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Sample records for flexor tendon graft

  1. Ulnar Nerve Injury after Flexor Tendon Grafting.

    PubMed

    McCleave, Michael John

    2016-10-01

    A 43-year-old female is presented who underwent a two-stage tendon reconstruction and developed a low ulnar nerve palsy postoperatively. Exploration found that the tendon graft was passing through Guyon's canal and that the ulnar nerve was divided. This is a previously unreported complication. The reconstruction is discussed, the literature reviewed and a guide is given on how to identify the correct tissue plane when passing a tendon rod. PMID:27595967

  2. Single-Stage Flexor Tendon Grafting: Refining the Steps.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Derek R; McClinton, Michael A

    2015-07-01

    Single-stage tendon grafting for reconstruction of zone I and II flexor tendon injuries is a challenging procedure in hand surgery. Careful patient selection, strict indications, and adherence to sound surgical principles are mandatory for return of digital motion. PMID:26026357

  3. Reconstruction of Attritional Rupture of Flexor Tendons with Fascia Lata Graft Following Distal Radius Fracture Malunion.

    PubMed

    Bhat, A K; Acharya, A M; Soni, N

    2016-10-01

    Incidence of multiple flexor tendon rupture following distal radius fractures is rare with very few cases being reported in literature. We present an unusual case of a patient who had come to us with complaints of weakness and paresthesia of the right hand of one month prior and with a past history of dorsal plating for distal radius fracture nine years ago. Radiographs showed a distal radius fracture malunion with intact dorsal plate and protrusion of screws through the volar cortex. On exploration, attritional ruptures of all digital flexors were found with sparing of the Flexor Pollicis Longus tendon. The fibrous mass was excised and flexors reconstructed with a fascia lata graft. Attempt was made to correct the malunion with radial and ulnar osteotomies. At one year the patient had excellent restoration of digital flexion. PMID:27595963

  4. Reconstruction of chronic patellar tendon rupture using graft from contralateral patella graft together with reinforcement from flexor tendons. Case report.

    PubMed

    Frois Temponi, Eduardo; de Carvalho, Lúcio Honório; da Silva Bernardes, Cláudio Otávio; Presses Teixeira, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Chronic patellar tendon rupture is a rare disabling injury that is technically difficult to repair. The true prevalence of this injury is unknown. Delayed reconstruction of chronic patellar tendon rupture has yielded suboptimal clinical and functional results. Many different surgical methods for reconstruction of chronic patellar tendon injury have been reported. In this report, we present a case with chronic patellar tendon injury that was addressed using a technique that had not previously been described in the literature, through combining procedures that had been described separately. The reconstruction method presented in this article has the advantages of being easy and reproducible, without a requirement of allografts.

  5. Active tendon implants in flexor tendon reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hunter, J M; Singer, D I; Jaeger, S H; Mackin, E J

    1988-11-01

    Forty-five active flexor tendon implants were evaluated after placement in scarred tendon beds of digits II through V. The implant is constructed of silicone rubber with a Dacron core, terminating in a loop proximally and a metal plate distally. Modification of the implant during the period of study has improved its reliability and longevity. The improvement in total active motion (TAM) averaged 72 degrees during implant functioning (stage I) in a group of digits that before operation were classified as 78% Boyes grade 5 (salvage). Complication rate during stage I was 11% (5 out of 45). Of the 27 digits evaluated after implant replacement by tendon autograft (stage II), there was an overall improvement in 62 degrees total active motion with 70% of digits being Boyes grade 5. Many of the complications were believed to be avoidable with experience. This study demonstrates the feasibility of an active tendon implant and the possibility of a permanent prosthesis. PMID:2976074

  6. Closed rupture of the flexor tendons caused by carpal bone and joint disorders.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, H; Kato, H; Hata, Y; Nakatsuchi, Y; Tsuchikane, A

    2007-12-01

    We analysed 21 patients with closed rupture of the flexor tendons caused by carpal bone and joint disorders. The tendon that ruptured depended on the location of the bone perforation into the carpal tunnel. Radiocarpal arthrography was performed in 13 patients and capsular perforation was demonstrated by contrast medium leakage into the carpal canal in 11 patients. This proved a useful diagnostic test. The flexor tendon(s) were reconstructed with free tendon graft in 17 patients, cross-over transfer of flexor tendons from adjacent digits in two and buddying to an adjacent flexor tendon in one patient. Postoperative total active range of motion in the fingers after 13 free tendon graft reconstructions averaged 213 degrees (range 170-265 degrees ). The active range of motion of the thumb-interphalangeal joint after free tendon graft reconstruction in three cases improved from 0 degrees to 33 degrees on average (range 10 degrees -40 degrees ).

  7. Preparation and characterization of antiadhesion barrier film from hyaluronic acid-grafted electrospun poly(caprolactone) nanofibrous membranes for prevention of flexor tendon postoperative peritendinous adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shih-Hsien; Chen, Chih-Hao; Shalumon, K T; Chen, Jyh-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Peritendinous adhesion is one of the common complications encountered after tendon injury and subsequent surgery, and it can be minimized by introducing a physical barrier between the injured site and the surrounding tissue. An electrospun hyaluronic acid-grafted poly(caprolactone) (PCL-g-HA) nanofibrous membrane (NFM) is proposed as an alternative to current antiadhesion barrier films. HA is covalently grafted to surface-aminolyzed PCL nanofibers, using carbodiimide as the coupling agent. Pristine PCL and PCL-g-HA NFMs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and mechanical testing. In vitro cell culture with fibroblasts showed that PCL-g-HA NFMs reduced cellular adhesion on the membrane surface while maintaining cell proliferation. Animal experiments using a rabbit flexor digitorum profundus tendon model confirmed the efficacy of PCL-g-HA in reducing peritendinous adhesion, based on gross observation, histology, joint flexion-angle measurements, gliding tests, and biomechanical evaluation. PMID:25187711

  8. Nutrient pathways of flexor tendons in primates

    SciTech Connect

    Manske, P.R.; Lesker, P.A.

    1982-09-01

    The perfusion and diffusion pathways to the flexor profundus tendons of 40 monkeys were investigated by measuring the uptake of tritiated proline by various tendon segments. In the absence of all vascular connections, the process of diffusion provides nutrients to all areas of flexor tendon and in this study the process of diffusion was greater. The distal segment of tendon was observed to be profused most rapidly. The proximal tendon segment is perfused from both the muscular-tendinous junction and the vinculum longus; vincular segment perfusion is via the vinculum longus vessels alone; central segment perfusion is shared by the vinculum longus and vinculum brevis vasculature. The distal segment uptake is by both the process of diffusion or vinculum brevis perfusion. The osseous attachment at the distal phalanx contributes little to tendon nutrition.

  9. IFSSH Flexor Tendon Committee report 2014: from the IFSSH Flexor Tendon Committee (Chairman: Jin Bo Tang).

    PubMed

    Tang, Jin Bo; Chang, James; Elliot, David; Lalonde, Donald H; Sandow, Michael; Vögelin, Esther

    2014-01-01

    Hand surgeons continue to search for the best surgical flexor tendon repair and treatment of the tendon sheaths and pulleys, and they are attempting to establish postoperative regimens that fit diverse clinical needs. It is the purpose of this report to present the current views, methods, and suggestions of six senior hand surgeons from six different countries - all experienced in tendon repair and reconstruction. Although certainly there is common ground, the report presents provocative views and approaches. The report reflects an update in the views of the committee. We hope that it is helpful to surgeons and therapists in treating flexor tendon injuries. PMID:23962872

  10. Traumatic simultaneous rupture of both flexor tendons in a finger of an athlete.

    PubMed

    Tan, Virak; Mundanthanam, George; Weiland, Andrew J

    2005-10-01

    We report a case of traumatic simultaneous disruption of both finger flexor tendons in a professional athlete. The novelties in this report are (1) the location of the rupture (FDS at midsubstance and FDP at insertion) and (2) the proposition that a normal but diminutive FDS tendon is a contributing factor in the rupture. We recommend that simultaneous rupture of the normal flexor tendons be treated in a similar manner as tendon lacerations. Primary repair, if possible, is the treatment of choice in these acute injuries. Tendon grafting should be reserved for subacute or chronic cases in which restoration of active finger flexion is needed.

  11. Tendon ruptures: mallet, flexor digitorum profundus.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Peter C; Shin, Steven S

    2012-08-01

    Mallet injuries are the most common closed tendon injury in the athlete. Flexor digitorum profundus ruptures are rare in baseball, but are common injuries in contact sports. The diagnosis for each condition is based on clinical examination, although radiographs should be evaluated for a possible bony component. Treatment for mallet injury depends on the athlete's goals of competition and understanding of the consequences of any treatment chosen. Gripping, throwing, and catching would be restricted or impossible with the injured finger immobilized. Treatment of FDP ruptures is almost always surgical and requires reattachment of the torn tendon to the distal phalanx.

