Science.gov

Sample records for flexible rotors supported

  1. Vibration and Control of Flexible Rotor Supported by Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nonami, Kenzou

    1988-01-01

    Active vibration control of flexible rotors supported by magnetic bearings is discussed. Using a finite-element method for a mathematical model of the flexible rotor, the eigenvalue problem is formulated taking into account the interaction between a mechanical system of the flexible rotor and an electrical system of the magnetic bearings and the controller. However, for the sake of simplicity, gyroscopic effects are disregarded. It is possible to adapt this formulation to a general flexible rotor-magnetic bearing system. Controllability with and without collocation sensors and actuators located at the same distance along the rotor axis is discussed for the higher order flexible modes of the test rig. In conclusion, it is proposed that it is necessary to add new active control loops for the higher flexible modes even in the case of collocation. Then it is possible to stabilize for the case of uncollocation by means of this method.

  2. Digital control of magnetic bearings supporting a multimass flexible rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, F. J.; Williams, R. D.; Allaire, P. E.; Schafer, R. M.

    1993-01-01

    The characteristics of magnetic bearings used to support a three mass flexible rotor operated at speeds up to 14,000 RPM are discussed. The magnetic components of the bearing are of a type reported in the literature previously, but the earlier analog controls were replaced by digital ones. Analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog converters and digital control software were installed in an AT&T PC. This PC-based digital controller was used to operate one of the magnetic bearings on the test rig. Basic proportional-derivative control was applied to the bearings, and the bearing stiffness and damping characteristics were evaluated. Particular attention is paid to the frequency dependent behavior of the stiffness and damping properties, and comparisons are made between the actual controllers and ideal proportional-derivative control.

  3. Steady-state unbalance response of a three-disk flexible rotor on flexible, damped supports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, R. E.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental data are presented for the unbalance response of a flexible, ball bearing supported rotor to speeds above the third lateral bending critical. Values of squeeze film damping coefficients obtained from measured data are compared to theoretical values obtained from short bearing approximation over a frequency range from 5000 to 31 000 cycles/min. Experimental response for an undamped rotor is compared to that of one having oil squeeze film dampers at the bearings. Unbalance applied varied from 0.62 to 15.1 gm-cm.

  4. The effect of support flexibility and damping on the dynamic response of a single mass flexible rotor in elastic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, R. G.; Gunter, E. J.

    1972-01-01

    The dynamic unabalance response and transient motion of the single mass Jeffcott rotor in elastic bearings mounted on damped, flexible supports are discussed. A steady state analysis of the shaft and the bearing housing motion was made by assuming synchronous precession of the system. The conditions under which the support system would act as a dynamic vibration absorber at the rotor critical speed were studied. Plots of the rotor and support amplitudes, phase angles, and forces transmitted were evaluated by the computer and the performance curves were plotted by an automatic plotter unit. Curves are presented on the optimization of the support housing characteristics of attenuate the rotor synchronous unbalance response.

  5. Flexible rotor balancing by the influence coefficient method: Multiple critical speeds with rigid or flexible supports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tessarzik, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    Experimental tests were conducted to demonstrate the ability of the influence coefficient method to achieve precise balance of flexible rotors of virtually any design for operation through virtually any speed range. Various practical aspects of flexible-rotor balancing were investigated. Tests were made on a laboratory quality machine having a 122 cm (48 in.) long rotor weighing 50 kg (110 lb) and covering a speed range up to 18000 rpm. The balancing method was in every instance effective, practical, and economical and permitted safe rotor operation over the full speed range covering four rotor bending critical speeds. Improved correction weight removal methods for rotor balancing were investigated. Material removal from a rotating disk was demonstrated through application of a commercially available laser.

  6. Development of flexible rotor balancing criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, W. W.; Rieger, N. F.

    1979-01-01

    Several studies in which analytical procedures were used to obtain balancing criteria for flexible rotors are described. General response data for a uniform rotor in damped flexible supports were first obtained for plain cylindrical bearings, tilting pad bearings, axial groove bearings, and partial arc bearings. These data formed the basis for the flexible rotor balance criteria presented. A procedure by which a practical rotor in bearings could be reduced to an equivalent uniform rotor was developed and tested. It was found that the equivalent rotor response always exceeded to practical rotor response by more than sixty percent for the cases tested. The equivalent rotor procedure was then tested against six practical rotor configurations for which data was available. It was found that the equivalent rotor method offered a procedure by which balance criteria could be selected for practical flexible rotors, using the charts given for the uniform rotor.

  7. Nonlinear dynamics of flexible rotor supported on the gas foil journal bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhore, Skylab P.; Darpe, Ashish K.

    2013-09-01

    Investigation on nonlinear dynamics of a flexible rotor supported on the gas foil journal bearings is attempted. A time domain orbit simulation is carried out that couples the equations of rotor motion, unsteady Reynolds equation and foil deformation. The unsteady Reynolds equation is solved using control volume formulation with power law hybrid scheme and Gauss-Seidel method. The nonlinear dynamic response is analyzed using disc center and journal center trajectories, Poincaré maps, Fast Fourier transforms and bifurcation plots. The analysis is carried out for different system parameters, namely, rotating speed, unbalance eccentricity, compliance and loss factor of gas foil bearing. The analysis reveals highly nonlinear behavior with periodic, multi-periodic and quasiperiodic motion of the disc and the journal center. The present analysis can be useful in designing and selection of suitable operating parameters of rotor bearing system.

  8. Flexible rotor dynamics analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, F. A.

    1973-01-01

    A digital computer program was developed to analyze the general nonaxisymmetric and nonsynchronous transient and steady-state rotor dynamic performance of a bending- and shear-wise flexible rotor-bearing system under various operating conditions. The effects of rotor material mechanical hysteresis, rotor torsion flexibility, transverse effects of rotor axial and torsional loading and the anisotropic, in-phase and out-of-phase bearing stiffness and damping force and moment coefficients were included in the program to broaden its capability. An optimum solution method was found and incorporated in the computer program. Computer simulation of experimental data was made and qualitative agreements observed. The mathematical formulations, computer program verification, test data simulation, and user instruction was presented and discussed.

  9. Stability and stability degree of a cracked flexible rotor supported on journal bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meng, Guang; Gasch, Robert

    1994-01-01

    This paper investigates the stability and the stability degree of a flexible cracked rotor supported on different kinds of journal bearings. It is found that no matter what kind of bearings is used, the unstable zones caused by rotor crack locate always within the speed ratio (2/N) (1 - Delta K(sub xi)/4) is less than Omega is less than 2/N when gravity parameter W(sub R) is greater than 1.0, and locate always within the speed ratio (2 Omega(sub alpha)/N) (1 - Delta K(sub xi)/4) is less than Omega is less than 2 Omega(sub alpha)/N when W(sub R) is less than 0.1, where Delta K(sub xi) is the crack stiffness ratio, N = 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, ..., and Omega(sub alpha) = ((1 + 2 alpha)/2 alpha)(exp 1/2). When 0.1 is less than W(sub R) is less than 1.0, there is a region where no unstable zones caused by rotor crack exist. Outside the crack ridge zones, the rotor crack has almost no influence on system's stability and stability degree; while within the crack ridge zones, the stability and stability degree depend both on the crack and system's parameters. In some cases, the system may still be stable even when the crack is very large. For small gravity parameter (W(sub R) is less than 0.1), the mass ratio alpha has large influence on the position of unstable region, but its influence on the stability degree is small. The influence of fixed Sommerfeld number S(sub 0) on the crack stability degree is small although S(sub 0) has large influence on the stability degree of uncracked rotor.

  10. Nonlinear dynamics of a support-excited flexible rotor with hydrodynamic journal bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dakel, Mzaki; Baguet, Sébastien; Dufour, Régis

    2014-05-01

    The major purpose of this study is to predict the dynamic behavior of an on-board rotor mounted on hydrodynamic journal bearings in the presence of rigid support movements, the target application being turbochargers of vehicles or rotating machines subject to seismic excitation. The proposed on-board rotor model is based on Timoshenko beam finite elements. The dynamic modeling takes into account the geometric asymmetry of shaft and/or rigid disk as well as the six deterministic translations and rotations of the rotor rigid support. Depending on the type of analysis used for the bearing, the fluid film forces computed with the Reynolds equation are linear/nonlinear. Thus the application of Lagrange's equations yields the linear/nonlinear equations of motion of the rotating rotor in bending with respect to the moving rigid support which represents a non-inertial frame of reference. These equations are solved using the implicit Newmark time-step integration scheme. Due to the geometric asymmetry of the rotor and to the rotational motions of the support, the equations of motion include time-varying parametric terms which can lead to lateral dynamic instability. The influence of sinusoidal rotational or translational motions of the support, the accuracy of the linear 8-coefficient bearing model and the interest of the nonlinear model for a hydrodynamic journal bearing are examined and discussed by means of stability charts, orbits of the rotor, time history responses, fast Fourier transforms, bifurcation diagrams as well as Poincaré maps.

  11. Steady-State Dynamic Behavior of a Flexible Rotor With Auxiliary Support From a Clearance Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xie, Huajun; Flowers, George T.; Feng, Li; Lawrence, Charles T.

    1996-01-01

    This paper investigates the steady-state responses of a rotor system supported by auxiliary bearings in which there is a clearance between the rotor and the inner race of the bearing. A simulation model based upon the rotor of a production jet engine is developed and its steady-state behavior is explored over a wide range of operating conditions for various parametric configurations. Specifically, the influence of rotor imbalance, clearance, support stiffness and damping is studied. Bifurcation diagrams are used as a tool to examine the dynamic behavior of this system as a function of the afore mentioned parameters. The harmonic balance method is also employed for synchronous response cases. The observed dynamical responses is discussed and some insights into the behavior of such systems are presented.

  12. Non-linear dynamic analysis of a flexible rotor supported on porous oil journal bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laha, S. K.; Kakoty, S. K.

    2011-03-01

    In the present paper, the non-linear dynamic analysis of a flexible rotor with a rigid disk under unbalance excitation mounted on porous oil journal bearings at the two ends is carried out. The system equation of motion is obtained by finite element formulation of Timoshenko beam and the disk. The non-linear oil-film forces are calculated from the solution of the modified Reynolds equation simultaneously with Darcy's equation. The system equation of motion is then solved by the Wilson- θ method. Bifurcation diagrams, Poincaré maps, time response, journal trajectories, FFT-spectrum, etc. are obtained to study the non-linear dynamics of the rotor-bearing system. The effect of various non-dimensional rotor-bearing parameters on the bifurcation characteristics of the system is studied. It is shown that the system undergoes Hopf bifurcation as the speed increases. Further, slenderness ratio, material properties of the rotor, ratio of disk mass to shaft mass and permeability of the porous bush are shown to have profound effect on the bifurcation characteristics of the rotor-bearing system.

  13. HPOTP low-speed flexible rotor balancing, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giordano, J.; Zorzi, E.

    1985-01-01

    A method was developed that shows promise in overcoming many balancing limitations. This method establishes one or more windows for low speed, out-of-housing balancing of flexible rotors. These windows are regions of speed and support flexibility where two conditions are simultaneously fulfilled. First, the rotor system behaves flexibly; therefore, there is separation among balance planes. Second, the response due to balance weights is large enough to reliably measure. The analytic formulation of the low-speed flexible rotor balancing method is described. The results of proof-of-principle tests conducted under the program are presented. Based on this effort, it is concluded that low speed flexible rotor balancing is a viable technology. In particular, the method can be used to balance a rotor bearing system at low speed which results in smooth operation above more than one bending critical speed. Furthermore, this balancing methodology is applicable to SSME turbopump rotors.

  14. Effect of support flexibilty and damping on the dynamic response of a single mass flexible rotor in elastic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, R. G.; Gunter, E. J.

    1972-01-01

    A steady state analysis of the shaft and the bearing housing motion was made by assuming synchronous precession of the system. The conditions under which the support system would act as a dynamic vibration absorber at the rotor critical speed were studied; plots of the rotor and support amplitudes, phase angles, and forces transmitted were evaluated by the computer, and the performance curves were automatically plotted by a CalComp plotter unit. Curves are presented on the optimization of the support housing characteristics to attenuate the rotor unbalance response over the entire rotor speed range. The complete transient motion including rotor unbalance was examined by integrating the equations of motion numerically using a modified fourth order Runge-Kutta procedure, and the resulting whirl orbits were plotted by the CalComp plotter unit. The results of the transient analysis are discussed with regards to the design optimization procedure derived from the steady-state analysis.

  15. Design of a squeeze-film damper for a multi-mass flexible rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, R. E.; Fleming, D. P.; Gunter, E. J.

    1975-01-01

    A single mass flexible rotor analysis was used to optimize the stiffness and damping of a flexible support for a symmetric five-mass rotor. The flexible support attenuates the rotor motions and forces transmitted to the support bearings when the rotor operates through and above its first bending critical speed. An oil squeeze-film damper was designed based on short bearing lubrication theory. The damper design was verified by an unbalance response computer program. Rotor amplitudes were reduced by a factor of 16 and loads reduced by a factor of 36 compared with the same rotor on rigid bearing supports.

  16. Design of an oil squeeze film damper bearing for a multimass flexible-rotor bearing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, R. E.; Gunter, E. J., Jr.; Fleming, D. P.

    1975-01-01

    A single-mass flexible-rotor analysis was used to optimize the stiffness and damping of a flexible support for a symmetric five-mass rotor. The flexible, damped support attenuates the amplitudes of motions and forces transmitted to the support bearings when the rotor operates through and above its first bending critical speed. An oil squeeze film damper was designed based on short bearing lubrication theory. The damper design was verified by an unbalance response computer program. Rotor amplitudes were reduced by a factor of 16 and loads reduced by a factor of 36 compared with the same rotor with rigid bearing supports.

  17. Housing flexibility effects on rotor stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, L. B.; Wolfe, E. A.; Beatty, R. F.

    1985-01-01

    Preliminary rotordynamic evaluations are performed with a housing stiffness assumption that is typically determined only after the hardware is built. In addressing rotor stability, a rigid housing assumption was shown to predict an instability at a lower spin speed than a comparable flexible housing analysis. This rigid housing assumption therefore provides a conservative estimate of the stability threshold speed. A flexible housing appears to act as an energy absorber and dissipated some of the destabilizing force. The fact that a flexible housing is usually asymmetric and considerably heavier than the rotor was related to this apparent increase in rotor stability. Rigid housing analysis is proposed as a valuable screening criteria and may save time and money in construction of elaborate housing finite element models for linear stability analyses.

  18. Nonlinear transient analysis of multi-mass flexible rotors - theory and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, R. G.; Gunter, E. J.

    1973-01-01

    The equations of motion necessary to compute the transient response of multi-mass flexible rotors are formulated to include unbalance, rotor acceleration, and flexible damped nonlinear bearing stations. A method of calculating the unbalance response of flexible rotors from a modified Myklestad-Prohl technique is discussed in connection with the method of solution for the transient response. Several special cases of simplified rotor-bearing systems are presented and analyzed for steady-state response, stability, and transient behavior. These simplified rotor models produce extensive design information necessary to insure stable performance to elastic mounted rotor-bearing systems under varying levels and forms of excitation. The nonlinear journal bearing force expressions derived from the short bearing approximation are utilized in the study of the stability and transient response of the floating bush squeeze damper support system. Both rigid and flexible rotor models are studied, and results indicate that the stability of flexible rotors supported by journal bearings can be greatly improved by the use of squeeze damper supports. Results from linearized stability studies of flexible rotors indicate that a tuned support system can greatly improve the performance of the units from the standpoint of unbalanced response and impact loading. Extensive stability and design charts may be readily produced for given rotor specifications by the computer codes presented in this analysis.

  19. Research study for effects of case flexibility on bearing loads and rotor stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenwick, J. R.; Tarn, R. B.

    1984-01-01

    Methods to evaluate the effect of casing flexibility on rotor stability and component loads were developed. Recent Rocketdyne turbomachinery was surveyed to determine typical properties and frequencies versus running speed. A small generic rotor was run with a flexible case with parametric variations in casing properties for comparison with a rotor attached to rigid supports. A program for the IBM personal computer for interactive evaluation of rotors and casings is developed. The Root locus method is extended for use in rotor dynamics for symmetrical systems by transforming all motion and coupling into a single plane and using a 90 degree criterion when plotting loci.

  20. Turbomachinery rotor support with damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonpragenau, George L. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    Damping seals, damping bearings, and a support sleeve are presented for the ball bearings of a high speed rotor. The ball bearings consist of a duplex set having the outer races packaged tightly within the sleeve while the sleeve provides a gap with a support member so that the bearings may float with the sleeve. The sleeve has a web extending radially between the pair of outer races and acts in conjunction with one or more springs to apply an axial preload to the outer races. The sleeves have a series of slits which provide the sleeve with a spring-like quality so that the spring acts to center the rotor upon which the bearings are mounted during start up and shut down. A damping seal or a damping bearing may be used in conjunction with the ball bearings and supporting sleeve, the damping seal and damping bearing having rotor portions including rigid outer surfaces mounted within the bore of a stator portion having triangular shaped pockets on the surface facing the rotor. Axial gates are provided between adjacent pockets in sections of the stator permitting fluid to flow with less resistance axially relative to the flow of fluids circumferentially between the rotor and the stator.

  1. Control of flexible rotor systems with active magnetic bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Shuliang; Palazzolo, Alan

    2008-07-01

    An approach is presented for the analysis and design of magnetic suspension systems with large flexible rotordynamics models including dynamics, control, and simulation. The objective is to formulate and synthesize a large-order, flexible shaft rotordynamics model for a flywheel supported with magnetic bearings. A finite element model of the rotor system is assembled and then employed to develop a magnetic suspension compensator to provide good reliability and disturbance rejection. Stable operation over the complete speed range and optimization of the closed-loop rotordynamic properties are obtained via synthesis of eigenvalue analysis, Campbell plots, waterfall plots, and mode shapes. The large order of the rotor model and high spin speed of the rotor present a challenge for magnetic suspension control. A flywheel system is studied as an example for realizing a physical controller that provides stable rotor suspension and good disturbance rejection in all operating states. The baseline flywheel system control is determined from extensive rotordynamics synthesis and analysis for rotor critical speeds, mode shapes, frequency responses, and time responses.

  2. Dynamics of a flexible rotor in magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allaire, P. E.; Humphris, R. R.; Kelm, R. D.

    1987-01-01

    Discussed is a magnetic bearing which was designed and tested in a flexible rotor both as support bearings and as a vibration controller. The design of the bearing is described and the effect of control circuit bandwidth determined. Both stiffness and damping coefficients were measured and calculated for the bearing with good agreement. The bearings were then placed in a single mass rotor as support bearings and the machine run through two critical speeds. Measurements were made of the vibration response in plain bushings and magnetic bearings. Comparisons were also made of the theoretical calculations with the measured peak unbalance response speeds. Finally, runs were made with the magnetic bearing used as a vibration controller.

  3. Laser balancing demonstration on a high-speed flexible rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demuth, R. S.; Rio, R. A.; Fleming, D. P.

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes a flexible rotor system used for two-plane laser balancing and an experimental demonstration of the laser material removal method for balancing. A laboratory test rotor was modified to accept balancing corrections using a laser metal removal method while the rotor is at operating speed. The laser setup hardware required to balance the rotor using two correction planes is described. The test rig optical configuration and a neodymium glass laser were assembled and calibrated for material removal rates. Rotor amplitudes before and after balancing, trial and correction weights, rotor speed during operation of laser, and balancing time were documented. The rotor was balanced through the first bending critical speed using the laser material removal procedure to apply trial weights and correction weights without stopping the rotor.

  4. Forward and Backward Precession of a Vertical Anisotropically Supported Rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muszynska, A.

    1996-04-01

    This paper presents the analytical and experimental study of a vertical, overhung imbalanced rotor supported by flexible, anisotropic bearings. The results show that existence of imbalance and shaft bow causes the synchronous forced precession of the rotor to be forward (below the first value of split balance resonance and above the second value of the split balance resonance) or backward (between the two values of the split resonance). This phenomenon is classical. The new result consists of exploring the existence of forward precession of the inboard and midspan rotor sections while the outboard disk is precessing backward. The sensitivity analysis shows which system parameters are mainly responsible for this apparently bizarre phenomenon.

  5. Instability thresholds for flexible rotors in hydrodynamic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allaire, P. E.; Flack, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    Two types of fixed pad hydrodynamic bearings (multilobe and pressure dam) were considered. Optimum and nonoptimum geometric configurations were tested. The optimum geometric configurations were determined by using a theoretical analysis and then the bearings were constructed for a flexible rotor test rig. It was found that optimizing bearings using this technique produces a 100% or greater increase in rotor stability. It is shown that this increase in rotor stability is carried out in the absence of certain types of instability mechanisms such as aerodynamic crosscoupling. However, the increase in rotor stability should greatly improve rotating machinery performance in the presence of such forces as well.

  6. Balancing of Rigid and Flexible Rotors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    rotor conr- Igjurations that can be "dialed In" are shown at left. (Cour- tesy of’ Schenak Trebel Corporation.) ŕ 1,4 BALANJCING MACHINES ANI...anice, For all rigid rotors in any grado , the specific balance requirement for that grade should provide smooth operation. Tlhe grstde number represents

  7. Third order LPF type compensator for flexible rotor suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsushita, Osami; Takahashi, Naohiko; Takagi, Michiyuki

    1994-01-01

    The tuning job of the compensator for levitating flexible rotors supported by active magnetic bearings (AMB) concerns providing a good damping effect to the critical speed modes while avoiding the spillover problem on the instability of higher bending modes. In this paper, an idea for design of the control law of the compensator based on utilizing a third order low pass filter (LPF) is proposed to essentially enable elimination of the spillover instability. According to the proposed design method, good damping effects for the critical speeds are obtained by the usual phase lead/lag function. Stabilization for all of higher bending modes is completed by the additional function of the 3rd order LPF due to its phase lag approaching about -270 degrees in the high frequency domain. This idea is made clear by experiments and simulations.

  8. Active vibration control for flexible rotor by optimal direct-output feedback control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nonami, Kenzou; Dirusso, Eliseo; Fleming, David P.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental research tests were performed to actively control the rotor vibrations of a flexible rotor mounted on flexible bearing supports. The active control method used in the tests is called optimal direct-output feedback control. This method uses four electrodynamic actuators to apply control forces directly to the bearing housings in order to achieve effective vibration control of the rotor. The force actuators are controlled by an analog controller that accepts rotor displacement as input. The controller is programmed with experimentally determined feedback coefficients; the output is a control signal to the force actuators. The tests showed that this active control method reduced the rotor resonance peaks due to unbalance from approximately 250 micrometers down to approximately 25 micrometers (essentially runout level). The tests were conducted over a speed range from 0 to 10,000 rpm; the rotor system had nine critical speeds within this speed range. The method was effective in significantly reducing the rotor vibration for all of the vibration modes and critical speeds.

  9. Balancing of machinery with a flexible variable-speed rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sève, F.; Andrianoely, M. A.; Berlioz, A.; Dufour, R.; Charreyron, M.

    2003-07-01

    The balancing procedure of machines composed of a flexible rotating part (rotor) and a non-rotating part (stator) mounted on suspensions is presented. The rotating part runs at a variable speed of rotation and is mounted on bearings with variable-speed-dependent characteristics. Assuming that the unbalance masses are relatively well defined, such as in the case of a crank-shaft, the procedure is based on a numerical approach using rotordynamics theory coupled with the Finite Element and Influence Coefficient Methods. An academic rotor/stator model illustrates the procedure. Moreover, the industrial application concerns a refrigerant rotary compressor whose experimental investigation permits validating the model. Assuming that the balancing planes are located on the rotor, it is shown that reducing the vibration level of both rotor and stator requires a balancing procedure using target planes on the rotor and on the stator. In the case of the rotary compressor, this avoids rotor-to-stator rubs and minimizes vibration transmission through pipes and grommets.

  10. Dynamics of High-Speed Rotors Supported in Sliding Bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šimek, J.; Svoboda, R.

    The higher the operating speed, the more serious are problems with rotor stability. Three basic groups of rotors are analyzed and some methods of suppressing instability are shown. In the first group are classical elastic rotors supported in hydrodynamic bearings. Practically all high-speed rotors now run in tilting pad bearings, which are inherently stable, but in specific conditions even tiling pad bearings may not ensure rotor stability. The second group is composed of combustion engines turbocharger rotors, which are characteristic by heavy impellers at both overhung ends of elastic shaft. These rotors are in most cases supported in floating ring bearings, which bring special features to rotor behaviour. The third group of rotors with gas bearings exhibits special features.

  11. Effects of vibration and shock on the performance of gas-bearing space-power Brayton cycle turbomachinery. Part 4: Suppression of rotor-bearing system vibrations through flexible bearing support damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tessarzik, J. M.; Chiang, T.; Badgley, R. H.

    1974-01-01

    A bearing damper, operating on the support flexure of a pivoted pad in a tilting-pad type gas-lubricated journal bearing, has been designed, built, and tested under externally-applied random vibrations. The NASA Brayton Rotating Unit (BRU), a 36,000 rpm, 10-Kwe turbogenerator had previously been subjected in the MTI Vibration Test Laboratory to external random vibrations, and vibration response data had been recorded and analyzed for amplitude distribution and frequency content at a number of locations in the machine. Based on data from that evaluation, a piston-type damper was designed and developed for each of the two flexibly-supported journal bearing pads (one in each of the two three-pad bearings). A modified BRU, with dampers installed, has been re-tested under random vibration conditions. Root-mean-square vibration amplitudes were determined from the test data, and displacement power spectral density analyses have been performed. Results of these data reduction efforts have been compared with vibration tolerance limits. Results of the tests indicate significant reductions in vibration levels in the bearing gas-lubricant films, particularly in the rigidly-mounted pads. The utility of the gas-lubricated damper for limiting rotor-bearing system vibrations in high-speed turbomachinery has thus been demonstrated.

  12. Dynamic modelling and analysis of a magnetically suspended flexible rotor. M.S. Thesis, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccallum, Duncan C.

    1991-01-01

    A 12-state lumped-element model is presented for a flexible rotor supported by two attractive force electromagnetic journal bearings. The rotor is modeled as a rigid disk with radial mass unbalance mounted on a flexible, massless shaft with internal damping (Jeffcott rotor). The disk is offset axially from the midspan of the shaft. Bearing dynamics in each radial direction are modeled as a parallel combination of a negative (unstable) spring and a linear current-to-force actuator. The model includes translation and rotation of the rigid mass and the first and second bending models of the flexible shaft, and it simultaneously includes internal shaft damping, gyroscopic effects, and the unstable nature of the attractive force magnetic bearings. The model is used to analyze the dependence of the system transmission zeros and open-loop poles on system parameters. The dominant open-loop poles occur in stable/unstable pairs with bandwidth dependent on the ratios of bearing (unstable) stiffnesses to rotor mass and damping dependent on the shaft spin rate. The zeros occur in complex conjugate pairs with bandwidth dependent on the ratios of shaft stiffness to rotor mass and damping dependent on the shaft spin rate. Some of the transmission zeros are non-minimum phase when the spin rate exceeds the shaft critical speed. The transmission zeros and open-loop poles impact the design of magnetic bearing control systems. The minimum loop cross-over frequency of the closed-loop system is the speed of the unstable open-loop poles. For the supercritical shaft spin rates, the presence of non-minimum phase zeros limits the distribution rejection achievable at frequencies near or above the shaft critical speed. Since non-minimum phase transmission zeros can only be changed by changing the system inputs and/or outputs, closed-loop performance is limited for supercritical spin rates unless additional force or torque actuators are added.

  13. Photocatalytic reactor with flexible supports

    DOEpatents

    Jacoby, W.A.; Blake, D.M.

    1995-09-12

    Organic pollutants and bioaerosols in a gaseous stream are oxidized by exposure to light (e.g., UV light) in the presence of semiconductor catalyst particles or coatings supported on flexible strips suspended in the gaseous stream. 3 figs.

  14. Photocatalytic reactor with flexible supports

    DOEpatents

    Jacoby, William A.; Blake, Daniel M.

    1995-01-01

    Organic pollutants and bioaerosols in a gaseous stream are oxidized by exposure to light (e.g., UV light) in the presence of semiconductor catalyst particles or coatings supported on flexible strips suspended in the gaseous stream.

  15. CFD simulation of a 2 bladed multi megawatt wind turbine with flexible rotor connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, L.; Luhmann, B.; Rösch, K.-N.; Lutz, T.; Cheng, P.-W.; Krämer, E.

    2016-09-01

    An innovative passive load reduction concept for a two bladed 3.4 MW wind turbine is investigated by a conjoint CFD and MBS - BEM methodology. The concept consists of a flexible hub mount which allows a tumbling motion of the rotor. First, the system is simulated with a MBS tool coupled to a BEM code. Then, the resulting motion of the rotor is extracted from the simulation and applied on the CFD simulation as prescribed motion. The aerodynamic results show a significant load reduction on the support structure. Hub pitching and yawing moment amplitudes are reduced by more than 50% in a vertically sheared inflow. Furthermore, the suitability of the MBS - BEM approach for the simulation of the load reduction system is shown.

  16. Lateral vibration control of a flexible overcritical rotor via an active gas bearing - Theoretical and experimental comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierart, Fabian G.; Santos, Ilmar F.

    2016-11-01

    The lack of damping of radial gas bearings leads to high vibration levels of a rotor supported by this type of bearing when crossing resonant areas. This is even more relevant for flexible rotors, as studied in this work. In order to reduce these high vibration levels, an active gas bearing is proposed. The control action of this active bearing is selected based on two different strategies: a simple proportional integral derivative controller and an optimal controller. Both controllers are designed based on a theoretical model previously presented. The dynamics of the flexible rotor are modelled aided by the finite element method and the rotor-fluid interaction in the gas bearing is included using the solution of a modified version of the Reynolds equation for compressible fluids, taking into account the piezoelectrically controlled jet action. Performance and accuracy of both model-based controllers are compared against experimental results, showing good agreement. Theoretical and experimental results show a significant increase in the damping ratio of the system, enabling the flexible rotor to run safely across the critical speeds and up to 12,000 rev/min, i.e. 50 percent over the second critical speed without any instability problems.

  17. Blade mistuning coupled with shaft flexibility effects in rotor aeroelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khader, Naim; Loewy, Robert G.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of bladed-disk polar dissymmetry, resulting from variations in mass from one blade to another, on aeroelastic stability boundaries for a fan stage is presented. In addition to both in-plane and out-of-plane deformations of the bladed-disk, bending of the supporting shaft in two planes is considered, and the resulting Coriolis forces and gyroscopic moments are included in the analysis. A quasi-steady aerodynamics approach is combined with the Lagrangian method to develop the governing equations of motion for the flexible bladed-disk-shaft assembly. Calculations are performed for an actual fan stage.

  18. Influence of backup bearings and support structure dynamics on the behavior of rotors with active supports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flowers, George T.

    1995-01-01

    Progress made in the current year is listed, and the following papers are included in the appendix: Steady-State Dynamic Behavior of an Auxiliary Bearing Supported Rotor System; Dynamic Behavior of a Magnetic Bearing Supported Jet Engine Rotor with Auxiliary Bearings; Dynamic Modelling and Response Characteristics of a Magnetic Bearing Rotor System with Auxiliary Bearings; and Synchronous Dynamics of a Coupled Shaft/Bearing/Housing System with Auxiliary Support from a Clearance Bearing: Analysis and Experiment.

  19. Influence of backup bearings and support structure dynamics on the behavior of rotors with active supports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flowers, George T.

    1995-02-01

    This semiannual status report lists specific accomplishments made on the research of the influence of backup bearings and support structure dynamics on the behavior of rotors with active supports. Papers have been presented representing work done on the T-501 engine model; an experimental/simulation study of auxiliary bearing rotordynamics; and a description of a rotordynamical model for a magnetic bearing supported rotor system, including auxiliary bearing effects. A finite element model for a foil bearing has been developed. Additional studies of rotor/bearing/housing dynamics are currently being performed as are studies of the effects of sideloading on auxiliary bearing rotordynamics using the magnetic bearing supported rotor model.

  20. Influence of backup bearings and support structure dynamics on the behavior of rotors with active supports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flowers, George T.

    1995-01-01

    This semiannual status report lists specific accomplishments made on the research of the influence of backup bearings and support structure dynamics on the behavior of rotors with active supports. Papers have been presented representing work done on the T-501 engine model; an experimental/simulation study of auxiliary bearing rotordynamics; and a description of a rotordynamical model for a magnetic bearing supported rotor system, including auxiliary bearing effects. A finite element model for a foil bearing has been developed. Additional studies of rotor/bearing/housing dynamics are currently being performed as are studies of the effects of sideloading on auxiliary bearing rotordynamics using the magnetic bearing supported rotor model.

  1. Stability and vibration analysis of a complex flexible rotor bearing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa, C.; Sinou, J.-J.; Thouverez, F.

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents the non-linear dynamic analysis of a flexible rotor having unbalanced and supported by ball bearings. The rolling element bearings are modeled as two degree of freedom elements where the kinematics of the rolling elements are taken into account, as well as the internal clearance and the Hertz contact non-linearity. In order to calculate the periodic response of this non-linear system, the harmonic balance method is used. This method is implemented with an exact condensation strategy to reduce the computational time. Moreover, the stability of the non-linear system is analyzed in the frequency-domain by a method based on a perturbation applied to the known harmonic solution in the time domain.

  2. Identification of dynamic characteristics of flexible rotors as dynamic inverse problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roisman, W. P.; Vajingortin, L. D.

    1991-01-01

    The problem of dynamic and balancing of flexible rotors were considered, which were set and solved as the problem of the identification of flexible rotor systems, which is the same as the inverse problem of the oscillation theory dealing with the task of the identifying the outside influences and system parameters on the basis of the known laws of motion. This approach to the problem allows the disclosure the picture of disbalances throughout the rotor-under-test (which traditional methods of flexible rotor balancing, based on natural oscillations, could not provide), and identify dynamic characteristics of the system, which correspond to a selected mathematical model. Eventually, various methods of balancing were developed depending on the special features of the machines as to their design, technology, and operation specifications. Also, theoretical and practical methods are given for the flexible rotor balancing at far from critical rotation frequencies, which does not necessarily require the knowledge forms of oscillation, dissipation, and elasticity and inertia characteristics, and to use testing masses.

  3. High-Temperature Hybrid Rotor Support System Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montague, Gerald T.

    2004-01-01

    The Army Research Laboratory Vehicle Technology Directorate and the NASA Glenn Research Center demonstrated a unique high-speed, high-temperature rotor support system in September 2003. Advanced turbomachinery is on its way to surpassing the capabilities of rolling-element bearings and conventional dampers. To meet these demands, gas turbine engines of the future will demand increased efficiency and thrust-to-weight ratio, and reduced specific fuel consumption and noise. The more-electric engine replaces oil-lubricated bearings, dampers, gears, and seals with electrical devices. One such device is the magnetic bearing. The Vehicle Technology Directorate and Glenn have demonstrated the operation of a radial magnetic bearing in combination with a hydrostatic bearing at 1000 F at 31,000 rpm (2.3 MDN1). This unique combination takes advantage of a high-temperature rub surface in the event of electrical power loss or sudden overloads. The hydrostatic bearings allow load sharing with the magnetic bearing. The magnetic-hydrostatic bearing combination eliminates wear and high contact stress from sudden acceleration of the rolling-element bearings and overheating. The magnetic bearing enables high damping, adaptive vibration control, and precise rotor positioning, diagnostics, and health monitoring. A model of the test facility used at Glenn for this technology demonstration is shown. A high-temperature heteropolar radial magnetic bearing is located at the center of gravity of the test rotor. There is a 0.022-in. radial air gap between the rotor and stator. Two rub surface hydrostatic bearings were placed on either side of the magnetic bearing. The rotor is supported by a 0.002-in. hydrostatic air film and the magnetic field. The prototype active magnetic bearing cost $24,000 to design and fabricate and a set of four high temperature, rub-surface, hydrostatic bearings cost $28,000. This work was funded by the Turbine-Based Combined Cycle program.

  4. Modelling and control of a rotor supported by magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurumoorthy, R.; Pradeep, A. K.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we develop a dynamical model of a rotor and the active magnetic bearings used to support the rotor. We use this model to develop a stable state feedback control of the magnetic bearing system. We present the development of a rigid body model of the rotor, utilizing both Rotation Matrices (Euler Angles) and Euler Parameters (Quaternions). In the latter half of the paper we develop a stable state feedback control of the actively controlled magnetic bearing to control the rotor position under inbalances. The control law developed takes into account the variation of the model with rotational speed. We show stability over the whole operating range of speeds for the magnetic bearing system. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the closed loop system performance. We develop the model of the magnetic bearing, and present two schemes for the excitation of the poles of the actively controlled magnetic bearing. We also present a scheme for averaging multiple sensor measurements and splitting the actuation forces amongst redundant actuators.

  5. Influence of backup bearings and support structure dynamics on the behavior of rotors with active supports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flowers, George T.

    1994-01-01

    Progress over the past year includes the following: A simplified rotor model with a flexible shaft and backup bearings has been developed. A simple rotor model which includes a flexible disk and bearings with clearance has been developed and the dynamics of the model investigated. A rotor model based upon the T-501 engine has been developed which includes backup bearing effects. Parallel simulation runs are being conducted using an ANSYS based finite element model of the T-501. The magnetic bearing test rig is currently floating and dynamics/control tests are being conducted. A paper has been written that documents the work using the T-501 engine model. Work has continued with the simplified model. The finite element model is currently being modified to include the effects of foundation dynamics. A literature search for material on foil bearings has been conducted. A finite element model is being developed for a magnetic bearing in series with a foil backup bearing.

  6. Influence of backup bearings and support structure dynamics on the behavior of rotors with active supports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flowers, George T.

    1994-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made toward the goals of this research effort in the past six months. A simplified rotor model with a flexible shaft and backup bearings has been developed. The model is based upon the work of Ishii and Kirk. Parameter studies of the behavior of this model are currently being conducted. A simple rotor model which includes a flexible disk and bearings with clearance has been developed and the dynamics of the model investigated. The study consists of simulation work coupled with experimental verification. The work is documented in the attached paper. A rotor model based upon the T-501 engine has been developed which includes backup bearing effects. The dynamics of this model are currently being studied with the objective of verifying the conclusions obtained from the simpler models. Parallel simulation runs are being conducted using an ANSYS based finite element model of the T-501.

  7. Dynamic analysis of flexible rotor-bearing systems using a modal approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choy, K. C.; Gunter, E. J.; Barrett, L. E.

    1978-01-01

    The generalized dynamic equations of motion were obtained by the direct stiffness method for multimass flexible rotor-bearing systems. The direct solution of the equations of motion is illustrated on a simple 3-mass system. For complex rotor-bearing systems, the direct solution of the equations becomes very difficult. The transformation of the equations of motion into modal coordinates can greatly simplify the computation for the solution. The use of undamped and damped system mode shapes in the transformation are discussed. A set of undamped critical speed modes is used to transform the equations of motion into a set of coupled modal equations of motion. A rapid procedure for computing stability, steady state unbalance response, and transient response of the rotor-bearing system is presented. Examples of the application of this modal approach are presented. The dynamics of the system is further investigated with frequency spectrum analysis of the transient response.

  8. Influence of oil-squeeze-film damping on steady-state response of flexible rotor operating to supercritical speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, R. E.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental data were obtained for the unbalance response of a flexible rotor to speeds above the third lateral bending critical. Squeeze-film damping coefficients calculated from measured data showed good agreement with short-journal-bearing approximations over a frequency range from 5000 to 31,000 cmp. Response of a rotor to varying amounts of unbalance was investigated. A very lightly damped rotor was compared with one where oil-squeeze dampers were applied.

  9. Modeling and control of a flexible rotor system with AMB-based sustentation.

    PubMed

    Arredondo, I; Jugo, J; Etxebarria, V

    2008-01-01

    In this work the modeling and basic control design process of a rotary flexible spindle hovered by Active Magnetic Bearings (AMB) whose good capabilities for machine-tool industry extensively treated in the literature is presented. The modeling takes into account the three main behavioral characteristics of such magnetically-levitated rotor: the rigid dynamics, the flexible dynamics and the rotating unbalanced motion. Besides, the gyroscopic coupling is also studied proving that in this case, its effects are not significant and can be neglected. Using this model, a stabilizing controller based on symmetry properties is successfully designed for the system and a complete experimental analysis of its performance is carried out. Also, the predictions of the model are compared with the actual measured experimental results on a laboratory set-up based on the MBC500 Rotor Dynamics. Afterwards, a brief study about some nonlinear behavior observed in the system and its effect over the system stability at the critical speed is included.

  10. Coupled rotor-flexible fuselage vibration reduction using open loop higher harmonic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papavassiliou, I.; Friedmann, P. P.; Venkatesan, C.

    1991-01-01

    A fundamental study of vibration prediction and vibration reduction in helicopters using active controls was performed. The nonlinear equations of motion for a coupled rotor/flexible fuselage system have been derived using computer algebra on a special purpose symbolic computer facility. The trim state and vibratory response of the helicopter are obtained in a single pass by applying the harmonic balance technique and simultaneously satisfying the trim and the vibratory response of the helicopter for all rotor and fuselage degrees of freedom. The influence of the fuselage flexibility on the vibratory response is studied. It is shown that the conventional single frequency higher harmonic control is capable of reducing either the hub loads or only the fuselage vibrations but not both simultaneously. It is demonstrated that for simultaneous reduction of hub shears and fuselae vibrations a new scheme called multiple higher harmonic control is required.

  11. Interaction Dynamics Between a Flexible Rotor and an Auxiliary Clearance Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawen, James L., Jr.; Flowers, George T.

    1996-01-01

    This study investigates the application of synchronous interaction dynamics methodology to the design of auxiliary bearing systems. The technique is applied to a flexible rotor system and comparisons are made between the behavior predicted by this analysis method and the observed simulation response characteristics. Of particular interest is the influence of coupled shaft/bearing vibration modes on rotordynamical behavior. Experimental studies are also perFormed to validate the simulation results and provide insight into the expected behavior of such a system.

  12. Adding In-Plane Flexibility to the Equations of Motion of a Single Rotor Helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtiss, H. C., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    This report describes a way to add the effects of main rotor blade flexibility in the in- plane or lead-lag direction to a large set of non-linear equations of motion for a single rotor helicopter with rigid blades(l). Differences between the frequency of the regressing lag mode predicted by the equations of (1) and that measured in flight (2) for a UH-60 helicopter indicate that some element is missing from the analytical model of (1) which assumes rigid blades. A previous study (3) noted a similar discrepancy for the CH-53 helicopter. Using a relatively simple analytical model in (3), compared to (1), it was shown that a mechanical lag damper increases significantly the coupling between the rigid lag mode and the first flexible mode. This increased coupling due to a powerful lag damper produces an increase in the lowest lag frequency when viewed in a frame rotating with the blade. Flight test measurements normally indicate the frequency of this mode in a non-rotating or fixed frame. This report presents the additions necessary to the full equations of motion, to include main rotor blade lag flexibility. Since these additions are made to a very complex nonlinear dynamic model, in order to provide physical insight, a discussion of the results obtained from a simplified set of equations of motion is included. The reduced model illustrates the physics involved in the coupling and should indicate trends in the full model.

  13. Stability Analysis of a Turbocharger Rotor System Supported on Floating Ring Bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Shi, Z. Q.; Zhen, D.; Gu, F. S.; Ball, A. D.

    2012-05-01

    The stability of a turbocharger rotor is governed by the coupling of rotor dynamics and fluid dynamics because the high speed rotor system is supported on a pair of hydrodynamic floating ring bearings which comprise of inner and outer fluid films in series. In order to investigate the stability, this paper has developed a finite element model of the rotor system with consideration of such exciting forces as rotor imbalance, hydrodynamic fluid forces, lubricant feed pressure and dead weight. The dimensionless analytical expression of nonlinear oil film forces in floating ring bearings have been derived on the basis of short bearing theory. Based on numerical simulation, the effects of rotor imbalance, lubricant viscosity, lubricant feed pressure and bearing clearances on the stability of turbocharger rotor system have been studied. The disciplines of the stability of two films and dynamic performances of rotor system have been provided.

  14. The longitudinal equations of motion of a tilt prop/rotor aircraft including the effects of wing and prop/rotor blade flexibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtiss, H. C., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The equations of motion for the longitudinal dynamics of a tilting prop/rotor aircraft are developed. The analysis represents an extension of the equations of motion. The effects of the longitudinal degrees of freedom of the body (pitch, heave and horizontal velocity) are included. The results of body freedom can be added to the equations of motion for the flexible wing propeller combination.

  15. High-Speed Rotor Analytical Dynamics on Flexible Foundation Subjected to Internal and External Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jivkov, Venelin S.; Zahariev, Evtim V.

    2016-12-01

    The paper presents a geometrical approach to dynamics simulation of a rigid and flexible system, compiled of high speed rotating machine with eccentricity and considerable inertia and mass. The machine is mounted on a vertical flexible pillar with considerable height. The stiffness and damping of the column, as well as, of the rotor bearings and the shaft are taken into account. Non-stationary vibrations and transitional processes are analyzed. The major frequency and modal mode of the flexible column are used for analytical reduction of its mass, stiffness and damping properties. The rotor and the foundation are modelled as rigid bodies, while the flexibility of the bearings is estimated by experiments and the requirements of the manufacturer. The transition effects as a result of limited power are analyzed by asymptotic methods of averaging. Analytical expressions for the amplitudes and unstable vibrations throughout resonance are derived by quasi-static approach increasing and decreasing of the exciting frequency. Analytical functions give the possibility to analyze the influence of the design parameter of many structure applications as wind power generators, gas turbines, turbo-generators, and etc. A numerical procedure is applied to verify the effectiveness and precision of the simulation process. Nonlinear and transitional effects are analyzed and compared to the analytical results. External excitations, as wave propagation and earthquakes, are discussed. Finite elements in relative and absolute coordinates are applied to model the flexible column and the high speed rotating machine. Generalized Newton - Euler dynamics equations are used to derive the precise dynamics equations. Examples of simulation of the system vibrations and nonstationary behaviour are presented.

  16. Nonlinear Dynamics of a Foil Bearing Supported Rotor System: Simulation and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Feng; Flowers, George T.

    1996-01-01

    Foil bearings provide noncontacting rotor support through a number of thin metal strips attached around the circumference of a stator and separated from the rotor by a fluid film. The resulting support stiffness is dominated by the characteristics of the foils and is a nonlinear function of the rotor deflection. The present study is concerned with characterizing this nonlinear effect and investigating its influence on rotordynamical behavior. A finite element model is developed for an existing bearing, the force versus deflection relation characterized, and the dynamics of a sample rotor system are studied. Some conclusions are discussed with regard to appropriate ranges of operation for such a system.

  17. Flexible Electronics Development Supported by NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumann, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The commercial electronics industry is leading development in most areas of electronics for NASA applications; however, working in partnership with industry and the academic community, results from NASA research could lead to better understanding and utilization of electronic materials by the flexible electronics industry. Innovative ideas explored by our partners in industry and the broader U.S. research community help NASA execute our missions and bring new American products and services to the global technology marketplace. [Mike Gazarik, associate administrator for Space Technology, NASA Headquarters, Washington DC] This presentation provides information on NASA needs in electronics looking towards the future, some of the work being supported by NASA in flexible electronics, and the capabilities of the Glenn Research Center supporting the development of flexible electronics.

  18. A Flexible Nurse Scheduling Support System

    PubMed Central

    Ozkarahan, Irem

    1987-01-01

    Scheduling nursing personnel in hospitals is very complex because of the variety of conflicting interests and objectives. Also, demand varies 24-hour a day 7-day a week, is skill specific and hard to forecast. In the face of this complexity, the present nurse scheduling models have met with little success. In this paper, we propose a more flexible decision support system that will satisfy the interests of both hospitals and nurses through alternative models that attempt to accommodate flexible work patterns as it integrates time of the day (TOD) and day of the week (DOW) scheduling problems.

  19. A new model of water-lubricated rubber bearings for vibration analysis of flexible multistage rotor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shibing; Yang, Bingen

    2015-08-01

    Flexible multistage rotating systems that are supported or guided by long water-lubricated rubber bearings (WLRBs) have a variety of engineering applications. Vibration analysis of this type of machinery for performance and duality requires accurate modeling of WLRBs and related rotor-bearing assemblies. This work presents a new model of WLRBs, with attention given to the determination of bearing dynamic coefficients. Due to its large length-to-diameter ratio, a WLRB cannot be described by conventional pointwise bearing models with good fidelity. The bearing model proposed in this paper considers spatially distributed bearing forces. For the first time in the literature, the current study addresses the issue of mixed lubrication in the operation of WLRBs, which involves interactions of shaft vibration, elastic deformation of rubber material and fluid film pressure, and validates the WLRB model in experiments. Additionally, with the new bearing model, vibration analysis of WLRB-supported flexible multistage rotating systems is performed through use of a distributed transfer function method, which delivers accurate and closed-form analytical solutions of steady-state responses without discretization.

  20. Flexible Support Test Procedure and Results

    SciTech Connect

    Kurita, C.H.; /Fermilab

    1987-12-04

    Upon completion of the fabrication process, the four central calorimeter cryostat flexible support assemblies were sent to Construction Technology Laboratories (CTL) in Skokie, IL, where the required tests were performed for Richmond Lox prior to the installation of the stanchions in the cryostat. These tests were to simulate the simultaneous axial and transverse loading experienced by the stanchions when the cryostat undergoes the cool down process.

  1. Dynamic behavior of a magnetic bearing supported jet engine rotor with auxiliary bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homaifar, Abdollah (Editor); Kelly, John C., Jr. (Editor); Flowers, G. T.; Xie, H.; Sinha, S. C.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the dynamic behavior of a rotor system supported by auxiliary bearings. The steady-state behavior of a simulation model based upon a production jet engine is explored over a wide range of operating conditions for varying rotor imbalance, support stiffness and damping. Interesting dynamical phenomena, such as chaos, subharmonic responses, and double-valued responses, are presented and discussed.

  2. Dynamic behavior of a magnetic bearing supported jet engine rotor with auxiliary bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flowers, George T.; Xie, Huajun; Sinha, S. C.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the dynamic behavior of a rotor system supported by auxiliary bearings. The steady-state behavior of a simulation model based upon a production jet engine is explored over a wide range of operating conditions for varying rotor imbalance, support stiffness, and damping. Interesting dynamical phenomena, such as chaos, subharmonic responses, and double-valued responses, are presented and discussed.

  3. A magnetic damper for first mode vibration reduction in multimass flexible rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasarda, M. E. F.; Allaire, P. E.; Humphris, R. R.; Barrett, L. E.

