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Sample records for flexible modelling strategy

  1. Mental Model Progression in Learning the Electron Transport Chain: Effects of Instructional Strategies and Cognitive Flexibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darabi, Aubteen; Hemphill, Jennifer; Nelson, David W.; Boulware, Wilma; Liang, Xinya

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of two instructional strategies, segmented and holistic, on the progression over time of learners' mental models toward that of an expert with the moderator of cognitive flexibility. Sixty-four juniors and seniors in a college metabolism course were randomly assigned to one of the two strategies for instruction…

  2. Adaptive Control Strategies for Flexible Robotic Arm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bialasiewicz, Jan T.

    1996-01-01

    The control problem of a flexible robotic arm has been investigated. The control strategies that have been developed have a wide application in approaching the general control problem of flexible space structures. The following control strategies have been developed and evaluated: neural self-tuning control algorithm, neural-network-based fuzzy logic control algorithm, and adaptive pole assignment algorithm. All of the above algorithms have been tested through computer simulation. In addition, the hardware implementation of a computer control system that controls the tip position of a flexible arm clamped on a rigid hub mounted directly on the vertical shaft of a dc motor, has been developed. An adaptive pole assignment algorithm has been applied to suppress vibrations of the described physical model of flexible robotic arm and has been successfully tested using this testbed.

  3. A simulation strategy for the atomistic modeling of flexible molecules covalently tethered to rigid surfaces: application to peptides.

    PubMed

    Curcó, David; Zanuy, David; Nussinov, Ruth; Alemán, Carlos

    2011-03-01

    A computational strategy to model flexible molecules tethered to a rigid inert surface is presented. The strategy is able to provide uncorrelated relaxed microstructures at the atomistic level. It combines an algorithm to generate molecules tethered to the surface without atomic overlaps, a method to insert solvent molecules and ions in the simulation box, and a powerful relaxation procedure. The reliability of the strategy has been investigated by simulating two different systems: (i) mixed monolayers consisting of binary mixtures of long-chain alkyl thiols of different lengths adsorbed on a rigid inert surface and (ii) CREKA (Cys-Arg-Glu-Lys-Ala), a short linear pentapeptide that recognizes clotted plasma proteins and selectively homes to tumors, covalently tethered to a rigid inert surface in aqueous solution. In the first, we examined the segregation of the two species in the monolayers using different long-chain:short-chain ratios, whereas in the second, we explored the conformational space of CREKA and ions distribution considering densities of peptides per nm(2) ranging from 0.03 to 1.67. Results indicate a spontaneous segregation in alkyl thiol monolayers, which enhances when the concentration of longest chains increases. However, the whole conformational profile of CREKA depends on the number of molecules tethered to the surface pointing out the large influence of molecular density on the intermolecular interactions, even though the bioactive conformation was found as the most stable in all cases.

  4. Modeling Intercellular Communication as a Survival Strategy of Cancer Cells: An In Silico Approach on a Flexible Bioinformatics Framework

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas-García, Maura; González-Pérez, Pedro P.; Montagna, Sara; Cortés, Oscar Sánchez; Caballero, Elena Hernández

    2016-01-01

    Intercellular communication is very important for cell development and allows a group of cells to survive as a population. Cancer cells have a similar behavior, presenting the same mechanisms and characteristics of tissue formation. In this article, we model and simulate the formation of different communication channels that allow an interaction between two cells. This is a first step in order to simulate in the future processes that occur in healthy tissue when normal cells surround a cancer cell and to interrupt the communication, thus preventing the spread of malignancy into these cells. The purpose of this study is to propose key molecules, which can be targeted to allow us to break the communication between cancer cells and surrounding normal cells. The simulation is carried out using a flexible bioinformatics platform that we developed, which is itself based on the metaphor chemistry-based model. PMID:26997867

  5. Modeling Intercellular Communication as a Survival Strategy of Cancer Cells: An In Silico Approach on a Flexible Bioinformatics Framework.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas-García, Maura; González-Pérez, Pedro P; Montagna, Sara; Cortés, Oscar Sánchez; Caballero, Elena Hernández

    2016-01-01

    Intercellular communication is very important for cell development and allows a group of cells to survive as a population. Cancer cells have a similar behavior, presenting the same mechanisms and characteristics of tissue formation. In this article, we model and simulate the formation of different communication channels that allow an interaction between two cells. This is a first step in order to simulate in the future processes that occur in healthy tissue when normal cells surround a cancer cell and to interrupt the communication, thus preventing the spread of malignancy into these cells. The purpose of this study is to propose key molecules, which can be targeted to allow us to break the communication between cancer cells and surrounding normal cells. The simulation is carried out using a flexible bioinformatics platform that we developed, which is itself based on the metaphor chemistry-based model.

  6. A flexible search strategy for production systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dey, Pradip; Srinivasan, S.; Sundararaghavan, K. R.

    1988-01-01

    Most problems considered to be solvable by expert systems have very large search space. It is imperative to use efficient search strategy in expert system tools. Thus, OPS5 uses a kind of hill climbing which is very efficient. However, hill climbing is inadequate for many problems because it is one of the least dependable search strategies. In order to make the search efficient and adequate one can: (1) adopt best-first search instead of hill climbing, or (2) modify hill climbing with intelligent backtracking. The second alternative is adopted. It is implemented in a production system called PRO2 embedded in C running on UNIX. It is called hill tracking. It is a general purpose tool for developing expert systems. This is a rule based production system with an effective, intelligent and flexible backtracking control mechanism, which makes the system more dependable. The advantages and disadvantages of PRO2 are discussed.

  7. Model reduction of flexible manipulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jie; Xu, Yangsheng; Chen, C. S.

    1992-06-01

    Flexible manipulators can be characterized by a dynamic model with a large number of vibration modes, and the use of the model in the model-based control schemes requires reduction of model order. Balanced truncation is an effective method for model reduction of asymptotically stable systems by transforming the states to a coordinate system in which the controllability and observability Gramians are equal and diagonal, and eliminating the states which contribute weakly to the input-output map. An elastic flexible manipulator, however, is a marginally stable system and thus the balanced truncation method can not be directly applied. Herein, a method is presented of reducing the order of a marginally stable system based on the fact that translation transformations in the frequency domain preserve input-output properties of the system. The successful application is addressed of the method to model reduction of flexible manipulators with infinite-dimensional for finite-dimensional model. The method is also applicable for any other marginally stable model, such as elastic space trusswork and multi-dimensional space vehicle structure.

  8. Protein flexibility oriented virtual screening strategy for JAK2 inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Xiao; Yuan, Haoliang; Zhang, Yanmin; Xu, Jinxing; Ran, Ting; Liu, Haichun; Lu, Shuai; Xu, Anyang; Li, Hongmei; Jiang, Yulei; Lu, Tao; Chen, Yadong

    2015-10-01

    JAK2 has been considered as an important target for the development of anti-cancer agents. In this study, considering the flexibility of its binding site, an integrated strategy combining Bayesian categorization modeling and ensemble docking was established. Four representative crystal structures were selected for ensemble docking by the hierarchical clustering of 34 crystal structures according to the volume overlaps of each structure. A retrospective virtual screening was performed to validate this integrated strategy. As the preliminary filtration, the Bayesian model enhanced the ratio of actives by reducing the large amount of decoys. After docking the remaining compounds, the comparison between the ensemble and individual results showed that the enrichment of ensemble docking improved significantly. The results of analysis on conformational changes of two top ranked active inhibitors when docking into different proteins indicated that compounds with flexible conformations well fitted the different binding site shapes were more likely to be potential JAK2 inhibitors. This high efficient strategy will facilitate virtual screening for novel JAK2 inhibitors and could be even applied in drug discovery against other targets.

  9. Flexible Studies as Strategy for Lifelong Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bugge, Liv Susanne; Wikan, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    Many countries face a challenge in recruiting teachers. At the same time, the labour market is changing and the demand for re-education is increasing. In this situation, lifelong learning is seen as relevant and higher education institutions are asked to offer flexible and decentralised study programmes in order to accommodate the need for formal…

  10. Adaptive control strategies for flexible robotic arm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bialasiewicz, Jan T.

    1993-01-01

    The motivation of this research came about when a neural network direct adaptive control scheme was applied to control the tip position of a flexible robotic arm. Satisfactory control performance was not attainable due to the inherent non-minimum phase characteristics of the flexible robotic arm tip. Most of the existing neural network control algorithms are based on the direct method and exhibit very high sensitivity if not unstable closed-loop behavior. Therefore a neural self-tuning control (NSTC) algorithm is developed and applied to this problem and showed promising results. Simulation results of the NSTC scheme and the conventional self-tuning (STR) control scheme are used to examine performance factors such as control tracking mean square error, estimation mean square error, transient response, and steady state response.

  11. Flexible stocking strategies for adapting to climatic variability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As a result of precipitation-induced variability on forage production, ranchers have difficulty matching animal demand with forage availability in their operations. Flexible stocking strategies could more effectively use extra forage in highly productive years and limit risk of overgrazing during dr...

  12. Two strategies to engineer flexible loops for improved enzyme thermostability

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Haoran; Yan, Yihan; Zhang, Cheng; Dalby, Paul A.

    2017-01-01

    Flexible sites are potential targets for engineering the stability of enzymes. Nevertheless, the success rate of the rigidifying flexible sites (RFS) strategy is still low due to a limited understanding of how to determine the best mutation candidates. In this study, two parallel strategies were applied to identify mutation candidates within the flexible loops of Escherichia coli transketolase (TK). The first was a “back to consensus mutations” approach, and the second was computational design based on ΔΔG calculations in Rosetta. Forty-nine single variants were generated and characterised experimentally. From these, three single-variants I189H, A282P, D143K were found to be more thermostable than wild-type TK. The combination of A282P with H192P, a variant constructed previously, resulted in the best all-round variant with a 3-fold improved half-life at 60 °C, 5-fold increased specific activity at 65 °C, 1.3-fold improved kcat and a Tm increased by 5 °C above that of wild type. Based on a statistical analysis of the stability changes for all variants, the qualitative prediction accuracy of the Rosetta program reached 65.3%. Both of the two strategies investigated were useful in guiding mutation candidates to flexible loops, and had the potential to be used for other enzymes. PMID:28145457

  13. Two strategies to engineer flexible loops for improved enzyme thermostability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haoran; Yan, Yihan; Zhang, Cheng; Dalby, Paul A.

    2017-02-01

    Flexible sites are potential targets for engineering the stability of enzymes. Nevertheless, the success rate of the rigidifying flexible sites (RFS) strategy is still low due to a limited understanding of how to determine the best mutation candidates. In this study, two parallel strategies were applied to identify mutation candidates within the flexible loops of Escherichia coli transketolase (TK). The first was a “back to consensus mutations” approach, and the second was computational design based on ΔΔG calculations in Rosetta. Forty-nine single variants were generated and characterised experimentally. From these, three single-variants I189H, A282P, D143K were found to be more thermostable than wild-type TK. The combination of A282P with H192P, a variant constructed previously, resulted in the best all-round variant with a 3-fold improved half-life at 60 °C, 5-fold increased specific activity at 65 °C, 1.3-fold improved kcat and a Tm increased by 5 °C above that of wild type. Based on a statistical analysis of the stability changes for all variants, the qualitative prediction accuracy of the Rosetta program reached 65.3%. Both of the two strategies investigated were useful in guiding mutation candidates to flexible loops, and had the potential to be used for other enzymes.

  14. Flexible healthcare structures: analysis and evaluation of possible strategies and technologies.

    PubMed

    Buffoli, M; Nachiero, D; Capolongo, S

    2012-01-01

    Hospitals are complex buildings because of their articulation, function, organization and technology equipment. Planning hospitals needs an interdisciplinary approach in order to organize efficiently the construction of qualitative and flexible units, that must be able to answer to all the requirements of different users and to the fast changes due to the research innovations. Human and care activities have a rapid progress, that creates a constant demand of modernizations of the hospitals and readjustment of the functional connections. Flexibility becomes the core of all the modifications depending on the progress of the medical science. The future challenge is to build structures that promote sustainable flexibility and also allow to achieve wellness in a synergic relation with complementary external activities. Therefore the research aims to identify lay-out models, technical and constructive solutions to guarantee different levels of flexibility. The research was made of different stages to define flexibility inside healthcare structures using strategies and technologies. The first step has followed the evolution of hospital structures during the centuries. It illustrates the most efficient methods and solutions used in last fifty years to achieve the flexibility. The second step was the analysis of the most important contemporaries healthcare structures. In that analysis, the hospitals will be compared through an evaluation matrix made by diferent flexibility levels that underlines the most efficient technologies and strategies used. At the end it was made a list of design indications focused on the definition of a new design approach that guarantees flexibility for these complex systems.

  15. Flexible Models for Solar Sail Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver Smith, Suzanne; Song, Haiping; Baker, John R.; Black, Jonathan; Muheim, Danniella M.

    2005-01-01

    Solar sails employ a unique form of propulsion, gaining momentum from incident and reflected photons. However, the momentum transferred by an individual photon is extremely small. Consequently, a solar sail must have an extremely large surface area and also be extremely light. The flexibility of the sail then must be considered when designing or evaluating control laws. In this paper, solar sail flexibility and its influence on control effectiveness is considered using idealized two-dimensional models to represent physical phenomena rather than a specific design. Differential equations of motion are derived for a distributed parameter model of a flexible solar sail idealized as a rotating central hub with two opposing flexible booms. This idealization is appropriate for solar sail designs in which the vibrational modes of the sail and supporting booms move together allowing the sail mass to be distributed along the booms in the idealized model. A reduced analytical model of the flexible response is considered. Linear feedback torque control is applied at the central hub. Two translational disturbances and a torque disturbance also act at the central hub representing the equivalent effect of deflecting sail shape about a reference line. Transient simulations explore different control designs and their effectiveness for controlling orientation, for reducing flexible motion and for disturbance rejection. A second model also is developed as a two-dimensional "pathfinder" model to calculate the effect of solar sail shape on the resultant thrust, in-plane force and torque at the hub. The analysis is then extended to larger models using the finite element method. The finite element modeling approach is verified by comparing results from a two-dimensional finite element model with those from the analytical model. The utility of the finite element modeling approach for this application is then illustrated through examples based on a full finite element model.

  16. A Model for Flexibly Editing CSCL Scripts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobreira, Pericles; Tchounikine, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a model whose primary concern and design rationale is to offer users (teachers) with basic ICT skills an intuitive, easy, and flexible way of editing scripts. The proposal is based on relating an end-user representation as a table and a machine model as a tree. The table-tree model introduces structural expressiveness and…

  17. Flexible and robust strategies for waste management in Sweden

    SciTech Connect

    Finnveden, Goeran Bjoerklund, Anna; Reich, Marcus Carlsson; Eriksson, Ola; Soerbom, Adrienne

    2007-07-01

    Treatment of solid waste continues to be on the political agenda. Waste disposal issues are often viewed from an environmental perspective, but economic and social aspects also need to be considered when deciding on waste strategies and policy instruments. The aim of this paper is to suggest flexible and robust strategies for waste management in Sweden, and to discuss different policy instruments. Emphasis is on environmental aspects, but social and economic aspects are also considered. The results show that most waste treatment methods have a role to play in a robust and flexible integrated waste management system, and that the waste hierarchy is valid as a rule of thumb from an environmental perspective. A review of social aspects shows that there is a general willingness among people to source separate wastes. A package of policy instruments can include landfill tax, an incineration tax which is differentiated with respect to the content of fossil fuels and a weight based incineration tax, as well as support to the use of biogas and recycled materials.

  18. Flexible robot control: Modeling and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oppenheim, Irving J.; Shimoyama, Isao

    1989-01-01

    Described here is a model and its use in experimental studies of flexible manipulators. The analytical model uses the equivalent of Rayleigh's method to approximate the displaced shape of a flexible link as the static elastic displacement which would occur under end rotations as applied at the joints. The generalized coordinates are thereby expressly compatible with joint motions and rotations in serial link manipulators, because the amplitude variables are simply the end rotations between the flexible link and the chord connecting the end points. The equations for the system dynamics are quite simple and can readily be formulated for the multi-link, three-dimensional case. When the flexible links possess mass and (polar moment of) inertia which are small compared to the concentrated mass and inertia at the joints, the analytical model is exact and displays the additional advantage of reduction in system dimension for the governing equations. Four series of pilot tests have been completed. Studies on a planar single-link system were conducted at Carnegie-Mellon University, and tests conducted at Toshiba Corporation on a planar two-link system were then incorporated into the study. A single link system under three-dimensional motion, displaying biaxial flexure, was then tested at Carnegie-Mellon.

  19. Modelling and Control of Flexible Airship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennaceur, S.; Abichou, A.; Azouz, N.

    2008-06-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (U.A.V.) have a need of a greater autonomy in their new missions. Autonomous U.A.V. flight control systems require a precise modeling of the dynamic behavior taking into account the effect of flexibility and the interaction with surrounding fluid. In this paper, we present an efficient modeling of the autonomous flexible blimps. These flying objects are assumed to undergo large rigid-body motion and small elastic deformations. The formalism used is based on the Newton-Euler approach. This one is frequently used for flying rigid objects. In this study we develop a method to generalize the existing Newton-Euler "rigid body" formalisms by including the effect of the flexibility without destroying the global methodology. The method is hybrid. It uses the Lagrange equations and the Eulerian variables. The flexibility appears in the global dynamical system by the way of few supplementary degrees of freedom. This method has the advantage of making easier the elaboration of algorithms of control, stabilization or generation of trajectories. The added mass phenomenon is also taken into account in the dynamical system. This phenomenon is important for big and light objects moving in a fluid such as airships. As validation we use the parameters of an AS-200 blimp belonging to the University of Evry.

  20. Modeling flexible flapping wings oscillating at resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeev, Alexander; Masoud, Hassan

    2010-03-01

    Using a hybrid approach for fluid-structure interactions that integrates the lattice Boltzmann and lattice spring models, we study the three-dimensional aerodynamics of flexible flapping wings at hovering. The wings are a pair of flat elastic plates tilted from the horizontal and driven to oscillate according to the sinusoidal law. Our simulations reveal that resonance oscillations of flexible wings dramatically increase aerodynamic lift at low Reynolds number. Comparing to otherwise identical rigid wings, flexible wings at resonance generate up to two orders of magnitude greater lift. Within the resonance band, we identify two operation regimes leading to the maximum lift and the maximum efficiency, respectively. The maximum lift occurs when the wing tip and root move with a phase lag of 90 degrees, whereas the maximum efficiency occurs at the frequency where the wing tip and root oscillate in counterphase. Our results suggest that the resonance regimes would be optimal for the design of microscale flying machines using flexible flapping wings driven by simple kinematic strokes.

  1. Modeling and Control of Intelligent Flexible Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-26

    Figure 5 illustrates a comparison between the analytical model obtained from Figure 4 and "" i t " • a . aw SFigure 5 Mtperinenta (solid fine) and...was used for position comol of the m ua various S a frame that models the dynanics of a solr arry.The msiga operations (summada., subractio. etc...34 and -180" for all positive aw , which is equivalent to I lax- lpxrx5Ex 0 for all o) > 0. (19) EXPERIMENTAL TESTBED FLEXIBLE ANTENNA MODEL The convex

  2. Emulating a flexible space structure: Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waites, H. B.; Rice, S. C.; Jones, V. L.

    1988-01-01

    Control Dynamics, in conjunction with Marshall Space Flight Center, has participated in the modeling and testing of Flexible Space Structures. Through the series of configurations tested and the many techniques used for collecting, analyzing, and modeling the data, many valuable insights have been gained and important lessons learned. This paper discusses the background of the Large Space Structure program, Control Dynamics' involvement in testing and modeling of the configurations (especially the Active Control Technique Evaluation for Spacecraft (ACES) configuration), the results from these two processes, and insights gained from this work.

  3. Experimental validation of flexible robot arm modeling and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulsoy, A. Galip

    1989-01-01

    Flexibility is important for high speed, high precision operation of lightweight manipulators. Accurate dynamic modeling of flexible robot arms is needed. Previous work has mostly been based on linear elasticity with prescribed rigid body motions (i.e., no effect of flexible motion on rigid body motion). Little or no experimental validation of dynamic models for flexible arms is available. Experimental results are also limited for flexible arm control. Researchers include the effects of prismatic as well as revolute joints. They investigate the effect of full coupling between the rigid and flexible motions, and of axial shortening, and consider the control of flexible arms using only additional sensors.

  4. Flexibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphrey, L. Dennis

    1981-01-01

    Flexibility is an important aspect of all sports and recreational activities. Flexibility can be developed and maintained by stretching exercises. Exercises designed to develop flexibility in ankle joints, knees, hips, and the lower back are presented. (JN)

  5. Flexible Learning Strategies in First through Fourth-Year Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassidy, Alice; Fu, Guopeng; Valley, Will; Lomas, Cyprien; Jovel, Eduardo; Riseman, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Flexible Learning (FL) is a pedagogical approach allowing for flexibility of time, place, and audience, including but not solely focused on the use of technologies. We describe Flexible Learning as a pedagogical approach in four courses framed by three key themes: 1) objectives and aspects of course design, 2) evaluation and assessment, and 3)…

  6. Flexible digestion strategies and trace metal assimilation in marine bivalves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Decho, Alan W.; Luoma, Samuel N.

    1996-01-01

    Pulse-chase experiments show that two marine bivalves take optimal advantage of different types of particulate food by varying food retention time in a flexible two-phase digestive system. For example, carbon is efficiently assimilated from bacteria by subjecting nearly all the ingested bacteria to prolonged digestion. Prolonging digestion also enhances assimilation of metals, many of which are toxic in minute quantities if they are biologically available. Detritus-feeding aquatic organisms have always lived in environments naturally rich in particle-reactive metals. We suggest that avoiding excess assimilation of metals could be a factor in the evolution of digestion strategies. We tested that suggestion by studying digestion of particles containing different Cr concentrations. We show that bivalves are capable of modifying the digestive processing of food to reduce exposure to high, biologically available, Cr concentrations. The evolution of a mechanism in some species to avoid high concentrations of metals in food could influence how effects of modern metal pollution are manifested in marine ecosystems.

  7. Bayesian modeling of flexible cognitive control

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jiefeng; Heller, Katherine; Egner, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    “Cognitive control” describes endogenous guidance of behavior in situations where routine stimulus-response associations are suboptimal for achieving a desired goal. The computational and neural mechanisms underlying this capacity remain poorly understood. We examine recent advances stemming from the application of a Bayesian learner perspective that provides optimal prediction for control processes. In reviewing the application of Bayesian models to cognitive control, we note that an important limitation in current models is a lack of a plausible mechanism for the flexible adjustment of control over conflict levels changing at varying temporal scales. We then show that flexible cognitive control can be achieved by a Bayesian model with a volatility-driven learning mechanism that modulates dynamically the relative dependence on recent and remote experiences in its prediction of future control demand. We conclude that the emergent Bayesian perspective on computational mechanisms of cognitive control holds considerable promise, especially if future studies can identify neural substrates of the variables encoded by these models, and determine the nature (Bayesian or otherwise) of their neural implementation. PMID:24929218

  8. The Economic Merits of Flexible Carbon Capture and Sequestration as a Compliance Strategy with the Clean Power Plan.

    PubMed

    Craig, Michael T; Jaramillo, Paulina; Zhai, Haibo; Klima, Kelly

    2017-02-07

    Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) may be a key technology for achieving large CO2 emission reductions. Relative to "normal" CCS, "flexible" CCS retrofits include solvent storage that allows the generator to temporarily reduce the CCS parasitic load and increase the generator's net efficiency, capacity, and ramp rate. Due to this flexibility, flexible CCS generators provide system benefits that normal CCS generators do not, which could make flexible CCS an economic CO2 emission reduction strategy. Here, we estimate the system-level cost effectiveness of reducing CO2 emissions with flexible CCS compared to redispatching (i.e., substituting gas- for coal-fired electricity generation), wind, and normal CCS under the Clean Power Plan (CPP) and a hypothetical more stringent CO2 emission reduction target ("stronger CPP"). Using a unit commitment and economic dispatch model, we find flexible CCS achieves more cost-effective emission reductions than normal CCS under both reduction targets, indicating that policies that promote CCS should encourage flexible CCS. However, flexible CCS is less cost effective than wind under both reduction targets and less and more cost effective than redispatching under the CPP and stronger CPP, respectively. Thus, CCS will likely be a minor CPP compliance strategy but may play a larger role under a stronger emission reduction target.

  9. Modeling Robot Flexibility for Endpoint Force Control.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-01

    SIDM 19. KE9Y WORDS fCntknu. OnPVOO&O 0401 It 00041000111O ed 0000#uF 6P 1111411 amA.w) robot force control * robot control / robot dynamics flexible...no. 3, pp. 62-75. [2] Eppinger, S.D. and Seering, W.P. On Dynamic Models of Robot Force Control . In Proceedings of International Conference on...W.P. Understanding Bandwidth Limitations in Robot Force Control . In Proceedings of International Conference on Robotics and Automation. IEEE, April 1987

  10. Robustness, flexibility, and sensitivity in a multifunctional motor control model.

    PubMed

    Lyttle, David N; Gill, Jeffrey P; Shaw, Kendrick M; Thomas, Peter J; Chiel, Hillel J

    2017-02-01

    Motor systems must adapt to perturbations and changing conditions both within and outside the body. We refer to the ability of a system to maintain performance despite perturbations as "robustness," and the ability of a system to deploy alternative strategies that improve fitness as "flexibility." Different classes of pattern-generating circuits yield dynamics with differential sensitivities to perturbations and parameter variation. Depending on the task and the type of perturbation, high sensitivity can either facilitate or hinder robustness and flexibility. Here we explore the role of multiple coexisting oscillatory modes and sensory feedback in allowing multiphasic motor pattern generation to be both robust and flexible. As a concrete example, we focus on a nominal neuromechanical model of triphasic motor patterns in the feeding apparatus of the marine mollusk Aplysia californica. We find that the model can operate within two distinct oscillatory modes and that the system exhibits bistability between the two. In the "heteroclinic mode," higher sensitivity makes the system more robust to changing mechanical loads, but less robust to internal parameter variations. In the "limit cycle mode," lower sensitivity makes the system more robust to changes in internal parameter values, but less robust to changes in mechanical load. Finally, we show that overall performance on a variable feeding task is improved when the system can flexibly transition between oscillatory modes in response to the changing demands of the task. Thus, our results suggest that the interplay of sensory feedback and multiple oscillatory modes can allow motor systems to be both robust and flexible in a variable environment.

  11. Evidence for the flexible sensorimotor strategies predicted by optimal feedback control.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dan; Todorov, Emanuel

    2007-08-29

    Everyday movements pursue diverse and often conflicting mixtures of task goals, requiring sensorimotor strategies customized for the task at hand. Such customization is mostly ignored by traditional theories emphasizing movement geometry and servo control. In contrast, the relationship between the task and the strategy most suitable for accomplishing it lies at the core of our optimal feedback control theory of coordination. Here, we show that the predicted sensitivity to task goals affords natural explanations to a number of novel psychophysical findings. Our point of departure is the little-known fact that corrections for target perturbations introduced late in a reaching movement are incomplete. We show that this is not simply attributable to lack of time, in contradiction with alternative models and, somewhat paradoxically, in agreement with our model. Analysis of optimal feedback gains reveals that the effect is partly attributable to a previously unknown trade-off between stability and accuracy. This yields a testable prediction: if stability requirements are decreased, then accuracy should increase. We confirm the prediction experimentally in three-dimensional obstacle avoidance and interception tasks in which subjects hit a robotic target with programmable impedance. In additional agreement with the theory, we find that subjects do not rely on rigid control strategies but instead exploit every opportunity for increased performance. The modeling methodology needed to capture this extra flexibility is more general than the linear-quadratic methods we used previously. The results suggest that the remarkable flexibility of motor behavior arises from sensorimotor control laws optimized for composite cost functions.

  12. Dynamics modeling and adaptive control of flexible manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasiadek, J. Z.

    1991-01-01

    An application of Model Reference Adaptive Control (MRAC) to the position and force control of flexible manipulators and robots is presented. A single-link flexible manipulator is analyzed. The problem was to develop a mathematical model of a flexible robot that is accurate. The objective is to show that the adaptive control works better than 'conventional' systems and is suitable for flexible structure control.

  13. Modeling and control of flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, J. S.; Mingori, D. L.

    1988-01-01

    This monograph presents integrated modeling and controller design methods for flexible structures. The controllers, or compensators, developed are optimal in the linear-quadratic-Gaussian sense. The performance objectives, sensor and actuator locations and external disturbances influence both the construction of the model and the design of the finite dimensional compensator. The modeling and controller design procedures are carried out in parallel to ensure compatibility of these two aspects of the design problem. Model reduction techniques are introduced to keep both the model order and the controller order as small as possible. A linear distributed, or infinite dimensional, model is the theoretical basis for most of the text, but finite dimensional models arising from both lumped-mass and finite element approximations also play an important role. A central purpose of the approach here is to approximate an optimal infinite dimensional controller with an implementable finite dimensional compensator. Both convergence theory and numerical approximation methods are given. Simple examples are used to illustrate the theory.

  14. Flexible Strategies for Coping with Rainfall Variability: Seasonal Adjustments in Cropped Area in the Ganges Basin

    PubMed Central

    Siderius, Christian; Biemans, Hester; van Walsum, Paul E. V.; van Ierland, Ekko C.; Kabat, Pavel; Hellegers, Petra J. G. J.

    2016-01-01

    One of the main manifestations of climate change will be increased rainfall variability. How to deal with this in agriculture will be a major societal challenge. In this paper we explore flexibility in land use, through deliberate seasonal adjustments in cropped area, as a specific strategy for coping with rainfall variability. Such adjustments are not incorporated in hydro-meteorological crop models commonly used for food security analyses. Our paper contributes to the literature by making a comprehensive model assessment of inter-annual variability in crop production, including both variations in crop yield and cropped area. The Ganges basin is used as a case study. First, we assessed the contribution of cropped area variability to overall variability in rice and wheat production by applying hierarchical partitioning on time-series of agricultural statistics. We then introduced cropped area as an endogenous decision variable in a hydro-economic optimization model (WaterWise), coupled to a hydrology-vegetation model (LPJmL), and analyzed to what extent its performance in the estimation of inter-annual variability in crop production improved. From the statistics, we found that in the period 1999–2009 seasonal adjustment in cropped area can explain almost 50% of variability in wheat production and 40% of variability in rice production in the Indian part of the Ganges basin. Our improved model was well capable of mimicking existing variability at different spatial aggregation levels, especially for wheat. The value of flexibility, i.e. the foregone costs of choosing not to crop in years when water is scarce, was quantified at 4% of gross margin of wheat in the Indian part of the Ganges basin and as high as 34% of gross margin of wheat in the drought-prone state of Rajasthan. We argue that flexibility in land use is an important coping strategy to rainfall variability in water stressed regions. PMID:26934389

  15. Designing Capital-Intensive Systems with Architectural and Operational Flexibility Using a Screening Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jijun; de Weck, Olivier; de Neufville, Richard; Robinson, Bob; MacGowan, David

    Development of capital intensive systems, such as offshore oil platforms or other industrial infrastructure, generally requires a significant amount of capital investment under various resource, technical, and market uncertainties. It is a very challenging task for development co-owners or joint ventures because important decisions, such as system architectures, have to be made while uncertainty remains high. This paper develops a screening model and a simulation framework to quickly explore the design space for complex engineering systems under uncertainty allowing promising strategies or architectures to be identified. Flexibility in systems’ design and operation is proposed as a proactive means to enable systems to adapt to future uncertainty. Architectural and operational flexibility can improve systems’ lifecycle value by mitigating downside risks and capturing upside opportunities. In order to effectively explore different flexible strategies addressing a view of uncertainty which changes with time, a computational framework based on Monte Carlo simulation is proposed in this paper. This framework is applied to study flexible development strategies for a representative offshore petroleum project. The complexity of this problem comes from multi-domain uncertainties, large architectural design space, and structure of flexibility decision rules. The results demonstrate that architectural and operational flexibility can significantly improve projects’ Expected Net Present Value (ENPV), reduce downside risks, and improve upside gains, compared to adopting an inflexible strategy appropriate to the view of uncertainty at the start of the project. In this particular case study, the most flexible strategy improves ENPV by 85% over an inflexible base case.

  16. Flexible Programmes in Higher Professional Education: Expert Validation of a Flexible Educational Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schellekens, Ad; Paas, Fred; Verbraeck, Alexander; van Merrienboer, Jeroen J. G.

    2010-01-01

    In a preceding case study, a process-focused demand-driven approach for organising flexible educational programmes in higher professional education (HPE) was developed. Operations management and instructional design contributed to designing a flexible educational model by means of discrete-event simulation. Educational experts validated the model…

  17. Flexibility as a Strategy in Nucleoside Antiviral Drug Design.

    PubMed

    Peters, H L; Ku, T C; Seley-Radtke, K L

    2015-01-01

    As far back as Melville Wolfrom's acyclic sugar synthesis in the 1960's, synthesis of flexible nucleoside analogues have been an area of interest. This concept, however, went against years of enzyme-substrate binding theory. Hence, acyclic methodology in antiviral drug design did not take off until the discovery and subsequent FDA approval of such analogues as Acyclovir and Tenofovir. More recently, the observation that flexible nucleosides could overcome drug resistance spawned a renewed interest in the field of nucleoside drug design. The next generation of flexible nucleosides shifted the focus from the sugar moiety to the nucleobase. With analogues such as Seley-Radtke "fleximers", and Herdewijn's C5 substituted 2'-deoxyuridines, the area of base flexibility has seen great expansion. More recently, the marriage of these methodologies with acyclic sugars has resulted in a series of acyclic flex-base nucleosides with a wide range of antiviral properties, including some of the first to exhibit anti-coronavirus activity. Various flexible nucleosides and their corresponding nucleobases will be compared in this review.

  18. Dynamic model of flexible phytoplankton nutrient uptake

    PubMed Central

    Bonachela, Juan A.; Raghib, Michael; Levin, Simon A.

    2011-01-01

    The metabolic machinery of marine microbes can be remarkably plastic, allowing organisms to persist under extreme nutrient limitation. With some exceptions, most theoretical approaches to nutrient uptake in phytoplankton are largely dominated by the classic Michaelis–Menten (MM) uptake functional form, whose constant parameters cannot account for the observed plasticity in the uptake apparatus. Following seminal ideas by earlier researchers, we propose a simple cell-level model based on a dynamic view of the uptake process whereby the cell can regulate the synthesis of uptake proteins in response to changes in both internal and external nutrient concentrations. In our flexible approach, the maximum uptake rate and nutrient affinity increase monotonically as the external nutrient concentration decreases. For low to medium nutrient availability, our model predicts uptake and growth rates larger than the classic MM counterparts, while matching the classic MM results for large nutrient concentrations. These results have important consequences for global coupled models of ocean circulation and biogeochemistry, which lack this regulatory mechanism and are thus likely to underestimate phytoplankton abundances and growth rates in oligotrophic regions of the ocean. PMID:22143781

  19. A reliable and flexible gene manipulation strategy in posthatch zebra finch brain

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadiantehrani, Somayeh; London, Sarah E.

    2017-01-01

    Songbird models meaningfully contribute to many fields including learned vocal communication, the neurobiology of social interactions, brain development, and ecology. The value of investigating gene-brain-behavior relationships in songbirds is therefore high. Viral infections typically used in other lab animals to deliver gene editing constructs have been less effective in songbirds, likely due to immune system properties. We therefore leveraged the in vivo electroporation strategy used in utero in rodents and in ovo in poultry, and apply it to posthatch zebra finch songbird chicks. We present a series of experiments with a combination of promoters, fluorescent protein genes, and piggyBac transposase vectors to demonstrate that this can be a reliable, efficient, and flexible strategy for genome manipulation. We discuss options for gene delivery experiments to test circuit and behavioral hypotheses using a variety of manipulations, including gene overexpression, CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing, inducible technologies, optogenetic or DREADD cellular control, and cell type-specific expression. PMID:28233828

  20. Flexible Learning Strategies in Higher and Further Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Diana, Ed.

    This book contains 15 papers written by contributors from all areas of Great Britain in further and higher education. The following papers are included: "Learning to Be Flexible" (Diana Thomas); "Managing Change: Towards a New Paradigm?" (Mac Stephenson, Timothy Lehmann); "Open Learning: Educational Opportunity or…

  1. Living in the Global Village: Strategies for Teaching Mental Flexibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNulty, Carol P.; Davies, MaryAnn; Maddoux, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Mental flexibility emerges as an essential skill for preparing young learners for global competency and denotes the ability to learn from and about different perspectives. Students who are regularly exposed to "alternative approaches to a wide range of scientific, social and everyday problems" appear to be more receptive to alternative solutions…

  2. Modelling the Shuttle Remote Manipulator System: Another flexible model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barhorst, Alan A.

    1993-01-01

    High fidelity elastic system modeling algorithms are discussed. The particular system studied is the Space Shuttle Remote Manipulator System (RMS) undergoing full articulated motion. The model incorporates flexibility via a methodology the author has been developing. The technique is based in variational principles, so rigorous boundary condition generation and weak formulations for the associated partial differential equations are realized, yet the analyst need not integrate by parts. The methodology is formulated using vector-dyad notation with minimal use of tensor notation, therefore the technique is believed to be affable to practicing engineers. The objectives of this work are as follows: (1) determine the efficacy of the modeling method; and (2) determine if the method affords an analyst advantages in the overall modeling and simulation task. Generated out of necessity were Mathematica algorithms that quasi-automate the modeling procedure and simulation development. The project was divided into sections as follows: (1) model development of a simplified manipulator; (2) model development of the full-freedom RMS including a flexible movable base on a six degree of freedom orbiter (a rigid-body is attached to the manipulator end-effector); (3) simulation development for item 2; and (4) comparison to the currently used model of the flexible RMS in the Structures and Mechanics Division of NASA JSC. At the time of the writing of this report, items 3 and 4 above were not complete.

  3. Computational strategies in the dynamic simulation of constrained flexible MBS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amirouche, F. M. L.; Xie, M.

    1993-01-01

    This research focuses on the computational dynamics of flexible constrained multibody systems. At first a recursive mapping formulation of the kinematical expressions in a minimum dimension as well as the matrix representation of the equations of motion are presented. The method employs Kane's equation, FEM, and concepts of continuum mechanics. The generalized active forces are extended to include the effects of high temperature conditions, such as creep, thermal stress, and elastic-plastic deformation. The time variant constraint relations for rolling/contact conditions between two flexible bodies are also studied. The constraints for validation of MBS simulation of gear meshing contact using a modified Timoshenko beam theory are also presented. The last part deals with minimization of vibration/deformation of the elastic beam in multibody systems making use of time variant boundary conditions. The above methodologies and computational procedures developed are being implemented in a program called DYAMUS.

  4. Modeling procedures for handling qualities evaluation of flexible aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Govindaraj, K. S.; Eulrich, B. J.; Chalk, C. R.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents simplified modeling procedures to evaluate the impact of flexible modes and the unsteady aerodynamic effects on the handling qualities of Supersonic Cruise Aircraft (SCR). The modeling procedures involve obtaining reduced order transfer function models of SCR vehicles, including the important flexible mode responses and unsteady aerodynamic effects, and conversion of the transfer function models to time domain equations for use in simulations. The use of the modeling procedures is illustrated by a simple example.

  5. Linearized flexibility models in multibody dynamics and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cimino, William W.

    1989-01-01

    Simulation of structural response of multi-flexible-body systems by linearized flexible motion combined with nonlinear rigid motion is discussed. Advantages and applicability of such an approach for accurate simulation with greatly reduced computational costs and turnaround times are described, restricting attention to the control design environment. Requirements for updating the linearized flexibility model to track large angular motions are discussed. Validation of such an approach by comparison with other existing codes is included. Application to a flexible robot manipulator system is described.

  6. Flexible strategies for sensory integration during motor planning.

    PubMed

    Sober, Samuel J; Sabes, Philip N

    2005-04-01

    When planning target-directed reaching movements, human subjects combine visual and proprioceptive feedback to form two estimates of the arm's position: one to plan the reach direction, and another to convert that direction into a motor command. These position estimates are based on the same sensory signals but rely on different combinations of visual and proprioceptive input, suggesting that the brain weights sensory inputs differently depending on the computation being performed. Here we show that the relative weighting of vision and proprioception depends both on the sensory modality of the target and on the information content of the visual feedback, and that these factors affect the two stages of planning independently. The observed diversity of weightings demonstrates the flexibility of sensory integration and suggests a unifying principle by which the brain chooses sensory inputs so as to minimize errors arising from the transformation of sensory signals between coordinate frames.

  7. The emergence of flexible spatial strategies in young children.

    PubMed

    Waismeyer, Anna S; Jacobs, Lucia F

    2013-02-01

    The development of spatial navigation in children depends not only on remembering which landmarks lead to a goal location but also on developing strategies to deal with changes in the environment or imperfections in memory. Using cue combination methods, the authors examined 3- and 4-year-old children's memory for different types of spatial cues and the spatial strategies that they use when those cues are in conflict. Children were taught to search for a toy in 1 of 4 possible hiding locations. Children were then tested on transformations of the array of locations. The transformations dissociated the different types of cues by putting them in conflict with one another. The authors were especially interested in the use of a majority strategy, by which children choose to search in the location indicated by the greatest number of cue types rather than relying on a preferred cue type. Children's memory for spatial cues and their strategies varied both by age and by experimental setup. In Experiment 1, both 3- and 4-year-old children preferred to use the distinct landmarks coincident with the hiding locations over any other types of cues and showed no use of a majority strategy. However, in Experiment 2, when the coincident landmarks were moved adjacent to the hiding locations, both 3- and 4-year-old children preferred to search in the position of the hiding location relative to the array. Furthermore, 4-year-old children in Experiment 2 showed better memory for individual types of cues and the emergence of a majority strategy.

  8. A Model for Effective Implementation of Flexible Programme Delivery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Normand, Carey; Littlejohn, Allison; Falconer, Isobel

    2008-01-01

    The model developed here is the outcome of a project funded by the Quality Assurance Agency Scotland to support implementation of flexible programme delivery (FPD) in post-compulsory education. We highlight key features of FPD, including explicit and implicit assumptions about why flexibility is needed and the perceived barriers and solutions to…

  9. Model Order Reduction of Aeroservoelastic Model of Flexible Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yi; Song, Hongjun; Pant, Kapil; Brenner, Martin J.; Suh, Peter

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a holistic model order reduction (MOR) methodology and framework that integrates key technological elements of sequential model reduction, consistent model representation, and model interpolation for constructing high-quality linear parameter-varying (LPV) aeroservoelastic (ASE) reduced order models (ROMs) of flexible aircraft. The sequential MOR encapsulates a suite of reduction techniques, such as truncation and residualization, modal reduction, and balanced realization and truncation to achieve optimal ROMs at grid points across the flight envelope. The consistence in state representation among local ROMs is obtained by the novel method of common subspace reprojection. Model interpolation is then exploited to stitch ROMs at grid points to build a global LPV ASE ROM feasible to arbitrary flight condition. The MOR method is applied to the X-56A MUTT vehicle with flexible wing being tested at NASA/AFRC for flutter suppression and gust load alleviation. Our studies demonstrated that relative to the fullorder model, our X-56A ROM can accurately and reliably capture vehicles dynamics at various flight conditions in the target frequency regime while the number of states in ROM can be reduced by 10X (from 180 to 19), and hence, holds great promise for robust ASE controller synthesis and novel vehicle design.

  10. The Emergence of Flexible Spatial Strategies in Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waismeyer, Anna S.; Jacobs, Lucia F.

    2013-01-01

    The development of spatial navigation in children depends not only on remembering which landmarks lead to a goal location but also on developing strategies to deal with changes in the environment or imperfections in memory. Using cue combination methods, the authors examined 3- and 4-year-old children's memory for different types of spatial cues…

  11. Mathematical modeling of a class of multibody flexible spacecraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelkar, Atul, G.

    1994-01-01

    A mathematical model for a general multibody flexible spacecraft is obtained. The generic spacecraft considered consists of a flexible central body to which a number of flexible multibody structures are attached. The coordinate systems used in the derivation allow effective decoupling of the translational motion of the entire spacecraft from its rotational motion about its center of mass. The derivation assumes that the deformations in the bodies are only due to elastic motions. The dynamic model derived is a closed-form vector-matrix differential equation. The model developed can be used for analysis and simulation of many realistic spacecraft configurations.

  12. Residual flexibility test method for verification of constrained structural models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Admire, John R.; Tinker, Michael L.; Ivey, Edward W.

    1992-01-01

    A method is presented for deriving constrained modes and frequencies from a model correlated to a set of free-free test modes and a set of measured residual flexibilities. The method involves a simple modification of the MacNeal and Rubin component mode representation to allow verification of a constrained structural model. Results for two spaceflight structures show quick convergence of constrained modes using an easily measurable set of free-free modes plus the residual flexibility matrix or its boundary partition. This paper further validates the residual flexibility approach as an alternative test/analysis method when fixed-base testing proves impractical.

  13. Modeling Flexible Aircraft for Flight Control Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    body variahlos. control surface deflections, or gust variables as well as structur l m -,,- 4hapes. 1-12 As indicated by Arrows 3 and 11 in Figure 1-1...flexibility matrix is used, it i:: m - , i,ticable to define it for a structure that is supported in a statical1y d--’,iiate way. 1-27 !* CDMS GEOMETRY...dynamicist chooses as his reduced set of degrees of freedom m ,,tly translational deflections along the major axes of the str,,t,,, : on a wing

  14. Intrinsic flexibility of porous materials; theory, modelling and the flexibility window of the EMT zeolite framework

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Rachel E.; Wells, Stephen A.; Leung, Ka Ming; Edwards, Peter P.; Sartbaeva, Asel

    2015-01-01

    Framework materials have structures containing strongly bonded polyhedral groups of atoms connected through their vertices. Typically the energy cost for variations of the inter-polyhedral geometry is much less than the cost of distortions of the polyhedra themselves – as in the case of silicates, where the geometry of the SiO4 tetrahedral group is much more strongly constrained than the Si—O—Si bridging angle. As a result, framework materials frequently display intrinsic flexibility, and their dynamic and static properties are strongly influenced by low-energy collective motions of the polyhedra. Insight into these motions can be obtained in reciprocal space through the ‘rigid unit mode’ (RUM) model, and in real-space through template-based geometric simulations. We briefly review the framework flexibility phenomena in energy-relevant materials, including ionic conductors, perovskites and zeolites. In particular we examine the ‘flexibility window’ phenomenon in zeolites and present novel results on the flexibility window of the EMT framework, which shed light on the role of structure-directing agents. Our key finding is that the crown ether, despite its steric bulk, does not limit the geometric flexibility of the framework. PMID:26634720

  15. Real-time strategy game training: emergence of a cognitive flexibility trait.

    PubMed

    Glass, Brian D; Maddox, W Todd; Love, Bradley C

    2013-01-01

    Training in action video games can increase the speed of perceptual processing. However, it is unknown whether video-game training can lead to broad-based changes in higher-level competencies such as cognitive flexibility, a core and neurally distributed component of cognition. To determine whether video gaming can enhance cognitive flexibility and, if so, why these changes occur, the current study compares two versions of a real-time strategy (RTS) game. Using a meta-analytic Bayes factor approach, we found that the gaming condition that emphasized maintenance and rapid switching between multiple information and action sources led to a large increase in cognitive flexibility as measured by a wide array of non-video gaming tasks. Theoretically, the results suggest that the distributed brain networks supporting cognitive flexibility can be tuned by engrossing video game experience that stresses maintenance and rapid manipulation of multiple information sources. Practically, these results suggest avenues for increasing cognitive function.

  16. A general dynamic model of flexible robot arms for control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, X.; Tarn, T. J.; Bejczy, A. K.

    1989-01-01

    Hamilton's principle is used to derive the dynamic model for a large class of flexible robot arms. The resultant dynamic model consists of a system of partial differential-integral equations and the dynamic boundary conditions associated with it. Some properties of the model are observed, and its application to control is discussed. This model represents an infinite-dimensional nonlinear dynamic system and yet can be turned into a finite-dimensional system that could be obtained by modal expansion, if it is desired. This provides more flexibility for control purposes as well as for the analysis of the system.

  17. A Multilevel Strategy for the Exploration of the Conformational Flexibility of Small Molecules.

    PubMed

    Forti, Flavio; Cavasotto, Claudio N; Orozco, Modesto; Barril, Xavier; Luque, F Javier

    2012-05-08

    Predicting the conformational preferences of flexible compounds is still a challenging problem with important implications in areas such as molecular recognition and drug design. In this work, we describe a multilevel strategy to explore the conformational preferences of molecules. The method relies on the predominant-state approximation, which partitions the conformational space into distinct conformational wells. Moreover, it combines low-level (LL) methods for sampling the conformational minima and high-level (HL) techniques for calibrating their relative stability. In the implementation used in this study, the LL sampling is performed with the semiempirical RM1 Hamiltonian, and solvent effects are included using the RM1 version of the MST continuum solvation model. The HL refinement of the conformational wells is performed by combining geometry optimizations of the minima at the B3LYP (gas phase) or MST-B3LYP (solution) level, followed by single point MP2 computations using Dunning's augmented basis sets. Then, the effective free energy of a conformational well is estimated by combining the MP2 energy, supplemented with the MST-B3LYP solvation free energy for a conformational search in solution, with the local curvature of the well sampled at the semiempirical level. Applications of this strategy involve the exploration of the conformational preferences of 1,2-dichloroethane and neutral histamine in both the gas phase and water solution. Finally, the multilevel strategy is used to estimate the reorganization cost required for selecting the bioactive conformation of HIV reverse transcriptase inhibitors, which is estimated to be at most 1.3 kcal/mol.

  18. Flexible multivariate marginal models for analyzing multivariate longitudinal data, with applications in R.

    PubMed

    Asar, Ozgür; Ilk, Ozlem

    2014-07-01

    Most of the available multivariate statistical models dictate on fitting different parameters for the covariate effects on each multiple responses. This might be unnecessary and inefficient for some cases. In this article, we propose a modelling framework for multivariate marginal models to analyze multivariate longitudinal data which provides flexible model building strategies. We show that the model handles several response families such as binomial, count and continuous. We illustrate the model on the Kenya Morbidity data set. A simulation study is conducted to examine the parameter estimates. An R package mmm2 is proposed to fit the model.

  19. Liquid plug propagation in flexible microchannels: A small airway model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y.; Fujioka, H.; Bian, S.; Torisawa, Y.; Huh, D.; Takayama, S.; Grotberg, J. B.

    2009-07-01

    In the present study, we investigate the effect of wall flexibility on the plug propagation and the resulting wall stresses in small airway models with experimental measurements and numerical simulations. Experimentally, a flexible microchannel was fabricated to mimic the flexible small airways using soft lithography. Liquid plugs were generated and propagated through the microchannels. The local wall deformation is observed instantaneously during plug propagation with the maximum increasing with plug speed. The pressure drop across the plug is measured and observed to increase with plug speed, and is slightly smaller in a flexible channel compared to that in a rigid channel. A computational model is then presented to model the steady plug propagation through a flexible channel corresponding to the middle plane in the experimental device. The results show qualitative agreements with experiments on wall shapes and pressure drops and the discrepancies bring up interesting questions on current field of modeling. The flexible wall deforms inward near the plug core region, the deformation and pressure drop across the plug increase with the plug speed. The wall deformation and resulting stresses vary with different longitudinal tensions, i.e., for large wall longitudinal tension, the wall deforms slightly, which causes decreased fluid stress and stress gradients on the flexible wall comparing to that on rigid walls; however, the wall stress gradients are found to be much larger on highly deformable walls with small longitudinal tensions. Therefore, in diseases such as emphysema, with more deformable airways, there is a high possibility of induced injuries on lining cells along the airways because of larger wall stresses and stress gradients.

  20. A Neurobehavioral Model of Flexible Spatial Language Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipinski, John; Schneegans, Sebastian; Sandamirskaya, Yulia; Spencer, John P.; Schoner, Gregor

    2012-01-01

    We propose a neural dynamic model that specifies how low-level visual processes can be integrated with higher level cognition to achieve flexible spatial language behaviors. This model uses real-word visual input that is linked to relational spatial descriptions through a neural mechanism for reference frame transformations. We demonstrate that…

  1. Modeling the interaction between flow and highly flexible aquatic vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dijkstra, J. T.; Uittenbogaard, R. E.

    2010-12-01

    Aquatic vegetation has an important role in estuaries and rivers by acting as bed stabilizer, filter, food source, and nursing area. However, macrophyte populations worldwide are under high anthropogenic pressure. Protection and restoration efforts will benefit from more insight into the interaction between vegetation, currents, waves, and sediment transport. Most aquatic plants are very flexible, implying that their shape and hence their drag and turbulence production depend on the flow conditions. We have developed a numerical simulation model that describes this dynamic interaction between very flexible vegetation and a time-varying flow, using the sea grass Zostera marina as an example. The model consists of two parts: an existing 1DV k-ɛ turbulence model simulating the flow combined with a new model simulating the bending of the plants, based on a force balance that takes account of both vegetation position and buoyancy. We validated this model using observations of positions of flexible plastic strips and of the forces they are subjected to, as well as hydrodynamic measurements. The model predicts important properties like the forces on plants, flow velocity profiles, and turbulence characteristics well. Although the validation data are limited, the results are sufficiently encouraging to consider our model to be of generic value in studying flow processes in fields of flexible vegetation.

  2. Mechanism test bed. Flexible body model report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, Jimmy

    1991-01-01

    The Space Station Mechanism Test Bed is a six degree-of-freedom motion simulation facility used to evaluate docking and berthing hardware mechanisms. A generalized rigid body math model was developed which allowed the computation of vehicle relative motion in six DOF due to forces and moments from mechanism contact, attitude control systems, and gravity. No vehicle size limitations were imposed in the model. The equations of motion were based on Hill's equations for translational motion with respect to a nominal circular earth orbit and Newton-Euler equations for rotational motion. This rigid body model and supporting software were being refined.

  3. Mathematical model of a flexible space shuttle vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, C. A.

    1972-01-01

    The development of a mathematical model of the lateral motion of a flexible space shuttle vehicle during ascent is described. The model was developed to perform control system synthesis using stochastic constrained optimization techniques. The goals of the control system synthesis are to demonstrate the applicability of the techniques and to discover any problems peculiar to the flexible nature of a shuttle vehicle. The equations of motion are derived. A brief description of the generation of numerical data is given. Explicit definitions and numerical values of trajectory data and coefficients appearing in the equations of motion are included.

  4. The Rigid-Flexible System Dynamics Model of Highline Cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Daoqi; Li, Nan; Zhang, Shiyun

    The paper researches rigid flexible system dynamics model of the rope, and used it to simulate sealift Highline based on the multi-body dynamics theory. Meanwhile the paper simulated to the sea dry cargo replenishment of transverse process, then gain the conclusion that the rigid flexible dynamic model get in the paper is more close to the Caucasus, and the dynamic calculation results closer to the actual situation, through the analysis of simulation results, and combined with the actual situation in the Caucasus the structure of overhead cable.

  5. Frequency response modeling and control of flexible structures: Computational methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, William H.

    1989-01-01

    The dynamics of vibrations in flexible structures can be conventiently modeled in terms of frequency response models. For structural control such models capture the distributed parameter dynamics of the elastic structural response as an irrational transfer function. For most flexible structures arising in aerospace applications the irrational transfer functions which arise are of a special class of pseudo-meromorphic functions which have only a finite number of right half place poles. Computational algorithms are demonstrated for design of multiloop control laws for such models based on optimal Wiener-Hopf control of the frequency responses. The algorithms employ a sampled-data representation of irrational transfer functions which is particularly attractive for numerical computation. One key algorithm for the solution of the optimal control problem is the spectral factorization of an irrational transfer function. The basis for the spectral factorization algorithm is highlighted together with associated computational issues arising in optimal regulator design. Options for implementation of wide band vibration control for flexible structures based on the sampled-data frequency response models is also highlighted. A simple flexible structure control example is considered to demonstrate the combined frequency response modeling and control algorithms.

  6. Model Offices: Flexible Options, Local Innovations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perspective: Essays and Reviews of Issues in Employment Security and Employment and Training Programs, 1990

    1990-01-01

    This volume of an annual journal contains 17 articles that focus on model local offices of the employment security (ES) and training systems. The articles are arranged in three parts. Part I, on developing new initiatives, contains the following five articles: "A Public Employment Service for the 1990s" (Elizabeth Dole); "The…

  7. Cell flexibility affects the alignment of model myxobacteria.

    PubMed

    Janulevicius, Albertas; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Simone, Angelo; Picioreanu, Cristian

    2010-11-17

    Myxobacteria are social bacteria that exhibit a complex life cycle culminating in the development of multicellular fruiting bodies. The alignment of rod-shaped myxobacteria cells within populations is crucial for development to proceed. It has been suggested that myxobacteria align due to mechanical interactions between gliding cells and that cell flexibility facilitates reorientation of cells upon mechanical contact. However, these suggestions have not been based on experimental or theoretical evidence. Here we created a computational mass-spring model of a flexible rod-shaped cell that glides on a substratum periodically reversing direction. The model was formulated in terms of experimentally measurable mechanical parameters, such as engine force, bending stiffness, and drag coefficient. We investigated how cell flexibility and motility engine type affected the pattern of cell gliding and the alignment of a population of 500 mechanically interacting cells. It was found that a flexible cell powered by engine force at the rear of the cell, as suggested by the slime extrusion hypothesis for myxobacteria motility engine, would not be able to glide in the direction of its long axis. A population of rigid reversing cells could indeed align due to mechanical interactions between cells, but cell flexibility impaired the alignment.

  8. Energetic optimisation of foraging honeybees: flexible change of strategies in response to environmental challenges.

    PubMed

    Stabentheiner, Anton; Kovac, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    Heterothermic insects like honeybees, foraging in a variable environment, face the challenge of keeping their body temperature high to enable immediate flight and to promote fast exploitation of resources. Because of their small size they have to cope with an enormous heat loss and, therefore, high costs of thermoregulation. This calls for energetic optimisation which may be achieved by different strategies. An 'economizing' strategy would be to reduce energetic investment whenever possible, for example by using external heat from the sun for thermoregulation. An 'investment-guided' strategy, by contrast, would be to invest additional heat production or external heat gain to optimize physiological parameters like body temperature which promise increased energetic returns. Here we show how honeybees balance these strategies in response to changes of their local microclimate. In a novel approach of simultaneous measurement of respiration and body temperature foragers displayed a flexible strategy of thermoregulatory and energetic management. While foraging in shade on an artificial flower they did not save energy with increasing ambient temperature as expected but acted according to an 'investment-guided' strategy, keeping the energy turnover at a high level (∼56-69 mW). This increased thorax temperature and speeded up foraging as ambient temperature increased. Solar heat was invested to increase thorax temperature at low ambient temperature ('investment-guided' strategy) but to save energy at high temperature ('economizing' strategy), leading to energy savings per stay of ∼18-76% in sunshine. This flexible economic strategy minimized costs of foraging, and optimized energetic efficiency in response to broad variation of environmental conditions.

  9. Flexible Environmental Modeling with Python and Open - GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryet, Alexandre; Atteia, Olivier; Delottier, Hugo; Cousquer, Yohann

    2015-04-01

    Numerical modeling now represents a prominent task of environmental studies. During the last decades, numerous commercial programs have been made available to environmental modelers. These software applications offer user-friendly graphical user interfaces that allow an efficient management of many case studies. However, they suffer from a lack of flexibility and closed-source policies impede source code reviewing and enhancement for original studies. Advanced modeling studies require flexible tools capable of managing thousands of model runs for parameter optimization, uncertainty and sensitivity analysis. In addition, there is a growing need for the coupling of various numerical models associating, for instance, groundwater flow modeling to multi-species geochemical reactions. Researchers have produced hundreds of open-source powerful command line programs. However, there is a need for a flexible graphical user interface allowing an efficient processing of geospatial data that comes along any environmental study. Here, we present the advantages of using the free and open-source Qgis platform and the Python scripting language for conducting environmental modeling studies. The interactive graphical user interface is first used for the visualization and pre-processing of input geospatial datasets. Python scripting language is then employed for further input data processing, call to one or several models, and post-processing of model outputs. Model results are eventually sent back to the GIS program, processed and visualized. This approach combines the advantages of interactive graphical interfaces and the flexibility of Python scripting language for data processing and model calls. The numerous python modules available facilitate geospatial data processing and numerical analysis of model outputs. Once input data has been prepared with the graphical user interface, models may be run thousands of times from the command line with sequential or parallel calls. We

  10. Manipulators with flexible links: A simple model and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimoyama, Isao; Oppenheim, Irving J.

    1989-01-01

    A simple dynamic model proposed for flexible links is briefly reviewed and experimental control results are presented for different flexible systems. A simple dynamic model is useful for rapid prototyping of manipulators and their control systems, for possible application to manipulator design decisions, and for real time computation as might be applied in model based or feedforward control. Such a model is proposed, with the further advantage that clear physical arguments and explanations can be associated with its simplifying features and with its resulting analytical properties. The model is mathematically equivalent to Rayleigh's method. Taking the example of planar bending, the approach originates in its choice of two amplitude variables, typically chosen as the link end rotations referenced to the chord (or the tangent) motion of the link. This particular choice is key in establishing the advantageous features of the model, and it was used to support the series of experiments reported.