  12. Murine Flexor Tendon Injury and Repair Surgery.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Jessica E; Loiselle, Alayna E

    2016-01-01

    Tendon connects skeletal muscle and bone, facilitating movement of nearly the entire body. In the hand, flexor tendons (FTs) enable flexion of the fingers and general hand function. Injuries to the FTs are common, and satisfactory healing is often impaired due to excess scar tissue and adhesions between the tendon and surrounding tissue. However, little is known about the molecular and cellular components of FT repair. To that end, a murine model of FT repair that recapitulates many aspects of healing in humans, including impaired range of motion and decreased mechanical properties, has been developed and previously described. Here an in-depth demonstration of this surgical procedure is provided, involving transection and subsequent repair of the flexor digitorum longus (FDL) tendon in the murine hind paw. This technique can be used to conduct lineage analysis of different cell types, assess the effects of gene gain or loss-of-function, and to test the efficacy of pharmacological interventions in the healing process. However, there are two primary limitations to this model: i) the FDL tendon in the mid-portion of the murine hind paw, where the transection and repair occur, is not surrounded by a synovial sheath. Therefore this model does not account for the potential contribution of the sheath to the scar formation process. ii) To protect the integrity of the repair site, the FT is released at the myotendinous junction, decreasing the mechanical forces of the tendon, likely contributing to increased scar formation. Isolation of sufficient cells from the granulation tissue of the FT during the healing process for flow cytometric analysis has proved challenging; cytology centrifugation to concentrate these cells is an alternate method used, and allows for generation of cell preparations on which immunofluorescent labeling can be performed. With this method, quantification of cells or proteins of interest during FT healing becomes possible. PMID:27684281

  13. Effects of lubricant and autologous bone marrow stromal cell augmentation on immobilized flexor tendon repairs.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunfeng; Ozasa, Yasuhiro; Shimura, Haruhiko; Reisdorf, Ramona L; Thoreson, Andrew R; Jay, Gregory; Moran, Steven L; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to test a novel treatment that carbodiimide-derivatized-hyaluronic acid-lubricin (cd-HA-lubricin) combined cell-based therapy in an immobilized flexor tendon repair in a canine model. Seventy-eight flexor tendons from 39 dogs were transected. One tendon was treated with cd-HA-lubricin plus an interpositional graft of 8 × 10(5) BMSCs and GDF-5. The other tendon was repaired without treatment. After 21 day of immobilization, 19 dogs were sacrificed; the remaining 20 dogs underwent a 21-day rehabilitation protocol before euthanasia. The work of flexion, tendon gliding resistance, and adhesion score in treated tendons were significantly less than the untreated tendons (p < 0.05). The failure strength of the untreated tendons was higher than the treated tendons at 21 and 42 days (p < 0.05). However, there is no significant difference in stiffness between two groups at day 42. Histologic analysis of treated tendons showed a smooth surface and viable transplanted cells 42 days after the repair, whereas untreated tendons showed severe adhesion formation around the repair site. The combination of lubricant and cell treatment resulted in significantly improved digit function, reduced adhesion formation. This novel treatment can address the unmet needs of patients who are unable to commence an early mobilization protocol after flexor tendon repair. PMID:26177854

  14. The role of carbon fibre as a flexor tendon substitute.

    PubMed

    Rawlins, R

    1983-06-01

    Experiments have been carried out on Rhesus monkeys to determine the effectiveness of carbon fibre as a flexor tendon substitute. Though the strength, flexibility and capacity to induce a neotendon make carbon fibre an ideal flexor tendon substitute, induction of fibrosis and accompanying increase in bulk of the implant resulted in failure.

  15. Resurfacing with Chemically Modified Hyaluronic Acid and Lubricin for Flexor Tendon Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chunfeng; Hashimoto, Takahiro; Kirk, Ramona L.; Thoreson, Andrew R.; Jay, Gregory D.; Moran, Steven L.; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C.

    2013-01-01

    We assessed surface coating with carbodiimide derivatized hyaluronic acid combined with lubricin (cd-HA-Lubricin) as a way to improve extrasynovial tendon surface quality and, consequently, the functional results in flexor tendon reconstruction, using a canine in vivo model. The second and fifth flexor digitorum profundus tendons from 14 dogs were reconstructed with autologs peroneus longus (PL) tendons 6 weeks after a failed primary repair. One digit was treated with cd-HA-Lubricin, and the other was treated with saline as the control. Six weeks following grafting, the digits and graft tendons were functionally and histologically evaluated. Adhesion score, normalized work of flexion, graft friction in zone II, and adhesion breaking strength at the proximal repair site in zone III were all lower in the cd-HA-Lubricin treated group compared to the control group. The strength at the distal tendon/bone interface was decreased in the cd-HA-Lubricin treated grafts compared to the control grafts. Histology showed inferior healing in the cd-HA-Lubricin group at both proximal and distal repair sites. However, cd-HA-Lubricin treatment did not result in any gap or rupture at either the proximal or distal repair sites. These results demonstrate that cd-HA-Lubricin can eliminate graft adhesions and improve digit function, but that treatment may have an adverse effect on tendon healing. PMID:23335124

  16. Resurfacing with chemically modified hyaluronic acid and lubricin for flexor tendon reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunfeng; Hashimoto, Takahiro; Kirk, Ramona L; Thoreson, Andrew R; Jay, Gregory D; Moran, Steven L; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C

    2013-06-01

    We assessed surface coating with carbodiimide derivatized hyaluronic acid combined with lubricin (cd-HA-Lubricin) as a way to improve extrasynovial tendon surface quality and, consequently, the functional results in flexor tendon reconstruction, using a canine in vivo model. The second and fifth flexor digitorum profundus tendons from 14 dogs were reconstructed with autologs peroneus longus (PL) tendons 6 weeks after a failed primary repair. One digit was treated with cd-HA-Lubricin, and the other was treated with saline as the control. Six weeks following grafting, the digits and graft tendons were functionally and histologically evaluated. Adhesion score, normalized work of flexion, graft friction in zone II, and adhesion breaking strength at the proximal repair site in zone III were all lower in the cd-HA-Lubricin treated group compared to the control group. The strength at the distal tendon/bone interface was decreased in the cd-HA-Lubricin treated grafts compared to the control grafts. Histology showed inferior healing in the cd-HA-Lubricin group at both proximal and distal repair sites. However, cd-HA-Lubricin treatment did not result in any gap or rupture at either the proximal or distal repair sites. These results demonstrate that cd-HA-Lubricin can eliminate graft adhesions and improve digit function, but that treatment may have an adverse effect on tendon healing.

  17. Should we think about wrist extensor after flexor tendon repair?

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Aline M; Tanaka, Denise M; Barbosa, Rafael I; Marcolino, Alexandre M; Elui, Valeria MC; Mazzer, Nilton

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the activity of wrist extensor muscle, correlating with wrist motion during gripping after flexor tendon repair. Design: Cross-sectional clinical measurement study. Setting: Laboratory for biomechanics and rehabilitation. Subjects: A total of 11 patients submitted to rehabilitation by early passive motion of the fingers with wrist flexion position were evaluated after 8 weeks of fingers flexor tendon repair and 11 healthy volunteers, all ranging from 20 to 37 years of age. Intervention: Volunteers performed an isometric standardized gripping task. Main measures: We used electrogoniometry to analyze wrist range of motion and surface electromyography, considering 100% maximum voluntary contraction to represent the amplitude of electromyographic activity of the extensor carpi radialis and flexor digitorum superficialis. Results: Patients with flexor tendon repair showed co-activation deficit between wrist extensor (extensor carpi radialis) and flexor finger muscles (flexor digitorum superficialis) during gripping in the intermediate phase of rehabilitation, despite some recovering mobility for wrist extension (p ≤ 0.05). A moderate correlation between range of motion and extensor carpi radialis was present only for injured group (r = 0.32). Total active motion score, which represents finger active excursion, was regular or poor in 65% of cases, all with nerve repair associated. Conclusion: Wrist extensors have an important synergist role at handgrip, although some imbalance can be present after flexor tendon repair. These preliminary findings suggest that emphasis could be directed to add synergistic wrist motion in rehabilitation protocols after flexor tendon repair. Future studies with early active rehabilitation are necessary. PMID:26770674

  18. Effect of flexor sheath integrity on nutrient uptake by chicken flexor tendons

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, W.W.; Manske, P.R.; Lesker, P.A.

    1985-12-01

    The effect of varying degrees of flexor sheath integrity (sheath excised, incised, or incised and repaired) on the uptake of /sub 2/H-proline by chicken flexor tendons in Zone II was studied. The tendons were either: normal and uninjured, lacerated and repaired, or uninjured except for vinculum longum ligation. Different degrees of sheath integrity did not influence the uptake of /sub 2/H-proline by the tendons. The tendon does not appear to be dependent on a synovial environment for nutrients and is capable of obtaining these nutrients by diffusion from the surrounding extracellular tissue fluid. Diffusion is the primary nutrient pathway to the flexor tendon in this area, because removing its major vascular attachment (i.e., the vinculum longum) did not effect proline uptake. Careful closure of the sheath with restoration of a synovial environment does not appear to be necessary for tendon nutrition.