    1989-01-01

    Many rotating machines such as compressors, turbines and pumps have long thin shafts with resulting vibration problems, and would benefit from additional damping near the center of the shaft. Magnetic dampers have the potential to be employed in these machines because they can operate in the working fluid environment unlike conventional bearings. An experimental test rig is described which was set up with a long thin shaft and several masses to represent a flexible shaft machine. An active magnetic damper was placed in three locations: near the midspan, near one end disk, and close to the bearing. With typical control parameter settings, the midspan location reduced the first mode vibration 82 percent, the disk location reduced it 75 percent and the bearing location attained a 74 percent reduction. Magnetic damper stiffness and damping values used to obtain these reductions were only a few percent of the bearing stiffness and damping values. A theoretical model of both the rotor and the damper was developed and compared to the measured results. The agreement was good.

  4. Vibration and control of a flexible rotor in magnetic bearings using hybrid method and H{sup {infinity}} control theory

    SciTech Connect

    Shiau, T.N.; Sheu, G.J.; Yang, C.D.

    1997-01-01

    The vibration and active control of a flexible rotor system with magnetic bearings are investigated using Hybrid Method (HM) and H{sup {infinity}} control theory with consideration of gyroscopic effect. The hybrid method, which combines the merits of the finite element method (FEM) and generalized polynomial expansion method (GPEM) is employed to model the flexible rotor system with small order of plant. The mixed sensitivity problem of H{sup {infinity}} control theory is applied to design the control of system vibration with spillover phenomena for the reduced order plant. The H{sub 2} control design is also employed for comparison with the H{sup {infinity}} design. The experimental simulation is used to illustrate the effects of control design. It is shown that the H{sup {infinity}} controller design can be very effective to suppress spillover phenomena. In addition, the H{sup {infinity}} control design has robustness to the variation of the model parameters. The application of the hybrid method (HM) together with H{sup {infinity}} control design is highly recommended for vibration control of flexible rotor systems with magnetic bearings.

  5. Flexible rotor balancing by the influence coefficient method. Part 1: Evaluation of the exact point-speed and least squares procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tessarzik, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    The practical aspects of balancing real, flexible rotors were investigated through inclusion of rotor out-of-roundness data at the measurement probe locations. The computer program was demonstrated to be fully capable of handling out-of-roundness data in the investigation. Testing was performed predominantly with a machine having a 41-inch long, 126-pound rotor. This rotor was operated over a speed range encompassing three rotor-bearing system critical speeds. Both balancing procedures were evaluated for several different conditions of initial rotor unbalance. Safe (and slow) passage through all the critical speeds was obtained after two or three balancing runs in most cases. The Least Squares procedure was found to be generally equivalent in capability to the Exact Point-Speed procedure for the configurations studies. (U)

  6. Foil bearings for axial and radial support of high speed rotors: Design, development, and determination of operating characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Licht, L.

    1978-01-01

    Flexible surface thrust and journal foil bearings were fabricated, and their performance was demonstrated, both individually and jointly as a unified rotor support system. Experimental results are documented with graphs and oscilloscopic data of trajectories, waveforms, and scans of amplitude response. At speeds of 40,000 to 45,000 rpm and a mean clearance of the order of 15 to 20 micrometers (600 to 800 micrometers, the resilient, air lubricated, spiral groove thrust bearings support a load of 127 N (29 lb; 13 kgf), equivalent to 3.0 N/sq cm (4.5 lb/sq in 0.31 kgf sq cm). Journal bearings with polygonal sections provided stable and highly damped supports at speeds up to 50,000 rpm.

  7. Bifurcation Behavior of a Rotor Supported by Active Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    JI, J. C.; YU, L.; LEUNG, A. Y. T.

    2000-08-01

    The non-linear dynamics of a rigid rotor levitated by active magnetic bearings is investigated. The vibrations in the horizontal and vertical directions are analyzed on the center manifold near the double-zero degenerate point by using normal-form method. The resulting normal forms in the horizontal and vertical directions are different due to the effect of rotor weight. It is shown that the vibratory behavior in the vertical direction can be reduced on the center manifold to the Bogdanov-Takens form. For the autonomous case, there exist saddle-node bifurcation and Hopf bifurcation for local analysis, and a saddle-connection bifurcation for global analysis. For non-autonomous case, the Melnikov technique is used to determine the critical parameter at which the homoclinic orbits intersect transversally. For the vibrations in the horizontal direction, the essential non-linear terms of the truncated normal form are third order. The behaviors of zero solutions are given. Finally, numerical simulations are performed to verify the analytical predictions.

  8. Parametric instabilities of rotor-support systems with application to industrial ventilators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parszewski, Z.; Krodkiemski, T.; Marynowski, K.

    1980-01-01

    Rotor support systems interaction with parametric excitation is considered for both unequal principal shaft stiffness (generators) and offset disc rotors (ventilators). Instability regions and types of instability are computed in the first case, and parametric resonances in the second case. Computed and experimental results are compared for laboratory machine models. A field case study of parametric vibrations in industrial ventilators is reported. Computed parametric resonances are confirmed in field measurements, and some industrial failures are explained. Also the dynamic influence and gyroscopic effect of supporting structures are shown and computed.

  9. Steady-state dynamic behavior of an auxiliary bearing supported rotor system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xie, Huajun; Flowers, George T.; Lawrence, Charles

    1995-01-01

    This paper investigates the steady-state responses of a rotor system supported by auxiliary bearings in which there is a clearance between the rotor and the inner race of the bearing. A simulation model based upon the rotor of a production jet engine is developed and its steady-state behavior is explored over a wide range of operating conditions for various parametric configurations. Specifically, the influence of rotor imbalance, support stiffness, and damping is studied. It is found that imbalance may change the rotor responses dramatically in terms of frequency contents at certain operating speeds. Subharmonic responses of 2nd order through 10th order are all observed except the 9th order. Chaotic phenomenon is also observed. Jump phenomena (or double-valued responses) of both hard-spring type and soft-spring type are shown to occur at low operating speeds for systems with low auxiliary bearing damping or large clearance even with relatively small imbalance. The effect of friction between the shaft and the inner race of the bearing is also discussed.

  10. Aircraft engine with inter-turbine engine frame supported counter rotating low pressure turbine rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seda, Jorge F. (Inventor); Dunbar, Lawrence W. (Inventor); Gliebe, Philip R. (Inventor); Szucs, Peter N. (Inventor); Brauer, John C. (Inventor); Johnson, James E. (Inventor); Moniz, Thomas (Inventor); Steinmetz, Gregory T. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An aircraft gas turbine engine assembly includes an inter-turbine frame axially located between high and low pressure turbines. Low pressure turbine has counter rotating low pressure inner and outer rotors with low pressure inner and outer shafts which are at least in part rotatably disposed co-axially within a high pressure rotor. Inter-turbine frame includes radially spaced apart radially outer first and inner second structural rings disposed co-axially about a centerline and connected by a plurality of circumferentially spaced apart struts. Forward and aft sump members having forward and aft central bores are fixedly joined to axially spaced apart forward and aft portions of the inter-turbine frame. Low pressure inner and outer rotors are rotatably supported by a second turbine frame bearing mounted in aft central bore of aft sump member. A mount for connecting the engine to an aircraft is located on first structural ring.

  11. [Moving Mirror Scanning System Based on the Flexible Hinge Support].

    PubMed

    Xie, Fei; Feng, Fei; Wang, Fu-bei; Wu, Qiong-shui; Zeng, Li-bo

    2015-08-01

    In order to improve moving mirror drive of Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, we design a dynamic scanning system based on flexible hinge support. Using the flexible hinge support way and the voice coil motor drive mode. Specifically, Using right Angle with high accuracy high stability type flexible hinge support mechanism support moving mirror, dynamic mirror can be moved forward and backward driven by voice coil motor reciprocating motion, DSP control system to control the moving mirror at a constant speed. The experimental results show that the designed of moving mirror scanning system has advantages of stability direction, speed stability, superior seismic performance.

  12. Separators for flywheel rotors

    DOEpatents

    Bender, D.A.; Kuklo, T.C.

    1998-07-07

    A separator forms a connection between the rotors of a concentric rotor assembly. This separator allows for the relatively free expansion of outer rotors away from inner rotors while providing a connection between the rotors that is strong enough to prevent disassembly. The rotor assembly includes at least two rotors referred to as inner and outer flywheel rings or rotors. This combination of inner flywheel ring, separator, and outer flywheel ring may be nested to include an arbitrary number of concentric rings. The separator may be a segmented or continuous ring that abuts the ends of the inner rotor and the inner bore of the outer rotor. It is supported against centrifugal loads by the outer rotor and is affixed to the outer rotor. The separator is allowed to slide with respect to the inner rotor. It is made of a material that has a modulus of elasticity that is lower than that of the rotors. 10 figs.

  13. Separators for flywheel rotors

    DOEpatents

    Bender, Donald A.; Kuklo, Thomas C.

    1998-01-01

    A separator forms a connection between the rotors of a concentric rotor assembly. This separator allows for the relatively free expansion of outer rotors away from inner rotors while providing a connection between the rotors that is strong enough to prevent disassembly. The rotor assembly includes at least two rotors referred to as inner and outer flywheel rings or rotors. This combination of inner flywheel ring, separator, and outer flywheel ring may be nested to include an arbitrary number of concentric rings. The separator may be a segmented or continuous ring that abuts the ends of the inner rotor and the inner bore of the outer rotor. It is supported against centrifugal loads by the outer rotor and is affixed to the outer rotor. The separator is allowed to slide with respect to the inner rotor. It is made of a material that has a modulus of elasticity that is lower than that of the rotors.

  14. Tuning the vibration of a rotor with shape memory alloy metal rubber supports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yanhong; Zhang, Qicheng; Zhang, Dayi; Scarpa, Fabrizio; Liu, Baolong; Hong, Jie

    2015-09-01

    The paper describes a novel smart rotor support damper with variable stiffness made with a new multifunctional material - the shape memory alloy metal rubber (SMA-MR). SMA-MR gives high load bearing capability (yield limit up to 100 MPa and stiffness exceeding 1e8 N/m), high damping (loss factor between 0.15 and 0.3) and variable stiffness (variation of 2.6 times between martensite and austenite phases). The SMA-MR has been used to replace a squeeze film damper and combined with an elastic support. The mechanical performance of the smart support damper has been investigated at room and high temperatures on a rotor test rig. The vibration tuning capabilities of the SMA-MR damper have been evaluated through FEM simulations and experimental tests. The study shows the feasibility of using the SMA-MR material for potential applications of active vibration control at different temperatures in rotordynamics systems.

  15. Learning Objects: Supporting Flexible Delivery of Online Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Ron

    There are now many educational organizations and institutions that have decided to pursue flexible delivery and online learning as strategies. While many educators value online delivery of programs for the flexibility and opportunities offered, the environment offers far more than these outcomes alone. Online delivery supports and encourages very…

  16. Influence of Back-Up Bearings and Support Structure Dynamics on the Behavior of Rotors With Active Supports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flowers, George T.

    1996-01-01

    This report presents a synopsis of the research work. Specific accomplishments are itemized below: (1) Experimental facilities have been developed. This includes a magnetic bearing test rig and an auxiliary bearing test rig. In addition, components have been designed, constructed, and tested for use with a rotordynamics test rig located at NASA Lewis Research Center. (2) A study of the rotordynamics of an auxiliary bearing supported T-501 engine model was performed. (3) An experimental/simulation study of auxiliary bearing rotordynamics has been performed. (4) A rotordynamical model for a magnetic bearing supported rotor system, including auxiliary bearing effects has been developed and simulation studies performed.(5) A finite element model for a foil bearing has been developed and studies of a rotor supported by foil bearings have been performed. (6) Two students affiliated with this project have graduated with M.S. degrees.

  17. Passive vibration control in rotor dynamics: Optimization of composed support using viscoelastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Eduardo Afonso; Pereira, Jucélio Tomás; Alberto Bavastri, Carlos

    2015-09-01

    One of the major reasons for inserting damping into bearings is that rotating machines are often requested in critical functioning conditions having sometimes to function under dynamic instability or close to critical speeds. Hydrodynamic and magnetic bearings have usually been used for this purpose, but they present limitations regarding costs and operation, rendering the use of viscoelastic supports a feasible solution for vibration control in rotating machines. Most papers in the area use simple analytic or single degree of freedom models for the rotor as well as classic mechanical models of linear viscoelasticity for the support - like Maxwell, Kelvin-Voigt, Zenner, four-element, GHM models and even frequency independent models - but they lack the accuracy of fractional models in a large range of frequency and temperature regarding the same number of coefficients. Even in those works, the need to consider the addition of degrees of freedom to the support is evident. However, so far no paper has been published focusing on a methodology to determine the optimal constructive form for any viscoelastic support in which the rotor is discretized by finite elements associated to an accurate model for characterizing the viscoelastic material. In general, the support is meant to be a simple isolation system, and the fact the stiffness matrix is complex and frequency-temperature dependent - due to its viscoelastic properties - forces the traditional methods to require an extremely long computing time, thus rendering them too time consuming in an optimization environment. The present work presents a robust methodology based mainly on generalized equivalent parameters (GEP) - for an optimal design of viscoelastic supports for rotating machinery - aiming at minimizing the unbalance frequency response of the system using a hybrid optimization technique (genetic algorithms and Nelder-Mead method). The rotor is modeled based on the finite element method using Timoshenko's thick

  18. Flexible services for the support of research.

    PubMed

    Turilli, Matteo; Wallom, David; Williams, Chris; Gough, Steve; Curran, Neal; Tarrant, Richard; Bretherton, Dan; Powell, Andy; Johnson, Matt; Harmer, Terry; Wright, Peter; Gordon, John

    2013-01-28

    Cloud computing has been increasingly adopted by users and providers to promote a flexible, scalable and tailored access to computing resources. Nonetheless, the consolidation of this paradigm has uncovered some of its limitations. Initially devised by corporations with direct control over large amounts of computational resources, cloud computing is now being endorsed by organizations with limited resources or with a more articulated, less direct control over these resources. The challenge for these organizations is to leverage the benefits of cloud computing while dealing with limited and often widely distributed computing resources. This study focuses on the adoption of cloud computing by higher education institutions and addresses two main issues: flexible and on-demand access to a large amount of storage resources, and scalability across a heterogeneous set of cloud infrastructures. The proposed solutions leverage a federated approach to cloud resources in which users access multiple and largely independent cloud infrastructures through a highly customizable broker layer. This approach allows for a uniform authentication and authorization infrastructure, a fine-grained policy specification and the aggregation of accounting and monitoring. Within a loosely coupled federation of cloud infrastructures, users can access vast amount of data without copying them across cloud infrastructures and can scale their resource provisions when the local cloud resources become insufficient.

  19. A miniaturized two-DOF rotational gyro with a ball-joint supported permanent magnet rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hai; Liu, Xiaowei; Chen, Weiping; Zhang, Haifeng

    2016-07-01

    We proposed a miniaturized two-degrees of freedom (DOF) rotational gyro with a ball-joint supported permanent magnet rotor. The structural design and the dynamic model of the gyro are presented and analyzed in detail in this paper and testified by preliminary experiments. When the rotor tilts away from its null position, it will be constrained by a contactless magnetic equivalent elastic torque derived from the driving structure. As a rotational gyro, this structure is very simple and small, with a core size less than 6 cm3, and it needs only 0.75 W to keep the rotor spinning at a speed of 15 000 revolutions per minute (rpm) in a standard air pressure condition. Preliminary measurements show that, at 7000 rpm within a full scale of ±100 °/s, the gyro has a scale factor of 18.69 mV/(°/s), and a nonlinearity of 0.33% is also achieved through calculation. The results show that the gyro can be used to measure two DOFs' angular rates of carriers without close-loop control due to the existence of magnetic equivalent elasticity.

  20. Cognitive Flexibility Supports Preschoolers' Detection of Communicative Ambiguity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillis, Randall; Nilsen, Elizabeth S.

    2014-01-01

    To become successful communicators, children must be sensitive to the clarity/ambiguity of language. Significant gains in children's ability to detect communicative ambiguity occur during the early school-age years. However, little is known about the cognitive abilities that support this development. Relations between cognitive flexibility and…

  1. Flexibility Principle 3: Supporting Effective Instruction and Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Clearinghouse for English Language Acquisition & Language Instruction Educational Programs, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Within the US Department of Education's new flexibility initiative, there are three key principles, each with areas of focus. The third of these is that State Education Agencies (SEAs) must develop and implement systems of determining and supporting effective instruction and leadership within schools. This brief looks at websites, documents, and…

  2. Bifurcation and chaos analysis of nonlinear rotor system with axial-grooved gas-lubricated journal bearing support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongfang; Hei, Di; Lü, Yanjun; Wang, Quandai; Müller, Norbert

    2014-03-01

    Axial-grooved gas-lubricated journal bearings have been widely applied to precision instrument due to their high accuracy, low friction, low noise and high stability. The rotor system with axial-grooved gas-lubricated journal bearing support is a typical nonlinear dynamic system. The nonlinear analysis measures have to be adopted to analyze the behaviors of the axial-grooved gas-lubricated journal bearing-rotor nonlinear system as the linear analysis measures fail. The bifurcation and chaos of nonlinear rotor system with three axial-grooved gas-lubricated journal bearing support are investigated by nonlinear dynamics theory. A time-dependent mathematical model is established to describe the pressure distribution in the axial-grooved compressible gas-lubricated journal bearing. The time-dependent compressible gas-lubricated Reynolds equation is solved by the differential transformation method. The gyroscopic effect of the rotor supported by gas-lubricated journal bearing with three axial grooves is taken into consideration in the model of the system, and the dynamic equation of motion is calculated by the modified Wilson- θ-based method. To analyze the unbalanced responses of the rotor system supported by finite length gas-lubricated journal bearings, such as bifurcation and chaos, the bifurcation diagram, the orbit diagram, the Poincaré map, the time series and the frequency spectrum are employed. The numerical results reveal that the nonlinear gas film forces have a significant influence on the stability of rotor system and there are the rich nonlinear phenomena, such as the periodic, period-doubling, quasi-periodic, period-4 and chaotic motion, and so on. The proposed models and numerical results can provide a theoretical direction to the design of axial-grooved gas-lubricated journal bearing-rotor system.

  3. Stability Limits of a PD Controller for a Flywheel Supported on Rigid Rotor and Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascak, Albert F.; Brown, Gerald V.; Jansen, Ralph H.; Dever, TImothy P.

    2006-01-01

    Active magnetic bearings are used to provide a long-life, low-loss suspension of a high-speed flywheel rotor. This paper describes a modeling effort used to understand the stability boundaries of the PD controller used to control the active magnetic bearings on a high speed test rig. Limits of stability are described in terms of allowable stiffness and damping values which result in stable levitation of the nonrotating rig. Small signal stability limits for the system is defined as a nongrowth in vibration amplitude of a small disturbance. A simple mass-force model was analyzed. The force resulting from the magnetic bearing was linearized to include negative displacement stiffness and a current stiffness. The current stiffness was then used in a PD controller. The phase lag of the control loop was modeled by a simple time delay. The stability limits and the associated vibration frequencies were measured and compared to the theoretical values. The results show a region on stiffness versus damping plot that have the same qualitative tendencies as experimental measurements. The resulting stability model was then extended to a flywheel system. The rotor dynamics of the flywheel was modeled using a rigid rotor supported on magnetic bearings. The equations of motion were written for the center of mass and a small angle linearization of the rotations about the center of mass. The stability limits and the associated vibration frequencies were found as a function of nondimensional magnetic bearing stiffness and damping and nondimensional parameters of flywheel speed and time delay.

  4. The Effect of Swirl Braked Grooved Seals on the Stability and the Unbalance Response of a Flexible Rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimaru, Hidetsugu; Iwatsubo, Takuzo

    Swirl Braked Grooved Seal (SBGS) is an advanced grooved annular seal for rotordynamic stability improvement. SBGS has circumferential or helical grooves in which several swirl brakes are placed. The swirl brakes can prevent the circumferential flow that might generate unstable dynamic fluid force in the seal. The stability and the unbalance response of a simply supported Jeffcott rotor, having a seal near the disk, are analyzed by FEM in which measured rotordynamic coefficients of seals are used. The rotordynamic analysis is performed for 18 different types of seals, including 13 SBGS, 4 conventional grooved seals (1 circumferential and 3 helical), and a smooth seal. Results show that the SBGS with circumferential grooves have high stability and low sensitivity to unbalance. On the other hand, the swirl brakes did not improve either stability or unbalance response for the helically grooved seals.

  5. Method for Providing a Jewel Bearing for Supporting a Pump Rotor Shaft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Methods for a blood pump bearing system within a pump housing to support long-term high-speed rotation of a rotor with an impeller blade having a plurality of individual magnets disposed thereon to provide a small radial air gap between the magnets and a stator of less than 0.025 inches. The bearing system may be mounted within a flow straightener, diffuser, or other pump element to support the shaft of a pump rotor. The bearing system includes a zirconia shaft having a radiused end. The radiused end has a first radius selected to be about three times greater than the radius of the zirconia shaft. The radiused end of the zirconia shaft engages a flat sapphire endstone. Due to the relative hardness of these materials a flat is quickly produced during break-in on the zirconia radiused end of precisely the size necessary to support thrust loads whereupon wear substantially ceases. Due to the selection of the first radius, the change in shaft end-play during pump break-in is limited to a total desired end-play of less than about 0.010 inches. Radial loads are supported by an olive hole ring jewel that makes near line contact around the circumference of the shaft to support high speed rotation with little friction. The width of olive hole ring jewel is small to allow heat to conduct through to thereby prevent heat build-up in the bearing. A void defined by the bearing elements may fill with blood that then coagulates within the void. The coagulated blood is then conformed to the shape of the bearing surfaces.

  6. Stability of a rigid rotor supported on oil-film journal bearings under dynamic load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, B. C.; Brewe, D. E.

    1987-01-01

    Most published work relating to dynamically loaded journal bearings are directed to determining the minimum film thickness from the predicted journal trajectories. These do not give any information about the subsynchronous whirl stability of journal bearing systems since they do not consider the equations of motion. It is, however, necessary to know whether the bearing system operation is stable or not under such an operating condition. The stability characteristics of the system are analyzed. A linearized perturbation theory about the equilibrium point can predict the threshold of stability; however it does not indicate postwhirl orbit detail. The linearized method may indicate that a bearing is unstable for a given operating condition whereas the nonlinear analysis may indicate that it forms a stable limit cycle. For this reason, a nonlinear transient analysis of a rigid rotor supported on oil journal bearings under: (1) a unidirectional constant load, (2) a unidirectional periodic load, and (3) variable rotating load are performed. The hydrodynamic forces are calculated after solving the time-dependent Reynolds equation by a finite difference method with a successive overrelaxation scheme. Using these forces, equations of motion are solved by the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method to predict the transient behavior of the rotor. With the aid of a high-speed digital computer and graphics, the journal trajectories are obtained for several different operating conditions.

  7. Nonlinear dynamic modeling of rotor system supported by angular contact ball bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hong; Han, Qinkai; Zhou, Daning

    2017-02-01

    In current bearing dynamic models, the displacement coordinate relations are usually utilized to approximately obtain the contact deformations between the rolling element and raceways, and then the nonlinear restoring forces of the rolling bearing could be calculated accordingly. Although the calculation efficiency is relatively higher, the accuracy is lower as the contact deformations should be solved through iterative analysis. Thus, an improved nonlinear dynamic model is presented in this paper. Considering the preload condition, surface waviness, Hertz contact and elastohydrodynamic lubrication, load distribution analysis is solved iteratively to more accurately obtain the contact deformations and angles between the rolling balls and raceways. The bearing restoring forces are then obtained through iteratively solving the load distribution equations at every time step. Dynamic tests upon a typical rotor system supported by two angular contact ball bearings are conducted to verify the model. Through comparisons, the differences between the nonlinear dynamic model and current models are also pointed out. The effects of axial preload, rotor eccentricity and inner/outer waviness amplitudes on the dynamic response are discussed in detail.

  8. Vibration attenuation of rotating machines by application of magnetorheological dampers to minimize energy losses in the rotor support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapoměl, J.; Ferfecki, P.

    2016-09-01

    A frequently used technological solution for minimization of undesirable effects caused by vibration of rotating machines consists in placing damping devices in the rotor supports. The application of magnetorheological squeeze film dampers enables their optimum performance to be achieved in a wide range of rotating speeds by adapting their damping effect to the current operating conditions. The damping force, which is produced by squeezing the layer of magnetorheological oil, can be controlled by changing magnetic flux passing through the lubricant. The force acting between the rotor and its frame is transmitted through the rolling element bearing, the lubricating layer and the squirrel spring. The loading of the bearing produces a time variable friction moment, energy losses, uneven rotor running, and has an influence on the rotor service life and the current fluctuation in electric circuits. The carried out research consisted in the development of a mathematical model of a magnetorheological squeeze film damper, its implementation into the computational models of rotor systems, and in performing the study on the dependence of the energy losses and variation of the friction moment on the damping force and its control. The new and computationally stable mathematical model of a magnetorheological squeeze film damper, its implementation in the computational models of rigid rotors and learning more on the energy losses generated in the rotor supports in dependence on the damping effect are the principal contributions of this paper. The results of the computational simulations prove that a suitable control of the damping force enables the energy losses to be reduced in a wide velocity range.

  9. Flexible learning to support safe, person-centred care.

    PubMed

    Rae, Ann

    2012-02-01

    Effective Practitioner is an educational initiative that supports nurses, midwives and allied health professionals to deliver person-centred, safe and effective care. It offers access to flexible work-based learning and development resources. This article describes the progress of the initiative and sets out the expected effects on service delivery, as well as exploring the Scottish context and the initiative's relevance to the rest of the UK and abroad.

  10. Stability of rigid rotors supported by air foil bearings: Comparison of two fundamental approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Jon S.; Santos, Ilmar F.; von Osmanski, Sebastian

    2016-10-01

    High speed direct drive motors enable the use of Air Foil Bearings (AFB) in a wide range of applications due to the elimination of gear forces. Unfortunately, AFB supported rotors are lightly damped, and an accurate prediction of their Onset Speed of Instability (OSI) is therefore important. This paper compares two fundamental methods for predicting the OSI. One is based on a nonlinear time domain simulation and another is based on a linearised frequency domain method and a perturbation of the Reynolds equation. Both methods are based on equivalent models and should predict similar results. Significant discrepancies are observed leading to the question, is the classical frequency domain method sufficiently accurate? The discrepancies and possible explanations are discussed in detail.

  11. Oil-Free Rotor Support Technologies for Long Life, Closed Cycle Brayton Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucero, John M.; DellaCorte, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this study is to provide technological support to ensure successful life and operation of a 50-300 kW dynamic power conversion system specifically with response to the rotor support system. By utilizing technical expertise in tribology, bearings, rotordynamic, solid lubricant coatings and extensive test facilities, valuable input for mission success is provided. A discussion of the history of closed cycle Brayton turboalternators (TA) will be included. This includes the 2 kW Mini-Brayton Rotating Unit (Mini-BRU), the 10kW Brayton Rotating Unit (BRU) and the 125 kW turboalternator-compressor (TAC) designed in mid 1970's. Also included is the development of air-cycle machines and terrestrial oil-free gas turbine power systems in the form of microturbines, specifically Capstone microturbines. A short discussion of the self-acting compliant surface hydrodynamic fluid film bearings, or foil bearings, will follow, including a short history of the load capacity advances, the NASA coatings advancements as well as design model advances. Successes in terrestrial based machines will be noted and NASA tribology and bearing research test facilities will be described. Finally, implementation of a four step integration process will be included in the discussion.

  12. Derivation of equations of motion for multi-blade rotors employing coupled modes and including high twist capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sopher, R.

    1975-01-01

    The equations of motion are derived for a multiblade rotor. A high twist capability and coupled flatwise-edgewise assumed normal modes are employed instead of uncoupled flatwise - edgewise assumed normal models. The torsion mode is uncoupled. Support system models, consisting of complete helicopters in free flight, or grounded flexible supports, arbitrary rotor-induced inflow, and arbitrary vertical gust models are also used.

  13. The influence of dynamic inflow and torsional flexibility on rotor damping in forward flight from symbolically generated equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, T. S. R.; Warmbrodt, W.

    1984-01-01

    The combined effects of blade torsion and dynamic inflow on the aeroelastic stability of an elastic rotor blade in forward flight are studied. The Helicopter Equations for Stability and Loads (HESL) program is extended to derive the governing equations of motion for the blade, and a Lagrangian formulation is used to obtain the equations in generalized coordinates. The program generates the steady-state and linearized perturbation equations in symbolic form and then codes them into FORTRAN subroutines. The coefficients for each equation and for each mode are identified through a numerical program; the latter can also be used to obtain the harmonic balance equations. The governing multiblade equations are derived explicitly using HESL. These equations can accommodate any number of elastic blade modes. Stability results are presented for several hingeless rotor blade structural models, and the influence of dynamic inflow in forward flight with an elastic hingeless rotor is investigated.

  14. The role of rotor impedance in the vibration analysis of rotorcraft, part 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohenemser, K. H.

    1978-01-01

    A method for a strongly idealized case of vertical excitation and for rolling and pitching moment excitation of a four bladed hingeless rotor on an up-focussing flexible mount is developed. The aeroelastic rotor impedances are computed directly with a finite blade element method that includes aerodynamics. The rotor impedance matrix for three or more blades is determined from the root moment impedance for a single blade by a simple multiblade transformation rule. Force and moment amplitudes transferred from the rotor to support are found to be critically dependent on the support dynamics.

  15. Flexibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphrey, L. Dennis

    1981-01-01

    Flexibility is an important aspect of all sports and recreational activities. Flexibility can be developed and maintained by stretching exercises. Exercises designed to develop flexibility in ankle joints, knees, hips, and the lower back are presented. (JN)

  16. Supporting Ecological Research With a Flexible Satellite Sensornet Gateway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, F.; Rundel, P. W.; Graham, E. A.; Falk, A.; Ye, W.; Pradkin, Y.; Deschon, A.; Bhatt, S.; McHenry, T.

    2007-12-01

    Wireless sensor networks are a promising technology for ecological research due to their capability to make continuous and in-situ measurements. However, there are some challenges for the wide adoption of this technology by scientists, who may have various research focuses. First, the observation system needs to be rapidly and easily deployable at different remote locations. Second, the system needs to be flexible enough to meet the requirements of different applications and easily reconfigurable by scientists, who may not always be technology experts. To address these challenges, we designed and implemented a flexible satellite gateway for using sensor networks. Our first prototype is being deployed at Stunt Ranch in the Santa Monica Mountains to support biological research at UCLA. In this joint USC/ISI-UCLA deployment, scientists are interested in a long-term investigation of the influence of the 2006-07 southern California drought conditions on the water relations of important chaparral shrub and tree species that differ in their depth of rooting. Rainfall over this past hydrologic year in southern California has been less than 25% of normal, making it the driest year on record. In addition to core measurements of air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, solar irradiance, rainfall, and soil moisture, we use constant-heating sap flow sensors to continuously monitor the flow of water through the xylem of replicated stems of four species to compare their access to soil moisture with plant water stress. Our gateway consists of a front-end data acquisition system and a back-end data storage system, connected by a long-haul satellite communication link. At the front-end, all environmental sensors are connected to a Compact RIO, a rugged data acquisition platform developed by National Instruments. Sap flow sensors are deployed in several locations that are 20 to 50 meters away from the Compact RIO. At each plant, a Hobo datalogger is used to collect sap flow

  17. Dynamics and stability of rigid rotors levitated by passive cylinder-magnet bearings and driven/supported axially by pointwise contact clutch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Søren B.; Enemark, Søren; Santos, Ilmar F.

    2013-12-01

    A stable rotor—supported laterally by passive magnetic bearings and longitudinally by magnetic forces and a clutch—loses suddenly its contact to the clutch and executes abruptly longitudinal movements away from its original equilibrium position as a result of small increases in angular velocity. Such an abrupt unstable behaviour and its reasons are thoroughly theoretically as well as experimentally investigated in this work. In this context, this paper gives theoretical as well as experimental contributions to the problem of two dimensional passive magnetic levitation and one dimensional pointwise contact stability dictated by mechanical-magnetic interaction. Load capacity and stiffness of passive multicylinder magnetic bearings (MCMB) are thoroughly investigated using two theoretical approaches followed by experimental validation. The contact dynamics between the clutch and the rotor supported by MCMB using several configurations of magnet distribution are described based on an accurate nonlinear model able to reliably reproduce the rotor-bearing dynamic behaviour. Such investigations lead to: (a) clear physical explanation about the reasons for the rotor's unstable behaviour, losing its contact to the clutch and (b) an accurate prediction of the threshold of stability based on the nonlinear rotor-bearing model, i.e. maximum angular velocity before the rotor misses its contact to the clutch as a function of rotor, bearing and clutch design parameters. passive cylinder-magnet bearings, imbalance ring with a screw, passive rotating cylinder-magnets, rotor, Pointwise contact clutch, and DC-motor. The rotor (4) is levitated in the two horseshoe-shaped bearing houses (1) which contain several cylinder-magnets arranged in a circular pattern. These permanent magnets form a magnetic field around the rotor which repels similar cylinder-magnets (3) embedded in the rotor, thereby counteracting the gravity forces. As the shape of the magnetic field generated by the

  18. A novel smart rotor support with shape memory alloy metal rubber for high temperatures and variable amplitude vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yanhong; Zhang, Qicheng; Zhang, Dayi; Scarpa, Fabrizio; Liu, Baolong; Hong, Jie

    2014-12-01

    The work describes the design, manufacturing and testing of a smart rotor support with shape memory alloy metal rubber (SMA-MR) elements, able to provide variable stiffness and damping characteristics with temperature, motion amplitude and excitation frequency. Differences in damping behavior and nonlinear stiffness between SMA-MR and more traditional metal rubber supports are discussed. The mechanical performance shown by the prototype demonstrates the feasibility of using the SMA-MR concept for active vibration control in rotordynamics, in particular at high temperatures and large amplitude vibrations.

  19. The role of rotor impedance in the vibration analysis of rotorcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohenemser, K. H.; Yin, S.-K.

    1978-01-01

    In an improved method which retains the advantage of separate treatment of rotor and airframe, the rotor impedance is used to correct the input to the airframe. This improved method is illustrated for a strongly idealized case of vertical excitation and then for rolling and pitching moment excitation of a four bladed hingeless rotor on an up-focussing flexible mount. Contrary to the usual approach that represents aeroelastic blade motions by a series of normal blade modes in vacuum, the aeroelastic rotor impedances are computed directly with a finite blade element method that includes aerodynamics. The rotor impedance matrix for three or more blades is determined from the root moment impedance for a single blade by a simple multiblade transformation rule. Force and moment amplitudes transferred from the rotor to the support are found to be critically dependent on the support dynamics.

  20. The influence of dynamic inflow and torsional flexibility on rotor damping in forward flight from symbolically generated equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, T. S. R.; Warmbrodt, W.

    1985-01-01

    The combined effects of blade torsion and dynamic inflow on the aeroelastic stability of an elastic rotor blade in forward flight are studied. The governing sets of equations of motion (fully nonlinear, linearized, and multiblade equations) used in this study are derived symbolically using a program written in FORTRAN. Stability results are presented for different structural models with and without dynamic inflow. A combination of symbolic and numerical programs at the proper stage in the derivation process makes the obtainment of final stability results an efficient and straightforward procedure.

  1. The dynamic characteristics of a turbo-rotor simulator supported on gas-lubricated foil bearings. Part 1: Response to rotating imbalance and unidirectional excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Licht, L.

    1970-01-01

    A sixteen-inch rotor, weighing approximately twenty-one pounds, was supported by air-lubricated foil bearings. In physical size and in mass distribution, the rotor closely matched that of an experimental Brayton cycle turboalternator unit. The rotor was stable in both vertical horizontal attitudes at speeds up to 50,000 rpm. A detailed description of the experimental apparatus and of the foil bearing design are given. The paper contains data on response of the rotor to rotating imbalance, symmetric and asymmetric, and to excitation by means of a vibrator (shake table). It is concluded that the gas-lubricated foil bearing suspension is free from fractional frequency whirl and suffers no loss of load capacity when excited at frequency equal to half the rotational speed. In contrast to rigid gas bearings, the foil bearing imposes no stringent requirements with respect to dimensional tolerances, cleanliness, or limitations of journal motion within the narrow confines of bearing clearance.

  2. A Comprehensive C++ Controller for a Magnetically Supported Vertical Rotor. 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Carlos R.

    2001-01-01

    This manual describes the new FATMaCC (Five-Axis, Three-Magnetic-Bearing Control Code). The FATMaCC (pronounced "fat mak") is a versatile control code that possesses many desirable features that were not available in previous in-house controllers. The ultimate goal in designing this code was to achieve full rotor levitation and control at a loop time of 50 microsec. Using a 1-GHz processor, the code will control a five-axis system in either a decentralized or a more elegant centralized (modal control) mode at a loop time of 56 microsec. In addition, it will levitate and control (with only minor modification to the input/output wiring) a two-axis and/or a four-axis system. Stable rotor levitation and control of any of the systems mentioned above are accomplished through appropriate key presses to modify parameters, such as stiffness, damping, and bias. A signal generation block provides 11 excitation signals. An excitation signal is then superimposed on the radial bearing x- and y-control signals, thus producing a resultant force vector. By modulating the signals on the bearing x- and y-axes with a cosine and a sine function, respectively, a radial excitation force vector is made to rotate 360 deg. about the bearing geometric center. The rotation of the force vector is achieved manually by using key press or automatically by engaging the "one-per-revolution" feature. Rotor rigid body modes can be excited by using the excitation module. Depending on the polarities of the excitation signal in each radial bearing, the bounce or tilt mode will be excited.

  3. Elastomer mounted rotors - An alternative for smoother running turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tecza, J. A.; Jones, S. W.; Smalley, A. J.; Cunningham, R. E.; Darlow, M. S.

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes the design of elastomeric bearing supports for a rotor built to simulate the power turbine of an advanced gas turbine engine which traverses two bending critical speeds. The elastomer dampers were constructed so as to minimize rotor dynamic response at the critical speeds. Results are presented of unbalance response tests performed with two different elastomer materials. These results showed that the resonances on the elastomer-mounted rotor were well damped for both elastomer materials and showed linear response to the unbalance weights used for response testing. Additional tests were performed using solid steel supports at either end (hand-mounted), which resulted in drastically increased sensitivity and nonlinear response, and with steel supports in one end of the rotor and the elastomer at the other, which yielded results which were between the soft- and hard-mounted cases. It is concluded that elastomeric supports are a viable alternative to other methods of mounting flexible rotors, that damping was well in excess of predictions and that elastomeric supports are tolerant of small rotor misalignments.

  4. Theory of self-excited mechanical oscillations of helicopter rotors with hinged blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, Robert P; Feingold, Arnold M

    1958-01-01

    Vibrations of rotary-wing aircraft may derive their energy from the rotation of the rotor rather than from the air forces. A theoretical analysis of these vibrations is described and methods for its application are explained in Chapter one. Chapter two reports the results of an investigation of the mechanical stability of a rotor having two vertically hinged blades mounted upon symmetrical supports, that is, of equal stiffness and mass in all horizontal directions. Chapter three presents the theory of ground vibrations of a two-blade helicopter rotor on anisotropic flexible supports.

  5. Coupled rotor-body equations of motion hover flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtiss, H. C., Jr.; Mckillip, R. M., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    A set of linearized equations of motion to predict the linearized dynamic response of a single rotor helicopter in a hover trim condition to cyclic pitch control inputs is described. The equations of motion assume four fuselage degrees of freedom: lateral and longitudinal translation, roll angle, pitch angle: four rotor degrees of freedom: flapping (lateral and longitudinal tilt of the tip path plane), lagging (lateral and longitudinal displacement of the rotor plane center of mass); and dynamic inflow (harmonic components). These ten degrees of freedom correspond to a system with eighteen dynamic states. In addition to examination of the full system dynamics, the computer code supplied with this report permits the examination of various reduced order models. The code is presented in a specific form such that the dynamic response of a helicopter in flight can be investigated. With minor modifications to the code the dynamics of a rotor mounted on a flexible support can also be studied.

  6. Robust stabilization of rotor-active magnetic bearing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guoxin

    Active magnetic bearings (AMBs) are emerging as a beneficial technology for high-speed and high-performance suspensions in rotating machinery applications. A fundamental feedback control problem is robust stabilization in the presence of uncertain destabilizing mechanisms in aeroelastic, hydroelastic dynamics, and AMB feedback. As rotating machines are evolving in achieving high speed, high energy density, and high performance, the rotor and the support structure become increasingly flexible, and highly coupled. This makes rotor-AMB system more challenging to stabilize. The primary objective of this research is to develop a systematic control synthesis procedure for achieving highly robust stabilization of rotor-AMB systems. Of special interest is the stabilization of multivariable systems such as the AMB supported flexible rotors and gyroscopic rotors, where the classical control design may encounter difficulties. To this end, we first developed a systematic modeling procedure. This modeling procedure exploited the best advantages of technology developed in rotordynamics and the unique system identification tool provided by the AMBs. A systematic uncertainty model for rotor-AMB systems was developed, eliminating the iterative process of selecting uncertainty structures. The consequences of overestimation or underestimation of uncertainties were made transparent to control engineers. To achieve high robustness, we explored the fundamental performance/robustness limitations due to rotor-AMB system unstable poles. We examined the mixed sensitivity performance that is closely related to the unstructured uncertainty. To enhance transparency of the synthesis, we analyzed multivariable controllers from classical control perspectives. Based on these results, a systematic robust control synthesis procedure was established. For a strong gyroscopic rotor over a wide speed range, we applied the advanced gain-scheduled synthesis, and compared two synthesis frameworks in

  7. High Speed, High Temperature, Fault Tolerant Operation of a Combination Magnetic-Hydrostatic Bearing Rotor Support System for Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansen, Mark; Montague, Gerald; Provenza, Andrew; Palazzolo, Alan

    2004-01-01

    Closed loop operation of a single, high temperature magnetic radial bearing to 30,000 RPM (2.25 million DN) and 540 C (1000 F) is discussed. Also, high temperature, fault tolerant operation for the three axis system is examined. A novel, hydrostatic backup bearing system was employed to attain high speed, high temperature, lubrication free support of the entire rotor system. The hydrostatic bearings were made of a high lubricity material and acted as journal-type backup bearings. New, high temperature displacement sensors were successfully employed to monitor shaft position throughout the entire temperature range and are described in this paper. Control of the system was accomplished through a stand alone, high speed computer controller and it was used to run both the fault-tolerant PID and active vibration control algorithms.

  8. Nonlinear Equations of Motion for Cantilever Rotor Blades in Hover with Pitch Link Flexibility, Twist, Precone, Droop, Sweep, Torque Offset, and Blade Root Offset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, D. H.

    1976-01-01

    Nonlinear equations of motion for a cantilever rotor blade are derived for the hovering flight condition. The blade is assumed to have twist, precone, droop, sweep, torque offset and blade root offset, and the elastic axis and the axes of center of mass, tension, and aerodynamic center coincident at the quarter chord. The blade is cantilevered in bending, but has a torsional root spring to simulate pitch link flexibility. Aerodynamic forces acting on the blade are derived from strip theory based on quasi-steady two-dimensional airfoil theory. The equations are hybrid, consisting of one integro-differential equation for root torsion and three integro-partial differential equations for flatwise and chordwise bending and elastic torsion. The equations are specialized for a uniform blade and reduced to nonlinear ordinary differential equations by Galerkin's method. They are linearized for small perturbation motions about the equilibrium operating condition. Modal analysis leads to formulation of a standard eigenvalue problem where the elements of the stability matrix depend on the solution of the equilibrium equations. Two different forms of the root torsion equation are derived that yield virtually identical numerical results. This provides a reasonable check for the accuracy of the equations.

  9. The Effects of Manufacturing Tolerances on the Vibration of Aero-engine Rotor-damper Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sykes, J. E. H.; Holmes, R.

    1991-01-01

    A range of rotor assemblies incorporating one and two squeeze film dampers with various static misalignments is investigated. Waterfall diagrams are constructed which demonstrate the effects of such misalignment and damper support flexibility on the nature and severity of subsynchronous resonance and jump phenomena. Vibration signatures of similar rotor-bearing assemblies are shown to contrast strongly due to different accumulations of tolerances during manufacture, fitting, and operation.

  10. A service-oriented approach for flexible process support within enterprises: application on PLM systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachani, Safa; Gzara, Lilia; Verjus, Hervé

    2013-02-01

    Manufacturing industries collaborating to develop new products need to implement an effective management of their design processes (DPs) and product information. Unfortunately, product lifecycle management (PLM) systems which are dedicated to support design activities are not efficient as it might be expected. Indeed, DPs are changing, emergent and non deterministic, due to the business environment under which they are carried out. PLM systems are currently based on workflow technology which does not support process agility. So, needs in terms of process support flexibility are necessary to facilitate the coupling with the environment reality. Furthermore, service-oriented approaches (SOA) enhances flexibility and adaptability of composed solutions. Systems based on SOA have the ability to inherently being evolvable. So, we can say that SOA can promote a support of flexible DPs. The aim of this work is to propose an alternative approach for flexible process support within PLM systems. The objective is to specify, design and implement business processes (BPs) in a very flexible way so that business changes can rapidly be considered in PLM solutions. Unlike existing approaches, the proposed one deal with a service-oriented perspectives rather than an activity-oriented one.

  11. Integrated technology rotor/flight research rotor concept definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, R. G.; Beno, E. A.; Ulisnik, H. D.

    1983-01-01

    As part of the Integrated Technology Rotor/Flight Research Rotor (ITR/FRR) Program a number of advanced rotor system designs were conceived and investigated. From these, several were chosen that best meet the started ITR goals with emphasis on stability, reduced weight and hub drag, simplicity, low head moment stiffness, and adequate strength and fatigue life. It was concluded that obtaining low hub moment stiffness was difficult when only the blade flexibility of bearingless rotor blades is considered, unacceptably low fatigue life being the primary problem. Achieving a moderate hub moment stiffness somewhat higher than state of the art articulated rotors in production today is possible within the fatigue life constraint. Alternatively, low stiffness is possible when additional rotor elements, besides the blades themselves, provide part of the rotor flexibility. Two primary designs evolved as best meeting the general ITR requirements that presently exist. An I shaped flexbeam with an external torque tube can satisfy the general goals but would have either higher stiffness or reduced fatigue life. The elastic gimbal rotor can achieve a better combination of low stiffness and high fatigue life but would be a somewhat heavier design and possibly exhibit a higher risk of aeromechanical instability.

  12. Oil-Free Rotor Support Technologies for an Optimized Helicopter Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Bruckner, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    An optimized rotorcraft propulsion system incorporating a foil air bearing supported Oil-Free engine coupled to a high power density gearbox using high viscosity gear oil is explored. Foil air bearings have adequate load capacity and temperature capability for the highspeed gas generator shaft of a rotorcraft engine. Managing the axial loads of the power turbine shaft (low speed spool) will likely require thrust load support from the gearbox through a suitable coupling or other design. Employing specially formulated, high viscosity gear oil for the transmission can yield significant improvements (approx. 2X) in allowable gear loading. Though a completely new propulsion system design is needed to implement such a system, improved performance is possible.

  13. Vibration control of rotor shaft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nonami, K.

    1985-01-01

    Suppression of flexural forced vibration or the self-excited vibration of a rotating shaft system not by passive elements but by active elements is described. The distinctive feature of this method is not to dissipate the vibration energy but to provide the force cancelling the vibration displacement and the vibration velocity through the bearing housing in rotation. Therefore the bearings of this kind are appropriately named Active Control Bearings. A simple rotor system having one disk at the center of the span on flexible supports is investigated in this paper. The actuators of the electrodynamic transducer are inserted in the sections of the bearing housing. First, applying the optimal regulator of optimal control theory, the flexural vibration control of the rotating shaft and the vibration control of support systems are performed by the optimal state feedback system using these actuators. Next, the quasi-modal control based on a modal analysis is applied to this rotor system. This quasi-modal control system is constructed by means of optimal velocity feedback loops. The differences between optimal control and quasi-modal control are discussed and their merits and demerits are made clear. Finally, the experiments are described concerning only the optimal regulator method.

  14. A Web-Based Learning and Assessment System To Support Flexible Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Lesley; Sheridan, D.; White, D.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the development of a computer-supported, Web-based learning system, CECIL, at the University of Auckland (New Zealand). Discusses the potential benefits that a university-wide resource management system may have in terms of educational flexibility, such as online learning for distance education, and resource sharing, as well as…

  15. Stretching the Limits: How States Are Using Welfare Flexibility To Support Children. Issue Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feeley, Theresa J.; Stein, Deborah L.

    While the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 included many provision of concern to child advocates, the Act also gave states increased flexibility to design welfare programs in ways that support children, or that ameliorate some of the harshest provisions of the Act. This issue brief describes innovative…

  16. Design of an Advanced Wood Composite Rotor and Development of Wood Composite Blade Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroebel, Thomas; Dechow, Curtis; Zuteck, Michael

    1984-01-01

    In support of a program to advance wood composite wind turbine blade technology, a design was completed for a prototype, 90-foot diameter, two-bladed, one-piece rotor, with all wood/epoxy composite structure. The rotor was sized for compatibility with a generator having a maximum power rating of 4000 kilowatts. Innovative features of the rotor include: a teetering hub to minimize the effects of gust loads, untwisted blades to promote rotor power control through stall, joining of blades to the hub structure via an adhesive bonded structural joint, and a blade structural design which was simplified relative to earlier efforts. The prototype rotor was designed to allow flexibility for configuring the rotor upwind or downwind of the tower, for evaluating various types of teeter dampers and/or elastomeric stops, and with variable delta-three angle settings of the teeter shaft axis. The prototype rotor was also designed with provisions for installing pressure tap and angle of attack instrumentation in one blade. A production version rotor cost analysis was conducted. Included in the program were efforts directed at developing advanced load take-off stud designs for subsequent evaluation testing by NASA, development of aerodynamic tip brake concepts, exploratory testing of a wood/epoxy/graphite concept, and compression testing of wood/epoxy laminate, with scarf-jointed plies.

  17. Internally supported flexible duct joint. [device for conducting fluids in high pressure systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, R. F., Jr. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    An internally supported, flexible duct joint for use in conducting fluids under relatively high pressures in systems where relatively large deflection angles must be accommodated is presented. The joint includes a flexible tubular bellows and an elongated base disposed within the bellows. The base is connected through radiating struts to the bellows near mid-portion and to each of the opposite end portions of the bellows through a pivotal connecting body. A motion-controlling linkage is provided for linking the connecting bodies, whereby angular displacement of the joint is controlled and uniformity in the instantaneous bend radius of the duct is achieved as deflection is imposed.

  18. Developing an Advanced Life Support System for the Flexible Path into Deep Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry W.; Kliss, Mark H.

