg(2+), as well as by membrane depolarization. Unlike other tetrameric potassium channels, the BK channel has seven transmembrane helices (S0-S6) including an extra helix S0. The intracellular segment between S0 and S1 (BK-IS1) is essential to BK channel functions and Asp99 in BK-IS1 is reported to be responsible for Mg(2+) coordination. In this study, BK-IS1 (44-113) was over-expressed using a bacterial system and purified in the presence of detergent micelles for multidimensional heteronuclear nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structural studies. Backbone resonance assignment and secondary structure analysis showed that BK-IS1 contains two amphipathic helices connected by a 36-residue loop. Amide (1)H-(15)N heteronuclear NOE analysis indicated that the loop is very flexible, while the two amphipathic helices are possibly stabilized through interaction with the membrane. A solution NMR-based titration assay of BK-IS1 was performed with various concentrations of Mg(2+). Two residues (Thr45 and Leu46) with chemical shift changes were observed but no, or very minor, chemical shift difference was observed for Asp99, indicating a possible site for binding divalent ions or other modulation partners.

  20. Experimental and Theoretical Study of the Movement of the Wpd Flexible Loop of Human Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase PTP1B in Complex with Halide Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Aline; Saenz-Méndez, Patricia; Cousido-Siah, Alexandra; Podjarny, Alberto D.; Ventura, Oscar N.

    2012-11-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation is a post-translational modification mechanism, crucial for the regulation of nearly all aspects of cell life. This dynamic, reversible process is regulated by the balanced opposing activity of protein tyrosine kinases and protein tyrosine phosphatases. In particular, the protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is implicated in the regulation of the insulin-receptor activity, leptin-stimulated signal transduction pathways and other clinically relevant metabolic routes, and it has been found overexpressed or overregulated in human breasts, colon and ovary cancers. The WPD loop of the enzyme presents an inherent flexibility, and it plays a fundamental role in the enzymatic catalysis, turning it into a potential target in the design of new efficient PTP1B inhibitors. In order to determine the interactions that control the spatial conformation adopted by the WPD loop, complexes between the enzyme and halide ions (Br- and I- in particular) were crystallized and their crystallographic structure determined, and the collective movements of the aforementioned complexes were studied through Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. Both studies yielded concordant results, indicating the existence of a relationship between the identity of the ion present in the complex and the strength of the interactions it establishes with the surrounding protein residues.

  1. Emerging Behavioral Flexibility in Loop Writing: A longitudinal study in 7- to 9-Year-Old Primary School Children.

    PubMed

    Bosga-Stork, Ida M; Bosga, Jurjen; Meulenbroek, Ruud G J

    2017-04-01

    The development of the ability to adapt one's motor performance to the constraints of a movement task was examined in a longitudinal study involving 7 to-9-year-old children who were asked to perform a preparatory handwriting task. The capacity for sensorimotor synchronization was captured by the standard deviation of the relative phase between pacing signals and writing movements and the capacity to adjust wrist-finger coordination while performing repetitive movements was analyzed by autocorrelations of the vertical pen-tip displacements. While the capacity for synchronization improved with age, the autocorrelations were positive at short time lags only and hardly changed with age. A measure of "the long-term memory" of time series (Hurst exponent) confirmed that the findings were systematic rather than noise. Collectively, the results indicate that flexible movement strategies emerge early on in the first 3 years of formal handwriting education. Implications for educational and clinical practice are considered.

  2. Syntheses, structures, molecular and cationic recognitions and catalytic properties of two lanthanide coordination polymers based on a flexible tricarboxylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yu; Wang, Yan-Mei; Xu, Ji; Liu, Pan; Weththasinha, H. A. B. M. D.; Wu, Yun-Long; Lu, Xiao-Qing; Xie, Ji-Min

    2014-11-01

    Two lanthanide coordination polymers, namely, {[La(TTTA)(H2O)2]·2H2O}n (La-TTTA) and [Nd(TTTA)(H2O)2]·2H2O}n (Nd-TTTA) have been hydrothermally synthesized through the reaction of lanthanide ions (La3+ and Nd3+) with the flexible tripodal ligand 2,2‧,2″-[1,3,5-triazine-2,4,6-triyltris(thio)]tris-acetic acid (H3TTTA). La-TTTA and Nd-TTTA are isostructural and both show three dimensional structures. La-TTTA and Nd-TTTA show good recognition of amine molecules via quenching the luminescent intensities in amines emulsions. They can also recognize Fe3+, Cu2+, Mg2+, Cr3+ and Co2+ ions with the quenching the peak around 361 nm when the compounds immersed in ionic solutions. The two compounds act as efficient Lewis acid catalysts for the cyanosilylation of benzaldehyde and derivatives in high yields shortly due to the strong Lewis acidity and the possible open sites of the lanthanide ions.

  3. Syntheses, structures, molecular and cationic recognitions and catalytic properties of two lanthanide coordination polymers based on a flexible tricarboxylate

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Yu; Wang, Yan-Mei; Xu, Ji; Liu, Pan; Weththasinha, H.A.B.M.D.; Wu, Yun-Long; Lu, Xiao-Qing; Xie, Ji-Min

    2014-11-15

    Two lanthanide coordination polymers, namely, ([La(TTTA)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]·2H{sub 2}O){sub n} (La-TTTA) and [Nd(TTTA)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]·2H{sub 2}O){sub n} (Nd-TTTA) have been hydrothermally synthesized through the reaction of lanthanide ions (La{sup 3+} and Nd{sup 3+}) with the flexible tripodal ligand 2,2′,2″-[1,3,5-triazine-2,4,6-triyltris(thio)]tris-acetic acid (H{sub 3}TTTA). La-TTTA and Nd-TTTA are isostructural and both show three dimensional structures. La-TTTA and Nd-TTTA show good recognition of amine molecules via quenching the luminescent intensities in amines emulsions. They can also recognize Fe{sup 3+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, Cr{sup 3+} and Co{sup 2+} ions with the quenching the peak around 361 nm when the compounds immersed in ionic solutions. The two compounds act as efficient Lewis acid catalysts for the cyanosilylation of benzaldehyde and derivatives in high yields shortly due to the strong Lewis acidity and the possible open sites of the lanthanide ions. - Graphical abstract: We have synthesized two isostructural 3D compounds based on H{sub 3}TTTA. They are chemical sensor of amine solvents and cations. They have higher yields and TOFs to catalyze cyanosilylation reactions. - Highlights: • The compounds show recognition of amine molecules via quenching luminescent intensities. • The compounds recognize Fe{sup 3+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, Cr{sup 3+} and Co{sup 2+} ions via quenching the peak around 361 nm. • They act as efficient Lewis acid catalysts for the cyanosilylation reactions in high yields.

  4. (1,3;1,4)-β-Glucan Biosynthesis by the CSLF6 Enzyme: Position and Flexibility of Catalytic Residues Influence Product Fine Structure.

    PubMed

    Dimitroff, George; Little, Alan; Lahnstein, Jelle; Schwerdt, Julian G; Srivastava, Vaibhav; Bulone, Vincent; Burton, Rachel A; Fincher, Geoffrey B

    2016-04-05

    Cellulose synthase-like F6 (CslF6) genes encode polysaccharide synthases responsible for (1,3;1,4)-β-glucan biosynthesis in cereal grains. However, it is not clear how both (1,3)- and (1,4)-linkages are incorporated into a single polysaccharide chain and how the frequency and arrangement of the two linkage types that define the fine structure of the polysaccharide are controlled. Through transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, two CSLF6 orthologs from different cereal species were shown to mediate the synthesis of (1,3;1,4)-β-glucans with very different fine structures. Chimeric cDNA constructs with interchanged sections of the barley and sorghum CslF6 genes were developed to identify regions of the synthase enzyme responsible for these differences. A single amino acid residue upstream of the TED motif in the catalytic region was shown to dramatically change the fine structure of the polysaccharide produced. The structural basis of this effect can be rationalized by reference to a homology model of the enzyme and appears to be related to the position and flexibility of the TED motif in the active site of the enzyme. The region and amino acid residue identified provide opportunities to manipulate the solubility of (1,3;1,4)-β-glucan in grains and vegetative tissues of the grasses and, in particular, to enhance the solubility of dietary fibers that are beneficial to human health.

  5. Modulation of erbB kinase activity and oncogenic potential by single point mutations in the glycine loop of the catalytic domain.

    PubMed

    Shu, H K; Chang, C M; Ravi, L; Ling, L; Castellano, C M; Walter, E; Pelley, R J; Kung, H J

    1994-10-01

    Avian c-erbB is activated to a leukemia oncogene following truncation of its amino-terminal ligand-binding domain by retroviral insertion. The insertionally activated transcripts encode protein products which have constitutive tyrosine kinase activity and can induce erythroleukemia but not sarcomas. We have previously found that a valine-to-isoleucine point mutation at position 157 (V157I mutant) within the tyrosine kinase domain of this truncated erbB can dramatically activate the sarcomagenic potential of the oncogene and increase the kinase activity of this oncoprotein. This mutation lies at position 157 of the insertionally activated c-erbB product, affecting a highly conserved valine residue of the glycine loop involved in ATP binding and phosphate transfer. To investigate the functional importance of this residue in the catalytic activity of kinases, we have introduced at this position, by site-directed mutagenesis, codons representing the remaining 18 amino acid residues. Most of the mutants have diminished activity, with six of them completely devoid of kinase activity, indicating the sensitivity of this region to conformational changes. Some of these mutants displayed increased kinase activity and greater transforming potential in comparison with IA c-erbB, but none had levels as high as those of the V157I mutant. In general, the sarcomagenic potential of the various erbB mutants correlated with their autophosphorylation state and their ability to cause phosphorylation of MAP kinase. However, there are important exceptions such as the V157G mutant, which lacks enhanced autophosphorylation but is highly sarcomagenic. Studies of this and other autophosphorylation site mutants point to the existence of an autophosphorylation-independent pathway in sarcomagenesis. The requirement for leukemogenic potential is much less stringent and correlates with positivity of kinase activity. When the valine-to-isoleucine substitution was put in context of the full

  6. The structure of a dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A-PKC412 complex reveals disulfide-bridge formation with the anomalous catalytic loop HRD(HCD) cysteine.

    PubMed

    Alexeeva, Marina; Åberg, Espen; Engh, Richard A; Rothweiler, Ulli

    2015-05-01

    Dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A) is a protein kinase associated with neuronal development and brain physiology. The DYRK kinases are very unusual with respect to the sequence of the catalytic loop, in which the otherwise highly conserved arginine of the HRD motif is replaced by a cysteine. This replacement, along with the proximity of a potential disulfide-bridge partner from the activation segment, implies a potential for redox control of DYRK family activities. Here, the crystal structure of DYRK1A bound to PKC412 is reported, showing the formation of the disulfide bridge and associated conformational changes of the activation loop. The DYRK kinases represent emerging drug targets for several neurological diseases as well as cancer. The observation of distinct activation states may impact strategies for drug targeting. In addition, the characterization of PKC412 binding offers new insights for DYRK inhibitor discovery.

  7. Managing Demand and Capacity Using Multi-Sector Planning and Flexible Airspace: Human-in-the-Loop Evaluation of NextGen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Paul U.; Smith, Nancy M.; Prevot, Thomas; Homola, Jeffrey R.

    2010-01-01

    When demand for an airspace sector exceeds capacity, the balance can be re-established by reducing the demand, increasing the capacity, or both. The Multi-Sector Planner (MSP) concept has been proposed to better manage traffic demand by modifying trajectories across multiple sectors. A complementary approach to MSP, called Flexible Airspace Management (FAM), reconfigures the airspace such that capacity can be reallocated dynamically to balance the traffic demand across multiple sectors, resulting in fewer traffic management initiatives. The two concepts have been evaluated with a series of human-in-the-loop simulations at the Airspace Operations Laboratory to examine and refine the roles of the human operators in these concepts, as well as their tools and procedural requirements. So far MSP and FAM functions have been evaluated individually but the integration of the two functions is desirable since there are significant overlaps in their goals, geographic/temporal scope of the problem space, and the implementation timeframe. Ongoing research is planned to refine the humans roles in the integrated concept.

  8. Solution structure of loop A from the hairpin ribozyme from tobacco ringspot virus satellite.

    PubMed

    Cai, Z; Tinoco, I

    1996-05-14

    The solution structure of loop A from the hairpin ribozyme found in the minus strand of tobacco ringspot virus satellite has been determined by NMR spectroscopy. The ribozyme consists of two internal loops flanked by short helices: loop A and helices I and II include the substrate and substrate binding site; loop B and helices III and IV are the catalytic domain. Loop A is a symmetric internal loop of eight nucleotides that contains the cleavage site. The 2-amino group of the guanine immediately 3' to the cleavage site is essential for catalysis. NMR results show that this guanine forms a sheared G.A base pair. The cytosine residue immediately 5' to the cleavage site forms an AH+.C base pair with an adenine whose pKa is shifted to 6.2 to allow partial protonation near neutral pH. Although the residues flanking the cleavage site are stacked in an A-form pattern, the phosphodiester backbone next to the cleavage site on the 3' side is splayed apart. This places the following base-a uracil-in the expanded major groove. The conformational flexibility and the lack of steric hindrance of the uracil as well as the unoccupied Watson-Crick positions on the sheared G.A base pair can allow loop A to specifically interact with the catalytic domain (loop B) without drastically changing its own conformation. The three-dimensional structure of loop A provides explanations for previously published mutation and structural mapping results.

  9. Cold adaptation of zinc metalloproteases in the thermolysin family from deep sea and arctic sea ice bacteria revealed by catalytic and structural properties and molecular dynamics: new insights into relationship between conformational flexibility and hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Xie, Bin-Bin; Bian, Fei; Chen, Xiu-Lan; He, Hai-Lun; Guo, Jun; Gao, Xiang; Zeng, Yin-Xin; Chen, Bo; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2009-04-03

    Increased conformational flexibility is the prevailing explanation for the high catalytic efficiency of cold-adapted enzymes at low temperatures. However, less is known about the structural determinants of flexibility. We reported two novel cold-adapted zinc metalloproteases in the thermolysin family, vibriolysin MCP-02 from a deep sea bacterium and vibriolysin E495 from an Arctic sea ice bacterium, and compared them with their mesophilic homolog, pseudolysin from a terrestrial bacterium. Their catalytic efficiencies, k(cat)/K(m) (10-40 degrees C), followed the order pseudolysin < MCP-02 < E495 with a ratio of approximately 1:2:4. MCP-02 and E495 have the same optimal temperature (T(opt), 57 degrees C, 5 degrees C lower than pseudolysin) and apparent melting temperature (T(m) = 64 degrees C, approximately 10 degrees C lower than pseudolysin). Structural analysis showed that the slightly lower stabilities resulted from a decrease in the number of salt bridges. Fluorescence quenching experiments and molecular dynamics simulations showed that the flexibilities of the proteins were pseudolysin < MCP-02 < E495, suggesting that optimization of flexibility is a strategy for cold adaptation. Molecular dynamics results showed that the ordinal increase in flexibility from pseudolysin to MCP-02 and E495, especially the increase from MCP-02 to E495, mainly resulted from the decrease of hydrogen-bond stability in the dynamic structure, which was due to the increase in asparagine, serine, and threonine residues. Finally, a model for the cold adaptation of MCP-02 and E495 was proposed. This is the first report of the optimization of hydrogen-bonding dynamics as a strategy for cold adaptation and provides new insights into the structural basis underlying conformational flexibility.

  10. Conformational flexibility in the catalytic triad revealed by the high-resolution crystal structure of Streptomyces erythraeus trypsin in an unliganded state

    SciTech Connect

    Blankenship, Elise; Vukoti, Krishna; Miyagi, Masaru; Lodowski, David T.

    2014-03-01

    This work reports the first sub-angstrom resolution structure of S. erythraeus trypsin. The detailed model of a prototypical serine protease at a catalytically relevant pH with an unoccupied active site is presented and is compared with other high-resolution serine protease structures. With more than 500 crystal structures determined, serine proteases make up greater than one-third of all proteases structurally examined to date, making them among the best biochemically and structurally characterized enzymes. Despite the numerous crystallographic and biochemical studies of trypsin and related serine proteases, there are still considerable shortcomings in the understanding of their catalytic mechanism. Streptomyces erythraeus trypsin (SET) does not exhibit autolysis and crystallizes readily at physiological pH; hence, it is well suited for structural studies aimed at extending the understanding of the catalytic mechanism of serine proteases. While X-ray crystallographic structures of this enzyme have been reported, no coordinates have ever been made available in the Protein Data Bank. Based on this, and observations on the extreme stability and unique properties of this particular trypsin, it was decided to crystallize it and determine its structure. Here, the first sub-angstrom resolution structure of an unmodified, unliganded trypsin crystallized at physiological pH is reported. Detailed structural analysis reveals the geometry and structural rigidity of the catalytic triad in the unoccupied active site and comparison to related serine proteases provides a context for interpretation of biochemical studies of catalytic mechanism and activity.

  11. Enhancement of surface nonwettability by grafting loops.

    PubMed

    Pei, Han-Wen; Liu, Xiao-Li; Liu, Hong; Zhu, You-Liang; Lu, Zhong-Yuan

    2017-02-08

    We present a computer simulation study on the nonwettability of a flat surface tethered with deformable looped polymer chains. Two kinds of loops are studied: monodispersed loops (loops with the same length) and polydispersed loops (loops with different lengths). Both kinds of loops include two arrangements: with regularly tethered sites and with randomly tethered sites. Regularly grafted loops form typical grooves on the surface, while randomly grafted loops form a more rugged surface. For monodispersed loops, we analyze the factors that influence the nonwettability when varying the rigidity of the loops. The loops are divided into two categories based on their rigidity according to our previous analysis procedure (Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2016, 18, 18767-18775): rigid loops and flexible loops. It is found that the loop can partially form a re-entrant-like structure, which is helpful to increase the nonwettability of the surface. The surfaces with grafted loops have increased nonwettability, especially those grafted with flexible chains. However, the contact angle on the loop structure cannot further increase for the rigid chains due to a large top layer density (Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2016, 18, 18767-18775). For polydispersed loops, the contact angle is highly related to the rigidity of the long loops that contact the droplet. Different from monodispersed loops, the mechanism of the nonwettability of polydispersed loops is attributed to the supporting ability (rigidity) of long loops.

  12. The effect of deleting residue C269 in the β12-β13 loop of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A)catalytic subunit on the interaction between PP2A and metal ions, especially Mn(2+).

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Liu, Chao; Zhang, Hao; Wei, Qun

    2011-12-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is one of the most important Ser/Thr phosphatases in eukaryotic cells. The enzymatic core of PP2A (PP2A(D)) consists of a scaffold subunit (A subunit) and a catalytic subunit (C subunit). When residue Cys269 in the β12-β13 loop of the PP2A C subunit was deleted (ΔC269), the activity and the intrinsic fluorescence intensity of PP2A(D) decreased. Specify the effects of some metal ions on PP2A(D) were also changed. Mn(2+) in particular was an efficient activator of ΔC269 and altered the intrinsic fluorescence spectrum of ΔC269. Remarkably, after pre-treatment of ΔC269 with Mn(2+), the effects of other metal ions showed the same trends as they had on the WT. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations showed that deletion of Cys269 decreased the polarity of the β12-β13 loop of PP2A Cα. We conclude that deletion of residue Cys269 alters the conformation and activity of PP2A(D) and influences the interaction between PP2A and various metal ions, notably Mn(2+). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Regulative Loops, Step Loops and Task Loops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanLehn, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    This commentary suggests a generalization of the conception of the behavior of tutoring systems, which the target article characterized as having an outer loop that was executed once per task and an inner loop that was executed once per step of the task. A more general conception sees these two loops as instances of regulative loops, which…

  14. Regulative Loops, Step Loops and Task Loops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanLehn, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    This commentary suggests a generalization of the conception of the behavior of tutoring systems, which the target article characterized as having an outer loop that was executed once per task and an inner loop that was executed once per step of the task. A more general conception sees these two loops as instances of regulative loops, which…

  15. Reducing the Flexibility of Type II Dehydroquinase for Inhibition: A Fragment-Based Approach and Molecular Dynamics Study.

    PubMed

    Peón, Antonio; Robles, Adrián; Blanco, Beatriz; Convertino, Marino; Thompson, Paul; Hawkins, Alastair R; Caflisch, Amedeo; González-Bello, Concepción

    2017-09-21

    A multidisciplinary approach was used to identify and optimize a quinazolinedione-based ligand that would decrease the flexibility of the substrate-covering loop (catalytic loop) of the type II dehydroquinase from Helicobacter pylori. This enzyme, which is essential for the survival of this bacterium, is involved in the biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids. A computer-aided fragment-based protocol (ALTA) was first used to identify the aromatic fragments able to block the interface pocket that separates two neighboring enzyme subunits and is located at the active site entrance. Chemical modification of its non-aromatic moiety through an olefin cross-metathesis and Seebach's self-reproduction of chirality synthetic principle allowed the development of a quinazolinedione derivative that disables the catalytic loop plasticity, which is essential for the enzyme's catalytic cycle. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed that the ligand would force the catalytic loop into an inappropriate arrangement for catalysis by strong interactions with the catalytic tyrosine and by expelling the essential arginine out of the active site. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Hydrogen bonds between the alpha and beta subunits of the F1-ATPase allow communication between the catalytic site and the interface of the beta catch loop and the gamma subunit.

    PubMed

    Boltz, Kathryn W; Frasch, Wayne D

    2006-09-19

    F(1)-ATPase mutations in Escherichia coli that changed the strength of hydrogen bonds between the alpha and beta subunits in a location that links the catalytic site to the interface between the beta catch loop and the gamma subunit were examined. Loss of the ability to form the hydrogen bonds involving alphaS337, betaD301, and alphaD335 lowered the k(cat) of ATPase and decreased its susceptibility to Mg(2+)-ADP-AlF(n) inhibition, while mutations that maintain or strengthen these bonds increased the susceptibility to Mg(2+)-ADP-AlF(n) inhibition and lowered the k(cat) of ATPase. These data suggest that hydrogen bonds connecting alphaS337 to betaD301 and betaR323 and connecting alphaD335 to alphaS337 are important to transition state stabilization and catalytic function that may result from the proper alignment of catalytic site residues betaR182 and alphaR376 through the VISIT sequence (alpha344-348). Mutations betaD301E, betaR323K, and alphaR282Q changed the rate-limiting step of the reaction as determined by an isokinetic plot. Hydrophobic mutations of betaR323 decreased the susceptibility to Mg(2+)-ADP-AlF(n)() inhibition and lowered the number of interactions required in the rate-limiting step yet did not affect the k(cat) of ATPase, suggesting that betaR323 is important to transition state formation. The decreased rate of ATP synthase-dependent growth and decreased level of lactate-dependent quenching observed with alphaD335, betaD301, and alphaE283 mutations suggest that these residues may be important to the formation of an alternative set of hydrogen bonds at the interface of the alpha and beta subunits that permits the release of intersubunit bonds upon the binding of ATP, allowing gamma rotation in the escapement mechanism.

  17. A new crystal form of human tear lipocalin reveals high flexibility in the loop region and induced fit in the ligand cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Breustedt, Daniel A.; Chatwell, Lorenz; Skerra, Arne

    2009-10-01

    The crystal structure of tear lipocalin determined in space group P2{sub 1} revealed large structural deviations from the previously solved X-ray structure in space group C2, especially in the loop region and adjoining parts of the β-barrel which give rise to the ligand-binding site. These findings illustrate a novel mechanism for promiscuity in ligand recognition by the lipocalin protein family. Tear lipocalin (TLC) with the bound artificial ligand 1,4-butanediol has been crystallized in space group P2{sub 1} with four protein molecules in the asymmetric unit and its X-ray structure has been solved at 2.6 Å resolution. TLC is a member of the lipocalin family that binds ligands with diverse chemical structures, such as fatty acids, phospholipids and cholesterol as well as microbial siderophores and the antibiotic rifampin. Previous X-ray structural analysis of apo TLC crystallized in space group C2 revealed a rather large bifurcated ligand pocket and a partially disordered loop region at the entrace to the cavity. Analysis of the P2{sub 1} crystal form uncovered major conformational changes (i) in β-strands B, C and D, (ii) in loops 1, 2 and 4 at the open end of the β-barrel and (iii) in the extended C-terminal segment, which is attached to the β-barrel via a disulfide bridge. The structural comparison indicates high conformational plasticity of the loop region as well as of deeper parts of the ligand pocket, thus allowing adaptation to ligands that differ vastly in size and shape. This illustrates a mechanism for promiscuity in ligand recognition which may also be relevant for some other physiologically important members of the lipocalin protein family.

  18. Loop Dynamics of the Extracellular Domain of Human Tissue Factor and Activation of Factor VIIa

    PubMed Central

    Minazzo, Agnese S.; Darlington, Reuben C.; Ross, J.B. Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Abstract In the crystal structure of the complex between the soluble extracellular domain of tissue factor (sTF) and active-site-inhibited VIIa, residues 91 and 92 in the Pro79-Pro92 loop of sTF interact with the catalytic domain of VIIa. It is not known, however, whether this loop has a role in allosteric activation of VIIa. Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy measurements of probes covalently bound to sTF mutants E84C and T121C show that binding uninhibited Factor VIIa affects segmental motions in sTF. Glu84 resides in the Pro79-Pro92 loop, and Thr121 resides in the turn between the first and second antiparallel β-strands of the sTF subdomain that interacts with the Gla and EGF1 domains of VIIa; neither Glu84 nor Thr121 makes direct contact with VIIa. Probes bound to T121C report limited segmental flexibility in free sTF, which is lost after VIIa binding. Probes bound to E84C report substantial segmental flexibility in the Pro79-Pro92 loop in free sTF, which is greatly reduced after VIIa binding. Thus, VIIa binding reduces dynamic motions in sTF. In particular, the decrease in the Pro79-Pro92 loop motions indicates that loop entropy has a role in the thermodynamics of the protein-protein interactions involved in allosteric control of VIIa activation. PMID:19167313

  19. Solution structure of loop A from the hairpin ribozyme from tobacco ringspot virus satellite

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Z.; Tinoco, I. Jr. |

    1996-05-14

    The solution structure of loop A form the hairpin ribozyme fund in the minus strand of tobacco ringspot virus satellite has been determined by NMR spectroscopy. The ribozyme consists of two internal loops flanked by short helices: loop A and helices I and II include the substrate and substrate binding site; loop B and helices III and IV are the catalytic domain. Loop A is a symmetric internal loop of eight nucleotides that contains the cleavage site. The 2-amino group of the guanine immediately 3{prime} to the cleavage site is essential for catalysis. NMR results show that this guanine forms a sheared G{sm_bullet}A base pair. The cytosine residue immediately 5{prime} to the cleavage site forms an AH{sup +}{sm_bullet}C base pair with an adenine whose pK{sub a} is shifted to 6.2 to allow partial protonation near neutral pH. Although the residues flanking the cleavage site are stacked in an A-form pattern, the phosphodiester backbone next to the cleavage site on the 3{prime} side is splayed apart. This places the following base-a uracil-in the expanded major groove. The conformational flexibility and the lack of steric hindrance of the uracil as well as the unoccupied Watson-Crick positions on the sheared G{sm_bullet}A base pair can allow loop A to specifically interact with the catalytic domain (loop B) without drastically changing its own conformation. The three-dimensional structure of loop A provides explanations for previously published mutation and structural mapping results. 38 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Flexibility of the P-loop of Pim-1 kinase: observation of a novel conformation induced by interaction with an inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Lorien J.; Watanabe, Hisami; Tsuganezawa, Keiko; Tomabechi, Yuri; Handa, Noriko; Shirouzu, Mikako; Yuki, Hitomi; Honma, Teruki; Ogawa, Naoko; Nagano, Tetsuo; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Tanaka, Akiko

    2012-01-01

    The serine/threonine kinase Pim-1 is emerging as a promising target for cancer therapeutics. Much attention has recently been focused on identifying potential Pim-1 inhibitor candidates for the treatment of haematopoietic malignancies. The outcome of a rational drug-design project has recently been reported [Nakano et al. (2012 ▶), J. Med. Chem. 55, 5151–5156]. The report described the process of optimization of the structure–activity relationship and detailed from a medicinal chemistry perspective the development of a low-potency and nonselective compound initially identified from in silico screening into a potent, selective and metabolically stable Pim-1 inhibitor. Here, the structures of the initial in silico hits are reported and the noteworthy features of the Pim-1 complex structures are described. A particular focus was placed on the rearrangement of the glycine-rich P-loop region that was observed for one of the initial compounds, (Z)-7-(azepan-1-ylmethyl)-2-[(1H-indol-3-­yl)methylidene]-6-hydroxy-1-benzofuran-3(2H)-one (compound 1), and was also found in all further derivatives. This novel P-loop conformation, which appears to be stabilized by an additional interaction with the β3 strand located above the binding site, is not usually observed in Pim-1 structures. PMID:22869110

  1. Flexibility of the P-loop of Pim-1 kinase: observation of a novel conformation induced by interaction with an inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Parker, Lorien J; Watanabe, Hisami; Tsuganezawa, Keiko; Tomabechi, Yuri; Handa, Noriko; Shirouzu, Mikako; Yuki, Hitomi; Honma, Teruki; Ogawa, Naoko; Nagano, Tetsuo; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Tanaka, Akiko

    2012-08-01

    The serine/threonine kinase Pim-1 is emerging as a promising target for cancer therapeutics. Much attention has recently been focused on identifying potential Pim-1 inhibitor candidates for the treatment of haematopoietic malignancies. The outcome of a rational drug-design project has recently been reported [Nakano et al. (2012), J. Med. Chem. 55, 5151-5156]. The report described the process of optimization of the structure-activity relationship and detailed from a medicinal chemistry perspective the development of a low-potency and nonselective compound initially identified from in silico screening into a potent, selective and metabolically stable Pim-1 inhibitor. Here, the structures of the initial in silico hits are reported and the noteworthy features of the Pim-1 complex structures are described. A particular focus was placed on the rearrangement of the glycine-rich P-loop region that was observed for one of the initial compounds, (Z)-7-(azepan-1-ylmethyl)-2-[(1H-indol-3-yl)methylidene]-6-hydroxy-1-benzofuran-3(2H)-one (compound 1), and was also found in all further derivatives. This novel P-loop conformation, which appears to be stabilized by an additional interaction with the β3 strand located above the binding site, is not usually observed in Pim-1 structures.

  2. Loop quantization

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolau, A.

    1988-10-01

    Loop unwinding is a known technique for reducing loop overhead, exposing parallelism, and increasing the efficiency of pipelining. Traditional loop unwinding is limited to the innermost loop in a group of nested loops and the amount of unwinding either is fixed or must be specified by the user, on a case by case basis. In this paper the authors present a general technique for automatically unwinding multiply nested loops, explain its advantages over other transformation techniques, and illustrate its practical effectiveness. Lopp Quantization could be beneficial by itself or coupled with other loop transformations.

  3. DNA Flexibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widom, Jonathan

    2005-03-01

    Classic experimental and theoretical analyses led to a unified view of DNA as a semiflexible polymer, characterized by a bending persistence length, P, ˜50 nm (˜150 bp). In this view, DNA lengths that are greater than P are, on average, spontaneously gently bent, and require relatively little force to bend significantly, while DNA lengths that are shorter than P are nearly straight, and require great force to bend significantly. Nevertheless, sharply bent DNA plays important roles in biology. We used the method of ligase catalyzed DNA cyclization to investigate the spontaneous looping of short DNAs. Remarkably, DNAs as short as 84 bp spontaneously bend into circles, and 94 bp DNA sequences cyclize up to 10^5 times more easily than predicted from classic theories of DNA bending. In subsequent studies we find that the twistability of sharply looped DNAs exceeds the prediction of classic theories by up to 400-fold. These results can only be understood by greatly enhanced DNA flexibility, not by permanent bends. Our results provide striking support for two new theories of DNA mechanics based on local melted or kinked regions, and they establish DNA as an active participant in the formation and function of looped regulatory complexes in vivo.

  4. Catalytic Reforming

    SciTech Connect

    Little, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    Don Little's Catalytic Reforming deals exclusively with reforming. With the increasing need for unleaded gasoline, the importance of this volume has escalated since it combines various related aspects of reforming technology into a single publication. For those with no practical knowledge of catalytic reforming, the chemical reactions, flow schemes and how the cat reformer fits into the overall refinery process will be of interest. Contents include: Catalytic reforming in refinery processing: How catalytic reformers work - chemical reactions; Process design; The catalyst, process variables and unit operation; Commercial processes; BTX operation; Feed preparation; naphtha hydrotreating and catalytic reforming; Index.

  5. Linking conformational flexibility and kinetics: catalytic 1,4-type Friedel-Crafts reactions of phenols utilizing 1,3-diamine-tethered guanidine/bisthiourea organocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Sohtome, Yoshihiro; Shin, Bongki; Horitsugi, Natsuko; Noguchi, Keiichi; Nagasawa, Kazuo

    2011-09-05

    Herein, we present details of our conformationally flexible, 1,3-diamine-tethered guanidine/bisthiourea organocatalysts for chemo-, regio-, and enantioselective 1,4-type Friedel-Crafts reactions of phenols. These organocatalysts show a unique stereo-discrimination governed by the differential activation entropy (ΔΔS(≠)), rather than by the differential activation enthalpy (ΔΔH(≠)). Extensive kinetic analyses using Eyring plots for a series of guanidine/bisthiourea organocatalysts revealed the key structural motif in the catalysts associated with a large magnitude of differential activation entropy (ΔΔS(≠)). A plausible guanidine-thiourea cooperative mechanism for the enantioselective Friedel-Crafts reaction is proposed.

  6. External loops at the ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase protein-partner binding cavity contribute to substrates allocation.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Azqueta, Ana; Martínez-Júlvez, Marta; Hervás, Manuel; Navarro, José A; Medina, Milagros

    2014-02-01

    Ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase (FNR) is the structural prototype of a family of FAD-containing reductases that catalyze electron transfer between low potential proteins and NAD(P)(+)/H, and that display a two-domain arrangement with an open cavity at their interface. The inner part of this cavity accommodates the reacting atoms during catalysis. Loops at its edge are highly conserved among plastidic FNRs, suggesting that they might contribute to both flavin stabilization and competent disposition of substrates. Here we pay attention to two of these loops in Anabaena FNR. The first is a sheet-loop-sheet motif, loop102-114, that allocates the FAD adenosine. It was thought to determine the extended FAD conformation, and, indirectly, to modulate isoalloxazine electronic properties, partners binding, catalytic efficiency and even coenzyme specificity. The second, loop261-269, contains key residues for the allocation of partners and coenzyme, including two glutamates, Glu267 and Glu268, proposed as candidates to facilitate the key displacement of the C-terminal tyrosine (Tyr303) from its stacking against the isoalloxazine ring during the catalytic cycle. Our data indicate that the main function of loop102-114 is to provide the inter-domain cavity with flexibility to accommodate protein partners and to guide the coenzyme to the catalytic site, while the extended conformation of FAD must be induced by other protein determinants. Glu267 and Glu268 appear to assist the conformational changes that occur in the loop261-269 during productive coenzyme binding, but their contribution to Tyr303 displacement is minor than expected. Additionally, loop261-269 appears a determinant to ensure reversibility in photosynthetic FNRs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Flexibility and mutagenic resiliency of glycosyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Bay, Marie Lund; Cuesta-Seijo, Jose A; Weadge, Joel T; Persson, Mattias; Palcic, Monica M

    2014-10-01

    The human blood group A and B antigens are synthesized by two highly homologous enzymes, glycosyltransferase A (GTA) and glycosyltransferase B (GTB), respectively. These enzymes catalyze the transfer of either GalNAc or Gal from their corresponding UDP-donors to αFuc1-2βGal-R terminating acceptors. GTA and GTB differ at only four of 354 amino acids (R176G, G235S, L266M, G268A), which alter the donor specificity from UDP-GalNAc to UDP-Gal. Blood type O individuals synthesize truncated or non-functional enzymes. The cloning, crystallization and X-ray structure elucidations for GTA and GTB have revealed key residues responsible for donor discrimination and acceptor binding. Structural studies suggest that numerous conformational changes occur during the catalytic cycle. Over 300 ABO alleles are tabulated in the blood group antigen mutation database (BGMUT) that provides a framework for structure-function studies. Natural mutations are found in all regions of GTA and GTB from the active site, flexible loops, stem region and surfaces remote from the active site. Our characterizations of natural mutants near a flexible loop (V175M), on a remote surface site (P156L), in the metal binding motif (M212V) and near the acceptor binding site (L232P) demonstrate the resiliency of GTA and GTB to mutagenesis.

  8. Effect of DNA modifications on DNA processing by HIV-1 integrase and inhibitor binding: role of DNA backbone flexibility and an open catalytic site.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Allison A; Sayer, Jane M; Yagi, Haruhiko; Patil, Sachindra S; Debart, Françoise; Maier, Martin A; Corey, David R; Vasseur, Jean-Jacques; Burke, Terrence R; Marquez, Victor E; Jerina, Donald M; Pommier, Yves

    2006-10-27

    Integration of the viral cDNA into host chromosomes is required for viral replication. Human immunodeficiency virus integrase catalyzes two sequential reactions, 3'-processing (3'-P) and strand transfer (ST). The first integrase inhibitors are undergoing clinical trial, but interactions of inhibitors with integrase and DNA are not well understood in the absence of a co-crystal structure. To increase our understanding of integrase interactions with DNA, we examined integrase catalysis with oligonucleotides containing DNA backbone, base, and groove modifications placed at unique positions surrounding the 3'-processing site. 3'-Processing was blocked with substrates containing constrained sugars and alpha-anomeric residues, suggesting that integrase requires flexibility of the phosphodiester backbone at the 3'-P site. Of several benzo[a]pyrene 7,8-diol 9,10-epoxide (BaP DE) adducts tested, only the adduct in the minor groove at the 3'-P site inhibited 3'-P, suggesting the importance of the minor groove contacts for 3'-P. ST occurred in the presence of bulky BaP DE DNA adducts attached to the end of the viral DNA suggesting opening of the active site for ST. Position-specific effects of these BaP DE DNA adducts were found for inhibition of integrase by diketo acids. Together, these results demonstrate the importance of DNA structure and specific contacts with the viral DNA processing site for inhibition by integrase inhibitors.

  9. Flexible long-range loops in the VH gene region of the Igh locus facilitate the generation of a diverse antibody repertoire.

    PubMed

    Medvedovic, Jasna; Ebert, Anja; Tagoh, Hiromi; Tamir, Ido M; Schwickert, Tanja A; Novatchkova, Maria; Sun, Qiong; Huis In 't Veld, Pim J; Guo, Chunguang; Yoon, Hye Suk; Denizot, Yves; Holwerda, Sjoerd J B; de Laat, Wouter; Cogné, Michel; Shi, Yang; Alt, Frederick W; Busslinger, Meinrad

    2013-08-22

    The immunoglobulin heavy-chain (Igh) locus undergoes large-scale contraction in pro-B cells, which facilitates VH-DJH recombination by juxtaposing distal VH genes next to the DJH-rearranged gene segment in the 3' proximal Igh domain. By using high-resolution mapping of long-range interactions, we demonstrate that local interaction domains established the three-dimensional structure of the extended Igh locus in lymphoid progenitors. In pro-B cells, these local domains engaged in long-range interactions across the Igh locus, which depend on the regulators Pax5, YY1, and CTCF. The large VH gene cluster underwent flexible long-range interactions with the more rigidly structured proximal domain, which probably ensures similar participation of all VH genes in VH-DJH recombination to generate a diverse antibody repertoire. These long-range interactions appear to be an intrinsic feature of the VH gene cluster, because they are still generated upon mutation of the Eμ enhancer, IGCR1 insulator, or 3' regulatory region in the proximal Igh domain. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Interaction of RNA Polymerase II Fork Loop 2 with Downstream Non-template DNA Regulates Transcription Elongation*

    PubMed Central

    Kireeva, Maria L.; Domecq, Céline; Coulombe, Benoit; Burton, Zachary F.; Kashlev, Mikhail

    2011-01-01

    Fork loop 2 is a small semiconservative segment of the larger fork domain in the second largest Rpb2 subunit of RNA polymerase II (Pol II). This flexible loop, juxtaposed at the leading edge of transcription bubble, has been proposed to participate in DNA strand separation, translocation along DNA, and NTP loading to Pol II during elongation. Here we show that the Rpb2 mutant carrying a deletion of the flexible part of the loop is not lethal in yeast. The mutation exhibits no defects in DNA melting and translocation in vitro but confers a moderate decrease of the catalytic activity of the enzyme caused by the impaired sequestration of the NTP substrate in the active center prior to catalysis. In the structural model of the Pol II elongation complex, fork loop 2 directly interacts with an unpaired DNA residue in the non-template DNA strand one nucleotide ahead from the active center (the i+2 position). We showed that elimination of this putative interaction by replacement of the i+2 residue with an abasic site inhibits Pol II activity to the same degree as the deletion of fork loop 2. This replacement has no detectable effect on the activity of the mutant enzyme. We provide direct evidence that interaction of fork loop 2 with the non-template DNA strand facilitates NTP sequestration through interaction with the adjacent segment of the fork domain involved in the active center of Pol II. PMID:21730074

  11. Inhibitors bound to Ca(2+)-free sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase lock its transmembrane region but not necessarily its cytosolic region, revealing the flexibility of the loops connecting transmembrane and cytosolic domains.

    PubMed

    Montigny, Cédric; Picard, Martin; Lenoir, Guillaume; Gauron, Carole; Toyoshima, Chikashi; Champeil, Philippe

    2007-12-25

    Ca2+-free crystals of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase have, up until now, been obtained in the presence of inhibitors such as thapsigargin (TG), bound to the transmembrane region of this protein. Here, we examined the consequences of such binding for the protein. We found that, after TG binding, an active site ligand such as beryllium fluoride can still bind to the ATPase and change the conformation or dynamics of the cytosolic domains (as revealed by the protection afforded against proteolysis), but it becomes unable to induce any change in the transmembrane domain (as revealed by the intrinsic fluorescence of the membranous tryptophan residues). TG also obliterates the Trp fluorescence changes normally induced by binding of MgATP or metal-free ATP, as well as those induced by binding of Mg2+ alone. In the nucleotide binding domain, the environment of Lys515 (as revealed by fluorescein isothiocyanate fluorescence after specific labeling of this residue) is significantly different in the ATPase complex with aluminum fluoride and in the ATPase complex with beryllium fluoride, and in the latter case it is modified by TG. All these facts document the flexibility of the loops connecting the transmembrane and cytosolic domains in the ATPase. In the absence of active site ligands, TG protects the ATPase from cleavage by proteinase K at Thr242-Glu243, suggesting TG-induced reduction in the mobility of these loops. 2,5-Di-tert-butyl-1,4-dihydroxybenzene or cyclopiazonic acid, inhibitors which also bind in or near the transmembrane region, also produce similar overall effects on Ca2+-free ATPase.

  12. The remarkable efficiency of a Pin-II proteinase inhibitor sans two conserved disulfide bonds is due to enhanced flexibility and hydrogen bond density in the reactive site loop.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Rakesh S; Mishra, Manasi; Tamhane, Vaijayanti A; Ghosh, Anirban; Sonavane, Uddhavesh; Suresh, C G; Joshi, Rajendra; Gupta, Vidya S; Giri, Ashok P

    2014-01-01

    Capsicum annuum (L.) expresses diverse potato type II family proteinase inhibitors comprising of inhibitory repeat domain (IRD) as basic functional unit. Most IRDs contain eight conserved cysteines forming four disulfide bonds, which are indispensible for their stability and activity. We investigated the functional significance of evolutionary variations in IRDs and their role in mediating interaction between the inhibitor and cognate proteinase. Among the 18 IRDs encoded by C. annuum, IRD-7, -9, and -12 were selected for further characterization on the basis of variation in their reactive site loop, number of conserved cysteine residues, and higher theoretical ΔGbind for interaction with Helicoverpa armigera trypsin. Moreover, inhibition kinetics showed that IRD-9, despite loss of some of the disulfide bonds, was a more potent proteinase inhibitor among the three selected IRDs. Molecular dynamic simulations revealed that serine residues in the place of cysteines at seventh and eighth positions of IRD-9 resulted in an increase in the density of intramolecular hydrogen bonds and reactive site loop flexibility. Results of the serine residues chemical modification also supported this observation and provided a possible explanation for the remarkable inhibitory potential of IRD-9. Furthermore, this natural variant among IRDs showed special attributes like stability to proteolysis and synergistic inhibitory effect on other IRDs. It is likely that IRDs have coevolved selective specialization of their structure and function as a response towards specific insect proteases they encountered. Understanding the molecular mechanism of pest protease-plant proteinaceous inhibitor interaction will help in developing effective pest control strategies. An animated interactive 3D complement (I3DC) is available in Proteopedia at http://proteopedia.org/w/Journal:JBSD:39.

