Science.gov

Sample records for flexion knee deformity

  1. Femoral shortening in correction of congenital knee flexion deformity with popliteal webbing.

    PubMed

    Saleh, M; Gibson, M F; Sharrard, W J

    1989-01-01

    Severe knee flexion deformity with popliteal webbing or pterygium is considered to be uncorrectable. The soft tissues and, in particular, the main nerves and vessels are short relative to the bone. Femoral shortening was used in correction of such a deformity in a child with arthrogryposis. The operative procedure is described. Femoral shortening should be considered as an aid to correction of any severe knee flexion deformity.

  2. Successful Correction of Idiopathic Bilateral Flexion Deformity of Knee: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Mugalur, Aakash; Pathak, Aditya C; Shahane, Sunil M; Samant, Ashwin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Bilateral Flexion Deformity commonly results secondary to cerebral palsy, poliomyelitis, haemophilia etc. It is accompanied by valgus deformity and external rotation at knee in long standing cases secondary to the contracture of the iliotibial tract. Flexion deformity at knees is an impediment to the normal ambulation and is difficult to address. Case Report: A 34 year old male presented with bilateral knee stiffness. He had multifocal tuberculosis and was bed ridden for almost a year and consequently developed bilateral knee flexion deformity of 60o with further flexion upto 120o. Patient was treated with gradual distraction using a modified external fixator and achieved full correction at the end of 6 weeks. At final followup patient was walking comfortably and was able to squat and sit crossed legged. Conclusion: Idiopathic isolated bilateral flexion deformity of knees is very rare and is an impediment to normal ambulation. Arthrodiastasis with indigenously designed fixator using the Ilizarov principle and modified fixator is a simple, efficient and cost effective treatment for flexion deformity of knee. PMID:27299020

  3. Severe Bilateral Fixed Flexion Deformity-Simultaneous or Staged Total Knee Arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Lee, Wu Chean; Kwan, Yu Heng; Yeo, Seng Jin

    2016-01-01

    Outcomes of 29 simultaneous (SimBTKA) and 38 staged bilateral total knee arthroplasty (StaBTKA) subjects with severe (≥16°) bilateral fixed flexion deformity (FFD) were retrospectively investigated. SimBTKA patients were significantly younger (63 ± 8 vs 68 ± 7, P > .01). At 2 years, SimBTKA subjects had significantly better residual FFD (2.5° ± 5.1° vs 5.4° ± 6.6°, P = .02) and Knee Society function score (75.7 ± 25.7 vs 69.3 ± 24.1, P = .02). However, Knee Society knee scores, Oxford Knee Scores, and Short Form-36 scores were similar. These suggest no large clinical advantage of SimBTKA over StaBTKA. We feel that severe bilateral FFD is not an absolute indication for SimBTKA.

  4. Total Knee Arthroplasty for Severe Flexion Contracture in Rheumatoid Arthritis Knees

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Youn Soo; Moon, Kyu Pill; Kim, Kyung Taek; Kim, Jin Wan; Park, Won Seok

    2016-01-01

    Flexion contracture deformities, as well as severe varus and valgus deformities of the knee joint, accompany osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In particular, severe flexion contracture deformity of the knee joint is often found in patients with RA, which renders them nonambulatory. This report describes a 26-year-old female patient diagnosed with RA 10 years ago. She had chronic joint pain, severe flexion contracture, valgus deformity in both knees, and limited range of motion in both knees and became nonambulatory. She underwent a total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and serial casting and physical therapy to restore stable joint movement and correct knee joint deformity. Her pain was successfully relieved, and she was able to walk after surgery. Here, we report the excellent results of TKA in this RA patient with severe flexion contracture of both knees. PMID:27894181

  5. Effect of implant design on knee flexion.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Douglas A; Heekin, R David; Clark, Charles R; Murphy, Jeffrey A; O'Dell, Tammy L; Dwyer, Kimberly A

    2013-03-01

    From March 2006 to August 2008, 93 subjects (186 knees) underwent simultaneous bilateral total knee arthroplasty performed by eight surgeons at North American centers. This randomized study was conducted to determine whether non-weight-bearing passive flexion was superior for knees receiving a posterior stabilized high flexion device compared to a posterior stabilized standard device in the contra-lateral knee. Weight-bearing single leg active flexion was one secondary endpoint. Follow-up compliance was 92.5%. Results show small, but significant superiority in the motion metrics for the high flexion device compared to the standard device 12 months after surgery, especially for a subgroup of patients with pre-operative flexion less than 120° in both knees. Thus, the ideal candidate for the high flexion device may be one with lesser pre-operative flexion.

  6. [Management of Flexion Contracture in Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Hube, R; Mayr, H O; Pfitzner, T; von Roth, P

    2015-06-01

    Flexion contracture is a common deformity of the arthritic knee. The present publication describes causes, clinical relevance and surgical technique in the presence of flexion contractures in total knee arthroplasty. Flexion contracture can be attributed to different causes. Basically it is a mismatch between flexion and extension gaps. Moderate and severe deformities have to be corrected by additional surgical interventions. In most cases soft tissue techniques with release of contracted structures, the removal of osteophytes and additional distal femoral bone resection are necessary. The goal of these interventions is to achieve full extension of the knee. During rehabilitation attention has to be paid to maintain it with intensive physical therapy. A remaining flexion contracture is associated with inferior functional outcome and persistent pain.

  7. Measured flexion following total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Mai, Kenny T; Verioti, Christopher A; Hardwick, Mary E; Ezzet, Kace A; Copp, Steven N; Colwell, Clifford W

    2012-10-01

    Postoperative flexion is an important factor in the outcome of total knee arthroplasty. Although normal activities of daily living require a minimum of 105° to 110° of flexion, patients from non-Western cultures often engage in activities such as kneeling and squatting that require higher flexion. The desire to achieve greater flexion serves as the driving force for prosthetic modifications, including high-flexion designs. Techniques used to measure knee flexion and knee position during measurement are not often described or are different depending on the examiner. The purpose of this study was to compare active (self) and passive (assisted) flexion after successful total knee arthroplasty for 5 prostheses (2 standard and 3 high-flexion) using clinical (goniometer) and radiographic (true lateral radiograph) measurement techniques by different independent examiners.At a mean follow-up of 2.7 years (range, 1-5.6 years), a total of 108 patients (144 total knee arthroplasties) had completed the study. Mean postoperative active flexion was 111° clinically and 109° radiographically for the standard designs and 114° clinically and 117° radiographically for the high-flexion designs. Adding passive flexion increased flexion to 115° clinically and 117° radiographically for the standard designs and 119° clinically and 124° radiographically for the high-flexion designs. Flexion differences between the 2 measurement techniques (active vs passive and clinically vs radiographically) were statistically significant (P<.05). These findings demonstrate the importance of describing how flexion is measured in studies and understanding how the method of measurement can affect the findings.

  8. Is high flexion following total knee arthroplasty safe?: evaluation of knee joint loads in the patients during maximal flexion.

    PubMed

    Nagura, Takeo; Otani, Toshiro; Suda, Yasunori; Matsumoto, Hideo; Toyama, Yoshiaki

    2005-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to indicate the mechanical loads and the flexion angle at the knee during rise from maximal flexion following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Twenty three knees were evaluated using skin marker-based motion analysis system during four different activities of daily living. The average maximum flexion was 90 degrees (34 degrees less than passive flexion) and all subjects required support for their weight to rise from maximal flexion. The external moments and the external forces at the knee during the maximal flexion were smaller than those during the stair descending activity. The results indicate that capable flexion angle for the patients following TKA is approximately 90 degrees which has smaller mechanical loads at the knee than the stair descending activity.

  9. In vivo healthy knee kinematics during dynamic full flexion.

    PubMed

    Hamai, Satoshi; Moro-oka, Taka-aki; Dunbar, Nicholas J; Miura, Hiromasa; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Banks, Scott A

    2013-01-01

    Healthy knee kinematics during dynamic full flexion were evaluated using 3D-to-2D model registration techniques. Continuous knee motions were recorded during full flexion in a lunge from 85° to 150°. Medial and lateral tibiofemoral contacts and femoral internal-external and varus-valgus rotations were analyzed as a function of knee flexion angle. The medial tibiofemoral contact translated anteroposteriorly, but remained on the center of the medial compartment. On the other hand, the lateral tibiofemoral contact translated posteriorly to the edge of the tibial surface at 150° flexion. The femur exhibited external and valgus rotation relative to the tibia over the entire activity and reached 30° external and 5° valgus rotations at 150° flexion. Kinematics' data during dynamic full flexion may provide important insight as to the designing of high-flexion total knee prostheses.

  10. Development of a knee joint motion simulator to evaluate deep knee flexion of artificial knee joints.

    PubMed

    Takano, Y; Ueno, M; Kiguchi, K; Ito, J; Mawatari, M; Hotokebuchi, T

    2008-01-01

    A purpose of this study is to examine the effect that quadriceps femoris force gives to rotation angle and joint reaction force of total knee prosthesis during deep knee flexion such as a unique sitting style called 'seiza' in Japanese. For the evaluation, we developed the knee motion simulator which could bend to 180 degrees continually simulating the passive flexion performed by clinicians. A total knee prosthesis, which is a specially-devised posterior stabilized type and capable of flexion up to 180 degrees, was inserted into bone model. And this prosthesis pulled by three kinds of quadriceps femoris forces to perform parameter study. The results obtained in this study were showed the same tendency with those in the past cadaveric experiment. It is suggested that the rotation angle and joint reaction force of total knee prosthesis are affected by shape of prosthesis, a vector of quadriceps femoris force, and bony aliments during deep knee flexion.

  11. Tibiofemoral contact areas and pressures in six high flexion knees

    PubMed Central

    Vizesi, Frank; Bruce, Warwick; Herrmann, Sebastian; Walsh, William R

    2007-01-01

    The tibiofemoral articulating interfaces of six high flexion knee designs were examined using a standard testing protocol developed by Harris et al. [J Biomech 32:951–958 (1999)] to investigate the polyethylene insert contact areas and pressures. A load of 3600 N was applied for 10 s at 0, 30, 60, 90, 110, 135 and 155° of flexion. Contact areas and pressures at the femoral–polyethylene insert interface were measured with a I-scan 4000 system. Up to 110°of flexion, the VANGUARD RP HI-FLEX showed the highest contact area and lowest pressure. At the deep flexion angles, contact area decreased and contact pressure increased significantly in all knees. The NexGen series showed a constant contact area throughout the various flexion angles. In general, all high flexion knees could result in almost point contact in an extremely high range of motion. PMID:18034243

  12. Computer-assisted navigation for the assessment of fixed flexion in knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Gallie, Price A.M.; Davis, Edward T.; Macgroarty, Kelly; Waddell, James P.; Schemitsch, Emil H.

    2010-01-01

    Background Correction of a fixed flexion deformity is an important goal when performing total knee arthroplasty. The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of clinical assessment compared with imageless computer navigation in determining the degree of fixed flexion. Methods We performed navigation anatomy registration using 14 cadaver knees. The knees were held in various degrees of flexion with 2 crossed pins. The degree of flexion was first recorded on the computer and then on lateral radiographs. The cadaver knees were draped as they would be for a total knee arthroplasty, and 9 examiners were asked to clinically assess by visual observation the amount of fixed flexion. Three examiners repeated the process 1 week later. Results The mean error from the radiographs in the navigation group was 2.18° (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.23°–3.01°) compared with 5.57° (95%CI 4.86°–6.29°) in the observer group. The navigation was more consistent, with a range of error of −5° to +5.5° compared with −18.5° to +17.5° in the observer group. The observers tended to underestimate the amount of knee flexion (median error −4°), whereas the navigation group was more evenly distributed (median error 0). The highest concordance coefficient was found between navigation and radiography (0.96). The concordance coefficient was 0.88 for the 3 surgeons who repeated the measurements 1 week later (mean error 3.5°, range 15°). Conclusion The use of computer navigation appears to be a more accurate method for assessing the degree of knee flexion, with a reduced range of error compared with clinical assessment. The use of computer-assisted surgery may therefore provide surgeons with the information required to more consistently restore full extension during total knee arthroplasty. PMID:20100412

  13. Trapezoid supracondylar femoral extension osteotomy for knee flexion contractures in patients with haemophilia.

    PubMed

    Mortazavi, S M J; Heidari, P; Esfandiari, H; Motamedi, M

    2008-01-01

    Flexion deformity of the haemophilic knee is a considerable cause of disability and may need to be managed surgically in severe cases. We have used a trapezoid supracondylar femoral extension osteotomy to correct severe knee flexion deformity. Nine severe haemophilic patients with contractures >30 degrees that were unresponsive to conservative measures underwent 11 trapezoid osteotomies. The angle of deformity was measured using anteroposterior and lateral knee X-ray films at maximum extension. Factor levels of 80-100% were achieved before the operation. A trapezoid osteotomy of the distal femur bone was performed using a lateral approach. The frontal plane angular deformity (if any) was corrected at the same time. The osteotomy site was fixed using an Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteo synthesefragen (AO) condylar blade plate. Following surgery, the knee was supported by a plaster splint at 20 degrees of flexion. Physiotherapy was started on third postoperative day and continued three times a week. There was no serious complication. The deformities were corrected in all of the patients and the mean range of motion increased form 68.6 degrees to 98.1 degrees . Bleeding episodes decreased in all four knees which had a bleeding score of 3 before surgery. Using the Orthopaedic Advisory Committee of the World Federation of Haemophilia scores, nine good and two fair results were obtained. All patients regained the ability to walk for both short and long distance without any aid, climb the stairs, bath, and use public transportation. Trapezoid supracondylar femoral extension osteotomy should be considered in the surgical management of severe haemophilic flexion deformity of the knee joint.

  14. Dynamic splinting for knee flexion contracture following total knee arthroplasty: a case report.

    PubMed

    Finger, Eric; Willis, F Buck

    2008-12-29

    Total Knee Arthroplasty operations are increasing in frequency, and knee flexion contracture is a common pathology, both pre-existing and post-operative. A 61-year-old male presented with knee flexion contracture following a total knee arthroplasty. Physical therapy alone did not fully reduce the contracture and dynamic splinting was then prescribed for daily low-load, prolonged-duration stretch. After 28 physical therapy sessions, the active range of motion improved from -20 degrees to -12 degrees (stiff knee still lacking full extension), and after eight additional weeks with nightly wear of dynamic splint, the patient regained full knee extension, (active extension improved from -12 degrees to 0 degrees ).

  15. Posterior femoral condylar offset after total knee replacement in the risk of knee flexion contracture.

    PubMed

    Onodera, Tomohiro; Majima, Tokifumi; Nishiike, Osamu; Kasahara, Yasuhiko; Takahashi, Daisuke

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the risk of knee flexion contracture associated with a posterior femoral condylar offset after total knee replacement (TKR). Radiographs from 100 healthy Japanese volunteers were included in the study. We evaluated femoral component posterior offset in various implants and compared them with the normal Japanese knee. Posterior offset of the femoral condyle is up to a maximum of 4.7 times greater than that of the healthy Japanese knee in all knee implants. Excess posterior offset of the femoral condyle in TKR prostheses may cause knee joint flexion contracture due to the relative shortening of the posterior soft tissue.

  16. Active Flexion in Weight Bearing Better Correlates with Functional Outcomes of Total Knee Arthroplasty than Passive Flexion

    PubMed Central

    Song, Young Dong; Jain, Nimash; Kang, Yeon Gwi; Kim, Tae Yune

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Correlations between maximum flexion and functional outcomes in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) patients are reportedly weak. We investigated whether there are differences between passive maximum flexion in nonweight bearing and other types of maximum flexion and whether the type of maximum flexion correlates with functional outcomes. Materials and Methods A total of 210 patients (359 knees) underwent preoperative evaluation and postoperative follow-up evaluations (6, 12, and 24 months) for the assessment of clinical outcomes including maximum knee flexion. Maximum flexion was measured under five conditions: passive nonweight bearing, passive weight bearing, active nonweight bearing, and active weight bearing with or without arm support. Data were analyzed for relationships between passive maximum flexion in nonweight bearing by Pearson correlation analyses, and a variance comparison between measurement techniques via paired t test. Results We observed substantial differences between passive maximum flexion in nonweight bearing and the other four maximum flexion types. At all time points, passive maximum flexion in nonweight bearing correlated poorly with active maximum flexion in weight bearing with or without arm support. Active maximum flexion in weight bearing better correlated with functional outcomes than the other maximum flexion types. Conclusions Our study suggests active maximum flexion in weight bearing should be reported together with passive maximum flexion in nonweight bearing in research on the knee motion arc after TKA. PMID:27274468

  17. Effect of patellar thickness on knee flexion in total knee arthroplasty: a biomechanical and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Abolghasemian, Mansour; Samiezadeh, Saeid; Sternheim, Amir; Bougherara, Habiba; Barnes, C Lowry; Backstein, David J

    2014-01-01

    A biomechanical computer-based model was developed to simulate the influence of patellar thickness on passive knee flexion after arthroplasty. Using the computer model of a single-radius, PCL-sacrificing knee prosthesis, a range of patella-implant composite thicknesses was simulated. The biomechanical model was then replicated using two cadaveric knees. A patellar-thickness range of 15 mm was applied to each of the knees. Knee flexion was found to decrease exponentially with increased patellar thickness in both the biomechanical and experimental studies. Importantly, this flexion loss followed an exponential pattern with higher patellar thicknesses in both studies. In order to avoid adverse biomechanical and functional consequences, it is recommended to restore patellar thickness to that of the native knee during total knee arthroplasty.

  18. Intraoperative Manipulation for Flexion Contracture During Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yoshio; Minoda, Yukihide; Fumiaki, Inori; Nakagawa, Sigeru; Okajima, Yoshiaki; Kobayashi, Akio

    2016-11-01

    Joint gap balancing during total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is important for ensuring postoperative joint stability and range of motion. Although the joint gap should be balanced to ensure joint stability, it is not easy to achieve perfect balancing during TKA. In particular, relative extension gap shortening can induce flexion contracture. Intraoperative manipulation is often empirically performed. This study evaluated the tension required for this manipulation and investigated the influence of intraoperative manipulation on the joint gap in cadaveric knees. Total knee arthroplasty was performed in 6 cadaveric knees from whole body cadavers. Flexion contracture was induced using an insert that was 4 mm thicker than the extension gap, and intraoperative manipulation was performed. Study measurements included the changes in the joint gap after manipulation at 6 positions, with the knee bending from extension to 120° flexion, and the manipulation tension that was required to create a 4-mm increase in the gap. The manipulation tension needed to create a 4-mm increase in the extension gap was 303±17 N. The changes in the joint gap after manipulation were 0.4 mm, 0.6 mm, 0.2 mm, -0.2 mm, -0.4 mm, and -0.6 mm at 0°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 90°, and 120° flexion, respectively. Therefore, the joint gap was not significantly changed by the manipulation. Intraoperative manipulation does not resolve flexion contracture. Therefore, if flexion contracture occurs during TKA, treatment with additional bone cutting and soft tissue release is likely more appropriate than manipulation. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(6):e1070-e1074.].

  19. Peak knee flexion angles during stair descent in TKA patients.

    PubMed

    Bjerke, Joakim; Öhberg, Fredrik; Nilsson, Kjell G; Foss, Olav A; Stensdotter, Ann K

    2014-04-01

    Reduced peak knee flexion during stair descent (PKSD) is demonstrated in subjects with total knee arthroplasty (TKA), but the underlying factors are not well studied. 3D gait patterns during stair descent, peak passive knee flexion (PPKF), quadriceps strength, pain, proprioception, demographics, and anthropometrics were assessed in 23 unilateral TKA-subjects ~19 months post-operatively, and in 23 controls. PKSD, PPKF and quadriceps strength were reduced in the TKA-side, but also in the contralateral side. A multiple regression analysis identified PPKF as the only predictor (57%) to explain the relationship with PKSD. PPKF was, however sufficient for normal PKSD. Deficits in quadriceps strength in TKA-group suggest that strength is also contributing to smaller PKSD. Increased hip adduction at PKSD may indicate both compensatory strategy and reduced hip strength.

  20. Surgical Release of Severe Flexion Contracture for Oncologic Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Vincent Y.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Severe postoperative knee contractures after arthroplasty or megaprosthesis reconstruction occur rarely, but are devastating complications. Management of preoperative flexion contractures is well-described, but there is a paucity of literature for surgical treatment of postoperative contractures. A retrospective chart review was performed for a single surgeon of cases between 1996 and 2014. Results: Nine patients (5 of 66 for pediatrics; 4 of 95 for adults) underwent surgical release for severe stiffness after implantation of knee megaprosthesis. The total arc of motion was improved from a preoperative mean of 34° (range, 10° to 70°) to a postoperative mean 89° (63° to 125°). The amount of extension improved by a mean of 27° (range, -3° to +70°) and the amount of flexion improved by a mean of 28° (range, -10° to +75°). Conclusion: Surgical release of severe postoperative knee contracture is a challenging procedure, but in most cases, the amount of extension and flexion can be improved, yielding a greater total arc of motion.

  1. In vivo knee kinematics during stair and deep flexion activities in patients with bicruciate substituting total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kuroyanagi, Yuji; Mu, Shang; Hamai, Satoshi; Robb, William J; Banks, Scott A

    2012-01-01

    Orthopedic surgeons and their patients continue to seek better functional outcomes after total knee arthroplasty. The bicruciate substituting (BCS) total knee arthroplasty design has been introduced to achieve more natural knee mechanics. The purpose of this study was to characterize kinematics in knees with BCS arthroplasty during deep flexion and stair activities using fluoroscopy and model-image registration. In 20 patients with 25 BCS knees, we observed average implant flexion of 128° during kneeling and consistent posterior condylar translations with knee flexion. Tibial rotations were qualitatively similar to those observed in the arthritic natural knee. Knee kinematics with BCS arthroplasty were qualitatively more similar to arthritic natural knees than knees with either posterior cruciate-retaining or posterior-stabilized arthroplasty.

  2. HINGED CAST BRACE FOR PERSISTENT FLEXION CONTRACTURE FOLLOWING TOTAL KNEE REPLACEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Karam, Matthew D; Pugely, Andrew; Callaghan, John J; Shurr, Donald

    2011-01-01

    The reported incidence of persistent knee flexion contracture following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has varied from 1-15 percent Various treatment modalities have been described in attempts to manage this often difficult problem. This paper describes a novel method of treatment by using a hinged cast brace (previously reported for treatment of femur fractures and knee contractures secondary to hemophilia and cerebral palsy) for use in patients with symptomatic knee flexion contractures. Application of this cast brace with frequent adjustment (every three to four days, initially) toward full extension can often improve knee extension, after physical therapy and other modalities such as extension-assist braces have failed. Care must be taken in the application and use of this device which utilizes frequent manipulations to reduce and maintain the knee flexion angle. We report two clinical cases in which this protocol was effectively used in decreasing symptomatic knee flexion contractures. PMID:22096423

  3. Isokinetic strength during knee flexion and extension in elite fencers.

    PubMed

    Poulis, I; Chatzis, S; Christopoulou, K; Tsolakis, Ch

    2009-06-01

    The relation of leg preference and muscular strength in elite fencers was examined. The dominant and nondominant extensor and flexor muscles of 30 elite fencers (M age = 18.2 yr., SD = 2.0 yr.; M height = 173 cm, SD=7.4 cm; M weight = 62.7 kg, SD=8.9 kg), who were members of the Greek national team, and 14 healthy, young, sedentary adults (8 men, 6 women; M age 23.4 yr., SD = 1.9; M height = 169 cm, SD = 10.5 cm; M weight = 66.3 kg, SD = 9.9) were tested for concentric isokinetic contraction at slow (30 to 60 degrees/sec.) and fast (240 degrees/sec.) angular velocities. Significant multivariate differences were found between groups for knee extension, angle of knee extension, knee flexion, and flexor/extensor peak torque ratio. In contrast, no significant difference was found between the dominant and nondominant legs. There was no significant difference in the flexor/extensor peak torque ratio among any of the concentric angular velocities tested. These findings suggest that long-term training in fencing influences the strength characteristics of the lower limbs.

  4. Knee extension and flexion: MR delineation of normal and torn anterior cruciate ligaments

    SciTech Connect

    Niitsu, Mamoru; Ikeda, Kotaroh; Fukubayashi, Tohru; Anno, Izumi; Itai, Yuji

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to assess the effect of joint position of semiflexed and extended knees in MR delineation of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). With a mobile knee brace and a flexible surface coil, the knee joint was either fully extended or bent to a semiflexed position (average 45{degrees} of flexion) within the magnet bore. Sets of oblique sagittal MR images were obtained for both extended and flexed knee positions. Thirty-two knees with intact ACLs and 43 knees with arthroscopically proven ACL tears were evaluated. Two observers compared paired MR images of both extended and flexed positions and rated them by a relative three point scale. Anatomic correlation in MR images was obtained by a cadaveric knee with incremental flexion. The MR images of flexed knees were more useful than of extended knees in 53% of the case reviews of femoral attachments and 36% of reviews of midportions of normal ACLs. Compared with knee extensions, the MR images for knee flexion provided better clarity in 48% of reviews of disrupted sites and 52% of residual bundles of torn ACLs. Normal ACL appeared taut in the knee extension and lax in semiflexion. Compared with MR images of knees in extension, MR images of knees in flexion more clearly delineate the femoral side of the ligament with wider space under the intercondylar roof and with decreased volume-averaging artifacts, providing superior visualization of normal and torn ACLs. 13 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Crouched gait in myelomeningocele: a comparison between the degree of knee flexion contracture in the clinical examination and during gait.

    PubMed

    Moen, Todd; Gryfakis, Nicholas; Dias, Luciano; Lemke, Laura

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantitatively evaluate, in patients with low lumbar and sacral level myelomeningocele who have knee flexion contractures, whether there are significant differences between the degree of knee flexion contracture measured clinically and the degree of actual knee flexion during gait, measured by computerized gait analysis. Patients were divided into two groups, those who walked with ankle-foot orthoses (AFOs) alone and those who walked with AFOs and crutches. In both groups, the patient's knee flexion contractures were measured clinically, and the degree of knee flexion was measured dynamically at two representative points in the gait cycle. In both groups and at both points of the gait cycle, the degree of knee flexion during gait was significantly greater than the degree of clinical knee flexion contracture. This should be taken into account when evaluating the crouch gait of children with myelomeningocele and planning the proper treatment.

  6. Analysis of muscle activation patterns during transitions into and out of high knee flexion postures.

    PubMed

    Tennant, Liana M; Maly, Monica R; Callaghan, Jack P; Acker, Stacey M

    2014-10-01

    Increased risk of medial tibiofemoral osteoarthritis (OA) is linked to occupations that require frequent transitions into and out of postures which require high knee flexion (>90°). Muscle forces are major contributors to joint loading, and an association between compressive forces due to muscle activations and the degeneration of joint cartilage has been suggested. The purpose of this study was to evaluate muscle activation patterns of muscles crossing the knee during transitions into and out of full-flexion kneeling and squatting, sitting in a low chair, and gait. Both net and co-activation were greater when transitioning out of high flexion postures, with maximum activation occurring at knee angles greater than 100°. Compared to gait, co-activation levels during high flexion transitions were up to approximately 3 times greater. Co-activation was significantly greater in the lateral muscle group compared to the medial group during transitions into and out of high flexion postures. These results suggest that compression due to activation of the medial musculature of the knee may not be the link between high knee flexion postures and increased medial knee OA observed in occupational settings. Further research on a larger subject group and workers with varying degrees of knee OA is necessary.

  7. In-vivo spinal cord deformation in flexion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Qing; Dougherty, Lawrence; Margulies, Susan S.

    1997-05-01

    Traumatic mechanical loading of the head-neck complex results cervical spinal cord injury when the distortion of the cord is sufficient to produce functional or structural failure of the cord's neural and/or vascular components. Characterizing cervical spinal cord deformation during physiological loading conditions is an important step to defining a comprehensive injury threshold associated with acute spinal cord injury. In this study, in vivo quasi- static deformation of the cervical spinal cord during flexion of the neck in human volunteers was measured using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of motion with spatial modulation of magnetization (SPAMM). A custom-designed device was built to guide the motion of the neck and enhance more reproducibility. the SPAMM pulse sequence labeled the tissue with a series of parallel tagging lines. A single- shot gradient-recalled-echo sequence was used to acquire the mid-sagittal image of the cervical spine. A comparison of the tagged line pattern in each MR reference and deformed image pair revealed the distortion of the spinal cord. The results showed the cervical spinal cord elongates during head flexion. The elongation experienced by the spinal cord varies linearly with head flexion, with the posterior surface of the cord stretching more than the anterior surface. The maximal elongation of the cord is about 12 percent of its original length.

  8. External Knee Adduction and Flexion Moments during Gait and Medial Tibiofemoral Disease Progression in Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Alison H.; Moisio, Kirsten C.; Chmiel, Joan S.; Eckstein, Felix; Guermazi, Ali; Prasad, Pottumarthi V.; Zhang, Yunhui; Almagor, Orit; Belisle, Laura; Hayes, Karen; Sharma, Leena

    2015-01-01

    Objective Test the hypothesis that greater baseline peak external knee adduction moment (KAM), KAM impulse, and peak external knee flexion moment (KFM) during the stance phase of gait are associated with baseline-to-2-year medial tibiofemoral cartilage damage and bone marrow lesion progression, and cartilage thickness loss. Methods Participants all had knee OA in at least one knee. Baseline peak KAM, KAM impulse, and peak KFM (normalized to body weight and height) were captured and computed using a motion analysis system and 6 force plates. Participants underwent MRI of both knees at baseline and two years later. To assess the association between baseline moments and baseline-to-2-year semiquantitative cartilage damage and bone marrow lesion progression and quantitative cartilage thickness loss, we used logistic regression with generalized estimating equations (GEE), adjusting for gait speed, age, gender, disease severity, knee pain severity, and medication use. Results The sample consisted of 391 knees (204 persons): mean age 64.2 years (SD 10.0); BMI 28.4 kg/m2 (5.7); 156 (76.5%) women. Greater baseline peak KAM and KAM impulse were each associated with worsening of medial bone marrow lesions, but not cartilage damage. Higher baseline KAM impulse was associated with 2-year medial cartilage thickness loss assessed both as % loss and as a threshold of loss, whereas peak KAM was related only to % loss. There was no relationship between baseline peak KFM and any medial disease progression outcome measures. Conclusion Findings support targeting KAM parameters in an effort to delay medial OA disease progression. PMID:25677110

  9. Clinical evaluation of 292 Genesis II posterior stabilized high-flexion total knee arthroplasty: range of motion and predictors.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Mathijs C H W; Janssen, Rob P A

    2015-01-01

    The primary aim of the study was to evaluate the range of motion and complications after Genesis II total knee arthroplasty with high-flexion tibia insert (TKA-HF). Furthermore, difference in knee flexion between high flexion and standard inserts was compared. The hypothesis was that knee flexion is better after high-flexion TKA. A total of 292 TKA-HF were retrospectively reviewed. Mean follow-up was 24.3 months. The range of motion was compared between TKA-HF (high-flexion group) and a comparable cohort of 86 Genesis II TKA with a standard tibia insert (control group). Surgeries were performed by one experienced knee orthopedic surgeon. Knee flexion in the high-flexion group increased from 114.8° preoperatively to 118.0° postoperatively (P < 0.01). Knee extension in the high-flexion group increased from -4.5° preoperatively to -0.4° after surgery (P < 0.01). Mean knee flexion was 5.52° (± 1.46°) better in the high-flexion group compared with the control group (P < 0.01). Preoperative range of motion, body mass index, diabetes mellitus and patellofemoral pain significantly influenced range of motion. Few complications occurred after TKA-HF. The Genesis II TKA-HF showed good short-term results with limited complications. Knee flexion after Genesis II TKA-HF was better compared with a standard tibia insert.

  10. Stance controlled knee flexion improves stimulation driven walking after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS) restores walking function after paralysis from spinal cord injury via electrical activation of muscles in a coordinated fashion. Combining FNS with a controllable orthosis to create a hybrid neuroprosthesis (HNP) has the potential to extend walking distance and time by mechanically locking the knee joint during stance to allow knee extensor muscle to rest with stimulation turned off. Recent efforts have focused on creating advanced HNPs which couple joint motion (e.g., hip and knee or knee and ankle) to improve joint coordination during swing phase while maintaining a stiff-leg during stance phase. Methods The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of incorporating stance controlled knee flexion during loading response and pre-swing phases on restored gait. Knee control in the HNP was achieved by a specially designed variable impedance knee mechanism (VIKM). One subject with a T7 level spinal cord injury was enrolled and served as his own control in examining two techniques to restore level over-ground walking: FNS-only (which retained a stiff knee during stance) and VIKM-HNP (which allowed controlled knee motion during stance). The stimulation pattern driving the walking motion remained the same for both techniques; the only difference was that knee extensor stimulation was constant during stance with FNS-only and modulated together with the VIKM to control knee motion during stance with VIKM-HNP. Results Stance phase knee angle was more natural during VIKM-HNP gait while knee hyperextension persisted during stiff-legged FNS-only walking. During loading response phase, vertical ground reaction force was less impulsive and instantaneous gait speed was increased with VIKM-HNP, suggesting that knee flexion assisted in weight transfer to the leading limb. Enhanced knee flexion during pre-swing phase also aided flexion during swing, especially when response to stimulation was compromised. Conclusions

  11. Adjustable bracing technique for the prevention of knee flexion contracture during tibial lengthening.

    PubMed

    Segev, Eitan; Hayek, Shlomo

    2003-01-01

    The authors present a simple thigh-knee brace that prevents flexion contracture during tibial lengthening. The brace is strapped to the thigh and connected to the Ilizarov frame via two simple hinges. While in the brace the knee can be mobilized for physiotherapy and locked in extension during rest.

  12. In vivo knee laxity in flexion and extension: a radiographic study in 30 older healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Heesterbeek, P J C; Verdonschot, N; Wymenga, A B

    2008-01-01

    In order to determine how "tight" a total knee prosthesis should be implanted, it is important to know the amount of laxity in a healthy knee. The objective of this study was to determine knee laxity in extension and flexion in healthy, non-arthritic knees of subjects similar in age to patients undergoing a total knee arthroplasty and to provide guidelines for the orthopaedic surgeon in his attempt to restore the stability of an osteoarthritic knee to normal. Thirty healthy subjects (15 male, 15 female), mean age 62 (SD 6.4) years, were included in the study. For each subject one, randomly selected, knee was stressed in extension and in 70 degrees flexion (15 Nm). Varus and valgus laxity were measured on radiographs. The passive range of motion and active flexion was assessed. Mean valgus laxity in extension was 2.3 degrees (SD 0.9, range 0.2 degrees -4.1 degrees ). In extension mean varus laxity was 2.8 degrees (SD 1.3, range 0.6 degrees -5.4 degrees ). In flexion, mean valgus laxity was 2.5 degrees (SD 1.5, range 0.0 degrees -6.0 degrees ) and mean varus laxity was 3.1 degrees (SD 2.0, range 0.1 degrees -7.0 degrees ). Varus and valgus knee laxity in extension and in flexion were comparable. This study shows that the normal knee in this age group has an inherent degree of varus-valgus laxity. Whether the results of the present study can be used to optimise the total knee arthroplasty implantation technique requires further investigation.

  13. Intraoperative medial pivot affects deep knee flexion angle and patient-reported outcomes after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Yusuke; Onodera, Tomohiro; Kasahara, Yasuhiko; Takahashi, Daisuke; Iwasaki, Norimasa; Majima, Tokifumi

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between clinical results including patient-reported outcomes and intraoperative knee kinematic patterns after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). A cross-sectional survey of forty consecutive medial osteoarthritis patients who had a primary TKA using a CT-based navigation system was conducted. Subjects were divided into two groups based on intraoperative kinematic patterns: a medial pivot group (n = 20) and a non-medial pivot group (n = 20). Subjective outcomes with the new Knee Society Score and clinical outcomes were evaluated. The functional activities, patient satisfaction and the knee flexion angle of the medial pivot group were significantly better than those of the non-medial pivot group. An intraoperative medial pivot pattern positively influences deep knee flexion and patient-reported outcomes.

  14. Bilateral Medial Tibiofemoral Joint Stiffness in Full Extension and 20° of Knee Flexion

    PubMed Central

    Aronson, Patricia A; Rijke, Arie M; Ingersoll, Christopher D

    2008-01-01

    Context: The valgus stress test is used clinically to assess injury to the medial knee structures in 2 positions: full extension and some degree of flexion. The amount of flexion used to “isolate” the medial collateral ligament is not consistent in the literature, but most studies have shown that stiffness of the ligaments was consistent between the limbs. Objective: To determine (1) if the stiffness of the medial knee structures was the same bilaterally, and (2) if the stiffness was different in full extension compared with 20° of knee flexion. Design: Criterion standard, before-after design. Setting: University research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Both knees of 45 healthy and active volunteers (26 females, 19 males; age  =  23.2 ± 3.96 years, height  =  170.6 ± 7.75 cm, mass  =  74.2 ± 15.14 kg) were studied. Intervention(s): A valgus force of 60 N was applied to the lateral aspect of both knees in full extension and in 20° of flexion. Main Outcome Measure(s): The slope of the force-strain line of the medial knee during a valgus force was calculated using the LigMaster arthrometer. Results: Slope means in full extension were 16.1 ± 3.3 (right knee) and 15.8 ± 3.1(left knee). Means for 20° of flexion were 12.2 ± 3.1 (right) and 11.7 ± 2.8 (left). Stiffness was greater when the knee was in full extension versus 20° of flexion (t44  =  12.04, P < .001). No difference was noted between the slopes of the 2 knees in extension (t44  =  0.74, P  =  .46) or in flexion (t44  =  1.2, P  =  .27). Conclusions: These findings support the use of the contralateral knee as a control. Further, the valgus stress test should be performed in full extension and in some degree of flexion to assess the different restraining structures of the medial tibiofemoral joint. PMID:18345340

  15. Patellofemoral overstuff and its relationship to flexion after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Mihalko, William; Fishkin, Zair; Krackow, Kenneth; Krakow, Kenneth

    2006-08-01

    Flexion is an important outcome variable after total knee arthroplasty. Traditionally, matched implant-bone resections of the distal and posterior aspects of the femur are used to prevent loss of knee flexion or extension. However, given limited implant sizes, resection of these portions of the femur may affect the shape of the knee. Variations in the anterior aspects of the femur along with implant size constraints may increase trochlear groove height in the anterior compartment, increase the arc that the extensor mechanism must travel, and thereby decrease passive flexion. We determined the trochlear groove height change in 55 patients after primary total knee arthroplasties. The thickness of the replaced lateral and medial anterior flanges increased by 1.1 +/- 2.6 mm and 0.5 +/- 2.2 mm, respectively, whereas the change in trochlear groove thickness was 0 +/- 1.1 mm. We examined varying amounts of patellofemoral buildup in a cadaver model to observe the effect on passive range of motion of the knee. A 2-mm and 4-mm buildup of the anterior cortex resulted in flexion loss of 1.8 degrees and 4.4 degrees, respectively. The change in the shape of the anterior aspect of the femur may have small effects on flexion but they may not be clinically important.

  16. Effects of hamstring stretching on passive muscle stiffness vary between hip flexion and knee extension maneuvers.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, N; Hirata, K; Kanehisa, H

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether the effects of hamstring stretching on the passive stiffness of each of the long head of the biceps femoris (BFl), semitendinosus (ST), and semimembranosus (SM) vary between passive knee extension and hip flexion stretching maneuvers. In 12 male subjects, before and after five sets of 90 s static stretching, passive lengthening measurements where knee or hip joint was passively rotated to the maximal range of motion (ROM) were performed. During the passive lengthening, shear modulus of each muscle was measured by ultrasound shear wave elastography. Both stretching maneuvers significantly increased maximal ROM and decreased passive torque at a given joint angle. Passive knee extension stretching maneuver significantly reduced shear modulus at a given knee joint angle in all of BFl, ST, and SM. In contrast, the stretching effect by passive hip flexion maneuver was significant only in ST and SM. The present findings indicate that the effects of hamstring stretching on individual passive muscles' stiffness vary between passive knee extension and hip flexion stretching maneuvers. In terms of reducing the muscle stiffness of BFl, stretching of the hamstring should be performed by passive knee extension rather than hip flexion.

  17. Quasi-stiffness of the knee joint in flexion and extension during the golf swing.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ahnryul; Sim, Taeyong; Mun, Joung Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Biomechanical understanding of the knee joint during a golf swing is essential to improve performance and prevent injury. In this study, we quantified the flexion/extension angle and moment as the primary knee movement, and evaluated quasi-stiffness represented by moment-angle coupling in the knee joint. Eighteen skilled and 23 unskilled golfers participated in this study. Six infrared cameras and two force platforms were used to record a swing motion. The anatomical angle and moment were calculated from kinematic and kinetic models, and quasi-stiffness of the knee joint was determined as an instantaneous slope of moment-angle curves. The lead knee of the skilled group had decreased resistance duration compared with the unskilled group (P < 0.05), and the resistance duration of the lead knee was lower than that of the trail knee in the skilled group (P < 0.01). The lead knee of the skilled golfers had greater flexible excursion duration than the trail knee of the skilled golfers, and of both the lead and trail knees of the unskilled golfers. These results provide critical information for preventing knee injuries during a golf swing and developing rehabilitation strategies following surgery.

  18. In vivo kinematic evaluation and design considerations related to high flexion in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Argenson, Jean-Noël A; Scuderi, Giles R; Komistek, Richard D; Scott, W Norman; Kelly, Michael A; Aubaniac, Jean-Manuel

    2005-02-01

    In designing a posterior-stabilized total knee arthroplasty (TKA) it is preferable that when the cam engages the tibial spine the contact point of the cam move down the tibial spine. This provides greater stability in flexion by creating a greater jump distance and reduces the stress on the tibial spine. In order to eliminate edge loading of the femoral component on the posterior tibial articular surface, the posterior femoral condyles need to be extended. This provides an ideal femoral contact with the tibial articular surface during high flexion angles. To reduce extensor mechanism impingement in deep flexion, the anterior margin of the tibial articular component should be recessed. This provides clearance for the patella and patella tendon. An in vivo kinematic analysis that determined three dimensional motions of the femorotibial joint was performed during a deep knee bend using fluoroscopy for 20 subjects having a TKA designed for deep flexion. The average weight-bearing range-of-motion was 125 degrees . On average, TKA subjects experienced 4.9 degrees of normal axial rotation and all subjects experienced at least -4.4 mm of posterior femoral rollback. It is assumed that femorotibial kinematics can play a major role in patellofemoral kinematics. In this study, subjects implanted with a high-flexion TKA design experienced kinematic patterns that were similar to the normal knee. It can be hypothesized that forces acting on the patella were not substantially increased for TKA subjects compared with the normal subjects.

  19. Investigating the Effects of Knee Flexion during the Eccentric Heel-Drop Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Weinert-Aplin, Robert A.; Bull, Anthony M.J.; McGregor, Alison H.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to characterise the biomechanics of the widely practiced eccentric heel-drop exercises used in the management of Achilles tendinosis. Specifically, the aim was to quantify changes in lower limb kinematics, muscle lengths and Achilles tendon force, when performing the exercise with a flexed knee instead of an extended knee. A musculoskeletal modelling approach was used to quantify any differences between these versions of the eccentric heel drop exercises used to treat Achilles tendinosis. 19 healthy volunteers provided a group from which optical motion, forceplate and plantar pressure data were recorded while performing both the extended and flexed knee eccentric heel-drop exercises over a wooden step when barefoot or wearing running shoes. This data was used as inputs into a scaled musculoskeletal model of the lower limb. Range of ankle motion was unaffected by knee flexion. However, knee flexion was found to significantly affect lower limb kinematics, inter-segmental loads and triceps muscle lengths. Peak Achilles load was not influenced despite significantly reduced peak ankle plantarflexion moments (p < 0.001). The combination of reduced triceps lengths and greater ankle dorsiflexion, coupled with reduced ankle plantarflexion moments were used to provide a basis for previously unexplained observations regarding the effect of knee flexion on the relative loading of the triceps muscles during the eccentric heel drop exercises. This finding questions the role of the flexed knee heel drop exercise when specifically treating Achilles tendinosis. Key points A more dorsiflexed ankle and a flexing knee are characteristics of performing the flexed knee heel-drop eccentric exercise. Peak ankle plantarflexion moments were reduced with knee flexion, but did not reduce peak Achilles tendon force. Kinematic changes at the knee and ankle affected the triceps muscle length and resulted in a reduction in the amount of Achilles tendon work performed. A version

  20. Absolute reliability of isokinetic knee flexion and extension measurements adopting a prone position.

    PubMed

    Ayala, F; De Ste Croix, M; Sainz de Baranda, P; Santonja, F

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to determine the absolute and relative reliability of isokinetic peak torque (PT), angle of peak torque (APT), average power (PW) and total work (TW) for knee flexion and extension during concentric and eccentric actions measured in a prone position at 60, 180 and 240° s(-1). A total of 50 recreational athletes completed the study. PT, APT, PW and TW for concentric and eccentric knee extension and flexion were recorded at three different angular velocities (60, 180 and 240° s(-1)) on three different occasions with a 72- to 96-h rest interval between consecutive testing sessions. Absolute reliability was examined through typical percentage error (CV(TE)), percentage change in the mean (ChM) and relative reliability with intraclass correlations (ICC(3,1)). For both the knee extensor and flexor muscle groups, all strength data (except APT during knee flexion movements) demonstrated moderate absolute reliability (ChM < 3%; ICCs > 0·70; and CV(TE) < 20%) independent of the knee movement (flexion and extension), type of muscle action (concentric and eccentric) and angular velocity (60, 180 and 240° s(-1)). Therefore, the current study suggests that the CV(TE) values reported for PT (8-20%), APT (8-18%) (only during knee extension movements), PW (14-20%) and TW (12-28%) may be acceptable to detect the large changes usually observed after rehabilitation programmes, but not acceptable to examine the effect of preventative training programmes in healthy individuals.

  1. Effect of chronic knee osteoarthritis on flexion-relaxation phenomenon of the erector spinae in elderly females

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Yeon-Gyu; Jeong, Yeon-Jae; Koo, Jung-Wan

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the flexion-relaxation phenomenon of the erector spinae in elderly women with chronic knee osteoarthritis and determined whether the flexion-relaxation phenomenon can be used as a pain evaluation tool in such cases. [Subjects and Methods] Seventeen elderly females with chronic knee osteoarthritis and 13 healthy young females voluntarily participated in this study. They performed three postural positions in 15 s: trunk flexion, complete trunk flexion, and trunk extension, each for 5 s. While these positions were held, muscle activation of the thoracic and lumbar erector spinae were measured using surface electromyography. The flexion-relaxation rate was determined by dividing the values for trunk extension by those of complete trunk flexion and by dividing the values for trunk flexion by those of complete trunk flexion. [Results] According to our results, the flexion-relaxation phenomenon was different between healthy young and elderly females with chronic knee osteoarthritis. Specifically, there was a difference in the left thoracic erector spinae muscle, but not in the left and right lumbar erector spinae or right thoracic spinae muscle. [Conclusion] Our study demonstrated that the erector spinae muscle flexion-relaxation phenomenon can be used as a pain evaluation tool in elderly females with chronic knee osteoarthritis. PMID:27512244

  2. A Textile-Based Wearable Sensing Device Designed for Monitoring the Flexion Angle of Elbow and Knee Movements

    PubMed Central

    Shyr, Tien-Wei; Shie, Jing-Wen; Jiang, Chang-Han; Li, Jung-Jen

    2014-01-01

    In this work a wearable gesture sensing device consisting of a textile strain sensor, using elastic conductive webbing, was designed for monitoring the flexion angle of elbow and knee movements. The elastic conductive webbing shows a linear response of resistance to the flexion angle. The wearable gesture sensing device was calibrated and then the flexion angle-resistance equation was established using an assembled gesture sensing apparatus with a variable resistor and a protractor. The proposed device successfully monitored the flexion angle during elbow and knee movements. PMID:24577526

  3. DOES RECTUS FEMORIS TRANSFER INCREASE KNEE FLEXION DURING STANCE PHASE IN CEREBRAL PALSY?

    PubMed Central

    de Morais, Mauro César; Blumetti, Francesco Camara; Kawamura, Cátia Miyuki; Lopes, José Augusto Fernandes; Neves, Daniella Lins; Cardoso, Michelle de Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate whether distal rectus femoris transfer (DRFT) is related to postoperative increase of knee flexion during the stance phase in cerebral palsy (CP). Methods: The inclusion criteria were Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) levels I-III, kinematic criteria for stiff-knee gait at baseline, and individuals who underwent orthopaedic surgery and had gait analyses performed before and after intervention. The patients included were divided into the following two groups: NO-DRFT (133 patients), which included patients who underwent orthopaedic surgery without DRFT, and DRFT (83 patients), which included patients who underwent orthopaedic surgery that included DRFT. The primary outcome was to evaluate in each group if minimum knee flexion in stance phase (FMJFA) changed after treatment. Results: The mean FMJFA increased from 13.19° to 16.74° (p=0.003) and from 10.60° to 14.80° (p=0.001) in Groups NO-DRFT and DRFT, respectively. The post-operative FMJFA was similar between groups NO-DRFT and DRFT (p=0.534). The increase of FMJFA during the second exam (from 13.01° to 22.51°) was higher among the GMFCS III patients in the DRFT group (p<0.001). Conclusion: In this study, DRFT did not generate additional increase of knee flexion during stance phase when compared to the control group. Level of Evidence III, Retrospective Comparative Study. PMID:26997910

  4. Treatment for flexion contracture of the knee during Ilizarov reconstruction of tibia with passive knee extension splint.

    PubMed

    Kwan, M K; Penafort, R; Saw, A

    2004-12-01

    Joint stiffness is one of the complications of limb procedure. It developes as a result of failure of knee flexors to lengthen in tandem with the bone, especially when there is inadequate physical therapy to provide active and passive mobilization of the affected joint. We are reporting four patients who developed fixed flexion contracture of their knees during bone lengthening procedure for the tibia with Ilizarov external fixator. Three of them were treated for congenital pseudoarthrosis and one was for fibular hemimelia. None of them were able to visit the physiotherapist even on a weekly basis. A splint was constructed from components of Ilizarov external fixator and applied on to the existing frame to passively extend the affected knee. Patients and their family members were taught to perform this exercise regularly and eventually near complete correction were achieved. With this result, we would like to recommend the use of this "Passive Knee Extension Splint" to avoid knee flexion Contracture during limb lengthening procedures with Ilizarov external fixators.

  5. Changes in sarcomere lengths of the human vastus lateralis muscle with knee flexion measured using in vivo microendoscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuefeng; Sanchez, Gabriel N; Schnitzer, Mark J; Delp, Scott L

    2016-09-06

    Sarcomeres are the basic contractile units of muscle, and their lengths influence muscle force-generating capacity. Despite their importance, in vivo sarcomere lengths remain unknown for many human muscles. Second harmonic generation (SHG) microendoscopy is a minimally invasive technique for imaging sarcomeres in vivo and measuring their lengths. In this study, we used SHG microendoscopy to visualize sarcomeres of the human vastus lateralis, a large knee extensor muscle important for mobility, to examine how sarcomere lengths change with knee flexion and thus affect the muscle׳s force-generating capacity. We acquired in vivo sarcomere images of several muscle fibers of the resting vastus lateralis in six healthy individuals. Mean sarcomere lengths increased (p=0.031) from 2.84±0.16μm at 50° of knee flexion to 3.17±0.13μm at 110° of knee flexion. The standard deviation of sarcomere lengths among different fibers within a muscle was 0.21±0.09μm. Our results suggest that the sarcomeres of the resting vastus lateralis at 50° of knee flexion are near optimal length. At a knee flexion angle of 110° the resting sarcomeres of vastus lateralis are longer than optimal length. These results show a smaller sarcomere length change and greater conservation of force-generating capacity with knee flexion than estimated in previous studies.

  6. Variability of Measurement of Patellofemoral Indices with Knee Flexion and Quadriceps Contraction: An MRI-Based Anatomical Study

    PubMed Central

    Laugharne, Edward; Bali, Navi; Purushothamdas, Sanjay; Almallah, Faris; Kundra, Rik

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of varying knee flexion and quadriceps activity on patellofemoral indices measured on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and Methods MRI of the knee was performed in 20 patients for indications other than patellar or patellofemoral pathology. Axial and sagittal sequences were performed in full extension of the knee with the quadriceps relaxed, full extension of the knee with the quadriceps contracted, 30° flexion of the knee with the quadriceps relaxed, and 30° flexion with the quadriceps contracted. Bisect offset, patella tilt angle, Insall-Salvati ratio and Caton-Deschamps index were measured. Results With the knee flexed to 30° and quadriceps relaxed, the mean values of patellar tilt angle, bisect offset, Insall-Salvati ratio and Caton-Deschamps index were all within normal limits. With the knee extended and quadriceps contracted, the mean patellar tilt angle (normal value, <15°) was 14.6° and the bisect offset (normal value, <65%) was 65%, while the Caton-Deschamps index was 1.34 (normal range, 0.6 to 1.3). With the knee extended and quadriceps relaxed, the mean Caton-Deschamps index was 1.31. Conclusions MRI scanning of the knee in extension with the quadriceps contracted leads to elevated patellofemoral indices. MRI taken with the knee in 30° of flexion allows more reliable assessment of the patellofemoral joint and minimises the confounding effect of quadriceps contraction. PMID:27894177

  7. Defining the knee joint flexion-extension axis for purposes of quantitative gait analysis: an evaluation of methods.

    PubMed

    Schache, Anthony G; Baker, Richard; Lamoreux, Larry W

    2006-08-01

    Minimising measurement variability associated with hip axial rotation and avoiding knee joint angle cross-talk are two fundamental objectives of any method used to define the knee joint flexion-extension axis for purposes of quantitative gait analysis. The aim of this experiment was to compare three different methods of defining this axis: the knee alignment device (KAD) method, a method based on the transepicondylar axis (TEA) and an alternative numerical method (Dynamic). The former two methods are common approaches that have been applied clinically in many quantitative gait analysis laboratories; the latter is an optimisation procedure. A cohort of 20 subjects performed three different functional tasks (normal gait; squat; non-weight bearing knee flexion) on repeated occasions. Three-dimensional hip and knee angles were computed using the three alternative methods of defining the knee joint flexion-extension axis. The repeatability of hip axial rotation measurements during normal gait was found to be significantly better for the Dynamic method (p<0.01). Furthermore, both the variance in the knee varus-valgus kinematic profile and the degree of knee joint angle cross-talk were smallest for the Dynamic method across all functional tasks. The Dynamic method therefore provided superior results in comparison to the KAD and TEA-based methods and thus represents an attractive solution for orientating the knee joint flexion-extension axis for purposes of quantitative gait analysis.

  8. Analysis for Sit-to-Stand Performance According to the Angle of Knee Flexion in Individuals with Hemiparesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi Young; Lee, Hae Yong

    2013-12-01

    [Purpose] Sit-to-stand (STS) is one of the important functional tasks people perform throughout the day. This study investigated whether varying angles of knee flexion affect STS patterns in individuals with hemiparesis by using a foot plantar pressure measurement system. [Methods] Fifteen stroke patients with hemiparesis participated for this study. They performed sit-to-stand with three angles of knee flexion (70°, 90°, and 110°). We measured the trajectory of the center of pressure, peak plantar pressure, and symmetry index using a Mat-scan system (Tekscan, South Boston, MA, USA). [Results] As a result, we found that there were significant differences among the three angle conditions (trajectory of center of pressure, peak plantar pressure on the affected side, and symmetry index). However, there was no significant difference in peak pressure according to the knee flexion on the unaffected side. [Conclusion] In the current study, we found that stroke patients with hemiparesis had a compensated STS pattern according to knee flexion angles. This indicates that the peak value of plantar pressure increased and that the trajectory of the center of pressure widened as the angle of knee flexion increased. We also suggest that hemiparesis patients should be more concerned about proper knee angle for symmetrical STS pattern.

  9. Identifying the Functional Flexion-extension Axis of the Knee: An In-Vivo Kinematics Study

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Li; Chen, Kaining; Guo, Lin; Cheng, Liangjun; Wang, Fuyou; Yang, Liu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to calculate the flexion-extension axis (FEA) of the knee through in-vivo knee kinematics data, and then compare it with two major anatomical axes of the femoral condyles: the transepicondylar axis (TEA) defined by connecting the medial sulcus and lateral prominence, and the cylinder axis (CA) defined by connecting the centers of posterior condyles. Methods The knee kinematics data of 20 healthy subjects were acquired under weight-bearing condition using bi-planar x-ray imaging and 3D-2D registration techniques. By tracking the vertical coordinate change of all points on the surface of femur during knee flexion, the FEA was determined as the line connecting the points with the least vertical shift in the medial and lateral condyles respectively. Angular deviation and distance among the TEA, CA and FEA were measured. Results The TEA-FEA angular deviation was significantly larger than that of the CA-FEA in 3D and transverse plane (3.45° vs. 1.98°, p < 0.001; 2.72° vs. 1.19°, p = 0.002), but not in the coronal plane (1.61° vs. 0.83°, p = 0.076). The TEA-FEA distance was significantly greater than that of the CA-FEA in the medial side (6.7 mm vs. 1.9 mm, p < 0.001), but not in the lateral side (3.2 mm vs. 2.0 mm, p = 0.16). Conclusion The CA is closer to the FEA compared with the TEA; it can better serve as an anatomical surrogate for the functional knee axis. PMID:26039711

  10. Soleus and vastus medialis H-reflexes: similarities and differences while standing or lying during varied knee flexion angles.

    PubMed

    Alrowayeh, Hesham N; Sabbahi, Mohamed A; Etnyre, Bruce

    2005-06-15

    The H-reflex may be a useful measure to examine the lower extremity muscles activation and inhibition following an injury. Recording the vastus medialis H-reflex amplitudes in healthy subjects while standing or lying during varied knee flexion angles may establish a reference for comparison for patients with ACL injury. Vastus medialis and soleus H-reflexes were recorded from 14 healthy subjects while lying and standing during 0, 30, 45, and 60 degrees knee flexion. EMG unit was used to electrically stimulate the tibial and femoral nerves (using 0.5 ms pulses at 0.2 pps of H-maximum amplitude) and to record four traces of the soleus and vastus medialis H-wave and one trace of the M-wave peak-to-peak amplitudes. Repeated measures three-way ANOVAs were calculated with the global alpha=0.05. Results showed that (1) the average soleus H-reflex amplitude was significantly less during standing than lying across all knee flexion conditions, (2) the average vastus medialis H-reflex amplitudes showed no measurable significant differences between neutral standing compared with lying, (3) the average vastus medialis H-reflex amplitudes were significantly greater during standing knee flexion conditions (30, 45, and 60 degrees ) than lying or neutral standing, and (4) there were no differences between soleus and vastus medialis H-reflex amplitudes during lying across all knee flexion conditions. Data from H/M ratio follow the same pattern of H-amplitude. Recording the vastus medialis H-reflex amplitude during standing and knee flexion may be a reflective of the knee function. It is more specific than the soleus H-reflex because it reflects the changes in the excitability of the quadriceps motoneurons acting directly around the knee joint.

  11. Osteotomy around young deformed knees: 38-year super-long-term follow-up to detect osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Since 1969 corrective osteotomy has been performed at our institute in young patients (under 40 years) with bowlegs, knock knees and flexion or rotational deformities around the knee. Fifty-seven knees (29 left, 28 right) of 45 patients (19 boys, 26 girls) were followed-up for a period ranging from 30 to 38 years in seven patients with seven knees, from 20 to 29 years in nine patients with 11 knees, and from ten to 19 years in 29 patients with 39 knees. Supracondylar femoral osteotomy was performed on 12 knees (11 patients), high tibial osteotomy above the tibial tuberosity on eight knees (six patients) and below the tuberosity on 37 knees (28 patients). At the final follow-up (age range 42–73 years), all of the deformities were satisfactorily corrected, with no symptoms apart from nine knees, seven of which had dull pain after strenuous sport with osteophytes, etc. in the radiograph. Total knee arthroplasty was performed in the remaining two knees, at ten and 26 years, respectively, after the initial osteotomy. Osteoarthritis developed in the contralateral knee to the initial osteotomy in two patients after 34 years at age 73 and after 33 years at age 67. PMID:19777231

  12. Pigmented villonodular synovitis diagnosed during revision total knee arthroplasty for flexion instability and patellar fracture.

    PubMed

    Camp, Christopher L; Yuan, Brandon J; Wood, Adam J; Lewallen, David G

    2016-03-01

    Occurring in either a localized or diffuse form, pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a disease of unknown etiology that typically presents with insidious onset of pain, swelling, stiffness, or mechanical symptoms as a result of synovial tissue proliferation. PVNS preferentially affects large joints, most commonly the knee. Currently there is no known association with PVNS and total knee arthroplasty (TKA), and to date, there are only a few cases reported in the orthopedic literature in which PVNS was diagnosed after primary TKA. To our knowledge, this is the first case of diffuse PVNS that was discovered at the time of revision TKA for flexion instability and patellar fracture. In this patient, with no known history of PVNS, the diagnosis of diffuse PVNS was made at the time of surgery. She underwent revision TKA, partial patellectomy, and extensive synovectomy. Level of evidence: V, Case Report.

  13. Effect of a pelvic wedge and belt on the medial and lateral hamstring muscles during knee flexion.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] This study developed a pelvic wedge and belt and investigated their effects on the selective activation of medial and lateral hamstring muscles during knee flexion. [Subjects and Methods] Nine adults were enrolled. The participants performed exercises without and with the pelvic wedge and belt, and the electromyographic activities of the medial and lateral hamstring muscles were recorded. [Results] The activity of the medial hamstring was increased significantly when using the pelvic wedge and belt, while the activity of the lateral hamstring did not differ significantly. [Conclusion] The pelvic wedge and belt provide a self-locked position during knee flexion in the prone position. Prone knee flexion in this position is an effective self-exercise for balanced strengthening of the medial hamstring.

  14. Effect of a pelvic wedge and belt on the medial and lateral hamstring muscles during knee flexion

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won-gyu

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] This study developed a pelvic wedge and belt and investigated their effects on the selective activation of medial and lateral hamstring muscles during knee flexion. [Subjects and Methods] Nine adults were enrolled. The participants performed exercises without and with the pelvic wedge and belt, and the electromyographic activities of the medial and lateral hamstring muscles were recorded. [Results] The activity of the medial hamstring was increased significantly when using the pelvic wedge and belt, while the activity of the lateral hamstring did not differ significantly. [Conclusion] The pelvic wedge and belt provide a self-locked position during knee flexion in the prone position. Prone knee flexion in this position is an effective self-exercise for balanced strengthening of the medial hamstring. PMID:28210048

  15. Application of a vibrating device for the prevention of flexion contracture after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Manó, Sándor; Pálinkás, Judit; Szabó, János; Nagy, Judit T; Bakó, Katalin; Csernátony, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    Our research team developed a new, heel support-based static and vibrating complementary treatment method for the prevention of flexion contractures often arising after total knee arthroplasty. We examined the efficiency of the method performing a randomized clinical trial with 144 patients undergoing total knee replacement. Seventy-nine patients were treated for 1 week with a generally used continuous passive motion (CPM) device complemented with our new method, which was based on the application of a static and an alternating heel support. The 65 patients in the control group were treated with only a CPM device as in usual clinical practice. The femoro-tibial angle was measured immediately following surgery, and after 1 week of treatment. At the end of the 1 week treatment, the target extension angle (0° ± 5°) was achieved by significantly more patients with the new combined method. This way the elevated heel rest and the vibrating device proved to be a good adjunct treatment along with the CPM used in routine clinical practice in the first place for the prevention of flexion contractures.

  16. In-situ mechanical behavior and slackness of the anterior cruciate ligament at multiple knee flexion angles.

    PubMed

    Rachmat, H H; Janssen, D; Verkerke, G J; Diercks, R L; Verdonschot, N

    2016-03-01

    In this study the in-situ tensile behavior and slackness of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) was evaluated at various knee flexion angles. In four cadaveric knees the ACL was released at the tibial insertion, after which it was re-connected to a tensiometer. After pre-tensioning (10 N) the ACL in full-extension, the knee was flexed from 0° to 150° at 15° increments, during which the ACL tension was measured. At each angle the ACL was subsequently elongated and shortened under displacement control, while measuring the ACL tension. In this manner, the pre-tension or the slackness, and the mechanical response of the ACL were measured. All ACL's displayed a higher tension at low (0°-60°) and high (120°-150°) flexion angles. The ACL slackness depended on flexion angle, with the highest slackness found at 75°-90°. Additionally, the ACL stiffness also varied with flexion angle, with the ACL behaving stiffer at low and high flexion angels. In general, the ACL was stiffest at 150°, and most compliant at 90°. The results of this study contribute to understanding the mechanical behavior of the ACL in-situ, and may help tuning and validating computational knee models studying ACL function.

  17. In Vivo Cervical Facet Joint Capsule Deformation During Flexion-Extension

    PubMed Central

    Anderst, William J; Lee, Joon Y; Kang, James D

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Non-randomized controlled cohort. Objective To characterize subaxial cervical facet joint kinematics and facet joint capsule (FJC) deformation during in vivo, dynamic flexion-extension. To assess the effect of single-level anterior arthrodesis on adjacent segment FJC deformation. Summary of Background Data The cervical facet joint has been identified as the most common source of neck pain and it is thought to play a role in chronic neck pain related to whiplash injury. Our current knowledge of cervical facet joint kinematics is based on cadaveric mechanical testing. Methods 14 asymptomatic controls and 9 C5-C6 arthrodesis patients performed full range of motion (ROM) flexion-extension while biplane radiographs were collected at 30 Hz. A volumetric model-based tracking process determined 3D vertebral position with sub-millimeter accuracy. FJC fibers were modeled and grouped into anterior, lateral, posterior-lateral, posterior, and posterior-medial regions. FJC fiber deformations (total, shear and compression-distraction) relative to the static position were determined for each cervical motion segment (C2-C3 through C6-C7) during flexion-extension. Results No significant differences in the rate of fiber deformation in flexion were identified among motion segments (p = .159), however, significant differences were observed among fiber regions (p < .001). Significant differences in the rate of fiber deformation in extension were identified among motion segments (p < .001) and among fiber regions (p = .001). The rate of FJC deformation in extension adjacent to the arthrodesis was 45% less than in corresponding motion segments in control subjects (p = .001). Conclusion In control subjects, facet joint capsule deformations are significantly different among vertebral levels and capsule regions when vertebrae are in an extended orientation. In a flexed orientation, FJC deformations are only different among capsule regions. Single-level anterior arthrodesis is

  18. Influence of knee flexion angle and age on triceps surae muscle fatigue during heel raises.

    PubMed

    Hébert-Losier, Kim; Schneiders, Anthony G; García, José A; Sullivan, S John; Simoneau, Guy G

    2012-11-01

    The triceps surae (TS) muscle-tendon unit is 1 of the most commonly injured in elite and recreational athletes, with a high prevalence in middle-aged adults. The performance of maximal numbers of unilateral heel raises is used to assess, train, and rehabilitate TS endurance and conventionally prescribed in 0° knee flexion (KF) for the gastrocnemius and 45° for the soleus (SOL). However, the extent of muscle selectivity conferred through the change in the knee angle is lacking for heel raises performed to volitional fatigue. This study investigated the influence of knee angle on TS muscle fatigue during heel raises and determined whether fatigue differed between middle-aged and younger-aged adults. Forty-eight healthy individuals aged 18-25 and 35-45 years performed maximal numbers of unilateral heel raises in 0° and 45° KF. Median frequencies and linear regression slopes were calculated from the SOL, gastrocnemius medialis (GM), and gastrocnemius lateralis (GL) surface electromyographic signals. Stepwise mixed-effect regressions were used for analysis. The subjects completed an average of 45 and 48 heel raises in 0° and 45° KF, respectively. The results indicated that the 3 muscles fatigued during testing as all median frequencies decreased, and regression slopes were negative. Consistent with muscle physiology and fiber typing, fatigue was greater in the GM and GL than in the SOL (p < 0.001). However, knee angle did not influence TS muscle fatigue parameters (p = 0.814), with similar SOL, GM, and GL fatigue in 0° and 45° KF. These findings are in contrast with the traditionally described clinical use of heel raises in select knee angles for the gastrocnemius and the SOL. Furthermore, no difference in TS fatigue between the 2 age groups was able to be determined, despite the reported higher prevalence of injury in middle-aged individuals.