    2010-01-01

    Long duration human missions beyond low Earth orbit, such as a permanent lunar base, an asteroid rendezvous, or exploring Mars, will use recycling life support systems to preclude supplying large amounts of metabolic consumables. The International Space Station (ISS) life support design provides a historic guiding basis for future systems, but both its system architecture and the subsystem technologies should be reconsidered. Different technologies for the functional subsystems have been investigated and some past alternates appear better for flexible path destinations beyond low Earth orbit. There is a need to develop more capable technologies that provide lower mass, increased closure, and higher reliability. A major objective of redesigning the life support system for the flexible path is achieving the maintainability and ultra-reliability necessary for deep space operations.

  19. System for Controlling a Magnetically Levitated Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Carlos R. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    In a rotor assembly having a rotor supported for rotation by magnetic bearings, a processor controlled by software or firmware controls the generation of force vectors that position the rotor relative to its bearings in a "bounce" mode in which the rotor axis is displaced from the principal axis defined between the bearings and a "tilt" mode in which the rotor axis is tilted or inclined relative to the principal axis. Waveform driven perturbations are introduced to generate force vectors that excite the rotor in either the "bounce" or "tilt" modes.

  20. Dynamic Characteristics of Micro-Beams Considering the Effect of Flexible Supports

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Zuo-Yang; Zhang, Wen-Ming; Meng, Guang

    2013-01-01

    Normally, the boundaries are assumed to allow small deflections and moments for MEMS beams with flexible supports. The non-ideal boundary conditions have a significant effect on the qualitative dynamical behavior. In this paper, by employing the principle of energy equivalence, rigorous theoretical solutions of the tangential and rotational equivalent stiffness are derived based on the Boussinesq's and Cerruti's displacement equations. The non-dimensional differential partial equation of the motion, as well as coupled boundary conditions, are solved analytically using the method of multiple time scales. The closed-form solution provides a direct insight into the relationship between the boundary conditions and vibration characteristics of the dynamic system, in which resonance frequencies increase with the nonlinear mechanical spring effect but decrease with the effect of flexible supports. The obtained results of frequencies and mode shapes are compared with the cases of ideal boundary conditions, and the differences between them are contrasted on frequency response curves. The influences of the support material property on the equivalent stiffness and resonance frequency shift are also discussed. It is demonstrated that the proposed model with the flexible supports boundary conditions has significant effect on the rigorous quantitative dynamical analysis of the MEMS beams. Moreover, the proposed analytical solutions are in good agreement with those obtained from finite element analyses.

  1. Blade loss transient dynamics analysis with flexible bladed disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallardo, V. C.; Black, G.; Bach, L.; Cline, S.; Storace, A.

    1983-01-01

    The transient dynamic response of a flexible bladed disk on a flexible rotor in a two rotor system is formulated by modal synthesis and a Lagrangian approach. Only the nonequilibrated one diameter flexible mode is considered for the flexible bladed disk, while the two flexible rotors are represented by their normal modes. The flexible bladed disk motion is modeled as a combination of two one diameter standing waves, and is coupled inertially and gyroscopically to the flexible rotors. Application to a two rotor model shows that a flexible bladed disk on one rotor can be driven into resonance by an unbalance in the other rotor, and at a frequency equal to the difference in the rotor speeds.

  2. Instability analysis procedure for 3-level multi-bearing rotor-foundation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, S.; Rieger, N. F.

    1985-01-01

    A procedure for the instability analysis of a three-level multispan rotor systems is described. This procedure is based on a distributed mass elastic representation of the rotor system in several eight-coefficient bearings. Each bearing is supported from an elastic foundation on damped, elastic pedestals. The foundation is represented as a general distributed mass elastic structure on discrete supports, which may have different stiffness and damping properties in the horizontal and vertical directions. This system model is suited to studies of instability threshold conditions for multirotor turbomachines on either massive or flexible foundations. The instability conditions is found by obtaining the eigenvalues of the system determinant, which is obtained by the transfer matrix method from the three-level system model. The stability determinant is solved for the lowest rotational speed at which the system damping becomes zero in the complex eigenvalue, and for the whirl frequency corresponding to the natural frequency of the unstable mode. An efficient algorithm for achieving this is described. Application of this procedure to a rigid rotor in two damped-elastic bearings and flexible supports is described. A second example discusses a flexible rotor with four damped-elastic bearings. The third case compares the stability of a six-bearing 300 Mw turbine generator unit, using two different bearing types. These applications validate the computer program and various aspects of the analysis.

  3. Flexible Foam Protection Materials for Portable Life Support System Packaging Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang,Henry H.; Dillon, Paul A.; Thomas, Gretchen A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the phase I effort in evaluating and selecting a light weight impact protection material for the Constellation Space Suit Element (CSSE) Portable Life Support System (PLSS) conceptual packaging study. A light weight material capable of holding and protecting the components inside the PLSS is required to demonstrate the viability of the flexible PLSS packaging concept. The material needs to distribute, dissipate, and absorb the impact energy of the PLSS falling on the lunar surface. It must also be robust to consistently perform over several Extravehicular Activity (EVA) missions in the extreme lunar thermal vacuum environment. This paper documents the performance requirements for selecting a foam protection material, and the methodologies for evaluating some commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) foam material candidates. It also presents the mechanical properties and impact drop tests results of the foam material candidates. The results of this study suggest that a foam based flexible protection system is a viable solution for PLSS packaging. However, additional works are needed to optimize COTS foam or to develop a composite foam system that will meet all the performance requirements for the CSSE PLSS flexible packaging.

  4. Flexible Foam Protection Materials for Constellation Space Suit Element Portable Life Support Subsystem Packaging Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Henry H.; Orndoff, Evelyne S.; Thomas, Gretchen A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the effort in evaluating and selecting a light weight impact protection material for the Constellation Space Suit Element (CSSE) Portable Life Support Subsystem (PLSS) conceptual packaging study. A light weight material capable of holding and protecting the components inside the PLSS is required to demonstrate the viability of the flexible PLSS packaging concept. The material needs to distribute, dissipate, and absorb the impact energy of the PLSS falling on the lunar surface. It must also be very robust and function in the extreme lunar thermal vacuum environment for up to one hundred Extravehicular Activity (EVA) missions. This paper documents the performance requirements for selecting a foam protection material, and the methodologies for evaluating commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) foam protection materials. It also presents the materials properties test results and impact drop test results of the various foam materials evaluated in the study. The findings from this study suggest that a foam based flexible protection system is a viable solution for PLSS packaging. However, additional works are needed to optimize COTS foam properties or to develop a composite foam system that will meet all the performance requirements for the CSSE PLSS flexible packaging.

  5. Alterations in the functional neural circuitry supporting flexible choice behavior in autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    D'Cruz, A-M; Mosconi, M W; Ragozzino, M E; Cook, E H; Sweeney, J A

    2016-01-01

    Restricted and repetitive behaviors, and a pronounced preference for behavioral and environmental consistency, are distinctive characteristics of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Alterations in frontostriatal circuitry that supports flexible behavior might underlie this behavioral impairment. In an functional magnetic resonance imaging study of 17 individuals with ASD, and 23 age-, gender- and IQ-matched typically developing control participants, reversal learning tasks were used to assess behavioral flexibility as participants switched from one learned response choice to a different response choice when task contingencies changed. When choice outcome after reversal was uncertain, the ASD group demonstrated reduced activation in both frontal cortex and ventral striatum, in the absence of task performance differences. When the outcomes of novel responses were certain, there was no difference in brain activation between groups. Reduced activation in frontal cortex and ventral striatum suggest problems in decision-making and response planning, and in processing reinforcement cues, respectively. These processes, and their integration, are essential for flexible behavior. Alterations in these systems may therefore contribute to a rigid adherence to preferred behavioral patterns in individuals with an ASD. These findings provide an additional impetus for the use of reversal learning paradigms as a translational model for treatment development targeting the domain of restricted and repetitive behaviors in ASD. PMID:27727243

  6. A flexible and efficient multi-model framework in support of water management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfs, Vincent; Tran Quoc, Quan; Willems, Patrick

    2016-05-01

    Flexible, fast and accurate water quantity models are essential tools in support of water management. Adjustable levels of model detail and the ability to handle varying spatial and temporal resolutions are requisite model characteristics to ensure that such models can be employed efficiently in various applications. This paper uses a newly developed flexible modelling framework that aims to generate such models. The framework incorporates several approaches to model catchment hydrology, rivers and floodplains, and the urban drainage system by lumping processes on different levels. To illustrate this framework, a case study of integrated hydrological-hydraulic modelling is elaborated for the Grote Nete catchment in Belgium. Three conceptual rainfall-runoff models (NAM, PDM and VHM) were implemented in a generalized model structure, allowing flexibility in the spatial resolution by means of an innovative disaggregation/aggregation procedure. They were linked to conceptual hydraulic models of the rivers in the catchment, which were developed by means of an advanced model structure identification and calibration procedure. The conceptual models manage to emulate the simulation results of a detailed full hydrodynamic model accurately. The models configured using the approaches of this framework are well-suited for many applications in water management due to their very short calculation time, interfacing possibilities and adjustable level of detail.

  7. Dynamic Behavior of Wind Turbine by a Mixed Flexible-Rigid Multi-Body Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianhong; Qin, Datong; Ding, Yi

    A mixed flexible-rigid multi-body model is presented to study the dynamic behavior of a horizontal axis wind turbine. The special attention is given to flexible body: flexible rotor is modeled by a newly developed blade finite element, support bearing elasticities, variations in the number of teeth in contact as well as contact tooth's elasticities are mainly flexible components in the power train. The couple conditions between different subsystems are established by constraint equations. The wind turbine model is generated by coupling models of rotor, power train and generator with constraint equations together. Based on this model, an eigenproblem analysis is carried out to show the mode shape of rotor and power train at a few natural frequencies. The dynamic responses and contact forces among gears under constant wind speed and fixed pitch angle are analyzed.

  8. Molecular Rotors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-31

    Zack Murray No Faith Jordan No Charles Hagerdorn No Elizabeth Baker, No Mathew Myers No Leah A. Edelman No William T. Gathright No Bill Bockrath No...ligand could impact the construction of rotor arrays. Consequently, VASP calculations were performed in collaboration with Dr. Jeffrey Reimers of

  9. Dynamic modelling of flexibly supported gears using iterative convergence of tooth mesh stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Song; Howard, Ian

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a new gear dynamic model for flexibly supported gear sets aiming to improve the accuracy of gear fault diagnostic methods. In the model, the operating gear centre distance, which can affect the gear design parameters, like the gear mesh stiffness, has been selected as the iteration criteria because it will significantly deviate from its nominal value for a flexible supported gearset when it is operating. The FEA method was developed for calculation of the gear mesh stiffnesses with varying gear centre distance, which can then be incorporated by iteration into the gear dynamic model. The dynamic simulation results from previous models that neglect the operating gear centre distance change and those from the new model that incorporate the operating gear centre distance change were obtained by numerical integration of the differential equations of motion using the Newmark method. Some common diagnostic tools were utilized to investigate the difference and comparison of the fault diagnostic results between the two models. The results of this paper indicate that the major difference between the two diagnostic results for the cracked tooth exists in the extended duration of the crack event and in changes to the phase modulation of the coherent time synchronous averaged signal even though other notable differences from other diagnostic results can also be observed.

  10. Flexible assembly module for beam-shaping product families based on support structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haag, Sebastian; Rübenach, Olaf; Beleke, Andreas; Haverkamp, Tobias; Müller, Tobias; Zontar, Daniel; Wenzel, Christian; Brecher, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Depending on the application, high-power diode lasers (HPDL) have individual requirements on their beam-shaping as well as their mechanical fixation. In order to reduce assembly efforts, laser system manufacturers request pre-assembled beam-shaping systems consisting of a support structure for adhesive bonding as well as one, two or more lenses. Therefore, manufacturers of micro-optics for HPDL need flexible solutions for assembling beam-shaping subassemblies. This paper discusses current solutions for mounting optical subassemblies for beam-shaping of high-power diode lasers and their drawbacks regarding quality and scalability. Subsequently, the paper presents a device which can be used for the sensor-guided assembly of beam-shaping systems based on bottomtab support structures. Results from test productions of several hundred modules are presented showing that repeatability in the range of 1 μm is feasible on an industrial level.

  11. Limit cycles of a flexible shaft with hydrodynamic journal bearings in unstable regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. D.; Black, H. F.

    1980-01-01

    A symmetric 3 mass rotor supported on hydrodynamic bearings is described. An approximate method of representing finite bearings is used to calculate bearing forces. As the method sums forces from a number of independent circular lobes lemon 3 and 4 lobe bearings are taken into account. The calculations are based on an axial groove bearing. Linear analysis precedes nonlinear simulation of some unstable conditions. The demonstration of small limit cycles suggests that necessarily flexible rotors e.g., helicopter tail rotors, may be practical without either tilt pad bearings or external dampers.

  12. The effect of flexible acrylic resin on masticatory muscle activity in implant-supported mandibular overdentures: a controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Ibraheem, Eman Mostafa Ahmed; Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria

    2016-01-01

    Background It is not yet clear from the current literature to what extent masticatory muscle activity is affected by the use of flexible acrylic resin in the construction of implant-supported mandibular overdentures. Objective To compare masticatory muscle activity between patients who were provided with implant-supported mandibular overdentures constructed from flexible acrylic resin and those who were provided with implant-supported mandibular overdentures constructed from heat-cured conventional acrylic resin. Methods In this clinical trial, 12 completely edentulous patients were selected and randomly allocated into two equal treatment groups. Each patient in Group 1 received two implants to support a mandibular overdenture made of conventional acrylic resin. In Group 2, the patients received two implants to support mandibular overdentures constructed from “Versacryl” flexible acrylic resin. The maxillary edentulous arch for patients in both groups was restored by conventional complete dentures. For all patients, masseter and temporalis muscle activity was evaluated using surface electromyography (sEMG). Results The results showed a significant decrease in masticatory muscle activity among patients with implant-supported mandibular overdentures constructed from flexible acrylic resin. Conclusion The use of “Versacryl” flexible acrylic resin in the construction of implant-supported mandibular overdentures resulted in decreased masticatory muscle activity. PMID:26955445

  13. Design and Analysis of a Flexible, Reliable Deep Space Life Support System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry W.

    2012-01-01

    This report describes a flexible, reliable, deep space life support system design approach that uses either storage or recycling or both together. The design goal is to provide the needed life support performance with the required ultra reliability for the minimum Equivalent System Mass (ESM). Recycling life support systems used with multiple redundancy can have sufficient reliability for deep space missions but they usually do not save mass compared to mixed storage and recycling systems. The best deep space life support system design uses water recycling with sufficient water storage to prevent loss of crew if recycling fails. Since the amount of water needed for crew survival is a small part of the total water requirement, the required amount of stored water is significantly less than the total to be consumed. Water recycling with water, oxygen, and carbon dioxide removal material storage can achieve the high reliability of full storage systems with only half the mass of full storage and with less mass than the highly redundant recycling systems needed to achieve acceptable reliability. Improved recycling systems with lower mass and higher reliability could perform better than systems using storage.

  14. Dynamic behavior of air lubricated pivoted-pad journal-bearing, rotor system. 2: Pivot consideration and pad mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Z. N.

    1972-01-01

    Rotor bearing dynamic tests were conducted with tilting-pad journal bearings having three different pad masses and two different pivot geometries. The rotor was vertically mounted and supported by two three-pad tilting-pad gas journal bearings and a simple externally pressurized thrust bearing. The bearing pads were 5.1 cm (2.02 in.) in diameter and 2.8 cm (1.5 in.) long. The length to diameter ratio was 0.75. One pad was mounted on a flexible diaphragm. The bearing supply pressure ranged from 0 to 690 kilonewtons per square meter (0 to 100 psig), and speeds ranged to 38,500 rpm. Heavy mass pad tilting-pad assemblies produced three rotor-bearing resonances above the first two rotor critical speeds. Lower supply pressure eliminated the resonances. The resonances were oriented primarily in the direction normal to the diaphragm.

  15. Flexible Packaging Concept for a Space Suit Portable Life Support Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Gretchen; Dillon, Paul; Oliver, Joe; Zapata, Felipe

    2009-01-01

    Neither the Shuttle Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU), the space suit currently used for space shuttle and International Space Station (ISS) missions, nor the Apollo EMU, the space suit successfully used on previous lunar missions, will satisfy the requirements for the next generation Constellation Program (CxP) lunar suit. The CxP system or Constellation Space Suit Element (CSSE) must be able to tolerate more severe environmental and use conditions than any previous system. These conditions include missions to the severely cold lunar poles and up to 100 Extravehicular Activity (EVA) excursions without ground maintenance. Much effort is focused on decreasing the mass and volume of the Portable Life Support Subsystem (PLSS) over previous suit designs in order to accommodate the required increase in functionality. This paper documents the progress of a conceptual packaging effort of a flexible backpack for the CSSE PLSS. The flexible backpack concept relies on a foam protection system to absorb, distribute, and dissipate the energy from falls on the lunar surface. Testing and analysis of the foam protection system concept that was conducted during this effort indicates that this method of system packaging is a viable solution.

  16. Low-cost flexible supercapacitors based on laser reduced graphene oxide supported on polyethylene terephthalate substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoniem, Engy; Mori, Shinsuke; Abdel-Moniem, Ahmed

    2016-08-01

    A controlled high powered CO2 laser system is used to reduce and pattern graphene oxide (GO) film supported onto a flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate. The laser reduced graphene oxide (rGO) film is characterized and evaluated electrochemically in the absence and presence of an overlying anodicaly deposited thin film of pseuodcapactive MnO2 as electrodes for supercapacitor applications using aqueous electrolyte. The laser treatment of the GO film leads to an overlapped structure of defective multi-layer rGO sheets with an electrical conductivity of 273 S m-1. The rGO and MnO2/rGO electrodes exhibit specific capacitance in the range of 82-107 and 172-368 Fg-1 at applied current range of 0.1-1.0 mA cm-2 and retain 98 and 95% of their initial capacitances after 2000 cycles at a current density of 1.0 mA cm-2, respectively. Also, the rGO is assigned as an electrode material for flexible conventionally stacked and interdigitated in-plane supercapacitor structures using gel electrolyte. Three electrode architectures of 2, 4, and 6 sub-electrodes are studied for the interdigital in-plane design. The device with interdigital 6 sub-electrodes architecture I-PS(6) delivers power density of 537.1 Wcm-3 and an energy density of 0.45 mWh cm-3.

  17. Vibration transmission through rolling element bearings. Part III: Geared rotor system studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, T. C.; Singh, R.

    1991-11-01

    This paper extends the proposed bearing matrix formulation of Parts I and II to analyze the overall dynamics of a geared rotor system which includes a spur gear pair, shafts, rolling element bearing, a prime mover and a load (attached to the geared rotor system through flexible torsional couplings), a rigid or flexible casing, and compliant or massive mounts. Linear time-invariant, discrete dynamic models of a generic geared rotor system with proportional viscous damping are developed, by using lumped parameter and dynamic finite element techniques, which are then used to predict the vibration transmissibility through bearings and mounts, casing vibration motion, and dynamic response of the internal rotating system. Each rotating shaft is modeled as an Euler beam in the lumped parameter model and as a Timoshenko beam in the dynamic finite element model, but the gyroscopic moment is not included. Eigensolution and forced harmonic response studies due to rotating mass unbalance or kinematic transmission error excitation for the following example cases are obtained by using the formulation, and the results are compared with those of simple models currently available in the literature and/or experiment: case I, a single-stage rotor system with flexibly mounted rigid casing consisting of two bearings as a special case of the geared rotor system; case II, a spur gear pair drive supported by four bearings installed in a flexibly mounted rigid casing; and case III, an experimental set-up consisting of a high-precision gear and pinion, and four identical rolling element bearings contained in a flexible casing mounted rigidly on a massive foundation. Analytical predictions show that the theory is indeed capable of predicting bearing and mount moment transmissibilities in addition to the force transmissibilities. Also, flexural vibrations of the casing plate are predicted well as the theory is in good agreement with measurements made on case III; such predictions are not

  18. Exact mesh shape design of large cable-network antenna reflectors with flexible ring truss supports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wang; Li, Dong-Xu; Yu, Xin-Zhan; Jiang, Jian-Ping

    2014-04-01

    An exact-designed mesh shape with favorable surface accuracy is of practical significance to the performance of large cable-network antenna reflectors. In this study, a novel design approach that could guide the generation of exact spatial parabolic mesh configurations of such reflector was proposed. By incorporating the traditional force density method with the standard finite element method, this proposed approach had taken the deformation effects of flexible ring truss supports into consideration, and searched for the desired mesh shapes that can satisfy the requirement that all the free nodes are exactly located on the objective paraboloid. Compared with the conventional design method, a remarkable improvement of surface accuracy in the obtained mesh shapes had been demonstrated by numerical examples. The present work would provide a helpful technical reference for the mesh shape design of such cable-network antenna reflector in engineering practice. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  19. Evolution of Flexible Multibody Dynamics for Simulation Applications Supporting Human Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, An; Brain, Thomas A.; MacLean, John R.; Quiocho, Leslie J.

    2016-01-01

    During the course of transition from the Space Shuttle and International Space Station programs to the Orion and Journey to Mars exploration programs, a generic flexible multibody dynamics formulation and associated software implementation has evolved to meet an ever changing set of requirements at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC). Challenging problems related to large transitional topologies and robotic free-flyer vehicle capture/ release, contact dynamics, and exploration missions concept evaluation through simulation (e.g., asteroid surface operations) have driven this continued development. Coupled with this need is the requirement to oftentimes support human spaceflight operations in real-time. Moreover, it has been desirable to allow even more rapid prototyping of on-orbit manipulator and spacecraft systems, to support less complex infrastructure software for massively integrated simulations, to yield further computational efficiencies, and to take advantage of recent advances and availability of multi-core computing platforms. Since engineering analysis, procedures development, and crew familiarity/training for human spaceflight is fundamental to JSC's charter, there is also a strong desire to share and reuse models in both the non-realtime and real-time domains, with the goal of retaining as much multibody dynamics fidelity as possible. Three specific enhancements are reviewed here: (1) linked list organization to address large transitional topologies, (2) body level model order reduction, and (3) parallel formulation/implementation. This paper provides a detailed overview of these primary updates to JSC's flexible multibody dynamics algorithms as well as a comparison of numerical results to previous formulations and associated software.

  20. Rotary sequencing valve with flexible port plate

    DOEpatents

    Wagner, Glenn Paul

    2005-05-10

    Rotary sequencing valve comprising a rotor having a rotor face rotatable about an axis perpendicular to the rotor face, wherein the rotor face has a plurality of openings, one or more of which are disposed at a selected radial distance from the axis, and wherein the rotor includes at least one passage connecting at least one pair of the plurality of openings. The valve includes a flexible port plate having a first side and a second side, wherein the first side faces the rotor and engages the rotor such that the flexible port plate can be rotated coaxially by the rotor and can move axially with respect to the rotor, wherein the flexible port plate has a plurality of ports between the first and second sides, which ports are aligned with the openings in the rotor face. The valve also includes a stator having a stator face disposed coaxially with the rotor and the flexible port plate, wherein the second side of the flexible port plate is in sealable, slidable rotary contact with the stator face, wherein the stator face has a plurality of openings, some of which are disposed at the selected radial distance from the axis, and wherein the plurality of openings extend as passages through the stator. The valve may be used in pressure or temperature swing adsorption systems.

  1. Eigenvalues and stability problems of rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walczyk, Z.

    1985-01-01

    The essential theoretical results of the application of a developed transfer matrix method to the free transverse vibration of a rotor are shown. Gyroscopic and shear effects, rotary inertia, and external and internal damping as well as the influence of sleeve bearings and rotor supports are taken into consideration. The eigenvalues of the motion equations of the rotor are searched by using a modified determinant method.

  2. Does Flexible Arterial Tubing Retain More Hemodynamic Energy During Pediatric Pulsatile Extracorporeal Life Support?

    PubMed

    Wang, Shigang; Kunselman, Allen R; Ündar, Akif

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the hemodynamic performance and energy transmission of flexible arterial tubing as the arterial line in a simulated pediatric pulsatile extracorporeal life support (ECLS) system. The ECLS circuit consisted of a Medos Deltastream DP3 diagonal pump head, Medos Hilite 2400 LT oxygenator, Biomedicus arterial/venous cannula (10 Fr/14 Fr), 3 feet of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) arterial tubing or latex rubber arterial tubing, primed with lactated Ringer's solution and packed red blood cells (hematocrit 40%). Trials were conducted at flow rates of 300 to 1200 mL/min (300 mL/min increments) under nonpulsatile and pulsatile modes at 36°C using either PVC arterial tubing (PVC group) or latex rubber tubing (Latex group). Real-time pressure and flow data were recorded using a custom-based data acquisition system. Mean pressures and energy equivalent pressures (EEP) were the same under nonpulsatile mode between the two groups. Under pulsatile mode, EEPs were significantly great than mean pressure, especially in the Latex group (P < 0.05). There was no difference between the two groups with regards to pressure drops across ECLS circuit, but pulsatile flow created more pressure drops than nonpulsatile flow (P < 0.05). Surplus hemodynamic energy (SHE) levels were always higher in the Latex group than in the PVC group at all sites. Although total hemodynamic energy (THE) losses were higher under pulsatile mode compared to nonpulsatile mode, more THE was delivered to the pseudopatient, particularly in the Latex group (P < 0.05). The results showed that the flexible arterial tubing retained more hemodynamic energy passing through it under pulsatile mode while mean pressures and pressure drops across the ECLS circuit were similar between PVC and latex rubber arterial tubing. Further studies are warranted to verify our findings.

  3. Internal rotor friction instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, J.; Artiles, A.; Lund, J.; Dill, J.; Zorzi, E.

    1990-01-01

    The analytical developments and experimental investigations performed in assessing the effect of internal friction on rotor systems dynamic performance are documented. Analytical component models for axial splines, Curvic splines, and interference fit joints commonly found in modern high speed turbomachinery were developed. Rotor systems operating above a bending critical speed were shown to exhibit unstable subsynchronous vibrations at the first natural frequency. The effect of speed, bearing stiffness, joint stiffness, external damping, torque, and coefficient of friction, was evaluated. Testing included material coefficient of friction evaluations, component joint quantity and form of damping determinations, and rotordynamic stability assessments. Under conditions similar to those in the SSME turbopumps, material interfaces experienced a coefficient of friction of approx. 0.2 for lubricated and 0.8 for unlubricated conditions. The damping observed in the component joints displayed nearly linear behavior with increasing amplitude. Thus, the measured damping, as a function of amplitude, is not represented by either linear or Coulomb friction damper models. Rotordynamic testing of an axial spline joint under 5000 in.-lb of static torque, demonstrated the presence of an extremely severe instability when the rotor was operated above its first flexible natural frequency. The presence of this instability was predicted by nonlinear rotordynamic time-transient analysis using the nonlinear component model developed under this program. Corresponding rotordynamic testing of a shaft with an interference fit joint demonstrated the presence of subsynchronous vibrations at the first natural frequency. While subsynchronous vibrations were observed, they were bounded and significantly lower in amplitude than the synchronous vibrations.

  4. Flexible self-supporting nanofibers thin films showing reversible photochromic fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Gao, Rui; Cao, Ding; Guan, Yan; Yan, Dongpeng

    2015-05-13

    Highly sensitive stimuli-responsive fluorescent films play an important role in smart sensors and readable optical devices. However, systems involving light-driven fluorescence changes are still limited compared with photochromic materials that simply change color upon photostimulation. Herein, by incorporation of stilbene-based molecules into a poly(vinyl alcohol) host, we have developed new flexible self-supporting nanofiber films that exhibited fast and obvious photochromic fluorescence (PCF). The reversible transfer between two fluorescent states can be easily recycled. Fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy images supplied in situ evidence of changes in fluorescence and surface morphology, respectively. Density functional theoretical calculations showed that the PCF can be attributed to photoisomerization of the stilbene-based molecules. Therefore, based on the combination of experimental and theoretical studies, this work not only supplies new stilbene-based systems with light-induced fluorescence change, but also gives detailed understanding on the photoisomerization and PCF processes of the nanofibers systems. We anticipate that these PCF films can be applied in erasable memory devices and antiforgery materials, and that our strategy may be extended to other systems to fabricate multistimuli-responsive fluorescent materials.

  5. Bringing Flexibility & Focus to Education Law: Supporting State and Local Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This paper offers tips on how states may receive ESEA (Elementary and Secondary Education Act) flexibility. To receive flexibility through waivers of NCLB (No Child Left Behind) requirements, a state must develop a rigorous and comprehensive plan addressing the three critical areas that are designed to improve educational outcomes for all…

  6. Predesign study for a modern 4-bladed rotor for the NASA rotor systems research aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, H. E.; Burkam, J. E.; Heminway, R. C.; Keys, C. N.; Smith, K. E.; Smith, J. H.; Staley, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    Trade-off study results and the rationale for the final selection of an existing modern four-bladed rotor system that can be adapted for installation on the Rotor Systems Research Aircraft (RSRA) are reported. The results of the detailed integration studies, parameter change studies, and instrumentation studies and the recommended plan for development and qualification of the rotor system is also given. Its parameter variants, integration on the RSRA, and support of ground and flight test programs are also discussed.

  7. Aero-/hydro-elastic stability of flexible panels: Prediction and control using localised spring support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, B. H.; Lucey, A. D.; Howell, R. M.

    2013-12-01

    We study the effect of adding localised stiffness, via a spring support, on the stability of flexible panels subjected to axial uniform incompressible flow. Applications are considered that range from the hydro-elasticity of hull panels of high-speed ships to the aero-elasticity of glass panels in the curtain walls of high-rise buildings in very strong winds. A two-dimensional linear analysis is conducted using a hybrid of theoretical and computational methods that calculates the system eigen-states but can also be used to capture the transient behaviour that precedes these. We show that localised stiffening is a very effective means to increase the divergence-onset flow speed in both hydro- and aero-elastic applications. It is most effective when located at the mid-chord of the panel and there exists an optimum value of added stiffness beyond which further increases to the divergence-onset flow speed do not occur. For aero-elastic applications, localised stiffening can be used to replace the more destructive flutter instability that follows divergence at higher flow speeds by an extended range of divergence. The difference in eigen-solution morphology between aero- and hydro-elastic applications is highlighted, showing that for the former coalescence of two non-oscillatory divergence modes is the mechanism for flutter onset. This variation in solution morphology is mapped out in terms of a non-dimensional mass ratio. Finally, we present a short discussion of the applicability of the stabilisation strategy in a full three-dimensional system.

  8. Rotor dynamic considerations for large wind power generator systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormiston, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    Successful large, reliable, low maintenance wind turbines must be designed with full consideration for minimizing dynamic response to aerodynamic, inertial, and gravitational forces. Much of existing helicopter rotor technology is applicable to this problem. Compared with helicopter rotors, large wind turbines are likely to be relatively less flexible with higher dimensionless natural frequencies. For very large wind turbines, low power output per unit weight and stresses due to gravitational forces are limiting factors. The need to reduce rotor complexity to a minimum favors the use of cantilevered (hingeless) rotor configurations where stresses are relieved by elastic deformations.

  9. Halbach Magnetic Rotor Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallo, Christopher A.

    2008-01-01

    The NASA John H. Glenn Research Center has a wealth of experience in Halbach array technology through the Fundamental Aeronautics Program. The goals of the program include improving aircraft efficiency, reliability, and safety. The concept of a Halbach magnetically levitated electric aircraft motor will help reduce harmful emissions, reduce the Nation s dependence on fossil fuels, increase efficiency and reliability, reduce maintenance and decrease operating noise levels. Experimental hardware systems were developed in the GRC Engineering Development Division to validate the basic principles described herein and the theoretical work that was performed. A number of Halbach Magnetic rotors have been developed and tested under this program. A separate test hardware setup was developed to characterize each of the rotors. A second hardware setup was developed to test the levitation characteristics of the rotors. Each system focused around a unique Halbach array rotor. Each rotor required original design and fabrication techniques. A 4 in. diameter rotor was developed to test the radial levitation effects for use as a magnetic bearing. To show scalability from the 4 in. rotor, a 1 in. rotor was developed to also test radial levitation effects. The next rotor to be developed was 20 in. in diameter again to show scalability from the 4 in. rotor. An axial rotor was developed to determine the force that could be generated to position the rotor axially while it is rotating. With both radial and axial magnetic bearings, the rotor would be completely suspended magnetically. The purpose of this report is to document the development of a series of Halbach magnetic rotors to be used in testing. The design, fabrication and assembly of the rotors will be discussed as well as the hardware developed to test the rotors.

  10. Occupation and Industry Sex Segregation, Gender, and Workplace Support: The Use of Flexible Scheduling Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnotte, Krista Lynn; Cook, Alison; Minnotte, Michael C.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines how industry and occupation sex segregation are related to the use of flexible scheduling policies and perceptions of the career repercussions of using such policies. The analysis is performed on data from the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce (N = 2,810). Findings suggest that the percentage of women per industry…

  11. Becoming Self-Directed: Abstract Representations Support Endogenous Flexibility in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Hannah R.; Munakata, Yuko

    2010-01-01

    A fundamental part of growing up is going beyond routines. Children become increasingly skilled over the first years of life at actively maintaining goals in the service of flexible behavior, allowing them to break out of habits and switch from one task to another. Their early successes often occur with exogenous (externally-provided) goals, and…

  12. Open Rotor Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Zante, Dale E.; Rizzi, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    The ERA project executed a comprehensive test program for Open Rotor aerodynamic and acoustic performance. System studies used the data to estimate the fuel burn savings and acoustic margin for an aircraft system with open rotor propulsion. The acoustic measurements were used to produce an auralization that compares the legacy blades to the current generation of open rotor designs.

  13. Autonomous Operations Planner: A Flexible Platform for Research in Flight-Deck Support for Airborne Self-Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, David A.; Vivona, Robert A.; DePascale, Stephen M.; Wing, David J.

    2012-01-01

    The Autonomous Operations Planner (AOP), developed by NASA, is a flexible and powerful prototype of a flight-deck automation system to support self-separation of aircraft. The AOP incorporates a variety of algorithms to detect and resolve conflicts between the trajectories of its own aircraft and traffic aircraft while meeting route constraints such as required times of arrival and avoiding airspace hazards such as convective weather and restricted airspace. This integrated suite of algorithms provides flight crew support for strategic and tactical conflict resolutions and conflict-free trajectory planning while en route. The AOP has supported an extensive set of experiments covering various conditions and variations on the self-separation concept, yielding insight into the system s design and resolving various challenges encountered in the exploration of the concept. The design of the AOP will enable it to continue to evolve and support experimentation as the self-separation concept is refined.

  14. The roles of CymA in support of the respiratory flexibility of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Marritt, Sophie; McMillan, Duncan G.; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Richardson, David J.; Jeuken, Lars J.; Butt, Julea N.

    2012-12-01

    Shewanella species are isolated from the oxic/anoxic regions of seawater and aquatic sediments where redox conditions fluctuate in time and space. Colonization of these environments is by virtue of flexible respiratory chains, many of which are notable for the ability to reduce extracellular substrates including the Fe(III) and Mn(IV) contained in oxide and phyllosilicate minerals. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 serves as a model organism to consider the biochemical basis of this flexibility. In the present paper, we summarize the various systems that serve to branch the respiratory chain of S. oneidensis MR-1 in order that electrons from quinol oxidation can be delivered the various terminal electron acceptors able to support aerobic and anaerobic growth. This serves to highlight several unanswered questions relating to the regulation of respiratory electron transport in Shewanella and the central role(s) of the tetrahaem-containing quinol dehydrogenase CymA in that process.

  15. Whirl and whip: Rotor/bearing stability problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muszynska, A.

    1985-01-01

    A mathematical model of a symmetric rotor supported by one rigid and one fluid lubricated bearing is proposed. The rotor model is represented by generalized (modal) parameters of its first bending mode. The rotational character of the bearing fluid force is taken into account. The model yields synchronous vibrations due to rotor unbalance as a particular solution of the equations of motion, rotor/bearing system natural frequencies and corresponding self-excited vibrations known as oil whirl and oil whip. The stability analysis yields rotative speed threshold of stability. The model also gives the evaluation of stability of the rotor synchronous vibrations. In the first balance resonance speed region two more thresholds of stability are yielded. The width of this stability region is directly related to the amount of rotor unbalance. The results of the analysis based on this model stand with very good agreement with field observations of rotor dynamic behavior and the experimental results.

  16. Stroboscope Controller for Imaging Helicopter Rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Scott; Marmie, John; Mai, Nghia

    2004-01-01

    A versatile electronic timing-and-control unit, denoted a rotorcraft strobe controller, has been developed for use in controlling stroboscopes, lasers, video cameras, and other instruments for capturing still images of rotating machine parts especially helicopter rotors. This unit is designed to be compatible with a variety of sources of input shaftangle or timing signals and to be capable of generating a variety of output signals suitable for triggering instruments characterized by different input-signal specifications. It is also designed to be flexible and reconfigurable in that it can be modified and updated through changes in its control software, without need to change its hardware. Figure 1 is a block diagram of the rotorcraft strobe controller. The control processor is a high-density complementary metal oxide semiconductor, singlechip 8-bit microcontroller. It is connected to a 32K x 8 nonvolatile static random-access memory (RAM) module. Also connected to the control processor is a 32K 8 electrically programmable read-only-memory (EPROM) module, which is used to store the control software. Digital logic support circuitry is implemented in a field-programmable gate array (FPGA). A 240 x 128-dot, 40- character 16-line liquid-crystal display (LCD) module serves as a graphical user interface; the user provides input through a 16-key keypad mounted next to the LCD. A 12-bit digital-to-analog converter (DAC) generates a 0-to-10-V ramp output signal used as part of a rotor-blade monitoring system, while the control processor generates all the appropriate strobing signals. Optocouplers are used to isolate all input and output digital signals, and optoisolators are used to isolate all analog signals. The unit is designed to fit inside a 19-in. (.48-cm) rack-mount enclosure. Electronic components are mounted on a custom printed-circuit board (see Figure 2). Two power-conversion modules on the printedcircuit board convert AC power to +5 VDC and 15 VDC, respectively.

  17. Flexibility Support for Homecare Applications Based on Models and Multi-Agent Technology.

    PubMed

    Armentia, Aintzane; Gangoiti, Unai; Priego, Rafael; Estévez, Elisabet; Marcos, Marga

    2015-12-17

    In developed countries, public health systems are under pressure due to the increasing percentage of population over 65. In this context, homecare based on ambient intelligence technology seems to be a suitable solution to allow elderly people to continue to enjoy the comforts of home and help optimize medical resources. Thus, current technological developments make it possible to build complex homecare applications that demand, among others, flexibility mechanisms for being able to evolve as context does (adaptability), as well as avoiding service disruptions in the case of node failure (availability). The solution proposed in this paper copes with these flexibility requirements through the whole life-cycle of the target applications: from design phase to runtime. The proposed domain modeling approach allows medical staff to design customized applications, taking into account the adaptability needs. It also guides software developers during system implementation. The application execution is managed by a multi-agent based middleware, making it possible to meet adaptation requirements, assuring at the same time the availability of the system even for stateful applications.

  18. Photochromic dynamics of organic-inorganic hybrids supported on transparent and flexible recycled PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, R. P.; Nalin, M.; Ribeiro, S. J. L.; Molina, C.

    2017-04-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrids (OIH) synthesized by sol gel process containing phosphotungstic acid (PWA) entrapped have been attracted much attention for ultraviolet sensitive materials. However, the limitations for practical photochromic application of these materials are the poor interaction with flexible polymer substrates such as Poly(ethyleneterephthalate) (PET) and also photo response under ultraviolet radiation. This paper describes the use of the d-ureasil HOI, based on siliceous network grafted through linkages to both ends of polymer chain containing 2.5 poly(oxyethylene) units with PWA entrapped prepared as films on recycled PET. Films were characterized by IR-ATR, XRD, TG/DTG, UV-Vis and Contact angle. XRD patterns showed that both pristine hybrid matrix and those containing PWA are amorphous. IR showed that PWA structure is preserved in the matrix and interactions between them occur by intermolecular forces. Films are thermally stable up to 325 °C and contact angle of 25.1° showed a good wettability between substrate and hybrid matrix. Furthermore, films showed fast photochromic response after 1 min of ultraviolet exposure time. The bleaching process revealed that the relaxation process is dependent of the temperature and the activation energy of 47.2 kJ mol-1 was determined. The properties of these films make them potential candidates for applications in flexible photochromic materials.

  19. Flexibility Support for Homecare Applications Based on Models and Multi-Agent Technology

    PubMed Central

    Armentia, Aintzane; Gangoiti, Unai; Priego, Rafael; Estévez, Elisabet; Marcos, Marga

    2015-01-01

    In developed countries, public health systems are under pressure due to the increasing percentage of population over 65. In this context, homecare based on ambient intelligence technology seems to be a suitable solution to allow elderly people to continue to enjoy the comforts of home and help optimize medical resources. Thus, current technological developments make it possible to build complex homecare applications that demand, among others, flexibility mechanisms for being able to evolve as context does (adaptability), as well as avoiding service disruptions in the case of node failure (availability). The solution proposed in this paper copes with these flexibility requirements through the whole life-cycle of the target applications: from design phase to runtime. The proposed domain modeling approach allows medical staff to design customized applications, taking into account the adaptability needs. It also guides software developers during system implementation. The application execution is managed by a multi-agent based middleware, making it possible to meet adaptation requirements, assuring at the same time the availability of the system even for stateful applications. PMID:26694416

  20. A review of research in rotor loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bousman, William G.; Mantay, Wayne R.

    1988-01-01

    The research accomplished in the area of rotor loads over the last 13 to 14 years is reviewed. The start of the period examined is defined by the 1973 AGARD Milan conference and the 1974 hypothetical rotor comparison. The major emphasis of the review is research performed by the U.S. Army and NASA at their laboratories and/or by the industry under government contract. For the purpose of this review, two main topics are addressed: rotor loads prediction and means of rotor loads reduction. A limited discussion of research in gust loads and maneuver loads is included. In the area of rotor loads predictions, the major problem areas are reviewed including dynamic stall, wake induced flows, blade tip effects, fuselage induced effects, blade structural modeling, hub impedance, and solution methods. It is concluded that the capability to predict rotor loads has not significantly improved in this time frame. Future progress will require more extensive correlation of measurements and predictions to better understand the causes of the problems, and a recognition that differences between theory and measurement have multiple sources, yet must be treated as a whole. There is a need for high-quality data to support future research in rotor loads, but the resulting data base must not be seen as an end in itself. It will be useful only if it is integrated into firm long-range plans for the use of the data.

  1. Tuned mass damper for integrally bladed turbine rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marra, John J. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The invention is directed to a damper ring for damping the natural vibration of the rotor blades of an integrally bladed rocket turbine rotor. The invention consists of an integral damper ring which is fixed to the underside of the rotor blade platform of a turbine rotor. The damper ring includes integral supports which extend radially outwardly therefrom. The supports are located adjacent to the base portion and directly under each blade of the rotor. Vibration damping is accomplished by action of tuned mass damper beams attached at each end to the supports. These beams vibrate at a predetermined frequency during operation. The vibration of the beams enforce a local node of zero vibratory amplitude at the interface between the supports and the beam. The vibration of the beams create forces upon the supports which forces are transmitted through the rotor blade mounting platform to the base of each rotor blade. When these forces attain a predetermined design frequency and magnitude and are directed to the base of the rotor blades, vibration of the rotor blades is effectively counteracted.

  2. Ultrafast direct fabrication of flexible substrate-supported designer plasmonic nanoarrays.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yaowu; Kumar, Prashant; Xu, Rong; Zhao, Kejie; Cheng, Gary J

    2016-01-07

    Fabrication of plasmonic nanostructures has been an important topic for their potential applications in photonic and optoelectronic devices. Among plasmonic materials, gold is one of the most promising materials due to its low ohmic loss at optical frequencies and high oxidation resistance. However, there are two major bottlenecks for its industrial applications: (1) the need for large-scale fabrication technology for high-precision plasmonic nanostructures; and (2) the need to integrate the plasmonic nanostructures on various substrates. While conventional top-down approaches involve high cost and give low throughput, bottom-up approaches suffer from irreproducibility and low precision. Herein, we report laser shock induced direct imprinting of large-area plasmonic nanostructures from physical vapor deposited (PVD) gold thin film on a flexible commercial free-standing aluminum foil. Among the important characteristics of the laser-shock direct imprinting is their unique capabilities to reproducibly deliver designer plasmonic nanostructures with extreme precision and in an ultrafast manner. Excellent size tunability (from several μm down to 15 nm) has been achieved by varying mold dimensions and laser parameters. The physical mechanism of the hybrid film imprinting is elaborated by finite element modeling. A mechanical robustness test of the hybrid film validates a significantly improved interfacial contact between gold arrays and the underlying substrate. The strong optical field enhancement was realized in the large-area fabricated engineered gold nanostructures. Low concentration molecular sensing was investigated employing the fabricated structures as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates. The ability to ultrafast direct imprint plasmonic nanoarrays on a flexible substrate at multiscale is a critical step towards roll-to-roll manufacturing of multi-functional devices which is poised to inspire several emerging applications.

  3. Rotor control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradford, Michael P. (Inventor); Maciolek, Joseph R. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A helicopter rotor control system (13) including a stop azimuth controller (32) for establishing the value of a deceleration command (15') to a deceleration controller (23), a transition azimuth predictor (41) and a position reference generator (55), which are effective during the last revolution of said rotor (14) to establish a correction indication (38) to adjust the deceleration command (15') to ensure that one of the rotor blades (27) stops at a predetermined angular position.

  4. Flapping response characteristics of hingeless rotor blades by a gereralized harmonic balance method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, D. A.; Ormiston, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    Linearized equations of motion for the flapping response of flexible rotor blades in forward flight are derived in terms of generalized coordinates. The equations are solved using a matrix form of the method of linear harmonic balance, yielding response derivatives for each harmonic of the blade deformations and of the hub forces and moments. Numerical results and approximate closed-form expressions for rotor derivatives are used to illustrate the relationships between rotor parameters, modeling assumptions, and rotor response characteristics. Finally, basic hingeless rotor response derivatives are presented in tabular and graphical form for a wide range of configuration parameters and operating conditions.

  5. Rotor dynamic behaviour of a high-speed oil-free motor compressor with a rigid coupling supported on four radial magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmied, J.; Pradetto, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    The combination of a high-speed motor, dry gas seals, and magnetic bearings realized in this unit facilitates the elimination of oil. The motor is coupled with a quill shaft to the compressor. This yields higher natural frequencies of the rotor than with the use of a diaphragm coupling and helps to maintain a sufficient margin of the maximum speed to the frequency of the second compressor bending mode. However, the controller of each bearing then has to take the combined modes of both machines into account. The requirements for the controller to ensure stability and sufficient damping of all critical speeds are designed and compared with the implemented controller. The calculated closed loop behavior was confirmed experimentally, except the stability of some higher modes due to slight frequency deviations of the rotor model to the actual rotor. The influence of a mechanical damper as a device to provide additional damping to high models is demonstrated theoretically. After all, it was not necessary to install the damper, since all modes cold be stabilized by the controller.

  6. Dynamic modelling and response characteristics of a magnetic bearing rotor system with auxiliary bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Free, April M.; Flowers, George T.; Trent, Victor S.

    1995-01-01

    Auxiliary bearings are a critical feature of any magnetic bearing system. They protect the soft iron core of the magnetic bearing during an overload or failure. An auxiliary bearing typically consists of a rolling element bearing or bushing with a clearance gap between the rotor and the inner race of the support. The dynamics of such systems can be quite complex. It is desired to develop a rotordynamic model which describes the dynamic behavior of a flexible rotor system with magnetic bearings including auxiliary bearings. The model is based upon an experimental test facility. Some simulation studies are presented to illustrate the behavior of the model. In particular, the effects of introducing sideloading from the magnetic bearing when one coil fails is studied.

  7. Rotordynamic Modelling and Response Characteristics of an Active Magnetic Bearing Rotor System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Free, April M.; Flowers, George T.; Trent, Victor S.

    1996-01-01

    Auxiliary bearings are a critical feature of any magnetic bearing system. They protect the soft iron core of the magnetic bearing during an overload or failure. An auxiliary bearing typically consists of a rolling element bearing or bushing with a clearance gap between the rotor and the inner race of the support. The dynamics of such systems can be quite complex. It is desired to develop a rotordynamic model which describes the dynamic behavior of a flexible rotor system with magnetic bearings including auxiliary bearings. The model is based upon an experimental test facility. Some simulation studies are presented to illustrate the behavior of the model. In particular, the effects of introducing sideloading from the magnetic bearing when one coil fails is studied. These results are presented and discussed.

  8. Application of NDE technologies to support in-service health monitoring of flexible composite components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Lawrence M.; Novack, Michele R.; Qaddoumi, Nasser; Bigelow, Tim

    1999-02-01

    The Carderock Division of the Naval Surface Warfare Center is evaluating nondestructive evaluation techniques for the inspection of flexible rubber composites in a shipboard service environment. The composite components are constructed of low-loss rubber materials, with several layers of reinforcement fabric located in the mid-thickness of the material. In a preliminary investigation, specimens aged in a laboratory environment and specimens removed form in-service platforms were inspected using near-field microwave techniques. The aged specimens contained small cracks and surface imperfections, while the in-service specimens exhibited delaminations between the rubber base material and the fabric plies. Inspections using a 33.375 GHz, open-ended rectangular waveguide demonstrated the ability to detect delaminations between the rubber casings and fabric plies, as well as for the detection of cord breakage of the fibers. Additional work is being planned to quantify the inspection capabilities relative to an acceptance criterion and to conduct in-service pilot studies with naval inspection personnel.

  9. Big and small numbers: Empirical support for a single, flexible mechanism for numerosity perception.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Rakesh; Bapiraju, S; Melcher, David

    2017-01-01

    The existence of perceptually distinct numerosity ranges has been proposed for small (i.e., subitizing range) and larger numbers based on differences in precision, Weber fractions, and reaction times. This raises the question of whether such dissociations reflect distinct mechanisms operating across the two numerosity ranges. In the present work, we explore the predictions of a single-layer recurrent on-center, off-surround network model of attentional priority that has been applied to object individuation and enumeration. Activity from the network can be used to model various phenomena in the domain of visual number perception based on a single parameter: the strength of inhibition between nodes. Specifically, higher inhibition allows for precise representation of small numerosities, while low inhibition is preferred for high numerosities. The model makes novel predictions, including that enumeration of small numerosities following large numerosities should result in longer reaction times than when a small numerosity trial following small numerosities. Moreover, the model predicts underestimation of number when a display containing a large number of items follows a trial with small numerosities. We behaviorally confirmed these predictions in a series of experiments. This pattern of results is consistent with a single, flexible object individuation system, which can be modeled successfully by dynamic on-center, off-surround network model of the attentional priority (saliency) map.