  13. Selective disruption of disulphide bonds lowered activation energy and improved catalytic efficiency in TALipB from Trichosporon asahii MSR54: MD simulations revealed flexible lid and extended substrate binding area in the mutant.

    PubMed

    Singh, Yogesh; Gupta, Namita; Verma, Ved Vrat; Goel, Manisha; Gupta, Rani

    2016-03-25

    TALipB (33 kDa) is a solvent stable, enantioselective lipase from Trichosporon asahii MSR54. It is cysteine-rich and shows activation in presence of thiol reducing agents. DIANNA server predicted three disulphide bridges C53-C195 (S1), C89-C228 (S2) and C164-C254 (S3) in the enzyme. Selective disruption of disulphide bonds by cysteine to alanine mutations at Cys53 and Cys89 of S1 and S2 bonds resulted in enzyme activation. Mutant mTALipB (S1+S2) showed increase in specific activity by ∼4-fold (834 mM/mg) and improved Vmax of 6.27 μmol/ml/min at 40 °Con pNP caprate. Temperature optima of mTALipB shifted from 50 to 40 °C and activation energy decreased by 0.7 kcal mol(-1). However, the mutant was less thermostable with a t1/2 of 18 min at 60 °C as compared to t1/2 of 38 min for the native enzyme. Mutant also displayed an improved activity on all pNP esters and higher enantiomeric excess (61%) during esterification of (±) 1-phenylethanol. Far-UV CD analysis showed significant changes in secondary structure after S-S bridge disruption with 7.16% decrease in α-helices and 1.31% increase in β-sheets. In silico analysis predicted two lids (α5 and α9) in TALipB. Molecular dynamic simulations at 40 °C and 50 °C revealed that in the mTALipB, both the lids opened at 40 °C with clockwise and anticlockwise rotations in Lid1 and Lid2, respectively. In the native protein, however, the lid was only partially open even at 50 °C. Concomitant to lid flexibility, there was an extension of accessible catalytic triad surface area resulting in improved catalytic efficiency of the mutant enzyme. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Varietal Loops

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-09-15

    A series of active regions stretched along the right side of the sun exhibited a wide variety of loops cascading above them (Sept. 12-14, 2016). The active region near the center has tightly coiled loops, while the region rotating over the right edge has some elongated and some very stretched loops above it. The loops are actually charged particles spiraling along magnetic field lines, observed here in a wavelength of extreme ultraviolet light. Near the middle of the video the Earth quickly passes in front of a portion of the sun as viewed by SDO. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA16997

  15. Modulation of HIV protease flexibility by the T80N mutation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hao; Li, Shangyang; Badger, John; Nalivaika, Ellen; Cai, Yufeng; Foulkes-Murzycki, Jennifer; Schiffer, Celia; Makowski, Lee

    2015-11-01

    The flexibility of HIV protease (HIVp) plays a critical role in enabling enzymatic activity and is required for substrate access to the active site. While the importance of flexibility in the flaps that cover the active site is well known, flexibility in other parts of the enzyme is also critical for function. One key region is a loop containing Thr 80, which forms the walls of the active site. Although not situated within the active site, amino acid Thr80 is absolutely conserved. The mutation T80N preserves the structure of the enzyme but catalytic activity is completely lost. To investigate the potential influence of the T80N mutation on HIVp flexibility, wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) data was measured for a series of HIVp variants. Starting with a calculated WAXS pattern from a rigid atomic model, the modulations in the intensity distribution caused by structural fluctuations in the protein were predicted by simple analytic methods and compared with the experimental data. An analysis of T80N WAXS data shows that this variant is significantly more rigid than the WT across all length scales. The effects of this single point mutation extend throughout the protein, to alter the mobility of amino acids in the enzymatic core. These results support the contentions that significant protein flexibility extends throughout HIVp and is critical to catalytic function.

  16. Catalytic autothermal reforming increases fuel cell flexibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Voecks, G. E.

    1981-01-01

    Experimental results are presented for the autothermal reforming (ATR) of n-hexane, n-tetradecane, benzene and benzene solutions of naphthalene. The tests were run at atmospheric pressure and at moderately high reactant preheat temperatures in the 800-900 K range. Carbon formation lines were determined for paraffinic and aromatic liquids. Profiles were determined for axial bed temperature and composition. Space velocity efforts were assessed, and the locations and types of carbon were recorded. Significant reactive differences between hydrocarbons were identified. Carbon formation characteristics were hydrocarbon specific. The differing behavior of paraffinic and aromatic fuels with respect to their carbon formation may be important in explaining the narrow range of carbon-free operating conditions found in the ATR of number two fuel oil.

  17. Flexible Proteins at the Origin of Life

    PubMed Central

    Pohorille, Andrew; Wilson, Michael A.; Shannon, Gareth

    2017-01-01

    Almost all modern proteins possess well-defined, relatively rigid scaffolds that provide structural preorganization for desired functions. Such scaffolds require the sufficient length of a polypeptide chain and extensive evolutionary optimization. How ancestral proteins attained functionality, even though they were most likely markedly smaller than their contemporary descendants, remains a major, unresolved question in the origin of life. On the basis of evidence from experiments and computer simulations, we argue that at least some of the earliest water-soluble and membrane proteins were markedly more flexible than their modern counterparts. As an example, we consider a small, evolved in vitro ligase, based on a novel architecture that may be the archetype of primordial enzymes. The protein does not contain a hydrophobic core or conventional elements of the secondary structure characteristic of modern water-soluble proteins, but instead is built of a flexible, catalytic loop supported by a small hydrophilic core containing zinc atoms. It appears that disorder in the polypeptide chain imparts robustness to mutations in the protein core. Simple ion channels, likely the earliest membrane protein assemblies, could also be quite flexible, but still retain their functionality, again in contrast to their modern descendants. This is demonstrated in the example of antiamoebin, which can serve as a useful model of small peptides forming ancestral ion channels. Common features of the earliest, functional protein architectures discussed here include not only their flexibility, but also a low level of evolutionary optimization and heterogeneity in amino acid composition and, possibly, the type of peptide bonds in the protein backbone. PMID:28587235

  18. Flexible Proteins at the Origin of Life.

    PubMed

    Pohorille, Andrew; Wilson, Michael A; Shannon, Gareth

    2017-06-05

    Almost all modern proteins possess well-defined, relatively rigid scaffolds that provide structural preorganization for desired functions. Such scaffolds require the sufficient length of a polypeptide chain and extensive evolutionary optimization. How ancestral proteins attained functionality, even though they were most likely markedly smaller than their contemporary descendants, remains a major, unresolved question in the origin of life. On the basis of evidence from experiments and computer simulations, we argue that at least some of the earliest water-soluble and membrane proteins were markedly more flexible than their modern counterparts. As an example, we consider a small, evolved in vitro ligase, based on a novel architecture that may be the archetype of primordial enzymes. The protein does not contain a hydrophobic core or conventional elements of the secondary structure characteristic of modern water-soluble proteins, but instead is built of a flexible, catalytic loop supported by a small hydrophilic core containing zinc atoms. It appears that disorder in the polypeptide chain imparts robustness to mutations in the protein core. Simple ion channels, likely the earliest membrane protein assemblies, could also be quite flexible, but still retain their functionality, again in contrast to their modern descendants. This is demonstrated in the example of antiamoebin, which can serve as a useful model of small peptides forming ancestral ion channels. Common features of the earliest, functional protein architectures discussed here include not only their flexibility, but also a low level of evolutionary optimization and heterogeneity in amino acid composition and, possibly, the type of peptide bonds in the protein backbone.

  19. Function of the D-alanine:D-alanine ligase lid loop: a molecular modeling and bioactivity study.

    PubMed

    Hrast, Martina; Vehar, Blaž; Turk, Samo; Konc, Janez; Gobec, Stanislav; Janežič, Dušanka

    2012-08-09

    D-Alanine:D-alanine ligase (Ddl) is an essential ATP-dependent bacterial enzyme involved in peptidoglycan biosynthesis. Discovery of Ddl inhibitors not competitive with ATP has proven to be difficult because the Ddl bimolecular d-alanine binding pocket is very restricted, as is accessibility to the active site for larger molecules in the catalytically active closed conformation of Ddl. A molecular dynamics study of the opening and closing of the Ddl lid loop informs future structure-based design efforts that allow for the flexibility of Ddl. A virtual screen on generated enzyme conformations yielded some hit inhibitors whose bioactivity was determined.

  20. The conformational flexibility of the carboxy terminal residues 105–114 is a key modulator of the catalytic activity and stability of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF)†

    PubMed Central

    El-Turk, Farah; Cascella, Michele; Ouertatani-Sakouhi, Hajer; Narayanan, Raghavendran Lakshmi; Leng, Lin; Bucala, Richard; Hweckstetter, Markus; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Lashuel, Hilal A.

    2013-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a multifunctional protein and a major mediator of innate immunity. Although X-ray crystallography revealed that MIF exists as a homotrimer, its oligomerization state in vivo as well as the factors governing its oligomerization and stability remain poorly understood. The C-terminal region of MIF is highly conserved and participates in several intramolecular interactions that suggest a role in modulating the stability and biochemical activity of MIF. To determine the importance of these interactions, point mutations (A48P, L46A), insertions (P107) at the monomer-monomer interfaces, and C-terminal deletion (Δ110-114NSTFA and Δ105–114NVGWNNSTFA) variants were designed and their structural properties, thermodynamic stability, oligomerization state, catalytic activity and receptor binding were characterized using a battery of biophysical methods. The C-terminal deletion mutants ΔC5 huMIF1-109 and ΔC10 huMIF1-104 were enzymatically inactive and thermodynamically less stable than wild type MIF. Analytical ultracentrifugation studies demonstrate that both C-terminal mutants sediment as trimers and exhibit similar binding to CD74 as the wild type protein. Disrupting the conformation of the C-terminal region 105–114 and increasing its conformational flexibility through the insertion of a proline residue at position 107 was sufficient to reproduce the structural, biochemical and thermodynamic properties of the deletion mutants. P107 MIF forms an enzymatically inactive trimer and exhibits reduced thermodynamic stability relative to the wild type protein. To provide a rationale for the changes induced by these mutations at the molecular level, we also performed molecular dynamics simulations on these mutants in comparison to the wild type MIF. Together, our studies demonstrate that inter-subunit interactions involving the C-terminal region 105–114, including a salt-bridge interaction between Arg73 of one monomer and the

  1. Three critical hydrogen bonds determine the catalytic activity of the Diels–Alderase ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Kraut, Stefanie; Bebenroth, Dirk; Nierth, Alexander; Kobitski, Andrei Y.; Nienhaus, G. Ulrich; Jäschke, Andres

    2012-01-01

    Compared to protein enzymes, our knowledge about how RNA accelerates chemical reactions is rather limited. The crystal structures of a ribozyme that catalyzes Diels–Alder reactions suggest a rich tertiary architecture responsible for catalysis. In this study, we systematically probe the relevance of crystallographically observed ground-state interactions for catalytic function using atomic mutagenesis in combination with various analytical techniques. The largest energetic contribution apparently arises from the precise shape complementarity between transition state and catalytic pocket: A single point mutant that folds correctly into the tertiary structure but lacks one H-bond that normally stabilizes the pocket is completely inactive. In the rate-limiting chemical step, the dienophile is furthermore activated by two weak H-bonds that contribute ∼7–8 kJ/mol to transition state stabilization, as indicated by the 25-fold slower reaction rates of deletion mutants. These H-bonds are also responsible for the tight binding of the Diels–Alder product by the ribozyme that causes product inhibition. For high catalytic activity, the ribozyme requires a fine-tuned balance between rigidity and flexibility that is determined by the combined action of one inter-strand H-bond and one magnesium ion. A sharp 360° turn reminiscent of the T-loop motif observed in tRNA is found to be important for catalytic function. PMID:21976731

  2. Rational design of ornithine decarboxylase with high catalytic activity for the production of putrescine.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyang; Kyeong, Hyun-Ho; Choi, Jung Min; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2014-09-01

    Putrescine finds wide industrial applications in the synthesis of polymers, pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and surfactants. Owing to economic and environmental concerns, the microbial production of putrescine has attracted a great deal of attention, and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) is known to be a key enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway. Herein, we present the design of ODC from Escherichia coli with high catalytic efficiency using a structure-based rational approach. Through a substrate docking into the model structure of the enzyme, we first selected residues that might lead to an increase in catalytic activity. Of the selected residues that are located in the α-helix and the loops constituting the substrate entry site, a mutational analysis of the single mutants identified two key residues, I163 and E165. A combination of two single mutations resulted in a 62.5-fold increase in the catalytic efficiency when compared with the wild-type enzyme. Molecular dynamics simulations of the best mutant revealed that the substrate entry site becomes more flexible through mutations, while stabilizing the formation of the dimeric interface of the enzyme. Our approach can be applied to the design of other decarboxylases with high catalytic efficiency for the production of various chemicals through bio-based processes.

  3. Identification of cytoplasmic subdomains that control pH-sensing of the Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE1): pH-maintenance, ATP-sensitive, and flexible loop domains.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, T; Schmitt, B; Pouysségur, J; Wakabayashi, S; Shigekawa, M

    1997-02-01

    To precisely identify the cytoplasmic subdomains that are responsible for the intracellular pH (pHi)-sensitivity, ATP depletion-induced inhibition and Ca2+ activation of the Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE1), we generated a set of deletion mutants of carboxyl-terminated cytoplasmic domain and expressed them in the exchanger-deficient cell line PS120. We evaluated pHi-sensitivity of these mutants by measuring the resting pHi in cells placed in an acidic medium (pH 6.0) and pHi-dependence of 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl)amiloride-sensitive 22Na+ uptake. Detailed analysis revealed that the cytoplasmic domain of NHE1 is consists of at least four subdomains in terms of pHi-sensitivity of the unstimulated NHE1: I, aa 516-590/595; II, aa 596-635; III aa 636-659; and IV, aa 660-815. Subdomains II and IV were silent for pHi-sensitivity. Subdomain I had a pHi-maintenance function, preserving pHi-sensitivity in a physiological range, whereas subdomain III, overlapping with the high affinity calmodulin (CaM)-binding site, exhibited an autoinhibitory function. Deletion of subdomain I abolished the decrease of pHi-sensitivity induced by cell ATP depletion, indicating that domain I plays a crucial role in this phenomenon. Deletion of subdomain III rendered the inhibition by ATP depletion less efficient, suggesting the possible interaction between subdomains I and III. On the other hand, tandem elongation of subdomain II by insertion did not affect either the inhibitory function of domain III or the removal of this inhibition by ionomycin or thrombin. However, deletion of subdomain II partially abolished the inhibitory effect of subdomain III. Subdomain II thus seems to function as a mobile "flexible loop," permitting the CaM-binding subdomain III to exert its normal function. These findings, together with our previous data, support a concept that cell ATP, Ca2+, and growth factors regulate NHE1 via a mechanism involving direct or indirect interactions of specific cytoplasmic subdomains with the

  4. Stretched Loops

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-03-16

    When an active region rotated over to the edge of the sun, it presented us with a nice profile view of its elongated loops stretching and swaying above it (Mar. 8-9, 2017). These loops are actually charged particles (made visible in extreme ultraviolet light) swirling along the magnetic field lines of the active region. The video covers about 30 hours of activity. Also of note is a darker twisting mass of plasma to the left of the active region being pulled and spun about by magnetic forces. Video is available at http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21562

  5. Loop-to-loop coupling.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Lucero, Larry Martin; Langston, William L.; Salazar, Robert Austin; Coleman, Phillip Dale; Basilio, Lorena I.; Bacon, Larry Donald

    2012-05-01

    This report estimates inductively-coupled energy to a low-impedance load in a loop-to-loop arrangement. Both analytical models and full-wave numerical simulations are used and the resulting fields, coupled powers and energies are compared. The energies are simply estimated from the coupled powers through approximations to the energy theorem. The transmitter loop is taken to be either a circular geometry or a rectangular-loop (stripline-type) geometry that was used in an experimental setup. Simple magnetic field models are constructed and used to estimate the mutual inductance to the receiving loop, which is taken to be circular with one or several turns. Circuit elements are estimated and used to determine the coupled current and power (an equivalent antenna picture is also given). These results are compared to an electromagnetic simulation of the transmitter geometry. Simple approximate relations are also given to estimate coupled energy from the power. The effect of additional loads in the form of attached leads, forming transmission lines, are considered. The results are summarized in a set of susceptibility-type curves. Finally, we also consider drives to the cables themselves and the resulting common-to-differential mode currents in the load.

  6. Flexibility and Stability Trade-Off in Active Site of Cold-Adapted Pseudomonas mandelii Esterase EstK.

    PubMed

    Truongvan, Ngoc; Jang, Sei-Heon; Lee, ChangWoo

    2016-06-28

    Cold-adapted enzymes exhibit enhanced conformational flexibility, especially in their active sites, as compared with their warmer-temperature counterparts. However, the mechanism by which cold-adapted enzymes maintain their active site stability is largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of conserved D308-Y309 residues located in the same loop as the catalytic H307 residue in the cold-adapted esterase EstK from Pseudomonas mandelii. Mutation of D308 and/or Y309 to Ala or deletion resulted in increased conformational flexibility. Particularly, the D308A or Y309A mutant showed enhanced substrate affinity and catalytic rate, as compared with wild-type EstK, via enlargement of the active site. However, all mutant EstK enzymes exhibited reduced thermal stability. The effect of mutation was greater for D308 than Y309. These results indicate that D308 is not preferable for substrate selection and catalytic activity, whereas hydrogen bond formation involving D308 is critical for active site stabilization. Taken together, conformation of the EstK active site is constrained via flexibility-stability trade-off for enzyme catalysis and thermal stability. Our study provides further insights into active site stabilization of cold-adapted enzymes.

  7. Catalytic reforming

    SciTech Connect

    Aldag, A.W. Jr.

    1986-01-28

    This patent describes a process for the catalytic reforming of a feedstock which contains at least one reformable organic compound. The process consists of contacting the feedstock under suitable reforming conditions with a catalyst composition selected from the group consisting of a catalyst. The catalyst essentially consists of zinc oxide and a spinel structure alumina. Another catalyst consists essentially of a physical mixture of zinc titanate and a spinel structure alumina in the presence of sufficient added hydrogen to substantially prevent the formation of coke. Insufficient zinc is present in the catalyst composition for the formation of a bulk zinc aluminate.

  8. Flexible Ablators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stackpoole, Margaret M. (Inventor); Ghandehari, Ehson M. (Inventor); Thornton, Jeremy J. (Inventor); Covington, Melmoth Alan (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A low-density article comprising a flexible substrate and a pyrolizable material impregnated therein, methods of preparing, and devices using the article are disclosed. The pyrolizable material pyrolizes above 350 C and does not flow at temperatures below the pyrolysis temperature. The low-density article remains flexible after impregnation and continues to remain flexible when the pyrolizable material is fully pyrolized.

  9. Modulation of the interaction between human P450 3A4 and B. megaterium reductase via engineered loops.

    PubMed

    Castrignanò, Silvia; D'Avino, Serena; Di Nardo, Giovanna; Catucci, Gianluca; Sadeghi, Sheila J; Gilardi, Gianfranco

    2017-07-19

    Chimerogenesis involving cytochromes P450 is a successful approach to generate catalytically self-sufficient enzymes. However, the connection between the different functional modules should allow a certain degree of flexibility in order to obtain functional and catalytically efficient proteins. We previously applied the molecular Lego approach to develop a chimeric P450 3A4 enzyme linked to the reductase domain of P450 BM3 (BMR). Three constructs were designed with the connecting loop containing no glycine, 3 glycine or 5 glycine residues and showed a different catalytic activity and coupling efficiency. Here we investigate how the linker affects the ability of P450 3A4 to bind substrates and inhibitors. We measure the electron transfer rates and the catalytic properties of the enzyme also in the presence of ketoconazole as inhibitor. The data show that the construct 3A4-5GLY-BMR with the longest loop better retains the binding ability and cooperativity for testosterone, compared to P450 3A4. In both 3A4-3GLY-BMR and 3A4-5GLY-BMR, the substrate induces an increase in the first electron transfer rate and a shorter lag phase related to a domain rearrangements, when compared to the construct without Gly. These data are consistent with docking results and secondary structure predictions showing a propensity to form helical structures in the loop of the 3A4-BMR and 3A4-3GLY-BMR. All three chimeras retain the ability to bind the inhibitor ketoconazole and show an IC50 comparable with those reported for the wild type protein. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cytochrome P450 biodiversity and biotechnology, edited by Erika Plettner, Gianfranco Gilardi, Luet Wong, Vlada Urlacher, Jared Goldstone. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Active Site Loop Dynamics of a Class IIa Fructose 1,6-Bisphosphate Aldolase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Pegan, Scott D.; Rukseree, Kamolchanok; Capodagli, Glenn C.; Baker, Erica A.; Krasnykh, Olga; Franzblau, Scott G.; Mesecar, Andrew D.

    2013-01-08

    The class II fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolases (FBAs, EC 4.1.2.13) comprises one of two families of aldolases. Instead of forming a Schiff base intermediate using an ε-amino group of a lysine side chain, class II FBAs utilize Zn(II) to stabilize a proposed hydroxyenolate intermediate (HEI) in the reversible cleavage of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, forming glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate and dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP). As class II FBAs have been shown to be essential in pathogenic bacteria, focus has been placed on these enzymes as potential antibacterial targets. Although structural studies of class II FBAs from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtFBA), other bacteria, and protozoa have been reported, the structure of the active site loop responsible for catalyzing the protonation–deprotonation steps of the reaction for class II FBAs has not yet been observed. We therefore utilized the potent class II FBA inhibitor phosphoglycolohydroxamate (PGH) as a mimic of the HEI- and DHAP-bound form of the enzyme and determined the X-ray structure of the MtFBA–PGH complex to 1.58 Å. Remarkably, we are able to observe well-defined electron density for the previously elusive active site loop of MtFBA trapped in a catalytically competent orientation. Utilization of this structural information and site-directed mutagenesis and kinetic studies conducted on a series of residues within the active site loop revealed that E169 facilitates a water-mediated deprotonation–protonation step of the MtFBA reaction mechanism. Furthermore, solvent isotope effects on MtFBA and catalytically relevant mutants were used to probe the effect of loop flexibility on catalytic efficiency. Additionally, we also reveal the structure of MtFBA in its holoenzyme form.

  11. Active site loop dynamics of a class IIa fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Pegan, Scott D; Rukseree, Kamolchanok; Capodagli, Glenn C; Baker, Erica A; Krasnykh, Olga; Franzblau, Scott G; Mesecar, Andrew D

    2013-02-05

    Class II fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolases (FBAs, EC 4.1.2.13) comprise one of two families of aldolases. Instead of forming a Schiff base intermediate using an ε-amino group of a lysine side chain, class II FBAs utilize Zn(II) to stabilize a proposed hydroxyenolate intermediate (HEI) in the reversible cleavage of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, forming glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate and dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP). As class II FBAs have been shown to be essential in pathogenic bacteria, focus has been placed on these enzymes as potential antibacterial targets. Although structural studies of class II FBAs from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtFBA), other bacteria, and protozoa have been reported, the structure of the active site loop responsible for catalyzing the protonation-deprotonation steps of the reaction for class II FBAs has not yet been observed. We therefore utilized the potent class II FBA inhibitor phosphoglycolohydroxamate (PGH) as a mimic of the HEI- and DHAP-bound form of the enzyme and determined the X-ray structure of the MtFBA-PGH complex to 1.58 Å. Remarkably, we are able to observe well-defined electron density for the previously elusive active site loop of MtFBA trapped in a catalytically competent orientation. Utilization of this structural information and site-directed mutagenesis and kinetic studies conducted on a series of residues within the active site loop revealed that E169 facilitates a water-mediated deprotonation-protonation step of the MtFBA reaction mechanism. Also, solvent isotope effects on MtFBA and catalytically relevant mutants were used to probe the effect of loop flexibility on catalytic efficiency. Additionally, we also reveal the structure of MtFBA in its holoenzyme form.

  12. Catalytic reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Aaron, Timothy Mark; Shah, Minish Mahendra; Jibb, Richard John

    2009-03-10

    A catalytic reactor is provided with one or more reaction zones each formed of set(s) of reaction tubes containing a catalyst to promote chemical reaction within a feed stream. The reaction tubes are of helical configuration and are arranged in a substantially coaxial relationship to form a coil-like structure. Heat exchangers and steam generators can be formed by similar tube arrangements. In such manner, the reaction zone(s) and hence, the reactor is compact and the pressure drop through components is minimized. The resultant compact form has improved heat transfer characteristics and is far easier to thermally insulate than prior art compact reactor designs. Various chemical reactions are contemplated within such coil-like structures such that as steam methane reforming followed by water-gas shift. The coil-like structures can be housed within annular chambers of a cylindrical housing that also provide flow paths for various heat exchange fluids to heat and cool components.

  13. Structure of a novel class II phospholipase D: catalytic cleft is modified by a disulphide bridge.

    PubMed

    de Giuseppe, Priscila Oliveira; Ullah, Anwar; Silva, Dilza Trevisan; Gremski, Luiza Helena; Wille, Ana Carolina Martins; Chaves Moreira, Daniele; Ribeiro, Andrea Senff; Chaim, Olga Meiri; Murakami, Mario Tyago; Veiga, Silvio Sanches; Arni, Raghuvir Krishnaswamy

    2011-06-17

    Phospholipases D (PLDs) are principally responsible for the local and systemic effects of Loxosceles envenomation including dermonecrosis and hemolysis. Despite their clinical relevance in loxoscelism, to date, only the SMase I from Loxosceles laeta, a class I member, has been structurally characterized. The crystal structure of a class II member from Loxosceles intermedia venom has been determined at 1.7Å resolution. Structural comparison to the class I member showed that the presence of an additional disulphide bridge which links the catalytic loop to the flexible loop significantly changes the volume and shape of the catalytic cleft. An examination of the crystal structures of PLD homologues in the presence of low molecular weight compounds at their active sites suggests the existence of a ligand-dependent rotamer conformation of the highly conserved residue Trp230 (equivalent to Trp192 in the glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase from Thermus thermophofilus, PDB code: 1VD6) indicating its role in substrate binding in both enzymes. Sequence and structural analyses suggest that the reduced sphingomyelinase activity observed in some class IIb PLDs is probably due to point mutations which lead to a different substrate preference. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Rigidification of the autolysis loop enhances Na[superscript +] binding to thrombin

    SciTech Connect

    Pozzi, Nicola; Chen, Raymond; Chen, Zhiwei; Bah, Alaji; Di Cera, Enrico

    2011-09-20

    Binding of Na{sup +} to thrombin ensures high activity toward physiological substrates and optimizes the procoagulant and prothrombotic roles of the enzyme in vivo. Under physiological conditions of pH and temperature, the binding affinity of Na{sup +} is weak due to large heat capacity and enthalpy changes associated with binding, and the K{sub d} = 80 mM ensures only 64% saturation of the site at the concentration of Na{sup +} in the blood (140 mM). Residues controlling Na{sup +} binding and activation have been identified. Yet, attempts to improve the interaction of Na{sup +} with thrombin and possibly increase catalytic activity under physiological conditions have so far been unsuccessful. Here we report how replacement of the flexible autolysis loop of human thrombin with the homologous rigid domain of the murine enzyme results in a drastic (up to 10-fold) increase in Na{sup +} affinity and a significant improvement in the catalytic activity of the enzyme. Rigidification of the autolysis loop abolishes the heat capacity change associated with Na{sup +} binding observed in the wild-type and also increases the stability of thrombin. These findings have general relevance to protein engineering studies of clotting proteases and trypsin-like enzymes.

  15. Conformational flexibility of the glycosidase NagZ allows it to bind structurally diverse inhibitors to suppress β-lactam antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Vadlamani, Grishma; Stubbs, Keith A; Désiré, Jérôme; Blériot, Yves; Vocadlo, David J; Mark, Brian L

    2017-03-28

    NagZ is an N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminidase that participates in the peptidoglycan (PG) recycling pathway of Gram-negative bacteria by removing N-acetyl-glucosamine (GlcNAc) from PG fragments that have been excised from the cell wall during growth. The 1,6-anhydromuramoyl-peptide products generated by NagZ activate β-lactam resistance in many Gram-negative bacteria by inducing the expression of AmpC β-lactamase. Blocking NagZ activity can thereby suppress β-lactam antibiotic resistance in these bacteria. The NagZ active site is dynamic and it accommodates distortion of the glycan substrate during catalysis using a mobile catalytic loop that carries a histidine residue which serves as the active site general acid/base catalyst. Here, we show that flexibility of this catalytic loop also accommodates structural differences in small molecule inhibitors of NagZ, which could be exploited to improve inhibitor specificity. X-ray structures of NagZ bound to the potent yet non-selective N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase inhibitor PUGNAc (O-(2-acetamido-2-deoxy-d-glucopyranosylidene) amino-N-phenylcarbamate), and two NagZ-selective inhibitors - EtBuPUG, a PUGNAc derivative bearing a 2-N-ethylbutyryl group, and MM-156, a 3-N-butyryl trihydroxyazepane, revealed that the phenylcarbamate moiety of PUGNAc and EtBuPUG completely displaces the catalytic loop from the NagZ active site to yield a catalytically incompetent form of the enzyme. In contrast, the catalytic loop was found positioned in the catalytically active conformation within the NagZ active site when bound to MM-156, which lacks the phenylcarbamate extension. Displacement of the catalytic loop by PUGNAc and its N-acyl derivative EtBuPUG alters the active site conformation of NagZ, which presents an additional strategy to improve the potency and specificity of NagZ inhibitors.

  16. Flexibility Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    These brief guidelines for a muscular flexibility program state that the purpose of such a program is to increase the range of motion in order to avoid injuries and eliminate awkwardness in physical activities. A flexibility program is described as an extension of the warm-up period and should be an ongoing, permanent effort to lengthen muscles. A…

  17. Flexible Scheduling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Harold S.; Bechard, Joseph E.

    A flexible schedule allows teachers to change group size, group composition, and class length according to the purpose of the lesson. This pamphlet presents various "master" schedules for flexible scheduling: (1) Simple block schedules, (2) back-to-back schedules, (3) interdisciplinary schedules, (4) school-wide block schedules, (5) open-lab…

  18. On the structural context and identification of enzyme catalytic residues.

    PubMed

    Chien, Yu-Tung; Huang, Shao-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Enzymes play important roles in most of the biological processes. Although only a small fraction of residues are directly involved in catalytic reactions, these catalytic residues are the most crucial parts in enzymes. The study of the fundamental and unique features of catalytic residues benefits the understanding of enzyme functions and catalytic mechanisms. In this work, we analyze the structural context of catalytic residues based on theoretical and experimental structure flexibility. The results show that catalytic residues have distinct structural features and context. Their neighboring residues, whether sequence or structure neighbors within specific range, are usually structurally more rigid than those of noncatalytic residues. The structural context feature is combined with support vector machine to identify catalytic residues from enzyme structure. The prediction results are better or comparable to those of recent structure-based prediction methods.

  19. On the Structural Context and Identification of Enzyme Catalytic Residues

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Yu-Tung; Huang, Shao-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Enzymes play important roles in most of the biological processes. Although only a small fraction of residues are directly involved in catalytic reactions, these catalytic residues are the most crucial parts in enzymes. The study of the fundamental and unique features of catalytic residues benefits the understanding of enzyme functions and catalytic mechanisms. In this work, we analyze the structural context of catalytic residues based on theoretical and experimental structure flexibility. The results show that catalytic residues have distinct structural features and context. Their neighboring residues, whether sequence or structure neighbors within specific range, are usually structurally more rigid than those of noncatalytic residues. The structural context feature is combined with support vector machine to identify catalytic residues from enzyme structure. The prediction results are better or comparable to those of recent structure-based prediction methods. PMID:23484160

  20. Synergize fuel and petrochemical processing plans with catalytic reforming

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    Depending on the market, refiner`s plans to produce clean fuels and higher value petrochemicals will weigh heavily on the catalytic reformer`s flexibility. It seems that as soon as a timely article related to catalytic reforming operations is published, a new {open_quotes}boutique{close_quotes} gasoline fuel specification is slapped on to existing fuel standards, affecting reformer operations and processing objectives. Just as importantly, the petrochemical market (such as aromatics) that refiners are targeting, can be very fickle. That`s why process engineers have endeavored to maintain an awareness of the flexibility that technology suppliers are building into modern catalytic reformers.

  1. Replacement and deletion mutations in the catalytic domain and belt region of Aspergillus awamori glucoamylase to enhance thermostability.

    PubMed

    Liu, H L; Doleyres, Y; Coutinho, P M; Ford, C; Reilly, P J

    2000-09-01

    Three single-residue mutations, Asp71-->Asn, Gln409-->Pro and Gly447-->Ser, two long-to-short loop replacement mutations, Gly23-Ala24-Asp25-Gly26-Ala27-Trp28- Val29-Ser30-->Asn-Pro-Pro (23-30 replacement) and Asp297-Ser298-Glu299-Ala300-Val301-->Ala-G ly-Ala (297-301 replacement) and one deletion mutation removing Glu439, Thr440 and Ser441 (Delta439-441), all based on amino acid sequence alignments, were made to improve Aspergillus awamori glucoamylase thermostability. The first and second single-residue mutations were designed to introduce a potential N:-glycosylation site and to restrict backbone bond rotation, respectively, and therefore to decrease entropy during protein unfolding. The third single-residue mutation was made to decrease flexibility and increase O:-glycosylation in the already highly O:-glycosylated belt region that extends around the globular catalytic domain. The 23-30 replacement mutation was designed to eliminate a very thermolabile extended loop on the catalytic domain surface and to bring the remainder of this region closer to the rest of the catalytic domain, therefore preventing it from unfolding. The 297-301 replacement mutant GA was made to understand the function of the random coil region between alpha-helices 9 and 10. Delta439-441 was constructed to decrease belt flexibility. All six mutations increased glucoamylase thermostability without significantly changing enzyme kinetic properties, with the 23-30 replacement mutation increasing the activation free energy for thermoinactivation by about 4 kJ/mol, which leads to a 4 degrees C increase in operating temperature at constant thermostability.

  2. Raney nickel catalytic device

    DOEpatents

    O'Hare, Stephen A.

    1978-01-01

    A catalytic device for use in a conventional coal gasification process which includes a tubular substrate having secured to its inside surface by expansion a catalytic material. The catalytic device is made by inserting a tubular catalytic element, such as a tubular element of a nickel-aluminum alloy, into a tubular substrate and heat-treating the resulting composite to cause the tubular catalytic element to irreversibly expand against the inside surface of the substrate.

  3. Length of the active-site crossover loop defines the substrate specificity of ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolases for ubiquitin chains.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zi-Ren; Zhang, Yu-Hang; Liu, Shuai; Song, Ai-Xin; Hu, Hong-Yu

    2012-01-01

    UCHs [Ub (ubiquitin) C-terminal hydrolases] are a family of deubiquitinating enzymes that are often thought to only remove small C-terminal peptide tails from Ub adducts. Among the four UCHs identified to date, neither UCH-L3 nor UCH-L1 can catalyse the hydrolysis of isopeptide Ub chains, but UCH-L5 can when it is present in the PA700 complex of the proteasome. In the present paper, we report that the UCH domain of UCH-L5, different from UCH-L1 and UCH-L3, by itself can process the K48-diUb (Lys48-linked di-ubiquitin) substrate by cleaving the isopeptide bond between two Ub units. The catalytic specificity of the four UCHs is dependent on the length of the active-site crossover loop. The UCH domain with a long crossover loop (usually >14 residues), such as that of UCH-L5 or BAP1 [BRCA1 (breast cancer early-onset 1)-associated protein 1], is able to cleave both small and large Ub derivatives, whereas the one with a short loop can only process small Ub derivatives. We also found that elongation of the crossover loop enables UCH-L1 to have isopeptidase activity for K48-diUb in a length-dependent manner. Thus the loop length of UCHs defines their substrate specificity for diUb chains, suggesting that the chain flexibility of the crossover loop plays an important role in determining its catalytic activity and substrate specificity for cleaving isopeptide Ub chains.

  4. Water Stream "Loop-the-Loop"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jefimenko, Oleg

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the design of a modified loop-the-loop apparatus in which a water stream is used to illustrate centripetal forces and phenomena of high-velocity hydrodynamics. Included are some procedures of carrying out lecture demonstrations. (CC)

  5. Water Stream "Loop-the-Loop"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jefimenko, Oleg

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the design of a modified loop-the-loop apparatus in which a water stream is used to illustrate centripetal forces and phenomena of high-velocity hydrodynamics. Included are some procedures of carrying out lecture demonstrations. (CC)

  6. Improved activity and modulated action pattern obtained by random mutagenesis at the fourth beta-alpha loop involved in substrate binding to the catalytic (beta/alpha)8-barrel domain of barley alpha-amylase 1.

    PubMed

    Matsui, I; Svensson, B

    1997-09-05

    The functionality of the sequence Arg183-Gly184-Tyr185 of the substrate binding fourth beta-alpha loop in the (beta/alpha)8-barrel of barley alpha-amylase isozyme 1 (AMY1) was studied by random mutagenesis. A motif of polar Gly184 hydrophobic residues was present in active mutants, selected by starch plate screening of yeast transformants. Gly184 was important, probably due to the carbonyl group binding to Ca2+ and the spatial proximity of Phe181. Mutation of both flanking residues as in Ser183-Gly184-Met185 (SGM-) and TGL-AMY1 decreased the Ca2+ affinity. SGM-AMY1 has 2-fold increased activity for amylose but reduced activity on maltooligosaccharides, whereas KGY-AMY1 has up to 3-fold elevated activity toward the oligosaccharides. TGL-AMY1 has modest activity on all substrates. Shifted action pattern on maltooligosaccharides for NGY-, SGM-, and TGL-AMY1 support that Arg183 in wild type is located at subsites +1 and +2, accommodating two sugar rings toward the reducing end from the site of cleavage. In the crystal structure of barley alpha-amylase 2 (AMY2), Lys182 (equivalent to AMY1 Arg183) is hydrogen-bonded with sugar OH-3 in subsite +2. Higher Ki app for acarbose inhibition of KGY-AMY1 and parent AMY1 compared with the other mutants suggests favorable substrate interactions for Arg/Lys183. KGY-AMY1 was not inhibited by the AMY2-specific proteinaceous barley alpha-amylase/subtilisin inhibitor, although Lys182 of AMY2 is salt-linked to the inhibitor.

  7. Binding of pyrene isothiocyanate to the E1ATP site makes the H4-H5 cytoplasmic loop of Na+/K+-ATPase rigid.

    PubMed

    Linnertz, H; Miksik, I; Kvasnicka, P; Bertoli, E; Mazzanti, L; Schoner, W; Amler, E

    1998-01-15

    1-Pyreneisothiocyanate was shown to be an inhibitor of Na+/K+-ATPase. Reverse-phase HPLC and activity studies indicated binding of 1-pyreneisothiocyanate at the H4-H5 loop of the alpha subunit and competition with the fluorescein 5'-isothiocyanate for the E1ATP site. While fluorescein 5'-isothiocyanate, the fluorescent ATP pseudo-analog, was shown to be immobilized at the E1ATP site, there was no possibility to draw any conclusion about the flexibility of the E1ATP site due to its short lifetime. Employing 1-pyreneisothiocyanate as a long-lived fluorophore and a label for the E1ATP site, we found that the ATP-binding site of Na+/K+-ATPase and, in fact, the whole large intracellularly exposed H4-H5 loop of the catalytic alpha subunit is rigid and rotationally immobilized. This has important consequences for the molecular mechanism of the transport function.

  8. Flexible Sigmoidoscopy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Task Force (USPSTF). Most doctors recommend colonoscopy to screen for colon cancer because colonoscopy shows the entire colon and can remove colon polyps. However, preparing for and performing a flexible sigmoidoscopy may take less time and you may ...

  9. Flexible Straws.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prentice, Gerard

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the use of flexible straws for teaching properties of figures and families of shapes. Describes a way to make various two- or three-dimensional geometric shapes. Lists eight advantages of the method. (YP)

  10. Flexible Parsing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-22

    grammaticality. The primary objective of this project Is to develop flexible computer q parsing techniques which can deal with the various kinds of...0143 6. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT . TASK Computer Science Department Carnegie-Nellon University PE61102F; 2304...spontaneously, the, often do not adhere strictly to commonly accepted standards of grammaticalitf. The primary objective of this proJect is to develop flexible

  11. An RNA molecular switch: Intrinsic flexibility of 23S rRNA Helices 40 and 68 5’-UAA/5’-GAN internal loops studied by molecular dynamics methods

    PubMed Central

    Réblová, Kamila; Střelcová, Zora; Kulhánek, Petr; Beššeová, Ivana; Mathews, David H.; Nostrand, Keith Van; Yildirim, Ilyas; Turner, Douglas H.; Šponer, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Functional RNA molecules such as ribosomal RNAs frequently contain highly conserved internal loops with a 5’-UAA/5’-GAN (UAA/GAN) consensus sequence. The UAA/GAN internal loops adopt distinctive structure inconsistent with secondary structure predictions. The structure has a narrow major groove and forms a trans Hoogsteen/Sugar edge (tHS) A/G base pair followed by an unpaired stacked adenine, a trans Watson-Crick/Hoogsteen (tWH) U/A base pair and finally by a bulged nucleotide (N). The structure is further stabilized by a three-adenine stack and base-phosphate interaction. In the ribosome, the UAA/GAN internal loops are involved in extensive tertiary contacts, mainly as donors of A-minor interactions. Further, this sequence can adopt an alternative 2D/3D pattern stabilized by a four-adenine stack involved in a smaller number of tertiary interactions. The solution structure of an isolated UAA/GAA internal loop shows substantially rearranged base pairing with three consecutive non-Watson-Crick base pairs. Its A/U base pair adopts an incomplete cis Watson-Crick/Sugar edge (cWS) A/U conformation instead of the expected Watson-Crick arrangement. We performed 3.1 µs of explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the X-ray and NMR UAA/GAN structures, supplemented by MM-PBSA free energy calculations, locally enhanced sampling (LES) runs, targeted MD (TMD) and nudged elastic band (NEB) analysis. We compared parm99 and parmbsc0 force fields and net-neutralizing Na+ vs. excess salt KCl ion environments. Both force fields provide a similar description of the simulated structures, with the parmbsc0 leading to modest narrowing of the major groove. The excess salt simulations also cause a similar effect. While the NMR structure is entirely stable in simulations, the simulated X-ray structure shows considerable widening of the major groove, loss of base-phosphate interaction and other instabilities. The alternative X-ray geometry even undergoes conformational

  12. Crystal structure of the catalytic domain of RluD, the only rRNA pseudouridine synthase required for normal growth of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    DEL CAMPO, MARK; OFENGAND, JAMES; MALHOTRA, ARUN

    2004-01-01

    Escherichia coli pseudouridine synthase RluD makes pseudouridines 1911, 1915, and 1917 in the loop of helix 69 in 23S RNA. These are the most highly conserved ribosomal pseudouridines known. Of 11 pseudouridine synthases in E. coli, only cells lacking RluD have severe growth defects and abnormal ribosomes. We have determined the 2.0 Å structure of the catalytic domain of RluD (residues 77–326), the first structure of an RluA family member. The catalytic domain folds into a mainly antiparallel β-sheet flanked by several loops and helices. A positively charged cleft that presumably binds RNA leads to the conserved Asp 139. The RluD N-terminal S4 domain, connected by a flexible linker, is disordered in our structure. RluD is very similar in both catalytic domain structure and active site arrangement to the pseudouridine synthases RsuA, TruB, and TruA. We identify five sequence motifs, two of which are novel, in the RluA, RsuA, TruB, and TruA families, uniting them as one superfamily. These results strongly suggest that four of the five families of pseudouridine synthases arose by divergent evolution. The RluD structure also provides insight into its multisite specificity. PMID:14730022

  13. Closed-Loop Neuromorphic Benchmarks

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Terrence C.; DeWolf, Travis; Kleinhans, Ashley; Eliasmith, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Evaluating the effectiveness and performance of neuromorphic hardware is difficult. It is even more difficult when the task of interest is a closed-loop task; that is, a task where the output from the neuromorphic hardware affects some environment, which then in turn affects the hardware's future input. However, closed-loop situations are one of the primary potential uses of neuromorphic hardware. To address this, we present a methodology for generating closed-loop benchmarks that makes use of a hybrid of real physical embodiment and a type of “minimal” simulation. Minimal simulation has been shown to lead to robust real-world performance, while still maintaining the practical advantages of simulation, such as making it easy for the same benchmark to be used by many researchers. This method is flexible enough to allow researchers to explicitly modify the benchmarks to identify specific task domains where particular hardware excels. To demonstrate the method, we present a set of novel benchmarks that focus on motor control for an arbitrary system with unknown external forces. Using these benchmarks, we show that an error-driven learning rule can consistently improve motor control performance across a randomly generated family of closed-loop simulations, even when there are up to 15 interacting joints to be controlled. PMID:26696820

  14. Functional significance of four successive glycine residues in the pyrophosphate binding loop of fungal 6-oxopurine phosphoribosyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Moynié, Lucile; Giraud, Marie-France; Breton, Annick; Boissier, Fanny; Daignan-Fornier, Bertrand; Dautant, Alain

    2012-08-01

    Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) is a key enzyme of the purine recycling pathway that catalyzes the conversion of 5-phospho-ribosyl-α-1-pyrophosphate and guanine or hypoxanthine to guanosine monophosphate (GMP) or inosine monophosphate (IMP), respectively, and pyrophosphate (PPi). We report the first crystal structure of a fungal 6-oxopurine phosphoribosyltransferase, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae HGPRT (Sc-HGPRT) in complex with GMP. The crystal structures of full length protein with (WT1) or without (WT2) sulfate that mimics the phosphate group in the PPi binding site were solved by molecular replacement using the structure of a truncated version (Δ7) solved beforehand by multiwavelength anomalous diffusion. Sc-HGPRT is a dimer and adopts the overall structure of class I phosphoribosyltransferases (PRTs) with a smaller hood domain and a short two-stranded parallel β-sheet linking the N- to the C-terminal end. The catalytic loops in WT1 and WT2 are in an open form while in Δ7, due to an inter-subunit disulfide bridge, the catalytic loop is in either an open or closed form. The closure is concomitant with a peptide plane flipping in the PPi binding loop. Moreover, owing the flexibility of a GGGG motif conserved in fungi, all the peptide bonds of the phosphate binding loop are in trans conformation whereas in nonfungal 6-oxopurine PRTs, one cis-peptide bond is required for phosphate binding. Mutations affecting the enzyme activity or the previously characterized feedback inhibition by GMP are located at the nucleotide binding site and the dimer interface. Copyright © 2012 The Protein Society.