  11. Modeling and Control of Large Flexible Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-31

    frequencies induced by the 4th spatial mode.) The meaning of the plot titles is as follows: "Beam at x, yth mode," t means that the beam is initially...structures, represented here by an Euler beam model. The results of . this algorithm provide a means for assessing effects of controller/observer...define T - - r-i E), T- - (60) +- 1 then .L. 0 t>O 0 > 7 𔄀) -1 (61 C: t𔃾) 0 0J -. This means that T +(respectively T ) is the projection of T onto the

  12. DEM modeling of flexible structures against granular material avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Stéphane; Albaba, Adel; Nicot, François; Chareyre, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    This article presents the numerical modeling of flexible structures intended to contain avalanches of granular and coarse material (e.g. rock slide, a debris slide). The numerical model is based on a discrete element method (YADE-Dem). The DEM modeling of both the flowing granular material and the flexible structure are detailed before presenting some results. The flowing material consists of a dry polydisperse granular material accounting for the non-sphericity of real materials. The flexible structure consists in a metallic net hanged on main cables, connected to the ground via anchors, on both sides of the channel, including dissipators. All these components were modeled as flexible beams or wires, with mechanical parameters defined from literature data. The simulation results are presented with the aim of investigating the variability of the structure response depending on different parameters related to the structure (inclination of the fence, with/without brakes, mesh size opening), but also to the channel (inclination). Results are then compared with existing recommendations in similar fields.

  13. A comparison of refined models for flexible subassemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Suzanne Weaver; Zimmerman, David C.

    1993-01-01

    Interactions between structure response and control of large flexible space systems have challenged current modeling techniques and have prompted development of new techniques for model improvement. Due to the geometric complexity of envisioned large flexible space structures, finite element models (FEM's) will be used to predict the dynamic characteristics of structural components. It is widely accepted that these models must be experimentally 'validated' before their acceptance as the basis for final design analysis. However, predictions of modal properties (natural frequencies, mode shapes, and damping ratios) are often in error when compared to those obtained from Experimental Modal Analysis (EMA). Recent research efforts have resulted in the development of algorithmic approaches for model improvement, also referred to as system or structure identification.

  14. Direct model reference adaptive control of a flexible robotic manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meldrum, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    Quick, precise control of a flexible manipulator in a space environment is essential for future Space Station repair and satellite servicing. Numerous control algorithms have proven successful in controlling rigid manipulators wih colocated sensors and actuators; however, few have been tested on a flexible manipulator with noncolocated sensors and actuators. In this thesis, a model reference adaptive control (MRAC) scheme based on command generator tracker theory is designed for a flexible manipulator. Quicker, more precise tracking results are expected over nonadaptive control laws for this MRAC approach. Equations of motion in modal coordinates are derived for a single-link, flexible manipulator with an actuator at the pinned-end and a sensor at the free end. An MRAC is designed with the objective of controlling the torquing actuator so that the tip position follows a trajectory that is prescribed by the reference model. An appealing feature of this direct MRAC law is that it allows the reference model to have fewer states than the plant itself. Direct adaptive control also adjusts the controller parameters directly with knowledge of only the plant output and input signals.

  15. Pressure Sensitive Paint Applied to Flexible Models Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schairer, Edward T.; Kushner, Laura Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    One gap in current pressure-measurement technology is a high-spatial-resolution method for accurately measuring pressures on spatially and temporally varying wind-tunnel models such as Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators (IADs), parachutes, and sails. Conventional pressure taps only provide sparse measurements at discrete points and are difficult to integrate with the model structure without altering structural properties. Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) provides pressure measurements with high spatial resolution, but its use has been limited to rigid or semi-rigid models. Extending the use of PSP from rigid surfaces to flexible surfaces would allow direct, high-spatial-resolution measurements of the unsteady surface pressure distribution. Once developed, this new capability will be combined with existing stereo photogrammetry methods to simultaneously measure the shape of a dynamically deforming model in a wind tunnel. Presented here are the results and methodology for using PSP on flexible surfaces.

  16. Distributed Flexibility Characterization and Resource Allocation Strategies for Multi-zone Commercial Buildings in the Smart Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, He; Lian, Jianming; Kalsi, Karanjit; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2015-12-15

    The HVAC (Heating, Ventilation, and Air- Conditioning) system of commercial buildings is a complex system with a large number of dynamically interacting components. In particular, the thermal dynamics of each zone are coupled with those of the neighboring zones. In this paper, we study a multi-agent based approach to model and control commercial building HVAC system for providing grid services. In the multi-agent system (MAS), individual zones are modeled as agents that can communicate, interact, and negotiate with one another to achieve a common objective. We first propose a distributed characterization method on the aggregated airflow (and thus fan power) flexibility that the HVAC system can provide to the ancillary service market. Then, we propose a Nash-bargaining based airflow allocation strategy to track a dispatch signal (that is within the offered flexibility limit) while respecting the preference and flexibility of individual zones. Moreover, we devise a distributed algorithm to obtain the Nash bargaining solution via dual decomposition and average consensus. Numerical simulations illustrate that the proposed distributed protocols are much more scalable than the centralized approaches especially when the system becomes larger and more complex.

  17. Recent Advancements in Flexible and Stretchable Electrodes for Electromechanical Sensors: Strategies, Materials, and Features.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Songfang; Li, Jinhui; Cao, Duxia; Zhang, Guoping; Li, Jia; Li, Kui; Yang, Yang; Wang, Wei; Jin, Yufeng; Sun, Rong; Wong, Ching-Ping

    2017-03-30

    Stretchable and flexible sensors attached onto the surface of the human body can perceive external stimuli, thus attracting extensive attention due to their lightweight, low modulus, low cost, high flexibility, and stretchability. Recently, a myriad of efforts have been devoted to improving the performance and functionality of wearable sensors. Herein, this review focuses on recent remarkable advancements in the development of flexible and stretchable sensors. Multifunction of these wearable sensors is realized by incorporating some desired features (e.g., self-healing, self-powering, linearity, and printing). Next, focusing on the characteristics of carbon nanomaterials, nanostructured metal, conductive polymer, or their hybrid composites, two major strategies (e.g., materials that stretch and structures that stretch) and diverse design approaches have been developed to achieve highly flexible and stretchable electrodes. Strain sensing performances of recently reported sensors indicate that the appropriate choice of geometric engineering as well as intrinsically stretchable materials is essential for high-performance strain sensing. Finally, some important directions and challenges of a fully sensor-integrated wearable platform are proposed to realize their potential applications for human motion monitoring and human-machine interfaces.

  18. The Creative Music Strategy: A Seven-Step Instructional Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Nathalie G.; Bell, Cindy L.; Pogonowski, Lenore

    2011-01-01

    The creative music strategy is a dynamic and flexible seven-step model for guiding general music students through the music concepts of improvisation and composition, followed by critical reflection. These are musical behaviors that cultivate the development of our students' deeper conceptual understandings and music independence by helping them…

  19. A flexible active and reactive power control strategy for a variable speed constant frequency generating system

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Y.; Xu, L.

    1995-07-01

    Variable-speed constant-frequency generating systems are used in wind power, hydro power, aerospace, and naval power generations to enhance efficiency and reduce friction. In these applications, an attractive candidate is the slip power recovery system comprising of doubly excited induction machine or doubly excited brushless reluctance machine and PWM converters with a dc link. In this paper, a flexible active and reactive power control strategy is developed, such that the optimal torque-speed profile of the turbine can be followed and overall reactive power can be controlled, while the machine copper losses have been minimized. At the same time, harmonics injected into the power network has also been minimized. In this manner, the system can function as both a high-efficient power generator and a flexible reactive power compensator.

  20. Adult-generated hippocampal neurons allow the flexible use of spatially precise learning strategies.

    PubMed

    Garthe, Alexander; Behr, Joachim; Kempermann, Gerd

    2009-01-01

    Despite enormous progress in the past few years the specific contribution of newly born granule cells to the function of the adult hippocampus is still not clear. We hypothesized that in order to solve this question particular attention has to be paid to the specific design, the analysis, and the interpretation of the learning test to be used. We thus designed a behavioral experiment along hypotheses derived from a computational model predicting that new neurons might be particularly relevant for learning conditions, in which novel aspects arise in familiar situations, thus putting high demands on the qualitative aspects of (re-)learning.In the reference memory version of the water maze task suppression of adult neurogenesis with temozolomide (TMZ) caused a highly specific learning deficit. Mice were tested in the hidden platform version of the Morris water maze (6 trials per day for 5 days with a reversal of the platform location on day 4). Testing was done at 4 weeks after the end of four cycles of treatment to minimize the number of potentially recruitable new neurons at the time of testing. The reduction of neurogenesis did not alter longterm potentiation in CA3 and the dentate gyrus but abolished the part of dentate gyrus LTP that is attributed to the new neurons. TMZ did not have any overt side effects at the time of testing, and both treated mice and controls learned to find the hidden platform. Qualitative analysis of search strategies, however, revealed that treated mice did not advance to spatially precise search strategies, in particular when learning a changed goal position (reversal). New neurons in the dentate gyrus thus seem to be necessary for adding flexibility to some hippocampus-dependent qualitative parameters of learning.Our finding that a lack of adult-generated granule cells specifically results in the animal's inability to precisely locate a hidden goal is also in accordance with a specialized role of the dentate gyrus in generating a metric

  1. Experimental Study of Flexible Plate Vibration Control by Using Two-Loop Sliding Mode Control Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jingyu; Lin, Jiahui; Liu, Yuejun; Yang, Kang; Zhou, Lanwei; Chen, Guoping

    2016-06-01

    It is well known that intelligent control theory has been used in many research fields, novel modeling method (DROMM) is used for flexible rectangular active vibration control, and then the validity of new model is confirmed by comparing finite element model with new model. In this paper, taking advantage of the dynamics of flexible rectangular plate, a two-loop sliding mode (TSM) MIMO approach is introduced for designing multiple-input multiple-output continuous vibration control system, which can overcome uncertainties, disturbances or unstable dynamics. An illustrative example is given in order to show the feasibility of the method. Numerical simulations and experiment confirm the effectiveness of the proposed TSM MIMO controller.

  2. Residual flexibility test method for verification of constrained structural models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Admire, John R.; Tinker, Michael L.; Ivey, Edward W.

    1994-01-01

    A method is described for deriving constrained modes and frequencies from a reduced model based on a subset of the free-free modes plus the residual effects of neglected modes. The method involves a simple modification of the MacNeal and Rubin component mode representation to allow development of a verified constrained (fixed-base) structural model. Results for two spaceflight structures having translational boundary degrees of freedom show quick convergence of constrained modes using a measureable number of free-free modes plus the boundary partition of the residual flexibility matrix. This paper presents the free-free residual flexibility approach as an alternative test/analysis method when fixed-base testing proves impractical.

  3. An integrated dynamic model of a flexible wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bongers, Peter M. M.; Bierbooms, Wim A. A.; Dijkstra, Sjoerd; Vanholten, Theo

    1990-06-01

    A model to study the dynamic behavior of flexible wind turbines was developed. The different subsystems of the wind turbine are individually modeled with about the same degree of accuracy. The aerodynamic part describes wind shear, gravity effects, unsteady effects, and dynamic inflow. The rotor blades are provided with degrees of freedom in lag and flap directions. The tower construction is modeled including the first bending mode. The first torsional mode of the transmission is included in the model. The model of synchronous generator with dc link consists of a nonlinear fourth order model, including saturation effects. The different models of the subsystems are coupled into one integrated dynamic model which is implemented as simulation code in the DUWECS (Delf University Wind Energy Converter Simulation Package) program. The DUWECS program is developed in such a manner that it is an easy to handle tool for the study of the dynamic features of wind turbine systems.

  4. Numerical modeling of flexible insect wings using volume penalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engels, Thomas; Kolomenskiy, Dmitry; Schneider, Kai; Sesterhenn, Joern

    2012-11-01

    We consider the effects of chordwise flexibility on the aerodynamic performance of insect flapping wings. We developed a numerical method for modeling viscous fluid flows past moving deformable foils. It extends on the previously reported model for flows past moving rigid wings (J Comput Phys 228, 2009). The two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations are solved using a Fourier pseudo-spectral method with the no-slip boundary conditions imposed by the volume penalization method. The deformable wing section is modeled using a non-linear beam equation. We performed numerical simulations of heaving flexible plates. The results showed that the optimal stroke frequency, which maximizes the mean thrust, is lower than the resonant frequency, in agreement with the experiments by Ramananarivo et al. (PNAS 108(15), 2011). The oscillatory part of the force only increases in amplitude when the frequency increases, and at the optimal frequency it is about 3 times larger than the mean force. We also study aerodynamic interactions between two heaving flexible foils. This flow configuration corresponds to the wings of dragonflies. We explore the effects of the phase difference and spacing between the fore- and hind-wing.

  5. Modeling, design, and control of flexible manipulator arms: Status and trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Book, Wayne J.

    1989-01-01

    The desire for higher performance manipulators has lead to dynamic behavior in which the flexibility is an essential aspect. The mathematical representations commonly used in modeling flexible arms and arms with flexible drives are examined first. Then design considerations directly arising from the flexible nature of the arm are discussed. Finally, controls of joints for general and tip motion are discussed.

  6. Lumped mass formulations for modeling flexible body systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rampalli, Rajiv

    1989-01-01

    The efforts of Mechanical Dynamics, Inc. in obtaining a general formulation for flexible bodies in a multibody setting are discussed. The efforts being supported by MDI, both in house and externally are summarized. The feasibility of using lumped mass approaches to modeling flexibility in a multibody dynamics context is examined. The kinematics and kinetics for a simple system consisting of two rigid bodies connected together by an elastic beam are developed in detail. Accuracy, efficiency and ease of use using this approach are some of the issues that are then looked at. The formulation is then generalized to a superelement containing several nodes and connecting several bodies. Superelement kinematics and kinetics equations are developed. The feasibility and effectiveness of the method is illustrated by the use of some examples illustrating phenomena common in the context of spacecraft motions.

  7. Rationale for Flexible Path - A Space Exploration Strategy for the 21st Century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, G. R.; Landis, G. A.; Oleson, S. R.

    In 2009, the U.S. President convened a special committee to recommend directions for the U.S. human spaceflight program. One preferred option - the “Flexible Path” strategy - differs markedly from the Moon and Mars-oriented paradigm that has driven U.S. planning in the past. Specifically, it refrains from placing humans on the surfaces of these planetary bodies in the near-term, and instead focuses on sending piloted spacecraft into orbit around exploration targets of interest, and conducting astronaut exploration of the surfaces using telerobots and remotely controlled systems. Teleoperation provides scientists real- time control of rovers and other sophisticated instruments, thus expanding the scientific return at these destinations. It also eliminates development of the numerous man-rated landers, ascent vehicles and systems required to sustain humans on planetary surfaces. The propulsive requirements to travel from Low Earth Orbit (LEO) to many destinations with shallow gravity-wells in the inner solar system are quite similar. Thus, a common set of spacecraft elements (e.g., launch vehicles, upper stage/transfer vehicle, crew module/habitat) could be used to perform a variety of different missions, including orbit- based surface exploration of the Moon, Mars and Venus, and rendezvous with Near Earth Asteroids (NEAs), as well as Phobos and Deimos. This paper presents the rationale for Flexible Path, and explains why it should be the strategy for human space exploration in the 21st Century.

  8. Cyberkelp: an integrative approach to the modelling of flexible organisms.

    PubMed Central

    Denny, Mark W; Hale, Ben B

    2003-01-01

    Biomechanical models come in a variety of forms: conceptual models; physical models; and mathematical models (both of the sort written down on paper and the sort carried out on computers). There are model structures (such as insect flight muscle and the tendons of rats' tails), model organisms (such as the flying insect, Manduca sexta), even model systems of organisms (such as the communities that live on wave-swept rocky shores). These different types of models are typically employed separately, but their value often can be enhanced if their insights are integrated. In this brief report we explore a particular example of such integration among models, as applied to flexible marine algae. A conceptual model serves as a template for the construction of a mathematical model of a model species of giant kelp, and the validity of this numerical model is tested using physical models. The validated mathematical model is then used in conjunction with a computer-controlled tensile testing apparatus to simulate the loading regime placed on algal materials. The resulting information can be used to create a more precise mathematical model. PMID:14561344

  9. Elucidating the effects of adsorbent flexibility on fluid adsorption using simple models and flat-histogram sampling methods

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Vincent K. Siderius, Daniel W.

    2014-06-28

    Using flat-histogram Monte Carlo methods, we investigate the adsorptive behavior of the square-well fluid in two simple slit-pore-like models intended to capture fundamental characteristics of flexible adsorbent materials. Both models require as input thermodynamic information about the flexible adsorbent material itself. An important component of this work involves formulating the flexible pore models in the appropriate thermodynamic (statistical mechanical) ensembles, namely, the osmotic ensemble and a variant of the grand-canonical ensemble. Two-dimensional probability distributions, which are calculated using flat-histogram methods, provide the information necessary to determine adsorption thermodynamics. For example, we are able to determine precisely adsorption isotherms, (equilibrium) phase transition conditions, limits of stability, and free energies for a number of different flexible adsorbent materials, distinguishable as different inputs into the models. While the models used in this work are relatively simple from a geometric perspective, they yield non-trivial adsorptive behavior, including adsorption-desorption hysteresis solely due to material flexibility and so-called “breathing” of the adsorbent. The observed effects can in turn be tied to the inherent properties of the bare adsorbent. Some of the effects are expected on physical grounds while others arise from a subtle balance of thermodynamic and mechanical driving forces. In addition, the computational strategy presented here can be easily applied to more complex models for flexible adsorbents.

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF A FLEXIBLE, MULTIZONE, MULTIFAMILY BUILDING SIMULATION MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Malhotra, Mini; Im, Piljae

    2012-01-01

    Weatherization of multifamily buildings is gaining increased attention in the U.S. Available energy audit tools for multifamily buildings were found to need desirable improvements. On the wish list of field experts for enhanced features was the basic ability to model multizone buildings (i.e., one thermal zone per dwelling unit) with simplified user inputs, which allows a better analysis of decentralized and centralized HVAC and domestic hot water systems of multifamily buildings without having to create detailed building models. To address the desired capabilities, development of an enhanced energy audit tool was begun in 2011. The tool is a strategically structured, flexible, one-zone-per-unit, DOE-2.1e model coupled with a simplified user interface to model small to large multifamily buildings with decentralized or centralized systems and associated energy measures. This paper describes the modeling concept and its implementation.

  11. Human Operator Control Strategy Model.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    control learning control strategy N computer simulation of motor behavior ABSTRACT (Continue on reverese ide If necesery end Identify by block numbe...Frank Vogler has been a continuing resource during testing and analysis phases. Cooperative Plan students Kirk Hoyer , Bob Baltar, and Bob Hummel have...Introduction ....... .................... .. 79 1. Question 1: Do HOPE models match human behavior to an acceptable extent? .... ............ ... 80

  12. TREAT Modeling and Simulation Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    DeHart, Mark David

    2015-09-01

    This report summarizes a four-phase process used to describe the strategy in developing modeling and simulation software for the Transient Reactor Test Facility. The four phases of this research and development task are identified as (1) full core transient calculations with feedback, (2) experiment modeling, (3) full core plus experiment simulation and (4) quality assurance. The document describes the four phases, the relationship between these research phases, and anticipated needs within each phase.

  13. Multiscale multiphysics and multidomain models--flexibility and rigidity.

    PubMed

    Xia, Kelin; Opron, Kristopher; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2013-11-21

    The emerging complexity of large macromolecules has led to challenges in their full scale theoretical description and computer simulation. Multiscale multiphysics and multidomain models have been introduced to reduce the number of degrees of freedom while maintaining modeling accuracy and achieving computational efficiency. A total energy functional is constructed to put energies for polar and nonpolar solvation, chemical potential, fluid flow, molecular mechanics, and elastic dynamics on an equal footing. The variational principle is utilized to derive coupled governing equations for the above mentioned multiphysical descriptions. Among these governing equations is the Poisson-Boltzmann equation which describes continuum electrostatics with atomic charges. The present work introduces the theory of continuum elasticity with atomic rigidity (CEWAR). The essence of CEWAR is to formulate the shear modulus as a continuous function of atomic rigidity. As a result, the dynamics complexity of a macromolecular system is separated from its static complexity so that the more time-consuming dynamics is handled with continuum elasticity theory, while the less time-consuming static analysis is pursued with atomic approaches. We propose a simple method, flexibility-rigidity index (FRI), to analyze macromolecular flexibility and rigidity in atomic detail. The construction of FRI relies on the fundamental assumption that protein functions, such as flexibility, rigidity, and energy, are entirely determined by the structure of the protein and its environment, although the structure is in turn determined by all the interactions. As such, the FRI measures the topological connectivity of protein atoms or residues and characterizes the geometric compactness of the protein structure. As a consequence, the FRI does not resort to the interaction Hamiltonian and bypasses matrix diagonalization, which underpins most other flexibility analysis methods. FRI's computational complexity is of O

  14. Modeling and control of flexible space stations (slew maneuvers)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmed, N. U.; Lim, S. S.

    1989-01-01

    Large orbiting space structures are expected to experience mechanical vibrations arising from several disturbing forces such as those induced by shuttle takeoff or docking and crew movements. The problem is considered of modeling and control of large space structures subject to these and other disturbing forces. The system consists of a (rigid) massive body, which may play the role of experimental modules located at the center of the space station and flexible configurations, consisting of several beams, forming the space structure. A complete dynamic model of the system was developed using Hamilton's principle. This model consists of radial equations describing the translational motion of the central body, rotational equations describing the attitude motions of the body and several beam equations governing the vibration of the flexible members (platform) including appropriate boundary conditions. In summary, the dynamics of the space structure is governed by a complex system of interconnected partial and ordinary differential equations. Using Lyapunov's approach the asymptotic stability of the space structure is investigated. For asymptotic stability of the rest state (nominal trajectory), feedback controls are suggested. In the investigation, stability of the slewing maneuvers is also considered. Several numerical results are presented for illustration of the impact of coupling and the effectiveness of the stabilizing controls. Some insight is provided into the complexity of modeling, analysis and stabilization of actual space structures.

  15. A Flexible Statechart-to-Model-Checker Translator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouquette, Nicolas; Dunphy, Julia; Feather, Martin S.

    2000-01-01

    Many current-day software design tools offer some variant of statechart notation for system specification. We, like others, have built an automatic translator from (a subset of) statecharts to a model checker, for use to validate behavioral requirements. Our translator is designed to be flexible. This allows us to quickly adjust the translator to variants of statechart semantics, including problem-specific notational conventions that designers employ. Our system demonstration will be of interest to the following two communities: (1) Potential end-users: Our demonstration will show translation from statecharts created in a commercial UML tool (Rational Rose) to Promela, the input language of Holzmann's model checker SPIN. The translation is accomplished automatically. To accommodate the major variants of statechart semantics, our tool offers user-selectable choices among semantic alternatives. Options for customized semantic variants are also made available. The net result is an easy-to-use tool that operates on a wide range of statechart diagrams to automate the pathway to model-checking input. (2) Other researchers: Our translator embodies, in one tool, ideas and approaches drawn from several sources. Solutions to the major challenges of statechart-to-model-checker translation (e.g., determining which transition(s) will fire, handling of concurrent activities) are retired in a uniform, fully mechanized, setting. The way in which the underlying architecture of the translator itself facilitates flexible and customizable translation will also be evident.

  16. Optimal strategies for virtual screening of induced-fit and flexible target in the 2015 D3R Grand Challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Zhaofeng; Baumgartner, Matthew P.; Wingert, Bentley M.; Camacho, Carlos J.

    2016-09-01

    Induced fit or protein flexibility can make a given structure less useful for docking and/or scoring. The 2015 Drug Design Data Resource (D3R) Grand Challenge provided a unique opportunity to prospectively test optimal strategies for virtual screening in these type of targets: heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), a protein with multiple ligand-induced binding modes; and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase kinase 4 (MAP4K4), a kinase with a large flexible pocket. Using previously known co-crystal structures, we tested predictions from methods that keep the receptor structure fixed and used (a) multiple receptor/ligand co-crystals as binding templates for minimization or docking ("close"), (b) methods that align or dock to a single receptor ("cross"), and (c) a hybrid approach that chose from multiple bound ligands as initial templates for minimization to a single receptor ("min-cross"). Pose prediction using our "close" models resulted in average ligand RMSDs of 0.32 and 1.6 Å for HSP90 and MAP4K4, respectively, the most accurate models of the community-wide challenge. On the other hand, affinity ranking using our "cross" methods performed well overall despite the fact that a fixed receptor cannot model ligand-induced structural changes,. In addition, "close" methods that leverage the co-crystals of the different binding modes of HSP90 also predicted the best affinity ranking. Our studies suggest that analysis of changes on the receptor structure upon ligand binding can help select an optimal virtual screening strategy.

  17. Optimal strategies for virtual screening of induced-fit and flexible target in the 2015 D3R Grand Challenge.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhaofeng; Baumgartner, Matthew P; Wingert, Bentley M; Camacho, Carlos J

    2016-09-01

    Induced fit or protein flexibility can make a given structure less useful for docking and/or scoring. The 2015 Drug Design Data Resource (D3R) Grand Challenge provided a unique opportunity to prospectively test optimal strategies for virtual screening in these type of targets: heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), a protein with multiple ligand-induced binding modes; and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase kinase 4 (MAP4K4), a kinase with a large flexible pocket. Using previously known co-crystal structures, we tested predictions from methods that keep the receptor structure fixed and used (a) multiple receptor/ligand co-crystals as binding templates for minimization or docking ("close"), (b) methods that align or dock to a single receptor ("cross"), and (c) a hybrid approach that chose from multiple bound ligands as initial templates for minimization to a single receptor ("min-cross"). Pose prediction using our "close" models resulted in average ligand RMSDs of 0.32 and 1.6 Å for HSP90 and MAP4K4, respectively, the most accurate models of the community-wide challenge. On the other hand, affinity ranking using our "cross" methods performed well overall despite the fact that a fixed receptor cannot model ligand-induced structural changes,. In addition, "close" methods that leverage the co-crystals of the different binding modes of HSP90 also predicted the best affinity ranking. Our studies suggest that analysis of changes on the receptor structure upon ligand binding can help select an optimal virtual screening strategy.

  18. The MARINA Risk Assessment Strategy: A Flexible Strategy for Efficient Information Collection and Risk Assessment of Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Bos, Peter M J; Gottardo, Stefania; Scott-Fordsmand, Janeck J; van Tongeren, Martie; Semenzin, Elena; Fernandes, Teresa F; Hristozov, Danail; Hund-Rinke, Kerstin; Hunt, Neil; Irfan, Muhammad-Adeel; Landsiedel, Robert; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M; Sánchez Jiménez, Araceli; van Kesteren, Petra C E; Oomen, Agnes G

    2015-11-27

    An engineered nanomaterial (ENM) may actually consist of a population of primary particles, aggregates and agglomerates of various sizes. Furthermore, their physico-chemical characteristics may change during the various life-cycle stages. It will probably not be feasible to test all varieties of all ENMs for possible health and environmental risks. There is therefore a need to further develop the approaches for risk assessment of ENMs. Within the EU FP7 project Managing Risks of Nanoparticles (MARINA) a two-phase risk assessment strategy has been developed. In Phase 1 (Problem framing) a base set of information is considered, relevant exposure scenarios (RESs) are identified and the scope for Phase 2 (Risk assessment) is established. The relevance of an RES is indicated by information on exposure, fate/kinetics and/or hazard; these three domains are included as separate pillars that contain specific tools. Phase 2 consists of an iterative process of risk characterization, identification of data needs and integrated collection and evaluation of data on the three domains, until sufficient information is obtained to conclude on possible risks in a RES. Only data are generated that are considered to be needed for the purpose of risk assessment. A fourth pillar, risk characterization, is defined and it contains risk assessment tools. This strategy describes a flexible and efficient approach for data collection and risk assessment which is essential to ensure safety of ENMs. Further developments are needed to provide guidance and make the MARINA Risk Assessment Strategy operational. Case studies will be needed to refine the strategy.

  19. Nonlinear damping model for flexible structures. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zang, Weijian

    1990-01-01

    The study of nonlinear damping problem of flexible structures is addressed. Both passive and active damping, both finite dimensional and infinite dimensional models are studied. In the first part, the spectral density and the correlation function of a single DOF nonlinear damping model is investigated. A formula for the spectral density is established with O(Gamma(sub 2)) accuracy based upon Fokker-Planck technique and perturbation. The spectral density depends upon certain first order statistics which could be obtained if the stationary density is known. A method is proposed to find the approximate stationary density explicitly. In the second part, the spectral density of a multi-DOF nonlinear damping model is investigated. In the third part, energy type nonlinear damping model in an infinite dimensional setting is studied.

  20. Protein flexibility and ligand recognition: challenges for molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Spyrakis, Francesca; BidonChanal, Axel; Barril, Xavier; Luque, F Javier

    2011-01-01

    The intrinsic dynamics of macromolecules is an essential property to relate the structure of biomolecular systems with their function in the cell. In the field of ligand-receptor recognition, numerous evidences have revealed the limitations of the lock-and-key theory, and the need to elaborate models that take into account the inherent plasticity of biomolecules, such as the induced-fit model or the existence of an ensemble of pre-equilibrated conformations. Depending on the nature of the target system, ligand binding can be associated with small local adjustments in side chains or even the backbone to large-scale motions of structural fragments, domains or even subunits. Reproducing the inherent flexibility of biomolecules has thus become one of the most challenging issues in molecular modeling and simulation studies, as it has direct implications in our understanding of the structure-function relationships, but even in areas such as virtual screening and structure-based drug discovery. Given the intrinsic limitation of conventional simulation tools, only events occurring in short time scales can be reproduced at a high accuracy level through all-atom techniques such as Molecular Dynamics simulations. However, larger structural rearrangements demand the use of enhanced sampling methods relying on modified descriptions of the biomolecular system or the potential surface. This review illustrates the crucial role that structural plasticity plays in mediating ligand recognition through representative examples. In addition, it discusses some of the most powerful computational tools developed to characterize the conformational flexibility in ligand-receptor complexes.

  1. Flexible and Versatile Strategy for the Construction of Large Biochemical Pathways.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yongbo; Andersen, Erik; Zhao, Huimin

    2016-01-15

    Synthetic pathways and circuits have been increasingly used for microbial production of fuels and chemicals. Here, we report a flexible and versatile DNA assembly strategy that allows rapid, modular, and reliable construction of biological pathways and circuits from basic genetic parts. This strategy combines the automation-friendly ligase cycling reaction (LCR) method and the high-fidelity in vivo yeast-based DNA assembly method, DNA assembler. Briefly, LCR is used to preassemble basic genetic parts into gene expression cassettes or to preassemble small parts into larger parts to reduce the number of parts, in which many basic genetic parts can be reused. With the help of specially designed unique linkers, all preassembled parts will then be directly assembled using DNA assembler to build the target constructs. As proof of concept, three plasmids with varying sizes of 13.4, 24, and 44 kb were rapidly constructed with fidelities of 100, 88, and 71%, respectively. The yeast strain harboring the constructed 44 kb plasmid was confirmed to be capable of utilizing xylose, cellobiose, and glucose to produce zeaxanthin. This strategy should be generally applicable to any custom-designed pathways, circuits, or plasmids.

  2. Assessing an ensemble docking-based virtual screening strategy for kinase targets by considering protein flexibility.

    PubMed

    Tian, Sheng; Sun, Huiyong; Pan, Peichen; Li, Dan; Zhen, Xuechu; Li, Youyong; Hou, Tingjun

    2014-10-27

    In this study, to accommodate receptor flexibility, based on multiple receptor conformations, a novel ensemble docking protocol was developed by using the naïve Bayesian classification technique, and it was evaluated in terms of the prediction accuracy of docking-based virtual screening (VS) of three important targets in the kinase family: ALK, CDK2, and VEGFR2. First, for each target, the representative crystal structures were selected by structural clustering, and the capability of molecular docking based on each representative structure to discriminate inhibitors from non-inhibitors was examined. Then, for each target, 50 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were carried out to generate an ensemble of the conformations, and multiple representative structures/snapshots were extracted from each MD trajectory by structural clustering. On average, the representative crystal structures outperform the representative structures extracted from MD simulations in terms of the capabilities to separate inhibitors from non-inhibitors. Finally, by using the naïve Bayesian classification technique, an integrated VS strategy was developed to combine the prediction results of molecular docking based on different representative conformations chosen from crystal structures and MD trajectories. It was encouraging to observe that the integrated VS strategy yields better performance than the docking-based VS based on any single rigid conformation. This novel protocol may provide an improvement over existing strategies to search for more diverse and promising active compounds for a target of interest.

  3. Inverse problems in the modeling of vibrations of flexible beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Powers, R. K.; Rosen, I. G.

    1987-01-01

    The formulation and solution of inverse problems for the estimation of parameters which describe damping and other dynamic properties in distributed models for the vibration of flexible structures is considered. Motivated by a slewing beam experiment, the identification of a nonlinear velocity dependent term which models air drag damping in the Euler-Bernoulli equation is investigated. Galerkin techniques are used to generate finite dimensional approximations. Convergence estimates and numerical results are given. The modeling of, and related inverse problems for the dynamics of a high pressure hose line feeding a gas thruster actuator at the tip of a cantilevered beam are then considered. Approximation and convergence are discussed and numerical results involving experimental data are presented.

  4. Enabling Advanced Modeling and Simulations for Fuel-Flexible Combustors

    SciTech Connect

    Pitsch, Heinz

    2010-05-31

    The overall goal of the present project is to enable advanced modeling and simulations for the design and optimization of fuel-flexible turbine combustors. For this purpose we use a high fidelity, extensively-tested large-eddy simulation (LES) code and state-of-the-art models for premixed/partially-premixed turbulent combustion developed in the PI's group. In the frame of the present project, these techniques are applied, assessed, and improved for hydrogen enriched premixed and partially premixed gas-turbine combustion. Our innovative approaches include a completely consistent description of flame propagation; a coupled progress variable/level set method to resolve the detailed flame structure, and incorporation of thermal-diffusion (non-unity Lewis number) effects. In addition, we have developed a general flamelet-type transformation holding in the limits of both non-premixed and premixed burning. As a result, a model for partially premixed combustion has been derived. The coupled progress variable/level method and the general flamelet transformation were validated by LES of a lean-premixed low-swirl burner that has been studied experimentally at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The model is extended to include the non-unity Lewis number effects, which play a critical role in fuel-flexible combustor with high hydrogen content fuel. More specifically, a two-scalar model for lean hydrogen and hydrogen-enriched combustion is developed and validated against experimental and direct numerical simulation (DNS) data. Results are presented to emphasize the importance of non-unity Lewis number effects in the lean-premixed low-swirl burner of interest in this project. The proposed model gives improved results, which shows that the inclusion of the non-unity Lewis number effects is essential for accurate prediction of the lean-premixed low-swirl flame.

  5. Enabling Advanced Modeling and Simulations for Fuel-Flexible Combustors

    SciTech Connect

    Heinz Pitsch

    2010-05-31

    The overall goal of the present project is to enable advanced modeling and simulations for the design and optimization of fuel-flexible turbine combustors. For this purpose we use a high-fidelity, extensively-tested large-eddy simulation (LES) code and state-of-the-art models for premixed/partially-premixed turbulent combustion developed in the PI's group. In the frame of the present project, these techniques are applied, assessed, and improved for hydrogen enriched premixed and partially premixed gas-turbine combustion. Our innovative approaches include a completely consistent description of flame propagation, a coupled progress variable/level set method to resolve the detailed flame structure, and incorporation of thermal-diffusion (non-unity Lewis number) effects. In addition, we have developed a general flamelet-type transformation holding in the limits of both non-premixed and premixed burning. As a result, a model for partially premixed combustion has been derived. The coupled progress variable/level method and the general flamelet tranformation were validated by LES of a lean-premixed low-swirl burner that has been studied experimentally at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The model is extended to include the non-unity Lewis number effects, which play a critical role in fuel-flexible combustor with high hydrogen content fuel. More specifically, a two-scalar model for lean hydrogen and hydrogen-enriched combustion is developed and validated against experimental and direct numerical simulation (DNS) data. Results are presented to emphasize the importance of non-unity Lewis number effects in the lean-premixed low-swirl burner of interest in this project. The proposed model gives improved results, which shows that the inclusion of the non-unity Lewis number effects is essential for accurate prediction of the lean-premixed low-swirl flame.

  6. Dynamical modeling of serial manipulators with flexible links and joints using the method of kinematic influence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, Philip L.

    1989-01-01

    A method of formulating the dynamical equations of a flexible, serial manipulator is presented, using the Method of Kinematic Influence. The resulting equations account for rigid body motion, structural motion due to link and joint flexibilities, and the coupling between these two motions. Nonlinear inertial loads are included in the equations. A finite order mode summation method is used to model flexibilities. The structural data may be obtained from experimental, finite element, or analytical methods. Nonlinear flexibilities may be included in the model.

  7. Automated model formulation for time-varying flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, B. J.; Hanagud, S.

    1989-01-01

    Presented here is an identification technique that uses the sensor information to choose a new model out of a finite set of discrete model space, in order to follow the observed changes to the given time varying flexible structure. Boundary condition sets or other information on model variations are used to organize the set of possible models laterally into a search tree with levels of abstraction used to order the models vertically within branches. An object-oriented programming approach is used to represent the model set in the search tree. A modified A (asterisk) best first search algorithm finds the model where the model response best matches the current observations. Several extensions to this methodology are discussed. Methods of possible integration of rules with the current search algorithm are considered to give weight to interpreted trends that may be found in a series of observations. This capability might lead, for instance, to identifying a model that incorporates a progressive damage rather than with incorrect paramenters such as added mass. Another new direction is to consider the use of noisy time domain sensor feedback rather than frequency domain information in the search algorithm to improve the real-time capability of the developed procedure.

  8. Model updating in flexible-link multibody systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belotti, R.; Caneva, G.; Palomba, I.; Richiedei, D.; Trevisani, A.

    2016-09-01

    The dynamic response of flexible-link multibody systems (FLMSs) can be predicted through nonlinear models based on finite elements, to describe the coupling between rigid- body and elastic behaviour. Their accuracy should be as high as possible to synthesize controllers and observers. Model updating based on experimental measurements is hence necessary. By taking advantage of the experimental modal analysis, this work proposes a model updating procedure for FLMSs and applies it experimentally to a planar robot. Indeed, several peculiarities of the model of FLMS should be carefully tackled. On the one hand, nonlinear models of a FLMS should be linearized about static equilibrium configurations. On the other, the experimental mode shapes should be corrected to be consistent with the elastic displacements represented in the model, which are defined with respect to a fictitious moving reference (the equivalent rigid link system). Then, since rotational degrees of freedom are also represented in the model, interpolation of the experimental data should be performed to match the model displacement vector. Model updating has been finally cast as an optimization problem in the presence of bounds on the feasible values, by also adopting methods to improve the numerical conditioning and to compute meaningful updated inertial and elastic parameters.

  9. A simple model of backbone flexibility improves modeling of side-chain conformational variability.

    PubMed

    Friedland, Gregory D; Linares, Anthony J; Smith, Colin A; Kortemme, Tanja

    2008-07-18

    The considerable flexibility of side-chains in folded proteins is important for protein stability and function, and may have a role in mediating allosteric interactions. While sampling side-chain degrees of freedom has been an integral part of several successful computational protein design methods, the predictions of these approaches have not been directly compared to experimental measurements of side-chain motional amplitudes. In addition, protein design methods frequently keep the backbone fixed, an approximation that may substantially limit the ability to accurately model side-chain flexibility. Here, we describe a Monte Carlo approach to modeling side-chain conformational variability and validate our method against a large dataset of methyl relaxation order parameters derived from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments (17 proteins and a total of 530 data points). We also evaluate a model of backbone flexibility based on Backrub motions, a type of conformational change frequently observed in ultra-high-resolution X-ray structures that accounts for correlated side-chain backbone movements. The fixed-backbone model performs reasonably well with an overall rmsd between computed and predicted side-chain order parameters of 0.26. Notably, including backbone flexibility leads to significant improvements in modeling side-chain order parameters for ten of the 17 proteins in the set. Greater accuracy of the flexible backbone model results from both increases and decreases in side-chain flexibility relative to the fixed-backbone model. This simple flexible-backbone model should be useful for a variety of protein design applications, including improved modeling of protein-protein interactions, design of proteins with desired flexibility or rigidity, and prediction of correlated motions within proteins.

  10. Direct Adaptive Control Methodologies for Flexible-Joint Space Manipulators with Uncertainties and Modeling Errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, Steve

    This work addresses the direct adaptive trajectory tracking control problem associated with lightweight space robotic manipulators that exhibit elastic vibrations in their joints, and which are subject to parametric uncertainties and modeling errors. Unlike existing adaptive control methodologies, the proposed flexible-joint control techniques do not require identification of unknown parameters, or mathematical models of the system to be controlled. The direct adaptive controllers developed in this work are based on the model reference adaptive control approach, and manage modeling errors and parametric uncertainties by time-varying the controller gains using new adaptation mechanisms, thereby reducing the errors between an ideal model and the actual robot system. More specifically, new decentralized adaptation mechanisms derived from the simple adaptive control technique and fuzzy logic control theory are considered in this work. Numerical simulations compare the performance of the adaptive controllers with a nonadaptive and a conventional model-based controller, in the context of 12.6 m xx 12.6 m square trajectory tracking. To validate the robustness of the controllers to modeling errors, a new dynamics formulation that includes several nonlinear effects usually neglected in flexible-joint dynamics models is proposed. Results obtained with the adaptive methodologies demonstrate an increased robustness to both uncertainties in joint stiffness coefficients and dynamics modeling errors, as well as highly improved tracking performance compared with the nonadaptive and model-based strategies. Finally, this work considers the partial state feedback problem related to flexible-joint space robotic manipulators equipped only with sensors that provide noisy measurements of motor positions and velocities. An extended Kalman filter-based estimation strategy is developed to estimate all state variables in real-time. The state estimation filter is combined with an adaptive

  11. Aeroelastic modeling of the active flexible wing wind-tunnel model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Heeg, Jennifer; Bennett, Robert M.

    1991-01-01

    The primary issues involved in the generation of linear, state-space equations of motion of a flexible wind tunnel model, the Active Flexible Wing (AFW), are discussed. The codes that were used and their inherent assumptions and limitations are also briefly discussed. The application of the CAP-TSD code to the AFW for determination of the model's transonic flutter boundary is included as well.

  12. Organizational Learning, Strategic Flexibility and Business Model Innovation: An Empirical Research Based on Logistics Enterprises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Yaodong; Cheng, Lin; Zhang, Jian

    Using the data of 237 Jiangsu logistics firms, this paper empirically studies the relationship among organizational learning capability, business model innovation, strategic flexibility. The results show as follows; organizational learning capability has positive impacts on business model innovation performance; strategic flexibility plays mediating roles on the relationship between organizational learning capability and business model innovation; interaction among strategic flexibility, explorative learning and exploitative learning play significant roles in radical business model innovation and incremental business model innovation.

  13. Introducing MERGANSER: A Flexible Framework for Ecological Niche Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klawonn, M.; Dow, E. M.

    2015-12-01

    Ecological Niche Modeling (ENM) is a collection of techniques to find a "fundamental niche", the range of environmental conditions suitable for a species' survival in the absence of inter-species interactions, given a set of environmental parameters. Traditional approaches to ENM face a number of obstacles including limited data accessibility, data management problems, computational costs, interface usability, and model validation. The MERGANSER system, which stands for Modeling Ecological Residency Given A Normalized Set of Environmental Records, addresses these issues through powerful data persistence and flexible data access, coupled with a clear presentation of results and fine-tuned control over model parameters. MERGANSER leverages data measuring 72 weather related phenomena, land cover, soil type, population, species occurrence, general species information, and elevation, totaling over 1.5 TB of data. To the best of the authors' knowledge, MERGANSER uses higher-resolution spatial data sets than previously published models. Since MERGANSER stores data in an instance of Apache SOLR, layers generated in support of niche models are accessible to users via simplified Apache Lucene queries. This is made even simpler via an HTTP front end that generates Lucene queries automatically. Specifically, a user need only enter the name of a place and a species to run a model. Using this approach to synthesizing model layers, the MERGANSER system has successfully reproduced previously published niche model results with a simplified user experience. Input layers for the model are generated dynamically using OpenStreetMap and SOLR's spatial search functionality. Models are then run using either user-specified or automatically determined parameters after normalizing them into a common grid. Finally, results are visualized in the web interface, which allows for quick validation. Model results and all surrounding metadata are also accessible to the user for further study.

  14. Modeling and Simulation of Variable Mass, Flexible Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobbe, Patrick A.; Matras, Alex L.; Wilson, Heath E.

    2009-01-01

    The advent of the new Ares I launch vehicle has highlighted the need for advanced dynamic analysis tools for variable mass, flexible structures. This system is composed of interconnected flexible stages or components undergoing rapid mass depletion through the consumption of solid or liquid propellant. In addition to large rigid body configuration changes, the system simultaneously experiences elastic deformations. In most applications, the elastic deformations are compatible with linear strain-displacement relationships and are typically modeled using the assumed modes technique. The deformation of the system is approximated through the linear combination of the products of spatial shape functions and generalized time coordinates. Spatial shape functions are traditionally composed of normal mode shapes of the system or even constraint modes and static deformations derived from finite element models of the system. Equations of motion for systems undergoing coupled large rigid body motion and elastic deformation have previously been derived through a number of techniques [1]. However, in these derivations, the mode shapes or spatial shape functions of the system components were considered constant. But with the Ares I vehicle, the structural characteristics of the system are changing with the mass of the system. Previous approaches to solving this problem involve periodic updates to the spatial shape functions or interpolation between shape functions based on system mass or elapsed mission time. These solutions often introduce misleading or even unstable numerical transients into the system. Plus, interpolation on a shape function is not intuitive. This paper presents an approach in which the shape functions are held constant and operate on the changing mass and stiffness matrices of the vehicle components. Each vehicle stage or component finite element model is broken into dry structure and propellant models. A library of propellant models is used to describe the

  15. Modeling and control of flexible space platforms with articulated payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, Philip C.; Joshi, Suresh M.

    1989-01-01

    The first steps in developing a methodology for spacecraft control-structure interaction (CSI) optimization are identification and classification of anticipated missions, and the development of tractable mathematical models in each mission class. A mathematical model of a generic large flexible space platform (LFSP) with multiple independently pointed rigid payloads is considered. The objective is not to develop a general purpose numerical simulation, but rather to develop an analytically tractable mathematical model of such composite systems. The equations of motion for a single payload case are derived, and are linearized about zero steady-state. The resulting model is then extended to include multiple rigid payloads, yielding the desired analytical form. The mathematical models developed clearly show the internal inertial/elastic couplings, and are therefore suitable for analytical and numerical studies. A simple decentralized control law is proposed for fine pointing the payloads and LFSP attitude control, and simulation results are presented for an example problem. The decentralized controller is shown to be adequate for the example problem chosen, but does not, in general, guarantee stability. A centralized dissipative controller is then proposed, requiring a symmetric form of the composite system equations. Such a controller guarantees robust closed loop stability despite unmodeled elastic dynamics and parameter uncertainties.

  16. copCAR: A Flexible Regression Model for Areal Data.

    PubMed

    Hughes, John

    2015-09-16

    Non-Gaussian spatial data are common in many fields. When fitting regressions for such data, one needs to account for spatial dependence to ensure reliable inference for the regression coefficients. The two most commonly used regression models for spatially aggregated data are the automodel and the areal generalized linear mixed model (GLMM). These models induce spatial dependence in different ways but share the smoothing approach, which is intuitive but problematic. This article develops a new regression model for areal data. The new model is called copCAR because it is copula-based and employs the areal GLMM's conditional autoregression (CAR). copCAR overcomes many of the drawbacks of the automodel and the areal GLMM. Specifically, copCAR (1) is flexible and intuitive, (2) permits positive spatial dependence for all types of data, (3) permits efficient computation, and (4) provides reliable spatial regression inference and information about dependence strength. An implementation is provided by R package copCAR, which is available from the Comprehensive R Archive Network, and supplementary materials are available online.

  17. Flexible space structure model reduction by modal cost analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skelton, R. E.; Hughes, P. C.

    1979-01-01

    It is noted that reduced models and reduced controllers for flexible space structures are obtained by retaining those modes which make the greatest contribution to quadratic control objectives. Attention is given to the relative importance of damping, frequency and mode shapes in the mode truncation decisions for the following control objectives: attitude control, vibration suppression and figure control. It is also shown that using Modal Cost Analysis (MCA) on the closed loop modes of the optimally controlled system allows the construction of reduced control policies which feedback only those closed loop coordinates which are most critical to the quadratic control performance criterion. In this manner, the modes which need to be controlled are deduced from truncations of the optimal controller.

  18. Why did the meerkat cross the road? Flexible adaptation of phylogenetically-old behavioural strategies to modern-day threats.

    PubMed

    Perony, Nicolas; Townsend, Simon W

    2013-01-01

    Risk-sensitive adaptive spatial organisation during group movement has been shown to efficiently minimise the risks associated with external ecological threats. Whether animals can draw on such behaviours when confronted with man-made threats is generally less clear. We studied road-crossing in a wild, but habituated, population of meerkats living in the Kalahari Desert, South Africa. We found that dominant females, the core member in meerkat social systems, led groups to the road significantly more often than subordinates, yet were consistently less likely to cross first. Our results suggest that a reshuffling occurs in progression order when meerkat groups reach the road. By employing a simple model of collective movement, we have shown that risk aversion alone may be sufficient to explain this reshuffling, but that the risk aversion of dominant females toward road crossing is significantly higher than that of subordinates. It seems that by not crossing first, dominant females avoid occupying the most risky, exposed locations, such as at the front of the group--a potential selfish strategy that also promotes the long-term stability and hence reproductive output of their family groups. We argue that our findings support the idea that animals can flexibly apply phylogenetically-old behavioural strategies to deal with emerging modern-day problems.

  19. Why Did the Meerkat Cross the Road? Flexible Adaptation of Phylogenetically-Old Behavioural Strategies to Modern-Day Threats

    PubMed Central

    Perony, Nicolas; Townsend, Simon W.

    2013-01-01

    Risk-sensitive adaptive spatial organisation during group movement has been shown to efficiently minimise the risks associated with external ecological threats. Whether animals can draw on such behaviours when confronted with man-made threats is generally less clear. We studied road-crossing in a wild, but habituated, population of meerkats living in the Kalahari Desert, South Africa. We found that dominant females, the core member in meerkat social systems, led groups to the road significantly more often than subordinates, yet were consistently less likely to cross first. Our results suggest that a reshuffling occurs in progression order when meerkat groups reach the road. By employing a simple model of collective movement, we have shown that risk aversion alone may be sufficient to explain this reshuffling, but that the risk aversion of dominant females toward road crossing is significantly higher than that of subordinates. It seems that by not crossing first, dominant females avoid occupying the most risky, exposed locations, such as at the front of the group – a potential selfish strategy that also promotes the long-term stability and hence reproductive output of their family groups. We argue that our findings support the idea that animals can flexibly apply phylogenetically-old behavioural strategies to deal with emerging modern-day problems. PMID:23441144

  20. Adaptive Strategies for Controls of Flexible Arms. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, Bau-San

    1989-01-01

    An adaptive controller for a modern manipulator has been designed based on asymptotical stability via the Lyapunov criterion with the output error between the system and a reference model used as the actuating control signal. Computer simulations were carried out to test the design. The combination of the adaptive controller and a system vibration and mode shape estimator show that the flexible arm should move along a pre-defined trajectory with high-speed motion and fast vibration setting time. An existing computer-controlled prototype two link manipulator, RALF (Robotic Arm, Large Flexible), with a parallel mechanism driven by hydraulic actuators was used to verify the mathematical analysis. The experimental results illustrate that assumed modes found from finite element techniques can be used to derive the equations of motion with acceptable accuracy. The robust adaptive (modal) control is implemented to compensate for unmodelled modes and nonlinearities and is compared with the joint feedback control in additional experiments. Preliminary results show promise for the experimental control algorithm.

  1. Real-time dynamics and control strategies for space operations of flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, K. C.; Alvin, K. F.; Alexander, S.

    1993-01-01

    This project (NAG9-574) was meant to be a three-year research project. However, due to NASA's reorganizations during 1992, the project was funded only for one year. Accordingly, every effort was made to make the present final report as if the project was meant to be for one-year duration. Originally, during the first year we were planning to accomplish the following: we were to start with a three dimensional flexible manipulator beam with articulated joints and with a linear control-based controller applied at the joints; using this simple example, we were to design the software systems requirements for real-time processing, introduce the streamlining of various computational algorithms, perform the necessary reorganization of the partitioned simulation procedures, and assess the potential speed-up realization of the solution process by parallel computations. The three reports included as part of the final report address: the streamlining of various computational algorithms; the necessary reorganization of the partitioned simulation procedures, in particular the observer models; and an initial attempt of reconfiguring the flexible space structures.

  2. Fabrication of transistors on flexible substrates: from mass-printing to high-resolution alternative lithography strategies.

    PubMed

    Moonen, Pieter F; Yakimets, Iryna; Huskens, Jurriaan

    2012-11-02

    In this report, the development of conventional, mass-printing strategies into high-resolution, alternative patterning techniques is reviewed with the focus on large-area patterning of flexible thin-film transistors (TFTs) for display applications. In the first part, conventional and digital printing techniques are introduced and categorized as far as their development is relevant for this application area. The limitations of conventional printing guides the reader to the second part of the progress report: alternative-lithographic patterning on low-cost flexible foils for the fabrication of flexible TFTs. Soft and nanoimprint lithography-based patterning techniques and their limitations are surveyed with respect to patterning on low-cost flexible foils. These show a shift from fabricating simple microlense structures to more complicated, high-resolution electronic devices. The development of alternative, low-temperature processable materials and the introduction of high-resolution patterning strategies will lead to the low-cost, self-aligned fabrication of flexible displays and solar cells from cheaper but better performing organic materials.

  3. A Flexible Bayesian Model for Testing for Transmission Ratio Distortion

    PubMed Central

    Casellas, Joaquim; Manunza, Arianna; Mercader, Anna; Quintanilla, Raquel; Amills, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Current statistical approaches to investigate the nature and magnitude of transmission ratio distortion (TRD) are scarce and restricted to the most common experimental designs such as F2 populations and backcrosses. In this article, we describe a new Bayesian approach to check TRD within a given biallelic genetic marker in a diploid species, providing a highly flexible framework that can accommodate any kind of population structure. This model relies on the genotype of each offspring and thus integrates all available information from either the parents’ genotypes or population-specific allele frequencies and yields TRD estimates that can be corroborated by the calculation of a Bayes factor (BF). This approach has been evaluated on simulated data sets with appealing statistical performance. As a proof of concept, we have also tested TRD in a porcine population with five half-sib families and 352 offspring. All boars and piglets were genotyped with the Porcine SNP60 BeadChip, whereas genotypes from the sows were not available. The SNP-by-SNP screening of the pig genome revealed 84 SNPs with decisive evidences of TRD (BF > 100) after accounting for multiple testing. Many of these regions contained genes related to biological processes (e.g., nucleosome assembly and co-organization, DNA conformation and packaging, and DNA complex assembly) that are critically associated with embryonic viability. The implementation of this method, which overcomes many of the limitations of previous approaches, should contribute to fostering research on TRD in both model and nonmodel organisms. PMID:25271302

  4. Language Learning Strategies and Its Training Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Jing

    2010-01-01

    This paper summarizes and reviews the literature regarding language learning strategies and it's training model, pointing out the significance of language learning strategies to EFL learners and an applicable and effective language learning strategies training model, which is beneficial both to EFL learners and instructors, is badly needed.

  5. Control system design for flexible structures using data models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irwin, R. Dennis; Frazier, W. Garth; Mitchell, Jerrel R.; Medina, Enrique A.; Bukley, Angelia P.

    1993-01-01

    The dynamics and control of flexible aerospace structures exercises many of the engineering disciplines. In recent years there has been considerable research in the developing and tailoring of control system design techniques for these structures. This problem involves designing a control system for a multi-input, multi-output (MIMO) system that satisfies various performance criteria, such as vibration suppression, disturbance and noise rejection, attitude control and slewing control. Considerable progress has been made and demonstrated in control system design techniques for these structures. The key to designing control systems for these structures that meet stringent performance requirements is an accurate model. It has become apparent that theoretically and finite-element generated models do not provide the needed accuracy; almost all successful demonstrations of control system design techniques have involved using test results for fine-tuning a model or for extracting a model using system ID techniques. This paper describes past and ongoing efforts at Ohio University and NASA MSFC to design controllers using 'data models.' The basic philosophy of this approach is to start with a stabilizing controller and frequency response data that describes the plant; then, iteratively vary the free parameters of the controller so that performance measures become closer to satisfying design specifications. The frequency response data can be either experimentally derived or analytically derived. One 'design-with-data' algorithm presented in this paper is called the Compensator Improvement Program (CIP). The current CIP designs controllers for MIMO systems so that classical gain, phase, and attenuation margins are achieved. The center-piece of the CIP algorithm is the constraint improvement technique which is used to calculate a parameter change vector that guarantees an improvement in all unsatisfied, feasible performance metrics from iteration to iteration. The paper also

  6. Polymer-assisted metal deposition (PAMD): a full-solution strategy for flexible, stretchable, compressible, and wearable metal conductors.

    PubMed

    Yu, You; Yan, Casey; Zheng, Zijian

    2014-08-20

    Metal interconnects, contacts, and electrodes are indispensable elements for most applications of flexible, stretchable, and wearable electronics. Current fabrication methods for these metal conductors are mainly based on conventional microfabrication procedures that have been migrated from Si semiconductor industries, which face significant challenges for organic-based compliant substrates. This Research News highlights a recently developed full-solution processing strategy, polymer-assisted metal deposition (PAMD), which is particularly suitable for the roll-to-roll, low-cost fabrication of high-performance compliant metal conductors (Cu, Ni, Ag, and Au) on a wide variety of organic substrates including plastics, elastomers, papers, and textiles. This paper presents i) the principles of PAMD, and how to use it for making ii) flexible, stretchable, and wearable conductive metal electrodes, iii) patterned metal interconnects, and d) 3D stretchable and compressible metal sponges. A critical perspective on this emerging strategy is also provided.

  7. Mode Selection Techniques in Variable Mass Flexible Body Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quiocho, Leslie J.; Ghosh, Tushar K.; Frenkel, David; Huynh, An

    2010-01-01

    In developing a flexible body spacecraft simulation for the Launch Abort System of the Orion vehicle, when a rapid mass depletion takes place, the dynamics problem with time varying eigenmodes had to be addressed. Three different techniques were implemented, with different trade-offs made between performance and fidelity. A number of technical issues had to be solved in the process. This paper covers the background of the variable mass flexibility problem, the three approaches to simulating it, and the technical issues that were solved in formulating and implementing them.

  8. Mining Social Entrepreneurship Strategies Using Topic Modeling.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Yanto; Jiang, Li Crystal; Wang, Cheng-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Despite the burgeoning research on social entrepreneurship (SE), SE strategies remain poorly understood. Drawing on extant research on the social activism and social change, empowerment and SE models, we explore, classify and validate the strategies used by 2,334 social entrepreneurs affiliated with the world's largest SE support organization, Ashoka. The results of the topic modeling of the social entrepreneurs' strategy profiles reveal that they employed a total of 39 change-making strategies that vary across resources (material versus symbolic strategies), specificity (general versus specific strategies), and mode of participation (mass versus elite participation strategies); they also vary across fields of practice and time. Finally, we identify six meta-SE strategies-a reduction from the 39 strategies-and identify four new meta-SE strategies (i.e., system reform, physical capital development, evidence-based practices, and prototyping) that have been overlooked in prior SE research. Our findings extend and deepen the research into SE strategies and offer a comprehensive model of SE strategies that advances theory, practice and policy making.

  9. The rigid-flexible nonlinear robotic manipulator: Modeling and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenili, André; Balthazar, José Manoel

    2011-05-01

    The State-Dependent Riccati Equation (SDRE) control of a nonlinear rigid-flexible two link robotic manipulator is investigated. Different cases are considered assuming small deviations and large deviations from the desired final states. The nonlinear governing equations of motion are coupled, providing considerable excitation of all the nonlinear terms. The results present satisfactory final states but also undesirable overshoot.

  10. Reconciling Flexible Staffing Models with Inclusive Governance and Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitchurch, Celia; Gordon, George

    2013-01-01

    Higher education managers are under increasing pressure from governments to reduce costs by adopting more flexible staffing practices and tensions can arise as institutions seek to sustain motivation and morale across a diversifying workforce. This paper considers how institutional management and governance practices facilitate innovative…

  11. A Binding Model and Similarity for Flexible Modular Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Máté, Gabriell; Feinauer, Christoph J.; Hofmann, Andreas; Goldt, Sebastian; Liu, Lei; Heermann, Dieter W.

    2013-03-01

    Modular proteins are one of the most commonly found disordered protein motifs. An example is CTCF, a protein that has been named the master waver of the genome i.e., the organizer of the 3D structure of the chromosomes. Using NMR and numerical simulations, much progress has been made in understanding their various functions and ways of binding. Modular proteins are often composed of protein modules interconnected by flexible linkers. They can be imagined as ``beads on a string.'' We argue that when the number of beads is small, these structures behave like a self avoiding random walk. Nevertheless, when binding to a target, linkers can fold in more ordered and stable states. At the same time, folding can influence functional roles. We show that the flexibility of the linkers can boost binding affinity. As a result of flexibility, the conformations of these proteins before and after binding are different. So this implies that generic binding site prediction methods may fail. To deal with this we introduce a new methodology to characterize and compare these flexible structures. Employing topological concepts we propose a method which intrinsically fuses topology and geometry. GM gratefully acknowledges support from the HGS-MathComp and the RTG 1653.

  12. On the modeling, and open loop control of a rotating thin flexible beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choura, Slim; Jayasuriya, Suhada; Medick, Matthew A.