  10. Flexible and self-powered temperature-pressure dual-parameter sensors using microstructure-frame-supported organic thermoelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fengjiao; Zang, Yaping; Huang, Dazhen; di, Chong-An; Zhu, Daoben

    2015-09-01

    Skin-like temperature- and pressure-sensing capabilities are essential features for the next generation of artificial intelligent products. Previous studies of e-skin and smart elements have focused on flexible pressure sensors, whereas the simultaneous and sensitive detection of temperature and pressure with a single device remains a challenge. Here we report developing flexible dual-parameter temperature-pressure sensors based on microstructure-frame-supported organic thermoelectric (MFSOTE) materials. The effective transduction of temperature and pressure stimuli into two independent electrical signals permits the instantaneous sensing of temperature and pressure with an accurate temperature resolution of <0.1 K and a high-pressure-sensing sensitivity of up to 28.9 kPa-1. More importantly, these dual-parameter sensors can be self-powered with outstanding sensing performance. The excellent sensing properties of MFSOTE-based devices, together with their unique advantages of low cost and large-area fabrication, make MFSOTE materials possess promising applications in e-skin and health-monitoring elements.

  11. Flexible and self-powered temperature–pressure dual-parameter sensors using microstructure-frame-supported organic thermoelectric materials

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fengjiao; Zang, Yaping; Huang, Dazhen; Di, Chong-an; Zhu, Daoben

    2015-01-01

    Skin-like temperature- and pressure-sensing capabilities are essential features for the next generation of artificial intelligent products. Previous studies of e-skin and smart elements have focused on flexible pressure sensors, whereas the simultaneous and sensitive detection of temperature and pressure with a single device remains a challenge. Here we report developing flexible dual-parameter temperature–pressure sensors based on microstructure-frame-supported organic thermoelectric (MFSOTE) materials. The effective transduction of temperature and pressure stimuli into two independent electrical signals permits the instantaneous sensing of temperature and pressure with an accurate temperature resolution of <0.1 K and a high-pressure-sensing sensitivity of up to 28.9 kPa−1. More importantly, these dual-parameter sensors can be self-powered with outstanding sensing performance. The excellent sensing properties of MFSOTE-based devices, together with their unique advantages of low cost and large-area fabrication, make MFSOTE materials possess promising applications in e-skin and health-monitoring elements. PMID:26387591

  12. Aerodynamic Interaction Effects of a Helicopter Rotor and Fuselage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, David D., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    A three year Cooperative Research Agreements made in each of the three years between the Subsonic Aerodynamics Branch of the NASA Langley Research Center and the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Va. Tech) has been completed. This document presents results from this three year endeavor. The goal of creating an efficient method to compute unsteady interactional effects between a helicopter rotor and fuselage has been accomplished. This paper also includes appendices to support these findings. The topics are: 1) Rotor-Fuselage Interactions Aerodynamics: An Unsteady Rotor Model; and 2) Rotor/Fuselage Unsteady Interactional Aerodynamics: A New Computational Model.

  13. A rotor technology assessment of the advancing blade concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pleasants, W. A.

    1983-01-01

    A rotor technology assessment of the Advancing Blade Concept (ABC) was conducted in support of a preliminary design study. The analytical methodology modifications and inputs, the correlation, and the results of the assessment are documented. The primary emphasis was on the high-speed forward flight performance of the rotor. The correlation data base included both the wind tunnel and the flight test results. An advanced ABC rotor design was examined; the suitability of the ABC for a particular mission was not considered. The objective of this technology assessment was to provide estimates of the performance potential of an advanced ABC rotor designed for high speed forward flight.

  14. Double-ended ceramic helical-rotor expander

    DOEpatents

    Mohr, Peter B.; Myers, Wendell B.

    1995-01-01

    A ceramic helical rotor expander using a double-ended or tandem herringbone type rotor arrangement with bearing and seal assemblies remote from the hot gas inlets and especially capable of operating at an inlet temperature of above 1100.degree. C. The rotors are solid or hollow and bonded to hollow metal shafts, and mounted in a composite or simple prismatic casing. The rotors, casing and shafts are constructed from low expansivity materials. In the preferred embodiment the rotors are constructed of silicon nitride and the shafts constructed of an molybdenum alloy, with the metal shafts being supported in bearings and secured to synchronizing gears. The rotors and casing may be provided with coolant channels therein, and are constructed to eliminate the problem of end leakages at inlet temperature and pressure, and the need for high temperature bearings and seals.

  15. Double-ended ceramic helical-rotor expander

    DOEpatents

    Mohr, P.B.; Myers, W.B.

    1995-02-28

    A ceramic helical rotor expander is disclosed using a double-ended or tandem herringbone type rotor arrangement with bearing and seal assemblies remote from the hot gas inlets and especially capable of operating at an inlet temperature of above 1,100 C. The rotors are solid or hollow and bonded to hollow metal shafts, and mounted in a composite or simple prismatic casing. The rotors, casing and shafts are constructed from low expansivity materials. In the preferred embodiment the rotors are constructed of silicon nitride and the shafts constructed of an molybdenum alloy, with the metal shafts being supported in bearings and secured to synchronizing gears. The rotors and casing may be provided with coolant channels therein, and are constructed to eliminate the problem of end leakages at inlet temperature and pressure, and the need for high temperature bearings and seals. 3 figs.

  16. Effect of AFT Rotor on the Inter-Rotor Flow of an Open Rotor Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaboch, Paul E.; Stephens, David B.; Van Zante, Dale E.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of the aft rotor on the inter-rotor flow field of an open rotor propulsion rig were examined. A Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) dataset that was acquired phase locked to the front rotor position has been phase averaged based on the relative phase angle between the forward and aft rotors. The aft rotor phase was determined by feature tracking in raw PIV images through an image processing algorithm. The effect of the aft rotor potential field on the inter-rotor flow were analyzed and shown to be in good agreement with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations. It was shown that the aft rotor had no substantial effect on the position of the forward rotor tip vortex but did have a small effect on the circulation strength of the vortex when the rotors were highly loaded.

  17. Bistable devices for morphing rotor blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Terrence

    This dissertation presents two bistable concepts for morphing rotor blades. These concepts are simple and are composed of bistable devices that act as coupling structures between an actuator and the rotor blade. Bistable or "snap-through" mechanisms have two stable equilibrium states and are a novel way to achieve large actuation output stroke at relatively modest effort for gross rotor morphing applications. This is because in addition to the large actuation stroke associated with the snap-through (relative to conventional actuator/ amplification systems) coming at relatively low actuation effort, no locking is required in either equilibrium state (since they are both stable). The first concept that is presented in this dissertation is a that is composed of a bistable twisting device that twists the tip of helicopter rotor blades. This work examines the performance of the presented bistable twisting device for rotor morphing, specifically, blade tip twist under an aerodynamic lift load. The device is analyzed using finite element analysis to predict its load carrying capability and bistable behavior. The second concept that is presented is a concept that is composed of a bistable arch for rotor blade chord extension. The bistable arch is coupled to a thin flat plate that is supported by rollers. Increasing the chord of the rotor blade is expected to generate more lift-load and improve helicopter performance. In this work, a methodology is presented to design the bistable arches for chord morphing using the finite element analysis and pseudo-rigid body model method. This work also examines the effect of different arches, arch hinge size and shape, inertial loads and rigidity on arch performance. Finally, this work shows results from an experiment that was conducted to validate the developed numerical model and demonstrates how the arch can be actuated using a Nitinol Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) wire to extend the chord of a helicopter rotor blade.

  18. Flexible establishment of functional brain networks supports attentional modulation of unconscious cognition.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Martin; Adams, Sarah C; Kiefer, Markus

    2014-11-01

    In classical theories of attention, unconscious automatic processes are thought to be independent of higher-level attentional influences. Here, we propose that unconscious processing depends on attentional enhancement of task-congruent processing pathways implemented by a dynamic modulation of the functional communication between brain regions. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we tested our model with a subliminally primed lexical decision task preceded by an induction task preparing either a semantic or a perceptual task set. Subliminal semantic priming was significantly greater after semantic compared to perceptual induction in ventral occipito-temporal (vOT) and inferior frontal cortex, brain areas known to be involved in semantic processing. The functional connectivity pattern of vOT varied depending on the induction task and successfully predicted the magnitude of behavioral and neural priming. Together, these findings support the proposal that dynamic establishment of functional networks by task sets is an important mechanism in the attentional control of unconscious processing.

  19. Tilt rotor hover aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffen, Charles David

    1992-01-01

    The methodology, results, and conclusions of a study of tilt rotor hover aeroacoustics and aerodynamics are presented. Flow visualization and hot wire velocity measurement were performed on a 1/12-scale model of the XV-15 Tilt Rotor Aircraft in hover. The wing and fuselage below the rotor cause a complex recirculating flow. Results indicate the physical dimensions and details of the flow including the relative unsteadiness and turbulence characteristics of the flow. Discrete frequency harmonic thickness and the loading noise mechanism were predicted using WOPWOP for the standard metal blades and the Advanced Technology Blades. The recirculating flow created by the wing below the rotor is a primary sound mechanism for a hovering tilt rotor. The effects of dynamic blade response should be included for fountain flow conditions which produce impulsive blade loading. Broadband noise mechanisms were studied using Amiet's method with azimuthally varying turbulence characteristics derived from the measurements. The recirculating fountain flow with high turbulence levels in the recirculating zone is the dominant source of broadband noise for a hovering rotor. It is shown that tilt rotor hover aeroacoustic noise mechanisms are now understood. Noise predictions can be made based on reasonably accurate aerodynamic models developed here.

  20. Open Rotor Aeroacoustic Modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Envia, Edmane

    2012-01-01

    Owing to their inherent fuel efficiency, there is renewed interest in developing open rotor propulsion systems that are both efficient and quiet. The major contributor to the overall noise of an open rotor system is the propulsor noise, which is produced as a result of the interaction of the airstream with the counter-rotating blades. As such, robust aeroacoustic prediction methods are an essential ingredient in any approach to designing low-noise open rotor systems. To that end, an effort has been underway at NASA to assess current open rotor noise prediction tools and develop new capabilities. Under this effort, high-fidelity aerodynamic simulations of a benchmark open rotor blade set were carried out and used to make noise predictions via existing NASA open rotor noise prediction codes. The results have been compared with the aerodynamic and acoustic data that were acquired for this benchmark open rotor blade set. The emphasis of this paper is on providing a summary of recent results from a NASA Glenn effort to validate an in-house open noise prediction code called LINPROP which is based on a high-blade-count asymptotic approximation to the Ffowcs-Williams Hawkings Equation. The results suggest that while predicting the absolute levels may be difficult, the noise trends are reasonably well predicted by this approach.

  1. Open Rotor Aeroacoustic Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Envia, Edmane

    2012-01-01

    Owing to their inherent fuel efficiency, there is renewed interest in developing open rotor propulsion systems that are both efficient and quiet. The major contributor to the overall noise of an open rotor system is the propulsor noise, which is produced as a result of the interaction of the airstream with the counter-rotating blades. As such, robust aeroacoustic prediction methods are an essential ingredient in any approach to designing low-noise open rotor systems. To that end, an effort has been underway at NASA to assess current open rotor noise prediction tools and develop new capabilities. Under this effort, high-fidelity aerodynamic simulations of a benchmark open rotor blade set were carried out and used to make noise predictions via existing NASA open rotor noise prediction codes. The results have been compared with the aerodynamic and acoustic data that were acquired for this benchmark open rotor blade set. The emphasis of this paper is on providing a summary of recent results from a NASA Glenn effort to validate an in-house open noise prediction code called LINPROP which is based on a high-blade-count asymptotic approximation to the Ffowcs-Williams Hawkings Equation. The results suggest that while predicting the absolute levels may be difficult, the noise trends are reasonably well predicted by this approach.

  2. Numerical and Experimental Simulation of a Vertical High Speed Motorcompressor Rotor Drop onto Catcher Bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ransom, David; Masala, Andrea; Moore, Jeffrey; Vannini, Giuseppe; Camatti, Massimo

    A new research program was jointly set up between GE Oil&Gas and Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), to predict and test the dynamics of a vertical rotor drop on catcher bearings. A numerical tool able to account for flexible rotor and stator dynamics, catcher bearing stiffness and damping mechanism was developed. An experimental activity on a new vertical rotor test rig was carried out. A first analysis of numerical simulations and experimental analysis is presented in this paper.

  3. Hierarchically structured self-supported latex films for flexible and semi-transparent electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Määttänen, Anni; Ihalainen, Petri; Törngren, Björn; Rosqvist, Emil; Pesonen, Markus; Peltonen, Jouko

    2016-02-01

    Different length scale alterations in topography, surface texture, and symmetry are known to evoke diverse cell behavior, including adhesion, orientation, motility, cytoskeletal condensation, and modulation of intracellular signaling pathways. In this work, self-supported latex films with well-defined isotropic/anisotropic surface features and hierarchical morphologies were fabricated by a peel-off process from different template surfaces. In addition, the latex films were used as substrates for evaporated ultrathin gold films with nominal thicknesses of 10 and 20 nm. Optical properties and topography of the samples were characterized using UV-vis spectroscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) measurements, respectively. The latex films showed high-level transmittance of visible light, enabling the fabrication of semi-transparent gold electrodes. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements were carried out for a number of days to investigate the long-term stability of the electrodes. The effect of 1-octadecanethiol (ODT) and HS(CH2)11OH (MuOH) thiolation and protein (human serum albumin, HSA) adsorption on the impedance and capacitance was studied. In addition, cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurements were carried out to determine active medicinal components, i.e., caffeic acid with interesting biological activities and poorly water-soluble anti-inflammatory drug, piroxicam. The results show that the fabrication procedure presented in this study enables the formation of platforms with hierarchical morphologies for multimodal (optical and electrical) real-time monitoring of length-scale-dependent biomaterial-surface interactions.

  4. A Functional Description of CymA, an Electron Transfer Hub Supporting Anaerobic Respiratory Flexibility in Shewanella

    SciTech Connect

    Marritt, Sophie; Lowe, Thomas G.; Bye, Jordan; McMillan, Duncan G.; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Richardson, David J.; Cheesman, Myles R.; Jeuken, Lars J.; Butt, Julea N.

    2012-06-15

    CymA is a member of the NapC/NirT family of quinol dehydrogenases. Essential for the anaerobic respiratory flexibility of shewanellae, CymA transfers electrons from menaquinol to various dedicated systems for the reduction of terminal electron acceptors including fumarate and insoluble minerals of Fe(III). Spectroscopic characterization of CymA from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 identifies three low-spin His/His coordinated c-hemes and a single high-spin c-heme with His/H{sub 2}O coordination lying adjacent to the quinol binding site. At pH 7, binding of the menaquinol analogue, 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide, does not alter the mid-point potentials of the high-spin (ca. {approx}240 mV) and low-spin (ca. {approx}110, {approx}190 and {approx}265 mV) hemes that appear biased to transfer electrons from the high- to low-spin centres following quinol oxidation. CymA is reduced with menadiol (E{sub m} = {approx} 80 mV) in the presence of NADH (E{sub m} = {approx} 320 mV) and an NADH:menadione oxidoreductase, but not by menadiol alone. In cytoplasmic membranes reduction of CymA may then require the thermodynamic driving force from NADH, formate or H{sub 2} oxidation as the redox poise of the menaquinol pool in isolation is insufficient. Spectroscopic studies suggest that CymA requires a nonheme cofactor for quinol oxidation and that the reduced enzyme forms a 1:1 complex with its redox partner Fcc{sub 3}. The implications for CymA supporting the respiratory flexibility of shewanellae are discussed.

  5. A functional description of CymA, an electron-transfer hub supporting anaerobic respiratory flexibility in Shewanella.

    PubMed

    Marritt, Sophie J; Lowe, Thomas G; Bye, Jordan; McMillan, Duncan G G; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim; Zachara, John; Richardson, David J; Cheesman, Myles R; Jeuken, Lars J C; Butt, Julea N

    2012-06-15

    CymA (tetrahaem cytochrome c) is a member of the NapC/NirT family of quinol dehydrogenases. Essential for the anaerobic respiratory flexibility of shewanellae, CymA transfers electrons from menaquinol to various dedicated systems for the reduction of terminal electron acceptors including fumarate and insoluble minerals of Fe(III). Spectroscopic characterization of CymA from Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 identifies three low-spin His/His co-ordinated c-haems and a single high-spin c-haem with His/H(2)O co-ordination lying adjacent to the quinol-binding site. At pH 7, binding of the menaquinol analogue, 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide, does not alter the mid-point potentials of the high-spin (approximately -240 mV) and low-spin (approximately -110, -190 and -265 mV) haems that appear biased to transfer electrons from the high- to low-spin centres following quinol oxidation. CymA is reduced with menadiol (E(m) = -80 mV) in the presence of NADH (E(m) = -320 mV) and an NADH-menadione (2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone) oxidoreductase, but not by menadiol alone. In cytoplasmic membranes reduction of CymA may then require the thermodynamic driving force from NADH, formate or H2 oxidation as the redox poise of the menaquinol pool in isolation is insufficient. Spectroscopic studies suggest that CymA requires a non-haem co-factor for quinol oxidation and that the reduced enzyme forms a 1:1 complex with its redox partner Fcc3 (flavocytochrome c3 fumarate reductase). The implications for CymA supporting the respiratory flexibility of shewanellae are discussed.

  6. Reducing rotor weight

    SciTech Connect

    Cheney, M.C.

    1997-12-31

    The cost of energy for renewables has gained greater significance in recent years due to the drop in price in some competing energy sources, particularly natural gas. In pursuit of lower manufacturing costs for wind turbine systems, work was conducted to explore an innovative rotor designed to reduce weight and cost over conventional rotor systems. Trade-off studies were conducted to measure the influence of number of blades, stiffness, and manufacturing method on COE. The study showed that increasing number of blades at constant solidity significantly reduced rotor weight and that manufacturing the blades using pultrusion technology produced the lowest cost per pound. Under contracts with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the California Energy Commission, a 400 kW (33m diameter) turbine was designed employing this technology. The project included tests of an 80 kW (15.5m diameter) dynamically scaled rotor which demonstrated the viability of the design.

  7. Open Rotor Spin Test

    NASA Video Gallery

    An open rotor, also known as a high-speed propeller, is tested in a wind tunnel. The propeller moves much more quickly than a standard propeller, and the blades of the propeller are shaped differen...

  8. Full-scale hingeless rotor performance and loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Randall L.

    1995-01-01

    A full-scale BO-105 hingeless rotor system was tested in the NASA Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel on the rotor test apparatus. Rotor performance, rotor loads, and aeroelastic stability as functions of both collective and cyclic pitch, tunnel velocity, and shaft angle were investigated. This test was performed in support of the Rotor Data Correlation Task under the U.S. Army/German Memorandum of Understanding on Cooperative Research in the Field of Helicopter Aeromechanics. The primary objective of this test program was to create a data base for full-scale hingeless rotor performance and structural blade loads. A secondary objective was to investigate the ability to match flight test conditions in the wind tunnel. This data base can be used for the experimental and analytical studies of hingeless rotor systems over large variations in rotor thrust and tunnel velocity. Rotor performance and structural loads for tunnel velocities from hover to 170 knots and thrust coefficients (C(sub T)/sigma) from 0.0 to 0.12 are presented in this report. Thrust sweeps at tunnel velocities of 10, 20, and 30 knots are also included in this data set.

  9. Application of centrifugal precipitation chromatography and high-speed counter-current chromatography equipped with a spiral tubing support rotor for the isolation and partial characterization of carotenoid cleavage-like enzymes in Enteromorpha compressa (L.) Nees.

    PubMed

    Baldermann, Susanne; Mulyadi, Andriati N; Yang, Ziyin; Murata, Ariaka; Fleischmann, Peter; Winterhalter, Peter; Knight, Martha; Finn, Thomas M; Watanabe, Naoharu

    2011-10-01

    Centrifugal precipitation chromatography and a high-speed counter-current chromatography system equipped with a spiral tubing support rotor (spHSCCC) were successfully applied for the identification and isolation of carotenoid cleavage-like enzymes from Enteromorpha compressa (L.) Nees. This is the first study separating active enzymes from a complex natural matrix by spHSCCC. The target enzymes were identified after fractionation of the proteins in an acetone Tris-buffer gradient by centrifugal precipitation chromatography. Also, an aqueous two-phase solvent system consisting of PEG 1000 and mono- and dibasic potassium phosphate was used for the isolation of the enzymes by spHSCCC. The purified fractions contained two proteins of 65 and 72 kDa, respectively. The enzymes could cleave β-carotene and β-apo-8'-carotenal to produce β-ionone.

  10. NASP: an accurate, rapid method for the identification of SNPs in WGS datasets that supports flexible input and output formats

    PubMed Central

    Travis, Jason; Schupp, James M.; Gillece, John D.; Aziz, Maliha; Driebe, Elizabeth M.; Drees, Kevin P.; Hicks, Nathan D.; Williamson, Charles Hall Davis; Hepp, Crystal M.; Smith, David Earl; Roe, Chandler; Engelthaler, David M.; Wagner, David M.; Keim, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) of bacterial isolates has become standard practice in many laboratories. Applications for WGS analysis include phylogeography and molecular epidemiology, using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) as the unit of evolution. NASP was developed as a reproducible method that scales well with the hundreds to thousands of WGS data typically used in comparative genomics applications. In this study, we demonstrate how NASP compares with other tools in the analysis of two real bacterial genomics datasets and one simulated dataset. Our results demonstrate that NASP produces similar, and often better, results in comparison with other pipelines, but is much more flexible in terms of data input types, job management systems, diversity of supported tools and output formats. We also demonstrate differences in results based on the choice of the reference genome and choice of inferring phylogenies from concatenated SNPs or alignments including monomorphic positions. NASP represents a source-available, version-controlled, unit-tested method and can be obtained from tgennorth.github.io/NASP. PMID:28348869

  11. A Novel High-Performance Beam-Supported Membrane Structure with Enhanced Design Flexibility for Partial Discharge Detection

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Chenzhao; Si, Wenrong; Li, Haoyong; Li, Delin; Yuan, Peng; Yu, Yiting

    2017-01-01

    A novel beam-supported membrane (BSM) structure for the fiber optic extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer (EFPI) sensors showing an enhanced performance and an improved resistance to the temperature change was proposed for detecting partial discharges (PDs). The fundamental frequency, sensitivity, linear range, and flatness of the BSM structure were investigated by employing the finite element simulations. Compared with the intact membrane (IM) structure commonly used by EFPI sensors, BSM structure provides extra geometrical parameters to define the fundamental frequency when the diameter of the whole membrane and its thickness is determined, resulting in an enhanced design flexibility of the sensor structure. According to the simulation results, it is noted that BSM structure not only shows a much higher sensitivity (increased by almost four times for some cases), and a wider working range of fundamental frequency to choose, but also an improved linear range, making the system development much easier. In addition, BSM structure presents a better flatness than its IM counterpart, providing an increased signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). A further improvement of performance is thought to be possible with a step-forward structural optimization. The BSM structure shows a great potential to design the EFPI sensors, as well as others for detecting the acoustic signals. PMID:28294962

  12. Carbon-Coated Silicon Nanowires on Carbon Fabric as Self-Supported Electrodes for Flexible Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolei; Li, Ge; Seo, Min Ho; Lui, Gregory; Hassan, Fathy M; Feng, Kun; Xiao, Xingcheng; Chen, Zhongwei

    2017-03-22

    A novel self-supported electrode with long cycling life and high mass loading was developed based on carbon-coated Si nanowires grown in situ on highly conductive and flexible carbon fabric substrates through a nickel-catalyzed one-pot atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition. The high-quality carbon coated Si nanowires resulted in high reversible specific capacity (∼3500 mA h g(-1) at 100 mA g(-1)), while the three-dimensional electrode's unique architecture leads to a significantly improved robustness and a high degree of electrode stability. An exceptionally long cyclability with a capacity retention of ∼66% over 500 cycles at 1.0 A g(-1) was achieved. The controllable high mass loading enables an electrode with extremely high areal capacity of ∼5.0 mA h cm(-2). Such a scalable electrode fabrication technology and the high-performance electrodes hold great promise in future practical applications in high energy density lithium-ion batteries.

  13. Analyses of Multishaft Rotor-Bearing Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. D.; Meacham, W. L.

    1985-01-01

    Method works for linear and nonlinear systems. Finite-element-based computer program developed to analyze free and forced response of multishaft rotor-bearing systems. Acronym, ARDS, denotes Analysis of Rotor Dynamic Systems. Systems with nonlinear interconnection or support bearings or both analyzed by numerically integrating reduced set of coupledsystem equations. Linear systems analyzed in closed form for steady excitations and treated as equivalent to nonlinear systems for transient excitation. ARDS is FORTRAN program developed on an Amdahl 470 (similar to IBM 370).

  14. Rotor/bearing system dynamic stiffness measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muszynska, A.

    1985-01-01

    Sweep perturbation testing as used in Modal Analysis when applied to a rotating machine has to take into consideration the machine dynamic state of equilibrium at its operational rotative speed. This stands in contrasts to a static equilibrium of nonrotating structures. The rotational energy has a significant influence on rotor dynamic characteristics. The best perturbing input for rotating machines is a forward or reverse rotating, circular force applied directly to the shaft. Determination of Dynamic Stiffness Characteristics of the rotor bearing system by nonsynchronous perturbation of a symmetric rotating shaft supported in one relatively rigid and one oil lubricated bearing.

  15. Control of Magnetic Bearings for Rotor Unbalance With Plug-In Time-Varying Resonators

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Christopher; Tsao, Tsu-Chin

    2016-01-01

    Rotor unbalance, common phenomenon of rotational systems, manifests itself as a periodic disturbance synchronized with the rotor's angular velocity. In active magnetic bearing (AMB) systems, feedback control is required to stabilize the open-loop unstable electromagnetic levitation. Further, feedback action can be added to suppress the repeatable runout but maintain closed-loop stability. In this paper, a plug-in time-varying resonator is designed by inverting cascaded notch filters. This formulation allows flexibility in designing the internal model for appropriate disturbance rejection. The plug-in structure ensures that stability can be maintained for varying rotor speeds. Experimental results of an AMB–rotor system are presented. PMID:27222600

  16. Control of Magnetic Bearings for Rotor Unbalance With Plug-In Time-Varying Resonators.

    PubMed

    Kang, Christopher; Tsao, Tsu-Chin

    2016-01-01

    Rotor unbalance, common phenomenon of rotational systems, manifests itself as a periodic disturbance synchronized with the rotor's angular velocity. In active magnetic bearing (AMB) systems, feedback control is required to stabilize the open-loop unstable electromagnetic levitation. Further, feedback action can be added to suppress the repeatable runout but maintain closed-loop stability. In this paper, a plug-in time-varying resonator is designed by inverting cascaded notch filters. This formulation allows flexibility in designing the internal model for appropriate disturbance rejection. The plug-in structure ensures that stability can be maintained for varying rotor speeds. Experimental results of an AMB-rotor system are presented.

  17. Using a collision model to design safer wind turbine rotors for birds

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, V.A.

    1996-11-01

    A mathematical model for collisions between birds and propeller-type turbine rotors identifies the variables that can be manipulated to reduce the probability that birds will collide with the rotor. This study defines a safety index--the clearance power density--that allows rotors of different sizes and designs to be compared in terms of the amount of wind energy converted to electrical energy per bird collision. The collision model accounts for variations in wind speed during the year and shows that for model rotors with simple, one-dimensional blades, the safety index increases in proportion to rotor diameter, and variable speed rotors have higher safety indexes than constant speed rotors. The safety index can also be increased by enlarging the region near the center of the rotor hub where the blades move slowly enough for birds to avoid them. Painting the blades to make them more visible might have this effect. Model rotors with practical designs can have safety indexes an order of magnitude higher than those for model rotors typical of the constant speeds rotors in common use today. This finding suggests that redesigned rotors could have collision rates with birds perhaps an order of magnitude lower than today`s rotors, with no reduction in the production of wind power. The empirical data that exist for collisions between raptors, such as hawks and eagles, and rotors are consistent with the model: the numbers of raptor carcasses found beneath large variable speed rotors, relative to the numbers found under small constant speed rotors, are in the proportions predicted by the collision model rather than in proportion to the areas swept by the rotor blades. However, uncontrolled variables associated with these data prevent a stronger claim of support for the model.

  18. Disc rotors with permanent magnets for brushless DC motor

    DOEpatents

    Hawsey, Robert A.; Bailey, J. Milton

    1992-01-01

    A brushless dc permanent magnet motor drives an autonomous underwater vehe. In one embodiment, the motor comprises four substantially flat stators in stacked relationship, with pairs of the stators axially spaced, each of the stators comprising a tape-wound stator coil, and first and second substantially flat rotors disposed between the spaced pairs of stators. Each of the rotors includes an annular array of permanent magnets embedded therein. A first shaft is connected to the first rotor and a second, concentric shaft is connected to the second rotor, and a drive unit causes rotation of the two shafts in opposite directions. The second shaft comprises a hollow tube having a central bore in which the first shaft is disposed. Two different sets of bearings support the first and second shafts. In another embodiment, the motor comprises two ironless stators and pairs of rotors mounted on opposite sides of the stators and driven by counterrotating shafts.

  19. Tilt rotor aircraft aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Albert R.; Smith, Charles A.; Maisel, Martin D.; Brieger, John T.

    1989-01-01

    This paper studies the state of knowledge and the needed improvement in noise methodology and measurements for tilt rotor aircraft. Similarities and differences between tilt rotor aeroacoustic conditions and helicopter and propeller experience are identified. A discussion of the possible principal noise mechanisms throughout the flight envelope shows a need for further experimental and analytical investigations to develop an adequate understanding of the important sources and influencing factors. Existing experimental data from flight tests suggest terminal area noise reduction by operating within certain portions of the conversion flight envelope. Prediction methods are found to provide approximate indications only for low frequency harmonic and broadband noise for several of the tilt rotor's operating conditions. The acoustic effects of the hover case 'fountain' flow are pronounced and need further research. Impulsive noise and high frequency harmonic noise remain problems, as on helicopters, pending major improvements in wake, unsteady aerodynamics, and acoustics methodology.

  20. Rotor balancing apparatus and system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyman, Frank (Inventor); Lyman, Joseph (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    Rotor balancing apparatus and a system comprising balance probes for measuring unbalance at the ends of a magnetically suspended rotor are disclosed. Each balance probe comprises a photocell which is located in relationship to the magnetically suspended rotor such that unbalance of the rotor changes the amount of light recorded by each photocell. The signal from each photocell is electrically amplified and displayed by a suitable device, such as an oscilloscope.

  1. Formation of technical requirements for flexible rotary machine nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulenkov, Y.; Mikhaylov, A.

    2016-11-01

    The method of parameters determining for the flexible rotary machines and lines and its individual components is described in this article. The method is based on the analysis of the fail safe performance probability. It allows determining the fail safe performance probability for tools, transportation and tool changing device nodes, elements of flexible rotary machine and is based on the analysis of flexible rotor line structure. The relationships between rational flexible rotary line structure and parameters of the individual nodes are shown on the flexible rotor line for the screws processing.

  2. Helicopter tail rotor noise analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, A. R.; Chou, S. T.

    1986-01-01

    A study was made of helicopter tail rotor noise, particularly that due to interactions with the main rotor tip vortices, and with the fuselage separation mean wake. The tail rotor blade-main rotor tip vortex interaction is modelled as an airfoil of infinite span cutting through a moving vortex. The vortex and the geometry information required by the analyses are obtained through a free wake geometry analysis of the main rotor. The acoustic pressure-time histories for the tail rotor blade-vortex interactions are then calculated. These acoustic results are compared to tail rotor loading and thickness noise, and are found to be significant to the overall tail rotor noise generation. Under most helicopter operating conditions, large acoustic pressure fluctuations can be generated due to a series of skewed main rotor tip vortices passing through the tail rotor disk. The noise generation depends strongly upon the helicopter operating conditions and the location of the tail rotor relative to the main rotor.

  3. Wave rotor demonstrator engine assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Philip H.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of the program was to determine a wave rotor demonstrator engine concept using the Allison 250 series engine. The results of the NASA LERC wave rotor effort were used as a basis for the wave rotor design. A wave rotor topped gas turbine engine was identified which incorporates five basic requirements of a successful demonstrator engine. Predicted performance maps of the wave rotor cycle were used along with maps of existing gas turbine hardware in a design point study. The effects of wave rotor topping on the engine cycle and the subsequent need to rematch compressor and turbine sections in the topped engine were addressed. Comparison of performance of the resulting engine is made on the basis of wave rotor topped engine versus an appropriate baseline engine using common shaft compressor hardware. The topped engine design clearly demonstrates an impressive improvement in shaft horsepower (+11.4%) and SFC (-22%). Off design part power engine performance for the wave rotor topped engine was similarly improved including that at engine idle conditions. Operation of the engine at off design was closely examined with wave rotor operation at less than design burner outlet temperatures and rotor speeds. Challenges identified in the development of a demonstrator engine are discussed. A preliminary design was made of the demonstrator engine including wave rotor to engine transition ducts. Program cost and schedule for a wave rotor demonstrator engine fabrication and test program were developed.

  4. Application of High-Temperature Mold Materials to Die Cast Copper Motor Rotor for Improved Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    John G. Cowie; Edwin F. Brush, Jr.; Dale T. Peters; Stephen P. Midson; Darryl J. Van Son

    2003-05-01

    The objective of the study, Application of High-Temperature Mold Materials to Die Cast Copper Motor Rotor for Improved Efficiency, was to support the Copper Development Association (CDA) in its effort to design, fabricate and demonstrate mold technologies designed to withstand the copper motor rotor die casting environment for an economically acceptable life. The anticipated result from the compiled data and tests were to: (1) identify materials suitable for die casting copper, (2) fabricate motor rotor molds and (3) supply copper rotor motors for testing in actual compressor systems. Compressor manufacturers can apply the results to assess the technical and economical viability of copper rotor motors.

  5. Reference Model 2: %22Rev 0%22 Rotor Design.

    SciTech Connect

    Barone, Matthew F.; Berg, Jonathan Charles; Griffith, Daniel

    2011-12-01

    The preliminary design for a three-bladed cross-flow rotor for a reference marine hydrokinetic turbine is presented. A rotor performance design code is described, along with modifications to the code to allow prediction of blade support strut drag as well as interference between two counter-rotating rotors. The rotor is designed to operate in a reference site corresponding to a riverine environment. Basic rotor performance and rigid-body loads calculations are performed to size the rotor elements and select the operating speed range. The preliminary design is verified with a simple finite element model that provides estimates of bending stresses during operation. A concept for joining the blades and support struts is developed and analyzed with a separate finite element analysis. Rotor mass, production costs, and annual energy capture are estimated in order to allow calculations of system cost-of-energy. Evaluation Only. Created with Aspose.Pdf.Kit. Copyright 2002-2011 Aspose Pty Ltd Evaluation Only. Created with Aspose.Pdf.Kit. Copyright 2002-2011 Aspose Pty Ltd

  6. A strategy for advancing tilt-rotor technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morlok, Edward K.; Schoendorfer, David L.

    1985-01-01

    Tilt-rotor technology has many features which make it a very promising development in aviation which might have application to a wide variety of transportation and logistics situations. However, aside from military applications and rather specialized industrial applications, little is known regarding the potential of tilt-rotor for commercial transportation and hence it is difficult to plan a development program which would gain support and be likely to produce a stream of significant benefits. The purpose is to attempt to provide some of this information in a manner that would be useful for preparing a strategy for development of tilt-rotor aircraft technology. Specifically, the objectives were: to identify promising paths of development and deployment of tilt-rotor aircraft technology in the air transportation system considering both benefits and disbenefits, and to identify any particular groups that are likely to benefit significantly and propose plans for gaining their support of research and development of this technology. Potential advantages of the tilt-rotor technology in the context of air transportation as a door-to-door system were identified, and then promising paths of development of such tilt-rotor systems were analyzed. These then lead to recommendations for specific studies, information dissemination and development of awareness of the tilt-rotor among specific transport-related groups.

  7. Finite element analysis of two disk rotor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, Harsh Kumar

    2016-05-01

    A finite element model of simple horizontal rotor system is developed for evaluating its dynamic behaviour. The model is based on Timoshenko beam element and accounts for the effect of gyroscopic couple and other rotational forces. Present rotor system consists of single shaft which is supported by bearings at both ends and two disks are mounted at different locations. The natural frequencies, mode shapes and orbits of rotating system for a specific range of rotation speed are obtained by developing a MATLAB code for solving the finite element equations of rotary system. Consequently, Campbell diagram is plotted for finding a relationship between natural whirl frequencies and rotation of the rotor.

  8. Acoustic test of a model rotor and tail rotor: Results for the isolated rotors and combined configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. M.; Burley, C. L.; Elliott, J. W.

    1989-01-01

    Acoustic data from a model scale main rotor and tail rotor experiment in the NASA Langley 14 by 22 Foot Subsonic Tunnel are presented for the main rotor and trail rotor in isolation and for the two rotors operating together. Results for the isolated main rotor show the importance of the rotor flapping conditions on mid-frequency noise content. High levels of main rotor retreating side blade-vortex interaction noise are shown to radiate downstream of the model. The isolated tail rotor noise results show the dominance of harmonic noise in the thrusting direction. The occurrence of tail rotor broadband noise is seen by the broadening of the tail rotor harmonics and is attributed to fuselage wake turbulence. The combined main and tail rotor data are presented to show the dominance of each rotor's different noise sources at different directivity locations.

  9. Structural analysis of wind turbine rotors for NSF-NASA Mod-0 wind power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spera, D. A.

    1976-01-01

    Preliminary estimates are presented of vibratory loads and stresses in hingeless and teetering rotors for the proposed NSF-NASA Mod-0 wind power system. Preliminary blade design utilizes a tapered tubular aluminum spar which supports nonstructural aluminum ribs and skin and is joined to the rotor hub by a steel shank tube. Stresses in the shank of the blade are calculated for static, rated, and overload operating conditions. Blade vibrations were limited to the fundamental flapping modes, which were elastic cantilever bending for hingeless rotor blades and rigid-body rotation for teetering rotor blades. The MOSTAB-C computer code was used to calculate aerodynamic and mechanical loads. The teetering rotor has substantial advantages over the hingeless rotor with respect to shank stresses, fatigue life, and tower loading. The hingeless rotor analyzed does not appear to be structurally stable during overloads.

  10. Different Executive Functions Support Different Kinds of Cognitive Flexibility: Evidence from 2-, 3-, and 4-Year-Olds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blakey, Emma; Visser, Ingmar; Carroll, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Improvements in cognitive flexibility during the preschool years have been linked to developments in both working memory and inhibitory control, though the precise contribution of each remains unclear. In the current study, one hundred and twenty 2-, 3-, and 4-year-olds completed two rule-switching tasks. In one version, children switched rules in…

  11. Self-Supporting GaN Nanowires/Graphite Paper: Novel High-Performance Flexible Supercapacitor Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shouzhi; Sun, Changlong; Shao, Yongliang; Wu, Yongzhong; Zhang, Lei; Hao, Xiaopeng

    2017-02-01

    Flexible supercapacitors have attracted great interest as energy storage devices because of their promise in applications such as wearable and smart electronic devices. Herein, a novel flexible supercapacitor electrode based on gallium nitride nanowire (GaN NW)/graphite paper (GP) nanocomposites is reported. The outstanding electrical conductivities of the GaN NW (6.36 × 10(2) S m(-1) ) and GP (7.5 × 10(4) S m(-1) ) deliver a synergistically enhanced electrochemical performance that cannot be achieved by either of the components alone. The composite electrode exhibits excellent specific capacitance (237 mF cm(-2) at 0.1 mA cm(-2) ) and outstanding cycling performance (98% capacitance retention after 10 000 cycles). The flexible symmetric supercapacitor also manifests high energy and power densities (0.30 mW h cm(-3) and 1000 mW cm(-3) ). These findings demonstrate that the GaN/GP composite electrode has significant potential as a candidate for the flexible energy storage devices.

  12. Flexible Lamination-Fabricated Ultra-High Frequency Diodes Based on Self-Supporting Semiconducting Composite Film of Silicon Micro-Particles and Nano-Fibrillated Cellulose

    PubMed Central

    Sani, Negar; Wang, Xin; Granberg, Hjalmar; Andersson Ersman, Peter; Crispin, Xavier; Dyreklev, Peter; Engquist, Isak; Gustafsson, Göran; Berggren, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Low cost and flexible devices such as wearable electronics, e-labels and distributed sensors will make the future “internet of things” viable. To power and communicate with such systems, high frequency rectifiers are crucial components. We present a simple method to manufacture flexible diodes, operating at GHz frequencies, based on self-adhesive composite films of silicon micro-particles (Si-μPs) and glycerol dispersed in nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC). NFC, Si-μPs and glycerol are mixed in a water suspension, forming a self-supporting nanocellulose-silicon composite film after drying. This film is cut and laminated between a flexible pre-patterned Al bottom electrode and a conductive Ni-coated carbon tape top contact. A Schottky junction is established between the Al electrode and the Si-μPs. The resulting flexible diodes show current levels on the order of mA for an area of 2 mm2, a current rectification ratio up to 4 × 103 between 1 and 2 V bias and a cut-off frequency of 1.8 GHz. Energy harvesting experiments have been demonstrated using resistors as the load at 900 MHz and 1.8 GHz. The diode stack can be delaminated away from the Al electrode and then later on be transferred and reconfigured to another substrate. This provides us with reconfigurable GHz-operating diode circuits. PMID:27357006

  13. Flexible Lamination-Fabricated Ultra-High Frequency Diodes Based on Self-Supporting Semiconducting Composite Film of Silicon Micro-Particles and Nano-Fibrillated Cellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sani, Negar; Wang, Xin; Granberg, Hjalmar; Andersson Ersman, Peter; Crispin, Xavier; Dyreklev, Peter; Engquist, Isak; Gustafsson, Göran; Berggren, Magnus

    2016-06-01

    Low cost and flexible devices such as wearable electronics, e-labels and distributed sensors will make the future “internet of things” viable. To power and communicate with such systems, high frequency rectifiers are crucial components. We present a simple method to manufacture flexible diodes, operating at GHz frequencies, based on self-adhesive composite films of silicon micro-particles (Si-μPs) and glycerol dispersed in nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC). NFC, Si-μPs and glycerol are mixed in a water suspension, forming a self-supporting nanocellulose-silicon composite film after drying. This film is cut and laminated between a flexible pre-patterned Al bottom electrode and a conductive Ni-coated carbon tape top contact. A Schottky junction is established between the Al electrode and the Si-μPs. The resulting flexible diodes show current levels on the order of mA for an area of 2 mm2, a current rectification ratio up to 4 × 103 between 1 and 2 V bias and a cut-off frequency of 1.8 GHz. Energy harvesting experiments have been demonstrated using resistors as the load at 900 MHz and 1.8 GHz. The diode stack can be delaminated away from the Al electrode and then later on be transferred and reconfigured to another substrate. This provides us with reconfigurable GHz-operating diode circuits.

  14. Superior performance of highly flexible solid-state supercapacitor based on the ternary composites of graphene oxide supported poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Haihan; Zhai, Hua-Jin; Han, Gaoyi

    2016-08-01

    Ternary composite electrodes based on carbon nanotubes thin films (CNFs)-loaded graphene oxide (GO) supported poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)- carbon nanotubes (GO/PEDOT-CNTs) have been prepared via a facile one-step electrochemical codeposition method. The effect of long and short CNTs-incorporated composites (GO/PEDOT-lCNTs and GO/PEDOT-sCNTs) on the electrochemical behaviors of the electrodes is investigated and compared. Electrochemical measurements indicate that the incorporation of CNTs effectively improves the electrochemical performances of the GO/PEDOT electrodes. Long CNTs-incorporated GO/PEDOT-lCNTs electrodes have more superior electrochemical behaviors with respect to the short CNTs-incorporated GO/PEDOT-lCNTs electrodes, which can be attributed to the optimized composition and specific microstructures of the former. To verify the feasibility of the prepared composite electrodes for utilization as flexible supercapacitor, a solid-state supercapacitor using the CNFs-loaded GO/PEDOT-lCNTs electrodes is fabricated and tested. The device shows lightweight, ultrathin, and highly flexible features, which also has a high areal and volumetric specific capacitance (33.4 m F cm-2 at 10 mV s-1 and 2.7 F cm-3 at 0.042 A cm-3), superior rate capability, and excellent cycle stability (maintaining 97.5% for 5000 cycles). This highly flexible solid-state supercapacitor has great potential for applications in flexible electronics, roll-up display, and wearable devices.

  15. Variable camber rotor study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dadone, L.; Cowan, J.; Mchugh, F. J.

    1982-01-01

    Deployment of variable camber concepts on helicopter rotors was analytically assessed. It was determined that variable camber extended the operating range of helicopters provided that the correct compromise can be obtained between performance/loads gains and mechanical complexity. A number of variable camber concepts were reviewed on a two dimensional basis to determine the usefulness of leading edge, trailing edge and overall camber variation schemes. The most powerful method to vary camber was through the trailing edge flaps undergoing relatively small motions (-5 deg to +15 deg). The aerodynamic characteristics of the NASA/Ames A-1 airfoil with 35% and 50% plain trailing edge flaps were determined by means of current subcritical and transonic airfoil design methods and used by rotor performance and loads analysis codes. The most promising variable camber schedule reviewed was a configuration with a 35% plain flap deployment in an on/off mode near the tip of a blade. Preliminary results show approximately 11% reduction in power is possible at 192 knots and a rotor thrust coefficient of 0.09. The potential demonstrated indicates a significant potential for expanding the operating envelope of the helicopter. Further investigation into improving the power saving and defining the improvement in the operational envelope of the helicopter is recommended.

  16. Polygonal shaft hole rotor

    DOEpatents

    Hussey, John H.; Rose, John Scott; Meystrik, Jeffrey J.; White, Kent Lee

    2001-01-23

    A laminated rotor for an induction motor has a plurality of ferro-magnetic laminations mounted axially on a rotor shaft. Each of the plurality of laminations has a central aperture in the shape of a polygon with sides of equal length. The laminations are alternatingly rotated 180.degree. from one another so that the straight sides of the polygon shaped apertures are misaligned. As a circular rotor shaft is press fit into a stack of laminations, the point of maximum interference occurs at the midpoints of the sides of the polygon (i.e., at the smallest radius of the central apertures of the laminations). Because the laminates are alternatingly rotated, the laminate material at the points of maximum interference yields relatively easily into the vertices (i.e., the greatest radius of the central aperture) of the polygonal central aperture of the next lamination as the shaft is inserted into the stack of laminations. Because of this yielding process, the amount of force required to insert the shaft is reduced, and a tighter fit is achieved.

  17. Single rotor turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Platts, David A.

    2002-01-01

    There has been invented a turbine engine with a single rotor which cools the engine, functions as a radial compressor, pushes air through the engine to the ignition point, and acts as an axial turbine for powering the compressor. The invention engine is designed to use a simple scheme of conventional passage shapes to provide both a radial and axial flow pattern through the single rotor, thereby allowing the radial intake air flow to cool the turbine blades and turbine exhaust gases in an axial flow to be used for energy transfer. In an alternative embodiment, an electric generator is incorporated in the engine to specifically adapt the invention for power generation. Magnets are embedded in the exhaust face of the single rotor proximate to a ring of stationary magnetic cores with windings to provide for the generation of electricity. In this alternative embodiment, the turbine is a radial inflow turbine rather than an axial turbine as used in the first embodiment. Radial inflow passages of conventional design are interleaved with radial compressor passages to allow the intake air to cool the turbine blades.

  18. Test rig for investigations of force excited and synchrocoupling loaded rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, Adam

    1987-10-01

    The main topics of test rig based rotor investigations are: dynamic relations of a rotor bearing foundation system, shaft cracking, torsional simulation of rotor-generator hunting, flexural-torsional coupling of vibrations, and other areas of rotor dynamics including balancing, maintenance and modal analysis of a rotor. The present paper describes a general purpose rotor test rig capable of handling a great number of these areas. The test rig simulates a heavy, power-loaded rotor mounted on a flexible foundation. Five forms of excitation are provided: oscillating or impact torque, impact force, step force, bearing and foundation excitation. They can be combined if necessary. New research facilities offered by the rig are: external flexural force loading, driving torque loading by synchrocoupling with a full recovery of brake energy, bending release of rotor ends by pivoting, and multi-pulse impact force excitation. The most remarkable is the synchroaxle principle, called SAP for short, which is described in detail. Test rig features have been proved to be successful by research of shaft cracking and rotor-foundation vibrations. This presentation concerns only the general description, calculation and application aspects of the rig.

  19. Efficient Electrochemical and Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting by a 3D Nanostructured Carbon Supported on Flexible Exfoliated Graphene Foil.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yang; Qiu, Ming; Zhang, Tao; Ma, Ji; Liu, Shaohua; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Yuan, Chris; Feng, Xinliang

    2017-01-01

    A novel 3D Co-Nx |P-complex-doped carbon grown on flexible exfoliated graphene foil is designed and constructed for both electrochemical and photoelectrochemical water splitting. The coordination of Co-Nx active centers hybridized with that of neighboring P atoms enhances the electron transfer and optimizes the charge distribution of the carbon surface, which synergistically promotes reaction kinetics by providing more exposed active sites.

  20. V/STOL tilt rotor study. Volume 5: A mathematical model for real time flight simulation of the Bell model 301 tilt rotor research aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harendra, P. B.; Joglekar, M. J.; Gaffey, T. M.; Marr, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    A mathematical model for real-time flight simulation of a tilt rotor research aircraft was developed. The mathematical model was used to support the aircraft design, pilot training, and proof-of-concept aspects of the development program. The structure of the mathematical model is indicated by a block diagram. The mathematical model differs from that for a conventional fixed wing aircraft principally in the added requirement to represent the dynamics and aerodynamics of the rotors, the interaction of the rotor wake with the airframe, and the rotor control and drive systems. The constraints imposed on the mathematical model are defined.

  1. Growth and Characterization of Polyimide-Supported AlN Films for Flexible Surface Acoustic Wave Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qi; Liu, Hongyan; Li, Gen; Zeng, Fei; Pan, Feng; Luo, Jingting; Qian, Lirong

    2016-06-01

    Highly c-axis oriented aluminum nitride (AlN) films, which can be used in flexible surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices, were successfully deposited on polyimide (PI) substrates by direct current reactive magnetron sputtering without heating. The sputtering power, film thickness, and deposition pressure were optimized. The characterization studies show that at the optimized conditions, the deposited AlN films are composed of columnar grains, which penetrate through the entire film thickness (~2 μm) and exhibit an excellent (0002) texture with a full width at half maximum value of the rocking curve equal to 2.96°. The film surface is smooth with a root mean square value of roughness of 3.79 nm. SAW prototype devices with a center frequency of about 520 MHz and a phase velocity of Rayleigh wave of about 4160 m/s were successfully fabricated using the AlN/PI composite structure. The obtained results demonstrate that the highly c-axis oriented AlN films with a smooth surface and low stress can be produced on relatively rough, flexible substrates, and this composite structure can be possibly used in flexible SAW devices.

  2. Homopolar motor with dual rotors

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, J.S.