  15. Functional significance of four successive glycine residues in the pyrophosphate binding loop of fungal 6-oxopurine phosphoribosyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Moynié, Lucile; Giraud, Marie-France; Breton, Annick; Boissier, Fanny; Daignan-Fornier, Bertrand; Dautant, Alain

    2012-01-01

    Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) is a key enzyme of the purine recycling pathway that catalyzes the conversion of 5-phospho-ribosyl-α-1-pyrophosphate and guanine or hypoxanthine to guanosine monophosphate (GMP) or inosine monophosphate (IMP), respectively, and pyrophosphate (PPi). We report the first crystal structure of a fungal 6-oxopurine phosphoribosyltransferase, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae HGPRT (Sc-HGPRT) in complex with GMP. The crystal structures of full length protein with (WT1) or without (WT2) sulfate that mimics the phosphate group in the PPi binding site were solved by molecular replacement using the structure of a truncated version (Δ7) solved beforehand by multiwavelength anomalous diffusion. Sc-HGPRT is a dimer and adopts the overall structure of class I phosphoribosyltransferases (PRTs) with a smaller hood domain and a short two-stranded parallel β-sheet linking the N- to the C-terminal end. The catalytic loops in WT1 and WT2 are in an open form while in Δ7, due to an inter-subunit disulfide bridge, the catalytic loop is in either an open or closed form. The closure is concomitant with a peptide plane flipping in the PPi binding loop. Moreover, owing the flexibility of a GGGG motif conserved in fungi, all the peptide bonds of the phosphate binding loop are in trans conformation whereas in nonfungal 6-oxopurine PRTs, one cis-peptide bond is required for phosphate binding. Mutations affecting the enzyme activity or the previously characterized feedback inhibition by GMP are located at the nucleotide binding site and the dimer interface. PMID:22610485

  16. Flexible pile thermal barrier insulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, G. E.; Fell, D. M.; Tesinsky, J. S. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A flexible pile thermal barrier insulator included a plurality of upstanding pile yarns. A generally planar backing section supported the upstanding pile yarns. The backing section included a plurality of filler yarns forming a mesh in a first direction. A plurality of warp yarns were looped around said filler yarns and pile yarns in the backing section and formed a mesh in a second direction. A binder prevented separation of the yarns in the backing section.

  17. Looping: An Empirical Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cistone, Peter; Shneyderman, Aleksandr

    2004-01-01

    Looping is the practice in which a teacher instructs the same group of students for at least two school years, following them from one grade level to the next. Once a "loop" of two or more years is completed, the teacher may start a new loop teaching a new group of students. This evaluation study of the practice of looping in a large…

  18. Flexible flatfoot

    PubMed Central

    Atik, Aziz; Ozyurek, Selahattin

    2014-01-01

    While being one of the most frequent parental complained deformities, flatfoot does not have a universally accepted description. The reasons of flexible flatfoot are still on debate, but they must be differentiated from rigid flatfoot which occurs secondary to other pathologies. These children are commonly brought up to a physician without any complaint. It should be kept in mind that the etiology may vary from general soft tissue laxities to intrinsic foot pathologies. Every flexible flatfoot does not require radiological examination or treatment if there is no complaint. Otherwise further investigation and conservative or surgical treatment may necessitate. PMID:28058304

  19. Piping Flexibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A NASA computer program aids Hudson Engineering Corporation, Houston, Texas, in the design and construction of huge petrochemical processing plants like the one shown, which is located at Ju'aymah, Saudi Arabia. The pipes handling the flow of chemicals are subject to a variety of stresses, such as weight and variations in pressure and temperature. Hudson Engineering uses a COSMIC piping flexibility analysis computer program to analyze stresses and unsure the necessary strength and flexibility of the pipes. This program helps the company realize substantial savings in reduced engineering time.

  20. The preprocessed doacross loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saltz, Joel H.; Mirchandaney, Ravi

    1990-01-01

    Dependencies between loop iterations cannot always be characterized during program compilation. Doacross loops typically make use of a-priori knowledge of inter-iteration dependencies to carry out required synchronizations. A type of doacross loop is proposed that allows the scheduling of iterations of a loop among processors without advance knowledge of inter-iteration dependencies. The method proposed for loop iterations requires that parallelizable preprocessing and postprocessing steps be carried out during program execution.

  1. Fast flux locked loop

    DOEpatents

    Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R.; Snapp, Lowell D.

    2002-09-10

    A flux locked loop for providing an electrical feedback signal, the flux locked loop employing radio-frequency components and technology to extend the flux modulation frequency and tracking loop bandwidth. The flux locked loop of the present invention has particularly useful application in read-out electronics for DC SQUID magnetic measurement systems, in which case the electrical signal output by the flux locked loop represents an unknown magnetic flux applied to the DC SQUID.

  2. OPE for super loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sever, Amit; Vieira, Pedro; Wang, Tianheng

    2011-11-01

    We extend the Operator Product Expansion for Null Polygon Wilson loops to the Mason-Skinner-Caron-Huot super loop dual to non MHV gluon amplitudes. We explain how the known tree level amplitudes can be promoted into an infinite amount of data at any loop order in the OPE picture. As an application, we re-derive all one loop NMHV six gluon amplitudes by promoting their tree level expressions. We also present some new all loops predictions for these amplitudes.

  3. Switchable catalytic DNA catenanes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lianzhe; Lu, Chun-Hua; Willner, Itamar

    2015-03-11

    Two-ring interlocked DNA catenanes are synthesized and characterized. The supramolecular catenanes show switchable cyclic catalytic properties. In one system, the catenane structure is switched between a hemin/G-quadruplex catalytic structure and a catalytically inactive state. In the second catenane structure the catenane is switched between a catalytically active Mg(2+)-dependent DNAzyme-containing catenane and an inactive catenane state. In the third system, the interlocked catenane structure is switched between two distinct catalytic structures that include the Mg(2+)- and the Zn(2+)-dependent DNAzymes.

  4. Gene repression by minimal lac loops in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bond, Laura M; Peters, Justin P; Becker, Nicole A; Kahn, Jason D; Maher, L James

    2010-12-01

    The inflexibility of double-stranded DNA with respect to bending and twisting is well established in vitro. Understanding apparent DNA physical properties in vivo is a greater challenge. Here, we exploit repression looping with components of the Escherichia coli lac operon to monitor DNA flexibility in living cells. We create a minimal system for testing the shortest possible DNA repression loops that contain an E. coli promoter, and compare the results to prior experiments. Our data reveal that loop-independent repression occurs for certain tight operator/promoter spacings. When only loop-dependent repression is considered, fits to a thermodynamic model show that DNA twisting limits looping in vivo, although the apparent DNA twist flexibility is 2- to 4-fold higher than in vitro. In contrast, length-dependent resistance to DNA bending is not observed in these experiments, even for the shortest loops constraining <0.4 persistence lengths of DNA. As observed previously for other looping configurations, loss of the nucleoid protein heat unstable (HU) markedly disables DNA looping in vivo. Length-independent DNA bending energy may reflect the activities of architectural proteins and the structure of the DNA topological domain. We suggest that the shortest loops are formed in apical loops rather than along the DNA plectonemic superhelix.

  5. Asymmetric Flexible Supercapacitor Stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leela Mohana Reddy, A.; Estaline Amitha, F.; Jafri, Imran; Ramaprabhu, S.

    2008-04-01

    Electrical double layer supercapacitor is very significant in the field of electrical energy storage which can be the solution for the current revolution in the electronic devices like mobile phones, camera flashes which needs flexible and miniaturized energy storage device with all non-aqueous components. The multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) have been synthesized by catalytic chemical vapor deposition technique over hydrogen decrepitated Mischmetal (Mm) based AB3 alloy hydride. The polymer dispersed MWNTs have been obtained by insitu polymerization and the metal oxide/MWNTs were synthesized by sol-gel method. Morphological characterizations of polymer dispersed MWNTs have been carried out using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM and HRTEM). An assymetric double supercapacitor stack has been fabricated using polymer/MWNTs and metal oxide/MWNTs coated over flexible carbon fabric as electrodes and nafion® membrane as a solid electrolyte. Electrochemical performance of the supercapacitor stack has been investigated using cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge-discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

  6. High resolution crystal structure of the catalytic domain of MCR-1

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Guixing; Zhu, Yifan; Yu, Zhicheng; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Zhang, Hongmin

    2016-01-01

    The newly identified mobile colistin resistant gene (mcr-1) rapidly spread among different bacterial strains and confers colistin resistance to its host, which has become a global concern. Based on sequence alignment, MCR-1 should be a phosphoethanolamine transferase, members of the YhjW/YjdB/YijP superfamily and catalyze the addition of phosphoethanolamine to lipid A, which needs to be validated experimentally. Here we report the first high-resolution crystal structure of the C-terminal catalytic domain of MCR-1 (MCR-1C) in its native state. The active pocket of native MCR-1C depicts unphosphorylated nucleophilic residue Thr285 in coordination with two Zinc ions and water molecules. A flexible adjacent active site loop (aa: Lys348-365) pose an open conformation compared to its structural homologues, suggesting of an open substrate entry channel. Taken together, this structure sets ground for further study of substrate binding and MCR-1 catalytic mechanism in development of potential therapeutic agents. PMID:28000749

  7. Rapid Deployment of Rich Catalytic Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Richard S. Tuthill

    2004-06-10

    The overall objective of this research under the Turbines Program is the deployment of fuel flexible rich catalytic combustion technology into high-pressure ratio industrial gas turbines. The resulting combustion systems will provide fuel flexibility for gas turbines to burn coal derived synthesis gas or natural gas and achieve NO{sub x} emissions of 2 ppmvd or less (at 15 percent O{sub 2}), cost effectively. This advance will signify a major step towards environmentally friendly electric power generation and coal-based energy independence for the United States. Under Phase 1 of the Program, Pratt & Whitney (P&W) performed a system integration study of rich catalytic combustion in a small high-pressure ratio industrial gas turbine with a silo combustion system that is easily scalable to a larger multi-chamber gas turbine system. An implementation plan for this technology also was studied. The principal achievement of the Phase 1 effort was the sizing of the catalytic module in a manner which allowed a single reactor (rather than multiple reactors) to be used by the combustion system, a conclusion regarding the amount of air that should be allocated to the reaction zone to achieve low emissions, definition of a combustion staging strategy to achieve low emissions, and mechanical integration of a Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) combustor liner with the catalytic module.

  8. Flexibility Correlation between Active Site Regions Is Conserved across Four AmpC β-Lactamase Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jenna R.; Livesay, Dennis R.

    2015-01-01

    β-lactamases are bacterial enzymes that confer resistance to β-lactam antibiotics, such as penicillins and cephalosporins. There are four classes of β-lactamase enzymes, each with characteristic sequence and structure properties. Enzymes from class A are the most common and have been well characterized across the family; however, less is known about how physicochemical properties vary across the C and D families. In this report, we compare the dynamical properties of four AmpC (class C) β-lactamases using our distance constraint model (DCM). The DCM reliably predicts thermodynamic and mechanical properties in an integrated way. As a consequence, quantitative stability/flexibility relationships (QSFR) can be determined and compared across the whole family. The DCM calculates a large number of QSFR metrics. Perhaps the most useful is the flexibility index (FI), which quantifies flexibility along the enzyme backbone. As typically observed in other systems, FI is well conserved across the four AmpC enzymes. Cooperativity correlation (CC), which quantifies intramolecular couplings within structure, is rarely conserved across protein families; however, it is in AmpC. In particular, the bulk of each structure is composed of a large rigid cluster, punctuated by three flexibly correlated regions located at the active site. These regions include several catalytic residues and the Ω-loop. This evolutionary conservation combined with active their site location strongly suggests that these coupled dynamical modes are important for proper functioning of the enzyme. PMID:26018804

  9. Impaired Acid Catalysis by Mutation of a Protein Loop Hinge Residue in a YopH Mutant Revealed by Crystal Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Brandao, T.; Robinson, H; Johnson, S; Hengge, A

    2009-01-01

    Catalysis by the Yersinia protein-tyrosine phosphatase YopH is significantly impaired by the mutation of the conserved Trp354 residue to Phe. Though not a catalytic residue, this Trp is a hinge residue in a conserved flexible loop (the WPD-loop) that must close during catalysis. To learn why this seemingly conservative mutation reduces catalysis by 2 orders of magnitude, we have solved high-resolution crystal structures for the W354F YopH in the absence and in the presence of tungstate and vanadate. Oxyanion binding to the P-loop in W354F is analogous to that observed in the native enzyme. However, the WPD-loop in the presence of oxyanions assumes a half-closed conformation, in contrast to the fully closed state observed in structures of the native enzyme. This observation provides an explanation for the impaired general acid catalysis observed in kinetic experiments with Trp mutants. A 1.4 Angstroms structure of the W354F mutant obtained in the presence of vanadate reveals an unusual divanadate species with a cyclic [VO]2 core, which has precedent in small molecules but has not been previously reported in a protein crystal structure.

  10. Rich catalytic injection

    SciTech Connect

    Veninger, Albert

    2008-12-30

    A gas turbine engine includes a compressor, a rich catalytic injector, a combustor, and a turbine. The rich catalytic injector includes a rich catalytic device, a mixing zone, and an injection assembly. The injection assembly provides an interface between the mixing zone and the combustor. The injection assembly can inject diffusion fuel into the combustor, provides flame aerodynamic stabilization in the combustor, and may include an ignition device.

  11. Large planar maneuvers for articulated flexible manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Jen-Kuang; Yang, Li-Farn

    1988-01-01

    An articulated flexible manipulator carried on a translational cart is maneuvered by an active controller to perform certain position control tasks. The nonlinear dynamics of the articulated flexible manipulator are derived and a transformation matrix is formulated to localize the nonlinearities within the inertia matrix. Then a feedback linearization scheme is introduced to linearize the dynamic equations for controller design. Through a pole placement technique, a robust controller design is obtained by properly assigning a set of closed-loop desired eigenvalues to meet performance requirements. Numerical simulations for the articulated flexible manipulators are given to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed position control algorithms.

  12. Large planar maneuvers for articulated flexible manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Jen-Kuang; Yang, Li-Farn; Juang, Jer-Nan

    1988-01-01

    An articulated flexible manipulator carried on a translational cart is maneuvered by an active controller to perform certain position control tasks. The nonlinear dynamics of the articulated flexible manipulator are derived and a transformation matrix is formulated to localize the nonlinearities in the inertia matrix. Then a feeback linearization scheme is introduced to linearize the dynamic equations for controller design. Through a pole placement technique, a robust controller design is obtained by properly assigning a set of closed-loop desired eigenvalues to meet performance requirements. Numerical simulations for the articulated flexible manipulators are given to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed position control algorithms.

  13. Large planar maneuvers for articulated flexible manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Jen-Kuang; Yang, Li-Farn; Juang, Jer-Nan

    1988-01-01

    An articulated flexible manipulator carried on a translational cart is maneuvered by an active controller to perform certain position control tasks. The nonlinear dynamics of the articulated flexible manipulator are derived and a transformation matrix is formulated to localize the nonlinearities in the inertia matrix. Then a feeback linearization scheme is introduced to linearize the dynamic equations for controller design. Through a pole placement technique, a robust controller design is obtained by properly assigning a set of closed-loop desired eigenvalues to meet performance requirements. Numerical simulations for the articulated flexible manipulators are given to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed position control algorithms.

  14. Pseudonoise code tracking loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laflame, D. T. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A delay-locked loop is presented for tracking a pseudonoise (PN) reference code in an incoming communication signal. The loop is less sensitive to gain imbalances, which can otherwise introduce timing errors in the PN reference code formed by the loop.

  15. Blind Loop Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... breeding ground for bacteria. The bacteria may produce toxins as well as block the absorption of nutrients. The greater the length of small bowel involved in the blind loop, the greater the chance of bacterial overgrowth. What triggers blind loop syndrome? Blind loop ...

  16. Active Site Loop Conformation Regulates Promiscuous Activity in a Lactonase from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; An, Jiao; Yang, Guang-Yu; Bai, Aixi; Zheng, Baisong; Lou, Zhiyong; Wu, Geng; Ye, Wei; Chen, Hai-Feng; Feng, Yan; Manco, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme promiscuity is a prerequisite for fast divergent evolution of biocatalysts. A phosphotriesterase-like lactonase (PLL) from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 (GkaP) exhibits main lactonase and promiscuous phosphotriesterase activities. To understand its catalytic and evolutionary mechanisms, we investigated a “hot spot” in the active site by saturation mutagenesis as well as X-ray crystallographic analyses. We found that position 99 in the active site was involved in substrate discrimination. One mutant, Y99L, exhibited 11-fold improvement over wild-type in reactivity (kcat/Km) toward the phosphotriesterase substrate ethyl-paraoxon, but showed 15-fold decrease toward the lactonase substrate δ-decanolactone, resulting in a 157-fold inversion of the substrate specificity. Structural analysis of Y99L revealed that the mutation causes a ∼6.6 Å outward shift of adjacent loop 7, which may cause increased flexibility of the active site and facilitate accommodation and/or catalysis of organophosphate substrate. This study provides for the PLL family an example of how the evolutionary route from promiscuity to specificity can derive from very few mutations, which promotes alteration in the conformational adjustment of the active site loops, in turn draws the capacity of substrate binding and activity. PMID:25706379

  17. Two stage catalytic combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvin, Mary Anne (Inventor); Bachovchin, Dennis (Inventor); Smeltzer, Eugene E. (Inventor); Lippert, Thomas E. (Inventor); Bruck, Gerald J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A catalytic combustor (14) includes a first catalytic stage (30), a second catalytic stage (40), and an oxidation completion stage (49). The first catalytic stage receives an oxidizer (e.g., 20) and a fuel (26) and discharges a partially oxidized fuel/oxidizer mixture (36). The second catalytic stage receives the partially oxidized fuel/oxidizer mixture and further oxidizes the mixture. The second catalytic stage may include a passageway (47) for conducting a bypass portion (46) of the mixture past a catalyst (e.g., 41) disposed therein. The second catalytic stage may have an outlet temperature elevated sufficiently to complete oxidation of the mixture without using a separate ignition source. The oxidation completion stage is disposed downstream of the second catalytic stage and may recombine the bypass portion with a catalyst exposed portion (48) of the mixture and complete oxidation of the mixture. The second catalytic stage may also include a reticulated foam support (50), a honeycomb support, a tube support or a plate support.

  18. Valuing Flexibility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-09

    Bunker   Buster ”  of  Desert  Storm  (evolved  into  GBU...modular   muni=ons  to  achieve   opera=onal  flexibility   •  Various  configura=ons  are   allowable  based  on   warhead ...28)   –  New   warhead  “module”  used  in  conjunc=on  with  exis=ng  guidance  and  fuze   modules   – 

  19. Passivity Motivated Controller Design for Flexible Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-18

    theoretical approach to the control of systems containing lumped joint flexibility is based on the exact linearization method. for a summary see [4...feedforward compensation (for the exact linearization ) and the feedback stabilization are intertwined and errors in the feedforward may affect the closed loop

  20. VOC Destruction by Catalytic Combustion Microturbine

    SciTech Connect

    Tom Barton

    2009-03-10

    This project concerned the application of a catalytic combustion system that has been married to a micro-turbine device. The catalytic combustion system decomposes the VOC's and transmits these gases to the gas turbine. The turbine has been altered to operate on very low-level BTU fuels equivalent to 1.5% methane in air. The performance of the micro-turbine for VOC elimination has some flexibility with respect to operating conditions, and the system is adaptable to multiple industrial applications. The VOC source that was been chosen for examination was the emissions from coal upgrading operations. The overall goal of the project was to examine the effectiveness of a catalytic combustion based system for elimination of VOCs while simultaneously producing electrical power for local consumption. Project specific objectives included assessment of the feasibility for using a Flex-Microturbine that generates power from natural gas while it consumes VOCs generated from site operations; development of an engineering plan for installation of the Flex-Microturbine system; operation of the micro-turbine through various changes in site and operation conditions; measurement of the VOC destruction quantitatively; and determination of the required improvements for further studies. The micro-turbine with the catalytic bed worked effectively to produce power on levels of fuel much lower than the original turbine design. The ability of the device to add or subtract supplemental fuel to augment the amount of VOC's in the inlet air flow made the device an effective replacement for a traditional flare. Concerns about particulates in the inlet flow and the presence of high sulfur concentrations with the VOC mixtures was identified as a drawback with the current catalytic design. A new microturbine design was developed based on this research that incorporates a thermal oxidizer in place of the catalytic bed for applications where particulates or contamination would limit the lifetime of

  1. Isolated and coupled superquadric loop antennas for mobile communications applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Michael A.; Rahmat-Samii, Yahya

    1993-01-01

    This work provides an investigation of the performance of loop antennas for use in mobile communications applications. The analysis tools developed allow for high flexibility by representing the loop antenna as a superquadric curve, which includes the case of circular, elliptical, and rectangular loops. The antenna may be in an isolated environment, located above an infinite ground plane, or placed near a finite conducting plate or box. In cases where coupled loops are used, the two loops may have arbitrary relative positions and orientations. Several design examples are included to illustrate the versatility of the analysis capabilities. The performance of coupled loops arranged in a diversity scheme is also evaluated, and it is found that high diversity gain can be achieved even when the antennas are closely spaced.

  2. Catalytic distillation structure

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1984-01-01

    Catalytic distillation structure for use in reaction distillation columns, a providing reaction sites and distillation structure and consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and being present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consist of at least 10 volume % open space.

  3. Single link flexible beam testbed project. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Declan

    1992-01-01

    This thesis describes the single link flexible beam testbed at the CLaMS laboratory in terms of its hardware, software, and linear model, and presents two controllers, each including a hub angle proportional-derivative (PD) feedback compensator and one augmented by a second static gain full state feedback loop, based upon a synthesized strictly positive real (SPR) output, that increases specific flexible mode pole damping ratios w.r.t the PD only case and hence reduces unwanted residual oscillation effects. Restricting full state feedback gains so as to produce a SPR open loop transfer function ensures that the associated compensator has an infinite gain margin and a phase margin of at least (-90, 90) degrees. Both experimental and simulation data are evaluated in order to compare some different observer performance when applied to the real testbed and to the linear model when uncompensated flexible modes are included.

  4. FLEXIBLE COUPLING

    DOEpatents

    Babelay, E.F.

    1962-02-13

    A flexible shaft coupling for operation at speeds in excess of 14,000 rpm is designed which requires no lubrication. A driving sleeve member and a driven sleeve member are placed in concentric spaced relationship. A torque force is transmitted to the driven member from the driving member through a plurality of nylon balls symmetrically disposed between the spaced sleeves. The balls extend into races and recesses within the respective sleeve members. The sleeve members have a suitable clearance therebetween and the balls have a suitable radial clearance during operation of the coupling to provide a relatively loose coupling. These clearances accommodate for both parallel and/or angular misalignments and avoid metal-tometal contact between the sleeve members during operation. Thus, no lubrication is needed, and a minimum of vibrations is transmitted between the sleeve members. (AEC)

  5. Aspartase/fumarase superfamily: a common catalytic strategy involving general base-catalyzed formation of a highly stabilized aci-carboxylate intermediate.

    PubMed

    Puthan Veetil, Vinod; Fibriansah, Guntur; Raj, Hans; Thunnissen, Andy-Mark W H; Poelarends, Gerrit J

    2012-05-29

    Members of the aspartase/fumarase superfamily share a common tertiary and quaternary fold, as well as a similar active site architecture; the superfamily includes aspartase, fumarase, argininosuccinate lyase, adenylosuccinate lyase, δ-crystallin, and 3-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate lactonizing enzyme (CMLE). These enzymes all process succinyl-containing substrates, leading to the formation of fumarate as the common product (except for the CMLE-catalyzed reaction, which results in the formation of a lactone). In the past few years, X-ray crystallographic analysis of several superfamily members in complex with substrate, product, or substrate analogues has provided detailed insights into their substrate binding modes and catalytic mechanisms. This structural work, combined with earlier mechanistic studies, revealed that members of the aspartase/fumarase superfamily use a common catalytic strategy, which involves general base-catalyzed formation of a stabilized aci-carboxylate (or enediolate) intermediate and the participation of a highly flexible loop, containing the signature sequence GSSxxPxKxN (named the SS loop), in substrate binding and catalysis.

  6. Putative implication of alpha-amylase loop 7 in the mechanism of substrate binding and reaction products release.

    PubMed

    André, G; Tran, V

    2004-10-05

    Alpha-amylases are widespread endo-enzymes involved in the hydrolysis of internal alpha-(1,4) glycosidic linkages of starch polymers. Molecular modeling of amylose-amylase interactions is a step toward enzymatic mechanism understanding and rational design of new enzymes. From the crystallographic complex of barley alpha-amylase AMY2-acarbose, the static aspects of amylose-amylase docking have been characterized with a model of maltododecaose (DP12) (G. André, A. Buléon, R. Haser, and V. Tran, Biopolymers 1999, Vol. 50, pp. 751-762; G. André and V. Tran, Special Publication no. 246 1999, The Royal Society of Chemistry, H. J. Gilbert, G. J. Davies, B. Henrissat, and B. Svensson, Eds., Cambridge, pp. 165-174). These studies, consistent with the experimental subsite mapping (K. Bak-Jensen, G. André, V. Tran, and B. Svensson, Journal of Biological Chemistry, to be published), propose a propagation scheme for an amylose chain in the active cleft of AMY2. The topographical overview of alpha-amylases identified loop 7 as a conserved segment flanking the active site. Since some crystallographic experiments suspected its high flexibility, its putative motion was explored through a robotic scheme, an alternate route to dynamics simulations that consume CPU time. The present article describes the characteristics of the flexibility of loop 7: location and motion in AMY2. A back-and-forth motion with a large amplitude of more than 0.6 nm was evaluated. This movement could be triggered by two hinge residues. It results in the loop flipping over the active site to enhance the docking of the native helical substrate through specific interactions, it positions the catalytic residues, it distorts the substrate towards its transition state geometry, and finally monitors the release of the products after hydrolysis. The residues involved in the process are now rational mutation points in the hands of molecular biologists.

  7. Protein short loop prediction in terms of a structural alphabet.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Manoj; Bornot, Aurélie; Offmann, Bernard; de Brevern, Alexandre G

    2009-08-01

    Loops connect regular secondary structures. In many instances, they are known to play crucial biological roles. To bypass the limitation of secondary structure description, we previously defined a structural alphabet composed of 16 structural prototypes, called Protein Blocks (PBs). It leads to an accurate description of every region of 3D protein backbones and has been used in local structure prediction. In the present study, we used our structural alphabet to predict the loops connecting two repetitive structures. Thus, we showed interest to take into account the flanking regions, leading to prediction rate improvement up to 19.8%, but we also underline the sensitivity of such an approach. This research can be used to propose different structures for the loops and to probe and sample their flexibility. It is a useful tool for ab initio loop prediction and leads to insights into flexible docking approach.

  8. Flexibility in substrate recognition by thimet oligopeptidase as revealed by denaturation studies.

    PubMed

    Sigman, Jeffrey A; Patwa, Tasneem H; Tablante, Ana V; Joseph, Calleen D; Glucksman, Marc J; Wolfson, Adele J

    2005-05-15

    Thimet oligopeptidase (TOP) is a soluble metalloendopeptidase belonging to a family of enzymes including neurolysin and neprilysin that utilize the HEXXH metal-binding motif. TOP is widely distributed among cell types and is able to cleave a number of structurally unrelated peptides. A recent focus of interest has been on structure-function relationships in substrate selectivity by TOP. The enzyme's structural fold comprises two domains that are linked at the bottom of a deep substrate-binding cleft via several flexible loop structures. In the present study, fluorescence spectroscopy has been used to probe structural changes in TOP induced by the chemical denaturant urea. Fluorescence emission, anisotropy and collisional quenching data support a two-step unfolding process for the enzyme in which complete loss of the tertiary structure occurs in the second step. Complete loss of activity and loss of catalytic Zn(II) from the active site, monitored by absorption changes of the metal chelator 4-(2-pyridylazo)-resorcinol, are also connected with the second step. In contrast, the first unfolding event, which is linked to changes in the non-catalytic domain, leads to a sharp increase in kcat towards a 9-residue substrate and a sharp decrease in kcat for a 5-residue substrate. Thus a conformational change in TOP has been directly correlated with a change in substrate selectivity. These results provide insight into how the enzyme can process the range of structurally unrelated peptides necessary for its many physiological roles.

  9. Unbiased, scalable sampling of protein loop conformations from probabilistic priors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Protein loops are flexible structures that are intimately tied to function, but understanding loop motion and generating loop conformation ensembles remain significant computational challenges. Discrete search techniques scale poorly to large loops, optimization and molecular dynamics techniques are prone to local minima, and inverse kinematics techniques can only incorporate structural preferences in adhoc fashion. This paper presents Sub-Loop Inverse Kinematics Monte Carlo (SLIKMC), a new Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm for generating conformations of closed loops according to experimentally available, heterogeneous structural preferences. Results Our simulation experiments demonstrate that the method computes high-scoring conformations of large loops (>10 residues) orders of magnitude faster than standard Monte Carlo and discrete search techniques. Two new developments contribute to the scalability of the new method. First, structural preferences are specified via a probabilistic graphical model (PGM) that links conformation variables, spatial variables (e.g., atom positions), constraints and prior information in a unified framework. The method uses a sparse PGM that exploits locality of interactions between atoms and residues. Second, a novel method for sampling sub-loops is developed to generate statistically unbiased samples of probability densities restricted by loop-closure constraints. Conclusion Numerical experiments confirm that SLIKMC generates conformation ensembles that are statistically consistent with specified structural preferences. Protein conformations with 100+ residues are sampled on standard PC hardware in seconds. Application to proteins involved in ion-binding demonstrate its potential as a tool for loop ensemble generation and missing structure completion. PMID:24565175

  10. MD simulation of the Tat/Cyclin T1/CDK9 complex revealing the hidden catalytic cavity within the CDK9 molecule upon Tat binding

    PubMed Central

    Asamitsu, Kaori; Hirokawa, Takatsugu; Okamoto, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we applied molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to analyze the dynamic behavior of the Tat/CycT1/CDK9 tri-molecular complex and revealed the structural changes of P-TEFb upon Tat binding. We found that Tat could deliberately change the local flexibility of CycT1. Although the structural coordinates of the H1 and H2 helices did not substantially change, H1ʹ, H2ʹ, and H3ʹ exhibited significant changes en masse. Consequently, the CycT1 residues involved in Tat binding, namely Tat-recognition residues (TRRs), lost their flexibility with the addition of Tat to P-TEFb. In addition, we clarified the structural variation of CDK9 in complex with CycT1 in the presence or absence of Tat. Interestingly, Tat addition significantly reduced the structural variability of the T-loop, thus consolidating the structural integrity of P-TEFb. Finally, we deciphered the formation of the hidden catalytic cavity of CDK9 upon Tat binding. MD simulation revealed that the PITALRE signature sequence of CDK9 flips the inactive kinase cavity of CDK9 into the active form by connecting with Thr186, which is crucial for its activity, thus presumably recruiting the substrate peptide such as the C-terminal domain of RNA pol II. These findings provide vital information for the development of effective novel anti-HIV drugs with CDK9 catalytic activity as the target. PMID:28178316

  11. Flexible Metal-Fabric Radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, Cynthia; Nguyen, Hai D.; Ruemmele, Warren; Andish, Kambiz K.; McCalley, Sean

    2005-01-01

    Flexible metal-fabric radiators have been considered as alternative means of dissipating excess heat from spacecraft and space suits. The radiators also may be useful in such special terrestrial applications as rejecting heat from space-suit-like protective suits worn in hot work environments. In addition to flexibility and consequent ease of deployment and installation on objects of varying sizes and shapes, the main advantages of these radiators over conventional rigid radiators are that they weigh less and occupy less volume for a given amount of cooling capacity. A radiator of this type includes conventional stainless-steel tubes carrying a coolant fluid. The main radiating component consists of a fabric of interwoven aluminum-foil strips bonded to the tubes by use of a proprietary process. The strip/tube bonds are strong and highly thermally conductive. Coolant is fed to and from the tubes via flexible stainless-steel manifolds designed to accommodate flexing of, and minimize bending forces on, the fabric. The manifolds are sized to minimize pressure drops and distribute the flow of coolant evenly to all the tubes. The tubes and manifolds are configured in two independent flow loops for operational flexibility and protective redundancy.

  12. A fast loop-closure algorithm to accelerate residue matching in computational enzyme design.

    PubMed

    Xue, Jing; Huang, Xiaoqiang; Lin, Min; Zhu, Yushan

    2016-02-01

    Constructing an active site on an inert scaffold is still a challenge in chemical biology. Herein, we describe the incorporation of a Newton-direction-based fast loop-closure algorithm for catalytic residue matching into our enzyme design program ProdaMatch. This was developed to determine the sites and geometries of the catalytic residues as well as the position of the transition state with high accuracy in order to satisfy the geometric constraints on the interactions between catalytic residues and the transition state. Loop-closure results for 64,827 initial loops derived from 21 loops in the test set showed that 99.51% of the initial loops closed to within 0.05 Å in fewer than 400 iteration steps, while the large majority of the initial loops closed within 100 iteration steps. The revised version of ProdaMatch containing the novel loop-closure algorithm identified all native matches for ten scaffolds in the native active-site recapitulation test. Its high speed and accuracy when matching catalytic residues with a scaffold make this version of ProdaMatch potentially useful for scaffold selection through the incorporation of more complex theoretical enzyme models which may yield higher initial activities in de novo enzyme design.

  13. Evolution of catalytic function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, G. F.

    1993-01-01

    An RNA-based evolution system was constructed in the laboratory and used to develop RNA enzymes with novel catalytic function. By controlling the nature of the catalytic task that the molecules must perform in order to survive, it is possible to direct the evolving population toward the expression of some desired catalytic behavior. More recently, this system has been coupled to an in vitro translation procedure, raising the possibility of evolving protein enzymes in the laboratory to produce novel proteins with desired catalytic properties. The aim of this line of research is to reduce darwinian evolution, the fundamental process of biology, to a laboratory procedure that can be made to operate in the service of organic synthesis.

  14. Evolution of catalytic function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, G. F.

    1993-01-01

    An RNA-based evolution system was constructed in the laboratory and used to develop RNA enzymes with novel catalytic function. By controlling the nature of the catalytic task that the molecules must perform in order to survive, it is possible to direct the evolving population toward the expression of some desired catalytic behavior. More recently, this system has been coupled to an in vitro translation procedure, raising the possibility of evolving protein enzymes in the laboratory to produce novel proteins with desired catalytic properties. The aim of this line of research is to reduce darwinian evolution, the fundamental process of biology, to a laboratory procedure that can be made to operate in the service of organic synthesis.

  15. Catalytic distillation process

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1982-06-22

    A method is described for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C[sub 4] feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

  16. Catalytic distillation process

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1982-01-01

    A method for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C.sub.4 feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

  17. CD and NMR conformational studies of a peptide encompassing the Mid Loop interface of Ship2-Sam.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Flavia A; Scognamiglio, Pasqualina L; Di Natale, Concetta; Marasco, Daniela; Pellecchia, Maurizio; Leone, Marilisa

    2014-11-01

    The lipid phosphatase Ship2 is a protein that intervenes in several diseases such as diabetes, cancer, neurodegeneration, and atherosclerosis. It is made up of a catalytic domain and several protein docking modules such as a C-terminal Sam (Sterile alpha motif) domain. The Sam domain of Ship2 (Ship2-Sam) binds to the Sam domains of the EphA2 receptor (EphA2-Sam) and the PI3K effector protein Arap3 (Arap3-Sam). These heterotypic Sam-Sam interactions occur through formation of dimers presenting the canonical "Mid Loop/End Helix" binding mode. The central region of Ship2-Sam, spanning the C-terminal end of α2, the α3 and α4 helices together with the α2α3 and α3α4 interhelical loops, forms the Mid Loop surface that is needed to bind partners Sam domains. A peptide encompassing most of the Ship2-Sam Mid Loop interface (Shiptide) capable of binding to both EphA2-Sam and Arap3-Sam, was previously identified. Here we investigated the conformational features of this peptide, through solution CD and NMR studies in different conditions. These studies reveal that the peptide is highly flexible in aqueous buffer, while it adopts a helical conformation in presence of 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol. The discovered structural insights and in particular the identification of a helical motif, may lead to the design of more constrained and possibly cell permeable Shiptide analogs that could work as efficient antagonists of Ship2-Sam heterotypic interactions and embrace therapeutic applications.

  18. Catalytic distillation structure

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1984-04-17

    Catalytic distillation structure is described for use in reaction distillation columns, and provides reaction sites and distillation structure consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and is present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consists of at least 10 volume % open space. 10 figs.

  19. Clean catalytic combustor program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ekstedt, E. E.; Lyon, T. F.; Sabla, P. E.; Dodds, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    A combustor program was conducted to evolve and to identify the technology needed for, and to establish the credibility of, using combustors with catalytic reactors in modern high-pressure-ratio aircraft turbine engines. Two selected catalytic combustor concepts were designed, fabricated, and evaluated. The combustors were sized for use in the NASA/General Electric Energy Efficient Engine (E3). One of the combustor designs was a basic parallel-staged double-annular combustor. The second design was also a parallel-staged combustor but employed reverse flow cannular catalytic reactors. Subcomponent tests of fuel injection systems and of catalytic reactors for use in the combustion system were also conducted. Very low-level pollutant emissions and excellent combustor performance were achieved. However, it was obvious from these tests that extensive development of fuel/air preparation systems and considerable advancement in the steady-state operating temperature capability of catalytic reactor materials will be required prior to the consideration of catalytic combustion systems for use in high-pressure-ratio aircraft turbine engines.

  20. Packing loops into annular cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobral, T. A.; Gomes, M. A. F.

    2017-02-01

    The continuous packing of a flexible rod in two-dimensional cavities yields a countable set of interacting domains that resembles nonequilibrium cellular systems and belongs to a new class of lightweight material. However, the link between the length of the rod and the number of domains requires investigation, especially in the case of non-simply connected cavities, where the number of avoided regions emulates an effective topological temperature. In the present article we report the results of an experiment of injection of a single flexible rod into annular cavities in order to find the total length needed to insert a given number of loops (domains of one vertex). Using an exponential model to describe the experimental data we quite minutely analyze the initial conditions, the intermediary behavior, and the tight packing limit. This method allows the observation of a new fluctuation phenomenon associated with instabilities in the dynamic evolution of the packing process. Furthermore, the fractal dimension of the global pattern enters the discussion under a novel point of view. A comparison with the classical problems of the random close packing of disks and jammed disk packings is made.

  1. Testing loop quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson-Ewing, Edward

    2017-03-01

    Loop quantum cosmology predicts that quantum gravity effects resolve the big-bang singularity and replace it by a cosmic bounce. Furthermore, loop quantum cosmology can also modify the form of primordial cosmological perturbations, for example by reducing power at large scales in inflationary models or by suppressing the tensor-to-scalar ratio in the matter bounce scenario; these two effects are potential observational tests for loop quantum cosmology. In this article, I review these predictions and others, and also briefly discuss three open problems in loop quantum cosmology: its relation to loop quantum gravity, the trans-Planckian problem, and a possible transition from a Lorentzian to a Euclidean space-time around the bounce point.

  2. Precise control of flexible manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, R. H., Jr.; Bindford, T. O.; Schmitz, E.

    1984-01-01

    The design and experimental testing of end point position controllers for a very flexible one link lightweight manipulator are summarized. The latest upgraded version of the experimental set up, and the basic differences between conventional joint angle feedback and end point position feedback are described. A general procedure for application of modern control methods to the problem is outlined. The relationship between weighting parameters and the bandwidth and control stiffness of the resulting end point position closed loop system is shown. It is found that joint rate angle feedback in addition to the primary end point position sensor is essential for adequate disturbance rejection capability of the closed loop system. The use of a low order multivariable compensator design computer code; called Sandy is documented. A solution to the problem of control mode switching between position sensor sets is outlined. The proof of concept for endpoint position feedback for a one link flexible manipulator was demonstrated. The bandwidth obtained with the experimental end point position controller is about twice as fast as the beam's first natural cantilevered frequency, and comes within a factor of four of the absolute physical speed limit imposed by the wave propagation time of the beam.

  3. Evidence of adaptability in metal coordination geometry and active-site loop conformation among B1 metallo-beta-lactamases .

    PubMed

    González, Javier M; Buschiazzo, Alejandro; Vila, Alejandro J

    2010-09-14

    Subclass B1 beta-lactamases are Zn(II)-dependent hydrolases that confer bacterial resistance to most clinically useful beta-lactam antibiotics. The enzyme BcII from Bacillus cereus is a prototypical enzyme that belongs to this group, the first Zn(II)-dependent beta-lactamase to be discovered. Crucial aspects of the BcII catalytic mechanism and metal binding mode have been assessed mostly on the Co(II)-substituted surrogate. Here we report a high-resolution structure of Co(II)-BcII, revealing a metal coordination geometry identical to that of the native zinc enzyme. In addition, a high-resolution structure of the apoenzyme, together with structures with different degrees of metal occupancy and oxidation levels of a conserved Cys ligand, discloses a considerable mobility of two loops containing four metal ligands (namely, regions His116-Arg121 and Gly219-Cys221). This flexibility is expected to assist in the structural rearrangement of the metal sites during catalytic turnover, which, along with the coordination geometry adaptability of Zn(II) ions, grants the interaction with a variety of substrates, a characteristic feature of B1 metallo-beta-lactamases.