    1989-12-01

    A set of governing differential equations is derived for the inplane motion of a rotating thin flexible beam. The beam is assumed to be linearly elastic and is connected to a rigid hub driven by a torque motor. Both flexural and extensional effects are included in the derivation. This coupling due to flexure and extension is usually neglected in studies dealing with the control of such a system. Models for typical control studies are often derived by utilizing an assumed mode approach where the mode shapes are obtained by solving the Euler-Bernoulli beam equation for flexural vibrations, with clamped-free or pinned-free boundary conditions. The coupled equations developed in this paper are used to demonstrate that typical models in control studies give satisfactory results up to a critical rotational speed. For the case where these coupled equations are specialized to simple flexure only, valid for low angular speeds, a unique feedforward control strategy can be derived. This is an open loop control strategy that enables total elimination of an a priori specified vibratory mode from the gross motion in a finite critical time.

  13. A comparative study of velocity increment generation between the rigid body and flexible models of MMET

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail, Norilmi Amilia

    2016-02-01

    The motorized momentum exchange tether (MMET) is capable of generating useful velocity increments through spin–orbit coupling. This study presents a comparative study of the velocity increments between the rigid body and flexible models of MMET. The equations of motions of both models in the time domain are transformed into a function of true anomaly. The equations of motion are integrated, and the responses in terms of the velocity increment of the rigid body and flexible models are compared and analysed. Results show that the initial conditions, eccentricity, and flexibility of the tether have significant effects on the velocity increments of the tether.

  14. Flexible biogas production for demand-driven energy supply--feeding strategies and types of substrates.

    PubMed

    Mauky, Eric; Jacobi, H Fabian; Liebetrau, Jan; Nelles, Michael

    2015-02-01

    Purpose of this work was the evaluation of demand driven biogas production. In laboratory-scale experiments it could be demonstrated that with diurnal flexible feeding and specific combination of substrates with different degradation kinetics biogas can be produced highly flexible in CSTR systems. Corresponding to the feedings the diurnal variation leads to alternations of the methane, carbon dioxide and acid concentrations as well as the pH-value. The long-time process stability was not negatively affected by the dynamic feeding regime at high OLRs of up to 6 kg VS m(-3) d(-1). It is concluded that the flexible gas production can give the opportunity to minimize the necessary gas storage capacity which can save investments for non-required gas storage at site.

  15. Dynamic Behavior of Wind Turbine by a Mixed Flexible-Rigid Multi-Body Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianhong; Qin, Datong; Ding, Yi

    A mixed flexible-rigid multi-body model is presented to study the dynamic behavior of a horizontal axis wind turbine. The special attention is given to flexible body: flexible rotor is modeled by a newly developed blade finite element, support bearing elasticities, variations in the number of teeth in contact as well as contact tooth's elasticities are mainly flexible components in the power train. The couple conditions between different subsystems are established by constraint equations. The wind turbine model is generated by coupling models of rotor, power train and generator with constraint equations together. Based on this model, an eigenproblem analysis is carried out to show the mode shape of rotor and power train at a few natural frequencies. The dynamic responses and contact forces among gears under constant wind speed and fixed pitch angle are analyzed.

  16. Telestroke network business model strategies.

    PubMed

    Fanale, Christopher V; Demaerschalk, Bart M

    2012-10-01

    Our objective is to summarize the evidence that supports the reliability of telemedicine for diagnosis and efficacy in acute stroke treatment, identify strategies for funding the development of a telestroke network, and to present issues with respect to economic sustainability, cost effectiveness, and the status of reimbursement for telestroke.

  17. Mining Social Entrepreneurship Strategies Using Topic Modeling

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Despite the burgeoning research on social entrepreneurship (SE), SE strategies remain poorly understood. Drawing on extant research on the social activism and social change, empowerment and SE models, we explore, classify and validate the strategies used by 2,334 social entrepreneurs affiliated with the world’s largest SE support organization, Ashoka. The results of the topic modeling of the social entrepreneurs’ strategy profiles reveal that they employed a total of 39 change-making strategies that vary across resources (material versus symbolic strategies), specificity (general versus specific strategies), and mode of participation (mass versus elite participation strategies); they also vary across fields of practice and time. Finally, we identify six meta-SE strategies―a reduction from the 39 strategies―and identify four new meta-SE strategies (i.e., system reform, physical capital development, evidence-based practices, and prototyping) that have been overlooked in prior SE research. Our findings extend and deepen the research into SE strategies and offer a comprehensive model of SE strategies that advances theory, practice and policy making. PMID:26998970

  18. Radial Maze Analog for Pigeons: Evidence for Flexible Coding Strategies May Result from Faulty Assumptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gipson, Cassandra D.; DiGian, Kelly A.; Miller, Holly C.; Zentall, Thomas R.

    2008-01-01

    Previous research with the radial maze has found evidence that rats can remember both places that they have already been (retrospective coding) and places they have yet to visit (prospective coding; Cook, R. G., Brown, M. F., & Riley, D. A. (1985). Flexible memory processing by rats: Use of prospective and retrospective information in the radial…

  19. Use of Multiple Regression in Counseling Psychology Research: A Flexible Data-Analytic Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wampold, Bruce E.; Freund, Richard D.

    1987-01-01

    Explains multiple regression, demonstrates its flexibility for analyzing data from various designs, and discusses interpretation of results from multiple regression analysis. Presents regression equations for single independent variable and for two or more independent variables, followed by a discussion of coefficients related to these. Compares…

  20. The Flexibility of the Curriculum as a Strategy for Exercising Social Justice in Public Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molina García, Amelia; Andrade Lara, José Luis; Ponce Crespo, Christian

    2015-01-01

    This paper is guided by two principal ideas, the first one is about curriculum flexibility in the context of globalization and the second one is about the function of generating skills for the job market. Both are challenges that the Institutions for Undergraduate Education (IES) have to face in training their alumni. In this case we considered as…

  1. Model Flexibility Analysis Does Not Measure the Persuasiveness of a Fit.

    PubMed

    Evans, Nathan J; Howard, Zachary L; Heathcote, Andrew; Brown, Scott D

    2017-02-02

    Recently, Veksler, Myers, and Gluck (2015) proposed model flexibility analysis as a method that "aids model evaluation by providing a metric for gauging the persuasiveness of a given fit" (p. 755) Model flexibility analysis measures the complexity of a model in terms of the proportion of all possible data patterns it can predict. We show that this measure does not provide a reliable way to gauge complexity, which prevents model flexibility analysis from fulfilling either of the 2 aims outlined by Veksler et al. (2015): absolute and relative model evaluation. We also show that model flexibility analysis can even fail to correctly quantify complexity in the most clear cut case, with nested models. We advocate for the use of well-established techniques with these characteristics, such as Bayes factors, normalized maximum likelihood, or cross-validation, and against the use of model flexibility analysis. In the discussion, we explore 2 issues relevant to the area of model evaluation: the completeness of current model selection methods and the philosophical debate of absolute versus relative model evaluation. (PsycINFO Database Record

  2. Nonlinear model and attitude dynamics of flexible spacecraft with large amplitude slosh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Mingle; Yue, Baozeng

    2017-04-01

    This paper is focused on the nonlinearly modelling and attitude dynamics of spacecraft coupled with large amplitude liquid sloshing dynamics and flexible appendage vibration. The large amplitude fuel slosh dynamics is included by using an improved moving pulsating ball model. The moving pulsating ball model is an equivalent mechanical model that is capable of imitating the whole liquid reorientation process. A modification is introduced in the capillary force computation in order to more precisely estimate the settling location of liquid in microgravity or zero-g environment. The flexible appendage is modelled as a three dimensional Bernoulli-Euler beam and the assumed modal method is employed to derive the nonlinear mechanical model for the overall coupled system of liquid filled spacecraft with appendage. The attitude maneuver is implemented by the momentum transfer technique, and a feedback controller is designed. The simulation results show that the liquid sloshing can always result in nutation behavior, but the effect of flexible deformation of appendage depends on the amplitude and direction of attitude maneuver performed by spacecraft. Moreover, it is found that the liquid sloshing and the vibration of flexible appendage are coupled with each other, and the coupling becomes more significant with more rapid motion of spacecraft. This study reveals that the appendage's flexibility has influence on the liquid's location and settling time in microgravity. The presented nonlinear system model can provide an important reference for the overall design of the modern spacecraft composed of rigid platform, liquid filled tank and flexible appendage.

  3. Dynamics modeling of multibody flexible systems with traveling multi-point joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messac, Achille; Herman, Deborah

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a general methodology for modeling the dynamics of a flexible structure which moves on the surface of another flexible structure. The relative motion of the two bodies need not follow a straight line, nor need the contact surfaces be planar in their undeformed state. A model reduction approach is also developed, which makes the methodology applicable to large structural systems. The Space Station Freedom Mobile Transporter represents one such system, when attached to the Shuttle Orbiter. Numerical examples are provided.

  4. A novel approach to the modelling and control of flexible robot arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Xuru; Tarn, Tzyh-Jong; Bejczy, Antal K.

    1988-01-01

    A general dynamic model of a two-link Euler-Bernoulli beam flexible robot arm is presented in the form of partial-differential-integral equations. Observations are made on important properties of the dynamic model. The resulting infinite-dimensional system is then input-output decoupled and partially linearized by a diffeomorphic state transformation and nonlinear state feedback. The local stability issue is addressed for a one-link flexible robot arm.

  5. Measuring Model Flexibility with Parameter Space Partitioning: An Introduction and Application Example

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitt, Mark A.; Myung, Jay I.; Montenegro, Maximiliano; Pooley, James

    2008-01-01

    A primary criterion on which models of cognition are evaluated is their ability to fit empirical data. To understand the reason why a model yields a good or poor fit, it is necessary to determine the data-fitting potential (i.e., flexibility) of the model. In the first part of this article, methods for comparing models and studying their…

  6. Comprehensive modeling and control of flexible flapping wing micro air vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogar, Stephen Michael

    Flapping wing micro air vehicles hold significant promise due to the potential for improved aerodynamic efficiency, enhanced maneuverability and hover capability compared to fixed and rotary configurations. However, significant technical challenges exist to due the lightweight, highly integrated nature of the vehicle and coupling between the actuators, flexible wings and control system. Experimental and high fidelity analysis has demonstrated that aeroelastic effects can change the effective kinematics of the wing, reducing vehicle stability. However, many control studies for flapping wing vehicles do not consider these effects, and instead validate the control strategy with simple assumptions, including rigid wings, quasi-steady aerodynamics and no consideration of actuator dynamics. A control evaluation model that includes aeroelastic effects and actuator dynamics is developed. The structural model accounts for geometrically nonlinear behavior using an implicit condensation technique and the aerodynamic loads are found using a time accurate approach that includes quasi-steady, rotational, added mass and unsteady effects. Empirically based parameters in the model are fit using data obtained from a higher fidelity solver. The aeroelastic model and its ingredients are compared to experiments and computations using models of higher fidelity, and indicate reasonable agreement. The developed control evaluation model is implemented in a previously published, baseline controller that maintains stability using an asymmetric wingbeat, known as split-cycle, along with changing the flapping frequency and wing bias. The model-based controller determines the control inputs using a cycle-averaged, linear control design model, which assumes a rigid wing and no actuator dynamics. The introduction of unaccounted for dynamics significantly degrades the ability of the controller to track a reference trajectory, and in some cases destabilizes the vehicle. This demonstrates the

  7. Efficient and Flexible Strategy Use on Multi-Digit Sums: A Choice/No-Choice Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torbeyns, Joke; Verschaffel, Lieven

    2013-01-01

    This study analysed children's use of mental computation strategies and standard written algorithms in the domain of multi-digit addition and subtraction, using the choice/no-choice method. Twenty-one Flemish fourth-graders (M[subscript Age] =9y10m) solved problem-items that either stimulated the use of mental computation strategies or a standard…

  8. Modeling and control of a hydraulically actuated flexible-prismatic link robot

    SciTech Connect

    Love, L.; Kress, R.; Jansen, J.

    1996-12-01

    Most of the research related to flexible link manipulators to date has focused on single link, fixed length, single plane of vibration test beds. In addition, actuation has been predominantly based upon electromagnetic motors. Ironically, these elements are rarely found in the existing industrial long reach systems. This manuscript describes a new hydraulically actuated, long reach manipulator with a flexible prismatic link at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Focus is directed towards both modeling and control of hydraulic actuators as well as flexible links that have variable natural frequencies.

  9. A new minimum-time control law for a one-mode model of a flexible slewing structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbieri, Enrique; Ozguner, Umit

    1993-01-01

    We describe the construction of a new minimum-time control law for a single-axis, undamped, one-mode model of a flexible slewing structure. The set of necessary and sufficient conditions for optimality are developed using phase-plane techniques, and are given in terms of the vibration frequencies and the rigid-body states. This effectively provides the switching hypersurface in four-dimensional space. The resulting control strategy has the advantage that can be implemented on-line since no a priori computation of switching times is required.

  10. 2'-Alkynylnucleotides: A Sequence- and Spin Label-Flexible Strategy for EPR Spectroscopy in DNA.

    PubMed

    Haugland, Marius M; El-Sagheer, Afaf H; Porter, Rachel J; Peña, Javier; Brown, Tom; Anderson, Edward A; Lovett, Janet E

    2016-07-27

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is a powerful method to elucidate molecular structure through the measurement of distances between conformationally well-defined spin labels. Here we report a sequence-flexible approach to the synthesis of double spin-labeled DNA duplexes, where 2'-alkynylnucleosides are incorporated at terminal and internal positions on complementary strands. Post-DNA synthesis copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reactions with a variety of spin labels enable the use of double electron-electron resonance experiments to measure a number of distances on the duplex, affording a high level of detailed structural information.

  11. Variable strategy model of the human operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, John Michael

    Human operators often employ discontinuous or "bang-bang" control strategies when performing large-amplitude acquisition tasks. The current study applies Variable Structure Control (VSC) techniques to model human operator behavior during acquisition tasks. The result is a coupled, multi-input model replicating the discontinuous control strategy. In the VSC formulation, a switching surface is the mathematical representation of the operator's control strategy. The performance of the Variable Strategy Model (VSM) is evaluated by considering several examples, including the longitudinal control of an aircraft during the visual landing task. The aircraft landing task becomes an acquisition maneuver whenever large initial offsets occur. Several different strategies are explored in the VSM formulation for the aircraft landing task. First, a switching surface is constructed from literal interpretations of pilot training literature. This approach yields a mathematical representation of how a pilot is trained to fly a generic aircraft. This switching surface is shown to bound the trajectory response of a group of pilots performing an offset landing task in an aircraft simulator study. Next, front-side and back-side landing strategies are compared. A back-side landing strategy is found to be capable of landing an aircraft flying on either the front side or back side of the power curve. However, the front-side landing strategy is found to be insufficient for landing an aircraft flying on the back side. Finally, a more refined landing strategy is developed that takes into the account the specific aircraft's dynamic characteristics. The refined strategy is translated back into terminology similar to the existing pilot training literature.

  12. Modeling Parallelization and Flexibility Improvements in Skill Acquisition: From Dual Tasks to Complex Dynamic Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taatgen, Niels

    2005-01-01

    Emerging parallel processing and increased flexibility during the acquisition of cognitive skills form a combination that is hard to reconcile with rule-based models that often produce brittle behavior. Rule-based models can exhibit these properties by adhering to 2 principles: that the model gradually learns task-specific rules from instructions…

  13. First order coupled dynamic model of flexible space structures with time-varying configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jie; Li, Dongxu; Jiang, Jianping

    2017-03-01

    This paper proposes a first order coupled dynamic modeling method for flexible space structures with time-varying configurations for the purpose of deriving the characteristics of the system. The model considers the first time derivative of the coordinate transformation matrix between the platform's body frame and the appendage's floating frame. As a result it can accurately predict characteristics of the system even if flexible appendages rotate with complex trajectory relative to the rigid part. In general, flexible appendages are fixed on the rigid platform or forced to rotate with a slow angular velocity. So only the zero order of the transformation matrix is considered in conventional models. However, due to neglecting of time-varying terms of the transformation matrix, these models introduce severe error when appendages, like antennas, for example, rotate with a fast speed relative to the platform. The first order coupled dynamic model for flexible space structures proposed in this paper resolve this problem by introducing the first time derivative of the transformation matrix. As a numerical example, a central core with a rotating solar panel is considered and the results are compared with those given by the conventional model. It has been shown that the first order terms are of great importance on the attitude of the rigid body and dynamic response of the flexible appendage.

  14. Exemplars, Prototypes, and the Flexibility of Classification Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsson, Henrik; Wennerholm, Pia; Lyxzen, Urban

    2004-01-01

    J. P. Minda and J. D. Smith (2001) showed that a prototype model outperforms an exemplar model, especially in larger categories or categories that contained more complex stimuli. R. M. Nosofsky and S. R. Zaki (2002) showed that an exemplar model with a response-scaling mechanism outperforms a prototype model. The authors of the current study…

  15. A Flexible Latent Trait Model for Response Times in Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranger, Jochen; Kuhn, Jorg-Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Latent trait models for response times in tests have become popular recently. One challenge for response time modeling is the fact that the distribution of response times can differ considerably even in similar tests. In order to reduce the need for tailor-made models, a model is proposed that unifies two popular approaches to response time…

  16. Learning strategies: a synthesis and conceptual model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattie, John A. C.; Donoghue, Gregory M.

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore a model of learning that proposes that various learning strategies are powerful at certain stages in the learning cycle. The model describes three inputs and outcomes (skill, will and thrill), success criteria, three phases of learning (surface, deep and transfer) and an acquiring and consolidation phase within each of the surface and deep phases. A synthesis of 228 meta-analyses led to the identification of the most effective strategies. The results indicate that there is a subset of strategies that are effective, but this effectiveness depends on the phase of the model in which they are implemented. Further, it is best not to run separate sessions on learning strategies but to embed the various strategies within the content of the subject, to be clearer about developing both surface and deep learning, and promoting their associated optimal strategies and to teach the skills of transfer of learning. The article concludes with a discussion of questions raised by the model that need further research.

  17. The Strategies of Modeling in Biology Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svoboda, Julia; Passmore, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    Modeling, like inquiry more generally, is not a single method, but rather a complex suite of strategies. Philosophers of biology, citing the diverse aims, interests, and disciplinary cultures of biologists, argue that modeling is best understood in the context of its epistemic aims and cognitive payoffs. In the science education literature,…

  18. Reading Strategy Instruction through Mental Modelling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pani, Susmita

    2004-01-01

    Focus in recent times on realistic pedagogy implies that we can no longer depend on a transmission model of training, either for teachers or learners. We need to develop strategies that will help teachers and learners to be co-participators in the learning process. Mental modelling is one technique suggested in this article. It is a technique…

  19. Testing Strategies for Model-Based Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heimdahl, Mats P. E.; Whalen, Mike; Rajan, Ajitha; Miller, Steven P.

    2006-01-01

    This report presents an approach for testing artifacts generated in a model-based development process. This approach divides the traditional testing process into two parts: requirements-based testing (validation testing) which determines whether the model implements the high-level requirements and model-based testing (conformance testing) which determines whether the code generated from a model is behaviorally equivalent to the model. The goals of the two processes differ significantly and this report explores suitable testing metrics and automation strategies for each. To support requirements-based testing, we define novel objective requirements coverage metrics similar to existing specification and code coverage metrics. For model-based testing, we briefly describe automation strategies and examine the fault-finding capability of different structural coverage metrics using tests automatically generated from the model.

  20. Strategies for fitting nonlinear ecological models in R, AD Model Builder, and BUGS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bolker, Benjamin M.; Gardner, Beth; Maunder, Mark; Berg, Casper W.; Brooks, Mollie; Comita, Liza; Crone, Elizabeth; Cubaynes, Sarah; Davies, Trevor; de Valpine, Perry; Ford, Jessica; Gimenez, Olivier; Kéry, Marc; Kim, Eun Jung; Lennert-Cody, Cleridy; Magunsson, Arni; Martell, Steve; Nash, John; Nielson, Anders; Regentz, Jim; Skaug, Hans; Zipkin, Elise

    2013-01-01

    1. Ecologists often use nonlinear fitting techniques to estimate the parameters of complex ecological models, with attendant frustration. This paper compares three open-source model fitting tools and discusses general strategies for defining and fitting models. 2. R is convenient and (relatively) easy to learn, AD Model Builder is fast and robust but comes with a steep learning curve, while BUGS provides the greatest flexibility at the price of speed. 3. Our model-fitting suggestions range from general cultural advice (where possible, use the tools and models that are most common in your subfield) to specific suggestions about how to change the mathematical description of models to make them more amenable to parameter estimation. 4. A companion web site (https://groups.nceas.ucsb.edu/nonlinear-modeling/projects) presents detailed examples of application of the three tools to a variety of typical ecological estimation problems; each example links both to a detailed project report and to full source code and data.

  1. Dynamic Modeling of the SMAP Rotating Flexible Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayeri, Reza D.

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic model development in ADAMS for the SMAP project is explained: The main objective of the dynamic models are for pointing error assessment, and the control/stability margin requirement verifications

  2. High protein flexibility and reduced hydration water dynamics are key pressure adaptive strategies in prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, N.; Michoud, G.; Cario, A.; Ollivier, J.; Franzetti, B.; Jebbar, M.; Oger, P.; Peters, J.

    2016-01-01

    Water and protein dynamics on a nanometer scale were measured by quasi-elastic neutron scattering in the piezophile archaeon Thermococcus barophilus and the closely related pressure-sensitive Thermococcus kodakarensis, at 0.1 and 40 MPa. We show that cells of the pressure sensitive organism exhibit higher intrinsic stability. Both the hydration water dynamics and the fast protein and lipid dynamics are reduced under pressure. In contrast, the proteome of T. barophilus is more pressure sensitive than that of T. kodakarensis. The diffusion coefficient of hydration water is reduced, while the fast protein and lipid dynamics are slightly enhanced with increasing pressure. These findings show that the coupling between hydration water and cellular constituents might not be simply a master-slave relationship. We propose that the high flexibility of the T. barophilus proteome associated with reduced hydration water may be the keys to the molecular adaptation of the cells to high hydrostatic pressure. PMID:27595789

  3. High protein flexibility and reduced hydration water dynamics are key pressure adaptive strategies in prokaryotes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, N.; Michoud, G.; Cario, A.; Ollivier, J.; Franzetti, B.; Jebbar, M.; Oger, P.; Peters, J.

    2016-09-01

    Water and protein dynamics on a nanometer scale were measured by quasi-elastic neutron scattering in the piezophile archaeon Thermococcus barophilus and the closely related pressure-sensitive Thermococcus kodakarensis, at 0.1 and 40 MPa. We show that cells of the pressure sensitive organism exhibit higher intrinsic stability. Both the hydration water dynamics and the fast protein and lipid dynamics are reduced under pressure. In contrast, the proteome of T. barophilus is more pressure sensitive than that of T. kodakarensis. The diffusion coefficient of hydration water is reduced, while the fast protein and lipid dynamics are slightly enhanced with increasing pressure. These findings show that the coupling between hydration water and cellular constituents might not be simply a master-slave relationship. We propose that the high flexibility of the T. barophilus proteome associated with reduced hydration water may be the keys to the molecular adaptation of the cells to high hydrostatic pressure.

  4. The CAOS model: a physically based, flexible hydrological model for the mesoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westhoff, Martijn; Zehe, Erwin

    2014-05-01

    Hydrological models are not only tools to predict discharge, but they are also hypotheses of how a catchment functions with respect to rainfall-runoff behaviour. In this work in progress, we present a new (physically based) model concept that should ultimately be suitable to run at the mesoscale. To be able to run it efficiently on the mesoscale, the model cannot be too complex. Yet, we wanted it physically based, with explicit incorporation of dissipative structures, such as macropores and lateral preferential flow paths. Besides water fluxes it should also be able to simulate solute concentrations and energy fluxes. This helps to parameterize the model while the model is also thermodynamically consistent, meaning that it is suitable to test thermodynamic optimality principles (such as maximum entropy production principle). With these constraints in mind, we developed a model where, in each subroutine, flow is modelled in only one dimension (vertical for the unsaturated zone and lateral for subsurface storm flow, groundwater flow and stream flow routines, making the model multiple 1-D), decreasing computation time significantly. The code is developed in an object oriented way, leading to more flexibility to test different model structures. For example, we will demonstrate the effect on simulated rapid subsurface flow for different mathematical descriptions (i.e. the Darcy-Weisbach equation vs. the diffusive wave and kinematic wave equation). For this study, the model will also be evaluated for hillslopes in three different geological settings within the Attert Basin in Luxembourg.

  5. Krylov vector methods for model reduction and control of flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Tzu-Jeng; Craig, Roy R., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Krylov vectors and the concept of parameter matching are combined here to develop model-reduction algorithms for structural dynamics systems. The method is derived for a structural dynamics system described by a second-order matrix differential equation. The reduced models are shown to have a promising application in the control of flexible structures. It can eliminate control and observation spillovers while requiring only the dynamic spillover terms to be considered. A model-order reduction example and a flexible structure control example are provided to show the efficacy of the method.

  6. Flight dynamics simulation modeling and control of a large flexible tiltrotor aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juhasz, Ondrej

    A high order rotorcraft mathematical model is developed and validated against the XV-15 and a Large Civil Tiltrotor (LCTR) concept. The mathematical model is generic and allows for any rotorcraft configuration, from single main rotor helicopters to coaxial and tiltrotor aircraft. Rigid-body and inflow states, as well as flexible wing and blade states are used in the analysis. The separate modeling of each rotorcraft component allows for structural flexibility to be included, which is important when modeling large aircraft where structural modes affect the flight dynamics frequency ranges of interest, generally 1 to 20 rad/sec. Details of the formulation of the mathematical model are given, including derivations of structural, aerodynamic, and inertial loads. The linking of the components of the aircraft is developed using an approach similar to multibody analyses by exploiting a tree topology, but without equations of constraints. Assessments of the effects of wing flexibility are given. Flexibility effects are evaluated by looking at the nature of the couplings between rigid-body modes and wing structural modes and vice versa. The effects of various different forms of structural feedback on aircraft dynamics are analyzed. A proportional-integral feedback on the structural acceleration is deemed to be most effective at both improving the damping and reducing the overall excitation of a structural mode. A model following control architecture is then implemented on full order flexible LCTR models. For this aircraft, the four lowest frequency structural modes are below 20 rad/sec, and are thus needed for control law development and analysis. The impact of structural feedback on both Attitude-Command, Attitude-Hold (ACAH) and Translational Rate Command (TRC) response types are investigated. A rigid aircraft model has optimistic performance characteristics, and a control system designed for a rigid aircraft could potentially destabilize a flexible one. The various

  7. Adaptive Flexibility and Maladaptive Routines in Selecting Fast and Frugal Decision Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broder, Arndt; Schiffer, Stefanie

    2006-01-01

    Decision routines unburden the cognitive capacity of the decision maker. In changing environments, however, routines may become maladaptive. In 2 experiments with a hypothetical stock market game (n = 241), the authors tested whether decision routines tend to persist at the level of decision strategies rather than at the level of options in…

  8. NASA Workshop on Distributed Parameter Modeling and Control of Flexible Aerospace Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marks, Virginia B. (Compiler); Keckler, Claude R. (Compiler)

    1994-01-01

    Although significant advances have been made in modeling and controlling flexible systems, there remains a need for improvements in model accuracy and in control performance. The finite element models of flexible systems are unduly complex and are almost intractable to optimum parameter estimation for refinement using experimental data. Distributed parameter or continuum modeling offers some advantages and some challenges in both modeling and control. Continuum models often result in a significantly reduced number of model parameters, thereby enabling optimum parameter estimation. The dynamic equations of motion of continuum models provide the advantage of allowing the embedding of the control system dynamics, thus forming a complete set of system dynamics. There is also increased insight provided by the continuum model approach.

  9. Stability analysis, modeling, simulation and experimental testing of an EMS Maglev system with structural flexibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanasoge, Aravind M.

    Vehicle-guideway interaction studies of Magnetically Levitated (Maglev) vehicles indicate that structural flexibility can adversely affect the overall stability and performance of such systems. This is one of the reasons why guideways are generally made very rigid. This in turn leads to increased cost of the overall system since guideway construction forms a significant portion of the overall cost. In this dissertation, the influence of structural flexibility on the stability of Electromagnetic Suspension (EMS) Maglev systems is studied. It is shown how inherently unstable and flexible structure EMS Maglev systems can achieve guaranteed stability by using collocated actuators and sensors, along with de-centralized Proportional plus Derivative (PD) controllers. These results are valid even in the presence of Track/Guideway flexibility. A detailed dynamic model is developed for the EMS Maglev demonstration system (Test Bogie) currently under research and development at Old Dominion University (ODU). This model incorporates structural dynamics with flexible modes of vibration, non-linear electrodynamics, feedback controllers, discrete time implementation, noise filters and disturbance inputs. This model is validated via real time experimental testing. The model thus validated is used for simulation case studies involving levitation and lateral disturbance, lateral control, and centralized control.

  10. A flexible and efficient multi-model framework in support of water management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfs, Vincent; Tran Quoc, Quan; Willems, Patrick

    2016-05-01

    Flexible, fast and accurate water quantity models are essential tools in support of water management. Adjustable levels of model detail and the ability to handle varying spatial and temporal resolutions are requisite model characteristics to ensure that such models can be employed efficiently in various applications. This paper uses a newly developed flexible modelling framework that aims to generate such models. The framework incorporates several approaches to model catchment hydrology, rivers and floodplains, and the urban drainage system by lumping processes on different levels. To illustrate this framework, a case study of integrated hydrological-hydraulic modelling is elaborated for the Grote Nete catchment in Belgium. Three conceptual rainfall-runoff models (NAM, PDM and VHM) were implemented in a generalized model structure, allowing flexibility in the spatial resolution by means of an innovative disaggregation/aggregation procedure. They were linked to conceptual hydraulic models of the rivers in the catchment, which were developed by means of an advanced model structure identification and calibration procedure. The conceptual models manage to emulate the simulation results of a detailed full hydrodynamic model accurately. The models configured using the approaches of this framework are well-suited for many applications in water management due to their very short calculation time, interfacing possibilities and adjustable level of detail.

  11. Can Flexible Non-Linear Modeling Tell Us Anything New about Educational Productivity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Bruce D.

    2001-01-01

    Explores whether flexible nonlinear models (including neural networks and genetic algorithms) can reveal otherwise unexpected patterns of relationship in typical school-productivity data. Applying three types of algorithms alongside regression modeling to school-level data in 183 elementary schools proves the hypothesis and reveals new directions…

  12. Reducing model uncertainty effects in flexible manipulators through the addition of passive damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alberts, T. E.

    1987-01-01

    An important issue in the control of practical systems is the effect of model uncertainty on closed loop performance. This is of particular concern when flexible structures are to be controlled, due to the fact that states associated with higher frequency vibration modes are truncated in order to make the control problem tractable. Digital simulations of a single-link manipulator system are employed to demonstrate that passive damping added to the flexible member reduces adverse effects associated with model uncertainty. A controller was designed based on a model including only one flexible mode. This controller was applied to larger order systems to evaluate the effects of modal truncation. Simulations using a Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) design assuming full state feedback illustrate the effect of control spillover. Simulations of a system using output feedback illustrate the destabilizing effect of observation spillover. The simulations reveal that the system with passive damping is less susceptible to these effects than the untreated case.

  13. A multi-mode operation control strategy for flexible microgrid based on sliding-mode direct voltage and hierarchical controls.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qinjin; Liu, Yancheng; Zhao, Youtao; Wang, Ning

    2016-03-01

    Multi-mode operation and transient stability are two problems that significantly affect flexible microgrid (MG). This paper proposes a multi-mode operation control strategy for flexible MG based on a three-layer hierarchical structure. The proposed structure is composed of autonomous, cooperative, and scheduling controllers. Autonomous controller is utilized to control the performance of the single micro-source inverter. An adaptive sliding-mode direct voltage loop and an improved droop power loop based on virtual negative impedance are presented respectively to enhance the system disturbance-rejection performance and the power sharing accuracy. Cooperative controller, which is composed of secondary voltage/frequency control and phase synchronization control, is designed to eliminate the voltage/frequency deviations produced by the autonomous controller and prepare for grid connection. Scheduling controller manages the power flow between the MG and the grid. The MG with the improved hierarchical control scheme can achieve seamless transitions from islanded to grid-connected mode and have a good transient performance. In addition the presented work can also optimize the power quality issues and improve the load power sharing accuracy between parallel VSIs. Finally, the transient performance and effectiveness of the proposed control scheme are evaluated by theoretical analysis and simulation results.

  14. A flexible count data regression model for risk analysis.

    PubMed

    Guikema, Seth D; Coffelt, Jeremy P; Goffelt, Jeremy P

    2008-02-01

    In many cases, risk and reliability analyses involve estimating the probabilities of discrete events such as hardware failures and occurrences of disease or death. There is often additional information in the form of explanatory variables that can be used to help estimate the likelihood of different numbers of events in the future through the use of an appropriate regression model, such as a generalized linear model. However, existing generalized linear models (GLM) are limited in their ability to handle the types of variance structures often encountered in using count data in risk and reliability analysis. In particular, standard models cannot handle both underdispersed data (variance less than the mean) and overdispersed data (variance greater than the mean) in a single coherent modeling framework. This article presents a new GLM based on a reformulation of the Conway-Maxwell Poisson (COM) distribution that is useful for both underdispersed and overdispersed count data and demonstrates this model by applying it to the assessment of electric power system reliability. The results show that the proposed COM GLM can provide as good of fits to data as the commonly used existing models for overdispered data sets while outperforming these commonly used models for underdispersed data sets.

  15. Chempy: A flexible chemical evolution model for abundance fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybizki, J.; Just, A.; Rix, H.-W.; Fouesneau, M.

    2017-02-01

    Chempy models Galactic chemical evolution (GCE); it is a parametrized open one-zone model within a Bayesian framework. A Chempy model is specified by a set of 5-10 parameters that describe the effective galaxy evolution along with the stellar and star-formation physics: e.g. the star-formation history (SFH), the feedback efficiency, the stellar initial mass function (IMF) and the incidence of supernova of type Ia (SN Ia). Chempy can sample the posterior probability distribution in the full model parameter space and test data-model matches for different nucleosynthetic yield sets, performing essentially as a chemical evolution fitting tool. Chempy can be used to confront predictions from stellar nucleosynthesis with complex abundance data sets and to refine the physical processes governing the chemical evolution of stellar systems.

  16. PSO-MISMO modeling strategy for multistep-ahead time series prediction.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yukun; Xiong, Tao; Hu, Zhongyi

    2014-05-01

    Multistep-ahead time series prediction is one of the most challenging research topics in the field of time series modeling and prediction, and is continually under research. Recently, the multiple-input several multiple-outputs (MISMO) modeling strategy has been proposed as a promising alternative for multistep-ahead time series prediction, exhibiting advantages compared with the two currently dominating strategies, the iterated and the direct strategies. Built on the established MISMO strategy, this paper proposes a particle swarm optimization (PSO)-based MISMO modeling strategy, which is capable of determining the number of sub-models in a self-adaptive mode, with varying prediction horizons. Rather than deriving crisp divides with equal-size s prediction horizons from the established MISMO, the proposed PSO-MISMO strategy, implemented with neural networks, employs a heuristic to create flexible divides with varying sizes of prediction horizons and to generate corresponding sub-models, providing considerable flexibility in model construction, which has been validated with simulated and real datasets.

  17. Modeling structure and flexibility of Candida antarctica lipase B in organic solvents

    PubMed Central

    Trodler, Peter; Pleiss, Jürgen

    2008-01-01

    Background The structure and flexibility of Candida antarctica lipase B in water and five different organic solvent models was investigated using multiple molecular dynamics simulations to describe the effect of solvents on structure and dynamics. Interactions of the solvents with the protein and the distribution of water molecules at the protein surface were examined. Results The simulated structure was independent of the solvent, and had a low deviation from the crystal structure. However, the hydrophilic surface of CALB in non-polar solvents decreased by 10% in comparison to water, while the hydrophobic surface is slightly increased by 1%. There is a large influence on the flexibility depending on the dielectric constant of the solvent, with a high flexibility in water and a low flexibility in organic solvents. With decreasing dielectric constant, the number of surface bound water molecules significantly increased and a spanning water network with an increasing size was formed. Conclusion The reduced flexibility of Candida antarctica lipase B in organic solvents is caused by a spanning water network resulting from less mobile and slowly exchanging water molecules at the protein-surface. The reduced flexibility of Candida antarctica lipase B in organic solvent is not only caused by the interactions between solvent-protein, but mainly by the formation of a spanning water network. PMID:18254946

  18. Flexible and fixed mathematical models describing growth patterns of chukar partridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aygün, Ali; Narinç, Doǧan

    2016-04-01

    In animal science, the nonlinear regression models for growth curve analysis ofgrowth patterns are separated into two groups called fixed and flexible according to their point of inflection. The aims of this study were to compare fixed and flexible growth functions and to determine the best fit model for the growth data of chukar partridges. With this aim, the growth data of partridges were modeled with widely used models, such as Gompertz, Logistic, Von Bertalanffy as well as the flexible functions, such as, Richards, Janoschek, Levakovich. So as to evaluate growth functions, the R2 (coefficient of determination), adjusted R2 (adjusted coefficient of determination), MSE (mean square error), AIC (Akaike's information criterion) and BIC (Bayesian information criterion) goodness of fit criteria were used. It has been determined that the best fit model from the point of chukar partridge growth data according to mentioned goodness of fit criteria is Janoschek function which has a flexible structure. The Janoschek model is not only important because it has a higher number of parameters with biological meaning than the other functions (the mature weight and initial weight parameters), but also because it was not previously used in the modeling of the chukar partridge growth.

  19. Integrated Model Reduction and Control of Aircraft with Flexible Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swei, Sean Shan-Min; Zhu, Guoming G.; Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an integrated approach to the modeling and control of aircraft with exible wings. The coupled aircraft rigid body dynamics with a high-order elastic wing model can be represented in a nite dimensional state-space form. Given a set of desired output covariance, a model reduction process is performed by using the weighted Modal Cost Analysis (MCA). A dynamic output feedback controller, which is designed based on the reduced-order model, is developed by utilizing output covariance constraint (OCC) algorithm, and the resulting OCC design weighting matrix is used for the next iteration of the weighted cost analysis. This controller is then validated for full-order evaluation model to ensure that the aircraft's handling qualities are met and the uttering motion of the wings suppressed. An iterative algorithm is developed in CONDUIT environment to realize the integration of model reduction and controller design. The proposed integrated approach is applied to NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM) for demonstration.

  20. Flexibility need prompts installation of Zeepipe modeling system

    SciTech Connect

    Thaule, S.B.; Postvoll, W.

    1998-03-23

    Installation by den norske stats oljeselskap A.S. (Statoil) of a powerful pipeline-modeling system on Zeepipe has allowed this major North Sea gas pipeline to meet the growing demands and seasonal variations of the European gas market. The Troll gas-sales agreement (TGSA) in 1986 called for large volumes of Norwegian gas to begin arriving from the North Sea Sleipner East field in october 1993. It is important to Statoil to maintain regular gas delivers from its integrated transport network. In addition, high utilization of transport capacity maximizes profits. In advance of operations, Statoil realized that state-of-the-art supervisory control and data acquisition (scada) and pipeline-modeling systems (PMS) would be necessary to meet its goals and to remain the most efficient North Sea operator. The paper describes the linking of Troll and Zeebrugge, contractual issues, the supervisory system, the scada module, pipeline modeling, real-time model, look-ahead model, predictive model, and model performance.

  1. Fixed and Flexible: Coexistence of Obligate and Facultative Migratory Strategies in a Freshwater Fish

    PubMed Central

    Brodersen, Jakob; Chapman, Ben B.; Nilsson, P. Anders; Skov, Christian; Hansson, Lars-Anders; Brönmark, Christer

    2014-01-01

    Migration is an important event in many animal life histories, but the degree to which individual animals participate in seasonal migrations often varies within populations. The powerful ecological and evolutionary consequences of such partial migration are now well documented, but the underlying mechanisms are still heavily debated. One potential mechanism of partial migration is between-individual variation in body condition, where animals in poor condition cannot pay the costs of migration and hence adopt a resident strategy. However, underlying intrinsic traits may overrule such environmental influence, dictating individual consistency in migratory patterns. Unfortunately, field tests of individual consistency compared to the importance of individual condition on migratory propensity are rare. Here we analyse 6 years of field data on roach migration, gathered by tagging almost 3000 individual fish and monitoring their seasonal migrations over extended periods of time. Our aims were to provide a field test of the role of condition in wild fish for migratory decisions, and also to assess individual consistency in migratory tendency. Our analyses reveal that (1) migratory strategy, in terms of migration/residency, is highly consistent within individuals over time and (2) there is a positive relationship between condition and the probability of migration, but only in individuals that adopt a migratory strategy at some point during their lives. However, life-long residents do not differ in condition to migrants, hence body condition is only a good predictor of migratory tendency in fish with migratory phenotypes and not a more general determinant of migratory tendency for the population. As resident individuals can achieve very high body condition and still remain resident, we suggest that our data provides some of the first field evidence to show that both facultative and obligate strategies can co-exist within populations of migratory animals. PMID:24594698

  2. An Analytical Model for Predicting Stab Resistance of Flexible Woven Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Limin; Sun, Baozhong; Gu, Bohong

    2013-08-01

    Flexible woven composites have been widely used in geotextiles and light weight building structures. The stab resistance behavior of the flexible woven composite is an important factor for the application design. This paper reports an analytical model for predicting stab resistance of flexible woven composites under perpendicular stab with a blunt steel penetrator. The analytical model was established based on the microstructure and the deformation shape of the flexible woven composite under normal penetration. During the quasi-static stab penetration, the strain energies of warp and weft yarns and resins have been calculated. The stab resistance was calculated from the strain energies of the flexible woven composite. Furthermore, the contributions of the warp and weft yarns, resins to the stab resistance have been analyzed. It was found the three constituents have near the same contribution to the stab resistance. The higher value of weaving density, strength of yarns and especially the higher strength coating resins will lead the higher stab resistance. With the analytical model, the stab resistance would be expected to be designed in an efficient way with an acceptable precision.

  3. Phenotypic flexibility in the energetic strategy of the greater white-toothed shrew, Crocidura russula.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Flávio G; Tapisso, Joaquim T; Monarca, Rita I; Cerveira, Ana M; Mathias, Maria L

    2016-02-01

    The balance between energetic acquisition and expenditure depends on the amount of energy allocated to biological functions such as thermoregulation, growth, reproduction and behavior. Ambient temperature has a profound effect on this balance, with species inhabiting colder climates often needing to invest more energy in thermoregulation to maintain body temperature. This leads to local behavioral and physiological adaptations that increase energetic efficiency. In this study, we investigated the role of activity, behavior and thermogenic capacity in the ability of the greater white-toothed shrew, Crocidura russula, to cope with seasonal changes. Individuals were captured in the Sintra-Cascais Natural Park, a Mediterranean region, and separated into three experimental groups: a control group, acclimated to a 12L:12D photoperiod and temperature of 18-20°C; a winter group, acclimatized to natural winter fluctuations of light and temperature; and a summer group, acclimatized to natural summer fluctuations of light and temperature. No differences were found in resting metabolic rate and nonshivering thermogenesis between the three groups. However, winter shrews significantly reduced their activity, particularly at night, compared to the control and summer groups. Differences in torpor use were also found between groups, with winter shrews entering torpor more frequently and during shorter periods of time than summer and control shrews. Our results indicate C. russula from Sintra relies on the flexibility of energy saving mechanisms, namely daily activity level and torpor use, to cope with seasonal changes in a Mediterranean climate, rather than mechanisms involving body heat production.

  4. Flexible operation strategy for environment control system in abnormal supply power condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liping, Pang; Guoxiang, Li; Hongquan, Qu; Yufeng, Fang

    2017-04-01

    This paper establishes an optimization method that can be applied to the flexible operation of the environment control system in an abnormal supply power condition. A proposed conception of lifespan is used to evaluate the depletion time of the non-regenerative substance. The optimization objective function is to maximize the lifespans. The optimization variables are the allocated powers of subsystems. The improved Non-dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm is adopted to obtain the pareto optimization frontier with the constraints of the cabin environmental parameters and the adjustable operating parameters of the subsystems. Based on the same importance of objective functions, the preferred power allocation of subsystems can be optimized. Then the corresponding running parameters of subsystems can be determined to ensure the maximum lifespans. A long-duration space station with three astronauts is used to show the implementation of the proposed optimization method. Three different CO2 partial pressure levels are taken into consideration in this study. The optimization results show that the proposed optimization method can obtain the preferred power allocation for the subsystems when the supply power is at a less-than-nominal value. The method can be applied to the autonomous control for the emergency response of the environment control system.

  5. Discrete and continuous dynamics modeling of a mass moving on a flexible structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Deborah Ann

    1992-01-01

    A general discrete methodology for modeling the dynamics of a mass that moves on the surface of a flexible structure is developed. This problem was motivated by the Space Station/Mobile Transporter system. A model reduction approach is developed to make the methodology applicable to large structural systems. To validate the discrete methodology, continuous formulations are also developed. Three different systems are examined: (1) simply-supported beam, (2) free-free beam, and (3) free-free beam with two points of contact between the mass and the flexible beam. In addition to validating the methodology, parametric studies were performed to examine how the system's physical properties affect its dynamics.

  6. Kane's equations of flexible multibody systems with tree structure - A computer-oriented modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Liang; Bauer, Helmut F.

    1991-09-01

    Kane's dynamical model of flexible multibody space systems with tree structure is developed in this paper. The system topology is restricted to a tree configuration which is defined as an arbitrary set of flexible and rigid bodies connected by hinges characterizing relative translations and rotations of two adjoining bodies. The relative translational velocities, angular velocities, and the differential of model coordinates are selected as the generalized velocities. The motion equations of minimum dimension are derived via Kane's method. The resulting equations are suitable for automatic generation and computer simulation.

  7. Unsymmetric Lanczos model reduction and linear state function observer for flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Tzu-Jeng; Craig, Roy R., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    This report summarizes part of the research work accomplished during the second year of a two-year grant. The research, entitled 'Application of Lanczos Vectors to Control Design of Flexible Structures' concerns various ways to use Lanczos vectors and Krylov vectors to obtain reduced-order mathematical models for use in the dynamic response analyses and in control design studies. This report presents a one-sided, unsymmetric block Lanczos algorithm for model reduction of structural dynamics systems with unsymmetric damping matrix, and a control design procedure based on the theory of linear state function observers to design low-order controllers for flexible structures.

  8. Folding in a semi-flexible lattice model for Crambin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Guangjie; Farris, Alfred C. K.; Wüst, Thomas; Landau, David P.

    2016-01-01

    Using the Replica-Exchange Wang-Landau sampling method, we investigated and compared three different coarse-grained lattice protein models for the small, hydrophobic protein Crambin. We show that slight extensions of the HP lattice protein model, including the stiffness of bonds can lead to a significant decrease in ground-state degeneracies (up to 5 orders of magnitudes). Moreover, the ground-state structures begin to bear resemblance to native structures observed in real Crambin.

  9. Pseudoabsence Generation Strategies for Species Distribution Models

    PubMed Central

    Hanberry, Brice B.; He, Hong S.; Palik, Brian J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Species distribution models require selection of species, study extent and spatial unit, statistical methods, variables, and assessment metrics. If absence data are not available, another important consideration is pseudoabsence generation. Different strategies for pseudoabsence generation can produce varying spatial representation of species. Methodology We considered model outcomes from four different strategies for generating pseudoabsences. We generating pseudoabsences randomly by 1) selection from the entire study extent, 2) a two-step process of selection first from the entire study extent, followed by selection for pseudoabsences from areas with predicted probability <25%, 3) selection from plots surveyed without detection of species presence, 4) a two-step process of selection first for pseudoabsences from plots surveyed without detection of species presence, followed by selection for pseudoabsences from the areas with predicted probability <25%. We used Random Forests as our statistical method and sixteen predictor variables to model tree species with at least 150 records from Forest Inventory and Analysis surveys in the Laurentian Mixed Forest province of Minnesota. Conclusions Pseudoabsence generation strategy completely affected the area predicted as present for species distribution models and may be one of the most influential determinants of models. All the pseudoabsence strategies produced mean AUC values of at least 0.87. More importantly than accuracy metrics, the two-step strategies over-predicted species presence, due to too much environmental distance between the pseudoabsences and recorded presences, whereas models based on random pseudoabsences under-predicted species presence, due to too little environmental distance between the pseudoabsences and recorded presences. Models using pseudoabsences from surveyed plots produced a balance between areas with high and low predicted probabilities and the strongest relationship between

  10. Fast Flexible Modeling of RNA Structure Using Internal Coordinates

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Samuel Coulbourn; Sherman, Michael A.; Bruns, Christopher M.; Eastman, Peter; Altman, Russ Biagio

    2015-01-01

    Modeling the structure and dynamics of large macromolecules remains a critical challenge. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are expensive because they model every atom independently, and are difficult to combine with experimentally derived knowledge. Assembly of molecules using fragments from libraries relies on the database of known structures and thus may not work for novel motifs. Coarse-grained modeling methods have yielded good results on large molecules but can suffer from difficulties in creating more detailed full atomic realizations. There is therefore a need for molecular modeling algorithms that remain chemically accurate and economical for large molecules, do not rely on fragment libraries, and can incorporate experimental information. RNABuilder works in the internal coordinate space of dihedral angles and thus has time requirements proportional to the number of moving parts rather than the number of atoms. It provides accurate physics-based response to applied forces, but also allows user-specified forces for incorporating experimental information. A particular strength of RNABuilder is that all Leontis-Westhof basepairs can be specified as primitives by the user to be satisfied during model construction. We apply RNABuilder to predict the structure of an RNA molecule with 160 bases from its secondary structure, as well as experimental information. Our model matches the known structure to 10.2 Angstroms RMSD and has low computational expense. PMID:21778523

  11. Models of the Sociocultural Strategies of Today's College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gritsenko, G. D.; Maslova, T. F.

    2013-01-01

    Survey data suggest that there are several models of sociocultural strategy used by Russian students, each with a specific hierarchy of values. A typical model is the traditionalist strategy, although the achievement-oriented strategy is also quite widespread.

  12. A Flexible Atmospheric Modeling Framework for the CESM

    SciTech Connect

    Randall, David; Heikes, Ross; Konor, Celal

    2014-11-12

    We have created two global dynamical cores based on the unified system of equations and Z-grid staggering on an icosahedral grid, which are collectively called UZIM (Unified Z-grid Icosahedral Model). The z-coordinate version (UZIM-height) can be run in hydrostatic and nonhydrostatic modes. The sigma-coordinate version (UZIM-sigma) runs in only hydrostatic mode. The super-parameterization has been included as a physics option in both models. The UZIM versions with the super-parameterization are called SUZI. With SUZI-height, we have completed aquaplanet runs. With SUZI-sigma, we are making aquaplanet runs and realistic climate simulations. SUZI-sigma includes realistic topography and a SiB3 model to parameterize the land-surface processes.

  13. Flutter suppression control law synthesis for the Active Flexible Wing model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivek; Perry, Boyd, III; Noll, Thomas E.

    1989-01-01

    The Active Flexible Wing Project is a collaborative effort between the NASA Langley Research Center and Rockwell International. The objectives are the validation of methodologies associated with mathematical modeling, flutter suppression control law development and digital implementation of the control system for application to flexible aircraft. A flutter suppression control law synthesis for this project is described. The state-space mathematical model used for the synthesis included ten flexible modes, four control surface modes and rational function approximation of the doublet-lattice unsteady aerodynamics. The design steps involved developing the full-order optimal control laws, reducing the order of the control law, and optimizing the reduced-order control law in both the continuous and the discrete domains to minimize stochastic response. System robustness was improved using singular value constraints. An 8th order robust control law was designed to increase the symmetric flutter dynamic pressure by 100 percent. Preliminary results are provided and experiences gained are discussed.

  14. Collective Molecular Superrotation: A Model for Extremely Flexible Molecules Applied to Protonated Methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmiedt, Hanno; Jensen, Per; Schlemmer, Stephan

    2016-11-01

    The concept of molecular structure is traditionally considered to be virtually fundamental. However, it breaks down in extremely flexible molecules, whose dynamics are governed by large-amplitude motions. For the dynamics of molecules with free internal rotations, we therefore propose a five-dimensional rigid rotor model, with states characterized by two generalized angular momentum quantum numbers and a rotational constant B . The quantum numbers characterize a 5D angular-momentum vector, super-j , which describes collective rotations that involve both the internal and the overall rotation. This model predicts the lowest energy states of the prototypical, extremely flexible molecule, CH5+ . Both energies and symmetries compare very favorably to recent experimental results. The respective assignment to the new quantum numbers indicates the validity of our concept of collective rotations in extremely flexible molecules.

  15. The design, results and future development of the National Energy Strategy Environmental Analysis Model (NESEAM)

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, R.E.; Boyd, G.A. ); Breed, W.S. . Office of Environmental Analysis)

    1991-01-01

    The National Energy Strategy Environmental Model (NESEAM) has been developed to project emissions for the National Energy Strategy (NES). Two scenarios were evaluated for the NES, a Current Policy Base Case and a NES Action Case. The results from the NES Actions Case project much lower emissions than the Current Policy Base Case. Future enhancements to NESEAM will focus on fuel cycle analysis, including future technologies and additional pollutants to model. NESEAM's flexibility will allow it to model other future legislative issues. 7 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Static Aeroelastic Scaling and Analysis of a Sub-Scale Flexible Wing Wind Tunnel Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, Eric; Lebofsky, Sonia; Nguyen, Nhan; Trinh, Khanh

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to the development of a scaled wind tunnel model for static aeroelastic similarity with a full-scale wing model. The full-scale aircraft model is based on the NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM) with flexible wing structures referred to as the Elastically Shaped Aircraft Concept (ESAC). The baseline stiffness of the ESAC wing represents a conventionally stiff wing model. Static aeroelastic scaling is conducted on the stiff wing configuration to develop the wind tunnel model, but additional tailoring is also conducted such that the wind tunnel model achieves a 10% wing tip deflection at the wind tunnel test condition. An aeroelastic scaling procedure and analysis is conducted, and a sub-scale flexible wind tunnel model based on the full-scale's undeformed jig-shape is developed. Optimization of the flexible wind tunnel model's undeflected twist along the span, or pre-twist or wash-out, is then conducted for the design test condition. The resulting wind tunnel model is an aeroelastic model designed for the wind tunnel test condition.

  17. Development of a flexible strategy towards FR900482 and the mitomycins.

    PubMed

    Trost, Barry M; O'Boyle, Brendan M; Torres, Wildeliz; Ameriks, Michael K

    2011-07-04

    FR900482 and the mitomycins are two intriguing classes of alkaloid natural products that have analogous biological mechanisms and obvious structural similarity. Both classes possess potent anticancer activity, a feature that has led to their investigation and implementation for the clinical treatment of human cancer. Given the structural similarity between these natural products, we envisioned a common synthetic strategy by which both classes could be targeted through assembling the mitomycin skeleton prior to further oxidative functionalization. Realization of this strategy with respect to FR900482 was accomplished through the synthesis of 7-epi-FR900482, which displayed equal potency relative to the natural product against two human cancer cell lines. With the challenging goal of a synthesis of either mitomycin or FR900482 in mind, several methodologies were explored. While not all of these methods ultimately proved useful for our synthetic goal, a number of them led to intriguing findings that provide a more complete understanding of several methodologies. In particular, amination via π-allyl palladium complexes for the synthesis of tetrahydroquinolines, eight-membered heterocycle formation via carbonylative lactamization, and amination through late-stage C-H insertion via rhodium catalysis all featured prominently in our synthetic studies.

  18. Development of a Flexible Strategy Toward FR900482 and the Mitomycins

    PubMed Central

    O’Boyle, Brendan M.; Torres, Wildeliz; Ameriks, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    FR900482 and the mitomycins are two intriguing classes of alkaloid natural products that have analogous biological mechanisms and obvious structural similarity. Both classes possess potent anti-cancer activity, a feature that has led to their investigation and implementation for the clinical treatment of human cancer. Given the structural similarity between these natural products, we envisioned a common synthetic strategy by which both classes could be targeted through assembling the mitomycin skeleton prior to further oxidative functionalization. Realization of this strategy with respect to FR900482 was accomplished through the synthesis of 7-epi-FR900482, which displayed equal potency relative to the natural product against two human cancer cell lines. With the challenging goal of a synthesis of either mitomycin or FR900482 in mind, several methodologies where explored. While not all of these methods ultimately proved useful for our synthetic goal, a number of them led to intriguing findings that provide a more complete understanding of several methodologies. In particular, amination via π-allyl palladium complexes for the synthesis of tetrahydroquinolines, 8-membered heterocycle formation via carbonylative lactamization, and amination through late-stage C-H insertion via rhodium catalysis all featured prominently in our synthetic studies. PMID:21618622

  19. Flexible Finite-Element Modeling of Global Geomagnetic Depth Sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribaudo, Joseph Thomas

    Time-varying primary magnetic fields generated outside Earth by the magnetospheric ring current induce electrical currents in Earth's interior, which give rise to secondary magnetic fields with a complementary geometry. Geomagnetic depth sounding involves the analysis of magnetic field data to compute frequency-dependent response functions which yield information about the electrical conductivity of Earth's interior. I explore methods and results of forward-modeling global electromagnetic induction under a variety of assumptions about Earth conductivity and the spatial structure of the primary field. I begin by developing computational tools to perform time- and frequency-domain simulations of global induction in models with arbitrary conductivity and primary field structure using FlexPDE, a general-purpose software package that employs the finite-element method to solve partial differential equations. The method is shown to produce solutions with better than 1% accuracy when the simulated fields and response functions are compared to analytic solutions for a variety of problems in electromagnetic induction, and to qualitatively reproduce fields and response functions measured by satellites and observatories. The technique is employed in combination with analytic methods to explore the effect on the response of Earth models to primary fields with asymmetric structure. Standard methods of producing response functions from scalar and vector magnetic data are compared, and scalar methods are found to generate responses with significantly greater spatial bias for models with non-zonal fields. I develop the mathematical formulation for including Earth-rotation in the forward models, and use it to calculate frequency-dependent estimates of the amount of non-zonal structure required to produce previously reported local-time bias in empirical satellite response functions. Because it is difficult to validate solutions to induction problems that lack analytic solutions, we

  20. The Strategies of Modeling in Biology Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svoboda, Julia; Passmore, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    Modeling, like inquiry more generally, is not a single method, but rather a complex suite of strategies. Philosophers of biology, citing the diverse aims, interests, and disciplinary cultures of biologists, argue that modeling is best understood in the context of its epistemic aims and cognitive payoffs. In the science education literature, modeling has been discussed in a variety of ways, but often without explicit reference to the diversity of roles models play in scientific practice. We aim to expand and bring clarity to the myriad uses of models in science by presenting a framework from philosopher of biology Jay Odenbaugh that describes five pragmatic strategies of model use in the biological sciences. We then present illustrative examples of each of these roles from an empirical study of an undergraduate biological modeling curriculum, which highlight how students used models to help them frame their research question, explore ideas, and refine their conceptual understanding in an educational setting. Our aim is to begin to explicate the definition of modeling in science in a way that will allow educators and curriculum developers to make informed choices about how and for what purpose modeling enters science classrooms.

  1. Flexible Modeling of Epidemics with an Empirical Bayes Framework

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Logan C.; Farrow, David C.; Hyun, Sangwon; Tibshirani, Ryan J.; Rosenfeld, Roni

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal influenza epidemics cause consistent, considerable, widespread loss annually in terms of economic burden, morbidity, and mortality. With access to accurate and reliable forecasts of a current or upcoming influenza epidemic’s behavior, policy makers can design and implement more effective countermeasures. This past year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention hosted the “Predict the Influenza Season Challenge”, with the task of predicting key epidemiological measures for the 2013–2014 U.S. influenza season with the help of digital surveillance data. We developed a framework for in-season forecasts of epidemics using a semiparametric Empirical Bayes framework, and applied it to predict the weekly percentage of outpatient doctors visits for influenza-like illness, and the season onset, duration, peak time, and peak height, with and without using Google Flu Trends data. Previous work on epidemic modeling has focused on developing mechanistic models of disease behavior and applying time series tools to explain historical data. However, tailoring these models to certain types of surveillance data can be challenging, and overly complex models with many parameters can compromise forecasting ability. Our approach instead produces possibilities for the epidemic curve of the season of interest using modified versions of data from previous seasons, allowing for reasonable variations in the timing, pace, and intensity of the seasonal epidemics, as well as noise in observations. Since the framework does not make strict domain-specific assumptions, it can easily be applied to some other diseases with seasonal epidemics. This method produces a complete posterior distribution over epidemic curves, rather than, for example, solely point predictions of forecasting targets. We report prospective influenza-like-illness forecasts made for the 2013–2014 U.S. influenza season, and compare the framework’s cross-validated prediction error on historical data to

  2. Flexible Modeling of Epidemics with an Empirical Bayes Framework.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Logan C; Farrow, David C; Hyun, Sangwon; Tibshirani, Ryan J; Rosenfeld, Roni

    2015-08-01

    Seasonal influenza epidemics cause consistent, considerable, widespread loss annually in terms of economic burden, morbidity, and mortality. With access to accurate and reliable forecasts of a current or upcoming influenza epidemic's behavior, policy makers can design and implement more effective countermeasures. This past year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention hosted the "Predict the Influenza Season Challenge", with the task of predicting key epidemiological measures for the 2013-2014 U.S. influenza season with the help of digital surveillance data. We developed a framework for in-season forecasts of epidemics using a semiparametric Empirical Bayes framework, and applied it to predict the weekly percentage of outpatient doctors visits for influenza-like illness, and the season onset, duration, peak time, and peak height, with and without using Google Flu Trends data. Previous work on epidemic modeling has focused on developing mechanistic models of disease behavior and applying time series tools to explain historical data. However, tailoring these models to certain types of surveillance data can be challenging, and overly complex models with many parameters can compromise forecasting ability. Our approach instead produces possibilities for the epidemic curve of the season of interest using modified versions of data from previous seasons, allowing for reasonable variations in the timing, pace, and intensity of the seasonal epidemics, as well as noise in observations. Since the framework does not make strict domain-specific assumptions, it can easily be applied to some other diseases with seasonal epidemics. This method produces a complete posterior distribution over epidemic curves, rather than, for example, solely point predictions of forecasting targets. We report prospective influenza-like-illness forecasts made for the 2013-2014 U.S. influenza season, and compare the framework's cross-validated prediction error on historical data to that of a

  3. An Evaluation of the Pavement Condition Index Prediction Model for Flexible Airfield Pavements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-01

    NO. 3 . RECiPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER LSSR 11-83 LID,_ 13 -______9_ 4. TITLE (end Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED AN EVALUATION OF THE...Flexible Models. ......... 42 Current Model Development ...........54 Dronen Model................67 Conclusion ................... 71 iv CHAPTER Page 3 ...13 2-2 General Guide for Establishing Rigid Pavement Condition................16 2- 3 Types of Distress in Airfield Pavement

  4. Application of partial differential equation modeling of the control/structural dynamics of flexible spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Lawrence W., Jr.; Rajiyah, H.