    1998-12-01

    A homopolar motor has a field rotor mounted on a frame for rotation in a first rotational direction and for producing an electromagnetic field, and an armature rotor mounted for rotation on said frame within said electromagnetic field and in a second rotational direction counter to said first rotational direction of said field rotor. The two rotors are coupled through a 1:1 gearing mechanism, so as to travel at the same speed but in opposite directions. This doubles the output voltage and output power, as compared to a motor in which only the armature is rotated. Several embodiments are disclosed. 7 figs.

  3. Homopolar motor with dual rotors

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S.

    1998-01-01

    A homopolar motor (10) has a field rotor (15) mounted on a frame (11) for rotation in a first rotational direction and for producing an electromagnetic field, and an armature rotor (17) mounted for rotation on said frame (11) within said electromagnetic field and in a second rotational direction counter to said first rotational direction of said field rotor (15). The two rotors (15, 17) are coupled through a 1:1 gearing mechanism (19), so as to travel at the same speed but in opposite directions. This doubles the output voltage and output power, as compared to a motor in which only the armature is rotated. Several embodiments are disclosed.

  4. 14 CFR 29.921 - Rotor brake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 29.921 Rotor brake. If there is a means to control the rotation of the rotor drive system independently of the engine, any limitations...

  5. 14 CFR 27.921 - Rotor brake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 27.921 Rotor brake. If there is a means to control the rotation of the rotor drive system independently of the engine, any limitations...

  6. Assessment of Scaled Rotors for Wind Tunnel Experiments.

    SciTech Connect

    Maniaci, David Charles; Kelley, Christopher Lee; Chiu, Phillip

    2015-07-01

    Rotor design and analysis work has been performed to support the conceptualization of a wind tunnel test focused on studying wake dynamics. This wind tunnel test would serve as part of a larger model validation campaign that is part of the Department of Energy Wind and Water Power Program’s Atmosphere to electrons (A2e) initiative. The first phase of this effort was directed towards designing a functionally scaled rotor based on the same design process and target full-scale turbine used for new rotors for the DOE/SNL SWiFT site. The second phase focused on assessing the capabilities of an already available rotor, the G1, designed and built by researchers at the Technical University of München.

  7. Elastoplastic viscous model of rotor-stator impact interaction without separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikiforov, A. N.; Shokhin, A. E.

    2016-06-01

    The impact interaction without separation between a flexible rotor and a rigid stator is analyzed in the framework of the plane model based on the equations of motion in Cartesian coordinates and the Hertz, Rivin, and Gerstner relations. It is shown that there are critical values of the system parameters at which the so-called asynchronous rolling of the rotor on the stator arises.

  8. The large pursuit rotor.

    PubMed

    Williams, L R; Grbin, I R

    1976-09-01

    The question of whether certain phenomena that occur on the conventional rotary pursuit and other small apparatus also appear on a gross motor task was examined using a large pursuit rotor that required whole-body movements. College males (n=29) were given 90 10-sec trials over three consecutive days with 30 trials of continuous practice per day. The existence of reactive inhibition, reminiscence, and warmup decrement was confirmed, indicating that common mechanisms underlie both fine and gross bodily movements. In addition, the substantial amounts of learning and the high reliabilities for performance and learning indicated that the present apparatus has considerable potential for motor-learning research.

  9. Molecular Rotors as Switches

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Mei; Wang, Kang L.

    2012-01-01

    The use of a functional molecular unit acting as a state variable provides an attractive alternative for the next generations of nanoscale electronics. It may help overcome the limits of conventional MOSFETd due to their potential scalability, low-cost, low variability, and highly integratable characteristics as well as the capability to exploit bottom-up self-assembly processes. This bottom-up construction and the operation of nanoscale machines/devices, in which the molecular motion can be controlled to perform functions, have been studied for their functionalities. Being triggered by external stimuli such as light, electricity or chemical reagents, these devices have shown various functions including those of diodes, rectifiers, memories, resonant tunnel junctions and single settable molecular switches that can be electronically configured for logic gates. Molecule-specific electronic switching has also been reported for several of these device structures, including nanopores containing oligo(phenylene ethynylene) monolayers, and planar junctions incorporating rotaxane and catenane monolayers for the construction and operation of complex molecular machines. A specific electrically driven surface mounted molecular rotor is described in detail in this review. The rotor is comprised of a monolayer of redox-active ligated copper compounds sandwiched between a gold electrode and a highly-doped P+ Si. This electrically driven sandwich-type monolayer molecular rotor device showed an on/off ratio of approximately 104, a read window of about 2.5 V, and a retention time of greater than 104 s. The rotation speed of this type of molecular rotor has been reported to be in the picosecond timescale, which provides a potential of high switching speed applications. Current-voltage spectroscopy (I-V) revealed a temperature-dependent negative differential resistance (NDR) associated with the device. The analysis of the device I–V characteristics suggests the source of the

  10. Taichi-inspired rigid-flexible coupling cellulose-supported solid polymer electrolyte for high-performance lithium batteries

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianjun; Yue, Liping; Hu, Pu; Liu, Zhihong; Qin, Bingsheng; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Qingfu; Ding, Guoliang; Zhang, Chuanjian; Zhou, Xinhong; Yao, Jianhua; Cui, Guanglei; Chen, Liquan

    2014-01-01

    Inspired by Taichi, we proposed rigid-flexible coupling concept and herein developed a highly promising solid polymer electrolyte comprised of poly (ethylene oxide), poly (cyano acrylate), lithium bis(oxalate)borate and robust cellulose nonwoven. Our investigation revealed that this new class solid polymer electrolyte possessed comprehensive properties in high mechanical integrity strength, sufficient ionic conductivity (3 × 10−4 S cm−1) at 60°C and improved dimensional thermostability (up to 160°C). In addition, the lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4)/lithium (Li) cell using such solid polymer electrolyte displayed superior rate capacity (up to 6 C) and stable cycle performance at 80°C. Furthermore, the LiFePO4/Li battery could also operate very well even at an elevated temperature of 160°C, thus improving enhanced safety performance of lithium batteries. The use of this solid polymer electrolyte mitigates the safety risk and widens the operation temperature range of lithium batteries. Thus, this fascinating study demonstrates a proof of concept of the use of rigid-flexible coupling solid polymer electrolyte toward practical lithium battery applications with improved reliability and safety. PMID:25183416

  11. Taichi-inspired rigid-flexible coupling cellulose-supported solid polymer electrolyte for high-performance lithium batteries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianjun; Yue, Liping; Hu, Pu; Liu, Zhihong; Qin, Bingsheng; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Qingfu; Ding, Guoliang; Zhang, Chuanjian; Zhou, Xinhong; Yao, Jianhua; Cui, Guanglei; Chen, Liquan

    2014-09-03

    Inspired by Taichi, we proposed rigid-flexible coupling concept and herein developed a highly promising solid polymer electrolyte comprised of poly (ethylene oxide), poly (cyano acrylate), lithium bis(oxalate)borate and robust cellulose nonwoven. Our investigation revealed that this new class solid polymer electrolyte possessed comprehensive properties in high mechanical integrity strength, sufficient ionic conductivity (3 × 10(-4) S cm(-1)) at 60°C and improved dimensional thermostability (up to 160°C). In addition, the lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4)/lithium (Li) cell using such solid polymer electrolyte displayed superior rate capacity (up to 6 C) and stable cycle performance at 80°C. Furthermore, the LiFePO4/Li battery could also operate very well even at an elevated temperature of 160°C, thus improving enhanced safety performance of lithium batteries. The use of this solid polymer electrolyte mitigates the safety risk and widens the operation temperature range of lithium batteries. Thus, this fascinating study demonstrates a proof of concept of the use of rigid-flexible coupling solid polymer electrolyte toward practical lithium battery applications with improved reliability and safety.

  12. Dynamic Analysis of Geared Rotors by Finite Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahraman, A.; Ozguven, H. Nevzat; Houser, D. R.; Zakrajsek, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    A finite element model of a geared rotor system on flexible bearings has been developed. The model includes the rotary inertia of on shaft elements, the axial loading on shafts, flexibility and damping of bearings, material damping of shafts and the stiffness and the damping of gear mesh. The coupling between the torsional and transverse vibrations of gears were considered in the model. A constant mesh stiffness was assumed. The analysis procedure can be used for forced vibration analysis geared rotors by calculating the critical speeds and determining the response of any point on the shafts to mass unbalances, geometric eccentricities of gears, and displacement transmission error excitation at the mesh point. The dynamic mesh forces due to these excitations can also be calculated. The model has been applied to several systems for the demonstration of its accuracy and for studying the effect of bearing compliances on system dynamics.

  13. Inflight Rotor Stability Monitor. [for Sikorsky aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuczynski, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    An inflight rotor stability monitor developed at Sikorsky Aircraft to support stability testing of new rotorcraft is described. The monitor has as its core a damping estimation algorithm which embodies spectral analysis techniques. The interactive system is activated and controlled from a cathode ray tube (CRT) and operates on-line in a flight test telemetry environment. Accurate estimates of the level of damping of critical system modes are generated within one minute of the completion of a prescribed test maneuver. The stability monitor was used successfully to support various Sikorsky research and development flight programs including the UTTAS, CH-53E, S-67 Fan-in-Fin, and ABC.

  14. Transparent and Self-Supporting Graphene Films with Wrinkled- Graphene-Wall-Assembled Opening Polyhedron Building Blocks for High Performance Flexible/Transparent Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Huang, Xuankai; Zhang, Haiyan; Li, Yunyong; Wang, Chengxin

    2017-03-22

    Improving mass loading while maintaining high transparency and large surface area in one self-supporting graphene film is still a challenge. Unfortunately, all of these factors are absolutely essential for enhancing the energy storage performance of transparent supercapacitors for practical applications. To solve the above bottleneck problem, we produce a novel self-supporting flexible and transparent graphene film (STF-GF) with wrinkled-wall-assembled opened-hollow polyhedron building units. Taking advantage of the microscopic morphology, the STF-GF exhibits improved mass loading with high transmittance (70.2% at 550 nm), a large surface area (1105.6 m(2)/g), and good electrochemical performance: high energy (552.3 μWh/cm(3)), power densities (561.9 mW/cm(3)), a superlong cycle life, and good cycling stability (the capacitance retention is ∼94.8% after 20,000 cycles).

  15. A review of helicopter rotor blade tip shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brocklehurst, A.; Barakos, G. N.

    2013-01-01

    A review of helicopter rotor blade tip design technology has been carried out with a view to undertaking subsequent computations to evaluate the performance of new tip designs. The review starts by briefly looking at (fixed) wing tip design concepts and the underlying fluid mechanics on which they are based in order to see if there is any carry-over of ideas on which improved tip design concepts might be based. Then, rotor blade tip shapes that have been used, or suggested for use, on past and present rotorcraft are examined to obtain a better understanding of the helicopter tip design problem. In parallel, the review traces the development of analysis tools to evaluate the performance of the rotor and blade tip design. It is clear that in the past, the designer relied heavily on classical aerodynamic knowledge, supplemented by experience and intuition, supported by wind tunnel and model rotor testing, and relatively low-order aerodynamic calculations. New rotor designs were, and still are the subject of intensive flight test verification. However, recent development of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) now offers an opportunity to accurately predict the viscous, compressible flow-field in the tip region, and thus predict the performance of new rotor and tip designs, provided that the solver has adequate resolution, is able to handle all aspects of the helicopter problem, and sufficient computational resources are available to complete the design in a practical time-scale.

  16. Model helicopter rotor high-speed impulsive noise: Measured acoustics and blade pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boxwell, D. A.; Schmitz, F. H.; Splettstoesser, W. R.; Schultz, K. J.

    1983-01-01

    A 1/17-scale research model of the AH-1 series helicopter main rotor was tested. Model-rotor acoustic and simultaneous blade pressure data were recorded at high speeds where full-scale helicopter high-speed impulsive noise levels are known to be dominant. Model-rotor measurements of the peak acoustic pressure levels, waveform shapes, and directively patterns are directly compared with full-scale investigations, using an equivalent in-flight technique. Model acoustic data are shown to scale remarkably well in shape and in amplitude with full-scale results. Model rotor-blade pressures are presented for rotor operating conditions both with and without shock-like discontinuities in the radiated acoustic waveform. Acoustically, both model and full-scale measurements support current evidence that above certain high subsonic advancing-tip Mach numbers, local shock waves that exist on the rotor blades ""delocalize'' and radiate to the acoustic far-field.

  17. Integrated technology rotor/flight research rotor hub concept definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, P. G. C.

    1983-01-01

    Two variations of the helicopter bearingless main rotor hub concept are proposed as bases for further development in the preliminary design phase of the Integrated Technology Rotor/Flight Research Rotor (ITR/FRR) program. This selection was the result of an evaluation of three bearingless hub concepts and two articulated hub concepts with elastomeric bearings. The characteristics of each concept were evaluated by means of simplified methodology. These characteristics included the assessment of stability, vulnerability, weight, drag, cost, stiffness, fatigue life, maintainability, and reliability.

  18. Blade lock for a rotor disk and rotor blade assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Jerry H. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A rotor disk 18 and rotor blade 26 assembly is disclosed having a blade lock 66 which retains the rotor blade against axial movement in an axially extending blade retention slot 58. Various construction details are developed which shield the dead rim region D.sub.d and shift at least a portion of the loads associated with the locking device from the dead rim. In one detailed embodiment, a projection 68 from the live rim D.sub.1 of the disk 18 is adapted by slots 86 to receive blade locks 66.

  19. Development of Mach scale rotors with composite tailored couplings for vibration reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Jinsong

    The use of composite tailored couplings in rotor blades to reduce vibratory hub loads was studied through design, structural and aeroelastic analysis, fabrication, and wind tunnel test of Mach scale articulated composite rotors with tailored flap-bending/torsion couplings. The rotor design was nominally based on the UH-60 BLACK HAWK rotor. The 6-foot diameter blades have a SC1095 profile and feature a linear twist of -12 deg. The analysis of composite rotor was carried out using a mixed cross-section structural model, and UMARC. Five sets of composite rotor were fabricated, including a baseline rotor without coupling, rotors with spanwise uniform positive coupling and negative coupling, and rotors with spanwise dual-segmented coupling (FBT-P/N) and triple-segmented coupling. The blade composite D-spar is the primary structural element supporting the blade loads and providing the desired elastic couplings. Non-rotating tests were performed to examine blade structural properties. The measurements showed good correlation with predictions, and good repeatability for the four blades of each rotor set. All rotors were tested at a rotor speed of 2300 rpm (tip Mach number 0.65) at different advance ratios and thrust levels, in the Glenn L. Martin Wind Tunnel at the University of Maryland. The test results showed that flap-bending/torsion couplings have a significant effect on the rotor vibratory hub loads. All coupled rotors reduced the 4/rev vertical force for advance ratios up to 0.3, with reductions ranging from 1 to 34%. The mixed coupling rotor FBT-P/N reduced overall 4/rev hub loads at advance ratios of 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3. At a rotor speed of 2300 rpm and an advance ratio of 0.3, the FBT-P/N rotor achieved 15% reduction for 4/rev vertical force, 3% for 4/rev in-plane force and 14% for 4/rev head moment. The reductions in the 4/rev hub loads are related to the experimentally observed reductions in 3/rev and 5/rev blade flap bending moments. Through the present research

  20. NASA Open Rotor Noise Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Envia, Ed

    2010-01-01

    Owing to their inherent fuel burn efficiency advantage compared with the current generation high bypass ratio turbofan engines, there is resurgent interest in developing open rotor propulsion systems for powering the next generation commercial aircraft. However, to make open rotor systems truly competitive, they must be made to be acoustically acceptable too. To address this challenge, NASA in collaboration with industry is exploring the design space for low-noise open rotor propulsion systems. The focus is on the system level assessment of the open rotors compared with other candidate concepts like the ultra high bypass ratio cycle engines. To that end there is an extensive research effort at NASA focused on component testing and diagnostics of the open rotor acoustic performance as well as assessment and improvement of open rotor noise prediction tools. In this presentation and overview of the current NASA research on open rotor noise will be provided. Two NASA projects, the Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project and the Subsonic Fixed Wing Project, have been funding this research effort.

  1. Gas turbine rotor straightening -- Case history

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, Z.; Kubiak, J.; Villela, A.; Orozco, J.

    1999-11-01

    Due to catastrophic damage, the turbine-compressor rotor of a gas turbine has been bent 0.62 mm. The in-situ repair process of rotor straightening is fully described. The repair process included the design of special fixtures for placing the rotor vertically and then hydraulically tensioning the rotor bolts for discs disassembling and run-out check by a special rotary equipment. After the repair process the rotor run-out fell within the design limits. Finally the rotor was put back into service. The approach to the in-house repair of the rotor bend has been successful and can be widely recommended for users of turbomachinery.

  2. Wind turbine rotor aileron

    DOEpatents

    Coleman, Clint; Kurth, William T.

    1994-06-14

    A wind turbine has a rotor with at least one blade which has an aileron which is adjusted by an actuator. A hinge has two portions, one for mounting a stationary hinge arm to the blade, the other for coupling to the aileron actuator. Several types of hinges can be used, along with different actuators. The aileron is designed so that it has a constant chord with a number of identical sub-assemblies. The leading edge of the aileron has at least one curved portion so that the aileron does not vent over a certain range of angles, but vents if the position is outside the range. A cyclic actuator can be mounted to the aileron to adjust the position periodically. Generally, the aileron will be adjusted over a range related to the rotational position of the blade. A method for operating the cyclic assembly is also described.

  3. Rotor component displacement measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Mercer, Gary D.; Li, Ming C.; Baum, Charles R.

    2003-05-27

    A measuring system for measuring axial displacement of a tube relative to an axially stationary component in a rotating rotor assembly includes at least one displacement sensor adapted to be located normal to a longitudinal axis of the tube; an insulated cable system adapted for passage through the rotor assembly; a rotatable proximitor module located axially beyond the rotor assembly to which the cables are connected; and a telemetry system operatively connected to the proximitor module for sampling signals from the proximitor module and forwarding data to a ground station.

  4. Self-supported Zn3P2 nanowire arrays grafted on carbon fabrics as an advanced integrated anode for flexible lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenwu; Gan, Lin; Guo, Kai; Ke, Linbo; Wei, Yaqing; Li, Huiqiao; Shen, Guozhen; Zhai, Tianyou

    2016-04-01

    We, for the first time, successfully grafted well-aligned binary lithium-reactive zinc phosphide (Zn3P2) nanowire arrays on carbon fabric cloth by a facile CVD method. When applied as a novel self-supported binder-free anode for lithium ion batteries (LIBs), the hierarchical three-dimensional (3D) integrated anode shows excellent electrochemical performances: a highly reversible initial lithium storage capacity of ca. 1200 mA h g-1 with a coulombic efficiency of up to 88%, a long lifespan of over 200 cycles without obvious decay, and a high rate capability of ca. 400 mA h g-1 capacity retention at an ultrahigh rate of 15 A g-1. More interestingly, a flexible LIB full cell is assembled based on the as-synthesized integrated anode and the commercial LiFePO4 cathode, and shows striking lithium storage performances very close to the half cells: a large reversible capacity over 1000 mA h g-1, a long cycle life of over 200 cycles without obvious decay, and an ultrahigh rate performance of ca. 300 mA h g-1 even at 20 A g-1. Considering the excellent lithium storage performances of coin-type half cells as well as flexible full cells, the as-prepared carbon cloth grafted well-aligned Zn3P2 nanowire arrays would be a promising integrated anode for flexible LIB full cell devices.We, for the first time, successfully grafted well-aligned binary lithium-reactive zinc phosphide (Zn3P2) nanowire arrays on carbon fabric cloth by a facile CVD method. When applied as a novel self-supported binder-free anode for lithium ion batteries (LIBs), the hierarchical three-dimensional (3D) integrated anode shows excellent electrochemical performances: a highly reversible initial lithium storage capacity of ca. 1200 mA h g-1 with a coulombic efficiency of up to 88%, a long lifespan of over 200 cycles without obvious decay, and a high rate capability of ca. 400 mA h g-1 capacity retention at an ultrahigh rate of 15 A g-1. More interestingly, a flexible LIB full cell is assembled based on the as

  5. Supporting Teaching and Learning Via the Web: Transforming Hard-Copy Linear Mindsets into Web-Flexible Creative Thinking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borkowski, Ellen Yu; Henry, David; Larsen, Lida L.; Mateik, Deborah

    This paper describes a four-tiered approach to supporting University of Maryland faculty in the development of instructional materials to be delivered via the World Wide Web. The approach leverages existing equipment and staff by the design of Web posting, editing, and management tools for use on the campus-wide information server,…

  6. Rotor assembly for a gas turbine engine

    SciTech Connect

    Antonellis, S. M.; Breunig, R. D.

    1985-07-02

    A rotor assembly for a gas turbine engine is disclosed. The rotor assembly includes a pair of axially spaced apart rotor disks such as the rotor disks. An inner air seal extends axially between the adjacent rotor disks. A member extends axially between the disks to join the disks together and is attached to the inner air seal at a mid span location to restrain the seal against outward movement.

  7. Asymmetric supercapacitor based on flexible TiC/CNF felt supported interwoven nickel-cobalt binary hydroxide nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Gangyong; Xiong, Tianrou; He, Shuijian; Li, Yonghong; Zhu, Yongmei; Hou, Haoqing

    2016-06-01

    Nanostructured nickel-cobalt binary hydroxide (NiCosbnd BH) is widely investigated as supercapacitor electrode material. However, the aggregation and poor electrical conductivity of NiCosbnd BH limit its practical application as a supercapacitor. In this work, a flexible free-standing hierarchical porous composite composed of NiCosbnd BH nanosheets and titanium carbide-carbon nanofiber (NiCosbnd BH@TiC/CNF) is fabricated through electrospinning and microwave assisted method. The as-prepared composites exhibit desirable electrochemical performances, including high specific capacitance, cycling stability, and rate capability. In particular, the NiCosbnd BH41@TiC/CNF composite electrode exhibits a maximum specific capacitance of 2224 F g-1 at the current density of 0.5 A g-1 and excellent cyclic stability of 91% capacity retention after 3000 cycles at 5.0 A g-1. To expand its practical application, an asymmetric supercapacitor (ASC) is fabricated using the NiCosbnd BH41@TiC/CNF composite as the positive electrode and active carbon as the negative electrode. The ASC exhibits a prominent energy density of 55.93 Wh kg-1 and a high power density of 18,300 W kg-1 at 5.0 A g-1. The superior electrochemical property is attributed to the uniform dispersion of NiCosbnd BH nanosheets on the TiC/CNF felt matrix. The TiC/CNF felt with uniformed TiC nanoparticles makes the fiber surface more suitable for growing NiCosbnd BH nanosheets and simultaneously enhances the conductivity of electrode.

  8. The effects of short foot exercises and arch support insoles on improvement in the medial longitudinal arch and dynamic balance of flexible flatfoot patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Jin Seop

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study is to apply short foot exercises and arch support insoles in order to improve the medial longitudinal arch of flatfoot and compare the results to identify the effects of the foregoing exercises on the dynamic balance of the feet and the lower limbs. [Subjects and Methods] Fourteen university students with flexible flatfoot were selected by conducting navicular drop tests and randomly assigned to a short foot exercise group of seven subjects and an arch support insoles group of seven subjects. The intervention in the experiment was implemented for 30 minutes per time, three times per week for five weeks in total. [Results] In inter-group comparison conducted through navicular drop tests and Y-balance tests, the short foot exercise group showed significant differences. Among intra-group comparisons, in navicular drop tests, the short foot exercise group showed significant decreases. In Y-balance tests, both the short foot exercise group and the arch support insoles group showed significant increases. [Conclusion] In the present study, it could be seen that to improve flatfoot, applying short foot exercises was more effective than applying arch support insoles in terms of medial longitudinal arch improvement and dynamic balance ability. PMID:27942135

  9. Design and Testing of the Primary and Secondary Oxygen Regulators for the Flexible Portable Life Support System (FlexPLSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Colin; Hepworth, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The next generation space suit requires additional capabilities for controlling and adjusting internal pressure compared to that of historical designs. Although the general configuration of the oxygen systems for the next generation space suit is similar or derived from the Apollo and Shuttle Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) with Primary closed loop life support operation and Secondary sourced open loop life support operations, nearly everything else has evolved with new available technologies. For the case of the primary and secondary regulators, the design has gone away from purely mechanical systems actuated with pull-cords or "bicycle cables" to electro-mechanical hybrids that provide the best of both worlds with respect to power draw, reliability, and versatility. This paper discusses the development and testing of a Secondary Oxygen Regulator bench-top prototype along with comparisons of operation with the various prototypes for the Primary Oxygen Regulator.

  10. LAVA Applications to Open Rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin C.; Housman, Jeff; Barad, Mike; Brehm, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Outline: LAVA (Launch Ascent Vehicle Aerodynamics); Introduction; Acoustics Related Applications; LAVA Applications to Open Rotor; Structured Overset Grids; Cartesian Grid with Immersed Boundary; High Speed Case; High Speed Case with Plate Low Speed Case.

  11. Feedback Control of Rotor Overspeed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Churchill, G. B.

    1984-01-01

    Feedback system for automatically governing helicopter rotor speed promises to lessen pilot's workload, enhance maneuverability, and protect airframe. With suitable modifications, concept applied to control speed of electrical generators, automotive engines and other machinery.

  12. Soft hub for bearingless rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, Peter G. C.

    1991-01-01

    Soft hub concepts which allow the direct replacement of articulated rotor systems by bearingless types without any change in controllability or need for reinforcement to the drive shaft and/or transmission/fuselage attachments of the helicopter were studied. Two concepts were analyzed and confirmed for functional and structural feasibility against a design criteria and specifications established for this effort. Both systems are gimballed about a thrust carrying universal elastomeric bearing. One concept includes a set of composite flexures for drive torque transmittal from the shaft to the rotor, and another set (which is changeable) to impart hub tilting stiffness to the rotor system as required to meet the helicopter application. The second concept uses a composite bellows flexure to drive the rotor and to augment the hub stiffness provided by the elastomeric bearing. Each concept was assessed for weight, drag, ROM cost, and number of parts and compared with the production BO-105 hub.

  13. Rotor loading on a three-bladed wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, Peter Hauge; Rasmussen, Flemming

    For a well designed and adjusted horizontal axis wind turbine, the turbulence in the wind is one of the primary sources of cyclic loading. Wind turbulence not only causes blade loads, but is responsible for the major part of the cyclic rotor loads which are transferred through the rotor shaft. In order to predict the cyclic part of the primary structural rotor loads, the thrust, the yaw and the tilt moment, a model was developed. The model works in the frequency domain and uses the standard engineering representation of turbulence in terms of a coherence function and a power spectrum. The model which accounts for the rotational sampling of the turbulent wind field, shows good agreement with the results of testing programs on wind turbines which are tested at The Test Station for Windmills at Risoe National Laboratory. The comparison is made in terms of both the frequency content of the turbulence induced loads as well as the associated fatigue damage. A parametric study demonstrates the effect of the tower bending and tower torsion flexibility on the magnitude of the cyclic rotor loads.

  14. Macroscopic balance model for wave rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Gerard E.

    1996-01-01

    A mathematical model for multi-port wave rotors is described. The wave processes that effect energy exchange within the rotor passage are modeled using one-dimensional gas dynamics. Macroscopic mass and energy balances relate volume-averaged thermodynamic properties in the rotor passage control volume to the mass, momentum, and energy fluxes at the ports. Loss models account for entropy production in boundary layers and in separating flows caused by blade-blockage, incidence, and gradual opening and closing of rotor passages. The mathematical model provides a basis for predicting design-point wave rotor performance, port timing, and machine size. Model predictions are evaluated through comparisons with CFD calculations and three-port wave rotor experimental data. A four-port wave rotor design example is provided to demonstrate model applicability. The modeling approach is amenable to wave rotor optimization studies and rapid assessment of the trade-offs associated with integrating wave rotors into gas turbine engine systems.

  15. Flexible Ablators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stackpoole, Margaret M. (Inventor); Ghandehari, Ehson M. (Inventor); Thornton, Jeremy J. (Inventor); Covington, Melmoth Alan (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A low-density article comprising a flexible substrate and a pyrolizable material impregnated therein, methods of preparing, and devices using the article are disclosed. The pyrolizable material pyrolizes above 350 C and does not flow at temperatures below the pyrolysis temperature. The low-density article remains flexible after impregnation and continues to remain flexible when the pyrolizable material is fully pyrolized.

  16. The History of the XV-15 Tilt Rotor Research Aircraft: From Concept to Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maisel, Martin D.; Giulianetti, Demo J.; Dugan, Daniel C.

    2000-01-01

    This monograph is a testament to the efforts of many people overcoming multiple technical challenges encountered while developing the XV-15 tilt rotor research aircraft. The Ames involvement with the tilt rotor aircraft began in 1957 with investigations of the performance and dynamic behavior of the Bell XV-3 tilt rotor aircraft. At that time, Ames Research Center was known as the Ames Aeronautical Laboratory of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA). As we approach the new millennium, and after more than 40 years of effort and the successful completion of our initial goals, it is appropriate to reflect on the technical accomplishments and consider the future applications of this unique aircraft class, the tilt rotor. The talented engineers, technicians, managers, and leaders at Ames have worked hard with their counterparts in the U.S. rotorcraft industry to overcome technology barriers and to make the military and civil tilt rotor aircraft safer, environmentally acceptable, and more efficient. The tilt rotor aircraft combines the advantages of vertical takeoff and landing capabilities, inherent to the helicopter, with the forward speed and range of a fixed wing turboprop airplane. Our studies have shown that this new vehicle type can provide the aviation transportation industry with the flexibility for highspeed, long-range flight, coupled with runway-independent operations, thus having a significant potential to relieve airport congestion. We see the tilt rotor aircraft as an element of the solution to this growing air transport problem.

  17. Detached Eddy Simulation of the UH-60 Rotor Wake Using Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaderjian, Neal M.; Ahmad, Jasim U.

    2012-01-01

    Time-dependent Navier-Stokes flow simulations have been carried out for a UH-60 rotor with simplified hub in forward flight and hover flight conditions. Flexible rotor blades and flight trim conditions are modeled and established by loosely coupling the OVERFLOW Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code with the CAMRAD II helicopter comprehensive code. High order spatial differences, Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR), and Detached Eddy Simulation (DES) are used to obtain highly resolved vortex wakes, where the largest turbulent structures are captured. Special attention is directed towards ensuring the dual time accuracy is within the asymptotic range, and verifying the loose coupling convergence process using AMR. The AMR/DES simulation produced vortical worms for forward flight and hover conditions, similar to previous results obtained for the TRAM rotor in hover. AMR proved to be an efficient means to capture a rotor wake without a priori knowledge of the wake shape.

  18. Comparison of Computed and Measured Vortex Evolution for a UH-60A Rotor in Forward Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Jasim Uddin; Yamauchi, Gloria K.; Kao, David L.

    2013-01-01

    A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation using the Navier-Stokes equations was performed to determine the evolutionary and dynamical characteristics of the vortex flowfield for a highly flexible aeroelastic UH-60A rotor in forward flight. The experimental wake data were acquired using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) during a test of the fullscale UH-60A rotor in the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel. The PIV measurements were made in a stationary cross-flow plane at 90 deg rotor azimuth. The CFD simulation was performed using the OVERFLOW CFD solver loosely coupled with the rotorcraft comprehensive code CAMRAD II. Characteristics of vortices captured in the PIV plane from different blades are compared with CFD calculations. The blade airloads were calculated using two different turbulence models. A limited spatial, temporal, and CFD/comprehensive-code coupling sensitivity analysis was performed in order to verify the unsteady helicopter simulations with a moving rotor grid system.

  19. Stoichiometry-controlled two flexible interpenetrated frameworks: higher CO2 uptake in a nanoscale counterpart supported by accelerated adsorption kinetics.

    PubMed

    Sikdar, Nivedita; Hazra, Arpan; Maji, Tapas Kumar

    2014-06-16

    Here, we report the synthesis, structural characterizations, and gas storage properties of two new 2-fold interpenetrated 3D frameworks, {[Zn2(bpdc)2(azpy)]·2H2O·2DMF}n (1) and {[Zn3(bpdc)3(azpy)]·4H2O·2DEF}n (2) [bpdc = 4,4'-biphenyldicarboxylate; azpy = 4,4'-azobipyridine], obtained from the same set of organic linkers. Furthermore, 1 has been successfully miniaturized to nanoscale (MOF1N) of spherical morphology to study size dependent adsorption properties through a coordination modulation method. The two different SBUs, dinuclear paddle-wheel {Zn2(COO)4} for 1 and trinuclear {Zn3(μ2-OCO)2(COO)4 }for 2, direct the different network topologies of the frameworks that render different adsorption characteristics into the systems. Both of the frameworks show guest induced structural transformations as supported by PXRD studies. Adsorption studies of 1 and 2 show CO2 selectivity over several other gases (such as N2, H2, O2, and Ar) under identical experimental conditions. Interestingly, MOF1N exhibits significantly higher CO2 storage capacity compared to bulk crystals of 1 and that can be attributed to the smaller diffusion barrier at the nanoscale that is supported by studies of adsorption kinetics in both states. Kinetic measurement based on water vapor adsorption clearly distinguishes between the rate of diffusion of bulk (1) and nanospheres (MOF1N). The respective kinetic rate constant (k, s(-1)) for MOF1N (k = 1.29 × 10(-2) s(-1)) is found to be considerably higher than 1 (k = 7.1 × 10(-3) s(-1)) as obtained from the linear driving force (LDF) model. This is the first account where a new interpenetrated MOF has been scaled down to nanoscale through a coordination modulation method, and their difference in gas uptake properties has been correlated through a higher rate of mass diffusion as obtained from kinetics of adsorption.

  20. Structural Considerations of a 20MW Multi-Rotor Wind Energy System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamieson, P.; Branney, M.

    2014-12-01

    The drive to upscale offshore wind turbines relates especially to possiblereductions in O&M and electrical interconnection costs per MW of installed capacity.Even with best current technologies, designs with rated capacity above about 3 MW are less cost effective exfactory per rated MW(turbine system costs) than smaller machines.Very large offshore wind turbines are thereforejustifiedprimarily by overall offshore project economics. Furthermore, continuing progress in materials and structures has been essential to avoid severe penalties in the power/mass ratio of large multi-MW machines.The multi-rotor concept employs many small rotors to maximise energy capture area withminimum systemvolume. Previous work has indicated that this can enablea very large reduction in the total weight and cost of rotors and drive trains compared to an equivalent large single rotor system.Thus the multi rotor concept may enable rated capacities of 20 MW or more at a single maintenancesite. Establishing the cost benefit of a multi rotor system requires examination of solutions for the support structure and yawing, ensuring aerodynamic losses from rotor interaction are not significant and that overall logistics, with much increased part count (more reliable components) and less consequence of single failuresare favourable. This paper addresses the viability of a support structure in respect of structural concept and likely weight as one necessary step in exploring the potential of the multi rotor concept.

  1. Research investigation of helicopter main rotor/tail rotor interaction noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, J.; Kohlhepp, F.

    1988-01-01

    Acoustic measurements were obtained in a Langley 14 x 22 foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel to study the aeroacoustic interaction of 1/5th scale main rotor, tail rotor, and fuselage models. An extensive aeroacoustic data base was acquired for main rotor, tail rotor, fuselage aerodynamic interaction for moderate forward speed flight conditions. The details of the rotor models, experimental design and procedure, aerodynamic and acoustic data acquisition and reduction are presented. The model was initially operated in trim for selected fuselage angle of attack, main rotor tip-path-plane angle, and main rotor thrust combinations. The effects of repositioning the tail rotor in the main rotor wake and the corresponding tail rotor countertorque requirements were determined. Each rotor was subsequently tested in isolation at the thrust and angle of attack combinations for trim. The acoustic data indicated that the noise was primarily dominated by the main rotor, especially for moderate speed main rotor blade-vortex interaction conditions. The tail rotor noise increased when the main rotor was removed indicating that tail rotor inflow was improved with the main rotor present.

  2. Flexible Multi-Shock Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L. (Inventor); Crews, Jeanne L. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Flexible multi-shock shield system and method are disclosed for defending against hypervelocity particles. The flexible multi-shock shield system and method may include a number of flexible bumpers or shield layers spaced apart by one or more resilient support layers, all of which may be encapsulated in a protective cover. Fasteners associated with the protective cover allow the flexible multi-shock shield to be secured to the surface of a structure to be protected.

  3. Application of system identification to analytic rotor modeling from simulated and wind tunnel dynamic test data, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohenemser, K. H.; Banerjee, D.

    1977-01-01

    An introduction to aircraft state and parameter identification methods is presented. A simplified form of the maximum likelihood method is selected to extract analytical aeroelastic rotor models from simulated and dynamic wind tunnel test results for accelerated cyclic pitch stirring excitation. The dynamic inflow characteristics for forward flight conditions from the blade flapping responses without direct inflow measurements were examined. The rotor blades are essentially rigid for inplane bending and for torsion within the frequency range of study, but flexible in out-of-plane bending. Reverse flow effects are considered for high rotor advance ratios. Two inflow models are studied; the first is based on an equivalent blade Lock number, the second is based on a time delayed momentum inflow. In addition to the inflow parameters, basic rotor parameters like the blade natural frequency and the actual blade Lock number are identified together with measurement bias values. The effect of the theoretical dynamic inflow on the rotor eigenvalues is evaluated.

  4. Control of molecular rotor rotational frequencies in porous coordination polymers using a solid-solution approach.

    PubMed

    Inukai, Munehiro; Fukushima, Tomohiro; Hijikata, Yuh; Ogiwara, Naoki; Horike, Satoshi; Kitagawa, Susumu

    2015-09-30

    Rational design to control the dynamics of molecular rotors in crystalline solids is of interest because it offers advanced materials with precisely tuned functionality. Herein, we describe the control of the rotational frequency of rotors in flexible porous coordination polymers (PCPs) using a solid-solution approach. Solid-solutions of the flexible PCPs [{Zn(5-nitroisophthalate)x(5-methoxyisophthalate)1-x(deuterated 4,4'-bipyridyl)}(DMF·MeOH)]n allow continuous modulation of cell volume by changing the solid-solution ratio x. Variation of the isostructures provides continuous changes in the local environment around the molecular rotors (pyridyl rings of the 4,4'-bipyridyl group), leading to the control of the rotational frequency without the need to vary the temperature.

  5. Rotor assembly and assay method

    DOEpatents

    Burtis, Carl A.; Johnson, Wayne F.; Walker, William A.

    1993-01-01

    A rotor assembly for carrying out an assay includes a rotor body which is rotatable about an axis of rotation, and has a central chamber and first, second, third, fourth, fifth, and sixth chambers which are in communication with and radiate from the central chamber. The rotor assembly further includes a shuttle which is movable through the central chamber and insertable into any of the chambers, the shuttle including a reaction cup carrying an immobilized antigen or an antibody for transport among the chambers. A method for carrying out an assay using the rotor assembly includes moving the reaction cup among the six chambers by passing the cup through the central chamber between centrifugation steps in order to perform the steps of: separating plasma from blood cells, binding plasma antibody or antigen, washing, drying, binding enzyme conjugate, reacting with enzyme substrate and optically comparing the resulting reaction product with unreacted enzyme substrate solution. The movement of the reaction cup can be provided by attaching a magnet to the reaction cup and supplying a moving magnetic field to the rotor.

  6. Rotor assembly and assay method

    DOEpatents

    Burtis, C.A.; Johnson, W.F.; Walker, W.A.

    1993-09-07

    A rotor assembly for carrying out an assay includes a rotor body which is rotatable about an axis of rotation, and has a central chamber and first, second, third, fourth, fifth, and sixth chambers which are in communication with and radiate from the central chamber. The rotor assembly further includes a shuttle which is movable through the central chamber and insertable into any of the chambers, the shuttle including a reaction cup carrying an immobilized antigen or an antibody for transport among the chambers. A method for carrying out an assay using the rotor assembly includes moving the reaction cup among the six chambers by passing the cup through the central chamber between centrifugation steps in order to perform the steps of: separating plasma from blood cells, binding plasma antibody or antigen, washing, drying, binding enzyme conjugate, reacting with enzyme substrate and optically comparing the resulting reaction product with unreacted enzyme substrate solution. The movement of the reaction cup can be provided by attaching a magnet to the reaction cup and supplying a moving magnetic field to the rotor. 34 figures.

  7. Nonlinear dynamic response of wind turbine rotors. Ph.D. Thesis - MIT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chopra, I.

    1977-01-01

    The nonlinear equations of motion for a rigid rotor restrained by three flexible springs representing the flapping, lagging and feathering motions are derived using Lagrange's equations for arbitrary angular rotations. These are reduced to a consistent set of nonlinear equations using nonlinear terms up to third order.

  8. Rotor-to-stator Partial Rubbing and Its Effects on Rotor Dynamic Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muszynska, Agnes; Franklin, Wesley D.; Hayashida, Robert D.

    1991-01-01

    Results from experimental and analytical studies on rotor to stationary element partial rubbings at several locations and their effects on rotor dynamic responses are presented. The mathematical model of a rubbing rotor is given. The computer program provides numerical results which agree with experimentally obtained rotor responses.

  9. Rotor/Wing Interactions in Hover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A.; Derby, Michael R.

    2002-01-01

    Hover predictions of tiltrotor aircraft are hampered by the lack of accurate and computationally efficient models for rotor/wing interactional aerodynamics. This paper summarizes the development of an approximate, potential flow solution for the rotor-on-rotor and wing-on-rotor interactions. This analysis is based on actuator disk and vortex theory and the method of images. The analysis is applicable for out-of-ground-effect predictions. The analysis is particularly suited for aircraft preliminary design studies. Flow field predictions from this simple analytical model are validated against experimental data from previous studies. The paper concludes with an analytical assessment of the influence of rotor-on-rotor and wing-on-rotor interactions. This assessment examines the effect of rotor-to-wing offset distance, wing sweep, wing span, and flaperon incidence angle on tiltrotor inflow and performance.

  10. Open Rotor: New Option for Jet Engines

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Dale Van Zante describes how the open rotor propulsion system will be tested in a wind tunnel at NASA's Glenn Research Center. Open rotor aircraft engines use high-speed propellers and are c...

  11. Active magnetic bearings dynamic parameters identification from experimental rotor unbalance response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yuanping; Zhou, Jin; Di, Long; Zhao, Chen

    2017-01-01

    Active magnetic bearings (AMBs) support rotors using electromagnetic force rather than mechanical forces. It is necessary to accurately identify the AMBs force coefficients since they play a critical role in the rotordynamic analysis including system stability, bending critical speeds and modes of vibrations. This paper proposes a rotor unbalance response based approach to identifying the AMBs stiffness and damping coefficients during rotation. First, a Timoshenko beam finite element (FE) rotor model is created. Second, an identification procedure based on the FE model is proposed. Then based on the experimental rotor unbalance response data from 1200 rpm to 30,000 rpm, the AMBs dynamic force parameters (stiffness and damping) are obtained. Finally, the identified results are verified by comparing the estimated and experimental rotor unbalance responses, which shows high accuracy.

  12. NASA/Army rotor system flight research leading to the UH-60 airloads program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, W. J.; Cross, J. L.; Kufeld, Robert

    1990-01-01

    A review is presented of some of the early rotor systems flight research leading to the present comprehensive NASA/Army rotor system airloads program with the UH-60 helicopter. The experimental and analytical plans and progress for this program are described, including the design and development of a rotor blade which incorporated 242 pressure transducers buried in the surface of the blade, and also the development of calibration hardware for regular calibration and testing of the transducers. Supporting analytical developments based on the comprehensive analytical model of rotorcraft aerodynamics and dynamics (CAMRAD) and various CFD codes are discussed. The highly instrumented UH-60 as well as companion programs of full-scale and model wind tunnel tests of the UH-60 rotor with identical instrumentation will provide the opportunity to explore a full range of rotor experiments and the data necessary to validate the advanced methodologies under development.

  13. Rotor for centrifugal fast analyzers

    DOEpatents

    Lee, N.E.

    1984-01-01

    The invention is an improved photometric analyzer of the rotary cuvette type, the analyzer incorporating a multicuvette rotor of novel design. The rotor (a) is leaktight, (b) permits operation in the 90/sup 0/ and 180/sup 0/ excitation modes, (c) is compatible with extensively used Centrifugal Fast Analyzers, and (d) can be used thousands of times. The rotor includes an assembly comprising a top plate, a bottom plate, and a central plate, the rim of the central plate being formed with circumferentially spaced indentations. A uv-transmitting ring is sealably affixed to the indented rim to define with the indentations an array of cuvettes. The ring serves both as a sealing means and an end window for the cuvettes.

  14. Rotor for centrifugal fast analyzers

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Norman E.

    1985-01-01

    The invention is an improved photometric analyzer of the rotary cuvette type, the analyzer incorporating a multicuvette rotor of novel design. The rotor (a) is leaktight, (b) permits operation in the 90.degree. and 180.degree. excitation modes, (c) is compatible with extensively used Centrifugal Fast Analyzers, and (d) can be used thousands of times. The rotor includes an assembly comprising a top plate, a bottom plate, and a central plate, the rim of the central plate being formed with circumferentially spaced indentations. A UV-transmitting ring is sealably affixed to the indented rim to define with the indentations an array of cuvettes. The ring serves both as a sealing means and an end window for the cuvettes.

  15. Turbomachine rotor with improved cooling

    DOEpatents

    Hultgren, Kent Goran; McLaurin, Leroy Dixon; Bertsch, Oran Leroy; Lowe, Perry Eugene

    1998-01-01

    A gas turbine rotor has an essentially closed loop cooling air scheme in which cooling air drawn from the compressor discharge air that is supplied to the combustion chamber is further compressed, cooled, and then directed to the aft end of the turbine rotor. Downstream seal rings attached to the downstream face of each rotor disc direct the cooling air over the downstream disc face, thereby cooling it, and then to cooling air passages formed in the rotating blades. Upstream seal rings attached to the upstream face of each disc direct the heated cooling air away from the blade root while keeping the disc thermally isolated from the heated cooling air. From each upstream seal ring, the heated cooling air flows through passages in the upstream discs and is then combined and returned to the combustion chamber from which it was drawn.

  16. Turbomachine rotor with improved cooling

    DOEpatents

    Hultgren, K.G.; McLaurin, L.D.; Bertsch, O.L.; Lowe, P.E.

    1998-05-26

    A gas turbine rotor has an essentially closed loop cooling air scheme in which cooling air drawn from the compressor discharge air that is supplied to the combustion chamber is further compressed, cooled, and then directed to the aft end of the turbine rotor. Downstream seal rings attached to the downstream face of each rotor disc direct the cooling air over the downstream disc face, thereby cooling it, and then to cooling air passages formed in the rotating blades. Upstream seal rings attached to the upstream face of each disc direct the heated cooling air away from the blade root while keeping the disc thermally isolated from the heated cooling air. From each upstream seal ring, the heated cooling air flows through passages in the upstream discs and is then combined and returned to the combustion chamber from which it was drawn. 5 figs.

  17. On Cup Anemometer Rotor Aerodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Pindado, Santiago; Pérez, Javier; Avila-Sanchez, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    The influence of anemometer rotor shape parameters, such as the cups' front area or their center rotation radius on the anemometer's performance was analyzed. This analysis was based on calibrations performed on two different anemometers (one based on magnet system output signal, and the other one based on an opto-electronic system output signal), tested with 21 different rotors. The results were compared to the ones resulting from classical analytical models. The results clearly showed a linear dependency of both calibration constants, the slope and the offset, on the cups' center rotation radius, the influence of the front area of the cups also being observed. The analytical model of Kondo et al. was proved to be accurate if it is based on precise data related to the aerodynamic behavior of a rotor's cup. PMID:22778638

  18. On cup anemometer rotor aerodynamics.

    PubMed

    Pindado, Santiago; Pérez, Javier; Avila-Sanchez, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    The influence of anemometer rotor shape parameters, such as the cups' front area or their center rotation radius on the anemometer's performance was analyzed. This analysis was based on calibrations performed on two different anemometers (one based on magnet system output signal, and the other one based on an opto-electronic system output signal), tested with 21 different rotors. The results were compared to the ones resulting from classical analytical models. The results clearly showed a linear dependency of both calibration constants, the slope and the offset, on the cups' center rotation radius, the influence of the front area of the cups also being observed. The analytical model of Kondo et al. was proved to be accurate if it is based on precise data related to the aerodynamic behavior of a rotor's cup.

  19. Wave Rotor Research and Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Gerard E.

    1998-01-01

    Wave rotor technology offers the potential to increase the performance of gas turbine engines significantly, within the constraints imposed by current material temperature limits. The wave rotor research at the NASA Lewis Research Center is a three-element effort: 1) Development of design and analysis tools to accurately predict the performance of wave rotor components; 2) Experiments to characterize component performance; 3) System integration studies to evaluate the effect of wave rotor topping on the gas turbine engine system.

  20. Rotor-Bearing Dynamics Technology Design Guide. Part 1. Flexible Rotor Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    polar moment of inertia J Transverse mass moment of inertia k bnit vector k Lineal spring rate K Stiffness matrix or impedance matrix Kn Second...as an independent de- gree of freedom (in addition to deflection) in the lateral shaft motion. o Both angular and lineal stiffness and damping...Horizontal (along y) misalignment at the L-th bearing (inches) Column 31 - 40: S5(L,I) - Vertical static lineal stiffness of the L-th bearing (lb

  1. Rolling cuff flexible bellows

    DOEpatents

    Lambert, Donald R.

    1985-01-01

    A flexible connector apparatus used to join two stiff non-deformable members, such as piping. The apparatus is provided with one or more flexible sections or assemblies each utilizing a bellows of a rolling cuff type connected between two ridge members, with the bellows being supported by a back-up ring, such that only the curved end sections of the bellows are unsupported. Thus, the bellows can be considered as being of a tube-shaped configuration and thus have high pressure resistance. The components of the flexible apparatus are sealed or welded one to another such that it is fluid tight.

  2. Filter type rotor for multistation photometer

    DOEpatents

    Shumate, II, Starling E.

    1977-07-12

    A filter type rotor for a multistation photometer is provided. The rotor design combines the principle of cross-flow filtration with centrifugal sedimentation so that these occur simultaneously as a first stage of processing for suspension type fluids in an analytical type instrument. The rotor is particularly useful in whole-blood analysis.

  3. Assessment of Geometry and In-Flow Effects on Contra-Rotating Open Rotor Broadband Noise Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zawodny, Nikolas S.; Nark, Douglas M.; Boyd, D. Douglas, Jr.