  19. Contributions of knee swing initiation and ankle plantar flexion to the walking mechanics of amputees using a powered prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Ingraham, Kimberly A; Fey, Nicholas P; Simon, Ann M; Hargrove, Levi J

    2014-01-01

    Recently developed powered prostheses are capable of producing near-physiological joint torque at the knee and/or ankle joints. Based on previous studies of biological joint impedance and the mechanics of able-bodied gait, an impedance-based controller has been developed for a powered knee and ankle prosthesis that integrates knee swing initiation and powered plantar flexion in late stance with increasing ankle stiffness throughout stance. In this study, five prosthesis configuration conditions were tested to investigate the individual contributions of each sub-strategy to the overall walking mechanics of four unilateral transfemoral amputees as they completed a clinical 10-m walk test using a powered knee and ankle prosthesis. The baseline condition featured constant ankle stiffness and no swing initiation or powered plantar flexion. The four remaining conditions featured knee swing initiation alone (SI) or in combination with powered plantar flexion (SI+PF), increasing ankle stiffness (SI+IK), or both (SI+PF+IK). Self-selected walking speed did not significantly change between conditions, although subjects tended to walk the slowest in the baseline condition compared to conditions with swing initiation. The addition of powered plantar flexion resulted in significantly higher ankle power generation in late stance irrespective of ankle stiffness. The inclusion of swing initiation resulted in a significantly more flexed knee at toe off and a significantly higher average extensor knee torque following toe off. Identifying individual contributions of intrinsic control strategies to prosthesis biomechanics could help inform the refinement of impedance-based prosthesis controllers and simplify future designs of prostheses and lower-limb assistive devices alike.

  20. Peak triceps surae muscle activity is not specific to knee flexion angles during MVIC.

    PubMed

    Hébert-Losier, Kim; Schneiders, Anthony G; García, José A; Sullivan, S John; Simoneau, Guy G

    2011-10-01

    There is limited research on peak activity of the separate triceps surae muscles in select knee flexion (KF) positions during a maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) used to normalize EMG signals. The aim of this study was to determine how frequent peak activity occurred during an MVIC for soleus (SOL), gastrocnemius medialis (GM), and gastrocnemius lateralis (GL) in select KF positions, and if these peaks were recorded in similar KF positions. Forty-eight healthy individuals performed unilateral plantar-flexion MVIC in standing with 0°KF and 45°KF, and in sitting with 90°KF. Surface EMG of SOL, GM, and GL were collected and processed in 250 ms epochs to determine peak root-mean-square amplitude. Peak activity was most frequently captured in standing and rarely in sitting, with no position selective to SOL, GM or GL activity. Peak GM and GL activity was more frequent in 0°KF than 45°KF, and more often in similar KF positions than not. Peak SOL activity was just as likely in 45°KF as 0°KF, and more in positions similar to GM, but not GL. The EMG amplitudes were at least 20% greater in positions that captured peak activity over those that did not. The overall findings support performing an MVIC in more than one KF position to normalize triceps surae EMG. It is emphasized that no KF position is selective to SOL, GM, or GL alone.

  1. Larger plantar flexion torque variability implies less stable balance in the young: an association affected by knee position.

    PubMed

    Mello, Emanuele Moraes; Magalhães, Fernando Henrique; Kohn, André Fabio

    2013-12-01

    The present study examined the association between plantar flexion torque variability during isolated isometric contractions and during quiet bipedal standing. For plantar flexion torque measurements in quiet stance (QS), subjects stood still over a force plate. The mean plantar flexion torque level exerted by each subject in QS (divided by 2 to give the torque due to a single leg) served as the target torque level for right leg force-matching tasks in extended knee (KE) and flexed knee (KF) conditions. Muscle activation levels (EMG amplitudes) of the triceps surae and mean, standard deviation and coefficient of variation of plantar flexion torque were computed from signals acquired during periods with and without visual feedback. No significant correlations were found between EMG amplitudes and torque variability, regardless of the condition and muscle being analyzed. A significant correlation was found between torque variability in QS and KE, whereas no significant correlation was found between torque variability in QS and KF, regardless of vision availability. Therefore, torque variability measured in a controlled extended knee plantar flexion contraction is a predictor of torque variability in the anterior-posterior direction when the subjects are in quiet standing. In other words, larger plantar flexion torque variability in KE (but not in KF) implies less stable balance. The mechanisms underlying the findings above are probably associated with the similar proprioceptive feedback from the triceps surae in QS and KE and poorer proprioceptive feedback from the triceps surae in KF due to the slackening of the gastrocnemii. An additional putative mechanism includes the different torque contributions of each component of the triceps surae in the two knee angles. From a clinical and research standpoint, it would be advantageous to be able to estimate changes in balance ability by means of simple measurements of torque variability in a force matching task.

  2. A Multibody Knee Model Corroborates Subject-Specific Experimental Measurements of Low Ligament Forces and Kinematic Coupling During Passive Flexion.

    PubMed

    Kia, Mohammad; Schafer, Kevin; Lipman, Joseph; Cross, Michael; Mayman, David; Pearle, Andrew; Wickiewicz, Thomas; Imhauser, Carl

    2016-05-01

    A multibody model of the knee was developed and the predicted ligament forces and kinematics during passive flexion corroborated subject-specific measurements obtained from a human cadaveric knee that was tested using a robotic manipulator. The model incorporated a novel strategy to estimate the slack length of ligament fibers based on experimentally measured ligament forces at full extension and included multifiber representations for the cruciates. The model captured experimentally measured ligament forces (≤ 5.7 N root mean square (RMS) difference), coupled internal rotation (≤ 1.6 deg RMS difference), and coupled anterior translation (≤ 0.4 mm RMS difference) through 130 deg of passive flexion. This integrated framework of model and experiment improves our understanding of how passive structures, such as ligaments and articular geometries, interact to generate knee kinematics and ligament forces.

  3. The Effect of Tibial Rotation on the Contribution of Medial and Lateral Hamstrings During Isometric Knee Flexion

    PubMed Central

    Jónasson, Gunnlaugur; Helgason, Andri; Ingvarsson, Þorsteinn; Kristjánsson, Arnar Már; Briem, Kristín

    2015-01-01

    Background: Selective atrophy of hamstring components may result from muscle strain or graft harvesting for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Assessment and rehabilitation that specifically targets medial (MH) or lateral (LH) hamstring components may improve patient outcomes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate effects of volitional tibial rotation medially (MR) versus laterally (LR) on activation levels of MH versus LH and strength measures during isometric testing of knee flexors. Hypothesis: Muscle activation of MH and LH during knee flexor strength testing will be augmented when coupled with MR and LR of the tibia, respectively, without affecting knee flexor strength measures. Study Design: Cross-sectional laboratory study. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Methods: Surface electrodes were used to record neuromuscular activity from MH and LH of the right lower limb in 40 healthy young men and women during isometric knee flexor strength testing at 40° of knee flexion, where participants maintained concurrent volitional MR or LR of the tibia. Statistical analyses of variance included general linear models for repeated measures. Results: A significant interaction was found for tibial rotation and hamstring component variables (P < 0.01). When isometric knee flexion was coupled with LR, normalized activation levels were similar for MH and LH. When performed with MR, a significant drop in LH activation led to dissimilar activation levels of the 2 components. Significantly greater strength measures were found when isometric knee flexion was performed with concurrent LR of the tibia (P < 0.01). Both sexes demonstrated the same rotation-dependent differences. Conclusion: Coupling tibial rotation with knee flexor activities primarily affects the LH component. Clinical Relevance: Strategies involving volitional tibial rotation may be considered for specific assessment/rehabilitation of the MH or LH component. PMID:26721286

  4. Analysis of Impingement between Patella Bone and Bearing Post in Cruciate-Substituting High-Flexion Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Chon, Jegyun; Shin, Sangyeop; Jang, Gunil; Jeon, Taehyeon

    2016-01-01

    Background We investigated the causes of impingement between the patella bone and the bearing post during high flexion in cruciate-substituting total knee arthroplasty and proposed a treatment strategy. Methods This prospective cohort study included 218 cases that had undergone cruciate-substituting total knee arthroplasty from February 2014 to January 2015; a single surgeon performed the operation using the same method without patellar resurfacing in all patients. Results In these patients, the occurrence of impingement was determined by performing more than 120° high knee flexion after inserting a bearing perioperatively. The incidence of impingement was significantly associated with bearing design, femoral implant size, patella bone length, and patella inferior pole angle (p < 0.05). The impingement was resolved by resection of the lower articular side of the patella bone. Conclusions In the cruciate-substituting high-flexion total knee arthroplasty, impingement between the patella bone and bearing post was more common in patients with mobile bearing, small-size femoral component, and a long patella or a large inferior pole angle. In cases of intraoperative impingement between the patella bone and the bearing post, resection in the lower portion of the patella prevented impingement of the bearing with soft tissue or the patella by widening the space between the patella and the bearing post, which in turn prevented postoperative reduction in range of motion. PMID:27247740

  5. Quadriceps and patellar tendon pie-crusting as a treatment for limited flexion in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Burge, J Ross; Sanchez, Hugo B; Wagner, Russell A

    2014-04-01

    The pie-crusting method of ligament and tendon lengthening has been used successfully in various tissues but is not reported in the literature as an option for patellar or quadriceps tendons to address flexion limitation. Our case report discusses a patient with longstanding flexion limitation who underwent primary total knee arthroplasty. The report reviews the literature on intraoperative treatments, which primarily pertains to the condition of patella baja, and demonstrates that the pie-crusting technique should be included as a treatment option for a tight extensor mechanism while having some advantages over tibial tubercle osteotomy or Z-plasty.

  6. Influence of knee flexion angle and age on triceps surae muscle activity during heel raises.

    PubMed

    Hébert-Losier, Kim; Schneiders, Anthony G; García, José A; Sullivan, S John; Simoneau, Guy G

    2012-11-01

    Triceps surae and Achilles tendon injuries are frequent in sports medicine, particularly in middle-aged adults. Muscle imbalances and weakness are suggested to be involved in the etiology of these conditions, with heel-raise testing often used to assess and treat triceps surae (TS) injuries. Although heel raises are recommended with the knee straight for gastrocnemius and bent for soleus (SOL), the extent of muscle selectivity in these positions is not clear. This study aimed to determine the influence of knee angle and age on TS muscle activity during heel raises. Forty-eight healthy men and women were recruited from a younger-aged (18-25 years) and middle-aged (35-45 years) population. All the subjects performed unilateral heel raises in 0° and 45° knee flexion (KF). Soleus, gastrocnemius medialis (GM) and gastrocnemius lateralis (GL) surface electromyography signals were processed to compute root-mean-square amplitudes, and data were analyzed using mixed-effects models and stepwise regression. The mean TS activity during heel raises was 23% of maximum voluntary isometric contraction when performed in 0° KF and 21% when in 45°. Amplitudes were significantly different between TS muscles (p < 0.001) and KF angles (p < 0.001), with a significant interaction (p < 0.001). However, the age of the population did not influence the results (p = 0.193). The findings demonstrate that SOL activity was 4% greater when tested in 45° compared with 0° KF and 5% lower in the GM and GL. The results are consistent with the recommended use of heel raises in select knee positions for assessing, training, and rehabilitating the SOL and gastrocnemius muscles; however, the 4-5% documented change in activity might not be enough to significantly influence clinical outcome measures or muscle-specific benefits. Contrary to expectations, TS activity did not distinguish between middle-aged and younger-aged adults, despite the higher injury prevalence in middle age.

  7. Noninvasive Determination of Knee Cartilage Deformation During Jumping

    PubMed Central

    Filipovic, Nenad; Vulovic, Radun; Peulic, Aleksandar; Radakovic, Radivoje; Kosanic, Djordje; Ristic, Branko

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to use a combination of image processing, force measurements and finite element modeling to calculate deformation of the knee cartilage during jumping. Professional athletes performed jumps analyzed using a force plate and high-speed video camera system. Image processing was performed on each frame of video using a color recognition algorithm. A simplified mass-spring-damper model was utilized for determination of global force and moment on the knee. Custom software for fitting the coupling characteristics was created. Simulated results were used as input data for the finite element calculation of cartilage deformation in the athlete’s knee. Computer simulation data was compared with the average experimental ground reaction forces. The results show the three-dimensional mechanical deformation distribution inside the cartilage volume. A combination of the image recognition technology, force plate measurements and the finite element cartilage deformation in the knee may be used in the future as an effective noninvasive tool for prediction of injury during jumping. Key points Even there are many existing mathematical models of force distribution during running or jumping (Liu et al, 1998), to our knowledge there is no interdisciplinary approach where imaging processing, finite element modeling and experimental force plate system are employed. The aim is to explore noninvasive deformation in the knee cartilage during athlete’s jumping on the force plate. An original image algorithms and software were developed as well as complex mathematical models using high-performance computational power of finite element modeling together with one-dimensional dynamics model. The initial results showed cartilage deformation in the knee and future research will be focused on the methodology and more precisely determination of the stress and strain distribution in the knee cartilage during training phase of sportsman. PMID:24149600

  8. The functional anatomy of the iliotibial band during flexion and extension of the knee: implications for understanding iliotibial band syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fairclough, John; Hayashi, Koji; Toumi, Hechmi; Lyons, Kathleen; Bydder, Graeme; Phillips, Nicola; Best, Thomas M; Benjamin, Mike

    2006-03-01

    Iliotibial band (ITB) syndrome is a common overuse injury in runners and cyclists. It is regarded as a friction syndrome where the ITB rubs against (and 'rolls over') the lateral femoral epicondyle. Here, we re-evaluate the clinical anatomy of the region to challenge the view that the ITB moves antero-posteriorly over the epicondyle. Gross anatomical and microscopical studies were conducted on the distal portion of the ITB in 15 cadavers. This was complemented by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of six asymptomatic volunteers and studies of two athletes with acute ITB syndrome. In all cadavers, the ITB was anchored to the distal femur by fibrous strands, associated with a layer of richly innervated and vascularized fat. In no cadaver, volunteer or patient was a bursa seen. The MR scans showed that the ITB was compressed against the epicondyle at 30 degrees of knee flexion as a consequence of tibial internal rotation, but moved laterally in extension. MR signal changes in the patients with ITB syndrome were present in the region occupied by fat, deep to the ITB. The ITB is prevented from rolling over the epicondyle by its femoral anchorage and because it is a part of the fascia lata. We suggest that it creates the illusion of movement, because of changing tension in its anterior and posterior fibres during knee flexion. Thus, on anatomical grounds, ITB overuse injuries may be more likely to be associated with fat compression beneath the tract, rather than with repetitive friction as the knee flexes and extends.

  9. Evaluation of Postoperative Range of Motion and Functional Outcomes after Cruciate-Retaining and Posterior-Stabilized High-Flexion Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chang Wook; Yang, Ick Hwan; Lee, Woo Suk; Park, Kwan Kyu

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare postoperative range of motion and functional outcomes among patients who received high-flexion total knee arthroplasty using cruciate-retaining (CR-Flex) and posterior-stabilized (PS-Flex) type prostheses. Materials and Methods Among 127 patients (186 knees) who underwent high-flexion total knee arthroplasty between 2005 and 2007, 92 knees were placed in the CR-Flex group, and 94 knees were placed in the PS-Flex group. After two years of postoperative follow-up, clinical and radiographic data were reviewed. Postoperative non-weight-bearing range of knee motion, angle of flexion contracture and functional outcomes based on the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis (WOMAC) functional sub-scale were assessed and compared between the two groups. Results After the 2-year postoperative period, the mean range of motion was 131° in the CR-Flex group and 133° in the PS-Flex group. There were no significant differences in postoperative range of motion between the two groups. Only age at operation and preoperative range of motion were significantly associated with postoperative range of motion after high-flexion total knee arthroplasty. Postoperative functional outcomes based on the WOMAC functional sub-scale were slightly better in the CR-Flex group (9.2±9.1 points) than in the PS-Flex group (11.9±9.6 points); however, this difference was not statistically significant (p=non-significant). Conclusion The retention or substitution of the posterior cruciate ligament does not affect postoperative range of motion (ROM) or functional outcomes, according to 2 years of postoperative follow-up of high-flexion total knee arthroplasty. PMID:22665348

  10. Correction of angular deformities of the knee by percutaneous hemiepiphysiodesis.

    PubMed

    Inan, Muharrem; Chan, Gilbert; Bowen, J Richard

    2007-03-01

    Predicting patients' remaining angular growth and timing for hemiepiphysiodesis are crucial for correcting coronal plane knee deformities in children. We asked whether the Angular Deformity Versus Growth Remaining Chart predicted correction of coronal angular deformities of the knee in children. Serial orthoroentgenograms and the predictive chart were used to time percutaneous hemiepiphysiodesis, and the children were followed until skeletal maturity. Twenty-five consecutive children (35 extremities) with a mean skeletal age of 13 years (range, 9.6-16 years) had percutaneous hemiepiphysiodeses as described by Bowen and Johnson, and were followed up until skeletal maturity. At skeletal maturity, correction of varus and valgus coronal plane deformities were within 2 degrees (range, 0 degrees - 6 degrees) of the predicted value. The maximum limb-length discrepancy resulting from the procedure was 1.5 cm. The only complication was failure of a physeal bar formation hemiepiphysiodesis; this was treated successfully with a repeat percutaneous hemiepiphysiodesis. The percutaneous hemiepiphysiodesis is effective and has a low complication rate. Angular correction and timing for hemiepiphysiodesis can be predicted by using the Angular Deformity Versus Growth Remaining Chart in children with coronal plain knee deformities.

  11. Focusing on Increasing Velocity during Heavy Resistance Knee Flexion Exercise Boosts Hamstring Muscle Activity in Chronic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsen, Markus D.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Muscle strength is markedly reduced in stroke patients, which has negative implications for functional capacity and work ability. Different types of feedback during strength training exercises may alter neuromuscular activity and functional gains. Objective. To compare levels of muscle activity during conditions of blindfolding and intended high contraction speed with a normal condition of high-intensity knee flexions. Methods. Eighteen patients performed unilateral machine knee flexions with a 10-repetition maximum load. Surface electromyography (EMG) was recorded from the quadrics and hamstring muscles and normalized to maximal EMG (nEMG) of the nonparetic limb. Results. For the paretic leg, the speed condition showed higher values of muscle activity compared with the normal and blindfolded conditions for both biceps femoris and semitendinosus. Likewise, the speed condition showed higher co-contraction values compared with the normal and blindfolded conditions for the vastus lateralis. No differences were observed between exercise conditions for the nonparetic leg. Conclusion. Chronic stroke patients are capable of performing heavy resistance training with intended high speed of contraction. Focusing on speed during the concentric phase elicited higher levels of muscle activity of the hamstrings compared to normal and blindfolded conditions, which may have implications for regaining fast muscle strength in stroke survivors. PMID:27525118

  12. An individual approach for optimizing ankle-foot orthoses to improve mobility in children with spastic cerebral palsy walking with excessive knee flexion.

    PubMed

    Kerkum, Yvette L; Harlaar, Jaap; Buizer, Annemieke I; van den Noort, Josien C; Becher, Jules G; Brehm, Merel-Anne

    2016-05-01

    Ankle-Foot Orthoses (AFOs) are commonly prescribed to promote gait in children with cerebral palsy (CP). The AFO prescription process is however largely dependent on clinical experience, resulting in confusing results regarding treatment efficacy. To maximize efficacy, the AFO's mechanical properties should be tuned to the patient's underlying impairments. This study aimed to investigate whether the efficacy of a ventral shell AFO (vAFO) to reduce knee flexion and walking energy cost could be improved by individually optimizing AFO stiffness in children with CP walking with excessive knee flexion. Secondarily, the effect of the optimized vAFO on daily walking activity was investigated. Fifteen children with spastic CP were prescribed with a hinged vAFO with adjustable stiffness. Effects of a rigid, stiff, and flexible setting on knee angle and the net energy cost (EC) [Jkg(-1)m(-1)] were assessed to individually select the optimal stiffness. After three months, net EC, daily walking activity [stridesmin(-1)] and knee angle [deg] while walking with the optimized vAFO were compared to walking with shoes-only. A near significant 9% (p=0.077) decrease in net EC (-0.5Jkg(-1)m(-1)) was found for walking with the optimized vAFO compared to shoes-only. Daily activity remained unchanged. Knee flexion in stance was reduced by 2.4° (p=0.006). These results show that children with CP who walk with excessive knee flexion show a small, but significant reduction of knee flexion in stance as a result of wearing individually optimized vAFOs. Data suggest that this also improves gait efficiency for which an individual approach to AFO prescription is emphasized.

  13. The functional anatomy of the iliotibial band during flexion and extension of the knee: implications for understanding iliotibial band syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fairclough, John; Hayashi, Koji; Toumi, Hechmi; Lyons, Kathleen; Bydder, Graeme; Phillips, Nicola; Best, Thomas M; Benjamin, Mike

    2006-01-01

    Iliotibial band (ITB) syndrome is a common overuse injury in runners and cyclists. It is regarded as a friction syndrome where the ITB rubs against (and ‘rolls over’) the lateral femoral epicondyle. Here, we re-evaluate the clinical anatomy of the region to challenge the view that the ITB moves antero-posteriorly over the epicondyle. Gross anatomical and microscopical studies were conducted on the distal portion of the ITB in 15 cadavers. This was complemented by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of six asymptomatic volunteers and studies of two athletes with acute ITB syndrome. In all cadavers, the ITB was anchored to the distal femur by fibrous strands, associated with a layer of richly innervated and vascularized fat. In no cadaver, volunteer or patient was a bursa seen. The MR scans showed that the ITB was compressed against the epicondyle at 30° of knee flexion as a consequence of tibial internal rotation, but moved laterally in extension. MR signal changes in the patients with ITB syndrome were present in the region occupied by fat, deep to the ITB. The ITB is prevented from rolling over the epicondyle by its femoral anchorage and because it is a part of the fascia lata. We suggest that it creates the illusion of movement, because of changing tension in its anterior and posterior fibres during knee flexion. Thus, on anatomical grounds, ITB overuse injuries may be more likely to be associated with fat compression beneath the tract, rather than with repetitive friction as the knee flexes and extends. PMID:16533314

  14. Restoring the anatomical tibial slope and limb axis may maximise post-operative flexion in posterior-stabilised total knee replacements.

    PubMed

    Singh, G; Tan, J H; Sng, B Y; Awiszus, F; Lohmann, C H; Nathan, S S

    2013-10-01

    The optimal management of the tibial slope in achieving a high flexion angle in posterior-stabilised (PS) total knee replacement (TKR) is not well understood, and most studies evaluating the posterior tibial slope have been conducted on cruciate-retaining TKRs. We analysed pre- and post-operative tibial slope differences, pre- and post-operative coronal knee alignment and post-operative maximum flexion angle in 167 patients undergoing 209 TKRs. The mean pre-operative posterior tibial slope was 8.6° (1.3° to 17°) and post-operatively it was 8.0° (0.1° to 16.7°). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that the absolute difference between pre- and post-operative tibial slope (p < 0.001), post-operative coronal alignment (p = 0.02) and pre-operative range of movement (p < 0.001) predicted post-operative flexion. The variance of change in tibial slope became larger as the post-operative maximum flexion angle decreased. The odds ratio of having a post-operative flexion angle < 100° was 17.6 if the slope change was > 2°. Our data suggest that recreation of the anatomical tibial slope appears to improve maximum flexion after posterior-stabilised TKR, provided coronal alignment has been restored.

  15. Baseline knee adduction and flexion moments during walking are both associated with five year cartilage changes in patients with medial knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chehab, Eric F.; Favre, Julien; Erhart-Hledik, Jennifer C.; Andriacchi, Thomas P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that knee cartilage changes over five years are associated with baseline peak knee adduction moment (KAM) and peak knee flexion moment (KFM) during early stance. Design Baseline KAM and KFM were measured in sixteen subjects with medial knee OA. Regional changes in cartilage thickness and changes in medial-to-lateral thickness ratio were quantified using magnetic resonance imaging at baseline and again after five years. Multiple regression was used to determine whether baseline measures of KAM and KFM were associated with cartilage changes over five years. Associations with baseline pain score, Kellgren-Lawrence grade, walking speed, age, gender, and body mass index were tested one-by-one in the presence of KAM and KFM. Results Changes over five years in femoral medial-to-lateral thickness ratio were associated with baseline KAM, KFM, and pain score (R2=0.60, p=0.010), and most significantly with KAM (R2=0.33, p=0.019). Changes in tibial medial-to-lateral thickness ratio were associated with baseline KAM, KFM, and walking speed (R2=0.49, p=0.039), with KFM driving this association (R2=0.40, p=0.009). Changes in medial tibial thickness were associated with baseline KAM, KFM, and walking speed (R2=0.49, p=0.041); KFM also drove this association (R2=0.42, p=0.006). Conclusions The findings that the KAM has a greater influence on femoral cartilage change and the KFM has a greater influence on tibial cartilage change provide new insight into the tibiofemoral variations in cartilage changes associated with walking kinetics. These results suggest that both KAM and KFM should be considered when designing disease interventions as well as when assessing the risk for OA progression. PMID:25211281

  16. Ranges of Cervical Intervertebral Disc Deformation during an In-Vivo Dynamic Flexion-Extension of the Neck.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yan; Mao, Haiqing; Li, Jing-Sheng; Tsai, Tsung-Yuan; Cheng, Liming; Wood, Kirkham B; Li, Guoan; Cha, Thomas D

    2017-03-23

    While abnormal loading is widely believed to cause cervical spine disc diseases, in-vivo cervical disc deformation during dynamic neck motion has not been well delineated. This study investigated the range of cervical disc deformation during an in-vivo functional flexion-extension of the neck. Ten asymptomatic human subjects were tested using a combined dual fluoroscopic imaging system and MRI based 3D modeling technique. Overall disc deformation was determined using the changes of the space geometry between upper and lower endplates of each intervertebral segment (C3/4, C4/5, C5/6 and C6/7). Five points (anterior, center, posterior, left and right) of each disc were analyzed to examine the disc deformation distributions. The data indicated that between the functional maximum flexion and extension of the neck, the anterior points of the discs experienced large changes of distraction/compression deformation and shear deformation. The higher level discs experienced higher ranges of disc deformation. No significant difference was found in deformation ranges at posterior points of all discs. The data indicated that the range of disc deformation is disc level dependent and the anterior region experienced larger changes of deformation than the center and posterior regions, except for the C6/7 disc. The data obtained from this study could serve as baseline knowledge for the understanding of the cervical spine disc biomechanics and for investigation of the biomechanical etiology of disc diseases. These data could also provide insights for development of motion preservation surgeries for cervical spine.

  17. Study of the influence of degenerative intervertebral disc changes on the deformation behavior of the cervical spine segment in flexion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolmakova, Tatyana V.

    2016-11-01

    The paper describes the model of the cervical spine segment (C3-C4) and the calculation results of the deformation behavior of the segment under degenerative changes of the intervertebral disc. The segment model was built based on the experimental literature data taking into account the presence of the cortical and cancellous bone tissue of vertebral bodies. The calculation results show that degenerative changes of the intervertebral disc cause the immobility of the C3 vertebra at flexion.

  18. Effect of knee flexion angle on ground reaction forces, knee moments and muscle co-contraction during an impact-like deceleration landing: implications for the non-contact mechanism of ACL injury.

    PubMed

    Podraza, Jeffery T; White, Scott C

    2010-08-01

    Investigating landing kinetics and neuromuscular control strategies during rapid deceleration movements is a prerequisite to understanding the non-contact mechanism of ACL injury. The purpose of this study was to quantify the effect of knee flexion angle on ground reaction forces, net knee joint moments, muscle co-contraction and lower extremity muscles during an impact-like, deceleration task. Ground reaction forces and knee joint moments were determined from video and force plate records of 10 healthy male subjects performing rapid deceleration single leg landings from a 10.5 cm height with different degrees of knee flexion at landing. Muscle co-contraction was based on muscle moments calculated from an EMG-to-moment processing model. Ground reaction forces and co-contraction indices decreased while knee extensor moments increased significantly with increased degrees of knee flexion at landing (all p<0.005). Higher ground reaction forces when landing in an extended knee position suggests they are a contributing factor in non-contact ACL injuries. Increased knee extensor moments and less co-contraction with flexed knee landings suggest that quadriceps overload may not be the primary cause of non-contact ACL injuries. The results bring into question the counterbalancing role of the hamstrings during dynamic movements. The soleus may be a valuable synergist stabilizing the tibia against anterior translation at landing. Movement strategies that lessen the propagation of reaction forces up the kinetic chain may help prevent non-contact ACL injuries. The relative interaction of all involved thigh and lower leg muscles, not just the quadriceps and hamstrings should be considered when interpreting non-contact ACL injury mechanisms.

  19. Total Knee Arthroplasty in Severe Valgus Osteoarthritis Excellent Early Results in a 90-Year-Old Patient with a Valgus Deformity of 47°

    PubMed Central

    Kernen, Rolf; Mueller, Sebastian Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Grade III valgus deformity (tibiofemoral alignment > 20°) is present in only 0.5% of patients receiving total knee arthroplasty. Furthermore, cases with a valgus deformity exceeding 40° are even rarer. Since they mostly affect elderly, polymorbid patients, successful outcome means a great challenge. We report on a case of a 90-year-old patient with a valgus deformity of 47°. The patient was preoperatively restricted to a wheel chair, unable to walk, and only able to stand for a few seconds. The maximal knee flexion was 100°, and there was an extension deficit of 15°. The WOMAC score was 91; the EQ-5D-5L Index was 0.048. She was treated with a constrained hinged prosthesis. Postoperatively, the axis was 6° valgus. After 3 months of rehabilitation, she was independent using a wheeled walker. The maximal flexion of the knee was 110° and there was no extension deficit. The WOMAC score was 45; the EQ-5D-5L Index was 0.813. This case demonstrates the possibility of a satisfactory result and an improvement in quality of life and mobility with a plausible timetable and with reasonable use of resources even in advanced age and severe valgus deformity. PMID:28386499

  20. Radiographic Measurement of Joint Space Width Using the Fixed Flexion View in 1,102 Knees of Japanese Patients with Osteoarthritis in Comparison with the Standing Extended View

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Hiroyuki; Arai, Yuji; Kobayashi, Masashi; Nakagawa, Shuji; Inoue, Hiroaki; Hino, Manabu; Komaki, Shintaro; Ikoma, Kazuya; Ueshima, Keiichiro; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The fixed flexion view (FFV) of the knee is considered useful for evaluating the joint space when assessing the severity of osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. To clarify the usefulness of FFV for evaluation of the joint space and severity of knee OA, this study evaluated changes in the joint space on the FFV and standing extended view (SEV) in patients with knee OA. Materials and Methods The SEV and FFV images were acquired in 567 patients (1,102 knees) who visited the hospital with a chief complaint of knee joint pain. Medial joint space width (MJSW) and Kellgren-Lawrence (K-L) classification assessed using the SEV and FFV images were compared. Results Mean MJSW was significantly smaller when assessed on the FFV than on the SEV (3.02±1.55 mm vs. 4.31±1.30 mm; p<0.001). The K-L grade was the same or higher on the FFV than on the SEV. Conclusions The FFV is more useful than the SEV for evaluating the joint space in OA knees. Treatment strategies in patients with knee OA should be determined based on routinely acquired FFV images. PMID:28231651

  1. Total Knee Arthroplasty in Patients with Blount Disease or Blount-Like Deformity.

    PubMed

    Natoli, Roman M; Nypaver, Chrissy M; Schiff, Adam P; Hopkinson, William J; Rees, Harold W

    2016-01-01

    Blount disease is associated with complex deformity of the proximal tibia, and some patients will develop knee osteoarthritis. Five patients (eight knees) with Blount disease or Blount-like deformity underwent total knee arthroplasty. Mean proximal tibial metaphyseal-diaphyseal angle was 20.75°. Each patient had substantial posteromedial tibial bony defects and six knees required extensive medial releases. Two knees required increased constraint at index procedure. One patient has undergone bilateral revision surgery with rotating hinge prostheses. Mean WOMAC scores were 13.5 and Knee Society scores were 212.5 at average 75.2 month follow-up. Despite technical challenges, patients with these deformities can have successful outcomes after total knee arthroplasty. Surgeons should be prepared to address posteromedial tibial bony defects and consider constrained arthroplasty at the index procedure.

  2. Measurement of knee joint gaps without bone resection: "physiologic" extension and flexion gaps in total knee arthroplasty are asymmetric and unequal and anterior and posterior cruciate ligament resections produce different gap changes.

    PubMed

    Nowakowski, Andrej Maria; Majewski, Martin; Müller-Gerbl, Magdalena; Valderrabano, Victor

    2012-04-01

    General agreement is that flexion and extension gaps should be equal and symmetrical in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) procedures. However, comparisons using a standard TKA approach to normal knee joints that have not undergone bone resection are currently unavailable. Since bony preparation can influence capsule and ligament tension, our purpose was to perform measurements without this influence. Ten normal cadaveric knees were assessed using a standard medial parapatellar TKA approach with patellar subluxation. Gap measurements were carried out twice each alternating 100 and 200 N per compartment using a prototypical force-determining ligament balancer without the need for bony resection. Initial measurements were performed in extension, followed by 908 of flexion. The ACL was then resected, and finally the PCL was resected, and measurements were carried out in an analogous fashion. In general, the lateral compartment could be stretched further than the medial compartment, and the corresponding flexion gap values were significantly larger. ACL resection predominantly increased extension gaps, while PCL resection increased flexion gaps. Distraction force of 100 N per compartment appeared adequate; increasing to 200 N did not improve the results.

  3. The Effects of Varying Ankle Foot Orthosis Stiffness on Gait in Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy Who Walk with Excessive Knee Flexion

    PubMed Central

    Kerkum, Yvette L.; Buizer, Annemieke I.; van den Noort, Josien C.; Becher, Jules G.; Harlaar, Jaap; Brehm, Merel-Anne

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Rigid Ankle-Foot Orthoses (AFOs) are commonly prescribed to counteract excessive knee flexion during the stance phase of gait in children with cerebral palsy (CP). While rigid AFOs may normalize knee kinematics and kinetics effectively, it has the disadvantage of impeding push-off power. A spring-like AFO may enhance push-off power, which may come at the cost of reducing the knee flexion less effectively. Optimizing this trade-off between enhancing push-off power and normalizing knee flexion in stance is expected to maximize gait efficiency. This study investigated the effects of varying AFO stiffness on gait biomechanics and efficiency in children with CP who walk with excessive knee flexion in stance. Fifteen children with spastic CP (11 boys, 10±2 years) were prescribed with a ventral shell spring-hinged AFO (vAFO). The hinge was set into a rigid, or spring-like setting, using both a stiff and flexible performance. At baseline (i.e. shoes-only) and for each vAFO, a 3D-gait analysis and 6-minute walk test with breath-gas analysis were performed at comfortable speed. Lower limb joint kinematics and kinetics were calculated. From the 6-minute walk test, walking speed and the net energy cost were determined. A generalized estimation equation (p<0.05) was used to analyze the effects of different conditions. Compared to shoes-only, all vAFOs improved the knee angle and net moment similarly. Ankle power generation and work were preserved only by the spring-like vAFOs. All vAFOs decreased the net energy cost compared to shoes-only, but no differences were found between vAFOs, showing that the effects of spring-like vAFOs to promote push-off power did not lead to greater reductions in walking energy cost. These findings suggest that, in this specific group of children with spastic CP, the vAFO stiffness that maximizes gait efficiency is primarily determined by its effect on knee kinematics and kinetics rather than by its effect on push-off power. Trial

  4. Higher Knee Flexion Moment During the Second Half of the Stance Phase of Gait Is Associated With the Progression of Osteoarthritis of the Patellofemoral Joint on Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Hsiang-Ling; Macleod, Toran D.; Link, Thomas M.; Majumdar, Sharmila; Souza, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN Controlled laboratory study, longitudinal design. OBJECTIVE To examine whether baseline knee flexion moment or impulse during walking is associated with the progression of osteoarthritis (OA) with magnetic resonance imaging of the patellofemoral joint (PFJ) at 1 year. BACKGROUND Patellofemoral joint OA is highly prevalent and a major source of pain and dysfunction. The biomechanical factors associated with the progression of PFJ OA remain unclear. METHODS Three-dimensional gait analyses were performed at baseline. Magnetic resonance imaging of the knee (high-resolution, 3-D, fast spin-echo sequence) was used to identify PFJ cartilage and bone marrow edema–like lesions at baseline and a 1-year follow-up. The severity of PFJ OA progression was defined using the modified Whole-Organ Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score when new or increased cartilage or bone marrow edema–like lesions were observed at 1 year. Peak external knee flexion moment and flexion moment impulse during the first and second halves of the stance phase of gait were compared between progressors and nonprogressors, and used to predict progression after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, and presence of baseline PFJ OA. RESULTS Sixty-one participants with no knee OA or isolated PFJ OA were included. Patellofemoral joint OA progressors (n = 10) demonstrated significantly higher peak knee flexion moment (P = .01) and flexion moment impulse (P = .04) during the second half of stance at baseline compared to nonprogressors. Logistic regression showed that higher peak knee flexion moment during the second half of the stance phase was significantly associated with progression at 1 year (adjusted odds ratio = 3.3, P = .01). CONCLUSION Peak knee flexion moment and flexion moment impulse during the second half of stance are related to the progression of PFJ OA and may need to be considered when treating individuals who are at risk of or who have PFJ OA. PMID:26161626

  5. Surgical correction of angular deformity of the knee in children with renal osteodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Oppenheim, W L; Fischer, S R; Salusky, I B

    1997-01-01

    Twenty-nine children with renal osteodystrophy (RO) and angular deformities about the knee were studied, including 19 in whom 36 corrective operations were performed. Corrective osteotomy of the distal femur was performed in 20 knees, osteotomy of the proximal tibia in 11 knees, combined femoral/tibial osteotomy in three knees, and medial physeal stapling in two knees. The indication for surgery was a deformity significant enough to interfere with gait. Complications occurred in three patients and recurrence severe enough to require repeated surgery occurred in four patients. Patients who required repeated osteotomy appeared to have had poor metabolic control during the initial surgery, as measured by an increased alkaline phosphatase. Surgery for children with RO and knee deformities is quite feasible but requires careful surgical planning and preoperative metabolic stabilization. Whether to correct the femur or tibia can be determined by evaluating full-length films of the lower extremities.

  6. Computer-assisted surgery patterns of ligamentous deformity of the knee: a clinical and cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Schwarzkopf, Ran; Hadley, Scott; Abbasi, Mohammed; Meere, Patrick A

    2013-08-01

    Knee malalignment during total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is commonly classified as either varus or valgus on the basis of a standing anteroposterior radiograph. Computer-assisted surgery (CAS) navigation TKA provides precise dynamic evaluation of knee alignment throughout the full range of motion (FROM). The goal of this study was to classify patterns of CAS-generated knee deformity curves that match specific soft tissue contracture combinations. This can then be applied as an algorithm for soft tissue balancing on the basis of the preoperative knee deformity curve. Computer navigation-generated graphs from 65 consecutive TKA procedures performed by a single surgeon were analyzed. A stress-strain curve of the coronal alignment of the knee was recorded throughout FROM before bony resection. All graphs were classified into groups according to their pattern. Cadaveric knee models were then used to test the correlation between isolated and combined ligamentous contractures and identified CAS deformity curves. An analysis of the intraoperative knee alignment graphs revealed four distinct patterns of coronal deformity on the basis of intraoperative data: 13% diagonal, 18.5% C-shaped, 43.5% comma shaped, and 25% S-shaped. Each represents the change in varus and valgus alignment during FROM. All patterns were reproduced with cadaveric knees by recreating specific contracture constellations. A tight posterior capsule gave an S-shaped curve, a tight lateral collateral ligament gave a C-shaped curve, tight medial collateral ligament gave a diagonal curve, and a tight posterior lateral corner gave a comma-shaped curve. Release of the specific contractures resulted in correction of all patterns of deformity as measured by CAS. We propose a new classification system for coronal plane knee deformity throughout FROM. This system intends to match individual and combined soft tissue pathological contractures to specific stress-strain curves obtained through routine knee CAS

  7. Effects of Reduction Osteotomy on Gap Balancing During Total Knee Arthroplasty for Severe Varus Deformity.

    PubMed

    Niki, Yasuo; Harato, Kengo; Nagai, Katsuya; Suda, Yasunori; Nakamura, Masaya; Matsumoto, Morio

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to assess the effects of down-sizing and lateralizing of the tibial component (reduction osteotomy) on gap balancing in TKA, and the clinical feasibility of an uncemented modular trabecular metal tibial tray in this technique. Reduction osteotomy was performed for 39 knees of 36 patients with knee OA with a mean tibiofemoral angle of 21° varus. In 20 knees, appropriate gap balance was achieved by release of the deep medial collateral ligament alone. Flexion gap imbalance could be reduced by approximately 1.7° and 2.8° for 4-mm osteotomy and 8-mm osteotomy, respectively. Within the first postoperative year, clinically-stable tibial component subsidence was observed in 9 knees, but it was not progressive, and the clinical results were excellent at a mean follow-up of 3.3 years.

  8. Passive knee kinematics before and after total knee arthroplasty: are we correcting pathologic motion?

    PubMed

    Mihalko, William M; Ali, Mounawar; Phillips, Matthew J; Bayers-Thering, Mary; Krackow, Kenneth A

    2008-01-01

    The change in coronal plane deformity throughout a range of flexion before and after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has not been reported. Unlike most alignment assessments traditionally reporting coronal plane alignment in a standing position under static conditions, this study reports deformity throughout the flexion arc before and after deformity correction. One hundred fifty-two TKA patients using the anteroposterior axis for femoral component rotation and computer navigation techniques were included in the study. Deformity before TKA ranged from 17.5 degrees varus (deformity apex away from the midline) to 20.5 degrees valgus (deformity apex toward the midline) in full extension. Before TKA, deformity was not constant through an arc of motion and significantly decreased with flexion of 60 degrees and more (P < .01). The deformity after performing a TKA was not different (P = .478) throughout the flexion arc. The data determined that deformity is not constant throughout flexion in osteoarthritic knees preoperatively and that deformity throughout flexion can be corrected with the use of conventional alignment techniques during TKA.

  9. Factors affecting angular deformities of the knees in Nigerian children--Ilorin experience.

    PubMed

    Agaja, S B

    2001-01-01

    44 children with angular knee deformities were studied at the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital from September 1994 to December, 1997. There were 19 males (43.2%) and 25 females (56.8%). The commonest age range was 0-5 years age range (81.5%). Bilateral angular deformities are more common than unilateral angular deformities. Windswept deformities accounted for 16 cases(36.4%), bilateral Genu Varum accounted for 15 cases (34.0%), and unilateral Genu Valgum, 8 cases (18.2%). It was found in the study that 40 cases (90.9%) were from urban communities while 4 cases (9.1%) were from rural communities. The angular knee deformities affect both Christian and Moslem children alike; however, the environmental factor is the restriction of children indoors which is a serious factor in the causation of Nutritional Rickets. Angular deformities of the knee were far more common amongst urban dwellers than in children from rural area (Ratio 10:1) while involvement of both knees (88.6%) simultaneously is also more common than single knee involvement (11.4%). Some of the objectives of the investigation were to find out the implications of the angular deformities to parents and children; and ways to prevent occurrence were also discussed in this paper.

  10. The Effect of Malrotation of Tibial Component of Total Knee Arthroplasty on Tibial Insert during High Flexion Using a Finite Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Todo, Mitsugu

    2014-01-01

    One of the most common errors of total knee arthroplasty procedure is a malrotation of tibial component. The stress on tibial insert is closely related to polyethylene failure. The objective of this study is to analyze the effect of malrotation of tibial component for the stress on tibial insert during high flexion using a finite element analysis. We used Stryker NRG PS for analysis. Three different initial conditions of tibial component including normal, 15° internal malrotation, and 15° external malrotation were analyzed. The tibial insert made from ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene was assumed to be elastic-plastic while femoral and tibial metal components were assumed to be rigid. Four nonlinear springs attached to tibial component represented soft tissues around the knee. Vertical load was applied to femoral component which rotated from 0° to 135° while horizontal load along the anterior posterior axis was applied to tibial component during flexion. Maximum equivalent stresses on the surface were analyzed. Internal malrotation caused the highest stress which arose up to 160% of normal position. External malrotation also caused higher stress. Implanting prosthesis in correct position is important for reducing the risk of abnormal wear and failure. PMID:24895658

  11. A Novel Medial Soft Tissue Release Method for Varus Deformity during Total Knee Arthroplasty: Femoral Origin Release of the Medial Collateral Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Yup; Yang, Jae-Hyuk; Lee, Yong-In

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Numerous methods of medial soft tissue release for severe varus deformity during total knee arthroplasty (TKA) have been reported. These include tibial stripping of the superficial medial collateral ligament (MCL), pie-crusting technique, and medial epicondylar osteotomy. However, there are inherent disadvantages in these techniques. Authors hereby present a novel quantitative method: femoral origin release of the medial collateral ligament (FORM). Surgical Technique For medial tightness remaining even after the release of the deep MCL and semimembranosus, the FORM is initiated with identification of the femoral insertion area of the MCL with the knee in flexion. Starting from the most posterior part of the femoral insertion, one third of the MCL femoral insertion is released from its attachment. If necessary, further sequential medial release is performed. Materials and Methods Seventeen knees that underwent the FORM were evaluated for radiological and clinical outcomes. Results Regardless of the extent of the FORM, no knees showed residual valgus instability at 24 weeks after surgery. Conclusions As the FORM is performed in a stepwise manner, fine adjustment during medial release might be beneficial to prevent inadvertent over-release of the medial structures of the knee. PMID:27274473

  12. Growth arrest of the proximal tibial physis with recurvatum and valgus deformity of the knee.

    PubMed

    Domzalski, Marcin; Mackenzie, William

    2009-10-01

    Two cases of asymmetrical closure of the proximal tibial epiphysis without a clear aetiological factor were presented. In both cases premature closure of the growth plate resulted in progressive recurvatum and valgus deformity of the knee with leg length discrepancy. The correction of deformity was obtained using Taylor Spatial frame with excellent results at 2 years follow-up. We hypothesize that repetitive trauma or chronic overloading during sports activities might be a factor of growth arrest in reported cases. Orthopedic surgeons should be aware of the possibility of subtle physeal injuries, causing angular deformities, in the cases of even minor knee trauma in skeletally immature population.

  13. The choice of a constitutive formulation for modeling limb flexion-induced deformations and stresses in the human femoropopliteal arteries of different ages.

    PubMed

    Desyatova, Anastasia; MacTaggart, Jason; Poulson, William; Deegan, Paul; Lomneth, Carol; Sandip, Anjali; Kamenskiy, Alexey

    2016-11-21

    Open and endovascular treatments for peripheral arterial disease are notorious for high failure rates. Severe mechanical deformations experienced by the femoropopliteal artery (FPA) during limb flexion and interactions between the artery and repair materials play important roles and may contribute to poor clinical outcomes. Computational modeling can help optimize FPA repair, but these simulations heavily depend on the choice of constitutive model describing the arterial behavior. In this study finite element model of the FPA in the standing (straight) and gardening (acutely bent) postures was built using computed tomography data, longitudinal pre-stretch and biaxially determined mechanical properties. Springs and dashpots were used to represent surrounding tissue forces associated with limb flexion-induced deformations. These forces were then used with age-specific longitudinal pre-stretch and mechanical properties to obtain deformed FPA configurations for seven age groups. Four commonly used invariant-based constitutive models were compared to determine the accuracy of capturing deformations and stresses in each age group. The four-fiber FPA model most accurately portrayed arterial behavior in all ages, but in subjects younger than 40 years, the performance of all constitutive formulations was similar. In older subjects, Demiray (Delfino) and classic two-fiber Holzapfel-Gasser-Ogden formulations were better than the Neo-Hookean model for predicting deformations due to limb flexion, but both significantly overestimated principal stresses compared to the FPA or Neo-Hookean models.

  14. Optimising Ankle Foot Orthoses for children with Cerebral Palsy walking with excessive knee flexion to improve their mobility and participation; protocol of the AFO-CP study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ankle-Foot-Orthoses with a ventral shell, also known as Floor Reaction Orthoses (FROs), are often used to reduce gait-related problems in children with spastic cerebral palsy (SCP), walking with excessive knee flexion. However, current evidence for the effectiveness (e.g. in terms of walking energy cost) of FROs is both limited and inconclusive. Much of this ambiguity may be due to a mismatch between the FRO ankle stiffness and the patient’s gait deviations. The primary aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of FROs optimised for ankle stiffness on the walking energy cost in children with SCP, compared to walking with shoes alone. In addition, effects on various secondary outcome measures will be evaluated in order to identify possible working mechanisms and potential predictors of FRO treatment success. Method/Design A pre-post experimental study design will include 32 children with SCP, walking with excessive knee flexion in midstance, recruited from our university hospital and affiliated rehabilitation centres. All participants will receive a newly designed FRO, allowing ankle stiffness to be varied into three configurations by means of a hinge. Gait biomechanics will be assessed for each FRO configuration. The FRO that results in the greatest reduction in knee flexion during the single stance phase will be selected as the subject’s optimal FRO. Subsequently, the effects of wearing this optimal FRO will be evaluated after 12–20 weeks. The primary study parameter will be walking energy cost, with the most important secondary outcomes being intensity of participation, daily activity, walking speed and gait biomechanics. Discussion The AFO-CP trial will be the first experimental study to evaluate the effect of individually optimised FROs on mobility and participation. The evaluation will include outcome measures at all levels of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, providing a unique set of data with which to

  15. Selective lengthening of the psoas and rectus femoris and preservation of the iliacus for flexion deformity of the hip in cerebral palsy patients.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, T; Hara, H; Tada, S

    1987-01-01

    Between 1978 and 1983, 52 Japanese patients with cerebral palsy underwent operative correction of flexion deformity of the hip. The results of lengthening of the psoas, rectus femoris, and proximal hamstrings were satisfactory. The iliacus was left intact. Improvement in gait and activities of daily living was attained. Concentric reduction was obtained in 27 of 33 dislocated or subluxated hips. Sitting and perineal care were facilitated, and pain was alleviated. We conclude that preservation of the iliacus is important.

  16. Radiological and clinical effect of prosthesis design in varus knees?

    PubMed Central

    Isyar, Mehmet; Guler, Olcay; Cakmak, Selami; Kara, Adnan; Yalcin, Sercan; Mahirogullari, Mahir

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the study is to investigate the efficacy of the prosthesis design used in total knee arthroplasty in patients with varus malalignment. Methods After exclusion criteria we classified 90 patients underwent total knee arthroplasty according to prosthesis used into two groups: posterior cruciate ligament substituting and retaining. Mean follow up period was 25–98 months. We evaluated preoperative and postoperative radiological and as well as clinical parameters such as pain, knee function, flexion deformity. Results We found statistically significant difference in both groups in terms of deformity correction (p = 0.000). Conclusion Prosthesis design affects radiological outcomes in varus knees. PMID:26566321

  17. Reliability of Concentric, Eccentric and Isometric Knee Extension and Flexion when using the REV9000 Isokinetic Dynamometer.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho Froufe Andrade, Alberto César Pereira; Caserotti, Paolo; de Carvalho, Carlos Manuel Pereira; de Azevedo Abade, Eduardo André; da Eira Sampaio, António Jaime

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the reliability of isokinetic and ISO knee extensor and flexor muscle strength when using the REV9000 (Technogym) isokinetic dynamometer. Moreover, the reliability of several strength imbalance indices and bilateral ratios were also examined. Twenty-four physically active healthy subjects (age 23±3 years) underwent three testing sessions, two on the same day and a third, 7 days later. All sessions proceeded in the same order: five concentric contractions at 60ºs-1 followed by an isometric contraction (5 seconds) and five eccentric contractions (60ºs-1). The results of this study showed a high reproducibility in eccentric (0.95-0.97), concentric (0.95-0.96) and isometric (0.93-0.96), isokinetic strength for knee extensor and flexor muscles, thus indicating that the REV9000 isokinetic dynamometer can be used in future sports performance studies. A low-to-moderate reliability was found in the isokinetic strength bilateral ratios while the Hamstring:Quadricep concentric ratio showed moderate reliability. The highest reliability (>0.90) was observed in the dynamic control ratio (Hamstring eccentric:Quadricep concentric) which consequently confirms that it is a more valid indicator for imbalanced reciprocal parameters and can be used in rehabilitation and sports medicine.

  18. Arthroscopic knee debridement can delay total knee replacement in painful moderate haemophilic arthropathy of the knee in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E Carlos; Gomez-Cardero, Primitivo

    2016-09-01

    The role of arthroscopic debridement of the knee in haemophilia is controversial in the literature. The purpose of this study is to describe the results of arthroscopic knee debridement (AKD), with the aim of determining whether it is possible to delay total knee replacement (TKR) for painful moderate haemophilic arthropathy of the knee in adult patients. In a 14-year period (1998-2011), AKD was performed for moderate haemophilic arthropathy of the knee in 27 patients with haemophilia A. Their average age at operation was 28.6 years (range 26-39 years). Indications for surgery were as follows: more than 90° of knee flexion, flexion deformity less than 30°, good axial alignment of the knee, good patellar alignment, and pain above >60 points in a visual analogue scale [0 (no pain) to 100 points]. Secondary haematological prophylaxis and rehabilitation (physiotherapy) was given for at least 3 months after surgery. Follow-up was for an average of 7.5 years (range 2-14 years). We assessed the clinical outcome before surgery and at the time of latest follow-up using the Knee Society pain and function scores, the range of motion, and the radiological score of the World Federation of Haemophilia. Knee Society pain scores improved from 39 preoperatively to 66 postoperatively, and function scores improved from 36 to 52. Range of motion improved on an average from -15° of extension and 90° of flexion before surgery, to -5° of extension and 110° of flexion at the last follow-up. A radiological deterioration of 2.8 points on average was found. There were two (7.4%) postoperative complications (haemarthroses resolved by joint aspiration). One patient (3.7%) required a TKR 12.5 years later. AKD should be considered in painful moderate haemophilic arthropathy of the knee in adult patients to delay TKR.

  19. A Maximum Muscle Strength Prediction Formula Using Theoretical Grade 3 Muscle Strength Value in Daniels et al.'s Manual Muscle Test, in Consideration of Age: An Investigation of Hip and Knee Joint Flexion and Extension

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Masashi; Ichikawa, Kazuna; Takei, Hitoshi

    2017-01-01

    This study attempted to develop a formula for predicting maximum muscle strength value for young, middle-aged, and elderly adults using theoretical Grade 3 muscle strength value (moment fair: Mf)—the static muscular moment to support a limb segment against gravity—from the manual muscle test by Daniels et al. A total of 130 healthy Japanese individuals divided by age group performed isometric muscle contractions at maximum effort for various movements of hip joint flexion and extension and knee joint flexion and extension, and the accompanying resisting force was measured and maximum muscle strength value (moment max, Mm) was calculated. Body weight and limb segment length (thigh and lower leg length) were measured, and Mf was calculated using anthropometric measures and theoretical calculation. There was a linear correlation between Mf and Mm in each of the four movement types in all groups, excepting knee flexion in elderly. However, the formula for predicting maximum muscle strength was not sufficiently compatible in middle-aged and elderly adults, suggesting that the formula obtained in this study is applicable in young adults only. PMID:28133549

  20. A Maximum Muscle Strength Prediction Formula Using Theoretical Grade 3 Muscle Strength Value in Daniels et al.'s Manual Muscle Test, in Consideration of Age: An Investigation of Hip and Knee Joint Flexion and Extension.

    PubMed

    Usa, Hideyuki; Matsumura, Masashi; Ichikawa, Kazuna; Takei, Hitoshi

    2017-01-01

    This study attempted to develop a formula for predicting maximum muscle strength value for young, middle-aged, and elderly adults using theoretical Grade 3 muscle strength value (moment fair: Mf )-the static muscular moment to support a limb segment against gravity-from the manual muscle test by Daniels et al. A total of 130 healthy Japanese individuals divided by age group performed isometric muscle contractions at maximum effort for various movements of hip joint flexion and extension and knee joint flexion and extension, and the accompanying resisting force was measured and maximum muscle strength value (moment max, Mm ) was calculated. Body weight and limb segment length (thigh and lower leg length) were measured, and Mf was calculated using anthropometric measures and theoretical calculation. There was a linear correlation between Mf and Mm in each of the four movement types in all groups, excepting knee flexion in elderly. However, the formula for predicting maximum muscle strength was not sufficiently compatible in middle-aged and elderly adults, suggesting that the formula obtained in this study is applicable in young adults only.

  1. Kinematic evaluation of the finger's interphalangeal joints coupling mechanism--variability, flexion-extension differences, triggers, locking swanneck deformities, anthropometric correlations.

    PubMed

    Leijnse, J N A L; Quesada, P M; Spoor, C W

    2010-08-26

    The human finger contains tendon/ligament mechanisms essential for proper control. One mechanism couples the movements of the interphalangeal joints when the (unloaded) finger is flexed with active deep flexor. This study's aim was to accurately determine in a large finger sample the kinematics and variability of the coupled interphalangeal joint motions, for potential clinical and finger model validation applications. The data could also be applied to humanoid robotic hands. Sixty-eight fingers were measured in seventeen hands in nine subjects. Fingers exhibited great joint mobility variability, with passive proximal interphalangeal hyperextension ranging from zero to almost fifty degrees. Increased measurement accuracy was obtained by using marker frames to amplify finger segment motions. Gravitational forces on the marker frames were not found to invalidate measurements. The recorded interphalangeal joint trajectories were highly consistent, demonstrating the underlying coupling mechanism. The increased accuracy and large sample size allowed for evaluation of detailed trajectory variability, systematic differences between flexion and extension trajectories, and three trigger types, distinct from flexor tendon triggers, involving initial flexion deficits in either proximal or distal interphalangeal joint. The experimental methods, data and analysis should advance insight into normal and pathological finger biomechanics (e.g., swanneck deformities), and could help improve clinical differential diagnostics of trigger finger causes. The marker frame measuring method may be useful to quantify interphalangeal joints trajectories in surgical/rehabilitative outcome studies. The data as a whole provide the most comprehensive collection of interphalangeal joint trajectories for clinical reference and model validation known to us to date.

  2. Neglected surgically intervened bilateral congenital dislocation of knee in an adolescent

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Jaswant; Dhammi, Ish Kumar; Jain, Anil K

    2014-01-01

    Neglected bilateral congenital dislocation of knee is unusual. A 12 year old boy presented with inability to walk due to buckling of the knee. The symptoms were present since the child learnt walking. He preferred not to walk. Bilateral supracondylar femoral osteotomy was done at the age of 6 years. Patient had a fixed flexion deformity of both knees, 30° in the right (range of flexion from 30° to 45°) and 45° fixed flexion deformity in left knee respectively (range of flexion from 45° to 65°) when presented to us. The radiological examination revealed bilateral congenital dislocation of knee (CDK). No syndromic association was observed. He was planned for staged treatment. In stage I, the knee joints were distracted by Ilizarov ring fixators and this was followed by open reduction of both the knee joints in stage II. A bilateral supracondylar extension osteotomy was done 18 months after the previous surgery (stage III). The final followup visit at 4 years the patient presented with range of motion 5-100° and 5-80° on the right and left knee respectively with good functional outcome. The case is reported in view of lack of treatment guidelines for long standing neglected CDK in an adolescent child. PMID:24600070

  3. SEVERE VALGUS DEFORMITY OF THE KNEE: DESCRIPTION OF NEW SURGICAL TECHNIQUE FOR ITS CORRECTION

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Robson Rocha; Matos, Marcos Almeida; Pimentel, Maurício; Martins, Bruno Jacomeli; Oliveira, Rafael Valadares

    2015-01-01

    Varus supracondylar osteotomy of the femur is the established procedure for treating painful knees that present lateral arthrosis and valgus deformity. In descriptions of the conventional surgical techniques, there are divergences regarding the location, access route, correction level, fixation type and area for synthesis insertion. This is most evident in cases of severe valgus with angles greater than 30° and distal femoral deformation, in association with hypoplasia of the lateral condyle. The authors describe a new surgical technique for distal femoral osteotomy, based on anatomical and geometrical criteria, which was developed in their clinic for treating severe valgus cases, and they present one of the cases treated. In the new technique, the wedge to be surgically resected has an oblique direction and the format of an isosceles triangle. This new proposal thus seeks to resolve problems that have been presented in such cases, through enabling valgus correction without causing any new deformity of the distal femur. Good cortical bone contact is promoted, and application of a stable synthesis system is made easier. However, the age limits for such patients and the degree of knee arthrosis that might contraindicate this procedure remain unknown. Hence, a larger sample and longer follow-up for operated cases are required. PMID:27042630

  4. [Soft tissue balancing in total condylar knee arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Trepte, C T; Pfanzelt, K

    2003-01-01

    Soft tissue balancing and correct bone cuts are an entity in correcting malalignment in total knee arthroplasty, and cannot be considered isolated. Distinct bony deformations/deviations need enlarged soft tissue management. The extent of resection of the bone stock has to be planned exactly before the operation. Exact soft tissue balancing is necessary to stabilize the corrected knee. Soft tissue balancing has to be done primarily on the side of the contracture by lengthening of the shortened and contracted structures. After balancing the ligaments should have the same tension in extension and flexion together with the same height of the extension and flexion gap. Because of the classic resection of the tibial head, the femoral resection must follow the Insall-Line, that means 3 degrees to 5 degrees outer rotation in relation to the condyles. Only in this way a symmetric flexion gap can be achieved in combination with ligamentous stability in extension and flexion.

  5. Clinical Outcomes of Patients with Valgus Deformity Undergoing Minimally Invasive Total Knee Arthroplasty Through the Medial Approach

    PubMed Central

    Hamahashi, Kosuke; Mitani, Genya; Takagaki, Tomonori; Serigano, Kenji; Mochida, Joji; Sato, Masato; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes between patients with a valgus or varus deformity undergoing minimally invasive total knee arthroplasty through the medial approach. Methods: The patients were classified into 2 groups according to the preoperative femorotibial angle measured on an anteroposterior long leg roentgenogram. The valgus group comprised of 26 knees in 21 patients with a femorotibial angle <170° (163.5 ± 5.7), and the varus group comprised of 24 knees in 21 patients with a femorotibial angle >190° (195.9 ± 5.5). The following background variables were compared between the groups: age at the time of the operation, sex, causative disease, preoperative femoral mechanical–anatomical angle, and postoperative knee range of motion, Knee Society score, femorotibial angle, and implant position. Results: There were significant differences between the valgus and varus groups in the age (68.0 ± 6.9 vs 75.8 ± 6.2 years), percentage of males (23.8% vs 0%), percentage with rheumatoid arthritis (61.9% vs 4.8%), and preoperative femoral mechanical–anatomical angle (6.2 ± 1.0° vs 7.4 ± 2.1°). Clinical outcome variables of postoperative femorotibial angle (173.1 ± 3.9° vs 175.2 ± 1.6°) and α angle (96.6 ± 3.1° vs 95.0 ± 1.9°) also differed. Conclusion: It was assumed that over-valgus resection of the femur is a contributory factor to residual valgus alignment. However, knee range of motion and Knee Society score did not differ between the groups. We suggest that minimally invasive total knee arthroplasty through the medial approach is one of the treatment options for patients with valgus deformity. PMID:28144381

  6. Osteogenesis imperfecta: a case with hand deformities.

    PubMed

    Oz, Bengi; Olmez, Nese; Memis, Asuman

    2005-09-01

    In a 51-year-old woman with a history of fractures and dislocations after low intensity trauma in childhood, intensive blue sclera, short stature, and hearing loss, the diagnosis of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) was suspected. She was referred to our clinic with hand deformities and left knee pain and stiffness. She had difficulty in walking and reported a history of immobilization for 6 months because of knee pain. She had bilateral flexion contracture of the elbows which occurred following dislocations of the elbows in childhood. She had Z deformity of the first phalanges, reducible swan-neck deformity of the third finger of the left and the second finger of the right hand, flexion contracture of the proximal interphalangeal joint of the fifth finger of the left hand, and syndactyly of the third and fourth fingers of the right hand. Flexion contractures of both knees were observed. Pes planus and short toes were the deformities of the feet. Acute phase reactants of the patient were normal. She had no history of arthritis or morning stiffness. Bone mineral density evaluated by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) showed severe osteoporosis of the femur and lumbar vertebrae. She had radiographic evidence of healed fractures of the left fibula, the third metacarpal, and the fourth and fifth middle phalanges of the right hand. OI, affecting the type I collagen tissue of the sclera, skin, ligaments, and skeleton, presenting with ligament laxity resulting in subluxations and hand deformities may be misdiagnosed as hand deformities of rheumatoid arthritis.

  7. Guided growth with a noncannulated screw-plate system for angular deformity of the knee: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Joo; Oh, Chang-Wug; Song, Kwang-Soon; Kyung, Hee-Soo; Min, Woo-Kie; Park, Byung-Chul

    2012-07-01

    We assessed the result of guided growth for an angular knee deformity using a 3.5-mm noncannulated screw-plate system. Twenty-seven patients with angular deformities (10 distal femora, 13 proximal tibiae, and four both areas) underwent this procedure with the reconstruction plate and two noncannulated screws. Average age at the time of the procedure was 7.8 years and the average follow-up was 25.7 months. Except for one patient (two knees), 25 of 27 deformities showed a resolved outcome with a neutral alignment. The mechanical lateral distal femoral angle changed an average of 8.3° for 13 months and the medial proximal tibial angle changed an average of 7.7° for 11.8 months in the neutral state. The mean angle between the two screws was -2° in immediate postoperative radiographs and 23° in radiographs taken at the latest follow-up. Two patients showed a rebound outcome and one showed a failure of no correction. There was a superficial infection, but no mechanical failure of the screw and the plate was observed. The noncannulated screw-plate system may play a similar role of guided growth, to correct angular knee deformity, although a large series study with a long follow-up is required for a definitive conclusion.

  8. Three Point Extension Splint To Treat Flexion Contractures About Limb Synovial Hinge Joints.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    rehabilitating flexion contractures caused by soft tissue injury. More particularly, the invention relates to a three point extension splint to treat flexion contractures about the knee, elbow and/or finger.

  9. Deformity correction of knee and leg lengthening by Ilizarov method in hypophosphatemic rickets: outcomes and significance of serum phosphate level.

    PubMed

    Choi, In Ho; Kim, Jae Kwang; Chung, Chin Youb; Cho, Tae-Joon; Lee, Seok Hyun; Suh, Seong Woo; Whang, Kuhn Sung; Park, Hui Wan; Song, Kwang Soon

    2002-01-01

    The authors evaluated 14 patients with hypophosphatemic rickets who underwent correction of a knee deformity along with a leg lengthening by the Ilizarov method. Deformity correction alone was performed in 8 femora and 4 tibiae-fibulae, and concomitant deformity correction and limb lengthening (>1.0 cm) in 9 femora and 19 tibiae-fibulae. The healing index correlated with the biochemical parameters. Knee deformities were satisfactorily corrected in all patients except one. There was a statistically significant negative correlation between the healing index and the serum phosphate level: those who had a serum phosphate level higher than 2.5 mg/dL showed a relatively rapid regenerate bone healing compared with those with less than 2.5 mg/dL. The authors conclude that a serum phosphate level of 2.5 mg/dL as a cut-off point should be considered in deciding whether deformity correction alone or with a concomitant leg lengthening should be undertaken.

  10. Validation of a novel smartphone accelerometer-based knee goniometer.

    PubMed

    Ockendon, Matthew; Gilbert, Robin E

    2012-09-01

    Loss of full knee extension following anterior cruciate ligament surgery has been shown to impair knee function. However, there can be significant difficulties in accurately and reproducibly measuring a fixed flexion of the knee. We studied the interobserver and the intraobserver reliabilities of a novel, smartphone accelerometer-based, knee goniometer and compared it with a long-armed conventional goniometer for the assessment of fixed flexion knee deformity. Five healthy male volunteers (age range 30 to 40 years) were studied. Measurements of knee flexion angle were made with a telescopic-armed goniometer (Lafayette Instrument, Lafayette, IN) and compared with measurements using the smartphone (iPhone 3GS, Apple Inc., Cupertino, CA) knee goniometer using a novel trigonometric technique based on tibial inclination. Bland-Altman analysis of validity and reliability including statistical analysis of correlation by Pearson's method was undertaken. The iPhone goniometer had an interobserver correlation (r) of 0.994 compared with 0.952 for the Lafayette. The intraobserver correlation was r = 0.982 for the iPhone (compared with 0.927). The datasets from the two instruments correlate closely (r = 0.947) are proportional and have mean difference of only -0.4 degrees (SD 3.86 degrees). The Lafayette goniometer had an intraobserver reliability +/- 9.6 degrees. The interobserver reliability was +/- 8.4 degrees. By comparison the iPhone had an interobserver reliability +/- 2.7 degrees and an intraobserver reliability +/- 4.6 degrees. We found the iPhone goniometer to be a reliable tool for the measurement of subtle knee flexion in the clinic setting.