    1991-01-01

    Partial differential equations for modeling the structural dynamics and control systems of flexible spacecraft are applied here in order to facilitate systems analysis and optimization of these spacecraft. Example applications are given, including the structural dynamics of SCOLE, the Solar Array Flight Experiment, the Mini-MAST truss, and the LACE satellite. The development of related software is briefly addressed.

  5. MODELING THE EFFECTS OF FLEXIBILITY ON THE BINDING OF ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS TO THE ESTROGEN RECEPTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modeling the effects of flexibility on the binding of environmental estrogens to the estrogen receptor
    There are many reports of environmental endocrine disruption in the literature, yet it has been difficult to identify the specific chemicals responsible for these effects. ...

  6. A General and Flexible Approach to Estimating the Social Relations Model Using Bayesian Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludtke, Oliver; Robitzsch, Alexander; Kenny, David A.; Trautwein, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    The social relations model (SRM) is a conceptual, methodological, and analytical approach that is widely used to examine dyadic behaviors and interpersonal perception within groups. This article introduces a general and flexible approach to estimating the parameters of the SRM that is based on Bayesian methods using Markov chain Monte Carlo…

  7. A Competency-Based Technical Training Model That Embraces Learning Flexibility and Rewards Competency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yasinski, Lee

    2014-01-01

    Today's adult learners are continuously searching for successful programs with added learner flexibility, a positive learning experience, and the best education for their investment. Red Deer College's unique competency based welder apprenticeship training model fulfills this desire for many adult learners.

  8. Latent Class Analysis with Distal Outcomes: A Flexible Model-Based Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanza, Stephanie T.; Tan, Xianming; Bray, Bethany C.

    2013-01-01

    Although prediction of class membership from observed variables in latent class analysis is well understood, predicting an observed distal outcome from latent class membership is more complicated. A flexible model-based approach is proposed to empirically derive and summarize the class-dependent density functions of distal outcomes with…

  9. Application of partial differential equation modeling of the control/structural dynamics of flexible spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Lawrence W., Jr.; Rajiyah, H.

    Partial differential equations for modeling the structural dynamics and control systems of flexible spacecraft are applied here in order to facilitate systems analysis and optimization of these spacecraft. Example applications are given, including the structural dynamics of SCOLE, the Solar Array Flight Experiment, the Mini-MAST truss, and the LACE satellite. The development of related software is briefly addressed.

  10. Flexible Approximation Model Approach for Bi-Level Integrated System Synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, Jaroslaw; Kim, Hongman; Ragon, Scott; Soremekun, Grant; Malone, Brett

    2004-01-01

    Bi-Level Integrated System Synthesis (BLISS) is an approach that allows design problems to be naturally decomposed into a set of subsystem optimizations and a single system optimization. In the BLISS approach, approximate mathematical models are used to transfer information from the subsystem optimizations to the system optimization. Accurate approximation models are therefore critical to the success of the BLISS procedure. In this paper, new capabilities that are being developed to generate accurate approximation models for BLISS procedure will be described. The benefits of using flexible approximation models such as Kriging will be demonstrated in terms of convergence characteristics and computational cost. An approach of dealing with cases where subsystem optimization cannot find a feasible design will be investigated by using the new flexible approximation models for the violated local constraints.

  11. Modeling of protein-peptide interactions using the CABS-dock web server for binding site search and flexible docking.

    PubMed

    Blaszczyk, Maciej; Kurcinski, Mateusz; Kouza, Maksim; Wieteska, Lukasz; Debinski, Aleksander; Kolinski, Andrzej; Kmiecik, Sebastian

    2016-01-15

    Protein-peptide interactions play essential functional roles in living organisms and their structural characterization is a hot subject of current experimental and theoretical research. Computational modeling of the structure of protein-peptide interactions is usually divided into two stages: prediction of the binding site at a protein receptor surface, and then docking (and modeling) the peptide structure into the known binding site. This paper presents a comprehensive CABS-dock method for the simultaneous search of binding sites and flexible protein-peptide docking, available as a user's friendly web server. We present example CABS-dock results obtained in the default CABS-dock mode and using its advanced options that enable the user to increase the range of flexibility for chosen receptor fragments or to exclude user-selected binding modes from docking search. Furthermore, we demonstrate a strategy to improve CABS-dock performance by assessing the quality of models with classical molecular dynamics. Finally, we discuss the promising extensions and applications of the CABS-dock method and provide a tutorial appendix for the convenient analysis and visualization of CABS-dock results. The CABS-dock web server is freely available at http://biocomp.chem.uw.edu.pl/CABSdock/.

  12. Digestive strategies and food choice in mantled howler monkeys Alouatta palliata mexicana: bases of their dietary flexibility.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Gómez, Fabiola; Gómez-Rosales, Sergio; Wallis, Ian R; Canales-Espinosa, Domingo; Hernández-Salazar, Laura

    2013-12-01

    Mantled howler monkeys (Alouatta palliata) occupy a wide variety of tropical habitats and are the most folivorous of New World primates. However, their diet may include fruits, buds, petioles, and flowers, as well as leaves, suggesting they must cope with variations in the nutrient composition of their food. We studied the physiological basis of the dietary flexibility of these monkeys by comparing food choice, digestive performance and patterns of digesta flow in six adults, fed diets of either leaves or a mixture of fruit and leaves. Although monkeys ate similar amounts of the two diets, they ingested more digestible protein when offered the leaf diet, on which they lost body mass, but they ingested much more soluble sugars when offered fruit and leaves on which they gained mass. Digestibilities of dry matter, fat, energy and fibre did not differ between diets, but those of crude protein, soluble sugars and minerals were higher on the fruit-leaf diet. Mean retention times in the gut of solute (Co-EDTA) and particulate markers (Cr-mordanted cell walls) did not differ between diets, but on both diets the monkeys retained the particulate marker (mean retention time ca 55 h) for longer than they did the solute marker (MRT ca 50 h). A lack of selective retention of solutes and small particles in the gastro-intestinal tract of howler monkeys probably restricts them to mixed diets but their digestive strategy is sufficiently flexible to allow them to feed on a diet of leaves when fruit is unavailable.

  13. A model of smoldering combustion applied to flexible polyurethane foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohlemiller, T. J.; Rogers, F.; Bellan, J.

    1979-01-01

    Smoldering combustion, particularly in upholstery and bedding materials, has been proven a serious life hazard. The simplest representation of this hazard situation is one-dimensional downward propagation of a smolder wave against a buoyant upflow (cocurrent smolder); the configuration treated here is identical in all respects to this except for the presence of a forced flow replacing the buoyant one. The complex degradation chemistry of the polyurethanes is here reduced to the two major overall reactions of char formation and char oxidation. The model solutions, which are in reasonable agreement with experimental results, show the smolder process to be oxygen-limited, which leads to some very simple trends. More subtle behavior aspects determine actual propagation velocity, fraction of fuel consumed, and apparent equivalence ratio (all of which are variable). The self-insulating character of the smolder wave makes it viable in a wide-ranging set of conditions if the igniting stimulus is sufficiently long. These results have significant implications regarding the problem of smolder prevention or hindrance.

  14. Methodological developments and strategies for a fast flexible superposition of drug-size molecules.

    PubMed

    Klebe, G; Mietzner, T; Weber, F

    1999-01-01

    An alternative to experimental high through-put screening is the virtual screening of compound libraries on the computer. In absence of a detailed structure of the receptor protein, candidate molecules are compared with a known reference by mutually superimposing their skeletons and scoring their similarity. Since molecular shape highly depends on the adopted conformation, an efficient conformational screening is performed using a knowledge-based approach. A comprehensive torsion library has been compiled from crystal data stored in the Cambridge Structural Database. For molecular comparison a strategy is followed considering shape associated physicochemical properties in space such as steric occupancy, electrostatics, lipophilicity and potential hydrogen-bonding. Molecular shape is approximated by a set of Gaussian functions not necessarily located at the atomic positions. The superposition is performed in two steps: first by a global alignment search operating on multiple rigid conformations and then by conformationally relaxing the best scored hits of the global search. A normalized similarity scoring is used to allow for a comparison of molecules with rather different shape and size. The approach has been implemented on a cluster of parallel processors. As a case study, the search for ligands binding to the dopamine receptor is given.

  15. Methodological developments and strategies for a fast flexible superposition of drug-size molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klebe, Gerhard; Mietzner, Thomas; Weber, Frank

    1999-01-01

    An alternative to experimental high through-put screening is the virtual screening of compound libraries on the computer. In absence of a detailed structure of the receptor protein, candidate molecules are compared with a known reference by mutually superimposing their skeletons and scoring their similarity. Since molecular shape highly depends on the adopted conformation, an efficient conformational screening is performed using a knowledge-based approach. A comprehensive torsion library has been compiled from crystal data stored in the Cambridge Structural Database. For molecular comparison a strategy is followed considering shape associated physicochemical properties in space such as steric occupancy, electrostatics, lipophilicity and potential hydrogen-bonding. Molecular shape is approximated by a set of Gaussian functions not necessarily located at the atomic positions. The superposition is performed in two steps: first by a global alignment search operating on multiple rigid conformations and then by conformationally relaxing the best scored hits of the global search. A normalized similarity scoring is used to allow for a comparison of molecules with rather different shape and size. The approach has been implemented on a cluster of parallel processors. As a case study, the search for ligands binding to the dopamine receptor is given.

  16. Steric confinement and enhanced local flexibility assist knotting in simple models of protein folding.

    PubMed

    Soler, Miguel A; Rey, Antonio; Faísca, Patrícia F N

    2016-09-29

    The chaperonin complex GroEL-GroES is able to accelerate the folding process of knotted proteins considerably. However, the folding mechanism inside the chaperonin cage is elusive. Here we use a combination of lattice and off-lattice Monte Carlo simulations of simple Gō models to study the effect of physical confinement and local flexibility on the folding process of protein model systems embedding a trefoil knot in their native structure. This study predicts that steric confinement plays a specific role in the folding of knotted proteins by increasing the knotting probability for very high degrees of confinement. This effect is observed for protein MJ0366 even above the melting temperature for confinement sizes compatible with the size of the GroEL/GroES chaperonin cage. An enhanced local flexibility produces the same qualitative effects on the folding process. In particular, we observe that knotting probability increases up to 40% in the transition state of protein MJ0366 when flexibility is enhanced. This is underlined by a structural change in the transition state, which becomes devoid of helical content. No relation between the knotting mechanism and flexibility was found in the context of the off-lattice model adopted in this work.

  17. Politeness Strategies Used in Requests--A Cybernetic Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitao, Kenji

    This paper discusses a cybernetic model of politeness strategies used in the process of making a request. The concept of systems, cybernetic models, and politeness strategies are reviewed, and the way they work together in the proposed model is examined. Politeness strategies are communication strategies used to change behavior enough to achieve…

  18. Modeling and control of a flexible rotor system with AMB-based sustentation.

    PubMed

    Arredondo, I; Jugo, J; Etxebarria, V

    2008-01-01

    In this work the modeling and basic control design process of a rotary flexible spindle hovered by Active Magnetic Bearings (AMB) whose good capabilities for machine-tool industry extensively treated in the literature is presented. The modeling takes into account the three main behavioral characteristics of such magnetically-levitated rotor: the rigid dynamics, the flexible dynamics and the rotating unbalanced motion. Besides, the gyroscopic coupling is also studied proving that in this case, its effects are not significant and can be neglected. Using this model, a stabilizing controller based on symmetry properties is successfully designed for the system and a complete experimental analysis of its performance is carried out. Also, the predictions of the model are compared with the actual measured experimental results on a laboratory set-up based on the MBC500 Rotor Dynamics. Afterwards, a brief study about some nonlinear behavior observed in the system and its effect over the system stability at the critical speed is included.

  19. Tracking control strategy for the optoelectronic system on the flexible suspended platform based on backstepping method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wei; Ma, Jiaguang; Xiao, Jing

    2012-10-01

    To improve the optoelectronic tracking ability and rope-hanged platform attitude stability, against the interact effect between rope-hanged platform and optoelectronic system during system tracking process, the optoelectronic system fixed on rope hanged platform simplified dynamic model, according to the system's Lagrange dynamic model, was established. Backstepping method was employed to design an integrated controller for both optoelectronic system azimuth direction steering and platform attitude stabilizing. To deal with model's uncertainty and disturbance, a sliding mode controller form based exponential reaching law was adopted to structure the integrated controller. Simulation experiments simulated an optoelectronic system with 600mm caliber telescope, whose inertia fluctuation is 6%. The maximal control moment is 15Nm. And the external disturbance and internal friction effected together. When the line of sight(LOS) azimuth angular input is a step signal with 1rad amplitude, the response's overshoot is 6%, and the response time is 6.2s, and the steady state error is less than 4×10-4rad. When the input is a sinusoidal signal of 0.2rad amplitude with 0.0318Hz frequency, the LOS azimuth angular error amplitude is 5. 6×10-4rad. It is concluded that the controller designed in this article has excellent ability and can ensure the system's stability.

  20. Error handling strategies in multiphase inverse modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Finsterle, S.; Zhang, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Parameter estimation by inverse modeling involves the repeated evaluation of a function of residuals. These residuals represent both errors in the model and errors in the data. In practical applications of inverse modeling of multiphase flow and transport, the error structure of the final residuals often significantly deviates from the statistical assumptions that underlie standard maximum likelihood estimation using the least-squares method. Large random or systematic errors are likely to lead to convergence problems, biased parameter estimates, misleading uncertainty measures, or poor predictive capabilities of the calibrated model. The multiphase inverse modeling code iTOUGH2 supports strategies that identify and mitigate the impact of systematic or non-normal error structures. We discuss these approaches and provide an overview of the error handling features implemented in iTOUGH2.

  1. A new bead-spring model for simulation of semi-flexible macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Saadat, Amir; Khomami, Bamin

    2016-11-28

    A bead-spring model for semi-flexible macromolecules is developed to overcome the deficiencies of the current coarse-grained bead-spring models. Specifically, model improvements are achieved through incorporation of a bending potential. The new model is designed to accurately describe the correlation along the backbone of the chain, segmental length, and force-extension behavior of the macromolecule even at the limit of 1 Kuhn step per spring. The relaxation time of different Rouse modes is used to demonstrate the capabilities of the new model in predicting chain dynamics.

  2. A new bead-spring model for simulation of semi-flexible macromolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadat, Amir; Khomami, Bamin

    2016-11-01

    A bead-spring model for semi-flexible macromolecules is developed to overcome the deficiencies of the current coarse-grained bead-spring models. Specifically, model improvements are achieved through incorporation of a bending potential. The new model is designed to accurately describe the correlation along the backbone of the chain, segmental length, and force-extension behavior of the macromolecule even at the limit of 1 Kuhn step per spring. The relaxation time of different Rouse modes is used to demonstrate the capabilities of the new model in predicting chain dynamics.

  3. Modulation of fixation stiffness from flexible to stiff in a rat model of bone healing

    PubMed Central

    Bartnikowski, Nicole; Claes, Lutz E; Koval, Lidia; Glatt, Vaida; Bindl, Ronny; Steck, Roland; Ignatius, Anita; Schuetz, Michael A; Epari, Devakara R

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose Constant fixator stiffness for the duration of healing may not provide suitable mechanical conditions for all stages of bone repair. We therefore investigated the influence of stiffening fixation on callus stiffness and morphology in a rat diaphyseal osteotomy model to determine whether healing time was shortened and callus stiffness increased through modulation of fixation from flexible to stiff. Material and methods An external unilateral fixator was applied to the osteotomized femur and stiffened by decreasing the offset of the inner fixator bar at 3, 7, 14, and 21 days after operation. After 5 weeks, the rats were killed and healing was evaluated with mechanical, histological, and microcomputed tomography methods. Constant fixation stiffness control groups with either stiff or flexible fixation were included for comparison. Results The callus stiffness of the stiff group and all 4 experimental groups was greater than in the flexible group. The callus of the flexible group was larger but contained a higher proportion of unmineralized tissue and cartilage. The stiff and modulated groups (3, 7, 14, and 21 days) all showed bony bridging at 5 weeks, as well as signs of callus remodeling. Stiffening fixation at 7 and 14 days after osteotomy produced the highest degree of callus bridging. Bone mineral density in the fracture gap was highest in animals in which the fixation was stiffened after 14 days. Interpretation The predicted benefit of a large robust callus formed through early flexible fixation could not be shown, but the benefits of stabilizing a flexible construct to achieve timely healing were demonstrated at all time points. PMID:27841708

  4. Modulation of fixation stiffness from flexible to stiff in a rat model of bone healing.

    PubMed

    Bartnikowski, Nicole; Claes, Lutz E; Koval, Lidia; Glatt, Vaida; Bindl, Ronny; Steck, Roland; Ignatius, Anita; Schuetz, Michael A; Epari, Devakara R

    2016-11-14

    Background and purpose - Constant fixator stiffness for the duration of healing may not provide suitable mechanical conditions for all stages of bone repair. We therefore investigated the influence of stiffening fixation on callus stiffness and morphology in a rat diaphyseal osteotomy model to determine whether healing time was shortened and callus stiffness increased through modulation of fixation from flexible to stiff. Material and methods - An external unilateral fixator was applied to the osteotomized femur and stiffened by decreasing the offset of the inner fixator bar at 3, 7, 14, and 21 days after operation. After 5 weeks, the rats were killed and healing was evaluated with mechanical, histological, and microcomputed tomography methods. Constant fixation stiffness control groups with either stiff or flexible fixation were included for comparison. Results - The callus stiffness of the stiff group and all 4 experimental groups was greater than in the flexible group. The callus of the flexible group was larger but contained a higher proportion of unmineralized tissue and cartilage. The stiff and modulated groups (3, 7, 14, and 21 days) all showed bony bridging at 5 weeks, as well as signs of callus remodeling. Stiffening fixation at 7 and 14 days after osteotomy produced the highest degree of callus bridging. Bone mineral density in the fracture gap was highest in animals in which the fixation was stiffened after 14 days. Interpretation - The predicted benefit of a large robust callus formed through early flexible fixation could not be shown, but the benefits of stabilizing a flexible construct to achieve timely healing were demonstrated at all time points.

  5. A National Strategy for Advancing Climate Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Dunlea, Edward; Elfring, Chris

    2012-12-04

    Climate models are the foundation for understanding and projecting climate and climate-related changes and are thus critical tools for supporting climate-related decision making. This study developed a holistic strategy for improving the nation's capability to accurately simulate climate and related Earth system changes on decadal to centennial timescales. The committee's report is a high level analysis, providing a strategic framework to guide progress in the nation's climate modeling enterprise over the next 10-20 years. This study was supported by DOE, NSF, NASA, NOAA, and the intelligence community.

  6. Iron-Clad Fibers: A Metal-Based Biological Strategy for Hard Flexible Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, Matthew J.; Masic, Admir; Holten-Andersen, Niels; Waite, J. Herbert; Fratzl, Peter

    2010-04-01

    The extensible byssal threads of marine mussels are shielded from abrasion in wave-swept habitats by an outer cuticle that is largely proteinaceous and approximately fivefold harder than the thread core. Threads from several species exhibit granular cuticles containing a protein that is rich in the catecholic amino acid 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (dopa) as well as inorganic ions, notably Fe3+. Granular cuticles exhibit a remarkable combination of high hardness and high extensibility. We explored byssus cuticle chemistry by means of in situ resonance Raman spectroscopy and demonstrated that the cuticle is a polymeric scaffold stabilized by catecholato-iron chelate complexes having an unusual clustered distribution. Consistent with byssal cuticle chemistry and mechanics, we present a model in which dense cross-linking in the granules provides hardness, whereas the less cross-linked matrix provides extensibility.

  7. Design, dynamic modelling and experimental validation of a 2DOF flexible antenna sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, Claudia F.; Naci Engin, Seref; Feliu Batlle, Vicente

    2014-04-01

    A two-degree-of-freedom flexible antenna sensor platform was designed to physically simulate the ability of a robotic arm, which rapidly reorients and targets itself towards specific surfaces from different approachable angles. An accurate antenna model involves non-linear expressions that represent the system dynamics. Therefore, a comprehensive study along with experimental work has been carried out in order to achieve accurate system identification and validate the dynamic model. The model developed has proven useful in controlling the antenna tip, minimising the effects of the non-linear flexural dynamics and the Coulomb friction. The system was driven by servo motors. Algebraic controllers were developed for the antenna tip to track the reference trajectory. The platform system used encoders to measure the joint angles and a loadcell sensor to obtain the flexible link tip position. To validate the sensory information, the results obtained by the integrated sensors were compared to that of an external camera system.

  8. Generalism as a subsistence strategy: advantages and limitations of the highly flexible feeding traits of Pleistocene Stephanorhinus hundsheimensis (Rhinocerotidae, Mammalia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahlke, Ralf-Dietrich; Kaiser, Thomas M.

    2011-08-01

    The so-called Hundsheim rhinoceros, Stephanorhinus hundsheimensis, was a very common faunal element of the Early to early Middle Pleistocene period in the western Palaearctic. In this study, individuals from two different central European populations of the Hundsheim rhinoceros were analysed in order to determine whether their local dietary signals could reflect differing food availability between the two populations, and whether such information could provide a better understanding of the ecological role of S. hundsheimensis within corresponding faunal assemblages, and of its principal subsistence strategy in the western Palaearctic. The mesowear traits observed in the studied S. hundsheimensis populations have been interpreted as representing biome-specific signals, indicating grassland vegetation at the site of Süßenborn, and dense to open forests at Voigtstedt (both localities in Germany). The analyses performed on the fossil rhino material demonstrate the most pronounced dietary variability ever established for a single herbivorous ungulate species by mesowear studies. This variability ranges from an attrition dominated grazing regime, to a one of predominantly browsing, and characterises S. hundsheimensis as the most ecologically tolerant rhinoceros of the Palaearctic Plio-Pleistocene. Although such dietary flexibility proved an effective enough subsistence strategy over a period of 600-900 ka (1.4/1.2-0.6/0.5 Myr) in the western Palaearctic, the situation changed dramatically after 0.6 Myr BP, when the new species of rhinoceroses, Stephanorhinus hemitoechus and Stephanorhinus kirchbergensis, appeared and started to compete for both the grass and the browse. For the generalist S. hundsheimensis, this bilateral interference was detrimental to its success in all of its habitats. The successful competition of specialised forms of rhinoceroses, which might have originated as a result of the development of 100 ka periodicity in the global climatic record, is

  9. Modeling of a flexible beam actuated by shape memory alloy wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Steven G.; Lagoudas, Dimitris C.; Hughes, Declan; Wen, John T.

    1997-06-01

    A thermomechanical model is developed to predict the structural response of a flexible beam with shape memory alloy (SMA) wire actuators. A geometrically nonlinear static analysis is first carried out to investigate the deformed shape of a flexible cantilever beam caused by an externally-attached SMA wire actuated electrically. The actuation force applied by the SMA actuator to the beam is evaluated by solving a coupled problem that combines a thermodynamic constitutive model of SMAs with the heat conduction equation in the SMA and the structural model of the beam. To calculate the temperature history of the SMA actuator for given electrical current input, the heat transfer equation is solved with the electrical resistive heating being modeled as a distributed heat source along the SMA wire. The steps in the formulation are connected together through an iterative scheme that takes into account the static equilibrium of the beam and the constitutive relation of SMAs, thus translating an electrical current history input into beam strain output. The proposed model is used to simulate the experimental results, thus demonstrating the feasibility of using SMA actuators for shape control of active flexible structural systems.

  10. Flexibility on storage-release based distributed hydrologic modeling with object-oriented approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Kwangmin; Merwade, Venkatesh; Chun, Jong Ahn; Timlin, Dennis

    2016-09-01

    With the availability of advanced hydrologic data in public domain such as remote sensed and climate change scenario data, there is a need for a modeling framework that is capable of using these data to simulate and extend hydrologic processes with multidisciplinary approaches for sustainable water resources management. To address this need, a storage-release based distributed hydrologic model (STORE DHM) is developed based on an object-oriented approach. The model is tested for demonstrating model flexibility and extensibility to know how to well integrate object-oriented approach to further hydrologic research issues, e.g., reconstructing missing precipitation in this study, without changing its main frame. Moreover, the STORE DHM is applied to simulate hydrological processes with multiple classes in the Nanticoke watershed. This study also describes a conceptual and structural framework of object-oriented inheritance and aggregation characteristics under the STORE DHM. In addition, NearestMP (missing value estimation based on nearest neighborhood regression) and KernelMP (missing value estimation based on Kernel Function) are proposed for evaluating STORE DHM flexibility. And then, STORE DHM runoff hydrographs compared with NearestMP and KernelMP runoff hydrographs. Overall results from these comparisons show promising hydrograph outputs generated by the proposed two classes. Consequently, this study suggests that STORE DHM with an object-oriented approach will be a comprehensive water resources modeling tools by adding additional classes for toward developing through its flexibility and extensibility.

  11. The effect of porosity and flexibility on the hydrodynamics behind a mangrove-like root model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemi, Amirkhosro; Parry, Samantha; van de Riet, Keith; Curet, Oscar

    2015-11-01

    Mangroves play a prominent role in coastal areas in subtropics regions. Mangrove forests are of special interest to protect shorelines against storm surges, hurricane winds, sea-level rise and tsunamis. In addition, mangroves play a critical role in filtering water and providing habitat to different organisms. In this work we study the complex interaction of water flow and mangrove roots which were modeled with a circular array of cylinders with different spacing between them as well as different configurations. In addition, we modeled the flexibility of the roots by attaching rigid cylinders to torsional connectors. The models were tested in a water tunnel for a range of Reynolds number from 2200 to 12000. In a series of experiments we measured the drag force, instant and mean velocity behind the models. We also performed 2D flow visualization for the models in a flowing soap film setup. The results show that the minimum velocity of the wake is highly dependent on the porosity and flexibility of the roots. We observed that there is a small-scale turbulent region. This turbulence is recombined downstream in a larger vortex structure eventually forming a von Karman vortex street wake. We compare the results from rigid cylinder and the flexible counterpart.

  12. Predictive wall adjustment strategy for two-dimensional flexible walled adaptive wind tunnel: A detailed description of the first one-step method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, Stephen W. D.; Goodyer, Michael J.

    1988-01-01

    Following the realization that a simple iterative strategy for bringing the flexible walls of two-dimensional test sections to streamline contours was too slow for practical use, Judd proposed, developed, and placed into service what was the first Predictive Strategy. The Predictive Strategy reduced by 75 percent or more the number of iterations of wall shapes, and therefore the tunnel run-time overhead attributable to the streamlining process, required to reach satisfactory streamlines. The procedures of the Strategy are embodied in the FORTRAN subroutine WAS (standing for Wall Adjustment Strategy) which is written in general form. The essentials of the test section hardware, followed by the underlying aerodynamic theory which forms the basis of the Strategy, are briefly described. The subroutine is then presented as the Appendix, broken down into segments with descriptions of the numerical operations underway in each, with definitions of variables.

  13. Fuzzy Model-based Pitch Stabilization and Wing Vibration Suppression of Flexible Wing Aircraft.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayoubi, Mohammad A.; Swei, Sean Shan-Min; Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a fuzzy nonlinear controller to regulate the longitudinal dynamics of an aircraft and suppress the bending and torsional vibrations of its flexible wings. The fuzzy controller utilizes full-state feedback with input constraint. First, the Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy linear model is developed which approximates the coupled aeroelastic aircraft model. Then, based on the fuzzy linear model, a fuzzy controller is developed to utilize a full-state feedback and stabilize the system while it satisfies the control input constraint. Linear matrix inequality (LMI) techniques are employed to solve the fuzzy control problem. Finally, the performance of the proposed controller is demonstrated on the NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM).

  14. The Experimental Research on E-Learning Instructional Design Model Based on Cognitive Flexibility Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xianzhong; Wang, Feng; Zheng, Zhongmei

    The paper reports an educational experiment on the e-Learning instructional design model based on Cognitive Flexibility Theory, the experiment were made to explore the feasibility and effectiveness of the model in promoting the learning quality in ill-structured domain. The study performed the experiment on two groups of students: one group learned through the system designed by the model and the other learned by the traditional method. The results of the experiment indicate that the e-Learning designed through the model is helpful to promote the intrinsic motivation, learning quality in ill-structured domains, ability to resolve ill-structured problem and creative thinking ability of the students.

  15. Behaviorally Modeling Games of Strategy Using Descriptive Q-learning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    REPORT Behaviorally Modeling Games of Strategy Using Descriptive Q-learning 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Modeling human decision making... Games of Strategy Using Descriptive Q-learning Report Title ABSTRACT Modeling human decision making in strategic problem domains is challenging with...an unknown automated opponent. Behaviorally Modeling Games of Strategy Using Descriptive Q-learning Roi Ceren Department of Computer Science

  16. Dynamic modelling and stability parametric analysis of a flexible spacecraft with fuel slosh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasbarri, Paolo; Sabatini, Marco; Pisculli, Andrea

    2016-10-01

    Modern spacecraft often contain large quantities of liquid fuel to execute station keeping and attitude manoeuvres for space missions. In general the combined liquid-structure system is very difficult to model, and the analyses are based on some assumed simplifications. A realistic representation of the liquid dynamics inside closed containers can be approximated by an equivalent mechanical system. This technique can be considered a very useful mathematical tool for solving the complete dynamics problem of a space-system containing liquid. Thus they are particularly useful when designing a control system or to study the stability margins of the coupled dynamics. The commonly used equivalent mechanical models are the mass-spring models and the pendulum models. As far as the spacecraft modelling is concerned they are usually considered rigid; i.e. no flexible appendages such as solar arrays or antennas are considered when dealing with the interaction of the attitude dynamics with the fuel slosh. In the present work the interactions among the fuel slosh, the attitude dynamics and the flexible appendages of a spacecraft are first studied via a classical multi-body approach. In particular the equations of attitude and orbit motion are first derived for the partially liquid-filled flexible spacecraft undergoing fuel slosh; then several parametric analyses will be performed to study the stability conditions of the system during some assigned manoeuvers. The present study is propaedeutic for the synthesis of advanced attitude and/or station keeping control techniques able to minimize and/or reduce an undesired excitation of the satellite flexible appendages and of the fuel sloshing mass.

  17. Flexible Web service infrastructure for the development and deployment of predictive models.

    PubMed

    Guha, Rajarshi

    2008-02-01

    The development of predictive statistical models is a common task in the field of drug design. The process of developing such models involves two main steps: building the model and then deploying the model. Traditionally such models have been deployed using Web page interfaces. This approach restricts the user to using the specified Web page, and using the model in other ways can be cumbersome. In this paper we present a flexible and generalizable approach to the deployment of predictive models, based on a Web service infrastructure using R. The infrastructure described allows one to access the functionality of these models using a variety of approaches ranging from Web pages to workflow tools. We highlight the advantages of this infrastructure by developing and subsequently deploying random forest models for two data sets.

  18. Aeroservoelastic wind-tunnel investigations using the active flexible wing model - Status and recent accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, Thomas; Perry, Boyd, III; Tiffany, Sherwood; Cole, Stanley; Buttrill, Carey; Adams, William, Jr.; Houck, Jacob; Srinathkumar, S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the status of the joint NASA/Rockwell Active Flexible Wing Wind-Tunnel Test Program. The objectives of the program are to develop and validate the analysis, design and test methodologies required to apply multifunction active control technology for improving aircraft performance and stability. Major tasks of the program include designing digital multiinput/multioutput flutter-suppression and rolling-maneuver-load-alleviation concepts for a flexible full-span wind-tunnel model, obtaining an experimental data base for the basic model and each control concept, and providing comparisons between experimental and analytical results to validate the methodologies. This program is also providing the opportunity to improve real-time simulation techniques and to gain practical experience with digital control law implementation procedures.

  19. Flexible Virtual Structure Consideration in Dynamic Modeling of Mobile Robots Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Kamel, A. Essghaier; Beji, L.; Lerbet, J.; Abichou, A.

    2009-03-01

    In cooperative mobile robotics, we look for formation keeping and maintenance of a geometric configuration during movement. As a solution to these problems, the concept of a virtual structure is considered. Based on this idea, we have developed an efficient flexible virtual structure, describing the dynamic model of n vehicles in formation and where the whole formation is kept dependant. Notes that, for 2D and 3D space navigation, only a rigid virtual structure was proposed in the literature. Further, the problem was limited to a kinematic behavior of the structure. Hence, the flexible virtual structure in dynamic modeling of mobile robots formation presented in this paper, gives more capabilities to the formation to avoid obstacles in hostile environment while keeping formation and avoiding inter-agent collision.

  20. The dynamics and control of large flexible space structures. Part A: Discrete model and modal control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bainum, P. M.; Sellappan, R.

    1978-01-01

    Attitude control techniques for the pointing and stabilization of very large, inherently flexible spacecraft systems were investigated. The attitude dynamics and control of a long, homogeneous flexible beam whose center of mass is assumed to follow a circular orbit was analyzed. First order effects of gravity gradient were included. A mathematical model which describes the system rotations and deflections within the orbital plane was developed by treating the beam as a number of discretized mass particles connected by massless, elastic structural elements. The uncontrolled dynamics of the system are simulated and, in addition, the effects of the control devices were considered. The concept of distributed modal control, which provides a means for controlling a system mode independently of all other modes, was examined. The effect of varying the number of modes in the model as well as the number and location of the control devices were also considered.

  1. Aeroservoelastic wind-tunnel investigations using the Active Flexible Wing Model: Status and recent accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, Thomas E.; Perry, Boyd, III; Tiffany, Sherwood H.; Cole, Stanley R.; Buttrill, Carey S.; Adams, William M., Jr.; Houck, Jacob A.; Srinathkumar, S.; Mukhopadhyay, Vivek; Pototzky, Anthony S.

    1989-01-01

    The status of the joint NASA/Rockwell Active Flexible Wing Wind-Tunnel Test Program is described. The objectives are to develop and validate the analysis, design, and test methodologies required to apply multifunction active control technology for improving aircraft performance and stability. Major tasks include designing digital multi-input/multi-output flutter-suppression and rolling-maneuver-load alleviation concepts for a flexible full-span wind-tunnel model, obtaining an experimental data base for the basic model and each control concept and providing comparisons between experimental and analytical results to validate the methodologies. The opportunity is provided to improve real-time simulation techniques and to gain practical experience with digital control law implementation procedures.

  2. In Pursuit of Fully Flexible Protein-Ligand Docking: Modeling the Bilateral Mechanism of Binding.

    PubMed

    Henzler, Angela M; Rarey, Matthias

    2010-03-15

    Modern structure-based drug design aims at accounting for the intrinsic flexibility of therapeutic relevant targets. Over the last few years a considerable amount of docking approaches that encounter this challenging problem has emerged. Here we provide the readership with an overview of established methods for fully flexible protein-ligand docking and current developments in the field. All methods are based on one of two fundamental models which describe the dynamic behavior of proteins upon ligand binding. Methods for ensemble docking (ED) model the protein conformational change before the ligand is placed, whereas induced-fit docking (IFD) optimizes the protein structure afterwards. A third category of docking approaches is formed by recent approaches that follow both concepts. This categorization allows to comprehensively discover strengths and weaknesses of the individual processes and to extract information for their applicability in real world docking scenarios.

  3. Modeling and bonding-free fabrication of flexible fluidic microactuators with a bending motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorissen, Benjamin; Vincentie, Wannes; Al-Bender, Farid; Reynaerts, Dominiek; De Volder, Michaël

    2013-04-01

    Flexible fluidic actuators recently attracted the interest of the microsystem community, especially for soft robotic applications including minimally invasive surgery. These actuators, based on a well-known actuator design where a void is surrounded by an asymmetric elastic structure, can achieve large bending strokes when pressurized. Miniaturized versions of these actuators typically fail due to poor bonding of constituting components, and further, there is little theoretical understanding of these devices. This paper presents a new actuator design which does not require any bonding and provides new insights into the modeling of these actuators. The newly developed production process of the actuators is based on out-of-plane high aspect ratio micromolding, which enables high-throughput bonding-free fabrication. Furthermore, a mathematical model based on Euler-Bernoulli's beam equation with a deformable cross section is developed that shows good agreement with validation experiments on prototypes. These theoretical insights greatly facilitate the design and optimization of flexible bending actuators.

  4. A minimum state multibody/FEM approach for modeling flexible orbiting space systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisculli, A.; Gasbarri, P.

    2015-05-01

    In the past the deployment of space structures has widely been analyzed by using multibody formulations. The two leading approaches are usually based on the Newton-Euler (NE) formulation and Euler-Lagrange (EL) formulation. Both of them present advantages and drawbacks. The ideal approach for describing multi-body systems can be represented by a combination between NE and EL formulations. This can be obtained by considering the NE formulation for assembling the equation of motion and then by defining the ODE governing equations with the use of a minimum set of variables. In this paper the authors present a mixed NE/EL formulation suitable for synthesizing optimal control strategies during the deploying maneuvers of robotic arms or solar arrays. The proposed method has two main characteristics: (i) the reference frame, which all the bodies motions are referred to, is a floating reference frame attached to the orbiting base platform body; (ii) it leads to a more organic formulation which makes a shifting from the NE to the EL formulations possible, through the use of a Jacobian matrix. In the present work this mixed formulation is derived to describe a fully elastic multi-body spacecraft. Furthermore the presented formulation, complemented with gravity, gravity gradient and generalized gravitational modal forces, will be used to study the dynamic behavior of an orbiting manipulator with flexible appendages. Finally a Reaction Null/Jacobian Transpose control strategy will be applied to control and deploy the robotic arms to grasp an orbiting flexible spacecraft.

  5. Integrated Flight Mechanic and Aeroelastic Modelling and Control of a Flexible Aircraft Considering Multidimensional Gust Input

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-05-01

    INTEGRATED FLIGHT MECHANIC AND AEROELASTIC MODELLING AND CONTROL OF A FLEXIBLE AIRCRAFT CONSIDERING MULTIDIMENSIONAL GUST INPUT Patrick Teufel, Martin Hanel...the lateral separation distance have been developed by ’ = matrix of two dimensional spectrum function Eichenbaum 4 and are described by Bessel...Journal of Aircraft, Vol. 30, No. 5, Sept.-Oct. 1993 Relations to Risk Sensitivity, System & Control Letters 11, [4] Eichenbaum F.D., Evaluation of 3D

  6. A computational kinematics and evolutionary approach to model molecular flexibility for bionanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brintaki, Athina N.

    Modeling molecular structures is critical for understanding the principles that govern the behavior of molecules and for facilitating the exploration of potential pharmaceutical drugs and nanoscale designs. Biological molecules are flexible bodies that can adopt many different shapes (or conformations) until they reach a stable molecular state that is usually described by the minimum internal energy. A major challenge in modeling flexible molecules is the exponential explosion in computational complexity as the molecular size increases and many degrees of freedom are considered to represent the molecules' flexibility. This research work proposes a novel generic computational geometric approach called enhanced BioGeoFilter (g.eBGF) that geometrically interprets inter-atomic interactions to impose geometric constraints during molecular conformational search to reduce the time for identifying chemically-feasible conformations. Two new methods called Kinematics-Based Differential Evolution ( kDE) and Biological Differential Evolution ( BioDE) are also introduced to direct the molecular conformational search towards low energy (stable) conformations. The proposed kDE method kinematically describes a molecule's deformation mechanism while it uses differential evolution to minimize the intra-molecular energy. On the other hand, the proposed BioDE utilizes our developed g.eBGF data structure as a surrogate approximation model to reduce the number of exact evaluations and to speed the molecular conformational search. This research work will be extremely useful in enabling the modeling of flexible molecules and in facilitating the exploration of nanoscale designs through the virtual assembly of molecules. Our research work can also be used in areas such as molecular docking, protein folding, and nanoscale computer-aided design where rapid collision detection scheme for highly deformable objects is essential.

  7. Analysis of vibration and frequency transmission of high speed EMU with flexible model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zun-Song; Yang, Guang; Wang, Shan-Shan; Sun, Shou-Guang

    2014-12-01

    When the operation speed of the high-speed train increases and the weight of the carbody becomes lighter, not only does the sensitivity of the wheel/rail contact get higher, but also the vibration frequency range of the vehicle system gets enlarged and more frequencies are transmitted from the wheelset to the carbody. It is important to investigate the vibration characteristics and the dynamic frequency transmission from the wheel/rail interface to the carbody of the high-speed electric multi-uint (EMU). An elastic highspeed vehicle dynamics model is established in which the carbody, bogieframes, and wheelsets are all dealt with as flexible body. A rigid high-speed vehicle dynamics model is set up to compare with the simulation results of the elastic model. In the rigid vehicle model, the carbody, bogieframes and wheelsets are treated as rigid component while the suspension and structure parameters are the same as used in the elastic model. The dynamic characteristic of the elastic high speed vehicle is investigated in time and frequency domains and the difference of the acceleration, frequency distribution and transmission of the two types of models are presented. The results show that the spectrumpower density of the vehicle decreases from the wheelset to the carbody and the acceleration transmission ratio is approximately from 1% to 10% for each suspension system. The frequency of the wheelset rotation is evident in the vibration of the flexible model and is transmitted from the wheelset to the bogieframe and to the carbody. The results of the flexible model are more reasonable than that of the rigid model. A field test data of the high speed train are presented to verify the simulation results. It shows that the simulation results are coincidentwith the field test data.

  8. Modeling and control for heave dynamics of a flexible wing micro aerial vehicle distributed parameter system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Lisa M.

    2011-07-01

    In recent years, much research has been motivated by the idea of biologically-inspired flight. It is a conjecture of the United States Air Force that incorporating characteristics of biological flight into air vehicles will significantly improve the maneuverability and performance of modern aircraft. Although there are studies which involve the aerodynamics, structural dynamics, modeling, and control of flexible wing micro aerial vehicles (MAVs), issues of control and vehicular modeling as a whole are largely unexplored. Modeling with such dynamics lends itself to systems of partial differential equations (PDEs) with nonlinearities, and limited control theory is available for such systems. In this work, a multiple component structure consisting of two Euler-Bernoulli beams connected to a rigid mass is used to model the heave dynamics of an aeroelastic wing MAV, which is acted upon by a nonlinear aerodynamic lift force. We seek to employ tools from distributed parameter modeling and linear control theory in an effort to achieve agile flight potential of flexible, morphable wing MAV airframes. Theoretical analysis of the model is conducted, which includes generating solutions to the eigenvalue problem for the system and determining well-posedness and the attainment of a C 0-semigroup for the linearly approximated model. In order to test the model's ability to track to a desired state and to gain insight into optimal morphing trajectories, two control objectives are employed on the model: target state tracking and morphing trajectory over time.

  9. LED luminaire longevity strategy models comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemieux, Hugo; Thibault, Simon; Martel, Alain A.

    2010-08-01

    As energy efficiency becomes more and more important, light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are a promising alternative to traditional lighting. Indeed, the energy efficiency of LEDs is still improving as their luminosity is modulated by current. Moreover, for applications such as exterior lamp posts, their small size, directionality, colors and high frequency response allow to combine them and provide design possibilities which are impossible with any other light source. However, as any lamp, LEDs have a lumen depreciation which is a function of both current and temperature. Thus, to take advantage of the full characteristics of LEDs, LED luminaire longevity strategies must be carefully studied and planned, especially since the IES and CIE guidelines state clearly that the luminaire must maintain the rated recommended light level until the end of the system's operating life. The recommended approach for LED luminaire specification is therefore to use the end-of-life light level when evaluating the luminaire. Different power supply strategies have been simulated to determine which one maximizes energy saving and lifetime. With these results, it appears that active control can save at least 25% in energy, but the best strategy cannot be determined because of uncertainties in luminosity degradation models.

  10. Dynamical Modeling and Control Simulation of a Large Flexible Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Du, Wei; Wie, Bong; Whorton, Mark

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents dynamical models of a large flexible launch vehicle. A complete set of coupled dynamical models of propulsion, aerodynamics, guidance and control, structural dynamics, fuel sloshing, and thrust vector control dynamics are described. Such dynamical models are used to validate NASA s SAVANT Simulink-based program which is being used for the preliminary flight control systems analysis and design of NASA s Ares-1 Crew Launch Vehicle. SAVANT simulation results for validating the performance and stability of an ascent phase autopilot system of Ares-1 are also presented.

  11. Generalized ``thick'' strip modelling for vortex-induced vibration of long flexible cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Yan; Palocios, Rafael; Sherwin, Spencer; Nektar++ Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    We propose a generalized strip modelling method that is computationally efficient for the VIV prediction of long flexible cylinders in three-dimensional incompressible flow. In order to overcome the shortcomings of conventional strip theory-based 2D models, the fluid domain is divided into ``thick'' strips, which are sufficiently thick to locally resolve the small scale turbulence effects and three dimensionality of the flow around the cylinder. An attractive feature of the model is that we independently construct a three-dimensional scale resolving model for individual strips, which have local spanwise scale along the cylinder's axial direction and are only coupled through the structural model of the cylinder. Therefore, this model is able to cover the situations of fully resolved 3D model and 2D strip theory model. The connection between these strips is achieved through the calculation of a tensioned beam equation, which is used to represent the dynamics of the flexible body. In the limit, however, a single ``thick'' strip would request the full 3D domain. A parallel Fourier spectral/hp element method is employed to solve the 3D flow dynamics in the strip-domain, and then the VIV response prediction is achieved through the strip-structure interactions. This work is supported by EPSRC grant EP/K037536/1. Acknowledge UK Turbulence Consortium (UKTC) for ARCHER time under EPSRC grant EP/L000261/1.

  12. Female red colobus monkeys maintain their densities through flexible feeding strategies in logged forests in Kibale National Park, Uganda.

    PubMed

    Milich, Krista M; Stumpf, Rebecca M; Chambers, Josephine M; Chapman, Colin A

    2014-05-01

    Behavioral flexibility allows primates to cope with environmental variability. Quantifying primate responses to human habitat modifications allows an effective means of assessing coping mechanisms. Within Kibale National Park, Uganda, logging led to reduced primate food availability that still exists almost 50 years after the harvest. Following the predictions of the ideal free distribution theory, primate densities are expected to decrease in areas of lower resource availability so that the resources available per individual are equivalent in logged and old-growth areas. However, counter to what would be predicted by the ideal free distribution theory, red colobus monkeys (Procolobus rufomitratus) occur at similar densities in logged and old-growth areas of Kibale. This suggests that either the ecological differences between the two areas are not sufficient to impact red colobus densities or that animals in logged areas are compensating to changes in resource availability by using different foraging strategies. To test between these hypotheses, we examined four groups of red colobus, two in logged and two in old-growth forests, and compared feeding behavior, feeding tree size, and tree productivity. Females in logged areas fed on resources from a greater number of plant species, fed on fewer resources from each species, and spent more time feeding than those in old-growth areas. By expanding their diet, females in logged areas effectively increased the resources available to them, which may contribute to their ability to maintain similar densities to females in old-growth areas. These findings have implications for an evolutionary understanding of how species deal with environmental change and considerations for conservation practices that determine what areas should be prioritized for protection.

  13. New Modelling Strategies For Metal Cutting

    SciTech Connect

    Rosa, Pedro A. R.; Martins, Paulo A. F.; Atkins, Anthony G.

    2007-05-17

    This paper draws from the 'plasticity and friction only' view of metal cutting to the presentation of new modelling strategies based on the interaction between finite elements and modern ductile fracture mechanics. The overall presentation is supported by specially designed orthogonal metal cutting experiments that were performed on Lead test specimens under laboratory-controlled conditions. Comparisons between theoretical predictions and experimental results comprise a wide range of topics such as material flow, cutting forces and specific cutting pressure. The paper demonstrates that while material flow and chip formation can be successfully modelled by traditional 'plasticity and friction only' analyses, the contribution of the fracture work involved in the formation of new surfaces is essential for obtaining good estimates of cutting forces and of the specific cutting pressure.

  14. Simulation of the evolution of rail corrugation using a rotating flexible wheelset model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vila, Paloma; Fayos, Juan; Baeza, Luis

    2011-11-01

    This paper presents a simulation tool designed for predicting the wear pattern on the running surface of the rails and for studying the evolution of rail corrugation after thousands of wheelset passages. This simulation tool implements a cyclic track model, a rotating flexible wheelset model, a wheel-rail contact model and a wear model. The vehicle-track system is modelled by using a substructuring technique, by which the vehicle, the rails and the sleepers are treated independently of each other and are coupled by the forces transmitted through the wheel-rail contact and the railpad. The vehicle model takes only account of the wheelset since the sprung masses of the vehicle are not relevant in the frequency range analysed. The wheelset model considers the flexibility of the wheelset and the effects associated with rotation. By using the Campbell diagram, two cases have been identified in which the combined effect of two different modes may give rise to higher wheel-rail contact forces and wear.

  15. A new flexible plug and play scheme for modeling, simulating, and predicting gastric emptying

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In-silico models that attempt to capture and describe the physiological behavior of biological organisms, including humans, are intrinsically complex and time consuming to build and simulate in a computing environment. The level of detail of description incorporated in the model depends on the knowledge of the system’s behavior at that level. This knowledge is gathered from the literature and/or improved by knowledge obtained from new experiments. Thus model development is an iterative developmental procedure. The objective of this paper is to describe a new plug and play scheme that offers increased flexibility and ease-of-use for modeling and simulating physiological behavior of biological organisms. Methods This scheme requires the modeler (user) first to supply the structure of the interacting components and experimental data in a tabular format. The behavior of the components described in a mathematical form, also provided by the modeler, is externally linked during simulation. The advantage of the plug and play scheme for modeling is that it requires less programming effort and can be quickly adapted to newer modeling requirements while also paving the way for dynamic model building. Results As an illustration, the paper models the dynamics of gastric emptying behavior experienced by humans. The flexibility to adapt the model to predict the gastric emptying behavior under varying types of nutrient infusion in the intestine (ileum) is demonstrated. The predictions were verified with a human intervention study. The error in predicting the half emptying time was found to be less than 6%. Conclusions A new plug-and-play scheme for biological systems modeling was developed that allows changes to the modeled structure and behavior with reduced programming effort, by abstracting the biological system into a network of smaller sub-systems with independent behavior. In the new scheme, the modeling and simulation becomes an automatic machine readable and

  16. Information flow analysis and Petri-net-based modeling for welding flexible manufacturing cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, T.; Chen, Shanben; Wang, Y. T.; Wu, Lin

    2000-10-01

    Due to the development of advanced manufacturing technology and the introduction of Smart-Manufacturing notion in the field of modern industrial production, welding flexible manufacturing system (WFMS) using robot technology has become the inevitable developing direction on welding automation. In WFMS process, the flexibility for different welding products and the realizing on corresponding welding parameters control are the guarantees for welding quality. Based on a new intelligent arc-welding flexible manufacturing cell (WFMC), the system structure and control policies are studied in this paper. Aiming at the different information flows among every subsystem and central monitoring computer in this WFMC, Petri net theory is introduced into the process of welding manufacturing. With its help, a discrete control model of WFMC has been constructed, in which the system status is regarded as place and the control process is regarded as transition. Moreover, grounded on automation Petri net principle, the judging and utilizing of information obtained from welding sensors are imported into net structure, which extends the traditional Petri net concepts. The control model and policies researched in this paper have established foundation for further intelligent real-time control on WFMC and WFMS.

  17. An analytical model and scaling of chordwise flexible flapping wings in forward flight.

    PubMed

    Kodali, Deepa; Kang, Chang-Kwon

    2016-12-13

    Aerodynamic performance of biological flight characterized by the fluid structure interaction of a flapping wing and the surrounding fluid is affected by the wing flexibility. One of the main challenges to predict aerodynamic forces is that the wing shape and motion are a priori unknown. In this study, we derive an analytical fluid-structure interaction model for a chordwise flexible flapping two-dimensional airfoil in forward flight. A plunge motion is imposed on the rigid leading-edge (LE) of teardrop shape and the flexible tail dynamically deforms. The resulting unsteady aeroelasticity is modeled with the Euler-Bernoulli-Theodorsen equation under a small deformation assumption. The two-way coupling is realized by considering the trailing-edge deformation relative to the LE as passive pitch, affecting the unsteady aerodynamics. The resulting wing deformation and the aerodynamic performance including lift and thrust agree well with high-fidelity numerical results. Under the dynamic balance, the aeroelastic stiffness decreases, whereas the aeroelastic stiffness increases with the reduced frequency. A novel aeroelastic frequency ratio is derived, which scales with the wing deformation, lift, and thrust. Finally, the dynamic similarity between flapping in water and air is established.

  18. The role of stoichiometric flexibility in modelling forest ecosystem responses to nitrogen fertilization.

    PubMed

    Meyerholt, Johannes; Zaehle, Sönke

    2015-12-01

    The response of the forest carbon (C) balance to changes in nitrogen (N) deposition is uncertain, partly owing to diverging representations of N cycle processes in dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs). Here, we examined how different assumptions about the degree of flexibility of the ecosystem's C : N ratios contribute to this uncertainty, and which of these assumptions best correspond to the available data. We applied these assumptions within the framework of a DGVM and compared the results to responses in net primary productivity (NPP), leaf N concentration, and ecosystem N partitioning, observed at 22 forest N fertilization experiments. Employing flexible ecosystem pool C : N ratios generally resulted in the most convincing model-data agreement with respect to production and foliar N responses. An intermediate degree of stoichiometric flexibility in vegetation, where wood C : N ratio changes were decoupled from leaf and root C : N ratio changes, led to consistent simulation of production and N cycle responses to N addition. Assuming fixed C : N ratios or scaling leaf N concentration changes to other tissues, commonly assumed by DGVMs, was not supported by reported data. Between the tested assumptions, the simulated changes in ecosystem C storage relative to changes in C assimilation varied by up to 20%.

  19. Coordination, Organisation and Model-driven Approaches for Dynamic, Flexible, Robust Software and Services Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieves, Juan Carlos; Padget, Julian; Vasconcelos, Wamberto; Staikopoulos, Athanasios; Cliffe, Owen; Dignum, Frank; Vázquez-Salceda, Javier; Clarke, Siobhán; Reed, Chris

    Enterprise systems are increasingly composed of (and even functioning as) components in a dynamic, digital ecosystem. On the one hand, this new situation requires flexible, spontaneous and opportunistic collaboration activities to be identified and established among (electronic) business parties. On the other, it demands engineering methods that are able to integrate new functionalities and behaviours into running systems composed by active, distributed, interdependent processes. Here we present a multi-level architecture that combines organisational and coordination theories with model driven development, for the implementation, deployment and management of dynamic, flexible and robust service-oriented business applications, combined with a service layer that accommodates semantic service description, fine-grained semantic service discovery and the dynamic adaptation of services to meet changing circumstances.

  20. a Model-Based Autofocus Algorithm for Ultrasonic Imaging Using a Flexible Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, A. J.; Drinkwater, B. W.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2010-02-01

    Autofocus is a methodology for estimating and correcting errors in the assumed parameters of an imaging algorithm. It provides improved image quality and, therefore, better defect detection and characterization capabilities. In this paper, we present a new autofocus algorithm developed specifically for ultrasonic non-destructive testing and evaluation (NDE). We consider the estimation and correction of errors in the assumed element positions for a flexible ultrasonic array coupled to a specimen with an unknown surface profile. The algorithm performs a weighted least-squares minimization of the time-of-arrival errors in the echo data using assumed models for known features in the specimen. The algorithm is described for point and planar specimen features and demonstrated using experimental data from a flexible array prototype.

  1. Dynamic modeling and optimal control of spacecraft with flexible structures undergoing general attitude maneuvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yiing-Yuh; Lin, Gern-Liang

    1992-08-01

    In this research, the dynamics and control of a rigid spacecraft with flexible structures were studied for the case of optimal simultaneous multiaxis reorientation. A model spacecraft consisting of a rigid hub in the middle and two solid bodies symmetrically connected to either side of the hub through uniformly distributed flexible beams is considered for the dynamic analysis and control simulation. To optimally reorienting the spacecraft, an optimal nominal control trajectory is found first through an iterative procedure. Linear flexural deformations are assumed for the beam structures and the assumed modes method is applied to find the vibration control law of the beams. The system overall optimal attitude control is achieved by following the open loop optimal reference control trajectory with an stabilizing guidance law.

  2. Dynamic modelling and analysis of a magnetically suspended flexible rotor. M.S. Thesis, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccallum, Duncan C.

    1991-01-01

    A 12-state lumped-element model is presented for a flexible rotor supported by two attractive force electromagnetic journal bearings. The rotor is modeled as a rigid disk with radial mass unbalance mounted on a flexible, massless shaft with internal damping (Jeffcott rotor). The disk is offset axially from the midspan of the shaft. Bearing dynamics in each radial direction are modeled as a parallel combination of a negative (unstable) spring and a linear current-to-force actuator. The model includes translation and rotation of the rigid mass and the first and second bending models of the flexible shaft, and it simultaneously includes internal shaft damping, gyroscopic effects, and the unstable nature of the attractive force magnetic bearings. The model is used to analyze the dependence of the system transmission zeros and open-loop poles on system parameters. The dominant open-loop poles occur in stable/unstable pairs with bandwidth dependent on the ratios of bearing (unstable) stiffnesses to rotor mass and damping dependent on the shaft spin rate. The zeros occur in complex conjugate pairs with bandwidth dependent on the ratios of shaft stiffness to rotor mass and damping dependent on the shaft spin rate. Some of the transmission zeros are non-minimum phase when the spin rate exceeds the shaft critical speed. The transmission zeros and open-loop poles impact the design of magnetic bearing control systems. The minimum loop cross-over frequency of the closed-loop system is the speed of the unstable open-loop poles. For the supercritical shaft spin rates, the presence of non-minimum phase zeros limits the distribution rejection achievable at frequencies near or above the shaft critical speed. Since non-minimum phase transmission zeros can only be changed by changing the system inputs and/or outputs, closed-loop performance is limited for supercritical spin rates unless additional force or torque actuators are added.

  3. Generalized thick strip modelling for vortex-induced vibration of long flexible cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Y.; Palacios, R.; Graham, M.; Sherwin, S.

    2016-09-15

    We propose a generalized strip modelling method that is computationally efficient for the VIV prediction of long flexible cylinders in three-dimensional incompressible flow. In order to overcome the shortcomings of conventional strip-theory-based 2D models, the fluid domain is divided into “thick” strips, which are sufficiently thick to locally resolve the small scale turbulence effects and three dimensionality of the flow around the cylinder. An attractive feature of the model is that we independently construct a three-dimensional scale resolving model for individual strips, which have local spanwise scale along the cylinder's axial direction and are only coupled through the structural model of the cylinder. Therefore, this approach is able to cover the full spectrum for fully resolved 3D modelling to 2D strip theory. The connection between these strips is achieved through the calculation of a tensioned beam equation, which is used to represent the dynamics of the flexible body. In the limit, however, a single “thick” strip would fill the full 3D domain. A parallel Fourier spectral/hp element method is employed to solve the 3D flow dynamics in the strip-domain, and then the VIV response prediction is achieved through the strip–structure interactions. Numerical tests on both laminar and turbulent flows as well as the comparison against the fully resolved DNS are presented to demonstrate the applicability of this approach.

  4. Dynamic modelling of flexibly supported gears using iterative convergence of tooth mesh stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Song; Howard, Ian

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a new gear dynamic model for flexibly supported gear sets aiming to improve the accuracy of gear fault diagnostic methods. In the model, the operating gear centre distance, which can affect the gear design parameters, like the gear mesh stiffness, has been selected as the iteration criteria because it will significantly deviate from its nominal value for a flexible supported gearset when it is operating. The FEA method was developed for calculation of the gear mesh stiffnesses with varying gear centre distance, which can then be incorporated by iteration into the gear dynamic model. The dynamic simulation results from previous models that neglect the operating gear centre distance change and those from the new model that incorporate the operating gear centre distance change were obtained by numerical integration of the differential equations of motion using the Newmark method. Some common diagnostic tools were utilized to investigate the difference and comparison of the fault diagnostic results between the two models. The results of this paper indicate that the major difference between the two diagnostic results for the cracked tooth exists in the extended duration of the crack event and in changes to the phase modulation of the coherent time synchronous averaged signal even though other notable differences from other diagnostic results can also be observed.