    2015-01-01

    Application of previously formulated semi-analytical models for the prediction of broadband noise due to turbulent rotor wake interactions and rotor blade trailing edges is performed on the historical baseline F31/A31 contra-rotating open rotor configuration. Simplified two-dimensional blade element analysis is performed on cambered NACA 4-digit airfoil profiles, which are meant to serve as substitutes for the actual rotor blade sectional geometries. Rotor in-flow effects such as induced axial and tangential velocities are incorporated into the noise prediction models based on supporting computational fluid dynamics (CFD) results and simplified in-flow velocity models. Emphasis is placed on the development of simplified rotor in-flow models for the purpose of performing accurate noise predictions independent of CFD information. The broadband predictions are found to compare favorably with experimental acoustic results.

  4. Previous Open Rotor Research in the US

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Dale

    2011-01-01

    Previous Open Rotor noise experience in the United States, current Open Rotor noise research in the United States and current NASA prediction methods activities were presented at a European Union (EU) X-Noise seminar. The invited attendees from EU industries, research establishments and universities discussed prospects for reducing Open Rotor noise and reviewed all technology programs, past and present, dedicated to Open Rotor engine concepts. This workshop was particularly timely because the Committee on Aviation Environmental Protection (CAEP) plans to involve Independent Experts in late 2011 in assessing the noise of future low-carbon technologies including the open rotor.

  5. Advanced Rotor Blade Materials Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-23

    helicopter rotor blade erosion resistant treatments that had been supplied in response to a US Navy BAA Program. The Navy Program was meant to improve the...earlier ONR BAA Program had been concluded and while this specific program was active. This program was one of the drivers behind the need to

  6. ENGINEL: A single rotor turbojet engine cycle match performance program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovell, W. A.

    1977-01-01

    ENGINEL is a computer program which was developed to generate the design and off-design performance of a single rotor turbojet engine with or without afterburning using a cycle match procedure. It is capable of producing engine performance over a wide range of altitudes and Mach numbers. The flexibility, of operating with a variable geometry turbine, for improved off-design fuel consumption or with a fixed geometry turbine as in conventional turbojets, has been incorporated. In addition, the option of generation engine performance with JP4, liquid hydrogen or methane as fuel is provided.

  7. Advances in tilt rotor noise prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, A. R.; Coffen, C. D.; Ringler, T. D.

    1992-01-01

    The two most serious tilt rotor external noise problems, hover noise and blade-vortex interaction noise, are studied. The results of flow visualization and inflow velocity measurements document a complex, recirculating highly unsteady and turbulent flow due to the rotor-wing-body interactions characteristic of tilt rotors. The wing under the rotor is found to obstruct the inflow, causing a deficit in the inflow velocities over the inboard region of the rotor. Discrete frequency harmonic thickness and loading noise mechanisms in hover are examined by first modeling tilt rotor hover aerodynamics and then applying various noise prediction methods using the WOPWOP code. The analysis indicates that the partial ground plane created by the wing below the rotor results in a primary sound source for hover.

  8. Fuselage upwash effects on RSRA rotor systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowan, J.; Dadone, L.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of RSRA fuselage configurations on rotor performance and loads have been quantified analytically by means of currently available potential flow and rotor analysis. Four configurations of the Rotor Systems Research Aircraft (RSRA) were considered in this study. They were: (1) fuselage alone (conventional helicopter); (2) fuselage with auxiliary propulsion; (3) fuselage with wings (auxiliary lift); and (4) fuselage with both auxiliary lift propulsion. The rotor system investigated was identical to a CH-47D front rotor except that it had four instead of three blades. Two scaled-down versions of the same rotor were also analyzed to determine the effect of rotor scale on the fuselage upwash effects. The flight conditions considered for the upwash study are discussed. The potential flow models for the RSRA configuration, with and without the wings and the auxiliary propulsion system, are presented. The results of fuselage/wing/propulsion system upwash on performance and loads are also presented.

  9. Hi-Q Rotor - Low Wind Speed Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Todd E. Mills; Judy Tatum

    2010-01-11

    The project objective was to optimize the performance of the Hi-Q Rotor. Early research funded by the California Energy Commission indicated the design might be advantageous over state-of-the-art turbines for collecting wind energy in low wind conditions. The Hi-Q Rotor is a new kind of rotor targeted for harvesting wind in Class 2, 3, and 4 sites, and has application in areas that are closer to cities, or 'load centers.' An advantage of the Hi-Q Rotor is that the rotor has non-conventional blade tips, producing less turbulence, and is quieter than standard wind turbine blades which is critical to the low-wind populated urban sites. Unlike state-of-the-art propeller type blades, the Hi-Q Rotor has six blades connected by end caps. In this phase of the research funded by DOE's Inventions and Innovation Program, the goal was to improve the current design by building a series of theoretical and numeric models, and composite prototypes to determine a best of class device. Development of the rotor was performed by aeronautical engineering and design firm, DARcorporation. From this investigation, an optimized design was determined and an 8-foot diameter, full-scale rotor was built and mounted using a Bergey LX-1 generator and furling system which were adapted to support the rotor. The Hi-Q Rotor was then tested side-by-side against the state-of-the-art Bergey XL-1 at the Alternative Energy Institute's Wind Test Center at West Texas State University for six weeks, and real time measurements of power generated were collected and compared. Early wind tunnel testing showed that the cut-in-speed of the Hi-Q rotor is much lower than a conventional tested HAWT enabling the Hi-Q Wind Turbine to begin collecting energy before a conventional HAWT has started spinning. Also, torque at low wind speeds for the Hi-Q Wind Turbine is higher than the tested conventional HAWT and enabled the wind turbine to generate power at lower wind speeds. Based on the data collected, the results of

  10. Blade platform seal for ceramic/metal rotor assembly

    DOEpatents

    Wertz, John L.

    1982-01-01

    A combination ceramic and metal turbine rotor for use in high temperature gas turbine engines includes a metal rotor disc having a rim with a plurality of circumferentially spaced blade root retention slots therein to receive a plurality of ceramic blades, each including side platform segments thereon and a dovetail configured root slidably received in one of the slots. Adjacent ones of the platform segments including edge portions thereon closely spaced when the blades are assembled to form expansion gaps in an annular flow surface for gas passage through the blades and wherein the assembly further includes a plurality of unitary seal members on the rotor connected to its rim and each including a plurality of spaced, axially extending, flexible fingers that underlie and conform to the edge portions of the platform segments and which are operative at turbine operating temperatures and speeds to distribute loading on the platform segments as the fingers are seated against the underside of the blade platforms to seal the gaps without undesirably stressing thin web ceramic sections of the platform.

  11. Atom-triatom rigid rotor inelastic scattering with the MultiConfiguration Time Dependent Hartree approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ndengué, Steve; Dawes, Richard; Gatti, Fabien; Meyer, Hans-Dieter

    2017-01-01

    The inelastic scattering between a rigid rotor triatomic molecule and an atom is described within the frame of the MultiConfiguration Time dependent Hartree (MCTDH) method. Sample calculations are done on the H2O-Ar system for which a flexible 6D PES (used here in the rigid rotor approximation) has been recently computed in our group and will be presented separately. The results are compared with corresponding time independent calculations using the Arthurs and Dalgarno approach and confirm as expected the equivalence of the two methods.

  12. Investigation of rotor blade element airloads for a teetering rotor in the blade stall regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dadone, L. U.; Fukushima, T.

    1974-01-01

    A model of a teetering rotor was tested in a low speed wind tunnel. Blade element airloads measured on an articulated model rotor were compared with the teetering rotor and showed that the teetering rotor is subjected to less extensive flow separation. Retreating blade stall was studied. Results show that stall, under the influence of unsteady aerodynamic effects, consists of four separate stall events, each associated with a vortex shed from the leading edge and sweeping over the upper surface of the rotor blade. Current rotor performance prediction methodology was evaluated through computer simulation.

  13. Pre-design study for a modern four-bladed rotor for the Rotor System Research Aircraft (RSRA). [integrating the YAH-64 main rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, C. W.; Logan, A. H.

    1981-01-01

    Various candidate rotor systems were compared in an effort to select a modern four-bladed rotor for the RSRA. The YAH-64 rotor system was chosen as the candidate rotor system for further development for the RSRA. The process used to select the rotor system, studies conducted to mate the rotor with the RSRA and provide parametric variability, and the development plan which would be used to implement these studies are presented. Drawings are included.

  14. Flexible Straws.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prentice, Gerard

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the use of flexible straws for teaching properties of figures and families of shapes. Describes a way to make various two- or three-dimensional geometric shapes. Lists eight advantages of the method. (YP)

  15. Nonlinear vibration phenomenon of an aircraft rub-impact rotor system due to hovering flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Lei; Chen, Yushu; Cao, Qingjie

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on the nonlinear vibration phenomenon caused by aircraft hovering flight in a rub-impact rotor system supported by two general supports with cubic stiffness. The effect of aircraft hovering flight on the rotor system is considered as a maneuver load to formulate the equations of motion, which might result in periodic response instability to the rotor system even the eccentricity is small. The dynamic responses of the system under maneuver load are presented by bifurcation diagrams and the corresponding Lyapunov exponent spectrums. Numerical analyses are carried out to detect the periodic, sub-harmonic and quasi-periodic motions of the system, which are presented by orbit diagrams, phase trajectories, Poincare maps and amplitude power spectrums. The results obtained in this paper will contribute an understanding of the nonlinear dynamic behaviors of aircraft rotor systems in maneuvering flight.

  16. A study of the effects of disk flexibility on the rotordynamics of the space shuttle main engine turbo-pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flowers, George T.

    1989-01-01

    Rotor dynamical analyses are typically performed using rigid disk models. Studies of rotor models in which the effects of disk flexibility were included indicate that is may be an important effect for many systems. This issue is addressed with respect to the Space Shuttle Main Engine high pressure turbo-pumps. Finite element analyses have been performed for a simplified free-free flexible disk rotor model and the modes and frequencies compared to those of a rigid disk model. The simple model was then extended to a more sophisticated HPTOP rotor model and similar results were observed. Equations were developed that are suitable for modifying the current rotordynamical analysis program to account for disk flexibility. Some conclusions are drawn from the results of this work as to the importance of disk flexibility on the HPTOP rotordynamics and some recommendations are given for follow-up research in this area.

  17. Rotor design optimization using a free wake analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quackenbush, Todd R.; Boschitsch, Alexander H.; Wachspress, Daniel A.; Chua, Kiat

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this effort was to develop a comprehensive performance optimization capability for tiltrotor and helicopter blades. The analysis incorporates the validated EHPIC (Evaluation of Hover Performance using Influence Coefficients) model of helicopter rotor aerodynamics within a general linear/quadratic programming algorithm that allows optimization using a variety of objective functions involving the performance. The resulting computer code, EHPIC/HERO (HElicopter Rotor Optimization), improves upon several features of the previous EHPIC performance model and allows optimization utilizing a wide spectrum of design variables, including twist, chord, anhedral, and sweep. The new analysis supports optimization of a variety of objective functions, including weighted measures of rotor thrust, power, and propulsive efficiency. The fundamental strength of the approach is that an efficient search for improved versions of the baseline design can be carried out while retaining the demonstrated accuracy inherent in the EHPIC free wake/vortex lattice performance analysis. Sample problems are described that demonstrate the success of this approach for several representative rotor configurations in hover and axial flight. Features that were introduced to convert earlier demonstration versions of this analysis into a generally applicable tool for researchers and designers is also discussed.

  18. A Survey of Theoretical and Experimental Coaxial Rotor Aerodynamic Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, Colin P.

    1997-01-01

    The recent appearance of the Kamov Ka-50 helicopter and the application of coaxial rotors to unmanned aerial vehicles have renewed international interest in the coaxial rotor configuration. This report addresses the aerodynamic issues peculiar to coaxial rotors by surveying American, Russian, Japanese, British, and German research. (Herein, 'coaxial rotors' refers to helicopter, not propeller, rotors. The intermeshing rotor system was not investigated.) Issues addressed are separation distance, load sharing between rotors, wake structure, solidity effects, swirl recovery, and the effects of having no tail rotor. A general summary of the coaxial rotor configuration explores the configuration's advantages and applications.

  19. Preliminary analysis of turbochargers rotors dynamic behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monoranu, R.; Ştirbu, C.; Bujoreanu, C.

    2016-08-01

    Turbocharger rotors for the spark and compression ignition engines are resistant steels manufactured in order to support the exhaust gas temperatures exceeding 1200 K. In fact, the mechanical stress is not large as the power consumption of these systems is up to 10 kW, but the operating speeds are high, ranging between 30000 ÷ 250000 rpm. Therefore, the correct turbochargers functioning involves, even from the design stage, the accurate evaluation of the temperature effects, of the turbine torque due to the engine exhaust gases and of the vibration system behaviour caused by very high operating speeds. In addition, the turbocharger lubrication complicates the model, because the classical hydrodynamic theory cannot be applied to evaluate the floating bush bearings. The paper proposes a FEM study using CATIA environment, both as modeling medium and as tool for the numerical analysis, in order to highlight the turbocharger complex behaviour. An accurate design may prevent some major issues which can occur during its operation.

  20. Rotor and bearing system for a turbomachine

    DOEpatents

    Lubell, Daniel; Weissert, Dennis

    2006-09-26

    A rotor and bearing system for a turbomachine. The turbomachine includes a drive shaft, an impeller positioned on the drive shaft, and a turbine positioned on the drive shaft proximate to the impeller. The bearing system comprises one gas journal bearing supporting the drive shaft between the impeller and the turbine. The area between the impeller and the turbine is an area of increased heat along the drive shaft in comparison to other locations along the drive shaft. The section of the drive shaft positioned between impeller and the turbine is also a section of the drive shaft that experiences increased stressed and load in the turbomachine. The inventive bearing machine system positions only one radial bearing in this area of increased stress and load.

  1. Transient vibrations of a bent rotor having residual imbalance during its rundown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostyuk, A. G.; Volokhovskaya, O. A.

    2015-09-01

    The model of a single-span rotor having an initial nonremovable sag and residual imbalance is used for estimating the amplitudes of its resonance vibrations at check points (on the supports and in the middle of the span) in the vicinity of critical speeds lying below the operating angular speed passed by the rotor as it rotates with an angular deceleration in the period from the turbine disconnection moment to its full stop (during the rundown). Two cases of installing the rotor on yielding anisotropic supports (sleeve-type bearings with an elliptic bore) are considered: during rig tests when there are two yielding supports, and when the rotor interacts with the remaining part of the assembled turbine set shaft system, which was modeled by using a yielding support at the left-hand end and a fixed hinge at the right-hand end. The analysis procedure is illustrated by calculations carried out for a K-300-23.5 turbine's high-pressure rotor having an initial sag and residual imbalance. The values of both excitation initiating factors were taken equal to their maximum permissible levels established by the limitations imposed from turbine sets operating experience on the hot-test values for the initial sag of a thermally unstable rotor and for its residual imbalance. The list of considered cases included lumped imbalance of the rotor resulted from separation of a blade or disk section and distributed residual imbalance remaining after preliminary balancing of the rotor on a rig. An analysis of the obtained results is presented.

  2. Rotor blade vortex interaction noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yung H.

    2000-02-01

    Blade-vortex interaction noise-generated by helicopter main rotor blades is one of the most severe noise problems and is very important both in military applications and community acceptance of rotorcraft. Research over the decades has substantially improved physical understanding of noise-generating mechanisms, and various design concepts have been investigated to control noise radiation using advanced blade planform shapes and active blade control techniques. The important parameters to control rotor blade-vortex interaction noise and vibration have been identified: blade tip vortex structures and its trajectory, blade aeroelastic deformation, and airloads. Several blade tip design concepts have been investigated for diffusing tip vortices and also for reducing noise. However, these tip shapes have not been able to substantially reduce blade-vortex interaction noise without degradation of rotor performance. Meanwhile, blade root control techniques, such as higher-harmonic pitch control (HHC) and individual blade control (IBC) concepts, have been extensively investigated for noise and vibration reduction. The HHC technique has proved the substantial blade-vortex interaction noise reduction, up to 6 dB, while vibration and low-frequency noise have been increased. Tests with IBC techniques have shown the simultaneous reduction of rotor noise and vibratory loads with 2/rev pitch control inputs. Recently, active blade control concepts with smart structures have been investigated with the emphasis on active blade twist and trailing edge flap. Smart structures technologies are very promising, but further advancements are needed to meet all the requirements of rotorcraft applications in frequency, force, and displacement.

  3. Rotor blades for turbine engines

    DOEpatents

    Piersall, Matthew R; Potter, Brian D

    2013-02-12

    A tip shroud that includes a plurality of damping fins, each damping fin including a substantially non-radially-aligned surface that is configured to make contact with a tip shroud of a neighboring rotor blade. At least one damping fin may include a leading edge damping fin and at least one damping fin may include a trailing edge damping fin. The leading edge damping fin may be configured to correspond to the trailing edge damping fin.

  4. Drive system for the retraction/extension of variable diameter rotor systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gmirya, Yuriy (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A drive system for a variable diameter rotor (VDR) system includes a plurality of rotor blade assemblies with inner and outer rotor blade segments. The outer blade segment being telescopically mounted to the inner blade segment. The VDR retraction/extension system includes a drive housing mounted at the root of each blade. The housing supports a spool assembly, a harmonic gear set and an electric motor. The spool assembly includes a pair of counter rotating spools each of which drive a respective cable which extends through the interior of the inboard rotor blade section and around a pulley mounted to the outboard rotor blade section. In operation, the electric motor drives the harmonic gear set which rotates the counter rotating spools. Rotation of the spools causes the cables to be wound onto or off their respective spool consequently effecting retraction/extension of the pulley and the attached outboard rotor blade section relative the inboard rotor blade section. As each blade drive system is independently driven by a separate electrical motor, each independent VDR blade assembly is independently positionable.

  5. Chaos control and impact suppression in rotor-bearing system using magnetorheological fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccirillo, V.; Balthazar, J. M.; Tusset, A. M.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper a general dynamic model of a rotor-bearing system using magnetorheological fluid (MR) is presented. The mathematical model of the rotor-bearing system results from a Jeffcott rotor with two-degrees of freedom and discontinuous supports. The effect of magnetorheological fluid on vibration is investigated based on a model of a modified LuGre dynamical friction model. A comparison with equivalent rotor-bearing system is made to verify the contribution of MR in this system. In this study two different implementations of the control procedure are presented, one eliminating the chaotic behavior and the second suppressing the unbalancing vibration so as to avoid impact in rotor-bearing system. First, to control the undesirable chaos in rotor-bearing system a damped passive control methodology is used. On the other hand, to suppressing the impact vibration, the Fuzzy Logic Control is considered. Results demonstrate that undesirable behaviors of rotor can be avoided by varying the damping force.

  6. A study of rotor broadband noise mechanisms and helicopter tail rotor noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Shau-Tak Rudy

    1990-01-01

    The rotor broadband noise mechanisms considered are the following: (1) lift fluctuation due to turbulence ingestion; (2) boundary layer/trailing edge interaction; (3) tip vortex formation; and (4) turbulent vortex shedding from blunt trailing edge. Predictions show good agreement with available experimental data. The study shows that inflow turbulence is the most important broadband noise source for typical helicopters' main rotors at low- and mid-frequencies. Due to the size difference, isolated helicopter tail rotor broadband noise is not important compared to the much louder main rotor broadband noise. However, the inflow turbulence noise from a tail rotor can be very significant because it is operating in a highly turbulent environment, ingesting wakes from upstream components of the helicopter. The study indicates that the main rotor turbulent wake is the most important source of tail rotor broadband noise. The harmonic noise due to ingestion of main rotor tip vortices is studied.

  7. An unsteady rotor/fuselage interaction method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egolf, T. Alan; Lorber, Peter F.

    1987-01-01

    An analytical method has been developed to treat unsteady helicopter rotor, wake, and fuselage interaction aerodynamics. An existing lifting line/prescribed wake rotor analysis and a source panel fuselage analysis were modified to predict vibratory fuselage airloads. The analyses were coupled through the induced flow velocities of the rotor and wake on the fuselage and the fuselage on the rotor. A prescribed displacement technique was used to distort the rotor wake about the fuselage. Sensitivity studies were performed to determine the influence of wake and body geometry on the computed airloads. Predicted and measured mean and unsteady pressures on a cylindrical body in the wake of a two-bladed rotor were compared. Initial results show good qualitative agreement.

  8. Parametric tip effects for conformable rotor applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantay, W. R.; Yeager, W. T., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A research study was initiated to systematically determine the impact of selected blade tip geometric parameters on aeroelasticity conformable rotor performance and loads characteristics. The model articulated rotors included baseline and torsionally soft blades with interchangeable tips. Seven blade tip designs were evaluated on the baseline rotor and three tip designs were tested on the torsionally soft blades. The designs incorporated a systematic variation in three geometric parameters: sweep, taper, and anhedral. The rotors were evaluated in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel at several advance ratios, lift and propulsive force values, and tip Mach numbers. Based on the test results, tip parameter variations generated significant rotor performance and loads difference for both baseline and torsionally soft blades. Azimuthal variation of elastic twist generated by the tip parameters strongly correlated with rotor performance and loads, but the magnitude of advancing blade elastic twist did not correlate.

  9. Rotor fatigue monitoring data acquisition system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.

    1993-01-01

    The 40 by 80 Foot Wind Tunnel of the National Full Scale Aerodynamics Complex (NFAC) had a requirement to monitor rotor fatigue during a test. This test subjected various rotor components to stress levels higher than their structural fatigue limits. A data acquisition system was developed to monitor the cumulative fatigue damage of rotor components using National Instruments hardware and LabVIEW software. A full description of the data acquisition system including its configuration and salient features, is presented in this paper.

  10. Inertial dynamics of a general purpose rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duval, R. W.

    1979-01-01

    The inertial dynamics of a fully articulated stiff rotor blade are derived with emphasis on equations that facilitate an organized programming approach for simulation applications. The model for the derivation includes hinge offset and six degrees of freedom for the rotor shaft. Results are compared with the flapping and lead-lag equations currently used in the Rotor Systems Research Aircraft simulation model and differences are analyzed.

  11. Flywheel Rotor Safe-Life Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratner, J. K. H.; Chang, J. B.; Christopher, D. A.; McLallin, Kerry L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Since the 1960s, research has been conducted into the use of flywheels as energy storage systems. The-proposed applications include energy storage for hybrid and electric automobiles, attitude control and energy storage for satellites, and uninterruptible power supplies for hospitals and computer centers. For many years, however, the use of flywheels for space applications was restricted by the total weight of a system employing a metal rotor. With recent technological advances in the manufacturing of composite materials, however, lightweight composite rotors have begun to be proposed for such applications. Flywheels with composite rotors provide much higher power and energy storage capabilities than conventional chemical batteries. However, the failure of a high speed flywheel rotor could be a catastrophic event. For this reason, flywheel rotors are classified by the NASA Fracture Control Requirements Standard as fracture critical parts. Currently, there is no industry standard to certify a composite rotor for safe and reliable operation forth( required lifetime of the flywheel. Technical problems hindering the development of this standard include composite manufacturing inconsistencies, insufficient nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques for detecting defects and/or impact damage, lack of standard material test methods for characterizing composite rotor design allowables, and no unified proof (over-spin) test for flight rotors. As part of a flywheel rotor safe-life certification pro-ram funded b the government, a review of the state of the art in composite rotors is in progress. The goal of the review is to provide a clear picture of composite flywheel rotor technologies. The literature review has concentrated on the following topics concerning composites and composite rotors: durability (fatigue) and damage tolerance (safe-life) analysis/test methods, in-service NDE and health monitoring techniques, spin test methods/ procedures, and containment options

  12. Preliminary investigation of labyrinth packing pressure drops at onset of swirl-induced rotor instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E. H.; Vohr, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    Backward and forward subsynchronous instability was observed in a flexible model test rotor under the influence of swirl flow in a straight-through labyrinth packing. The packing pressure drop at the onset of instability was then measured for a range of operating speeds, clearances and inlet swirl conditions. The trend in these measurements for forward swirl and forward instability is generally consistent with the short packing rotor force formulations of Benchert and Wachter. Diverging clearances were also destabilizing and had a forward orbit with forward swirl and a backward orbit with reverse swirl. A larger, stiff rotor model system is now being assembled which will permit testing steam turbine-type straight-through and hi-lo labyrinth packings. With calibrated and adjustable bearings in this new apparatus, direct measure of the net destabilizing force generated by the packings can be made.

  13. Design of helicopter rotors to noise constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaeffer, E. G.; Sternfeld, H., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Results of the initial phase of a research project to study the design constraints on helicopter noise are presented. These include the calculation of nonimpulsive rotor harmonic and broadband hover noise spectra, over a wide range of rotor design variables and the sensitivity of perceived noise level (PNL) to changes in rotor design parameters. The prediction methodology used correlated well with measured whirl tower data. Application of the predictions to variations in rotor design showed tip speed and thrust as having the most effect on changing PNL.

  14. Rotor/wing aerodynamic interactions in hover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felker, F. F.; Light, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical investigation of rotor/wing aerodynamic interactions in hover is described. The experimental investigation consisted of both a large-scale and small-scale test. A 0.658-scale, V-22 rotor and wing was used in the large-scale test. Wind download, wing surface pressure, rotor performance, and rotor downwash data from the large-scale test are presented. A small-scale experiment was conducted to determine how changes in the rotor/wing geometry affected the aerodynamic interactions. These geometry variations included the distance between the rotor and wing, wing incidence angle, and configurations both with the rotor axis at the tip of the wing (tilt rotor configuration) and with the rotor axis at the center of the wing (compound helicopter configuration). A wing with boundary-layer control was also tested to evaluate the effect of leading and trailing edge upper surface blowing on the wing download. A computationally efficient, semi-empirical theory was developed to predict the download on the wing. Finally, correlations between the theoretical predictions and test data are presented.

  15. Prediction of helicopter rotor rotational noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guohua; Gao, Zheng

    1991-06-01

    Based on Farassat (1981) formulation 1A for subsonic time domain, a method is developed for predicting the rotor rotational noise, which is valid for arbitrary observer positions and all linear flight conditions. Without considering the elasticity of the blade, the retarded time equation and all of the integrands in the formulation 1A are derived and expressed as the proper form for numerical calculation. As examples, the noise calculation of the helicopter Z-8 rotor and 1/4 scale UH-1 rotor in hover are carried out. Discussions are presented on the influence of rotor parameters, such as the tip Mach number, the disk loading, and the blade airfoil.

  16. Rotor thermal stress monitoring in steam turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonín, Bouberle; Jan, Jakl; Jindřich, Liška

    2015-11-01

    One of the issues of steam turbines diagnostics is monitoring of rotor thermal stress that arises from nonuniform temperature field. The effort of steam turbine operator is to operate steam turbine in such conditions, that rotor thermal stress doesn't exceed the specified limits. If rotor thermal stress limits are exceeded for a long time during machine operation, the rotor fatigue life is shortened and this may lead to unexpected machine failure. Thermal stress plays important role during turbine cold startup, when occur the most significant differences of temperatures through rotor cross section. The temperature field can't be measured directly in the entire rotor cross section and standardly the temperature is measured by thermocouple mounted in stator part. From this reason method for numerical solution of partial differential equation of heat propagation through rotor cross section must be combined with method for calculation of temperature on rotor surface. In the first part of this article, the application of finite volume method for calculation of rotor thermal stress is described. The second part of article deals with optimal trend generation of thermal flux, that could be used for optimal machine loading.

  17. Dynamic Balancing Of Turbomachinery Shafts And Rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verhoff, Vincent G.

    1993-01-01

    Method for dynamic balancing of turbomachinery shafts and rotors developed with view toward reducing time spent in balancing process. Improved method based on existing dynamic-balancing techniques and equipment, incorporating use of balancing arbor, which is mandrel duplicating mounting geometry and dynamic-balance properties of shaft balanced. Once shaft balanced, not necessary to disassemble machinery and/or shaft completely and rebalance shaft when replacing rotor on shaft. Instead, one balances replacement rotor on balancing arbor, then installs balanced rotor on shaft.

  18. Rotor Flapping Response to Active Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Khanh; Johnson, Wayne

    2004-01-01

    Rotor active control using higher harmonic blade pitch has been proposed as a means to reduce both rotor radiated noise and airframe vibration and to enhance rotor performance. The higher harmonic input, however, can affect rotor thrust and cyclic flapping - the basic trim characteristics of the rotor. Some of the trim changes can negate the active control benefits. For example, wind tunnel test results of a full scale BO-105 rotor with individual-blade control indicate some rotor performance improvements, accompanied with changes in rotor trim, using two-per-rev blade pitch input. The observed performance benefits could therefore be a simple manifestation of the trim change rather than an efficient redistribution of the rotor airloads. More recently, the flight test of the BO-105 helicopter equip,ped with individual-blade-control actuators also reported trim changes whenever the two-per-rev blade pitch for noise reduction was activated. The pilot had to adjust the trim control to maintain the aircraft under a constant flight path. These two cases highlight the, importance of trim considerations in the application of active control to rotorcraft.

  19. High Speed Rotor Head Mounted Instrumentation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hee, Leonard; Reynolds, R. S. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    NASA Ames Research Center has been investigating the air flow of a rotor blade on a UH-60 Blackhawk helicopter in-flight. This paper will address the hardware problems and solutions used to design and fabricate an instrumentation system on top of a UH-60 main rotor head. The instrumentation system consisted of 10 data systems operating in parallel and collected data from 370 sensors that are mounted in four rotor blades and on the rotating rotor head. The data was recorded on board the aircraft and simultaneously down linked to the ground station at 7.5 MHz.

  20. A comprehensive vibration analysis of a coupled rotor/fuselage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Hyeonsoo

    A comprehensive vibration analysis of a coupled rotor/fuselage system for a two-bladed teetering rotor using finite element methods in space and time is developed which incorporates consistent rotor/fuselage structural, aerodynamic, and inertial couplings and a modern free wake model. A coordinate system is developed to take into account a teetering rotor's unique characteristics, such as teetering motion and undersling. Coupled nonlinear periodic blade and fuselage equations are transformed to the modal space in the fixed frame and solved simultaneously. The elastic line and detailed 3-D NASTRAN finite element models of the AH-1G helicopter airframe from the DAMVIBS program are integrated into the elastic rotor finite element model. Analytical predictions of rotor control angles, blade loads, hub forces, and vibration are compared with AH-1G Operation Load Survey flight test data. The blade loads predicted by present analysis show generally fair agreement with the flight test data, especially blade chord bending moment estimation shows good agreement. Calculated 2/rev vertical vibration levels at pilot seat show good correlation with the flight test data both in magnitude and phase, but 4/rev vibration levels show fair correlation only in magnitude. Lateral vibration results show more disagreement than vertical vibration results. Pylon flexibility effect is essential in the two-bladed teetering rotor vibration analysis. The pylon flexibility increases the first lag frequency by about 14%, and decreases 2/rev longitudinal and lateral hub forces by more than half. Rotor/fuselage coupling reduces 2/rev vertical and lateral vibration levels by 60% to 70% and has a small effect on 4/rev vibration levels. Modeling of difficult components (secondary structures, doors/panels, etc) is essential in predicting airframe natural frequencies. Refined aerodynamics such as free wake and unsteady aerodynamics have an important role in the prediction of vibration. For example, free

  1. Piping Flexibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A NASA computer program aids Hudson Engineering Corporation, Houston, Texas, in the design and construction of huge petrochemical processing plants like the one shown, which is located at Ju'aymah, Saudi Arabia. The pipes handling the flow of chemicals are subject to a variety of stresses, such as weight and variations in pressure and temperature. Hudson Engineering uses a COSMIC piping flexibility analysis computer program to analyze stresses and unsure the necessary strength and flexibility of the pipes. This program helps the company realize substantial savings in reduced engineering time.

  2. Flexible flatfoot

    PubMed Central

    Atik, Aziz; Ozyurek, Selahattin

    2014-01-01

    While being one of the most frequent parental complained deformities, flatfoot does not have a universally accepted description. The reasons of flexible flatfoot are still on debate, but they must be differentiated from rigid flatfoot which occurs secondary to other pathologies. These children are commonly brought up to a physician without any complaint. It should be kept in mind that the etiology may vary from general soft tissue laxities to intrinsic foot pathologies. Every flexible flatfoot does not require radiological examination or treatment if there is no complaint. Otherwise further investigation and conservative or surgical treatment may necessitate. PMID:28058304

  3. Method for manufacturing a rotor having superconducting coils

    DOEpatents

    Driscoll, David I.; Shoykhet, Boris A.

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus for manufacturing a rotor for use with a rotating machine is provided that employs a superconducting coil on the rotor. An adhesive is applied to an outer surface of the rotor body, which may include a groove disposed within an outer surface of the rotor body. A superconducting coil is then mounted onto the rotor body such that the adhesive bonds the superconducting coil to the rotor body.

  4. Synchronous dynamics of a coupled shaft/bearing/housing system with auxiliary support from a clearance bearing: Analysis and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawen, James, Jr.; Flowers, George T.

    1992-01-01

    This study examines the response of a flexible rotor supported by load sharing between linear bearings and an auxiliary clearance bearing. The objective of the work is to develop a better understanding of the dynamical behavior of a magnetic bearing supported rotor system interacting with auxiliary bearings during a critical operating condition. Of particular interest is the effect of coupling between the bearing/housing and shaft vibration on the rotordynamical responses. A simulation model is developed and a number of studies are performed for various parametric configurations. An experimental investigation is also conducted to compare and verify the rotordynamic behavior predicted by the simulation studies. A strategy for reducing synchronous shaft vibration through appropriate design of coupled shaft/bearing/housing vibration modes is identified. The results are presented and discussed.

  5. Synchronous dynamics of a coupled shaft/bearing/housing system with auxiliary support from a clearance bearing: Analysis and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawen, James L., Jr.; Flowers, George T.

    1995-01-01

    This study examines the response of a flexible rotor supported by load sharing between linear bearings and an auxiliary clearance bearing. The objective is to develop a better understanding of the dynamical behavior of a magnetic bearing supported rotor system interacting with auxiliary bearings during a critical operating condition. Of particular interest is the effect of coupling between the bearing/housing and shaft vibration on the rotordynamical responses. A simulation model is developed and a number of studies are performed for various parametric configurations. An experimental investigation is also conducted to compare and verify the rotordynamic behavior predicted by the simulation studies. A strategy for reducing synchronous shaft vibration through appropriate design of coupled shaft/bearing/housing vibration modes is identified.

  6. Impact of magnetic suspension stiffness on aeroelastic compressor rotor vibrations of gas pumping units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekhonoshina, E. V.; Modorskii, V. Ya.

    2016-10-01

    This paper describes simulation of oscillation modes in the elastic rotor supports with the gas-dynamic flow influence on the rotor in the magnetic suspension in the course of computational experiments. The system of engineering analysis ANSYS 15.0 was used as a numerical tool. The finite volume method for gas dynamics and finite element method for evaluating components of the stress-strain state (SSS) were applied for computation. The research varied magnetic suspension rigidity and estimated the SSS components in the system "gas-dynamic flow - compressor rotor - magnetic suspensions." The influence of aeroelastic effects on the impeller and the rotor on the deformability of vibration magnetic suspension was detected.

  7. Theoretical study of hull-rotor aerodynamic interference on semibuoyant vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spangler, S. B.; Smith, C. A.

    1978-01-01

    Analytical methods are developed to predict the pressure distribution and overall loads on the hulls of airships which have close coupled, relatively large and/or high disk loading propulsors for attitude control, station keeping, and partial support of total weight as well as provision of thrust in cruise. The methods comprise a surface-singularity, potential-flow model for the hull and lifting surfaces (such as tails) and a rotor model which calculates the velocity induced by the rotor and its wake at points adjacent to the wake. Use of these two models provides an inviscid pressure distribution on the hull with rotor interference. A boundary layer separation prediction method is used to locate separation on the hull, and a wake pressure is imposed on the separated region for purposes of calculating hull loads. Results of calculations are shown to illustrate various cases of rotor-hull interference and comparisons with small scale data are made to evaluate the method.

  8. Chiral Bands for Quasi-Proton and Quasi-Neutron Coupling with a Triaxial Rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, B.; Zhang, S. Q.; Wang, S. Y.; Meng, J.

    2008-04-01

    A particle rotor model (PRM) with a quasi-proton and a quasi-neutron coupled with a triaxial rotor is developed and applied to study chiral doublet bands with configurations of an h11/2 proton and an h11/2 quasi-neutron. With pairing treated by the BCS approximation, the present quasi-particle PRM is aimed at simulating one proton and many neutron holes coupled with a triaxial rotor. It is found that aplanar rotation or equivalently chiral geometry exists beyond the usual one proton and one neutron hole coupled with a triaxial rotor. After including the pairing correlation, the model describes the candidate chiral bands in 126Cs successfully, which supports the interpretation of chirality geometry.

  9. Full-scale wind-tunnel test of the aeroelastic stability of a bearingless main rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warmbrodt, W.; Mccloud, J., III; Sheffler, M.; Staley, J.

    1981-01-01

    The rotor studied in the wind tunnel had previously been flight tested on a BO-105 helicopter. The investigation was conducted to determine the rotor's aeroelastic stability characteristics in hover and at airspeeds up to 143 knots. These characteristics are compared with those obtained from whirl-tower and flight tests and predictions from a digital computer simulation. It was found that the rotor was stable for all conditions tested. At constant tip speed, shaft angle, and airspeed, stability increases with blade collective pitch setting. No significant change in system damping occurred that was attributable to frequency coalescence between the rotor inplane regressing mode and the support modes. Stability levels determined in the wind tunnel were of the same magnitude and yielded the same trends as data obtained from whirl-tower and flight tests.

  10. Machined blocks ease job of separating generator rotor from Francis-type turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, B. )

    1991-06-01

    The Bureau of Reclamation has designed a new method of separating the generator rotor from a hydraulic turbine. Before disassembly, workers measure the distance from the top of the discharge ring to the bottom of the turbine runner, at 10 to 12 locations around the discharge ring. Mechanics then machine steel blocks to the exact measurement for each location. Workers then use the generator's braking system to jack up the generator, and then set the steel blocks in place on the discharge ring. The generator is then lowered onto the jacking block, which supports the rotor. The turbine runner barely touches the steel blocks. The coupling bolts are then removed and the rotor lifted out. Since the elevation of the turbine runner is not significantly changed, reassembly is a matter of setting the rotor in place. This method has saved manhours of labor and has increased worker safety by decreasing workers' handling of heavy equipment.

  11. Recent developments in the dynamics of advanced rotor systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.

    1985-01-01

    The problems that were encountered in the dynamics of advanced rotor systems are described. The methods for analyzing these problems are discussed, as are past solutions of the problems. To begin, the basic dynamic problems of rotors are discussed: aeroelastic stability, rotor and airframe loads, and aircraft vibration. Next, advanced topics that are the subject of current research are described: vibration control, dynamic upflow, finite element analyses, and composite materials. Finally, the dynamics of various rotorcraft configurations are considered: hingeless rotors, bearingless rotors, rotors with circulation control, coupled rotor/engine dynamics, articulated rotors, and tilting proprotor aircraft.

  12. Advances in Rotor Performance and Turbulent Wake Simulation Using DES and Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaderjian, Neal M.

    2012-01-01

    Time-dependent Navier-Stokes simulations have been carried out for a rigid V22 rotor in hover, and a flexible UH-60A rotor in forward flight. Emphasis is placed on understanding and characterizing the effects of high-order spatial differencing, grid resolution, and Spalart-Allmaras (SA) detached eddy simulation (DES) in predicting the rotor figure of merit (FM) and resolving the turbulent rotor wake. The FM was accurately predicted within experimental error using SA-DES. Moreover, a new adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) procedure revealed a complex and more realistic turbulent rotor wake, including the formation of turbulent structures resembling vortical worms. Time-dependent flow visualization played a crucial role in understanding the physical mechanisms involved in these complex viscous flows. The predicted vortex core growth with wake age was in good agreement with experiment. High-resolution wakes for the UH-60A in forward flight exhibited complex turbulent interactions and turbulent worms, similar to the V22. The normal force and pitching moment coefficients were in good agreement with flight-test data.

  13. Dynamic analysis of a geared rotor system considering a slant crack on the shaft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Qinkai; Zhao, Jingshan; Chu, Fulei

    2012-12-01

    The vibration problems associated with geared systems have been the focus of research in recent years. As the torque is mainly transmitted by the geared system, a slant crack is more likely to appear on the gear shaft. Due to the slant crack and its breathing mechanism, the dynamic behavior of cracked geared system would differ distinctly with that of uncracked system. Relatively less work is reported on slant crack in the geared rotor system during the past research. Thus, the dynamic analysis of a geared rotor-bearing system with a breathing slant crack is performed in the paper. The finite element model of a geared rotor with slant crack is presented. Based on fracture mechanics, the flexibility matrix for the slant crack is derived that accounts for the additional stress intensity factors. Three methods for whirling analysis, parametric instability analysis and steady-state response analysis are introduced. Then, by taking a widely used one-stage geared rotor-bearing system as an example, the whirling frequencies of the equivalent time-invariant system, two types of instability regions and steady-state response under the excitations of unbalance forces and tooth transmission errors, are computed numerically. The effects of crack depth, position and type (transverse or slant) on the system dynamic behaviors are considered in the discussion. The comparative study with slant cracked geared rotor is carried out to explore distinctive features in their modal, parametric instability and frequency response behaviors.

  14. The Flexibility Hypothesis of Healing.

    PubMed

    Hinton, Devon E; Kirmayer, Laurence J

    2017-03-01

    Theories of healing have attempted to identify general mechanisms that may work across different modalities. These include altering expectations, remoralization, and instilling hope. In this paper, we argue that many forms of healing and psychotherapy may work by inducing positive psychological states marked by flexibility or an enhanced ability to shift cognitive sets. Healing practices may induce these states of cognitive and emotional flexibility through specific symbolic interventions we term "flexibility primers" that can include images, metaphors, music, and other media. The flexibility hypothesis suggests that cognitive and emotional flexibility is represented, elicited, and enacted through multiple modalities in healing rituals. Identifying psychological processes and cultural forms that evoke and support cognitive and emotional flexibility provides a way to understand the cultural specificity and potential efficacy of particular healing practices and can guide the design of interventions that promote resilience and well-being.

  15. An analytic modeling and system identification study of rotor/fuselage dynamics at hover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Steven W.; Curtiss, H. C., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    A combination of analytic modeling and system identification methods have been used to develop an improved dynamic model describing the response of articulated rotor helicopters to control inputs. A high-order linearized model of coupled rotor/body dynamics including flap and lag degrees of freedom and inflow dynamics with literal coefficients is compared to flight test data from single rotor helicopters in the near hover trim condition. The identification problem was formulated using the maximum likelihood function in the time domain. The dynamic model with literal coefficients was used to generate the model states, and the model was parametrized in terms of physical constants of the aircraft rather than the stability derivatives resulting in a significant reduction in the number of quantities to be identified. The likelihood function was optimized using the genetic algorithm approach. This method proved highly effective in producing an estimated model from flight test data which included coupled fuselage/rotor dynamics. Using this approach it has been shown that blade flexibility is a significant contributing factor to the discrepancies between theory and experiment shown in previous studies. Addition of flexible modes, properly incorporating the constraint due to the lag dampers, results in excellent agreement between flight test and theory, especially in the high frequency range.

  16. An analytic modeling and system identification study of rotor/fuselage dynamics at hover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Steven W.; Curtiss, H. C., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    A combination of analytic modeling and system identification methods have been used to develop an improved dynamic model describing the response of articulated rotor helicopters to control inputs. A high-order linearized model of coupled rotor/body dynamics including flap and lag degrees of freedom and inflow dynamics with literal coefficients is compared to flight test data from single rotor helicopters in the near hover trim condition. The identification problem was formulated using the maximum likelihood function in the time domain. The dynamic model with literal coefficients was used to generate the model states, and the model was parametrized in terms of physical constants of the aircraft rather than the stability derivatives, resulting in a significant reduction in the number of quantities to be identified. The likelihood function was optimized using the genetic algorithm approach. This method proved highly effective in producing an estimated model from flight test data which included coupled fuselage/rotor dynamics. Using this approach it has been shown that blade flexibility is a significant contributing factor to the discrepancies between theory and experiment shown in previous studies. Addition of flexible modes, properly incorporating the constraint due to the lag dampers, results in excellent agreement between flight test and theory, especially in the high frequency range.

  17. Multiple piece turbine rotor blade

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Russell B; Fedock, John A

    2013-05-21

    A multiple piece turbine rotor blade with a shell having an airfoil shape and secured between a spar and a platform with the spar including a tip end piece. a snap ring fits around the spar and abuts against the spar tip end piece on a top side and abuts against a shell on the bottom side so that the centrifugal loads from the shell is passed through the snap ring and into the spar and not through a tip cap dovetail slot and projection structure.

  18. Blood Pump Having a Magnetically Suspended Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antaki, James F. (Inventor); Paden, Bradley (Inventor); Burgreen, Gregory (Inventor); Groom, Nelson J. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A blood pump preferably has a magnetically suspended rotor that rotates within a housing. The rotor may rotate about a stator disposed within the housing. Radial magnetic bearings may be defined within the stator and the rotor in order to suspend the rotor. The radial magnetic bearings may be passive magnetic bearings that include permanent magnets disposed within the stator and the rotor or active magnetic bearings. The pump may further include an axial magnetic bearing that may be either a passive or an active magnetic bearing. A motor that drives the rotor may be disposed within the housing in order to more easily dissipate heat generated by the motor. A primary flow path is defined between the rotor and the stator, and a secondary flow path is defined between the stator and the rotor. Preferably, a substantial majority of blood passes through the primary flow path. The secondary flow path is large enough so that it provides adequate flushing of the secondary flow path while being small enough to permit efficient operation of the radial magnet bearings across the secondary flow path.

  19. Blood Pump Having a Magnetically Suspended Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antaki, James F. (Inventor); Paden, Bradley (Inventor); Burgreen, Gregory (Inventor); Groom, Nelson J. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A blood pump preferably has a magnetically suspended rotor that rotates within a housing. The rotor may rotate about a stator disposed within the housing. Radial magnetic bearings may be defined within the stator and the rotor in order to suspend the rotor. The radial magnetic bearings may be passive magnetic bearings that include permanent magnets disposed within the stator and the rotor or active magnetic bearings. The pump may further include an axial magnetic bearing that may be either a passive or an active magnetic bearing. A motor that drives the rotor may be disposed within the housing in order to more easily dissipate heat generated by the motor. A primary flow path is defined between the rotor and the stator, and a secondary flow path is defined between the stator and the rotor. Preferably, a substantial majority of blood passes through the primary flow path. The secondary flow path is large enough so that it provides adequate flushing of the secondary flow path while being small enough to permit efficient operation of the radial magnet bearings across the secondary flow path.

  20. Pneumatic boot for helicopter rotor deicing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaha, B. J.; Evanich, P. L.

    1981-01-01

    Pneumatic deicer boots for helicopter rotor blades were tested. The tests were conducted in the 6 by 9 ft icing research tunnel on a stationary section of a UH-IH helicopter main rotor blade. The boots were effective in removing ice and in reducing aerodynamic drag due to ice.

  1. Total main rotor isolation system analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankewitsch, V.

    1981-01-01

    Requirements, preliminary design, and verification procedures for a total main rotor isolation system at n/rev are presented. The fuselage is isolated from the vibration inducing main rotor at one frequency in all degrees of freedom by four antiresonant isolation units. Effects of parametric variations on isolation system performance are evaluated.

  2. Prediction and reduction of rotor broadband noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayden, R. E.; Aravamudan, K. S.

    1978-01-01

    Prediction techniques which can be or have been applied to subsonic rotors, and methods for designing helicopter rotors for reduced broadband noise generation are summarized. It is shown how detailed physical models of the noise source can be used to identify approaches to noise control.

  3. Flapping inertia for selected rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, John D.; May, Matthew J.

    1991-01-01

    Aerodynamics of helicopter rotor systems cannot be investigated without consideration for the dynamics of the rotor. One of the principal properties of the rotor which affects the rotor dynamics is the inertia of the rotor blade about its root attachment. Previous aerodynamic investigation have been performed on rotor blades with a variety of planforms to determine the performance differences due to blade planform. The blades tested for this investigation have been tested on the U.S. Army 2 meter rotor test system (2MRTS) in the NASA Langley 14 by 22 foot subsonic tunnel for hover performance. This investigation was intended to provide fundamental information on the flapping inertia of five rotor blades with differing planforms. The inertia of the bare cuff and the cuff with a blade extension were also measured for comparison with the inertia of the blades. Inertia was determined using a swing testing technique, using the period of oscillation to determine the effective flapping inertia. The effect of damping in the swing test was measured and described. A comparison of the flapping inertials for rectangular and tapered planform blades of approximately the same mass showed the tapered blades to have a lower inertia, as expected.

  4. Theoretical models of helicopter rotor noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkings, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    For low speed rotors, it is shown that unsteady load models are only partially successful in predicting experimental levels. A theoretical model is presented which leads to the concept of unsteady thickness noise. This gives better agreement with test results. For high speed rotors, it is argued that present models are incomplete and that other mechanisms are at work. Some possibilities are briefly discussed.

  5. Wave rotor-enhanced gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Gerard E.; Scott, Jones M.; Paxson, Daniel E.

    1995-01-01

    The benefits of wave rotor-topping in small (400 to 600 hp-class) and intermediate (3000 to 4000 hp-class) turboshaft engines, and large (80,000 to 100,000 lb(sub f)-class) high bypass ratio turbofan engines are evaluated. Wave rotor performance levels are calculated using a one-dimensional design/analysis code. Baseline and wave rotor-enhanced engine performance levels are obtained from a cycle deck in which the wave rotor is represented as a burner with pressure gain. Wave rotor-toppings is shown to significantly enhance the specific fuel consumption and specific power of small and intermediate size turboshaft engines. The specific fuel consumption of the wave rotor-enhanced large turbofan engine can be reduced while operating at significantly reduced turbine inlet temperature. The wave rotor-enhanced engine is shown to behave off-design like a conventional engine. Discussion concerning the impact of the wave rotor/gas turbine engine integration identifies tenable technical challenges.

  6. Computerized Analysis Of Helicopter-Rotor Aeroelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, T. S. R.

    1988-01-01

    Analysis of aeroelastic stability of helicopter rotor automated. Symbolic-manipulation program, HESL, written in FORTRAN, used to aid in derivation of government equations of motion for elastic-bladed rotor. Operates both on expressions and matrices. By transferring some burden of algebraic manipulations from human analyst to computer, program reduces tedium analysis and conequent opportunity for errors.

  7. Rotor systems research aircraft simulation mathematical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houck, J. A.; Moore, F. L.; Howlett, J. J.; Pollock, K. S.; Browne, M. M.

    1977-01-01

    An analytical model developed for evaluating and verifying advanced rotor concepts is discussed. The model was used during in both open loop and real time man-in-the-loop simulation during the rotor systems research aircraft design. Future applications include: pilot training, preflight of test programs, and the evaluation of promising concepts before their implementation on the flight vehicle.