  11. Lengthening and deformity correction about the knee using a magnetic internal lengthening nail

    PubMed Central

    Fragomen, Austin T.; Rozbruch, S. Robert

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The introduction of the internal lengthening nail (ILN) has changed the treatment of complex malalignment and shortening about the knee. Acute correction of the deformity and gradual lengthening through this osteotomy site has greatly simplified postoperative recovery. This manuscript is a review of the techniques that are currently being used in surgery. Methods: The article is broken into two sections: distal femur osteotomy and tibia osteotomy. Each is addressed separately since they have different personalities. Also included are topics of particular interest that surface in ongoing conferences regarding the ILN. This work is a mix of expert opinion and best practice supported by peer reviewed publications on the topic. Results: Most published series demonstrate excellent results with the ILN. Certain precautions are reiterated including avoiding mechanical failure, need for a percutaneous osteotomy, need for over-reaming, and the need for blocking screws. Discussion: Current controversies will be brought to light and discussed. The reader should find this aspect particularly helpful in navigating this rapidly evolving field. PMID:28322717

  12. Custom Knee Device for Knee Contractures After Internal Femoral Lengthening.

    PubMed

    Bhave, Anil; Shabtai, Lior; Ong, Peck-Hoon; Standard, Shawn C; Paley, Dror; Herzenberg, John E

    2015-07-01

    The development of knee flexion contractures is among the most common problems and complications associated with lengthening the femur with an internal device or external fixator. Conservative treatment strategies include physical therapy, serial casting, and low-load prolonged stretching with commercially available splinting systems. The authors developed an individually molded, low-cost custom knee device with polyester synthetic conformable casting material to treat knee flexion contractures. The goal of this study was to evaluate the results of treatment with a custom knee device and specialized physical therapy in patients who had knee flexion contracture during femoral lengthening with an intramedullary lengthening femoral nail. This retrospective study included 23 patients (27 limbs) who underwent femoral lengthening with an internal device for the treatment of limb length discrepancy. All patients had a knee flexion contracture raging from 10° to 90° during the lengthening process and were treated with a custom knee device and specialized physical therapy. The average flexion contracture before treatment was 36°. The mean amount of lengthening was 5.4 cm. After an average of 3.8 weeks of use of the custom knee device, only 2 of 27 limbs (7.5%) had not achieved complete resolution of the flexion contracture. The average final extension was 1.4°. Only 7 of 27 limbs (26%) required additional soft tissue release. The custom knee device is an inexpensive and effective method for treating knee flexion contracture after lengthening with an internal device.

  13. Patterns of knee osteoarthritis in Arabian and American knees.

    PubMed

    Hodge, W Andrew; Harman, Melinda K; Banks, Scott A

    2009-04-01

    This study illustrates differences in the cartilage degeneration in osteoarthritic knees in patients with more frequent hyperflexion activities of daily living compared with Western patients. Proximal tibial articular cartilage wear and cruciate ligament condition were assessed in Saudi Arabian and North American patients with varus osteoarthritis undergoing total knee arthroplasty. In anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) intact knees, there were significant differences in wear location, with a clearly more anterior pattern in Saudi Arabian knees. Complete ACL deficiency occurred in 25% of North American knees but only 14% of Saudi Arabian knees. These ACL-deficient knees showed the most severe cartilage wear in both groups and posterior medial wear patterns. Biomechanical descriptions of knee flexion and axial rotation during kneeling or squatting are consistent with the more pronounced anteromedial and posterolateral cartilage wear patterns observed on the Saudi Arabian knees. These observations provide insight into altered knee mechanics in 2 culturally different populations with different demands on knee flexion.

  14. Assessment of Knee Cartilage Stress Distribution and Deformation Using Motion Capture System and Wearable Sensors for Force Ratio Detection.

    PubMed

    Mijailovic, N; Vulovic, R; Milankovic, I; Radakovic, R; Filipovic, N; Peulic, A

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge about the knee cartilage deformation ratio as well as the knee cartilage stress distribution is of particular importance in clinical studies due to the fact that these represent some of the basic indicators of cartilage state and that they also provide information about joint cartilage wear so medical doctors can predict when it is necessary to perform surgery on a patient. In this research, we apply various kinds of sensors such as a system of infrared cameras and reflective markers, three-axis accelerometer, and force plate. The fluorescent marker and accelerometers are placed on the patient's hip, knee, and ankle, respectively. During a normal walk we are recording the space position of markers, acceleration, and ground reaction force by force plate. Measured data are included in the biomechanical model of the knee joint. Geometry for this model is defined from CT images. This model includes the impact of ground reaction forces, contact force between femur and tibia, patient body weight, ligaments, and muscle forces. The boundary conditions are created for the finite element method in order to noninvasively determine the cartilage stress distribution.

  15. Deformation of articular cartilage during static loading of a knee joint--experimental and finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Halonen, K S; Mononen, M E; Jurvelin, J S; Töyräs, J; Salo, J; Korhonen, R K

    2014-07-18

    Novel conical beam CT-scanners offer high resolution imaging of knee structures with i.a. contrast media, even under weight bearing. With this new technology, we aimed to determine cartilage strains and meniscal movement in a human knee at 0, 1, 5, and 30 min of standing and compare them to the subject-specific 3D finite element (FE) model. The FE model of the volunteer׳s knee, based on the geometry obtained from magnetic resonance images, was created to simulate the creep. The effects of collagen fibril network stiffness, nonfibrillar matrix modulus, permeability and fluid flow boundary conditions on the creep response in cartilage were investigated. In the experiment, 80% of the maximum strain in cartilage developed immediately, after which the cartilage continued to deform slowly until the 30 min time point. Cartilage strains and meniscus movement obtained from the FE model matched adequately with the experimentally measured values. Reducing the fibril network stiffness increased the mean strains substantially, while the creep rate was primarily influenced by an increase in the nonfibrillar matrix modulus. Changing the initial permeability and preventing fluid flow through noncontacting surfaces had a negligible effect on cartilage strains. The present results improve understanding of the mechanisms controlling articular cartilage strains and meniscal movements in a knee joint under physiological static loading. Ultimately a validated model could be used as a noninvasive diagnostic tool to locate cartilage areas at risk for degeneration.

  16. Non-invasive quantification of lower limb mechanical alignment in flexion

    PubMed Central

    Deakin, Angela; Fogg, Quentin A.; Picard, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    (coefficient ≤2°) was observed until 40° flexion; however, beyond 50° flexion, the repeatability coefficient was >3°. As was the case with precision, agreement between the invasive and non-invasive systems was satisfactory in extension and worsened with flexion. Mean limits of agreement between the invasive and non-invasive system using fabric strapping to assess MFTA were 3° (range: 2.3–3.8°) with no stress applied and 3.9° (range: 2.8–5.2°) with varus and valgus stress. Using rubber strapping, the corresponding values were 4.4° (range: 2.8–8.5°) with no stress applied, 5.5° (range: 3.3–9.0°) with varus stress, and 5.6° (range: 3.3–11.9°) with valgus stress. Discussion Acceptable precision and accuracy may be possible when measuring knee kinematics in early flexion using a non-invasive system; however, we do not believe passive trackers should be mounted with rubber strapping such as was used in this study. Flexing the knee appears to decrease the precision and accuracy of the system. The functions of this new software using image-free navigation technology have many potential clinical applications, including assessment of bony and soft tissue deformity, pre-operative planning, and post-operative evaluation, as well as in further pure research comparing kinematics of the normal and pathological knee. PMID:24856249

  17. A subdivision-based parametric deformable model for surface extraction and statistical shape modeling of the knee cartilages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fripp, Jurgen; Crozier, Stuart; Warfield, Simon K.; Ourselin, Sébastien

    2006-03-01

    Subdivision surfaces and parameterization are desirable for many algorithms that are commonly used in Medical Image Analysis. However, extracting an accurate surface and parameterization can be difficult for many anatomical objects of interest, due to noisy segmentations and the inherent variability of the object. The thin cartilages of the knee are an example of this, especially after damage is incurred from injuries or conditions like osteoarthritis. As a result, the cartilages can have different topologies or exist in multiple pieces. In this paper we present a topology preserving (genus 0) subdivision-based parametric deformable model that is used to extract the surfaces of the patella and tibial cartilages in the knee. These surfaces have minimal thickness in areas without cartilage. The algorithm inherently incorporates several desirable properties, including: shape based interpolation, sub-division remeshing and parameterization. To illustrate the usefulness of this approach, the surfaces and parameterizations of the patella cartilage are used to generate a 3D statistical shape model.

  18. Comparison of crossed pins and external fixation for correction of angular deformities about the knee in children.

    PubMed

    Davis, C A; Maranji, K; Frederick, N; Dorey, F; Moseley, C F

    1998-01-01

    External fixation was compared to crossed Steinman pins and plaster for fixation after osteotomy about the knee in children. A group of 26 patients treated by external fixation was compared to a control group of 26 patients fixed with crossed Steinman pins and casting. The groups were matched for age, height, and weight. Overall there was a 100% union rate. Preoperative deformity and postoperative correction were similar in the two groups. The time to union was significantly longer, and there were significantly more complications in the external fixator group. There were 16 complications (62%) in the external fixator group and five (19%) in the control group. Complications included pin tract infections, peroneal nerve palsy, and delayed union. External fixation provides certain advantages for fixation after osteotomies about the knee in children but is associated with a variety of complications.

  19. Correction of coronal plane deformities around the knee using a tension band plate in children younger than 10 years

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Ruta M; Ilyas Rushnaiwala, Faizaan M; Kulkarni, GS; Negandhi, Rajiv; Kulkarni, Milind G; Kulkarni, Sunil G

    2015-01-01

    Background: Guided growth through temporary hemiepiphysiodesis has gained acceptance as the preferred primary treatment in treating pediatric lower limb deformities as it is minimally invasive with a lesser morbidity than the traditional osteotomy. The tension band plate is the most recent development in implants used for temporary hemiepiphysiodesis. Our aim was to determine its safety and efficacy in correcting coronal plane deformities around the knee in children younger than 10 years. Materials and Methods: A total of 24 children under the age of 10 were operated for coronal plane deformities around the knee with a single extra periosteal tension band plate and two nonlocking screws. All the children had a pathological deformity for which a detailed preoperative work-up was carried out to ascertain the cause of the deformity and rule out physiological ones. The average age at hemiepiphysiodesis was 5 years 3 months (range: 2 years to 9 years 1 month). Results: The plates were inserted for an average of 15.625 months (range: 7 months to 29 months). All the patients showed improvement in the mechanical axis. Two patients showed partial correction. Two cases of screw loosening were observed. In the genu valgum group, the tibiofemoral angle improved from a preoperative mean of 19.89° valgus (range: 10° valgus to 40° valgus) to 5.72° valgus (range: 2° varus to 10° valgus). In patients with genu varum the tibiofemoral angle improved from a mean of 28.27° varus (range: 13° varus to 41° varus) to 1.59° valgus (range: 0-8° valgus). Conclusion: Temporary hemiepiphysiodesis through the application of the tension band plate is an effective method to correct coronal plane deformities around the knee with minimal complications. Its ease and accuracy of insertion has extended the indication of temporary hemiepiphysiodesis to patients younger than 10 years and across a wide variety of diagnosis including pathological physis, which were traditionally out of the

  20. Preliminary analysis of knee stress in Full Extension Landing

    PubMed Central

    Makinejad, Majid Davoodi; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan; Wan Abas, Wan Abu Bakar; Bayat, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study provides an experimental and finite element analysis of knee-joint structure during extended-knee landing based on the extracted impact force, and it numerically identifies the contact pressure, stress distribution and possibility of bone-to-bone contact when a subject lands from a safe height. METHODS: The impact time and loads were measured via inverse dynamic analysis of free landing without knee flexion from three different heights (25, 50 and 75 cm), using five subjects with an average body mass index of 18.8. Three-dimensional data were developed from computed tomography scans and were reprocessed with modeling software before being imported and analyzed by finite element analysis software. The whole leg was considered to be a fixed middle-hinged structure, while impact loads were applied to the femur in an upward direction. RESULTS: Straight landing exerted an enormous amount of pressure on the knee joint as a result of the body's inability to utilize the lower extremity muscles, thereby maximizing the threat of injury when the load exceeds the height-safety threshold. CONCLUSIONS: The researchers conclude that extended-knee landing results in serious deformation of the meniscus and cartilage and increases the risk of bone-to-bone contact and serious knee injury when the load exceeds the threshold safety height. This risk is considerably greater than the risk of injury associated with walking downhill or flexion landing activities. PMID:24141832

  1. Instability following total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E Carlos

    2011-10-01

    Background Knee prosthesis instability (KPI) is a frequent cause of failure of total knee arthroplasty. Moreover, the degree of constraint required to achieve immediate and long-term stability in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is frequently debated. Questions This review aims to define the problem, analyze risk factors, and review strategies for prevention and treatment of KPI. Methods A PubMed (MEDLINE) search of the years 2000 to 2010 was performed using two key words: TKA and instability. One hundred and sixty-five initial articles were identified. The most important (17) articles as judged by the author were selected for this review. The main criteria for selection were that the articles addressed and provided solutions to the diagnosis and treatment of KPI. Results Patient-related risk factors predisposing to post-operative instability include deformity requiring a large surgical correction and aggressive ligament release, general or regional neuromuscular pathology, and hip or foot deformities. KPI can be prevented in most cases with appropriate selection of implants and good surgical technique. When ligament instability is anticipated post-operatively, the need for implants with a greater degree of constraint should be anticipated. In patients without significant varus or valgus malalignment and without significant flexion contracture, the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) can be retained. However, the PCL should be sacrificed when deformity exists particularly in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, previous patellectomy, previous high tibial osteotomy or distal femoral osteotomy, and posttraumatic osteoarthritis with disruption of the PCL. In most cases, KPI requires revision surgery. Successful outcomes can only be obtained if the cause of KPI is identified and addressed. Conclusions Instability following TKA is a common cause of the need for revision. Typically, knees with deformity, rheumatoid arthritis, previous patellectomy or high tibial osteotomy, and

  2. Alterations in walking knee joint stiffness in individuals with knee osteoarthritis and self-reported knee instability.

    PubMed

    Gustafson, Jonathan A; Gorman, Shannon; Fitzgerald, G Kelley; Farrokhi, Shawn

    2016-01-01

    Increased walking knee joint stiffness has been reported in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) as a compensatory strategy to improve knee joint stability. However, presence of episodic self-reported knee instability in a large subgroup of patients with knee OA may be a sign of inadequate walking knee joint stiffness. The objective of this work was to evaluate the differences in walking knee joint stiffness in patients with knee OA with and without self-reported instability and examine the relationship between walking knee joint stiffness with quadriceps strength, knee joint laxity, and varus knee malalignment. Overground biomechanical data at a self-selected gait velocity was collected for 35 individuals with knee OA without self-reported instability (stable group) and 17 individuals with knee OA and episodic self-reported instability (unstable group). Knee joint stiffness was calculated during the weight-acceptance phase of gait as the change in the external knee joint moment divided by the change in the knee flexion angle. The unstable group walked with lower knee joint stiffness (p=0.01), mainly due to smaller heel-contact knee flexion angles (p<0.01) and greater knee flexion excursions (p<0.01) compared to their knee stable counterparts. No significant relationships were observed between walking knee joint stiffness and quadriceps strength, knee joint laxity or varus knee malalignment. Reduced walking knee joint stiffness appears to be associated with episodic knee instability and independent of quadriceps muscle weakness, knee joint laxity or varus malalignment. Further investigations of the temporal relationship between self-reported knee joint instability and walking knee joint stiffness are warranted.

  3. Postural deformities in congenital nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, G; Postlethwaite, R J; Lendon, M; Houston, I B; Savage, J M

    1981-01-01

    Six successive cases of congenital nephrotic syndrome are described. Each one showed flexion deformities of the knees and hips, widely open anterior and posterior fontanelles, and wide separation of the skull sutures. These abnormalities were present not only in cases in which the renal histology was of the microcystic Finnish type of congenital nephrotic syndrome, but also in those in which the histological picture was one of the variants associated with congenital nephrotic syndrome. It is suggested that such abnormalities are postural deformities, possibly produced by the large placenta. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7332344

  4. Determining the Best Treatment for Coronal Angular Deformity of the Knee Joint in Growing Children: A Decision Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Ki Hyuk; Chung, Chin Youb; Lee, Kyoung Min; Lee, Seung Yeol; Choi, In Ho; Cho, Tae-Joon; Yoo, Won Joon; Park, Moon Seok

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the best treatment modality for coronal angular deformity of the knee joint in growing children using decision analysis. A decision tree was created to evaluate 3 treatment modalities for coronal angular deformity in growing children: temporary hemiepiphysiodesis using staples, percutaneous screws, or a tension band plate. A decision analysis model was constructed containing the final outcome score, probability of metal failure, and incomplete correction of deformity. The final outcome was defined as health-related quality of life and was used as a utility in the decision tree. The probabilities associated with each case were obtained by literature review, and health-related quality of life was evaluated by a questionnaire completed by 25 pediatric orthopedic experts. Our decision analysis model favored temporary hemiepiphysiodesis using a tension band plate over temporary hemiepiphysiodesis using percutaneous screws or stapling, with utilities of 0.969, 0.957, and 0.962, respectively. One-way sensitivity analysis showed that hemiepiphysiodesis using a tension band plate was better than temporary hemiepiphysiodesis using percutaneous screws, when the overall complication rate of hemiepiphysiodesis using a tension band plate was lower than 15.7%. Two-way sensitivity analysis showed that hemiepiphysiodesis using a tension band plate was more beneficial than temporary hemiepiphysiodesis using percutaneous screws. PMID:25276801

  5. Importance of the different posterolateral knee static stabilizers: biomechanical study

    PubMed Central

    Lasmar, Rodrigo Campos Pace; Marques de Almeida, Adriano; Serbino, José Wilson; da Mota Albuquerque, Roberto Freire; Hernandez, Arnaldo José

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relative importance of the different static stabilizers of the posterolateral corner of the knee in cadavers. METHODS Tests were performed with the application of a varus and external rotation force to the knee in extension at 30 and 60 degrees of flexion using 10 cadaver knees. The forces were applied initially to an intact knee and then repeated after a selective sectioning of the ligaments into the following: section of the lateral collateral ligament; section of the lateral collateral ligament and the popliteofibular complex; and section of the lateral collateral ligament, the popliteofibular complex and the posterolateral capsule. The parameters studied were the angular deformity and stiffness when the knees were submitted to a 15 Newton-meter varus torque and a 6 Newton-meter external tibial torque. Statistical analysis was performed using the ANOVA (Analysis of Variance) and Tukey’s tests. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION Our findings showed that the lateral collateral ligament was important in varus stability at 0, 30 and 60 degrees. The popliteofibular complex was the most important structure for external rotation stability at all angles of flexion and was also important for varus stability at 30 and 60 degrees. The posterolateral capsule was important for varus stability at 0 and 30 degrees and for external rotation stability in extension. Level of evidence: Level IV (cadaver study). PMID:20454502

  6. Correction of static axial alignment in children with knee varus or valgus deformities through guided growth: Does it also correct dynamic frontal plane moments during walking?

    PubMed

    Böhm, Harald; Stief, Felix; Sander, Klaus; Hösl, Matthias; Döderlein, Leonhard

    2015-09-01

    Malaligned knees are predisposed to the development and progression of unicompartmental degenerations because of the excessive load placed on one side of the knee. Therefore, guided growth in skeletally immature patients is recommended. Indication for correction of varus/valgus deformities are based on static weight bearing radiographs. However, the dynamic knee abduction moment during walking showed only a weak correlation to malalignment determined by static radiographs. Therefore, the aim of the study was to measure the effects of guided growth on the normalization of frontal plane knee joint moments during walking. 15 legs of 8 patients (11-15 years) with idiopathic axial varus or valgus malalignment were analyzed. 16 typically developed peers served as controls. Instrumented gait analysis and clinical assessment were performed the day before implantation and explantation of eight-plates. Correlation between static mechanical tibiofemoral axis angle (MAA) and dynamic frontal plane knee joint moments and their change by guided growth were performed. The changes in dynamic knee moment in the frontal plane following guided growth showed high and significant correlation to the changes in static MAA (R=0.97, p<0.001). Contrary to the correlation of the changes, there was no correlation between static and dynamic measures in both sessions. In consequence two patients that had a natural knee moment before treatment showed a more pathological one after treatment. In conclusion, the changes in the dynamic load situation during walking can be predicted from the changes in static alignment. If pre-surgical gait analysis reveals a natural load situation, despite a static varus or valgus deformity, the intervention must be critically discussed.

  7. Immediate effect of Masai Barefoot Technology shoes on knee joint moments in women with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Tateuchi, Hiroshige; Taniguchi, Masashi; Takagi, Yui; Goto, Yusuke; Otsuka, Naoki; Koyama, Yumiko; Kobayashi, Masashi; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2014-01-01

    Footwear modification can beneficially alter knee loading in patients with knee osteoarthritis. This study evaluated the effect of Masai Barefoot Technology shoes on reductions in external knee moments in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Three-dimensional motion analysis was used to examine the effect of Masai Barefoot Technology versus control shoes on the knee adduction and flexion moments in 17 women (mean age, 63.6 years) with radiographically confirmed knee osteoarthritis. The lateral and anterior trunk lean values, knee flexion and adduction angles, and ground reaction force were also evaluated. The influence of the original walking pattern on the changes in knee moments with Masai Barefoot Technology shoes was evaluated. The knee flexion moment in early stance was significantly reduced while walking with the Masai Barefoot Technology shoes (0.25±0.14Nm/kgm) as compared with walking with control shoes (0.30±0.19 Nm/kgm); whereas the knee adduction moment showed no changes. Masai Barefoot Technology shoes did not increase compensatory lateral and anterior trunk lean. The degree of knee flexion moment in the original walking pattern with control shoes was correlated directly with its reduction when wearing Masai Barefoot Technology shoes by multiple linear regression analysis (adjusted R2=0.44, P<0.01). Masai Barefoot Technology shoes reduced the knee flexion moment during walking without increasing the compensatory trunk lean and may therefore reduce external knee loading in women with knee osteoarthritis.

  8. The medial gastrocnemius muscle attenuates force fluctuations during plantar flexion.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Minoru; Yoshitake, Yasuhide; Kouzaki, Motoki; Fukunaga, Tetsuo

    2006-02-01

    Force fluctuations during steady contractions of multiple agonist muscles may be influenced by the relative contribution of force by each muscle. The purpose of the study was to compare force fluctuations during steady contractions performed with the plantar flexor muscles in different knee positions. Nine men (25.8+/-5.1 years) performed steady contractions of the plantar flexor muscles in the knee-flexed and knee-extended (greater involvement of the gastrocnemii muscles) positions. The maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force was 32% greater in the knee-extended position compared with the knee-flexed position. The target forces were 2.5-10% MVC force in the respective position. The amplitude of electromyogram in the medial gastrocnemius muscle was greater in the knee-extended position (10.50+/-9.80%) compared with the knee-flexed position (1.26+/-1.15%, P<0.01). The amplitude of electromyogram in the soleus muscle was not influenced by the knee position. The amplitude of electromyogram in the lateral gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior muscles was marginal and unaltered with knee position. At the same force (in Newtons), the standard deviation of force was lower in the knee-extended position compared with the knee-flexed position. These results indicate that force fluctuations during plantar flexion are attenuated with greater involvement of the medial gastrocnemius muscle.

  9. Arthrofibrosis after TKA - Influence factors on the absolute flexion and gain in flexion after manipulation under anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Stiffness with decreased range of motion (ROM) has been described as a frustrating complication after TKA. If all methods of physiotherapeutic treatment have been exhausted trying to develop ROM, manipulation under anaesthesia (MUA) can be discussed. The aim of the present study was to show the effect of MUA and to determine the influence of BMI, number of previous surgical procedures, pre-MUA ROM and timing of MUA for the results after MUA in regard to absolute flexion and gain in flexion. Methods 858 patients underwent TKA at our institution between 2004 and 2009. 39 of these patients underwent MUA because of postoperative knee stiffness. The data were retrospective analysed for the influence of BMI, pre-MUA flexion (/≤ 30 days after TKA) and number of previous surgery on the results after MUA (absolute Flexion/gain in flexion). Results The prevalence for stiffness after TKA was 4.54%. There was a statistically significant improvement in flexion not only directly after MUA but also 6 weeks after MUA. Patients with two or more previous operations before TKA showed statistically significant worse results six weeks after MUA in absolute flexion and gain in flexion (p = 0.039) than patients with one or two previous operations. No statistical significance in absolute flexion (p = 0.655) and gain in flexion (p = 0.328) after MUA between "early" and "late" was detected. The stiffer knees with a flexion below 70° showed significantly worse results (p = 0.044) in absolute flexion six weeks after MUA, but they also had statistical statistically better results with regard to gain in flexion (p ≤ 0.001). Conclusion MUA is a good instrument for improving ROM after TKA. The time between TKA and MUA seems less important, so different types of physiotherapeutic treatment could be tried before the procedure is started. MUA in patients with many previous operations and a flexion of less than 70° before MUA is not as effective as in

  10. Can an anterior quadriceps release improve range of motion in the stiff arthritic knee?

    PubMed

    Tarabichi, Samih; Tarabichi, Yasir

    2010-06-01

    We hypothesize that tethering adhesions of the quadriceps muscle are the major pathological structures responsible for a limited range of motion in the stiff arthritic knee. Forty-two modified quadriceps muscle releases were performed on 24 patients with advanced osteoarthritis scheduled for total knee arthroplasty. The ranges of motion were documented intraoperatively both before and immediately after the release. Passive flexion improved significantly in all patients (mean, 32.4 degrees of improvement, P < .001) following a modified quadriceps release, despite any presence of osteophytes or severe deformities. These results strongly implicate adhesions of the quadriceps muscle to the underlying femur, which prevent the distal excursion of the quadriceps tendon, as the restrictive pathology preventing deep flexion in patients with osteoarthritis.

  11. Gap balancing in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bottros, John; Gad, Bishoy; Krebs, Viktor; Barsoum, Wael K

    2006-06-01

    It is well known that the success of total knee arthroplasty is collectively dependent on the proper recreation of the joint line, appropriate soft tissue balancing, and respectful management of the extensor mechanism. One of the most decisive factors within the surgeon's control is the reestablishment of proper knee kinematics through both medial-lateral and flexion-extension ligamentous balancing. This can be accomplished only by a comprehensive intraoperative evaluation in full flexion, mid flexion, and full extension to minimize potential gap mismatches. Most of the discussion will focus on this aspect of soft tissue balancing, but this does not undermine the importance of the other aforementioned principles of successful knee arthroplasty.

  12. Intraoperative passive kinematics of osteoarthritic knees before and after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Siston, Robert A; Giori, Nicholas J; Goodman, Stuart B; Delp, Scott L

    2006-08-01

    Total knee arthroplasty is a successful procedure to treat pain and functional disability due to osteoarthritis. However, precisely how a total knee arthroplasty changes the kinematics of an osteoarthritic knee is unknown. We used a surgical navigation system to measure normal passive kinematics from 7 embalmed cadaver lower extremities and in vivo intraoperative passive kinematics on 17 patients undergoing primary total knee arthroplasty to address two questions: How do the kinematics of knees with advanced osteoarthritis differ from normal knees?; and, Does posterior substituting total knee arthroplasty restore kinematics towards normal? Osteoarthritic knees displayed a decreased screw-home motion and abnormal varus/valgus rotations between 10 degrees and 90 degrees of knee flexion when compared to normal knees. The anterior-posterior motion of the femur in osteoarthritic knees was not different than in normal knees. Following total knee arthroplasty, we found abnormal varus/valgus rotations in early flexion, a reduced screw-home motion when compared to the osteoarthritic knees, and an abnormal anterior translation of the femur during the first 60 degrees of flexion. Posterior substituting total knee arthroplasty does not appear to restore normal passive varus/valgus rotations or the screw motion and introduces an abnormal anterior translation of the femur during intraoperative evaluation.

  13. In vivo knee kinematics in patients with bilateral total knee arthroplasty of 2 designs.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Nobukazu; Breslauer, Leigh; Hedley, Anthony K; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Banks, Scott A

    2011-09-01

    Many younger and highly active patients desire to achieve high flexion after total knee arthroplasty. This study's purpose was to determine if a contemporary total knee arthroplasty design improved functional knee flexion compared with a traditional total knee arthroplasty in patients living a Western lifestyle. Ten patients with bilateral total knee arthroplasty of 2 types were studied during weight-bearing lunge, kneeling, and stair activities using fluoroscopic imaging. There were no differences in maximum knee flexion during lunging or kneeling. Statistically significant differences in tibial rotation and condylar translation were observed during the 3 activities. Although several joint kinematic differences were observed, no important functional differences were observed in clinically excellent, high performing subjects with bilateral total knee arthroplasty of 2 types.

  14. Nonuniform Weakness in the Paretic Knee and Compensatory Strength Gains in the Nonparetic Knee Occurs after Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lomaglio, Melanie J.; Eng, Janice J.

    2015-01-01

    Background This study was designed to quantify torque production at different joint angles in the paretic and non-paretic knee joints of individuals with stroke. Methods Extension and flexion torques were measured at 6 angles of the knee joint and normalized to peak torque in 19 subjects with stroke and 19 controls. Results Paretic knee extension torque was lower than controls when the knee was positioned near extension. In contrast, nonparetic knee extension and flexion torques were higher than controls when the knee was positioned near full flexion. Conclusions The paretic knee extensors demonstrated exaggerated weakness at short muscle lengths and the nonparetic knee extensors and flexors demonstrated selective strength gains. Clinicians should therefore consider paretic knee extensor strengthening near full extension and promote symmetrical use of the legs to prevent compensatory overuse of the non-paretic leg. PMID:18946213

  15. Knee joint kinematics, fixation and function related to joint area design in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Uvehammer, J

    2001-02-01

    The aim was to study the influence of different designs of the joint area on tibial component fixation, kinematics and clinical outcome after a cemented total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The HSS score and a special questionnaire were used at the clinical examination. Conventional radiography was done to record the positioning of the implants and development of radiolucencies. The migration and inducible displacement were evaluated using radiostereometry (RSA). The kinematics of the knee during active extension was studied using dynamic RSA. In randomised and prospective studies 87 knees in 83 patients (28 male, 55 female, age 69, range 50-83) received an AMK (DePuy, Johnson & Johnson) TKA. The patients were divided into two groups. In group 1 the patients had varus/valgus deformities of < or = 5 degrees and the PCL was retained. The PCL was resected in group 2 where the patients had deformities exceeding 5 degrees and/or fixed flexion deformities of more than 10 degrees. In group 1 a flat (F, n = 20) or a concave (C, n = 20) design was implanted (study 3). In group 2 (study 4) the patients received a concave (n = 25) or a posterior-stabilised (PS, n = 22) tibial plateau. The migration of the tibial component, positioning of the prosthesis, development of radiolucencies and the clinical outcome was evaluated after 1 and 2 years. Twenty-two patients (11 F, 11 C) in group 1 (study 1) and 22 knees in 20 patients in group 2 (study 2, 11 C, 11 PS) were examined 1 year post-operatively to evaluate the kinematics of the knee. Eleven normals served as controls. During active extension of the knee the inducible displacements of the tibial component were recorded in 16 knees (15 patients). Based on successful RSA examinations 5 knees (4 F, 1 C) from group 1 and 11 knees (5 C, 6 PS) from group 2 were selected (study 5). Abnormal kinematics and especially increased AP translations compared to normals (p < 0.0005) were recorded in all designs. The concave design showed the widest

  16. Evolution of knee kinematics three months after total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Alice, Bonnefoy-Mazure; Stéphane, Armand; Yoshisama, Sagawa Junior; Pierre, Hoffmeyer; Domizio, Suvà; Hermes, Miozzari; Katia, Turcot

    2015-02-01

    In patients with debilitating knee osteoarthritis, total knee replacement is the most common surgical procedure. Numerous studies have demonstrated that knee kinematics one year after total knee replacement are still altered compared to the healthy joint. However, little is known regarding impairments and functional limitations of patients several months after total knee replacement. The aim of this study was to describe the evolution of the knee gait kinematic in patients with knee osteoarthritis before and three months after a total knee replacement. Ninety patients who were to undergo total knee replacement were included in this study. Twenty-three subjects were recruited as the control group. Three-dimensional gait analysis was performed before and three months after surgery. The spatio-temporal parameters and three-dimensional knee kinematics for the operated limb were evaluated during a comfortable gait and compared between groups (the before and after surgery groups and the control group). Three months after surgery, patients always walk with a slower gait velocity and lower knee flexion-extension movements compared to the control group. However, a degree of progress was observed in term of the stride and step length, gait velocity and knee alignment in the coronal plane. Our results suggest that the disability is still significant for most patients three months after total knee replacement. A better understand of the impairments and functional limitations following surgery would help clinicians design rehabilitation programs. Moreover, patients should be informed that rehabilitation after total knee replacement is a long process.

  17. Comparison of knee gait kinematics of workers exposed to knee straining posture to those of non-knee straining workers.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, Nathaly; Hagemeister, Nicola; Poitras, Stéphane; de Guise, Jacques A

    2013-06-01

    Workers exposed to knee straining postures, such as kneeling and squatting, may present modifications in knee gait kinematics that can make them vulnerable to osteoarthritis. In this study, knee kinematics of workers exposed to occupational knee straining postures (KS workers) were compared to those of non-knee straining (non-KS) workers. Eighteen KS workers and 20 non-KS workers participated in the study. Three-dimensional gait kinematic data were recorded at the knee using an electromagnetic motion tracking system. The following parameters were extracted from flexion/extension, adduction/abduction and internal/external rotation angle data and used for group comparisons: knee angle at initial foot contact, peak angles, minimal angles and angle range during the entire gait cycle. Group comparisons were performed with Student t-tests. In the sagittal plane, KS workers had a greater knee flexion angle at initial foot contact, a lower peak knee flexion angle during the swing phase and a lower angle range than non-KS workers (p<0.05). In the frontal plane, all parameters indicated that KS workers had their knees more adducted than non-KS workers. External/internal rotation range was greater for KS workers. This study provides new knowledge on work related to KS postures and knee kinematics. The results support the concept that KS workers might exhibit knee kinematics that are different from those of non-KS workers.

  18. Knee range of motion after total knee arthroplasty: how important is this as an outcome measure?

    PubMed

    Miner, Andrew L; Lingard, Elizabeth A; Wright, Elizabeth A; Sledge, Clement B; Katz, Jeffrey N

    2003-04-01

    We investigated the relationship of knee range of motion (ROM) and function in a prospective, observational study of primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Preoperative and 12-month data were collected on 684 patients, including knee ROM, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain and function questionnaire scores, patient satisfaction, and perceived improvement in quality of life (QOL). Only modest correlations were found between knee ROM and WOMAC function (r<0.34). At 12 months we found significantly worse WOMAC function scores for patients with <95 degrees flexion compared with patients with > or =95 degrees (mean, 61.9 vs 75.0; P<.0001). In linear regression models, WOMAC pain and function scores at 12 months were both correlates of patient satisfaction and perceived improvement in QOL (standardized beta>3.5; P<.0001), but knee flexion was not. For assessment of these outcomes, WOMAC function appears to be more important than knee flexion.

  19. Tibia valga morphology in osteoarthritic knees: importance of preoperative full limb radiographs in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Alghamdi, Ahmed; Rahmé, Michel; Lavigne, Martin; Massé, Vincent; Vendittoli, Pascal-André

    2014-08-01

    Osteoarthritis of the knee is associated with deformities of the lower limb. Tibia valga is a contributing factor to lower limb alignment in valgus knees. We evaluated 97 valgus knees and 100 varus knees. Long-leg films were taken in weight bearing with both knees in full extension. For valgus knees, 52 knees (53%) had a tibia valga deformity. Average tibia valgus deformation was 5.0°. For varus knees, there was only 1 case of tibia valga (1%), with a deformation of 2.5°. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of primary tibia valga in valgus and varus knees and understand how it affects our approach to total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We recommend having full-leg length films when planning for TKA in valgus knees.

  20. Patient function after a posterior stabilizing total knee arthroplasty: cam-post engagement and knee kinematics.

    PubMed

    Suggs, Jeremy F; Hanson, George R; Park, Sang Eun; Moynihan, Angela L; Li, Guoan

    2008-03-01

    Even though posterior substituting total knee arthroplasty has been widely used in surgery, how the cam-post mechanism (posterior substituting mechanism) affects knee joint kinematics and function in patients is not known. The objective of the present study was to investigate posterior femoral translation, internal tibial rotation, tibiofemoral contact, and cam-post engagement of total knee arthroplasty patients during in vivo weight-bearing flexion. Twenty-four knees with a PS TKA were investigated while performing a single leg weight-bearing lunge from full extension to maximum flexion as images were recorded using a dual fluoroscopic system. The in vivo knee position at each targeted flexion angle was reproduced using 3D TKA models and the fluoroscopic images. The kinematics of the knee was measured from the series of the total knee arthroplasty models. The cam-post engagement was determined when the surface model of the femoral cam overlapped with that of the tibial post. The mean maximum flexion angle for all the subjects was 112.5 +/- 13.1 degrees . The mean flexion angle where cam-post engagement was observed was 91.1 +/- 10.9 degrees . The femur moved anteriorly from 0 degrees to 30 degrees and posteriorly through the rest of the flexion range. The internal tibial rotation increased approximately 6 degrees from full extension to 90 degrees of flexion and decreased slightly with further flexion. Both the medial and lateral contact point moved posteriorly from 0 degrees to 30 degrees , remained relatively constant from 30 degrees to 90 degrees , and then moved further posterior from 90 degrees to maximum flexion. The in vivo cam-post engagement corresponded to increased posterior translation and reduced internal tibial rotation at high flexion of the posterior substituting total knee arthroplasty. The initial cam-post engagement was also mildly correlated with the maximum flexion angle of the knee (R = 0.51, p = 0.019). A later cam-post engagement might

  1. Validating Dual Fluoroscopy System Capabilities for Determining In-Vivo Knee Joint Soft Tissue Deformation: A Strategy for Registration Error Management.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Gulshan B; Kuntze, Gregor; Kukulski, Diane; Ronsky, Janet L

    2015-07-16

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) causes structural and mechanical changes within tibiofemoral (TF) cartilage affecting tissue load deformation behavior. Quantifying in-vivo TF soft tissue deformations in healthy and early OA may provide a novel biomechanical marker, sensitive to alterations occurring prior to radiographic change. Dual Fluoroscopy (DF) allows accurate in-vivo TF soft tissue deformation assessment but requires validation. In-vivo healthy and early OA TF cartilage deforms 0.3-1.2mm during static standing full body-weight loading. Our aim was to establish minimum detectable displacement (MDD) for femoral translation in a DF system using a marker-based and markerless approach with variable image intensifier magnifications. An instrumented frame allowed controlled femur specimen translations. Bone positions were reconstructed from DF data using centroids of affixed steel beads (marker-based) and 2D-3D bone feature registration (markerless). Statistical analyses included independent samples t-tests and reliability analysis. Markerless measurements by three trained operators had large variations making it prudent to have an appropriate error management strategy when performing 2D-3D registration. Marker-based MDD improved with image resolution and was 0.05 mm at 3.2 LP/mm (LP: line pairs). Markerless MDD at 3.2 LP/mm was 0.08 mm. Average femur and tibia 2D-3D registrations yielded excellent reliability (84.4%). Therefore, DF images acquired at resolution greater than 3.2 LP/mm would be capable for determining accurate and reliable in-vivo healthy and early OA TF soft tissue deformation. This study provides a registration error management strategy for in-vivo TF soft tissue deformation assessment that could be applied for future clinical applications to establish non-invasive biomechanical markers for early OA diagnosis.

  2. The influence of body mass index and velocity on knee biomechanics during walking.

    PubMed

    Freedman Silvernail, Julia; Milner, Clare E; Thompson, Dixie; Zhang, Songning; Zhao, Xiaopeng

    2013-04-01

    Obesity has been associated with both the development and progression of knee osteoarthritis. Being overweight or obese from a young age is likely to decrease the age of onset for co-morbidities of obesity such as osteoarthritis. However, research on osteoarthritis has thus far focused on older adults. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine whether young adults who are overweight or obese exhibit biomechanical risk factors for knee osteoarthritis at either their preferred walking velocity or at 1m/s, which was slower than the preferred velocity. Thirty healthy young adults formed three equal groups according to body mass index. Three dimensional kinetics and kinematics were collected while participants walked overground at both velocities. Joint moments were normalized to fat free weight and height. The preferred walking velocity of obese participants was slower than that of normal weight individuals. There were no differences in knee flexion excursion, peak knee flexion angle, normalized peak knee flexion moment or normalized peak knee adduction moment among groups. Obese participants walked with lower peak knee adduction angle than both overweight and normal body mass index participants and several shifted towards knee abduction. All groups had smaller knee flexion excursion, peak knee flexion angle, peak knee flexion moment and peak knee adduction moment at 1m/s compared to preferred walking velocity. Overall, young and otherwise healthy overweight and obese participants have knee biomechanics during gait at preferred and slow walking velocities that are comparable to normal weight adults.

  3. Calcaneal Plantar Flexion During the Stance Phase of Gait.

    PubMed

    Stamm, Stacy E; Chiu, Loren Z F

    2016-04-01

    When the rear- and forefoot are constrained, calcaneal plantar flexion may occur, deforming the longitudinal arch. Previous research has reported calcaneal motion relative to the tibia or forefoot; these joint rotations may not accurately describe rotation of the calcaneus alone. This investigation: (1) characterized the calcaneus and leg segment and ankle joint rotations during stance in gait, and (2) described the range of calcaneal plantar flexion in different structural arch types. Men (n = 14) and women (n = 16) performed gait in a motion analysis laboratory. From heel strike to heel off, the leg rotated forward while the calcaneus plantar flexed. Before foot flat, calcaneal plantar flexion was greater than forward leg rotation, resulting in ankle plantar flexion. After foot flat, forward leg rotation was greater than calcaneal plantar flexion, resulting in ankle dorsiflexion. Structural arch type was classified using the longitudinal arch angle. The range of calcaneal plantar flexion from foot flat to heel off was small in low (-2° to -8°), moderate in high (-3° to -12°), and large in normal (-2° to -20°) structural arches. Calcaneal plantar flexion in gait during midstance may reflect functional arch characteristics, which vary depending on structural arch type.

  4. Lessons Learned from Selective Soft-Tissue Release for Gap Balancing in Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty: An Analysis of 1216 Consecutive Total Knee Arthroplasties

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Christopher L.; Jimenez, Chris; Erickson, Jill; Anderson, Mike B.; Pelt, Christopher E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Soft-tissue releases are commonly necessary to achieve symmetrical flexion and extension gaps in primary total knee arthroplasty performed with a measured resection technique. We reviewed the frequency of required releases according to preoperative alignment and the clinical and radiographic results; associations with failure, reoperations, and complications are presented. Methods: We reviewed 1216 knees that underwent primary total knee arthroplasty from 2004 to 2009; 774 (64%) were in female patients and 442 (36%), in male patients. In the coronal plane, 855 knees had preoperative varus deformity, 123 were neutral, and 238 had valgus deformity. The mean age at the time of the index procedure was 62.7 years (range, twenty-three to ninety-four years), and the mean body mass index was 32.7 kg/m2 (range, 17.4 to 87.9 kg/m2). Clinical outcomes included the Knee Society Score (KSS), implant failure, reoperation, and complications. Radiographs were analyzed for component alignment. Results: The only difference in the total KSS was found at the time of final follow-up between valgus knees with zero releases (total KSS = 178) and those with one or two releases (KSS = 160, p = 0.026). Overall, 407 knees (33.5%) required zero releases, 686 (56.4%) required oneor two releases, and 123 (10.1%) required three or more releases. Among varus knees, 37% required zero releases, 55% required one or two releases, and 7.5% required three or more releases. Among neutral knees, 39% required zero releases, 55% required one or two releases, and 5.7% required three or more releases. Only 17% of valgus knees required zero releases whereas 61% required one or two releases and 21.8% required three or more releases. Valgus knees required more releases than neutral or varus knees did (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Selective soft-tissue release for gap balancing in primary total knee arthroplasty is an effective technique that produced excellent clinical and radiographic results

  5. Is routine splintage following primary total knee replacement necessary? A prospective randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Horton, T C; Jackson, R; Mohan, N; Hambidge, J E

    2002-09-01

    It was hypothesised that routine splintage following primary total knee replacement has no affect on flexion deformity and offers no benefit over simple wool and crepe. Fifty-five patients undergoing primary total knee replacement were entered into a prospective study. The patients were randomly assigned to two groups: The first group was rehabilitated without a splint and the second received an adjustable semi-rigid extension splint (Richards splint) for the first 48 h after surgery. Range of motion measurements were recorded pre-operatively and at 2 days, 1 week and 3 months post-operation by a research nurse blinded to the allocation. No statistically significant difference in flexion deformity was found at any stage (P>0.5). No difference was found in general or wound complications, or requirement for blood transfusion, and the post-operative stay was equal in the two groups. We conclude that routine use of a semi-rigid splint following primary total knee replacement has no advantage over simple wound dressings.

  6. Runner's Knee

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Runner's Knee KidsHealth > For Teens > Runner's Knee A A A ... told he had runner's knee. What Is Runner's Knee? Runner's knee is the term doctors use for ...

  7. Knee pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - knee ... Knee pain can have different causes. Being overweight puts you at greater risk for knee problems. Overusing your knee can trigger knee problems that cause pain. If you have a history of arthritis, it ...

  8. The Effect of Axial Load in the Tibia on the Response of the 90 degrees Flexed Knee to Blunt Impacts with a Deformable Interface.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Eric G; Sinnott, Michael T; Haut, Roger C; Jayaraman, Gopal S; Smith, Walter E

    2004-11-01

    Lower extremity injuries are a frequent outcome of automotive accidents. While the lower extremity injury criterion is based on fracture of bone, most injuries are of less severity. Recent studies suggest microscopic, occult fractures that have been shown to be precursors of gross bone fractures, may occur in the kneecap (patella) for impacts with rigid and deformable interfaces due to excessive levels of patello-femoral contact pressure. One method of reducing this contact pressure for a 90 degrees flexed knee is to provide a parallel pathway for knee impact loads into the tibial tuberosity. Yet, blunt loads onto the tibial tuberosity can cause posterior drawer motion of the tibia, leading to injury or rupture of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). Recently studies have shown that axial loads in the tibia, which are measured during blunt loading on the knee in typical automobile crashes, can induce anterior drawer motion of the tibia and possibly help unload the PCL. The purpose of the current study was to explore the effect of combined anterior knee loading (AKL) and axial tibia loading (ATL), on response and injury for the 90 degrees flexed human knee. In repeated impacts with increasing ATL the stiffness of the knee to an AKL impact increased. For a 3 kN AKL, the stiffness of the knee increased approximately 26% when the ATL was increased from 0 kN to 2 kN. For 6 kN and 9 kN AKL, the stiffness was increased approximately 17% and 20%, respectively, when the ATL was increased from 0 kN (uniaxial) to 4 kN (biaxial). The effect, however, was not statistically significant at the 9 kN AKL level. The posterior tibial drawer was shown to increase with increased AKL and decrease with increased levels of ATL at an average of 0.3 mm per kN ATL for both the 3 kN and 6 kN ATL scenarios. For 9 kN AKL this drawer displacement was significantly reduced for biaxial versus uniaxial impacts, from 7.4+/-1.4 mm to 5.8+/-0.6 mm, respectively. Additionally, the percentage of the

  9. Knee Brace Would Lock And Unlock Automatically

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Neill; Forbes, John; Shadoan, Mike; Baker, Kevin

    1995-01-01

    Proposed knee brace designed to aid rehabilitation of person who suffered some muscle damage in leg. Not limited to locking in straight-leg position and, instead, locks at any bend angle. Does not prevent knee from bearing weight. Instead, knee brace allows knee to bear weight and locks only when foot and lower leg bear weight. Thus, brace prevents flexion that wearer desired to prevent but could not prevent because of weakened muscles. Knee bends freely to exercise knee-related muscles. Knee brace strapped at upper end to leg above knee, and anchored at lower end by stirrup under foot. Joint mechanism (identical mechanisms used in left and right assemblies) allows knee joint to flex freely except when weight applied to heel.

  10. Forces and moments on the knee during kneeling and squatting.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Jonisha P; Porter, William L; Redfern, Mark S

    2011-08-01

    Euler angle decomposition and inverse dynamics were used to determine the knee angles and net forces and moments applied to the tibia during kneeling and squatting with and without kneepads for 10 subjects in four postures: squatting (Squat), kneeling on the right knee (One Knee), bilateral kneeling near full flexion (Near Full) and bilateral kneeling near 90° flexion (Near 90). Kneepads affected the knee flexion (p = .002), medial forces (p = .035), and internal rotation moments (p = .006). Squat created loading conditions that had higher varus (p < .001) and resultant moments (p = .027) than kneeling. One Knee resulted in the highest force magnitudes and net moments (p < .001) of the kneeling postures. Thigh-calf and heel-gluteus contact forces decreased the flexion moment on average by 48% during Squat and Near Full.

  11. Is the pie-crusting technique safe for MCL release in varus deformity correction in total knee arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Meneghini, R Michael; Daluga, Andrew T; Sturgis, Lindsey A; Lieberman, Jay R

    2013-09-01

    Established for lateral release in TKA, the pie-crusting technique has not been studied for the medial collateral ligament (MCL). In cadaveric knees the MCL was release with a pie-crusting technique in one and traditional technique in the contralateral knee. Along with a control group, each MCL was subjected to mechanical testing. The stiffness, force and stress required to cause ligament elongation were less in the pie-crusting group (p < 0.05) compared to the control group, but were not statistically different than the traditional group. The pie-crusting group demonstrated a characteristic "stair-step" failure mode at the joint line, whereas the traditional group failed elastically at the tibial insertion. MCL pie-crusting is likely technique dependent since failure occurs within the ligament itself and further study is warranted.

  12. Effects of childhood obesity on three-dimensional knee joint biomechanics during walking.

    PubMed

    Gushue, David L; Houck, Jeff; Lerner, Amy L

    2005-01-01

    Despite the increasing percentages of children who are overweight, few studies have investigated their gait patterns. The purpose of this study was to quantify the three-dimensional knee joint kinematics and kinetics during walking in children of varying body mass and to identify effects associated with obesity. Three-dimensional kinematics and kinetics were collected from children of normal weight and overweight during normal gait using surface-mounted infrared emitting diodes and a force plate. The overweight group walked with a significantly lower peak knee flexion angle during early stance, and no significant differences in peak internal knee extension moments were found between groups. However, the overweight group showed a significantly higher peak internal knee abduction moment during early stance. These data suggest that although overweight children may develop a gait adaptation to maintain a similar knee extensor load, they may not be able to compensate for alterations in the frontal plane, which may lead to increased medial compartment joint loads. Therefore, assuming that the development of varus angular deformities of the knee joint and, in the longer term, medial compartment osteoarthritis are influenced by cumulative stress, this study supports the understanding that childhood obesity may impart a greater risk for the development of these diseases.

  13. Does the Q − H index show a stronger relationship than the H:Q ratio in regard to knee pain during daily activities in patients with knee osteoarthritis?

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Remi; Matsui, Yasumoto; Harada, Atsushi; Takemura, Marie; Kondo, Izumi; Nemoto, Tetsuya; Sakai, Tadahiro; Hiraiwa, Hideki; Ota, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to elucidate the relationship between knee muscle strength and knee pain in activities of daily living, based on consideration of the difference between extension and flexion strength (Q − H) and the hamstring:quadriceps (H:Q) ratio in patients with knee osteoarthritis. [Subjects and Methods] The participants were 78 females with knee osteoarthritis, and a total of 133 knees that had not been treated surgically were the targets of this research. The legs were divided according to dominance. Isometric knee extension and flexion muscle strength and knee pain during activities of daily living were measured. The H:Q ratio (flexion/extension muscle strength) and the difference between extension and flexion strength, (extension muscle strength/weight) minus (flexion muscle strength/weight), that is, Q − H, were calculated. The correlation between these indices and the knee pain score during activities of daily living was investigated. [Results] Greater knee pain during activities of daily living was related to lower knee extension muscle strength and Q − H in both the dominant and nondominant legs. Knee flexion muscle strength and the H:Q ratio were not significantly correlated with knee pain during any activities of daily living. [Conclusion] Knee extension muscle strength and Q − H were found to be significantly correlated with knee pain during activities of daily living, whereas the H:Q ratio was not. PMID:28174444

  14. Open Knee: Open Source Modeling & Simulation to Enable Scientific Discovery and Clinical Care in Knee Biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Erdemir, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Virtual representations of the knee joint can provide clinicians, scientists, and engineers the tools to explore mechanical function of the knee and its tissue structures in health and disease. Modeling and simulation approaches such as finite element analysis also provide the possibility to understand the influence of surgical procedures and implants on joint stresses and tissue deformations. A large number of knee joint models are described in the biomechanics literature. However, freely accessible, customizable, and easy-to-use models are scarce. Availability of such models can accelerate clinical translation of simulations, where labor intensive reproduction of model development steps can be avoided. The interested parties can immediately utilize readily available models for scientific discovery and for clinical care. Motivated by this gap, this study aims to describe an open source and freely available finite element representation of the tibiofemoral joint, namely Open Knee, which includes detailed anatomical representation of the joint's major tissue structures, their nonlinear mechanical properties and interactions. Three use cases illustrate customization potential of the model, its predictive capacity, and its scientific and clinical utility: prediction of joint movements during passive flexion, examining the role of meniscectomy on contact mechanics and joint movements, and understanding anterior cruciate ligament mechanics. A summary of scientific and clinically directed studies conducted by other investigators are also provided. The utilization of this open source model by groups other than its developers emphasizes the premise of model sharing as an accelerator of simulation-based medicine. Finally, the imminent need to develop next generation knee models are noted. These are anticipated to incorporate individualized anatomy and tissue properties supported by specimen-specific joint mechanics data for evaluation, all acquired in vitro from varying age

  15. Knee Proprioception and Strength and Landing Kinematics During a Single-Leg Stop-Jump Task

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, Takashi; Sell, Timothy C; House, Anthony J; Abt, John P; Lephart, Scott M

    2013-01-01

    Context The importance of the sensorimotor system in maintaining a stable knee joint has been recognized. As individual entities, knee-joint proprioception, landing kinematics, and knee muscles play important roles in functional joint stability. Preventing knee injuries during dynamic tasks requires accurate proprioceptive information and adequate muscular strength. Few investigators have evaluated the relationship between knee proprioception and strength and landing kinematics. Objective To examine the relationship between knee proprioception and strength and landing kinematics. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting University research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants Fifty physically active men (age = 26.4 ± 5.8 years, height = 176.5 ± 8.0 cm, mass = 79.8 ± 16.6 kg). Intervention(s) Three tests were performed. Knee conscious proprioception was evaluated via threshold to detect passive motion (TTDPM). Knee strength was evaluated with a dynamometer. A 3-dimensional biomechanical analysis of a single-legged stop-jump task was used to calculate initial contact (IC) knee-flexion angle and knee-flexion excursion. Main Outcome Measure(s) The TTDPM toward knee flexion and extension, peak knee flexion and extension torque, and IC knee-flexion angle and knee flexion excursion. Linear correlation and stepwise multiple linear regression analyses were used to evaluate the relationships of both proprioception and strength against landing kinematics. The α level was set a priori at .05. Results Enhanced TTDPM and greater knee strength were positively correlated with greater IC knee-flexion angle (r range = 0.281–0.479, P range = .001–.048). The regression analysis revealed that 27.4% of the variance in IC knee-flexion angle could be accounted for by knee-flexion peak torque and TTDPM toward flexion (P = .001). Conclusions The current research highlighted the relationship between knee proprioception and strength and landing kinematics. Individuals with enhanced

  16. Surface marker cluster translation, rotation, scaling and deformation: Their contribution to soft tissue artefact and impact on knee joint kinematics.

    PubMed

    Benoit, D L; Damsgaard, M; Andersen, M S

    2015-07-16

    When recording human movement with stereophotogrammetry, skin deformation and displacement (soft tissue artefact; STA) inhibits surface markers' ability to validly represent the movement of the underlying bone. To resolve this issue, the components of marker motions which contribute to STA must be understood. The purpose of this study is to describe and quantify which components of this marker motion (cluster translation, rotation, scaling and deformation) contribute to STA during the stance phase of walking, a cutting manoeuvre, and one-legged hops. In vivo bone pin-based tibio-femoral kinematics of six healthy subjects were used to study skin marker-based STA. To quantify how total cluster translation, rotation, scaling and deformation contribute to STA, a resizable and deformable cluster model was constructed. STA was found to be greater in the thigh than the shank during all three movements. We found that the non-rigid (i.e. scaling and deformation) movements contribute very little to the overall amount of error, rendering surface marker optimisation methods aimed at minimising this component superfluous. The results of the current study indicate that procedures designed to account for cluster translation and rotation during human movement are required to correctly represent the motion of body segments, however reducing marker cluster scaling and deformation will have little effect on STA.

  17. Percutaneous quadriceps tendon pie-crusting release of extension contracture of the knee.

    PubMed

    Liu, H X; Wen, H; Hu, Y Z; Yu, H C; Pan, X Y

    2014-05-01

    To release extension contracture of the knee, the authors used a minimally invasive technique: percutaneous quadriceps tendon pie-crusting release. Percutaneous pie-crusting release was performed using an 18-gauge needle to puncture the stiff fibrous band of the distal and lateral quadriceps tendon under maximum knee flexion. Quadriceps contracture was gradually released by multiple needle punctures. A knee brace was prescribed for one week and knee flexion exercises were performed on the first postoperative day. This technique was performed in seven post-traumatic stiff knees and five stiff total knee arthroplasties. Mean maximum flexion increased from 37° preoperatively to 50° after arthrolysis and 107(o) after pie-crusting. At a mean follow-up of eight months, mean maximum flexion was 103°. There were no major complications. The technique of quadriceps tendon pie-crusting release is a simple, minimally invasive and effective treatment for knee extension contracture.

  18. Mobile Sensor Application for Kinematic Detection of the Knees

    PubMed Central

    Suputtitada, Areerat; Khovidhungij, Watcharapong

    2015-01-01

    Objective To correctly measure the knee joint angle, this study utilized a Qualisys motion capture system and also used it as the reference to assess the validity of the study's Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) system that consisted of four IMU sensors and the Knee Angle Recorder software. The validity was evaluated by the root mean square (RMS) of different angles and the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) values between the Qualisys system and the IMU system. Methods Four functional knee movement tests for ten healthy participants were investigated, which were the knee flexion test, the hip and knee flexion test, the forward step test and the leg abduction test, and the walking test. Results The outcomes of the knee flexion test, the hip and knee flexion test, the forward step test, and the walking test showed that the RMS of different angles were less than 6°. The ICC values were in the range of 0.84 to 0.99. However, the leg abduction test showed a poor correlation in the measurement of the knee abduction-adduction movement. Conclusion The IMU system used in this study is a new good method to measure the knee flexion-extension movement. PMID:26361597

  19. Six degree-of-freedom knee joint kinematics in obese individuals with knee pain during gait

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing-Sheng; Tsai, Tsung-Yuan; Felson, David T.; Li, Guoan; Lewis, Cara L.

    2017-01-01

    Knee joint pain is a common symptom in obese individuals and walking is often prescribed as part of management programs. Past studies in obese individuals have focused on standing alignment and kinematics in the sagittal and coronal planes. Investigation of 6 degree-of-freedom (6DOF) knee joint kinematics during standing and gait is important to thoroughly understand knee function in obese individuals with knee pain. This study aimed to investigate the 6DOF knee joint kinematics in standing and during gait in obese patients using a validated fluoroscopic imaging system. Ten individuals with obesity and knee pain were recruited. While standing, the knee was in 7.4±6.3°of hyperextension, 2.8±3.3° of abduction and 5.6±7.3° of external rotation. The femoral center was located 0.7±3.1mm anterior and 5.1±1.5mm medial to the tibial center. During treadmill gait, the sagittal plane motion, i.e., flexion/extension and anterior-posterior translation, showed a clear pattern. Specifically, obese individuals with knee pain maintained the knee in more flexion and more anterior tibial translation during most of the stance phase of the gait cycle and had a reduced total range of knee flexion when compared to a healthy non-obese group. In conclusion, obese individuals with knee pain used hyperextension knee posture while standing, but maintained the knee in more flexion during gait with reduced overall range of motion in the 6DOF analysis. PMID:28339477

  20. Posterior cruciate ligament balancing in total knee arthroplasty: a numerical study with a dynamic force controlled knee model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Adequate soft tissue balancing is a key factor for a successful result after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is the primary restraint to posterior translation of the tibia after cruciate retaining TKA and is also responsible for the amount of joint compression. However, it is complex to quantify the amount of ligament release with its effects on load bearing and kinematics in TKA and limited both in vivo and in vitro. The goal of this study was to create a dynamic and deformable finite element model of a full leg and analyze a stepwise release of the PCL regarding knee kinematics, pressure distribution and ligament stresses. Methods A dynamic finite element model was developed in Ansys V14.0 based on boundary conditions of an existing knee rig. A cruciate retraining knee prosthesis was virtually implanted. Ligament and muscle structures were simulated with modified spring elements. Linear elastic materials were defined for femoral component, inlay and patella cartilage. A restart algorithm was developed and implemented into the finite element simulation to hold the ground reaction force constant by adapting quadriceps force. After simulating the unreleased PCL model, two models were developed and calculated with the same boundary conditions with a 50% and 75% release of the PCL stiffness. Results From the beginning of the simulation to approximately 35° of flexion, tibia moves posterior related to the femur and with higher flexion anteriorly. Anterior translation of the tibia ranged from 5.8 mm for unreleased PCL to 3.7 mm for 75% PCL release (4.9 mm 50% release). A decrease of maximum von Mises equivalent stress on the inlay was given with PCL release, especially in higher flexion angles from 11.1 MPa for unreleased PCL to 8.9 MPa for 50% release of the PCL and 7.8 MPa for 75% release. Conclusions Our study showed that dynamic FEM is an effective method for simulation of PCL balancing in knee arthroplasty. A tight

  1. A dynamic multibody model of the physiological knee to predict internal loads during movement in gravitational field.

    PubMed

    Bersini, Simone; Sansone, Valerio; Frigo, Carlo A

    2016-01-01

    Obtaining tibio-femoral (TF) contact forces, ligament deformations and loads during daily life motor tasks would be useful to better understand the aetiopathogenesis of knee joint diseases or the effects of ligament reconstruction and knee arthroplasty. However, methods to obtain this information are either too simplified or too computationally demanding to be used for clinical application. A multibody dynamic model of the lower limb reproducing knee joint contact surfaces and ligaments was developed on the basis of magnetic resonance imaging. Several clinically relevant conditions were simulated, including resistance to hyperextension, varus-valgus stability, anterior-posterior drawer, loaded squat movement. Quadriceps force, ligament deformations and loads, and TF contact forces were computed. During anterior drawer test the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) was maximally loaded when the knee was extended (392 N) while the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) was much more stressed during posterior drawer when the knee was flexed (319 N). The simulated loaded squat revealed that the anterior fibres of ACL become inactive after 60° of flexion in conjunction with PCL anterior bundle activation, while most components of the collateral ligaments exhibit limited length changes. Maximum quadriceps and TF forces achieved 3.2 and 4.2 body weight, respectively. The possibility to easily manage model parameters and the low computational cost of each simulation represent key points of the present project. The obtained results are consistent with in vivo measurements, suggesting that the model can be used to simulate complex and clinically relevant exercises.

  2. The effectiveness of posterior knee capsulotomies and knee extension osteotomies in crouched gait in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Daveda; Connor, Justin; Church, Chris; Lennon, Nancy; Henley, John; Niiler, Tim; Miller, Freeman

    2016-11-01

    Crouched gait is common in children with cerebral palsy (CP), and there are various treatment options. This study evaluated the effectiveness of single-event multilevel surgery including posterior knee capsulotomy or distal femoral extension osteotomy to correct knee flexion contracture in children with CP. Gait analyses were carried out to evaluate gait preoperatively and postoperatively. Significant improvements were found in physical examination and kinematic measures, which showed that children with CP and crouched gait who develop knee flexion contractures can be treated effectively using single-event multilevel surgery including a posterior knee capsulotomy or distal femoral extension osteotomy.

  3. Paraplegic flexion contracture of hip joints: An unsolvable problem

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Sailendra

    2016-01-01

    Paraplegic flexion contracture of hip joints beyond 90° is a difficult condition to treat for any orthopedic surgeon. There is no fixed protocol of treatment described, by and large it is individualized. A 20 year old female presented with paraplegia for last 15 years due to irrecoverable spinal cord disease with complete sensory and motor loss of both lower extremities and was admitted with acute flexion contracture of both hip joints with trunk resting on thighs. She underwent bilateral proximal femoral resection. Both hip joints were straight immediately after surgery and patient could lie on her back. In a course of time, she started sitting on her buttocks, led a comfortable wheelchair life with a sitting balance. Proximal femoral resection is an effective method to treat long standing irrecoverable paraplegic acute flexion deformity of the hip joint. PMID:27904226

  4. Paraplegic flexion contracture of hip joints: An unsolvable problem.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Sailendra

    2016-01-01

    Paraplegic flexion contracture of hip joints beyond 90° is a difficult condition to treat for any orthopedic surgeon. There is no fixed protocol of treatment described, by and large it is individualized. A 20 year old female presented with paraplegia for last 15 years due to irrecoverable spinal cord disease with complete sensory and motor loss of both lower extremities and was admitted with acute flexion contracture of both hip joints with trunk resting on thighs. She underwent bilateral proximal femoral resection. Both hip joints were straight immediately after surgery and patient could lie on her back. In a course of time, she started sitting on her buttocks, led a comfortable wheelchair life with a sitting balance. Proximal femoral resection is an effective method to treat long standing irrecoverable paraplegic acute flexion deformity of the hip joint.

  5. Prosthetic knee design by simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hollerbach, K; Hollister, A

    1999-07-30

    Although 150,000 total knee replacement surgeries are performed annually in North America, current designs of knee prostheses have mechanical problems that include a limited range of motion, abnormal gait patterns, patellofemoral joint dysfunction, implant loosening or subsidence, and excessive wear. These problems fall into three categories: failure to reproduce normal joint kinematics, which results in altered limb function; bone-implant interface failure; and material failure. Modern computer technology can be used to design, prototype, and test new total knee implants. The design team uses the full range of CAD-CAM to design and produce implant prototypes for mechanical and clinical testing. Closer approximation of natural knee kinematics and kinetics is essential for improved patient function and diminished implant loads. Current knee replacement designs are based on 19th Century theories that the knee moves about a variable axis of rotation. Recent research has shown, however, that knee motion occurs about two fixed, offset axes of rotation. These aces are not perpendicular to the long axes of the bones or to each other, and the axes do not intersect. Bearing surfaces of mechanisms that move about axes of rotation are surfaces of revolution of those axes which advanced CAD technology can produce. Solids with surfaces of revolution for the two axes of rotation for the knee have been made using an HP9000 workstation and Structural Ideas Master Series CAD software at ArthroMotion. The implant's CAD model should closely replicate movements of the normal knee. The knee model will have a range of flexion-extension (FE) from -5 to 120 degrees. Movements include varus, valgus, internal and external rotation, as well as flexion and extension. The patellofemoral joint is aligned perpendicular to the FE axis and replicates the natural joint more closely than those of existing prostheses. The bearing surfaces will be more congruent than current designs and should

  6. In vivo articular cartilage deformation: noninvasive quantification of intratissue strain during joint contact in the human knee

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Deva D.; Cai, Luyao; Butz, Kent D.; Trippel, Stephen B.; Nauman, Eric A.; Neu, Corey P.

    2016-01-01

    The in vivo measurement of articular cartilage deformation is essential to understand how mechanical forces distribute throughout the healthy tissue and change over time in the pathologic joint. Displacements or strain may serve as a functional imaging biomarker for healthy, diseased, and repaired tissues, but unfortunately intratissue cartilage deformation in vivo is largely unknown. Here, we directly quantified for the first time deformation patterns through the thickness of tibiofemoral articular cartilage in healthy human volunteers. Magnetic resonance imaging acquisitions were synchronized with physiologically relevant compressive loading and used to visualize and measure regional displacement and strain of tibiofemoral articular cartilage in a sagittal plane. We found that compression (of 1/2 body weight) applied at the foot produced a sliding, rigid-body displacement at the tibiofemoral cartilage interface, that loading generated subject- and gender-specific and regionally complex patterns of intratissue strains, and that dominant cartilage strains (approaching 12%) were in shear. Maximum principle and shear strain measures in the tibia were correlated with body mass index. Our MRI-based approach may accelerate the development of regenerative therapies for diseased or damaged cartilage, which is currently limited by the lack of reliable in vivo methods for noninvasive assessment of functional changes following treatment. PMID:26752228

  7. In vivo articular cartilage deformation: noninvasive quantification of intratissue strain during joint contact in the human knee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Deva D.; Cai, Luyao; Butz, Kent D.; Trippel, Stephen B.; Nauman, Eric A.; Neu, Corey P.