  5. A Flexible Model for Correlated Medical Costs, with Application to Medical Expenditure Panel Survey Data

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinsong; Liu, Lei; Shih, Ya-Chen T.; Zhang, Daowen; Severini, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a flexible model for correlated medical cost data with several appealing features. First, the mean function is partially linear. Second, the distributional form for the response is not specified. Third, the covariance structure of correlated medical costs has a semiparametric form. We use extended generalized estimating equations to simultaneously estimate all parameters of interest. B-splines is used to estimate unknown functions, and a modification to Akaike Information Criterion is proposed for selecting knots in spline bases. We apply the model to correlated medical costs in the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) dataset. Simulation studies are conducted to assess the performance of our method. PMID:26403805

  6. A flexible model for correlated medical costs, with application to medical expenditure panel survey data.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinsong; Liu, Lei; Shih, Ya-Chen T; Zhang, Daowen; Severini, Thomas A

    2016-03-15

    We propose a flexible model for correlated medical cost data with several appealing features. First, the mean function is partially linear. Second, the distributional form for the response is not specified. Third, the covariance structure of correlated medical costs has a semiparametric form. We use extended generalized estimating equations to simultaneously estimate all parameters of interest. B-splines are used to estimate unknown functions, and a modification to Akaike information criterion is proposed for selecting knots in spline bases. We apply the model to correlated medical costs in the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey dataset. Simulation studies are conducted to assess the performance of our method.

  7. A fast and flexible reactor physics model for simulating neutron spectra and depletion in fast reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recktenwald, Geoff; Deinert, Mark

    2010-03-01

    Determining the time dependent concentration of isotopes within a nuclear reactor core is central to the analysis of nuclear fuel cycles. We present a fast, flexible tool for determining the time dependent neutron spectrum within fast reactors. The code (VBUDS: visualization, burnup, depletion and spectra) uses a two region, multigroup collision probability model to simulate the energy dependent neutron flux and tracks the buildup and burnout of 24 actinides, as well as fission products. While originally developed for LWR simulations, the model is shown to produce fast reactor spectra that show high degree of fidelity to available fast reactor benchmarks.

  8. Investigation of flexibility in Myosin V using a new 3D mechanical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghshenas-Jaryani, Mahdi

    2012-02-01

    This paper presents the development of a three dimensional rigid multibody model for the simulation and analysis of motor protein locomotion. The interesting aspect of this model is that it retains the mass properties, in contrast to the commonly used models which omit mass properties at the nano scale. The disproportionate size of the small mass of Myosin V relative to the large viscous friction forces requires a small integration step size that leads to a long simulation run time; however, the proposed model can be numerically integrated in a reasonable amount of time. This paper discusses modeling flexibility in the protein as an extension of the original rigid body model. Empirical studies have shown that Myosin V's neck domain can be considered as three pairs of tandem elements called IQ motifs which can bending at junctures between them. Therefore, each neck is modeled by three rigid bodies connected by ball-and-socket joints together, rather than single rigid body has been used in the previous works. Euler parameters are used to model the orientation of bodies in order to eliminate singularities in the description of orientation. In order to accomplish this, the equations of motion are reduced to minimal form using changing holonomic and non-holonomic constraints applied to the model which represent the normalization of the Euler parameters as well as contact and impact non-penetration conditions. The differences between the dynamic behavior of the new mechanical model, with flexible neck domains, and the original rigid body model are compared using simulation results.

  9. Control structural interaction testbed: A model for multiple flexible body verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chory, M. A.; Cohen, A. L.; Manning, R. A.; Narigon, M. L.; Spector, V. A.

    1993-01-01

    Conventional end-to-end ground tests for verification of control system performance become increasingly complicated with the development of large, multiple flexible body spacecraft structures. The expense of accurately reproducing the on-orbit dynamic environment and the attendant difficulties in reducing and accounting for ground test effects limits the value of these tests. TRW has developed a building block approach whereby a combination of analysis, simulation, and test has replaced end-to-end performance verification by ground test. Tests are performed at the component, subsystem, and system level on engineering testbeds. These tests are aimed at authenticating models to be used in end-to-end performance verification simulations: component and subassembly engineering tests and analyses establish models and critical parameters, unit level engineering and acceptance tests refine models, and subsystem level tests confirm the models' overall behavior. The Precision Control of Agile Spacecraft (PCAS) project has developed a control structural interaction testbed with a multibody flexible structure to investigate new methods of precision control. This testbed is a model for TRW's approach to verifying control system performance. This approach has several advantages: (1) no allocation for test measurement errors is required, increasing flight hardware design allocations; (2) the approach permits greater latitude in investigating off-nominal conditions and parametric sensitivities; and (3) the simulation approach is cost effective, because the investment is in understanding the root behavior of the flight hardware and not in the ground test equipment and environment.

  10. Inter-Vertebral Flexibility of the Ostrich Neck: Implications for Estimating Sauropod Neck Flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Cobley, Matthew J.; Rayfield, Emily J.; Barrett, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    The flexibility and posture of the neck in sauropod dinosaurs has long been contentious. Improved constraints on sauropod neck function will have major implications for what we know of their foraging strategies, ecology and overall biology. Several hypotheses have been proposed, based primarily on osteological data, suggesting different degrees of neck flexibility. This study attempts to assess the effects of reconstructed soft tissues on sauropod neck flexibility through systematic removal of muscle groups and measures of flexibility of the neck in a living analogue, the ostrich (Struthio camelus). The possible effect of cartilage on flexibility is also examined, as this was previously overlooked in osteological estimates of sauropod neck function. These comparisons show that soft tissues are likely to have limited the flexibility of the neck beyond the limits suggested by osteology alone. In addition, the inferred presence of cartilage, and varying the inter-vertebral spacing within the synovial capsule, also affect neck flexibility. One hypothesis proposed that flexibility is constrained by requiring a minimum overlap between successive zygapophyses equivalent to 50% of zygapophyseal articular surface length (ONP50). This assumption is tested by comparing the maximum flexibility of the articulated cervical column in ONP50 and the flexibility of the complete neck with all tissues intact. It is found that this model does not adequately convey the pattern of flexibility in the ostrich neck, suggesting that the ONP50 model may not be useful in determining neck function if considered in isolation from myological and other soft tissue data. PMID:23967284

  11. Analytical and numerical models to predict the behavior of unbonded flexible risers under torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Shao-fei; Xue, Hong-xiang; Tang, Wen-yong

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents analytical and numerical models to predict the behavior of unbonded flexible risers under torsion. The analytical model takes local bending and torsion of tensile armor wires into consideration, and equilibrium equations of forces and displacements of layers are deduced. The numerical model includes lay angle, cross-sectional profiles of carcass, pressure armor layer and contact between layers. Abaqus/Explicit quasi-static simulation and mass scaling are adopted to avoid convergence problem and excessive computation time caused by geometric and contact nonlinearities. Results show that local bending and torsion of helical strips may have great influence on torsional stiffness, but stress related to bending and torsion is negligible; the presentation of anti-friction tapes may have great influence both on torsional stiffness and stress; hysteresis of torsion-twist relationship under cyclic loading is obtained by numerical model, which cannot be predicted by analytical model because of the ignorance of friction between layers.

  12. A leaky-integrator model as a control mechanism underlying flexible decision making during task switching.

    PubMed

    Mitani, Akinori; Sasaki, Ryo; Oizumi, Masafumi; Uka, Takanori

    2013-01-01

    The ability to switch between tasks is critical for animals to behave according to context. Although the association between the prefrontal cortex and task switching has been well documented, the ultimate modulation of sensory-motor associations has yet to be determined. Here, we modeled the results of a previous study showing that task switching can be accomplished by communication from distinct populations of sensory neurons. We proposed a leaky-integrator model where relevant and irrelevant information were stored separately in two integrators and task switching was achieved by leaking information from the irrelevant integrator. The model successfully explained both the behavioral and neuronal data. Additionally, the leaky-integrator model showed better performance than an alternative model, where irrelevant information was discarded by decreasing the weight on irrelevant information, when animals initially failed to commit to a task. Overall, we propose that flexible switching is, in part, achieved by actively controlling the amount of leak of relevant and irrelevant information.

  13. The reduced order model problem in distributed parameter systems adaptive identification and control. [adaptive control of flexible spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. R., Jr.; Lawrence, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    The reduced order model problem in distributed parameter systems adaptive identification and control is investigated. A comprehensive examination of real-time centralized adaptive control options for flexible spacecraft is provided.

  14. Advanced ensemble modelling of flexible macromolecules using X-ray solution scattering

    PubMed Central

    Tria, Giancarlo; Mertens, Haydyn D. T.; Kachala, Michael; Svergun, Dmitri I.

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic ensembles of macromolecules mediate essential processes in biology. Understanding the mechanisms driving the function and molecular interactions of ‘unstructured’ and flexible molecules requires alternative approaches to those traditionally employed in structural biology. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is an established method for structural characterization of biological macromolecules in solution, and is directly applicable to the study of flexible systems such as intrinsically disordered proteins and multi-domain proteins with unstructured regions. The Ensemble Optimization Method (EOM) [Bernadó et al. (2007 ▶). J. Am. Chem. Soc. 129, 5656–5664] was the first approach introducing the concept of ensemble fitting of the SAXS data from flexible systems. In this approach, a large pool of macromolecules covering the available conformational space is generated and a sub-ensemble of conformers coexisting in solution is selected guided by the fit to the experimental SAXS data. This paper presents a series of new developments and advancements to the method, including significantly enhanced functionality and also quantitative metrics for the characterization of the results. Building on the original concept of ensemble optimization, the algorithms for pool generation have been redesigned to allow for the construction of partially or completely symmetric oligomeric models, and the selection procedure was improved to refine the size of the ensemble. Quantitative measures of the flexibility of the system studied, based on the characteristic integral parameters of the selected ensemble, are introduced. These improvements are implemented in the new EOM version 2.0, and the capabilities as well as inherent limitations of the ensemble approach in SAXS, and of EOM 2.0 in particular, are discussed. PMID:25866658

  15. An intermittent control model of flexible human gait using a stable manifold of saddle-type unstable limit cycle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chunjiang; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Kiyono, Ken; Morasso, Pietro; Nomura, Taishin

    2014-12-06

    Stability of human gait is the ability to maintain upright posture during walking against external perturbations. It is a complex process determined by a number of cross-related factors, including gait trajectory, joint impedance and neural control strategies. Here, we consider a control strategy that can achieve stable steady-state periodic gait while maintaining joint flexibility with the lowest possible joint impedance. To this end, we carried out a simulation study of a heel-toe footed biped model with hip, knee and ankle joints and a heavy head-arms-trunk element, working in the sagittal plane. For simplicity, the model assumes a periodic desired joint angle trajectory and joint torques generated by a set of feed-forward and proportional-derivative feedback controllers, whereby the joint impedance is parametrized by the feedback gains. We could show that a desired steady-state gait accompanied by the desired joint angle trajectory can be established as a stable limit cycle (LC) for the feedback controller with an appropriate set of large feedback gains. Moreover, as the feedback gains are decreased for lowering the joint stiffness, stability of the LC is lost only in a few dimensions, while leaving the remaining large number of dimensions quite stable: this means that the LC becomes saddle-type, with a low-dimensional unstable manifold and a high-dimensional stable manifold. Remarkably, the unstable manifold remains of low dimensionality even when the feedback gains are decreased far below the instability point. We then developed an intermittent neural feedback controller that is activated only for short periods of time at an optimal phase of each gait stride. We characterized the robustness of this design by showing that it can better stabilize the unstable LC with small feedback gains, leading to a flexible gait, and in particular we demonstrated that such an intermittent controller performs better if it drives the state point to the stable manifold, rather

  16. An intermittent control model of flexible human gait using a stable manifold of saddle-type unstable limit cycle dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Chunjiang; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Kiyono, Ken; Morasso, Pietro; Nomura, Taishin

    2014-01-01

    Stability of human gait is the ability to maintain upright posture during walking against external perturbations. It is a complex process determined by a number of cross-related factors, including gait trajectory, joint impedance and neural control strategies. Here, we consider a control strategy that can achieve stable steady-state periodic gait while maintaining joint flexibility with the lowest possible joint impedance. To this end, we carried out a simulation study of a heel-toe footed biped model with hip, knee and ankle joints and a heavy head-arms-trunk element, working in the sagittal plane. For simplicity, the model assumes a periodic desired joint angle trajectory and joint torques generated by a set of feed-forward and proportional-derivative feedback controllers, whereby the joint impedance is parametrized by the feedback gains. We could show that a desired steady-state gait accompanied by the desired joint angle trajectory can be established as a stable limit cycle (LC) for the feedback controller with an appropriate set of large feedback gains. Moreover, as the feedback gains are decreased for lowering the joint stiffness, stability of the LC is lost only in a few dimensions, while leaving the remaining large number of dimensions quite stable: this means that the LC becomes saddle-type, with a low-dimensional unstable manifold and a high-dimensional stable manifold. Remarkably, the unstable manifold remains of low dimensionality even when the feedback gains are decreased far below the instability point. We then developed an intermittent neural feedback controller that is activated only for short periods of time at an optimal phase of each gait stride. We characterized the robustness of this design by showing that it can better stabilize the unstable LC with small feedback gains, leading to a flexible gait, and in particular we demonstrated that such an intermittent controller performs better if it drives the state point to the stable manifold, rather

  17. Modeling strategies of ultrasound backscattering by blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guy, Cloutier; David, Savery; Isabelle, Fontaine; Beng Ghee, Teh

    2002-05-01

    Tissue characterization using ultrasound (US) scattering can allow the identification of relevant cellular biophysical information noninvasively. The characterization of the level of red blood cell (RBC) aggregation is one of the proposed applications. Different modeling strategies have been investigated by our group to better understand the mechanisms of US backscattering by blood, and to propose relevant measurable indices of aggregation. It could be hypothesized from these studies that the microstructure formed by RBC clusters is a main determinant of US backscattered power. The structure factor, which is related to the Fourier transform of the microscopic density function of RBCs, is described and used to explain the scattering behavior for different spatial arrangements of nonaggregated and aggregated RBCs. The microscopic density function was described by the Percus-Yevick approximation (nonaggregated RBCs), and for aggregated RBCs, by the Poisson distribution, the Neyman-Scott point process, and very recently by a flow-dependent rheological model. These statistical and microrheological models allowed the study of US backscattered power as a function of the hematocrit, scatterers' size, insonification frequency, and level of RBC aggregation. Experimental results available from the literature were used to validate the different approaches. [Work supported by Canadian Institutes of Health Research (MOP-36467), HSFQ, FCAR, and FRSQ.

  18. Advantage of Animal Models with Metabolic Flexibility for Space Research Beyond Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griko, Yuri V.; Rask, Jon C.; Raychev, Raycho

    2017-01-01

    As the world's space agencies and commercial entities continue to expand beyond Low Earth Orbit (LEO), novel approaches to carry out biomedical experiments with animals are required to address the challenge of adaptation to space flight and new planetary environments. The extended time and distance of space travel along with reduced involvement of Earth-based mission support increases the cumulative impact of the risks encountered in space. To respond to these challenges, it becomes increasingly important to develop the capability to manage an organism's self-regulatory control system, which would enable survival in extraterrestrial environments. To significantly reduce the risk to animals on future long duration space missions, we propose the use of metabolically flexible animal models as "pathfinders," which are capable of tolerating the environmental extremes exhibited in spaceflight, including altered gravity, exposure to space radiation, chemically reactive planetary environments and temperature extremes. In this report we survey several of the pivotal metabolic flexibility studies and discuss the importance of utilizing animal models with metabolic flexibility with particular attention given to the ability to suppress the organism's metabolism in spaceflight experiments beyond LEO. The presented analysis demonstrates the adjuvant benefits of these factors to minimize damage caused by exposure to spaceflight and extreme planetary environments. Examples of microorganisms and animal models with dormancy capabilities suitable for space research are considered in the context of their survivability under hostile or deadly environments outside of Earth. Potential steps toward implementation of metabolic control technology in spaceflight architecture and its benefits for animal experiments and manned space exploration missions are discussed.

  19. Model reference adaptive control of flexible robots in the presence of sudden load changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinvorth, Rodrigo; Kaufman, Howard; Neat, Gregory

    1991-01-01

    Direct command generator tracker based model reference adaptive control (MRAC) algorithms are applied to the dynamics for a flexible-joint arm in the presence of sudden load changes. Because of the need to satisfy a positive real condition, such MRAC procedures are designed so that a feedforward augmented output follows the reference model output, thus, resulting in an ultimately bounded rather than zero output error. Thus, modifications are suggested and tested that: (1) incorporate feedforward into the reference model's output as well as the plant's output, and (2) incorporate a derivative term into only the process feedforward loop. The results of these simulations give a response with zero steady state model following error, and thus encourage further use of MRAC for more complex flexibile robotic systems.

  20. Transform methods for precision continuum and control models of flexible space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lupi, Victor D.; Turner, James D.; Chun, Hon M.

    1991-01-01

    An open loop optimal control algorithm is developed for general flexible structures, based on Laplace transform methods. A distributed parameter model of the structure is first presented, followed by a derivation of the optimal control algorithm. The control inputs are expressed in terms of their Fourier series expansions, so that a numerical solution can be easily obtained. The algorithm deals directly with the transcendental transfer functions from control inputs to outputs of interest, and structural deformation penalties, as well as penalties on control effort, are included in the formulation. The algorithm is applied to several structures of increasing complexity to show its generality.

  1. Molecular dynamics study of liquid methanol with a flexible three-site model

    SciTech Connect

    Palinkas, G.; Hawlicka, E.; Heinzinger, K.

    1987-07-30

    A new potential is presented which describes the methanol-methanol interactions on the basis of a flexible three-site model. The intramolecular part of the potential has been derived from spectroscopic data. A molecular dynamics study has been performed with this potential at 286 K. The structural properties of liquid methanol calculated from the simulations are in good agreement with X-ray measurements. The average geometrical arrangement of nearest neighbors and their hydrogen bonding are discussed. The potential describes correctly the gas-liquid frequency shifts of the intramolecular vibrations. Several thermodynamic properties calculated from the simulation compare favorably with experimental results.

  2. A salamander's flexible spinal network for locomotion, modeled at two levels of abstraction.

    PubMed

    Knüsel, Jeremie; Bicanski, Andrej; Ryczko, Dimitri; Cabelguen, Jean-Marie; Ijspeert, Auke Jan

    2013-08-01

    Animals have to coordinate a large number of muscles in different ways to efficiently move at various speeds and in different and complex environments. This coordination is in large part based on central pattern generators (CPGs). These neural networks are capable of producing complex rhythmic patterns when activated and modulated by relatively simple control signals. Although the generation of particular gaits by CPGs has been successfully modeled at many levels of abstraction, the principles underlying the generation and selection of a diversity of patterns of coordination in a single neural network are still not well understood. The present work specifically addresses the flexibility of the spinal locomotor networks in salamanders. We compare an abstract oscillator model and a CPG network composed of integrate-and-fire neurons, according to their ability to account for different axial patterns of coordination, and in particular the transition in gait between swimming and stepping modes. The topology of the network is inspired by models of the lamprey CPG, complemented by additions based on experimental data from isolated spinal cords of salamanders. Oscillatory centers of the limbs are included in a way that preserves the flexibility of the axial network. Similarly to the selection of forward and backward swimming in lamprey models via different excitation to the first axial segment, we can account for the modification of the axial coordination pattern between swimming and forward stepping on land in the salamander model, via different uncoupled frequencies in limb versus axial oscillators (for the same level of excitation). These results transfer partially to a more realistic model based on formal spiking neurons, and we discuss the difference between the abstract oscillator model and the model built with formal spiking neurons.

  3. Modeling the transient aerodynamic effects during the motion of a flexible trailing edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, T.; Seume, J. R.

    2016-09-01

    Wind turbine blades have been becoming longer and more slender during the last few decades. The longer lever arm results in higher stresses at the blade root. Hence, the unsteady loads induced by turbulence, gust, or wind shear increase. One promising way to control these loads is to use flexible trailing edges near the blade tip. The unsteady effects which appear during the motion of a flexible trailing edge must be considered for the load calculation during the design process because of their high influence on aeroelastic effects and hence on the fatigue loads. This is not yet possible in most of the wind turbine simulation environments. Consequently, an empirical model is developed in the present study which accounts for unsteady effects during the motion of the trailing edge. The model is based on Fourier analyses of results generated with Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulations of a typical thin airfoil with a deformable trailing edge. The validation showed that the model fits Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) results simulated with a random time series of the deflection angle.

  4. Flexible Wing Model for Structural Sizing and Multidisciplinary Design Optimization of a Strut-Braced Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gern, Frank H.; Naghshineh, Amir H.; Sulaeman, Erwin; Kapania, Rakesh K.; Haftka, Raphael T.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes a structural and aeroelastic model for wing sizing and weight calculation of a strut-braced wing. The wing weight is calculated using a newly developed structural weight analysis module considering the special nature of strut-braced wings. A specially developed aeroelastic model enables one to consider wing flexibility and spanload redistribution during in-flight maneuvers. The structural model uses a hexagonal wing-box featuring skin panels, stringers, and spar caps, whereas the aerodynamics part employs a linearized transonic vortex lattice method. Thus, the wing weight may be calculated from the rigid or flexible wing spanload. The calculations reveal the significant influence of the strut on the bending material weight of the wing. The use of a strut enables one to design a wing with thin airfoils without weight penalty. The strut also influences wing spanload and deformations. Weight savings are not only possible by calculation and iterative resizing of the wing structure according to the actual design loads. Moreover, as an advantage over the cantilever wing, employment of the strut twist moment for further load alleviation leads to increased savings in structural weight.

  5. Molecular modelling of the three-dimensional structure and conformational flexibility of bacterial lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Kastowsky, M; Gutberlet, T; Bradaczek, H

    1992-01-01

    Molecular modelling techniques have been applied to calculate the three-dimensional architecture and the conformational flexibility of a complete bacterial S-form lipopolysaccharide (LPS) consisting of a hexaacyl lipid A identical to Escherichia coli lipid A, a complete Salmonella typhimurium core oligosaccharide portion, and four repeating units of the Salmonella serogroup B O-specific chain. X-ray powder diffraction experiments on dried samples of LPS were carried out to obtain information on the dimensions of the various LPS partial structures. Up to the Ra-LPS structure, the calculated model dimensions were in good agreement with experimental data and were 2.4 nm for lipid A, 2.8 nm for Re-LPS, 3.5 nm for Rd-LPS, and 4.4 nm for Ra-LPS. The maximum length of a stretched S-form LPS model bearing four repeating units was evaluated to be 9.6 nm; however, energetically favored LPS conformations showed the O-specific chain bent with respect to the Ra-LPS portion and significantly smaller dimensions (about 5.0 to 5.5 nm). According to the calculations, the Ra-LPS moiety has an approximately cylindrical shape and is conformationally well defined, in contrast to the O-specific chain, which was found to be the most flexible portion within the molecule. PMID:1624466

  6. Development, Analysis and Testing of the High Speed Research Flexible Semispan Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, David M.; Spain, Charles V.; Turnock, David L.; Rausch, Russ D.; Hamouda, M-Nabil; Vogler, William A.; Stockwell, Alan E.

    1999-01-01

    This report presents the work performed by Lockheed Martin Engineering and Sciences (LMES) in support of the High Speed Research (HSR) Flexible Semispan Model (FSM) wind-tunnel test. The test was conducted in order to assess the aerodynamic and aeroelastic character of a flexible high speed civil transport wing. Data was acquired for the purpose of code validation and trend evaluation for this type of wing. The report describes a number of activities in preparing for and conducting the wind-tunnel test. These included coordination of the design and fabrication, development of analytical models, analysis/hardware correlation, performance of laboratory tests, monitoring of model safety issues, and wind-tunnel data acquisition and reduction. Descriptions and relevant evaluations associated with the pretest data are given in sections 1 through 6, followed by pre- and post-test flutter analysis in section 7, and the results of the aerodynamics/loads test in section 8. Finally, section 9 provides some recommendations based on lessons learned throughout the FSM program.

  7. Developing Flexible Discrete Event Simulation Models in an Uncertain Policy Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, David J.; Fayez, Sam; Steele, Martin J.

    2011-01-01

    On February 1st, 2010 U.S. President Barack Obama submitted to Congress his proposed budget request for Fiscal Year 2011. This budget included significant changes to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), including the proposed cancellation of the Constellation Program. This change proved to be controversial and Congressional approval of the program's official cancellation would take many months to complete. During this same period an end-to-end discrete event simulation (DES) model of Constellation operations was being built through the joint efforts of Productivity Apex Inc. (PAl) and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) teams under the guidance of NASA. The uncertainty in regards to the Constellation program presented a major challenge to the DES team, as to: continue the development of this program-of-record simulation, while at the same time remain prepared for possible changes to the program. This required the team to rethink how it would develop it's model and make it flexible enough to support possible future vehicles while at the same time be specific enough to support the program-of-record. This challenge was compounded by the fact that this model was being developed through the traditional DES process-orientation which lacked the flexibility of object-oriented approaches. The team met this challenge through significant pre-planning that led to the "modularization" of the model's structure by identifying what was generic, finding natural logic break points, and the standardization of interlogic numbering system. The outcome of this work resulted in a model that not only was ready to be easily modified to support any future rocket programs, but also a model that was extremely structured and organized in a way that facilitated rapid verification. This paper discusses in detail the process the team followed to build this model and the many advantages this method provides builders of traditional process-oriented discrete

  8. Rigid-flexible outer sheath model using slider linkage locking mechanism and air pressure for endoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Akihiko; Matsumiya, Kiyoshi; Masamune, Ken; Liao, Hongen; Dohi, Takeyoshi

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to develop an outer sheath for flexible endoscopic manipulators. This sheath can switch two states including flexible and rigid, and make a rigid curved path for inserting manipulators. The flexible mode can be curved into a required shape. The rigid mode can hold the shape of the sheath, and then keep the path for instruments. Through the managed path, the flexible manipulators become easy to reach the target. We proposed a serial multi joint model to realize the flexible mechanism. This model is composed of a set of frame units which are connected serially. Each unit can be rotated to a given angle around the center of the joint. We developed a slider-link mechanism and a gear stopper controlled by air pressure for rigid mode. We designed and fabricated the prototype with a diameter of 16 mm and length of 290 mm. The experiment showed that the device could be switched from the flexible mode to the rigid mode when the air pressure was over 150 kPa, and each joint could hold its angle against the maximum 400 mNm. The phantom experiment showed that the flexible devices are possible to transmit the wire tension to the endpoint of the manipulator without changing the curving shape with by the developed outer sheath device.

  9. Assessment of excitation mechanisms and structural flexibility influence in excitation propagation in multi-megawatt wind turbine gearboxes: Experiments and flexible multibody model optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helsen, Jan; Marrant, Ben; Vanhollebeke, Frederik; De Coninck, Filip; Berckmans, Dries; Vandepitte, Dirk; Desmet, Wim

    2013-10-01

    Reliable gearbox design calculations require sufficient insight in gearbox dynamics, which is determined by the interaction between the different excitation mechanisms and the gearbox modal behavior. Both external gearbox excitation originating from the wind turbine drive train and internal gearbox excitation are important. Moreover with regard to the modal behavior the different gearbox structural components: planet carrier, shafts and housing are of influence. The main objective of this article is the experimental investigation of the interaction between the different excitation mechanisms and the gearbox modal behavior. The insights gathered are used to prove the need for accurate gear mesh representation and structural flexibility within the corresponding flexible multibody gearbox simulation model. Experiments are conducted on a dynamic 13.2 MW test facility on which two multi-megawatt wind turbine gearboxes are placed back to back and subjected to a speed run-up. Measurement sensors consist of bearing displacement sensors, torque sensors, encoders and accelerometers distributed over the gearbox. Excitation order amplitudes on different locations in the gearbox are determined by means of a Time Varying Discrete Fourier Transform (TVDFT) order tracking on the measured sensor signals. Moreover the propagation of this excitation throughout the gearbox is assessed. Relating the orders to the corresponding excitation source allows the definition of order influence regions within the gearbox. The interaction between the gear mesh order excitation and structural flexibility is shown.

  10. A Flexible Hierarchical Bayesian Modeling Technique for Risk Analysis of Major Accidents.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongyang; Khan, Faisal; Veitch, Brian

    2017-02-28

    Safety analysis of rare events with potentially catastrophic consequences is challenged by data scarcity and uncertainty. Traditional causation-based approaches, such as fault tree and event tree (used to model rare event), suffer from a number of weaknesses. These include the static structure of the event causation, lack of event occurrence data, and need for reliable prior information. In this study, a new hierarchical Bayesian modeling based technique is proposed to overcome these drawbacks. The proposed technique can be used as a flexible technique for risk analysis of major accidents. It enables both forward and backward analysis in quantitative reasoning and the treatment of interdependence among the model parameters. Source-to-source variability in data sources is also taken into account through a robust probabilistic safety analysis. The applicability of the proposed technique has been demonstrated through a case study in marine and offshore industry.

  11. A model of a flexible anguilliform swimmer driven by a central pattern generator with proprioceptive feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamlet, Christina; Tytell, Eric; Hoffman, Kathleen; Fauci, Lisa

    2015-11-01

    The swimming of a simple vertebrate, the lamprey, can shed light on how a flexible body can couple with a fluid environment to swim rapidly and efficiently. Animals use proprioceptive sensory information to sense how their bodies are bending, and then adjust the neural signals to their muscles to improve performance. We will present recent progress in the development of a computational model of a lamprey swimming in a Navier-Stokes fluid where a simple central pattern generator model, based on phase oscillators, is coupled to the evolving body dynamics of the swimmer through curvature and curvature derivative feedback. Such feedback can be positive (frequency decreasing), negative (frequency increasing), or mixed (positive to one side of the body and negative to the other, or vice versa). We will examine how the emergent swimming behavior and cost of transport depends upon these functional forms of proprioceptive feedback chosen in the model.

  12. A Flight Dynamics Model for a Multi-Actuated Flexible Rocket Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, Jeb S.

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive set of motion equations for a multi-actuated flight vehicle is presented. The dynamics are derived from a vector approach that generalizes the classical linear perturbation equations for flexible launch vehicles into a coupled three-dimensional model. The effects of nozzle and aerosurface inertial coupling, sloshing propellant, and elasticity are incorporated without restrictions on the position, orientation, or number of model elements. The present formulation is well suited to matrix implementation for large-scale linear stability and sensitivity analysis and is also shown to be extensible to nonlinear time-domain simulation through the application of a special form of Lagrange s equations in quasi-coordinates. The model is validated through frequency-domain response comparison with a high-fidelity planar implementation.

  13. Finite element analysis of flexible, rotating blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgee, Oliver G.

    1987-01-01

    A reference guide that can be used when using the finite element method to approximate the static and dynamic behavior of flexible, rotating blades is given. Important parameters such as twist, sweep, camber, co-planar shell elements, centrifugal loads, and inertia properties are studied. Comparisons are made between NASTRAN elements through published benchmark tests. The main purpose is to summarize blade modeling strategies and to document capabilities and limitations (for flexible, rotating blades) of various NASTRAN elements.

  14. Flexible models for spike count data with both over- and under- dispersion.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Ian H

    2016-08-01

    A key observation in systems neuroscience is that neural responses vary, even in controlled settings where stimuli are held constant. Many statistical models assume that trial-to-trial spike count variability is Poisson, but there is considerable evidence that neurons can be substantially more or less variable than Poisson depending on the stimuli, attentional state, and brain area. Here we examine a set of spike count models based on the Conway-Maxwell-Poisson (COM-Poisson) distribution that can flexibly account for both over- and under-dispersion in spike count data. We illustrate applications of this noise model for Bayesian estimation of tuning curves and peri-stimulus time histograms. We find that COM-Poisson models with group/observation-level dispersion, where spike count variability is a function of time or stimulus, produce more accurate descriptions of spike counts compared to Poisson models as well as negative-binomial models often used as alternatives. Since dispersion is one determinant of parameter standard errors, COM-Poisson models are also likely to yield more accurate model comparison. More generally, these methods provide a useful, model-based framework for inferring both the mean and variability of neural responses.

  15. Regulatory network reconstruction using an integral additive model with flexible kernel functions

    PubMed Central

    Novikov, Eugene; Barillot, Emmanuel

    2008-01-01

    Background Reconstruction of regulatory networks is one of the most challenging tasks of systems biology. A limited amount of experimental data and little prior knowledge make the problem difficult to solve. Although models that are currently used for inferring regulatory networks are sometimes able to make useful predictions about the structures and mechanisms of molecular interactions, there is still a strong demand to develop increasingly universal and accurate approaches for network reconstruction. Results The additive regulation model is represented by a set of differential equations and is frequently used for network inference from time series data. Here we generalize this model by converting differential equations into integral equations with adjustable kernel functions. These kernel functions can be selected based on prior knowledge or defined through iterative improvement in data analysis. This makes the integral model very flexible and thus capable of covering a broad range of biological systems more adequately and specifically than previous models. Conclusion We reconstructed network structures from artificial and real experimental data using differential and integral inference models. The artificial data were simulated using mathematical models implemented in JDesigner. The real data were publicly available yeast cell cycle microarray time series. The integral model outperformed the differential one for all cases. In the integral model, we tested the zero-degree polynomial and single exponential kernels. Further improvements could be expected if the kernel were selected more specifically depending on the system. PMID:18218091

  16. Hydrogel core flexible matrix composite (H-FMC) actuators: theory and preliminary modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dicker, M. P. M.; Weaver, P. M.; Rossiter, J. M.; Bond, I. P.

    2014-09-01

    The underlying theory of a new actuator concept based on hydrogel core flexible matrix composites (H-FMC) is presented. The key principle that underlines the H-FMC actuator operation is that the three-dimensional swelling of a hydrogel is partially constrained in order to improve the amount of useful work done. The partial constraint is applied to the hydrogel by a flexible matrix composite (FMC) that minimizes the hydrogel's volume expansion while swelling. This constraint serves to maximize the fixed charge density and resulting osmotic pressure, the driving force behind actuation. In addition, for certain FMC fibre orientations the Poisson's ratio of the anisotropic FMC laminate converts previously unused hydrogel swelling in the radial and circumferential directions into useful axial strains. The potential benefit of the H-FMC concept to hydrogel actuator performance is shown through comparison of force-stroke curves and evaluation of improvements in useful actuation work. The model used to achieve this couples chemical and electrical components, represented with the Nernst-Plank and Poisson equations, as well as a linear elastic mechanical material model, encompassing limited geometric nonlinearities. It is found that improvements in useful actuation work in the order of 1500% over bare hydrogel performance are achieved by the H-FMC concept. A parametric study is also undertaken to determine the effect of various FMC design parameters on actuator free strain and blocking stress. A comparison to other actuator concepts is also included.

  17. Cognitive flexibility impairment and reduced frontal cortex BDNF expression in the ouabain model of mania.

    PubMed

    Amodeo, Dionisio A; Grospe, Gena; Zang, Hui; Dwivedi, Yogesh; Ragozzino, Michael E

    2017-03-14

    Central infusion of the Na+/K+-ATPase inhibitor, ouabain in rats serves as an animal model of mania because it leads to hyperactivity, as well as reproduces ion dysregulation and reduced brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels similar to that observed in bipolar disorder. Bipolar disorder is also associated with cognitive inflexibility and working memory deficits. It is unknown whether ouabain treatment in rats leads to similar cognitive flexibility and working memory deficits. The present study examined the effects of an intracerebral ventricular infusion of ouabain in rats on spontaneous alternation, probabilistic reversal learning and BDNF expression levels in the frontal cortex. Ouabain treatment significantly increased locomotor activity, but did not affect alternation performance in a Y-maze. Ouabain treatment selectively impaired reversal learning in a spatial discrimination task using an 80/20 probabilistic reinforcement procedure. The reversal learning deficit in ouabain-treated rats resulted from an impaired ability to maintain a new choice pattern (increased regressive errors). Ouabain treatment also decreased sensitivity to negative feedback during the initial phase of reversal learning. Expression of BDNF mRNA and protein levels was downregulated in the frontal cortex which also negatively correlated with regressive errors. These findings suggest that the ouabain model of mania may be useful in understanding the neuropathophysiology that contributes to cognitive flexibility deficits and test potential treatments to alleviate cognitive deficits in bipolar disorder.

  18. Static Aeroelastic and Longitudinal Trim Model of Flexible Wing Aircraft Using Finite-Element Vortex-Lattice Coupled Solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, Eric; Nguyen, Nhan; Trinh, Khanh

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a static aeroelastic model and longitudinal trim model for the analysis of a flexible wing transport aircraft. The static aeroelastic model is built using a structural model based on finite-element modeling and coupled to an aerodynamic model that uses vortex-lattice solution. An automatic geometry generation tool is used to close the loop between the structural and aerodynamic models. The aeroelastic model is extended for the development of a three degree-of-freedom longitudinal trim model for an aircraft with flexible wings. The resulting flexible aircraft longitudinal trim model is used to simultaneously compute the static aeroelastic shape for the aircraft model and the longitudinal state inputs to maintain an aircraft trim state. The framework is applied to an aircraft model based on the NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM) with wing structures allowed to flexibly deformed referred to as the Elastically Shaped Aircraft Concept (ESAC). The ESAC wing mass and stiffness properties are based on a baseline "stiff" values representative of current generation transport aircraft.

  19. Implementations of a Flexible Framework for Managing Geologic Sequestration Modeling Projects

    SciTech Connect

    White, Signe K.; Gosink, Luke J.; Sivaramakrishnan, Chandrika; Black, Gary D.; Purohit, Sumit; Bacon, Diana H.; Hou, Zhangshuan; Lin, Guang; Gorton, Ian; Bonneville, Alain

    2013-08-06

    Numerical simulation is a standard practice used to support designing, operating, and monitoring CO2 injection projects. Although a variety of computational tools have been developed that support the numerical simulation process, many are single-purpose or platform specific and have a prescribed workflow that may or may not be suitable for a particular project. We are developing an open-source, flexible framework named Velo that provides a knowledge management infrastructure and tools to support modeling and simulation for various types of projects in a number of scientific domains. The Geologic Sequestration Software Suite (GS3) is a version of this framework with features and tools specifically tailored for geologic sequestration studies. Because of its general nature, GS3 is being employed in a variety of ways on projects with differing goals. GS3 is being used to support the Sim-SEQ international model comparison study, by providing a collaborative framework for the modeling teams and providing tools for model comparison. Another customized deployment of GS3 has been made to support the permit application process. In this case, GS3 is being used to manage data in support of conceptual model development and provide documentation and provenance for numerical simulations. An additional customized deployment of GS3 is being created for use by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US-EPA) to aid in the CO2 injection permit application review process in one of its regions. These use cases demonstrate GS3’s flexibility, utility, and broad applicability

  20. Flexible climate modeling systems: Lessons from Snowball Earth, Titan and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierrehumbert, R. T.

    2007-12-01

    Climate models are only useful to the extent that real understanding can be extracted from them. Most leading- edge problems in climate change, paleoclimate and planetary climate require a high degree of flexibility in terms of incorporating model physics -- for example in allowing methane or CO2 to be a condensible substance instead of water vapor. This puts a premium on model design that allows easy modification, and on physical parameterizations that are close to fundamentals with as little empirical ad-hoc formulation as possible. I will provide examples from two approaches to this problem we have been using at the University of Chicago. The first is the FOAM general circulation model, which is a clean single-executable Fortran-77/c code supported by auxiliary applications in Python and Java. The second is a new approach based on using Python as a shell for assembling building blocks in compiled-code into full models. Applications to Snowball Earth, Titan and Mars, as well as pedagogical uses, will be discussed. One painful lesson we have learned is that Fortran-95 is a major impediment to portability and cross-language interoperability; in this light the trend toward Fortran-95 in major modelling groups is seen as a significant step backwards. In this talk, I will focus on modeling projects employing a full representation of atmospheric fluid dynamics, rather than "intermediate complexity" models in which the associated transports are parameterized.

  1. A flexible model for the mean and variance functions, with application to medical cost data.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinsong; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Daowen; Shih, Ya-Chen T

    2013-10-30

    Medical cost data are often skewed to the right and heteroscedastic, having a nonlinear relation with covariates. To tackle these issues, we consider an extension to generalized linear models by assuming nonlinear associations of covariates in the mean function and allowing the variance to be an unknown but smooth function of the mean. We make no further assumption on the distributional form. The unknown functions are described by penalized splines, and the estimation is carried out using nonparametric quasi-likelihood. Simulation studies show the flexibility and advantages of our approach. We apply the model to the annual medical costs of heart failure patients in the clinical data repository at the University of Virginia Hospital System.

  2. Modeling and control of flow-induced vibrations of a flexible hydrofoil in viscous flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caverly, Ryan James; Li, Chenyang; Chae, Eun Jung; Forbes, James Richard; Young, Yin Lu

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a reduced-order model (ROM) of the flow-induced vibrations of a flexible cantilevered hydrofoil is developed and used to design an active feedback controller. The ROM is developed using data from high-fidelity viscous fluid-structure interaction (FSI) simulations and includes nonlinear terms to accurately capture the effect of lock-in. An active linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) controller is designed based on a linearization of the ROM and is implemented in simulation with the ROM and the high-fidelity viscous FSI model. A controller saturation method is also presented that ensures that the control force applied to the system remains within a prescribed range. Simulation results demonstrate that the LQG controller successfully suppresses vibrations in both the ROM and viscous FSI simulations using a reasonable amount of control force.

  3. Flutter of High-Speed Civil Transport Flexible Semispan Model: Time-Frequency Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chabalko, Christopher C.; Hajj, Muhammad R.; Silva, Walter A.

    2006-01-01

    Time/frequency analysis of fluctuations measured by pressure taps and strain gauges in the experimental studies of the flexible semispan model of a high-speed civil transport wing configuration is performed. The interest is in determining the coupling between the aerodynamic loads and structural motions that led to the hard flutter conditions and loss of the model. The results show that, away from the hard flutter point, the aerodynamic loads at all pressure taps near the wing tip and the structural motions contained the same frequency components. On the other hand, in the flow conditions leading to the hard flutter, the frequency content of the pressure fluctuations near the leading and trailing edges varied significantly. This led to contribution to the structural motions over two frequency ranges. The ratio of these ranges was near 2:1, which suggests the possibility of nonlinear structural coupling.

  4. Methodology for modeling the mechanical interaction between a reaction wheel and a flexible structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, Laila M.; Dekens, Frank G.; Basdogan, Ipek; Sievers, Lisa A.; Neville, Timothy

    2003-02-01

    This paper presents a modeling methodology used to predict the performance of a flexible structure, such as a space telescope, in the presence of an on-board vibrational disturbance source, such as a reaction wheel assembly (RWA). Both decoupled and coupled analysis methods are presented. The decoupled method relies on blocked RWA disturbances, measured with the RWA hardmounted to a rigid surface. The coupled method corrects the blocked RWA disturbance boundary conditions using 'force filters' which depend on estimates of the interface accelerances of the RWA and spacecraft. Both methods were validated on the Micro-Precision Interferometer testbed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Experimental results are encouraging, indicating that both methods provide sufficient accuracy compared to measured values; however, the coupled method provides the best results when the gyroscopic nature of the spinning RWA is captured in the RWA accelerance model. Additionally, the RWA disturbance cross spectral density terms are found to be influential.

  5. Programming of a flexible computer simulation to visualize pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic models.

    PubMed

    Lötsch, J; Kobal, G; Geisslinger, G

    2004-01-01

    Teaching pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) models can be made more effective using computer simulations. We propose the programming of educational PK or PK/PD computer simulations as an alternative to the use of pre-built simulation software. This approach has the advantage of adaptability to non-standard or complicated PK or PK/PD models. Simplicity of the programming procedure was achieved by selecting the LabVIEW programming environment. An intuitive user interface to visualize the time courses of drug concentrations or effects can be obtained with pre-built elements. The environment uses a wiring analogy that resembles electrical circuit diagrams rather than abstract programming code. The goal of high interactivity of the simulation was attained by allowing the program to run in continuously repeating loops. This makes the program behave flexibly to the user input. The programming is described with the aid of a 2-compartment PK simulation. Examples of more sophisticated simulation programs are also given where the PK/PD simulation shows drug input, concentrations in plasma, and at effect site and the effects themselves as a function of time. A multi-compartmental model of morphine, including metabolite kinetics and effects is also included. The programs are available for download from the World Wide Web at http:// www. klinik.uni-frankfurt.de/zpharm/klin/ PKPDsimulation/content.html. For pharmacokineticists who only program occasionally, there is the possibility of building the computer simulation, together with the flexible interactive simulation algorithm for clinical pharmacological teaching in the field of PK/PD models.

  6. Flexible parametric modelling of the cause-specific cumulative incidence function.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Paul C; Wilkes, Sally R; Crowther, Michael J

    2017-04-30

    Competing risks arise with time-to-event data when individuals are at risk of more than one type of event and the occurrence of one event precludes the occurrence of all other events. A useful measure with competing risks is the cause-specific cumulative incidence function (CIF), which gives the probability of experiencing a particular event as a function of follow-up time, accounting for the fact that some individuals may have a competing event. When modelling the cause-specific CIF, the most common model is a semi-parametric proportional subhazards model. In this paper, we propose the use of flexible parametric survival models to directly model the cause-specific CIF where the effect of follow-up time is modelled using restricted cubic splines. The models provide smooth estimates of the cause-specific CIF with the important advantage that the approach is easily extended to model time-dependent effects. The models can be fitted using standard survival analysis tools by a combination of data expansion and introducing time-dependent weights. Various link functions are available that allow modelling on different scales and have proportional subhazards, proportional odds and relative absolute risks as particular cases. We conduct a simulation study to evaluate how well the spline functions approximate subhazard functions with complex shapes. The methods are illustrated using data from the European Blood and Marrow Transplantation Registry showing excellent agreement between parametric estimates of the cause-specific CIF and those obtained from a semi-parametric model. We also fit models relaxing the proportional subhazards assumption using alternative link functions and/or including time-dependent effects. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. A single flexible tube in a rigid array as a model for fluidelastic instability in tube bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalifa, Ahmed; Weaver, David; Ziada, Samir

    2012-10-01

    Fluidelastic instability is considered the most critical flow induced vibration mechanism in tube and shell heat exchangers, and as such has received the most attention. The present study examines the concept of using a single flexible tube in a rigid array for predicting fluidelastic instability. The experimental work published in the open literature involving the use of a single flexible tube in a rigid array is critically reviewed. Based on this, an experiment is designed to facilitate precise control of the system parameters and to study tube response at different locations in the array. Experiments were conducted using a fully flexible array as well as a single flexible tube in the same rigid array. It is found that a single flexible tube located in the third row of a rigid parallel triangular array becomes fluidelastically unstable at essentially the same threshold as for the fully flexible array. However, when the single flexible tube is located in the first, second, fourth, or fifth rows, no instability behavior is detected. Thus, tube location inside the array significantly affects its fluidelastic stability behavior when tested as a single flexible tube in a rigid array. It is concluded that, in general, fluidelastic instability in tube arrays is caused by a combination of the damping and stiffness mechanisms. In certain cases, a single flexible tube in a rigid array will become fluidelastically unstable and provide a useful model for fundamental research and developing physical insights. However, it must be cautioned that this behavior is a special case and not generally useful for determining the stability limit of tube arrays.

  8. Flexibility Support for Homecare Applications Based on Models and Multi-Agent Technology.

    PubMed

    Armentia, Aintzane; Gangoiti, Unai; Priego, Rafael; Estévez, Elisabet; Marcos, Marga

    2015-12-17

    In developed countries, public health systems are under pressure due to the increasing percentage of population over 65. In this context, homecare based on ambient intelligence technology seems to be a suitable solution to allow elderly people to continue to enjoy the comforts of home and help optimize medical resources. Thus, current technological developments make it possible to build complex homecare applications that demand, among others, flexibility mechanisms for being able to evolve as context does (adaptability), as well as avoiding service disruptions in the case of node failure (availability). The solution proposed in this paper copes with these flexibility requirements through the whole life-cycle of the target applications: from design phase to runtime. The proposed domain modeling approach allows medical staff to design customized applications, taking into account the adaptability needs. It also guides software developers during system implementation. The application execution is managed by a multi-agent based middleware, making it possible to meet adaptation requirements, assuring at the same time the availability of the system even for stateful applications.

  9. Role of passive deformation on propulsion through a lumped torsional flexibility model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Nipun; Gupta, Amit

    2016-11-01

    Scientists and biologists have been affianced in a deeper examination of insect flight to develop an improved understanding of the role of flexibility on aerodynamic performance. Here, we mimic a flapping wing through a fluid-structure interaction framework based upon a lumped torsional flexibility model. The developed fluid and structural solvers together determine the aerodynamic forces and wing deformation, respectively. An analytical solution to the simplified single-spring structural dynamics equation is established to substantiate simulations. It is revealed that the dynamics of structural deformation is governed by the balance between inertia, stiffness and aerodynamics, where the former two oscillate at the plunging frequency and the latter oscillates at twice the plunging frequency. We demonstrate that an induced phase difference between plunging and passive pitching is responsible for a higher thrust coefficient. This phase difference is also shown to be dependent on aerodynamics to inertia and natural to plunging frequency ratios. For inertia dominated flows, pitching and plunging always remain in phase. As the aerodynamics dominates, a large phase difference is induced which is accountable for a large passive deformation and higher thrust. Authors acknowledge the financial support received from the Aeronautics Research and Development Board (ARDB) under SIGMA Project No. 1705 and thank the IIT Delhi HPC facility for computational resources.

  10. Fractional derivative and hereditary combined model for memory effects on flexible polyurethane foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elfarhani, Makram; Jarraya, Abdessalem; Abid, Said; Haddar, Mohamed

    2016-06-01

    In a quasi-static regime with cyclic loading, the force-displacement curve of flexible polyurethane exhibits complicated behavior: nonlinearity, visco-elasticity, hysteresis, residual force, etc. Beside nonlinearity and visco-elasticity, this material displays high dependence on the displacement rate and past loading history. Its dependence on compression rate helps to appropriately identify the force-displacement curve. Based on the new curve identification, the overall foam response is assumed to be a composite of a nonlinear elastic component and a visco-elastic component. The elastic component is expressed as a polynomial function in displacement, while the visco-elastic one is formulated according to the hereditary approach to represent the foam visco-elastic damping force during the loading phase and according to the fractional derivative approach during unloading to represent the visco-elastic residual force in the material. The focus of this study was to develop mathematical formulations and identification parameters to faithfully characterize the visco-elastic behavior of flexible polyurethane foam under multi-cycle compressive tests. A parameter calibration methodology based on the separation of the measurement data of each component force was established. This optimization process helps to avoid the parameter values admixture problem during the phase of numeric calculations of the same component force. The validity of the model results is checked according to the simulation accuracy, the physical significance of results and their agreement with the obtained force-displacement curve identification.

  11. Flexibility Support for Homecare Applications Based on Models and Multi-Agent Technology

    PubMed Central

    Armentia, Aintzane; Gangoiti, Unai; Priego, Rafael; Estévez, Elisabet; Marcos, Marga

    2015-01-01

    In developed countries, public health systems are under pressure due to the increasing percentage of population over 65. In this context, homecare based on ambient intelligence technology seems to be a suitable solution to allow elderly people to continue to enjoy the comforts of home and help optimize medical resources. Thus, current technological developments make it possible to build complex homecare applications that demand, among others, flexibility mechanisms for being able to evolve as context does (adaptability), as well as avoiding service disruptions in the case of node failure (availability). The solution proposed in this paper copes with these flexibility requirements through the whole life-cycle of the target applications: from design phase to runtime. The proposed domain modeling approach allows medical staff to design customized applications, taking into account the adaptability needs. It also guides software developers during system implementation. The application execution is managed by a multi-agent based middleware, making it possible to meet adaptation requirements, assuring at the same time the availability of the system even for stateful applications. PMID:26694416

  12. The value of flexibility in conservation financing.

    PubMed

    Lennox, Gareth D; Fargione, Joseph; Spector, Sacha; Williams, Gwyn; Armsworth, Paul R

    2016-06-07

    Land-acquisition strategies employed by conservation organizations vary in their flexibility. Conservation-planning theory largely fails to reflect this by presenting models that are either extremely inflexible-parcel acquisitions are irreversible and budgets are fixed-or extremely flexible-previously acquired parcels can readily be sold. This latter approach, the selling of protected areas, is infeasible or problematic in many situations. We considered the value to conservation organizations of increasing the flexibility of their land-acquisition strategies through their approach to financing deals. Specifically, we modeled 2 acquisition-financing methods commonly used by conservation organizations: borrowing and budget carry-over. Using simulated data, we compared results from these models with those from an inflexible fixed-budget model and an extremely flexible selling model in which previous acquisitions could be sold to fund new acquisitions. We then examined 3 case studies of how conservation organizations use borrowing and budget carry-over in practice. Model comparisons showed that borrowing and budget carry-over always returned considerably higher rewards than the fixed-budget model. How they performed relative to the selling model depended on the relative conservation value of past acquisitions. Both the models and case studies showed that incorporating flexibility through borrowing or budget carry-over gives conservation organizations the ability to purchase parcels of higher conservation value than when budgets are fixed without the problems associated with the selling of protected areas.

  13. Flexible Learning in a Digital World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collis, Betty; Moonen, Jef

    2002-01-01

    Defines flexible learning and describes components of flexible learning in higher education, including technology, pedagogy or instructional approach, implementation strategies, and institutional framework. Considers factors constraining learning flexibility; changing student characteristics; and the need for lifelong learning, particularly in the…

  14. Study of design and control of remote manipulators. Modeling manipulator arms with distributed flexibility for design and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Book, W. J.

    1974-01-01

    The interactions of control system and distributed flexible structural dynamics is explored for mechanical arms. A modeling process using 4 x 4 transfer matrices is described which permits the closed loop response of many current arm configurations to be evaluated. Root locus, frequency response, modal shapes, and time impulse response have all been obtained from the digital computer implementation of this model, which is oriented to arm design and allows for easy variation of the arm configuration through data cards. The model corresponds with experimentally observed natural frequencies with an average error of less than 5% in the first three flexible modes in the seven cases considered. The model was used to explore the limits imposed by structural flexibility on a nondimensionalized two link arm with one and two joints for planar motion.

  15. Conductance Thin Film Model of Flexible Organic Thin Film Device using COMSOL Multiphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carradero-Santiago, Carolyn; Vedrine-Pauléus, Josee

    We developed a virtual model to analyze the electrical conductivity of multilayered thin films placed above a graphene conducting and flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate. The organic layers of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) as a hole conducting layer, poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT), as a p-type, phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) and as n-type, with aluminum as a top conductor. COMSOL Multiphysics was the software we used to develop the virtual model to analyze potential variations and conductivity through the thin-film layers. COMSOL Multiphysics software allows simulation and modeling of physical phenomena represented by differential equations such as heat transfer, fluid flow, electromagnetism, and structural mechanics. In this work, using the AC/DC, electric currents module we defined the geometry of the model and properties for each of the six layers: PET/graphene/PEDOT:PSS/P3HT/PCBM/aluminum. We analyzed the model with varying thicknesses of graphene and active layers (P3HT/PCBM). This simulation allowed us to analyze the electrical conductivity, and visualize the model with varying voltage potential, or bias across the plates, useful for applications in solar cell devices.

  16. Competing quantum effects in the dynamics of a flexible water model.

    PubMed

    Habershon, Scott; Markland, Thomas E; Manolopoulos, David E

    2009-07-14

    Numerous studies have identified large quantum mechanical effects in the dynamics of liquid water. In this paper, we suggest that these effects may have been overestimated due to the use of rigid water models and flexible models in which the intramolecular interactions were described using simple harmonic functions. To demonstrate this, we introduce a new simple point charge model for liquid water, q-TIP4P/F, in which the O-H stretches are described by Morse-type functions. We have parametrized this model to give the correct liquid structure, diffusion coefficient, and infrared absorption frequencies in quantum (path integral-based) simulations. The model also reproduces the experimental temperature variation of the liquid density and affords reasonable agreement with the experimental melting temperature of hexagonal ice at atmospheric pressure. By comparing classical and quantum simulations of the liquid, we find that quantum mechanical fluctuations increase the rates of translational diffusion and orientational relaxation in our model by a factor of around 1.15. This effect is much smaller than that observed in all previous simulations of empirical water models, which have found a quantum effect of at least 1.4 regardless of the quantum simulation method or the water model employed. The small quantum effect in our model is a result of two competing phenomena. Intermolecular zero point energy and tunneling effects destabilize the hydrogen-bonding network, leading to a less viscous liquid with a larger diffusion coefficient. However, this is offset by intramolecular zero point motion, which changes the average water monomer geometry resulting in a larger dipole moment, stronger intermolecular interactions, and a slower diffusion. We end by suggesting, on the basis of simulations of other potential energy models, that the small quantum effect we find in the diffusion coefficient is associated with the ability of our model to produce a single broad O-H stretching

  17. An auditory model based strategy for cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Waldo; Kátai, András; Harczos, Tamás; Klefenz, Frank; Buechner, Andreas; Edler, Bernd

    2007-01-01

    A physiological and computational model of the human auditory system has been fitted in a signal processing strategy for cochlear implants (CIs). The aim of the new strategy is to obtain more natural sound in CIs by better mimicking the human auditory system. The new strategy was built in three independent stages as proposed in [6]. First a basilar membrane motion model was substituted by the filterbank commonly used in commercial strategies. Second, an inner hair cell model was included in a commercial strategy while maintaining the original filterbank. Third, both the basilar membrane motion and the inner-hair cell model were included in the commercial strategy. This paper analyses the properties and presents results obtained with CI recipients for each algorithm designed.

  18. Distance measurements in model Bis-Gd(III) complexes with flexible “bridge”. Emulation of biological molecules having flexible structure with Gd(III) labels attached

    PubMed Central

    Potapov, A.; Song, Y.; Meade, T. J.; Goldfarb, D.; Astashkin, A.V.; Raitsimring, A.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we continue to explore Gd(III) as a possible spin label for high field Double Electron Electron Resonance (DEER) based distance measurements in biological molecules with flexible geometry. For this purpose, a bis-Gd(III) complex with a flexible “bridge” was used as a model. The distances in the model were expected to be distributed in the range of 5-26 Å, allowing us to probe the shortest limits of accessible distances which were found to be as small as 13 Å. The upper distance limit for these labels was also evaluated and was found to be about 60 Å. Various pulse duration setups can result in apparent differences in the distribution function derived from DEER kinetics due to short distance limit variations. The advantages, such as the ability to perform measurements at cryogenic temperatures and high repetition rates simultaneously, the use of very short pumping and observation pulses without mutual interference, the lack of orientational selectivity, as well as the shortcomings, such as the limited mw operational frequency range and intrinsically smaller amplitude of oscillation related to dipolar interaction as compared with nitroxide spin labels are discussed. Most probably the use of nitroxide and Gd based labels for distance measurements will be complementary depending on the particulars of the problem and the availability of instrumentation. PMID:20418132

  19. Molecular modeling of zinc paddlewheel molecular complexes and the pores of a flexible metal organic framework.

    PubMed

    Alzahrani, Khalid A H; Deeth, Robert J

    2016-04-01

    A new all-atom first-principles force field (FF) is constructed for the bimetallic, four-bladed zinc paddlewheel (ZPW) motif. Zinc-ligand interactions are described via Morse functions and the angular geometry at the metal centers is modeled with a pure ligand-ligand repulsion term. The ZPW-FF is principally based on 15 DFT-optimized model systems of general formula ZnPR.nL, where ZnP is the base Zn2(O2CR)4 unit, R = H, CH3 or CF3, L = NH3 or pyridine, and n = 0, 1 or 2. It correctly generates the distorted tetrahedral coordination of the uncapped [Zn2(O2CR)4] species in their ground states as well as giving reasonable structures and energies for the higher symmetry D4h transition state conformations. The zinc-ligand Morse function reference distance, r 0 , is further refined against 30 complexes located in the Cambridge Structural Database and this FF is applied to pore models of the flexible metal-organic framework (MOF) [Zn(bdc)2(dabco)]n (bdc = 1,4-benzendicarboxylate; dabco = 1,4-diazabicyclo(2.2.2)octane). A single pore model reproduces the unit cell of the evacuated MOF system while a 3×3 grid model is necessary to provide good agreement with the observed pronounced structural changes upon adsorption of either dimethylformamide or benzene.

  20. Expectation maximization-based likelihood inference for flexible cure rate models with Weibull lifetimes.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Narayanaswamy; Pal, Suvra

    2016-08-01

    Recently, a flexible cure rate survival model has been developed by assuming the number of competing causes of the event of interest to follow the Conway-Maxwell-Poisson distribution. This model includes some of the well-known cure rate models discussed in the literature as special cases. Data obtained from cancer clinical trials are often right censored and expectation maximization algorithm can be used in this case to efficiently estimate the model parameters based on right censored data. In this paper, we consider the competing cause scenario and assuming the time-to-event to follow the Weibull distribution, we derive the necessary steps of the expectation maximization algorithm for estimating the parameters of different cure rate survival models. The standard errors of the maximum likelihood estimates are obtained by inverting the observed information matrix. The method of inference developed here is examined by means of an extensive Monte Carlo simulation study. Finally, we illustrate the proposed methodology with a real data on cancer recurrence.

  1. Model of rotary-actuated flexible beam with notch filter vibration suppression controller and torque feedforward load compensation controller

    SciTech Connect

    Bills, K.C.; Kress, R.L.; Kwon, D.S.; Baker, C.P.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes ORNL`s development of an environment for the simulation of robotic manipulators. Simulation includes the modeling of kinematics, dynamics, sensors, actuators, control systems, operators, and environments. Models will be used for manipulator design, proposal evaluation, control system design and analysis, graphical preview of proposed motions, safety system development, and training. Of particular interest is the development of models for robotic manipulators having at least one flexible link. As a first application, models have been developed for the Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s Flexible Beam Test Bed (PNL FBTB), which is a 1-Degree-of-Freedom, flexible arm with a hydraulic base actuator. ORNL transferred control algorithms developed for the PNL FBTB to controlling IGRIP models. A robust notch filter is running in IGRIP controlling a full dynamics model of the PNL test bed. Model results provide a reasonable match to the experimental results (quantitative results are being determined) and can run on ORNL`s Onyx machine in approximately realtime. The flexible beam is modeled as six rigid sections with torsional springs between each segment. The spring constants were adjusted to match the physical response of the flexible beam model to the experimental results. The controller is able to improve performance on the model similar to the improvement seen on the experimental system. Some differences are apparent, most notably because the IGRIP model presently uses a different trajectory planner than the one used by ORNL on the PNL test bed. In the future, the trajectory planner will be modified so that the experiments and models are the same. The successful completion of this work provides the ability to link C code with IGRIP, thus allowing controllers to be developed, tested, and tuned in simulation and then ported directly to hardware systems using the C language.