  4. The Role of the β5-α11 Loop in the Active-Site Dynamics of Acylated Penicillin-Binding Protein A from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Fedarovich, Alena; Nicholas, Robert A.; Davies, Christopher

    2013-04-22

    Penicillin-binding protein A (PBPA) is a class B penicillin-binding protein that is important for cell division in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We have determined a second crystal structure of PBPA in apo form and compared it with an earlier structure of apoenzyme. Significant structural differences in the active site region are apparent, including increased ordering of a β-hairpin loop and a shift of the SxN active site motif such that it now occupies a position that appears catalytically competent. Using two assays, including one that uses the intrinsic fluorescence of a tryptophan residue, we have also measured the second-order acylation rate constants for the antibiotics imipenem, penicillin G, and ceftriaxone. Of these, imipenem, which has demonstrable anti-tubercular activity, shows the highest acylation efficiency. Crystal structures of PBPA in complex with the same antibiotics were also determined, and all show conformational differences in the β5–α11 loop near the active site, but these differ for each β-lactam and also for each of the two molecules in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. Overall, these data reveal the β5–α11 loop of PBPA as a flexible region that appears important for acylation and provide further evidence that penicillin-binding proteins in apo form can occupy different conformational states.

  5. The importance of slow motions for protein functional loops.

    PubMed

    Skliros, Aris; Zimmermann, Michael T; Chakraborty, Debkanta; Saraswathi, Saras; Katebi, Ataur R; Leelananda, Sumudu P; Kloczkowski, Andrzej; Jernigan, Robert L

    2012-02-07

    Loops in proteins that connect secondary structures such as alpha-helix and beta-sheet, are often on the surface and may play a critical role in some functions of a protein. The mobility of loops is central for the motional freedom and flexibility requirements of active-site loops and may play a critical role for some functions. The structures and behaviors of loops have not been studied much in the context of the whole structure and its overall motions, especially how these might be coupled. Here we investigate loop motions by using coarse-grained structures (C(α) atoms only) to solve the motions of the system by applying Lagrange equations with elastic network models to learn about which loops move in an independent fashion and which move in coordination with domain motions, faster and slower, respectively. The normal modes of the system are calculated using eigen-decomposition of the stiffness matrix. The contribution of individual modes and groups of modes is investigated for their effects on all residues in each loop by using Fourier analyses. Our results indicate overall that the motions of functional sets of loops behave in similar ways as the whole structure. But overall only a relatively few loops move in coordination with the dominant slow modes of motion, and these are often closely related to function.

  6. Low and medium heating value coal gas catalytic combustor characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwab, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    Catalytic combustion with both low and medium heating value coal gases obtained from an operating gasifier was demonstrated. A practical operating range for efficient operation was determined, and also to identify potential problem areas were identified for consideration during stationary gas turbine engine design. The test rig consists of fuel injectors, a fuel-air premixing section, a catalytic reactor with thermocouple instrumentation and a single point, water cooled sample probe. The test rig included inlet and outlet transition pieces and was designed for installation into an existing test loop.

  7. One-Loop Helicity Amplitudes for tt Production at Hadron Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Badger, Simon; Sattler, Ralf; Yundin, Valery

    2011-04-01

    We present compact analytic expressions for all one-loop helicity amplitudes contributing to tt production at hadron colliders. Using recently developed generalized unitarity methods and a traditional Feynman based approach we produce a fast and flexible implementation.

  8. Conformational flexibility in biochemical regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Trewhella, J.

    1993-09-01

    Small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering have proven extremely useful for studying the evolutionarily related dumbbell-shaped Ca {sup 2+} -binding proteins calmodulin and troponin C and their interactions with the target proteins whose activity they regulate. Calmodulin contracts about target enzyme binding domains with the common characteristic of having a high propensity for forming a basic, amphipathic a-helix. The contraction is achieved via flexibility in the interconnecting helix region of the molecule that links its two globular domains. This flexibility allows calmodulin to optimize its binding to different arrangements of hydrophobic and charged residues important in forming these complexes. In contrast calmodulin remains extended in its interaction with the catalytic subunit of phosphorylase kinase. There are structural and functional similarities between this interaction and that of troponin C and troponin I. Our most recent neutron scattering experiments confirm our prediction that troponin C also remains extended in this complex. The ability of the dumbbell-shaped Ca {sup 2+} -binding proteins to modulate their conformations via flexibility in the interconnecting helix region in order to accommodate different target binding domains is a remarkable example nature building functional diversity as well as specificity into a compact and unusual shape.

  9. Catalytic nanoporous membranes

    DOEpatents

    Pellin, Michael J; Hryn, John N; Elam, Jeffrey W

    2013-08-27

    A nanoporous catalytic membrane which displays several unique features Including pores which can go through the entire thickness of the membrane. The membrane has a higher catalytic and product selectivity than conventional catalysts. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes serve as the catalyst substrate. This substrate is then subjected to Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), which allows the controlled narrowing of the pores from 40 nm to 10 nm in the substrate by deposition of a preparatory material. Subsequent deposition of a catalytic layer on the inner surfaces of the pores reduces pore sizes to less than 10 nm and allows for a higher degree of reaction selectivity. The small pore sizes allow control over which molecules enter the pores, and the flow-through feature can allow for partial oxidation of reactant species as opposed to complete oxidation. A nanoporous separation membrane, produced by ALD is also provided for use in gaseous and liquid separations. The membrane has a high flow rate of material with 100% selectivity. Also provided is a method for producing a catalytic membrane having flow-through pores and discreet catalytic clusters adhering to the inside surfaces of the pores.

  10. Transient catalytic combustor model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    A quasi-steady gas phase and thermally thin substrate model is used to analyze the transient behavior of catalytic monolith combustors in fuel lean operation. The combustor response delay is due to the substrate thermal inertia. Fast response is favored by thin substrate, short catalytic bed length, high combustor inlet and final temperatures, and small gas channel diameters. The calculated gas and substrate temperature time history at different axial positions provides an understanding of how the catalytic combustor responds to an upstream condition change. The computed results also suggest that the gas residence times in the catalytic bed in the after bed space are correlatable with the nondimensional combustor response time. The model also performs steady state combustion calculations; and the computed steady state emission characteristics show agreement with available experimental data in the range of parameters covered. A catalytic combustor design for automotive gas turbine engine which has reasonably fast response ( 1 second) and can satisfy the emission goals in an acceptable total combustor length is possible.

  11. Transient catalytic combustor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tien, J. S.

    1981-05-01

    A quasi-steady gas phase and thermally thin substrate model is used to analyze the transient behavior of catalytic monolith combustors in fuel lean operation. The combustor response delay is due to the substrate thermal inertia. Fast response is favored by thin substrate, short catalytic bed length, high combustor inlet and final temperatures, and small gas channel diameters. The calculated gas and substrate temperature time history at different axial positions provides an understanding of how the catalytic combustor responds to an upstream condition change. The computed results also suggest that the gas residence times in the catalytic bed in the after bed space are correlatable with the nondimensional combustor response time. The model also performs steady state combustion calculations; and the computed steady state emission characteristics show agreement with available experimental data in the range of parameters covered. A catalytic combustor design for automotive gas turbine engine which has reasonably fast response ( 1 second) and can satisfy the emission goals in an acceptable total combustor length is possible.

  12. Multiprotein DNA Looping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilar, Jose M. G.; Saiz, Leonor

    2006-06-01

    DNA looping plays a fundamental role in a wide variety of biological processes, providing the backbone for long range interactions on DNA. Here we develop the first model for DNA looping by an arbitrarily large number of proteins and solve it analytically in the case of identical binding. We uncover a switchlike transition between looped and unlooped phases and identify the key parameters that control this transition. Our results establish the basis for the quantitative understanding of fundamental cellular processes like DNA recombination, gene silencing, and telomere maintenance.

  13. Thermal power loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gottschlich, Joseph M.; Richter, Robert

    1991-01-01

    The concept of a thermal power loop (TPL) to transport thermal power over relatively large distances is presented as an alternative to heat pipes and their derivatives. The TPL is compared to heat pipes, and capillary pumped loops with respect to size, weight, conservation of thermal potential, start-up, and 1-g testing capability. Test results from a proof of feasibility demonstrator at the NASA JPL are discussed. This analysis demonstrates that the development of specific thermal power loops will result in substantial weight and cost savings for many spacecraft.

  14. Large lithium loop experience

    SciTech Connect

    Kolowith, R.; Owen, T.J.; Berg, J.D.; Atwood, J.M.

    1981-10-01

    An engineering design and operating experience of a large, isothermal, lithium-coolant test loop are presented. This liquid metal coolant loop is called the Experimental Lithium System (ELS) and has operated safely and reliably for over 6500 hours through September 1981. The loop is used for full-scale testing of components for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility. Main system parameters include coolant temperatures to 430/sup 0/C and flow to 0.038 m/sup 3//s (600 gal/min). Performance of the main pump, vacuum system, and control system is discussed. Unique test capabilities of the ELS are also discussed.

  15. The Energy Landscape of Hyperstable LacI-DNA Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahn, Jason

    2009-03-01

    The Escherichia coli LacI protein represses transcription of the lac operon by blocking access to the promoter through binding at a promoter-proximal DNA operator. The affinity of tetrameric LacI (and therefore the repression efficiency) is enhanced by simultaneous binding to an auxiliary operator, forming a DNA loop. Hyperstable LacI-DNA loops were previously shown to be formed on DNA constructs that include a sequence-directed bend flanked by operators. Biochemical experiments showed that two such constructs (9C14 and 11C12) with different helical phasing between the operators and the DNA bend form different DNA loop shapes. The geometry and topology of the loops and the relevance of alternative conformations suggested by probable flexible linkers in LacI remain unclear. Bulk and single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (SM-FRET, with D. English) experiments on a dual fluorophore-labeled 9C14-LacI loop demonstrate that it adopts a single, stable, rigid closed-form loop conformation. Here, we characterize the LacI-9C14 loop by SM-FRET as a function of inducer isopropyl-β,D-thiogalactoside (IPTG) concentration. Energy transfer measurements reveal partial but incomplete destabilization of loop formation by IPTG. Surprisingly, there is no change in the energy transfer efficiency of the remaining looped population. Models for the regulation of the lac operon often assume complete disruption of LacI-operator complexes upon inducer binding to LacI. Our work shows that even at saturating IPTG there is still a significant population of LacI-DNA complexes in a looped state, in accord with previous in vivo experiments that show incomplete induction (with J. Maher). Finally, we will report progress on characterizing the ``energy landscape'' for DNA looping upon systematic variation of the DNA linkers between the operators and the bending locus. Rod mechanics simulations (with N. Perkins) provide testable predictions on loop stability, topology, and FRET.

  16. Introduction to Loop Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung

    2015-01-01

    This is the presentation file for the short course Introduction to Loop Heat Pipes, to be conducted at the 2015 Thermal Fluids and Analysis Workshop, August 3-7, 2015, Silver Spring, Maryland. This course will discuss operating principles and performance characteristics of a loop heat pipe. Topics include: 1) pressure profiles in the loop; 2) loop operating temperature; 3) operating temperature control; 4) loop startup; 4) loop shutdown; 5) loop transient behaviors; 6) sizing of loop components and determination of fluid inventory; 7) analytical modeling; 8) examples of flight applications; and 9) recent LHP developments.

  17. Maneuvering and control of flexible space robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meirovitch, Leonard; Lim, Seungchul

    1994-01-01

    This paper is concerned with a flexible space robot capable of maneuvering payloads. The robot is assumed to consist of two hinge-connected flexible arms and a rigid end-effector holding a payload; the robot is mounted on a rigid platform floating in space. The equations of motion are nonlinear and of high order. Based on the assumption that the maneuvering motions are one order of magnitude larger than the elastic vibrations, a perturbation approach permits design of controls for the two types of motion separately. The rigid-body maneuvering is carried out open loop, but the elastic motions are controlled closed loop, by means of discrete-time linear quadratic regulator theory with prescribed degree of stability. A numerical example demonstrates the approach. In the example, the controls derived by the perturbation approach are applied to the original nonlinear system and errors are found to be relatively small.

  18. Fault Accommodation in Control of Flexible Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maghami, Peiman G.; Sparks, Dean W., Jr.; Lim, Kyong B.

    1998-01-01

    New synthesis techniques for the design of fault accommodating controllers for flexible systems are developed. Three robust control design strategies, static dissipative, dynamic dissipative and mu-synthesis, are used in the approach. The approach provides techniques for designing controllers that maximize, in some sense, the tolerance of the closed-loop system against faults in actuators and sensors, while guaranteeing performance robustness at a specified performance level, measured in terms of the proximity of the closed-loop poles to the imaginary axis (the degree of stability). For dissipative control designs, nonlinear programming is employed to synthesize the controllers, whereas in mu-synthesis, the traditional D-K iteration is used. To demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed techniques, they are applied to the control design of a structural model of a flexible laboratory test structure.

  19. Catalytic membranes beckon

    SciTech Connect

    Caruana, C.M.

    1994-11-01

    Chemical engineers here and abroad are finding that the marriage of catalysts and membranes holds promise for faster and more specific reactions, although commercialization of this technology is several years away. Catalytic membrane reactors (CMRs) combine a heterogeneous catalyst and a permselective membrane. Reactions performed by CMRs provide higher yields--sometimes as much as 50% higher--because of better reaction selectivity--as opposed to separation selectivity. CMRs also can work at very high temperatures, using ceramic materials that would not be possible with organic membranes. Although the use of CMRs is not widespread presently, the development of new membranes--particularly porous ceramic and zeolite membranes--will increase the potential to improve yields of many catalytic processes. The paper discusses ongoing studies, metal and advanced materials for membranes, the need for continued research, hydrogen recovery from coal-derived gases, catalytic oxidation of sulfides, CMRs for water purification, and oxidative coupling of methane.

  20. Catalytic hydrotreating process

    DOEpatents

    Karr, Jr., Clarence; McCaskill, Kenneth B.

    1978-01-01

    Carbonaceous liquids boiling above about 300.degree. C such as tars, petroleum residuals, shale oils and coal-derived liquids are catalytically hydrotreated by introducing the carbonaceous liquid into a reaction zone at a temperature in the range of 300.degree. to 450.degree. C and a pressure in the range of 300 to 4000 psig for effecting contact between the carbonaceous liquid and a catalytic transition metal sulfide in the reaction zone as a layer on a hydrogen permeable transition metal substrate and then introducing hydrogen into the reaction zone by diffusing the hydrogen through the substrate to effect the hydrogenation of the carbonaceous liquid in the presence of the catalytic sulfide layer.

  1. Closed-Loop System Removes Contaminants From Inert Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K.

    1995-01-01

    Concentration of oxygen in this closed-loop system kept low by use of heated catalytic sorbent bed in cartridge. Proposed to keep concentration of water vapor low by use of predried zeolite sorbent bed in another cartridge, and to remove particles smaller than 0.1 micrometer by use of porous metal filters. In specific application, chamber is one in which semiconducting materials processed. By virtue of closed-loop operation, limited supply of inert gas adequate to provide atmosphere for industrial processing of semiconductors.

  2. Steam reformer with catalytic combustor

    DOEpatents

    Voecks, Gerald E.

    1990-03-20

    A steam reformer is disclosed having an annular steam reforming catalyst bed formed by concentric cylinders and having a catalytic combustor located at the center of the innermost cylinder. Fuel is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and air is directed at the top of the combustor, creating a catalytic reaction which provides sufficient heat so as to maintain the catalytic reaction in the steam reforming catalyst bed. Alternatively, air is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and a fuel mixture is directed at the top. The catalytic combustor provides enhanced radiant and convective heat transfer to the reformer catalyst bed.

  3. Steam reformer with catalytic combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voecks, Gerald E. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A steam reformer is disclosed having an annular steam reforming catalyst bed formed by concentric cylinders and having a catalytic combustor located at the center of the innermost cylinder. Fuel is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and air is directed at the top of the combustor, creating a catalytic reaction which provides sufficient heat so as to maintain the catalytic reaction in the steam reforming catalyst bed. Alternatively, air is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and a fuel mixture is directed at the top. The catalytic combustor provides enhanced radiant and convective heat transfer to the reformer catalyst bed.

  4. Nanocarbons for Catalytic Desulfurization.

    PubMed

    Gu, Qingqing; Lin, Yangming; Heumann, Saskia; Su, Dangsheng

    2017-08-24

    Nanocarbon catalysts are green and sustainable alternatives to the metal-based catalysts for numerous catalytic transformations. The application of nanocarbons for environmental catalysis is an emerging research discipline and has undergone rapid development in recent years. In this focus review, we provide a critical analysis on the state-of-the-art nanocarbon catalysts for three different catalytic desulfurization processes. And the focus is on the advantage and limitation as well as the reaction mechanism of the nanocarbon catalysts at molecular level. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Catalytic cracking process

    SciTech Connect

    Aufdembrink, B.A.; Degnan, T.F.; Kresge, C.T.

    1990-01-23

    This patent describes a process for catalytically cracking a petroleum fraction to lighter hydrocarbons. The process comprises providing a feedstock containing a petroleum fraction and then contacting the feedstock with a catalyst under catalytic cracking conditions. The catalyst composition includes a titanometallate layered metal oxide material comprising a layered metal oxide material comprising a layered metal oxide and pillars of a chalcogenide of at least one element selected from Groups IB, IIB, IIIA, IIIB, IVB, VA, VB, VIA, VIIA and VIIIA of the Periodic Table of Elements separating the layers of the metal oxides.

  6. Dynamic Loops in Profile

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-03-28

    As an active region rotated into view, NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory was able to observe well-defined magnetic loops gyrating above the sun between Mar, 23-24, 2017. These loops appear because charged particles spinning along the magnetic field lines above this active region are made visible in this wavelength of extreme ultraviolet light. The video clip covers about a day and a half of activity. Movies are available at https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21583

  7. Explaining Warm Coronal Loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimchuk, James A.; Karpen, Judy T.; Patsourakos, Spiros

    2008-01-01

    One of the great mysteries of coronal physics that has come to light in the last few years is the discovery that warn (- 1 INK) coronal loops are much denser than expected for quasi-static equilibrium. Both the excess densities and relatively long lifetimes of the loops can be explained with bundles of unresolved strands that are heated impulsively to very high temperatures. Since neighboring strands are at different stages of cooling, the composite loop bundle is multi-thermal, with the distribution of temperatures depending on the details of the "nanoflare storm." Emission hotter than 2 MK is predicted, but it is not clear that such emission is always observed. We consider two possible explanations for the existence of over-dense warm loops without corresponding hot emission: (1) loops are bundles of nanoflare heated strands, but a significant fraction of the nanoflare energy takes the form of a nonthermal electron beam rather then direct plasma heating; (2) loops are bundles of strands that undergo thermal nonequilibrium that results when steady heating is sufficiently concentrated near the footpoints. We present numerical hydro simulations of both of these possibilities and explore the observational consequences, including the production of hard X-ray emission and absorption by cool material in the corona.

  8. Explaining Warm Coronal Loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimchuk, James A.; Karpen, Judy T.; Patsourakos, Spiros

    2008-01-01

    One of the great mysteries of coronal physics that has come to light in the last few years is the discovery that warn (- 1 INK) coronal loops are much denser than expected for quasi-static equilibrium. Both the excess densities and relatively long lifetimes of the loops can be explained with bundles of unresolved strands that are heated impulsively to very high temperatures. Since neighboring strands are at different stages of cooling, the composite loop bundle is multi-thermal, with the distribution of temperatures depending on the details of the "nanoflare storm." Emission hotter than 2 MK is predicted, but it is not clear that such emission is always observed. We consider two possible explanations for the existence of over-dense warm loops without corresponding hot emission: (1) loops are bundles of nanoflare heated strands, but a significant fraction of the nanoflare energy takes the form of a nonthermal electron beam rather then direct plasma heating; (2) loops are bundles of strands that undergo thermal nonequilibrium that results when steady heating is sufficiently concentrated near the footpoints. We present numerical hydro simulations of both of these possibilities and explore the observational consequences, including the production of hard X-ray emission and absorption by cool material in the corona.

  9. Loop-loop interactions govern multiple steps in indole-3-glycerol phosphate synthase catalysis.

    PubMed

    Zaccardi, Margot J; O'Rourke, Kathleen F; Yezdimer, Eric M; Loggia, Laura J; Woldt, Svenja; Boehr, David D

    2014-03-01

    Substrate binding, product release, and likely chemical catalysis in the tryptophan biosynthetic enzyme indole-3-glycerol phosphate synthase (IGPS) are dependent on the structural dynamics of the β1α1 active-site loop. Statistical coupling analysis and molecular dynamic simulations had previously indicated that covarying residues in the β1α1 and β2α2 loops, corresponding to Arg54 and Asn90, respectively, in the Sulfolobus sulfataricus enzyme (ssIGPS), are likely important for coordinating functional motions of these loops. To test this hypothesis, we characterized site mutants at these positions for changes in catalytic function, protein stability and structural dynamics for the thermophilic ssIGPS enzyme. Although there were only modest changes in the overall steady-state kinetic parameters, solvent viscosity and solvent deuterium kinetic isotope effects indicated that these amino acid substitutions change the identity of the rate-determining step across multiple temperatures. Surprisingly, the N90A substitution had a dramatic effect on the general acid/base catalysis of the dehydration step, as indicated by the loss of the descending limb in the pH rate profile, which we had previously assigned to Lys53 on the β1α1 loop. These changes in enzyme function are accompanied with a quenching of ps-ns and µs-ms timescale motions in the β1α1 loop as measured by nuclear magnetic resonance studies. Altogether, our studies provide structural, dynamic and functional rationales for the coevolution of residues on the β1α1 and β2α2 loops, and highlight the multiple roles that the β1α1 loop plays in IGPS catalysis. Thus, substitution of covarying residues in the active-site β1α1 and β2α2 loops of indole-3-glycerol phosphate synthase results in functional, structural, and dynamic changes, highlighting the multiple roles that the β1α1 loop plays in enzyme catalysis and the importance of regulating the structural dynamics of this loop through noncovalent

  10. Balance and flexibility.

    PubMed

    2003-12-01

    The 'work-life balance' and flexible working are currently key buzz terms in the NHS. Those looking for more information on these topics should visit Flexibility at www.flexibility.co.uk for a host of resources designed to support new ways of working, including information on flexible workers and flexible rostering, the legal balancing act for work-life balance and home working.

  11. Closed Loop System Identification with Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whorton, Mark S.

    2004-01-01

    High performance control design for a flexible space structure is challenging since high fidelity plant models are di.cult to obtain a priori. Uncertainty in the control design models typically require a very robust, low performance control design which must be tuned on-orbit to achieve the required performance. Closed loop system identi.cation is often required to obtain a multivariable open loop plant model based on closed-loop response data. In order to provide an accurate initial plant model to guarantee convergence for standard local optimization methods, this paper presents a global parameter optimization method using genetic algorithms. A minimal representation of the state space dynamics is employed to mitigate the non-uniqueness and over-parameterization of general state space realizations. This control-relevant system identi.cation procedure stresses the joint nature of the system identi.cation and control design problem by seeking to obtain a model that minimizes the di.erence between the predicted and actual closed-loop performance.

  12. Functional loop dynamics of the streptavidin-biotin complex.

    PubMed

    Song, Jianing; Li, Yongle; Ji, Changge; Zhang, John Z H

    2015-01-20

    Accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) simulation is employed to study the functional dynamics of the flexible loop(3-4) in the strong-binding streptavidin-biotin complex system. Conventional molecular (cMD) simulation is also performed for comparison. The present study reveals the following important properties of the loop dynamics: (1) The transition of loop(3-4) from open to closed state is observed in 200 ns aMD simulation. (2) In the absence of biotin binding, the open-state streptavidin is more stable, which is consistent with experimental evidences. The free energy (ΔG) difference is about 5 kcal/mol between two states. But with biotin binding, the closed state is more stable due to electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions between the loop(3-4) and biotin. (3) The closure of loop(3-4) is concerted to the stable binding of biotin to streptavidin. When the loop(3-4) is in its open-state, biotin moves out of the binding pocket, indicating that the interactions between the loop(3-4) and biotin are essential in trapping biotin in the binding pocket. (4) In the tetrameric streptavidin system, the conformational change of the loop(3-4) in each monomer is independent of each other. That is, there is no cooperative binding for biotin bound to the four subunits of the tetramer.

  13. Functional Loop Dynamics of the Streptavidin-Biotin Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jianing; Li, Yongle; Ji, Changge; Zhang, John Z. H.

    2015-01-01

    Accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) simulation is employed to study the functional dynamics of the flexible loop3-4 in the strong-binding streptavidin-biotin complex system. Conventional molecular (cMD) simulation is also performed for comparison. The present study reveals the following important properties of the loop dynamics: (1) The transition of loop3-4 from open to closed state is observed in 200 ns aMD simulation. (2) In the absence of biotin binding, the open-state streptavidin is more stable, which is consistent with experimental evidences. The free energy (ΔG) difference is about 5 kcal/mol between two states. But with biotin binding, the closed state is more stable due to electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions between the loop3-4 and biotin. (3) The closure of loop3-4 is concerted to the stable binding of biotin to streptavidin. When the loop3-4 is in its open-state, biotin moves out of the binding pocket, indicating that the interactions between the loop3-4 and biotin are essential in trapping biotin in the binding pocket. (4) In the tetrameric streptavidin system, the conformational change of the loop3-4 in each monomer is independent of each other. That is, there is no cooperative binding for biotin bound to the four subunits of the tetramer.

  14. Control-structure interaction in precision pointing servo loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spanos, John T.

    1989-01-01

    The control-structure interaction problem is addressed via stability analysis of a generic linear servo loop model. With the plant described by the rigid body mode and a single elastic mode, structural flexibility is categorized into one of three types: (1) appendage, (2) in-the-loop minimum phase, and (3) in-the-loop nonminimum phase. Closing the loop with proportional-derivative (PD) control action and introducing sensor roll-off dynamics in the feedback path, stability conditions are obtained. Trade studies are conducted with modal frequency, modal participation, modal damping, loop bandwidth, and sensor bandwidth treated as free parameters. Results indicate that appendage modes are most likely to produce instability if they are near the sensor rolloff, whereas in-the-loop modes are most dangerous near the loop bandwidth. The main goal of this paper is to provide a fundamental understanding of the control-structure interaction problem so that it may benefit the design of complex spacecraft and pointing system servo loops. In this framework, the JPL Pathfinder gimbal pointer is considered as an example.

  15. Structure-function relationships of lipoprotein lipase: mutation analysis and mutagenesis of the loop region.

    PubMed

    Henderson, H E; Ma, Y; Liu, M S; Clark-Lewis, I; Maeder, D L; Kastelein, J J; Brunzell, J D; Hayden, M R

    1993-09-01

    The molecular models of two microbial lipases and human pancreatic lipase (PL) have suggested the existence of common structural motifs including a buried active site shielded by an amphipathic surface loop. In an effort to explore the role of residues comprising the loop of lipoprotein lipase (LPL), we have used site-directed mutagenesis to generate three new LPL variants. In variant LPLM1 we deleted 18 amino acids leaving a loop of only 4 residues which resulted in an LPL protein inactive against triolein substrates. In contrast, two other LPL variants with only partial deletions, involving the apical section of the loop [LPLM2 (-8 amino acids) and LPLM3 (-2 amino acids)] manifested normal lipolytic activity. These findings indicate a critical requirement for the maintenance of charge and periodicity in the proximal and distal segments of the LPL loop in normal catalytic function. This is further highlighted by the detection of a mutation in the proximal section of the loop in a patient with LPL deficiency at position 225 which results in a substitution of threonine for isoleucine. The intact catalytic activity of the partial deletion variants (LPLM2 and LPLM3) further suggests that the apical residues of the loop contribute minimally to the functional motifs of the active site. We support this postulate by showing that the conserved glycine in the apical turn section (G229) can be substituted by glutamine, lysine, proline, or threonine without significantly affecting catalytic activity.

  16. Catalytic efficiency of designed catalytic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Korendovych, Ivan V; DeGrado, William F

    2014-01-01

    The de novo design of catalysts that mimic the affinity and specificity of natural enzymes remains one of the Holy Grails of chemistry. Despite decades of concerted effort we are still unable to design catalysts as efficient as enzymes. Here we critically evaluate approaches to (re)design of novel catalytic function in proteins using two test cases: Kemp elimination and ester hydrolysis. We show that the degree of success thus far has been modest when the rate enhancements seen for the designed proteins are compared with the rate enhancements by small molecule catalysts in solvents with properties similar to the active site. Nevertheless, there are reasons for optimism: the design methods are ever improving and the resulting catalyst can be efficiently improved using directed evolution. PMID:25048695

  17. Catalytic coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Garg, D.; Sunder, S.

    1986-12-02

    An improved process for catalytic solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a solvent comprises using as catalyst a mixture of a 1,2- or 1,4-quinone and an alkaline compound, selected from ammonium, alkali metal, and alkaline earth metal oxides, hydroxides or salts of weak acids. 1 fig.

  18. Catalytic coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Garg, Diwakar; Sunder, Swaminathan

    1986-01-01

    An improved process for catalytic solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a solvent comprises using as catalyst a mixture of a 1,2- or 1,4-quinone and an alkaline compound, selected from ammonium, alkali metal, and alkaline earth metal oxides, hydroxides or salts of weak acids.

  19. Classical Physics and Quantum Loops

    SciTech Connect

    Barry R. Holstein; John F. Donoghue

    2004-05-01

    The standard picture of the loop expansion associates a factor of h-bar with each loop, suggesting that the tree diagrams are to be associated with classical physics, while loop effects are quantum mechanical in nature. We discuss examples wherein classical effects arise from loop contributions and display the relationship between the classical terms and the long range effects of massless particles.

  20. Crystal Structure of the DNA Deaminase APOBEC3B Catalytic Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ke; Carpenter, Michael A.; Kurahashi, Kayo; Harris, Reuben S.; Aihara, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Functional and deep sequencing studies have combined to demonstrate the involvement of APOBEC3B in cancer mutagenesis. APOBEC3B is a single-stranded DNA cytosine deaminase that functions normally as a nuclear-localized restriction factor of DNA-based pathogens. However, it is overexpressed in cancer cells and elicits an intrinsic preference for 5′-TC motifs in single-stranded DNA, which is the most frequently mutated dinucleotide in breast, head/neck, lung, bladder, cervical, and several other tumor types. In many cases, APOBEC3B mutagenesis accounts for the majority of both dispersed and clustered (kataegis) cytosine mutations. Here, we report the first structures of the APOBEC3B catalytic domain in multiple crystal forms. These structures reveal a tightly closed active site conformation and suggest that substrate accessibility is regulated by adjacent flexible loops. Residues important for catalysis are identified by mutation analyses, and the results provide insights into the mechanism of target site selection. We also report a nucleotide (dCMP)-bound crystal structure that informs a multistep model for binding single-stranded DNA. Overall, these high resolution crystal structures provide a framework for further mechanistic studies and the development of novel anti-cancer drugs to inhibit this enzyme, dampen tumor evolution, and minimize adverse outcomes such as drug resistance and metastasis. PMID:26416889

  1. High heat flux loop heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    North, Mark T.; Sarraf, David B.; Rosenfeld, John H.; Maidanik, Yuri F.; Vershinin, Sergey

    1997-01-01

    Loop heat pipes (LHPs) can transport very large thermal power loads over long distances, through flexible, small diameter tubes against gravitational heads. In order to overcome the evaporator limit of LHPs, which is of about 0.07 MW/sq m, work was carried out to improve the efficiency by threefold to tenfold. The vapor passage geometry for the high heat flux conditions is shown. A bidisperse wick material within the circumferential vapor passages was used. Along with heat flux enhancement, several underlying issues were demonstrated, including the fabrication of bidisperse powder with controlled properties and the fabrication of a device geometry capable of replacing vapor passages with bidisperse powder.

  2. Shape of Cosmic String Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copi, Craig J.; Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2010-11-01

    Complicated cosmic string loops will fragment until they reach simple, non-intersecting ("stable") configurations. Through extensive numerical study we characterize these attractor loop shapes including their length, velocity, kink, and cusp distributions. We find that an initial loop containing M harmonic modes will, on average, split into 3M stable loops. These stable loops are approximately described by the degenerate kinky loop, which is planar and rectangular, independently of the number of modes on the initial loop. This is confirmed by an analytic construction of a stable family of perturbed degenerate kinky loops. The average stable loop is also found to have a 40% chance of containing a cusp. We examine the properties of stable loops of different lengths and find only slight variation. Finally we develop a new analytic scheme to explicitly solve the string constraint equations.

  3. Shape of cosmic string loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copi, Craig J.; Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2011-01-01

    Complicated cosmic string loops will fragment until they reach simple, nonintersecting (“stable”) configurations. Through extensive numerical study we characterize these attractor loop shapes including their length, velocity, kink, and cusp distributions. We find that an initial loop containing M harmonic modes will, on average, split into 3M stable loops. These stable loops are approximately described by the degenerate kinky loop, which is planar and rectangular, independently of the number of modes on the initial loop. This is confirmed by an analytic construction of a stable family of perturbed degenerate kinky loops. The average stable loop is also found to have a 40% chance of containing a cusp. We examine the properties of stable loops of different lengths and find only slight variation. Finally we develop a new analytic scheme to explicitly solve the string constraint equations.

  4. Understanding of known drug-target interactions in the catalytic pocket of neuraminidase subtype N1.

    PubMed

    Malaisree, Maturos; Rungrotmongkol, Thanyada; Decha, Panita; Intharathep, Pathumwadee; Aruksakunwong, Ornjira; Hannongbua, Supot

    2008-06-01

    To provide detailed information and insight into the drug-target interaction, structure, solvation, and dynamic and thermodynamic properties, the three known-neuraminidase inhibitors-oseltamivir (OTV), zanamivir (ZNV), and peramivir (PRV)-embedded in the catalytic site of neuraminidase (NA) subtype N1 were studied using molecular dynamics simulations. In terms of ligand conformation, there were major differences in the structures of the guanidinium and the bulky groups. The atoms of the guanidinium group of PRV were observed to form many more hydrogen bonds with the surrounded residues and were much less solvated by water molecules, in comparison with the other two inhibitors. Consequently, D151 lying on the 150-loop (residues 147-152) of group-1 neuraminidase (N1, N4, N5, and N8) was considerably shifted to form direct hydrogen bonds with the --OH group of the PRV, which was located rather far from the 150-loop. For the bulky group, direct hydrogen bonds were detected only between the hydrophilic side chain of ZNV and residues R224, E276, and E277 of N1 with rather weak binding, 20-70% occupation. This is not the case for OTV and PRV, in which flexibility and steric effects due to the hydrophobic side chain lead to the rearrangement of the surrounded residues, that is, the negatively charged side chain of E276 was shifted and rotated to form hydrogen bonds with the positively charged moiety of R224. Taking into account all the ligand-enzyme interaction data, the gas phase MM interaction energy of -282.2 kcal/mol as well as the binding free energy (DeltaG(binding)) of -227.4 kcal/mol for the PRV-N1 are significantly lower than those of the other inhibitors. The ordering of DeltaG(binding) of PRV < ZNV < OTV agrees well with the ordering of experimental IC(50) value. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Reconstitution of active catalytic trimer of aspartate transcarbamoylase from proteolytically cleaved polypeptide chains.

    PubMed Central

    Powers, V. M.; Yang, Y. R.; Fogli, M. J.; Schachman, H. K.

    1993-01-01

    Treatment of the catalytic (C) trimer of Escherichia coli aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase) with alpha-chymotrypsin by a procedure similar to that used by Chan and Enns (1978, Can. J. Biochem. 56, 654-658) has been shown to yield an intact, active, proteolytically cleaved trimer containing polypeptide fragments of 26,000 and 8,000 MW. Vmax of the proteolytically cleaved trimer (CPC) is 75% that of the wild-type C trimer, whereas Km for aspartate and Kd for the bisubstrate analog, N-(phosphonacetyl)-L-aspartate, are increased about 7- and 15-fold, respectively. CPC trimer is very stable to heat denaturation as shown by differential scanning microcalorimetry. Amino-terminal sequence analyses as well as results from electrospray ionization mass spectrometry indicate that the limited chymotryptic digestion involves the rupture of only a single peptide bond leading to the production of two fragments corresponding to residues 1-240 and 241-310. This cleavage site involving the bond between Tyr 240 and Ala 241 is in a surface loop known to be involved in intersubunit contacts between the upper and lower C trimers in ATCase when it is in the T conformation. Reconstituted holoenzyme comprising two CPC trimers and three wild-type regulatory (R) dimers was shown by enzyme assays to be devoid of the homotropic and heterotropic allosteric properties characteristic of wild-type ATCase. Moreover, sedimentation velocity experiments demonstrate that the holoenzyme reconstituted from CPC trimers is in the R conformation. These results indicate that the intact flexible loop containing Tyr 240 is essential for stabilizing the T conformation of ATCase. Following denaturation of the CPC trimer in 4.7 M urea and dilution of the solution, the separate proteolytic fragments re-associate to form active trimers in about 60% yield. How this refolding of the fragments, docking, and association to form trimers are achieved is not known. PMID:8318885

  6. Simulation of catalytic oxidation and selective catalytic NOx reduction in lean-exhaust hybrid vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Zhiming; Daw, C Stuart; Chakravarthy, Veerathu K

    2012-01-01

    We utilize physically-based models for diesel exhaust catalytic oxidation and urea-based selective catalytic NOx reduction to study their impact on drive cycle performance of hypothetical light-duty diesel powered hybrid vehicles. The models have been implemented as highly flexible SIMULINK block modules that can be used to study multiple engine-aftertreatment system configurations. The parameters of the NOx reduction model have been adjusted to reflect the characteristics of Cu-zeolite catalysts, which are of widespread current interest. We demonstrate application of these models using the Powertrain System Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) software for vehicle simulations, along with a previously published methodology that accounts for emissions and temperature transients in the engine exhaust. Our results illustrate the potential impact of DOC and SCR interactions for lean hybrid electric and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.

  7. Mitsunobu Reactions Catalytic in Phosphine and a Fully Catalytic System

    PubMed Central

    Buonomo, Joseph A; Aldrich, Courtney C

    2015-01-01

    The Mitsunobu reaction is renowned for its mild reaction conditions and broad substrate tolerance, but has limited utility in process chemistry and industrial applications due to poor atom economy and the generation of stoichiometric phosphine oxide and hydrazine by-products that complicate purification. A catalytic Mitsunobu reaction using innocuous reagents to recycle these by-products would overcome both of these shortcomings. Herein we report a protocol that is catalytic in phosphine (1-phenylphospholane) employing phenylsilane to recycle the catalyst. Integration of this phosphine catalytic cycle with Taniguchi’s azocarboxylate catalytic system provided the first fully catalytic Mitsunobu reaction. PMID:26347115

  8. Vibration and Control of Flexible Rotor Supported by Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nonami, Kenzou

    1988-01-01

    Active vibration control of flexible rotors supported by magnetic bearings is discussed. Using a finite-element method for a mathematical model of the flexible rotor, the eigenvalue problem is formulated taking into account the interaction between a mechanical system of the flexible rotor and an electrical system of the magnetic bearings and the controller. However, for the sake of simplicity, gyroscopic effects are disregarded. It is possible to adapt this formulation to a general flexible rotor-magnetic bearing system. Controllability with and without collocation sensors and actuators located at the same distance along the rotor axis is discussed for the higher order flexible modes of the test rig. In conclusion, it is proposed that it is necessary to add new active control loops for the higher flexible modes even in the case of collocation. Then it is possible to stabilize for the case of uncollocation by means of this method.

  9. Loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiou, Dah-Wei

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents an "in-a-nutshell" yet self-contained introductory review on loop quantum gravity (LQG) — a background-independent, nonperturbative approach to a consistent quantum theory of gravity. Instead of rigorous and systematic derivations, it aims to provide a general picture of LQG, placing emphasis on the fundamental ideas and their significance. The canonical formulation of LQG, as the central topic of the paper, is presented in a logically orderly fashion with moderate details, while the spin foam theory, black hole thermodynamics, and loop quantum cosmology are covered briefly. Current directions and open issues are also summarized.

  10. Wilson-loop instantons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kimyeong; Holman, Richard; Kolb, Edward W.

    1987-01-01

    Wilson-loop symmetry breaking is considered on a space-time of the form M4 x K, where M4 is a four-dimensional space-time and K is an internal space with nontrivial and finite fundamental group. It is shown in a simple model that the different vacua obtained by breaking a non-Abelian gauge group by Wilson loops are separated in the space of gauge potentials by a finite energy barrier. An interpolating gauge configuration is then constructed between these vacua and shown to have minimum energy. Finally some implications of this construction are discussed.

  11. Flexible thermal laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawn, F. S.; Sauers, D. G.

    1977-01-01

    Lightweight flexible laminate of interwoven conducting and insulating yarns, designed to provide localized controlled heating for propellant tanks on space vehicles, is useful for nonspace applications where weight, bulk, and flexibility are critical concerns.

  12. Flexibility and Muscular Strength.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liemohn, Wendell

    1988-01-01

    This definition of flexibility and muscular strength also explores their roles in overall physical fitness and focuses on how increased flexibility and muscular strength can help decrease or eliminate lower back pain. (CB)

  13. Flexibility and Muscular Strength.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liemohn, Wendell

    1988-01-01

    This definition of flexibility and muscular strength also explores their roles in overall physical fitness and focuses on how increased flexibility and muscular strength can help decrease or eliminate lower back pain. (CB)

  14. Catalytic thermal barrier coatings

    DOEpatents

    Kulkarni, Anand A.; Campbell, Christian X.; Subramanian, Ramesh

    2009-06-02

    A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

  15. Catalytic, hollow, refractory spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Improved, heterogeneous, refractory catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitable formed of a shell (12) of refractory such as alumina having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be itself catalytic or a catalytically active material coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  16. Catalytic reforming catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Buss, W.C.; Kluksdahl, H.E.

    1980-12-09

    An improved catalyst, having a reduced fouling rate when used in a catalytic reforming process, said catalyst comprising platinum disposed on an alumina support wherein the alumina support is obtained by removing water from aluminum hydroxide produced as a by-product from a ziegler higher alcohol synthesis reaction, and wherein the alumina is calcined at a temperature of 1100-1400/sup 0/F so as to have a surface area of 165 to 215 square meters per gram.

  17. Livermore Compiler Analysis Loop Suite

    SciTech Connect

    Hornung, R. D.

    2013-03-01

    LCALS is designed to evaluate compiler optimizations and performance of a variety of loop kernels and loop traversal software constructs. Some of the loop kernels are pulled directly from "Livermore Loops Coded in C", developed at LLNL (see item 11 below for details of earlier code versions). The older suites were used to evaluate floating-point performances of hardware platforms prior to porting larger application codes. The LCALS suite is geared toward assissing C++ compiler optimizations and platform performance related to SIMD vectorization, OpenMP threading, and advanced C++ language features. LCALS contains 20 of 24 loop kernels from the older Livermore Loop suites, plus various others representative of loops found in current production appkication codes at LLNL. The latter loops emphasize more diverse loop constructs and data access patterns than the others, such as multi-dimensional difference stencils. The loops are included in a configurable framework, which allows control of compilation, loop sampling for execution timing, which loops are run and their lengths. It generates timing statistics for analysis and comparing variants of individual loops. Also, it is easy to add loops to the suite as desired.

  18. Catalytic nanoporous membranes

    DOEpatents

    Pellin, Michael J.; Hryn, John N.; Elam, Jeffrey W.