    2016-01-01

    The in vivo measurement of articular cartilage deformation is essential to understand how mechanical forces distribute throughout the healthy tissue and change over time in the pathologic joint. Displacements or strain may serve as a functional imaging biomarker for healthy, diseased, and repaired tissues, but unfortunately intratissue cartilage deformation in vivo is largely unknown. Here, we directly quantified for the first time deformation patterns through the thickness of tibiofemoral articular cartilage in healthy human volunteers. Magnetic resonance imaging acquisitions were synchronized with physiologically relevant compressive loading and used to visualize and measure regional displacement and strain of tibiofemoral articular cartilage in a sagittal plane. We found that compression (of 1/2 body weight) applied at the foot produced a sliding, rigid-body displacement at the tibiofemoral cartilage interface, that loading generated subject- and gender-specific and regionally complex patterns of intratissue strains, and that dominant cartilage strains (approaching 12%) were in shear. Maximum principle and shear strain measures in the tibia were correlated with body mass index. Our MRI-based approach may accelerate the development of regenerative therapies for diseased or damaged cartilage, which is currently limited by the lack of reliable in vivo methods for noninvasive assessment of functional changes following treatment.

  8. Dynamic activity dependence of in vivo normal knee kinematics.

    PubMed

    Moro-oka, Taka-aki; Hamai, Satoshi; Miura, Hiromasa; Shimoto, Takeshi; Higaki, Hidehiko; Fregly, Benjamin J; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Banks, Scott A

    2008-04-01

    Dynamic knee kinematics were analyzed for normal knees in three activities, including two different types of maximum knee flexion. Continuous X-ray images of kneel, squat, and stair climb motions were taken using a large flat panel detector. CT-derived bone models were used for model registration-based 3D kinematic measurement. Three-dimensional joint kinematics and contact locations were determined using three methods: bone-fixed coordinate systems, interrogation of CT-based bone model surfaces, and interrogation of MR-based articular cartilage model surfaces. The femur exhibited gradual external rotation throughout the flexion range. Tibiofemoral contact exhibited external rotation, with contact locations translating posterior while maintaining 15 degrees to 20 degrees external rotation from 20 degrees to 80 degrees of flexion. From 80 degrees to maximum flexion, contact locations showed a medial pivot pattern. Kinematics based on bone-fixed coordinate systems differed from kinematics based on interrogation of CT and MR surfaces. Knee kinematics varied significantly by activity, especially in deep flexion. No posterior subluxation occurred for either femoral condyle in maximum knee flexion. Normal knees accommodate a range of motions during various activities while maintaining geometric joint congruency.

  9. Posterior cruciate ligament removal contributes to abnormal knee motion during posterior stabilized total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Cromie, Melinda J; Siston, Robert A; Giori, Nicholas J; Delp, Scott L

    2008-11-01

    Abnormal anterior translation of the femur on the tibia has been observed in mid flexion (20-60 degrees ) following posterior stabilized total knee arthroplasty. The underlying biomechanical causes of this abnormal motion remain unknown. The purpose of this study was to isolate the effects of posterior cruciate ligament removal on knee motion after total knee arthroplasty. We posed two questions: Does removing the posterior cruciate ligament introduce abnormal anterior femoral translation? Does implanting a posterior stabilized prosthesis change the kinematics from the cruciate deficient case? Using a navigation system, we measured passive knee kinematics of ten male osteoarthritic patients during surgery after initial exposure, after removing the anterior cruciate ligament, after removing the posterior cruciate ligament, and after implanting the prosthesis. Passively flexing and extending the knee, we calculated anterior femoral translation and the flexion angle at which femoral rollback began. Removing the posterior cruciate ligament doubled anterior translation (from 5.1 +/- 4.3 mm to 10.4 +/- 5.1 mm) and increased the flexion angle at which femoral rollback began (from 31.2 +/- 9.6 degrees to 49.3 +/- 7.3 degrees). Implanting the prosthesis increased the amount of anterior translation (to 16.1 +/- 4.4 mm), and did not change the flexion angle at which femoral rollback began. Abnormal anterior translation was observed in low and mid flexion (0-60 degrees) after removing the posterior cruciate ligament, and normal motion was not restored by the posterior stabilized prosthesis.

  10. Knee joint functional range of movement prior to and following total knee arthroplasty measured using flexible electrogoniometry.

    PubMed

    Myles, Christine M; Rowe, Philip J; Walker, Colin R C; Nutton, Richard W

    2002-08-01

    The functional ranges of movement of the knee were investigated in a group of patients with knee osteoarthritis (n = 42, mean age 70 years) before, 4 months and at 18-24 months after total knee arthroplasty and then compared with age matched normal subjects (n = 20, mean age 67 years). Flexible electrogoniometry was used to record the maximum flexion-extension angle, the minimum flexion-extension angle and flexion-extension excursions of both knees during eleven functional activities along with the active and passive knee joint range of motion measured using a manual goniometer. Over the eleven functional activities the patients pre-operatively exhibited 28% less knee joint excursion than normal age matched subjects. By 18-24 months following total knee arthroplasty only 2% of this deficit was recovered. Statistically this recovery was only significant in level walking, slope ascent and slope descent. A greater range of movement was measured in a non-weight bearing position than was used in weight bearing functional activity. It is concluded that total knee arthroplasty gives rise to little improvement in knee motion during functional activities and that functional range of movement of the knee remains limited when compared to normal knee function for a minimum of 18 months following operation.

  11. Patient Self-Assessed Passive Range of Motion of the Knee Cannot Replace Health Professional Measurements.

    PubMed

    Borgbjerg, Jens; Madsen, Frank; Odgaard, Anders

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether patients can accurately self-assess their knee passive range of motion (PROM). A picture-based questionnaire for patient self-assessment of knee PROM was developed and posted to patients. The self-assessed PROM from 58 patients was compared with surgeon-assessed PROM using a short-arm goniometer. Agreement between the measurement methods was calculated with the Bland-Altman method. We calculated the sensitivity and specificity of patient-assessed PROM in dichotomously detecting knee motion impairment in both flexion (≤ 100 degrees) and extension (≥ 10-degree flexion contracture). Surgeon- and patient-assessed knee PROM showed a mean difference (95% limits of agreement) of -2.1 degrees (-42.5 to 38.3 degrees) for flexion and -8.1 degrees (-28.8 to 12.7 degrees) for extension. The sensitivity of patient self-assessed PROM in identifying knee flexion and extension impairments was 86 and 100%, respectively, whereas its specificity was 84 and 43%, respectively. Although wide limits of agreement were observed between surgeon- and patient-assessed knee PROM, the picture-based questionnaire for patient assessment of knee ROM was found to be a valid tool for dichotomously detecting knee motion impairment in flexion (≤ 100 degrees). However, the specificity of the questionnaire for detection of knee extension impairments (≥ 10-degree flexion contracture) was low, which limits is practical utility for this purpose.

  12. Multiple needle puncturing: balancing the varus knee.

    PubMed

    Bellemans, Johan

    2011-09-09

    The so-called "pie crusting" technique using multiple stab incisions is a well-established procedure for correcting tightness of the iliotibial band in the valgus knee. It is, however, not applicable for balancing the medial side in varus knees because of the risk for iatrogenic transsection of the medial collateral ligament (MCL). This article presents our experience with a safer alternative and minimally invasive technique for medial soft tissue balancing, where we make multiple punctures in the MCL using a 19-gauge needle to progressively stretch the MCL until a correct ligament balance is achieved. Our technique requires minimal to no additional soft tissue dissection and can even be performed percutaneously when necessary. This technique, therefore, does not impact the length of the skin or soft tissue incisions. We analyzed 61 cases with varus deformity that were intraoperatively treated using this technique. In 4 other cases, the technique was used as a percutaneous procedure to correct postoperative medial tightness that caused persistent pain on the medial side. The procedure was considered successful when a 2- to 4-mm mediolateral joint line opening was obtained in extension and 2 to 6 mm in flexion. In 62 cases (95%), a progressive correction of medial tightness was achieved according to the above-described criteria. Three cases were overreleased and required compensatory release of the lateral structures and use of a thicker insert. Based on these results, we consider needle puncturing an effective and safe technique for progressive correction of MCL tightness during minimally invasive total knee arthroplasty.

  13. Post-traumatic knee stiffness: surgical techniques.

    PubMed

    Pujol, N; Boisrenoult, P; Beaufils, P

    2015-02-01

    Post-traumatic knee stiffness and loss of range of motion is a common complication of injuries to the knee area. The causes of post-traumatic knee stiffness can be divided into flexion contractures, extension contractures, and combined contractures. Post-traumatic stiffness can be due to the presence of dense intra-articular adhesions and/or fibrotic transformation of peri-articular structures. Various open and arthroscopic surgical treatments are possible. A precise diagnosis and understanding of the pathology is mandatory prior to any surgical treatment. Failure is imminent if all pathologies are not addressed correctly. From a general point of view, a flexion contracture is due to posterior adhesions and/or anterior impingement. On the other hand, extension contractures are due to anterior adhesions and/or posterior impingement. This overview will describe the different modern surgical techniques for treating post-traumatic knee stiffness. Any bony impingements must be treated before soft tissue release is performed. Intra-articular stiff knees with a loss of flexion can be treated by an anterior arthroscopic arthrolysis. Extra-articular pathology causing a flexion contracture can be treated by open or endoscopic quadriceps release. Extension contractures can be treated by arthroscopic or open posterior arthrolysis. Postoperative care (analgesia, rehabilitation) is essential to maintaining the range of motion obtained intra-operatively.

  14. Changes in the activity of trunk and hip extensor muscles during bridge exercises with variations in unilateral knee joint angle

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Juseung; Park, Minchul

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study compared abdominal and hip extensor muscle activity during a bridge exercise with various knee joint angles. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-two healthy male subjects performed a bridge exercise in which the knee joint angle was altered. While subjects performed the bridge exercise, external oblique, internal oblique, gluteus maximus, and semitendinosus muscle activity was measured using electromyography. [Results] The bilateral external and internal oblique muscle activity was significantly higher at 0° knee flexion compared to 120°, 90°, and 60°. The bilateral gluteus maximus muscle activity was significantly different at 0° of knee flexion compared to 120°, 90°, and 60°. The ipsilateral semitendinosus muscle activity was significantly increased at 90° and 60° of knee flexion compared to 120°, and significantly decreased at 0° knee flexion compared with 120°, 90°, and 60°. The contralateral semitendinosus muscle activity was significantly higher at 60° of knee flexion than at 120°, and significantly higher at 0° of knee flexion than at 120°, 90°, and 60°. [Conclusion] Bridge exercises performed with knee flexion less than 90° may be used to train the ipsilateral semitendinosus. Furthermore, bridge exercise performed with one leg may be used to train abdominal and hip extensor muscles. PMID:27799688

  15. Associations of knee muscle force, bone malalignment, and knee-joint laxity with osteoarthritis in elderly people

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Kazumasa; Maeda, Misako

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] From the viewpoint of prevention of knee osteoarthritis, the aim of this study was to verify how muscle strength and joint laxity are related to knee osteoarthritis. [Subjects and Methods] The study subjects consisted of 90 community-dwelling elderly people aged more than 60 years (22 males, 68 females). Femorotibial angle alignment, knee joint laxity, knee extensors and flexor muscle strengths were measured in all subjects. In addition, the subjects were divided into four groups based on the presence of laxity and knee joint deformation, and the muscle strength values were compared. [Results] There was no significant difference in knee extensor muscle strength among the four groups. However, there was significant weakness of the knee flexor muscle in the group with deformation and laxity was compared with the group without deformation and laxity. [Conclusion] Decreased knee flexor muscle strengths may be involved in knee joint deformation. The importance of muscle strength balance was also considered. PMID:28356631

  16. Associations of knee muscle force, bone malalignment, and knee-joint laxity with osteoarthritis in elderly people.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Kazumasa; Maeda, Misako

    2017-03-01

    [Purpose] From the viewpoint of prevention of knee osteoarthritis, the aim of this study was to verify how muscle strength and joint laxity are related to knee osteoarthritis. [Subjects and Methods] The study subjects consisted of 90 community-dwelling elderly people aged more than 60 years (22 males, 68 females). Femorotibial angle alignment, knee joint laxity, knee extensors and flexor muscle strengths were measured in all subjects. In addition, the subjects were divided into four groups based on the presence of laxity and knee joint deformation, and the muscle strength values were compared. [Results] There was no significant difference in knee extensor muscle strength among the four groups. However, there was significant weakness of the knee flexor muscle in the group with deformation and laxity was compared with the group without deformation and laxity. [Conclusion] Decreased knee flexor muscle strengths may be involved in knee joint deformation. The importance of muscle strength balance was also considered.

  17. The influence of knee position on ankle dorsiflexion - a biometric study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Musculus gastrocnemius tightness (MGT) can be diagnosed by comparing ankle dorsiflexion (ADF) with the knee extended and flexed. Although various measurement techniques exist, the degree of knee flexion needed to eliminate the effect of the gastrocnemius on ADF is still unknown. The aim of this study was to identify the minimal degree of knee flexion required to eliminate the restricting effect of the musculus gastrocnemius on ADF. Methods Bilateral ADF of 20 asymptomatic volunteers aged 18-40 years (50% female) was assessed prospectively at six different degrees of knee flexion (0°, 20°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 75°, Lunge). Tests were performed following a standardized protocol, non weightbearing and weightbearing, by two observers. Statistics comprised of descriptive statistics, t-tests, repeated measurement ANOVA and ICC. Results 20 individuals with a mean age of 27 ± 4 years were tested. No significant side to side differences were observed. The average ADF [95% confidence interval] for non weightbearing was 4° [1°-8°] with the knee extended and 20° [16°-24°] for the knee 75° flexed. Mean weightbearing ADF was 25° [22°-28°] for the knee extended and 39° [36°-42°] for the knee 75° flexed. The mean differences between 20° knee flexion and full extension were 15° [12°-18°] non weightbearing and 13° [11°-16°] weightbearing. Significant differences of ADF were only found between full extension and 20° of knee flexion. Further knee flexion did not increase ADF. Conclusion Knee flexion of 20° fully eliminates the ADF restraining effect of the gastrocnemius. This knowledge is essential to design a standardized clinical examination assessing MGT. PMID:25053374

  18. Kinematic Analysis of a Posterior-stabilized Knee Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhi-Xin; Wen, Liang; Qu, Tie-Bing; Hou, Li-Li; Xiang, Dong; Bin, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Background: The goal of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is to restore knee kinematics. Knee prosthesis design plays a very important role in successful restoration. Here, kinematics models of normal and prosthetic knees were created and validated using previously published data. Methods: Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans of a healthy, anticorrosive female cadaver were used to establish a model of the entire lower limbs, including the femur, tibia, patella, fibula, distal femur cartilage, and medial and lateral menisci, as well as the anterior cruciate, posterior cruciate, medial collateral, and lateral collateral ligaments. The data from the three-dimensional models of the normal knee joint and a posterior-stabilized (PS) knee prosthesis were imported into finite element analysis software to create the final kinematic model of the TKA prosthesis, which was then validated by comparison with a previous study. The displacement of the medial/lateral femur and the internal rotation angle of the tibia were analyzed during 0–135° flexion. Results: Both the output data trends and the measured values derived from the normal knee's kinematics model were very close to the results reported in a previous in vivo study, suggesting that this model can be used for further analyses. The PS knee prosthesis underwent an abnormal forward displacement compared with the normal knee and has insufficient, or insufficiently aggressive, “rollback” compared with the lateral femur of the normal knee. In addition, a certain degree of reverse rotation occurs during flexion of the PS knee prosthesis. Conclusions: There were still several differences between the kinematics of the PS knee prosthesis and a normal knee, suggesting room for improving the design of the PS knee prosthesis. The abnormal kinematics during early flexion shows that the design of the articular surface played a vital role in improving the kinematics of the PS knee prosthesis. PMID:25591565

  19. Treatable Bedridden Elderly―Recovery from Flexion Contracture after Cortisol Replacement in a Patient with Isolated Adrenocorticotropic Hormone Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Takamasa; Terada, Norihiko; Fujikawa, Yoshiki; Fujimoto, Takushi

    2016-01-01

    Isolated adrenocorticotropic hormone deficiency (IAD) is a rare disorder with diverse clinical presentations. A 79-year-old man was bedridden for six months due to flexion contractures of the bilateral hips and knees, along with hyponatremia. He was diagnosed with IAD based on the results of endocrine tests. After one month of corticosteroid replacement, he recovered and was able to stand up by himself. Although flexion contracture is a rare symptom of IAD, steroid replacement therapy may be effective, even for seemingly irreversibly bedridden elderly patients. In bedridden elderly patients with flexion contractures, we should consider and look for any signs of adrenal insufficiency. PMID:27746435

  20. Treatable Bedridden Elderly -Recovery from Flexion Contracture after Cortisol Replacement in a Patient with Isolated Adrenocorticotropic Hormone Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takamasa; Terada, Norihiko; Fujikawa, Yoshiki; Fujimoto, Takushi

    Isolated adrenocorticotropic hormone deficiency (IAD) is a rare disorder with diverse clinical presentations. A 79-year-old man was bedridden for six months due to flexion contractures of the bilateral hips and knees, along with hyponatremia. He was diagnosed with IAD based on the results of endocrine tests. After one month of corticosteroid replacement, he recovered and was able to stand up by himself. Although flexion contracture is a rare symptom of IAD, steroid replacement therapy may be effective, even for seemingly irreversibly bedridden elderly patients. In bedridden elderly patients with flexion contractures, we should consider and look for any signs of adrenal insufficiency.

  1. Squat exercise to estimate knee megaprosthesis rehabilitation: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Lovecchio, Nicola; Zago, Matteo; Sciumè, Luciana; Lopresti, Maurizio; Sforza, Chiarella

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated a specific rehabilitation protocol using a half squat after total knee reconstruction with distal femur megaprosthesis and tibial allograft-prosthesis composite. [Subject and Methods] Squat execution was recorded by a three-dimensional system before and after a specific rehabilitation program on a 28-year-old patient. Squat duration, body center of mass trajectory, and vertical range of motion were determined. Step width and joint angles and symmetry (hip flexion, extension, and rotation, knee flexion, and ankle dorsal and plantar flexion) were estimated. Knee and hip joint symmetry was computed using a bilateral cyclogram technique. [Results] After rehabilitation, the squat duration was longer (75%), step width was similar, and vertical displacement was higher. Hip flexion increased by over 20%, and ankle dorsiflexion diminished by 14%. The knee had the highest symmetry gain (4.1–3.4%). Angle-angle plot subtended areas decreased from 108° to 40°2 (hip) and from 204° to 85°2 (knee), showing improvement in movement symmetry. [Conclusion] We concluded that the squat is an effective multifactorial exercise to estimate rehabilitation outcomes after megaprosthesis, also considering that compressive and shear forces are minimal up to 60–70° of knee flexion. PMID:26311992

  2. Squat exercise to estimate knee megaprosthesis rehabilitation: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Lovecchio, Nicola; Zago, Matteo; Sciumè, Luciana; Lopresti, Maurizio; Sforza, Chiarella

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated a specific rehabilitation protocol using a half squat after total knee reconstruction with distal femur megaprosthesis and tibial allograft-prosthesis composite. [Subject and Methods] Squat execution was recorded by a three-dimensional system before and after a specific rehabilitation program on a 28-year-old patient. Squat duration, body center of mass trajectory, and vertical range of motion were determined. Step width and joint angles and symmetry (hip flexion, extension, and rotation, knee flexion, and ankle dorsal and plantar flexion) were estimated. Knee and hip joint symmetry was computed using a bilateral cyclogram technique. [Results] After rehabilitation, the squat duration was longer (75%), step width was similar, and vertical displacement was higher. Hip flexion increased by over 20%, and ankle dorsiflexion diminished by 14%. The knee had the highest symmetry gain (4.1-3.4%). Angle-angle plot subtended areas decreased from 108° to 40°(2) (hip) and from 204° to 85°(2) (knee), showing improvement in movement symmetry. [Conclusion] We concluded that the squat is an effective multifactorial exercise to estimate rehabilitation outcomes after megaprosthesis, also considering that compressive and shear forces are minimal up to 60-70° of knee flexion.

  3. In Vivo Kinematics of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament Deficient Knee During Wide-Based Squat Using a 2D/3D Registration Technique.

    PubMed

    Miyaji, Takeshi; Gamada, Kazuyoshi; Kidera, Kenichi; Ikuta, Futoshi; Yoneta, Kei; Shindo, Hiroyuki; Osaki, Makoto; Yonekura, Akihiko

    2012-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficiency increases the risk of early osteoarthritis (OA). Studies of ACL deficient knee kinematics would be important to reveal the disease process and therefore to find mechanisms which would potentially slow OA progression. The purpose of this study was to determine if in vivo kinematics of the anterior cruciate ligament deficient (ACLD) knee during a wide-based squat activity differ from kinematics of the contralateral intact knee. Thirty-three patients with a unilateral ACLD knee consented to participate in this institutional review board approved study with the contralateral intact knee serving as the control. In vivo knee kinematics during the wide-based squat were analyzed using a 2D/3D registration technique utilizing CT-based bone models and lateral fluoroscopy. Comparisons were performed using values between 0 and 100° flexion both in flexion and extension phases of the squat activity. Both the ACLD and intact knees demonstrated increasing tibial internal rotation with knee flexion, and no difference was observed in tibial rotation between the groups. The tibia in the ACLD knee was more anterior than that of the contralateral knees at 0 and 5° flexion in both phases (p < 0.05). Tibiofemoral medial contact points of the ACLD knees were more posterior than that of the contralateral knees at 5, 10 and 15° of knee flexion in the extension phase of the squat activity (p < 0.05). Tibiofemoral lateral contact points of the ACLD knees were more posterior than that of the contralateral knees at 0° flexion in the both phases (p < 0.05). The kinematics of the ACLD and contralateral intact knees were similar during the wide-based squat except at the low flexion angles. Therefore, we conclude the wide-based squat may be recommended for the ACLD knee by avoiding terminal extension.

  4. Knee Bursitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... make a diagnosis of knee bursitis during a physical exam. Your doctor will inspect your knee by: Comparing the condition of both knees, particularly if only one is painful Gently pressing on different areas of your knee to detect warmth, swelling and the source of pain Carefully moving ...

  5. The effect of trunk flexion on able-bodied gait.

    PubMed

    Saha, Devjani; Gard, Steven; Fatone, Stefania

    2008-05-01

    This study examined the effect of sagittal trunk posture on the gait of able-bodied subjects. Understanding the effect of trunk posture on gait is of clinical interest since alterations in trunk posture often occur with age or in the presence of spinal pathologies, such as lumbar flatback. Gait analysis was conducted on 14 adults walking at self-selected slow, normal, and fast walking speeds while maintaining three trunk postures: upright, and with 25+/-7 degrees and 50+/-7 degrees of trunk flexion from the vertical. During trunk-flexed gait, subjects adopted a crouch posture characterized by sustained knee flexion during stance and an increase in ankle dorsiflexion and hip flexion angles. During stance, these kinematic adaptations produced a posterior shift in the positions of the trunk and pelvis, which helped to offset the anterior shift in the trunk mass that occurred with trunk flexion. In this way, kinematic adaptations may have been used to maintain balance by shifting the body's center of mass to a position similar to that of upright walking. These changes in lower limb joint kinematics created a phase lag in the position of the hip joint center relative to that of the ankle joint center in the sagittal plane. Alterations in the sagittal alignment of the hip and ankle joint positions were associated with a phase lag in the vertical position, velocity, and acceleration of the body's center of mass (BCOM) relative to upright walking. Since the vertical ground reaction force (GRF(v)) is proportional to the vertical acceleration of the BCOM, significant changes were also seen in the GRF(v) during trunk-flexed gait. In summary, kinematic adaptations necessary to maintain dynamic balance altered the trajectory and acceleration of the BCOM in the vertical direction, which was reflected in the GRF(v). The results of this study may help clinicians better understand the nature and impact of compensatory mechanisms in patients who exhibit trunk-flexed postures during

  6. Fatigue Effects on Knee Joint Stability During Two Jump Tasks in Women

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Alexis; Olson, Sharon L.; Etnyre, Bruce; Trudelle-Jackson, Elaine E.; Bartlett, William; Venegas-Rios, Heidi L.

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic knee joint stability may be affected by the onset of metabolic fatigue during sports participation that could increase the risk for knee injury. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effects of metabolic fatigue on knee muscle activation, peak knee joint angles, and peak knee internal moments in young women during 2 jumping tasks. Fifteen women (mean age: 24.6 ± 2.6 years) participated in one nonfatigued session and one fatigued session. During both sessions, peak knee landing flexion and valgus joint angles, peak knee extension and varus/valgus internal moments, electromyographic (EMG) muscle activity of the quadriceps and hamstrings, and quadriceps/hamstring EMG cocontraction ratio were measured. The tasks consisted of a single-legged drop jump from a 40-cm box and a 20-cm, up-down, repeated hop task. The fatigued session included a Wingate anaerobic protocol followed by performance of the 2 tasks. Although participants exhibited greater knee injury–predisposing factors during the fatigued session, such as lesser knee flexion joint angles, greater knee valgus joint angles, and greater varus/valgus internal joint moments for both tasks, only knee flexion during the up-down task was statistically significant (p = 0.028). Metabolic fatigue may perhaps predispose young women to knee injuries by impairing dynamic knee joint stability. Training strength-endurance components and the ability to maintain control of body movements in either rested or fatigued situations might help reduce injuries in young women athletes. PMID:20300024

  7. Fatigue effects on knee joint stability during two jump tasks in women.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Alexis; Olson, Sharon L; Etnyre, Bruce; Trudelle-Jackson, Elaine E; Bartlett, William; Venegas-Rios, Heidi L

    2010-04-01

    Dynamic knee joint stability may be affected by the onset of metabolic fatigue during sports participation that could increase the risk for knee injury. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effects of metabolic fatigue on knee muscle activation, peak knee joint angles, and peak knee internal moments in young women during 2 jumping tasks. Fifteen women (mean age: 24.6 +/- 2.6 years) participated in one nonfatigued session and one fatigued session. During both sessions, peak knee landing flexion and valgus joint angles, peak knee extension and varus/valgus internal moments, electromyographic (EMG) muscle activity of the quadriceps and hamstrings, and quadriceps/hamstring EMG cocontraction ratio were measured. The tasks consisted of a single-legged drop jump from a 40-cm box and a 20-cm, up-down, repeated hop task. The fatigued session included a Wingate anaerobic protocol followed by performance of the 2 tasks. Although participants exhibited greater knee injury-predisposing factors during the fatigued session, such as lesser knee flexion joint angles, greater knee valgus joint angles, and greater varus/valgus internal joint moments for both tasks, only knee flexion during the up-down task was statistically significant (p = 0.028). Metabolic fatigue may perhaps predispose young women to knee injuries by impairing dynamic knee joint stability. Training strength-endurance components and the ability to maintain control of body movements in either rested or fatigued situations might help reduce injuries in young women athletes.

  8. Novel knee joint mechanism of transfemoral prosthesis for stair ascent.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Koh; Wada, Takahiro; Harada, Ryuchi; Tachiwana, Shinichi

    2013-06-01

    The stability of a transfemoral prosthesis when walking on flat ground has been established by recent advances in knee joint mechanisms and their control methods. It is, however, difficult for users of a transfemoral prosthesis to ascend stairs. This difficulty is mainly due to insufficient generation of extension moment around the knee joint of the prosthesis to lift the body to the next step on the staircase and prevent any unexpected flexion of the knee joint in the stance phase. Only a prosthesis with an actuator has facilitated stair ascent using a step-over-step gait (1 foot is placed per step). However, its use has issues associated with the durability, cost, maintenance, and usage environment. Therefore, the purpose of this research is to develop a novel knee joint mechanism for a prosthesis that generates an extension moment around the knee joint in the stance phase during stair ascent, without the use of any actuators. The proposed mechanism is based on the knowledge that the ground reaction force increases during the stance phase when the knee flexion occurs. Stair ascent experiments with the prosthesis showed that the proposed prosthesis can realize stair ascent without any undesirable knee flexion. In addition, the prosthesis is able to generate a positive knee joint moment power in the stance phase even without any power source.

  9. How effective is multiple needle puncturing for medial soft tissue balancing during total knee arthroplasty? A cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Koh, In Jun; Kwak, Dai-Soon; Kim, Tae Kyun; Park, In Joo; In, Yong

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the quantitative effect and risk factors for over-release during multiple needle puncturing (MNP) for medial gap balancing in varus total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Of the ten pairs of cadaveric knees, one knee from each pair was randomly assigned to undergo MNP in extension (E group), while the other knee underwent MNP in flexion (F group). The increased extension and 90° flexion gaps after every five needle punctures were measured until over-release occurred. The extension gap (< 4mm) and the 90° flexion gap (< 6mm) gradually increased in both groups. The 90° flexion gaps increased more selectively than did the extension gaps. MNP in the flexed knee, a narrow MCL, and severe osteoarthritis were associated with a smaller number of MNPs required to over-release.

  10. Knee pain, knee injury, knee osteoarthritis & work.

    PubMed

    Dulay, Gurdeep S; Cooper, C; Dennison, E M

    2015-06-01

    Symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA) can be viewed as the end result of a molecular cascade which ensues after certain triggers occur and ultimately results in irreversible damage to the articular cartilage. The clinical phenotype that knee OA can produce is variable and often difficult to accurately predict. This is further complicated by the often poor relationship between radiographic OA and knee pain. As a consequence, it can be difficult to compare studies that use different definitions of OA. However, the literature suggests that while there are multiple causes of knee OA, two have attracted particular attention over recent years; occupation related knee OA and OA subsequent to previous knee injury. The evidence of a relationship, and the strength of this association, is discussed in this chapter.

  11. Evaluation of total knee mechanics using a crouching simulator with a synthetic knee substitute.

    PubMed

    Lowry, Michael; Rosenbaum, Heather; Walker, Peter S

    2016-05-01

    Mechanical evaluation of total knees is frequently required for aspects such as wear, strength, kinematics, contact areas, and force transmission. In order to carry out such tests, we developed a crouching simulator, based on the Oxford-type machine, with novel features including a synthetic knee including ligaments. The instrumentation and data processing methods enabled the determination of contact area locations and interface forces and moments, for a full flexion-extension cycle. To demonstrate the use of the simulator, we carried out a comparison of two different total knee designs, cruciate retaining and substituting. The first part of the study describes the simulator design and the methodology for testing the knees without requiring cadaveric knee specimens. The degrees of freedom of the anatomic hip and ankle joints were reproduced. Flexion-extension was obtained by changing quadriceps length, while variable hamstring forces were applied using springs. The knee joint was represented by three-dimensional printed blocks on to which the total knee components were fixed. Pretensioned elastomeric bands of realistic stiffnesses passed through holes in the block at anatomical locations to represent ligaments. Motion capture of the knees during flexion, together with laser scanning and computer modeling, was used to reconstruct contact areas on the bearing surfaces. A method was also developed for measuring tibial component interface forces and moments as a comparative assessment of fixation. The method involved interposing Tekscan pads at locations on the interface. Overall, the crouching machine and the methodology could be used for many different mechanical measurements of total knee designs, adapted especially for comparative or parametric studies.

  12. The influence of pain on knee motion in patients with osteoarthritis undergoing total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Damien; Hanratty, Brian; Thompson, Neville; Beverland, David E

    2009-04-01

    Pain is the predominant symptom of degenerative knee arthritis and the main reason patients undergo total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Variation in patient response to pain has proved difficult to quantify. The effect of removing pain by testing TKA patients' range of motion (ROM) before and after the administration of anesthesia has not previously been analyzed. This study objectively quantifies the effect of eliminating pain on knee joint ROM for a typical group of TKA patients with osteoarthritis. We prospectively recruited 141 patients with osteoarthritis admitted for TKA to assess the inhibitory effect of pain on ROM. Passive maximum flexion, extension, and ROM were measured preoperatively before and after administration of anesthesia (spinal anesthetic followed by femoral and sciatic regional nerve blocks). Following pain abolition, passive maximum flexion increased by an average of 13.4 degrees (SD=11.9 degrees), passive maximum extension improved by an average of 3.0 degrees (SD=4.2 degrees), and passive ROM increased by an average of 16.4 degrees (SD=13.1 degrees). The change in each parameter was statistically significant (P<.0001). Improvements in flexion (P=.01) and ROM (P=.005) were significantly greater in women. Measurements taken before anesthesia reflect knee ROM that the patient will tolerate before pain becomes the limiting factor, while measurements taken after anesthesia is achieved suggest the knee ROM possible once pain is eliminated. Abolition of pain led to significant increases in knee flexion, extension, and ROM, suggesting that pain has a significant inhibitory effect on knee motion.

  13. WEAK LENSING MASS RECONSTRUCTION: FLEXION VERSUS SHEAR

    SciTech Connect

    Pires, S.

    2010-11-10

    Weak gravitational lensing has proven to be a powerful tool to map directly the distribution of dark matter in the universe. The technique, currently used, relies on the accurate measurement of the gravitational shear that corresponds to the first-order distortion of the background galaxy images. More recently, a new technique has been introduced that relies on the accurate measurement of the gravitational flexion that corresponds to the second-order distortion of the background galaxy images. This technique should probe structures on smaller scales than that of shear analysis. The goal of this paper is to compare the ability of shear and flexion to reconstruct the dark matter distribution by taking into account the dispersion in shear and flexion measurements. Our results show that the flexion is less sensitive than shear for constructing the convergence maps on scales that are physically feasible for mapping, meaning that flexion alone should not be used to do convergence map reconstruction, even on small scales.

  14. Intraoperative evaluation of total knee replacement: kinematic assessment with a navigation system.

    PubMed

    Casino, Daniela; Zaffagnini, Stefano; Martelli, Sandra; Lopomo, Nicola; Bignozzi, Simone; Iacono, Francesco; Russo, Alessandro; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2009-04-01

    Interest in the kinematics of reconstructed knees has increased since it was shown that the alteration of knee motion could lead to abnormal wear and damage to soft tissues. We performed intraoperative kinematic measurements using a navigation system to study knee kinematics before and after posterior substituting rotating platform total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We verified intraoperatively (1) if varus/valgus (VV) laxity and anterior/posterior (AP) laxity were restored after TKA; (2) if TKA induced abnormal femoral rollback; and (3) how tibial axial rotation was influenced by TKA throughout the range of flexion. We found that TKA improved alignment in preoperative osteoarthritic varus knees which became neutral after surgery and maintained a neutral alignment in neutral knees. The VV stability at 0 degrees was restored while AP laxity at 90 degrees significantly increased after TKA. Following TKA, the femur had an abnormal anterior translation up to 60 degrees of flexion, followed by a small rollback of 12 +/- 5 mm. TKA influenced the tibia rotation pattern during flexion, but not the total amount of internal/external rotation throughout whole range of flexion, which was preserved after TKA (6 degrees +/- 5 degrees ). This study showed that the protocol proposed might be useful to adjust knee stability at time zero and that knee kinematic outcome during total knee replacement can be monitored by a navigation system.

  15. [Congenital knee dislocation: case report].

    PubMed

    Arvinius, C; Luque, R; Díaz-Ceacero, C; Marco, F

    2016-01-01

    Congenital knee dislocation is an infrequent condition with unknown etiology. In some cases it occurs as an isolated condition, while in others it coexists with associated conditions or syndromes. The treatment of congenital knee dislocation is driven by the severity and flexibility of the deformity. The literature includes from serial casting or the Pavlik harness to quadriceps tendon plasty or femoral osteotomies. We report herein the case of a congenital dislocation treated with serial casting with a good outcome.

  16. Knee kinematics in medial osteoarthritis during in vivo weight-bearing activities.

    PubMed

    Hamai, Satoshi; Moro-oka, Taka-Aki; Miura, Hiromasa; Shimoto, Takeshi; Higaki, Hidehiko; Fregly, Benjamin J; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Banks, Scott A

    2009-12-01

    Dynamic knee kinematics were analyzed for medial osteoarthritic (OA) knees in three activities, including two types of maximum knee flexion. Continuous x-ray images of kneeling, squatting, and stair climbing motions were taken using a large flat panel detector. CT-derived bone models were used for the model registration-based 3D kinematic measurements. Three-dimensional joint kinematics and contact locations were determined using two methods: bone-fixed coordinate systems and by interrogation of CT-based bone model surfaces. The femur exhibited gradual external rotation with knee flexion for kneeling and squatting activities, and gradual internal rotation with knee extension for stair climbing. From 100 degrees to 120 degrees flexion, contact locations showed a medial pivot pattern similar to normal knees. However, knees with medial OA displayed a femoral internal rotation bias and less posterior translation when compared with normal knees. A classic screw-home movement was not observed in OA knees near extension. Decreased variability with both activities and methods of calculation were demonstrated for all three activities. In conclusion, the weight-bearing kinematics of patients with medial OA differs from normal knees. Pathological changes of the articulating surfaces and the ligaments correspond to observed abnormalities in knee kinematics.

  17. The effect of different types of insoles or shoe modifications on medial loading of the knee in persons with medial knee osteoarthritis: a randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Graham J.; Parkes, Matthew J.; Forsythe, Laura.; Felson, David T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many conservative treatments exist for medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) which aims to reduce the external knee adduction moment (EKAM). The objective of this study was to determine the difference between different shoes and lateral wedge insoles on EKAM, knee adduction angular impulse (KAAI), external knee flexion moment, pain, and comfort when walking in individuals with medial knee OA. Seventy individuals with medial knee OA underwent three‐dimensional walking gait analysis in five conditions (barefoot, control shoe, typical wedge, supported wedge, and mobility shoe) with pain and comfort recorded concurrently. The change in EKAM, KAAI, external knee flexion moment, pain, and comfort were assessed using multiple linear regressions and pairwise comparisons. Compared with the control shoe, lateral wedge insoles and barefoot walking significantly reduced early stance EKAM and KAAI. The mobility shoe showed no effect. A significant reduction in latter stance EKAM was seen in the lateral wedge insoles compared to the other conditions, with only the barefoot condition reducing the external knee flexion moment. However, the mobility shoe showed significant immediate knee pain reduction and improved comfort scores. Different lateral wedge insoles show comparable reductions in medial knee loading and in our study, the mobility shoe did not affect medial loading. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Orthopaedic Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 33:1646–1654, 2015. PMID:25991385

  18. The effect of different types of insoles or shoe modifications on medial loading of the knee in persons with medial knee osteoarthritis: a randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Jones, Richard K; Chapman, Graham J; Parkes, Matthew J; Forsythe, Laura; Felson, David T

    2015-11-01

    Many conservative treatments exist for medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) which aims to reduce the external knee adduction moment (EKAM). The objective of this study was to determine the difference between different shoes and lateral wedge insoles on EKAM, knee adduction angular impulse (KAAI), external knee flexion moment, pain, and comfort when walking in individuals with medial knee OA. Seventy individuals with medial knee OA underwent three-dimensional walking gait analysis in five conditions (barefoot, control shoe, typical wedge, supported wedge, and mobility shoe) with pain and comfort recorded concurrently. The change in EKAM, KAAI, external knee flexion moment, pain, and comfort were assessed using multiple linear regressions and pairwise comparisons. Compared with the control shoe, lateral wedge insoles and barefoot walking significantly reduced early stance EKAM and KAAI. The mobility shoe showed no effect. A significant reduction in latter stance EKAM was seen in the lateral wedge insoles compared to the other conditions, with only the barefoot condition reducing the external knee flexion moment. However, the mobility shoe showed significant immediate knee pain reduction and improved comfort scores. Different lateral wedge insoles show comparable reductions in medial knee loading and in our study, the mobility shoe did not affect medial loading.

  19. Maximum Velocities in Flexion and Extension Actions for Sport

    PubMed Central

    Jessop, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Speed of movement is fundamental to the outcome of many human actions. A variety of techniques can be implemented in order to maximise movement speed depending on the goal of the movement, constraints, and the time available. Knowing maximum movement velocities is therefore useful for developing movement strategies but also as input into muscle models. The aim of this study was to determine maximum flexion and extension velocities about the major joints in upper and lower limbs. Seven university to international level male competitors performed flexion/extension at each of the major joints in the upper and lower limbs under three conditions: isolated; isolated with a countermovement; involvement of proximal segments. 500 Hz planar high speed video was used to calculate velocities. The highest angular velocities in the upper and lower limb were 50.0 rad·s-1 and 28.4 rad·s-1, at the wrist and knee, respectively. As was true for most joints, these were achieved with the involvement of proximal segments, however, ANOVA analysis showed few significant differences (p<0.05) between conditions. Different segment masses, structures and locations produced differing results, in the upper and lower limbs, highlighting the requirement of segment specific strategies for maximal movements. PMID:28149339

  20. Data Collection and Analysis Using Wearable Sensors for Monitoring Knee Range of Motion after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Chih-Yen; Chen, Kun-Hui; Liu, Kai-Chun; Hsu, Steen Jun-Ping; Chan, Chia-Tai

    2017-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is the most common treatment for degenerative osteoarthritis of that articulation. However, either in rehabilitation clinics or in hospital wards, the knee range of motion (ROM) can currently only be assessed using a goniometer. In order to provide continuous and objective measurements of knee ROM, we propose the use of wearable inertial sensors to record the knee ROM during the recovery progress. Digitalized and objective data can assist the surgeons to control the recovery status and flexibly adjust rehabilitation programs during the early acute inpatient stage. The more knee flexion ROM regained during the early inpatient period, the better the long-term knee recovery will be and the sooner early discharge can be achieved. The results of this work show that the proposed wearable sensor approach can provide an alternative for continuous monitoring and objective assessment of knee ROM recovery progress for TKA patients compared to the traditional goniometer measurements. PMID:28241434

  1. Variable stiffness actuated prosthetic knee to restore knee buckling during stance: a modeling study.

    PubMed

    Wentink, E C; Koopman, H F J M; Stramigioli, S; Rietman, J S; Veltink, P H

    2013-06-01

    Most modern intelligent knee prosthesis use dampers to modulate dynamic behavior and prevent excessive knee flexion, but they dissipate energy and do not assist in knee extension. Energy efficient variable stiffness control (VSA) can reduce the energy consumption yet effectively modulate the dynamic behavior and use stored energy during flexion to assist in subsequent extension. A principle design of energy efficient VSA in a prosthetic knee is proposed and analyzed for the specific case of rejection of a disturbed stance phase. The concept is based on the principle that the output stiffness of a spring can be changed without changing the energy stored in the elastic elements of the spring. The usability of this concept to control a prosthetic knee is evaluated using a model. Part of the stance phase of the human leg was modeled by a double pendulum. Specifically the rejection of a common disturbance of transfemoral prosthetic gait, an unlocked knee at heel strike, was evaluated. The ranges of spring stiffnesses were determined such that the angular characteristics of a normal stance phase were preserved, but disturbances could also be rejected. The simulations predicted that energy efficient VSA can be useful for the control of prosthetic knees.

  2. The Transseptal Arthroscopic Knee Portal Is in Close Proximity to the Popliteal Artery: A Cadaveric Study.

    PubMed

    Cancienne, Jourdan M; Werner, Brian C; Burrus, M Tyrrell; Kandil, Abdurrahman; Conte, Evan J; Gwathmey, Frank W; Miller, Mark D

    2017-03-10

    The purpose of this study was to use fluoroscopy to measure the distance between the transseptal portal and the popliteal artery under arthroscopic conditions with an intact posterior knee capsule, and to determine the difference between 90 degrees of knee flexion and full extension. The popliteal artery of eight fresh-frozen cadaveric knees was dissected and cannulated proximal to the knee joint. The posterolateral, posteromedial, and transseptal portals were then established at 90 degrees of flexion. A 4-mm switching stick was placed through the transseptal portal, and barium contrast was injected into the popliteal artery. A lateral fluoroscopic image was taken with the knee in 90 degrees of flexion and full extension, and the distance between the popliteal artery and the switching stick was measured and compared using a paired t-test. In knee flexion, the average distance between the transseptal portal and the anterior aspect of the popliteal artery for the eight cadaveric specimens was 12.0 mm ± 3.3 mm; in extension, this decreased to 9.0 mm ± 2.7 mm. The distance between the transseptal portal and popliteal artery was significantly higher at 90 degrees of knee flexion as compared with extension (p = 0.0005). The transseptal posterior knee arthroscopic portal must be carefully created due to the close proximity to the popliteal artery, and may be closer to the artery than previously reported in specimens with an intact posterior knee capsule. Creating the portal with the knee in flexion significantly displaces the popliteal artery away from the portal reducing the risk of arterial injury.

  3. A Highly Backdrivable, Lightweight Knee Actuator for Investigating Gait in Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Sulzer, James S.; Roiz, Ronald A.; Peshkin, Michael A.; Patton, James L.

    2012-01-01

    Many of those who survive a stroke develop a gait disability known as stiff-knee gait (SKG). Characterized by reduced knee flexion angle during swing, people with SKG walk with poor energy efficiency and asymmetry due to the compensatory mechanisms required to clear the foot. Previous modeling studies have shown that knee flexion activity directly before the foot leaves the ground, and this should result in improved knee flexion angle during swing. The goal of this research is to physically test this hypothesis using robotic intervention. We developed a device that is capable of assisting knee flexion torque before swing but feels imperceptible (transparent) for the rest of the gait cycle. This device uses sheathed Bowden cable to control the deflection of a compliant torsional spring in a configuration known as a Series Elastic Remote Knee Actuator (SERKA). In this investigation, we describe the design and evaluation of SERKA, which includes a pilot experiment on stroke subjects. SERKA could supply a substantial torque (12 N· m) in less than 20 ms, with a maximum torque of 41 N·m. The device resisted knee flexion imperceptibly when desired, at less than 1 N·m rms torque during normal gait. With the remote location of the actuator, the user experiences a mass of only 1.2 kg on the knee. We found that the device was capable of increasing both peak knee flexion angle and velocity during gait in stroke subjects. Thus, the SERKA is a valid experimental device that selectively alters knee kinetics and kinematics in gait after stroke. PMID:22563305

  4. Sagittal Plane Knee Biomechanics and Vertical Ground Reaction Forces Are Modified Following ACL Injury Prevention Programs

    PubMed Central

    Padua, Darin A.; DiStefano, Lindsay J.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) occur because of excessive loading on the knee. ACL injury prevention programs can influence sagittal plane ACL loading factors and vertical ground reaction force (VGRF). Objective: To determine the influence of ACL injury prevention programs on sagittal plane knee biomechanics (anterior tibial shear force, knee flexion angle/moments) and VGRF. Data Sources: The PubMed database was searched for studies published between January 1988 and June 2008. Reference lists of selected articles were also reviewed. Study Selection: Studies were included that evaluated healthy participants for knee flexion angle, sagittal plane knee kinetics, or VGRF after performing a multisession training program. Two individuals reviewed all articles and determined which articles met the selection criteria. Approximately 4% of the articles fulfilled the selection criteria. Data Extraction: Data were extracted regarding each program’s duration, frequency, exercise type, population, supervision, and testing procedures. Means and variability measures were recorded to calculate effect sizes. One reviewer extracted all data and assessed study quality using PEDro (Physiotherapy Evidence Database). A second reviewer (blinded) verified all information. Results: There is moderate evidence to indicate that knee flexion angle, external knee flexion moment, and VGRF can be successfully modified by an ACL injury prevention program. Programs utilizing multiple exercises (ie, integrated training) appear to produce the most improvement, in comparison to that of single-exercise programs. Knee flexion angle was improved following integrated training (combined balance and strength exercises or combined plyometric and strength exercises). Similarly, external knee flexion moment was improved following integrated training consisting of balance, plyometric, and strength exercises. VGRF was improved when incorporating supervision with instruction and

  5. Effect of antagonist muscle fatigue on knee extension torque.

    PubMed

    Beltman, J G M; Sargeant, A J; Ball, D; Maganaris, C N; de Haan, A

    2003-09-01

    The effect of hamstring fatigue on knee extension torque was examined at different knee angles for seven male subjects. Before and after a dynamic flexion fatigue protocol (180 degrees s(-1), until dynamic torque had declined by 50%), maximal voluntary contraction extension torque was measured at four knee flexion angles (90 degrees, 70 degrees, 50 degrees and 30 degrees ). Maximal torque generating capacity and voluntary activation of the quadriceps muscle were determined using electrical stimulation. Average rectified EMG of the biceps femoris was determined. Mean dynamic flexion torque declined by 48+/-11%. Extensor maximal voluntary contraction torque, maximal torque generating capacity, voluntary activation and average rectified EMG at the four knee angles were unaffected by the hamstring fatigue protocol. Only at 50 degrees knee angle was voluntary activation significantly lower (15.7%) after fatigue ( P<0.05). In addition, average rectified EMG before fatigue was not significantly influenced by knee angle. It was concluded that a fatigued hamstring muscle did not increase the maximal voluntary contraction extension torque and knee angle did not change coactivation. Three possible mechanisms may explain the results: a potential difference in recruited fibre populations in antagonist activity compared with the fibres which were fatigued in the protocol, a smaller loss in isometric torque generating capacity of the hamstring muscle than was expected from the dynamic measurements and/or a reduction in voluntary activation.

  6. Intraoperative passive knee kinematics during total knee arthroplasty surgery.

    PubMed

    Young, Kathryn L; Dunbar, Michael J; Richardson, Glen; Astephen Wilson, Janie L

    2015-11-01

    Surgical navigation systems for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) surgery are capable of capturing passive three-dimensional (3D) angular joint movement patterns intraoperatively. Improved understanding of patient-specific knee kinematic changes between pre and post-implant states and their relationship with post-operative function may be important in optimizing TKA outcomes. However, a comprehensive characterization of the variability among patients has yet to be investigated. The objective of this study was to characterize the variability within frontal plane joint movement patterns intraoperatively during a passive knee flexion exercise. Three hundred and forty patients with severe knee osteoarthritis (OA) received a primary TKA using a navigation system. Passive kinematics were captured prior to (pre-implant), and after prosthesis insertion (post-implant). Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to capture characteristic patterns of knee angle kinematics among patients, to identify potential patient subgroups based on these patterns, and to examine the subgroup-specific changes in these patterns between pre- and post-implant states. The first four extracted patterns explained 99.9% of the diversity within the frontal plane angle patterns among the patients. Post-implant, the magnitude of the frontal plane angle shifted toward a neutral mechanical axis in all phenotypes, yet subtle pattern (shape of curvature) features of the pre-implant state persisted.

  7. Torso flexion modulates stiffness and reflex response.

    PubMed

    Granata, K P; Rogers, E

    2007-08-01

    Neuromuscular factors that contribute to spinal stability include trunk stiffness from passive and active tissues as well as active feedback from reflex response in the paraspinal muscles. Trunk flexion postures are a recognized risk factor for occupational low-back pain and may influence these stabilizing control factors. Sixteen healthy adult subjects participated in an experiment to record trunk stiffness and paraspinal muscle reflex gain during voluntary isometric trunk extension exertions. The protocol was designed to achieve trunk flexion without concomitant influences of external gravitational moment, i.e., decouple the effects of trunk flexion posture from trunk moment. Systems identification analyses identified reflex gain by quantifying the relation between applied force disturbances and time-dependent EMG response in the lumbar paraspinal muscles. Trunk stiffness was characterized from a second order model describing the dynamic relation between the force disturbances versus the kinematic response of the torso. Trunk stiffness increased significantly with flexion angle and exertion level. This was attributed to passive tissue contributions to stiffness. Reflex gain declined significantly with trunk flexion angle but increased with exertion level. These trends were attributed to correlated changes in baseline EMG recruitment in the lumbar paraspinal muscles. Female subjects demonstrated greater reflex gain than males and the decline in reflex gain with flexion angle was greater in females than in males. Results reveal that torso flexion influences neuromuscular factors that control spinal stability and suggest that posture may contribute to the risk of instability injury.

  8. Head flexion angle while using a smartphone.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sojeong; Kang, Hwayeong; Shin, Gwanseob

    2015-01-01

    Repetitive or prolonged head flexion posture while using a smartphone is known as one of risk factors for pain symptoms in the neck. To quantitatively assess the amount and range of head flexion of smartphone users, head forward flexion angle was measured from 18 participants when they were conducing three common smartphone tasks (text messaging, web browsing, video watching) while sitting and standing in a laboratory setting. It was found that participants maintained head flexion of 33-45° (50th percentile angle) from vertical when using the smartphone. The head flexion angle was significantly larger (p < 0.05) for text messaging than for the other tasks, and significantly larger while sitting than while standing. Study results suggest that text messaging, which is one of the most frequently used app categories of smartphone, could be a main contributing factor to the occurrence of neck pain of heavy smartphone users. Practitioner Summary: In this laboratory study, the severity of head flexion of smartphone users was quantitatively evaluated when conducting text messaging, web browsing and video watching while sitting and standing. Study results indicate that text messaging while sitting caused the largest head flexion than that of other task conditions.

  9. Verification of predicted knee replacement kinematics during simulated gait in the Kansas knee simulator.

    PubMed

    Halloran, Jason P; Clary, Chadd W; Maletsky, Lorin P; Taylor, Mark; Petrella, Anthony J; Rullkoetter, Paul J

    2010-08-01

    Evaluating total knee replacement kinematics and contact pressure distributions is an important element of preclinical assessment of implant designs. Although physical testing is essential in the evaluation process, validated computational models can augment these experiments and efficiently evaluate perturbations of the design or surgical variables. The objective of the present study was to perform an initial kinematic verification of a dynamic finite element model of the Kansas knee simulator by comparing predicted tibio- and patellofemoral kinematics with experimental measurements during force-controlled gait simulation. A current semiconstrained, cruciate-retaining, fixed-bearing implant mounted in aluminum fixtures was utilized. An explicit finite element model of the simulator was developed from measured physical properties of the machine, and loading conditions were created from the measured experimental feedback data. The explicit finite element model allows both rigid body and fully deformable solutions to be chosen based on the application of interest. Six degrees-of-freedom kinematics were compared for both tibio- and patellofemoral joints during gait loading, with an average root mean square (rms) translational error of 1.1 mm and rotational rms error of 1.3 deg. Model sensitivity to interface friction and damping present in the experimental joints was also evaluated and served as a secondary goal of this paper. Modifying the metal-polyethylene coefficient of friction from 0.1 to 0.01 varied the patellar flexion-extension and tibiofemoral anterior-posterior predictions by 7 deg and 2 mm, respectively, while other kinematic outputs were largely insensitive.

  10. A kinetic and kinematic analysis of the effect of stochastic resonance electrical stimulation and knee sleeve during gait in osteoarthritis of the knee.

    PubMed

    Collins, Amber; Blackburn, Troy; Olcott, Chris; Jordan, Joanne M; Yu, Bing; Weinhold, Paul

    2014-02-01

    Extended use of knee sleeves in populations at risk for knee osteoarthritis progression has shown functional and quality of life benefits; however, additional comprehensive kinematic and kinetic analyses are needed to determine possible physical mechanisms of these benefits which may be due to the sleeve's ability to enhance knee proprioception. A novel means of extending these enhancements may be through stochastic resonance stimulation. Our goal was to determine whether the use of a knee sleeve alone or combined with stochastic resonance electrical stimulation improves knee mechanics in knee osteoarthritis. Gait kinetics and kinematics were assessed in subjects with medial knee osteoarthritis when presented with four conditions: control1, no electrical stimulation/sleeve, 75% threshold stimulation/sleeve, and control2. An increase in knee flexion angle throughout stance and a decrease in flexion moment occurring immediately after initial contact were seen in the stimulation/sleeve and sleeve alone conditions; however, these treatment conditions did not affect the knee adduction angle and internal knee abduction moment during weight acceptance. No differences were found between the sleeve alone and the stochastic resonance with sleeve conditions. A knee sleeve can improve sagittal-plane knee kinematics and kinetics, although adding the current configuration of stochastic resonance did not enhance these effects.

  11. A multicenter analysis of axial femorotibial rotation after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Douglas A; Komistek, Richard D; Mahfouz, Mohamed R; Walker, Scott A; Tucker, Abby

    2004-11-01

    A multicenter analysis was done to determine in vivo femorotibial axial rotation magnitudes and patterns in 1,027 knees (normal knees, nonimplanted ACL-deficient knees, and multiple designs of total knee arthroplasty). All knees were analyzed using fluoroscopy and a three-dimensional computer model-fitting technique during a deep knee bend and/or gait. Normal knees showed 16.5 degrees and 5.7 degrees of internal tibial rotation during a deep knee bend and gait, respectively. Rotation magnitudes and the percent having normal axial rotation patterns decreased in all total knee arthroplasty groups during a deep knee bend. During gait, all knee arthroplasty groups had similar rotational patterns (limited magnitudes). Average axial rotational magnitudes in gait and a deep knee bend were similar among major implant categories (ie, fixed-bearing versus mobile-bearing, etc). Average values in normal knees and ACL-retaining total knee arthroplasty patients (16.5 degrees and 8.1 degrees , respectively) were higher than in groups in which the ACL was absent (< 4.0 degrees ). All total knee arthroplasty groups had at least 19% of patients have a reverse axial rotational pattern during a deep knee bend and at least 31% during gait. Normal axial rotation patterns are essential for good patellar tracking, reduction of patellofemoral shear forces, and maximization of knee flexion.

  12. Is latero-medial patellar mobility related to the range of motion of the knee joint after total knee arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Ota, Susumu; Nakashima, Takeshi; Morisaka, Ayako; Omachi, Takaaki; Ida, Kunio; Kawamura, Morio

    2010-12-01

    Diminished range of motion (ROM) of the knee joint after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is thought to be related to reduced patellar mobility. This has not been confirmed clinically due to a lack of quantitative methods adequate for measuring patellar mobility. We investigated the relationship between patellar mobility by a reported quantitative method and knee joint ROM after TKA. Forty-nine patients [osteoarthritis--OA: 29 knees; rheumatoid arthritis--RA: 20 knees] were examined after TKA. Respective medial and lateral patellar mobility was measured 1 and 6 months postoperatively using a patellofemoral arthrometer (PFA). Knee joint ROM was also measured in each of those 2 sessions. Although the flexion and extension of the knee joints improved significantly from 1 to 6 months after TKA, the medial and lateral patellar displacements (LPDs) failed to improve during that same period. Moreover, only the changes in knee flexion and medial patellar displacement (MPD) between the two sessions were positively correlated (r = 0.31, p < 0.05). However, our findings demonstrated that medial and lateral patellar mobility had no sufficient longitudinal relationship with knee ROM after TKA.

  13. Highly conforming polyethylene inlays reduce the in vivo variability of knee joint kinematics after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Daniilidis, Kiriakos; Skwara, Adrian; Vieth, Volker; Fuchs-Winkelmann, Susanne; Heindel, Walter; Stückmann, Volker; Tibesku, Carsten O

    2012-08-01

    The use of highly conforming polyethylene inlays in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) provides improved anteroposterior stability. The aim of this fluoroscopic study was to investigate the in vivo kinematics during unloaded and loaded active extension with a highly conforming inlay and a flat inlay after cruciate retaining (CR) total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Thirty one patients (50 knees) received a fixed-bearing cruciate retaining total knee arthroplasty (Genesis II, Smith & Nephew, Schenefeld, Germany) for primary knee osteoarthritis. Twenty two of them received a flat polyethylene inlay (PE), nine a deep dished PE and 19 were in the control group (physiological knees). The mean age at the time of surgery was 62 years. Dynamic examination with fluoroscopy was performed to assess the "patella tendon angle" in relation to the knee flexion angle (measure of anteroposterior translation) and the "kinematic index" (measure of reproducibility). Fluoroscopy was performed under active extension and flexion, during unloaded movement, and under full weight bearing, simulated by step climbing. No significant difference was observed between both types of polyethylene inlay designs and the physiological knee during unloaded movement. Anteroposterior (AP) instability was found during weight-bearing movement. The deep-dish inlay resulted in lower AP translation and a non-physiological rollback. Neither inlay types could restore physiological kinematics of the knee. Despite the fact that deep dished inlays reduce the AP translation, centralisation of contact pressure results in non-physiological rollback. The influence of kinematic pattern variability on clinical results warrants further investigation.

  14. Image Segmentation and Analysis of Flexion-Extension Radiographs of Cervical Spines

    PubMed Central

    Enikov, Eniko T.

    2014-01-01

    We present a new analysis tool for cervical flexion-extension radiographs based on machine vision and computerized image processing. The method is based on semiautomatic image segmentation leading to detection of common landmarks such as the spinolaminar (SL) line or contour lines of the implanted anterior cervical plates. The technique allows for visualization of the local curvature of these landmarks during flexion-extension experiments. In addition to changes in the curvature of the SL line, it has been found that the cervical plates also deform during flexion-extension examination. While extension radiographs reveal larger curvature changes in the SL line, flexion radiographs on the other hand tend to generate larger curvature changes in the implanted cervical plates. Furthermore, while some lordosis is always present in the cervical plates by design, it actually decreases during extension and increases during flexion. Possible causes of this unexpected finding are also discussed. The described analysis may lead to a more precise interpretation of flexion-extension radiographs, allowing diagnosis of spinal instability and/or pseudoarthrosis in already seemingly fused spines. PMID:27006937

  15. Position controlled Knee Rehabilitation Orthotic Device for Patients after Total Knee Replacement Arthroplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wannaphan, Patsiri; Chanthasopeephan, Teeranoot

    2016-11-01

    Knee rehabilitation after total knee replacement arthroplasty is essential for patients during their post-surgery recovery period. This study is about designing one degree of freedom knee rehabilitation equipment to assist patients for their post-surgery exercise. The equipment is designed to be used in sitting position with flexion/extension of knee in sagittal plane. The range of knee joint motion is starting from 0 to 90 degrees angle for knee rehabilitation motion. The feature includes adjustable link for different human proportions and the torque feedback control at knee joint during rehabilitation and the control of flexion/extension speed. The motion of the rehabilitation equipment was set to move at low speed (18 degrees/sec) for knee rehabilitation. The rehabilitation link without additional load took one second to move from vertical hanging up to 90° while the corresponding torque increased from 0 Nm to 2 Nm at 90°. When extra load is added, the link took 1.5 seconds to move to 90° The torque is then increased from 0 Nm to 4 Nm. After a period of time, the speed of the motion can be varied. User can adjust the motion to 40 degrees/sec during recovery activity of the knee and users can increase the level of exercise or motion up to 60 degrees/sec to strengthen the muscles during throughout their rehabilitation program depends on each patient. Torque control is included to prevent injury. Patients can use the equipment for home exercise to help reduce the number of hospital visit while the patients can receive an appropriate therapy for their knee recovery program.

  16. Changes in knee kinematics following total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Akbari Shandiz, Mohsen; Boulos, Paul; Saevarsson, Stefan Karl; Yoo, Sam; Miller, Stephen; Anglin, Carolyn

    2016-04-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) changes the knee joint in both intentional and unintentional, known and unknown, ways. Patellofemoral and tibiofemoral kinematics play an important role in postoperative pain, function, satisfaction and revision, yet are largely unknown. Preoperative kinematics, postoperative kinematics or changes in kinematics may help identify causes of poor clinical outcome. Patellofemoral kinematics are challenging to record since the patella is obscured by the metal femoral component in X-ray and moves under the skin. The purpose of this study was to determine the kinematic degrees of freedom having significant changes and to evaluate the variability in individual changes to allow future study of patients with poor clinical outcomes. We prospectively studied the 6 degrees of freedom patellofemoral and tibiofemoral weightbearing kinematics, tibiofemoral contact points and helical axes of rotation of nine subjects before and at least 1 year after total knee arthroplasty using clinically available computed tomography and radiographic imaging systems. Normal kinematics for healthy individuals were identified from the literature. Significant differences existed between pre-TKA and post-TKA kinematics, with the post-TKA kinematics being closer to normal. While on average the pre-total knee arthroplasty knees in this group displayed no pivoting (only translation), individually only five knees displayed this behaviour (of these, two showed lateral pivoting, one showed medial pivoting and one showed central pivoting). There was considerable variability postoperatively as well (five central, two lateral and two medial pivoting). Both preop and postop, flexion behaviour was more hinge-like medially and more rolling laterally. Helical axes were more consistent postop for this group. An inclusive understanding of the pre-TKA and post-TKA kinematics and changes in kinematics due to total knee arthroplasty could improve implant design, patient diagnosis and

  17. Jumper's Knee (Patellar Tendonitis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Jumper's Knee KidsHealth > For Teens > Jumper's Knee A A A ... continued damage to the knee. How Does the Knee Work? To understand how jumper's knee happens, it ...

  18. Knee arthroscopy - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... knee problems such as: a torn knee disc (meniscus) a damaged knee bone (patella) a damaged ligament ... surgeon can see the ligaments, the knee disc (meniscus), the knee bone (patella), the lining of the ...

  19. EFFECTS OF THE GENIUM MICROPROCESSOR KNEE SYSTEM ON KNEE MOMENT SYMMETRY DURING HILL WALKING

    PubMed Central

    Highsmith, M. Jason; Klenow, Tyler D.; Kahle, Jason T.; Wernke, Matthew M.; Carey, Stephanie L.; Miro, Rebecca M.; Lura, Derek J.

    2016-01-01

    Use of the Genium microprocessor knee (MPK) system reportedly improves knee kinematics during walking and other functional tasks compared to other MPK systems. This improved kinematic pattern was observed when walking on different hill conditions and at different speeds. Given the improved kinematics associated with hill walking while using the Genium, a similar improvement in the symmetry of knee kinetics is also feasible. The purpose of this study was to determine if Genium MPK use would reduce the degree of asymmetry (DoA) of peak stance knee flexion moment compared to the C-Leg MPK in transfemoral amputation (TFA) patients. This study used a randomized experimental crossover of TFA patients using Genium and C-Leg MPKs (n = 20). Biomechanical gait analysis by 3D motion tracking with floor mounted force plates of TFA patients ambulating at different speeds on 5° ramps was completed. Knee moment DoA was significantly different between MPK conditions in the slow and fast uphill as well as the slow and self-selected downhill conditions. In a sample of high-functioning TFA patients, Genium knee system accommodation and use improved knee moment symmetry in slow speed walking up and down a five degree ramp compared with C-Leg. Additionally, the Genium improved knee moment symmetry when walking downhill at comfortable speed. These results likely have application in other patients who could benefit from more consistent knee function, such as older patients and others who have slower walking speeds. PMID:28066523

  20. Improvements in knee biomechanics during walking are associated with increased physical activity after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Arnold, John B; Mackintosh, Shylie; Olds, Timothy S; Jones, Sara; Thewlis, Dominic

    2015-12-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in people with knee osteoarthritis increases knee-specific and general physical function, but it has not been established if there is a relationship between changes in these elements of functional ability. This study investigated changes and relationships between knee biomechanics during walking, physical activity, and use of time after TKA. Fifteen people awaiting TKA underwent 3D gait analysis before and six months after surgery. Physical activity and use of time were determined in free-living conditions from a high resolution 24-h activity recall. After surgery, participants displayed significant improvements in sagittal plane knee biomechanics and improved their physical activity profiles, standing for 105 more minutes (p=0.001) and performing 64 min more inside chores on average per day (p=0.008). Changes in sagittal plane knee range of motion (ROM) and peak knee flexion positively correlated with changes in total daily energy expenditure, time spent undertaking moderate to vigorous physical activity, inside chores and passive transport (r=0.52-0.66, p=0.005-0.047). Restoration of knee function occurs in parallel and is associated with improvements in physical activity and use of time after TKA. Increased functional knee ROM is required to support improvements in total and context specific physical activity.

  1. EFFECTS OF THE GENIUM MICROPROCESSOR KNEE SYSTEM ON KNEE MOMENT SYMMETRY DURING HILL WALKING.

    PubMed

    Highsmith, M Jason; Klenow, Tyler D; Kahle, Jason T; Wernke, Matthew M; Carey, Stephanie L; Miro, Rebecca M; Lura, Derek J

    2016-09-01

    Use of the Genium microprocessor knee (MPK) system reportedly improves knee kinematics during walking and other functional tasks compared to other MPK systems. This improved kinematic pattern was observed when walking on different hill conditions and at different speeds. Given the improved kinematics associated with hill walking while using the Genium, a similar improvement in the symmetry of knee kinetics is also feasible. The purpose of this study was to determine if Genium MPK use would reduce the degree of asymmetry (DoA) of peak stance knee flexion moment compared to the C-Leg MPK in transfemoral amputation (TFA) patients. This study used a randomized experimental crossover of TFA patients using Genium and C-Leg MPKs (n = 20). Biomechanical gait analysis by 3D motion tracking with floor mounted force plates of TFA patients ambulating at different speeds on 5° ramps was completed. Knee moment DoA was significantly different between MPK conditions in the slow and fast uphill as well as the slow and self-selected downhill conditions. In a sample of high-functioning TFA patients, Genium knee system accommodation and use improved knee moment symmetry in slow speed walking up and down a five degree ramp compared with C-Leg. Additionally, the Genium improved knee moment symmetry when walking downhill at comfortable speed. These results likely have application in other patients who could benefit from more consistent knee function, such as older patients and others who have slower walking speeds.