  19. Effect of pulley excision on flexor tendon biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Peterson, W W; Manske, P R; Bollinger, B A; Lesker, P A; McCarthy, J A

    1986-01-01

    Flexor tendon function following excision of various portions of the fibro-osseous pulley system was measured biomechanically using a tensile testing machine. The biomechanical parameters measured were tendon excursion (the excursion of the tendon required to fully flex the digit) and work of flexion (the area under the force-excursion curve, representing all the forces that resist tendon flexion). In this experiment, work of flexion included the forces necessary to accomplish full digital flexion against a 15-g counter-weight, as well as the frictional forces that resist tendon gliding. The results indicate that the work of flexion was affected to a greater degree by pulley loss than was tendon excursion, suggesting that it is a more sensitive measurement of tendon function. A2 was found to be the single most important pulley for flexor tendon function, followed by A4. However, both A2 and A4 had to be present if near-normal hand function was to be achieved; sacrificing the A1 pulley was not associated with a significant loss of flexion. The "pulley effect" of the skin and soft tissue as a supplement to the fibro-osseous pulleys in reducing tendon bow-stringing was also noted. Although the parameters of tendon excursion and work of flexion were used in this study to determine the effect of pulley loss on tendon function, they can also be used to evaluate other flexor tendon studies, such as pulley reconstruction.

  20. Staged tendon grafts and soft tissue coverage

    PubMed Central

    Elliot, David

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the two-staged flexor tendon method is to improve the predictability of final results in difficult problems dealing with tendon reconstruction. This article reviews the evolution and benefits of this procedure. It also considers the use of the technique to help deal with problems requiring pulley and skin reconstruction simultaneously with re-constituting the flexor tendon system. PMID:22022043

  1. Quantification of regional blood flow to canine flexor tendons

    SciTech Connect

    Weidman, K.A.; Simonet, W.T.; Wood, M.B.; Cooney, W.P.; Ilstrup, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    Although the blood supply and the microcirculation of flexor tendons have been studied and defined extensively using qualitative methods, the quantitative assessment of blood flow has been lacking because of the limitations of the available experimental techniques. The authors studied the regional blood supply to the flexor tendons of dogs by the technique of radionuclide-labeled microspheres. Seven adult mongrel dogs were used. Microsphere injection and tissue-counting techniques previously used for other tissues were applied. Samples of proximal, isthmus, and distal portions of the profundus and superficialis flexor tendons were harvested from each digital unit of available limbs from each dog. Mean (+/- SE) flows (ml/100 g dry tissue/min) were proximal profundus 1.78 +/- 0.60 and superficialis 7.10 +/- 1.50. The differences were significant. The study suggests that regional variation in blood flow to canine digital flexor tendons exists, so that a single value for blood flow to these tendons is not relevant. Furthermore, the study supports the concept of dual (vascular and synovial) nutrition to the digital flexor tendons in dogs. These observations may have implications regarding tendon repair techniques.

  2. Flexor carpi radialis tendon ultrasound pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Luong, Dien Hung; Smith, Jay; Bianchi, Stefano

    2014-06-01

    Disorders of the flexor carpi radialis tendon (FCRt) are often missed even though they are a relatively frequent cause of volar radial wrist pain. They can manifest as tenosynovitis, tendinopathy, synovial sheath cysts with or without scaphoid-trapezoid-trapezium (STT) joint pathology, and partial or complete rupture. Because FCRt disorders often present with non-specific symptoms and a non-diagnostic clinical examination, imaging is often necessary for accurate evaluation and therapeutic planning. Conventional radiography provides good visualization of the neighboring bones and joints, as well as rare intratendinous calcifications. MRI enables evaluation of the FCRt and adjacent anatomical structures with excellent tissue resolution. In comparison, ultrasound (US) evaluation of the FCRt is less commonly described in the radiology literature, despite its affordability, exquisite soft tissue resolution, and the advantages of quick, dynamic diagnostic imaging. This pictorial essay describes and demonstrates the normal anatomy of the FCRt, its US examination technique and normal US appearance, and US findings of clinically relevant FCRt disorders.

  3. Comparison of modified Kessler tendon suture at different levels in the human flexor digitorum profundus tendon and porcine flexors and porcine extensors: an experimental biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Havulinna, J; Leppänen, O V; Järvinen, T L N; Göransson, H

    2011-10-01

    This study compared the biomechanical behaviour of repairs in the human flexor digitorum profundus tendon in zones I, II and III with repairs of different segments of the porcine flexor tendon of the second digit and the extensor digiti quarti proprius tendon, in order to assess the validity of porcine tendons as models for human flexor tendon repairs. These porcine tendons were selected after comparing their size with the human flexor digitorum profundus tendon. The tendon repairs were done in three segments of each porcine tendon and repairs in the human tendons were done in zones I,II and III. Ten tendons in each group yielded a total of 90 specimens. A modified Kessler repair was done with 3-0 coated braided polyester suture and subjected to uniaxial tensile testing. In human flexor tendons, the ultimate force was higher in zones I and II than in zone III. The porcine flexor digitorum profundus tendon from the second digit and the proximal segment of the extensor digiti quarti proprius tendon behaved similarly to the human flexor tendon in zone III and can be considered as surrogates for the human flexor tendon. PMID:21816887

  4. A histological study of macroscopically normal equine digital flexor tendons.

    PubMed

    Webbon, P M

    1978-10-01

    The normal appearance of the superficial (SFT) and deep (DFT) digital flexor tendons was described and the difference between their histological structures was emphasised. Further differences were recognised between different sites from the same tendon and between tendons in the fore and hind limbs of the same animal. Both of the tendons underwent changes with age but although a number of alterations in the histological appearance were described, a particular change, involving a patchy loss of stainable nuclei, was found at the common site of SFT injuries. While this appearance has been seen in injured tendons and described as tendon necrosis, the author warns that no cause and effect relationship has been established between the acellularity and the clinical lesions. Neither is it certain that the loss of tendon cells results in mechanical weakness of the tendon.

  5. Bioreactor optimization of tissue engineered rabbit flexor tendons in vivo.

    PubMed

    Thorfinn, J; Angelidis, I K; Gigliello, L; Pham, H M; Lindsey, D; Chang, J

    2012-02-01

    Tissue-engineered rabbit flexor tendons reseeded with cells are stronger in vitro after culture in a bioreactor. It is not known whether this effect persists in vivo. Tenocytes from New Zealand white rabbits were seeded onto rabbit rear paw flexor tendons that were deprived of cells and exposed to cyclic strain in a bioreactor. Reseeded constructs that were kept unloaded in a medium for 5 days were used as controls. The tendons were implanted to bridge a zone II defect in the rabbit. After explantation 4 weeks later, the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and elastic modulus (EM) were determined. Tendon constructs that were exposed to cyclic strain had significantly improved UTS and EM. Histology showed that cellularity was increased in the bioreactor tendons.

  6. A biomechanical study of pediatric flexor profundus tendon repair

    PubMed Central

    Al-Thunayan, Turki A.; Al-Zahrani, Mohammed T.; Hakeem, Ahmad A.; Al-Zahrani, Fahad M.; Al-Qattan, Mohammad M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the tensile strength of repaired flexor profundus tendons in young lambs, which would be equivalent to repairs in children older than 2 years of age. Methods: A comparative in-vitro experimental study conducted at King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from October 2014 to December 2015. We utilized 30 flexor profundus tendons of young lambs with a width of 4 mm. All tendons were repaired with a 4-strand repair technique using 4/0 polypropylene core sutures. In group I (n=10 tendons), 2 separate figure-of-eight sutures were applied. In group II (n=10 tendons), simple locking sutures were added to the corners of 2 separate figure-of-eight sutures. In group III (n=10 tendons), the locked cruciate repair was used. All tendon repairs were tested to single-cycle tensile failure. Results: There was no significant difference between groups II and III with regards to gap and breaking forces; and all forces of these 2 groups were significantly higher than the forces in group I. Conclusion: It was concluded that 4 mm-wide pediatric flexor tendons allow a 4-strand repair and the use of 4/0 sutures. The use of locking sutures increases the tensile strength to values that may allow protective mobilization in children. PMID:27570850

  7. Phaeohyphomycosis infection leading to flexor tendon rupture: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chahal, Jaskarndip; Dhotar, Herman S; Anastakis, Dimitri J

    2009-09-01

    A rare previously unreported cause of flexor tendon rupture is described. A 66-year-old man presented with a fully extended left middle finger, accompanied by swelling and purulent drainage. Prior to presentation, he had received a steroid injection for left middle finger stenosing tenosynovitis and subsequently developed culture-proven phaeohyphomycosis fungal infection and secondary enterococcal bacterial infection, requiring pharmacotherapy and incision, drainage, and debridement for abscess formation. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging findings were consistent with the diagnosis of closed flexor tendon rupture of the left middle finger. Antifungal and antibiotic therapy followed by two-stage flexor tendon reconstruction was performed. Six months postoperatively, full passive range of motion was achieved and the proximal interphalangeal and distal interphalangeal joints of the left middle finger actively flexed to 125 degrees and 90 degrees, respectively. PMID:19259746

  8. Flexor digitorum profundus tendon tension during finger manipulation.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Tatsuro; Amadio, Peter C; Zhao, Chunfeng; Zobitz, Mark E; An, Kai-Nan

    2005-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to measure the tension in the flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) tendon in zone II and the digit angle during joint manipulations that replicate rehabilitation protocols. Eight FDP tendons from eight human cadavers were used in this study. The dynamic tension in zone II of the tendon and metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint angle were measured in various wrist and digit positions. Tension in the FDP tendon increased with MCP joint extension. There was no tension with the finger fully flexed and wrist extended (synergistic motion), but the tendon force reached 1.77 +/- 0.43 N with the MCP joint hyperextended 45 degrees with the distal interphalangeal and proximal interphalangeal joints flexed. The combination of wrist extension and MCP joint hyperextension with the distal interphalangeal and proximal interphalangeal joints fully flexed, what the authors term "modified synergistic motion," produced a modest tendon tension and may be a useful alternative configuration to normal synergistic motion in tendon rehabilitation.