    2009-12-01

    A nanoporous catalytic membrane which displays several unique features including pores which can go through the entire thickness of the membrane. The membrane has a higher catalytic and product selectivity than conventional catalysts. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes serve as the catalyst substrate. This substrate is then subjected to Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), which allows the controlled narrowing of the pores from 40 nm to 10 nm in the substrate by deposition of a preparatory material. Subsequent deposition of a catalytic layer on the inner surfaces of the pores reduces pore sizes to less than 10 nm and allows for a higher degree of reaction selectivity. The small pore sizes allow control over which molecules enter the pores, and the flow-through feature can allow for partial oxidation of reactant species as opposed to complete oxidation. A nanoporous separation membrane, produced by ALD is also provided for use in gaseous and liquid separations. The membrane has a high flow rate of material with 100% selectivity.

  19. Quenched catalytic cracking process

    SciTech Connect

    Krambeck, F.J.; Penick, J.E.; Schipper, P.H.

    1990-12-18

    This paper describes improvement in a fluidized catalytic cracking process wherein a fluidizable catalyst cracking catalyst and a hydrocarbon feed are charged to a reactor riser at catalytic riser cracking conditions to form catalytically cracked vapor product and spent catalyst which are discharged into a reactor vessel having a volume via a riser reactor outlet equipped with a separation means to produce a catalyst lean phase. It comprises: a majority of the cracked product, and a catalyst rich phase comprising a majority of the spend catalyst. The the catalyst rich phase is discharged into a dense bed of catalyst maintained below the riser outlet and the catalyst lean phase is discharged into the vessel for a time, and at a temperature, which cause unselective thermal cracking of the cracked product in the reactor volume before product is withdrawn from the vessel via a vessel outlet. The improvement comprises: addition, after riser cracking is completed, and after separation of cracked products from catalyst, of a quenching stream into the vessel above the dense bed of catalyst, via a quench stream addition point which allows the quench stream to contact at least a majority of the volume of the vessel above the dense bed.

  20. Thinking about Flexibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villa, Mario Diaz

    2009-01-01

    This article emphasizes the complexity of the term flexibility and discusses its meanings and political dimensions, along with its expressions or realizations within the field of higher education. It proposes a new principle of flexibility that overcomes an understanding of flexibility within higher education as the mere ability or versatility to…

  1. Thinking about Flexibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villa, Mario Diaz

    2009-01-01

    This article emphasizes the complexity of the term flexibility and discusses its meanings and political dimensions, along with its expressions or realizations within the field of higher education. It proposes a new principle of flexibility that overcomes an understanding of flexibility within higher education as the mere ability or versatility to…

  2. Sequence dependence of transcription factor-mediated DNA looping.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Stephanie; Lindén, Martin; Phillips, Rob

    2012-09-01

    DNA is subject to large deformations in a wide range of biological processes. Two key examples illustrate how such deformations influence the readout of the genetic information: the sequestering of eukaryotic genes by nucleosomes and DNA looping in transcriptional regulation in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. These kinds of regulatory problems are now becoming amenable to systematic quantitative dissection with a powerful dialogue between theory and experiment. Here, we use a single-molecule experiment in conjunction with a statistical mechanical model to test quantitative predictions for the behavior of DNA looping at short length scales and to determine how DNA sequence affects looping at these lengths. We calculate and measure how such looping depends upon four key biological parameters: the strength of the transcription factor binding sites, the concentration of the transcription factor, and the length and sequence of the DNA loop. Our studies lead to the surprising insight that sequences that are thought to be especially favorable for nucleosome formation because of high flexibility lead to no systematically detectable effect of sequence on looping, and begin to provide a picture of the distinctions between the short length scale mechanics of nucleosome formation and looping.

  3. Molecular Dynamics Studies on the HIV-1 Integrase Catalytic Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Lins, Roberto D.; Briggs, J. M.; Straatsma, TP; Carlson, Heather A.; Greenwald, Jason; Choe, Senyon; Mccammon, Andy

    1999-06-30

    The HIV-1 integrase, which is essential for viral replication, catalyzes the insertion of viral DNA into the host chromosome, thereby recruiting host cell machinery into making viral proteins. It represents the third main HIV enzyme target for inhibitor design, the first two being the reverse transcriptase and the protease. Two 1-ns molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out on completely hydrated models of the HIV-1 integrase catalytic domain, one with no metal ions and another with one magnesium ion in the catalytic site. The simulations predict that the region of the active site that is missing in the published crystal structures has (at the time of this work) more secondary structure than previously thought. The flexibility of this region has been discussed with respect to the mechanistic function of the enzyme. The results of these simulations will be used as part of inhibitor design projects directed against the catalytic domain of the enzyme.

  4. Mashup the OODA Loop

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    MTR070365 MITRE TECHNICAL REPORT Mashup the OODA Loop June 2008 Jeffrey E. Heier-E305 C2C Center – MITRE New Jersey Sponsor: Sponsor Name...ES) The MITRE Corporation, C2C Center,260 Industrial Way West,Eatontown,NJ,07724 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING

  5. Closing the Loop Sampler.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Integrated Waste Management Board, Sacramento.

    Closing the Loop (CTL) is a science curriculum designed to introduce students to integrated waste management through awareness. This document presents five lesson plans focusing on developing an understanding of natural resources, solid wastes, conservation, and the life of landfills. Contents include: (1) "What Are Natural Resources?"; (2)…

  6. Closing the Loop Sampler.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Integrated Waste Management Board, Sacramento.

    Closing the Loop (CTL) is a science curriculum designed to introduce students to integrated waste management through awareness. This document presents five lesson plans focusing on developing an understanding of natural resources, solid wastes, conservation, and the life of landfills. Contents include: (1) "What Are Natural Resources?"; (2)…

  7. Reversible hysteresis loop tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, A.; Binek, Ch.; Margulies, D. T.; Moser, A.; Fullerton, E. E.

    2006-02-01

    We utilize antiferromagnetically coupled bilayer structures to magnetically tune hysteresis loop properties. Key element of this approach is the non-overlapping switching field distribution of the two magnetic layers that make up the system: a hard magnetic CoPtCrB layer (HL) and a soft magnetic CoCr layer (SL). Both layers are coupled antiferromagnetically through an only 0.6-nm-thick Ru interlayer. The non-overlapping switching field distribution allows the measurement of magnetization reversal in the SL at low fields while keeping the magnetization state of the HL unperturbed. Applying an appropriate high field or high field sequence changes the magnetic state of the HL, which then influences the SL magnetization reversal due to the interlayer coupling. In this way, the position and shape of the SL hysteresis loop can be changed or tuned in a fully reversible and highly effective manner. Here, we study specifically how the SL hysteresis loop characteristics change as we move the HL through an entire high field hysteresis loop sequence.

  8. Closing the Assessment Loop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banta, Trudy W.; Blaich, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Accreditors, speakers at assessment conferences, and campus leaders all decry the fact that too few faculty are closing the loop--that is, studying assessment findings to see what improvements might be suggested and taking the appropriate steps to make them. This is difficult enough with locally developed measures; adding the need to interpret…

  9. NETL - Chemical Looping Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    2013-07-24

    NETL's Chemical Looping Reactor unit is a high-temperature integrated CLC process with extensive instrumentation to improve computational simulations. A non-reacting test unit is also used to study solids flow at ambient temperature. The CLR unit circulates approximately 1,000 pounds per hour at temperatures around 1,800 degrees Fahrenheit.

  10. NETL - Chemical Looping Reactor

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    NETL's Chemical Looping Reactor unit is a high-temperature integrated CLC process with extensive instrumentation to improve computational simulations. A non-reacting test unit is also used to study solids flow at ambient temperature. The CLR unit circulates approximately 1,000 pounds per hour at temperatures around 1,800 degrees Fahrenheit.

  11. Interplay between the trigger loop and the F loop during RNA polymerase catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Miropolskaya, Nataliya; Esyunina, Daria; Klimašauskas, Saulius; Nikiforov, Vadim; Artsimovitch, Irina; Kulbachinskiy, Andrey

    2014-01-01

    The trigger loop (TL) in the RNA polymerase (RNAP) active center plays key roles in the reactions of nucleotide addition and RNA cleavage catalyzed by RNAP. The adjacent F loop (FL) was proposed to contribute to RNAP catalysis by modulating structural changes in the TL. Here, we investigate the interplay between these two elements during transcription by bacterial RNAP. Thermodynamic analysis of catalysis by RNAP variants with mutations in the TL and FL suggests that the TL is the key element required for temperature activation in RNAP catalysis, and that the FL promotes TL transitions during nucleotide addition. We reveal characteristic differences in the catalytic parameters between thermophilic Thermus aquaticus and mesophilic Deinococcus radiodurans RNAPs and identify the FL as an adaptable element responsible for the observed differеnces. Mutations in the FL also significantly affect the rate of intrinsic RNA cleavage in a TL-dependent manner. In contrast, much weaker effects of the FL and TL mutations on GreA-assisted RNA cleavage suggest that the FL-dependent TL transitions are not required for this reaction. Thus, functional interplay between the FL and TL is essential for various catalytic activities of RNAP and plays an adaptive role in catalysis by thermophilic and mesophilic enzymes. PMID:24089145

  12. Joint X-ray crystallographic and molecular dynamics study of cellobiohydrolase I from Trichoderma harzianum: deciphering the structural features of cellobiohydrolase catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Textor, Larissa C; Colussi, Francieli; Silveira, Rodrigo L; Serpa, Viviane; de Mello, Bruno L; Muniz, João Renato C; Squina, Fabio M; Pereira, Nei; Skaf, Munir S; Polikarpov, Igor

    2013-01-01

    Aiming to contribute toward the characterization of new, biotechnologically relevant cellulolytic enzymes, we report here the first crystal structure of the catalytic core domain of Cel7A (cellobiohydrolase I) from the filamentous fungus Trichoderma harzianum IOC 3844. Our structural studies and molecular dynamics simulations show that the flexibility of Tyr260, in comparison with Tyr247 from the homologous Trichoderma reesei Cel7A, is enhanced as a result of the short side-chains of adjacent Val216 and Ala384 residues and creates an additional gap at the side face of the catalytic tunnel. T. harzianum cellobiohydrolase I also has a shortened loop at the entrance of the cellulose-binding tunnel, which has been described to interact with the substrate in T. reesei Cel7A. These structural features might explain why T. harzianum Cel7A displays higher k(cat) and K(m) values, and lower product inhibition on both glucoside and lactoside substrates, compared with T. reesei Cel7A.

  13. Mutational analysis of the active site flap (20s loop) of mandelate racemase.

    PubMed

    Bourque, Jennifer R; Bearne, Stephen L

    2008-01-15

    Mandelate racemase from Pseudomonas putida catalyzes the Mg2+-dependent 1,1-proton transfer that interconverts the enantiomers of mandelate. Residues of the 20s and 50s loops determine, in part, the topology and polarity of the active site and hence the substrate specificity. Previously, we proposed that, during racemization, the phenyl ring of mandelate moves between an S-pocket comprised of residues from the 50s loop and an R-pocket comprised of residues from the 20s loop [Siddiqi, F., Bourque, J. R., Jiang, H., Gardner, M., St. Maurice, M., Blouin, C., and Bearne, S. L. (2005) Biochemistry 44, 9013-9021]. The 20s loop constitutes a mobile beta-meander flap that covers the active site cavity shielding it from solvent and controlling entry and egress of ligands. To understand the role of the 20s loop in catalysis and substrate specificity, we constructed a series of mutants (V22A, V22I, V22F, T24S, A25V, V26A, V26L, V26F, V29A, V29L, V29F, V26A/V29L, and V22I/V29L) in which the sizes of hydrophobic side chains of the loop residues were varied. Catalytic efficiencies (kcat/Km) for all mutants were reduced between 6- and 40-fold with the exception of those of V22I, V26A, V29L, and V22I/V29L which had near wild-type efficiencies with mandelate. Thr 24 and Ala 25, located at the tip of the 20s loop, were particularly sensitive to minor alterations in the size of their hydrophobic side chains; however, most mutations were tolerated quite well, suggesting that flap mobility could compensate for increases in the steric bulk of hydrophobic side chains. With the exception of V29L, with mandelate as the substrate, and V22F and V26A/V29L, with 2-naphthylglycolate (2-NG) as the substrate, the values of kcat and Km were not altered in a manner consistent with steric obstruction of the R-pocket, perhaps due to flap mobility compensating for the increased size of the hydrophobic side chains. Surprisingly, V22I and V29L catalyzed the racemization of the bulkier substrate 2-NG

  14. A competent catalytic active site is necessary for substrate induced dimer assembly in triosephosphate isomerase.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Sandoval, Pedro; Vique-Sanchez, Jose Luis; Hidalgo, Marisol López; Velazquez-Juarez, Gilberto; Diaz-Quezada, Corina; Arroyo-Navarro, Luis Fernando; Moran, Gabriela Montero; Fattori, Juliana; Jessica Diaz-Salazar, A; Rudiño-Pinera, Enrique; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio; Figueira, Ana Carolina Migliorini; Lara-Gonzalez, Samuel; Benítez-Cardoza, Claudia G; Brieba, Luis G

    2017-11-01

    The protozoan parasite Trichomonas vaginalis contains two nearly identical triosephosphate isomerases (TvTIMs) that dissociate into stable monomers and dimerize upon substrate binding. Herein, we compare the role of the "ball and socket" and loop 3 interactions in substrate assisted dimer assembly in both TvTIMs. We found that point mutants at the "ball" are only 39 and 29-fold less catalytically active than their corresponding wild-type counterparts, whereas Δloop 3 deletions are 1502 and 9400-fold less active. Point and deletion mutants dissociate into stable monomers. However, point mutants assemble as catalytic competent dimers upon binding of the transition state substrate analog PGH, whereas loop 3 deletions remain monomeric. A comparison between crystal structures of point and loop 3 deletion monomeric mutants illustrates that the catalytic residues in point mutants and wild-type TvTIMs are maintained in the same orientation, whereas the catalytic residues in deletion mutants show an increase in thermal mobility and present structural disorder that may hamper their catalytic role. The high enzymatic activity present in monomeric point mutants correlates with the formation of dimeric TvTIMs upon substrate binding. In contrast, the low activity and lack of dimer assembly in deletion mutants suggests a role of loop 3 in promoting the formation of the active site as well as dimer assembly. Our results suggest that in TvTIMs the active site is assembled during dimerization and that the integrity of loop 3 and ball and socket residues is crucial to stabilize the dimer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A decoupled recursive approach for constrained flexible multibody system dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, Hao-Jan; Kim, Sung-Soo; Haug, Edward J.; Bae, Dae-Sung

    1989-01-01

    A variational-vector calculus approach is employed to derive a recursive formulation for dynamic analysis of flexible multibody systems. Kinematic relationships for adjacent flexible bodies are derived in a companion paper, using a state vector notation that represents translational and rotational components simultaneously. Cartesian generalized coordinates are assigned for all body and joint reference frames, to explicitly formulate deformation kinematics under small deformation kinematics and an efficient flexible dynamics recursive algorithm is developed. Dynamic analysis of a closed loop robot is performed to illustrate efficiency of the algorithm.

  16. Optimized input shaping for a single flexible robot link

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, D.G.; Stokes, D.; Starr, G.; Robinett, R.D.

    1996-03-01

    This paper will discuss the design of an input shaped open-loop control for a single flexible robot link. The authors develop the equations of motion, including the first flexible mode shape and the actuator dynamics. Additional content includes the hardware system identification iterative runs used to update the model. Optimized input shaped commands for the flexible robot link to produce a rest-to-rest, residual vibration-free, 90 degree maneuver are developed. Correlation between both experimental and analytical results of the 90{degree} slew, using two different identification models, are reviewed.

  17. COLD TEST LOOP INTEGRATED TEST LOOP RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, TJ

    2003-10-22

    A testing facility (Cold Test Loop) was constructed and operated to demonstrate the efficacy of the Accelerated Waste Retrieval (AWR) Project's planned sluicing approach to the remediation of Silos 1 and 2 at the Fernald Environmental Management Project near Cincinnati, Ohio. The two silos contain almost 10,000 tons of radium-bearing low-level waste, which consists primarily of solids of raffinates from processing performed on ores from the Democratic Republic of Congo (commonly referred to as ''Belgium Congo ores'') for the recovery of uranium. These silos are 80 ft in diameter, 36 ft high to the center of the dome, and 26.75 ft to the top of the vertical side walls. The test facility contained two test systems, each designed for a specific purpose. The first system, the Integrated Test Loop (ITL), a near-full-scale plant including the actual equipment to be installed at the Fernald Site, was designed to demonstrate the sluicing operation and confirm the selection of a slurry pump, the optimal sluicing nozzle operation, and the preliminary design material balance. The second system, the Component Test Loop (CTL), was designed to evaluate many of the key individual components of the waste retrieval system over an extended run. The major results of the initial testing performed during July and August 2002 confirmed that the AWR approach to sluicing was feasible. The ITL testing confirmed the following: (1) The selected slurry pump (Hazleton 3-20 type SHW) performed well and is suitable for AWR application. However, the pump's motor should be upgraded to a 200-hp model and be driven by a 150-hp variable-frequency drive (VFD). A 200-hp VFD is not much more expensive and would allow the pump to operate at full speed. (2) The best nozzle performance was achieved by using 15/16-in. nozzles operated alternately. This configuration appeared to most effectively mine the surrogate. (3) The Solartron densitometer, which was tested as an alternative mass flow measurement

  18. Statistical database analysis of the role of loop dynamics for protein-protein complex formation and allostery.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yina; Li, Da-Wei; Brüschweiler, Rafael

    2017-06-15

    Protein loops show rich conformational dynamics properties on a wide range of timescales as they play an essential role for many cellular functions during protein-protein interactions and recognition processes. However, little is known about the detail behavior of loops upon protein binding including allostery. We report the loop motions and their dominant timescales for a library of 230 proteins that form protein-protein complexes using the ToeLoop predictor of loop dynamics. We applied the analysis to proteins in both their complex and free state and relate specific loop properties to their role in protein recognition. We observe a strong tendency of loops that move on relatively slow timescales of tens of ns to sub-μs to be directly involved in binding and recognition processes. Complex formation leads to a significant reduction in loop flexibility at the binding interface, but in a number of cases it can also trigger increased flexibility in distal loops in response to allosteric conformational changes. The importance of loop dynamics and allostery is highlighted by a case study of an antibody-antigen complex. Furthermore, we explored the relationship between loop dynamics and experimental binding affinities and found that a prevalence of high loop rigidity at the binding interface is an indicator of increased binding strength. http://spin.ccic.ohio-state.edu/index.php/toeloopppi. bruschweiler.1@osu.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  19. A summary of the active flexible wing program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Boyd, III; Cole, Stanley R.; Miller, Gerald D.

    1992-01-01

    A summary of the NASA/Rockwell Active Flexible Wing Program is presented. Major elements of the program are presented. Key program accomplishments included single- and multiple-mode flutter suppression, load alleviation and load control during rapid roll maneuvers, and multi-input/multi-output multiple-function active controls tests above the open-loop flutter boundary.

  20. L2' loop is critical for caspase-7 active site formation.

    PubMed

    Witkowski, Witold A; Hardy, Jeanne A

    2009-07-01

    The active sites of caspases are composed of four mobile loops. A loop (L2) from one half of the dimer interacts with a loop (L2') from the other half of the dimer to bind substrate. In an inactive form, the two L2' loops form a cross-dimer hydrogen-bond network over the dimer interface. Although the L2' loop has been implicated as playing a central role in the formation of the active-site loop bundle, its precise role in catalysis has not been shown. A detailed understanding of the active and inactive conformations is essential to control the caspase function. We have interrogated the contributions of the residues in the L2' loop to catalytic function and enzyme stability. In wild-type and all mutants, active-site binding results in substantial stabilization of the complex. One mutation, P214A, is significantly destabilized in the ligand-free conformation, but is as stable as wild type when bound to substrate, indicating that caspase-7 rests in different conformations in the absence and presence of substrate. Residues K212 and I213 in the L2' loop are shown to be essential for substrate-binding and thus proper catalytic function of the caspase. In the crystal structure of I213A, the void created by side-chain deletion is compensated for by rearrangement of tyrosine 211 to fill the void, suggesting that the requirements of substrate-binding are sufficiently strong to induce the active conformation. Thus, although the L2' loop makes no direct contacts with substrate, it is essential for buttressing the substrate-binding groove and is central to native catalytic efficiency.

  1. Classical physics and quantum loops.

    PubMed

    Holstein, Barry R; Donoghue, John F

    2004-11-12

    The standard picture of the loop expansion associates a factor of variant Planck's over 2pi with each loop, suggesting that the tree diagrams are to be associated with classical physics, while loop effects are quantum mechanical in nature. We discuss counterexamples wherein classical effects arise from loop diagrams and display the relationship between the classical terms and the long range effects of massless particles.

  2. Catalytic reforming process

    SciTech Connect

    Absil, R.P.; Huss, A. Jr.; McHale, W.D.; Partridge, R.D.

    1989-06-13

    This patent describes a catalytic reforming process which comprises contacting a naphtha range feed with a low acidity extrudate comprising an intermediate and/or a large pore acidic zeolite bound with a low acidity refractory oxide under reforming conditions to provide a reaction product of increased aromatic content, the extrudate having been prepared with at least an extrusion-facilitating amount of a low acidity refractory oxide in colloidal form and containing at least one metal species selected from the platinum group metals.

  3. Catalytic reforming methods

    DOEpatents

    Tadd, Andrew R; Schwank, Johannes

    2013-05-14

    A catalytic reforming method is disclosed herein. The method includes sequentially supplying a plurality of feedstocks of variable compositions to a reformer. The method further includes adding a respective predetermined co-reactant to each of the plurality of feedstocks to obtain a substantially constant output from the reformer for the plurality of feedstocks. The respective predetermined co-reactant is based on a C/H/O atomic composition for a respective one of the plurality of feedstocks and a predetermined C/H/O atomic composition for the substantially constant output.

  4. Protein Loop Closure Using Orientational Restraints from NMR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathy, Chittaranjan; Zeng, Jianyang; Zhou, Pei; Donald, Bruce Randall

    Protein loops often play important roles in biological functions such as binding, recognition, catalytic activities and allosteric regulation. Modeling loops that are biophysically sensible is crucial to determining the functional specificity of a protein. A variety of algorithms ranging from robotics-inspired inverse kinematics methods to fragmentbased homology modeling techniques have been developed to predict protein loops. However, determining the 3D structures of loops using global orientational restraints on internuclear vectors, such as those obtained from residual dipolar coupling (RDC) data in solution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, has not been well studied. In this paper, we present a novel algorithm that determines the protein loop conformations using a minimal amount of RDC data. Our algorithm exploits the interplay between the sphero-conics derived from RDCs and the protein kinematics, and formulates the loop structure determination problem as a system of low-degree polynomial equations that can be solved exactly and in closed form. The roots of these polynomial equations, which encode the candidate conformations, are searched systematically, using efficient and provable pruning strategies that triage the vast majority of conformations, to enumerate or prune all possible loop conformations consistent with the data. Our algorithm guarantees completeness by ensuring that a possible loop conformation consistent with the data is never missed. This data-driven algorithm provides a way to assess the structural quality from experimental data with minimal modeling assumptions. We applied our algorithm to compute the loops of human ubiquitin, the FF Domain 2 of human transcription elongation factor CA150 (FF2), the DNA damage inducible protein I (DinI) and the third IgG-binding domain of Protein G (GB3) from experimental RDC data. A comparison of our results versus those obtained by using traditional structure determination protocols on the

  5. Loop Heat Pipes and Capillary Pumped Loops: An Applications Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Dan; Ku, Jentung; Swanson, Theodore; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Capillary pumped loops (CPLS) and loop heat pipes (LHPS) are versatile two-phase heat transfer devices which have recently gained increasing acceptance in space applications. Both systems work based on the same principles and have very similar designs. Nevertheless, some differences exist in the construction of the evaporator and the hydro-accumulator, and these differences lead to very distinct operating characteristics for each loop. This paper presents comparisons of the two loops from an applications perspective, and addresses their impact on spacecraft design, integration, and test. Some technical challenges and issues for both loops are also addressed.

  6. Mining protein loops using a structural alphabet and statistical exceptionality

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Protein loops encompass 50% of protein residues in available three-dimensional structures. These regions are often involved in protein functions, e.g. binding site, catalytic pocket... However, the description of protein loops with conventional tools is an uneasy task. Regular secondary structures, helices and strands, have been widely studied whereas loops, because they are highly variable in terms of sequence and structure, are difficult to analyze. Due to data sparsity, long loops have rarely been systematically studied. Results We developed a simple and accurate method that allows the description and analysis of the structures of short and long loops using structural motifs without restriction on loop length. This method is based on the structural alphabet HMM-SA. HMM-SA allows the simplification of a three-dimensional protein structure into a one-dimensional string of states, where each state is a four-residue prototype fragment, called structural letter. The difficult task of the structural grouping of huge data sets is thus easily accomplished by handling structural letter strings as in conventional protein sequence analysis. We systematically extracted all seven-residue fragments in a bank of 93000 protein loops and grouped them according to the structural-letter sequence, named structural word. This approach permits a systematic analysis of loops of all sizes since we consider the structural motifs of seven residues rather than complete loops. We focused the analysis on highly recurrent words of loops (observed more than 30 times). Our study reveals that 73% of loop-lengths are covered by only 3310 highly recurrent structural words out of 28274 observed words). These structural words have low structural variability (mean RMSd of 0.85 Å). As expected, half of these motifs display a flanking-region preference but interestingly, two thirds are shared by short (less than 12 residues) and long loops. Moreover, half of recurrent motifs exhibit a

  7. Surface NMR imaging with simultaneously energized transmission loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irons, T. P.; Kass, A.; Parsekian, A.

    2016-12-01

    Surface nuclear magnetic resonance (sNMR) is a unique geophysical technique which allows for the direct detection of liquid-phase water. In saturated media the sNMR response also provides estimates of hydrologic properties including porosity and permeability. The most common survey deployment consists of a single coincident loop performing both transmission and receiving. Because the sNMR method is relatively slow, tomography using coincident loops is time-intensive. Surveys using multiple receiver loops (but a single transmitter) provide additional sensitivity; however, they still require iterating transmission over the loops, and do not decrease survey acquisition time. In medical rotating frame imaging, arrays of transmitters are employed in order to decrease acquisition time, whilst optimizing image resolving power-a concept which we extend to earth's field imaging. Using simultaneously energized transmission loops decreases survey time linearly with the number of channels. To demonstrate the efficacy and benefits of multiple transmission loops, we deployed simultaneous sNMR transmission arrays using minimally coupled loops and a specially modified instrument at the Red Buttes Hydrogeophysics Experiment Site-a well-characterized location near Laramie, Wyoming. The proposed survey proved capable of acquiring multiple-channel imaging data with comparable noise levels to figure-eight configurations. Finally, the channels can be combined after acquisition or inverted simultaneously to provide composite datasets and images. This capability leverages the improved near surface resolving power of small loops but retains sensitivity to deep media through the use of synthetic aperature receivers. As such, simultaneously acquired loop arrays provide a great deal of flexibility.

  8. Aurora Australis, Sinuous Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This view of the Aurora Australis or Southern Lights (location unknown) shows a sinuous looping band of airglow above the Earth Limb. Calculated to be in the 80 - 120 km altitude region, auroral activity is due to exitation of atomic oxygen in the upper atmosphere by radiation from the van Allen Radiation Belts and is most common above the 65 degree north and south latitude range during the spring and fall of the year.

  9. Loop Quantum Cosmology.

    PubMed

    Bojowald, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Quantum gravity is expected to be necessary in order to understand situations where classical general relativity breaks down. In particular in cosmology one has to deal with initial singularities, i.e., the fact that the backward evolution of a classical space-time inevitably comes to an end after a finite amount of proper time. This presents a breakdown of the classical picture and requires an extended theory for a meaningful description. Since small length scales and high curvatures are involved, quantum effects must play a role. Not only the singularity itself but also the surrounding space-time is then modified. One particular realization is loop quantum cosmology, an application of loop quantum gravity to homogeneous systems, which removes classical singularities. Its implications can be studied at different levels. Main effects are introduced into effective classical equations which allow to avoid interpretational problems of quantum theory. They give rise to new kinds of early universe phenomenology with applications to inflation and cyclic models. To resolve classical singularities and to understand the structure of geometry around them, the quantum description is necessary. Classical evolution is then replaced by a difference equation for a wave function which allows to extend space-time beyond classical singularities. One main question is how these homogeneous scenarios are related to full loop quantum gravity, which can be dealt with at the level of distributional symmetric states. Finally, the new structure of space-time arising in loop quantum gravity and its application to cosmology sheds new light on more general issues such as time.

  10. Loop Quantum Cosmology.

    PubMed

    Bojowald, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Quantum gravity is expected to be necessary in order to understand situations in which classical general relativity breaks down. In particular in cosmology one has to deal with initial singularities, i.e., the fact that the backward evolution of a classical spacetime inevitably comes to an end after a finite amount of proper time. This presents a breakdown of the classical picture and requires an extended theory for a meaningful description. Since small length scales and high curvatures are involved, quantum effects must play a role. Not only the singularity itself but also the surrounding spacetime is then modified. One particular theory is loop quantum cosmology, an application of loop quantum gravity to homogeneous systems, which removes classical singularities. Its implications can be studied at different levels. The main effects are introduced into effective classical equations, which allow one to avoid the interpretational problems of quantum theory. They give rise to new kinds of early-universe phenomenology with applications to inflation and cyclic models. To resolve classical singularities and to understand the structure of geometry around them, the quantum description is necessary. Classical evolution is then replaced by a difference equation for a wave function, which allows an extension of quantum spacetime beyond classical singularities. One main question is how these homogeneous scenarios are related to full loop quantum gravity, which can be dealt with at the level of distributional symmetric states. Finally, the new structure of spacetime arising in loop quantum gravity and its application to cosmology sheds light on more general issues, such as the nature of time.

  11. Cosmic string loop microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloomfield, Jolyon K.; Chernoff, David F.

    2014-06-01

    Cosmic superstring loops within the galaxy microlens background point sources lying close to the observer-string line of sight. For suitable alignments, multiple paths coexist and the (achromatic) flux enhancement is a factor of two. We explore this unique type of lensing by numerically solving for geodesics that extend from source to observer as they pass near an oscillating string. We characterize the duration of the flux doubling and the scale of the image splitting. We probe and confirm the existence of a variety of fundamental effects predicted from previous analyses of the static infinite straight string: the deficit angle, the Kaiser-Stebbins effect, and the scale of the impact parameter required to produce microlensing. Our quantitative results for dynamical loops vary by O(1) factors with respect to estimates based on infinite straight strings for a given impact parameter. A number of new features are identified in the computed microlensing solutions. Our results suggest that optical microlensing can offer a new and potentially powerful methodology for searches for superstring loop relics of the inflationary era.

  12. Verification of Loop Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winebarger, A.; Lionello, R.; Mok, Y.; Linker, J.; Mikic, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Many different techniques have been used to characterize the plasma in the solar corona: density-sensitive spectral line ratios are used to infer the density, the evolution of coronal structures in different passbands is used to infer the temperature evolution, and the simultaneous intensities measured in multiple passbands are used to determine the emission measure. All these analysis techniques assume that the intensity of the structures can be isolated through background subtraction. In this paper, we use simulated observations from a 3D hydrodynamic simulation of a coronal active region to verify these diagnostics. The density and temperature from the simulation are used to generate images in several passbands and spectral lines. We identify loop structures in the simulated images and calculate the loop background. We then determine the density, temperature and emission measure distribution as a function of time from the observations and compare with the true temperature and density of the loop. We find that the overall characteristics of the temperature, density, and emission measure are recovered by the analysis methods, but the details of the true temperature and density are not. For instance, the emission measure curves calculated from the simulated observations are much broader than the true emission measure distribution, though the average temperature evolution is similar. These differences are due, in part, to inadequate background subtraction, but also indicate a limitation of the analysis methods.

  13. Loops of Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opolski, Antoni

    2014-12-01

    Professor Antoni Opolski was actively interested in astronomy after his retirement in 1983. He especially liked to study the works of the famous astronomer Copernicus getting inspiration for his own work. Opolski started his work on planetary loops in 2011 continuing it to the end of 2012 . During this period calculations, drawings, tables, and basic descriptions of all the planets of the Solar System were created with the use of a piece of paper and a pencil only. In 2011 Antoni Opolski asked us to help him in editing the manuscript and preparing it for publication. We have been honored having the opportunity to work on articles on planetary loops with Antoni Opolski in his house for several months. In the middle of 2012 the detailed material on Jupiter was ready. However, professor Opolski improved the article by smoothing the text and preparing new, better drawings. Finally the article ''Loops of Jupiter'', written by the 99- year old astronomer, was published in the year of his 100th birthday.

  14. Chemical Looping Combustion Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Edward Eyring; Gabor Konya

    2009-03-31

    One of the most promising methods of capturing CO{sub 2} emitted by coal-fired power plants for subsequent sequestration is chemical looping combustion (CLC). A powdered metal oxide such as NiO transfers oxygen directly to a fuel in a fuel reactor at high temperatures with no air present. Heat, water, and CO{sub 2} are released, and after H{sub 2}O condensation the CO{sub 2} (undiluted by N{sub 2}) is ready for sequestration, whereas the nickel metal is ready for reoxidation in the air reactor. In principle, these processes can be repeated endlessly with the original nickel metal/nickel oxide participating in a loop that admits fuel and rejects ash, heat, and water. Our project accumulated kinetic rate data at high temperatures and elevated pressures for the metal oxide reduction step and for the metal reoxidation step. These data will be used in computational modeling of CLC on the laboratory scale and presumably later on the plant scale. The oxygen carrier on which the research at Utah is focused is CuO/Cu{sub 2}O rather than nickel oxide because the copper system lends itself to use with solid fuels in an alternative to CLC called 'chemical looping with oxygen uncoupling' (CLOU).

  15. Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart Nemser, PhD

    2010-10-01

    There are many industrial catalytic organic reversible reactions with amines or alcohols that have water as one of the products. Many of these reactions are homogeneously catalyzed. In all cases removal of water facilitates the reaction and produces more of the desired chemical product. By shifting the reaction to right we produce more chemical product with little or no additional capital investment. Many of these reactions can also relate to bioprocesses. Given the large number of water-organic compound separations achievable and the ability of the Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. (CMS) perfluoro membranes to withstand these harsh operating conditions, this is an ideal demonstration system for the water-of-reaction removal using a membrane reactor. Enhanced reaction synthesis is consistent with the DOE objective to lower the energy intensity of U.S. industry 25% by 2017 in accord with the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and to improve the United States manufacturing competitiveness. The objective of this program is to develop the platform technology for enhancing homogeneous catalytic chemical syntheses.

  16. Invertible flexible matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Justino, Júlia

    2017-06-01

    Matrices with coefficients having uncertainties of type o (.) or O (.), called flexible matrices, are studied from the point of view of nonstandard analysis. The uncertainties of the afore-mentioned kind will be given in the form of the so-called neutrices, for instance the set of all infinitesimals. Since flexible matrices have uncertainties in their coefficients, it is not possible to define the identity matrix in an unique way and so the notion of spectral identity matrix arises. Not all nonsingular flexible matrices can be turned into a spectral identity matrix using Gauss-Jordan elimination method, implying that that not all nonsingular flexible matrices have the inverse matrix. Under certain conditions upon the size of the uncertainties appearing in a nonsingular flexible matrix, a general theorem concerning the boundaries of its minors is presented which guarantees the existence of the inverse matrix of a nonsingular flexible matrix.

  17. Input shaped control of 3-dimensional maneuvers of flexible spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, T.; Vadali, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper deals with the control of three dimensional rotational maneuvers of flexible spacecraft. A spacecraft with a spherical hub and six symmetric appendages is considered here as a model. The appendages are long and flexible leading to low frequency vibration under any control action. To provide a comprehensive treatment of input shaped controllers, both open loop and closed loop controllers are considered. The minimum-time bang-bang and the near-minimum-time controller, used in conjunction with the shaped input technique are studied. In addition, a combination of a Liapunov controller with the shaped input control technique is proposed to take advantage of the simple feedback control strategy and augment it with a technique that can eliminate the vibratory motion of the flexible appendages more efficiently.

  18. Robotic Simulation of Flexible-Body Spacecraft Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brannan, Justin C.; Carignan, Craig R.

    2016-01-01

    A robotic testbed has been developed to conduct hardware-in-the-loop simulations of a robotic servicer interacting with a client satellite on-orbit. By creating an analytical model of a satellite with flexible appendages, it is possible to simulate the system response to external force and torque inputs and compare the predicted system motion to a robot mass simulator outfitted with physical appendages. This validation effort includes multiple test cases that encompass the types of interaction forces a satellite might experience during a nominal on-orbit servicing mission and aims to show the simulation's ability to capture the physical system response. After incorporating the flexible-body dynamics into the robotic mass simulator at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), a hardware-in-the-loop simulation can be used to characterize the potential impact of structural flexibility on an end-to-end satellite servicing mission.

  19. Creating stable stem regions for loop elongation in Fcabs - insights from combining yeast surface display, in silico loop reconstruction and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Hasenhindl, Christoph; Lai, Balder; Delgado, Javier; Traxlmayr, Michael W; Stadlmayr, Gerhard; Rüker, Florian; Serrano, Luis; Oostenbrink, Chris; Obinger, Christian

    2014-09-01

    Fcabs (Fc antigen binding) are crystallizable fragments of IgG where the C-terminal structural loops of the CH3 domain are engineered for antigen binding. For the design of libraries it is beneficial to know positions that will permit loop elongation to increase the potential interaction surface with antigen. However, the insertion of additional loop residues might impair the immunoglobulin fold. In the present work we have probed whether stabilizing mutations flanking the randomized and elongated loop region improve the quality of Fcab libraries. In detail, 13 libraries were constructed having the C-terminal part of the EF loop randomized and carrying additional residues (1, 2, 3, 5 or 10, respectively) in the absence and presence of two flanking mutations. The latter have been demonstrated to increase the thermal stability of the CH3 domain of the respective solubly expressed proteins. Assessment of the stability of the libraries expressed on the surface of yeast cells by flow cytometry demonstrated that loop elongation was considerably better tolerated in the stabilized libraries. By using in silico loop reconstruction and mimicking randomization together with MD simulations the underlying molecular dynamics were investigated. In the presence of stabilizing stem residues the backbone flexibility of the engineered EF loop as well as the fluctuation between its accessible conformations were decreased. In addition the CD loop (but not the AB loop) and most of the framework regions were rigidified. The obtained data are discussed with respect to the design of Fcabs and available data on the relation between flexibility and affinity of CDR loops in Ig-like molecules. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Mitsunobu Reactions Catalytic in Phosphine and a Fully Catalytic System.

    PubMed

    Buonomo, Joseph A; Aldrich, Courtney C

    2015-10-26

    The Mitsunobu reaction is renowned for its mild reaction conditions and broad substrate tolerance, but has limited utility in process chemistry and industrial applications due to poor atom economy and the generation of stoichiometric phosphine oxide and hydrazine by-products that complicate purification. A catalytic Mitsunobu reaction using innocuous reagents to recycle these by-products would overcome both of these shortcomings. Herein we report a protocol that is catalytic in phosphine (1-phenylphospholane) employing phenylsilane to recycle the catalyst. Integration of this phosphine catalytic cycle with Taniguchi's azocarboxylate catalytic system provided the first fully catalytic Mitsunobu reaction. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited and is not used for commercial purposes.

  1. Coronal Loops: Isothermal or Multithermal?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimble, Jason; Schmelz, J. T.; Nasraoui, K.; Cirtain, J. W.; Del Zanna, G.; DeLuca, E. E.; Mason, H. E.

    2007-05-01

    The coronal loop data used for this analysis were taken on 2003 January 17 at 14:24:45 UT by the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS) aboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory. We use the Chianti atomic physics data base and the hybrid coronal abundances to determine temperatures and densities for positions along several loops. The traditional method used to create our differential emission measure (DEM) curves has been forward folding, but we are now using both emission measure loci plots and DEM automatic inversion to support and confirm the original conclusions. In this poster, we will look specifically at the emission measure loci analysis of three loops visible in the CDS data set. We find different results for each of these loops. One of the loops seems to be composed of isothermal plasma with Log T = 5.8 MK. The temperature does not appear to change with position, from the footpoint to the loop leg. Unfortunately, the loop top is outside the CDS field of view. Each pixel examined in the second loop seems to require a multithermal DEM distribution. For the third loop, the temperature increases and the density appears to decrease with loop height, reminiscent of traditional hydrostatic loop models. Solar physics research at the University of Memphis is supported by NSF ATM-0402729 and NASA NNG05GE68G.

  2. Bifurcations of limit cycles in open and closed loop reverse flow reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Lucia; Crescitelli, Silvestro; Brasiello, Antonio

    2013-10-01

    The present work analyses the bifurcations of limit cycles in open and loop reverse flow reactors. The open loop system consists of a reactor where the flow direction is periodically forced whereas in the closed loop system, the flow inversion is dictated by a control law which activates when the temperature at the edge of catalytic bed falls below the set-point value. We performed the bifurcation analysis of the open loop system as the switch time is varied and we constructed the solution diagram through the application of continuation technique. Many Naimark-Sacker bifurcations leading to quasi-periodic regimes have been found on the limit cycles branches. Finally, we compared these limit cycles with those of the closed loop system where the flow inversion is dictated by a control system which acts if the temperature measured at the edge of reactor falls below a set-point value.

  3. Fast Protein Loop Sampling and Structure Prediction Using Distance-Guided Sequential Chain-Growth Monte Carlo Method

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ke; Zhang, Jinfeng; Liang, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Loops in proteins are flexible regions connecting regular secondary structures. They are often involved in protein functions through interacting with other molecules. The irregularity and flexibility of loops make their structures difficult to determine experimentally and challenging to model computationally. Conformation sampling and energy evaluation are the two key components in loop modeling. We have developed a new method for loop conformation sampling and prediction based on a chain growth sequential Monte Carlo sampling strategy, called Distance-guided Sequential chain-Growth Monte Carlo (DiSGro). With an energy function designed specifically for loops, our method can efficiently generate high quality loop conformations with low energy that are enriched with near-native loop structures. The average minimum global backbone RMSD for 1,000 conformations of 12-residue loops is Å, with a lowest energy RMSD of Å, and an average ensemble RMSD of Å. A novel geometric criterion is applied to speed up calculations. The computational cost of generating 1,000 conformations for each of the x loops in a benchmark dataset is only about cpu minutes for 12-residue loops, compared to ca cpu minutes using the FALCm method. Test results on benchmark datasets show that DiSGro performs comparably or better than previous successful methods, while requiring far less computing time. DiSGro is especially effective in modeling longer loops (– residues). PMID:24763317

  4. Top3-Rmi1 dissolve Rad51-mediated D-loops by a topoisomerase-based mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Fasching, Clare L.; Cejka, Petr; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.; Heyer, Wolf-Dietrich

    2015-01-01

    Summary The displacement loop (D-loop) is the DNA strand invasion product formed during homologous recombination. Disruption of nascent D-loops represents a mechanism of anti-recombination. During Synthesis-Dependent Strand Annealing D-loop disruption after extension of the invading strand is an integral step of the pathway and ensures a non-crossover outcome. The proteins implicated in D-loop disruption are DNA motor proteins/helicases acting by migrating DNA junctions. Here we report an unanticipated mechanism of D-loop dissolution mediated by DNA topoisomerase 3 (Top3) and dependent on its catalytic activity. D-loop dissolution catalyzed by yeast Top3 is highly specific for yeast Rad51/Rad54-mediated D-loops, whereas protein-free D-loops or D-loop mediated by bacterial RecA protein or human RAD51/RAD54 resist dissolution. Also the human Topoisomerase IIIα-RMI1–RMI2 complex is capable of dissolving D-loops. Consistent with genetic data, we suggest that the extreme growth defect and hyper-recombination phenotype of Top3-deficient yeast cells is in part a result of unprocessed D-loops. PMID:25699708

  5. Coupled dual loop absorption heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Sarkisian, Paul H.; Reimann, Robert C.; Biermann, Wendell J.

    1985-01-01

    A coupled dual loop absorption system which utilizes two separate complete loops. Each individual loop operates at three temperatures and two pressures. This low temperature loop absorber and condenser are thermally coupled to the high temperature loop evaporator, and the high temperature loop condenser and absorber are thermally coupled to the low temperature generator.