  2. Correction of tibial deformity in Paget's disease using the Taylor spatial frame.

    PubMed

    Tsaridis, E; Sarikloglou, S; Papasoulis, E; Lykoudis, S; Koutroumpas, I; Avtzakis, V

    2008-02-01

    A 64-year-old man presented with a severe deformity of the tibia caused by Paget's disease and osteoarthritis of the ipsilateral knee. Total knee replacement required preliminary correction of the tibial deformity. This was successfully achieved by tibial osteotomy followed by distraction osteogenesis using the Taylor spatial frame. The subsequent knee replacement was successful, with no recurrence of deformity.

  3. Metatarsophalangeal Hyperextension Movement Pattern Related to Diabetic Forefoot Deformity

    PubMed Central

    Hastings, Mary K.; Mueller, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Metatarsophalangeal joint (MTPJ) hyperextension deformity is common in people with diabetic neuropathy and a known risk factor for ulceration and amputation. An MTPJ hyperextension movement pattern may contribute to the development of this acquired deformity. Objective The purpose of this study was to determine, in people with diabetes mellitus and peripheral neuropathy (DM+PN), the ankle and MTPJ ranges of motion that characterize an MTPJ hyperextension movement pattern and its relationship to MTPJ deformity severity. It was hypothesized that severity of MTPJ deformity would be related to limitations in maximum ankle dorsiflexion and increased MTPJ extension during active ankle dorsiflexion movement tasks. Design A cross-sectional study design was used that included 34 people with DM+PN (mean age=59 years, SD=9). Methods Computed tomography and 3-dimensional motion capture analysis were used to measure resting MTPJ angle and intersegmental foot motion during the tasks of ankle dorsiflexion and plantar flexion with the knee extended and flexed to 90 degrees, walking, and sit-to/from-stand. Results The MTPJ extension movement pattern during all tasks was directly correlated with severity of MTPJ deformity: maximum ankle dorsiflexion with knee extended (r=.35; 95% confidence interval [CI]=.02, .62), with knee flexed (r=.35; 95% CI=0.01, 0.61), during the swing phase of gait (r=.47; 95% CI=0.16, 0.70), during standing up (r=.48; 95% CI=0.17, 0.71), and during sitting down (r=.38; 95% CI=0.05, 0.64). All correlations were statistically significant. Limitations This study was cross-sectional, and causal relationships cannot be made. Conclusions A hyperextension MTPJ movement pattern associated with limited ankle dorsiflexion has been characterized in people with diabetic neuropathy. Increased MTPJ extension during movement and functional tasks was correlated with severity of resting MTPJ alignment. Repetition of this movement pattern could be an important

  4. In vivo determination of total knee arthroplasty kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Komistek, Richard D; Mahfouz, Mohamed R; Bertin, Kim; Rosenberg, Aaron; Kennedy, William

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if consistent posterior femoral rollback of an asymmetrical posterior cruciate retaining (PCR) total knee arthroplasty was mostly influenced by the implant design, surgical technique, or presence of a well-functioning posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). Three-dimensional femorotibial kinematics was determined for 80 subjects implanted by 3 surgeons, and each subject was evaluated under fluoroscopic surveillance during a deep knee bend. All subjects in this present study having an intact PCL had a well-functioning PCR knee and experienced normal kinematic patterns, although less in magnitude than the normal knee. In addition, a surprising finding was that, on average, subjects without a PCL still achieved posterior femoral rollback from full extension to maximum knee flexion. The findings in this study revealed that implant design did contribute to the normal kinematics demonstrated by subjects having this asymmetrical PCR total knee arthroplasty.

  5. Stress fracture of the proximal fibula after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Vaish, Abhishek; Vaishya, Raju; Agarwal, Amit Kumar; Vijay, Vipul

    2016-04-22

    We report a rare case of proximal fibular fatigue fracture developing 14 years after total knee arthroplasty in a known case of rheumatoid arthritis. A valgus deformity of the knee can put abnormal stress on the upper fibula leading to its failure. We believe that, as the fibula acts as an important lateral strut, its disruption due to a fracture led to rapid progress of the valgus deformity of the knee in this patient.

  6. Runner's Knee

    MedlinePlus

    ... name just two. It's the most common overuse injury among runners, but it can also strike other athletes who do activities that require a lot of knee bending, such as biking, jumping, or skiing. Runner's knee happens when the kneecap (patella) tracks incorrectly over a ...

  7. Effect of knee angle on quadriceps strength and activation after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Theuerkauf, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Quadriceps strength and activation deficits after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury or surgery are typically evaluated at joint positions that are biomechanically advantageous to the quadriceps muscle. However, the effect of knee joint position and the associated changes in muscle length on strength and activation is currently unknown in this population. Here, we examined the effect of knee angle on quadriceps strength, activation, and electrically evoked torque in individuals with ACL reconstruction. Furthermore, we evaluated whether knee angle mediated the relationship between quadriceps weakness and functional performance after ACL reconstruction. Knee strength and activation were tested bilaterally at 90° and 45° of knee flexion in 11 subjects with ACL reconstruction using an interpolated triplet technique. The magnitude of electrically evoked torque at rest was used to quantify peripheral muscle contractile property changes, and the single-leg hop for distance test was used to evaluate functional performance. The results indicated that although quadriceps strength deficits were similar between knee angles, voluntary activation deficits were significantly higher in the reconstructed leg at 45° of knee flexion. On the contrary, the side-to-side evoked torque at rest ratio [i.e., (reconstructed/nonreconstructed) × 100] was significantly lower at 90° than at 45° of knee flexion. The association between quadriceps strength and functional performance was stronger at 45° of knee flexion. The results provide novel evidence that quadriceps activation is selectively affected at 45° of knee flexion and emphasize the importance of assessing quadriceps strength and activation at this position when feasible because it better captures activation deficits. PMID:25997949

  8. Stiff-knee gait in cerebral palsy: how do patients adapt to uneven ground?

    PubMed

    Böhm, Harald; Hösl, Matthias; Schwameder, Hermann; Döderlein, Leonhard

    2014-04-01

    Patients with cerebral palsy frequently experience foot dragging and tripping during walking due to reduced toe clearance mostly caused by a lack of adequate knee flexion in swing (stiff-knee gait). The aim of this study was to investigate adaptive mechanism to an uneven surface in stiff-knee walkers with cerebral palsy. Sixteen patients with bilateral cerebral palsy, GMFCS I-II and stiff-knee gait, mean age 14.1 (SD=6.2) years, were compared to 13 healthy controls with mean age 13.5 (SD=4.8) years. Gait analysis including EMG was performed under even and uneven surface conditions. Similar strategies to improve leg clearance were found in patients as well as in controls. Both adapted with significantly reduced speed and cadence, increased outward foot rotation, knee and hip flexion as well as anterior pelvic tilt. Therefore cerebral palsy and stiff-knee gait did not affect the adaptation capacity on the uneven surface. On the uneven surface an average increase in knee flexion of 7° (SD=3°) and 12° (SD=5°) was observed in controls and patients with cerebral palsy, respectively. Although rectus femoris activity was increased in patients with cerebral palsy, they were able to increase their knee flexion during swing. The results of this study suggest that walking on uneven surface has the potential to improve knee flexion in stiff-knee walkers. Therefore training on uneven surface could be used as a conservative treatment regime alone, in combination with Botulinum neurotoxin or in the rehabilitation of surgery.

  9. The SIGN nail for knee fusion: technique and clinical results

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Duane Ray; Anderson, Lucas Aaron; Haller, Justin M.; Feyissa, Abebe Chala

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Evaluate the efficacy of using the SIGN nail for instrumented knee fusion. Methods: Six consecutive patients (seven knees, three males) with an average age of 30.5 years (range, 18–50 years) underwent a knee arthrodesis with SIGN nail (mean follow-up 10.7 months; range, 8–14 months). Diagnoses included tuberculosis (two knees), congenital knee dislocation in two knees (one patient), bacterial septic arthritis (one knee), malunited spontaneous fusion (one knee), and severe gout with 90° flexion contracture (one knee). The nail was inserted through an anteromedial entry point on the femur and full weightbearing was permitted immediately. Results: All knees had clinical and radiographic evidence of fusion at final follow-up and none required further surgery. Four of six patients ambulated without assistive device, and all patients reported improved overall physical function. There were no post-operative complications. Conclusion: The technique described utilizing the SIGN nail is both safe and effective for knee arthrodesis and useful for austere environments with limited fluoroscopy and implant options. PMID:27163095

  10. Rabbit knee model of post-traumatic joint contractures: the long-term natural history of motion loss and myofibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Kevin A; Sutherland, Craig; Zhang, Mei

    2004-03-01

    Our objective is to describe the natural history of motion loss with time and myofibroblast numbers in a rabbit knee model of post-traumatic joint contractures. Twenty-eight skeletally mature New Zealand White female rabbits had five-mm-squares of cortical bone removed from the medial and lateral femoral condyles of the right knee. A Kirschner wire (K-wire) was used to immobilize the knee joint in maximum flexion. A second operation was performed 8 weeks later to remove the K-wire. The rabbits were divided into four groups depending on the time of remobilization; 0, 8, 16 or 32 weeks. The average flexion contracture of the experimental knees in the 0-week and 8-week remobilization groups (38 degrees and 33 degrees, respectively) were significantly greater when compared with the values of the unoperated contralateral knees (8 degrees). The average flexion contractures of the experimental knees in the 16-week and 32-week remobilization groups were also greater than the unoperated contralateral knees, although they were not statistically significant. The average flexion contractures of the 16-week and 32-week groups were 19 degrees and 18 degrees, respectively, indicating a stabilization of the motion loss. Myofibroblast numbers in the posterior joint capsules were elevated 4-5x in the knees with contractures when compared to the contralateral knees. The initial decrease in severity followed by stabilization of motion loss and the association of motion loss with myofibroblasts mimics the human scenario of permanent post-traumatic joint contractures.

  11. Age-related changes in kinematics of the knee joint during deep squat.

    PubMed

    Fukagawa, Shingo; Leardini, Alberto; Callewaert, Barbara; Wong, Pius D; Labey, Luc; Desloovere, Kaat; Matsuda, Shuichi; Bellemans, Johan

    2012-06-01

    Researchers frequently use the deep knee squat as a motor task in order to evaluate the kinematic performance after total knee arthroplasty. Many authors reported about the kinematics of a normal squatting motion, however, little is known on what the influence of aging is. Twenty-two healthy volunteers in various age groups (range 21-75 years) performed a deep knee squat activity while undergoing motion analysis using an optical tracking system. The influence of aging was evaluated with respect to kinematics of the trunk, hip, knee and ankle joints. Older subjects required significantly more time to perform a deep squat, especially during the descending phase. They also had more knee abduction and delayed peak knee flexion. Older subjects were slower in descend than ascend during the squat. Although older subjects had a trend towards less maximal flexion and less internal rotation of the knee compared to younger subjects, this difference was not significant. Older subjects also showed a trend towards more forward leaning of the trunk, resulting in increased hip flexion and anterior thoracic tilt. This study confirmed that some aspects of squat kinematics vary significantly with age, and that the basic methodology employed here can successfully detect these age-related trends. Older subjects had more abduction of the knee joint, and this may indicate the load distribution of the medial and lateral condyles could be different amongst ages. Age-matched control data are therefore required whenever the performance of an implant is evaluated during a deep knee squat.

  12. Kinematic Analysis of Gait Following Intra-articular Corticosteroid Injection into the Knee Joint with an Acute Exacerbation of Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Saurabh; Szturm, Tony; El-Gabalawy, Hani S.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: The objective of this study was to examine the effects of intra-articular corticosteroid injection (ICI) on ipsilateral knee flexion/extension, ankle dorsiflexion/plantarflexion (DF/PF), and hip abduction/adduction (abd/add) during stance phase in people with an acute exacerbation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) of the knee joint. The study also assessed the effects of ICI on spatiotemporal parameters of gait and functional status in this group. Methods: Nine people with an exacerbation of RA of the knee were recruited. Kinematic and spatiotemporal gait parameters were obtained for each participant. Knee-related functional status was assessed using the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS). Spatiotemporal gait parameters and joint angles (knee flexion, ankle DF/PF, hip abd/add) of the affected side were compared pre- and post-ICI. Results: Data for eight people were available for analysis. Median values for knee flexion and ankle PF increased significantly following ICI. Gait parameters of cadence, velocity, bilateral stride length, bilateral step length, step width, double-support percentage, and step time on the affected side also showed improvement. Pain and knee-related functional status as measured by the KOOS showed improvement. Conclusions: This study demonstrated a beneficial short-term effect of ICI on knee-joint movements, gait parameters, and knee-related functional status in people with acute exacerbation of RA of the knee. PMID:22942516

  13. Improving lensing cluster mass estimate with flexion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardone, V. F.; Vicinanza, M.; Er, X.; Maoli, R.; Scaramella, R.

    2016-11-01

    Gravitational lensing has long been considered as a valuable tool to determine the total mass of galaxy clusters. The shear profile, as inferred from the statistics of ellipticity of background galaxies, allows us to probe the cluster intermediate and outer regions, thus determining the virial mass estimate. However, the mass sheet degeneracy and the need for a large number of background galaxies motivate the search for alternative tracers which can break the degeneracy among model parameters and hence improve the accuracy of the mass estimate. Lensing flexion, i.e. the third derivative of the lensing potential, has been suggested as a good answer to the above quest since it probes the details of the mass profile. We investigate here whether this is indeed the case considering jointly using weak lensing, magnification and flexion. We use a Fisher matrix analysis to forecast the relative improvement in the mass accuracy for different assumptions on the shear and flexion signal-to- noise (S/N) ratio also varying the cluster mass, redshift, and ellipticity. It turns out that the error on the cluster mass may be reduced up to a factor of ˜2 for reasonable values of the flexion S/N ratio. As a general result, we get that the improvement in mass accuracy is larger for more flattened haloes, but it extracting general trends is difficult because of the many parameters at play. We nevertheless find that flexion is as efficient as magnification to increase the accuracy in both mass and concentration determination.

  14. Sagittal plane balancing in the total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Manson, Theodore T; Khanuja, Harpal S; Jacobs, Michael A; Hungerford, Marc W

    2009-01-01

    Postoperative stiffness or instability may result from a total knee arthroplasty imbalanced in the sagittal plane. Total knee arthroplasty instrumentation systems differ in the basic strategies used to assure this balance. In an anterior referencing system, changes in femoral size affect flexion gap tightness, and femoral size selection is paramount to assure sagittal plane balance. Conversely, in posterior referencing systems, femoral size changes do not affect the flexion gap but, rather, influence femoral component-patella articulation. Flexion/extension gap systems use calibrated spacer blocks to ensure gap balance but do not guarantee midrange stability; if used incorrectly, they may cause component malposition and joint line elevation. The authors reviewed the strengths and weaknesses of system types and provided system-specific troubleshooting guidelines for clinicians addressing intraoperative sagittal plane imbalance.

  15. Knee Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... keeping it from bending outward. anterior cruciate ligament (ACL): The ACL connects your femur to your tibia at the ... Common knee sprains usually involve damage to the ACL and/or MCL. The most serious sprains involve ...

  16. Knee MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the knee uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of ... scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radio waves redirect alignment of hydrogen atoms that naturally exist ...

  17. Wipe and flexion reflexes of the frog. II. Response to perturbations.

    PubMed

    Schotland, J L; Rymer, W Z

    1993-05-01

    1. To evaluate the hypothesis that the neural control of sensorimotor transformations may be simplified by using a single control variable, we compared the movement kinematics and muscle activity patterns [electromyograms (EMGs)] of the frog during flexion withdrawal and the hind limb-hind limb wipe reflex before and after adding an external load. In addition, the flexibility of spinal cord circuitry underlying the hind limb-hind limb wipe reflex was evaluated by comparing wipes before and after removal of one of the contributing muscles by cutting a muscle nerve. 2. The kinematics of the movements were recorded using a WATSMART infrared emitter-detector system and quantified using principal-components analysis to provide a measure of the shape (eigenvalues) and orientation (eigenvector coefficients) of the movement trajectories. The neural pattern coordinating the movements was characterized by the latencies and magnitudes of EMGs of seven muscles acting at the hip, knee, and ankle. These variables were compared 1) during flexion withdrawal and the initial movement segment of the limb during the hind limb-hind limb wipe reflex in both unrestrained movements and in movements executed when a load equal to approximately 10% of the animal's body weight was attached to a distal limb segment and 2) during the initial movement segment of the wipe reflex before and after cutting the nerve to the knee flexor-hip extensor, iliofibularis. 3. Addition of the load had no discernible effect on the end-point position of the foot during either reflex. However, during the loaded flexion reflex, the ankle joint did not move until after the hip and knee joints had moved to their normal positions. This delayed flexion of the ankle was accompanied by large increases in the magnitude of EMG activity in two ankle muscles that exceeded the levels found during unrestrained movements. Significant changes in the temporal organization of the EMG pattern accompanied the change in joint angle

  18. Evaluation of a variable resistance orthotic knee joint.

    PubMed

    Herbert-Copley, Andrew; Lemaire, Edward D; Baddour, Natalie

    2016-08-01

    Knee-ankle-foot orthoses (KAFOs) are full leg braces for individuals with knee extensor weakness, designed to support the person during weight bearing activities by preventing knee flexion. KAFOs typically result in an unnatural gait pattern and are primarily used for level ground walking. A novel variable resistance orthotic knee joint, the Ottawalk-Variable Speed (OWVS), was designed to address these limitations. This paper presents a pilot test to evaluate the OWVS functional performance during walking and stair descent. A carbon-fiber KAFO was adjusted for an able-bodied participant by a certified orthotist, with a standard orthotic single axis knee joint on the medial side and the OWVS on the lateral side. The participant performed level ground walking (stance-control, open, closed) and stair descent tests. The operator was able to manually switch between closed mode in terminal swing to open mode in terminal stance for stance-control walking. Knee angle kinematics were similar between open and stance control modes. For stair descent, resistance settings supported the participant as they lowered their body to the next step, but with smaller range of motion compared to the open setting. The Ottawalk-Variable Speed design successfully controls knee flexion during stance and stair descent, with one lateral control joint. Mode switching was fast and appropriate. This microprocessor controlled SCKAFO has a low profile that fits beneath clothing and the variable resistance design will allow people to negotiate different terrain types.

  19. Design and cadaveric validation of a novel device to quantify knee stability during total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Siston, Robert A; Maack, Thomas L; Hutter, Erin E; Beal, Matthew D; Chaudhari, Ajit M W

    2012-11-01

    The success of total knee arthroplasty depends, in part, on the ability of the surgeon to properly manage the soft tissues surrounding the joint, but an objective definition as to what constitutes acceptable postoperative joint stability does not exist. Such a definition may not exist due to lack of suitable instrumentation, as joint stability is currently assessed by visual inspection while the surgeon manipulates the joint. Having the ability to accurately and precisely measure knee stability at the time of surgery represents a key requirement in the process of objectively defining acceptable joint stability. Therefore, we created a novel sterilizable device to allow surgeons to measure varus-valgus, internal-external, or anterior-posterior stability of the knee during a total knee arthroplasty. The device can be quickly adjusted between 0 deg and 90 deg of knee flexion. The device interfaces with a custom surgical navigation system, which records the resultant rotations or translations of the knee while the surgeon applies known loads to a patient's limb with a handle instrumented with a load cell. We validated the performance of the device by having volunteers use it to apply loads to a mechanical linkage that simulated a knee joint; we then compared the joint moments calculated by our stability device against those recorded by a load cell in the simulated knee joint. Validation of the device showed low mean errors (less than 0.21 ± 1.38 Nm and 0.98 ± 3.93 N) and low RMS errors (less than 1.5 Nm and 5 N). Preliminary studies from total knee arthroplasties performed on ten cadaveric specimens also demonstrate the utility of our new device. Eventually, the use of this device may help determine how intra-operative knee stability relates to postoperative function and could lead to an objective definition of knee stability and more efficacious surgical techniques.

  20. Knee Dislocations

    PubMed Central

    Schenck, Robert C.; Richter, Dustin L.; Wascher, Daniel C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Traumatic knee dislocation is becoming more prevalent because of improved recognition and increased exposure to high-energy trauma, but long-term results are lacking. Purpose: To present 2 cases with minimum 20-year follow-up and a review of the literature to illustrate some of the fundamental principles in the management of the dislocated knee. Study Design: Review and case reports. Methods: Two patients with knee dislocations who underwent multiligamentous knee reconstruction were reviewed, with a minimum 20-year follow-up. These patients were brought back for a clinical evaluation using both subjective and objective measures. Subjective measures include the following scales: Lysholm, Tegner activity, visual analog scale (VAS), Short Form–36 (SF-36), International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), and a psychosocial questionnaire. Objective measures included ligamentous examination, radiographic evaluation (including Telos stress radiographs), and physical therapy assessment of function and stability. Results: The mean follow-up was 22 years. One patient had a vascular injury requiring repair prior to ligament reconstruction. The average assessment scores were as follows: SF-36 physical health, 52; SF-36 mental health, 59; Lysholm, 92; IKDC, 86.5; VAS involved, 10.5 mm; and VAS uninvolved, 2.5 mm. Both patients had excellent stability and were functioning at high levels of activity for their age (eg, hiking, skydiving). Both patients had radiographic signs of arthritis, which lowered 1 subject’s IKDC score to “C.” Conclusion: Knee dislocations have rare long-term excellent results, and most intermediate-term studies show fair to good functional results. By following fundamental principles in the management of a dislocated knee, patients can be given the opportunity to function at high levels. Hopefully, continued advances in the evaluation and treatment of knee dislocations will improve the long-term outcomes for these patients in the

  1. A dynamic analysis of knee ligament injuries in alpine skiing.

    PubMed

    Fischer, J F; Leyvraz, P F; Bally, A

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this study is to understand better the dynamic mechanisms of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture in alpine skiing. As a result of these findings, improvements in the boot-binding release systems are proposed. Six patients who sustained ACL rupture, aged 19 to 43 years, were studied. A step by step reconstruction of the accident was made using a questionnaire followed by an interview. The skiing equipment was tested in a specialized laboratory and the release levels of the boot-binding systems were measured in twist and in forward lean. ACL injury was confirmed by arthroscopy or surgery. Most patients had recent skiing equipment; their binding systems were correctly mounted and in perfect working order. Release levels of the bindings were equal to or slightly above those suggested by the ISO standards. The mechanisms of injury were valgus-external rotation in knee flexion of more than 90 degrees, internal rotation in knee flexion of more than 120 degrees with anterior drawer loads, internal rotation-valgus in knee flexion of less than 30 degrees with anterior drawer loads, external rotation-valgus in knee flexion of more than 120 degrees with anterior drawer loads, external rotation in knee flexion of about 100 degrees with anterior drawer loads and internal rotation-valgus. Even with a modern boot-binding system, properly adjusted, ACL injury remains possible. The improvements in the current equipment should be concerned with the behavior when confronted with combined loads producing friction in the system. We concluded that for lateral release at the toe, there should be a better compensation of the vertical parasite forces and an improvement of the antifriction devices. In order to prevent excessive anterior drawer loads on the ACL an additional release direction of the binding system, especially backwards, could, if properly adjusted, enhance the opportunities of early release in a dangerous backward lean "out of control" position.

  2. The relationship between knee arthroplasty and foot loading.

    PubMed

    Voronov, Michael L; Pinzur, Michael S; Havey, Robert M; Carandang, Gerard; Gil, Joseph A; Hopkinson, William J

    2012-02-01

    Surgeons have questioned whether foot deformity applies abnormal loading on a knee implant. A total of 24 patients with mild knee deformity underwent a static recording of foot loading prior to and at 3 months following knee replacement. Of these patients, 13 had a preoperative varus deformity. The recorded postoperative to preoperative loading in all 6 geographic sites was decreased by an average of 10%. The largest changes were observed in the hallux and lesser toe masks, whereas the postoperative to preoperative foot pressure ratio in the metatarsal head (lateral and medial), heel, and midfoot masks was 0.94. This preliminary investigation reveals a minimal change in geographic foot loading following total knee arthroplasty in patients with mild knee deformity.

  3. Three-dimensional dynamic analysis of knee joint during gait in medial knee osteoarthritis using loading axis of knee.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Katsutoshi; Omori, Go; Koga, Yoshio; Kobayashi, Koichi; Sakamoto, Makoto; Tanabe, Yuji; Tanaka, Masaei; Arakawa, Masaaki

    2015-07-01

    We recently developed a new method for three-dimensional evaluation of mechanical factors affecting knee joint in order to help identify factors that contribute to the progression of knee osteoarthritis (KOA). This study aimed to verify the clinical validity of our method by evaluating knee joint dynamics during gait. Subjects were 41 individuals (14 normal knees; 8 mild KOAs; 19 severe KOAs). The positions of skin markers attached to the body were captured during gait, and bi-planar X-ray images of the lower extremities were obtained in standing position. The positional relationship between the markers and femorotibial bones was determined from the X-ray images. Combining this relationship with gait capture allowed for the estimation of relative movement between femorotibial bones. We also calculated the point of intersection of loading axis of knee on the tibial proximal surface (LAK point) to analyze knee joint dynamics. Knee flexion range in subjects with severe KOA during gait was significantly smaller than that in those with normal knees (p=0.011), and knee adduction in those with severe KOA was significantly larger than in those with mild KOA (p<0.000). LAK point was locally loaded on the medial compartment of the tibial surface as KOA progressed, with LAK point of subjects with severe KOA rapidly shifting medially during loading response. Local loading and medial shear force were applied to the tibial surface during stance phase as medial KOA progressed. Our findings suggest that our method is useful for the quantitative evaluation of mechanical factors that affect KOA progression.

  4. Characteristics associated with improved knee extension after strength training for individuals with cerebral palsy and crouch gait.

    PubMed

    Steele, K M; Damiano, D L; Eek, M N; Unger, M; Delp, S L

    2012-01-01

    Muscle weakness may contribute to crouch gait in individuals with cerebral palsy, and some individuals participate in strength training programs to improve crouch gait. Unfortunately, improvements in muscle strength and gait are inconsistent after completing strength training programs. The purpose of this study was to examine changes in knee extensor strength and knee extension angle during walking after strength training in individuals with cerebral palsy who walk in crouch gait and to determine subject characteristics associated with these changes. A literature review was performed of studies published since January 2000 that included strength training, three-dimensional motion analysis, and knee extensor strength measurements for individuals with cerebral palsy. Three studies met these criteria and individual subject data was obtained from the authors for thirty crouch gait subjects. Univariate regression analyses were performed to determine which of ten physical examination and motor performance variables were associated with changes in strength and knee extension during gait. Change in knee extensor strength ranged from a 25% decrease to a 215% increase, and change in minimum knee flexion angle during gait ranged from an improvement of 9° more knee extension to 15° more knee flexion. Individuals without hamstring spasticity had greater improvement in knee extension after strength training. Hamstring spasticity was associated with an undesired increase in knee flexion during walking. Subject-specific factors such as hamstring spasticity may be useful for predicting which subjects will benefit from strength training to improve crouch gait.

  5. Muscle strength and knee range of motion after femoral lengthening

    PubMed Central

    Bhave, Anil; Shabtai, Lior; Woelber, Erik; Apelyan, Arman; Paley, Dror; Herzenberg, John E

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose Femoral lengthening may result in decrease in knee range of motion (ROM) and quadriceps and hamstring muscle weakness. We evaluated preoperative and postoperative knee ROM, hamstring muscle strength, and quadriceps muscle strength in a diverse group of patients undergoing femoral lengthening. We hypothesized that lengthening would not result in a significant change in knee ROM or muscle strength. Patients and methods This prospective study of 48 patients (mean age 27 (9–60) years) compared ROM and muscle strength before and after femoral lengthening. Patient age, amount of lengthening, percent lengthening, level of osteotomy, fixation time, and method of lengthening were also evaluated regarding knee ROM and strength. The average length of follow-up was 2.9 (2.0–4.7) years. Results Mean amount of lengthening was 5.2 (2.4–11.0) cm. The difference between preoperative and final knee flexion ROM was 2° for the overall group. Congenital shortening cases lost an average of 5% or 6° of terminal knee flexion, developmental cases lost an average of 3% or 4°, and posttraumatic cases regained all motion. The difference in quadriceps strength at 45° preoperatively and after lengthening was not statistically or clinically significant (2.7 Nm; p = 0.06). Age, amount of lengthening, percent lengthening, osteotomy level, fixation time, and lengthening method had no statistically significant influence on knee ROM or quadriceps strength at final follow-up. Interpretation Most variables had no effect on ROM or strength, and higher age did not appear to be a limiting factor for femoral lengthening. Patients with congenital causes were most affected in terms of knee flexion. PMID:27892743

  6. [Pathogenesis of knee osteoarthrist].

    PubMed

    Bennemann, M; Hönle, W; Simank, H G; Schuh, A

    2007-06-21

    More than 20% of the population of over 60-year olds suffers from degenerative joint diseases of the lower extremities. The cause of primary osteoarthritis of the knee is still unknown. A multifactorial genesis is presumed that includes genetic, nutritional, hormonal and age-related factors. On the other hand, secondary osteoarthritis is a sequela of predisposing factors. The most frequent are axial deformities, pre-existing conditions or injuries. Pre-osteoarthritis appears as dysplasias and dystopias (abnormal presentation) of the patella and axial misalignments, incongruities and joint damage after fractures. The result is the mechanical destruction of the cartilage that, in turn, initiates a vicious circle of further cartilage loss.

  7. Knee extension torque variability after exercise in ACL reconstructed knees.

    PubMed

    Goetschius, John; Kuenze, Christopher M; Hart, Joseph M

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare knee extension torque variability in patients with ACL reconstructed knees before and after exercise. Thirty two patients with an ACL reconstructed knee (ACL-R group) and 32 healthy controls (control group) completed measures of maximal isometric knee extension torque (90° flexion) at baseline and following a 30-min exercise protocol (post-exercise). Exercise included 30-min of repeated cycles of inclined treadmill walking and hopping tasks. Dependent variables were the coefficient of variation (CV) and raw-change in CV (ΔCV): CV = (torque standard deviation/torque mean x 100), ΔCV = (post-exercise - baseline). There was a group-by-time interaction (p = 0.03) on CV. The ACL-R group demonstrated greater CV than the control group at baseline (ACL-R = 1.07 ± 0.55, control = 0.79 ± 0.42, p = 0.03) and post-exercise (ACL-R = 1.60 ± 0.91, control = 0.94 ± 0.41, p = 0.001). ΔCV was greater (p = 0.03) in the ACL-R group (0.52 ± 0.82) than control group (0.15 ± 0.46). CV significantly increased from baseline to post-exercise (p = 0.001) in the ACL-R group, while the control group did not (p = 0.06). The ACL-R group demonstrated greater knee extension torque variability than the control group. Exercise increased torque variability more in the ACL-R group than control group.

  8. Interpolation function for approximating knee joint behavior in human gait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth-Taşcǎu, Mirela; Pater, Flavius; Stoia, Dan Ioan

    2013-10-01

    Starting from the importance of analyzing the kinematic data of the lower limb in gait movement, especially the angular variation of the knee joint, the paper propose an approximation function that can be used for processing the correlation among a multitude of knee cycles. The approximation of the raw knee data was done by Lagrange polynomial interpolation on a signal acquired using Zebris Gait Analysis System. The signal used in approximation belongs to a typical subject extracted from a lot of ten investigated subjects, but the function domain of definition belongs to the entire group. The study of the knee joint kinematics plays an important role in understanding the kinematics of the gait, this articulation having the largest range of motion in whole joints, in gait. The study does not propose to find an approximation function for the adduction-abduction movement of the knee, this being considered a residual movement comparing to the flexion-extension.

  9. Genu Recurvatum Deformity in a Child due to Salter Harris Type V Fracture of the Proximal Tibial Physis Treated with High Tibial Dome Osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Beslikas, Theodoros; Christodoulou, Andreas; Chytas, Anastasios; Gigis, Ioannis; Christoforidis, John

    2012-01-01

    Salter-Harris type V fracture is a very rare injury in the immature skeleton. In most cases, it remains undiagnosed and untreated. We report a case of genu recurvatum deformity in a 15-year-old boy caused by a Salter-Harris type V fracture of the proximal tibial physis. The initial X-ray did not reveal fracture. One year after injury, genu recurvatum deformity was detected associated with significant restriction of knee flexion and limp length discrepancy (2 cm) as well as medial and posterior instability of the joint. Further imaging studies revealed anterior bone bridge of the proximal tibial physis. The deformity was treated with a high tibial dome osteotomy combined with a tibial tubercle osteotomy stabilized with malleolar screws and a cast. Two years after surgery, the patient gained functional knee mobility without clinical instability. Firstly, this case highlights the importance of early identification of this rare lesion (Salter-Harris type V fracture) and, secondly, provides an alternative method of treatment for genu recurvatum deformity. PMID:23259115

  10. Relationship between knee alignment and the electromyographic activity of quadriceps muscles in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Seong Hoon; Hong, Bo Young; Oh, Jee Hae; Lee, Jong In

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] We evaluated the relationship between knee alignment and the electromyographic (EMG) activity of the vastus medialis (VM) to the vastus lateralis (VL) muscles in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) in a cross-sectional study. [Subjects and Methods] Forty subjects with knee OA were assessed by anatomic radiographic knee alignment and the VM/VL ratio was calculated. Surface EMG from both the VM and VL muscles were evaluated during maximal isometric contraction at 60° knee flexion. Simultaneously, peak quadriceps torque was assessed using an isokinetic dynamometer. Subjects were categorized into low, moderate, and high varus groups according to knee malalignment. The peak quadriceps torque and VM/VL ratio across groups, and their relationships with varus malalignment were analyzed. [Results] All subjects had medial compartment OA and the VM/VL ratio of all subjects was 1.31 ± 0.28 (mean ± SD). There were no significant differences in the peak quadriceps torque or VM/VL ratios across the groups nor were there any significant relationships with varus malalignment. [Conclusion] The VM/VL ratio and peak quadriceps torque were not associated with the severity of knee varus malalignment. PMID:25995602

  11. Knee kinematics during walking at different speeds in people who have undergone total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    McClelland, Jodie A; Webster, Kate E; Feller, Julian A; Menz, Hylton B

    2011-06-01

    People who have undergone total knee replacement (TKR) experience difficulties in some daily activities including walking. Walking at faster speeds requires more knee flexion and may therefore present a greater challenge following TKR. The aim of this study was to compare the knee kinematics of patients following TKR and unimpaired controls during comfortable and fast walking speeds. Forty patients (22 women, 18 men) 12 months following TKR and 40 control participants (matched for age and sex) were assessed during walking at self-selected comfortable and fast speeds using three dimensional motion analysis. The group averages of spatiotemporal and peak kinematic characteristics in the sagittal, coronal and transverse movement planes were compared using univariate analysis of variance with walking speed as a co-variate. The TKR group walked with significantly reduced cadence (p < 0.001 at both speeds) and reduced stride length (p < 0.001 at both speeds), less knee flexion during stance and swing phases (p < 0.001 for both speeds) and less knee extension during stance phase (p < 0.024 for comfortable speed; p < 0.042 for fast speed). The TKR group also walked with less peak knee external rotation than controls at both speeds (p < 0.001 for both speeds). Both groups increased their velocity, cadence and stride length by a similar proportion when walking at fast speed. When walking at a faster speed, spatiotemporal gait parameters and knee motion are altered in a similar manner for both TKR patients and controls. However, at both walking speeds, TKR patients exhibit residual deficits 12 months following surgery.

  12. Peak activation of lower limb musculature during high flexion kneeling and transitional movements.

    PubMed

    Kingston, David C; Tennant, Liana M; Chong, Helen C; Acker, Stacey M

    2016-09-01

    Few studies have measured lower limb muscle activation during high knee flexion or investigated the effects of occupational safety footwear. Therefore, our understanding of injury and disease mechanisms, such as knee osteoarthritis, is limited for these high-risk postures. Peak activation was assessed in eight bilateral lower limb muscles for twelve male participants, while shod or barefoot. Transitions between standing and kneeling had peak quadriceps and tibialis anterior (TA) activations above 50% MVC. Static kneeling and simulated tasks performed when kneeling had peak TA activity above 15% MVC but below 10% MVC for remaining muscles. In three cases, peak muscle activity was significantly higher (mean 8.9% MVC) when shod. However, net compressive knee joint forces may not be significantly increased when shod. EMG should be used as a modelling input when estimating joint contact forces for these postures, considering the activation levels in the hamstrings and quadriceps muscles during transitions. Practitioner Summary: Kneeling transitional movements are used in activities of daily living and work but are linked to increased knee osteoarthritis risk. We found peak EMG activity of some lower limb muscles to be over 70% MVC during transitions and minimal influence of wearing safety footwear.

  13. A new method to measure post-traumatic joint contractures in the rabbit knee.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Kevin A; Holmberg, Michael; Shrive, Nigel

    2003-12-01

    A new device and method to measure rabbit knee joint angles are described. The method was used to measure rabbit knee joint angles in normal specimens and in knee joints with obvious contractures. The custom-designed and manufactured gripping device has two clamps. The femoral clamp sits on a pinion gear that is driven by a rack attached to a materials testing system. A 100 N load cell in series with the rack gives force feedback. The tibial clamp is attached to a rotatory potentiometer. The system allows the knee joint multiple degrees-of-freedom (DOF). There are two independent DOF (compression-distraction and internal-external rotation) and two coupled motions (medial-lateral translation coupled with varus-valgus rotation; anterior-posterior translation coupled with flexion-extension rotation). Knee joint extension-flexion motion is measured, which is a combination of the materials testing system displacement (converted to degrees of motion) and the potentiometer values (calibrated to degrees). Internal frictional forces were determined to be at maximum 2% of measured loading. Two separate experiments were performed to evaluate rabbit knees. First, normal right and left pairs of knees from four New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits were subjected to cyclic loading. An extension torque of 0.2 Nm was applied to each knee. The average change in knee joint extension from the first to the fifth cycle was 1.9 deg +/- 1.5 deg (mean +/- sd) with a total of 49 tests of these eight knees. The maximum extension of the four left knees (tested 23 times) was 14.6 deg +/- 7.1 deg, and of the four right knees (tested 26 times) was 12.0 deg +/- 10.9 deg. There was no significant difference in the maximum extension between normal left and right knees. In the second experiment, nine skeletally mature NZW rabbits had stable fractures of the femoral condyles of the right knee that were immobilized for five, six or 10 weeks. The left knee served as an unoperated control. Loss of knee joint

  14. Multibody muscle driven model of an instrumented prosthetic knee during squat and toe rise motions.

    PubMed

    Stylianou, Antonis P; Guess, Trent M; Kia, Mohammad

    2013-04-01

    Detailed knowledge of knee joint kinematics and dynamic loading is essential for improving the design and outcomes of surgical procedures, tissue engineering applications, prosthetics design, and rehabilitation. The need for dynamic computational models that link kinematics, muscle and ligament forces, and joint contacts has long been recognized but such body-level forward dynamic models do not exist in recent literature. A main barrier in using computational models in the clinic is the validation of the in vivo contact, muscle, and ligament loads. The purpose of this study was to develop a full body, muscle driven dynamic model with subject specific leg geometries and validate it during squat and toe-rise motions. The model predicted loads were compared to in vivo measurements acquired with an instrumented knee implant. Data for this study were provided by the "Grand Challenge Competition to Predict In-Vivo Knee Loads" for the 2012 American Society of Mechanical Engineers Summer Bioengineering Conference. Data included implant and bone geometries, ground reaction forces, EMG, and the instrumented knee implant measurements. The subject specific model was developed in the multibody framework. The knee model included three ligament bundles for the lateral collateral ligament (LCL) and the medial collateral ligament (MCL), and one bundle for the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). The implanted tibia tray was segmented into 326 hexahedral elements and deformable contacts were defined between the elements and the femoral component. The model also included 45 muscles on each leg. Muscle forces were computed for the muscle driven simulation by a feedback controller that used the error between the current muscle length in the forward simulation and the muscle length recorded during a kinematics driven inverse simulation. The predicted tibia forces and torques, ground reaction forces, electromyography (EMG) patterns, and kinematics were compared to the experimentally

  15. Unicompartmental Knee Osteoarthritis (UKOA): Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty (UKA) or High Tibial Osteotomy (HTO)?

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E. Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review article is to analyze the results of high tibial osteotomy compared to unicompartmental knee arthroplasty in patients with unicompartmental knee osteoarthritis. The search engine used was PubMed. The keywords were: “high tibial osteotomy versus unicompartmental knee arthroplasty”. Twenty-one articles were found on 28 February 2015, but only eighteen were selected and reviewed because they strictly focused on the topic. In a meta-analysis the ratio for an excellent outcome was higher in unicompartmental knee arthroplasty than high tibial osteotomy and the risks of revision and complications were lower in the former. A prospective comparative study showed that unicompartmental knee arthroplasty offers better long-term success (77% for unicompartmental knee arthroplasty and 60% for high tibial osteotomy at 7-10 years). However, a review of the literature showed no evidence of superior results of one treatment over the other. A multicenter study stated that unicompartmental knee osteoarthritis without constitutional deformity should be treated with unicompartmental knee arthroplasty while in cases with constitutional deformity high tibial osteotomy should be indicated. A case control study stated that unicompartmental knee arthroplasty offers a viable alternative to high tibial osteotomy if proper patient selection is done. The literature is still controversial regarding the best surgical treatment for unicompartmental knee osteoarthritis (high tibial osteotomy or unicompartmental knee arthroplasty). However, unicompartmental knee arthroplasty utilization is increasing, while high tibial osteotomy utilization is decreasing, and a meta-analysis has shown better outcomes and less risk of revision and complications in the former. A systematic review has found that with correct patient selection, both procedures show effective and reliable results. However, prospective randomized studies are needed in order to answer the question of this article

  16. Fixed- versus mobile-bearing total knee arthroplasty: technical issues and surgical tips.

    PubMed

    Crossett, Lawrence S

    2002-02-01

    Mobile-bearing knee arthroplasties have been used clinically for 25 years. The success of this technology depends on strict adherence to the principles of flexion-extension gap technique. The use of the fixed femoral landmarks for the rotational positioning of the femoral component (measured resection technique) is not acceptable if bearing dislocation is to be avoided. The principles of flexion-extension gap balancing, as well as the surgical technique, are reviewed in this article.

  17. Quadriceps and hamstrings fatigue alters hip and knee mechanics.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Abbey C; McLean, Scott G; Palmieri-Smith, Riann M

    2010-05-01

    Neuromuscular fatigue exacerbates abnormal landing strategies, which may increase noncontact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury risk. The synergistic actions of quadriceps and hamstrings (QH) muscles are central to an upright landing posture, though the precise effect of simultaneous fatigue of these muscles on landing and ACL injury risk is unclear. Elucidating neuromechanical responses to QH fatigue thus appears important in developing more targeted fatigue-resistance intervention strategies. The current study thus aimed to examine the effects of QH fatigue on lower extremity neuromechanics during dynamic activity. Twenty-five healthy male and female volunteers performed three single-leg forward hops onto a force platform before and after QH fatigue. Fatigue was induced through sets of alternating QH concentric contractions, on an isokinetic dynamometer, until the first five repetitions of a set were performed at least 50% below QH peak torque. Three-dimensional hip and knee kinematics and normalized (body mass x height) kinetic variables were quantified for pre- and postfatigue landings and subsequently analyzed by way of repeated- measures mixed-model ANOVAs. QH fatigue produced significant increases in initial contact (IC) hip internal rotation and knee extension and external rotation angles (p < .05), with the increases in knee extension and external rotation being maintained at the time of peak vertical ground reaction force (vGRF) (p < .05). Larger knee extension and smaller knee flexion and external rotation moments were also evident at peak vGRF following fatigue (p < .05). Females landed with greater hip flexion and less abduction than males at both IC and peak vGRF as well as greater knee flexion at peak vGRF (p < .05). The peak vGRF was larger for females than males (p < .05). No sex x fatigue effects were found (p > .05). Fatigue of the QH muscles altered hip and knee neuromechanics, which may increase the risk of ACL injury. Prevention programs

  18. Which osteotomy for a valgus knee?

    PubMed Central

    Cipolla, Massimo; Cerullo, Guglielmo; Franco, Vittorio; Giannì, Enrico

    2009-01-01

    A valgus knee is a disabling condition that can affect patients of all ages. Antivalgus osteotomy of the knee is the treatment of choice to correct the valgus, to eliminate pain in the young or middle age patient, and to avoid or delay a total knee replacement. A distal femoral lateral opening wedge procedure appears to be one of the choices for medium or large corrections and is particularly easy and precise if compared to the medial femoral closing wedge osteotomy. However, if the deformity is minimal, a tibial medial closing wedge osteotomy can be done with a faster healing and a short recovery time. PMID:19547972

  19. Tibiofemoral force following total knee arthroplasty: comparison of four prosthesis designs in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nicholls, Rochelle L; Schirm, Andreas C; Jeffcote, Benjamin O; Kuster, Markus S

    2007-11-01

    Despite ongoing evolution in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) prosthesis design, restricted flexion continues to be common postoperatively. Compressive tibiofemoral force during flexion is generated through the interaction between soft tissues and prosthesis geometry. In this study, we compared the compressive tibiofemoral force in vitro of four commonly used prostheses: fixed-bearing PCL (posterior cruciate ligament)-retaining (PFC), mobile-bearing posterior-stabilized (PS), posterior-stabilized with a High Flex femoral component (HF), and mobile-bearing PCL-sacrificing (LCS). Fourteen fresh-frozen cadaver knee joints were tested in a passive motion rig, and tibiofemoral force measured using a modified tibial baseplate instrumented with six load cells. The implants without posterior stabilization displayed an exponential increase in force after 90 degrees of flexion, while PS implants maintained low force throughout the range of motion. The fixed-bearing PFC prosthesis displayed the highest peak force (214 +/- 68 N at 150 degrees flexion). Sacrifice of the PCL decreased the peak force to a level comparable with the LCS implant. The use of a PCL-substituting post and cam system reduced the peak force up to 78%, irrespective of whether it was a high-flex or a standard PS knee. However, other factors such as preoperative range of motion, knee joint kinematics, soft tissue impingement, and implantation technique play a role in postoperative knee function. The present study suggests that a posterior-stabilized TKA design might be advantageous in reducing soft tissue tension in deep flexion. Further research is necessary to fully understand all factors affecting knee flexion after TKA.

  20. Method and effect of total knee arthroplasty osteotomy and soft tissue release for serious knee joint space narrowing.

    PubMed

    Yulou, Si; Yanqin, Xue; Yongjun, Xing

    2015-01-01

    To discuss the method and effect of total knee arthroplasty osteotomy and soft tissue release for serious knee joint space narrowing. Clinical data of 80 patients from October 2013 to December 2014 was selected with a retrospective method. All patients have undergone total knee arthroplasty. Then the X-rays plain film in weight loading was measured before and after operation and osteotomy was performed accurately according to the knee joint scores and the conditions of lower limb alignments. The average angle of tibial plateau osteotomy of postoperative patients was 4.3°, and the corrective angle of soft tissue balancing was 10.7°; the postoperative patients' indicies including range of joint motion, knee joint HSS score, angle between articular surfaces, tibial angle, femoral-tibial angle and flexion contracture were distinctly better than the preoperative indicies (p<0.05) and the differences were statistically significant; the postoperative patients' flexion contracture and range of joint motion were distinctly better than the preoperative indicies (p<0.05) and the differences were statistically significant. The effective release of the soft tissue of the posterior joint capsule under direct vision can avoid excess osteotomy and get satisfactory knee replacement space without influencing the patients' joint recovery.

  1. Method and effect of total knee arthroplasty osteotomy and soft tissue release for serious knee joint space narrowing

    PubMed Central

    Yulou, Si; Yanqin, Xue; Yongjun, Xing

    2015-01-01

    To discuss the method and effect of total knee arthroplasty osteotomy and soft tissue release for serious knee joint space narrowing. Clinical data of 80 patients from October 2013 to December 2014 was selected with a retrospective method. All patients have undergone total knee arthroplasty. Then the X-rays plain film in weight loading was measured before and after operation and osteotomy was performed accurately according to the knee joint scores and the conditions of lower limb alignments. The average angle of tibial plateau osteotomy of postoperative patients was 4.3°, and the corrective angle of soft tissue balancing was 10.7°; the postoperative patients’ indicies including range of joint motion, knee joint HSS score, angle between articular surfaces, tibial angle, femoral-tibial angle and flexion contracture were distinctly better than the preoperative indicies (p<0.05) and the differences were statistically significant; the postoperative patients’ flexion contracture and range of joint motion were distinctly better than the preoperative indicies (p<0.05) and the differences were statistically significant. The effective release of the soft tissue of the posterior joint capsule under direct vision can avoid excess osteotomy and get satisfactory knee replacement space without influencing the patients’ joint recovery. PMID:28352736

  2. The Nature of Age-Related Differences in Knee Function during Walking: Implication for the Development of Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Katherine A.; Andriacchi, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Changes in knee kinematics have been identified in the early stages of osteoarthritis (OA). However, there is a paucity of information on the nature of kinematic change that occur with aging prior to the development of OA, This study applied a robust statistical method (Principal Component Analysis) to test the hypothesis that coupling between primary (flexion) and secondary (anterior-posterior translation, internal-external rotation) joint motions in walking would differ for age groupings of healthy subjects. Methods Seventy-four healthy participants divided into three groups with mean ages of 24 ± 2.3 years (younger), 48 ± 4.7years (middle-age) and 64 ± 2.4 years (older) were examined. Principal Component Analysis was used to characterize and statistically compare the patterns of knee joint movement and their relationships in walking. Results There were significant differences between the younger group and both the middle-age and older groups in the knee frontal plane angle and the coupling between knee flexion (PC1, p≤0.04) and the relative magnitudes of secondary plane motions in early and late stance (PC3, p<0.01). Two additional principal components (PC2, p = 0.03 and PC5, p<0.01) described differences in early stance knee flexion and relationship with secondary plane motion through-out stance for the older compared with middle-age group. Conclusions It appears there are changes in knee kinematics that occur with aging. The kinematic differences were identified for middle-aged as well as older adults suggesting midlife changes in neuromuscular physiology or behavior may have important consequences. These kinematic measures offer the potential to identify early markers for the risk of developing knee OA with aging. PMID:27973527

  3. Simultaneous Knee Extensor Muscle Action Induces an Increase in Voluntary Force Generation of Plantar Flexor Muscles.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takahito; Shioda, Kohei; Kinugasa, Ryuta; Fukashiro, Senshi

    2017-02-01

    Suzuki, T, Shioda, K, Kinugasa, R, and Fukashiro, S. Simultaneous knee extensor muscle action induces an increase in voluntary force generation of plantar flexor muscles. J Strength Cond Res 31(2): 365-371, 2017-Maximum activation of the plantar flexor muscles is required for various sporting activities that involve simultaneous plantar flexion and knee extension. During a multi-joint movement, activation of the plantar flexor muscles is affected by the activity of the knee extensor muscles. We hypothesized that coactivation of the plantar flexor muscles and knee extensor muscles would result in a higher plantar flexion torque. To test this hypothesis, 8 male volunteers performed maximum voluntary isometric action of the plantar flexor muscles with and without isometric action of the knee extensor muscles. Surface electromyographic data were collected from 8 muscles of the right lower limb. Voluntary activation of the triceps surae muscles, evaluated using the interpolated twitch technique, significantly increased by 6.4 percentage points with intentional knee extensor action (p = 0.0491). This finding is in line with a significant increase in the average rectified value of the electromyographic activity of the vastus lateralis, fibularis longus, and soleus muscles (p = 0.013, 0.010, and 0.045, respectively). The resultant plantar flexion torque also significantly increased by 11.5% of the predetermined maximum (p = 0.031). These results suggest that higher plantar flexor activation coupled with knee extensor activation facilitates force generation during a multi-joint task.

  4. Knee Menisci.

    PubMed

    Bryceland, James Kevin; Powell, Andrew John; Nunn, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    The menisci of the knees are semicircular fibrocartilaginous structures consisting of a hydrophilic extracellular matrix containing a network of collagen fibers, glycoproteins, and proteoglycans maintained by a cellular component. The menisci are responsible for more than 50% of load transmission across the knee and increase joint congruity thereby also aiding in fluid film lubrication of the joint. In the United Kingdom, meniscal tears are the most common form of intra-articular knee injury and one of the commonest indications for orthopedic intervention. The management of these injuries is dependent on the location within the meniscus (relative to peripheral blood supply) and the pattern of tear. Removal of meniscus is known to place the knee at increased risk of osteoarthritis; therefore repair of meniscal tears is preferable. However, a significant proportion of tears are irreparable and can only be treated by partial or even complete meniscectomy. More recent studies have shown encouraging results with meniscal replacement in this situation, though further work is required in this area.

  5. Perioperative Rehabilitation Using a Knee Extension Device and Arthroscopic Debridement in the Treatment of Arthrofibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Biggs-Kinzer, Angie; Murphy, Brian; Shelbourne, K. Donald; Urch, Scott

    2010-01-01

    Background: Arthrofibrosis is a postoperative complication of intra-articular knee surgery that can be difficult to treat. Evidence suggests that maximizing knee range of motion may improve outcomes in patients with arthrofibrosis who undergo arthroscopic debridement. Hypothesis: Patients who achieve greater knee range of motion will have better subjective scores. Study Design: Retrospective case series analysis. Methods: A review of records was performed for 33 patients with arthrofibrosis who underwent knee arthroscopy and scar resection coupled with perioperative rehabilitation to maximize knee range of motion. Patient demographics and preoperative and postoperative range of motion measurements were extracted from the records. The International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) Subjective Knee Form was administered to assess pain, activity, and knee function. Patients performed a preoperative and postoperative rehabilitation program utilizing a knee extension device to maximize knee extension. Results: According to the IKDC range of motion criteria, 27 of 33 patients achieved normal knee extension, and 14 of 33 achieved normal knee flexion at a mean of 8.6 months after surgery. Patients with normal knee motion had a mean IKDC Subjective Knee Form score of 72.6 ± 13.6, which was significantly higher than patients who did not achieve normal motion (P = .04). Overall, mean IKDC Subjective Knee Form scores improved from 45.3 ± 16.7 preoperatively to 67.1 ± 18.0 postoperatively (P < .01) at a mean of 14.7 months after surgery. Conclusions: Perioperative rehabilitation that emphasizes restoration of normal knee range of motion appears to improve outcomes in patients with arthrofibrosis who undergo arthroscopic scar resection. In support of our hypothesis, patients who achieved greater knee range of motion had better subjective knee scores. PMID:23015970

  6. Effects of Cervical Flexion on the Flexion-relaxation Ratio during Smartphone Use.

    PubMed

    Shin, HyeonHui; Kim, KyeongMi

    2014-12-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to measure the cervical flexion-relaxation ratio (FRR) and intensity of neck pain and identify the differences according to postures adopted while using smartphones. [Subjects] Fifteen healthy adults with no neck pain, spinal trauma, or history cervical surgery participated in this study. [Methods] The activity of the cervical erector spinae muscle was recorded while performing a standardized cervical flexion-extension movement in three phases (flexion, sustained full flexion, extension). And neck pain intensity was recorded using a visual analog scale (VAS) with values between 0 and 10. Postures held while using a smartphone are distinguished between desk postures and lap postures. The FRR was calculated by dividing the maximal muscle activation during the extension phase by average activation during the complete flexion phase. [Results] No significant differences were found in the FRR between desk posture, lap posture, and baseline, though the intensity of the neck pain increased in the lap posture. [Conclusion] The FRR could be a significant criterion of neuromuscular impairment in chronic neck pain or lumbar pain patients, but it is impossible to distinguish neck pain that is caused by performing task for a short time. Prolonged lap posture might cause neck pain, so the use of smartphones for a long time in this posture should be avoided.

  7. Acute effects of anterior thigh foam rolling on hip angle, knee angle, and rectus femoris length in the modified Thomas test.

    PubMed

    Vigotsky, Andrew D; Lehman, Gregory J; Contreras, Bret; Beardsley, Chris; Chung, Bryan; Feser, Erin H

    2015-01-01

    Background. Foam rolling has been shown to acutely increase range of motion (ROM) during knee flexion and hip flexion with the experimenter applying an external force, yet no study to date has measured hip extensibility as a result of foam rolling with controlled knee flexion and hip extension moments. The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute effects of foam rolling on hip extension, knee flexion, and rectus femoris length during the modified Thomas test. Methods. Twenty-three healthy participants (male = 7; female = 16; age = 22 ± 3.3 years; height = 170 ± 9.18 cm; mass = 67.7 ± 14.9 kg) performed two, one-minute bouts of foam rolling applied to the anterior thigh. Hip extension and knee flexion were measured via motion capture before and after the foam rolling intervention, from which rectus femoris length was calculated. Results. Although the increase in hip extension (change = +1.86° (+0.11, +3.61); z(22) = 2.08; p = 0.0372; Pearson's r = 0.43 (0.02, 0.72)) was not due to chance alone, it cannot be said that the observed changes in knee flexion (change = -1.39° (-5.53, +2.75); t(22) = -0.70; p = 0.4933; Cohen's d = - 0.15 (-0.58, 0.29)) or rectus femoris length (change = -0.005 (-0.013, +0.003); t(22) = -1.30; p = 0.2070; Cohen's d = - 0.27 (-0.70, 0.16)) were not due to chance alone. Conclusions. Although a small change in hip extension was observed, no changes in knee flexion or rectus femoris length were observed. From these data, it appears unlikely that foam rolling applied to the anterior thigh will improve passive hip extension and knee flexion ROM, especially if performed in combination with a dynamic stretching protocol.

  8. Preliminary study of optimal measurement location on vibroarthrography for classification of patients with knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ota, Susumu; Ando, Akiko; Tozawa, Yusuke; Nakamura, Takuya; Okamoto, Shogo; Sakai, Takenobu; Hase, Kazunori

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aims of the present study were to investigate the most suitable location for vibroarthrography measurements of the knee joint to distinguish a healthy knee from knee osteoarthritis using Wavelet transform analysis. [Subjects and Methods] Participants were 16 healthy females and 17 females with severe knee osteoarthritis. Vibroarthrography signals were measured on the medial and lateral epicondyles, mid-patella, and tibia using stethoscopes with a microphone while subjects stood up from a seated position. Frequency and knee flexion angles at the peak wavelet coefficient were obtained. [Results] Peak wavelet coefficients at the lateral condyle and tibia were significantly higher in patients with knee osteoarthritis than in the control group. Knee joint angles at the peak wavelet coefficient were smaller (more extension) in the osteoarthritis group compared to the control group. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve on tibia assessment with the frequency and knee flexion angles was higher than at the other measurement locations (both area under the curve: 0.86). [Conclusion] The tibia is the most suitable location for classifying knee osteoarthritis based on vibroarthrography signals. PMID:27821959

  9. Predicting Functional Performance and Range of Motion Outcomes After Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bade, Michael J.; Kittelson, John M.; Kohrt, Wendy M.; Stevens-Lapsley, Jennifer E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to assess the predictive value of functional performance and range of motion measures on outcomes after total knee arthroplasty. Design This is a secondary analysis of two pooled prospective randomized controlled trials. Sixty-four subjects (32 men and 32 women) with end-stage knee osteoarthritis scheduled to undergo primary total knee arthroplasty were enrolled. Active knee flexion and extension range of motion, Timed Up and Go (TUG) test time, and 6-min walk test distance were assessed. Results Preoperative measures of knee flexion and extension were predictive of long-term flexion (β = 0.44, P < 0.001) and extension (β = 0.46, P < 0.001). Acute measures of knee flexion and extension were not predictive of long-term flexion (β= 0.09, P = 0.26) or extension (β = 0.04, P = 0.76). Preoperative TUG performance was predictive of long-term 6-min walk performance (β = −21, P < 0.001). Acute TUG performance was predictive of long-term functional performance on the 6-min walk test, after adjusting for the effects of sex and age (P = 0.02); however, once adjusted for preoperative TUG performance, acute TUG was no longer related to long-term 6-min walk performance (P = 0.65). Conclusions Acute postoperative measures of knee range of motion are of limited prognostic value, although preoperative measures have some prognostic value. However, acute measures of functional performance are of useful prognostic value, especially when preoperative functional performance data are unavailable. PMID:24508937

  10. Fabella Syndrome as an Uncommon Cause of Posterolateral Knee Pain after Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Okano, Eriko; Yanai, Takaji; Kohyama, Sho; Kanamori, Akihiro; Yamazaki, Masashi; Tanaka, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    The fabella is a sesamoid bone that is located in the lateral head of the gastrocnemius muscle and has been identified on magnetic resonance imaging in 31% of Japanese people. In the present case, a 65-year-old woman experienced posterolateral knee pain, accompanied by a clicking “sound” during active knee flexion, after undergoing total knee arthroplasty for knee osteoarthritis. Eight months of conservative therapy failed to produce an improvement, with progressive osteoarthritic change of the fabella identified on plain radiography. Based on this evidence, a diagnosis of fabella syndrome was made and the patient underwent a fabellectomy. Fabellectomy provided immediate resolution of posterolateral knee pain and the clicking sound with knee flexion, with the patient remaining symptom-free 18 months after fabellectomy and with no limitations in knee function. Fabellectomy eliminated symptoms in all of five case reports that have been previously published and is regarded as an effective first choice for treating fabella syndrome after total knee arthroplasty. PMID:27418991

  11. Hinge total knee replacement revisited

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Hugh U.; Hu, Cungen; Vyamont, Didier

    1997-01-01

    Objective To determine if aseptic loosening is a major problem in hinge total knee replacement. Design A cohort study. Setting A university-affiliated institute, specializing in elective orthopedic surgery. Patients Fifty-eight patients, mainly those requiring revision, in whom the conditions were such that it was felt only a totally constrained implant was appropriate. In 7 patients the implant was press-fitted; in the remainder it was cemented. Five patients required fusion or revision, and 8 died less than 2 years after implantation, leaving 45 for review. Follow-up was 2 to 13 years. Intervention Total knee replacement with a Guepar II prosthesis. Main outcome measures Radiolucency determined by the Cameron system and clinical scoring using the Hospital for Special Surgery system. Results Of the cemented components, 91% of femoral stems were type IA (no lucency), 9% were type IB (partial lucency), with no type II or III lucency. Tibial lucency was 87% type IA and 13% type IB, with no type II or III lucency. Of the noncemented components, 58% of femoral components were type IA and 42% type IB. Tibial lucency was 71% type IA and 29% type IB. Lucency was mainly present in zones 1 and 2 adjacent to the knee. Clinical rating was 18% excellent, 20% good, 20% fair and 42% poor. Postoperative complications included infection (13%), aseptic loosening (7%), quadriceps lag (16%) and extensor mechanism problems (16%). Conclusions Aseptic loosening is an uncommon problem in hinge total knee replacement. The complication rate in cases of sufficient severity as to require a hinge replacement remains high. Current indications for a hinge prosthesis are anteroposterior instability with a very large flexion gap, complete absence of the collateral ligaments and complete absence of a functioning extensor mechanism. PMID:9267296

  12. Role of gastrocnemius activation in knee joint biomechanics: gastrocnemius acts as an ACL antagonist.

    PubMed

    Adouni, M; Shirazi-Adl, A; Marouane, H

    2016-01-01

    Gastrocnemius is a premier muscle crossing the knee, but its role in knee biomechanics and on the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) remains less clear when compared to hamstrings and quadriceps. The effect of changes in gastrocnemius force at late stance when it peaks on the knee joint response and ACL force was initially investigated using a lower extremity musculoskeletal model driven by gait kinematics-kinetics. The tibiofemoral joint under isolated isometric contraction of gastrocnemius was subsequently analyzed at different force levels and flexion angles (0°-90°). Changes in gastrocnemius force at late stance markedly influenced hamstrings forces. Gastrocnemius acted as ACL antagonist by substantially increasing its force. Simulations under isolated contraction of gastrocnemius confirmed this role at all flexion angles, in particular, at extreme knee flexion angles (0° and 90°). Constraint on varus/valgus rotations substantially decreased this effect. Although hamstrings and gastrocnemius are both knee joint flexors, they play opposite roles in respectively protecting or loading ACL. Although the quadriceps is also recognized as antagonist of ACL, at larger joint flexion and in contrast to quadriceps, activity in gastrocnemius substantially increased ACL forces (anteromedial bundle). The fact that gastrocnemius is an antagonist of ACL should help in effective prevention and management of ACL injuries.

  13. NAVIGATION IN TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    da Mota e Albuquerque, Roberto Freire

    2015-01-01

    Navigation was the most significant advance in instrumentation for total knee arthroplasty over the last decade. It provides surgeons with a precision tool for carrying out surgery, with the possibility of intraoperative simulation and objective control over various anatomical and surgical parameters and references. Since the first systems, which were basically used to control the alignment of bone cutting referenced to the mechanical axis of the lower limb, many other surgical steps have been incorporated, such as component rotation, ligament balancing and arranging the symmetry of flexion and extension spaces, among others. Its efficacy as a precision tool with an effective capacity for promoting better alignment of the lower-limb axis has been widely proven in the literature, but the real value of optimized alignment and the impact of navigation on clinical results and the longevity of arthroplasty have yet to be established. PMID:27026979

  14. The elephant knee joint: morphological and biomechanical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Weissengruber, G E; Fuss, F K; Egger, G; Stanek, G; Hittmair, K M; Forstenpointner, G

    2006-01-01

    Elephant limbs display unique morphological features which are related mainly to supporting the enormous body weight of the animal. In elephants, the knee joint plays important roles in weight bearing and locomotion, but anatomical data are sparse and lacking in functional analyses. In addition, the knee joint is affected frequently by arthrosis. Here we examined structures of the knee joint by means of standard anatomical techniques in eight African (Loxodonta africana) and three Asian elephants (Elephas maximus). Furthermore, we performed radiography in five African and two Asian elephants and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in one African elephant. Macerated bones of 11 individuals (four African, seven Asian elephants) were measured with a pair of callipers to give standardized measurements of the articular parts. In one Asian and three African elephants, kinematic and functional analyses were carried out using a digitizer and according to the helical axis concept. Some peculiarities of healthy and arthrotic knee joints of elephants were compared with human knees. In contrast to those of other quadruped mammals, the knee joint of elephants displays an extended resting position. The femorotibial joint of elephants shows a high grade of congruency and the menisci are extremely narrow and thin. The four-bar mechanism of the cruciate ligaments exists also in the elephant. The main motion of the knee joint is extension–flexion with a range of motion of 142°. In elephants, arthrotic alterations of the knee joint can lead to injury or loss of the cranial (anterior) cruciate ligament. PMID:16420379

  15. Possibilities and limitations of novel in-vitro knee simulator.

    PubMed

    Verstraete, Matthias A; Victor, Jan

    2015-09-18

    The ex-vivo evaluation of knee kinematics remains vital to understand the impact of surgical treatments such as total knee arthroplasty (TKA). To that extent, knee simulators have been developed. However, these simulators have mainly focused on the simulation of a squatting motion. The relevance of this motion pattern for patients' activities of daily living is however questionable as squatting is difficult for elderly patients. Walking, stairs and cycling are more relevant motion patterns. This paper presents the design and control of a simulator that allows to independently control the applied kinematic and kinetic boundary conditions to simulate these daily life activities. Thereby, the knee is left with five degrees of freedom; only the knee flexion is actively controlled. From a kinetic point of view, the quadriceps and hamstring muscles are loaded. Optionally, a varus/valgus moment can be applied, facilitating a dynamic evaluation of the knee's stability. The simulator is based on three control loops, whose synchronization appears satisfactory. The input for these control loops can be determined from either musculoskeletal simulations or in accordance to literature data for traditional knee simulators. This opens the door towards an improved understanding of the knee biomechanics and comparison between different applied motion and force patterns.

  16. A miniature tension sensor to measure surgical suture tension of deformable musculoskeletal tissues during joint motion.

    PubMed

    Kiriyama, Yoshimori; Matsumoto, Hideo; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Nagura, Takeo

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a new suture tension sensor for musculoskeletal soft tissue that shows deformation or movements. The suture tension sensor was 10 mm in size, which was small enough to avoid conflicting with the adjacent sensor. Furthermore, the sensor had good linearity up to a tension of 50 N, which is equivalent to the breaking strength of a size 1 absorbable suture defined by the United States Pharmacopeia. The design and mechanism were analyzed using a finite element model prior to developing the actual sensor. Based on the analysis, adequate material was selected, and the output linearity was confirmed and compared with the simulated result. To evaluate practical application, the incision of the skin and capsule were sutured during simulated total knee arthroplasty. When conventional surgery and minimally invasive surgery were performed, suture tensions were compared. In minimally invasive surgery, the distal portion of the knee was dissected, and the proximal portion of the knee was dissected additionally in conventional surgery. In the skin suturing, the maximum tension was 4.4 N, and this tension was independent of the sensor location. In contrast, the sensor suturing the capsule in the distal portion had a tension of 4.4 N in minimally invasive surgery, while the proximal sensor had a tension of 44 N in conventional surgery. The suture tensions increased nonlinearly and were dependent on the knee flexion angle. Furthermore, the tension changes showed hysteresis. This miniature tension sensor may help establish the optimal suturing method with adequate tension to ensure wound healing and early recovery.