  2. Modeling the Multi-Body System Dynamics of a Flexible Solar Sail Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Young; Stough, Robert; Whorton, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Solar sail propulsion systems enable a wide range of space missions that are not feasible with current propulsion technology. Hardware concepts and analytical methods have matured through ground development to the point that a flight validation mission is now realizable. Much attention has been given to modeling the structural dynamics of the constituent elements, but to date an integrated system level dynamics analysis has been lacking. Using a multi-body dynamics and control analysis tool called TREETOPS, the coupled dynamics of the sailcraft bus, sail membranes, flexible booms, and control system sensors and actuators of a representative solar sail spacecraft are investigated to assess system level dynamics and control issues. With this tool, scaling issues and parametric trade studies can be performed to study achievable performance, control authority requirements, and control/structure interaction assessments.

  3. Increased flexibility for modeling telemetry and nest-survival data using the multistate framework

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Devineau, Olivier; Kendall, William L.; Doherty, Paul F.; Shenk, Tanya M.; White, Gary C.; Lukacs, Paul M.; Burnham, Kenneth P.

    2014-01-01

    Although telemetry is one of the most common tools used in the study of wildlife, advances in the analysis of telemetry data have lagged compared to progress in the development of telemetry devices. We demonstrate how standard known-fate telemetry and related nest-survival data analysis models are special cases of the more general multistate framework. We present a short theoretical development, and 2 case examples regarding the American black duck and the mallard. We also present a more complex lynx data analysis. Although not necessary in all situations, the multistate framework provides additional flexibility to analyze telemetry data, which may help analysts and biologists better deal with the vagaries of real-world data collection.

  4. A highly stereoselective and flexible strategy for the convergent synthesis of long-chain polydeoxypropionates: application towards the synthesis of the glycolipid membrane components hydroxyphthioceranic and phthioceranic acid.

    PubMed

    Pischl, Matthias C; Weise, Christian F; Haseloff, Stefan; Müller, Marc-André; Pfaltz, Andreas; Schneider, Christoph

    2014-12-22

    A highly stereocontrolled and flexible access to biologically relevant polydeoxypropionates in optically pure form has been developed. Taking advantage of our previously established strategy for the asymmetric and stereodivergent synthesis of trideoxypropionate building blocks, we have now been able to assemble large polydeoxypropionate chains with defined configuration in a highly convergent manner. Central steps of this approach include two Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reactions with subsequent highly diastereoselective hydrogenations to join three advanced synthetic intermediates in excellent yield and with full stereochemical control. We have applied this strategy successfully towards the asymmetric synthesis of glycolipid membrane components phthioceranic acid and hydroxyphthioceranic acid, the latter of which was synthesized on a half-gram scale.

  5. Residual-flexibility corrections for transient modal rotordynamic models. [Space Shuttle main engine high pressure oxygen turbopump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, D. W.; Bates, J. B., III

    1978-01-01

    A modal residual-flexibility approach due to Schwendler and MacNeal (1962) is adapted to account for the 'static' contribution of higher-frequency modes without requiring their integration. It is assumed that each rotor mode acts as a lightly damped second-order system. The additional accuracy provided by residual-flexibility corrections becomes progressively more important as a modal model's actual boundary conditions are forced to deviate from the boundary conditions used to define the rotor's original structural model (stiffness matrix) and its associated eigendata input to the transient modal model. An analysis of the high-pressure-oxygen turbopump of the Space Shuttle main engine shows that the residual-flexibility approach ensures a substantial improvement in accuracy for a relatively moderate increase in computer-time requirements.

  6. Tuning the Liquid-Liquid Transition by Modulating the Hydrogen-Bond Angular Flexibility in a Model for Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smallenburg, Frank; Sciortino, Francesco

    2015-07-01

    We propose a simple extension of the well known ST2 model for water [F. H. Stillinger and A. Rahman, J. Chem. Phys. 60, 1545 (1974)] that allows for a continuous modification of the hydrogen-bond angular flexibility. We show that the bond flexibility affects the relative thermodynamic stability of the liquid and of the hexagonal (or cubic) ice. On increasing the flexibility, the liquid-liquid critical point, which in the original ST2 model is located in the no-man's land (i.e., the region where ice is the thermodynamically stable phase) progressively moves to a temperature where the liquid is more stable than ice. Our study definitively proves that the liquid-liquid transition in the ST2 model is a genuine phenomenon, of high relevance in all tetrahedral network-forming liquids, including water.

  7. Differences in the Flexibility of Switching Learning Strategies and CREB Phosphorylation Levels in Prefrontal Cortex, Dorsal Striatum and Hippocampus in Two Inbred Strains of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Woo-Hyun; Han, Jung-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Flexibility in using different learning strategies was assessed in two different inbred strains of mice, the C57BL/6 and DBA/2 strains. Mice were trained sequentially in two different Morris water maze protocols that tested their ability to switch their learning strategy to complete a new task after first being trained in a different task. Training consisted either of visible platform trials (cued training) followed by subsequent hidden platform trials (place training) or the reverse sequence (place training followed by cued training). Both strains of mice showed equivalent performance in the type of training (cued or place) that they received first. However, C57BL/6 mice showed significantly better performances than DBA/2 mice following the switch in training protocols, irrespective of the order of training. After completion of the switched training session, levels of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and phosphorylated CREB (pCREB) were measured in the hippocampus, striatum and prefrontal cortex of the mice. Prefrontal cortical and hippocampal pCREB levels differed by strain, with higher levels found in C57BL/6 mice than in DBA/2 mice. No strain differences were observed in the medial or lateral region of the dorsal striatum. These findings indicate that the engagement (i.e., CREB signaling) of relevant neural structures may vary by the specific demands of the learning strategy, and this is closely tied to differences in the flexibility of C57BL/6 and DBA/2 mice to switch their learning strategies when given a new task. PMID:27695401

  8. Differences in the Flexibility of Switching Learning Strategies and CREB Phosphorylation Levels in Prefrontal Cortex, Dorsal Striatum and Hippocampus in Two Inbred Strains of Mice.

    PubMed

    Cho, Woo-Hyun; Han, Jung-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Flexibility in using different learning strategies was assessed in two different inbred strains of mice, the C57BL/6 and DBA/2 strains. Mice were trained sequentially in two different Morris water maze protocols that tested their ability to switch their learning strategy to complete a new task after first being trained in a different task. Training consisted either of visible platform trials (cued training) followed by subsequent hidden platform trials (place training) or the reverse sequence (place training followed by cued training). Both strains of mice showed equivalent performance in the type of training (cued or place) that they received first. However, C57BL/6 mice showed significantly better performances than DBA/2 mice following the switch in training protocols, irrespective of the order of training. After completion of the switched training session, levels of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and phosphorylated CREB (pCREB) were measured in the hippocampus, striatum and prefrontal cortex of the mice. Prefrontal cortical and hippocampal pCREB levels differed by strain, with higher levels found in C57BL/6 mice than in DBA/2 mice. No strain differences were observed in the medial or lateral region of the dorsal striatum. These findings indicate that the engagement (i.e., CREB signaling) of relevant neural structures may vary by the specific demands of the learning strategy, and this is closely tied to differences in the flexibility of C57BL/6 and DBA/2 mice to switch their learning strategies when given a new task.

  9. The Flexible Global Ocean-Atmosphere-Land system model, Spectral Version 2: FGOALS-s2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Qing; Lin, Pengfei; Zhou, Tianjun; Liu, Yimin; Yu, Yongqiang; Wu, Guoxiong; He, Bian; He, Jie; Li, Lijuan; Li, Jiandong; Li, Yangchun; Liu, Hailong; Qiao, Fangli; Song, Zhenya; Wang, Bin; Wang, Jun; Wang, Pengfei; Wang, Xiaocong; Wang, Zaizhi; Wu, Bo; Wu, Tongwen; Xu, Yongfu; Yu, Haiyang; Zhao, Wei; Zheng, Weipeng; Zhou, Linjiong

    2013-05-01

    The Flexible Global Ocean-Atmosphere-Land System model, Spectral Version 2 (FGOALS-s2) was used to simulate realistic climates and to study anthropogenic influences on climate change. Specifically, the FGOALS-s2 was integrated with Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) to conduct coordinated experiments that will provide valuable scientific information to climate research communities. The performances of FGOALS-s2 were assessed in simulating major climate phenomena, and documented both the strengths and weaknesses of the model. The results indicate that FGOALS-s2 successfully overcomes climate drift, and realistically models global and regional climate characteristics, including SST, precipitation, and atmospheric circulation. In particular, the model accurately captures annual and semi-annual SST cycles in the equatorial Pacific Ocean, and the main characteristic features of the Asian summer monsoon, which include a low-level southwestern jet and five monsoon rainfall centers. The simulated climate variability was further examined in terms of teleconnections, leading modes of global SST (namely, ENSO), Pacific Decadal Oscillations (PDO), and changes in 19th-20th century climate. The analysis demonstrates that FGOALS-s2 realistically simulates extra-tropical teleconnection patterns of large-scale climate, and irregular ENSO periods. The model gives fairly reasonable reconstructions of spatial patterns of PDO and global monsoon changes in the 20th century. However, because the indirect effects of aerosols are not included in the model, the simulated global temperature change during the period 1850-2005 is greater than the observed warming, by 0.6°C. Some other shortcomings of the model are also noted.

  10. Re-Evaluation of the AASHTO-Flexible Pavement Design Equation with Neural Network Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Tiğdemir, Mesut

    2014-01-01

    Here we establish that equivalent single-axle loads values can be estimated using artificial neural networks without the complex design equality of American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO). More importantly, we find that the neural network model gives the coefficients to be able to obtain the actual load values using the AASHTO design values. Thus, those design traffic values that might result in deterioration can be better calculated using the neural networks model than with the AASHTO design equation. The artificial neural network method is used for this purpose. The existing AASHTO flexible pavement design equation does not currently predict the pavement performance of the strategic highway research program (Long Term Pavement Performance studies) test sections very accurately, and typically over-estimates the number of equivalent single axle loads needed to cause a measured loss of the present serviceability index. Here we aimed to demonstrate that the proposed neural network model can more accurately represent the loads values data, compared against the performance of the AASHTO formula. It is concluded that the neural network may be an appropriate tool for the development of databased-nonparametric models of pavement performance. PMID:25397962

  11. Re-evaluation of the AASHTO-flexible pavement design equation with neural network modeling.

    PubMed

    Tiğdemir, Mesut

    2014-01-01

    Here we establish that equivalent single-axle loads values can be estimated using artificial neural networks without the complex design equality of American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO). More importantly, we find that the neural network model gives the coefficients to be able to obtain the actual load values using the AASHTO design values. Thus, those design traffic values that might result in deterioration can be better calculated using the neural networks model than with the AASHTO design equation. The artificial neural network method is used for this purpose. The existing AASHTO flexible pavement design equation does not currently predict the pavement performance of the strategic highway research program (Long Term Pavement Performance studies) test sections very accurately, and typically over-estimates the number of equivalent single axle loads needed to cause a measured loss of the present serviceability index. Here we aimed to demonstrate that the proposed neural network model can more accurately represent the loads values data, compared against the performance of the AASHTO formula. It is concluded that the neural network may be an appropriate tool for the development of databased-nonparametric models of pavement performance.

  12. A magnetospheric magnetic field model with flexible current systems driven by independent physical parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilmer, Robert V.; Voigt, Gerd-Hannes

    1995-01-01

    A tilt-dependent magnetic field model of the Earth's magnetosphere with variable magnetopause standoff distance is presented. Flexible analytic representations for the ring and cross-tail currents, each composed of the elements derived from the Tsyganenko and Usmanov (1982) model, are combined with the fully shielded vacuum dipole configurations of Voigt (1981). Although the current sheet does not warp in the y-z plane, changes in the shape and position of the neutral sheet with dipole tilt are consistent with both MHD equilibrium theory and observations. In addition, there is good agreement with observed Delta B profiles and the average equatorial contours of magnetic field magnitude. While the dipole field is rigorously shielded within the defined magnetopause, the ring and cross-tails currents are not similarly confined, consequently, the model's region of validity is limited to the inner magnetosphere. The model depends on four independent external parameters. We present a simple but limited method of simulating several substorm related magnetic field changes associated with the disrupion of the near-Earth cross-tail current sheet and collapse of the midnight magnetotail field region. This feature further facilitates the generation of magnetic field configuration time sequences useful in plasma convection simulations of real magnetospheric events.

  13. Maximizing sinter plant operating flexibility through emissions trading and air modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Schewe, G.J.; Wagner, J.A.; Heron, T.; Topf, R.; Shepker, T.O.

    1998-12-31

    This paper provides details on the dispersion modeling analysis performed to demonstrate air quality impacts associated with an emission trading scheme for a sintering operation in Youngstown, Ohio. The emission trade was proposed to allow the sinter plant to expand its current allowable sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions while being offset with SO{sub 2} emissions from boilers at a nearby shutdown steel mill. While the emission trade itself was feasible and the emissions required for the offset were available (the boiler shutdown and their subsequent SO{sub 2} emission credits were never claimed, banked, or used elsewhere), the second criteria for determining compliance was a demonstration of minimal air quality impact. The air analysis combined the increased ambient SO{sub 2} concentrations of the relaxed sinter plant emissions with the offsetting air quality of the shutdown boilers to yield the net air quality impacts. To test this net air impact, dispersion modeling was performed treating the sinter plant SO{sub 2} emissions as positive and the shutdown boiler SO{sub 2} emissions as negative. The results of the modeling indicated that the ambient air concentrations due to the proposed emissions increase will be offset by the nearby boiler emissions to levels acceptable under EPA`s offset policy Level 2 significant impact concentrations. Therefore, the dispersion modeling demonstrated that the emission trading scheme would not result in significant air quality impacts and maximum operating flexibility was provided to the sintering facility.

  14. A NASTRAN Model of a Large Flexible Swing-Wing Bomber. Volume 1: NASTRAN Model Plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mock, W. D.

    1982-01-01

    A review was conducted of B-1 aircraft no. 2 (A/C-2) internal loads models to determine the minimum model complexity necessary to fulfill all of the airloads research study objectives. Typical model sizings were tabulated at selected vehicle locations, and scale layouts were prepared of the NASTRAN structural analysis model.

  15. Strategies: The Thomas Jefferson University Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forrest, Jane L.

    1991-01-01

    Thomas Jefferson University (Pennsylvania) has two dental professional hygiene education programs, one a prelicensure, entry-level clinical education program and the other a postcertificate or baccalaureate degree completion program. Recruitment strategies include prerequisite restructuring and part-time programs, and retention efforts begin with…

  16. Nine Strategies for Growing into Kirkpatrick's Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilburn, Kathleen M.; Wilburn, H. Ralph

    1998-01-01

    Presents nine strategies for gathering information on training effectiveness via: telephone, e-mail, mail-in survey, postcards, online bulletin board, a visit to the human resources department, the strategic plan, focus group, and end-of-course evaluations. (AEF)

  17. Cognitive niches: an ecological model of strategy selection.

    PubMed

    Marewski, Julian N; Schooler, Lael J

    2011-07-01

    How do people select among different strategies to accomplish a given task? Across disciplines, the strategy selection problem represents a major challenge. We propose a quantitative model that predicts how selection emerges through the interplay among strategies, cognitive capacities, and the environment. This interplay carves out for each strategy a cognitive niche, that is, a limited number of situations in which the strategy can be applied, simplifying strategy selection. To illustrate our proposal, we consider selection in the context of 2 theories: the simple heuristics framework and the ACT-R (adaptive control of thought-rational) architecture of cognition. From the heuristics framework, we adopt the thesis that people make decisions by selecting from a repertoire of simple decision strategies that exploit regularities in the environment and draw on cognitive capacities, such as memory and time perception. ACT-R provides a quantitative theory of how these capacities adapt to the environment. In 14 simulations and 10 experiments, we consider the choice between strategies that operate on the accessibility of memories and those that depend on elaborate knowledge about the world. Based on Internet statistics, our model quantitatively predicts people's familiarity with and knowledge of real-world objects, the distributional characteristics of the associated speed of memory retrieval, and the cognitive niches of classic decision strategies, including those of the fluency, recognition, integration, lexicographic, and sequential-sampling heuristics. In doing so, the model specifies when people will be able to apply different strategies and how accurate, fast, and effortless people's decisions will be.

  18. The effect of a flexible hydrological discharge model on the climate of the Middle Miocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stärz, Michael; Ward, Andrew; Stepanek, Christian; Lohmann, Gerrit

    2016-04-01

    The Middle Miocene (~17‒14 Myrs ago) climate is characterized by much warmer temperatures and an amplified hydrological cycle with respect to present-day climate. Though it is well known that a change in the global freshwater distribution via the hydrological cycle can impact climate and large scale ocean circulation, most modelling studies encompassing tectonic time scales rather focus on the sensitivity of the climate to orography, ocean gateways, land surface, ice-sheets, and CO2 changes. Alternatively, here we study the effect of two different kinds of hydrological discharge models and their respective boundary conditions, that are fully implemented in the earth system model COSMOS, on the climate of the Middle Miocene. The standard hydrological discharge model (HD) of COSMOS requires the information of high spatial resolution orography for the Middle Miocene that is conventionally tuned to present-day conditions, to calculate river routing following the steepest slope of the terrain. Instead, the flexible hydrological discharge model (FHD) calculates river routing by using Middle Miocene orography at identical grid resolution as the atmosphere model and additionally taking the dynamic topography of continental water levels into account. We find that the anomaly between a climate simulation of the Middle Miocene with COSMOS and HD versus a comparable simulation based on COSMOS and FHD reveals strong differences in the redistribution of freshwater in form of continental discharge from land to the ocean. As a consequence, deep water formation and large scale ocean circulation significantly differ between both model versions, emphasizing the importance of representing a realistic freshwater redistribution from land towards the ocean. We therefore conclude that a more realistic representation of climate states at tectonic time scales necessitates geological constraints on the freshwater redistribution, and changes in the freshwater redistribution may have had a

  19. Vibration control of a pneumatic driven piezoelectric flexible manipulator using self-organizing map based multiple models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhi-li; Qiu, Zhi-cheng; Zhang, Xian-min; Han, Jian-da

    2016-03-01

    A kind of hybrid pneumatic-piezoelectric flexible manipulator system has been presented in the paper. A hybrid driving scheme is achieved by combining of a pneumatic proportional valve based pneumatic drive and a piezoelectric actuator bonded to the flexible beam. The system dynamics models are obtained based on system identification approaches, using the established experimental system. For system identification of the flexible piezoelectric manipulator subsystem, parametric estimation methods are utilized. For the pneumatic driven system, a single global linear model is not accurate enough to describe its dynamics, due to the high nonlinearity of the pneumatic driven system. Therefore, a self-organizing map (SOM) based multi-model system identification approach is used to get multiple local linear models. Then, a SOM based multi-model inverse controller and a variable damping pole-placement controller are applied to the pneumatic drive and piezoelectric actuator, respectively. Experiments on pneumatic driven vibration control, piezoelectric vibration control and hybrid vibration control are conducted, utilized proportional and derivative (PD) control, SOM based multi-model inverse controller, and the variable damping pole-placement controller. Experimental results demonstrate that the investigated control algorithms can improve the vibration control performance of the pneumatic driven flexible piezoelectric manipulator system.

  20. Flexible simulation framework to couple processes in complex 3D models for subsurface utilization assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempka, Thomas; Nakaten, Benjamin; De Lucia, Marco; Nakaten, Natalie; Otto, Christopher; Pohl, Maik; Tillner, Elena; Kühn, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Utilization of the geological subsurface for production and storage of hydrocarbons, chemical energy and heat as well as for waste disposal requires the quantification and mitigation of environmental impacts as well as the improvement of georesources utilization in terms of efficiency and sustainability. The development of tools for coupled process simulations is essential to tackle these challenges, since reliable assessments are only feasible by integrative numerical computations. Coupled processes at reservoir to regional scale determine the behaviour of reservoirs, faults and caprocks, generally demanding for complex 3D geological models to be considered besides available monitoring and experimenting data in coupled numerical simulations. We have been developing a flexible numerical simulation framework that provides efficient workflows for integrating the required data and software packages to carry out coupled process simulations considering, e.g., multiphase fluid flow, geomechanics, geochemistry and heat. Simulation results are stored in structured data formats to allow for an integrated 3D visualization and result interpretation as well as data archiving and its provision to collaborators. The main benefits in using the flexible simulation framework are the integration of data geological and grid data from any third party software package as well as data export to generic 3D visualization tools and archiving formats. The coupling of the required process simulators in time and space is feasible, while different spatial dimensions in the coupled simulations can be integrated, e.g., 0D batch with 3D dynamic simulations. User interaction is established via high-level programming languages, while computational efficiency is achieved by using low-level programming languages. We present three case studies on the assessment of geological subsurface utilization based on different process coupling approaches and numerical simulations.

  1. Undulatory locomotion of flexible foils as biomimetic models for understanding fish propulsion.

    PubMed

    Shelton, Ryan M; Thornycroft, Patrick J M; Lauder, George V

    2014-06-15

    An undulatory pattern of body bending in which waves pass along the body from head to tail is a major mechanism of creating thrust in many fish species during steady locomotion. Analyses of live fish swimming have provided the foundation of our current understanding of undulatory locomotion, but our inability to experimentally manipulate key variables such as body length, flexural stiffness and tailbeat frequency in freely swimming fish has limited our ability to investigate a number of important features of undulatory propulsion. In this paper we use a mechanical flapping apparatus to create an undulatory wave in swimming flexible foils driven with a heave motion at their leading edge, and compare this motion with body bending patterns of bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) and clown knifefish (Notopterus chitala). We found similar swimming speeds, Reynolds and Strouhal numbers, and patterns of curvature and shape between these fish and foils, suggesting that flexible foils provide a useful model for understanding fish undulatory locomotion. We swam foils with different lengths, stiffnesses and heave frequencies while measuring forces, torques and hydrodynamics. From measured forces and torques we calculated thrust and power coefficients, work and cost of transport for each foil. We found that increasing frequency and stiffness produced faster swimming speeds and more thrust. Increasing length had minimal impact on swimming speed, but had a large impact on Strouhal number, thrust coefficient and cost of transport. Foils that were both stiff and long had the lowest cost of transport (in mJ m(-1) g(-1)) at low cycle frequencies, and the ability to reach the highest speed at high cycle frequencies.

  2. Monte Carlo simulation of flexible trimers: from square well chains to amphiphilic primitive models.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Serratos, Guadalupe; Gil-Villegas, Alejandro; Vega, Carlos; Blas, Felipe J

    2013-09-21

    In this work, we present Monte Carlo computer simulation results of a primitive model of self-assembling system based on a flexible 3-mer chain interacting via square-well interactions. The effect of switching off the attractive interaction in an extreme sphere is analyzed, since the anisotropy in the molecular potential promotes self-organization. Before addressing studies on self-organization it is necessary to know the vapor liquid equilibrium of the system to avoid to confuse self-organization with phase separation. The range of the attractive potential of the model, λ, is kept constant and equal to 1.5σ, where σ is the diameter of a monomer sphere, while the attractive interaction in one of the monomers was gradually turned off until a pure hard body interaction was obtained. We present the vapor-liquid coexistence curves for the different models studied, their critical properties, and the comparison with the SAFT-VR theory prediction [A. Gil-Villegas, A. Galindo, P. J. Whitehead, S. J. Mills, G. Jackson, and A. N. Burgess, J. Chem. Phys. 106, 4168 (1997)]. Evidence of self-assembly for this system is discussed.

  3. Monte Carlo simulation of flexible trimers: From square well chains to amphiphilic primitive models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Serratos, Guadalupe; Gil-Villegas, Alejandro; Vega, Carlos; Blas, Felipe J.

    2013-09-01

    In this work, we present Monte Carlo computer simulation results of a primitive model of self-assembling system based on a flexible 3-mer chain interacting via square-well interactions. The effect of switching off the attractive interaction in an extreme sphere is analyzed, since the anisotropy in the molecular potential promotes self-organization. Before addressing studies on self-organization it is necessary to know the vapor liquid equilibrium of the system to avoid to confuse self-organization with phase separation. The range of the attractive potential of the model, λ, is kept constant and equal to 1.5σ, where σ is the diameter of a monomer sphere, while the attractive interaction in one of the monomers was gradually turned off until a pure hard body interaction was obtained. We present the vapor-liquid coexistence curves for the different models studied, their critical properties, and the comparison with the SAFT-VR theory prediction [A. Gil-Villegas, A. Galindo, P. J. Whitehead, S. J. Mills, G. Jackson, and A. N. Burgess, J. Chem. Phys. 106, 4168 (1997)]. Evidence of self-assembly for this system is discussed.

  4. Single-molecule elasticity of single-stranded DNA, a model flexible polyelectrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Dustin B.

    Understanding the structure of unfolded, flexible polyelectrolytes is important for our comprehension of basic processes in molecular biology (e.g., RNA and protein folding) and our ability to exploit the polymers in technology (e.g., in self-assembled nanostructures). Here, we investigate the structure of single single-stranded DNA molecules and their interactions with ions using magnetic tweezers. Our data reveal that single-stranded DNA is not well-described by ideal polymer models such as the Worm-Like Chain. At low force, we report the first experimental observation of a nonlinear elastic regime revealing the relevance of long-range excluded volume effects. At high force, the extension scales as a logarithm in monovalent salt. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that this logarithmic regime is the result of ion-stabilized wrinkles at short-length scales along the polymer backbone. Addition of divalent salt to the buffer results in enhanced elasticity indicating increased wrinkling or polymer ''wrapping" around the divalent ions. Using a thermodynamic identity, we are able to count ions as they are released into the bulk upon polymer elongation. We find that ssDNA releases significantly more ions than dsDNA. We posit that the recently termed ''Snake-Like Chain" model (Ullner, J. Phys. Chem B (2003)) for flexible polyelectrolytes may explain these observations. As a first step towards characterizing biologically relevant nucleic acid structures, we measure the effects of base-stacking on ssDNA elasticity. We find that base-stacking in poly(dA) significantly enhances the rigidity of the polymer as evidenced by the low-force elasticity. The unstacking transition of poly(dA) at high force reveals that the intrinsic electrostatic tension on the molecule varies significantly more weakly on salt concentration than predictions from mean-field models. Further, we provide a model-independent estimate of the free energy difference between stacked and unstacked nucleic

  5. Novel Strategy for One-Pot Synthesis of Gold Nanoplates on Carbon Nanotube Sheet As an Effective Flexible SERS Substrate.

    PubMed

    Xin, Wenbo; Yang, Jenn-Ming; Li, Chao; Goorsky, Mark S; Carlson, Larry; De Rosa, Igor M

    2017-02-22

    In this work, we demonstrate a novel route for one-pot synthesis of two-dimensional gold nanoplates (2-D AuNPLs) on carbon nanotube (CNT) sheet. Well-defined AuNPLs are grafted onto CNT sheet via a facile hydrothermal reduction process, during which bromine ions are employed as the surfactant for gold anisotropic growth. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows large-scale AuNPLs with micrometer-scaled length and sub-100 nm thickness are deposited uniformly on the CNT sheet. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results confirm the synthesized AuNPLs are single-crystalline with preferential {111} orientation. Based on the CNT sheet/AuNPLs hybrid, we have fabricated a flexible surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate, which can effectively detect the analyte Rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) at the concentration as low as 1 × 10(-7) M. The excellent SERS performance of this novel flexible substrate is mainly attributed to nanoscaled gaps between the neighbors, large surface area with roughness, and their sharp edges and corners.

  6. A robust and flexible Geospatial Modeling Interface (GMI) for environmental model deployment and evaluation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper provides an overview of the GMI (Geospatial Modeling Interface) simulation framework for environmental model deployment and assessment. GMI currently provides access to multiple environmental models including AgroEcoSystem-Watershed (AgES-W), Nitrate Leaching and Economic Analysis 2 (NLEA...

  7. The role of sensory cortex in behavioral flexibility.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lan; Ponvert, Nicholas D; Jaramillo, Santiago

    2017-03-14

    To thrive in a changing environment, organisms evolved strategies for rapidly modifying their behavioral responses to sensory stimuli. In this review, we investigate the role of sensory cortical circuits in these flexible behaviors. First, we provide a framework for classifying tasks in which flexibility is required. We then present studies in animal models which demonstrate that responses of sensory cortical neurons depend on the expected outcome associated with a stimulus. Last, we discuss inactivation studies which indicate that sensory cortex facilitates behavioral flexibility, but is not always required for adapting to changes in environmental conditions. This analysis provides insights into the contributions of cortical and subcortical sensory circuits to flexibility in behavior.

  8. Health benefit modelling and optimization of vehicular pollution control strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonawane, Nayan V.; Patil, Rashmi S.; Sethi, Virendra

    2012-12-01

    This study asserts that the evaluation of pollution reduction strategies should be approached on the basis of health benefits. The framework presented could be used for decision making on the basis of cost effectiveness when the strategies are applied concurrently. Several vehicular pollution control strategies have been proposed in literature for effective management of urban air pollution. The effectiveness of these strategies has been mostly studied as a one at a time approach on the basis of change in pollution concentration. The adequacy and practicality of such an approach is studied in the present work. Also, the assessment of respective benefits of these strategies has been carried out when they are implemented simultaneously. An integrated model has been developed which can be used as a tool for optimal prioritization of various pollution management strategies. The model estimates health benefits associated with specific control strategies. ISC-AERMOD View has been used to provide the cause-effect relation between control options and change in ambient air quality. BenMAP, developed by U.S. EPA, has been applied for estimation of health and economic benefits associated with various management strategies. Valuation of health benefits has been done for impact indicators of premature mortality, hospital admissions and respiratory syndrome. An optimization model has been developed to maximize overall social benefits with determination of optimized percentage implementations for multiple strategies. The model has been applied for sub-urban region of Mumbai city for vehicular sector. Several control scenarios have been considered like revised emission standards, electric, CNG, LPG and hybrid vehicles. Reduction in concentration and resultant health benefits for the pollutants CO, NOx and particulate matter are estimated for different control scenarios. Finally, an optimization model has been applied to determine optimized percentage implementation of specific

  9. Joint modelling of repeated measurements and time-to-event outcomes: flexible model specification and exact likelihood inference.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Jessica; Diggle, Peter; Henderson, Robin; Taylor-Robinson, David

    2015-01-01

    Random effects or shared parameter models are commonly advocated for the analysis of combined repeated measurement and event history data, including dropout from longitudinal trials. Their use in practical applications has generally been limited by computational cost and complexity, meaning that only simple special cases can be fitted by using readily available software. We propose a new approach that exploits recent distributional results for the extended skew normal family to allow exact likelihood inference for a flexible class of random-effects models. The method uses a discretization of the timescale for the time-to-event outcome, which is often unavoidable in any case when events correspond to dropout. We place no restriction on the times at which repeated measurements are made. An analysis of repeated lung function measurements in a cystic fibrosis cohort is used to illustrate the method.

  10. Evaluation of quantitative structure-activity relationship modeling strategies: local and global models.

    PubMed

    Helgee, Ernst Ahlberg; Carlsson, Lars; Boyer, Scott; Norinder, Ulf

    2010-04-26

    A thorough comparison between different QSAR modeling strategies is presented. The comparison is conducted for local versus global modeling strategies, risk assessment, and computational cost. The strategies are implemented using random forests, support vector machines, and partial least squares. Results are presented for simulated data, as well as for real data, generally indicating that a global modeling strategy is preferred over a local strategy. Furthermore, the results also show that there is an pronounced risk and a comparatively high computational cost when using the local modeling strategies.

  11. Toward a Model of Strategies and Summary Writing Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Hui-Chun

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the construct of a summarization test task by means of single-group and multigroup structural equation modeling (SEM). It examines the interrelationships between strategy use and performance, drawing on data from 298 Taiwanese undergraduates' summary essays and their self-reported strategy use. Single-group SEM analyses…

  12. A Latent Trait Model for Differential Strategies in Cognitive Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samejima, Fumiko

    Some cognitive psychologists, who have tried to approach psychometric theories, say that the psychometric approach does not provide them with theories and methods with which they can deal with differential strategies. In this paper, a general latent trait model for differential strategies in cognitive processes is proposed which includes three…

  13. Enhanced Television Strategy Models: A Study of TV Web Sites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ha, Louisa

    2002-01-01

    Compares the use of enhanced television features and television commerce features on the Web sites of cable and broadcast television networks. Shows differences in strategies and site usability; proposes three enhanced television strategy models; and discusses implications on television revenue and viewership. (Author/LRW)

  14. Validating Work Discrimination and Coping Strategy Models for Sexual Minorities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Y. Barry; Williams, Wendi; Dispenza, Franco

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate and expand on Y. B. Chung's (2001) models of work discrimination and coping strategies among lesbian, gay, and bisexual persons. In semistructured individual interviews, 17 lesbians and gay men reported 35 discrimination incidents and their related coping strategies. Responses were coded based on Chung's…

  15. Drug discovery strategies in the field of tumor energy metabolism: Limitations by metabolic flexibility and metabolic resistance to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Amoedo, N D; Obre, E; Rossignol, R

    2017-02-16

    The search for new drugs capable of blocking the metabolic vulnerabilities of human tumors has now entered the clinical evaluation stage, but several projects already failed in phase I or phase II. In particular, very promising in vitro studies could not be translated in vivo at preclinical stage and beyond. This was the case for most glycolysis inhibitors that demonstrated systemic toxicity. A more recent example is the inhibition of glutamine catabolism in lung adenocarcinoma that failed in vivo despite a strong addiction of several cancer cell lines to glutamine in vitro. Such contradictory findings raised several questions concerning the optimization of drug discovery strategies in the field of cancer metabolism. For instance, the cell culture models in 2D or 3D might already show strong limitations to mimic the tumor micro- and macro-environment. The microenvironment of tumors is composed of cancer cells of variegated metabolic profiles, supporting local metabolic exchanges and symbiosis, but also of immune cells and stroma that further interact with and reshape cancer cell metabolism. The macroenvironment includes the different tissues of the organism, capable of exchanging signals and fueling the tumor 'a distance'. Moreover, most metabolic targets were identified from their increased expression in tumor transcriptomic studies, or from targeted analyses looking at the metabolic impact of particular oncogenes or tumor suppressors on selected metabolic pathways. Still, very few targets were identified from in vivo analyses of tumor metabolism in patients because such studies are difficult and adequate imaging methods are only currently being developed for that purpose. For instance, perfusion of patients with [(13)C]-glucose allows deciphering the metabolomics of tumors and opens a new area in the search for effective targets. Metabolic imaging with positron emission tomography and other techniques that do not involve [(13)C] can also be used to evaluate tumor

  16. Multibody dynamics: Modeling component flexibility with fixed, free, loaded, constraint, and residual modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spanos, John T.; Tsuha, Walter S.

    1989-01-01

    The assumed-modes method in multibody dynamics allows the elastic deformation of each component in the system to be approximated by a sum of products of spatial and temporal functions commonly known as modes and modal coordinates respectively. The choice of component modes used to model articulating and non-articulating flexible multibody systems is examined. Attention is directed toward three classical Component Mode Synthesis (CMS) methods whereby component normal modes are generated by treating the component interface (I/F) as either fixed, free, or loaded with mass and stiffness contributions from the remaining components. The fixed and free I/F normal modes are augmented by static shape functions termed constraint and residual modes respectively. A mode selection procedure is outlined whereby component modes are selected from the Craig-Bampton (fixed I/F plus constraint), MacNeal-Rubin (free I/F plus residual), or Benfield-Hruda (loaded I/F) mode sets in accordance with a modal ordering scheme derived from balance realization theory. The success of the approach is judged by comparing the actuator-to-sensor frequency response of the reduced order system with that of the full order system over the frequency range of interest. A finite element model of the Galileo spacecraft serves as an example in demonstrating the effectiveness of the proposed mode selection method.

  17. The identification of a distributed parameter model for a flexible structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Gates, S. S.; Rosen, I. G.; Wang, Y.

    1988-01-01

    A computational method is developed for the estimation of parameters in a distributed model for a flexible structure. The structure we consider (part of the RPL experiment) consists of a cantilevered beam with a thruster and linear accelerometer at the free end. The thruster is fed by a pressurized hose whose horizontal motion effects the transverse vibration of the beam. The Euler-Bernoulli theory is used to model the vibration of the beam and treat the hose thruster assembly as a lumped or point mass dashpot spring system at the tip. Measurements of linear acceleration at the tip are used to estimate the hose parameters (mass, stiffness, damping) and a Voigt-Kelvin viscoelastic structural damping parameter for the beam using a least squares fit to the data. Spline based approximations are considered to the hybrid (coupled ordinary and partial differential equations) systems; theoretical convergence results and numerical studies with both simulation and actual experimental data obtained from the structure are presented and discussed.

  18. Damage Detection in Flexible Plates through Reduced-Order Modeling and Hybrid Particle-Kalman Filtering.

    PubMed

    Capellari, Giovanni; Azam, Saeed Eftekhar; Mariani, Stefano

    2015-12-22

    Health monitoring of lightweight structures, like thin flexible plates, is of interest in several engineering fields. In this paper, a recursive Bayesian procedure is proposed to monitor the health of such structures through data collected by a network of optimally placed inertial sensors. As a main drawback of standard monitoring procedures is linked to the computational costs, two remedies are jointly considered: first, an order-reduction of the numerical model used to track the structural dynamics, enforced with proper orthogonal decomposition; and, second, an improved particle filter, which features an extended Kalman updating of each evolving particle before the resampling stage. The former remedy can reduce the number of effective degrees-of-freedom of the structural model to a few only (depending on the excitation), whereas the latter one allows to track the evolution of damage and to locate it thanks to an intricate formulation. To assess the effectiveness of the proposed procedure, the case of a plate subject to bending is investigated; it is shown that, when the procedure is appropriately fed by measurements, damage is efficiently and accurately estimated.

  19. Estimating the loss in expectation of life due to cancer using flexible parametric survival models.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Therese M-L; Dickman, Paul W; Eloranta, Sandra; Lambe, Mats; Lambert, Paul C

    2013-12-30

    A useful summary measure for survival data is the expectation of life, which is calculated by obtaining the area under a survival curve. The loss in expectation of life due to a certain type of cancer is the difference between the expectation of life in the general population and the expectation of life among the cancer patients. This measure is used little in practice as its estimation generally requires extrapolation of both the expected and observed survival. A parametric distribution can be used for extrapolation of the observed survival, but it is difficult to find a distribution that captures the underlying shape of the survival function after the end of follow-up. In this paper, we base our extrapolation on relative survival, because it is more stable and reliable. Relative survival is defined as the observed survival divided by the expected survival, and the mortality analogue is excess mortality. Approaches have been suggested for extrapolation of relative survival within life-table data, by assuming that the excess mortality has reached zero (statistical cure) or has stabilized to a constant. We propose the use of flexible parametric survival models for relative survival, which enables estimating the loss in expectation of life on individual level data by making these assumptions or by extrapolating the estimated linear trend at the end of follow-up. We have evaluated the extrapolation from this model using data on four types of cancer, and the results agree well with observed data.

  20. A multi-physical model for charge and mass transport in a flexible ionic polymer sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zicai; Asaka, Kinji; Takagi, Kentaro; Aabloo, Alvo; Horiuchi, Tetsuya

    2016-04-01

    An ionic polymer material can generate electrical potential and function as a bio-sensor under a non-uniform deformation. Ionic polymer-metal composite (IPMC) is a typical flexible ionic polymer sensor material. A multi-physical sensing model is presented at first based on the same physical equations in the physical model for IPMC actuator we obtained before. Under an applied bending deformation, water and cation migrate to the direction of outside electrode immediately. Redistribution of cations causes an electrical potential difference between two electrodes. The cation migration is strongly restrained by the generated electrical potential. And the migrated cations will move back to the inner electrode under the concentration diffusion effect and lead to a relaxation of electrical potential. In the whole sensing process, transport and redistribution of charge and mass are revealed along the thickness direction by numerical analysis. The sensing process is a revised physical process of the actuation, however, the transport properties are quite different from those of the later. And the effective dielectric constant of IPMC, which is related to the morphology of the electrode-ionic polymer interface, is proved to have little relation with the sensing amplitude. All the conclusions are significant for ionic polymer sensing material design.

  1. Damage Detection in Flexible Plates through Reduced-Order Modeling and Hybrid Particle-Kalman Filtering

    PubMed Central

    Capellari, Giovanni; Eftekhar Azam, Saeed; Mariani, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Health monitoring of lightweight structures, like thin flexible plates, is of interest in several engineering fields. In this paper, a recursive Bayesian procedure is proposed to monitor the health of such structures through data collected by a network of optimally placed inertial sensors. As a main drawback of standard monitoring procedures is linked to the computational costs, two remedies are jointly considered: first, an order-reduction of the numerical model used to track the structural dynamics, enforced with proper orthogonal decomposition; and, second, an improved particle filter, which features an extended Kalman updating of each evolving particle before the resampling stage. The former remedy can reduce the number of effective degrees-of-freedom of the structural model to a few only (depending on the excitation), whereas the latter one allows to track the evolution of damage and to locate it thanks to an intricate formulation. To assess the effectiveness of the proposed procedure, the case of a plate subject to bending is investigated; it is shown that, when the procedure is appropriately fed by measurements, damage is efficiently and accurately estimated. PMID:26703615

  2. Flexible quality of service model for wireless body area sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yangzhe; Leeson, Mark S; Higgins, Matthew D

    2016-03-01

    Wireless body area sensor networks (WBASNs) are becoming an increasingly significant breakthrough technology for smart healthcare systems, enabling improved clinical decision-making in daily medical care. Recently, radio frequency ultra-wideband technology has developed substantially for physiological signal monitoring due to its advantages such as low-power consumption, high transmission data rate, and miniature antenna size. Applications of future ubiquitous healthcare systems offer the prospect of collecting human vital signs, early detection of abnormal medical conditions, real-time healthcare data transmission and remote telemedicine support. However, due to the technical constraints of sensor batteries, the supply of power is a major bottleneck for healthcare system design. Moreover, medium access control (MAC) needs to support reliable transmission links that allow sensors to transmit data safely and stably. In this Letter, the authors provide a flexible quality of service model for ad hoc networks that can support fast data transmission, adaptive schedule MAC control, and energy efficient ubiquitous WBASN networks. Results show that the proposed multi-hop communication ad hoc network model can balance information packet collisions and power consumption. Additionally, wireless communications link in WBASNs can effectively overcome multi-user interference and offer high transmission data rates for healthcare systems.

  3. Ontology aided modeling of organic reaction mechanisms with flexible and fragment based XML markup procedures.

    PubMed

    Sankar, Punnaivanam; Aghila, Gnanasekaran

    2007-01-01

    The mechanism models for primary organic reactions encoding the structural fragments undergoing substitution, addition, elimination, and rearrangements are developed. In the proposed models, each and every structural component of mechanistic pathways is represented with flexible and fragment based markup technique in XML syntax. A significant feature of the system is the encoding of the electron movements along with the other components like charges, partial charges, half bonded species, lone pair electrons, free radicals, reaction arrows, etc. needed for a complete representation of reaction mechanism. The rendering of reaction schemes described with the proposed methodology is achieved with a concise XML extension language interoperating with the structure markup. The reaction scheme is visualized as 2D graphics in a browser by converting them into SVG documents enabling the desired layouts normally perceived by the chemists conventionally. An automatic representation of the complex patterns of the reaction mechanism is achieved by reusing the knowledge in chemical ontologies and developing artificial intelligence components in terms of axioms.

  4. The identification of a distributed parameter model for a flexible structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Gates, S. S.; Rosen, I. G.; Wang, Y.

    1986-01-01

    A computational method is developed for the estimation of parameters in a distributed model for a flexible structure. The structure we consider (part of the RPL experiment) consists of a cantilevered beam with a thruster and linear accelerometer at the free end. The thruster is fed by a pressurized hose whose horizontal motion effects the transverse vibration of the beam. The Euler-Bernoulli theory is used to model the vibration of the beam and treat the hose-thruster assembly as a lumped or point mass-dashpot-spring system at the tip. Using measurements of linear acceleration at the tip, it is estimated that the parameters (mass, stiffness, damping) and a Voight-Kelvin viscoelastic structural damping parameter for the beam using a least squares fit to the data. Spline based approximations to the hybrid (coupled ordinary and partial differential equations) system are considered; theoretical convergence results and numerical studies with both simulation and actual experimental data obtained from the structure are presented and discussed.

  5. Experimental verification of a model of a two-link flexible, lightweight manipulator. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huggins, James David

    1988-01-01

    Experimental verification is presented for an assumed modes model of a large, two link, flexible manipulator design and constructed in the School of Mechanical Engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology. The structure was designed to have typical characteristics of a lightweight manipulator.

  6. Flexible Learning in a Workplace Model: Blended a Motivation to a Lifelong Learner in a Social Network Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Na-songkhla, Jaitip

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a model of learning in a workplace, in which an online course provides flexibility for staff to learn at their convenient hours. A motivation was brought into an account of the success of learning in a workplace program, based upon Behaviorist learning approach--an online mentor and an accumulated learning activities score was…

  7. Conformation and hydrogen ion titration of proteins: a continuum electrostatic model with conformational flexibility.

    PubMed

    You, T J; Bashford, D

    1995-11-01

    A new method for including local conformational flexibility in calculations of the hydrogen ion titration of proteins using macroscopic electrostatic models is presented. Intrinsic pKa values and electrostatic interactions between titrating sites are calculated from an ensemble of conformers in which the positions of titrating side chains are systematically varied. The method is applied to the Asp, Glu, and Tyr residues of hen lysozyme. The effects of different minimization and/or sampling protocols for both single-conformer and multi-conformer calculations are studied. For single-conformer calculations it is found that the results are sensitive to the choice of all-hydrogen versus polar-hydrogen-only atomic models and to the minimization protocol chosen. The best overall agreement of single-conformer calculations with experiment is obtained with an all-hydrogen model and either a two-step minimization process or minimization using a high dielectric constant. Multi-conformational calculations give significantly improved agreement with experiment, slightly smaller shifts between model compound pKa values and calculated intrinsic pKa values, and reduced sensitivity of the intrinsic pKa calculations to the initial details of the structure compared to single-conformer calculations. The extent of these improvements depends on the type of minimization used during the generation of conformers, with more extensive minimization giving greater improvements. The ordering of the titrations of the active-site residues, Glu-35 and Asp-52, is particularly sensitive to the minimization and sampling protocols used. The balance of strong site-site interactions in the active site suggests a need for including site-site conformational correlations.

  8. End-to-end modeling: a new modular and flexible approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genoni, M.; Riva, M.; Landoni, M.; Pariani, G.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we present an innovative philosophy to develop the End-to-End model for astronomical observation projects, i.e. the architecture which allows physical modeling of the whole system from the light source to the reduced data. This alternative philosophy foresees the development of the physical model of the different modules, which compose the entire End-to-End system, directly during the project design phase. This approach is strongly characterized by modularity and flexibility; these aspects will be of relevant importance in the next generation astronomical observation projects like E-ELT (European Extremely Large Telescope) because of the high complexity and long-time design and development. With this approach it will be possible to keep the whole system and its different modules efficiently under control during every project phase and to exploit a reliable tool at a system engineering level to evaluate the effects on the final performance both of the main parameters and of different instrument architectures and technologies. This philosophy will be important to allow scientific community to perform in advance simulations and tests on the scientific drivers. This will translate in a continuous feedback to the (system) design process with a resulting improvement in the effectively achievable scientific goals and consistent tool for efficiently planning observation proposals and programs. We present the application case for this End-to-End modeling technique, which is the high resolution spectrograph at the E-ELT (E-ELT HIRES). In particular we present the definition of the system modular architecture, describing the interface parameters of the modules.

  9. Event-based hydrological modeling for detecting dominant hydrological process and suitable model strategy for semi-arid catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Pengnian; Li, Zhijia; Chen, Ji; Li, Qiaoling; Yao, Cheng

    2016-11-01

    To simulate the hydrological processes in semi-arid areas properly is still challenging. This study assesses the impact of different modeling strategies on simulating flood processes in semi-arid catchments. Four classic hydrological models, TOPMODEL, XINANJIANG (XAJ), SAC-SMA and TANK, were selected and applied to three semi-arid catchments in North China. Based on analysis and comparison of the simulation results of these classic models, four new flexible models were constructed and used to further investigate the suitability of various modeling strategies for semi-arid environments. Numerical experiments were also designed to examine the performances of the models. The results show that in semi-arid catchments a suitable model needs to include at least one nonlinear component to simulate the main process of surface runoff generation. If there are more than two nonlinear components in the hydrological model, they should be arranged in parallel, rather than in series. In addition, the results show that the parallel nonlinear components should be combined by multiplication rather than addition. Moreover, this study reveals that the key hydrological process over semi-arid catchments is the infiltration excess surface runoff, a non-linear component.

  10. PERSiST: a flexible rainfall-runoff modelling toolkit for use with the INCA family of models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futter, M. N.; Erlandsson, M. A.; Butterfield, D.; Whitehead, P. G.; Oni, S. K.; Wade, A. J.

    2014-02-01

    Runoff generation processes and pathways vary widely between catchments. Credible simulations of solute and pollutant transport in surface waters are dependent on models which facilitate appropriate, catchment-specific representations of perceptual models of the runoff generation process. Here, we present a flexible, semi-distributed landscape-scale rainfall-runoff modelling toolkit suitable for simulating a broad range of user-specified perceptual models of runoff generation and stream flow occurring in different climatic regions and landscape types. PERSiST (the Precipitation, Evapotranspiration and Runoff Simulator for Solute Transport) is designed for simulating present-day hydrology; projecting possible future effects of climate or land use change on runoff and catchment water storage; and generating hydrologic inputs for the Integrated Catchments (INCA) family of models. PERSiST has limited data requirements and is calibrated using observed time series of precipitation, air temperature and runoff at one or more points in a river network. Here, we apply PERSiST to the river Thames in the UK and describe a Monte Carlo tool for model calibration, sensitivity and uncertainty analysis.

  11. An epidemiological model with vaccination strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prates, Dérek B.; Silva, Jaqueline M.; Gomes, Jessica L.; Kritz, Maurício V.

    2016-06-01

    Mathematical models can be widely found in the literature describing epidemics. The epidemical models that use differential equations to represent mathematically such description are especially sensible to parameters. This work analyze a variation of the SIR model when applied to a epidemic scenario including several aspects, as constant vaccination, pulse vaccination, seasonality, cross-immunity factor, birth and dead rate. The analysis and results are performed through numerical solutions of the model and a special attention is given to the discussion generated by the paramenters variation.

  12. Simulation/optimization modeling for robust pumping strategy design.

    PubMed

    Kalwij, Ineke M; Peralta, Richard C

    2006-01-01

    A new simulation/optimization modeling approach is presented for addressing uncertain knowledge of aquifer parameters. The Robustness Enhancing Optimizer (REO) couples genetic algorithm and tabu search as optimizers and incorporates aquifer parameter sensitivity analysis to guide multiple-realization optimization. The REO maximizes strategy robustness for a pumping strategy that is optimal for a primary objective function (OF), such as cost. The more robust a strategy, the more likely it is to achieve management goals in the field, even if the physical system differs from the model. The REO is applied to trinitrotoluene and Royal Demolition Explosive plumes at Umatilla Chemical Depot in Oregon to develop robust least cost strategies. The REO efficiently develops robust pumping strategies while maintaining the optimal value of the primary OF-differing from the common situation in which a primary OF value degrades as strategy reliability increases. The REO is especially valuable where data to develop realistic probability density functions (PDFs) or statistically derived realizations are unavailable. Because they require much less field data, REO-developed strategies might not achieve as high a mathematical reliability as strategies developed using many realizations based upon real aquifer parameter PDFs. REO-developed strategies might or might not yield a better OF value in the field.

  13. Influence of the Flexible Liposomes on the Skin Deposition of a Hydrophilic Model Drug, Carboxyfluorescein: Dependency on Their Composition

    PubMed Central

    Badran, Mohamed; Shalaby, Khaled; Al-Omrani, Abdullah

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on the effect of different flexible liposomes containing sodium cholate, Tween 80, or cineol on skin deposition of carboxyfluorescein (CF). Size distribution, morphology, zeta potential, and stability of the prepared vesicles were evaluated. The influence of these systems on the skin deposition of CF utilizing rat skin as membrane model was investigated. Results showed that all of the investigated liposomes had almost spherical shapes with low polydispersity (PDI < 0.3) and particles size range from 83 to 175 nm. All liposomal formulations exhibited negative zeta potential, good drug entrapment efficiency, and stability. In vitro skin deposition data showed that flexible liposomes gave significant deposition of CF on the skin compared to conventional liposomes and drug solutions. This study revealed that flexible liposomes, containing cineole, were able to deliver higher amount of CF suggesting that the hydrophilic drugs delivery to the skin was strictly correlated to the vesicle composition. PMID:22536120

  14. Accurate Modelling of a Flexible-Link Planar Mechanism by Means of a Linearized Model in the State-Space Form for Design of a Vibration Controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GASPARETTO, A.

    2001-02-01

    Vibration control of flexible link mechanisms with more than two flexible links is still an open question, mainly because defining a model that is adequate for the designing of a controller is a rather difficult task. In this work, an accurate dynamic non-linear model of a flexible-link planar mechanism is presented. In order to bring the system into a form that is suitable for the design of a vibration controller, the model is then linearized about an operating point, so as to achieve a linear model of the system in the standard state-space form of system theory. The linear model obtained, which is valid for whatever planar mechanism with any number of flexible link, is then applied to a four-bar planar linkage. Extensive simulation is carried out, aimed at comparing the system dynamic evolution, both in the open- and in the closed-loop case, using the non-linear model and the linearized one. The results prove that the error made by using the linearized system instead of the non-linear one is small. Therefore, it can be concluded that the model proposed in this work can constitute an effective basis for designing and testing many types of vibration controllers for flexible planar mechanisms.

  15. Flexible fabrication of biomimetic compound eye array via two-step thermal reflow of simply pre-modeled hierarchic microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shengzhou; Li, Mujun; Shen, Lianguan; Qiu, Jinfeng; Zhou, Youquan

    2017-06-01

    A flexible fabrication method for the biomimetic compound eye (BCE) array is proposed. In this method, a triple-layer sandwich-like coating configuration was introduced, and the required hierarchic microstructures are formed with a simple single-scan exposure in maskless digital lithography. Taking advantage of the difference of glass transition point (Tg) between photoresists of each layer, the pre-formed hierarchic microstructures are in turn reflowed to the curved substrate and the BCE ommatidia in a two-step thermal reflow process. To avoid affecting the spherical substrate formed in the first thermal reflow, a non-contact strategy was proposed in the second reflow process. The measurement results were in good agreement with the designed BCE profiles. Results also showed that the fabricated BCE had good performances in optical test. The presented method is flexible, convenient, low-cost and can easily adapt to the fabrications of other optical elements with hierarchic microstructures.

  16. Time constraints and flexibility of growth strategies: geographic variation in catch-up growth responses in amphibian larvae.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Emma; Orizaola, Germán; Nicieza, Alfredo G; Laurila, Anssi; Meiri, Shai

    2012-11-01

    1. As size is tightly associated with fitness, compensatory strategies for growth loss can be vital for restoring individual fitness. However, immediate and delayed costs of compensatory responses may prevent their generalization, and the optimal strategy may depend on environmental conditions. Compensatory responses may be particularly important in high-latitude habitats with short growing seasons, and thus, high-latitude organisms might be more efficient at compensating after periods of unfavourable growth conditions than low-latitude organisms. 2. We investigated geographical differences in catch-up growth strategies of populations of the common frog (Rana temporaria) from southern and northern Sweden in two factorial common garden experiments involving predation risk and two different causes of growth arrest (nutritional stress and low temperatures) to evaluate how the compensatory strategies can be affected by context-dependent costs of compensation. Larval and metamorphic traits, and post-metamorphic performance were used as response variables. 3. Only northern tadpoles exposed to low food completely caught up in terms of metamorphic size, mainly by extending the larval period. Low food decreased survival and post-metamorphic jumping performance in southern, but not in northern tadpoles, suggesting that northern tadpoles have a better ability to compensate after periods of restricted food. 4. Both northern and southern tadpoles were able to metamorphose at the same size as control tadpoles after being exposed to low temperatures, indicating that consequences of variation in temperature and food availability differed for tadpoles. However, the combination of low temperatures and predation risk reduced survival in both southern and northern tadpoles. Also, predation risk decreased energy storage in both experiments. 5. Our results highlight the influence of climatic variation and the type of stressor as selective factors shaping compensatory strategies.

  17. Comprehensive system models: Strategies for evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Field, Christopher; Kutzbach, John E.; Ramanathan, V.; Maccracken, Michael C.

    1992-01-01

    The task of evaluating comprehensive earth system models is vast involving validations of every model component at every scale of organization, as well as tests of all the individual linkages. Even the most detailed evaluation of each of the component processes and the individual links among them should not, however, engender confidence in the performance of the whole. The integrated earth system is so rich with complex feedback loops, often involving components of the atmosphere, oceans, biosphere, and cryosphere, that it is certain to exhibit emergent properties very difficult to predict from the perspective of a narrow focus on any individual component of the system. Therefore, a substantial share of the task of evaluating comprehensive earth system models must reside at the level of whole system evaluations. Since complete, integrated atmosphere/ ocean/ biosphere/ hydrology models are not yet operational, questions of evaluation must be addressed at the level of the kinds of earth system processes that the models should be competent to simulate, rather than at the level of specific performance criteria. Here, we have tried to identify examples of earth system processes that are difficult to simulate with existing models and that involve a rich enough suite of feedbacks that they are unlikely to be satisfactorily described by highly simplified or toy models. Our purpose is not to specify a checklist of evaluation criteria but to introduce characteristics of the earth system that may present useful opportunities for model testing and, of course, improvement.

  18. Mixed Membership Distributions with Applications to Modeling Multiple Strategy Usage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galyardt, April

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines two related questions. "How do mixed membership models work?" and "Can mixed membership be used to model how students use multiple strategies to solve problems?". Mixed membership models have been used in thousands of applications from text and image processing to genetic microarray analysis. Yet…

  19. A vaccination strategy to SEIR-CA model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almuzakki, Muhammad Zaki; Nuraini, Nuning

    2016-04-01

    A combination between Susceptible-Exposed-Infected-Removed (SEIR) model and Cellular Automaton (CA) called SEIR-CA model has been proposed to simulate spreading diseases through populations. We make an improvement to the parameter which describe the impact of neighborhood in CA system. We also propose a vaccination strategy to the model. Three examples are given to illustrate the model. The first one shows that the previously established SEIR-CA model does not work properly in a population with randomly distributed individuals. After an improvement to the neighborhood impact parameter has been made, the model works properly in a population with randomly distributed individuals and it is shown in the second example. The last example shows the spreading mechanisms with a chosen vaccination strategy. We also show that the vaccination strategy can reduce the number of infected individuals and can suppress the spread of the diseases.

  20. Tribology of flexible and sliding spinal implants: development of experimental and numerical models.

    PubMed

    Le Cann, Sophie; Chaves-Jacob, Julien; Rossi, Jean-Marie; Linares, Jean-Marc; Chabrand, Patrick

    2016-11-22

    New fusionless devices are being developed to get over the limits of actual spinal surgical treatment, based on arthrodesis. However, due to their recentness, no standards exist to test and validate those devices, especially concerning the wear. A new tribological first approach to the definition of an in vitro wear protocol to study wear of flexible and sliding spinal devices is presented in this article, and was applied to a new concept. A simplified synthetic spine portion (polyethylene) was developed to reproduce a simple supra-physiological spinal flexion (10° between two vertebrae). The device studied with this protocol was tested in wet environment until 1 million cycles (Mc). We obtained an encouraging estimated wear volume of same order of magnitude compared to similar devices. An associated finite element (FE) numerical model has permitted to access contact information and study the effect of misalignment of one screw. First results could point out how to improve the design and suggest that a vertical misalignment of a screw (under or over-screwing) has more impact than a horizontal one. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2016.

  1. Open Vehicle Sketch Pad Aircraft Modeling Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Andrew S.

    2013-01-01

    Geometric modeling of aircraft during the Conceptual design phase is very different from that needed for the Preliminary or Detailed design phases. The Conceptual design phase is characterized by the rapid, multi-disciplinary analysis of many design variables by a small engineering team. The designer must walk a line between fidelity and productivity, picking tools and methods with the appropriate balance of characteristics to achieve the goals of the study, while staying within the available resources. Identifying geometric details that are important, and those that are not, is critical to making modeling and methodology choices. This is true for both the low-order analysis methods traditionally used in Conceptual design as well as the highest-order analyses available. This paper will highlight some of Conceptual design's characteristics that drive the designer s choices as well as modeling examples for several aircraft configurations using the open source version of the Vehicle Sketch Pad (Open VSP) aircraft Conceptual design geometry modeler.

  2. Collaborative Project. A Flexible Atmospheric Modeling Framework for the Community Earth System Model (CESM)

    SciTech Connect

    Gettelman, Andrew

    2015-10-01

    In this project we have been upgrading the Multiscale Modeling Framework (MMF) in the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM), also known as Super-Parameterized CAM (SP-CAM). This has included a major effort to update the coding standards and interface with CAM so that it can be placed on the main development trunk. It has also included development of a new software structure for CAM to be able to handle sub-grid column information. These efforts have formed the major thrust of the work.