  8. An unsteady helicopter rotor: Fuselage interaction analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorber, Peter F.; Egolf, T. Alan

    1988-01-01

    A computational method was developed to treat unsteady aerodynamic interactions between a helicopter rotor, wake, and fuselage and between the main and tail rotors. An existing lifting line prescribed wake rotor analysis and a source panel fuselage analysis were coupled and modified to predict unsteady fuselage surface pressures and airloads. A prescribed displacement technique is used to position the rotor wake about the fuselage. Either a rigid blade or an aeroelastic blade analysis may be used to establish rotor operating conditions. Sensitivity studies were performed to determine the influence of the wake fuselage geometry on the computation. Results are presented that describe the induced velocities, pressures, and airloads on the fuselage and on the rotor. The ability to treat arbitrary geometries is demonstrated using a simulated helicopter fuselage. The computational results are compared with fuselage surface pressure measurements at several locations. No experimental data was available to validate the primary product of the analysis: the vibratory airloads on the entire fuselage. A main rotor-tail rotor interaction analysis is also described, along with some hover and forward flight.

  9. Radial-radial single rotor turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Platts, David A.

    2006-05-16

    A rotor for use in turbine applications has a radial compressor/pump having radially disposed spaced apart fins forming passages and a radial turbine having hollow turbine blades interleaved with the fins and through which fluid from the radial compressor/pump flows. The rotor can, in some applications, be used to produce electrical power.

  10. Sweep-twist adaptive rotor blade : final project report.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwill, Thomas D.

    2010-02-01

    Knight & Carver was contracted by Sandia National Laboratories to develop a Sweep Twist Adaptive Rotor (STAR) blade that reduced operating loads, thereby allowing a larger, more productive rotor. The blade design used outer blade sweep to create twist coupling without angled fiber. Knight & Carver successfully designed, fabricated, tested and evaluated STAR prototype blades. Through laboratory and field tests, Knight & Carver showed the STAR blade met the engineering design criteria and economic goals for the program. A STAR prototype was successfully tested in Tehachapi during 2008 and a large data set was collected to support engineering and commercial development of the technology. This report documents the methodology used to develop the STAR blade design and reviews the approach used for laboratory and field testing. The effort demonstrated that STAR technology can provide significantly greater energy capture without higher operating loads on the turbine.

  11. Computational Analysis of Multi-Rotor Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoon, Seokkwan; Lee, Henry C.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2016-01-01

    Interactional aerodynamics of multi-rotor flows has been studied for a quadcopter representing a generic quad tilt-rotor aircraft in hover. The objective of the present study is to investigate the effects of the separation distances between rotors, and also fuselage and wings on the performance and efficiency of multirotor systems. Three-dimensional unsteady Navier-Stokes equations are solved using a spatially 5th order accurate scheme, dual-time stepping, and the Detached Eddy Simulation turbulence model. The results show that the separation distances as well as the wings have significant effects on the vertical forces of quadroror systems in hover. Understanding interactions in multi-rotor flows would help improve the design of next generation multi-rotor drones.

  12. A CFD study of tilt rotor flowfields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fejtek, Ian; Roberts, Leonard

    1989-01-01

    The download on the wing produced by the rotor wake of a tilt rotor vehicle in hover is of major concern because of its severe impact on payload-carrying capability. In a concerted effort to understand the fundamental fluid dynamics that cause this download, and to help find ways to reduce it, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is employed to study this problem. The thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations are used to describe the flow, and an implicit, finite difference numerical algorithm is the method of solution. The methodology is developed to analyze the tilt rotor flowfield. Included are discussions of computations of an airfoil and wing in freestream flows at -90 degrees, a rotor alone, and wing/rotor interaction in two and three dimensions. Preliminary results demonstrate the feasibility and great potential of the present approach. Recommendations are made for both near-term and far-term improvements to the method.

  13. Substantially parallel flux uncluttered rotor machines

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, John S.

    2012-12-11

    A permanent magnet-less and brushless synchronous system includes a stator that generates a magnetic rotating field when sourced by polyphase alternating currents. An uncluttered rotor is positioned within the magnetic rotating field and is spaced apart from the stator. An excitation core is spaced apart from the stator and the uncluttered rotor and magnetically couples the uncluttered rotor. The brushless excitation source generates a magnet torque by inducing magnetic poles near an outer peripheral surface of the uncluttered rotor, and the stator currents also generate a reluctance torque by a reaction of the difference between the direct and quadrature magnetic paths of the uncluttered rotor. The system can be used either as a motor or a generator

  14. Open Rotor - Analysis of Diagnostic Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Envia, Edmane

    2011-01-01

    NASA is researching open rotor propulsion as part of its technology research and development plan for addressing the subsonic transport aircraft noise, emission and fuel burn goals. The low-speed wind tunnel test for investigating the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of a benchmark blade set at the approach and takeoff conditions has recently concluded. A high-speed wind tunnel diagnostic test campaign has begun to investigate the performance of this benchmark open rotor blade set at the cruise condition. Databases from both speed regimes will comprise a comprehensive collection of benchmark open rotor data for use in assessing/validating aerodynamic and noise prediction tools (component & system level) as well as providing insights into the physics of open rotors to help guide the development of quieter open rotors.

  15. Spiral and Rotor Patterns Produced by Fairy Ring Fungi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karst, N.; Dralle, D.; Thompson, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    Soil fungi fill many essential ecological and biogeochemical roles, e.g. decomposing litter, redistributing nutrients, and promoting biodiversity. Fairy ring fungi offer a rare glimpse into the otherwise opaque spatiotemporal dynamics of soil fungal growth, because subsurface mycelial patterns can be inferred from observations at the soil's surface. These observations can be made directly when the fungi send up fruiting bodies (e.g., mushrooms and toadstools), or indirectly via the effect the fungi have on neighboring organisms. Grasses in particular often temporarily thrive on the nutrients liberated by the fungus, creating bands of rich, dark green turf at the edge of the fungal mat. To date, only annular (the "ring" in fairy ring) and arc patterns have been described in the literature. We report observations of novel spiral and rotor pattern formation in fairy ring fungi, as seen in publically available high-resolution aerial imagery of 22 sites across the continental United States. To explain these new behaviors, we first demonstrate that a well-known model describing fairy ring formation is equivalent to the Gray-Scott reaction-diffusion model, which is known to support a wide range of dynamical behaviors, including annular traveling waves, rotors, spirals, and stable spatial patterns including spots and stripes. Bifurcation analysis and numerical simulation are then used to define the region of parameter space that supports spiral and rotor formation. We find that this region is adjacent to one within which typical fairy rings develop. Model results suggest simple experimental procedures that could potentially induce traditional ring structures to exhibit rotor or spiral dynamics. Intriguingly, the Gray-Scott model predicts that these same procedures could be used to solicit even richer patterns, including spots and stripes, which have not yet been identified in the field.

  16. Spiral and Rotor Patterns Produced by Fairy Ring Fungi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karst, N.; Dralle, D.; Thompson, S. E.

    2014-12-01

    Soil fungi fill many essential ecological and biogeochemical roles, e.g. decomposing litter, redistributing nutrients, and promoting biodiversity. Fairy ring fungi offer a rare glimpse into the otherwise opaque spatiotemporal dynamics of soil fungal growth, because subsurface mycelial patterns can be inferred from observations at the soil's surface. These observations can be made directly when the fungi send up fruiting bodies (e.g., mushrooms and toadstools), or indirectly via the effect the fungi have on neighboring organisms. Grasses in particular often temporarily thrive on the nutrients liberated by the fungus, creating bands of rich, dark green turf at the edge of the fungal mat. To date, only annular (the "ring" in fairy ring) and arc patterns have been described in the literature. We report observations of novel spiral and rotor pattern formation in fairy ring fungi, as seen in publically available high-resolution aerial imagery of 22 sites across the continental United States. To explain these new behaviors, we first demonstrate that a well-known model describing fairy ring formation is equivalent to the Gray-Scott reaction-diffusion model, which is known to support a wide range of dynamical behaviors, including annular traveling waves, rotors, spirals, and stable spatial patterns including spots and stripes. Bifurcation analysis and numerical simulation are then used to define the region of parameter space that supports spiral and rotor formation. We find that this region is adjacent to one within which typical fairy rings develop. Model results suggest simple experimental procedures that could potentially induce traditional ring structures to exhibit rotor or spiral dynamics. Intriguingly, the Gray-Scott model predicts that these same procedures could be used to solicit even richer patterns, including spots and stripes, which have not yet been identified in the field.

  17. Model updating of rotor systems by using Nonlinear least square optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, A. K.; Dewangan, P.; Sarangi, M.

    2016-07-01

    Mathematical models of structure or machineries are always different from the existing physical system, because the approach of numerical predictions to the behavior of a physical system is limited by the assumptions used in the development of the mathematical model. Model updating is, therefore necessary so that updated model should replicate the physical system. This work focuses on the model updating of rotor systems at various speeds as well as at different modes of vibration. Support bearing characteristics severely influence the dynamics of rotor systems like turbines, compressors, pumps, electrical machines, machine tool spindles etc. Therefore bearing parameters (stiffness and damping) are considered to be updating parameters. A finite element model of rotor systems is developed using Timoshenko beam element. Unbalance response in time domain and frequency response function have been calculated by numerical techniques, and compared with the experimental data to update the FE-model of rotor systems. An algorithm, based on unbalance response in time domain is proposed for updating the rotor systems at different running speeds of rotor. An attempt has been made to define Unbalance response assurance criterion (URAC) to check the degree of correlation between updated FE model and physical model.

  18. The effect of blade pitch in the rotor hydrodynamics of a cross-flow turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somoano, Miguel; Huera-Huarte, Francisco

    2016-11-01

    In this work we will show how the hydrodynamics of the rotor of a straight-bladed Cross-Flow Turbine (CFT) are affected by the Tip Speed Ratio (TSR), and the blade pitch angle imposed to the rotor. The CFT model used in experiments consists of a three-bladed (NACA-0015) vertical axis turbine with a chord (c) to rotor diameter (D) ratio of 0.16. Planar Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV) was used, with the laser sheet aiming at the mid-span of the blades, illuminating the inner part of the rotor and the near wake of the turbine. Tests were made by forcing the rotation of the turbine with a DC motor, which provided precise control of the TSR, while being towed in a still-water tank at a constant Reynolds number of 61000. A range of TSRs from 0.7 to 2.3 were covered for different blade pitches, ranging from 8° toe-in to 16° toe-out. The interaction between the blades in the rotor will be discussed by examining dimensionless phase-averaged vorticity fields in the inner part of the rotor and mean velocity fields in the near wake of the turbine. Supported by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness, Grant BES-2013-065366 and project DPI2015-71645-P.

  19. 14 CFR 27.1461 - Equipment containing high energy rotors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Equipment containing high energy rotors. 27... Equipment containing high energy rotors. (a) Equipment containing high energy rotors must meet paragraph (b), (c), or (d) of this section. (b) High energy rotors contained in equipment must be able to...

  20. 14 CFR 29.1461 - Equipment containing high energy rotors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Equipment containing high energy rotors. 29... § 29.1461 Equipment containing high energy rotors. (a) Equipment containing high energy rotors must meet paragraph (b), (c), or (d) of this section. (b) High energy rotors contained in equipment must...

  1. 14 CFR 25.1461 - Equipment containing high energy rotors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment containing high energy rotors. 25... § 25.1461 Equipment containing high energy rotors. (a) Equipment containing high energy rotors must meet paragraph (b), (c), or (d) of this section. (b) High energy rotors contained in equipment must...

  2. 14 CFR 25.1461 - Equipment containing high energy rotors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Equipment containing high energy rotors. 25... § 25.1461 Equipment containing high energy rotors. (a) Equipment containing high energy rotors must meet paragraph (b), (c), or (d) of this section. (b) High energy rotors contained in equipment must...

  3. 14 CFR 27.1461 - Equipment containing high energy rotors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment containing high energy rotors. 27... Equipment containing high energy rotors. (a) Equipment containing high energy rotors must meet paragraph (b), (c), or (d) of this section. (b) High energy rotors contained in equipment must be able to...

  4. 14 CFR 29.1461 - Equipment containing high energy rotors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment containing high energy rotors. 29... § 29.1461 Equipment containing high energy rotors. (a) Equipment containing high energy rotors must meet paragraph (b), (c), or (d) of this section. (b) High energy rotors contained in equipment must...

  5. 14 CFR 27.547 - Main rotor structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... structure. (a) Each main rotor assembly (including rotor hubs and blades) must be designed as prescribed in this section. (b) (c) The main rotor structure must be designed to withstand the following loads... altitude. (d) The main rotor structure must be designed to withstand loads simulating— (1) For the...

  6. 14 CFR 29.661 - Rotor blade clearance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Rotors § 29.661 Rotor blade clearance. There must be enough clearance between the rotor blades and other parts of the structure to... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Rotor blade clearance. 29.661 Section...

  7. 14 CFR 27.661 - Rotor blade clearance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Rotors § 27.661 Rotor blade clearance. There must be enough clearance between the rotor blades and other parts of the structure to... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Rotor blade clearance. 27.661 Section...

  8. 14 CFR 29.661 - Rotor blade clearance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Rotors § 29.661 Rotor blade clearance. There must be enough clearance between the rotor blades and other parts of the structure to... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Rotor blade clearance. 29.661 Section...

  9. 14 CFR 29.661 - Rotor blade clearance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Rotors § 29.661 Rotor blade clearance. There must be enough clearance between the rotor blades and other parts of the structure to... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Rotor blade clearance. 29.661 Section...

  10. 14 CFR 29.547 - Main and tail rotor structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... autorotation. (d) The rotor structure must be designed to withstand loads simulating— (1) For the rotor blades... includes the rotor hub, blades, blade dampers, the pitch control mechanisms, and all other parts that rotate with the assembly. (b) Each rotor assembly must be designed as prescribed in this section and...

  11. 14 CFR 27.661 - Rotor blade clearance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Rotors § 27.661 Rotor blade clearance. There must be enough clearance between the rotor blades and other parts of the structure to... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Rotor blade clearance. 27.661 Section...

  12. 14 CFR 27.547 - Main rotor structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... structure. (a) Each main rotor assembly (including rotor hubs and blades) must be designed as prescribed in this section. (b) (c) The main rotor structure must be designed to withstand the following loads... altitude. (d) The main rotor structure must be designed to withstand loads simulating— (1) For the...

  13. 14 CFR 27.661 - Rotor blade clearance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Rotors § 27.661 Rotor blade clearance. There must be enough clearance between the rotor blades and other parts of the structure to... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rotor blade clearance. 27.661 Section...

  14. 14 CFR 29.547 - Main and tail rotor structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... autorotation. (d) The rotor structure must be designed to withstand loads simulating— (1) For the rotor blades... includes the rotor hub, blades, blade dampers, the pitch control mechanisms, and all other parts that rotate with the assembly. (b) Each rotor assembly must be designed as prescribed in this section and...

  15. 14 CFR 29.547 - Main and tail rotor structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... autorotation. (d) The rotor structure must be designed to withstand loads simulating— (1) For the rotor blades... includes the rotor hub, blades, blade dampers, the pitch control mechanisms, and all other parts that rotate with the assembly. (b) Each rotor assembly must be designed as prescribed in this section and...

  16. 14 CFR 29.547 - Main and tail rotor structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... autorotation. (d) The rotor structure must be designed to withstand loads simulating— (1) For the rotor blades... includes the rotor hub, blades, blade dampers, the pitch control mechanisms, and all other parts that rotate with the assembly. (b) Each rotor assembly must be designed as prescribed in this section and...

  17. 14 CFR 27.547 - Main rotor structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... structure. (a) Each main rotor assembly (including rotor hubs and blades) must be designed as prescribed in this section. (b) (c) The main rotor structure must be designed to withstand the following loads... altitude. (d) The main rotor structure must be designed to withstand loads simulating— (1) For the...

  18. 14 CFR 27.661 - Rotor blade clearance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Rotors § 27.661 Rotor blade clearance. There must be enough clearance between the rotor blades and other parts of the structure to... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Rotor blade clearance. 27.661 Section...

  19. 14 CFR 29.547 - Main and tail rotor structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... autorotation. (d) The rotor structure must be designed to withstand loads simulating— (1) For the rotor blades... includes the rotor hub, blades, blade dampers, the pitch control mechanisms, and all other parts that rotate with the assembly. (b) Each rotor assembly must be designed as prescribed in this section and...

  20. 14 CFR 29.661 - Rotor blade clearance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Rotors § 29.661 Rotor blade clearance. There must be enough clearance between the rotor blades and other parts of the structure to... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rotor blade clearance. 29.661 Section...

  1. 14 CFR 27.547 - Main rotor structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... structure. (a) Each main rotor assembly (including rotor hubs and blades) must be designed as prescribed in this section. (b) (c) The main rotor structure must be designed to withstand the following loads... altitude. (d) The main rotor structure must be designed to withstand loads simulating— (1) For the...

  2. 14 CFR 29.661 - Rotor blade clearance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Rotors § 29.661 Rotor blade clearance. There must be enough clearance between the rotor blades and other parts of the structure to... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Rotor blade clearance. 29.661 Section...

  3. 14 CFR 27.661 - Rotor blade clearance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Rotors § 27.661 Rotor blade clearance. There must be enough clearance between the rotor blades and other parts of the structure to... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Rotor blade clearance. 27.661 Section...

  4. 14 CFR 27.547 - Main rotor structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... structure. (a) Each main rotor assembly (including rotor hubs and blades) must be designed as prescribed in this section. (b) (c) The main rotor structure must be designed to withstand the following loads... altitude. (d) The main rotor structure must be designed to withstand loads simulating— (1) For the...

  5. 14 CFR 29.1461 - Equipment containing high energy rotors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Equipment containing high energy rotors. 29... § 29.1461 Equipment containing high energy rotors. (a) Equipment containing high energy rotors must meet paragraph (b), (c), or (d) of this section. (b) High energy rotors contained in equipment must...

  6. 14 CFR 25.1461 - Equipment containing high energy rotors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Equipment containing high energy rotors. 25... § 25.1461 Equipment containing high energy rotors. (a) Equipment containing high energy rotors must meet paragraph (b), (c), or (d) of this section. (b) High energy rotors contained in equipment must...

  7. 14 CFR 27.1461 - Equipment containing high energy rotors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Equipment containing high energy rotors. 27... Equipment containing high energy rotors. (a) Equipment containing high energy rotors must meet paragraph (b), (c), or (d) of this section. (b) High energy rotors contained in equipment must be able to...

  8. 14 CFR 29.1461 - Equipment containing high energy rotors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Equipment containing high energy rotors. 29... § 29.1461 Equipment containing high energy rotors. (a) Equipment containing high energy rotors must meet paragraph (b), (c), or (d) of this section. (b) High energy rotors contained in equipment must...

  9. 14 CFR 27.1461 - Equipment containing high energy rotors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Equipment containing high energy rotors. 27... Equipment containing high energy rotors. (a) Equipment containing high energy rotors must meet paragraph (b), (c), or (d) of this section. (b) High energy rotors contained in equipment must be able to...

  10. 14 CFR 25.1461 - Equipment containing high energy rotors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Equipment containing high energy rotors. 25... § 25.1461 Equipment containing high energy rotors. (a) Equipment containing high energy rotors must meet paragraph (b), (c), or (d) of this section. (b) High energy rotors contained in equipment must...

  11. 14 CFR 25.1461 - Equipment containing high energy rotors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Equipment containing high energy rotors. 25... § 25.1461 Equipment containing high energy rotors. (a) Equipment containing high energy rotors must meet paragraph (b), (c), or (d) of this section. (b) High energy rotors contained in equipment must...

  12. 14 CFR 27.1461 - Equipment containing high energy rotors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Equipment containing high energy rotors. 27... Equipment containing high energy rotors. (a) Equipment containing high energy rotors must meet paragraph (b), (c), or (d) of this section. (b) High energy rotors contained in equipment must be able to...

  13. 14 CFR 29.1461 - Equipment containing high energy rotors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Equipment containing high energy rotors. 29... § 29.1461 Equipment containing high energy rotors. (a) Equipment containing high energy rotors must meet paragraph (b), (c), or (d) of this section. (b) High energy rotors contained in equipment must...

  14. Flywheel rotor and containment technology development

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, S.V.

    1981-08-11

    The goals of the project are: to develop an economical and practical composite flywheel having an energy density of 88 Wh/kg at failure, an operational energy density of 44 to 55 Wh/kg, and an energy storage capacity of approximately 1 kWh; to determine the suitability of various manufacturing processes for low-cost rotor fabrication; to investigate flywheel and flywheel-systems dynamics; to test and evaluate prototype rotors for use in transportation and stationary applications; and to develop a fail-safe, lightweight, and low-cost flywheel containment. The following tasks have been accomplished: evaluation and selection of 1-kWh, first-generation, advanced flywheel rotor designs for subsequent development towards the DOE-established energy density goal of 88 Wh/kg at burst; completion of an advanced design concept for a flywheel primary containment structure, capable of containing the failure of a 1-kWh flywheel rotor and targeted for vehicular applications; non-destructive inspection and burst testing of approximately twenty (20) prototype rotors, and initiation of cyclic testing; completion of various activities in the areas of rotor manufacturing processes, dynamic analyses and composite materials design data generation; and initiation of an economic feasibility study to establish a rational costing methodology for composite rotors and containment.

  15. Spiral and Rotor Patterns Produced by Fairy Ring Fungi

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A broad class of soil fungi form the annular patterns known as ‘fairy rings’ and provide one of the only means to observe spatio-temporal dynamics of otherwise cryptic fungal growth processes in natural environments. We present observations of novel spiral and rotor patterns produced by fairy ring fungi and explain these behaviors mathematically by first showing that a well known model of fairy ring fungal growth and the Gray-Scott reaction-diffusion model are mathematically equivalent. We then use bifurcation analysis and numerical simulations to identify the conditions under which spiral waves and rotors can arise. We demonstrate that the region of dimensionless parameter space supporting these more complex dynamics is adjacent to that which produces the more familiar fairy rings, and identify experimental manipulations to test the transitions between these spatial modes. These same manipulations could also feasibly induce fungal colonies to transition from rotor/spiral formation to a set of richer, as yet unobserved, spatial patterns. PMID:26934477

  16. Optical evidence of quantum rotor orbital excitations in orthorhombic manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaleva, N. N.; Kugel, K. I.; Potůček, Z.; Kusmartseva, O. E.; Goryachev, N. S.; Bryknar, Z.; Demikhov, E. I.; Trepakov, V. A.; Dejneka, A.; Kusmartsev, F. V.; Stoneham, A. M.

    2016-05-01

    In magnetic compounds with Jahn-Teller (JT) ions (such as Mn3+ or Cu2+), the ordering of the electron or hole orbitals is associated with cooperative lattice distortions. There the role of JT effect, although widely recognized, is still elusive in the ground state properties. Here we discovered that, in these materials, there exist excitations whose energy spectrum is described in terms of the total angular momentum eigenstates and is quantized as in quantum rotors found in JT centers. We observed features originating from these excitations in the optical spectra of a model compound LaMnO3 using ellipsometry technique. They appear clearly as narrow sidebands accompanying the electron transition between the JT split orbitals at neighboring Mn3+ ions, displaying anomalous temperature behavior around the Néel temperature T N ≈ 140 K. We present these results together with new experimental data on photoluminescence found in LaMnO3, which lend additional support to the ellipsometry implying the electronic-vibrational origin of the quantum rotor orbital excitations. We note that the discovered orbital excitations of quantum rotors may play an important role in many unusual properties observed in these materials upon doping, such as high-temperature superconductivity and colossal magnetoresistance.

  17. Rotor instrumentation study for high-temperature superconducting generators

    SciTech Connect

    Schwenterly, S.W.; Wilson, C.T.

    1996-06-01

    In FY 9195, ORNL carried out work on rotor instrumentation systems in support of the General Electric (GE) Superconductivity Partnership Initiative (SPI) on Superconducting Generator Development. The objective was to develop a system for tramsitting data from sensors in the spinning rotor to a stationary data acquisition system. Previous work at ORNL had investigated an optical method of cryogenic temperature measurement using laser-induced fluorescence in certain phosphors. Later follow-up discussions with experts in the ORNL Engineering Technology Division indicated that this method could also be extended to measure strain and magnetic field. Another optical alternative using standard fiber optic transmission modules was also investigated. The equipment is very inexpensive, but needs to be adapted for operation in a high-g-force rotating environment. An optical analog of a commutator or slip ring also needs to be developed to couple the light signals from the rotor to the stationary frame. Sealed mercury-film rotary contacts are manufactured by Meridian Laboratory. Unlike conventional slipring assemblies, these offer low noise and long lifetime, with low costs per channel. Standard units may need some upgrading for 3600-rpm or high-voltage operation. A commercial electronic telemetry system offered by Wireless Data Corporation (WDC) was identified as a viable candidate, and information on this system was presented to GE. GE has since ordered two of these systems from WDC for temperature measurements in their rotating test cryostat.

  18. Development of a set of equations for incorporating disk flexibility effects in rotordynamical analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flowers, George T.; Ryan, Stephen G.

    1991-01-01

    Rotordynamical equations that account for disk flexibility are developed. These equations employ free-free rotor modes to model the rotor system. Only transverse vibrations of the disks are considered, with the shaft/disk system considered to be torsionally rigid. Second order elastic foreshortening effects that couple with the rotor speed to produce first order terms in the equations of motion are included. The approach developed in this study is readily adaptable for usage in many of the codes that are current used in rotordynamical simulations. The equations are similar to those used in standard rigid disk analyses but with additional terms that include the effects of disk flexibility. An example case is presented to demonstrate the use of the equations and to show the influence of disk flexibility on the rotordynamical behavior of a sample system.

  19. Multiple piece turbine rotor blade

    SciTech Connect

    Kimmel, Keith D.; Plank, William L.

    2016-07-19

    A spar and shell turbine rotor blade with a spar and a tip cap formed as a single piece, the spar includes a bottom end with dovetail or fir tree slots that engage with slots on a top end of a root section, and a platform includes an opening on a top surface for insertion of the spar in which a shell made from an exotic high temperature resistant material is secured between the tip cap and the platform. The spar is tapered to form thinner walls at the tip end to further reduce the weight and therefore a pulling force due to blade rotation. The spar and tip cap piece is made from a NiAL material to further reduce the weight and the pulling force.

  20. Hydraulic Actuator System for Rotor Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulbrich, Heinz; Althaus, Josef

    1991-01-01

    In the last ten years, several different types of actuators were developed and fabricated for active control of rotors. A special hydraulic actuator system capable of generating high forces to rotating shafts via conventional bearings is addressed. The actively controlled hydraulic force actuator features an electrohydraulic servo valve which can produce amplitudes and forces at high frequencies necessary for influencing rotor vibrations. The mathematical description will be given in detail. The experimental results verify the theoretical model. Simulations already indicate the usefulness of this compact device for application to a real rotor system.

  1. Internal Friction And Instabilities Of Rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, J.; Artiles, A.; Lund, J.; Dill, J.; Zorzi, E.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes study of effects of internal friction on dynamics of rotors prompted by concern over instabilities in rotors of turbomachines. Theoretical and experimental studies described. Theoretical involved development of nonlinear mathematical models of internal friction in three joints found in turbomachinery - axial splines, Curvic(TM) splines, and interference fits between smooth cylindrical surfaces. Experimental included traction tests to determine the coefficients of friction of rotor alloys at various temperatures, bending-mode-vibration tests of shafts equipped with various joints and rotordynamic tests of shafts with axial-spline and interference-fit joints.

  2. Helicopter rotor induced velocities theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, John D.; Hoad, Danny R.; Elliott, Joe W.; Althoff, Susan L.

    1987-01-01

    An investigation has been performed to assess methods used for rotor inflow modeling. A key element of this assessment has been the recent acquisition of high quality experimental measurements of inflow velocities taken in the proximity of a lifting rotor in forward flight. Widely used rotor performance predictive methods are based on blade element strip theory coupled with an inflow model. The inflow prediction models assessed in this paper include the uniform inflow based on momentum, a skewed disk model, and two methods based on a vortex wake structure.

  3. Vacuum coupling of rotating superconducting rotor

    DOEpatents

    Shoykhet, Boris A.; Zhang, Burt Xudong; Driscoll, David Infante

    2003-12-02

    A rotating coupling allows a vacuum chamber in the rotor of a superconducting electric motor to be continually pumped out. The coupling consists of at least two concentric portions, one of which is allowed to rotate and the other of which is stationary. The coupling is located on the non-drive end of the rotor and is connected to a coolant supply and a vacuum pump. The coupling is smaller in diameter than the shaft of the rotor so that the shaft can be increased in diameter without having to increase the size of the vacuum seal.

  4. Discrete analog computing with rotor-routers.

    PubMed

    Propp, James

    2010-09-01

    Rotor-routing is a procedure for routing tokens through a network that can implement certain kinds of computation. These computations are inherently asynchronous (the order in which tokens are routed makes no difference) and distributed (information is spread throughout the system). It is also possible to efficiently check that a computation has been carried out correctly in less time than the computation itself required, provided one has a certificate that can itself be computed by the rotor-router network. Rotor-router networks can be viewed as both discrete analogs of continuous linear systems and deterministic analogs of stochastic processes.

  5. Molecular Rotors Built in Porous Materials.

    PubMed

    Comotti, Angiolina; Bracco, Silvia; Sozzani, Piero

    2016-09-20

    Molecules and materials can show dynamic structures in which the dominant mechanism is rotary motion. The single mobile elements are defined as "molecular rotors" and exhibit special properties (compared with their static counterparts), being able in perspective to greatly modulate the dielectric response and form the basis for molecular motors that are designed with the idea of making molecules perform a useful mechanical function. The construction of ordered rotary elements into a solid is a necessary feature for such design, because it enables the alignment of rotors and the fine-tuning of their steric and dipolar interactions. Crystal surfaces or bulk crystals are the most suitable to adapt rotors in 2D or 3D arrangements and engineer juxtaposition of the rotors in an ordered way. Nevertheless, it is only in recent times that materials showing porosity and remarkably low density have undergone tremendous development. The characteristics of large free volume combine well with the virtually unhindered motion of the molecular rotors built into their structure. Indeed, the molecular rotors are used as struts in porous covalent and supramolecular architectures, spanning both hybrid and fully organic materials. The modularity of the approach renders possible a variety of rotor geometrical arrangements in both robust frameworks stable up to 850 K and self-assembled molecular materials. A nanosecond (fast dynamics) motional regime can be achieved at temperatures lower than 240 K, enabling rotor arrays operating in the solid state even at low temperatures. Furthermore, in nanoporous materials, molecular rotors can interact with the diffusing chemical species, be they liquids, vapors, or gases. Through this chemical intervention, rotor speed can be modulated at will, enabling a new generation of rotor-containing materials sensitive to guests. In principle, an applied electric field can be the stimulus for chemical release from porous materials. The effort needed to

  6. Full Scale Rotor Aeroacoustic Predictions and the Link to Model Scale Rotor Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, D. Douglas, Jr.; Burley, Casey L.; Conner, David A.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Aeroacoustic Prediction System (NAPS) is used to establish a link between model-scale and full-scale rotor predictions and is partially validated against measured wind tunnel and flight aeroacoustic data. The prediction approach of NAPS couples a comprehensive rotorcraft analysis with acoustic source noise and propagation codes. The comprehensive analysis selected for this study is CAMRAD-II, which provides the performance/trim/wake solution for a given rotor or flight condition. The post-trim capabilities of CAMRAD-II are used to compute high-resolution sectional airloads for the acoustic tone noise analysis, WOPMOD. The tone noise is propagated to observers on the ground with the propagation code, RNM (Rotor Noise Model). Aeroacoustic predictions are made with NAPS for an isolated rotor and compared to results of the second Harmonic Aeroacoustic Rotor Test (HART-II) program, which tested a 40% dynamically and Mach-scaled BO-105 main rotor at the DNW. The NAPS is validated with comparisons for three rotor conditions: a baseline condition and two Higher Harmonic Control (HHC) conditions. To establish a link between model and full-scale rotor predictions, a full-scale BO-105 main rotor input deck for NAPS is created from the 40% scale rotor input deck. The full-scale isolated rotor predictions are then compared to the model predictions. The comparisons include aerodynamic loading, acoustic levels, and acoustic pressure time histories for each of the three conditions. With this link established, full-scale predictions are made for a range of descent flight conditions and compared with measured trends from the recent Rotorcraft Operational Noise Abatement Procedures (RONAP) flight test conducted by DLR and ONERA. Additionally, the effectiveness of two HHC conditions from the HART-II program is demonstrated for the full-scale rotor in flight.

  7. HARP model rotor test at the DNW. [Hughes Advanced Rotor Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, Seth; Jordan, David; Smith, Charles; Ekins, James; Silverthorn, Lou

    1989-01-01

    Data from a test of a dynamically scaled model of the Hughes Advanced Rotor Program (HARP) bearingless model main rotor and 369K tail rotor are reported. The history of the HARP program and its goals are reviewed, and the main and tail rotor models are described. The test facilities and instrumentation are described, and wind tunnel test data are presented on hover, forward flight performance, and blade-vortex interaction. Performance data, acoustic data, and dynamic data from near field/far field and shear layer studies are presented.

  8. Preliminary simulation of an advanced, hingless rotor XV-15 tilt-rotor aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcveigh, M. A.

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility of the tilt-rotor concept was verified through investigation of the performance, stability and handling qualities of the XV-15 tilt rotor. The rotors were replaced by advanced-technology fiberglass/composite hingless rotors of larger diameter, combined with an advanced integrated fly-by-wire control system. A parametric simulation model of the HRXV-15 was developed, model was used to define acceptable preliminary ranges of primary and secondary control schedules as functions of the flight parameters, to evaluate performance, flying qualities and structural loads, and to have a Boeing-Vertol pilot conduct a simulated flight test evaluation of the aircraft.

  9. Axial seal system for a gas turbine steam-cooled rotor

    DOEpatents

    Mashey, Thomas Charles

    2002-01-01

    An axial seal assembly is provided at the interface between adjacent wheels and spacers of a gas turbine rotor and disposed about tubes passing through openings in the rotor adjacent the rotor rim and carrying a thermal medium. Each seal assembly includes a support bushing for supporting a land of the thermal medium carrying tube, an axially registering seat bushing disposed in the opposed opening and a frustoconical seal between the seal bushing and seat. The seal bushing includes a radial flange having an annular recess for retaining the outer diameter edge of the seal, while the seat bushing has an axially facing annular surface forming a seat for engagement by the inner diameter edge of the seal.

  10. Disk flexibility effects on the rotordynamics of the SSME high pressure turbopumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flowers, George T.

    1990-01-01

    Rotordynamical analyses are typically performed using rigid disk models. Studies of rotor models in which the effects of disk flexibility were included indicate that it may be an important effect for many systems. This issue is addressed with respect to the Space Shuttle Main Engine high pressure turbopumps. Finite element analyses were performed for a simplified free-free flexible disk rotor models and the modes and frequencies compared to those of a rigid disk model. Equations were developed to account for disk flexibility in rotordynamical analysis. Simulation studies were conducted to assess the influence of disk flexibility on the HPOTP. Some recommendations are given as to the importance of disk flexibility and for how this project should proceed.

  11. Development of monofilar rotor hub vibration absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duh, J.; Miao, W.

    1983-01-01

    A design and ground test program was conducted to study the performance of the monofilar absorber for vibration reduction on a four-bladed helicopter. A monofilar is a centrifugal tuned two degree-of-freedom rotor hub absorber that provides force attenuation at two frequencies using the same dynamic mass. Linear and non-linear analyses of the coupled monofilar/airframe system were developed to study tuning and attenuation characteristics. Based on the analysis, a design was fabricated and impact bench tests verified the calculated non-rotating natural frequencies and mode shapes. Performance characteristics were measured using a rotating absorber test facility. These tests showed significant attenuation of fixed-system 4P hub motions due to 3P inplane rotating-system hub forces. In addition, detuning effects of the 3P monofilar modal response were small due to the nonlinearities and tuning pin slippage. However, attenuation of 4P hub motions due to 5P inplane hub forces was poor. The performance of the 5P monofilar modal response was degraded by torsional motion of the dynamic mass relative to the support arm which resulted in binding of the dynamic components. Analytical design studies were performed to evaluate this torsional motion problem. An alternative design is proposed which may alleviate the torsional motion of the dynamic mass.

  12. Wind turbine rotor hub and teeter joint

    DOEpatents

    Coleman, Clint; Kurth, William T.; Jankowski, Joseph

    1994-10-11

    A rotor hub is provided for coupling a wind turbine rotor blade and a shaft. The hub has a yoke with a body which is connected to the shaft, and extension portions which are connected to teeter bearing blocks, each of which has an aperture. The blocks are connected to a saddle which envelops the rotor blade by one or two shafts which pass through the apertures in the bearing blocks. The saddle and blade are separated by a rubber interface which provides for distribution of stress over a larger portion of the blade. Two teeter control mechanisms, which may include hydraulic pistons and springs, are connected to the rotor blade and to the yoke at extension portions. These control mechanisms provide end-of-stroke damping, braking, and stiffness based on the teeter angle and speed of the blade.

  13. Interlayer toughening of fiber composite flywheel rotors

    DOEpatents

    Groves, Scott E.; Deteresa, Steven J.

    1998-01-01

    An interlayer toughening mechanism to mitigate the growth of damage in fiber composite flywheel rotors for long application. The interlayer toughening mechanism may comprise one or more tough layers composed of high-elongation fibers, high-strength fibers arranged in a woven pattern at a range from 0.degree. to 90.degree. to the rotor axis and bound by a ductile matrix material which adheres to and is compatible with the materials used for the bulk of the rotor. The number and spacing of the tough interlayers is a function of the design requirements and expected lifetime of the rotor. The mechanism has particular application in uninterruptable power supplies, electrical power grid reservoirs, and compulsators for electric guns, as well as electromechanical batteries for vehicles.

  14. Using molecular rotors to probe gelation.

    PubMed

    Raeburn, Jaclyn; Chen, Lin; Awhida, Salmah; Deller, Robert C; Vatish, Manu; Gibson, Matthew I; Adams, Dave J

    2015-05-14

    A series of fluorescent probes, including a number of molecular rotors, have been used to follow the self-assembly of dipeptide-based low molecular weight gelators. We show that these probes can be used to gain an insight into the assembly process. Thioflavin T, a commonly used stain for β-sheets, appears to act as a molecular rotor in these gelling systems, with the fluorescence data closely matching that of other rotors. The molecular rotor was incorporated into an assay system with glucose oxidase to enable glucose-concentration specific gelation and hence generating a fluorescent output. Applying this system to urine from patients with various levels of glycosuria (a symptom of diabetes), it was found to provide excellent correlation with different clinical assessments of diabetes. This demonstrates a new concept in gelation-linked biosensing for a real clinical problem.

  15. Direct integration of transient rotor dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascak, A. F.

    1980-01-01

    An implicit method was developed for integrating the equations of motion for a lumped mass model of a rotor dynamics system. As an aside, a closed form solution to the short bearing theory was also developed for a damper with arbitrary motion. The major conclusions are that the method is numerically stable and that the computation time is proportional to the number of elements in the rotor dynamics model rather than to the cube of the number. This computer code allowed the simulation of a complex rotor bearing system experiencing nonlinear transient motion and displayed the vast amount of results in an easily understood motion picture format - a 10 minute, 16 millimeter, color, sound motion picture supplement. An example problem with 19 mass elements in the rotor dynamics model took 0.7 second of central processing unit time per time step on an IBM 360-67 computer in a time sharing mode.

  16. Transonic aeroelasticity analysis for rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, Chuen-Yen; Chang, I-Chung; Gea, Lie-Mine

    1989-01-01

    A numerical method is presented for calculating the unsteady transonic rotor flow with aeroelasticity effects. The blade structural dynamic equations based on beam theory were formulated by FEM and were solved in the time domain, instead of the frequency domain. For different combinations of precone, droop, and pitch, the correlations are very good in the first three flapping modes and the first twisting mode. However, the predicted frequencies are too high for the first lagging mode at high rotational speeds. This new structure code has been coupled into a transonic rotor flow code, TFAR2, to demonstrate the capability of treating elastic blades in transonic rotor flow calculations. The flow fields for a model-scale rotor in both hover and forward flight are calculated. Results show that the blade elasticity significantly affects the flow characteristics in forward flight.

  17. Transonic Aeroelasticity Analysis For Helicopter Rotor Blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, I-Chung; Gea, Lie-Mine; Chow, Chuen-Yen

    1991-01-01

    Numerical-simulation method for aeroelasticity analysis of helicopter rotor blade combines established techniques for analysis of aerodynamics and vibrations of blade. Application of method clearly shows elasticity of blade modifies flow and, consequently, aerodynamic loads on blade.

  18. Interlayer toughening of fiber composite flywheel rotors

    DOEpatents

    Groves, S.E.; Deteresa, S.J.

    1998-07-14

    An interlayer toughening mechanism is described to mitigate the growth of damage in fiber composite flywheel rotors for long application. The interlayer toughening mechanism may comprise one or more tough layers composed of high-elongation fibers, high-strength fibers arranged in a woven pattern at a range from 0{degree} to 90{degree} to the rotor axis and bound by a ductile matrix material which adheres to and is compatible with the materials used for the bulk of the rotor. The number and spacing of the tough interlayers is a function of the design requirements and expected lifetime of the rotor. The mechanism has particular application in uninterruptable power supplies, electrical power grid reservoirs, and compulsators for electric guns, as well as electromechanical batteries for vehicles. 2 figs.

  19. Potential acoustic benefits of circulation control rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Cheeseman, I. C.

    1978-01-01

    The fundamental aeroacoustic mechanisms responsible for noise generation on a rotating blade are theoretically examined. Their contribution to the overall rotor sound pressure level is predicted. Results from a theory for airfoil trailing edge noise are presented. Modifications and extensions to other source theories are described where it is necessary to account for unique aspects of circulation control (CC) aerodynamics. The circulation control rotor (CCR), as embodied on an X-wing vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) aircraft, is used as an example for computational purposes, although many of the theoretical results presented are generally applicable to other CC applications (such as low speed rotors, propellers, compressors, and fixed wing aircraft). Using the analytical models, it is shown that the utilization CC aerodynamics theoretically makes possible unprecedented advances in rotor noise reduction. For the X-wing VTOL these reductions appear to be feasible without incurring significant attendant performance and weight penalties.

  20. Rolling-cuff flexible bellows

    DOEpatents

    Lambert, D.R.

    1982-09-27

    A flexible connector apparatus used to join two stiff non-deformable members, such as piping, is described. The apparatus is provided with one or more flexible sections or assemblies each utilizing a bellows of a rolling cuff type connected between two ridge members, with the bellows being supported by a back-up ring, such that only the curved end sections of the bellows are unsupported. Thus, the bellows can be considered as being of a tube-shaped configuration and thus have high pressure resistance. The components of the flexible apparatus are sealed or welded one to another such that it is fluid tight.

  1. FLEXIBLE COUPLING

    DOEpatents

    Babelay, E.F.

    1962-02-13

    A flexible shaft coupling for operation at speeds in excess of 14,000 rpm is designed which requires no lubrication. A driving sleeve member and a driven sleeve member are placed in concentric spaced relationship. A torque force is transmitted to the driven member from the driving member through a plurality of nylon balls symmetrically disposed between the spaced sleeves. The balls extend into races and recesses within the respective sleeve members. The sleeve members have a suitable clearance therebetween and the balls have a suitable radial clearance during operation of the coupling to provide a relatively loose coupling. These clearances accommodate for both parallel and/or angular misalignments and avoid metal-tometal contact between the sleeve members during operation. Thus, no lubrication is needed, and a minimum of vibrations is transmitted between the sleeve members. (AEC)

  2. Tail Rotor Airfoils Stabilize Helicopters, Reduce Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Founded by former Ames Research Center engineer Jim Van Horn, Van Horn Aviation of Tempe, Arizona, built upon a Langley Research Center airfoil design to create a high performance aftermarket tail rotor for the popular Bell 206 helicopter. The highly durable rotor has a lifetime twice that of the original equipment manufacturer blade, reduces noise by 40 percent, and displays enhanced performance at high altitudes. These improvements benefit helicopter performance for law enforcement, military training, wildfire and pipeline patrols, and emergency medical services.

  3. Finite-difference computations of rotor loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caradonna, F. X.; Tung, C.

    1985-01-01

    The current and future potential of finite difference methods for solving real rotor problems which now rely largely on empiricism are demonstrated. The demonstration consists of a simple means of combining existing finite-difference, integral, and comprehensive loads codes to predict real transonic rotor flows. These computations are performed for hover and high-advanced-ratio flight. Comparisons are made with experimental pressure data.

  4. Finite-difference computations of rotor loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caradonna, F. X.; Tung, C.

    1985-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the current and future potential of finite-difference methods for solving real rotor problems which now rely largely on empiricism. The demonstration consists of a simple means of combining existing finite-difference, integral, and comprehensive loads codes to predict real transonic rotor flows. These computations are performed for hover and high-advance-ratio flight. Comparisons are made with experimental pressure data.

  5. Spin stabilized magnetic levitation of horizontal rotors.

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, Louis Anthony

    2004-10-01

    In this paper we present an analysis of a new configuration for achieving spin stabilized magnetic levitation. In the classical configuration, the rotor spins about a vertical axis; and the spin stabilizes the lateral instability of the top in the magnetic field. In this new configuration the rotor spins about a horizontal axis; and the spin stabilizes the axial instability of the top in the magnetic field.

  6. Prediction of the Aero-Acoustic Performance of Open Rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Dale; Envia, Edmane

    2014-01-01

    The rising cost of jet fuel has renewed interest in contrarotating open rotor propulsion systems. Contemporary design methods offer the potential to maintain the inherently high aerodynamic efficiency of open rotors while greatly reducing their noise output, something that was not feasible in the 1980's designs. The primary source mechanisms of open rotor noise generation are thought to be the front rotor wake and tip vortex interacting with the aft rotor. In this paper, advanced measurement techniques and high-fidelity prediction tools are used to gain insight into the relative importance of the contributions to the open rotor noise signature of the front rotor wake and rotor tip vortex. The measurements include three-dimensional particle image velocimetry of the intra-rotor flowfield and the acoustic field of a model-scale open rotor. The predictions provide the unsteady flowfield and the associated acoustic field. The results suggest that while the front rotor tip vortex can have a significant influence on the blade passing tone noise produced by the aft rotor, the front rotor wake plays the decisive role in the generation of the interaction noise produced as a result of the unsteady aerodynamic interaction of the two rotors. At operating conditions typical of takeoff and landing operations, the interaction noise level is easily on par with that generated by the individual rotors, and in some cases is even higher. This suggests that a comprehensive approach to reducing open rotor noise should include techniques for mitigating the wake of the front rotor as well as eliminating the interaction of the front rotor tip vortex with the aft rotor blade tip.

  7. V/STOL tilt rotor aircraft study: Wind tunnel tests of a full scale hingeless prop/rotor designed for the Boeing Model 222 tilt rotor aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magee, J. P.; Alexander, H. R.

    1973-01-01

    The rotor system designed for the Boeing Model 222 tilt rotor aircraft is a soft-in-plane hingeless rotor design, 26 feet in diameter. This rotor has completed two test programs in the NASA Ames 40' X 80' wind tunnel. The first test was a windmilling rotor test on two dynamic wing test stands. The rotor was tested up to an advance ratio equivalence of 400 knots. The second test used the NASA powered propeller test rig and data were obtained in hover, transition and low speed cruise flight. Test data were obtained in the areas of wing-rotor dynamics, rotor loads, stability and control, feedback controls, and performance to meet the test objectives. These data are presented.

  8. Unbalance Response Prediction for Rotors on Ball Bearings Using Speed and Load Dependent Nonlinear Bearing Stiffness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, David P.; Poplawski, J. V.

    2003-01-01

    Rolling-element bearing forces vary nonlinearly with bearing deflection. Thus an accurate rotordynamic analysis requires that bearing forces corresponding to the actual bearing deflection be utilized. For this work bearing forces were calculated by COBRA-AHS, a recently developed rolling-element bearing analysis code. Bearing stiffness was found to be a strong function of bearing deflection, with higher deflection producing markedly higher stiffness. Curves fitted to the bearing data for a range of speeds and loads were supplied to a flexible rotor unbalance response analysis. The rotordynamic analysis showed that vibration response varied nonlinearly with the amount of rotor imbalance. Moreover, the increase in stiffness as critical speeds were approached caused a large increase in rotor and bearing vibration amplitude over part of the speed range compared to the case of constant bearing stiffness. Regions of bistable operation were possible, in which the amplitude at a given speed was much larger during rotor acceleration than during deceleration. A moderate amount of damping will eliminate the bistable region, but this damping is not inherent in ball bearings.

  9. Aeromechanical stability of helicopters with a bearingless main rotor. Part 1: Equations of motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    Equations of motion for a coupled rotor-body system were derived for the purpose of studying air and ground resonance characteristics of helicopters that have bearingless main rotors. For the fuselage, only four rigid body degrees of freedom are considered; longitudinal and lateral translations, pitch, and roll. The rotor is assumed to consist of three or more rigid blades. Each blade is joined to the hub by means of a flexible beam segment (flexbeam or strap). Pitch change is accomplished by twisting the flexbeam with the pitch-control system, the characteristics of which are variable. Thus, the analysis is capable of implicitly treating aeroelastic couplings generated by the flexbeam elastic deflections, the pitch-control system, and the angular offsets of the blade and flexbeam. The linearized equations are written in the nonrotating system retaining only the cyclic rotor modes; thus, they comprise a system of homogeneous ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients. All contributions to the linearized perturbation equations from inertia, gravity, quasi-steady aerodynamics, and the flexbeam equilibrium deflections are retained exactly.

  10. Dynamics of fluidic devices with applications to rotor pitch links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarborough, Lloyd H., III

    Coupling a Fluidic Flexible Matrix Composite (F2MC) to an air-pressurized fluid port produces a fundamentally new class of tunable vibration isolator. This fluidlastic device provides significant vibration reduction at an isolation frequency that can be tuned over a broad frequency range. The material properties and geometry of the F2MC element, as well as the port inertance, determine the isolation frequency. A unique feature of this device is that the port inertance depends on pressure so the isolation frequency can be adjusted by changing the air pressure. For constant port inertance, the isolation frequency is largely independent of the isolated mass so the device is robust to changes in load. A nonlinear model is developed to predict isolator length and port inertance. The model is linearized and the frequency response calculated. Experiments agree with theory, demonstrating a tunable isolation range from 9 Hz to 36 Hz and transmitted force reductions of up to 60 dB at the isolation frequency. Replacing rigid pitch links on rotorcraft with coupled fluidic devices has the potential to reduce the aerodynamic blade loads transmitted through the pitch links to the swashplate. Analytical models of two fluidic devices coupled with three different fluidic circuits are derived. These passive fluidlastic systems are tuned, by varying the fluid inertances and capacitances of each fluidic circuit, to reduce the transmitted pitch-link loads. The different circuit designs result in transmitted pitch link loads reduction at up to three main rotor harmonics. The simulation results show loads reduction at the targeted out-of-phase and in-phase harmonics of up to 88% and 93%, respectively. Experimental validation of two of the fluidic circuits demonstrates loads reduction of up to 89% at the out-of-phase isolation frequencies and up to 81% at the in-phase isolation frequencies. Replacing rigid pitch links on rotorcraft with fluidic pitch links changes the blade torsional

  11. Rotor wake characteristics of a transonic axial flow fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, M. D.; Gertz, J.; Epstein, A.; Strazisar, A. J.