  17. Knee CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - knee; Computed axial tomography scan - knee; Computed tomography scan - knee ... scanners can perform the exam without stopping.) A computer makes several images of the body area. These ...

  18. Knee pain (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... front of the knee can be due to bursitis, arthritis, or softening of the patella cartilage as ... knee. Overall knee pain can be due to bursitis, arthritis, tears in the ligaments, osteoarthritis of the ...

  19. Total Knee Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... stability. The long thigh muscles give the knee strength. All remaining surfaces of the knee are covered ... physical examination. This will assess knee motion, stability, strength, and overall leg alignment. • X-rays. These images ...

  20. Knee joint replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002974.htm Knee joint replacement To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Knee joint replacement is a surgery to replace a knee ...

  1. Water on the Knee

    MedlinePlus

    ... your knee joint. Some people call this condition "water on the knee." A swollen knee may be ... Choose low-impact exercise. Certain activities, such as water aerobics and swimming, don't place continuous weight- ...

  2. Blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome with knee joint disorder.

    PubMed

    Doi, Takehiko; Masumoto, Natsuko; Sonoda, Motoshi; Nakayama, Hideki; Mizuno, Yuji

    2016-08-01

    Blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome (BRBNS) involves cutaneous vascular malformation characterized by multiple venous malformations. This commonly affects the skin and gastrointestinal tract. BRBNS is associated with anemia and occasionally involves orthopedic manifestations. A 6-year-old boy was referred to hospital for evaluation of anemia. He presented with a rubber-like soft-tissue mass in the left knee and the right side of the neck, recurrent pain, and fixed flexion contracture of the knee. Blood examination indicated consumption coagulopathy and anemia caused by not only iron-deficiency anemia but also microangiopathy. Endoscopy of the gastrointestinal tract indicated multiple bluish-black sessile venous malformations. Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging of the knee showed intra-articular and intramuscular involvement. Based on these findings, BRBNS with knee joint disorder was diagnosed. With regard to vascular malformations, like other diseases such as inflammatory arthropathy, ultrasonography of the joint may become a new diagnostic approach for evaluating orthopedic manifestations.

  3. In vivo Kinematics of the Knee after a Posterior Cruciate-Substituting Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Comparison between Caucasian and South Korean Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Ji-Hoon; Hosseini, Ali; Nha, Kyung-Wook; Park, Sang-Eun; Tsai, Tsung Yuan; Kwon, Young-Min

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study compared in vivo kinematic differences between Caucasian and South Korean patients after a posterior-substituting total knee arthroplasty (PS-TKA). Materials and Methods In vivo motions of 9 Caucasian and 13 South Korean knees with a PS-TKA during weight bearing single leg lunge were determined using a dual fluoroscopic imaging technique. Normalized tibiofemoral condylar motions and articular contact locations were analyzed. Results Femoral condylar motions of the two groups showed a similar trend in anteroposterior translation, but the South Korean patients were more anteriorly positioned than the Caucasian patients at low flexion and maximal flexion angles in both medial and lateral compartments (p<0.05). Mediolateral femoral condyle translations were similar between the two groups. For tibiofemoral articular contact kinematics, the South Korean patients had significantly more anterior contact locations at the medial compartment at low flexion angles, and more lateral contact locations at the lateral compartment at 0° and 90° flexion compared to the Caucasian patients (p<0.05). The South Korean patients had significantly larger distances between the medial and lateral contact locations at 60° and 90° flexion compared to the Caucasian patients (p<0.05). Conclusions The study revealed that while the Caucasian and South Korean knees had similar femoral condylar motions, after PS-TKA the South Korean patients showed different articular contact point kinematics compared to the Caucasian patients. PMID:27274467

  4. Cruciate Retaining Versus Cruciate Stabilising Total Knee Arthroplasty – A Prospective Randomised Kinematic Study

    PubMed Central

    Godwin, T L; Bayan, A

    2016-01-01

    Objective: While there is a large body of research in regards to cruciate retaining(CR) and cruciate sacrificing total condylar knee replacement, the literature is spars in regards to highly conforming polyetheylene such as the triatholon cruciate stabilising tibial insert (CS).The aim was to determine whether there is a difference in the range of motion, kinematics as well as the functional outcome for Triathlon CS and CR TKJR. Methods: A single hospital consecutive series of one surgeon between 2011 and 2013 were enrolled. Kinematic data recorded prospectively at the time of surgery utilizing imageless navigation included preoperative and post-replacement extension, gravity flexion, passive flexion and rotation. Intraoperative femoral and tibial cuts and definitive implants were also recorded. Statistically analysis performed to compare CS and CR TKJR range of motion, deformity correction, and rotation pre and post-operatively. Oxford functional scores were obtained at the final follow up. 124 patients were randomised to 71 CS and 53 CR TKJR. The demographics were comparable between the two groups. Results: No significant difference was found between the groups’ preoperative range of motion. The net gain in extension for the CS group was 5.65 degrees (4.14-7.17) and for CR 5.64 degrees (4.24-7.04, p=0.99) with no significant difference shown. Post-operative gravity flexion significantly increased in CS TKJR with 129.01 degrees (127.37130.66) compared with 126.35 degrees (124.39-128.30, p =0.04) for CR. A weak positive correlation was shown between the size of distal femoral cut and post-operative extension for both CS and CR TKJR. A weak positive correlation was also shown for the difference between the intraoperative cuts (tibial and femoral) and the size of the implants used, in relation to post-operative extension. Post-operative oxford scores at average of 3.4 year follow up comparable between groups. Conclusion: The kinematics of CS and CR TKJR are

  5. Angle- and gender-specific quadriceps femoris muscle recruitment and knee extensor torque.

    PubMed

    Pincivero, Danny M; Salfetnikov, Yuliya; Campy, Robert M; Coelho, Alan J

    2004-11-01

    The objectives were to examine knee angle-, and gender-specific knee extensor torque output and quadriceps femoris (QF) muscle recruitment during maximal effort, voluntary contractions. Fourteen young adult men and 15 young adult women performed three isometric maximal voluntary contractions (MVC), in a random order, with the knee at 0 degrees (terminal extension), 10 degrees, 30 degrees, 50 degrees, 70 degrees, and 90 degrees flexion. Knee extensor peak torque (PT), and average torque (AT) were expressed in absolute (N m), relative (N m kg(-1)) and allometric-modeled (N m kg(-n)) units. Vastus medialis (VM), vastus lateralis (VL), and rectus femoris (RF) muscle EMG signals were full-wave rectified and integrated over the middle 3 s of each contraction, averaged over the three trials at each knee angle, and normalized to the activity recorded at 0 degrees. Muscle recruitment efficiency was calculated as the ratio of the normalized EMG of each muscle to the allometric-modeled average torque (normalized to the values at 0 degrees flexion), and expressed as a percent. Men generated significantly greater knee extensor PT and AT than women in absolute, relative and allometric-modeled units. Absolute and relative PT and AT were significantly highest at 70 degrees, while allometric-modeled values were observed to increase significantly across knee joint angles 10-90 degrees. VM EMG was significantly greater than the VL and RF muscles across all angles, and followed a similar pattern to absolute knee extensor torque. Recruitment efficiency improved across knee joint angles 10-90 degrees and was highest for the VL muscle. VM recruitment efficiency improved more than the VL and RF muscles across 70-90 degrees flexion. The findings demonstrate angle-, and gender-specific responses of knee extensor torque to maximal-effort contractions, while superficial QF muscle recruitment was most efficient at 90 degrees, and less dependent on gender.

  6. Anterior Knee Pain in Patients with Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Young; Lee, Sang Hyeong; Chung, Chin Youb; Park, Moon Seok; Lee, Kyoung Min; Sung, Ki Hyuk; Won, Sung Hun; Lee, In Hyeok; Choi, In Ho; Cho, Tae-Joon; Yoo, Won Joon

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to identify the risk factors for anterior knee pain in patients with cerebral palsy. Methods This prospective study investigated the risk factors for anterior knee pain in 127 ambulatory patients with spastic cerebral palsy in terms of walking pain, resting pain, and provocative pain. Demographic data analysis and physical examination for measuring the knee flexion contracture and unilateral and bilateral popliteal angles were performed. Patellar height was measured on radiographs, and patella alta was identified. The risk factors for anterior knee pain were analyzed using multivariate analysis with a generalized estimating equation. Results Seventy-seven patients were found to have patella alta based on the radiographic measurements (60.6%). Overall, sixteen patients (12.6%) had either unilateral or bilateral anterior knee pain. Of these, 6 patients showed a visual analogue scale (VAS) ≤ 3, 9 patients showed 3 < VAS ≤ 7, and one patient showed a VAS > 7. Age was found to be a significant risk factor for walking pain and resting pain with odds ratios (ORs) of 1.08 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02 to 1.14) and 1.09 (95% CI, 1.03 to 1.15), respectively. In the multivariate analysis, knee flexion contracture was a significant protective factor with an OR of 0.92 (95% CI, 0.85 to 0.98). Conclusions Approximately 12.6% of ambulatory patients with spastic cerebral palsy were found to have anterior knee pain in our hospital-based cohort study. Age was found to be a significant risk factor for anterior knee pain while walking and resting. PMID:25436067

  7. Gait analysis of elderly women after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lee, Aenon; Park, Junhyuck; Lee, Seungwon

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate ability and muscle activities of elderly women after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and compare them with those of healthy ones. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen female patients with TKA due to advanced degenerative arthritis of the measured on knee joint and 19 healthy elderly females participated. Tibiofemoral angles of TKA patients were using a gait analysis system anterioposterior X-rays of the weight-bearing knee. The knee flexion angle and gait parameters were measured. Muscle activities and prolongation time were EMG system. The gait of the treated limb of each participant was evaluated in three consecutive trials at fast speed and comfortable speed. [Results] The knee flexion angle %stance phase, stride length, step length, speed, cadence, and gait cycle significantly decreased at both the fast speed and comfortable speeds, and the onset and duration time of rectus femoris activity was significantly increased at the comfortable speed in the TKA group. [Conclusion] In conclusion, elderly women who received TKA showed decreased gait ability and muscle activity compared to the healthy elderly women.

  8. Gait analysis of elderly women after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Aenon; Park, Junhyuck; Lee, Seungwon

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate ability and muscle activities of elderly women after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and compare them with those of healthy ones. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen female patients with TKA due to advanced degenerative arthritis of the measured on knee joint and 19 healthy elderly females participated. Tibiofemoral angles of TKA patients were using a gait analysis system anterioposterior X-rays of the weight-bearing knee. The knee flexion angle and gait parameters were measured. Muscle activities and prolongation time were EMG system. The gait of the treated limb of each participant was evaluated in three consecutive trials at fast speed and comfortable speed. [Results] The knee flexion angle %stance phase, stride length, step length, speed, cadence, and gait cycle significantly decreased at both the fast speed and comfortable speeds, and the onset and duration time of rectus femoris activity was significantly increased at the comfortable speed in the TKA group. [Conclusion] In conclusion, elderly women who received TKA showed decreased gait ability and muscle activity compared to the healthy elderly women. PMID:25931687

  9. Altered gait biomechanics and increased knee-specific impairments in patients with coexisting tibiofemoral and patellofemoral osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Farrokhi, Shawn; O'Connell, Megan; Fitzgerald, G Kelley

    2015-01-01

    Coexisting patellofemoral osteoarthritis (PFOA) is a common finding in patients with tibiofemoral osteoarthritis (TFOA). The purpose of this study was to elucidate whether severity of coexisting PFOA in patients with TFOA is correlated with altered sagittal-plane gait biomechanics and greater knee-specific impairments. One hundred and six patients with radiographic TFOA were stratified into three groups of no PFOA, mild PFOA, and severe PFOA. All patients completed instrumented gait analysis, quantitative quadriceps strength testing and knee range of motion assessment. Compared to patients with no PFOA, those with severe PFOA exhibited reduced loading-response knee flexion excursions (p = 0.002) and increased peak single-leg stance external knee flexion moments (p < 0.05). The severe PFOA group also demonstrated lower quadriceps strength compared to the no PFOA and mild PFOA groups (p < 0.001). Regression analysis further revealed that quadriceps strength and knee extension range of motion were independently associated with altered sagittal-plane knee biomechanics during gait (p < 0.03). Reduced loading response knee flexion excursion during gait may be an attempt to decrease patellofemoral joint loading by patients with severe PFOA but it may increase impact loading of their arthritic tibiofemoral joint. Additionally, the greater external knee flexion moments observed during the single-leg stance phase of gait can lead to an overall increase in patellofemoral joint loading and symptoms in patients with more severe PFOA. Given the association between knee-specific impairments and altered gait biomechanics in our study, addressing quadriceps muscle weakness and limited knee extension range of motion may be indicated in patients with TFOA and severe coexisting PFOA.

  10. Kinematic and dynamic analysis of an anatomically based knee joint.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kok-Meng; Guo, Jiajie

    2010-05-07

    This paper presents a knee-joint model to provide a better understanding on the interaction between natural joints and artificial mechanisms for design and control of rehabilitation exoskeletons. The anatomically based knee model relaxes several commonly made assumptions that approximate a human knee as engineering pin-joint in exoskeleton design. Based on published MRI data, we formulate the kinematics of a knee-joint and compare three mathematical approximations; one model bases on two sequential circles rolling a flat plane; and the other two are mathematically differentiable ellipses-based models with and without sliding at the contact. The ellipses-based model taking sliding contact into accounts shows that the rolling-sliding ratio of a knee-joint is not a constant but has an average value consistent with published measurements. This knee-joint kinematics leads to a physically more accurate contact-point trajectory than methods based on multiple circles or lines, and provides a basis to derive a knee-joint kinetic model upon which the effects of a planar exoskeleton mechanism on the internal joint forces and torque during flexion can be numerically investigated. Two different knee-joint kinetic models (pin-joint approximation and anatomically based model) are compared against a condition with no exoskeleton. The leg and exoskeleton form a closed kinematic chain that has a significant effect on the joint forces in the knee. Human knee is more tolerant than pin-joint in negotiating around a singularity but its internal forces increase with the exoskeleton mass-to-length ratio. An oversimplifying pin-joint approximation cannot capture the finite change in the knee forces due to the singularity effect.

  11. In vivo six-degree-of-freedom knee-joint kinematics in overground and treadmill walking following total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Guan, Shanyuanye; Gray, Hans A; Schache, Anthony G; Feller, Julian; de Steiger, Richard; Pandy, Marcus G

    2016-10-22

    No data are available to describe six-degree-of-freedom (6-DOF) knee-joint kinematics for one complete cycle of overground walking following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The aims of this study were firstly, to measure 6-DOF knee-joint kinematics and condylar motion for overground walking following TKA; and secondly, to determine whether such data differed between overground and treadmill gait when participants walked at the same speed during both tasks. A unique mobile biplane X-ray imaging system enabled accurate measurement of 6-DOF TKA knee kinematics during overground walking by simultaneously tracking and imaging the joint. The largest rotations occurred for flexion-extension and internal-external rotation whereas the largest translations were associated with joint distraction and anterior-posterior drawer. Strong associations were found between flexion-extension and adduction-abduction (R(2)  = 0.92), joint distraction (R(2)  = 1.00), and anterior-posterior translation (R(2)  = 0.77), providing evidence of kinematic coupling in the TKA knee. Although the measured kinematic profiles for overground walking were grossly similar to those for treadmill walking, several statistically significant differences were observed between the two conditions with respect to temporo-spatial parameters, 6-DOF knee-joint kinematics, and condylar contact locations and sliding. Thus, caution is advised when making recommendations regarding knee implant performance based on treadmill-measured knee-joint kinematic data. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res.

  12. Robotic Total Knee Arthroplasty: Surgical Assistant for a Customized Normal Kinematic Knee.

    PubMed

    Urish, Kenneth L; Conditt, Michael; Roche, Martin; Rubash, Harry E

    2016-09-01

    Although current total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is considered a highly successful surgical procedure, patients undergoing TKA can still experience substantial functional impairment and increased revision rates as compared with those undergoing total hip arthroplasty. Robotic-assisted surgery has been available clinically for almost 15 years and was developed, in part, to address these concerns. Robotic-assisted surgery aims to improve TKA by enhancing the surgeon's ability to optimize soft tissue balancing, reproduce alignment, and restore normal knee kinematics. Current systems include a robotic arm with a variety of different navigation systems with active, semi-active, or passive control. Semi-active systems have become the dominant strategy, providing a haptic window through which the surgeon consistently prepares a TKA based on preoperative planning. A review of previous designs and clinical studies demonstrates that these robotic systems decrease variability and increase precision, primarily with the mechanical axis and restoration of the joint line. Future design objectives include precise planning and consistent intraoperative execution. Preoperative planning, intraoperative sensors, augmenting surgical instrumentation, and biomimetic surfaces will be used to re-create the 4-bar linkage system in the knee. Implants will be placed so that the knee functions with a medial pivot, lateral rollback, screw home mechanism, and patellar femoral tracking. Soft tissue balancing will become more than equalizing the flexion and extension gaps and will match the kinematics to a normal knee. Together, coupled with advanced knee designs, they may be the key to a patient stating, "My knee feels like my natural knee." [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(5):e822-e827.].

  13. In-vivo three-dimensional knee kinematics during daily activities in dogs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Stanley E; Jones, Stephen C; Lewis, Daniel D; Banks, Scott A; Conrad, Bryan P; Tremolada, Giovanni; Abbasi, Abdullah Z; Coggeshall, Jason D; Pozzi, Antonio

    2015-11-01

    The canine knee is morphologically similar to the human knee and thus dogs have been used in experimental models to study human knee pathology. To date, there is limited data of normal canine 3D knee kinematics during daily activities. The objective of this study was to characterize 3D in-vivo femorotibial kinematics in normal dogs during commonly performed daily activities. Using single-plane fluoroscopy, six normal dogs were imaged performing walk, trot, sit, and stair ascent activities. CT-generated bone models were used for kinematic measurement using a 3D-to-2D model registration technique. Increasing knee flexion angle was typically associated with increasing tibial internal rotation, abduction and anterior translation during all four activities. The precise relationship between flexion angle and these movements varied both within and between activities. Significant differences in axial rotation and coronal angulation were found at the same flexion angle during different phases of the walk and trot. This was also found with anterior tibial translation during the trot only. Normal canine knees accommodate motion in all planes; precise kinematics within this envelope of motion are activity dependent. This data establishes the characteristics of normal 3D femorotibial joint kinematics in dogs that can be used as a comparison for future studies.

  14. Wing Flexion and Aerodynamics Performance of Insect Free Flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Haibo; Liang, Zongxian; Ren, Yan

    2010-11-01

    Wing flexion in flapping flight is a hallmark of insect flight. It is widely thought that wing flexibility and wing deformation would potentially provide new aerodynamic mechanisms of aerodynamic force productions over completely rigid wings. However, there are lack of literatures on studying fluid dynamics of freely flying insects due to the presence of complex shaped moving boundaries in the flow domain. In this work, a computational study of freely flying insects is being conducted. High resolution, high speed videos of freely flying dragonflies and damselflies is obtained and used as a basis for developing high fidelity geometrical models of the dragonfly body and wings. 3D surface reconstruction technologies are used to obtain wing topologies and kinematics. The wing motions are highly complex and a number of different strategies including singular vector decomposition of the wing kinematics are used to examine the various kinematical features and their impact on the wing performance. Simulations are carried out to examine the aerodynamic performance of all four wings and understand the wake structures of such wings.

  15. The effect of sustained static kneeling on kinetic and kinematic knee joint gait parameters.

    PubMed

    Kajaks, Tara; Costigan, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Despite epidemiological evidence for kneeling as an occupational risk factor for knee osteoarthritis, biomechanical evidence is lacking. Gait knee joint mechanics, a common measure used to study knee osteoarthritis initiation, were used in the present study to investigate the effect of sustained static kneeling on the knee. Ten healthy male subjects (24.1 years ± 3.5) performed ten baseline walking trials, followed by a 30-min kneeling protocol and a second set of walking trials. Knee joint moments and angles were calculated during the stance phase. Within-subject root mean squared differences were compared within and between the pre- and post-kneeling gait trials. Differences were observed between the pre-kneeling and post-kneeling walking trails for flexion and adduction knee moments (0.12 Nm/kg ± 0.03, 0.07 Nm/kg ± 0.02) and angles (3.18° ± 1.22 and 1.64° ± 1.15), indicating that sustained static deep-knee flexion kneeling does acutely alter knee joint gait parameters.

  16. Simple verbal instruction improves knee biomechanics during landing in female athletes.

    PubMed

    Milner, Clare E; Fairbrother, Jeffrey T; Srivatsan, Abhaya; Zhang, Songning

    2012-08-01

    Knee injuries are highly prevalent in athletic populations, particularly among female athletes. Many of these injuries occur during landing from a jump. Various comprehensive knee injury prevention programs have been developed to date. However, there is a need to determine which components of these programs contribute directly to changes in knee biomechanics. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the immediate effect of three different simple verbal instructions on knee biomechanics during landing in adult female recreational athletes. Three-dimensional kinematic and kinetic analysis of landing from a countermovement jump was conducted in a counterbalanced cross-over repeated measures design. Results indicated that the instruction to land with equal weight distribution reduced the asymmetry of peak vertical ground reaction force compared to the control condition. The instruction to land softly reduced peak vertical ground reaction force and increased peak knee flexion compared to the control condition. The instruction to land with knees over toes increased peak knee flexion compared to the control condition. These findings indicate that verbal instruction may be a key component of the effects seen in previous research studies that have investigated the benefits of more complex training programs designed to reduce knee injury risk in female athletes.

  17. Scapular winging as a symptom of cervical flexion myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Yaguchi, Hiroaki; Takahashi, Ikuko; Tashiro, Jun; Tsuji, Sachiko; Yabe, Ichiro; Sasaki, Hidenao

    2007-01-01

    A 23-year-old man complained of weakness of the right arm that he first noted six years prior to his visit. Neurological examination revealed atrophy and weakness of the triceps and serratus anterior muscle on the right side, which resulted in scapular winging on that side. MRI with neck flexion revealed compression of the cervical cord enabling a diagnosis of flexion myelopathy. Proximal muscle weakness and atrophy in flexion myelopathies including Hirayama disease are extremely rare. Here, we report a case of unilateral, proximal upper limb atrophy with scapular winging, attributed to middle cervical flexion myelopathy.

  18. Effects of Static Flexion-relaxation on Paraspinal Reflex Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Granata, Kevin P.; Rogers, Ellen; Moorhouse, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    Background. Static trunk flexion working postures and disturbed trunk muscle reflexes are related to increased risk of low-back pain. Animal studies conclude that these factors may be related; passive tissue strain in spinal ligaments causes subsequent short-term changes in reflex. Although studies have documented changes in the myoelectric onset angle of flexion-relaxation following prolonged static flexion and cyclic flexion we could find no published evidence related to the human reflex response of the trunk extensor muscles following a period of static flexion-relaxation loading. Methods. Eighteen subjects maintained static lumbar flexion for 15 min. Paraspinal muscle reflexes were elicited both before and after the flexion-relaxation protocol using pseudorandom stochastic force disturbances while recording EMG. Reflex gain was computed from the peak value of the impulse response function relating input force perturbation to EMG response using time-domain deconvolution analyses. Findings. Reflexes showed a trend toward increased gain after the period of flexion-relaxation (P < 0.055) and were increased with trunk extension exertion (P < 0.021). Significant gender differences in reflex gain were observed (P < 0.01). Interpretations. Occupational activities requiring extended periods of trunk flexion contribute to changes in reflex behavior of the paraspinal muscles. Results suggest potential mechanisms by which flexed posture work may contribute to low-back pain. Significant gender differences indicate risk analyses should consider personal factors when considering neuromuscular behavior. PMID:15567532

  19. Comparison of upper cervical flexion and cervical flexion angle of computer workers with upper trapezius and levator scapular pain.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2014-02-01

    [Purpose] In this study, we compared upper cervical flexion and cervical flexion angle of computer workers with upper trapezius and levator scapular pain. [Subject] Eight male computer workers with upper trapezius muscle pain and eight others with levator scapular muscle pain participated. [Methods] Each subject was assessed in terms of upper cervical flexion angle and total cervical flexion angles using a cervical range of motion instrument after one hour of computer work. [Results] The upper cervical flexion angle of the group with levator scapular pain was significantly lower than that of the group with upper trapezius pain after computer work. The total cervical flexion angle of the group with upper trapezius pain was significantly lower than that of the group with levator scapular pain after computer work. [Conclusion] For selective and effective intervention for neck pain, therapists should evaluate upper and lower cervical motion individually.

  20. In vivo imaging of superficial femoral artery (SFA) stents for deformation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, A.; Schneider, A.; Keck, B.; Bennett, N. R.; Fahrig, R.

    2008-03-01

    A high-resolution (198 μm) C-arm CT imaging system (Axiom Artis dTA, Siemens Medical Solutions, Forchheim, Germany) was optimized for imaging superficial femoral artery (SFA) stents in humans. The SFA is susceptible to the development of atherosclerotic lesions. These are typically treated with angioplasty and stent deployment. However, these stents can have a fracture rate as high as 35%. Fracture is usually accompanied by restenosis and reocclusion. The exact cause of breakage is unknown and is hypothesized to result from deforming forces due to hip and knee flexion. Imaging was performed with the leg placed in both straight and bent positions. Projection images obtained during 20 s scans with ~200° of rotation of the C-arm were back-projected to obtain 3D volumes. Using a semi-automatic software algorithm developed in-house, the stent centerlines were found and ellipses were fitted to the slice normals. Image quality was adequate for calculations in 11/13 subjects. Bending the leg was found to shorten the stents in 10/11 cases with the maximum change being 9% (12 mm in a 133 mm stent), and extend the stent in one case by 1.6%. The maximum eccentricity change was 36% with a bend angle of 72° in a case where the stent extended behind the knee.

  1. Sensitivity of knee soft-tissues to surgical technique in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Schirm, Andreas C; Jeffcote, Benjamin O; Nicholls, Rochelle L; Jakob, Hilaire; Kuster, Markus S

    2011-06-01

    Restricted range of motion and excessive laxity are both potential complications of total knee arthroplasty (TKA). During TKA surgery, the surgeon is frequently faced with the question of how tightly to implant the prosthesis. The most common method of altering implantation tightness is to vary the thickness of the polyethylene inlay after the bone cuts have been made and the trial components inserted. We have sought to quantify how altering the polyethylene thickness may affect post-operative soft tissue tension for a range of prosthetic designs. Four different prosthetic designs were implanted into fresh-frozen cadaveric knee joints. All four designs were implanted in the standard manner, with a 100 Newton distraction force used to set soft tissue balance. The tibiofemoral force was then recorded at 15° intervals throughout the passive flexion range. After the standard implantation of each prosthesis, the tibial component was raised or lowered to mimic increasing and decreasing the polyethylene thickness by 2mm and the force measurements repeated. Tibiofemoral force in extension correlated with implantation tightness for all prosthesis designs. Between 15° and 90° of knee flexion, all four designs were insensitive to changes in implantation tightness. Beyond 90° the effect was more notable in rotating platform mobile-bearing and cruciate-retaining prostheses than in posterior-stabilised mobile-bearing designs. The findings of this research may be useful in assisting surgical decision-making during the implantation of TKA prostheses.

  2. Knee Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your knee joint is made up of bone, cartilage, ligaments and fluid. Muscles and tendons help the knee joint move. When any of these structures is hurt ... your life. The most common disease affecting the knee is osteoarthritis. The cartilage in the knee gradually wears away, ...

  3. Multibody dynamic simulation of knee contact mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Bei, Yanhong; Fregly, Benjamin J.

    2006-01-01

    Multibody dynamic musculoskeletal models capable of predicting muscle forces and joint contact pressures simultaneously would be valuable for studying clinical issues related to knee joint degeneration and restoration. Current three-dimensional multi-body knee models are either quasi-static with deformable contact or dynamic with rigid contact. This study proposes a computationally efficient methodology for combining multibody dynamic simulation methods with a deformable contact knee model. The methodology requires preparation of the articular surface geometry, development of efficient methods to calculate distances between contact surfaces, implementation of an efficient contact solver that accounts for the unique characteristics of human joints, and specification of an application programming interface for integration with any multibody dynamic simulation environment. The current implementation accommodates natural or artificial tibiofemoral joint models, small or large strain contact models, and linear or nonlinear material models. Applications are presented for static analysis (via dynamic simulation) of a natural knee model created from MRI and CT data and dynamic simulation of an artificial knee model produced from manufacturer’s CAD data. Small and large strain natural knee static analyses required 1 min of CPU time and predicted similar contact conditions except for peak pressure, which was higher for the large strain model. Linear and nonlinear artificial knee dynamic simulations required 10 min of CPU time and predicted similar contact force and torque but different contact pressures, which were lower for the nonlinear model due to increased contact area. This methodology provides an important step toward the realization of dynamic musculoskeletal models that can predict in vivo knee joint motion and loading simultaneously. PMID:15564115

  4. [Chronic knee joint discomfort].

    PubMed

    Wittke, R

    2005-06-23

    Chronic pain in the knee joint is frequently a sign of arthrosis in adults. This must be clearly differentiated from other knee problems. Patellofemoral stress syndrome (occurs mostly in young people) and arthritis with effusion in the knee joint after long and mostly unusual stress also allow only a reduced function of the knee joint. However, even when the knee joint is still fully functional, chronic problems could already exist: For example, for joggers, iliotibial band friction syndrome (runner's knee) or after high unphysiological stress, patellar tendinopathy (jumper's knee). These must be differentiated from pes anserinus syndrome and a plica mediopatellaris.

  5. The Effects of a Prophylactic Knee Brace and Two Neoprene Knee Sleeves on the Performance of Healthy Athletes: A Crossover Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mortaza, Niyousha; Ebrahimi, Ismail; Jamshidi, Ali Ashraf; Abdollah, Vahid; Kamali, Mohammad; Abas, Wan Abu Bakar Wan; Osman, Noor Azuan Abu

    2012-01-01

    Knee injury is one of the major problems in sports medicine, and the use of prophylactic knee braces is an attempt to reduce the occurrence and/or severity of injuries to the knee joint ligament(s) without inhibiting knee mobility. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of one recently designed prophylactic knee brace and two neoprene knee sleeves upon performance of healthy athletes. Thirty-one healthy male athletes (age = 21.2±1.5) volunteered as participants to examine the effect of prophylactic knee brace/sleeves on performance using isokinetic and functional tests. All subjects were tested in four conditions in a random order: 1. nonbraced (control) 2. using a neoprene knee sleeve 3. using a knee sleeve with four bilateral metal supports and 4. using a prophylactic knee brace. The study design was a crossover, randomized, controlled trial. Subjects completed single leg vertical jump, cross-over hop, and the isokinetic knee flexion and extension (at 60, 180, 300°/sec). Data were collected from the above tests and analyzed for jump height, cross-over hop distance, peak torque to body weight ratio and average power, respectively. Comparisons of these variables in the four testing conditions revealed no statistically significant difference (p>0.05). The selected prophylactic brace/sleeves did not significantly inhibit athletic performance which might verify that their structure and design have caused no complication in the normal function of the knee joint. Moreover, it could be speculated that, if the brace or the sleeves had any limiting effect, our young healthy athletic subjects were well able to generate a mean peak torque large enough to overcome this possible restriction. Further studies are suggested to investigate the long term effect of these prophylactic knee brace and sleeves as well as their possible effect on the adjacent joints to the knee. PMID:23185549

  6. The effects of a prophylactic knee brace and two neoprene knee sleeves on the performance of healthy athletes: a crossover randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Mortaza, Niyousha; Ebrahimi, Ismail; Jamshidi, Ali Ashraf; Abdollah, Vahid; Kamali, Mohammad; Abas, Wan Abu Bakar Wan; Osman, Noor Azuan Abu

    2012-01-01

    Knee injury is one of the major problems in sports medicine, and the use of prophylactic knee braces is an attempt to reduce the occurrence and/or severity of injuries to the knee joint ligament(s) without inhibiting knee mobility. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of one recently designed prophylactic knee brace and two neoprene knee sleeves upon performance of healthy athletes. Thirty-one healthy male athletes (age = 21.2 ± 1.5) volunteered as participants to examine the effect of prophylactic knee brace/sleeves on performance using isokinetic and functional tests. All subjects were tested in four conditions in a random order: 1. nonbraced (control) 2. using a neoprene knee sleeve 3. using a knee sleeve with four bilateral metal supports and 4. using a prophylactic knee brace. The study design was a crossover, randomized, controlled trial. Subjects completed single leg vertical jump, cross-over hop, and the isokinetic knee flexion and extension (at 60, 180, 300°/sec). Data were collected from the above tests and analyzed for jump height, cross-over hop distance, peak torque to body weight ratio and average power, respectively. Comparisons of these variables in the four testing conditions revealed no statistically significant difference (p>0.05). The selected prophylactic brace/sleeves did not significantly inhibit athletic performance which might verify that their structure and design have caused no complication in the normal function of the knee joint. Moreover, it could be speculated that, if the brace or the sleeves had any limiting effect, our young healthy athletic subjects were well able to generate a mean peak torque large enough to overcome this possible restriction. Further studies are suggested to investigate the long term effect of these prophylactic knee brace and sleeves as well as their possible effect on the adjacent joints to the knee.

  7. Multijoint kinetic chain analysis of knee extension during the soccer instep kick.

    PubMed

    Naito, Kozo; Fukui, Yosuke; Maruyama, Takeo

    2010-04-01

    Although previous studies have shown that motion-dependent interactions between adjacent segments play an important role in producing knee extension during the soccer instep kick, detailed knowledge about the mechanisms underlying those interactions is lacking. The present study aimed to develop a 3-D dynamical model for the multijoint kinetic chain of the instep kick in order to quantify the contributions of the causal dynamical factors to the production of maximum angular velocity during knee extension. Nine collegiate soccer players volunteered to participate in the experiment and performed instep kicking movements while 3-D positional data and the ground reaction force were measured. A dynamical model was developed in the form of a linked system containing 8 segments and 18 joint rotations, and the knee extension/flexion motion was decomposed into causal factors related to muscular moment, gyroscopic moment, centrifugal force, Coriolis force, gravity, proximal endpoint linear acceleration, and external force-dependent terms. The rapid knee extension during instep kicking was found to result almost entirely from kicking leg centrifugal force, trunk rotation muscular moment, kicking leg Coriolis force, and trunk rotation gyroscopic-dependent components. Based on the finding that rapid knee extension during instep kicking stems from multiple dynamical factors, it is suggested that the multijoint kinetic chain analysis used in the present study is more useful for achieving a detailed understanding of the cause of rapid kicking leg movement than the previously used 2-D, two-segment kinetic chain model. The present results also indicated that the centrifugal effect due to the kicking hip flexion angular velocity contributed substantially to the generation of a rapid knee extension, suggesting that the adjustment between the kicking hip flexion angular velocity and the leg configuration (knee flexion angle) is more important for effective instep kicking than other

  8. The influence of a user-adaptive prosthetic knee across varying walking speeds: A randomized cross-over trial.

    PubMed

    Prinsen, E C; Nederhand, M J; Sveinsdóttir, H S; Prins, M R; van der Meer, F; Koopman, H F J M; Rietman, J S

    2017-01-01

    Previously conducted trials comparing the gait pattern of individuals with a transfemoral amputation using a user-adaptive and a non-microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee (NMPK) found mixed and conflicting results. Few trials, however, have compared user-adaptive to non-adaptive prosthetic knees across different walking speeds. Because of the ability of variable damping, the effect of user-adaptive knees might be more pronounced at lower or higher walking speeds. Our aim was to compare the Rheo Knee II (a microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee) with NMPKs across varying walking speeds. In addition, we studied compensatory mechanisms associated with non-optimal prosthetic knee kinematics, such as intact ankle vaulting and vertical acceleration of the pelvis. Nine persons with a transfemoral amputation or knee disarticulation were included and measured with their own NMPK and with the Rheo Knee II. Measurements were performed at three walking speeds: preferred walking speed, 70% preferred walking speed and 115% preferred walking speed. No differences on peak prosthetic knee flexion during swing were found between prosthetic knee conditions. In addition, prosthetic knee flexion increased significantly with walking speed for both prosthetic knee conditions. At 70% preferred walking speed we found that vaulting of the intact ankle was significantly decreased while walking with the Rheo Knee II compared to the NMPK condition (P=0.028). We did not find differences in peak vertical acceleration of the pelvis during initial and mid-swing of the prosthetic leg. In conclusion, comparison of walking with the Rheo Knee II to walking with a NMPK across different walking speeds showed limited differences in gait parameters.

  9. Knee Extensor and Flexor Torque Development with Concentric and Eccentric Isokinetic Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Larry E.; Pierson, Lee M.; Nickols-Richardson, Sharon M.; Wootten, David F.; Selmon, Serah E.; Ramp, Warren K.; Herbert, William G.

    2006-01-01

    This study assessed muscular torque and rate of torque development following concentric (CON) or eccentric (ECC) isokinetic training. Thirty-eight women were randomly assigned to either CON or ECC training groups. Training consisted of knee extension and flexion of the nondominant leg three times per week for 20 weeks (SD = 1). Eccentric training…

  10. Manipulation for stiffness following total knee arthroplasty: when and how often to do it?

    PubMed

    Desai, Aravind S; Karmegam, Anand; Dramis, Asterios; Board, Tim N; Raut, Videsh

    2014-10-01

    Stiffness following total knee arthroplasty is a disabling complication. One of the management options of stiffness includes manipulation under anaesthesia, but no real consensus exist on appropriate timing of intervention, and the timing and results of the manipulation under anaesthesia (MUA) are under debate in the literature. Our aim was to determine the efficacy of single and multiple manipulations under anaesthesia following total knee arthroplasty and to determine the most appropriate timing for manipulation. We retrospectively reviewed 86 patients who underwent manipulation for stiffness following primary total knee replacement with at least 1-year follow-up. Range of motion before surgery, at the time of the MUA, immediately after MUA and at 6 weeks and 1 year post-MUA were recorded. At the end of 1 year post-manipulation, manipulations performed at less than 20 weeks, following primary total knee arthroplasty, showed 31° of flexion gain as compared to only 1.5° of flexion gain when manipulation was undertaken after 20 weeks. Of the 86 patients, 21 had multiple manipulations with no significant difference in flexion gain after the second manipulation. Patients on warfarin (26%) had an increased incidence of stiffness and poor flexion gain. This study showed that better results were achieved when manipulation was performed at less than 20 weeks (particularly between 12 and 14 weeks) from primary surgery with no added benefit from re-manipulations.

  11. Dynamic Alignment Analysis in the Osteoarthritic Knee Using Computer Navigation.

    PubMed

    Larrainzar-Garijo, Ricardo; Murillo-Vizuete, David; Garcia-Bogalo, Raul; Escobar-Anton, David; Horna-Castiñeiras, Lissette; Peralta-Molero, Juan Vicente

    2017-02-13

    The lower limb alignment is influenced by the geometry of the joint surfaces and surrounding soft tissue tension. The mechanical behavior changes in a normal, osteoarthritic, and postoperative knee. The purpose of this study is to determine the dynamic coronal femoral tibial mechanical angle (FTMA) in osteoarthritic knees using computer navigation. The authors hypothesize that there are different varus-valgus patterns between flexion and extension in the osteoarthritic knee. We conducted a transversal observational study and included patients with osteoarthritis who underwent primary navigation TKA (Orthopilot version 4.2; B. Braun Aesculap, Tuttlingen, Germany). In total, 98 consecutive patients with 100 osteoarthritic knee joints, on which total knee arthroplasty was performed in our institution from 2009 to 2010, were enrolled in this prospective study. The FTMA was measured with the patient supine with maximum knee extension possible (considering the value as 0), 30, 60, and 90 degrees. All FMTA data obtained were segmented by hierarchic cluster measuring method. Through the clustering system, five segments were generated for varus patients and three for valgus patients: expected varus, expected valgus, severe varus, severe valgus, structured varus, structured valgus, concave varus, mixed varus-valgus, and mixed valgus-varus. The findings of the present study have demonstrated that there is a well-defined dynamic alignment in osteoarthritic knees, resulting in a wide kinematic variation in the coronal FTMA between flexion and full extension. Further studies will be necessary to determine whether this dynamic approach to FTMA has clinical utility in the surgeon's decision-making process.

  12. The Isokinetic and Electromyographic Assessment of Knee Muscles Strength in the Short- and Long-Term Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Askary-Ashtiani, Ahmadreza; Ghanjal, Ali; Motaqi, Monireh; Meftahi, Gholam Hossein; Hatef, Boshra; Niknam, Hoda

    2016-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) patients are subject to muscle weakness. Objectives The aim of the study was an assessment of electromyographic (EMG) activity of knee muscles during isometric maximal voluntary contraction in the different disease durations of T2DM. Methods Eighteen patients with less than 10 years and twelve patients with more than 10 years of T2DM were compared with nineteen matched healthy control subjects. EMG of flexor and extensor muscles of knee concurrently with isometric maximal peak torque of knee flexion and extension at 75 degrees of knee flexion were recorded in three groups. Results Isometric maximal peak torque of extension and root mean squared (RMS) of vastus lateralis and medial hamstring in the healthy control was significantly higher than both patient groups. Whenever the maximal isometric peak flexion torque was not significantly different between groups, the mean power frequency (MPF) of flexor muscles especially medial hamstrings were higher in the short-term T2DM than healthy control groups. The two factors, gender and age, had significant effect on maximal peak torque and RMS of knee muscles. Conclusions EMG could show the effect of T2DM, gender and age on knee muscles activity. It seems that the medial hamstring was the most sensitive muscle of knee compartment to show the effect of T2DM and difference of short and long-term T2DM in EMG study. PMID:28144413

  13. Combined magnetic resonance and diffusion tensor imaging analyses provide a powerful tool for in vivo assessment of deformation along human muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Pamuk, Uluç; Karakuzu, Agah; Ozturk, Cengizhan; Acar, Burak; Yucesoy, Can A

    2016-10-01

    Muscle fiber direction strain provides invaluable information for characterizing muscle function. However, methods to study this for human muscles in vivo are lacking. Using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging based deformation analyses and diffusion tensor (DT) imaging based tractography combined, we aimed to assess muscle fiber direction local tissue deformations within the human medial gastrocnemius (GM) muscle. Healthy female subjects (n=5, age=27±1 years) were positioned prone within the MR scanner in a relaxed state with the ankle angle fixed at 90°. The knee was brought to flexion (140.8±3.0°) (undeformed state). Sets of 3D high resolution MR, and DT images were acquired. This protocol was repeated at extended knee joint position (177.0±1.0°) (deformed state). Tractography and Demons nonrigid registration algorithm was utilized to calculate local deformations along muscle fascicles. Undeformed state images were also transformed by a synthetic rigid body motion to calculate strain errors. Mean strain errors were significantly smaller then mean fiber direction strains (lengthening: 0.2±0.1% vs. 8.7±8.5%; shortening: 3.3±0.9% vs. 7.5±4.6%). Shortening and lengthening (up to 23.3% and 116.7%, respectively) occurs simultaneously along individual fascicles despite imposed GM lengthening. Along-fiber shear strains confirm the presence of much shearing between fascicles. Mean fiber direction strains of different tracts also show non-uniform distribution. Inhomogeneity of fiber strain indicates epimuscular myofascial force transmission. We conclude that MR and DT imaging analyses combined provide a powerful tool for quantifying deformation along human muscle fibers in vivo. This can help substantially achieving a better understanding of normal and pathological muscle function and mechanisms of treatment techniques.

  14. Weak lensing goes bananas: what flexion really measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, P.; Er, X.

    2008-07-01

    In weak gravitational lensing, the image distortion caused by shear measures the projected tidal gravitational field of the deflecting mass distribution. To lowest order, the shear is proportional to the mean image ellipticity. If the image sizes are not small compared to the scale over which the shear varies, higher-order distortions occur, called flexion. For ordinary weak lensing, the observable quantity is not the shear, but the reduced shear, owing to the mass-sheet degeneracy. Likewise, the flexion itself is unobservable. Instead, higher-order image distortions measure the reduced flexion, i.e., derivatives of the reduced shear. We derive the corresponding lens equation in terms of the reduced flexion and calculate the resulting relation between brightness moments of source and image. Assuming an isotropic distribution of source orientations, estimates for the reduced shear and flexion are obtained and then tested with simulations. In particular, the presence of flexion affects the determination of the reduced shear. The results of these simulations yield the amount of bias of the estimators as a function of the shear and flexion. We point out and quantify a fundamental limitation of the flexion formalism in terms of the product of reduced flexion and source size. If this product increases above the derived threshold, multiple images of the source are formed locally, and the formalism breaks down. Finally, we show how a general (reduced) flexion field can be decomposed into its four components. Two of them are due to a shear field, carrying an E- and B-mode in general. The other two components do not correspond to a shear field, and they can also be split up into corresponding E- and B-modes.

  15. Non-invasive, non-radiological quantification of anteroposterior knee joint ligamentous laxity

    PubMed Central

    Russell, D. F.; Deakin, A. H.; Fogg, Q. A.; Picard, F.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives We performed in vitro validation of a non-invasive skin-mounted system that could allow quantification of anteroposterior (AP) laxity in the outpatient setting. Methods A total of 12 cadaveric lower limbs were tested with a commercial image-free navigation system using trackers secured by bone screws. We then tested a non-invasive fabric-strap system. The lower limb was secured at 10° intervals from 0° to 60° of knee flexion and 100 N of force was applied perpendicular to the tibia. Acceptable coefficient of repeatability (CR) and limits of agreement (LOA) of 3 mm were set based on diagnostic criteria for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) insufficiency. Results Reliability and precision within the individual invasive and non-invasive systems was acceptable throughout the range of flexion tested (intra-class correlation coefficient 0.88, CR 1.6 mm). Agreement between the two systems was acceptable measuring AP laxity between full extension and 40° knee flexion (LOA 2.9 mm). Beyond 40° of flexion, agreement between the systems was unacceptable (LOA > 3 mm). Conclusions These results indicate that from full knee extension to 40° flexion, non-invasive navigation-based quantification of AP tibial translation is as accurate as the standard validated commercial system, particularly in the clinically and functionally important range of 20° to 30° knee flexion. This could be useful in diagnosis and post-operative evaluation of ACL pathology. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2013;2:233–7. PMID:24184443

  16. [Long-term results of proximal osteocartilaginous autografts in extensive cartilagenous destruction of the knee. Apropos of 5 cases].

    PubMed

    Maynou, C; Mestdagh, H; Beltrand, E; Petroff, E; Dubois, H

    1998-06-01

    Five patients with a large defect in the articular cartilage at the knee joint were treated by transplantation of an autogenic osteochondral fragment. The graft was harvested from the posterior portion of the ipsilateral femoral condyle in 4 cases of osteochondritis dissecans, and from the lateral third of the patella pedicled on the patellar ligament in one case of posttraumatic necrotic collapse of the lateral tibial plateau. One patient underwent concomitant high tibial osteotomy. Two months postoperatively bony union was achieved in all cases but in one case, the grafted articular cartilage did not survive after weight bearing because of an overlooked varus deformity. At the follow-up examination (8 to 20 years) all 5 patients were asymptomatic ; the range of flexion was somewhat restricted (120 degrees) ; roentgenogram revealed slight narrowing of the articular space or at least flattening of the grafted zone and subchondral osteosclerosis. At arthroscopic exploration, the grafted zones were recognizable from the surrounding cartilage, and histologic examination of their border revealed fibrocartilage and proliferating vessels; late gonarthrosis might ensue over time. Therefore the procedure should be performed only in large osteochondral defects where neither reattachment of a loose body, nor hemiarthroplasty, nor isolated osteotomy are suitable and before degenerative changes have developed. Morever any associated varus deformity requires concomitant correction by high tibial osteotomy to relieve stress from the graft.

  17. Effect of ACL graft material on anterior knee force during simulated in vivo ovine motion applied to the porcine knee: An in vitro examination of force during 2000 cycles.

    PubMed

    Boguszewski, Daniel V; Wagner, Christopher T; Butler, David L; Shearn, Jason T

    2015-12-01

    This study determined how anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction affected the magnitude and temporal patterns of anterior knee force and internal knee moment during 2000 cycles of simulated gait. Porcine knees were tested using a six degree-of-freedom robot, examining three porcine allograft materials compared with the native ACL. Reconstructions were performed using: (1) bone-patellar tendon-bone allograft (BPTB), (2) reconstructive porcine tissue matrix (RTM), or (3) an RTM-polymer hybrid construct (Hybrid). Forces and moments were measured over the entire gait cycle and contrasted at heel strike, mid stance, toe off, and peak flexion. The Hybrid construct performed the best, as magnitude and temporal changes in both anterior knee force and internal knee moment were not different from the native ACL knee. Conversely, the RTM knees showed greater loss in anterior knee force during 2000 cycles than the native ACL knee at heel strike and toe off, with an average force loss of 46%. BPTB knees performed the least favorably, with significant loss in anterior knee force at all key points and an average force loss of 61%. This is clinically relevant, as increases in post-operative knee laxity are believed to play a role in graft failure and early onset osteoarthritis.

  18. Acetabular cartilage defects cause altered hip and knee joint coordination variability during gait

    PubMed Central

    Samaan, Michael A.; Teng, Hsiang-Ling; Kumar, Deepak; Lee, Sonia; Link, Thomas; Majumdar, Sharmila; Souza, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with acetabular cartilage defects reported increased pain and disability compared to those without acetabular cartilage defects. The specific effects of acetabular cartilage defects on lower extremity coordination patterns are unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine hip and knee joint coordination variability during gait in those with and without acetabular cartilage defects. Methods A combined approach, consisting of a semi-quantitative MRI-based quantification method and vector coding, was used to assess hip and knee joint coordination variability during gait in those with and without acetabular cartilage lesions. Findings The coordination variability of the hip flexion-extension/knee rotation, hip abduction-adduction/knee rotation and hip rotation/knee rotation joint couplings were reduced in the acetabular lesion group compared to the control group during loading response of the gait cycle. The lesion group demonstrated increased variability in the hip flexion-extension/knee rotation and hip abduction-adduction/knee rotation joint couplings, compared to the control group, during the terminal stance/pre-swing phase of gait. Interpretation Reduced variability during loading response in the lesion group may suggest reduced movement strategies and a possible compensation mechanism for lower extremity instability during this phase of the gait cycle. During terminal stance/pre-swing, a larger variability in the lesion group may suggest increased movement strategies and represent a compensation or pain avoidance mechanism caused by the load applied to the hip joint. PMID:26298706

  19. Knee Control and Jump-Landing Technique in Young Basketball and Floorball Players.

    PubMed

    Leppänen, M; Pasanen, K; Kulmala, J-P; Kujala, U M; Krosshaug, T; Kannus, P; Perttunen, J; Vasankari, T; Parkkari, J

    2016-04-01

    Poor knee alignment is associated with increased loading of the joints, ligaments and tendons, and may increase the risk of injury. The study purpose was to compare differences in knee kinematics between basketball and floorball players during a vertical drop jump (VDJ) task. We wanted to investigate whether basketball players, whose sport includes frequent jump-landings, exhibited better knee control compared with floorball players, whose sport involves less jumping. Complete data was obtained from 173 basketball and 141 floorball players. Peak knee valgus and flexion angles during the VDJ were analyzed by 3D motion analysis.Larger knee valgus angles were observed among basketball players (- 3.2°, 95%CI -4.5 to - 2.0) compared with floorball players (- 0.9°, 95%CI -2.3 to 0.6) (P=0.022). Basketball players landed with a decreased peak knee flexion angle (83.1°, 95%CI 81.4 to 84.8) compared with floorball players (86.5°, 95%CI 84.6 to 88.4) (P=0.016). There were no significant differences in height, weight or BMI between basketball and floorball players. Female athletes exhibited significantly greater valgus angles than males. This study revealed that proper knee control during jump-landing does not seem to develop in young athletes simply by playing the sport, despite the fact that jump-landings occur frequently in practice and games.

  20. Accurate joint space quantification in knee osteoarthritis: a digital x-ray tomosynthesis phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sewell, Tanzania S.; Piacsek, Kelly L.; Heckel, Beth A.; Sabol, John M.

    2011-03-01

    The current imaging standard for diagnosis and monitoring of knee osteoarthritis (OA) is projection radiography. However radiographs may be insensitive to markers of early disease such as osteophytes and joint space narrowing (JSN). Relative to standard radiography, digital X-ray tomosynthesis (DTS) may provide improved visualization of the markers of knee OA without the interference of superimposed anatomy. DTS utilizes a series of low-dose projection images over an arc of +/-20 degrees to reconstruct tomographic images parallel to the detector. We propose that DTS can increase accuracy and precision in JSN quantification. The geometric accuracy of DTS was characterized by quantifying joint space width (JSW) as a function of knee flexion and position using physical and anthropomorphic phantoms. Using a commercially available digital X-ray system, projection and DTS images were acquired for a Lucite rod phantom with known gaps at various source-object-distances, and angles of flexion. Gap width, representative of JSW, was measured using a validated algorithm. Over an object-to-detector-distance range of 5-21cm, a 3.0mm gap width was reproducibly measured in the DTS images, independent of magnification. A simulated 0.50mm (+/-0.13) JSN was quantified accurately (95% CI 0.44-0.56mm) in the DTS images. Angling the rods to represent knee flexion, the minimum gap could be precisely determined from the DTS images and was independent of flexion angle. JSN quantification using DTS was insensitive to distance from patient barrier and flexion angle. Potential exists for the optimization of DTS for accurate radiographic quantification of knee OA independent of patient positioning.

  1. An ABJS Best Paper: Dynamic intraoperative ligament balancing for total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    D'Lima, Darryl D; Patil, Shantanu; Steklov, Nikolai; Colwell, Clifford W

    2007-10-01

    Complications after total knee arthroplasty, such as malalignment, instability, and excessive wear, have been attributed to poor soft tissue balance. Traditional instruments that assist in intraoperative soft tissue balancing rely on static measurements. We used a custom tibial trial, instrumented with force transducers, for dynamic measurement of soft tissue balance. Six cadaver knees and two patients were implanted with the trial tray along with a standard femoral component and a tibial insert. We recorded tibial forces during passive knee flexion, after the initial bone cuts were made, after soft tissue balancing, and after replacing the selected optimal insert with one that was 2 mm thicker. In all knees, substantial imbalance in tibial forces initially was recorded. Soft tissue balancing substantially reduced the imbalance. Although reasonable balance was achieved at 0-degree and 90-degree flexion, there was some measurable imbalance at flexion angles other than 0 degrees and 90 degrees. Increasing the thickness of the insert by 2 mm substantially increased net tibial forces. Inconsistent soft tissue balance may explain some of the wide variation in knee kinematics. Surgical navigation systems have reduced the variability in component alignment. An instrumented tibial trial can be a valuable adjunct to directly measure soft tissue balance.

  2. Relationship between joint gap difference and range of motion in total knee arthroplasty: a prospective randomised study between different platforms.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Hiroshi; Hatayama, Kazuhisa; Shimizu, Masaki; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Takagishi, Kenji

    2009-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the range of motion (ROM) of the knee before and four years after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) with a mobile or fixed type of platform and to prospectively evaluate whether there was a difference in ligament balance between the platform types. The subjects were 68 patients involving 76 joints. The mobile type was used in 31 joints and fixed type in 45 joints by employing a prospective randomised method. The passive maximum ROM was measured using a goniometer before and four years after surgery. Also, the intraoperative knee ligament balance was measured. The postoperative extension ROM was significantly improved after TKA using a mobile bearing type compared with that employing a fixed bearing type. In TKA using the former, the intraoperative gap difference was not related to the postoperative flexion angle of the knee. However, they were related in TKA using a fixed bearing type, with a positive correlation regarding the flexion gap.

  3. Influence of gap balance on the sagittal movement of a specific mobile bearing floating platform design in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dae-Hee; Lee, Dong-Ki; Shin, Young-Soo; Han, Seung-Beom

    2013-12-01

    We analyzed 119 knees implanted with mobile bearing floating platform prostheses using the navigation-assisted gap balancing technique to analyze the relationship between intraoperative sagittal movement of floating platforms and soft tissue balancing. The 95 (79.8%) knees were classified into the positive rollback group (mean insert posterior rollback 5.86 ± 1.24 mm), and the remaining 24 (20.2%) into the negative rollback group. Lateral flexion gap (LFG) differed significantly between knees with positive and negative rollback (20.5 ± 1.7 mm vs 22.1 ± 1.7 mm, P = .021). Only LFG significantly influenced the occurrence of bearing sagittal movement. Sagittal translation of the insert occurred in about 80% of knees implanted with mobile bearing floating platforms in TKA, and was affected by flexion gaps, especially on the lateral side.

  4. Biomechanical validation of medial pie-crusting for soft-tissue balancing in knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Mihalko, William M; Woodard, Erik L; Hebert, Casey T; Crockarell, John R; Williams, John L

    2015-02-01

    Balancing a varus knee is traditionally accomplished by releasing the medial soft-tissue sleeve off the tibia. Recently, "pie-crusting" (PC) medial structures has been described. In a biomechanical cadaver study we compared PC to traditional release (TR) to determine their effects on flexion and extension gaps. PC was done in five specimens along the anterior half of the medial soft-tissue sleeve and five along the posterior half, followed by a traditional release. In 90° flexion, valgus laxity after TR was significantly greater than after PC alone. PC of the anterior or posterior aspect of the medial soft-tissue sleeve can effect changes more in flexion than in extension, respectively. Complete TR did not provide more gap opening than PC in extension, but produced more effect in flexion.

  5. Effect of kinesio taping on the isokinetic muscle function in football athletes with a knee injury.

    PubMed

    Hong, SoonKwon; Shim, JeMyung; Kim, SungJoong; Namkoong, Seung; Roh, HyoLyun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the difference in isokinetic muscle function in football athletes with a knee injury with and without kinesio taping. [Subjects] The subjects for this study were 10 football athletes (males) with a knee injury. [Methods] Measurements were performed by using Cybex dynamometer under uniform motion before and after the application of kinesio tape to the quadriceps and hamstring muscle. Maximal concentric knee extension and flexion at three angular velocities (60°/s, 120°/s, and 180°/s) were measured. [Results] A significant difference was found in peak torque and total work of the flexion at 120°/s and 180°/s, as well as in the average power of extension at 180°/s. [Conclusion] Though it is not the main therapy for muscle function in football athletes with injury, kinesio taping was an effective adjunct therapy.

  6. Effect of kinesio taping on the isokinetic muscle function in football athletes with a knee injury

    PubMed Central

    Hong, SoonKwon; Shim, JeMyung; Kim, SungJoong; Namkoong, Seung; Roh, HyoLyun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the difference in isokinetic muscle function in football athletes with a knee injury with and without kinesio taping. [Subjects] The subjects for this study were 10 football athletes (males) with a knee injury. [Methods] Measurements were performed by using Cybex dynamometer under uniform motion before and after the application of kinesio tape to the quadriceps and hamstring muscle. Maximal concentric knee extension and flexion at three angular velocities (60°/s, 120°/s, and 180°/s) were measured. [Results] A significant difference was found in peak torque and total work of the flexion at 120°/s and 180°/s, as well as in the average power of extension at 180°/s. [Conclusion] Though it is not the main therapy for muscle function in football athletes with injury, kinesio taping was an effective adjunct therapy. PMID:26957761

  7. Effect of Knee Position on Quadriceps Muscle Force Steadiness and Activation Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Chandramouli; Allen, Eric J.; Williams, Glenn N.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction This study investigated the effect of knee position on quadriceps force steadiness and activation strategies. Methods Quadriceps force steadiness was evaluated in twenty-two volunteers at two knee positions by testing their ability to regulate submaximal force. Muscle activation strategies were studied in both time and frequency domains using surface electromyography. Results Quadriceps force fluctuations and the associated agonist and antagonist activity were significantly higher at 90° than at 30° of flexion (P < 0.05). The quadriceps median frequency recorded at 30° was significantly higher than at 90° of flexion (P < 0.05). Regression analyses revealed that force steadiness was related to quadriceps activation and median frequency (P < 0.001), but not to hamstring coactivation (P > 0.05). Discussion The results indicate that knee position significantly affects quadriceps force steadiness and activation strategies. This finding may have important implications for designing a force control testing protocol and interpreting test results. PMID:21404288

  8. Strategies used during a challenging weighted walking task in healthy adults and individuals with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Kubinski, Andrew J; Higginson, Jill S

    2012-01-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a disease that affects millions of people. While numerous gait differences have been identified between healthy adults and adults with knee OA under normal and challenging conditions, adults with knee OA have not been studied during a challenging weighted walking task. Investigation of the effect of weighted walking on the initial contact and loading response phases of gait was undertaken in 20 healthy and 20 knee OA subjects ages 40-85 years old walking at 1.0m/s while unweighted and weighted with 1/6th of their body weight in a weight vest. Subjects were grouped according to their Kellgren and Lawrence radiographic score and healthy subjects were age-matched to those with knee OA. ANOVA revealed significant effects for hip flexion angle at initial contact, step length, initial double support percent, and load rate. Post hoc t-tests revealed that subjects with knee OA had a larger initial double support percent and hip flexion angle at initial contact and a decreased load rate compared to unweighted, healthy adults. Also, both groups increased their initial double support percent in response to the challenging weighted walking task, but only the healthy adults increased their hip flexion angle at initial contact and decreased their load rate. During the weighted condition, the knee OA group had a shorter step length compared to the healthy group. Because the knee OA group only made minor compensations to their gait strategy, it appears that they may be unable or prefer not to adjust their gait mechanics due to underlying issues.

  9. Design and Characterization of a Novel Knee Articulation Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olinski, M.; Gronowicz, A.; Handke, A.; Ceccarelli, M.

    2016-08-01

    The paper is focused on designing a novel controllable and adjustable mechanism for reproducing human knee joint's complex motion by taking into account the flexion/extension movement in the sagittal plane, in combination with roll and slide. Main requirements for a knee rehabilitation supporting device are specified by researching the knee's anatomy and already existing mechanisms. A three degree of freedom (3 DOF) system (four-bar like linkage with controlled variable lengths of rockers) is synthesised to perform the reference path of instantaneous centre of rotation (ICR). Finally, a preliminary design of the adaptive mechanism is elaborated and a numerical model is built in Adams. Numerical results are derived from simulations that are presented to evaluate the accuracy of the reproduced movement and the mechanism's capabilities.

  10. Acute patellar dislocation with multiple ligament injuries after knee dislocation and single session reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Gormeli, Gokay; Gormeli, Cemile Ayse; Karakaplan, Mustafa; Gurbuz, Sukru; Ozdemir, Zeynep; Ozer, Mustafa

    2016-06-01

    Knee dislocation is a relatively rare condition of all orthopaedic injuries. Accompanying multiple ligament injuries are common after knee dislocations. A 41-year-old male presented to the emergency department suffering from right knee dislocation in June 2013. The patient had anterior cruciate ligament, medial collateral ligament (MCL), medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) rupture, and lateral meniscal tear. A single-bundle anatomic reconstruction, medial collateral ligament reconstruction, medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction and meniscus repair were performed in single session. At twelve months follow-up; there was 160º flexion and 10° extension knee range of motion. Lysholm knee score was 90. Extensive forces can cause both MCL and MPFL injury due to overload and the anatomical relationship between these two structures. Therefore, patients with valgus instability should be evaluated for both MPFL and MCL tears to facilitate successful treatment.

  11. Segmentation of multiple knee bones from CT for orthopedic knee surgery planning.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dijia; Sofka, Michal; Birkbeck, Neil; Zhou, S Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Patient-specific orthopedic knee surgery planning requires precisely segmenting from 3D CT images multiple knee bones, namely femur, tibia, fibula, and patella, around the knee joint with severe pathologies. In this work, we propose a fully automated, highly precise, and computationally efficient segmentation approach for multiple bones. First, each bone is initially segmented using a model-based marginal space learning framework for pose estimation followed by non-rigid boundary deformation. To recover shape details, we then refine the bone segmentation using graph cut that incorporates the shape priors derived from the initial segmentation. Finally we remove overlap between neighboring bones using multi-layer graph partition. In experiments, we achieve simultaneous segmentation of femur, tibia, patella, and fibula with an overall accuracy of less than 1mm surface-to-surface error in less than 90s on hundreds of 3D CT scans with pathological knee joints.

  12. Serial elongation-derotation-flexion casting for children with early-onset scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Canavese, Federico; Samba, Antoine; Dimeglio, Alain; Mansour, Mounira; Rousset, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Various early-onset spinal deformities, particularly infantile and juvenile scoliosis (JS), still pose challenges to pediatric orthopedic surgeons. The ideal treatment of these deformities has yet to emerge, as both clinicians and surgeons still face multiple challenges including preservation of thoracic motion, spine and cage, and protection of cardiac and lung growth and function. Elongation-derotation-flexion (EDF) casting is a technique that uses a custom-made thoracolumbar cast based on a three-dimensional correction concept. EDF can control progression of the deformity and - in some cases-coax the initially-curved spine to grow straighter by acting simultaneously in the frontal, sagittal and coronal planes. Here we provide a comprehensive review of how infantile and JS can affect normal spine and thorax and how serial EDF casting can be used to manage these spinal deformities. A fresh review of the literature helps fully understand the principles of the serial EDF casting technique and the effectiveness of conservative treatment in patients with early-onset spinal deformities, particularly infantile and juvenile scolisois. PMID:26716089

  13. One-stage long-stem total knee arthroplasty for arthritic knees with stress fractures.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Amber; Bhosale, Pradeep B; Suryawanshi, Ashish V; Purohit, Shaligram

    2013-08-01

    PURPOSE. To evaluate the outcome of one-stage long-stem total knee arthroplasty (TKA) for patients with arthritic knees and tibiofemoral stress fractures. METHODS. Records of 11 men and 18 women aged 47 to 78 (mean, 66) years who underwent fixed-bearing posterior-stabilised TKA for osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis of the knee with tibial (n=31) and femoral (n=3) stress fractures were reviewed. All the tibial fractures involved the proximal half. There were 7 associated fibular stress fractures. Of the 31 knees with tibial stress fractures, 26 and 5 manifested varus and valgus deformity, respectively. RESULTS. The mean follow-up period was 51 (range, 24-96) months. The mean tibiofemoral angle improved from 23.2 to 1.9 degrees varus. The mean Knee Society knee score improved from 38.5 (range, 15- 63) to 89.6 (range, 80-95) [p<0.05]. The mean Knee Society functional score improved from 25.5 (range, 0-40) to 86.5 (range, 60-100) [p<0.05]. All fractures were united at the last follow-up. No complications were encountered. CONCLUSION. One-stage long-stem TKA restores limb alignment and facilitates fracture healing, with excellent outcome.

  14. Total Arthroplasty in Ankylosed Knees: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Camanho, Gilberto Luiz

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To present nine patients with ankylosis in their knees that were submitted to a total arthroplasty to lessen their pain and improve their functional limitation. For these patients, arthrodesis remained a possibility in the event of arthroplasty failure. INTRODUCTION Ankylosis of the knee is a severe functional limitation that becomes worse when pain is present. Arthrodesis of the knee is a classical indication for such patients, since it resolves the pain; however, the severe functional limitation remains. METHODS In the present study, we evaluated the clinical course of nine patients who underwent total arthroplasty of the knee, and were followed up for at least five years. RESULTS The results demonstrate that all of the patients experienced a significant reduction in pain and some improvement in the degree of knee flexion and extension. CONCLUSION Based on the latest follow-up, there has been no need to perform arthrodesis for any of our patients, showing that a total arthroplasty could be a option for treatment in knee ankylosis. PMID:19330242

  15. Study of Wearable Knee Assistive Instruments for Walk Rehabilitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yong; Nakamura, Masahiro; Ito, Noritaka; Fujimoto, Hiroshi; Horikuchi, Kenichi; Wakabayashi, Shojiro; Takahashi, Rei; Terada, Hidetsugu; Haro, Hirotaka

    A wearable Knee Assistive Instrument for the walk rehabilitation was newly developed. Especially, this system aimed at supporting the rehabilitation for the post-TKA (Total Knee Arthroplasty) which is a popular surgery for aging people. This system consisted of an assisting mechanism for the knee joint, a hip joint support system and a foot pressure sensor system. The driving system of this robot consisted of a CPU board which generated the walking pattern, a Li-ion battery, DC motors with motor drivers, contact sensors to detect the state of foot and potentiometers to detect the hip joint angle. The control method was proposed to reproduce complex motion of knee joint as much as possible, and to increase hip or knee flexion angle. Especially, this method used the timing that heel left from the floor. This method included that the lower limb was raised to prevent a subject's fall. Also, the prototype of knee assisting system was tested. It was confirmed that the assisting system is useful.