  9. Absence of the flexor digitorum longus tendon: an MRI study.

    PubMed

    Magra, Merzesh; Taqvi, Syed; Cooper, Robert; Blundell, Chris M; Davies, Mark B

    2012-11-01

    Flexor digitorum longus (FDL) is the primary flexor of the lateral four toes. It is a reliable source of tendon for transfer surgery. We present a case whereby a patient who required a reconstruction for adult acquired flatfoot deformity using FDL as a dynamic structure for transfer was found to have an absent FDL tendon at the time of operation, necessitating the use of flexor hallucis longus (FHL) instead. This unusual finding prompted us to investigate the frequency of absence of the FDL tendon. We reviewed our hospital MRI database of foot and ankle images specifically looking for patients with absence of this tendon. After randomization, 756 images were reviewed independently by two surgeons and a consultant musculoskeletal radiologist. No instances of an absent FDL tendon were identified. In conclusion, the frequency of absence of the FDL tendon is less than 1 in 750. Surgeons who require FDL for tendon transfer surgery need not image the foot preoperatively to anticipate the need for the use of FHL as an alternative. PMID:22334461

  10. Subcutaneous rupture of the flexor hallucis longus tendon: a case report.

    PubMed

    Noda, Daisuke; Yoshimura, Ichiro; Kanazawa, Kazuki; Hagio, Tomonobu; Naito, Masatoshi

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that rupture of the flexor hallucis longus tendon can be associated with open injuries and that closed rupture of the flexor hallucis longus tendon is rare. Tendon injuries of the foot can occur secondary to direct, indirect, or repetitive injury. Repetitive tendon injuries can cause tendinitis or stenosing tenosynovitis. Tendinitis is associated with internal tendon injury that can present with tendon thickening, mucinoid degeneration, nodule development, or in situ partial tears. Stenosing tenosynovitis is the development of tendon adhesions within the tendon sheath that interfere with tendon gliding, known as trigger toe. The flexor hallucis longus tendon is susceptible to injury along its entire course. A total of 35 cases of complete or partial closed ruptures of the flexor hallucis longus tendon have been reported. We present the case of complete subcutaneous rupture of the flexor hallucis longus tendon associated with trauma at the proximal phalangeal head. PMID:22153296

  11. Pediatric flexor tendon injuries: A 10-year outcome analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sikora, Sheena; Lai, Michelle; Arneja, Jugpal S

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Primary flexor tendon repair was first introduced in the 1960s. Since then, major advances in the understanding of flexor tendon anatomy and biology have led to improved outcomes following repair. Relative to the adult population, sparse knowledge exists as to which operative and postoperative treatments are most successful in children. This is due, in part, to the rarity of pediatric tendon lacerations compared with the adult population, but also related to challenges when working with smaller anatomy and the decreased compliance in children with respect to rehabilitation protocols. Published reports indicate that the incidence of ‘good’ flexor tendon repair outcomes is as low as 53%. OBJECTIVE: To determine the injury pattern and demographics of pediatric flexor tendon injuries involving zones I, II and III over the past decade, and to report results and identify treatment paradigms that are associated with optimal outcomes. METHODS: A retrospective chart review of all flexor tendon injuries involving zones I, II and III between April 2001 and December 2010 was performed. Parameters reviewed included demographics, injury mechanism, repair technique, outcomes and complications. RESULTS: A total of 47 patients with a median age of eight years experienced 100 tendon injuries. The most common cause of injury was glass (n=22), with the most common digit injured being the small finger (n=30). Tendon injuries included the following: flexor digitorum superficialis (n=46); flexor digitorum profundus (n=45), flexor pollicis longus (n=8); and adductor pollicis longus (n=1). Zone III had the highest number of injuries (n=47), followed by zone II (n=39). Ninety tendons were repaired using polyester suture, the most common size being 4-0. The modified Kessler technique was used in the majority of cases (n=62). Only 22 tendons underwent an epitendinous repair. Splint immobilization was used in 30 patients and a full cast in 17. The median duration of

  12. Flexor Digitorum Longus Tendon Transfer and Modified Kidner Technique in Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Maskill, James T; Pomeroy, Gregory C

    2016-01-01

    The modified Kidner procedure and flexor digitorum longus tendon transfer are common procedures used today when addressing posterior tibial tendon dysfunction. These techniques are often used in conjunction with a combination of osteotomies to correct flatfoot deformity, and have been proved to be reliable and predictable. PMID:26590720

  13. Factors affecting the ultrasonic properties of equine digital flexor tendons.

    PubMed

    Miles, C A; Fursey, G A; Birch, H L; Young, R D

    1996-01-01

    The velocity, attenuation and apparent backscattering coefficient of 6-11-MHz ultrasound were measured in three orthogonal directions in equine deep digital flexor (DDF) and superficial digital flexor (SDF) tendons at 0 degree C. Ultrasonic measurements were examined for correlation with tendon water, collagen, DNA and glycosaminoglycans contents, determined by chemical analyses and with structure observed by scanning electron microscopy. The SDF tendon contained more water, more DNA (i.e., more cells), less collagen and less glycosaminoglycans and exhibited lower velocities and attenuations than the DDF tendon. Velocities were governed primarily by the adiabatic bulk modulus and density, perturbed by a highly direction-dependent rigidity. Ultrasound propagating across tendon generated frequency-independent backscattering which appeared to derive from the large interfaces between the fascicles, while along the fibres backscattering varied as f3.62 +/- 0.88 and appeared to derive from small structures such as collagen fibres. The mechanisms by which ultrasound is attenuated by tendon remain unknown.

  14. Temporal response of canine flexor tendon to limb suspension

    PubMed Central

    Thoreson, Andrew R.; Cha, Stephen S.; Zhao, Chunfeng; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C.

    2010-01-01

    Tendon disuse, or stress deprivation, frequently accompanies clinical disorders and treatments, yet the metabolism of tendons subject to stress deprivation has rarely been investigated systematically. The effects of stress deprivation on canine flexor tendon were investigated in this study. One adult canine forepaw was suspended for 21 or 42 days. Control forepaws were collected from dogs that had no intervention on their limbs and paws. The expression of collagen I and III was not significantly altered in the tendons disused for 21 days but was significantly decreased at 42 days (P < 0.03). The expression of collagen II, aggrecan, decorin, and fibronectin was significantly decreased in the tendons in the suspended limbs at 21 days (P < 0.002) and further reduced at 42 days. With stress deprivation, the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) was significantly increased (P < 0.004) at 21 and 42 days. The expression of MMP3 was significantly decreased at 21 and 42 days (P < 0.03). The expression of MMP13 was not altered with stress deprivation at 21 and 42 days. The expression of MMP14 was significantly increased at 21 days (P = 0.0015) and returned to the control level at 42 days. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP1) expression was decreased after the limbs were suspended for 42 days (P = 0.0043), but not 21 days. However, TIMP2 expression was not significantly different from control at 21 or 42 days. Furthermore, the cross-sectional area of the stress-deprived tendons at 42 days was decreased compared with the control group (P < 0.01). The intervention method in this study did not result in any alteration of stiffness of the tendon. Our study demonstrated that stress deprivation decreases the anabolic process and increases the catabolic process of extracellular matrix in flexor tendon. PMID:20947711

  15. Entrapment of the flexor hallucis longus tendon following ankle arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Keith, Troy; Robinson, Andrew H N

    2016-03-01

    Impingement following arthroscopic ankle arthrodesis has not been reported in the literature previously. We present a case report of a 68-year-old male 9 months following an uncomplicated arthroscopic ankle fusion presenting with persistent posteromedial ankle pain. Flexor hallucis longus (FHL) tendon impingement resulting from a prominent os trigonum was identified. This was successfully treated utilising hindfoot endoscopy with excision of the os trigonum and FHL release.