  3. Modeling, Identification, and Control Design for a Flexible Pointing System with Embedded Smart Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    The research effort emphasized system identification , decentralized control design, and their applications to smart structures and flexible pointing...systems. The research effort had both theoretical and experimental ingredients. On the theoretical side, new system identification techniques for

  4. A robust and flexible Geospatial Modeling Interface (GMI) for deploying and evaluating natural resource models

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Geographical information systems (GIS) software packages have been used for nearly three decades as analytical tools in natural resource management for geospatial data assembly, processing, storage, and visualization of input data and model output. However, with increasing availability and use of fu...

  5. Turnaround Management Strategies: The Adaptive Model and the Constructive Model. ASHE 1983 Annual Meeting Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaffee, Ellen E.

    The use of two management strategies by 14 liberal arts and comprehensive colleges attempting to recover from serious financial decline during 1973-1976 were studied. The adaptive model of strategy, based on resource dependence, involves managing demands in order to satisfy critical-resource providers. The constructive model of strategy, based on…

  6. Survival Regression Modeling Strategies in CVD Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Barkhordari, Mahnaz; Padyab, Mojgan; Sardarinia, Mahsa; Hadaegh, Farzad; Azizi, Fereidoun; Bozorgmanesh, Mohammadreza

    2016-01-01

    Background A fundamental part of prevention is prediction. Potential predictors are the sine qua non of prediction models. However, whether incorporating novel predictors to prediction models could be directly translated to added predictive value remains an area of dispute. The difference between the predictive power of a predictive model with (enhanced model) and without (baseline model) a certain predictor is generally regarded as an indicator of the predictive value added by that predictor. Indices such as discrimination and calibration have long been used in this regard. Recently, the use of added predictive value has been suggested while comparing the predictive performances of the predictive models with and without novel biomarkers. Objectives User-friendly statistical software capable of implementing novel statistical procedures is conspicuously lacking. This shortcoming has restricted implementation of such novel model assessment methods. We aimed to construct Stata commands to help researchers obtain the aforementioned statistical indices. Materials and Methods We have written Stata commands that are intended to help researchers obtain the following. 1, Nam-D’Agostino X2 goodness of fit test; 2, Cut point-free and cut point-based net reclassification improvement index (NRI), relative absolute integrated discriminatory improvement index (IDI), and survival-based regression analyses. We applied the commands to real data on women participating in the Tehran lipid and glucose study (TLGS) to examine if information relating to a family history of premature cardiovascular disease (CVD), waist circumference, and fasting plasma glucose can improve predictive performance of Framingham’s general CVD risk algorithm. Results The command is adpredsurv for survival models. Conclusions Herein we have described the Stata package “adpredsurv” for calculation of the Nam-D’Agostino X2 goodness of fit test as well as cut point-free and cut point-based NRI, relative

  7. Development of Genetically Flexible Mouse Models of Sarcoma Using RCAS-TVA Mediated Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kabaroff, Leah; Gupta, Amar; Menezes, Serena; Babichev, Yael; Kandel, Rita C.; Swallow, Carol J.; Dickson, Brendan C.; Gladdy, Rebecca A.

    2014-01-01

    Sarcomas are a heterogeneous group of mesenchymal malignancies and unfortunately there are limited functional genomics platforms to assess the molecular pathways contributing to sarcomagenesis. Thus, novel model systems are needed to validate which genes should be targeted for therapeutic intervention. We hypothesized that delivery of oncogenes into mouse skeletal muscle using a retroviral (RCAS-TVA) system would result in sarcomagenesis. We also sought to determine if the cell type transformed (mesenchymal progenitors vs. terminally differentiated tissues) would influence sarcoma biology. Cells transduced with RCAS vectors directing the expression of oncoproteins KrasG12D, c-Myc and/or Igf2 were injected into the hindlimbs of mice that expressed the retroviral TVA receptor in neural/mesenchymal progenitors, skeletal/cardiac muscle or ubiquitously (N-tva, AKE and BKE strains respectively). Disrupting the G1 checkpoint CDKN2 (p16/p19−/−) resulted in sarcoma in 30% of p16/p19−/−xN-tva mice with a median latency of 23 weeks (range 8–40 weeks). A similar incidence occurred in p16/p19−/−xBKE mice (32%), however, a shorter median latency (10.4 weeks) was observed. p16/p19−/−xAKE mice also developed sarcomas (24% incidence; median 9 weeks) yet 31% of mice also developed lung sarcomas. Gene-anchored PCR demonstrated retroviral DNA integration in 86% of N-tva, 93% of BKE and 88% of AKE tumors. KrasG12D was the most frequent oncogene isolated. Oncogene delivery by the RCAS-TVA system can generate sarcomas in mice with a defective cell cycle checkpoint. Sarcoma biology differed between the different RCAS models we created, likely due to the cell population being transformed. This genetically flexible system will be a valuable tool for sarcoma research. PMID:24733554

  8. Statistical model of a flexible inextensible polymer chain: The effect of kinetic energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pergamenshchik, V. M.; Vozniak, A. B.

    2017-01-01

    Because of the holonomic constraints, the kinetic energy contribution in the partition function of an inextensible polymer chain is difficult to find, and it has been systematically ignored. We present the first thermodynamic calculation incorporating the kinetic energy of an inextensible polymer chain with the bending energy. To explore the effect of the translation-rotation degrees of freedom, we propose and solve a statistical model of a fully flexible chain of N +1 linked beads which, in the limit of smooth bending, is equivalent to the well-known wormlike chain model. The partition function with the kinetic and bending energies and correlations between orientations of any pair of links and velocities of any pair of beads are found. This solution is precise in the limits of small and large rigidity-to-temperature ratio b /T . The last exact solution is essential as even very "harmless" approximation results in loss of the important effects when the chain is very rigid. For very high b /T , the orientations of different links become fully correlated. Nevertheless, the chain does not go over into a hard rod even in the limit b /T →∞ : While the velocity correlation length diverges, the correlations themselves remain weak and tend to the value ∝T /(N +1 ). The N dependence of the partition function is essentially determined by the kinetic energy contribution. We demonstrate that to obtain the correct energy and entropy in a constrained system, the T derivative of the partition function has to be applied before integration over the constraint-setting variable.

  9. Statistical model of a flexible inextensible polymer chain: The effect of kinetic energy.

    PubMed

    Pergamenshchik, V M; Vozniak, A B

    2017-01-01

    Because of the holonomic constraints, the kinetic energy contribution in the partition function of an inextensible polymer chain is difficult to find, and it has been systematically ignored. We present the first thermodynamic calculation incorporating the kinetic energy of an inextensible polymer chain with the bending energy. To explore the effect of the translation-rotation degrees of freedom, we propose and solve a statistical model of a fully flexible chain of N+1 linked beads which, in the limit of smooth bending, is equivalent to the well-known wormlike chain model. The partition function with the kinetic and bending energies and correlations between orientations of any pair of links and velocities of any pair of beads are found. This solution is precise in the limits of small and large rigidity-to-temperature ratio b/T. The last exact solution is essential as even very "harmless" approximation results in loss of the important effects when the chain is very rigid. For very high b/T, the orientations of different links become fully correlated. Nevertheless, the chain does not go over into a hard rod even in the limit b/T→∞: While the velocity correlation length diverges, the correlations themselves remain weak and tend to the value ∝T/(N+1). The N dependence of the partition function is essentially determined by the kinetic energy contribution. We demonstrate that to obtain the correct energy and entropy in a constrained system, the T derivative of the partition function has to be applied before integration over the constraint-setting variable.

  10. Strategies to Support Students' Mathematical Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Hyunyi

    2015-01-01

    An important question for mathematics teachers is this: "How can we help students learn mathematics to solve everyday problems, rather than teaching them only to memorize rules and practice mathematical procedures?" Teaching students using modeling activities can help them learn mathematics in real-world problem-solving situations that…

  11. Aeroelastic Analysis of a Flexible Wing Wind Tunnel Model with Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Ting, Eric; Lebofsky, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents data analysis of a flexible wing wind tunnel model with a variable camber continuous trailing edge flap (VCCTEF) design for drag minimization tested at the University of Washington Aeronautical Laboratory (UWAL). The wind tunnel test was designed to explore the relative merit of the VCCTEF concept for improved cruise efficiency through the use of low-cost aeroelastic model test techniques. The flexible wing model is a 10%-scale model of a typical transport wing and is constructed of woven fabric composites and foam core. The wing structural stiffness in bending is tailored to be half of the stiffness of a Boeing 757-era transport wing while the torsional stiffness is about the same. This stiffness reduction results in a wing tip deflection of about 10% of the wing semi-span. The VCCTEF is a multi-segment flap design having three chordwise camber segments and five spanwise flap sections for a total of 15 individual flap elements. The three chordwise camber segments can be positioned appropriately to create a desired trailing edge camber. Elastomeric material is used to cover the gaps in between the spanwise flap sections, thereby creating a continuous trailing edge. Wind tunnel data analysis conducted previously shows that the VCCTEF can achieve a drag reduction of up to 6.31% and an improvement in the lift-to-drag ratio (L=D) of up to 4.85%. A method for estimating the bending and torsional stiffnesses of the flexible wingUWAL wind tunnel model from static load test data is presented. The resulting estimation indicates that the stiffness of the flexible wing is significantly stiffer in torsion than in bending by as much as 9 to 1. The lift prediction for the flexible wing is computed by a coupled aerodynamic-structural model. The coupled model is developed by coupling a conceptual aerodynamic tool Vorlax with a finite-element model of the flexible wing via an automated geometry deformation tool. Based on the comparison of the lift curve slope

  12. Research on the Multi-Flexible-Body System Dynamics Model of Highline Cable of Alongside Replenishment at Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Nan; Wei, Zhuobin; Zhang, Shiyun

    In order to solve the problem that naval replenishment equipment could not be independent development and production, and In view of the present status that there is not a engineering model for sealift highline cable, the paper researched, The paper research multi-flexible-body system dynamics model of the rope and used it to simulate sealift Highline cable based on the multi-body dynamics theory. Meanwhile the paper simulated to the transverse replenishment process for sea dry cargo by using dynamics tools ADAMS, through the analysis of simulation results. Then the conclusion is gained, which the multi-flexible-body dynamic model is more close to the sealift highline cable and the dynamic calculation results is closer to the actual situation.

  13. Computational and Modeling Strategies for Cell Motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Yang, Xiaofeng; Adalsteinsson, David; Elston, Timothy C.; Jacobson, Ken; Kapustina, Maryna; Forest, M. Gregory

    A predictive simulation of the dynamics of a living cell remains a fundamental modeling and computational challenge. The challenge does not even make sense unless one specifies the level of detail and the phenomena of interest, whether the focus is on near-equilibrium or strongly nonequilibrium behavior, and on localized, subcellular, or global cell behavior. Therefore, choices have to be made clear at the outset, ranging from distinguishing between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, specificity within each of these types, whether the cell is "normal," whether one wants to model mitosis, blebs, migration, division, deformation due to confined flow as with red blood cells, and the level of microscopic detail for any of these processes. The review article by Hoffman and Crocker [48] is both an excellent overview of cell mechanics and an inspiration for our approach. One might be interested, for example, in duplicating the intricate experimental details reported in [43]: "actin polymerization periodically builds a mechanical link, the lamellipodium, connecting myosin motors with the initiation of adhesion sites, suggesting that the major functions driving motility are coordinated by a biomechanical process," or to duplicate experimental evidence of traveling waves in cells recovering from actin depolymerization [42, 35]. Modeling studies of lamellipodial structure, protrusion, and retraction behavior range from early mechanistic models [84] to more recent deterministic [112, 97] and stochastic [51] approaches with significant biochemical and structural detail. Recent microscopic-macroscopic models and algorithms for cell blebbing have been developed by Young and Mitran [116], which update cytoskeletal microstructure via statistical sampling techniques together with fluid variables. Alternatively, whole cell compartment models (without spatial details) of oscillations in spreading cells have been proposed [35, 92, 109] which show positive and negative feedback

  14. On the energetics of quadrupedal running: predicting the metabolic cost of transport via a flexible-torso model.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qu; Poulakakis, Ioannis

    2015-09-03

    In this paper, the effect of torso flexibility on the energetics of quadrupedal bounding is examined in a template setting. Two reductive sagittal-plane models, one with a rigid, non-deformable torso and one with a flexible, unactuated torso are proposed. Both models feature non-trivial leg mass and inertia to capture the energy associated with repositioning the legs after liftoff as well as the energy lost due to impacts. Bounding motions that minimize the cost of transport are generated for both models via a simple controller that coordinates leg recirculation. Comparisons reveal that torso compliance promotes locomotion efficiency by facilitating leg recirculation in anticipation of touchdown at speeds that are sufficiently high. Furthermore, by considering non-ideal torque generating and compliant elements with biologically reasonable efficiency values, it is shown that the flexible-torso model can predict the metabolic cost of transport for different animals, estimated using measurements of oxygen consumption. This way, the proposed model offers a means for approximating the energetic cost of transport of running quadrupeds in a simple and direct fashion.

  15. Flexible Ablators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stackpoole, Margaret M. (Inventor); Ghandehari, Ehson M. (Inventor); Thornton, Jeremy J. (Inventor); Covington, Melmoth Alan (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A low-density article comprising a flexible substrate and a pyrolizable material impregnated therein, methods of preparing, and devices using the article are disclosed. The pyrolizable material pyrolizes above 350 C and does not flow at temperatures below the pyrolysis temperature. The low-density article remains flexible after impregnation and continues to remain flexible when the pyrolizable material is fully pyrolized.

  16. Sediment calibration strategies of Phase 5 Chesapeake Bay watershed model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wu, J.; Shenk, G.W.; Raffensperger, J.; Moyer, D.; Linker, L.C.; ,

    2005-01-01

    Sediment is a primary constituent of concern for Chesapeake Bay due to its effect on water clarity. Accurate representation of sediment processes and behavior in Chesapeake Bay watershed model is critical for developing sound load reduction strategies. Sediment calibration remains one of the most difficult components of watershed-scale assessment. This is especially true for Chesapeake Bay watershed model given the size of the watershed being modeled and complexity involved in land and stream simulation processes. To obtain the best calibration, the Chesapeake Bay program has developed four different strategies for sediment calibration of Phase 5 watershed model, including 1) comparing observed and simulated sediment rating curves for different parts of the hydrograph; 2) analyzing change of bed depth over time; 3) relating deposition/scour to total annual sediment loads; and 4) calculating "goodness-of-fit' statistics. These strategies allow a more accurate sediment calibration, and also provide some insightful information on sediment processes and behavior in Chesapeake Bay watershed.

  17. A strategy to establish Food Safety Model Repositories.

    PubMed

    Plaza-Rodríguez, C; Thoens, C; Falenski, A; Weiser, A A; Appel, B; Kaesbohrer, A; Filter, M

    2015-07-02

    Transferring the knowledge of predictive microbiology into real world food manufacturing applications is still a major challenge for the whole food safety modelling community. To facilitate this process, a strategy for creating open, community driven and web-based predictive microbial model repositories is proposed. These collaborative model resources could significantly improve the transfer of knowledge from research into commercial and governmental applications and also increase efficiency, transparency and usability of predictive models. To demonstrate the feasibility, predictive models of Salmonella in beef previously published in the scientific literature were re-implemented using an open source software tool called PMM-Lab. The models were made publicly available in a Food Safety Model Repository within the OpenML for Predictive Modelling in Food community project. Three different approaches were used to create new models in the model repositories: (1) all information relevant for model re-implementation is available in a scientific publication, (2) model parameters can be imported from tabular parameter collections and (3) models have to be generated from experimental data or primary model parameters. All three approaches were demonstrated in the paper. The sample Food Safety Model Repository is available via: http://sourceforge.net/projects/microbialmodelingexchange/files/models and the PMM-Lab software can be downloaded from http://sourceforge.net/projects/pmmlab/. This work also illustrates that a standardized information exchange format for predictive microbial models, as the key component of this strategy, could be established by adoption of resources from the Systems Biology domain.

  18. Flexible Strategy Use by Students Who Learn Much versus Little from Text: Transitions within Think-Aloud Protocols

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cromley, Jennifer G.; Wills, Theodore W.

    2016-01-01

    Van den Broek's landscape model explicitly posits sequences of moves during reading in real time. Two other models that implicitly describe sequences of processes during reading are tested in the present research. Coded think-aloud data from 24 undergraduate students reading scientific text were analysed with lag-sequential techniques to compare…

  19. Teaching Comprehension and Study Strategies through Modeling and Thinking Aloud.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nist, Sherrie L.; Kirby, Kate

    1986-01-01

    Focuses on three ideas pertaining to modeling and thinking aloud, presents examples of how the processes can be applied to teaching both text comprehension and study strategies to college developmental readers, and discusses reasons for using modeling and thinking aloud in the classroom. (FL)

  20. Strategies for controlling intra- and intermicellar packing in block copolymer solutions: illustrating the flexibility of the self-assembly toolbox.

    PubMed

    Lodge, Timothy L; Bang, Joona; Li, Zhibo; Hillmyer, Marc A; Talmon, Yeshayhu

    2005-01-01

    Block copolymers constitute a class of self-assembling macromolecules that offer remarkable flexibility for controlling nanostructure, both in discrete objects and in bulk materials. Block copolymer micelles may be formed with multiple compartments by judicious choice of ingredients in an ABC triblock copolymer. For example, we have shown that a poly(ethylene oxide-b-styrene-b-fluorinated butadiene) triblock assembles in dilute aqueous solution into large, flat core/shell/corona disks, with the fluorine containing block forming the core. In contrast, the unfluorinated precursor generates large spherical micelles. A numerical analysis suggests that the disk-like motif is characteristic of the so-called superstrong segregation regime, whereby the interfacial tension becomes so large as to overwhelm the conformational entropy of the core blocks. For ABC miktoarm stars comprising polyethylene oxide, polyethylethylene, and polyhexafluoropropylene oxide arms, a much richer variety of micellar structures are observed. Prominent amongst these is a "segmented worm", in which alternating layers (5-7 nm thick) of hydrocarbon and fluorocarbon blocks form disks (6-10 nm in radius) that stack into cylindrical aggregates. The disk radii suggest almost fully stretched blocks, again consistent with the superstrong segregation regime. These structures are rationalized in terms of the constraints imposed by the star architecture, combined with the extremely strong interfacial tensions. In contrast, for lipids, surfactants, and aqueous diblock copolymers, increasing the interfacial tension can induce a transition from spheres to cylinders to flat bilayers; the disk-like motif is not usually seen. Interestingly, in aqueous diblocks both worm-like micelles and vesicles have been well-documented, whereas in "simple" organic systems they have not. We have shown that by suitable choice of block composition and solvent selectivity, the curvature sequence sphere/cylinder/vesicle can also be

  1. A multiscale model for simulating binding kinetics of proteins with flexible linkers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiawen; Xie, Zhong-Ru; Wu, Yinghao

    2014-10-01

    The kinetics of protein interactions are essential determinants in many cellular processes such as signal transduction and transcriptional regulation. Many proteins involved in these functions contain intrinsic disordered regions. This makes conformational flexibility become an unneglectable factor when studying the binding kinetic of these proteins. Compared with the binding of rigid proteins that is limited by diffusions, the binding mechanisms of proteins with internal flexibility are much more complicated. Using a small protein that contains two domains and a connecting loop as a testing system, we developed a multiscale simulation framework to study the role of flexible linkers in regulating kinetics of protein binding. The association and dissociation processes were implemented by a coarse-grained Monte-Carlo algorithm, while the conformational changes of the flexible linker were captured from all-atom molecular dynamic simulations. Our simulations illustrated that the presence of the extended domain linker can enhance the rate of protein association. On the other hand, the full-length flexible molecule is more difficult to dissociate than its two rigid domains but much easier than the molecule with a rigid linker. Overall, our studies demonstrated that both kinetics and thermodynamics of protein binding are closely modulated by the dynamic features of linker regions.

  2. Modelling combat strategies in fungal mycelia.

    PubMed

    Boswell, Graeme P

    2012-07-07

    Fungal mycelia have a well-established role in nutrient cycling and are widely used as agents in biological control and in the remediation of polluted landscapes. Competition and combat between different fungal communities is common in these contexts and its outcome impacts on local biodiversity and the success of such biotechnological applications. In this investigation a mathematical model representing mycelia as a system of partial differential equations is used to simulate combat between two fungal colonies growing into a nutrient-free domain. The resultant equations are integrated numerically and the model simulates well-established outcomes of combat between fungal communities. The outcome of pairwise combat is shown to depend on numerous factors including the suppression of advancing hyphae in rivals, the degradation of a rival's established biomass and the utilization and redistribution of available nutrient resources. It is demonstrated how non-transitive hierarchies in fungal communities can be established through switching mechanisms, mirroring observations reported in experimental studies, and how specialized defensive structures can emerge through changes in the redistribution of internal resources.

  3. Assessing the flexibility of research-based instructional strategies: Implementing tutorials in introductory physics in the lecture environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryjevskaia, Mila; Boudreaux, Andrew; Heins, Dustin

    2014-03-01

    Materials from Tutorials in Introductory Physics, originally designed and implemented by the Physics Education Group at the University of Washington, were used in modified form as interactive lectures under conditions significantly different from those suggested by the curriculum developers. Student learning was assessed using tasks drawn from the physics education research literature. Use of tutorials in the interactive lecture format yielded gains in student understanding comparable to those obtained through the canonical tutorial implementation at the University of Washington, suggesting that student engagement with the intellectual steps laid out in the tutorials, rather than the specific strategies used in facilitating such engagement, plays the central role in promoting student learning. We describe the implementation details and assessment of student learning for two different tutorials: one focused on mechanical waves, used at North Dakota State University, and one on Galilean relativity, used at Western Washington University. Also discussed are factors that may limit the generalizability of the results.

  4. Modeling the Insertion Mechanics of Flexible Neural Probes Coated with Sacrificial Polymers for Optimizing Probe Design

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sagar; Lo, Meng-Chen; Damodaran, Vinod B.; Kaplan, Hilton M.; Kohn, Joachim; Zahn, Jeffrey D.; Shreiber, David I.

    2016-01-01

    Single-unit recording neural probes have significant advantages towards improving signal-to-noise ratio and specificity for signal acquisition in brain-to-computer interface devices. Long-term effectiveness is unfortunately limited by the chronic injury response, which has been linked to the mechanical mismatch between rigid probes and compliant brain tissue. Small, flexible microelectrodes may overcome this limitation, but insertion of these probes without buckling requires supporting elements such as a stiff coating with a biodegradable polymer. For these coated probes, there is a design trade-off between the potential for successful insertion into brain tissue and the degree of trauma generated by the insertion. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a finite element model (FEM) to simulate insertion of coated neural probes of varying dimensions and material properties into brain tissue. Simulations were performed to predict the buckling and insertion forces during insertion of coated probes into a tissue phantom with material properties of brain. The simulations were validated with parallel experimental studies where probes were inserted into agarose tissue phantom, ex vivo chick embryonic brain tissue, and ex vivo rat brain tissue. Experiments were performed with uncoated copper wire and both uncoated and coated SU-8 photoresist and Parylene C probes. Model predictions were found to strongly agree with experimental results (<10% error). The ratio of the predicted buckling force-to-predicted insertion force, where a value greater than one would ideally be expected to result in successful insertion, was plotted against the actual success rate from experiments. A sigmoidal relationship was observed, with a ratio of 1.35 corresponding to equal probability of insertion and failure, and a ratio of 3.5 corresponding to a 100% success rate. This ratio was dubbed the “safety factor”, as it indicated the degree to which the coating should be over

  5. Modeling the Insertion Mechanics of Flexible Neural Probes Coated with Sacrificial Polymers for Optimizing Probe Design.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sagar; Lo, Meng-Chen; Damodaran, Vinod B; Kaplan, Hilton M; Kohn, Joachim; Zahn, Jeffrey D; Shreiber, David I

    2016-03-04

    Single-unit recording neural probes have significant advantages towards improving signal-to-noise ratio and specificity for signal acquisition in brain-to-computer interface devices. Long-term effectiveness is unfortunately limited by the chronic injury response, which has been linked to the mechanical mismatch between rigid probes and compliant brain tissue. Small, flexible microelectrodes may overcome this limitation, but insertion of these probes without buckling requires supporting elements such as a stiff coating with a biodegradable polymer. For these coated probes, there is a design trade-off between the potential for successful insertion into brain tissue and the degree of trauma generated by the insertion. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a finite element model (FEM) to simulate insertion of coated neural probes of varying dimensions and material properties into brain tissue. Simulations were performed to predict the buckling and insertion forces during insertion of coated probes into a tissue phantom with material properties of brain. The simulations were validated with parallel experimental studies where probes were inserted into agarose tissue phantom, ex vivo chick embryonic brain tissue, and ex vivo rat brain tissue. Experiments were performed with uncoated copper wire and both uncoated and coated SU-8 photoresist and Parylene C probes. Model predictions were found to strongly agree with experimental results (<10% error). The ratio of the predicted buckling force-to-predicted insertion force, where a value greater than one would ideally be expected to result in successful insertion, was plotted against the actual success rate from experiments. A sigmoidal relationship was observed, with a ratio of 1.35 corresponding to equal probability of insertion and failure, and a ratio of 3.5 corresponding to a 100% success rate. This ratio was dubbed the "safety factor", as it indicated the degree to which the coating should be over

  6. A flexible-segment-model-based dynamics calculation method for free hanging marine risers in re-entry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xue-song; Wang, Sheng-wei

    2012-03-01

    In re-entry, the drilling riser hanging to the holding vessel takes on a free hanging state, waiting to be moved from the initial random position to the wellhead. For the re-entry, dynamics calculation is often done to predict the riser motion or evaluate the structural safety. A dynamics calculation method based on Flexible Segment Model (FSM) is proposed for free hanging marine risers. In FSM, a riser is discretized into a series of flexible segments. For each flexible segment, its deflection feature and external forces are analyzed independently. For the whole riser, the nonlinear governing equations are listed according to the moment equilibrium at nodes. For the solution of the nonlinear equations, a linearization iteration scheme is provided in the paper. Owing to its flexibility, each segment can match a long part of the riser body, which enables that good results can be obtained even with a small number of segments. Moreover, the linearization iteration scheme can avoid widely used Newton-Rapson iteration scheme in which the calculation stability is influenced by the initial points. The FSM-based dynamics calculation is timesaving and stable, so suitable for the shape prediction or real-time control of free hanging marine risers.

  7. Flexible bent rod model with a saturating induced dipole moment to study the electric linear dichroism of DNA fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolotto, Jorge A.; Umazano, Juan P.

    2016-06-01

    In the present work we make a theoretical study of the steady state electric linear dichroism of DNA fragments in aqueous solution. The here developed theoretical approach considers a flexible bent rod model with a saturating induced dipole moment. The electric polarizability tensor of bent DNA fragments is calculated considering a phenomenological model which theoretical and experimental backgroung is presented here. The model has into account the electric polarizability longitudinal and transversal to the macroion. Molecular flexibility is described using an elastic potential. We consider DNA fragments originally bent with bending fluctuations around an average bending angle. The induced dipole moment is supposed constant once the electric field strength grows up at critical value. To calculate the reduced electric linear dichroism we determine the optical factor considering the basis of the bent DNA perpendicular to the molecular axis. The orientational distribution function has into account the anisotropic electric properties and the molecule flexibility. We applied the present theoretical background to fit electric dichroism experimental data of DNA fragments reported in the bibliography in a wide range of molecular weight and electric field. From these fits, values of DNA physical properties are estimated. We compare and discuss the results here obtained with the theoretical and experimental data presented by other authors. The original contributions of this work are: the inclusion of the transversal electric polarizability saturating with the electric field, the description of the electric properties with an electric polarizability tensor dependant on the bending angle and the use of an arc model originally bent.

  8. Computationally efficient and flexible modular modelling approach for river and urban drainage systems based on surrogate conceptual models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfs, Vincent; Willems, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    Water managers rely increasingly on mathematical simulation models that represent individual parts of the water system, such as the river, sewer system or waste water treatment plant. The current evolution towards integral water management requires the integration of these distinct components, leading to an increased model scale and scope. Besides this growing model complexity, certain applications gained interest and importance, such as uncertainty and sensitivity analyses, auto-calibration of models and real time control. All these applications share the need for models with a very limited calculation time, either for performing a large number of simulations, or a long term simulation followed by a statistical post-processing of the results. The use of the commonly applied detailed models that solve (part of) the de Saint-Venant equations is infeasible for these applications or such integrated modelling due to several reasons, of which a too long simulation time and the inability to couple submodels made in different software environments are the main ones. Instead, practitioners must use simplified models for these purposes. These models are characterized by empirical relationships and sacrifice model detail and accuracy for increased computational efficiency. The presented research discusses the development of a flexible integral modelling platform that complies with the following three key requirements: (1) Include a modelling approach for water quantity predictions for rivers, floodplains, sewer systems and rainfall runoff routing that require a minimal calculation time; (2) A fast and semi-automatic model configuration, thereby making maximum use of data of existing detailed models and measurements; (3) Have a calculation scheme based on open source code to allow for future extensions or the coupling with other models. First, a novel and flexible modular modelling approach based on the storage cell concept was developed. This approach divides each

  9. Selection Strategies for Social Influence in the Threshold Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karampourniotis, Panagiotis; Szymanski, Boleslaw; Korniss, Gyorgy

    The ubiquity of online social networks makes the study of social influence extremely significant for its applications to marketing, politics and security. Maximizing the spread of influence by strategically selecting nodes as initiators of a new opinion or trend is a challenging problem. We study the performance of various strategies for selection of large fractions of initiators on a classical social influence model, the Threshold model (TM). Under the TM, a node adopts a new opinion only when the fraction of its first neighbors possessing that opinion exceeds a pre-assigned threshold. The strategies we study are of two kinds: strategies based solely on the initial network structure (Degree-rank, Dominating Sets, PageRank etc.) and strategies that take into account the change of the states of the nodes during the evolution of the cascade, e.g. the greedy algorithm. We find that the performance of these strategies depends largely on both the network structure properties, e.g. the assortativity, and the distribution of the thresholds assigned to the nodes. We conclude that the optimal strategy needs to combine the network specifics and the model specific parameters to identify the most influential spreaders. Supported in part by ARL NS-CTA, ARO, and ONR.

  10. A dynamic warm-up model increases quadriceps strength and hamstring flexibility.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Alain J; DiStefano, Lindsay J; Brown, Cathleen N; Herman, Daniel C; Guskiewicz, Kevin M; Padua, Darin A

    2012-04-01

    Research suggests that static stretching can negatively influence muscle strength and power and may result in decreased functional performance. The dynamic warm-up (DWU) is a common alternative to static stretching before physical activity, but there is limited research investigating the effects of a DWU. The purpose of this study was to compare the acute effects of a DWU and static stretching warm-up (SWU) on muscle flexibility, strength, and vertical jump using a randomized controlled trial design. Forty-five volunteers were randomly assigned into a control (CON), SWU, or DWU group. All participants rode a stationary bicycle for 5 minutes and completed a 10-minute warm-up protocol. During this protocol, the DWU group performed dynamic stretching and running, the SWU group performed static stretching, and the CON group rested. Dependent variables were measured immediately before and after the warm-up protocol. A digital inclinometer measured flexibility (degrees) for the hamstrings, quadriceps, and hip flexor muscles. An isokinetic dynamometer measured concentric and eccentric peak torque (N·m/kg) for the hamstrings and quadriceps. A force plate was used to measure vertical jump height (meters) and power (watts). In the DWU group, there was a significant increase in hamstring flexibility (pretest: 26.4 ± 13.5°, posttest: 16.9 ± 9.4°; p < .0001) and eccentric quadriceps peak torque (pretest: 2.49 ± 0.83 N·m/kg, posttest: 2.78 ± 0.69 N·m/kg; p = 0.04). The CON and SWU did not significantly affect any flexibility, strength, or vertical jump measures (p > 0.05). The DWU significantly improved eccentric quadriceps strength and hamstrings flexibility, whereas the SWU did not facilitate any positive or negative changes in muscle flexibility, strength, power, or vertical jump. Therefore, the DWU may be a better preactivity warm-up choice than an SWU.

  11. A Flexible Electronic Commerce Recommendation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Songjie

    Recommendation systems have become very popular in E-commerce websites. Many of the largest commerce websites are already using recommender technologies to help their customers find products to purchase. An electronic commerce recommendation system learns from a customer and recommends products that the customer will find most valuable from among the available products. But most recommendation methods are hard-wired into the system and they support only fixed recommendations. This paper presented a framework of flexible electronic commerce recommendation system. The framework is composed by user model interface, recommendation engine, recommendation strategy model, recommendation technology group, user interest model and database interface. In the recommender strategy model, the method can be collaborative filtering, content-based filtering, mining associate rules method, knowledge-based filtering method or the mixed method. The system mapped the implementation and demand through strategy model, and the whole system would be design as standard parts to adapt to the change of the recommendation strategy.

  12. Models of Strategy and Strategy-Shifting in Spatial Visualization Performance.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-01

    figures. Model C-Ill represented a forword -stopping synthesis strategy. Subjects first attempt to synthesize the A and 8 figures into an AS product...other two groups, but these differences were not significant. The fast average response time for the feature-comparers was due primarily to those who

  13. Optimal control for competitive-cooperative systems: Modeling flexible coalitions in tomorrow`s competitive world

    SciTech Connect

    Lenhart, S. |; Protopopescu, V.

    1994-09-01

    The last years have witnessed a dramatic shift of the world`s military, political, and economic paradigm from a bi-polar competitive gridlock to a more fluid, multi-player environment. This change has necessarily been followed by a re-evaluation of the strategic thinking and by a reassessment of mutual positions, options, and decisions. The essential attributes of the new situation are modeled by a system of nonlinear evolution equations with competitive/cooperative interactions. The mathematical setting is quite general to accommodate models related to military confrontation, arms control, economic competition, political negotiations, etc. Irrespective of the specific details, all these situations share a common denominator, namely the presence of various players with different and often changing interests and goals. The interests, ranging from conflicting to consensual, are defined in a context of interactions between the players that vary from competitive to cooperative. Players with converging interests tend to build up cooperative coalitions while coalitions with diverging interests usually compete among themselves, but this is not an absolute requirement (namely, one may have groups with converging interests and competitive interactions, and vice-versa). Appurtenance to a coalition may change in time according to the shift in one`s perceptions, interests, or obligations. During the time evolution, the players try to modify their strategies as to best achieve their respective goals. An objective functional quantifying the rate of success (payoff) vs. effort (cost) measures the degree of goal attainment for all players involved, thus selecting an optimal strategy based on optimal controls. While the technical details may vary from problem to problem, the general approach described here establishes a standard framework for a host of concrete situations that may arise from tomorrow`s {open_quotes}next competition{close_quotes}.

  14. Deterioration modeling for condition assessment of flexible pavements considering extreme weather events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi Tari, Yasamin; Shahini Shamsabadi, Salar; Birken, Ralf; Wang, Ming

    2015-04-01

    Accurate pavement management systems are essential for states' Department Of Transportation and roadway agencies to plan for cost-effective maintenance and repair (M and R) strategies. Pavement deterioration model is an imperative component of any pavement management system since the future budget and M and R plans would be developed based on the predicted pavement performance measures. It is crucial for the pavement deterioration models to consider the factors that significantly aggravate the pavement condition. While many studies have highlighted the impact of different environmental, load, and pavement's structure on the life cycle of the pavement, effect of extreme weather events such as Floods and Snow Storms have often been overlooked. In this study, a pavement deterioration model is proposed which would consider the effect of traffic loads, climate conditions, and extreme weather events. Climate, load and performance data has been compiled for over twenty years and for eight states using the Long Term Pavement Performance (LTPP) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) databases. A stepwise regression approach is undertaken to quantify the effect of the extreme weather events, along with other influential factors on pavement performance in terms of International Roughness Index (IRI). Final results rendered more than 90% correlation with the quantified impact values of extreme weather events.

  15. Clinically compatible flexible wide-field multi-color fluorescence endoscopy with a porcine colon model

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Gyugnseok; Park, Youngrong; Yoo, Su Woong; Hwang, Soonjoo; Chin-Yu, Alexey V. Dan; Ryu, Yeon-Mi; Kim, Sang-Yeob; Do, Eun-Ju; Kim, Ki Hean; Kim, Sungjee; Myung, Seung-Jae; Chung, Euiheon

    2017-01-01

    Early detection of structural or molecular changes in dysplastic epithelial tissues is crucial for cancer screening and surveillance. Multi-targeting molecular endoscopic fluorescence imaging may improve noninvasive detection of precancerous lesions in the colon. Here, we report the first clinically compatible, wide-field-of-view, multi-color fluorescence endoscopy with a leached fiber bundle scope using a porcine model. A porcine colon model that resembles the human colon is used for the detection of surrogate tumors composed of multiple biocompatible fluorophores (FITC, ICG, and heavy metal-free quantum dots (hfQDs)). With an ex vivo porcine colon tumor model, molecular imaging with hfQDs conjugated with MMP14 antibody was achieved by spraying molecular probes on a mucosa layer that contains xenograft tumors. With an in vivo porcine colon embedded with surrogate tumors, target-to-background ratios of 3.36 ± 0.43, 2.70 ± 0.72, and 2.10 ± 0.13 were achieved for FITC, ICG, and hfQD probes, respectively. This promising endoscopic technology with molecular contrast shows the capacity to reveal hidden tumors and guide treatment strategy decisions. PMID:28270983

  16. Vehicle-track interaction at high frequencies - Modelling of a flexible rotating wheelset in non-inertial reference frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guiral, A.; Alonso, A.; Giménez, J. G.

    2015-10-01

    Vehicle-track interaction in the mid- and high-frequency range has become an important issue for rolling-stock manufacturers, railway operators and administrations. Previous modelling approaches have been focused on the development of flexible wheelset-track systems based on the assumption that the unsprung masses are decoupled from the high-frequency dynamic behaviour of carbody and bogies. In this respect, the available flexible wheelset models account for gyroscopic and inertial effects due to the main rotation but are, in general, developed from the viewpoint of inertial spaces and consequently restricted to the study of tangent layouts. The aim of this paper is to present the formulation of a flexible rotating wheelset derived within the framework of a non-inertial vehicle moving reference frame. This brings a double advantage; on the one hand, the formulation is not restricted to tangent tracks, but is also suitable for the study of transition curves and curve negotiation. On the other hand, the use of a vehicle moving reference frame allows the introduction of the hypothesis of small displacement for the degrees of freedom of the wheelset. This hypothesis is not applied to the pitch angle, as it is associated with the main axis of rotation. In addition, unlike previous flexible wheelset models that only consider the rotation around the main axis, all the degrees of freedom will be considered when developing the dynamic equations of motion. Results for the proposed model will be presented and the influence of the inertial and gyroscopic terms not taken into account in previous derived formulations will be evaluated.

  17. Strategy Guideline: Modeling Enclosure Design in Above-Grade Walls

    SciTech Connect

    Lstiburek, J.; Ueno, K.; Musunuru, S.

    2016-02-24

    The Strategy Guideline describes how to model and interpret results of models for above grade walls. The Measure Guideline analyzes the failure thresholds and criteria for above grade walls. A library of above-grade walls with historically successful performance was used to calibrate WUFI (Warme Und Feuchte Instationar) software models. The information is generalized for application to a broad population of houses within the limits of existing experience.

  18. Dynamics modeling and control of a 6-DOF space robot with flexible panels for capturing a free floating target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhang-wei; Liu, Xiao-feng; Cai, Guo-ping

    2016-11-01

    In many kinds of on-orbit space robot tasks, capturing free floating target using space robot attracts more attention of researchers. However, most existing researches about dynamics and control of space robot concern planar problem, and the effect of flexible panel on capturing dynamics of the system is not considered. In this paper, spatial dynamics and control of a 6-DOF space robot with flexible panels are investigated and spatial impact problem is considered. Dynamic model of the system is established by the single direction recursive construction method and the Jourdain's velocity variation principle. The Hertz contact and impact theory and the method of computer graphics are used to establish the impact model. The computed torque control method is used to design active controller to suppress the spacecraft drift caused by the impact. Numerical simulation results show that the established dynamic model is effective in describing the dynamics behavior of the space robot; flexible panels have big influence on impact dynamic characteristics; the designed controller may effectively control the spacecraft drift during the capture process.

  19. A flexible object-based software framework for modeling complex systems with interacting natural and societal processes.

    SciTech Connect

    Christiansen, J. H.

    2000-06-15

    The Dynamic Information Architecture System (DIAS) is a flexible, extensible, object-based framework for developing and maintaining complex multidisciplinary simulations. The DIAS infrastructure makes it feasible to build and manipulate complex simulation scenarios in which many thousands of objects can interact via dozens to hundreds of concurrent dynamic processes. The flexibility and extensibility of the DIAS software infrastructure stem mainly from (1) the abstraction of object behaviors, (2) the encapsulation and formalization of model functionality, and (3) the mutability of domain object contents. DIAS simulation objects are inherently capable of highly flexible and heterogeneous spatial realizations. Geospatial graphical representation of DIAS simulation objects is addressed via the GeoViewer, an object-based GIS toolkit application developed at ANL. DIAS simulation capabilities have been extended by inclusion of societal process models generated by the Framework for Addressing Cooperative Extended Transactions (FACET), another object-based framework developed at Argonne National Laboratory. By using FACET models to implement societal behaviors of individuals and organizations within larger DIAS-based natural systems simulations, it has become possible to conveniently address a broad range of issues involving interaction and feedback among natural and societal processes. Example DIAS application areas discussed in this paper include a dynamic virtual oceanic environment, detailed simulation of clinical, physiological, and logistical aspects of health care delivery, and studies of agricultural sustainability of urban centers under environmental stress in ancient Mesopotamia.

  20. Flexibility of the exportins Cse1p and Xpot depicted by elastic network model.

    PubMed

    Hu, Mingwen; Kim, Byung

    2011-07-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic transport in eukaryotic cells involves many interactions between macromolecules, and has been an active area for many researchers. However, the precise mechanism still evades us and more efforts are needed to better understand it. In this study, the authors investigated exportins (Cse1p and Xpot) by elastic network interpolation (ENI) and elastic network based normal mode analysis (EN-NMA). Results of the study on Cse1p were in good agreement with the results obtained by molecular dynamics simulation in another study but with the benefit of time-efficiency. First, a formation of ring closure obtained by ENI was observed. Second, HEAT 1 to 3 and HEAT 14 to 17 had the largest values of root mean square deviation (RMSD) which indicated the flexibility of Cse1p during the transition. In the case of Xpot, a possible pathway from nuclear state to cytoplasmic state was shown, and the predicted pathway was also quantitatively analyzed in terms of RMSD. The results suggested two flexible regions of Xpot that might be important to the transporting mechanism. Moreover, the dominant mode of Xpot in the nuclear state obtained by EN-NMA not only showed the tendency to match the predicted pathway to the cytoplasmic state of Xpot, but also displayed the flexible regions of Xpot. A time-efficient computational approach was presented in this paper and the results indicated that the flexibility of tested exportins might be required to perform the biological function of transporting cargos.

  1. The Community Grant Writing Project: A Flexible Service-Learning Model for Writing-Intensive Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Courtney

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the Community Grant Writing Project (CGWP), a flexible service-learning framework designed for use in writing-intensive courses. The CGWP incorporates best-practice recommendations from the service-learning literature and addresses recent challenges identified for successful service-learning partnerships. In the CGWP,…

  2. A Flexible Pre-Major Model for British Columbia Departments of Anthropology. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinbest, Jerry

    2007-01-01

    The Sociology/Anthropology Articulation Committee has engaged in a project resulting in tandem reports for each of the respective disciplines, which identify flexible pre-majors for both Sociology and Anthropology and summarize the specific types of courses that must be taken by students to allow them to transfer into third year of a major. A…

  3. Identifying optimal agricultural countermeasure strategies for a hypothetical contamination scenario using the strategy model.

    PubMed

    Cox, G; Beresford, N A; Alvarez-Farizo, B; Oughton, D; Kis, Z; Eged, K; Thørring, H; Hunt, J; Wright, S; Barnett, C L; Gil, J M; Howard, B J; Crout, N M J

    2005-01-01

    A spatially implemented model designed to assist the identification of optimal countermeasure strategies for radioactively contaminated regions is described. Collective and individual ingestion doses for people within the affected area are estimated together with collective exported ingestion dose. A range of countermeasures are incorporated within the model, and environmental restrictions have been included as appropriate. The model evaluates the effectiveness of a given combination of countermeasures through a cost function which balances the benefit obtained through the reduction in dose with the cost of implementation. The optimal countermeasure strategy is the combination of individual countermeasures (and when and where they are implemented) which gives the lowest value of the cost function. The model outputs should not be considered as definitive solutions, rather as interactive inputs to the decision making process. As a demonstration the model has been applied to a hypothetical scenario in Cumbria (UK). This scenario considered a published nuclear power plant accident scenario with a total deposition of 1.7x10(14), 1.2x10(13), 2.8x10(10) and 5.3x10(9)Bq for Cs-137, Sr-90, Pu-239/240 and Am-241, respectively. The model predicts that if no remediation measures were implemented the resulting collective dose would be approximately 36 000 person-Sv (predominantly from 137Cs) over a 10-year period post-deposition. The optimal countermeasure strategy is predicted to avert approximately 33 000 person-Sv at a cost of approximately 160 million pounds. The optimal strategy comprises a mixture of ploughing, AFCF (ammonium-ferric hexacyano-ferrate) administration, potassium fertiliser application, clean feeding of livestock and food restrictions. The model recommends specific areas within the contaminated area and time periods where these measures should be implemented.

  4. Importance of chirality and reduced flexibility of protein side chains: A study with square and tetrahedral lattice models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jinfeng; Chen, Yu; Chen, Rong; Liang, Jie

    2004-07-01

    Side chains of amino acid residues are the determining factor that distinguishes proteins from other unstable chain polymers. In simple models they are often represented implicitly (e.g., by spin states) or simplified as one atom. Here we study side chain effects using two-dimensional square lattice and three-dimensional tetrahedral lattice models, with explicitly constructed side chains formed by two atoms of different chirality and flexibility. We distinguish effects due to chirality and effects due to side chain flexibilities, since residues in proteins are L residues, and their side chains adopt different rotameric states. For short chains, we enumerate exhaustively all possible conformations. For long chains, we sample effectively rare events such as compact conformations and obtain complete pictures of ensemble properties of conformations of these models at all compactness region. This is made possible by using sequential Monte Carlo techniques based on chain growth method. Our results show that both chirality and reduced side chain flexibility lower the folding entropy significantly for globally compact conformations, suggesting that they are important properties of residues to ensure fast folding and stable native structure. This corresponds well with our finding that natural amino acid residues have reduced effective flexibility, as evidenced by statistical analysis of rotamer libraries and side chain rotatable bonds. We further develop a method calculating the exact side chain entropy for a given backbone structure. We show that simple rotamer counting underestimates side chain entropy significantly for both extended and near maximally compact conformations. We find that side chain entropy does not always correlate well with main chain packing. With explicit side chains, extended backbones do not have the largest side chain entropy. Among compact backbones with maximum side chain entropy, helical structures emerge as the dominating configurations. Our

  5. New Learning Strategies in Bustillos and Oliveira Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Mingfeng; Pan, Xiaowen; Mu, Xiaojia; Feng, Lin

    Armando Ticona Bustillos and Paulo Murilo C. de Oliveira first combined learning strategy with Penna model using a third bit string to represent knowledge. There are two forms of learning strategy in their model: individual learning through trial-and-error and social learning through copying knowledge from others. Based on the Bustillos-Oliveira model, we propose a new learning strategy:. (1) Individual learning ability depending on knowledge, through which the individual learning ability is not a constant but in direct proportion to the knowledge level of individual;. (2) Double-direction Social learning, under this, not only the young can learn from the elder, but also the elder can learn from the young;. (3) The age-dependent learning capacity, we make the learning capacity a variable in inverse proportion to the age, unlike which has been represented in Bustillos and Oliveira's model as a constant. Under this new learning strategy represented above, we get different result in the level of knowledge of individuals from B-O model.

  6. Modeling of flexible waveguides for ultrasonic vibrations transmission: longitudinal and flexural vibrations of non-deformed waveguide.

    PubMed

    Stepanenko, Dmitry A; Minchenya, Vladimir T

    2010-03-01

    The article presents the mathematical model allowing to investigate longitudinal and flexural vibrations of stepped flexible waveguides with transitional section without regard to various vibration modes interaction. The model uses original numerical-analytic calculations based on analytical solutions of the equation of waveguide steps vibrations and their continuous matching with numerical solution of the equation of transitional section vibrations. The proposed model can be considered as an initial approximation to the solution of the problem of flexible waveguides design, which makes it possible to determine and validate effective methods of its addressing. Resonant curves of longitudinal and flexural vibrations of two-step waveguide are traced for the given vibration frequency. Step lengths values providing simultaneous resonance of longitudinal and flexural vibrations for the given frequency are determined. Validity of the proposed model is proved by the results of finite elements method (FEM) modeling using ANSYS software. Application of Timoshenko's model instead of Euler-Bernoulli's model for description of flexural vibrations enabled reduction of relative deviation of resonant frequencies calculated using ANSYS from the value specified during resonant curves tracing down to negligible value (0.17%).

  7. A flexible cure rate model for spatially correlated survival data based on generalized extreme value distribution and Gaussian process priors.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Wang, Xia; Dey, Dipak K

    2016-09-01

    Our present work proposes a new survival model in a Bayesian context to analyze right-censored survival data for populations with a surviving fraction, assuming that the log failure time follows a generalized extreme value distribution. Many applications require a more flexible modeling of covariate information than a simple linear or parametric form for all covariate effects. It is also necessary to include the spatial variation in the model, since it is sometimes unexplained by the covariates considered in the analysis. Therefore, the nonlinear covariate effects and the spatial effects are incorporated into the systematic component of our model. Gaussian processes (GPs) provide a natural framework for modeling potentially nonlinear relationship and have recently become extremely powerful in nonlinear regression. Our proposed model adopts a semiparametric Bayesian approach by imposing a GP prior on the nonlinear structure of continuous covariate. With the consideration of data availability and computational complexity, the conditionally autoregressive distribution is placed on the region-specific frailties to handle spatial correlation. The flexibility and gains of our proposed model are illustrated through analyses of simulated data examples as well as a dataset involving a colon cancer clinical trial from the state of Iowa.

  8. The dynamics and control of large flexible space structures. Part B: Development of continuum model and computer simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bainum, P. M.; Kumar, V. K.; James, P. K.

    1978-01-01

    The equations of motion of an arbitrary flexible body in orbit were derived. The model includes the effects of gravity with all its higher harmonics. As a specific example, the motion of a long, slender, uniform beam in circular orbit was modelled. The example considers both the inplane and three dimensional motion of the beam in orbit. In the case of planar motion with only flexible vibrations, the pitch motion is not influenced by the elastic motion of the beam. For large values of the square of the ratio of the structural modal frequency to the orbital angular rate the elastic motion was decoupled from the pitch motion. However, for small values of the ratio and small amplitude pitch motion, the elastic motion was governed by a Hill's 3 term equation. Numerical simulation of the equation indicates the possibilities of instability for very low values of the square of the ratio of the modal frequency to the orbit angular rate. Also numerical simulations of the first order nonlinear equations of motion for a long flexible beam in orbit were performed. The effect of varying the initial conditions and the number of modes was demonstrated.

  9. Strategies for Large Scale Implementation of a Multiscale, Multiprocess Integrated Hydrologic Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, M.; Duffy, C.

    2006-05-01

    Distributed models simulate hydrologic state variables in space and time while taking into account the heterogeneities in terrain, surface, subsurface properties and meteorological forcings. Computational cost and complexity associated with these model increases with its tendency to accurately simulate the large number of interacting physical processes at fine spatio-temporal resolution in a large basin. A hydrologic model run on a coarse spatial discretization of the watershed with limited number of physical processes needs lesser computational load. But this negatively affects the accuracy of model results and restricts physical realization of the problem. So it is imperative to have an integrated modeling strategy (a) which can be universally applied at various scales in order to study the tradeoffs between computational complexity (determined by spatio- temporal resolution), accuracy and predictive uncertainty in relation to various approximations of physical processes (b) which can be applied at adaptively different spatial scales in the same domain by taking into account the local heterogeneity of topography and hydrogeologic variables c) which is flexible enough to incorporate different number and approximation of process equations depending on model purpose and computational constraint. An efficient implementation of this strategy becomes all the more important for Great Salt Lake river basin which is relatively large (~89000 sq. km) and complex in terms of hydrologic and geomorphic conditions. Also the types and the time scales of hydrologic processes which are dominant in different parts of basin are different. Part of snow melt runoff generated in the Uinta Mountains infiltrates and contributes as base flow to the Great Salt Lake over a time scale of decades to centuries. The adaptive strategy helps capture the steep topographic and climatic gradient along the Wasatch front. Here we present the aforesaid modeling strategy along with an associated

  10. Effects of uncertainties and flexible dynamic contributions on the control of a spacecraft full-coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasbarri, P.; Monti, R.; De Angelis, C.; Sabatini, M.

    2014-01-01

    One of the most important problems for performing a good design of the spacecraft attitude control law is connected to its robustness when some uncertainty parameters are present on the inertial and/or on the elastic characteristics of a satellite. These uncertainties are generally intrinsic on the modeling of complex structures and in the case of large flexible structures they can be also attributed to secondary effects associated to the elasticity. One of the most interesting issues in modeling large flexible space structures is associated to the evaluation of the inertia tensor which in general depends not only on the geometric ‘fixed' characteristic of the satellite but also on its elastic displacements which of course in turn modify the ‘shape' of the satellite. Usually these terms can be considered of a second order of magnitude if compared with the ones associated to the rigid part of a structure. However the increasing demand on the dimension of satellites due to the presence for instance of very large solar arrays (necessary to generate power) and/or large antennas has the necessity to investigate their effects on their global dynamic behavior in more details as a consequence. In the present paper a methodology based on classical Lagrangian approach coupled with a standard Finite Element tool has been used to derive the full dynamic equations of an orbiting flexible satellite under the actions of gravity, gravity gradient forces and attitude control. A particular attention has been paid to the study of the effects of flexibility on the inertial terms of the spacecraft which, as well known, influence its attitude dynamic behavior. Furthermore the effects of the attitude control authority and its robustness to the uncertainties on inertial and elastic parameters has been investigated and discussed.

  11. Learning Strategies for Police Organization--Modeling Organizational Learning Perquisites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luoma, Markku; Nokelainen, Petri; Ruohotie, Pekka

    The factors contributing to organizational learning in police units in Finland and elsewhere were examined to find strategies to improve the prerequisites of learning and compare linear and nonlinear methods of modeling organizational learning prerequisites. A questionnaire was used to collect data from the 281 staff members of five police…

  12. An Assessment-Based Model for Counseling Strategy Selection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Mary Lee

    2002-01-01

    Presents a counseling strategy selection model grounded in technical eclecticism and based on thorough assessment of the client's problems. Assessment should consider client mental health, counseling goals, problem complexity, and capacity and desire for insight. Distinguishing between simple and complex problems can aid assessment and provide…

  13. Modeling and Control Strategies for Autonomous Robotic Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-23

    Robotic Systems 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Roger W. Brockett A]&. TYPE Of REPORT 113b. TIME COVERD 114 DATt__Of RE PVRT (Year- month, Day) S.PAGE COUNT Final...NO. ACCESSION NO Reseaich Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211I I 11 TITLE (ir-’-4 Cae-unrv Canmuicauon) Modeling and Control Strategies for Autonomous

  14. Equal Access in Vocational Education. Instructor's Guidebook. Models and Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Money, Marilyn; Smith, Armenia

    This guidebook consists of a model and strategies for teachers and counselors to use in recruiting nontraditional and other special needs students into vocational education programs. Provided in the first section are guidelines for fair recruitment of male and female students into vocational programs as well as for recruitment of learning…

  15. Current Models and Innovative Strategies in Management Education in China.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Zhong-Ming

    1999-01-01

    Current models of management education in China include national training, on-the-job technical training, and the national master's of business administration supervisory committee. Effective strategies being used include teamwork, process skills, action learning, cross-cultural management learning, and competency-based management development. (SK)

  16. Modeling and compensation of flexible modes in 3-DOF H-gantry with decoupling design: a primitive study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Si-Lu; Gharib, Fraj; Teo, Chek Sing; Lin, Wei

    2015-03-01

    The special designed 3-DOF direct-drive air bearing decoupling stage has the advantages of high repeatability and free coupling error between different axes. And it is suitable for wafer scanning application. However, due to the flexible joints between the orthogonal axes, the relatively low frequency resonant modes limit the bandwidth of closed loop tracking control. This presentation shows how we obtain the frequency response model of the decouple stage accurately and safely with closed-loop identification approach, using dSPACE modular control systems, and how we use the model to achieve high-speed tracking control using model-based feedforward / feedback composite control. For safety purposes, the electrical portion of decoupled stage is carefully designed with appropriate limit sensors and emergency safety switch. The decoupled stage is controlled by DS1005 modular control system, which gives ultra-high control loop updating rate at 100us. With such high profile controller, we model the frequency response of 3-DOF system using sequential closed-loop relay feedback. From here, the model of rigid body mode and flexible modes are identified. The identified model provides a guideline for trajectory design and closed-loop PID plus feedforward controller design for synchronization of dual-drive X-axis motion. Although the trial on design of decoupling controller has been proposed, internal stability of such decoupling control schemes remains a research issue for our future work.

  17. A new model of water-lubricated rubber bearings for vibration analysis of flexible multistage rotor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shibing; Yang, Bingen

    2015-08-01

    Flexible multistage rotating systems that are supported or guided by long water-lubricated rubber bearings (WLRBs) have a variety of engineering applications. Vibration analysis of this type of machinery for performance and duality requires accurate modeling of WLRBs and related rotor-bearing assemblies. This work presents a new model of WLRBs, with attention given to the determination of bearing dynamic coefficients. Due to its large length-to-diameter ratio, a WLRB cannot be described by conventional pointwise bearing models with good fidelity. The bearing model proposed in this paper considers spatially distributed bearing forces. For the first time in the literature, the current study addresses the issue of mixed lubrication in the operation of WLRBs, which involves interactions of shaft vibration, elastic deformation of rubber material and fluid film pressure, and validates the WLRB model in experiments. Additionally, with the new bearing model, vibration analysis of WLRB-supported flexible multistage rotating systems is performed through use of a distributed transfer function method, which delivers accurate and closed-form analytical solutions of steady-state responses without discretization.

  18. A parametric sensitivity and optimization study for the active flexible wing wind-tunnel model flutter characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rais-Rohani, Masoud

    1991-01-01

    In this paper an effort is made to improve the analytical open-loop flutter predictions for the Active Flexible Wing wind-tunnel model using a sensitivity based optimization approach. The sensitivity derivatives of the flutter frequency and dynamic pressure of the model with respect to the lag terms appearing in the Roger's unsteady aerodynamics approximations are evaluated both analytical and by finite differences. Then, the Levenberg-Marquardt method is used to find the optimum values for these lag-terms. The results obtained here agree much better with the experimental (wind tunnel) results than those found in the previous studies.

  19. A discounted-cost continuous-time flexible manufacturing and operator scheduling model solved by deconvexification over time

    SciTech Connect

    Eaves, B.C.; Rothblum, U.G.

    1990-08-01

    A discounted-cost, continuous-time, infinite-horizon version of a flexible manufacturing and operator scheduling model is solved. The solution procedure is to convexify the discrete operator-assignment constraints to obtain a linear program, and then to regain the discreteness and obtain an approximate manufacturing schedule by deconvexification of the solution of the linear program over time. The strong features of the model are the accommodation of linear inequality relations among the manufacturing activities and the discrete manufacturing scheduling, whereas the weak features are intra-period relaxation of inventory availability constraints, and the absence of inventory costs, setup times, and setup charges.

  20. Physical model-set identification for robust control of flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karlov, Valeri I.; Glaese, Roger M.; Miller, David W.; Crawley, Edward F.

    1993-01-01

    An approach to dynamic system identification is presented taking into account the goal of enhancing robust control performance of flexible structures. Identification techniques are derived which take advantage of the physics of structural dynamics and can provide realistic bounds for all potential parameter uncertainties. The developed approach includes input optimization which distributes excitation energy in such a way that the influence of residual uncertainties on robust control performance is reduced.