  16. Minimization of the knee shear joint load in leg-extension equipment.

    PubMed

    Biscarini, A

    2008-10-01

    We developed an analytical biomechanical model for leg-extension equipment and the associated knee-extension/flexion exercises. The shear component, phi(t), of the tibiofemoral joint load was calculated taking into account all the fundamental elements of the equipment mechanics (resistance pad placement, cam/pulley system geometry, selected weight stack, etc.) and the instantaneous values of the relevant kinematical parameters (knee-flexion angle (theta(f)), angular velocity, and angular acceleration). The optimal distance (a(R))(OPT) between the knee-flexion/extension axis and the resistance pad placement point was derived by minimizing phi(t). (a(R))(OPT) is nearly independent of joint angular velocity and, for appreciably high resistance torques, becomes nearly independent of resistance level and cam/pulley geometry: for theta(f)>40 degrees , phi(t) is minimized by placing the resistance pad distally along the lower leg; for theta(f)knee-extension phase and distally during knee-flexion phase (0.17 mknee angular accelerations and hamstrings co-contractions, not predictable in advance, the value of (a(R))(OPT) obtained neglecting these effects still represents a good compromise for joint protection. This work establishes the rational basis for the design and clinical use of a leg-extension equipment that minimizes phi(t).

  17. Clinical and Biomechanical Evaluations of Staged Bilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty Patients with Two Different Implant Designs

    PubMed Central

    Renaud, Alexandre; Fuentes, Alexandre; Hagemeister, Nicola; Lavigne, Martin; Vendittoli, Pascal-André

    2016-01-01

    Background: Various implants of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are used in clinical practice and each presents specific design characteristics. No implant managed this day to reproduce perfectly the biomechanics of the natural knee during gait. Objectives: We therefore asked whether (1) differences in tridimensional (3D) kinematic data during gait could be observed in two different designs of TKA on the same patients, (2) if those gait kinematic data are comparable with those of asymptomatic knees and (3) if difference in clinical subjective scores can be observed between the two TKA designs on the same patient. Methods: We performed knee kinematic analysis on 15 patients (30 TKAs) with two different TKA implant designs (Nexgen, Zimmer and Triathlon, Stryker) on each knee and on 25 asymptomatic subjects (35 knees). Clinical evaluation included range of motion, weight bearing radiographs, questionnaire of joint perception, KOOS, WOMAC and SF-12. Results: Comparison between TKAs and asymptomatic knees revealed that asymptomatic knees had significantly less knee flexion at initial contact (p < 0.04) and more flexion for most of the swing phase (p between 0.004 and 0.04). Asymptomatic knees also had less varus at loading response, during stance phase and during most of the swing phase (p between 0.001 - 0.05). Transverse plane analysis showed a tendency for asymptomatic knees to be more in internal rotation during stance phase (p 0.02 - 0.04). Comparing both TKA designs, NexgenTM implant had significantly more flexion at the end of swing phase (p = 0.04) compared to knees with the TriathlonTM implant. In frontal plane, from initial contact to maximum mid stance angle and between the mean mid stance angle and initial contact NexgenTM TKA had significantly more adduction (varus, p =0.02 – 0.03). Clinical scores of both TKAs did not have significant difference. Conclusions: TKA with the tested implants did not reproduce natural knee kinematics during gait. In our cohort

  18. Knee and Hip Joint Kinematics Predict Quadriceps and Hamstrings Neuromuscular Activation Patterns in Drop Jump Landings

    PubMed Central

    Malfait, Bart; Dingenen, Bart; Smeets, Annemie; Staes, Filip; Pataky, Todd; Robinson, Mark A.; Vanrenterghem, Jos; Verschueren, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose was to assess if variation in sagittal plane landing kinematics is associated with variation in neuromuscular activation patterns of the quadriceps-hamstrings muscle groups during drop vertical jumps (DVJ). Methods Fifty female athletes performed three DVJ. The relationship between peak knee and hip flexion angles and the amplitude of four EMG vectors was investigated with trajectory-level canonical correlation analyses over the entire time period of the landing phase. EMG vectors consisted of the {vastus medialis(VM),vastus lateralis(VL)}, {vastus medialis(VM),hamstring medialis(HM)}, {hamstring medialis(HM),hamstring lateralis(HL)} and the {vastus lateralis(VL),hamstring lateralis(HL)}. To estimate the contribution of each individual muscle, linear regressions were also conducted using one-dimensional statistical parametric mapping. Results The peak knee flexion angle was significantly positively associated with the amplitudes of the {VM,HM} and {HM,HL} during the preparatory and initial contact phase and with the {VL,HL} vector during the peak loading phase (p<0.05). Small peak knee flexion angles were significantly associated with higher HM amplitudes during the preparatory and initial contact phase (p<0.001). The amplitudes of the {VM,VL} and {VL,HL} were significantly positively associated with the peak hip flexion angle during the peak loading phase (p<0.05). Small peak hip flexion angles were significantly associated with higher VL amplitudes during the peak loading phase (p = 0.001). Higher external knee abduction and flexion moments were found in participants landing with less flexed knee and hip joints (p<0.001). Conclusion This study demonstrated clear associations between neuromuscular activation patterns and landing kinematics in the sagittal plane during specific parts of the landing. These findings have indicated that an erect landing pattern, characterized by less hip and knee flexion, was significantly associated with an

  19. Unique Anatomic Feature of the Posterior Cruciate Ligament in Knees Associated With Osteochondritis Dissecans

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Masakazu; Adachi, Nobuo; Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Nakamae, Atsuo; Nakasa, Tomoyuki; Ikuta, Yasunari; Hayashi, Seiju; Deie, Masataka; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the knee is a disorder in juveniles and young adults; however, its etiology still remains unclear. For OCD at the medial femoral condyle (MFC), it is sometimes observed that the lesion has a connection with fibers of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). Although this could be important information related to the etiology of MFC OCD, there is no report examining an association between the MFC OCD and the PCL anatomy. Purpose: To investigate the anatomic features of knees associated with MFC OCD, focusing especially on the femoral attachment of the PCL, and to compare them with knees associated with lateral femoral condyle (LFC) OCD and non-OCD lesions. Study Design: Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 39 patients (46 knees) with OCD lesions who had undergone surgical treatment. Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, the PCL attachment at the lateral wall of the MFC was measured on the coronal sections, and the knee flexion angle was also measured on the sagittal sections. As with non-OCD knees, we reviewed and analyzed 25 knees with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries and 16 knees with meniscal injuries. Results: MRIs revealed that the femoral PCL footprint was located in a significantly more distal position in the patients with MFC OCD compared with patients with LFC OCD and ACL and meniscal injuries. There was no significant difference in knee flexion angle among the 4 groups. Conclusion: The PCL in patients with MFC OCD attached more distally at the lateral aspect of the MFC compared with knees with LFC OCD and ACL and meniscal injuries. PMID:27294170

  20. Ballistic flexion movements of the human thumb.

    PubMed Central

    Hallett, M; Marsden, C D

    1979-01-01

    1. In response to an auditory stimulus normal subjects made ballistic flexion movements of the top joint of the thumb against a lever attached to the spindle of a low-inertia electric motor. 2. Electromyographic (e.m.g.) activity was recorded from pairs of fine wire electrodes inserted into flexor pollicis longus and extensor pollicis longus, respectively the sole flexor and extensor of the joint. 3. Movements of 5 degrees, 10 degrees and 20 degrees were made from initial angles of 10 degrees, 20 degrees and 30 degrees flexion against torques of 0.04, 0.08 and 0.16 Nm. 4. The e.m.g. activity initiating such movements was characterized by a 'triphasic' pattern of sequential bursts of activity in the agonist (flexor pollicis longus), then in the antagonist (extensor pollicis longus), and then in the agonist again. 5. The duration of the first agonist and first antagonist bursts ranged from about 50 to 90 ms and there was no significant change of burst length in the different mechanical conditions. 6. In movements of differing angular distance, the rectified and integrated e.m.g. activity of the first agonist burst could be correlated with the distance moved. The rectified and integrated e.m.g. activity of the first antagonist burst could not be correlated with the distance moved. 7. Responses of the muscles to perturbations either before or during the ballistic movements were studied. Current in the motor could be altered so to extend the thumb ('stretch'), to allow it to accelerate ('release'), or to prevent further movement ('halt'). 8. Suitably timed stretch increased the e.m.g. activity of the first agonist burst while release decreased it. 9. There was a small response of the agonist to stretch or halt timed to act during the interval between the first two agonist bursts; the major response was an augmentation of the second agonist burst. 10. Stretch, timed to act between the first two agonist bursts which released the antagonist, diminished the activity of the

  1. Knee Bracing: What Works?

    MedlinePlus

    ... that make knee braces claim that their products work well. Scientific studies have not completely agreed. It's not clear what the knee braces actually do. Braces often work better in the laboratory than they do in ...

  2. Partial knee replacement - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100225.htm Partial knee replacement - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Knee Replacement A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited ...

  3. Preventing Knee Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... as a result of a twisting or pivoting motion. This injury may cause susceptibility to repeat injuries and knee instability, and therefore often requires surgery. Occasionally, a twisting or hyperextension force to the knee may result in a tibial ...

  4. Knee arthroscopy - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... remove it. Torn or damaged anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) or posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) Inflamed or damaged ... surgery Knee pain Meniscal allograft transplantation Patient Instructions ACL reconstruction - discharge Getting your home ready - knee or ...

  5. Microprocessor prosthetic knees.

    PubMed

    Berry, Dale

    2006-02-01

    This article traces the development of microprocessor prosthetic knees from early research in the 1970s to the present. Read about how microprocessor knees work, functional options, patient selection, and the future of this prosthetic.

  6. Knee braces - unloading

    MedlinePlus

    ... in their knees, they are referring to a type of arthritis called osteoarthritis . Osteoarthritis is caused by wear and tear inside your knee joints. Cartilage, the firm, rubbery tissue that cushions all of ...

  7. Anatomic Versus Mechanically Aligned Total Knee Arthroplasty for Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty Revision

    PubMed Central

    Toliopoulos, Panagiota; LeBlanc, Marc-Andre; Hutt, Jonathan; Lavigne, Martin; Desmeules, Francois; Vendittoli, Pascal-Andre

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the intra-operative benefits and the clinical outcomes from kinematic or mechanical alignment for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in patients undergoing revision of failed unicompartmental kneel arthroplasty (UKA) to TKA. Methods: Ten revisions were performed with a kinematic alignment technique and 11 with a mechanical alignment. Measurements of the hip-knee-ankle angle (HKA), the lateral distal femoral angle (LDFA), and the medial proximal tibial angle (MPTA) were performed using long-leg radiographs. The need for augments, stems, and constrained inserts was compared between groups. Clinical outcomes were compared using the WOMAC score along with maximum distance walked as well as knee range of motion obtained prior to discharge. All data was obtained by a retrospective review of patient files. Results: The kinematic group required less augments, stems, and constrained inserts than the mechanical group and thinner polyethylene bearings. There were significant differences in the lateral distal femoral angle (LDFA) and the medial proximal tibial angle (MPTA) between the two groups (p<0.05). The mean WOMAC score obtained at discharge was better in the kinematic group as was mean knee flexion. At last follow up of 34 months for the kinematic group and 58 months for the mechanical group, no orthopedic complications or reoperations were recorded. Conclusion: Although this study has a small patient cohort, our results suggest that kinematic alignment for TKA after UKA revision is an attractive method. Further studies are warranted. PMID:27563365

  8. Thigh Muscle Activity, Knee Motion, and Impact Force During Side-Step Pivoting in Agility-Trained Female Basketball Players

    PubMed Central

    Wilderman, Danielle R; Ross, Scott E; Padua, Darin A

    2009-01-01

    Context: Improving neuromuscular control of hamstrings muscles might have implications for decreasing anterior cruciate ligament injuries in females. Objective: To examine the effects of a 6-week agility training program on quadriceps and hamstrings muscle activation, knee flexion angles, and peak vertical ground reaction force. Design: Prospective, randomized clinical research trial. Setting: Sports medicine research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Thirty female intramural basketball players with no history of knee injury (age  =  21.07 ± 2.82 years, height  =  171.27 ± 4.66 cm, mass  =  66.36 ± 7.41 kg). Intervention(s): Participants were assigned to an agility training group or a control group that did not participate in agility training. Participants in the agility training group trained 4 times per week for 6 weeks. Main Outcome Measure(s): We used surface electromyography to assess muscle activation for the rectus femoris, vastus medialis oblique, medial hamstrings, and lateral hamstrings for 50 milliseconds before initial ground contact and while the foot was in contact with the ground during a side-step pivot maneuver. Knee flexion angles (at initial ground contact, maximum knee flexion, knee flexion displacement) and peak vertical ground reaction force also were assessed during this maneuver. Results: Participants in the training group increased medial hamstrings activation during ground contact after the 6-week agility training program. Both groups decreased their vastus medialis oblique muscle activation during ground contact. Knee flexion angles and peak vertical ground reaction force did not change for either group. Conclusions: Agility training improved medial hamstrings activity in female intramural basketball players during a side-step pivot maneuver. Agility training that improves hamstrings activity might have implications for reducing anterior cruciate ligament sprain injury associated with side-step pivots. PMID

  9. Does dragonfly's abdomen flexion help with fast turning maneuvers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Geng; Li, Chengyu; Dong, Haibo; Flow Simulation Research Group Team

    2013-11-01

    Dragonflies are able to achieve fast turning maneuvers during take-off flights. Both asymmetric wing flapping and abdomen flexion have been observed during the fast turning. It's widely thought that the asymmetric wing beats are responsible of producing the aerodynamic moment needed for the body rotation. However, the dynamic effect of the abdomen flexion is not clear yet. In this study, an integrated experimental and computational approach is used to study the underlying dynamic effect of dragonfly abdomen flexion. It's found that dragonfly abdomen tended to bend towards the same side as the body reorienting to. Quantitative analysis have shown that during take-off turning maneuver the abdomen flexion can modulate the arm of force by changing the position of the center of mass relative to the thorax. As a result, roll and yaw moments produced by the wing flapping can be enhanced. This work is supported by NSF CBET-1313217. This work is supported by NSF CBET-1313217.

  10. Examining the knee joint.

    PubMed

    Monk, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    Appropriate history taking and examination can ensure accurate diagnosis of common knee problems, and rapid and effective interventions or referral to orthopaedic specialists. This article describes the anatomy of the knee joint and discusses relevant history taking, the examination process, special tests and radiology, as well as common knee injuries and their management.

  11. The difficult primary total knee arthroplasty: a review.

    PubMed

    Baldini, A; Castellani, L; Traverso, F; Balatri, A; Balato, G; Franceschini, V

    2015-10-01

    Primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a reliable procedure with reproducible long-term results. Nevertheless, there are conditions related to the type of patient or local conditions of the knee that can make it a difficult procedure. The most common scenarios that make it difficult are discussed in this review. These include patients with many previous operations and incisions, and those with severe coronal deformities, genu recurvatum, a stiff knee, extra-articular deformities and those who have previously undergone osteotomy around the knee and those with chronic dislocation of the patella. Each condition is analysed according to the characteristics of the patient, the pre-operative planning and the reported outcomes. When approaching the difficult primary TKA surgeons should use a systematic approach, which begins with the review of the existing literature for each specific clinical situation.

  12. Knee disarticulation after total-knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Lambregts, S A M; Hitters, W M G C

    2002-12-01

    An 89-year-old woman who had a total-knee replacement in the past, underwent a knee disarticulation of the same leg because of an ischaemic foot. Eight (8) months postoperatively the stump is fully weight-bearing and the patient is able to walk safely, using a prosthesis and a walking frame.

  13. Knee Lymphocutaneous Fistula Secondary to Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-de la Fuente, T.; Sandoval, E.; Alonso-Burgos, A.; García-Pardo, L.; Cárcamo, C.; Caballero, O.

    2014-01-01

    Lower limb lymphorrhea secondary to a surgical procedure is a rare but difficult-to-solve complication. In lower limb, this entity is frequently associated with vascular procedures around the inguinal area. We report on a case of a knee lymphocutaneous fistula secondary to a knee revision arthroplasty. To our knowledge, no previous reports regarding this complication have been published. PMID:25580333

  14. Apollo total knee replacements in University Malaya Medical Centre: a short-term outcome.

    PubMed

    Abbas, A A; Merican, A M; Kwan, M K; Mohamad, J A

    2006-02-01

    Total knee arthroplasty is the most preferred option for treatment of severe osteoarthritis of the knee. We report the short-term outcome of 48 total knee replacements in 31 patients utilizing the Apollo Total Knee System after an average follow-up of 48 months (range 15 to 70 months). Records of all patients who underwent TKA using Apollo Total Knee System were retrospectively reviewed. Functional outcome was evaluated using visual analogue scale for pain rating and the Oxford 12-item questionnaire. Postoperative radiographs of the replaced knees were assessed by using the Knee Society Total Knee Arthroplasty Roentgenographic Evaluation and Scoring System. Degenerative osteoarthritis was the commonest indication for TKA. The average patient's age was 63.7 years (range, 30-77 years). The mean visual analogue scale for pre- and post-operative pain was eight and zero respectively. The mean Oxford 12-item questionnaire score pre- and post-operatively was 44.8 and 16.5 respectively. Patient satisfaction was notable in 98% of the cases with an average improvement in arc of flexion of 111 degrees. There were four failures; deep infection (one) and aseptic loosening (three) giving rise to a 94% implant survivor. The short-term results of this series is comparable with or better than a number of outcome studies of the Apollo Knee System or other implants of similar design.

  15. Kinematic motion of the anterior cruciate ligament deficient knee during functionally high and low demanding tasks.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kentaro; Hasegawa, Takayuki; Kiriyama, Yoshimori; Matsumoto, Hideo; Otani, Toshiro; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Nagura, Takeo

    2014-07-18

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether mechanical adaptations were present in patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-deficient knees during high-demand activities. Twenty-two subjects with unilateral ACL deficiency (11 males and 11 females, 19.6 months after injury) performed five different activities at a comfortable speed (level walking, ascending and descending steps, jogging, jogging to a 90-degree side cutting toward the opposite direction of the tested side). Three-dimensional knee kinematics for the ACL-deficient knees and uninjured contralateral knees were evaluated using the Point Cluster Technique. There was no significant difference in knee flexion angle, but an offset toward the knee in less valgus and more external tibial rotation was observed in the ACL-deficient knee. The tendency was more obvious in high demand motions, and a significant difference was clearly observed in the side cutting motions. These motion patterns, with the knee in less valgus and more external tibial rotation, are proposed to be an adaptive movement to avoid pivot shift dynamically, and reveal evidence in support of a dynamic adaptive motion occurring in ACL-deficient knees.

  16. Wear-simulation analysis of rotating-platform mobile-bearing knees.

    PubMed

    Fisher, John; McEwen, Hannah; Tipper, Joanne; Jennings, Louise; Farrar, Richard; Stone, Martin; Ingham, Eileen

    2006-09-01

    The wear and wear debris from rotating-platform mobile-bearing knees and fixed-bearing knees were compared in knee joint-simulator studies. The wear rate of the fixed-bearing knees was found to increase as the kinematics were increased because of an increase in internal-external rotation and an increase in anterorposterior (AP) translation. The wear rate of the rotating-platform mobile-bearing knees was found to be significantly lower than that of the fixed-bearing knees. The rotating-platform mobile-bearing knee was able to decouple the complex kinematics to pure rotation at the inferior tibial articulating surface and linear flexion-extension and AP sliding at the superior femoral articulating interface, substantially reducing cross-shear and wear. No difference was found in the wear debris between the rotating-platform and fixed-bearing knees. This resulted in a substantially reduced functional biological activity or osteolytic potential for the rotating-platform mobile-bearing knees due to the lower wear rates.

  17. Soreness-related changes in three-dimensional running biomechanics following eccentric knee extensor exercise.

    PubMed

    Paquette, Max R; Peel, Shelby A; Schilling, Brian K; Melcher, Dan A; Bloomer, Richard J

    2017-06-01

    Runners often experience delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), especially of the knee extensors, following prolonged running. Sagittal knee joint biomechanics are altered in the presence of knee extensor DOMS but it is unclear how muscle soreness affects lower limb biomechanics in other planes of motion. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of knee extensor DOMS on three-dimensional (3D) lower limb biomechanics during running. Thirty-three healthy men (25.8 ± 6.8 years; 84.1 ± 9.2 kg; 1.77 ± 0.07 m) completed an isolated eccentric knee extensor damaging protocol to elicit DOMS. Biomechanics of over-ground running at a set speed of 3.35 m s(-1)±5% were measured before eccentric exercise (baseline) and, 24 h and 48 h following exercise in the presence of knee extensor DOMS. Knee flexion ROM was reduced at 48 h (P = 0.01; d = 0.26), and peak knee extensor moment was reduced at 24 h (P = 0.001; d = 0.49) and 48 h (P < 0.001; d = 0.68) compared to baseline. Frontal and transverse plane biomechanics were unaffected by the presence of DOMS (P > 0.05). Peak positive ankle and knee joint powers and, peak negative knee joint power were all reduced from baseline to 24 h and 48 h (P < 0.05). These findings suggest that knee extensor DOMS greatly influences sagittal knee joint angular kinetics and, reduces sagittal power production at the ankle joint. However, knee extensor DOMS does not affect frontal and transverse plane lower limb joint biomechanics during running.

  18. High resolution weak lensing mass mapping combining shear and flexion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanusse, F.; Starck, J.-L.; Leonard, A.; Pires, S.

    2016-06-01

    Aims: We propose a new mass mapping algorithm, specifically designed to recover small-scale information from a combination of gravitational shear and flexion. Including flexion allows us to supplement the shear on small scales in order to increase the sensitivity to substructures and the overall resolution of the convergence map without relying on strong lensing constraints. Methods: To preserve all available small scale information, we avoid any binning of the irregularly sampled input shear and flexion fields and treat the mass mapping problem as a general ill-posed inverse problem, which is regularised using a robust multi-scale wavelet sparsity prior. The resulting algorithm incorporates redshift, reduced shear, and reduced flexion measurements for individual galaxies and is made highly efficient by the use of fast Fourier estimators. Results: We tested our reconstruction method on a set of realistic weak lensing simulations corresponding to typical HST/ACS cluster observations and demonstrate our ability to recover substructures with the inclusion of flexion, which are otherwise lost if only shear information is used. In particular, we can detect substructures on the 15'' scale well outside of the critical region of the clusters. In addition, flexion also helps to constrain the shape of the central regions of the main dark matter halos. Our mass mapping software, called Glimpse2D, is made freely available at http://www.cosmostat.org/software/glimpse

  19. Anticipatory postural adjustments during cutting manoeuvres in football and their consequences for knee injury risk.

    PubMed

    Mornieux, Guillaume; Gehring, Dominic; Fürst, Patrick; Gollhofer, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs), i.e. preparatory positioning of the head, the trunk and the foot, are essential to initiate cutting manoeuvres during football games. The aim of the present study was to determine how APA strategies during cutting manoeuvres are influenced by a reduction of the time available to prepare the movement. Thirteen football players performed different cutting tasks, with directions of cutting either known prior to the task or indicated by a light signal occurring 850, 600 or 500 ms before ground contact. With less time available to prepare the cutting manoeuvre, the head was less orientated towards the cutting direction (P = 0.033) and the trunk was even more rotated in the opposite direction (P = 0.002), while the foot placement was not significantly influenced. Moreover, the induced higher lateral trunk flexion correlated with the increased knee abduction moment (r = 0.41; P = 0.009). Increasing lateral trunk flexion is the main strategy used to successfully perform a cutting manoeuvre when less time is available to prepare the movement. However, higher lateral trunk flexion was associated with an increased knee abduction moment and therefore an increased knee injury risk. Reducing lateral trunk flexion during cutting manoeuvres should be part of training programs seeking the optimisation of APAs.

  20. The Effects of Continued Rehabilitation After Primary Knee Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Radulovic, Tatjana Nozica; Lazovic, Milica; Jandric, Slavica; Bucma, Tatjana; Cvjetkovic, Dragana Dragicevic; Manojlovic, Slavko

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Tasks of rehabilitation after arthroplasty are to provide painless joint movements, to improve the range of motion, to establish a scheme of walking, to achieve independence in activities of daily living. The aim: of the study is to determine the effects of continued rehabilitation on the range of the knee motion and reducing the swelling after total knee replacement. Methods: The study was conducted from 2011 to 2013 and included 140 patients of both sexes, aged 45 to 85 with implanted endoprosthesis based on primary osteoarthritis. They were divided into two groups, experimental, which after early rehabilitation continued ongoing rehabilitation for a period of three weeks, while the control group after completion of early rehabilitation began rehabilitation two months from the surgery for a period of three weeks. The range of motion in the knee joint and the extent of the knee joint in the medium of patella were measured in both groups during the admission and discharge from rehabilitation. In the experimental group, control measurements were carried out three months after surgery. Results: In both groups, there was a significant reduction of the swelling at the discharge in relation to the admission while in the experimental group there was no change on the control of the joint swelling after three months in relation to the release from rehabilitation. In the experimental group, the range of motion of flexion and extension was improved at the discharge in relation to the admission as well as the flexion during the control while the range of motion of extension wasn’t significantly changing during the control examination. In the control group, the extension and flexion were significantly improved at the discharge compared to the admission. Comparing both groups, the results showed that there was a significant improvement in flexion movements in the experimental group during rehabilitation in comparison to the control group, while the range of

  1. Comparison of the Clinical Outcomes after Total Knee Arthroplasty with the LCS Rotating Platform Mobile Bearing Knee System and the PFC Sigma RP-F Mobile Bearing Knee System

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Ju-Yeong; Jeong, Jae-Heon; Lee, Sang-Hak; Jung, Ho-Joong

    2012-01-01

    Background We compared clinical outcomes after total knee arthroplasty with the Low Contact Stress (LCS) rotating platform mobile bearing knee system and the Press Fit Condylar Sigma rotating platform high flexion (PFC Sigma RP-F) mobile bearing knee system. Methods Fifty cases of total knee arthroplasty were performed with the PFC Sigma RP-F mobile bearing knee system and sixty-one cases were performed with the LCS mobile bearing total knee arthroplasty. The average duration of follow-up was 2.9 years. Results The mean Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) knee score was 62.1 (range, 52 to 75) in the LCS group and 61.9 (range, 50 to 74) in the Sigma RP-F group preoperatively, and 90.1 (range, 84 to 100) in the LCS group and 89.8 (range, 83 to 100) in the Sigma RP-F group at the final follow-up. The mean preoperative flexion contracture was 6.7° (range, 0° to 10°) in the LCS group and 9.3° (range, 0° to 15°) in the Sigma RP-F group preoperatively. The mean range of motion was 124.6° (range, 105° to 150°) in the LCS group and 126.1° (range, 104° to 145°) in the Sigma RP-F group at the final follow-up. Conclusions After a minimum duration of follow-up of two years, we found no significant differences between the two groups with regard to the range of knee motion or the clinical or radiographic results. PMID:23205234

  2. An in vitro dynamic evaluation of prophylactic knee braces during lateral impact loading.

    PubMed

    Erickson, A R; Yasuda, K; Beynnon, B; Johnson, R; Pope, M

    1993-01-01

    To determine the ability of prophylactic knee braces to reduce or limit medial collateral and anterior cruciate ligament elongation under dynamic loading conditions, we used cadaveric specimens that had a surrogate soft tissue material that matched the tissue compliance of in vivo contracted muscles. Eight cadaveric specimens were fitted with four prophylactic knee braces and instrumented with Hall Effect Strain Transducers on both the medial collateral and anterior cruciate ligament. Each specimen was mounted in a testing frame while a lateral impact was applied to the knee joint by a pendulum at levels below the injury threshold. Legs were tested at 0 degrees and 30 degrees of knee flexion, both with and without an intact anterior cruciate ligament. The maximum elongation for each ligament was calculated as a percentage of the initial measured length. The addition of a prophylactic knee brace significantly reduced the level of impact force at the point of impact, but this did not result in a significant reduction of anterior cruciate ligament elongation for any test. Although not significant, all braces tested were more effective at reducing medial collateral ligament elongation during a lateral impact with the knee flexion at 30 degrees than at 0 degrees.

  3. Musculo-tendon length and lengthening velocity of rectus femoris in stiff knee gait.

    PubMed

    Jonkers, Ilse; Stewart, Caroline; Desloovere, Kaat; Molenaers, Guy; Spaepen, Arthur

    2006-02-01

    Inappropriate activity of M. rectus femoris (RF) during swing is believed to contribute to stiff knee gait in cerebral palsy. This study used musculoskeletal modeling techniques to analyze rectus femoris musculo-tendon (MT) length and lengthening velocity during stiff knee gait in 35 children with diplegic cerebral palsy (CP). Duncan Ely test scores were used to categorize the patients into four groups with increasing levels of rectus femoris spasticity. Knee kinematics confirmed a significant reduction and delay of maximal peak knee flexion during swing in the patient groups compared to reference values. Maximal musculo-tendon length of M. rectus femoris was reduced and occurred prematurely in swing. Musculo-tendon lengthening velocity was significantly reduced and the timing of the maximal lengthening velocity was shifted into stance phase. The present study demonstrates altered dynamic behavior of the M. rectus femoris in stiff knee gait and the results indicate that maximal knee flexion in swing was not a valid reference for the MT length of the M. rectus femoris. Furthermore, in the patient group maximal musculo-tendon lengthening velocity of the muscle related to the stance phase rather than the stance-swing transition.

  4. Reliability, Concurrent Validity, and Minimal Detectable Change for iPhone Goniometer App in Assessing Knee Range of Motion.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Saurabh P; Barker, Katherine; Bowman, Brett; Galloway, Heather; Oliashirazi, Nicole; Oliashirazi, Ali

    2016-11-28

    Much of the published works assessing the reliability of smartphone goniometer apps (SG) have poor generalizability since the reliability was assessed in healthy subjects. No research has established the values for standard error of measurement (SEM) or minimal detectable change (MDC) which have greater clinical utility to contextualize the range of motion (ROM) assessed using the SG. This research examined the test-retest reproducibility, concurrent validity, SEM, and MDC values for the iPhone goniometer app (i-Goni; June Software Inc., v.1.1, San Francisco, CA) in assessing knee ROM in patients with knee osteoarthritis or those after total knee replacement. A total of 60 participants underwent data collection which included the assessment of active knee ROM using the i-Goni and the universal goniometer (UG; EZ Read Jamar Goniometer, Patterson Medical, Warrenville, IL), knee muscle strength, and assessment of pain and lower extremity disability using quadruple numeric pain rating scale (Q-NPRS) and lower extremity functional scale (LEFS), respectively. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were calculated to assess the reproducibility of the knee ROM assessed using the i-Goni and UG. Bland and Altman technique examined the agreement between these knee ROM. The SEM and MDC values were calculated for i-Goni assessed knee ROM to characterize the error in a single score and the index of true change, respectively. Pearson correlation coefficient examined concurrent relationships between the i-Goni and other measures. The ICC values for the knee flexion/extension ROM were superior for i-Goni (0.97/0.94) compared with the UG (0.95/0.87). The SEM values were smaller for i-Goni assessed knee flexion/extension (2.72/1.18 degrees) compared with UG assessed knee flexion/extension (3.41/1.62 degrees). Similarly, the MDC values were smaller for both these ROM for the i-Goni (6.3 and 2.72 degrees) suggesting smaller change required to infer true change in knee ROM. The i

  5. Sagittal knee joint kinematics and energetics in response to different landing heights and techniques.

    PubMed

    Yeow, C H; Lee, P V S; Goh, J C H

    2010-03-01

    Single-leg and double-leg landing techniques are common athletic maneuvers typically performed from various landing heights during intensive sports activities. However, it is still unclear how the knee joint responds in terms of kinematics and energetics to the combined effects of different landing heights and techniques. We hypothesized that the knee displays greater flexion angles and angular velocities, joint power and work in response to the larger peak ground reaction force from 0.6-m height, compared to 0.3-m height. We further hypothesized that the knee exhibits elevated flexion angles and angular velocities, joint power and work during double-leg landing, relative to single-leg landing. Ground reaction force, knee joint kinematics and energetics data were obtained from 10 subjects performing single-leg and double-leg landing from 0.3-m to 0.6-m heights, using motion-capture system and force-plates. Higher peak ground reaction force (p<0.05) was observed during single-leg landing and/or at greater landing height. We found greater knee flexion angles and angular velocities (p<0.05) during double-leg landing and/or at greater landing height. Elevated knee joint power and work were noted (p<0.05) during double-leg landing and/or at greater landing height. The knee joint is able to respond more effectively in terms of kinematics and energetics to a larger landing impact from an elevated height during double-leg landing, compared to single-leg landing. This allows better shock absorption and thus minimizes the risk of sustaining lower extremity injuries.

  6. Differences and correlations in knee and hip mechanics during single-leg landing, single-leg squat, double-leg landing, and double-leg squat tasks.

    PubMed

    Donohue, Michael R; Ellis, Samantha M; Heinbaugh, Erika M; Stephenson, Mitchell L; Zhu, Qin; Dai, Boyi

    2015-01-01

    Landing and squat tasks have been utilized to assess lower extremity biomechanics associated with anterior cruciate ligament loading and injury risks. The purpose of this study was to identify the differences and correlations in knee and hip mechanics during a single-leg landing, a single-leg squat, a double-leg landing, and a double-leg squat. Seventeen male and 17 female recreational athletes performed landings and squats when kinematic and kinetic data were collected. ANOVAs showed significant differences (p < 0.00001) for maximum knee flexion angles, maximum hip flexion angles, maximum knee abduction angles, maximum hip adduction angles, and maximum external knee abduction moments among squats and landings. For maximum knee and hip flexion angles, significant correlations (r ≥ 0.5, p ≤ 0.003) were observed between the two landings and between the two squats. For maximum knee abduction and hip adduction angles and maximum external knee abduction moments, significant correlations were mostly found between the two landings, and between the single-leg squat and landings (r ≥ 0.54, p ≤ 0.001). Individuals are likely to demonstrate different profiles of injury risks when screened using different tasks. While a double-leg landing should be considered as a priority in screening, a single-leg squat may be used as a surrogate to assess frontal plane motion and loading.

  7. Knee joint loading during lineman-specific movements in American football players.

    PubMed

    Lambach, Rebecca L; Young, Jay W; Flanigan, David C; Siston, Robert A; Chaudhari, Ajit M

    2015-06-01

    Linemen are at high risk for knee cartilage injuries and osteoarthritis. High-intensity movements from squatting positions (eg, 3-point stance) may produce high joint loads, increasing the risk for cartilage damage. We hypothesized that knee moments and joint reaction forces during lineman-specific activities would be greater than during walking or jogging. Data were collected using standard motion analysis techniques. Fifteen NCAA linemen (mean ± SD: height = 1.86 ± 0.07 m, mass = 121.45 ± 12.78 kg) walked, jogged, and performed 3 unloaded lineman-specific blocking movements from a 3-point stance. External 3-dimensional knee moments and joint reaction forces were calculated using inverse dynamics equations. MANOVA with subsequent univariate ANOVA and post hoc Tukey comparisons were used to determine differences in peak kinetic variables and the flexion angles at which they occurred. All peak moments and joint reaction forces were significantly higher during jogging than during all blocking drills (all P < .001). Peak moments occurred at average knee flexion angles > 70° during blocking versus < 44° in walking or jogging. The magnitude of moments and joint reaction forces when initiating movement from a 3-point stance do not appear to increase risk for cartilage damage, but the high flexion angles at which they occur may increase risk on the posterior femoral condyles.

  8. The Effects of a Valgus Collapse Knee Position on In Vivo ACL Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Utturkar, G. M.; Irribarra, L. A.; Taylor, K. A.; Spritzer, C. E.; Taylor, D. C.; Garrett, W. E.; DeFrate, Louis E.

    2013-01-01

    There are conflicting data regarding what motions increase ACL injury risk. More specifically, the mechanical role of valgus collapse positions during ACL injury remains controversial. Our objective was to evaluate ACL elongation in a model that mimics knee movements thought to occur during ACL injury. Eight healthy male subjects were imaged using MR and biplanar fluoroscopy to measure the in vivo elongation of the ACL and its functional bundles during three static knee positions: full extension, 30° of flexion, and a position intended to mimic a valgus collapse position described in the literature. For this study, the valgus collapse position consisted of 30° of knee flexion, internal rotation of the hip, and 10° of external tibial rotation. ACL length decreased significantly from full extension (30.2 ± 2.6 mm) to 30° of flexion (27.1 ± 2.2 mm). ACL length further decreased in the valgus collapse position (25.6 ± 2.4 mm). Both functional bundles of the ACL followed similar trends with regards to decreases in length in each of the three positions. Since strain would follow patterns of ACL length, landing on an extended knee may be a more relevant risk factor for ACL injuries than the valgus collapse position in males. Future studies should evaluate the effects of dynamic motion patterns on in vivo ACL strains. PMID:22855117

  9. Development and validation of a weight-bearing finite element model for total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Woiczinski, M; Steinbrück, A; Weber, P; Müller, P E; Jansson, V; Schröder, Ch

    2016-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a successful procedure for osteoarthritis. However, some patients (19%) do have pain after surgery. A finite element model was developed based on boundary conditions of a knee rig. A 3D-model of an anatomical full leg was generated from magnetic resonance image data and a total knee prosthesis was implanted without patella resurfacing. In the finite element model, a restarting procedure was programmed in order to hold the ground reaction force constant with an adapted quadriceps muscle force during a squat from 20° to 105° of flexion. Knee rig experimental data were used to validate the numerical model in the patellofemoral and femorotibial joint. Furthermore, sensitivity analyses of Young's modulus of the patella cartilage, posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) stiffness, and patella tendon origin were performed. Pearson's correlations for retropatellar contact area, pressure, patella flexion, and femorotibial ap-movement were near to 1. Lowest root mean square error for retropatellar pressure, patella flexion, and femorotibial ap-movement were found for the baseline model setup with Young's modulus of 5 MPa for patella cartilage, a downscaled PCL stiffness of 25% compared to the literature given value and an anatomical origin of the patella tendon. The results of the conducted finite element model are comparable with the experimental results. Therefore, the finite element model developed in this study can be used for further clinical investigations and will help to better understand the clinical aspects after TKA with an unresurfaced patella.

  10. The effects of a valgus collapse knee position on in vivo ACL elongation.

    PubMed

    Utturkar, G M; Irribarra, L A; Taylor, K A; Spritzer, C E; Taylor, D C; Garrett, W E; Defrate, Louis E

    2013-01-01

    There are conflicting data regarding what motions increase ACL injury risk. More specifically, the mechanical role of valgus collapse positions during ACL injury remains controversial. Our objective was to evaluate ACL elongation in a model that mimics knee movements thought to occur during ACL injury. Eight healthy male subjects were imaged using MR and biplanar fluoroscopy to measure the in vivo elongation of the ACL and its functional bundles during three static knee positions: full extension, 30° of flexion, and a position intended to mimic a valgus collapse position described in the literature. For this study, the valgus collapse position consisted of 30° of knee flexion, internal rotation of the hip, and 10° of external tibial rotation. ACL length decreased significantly from full extension (30.2 ± 2.6 mm) to 30° of flexion (27.1 ± 2.2 mm). ACL length further decreased in the valgus collapse position (25.6 ± 2.4 mm). Both functional bundles of the ACL followed similar trends with regards to decreases in length in each of the three positions. Since strain would follow patterns of ACL length, landing on an extended knee may be a more relevant risk factor for ACL injuries than the valgus collapse position in males. Future studies should evaluate the effects of dynamic motion patterns on in vivo ACL strains.

  11. Evaluating knee replacement mechanics during ADL with PID-controlled dynamic finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Clare K; Baldwin, Mark A; Clary, Chadd W; Maletsky, Lorin P; Rullkoetter, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    Validated computational knee simulations are valuable tools for design phase development of knee replacement devices. Recently, a dynamic finite element (FE) model of the Kansas knee simulator was kinematically validated during gait and deep flexion cycles. In order to operate the computational simulator in the same manner as the experiment, a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller was interfaced with the FE model to control the quadriceps actuator excursion and produce a target flexion profile regardless of implant geometry or alignment conditions. The controller was also expanded to operate multiple actuators simultaneously in order to produce in vivo loading conditions at the joint during dynamic activities. Subsequently, the fidelity of the computational model was improved through additional muscle representation and inclusion of relative hip-ankle anterior-posterior (A-P) motion. The PID-controlled model was able to successfully recreate in vivo loading conditions (flexion angle, compressive joint load, medial-lateral load distribution or varus-valgus torque, internal-external torque, A-P force) for deep knee bend, chair rise, stance-phase gait and step-down activities.

  12. Altered Knee and Ankle Kinematics During Squatting in Those With Limited Weight-Bearing–Lunge Ankle-Dorsiflexion Range of Motion

    PubMed Central

    Dill, Karli E.; Begalle, Rebecca L.; Frank, Barnett S.; Zinder, Steven M.; Padua, Darin A.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Ankle-dorsiflexion (DF) range of motion (ROM) may influence movement variables that are known to affect anterior cruciate ligament loading, such as knee valgus and knee flexion. To our knowledge, researchers have not studied individuals with limited or normal ankle DF-ROM to investigate the relationship between those factors and the lower extremity movement patterns associated with anterior cruciate ligament injury. Objective: To determine, using 2 different measurement techniques, whether knee- and ankle-joint kinematics differ between participants with limited and normal ankle DF-ROM. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Sports medicine research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Forty physically active adults (20 with limited ankle DF-ROM, 20 with normal ankle DF-ROM). Main Outcome Measure(s): Ankle DF-ROM was assessed using 2 techniques: (1) nonweight-bearing ankle DF-ROM with the knee straight, and (2) weight-bearing lunge (WBL). Knee flexion, knee valgus-varus, knee internal-external rotation, and ankle DF displacements were assessed during the overhead-squat, single-legged squat, and jump-landing tasks. Separate 1-way analyses of variance were performed to determine whether differences in knee- and ankle-joint kinematics existed between the normal and limited groups for each assessment. Results: We observed no differences between the normal and limited groups when classifying groups based on nonweight-bearing passive-ankle DF-ROM. However, individuals with greater ankle DF-ROM during the WBL displayed greater knee-flexion and ankle-DF displacement and peak knee flexion during the overhead-squat and single-legged squat tasks. In addition, those individuals also demonstrated greater knee-varus displacement during the single-legged squat. Conclusions: Greater ankle DF-ROM assessed during the WBL was associated with greater knee-flexion and ankle-DF displacement during both squatting tasks as well as greater knee-varus displacement during

  13. Comparison between two computer-assisted total knee arthroplasty: gap-balancing versus measured resection technique.

    PubMed

    Tigani, Domenico; Sabbioni, G; Ben Ayad, R; Filanti, M; Rani, N; Del Piccolo, N

    2010-10-01

    Two surgical strategies are possible in total knee arthroplasty (TKA): a measured resection technique, in which bone landmarks are used to guide resections equal to the distal and posterior thickness of the femoral component, or a gap-balancing approach, in which equal collateral ligament tension in flexion and extension is sought before and as a guide to final bone cuts. In this study performed with computer assisted system, we compared the 2 different methods in 126 patients followed prospectively in order to analyze the effect of both the techniques on joint-line (JL) maintenance, axial limb restoration and components position. The gap technique showed a statistical increase in the post-operative value when compared with the measured resection technique, (P = 0.008). When comparing the two groups regarding to the pre-operative deformity, we have found a statistical difference (P = 0.001) in case of moderate pre-operative deformity (less than 10 degrees), and the measured resection technique showed a slight superiority in preserving a joint line more faithful to the pre-operative. We found an ideal alignment for the mechanical axis (180 degrees ± 3 degrees) (95% of cases). In six cases (5%), the mean post-operative value exceeded (varus or valgus) the ideal value by more than 3 degrees. In the frontal plane, a good alignment was observed for both femoral and tibial components without a significant difference between the two techniques. In the sagittal plane was found more alignment variability due to the different implants used and their ideal starting slope, from 7 degrees to 3 degrees. Finally, the surgeon can use the approach with which he has more confidence; however, as the measured resection technique causes less reduction in the post-operative joint-line position, in case of shortening of patellar tendon or patella infera, this technique is preferable.

  14. Knee proprioception after exercise-induced muscle damage.

    PubMed

    Torres, R; Vasques, J; Duarte, J A; Cabri, J M H

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether exercise-induced quadriceps muscle damage affects knee proprioception such as joint position sense (JPS), force sense and the threshold to detect passive movement (TTDPM). Fourteen young men performed sets of eccentric quadriceps contractions at a target of 60% of the maximal concentric peak torque until exhaustion; the exercise was interrupted whenever the subject could not complete two sets. Muscle soreness, JPS, the TTDPM and force sense were examined before the exercise as well as one, 24, 48, 72 and 96 h after exercise. The results were compared using one-way repeated-measure ANOVA. Plasma CK activity, collected at the same times, was analyzed by the Friedman's test to discriminate differences between baseline values and each of the other assessment moments (p<0.05). Relative to the proprioception assessment, JPS at 30 and 70 degrees of knee flexion and force sense were significantly decreased up to 48 h, whereas TTDPM decreased significantly at only one hour and 24 h after exercise, at 30 and 70 degrees of the knee flexion, respectively. The results allow the conclusion that eccentric exercise leading to muscle damage alters joint proprioception, suggesting that there might be impairment in the intrafusal fibres of spindle muscles and in the tendon organs.

  15. Loss of neuromuscular control related to motion in the acutely ACL-injured knee: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Bonsfills, N; Gómez-Barrena, E; Raygoza, J J; Núñez, A

    2008-10-01

    Ligamentomuscular and muscular stretch reflexes are known to contribute to knee joint stability. After anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, a more intense and adjusted muscular response is required to maintain joint stability, but this neuromuscular control of the knee has not been clearly proved. The aim of the study is to record electromyography (EMG) signal and muscular fibre length variations in quadriceps and hamstrings of the knee with and without ACL, and to analyze and integrate the ligament strain and the muscular reaction to forced anterior tibial translation (ATT). In 17 knees from 12 cats, EMG electrodes and ultrasonomicrometry crystals were inserted into four main periarticular muscles, with strain gauges on periarticular ligament insertions. Their output signal was compared before and after ACL surgical section in series of ATT (at 90 degrees and 30 degrees knee flexion), and also during knee flexion and extension. Linear regression analysis was performed between the EMG signal and muscular fibre length variations, and between the EMG signal and the strain on ligament insertions, in the search of this reflex neuromuscular response. In the ACL deficient knees, the studied muscles showed a poor adjustment to motion of EMG firing, inversely to controls. The muscle stretch reflexes showed poorer correlation with post-peak EMG activity than the ligaments. ATT control depended mainly on hamstrings activity in control knees, whereas in unstable knees, quadriceps activity was associated with more tibial translation. Acute ACL-deficient knees showed poor neuromuscular control with weak ligamentomuscular reflexes and no muscular stretch reflexes, suggesting the ineffectiveness of acute muscular reaction to provide early mechanical knee stabilization after injury.

  16. Lower extremity joint position sense in runners with and without a history of knee overuse injury.

    PubMed

    Foch, Eric; Milner, Clare E

    2012-07-01

    Kinematic and kinetic analyses are routinely implemented to determine if gait differences exist between runners with and without a history of knee injury. Hip and knee kinematic differences have been reported between knee injured and non-injured runners. Yet, there is no consensus on whether these differences are the primary variables contributing to knee injury. Furthermore, there may be additional underlying factors that contribute to the development of injury that cannot be determined by gait analysis. The purpose of this investigation was to determine if joint position sense differences exist in runners with and without a history of knee overuse injury. Sagittal plane knee and hip joint position sense was measured in 13 runners with a history of knee overuse injury and 13 runners with no history of knee overuse injury. Absolute joint position replication error was measured during both a weight bearing and a non-weight bearing condition. Joint position replication errors at each joint were compared among groups and task using a two-way ANOVA with joint task as the repeated measure. Knee and hip joint replication errors were similar between both groups. The weight bearing and non-weight bearing tasks resulted in similar joint position replication errors. There were no interaction effects. In conclusion, knee flexion and hip adduction joint position sense is similar in runners with and without a history of knee overuse injury. Therefore, joint position sense measured via weight bearing and non-weight bearing joint position replication tasks may not play an important role in the development of knee overuse injury.

  17. Knee Joint Dysfunctions That Influence Gait in Cerebrovascular Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lucareli, Paulo Roberto Garcia; Greve, Julia Maria D’Andrea

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION There is still no consensus among different specialists on the subject of kinematic variation during the hemiparetic gait, including the main changes that take place during the gait cycle and whether the gait velocity changes the patterns of joint mobility. One of the most frequently discussed joints is the knee. OBJECTIVES This study aims to evaluate the variables found in the angular kinematics of knee joint, and to describe the alterations found in the hemiparetic gait resulting from cerebrovascular injury. METHODS This study included 66 adult patients of both genders with a diagnosis of either right or left hemiparesis resulting from ischemic cerebrovascular injury. All the participants underwent three-dimensional gait evaluation, an the angular kinematics of the joint knee were selected for analysis. RESULTS The results were distributed into four groups formed based on the median of the gait speed and the side of hemiparesis. CONCLUSIONS The relevant clinical characteristics included the important mechanisms of loading response in the stance, knee hyperextension in single stance, and reduction of the peak flexion and movement amplitude of the knee in the swing phase. These mechanisms should be taken into account when choosing the best treatment. We believe that the findings presented here may aid in preventing the occurrence of the problems found, and also in identifying the origin of these problems. PMID:18719753

  18. Femoral deformity planning: intentional placement of the apex of deformity.

    PubMed

    Fabricant, Peter D; Camara, James M; Rozbruch, S Robert

    2013-05-01

    Traditionally, correction of femoral deformity has been performed with osteotomies through the center of rotation of angulation (CORA), but the CORA location is not always practical. If the osteotomy is created at a site adjacent to the CORA, an additional translation must be performed to accurately correct the deformity. However, at times, the ideal osteotomy site may require an unfeasible amount of translation. Multiple osteotomies may also be problematic, and when overcorrection of the mechanical axis is planned, the CORA method is not practical.This article describes a novel method by which the surgeon may choose the location of the osteotomy regardless of the location of the CORA and may consolidate a multiapical deformity into a single corrective osteotomy. Furthermore, intentional mechanical axis overcorrection may be performed to unload knee joint arthritis. Simple, complex, and multiapical deformities may now be corrected via a single familiar surgical procedure, such as a distal femoral osteotomy, and the need for translation is eliminated.

  19. Knee Joint Loading during Gait in Healthy Controls and Individuals with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Deepak; Manal, Kurt T.; Rudolph, Katherine S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective People with knee osteoarthritis (OA) are thought to walk with high loads at the knee which are yet to be quantfied using modeling techniques that account for subject specific EMG patterns, kinematics and kinetics. The objective was to estimate medial and lateral loading for people with knee OA and controls using an approach that is sensitive to subject specific muscle activation patterns. Methods 16 OA and 12 control (C) subjects walked while kinematic, kinetic and EMG data were collected. Muscle forces were calculated using an EMG-Driven model and loading was calculated by balancing the external moments with internal muscle and contact forces Results OA subjects walked slower and had greater laxity, static and dynamic varus alignment, less flexion and greater knee adduction moment (KAM). Loading (normalized to body weight) was no different between the groups but OA subjects had greater absolute medial load than controls and maintained a greater %total load on the medial compartment. These patterns were associated with body mass, sagittal and frontal plane moments, static alignment and close to signficance for dynamic alignment. Lateral compartment unloading during mid-late stance was observed in 50% of OA subjects. Conclusions Loading for control subjects was similar to data from instrumented prostheses. Knee OA subjects had high medial contact loads in early stance and half of the OA cohort demonstared lateral compartment lift-off. Results suggest that interventions aimed at reducing body weight and dynamic malalignment might be effective in reducing medial compartment loading and establishing normal medio-lateral load sharing patterns. PMID:23182814

  20. Comparison of tibiofemoral joint space width measurements from standing CT and fixed flexion radiography.

    PubMed

    Segal, Neil A; Frick, Eric; Duryea, Jeffrey; Nevitt, Michael C; Niu, Jingbo; Torner, James C; Felson, David T; Anderson, Donald D

    2016-08-09

    The objective of this project was to determine the relationship between medial tibiofemoral joint space width measured on fixed-flexion radiographs and the three-dimensional joint space width distribution on low-dose, standing CT (SCT) imaging. At the 84-month visit of the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study, 20 participants were recruited. A commercial SCT scanner for the foot and ankle was modified to image knees while standing. Medial tibiofemoral joint space width was assessed on radiographs at fixed locations from 15-30% of compartment width using validated software and on SCT by mapping the distances between three-dimensional subchondral bone surfaces. Individual joint space width values from radiographs were compared with three-dimensional joint space width values from corresponding sagittal plane locations using paired t-tests and correlation coefficients. For the 4 medial-most tibiofemoral locations, radiographic joint space width values exceeded the minimal joint space width on SCT by a mean of 2.0mm and were approximately equal to the 61st percentile value of the joint space width distribution at each respective sagittal-plane location. Correlation coefficients at these locations were 0.91-0.97 and the offsets between joint space width values from radiographs and SCT measurements were consistent. There were greater offsets and variability in the offsets between modalities closer to the tibial spine. Joint space width measurements on fixed-flexion radiographs are highly correlated with three-dimensional joint space width from SCT. In addition to avoiding bony overlap obscuring the joint, a limitation of radiographs, the current study supports a role for SCT in the evaluation of tibiofemoral OA. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Does bracing influence brain activity during knee movement: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Thijs, Youri; Vingerhoets, Guy; Pattyn, Els; Rombaut, Lies; Witvrouw, Erik

    2010-08-01

    Studies have shown that proprioceptive inputs during active and passive arm movements are processed in the primary and secondary somatosensory cortex and supplementary motor area of the brain. At which level of the central nervous system proprioceptive signals coming from the knee are regulated remains to be elucidated. In order to investigate whether there is a detectable difference in brain activity when various proprioceptive inputs are exerted at the knee, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used. fMRI in 13 healthy, right leg-dominant female volunteers compared brain activation during flexion-extension movements of the right knee under three different conditions: with application of a tight knee brace, with application of a moderate tight knee sleeve, and without application of a brace or sleeve. Brain activation was detected in the primary sensorimotor cortex (left and right paracentral lobule) and in the left superior parietal lobule of the brain. There was a significantly higher level of brain activation with the application of the brace and sleeve, respectively, compared to the condition without a brace or sleeve. A significantly higher cortical activation was also seen when comparing the braced condition with the condition when a sleeve was applied. The results suggest that peripheral proprioceptive input to the knee joint by means of a brace or sleeve seems to influence brain activity during knee movement. The results of this study also show that the intensity of brain activation during knee movement can be influenced by the intensity of proprioceptive stimulation at the joint.

  2. Diverse range of fixed positional deformities and bone growth restraint provoked by flaccid paralysis in embryonic chicks

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Katherine J; Lewthwaite, Jo C; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Simon, Dominic; Kavanagh, Emma; Wheeler-Jones, Caroline P D; Pitsillides, Andrew A

    2003-01-01

    Pancuronium bromide (PB) is used in neonates and pregnant women to induce limp, flaccid paralysis in order to allow mechanical ventilation during intensive care. Such non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocking drugs are administered to 0.1% of all human births in the UK. In this study, we examined PB effects on skeletal development in chick embryos. PB treatment produced skeletal deformities associated with significant reduction in longitudinal growth of all appendicular elements. This was associated with greater cartilage to bone ratios, indicating a preferential reduction in osteogenesis. PB also increased the incidence of knee joint flexion and tibiotarsal joint hyperextension. In addition to limb, spinal and craniofacial deformities, flaccid immobility appears to convert the normal geometric pattern of weight gain to a simple arithmetic accretion. This novel study highlights the potentially harmful effects of pharmacologically induced flaccid immobility on chick embryonic skeletal development. Whilst in ovo avian development clearly differs from human, our findings may have implications for the fetus, premature and term neonate receiving such non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocking drugs. PMID:14632633

  3. Knee surgery assistance: patient model construction, motion simulation, and biomechanical visualization.

    PubMed

    Chen, J X; Wechsler, H; Pullen, J M; Zhu, Y; MacMahon, E B

    2001-09-01

    We present a new system that integrates computer graphics, physics-based modeling, and interactive visualization to assist knee study and surgical operation. First, we discuss generating patient-specific three-dimensional (3-D) knee models from patient's magnetic resonant images (MRIs). The 3-D model is obtained by deforming a reference model to match the MRI dataset. Second, we present simulating knee motion that visualizes patient-specific motion data on the patient-specific knee model. Third, we introduce visualizing biomechanical information on a patient-specific model. The focus is on visualizing contact area, contact forces, and menisci deformation. Traditional methods have difficulty in visualizing knee contact area without using invasive methods. The approach presented here provides an alternative of visualizing the knee contact area and forces without any risk to the patient. Finally, a virtual surgery can be performed. The constructed 3-D knee model is the basis of motion simulation, biomechanical visualization, and virtual surgery. Knee motion simulation determines the knee rotation angles as well as knee contact points. These parameters are used to solve the biomechanical model. Our results integrate 3-D construction, motion simulation, and biomechanical visualization into one system. Overall, the methodologies here are useful elements for future virtual medical systems where all the components of visualization, automated model generation, and surgery simulation come together.

  4. Evolution of trochlear compartment geometry in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Demey, Guillaume; Nover, Luca; Dejour, David

    2016-01-01

    Background The study aimed to compare trochlear profiles in recent total knee arthroplasty (TKA) models and to determine whether they feature improvements compared to their predecessors. The hypothesis was that recent TKA models have more anatomic trochlear compartments and would display no signs of trochlear dysplasia. Methods The authors analyzed the geometry of the 6 following TKA models using engineering software: PFC and Attune (DePuy), NexGen and Persona (Zimmer), Noetos and KneeTec (Tornier). The mediolateral trochlear profiles were plotted at various flexion angles (0°, 15°, 30° and 45°) to deduce the sulcus angle. Results Analysis of sulcus angles reveals general convergence of recent designs towards anatomic values. At 0° of flexion, sulcus angles of recent implant models were between 156.0–157.4°, while those of previous generation models between 154.5–165.5°. At 30° of flexion, sulcus angles of recent models also lie within 145.7–148.6°, but those of previous models are between 149.5–152.0°. All three manufacturers deepened their trochlear profile at 30° of flexion in recent models compared to earlier designs. Sulcus angles converge towards anatomic values but still exceed radiologic signs of dysplasia by 2–5°. Conclusions Recent TKA designs have more anatomic trochlear geometries than earlier TKA models by the same manufacturers, but trochlear compartments still exceed radiologic signs of trochlear dysplasia by 2° to 5°. The hypothesis that recent TKA models display no signs of trochlear dysplasia is therefore refuted. Surgeons should be aware of design limitations to optimize choice of implant and extensor mechanisms alignment. Level of evidence: IV geometric implant analysis. PMID:26855943

  5. A comparison of lower-body flexibility, strength, and knee stability between karate athletes and active controls.

    PubMed

    Probst, Manuel M; Fletcher, Richard; Seelig, Dayna S

    2007-05-01

    The purposes of this study were to compare the lower-body flexibility, strength, and knee stability of karate athletes against that of non-karate controls and to determine whether regular karate training results in adaptations that may result in an increased risk for knee injury. Flexibility measurements included knee flexion and extension, hip flexion and extension, hip internal and external rotation, and foot inversion and eversion. Nine karate athletes (4 women and 5 men, age = 24.3 +/- 6.7 years) and 15 active, non-karate controls (7 women and 8 men, age = 22.1 +/- 3.2 years) participated. No subjects reported recent knee surgery or chronic or acute knee pain. Concentric quadriceps and hamstrings strength and endurance were measured using a Biodex II isokinetic dynamometer at 60 degrees .s(-1) and 180 degrees .s(-1). Eccentric strength was measured at 150 degrees .s(-1) and 250 ft-lb (339 N.m). Knee stability was measured via varus and valgus stress and anterior drawer testing. Karate athletes demonstrated a significantly greater right hip flexion (p knees between the karate and control groups. The results indicate that this group of karate athletes may have demonstrated sport-specific adaptations in certain flexibility and strength measurements, but they showed no increased risk for knee injury.

  6. Knee biomechanics during a jump-cut maneuver: Effects of gender & ACL surgery

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Daniel L.; Fadale, Paul D.; Hulstyn, Michael J.; Shalvoy, Robert M.; Machan, Jason T.; Fleming, Braden C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare kinetic and knee kinematic measurements from male and female ACL-intact (ACLINT) and ACL-reconstructed (ACLREC) subjects during a jump-cut maneuver using biplanar videoradiography. Methods Twenty subjects were recruited; 10 ACLINT (5 males, 5 females) and 10 ACLREC (4 males, 6 females; five years post surgery). Each subject performed a jump-cut maneuver by landing on a single leg and performing a 45° side-step cut. Ground reaction force was measured by a force plate and expressed relative to body weight. Six-degree-of-freedom knee kinematics were determined from a biplanar videoradiography system and an optical motion capture system. Results ACLINT female subjects landed with a larger peak vertical GRF (p<0.001) compared to ACLINT male subjects. ACLINT subjects landed with a larger peak vertical GRF (p≤0.036) compared to ACLREC subjects. Regardless of ACL reconstruction status, female subjects underwent less knee flexion angle excursion (p=0.002) and had an increased average rate of anterior tibial translation (0.05±0.01%/millisecond; p=0.037) after contact compared to male subjects. Furthermore, ACLREC subjects had a lower rate of anterior tibial translation compared to ACLINT subjects (0.05±0.01%/millisecond; p=0.035). Finally, no striking differences were observed in other knee motion parameters. Conclusion Women permit a smaller amount of knee flexion angle excursion during a jump-cut maneuver, resulting in a larger peak vertical GRF and increased rate of anterior tibial translation. Notably, ACLREC subjects also perform the jump cut maneuver with lower GRF than ACLINT subjects five years post surgery. This study proposes a causal sequence whereby increased landing stiffness (larger peak vertical GRF combined with less knee flexion angle excursion) leads to an increased rate of anterior tibial translation while performing a jump-cut maneuver. PMID:23190595

  7. Biomechanics of hyperflexion and kneeling before and after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lee, Thay Q

    2014-06-01

    The capacity to perform certain activities is frequently compromised after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) due to a functional decline resulting from decreased range of motion and a diminished ability to kneel. In this manuscript, the current biomechanical understanding of hyperflexion and kneeling before and after TKA will be discussed. Patellofemoral and tibiofemoral joint contact area, contact pressure, and kinematics were evaluated in cadaveric studies using a Tekscan pressure measuring system and Microscribe. Testing was performed on intact knees and following cruciate retaining and posterior stabilized TKA at knee flexion angles of 90°, 105°, 120°, and 135°. Three loading conditions were used to simulate squatting, double stance kneeling, and single stance kneeling. Following TKA with double stance kneeling, patellofemoral contact areas did not increase significantly at high knee flexion angle (135°). Kneeling resulted in tibial posterior translation and external rotation at all flexion angles. Moving from double to single stance kneeling tended to increase pressures in the cruciate retaining group, but decreased pressures in the posterior stabilized group. The cruciate retaining group had significantly larger contact areas than the posterior stabilized group, although no significant differences in pressures were observed comparing the two TKA designs (p < 0.05). If greater than 120° of postoperative knee range of motion can be achieved following TKA, then kneeling may be performed with less risk in the patellofemoral joint than was previously believed to be the case. However, kneeling may increase the likelihood of damage to cartilage and menisci in intact knees and after TKA increases in tibiofemoral contact area and pressures may lead to polyethyelene wear if performed on a chronic, repetitive basis.

  8. Physiological coxa varus-genu valgus influences internal knee and ankle joint moments in females during crossover cutting.

    PubMed

    Nyland, J A; Caborn, D N M

    2004-07-01

    This study evaluated the ankle and knee electromyographic, kinematic, and kinetic differences of 20 nonimpaired females with either neutral (group 1) or coxa varus-genu valgus (group 2) alignment during crossover cutting stance phase. Two-way mixed model ANOVA (group, session) assessed mean differences ( p<0.05) and correlation analysis further delineated relationships. During impact absorption, group 2 displayed earlier peak horizontal braking (anterior-posterior) ground reaction force timing, decreased and earlier peak internal knee extension moments (eccentric function), and earlier peak internal ankle dorsiflexion moment timing (eccentric function). During the pivot phase, group 2 displayed later and eccentrically-biased peak ankle plantar flexion moments, increased peak internal knee flexion moments (eccentric function), and later peak knee internal rotation timing. Correlation analysis revealed that during impact absorption, subjects with coxa varus-genu valgus alignment (group 2) displayed a stronger relationship between knee internal rotation velocity and peak internal ankle dorsiflexion moment onset timing ( r= -0.64 vs r = -0.26) and between peak horizontal braking ground reaction forces and peak internal ankle dorsiflexion moment onset timing ( r= 0.61 vs r= 0.24). During the pivot phase these subjects displayed a stronger relationship between peak horizontal braking ground reaction forces and peak internal ankle plantar flexion moment onset timing ( r= -0.63 vs r= -0.09) and between peak horizontal braking forces and peak internal ankle plantar flexion moments ( r= -0.72 vs r= -0.26). Group differences suggest that subjects with coxa varus-genu valgus frontal-plane alignment have an increased dependence on both ankle dorsiflexor and plantar flexor muscle group function during crossover cutting. Greater dependence on ankle muscle group function during the performance of a task that requires considerable 3D dynamic knee joint control suggests a greater

  9. Achieving Accurate Ligament Balancing Using Robotic-Assisted Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Plate, Johannes F.; Mofidi, Ali; Mannava, Sandeep; Smith, Beth P.; Lang, Jason E.; Poehling, Gary G.; Conditt, Michael A.; Jinnah, Riyaz H.

    2013-01-01

    Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) allows replacement of a single compartment in patients with limited disease. However, UKA is technically challenging and relies on accurate component positioning and restoration of natural knee kinematics. This study examined the accuracy of dynamic, real-time ligament balancing using a robotic-assisted UKA system. Surgical data obtained from the computer system were prospectively collected from 51 patients (52 knees) undergoing robotic-assisted medial UKA by a single surgeon. Dynamic ligament balancing of the knee was obtained under valgus stress prior to component implantation and then compared to final ligament balance with the components in place. Ligament balancing was accurate up to 0.53 mm compared to the preoperative plan, with 83% of cases within 1 mm at 0°, 30°, 60°, 90°, and 110° of flexion. Ligamentous laxity of 1.31 ± 0.13 mm at 30° of flexion was corrected successfully to 0.78 ± 0.17 mm (P < 0.05). Robotic-assisted UKA allows accurate and precise reproduction of a surgical balance plan using dynamic, real-time soft-tissue balancing to help restore natural knee kinematics, potentially improving implant survival and functional outcomes. PMID:23634304

  10. Valgus knee stress in lumbosacral myelomeningocele: a gait-analysis evaluation.

    PubMed

    Lim, R; Dias, L; Vankoski, S; Moore, C; Marinello, M; Sarwark, J

    1998-01-01

    Twenty-five independent community-ambulating patients with lumbosacral-level myelomeningocele (N = 50 limbs) underwent gait analysis. The limbs of these patients were divided into two groups based on thigh-foot angle (TFA): Group I (n = 20) had marked external tibial torsion, TFA > or = 20 degrees, and group II had TFA between 10 and 20 degrees. Ten limbs were excluded because of neutral or internal alignment. Twenty normal limbs with TFA = 10 degrees served as controls. An abnormal internal varus knee stress during stance was identified in all group I limbs and 12 (70%) of 20 limbs group II limbs compared with controls, which demonstrated an internal valgus stress. This internal varus moment was greater in group I limbs than in the abnormal limbs in group II (p < 0.05). Knee flexion was the only other parameter found to correlate with this stress and only in group I limbs. We conclude that (a) in this patient group, increased external tibial torsion is likely to result in an abnormal internal varus knee stress; (b) TFA > 20 degrees appears significantly to increase this stress; and (c) knee flexion is an important related parameter, but only in limbs with TFA between 10 and 20 degrees. We believe that this abnormal stress may predispose the knee to late arthrosis and that derotational osteotomies to normalize the TFA may prove to have a favorable long-term effect.

  11. Metal hypersensitivity in total knee arthroplasty: revision surgery using a ceramic femoral component - a case report.