  16. Partial Flexor Tendon Laceration Assessment: Interobserver and Intraobserver Reliability.

    PubMed

    Barker, B Justin; Kolovich, Gregory P; Klinefelter, Ryan D

    2016-01-01

    Accurate assessment of partial-thickness flexor tendon lacerations in the hand is difficult owing to the subjectivity of evaluation. In this study, we created 12 partial-thickness flexor tendon lacerations in a cadaveric hand, evaluated the accuracy of 6 orthopedic residents and 4 fellowship-trained hand surgeons in estimating the percentage thickness of each laceration, and assessed the groups' interobserver and intraobserver agreement. The 10 participants estimated each laceration independently and on 2 separate occasions and indicated whether they would repair it. The actual thickness of each laceration was calculated from measurements made with a pair of digital microcalipers. Overall estimates differed significantly from calibrated measurements. Estimates grouped by residents and fellowship-trained hand surgeons also differed significantly. Third-year residents were the most accurate residents, and fellowship-trained hand surgeons were more accurate than residents. Overall interobserver agreement was poor for both readings. There was moderate overall intraobserver agreement. Fellowship-trained hand surgeons and first-year residents had the highest intraobserver agreement. These results highlight the difficulty in accurately assessing flexor tendon lacerations. Accuracy appears not to improve with surgeon experience. PMID:26991579

  17. [Flexor hallucis longus tendon rupture as an impingement lesion induced by os trigonum instability].

    PubMed

    Lohrer, H

    2006-03-01

    A Flexor hallucis longus tendon lesion induced by an unstable Os trigonum has not been described heretofore. A 39 years old karateka complained increasing load induced pain at the posteromedial ankle. Because of this, he was unable to take part in sports activities. Clinical, X-ray and MRI investigation assumed a Flexor hallucis longus tendon tear induced by an impingeing Os trigonum. At surgery a longitudinal and a partial transverse tendon tear was present. The Flexor hallucis longus tendon pulley was narrowed by a partially unstable Os trigonum. Tendon reconstruction, Os trigonum removal and early functional posttreatment resulted in full ability in sport, leisure-time activities and profession five months later.

  18. Technical and biological modifications for enhanced flexor tendon repair

    PubMed Central

    Kim, H. Mike; Nelson, Gregory; Thomopoulos, Stavros; Silva, Matthew J.; Das, Rosalina; Gelberman, Richard H.

    2010-01-01

    Clinical outcomes after intra-synovial flexor tendon repair have been substantially improved over the past two decades through advances in tendon suture techniques and postoperative rehabilitation methods. Nevertheless, complications such as repair site elongation (i.e., gap formation) and rupture continue to occur frequently. Experimental studies have shown that repair site strength fails to increase in the first three weeks following tendon suture. After three weeks, the strength and rigidity of the repair site improves significantly, a process that continues for several months. Formation of a repair site gap during the early rehabilitation period has been shown to considerably delay the accrual of repair site strength over time. Thus, it is of prime importance that the method of tendon suture achieves and maintains a stiff and strong repair site during the early healing interval by maintaining close approximation of the tendon stumps and by stimulating, where possible, the intrinsic repair response. In this review we describe recent efforts to enhance the integrity of the immature repair site. We focus on two major areas of advancement: surgical technique modifications and manipulation of the biologic and biochemical environment. PMID:20513584

  19. Operative technique for human composite flexor tendon allograft procurement and engraftment.

    PubMed

    DeGeorge, Brent R; Rodeheaver, George T; Drake, David B

    2014-01-01

    Devastating volar hand injuries with significant damage to the pulley structures and fibro-osseous sheath, flexor tendons, and volar plates pose a major problem to the reconstructive hand surgeon. Despite advances in tendon handling, operative technique, and postoperative hand rehabilitation, patients who have undergone flexor tendon reconstruction are often plagued by chronic pain, stiffness, and decreased range of motion with resultant decreased ability to work and poor quality of life. Postoperative adhesion formation and lack of suitable donor material for tendon autograft are 2 fundamental problems that continue to challenge the hand surgeon. In 1967, Erle E. Peacock, Jr, described a technique of flexor tendon reconstruction using cadaveric composite flexor tendon allograft, which consisted of both the flexor digitorum profundus and superficialis tendons in their respective fibro-osseous sheaths consisting of the digital pulley structures and the underlying periosteum and volar plates. This technique never gained widespread acceptance due to concerns regarding tissue antigenicity, infectious disease transmission, and the rising popularity of the method of Hunter for silastic rod-based flexor tendon reconstruction initially described during the same period. With modern-day advances in tissue processing with acellularization and extensive donor screening for transmissible diseases, this technique should be revisited to address the reconstructive needs of patients with extensive volar soft tissue and tendon injury. Herein, we describe the operative technique of composite flexor tendon procurement and reconstruction with key modifications from the initial technique described by Peacock for improved composite construct elevation, soft tissue inset, and bony attachment.

  20. Flexor Tendon Sheath Ganglions: Results of Surgical Excision

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Edwin E.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to review the clinical features and determine the results following surgical excision of a flexor tendon sheath ganglion. A retrospective analysis of 24 consecutive patients (25 ganglions) who underwent excision of a painful flexor tendon sheath ganglion by the same surgeon was performed. The patient’s medical and operative records were reviewed. Each patient was invited to return for an evaluation, which consisted of a clinical interview, completion of a questionnaire, and physical examination. Those patients that were unable to return underwent a detailed telephone interview. Sixteen patients returned for a clinical evaluation, while eight patients underwent a telephone interview. There were 15 women and nine men, with an average age of 43 years (range, 21–68 years). The dominant hand was involved in 15 patients. The long finger was most commonly involved (11 cases). The ganglion arose from the A1 pulley in 13 cases, between the A1 and A2 pulleys in three cases, and from the A2 pulley in nine cases. At an average follow-up of 18.5 months (range, 5–38 months), all of the patients were satisfied with their final result. No patient developed a recurrence and all returned to their previous functional level. There were two minor complications that resolved uneventfully; one patient experienced mild incisional tenderness, while an additional patient experienced transient digital nerve paresthesias. We conclude that surgical excision is a simple, safe, and effective method for treating a painful ganglion of the digital flexor tendon sheath. PMID:18780066

  1. Chondroma within the flexor hallucis longus tendon sheath. A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Brahms, M A; Fumich, R M

    1978-01-01

    Chondromas in tendon sheaths are a rare entity proviously reported in the flexor sheaths on the hand and possibly the foot. This is the first reported case of condroma of the flexor hallucis longus tendon sheath at the ankle region. A literature review with regard to pathogenesis, classification, and recurrence has been presented.

  2. Laser tissue welding and repair of digital flexor tendons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drew, P. J.; Kiernan, Michael N.; MacGregor, A. D.; Clement, Marc

    1996-01-01

    Injuries involving division of the flexor tendons of the hand are a common surgical problem. Sutured repairs must be strong enough to withstand early active movement. Experiments were designed to assess the strength of bonds formed between tendon sections as a result of heating (1) under controlled conditions in a water bath and (2) using a carbon dioxide laser (laser tissue welding). The load (N) and stress (N/cm2) required to disrupt thermal bonds between bovine tendon sections heated for 4 minutes in water peaked at 62 degrees Celsius (13N, 11.3N/cm2). Further experiments revealed the optimal time period for heating to be 9 minutes (21.5N, 20.6N/cm2). A threshold effect was apparent at these parameters. The in vitro strength of sutured, laser welded and sutured and laser welded tendon repairs was compared in a rabbit model. Laser welding alone did not produce repairs as strong as sutured repairs. It did, however, augment the strength of sutured repair. This effect was maximal at a power of 0.1 W.

  3. A study of the anatomy and repair strengths of porcine flexor and extensor tendons: are they appropriate experimental models?

    PubMed

    Mao, W F; Wu, Y F; Zhou, Y L; Tang, J B

    2011-10-01

    Although both porcine flexor and extensor tendons have been used in tendon repair research, no studies have specifically studied the anatomical differences and repair strengths in both types of tendons. We used 12 pig trotters to observe the anatomy of these tendons and compared the 2 mm gap and ultimate strengths of flexor and extensor tendons. There were four annular (A1, A2, A3, and A4) pulleys and one oblique pulley, which form a fibro-osseous tunnel for the flexor tendons, but the anatomy of the porcine extensor tendons was markedly different from the human flexor or extensor tendons. The diameter of flexor tendons was significantly greater than that of the extensors. The 2 mm gap and ultimate strengths of the flexor tendon with either two-strand or four-strand repairs were significantly greater than those of the extensor tendon. We conclude that the porcine flexor tendon systems are similar to those in the human, but the extensor tendons are not similar to either the flexor or extensor tendons in humans. Flexor and extensor tendons have different repair strengths which should be taken into account when interpreting findings from investigations using these tendons.