  6. A control system design approach for flexible spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverberg, L. M.

    1985-01-01

    A control system design approach for flexible spacecraft is presented. The control system design is carried out in two steps. The first step consists of determining the ideal control system in terms of a desirable dynamic performance. The second step consists of designing a control system using a limited number of actuators that possess a dynamic performance that is close to the ideal dynamic performance. The effects of using a limited number of actuators is that the actual closed-loop eigenvalues differ from the ideal closed-loop eigenvalues. A method is presented to approximate the actual closed-loop eigenvalues so that the calculation of the actual closed-loop eigenvalues can be avoided. Depending on the application, it also may be desirable to apply the control forces as impulses. The effect of digitizing the control to produce the appropriate impulses is also examined.

  7. Flexible aircraft flying and ride qualities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashkenas, I. L.; Magdaleno, R. E.; Mcruer, D. T.

    1984-01-01

    A brief analytic exposition is presented to illustrate a central principle in flexible mode control, some of the pertinent pilot centered requirements are listed and discussed. The desired features of the control methodology are exposed and the methodology to be used is selected. The example Boeing supplied characteristics are discussed and approximated with a reduced order model and a simplified treatment of unsteady aerodynamics. The closed loop flight control system design follows, along with first level assessments of resulting handling and ride quality characteristics. Some of these do not meet the postulated requirements and remain problems to be solved possibly by further analysis or future simulation.

  8. Bifunctional catalytic electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cisar, Alan (Inventor); Murphy, Oliver J. (Inventor); Clarke, Eric (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to an oxygen electrode for a unitized regenerative hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell and the unitized regenerative fuel cell having the oxygen electrode. The oxygen electrode contains components electrocatalytically active for the evolution of oxygen from water and the reduction of oxygen to water, and has a structure that supports the flow of both water and gases between the catalytically active surface and a flow field or electrode chamber for bulk flow of the fluids. The electrode has an electrocatalyst layer and a diffusion backing layer interspersed with hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions. The diffusion backing layer consists of a metal core having gas diffusion structures bonded to the metal core.

  9. ``OPTICAL Catalytic Nanomotors''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosary-Oyong, Se, Glory

    D. Kagan, et.al, 2009:'' a motion-based chemical sensing involving fuel-driven nanomotors is demonstrated. The new protocol relies on the use of an optical microscope for tracking charge in the speed of nanowire motors in the presence of target analyte''. Synthetic nanomotors are propelled by catalytic decomposition of .. they do not require external electric, magnetic or optical fields as energy... Accompanying Fig 2.6(a) of optical micrograph of a partial monolayer of silica microbeads [J.Gibbs, 2011 ] retrieves WF Paxton:''rods were characterized by transmission electron & dark-field optical microscopy..'' & LF Valadares:''dimer due to the limited resolution of optical microscopy, however the result..'. Acknowledged to HE. Mr. Prof. SEDIONO M.P. TJONDRONEGORO.

  10. Catalytic hollow spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    The improved, heterogeneous catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitably formed of a shell (12) of metal such as aluminum having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be, itself, catalytic or the catalyst can be coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  11. Catalytic hollow spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The improved, heterogeneous catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitably formed of a shell (12) of metal such as aluminum having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be, itself, catalytic or the catalyst can be coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  12. Catalytic cracking of hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Absil, R.P.L.; Bowes, E.; Green, G.J.; Marler, D.O.; Shihabi, D.S.; Socha, R.F.

    1992-02-04

    This patent describes an improvement in a catalytic cracking process in which a hydrocarbon feed is cracked in a cracking zone in the absence of added hydrogen and in the presence of a circulating inventory of solid acidic cracking a catalyst which acquires a deposit of coke that contains chemically bound nitrogen while the cracking catalyst is in the cracking zone, the coke catalyst being circulated to t regeneration zone to convert the coke catalyst to a regenerated catalyst with the formation of a flue gas comprising nitrogen oxides: the improvement comprises incorporating into the circulating catalyst inventory an amount of additive particles comprising a synthetic porous crystalline material containing copper metal or cations, to reduce the content of nitrogen oxides in the flue gas.

  13. Evolution of random catalytic networks

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, S.M.; Reidys, C.M. |

    1997-06-01

    In this paper the authors investigate the evolution of populations of sequences on a random catalytic network. Sequences are mapped into structures, between which are catalytic interactions that determine their instantaneous fitness. The catalytic network is constructed as a random directed graph. They prove that at certain parameter values, the probability of some relevant subgraphs of this graph, for example cycles without outgoing edges, is maximized. Populations evolving under point mutations realize a comparatively small induced subgraph of the complete catalytic network. They present results which show that populations reliably discover and persist on directed cycles in the catalytic graph, though these may be lost because of stochastic effects, and study the effect of population size on this behavior.

  14. Adaptive control strategies for flexible robotic arm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bialasiewicz, Jan T.

    1993-01-01

    The motivation of this research came about when a neural network direct adaptive control scheme was applied to control the tip position of a flexible robotic arm. Satisfactory control performance was not attainable due to the inherent non-minimum phase characteristics of the flexible robotic arm tip. Most of the existing neural network control algorithms are based on the direct method and exhibit very high sensitivity if not unstable closed-loop behavior. Therefore a neural self-tuning control (NSTC) algorithm is developed and applied to this problem and showed promising results. Simulation results of the NSTC scheme and the conventional self-tuning (STR) control scheme are used to examine performance factors such as control tracking mean square error, estimation mean square error, transient response, and steady state response.

  15. Closing the loop.

    PubMed

    Dassau, E; Atlas, E; Phillip, M

    2011-02-01

    Closed-loop algorithms can be found in every aspect of everyday modern life. Automation and control are used constantly to provide safety and to improve quality of life. Closed-loop systems and algorithms can be found in home appliances, automobiles, aviation and more. Can one imagine nowadays driving a car without ABS, cruise control or even anti-sliding control? Similar principles of automation and control can be used in the management of diabetes mellitus (DM). The idea of an algorithmic/technological way to control glycaemia is not new and has been researched for more than four decades. However, recent improvements in both glucose-sensing technology and insulin delivery together with advanced control and systems engineering made this dream of an artificial pancreas possible. The artificial pancreas may be the next big step in the treatment of DM since the use of insulin analogues. An artificial pancreas can be described as internal or external devices that use continuous glucose measurements to automatically manage exogenous insulin delivery with or without other hormones in an attempt to restore glucose regulation in individuals with DM using a control algorithm. This device as described can be internal or external; can use different types of control algorithms with bi-hormonal or uni-hormonal design; and can utilise different ways to administer them. The different designs and implementations have transitioned recently from in silico simulations to clinical evaluation stage with practical applications in mind. This may mark the beginning of a new era in diabetes management with the introduction of semi-closed-loop systems that can prevent or minimise nocturnal hypoglycaemia, to hybrid systems that will manage blood glucose (BG) levels with minimal user intervention to finally fully automated systems that will take the user out of the loop. More and more clinical trials will be needed for the artificial pancreas to become a reality but initial encouraging

  16. Bright Loops at 171

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    STEREO was able to capture bright loops in exquisite detail as they were arcing above an active region (May 26, 2007) over an 18 hour period. What we are actually seeing are charged particles spinning along magnetic field lines that extend above the Sun's surface. Active regions are areas of intense magnetic activity and often the source of solar storms. In fact, the clip ends with a flourish in which a small coronal mass ejection (CME) blows out into space. This is from the STEREO Ahead spacecraft at the 171 Angstroms wavelength in extreme ultraviolet light.

  17. Bright Arcing Loops

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-06-27

    Several arcing loops rotated into view and swirled above an active region, which gave us a nice profile view of the action (June 26-27, 2016). The arcing plasma is tracing magnetic field lines extending out from the active region. Some darker matter also jiggled back and forth near the active region as well, pulled about by magnetic forces. At one point a lick of plasma pushed its way out from the region but quickly fell back into the sun. The images were taken in a wavelength of extreme ultraviolet light. Movies are also available at the Photojournal. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20882

  18. Optical parametric loop mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, K.; Morioka, T.; Saruwatari, M.

    1995-06-01

    A novel configuration for four-wave mixing (FWM) is proposed that offers the remarkable feature of inherently separating the FWM wave from the input pump and signal waves and suppressing their background amplified stimulated emission without optical filtering. In the proposed configuration, an optical parametric loop mirror, two counterpropagating FWM waves generated in a Sagnac interferometer interfere with a relative phase difference that is introduced deliberately. FWM frequency-conversion experiments in a polarization-maintaining fiber achieved more than 35 dB of input-wave suppression against the FWM wave.

  19. Bright Loops at 171

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    STEREO was able to capture bright loops in exquisite detail as they were arcing above an active region (May 26, 2007) over an 18 hour period. What we are actually seeing are charged particles spinning along magnetic field lines that extend above the Sun's surface. Active regions are areas of intense magnetic activity and often the source of solar storms. In fact, the clip ends with a flourish in which a small coronal mass ejection (CME) blows out into space. This is from the STEREO Ahead spacecraft at the 171 Angstroms wavelength in extreme ultraviolet light.

  20. Line Loss Minimization of Loop Distribution Systems Using UPFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayed, Mahmoud A.; Inayoshi, Nobuyuki; Takeshita, Takaharu; Ueda, Fukashi

    This paper presents an elaborated mathematical analysis of the line loss minimum conditions of loop distribution systems. In order to achieve these conditions, the Unified Power Flow Controller (UPFC), a typical Flexible AC Transmission Systems (FACTS) device that is capable of instantaneous control of transmission and distribution power flow, is used. For minimizing the total line loss of the loop distribution system, the authors propose two control schemes, the Line Inductance Compensation control and the Line Voltage Compensation control. These control schemes can be applied for controlling the UPFC in the loop distribution system according to the line parameters. The effectiveness of the proposed control schemes has been verified experimentally using a laboratory prototype in a 200V, 6kVA system.

  1. TOWARDS AN ECONOMICAL FLEXIBILITY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUDILL, WILLIAM W.; RICHARDSON, L.S.

    AN ARCHITECT AND A SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS COLLABORATED ON THE DESIGN FOR A HIGH SCHOOL, WHICH STRESSED ECONOMY AND FLEXIBILITY. THEY CONSIDERED THREE ASPECTS OF FLEXIBILITY--(1) EXPANDABILITY, (2) CONVERTIBILITY, AND (3) VERSATILITY. EXPANDABILITY IS DISCUSSED IN TERMS OF SITE SELECTION AND PLANNING. CONVERTIBILITY FEATURES IDENTIFIED INCLUDE…

  2. Flexible Animation Computer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcup, Scott S.

    1990-01-01

    FLEXAN (Flexible Animation), computer program animating structural dynamics on Evans and Sutherland PS300-series graphics workstation with VAX/VMS host computer. Typical application is animation of spacecraft undergoing structural stresses caused by thermal and vibrational effects. Displays distortions in shape of spacecraft. Program displays single natural mode of vibration, mode history, or any general deformation of flexible structure. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  3. Flexible Animation Computer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcup, Scott S.

    1990-01-01

    FLEXAN (Flexible Animation), computer program animating structural dynamics on Evans and Sutherland PS300-series graphics workstation with VAX/VMS host computer. Typical application is animation of spacecraft undergoing structural stresses caused by thermal and vibrational effects. Displays distortions in shape of spacecraft. Program displays single natural mode of vibration, mode history, or any general deformation of flexible structure. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  4. Shear flexibility for structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stangeland, Maynard L. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    This device comprises a flexible sheet member having cross convolutions oriented 45.degree. to the shear vector with spherical reliefs at the convolution junctions. The spherical reliefs are essential to the shear flexibility by interrupting the principal stress lines that act along the ridges of the convolutions. The spherical reliefs provide convolutions in both directions in the plane of the cross-convolution ridges.

  5. Shear flexibility for structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stangeland, Maynard L. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    This device comprises a flexible sheet member having cross convolutions oriented 45.degree. to the shear vector with spherical reliefs at the convolution junctions. The spherical reliefs are essential to the shear flexibility by interrupting the principal stress lines that act along the ridges of the convolutions. The spherical reliefs provide convolutions in both directions in the plane of the cross-convolution ridges.

  6. Flexible 'zoning' aids adaptability.

    PubMed

    Corben, Simon

    2013-09-01

    Simon Corben, business development director at Capita Symonds' Health team, examines how 'clever use of zoning' when planning new healthcare facilities could improve hospital design, increase inherent flexibility, and reduce lifetime costs, and argues that a 'loose-fit, non-bespoke approach' to space planning will lead to 'more flexible buildings that are suitable for conversion to alternative uses'.

  7. Shield For Flexible Pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponton, Michael K.; Williford, Clifford B.; Lagen, Nicholas T.

    1995-01-01

    Cylindrical shield designed to fit around flexible pipe to protect nearby workers from injury and equipment from damage if pipe ruptures. Designed as pressure-relief device. Absorbs impact of debris ejected radially from broken flexible pipe. Also redirects flow of pressurized fluid escaping from broken pipe onto flow path allowing for relief of pressure while minimizing potential for harm.

  8. Flexibility within Fidelity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendall, Philip C.; Gosch, Elizabeth; Furr, Jami M.; Sood, Erica

    2008-01-01

    The authors address concerns regarding manual-based treatments, highlighting the role of flexibility and creativity. A cognitive-behavioral therapy for youth anxiety called the Coping Cat program demonstrates the flexible application of manuals and emphasizes the importance of a child-centered, personalized approach that involves the child in the…

  9. Flexible ferroelectric organic crystals

    PubMed Central

    Owczarek, Magdalena; Hujsak, Karl A.; Ferris, Daniel P.; Prokofjevs, Aleksandrs; Majerz, Irena; Szklarz, Przemysław; Zhang, Huacheng; Sarjeant, Amy A.; Stern, Charlotte L.; Jakubas, Ryszard; Hong, Seungbum; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Stoddart, J. Fraser

    2016-01-01

    Flexible organic materials possessing useful electrical properties, such as ferroelectricity, are of crucial importance in the engineering of electronic devices. Up until now, however, only ferroelectric polymers have intrinsically met this flexibility requirement, leaving small-molecule organic ferroelectrics with room for improvement. Since both flexibility and ferroelectricity are rare properties on their own, combining them in one crystalline organic material is challenging. Herein, we report that trisubstituted haloimidazoles not only display ferroelectricity and piezoelectricity—the properties that originate from their non-centrosymmetric crystal lattice—but also lend their crystalline mechanical properties to fine-tuning in a controllable manner by disrupting the weak halogen bonds between the molecules. This element of control makes it possible to deliver another unique and highly desirable property, namely crystal flexibility. Moreover, the electrical properties are maintained in the flexible crystals. PMID:27734829

  10. Flexible ferroelectric organic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Owczarek, Magdalena; Hujsak, Karl A.; Ferris, Daniel P.; Prokofjevs, Aleksandrs; Majerz, Irena; Szklarz, Przemysław; Zhang, Huacheng; Sarjeant, Amy A.; Stern, Charlotte L.; Jakubas, Ryszard; Hong, Seungbum; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Stoddart, J. Fraser

    2016-10-13

    Flexible organic materials possessing useful electrical properties, such as ferroelectricity, are of crucial importance in the engineering of electronic devices. But, until now, only ferroelectric polymers have intrinsically met this flexibility requirement, leaving small-molecule organic ferroelectrics with room for improvement. Since both flexibility and ferroelectricity are rare properties on their own, combining them in one crystalline organic material is challenging. We report that trisubstituted haloimidazoles not only display ferroelectricity and piezoelectricity-the properties that originate from their non-centrosymmetric crystal lattice-but also lend their crystalline mechanical properties to fine-tuning in a controllable manner by disrupting the weak halogen bonds between the molecules. This element of control makes it possible to deliver another unique and highly desirable property, namely crystal flexibility. Moreover, the electrical properties are maintained in the flexible crystals.

  11. Flexible ferroelectric organic crystals

    DOE PAGES

    Owczarek, Magdalena; Hujsak, Karl A.; Ferris, Daniel P.; ...

    2016-10-13

    Flexible organic materials possessing useful electrical properties, such as ferroelectricity, are of crucial importance in the engineering of electronic devices. But, until now, only ferroelectric polymers have intrinsically met this flexibility requirement, leaving small-molecule organic ferroelectrics with room for improvement. Since both flexibility and ferroelectricity are rare properties on their own, combining them in one crystalline organic material is challenging. We report that trisubstituted haloimidazoles not only display ferroelectricity and piezoelectricity-the properties that originate from their non-centrosymmetric crystal lattice-but also lend their crystalline mechanical properties to fine-tuning in a controllable manner by disrupting the weak halogen bonds between the molecules.more » This element of control makes it possible to deliver another unique and highly desirable property, namely crystal flexibility. Moreover, the electrical properties are maintained in the flexible crystals.« less

  12. Flexible ferroelectric organic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owczarek, Magdalena; Hujsak, Karl A.; Ferris, Daniel P.; Prokofjevs, Aleksandrs; Majerz, Irena; Szklarz, Przemysław; Zhang, Huacheng; Sarjeant, Amy A.; Stern, Charlotte L.; Jakubas, Ryszard; Hong, Seungbum; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Stoddart, J. Fraser

    2016-10-01

    Flexible organic materials possessing useful electrical properties, such as ferroelectricity, are of crucial importance in the engineering of electronic devices. Up until now, however, only ferroelectric polymers have intrinsically met this flexibility requirement, leaving small-molecule organic ferroelectrics with room for improvement. Since both flexibility and ferroelectricity are rare properties on their own, combining them in one crystalline organic material is challenging. Herein, we report that trisubstituted haloimidazoles not only display ferroelectricity and piezoelectricity--the properties that originate from their non-centrosymmetric crystal lattice--but also lend their crystalline mechanical properties to fine-tuning in a controllable manner by disrupting the weak halogen bonds between the molecules. This element of control makes it possible to deliver another unique and highly desirable property, namely crystal flexibility. Moreover, the electrical properties are maintained in the flexible crystals.

  13. Functions, structures and Triton X-100 effect for the catalytic subunits of heterodimeric phospholipases A2 from Vipera nikolskii venom.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Starkov, Vladislav G; He, Zi-Xuan; Wang, Qi-hai; Tsetlin, Victor I; Utkin, Yuri N; Lin, Zheng-jiong; Bi, Ru-chang

    2009-11-01

    Phospholipases A(2) (PLA(2)s) from snake venoms have diverse pharmacological functions including neurotoxicity, and more studies are necessary to understand relevant mechanisms. Here we report the different crystal structures for two enzymatically active basic subunits (HDP-1P and HDP-2P) of heterodimeric neurotoxic PLA(2)s isolated from Vipera nikolskii venom. Structural comparisons with similar PLA(2)s clearly show some flexible regions which might be important for the catalytic function and neurotoxicity. Unexpectedly, Triton X-100 molecule bound in the hydrophobic channel of HDP-1P and HDP-2P was observed, and its binding induced conformational changes in the Ca(2+) binding loop. Enzymatic activity measurements indicated that Triton X-100 decreased the activity of PLA(2), although with comparatively low inhibitory activity. For the first time exocytosis experiments in pancreatic beta cells were used to confirm the presynaptic neurotoxicity of relevant snake PLA(2). These experiments also indicated that Triton X-100 inhibited the influence of HDP-1P on exocytosis, but the inhibition was smaller than that of MJ33, a phospholipid-analogue inhibitor of PLA(2). Our studies performed at a cellular level are in good agreement with earlier findings that enzymatic activity of the snake presynaptic PLA(2) neurotoxins is essential for effective block of nerve terminals.

  14. Loop expansion and the bosonic representation of loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, E.; Guglielmon, J.; Hackl, L.; Yokomizo, N.

    2016-10-01

    We introduce a new loop expansion that provides a resolution of the identity in the Hilbert space of loop quantum gravity on a fixed graph. We work in the bosonic representation obtained by the canonical quantization of the spinorial formalism. The resolution of the identity gives a tool for implementing the projection of states in the full bosonic representation onto the space of solutions to the Gauss and area matching constraints of loop quantum gravity. This procedure is particularly efficient in the semiclassical regime, leading to explicit expressions for the loop expansions of coherent, heat kernel and squeezed states.

  15. Catalytically Active Regenerative Sorbent beds (CARS) for airborne contaminants.

    PubMed

    Akse, J R; Thompson, J O

    1995-01-01

    The Pd on Al2O3 catalyst used in the projected Space Station's Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) catalytic oxidizer can be poisoned by volatile halogen-, sulfur-, and nitrogen-containing organic species. Catalytically Active Regenerable Sorbents (CARS) eliminate these problematic contaminants and the large carbon bed used for their elimination in a three-step process. Contaminants are conventionally adsorbed by the CARS bed. After saturation, the bed is connected to an off-line recirculation loop, filled with hydrogen, and then heated. At temperature, contaminants are hydrogenated on catalytic sites within the bed, forming simple alkanes and acid gases that are efficiently converted to innocuous salts in an in-line alkaline bed. The CARS bed is regenerated by this cycle and alkane gases are released to be safely oxidized in the catalytic oxidizer. A challenge mixture containing Freon-113, thiophene, trichloroethylene, Halon-1301, and dichloromethane at 1670, 75, 81, 68, and 83 mg/m3 was successfully treated using this technology, demonstrating the CARS feasibility.

  16. Ekpyrotic loop quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson-Ewing, Edward

    2013-08-01

    We consider the ekpyrotic paradigm in the context of loop quantum cosmology. In loop quantum cosmology the classical big-bang singularity is resolved due to quantum gravity effects, and so the contracting ekpyrotic branch of the universe and its later expanding phase are connected by a smooth bounce. Thus, it is possible to explicitly determine the evolution of scalar perturbations, from the contracting ekpyrotic phase through the bounce and to the post-bounce expanding epoch. The possibilities of having either one or two scalar fields have been suggested for the ekpyrotic universe, and both cases will be considered here. In the case of a single scalar field, the constant mode of the curvature perturbations after the bounce is found to have a blue spectrum. On the other hand, for the two scalar field ekpyrotic model where scale-invariant entropy perturbations source additional terms in the curvature perturbations, the power spectrum in the post-bounce expanding cosmology is shown to be nearly scale-invariant and so agrees with observations.

  17. High temperature storage loop :

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, David Dennis; Kolb, William J.

    2013-07-01

    A three year plan for thermal energy storage (TES) research was created at Sandia National Laboratories in the spring of 2012. This plan included a strategic goal of providing test capability for Sandia and for the nation in which to evaluate high temperature storage (>650ÀC) technology. The plan was to scope, design, and build a flow loop that would be compatible with a multitude of high temperature heat transfer/storage fluids. The High Temperature Storage Loop (HTSL) would be reconfigurable so that it was useful for not only storage testing, but also for high temperature receiver testing and high efficiency power cycle testing as well. In that way, HTSL was part of a much larger strategy for Sandia to provide a research and testing platform that would be integral for the evaluation of individual technologies funded under the SunShot program. DOEs SunShot program seeks to reduce the price of solar technologies to 6/kWhr to be cost competitive with carbon-based fuels. The HTSL project sought to provide evaluation capability for these SunShot supported technologies. This report includes the scoping, design, and budgetary costing aspects of this effort

  18. Accelerating the loop expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Ingermanson, R.

    1986-07-29

    This thesis introduces a new non-perturbative technique into quantum field theory. To illustrate the method, I analyze the much-studied phi/sup 4/ theory in two dimensions. As a prelude, I first show that the Hartree approximation is easy to obtain from the calculation of the one-loop effective potential by a simple modification of the propagator that does not affect the perturbative renormalization procedure. A further modification then susggests itself, which has the same nice property, and which automatically yields a convex effective potential. I then show that both of these modifications extend naturally to higher orders in the derivative expansion of the effective action and to higher orders in the loop-expansion. The net effect is to re-sum the perturbation series for the effective action as a systematic ''accelerated'' non-perturbative expansion. Each term in the accelerated expansion corresponds to an infinite number of terms in the original series. Each term can be computed explicitly, albeit numerically. Many numerical graphs of the various approximations to the first two terms in the derivative expansion are given. I discuss the reliability of the results and the problem of spontaneous symmetry-breaking, as well as some potential applications to more interesting field theories. 40 refs.

  19. Control of nonlinear flexible space structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jianjun

    With the advances made in computer technology and efficiency of numerical algorithms over last decade, the MPC strategies have become quite popular among control community. However, application of MPC or GPC to flexible space structure control has not been explored adequately in the literature. The work presented in this thesis primarily focuses on application of GPC to control of nonlinear flexible space structures. This thesis is particularly devoted to the development of various approximate dynamic models, design and assessment of candidate controllers, and extensive numerical simulations for a realistic multibody flexible spacecraft, namely, Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO)---a Prometheus class of spacecraft proposed by NASA for deep space exploratory missions. A stable GPC algorithm is developed for Multi-Input-Multi-Output (MIMO) systems. An end-point weighting (penalty) is used in the GPC cost function to guarantee the nominal stability of the closed-loop system. A method is given to compute the desired end-point state from the desired output trajectory. The methodologies based on Fake Algebraic Riccati Equation (FARE) and constrained nonlinear optimization, are developed for synthesis of state weighting matrix. This makes this formulation more practical. A stable reconfigurable GPC architecture is presented and its effectiveness is demonstrated on both aircraft as well as spacecraft model. A representative in-orbit maneuver is used for assessing the performance of various control strategies using various design models. Different approximate dynamic models used for analysis include linear single body flexible structure, nonlinear single body flexible structure, and nonlinear multibody flexible structure. The control laws evaluated include traditional GPC, feedback linearization-based GPC (FLGPC), reconfigurable GPC, and nonlinear dissipative control. These various control schemes are evaluated for robust stability and robust performance in the presence of

  20. Structure of RNA Stem Loop B from the Picornavirus Replication Platform.

    PubMed

    Warden, Meghan S; Tonelli, Marco; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Liu, Dong; Hopersberger, Lorelei J; Ponniah, Komala; Pascal, Steven M

    2017-05-23

    The presumptive RNA cloverleaf at the start of the 5'-untranslated region of the picornavirus genome is an essential element in replication. Stem loop B (SLB) of the cloverleaf is a recognition site for the host polyC-binding protein, which initiates a switch from translation to replication. Here we present the solution structure of human rhinovirus isotype 14 SLB using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. SLB adopts a predominantly A-form helical structure. The stem contains five Watson-Crick base pairs and one wobble base pair and is capped by an eight-nucleotide loop. The wobble base pair introduces perturbations into the helical parameters but does not appear to introduce flexibility. However, the helix major groove appears to be accessible. Flexibility is seen throughout the loop and in the terminal nucleotides. The pyrimidine-rich region of the loop, the apparent recognition site for the polyC-binding protein, is the most disordered region of the structure.

  1. 2 π -flux loop semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Linhu; Chesi, Stefano; Yin, Chuanhao; Chen, Shu

    2017-08-01

    We introduce a model of 2 π -flux loop semimetals which holds nodal loops described by a winding number ν =2 . By adding some extra terms, this model can be transformed into a recently discovered Hopf-link semimetal, and the symmetries distinguishing these two types of semimetals are studied. We also propose a simpler physical implementation of 2 π -flux loops and of Hopf-link semimetals which only involves nearest-neighbor hoppings, although in the presence of spin-orbit interactions. Finally, we investigate the Floquet properties of the 2 π -flux loop, and find that such a loop may be driven into two separated π -flux loops or four Weyl points by light with circular polarization in certain directions.

  2. Chemistry and application of flexible porous coordination polymers*

    PubMed Central

    Bureekaew, Sareeya; Shimomura, Satoru; Kitagawa, Susumu

    2008-01-01

    Porous coordination polymers (PCPs), which are microporous materials, have been given much attention from both scientific and commercial aspects regarding their application to gas storage, gas separation and catalytic reaction because of the regularity of their pore shape and pore size, accompanied with the functionality. Moreover, in recent years, flexible PCPs, which are structurally transformable depending upon external stimuli, have been attractive because they provide unique properties, dissimilar to those of zeolites. In this review, the chemistry and application of flexible crystalline PCPs are summarized and discussed. PMID:27877934

  3. The double loop mattress suture

    PubMed Central

    Biddlestone, John; Samuel, Madan; Creagh, Terry; Ahmad, Tariq

    2014-01-01

    An interrupted stitch type with favorable tissue characteristics will reduce local wound complications. We describe a novel high-strength, low-tension repair for the interrupted closure of skin, cartilage, and muscle, the double loop mattress stitch, and compare it experimentally with other interrupted closure methods. The performance of the double loop mattress technique in porcine cartilage and skeletal muscle is compared with the simple, mattress, and loop mattress interrupted sutures in both a novel porcine loading chamber and mechanical model. Wound apposition is assessed by electron microscopy. The performance of the double loop mattress in vivo was confirmed using a series of 805 pediatric laparotomies/laparoscopies. The double loop mattress suture is 3.5 times stronger than the loop mattress in muscle and 1.6 times stronger in cartilage (p ≤ 0.001). Additionally, the double loop mattress reduces tissue tension by 66% compared with just 53% for the loop mattress (p ≤ 0.001). Wound gapping is equal, and wound eversion appears significantly improved (p ≤ 0.001) compared with the loop mattress in vitro. In vivo, the double loop mattress performs as well as the loop mattress and significantly better than the mattress stitch in assessments of wound eversion and dehiscence. There were no episodes of stitch extrusion in our series of patients. The mechanical advantage of its intrinsic pulley arrangement gives the double loop mattress its favorable properties. Wound dehiscence is reduced because this stitch type is stronger and exerts less tension on the tissue than the mattress stitch. We advocate the use of this novel stitch wherever a high-strength, low-tension repair is required. These properties will enhance wound repair, and its application will be useful to surgeons of all disciplines. PMID:24698436

  4. Closed-loop active optical system control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, T. E.

    1980-01-01

    A control system, based on a real-time lateral shear interferometer has been developed for use in control during thermal tests and static error compensation experiments. The minicomputer which controls the interferometer and provides its service functions also controls the active system, thereby giving flexibility to the algorithm. The minicomputer system contains 288 K bytes of memory and 15 M bytes of disk storage. The interferometer system employed is composed of the measuring head and its support electronics, a video display on which wavefront contour maps are generated, and a DECwriter operator console. The versatility provided by the use of a general purpose interferometer system allows for interactive control of the closed-loop process. Various arithmetic capabilities such as the addition of wavefronts, division by a constant, and fitting of wavefront data with Zernike polynomials, allow for measurements to be averaged and for removal of alignment errors before correction is performed.

  5. Catalytic Microtube Rocket Igniter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.; Deans, Matthew C.

    2011-01-01

    Devices that generate both high energy and high temperature are required to ignite reliably the propellant mixtures in combustion chambers like those present in rockets and other combustion systems. This catalytic microtube rocket igniter generates these conditions with a small, catalysis-based torch. While traditional spark plug systems can require anywhere from 50 W to multiple kW of power in different applications, this system has demonstrated ignition at less than 25 W. Reactants are fed to the igniter from the same tanks that feed the reactants to the rest of the rocket or combustion system. While this specific igniter was originally designed for liquid methane and liquid oxygen rockets, it can be easily operated with gaseous propellants or modified for hydrogen use in commercial combustion devices. For the present cryogenic propellant rocket case, the main propellant tanks liquid oxygen and liquid methane, respectively are regulated and split into different systems for the individual stages of the rocket and igniter. As the catalyst requires a gas phase for reaction, either the stored boil-off of the tanks can be used directly or one stream each of fuel and oxidizer can go through a heat exchanger/vaporizer that turns the liquid propellants into a gaseous form. For commercial applications, where the reactants are stored as gases, the system is simplified. The resulting gas-phase streams of fuel and oxidizer are then further divided for the individual components of the igniter. One stream each of the fuel and oxidizer is introduced to a mixing bottle/apparatus where they are mixed to a fuel-rich composition with an O/F mass-based mixture ratio of under 1.0. This premixed flow then feeds into the catalytic microtube device. The total flow is on the order of 0.01 g/s. The microtube device is composed of a pair of sub-millimeter diameter platinum tubes connected only at the outlet so that the two outlet flows are parallel to each other. The tubes are each

  6. Unstable anisotropic loop quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, William; Sakellariadou, Mairi

    2009-09-15

    We study stability conditions of the full Hamiltonian constraint equation describing the quantum dynamics of the diagonal Bianchi I model in the context of loop quantum cosmology. Our analysis has shown robust evidence of an instability in the explicit implementation of the difference equation, implying important consequences for the correspondence between the full loop quantum gravity theory and loop quantum cosmology. As a result, one may question the choice of the quantization approach, the model of lattice refinement, and/or the role of the ambiguity parameters; all these should, in principle, be dictated by the full loop quantum gravity theory.

  7. Loop Heat Pipe Startup Behaviors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung

    2016-01-01

    A loop heat pipe must start successfully before it can commence its service. The startup transient represents one of the most complex phenomena in the loop heat pipe operation. This paper discusses various aspects of loop heat pipe startup behaviors. Topics include the four startup scenarios, the initial fluid distribution between the evaporator and reservoir that determines the startup scenario, factors that affect the fluid distribution between the evaporator and reservoir, difficulties encountered during the low power startup, and methods to enhance the startup success. Also addressed are the pressure spike and pressure surge during the startup transient, and repeated cycles of loop startup and shutdown under certain conditions.

  8. Quantitative analysis of regulatory flexibility under changing environmental conditions

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Kieron D; Akman, Ozgur E; Knox, Kirsten; Lumsden, Peter J; Thomson, Adrian W; Brown, Paul E; Pokhilko, Alexandra; Kozma-Bognar, Laszlo; Nagy, Ferenc; Rand, David A; Millar, Andrew J

    2010-01-01

    The circadian clock controls 24-h rhythms in many biological processes, allowing appropriate timing of biological rhythms relative to dawn and dusk. Known clock circuits include multiple, interlocked feedback loops. Theory suggested that multiple loops contribute the flexibility for molecular rhythms to track multiple phases of the external cycle. Clear dawn- and dusk-tracking rhythms illustrate the flexibility of timing in Ipomoea nil. Molecular clock components in Arabidopsis thaliana showed complex, photoperiod-dependent regulation, which was analysed by comparison with three contrasting models. A simple, quantitative measure, Dusk Sensitivity, was introduced to compare the behaviour of clock models with varying loop complexity. Evening-expressed clock genes showed photoperiod-dependent dusk sensitivity, as predicted by the three-loop model, whereas the one- and two-loop models tracked dawn and dusk, respectively. Output genes for starch degradation achieved dusk-tracking expression through light regulation, rather than a dusk-tracking rhythm. Model analysis predicted which biochemical processes could be manipulated to extend dusk tracking. Our results reveal how an operating principle of biological regulators applies specifically to the plant circadian clock. PMID:21045818

  9. Flexible reusable mandrels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willden, Kurtis S. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A reusable laminate mandrel which is unaffected by extreme temperature changes. The flexible laminate mandrel is comprised of sheets stacked to produce the required configuration, a cover wrap that applies pressure to the mandrel laminate, maintaining the stack cross-section. Then after use, the mandrels can be removed, disassembled, and reused. In the method of extracting the flexible mandrel from one end of a composite stiffener, individual ones of the laminae of the flexible mandrel or all are extracted at the same time, depending on severity of the contour.

  10. Flexible Plasmonic Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Shir, Daniel; Ballard, Zachary S.; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical flexibility and the advent of scalable, low-cost, and high-throughput fabrication techniques have enabled numerous potential applications for plasmonic sensors. Sensitive and sophisticated biochemical measurements can now be performed through the use of flexible plasmonic sensors integrated into existing medical and industrial devices or sample collection units. More robust sensing schemes and practical techniques must be further investigated to fully realize the potentials of flexible plasmonics as a framework for designing low-cost, embedded and integrated sensors for medical, environmental, and industrial applications. PMID:27547023

  11. Flexible microstrip antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cano Barrera, Camilo Antonio

    2013-05-01

    Actually the technological community has an interest in developing flexible circuits and antennas with particular characteristics e.g. robust, flexible, lightweight load-bearing, economical and efficient antennas for integrated millimeter wave systems. Microstrip antennas are an excellent solution because those have all the characteristics before mentioned, but they have the problem of being rigid antennas and this makes impossible that those antennas can be use in portable devices. A practical solution is developing flexible microstrip antennas that can be integrated to different devices. One axis of work is the analysis of the electromagnetic field to the microstrip antennas using Bessel function and after generalize for application inflexible microstrip antennas.

  12. Rolling cuff flexible bellows

    DOEpatents

    Lambert, Donald R.

    1985-01-01

    A flexible connector apparatus used to join two stiff non-deformable members, such as piping. The apparatus is provided with one or more flexible sections or assemblies each utilizing a bellows of a rolling cuff type connected between two ridge members, with the bellows being supported by a back-up ring, such that only the curved end sections of the bellows are unsupported. Thus, the bellows can be considered as being of a tube-shaped configuration and thus have high pressure resistance. The components of the flexible apparatus are sealed or welded one to another such that it is fluid tight.

  13. Role of the DELSEED Loop in Torque Transmission of F1-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Tanigawara, Mizue; Tabata, Kazuhito V.; Ito, Yuko; Ito, Jotaro; Watanabe, Rikiya; Ueno, Hiroshi; Ikeguchi, Mitsunori; Noji, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    F1-ATPase is an ATP-driven rotary motor that generates torque at the interface between the catalytic β-subunits and the rotor γ-subunit. The β-subunit inwardly rotates the C-terminal domain upon nucleotide binding/dissociation; hence, the region of the C-terminal domain that is in direct contact with γ—termed the DELSEED loop—is thought to play a critical role in torque transmission. We substituted all the DELSEED loop residues with alanine to diminish specific DELSEED loop-γ interactions and with glycine to disrupt the loop structure. All the mutants rotated unidirectionally with kinetic parameters comparable to those of the wild-type F1, suggesting that the specific interactions between DELSEED loop and γ is not involved in cooperative interplays between the catalytic β-subunits. Glycine substitution mutants generated half the torque of the wild-type F1, whereas the alanine mutant generated comparable torque. Fluctuation analyses of the glycine/alanine mutants revealed that the γ-subunit was less tightly held in the α3β3-stator ring of the glycine mutant than in the wild-type F1 and the alanine mutant. Molecular dynamics simulation showed that the DELSEED loop was disordered by the glycine substitution, whereas it formed an α-helix in the alanine mutant. Our results emphasize the importance of loop rigidity for efficient torque transmissions. PMID:23009846

  14. Loop-the-Loop: Bringing Theory into Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suwonjandee, N.; Asavapibhop, B.

    2012-01-01

    During the Thai high-school physics teacher training programme, we used an aluminum loop-the-loop system built by the Institute for the Promotion of Teaching Science and Technology (IPST) to demonstrate a circular motion and investigate the concept of the conservation of mechanical energy. There were 27 high-school teachers from three provinces,…

  15. Loop-the-Loop: Bringing Theory into Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suwonjandee, N.; Asavapibhop, B.

    2012-01-01

    During the Thai high-school physics teacher training programme, we used an aluminum loop-the-loop system built by the Institute for the Promotion of Teaching Science and Technology (IPST) to demonstrate a circular motion and investigate the concept of the conservation of mechanical energy. There were 27 high-school teachers from three provinces,…

  16. A conserved P-loop anchor limits the structural dynamics that mediate nucleotide dissociation in EF-Tu

    PubMed Central

    Mercier, Evan; Girodat, Dylan; Wieden, Hans-Joachim

    2015-01-01

    The phosphate-binding loop (P-loop) is a conserved sequence motif found in mononucleotide-binding proteins. Little is known about the structural dynamics of this region and its contribution to the observed nucleotide binding properties. Understanding the underlying design principles is of great interest for biomolecular engineering applications. We have used rapid-kinetics measurements in vitro and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in silico to investigate the relationship between GTP-binding properties and P-loop structural dynamics in the universally conserved Elongation Factor (EF) Tu. Analysis of wild type EF-Tu and variants with substitutions at positions in or adjacent to the P-loop revealed a correlation between P-loop flexibility and the entropy of activation for GTP dissociation. The same variants demonstrate more backbone flexibility in two N-terminal amino acids of the P-loop during force-induced EF-Tu·GTP dissociation in Steered Molecular Dynamics simulations. Amino acids Gly18 and His19 are involved in stabilizing the P-loop backbone via interactions with the adjacent helix C. We propose that these P-loop/helix C interactions function as a conserved P-loop anchoring module and identify the presence of P-loop anchors within several GTPases and ATPases suggesting their evolutionary conservation. PMID:25566871

  17. A conserved P-loop anchor limits the structural dynamics that mediate nucleotide dissociation in EF-Tu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercier, Evan; Girodat, Dylan; Wieden, Hans-Joachim

    2015-01-01

    The phosphate-binding loop (P-loop) is a conserved sequence motif found in mononucleotide-binding proteins. Little is known about the structural dynamics of this region and its contribution to the observed nucleotide binding properties. Understanding the underlying design principles is of great interest for biomolecular engineering applications. We have used rapid-kinetics measurements in vitro and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in silico to investigate the relationship between GTP-binding properties and P-loop structural dynamics in the universally conserved Elongation Factor (EF) Tu. Analysis of wild type EF-Tu and variants with substitutions at positions in or adjacent to the P-loop revealed a correlation between P-loop flexibility and the entropy of activation for GTP dissociation. The same variants demonstrate more backbone flexibility in two N-terminal amino acids of the P-loop during force-induced EF-Tu.GTP dissociation in Steered Molecular Dynamics simulations. Amino acids Gly18 and His19 are involved in stabilizing the P-loop backbone via interactions with the adjacent helix C. We propose that these P-loop/helix C interactions function as a conserved P-loop anchoring module and identify the presence of P-loop anchors within several GTPases and ATPases suggesting their evolutionary conservation.

  18. A conserved P-loop anchor limits the structural dynamics that mediate nucleotide dissociation in EF-Tu.

    PubMed

    Mercier, Evan; Girodat, Dylan; Wieden, Hans-Joachim

    2015-01-08

    The phosphate-binding loop (P-loop) is a conserved sequence motif found in mononucleotide-binding proteins. Little is known about the structural dynamics of this region and its contribution to the observed nucleotide binding properties. Understanding the underlying design principles is of great interest for biomolecular engineering applications. We have used rapid-kinetics measurements in vitro and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in silico to investigate the relationship between GTP-binding properties and P-loop structural dynamics in the universally conserved Elongation Factor (EF) Tu. Analysis of wild type EF-Tu and variants with substitutions at positions in or adjacent to the P-loop revealed a correlation between P-loop flexibility and the entropy of activation for GTP dissociation. The same variants demonstrate more backbone flexibility in two N-terminal amino acids of the P-loop during force-induced EF-Tu · GTP dissociation in Steered Molecular Dynamics simulations. Amino acids Gly18 and His19 are involved in stabilizing the P-loop backbone via interactions with the adjacent helix C. We propose that these P-loop/helix C interactions function as a conserved P-loop anchoring module and identify the presence of P-loop anchors within several GTPases and ATPases suggesting their evolutionary conservation.

  19. Catalytic gasification of biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertus, R. J.; Mudge, L. K.; Sealock, L. J., Jr.; Mitchell, D. H.; Weber, S. L.

    1981-12-01

    Methane and methanol synthesis gas can be produced by steam gasification of biomass in the presence of appropriate catalysts. This concept is to use catalysts in a fluidized bed reactor which is heated indirectly. The objective is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of the concept. Technically the concept has been demonstrated on a 50 lb per hr scale. Potential advantages over conventional processes include: no oxygen plant is needed, little tar is produced so gas and water treatment are simplified, and yields and efficiencies are greater than obtained by conventional gasification. Economic studies for a plant processing 2000 T/per day dry wood show that the cost of methanol from wood by catalytic gasification is competitive with the current price of methanol. Similar studies show the cost of methane from wood is competitive with projected future costs of synthetic natural gas. When the plant capacity is decreased to 200 T per day dry wood, neither product is very attractive in today's market.

  20. Catalytic Membrane Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, T.J.; Brinker, C.J.; Gardner, T.J.; Hughes, R.C.; Sault, A.G.