    1985-01-01

    State of the art turbomachinery flow analysis codes are not capable of predicting the viscous flow features within turbomachinery blade wakes. Until efficient 3D viscous flow analysis codes become a reality there is therefore a need for models which can describe the generation and transport of blade wakes and the mixing process within the wake. To address the need for experimental data to support the development of such models, high response pressure measurements and laser anemometer velocity measurements were obtained in the wake of a transonic axial flow fan rotor.

  12. Analysis of rotor vibratory loads using higher harmonic pitch control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quackenbush, Todd R.; Bliss, Donald B.; Boschitsch, Alexander H.; Wachspress, Daniel A.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental studies of isolated rotors in forward flight have indicated that higher harmonic pitch control can reduce rotor noise. These tests also show that such pitch inputs can generate substantial vibratory loads. The modification is summarized of the RotorCRAFT (Computation of Rotor Aerodynamics in Forward flighT) analysis of isolated rotors to study the vibratory loading generated by high frequency pitch inputs. The original RotorCRAFT code was developed for use in the computation of such loading, and uses a highly refined rotor wake model to facilitate this task. The extended version of RotorCRAFT incorporates a variety of new features including: arbitrary periodic root pitch control; computation of blade stresses and hub loads; improved modeling of near wake unsteady effects; and preliminary implementation of a coupled prediction of rotor airloads and noise. Correlation studies are carried out with existing blade stress and vibratory hub load data to assess the performance of the extended code.

  13. Magnetic bearing development for support of satellite flywheels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palazzolo, Alan; Li, Mu; Kenny, Andrew; Lei, Shuliang; Havelka, Danny; Kascak, Albert

    1998-01-01

    The use of magnetic bearings (MB) for support of space based flywheels can provide significant improvement in efficiency due to reduction in drag torque. A NASA supported program directed through the Texas A&M Center for Space Power has been formed to advance the technology of MB's for satellite flywheel applications. The five areas of the program are: (a) Magnetic Field Simulation, (b) MB controller Development, (c) Electromechanical Rotordynamics Modeling, (d) Testing and (e) Technology Exchange. Planned innovations in these tasks include eddy current drag torque and power loss determination including moving conductor effects, digital (DSP) based control for high speed operation, MATLAB-based coupled flexible rotor/controller/actuator electromechanical model with fuzzy logic nonlinear control, and ultra high speed>100 krpm measurement of drag torque. The paper examines these areas and provides an overview of the project.

  14. Aeroelastic effects in multi-rotor vehicles with application to a hybrid heavy lift system. Part 1: Formulation of equations of motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatesan, C.; Friedman, P.

    1984-01-01

    This report presents a set of governing coupled differential equations for a model of a hybrid aircraft. The model consists of multiple rotor systems connected by an elastic interconnecting structure, with options to add any combination of or all of the following components; i.e., thrusters, a buoyant hull, and an underslung weight. The dynamic equations are written for the individual blade with hub motions, for the rigid body motions of the whole model, and also for the flexible modes of the interconnecting structure. One of the purposes of this study is to serve as the basis of a numerical study aimed at determining the aeroelastic stability and structural response characteristics of a Hybrid Heavy Lift Airship (HHLA). It is also expected that the formulation may be applicable to analyzing stability and responses of dual rotor helicopters such as a Heavy Lift Helicopter (HLH). Futhermore, the model is capable of representing coupled rotor/body aeromechanical problems of single rotor helicopters.

  15. The response of turbine engine rotors to interference rubs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascak, A. F.

    1980-01-01

    A method was developed for the direct integration of a rotor dynamics system experiencing a blade loss induced rotor rub. Both blade loss and rotor rub were simulated on a rotor typical of a small gas turbine. A small change in the coefficient of friction (from 0.1 to 0.2) caused the rotor to change from forward to backward whirl and to theoretically destroy itself in a few rotations. This method provides an analytical capability to study the susceptibility of rotors to rub induced backward whirl problems.

  16. Rotor blade structure and mounting for vertical axis wind machines

    SciTech Connect

    Lechner, W. L.

    1981-02-03

    A lightweight simplified economical and efficient sail or rotor blade for a vertical axis wind machine and simplified self-acting restraining means for the blade during rotor operation are disclosed. The rotor structure is characterized by ease of assembly and the absence of need for adjustment and frequent maintenance. Individual rotor blades are attached to vertical axis whips extending above and below horizontal rotor arms. The rotor is self-starting and turns in one direction only in response to wind coming from any direction on the compass.

  17. Important Scaling Parameters for Testing Model-Scale Helicopter Rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singleton, Jeffrey D.; Yeager, William T., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    An investigation into the effects of aerodynamic and aeroelastic scaling parameters on model scale helicopter rotors has been conducted in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. The effect of varying Reynolds number, blade Lock number, and structural elasticity on rotor performance has been studied and the performance results are discussed herein for two different rotor blade sets at two rotor advance ratios. One set of rotor blades were rigid and the other set of blades were dynamically scaled to be representative of a main rotor design for a utility class helicopter. The investigation was con-densities permits the acquisition of data for several Reynolds and Lock number combinations.

  18. Overview of the Novel Intelligent JAXA Active Rotor Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saito, Shigeru; Kobiki, Noboru; Tanabe, Yasutada; Johnson, Wayne; Yamauchi, Gloria K.; Young, Larry A.

    2010-01-01

    The Novel Intelligent JAXA Active Rotor (NINJA Rotor) program is a cooperative effort between JAXA and NASA, involving a test of a JAXA pressure-instrumented, active-flap rotor in the 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel at Ames Research Center. The objectives of the program are to obtain an experimental database of a rotor with active flaps and blade pressure instrumentation, and to use that data to develop analyses to predict the aerodynamic and aeroacoustic performance of rotors with active flaps. An overview of the program is presented, including a description of the rotor and preliminary pretest calculations.

  19. Rotor Wake Development During the First Revolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAlister, Kenneth W.

    2003-01-01

    The wake behind a two-bladed model rotor in light climb was measured using particle image velocimetry, with particular emphasis on the development of the trailing vortex during the first revolution of the rotor. The distribution of vorticity was distinguished from the slightly elliptical swirl pattern. Peculiar dynamics within the void region may explain why the peak vorticity appeared to shift away from the center as the vortex aged, suggesting the onset of instability. The swirl and axial velocities (which reached 44 and 12 percent of the rotor-tip speed, respectively) were found to be asymmetric relative to the vortex center. In particular, the axial flow was composed of two concentrated zones moving in opposite directions. The radial distribution of the circulation rapidly increased in magnitude until reaching a point just beyond the core radius, after which the rate of growth decreased significantly. The core-radius circulation increased slightly with wake age, but the large-radius circulation appeared to remain relatively constant. The radial distributions of swirl velocity and vorticity exhibit self-similar behaviors, especially within the core. The diameter of the vortex core was initially about 10 percent of the rotor-blade chord, but more than doubled its size after one revolution of the rotor. According to vortex models that approximate the measured data, the core-radius circulation was about 79 percent of the large-radius circulation, and the large-radius circulation was about 67 percent of the maximum bound circulation on the rotor blade. On average, about 53 percent of the maximum bound circulation resides within the vortex core during the first revolution of the rotor.

  20. Conceptual design studies of 1985 commercial VTOL transports that utilized rotors, Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magee, J. P.; Clark, R.; Alexander, H. R.

    1974-01-01

    Results of conceptual design studies of tilt rotor and tandem helicopter aircraft for a 200 nautical mile commercial short haul transport mission are presented. The trade study data used in selecting the design point aircraft and technology details necessary to support the design conclusions are included.

  1. Navier-Stokes Simulation of a Heavy Lift Slowed-Rotor Compound Helicopter Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, Brian G.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Yao, Chung-Sheng; Bartram, Scott M.; Hallissy, Jim B.; Harris, Jerome; Noonan, Kevin W.; Wong, Oliver D.; Jones, Henry E.; Malovrh, Brendon D.; reis, Deane G.; Mace, W. Derry

    2009-01-01

    Time accurate numerical simulations were performed using the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) flow solver OVERFLOW for a heavy lift, slowed-rotor, compound helicopter configuration, tested at the NASA Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. The primary purpose of these simulations is to provide support for the development of a large field of view Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) flow measurement technique supported by the Subsonic Rotary Wing (SRW) project under the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics program. These simulations provide a better understanding of the rotor and body wake flows and helped to define PIV measurement locations as well as requirements for validation of flow solver codes. The large field PIV system can measure the three-dimensional velocity flow field in a 0.914m by 1.83m plane. PIV measurements were performed upstream and downstream of the vertical tail section and are compared to simulation results. The simulations are also used to better understand the tunnel wall and body/rotor support effects by comparing simulations with and without tunnel floor/ceiling walls and supports. Comparisons are also made to the experimental force and moment data for the body and rotor.

  2. Effects of aerodynamic interaction between main and tail rotors on helicopter hover performance and noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menger, R. P.; Wood, T. L.; Brieger, J. T.

    1983-01-01

    A model test was conducted to determine the effects of aerodynamic interaction between main rotor, tail rotor, and vertical fin on helicopter performance and noise in hover out of ground effect. The experimental data were obtained from hover tests performed with a .151 scale Model 222 main rotor, tail rotor and vertical fin. Of primary interest was the effect of location of the tail rotor with respect to the main rotor. Penalties on main rotor power due to interaction with the tail rotor ranged up to 3% depending upon tail rotor location and orientation. Penalties on tail rotor power due to fin blockage alone ranged up to 10% for pusher tail rotors and up to 50% for tractor tail rotors. The main rotor wake had only a second order effect on these tail rotor/fin interactions. Design charts are presented showing the penalties on main rotor power as a function of the relative location of the tail rotor.

  3. Flexible ocean upwelling pipe

    DOEpatents

    Person, Abraham

    1980-01-01

    In an ocean thermal energy conversion facility, a cold water riser pipe is releasably supported at its upper end by the hull of the floating facility. The pipe is substantially vertical and has its lower end far below the hull above the ocean floor. The pipe is defined essentially entirely of a material which has a modulus of elasticity substantially less than that of steel, e.g., high density polyethylene, so that the pipe is flexible and compliant to rather than resistant to applied bending moments. The position of the lower end of the pipe relative to the hull is stabilized by a weight suspended below the lower end of the pipe on a flexible line. The pipe, apart from the weight, is positively buoyant. If support of the upper end of the pipe is released, the pipe sinks to the ocean floor, but is not damaged as the length of the line between the pipe and the weight is sufficient to allow the buoyant pipe to come to a stop within the line length after the weight contacts the ocean floor, and thereafter to float submerged above the ocean floor while moored to the ocean floor by the weight. The upper end of the pipe, while supported by the hull, communicates to a sump in the hull in which the water level is maintained below the ambient water level. The sump volume is sufficient to keep the pipe full during heaving of the hull, thereby preventing collapse of the pipe.

  4. Numerical investigation of nonlinear vibration for rotor-seal system of centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, W. J.; Yang, Y. C.; Xing, G. K.; Wang, L. Q.

    2013-12-01

    The exciting force in the seal is an important factor for the stability of a multiple stage centrifugal pump. With the speed increasing, the rotor system of multiple stage centrifugal pump presents some nonlinear characters. In order to provide supports for the research of nonlinear characters of multiple stage centrifugal pump, a rotor-seal system model of centrifugal pump is presented and the Muszynska nonlinear seal model is used to express the seal exciting force with multiple parameters in the paper. The fourth-order Runge-Kutta method is also used to determine the vibration response at the impeller place and obtain bifurcation diagram, axis orbit, phase diagram as well as Poincaré Map. The bifurcation results show that the rotor-seal system would be stable under a lower speed and change to be unstable as the rotor speed increases. Various multi-periodic motions and quasi-periodic motions are found showing the complicated motions in the rotor-seal system under nonlinear seal forces.

  5. A new facility to study three dimensional viscous flow and rotor-stator interaction in turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakshminarayana, B.; Camci, C.; Halliwell, I.

    1989-01-01

    A description of the Axial Flow Turbine Research Facility (AFTRF) being built at the Turbomachinery Laboratory of the Pennsylvania State University is presented. The purpose of the research to be performed in this facility is to obtain a better understanding of the rotor/stator interaction, three dimensional viscous flow field in nozzle and rotor blade passages, spanwise mixing and losses in these blade rows, transport of wake through rotor passage, and unsteady aerodynamics and heat transfer of rotor blade row. The experimental results will directly feed and support the analytical and the computational tool development. This large scale low speed facility is heavily instrumented with pressure and temperature probes and has provision for flow visualization and laser Doppler anemometer measurement. The facility design permits extensive use of the high frequency response instrumentation on the stationary vanes and more importantly on the rotating blades. Furthermore it facilitates detailed nozzle wake, rotor wake, and boundary layer surveys. The large size of the rig also has the advantage of operating at Reynolds numbers representative of the engine environment.

  6. Development of turbo-viscous pump with ceramic rotor assembly and oil-free driving unit

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Y.; Abe, T. , Naka Fusion Research Establishment, Naka-machi, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken, Japan ); Ohsawa, H.; Hata, S. )

    1991-05-01

    In order to establish a dynamic pumping system for fusion reactors and other advanced vacuum devices, a new type of roughing pump named turbo-viscous pump has been developed. The construction of the pump features a multistage ceramic (silicon nitride) rotor assembly and an oil-free driving unit. The rotor assembly has parallel rotor disks, between which project stator disks from the outer casing with rotor-stator clearances {lt}100 {mu}m, and a shaft with gas turbine blades. Spiral grooves are cut on either side of the rotor or stator disk of each stage, each of them starting near the center (or at the periphery) and ending at the periphery (or near the center). The pump shaft is supported by gas bearings and is driven by gas impulse turbines at {similar to}25 000 rpm. No lubricating or cooling oil is used. The turbo-viscous pump works in a wide pressure range from atmospheric pressure to 10{sup {minus}3} Pa. The pumping speed and ultimate pressure attained so far are 0.28 m{sup 3}/min (at inlet pressures between 10{sup {minus}1} and 10{sup 2} Pa) and 1{times}10{sup {minus}3} Pa, respectively.

  7. An Analysis of the Autorotative Performance of a Helicopter Powered by Rotor-Tip Jet Units

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gessow, Alfred

    1950-01-01

    The autorotative performance of an assumed helicopter was studied to determine the effect of inoperative jet units located at the rotor-blade tip on the helicopter rate of descent. For a representative ramjet design, the effect of the jet drag is to increase the minimum rate of descent of the helicopter from about 1,OO feet per minute to 3,700 feet per minute when the rotor is operating at a tip speed of approximately 600 feet per second. The effect is less if the rotor operates at lower tip speeds, but the rotor kinetic energy and the stall margin available for the landing maneuver are then reduced. Power-off rates of descent of pulse-jet helicopters would be expected to be less than those of ramjet. helicopters because pulse jets of current design appear to have greater ratios of net power-on thrust to power-off, drag than currently designed rain jets. Iii order to obtain greater accuracy in studies of autorotative performance, calculations in'volving high power-off rates of descent should include the weight-supporting effect of the fuselage parasite-drag force and the fact that the rotor thrust does not equal the weight of the helicopter.

  8. Dynamic Analysis of a Spiral Bevel-Geared Rotor-Bearing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LI, M.; HU, H. Y.

    2003-01-01

    Spiral bevel gears can transmit motion between two rotors, which are commonly perpendicular to each other. In this paper, the dynamic analysis of a spiral bevel-geared rotor-bearing system is studied. Firstly, the constraint equation describing the relationship between the generalized displacements of spiral bevel gear pairs is derived briefly. Then the modelling of coupled axial-lateral-torsional vibration of the rotor system geared by spiral bevel gears is discussed. Finally, the mechanism of coupled vibration of the spiral bevel-geared rotor system is analyzed theoretically and the dynamic behavior of the system is investigated numerically. The conclusions are characterized as follows. The influences of the critical speeds in rigid journal supports, stability threshold speed and unbalanced responses in hydrodynamic journal bearings are not remarkable in comparison with the spur bevel-geared system under the same conditions. However, the critical speeds and stability threshold speed are essentially affected by boundary conditions such as the torsional stiffness, and meanwhile the effect of the unbalanced responses is not prominent under the concerned rotating speeds except that around the resonance peaks. The steady state response due to torsional excitation is also analyzed, and the results show that it cannot be neglected either in the torsional direction or in the lateral and axial directions in the spiral bevel-geared rotor system.

  9. An open and flexible interface proposal and proof of concept implementation to support service orientated architectures and interoperability in the tactical environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peach, Nicholas

    2012-06-01

    The development of SOAs in the tactical domain has been hindered by a lack of interface standards suitable for the environment of unpredictable and low bandwidth communications, low powered computers and dynamic ad-hoc grouping of tactical participants. Existing commercial SOA standards have assumed reliable access to central servers and services and having relatively static participants. The proposal describes an open and published message-oriented interface created to support the aims of the upcoming MOD Generic Base Architecture1 (GBA) Defence Standard and the associated Land Open Systems Architecture2. The aims are; a) to support multiple open transport protocols, such as HTTP, SMTP, DDS and MQTT; b) to be suitable for integrating together low-level utility functions with their controlling systems (such as water, waste and power) and integrating together high-level mission-support functions (such as ISTAR and C2); c) reduce operator burden by using automated discovery and configuration where possible; d) dynamically integrate with MOD Generic Vehicle Architecture3 platforms to link base and vehicle mission and logistics systems over tactical radio links; e) extensible to support features such as security classification; f) to be lightweight in implementation and bandwidth and not dependent on central servers for operation. The paper will present the proposed interface and describe the features required for a military tactical rather than a commercial environment, and will report the outcome of a MOD-funded proof of concept that uses the proposed interface to interoperate several military systems.

  10. The processing of rotor startup signals based on empirical mode decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, Guanghong

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we applied empirical mode decomposition method to analyse rotor startup signals, which are non-stationary and contain a lot of additional information other than that from its stationary running signals. The methodology developed in this paper decomposes the original startup signals into intrinsic oscillation modes or intrinsic modes function (IMFs). Then, we obtained rotating frequency components for Bode diagrams plot by corresponding IMFs, according to the characteristics of rotor system. The method can obtain precise critical speed without complex hardware support. The low-frequency components were extracted from these IMFs in vertical and horizontal directions. Utilising these components, we constructed a drift locus of rotor revolution centre, which provides some significant information to fault diagnosis of rotating machinery. Also, we proved that empirical mode decomposition method is more precise than Fourier filter for the extraction of low-frequency component.

  11. Navier-Stokes computation of wing leading edge tangential blowing for a tilt rotor in hover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fejtek, Ian; Roberts, Leonard

    1992-01-01

    The effect of a thin tangential jet located at the leading edge of the wing of a tilt rotor configuration in hover is computed using the thin-layer Navier-stokes equations. Computations showed that leading edge tangential blowing is effective in reducing the download caused by the impingement of the rotor download caused by the impingement of the rotor downwash on the wing. Results from the numerical model support previous experimental findings that download reduction is due mainly to a decrease in upper surface pressure and not an increase in pressure on the lower surface. The numerical solution clearly shows that because of the three-dimensionality of the flow field, the download could be reduced further by allowing a spanwise variation in blowing strength.

  12. Dynamic modelling and response characteristics of a magnetic bearing rotor system including auxiliary bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Free, April M.; Flowers, George T.; Trent, Victor S.

    1993-01-01

    Auxiliary bearings are a critical feature of any magnetic bearing system. They protect the soft iron core of the magnetic bearing during an overload or failure. An auxiliary bearing typically consists of a rolling element bearing or bushing with a clearance gap between the rotor and the inner race of the support. The dynamics of such systems can be quite complex. It is desired to develop a rotor-dynamic model and assess the dynamic behavior of a magnetic bearing rotor system which includes the effects of auxiliary bearings. Of particular interest is the effects of introducing sideloading into such a system during failure of the magnetic bearing. A model is developed from an experimental test facility and a number of simulation studies are performed. These results are presented and discussed.

  13. Flexible Material Systems Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, John K.; Shook, Lauren S.; Ware, Joanne S.; Welch, Joseph V.

    2010-01-01

    An experimental program has been undertaken to better characterize the stress-strain characteristics of flexible material systems to support a NASA ground test program for inflatable decelerator material technology. A goal of the current study is to investigate experimental methods for the characterization of coated woven material stiffness. This type of experimental mechanics data would eventually be used to define the material inputs of fluid-structure interaction simulation models. The test methodologies chosen for this stress-strain characterization are presented along with the experimental results.

  14. Rotor burst protection program: Statistics on aircraft gas turbine engine rotor failures that occurred in US commercial aviation during 1975

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delucia, R. A.; Mangano, G. J.

    1977-01-01

    Statistics on gas turbine rotor failures that have occurred in U.S. commercial aviation during 1975 are presented. The compiled data were analyzed to establish: (1) The incidence of rotor failures and the number of contained and uncontained rotor bursts; (2) The distribution of rotor bursts with respect to engine rotor component; i.e., fan, compressor or turbine; (3) The type of rotor fragment (disk, rim or blade) typically generated at burst; (4) The cause of failure; (5) The type of engines involved; and (6) The flight condition at the time of failure.

  15. A rotor optimization using regression analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giansante, N.

    1984-01-01

    The design and development of helicopter rotors is subject to the many design variables and their interactions that effect rotor operation. Until recently, selection of rotor design variables to achieve specified rotor operational qualities has been a costly, time consuming, repetitive task. For the past several years, Kaman Aerospace Corporation has successfully applied multiple linear regression analysis, coupled with optimization and sensitivity procedures, in the analytical design of rotor systems. It is concluded that approximating equations can be developed rapidly for a multiplicity of objective and constraint functions and optimizations can be performed in a rapid and cost effective manner; the number and/or range of design variables can be increased by expanding the data base and developing approximating functions to reflect the expanded design space; the order of the approximating equations can be expanded easily to improve correlation between analyzer results and the approximating equations; gradients of the approximating equations can be calculated easily and these gradients are smooth functions reducing the risk of numerical problems in the optimization; the use of approximating functions allows the problem to be started easily and rapidly from various initial designs to enhance the probability of finding a global optimum; and the approximating equations are independent of the analysis or optimization codes used.

  16. Forward sweep, low noise rotor blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A forward-swept, low-noise rotor blade includes an inboard section, an aft-swept section and a forward-swept outboard section. The rotor blade reduces the noise of rotorcraft, including both standard helicopters and advanced systems such as tiltrotors. The primary noise reduction feature is the forward sweep of the planform over a large portion of the outer blade radius. The rotor blade also includes an aft-swept section. The purpose of the aft-swept region is to provide a partial balance to pitching moments produced by the outboard forward-swept portion of the blade. The rotor blade has a constant chord width; or has a chord width which decreases linearly along the entire blade span; or combines constant and decreasing chord widths, wherein the blade is of constant chord width from the blade root to a certain location on the rotor blade, then decreases linearly to the blade tip thereafter. The noise source showing maximum noise reduction is blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise. Also reduced are thickness, noise, high speed impulsive noise, cabin vibration and loading noise.

  17. Boost pulverizer performance with new exhauster rotor

    SciTech Connect

    Lauber, J.A.

    1994-10-01

    Georgia Power Co.'s Jack McDonough station, near Atlanta, Ga, consists of two tangentially fired boilers rated 1.734-million lb/hr, each paired with a 265-MW turbine/generator. The plant's primary fuel is Eastern Bituminous coal, which is ground by five pulverizers. In April 1993, it first began evaluating a new high-efficiency rotor for the pulverizer exhausters, supplied by ABB C-E Services Inc. Windsor, Conn. McDonough was designed to burn coal with a Hardgrove Grindability Index (HGI) of 55 and is typically supplied fuel with an HGI of 45. Thus, the units must operate with all five pulverizers to obtain full load, although each was intended to generate full load using four pulverizers. Now that the plant is burning low-sulfur coal to comply with the clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, the increased hardness limits McDonough's full-load capabilities and will dramatically increase pulverizer maintenance. Management was left with two options: a complete pulverizer replacement or further modifications. (The mills had already been upgraded several years ago.) The introduction of high-efficiency rotors for the exhauster fans made the second option more attractive. Unfortunately, the vendor had no significant operating experience with the rotor design, still in the developmental stage. Therefore, the plant decided to install a test rotor at McDonough Unit 2. This article is a review of the rotor's basic theory of operation, test results, and wear characteristics experienced at the unit.

  18. Unsteady rotor flow analysis using a diagonally implicit harmonic balance method and an overset mesh topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Dong-Kyun; Choi, Seongim; Hyuck Kwon, Jang

    2015-01-01

    The diagonally implicit harmonic balance method is developed in an overset mesh topology and applied to unsteady rotor flows analysis. Its efficiency is by reducing the complexity of a fully implicit harmonic balance method which becomes more flexible in handling the higher harmonics of the flow solutions. Applied to the overset mesh topology, the efficiency of the method becomes greater by reducing the number of solution interpolations required during the entire solution procedure as the method reduces the unsteady computation into periodic steady state. To verify the accuracy and efficiency of the method, both hovering and unsteady forward flight of Caradonna and Tung and AH-1G rotors are solved. Compared with wind-tunnel experiments, the numerical results demonstrate good agreements at computational cost an order of magnitude more efficient than the conventional time-accurate computation method. The proposed method has great potential in other engineering applications, including flapping wing vehicles, turbo-machinery, wind-turbines, etc.

  19. Synthesis, characterization, and evaluation of PS-PPDC resin: a novel flexible cross-linked polymeric support for solid-phase organic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Siyad, M A; Vinod Kumar, G S

    2012-01-01

    The present study describes the synthesis of different mole densities of poly(propylene glycol)dimethacrylate cross-linked resins using monomer units such as styrene and 4-chloromethyl styrene and its evaluation as an ideal support toward different stages of solid-phase peptide synthesis. Free radical generated aqueous suspension polymerization has been followed for polymerization and the formation of resin was characterized using infrared and carbon-13 spectroscopic techniques. Surface morphology of resin was examined by scanning electron microscopy. The polymerization reaction was investigated with respect to the effect of amount of cross-linking agent to verify the swelling, loading, and the mechanical stability of resin. Solvent imbibition abilities in commonly used solvents were measured and compared to commercially available Merrifield as well as reported styrene-acryloyloxyhydroxypropyl methacrylate-tripropyleneglycol diacrylate (SAT resins. The chemical inertness of the support was also checked with different reagents used for solid-phase peptide synthesis. The suitability of support was demonstrated by synthesizing biologically potent Endothelin class of linear peptides by Fmoc strategy and compared to SAT resin. The purities of synthetic peptides were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography and corresponding masses by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation-time of flight analysis.

  20. Dielectric spectroscopy and simulation of cryptophane and metal-organic framework crystals containing internal molecular rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winston, Erick B.

    With recent advances in chemistry and crystal engineering, it is now possible to flexibly synthesize stable crystals with internal molecular electric dipole rotors. This represents a nanoscale design approach to the creation of new materials. Potential applications of such systems include electro-optic materials, new ferroelectrics and dielectrics, and perhaps even information storage. In this thesis, the rotational dynamics of molecular rotors in single crystals is investigated by dielectric spectroscopy. Using X-ray crystallography in combination with molecular mechanics or ab initio calculations, the influence of the local crystal environment on the observed dynamics is ascertained. Additionally, the atomic coordinates from the X-ray structure, and molecular dipole moments determined from ab initio calculations, are used to create an approximate model for a Monte Carlo study of the significance of the dipole-dipole interactions among the rotors. The systems studied here represent two different families of synthetic approaches to creating molecular rotors in crystals. One approach consists of synthesizing inclusion compounds in which molecular crystals have internal cavities capable of hosting small molecular guests. Specifically, we look at the globular cryptophane complexes and find that iodomethane rotates in cryptophane-A with remarkably low barriers near 2 kcal·mol-1 (1000 K), in agreement with the molecular mechanics calculations. The other approach consists of synthesizing covalent crystals where the rotor elements are themselves part of the covalently bonded network. We study metal-organic open frameworks (MOFs), in particular IRMOF-2, and find rotation with a single barrier near 7 kcal·mol-1 (3500 K). The barrier is in approximate agreement with ab initio calculations. Statistical analysis of an MC simulation of IRMOF-2 suggests a dipolar phase change at lower temperatures. The residual dielectric effects of the dipole-dipole interaction above the

  1. Morphing Downwind-Aligned Rotor Concept Based on a 13-MW Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Ichter, Brian; Steele, Adam; Loth, Eric; Moriarty, Patrick; Selig, Michael

    2016-04-01

    To alleviate the mass-scaling issues associated with conventional upwind rotors of extreme-scale wind turbines (>/=10 MW), a morphing downwind-aligned rotor (MoDaR) concept is proposed herein. The concept employs a downwind rotor with blades whose elements are stiff (no intentional flexibility) but with hub-joints that can be unlocked to allow for moment-free downwind alignment. Aligning the combination of gravitational, centrifugal and thrust forces along the blade path reduces downwind cantilever loads, resulting in primarily tensile loading. For control simplicity, the blade curvature can be fixed with a single morphing degree of freedom using a near-hub joint for coning angle: 22 degrees at rated conditions. The conventional baseline was set as the 13.2-MW Sandia 100-m all glass blade in a three-bladed upwind configuration. To quantify potential mass savings, a downwind load-aligning, two-bladed rotor was designed. Because of the reduced number of blades, the MoDaR concept had a favorable 33% mass reduction. The blade reduction and coning led to a reduction in rated power, but morphing increased energy capture at lower speeds such that both the MoDaR and conventional rotors have the same average power: 5.4 MW. A finite element analysis showed that quasi-steady structural stresses could be reduced, over a range of operating wind speeds and azimuthal angles, despite the increases in loading per blade. However, the concept feasibility requires additional investigation of the mass, cost and complexity of the morphing hinge, the impact of unsteady aeroelastic influence because of turbulence and off-design conditions, along with system-level Levelized Cost of Energy analysis.

  2. Tip Vortex and Wake Characteristics of a Counterrotating Open Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Dale E.; Wernet, Mark P.

    2012-01-01

    One of the primary noise sources for Open Rotor systems is the interaction of the forward rotor tip vortex and blade wake with the aft rotor. NASA has collaborated with General Electric on the testing of a new generation of low noise, counterrotating Open Rotor systems. Three-dimensional particle image velocimetry measurements were acquired in the intra-rotor gap of the Historical Baseline blade set. The velocity measurements are of sufficient resolution to characterize the tip vortex size and trajectory as well as the rotor wake decay and turbulence character. The tip clearance vortex trajectory is compared to results from previously developed models. Forward rotor wake velocity profiles are shown. Results are presented in a form as to assist numerical modeling of Open Rotor system aerodynamics and acoustics.

  3. Measurements of atmospheric turbulence effects on tail rotor acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagen, Martin J.; Yamauchi, Gloria K.; Signor, David B.; Mosher, Marianne

    1994-01-01

    Results from an outdoor hover test of a full-scale Lynx tail rotor are presented. The investigation was designed to further the understanding of the acoustics of an isolated tail rotor hovering out-of-ground effect in atmospheric turbulence, without the effects of the main rotor wake or other helicopter components. Measurements include simultaneous rotor performance, noise, inflow, and far-field atmospheric turbulence. Results with grid-generated inflow turbulence are also presented. The effects of atmospheric turbulence ingestion on rotor noise are quantified. In contradiction to current theories, increasing rotor inflow and rotor thrust were found to increase turbulence ingestion noise. This is the final report of Task 13A--Helicopter Tail Rotor Noise, of the NASA/United Kingdom Defense Research Agency cooperative Aeronautics Research Program.

  4. NASA Now: Engineering Design: Tilt Rotors, Aircraft of the Future

    NASA Video Gallery

    Meet Carl Russell, a research aerospace engineer who is working on developing new innovations for air travel. Russell discusses how tilt rotors work, including a demonstration on how rotors use Ber...

  5. Estimation of dynamic rotor loads for the rotor systems research aircraft: Methodology development and validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duval, R. W.; Bahrami, M.

    1985-01-01

    The Rotor Systems Research Aircraft uses load cells to isolate the rotor/transmission systm from the fuselage. A mathematical model relating applied rotor loads and inertial loads of the rotor/transmission system to the load cell response is required to allow the load cells to be used to estimate rotor loads from flight data. Such a model is derived analytically by applying a force and moment balance to the isolated rotor/transmission system. The model is tested by comparing its estimated values of applied rotor loads with measured values obtained from a ground based shake test. Discrepancies in the comparison are used to isolate sources of unmodeled external loads. Once the structure of the mathematical model has been validated by comparison with experimental data, the parameters must be identified. Since the parameters may vary with flight condition it is desirable to identify the parameters directly from the flight data. A Maximum Likelihood identification algorithm is derived for this purpose and tested using a computer simulation of load cell data. The identification is found to converge within 10 samples. The rapid convergence facilitates tracking of time varying parameters of the load cell model in flight.

  6. Helicopter Rotor Blade With Free Tip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroub, Robert H.; Young, Larry; Cawthorne, Matthew; Keys, Charles

    1992-01-01

    Free-tip rotor blades improve fuel efficiency and performance characteristics of helicopters. Outermost portion of blade pivots independently with respect to inboard portion about pitch axis parallel to blade axis, located forward of aerodynamic center. Centrifugal force acts on tension/torsion strap and biases tip nose-up. Airstream turns tip nose-down, other torques cause tip to "weathervane" to intermediate angular position resulting in net lift. Reduces fluctuations in lift, with two effects: flapwise vibratory loads on blade and vibratory loads on pitch-control mechanism reduced; negative lift produced by advancing fixed tip eliminated, reducing power required to achieve same overall lift. Applies to tilt rotors and tail rotors as well.

  7. Evolution of Rotor Wake in Swirling Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Haldidi, Basman; Atassi, Hafiz; Envia, Edmane; Podboy, Gary

    2000-01-01

    A theory is presented for modeling the evolution of rotor wakes as a function of axial distance in swirling mean flows. The theory, which extends an earlier work to include arbitrary radial distributions of mean swirl, indicates that swirl can significantly alter the wake structure of the rotor especially at large downstream distances (i.e., for moderate to large rotor-stator spacings). Using measured wakes of a representative scale model fan stage to define the mean swirl and initial wake perturbations, the theory is used to predict the subsequent evolution of the wakes. The results indicate the sensitivity of the wake evolution to the initial profile and the need to have complete and consistent initial definition of both velocity and pressure perturbations.

  8. A Study of Coaxial Rotor Performance and Flow Field Characteristics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-22

    opposite directions with a vertical separation distance equivalent to the separation between the upper and lower rotor of the coaxial system were simulated...lower rotor separately . Ramasamy provided a convenient summary of coaxial rotor hover perfor- mance measurements prior to 2013, including those surveyed 1...actual blades. Fig. 3. Performance of HC1 (Ref. 13) in hover compared with momentum theory, BEMT and RotUNS steady cal- culations. Rotor separation

  9. Active-Twist Rotor Control Applications for UAVs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, Matthew L.; Wilkie, W. Keats

    2004-01-01

    The current state-of-the-art in active-twist rotor control is discussed using representative examples from analytical and experimental studies, and the application to rotary-wing UAVs is considered. Topics include vibration and noise reduction, rotor performance improvement, active blade tracking, stability augmentation, and rotor blade de-icing. A review of the current status of piezoelectric fiber composite actuator technology, the class of piezoelectric actuators implemented in active-twist rotor systems, is included.

  10. On aerodynamic design of the Savonius windmill rotor

    SciTech Connect

    Mojola, O.O.

    1982-08-01

    This paper examines under field conditions the performance characteristics of the Savonius windmill rotor. Test data were collected on the speed, torque and power of the rotor at a large number of wind speeds for each of seven values of the rotor overlap ratio. Field testing procedures are critically appraised and a unified approach is suggested. The performance data of the Savonius rotor are also fully discussed and design criteria established.

  11. User's Manual for Computer Program ROTOR. [to calculate tilt-rotor aircraft dynamic characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasue, M.

    1974-01-01

    A detailed description of a computer program to calculate tilt-rotor aircraft dynamic characteristics is presented. This program consists of two parts: (1) the natural frequencies and corresponding mode shapes of the rotor blade and wing are developed from structural data (mass distribution and stiffness distribution); and (2) the frequency response (to gust and blade pitch control inputs) and eigenvalues of the tilt-rotor dynamic system, based on the natural frequencies and mode shapes, are derived. Sample problems are included to assist the user.

  12. Comprehensive analysis of helicopters with bearingless rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, V. R.

    1988-01-01

    A modified Galerkin method is developed to analyze the dynamic problems of multiple-load-path bearingless rotor blades. The development and selection of functions are quite parallel to CAMRAD procedures, greatly facilitating the implementation of the method into the CAMRAD program. A software is developed implementing the modified Galerkin method to determine free vibration characteristics of multiple-load-path rotor blades undergoing coupled flapwise bending, chordwise bending, twisting, and extensional motions. Results are in the process of being obtained by debugging the software.

  13. Superballistic wavepacket spreading in double kicked rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Ping; Wang, Jiao

    2016-08-01

    We investigate possible ways in which a quantum wavepacket spreads. We show that in a general class of double kicked rotor system, a wavepacket may undergo superballistic spreading; i.e., its variance increases as the cubic of time. The conditions for the observed superballistic spreading and two related characteristic time scales are studied. Our results suggest that the symmetry of the studied model and whether it is a Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser system are crucial to its wavepacket spreading behavior. Our study also sheds new light on the exponential wavepacket spreading phenomenon previously observed in the double kicked rotor system.

  14. Simple theoretical models for composite rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valisetty, R. R.; Rehfield, L. W.

    1984-01-01

    The development of theoretical rotor blade structural models for designs based upon composite construction is discussed. Care was exercised to include a member of nonclassical effects that previous experience indicated would be potentially important to account for. A model, representative of the size of a main rotor blade, is analyzed in order to assess the importance of various influences. The findings of this model study suggest that for the slenderness and closed cell construction considered, the refinements are of little importance and a classical type theory is adequate. The potential of elastic tailoring is dramatically demonstrated, so the generality of arbitrary ply layup in the cell wall is needed to exploit this opportunity.

  15. Variable diameter wind turbine rotor blades

    DOEpatents

    Jamieson, Peter McKeich; Hornzee-Jones, Chris; Moroz, Emilian M.; Blakemore, Ralph W.

    2005-12-06

    A system and method for changing wind turbine rotor diameters to meet changing wind speeds and control system loads is disclosed. The rotor blades on the wind turbine are able to adjust length by extensions nested within or containing the base blade. The blades can have more than one extension in a variety of configurations. A cable winching system, a hydraulic system, a pneumatic system, inflatable or elastic extensions, and a spring-loaded jack knife deployment are some of the methods of adjustment. The extension is also protected from lightning by a grounding system.

  16. Higher harmonic rotor blade pitch control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewans, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    Tests of a model 'Reverse Velocity Rotor' system at high advance ratios and with twice-per-revolution cyclic pitch control were made under joint Navy-NASA sponsorship in the NASA, Ames 12 ft. pressure tunnel. The results showed significant gains in rotor performance at all advance ratios by using twice-per-revolution control. Detailed design studies have been made of alternative methods of providing higher harmonic motion including four types of mechanical systems and an electro-hydraulic system. The relative advantages and disadvantages are evaluated on the basis of stiffness, weight, volume, reliability and maintainability.

  17. Hover performance tests of baseline metal and Advanced Technology Blade (ATB) rotor systems for the XV-15 tilt rotor aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartie, K.; Alexander, H.; Mcveigh, M.; Lamon, S.; Bishop, H.

    1986-01-01

    Rotor hover performance data were obtained for two full-scale rotor systems designed for the XV-15 Tilt Rotor Research Aircraft. One rotor employed the rectangular planform metal blades (rotor solidity = 0.089) which were used on the initial flight configuration of the XV-15. The second rotor configuration examined the nonlinear taper, composite-construction, Advanced Technology Blade (ATB), (rotor solidity = 0.10) designed to replace the metal blades on the XV-15. Variations of the baseline ATB tip and cuff shapes were also tested. A new six-component rotor force and moment balance designed to obtain highly accurate data over a broad range of thrust and torque conditions is described. The test data are presented in nondimensional coefficient form for the performance results, and in dimensional form for the steady and alternating loads. Some wake and acoustic data are also shown.

  18. 14 CFR 23.1461 - Equipment containing high energy rotors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Equipment containing high energy rotors. 23... Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 23.1461 Equipment containing high energy rotors. (a) Equipment, such as Auxiliary Power Units (APU) and constant speed drive units, containing high energy rotors must...

  19. 14 CFR 23.1461 - Equipment containing high energy rotors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment containing high energy rotors. 23... Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 23.1461 Equipment containing high energy rotors. (a) Equipment, such as Auxiliary Power Units (APU) and constant speed drive units, containing high energy rotors must...

  20. 14 CFR 29.411 - Ground clearance: tail rotor guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ground clearance: tail rotor guard. 29.411 Section 29.411 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... System Loads § 29.411 Ground clearance: tail rotor guard. (a) It must be impossible for the tail rotor...

  1. 14 CFR 29.411 - Ground clearance: tail rotor guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Ground clearance: tail rotor guard. 29.411 Section 29.411 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... System Loads § 29.411 Ground clearance: tail rotor guard. (a) It must be impossible for the tail rotor...

  2. 14 CFR 29.411 - Ground clearance: tail rotor guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Ground clearance: tail rotor guard. 29.411 Section 29.411 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... System Loads § 29.411 Ground clearance: tail rotor guard. (a) It must be impossible for the tail rotor...

  3. 14 CFR 27.411 - Ground clearance: tail rotor guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Ground clearance: tail rotor guard. 27.411 Section 27.411 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... System Loads § 27.411 Ground clearance: tail rotor guard. (a) It must be impossible for the tail rotor...

  4. 14 CFR 27.411 - Ground clearance: tail rotor guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Ground clearance: tail rotor guard. 27.411 Section 27.411 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... System Loads § 27.411 Ground clearance: tail rotor guard. (a) It must be impossible for the tail rotor...

  5. 14 CFR 27.411 - Ground clearance: tail rotor guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ground clearance: tail rotor guard. 27.411 Section 27.411 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... System Loads § 27.411 Ground clearance: tail rotor guard. (a) It must be impossible for the tail rotor...

  6. 14 CFR 29.411 - Ground clearance: tail rotor guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ground clearance: tail rotor guard. 29.411 Section 29.411 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... System Loads § 29.411 Ground clearance: tail rotor guard. (a) It must be impossible for the tail rotor...

  7. 14 CFR 27.411 - Ground clearance: tail rotor guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ground clearance: tail rotor guard. 27.411 Section 27.411 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... System Loads § 27.411 Ground clearance: tail rotor guard. (a) It must be impossible for the tail rotor...

  8. Development of a rotor wake-vortex model, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majjigi, R. K.; Gliebe, P. R.

    1984-01-01

    Certain empirical rotor wake and turbulence relationships were developed using existing low speed rotor wave data. A tip vortex model was developed by replacing the annulus wall with a row of image vortices. An axisymmetric turbulence spectrum model, developed in the context of rotor inflow turbulence, was adapted to predicting the turbulence spectrum of the stator gust upwash.

  9. 14 CFR 29.411 - Ground clearance: tail rotor guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ground clearance: tail rotor guard. 29.411 Section 29.411 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... System Loads § 29.411 Ground clearance: tail rotor guard. (a) It must be impossible for the tail rotor...

  10. Tarp rotor system thrust, yaw and load control

    SciTech Connect

    Weisbrich, A. L.

    1985-09-10

    Presented is a means for thrust and, hence, yaw and load control of a TARP twin rotor system by means of initiating a thrust differential between said rotors which, in turn, yaws the twin rotor assembly into a protected low flow velocity region about a TARP and alleviates load on said assembly.

  11. Helicopter tail rotor blade-vortex interaction noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Albert R.; Chou, S.-T.

    1987-01-01

    A study is made of helicopter tail rotor noise, particularly that due to the interactions with main rotor tip vortices. Summarized here are present analysis, the computer codes, and the results of several test cases. Amiet's unsteady thin airfoil theory is used to calculate the acoustics of blade-vortex interaction. The noise source is modelled as a force dipole resulting from an airfoil of infinite span chopping through a skewed line vortex. To analyze the interactions between helicopter tail rotor and main rotor tip vortices, we developed a two-step approach: (1) the main rotor tip vortex system is obtained through a free wake geometry calculation of the main rotor using CAMRAD code; (2) acoustic analysis takes the results from the aerodynamic interaction analysis and calculates the farfield pressure signatures for the interactions. It is found that under a wide range of helicopter flight conditions, acoustic pressure fluctuations of significant magnitude can be generated by tail rotors due to a series of interactions with main rotor tip vortices. This noise mechanism depends strongly on the helicopter flight conditions and the relative location and phasing of the main and tail rotors. fluctuations of significant magnitude can be generated by tail rotors due to a series of interactions with main rotor tip vortices. This noise mechanism depends strongly upon the helicopter flight conditions and the relative location and phasing of the main and tail rotors.

  12. 14 CFR 23.1461 - Equipment containing high energy rotors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Equipment containing high energy rotors. 23... Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 23.1461 Equipment containing high energy rotors. (a) Equipment, such as Auxiliary Power Units (APU) and constant speed drive units, containing high energy rotors must...

  13. 14 CFR 23.1461 - Equipment containing high energy rotors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Equipment containing high energy rotors. 23... Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 23.1461 Equipment containing high energy rotors. (a) Equipment, such as Auxiliary Power Units (APU) and constant speed drive units, containing high energy rotors must...

  14. 14 CFR 23.1461 - Equipment containing high energy rotors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Equipment containing high energy rotors. 23... Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 23.1461 Equipment containing high energy rotors. (a) Equipment, such as Auxiliary Power Units (APU) and constant speed drive units, containing high energy rotors must...

  15. Dovetail Rotor Construction For Permanent-Magnet Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kintz, Lawrence J., Jr.; Puskas, William J.

    1988-01-01

    New way of mounting magnets in permanent-magnet, electronically commutated, brushless dc motors. Magnets wedge shaped, tapering toward center of rotor. Oppositely tapered pole pieces, electron-beam welded to rotor hub, retain magnets against centrifugal force generated by spinning rotor. To avoid excessively long electron-beam welds, pole pieces assembled in segments rather than single long bars.

  16. 76 FR 42020 - Airworthiness Standards; Rotor Overspeed Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-18

    ... ``extremely remote'' in Sec. 33.27(c); Exclusions of shaft sections from overspeed tests; Material properties... comment. Material Properties of Test Rotors Section 33.27(a)(1) proposed that test rotors used to... validated to prior overspeed test results of a similar rotor. The tool must be validated for each...

  17. OpenGeneMed: a portable, flexible and customizable informatics hub for the coordination of next-generation sequencing studies in support of precision medicine trials.

    PubMed

    Palmisano, Alida; Zhao, Yingdong; Li, Ming-Chung; Polley, Eric C; Simon, Richard M

    2016-07-15

    Trials involving genomic-driven treatment selection require the coordination of many teams interacting with a great variety of information. The need of better informatics support to manage this complex set of operations motivated the creation of OpenGeneMed. OpenGeneMed is a stand-alone and customizable version of GeneMed (Zhao et al. GeneMed: an informatics hub for the coordination of next-generation sequencing studies that support precision oncology clinical trials. Cancer Inform 2015;14(Suppl 2):45), a web-based interface developed for the National Cancer Institute Molecular Profiling-based Assignment of Cancer Therapy (NCI-MPACT) clinical trial coordinated by the NIH. OpenGeneMed streamlines clinical trial management and it can be used by clinicians, lab personnel, statisticians and researchers as a communication hub. It automates the annotation of genomic variants identified by sequencing tumor DNA, classifies the actionable mutations according to customizable rules and facilitates quality control in reviewing variants. The system generates summarized reports with detected genomic alterations that a treatment review team can use for treatment assignment. OpenGeneMed allows collaboration to happen seamlessly along the clinical pipeline; it helps reduce errors made transferring data between groups and facilitates clear documentation along the pipeline. OpenGeneMed is distributed as a stand-alone virtual machine, ready for deployment and use from a web browser; its code is customizable to address specific needs of different clinical trials and research teams. Examples on how to change the code are provided in the technical documentation distributed with the virtual machine. In summary, OpenGeneMed offers an initial set of features inspired by our experience with GeneMed, a system that has been proven to be efficient and successful for coordinating the application of next-generation sequencing in the NCI-MPACT trial.

  18. NASA/HAA Advanced Rotorcraft Technology and Tilt Rotor Workshop. Volume 7: Tilt Rotor Session

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The technical characteristics of the XV-15 aircraft were discussed. Program objectives, concept evaluation, tilt rotor experiments and civil market applications are presented. The XV-15 status and test schedule are also included.

  19. Response studies of rotors and rotor blades with application to aeroelastic tailoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, P. P.

    1982-01-01

    Various tools for the aeroelastic stability and response analysis of rotor blades in hover and forward flight were developed and incorporated in a comprehensive package capable of performing aeroelastic tailoring of rotor blades in forward flight. The results indicate that substantial vibration reductions, of order 15-40%, in the vibratory hub shears can be achieved by relatively small modifications of the initial design. Furthermore the optimized blade can be up to 20% lighter than the original design. Accomplishments are reported for the following tasks: (1) finite element modeling of rotary-wing aeroelastic problems in hover and forward flight; (2) development of numerical methods for calculating the aeroelastic response and stability of rotor blades in forward fight; (3) formulation of the helicopter air resonance problem in hover with active controls; and (4) optimum design of rotor blades for vibration reduction in forward flight.

  20. Effect of Rotor Diameter on the Thermal Stresses of a Turbine Rotor Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dávalos, J. O.; García, J. C.; Urquiza, G.; Castro-Gómez, L. L.; Rodríguez, J. A.; De Santiago, O.

    2016-04-01

    Thermal stresses in a simplified steam turbine rotor model during a cold startup are analyzed using finite element analysis (FEA). In order to validate the numerical model, an experimental array is developed in which a hollow cylinder is heated with hot air in the external surface. At the thick wall of the cylinder, temperature distribution is measured in real time, while at the same time an algorithm computes thermal stresses. Additional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations are made to obtain magnitudes of velocity and pressure in order to compute convective heat transfer coefficient. The experimental results show good agreement with the FEA computations. To evaluate the effect of rotor diameter size, FEA computations with variation in external and internal diameters are performed. Results show that thermal stresses are proportional to rotor diameter size. Also, zones of higher stress concentration are found in the external and internal surfaces of the rotor.