  4. Rupture of Flexor Pollicis Longus Tendon: A Complication of Volar Locking Plating of the Distal Radius.

    PubMed

    Rajeev, Aysha Sethunathan; Sreverthana, Shanaka; Harrison, John

    2010-08-01

    We report an unusual case of complete rupture of the flexor pollicis longus tendon following volar locking plating for a distal radius fracture. We believe that the prominence of a distal locking screw head predisposed to the rupture of the tendon. We highlight that correctly attaching the distal locking screws to the plate is essential for obtaining the correct biomechanics of the device and preventing flexor tendon rupture.

  5. The suture loop holding capacity of flexor digitorum profundus tendon within and outside the digital tendon sheath.

    PubMed

    Havulinna, J; Leppänen, O V; Göransson, H

    2013-09-01

    In a previous study we found that the strength of a Kessler core suture in the flexor tendon was greater in flexor zone 2 than in zone 3. To further investigate the material properties of the flexor tendon without the influence of a locking suture configuration, we measured the ultimate strength of a simple loop suture in the flexor digitorum profundus tendon in zones 1, 2, and 3. Eight cadaver flexor digitorum profundus tendons were tested in 10 mm increments with a 3-0 polyester suture loop pull-out test in the mid-substance of the tendon. The mean strength in zones 1 and 2 (26.7 N, SD 5.6) was significantly higher than the mean strength in zone 3 (17.7 N, SD 5.4). We conclude that the difference is owing to variations of the structure of the flexor tendon in different sections of the tendon, as the suture configuration was a simple loop without a locking or grasping component. PMID:23315625

  6. Determining flexor-tendon repair techniques via soft computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, M.; Firoozbakhsh, K.; Moniem, M.; Jamshidi, M.

    2001-01-01

    An SC-based multi-objective decision-making method for determining the optimal flexor-tendon repair technique from experimental and clinical survey data, and with variable circumstances, was presented. Results were compared with those from the Taguchi method. Using the Taguchi method results in the need to perform ad-hoc decisions when the outcomes for individual objectives are contradictory to a particular preference or circumstance, whereas the SC-based multi-objective technique provides a rigorous straightforward computational process in which changing preferences and importance of differing objectives are easily accommodated. Also, adding more objectives is straightforward and easily accomplished. The use of fuzzy-set representations of information categories provides insight into their performance throughout the range of their universe of discourse. The ability of the technique to provide a "best" medical decision given a particular physician, hospital, patient, situation, and other criteria was also demonstrated.

  7. Tissue engineering in flexor tendon surgery: current state and future advances.

    PubMed

    Galvez, M G; Crowe, C; Farnebo, S; Chang, J

    2014-01-01

    Tissue engineering of flexor tendons addresses a challenge often faced by hand surgeons: the restoration of function and improvement of healing with a limited supply of donor tendons. Creating an engineered tendon construct is dependent upon understanding the normal healing mechanisms of the tendon and tendon sheath. The production of a tendon construct includes: creating a three-dimensional scaffold; seeding cells within the scaffold; encouraging cellular growth within the scaffold while maintaining a gliding surface; and finally ensuring mechanical strength. An effective construct incorporates these factors in its design, with the ultimate goal of creating tendon substitutes that are readily available to the reconstructive hand surgeon.

  8. Effects of Stress Deprivation on Lubricin Synthesis and Gliding of Flexor Tendons in a Canine Model in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yu-Long; Zhao, Chunfeng; Jay, Gregory D.; Schmid, Thomas M.; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Lubricin facilitates boundary lubrication of cartilage. The synthesis of lubricin in cartilage is regulated by mechanical stimuli, especially shear force. Lubricin is also found in flexor tendons. However, little is known about the effect of mechanical loading on lubricin synthesis in tendons or about the function of lubricin in flexor tendons. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship of mechanical loading to lubricin expression and gliding resistance of flexor tendons. Methods: Flexor tendons were harvested from canine forepaws that had been suspended without weight-bearing for twenty-one days and from the contralateral forepaws that had been allowed free motion. Lubricin expression in each flexor tendon was investigated with real-time RT-PCR (reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction) and immunohistochemistry. Lubricin in the flexor tendon was extracted and quantified with ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay). The friction between the flexor tendon and the proximal pulley was measured. Results: The non-weight-bearing flexor tendons had a 40% reduction of lubricin expression (p < 0.01) and content (p < 0.01) compared with the flexor tendons in the contralateral limb. However, the gliding resistance of the tendons in the non-weight-bearing limb was the same as that of the tendons on the contralateral, weight-bearing side. Conclusions: Mechanical loading affected lubricin expression in flexor tendons, resulting in a 40% reduction of lubricin content, but these changes did not affect the gliding resistance of the flexor tendons. Clinical Relevance: The gliding resistance of flexor tendons was not affected after a period of limited motion. This suggests that physical activity after a short period of limited motion does not lead to wear of intact tendons and their surrounding tissue. PMID:23389791

  9. Zone 2 flexor tendon injuries: Venturing into the no man's land

    PubMed Central

    Kotwal, Prakash P; Ansari, Mohammed Tahir

    2012-01-01

    Flexor tendon injuries are seen commonly yet the management protocols are still widely debated. The advances in suture techniques, better understanding of the tendon morphology and its biomechanics have resulted in better outcomes. There has been a trend toward the active mobilization protocols with development of multistrand core suture techniques. Zone 2 injuries remain an enigma for the hand surgeons even today but the outcome results have definitely improved. Biomolecular modulation of tendon repair and tissue engineering are now the upcoming fields for future research. This review article focuses on the current concepts in the management of flexor tendon injuries in zone 2. PMID:23325961

  10. A Review of Current Concepts in Flexor Tendon Repair: Physiology, Biomechanics, Surgical Technique and Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Rymer, Ben; Theobald, Peter; Thomas, Peter B.M.

    2015-01-01

    Historically, the surgical treatment of flexor tendon injuries has always been associated with controversy. It was not until 1967, when the paper entitled Primary repair of flexor tendons in no man’s land was presented at the American Society of Hand Surgery, which reported excellent results and catalyzed the implementation of this technique into worldwide practice. We present an up to date literature review using PubMed and Google Scholar where the terms flexor tendon, repair and rehabilitation were used. Topics covered included functional anatomy, nutrition, biome-chanics, suture repair, repair site gapping, and rehabilitation. This article aims to provide a comprehensive and complete overview of flexor tendon repairs. PMID:26793293

  11. [Tenotomy of carpal and digital flexor tendons for correction of congenital neuromyodysplasia in a calf].

    PubMed

    Sohrt, J T; Heppelmann, M; Rehage, J; Staszyk, C

    2013-01-01

    In a 7-day-old heifer calf, a bilateral flexural deformity of the forelimbs involving the digital flexor tendons, the suspensory ligament and the ulnar and radial carpal flexor tendons was diagnosed. After 2 weeks of conservative treatment consisting of manual stretching of the legs and the application of splints and wooden blocks, which were glued to the soles and extended beyond the tip of the claws, the right forelimb could be extended sufficiently to allow weight bearing, whereas the left forelimb could be passively extended to only approximately 120°. Therefore, tenotomy of the ulnar carpal flexor tendon, the digital flexor tendons and the suspensory ligament was carried out in the left leg. A support bandage was then applied to the leg for 8 weeks, after which the carpus and fetlock could be completely extended passively. Flexural deformity of the carpus caused by contracture of the carpal flexor tendons was treated by means of a tenotomy of the ulnar carpal flexor tendon proximal to the accessory carpal bone, which allowed preservation of the carpal tunnel and avoided the risk of iatrogenic damage to nerves and the carpal joint capsule. PMID:23608892

  12. Effect of flexor sheath integrity on tendon gliding: a biomechanical and histologic study.

    PubMed

    Peterson, W W; Manske, P R; Kain, C C; Lesker, P A

    1986-01-01

    The effect on tendon gliding of flexor sheath excision versus incision/closure following primary flexor tendon repair was examined biomechanically and histologically in forty-one chickens. There was no significant difference in either the tendon excursion required to fully flex the digit or in the work of flexion (the integration of the forces that resist tendon gliding during excursion) between the sheath excised and sheath closed groups. The results were unaffected by postoperative immobilization or intermittent passive motion. Histologically, it was noted that at 3 weeks the healing tendon was surrounded by a layer of granulation tissue that was nearly identical in both the sheath excised and the sheath closed digits. Of note was the finding that a synovial lining could not be identified in those digits that had previously undergone sheath closure. However, at 6 weeks postoperatively, a new gliding surface could be identified surrounding the tendon in both the sheath excised and the sheath closed digits. This study indicates that closure of the flexor sheath after primary tendon repair does not improve tendon gliding as measured biomechanically. Despite its repair, the flexor sheath does not maintain its synovial characteristics as demonstrated histologically, and a new sheath must subsequently be formed.