    1998-12-01

    The proposed "catalytic membrane sensor" (CMS) was developed to generate a device which would selectively identify a specific reagent in a complex mixture of gases. This was to be accomplished by modifying an existing Hz sensor with a series of thin films. Through selectively sieving the desired component from a complex mixture and identifying it by decomposing it into Hz (and other by-products), a Hz sensor could then be used to detect the presence of the select component. The proposed "sandwich-type" modifications involved the deposition of a catalyst layered between two size selective sol-gel layers on a Pd/Ni resistive Hz sensor. The role of the catalyst was to convert organic materials to Hz and organic by-products. The role of the membraneo was to impart both chemical specificity by molecukir sieving of the analyte and converted product streams, as well as controlling access to the underlying Pd/Ni sensor. Ultimately, an array of these CMS elements encompassing different catalysts and membranes were to be developed which would enable improved selectivity and specificity from a compiex mixture of organic gases via pattern recognition methodologies. We have successfully generated a CMS device by a series of spin-coat deposited methods; however, it was determined that the high temperature required to activate the catalyst, destroys the sensor.

  1. Catalytic cracking process

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, R.L.; Perigard, R.G.; Rabo, J.A.

    1989-08-08

    This patent describes a process for catalytic cracking of hydrocarbon feedstocks. It comprises contacting the hydrocarbon feedstock under conditions effective to crack the feedstock with a catalyst. The catalyst is prepared by a process comprising the following step: contacting a fluid mixture of a large pore zeolite having a SiO/sub 2/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ ratio of about 3.5 to less than about 20 and an inorganic oxide matrix, with a fluoro salt of the formula A/sub (n-m)/(MF/sub n/)/sub z/. Wherein A is an organic or inorganic ionic moiety; (MF/sub n/)/sub z/ is a fluoroanion moiety comprising the element M; M is an element selected from the group of elements for Groups VB, VIB, VII, IIIA, IVA and VA of the Periodic Table of Elements; n is the coordination number of M; m is the valence of M and z is the valence or charge associated with A, at an effective pH value greater than about 3, at effective conditions of temperature and time to produce a catalyst product, whereby the cracking activity of the zeolite is enhanced.

  2. Vortex loops and Majoranas

    SciTech Connect

    Chesi, Stefano; Jaffe, Arthur; Loss, Daniel; Pedrocchi, Fabio L.

    2013-11-15

    We investigate the role that vortex loops play in characterizing eigenstates of interacting Majoranas. We give some general results and then focus on ladder Hamiltonian examples as a test of further ideas. Two methods yield exact results: (i) A mapping of certain spin Hamiltonians to quartic interactions of Majoranas shows that the spectra of these two examples coincide. (ii) In cases with reflection-symmetric Hamiltonians, we use reflection positivity for Majoranas to characterize vortices in the ground states. Two additional methods suggest wider applicability of these results: (iii) Numerical evidence suggests similar behavior for certain systems without reflection symmetry. (iv) A perturbative analysis also suggests similar behavior without the assumption of reflection symmetry.

  3. Dynamic PID loop control

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, L.; Klebaner, A.; Theilacker, J.; Soyars, W.; Martinez, A.; Bossert, R.; DeGraff, B.; Darve, C.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-01

    The Horizontal Test Stand (HTS) SRF Cavity and Cryomodule 1 (CM1) of eight 9-cell, 1.3GHz SRF cavities are operating at Fermilab. For the cryogenic control system, how to hold liquid level constant in the cryostat by regulation of its Joule-Thompson JT-valve is very important after cryostat cool down to 2.0 K. The 72-cell cryostat liquid level response generally takes a long time delay after regulating its JT-valve; therefore, typical PID control loop should result in some cryostat parameter oscillations. This paper presents a type of PID parameter self-optimal and Time-Delay control method used to reduce cryogenic system parameters oscillation.

  4. Pulse thermal loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weislogel, Mark M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A pulse thermal loop heat transfer system includes a means to use pressure rises in a pair of evaporators to circulate a heat transfer fluid. The system includes one or more valves that iteratively, alternately couple the outlets the evaporators to the condenser. While flow proceeds from one of the evaporators to the condenser, heating creates a pressure rise in the other evaporator, which has its outlet blocked to prevent fluid from exiting the other evaporator. When the flow path is reconfigured to allow flow from the other evaporator to the condenser, the pressure in the other evaporator is used to circulate a pulse of fluid through the system. The reconfiguring of the flow path, by actuating or otherwise changing the configuration of the one or more valves, may be triggered when a predetermined pressure difference between the evaporators is reached.

  5. Uranyl Nitrate Flow Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Ladd-Lively, Jennifer L

    2008-10-01

    The objectives of the work discussed in this report were to: (1) develop a flow loop that would simulate the purified uranium-bearing aqueous stream exiting the solvent extraction process in a natural uranium conversion plant (NUCP); (2) develop a test plan that would simulate normal operation and disturbances that could be anticipated in an NUCP; (3) use the flow loop to test commercially available flowmeters for use as safeguards monitors; and (4) recommend a flowmeter for production-scale testing at an NUCP. There has been interest in safeguarding conversion plants because the intermediate products [uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}), uranium tetrafluoride (UF{sub 4}), and uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6})] are all suitable uranium feedstocks for producing special nuclear materials. Furthermore, if safeguards are not applied virtually any nuclear weapons program can obtain these feedstocks without detection by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Historically, IAEA had not implemented safeguards until the purified UF{sub 6} product was declared as feedstock for enrichment plants. H. A. Elayat et al. provide a basic definition of a safeguards system: 'The function of a safeguards system on a chemical conversion plant is in general terms to verify that no useful nuclear material is being diverted to use in a nuclear weapons program'. The IAEA now considers all highly purified uranium compounds as candidates for safeguarding. DOE is currently interested in 'developing instruments, tools, strategies, and methods that could be of use to the IAEA in the application of safeguards' for materials found in the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle-prior to the production of the uranium hexafluoride or oxides that have been the traditional starting point for IAEA safeguards. Several national laboratories, including Oak Ridge, Los Alamos, Lawrence Livermore, and Brookhaven, have been involved in developing tools or techniques for safeguarding conversion plants. This study

  6. Loop gravity string

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freidel, Laurent; Perez, Alejandro; Pranzetti, Daniele

    2017-05-01

    In this work we study canonical gravity in finite regions for which we introduce a generalization of the Gibbons-Hawking boundary term including the Immirzi parameter. We study the canonical formulation on a spacelike hypersurface with a boundary sphere and show how the presence of this term leads to an unprecedented type of degrees of freedom coming from the restoration of the gauge and diffeomorphism symmetry at the boundary. In the presence of a loop quantum gravity state, these boundary degrees of freedom localize along a set of punctures on the boundary sphere. We demonstrate that these degrees of freedom are effectively described by auxiliary strings with a three-dimensional internal target space attached to each puncture. We show that the string currents represent the local frame field, that the string angular momenta represent the area flux, and that the string stress tensor represents the two-dimensional metric on the boundary of the region of interest. Finally, we show that the commutators of these broken diffeomorphism charges of quantum geometry satisfy, at each puncture, a Virasoro algebra with central charge c =3 . This leads to a description of the boundary degrees of freedom in terms of a CFT structure with central charge proportional to the number of loop punctures. The boundary S U (2 ) gauge symmetry is recovered via the action of the U (1 )3 Kac-Moody generators (associated with the string current) in a way that is the exact analog of an infinite dimensional generalization of the Schwinger spin representation. We finally show that this symmetry is broken by the presence of background curvature.

  7. Loop Quantum Gravity.

    PubMed

    Rovelli, Carlo

    2008-01-01

    The problem of describing the quantum behavior of gravity, and thus understanding quantum spacetime, is still open. Loop quantum gravity is a well-developed approach to this problem. It is a mathematically well-defined background-independent quantization of general relativity, with its conventional matter couplings. Today research in loop quantum gravity forms a vast area, ranging from mathematical foundations to physical applications. Among the most significant results obtained so far are: (i) The computation of the spectra of geometrical quantities such as area and volume, which yield tentative quantitative predictions for Planck-scale physics. (ii) A physical picture of the microstructure of quantum spacetime, characterized by Planck-scale discreteness. Discreteness emerges as a standard quantum effect from the discrete spectra, and provides a mathematical realization of Wheeler's "spacetime foam" intuition. (iii) Control of spacetime singularities, such as those in the interior of black holes and the cosmological one. This, in particular, has opened up the possibility of a theoretical investigation into the very early universe and the spacetime regions beyond the Big Bang. (iv) A derivation of the Bekenstein-Hawking black-hole entropy. (v) Low-energy calculations, yielding n-point functions well defined in a background-independent context. The theory is at the roots of, or strictly related to, a number of formalisms that have been developed for describing background-independent quantum field theory, such as spin foams, group field theory, causal spin networks, and others. I give here a general overview of ideas, techniques, results and open problems of this candidate theory of quantum gravity, and a guide to the relevant literature.

  8. ModLoop: automated modeling of loops in protein structures.

    PubMed

    Fiser, András; Sali, Andrej

    2003-12-12

    ModLoop is a web server for automated modeling of loops in protein structures. The input is the atomic coordinates of the protein structure in the Protein Data Bank format, and the specification of the starting and ending residues of one or more segments to be modeled, containing no more than 20 residues in total. The output is the coordinates of the non-hydrogen atoms in the modeled segments. A user provides the input to the server via a simple web interface, and receives the output by e-mail. The server relies on the loop modeling routine in MODELLER that predicts the loop conformations by satisfaction of spatial restraints, without relying on a database of known protein structures. For a rapid response, ModLoop runs on a cluster of Linux PC computers. The server is freely accessible to academic users at http://salilab.org/modloop

  9. Fast loop modeling for protein structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiong; Nguyen, Son; Shang, Yi; Xu, Dong; Kosztin, Ioan

    2015-03-01

    X-ray crystallography is the main method for determining 3D protein structures. In many cases, however, flexible loop regions of proteins cannot be resolved by this approach. This leads to incomplete structures in the protein data bank, preventing further computational study and analysis of these proteins. For instance, all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies of structure-function relationship require complete protein structures. To address this shortcoming, we have developed and implemented an efficient computational method for building missing protein loops. The method is database driven and uses deep learning and multi-dimensional scaling algorithms. We have implemented the method as a simple stand-alone program, which can also be used as a plugin in existing molecular modeling software, e.g., VMD. The quality and stability of the generated structures are assessed and tested via energy scoring functions and by equilibrium MD simulations. The proposed method can also be used in template-based protein structure prediction. Work supported by the National Institutes of Health [R01 GM100701]. Computer time was provided by the University of Missouri Bioinformatics Consortium.

  10. Optimization-based design of control systems for flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polak, E.; Baker, T. E.; Wuu, T-L.; Harn, Y-P.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to show that it is possible to use nonsmooth optimization algorithms to design both closed-loop finite dimensional compensators and open-loop optimal controls for flexible structures modeled by partial differential equations. An important feature of our approach is that it does not require modal decomposition and hence is immune to instabilities caused by spillover effects. Furthermore, it can be used to design control systems for structures that are modeled by mixed systems of coupled ordinary and partial differential equations.

  11. GROMACS: fast, flexible, and free.

    PubMed

    Van Der Spoel, David; Lindahl, Erik; Hess, Berk; Groenhof, Gerrit; Mark, Alan E; Berendsen, Herman J C

    2005-12-01

    This article describes the software suite GROMACS (Groningen MAchine for Chemical Simulation) that was developed at the University of Groningen, The Netherlands, in the early 1990s. The software, written in ANSI C, originates from a parallel hardware project, and is well suited for parallelization on processor clusters. By careful optimization of neighbor searching and of inner loop performance, GROMACS is a very fast program for molecular dynamics simulation. It does not have a force field of its own, but is compatible with GROMOS, OPLS, AMBER, and ENCAD force fields. In addition, it can handle polarizable shell models and flexible constraints. The program is versatile, as force routines can be added by the user, tabulated functions can be specified, and analyses can be easily customized. Nonequilibrium dynamics and free energy determinations are incorporated. Interfaces with popular quantum-chemical packages (MOPAC, GAMES-UK, GAUSSIAN) are provided to perform mixed MM/QM simulations. The package includes about 100 utility and analysis programs. GROMACS is in the public domain and distributed (with source code and documentation) under the GNU General Public License. It is maintained by a group of developers from the Universities of Groningen, Uppsala, and Stockholm, and the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research in Mainz. Its Web site is http://www.gromacs.org.

  12. Composite flexible blanket insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, Demetrius A. (Inventor); Lowe, David M. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An improved composite flexible blanket insulation is presented comprising top silicon carbide having an interlock design, wherein the reflective shield is composed of single or double aluminized polyimide and wherein the polyimide film has a honeycomb pattern.

  13. Flexible Transcription Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr-Smith, Norma

    1976-01-01

    Flexible structure in a San Francisco State University shorthand course is described as a way to provide motivation for students. Topics discussed are transcription testing plan, method of evaluation, practice tests, increasing difficulty of tests, and classroom results. (TA)

  14. Flexible Polyhedral Surfaces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexandrov, V. A.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses some questions connected with Cauchy's theorem which states that two convex closed polyhedral surfaces whose corresponding faces are congruent and whose faces adjoin each other in the same way are congruent. Describes how to construct a flexible polyhedron. (ASK)

  15. Flexible display enabling technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Sigurd; Fonash, Stephen J.; Jackson, Thomas N.; Sturm, James C.

    2001-09-01

    In a collaboration between Pennsylvania State University and Princeton University, we have been laying the foundations for flexible display technology. Flexible substrates including plastic or steel foil, backplanes of organic or silicone transistors, and directly printed RGB organic light emitting diodes are issues central to this collaboration. We present an overview of key recent results. Silicon based thin film transistors have been processed at the ultralow temperatures required for processing on plastic substrates. Organic thin film transistors and circuits with record mobilities have been fabricated that are naturally matched to low temperature substrates. Organic light emitting diodes have been made by inkjet printing in an approach that solves the RGB patterning problem of OLED displays. The mechanics of flexible substrates have been defined and thin film silicon transistor performance is shown to be unaffected by bending. Substantial progress has been made toward the realization of rugged, lightweight, flexible and even conformal displays.

  16. Flexibility of zeolite frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapko, Vitaliy; Treacy, Michael; Thorpe, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Zeolites are an important class of industrial catalysts because of their large internal surfaces and molecular-sieving properties. Recent geometric simulations (1) show that almost all of the known zeolites can exist without distortion of their tetrahedra within some range of densities, which we call the flexibility window. Within this window, the framework accommodates density changes by rotations about the shared tetrahedral corners. We argue that the presence of a flexibility window can be used as a topological criterion to select potential candidates for synthesis from millions of hypothetical structures. We also investigate the exceptions to the rule, as well as the shape of the flexibility window and the symmetric properties of zeolites inside it. (1) A. Sartbaeva, S.A. Wells, M.M.J. Treacy and M.F. Thorpe The flexibility window in zeolites, Nature Materials 5, 962-965 (2006); I. Rivin, commentary 931-932.

  17. Are flexible designs sound?

    PubMed

    Burman, Carl-Fredrik; Sonesson, Christian

    2006-09-01

    Flexible designs allow large modifications of a design during an experiment. In particular, the sample size can be modified in response to interim data or external information. A standard flexible methodology combines such design modifications with a weighted test, which guarantees the type I error level. However, this inference violates basic inference principles. In an example with independent N(mu, 1) observations, the test rejects the null hypothesis of mu < or = 0 while the average of the observations is negative. We conclude that flexible design in its most general form with the corresponding weighted test is not valid. Several possible modifications of the flexible design methodology are discussed with a focus on alternative hypothesis tests.

  18. Catalytic reforming of naphtha fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, K.C.; Vorhis, F.H.

    1980-09-16

    Production of motor gasoline and a btx-enriched reformate by fractionating a naphtha feedstock into a mid-boiling btxprecursor fraction, a relatively high-boiling fraction and a relatively low-boiling fraction; catalytically reforming the btxprecursor fraction in a first reforming zone; combining the relatively high-boiling and low-boiling fractions and catalytically reforming the combined fractions in a second reforming zone.

  19. Radiation/Catalytic Augmented Combustion.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    VUV wavelengths 157 nm (F2) and 193 nm (ArF). Radiative ignitions were achieved with the fluorine laser and not with the argon fluoride laser, even...enhanced combustion processes, utilizing pulsed and continuous VUV light-serces. Similarly, the catalytic technique has provided efficient combustion...ignited fuel-air mixtures, and has enhanced combustion processes, utilizing pulsed and continuous VUV light sources. Similarly, the catalytic technique has

  20. Improved code-tracking loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laflame, D. T.

    1980-01-01

    Delay-locked loop tracks pseudonoise codes without introducing dc timing errors, because it is not sensitive to gain imbalance between signal processing arms. "Early" and "late" reference codes pass in combined form through both arms, and each arm acts on both codes. Circuit accomodates 1 dB weaker input signals with tracking ability equal to that of tau-dither loops.

  1. The Projectile Inside the Loop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varieschi, Gabriele U.

    2006-01-01

    The loop-the-loop demonstration can be easily adapted to study the kinematics of projectile motion, when the moving body falls inside the apparatus. Video capturing software can be used to reveal peculiar geometrical effects of this simple but educational experiment.

  2. RCD+: Fast loop modeling server.

    PubMed

    López-Blanco, José Ramón; Canosa-Valls, Alejandro Jesús; Li, Yaohang; Chacón, Pablo

    2016-07-08

    Modeling loops is a critical and challenging step in protein modeling and prediction. We have developed a quick online service (http://rcd.chaconlab.org) for ab initio loop modeling combining a coarse-grained conformational search with a full-atom refinement. Our original Random Coordinate Descent (RCD) loop closure algorithm has been greatly improved to enrich the sampling distribution towards near-native conformations. These improvements include a new workflow optimization, MPI-parallelization and fast backbone angle sampling based on neighbor-dependent Ramachandran probability distributions. The server starts by efficiently searching the vast conformational space from only the loop sequence information and the environment atomic coordinates. The generated closed loop models are subsequently ranked using a fast distance-orientation dependent energy filter. Top ranked loops are refined with the Rosetta energy function to obtain accurate all-atom predictions that can be interactively inspected in an user-friendly web interface. Using standard benchmarks, the average root mean squared deviation (RMSD) is 0.8 and 1.4 Å for 8 and 12 residues loops, respectively, in the challenging modeling scenario in where the side chains of the loop environment are fully remodeled. These results are not only very competitive compared to those obtained with public state of the art methods, but also they are obtained ∼10-fold faster. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. RCD+: Fast loop modeling server

    PubMed Central

    López-Blanco, José Ramón; Canosa-Valls, Alejandro Jesús; Li, Yaohang; Chacón, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Modeling loops is a critical and challenging step in protein modeling and prediction. We have developed a quick online service (http://rcd.chaconlab.org) for ab initio loop modeling combining a coarse-grained conformational search with a full-atom refinement. Our original Random Coordinate Descent (RCD) loop closure algorithm has been greatly improved to enrich the sampling distribution towards near-native conformations. These improvements include a new workflow optimization, MPI-parallelization and fast backbone angle sampling based on neighbor-dependent Ramachandran probability distributions. The server starts by efficiently searching the vast conformational space from only the loop sequence information and the environment atomic coordinates. The generated closed loop models are subsequently ranked using a fast distance-orientation dependent energy filter. Top ranked loops are refined with the Rosetta energy function to obtain accurate all-atom predictions that can be interactively inspected in an user-friendly web interface. Using standard benchmarks, the average root mean squared deviation (RMSD) is 0.8 and 1.4 Å for 8 and 12 residues loops, respectively, in the challenging modeling scenario in where the side chains of the loop environment are fully remodeled. These results are not only very competitive compared to those obtained with public state of the art methods, but also they are obtained ∼10-fold faster. PMID:27151199

  4. The Projectile Inside the Loop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varieschi, Gabriele U.

    2006-01-01

    The loop-the-loop demonstration can be easily adapted to study the kinematics of projectile motion, when the moving body falls inside the apparatus. Video capturing software can be used to reveal peculiar geometrical effects of this simple but educational experiment.

  5. Megawatt Scale Hardware-in-the-Loop Testing of a High Speed Generator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-01

    measure the torque and speed on the high speed shaft . A flexible coupling with shear section, constructed by Coupling Corporation of America, is used...gearbox used to deliver up to 5 MW to the mechanical shaft of a generator at speeds of up to 24000 rpm. A rectifier using fast recovery diodes is...loop (HIL) simulation experiments provide a flexible and often cost effective way to exercise equipment and controllers in a realistic environment

  6. Implementing Audio Digital Feedback Loop Using the National Instruments RIO System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, G.; Byrd, J. M.

    2006-11-01

    Development of system for high precision RF distribution and laser synchronization at Berkeley Lab has been ongoing for several years. Successful operation of these systems requires multiple audio bandwidth feedback loops running at relatively high gains. Stable operation of the feedback loops requires careful design of the feedback transfer function. To allow for flexible and compact implementation, we have developed digital feedback loops on the National Instruments Reconfigurable Input/Output (RIO) platform. This platform uses an FPGA and multiple I/Os that can provide eight parallel channels running different filters. We present the design and preliminary experimental results of this system.

  7. Oligonucleotide microarrays with stem-loop probes: enhancing the hybridization of nucleic acids for sensitive analysis.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Shweta; Swami, Archana; Sethi, Dalip; Kumar, P; Gupta, K C

    2008-06-15

    We have demonstrated that the dynamics of nucleic acid hybridization in microarrays depend on the physical structure of immobilized probes. We have immobilized oligonucleotide-3'-phosphates with and without stem-loop structure on epoxylated glass surface, followed by hybridization under different conditions, viz., hybridization buffer, pH condition, temperature and ionic strength. In a comparative study, we have established that array constructed using probes with stem-loop structure displayed approximately 2.2 times higher hybridization signals than the probes without it. The stem-loop DNA array format is simple and flexible in design and thus potentially useful in various DNA diagnostic tests.

  8. Loop-bed combustion apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Shang, Jer-Yu; Mei, Joseph S.; Slagle, Frank D.; Notestein, John E.

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a combustion apparatus in the configuration of a oblong annulus defining a closed loop. Particulate coal together with a sulfur sorbent such as sulfur or dolomite is introduced into the closed loop, ignited, and propelled at a high rate of speed around the loop. Flue gas is withdrawn from a location in the closed loop in close proximity to an area in the loop where centrifugal force imposed upon the larger particulate material maintains these particulates at a location spaced from the flue gas outlet. Only flue gas and smaller particulates resulting from the combustion and innerparticle grinding are discharged from the combustor. This structural arrangement provides increased combustion efficiency due to the essentially complete combustion of the coal particulates as well as increased sulfur absorption due to the innerparticle grinding of the sorbent which provides greater particle surface area.

  9. Loop Heat Pipe Startup Behaviors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung

    2014-01-01

    A loop heat pipe must start successfully before it can commence its service. The start-up transient represents one of the most complex phenomena in the loop heat pipe operation. This paper discusses various aspects of loop heat pipe start-up behaviors. Topics include the four start-up scenarios, the initial fluid distribution between the evaporator and reservoir that determines the start-up scenario, factors that affect the fluid distribution between the evaporator and reservoir, difficulties encountered during the low power start-up, and methods to enhance the start-up success. Also addressed are the thermodynamic constraint between the evaporator and reservoir in the loop heat pipe operation, the superheat requirement for nucleate boiling, pressure spike and pressure surge during the start-up transient, and repeated cycles of loop start-up andshutdown under certain conditions.

  10. Higher dimensional loop quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangdong

    2016-07-01

    Loop quantum cosmology (LQC) is the symmetric sector of loop quantum gravity. In this paper, we generalize the structure of loop quantum cosmology to the theories with arbitrary spacetime dimensions. The isotropic and homogeneous cosmological model in n+1 dimensions is quantized by the loop quantization method. Interestingly, we find that the underlying quantum theories are divided into two qualitatively different sectors according to spacetime dimensions. The effective Hamiltonian and modified dynamical equations of n+1 dimensional LQC are obtained. Moreover, our results indicate that the classical big bang singularity is resolved in arbitrary spacetime dimensions by a quantum bounce. We also briefly discuss the similarities and differences between the n+1 dimensional model and the 3+1 dimensional one. Our model serves as a first example of higher dimensional loop quantum cosmology and offers the possibility to investigate quantum gravity effects in higher dimensional cosmology.

  11. Wilson Loop Diagrams and Positroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwala, Susama; Marin-Amat, Eloi

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we study a new application of the positive Grassmannian to Wilson loop diagrams (or MHV diagrams) for scattering amplitudes in N= 4 Super Yang-Mill theory ( N = 4 SYM). There has been much interest in studying this theory via the positive Grassmannians using BCFW recursion. This is the first attempt to study MHV diagrams for planar Wilson loop calculations (or planar amplitudes) in terms of positive Grassmannians. We codify Wilson loop diagrams completely in terms of matroids. This allows us to apply the combinatorial tools in matroid theory used to identify positroids (non-negative Grassmannians) to Wilson loop diagrams. In doing so, we find that certain non-planar Wilson loop diagrams define positive Grassmannians. While non-planar diagrams do not have physical meaning, this finding suggests that they may have value as an algebraic tool, and deserve further investigation.

  12. Genetically engineered immunoglobulins reveal structural features controlling segmental flexibility.

    PubMed

    Schneider, W P; Wensel, T G; Stryer, L; Oi, V T

    1988-04-01

    We have carried out nanosecond fluorescence polarization studies of genetically engineered immunoglobulins to determine the structural features controlling their segmental flexibility. The proteins studied were hybrids of a relatively rigid isotype (mouse IgG1) and a relatively flexible one (mouse IgG2a). They have identical light chains and heavy chain variable regions and have the same combining sites for epsilon-dansyl-L-lysine, a fluorescent hapten. The fluorescence of the bound dansyl chromophore was excited at 348 nm with subnanosecond laser pulses, and the emission in the nanosecond time range was measured with a single-photon-counting apparatus. The emission anisotropy kinetics of the hybrid antibodies revealed that segmental flexibility is controlled by the heavy chain constant region 1 (CH1) as well as by the hinge. In contrast, the CH2 and CH3 domains did not influence segmental flexibility. The hinge and CH1 domains must be properly matched to allow facile movement of the Fab units. Studies of hybrids of IgG1 and IgG2a within CH1 showed that the loop formed by residues 131-139 is important in controlling segmental flexibility. X-ray crystallographic studies by others of human IgG1 have shown that this loop makes several van der Waals contacts with the hinge.

  13. Stability of solar coronal loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goedbloed, J. P.

    1990-05-01

    The equations of magnetohydrodynamics do not contain an intrinsic length scale determining the size of phenomena. Hence, size only enters through the external geometrical properties of the configurations considered. This is one of the reasons why tokamaks and solar coronal loops may be considered as similar objects. The equations of MHD do not distinguish between the two. It is only the geometry and, hence, the boundary conditions that discriminate between them. Whereas for tokamaks toroidal periodicity and normal confinement provide the appropriate boundary conditions, for coronal loops line-tying at the photosphere and some prescription for the behavior across the ``edge'' of the loop determine the solutions. The latter is a more complicated problem and gives rise to even more complex dynamics than encountered in tokamaks. Here, we consider the influence of the two mentioned groups of boundary conditions for the problem of the stability and disruption of a solar coronal loop. We consider the stability properties of a single loop with twisted magnetic field lines under the simultaneous influence of photospheric line-tying and constraining by neighboring flux loops. The loops would be violently unstable without these two ingredients (i.e. for the corresponding tokamak problem). It is shown that line-tying alone in not sufficient for stability, but the neighboring flux tubes provide a normal boundary condition similar to a conducting shell in tokamaks. This stabilization gets lost on the time scale associated with reconnection of the tangetial magnetic field discontinuities present in the many-loop system. On this time scale the magnetic energy, which has been built up during the twisting of the field lines, gets released, resulting in a disruption of the loop. This process may be considered as the single loop variant of Parker's solar flare model.

  14. Electro Catalytic Oxidation (ECO) Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan Jones

    2011-03-31

    The power industry in the United States is faced with meeting many new regulations to reduce a number of air pollutants including sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, fine particulate matter, and mercury. With over 1,000 power plants in the US, this is a daunting task. In some cases, traditional pollution control technologies such as wet scrubbers and SCRs are not feasible. Powerspan's Electro-Catalytic Oxidation, or ECO{reg_sign} process combines four pollution control devices into a single integrated system that can be installed after a power plant's particulate control device. Besides achieving major reductions in emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NOx), fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and mercury (Hg), ECO produces a highly marketable fertilizer, which can help offset the operating costs of the process system. Powerspan has been operating a 50-MW ECO commercial demonstration unit (CDU) at FirstEnergy Corp.'s R.E. Burger Plant near Shadyside, Ohio, since February 2004. In addition to the CDU, a test loop has been constructed beside the CDU to demonstrate higher NOx removal rates and test various scrubber packing types and wet ESP configurations. Furthermore, Powerspan has developed the ECO{reg_sign}{sub 2} technology, a regenerative process that uses a proprietary solvent to capture CO{sub 2} from flue gas. The CO{sub 2} capture takes place after the capture of NOx, SO{sub 2}, mercury, and fine particulate matter. Once the CO{sub 2} is captured, the proprietary solution is regenerated to release CO{sub 2} in a form that is ready for geological storage or beneficial use. Pilot scale testing of ECO{sub 2} began in early 2009 at FirstEnergy's Burger Plant. The ECO{sub 2} pilot unit is designed to process a 1-MW flue gas stream and produce 20 tons of CO{sub 2} per day, achieving a 90% CO{sub 2} capture rate. The ECO{sub 2} pilot program provided the opportunity to confirm process design and cost estimates, and prepare for large scale capture and

  15. A conserved loop in polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase) essential for both RNA and ADP/phosphate binding.

    PubMed

    Carzaniga, Thomas; Mazzantini, Elisa; Nardini, Marco; Regonesi, Maria Elena; Greco, Claudio; Briani, Federica; De Gioia, Luca; Dehò, Gianni; Tortora, Paolo

    2014-02-01

    Polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase) reversibly catalyzes RNA phosphorolysis and polymerization of nucleoside diphosphates. Its homotrimeric structure forms a central channel where RNA is accommodated. Each protomer core is formed by two paralogous RNase PH domains: PNPase1, whose function is largely unknown, hosts a conserved FFRR loop interacting with RNA, whereas PNPase2 bears the putative catalytic site, ∼20 Å away from the FFRR loop. To date, little is known regarding PNPase catalytic mechanism. We analyzed the kinetic properties of two Escherichia coli PNPase mutants in the FFRR loop (R79A and R80A), which exhibited a dramatic increase in Km for ADP/Pi binding, but not for poly(A), suggesting that the two residues may be essential for binding ADP and Pi. However, both mutants were severely impaired in shifting RNA electrophoretic mobility, implying that the two arginines contribute also to RNA binding. Additional interactions between RNA and other PNPase domains (such as KH and S1) may preserve the enzymatic activity in R79A and R80A mutants. Inspection of enzyme structure showed that PNPase has evolved a long-range acting hydrogen bonding network that connects the FFRR loop with the catalytic site via the F380 residue. This hypothesis was supported by mutation analysis. Phylogenetic analysis of PNPase domains and RNase PH suggests that such network is a unique feature of PNPase1 domain, which coevolved with the paralogous PNPase2 domain.

  16. Rationally designed coiled-coil DNA looping peptides control DNA topology

    PubMed Central

    Gowetski, Daniel B.; Kodis, Erin J.; Kahn, Jason D.

    2013-01-01

    Artificial DNA looping peptides were engineered to study the roles of protein and DNA flexibility in controlling the geometry and stability of protein-mediated DNA loops. These LZD (leucine zipper dual-binding) peptides were derived by fusing a second, C-terminal, DNA-binding region onto the GCN4 bZip peptide. Two variants with different coiled-coil lengths were designed to control the relative orientations of DNA bound at each end. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays verified formation of a sandwich complex containing two DNAs and one peptide. Ring closure experiments demonstrated that looping requires a DNA-binding site separation of 310 bp, much longer than the length needed for natural loops. Systematic variation of binding site separation over a series of 10 constructs that cyclize to form 862-bp minicircles yielded positive and negative topoisomers because of two possible writhed geometries. Periodic variation in topoisomer abundance could be modeled using canonical DNA persistence length and torsional modulus values. The results confirm that the LZD peptides are stiffer than natural DNA looping proteins, and they suggest that formation of short DNA loops requires protein flexibility, not unusual DNA bendability. Small, stable, tunable looping peptides may be useful as synthetic transcriptional regulators or components of protein–DNA nanostructures. PMID:23825092

  17. Interlinking positive and negative feedback loops creates a tunable motif in gene regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiao-Jun; Zhang, Xiao-Peng; Liu, Feng; Wang, Wei

    2009-07-01

    Positive and negative feedback loops are often coupled to perform various functions in gene regulatory networks, acting as bistable switches, oscillators, and excitable devices. It is implied that such a system with interlinked positive and negative feedback loops is a flexible motif that can modulate itself among various functions. Here, we developed a minimal model for the system and systematically explored its dynamics and performance advantage in response to stimuli in a unifying framework. The system indeed displays diverse behaviors when the strength of feedback loops is changed. First, the system can be tunable from monostability to bistability by increasing the strength of positive feedback, and the bistability regime is modulated by the strength of negative feedback. Second, the system undergoes transitions from bistability to excitability and to oscillation with increasing the strength of negative feedback, and the reverse conversion occurs by enhancing the strength of positive feedback. Third, the system is more flexible than a single feedback loop; it can produce robust larger-amplitude oscillations over a wider stimulus regime compared with a single time-delayed negative feedback loop. Furthermore, the tunability of the system depends mainly on the topology of coupled feedback loops but less on the exact parameter values or the mode of interactions between model components. Thus, our results interpret why such a system represents a tunable motif and can accomplish various functions. These also suggest that coupled feedback loops can act as toolboxes for engineering diverse functional circuits in synthetic biology.

  18. System Study of Rich Catalytic/Lean burn (RCL) Catalytic Combustion for Natural Gas and Coal-Derived Syngas Combustion Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Shahrokh Etemad; Lance Smith; Kevin Burns

    2004-12-01

    Rich Catalytic/Lean burn (RCL{reg_sign}) technology has been successfully developed to provide improvement in Dry Low Emission gas turbine technology for coal derived syngas and natural gas delivering near zero NOx emissions, improved efficiency, extending component lifetime and the ability to have fuel flexibility. The present report shows substantial net cost saving using RCL{reg_sign} technology as compared to other technologies both for new and retrofit applications, thus eliminating the need for Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) in combined or simple cycle for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and natural gas fired combustion turbines.

  19. Evidence That GH115 α-Glucuronidase Activity, Which Is Required to Degrade Plant Biomass, Is Dependent on Conformational Flexibility*

    PubMed Central

    Rogowski, Artur; Baslé, Arnaud; Farinas, Cristiane S.; Solovyova, Alexandra; Mortimer, Jennifer C.; Dupree, Paul; Gilbert, Harry J.; Bolam, David N.

    2014-01-01

    The microbial degradation of the plant cell wall is an important biological process that is highly relevant to environmentally significant industries such as the bioenergy and biorefining sectors. A major component of the wall is glucuronoxylan, a β1,4-linked xylose polysaccharide that is decorated with α-linked glucuronic and/or methylglucuronic acid (GlcA/MeGlcA). Recently three members of a glycoside hydrolase family, GH115, were shown to hydrolyze MeGlcA side chains from the internal regions of xylan, an activity that has not previously been described. Here we show that a dominant member of the human microbiota, Bacteroides ovatus, contains a GH115 enzyme, BoAgu115A, which displays glucuronoxylan α-(4-O-methyl)-glucuronidase activity. The enzyme is significantly more active against substrates in which the xylose decorated with GlcA/MeGlcA is flanked by one or more xylose residues. The crystal structure of BoAgu115A revealed a four-domain protein in which the active site, comprising a pocket that abuts a cleft-like structure, is housed in the second domain that adopts a TIM barrel-fold. The third domain, a five-helical bundle, and the C-terminal β-sandwich domain make inter-chain contacts leading to protein dimerization. Informed by the structure of the enzyme in complex with GlcA in its open ring form, in conjunction with mutagenesis studies, the potential substrate binding and catalytically significant amino acids were identified. Based on the catalytic importance of residues located on a highly flexible loop, the enzyme is required to undergo a substantial conformational change to form a productive Michaelis complex with glucuronoxylan. PMID:24214982

  20. Modeling loop entropy.

    PubMed

    Chirikjian, Gregory S

    2011-01-01

    Proteins fold from a highly disordered state into a highly ordered one. Traditionally, the folding problem has been stated as one of predicting "the" tertiary structure from sequential information. However, new evidence suggests that the ensemble of unfolded forms may not be as disordered as once believed, and that the native form of many proteins may not be described by a single conformation, but rather an ensemble of its own. Quantifying the relative disorder in the folded and unfolded ensembles as an entropy difference may therefore shed light on the folding process. One issue that clouds discussions of "entropy" is that many different kinds of entropy can be defined: entropy associated with overall translational and rotational Brownian motion, configurational entropy, vibrational entropy, conformational entropy computed in internal or Cartesian coordinates (which can even be different from each other), conformational entropy computed on a lattice, each of the above with different solvation and solvent models, thermodynamic entropy measured experimentally, etc. The focus of this work is the conformational entropy of coil/loop regions in proteins. New mathematical modeling tools for the approximation of changes in conformational entropy during transition from unfolded to folded ensembles are introduced. In particular, models for computing lower and upper bounds on entropy for polymer models of polypeptide coils both with and without end constraints are presented. The methods reviewed here include kinematics (the mathematics of rigid-body motions), classical statistical mechanics, and information theory.

  1. Loop heat pipe radiator

    SciTech Connect

    Sarraf, D.B.; Gernert, N.J.

    1996-03-01

    This paper describes the design and testing of a Loop Heat Pipe Radiator (LHPR) which was developed as an alternative to state-of-the-art axially-grooved heat pipes for space-based heat rejection which would be usable with tubing made of aluminum foil covered with a carbon-epoxy composite. The LHPR had an aluminum envelope and a polymer wick, and used ammonia as a working fluid. It was 4 meters long with a mass of 1.4 kg. The LHPR transported 500 watts at a 2.3 meter adverse inclination and 1500 watts when horizontal. This non-optimized LHPR had a 3000 watt-meter capability, which is four times greater than an axially-grooved heat pipe of similar power-handling capability and mass. In addition to a higher power handling capability, the LHPR has a much higher capillary margin than axially-grooved pipes. That high capillary margin simplifies ground testing in a 1-g environment by reducing the need for the careful levelling and vibration reduction required by axially-grooved pipes. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Modeling Loop Entropy

    PubMed Central

    Chirikjian, Gregory S.

    2011-01-01

    Proteins fold from a highly disordered state into a highly ordered one. Traditionally, the folding problem has been stated as one of predicting ‘the’ tertiary structure from sequential information. However, new evidence suggests that the ensemble of unfolded forms may not be as disordered as once believed, and that the native form of many proteins may not be described by a single conformation, but rather an ensemble of its own. Quantifying the relative disorder in the folded and unfolded ensembles as an entropy difference may therefore shed light on the folding process. One issue that clouds discussions of ‘entropy’ is that many different kinds of entropy can be defined: entropy associated with overall translational and rotational Brownian motion, configurational entropy, vibrational entropy, conformational entropy computed in internal or Cartesian coordinates (which can even be different from each other), conformational entropy computed on a lattice; each of the above with different solvation and solvent models; thermodynamic entropy measured experimentally, etc. The focus of this work is the conformational entropy of coil/loop regions in proteins. New mathematical modeling tools for the approximation of changes in conformational entropy during transition from unfolded to folded ensembles are introduced. In particular, models for computing lower and upper bounds on entropy for polymer models of polypeptide coils both with and without end constraints are presented. The methods reviewed here include kinematics (the mathematics of rigid-body motions), classical statistical mechanics and information theory. PMID:21187223

  3. Invariant poles feedback control of flexible, highly variable spacecraft.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendel, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    This paper describes a technique for single-axis control of a model of a highly flexible Space Station. Active damping of lower frequency flexibility modes is employed. In the control technique, referred to as invariant poles feedback control (IPFC), feedback gains are adjusted so that the closed-loop system's characteristic equation is matched to that of a reference model; hence, closed-loop system's poles will not move - they will be invariant (provided bending frequencies and parameters can be identified accurately). This is accomplished by obtaining the system's characteristic equation in closed form; equating respective coefficients between terms of like powers in s in the system and reference model characteristic equations; and, solving for the feedback gains. The feedback gains are explicit functions of system plant parameters and the coefficients of the reference model's characteristic equation, and are easily programmed for the digital computer.

  4. Invariant poles feedback control of flexible highly variable spacecraft.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendel, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    Description of a technique for single-axis control of a model of a highly flexible space station. Active damping of lower frequency flexibility modes is employed. In the control technique, referred to as invariant poles feedback control, feedback gains are adjusted so that the closed-loop system characteristic equation is matched to that of a reference model. Hence closed-loop system poles will not move; they will be invariant (provided that bending frequencies and parameters can be identified accurately). This is accomplished by obtaining the system characteristic equation in closed form; equating respective coefficients between terms of like powers in s in the system and reference model characteristic equations; and solving for the feedback gains. The feedback gains are explicit functions of system plant parameters and the coefficients of the reference model characteristic equation, and are easily programmed for the digital computer.

  5. Catalytic Hydroxylation of Polyethylenes

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Polyolefins account for 60% of global plastic consumption, but many potential applications of polyolefins require that their properties, such as compatibility with polar polymers, adhesion, gas permeability, and surface wetting, be improved. A strategy to overcome these deficiencies would involve the introduction of polar functionalities onto the polymer chain. Here, we describe the Ni-catalyzed hydroxylation of polyethylenes (LDPE, HDPE, and LLDPE) in the presence of mCPBA as an oxidant. Studies with cycloalkanes and pure, long-chain alkanes were conducted to assess precisely the selectivity of the reaction and the degree to which potential C–C bond cleavage of a radical intermediate occurs. Among the nickel catalysts we tested, [Ni(Me4Phen)3](BPh4)2 (Me4Phen = 3,4,7,8,-tetramethyl-1,10-phenanthroline) reacted with the highest turnover number (TON) for hydroxylation of cyclohexane and the highest selectivity for the formation of cyclohexanol over cyclohexanone (TON, 5560; cyclohexanol/(cyclohexanone + ε-caprolactone) ratio, 10.5). The oxidation of n-octadecane occurred at the secondary C–H bonds with 15.5:1 selectivity for formation of an alcohol over a ketone and 660 TON. Consistent with these data, the hydroxylation of various polyethylene materials by the combination of [Ni(Me4Phen)3](BPh4)2 and mCPBA led to the introduction of 2.0 to 5.5 functional groups (alcohol, ketone, alkyl chloride) per 100 monomer units with up to 88% selectivity for formation of alcohols over ketones or chloride. In contrast to more classical radical functionalizations of polyethylene, this catalytic process occurred without significant modification of the molecular weight of the polymer that would result from chain cleavage or cross-linking. Thus, the resulting materials are new compositions in which hydroxyl groups are located along the main chain of commercial, high molecular weight LDPE, HDPE, and LLDPE materials. These hydroxylated polyethylenes have improved wetting

  6. Flexible High-Energy Polymer-Electrolyte-Based Rechargeable Zinc-Air Batteries.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jing; Lee, Dong Un; Hassan, Fathy Mohamed; Yang, Lin; Bai, Zhengyu; Park, Moon Gyu; Chen, Zhongwei

    2015-10-07

    A thin-film, flexible, and rechargeable zinc-air battery having high energy density is reported particularly for emerging portable and wearable electronic applications. This freeform battery design is the first demonstrated by sandwiching a porous-gelled polymer electrolyte with a freestanding zinc film and a bifunctional catalytic electrode film. The flexibility of both the electrode films and polymer electrolyte membrane gives great freedom in tailoring the battery geometry and performance.