    PubMed

    Bergschmidt, Philipp; Bader, Rainer; Mittelmeier, Wolfram

    2012-03-01

    We present a case involving the revision of a total knee arthroplasty with a metal femoral component using a ceramic implant due to metal hypersensitivity. A 58-year-old female patient underwent total knee arthroplasty (TKA) with a standard metal bicondylar knee system. She suffered from persistent pain and strong limitations in her range of motion (ROM) associated with flexion during the early postoperative period. Arthroscopic arthrolysis of the knee joint and intensive active and passive physical treatment, in combination with a cortisone regime, temporarily increased the ROM and reduced pain. No signs of low grade infection or other causes of implant failure were evident. Histology of synovial tissue revealed lymphoplasmacellular fibrinous tissue, consistent with a type IV allergic reaction. Allergometry (skin reaction) revealed type IV hypersensitivity against nickel-II-sulfate and palladium chloride. Revision surgery of the metal components was performed with a cemented ceramic femoral component (same bicondylar design) and a cemented titanium alloy tibial component. Postoperative evaluations were performed 10days, and 3 and 12months after the revision surgery. There was an increased ROM in flexion to 90° at the 12month follow-up. No swelling or effusion was observed at all clinical examinations after the revision surgery. No pain at rest and moderate walking pain were evident. The presented case demonstrates that ceramic implants are a promising solution for patients suffering from hypersensitivity to metal ions in total knee arthroplasty.

  12. Relationship of spasticity to knee angular velocity and motion during gait in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Damiano, Diane L; Laws, Edward; Carmines, Dave V; Abel, Mark F

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of spasticity in the hamstrings and quadriceps muscles on gait parameters including temporal spatial measures, knee position, excursion and angular velocity in 25 children with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy (CP) as compared to 17 age-matched peers. While subjects were instructed to relax, an isokinetic device alternately flexed and extended the left knee at one of the three constant velocities 30 degrees/s, 60 degrees/s and 120 degrees/s, while surface electromyography (EMG) electrodes over the biceps femoris and the rectus femoris recorded muscle activity. Patients then participated in 3D gait analysis at a self-selected speed. Results showed that, those with CP who exhibited heightened stretch responses (spasticity) in both muscles, had significantly slower knee angular velocities during the swing phase of gait as compared to those with and without CP who did not exhibit stretch responses at the joint and the tested speeds. The measured amount (torque) of the resistance to passive flexion or extension was not related to gait parameters in subjects with CP; however, the rate of change in resistance torque per unit angle change (stiffness) at the fastest test speed of 120 degrees/s showed weak to moderate relationships with knee angular velocity and motion during gait. For the subset of seven patients with CP who subsequently underwent a selective dorsal rhizotomy, knee angular extension and flexion velocity increased post-operatively, suggesting some degree of causality between spasticity and movement speed.

  13. Acute effects of anterior thigh foam rolling on hip angle, knee angle, and rectus femoris length in the modified Thomas test

    PubMed Central

    Lehman, Gregory J.; Contreras, Bret; Beardsley, Chris; Chung, Bryan; Feser, Erin H.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Foam rolling has been shown to acutely increase range of motion (ROM) during knee flexion and hip flexion with the experimenter applying an external force, yet no study to date has measured hip extensibility as a result of foam rolling with controlled knee flexion and hip extension moments. The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute effects of foam rolling on hip extension, knee flexion, and rectus femoris length during the modified Thomas test. Methods. Twenty-three healthy participants (male = 7; female = 16; age = 22 ± 3.3 years; height = 170 ± 9.18 cm; mass = 67.7 ± 14.9 kg) performed two, one-minute bouts of foam rolling applied to the anterior thigh. Hip extension and knee flexion were measured via motion capture before and after the foam rolling intervention, from which rectus femoris length was calculated. Results. Although the increase in hip extension (change = +1.86° (+0.11, +3.61); z(22) = 2.08; p = 0.0372; Pearson’s r = 0.43 (0.02, 0.72)) was not due to chance alone, it cannot be said that the observed changes in knee flexion (change = −1.39° (−5.53, +2.75); t(22) = −0.70; p = 0.4933; Cohen’s d = − 0.15 (−0.58, 0.29)) or rectus femoris length (change = −0.005 (−0.013, +0.003); t(22) = −1.30; p = 0.2070; Cohen’s d = − 0.27 (−0.70, 0.16)) were not due to chance alone. Conclusions. Although a small change in hip extension was observed, no changes in knee flexion or rectus femoris length were observed. From these data, it appears unlikely that foam rolling applied to the anterior thigh will improve passive hip extension and knee flexion ROM, especially if performed in combination with a dynamic stretching protocol. PMID:26421244

  14. Spine lateral flexion strength development differences between exercises with pelvic stabilization and without pelvic stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straton, Alexandru; Gidu, Diana Victoria; Micu, Alexandru

    2015-02-01

    Poor lateral flexor muscle strength can be an important source of lumbar/thoracic back pain in women. The purpose of this study was to evaluate pelvic stabilization (PS) and no pelvic stabilization (NoPS) lateral flexion strength exercise training on the development of isolated right and left lateral flexion strength. Isometric torque of the isolated right and left lateral flexion muscles was measured at two positions (0° and 30° opposed angle range of motion) on 42 healthy women before and after 8 weeks of PS and NoPS lateral flexion strength exercise training. Subjects were assigned in three groups, the first (n=14) trained 3 times/week with PS lateral flexion strength exercise, the second (n=14) trained 3 times/week with NoPS lateral flexion strength exercise and the third (control, n=14) did not train. Post training isometric strength values describing PS and NoPS lateral flexion strength improved in greater extent for the PS lateral flexion strength exercise group and in lesser extent for the NoPS lateral flexion strength exercise group, in both angles (p<0.05) relative to controls. These data indicate that the most effective way of training the spine lateral flexion muscles is PS lateral flexion strength exercises; NoPS lateral flexion strength exercises can be an effective way of training for the spine lateral flexion muscles, if there is no access to PS lateral flexion strength training machines.

  15. A biomechanical approach to interpreting magnetic resonance imaging of knee injuries.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Scott E; Khurana, Bharti; Gaviola, Glenn; Davis, Kirkland W

    2014-11-01

    This article discusses common injury mechanisms and the subsequent constellation of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings in the knee following trauma in the context of instability, as distinguished by the degree of knee flexion and tibial rotation at the time of initial injury, in addition to the direction and magnitude of the responsible force vectors. Using 3-dimensional imaging, common injury mechanisms are illustrated and correlated with MR imaging findings of the resulting osteochondral, ligamentous, meniscal, and musculotendinous lesions. The most common classification and grading systems for these individual lesions and their subsequent treatment implications are discussed.

  16. Proximal Tibial Epiphysis Injury (Flexion Type, Salter–Harris Type 1)

    PubMed Central

    Israni, Pratik; Panat, Mangesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Fractures of the proximal tibial epiphysis rare. It has been estimated that fractures of the upper tibial epiphysis account for 0.5-3.1% of all epiphyseal injuries. Who had no neurovascular deficit, with fixed extension deformity at the left knee was treated early with closed reduction techniques. Case Report: We present a case of a 16-year-old boy who while playing cricket on the road was hit by a car. The patient presented in emergency room with extremely swollen knee and soft tissue swelling (hemarthrosis), he was unable to lift his leg actively due to severe pain because of hamstrings spasm, and he had no wound over his left knee and had no other associated injuries. Plain radiographs were taken which revealed, separated proximal tibial epiphysis (salter harris Type 1 injury) The epiphysis was anteriorly displaced fracture line extending beyond growth plate through metaphysis and tibial tuberosity also displaced anteriorly, the proximal fibular epiphysis fragment was displaced anteriorly with no injury to femoral epiphysis and no patellar fracture, radiograph also revealed no intra-articular fracture as joint appears congruent. Under spinal anesthesia, under all aseptic precautions traction was applied for few minutes, the fracture was reduced closed as the hamstring spasm gave way, reduction was confirmed under image intensifier in both AP and lateral planes, and joint congruity was examined. Proximal fibular epiphysis also snapped back in place. Post-operative patient was immobilized with nil weight bearing for 4 weeks, check X-rays taken, he was mobilized in wheelchair. After 4 weeks slab was removed, K-wires were removed, and partial weight bearing was started with rehabilitation for full range of motion of the left knee. At 6 weeks, both the knee joints appeared symmetrical with no abnormalities or limb length discrepancy or instability with knee from 0° to 140°, with full weight bearing. Conclusion: Although less commonly seen, Salter

  17. Prior Knowledge Improves Decoding of Finger Flexion from Electrocorticographic Signals

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z.; Ji, Q.; Miller, K. J.; Schalk, Gerwin

    2011-01-01

    Brain–computer interfaces (BCIs) use brain signals to convey a user’s intent. Some BCI approaches begin by decoding kinematic parameters of movements from brain signals, and then proceed to using these signals, in absence of movements, to allow a user to control an output. Recent results have shown that electrocorticographic (ECoG) recordings from the surface of the brain in humans can give information about kinematic parameters (e.g., hand velocity or finger flexion). The decoding approaches in these studies usually employed classical classification/regression algorithms that derive a linear mapping between brain signals and outputs. However, they typically only incorporate little prior information about the target movement parameter. In this paper, we incorporate prior knowledge using a Bayesian decoding method, and use it to decode finger flexion from ECoG signals. Specifically, we exploit the constraints that govern finger flexion and incorporate these constraints in the construction, structure, and the probabilistic functions of the prior model of a switched non-parametric dynamic system (SNDS). Given a measurement model resulting from a traditional linear regression method, we decoded finger flexion using posterior estimation that combined the prior and measurement models. Our results show that the application of the Bayesian decoding model, which incorporates prior knowledge, improves decoding performance compared to the application of a linear regression model, which does not incorporate prior knowledge. Thus, the results presented in this paper may ultimately lead to neurally controlled hand prostheses with full fine-grained finger articulation. PMID:22144944

  18. Jumper's Knee (Patellar Tendonitis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... regularly play sports that involve a lot of repetitive jumping — like track and field (particularly high-jumping), basketball, volleyball, gymnastics, running, and soccer — can put a lot of strain on their knees. Jumper's knee can seem like a minor injury that isn't really that serious. Because of ...

  19. Tuberculosis of the knee

    PubMed Central

    Lidder, Surjit; Lang, Kathryn; Haroon, Mallick; Shahidi, Mitra; El-Guindi, Magdi

    2009-01-01

    Extrapulmonary manifestations of tuberculosis are reported in less than one in five cases with the knee affected in 8% after the spine and hip. We report a case of isolated highly erosive tuberculosis of the knee presenting in a previously fit Vietnamese woman. The difficulties of diagnosis, modalities of chemotherapeutic management, and surgical treatment are discussed. PMID:21808686

  20. Partial knee replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons (AAOS). Treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee: Evidence-based guideline 2nd edition (summary). Rosemont, IL. ... al. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. Treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee (nonarthroplasty). J Am Acad Orthop Surg . 2009;17: ...

  1. Anterior tibial transfer to the os calcis with Achilles tenodesis for calcaneal deformity in myelomeningocele.

    PubMed

    Banta, J V; Sutherland, D H; Wyatt, M

    1981-01-01

    Seven children aged 3.0 to 5.8 years underwent bilateral simultaneous transfer of the anterior tibial muscle to the os calcis combined with Achilles tenodesis. All patients underwent pre- and postoperative gait analysis. Results indicated decreased knee flexion in stance and decreased ankle dorsiflexion in stance resulting in a more upright posture in all patients. Electromyography revealed prolongation of firing time in both stance and swing phase of the gait cycle. Polypropylene ankle-foot orthoses, used to protect the transfers in the postoperative period, improved step length, single limb support, and walking velocity in all patients. Three patients underwent force plate analysis to calculate work output. The reduction in work from 1.578 to 0.628 joules/kg/m suggested a favorable reduction in the work required to ambulate following surgery. No equinus deformity developed as a consequence of the Achilles tenodesis. These preliminary findings suggest the combined procedure restored a more optimal balance to the foot and ankle. Postoperative orthotic support was beneficial for protection of the corrected alignment as well as long-term function.

  2. Global sagittal axis: a step toward full-body assessment of sagittal plane deformity in the human body.

    PubMed

    Diebo, Bassel G; Oren, Jonathan H; Challier, Vincent; Lafage, Renaud; Ferrero, Emmanuelle; Liu, Shian; Vira, Shaleen; Spiegel, Matthew Adam; Harris, Bradley Yates; Liabaud, Barthelemy; Henry, Jensen K; Errico, Thomas J; Schwab, Frank J; Lafage, Virginie

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE Sagittal malalignment requires higher energy expenditure to maintain an erect posture. Because the clinical impact of sagittal alignment is affected by both the severity of the deformity and recruitment of compensatory mechanisms, it is important to investigate new parameters that reflect both disability level and compensatory mechanisms for all patients. This study investigated the clinical relevance of the global sagittal axis (GSA), a novel measure to evaluate the standing axis of the human body. METHODS This is a retrospective review of patients who underwent full-body radiographs and completed health-related quality of life (HRQOL) questionnaires: Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Scoliosis Research Society-22, EuroQol-5D (EQ-5D), and the visual analog scale for back and leg pain. The GSA was defined as the angle formed by a line from the midpoint of the femoral condyles to the center of C-7, and a line from the midpoint between the femoral condyles to the posterior superior corner of the S-1 sacral endplate. After evaluating the correlation of GSA/HRQOL with sagittal parameters, linear regression models were generated to investigate how ODI and GSA related to radiographic parameters (T-1 pelvic angle, pelvic retroversion, knee flexion, and pelvic posterior translation). RESULTS One hundred forty-three patients (mean age 44 years) were included. The GSA correlated significantly with all HRQOL (up to r = 0.6 with EQ-5D) and radiographic parameters (up to r = 0.962 with sagittal vertical axis). Regression between ODI and sagittal radiographic parameters identified the GSA as an independent predictor (r = 0.517, r(2) = 0.267; p < 0.001). Analysis of standardized coefficients revealed that when controlling for deformity, the GSA increased with a concurrent decrease in pelvic retroversion (-0.837) and increases in knee flexion (+0.287) and pelvic posterior translation (+0.193). CONCLUSIONS The GSA is a simple, novel measure to assess the standing axis of

  3. Changes in Fatigue, Multiplanar Knee Laxity, and Landing Biomechanics During Intermittent Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Shultz, Sandra J.; Schmitz, Randy J.; Cone, John R.; Henson, Robert A.; Montgomery, Melissa M.; Pye, Michele L.; Tritsch, Amanda J.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Knee laxity increases during exercise. However, no one, to our knowledge, has examined whether these increases contribute to higher-risk landing biomechanics during prolonged, fatiguing exercise. Objectives: To examine associations between changes in fatigue (measured as sprint time [SPTIME]), multiplanar knee laxity (anterior-posterior [APLAX], varus-valgus [VVLAX] knee laxity, and internal-external rotation [IERLAX]) knee laxity and landing biomechanics during prolonged, intermittent exercise. Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Setting: Laboratory and gymnasium. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 30 male (age = 20.3 ± 2.0 years, height = 1.79 ± 0.05 m, mass = 75.2 ± 7.2 kg) and 29 female (age = 20.5 ± 2.3 years, height = 1.67 ± 0.08 m, mass = 61.8 ± 9.0 kg) competitive athletes. Intervention(s): A 90-minute intermittent exercise protocol (IEP) designed to simulate the physiologic and biomechanical demands of a soccer match. Main Outcome Measure(s): We measured SPTIME, APLAX, and landing biomechanics before and after warm-up, every 15 minutes during the IEP, and every 15 minutes for 1 hour after the IEP. We measured VVLAX and IERLAX before and after the warm-up, at 45 and 90 minutes during the IEP, and at 30 minutes after the IEP. We used hierarchical linear modeling to examine associations between exercise-related changes in SPTIME and knee laxity with exercise-related changes in landing biomechanics while controlling for initial (before warm-up) knee laxity. Results: We found that SPTIME had a more global effect on landing biomechanics in women than in men, resulting in a more upright landing and a reduction in landing forces and out-of-plane motions about the knee. As APLAX increased with exercise, women increased their knee internal-rotation motion (P = .02), and men increased their hip-flexion motion and energy-absorption (P = .006) and knee-extensor loads (P = .04). As VVLAX and IERLAX increased, women went through greater knee

  4. Current surgical strategies for total arthroplasty in valgus knee

    PubMed Central

    Nikolopoulos, Dimitrios; Michos, Ioannis; Safos, George; Safos, Petros

    2015-01-01

    The majority of orthopaedic surgeons even currently agree that primary total arthroplasty in valgus knees with a deformity of more than ten degrees may prove challenging. The unique sets of bone and soft tissue abnormalities that must be addressed at the time of the operation make accurate axis restoration, component orientation and joint stability attainment a difficult task. Understanding the specific pathologic anatomic changes associated with the valgus knee is a prerequisite so as to select the proper surgical method, to optimize component position and restore soft-tissue balance. The purpose of this article is to review the valgus knee anatomical variations, to assess the best pre-operative planning and to evaluate how to choose the grade of constraint of the implant. It will also be underlying the up-to-date main approaches and surgical techniques be proposed in the English literature both for bone cuts and soft tissue management of valgus knees. PMID:26191494

  5. Pneumatic osteoarthritis knee brace.

    PubMed

    Stamenović, Dimitrije; Kojić, Milos; Stojanović, Boban; Hunter, David

    2009-04-01

    Knee osteoarthritis is a chronic disease that necessitates long term therapeutic intervention. Biomechanical studies have demonstrated an improvement in the external adduction moment with application of a valgus knee brace. Despite being both efficacious and safe, due to their rigid frame and bulkiness, current designs of knee braces create discomfort and difficulties to patients during prolonged periods of application. Here we propose a novel design of a light osteoarthritis knee brace, which is made of soft conforming materials. Our design relies on a pneumatic leverage system, which, when pressurized, reduces the excessive loads predominantly affecting the medial compartment of the knee and eventually reverses the malalignment. Using a finite-element analysis, we show that with a moderate level of applied pressure, this pneumatic brace can, in theory, counterbalance a greater fraction of external adduction moment than the currently existing braces.

  6. Knee osteoarthritis image registration: data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galván-Tejada, Jorge I.; Celaya-Padilla, José M.; Treviño, Victor; Tamez-Peña, José G.

    2015-03-01

    Knee osteoarthritis is a very common disease, in early stages, changes in joint structures are shown, some of the most common symptoms are; formation of osteophytes, cartilage degradation and joint space reduction, among others. Based on a joint space reduction measurement, Kellgren-Lawrence grading scale, is a very extensive used tool to asses radiological OA knee x-ray images, based on information obtained from these assessments, the objective of this work is to correlate the Kellgren-Lawrence score to the bilateral asymmetry between knees. Using public data from the Osteoarthritis initiative (OAI), a set of images with different Kellgren-Lawrencescores were used to determine a relationship of Kellgren-Lawrence score and the bilateral asymmetry, in order to measure the asymmetry between the knees, the right knee was registered to match the left knee, then a series of similarity metrics, mutual information, correlation, and mean squared error where computed to correlate the deformation (mismatch) of the knees to the Kellgren-Lawrence score. Radiological information was evaluated and scored by OAI radiologist groups. The results of the study suggest an association between Radiological Kellgren-Lawrence score and image registration metrics, mutual information and correlation is higher in the early stages, and mean squared error is higher in advanced stages. This association can be helpful to develop a computer aided grading tool.

  7. Physeal bar resections after growth arrest about the knee.

    PubMed

    Kasser, J R

    1990-06-01

    Localized growth arrest about the knee can be treated with excision when less than 50% of the physis is involved and when at least 2.5 cm of growth remains. Simultaneous corrective osteotomy should be performed when the angular deformity exceeds 20 degrees. The superiority of the various interposition materials remains controversial, but the alternatives are fat, cartilage, elastomer, and methylmethacrylate.

  8. lower limbs kinematic assessment of the effect of a gym and hydrotherapy rehabilitation protocol after knee megaprosthesis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lovecchio, Nicola; Sciumè, Luciana; Zago, Matteo; Panella, Lorenzo; Lopresti, Maurizio; Sforza, Chiarella

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] To quantitatively assess the effect of a personalized rehabilitation protocol after knee megaprosthesis. [Subject and Methods] The gait patterns of a 33-year-old male patient with knee synovial sarcoma were assessed by a computerized analysis before and after 40 rehabilitation sessions. [Results] The rehabilitation protocol improved the gait pattern. After rehabilitation, hip flexion was nearly symmetric, with normalized affected limb hip flexion, and improved ankle flexion. Ankle in/eversion was asymmetric and did not improve after physiotherapy. Before physiotherapy, the hip flexion on the affected side anticipated the movement but nearly normalized in the follow-up assessment. Hip abduction range of motion increased, with wider movements and good balance. Knee range of motion nearly symmetrized, but maintained an anticipated behavior, without shock absorption at heel-strike. [Conclusion] Instrumental gait analysis allowed us to gain evidence about the training and how to expand rehabilitative interventions to improve efficacy. In particular, we recommend quadriceps and gastrocnemius eccentric contraction training (to improve the shock absorption phase, preventing early failures of the prosthesis); one-leg standing performance (to improve the support phase of the affected limb); adductor strength training (to aid in hip control during the swing phase); and peroneus strength training (to increase ankle joint stabilization).

  9. lower limbs kinematic assessment of the effect of a gym and hydrotherapy rehabilitation protocol after knee megaprosthesis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Lovecchio, Nicola; Sciumè, Luciana; Zago, Matteo; Panella, Lorenzo; Lopresti, Maurizio; Sforza, Chiarella

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To quantitatively assess the effect of a personalized rehabilitation protocol after knee megaprosthesis. [Subject and Methods] The gait patterns of a 33-year-old male patient with knee synovial sarcoma were assessed by a computerized analysis before and after 40 rehabilitation sessions. [Results] The rehabilitation protocol improved the gait pattern. After rehabilitation, hip flexion was nearly symmetric, with normalized affected limb hip flexion, and improved ankle flexion. Ankle in/eversion was asymmetric and did not improve after physiotherapy. Before physiotherapy, the hip flexion on the affected side anticipated the movement but nearly normalized in the follow-up assessment. Hip abduction range of motion increased, with wider movements and good balance. Knee range of motion nearly symmetrized, but maintained an anticipated behavior, without shock absorption at heel-strike. [Conclusion] Instrumental gait analysis allowed us to gain evidence about the training and how to expand rehabilitative interventions to improve efficacy. In particular, we recommend quadriceps and gastrocnemius eccentric contraction training (to improve the shock absorption phase, preventing early failures of the prosthesis); one-leg standing performance (to improve the support phase of the affected limb); adductor strength training (to aid in hip control during the swing phase); and peroneus strength training (to increase ankle joint stabilization). PMID:27134413

  10. Tibial osteotomy for the varus osteoarthritic knee.

    PubMed

    Aglietti, P; Rinonapoli, E; Stringa, G; Taviani, A

    1983-06-01

    High tibial osteotomy is a reliable method for relieving pain in the varus osteoarthritic knee. In a review of 139 osteotomies, excellent and good results were noted in 64% of the knees after a follow-up period of at least ten years. The ideal candidate for this operation has Grade I or II osteoarthritis; less than 10 degrees of varus deformity, as measured by a single leg standing roentgenogram; no lateral subluxation; and no instability. The lateral closed wedge osteotomy without internal fixation is the preferred technique, and correction beyond the normal anatomic position, to 5 degrees of valgus, is advised. Protected weight-bearing after the second postoperative day is allowed. Complications have been infrequent and minor. Forty-seven knees were managed in this manner, and 88% had an excellent or good result at a four-year follow-up evaluation. In the majority of the well corrected knees, the alignment did not change with time, and the osteoarthritis did not progress. No failures in this series were attributable to the associated patellofemoral osteoarthritis; the reaction of the patellofemoral joint to osteotomy is obscure.

  11. Effects of lumbar stabilization exercises on the flexion-relaxation phenomenon of the erector spinae.

    PubMed

    Park, San-Seong; Choi, Bo-Ram

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated the differences in the flexion-relaxation phenomenon (FRP) of the right and left erector spinae muscles in asymptomatic subjects and the effect of lumbar stabilization exercises on these differences. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-six participants (12 in the exercise group and 14 in the control group) with a difference in the FRP in the right and left erector spinae muscles were recruited from among healthy students attending Silla University. The exercise group performed two lumbar stabilization exercises (back bridge exercise and hand-knee exercise) for 4 weeks. The control group did not exercise. [Results] No significant group-by-exercise interaction was found. The right and left erector spinae muscles did show a difference in FRP between the control and exercise groups (119.2 ± 69.2 and 131.1 ± 85.2 ms, respectively). In addition, the exercise group showed a significant decrease in post-exercise (50.0 ± 27.0 ms) compared to pre-exercise (112.3 ± 41.5 ms) differences in the right and left FRP. [Conclusion] These results suggest that lumbar stabilization exercises may counter asymmetry of the FRP in the erector spinae muscles, possibly preventing low back pain in the general population.

  12. Effects of lumbar stabilization exercises on the flexion-relaxation phenomenon of the erector spinae

    PubMed Central

    Park, San-seong; Choi, Bo-ram

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated the differences in the flexion-relaxation phenomenon (FRP) of the right and left erector spinae muscles in asymptomatic subjects and the effect of lumbar stabilization exercises on these differences. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-six participants (12 in the exercise group and 14 in the control group) with a difference in the FRP in the right and left erector spinae muscles were recruited from among healthy students attending Silla University. The exercise group performed two lumbar stabilization exercises (back bridge exercise and hand-knee exercise) for 4 weeks. The control group did not exercise. [Results] No significant group-by-exercise interaction was found. The right and left erector spinae muscles did show a difference in FRP between the control and exercise groups (119.2 ± 69.2 and 131.1 ± 85.2 ms, respectively). In addition, the exercise group showed a significant decrease in post-exercise (50.0 ± 27.0 ms) compared to pre-exercise (112.3 ± 41.5 ms) differences in the right and left FRP. [Conclusion] These results suggest that lumbar stabilization exercises may counter asymmetry of the FRP in the erector spinae muscles, possibly preventing low back pain in the general population. PMID:27390399

  13. The bending stiffness of shoes is beneficial to running energetics if it does not disturb the natural MTP joint flexion.

    PubMed

    Oh, Keonyoung; Park, Sukyung

    2017-02-28

    A local minimum for running energetics has been reported for a specific bending stiffness, implying that shoe stiffness assists in running propulsion. However, the determinant of the metabolic optimum remains unknown. Highly stiff shoes significantly increase the moment arm of the ground reaction force (GRF) and reduce the leverage effect of joint torque at ground push-off. Inspired by previous findings, we hypothesized that the restriction of the natural metatarsophalangeal (MTP) flexion caused by stiffened shoes and the corresponding joint torque changes may reduce the benefit of shoe bending stiffness to running energetics. We proposed the critical stiffness, kcr, which is defined as the ratio of the MTP joint (MTPJ) torque to the maximal MTPJ flexion angle, as a possible threshold of the elastic benefit of shoe stiffness. 19 subjects participated in a running test while wearing insoles with five different bending stiffness levels. Joint angles, GRFs, and metabolic costs were measured and analyzed as functions of the shoe stiffness. No significant changes were found in the take-off velocity of the center of mass (CoM), but the horizontal ground push-offs were significantly reduced at different shoe stiffness levels, indicating that complementary changes in the lower-limb joint torques were introduced to maintain steady running. Slight increases in the ankle, knee, and hip joint angular impulses were observed at stiffness levels exceeding the critical stiffness, whereas the angular impulse at the MTPJ was significantly reduced. These results indicate that the shoe bending stiffness is beneficial to running energetics if it does not disturb the natural MTPJ flexion.

  14. [Osteoarthritis of the knee in the young patient--who should receive total knee arthroplasty and who should not?].

    PubMed

    Dornacher, D; Kappe, T; Reichel, H

    2014-06-01

    The incidence of total knee arthroplasty in young patients continues to rise in certain countries despite evidence of decreased patient satisfaction and increased likelihood for revision in patients 55 years of age or less. As long as sufficient pain relief and functional improvement can be obtained by alternative means, total knee arthroplasty should be avoided whenever possible. In young patients with unicompartmental osteoarthritis, and a partially conserved joint space, correctional osteotomy around the knee accompanied by cartilage surgery should be preferred in the presence of the respective deformity. In cases of advanced unicompartmental arthritis, unicompartmental arthroplasty should be considered even in younger patients. Only if advanced arthritic changes in more than one compartment or accompanying tibiofemoral instability are present in younger patients, is total knee arthroplasty indicated in selected cases. The strongest predictor of satisfaction even in younger patients is, however, a realistic expectation about the outcome of surgery.

  15. Provocative mechanical tests of the peripheral nervous system affect the joint torque-angle during passive knee motion.

    PubMed

    Andrade, R J; Freitas, S R; Vaz, J R; Bruno, P M; Pezarat-Correia, P

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to determine the influence of the head, upper trunk, and foot position on the passive knee extension (PKE) torque-angle response. PKE tests were performed in 10 healthy subjects using an isokinetic dynamometer at 2°/s. Subjects lay in the supine position with their hips flexed to 90°. The knee angle, passive torque, surface electromyography (EMG) of the semitendinosus and quadriceps vastus medialis, and stretch discomfort were recorded in six body positions during PKE. The different maximal active positions of the cervical spine (neutral; flexion; extension), thoracic spine (neutral; flexion), and ankle (neutral; dorsiflexion) were passively combined for the tests. Visual analog scale scores and EMG were unaffected by body segment positioning. An effect of the ankle joint was verified on the peak torque and knee maximum angle when the ankle was in the dorsiflexion position (P < 0.05). Upper trunk positioning had an effect on the knee submaximal torque (P < 0.05), observed as an increase in the knee passive submaximal torque when the cervical and thoracic spines were flexed (P < 0.05). In conclusion, other apparently mechanical unrelated body segments influence torque-angle response since different positions of head, upper trunk, and foot induce dissimilar knee mechanical responses during passive extension.

  16. Influence of Different Patellofemoral Design Variations Based on Genesis II Total Knee Endoprosthesis on Patellofemoral Pressure and Kinematics

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Barbara; Herzog, Yvonne; Schnauffer, Peter; Leichtle, Carmen I.; Wülker, Nikolaus

    2017-01-01

    In total knee arthroplasty (TKA), patellofemoral groove design varies greatly and likely has a distinct influence on patellofemoral biomechanics. To analyse the selective influence, five patellofemoral design variations were developed based on Genesis II total knee endoprosthesis (original design, being completely flat, being laterally elevated, being medially elevated, and both sides elevated) and made from polyamide using rapid prototyping. Muscle-loaded knee flexion was simulated on 10 human knee specimens using a custom-made knee simulator, measuring the patellofemoral pressure distribution and tibiofemoral and patellofemoral kinematics. The measurements were carried out in the native knee as well as after TKA with the 5 design prototypes. The overall influence of the different designs on the patellofemoral kinematics was small, but we found detectable effects for mediolateral tilt (p < 0.05 for 35°–80° flexion) and translation of the patella (p < 0.045 for 20°–65° and 75°–90°), especially for the completely flat design. Considering patellofemoral pressures, major interindividual differences were seen between the designs, which, on average, largely cancelled each other out. These results suggest that the elevation of the lateral margin of the patellofemoral groove is essential for providing mediolateral guidance, but smooth contouring as with original Genesis II design seems to be sufficient. The pronounced interindividual differences identify a need for more patellofemoral design options in TKA. PMID:28255225

  17. Influence of Different Patellofemoral Design Variations Based on Genesis II Total Knee Endoprosthesis on Patellofemoral Pressure and Kinematics.

    PubMed

    Leichtle, Ulf G; Lange, Barbara; Herzog, Yvonne; Schnauffer, Peter; Leichtle, Carmen I; Wülker, Nikolaus; Lorenz, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    In total knee arthroplasty (TKA), patellofemoral groove design varies greatly and likely has a distinct influence on patellofemoral biomechanics. To analyse the selective influence, five patellofemoral design variations were developed based on Genesis II total knee endoprosthesis (original design, being completely flat, being laterally elevated, being medially elevated, and both sides elevated) and made from polyamide using rapid prototyping. Muscle-loaded knee flexion was simulated on 10 human knee specimens using a custom-made knee simulator, measuring the patellofemoral pressure distribution and tibiofemoral and patellofemoral kinematics. The measurements were carried out in the native knee as well as after TKA with the 5 design prototypes. The overall influence of the different designs on the patellofemoral kinematics was small, but we found detectable effects for mediolateral tilt (p < 0.05 for 35°-80° flexion) and translation of the patella (p < 0.045 for 20°-65° and 75°-90°), especially for the completely flat design. Considering patellofemoral pressures, major interindividual differences were seen between the designs, which, on average, largely cancelled each other out. These results suggest that the elevation of the lateral margin of the patellofemoral groove is essential for providing mediolateral guidance, but smooth contouring as with original Genesis II design seems to be sufficient. The pronounced interindividual differences identify a need for more patellofemoral design options in TKA.

  18. Functional assessments of the knee joint biomechanics by using pendulum test in adults with Down syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Casabona, Antonino; Valle, Maria Stella; Pisasale, Mariangela; Pantò, Maria Rosita

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we assessed kinematics and viscoelastic features of knee joint in adults with Down syndrome (DS) by means of the Wartenberg pendulum test. This test allows the measuring of the kinematics of the knee joint during passive pendular motion of leg under the influence of gravity. In addition, by a combination of kinematic and anthropometric data, pendulum test provides estimates of joint viscoelastic properties by computing damping and stiffness coefficients. To monitor the occurrences of muscle activation, the surface electromyogram (EMG) of muscle rectus femoris was recorded. The experimental protocol was performed in a group of 10 adults with DS compared with 10 control adults without DS. Joint motion amplitude, velocity, and acceleration of the leg during the first knee flexion significantly decreased in persons with DS with respect to those without DS. This behavior was associated with the activation of rectus femoris in subjects with DS that resulted in increasing of joint resistance shortly after the onset of the first leg flexion. The EMG bursts mostly occurred between 50 and 150 ms from the leg flexion onset. During the remaining cycles of pendular motion, persons with DS exhibited passive leg oscillations with low tonic EMG activity and reduced damping coefficient compared with control subjects. These results suggest that adults with DS might perform preprogrammed contractions to increase joint resistance and compensate for inherent joint instability occurring for quick and unpredictable perturbations. The reduction of damping coefficients observed during passive oscillations could be a predictor of muscle hypotonia. PMID:22995394

  19. Gap changes after popliteus-tendon resection in PS-TKA: a cadaveric study in Thai female knees.

    PubMed

    Tantavisut, Saran; Tanavalee, Aree; Ngarmukos, Srihatach; Limtrakul, Arak; Wilairatana, Vajara; Wangroongsub, Yongsak

    2012-10-01

    Popliteus-tendon injury during total knee arthroplasty (TKA) may result in imbalanced soft-tissue tension; however, it is unclear whether complete popliteus-tendon resection is a factor which contributes to knee instability following TKA. We performed an isolated complete resection of the popliteus tendon during a standard posterior stabilised TKA (PS-TKA) in 14 normal knees of Thai female cadavers and measured gap differences in both knee flexion and extension. In addition, we measured the distance from the femoral attachment of the popliteus tendon to the femoral condyles including the distance from the most distal femoral attachment of the popliteus tendon to the distal lateral femoral condyle (DFa-DLFC), and the distance from the most posterior femoral attachment of the popliteus tendon to the posterior lateral femoral condyle (PFa-PLFC). After completion of bone cuts, static flexion and extension gaps were measured with a tension of 98 N under intact and complete tendon resection, respectively. The mean DFa-DLFC and PFa-PLFC distances were 8.9 mm (range, 6.4-10.5mm) and 11.5mm (range, 9.5-14.0mm), respectively. Of 14 cadaveric knees, 35.7% had a DFa-DLFC distance <9 mm. Flexion and extension gaps significantly increased in both medial and lateral sides after complete popliteus resection with a similar mean increased value of 1.85 mm. The clinical evaluation of gap changes after popliteus resection on knee stability should be further investigated. A routine 9-mm distal femoral bone cut may injure the popliteus tendon during TKA conducted on small knees.

  20. A study on muscle activity and ratio of the knee extensor depending on the types of squat exercise

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jeong-Il; Park, Joon-Su; Choi, Hyun; Jeong, Dae-Keun; Kwon, Hye-Min; Moon, Young-Jun

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] For preventing the patellofemoral pain syndrome, this study aims to suggest a proper squat method, which presents selective muscle activity of Vastus Medialis Oblique and muscle activity ratios of Vastus Medialis Oblique/Vastus Lateralis by applying squat that is a representative weight bearing exercise method in various ways depending on the surface conditions and knee bending angles. [Subjects and Methods] An isometric squat that was accompanied by hip adduction, depending on the surface condition and the knee joint flexion angle, was performed by 24 healthy students. The muscle activity and the ratio of muscle activity were measured. [Results] In a comparison of muscle activity depending on the knee joint flexion angle on a weight-bearing surface, the vastus medialis oblique showed a significant difference at 15° and 60°. Meanwhile, in a comparison of the muscle activity ratio between the vastus medialis oblique and the vastus lateralis depending on the knee joint flexion angle on a weight-bearing surface, significant differences were observed at 15° and 60°. [Conclusion] An efficient squat exercise posture for preventing the patellofemoral pain syndrome is to increase the knee joint bending angle on a stable surface. But it would be efficient for patients with difficulties in bending the knee joint to keep a knee joint bending angle of 15 degrees or less on an unstable surface. It is considered that in future, diverse studies on selective Vastus Medialis Oblique strengthening exercise methods would be needed after applying them to patients with the patellofemoral pain syndrome. PMID:28210036

  1. A study on muscle activity and ratio of the knee extensor depending on the types of squat exercise.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jeong-Il; Park, Joon-Su; Choi, Hyun; Jeong, Dae-Keun; Kwon, Hye-Min; Moon, Young-Jun

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] For preventing the patellofemoral pain syndrome, this study aims to suggest a proper squat method, which presents selective muscle activity of Vastus Medialis Oblique and muscle activity ratios of Vastus Medialis Oblique/Vastus Lateralis by applying squat that is a representative weight bearing exercise method in various ways depending on the surface conditions and knee bending angles. [Subjects and Methods] An isometric squat that was accompanied by hip adduction, depending on the surface condition and the knee joint flexion angle, was performed by 24 healthy students. The muscle activity and the ratio of muscle activity were measured. [Results] In a comparison of muscle activity depending on the knee joint flexion angle on a weight-bearing surface, the vastus medialis oblique showed a significant difference at 15° and 60°. Meanwhile, in a comparison of the muscle activity ratio between the vastus medialis oblique and the vastus lateralis depending on the knee joint flexion angle on a weight-bearing surface, significant differences were observed at 15° and 60°. [Conclusion] An efficient squat exercise posture for preventing the patellofemoral pain syndrome is to increase the knee joint bending angle on a stable surface. But it would be efficient for patients with difficulties in bending the knee joint to keep a knee joint bending angle of 15 degrees or less on an unstable surface. It is considered that in future, diverse studies on selective Vastus Medialis Oblique strengthening exercise methods would be needed after applying them to patients with the patellofemoral pain syndrome.

  2. [Recovery from total knee arthroplasty through continuous passive motion].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Mayo, B; Rodríguez-Mansilla, J; González Sánchez, B

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to know the effects of continuous passive mobilization in patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty. A search strategy was developed to retrieve all clinical trials, written in English and/or Spanish, published in the electronic search databases PubMed, Cochrane Library Plus, Dialnet, CSIC and PEDro. The inclusion criteria were: clinical trials published from January 2000 until November 2014 in English or Spanish. Out of 537 clinical trials that were potentially relevant, a total of 12 were included in this review. The evaluation of 1,153 patients shows that there is no significant difference in improving the range of the joint, pain, balance, motion, healing and hospital stay using continuous passive mobilization against the regular physiotherapy treatment for total knee arthroplasty. The application of continuous passive mobilization in the long-term does not provide any benefit in terms of the breadth of the range of the joint, pain and improvement of standing and motion in comparison with conventional postoperative physiotherapy treatment in total knee arthroplasty. In the short term an improvement is obtained in the range of joint motion in knee flexion.

  3. Sex Differences in Proximal Control of the Knee Joint

    PubMed Central

    Mendiguchia, Jurdan; Ford, Kevin R.; Quatman, Carmen E.; Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2014-01-01

    Following the onset of maturation, female athletes have a significantly higher risk for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury compared with male athletes. While multiple sex differences in lower-extremity neuromuscular control and biomechanics have been identified as potential risk factors for ACL injury in females, the majority of these studies have focused specifically on the knee joint. However, increasing evidence in the literature indicates that lumbopelvic (core) control may have a large effect on knee-joint control and injury risk. This review examines the published evidence on the contributions of the trunk and hip to knee-joint control. Specifically, the sex differences in potential proximal controllers of the knee as risk factors for ACL injury are identified and discussed. Sex differences in trunk and hip biomechanics have been identified in all planes of motion (sagittal, coronal and transverse). Essentially, female athletes show greater lateral trunk displacement, altered trunk and hip flexion angles, greater ranges of trunk motion, and increased hip adduction and internal rotation during sport manoeuvres, compared with their male counterparts. These differences may increase the risk of ACL injury among female athletes. Prevention programmes targeted towards trunk and hip neuromuscular control may decrease the risk for ACL injuries. PMID:21688868

  4. Biomechanical comparison of extensile exposures in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Wall, Simon J; Rose, David M; Khanuja, Harpal S; Sutter, Edward G; Knight, Trevor A; Belkoff, Stephen M; Mears, Simon C

    2010-06-09

    The "banana peel" exposure is a novel technique for knee joint exposure that consists of partially peeling the patellar tendon off the tibia, leaving the extensor mechanism intact distally and laterally. Although good clinical results have been reported with this technique with no disruption of the extensor mechanism, concerns exist that it could cause extensor lag, quadriceps weakness, or patellar tendon rupture. We compared the banana peel exposure repair to tibial tubercle osteotomy repair, which we chose as our benchmark procedure because much is known about its associated healing and rehabilitation protocols. In our study of 16 paired, fresh-frozen human knee specimens, the 2 techniques were used alternately for the right and left knees. To measure acute strength, 10 pairs were tested. The patella was clamped and pulled superiorly at 25 mm/min until failure. For cyclical testing (6 pairs), the knee was extended from 90 degrees of flexion to 0 degrees for 2000 cycles at 0.25 Hz while we monitored the distance between the inferior pole of the patella and the tibial diaphysis using a passive optical kinematic measuring system. Mean failure strengths of the banana peel and osteotomy groups were 2642+/-1104 N and 2123+/-562 N, respectively, suggesting that the banana peel repair is not weaker than the osteotomy repair. Neither group had a significant increase (via paired Student t test, P>.05) in the distance between the inferior pole of the patella and the tibial diaphysis, suggesting that neither exposure would result in extensor lag.

  5. Needle Assisted Arthroscopic Clysis of the Medial Collateral Ligament of the Knee: a Simple Technique to Improve Exposure in Arthroscopic Knee Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinning; Selby, Ronald M.; Newman, Ashley; O’Brien, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    During knee arthroscopy, narrowness and tightness maybe encountered in the medial compartment that does not allow sufficient visualization or instrumentation. When this occurs, our team has found it helpful to perform a percutaneous clysis of the deep portion of the medial collateral ligament with a spinal needle. With the knee positioned in 10° to 20° of flexion and a valgus stress is applied. A spinal needle (18 Gauge) is passed percutaneously through the medial collateral ligament between the tibial plateau and undersurface of the medial meniscus. Several passes are made with the spinal needle with the bevel of the needle angled to selectively divide the fibers while keeping the medial collateral ligament under tension. Then with controlled valgus force, the medial compartment will progressively open allowing improved visualization to the posteromedial corner of the knee. This increase in space gives an enhanced visual field and further allows more room for arthroscopic instrumentation. PMID:24416482

  6. Through Knee Amputation: Technique Modifications and Surgical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Albino, Frank P; Seidel, Rachel; Brown, Benjamin J; Crone, Charles G

    2014-01-01

    Background Knee disarticulations (KD) are most commonly employed following trauma or tumor resection but represent less than 2% of all lower extremity amputations performed in the United States annually. KDs provide enhanced proprioception, a long lever arm, preservation of adductor muscle insertion, decreased metabolic cost of ambulation, and an end weight-bearing stump. The role for KDs in the setting of arterial insufficiency or overwhelming infection is less clear. The purpose of this study is to describe technique modifications and report surgical outcomes following KDs at a high-volume Limb Salvage Center. Methods A retrospective study of medical records for all patients who underwent a through-knee amputation performed by the senior author (C.E.A.) between 2004 and 2012 was completed. Medical records were reviewed to collect demographic, operative, and postoperative information for each of the patients identified. Results Between 2004 and 2012, 46 through-knee amputations for 41 patients were performed. The mean patient age was 68 and indications for surgery included infection (56%), arterial thrombosis (35%), and trauma (9%). Postoperative complications included superficial cellulitis (13%), soft tissue infection (4%), and flap ischemia (4%) necessitating one case of surgical debridement (4%) and four trans-femoral amputations (9%). 9 (22%) patients went on to ambulate. Postoperative ambulation was greatest in the traumatic cohort and for patients less than 50 years of age, P<0.05. Alternatively, diabetes mellitus and infection reduced the likelihood of postoperative ambulation, P<0.01. Conclusions Knee disarticulations are a safe and effective alternative to other lower extremity amputations when clinically feasible. For patient unlikely to ambulate, a through-knee amputation maximizes ease of transfers, promotes mobility by providing a counterbalance, and eliminates the potential for knee flexion contracture with subsequent skin breakdown. PMID:25276650

  7. Effects of the sustained computer work on upper cervical flexion motion.

    PubMed

    Park, Se-Yeon; Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2014-03-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of sustained computer work on cervical flexion, especially the upper cervical region. [Subjects] We recruited 11 sedentary workers who used a computer for at least 4 hours a day. [Methods] Total range of cervical flexion, upper cervical flexion, and their ratio were measured before and after 1 hour of computer work. [Results] The total range of cervical flexion was not significantly different between pre-and post-measurement. However, upper cervical flexion, and the ratio between the upper cervical flexion and total cervical flexion significantly decreased after 1 hour of computer work, compared to pre-measurement. [Conclusion] Sustained computer work affects the range of cervical flexion, especially in the upper cervical region.

  8. Change in posture control after recent knee anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction?

    PubMed

    Dauty, Marc; Collon, Sylvie; Dubois, Charles

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare statical postures of a knee anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) population with a healthy control population. Thirty-five patients (age 25.5 +/- 5.8 years) were compared at 15 days after an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with 35 healthy, age and sex-matched subjects. Bilateral and unilateral postures were studied according to various stances, knee extension and 20 degrees knee flexion with opened and closed eyes, using a stabilometric platform. A comparison with the non-ACLR limb and the healthy limbs of the control population was carried out. The ACLR subjects present with the following: (i) a significant change in two-legged stance, i.e. distances covered by the centre of pressure projection are significantly increased; (ii) a postural alteration during the ACLR one-legged stance with knee extension and opened eyes in comparison with the non-ACLR limb; (iii) an incapacity for certain ACLR subjects to perform one-legged stance on the non-ACLR limb when there is no visual compensation. Only 11.4% (95% CI: 0.9-21.9%) and 42.8% (95% CI: 26.3-59.3%) of ACLR subjects are capable of maintaining correctly a one-legged stance posture with closed eyes on both sides (knee extension and flexion, respectively). The identification of the ACLR knee limb is possible from the one-legged stance postural test in knee extension and opened eyes condition. Because of a change in two-legged balance and of the incapacity for certain ACLR subjects to maintain one-legged stance with closed eyes, a central origin explaining the abnormalities of postural control is suggested.

  9. Assessment of isometricity before and after total knee arthroplasty: a cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Kuster, Markus S; Jeffcote, Benjamin O; Schirm, Andreas C; Jacob, Hilaire; Nicholls, Rochelle L

    2009-10-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) relies on soft tissue to regulate joint stability after surgery. In practice, the exact balance of the gaps can be difficult to measure, and various methods including intra-operative spreaders or distraction devices have been proposed. While individual ligament strain patterns have been measured, no data exist on the isometricity of the soft tissue envelope as a whole. In this study, a novel device was developed and validated to compare isometricity in the entire soft tissue envelope for both the intact and TKA knee. A spring-loaded rod was inserted in six cadaver knee joints between the tibial shaft and the tibial plateau or tibial tray after removing a 7 mm slice of bone. The displacement of the rod during passive flexion represented variation in tissue tension around the joint. The rod position in the intact knee remained within 1 mm of its initial position between 15 degrees and 135 degrees of flexion, and within 2 mm (+/-1.2 mm) throughout the entire range of motion (0-150 degrees). After insertion of a mobile-bearing TKA, the rod was displaced a mean of 6 mm at 150 degrees (p<0.001). The results were validated using a force transducer implanted in the tibial baseplate of the TKA, which showed increased tibiofemoral force in the parts of the flexion range where the rod was most displaced. The force measurements were highly correlated with the displacement pattern of the spring-loaded rod (r=-0.338; p=0.006). A simple device has been validated to measure isometricity in the soft tissue envelope around the knee joint. Isometricity measurements may be used in the future to improve implantation techniques during TKA surgery.

  10. Patellar tracking during total knee arthroplasty: an in vitro feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Belvedere, C; Catani, F; Ensini, A; Moctezuma de la Barrera, J L; Leardini, A

    2007-08-01

    Abnormal patellar tracking results in patello-femoral (PF) joint disorders and frequently in failure of total knee arthroplasty (TKA). It is fundamental to assess this tracking intra-operatively, i.e. since the implantation of the femoral and tibial components. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of three-dimensional anatomical-based patellar tracking intra-operatively in standard TKA. A surgical navigation system was utilized to test the new technique in-vitro. An original tracking device and a reference frame were designed and an articular convention for the description of PF joint kinematics was adopted. Six fresh-frozen amputated legs were analyzed with the new technique. Landmark digitations were used to define anatomical reference frames for the femur, tibia, and patella. Five trials of passive flexion were performed with 100 N force on the quadriceps, before and after standard knee arthroplasty. Patellar flexion, tilt, rotation and shift were calculated in addition to standard tibio-femoral (TF) joint kinematics. An intra-specimen repeatable path of motion over repetitions and a coupled path of motion throughout the flexion-extension cycle were observed in all intact knees, both at the TF and PF joints. Replication of the original PF motion in the intact knee was not fully accomplished in the replaced knee. These results revealed the feasibility and the necessity of patellar tracking during TKA. By monitoring intra-operatively also the PF kinematics, the surgeon has a more complete prediction of the performance of the final implant and therefore a valuable support for the most critical surgical decisions.

  11. Advanced concepts in knee arthrodesis

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Jennifer H; Conway, Janet D

    2015-01-01

    The aim is to describe advanced strategies that can be used to diagnose and treat complications after knee arthrodesis and to describe temporary knee arthrodesis to treat infected knee arthroplasty. Potential difficult complications include nonunited knee arthrodesis, limb length discrepancy after knee arthrodesis, and united but infected knee arthrodesis. If a nonunited knee arthrodesis shows evidence of implant loosening or failure, then bone grafting the nonunion site as well as exchange intramedullary nailing and/or supplemental plate fixation are recommended. If symptomatic limb length discrepancy cannot be satisfactorily treated with a shoe lift, then the patient should undergo tibial lengthening over nail with a monolateral fixator or exchange nailing with a femoral internal lengthening device. If a united knee arthrodesis is infected, the nail must be removed. Then the surgeon has the option of replacing it with a long, antibiotic cement-coated nail. The authors also describe temporary knee arthrodesis for infected knee arthroplasty in patients who have the potential to undergo insertion of a new implant. The procedure has two goals: eradication of infection and stabilization of the knee. A temporary knee fusion can be accomplished by inserting both an antibiotic cement-coated knee fusion nail and a static antibiotic cement-coated spacer. These advanced techniques can be helpful when treating difficult complications after knee arthrodesis and treating cases of infected knee arthroplasty. PMID:25793160

  12. Neuromuscular disorders associated with static lumbar flexion: a feline model.

    PubMed

    Solomonow, M; Zhou, B; Baratta, R V; Zhu, M; Lu, Y

    2002-04-01

    Static flexion of the lumbar spine with constant load applied to the viscoelastic structures for 20 minutes and for 50 minutes resulted in development of spasms and inhibition in the multifidus muscles (e.g., deep erector spinae) and in creep of the supraspinous ligament in the feline model. The development of spasms and inhibition was not dependent on load magnitude. It is suggested that occupational and sports activities which require prolonged static lumbar flexion within the physiological range can cause a "sprain"-like injury to the ligaments, which in turn reflexively induce spasms and inhibition in some erector spinae muscles. Such disorder may take a long time to recover, in the order of days to weeks, depending on the level of creep developed in the tissues.

  13. Impact response and biomechanical analysis of the knee-thigh-hip complex in frontal impacts with a full human body finite element model.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Jesse S; El-Jawahri, Raed; Barbat, Saeed; Rouhana, Stephen W; Prasad, Priya

    2008-11-01

    Changes in vehicle safety design technology and the increasing use of seat-belts and airbag restraint systems have gradually changed the relative proportion of lower extremity injuries. These changes in real world injuries have renewed interest and the need of further investigation into occupant injury mechanisms and biomechanical impact responses of the knee-thigh-hip complex during frontal impacts. This study uses a detailed finite element model of the human body to simulate occupant knee impacts experienced in frontal crashes. The human body model includes detailed anatomical features of the head, neck, shoulder, chest, thoracic and lumbar spine, abdomen, pelvis, and lower and upper extremities. The material properties used in the model for each anatomic part of the human body were obtained from test data reported in the literature. The human body model used in the current study has been previously validated in frontal and side impacts. It was further validated with cadaver knee-thigh-hip impact tests in the current study. The effects of impactor configuration and flexion angle of the knee on biomechanical impact responses of the knee-thigh-hip complex were studied using the validated human body finite element model. This study showed that the knee flexion angle and the impact direction and shape of the impactors affected the injury outcomes of the knee-thigh-hip complex significantly. The 60 degrees flexed knee impact showed the least impact force, knee pressure, femoral von Mises stress, and pelvic von Mises stress but largest relative displacements of the Posterior Cruciate Ligament (PCL) and Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL). The 90 degrees flexed knee impact resulted in a higher impact force, knee pressure, femoral von Mises stress, and pelvic von Mises stress; but smaller PCL and ACL displacements. Stress distributions of the patella, femur, and pelvis were also given for all the simulated conditions.

  14. Bilateral custom-fit total knee arthroplasty in a patient with poliomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Tardy, Nicolas; Chambat, Pierre; Murphy, Colin G; Fayard, Jean-Marie

    2014-09-01

    In limbs affected by poliomyelitis, total knee arthroplasty results in satisfactory pain relief. However, the risk of failure is high, especially if the preoperative quadriceps power is low. Therefore, treating osteoarthritis in the current patient represented a challenging procedure. A 66-year-old man presented with tricompartmental osteoarthritis of both knees, with valgus deformity of 14° on the left knee and 11° on the right knee. He walked with a bilateral knee recurvatum of 30° and a grade 1 quadriceps power. The authors treated both knees with cemented custom-fit hinged total knee arthroplasty with 30° of recurvatum in the tibial keel. Clinical scores showed good results 1 year postoperatively, especially on the subjective data of quality of life and function. At follow-up, radiographs showed good total knee arthroplasty positioning on the right side and a small mechanical loosening at the end of the tibial keel on the left side. Only 5 studies (Patterson and Insall; Moran; Giori and Lewallen; Jordan et al; and Tigani et al) have reported total knee arthroplasty results in patients with poliomyelitis. This study reports an original case of bilateral custom-fit hinged total knee arthroplasty in a patient with poliomyelitis. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of this type of procedure in the literature. The key point is the degree of recurvatum that is needed to allow walking, avoiding excessive constraints on the implants that can lead to early mechanical failure.

  15. Lumbopelvic flexibility modulates neuromuscular responses during trunk flexion-extension.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Zuriaga, Daniel; Artacho-Pérez, Carla; Biviá-Roig, Gemma

    2016-06-01

    Various stimuli such as the flexibility of lumbopelvic structures influence the neuromuscular responses of the trunk musculature, leading to different load sharing strategies and reflex muscle responses from the afferents of lumbopelvic mechanoreceptors. This link between flexibility and neuromuscular response has been poorly studied. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between lumbopelvic flexibility and neuromuscular responses of the erector spinae, hamstring and abdominal muscles during trunk flexion-extension. Lumbopelvic movement patterns were measured in 29 healthy women, who were separated into two groups according to their flexibility during trunk flexion-extension. The electromyographic responses of erector spinae, rectus abdominis and biceps femoris were also recorded. Subjects with greater lumbar flexibility had significantly less pelvic flexibility and vice versa. Subjects with greater pelvic flexibility had a higher rate of relaxation and lower levels of hamstring activation during maximal trunk flexion. The neuromuscular response patterns of the hamstrings seem partially modulated by pelvic flexibility. Not so with the lumbar erector spinae and lumbar flexibility, despite the assertions of some previous studies. The results of this study improve our knowledge of the relationships between trunk joint flexibility and neuromuscular responses, a relationship which may play a role in low back pain.

  16. Weak gravitational shear and flexion with polar shapelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Richard; Rowe, Barnaby; Refregier, Alexandre; Bacon, David J.; Bergé, Joel

    2007-09-01

    We derive expressions, in terms of `polar shapelets', for the image distortion operations associated with weak gravitational lensing. Shear causes galaxy shapes to become elongated, and is sensitive to the second derivative of the projected gravitational potential along their line of sight; flexion bends galaxy shapes into arcs, and is sensitive to the third derivative. Polar shapelets provide a natural representation, in which both shear and flexion transformations are compact. Through this tool, we understand progress in several weak lensing methods. We then exploit various symmetries of shapelets to construct a range of shear estimators with useful properties. Through an analogous investigation, we also explore several flexion estimators. In particular, some of the estimators can be measured simultaneously and independently for every galaxy, and will provide unique checks for systematics in future weak lensing analyses. Using simulated images from the Shear TEsting Programme, we show that we can recover input shears with no significant bias. A complete software package to parametrize astronomical images in terms of polar shapelets, and to perform a full weak lensing analysis, is available on the Internet.

  17. Knee Conditioning Program

    MedlinePlus

    ... muscles help your knee joint absorb shock. Flexibility: Stretching the muscles that you strengthen is important for restoring range of motion and preventing injury. Gently stretching after strengthening exercises can help reduce muscle soreness ...

  18. Anterior knee pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... places extra stress on the kneecap (such as running, jumping or twisting, skiing, or playing soccer). You ... noticeable with: Deep knee bends Going down stairs Running downhill Standing up after sitting for awhile

  19. Prosthetic Knee Systems

    MedlinePlus

    ... must give support when people stand, allow smooth motion when people walk, and permit movement when people ... of knees and their options for stability and motion control would work best for them. There are ...

  20. Knee microfracture surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... WM, Griesser MJ, Parker RD. Patellofemoral pain. In: Miller MD, Thompson SR, eds. DeLee and Drez's Orthopaedic ... ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 105. Miller RH, Azar FM. Knee injuries. In: Canale ST, ...

  1. Runners knee (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... forces on the knee, such as a misaligned patella. Chondromalacia is treated with rest or immobilization and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for pain. Physical therapy, especially ... alignment of the patella that cannot be corrected with therapy.

  2. Arthroscopic-assisted Arthrodesis of the Knee Joint With the Ilizarov Technique: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Waszczykowski, Michal; Niedzielski, Kryspin; Radek, Maciej; Fabis, Jaroslaw

    2016-01-01

    Arthrodesis of the knee joint is a mainly a salvage surgical procedure performed in cases of infected total knee arthroplasty, tumor, failed knee arthroplasty or posttraumatic complication.The authors report the case of 18-year-old male with posttraumatic complication of left knee because of motorbike accident 1 year before. He was treated immediately after the injury in the local Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology. The examination in the day of admission to our department revealed deformation of the left knee, massive scar tissue adhesions to the proximal tibial bone and multidirectional instability of the knee. The plain radiographs showed complete lack of lateral compartment of the knee joint and patella. The patient complained of severe instability and pain of the knee and a consecutive loss of supporting function of his left limb. The authors decided to perform an arthroscopic-assisted fusion of the knee with Ilizarov external fixator because of massive scar tissue in the knee region and the prior knee infection.In the final follow-up after 54 months a complete bone fusion, good functional and clinical outcome were obtained.This case provides a significant contribution to the development and application of low-invasive techniques in large and extensive surgical procedures in orthopedics and traumatology. Moreover, in this case fixation of knee joint was crucial for providing good conditions for the regeneration of damaged peroneal nerve.

  3. Automatic bone segmentation and alignment from MR knee images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Liang; Zach, Christopher; Styner, Martin; Charles, Cecil; Niethammer, Marc

    2010-03-01

    Automatic image analysis of magnetic resonance (MR) images of the knee is simplified by bringing the knee into a reference position. While the knee is typically put into a reference position during image acquisition, this alignment will generally not be perfect. To correct for imperfections, we propose a two-step process of bone segmentation followed by elastic tissue deformation. The approach makes use of a fully-automatic segmentation of femur and tibia from T1 and T2* images. The segmentation algorithm is based on a continuous convex optimization problem, incorporating regional, and shape information. The regional terms are included from a probabilistic viewpoint, which readily allows the inclusion of shape information. Segmentation of the outer boundary of the cortical bone is encouraged by adding simple appearance-based information to the optimization problem. The resulting segmentation without the shape alignment step is globally optimal. Standard registration is problematic for knee alignment due to the distinct physical properties of the tissues constituting the knee (bone, muscle, etc.). We therefore develop an alternative alignment approach based on a simple elastic deformation model combined with strict enforcement of similarity transforms for femur and tibia based on the obtained segmentations.

  4. Dashboard (in the) Knee

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, AA; Green, TP

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a 19-year-old individual presenting to an orthopaedic outpatient clinic several months following a dashboard knee injury during a road traffic accident with intermittent mechanical symptoms. Despite unremarkable examination findings and normal magnetic resonance imaging, the patient was identified subsequently as having an intra-articular plastic foreign body consistent with a piece of dashboard on arthroscopic knee assessment, the retrieval of which resulted in a complete resolution of symptoms. PMID:25723676

  5. Loading Patterns of the Posterior Cruciate Ligament in the Healthy Knee: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    List, Renate; Oberhofer, Katja; Fucentese, Sandro F.; Snedeker, Jess G.; Taylor, William R.

    2016-01-01

    Background The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is the strongest ligament of the knee, serving as one of the major passive stabilizers of the tibio-femoral joint. However, despite a number of experimental and modelling approaches to understand the kinematics and kinetics of the ligament, the normal loading conditions of the PCL and its functional bundles are still controversially discussed. Objectives This study aimed to generate science-based evidence for understanding the functional loading of the PCL, including the anterolateral and posteromedial bundles, in the healthy knee joint through systematic review and statistical analysis of the literature. Data sources MEDLINE, EMBASE and CENTRAL Eligibility criteria for selecting studies Databases were searched for articles containing any numerical strain or force data on the healthy PCL and its functional bundles. Studied activities were as follows: passive flexion, flexion under 100N and 134N posterior tibial load, walking, stair ascent and descent, body-weight squatting and forward lunge. Method Statistical analysis was performed on the reported load data, which was weighted according to the number of knees tested to extract average strain and force trends of the PCL and identify deviations from the norms. Results From the 3577 articles retrieved by the initial electronic search, only 66 met all inclusion criteria. The results obtained by aggregating data reported in the eligible studies indicate that the loading patterns of the PCL vary with activity type, knee flexion angle, but importantly also the technique used for assessment. Moreover, different fibres of the PCL exhibit different strain patterns during knee flexion, with higher strain magnitudes reported in the anterolateral bundle. While during passive flexion the posteromedial bundle is either lax or very slightly elongated, it experiences higher strain levels during forward lunge and has a synergetic relationship with the anterolateral bundle. The strain

  6. Multi-Axis Prosthetic Knee Resembles Alpine Skiing Movements of an Intact Leg

    PubMed Central

    Demšar, Ivan; Duhovnik, Jože; Lešnik, Blaž; Supej, Matej

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to analyse the flexion angles of the ski boot, ankle and knee joints of an above-knee prosthesis and to compare them with an intact leg and a control group of skiers. One subject with an above-knee amputation of the right leg and eight healthy subjects simulated the movement of a skiing turn by performing two-leg squats in laboratory conditions. By adding additional loads in proportion to body weight (BW; +1/3 BW, +2/3 BW, +3/3 BW), various skiing regimes were simulated. Change of Flexion Angle (CoFA) and Range of Motion (RoM) in the ski boot, ankle and knee joints were calculated and compared. An average RoM in the skiing boot on the side of prosthesis (4.4 ± 1.1°) was significantly lower compared to an intact leg (5.9 ± 1.8°) and the control group (6.5 ± 2.3°). In the ankle joint, the average RoM was determined to be 13.2±2.9° in the prosthesis, 12.7 ± 2.8° in an intact leg and 14.8±3.6 in the control group. However, the RoM of the knee joint in the prosthesis (42.2 ± 4.2°) was significantly larger than that of the intact leg (34.7 ± 4.4°). The average RoM of the knee joint in the control group was 47.8 ± 5.4°. The influences of additional loads on the kinematics of the lower extremities were different on the side of the prosthesis and on the intact leg. In contrast, additional loads did not produce any significant differences in the control group. Although different CoFAs in the ski boot, ankle and knee joints were used, an above-knee prosthesis with a built-in multi-axis prosthetic knee enables comparable leg kinematics in simulated alpine skiing. Key points The RoM in the ski boot on the side of the prosthetic leg was smaller than the RoM of the intact leg and the control group of healthy subjects. The RoM in the ankle joint of prosthetic leg was comparable to that of the intact leg and the control group of healthy subjects. The RoM in the prosthetic knee joint was greater than the RoM in the knee joint of the

  7. Flexion contractures of fingers: contracture elimination with trapeze-flap plasty.

    PubMed

    Grishkevich, V M

    2011-02-01

    Scar flexion contracture of fingers is one of the most serious consequences of hand burns and patient disability after burn. Many kinds of reconstructive techniques are currently used and new procedures are being investigated. The author presents a new method of finger contracture reconstruction developed in the process of burn reconstructive operations on hands of over a thousand patients. Finger flexion contractures are caused by a semilunar fold, both sheets of which are scars. The sheets have a surface deficiency in length, which causes a contracture, and excess of skin in width, which allows contracture elimination with local flaps. The length deficiency extends from the crest of the fold to the joint rotation axis and has a trapezoid form. To compensate for skin deficiency and to address the contracture, it is necessary to convert both fold sheets into trapezoid flaps by radial incisions. Because the fold is of semilunar (crescent) shape, the flaps accept a trapezoid form. One or several pairs of the flaps are mobilized with the split fat layer from the fold's crest to the joint rotation axis level. The oppositely transposed flaps fully or partially cover the wound in the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) zone first. The remaining smaller wounds are covered with full-thickness skin grafts. The flaps have a reliable blood circulation; partial flap loss is an exception. The flap's surface does not decrease, the skin grafts shrink insufficiently, and the distant results, as a rule, are good. Two hundred and seventy-five patients were operated upon. Scar contractures were satisfactorily addressed in all patients. Incomplete extension was found in 46 patients; this was caused by interphalangeal joint injuries (ligaments, capsule, cartilage), ankylosis or boutonniere deformity.

  8. Individuals with Isolated Patellofemoral Joint Osteoarthritis Exhibit Higher Mechanical Loading at the Knee during the Second Half of the Gait Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Hsiang-Ling; MacLeod, Toran D.; Kumar, Deepak; Link, Thomas M; Majumdar, Sharmila; Souza, Richard B

    2015-01-01

    Background Patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis is a highly prevalent condition and an important source of pain and disability. Nonetheless, biomechanical risk factors associated with patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to compare biomechanical factors that are associated with patellofemoral joint loading during walking between individuals with isolated patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis and no osteoarthritis. Methods MR images of the knee were obtained using a 3D fast-spin echo sequence to identify patellofemoral joint cartilage lesions (patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis group). Thirty-five subjects with isolated patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis (29 females) and 35 control subjects (21 females) walked at a self-selected speed and as fast as possible. Peak knee flexion moment, flexion moment impulse and peak patellofemoral joint stress during the first and second halves of the stance phase were compared between groups. Findings When compared to the controls, individuals with patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis demonstrated significantly higher peak knee flexion moment (P =.03, Eta2 =.07), higher knee flexion moment impulse (P =.03, Eta2 =.07) and higher peak patellofemoral joint stress (P =.01, Eta2 =.10) during the second half of the stance phase. No significant group difference was observed during the first half of the stance phase. Interpretation Findings of this study suggest that increased mechanical loading (i.e. knee flexion moment, impulse and patellofemoral joint stress) during the second half of the stance phase is associated with patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis. Prevention and rehabilitation programs for patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis may focus on reducing the loading on the patellofemoral joint, specifically during late stance. PMID:25726158