  13. The relationship of trigger finger and flexor tendon volar migration after carpal tunnel release.

    PubMed

    Lee, S K; Bae, K W; Choy, W S

    2014-09-01

    It has been suggested that the increased frequency of trigger finger (TF) after carpal tunnel release (CTR) may be caused by the volar migration of the flexor tendons at the wrist altering the tendon biomechanics at the A1 pulley. This hypothesis has not been validated. We performed pre- and post-operative ultrasonography (USG) on the affected wrists of 92 patients who underwent CTR. Pre-operative USG was performed in neutral with no tendon loading; post-operative USG was performed in neutral unloaded and in various positions of wrist flexion whilst loading the flexor tendons with gripping. The mean volar migration of the flexor tendons after CTR was 2.2 (SD 0.4) mm in the unloaded neutral position. It was 1.8 (SD 0.4) mm in patients who did not develop TF and 2.5 (SD 0.5) mm in those who did (p = 0.0067). In loaded wrist flexion, the mean volar migration of flexor tendons after CTR in patients who did not develop TF and those who did was 2.1 and 3.0 mm in 0° flexion; 3.2 and 3.9 mm in 15° flexion; 4.3 and 5.1 mm in 30° flexion; and 4.9 and 5.8 mm in 45° flexion, respectively. There were significant differences between patients with and without TF at each flexion angle. Our data indicate that patients with greater volar migration of the flexor tendons after CTR are more likely to develop TF. This conclusion supports the hypothesis that the occurrence of TF after CTR may be caused by the bowstringing effects of the flexor tendons.

  14. Repair of flexor carpi radialis tendon laceration at the wrist in a professional ice hockey player.

    PubMed

    Hepper, Clifford T; Boyer, Martin

    2011-06-01

    The flexor carpi radialis is a wrist flexor and radial deviator with half the relative strength of flexor carpi ulnaris. In the majority of patients, the flexor carpi radialis tendon is expendable and is routinely used for various reconstructive procedures about the hand and wrist. Isolated flexor carpi radialis lacerations at the wrist are rare. Flexor carpi radialis tendon ruptures, which have been reported in association with distal radius fractures, longstanding osteoarthritis, and percutaneous treatment of scaphoid fractures, are usually treated non-operatively. We report a case of a traumatic laceration of the flexor carpi radialis tendon at the wrist in a professional ice hockey player. Surgical repair and rehabilitation using established principles for intrasynovial flexor tendon repair allowed return to sport at the professional level in 2 months.Tension-free core suture repair was performed with a modified-Kessler, 4-strand repair using a double-stranded 4-0 Supramid suture. A running epitendinous suture was then placed around the circumference of the tendon with 6-0 Prolene. Immobilization of the wrist in 20° of flexion was maintained for 2 weeks. Full active and passive digital motion was allowed immediately postoperatively and continued throughout the rehabilitation. Therapy was initiated at 2 weeks postoperatively with full passive wrist flexion and passive wrist extension to a dorsal block of 20°. At 4 weeks postoperatively, a dorsal splint was fabricated to keep the wrist in neutral. At this time, active extension to a dorsal block of zero and full passive flexion was allowed. Active wrist flexion without resistance was begun at 6 weeks, and full strengthening was allowed at 8 weeks postoperatively. The patient returned to sport at the professional level shortly thereafter. At latest follow-up, the patient has been able to fully participate in professional ice hockey without pain or functional limitation. PMID:21667915

  15. Human flexor tendon tissue engineering: revitalization of biostatic allograft scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Woon, Colin Y L; Farnebo, Simon; Schmitt, Taliah; Kraus, Armin; Megerle, Kai; Pham, Hung; Yan, Xinrui; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Chang, James

    2012-12-01

    Cadaveric tendon allografts form a readily available and underutilized source of graft material. Because of their material properties, allografts are biomechanically and biologically superior to synthetic scaffolds. However, before clinical use, allografts must undergo decellularization to reduce immunogenicity and oxidation to increase porosity, leaving a nonvital biostatic scaffold. Ex vivo seeding, or revitalization, is thought to hasten graft incorporation and stimulate intrinsic tendon healing, permitting early mobilization and return to function. In this study, we examined physical and biochemical augmentation methods, including scaffold surface scoring (physical) and rehydration of lyophilized scaffolds in serum (biochemical). Scaffolds were divided into four groups: (1) scored scaffolds, (2) lyophilized scaffolds rehydrated in fetal calf serum (FCS), (3) scaffolds both scored and rehydrated in FCS, and (4) control scaffolds. Scaffolds were reseeded with adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). Reseeding efficacy was quantified by a live cell and total cell assays and qualified histologically with hematoxylin and eosin, live/dead and SYTO green nucleic acid stains, TUNEL apoptosis stains, procollagen stains, and transmission electron microscopy. Scaffold-seeded cell viability at up to 2 weeks in vitro and up to 4 weeks in vivo was demonstrated with bioluminescent imaging of scaffolds seeded with luciferase-positive ADSCs. The effect of seeding on scaffold biomechanical properties was demonstrated with evaluation of ultimate tensile stress (UTS) and an elastic modulus (EM). We found that scaffold surface scoring led to an increase in live and total cell attachment and penetration (MTS assay, p<0.001 and DNA assay, p=0.003, respectively). Histology confirmed greater total cell number in both construct core and surface in scored compared with unscored constructs. Cells reseeded on scored constructs displayed reduced apoptosis, persistent procollagen production, and

  16. Wrist and digital joint motion produce unique flexor tendon force and excursion in the canine forelimb.

    PubMed

    Lieber, R L; Silva, M J; Amiel, D; Gelberman, R H

    1999-02-01

    The force and excursion within the canine digital flexor tendons were measured during passive joint manipulations that simulate those used during rehabilitation after flexor tendon repair and during active muscle contraction, simulating the active rehabilitation protocol. Tendon force was measured using a small buckle placed upon the tendon while excursion was measured using a suture marker and video analysis method. Passive finger motion imposed with the wrist flexed resulted in dramatically lower tendon force (approximately 5 N) compared to passive motion imposed with the wrist extended (approximately 17 N). Lower excursions were seen at the level of the proximal interphalangeal joint with the wrist flexed (approximately 1.5 mm) while high excursion was observed when the wrist was extended or when synergistic finger and wrist motion were imposed (approximately 3.5 mm). Bivariate discriminant analysis of both force and excursion data revealed a natural clustering of the data into three general mechanical paradigms. With the wrist extended and with either one finger or four fingers manipulated, tendons experienced high loads of approximately 1500 g and high excursions of approximately 3.5 mm. In contrast, the same manipulations performed with the wrist flexed resulted in low tendon forces (4-8 N) and low tendon excursions of approximately 1.5 mm. Synergistic wrist and finger manipulation provided the third paradigm where tendon force was relatively low (approximately 4 N) but excursion was as high as those seen in the groups which were manipulated with the wrist extended. Active muscle contraction produced a modest tendon excursion (approximately 1 mm) and high or low tendon force with the wrist extended or flexed, respectively. These data provide the basis for experimentally testable hypotheses with regard to the factors that most significantly affect functional recovery after digital flexor tendon injury and define the normal mechanical operating characteristics

  17. Biomechanical risk factors and flexor tendon frictional work in the cadaveric carpal tunnel.

    PubMed

    Kociolek, Aaron M; Tat, Jimmy; Keir, Peter J

    2015-02-01

    Pathological changes in carpal tunnel syndrome patients include fibrosis and thickening of the subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT) adjacent to the flexor tendons in the carpal tunnel. These clinical findings suggest an etiology of excessive shear-strain force between the tendon and SSCT, underscoring the need to assess tendon gliding characteristics representative of repetitive and forceful work. A mechanical actuator moved the middle finger flexor digitorum superficialis tendon proximally and distally in eight fresh frozen cadaver arms. Eighteen experimental conditions tested the effects of three well-established biomechanical predictors of injury, including a combination of two wrist postures (0° and 30° flexion), three tendon velocities (50, 100, 150mm/sec), and three forces (10, 20, 40N). Tendon gliding resistance was determined with two light-weight load cells, and integrated over tendon displacement to represent tendon frictional work. During proximal tendon displacement, frictional work increased with tendon velocity (58.0% from 50-150mm/sec). There was a significant interaction between wrist posture and tendon force. In wrist flexion, frictional work increased 93.0% between tendon forces of 10 and 40N. In the neutral wrist posture, frictional work only increased 33.5% (from 10-40N). During distal tendon displacement, there was a similar multiplicative interaction on tendon frictional work. Concurrent exposure to multiple biomechanical work factors markedly increased tendon frictional work, thus providing a plausible link to the pathogenesis of work-related carpal tunnel syndrome. Additionally, our study provides the conceptual basis to evaluate injury risk, including the multiplicative repercussions of combined physical exposures. PMID:25553671

  18. Biomechanical risk factors and flexor tendon frictional work in the cadaveric carpal tunnel.

    PubMed

    Kociolek, Aaron M; Tat, Jimmy; Keir, Peter J

    2015-02-01

    Pathological changes in carpal tunnel syndrome patients include fibrosis and thickening of the subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT) adjacent to the flexor tendons in the carpal tunnel. These clinical findings suggest an etiology of excessive shear-strain force between the tendon and SSCT, underscoring the need to assess tendon gliding characteristics representative of repetitive and forceful work. A mechanical actuator moved the middle finger flexor digitorum superficialis tendon proximally and distally in eight fresh frozen cadaver arms. Eighteen experimental conditions tested the effects of three well-established biomechanical predictors of injury, including a combination of two wrist postures (0° and 30° flexion), three tendon velocities (50, 100, 150mm/sec), and three forces (10, 20, 40N). Tendon gliding resistance was determined with two light-weight load cells, and integrated over tendon displacement to represent tendon frictional work. During proximal tendon displacement, frictional work increased with tendon velocity (58.0% from 50-150mm/sec). There was a significant interaction between wrist posture and tendon force. In wrist flexion, frictional work increased 93.0% between tendon forces of 10 and 40N. In the neutral wrist posture, frictional work only increased 33.5% (from 10-40N). During distal tendon displacement, there was a similar multiplicative interaction on tendon frictional work. Concurrent exposure to multiple biomechanical work factors markedly increased tendon frictional work, thus providing a plausible link to the pathogenesis of work-related carpal tunnel syndrome. Additionally, our study provides the conceptual basis to evaluate injury risk, including the multiplicative repercussions of combined physical exposures.