  7. Wilson loops in minimal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Drukker, Nadav; Gross, David J.; Ooguri, Hirosi

    1999-04-27

    The AdS/CFT correspondence suggests that the Wilson loop of the large N gauge theory with N = 4 supersymmetry in 4 dimensions is described by a minimal surface in AdS{sub 5} x S{sup 5}. The authors examine various aspects of this proposal, comparing gauge theory expectations with computations of minimal surfaces. There is a distinguished class of loops, which the authors call BPS loops, whose expectation values are free from ultra-violet divergence. They formulate the loop equation for such loops. To the extent that they have checked, the minimal surface in AdS{sub 5} x S{sup 5} gives a solution of the equation. The authors also discuss the zig-zag symmetry of the loop operator. In the N = 4 gauge theory, they expect the zig-zag symmetry to hold when the loop does not couple the scalar fields in the supermultiplet. They will show how this is realized for the minimal surface.

  8. Printed Microinductors for Flexible Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, Erik; Whitacre, Jay; Wesseling, Emily

    2005-01-01

    A method of fabricating planar, flexible microinductors that exhibit a relatively high quality factor (Q) between 1 and 10 MHz has been devised. These inductors are targeted for use in flexible, low-profile power-converter circuits. They could also be incorporated into electronic circuits integrated into flexible structures, including flexible antenna and solar-sail structures that are deployable.

  9. Flexible manipulator control experiments and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yurkovich, S.; Ozguner, U.; Tzes, A.; Kotnik, P. T.

    1987-01-01

    Modeling and control design for flexible manipulators, both from an experimental and analytical viewpoint, are described. From the application perspective, an ongoing effort within the laboratory environment at the Ohio State University, where experimentation on a single link flexible arm is underway is described. Several unique features of this study are described here. First, the manipulator arm is slewed by a direct drive dc motor and has a rigid counterbalance appendage. Current experimentation is from two viewpoints: (1) rigid body slewing and vibration control via actuation with the hub motor, and (2) vibration suppression through the use of structure-mounted proof-mass actuation at the tip. Such an application to manipulator control is of interest particularly in design of space-based telerobotic control systems, but has received little attention to date. From an analytical viewpoint, parameter estimation techniques within the closed-loop for self-tuning adaptive control approaches are discussed. Also introduced is a control approach based on output feedback and frequency weighting to counteract effects of spillover in reduced-order model design. A model of the flexible manipulator based on experimental measurements is evaluated for such estimation and control approaches.

  10. Improved Thin, Flexible Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfeld, John H.; Gernert, Nelson J.; Sarraf, David B.; Wollen, Peter J.; Surina, Frank C.; Fale, John E.

    2004-01-01

    Flexible heat pipes of an improved type are fabricated as layers of different materials laminated together into vacuum- tight sheets or tapes. In comparison with prior flexible heat pipes, these flexible heat pipes are less susceptible to leakage. Other advantages of these flexible heat pipes, relative to prior flexible heat pipes, include high reliability and greater ease and lower cost of fabrication. Because these heat pipes are very thin, they are highly flexible. When coated on outside surfaces with adhesives, these flexible heat pipes can be applied, like common adhesive tapes, to the surfaces of heat sinks and objects to be cooled, even if those surfaces are curved.

  11. A Redox 2-Cys Mechanism Regulates the Catalytic Activity of Divergent Cyclophilins1[W

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Bruna Medéia; Sforça, Mauricio Luis; Ambrosio, Andre Luis Berteli; Domingues, Mariane Noronha; Brasil de Souza, Tatiana de Arruda Campos; Barbosa, João Alexandre Ribeiro Gonçalvez; Leme, Adriana Franco Paes; Perez, Carlos Alberto; Whittaker, Sara Britt-Marie; Murakami, Mario Tyago; Zeri, Ana Carolina de Matos; Benedetti, Celso Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    The citrus (Citrus sinensis) cyclophilin CsCyp is a target of the Xanthomonas citri transcription activator-like effector PthA, required to elicit cankers on citrus. CsCyp binds the citrus thioredoxin CsTdx and the carboxyl-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II and is a divergent cyclophilin that carries the additional loop KSGKPLH, invariable cysteine (Cys) residues Cys-40 and Cys-168, and the conserved glutamate (Glu) Glu-83. Despite the suggested roles in ATP and metal binding, the functions of these unique structural elements remain unknown. Here, we show that the conserved Cys residues form a disulfide bond that inactivates the enzyme, whereas Glu-83, which belongs to the catalytic loop and is also critical for enzyme activity, is anchored to the divergent loop to maintain the active site open. In addition, we demonstrate that Cys-40 and Cys-168 are required for the interaction with CsTdx and that CsCyp binds the citrus carboxyl-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II YSPSAP repeat. Our data support a model where formation of the Cys-40-Cys-168 disulfide bond induces a conformational change that disrupts the interaction of the divergent and catalytic loops, via Glu-83, causing the active site to close. This suggests a new type of allosteric regulation in divergent cyclophilins, involving disulfide bond formation and a loop-displacement mechanism. PMID:23709667

  12. A redox 2-Cys mechanism regulates the catalytic activity of divergent cyclophilins.

    PubMed

    Campos, Bruna Medéia; Sforça, Mauricio Luis; Ambrosio, Andre Luis Berteli; Domingues, Mariane Noronha; Brasil de Souza, Tatiana de Arruda Campos; Barbosa, João Alexandre Ribeiro Gonçalvez; Paes Leme, Adriana Franco; Perez, Carlos Alberto; Whittaker, Sara Britt-Marie; Murakami, Mario Tyago; Zeri, Ana Carolina de Matos; Benedetti, Celso Eduardo

    2013-07-01

    The citrus (Citrus sinensis) cyclophilin CsCyp is a target of the Xanthomonas citri transcription activator-like effector PthA, required to elicit cankers on citrus. CsCyp binds the citrus thioredoxin CsTdx and the carboxyl-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II and is a divergent cyclophilin that carries the additional loop KSGKPLH, invariable cysteine (Cys) residues Cys-40 and Cys-168, and the conserved glutamate (Glu) Glu-83. Despite the suggested roles in ATP and metal binding, the functions of these unique structural elements remain unknown. Here, we show that the conserved Cys residues form a disulfide bond that inactivates the enzyme, whereas Glu-83, which belongs to the catalytic loop and is also critical for enzyme activity, is anchored to the divergent loop to maintain the active site open. In addition, we demonstrate that Cys-40 and Cys-168 are required for the interaction with CsTdx and that CsCyp binds the citrus carboxyl-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II YSPSAP repeat. Our data support a model where formation of the Cys-40-Cys-168 disulfide bond induces a conformational change that disrupts the interaction of the divergent and catalytic loops, via Glu-83, causing the active site to close. This suggests a new type of allosteric regulation in divergent cyclophilins, involving disulfide bond formation and a loop-displacement mechanism.

  13. Analysis of flexible aircraft longitudinal dynamics and handling qualities. Volume 1: Analysis methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, M. R.; Schmidt, D. S.

    1985-01-01

    As aircraft become larger and lighter due to design requirements for increased payload and improved fuel efficiency, they will also become more flexible. For highly flexible vehicles, the handling qualities may not be accurately predicted by conventional methods. This study applies two analysis methods to a family of flexible aircraft in order to investigate how and when structural (especially dynamic aeroelastic) effects affect the dynamic characteristics of aircraft. The first type of analysis is an open loop model analysis technique. This method considers the effects of modal residue magnitudes on determining vehicle handling qualities. The second method is a pilot in the loop analysis procedure that considers several closed loop system characteristics. Volume 1 consists of the development and application of the two analysis methods described above.

  14. Open loop distribution system design

    SciTech Connect

    Glamocanin, V. ); Filipovic, V. . Elektrotechnicki fakulet)

    1993-10-01

    The ability to supply consumers of an urban area, with minimum interruption during a feeder segment or substation transformer outage, is assured by a uniform cable size of the feeder segments along the entire loop. Based on the criterion of the uniform cable size, a loop configuration is obtained first by minimizing the installation costs, and then an open loop solution is found by minimizing the power losses. Heuristic rules are proposed and used to obtain an initial solution, as well as to improve current solutions.

  15. Digital phase-locked loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, R. A. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    An digital phase-locked loop is provided for deriving a loop output signal from an accumulator output terminal. A phase detecting exclusive OR gate is fed by the loop digital input and output signals. The output of the phase detector is a bi-level digital signal having a duty cycle indicative of the relative phase of the input and output signals. The accumulator is incremented at a first rate in response to a first output level of the phase detector and at a second rate in response to a second output level of the phase detector.

  16. Perspective on Catalytic Hydrodeoxygenation of Biomass Pyrolysis Oils: Essential Roles of Fe-Based Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yongchun; Hensley, Alyssa; McEwen, Jean-Sabin; Wang, Yong

    2016-06-27

    Catalytic fast pyrolysis is the most promising approach for biofuel production, due to its simple process and versatility to handle lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks with varying and complex compositions. Compared with in situ catalytic fast pyrolysis, ex situ catalytic pyrolysis has the flexibility of optimizing the pyrolysis step and catalytic process individually to improve the quality of pyrolysis oil (stability, oxygen content, acid number, etc.) and to maximize the carbon efficiency in the conversion of biomass to pyrolysis oil. Hydrodeoxygenation is one of the key catalytic functions in ex situ catalytic fast pyrolysis. Recently, Fe-based catalysts have been reported to exhibit superior catalytic properties in hydrodeoxygenation of model compounds in pyrolysis oil, which potentially makes the ex situ pyrolysis of biomass commercially viable due to the abundance and low cost of Fe. Here, we briefly summarize the recent progress on Fe-based catalysts for hydrodeoxygenation of biomass, and provide perspectives on how to further improve Fe-based catalysts (activity and stability) for their potential applications in the emerging area of biomass conversion.

  17. Control of large flexible systems via eigenvalue relocation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denman, E. D.; Jeon, G. J.

    1985-01-01

    For the vibration control of large flexible systems, a control scheme by which the eigenvalues of the closed-loop systems are assigned to predetermined locations within the feasible region through velocity-only feedback is presented. Owing to the properties of second-order lambda-matrices and an efficient model decoupling technique, the control scheme makes it possible that selected modes are damped with the rest of the modes unchanged.

  18. Catalytic combustion with steam injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. N.; Tacina, R. R.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of steam injection on (1) catalytic combustion performance, and (2) the tendency of residual fuel to burn in the premixing duct upstream of the catalytic reactor were determined. A petroleum residual, no. 2 diesel, and a blend of middle and heavy distillate coal derived fuels were tested. Fuel and steam were injected together into the preheated airflow entering a 12 cm diameter catalytic combustion test section. The inlet air velocity and pressure were constant at 10 m/s and 600 kPa, respectively. Steam flow rates were varied from 24 percent to 52 percent of the air flow rate. The resulting steam air mixture temperatures varied from 630 to 740 K. Combustion temperatures were in the range of 1200 to 1400 K. The steam had little effect on combustion efficiency or emissions. It was concluded that the steam acts as a diluent which has no adverse effect on catalytic combustion performance for no. 2 diesel and coal derived liquid fuels. Tests with the residual fuel showed that upstream burning could be eliminated with steam injection rates greater than 30 percent of the air flow rate, but inlet mixture temperatures were too low to permit stable catalytic combustion of this fuel.

  19. Flexible Quantum Oblivious Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yu-Guang; Yang, Rui; Cao, Wei-Feng; Chen, Xiu-Bo; Zhou, Yi-Hua; Shi, Wei-Min

    2017-04-01

    We propose a flexible protocol for one-out-of- nquantum oblivious transfer (QOT) Compared with existing QOT protocols, our protocol is more flexible. We demonstrate that, by adjusting the value of 𝜃 the flexible one-out-of- nQOT is allowable where n can be located theoretically on any value the communicating parties wanted. Meanwhile, it also meets the rigorous security requirements of the oblivious transfer (OT) definition, which ensures Bob can receive on average one of n messages held by Alice, while Alice cannot know which one Bob has received. Finally, we analyze the security of our protocol and show that it is not based on quantum bit commitment and does not violate Lo's no-go theorem so that its security can be achieved.

  20. Flexible Quantum Oblivious Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yu-Guang; Yang, Rui; Cao, Wei-Feng; Chen, Xiu-Bo; Zhou, Yi-Hua; Shi, Wei-Min

    2017-01-01

    We propose a flexible protocol for one-out-of- nquantum oblivious transfer (QOT) Compared with existing QOT protocols, our protocol is more flexible. We demonstrate that, by adjusting the value of 𝜃 the flexible one-out-of- nQOT is allowable where n can be located theoretically on any value the communicating parties wanted. Meanwhile, it also meets the rigorous security requirements of the oblivious transfer (OT) definition, which ensures Bob can receive on average one of n messages held by Alice, while Alice cannot know which one Bob has received. Finally, we analyze the security of our protocol and show that it is not based on quantum bit commitment and does not violate Lo's no-go theorem so that its security can be achieved.

  1. Natural flexible dermal armor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen; Chen, Irene H; Gludovatz, Bernd; Zimmermann, Elizabeth A; Ritchie, Robert O; Meyers, Marc A

    2013-01-04

    Fish, reptiles, and mammals can possess flexible dermal armor for protection. Here we seek to find the means by which Nature derives its protection by examining the scales from several fish (Atractosteus spatula, Arapaima gigas, Polypterus senegalus, Morone saxatilis, Cyprinius carpio), and osteoderms from armadillos, alligators, and leatherback turtles. Dermal armor has clearly been developed by convergent evolution in these different species. In general, it has a hierarchical structure with collagen fibers joining more rigid units (scales or osteoderms), thereby increasing flexibility without significantly sacrificing strength, in contrast to rigid monolithic mineral composites. These dermal structures are also multifunctional, with hydrodynamic drag (in fish), coloration for camouflage or intraspecies recognition, temperature and fluid regulation being other important functions. The understanding of such flexible dermal armor is important as it may provide a basis for new synthetic, yet bioinspired, armor materials. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Analysis of flexible aircraft longitudinal dynamics and handling qualities. Volume 2: Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, M. R.; Schmidt, D. K.

    1985-01-01

    Two analysis methods are applied to a family of flexible aircraft in order to investigate how and when structural (especially dynamic aeroelastic) effects affect the dynamic characteristics of aircraft. The first type of analysis is an open loop modal analysis technique. This method considers the effect of modal residue magnitudes on determining vehicle handling qualities. The second method is a pilot in the loop analysis procedure that considers several closed loop system characteristics. Both analyses indicated that dynamic aeroelastic effects caused a degradation in vehicle tracking performance, based on the evaluation of some simulation results. Volume 2 consists of the presentation of the state variable models of the flexible aircraft configurations used in the analysis applications mode shape plots for the structural modes, numerical results from the modal analysis frequency response plots from the pilot in the loop analysis and a listing of the modal analysis computer program.

  3. Conservation of Flexible Residue Clusters among Structural and Functional Enzyme Homologues*

    PubMed Central

    Gagné, Donald; Charest, Laurie-Anne; Morin, Sébastien; Kovrigin, Evgenii L.; Doucet, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Conformational flexibility between structural ensembles is an essential component of enzyme function. Although the broad dynamical landscape of proteins is known to promote a number of functional events on multiple time scales, it is yet unknown whether structural and functional enzyme homologues rely on the same concerted residue motions to perform their catalytic function. It is hypothesized that networks of contiguous and flexible residue motions occurring on the biologically relevant millisecond time scale evolved to promote and/or preserve optimal enzyme catalysis. In this study, we use a combination of NMR relaxation dispersion, model-free analysis, and ligand titration experiments to successfully capture and compare the role of conformational flexibility between two structural homologues of the pancreatic ribonuclease family: RNase A and eosinophil cationic protein (or RNase 3). In addition to conserving the same catalytic residues and structural fold, both homologues show similar yet functionally distinct clusters of millisecond dynamics, suggesting that conformational flexibility can be conserved among analogous protein folds displaying low sequence identity. Our work shows that the reduced conformational flexibility of eosinophil cationic protein can be dynamically and functionally reproduced in the RNase A scaffold upon creation of a chimeric hybrid between the two proteins. These results support the hypothesis that conformational flexibility is partly required for catalytic function in homologous enzyme folds, further highlighting the importance of dynamic residue sectors in the structural organization of proteins. PMID:23135272

  4. Optical loop framing

    SciTech Connect

    Kalibjian, R.; Chong, Y.P.; Prono, D.S.; Cavagnolo, H.R.

    1984-06-01

    The ATA provides an electron beam pulse of 70-ns duration at a 1-Hz rate. Our present optical diagnostics technique involve the imaging of the visible light generated by the beam incident onto the plant of a thin sheet of material. It has already been demonstrated that the light generated has a sufficiently fast temporal reponse in performing beam diagnostics. Notwithstanding possible beam emittance degradation due to scattering in the thin sheet, the observation of beam spatial profiles with relatively high efficiencies has provided data complementary to that obtained from beam wall current monitors and from various x-ray probes and other electrical probes. The optical image sensor consists of a gated, intensified television system. The gate pulse of the image intensifier can be appropriately delayed to give frames that are time-positioned from the head to the tail of the beam with a minimum gate time of 5-ns. The spatial correlation of the time frames from pulse to pulse is very good for a stable electron beam; however, when instabilities do occur, it is difficult to properly assess the spatial composition of the head and the tail of the beam on a pulse-to-pulse basis. Multiple gating within a pulse duration becomes desirable but cannot be performed because the recycle time (20-ms) of the TV system is much longer than the beam pulse. For this reason we have developed an optical-loop framing technique that will allow the recording of two frames within one pulse duration with our present gated/intensified TV system.

  5. Catalytic bioreactors and methods of using same

    DOEpatents

    Worden, Robert Mark; Liu, Yangmu Chloe

    2017-07-25

    Various embodiments provide a bioreactor for producing a bioproduct comprising one or more catalytically active zones located in a housing and adapted to keep two incompatible gaseous reactants separated when in a gas phase, wherein each of the one or more catalytically active zones may comprise a catalytic component retainer and a catalytic component retained within and/or thereon. Each of the catalytically active zones may additionally or alternatively comprise a liquid medium located on either side of the catalytic component retainer. Catalytic component may include a microbial cell culture located within and/or on the catalytic component retainer, a suspended catalytic component suspended in the liquid medium, or a combination thereof. Methods of using various embodiments of the bioreactor to produce a bioproduct, such as isobutanol, are also provided.

  6. Flexible radiator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oren, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    The soft tube radiator subsystem is described including applicable system requirements, the design and limitations of the subsystem components, and the panel manufacturing method. The soft tube radiator subsystem is applicable to payloads requiring 1 to 12 kW of heat rejection for orbital lifetimes per mission of 30 days or less. The flexible radiator stowage volume required is about 60% and the system weight is about 40% of an equivalent heat rejection rigid panel. The cost should also be considerably less. The flexible radiator is particularly suited to shuttle orbiter sortie payloads and also whose mission lengths do not exceed the 30 day design life.

  7. Thin flexible intercalation anodes

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, S.C.; Cieslak, W.R.; Klassen, S.E.; Lagasse, R.R.

    1994-10-01

    Poly(acrylonitrile) fibers have been pyrolyzed under various conditions to form flexible carbon yarns capable of intercalating lithium ions. These fibers have also been formed into both woven and non woven cloths. Potentiostatic, potentiodynamic and galvanostatic tests have been conducted with these materials in several electrolytes. In some tests, a potential hold was used after each constant current charge and discharge. These tests have shown some of these flexible materials to reversibly intercalate lithium ions to levels that are suitable for use as a practical battery anode.

  8. Flexible Heating Head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert L.; Johnson, Samuel D.; Coultrip, Robert H.; Phillips, W. Morris

    1994-01-01

    United States Air Force is investigating method of repairing aircraft by use of adhesive bonding with induction heating to cure adhesive. Fast-acting and reliable induction heating device that is lightweight, portable, and easy to use needed for such applications. Newly developed flexible heating head lightweight and conforms to complex, curved surfaces. Incorporates principles and circuitry of toroid joining gun described in "Toroid Joining Gun for Fittings and Couplings" (LAR-14278). Concentrates heat in local area through induction heating. Flexible heating head contains tank circuit, connected via cable to source of power.

  9. Flexible Heating Head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert L.; Johnson, Samuel D.; Coultrip, Robert H.; Phillips, W. Morris

    1994-01-01

    United States Air Force is investigating method of repairing aircraft by use of adhesive bonding with induction heating to cure adhesive. Fast-acting and reliable induction heating device that is lightweight, portable, and easy to use needed for such applications. Newly developed flexible heating head lightweight and conforms to complex, curved surfaces. Incorporates principles and circuitry of toroid joining gun described in "Toroid Joining Gun for Fittings and Couplings" (LAR-14278). Concentrates heat in local area through induction heating. Flexible heating head contains tank circuit, connected via cable to source of power.

  10. Engineering Bifunctional Laccase-Xylanase Chimeras for Improved Catalytic Performance*

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Lucas F.; Furtado, Gilvan P.; Lourenzoni, Marcos R.; Costa-Filho, Antonio J.; Santos, Camila R.; Nogueira, Simone C. Peixoto; Betini, Jorge A.; Polizeli, Maria de Lourdes T. M.; Murakami, Mario T.; Ward, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    Two bifunctional enzymes exhibiting combined xylanase and laccase activities were designed, constructed, and characterized by biochemical and biophysical methods. The Bacillus subtilis cotA and xynA genes were used as templates for gene fusion, and the xynA coding sequence was inserted into a surface loop of the cotA. A second chimera was built replacing the wild-type xynA gene by a thermostable variant (xynAG3) previously obtained by in vitro molecular evolution. Kinetic measurements demonstrated that the pH and temperature optima of the catalytic domains in the chimeras were altered by less than 0.5 pH units and 5 °C, respectively, when compared with the parental enzymes. In contrast, the catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) of the laccase activity in both chimeras was 2-fold higher than for the parental laccase. Molecular dynamics simulations of the CotA-XynA chimera indicated that the two domains are in close contact, which was confirmed by the low resolution structure obtained by small angle x-ray scattering. The simulation also indicates that the formation of the inter-domain interface causes the dislocation of the loop comprising residues Leu-558 to Lys-573 in the laccase domain, resulting in a more accessible active site and exposing the type I Cu2+ ion to the solvent. These structural changes are consistent with the results from UV-visible electronic and EPR spectroscopy experiments of the type I copper between the native and chimeric enzymes and are likely to contribute to the observed increase in catalytic turnover number. PMID:22006920

  11. Structure of D-alanine-D-alanine ligase from Yersinia pestis: nucleotide phosphate recognition by the serine loop.

    PubMed

    Tran, Huyen Thi; Hong, Myoung Ki; Ngo, Ho Phuong Thuy; Huynh, Kim Hung; Ahn, Yeh Jin; Wang, Zhong; Kang, Lin Woo

    2016-01-01

    D-Alanyl-D-alanine is an essential precursor of bacterial peptidoglycan and is synthesized by D-alanine-D-alanine ligase (DDL) with hydrolysis of ATP; this reaction makes DDL an important drug target for the development of antibacterial agents. Five crystal structures of DDL from Yersinia pestis (YpDDL) were determined at 1.7-2.5 Å resolution: apo, AMP-bound, ADP-bound, adenosine 5'-(β,γ-imido)triphosphate-bound, and D-alanyl-D-alanine- and ADP-bound structures. YpDDL consists of three domains, in which four loops, loop 1, loop 2 (the serine loop), loop 3 (the ω-loop) and loop 4, constitute the binding sites for two D-alanine molecules and one ATP molecule. Some of them, especially the serine loop and the ω-loop, show flexible conformations, and the serine loop is mainly responsible for the conformational change in substrate nucleotide phosphates. Enzyme-kinetics assays were carried out for both the D-alanine and ATP substrates and a substrate-binding mechanism was proposed for YpDDL involving conformational changes of the loops.

  12. Expression studies of catalytic antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, H.D.; Patten, P.A.; Yang, P.L.

    1995-12-05

    We have examined the positive influence of human constant regions on the folding and bacterial expression of active soluble mouse immunoglobulin variable domains derived form a number of catalytic antibodies. Expression yields of eight hybridoma-and myeloma-derived chimeric Fab fragments are compared in both shake flasks and high-density fermentation. In addition the usefulness of this system for the generation of in vivo expression libraries is examined by constructing and expressing combinations of heavy and light chain variable regions that were not selected as a pair during an immune response. A mutagenesis study of one of the recombinant catalytic Fab fragments reveals that single amino acid substitutions can have dramatic effects on the expression yield. This system should be generally applicable to the production of Fab fragments of catalytic and other hybridoma-derived antibodies for crystallographic and structure-function studies. 41 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Catalytic distillation water recovery subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budininkas, P.; Rasouli, F.

    1985-01-01

    An integrated engineering breadboard subsystem for the recovery of potable water from untreated urine based on the vapor phase catalytic ammonia removal was designed, fabricated and tested. Unlike other evaporative methods, this process catalytically oxidizes ammonia and volatile hydrocarbons vaporizing with water to innocuous products; therefore, no pretreatment of urine is required. Since the subsystem is fabricated from commercially available components, its volume, weight and power requirements are not optimized; however, it is suitable for zero-g operation. The testing program consists of parametric tests, one month of daily tests and a continuous test of 168 hours duration. The recovered water is clear, odorless, low in ammonia and organic carbon, and requires only an adjustment of its pH to meet potable water standards. The obtained data indicate that the vapor phase catalytic ammonia removal process, if further developed, would also be competitive with other water recovery systems in weight, volume and power requirements.

  14. Flexible ceramic gasket for SOFC generator

    DOEpatents

    Zafred, Paolo [Murrysville, PA; Prevish, Thomas [Trafford, PA

    2009-02-03

    A solid oxide fuel cell generator (10) contains stacks of hollow axially elongated fuel cells (36) having an open top end (37), an oxidant inlet plenum (52), a feed fuel plenum (11), a combustion chamber (94) for combusting reacted oxidant/spent fuel; and, optionally, a fuel recirculation chamber (106) below the combustion chamber (94), where the fuel recirculation chamber (94) is in part defined by semi-porous fuel cell positioning gasket (108), all within an outer generator enclosure (8), wherein the fuel cell gasket (108) has a laminate structure comprising at least a compliant fibrous mat support layer and a strong, yet flexible woven layer, which may contain catalytic particles facing the combustion chamber, where the catalyst, if used, is effective to further oxidize exhaust fuel and protect the open top end (37) of the fuel cells.

  15. SDO Sees Brightening Magnetic Loops

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Two active regions sprouted arches of bundled magnetic loops in this video from NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory taken on Nov. 11-12, 2015. Charged particles spin along the magnetic field, tracing...

  16. Automatic blocking of nested loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiber, Robert; Dongarra, Jack J.

    1990-01-01

    Blocked algorithms have much better properties of data locality and therefore can be much more efficient than ordinary algorithms when a memory hierarchy is involved. On the other hand, they are very difficult to write and to tune for particular machines. The reorganization is considered of nested loops through the use of known program transformations in order to create blocked algorithms automatically. The program transformations used are strip mining, loop interchange, and a variant of loop skewing in which invertible linear transformations (with integer coordinates) of the loop indices are allowed. Some problems are solved concerning the optimal application of these transformations. It is shown, in a very general setting, how to choose a nearly optimal set of transformed indices. It is then shown, in one particular but rather frequently occurring situation, how to choose an optimal set of block sizes.

  17. Integrated optical phase locked loop.

    SciTech Connect

    Lentine, Anthony L.; Kim, Jungwon; Trotter, Douglas Chandler; DeRose, Christopher T.; Kartner, Franz X.; Byun, Hyunil; Nejadmalayeri, Amir H.; Watts, Michael R.; Zortman, William A.

    2010-12-01

    A silicon photonics based integrated optical phase locked loop is utilized to synchronize a 10.2 GHz voltage controlled oscillator with a 509 MHz mode locked laser, achieving 32 fs integrated jitter over 300 kHz bandwidth.

  18. SDO Sees Flourishing Magnetic Loops

    NASA Image and Video Library

    A bright set of loops near the edge of the sun’s face grew and shifted quickly after the magnetic field was disrupted by a small eruption on Nov. 25, 2015. Charged particles emitting light in extre...

  19. Loop Electrosurgical Excision Procedure (LEEP)

    MedlinePlus

    ... that acts like a scalpel (surgical knife). An electric current is passed through the loop, which cuts away ... A procedure in which an instrument works with electric current to destroy tissue. Local Anesthesia: The use of ...

  20. Loop Electrosurgical Excision Procedure (LEEP)

    MedlinePlus

    ... that acts like a scalpel (surgical knife). An electric current is passed through the loop, which cuts away ... A procedure in which an instrument works with electric current to destroy tissue. Local Anesthesia: The use of ...

  1. F-actin structure destabilization and DNase I binding loop: fluctuations mutational cross-linking and electron microscopy analysis of loop states and effects on F-actin.

    PubMed

    Oztug Durer, Zeynep A; Diraviyam, Karthikeyan; Sept, David; Kudryashov, Dmitri S; Reisler, Emil

    2010-01-22

    The conformational dynamics of filamentous actin (F-actin) is essential for the regulation and functions of cellular actin networks. The main contribution to F-actin dynamics and its multiple conformational states arises from the mobility and flexibility of the DNase I binding loop (D-loop; residues 40-50) on subdomain 2. Therefore, we explored the structural constraints on D-loop plasticity at the F-actin interprotomer space by probing its dynamic interactions with the hydrophobic loop (H-loop), the C-terminus, and the W-loop via mutational disulfide cross-linking. To this end, residues of the D-loop were mutated to cysteines on yeast actin with a C374A background. These mutants showed no major changes in their polymerization and nucleotide exchange properties compared to wild-type actin. Copper-catalyzed disulfide cross-linking was investigated in equimolar copolymers of cysteine mutants from the D-loop with either wild-type (C374) actin or mutant S265C/C374A (on the H-loop) or mutant F169C/C374A (on the W-loop). Remarkably, all tested residues of the D-loop could be cross-linked to residues 374, 265, and 169 by disulfide bonds, demonstrating the plasticity of the interprotomer region. However, each cross-link resulted in different effects on the filament structure, as detected by electron microscopy and light-scattering measurements. Disulfide cross-linking in the longitudinal orientation produced mostly no visible changes in filament morphology, whereas the cross-linking of D-loop residues >45 to the H-loop, in the lateral direction, resulted in filament disruption and the presence of amorphous aggregates on electron microscopy images. A similar aggregation was also observed upon cross-linking the residues of the D-loop (>41) to residue 169. The effects of disulfide cross-links on F-actin stability were only partially accounted for by the simulations of current F-actin models. Thus, our results present evidence for the high level of conformational plasticity in

  2. Observations of loops and prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, Keith T.

    1994-01-01

    We review recent observations by the Yohkoh-SXT (Soft X-ray Telescope) in collaboration with other spacecraft and ground-based observatories of coronal loops and prominences. These new results point to problems that SoHO will be able to address. With a unique combination of rapid-cadence digital imaging (greater than or equal to 32 s full-disk and greater than or equal to 2 s partial-frame images), high spatial resolution (greater than or equal to 2.5 arcsec pixels), high sensitivity (EM less than or equal to 10(exp 42) cm(exp -3)), a low-scatter mirror, and large dynamic range, SXT can observe a vast range of targets on the Sun. Over the first 21 months of Yohkoh operations SXT has taken over one million images of the corona and so is building up an invaluable long-term database on the large-scale corona and loop geometry. The most striking thing about the SXT images is the range of loop sizes and shapes. The active regions are a bright tangle of magnetic field lines, surrounded by a network of large-scale quiet-Sun loops stretching over distances in excess of 105 km. The cross-section of most loops seems to be constant. Loops displaying significant Gamma's are the exception, not the rule, implying the presence of widespread currents in the corona. All magnetic structures show changes. Time scales range from seconds to months. The question of how these structures are formed, become filled with hot plasma, and are maintained is still open. While we see the propagation of brightenings along the length of active-region loops and in X-ray jets with velocities of several hundred km/s, much higher velocities are seen in the quiet Sun. In XBP flares, for example, velocities of over 1000 km/s are common. Active-region loops seem to be in constant motion, moving slowly outward, carrying plasma with them. During flares, loops often produce localized brightenings at the base and later at the apex of the loop. Quiescent filaments and prominences have been observed regularly

  3. Closed loop spray cooling apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alger, D. L.; Schwab, W. B.; Furman, E. R. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A closed loop apparatus for jet spraying coolant against the back of a radiation target is described. The coolant is circulated through a closed loop with a bubble of inert gas being maintained around the spray. Mesh material is disposed between the bubble and the surface of the liquid coolant which is below the bubble at a predetermined level. In a second arrangement no inert gas is used, the bubble consists of vapor produced when the coolant is sprayed against the target.

  4. LETS: An Expressional Loop Notation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-01

    r - ..’ -rI- x- - r ,11 V~ The Expressional Metaphor 2- Waters i "The Expressional Metaphor ’lhe key property of expressions which makes them...development of a notation which has the property of decomposability. Viewing Loops as Expressions Involving Sequences In order to represent loops as...a DEFUNS or LETS. For example, the function EPLIST takes in a discnbodied plist and returns two values: a sequence of the property names. and a

  5. Digital tracking loops for a programmable digital modem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poklemba, John J.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, an analysis and hardware emulation of the tracking loops for a very flexible programmable digital modem (PDM) will be presented. The modem is capable of being programmed for 2, 4, 8, 16-PSK, 16-QAM, MSK, and Offset-QPSK modulation schemes over a range of data rates from 2.34 to 300 Mbps with programmable spectral occupancy from 1.2 to 1.8 times the symbol rate; these operational parameters are executable in burst or continuous mode. All of the critical processing in both the modulator and demodulator is done at baseband with very high-speed digital hardware and memory. Quadrature analog front-ends are used for translation between baseband and the IF center frequency. The modulator is based on a table lookup approach, where precomputed samples are stored in memory and clocked out according to the incoming data pattern. The sample values are predistorted to counteract the effects of the other filtering functions in the link as well as any transmission impairments. The demodulator architecture was adapted from a joint estimator-detector (JED) mathematical analysis. Its structure is applicable to most signalling formats that can be represented in a two-dimensional space. The JED realization uses interdependent, mutually aiding tracking loops with post-detection data feedback. To expedite and provide for more reliable synchronization, initial estimates for these loops are computed in a parallel acquisition processor. The cornerstone of the demodulator realization is the pre-averager received data filter which allows operation over a broad range of data rates without any hardware changes and greatly simplifies the implementation complexity. The emulation results confirmed tracking loop operation over the entire range of operational parameters listed above, as well as the capability of achieving and maintaining synchronization at BER's in excess of 10(exp -1). The emulation results also showed very close agreement with the tracking loop analysis, and

  6. Perfluoropolyalkylether decomposition on catalytic aluminas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morales, Wilfredo

    1994-01-01

    The decomposition of Fomblin Z25, a commercial perfluoropolyalkylether liquid lubricant, was studied using the Penn State Micro-oxidation Test, and a thermal gravimetric/differential scanning calorimetry unit. The micro-oxidation test was conducted using 440C stainless steel and pure iron metal catalyst specimens, whereas the thermal gravimetric/differential scanning calorimetry tests were conducted using catalytic alumina pellets. Analysis of the thermal data, high pressure liquid chromatography data, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data support evidence that there are two different decomposition mechanisms for Fomblin Z25, and that reductive sites on the catalytic surfaces are responsible for the decomposition of Fomblin Z25.

  7. THE CORONAL LOOP INVENTORY PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Schmelz, J. T.; Pathak, S.; Christian, G. M.; Dhaliwal, R. S. S.; Paul, K. S.

    2015-11-01

    Most coronal physicists now seem to agree that loops are composed of tangled magnetic strands and have both isothermal and multithermal cross-field temperature distributions. As yet, however, there is no information on the relative importance of each of these categories, and we do not know how common one is with respect to the other. In this paper, we investigate these temperature properties for all loop segments visible in the 171-Å image of AR 11294, which was observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on 2011 September 15. Our analysis revealed 19 loop segments, but only 2 of these were clearly isothermal. Six additional segments were effectively isothermal, that is, the plasma emission to which AIA is sensitive could not be distinguished from isothermal emission, within measurement uncertainties. One loop had both isothermal transition region and multithermal coronal solutions. Another five loop segments require multithermal plasma to reproduce the AIA observations. The five remaining loop segments could not be separated reliably from the background in the crucial non-171-Å AIA images required for temperature analysis. We hope that the direction of coronal heating models and the efforts modelers spend on various heating scenarios will be influenced by these results.

  8. The Structure of Coronal Loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2009-01-01

    It is widely believed that the simple coronal loops observed by XUV imagers, such as EIT, TRACE, or XRT, actually have a complex internal structure consisting of many (perhaps hundreds) of unresolved, interwoven "strands". According to the nanoflare model, photospheric motions tangle the strands, causing them to reconnect and release the energy required to produce the observed loop plasma. Although the strands, themselves, are unresolved by present-generation imagers, there is compelling evidence for their existence and for the nanoflare model from analysis of loop intensities and temporal evolution. A problem with this scenario is that, although reconnection can eliminate some of the strand tangles, it cannot destroy helicity, which should eventually build up to observable scales. we consider, therefore, the injection and evolution of helicity by the nanoflare process and its implications for the observed structure of loops and the large-scale corona. we argue that helicity does survive and build up to observable levels, but on spatial and temporal scales larger than those of coronal loops. we discuss the implications of these results for coronal loops and the corona, in general .

  9. Loop Models from SOHO Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landini, M.; Brković , A.; Landi, E.; Rüedi, I.; Solanki, S.

    1999-01-01

    The Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS) on SOHO is a grazing/normal incidence spectrograph, aimed to produce stigmatic spectra of selected regions of the solar surface in six spectral windows of the extreme ultraviolet from 150 Å to 785 Å (Harrison et al. 1995). In the present work, CDS, EIT, MDI and Yohkoh observations of active region lops have been analyzed. These observations are part of JOP 54. CDS monochromatic images from lines at different temperatures have been co-aligned with EIT and MDI images, and loop structures have been clearly identified using Fe XVI emission lines. Density sensitive lines and lines from adjacent stages of ionization of Fe ions have been used to measure electron density and temperature along the loop length; these measurements have been used to determine the electron pressure along the loop and test the constant pressure assumption commonly used in loop modeling. The observations have been compared with a static, isobaric loop model (Landini and Monsignori Fossi 1975) assuming a temperature-constant heating function in the energy balance equation. Good agreement is found for the temperature distribution along the loop at the coronal level. The model pressure is somewhat higher than obtained from density sensitive line ratios.

  10. High temperature loop heat pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, W.G.; Bland, J.J.; Fershtater, Y.; Goncharov, K.A.; Nikitkin, M.; Juhasz, A.

    1995-12-31

    Advantages of loop heat pipes over conventional heat pipes include self-priming during start-up, improved tolerance for noncondensible gas, and ability for ground testing in any orientation. The applications for high temperature, alkali-metal working fluid loop heat pipes include space radiators, and bimodal systems. A high temperature loop heat pipe was fabricated and tested at 850 K, using cesium as the working fluid. Previous loop heat pipes were tested with ambient temperature working fluids at temperatures below about 450 K. The loop heat pipe had a titanium envelope, and a titanium aluminide wick. The maximum cesium loop heat pipe power was only about 600 watts, which was lower the predicted 1,000 W power. The power limitation may be due to a wettability problem with the cesium not completely wetting the titanium aluminide wick. This would reduce the pumping capability of the wick, and the maximum power that the heat pipe could carry. This problem could be solved by using a refractory metal powder wick, since the alkali metals are known to wet refractory metal wicks.

  11. Crystal structure of the catalytic domain of human bile salt activated lipase.

    PubMed Central

    Terzyan, S.; Wang, C. S.; Downs, D.; Hunter, B.; Zhang, X. C.

    2000-01-01

    Bile-salt activated lipase (BAL) is a pancreatic enzyme that digests a variety of lipids in the small intestine. A distinct property of BAL is its dependency on bile salts in hydrolyzing substrates of long acyl chains or bulky alcoholic motifs. A crystal structure of the catalytic domain of human BAL (residues 1-538) with two surface mutations (N186D and A298D), which were introduced in attempting to facilitate crystallization, has been determined at 2.3 A resolution. The crystal form belongs to space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) with one monomer per asymmetric unit, and the protein shows an alpha/beta hydrolase fold. In the absence of bound bile salt molecules, the protein possesses a preformed catalytic triad and a functional oxyanion hole. Several surface loops around the active site are mobile, including two loops potentially involved in substrate binding (residues 115-125 and 270-285). PMID:11045623

  12. Highly flexible, transparent and conducting CuS-nanosheet networks for flexible quantum-dot solar cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zijie; Li, Teng; Zhang, Fayin; Hong, Xiaodan; Xie, Shuyao; Ye, Meidan; Guo, Wenxi; Liu, Xiangyang

    2017-03-17

    The rapid development of modern electronics has given rise to a higher demand for flexible and wearable energy sources. Flexible transparent conducting electrodes (TCEs) are one of the essential components of flexible/wearable thin-film solar cells (SCs). In this regard, we present highly transparent and conducting CuS-nanosheet (NS) networks with an optimized sheet resistance (Rs) as low as 50 Ω sq(-1) at 85% transmittance as a counter electrode (CE) for flexible quantum-dot solar cells (QDSCs). The CuS NS network electrode exhibits remarkable mechanical flexibility under bending tests compared to traditional ITO/plastic substrates and sputtered CuS films. Herein, CuS NS networks not only served as conducting films for collecting electrons from the external circuit, but also served as superior catalysts for reducing polysulfide (S(2-)/Sx(2-)) electrolytes. A power conversion efficiency (PCE) up to 3.25% was achieved for the QDSCs employing CuS NS networks as CEs, which was much higher than those of the devices based on Pt networks and sputtered CuS films. We believe that such CuS network TCEs with high flexibility, transparency, conductivity and catalytic activity could be widely used in making wearable electronic products.

  13. Retained Digital Flexible Ureteroscopes

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, Melissa; Telfer, Siobhan; Pautler, Stephen; Denstedt, John

    2017-01-01

    Abstract This report documents two instances of retained flexible ureteroscopes at the time of ureteroscopy and laser lithotripsy in a healthy 37-year-old male and a 53-year-old male with a pelvic kidney. We describe maneuvers to remove the ureteroscope endoscopically in the first case, while the second case required conversion to open surgery for ureteroscope extrication. PMID:28265593

  14. ESEA Flexibility. Updated

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    In order to move forward with State and local reforms designed to improve academic achievement and increase the quality of instruction for all students in a manner that was not originally contemplated by the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB), a State educational agency (SEA) may request flexibility, on its own behalf and on behalf of its…

  15. Flexible Planning in Ravens?

    PubMed

    Redshaw, Jonathan; Taylor, Alex H; Suddendorf, Thomas

    2017-09-15

    Across two different contexts, Kabadayi and Osvath found that ravens preferentially selected items that could be used to obtain future rewards. Do these results demand a rethink of the evolution of flexible planning, or are there leaner alternative explanations for the performance of ravens? Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Flexible Classroom Furniture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim Hassell,

    2011-01-01

    Classroom design for the 21st-century learning environment should accommodate a variety of learning skills and needs. The space should be large enough so it can be configured to accommodate a number of learning activities. This also includes furniture that provides flexibility and accommodates collaboration and interactive work among students and…

  17. Flexibility: Ensuring Adaptability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Slyke, Paul; Goode, Chris

    2003-01-01

    Discusses how to collaborate with administrators, physical plant representatives, department heads, lawmakers, and design professionals to create flexible school facilities that adapt to changing needs, noting the importance of utilizing a programming process that determines the true needs of a facility, based on the potential activities that will…

  18. Flexible Mental Calculation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Threlfall, John

    2002-01-01

    Suggests that strategy choice is a misleading characterization of efficient mental calculation and that teaching mental calculation methods as a whole is not conducive to flexibility. Proposes an alternative in which calculation is thought of as an interaction between noticing and knowledge. Presents an associated teaching approach to promote…

  19. Split-Level Flexibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberson, Kelly

    1997-01-01

    Presents photographs and the floor plan of a middle school whose split-level design separates "noisy" areas, such as the band room and gymnasium, from the academic wing. The design encourages teaming and flexibility through its classroom clustering and mobile partitions between classrooms. Additionally, all classrooms possess windows and…

  20. Split-Level Flexibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberson, Kelly

    1997-01-01

    Presents photographs and the floor plan of a middle school whose split-level design separates "noisy" areas, such as the band room and gymnasium, from the academic wing. The design encourages teaming and flexibility through its classroom clustering and mobile partitions between classrooms. Additionally, all classrooms possess windows and…