  1. A strategy for diagnosing and interpreting hydrological model nonstationarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westra, Seth; Thyer, Mark; Leonard, Michael; Kavetski, Dmitri; Lambert, Martin

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents a strategy for diagnosing and interpreting hydrological nonstationarity, aiming to improve hydrological models and their predictive ability under changing hydroclimatic conditions. The strategy consists of four elements: (i) detecting potential systematic errors in the calibration data; (ii) hypothesizing a set of "nonstationary" parameterizations of existing hydrological model structures, where one or more parameters vary in time as functions of selected covariates; (iii) trialing alternative stationary model structures to assess whether parameter nonstationarity can be reduced by modifying the model structure; and (iv) selecting one or more models for prediction. The Scott Creek catchment in South Australia and the lumped hydrological model GR4J are used to illustrate the strategy. Streamflow predictions improve significantly when the GR4J parameter describing the maximum capacity of the production store is allowed to vary in time as a combined function of: (i) an annual sinusoid; (ii) the previous 365 day rainfall and potential evapotranspiration; and (iii) a linear trend. This improvement provides strong evidence of model nonstationarity. Based on a range of hydrologically oriented diagnostics such as flow-duration curves, the GR4J model structure was modified by introducing an additional calibration parameter that controls recession behavior and by making actual evapotranspiration dependent only on catchment storage. Model comparison using an information-theoretic measure (the Akaike Information Criterion) and several hydrologically oriented diagnostics shows that the GR4J modifications clearly improve predictive performance in Scott Creek catchment. Based on a comparison of 22 versions of GR4J with different representations of nonstationarity and other modifications, the model selection approach applied in the exploratory period (used for parameter estimation) correctly identifies models that perform well in a much drier independent

  2. Modelling Difficulties and Their Overcoming Strategies in the Solution of a Modelling Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dede, Ayse Tekin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to reveal the elementary mathematics student teachers' difficulties encountered in the solution of a modelling problem, the strategies to overcome those difficulties and whether the strategies worked or not. Nineteen student teachers solved the modelling problem in their four or five-person groups, and the video records…

  3. Vortexlet models of flapping flexible wings show tuning for force production and control.

    PubMed

    Mountcastle, A M; Daniel, T L

    2010-12-01

    Insect wings are compliant structures that experience deformations during flight. Such deformations have recently been shown to substantially affect induced flows, with appreciable consequences to flight forces. However, there are open questions related to the aerodynamic mechanisms underlying the performance benefits of wing deformation, as well as the extent to which such deformations are determined by the boundary conditions governing wing actuation together with mechanical properties of the wing itself. Here we explore aerodynamic performance parameters of compliant wings under periodic oscillations, subject to changes in phase between wing elevation and pitch, and magnitude and spatial pattern of wing flexural stiffness. We use a combination of computational structural mechanics models and a 2D computational fluid dynamics approach to ask how aerodynamic force production and control potential are affected by pitch/elevation phase and variations in wing flexural stiffness. Our results show that lift and thrust forces are highly sensitive to flexural stiffness distributions, with performance optima that lie in different phase regions. These results suggest a control strategy for both flying animals and engineering applications of micro-air vehicles.

  4. Adding flexibility to physician training.

    PubMed

    Mahady, Suzanne E

    2011-05-02

    Demographic changes among junior doctors are driving demand for increased flexibility in advanced physician training, but flexible training posts are lacking. Suitable flexible training models include flexible full-time, job-share and part-time positions. Major barriers to establishing flexible training positions include difficulty in finding job-share partners, lack of funding for creating supernumerary positions, and concern over equivalence of educational quality compared with full-time training. Pilot flexible training positions should be introduced across the medical specialties and educational outcomes examined prospectively.

  5. Models, measurement, and strategies in developing critical-thinking skills.

    PubMed

    Brunt, Barbara A

    2005-01-01

    Health care professionals must use critical-thinking skills to solve increasingly complex problems. Educators need to help nurses develop their critical-thinking skills to maintain and enhance their competence. This article reviews various models of critical thinking, as well as methods used to evaluate critical thinking. Specific educational strategies to develop nurses' critical-thinking skills are discussed. Additional research studies are needed to determine how the process of nursing practice can nurture and develop critical-thinking skills, and which strategies are most effective in developing and evaluating critical thinking.

  6. SNP_NLMM: A SAS Macro to Implement a Flexible Random Effects Density for Generalized Linear and Nonlinear Mixed Models

    PubMed Central

    Vock, David M.; Davidian, Marie; Tsiatis, Anastasios A.

    2014-01-01

    Generalized linear and nonlinear mixed models (GMMMs and NLMMs) are commonly used to represent non-Gaussian or nonlinear longitudinal or clustered data. A common assumption is that the random effects are Gaussian. However, this assumption may be unrealistic in some applications, and misspecification of the random effects density may lead to maximum likelihood parameter estimators that are inconsistent, biased, and inefficient. Because testing if the random effects are Gaussian is difficult, previous research has recommended using a flexible random effects density. However, computational limitations have precluded widespread use of flexible random effects densities for GLMMs and NLMMs. We develop a SAS macro, SNP_NLMM, that overcomes the computational challenges to fit GLMMs and NLMMs where the random effects are assumed to follow a smooth density that can be represented by the seminonparametric formulation proposed by Gallant and Nychka (1987). The macro is flexible enough to allow for any density of the response conditional on the random effects and any nonlinear mean trajectory. We demonstrate the SNP_NLMM macro on a GLMM of the disease progression of toenail infection and on a NLMM of intravenous drug concentration over time. PMID:24688453

  7. Hydrologic Modeling Strategy for the Islamic Republic of Mauritania, Africa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedel, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    The government of Mauritania is interested in how to maintain hydrologic balance to ensure a long-term stable water supply for minerals-related, domestic, and other purposes. Because of the many complicating and competing natural and anthropogenic factors, hydrologists will perform quantitative analysis with specific objectives and relevant computer models in mind. Whereas various computer models are available for studying water-resource priorities, the success of these models to provide reliable predictions largely depends on adequacy of the model-calibration process. Predictive analysis helps us evaluate the accuracy and uncertainty associated with simulated dependent variables of our calibrated model. In this report, the hydrologic modeling process is reviewed and a strategy summarized for future Mauritanian hydrologic modeling studies.

  8. Variable Selection for Confounder Control, Flexible Modeling and Collaborative Targeted Minimum Loss-Based Estimation in Causal Inference.

    PubMed

    Schnitzer, Mireille E; Lok, Judith J; Gruber, Susan

    2016-05-01

    This paper investigates the appropriateness of the integration of flexible propensity score modeling (nonparametric or machine learning approaches) in semiparametric models for the estimation of a causal quantity, such as the mean outcome under treatment. We begin with an overview of some of the issues involved in knowledge-based and statistical variable selection in causal inference and the potential pitfalls of automated selection based on the fit of the propensity score. Using a simple example, we directly show the consequences of adjusting for pure causes of the exposure when using inverse probability of treatment weighting (IPTW). Such variables are likely to be selected when using a naive approach to model selection for the propensity score. We describe how the method of Collaborative Targeted minimum loss-based estimation (C-TMLE; van der Laan and Gruber, 2010 [27]) capitalizes on the collaborative double robustness property of semiparametric efficient estimators to select covariates for the propensity score based on the error in the conditional outcome model. Finally, we compare several approaches to automated variable selection in low- and high-dimensional settings through a simulation study. From this simulation study, we conclude that using IPTW with flexible prediction for the propensity score can result in inferior estimation, while Targeted minimum loss-based estimation and C-TMLE may benefit from flexible prediction and remain robust to the presence of variables that are highly correlated with treatment. However, in our study, standard influence function-based methods for the variance underestimated the standard errors, resulting in poor coverage under certain data-generating scenarios.

  9. Variable selection for confounder control, flexible modeling and Collaborative Targeted Minimum Loss-based Estimation in causal inference

    PubMed Central

    Schnitzer, Mireille E.; Lok, Judith J.; Gruber, Susan

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the appropriateness of the integration of flexible propensity score modeling (nonparametric or machine learning approaches) in semiparametric models for the estimation of a causal quantity, such as the mean outcome under treatment. We begin with an overview of some of the issues involved in knowledge-based and statistical variable selection in causal inference and the potential pitfalls of automated selection based on the fit of the propensity score. Using a simple example, we directly show the consequences of adjusting for pure causes of the exposure when using inverse probability of treatment weighting (IPTW). Such variables are likely to be selected when using a naive approach to model selection for the propensity score. We describe how the method of Collaborative Targeted minimum loss-based estimation (C-TMLE; van der Laan and Gruber, 2010) capitalizes on the collaborative double robustness property of semiparametric efficient estimators to select covariates for the propensity score based on the error in the conditional outcome model. Finally, we compare several approaches to automated variable selection in low-and high-dimensional settings through a simulation study. From this simulation study, we conclude that using IPTW with flexible prediction for the propensity score can result in inferior estimation, while Targeted minimum loss-based estimation and C-TMLE may benefit from flexible prediction and remain robust to the presence of variables that are highly correlated with treatment. However, in our study, standard influence function-based methods for the variance underestimated the standard errors, resulting in poor coverage under certain data-generating scenarios. PMID:26226129

  10. Optimization model of vaccination strategy for dengue transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widayani, H.; Kallista, M.; Nuraini, N.; Sari, M. Y.

    2014-02-01

    Dengue fever is emerging tropical and subtropical disease caused by dengue virus infection. The vaccination should be done as a prevention of epidemic in population. The host-vector model are modified with consider a vaccination factor to prevent the occurrence of epidemic dengue in a population. An optimal vaccination strategy using non-linear objective function was proposed. The genetic algorithm programming techniques are combined with fourth-order Runge-Kutta method to construct the optimal vaccination. In this paper, the appropriate vaccination strategy by using the optimal minimum cost function which can reduce the number of epidemic was analyzed. The numerical simulation for some specific cases of vaccination strategy is shown.

  11. A novel strategy to directly fabricate flexible hollow nanofibers with tunable luminescence-electricity-magnetism trifunctionality using one-pot electrospinning.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yawen; Ma, Qianli; Dong, Xiangting; Yu, Wensheng; Wang, Jinxian; Liu, Guixia

    2015-09-21

    Novel photoluminescent-electrical-magnetic trifunctional flexible Eu(BA)3phen/PANI/Fe3O4/PVP (BA = benzoic acid, phen = phenanthroline, PANI = polyaniline, PVP = polyvinylpyrrolidone) hollow nanofibers were fabricated by a one-pot electrospinning technique using a specially designed coaxial spinneret for the first time. Very different from the traditional preparation process of hollow fibers via coaxial electrospinning, which needs to firstly fabricate the coaxial fibers and followed by removing the core through high-temperature calcination or solvent extraction, in our current study, no core spinning solution is used to directly fabricate hollow nanofibers. The morphology and properties of the obtained hollow nanofibers were characterized in detail using X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, a 4-point probe resistivity measurement system and vibrating sample magnetometry. The Eu(BA)3phen/PANI/Fe3O4/PVP hollow nanofibers, with outer diameters of ca. 305 nm and inner diameters of about 140 nm, exhibit excellent photoluminescence performance, electrical conductivity and magnetic properties. Fluorescence emission peaks of Eu(3+) are observed in the Eu(BA)3phen/PANI/Fe3O4/PVP hollow nanofibers and assigned to the (5)D0→(7)F0 (580 nm), (5)D0→(7)F1 (592 nm) and (5)D0→(7)F2 (616 nm) energy level transitions of Eu(3+) ions, and the (5)D0→(7)F2 hypersensitive transition at 616 nm is the predominant emission peak. The electrical conductivity of the hollow nanofibers reaches up to the order of 10(-3) S cm(-1). The luminescent intensity, electrical conductivity and magnetic properties of the hollow nanofibers can be tuned by adding various amounts of Eu(BA)3phen, PANI and Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The new-type photoluminescent-electrical-magnetic trifunctional flexible hollow nanofibers hold potential for a variety of applications, including electromagnetic

  12. A Two-Locus Model of the Evolution of Insecticide Resistance to Inform and Optimise Public Health Insecticide Deployment Strategies

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    We develop a flexible, two-locus model for the spread of insecticide resistance applicable to mosquito species that transmit human diseases such as malaria. The model allows differential exposure of males and females, allows them to encounter high or low concentrations of insecticide, and allows selection pressures and dominance values to differ depending on the concentration of insecticide encountered. We demonstrate its application by investigating the relative merits of sequential use of insecticides versus their deployment as a mixture to minimise the spread of resistance. We recover previously published results as subsets of this model and conduct a sensitivity analysis over an extensive parameter space to identify what circumstances favour mixtures over sequences. Both strategies lasted more than 500 mosquito generations (or about 40 years) in 24% of runs, while in those runs where resistance had spread to high levels by 500 generations, 56% favoured sequential use and 44% favoured mixtures. Mixtures are favoured when insecticide effectiveness (their ability to kill homozygous susceptible mosquitoes) is high and exposure (the proportion of mosquitoes that encounter the insecticide) is low. If insecticides do not reliably kill homozygous sensitive genotypes, it is likely that sequential deployment will be a more robust strategy. Resistance to an insecticide always spreads slower if that insecticide is used in a mixture although this may be insufficient to outperform sequential use: for example, a mixture may last 5 years while the two insecticides deployed individually may last 3 and 4 years giving an overall ‘lifespan’ of 7 years for sequential use. We emphasise that this paper is primarily about designing and implementing a flexible modelling strategy to investigate the spread of insecticide resistance in vector populations and demonstrate how our model can identify vector control strategies most likely to minimise the spread of insecticide resistance

  13. Modeling, estimation and identification methods for static shape determination of flexible structures. [for large space structure design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, G.; Scheid, R. E., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    This paper outlines methods for modeling, identification and estimation for static determination of flexible structures. The shape estimation schemes are based on structural models specified by (possibly interconnected) elliptic partial differential equations. The identification techniques provide approximate knowledge of parameters in elliptic systems. The techniques are based on the method of maximum-likelihood that finds parameter values such that the likelihood functional associated with the system model is maximized. The estimation methods are obtained by means of a function-space approach that seeks to obtain the conditional mean of the state given the data and a white noise characterization of model errors. The solutions are obtained in a batch-processing mode in which all the data is processed simultaneously. After methods for computing the optimal estimates are developed, an analysis of the second-order statistics of the estimates and of the related estimation error is conducted. In addition to outlining the above theoretical results, the paper presents typical flexible structure simulations illustrating performance of the shape determination methods.

  14. The rigid-flexible robotic manipulator: Nonlinear control and state estimation considering a different mathematical model for estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenili, André

    2012-11-01

    In this paper the author investigates the angular position and vibration control of a nonlinear rigid-flexible two link robotic manipulator considering fast angular maneuvers. The nonlinear control technique named State-Dependent Riccati Equation (SDRE) is used here to achieve these aims. In a more realistic approach, it is considered that some states can be measured and some states cannot be measured. The states not measured are estimated in order to be used for the SDRE control. These states are all the angular velocities and the velocity of deformation of the flexible link. A state-dependent Riccati equation-based estimator is used here. Not only different initial conditions between the system to be controlled (here named "real" system) and the estimator but also a different mathematical model is considered as the estimation model in order to verify the limitations of the proposed estimation and control techniques. The mathematical model that emulates the real system to be controlled considers two modes expansion and the estimation model considers only one mode expansion. The results for the different approaches are compared and discussed.

  15. Strategy Guideline. Modeling Enclosure Design in Above-Grade Walls

    SciTech Connect

    J. Lstiburek; Ueno, K.; Musunuru, S.

    2016-02-01

    The Strategy Guideline, written by the U.S. Department of Energy's research team Building Science Corporation, 1) describes how to model and interpret results of models for above-grade walls, and 2) analyzes the failure thresholds and criteria for above-grade walls. A library of above-grade walls with historically successful performance was used to calibrate WUFI (Wärme und Feuchte instationär) software models. The information is generalized for application to a broad population of houses within the limits of existing experience.

  16. Evaluation strategies for CNSs: application of an evaluation model.

    PubMed

    Kennedy-Malone, L M

    1996-07-01

    Program development has become an essential role function for today's CNS, who must be able to evaluate programs to determine their efficacy. A useful evaluation guide is Stufflebeam's CIPP (context, input, process, and product) model, which includes a framework to evaluate indirect care measures directly affecting cost-effectiveness and accountability. The model's core consists of (1) context evaluation leading to informed, contemplated decisions; (2) input evaluation directing structured decisions; (3) process evaluation guiding implemented decisions; and (4) product evaluation serving to recycle decisions. Strategies for using Stufflebeam's CIPP model are described.

  17. Impact of the model-building strategy on inference about nonlinear and time-dependent covariate effects in survival analysis.

    PubMed

    Wynant, Willy; Abrahamowicz, Michal

    2014-08-30

    Cox's proportional hazards (PH) model assumes constant-over-time covariate effects. Furthermore, most applications assume linear effects of continuous covariates on the logarithm of the hazard. Yet, many prognostic factors have time-dependent (TD) and/or nonlinear (NL) effects, that is, violate these conventional assumptions. Detection of such complex effects could affect prognosis and clinical decisions. However, assessing the effects of each of the multiple, often correlated, covariates in flexible multivariable analyses is challenging. In simulations, we investigated the impact of the approach used to build the flexible multivariable model on inference about the TD and NL covariate effects. Results demonstrate that the conclusions regarding the statistical significance of the TD/NL effects depend heavily on the strategy used to decide which effects of the other covariates should be adjusted for. Both a failure to adjust for true TD and NL effects of relevant covariates and inclusion of spurious effects of covariates that conform to the PH and linearity assumptions increase the risk of incorrect conclusions regarding other covariates. In this context, iterative backward elimination of nonsignificant NL and TD effects from the multivariable model, which initially includes all these effects, may help discriminate between true and spurious effects. The practical importance of these issues was illustrated in an example that reassessed the predictive ability of selected biomarkers for survival in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer. In conclusion, a careful model-building strategy and flexible modeling of multivariable survival data can yield new insights about predictors' roles and improve the validity of analyses.

  18. Coupled Vortex-Lattice Flight Dynamic Model with Aeroelastic Finite-Element Model of Flexible Wing Transport Aircraft with Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap for Drag Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Ting, Eric; Nguyen, Daniel; Dao, Tung; Trinh, Khanh

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a coupled vortex-lattice flight dynamic model with an aeroelastic finite-element model to predict dynamic characteristics of a flexible wing transport aircraft. The aircraft model is based on NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM) with representative mass and stiffness properties to achieve a wing tip deflection about twice that of a conventional transport aircraft (10% versus 5%). This flexible wing transport aircraft is referred to as an Elastically Shaped Aircraft Concept (ESAC) which is equipped with a Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap (VCCTEF) system for active wing shaping control for drag reduction. A vortex-lattice aerodynamic model of the ESAC is developed and is coupled with an aeroelastic finite-element model via an automated geometry modeler. This coupled model is used to compute static and dynamic aeroelastic solutions. The deflection information from the finite-element model and the vortex-lattice model is used to compute unsteady contributions to the aerodynamic force and moment coefficients. A coupled aeroelastic-longitudinal flight dynamic model is developed by coupling the finite-element model with the rigid-body flight dynamic model of the GTM.

  19. Model building strategy for logistic regression: purposeful selection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongheng

    2016-03-01

    Logistic regression is one of the most commonly used models to account for confounders in medical literature. The article introduces how to perform purposeful selection model building strategy with R. I stress on the use of likelihood ratio test to see whether deleting a variable will have significant impact on model fit. A deleted variable should also be checked for whether it is an important adjustment of remaining covariates. Interaction should be checked to disentangle complex relationship between covariates and their synergistic effect on response variable. Model should be checked for the goodness-of-fit (GOF). In other words, how the fitted model reflects the real data. Hosmer-Lemeshow GOF test is the most widely used for logistic regression model.

  20. Cyanobacterial Biofuels: Strategies and Developments on Network and Modeling.

    PubMed

    Klanchui, Amornpan; Raethong, Nachon; Prommeenate, Peerada; Vongsangnak, Wanwipa; Meechai, Asawin

    2016-10-26

    Cyanobacteria, the phototrophic microorganisms, have attracted much attention recently as a promising source for environmentally sustainable biofuels production. However, barriers for commercial markets of cyanobacteria-based biofuels concern the economic feasibility. Miscellaneous strategies for improving the production performance of cyanobacteria have thus been developed. Among these, the simple ad hoc strategies resulting in failure to optimize fully cell growth coupled with desired product yield are explored. With the advancement of genomics and systems biology, a new paradigm toward systems metabolic engineering has been recognized. In particular, a genome-scale metabolic network reconstruction and modeling is a crucial systems-based tool for whole-cell-wide investigation and prediction. In this review, the cyanobacterial genome-scale metabolic models, which offer a system-level understanding of cyanobacterial metabolism, are described. The main process of metabolic network reconstruction and modeling of cyanobacteria are summarized. Strategies and developments on genome-scale network and modeling through the systems metabolic engineering approach are advanced and employed for efficient cyanobacterial-based biofuels production.

  1. Modelling the control strategies against dengue in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    BURATTINI, M. N.; CHEN, M.; CHOW, A.; COUTINHO, F. A. B.; GOH, K. T.; LOPEZ, L. F.; MA, S.; MASSAD, E.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Notified cases of dengue infections in Singapore reached historical highs in 2004 (9459 cases) and 2005 (13 817 cases) and the reason for such an increase is still to be established. We apply a mathematical model for dengue infection that takes into account the seasonal variation in incidence, characteristic of dengue fever, and which mimics the 2004–2005 epidemics in Singapore. We simulated a set of possible control strategies and confirmed the intuitive belief that killing adult mosquitoes is the most effective strategy to control an ongoing epidemic. On the other hand, the control of immature forms was very efficient in preventing the resurgence of dengue epidemics. Since the control of immature forms allows the reduction of adulticide, it seems that the best strategy is to combine both adulticide and larvicide control measures during an outbreak, followed by the maintenance of larvicide methods after the epidemic has subsided. In addition, the model showed that the mixed strategy of adulticide and larvicide methods introduced by the government seems to be very effective in reducing the number of cases in the first weeks after the start of control. PMID:17540051

  2. Model predictive control power management strategies for HEVs: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yanjun; Wang, Hong; Khajepour, Amir; He, Hongwen; Ji, Jie

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive review of power management strategy (PMS) utilized in hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) with an emphasis on model predictive control (MPC) based strategies for the first time. Research on MPC-based power management systems for HEVs has intensified recently due to its many inherent merits. The categories of the existing PMSs are identified from the latest literature, and a brief study of each type is conducted. Then, the MPC approach is introduced and its advantages are discussed. Based on the acquisition method of driver behavior used for state prediction and the dynamic model used, the MPC is classified and elaborated. Factors that affect the performance of the MPC are put forward, including prediction accuracy, design parameters, and solvers. Finally, several important issues in the application of MPC-based power management strategies and latest developing trends are discussed. This paper not only provides a comprehensive analysis of MPC-based power management strategies for HEVs but also puts forward the future and emphasis of future study, which will promote the development of energy management controller with high performance and low cost for HEVs.

  3. Campaign-level dynamic network modelling for spaceflight logistics for the flexible path concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Koki; de Weck, Olivier L.; Hoffman, Jeffrey A.; Shishko, Robert

    2016-06-01

    This paper develops a network optimization formulation for dynamic campaign-level space mission planning. Although many past space missions have been designed mainly from a mission-level perspective, a campaign-level perspective will be important for future space exploration. In order to find the optimal campaign-level space transportation architecture, a mixed-integer linear programming (MILP) formulation with a generalized multi-commodity flow and a time-expanded network is developed. Particularly, a new heuristics-based method, a partially static time-expanded network, is developed to provide a solution quickly. The developed method is applied to a case study containing human exploration of a near-Earth object (NEO) and Mars, related to the concept of the Flexible Path. The numerical results show that using the specific combinations of propulsion technologies, in-situ resource utilization (ISRU), and other space infrastructure elements can reduce the initial mass in low-Earth orbit (IMLEO) significantly. In addition, the case study results also show that we can achieve large IMLEO reduction by designing NEO and Mars missions together as a campaign compared with designing them separately owing to their common space infrastructure pre-deployment. This research will be an important step toward efficient and flexible campaign-level space mission planning.

  4. Interfacial modification to optimize stainless steel photoanode design for flexible dye sensitized solar cells: an experimental and numerical modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi Taleghani, Sara; Zamani Meymian, Mohammad Reza; Ameri, Mohsen

    2016-10-01

    In the present research, we report fabrication, experimental characterization and theoretical analysis of semi and full flexible dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) manufactured on the basis of bare and roughened stainless steel type 304 (SS304) substrates. The morphological, optical and electrical characterizations confirm the advantage of roughened SS304 over bare and even common transparent conducting oxides (TCOs). A significant enhancement of about 51% in power conversion efficiency is obtained for flexible device (5.51%) based on roughened SS304 substrate compared to the bare SS304. The effect of roughening the SS304 substrates on electrical transport characteristics is also investigated by means of numerical modeling with regard to metal-semiconductor and interfacial resistance arising from the metallic substrate and nanocrystalline semiconductor contact. The numerical modeling results provide a reliable theoretical backbone to be combined with experimental implications. It highlights the stronger effect of series resistance compared to schottky barrier in lowering the fill factor of the SS304-based DSSCs. The findings of the present study nominate roughened SS304 as a promising replacement for conventional DSSCs substrates as well as introducing a highly accurate modeling framework to design and diagnose treated metallic or non-metallic based DSSCs.

  5. Choosing where to work at work - towards a theoretical model of benefits and risks of activity-based flexible offices.

    PubMed

    Wohlers, Christina; Hertel, Guido

    2017-04-01

    Although there is a trend in today's organisations to implement activity-based flexible offices (A-FOs), only a few studies examine consequences of this new office type. Moreover, the underlying mechanisms why A-FOs might lead to different consequences as compared to cellular and open-plan offices are still unclear. This paper introduces a theoretical framework explaining benefits and risks of A-FOs based on theories from work and organisational psychology. After deriving working conditions specific for A-FOs (territoriality, autonomy, privacy, proximity and visibility), differences in working conditions between A-FOs and alternative office types are proposed. Further, we suggest how these differences in working conditions might affect work-related consequences such as well-being, satisfaction, motivation and performance on the individual, the team and the organisational level. Finally, we consider task-related (e.g. task variety), person-related (e.g. personality) and organisational (e.g. leadership) moderators. Based on this model, future research directions as well as practical implications are discussed. Practitioner Summary: Activity-based flexible offices (A-FOs) are popular in today's organisations. This article presents a theoretical model explaining why and when working in an A-FO evokes benefits and risks for individuals, teams and organisations. According to the model, A-FOs are beneficial when management encourages employees to use the environment appropriately and supports teams.

  6. Study of clathrate hydrates via equilibrium molecular-dynamics simulation employing polarisable and non-polarisable, rigid and flexible water models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnham, Christian J.; English, Niall J.

    2016-04-01

    Equilibrium molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed on metastable sI and sII polymorphs of empty hydrate lattices, in addition to liquid water and ice Ih. The non-polarisable TIP4P-2005, simple point charge model (SPC), and polarisable Thole-type models (TTM): TTM2, TTM3, and TTM4 water models were used in order to survey the differences between models and to see what differences can be expected when polarisability is incorporated. Rigid and flexible variants were used of each model to gauge the effects of flexibility. Power spectra are calculated and compared to density-of-states spectra inferred from inelastic neutron scattering (INS) measurements. Thermodynamic properties were also calculated, as well as molecular-dipole distributions. It was concluded that TTM models offer optimal fidelity vis-à-vis INS spectra, together with thermodynamic properties, with the flexible TTM2 model offering optimal placement of vibrational modes.

  7. Development of a Meso-Scale Material Model for Ballistic Fabric and Its Use in Flexible-Armor Protection Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Bell, W. C.; Arakere, G.; He, T.; Xie, X.; Cheeseman, B. A.

    2010-02-01

    A meso-scale ballistic material model for a prototypical plain-woven single-ply flexible armor is developed and implemented in a material user subroutine for the use in commercial explicit finite element programs. The main intent of the model is to attain computational efficiency when calculating the mechanical response of the multi-ply fabric-based flexible-armor material during its impact with various projectiles without significantly sacrificing the key physical aspects of the fabric microstructure, architecture, and behavior. To validate the new model, a comparative finite element method analysis is carried out in which: (a) the plain-woven single-ply fabric is modeled using conventional shell elements and weaving is done in an explicit manner by snaking the yarns through the fabric and (b) the fabric is treated as a planar continuum surface composed of conventional shell elements to which the new meso-scale unit-cell based material model is assigned. The results obtained show that the material model provides a reasonably good description for the fabric deformation and fracture behavior under different combinations of fixed and free boundary conditions. Finally, the model is used in an investigation of the ability of a multi-ply soft-body armor vest to protect the wearer from impact by a 9-mm round nose projectile. The effects of inter-ply friction, projectile/yarn friction, and the far-field boundary conditions are revealed and the results explained using simple wave mechanics principles, high-deformation rate material behavior, and the role of various energy-absorbing mechanisms in the fabric-based armor systems.

  8. Flexible Straws.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prentice, Gerard

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the use of flexible straws for teaching properties of figures and families of shapes. Describes a way to make various two- or three-dimensional geometric shapes. Lists eight advantages of the method. (YP)

  9. Bayesian model choice and search strategies for mapping interacting quantitative trait Loci.

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Nengjun; Xu, Shizhong; Allison, David B

    2003-01-01

    Most complex traits of animals, plants, and humans are influenced by multiple genetic and environmental factors. Interactions among multiple genes play fundamental roles in the genetic control and evolution of complex traits. Statistical modeling of interaction effects in quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis must accommodate a very large number of potential genetic effects, which presents a major challenge to determining the genetic model with respect to the number of QTL, their positions, and their genetic effects. In this study, we use the methodology of Bayesian model and variable selection to develop strategies for identifying multiple QTL with complex epistatic patterns in experimental designs with two segregating genotypes. Specifically, we develop a reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm to determine the number of QTL and to select main and epistatic effects. With the proposed method, we can jointly infer the genetic model of a complex trait and the associated genetic parameters, including the number, positions, and main and epistatic effects of the identified QTL. Our method can map a large number of QTL with any combination of main and epistatic effects. Utility and flexibility of the method are demonstrated using both simulated data and a real data set. Sensitivity of posterior inference to prior specifications of the number and genetic effects of QTL is investigated. PMID:14573494

  10. Dynamics, control and maneuvering of large flexible space tethered reflectors, tele-robots and experimental models, part 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bainum, Peter M.; Feiyue, Li; Jianke, Xu; Zhi, Tan Z.; Xing, Guang-Qian

    1995-05-01

    The effects of solar radiation heating on a large, thin, shallow spherical orbiting shell system are studied. The shell is representative of a large antenna reflector system which could also be gravitationally stabilized by connecting a sub-satellite to a long tether. After determining the steady state temperature distribution across the thickness of the shell, the corresponding thermal deformation is estimated as a function of the solar incidence angle and material properties. The closed-loop dynamic response of the shell is simulated by using LQR control design synthesis and assuming that 12 point actuators are placed on the outer surface and edge of the shell. Calculations also indicate that the shell's transverse elastic vibrational frequencies may differ significantly from their nominal values due to the solar-thermal influence. A practical control strategy for the minimum-time maneuver problem has been developed and successfully applied to the Naval Research Laboratory's Reconfigurable Spacecraft Host for Attitude and Pointing Experiments (RESHAPE) hardware test facility. This is the first time that the bang-bang type and feedback control strategy has been applied to the RESHAPE facility by including a flexible appendage which is represented with the attachment of a spherical pendulum device to the edge of the RESHAPE platform.

  11. Evaluation of Differentiation Strategy in Shipping Enterprises with Simulation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaxevanou, Anthi Z.; Ferfeli, Maria V.; Damianos, Sakas P.

    2009-08-01

    The present inquiring study aims at investigating the circumstances that prevail in the European Shipping Enterprises with special reference to the Greek ones. This investigation is held in order to explore the potential implementation of strategies so as to create a unique competitive advantage [1]. The Shipping sector is composed of enterprises that are mainly activated in the following three areas: the passenger, the commercial and the naval. The main target is to create a dynamic simulation model which, with reference to the STAIR strategic model, will evaluate the strategic differential choice that some of the shipping enterprises have.

  12. Active control strategy on a catenary-pantograph validated model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Rebollo, C.; Jimenez-Octavio, J. R.; Carnicero, A.

    2013-04-01

    Dynamic simulation methods have become essential in the design process and control of the catenary-pantograph system, overall since high-speed trains and interoperability criteria are getting very trendy. This paper presents an original hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) strategy aimed at integrating a multicriteria active control within the catenary-pantograph dynamic interaction. The relevance of HIL control systems applied in the frame of the pantograph is undoubtedly increasing due to the recent and more demanding requirements for high-speed railway systems. Since the loss of contact between the catenary and the pantograph leads to arcing and electrical wear, and too high contact forces cause mechanical wear of both the catenary wires and the strips of the pantograph, not only prescribed but also economic and performance criteria ratify such a relevance. Different configurations of the proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller are proposed and applied to two different plant systems. Since this paper is mainly focused on the control strategy, both plant systems are simulation models though the methodology is suitable for a laboratory bench. The strategy of control involves a multicriteria optimisation of the contact force and the consumption of the energy supplied by the control force, a genetic algorithm has been applied for this purpose. Thus, the PID controller is fitted according to these conflicting objectives and tested within a nonlinear lumped model and a nonlinear finite element model, being the last one validated against the European Standard EN 50318. Finally, certain tests have been accomplished in order to analyse the robustness of the control strategy. Particularly, the relevance or the plant simulation, the running speed and the instrumentation time delay are studied in this paper.

  13. Web malware spread modelling and optimal control strategies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wanping; Zhong, Shouming

    2017-02-10

    The popularity of the Web improves the growth of web threats. Formulating mathematical models for accurate prediction of malicious propagation over networks is of great importance. The aim of this paper is to understand the propagation mechanisms of web malware and the impact of human intervention on the spread of malicious hyperlinks. Considering the characteristics of web malware, a new differential epidemic model which extends the traditional SIR model by adding another delitescent compartment is proposed to address the spreading behavior of malicious links over networks. The spreading threshold of the model system is calculated, and the dynamics of the model is theoretically analyzed. Moreover, the optimal control theory is employed to study malware immunization strategies, aiming to keep the total economic loss of security investment and infection loss as low as possible. The existence and uniqueness of the results concerning the optimality system are confirmed. Finally, numerical simulations show that the spread of malware links can be controlled effectively with proper control strategy of specific parameter choice.

  14. Web malware spread modelling and optimal control strategies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wanping; Zhong, Shouming

    2017-01-01

    The popularity of the Web improves the growth of web threats. Formulating mathematical models for accurate prediction of malicious propagation over networks is of great importance. The aim of this paper is to understand the propagation mechanisms of web malware and the impact of human intervention on the spread of malicious hyperlinks. Considering the characteristics of web malware, a new differential epidemic model which extends the traditional SIR model by adding another delitescent compartment is proposed to address the spreading behavior of malicious links over networks. The spreading threshold of the model system is calculated, and the dynamics of the model is theoretically analyzed. Moreover, the optimal control theory is employed to study malware immunization strategies, aiming to keep the total economic loss of security investment and infection loss as low as possible. The existence and uniqueness of the results concerning the optimality system are confirmed. Finally, numerical simulations show that the spread of malware links can be controlled effectively with proper control strategy of specific parameter choice. PMID:28186203

  15. Web malware spread modelling and optimal control strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wanping; Zhong, Shouming

    2017-02-01

    The popularity of the Web improves the growth of web threats. Formulating mathematical models for accurate prediction of malicious propagation over networks is of great importance. The aim of this paper is to understand the propagation mechanisms of web malware and the impact of human intervention on the spread of malicious hyperlinks. Considering the characteristics of web malware, a new differential epidemic model which extends the traditional SIR model by adding another delitescent compartment is proposed to address the spreading behavior of malicious links over networks. The spreading threshold of the model system is calculated, and the dynamics of the model is theoretically analyzed. Moreover, the optimal control theory is employed to study malware immunization strategies, aiming to keep the total economic loss of security investment and infection loss as low as possible. The existence and uniqueness of the results concerning the optimality system are confirmed. Finally, numerical simulations show that the spread of malware links can be controlled effectively with proper control strategy of specific parameter choice.

  16. Study of materials and machines for 3D printed large-scale, flexible electronic structures using fused deposition modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Seyeon

    The 3 dimensional printing (3DP), called to additive manufacturing (AM) or rapid prototyping (RP), is emerged to revolutionize manufacturing and completely transform how products are designed and fabricated. A great deal of research activities have been carried out to apply this new technology to a variety of fields. In spite of many endeavors, much more research is still required to perfect the processes of the 3D printing techniques especially in the area of the large-scale additive manufacturing and flexible printed electronics. The principles of various 3D printing processes are briefly outlined in the Introduction Section. New types of thermoplastic polymer composites aiming to specified functional applications are also introduced in this section. Chapter 2 shows studies about the metal/polymer composite filaments for fused deposition modeling (FDM) process. Various metal particles, copper and iron particles, are added into thermoplastics polymer matrices as the reinforcement filler. The thermo-mechanical properties, such as thermal conductivity, hardness, tensile strength, and fracture mechanism, of composites are tested to figure out the effects of metal fillers on 3D printed composite structures for the large-scale printing process. In Chapter 3, carbon/polymer composite filaments are developed by a simple mechanical blending process with an aim of fabricating the flexible 3D printed electronics as a single structure. Various types of carbon particles consisting of multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT), conductive carbon black (CCB), and graphite are used as the conductive fillers to provide the thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) with improved electrical conductivity. The mechanical behavior and conduction mechanisms of the developed composite materials are observed in terms of the loading amount of carbon fillers in this section. Finally, the prototype flexible electronics are modeled and manufactured by the FDM process using Carbon/TPU composite filaments and

  17. Flexible parasympathetic responses to sadness facilitate spontaneous affect regulation.

    PubMed

    Stange, Jonathan P; Hamilton, Jessica L; Fresco, David M; Alloy, Lauren B

    2017-03-23

    The ability of the parasympathetic nervous system to flexibly adapt to changes in environmental context is thought to serve as a physiological indicator of self-regulatory capacity, and deficits in parasympathetic flexibility appear to characterize affective disorders such as depression. However, whether parasympathetic flexibility (vagal withdrawal to emotional or environmental challenges such as sadness, and vagal augmentation during recovery from sadness) could facilitate the effectiveness of adaptive affect regulation strategies is not known. In a study of 178 undergraduate students, we evaluated whether parasympathetic flexibility in response to a sad film involving loss would enhance the effectiveness of regulatory strategies (reappraisal, distraction, and suppression) spontaneously employed to reduce negative affect during a 2-min uninstructed recovery period following the induction. Parasympathetic reactivity and recovery were indexed by fluctuations in respiratory sinus arrhythmia and high-frequency heart rate variability. Cognitive reappraisal and distraction were more effective in attenuating negative affect among individuals with more parasympathetic flexibility, particularly greater vagal augmentation during recovery, relative to individuals with less parasympathetic flexibility. In contrast, suppression was associated with less attenuation of negative affect, but only among individuals who also had less vagal withdrawal during the sad film. Alternative models provided partial support for reversed directionality, with reappraisal predicting greater parasympathetic recovery, but only when individuals also experienced greater reductions in negative affect. These results suggest that contextually appropriate parasympathetic reactivity and recovery may facilitate the success of affect regulation. Impairments in parasympathetic flexibility could confer risk for affective disorders due to attenuated capacity for effective self-regulation.

  18. Considering Renewables in Capacity Expansion Models: Capturing Flexibility with Hourly Dispatch

    SciTech Connect

    Barrows, Clayton; Mai, Trieu; Hale, Elaine; Lopez, Anthony; Eurek, Kelly

    2015-07-03

    The Resource Planning Model co-optimizes dispatch and capacity expansion using a simplified, chronological dispatch period representation and high-resolution resource, load and infrastructure data. The computational tractability of capacity expansion models depends on model simplifications. We demonstrate the effects of various dispatch period representations on model results using the Resource Planning Model.

  19. Comprehensive Neurocognitive Endophenotyping Strategies for Mouse Models of Genetic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hunsaker, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    There is a need for refinement of the current behavioral phenotyping methods for mouse models of genetic disorders. The current approach is to perform a behavioral screen using standardized tasks to define a broad phenotype of the model. This phenotype is then compared to what is known concerning the disorder being modeled. The weakness inherent in this approach is twofold: First, the tasks that make up these standard behavioral screens do not model specific behaviors associated with a given genetic mutation but rather phenotypes affected in various genetic disorders; secondly, these behavioral tasks are insufficiently sensitive to identify subtle phenotypes. An alternate phenotyping strategy is to determine the core behavioral phenotypes of the genetic disorder being studied and develop behavioral tasks to evaluate specific hypotheses concerning the behavioral consequences of the genetic mutation. This approach emphasizes direct comparisons between the mouse and human that facilitate the development of neurobehavioral biomarkers or quantitative outcome measures for studies of genetic disorders across species. PMID:22266125

  20. Models for electricity market efficiency and bidding strategy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Hui

    This dissertation studies models for the analysis of market efficiency and bidding behaviors of market participants in electricity markets. Simulation models are developed to estimate how transmission and operational constraints affect the competitive benchmark and market prices based on submitted bids. This research contributes to the literature in three aspects. First, transmission and operational constraints, which have been neglected in most empirical literature, are considered in the competitive benchmark estimation model. Second, the effects of operational and transmission constraints on market prices are estimated through two models based on the submitted bids of market participants. Third, these models are applied to analyze the efficiency of the Electric Reliability Council Of Texas (ERCOT) real-time energy market by simulating its operations for the time period from January 2002 to April 2003. The characteristics and available information for the ERCOT market are considered. In electricity markets, electric firms compete through both spot market bidding and bilateral contract trading. A linear asymmetric supply function equilibrium (SFE) model with transmission constraints is proposed in this dissertation to analyze the bidding strategies with forward contracts. The research contributes to the literature in several aspects. First, we combine forward contracts, transmission constraints, and multi-period strategy (an obligation for firms to bid consistently over an extended time horizon such as a day or an hour) into the linear asymmetric supply function equilibrium framework. As an ex-ante model, it can provide qualitative insights into firms' behaviors. Second, the bidding strategies related to Transmission Congestion Rights (TCRs) are discussed by interpreting TCRs as linear combination of forwards. Third, the model is a general one in the sense that there is no limitation on the number of firms and scale of the transmission network, which can have

  1. A dynamic model of a cantilever beam with a closed, embedded horizontal crack including local flexibilities at crack tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Zhu, W. D.; Charalambides, P. G.; Shao, Y. M.; Xu, Y. F.; Fang, X. M.

    2016-11-01

    As one of major failure modes of mechanical structures subjected to periodic loads, embedded cracks due to fatigue can cause catastrophic failure of machineries. Understanding the dynamic characteristics of a structure with an embedded crack is helpful for early crack detection and diagnosis. In this work, a new three-segment beam model with local flexibilities at crack tips is developed to investigate the vibration of a cantilever beam with a closed, fully embedded horizontal crack, which is assumed to be not located at its clamped or free end or distributed near its top or bottom side. The three-segment beam model is assumed to be a linear elastic system, and it does not account for the nonlinear crack closure effect; the top and bottom segments always stay in contact at their interface during the beam vibration. It can model the effects of local deformations in the vicinity of the crack tips, which cannot be captured by previous methods in the literature. The middle segment of the beam containing the crack is modeled by a mechanically consistent, reduced bending moment. Each beam segment is assumed to be an Euler-Bernoulli beam, and the compliances at the crack tips are analytically determined using a J-integral approach and verified using commercial finite element software. Using compatibility conditions at the crack tips and the transfer matrix method, the nature frequencies and mode shapes of the cracked cantilever beam are obtained. The three-segment beam model is used to investigate the effects of local flexibilities at crack tips on the first three natural frequencies and mode shapes of the cracked cantilever beam. A stationary wavelet transform (SWT) method is used to process the mode shapes of the cracked cantilever beam; jumps in single-level SWT decomposition detail coefficients can be used to identify the length and location of an embedded horizontal crack.

  2. Comparison of New Single-Use Digital Flexible Ureteroscope Versus Nondisposable Fiber Optic and Digital Ureteroscope in a Cadaveric Model

    PubMed Central

    Proietti, Silvia; Dragos, Laurian; Molina, Wilson; Doizi, Steeve; Giusti, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: To evaluate LithoVue, the new single-use digital flexible ureteroscope, in a human cadaveric model and compare it with a nondisposable fiber optic and digital flexible ureteroscopes. Materials and Methods: LithoVue, a conventional fiber optic, and digital flexible ureteroscopes were each tested in four renal units of recently deceased female cadavers by three surgeons. The following parameters were analyzed: accessibility to the kidney and navigation of the entire collecting system with and without ureteral access sheath (UAS), lower pole access measuring the deflection of the ureteroscope with the working channel empty, and with inside two different baskets and laser fibers. A subjective evaluation of maneuverability and visibility was assessed by each surgeon at the end of every procedure. Results: Kidney access into the Renal unit 1 was not possible without UAS for all ureteroscopes because of noncompliant ureter at the level of sacroiliac joint. The reusable digital ureteroscope was unable to reach one calix of the lower pole and one calix of the upper pole (Renal units 2 and 3) without UAS placement. Lower pole access with baskets and laser fibers was possible for each ureteroscope after UAS placement. No statistically significant differences were detected in angle deflection between ureteroscopes. The digital ureteroscope was preferred for visibility in all procedures: LithoVue for maneuverability in six procedures, fiber optic in five procedures, and the digital ureteroscope in one procedure. Conclusions: LithoVue seems to be comparable with conventional ureteroscopes in terms of visibility and manipulation into the collecting system in fresh human cadavers. Further studies in humans are needed to determine the clinical value of this new instrument. PMID:27084572

  3. Modeling androgen receptor flexibility: a binding mode hypothesis of CYP17 inhibitors/antiandrogens for prostate cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Gianti, Eleonora; Zauhar, Randy J

    2012-10-22

    Prostate Cancer (PCa), a leading cause of cancer death worldwide (www.cancer.gov), is a complex malignancy where a spectrum of targets leads to a diversity of PCa forms. A widely pursued therapeutic target is the Androgen Receptor (AR). As a Steroid Hormone Receptor, AR serves as activator of transcription upon binding to androgens and plays a central role in the development of PCa. AR is a structurally flexible protein, and conformational plasticity of residues in the binding-pocket is a key to its ability to accommodate ligands from various chemical classes. Besides direct modulation of AR activity by antagonists, inhibition of cytochrome CYP17 (17α-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase), essential in androgen biosynthesis, has widely been considered an effective strategy against PCa. Interestingly, Handratta et al. (2005) discovered new, potent inhibitors of CYP17 (C-17 steroid derivatives) with pure AR antagonistic properties. Although the antiandrogenic activity of their lead compound (VN/124-1) has been experimentally proven both in vitro and in vivo, no structural data are currently available to elucidate the molecular determinants responsible for these desirable dual inhibitory properties. We implemented a Structure-based Drug Design (SBDD) approach to generate a valuable hypothesis as to the binding modes of steroidal CYP17 inhibitors/antiandrogens against the AR. To deal with the plasticity of residues buried in the Ligand Binding Domain (LBD), we developed a flexible-receptor Docking protocol based on Induced-Fit (IFD) methodology (www.schrodinger.com/). Our results constitute an ideal starting point for the rational design of next-generation analogues of CYP17 inhibitors/antiandrogens as well as an attractive tool to suggest novel chemical classes of AR antagonists.

  4. Using Cotton Model Simulations to Estimate Optimally Profitable Irrigation Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauget, S. A.; Leiker, G.; Sapkota, P.; Johnson, J.; Maas, S.

    2011-12-01

    In recent decades irrigation pumping from the Ogallala Aquifer has led to declines in saturated thickness that have not been compensated for by natural recharge, which has led to questions about the long-term viability of agriculture in the cotton producing areas of west Texas. Adopting irrigation management strategies that optimize profitability while reducing irrigation waste is one way of conserving the aquifer's water resource. Here, a database of modeled cotton yields generated under drip and center pivot irrigated and dryland production scenarios is used in a stochastic dominance analysis that identifies such strategies under varying commodity price and pumping cost conditions. This database and analysis approach will serve as the foundation for a web-based decision support tool that will help producers identify optimal irrigation treatments under specified cotton price, electricity cost, and depth to water table conditions.

  5. Modelling vaccination strategies against foot-and-mouth disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeling, M. J.; Woolhouse, M. E. J.; May, R. M.; Davies, G.; Grenfell, B. T.

    2003-01-01

    Vaccination has proved a powerful defence against a range of infectious diseases of humans and animals. However, its potential to control major epidemics of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in livestock is contentious. Using an individual farm-based model, we consider either national prophylactic vaccination campaigns in advance of an outbreak, or combinations of reactive vaccination and culling strategies during an epidemic. Consistent with standard epidemiological theory, mass prophylactic vaccination could reduce greatly the potential for a major epidemic, while the targeting of high-risk farms increases efficiency. Given sufficient resources and preparation, a combination of reactive vaccination and culling might control ongoing epidemics. We also explore a reactive strategy, `predictive' vaccination, which targets key spatial transmission loci and can reduce markedly the long tail that characterizes many FMD epidemics. These analyses have broader implications for the control of human and livestock infectious diseases in heterogeneous spatial landscapes.

  6. Testing of the coping flexibility hypothesis based on the dual-process theory: Relationships between coping flexibility and depressive Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Kato, Tsukasa

    2015-12-15

    According to the dual-process theory of coping flexibility (Kato, 2012), coping flexibility is the ability to discontinue an ineffective coping strategy (i.e., evaluation coping process) and implement an alternative strategy (i.e., adaptive coping process). The coping flexibility hypothesis (CFH) proposes that the ability to engage in flexible coping is related to better psychological functioning and physical health, including less depression. I the present study, participants were 393 American Whites, 429 Australian Whites, and 496 Chinese, selected from the data pool of the 2013 Coping and Health Survey (see Kato, 2014b). They completed both the Coping Flexibility Scale (Kato, 2012), which is based on the dual-process theory of coping flexibility, and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). For all nationalities and genders, evaluation coping and adaptive coping were significantly correlated with lower levels of depressive symptoms. Structural equation modeling revealed that evaluation coping was associated with lower depressive symptoms for all nationalities and genders, whereas no significant relationships between adaptive coping and depressive symptoms were found for any nationalities. Our results partially supported that the CFH fits with the dual-process theory of coping flexibility.

  7. Optimal Treatment Strategy for a Tumor Model under Immune Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwang Su; Cho, Giphil; Jung, Il Hyo

    2014-01-01

    We propose a mathematical model describing tumor-immune interactions under immune suppression. These days evidences indicate that the immune suppression related to cancer contributes to its progression. The mathematical model for tumor-immune interactions would provide a new methodology for more sophisticated treatment options of cancer. To do this we have developed a system of 11 ordinary differential equations including the movement, interaction, and activation of NK cells, CD8+T-cells, CD4+T cells, regulatory T cells, and dendritic cells under the presence of tumor and cytokines and the immune interactions. In addition, we apply two control therapies, immunotherapy and chemotherapy to the model in order to control growth of tumor. Using optimal control theory and numerical simulations, we obtain appropriate treatment strategies according to the ratio of the cost for two therapies, which suggest an optimal timing of each administration for the two types of models, without and with immunosuppressive effects. These results mean that the immune suppression can have an influence on treatment strategies for cancer. PMID:25140193

  8. An Effective Parameter Screening Strategy for High Dimensional Watershed Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khare, Y. P.; Martinez, C. J.; Munoz-Carpena, R.

    2014-12-01

    Watershed simulation models can assess the impacts of natural and anthropogenic disturbances on natural systems. These models have become important tools for tackling a range of water resources problems through their implementation in the formulation and evaluation of Best Management Practices, Total Maximum Daily Loads, and Basin Management Action Plans. For accurate applications of watershed models they need to be thoroughly evaluated through global uncertainty and sensitivity analyses (UA/SA). However, due to the high dimensionality of these models such evaluation becomes extremely time- and resource-consuming. Parameter screening, the qualitative separation of important parameters, has been suggested as an essential step before applying rigorous evaluation techniques such as the Sobol' and Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test (FAST) methods in the UA/SA framework. The method of elementary effects (EE) (Morris, 1991) is one of the most widely used screening methodologies. Some of the common parameter sampling strategies for EE, e.g. Optimized Trajectories [OT] (Campolongo et al., 2007) and Modified Optimized Trajectories [MOT] (Ruano et al., 2012), suffer from inconsistencies in the generated parameter distributions, infeasible sample generation time, etc. In this work, we have formulated a new parameter sampling strategy - Sampling for Uniformity (SU) - for parameter screening which is based on the principles of the uniformity of the generated parameter distributions and the spread of the parameter sample. A rigorous multi-criteria evaluation (time, distribution, spread and screening efficiency) of OT, MOT, and SU indicated that SU is superior to other sampling strategies. Comparison of the EE-based parameter importance rankings with those of Sobol' helped to quantify the qualitativeness of the EE parameter screening approach, reinforcing the fact that one should use EE only to reduce the resource burden required by FAST/Sobol' analyses but not to replace it.

  9. Intelligent Control of Flexible-Joint Robotic Manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colbaugh, R.; Gallegos, G.

    1997-01-01

    This paper considers the trajectory tracking problem for uncertain rigid-link. flexible.joint manipulators, and presents a new intelligent controller as a solution to this problem. The proposed control strategy is simple and computationally efficient, requires little information concerning either the manipulator or actuator/transmission models and ensures uniform boundedness of all signals and arbitrarily accurate task-space trajectory tracking.

  10. Balancing organization and flexibility in foraging dynamics.

    PubMed

    Tabone, Michaelangelo; Ermentrout, Bard; Doiron, Brent

    2010-10-07

    Proper pattern organization and reorganization are central problems facing many biological networks which thrive in fluctuating environments. However, in many cases the mechanisms that organize system activity oppose those that support behavioral flexibility. Thus, a balance between pattern organization and pattern flexibility is critically important for overall biological fitness. We study this balance in the foraging strategies of ant colonies exploiting food in dynamic environments. We present discrete time and space simulations of colony activity that uses a pheromone-based recruitment strategy biasing foraging towards a food source. After food relocation, the pheromone must evaporate sufficiently before foraging can shift colony attention to a new food source. The amount of food consumed within the dynamic environment depends non-monotonically on the pheromone evaporation time constant-with maximal consumption occurring at a time constant which balances trail formation and trail flexibility. A deterministic, 'mean field' model of pheromone and foragers on trails mimics our colony simulations. This reduced framework captures the essence of the flexibility-organization balance, and relates optimal pheromone evaporation to the timescale of the dynamic environment. We expect that the principles exposed in our study will generalize and motivate novel analysis across a broad range systems biology.

  11. Financial Flexibility in North Carolina Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suarez, Tanya M.; Polen, Deborah A.

    This paper explores educational financial flexibility with a focus on the specific issues surrounding local flexibility in North Carolina school districts. Strategies that states have used to increase local financial flexibility include waivers, reduction of budget categories, block grants, and school-based budgeting. The North Carolina system of…

  12. Synthetic 3D diamond-based electrodes for flexible retinal neuroprostheses: Model, production and in vivo biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Bendali, Amel; Rousseau, Lionel; Lissorgues, Gaëlle; Scorsone, Emmanuel; Djilas, Milan; Dégardin, Julie; Dubus, Elisabeth; Fouquet, Stéphane; Benosman, Ryad; Bergonzo, Philippe; Sahel, José-Alain; Picaud, Serge

    2015-10-01

    Two retinal implants have recently received the CE mark and one has obtained FDA approval for the restoration of useful vision in blind patients. Since the spatial resolution of current vision prostheses is not sufficient for most patients to detect faces or perform activities of daily living, more electrodes with less crosstalk are needed to transfer complex images to the retina. In this study, we modelled planar and three-dimensional (3D) implants with a distant ground or a ground grid, to demonstrate greater spatial resolution with 3D structures. Using such flexible 3D implant prototypes, we showed that the degenerated retina could mould itself to the inside of the wells, thereby isolating bipolar neurons for specific, independent stimulation. To investigate the in vivo biocompatibility of diamond as an electrode or an isolating material, we developed a procedure for depositing diamond onto flexible 3D retinal implants. Taking polyimide 3D implants as a reference, we compared the number of neurones integrating the 3D diamond structures and their ratio to the numbers of all cells, including glial cells. Bipolar neurones were increased whereas there was no increase even a decrease in the total cell number. SEM examinations of implants confirmed the stability of the diamond after its implantation in vivo. This study further demonstrates the potential of 3D designs for increasing the resolution of retinal implants and validates the safety of diamond materials for retinal implants and neuroprostheses in general.

  13. A computer model for simulation of absorption systems in flexible and modular form

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, G; Gommed, K; Gadoth, D

    1991-08-01

    A computer code in a flexible and modular form developed for simulation of absorption systems makes it possible to investigate various cycle configurations with different working fluids. The code is based on unit subroutines containing the governing equations for the system's components. The equations are linked by a main program according to the user's specifications to form the complete system. The equations are solved simultaneously, and fluid properties are taken from a property data base. The code is user oriented and requires a relatively simple input containing the given operating conditions and the working fluid at each state point. The user conveys to the computer an image of his or her cycle by specifying the different subunits and their interconnection. Based on this information, the program calculates (1) the temperature, flow rate, concentration, pressure, and vapor fraction at each state point in the system and (2) the heat duty at each unit, from which the coefficient of performance may be determined. The program has been used successfully to simulate a variety of single-stage, double-stage, and dual-loop heat pumps and heat transformers, with the working fluids LiBr-H{sup 2}O,H{sub 2}O-NH{sub 3}, LiBr/H{sub 2}O-NH{sub 3}, LiBr/ZnBr{sub 2}-CH{sub 3}OH, and more. 23 refs., 10 figs., 13 tabs.

  14. EMERGE: a flexible modelling framework to predict genomic regulatory elements from genomic signatures

    PubMed Central

    van Duijvenboden, Karel; de Boer, Bouke A.; Capon, Nicolas; Ruijter, Jan M.; Christoffels, Vincent M.

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory DNA elements, short genomic segments that regulate gene expression, have been implicated in developmental disorders and human disease. Despite this clinical urgency, only a small fraction of the regulatory DNA repertoire has been confirmed through reporter gene assays. The overall success rate of functional validation of candidate regulatory elements is low. Moreover, the number and diversity of datasets from which putative regulatory elements can be identified is large and rapidly increasing. We generated a flexible and user-friendly tool to integrate the information from different types of genomic datasets, e.g. ATAC-seq, ChIP-seq, conservation, aiming to increase the ease and success rate of functional prediction. To this end, we developed the EMERGE program that merges all datasets that the user considers informative and uses a logistic regression framework, based on validated functional elements, to set optimal weights to these datasets. ROC curve analysis shows that a combination of datasets leads to improved prediction of tissue-specific enhancers in human, mouse and Drosophila genomes. Functional assays based on this prediction can be expected to have substantially higher success rates. The resulting integrated signal for prediction of functional elements can be plotted in a build-in genome browser or exported for further analysis. PMID:26531828

  15. Model Update of a Micro Air Vehicle (MAV) Flexible Wing Frame with Uncertainty Quantification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reaves, Mercedes C.; Horta, Lucas G.; Waszak, Martin R.; Morgan, Benjamin G.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a procedure to update parameters in the finite element model of a Micro Air Vehicle (MAV) to improve displacement predictions under aerodynamics loads. Because of fabrication, materials, and geometric uncertainties, a statistical approach combined with Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (MDO) is used to modify key model parameters. Static test data collected using photogrammetry are used to correlate with model predictions. Results show significant improvements in model predictions after parameters are updated; however, computed probabilities values indicate low confidence in updated values and/or model structure errors. Lessons learned in the areas of wing design, test procedures, modeling approaches with geometric nonlinearities, and uncertainties quantification are all documented.

  16. Piping Flexibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A NASA computer program aids Hudson Engineering Corporation, Houston, Texas, in the design and construction of huge petrochemical processing plants like the one shown, which is located at Ju'aymah, Saudi Arabia. The pipes handling the flow of chemicals are subject to a variety of stresses, such as weight and variations in pressure and temperature. Hudson Engineering uses a COSMIC piping flexibility analysis computer program to analyze stresses and unsure the necessary strength and flexibility of the pipes. This program helps the company realize substantial savings in reduced engineering time.

  17. Flexible flatfoot

    PubMed Central

    Atik, Aziz; Ozyurek, Selahattin

    2014-01-01

    While being one of the most frequent parental complained deformities, flatfoot does not have a universally accepted description. The reasons of flexible flatfoot are still on debate, but they must be differentiated from rigid flatfoot which occurs secondary to other pathologies. These children are commonly brought up to a physician without any complaint. It should be kept in mind that the etiology may vary from general soft tissue laxities to intrinsic foot pathologies. Every flexible flatfoot does not require radiological examination or treatment if there is no complaint. Otherwise further investigation and conservative or surgical treatment may necessitate. PMID:28058304

  18. Supply Chain Management Model for Modular or Flexible Optimally Manned Ships

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    simulate system operations. A model based systems engineering approach using CORE enabled requirements management and traceability, identification of...determine which one could be suitable for altering to meet the stakeholders’ requirements. Modeling and simulation was used to simulate system ... SYSTEM MODELING ...............................................................................139 B. SYSTEM SIMULATION

  19. Sensitivity, optimal scaling and minimum roundoff errors in flexible structure models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skelton, Robert E.

    1987-01-01

    Traditional modeling notions presume the existence of a truth model that relates the input to the output, without advanced knowledge of the input. This has led to the evolution of education and research approaches (including the available control and robustness theories) that treat the modeling and control design as separate problems. The paper explores the subtleties of this presumption that the modeling and control problems are separable. A detailed study of the nature of modeling errors is useful to gain insight into the limitations of traditional control and identification points of view. Modeling errors need not be small but simply appropriate for control design. Furthermore, the modeling and control design processes are inevitably iterative in nature.

  20. M4ARC: multi-model multi-mode adaptive resonant control for dynamically loaded flexible beam structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjahyadi, H.; He, F.; Sammut, K.

    2008-08-01

    A hybrid multi-model-multi-mode adaptive resonant control (M4ARC) approach is proposed for dynamically loaded flexible beam structures to provide superior vibration damping performance as compared to its fixed-model and adaptive counterparts. The proposed approach uses a configurable controller, the parameters of which are updated using a fast and accurate on-line frequency identification method for N modes of interest. This method incorporates a simple supervision scheme that selects between the output of an N-mode filter bank (representing the multiple-fixed-model set) and the output of an estimator bank (representing the accurate model of the plant). The estimator bank comprises a multi-rate set of parallel N second-order recursive-least-squares estimators to achieve rapid parameter convergence. While the estimators are still in transition, the supervisor provides the configurable controller with an intermediate set of frequencies that correspond to the closest fixed model. Once the estimators converge, the supervisor selects the estimated frequency set to provide the configurable controller with an accurate representation of the current plant. This supervisor scheme significantly reduces the computational complexity as compared with existing counterparts. Experiments reveal that the proposed M4ARC approach offers the best compromise in terms of adapting to sudden and highly variable loading condition changes (within a bounded domain) while, at the same time, achieving fast transient performance.