  19. Unusual Closed Traumatic Avulsion of Both Flexor Tendons in Zones 1 and 3 of the Little Finger.

    PubMed

    Soro, Marie-Aimée Päivi; Christen, Thierry; Durand, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Closed tendon avulsion of both flexor tendons in the same finger is an extremely rare condition. We encountered the case of a patient who presented a rupture of the flexor digitorum profundus in zone 1 and flexor digitorum superficialis in zone 3 in the little finger. This occurrence has not been reported previously. We hereby present our case, make a review of the literature of avulsion of both flexor tendons of the same finger, and propose a treatment according to the site of the ruptures. PMID:27656304

  20. Unusual Closed Traumatic Avulsion of Both Flexor Tendons in Zones 1 and 3 of the Little Finger

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Closed tendon avulsion of both flexor tendons in the same finger is an extremely rare condition. We encountered the case of a patient who presented a rupture of the flexor digitorum profundus in zone 1 and flexor digitorum superficialis in zone 3 in the little finger. This occurrence has not been reported previously. We hereby present our case, make a review of the literature of avulsion of both flexor tendons of the same finger, and propose a treatment according to the site of the ruptures. PMID:27656304

  1. Unusual Closed Traumatic Avulsion of Both Flexor Tendons in Zones 1 and 3 of the Little Finger

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Closed tendon avulsion of both flexor tendons in the same finger is an extremely rare condition. We encountered the case of a patient who presented a rupture of the flexor digitorum profundus in zone 1 and flexor digitorum superficialis in zone 3 in the little finger. This occurrence has not been reported previously. We hereby present our case, make a review of the literature of avulsion of both flexor tendons of the same finger, and propose a treatment according to the site of the ruptures.

  2. Middle phalanx skeletal morphology in the hand: can it predict flexor tendon size and attachments?

    PubMed

    Marzke, Mary W; Shrewsbury, Marvin M; Horner, Kristin E

    2007-10-01

    Specific sites on the palmar diaphysis of the manual middle phalanges provide attachment for the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) tendon. It has been assumed in the literature that lateral palmar fossae on these bones reflect locations for these attachments and offer evidence for relative size of the flexor tendon. This assumption has led to predictions about relative FDS muscle force potential from sizes of fossae on fossil hominin middle phalanges. Inferences about locomotor capabilities of fossil hominins in turn have been drawn from the predicted force potential of the flexor muscle. The study reported here provides a critical first step in evaluating hypotheses about behavioral implications of middle phalangeal morphology in fossil hominins, by testing the hypothesis that the lateral fossae reflect the size of the FDS tendon and the location of the terminal FDS tendon attachments on the middle phalanx. The middle phalangeal region was dissected in 43 individuals from 16 primate genera, including humans. Qualitative observations were made of tendon attachment locations relative to the lateral fossae. Length measurements of the fossae were tested as predictors of FDS tendon cross-sectional area and of FDS attachment tendon lengths. Our results lead to the conclusion that the hypothesis must be rejected, and that future attention should focus on functional implications of the palmar median bar associated with the lateral fossae.

  3. Carpal tunnel syndrome caused by a giant cell tumour of the flexor tendon sheath.

    PubMed

    Meek, Marcel F; Sheikh, Zahid A; Quinton, David N

    2014-02-01

    A 76-year-old woman developed right carpal tunnel syndrome after being conservatively treated for tenosynovitis of the flexor tendons with associated mild carpal tunnel syndrome. A magnetic resonance imaging scan showed a tumour in the carpal tunnel. Re-exploration showed that the median nerve was being compressed by a giant cell tumour of the flexor tendon sheaths. Appropriate imaging is advised in patients with additional findings (such as swelling) or in patients with secondary carpal tunnel syndrome and incomplete response to conservative treatment, to exclude a space-occupying lesion.

  4. Endoscopic Loose Body Removal From Zone 2 Flexor Hallucis Longus Tendon Sheath.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-06-01

    Tenosynovial chondromatosis can occur in the flexor hallucis longus tendon sheath. Complete synovectomy and removal of the loose bodies comprise the treatment of choice. An open procedure requires extensive soft-tissue dissection because the flexor hallucis longus tendon is a deep structure except at the hallux. A tendoscopy approach to synovectomy and removal of loose bodies has the advantage of minimally invasive surgery. This technical note outlines pearls and pitfalls and provides a step-by-step guide to performing this procedure. PMID:27656363

  5. Systemic EP4 Inhibition Increases Adhesion Formation in a Murine Model of Flexor Tendon Repair.

    PubMed

    Geary, Michael B; Orner, Caitlin A; Bawany, Fatima; Awad, Hani A; Hammert, Warren C; O'Keefe, Regis J; Loiselle, Alayna E

    2015-01-01

    Flexor tendon injuries are a common clinical problem, and repairs are frequently complicated by post-operative adhesions forming between the tendon and surrounding soft tissue. Prostaglandin E2 and the EP4 receptor have been implicated in this process following tendon injury; thus, we hypothesized that inhibiting EP4 after tendon injury would attenuate adhesion formation. A model of flexor tendon laceration and repair was utilized in C57BL/6J female mice to evaluate the effects of EP4 inhibition on adhesion formation and matrix deposition during flexor tendon repair. Systemic EP4 antagonist or vehicle control was given by intraperitoneal injection during the late proliferative phase of healing, and outcomes were analyzed for range of motion, biomechanics, histology, and genetic changes. Repairs treated with an EP4 antagonist demonstrated significant decreases in range of motion with increased resistance to gliding within the first three weeks after injury, suggesting greater adhesion formation. Histologic analysis of the repair site revealed a more robust granulation zone in the EP4 antagonist treated repairs, with early polarization for type III collagen by picrosirius red staining, findings consistent with functional outcomes. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated accelerated peaks in F4/80 and type III collagen (Col3a1) expression in the antagonist group, along with decreases in type I collagen (Col1a1). Mmp9 expression was significantly increased after discontinuing the antagonist, consistent with its role in mediating adhesion formation. Mmp2, which contributes to repair site remodeling, increases steadily between 10 and 28 days post-repair in the EP4 antagonist group, consistent with the increased matrix and granulation zones requiring remodeling in these repairs. These findings suggest that systemic EP4 antagonism leads to increased adhesion formation and matrix deposition during flexor tendon healing. Counter to our hypothesis that EP4 antagonism would improve the

  6. Systemic EP4 Inhibition Increases Adhesion Formation in a Murine Model of Flexor Tendon Repair.

    PubMed

    Geary, Michael B; Orner, Caitlin A; Bawany, Fatima; Awad, Hani A; Hammert, Warren C; O'Keefe, Regis J; Loiselle, Alayna E

    2015-01-01

    Flexor tendon injuries are a common clinical problem, and repairs are frequently complicated by post-operative adhesions forming between the tendon and surrounding soft tissue. Prostaglandin E2 and the EP4 receptor have been implicated in this process following tendon injury; thus, we hypothesized that inhibiting EP4 after tendon injury would attenuate adhesion formation. A model of flexor tendon laceration and repair was utilized in C57BL/6J female mice to evaluate the effects of EP4 inhibition on adhesion formation and matrix deposition during flexor tendon repair. Systemic EP4 antagonist or vehicle control was given by intraperitoneal injection during the late proliferative phase of healing, and outcomes were analyzed for range of motion, biomechanics, histology, and genetic changes. Repairs treated with an EP4 antagonist demonstrated significant decreases in range of motion with increased resistance to gliding within the first three weeks after injury, suggesting greater adhesion formation. Histologic analysis of the repair site revealed a more robust granulation zone in the EP4 antagonist treated repairs, with early polarization for type III collagen by picrosirius red staining, findings consistent with functional outcomes. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated accelerated peaks in F4/80 and type III collagen (Col3a1) expression in the antagonist group, along with decreases in type I collagen (Col1a1). Mmp9 expression was significantly increased after discontinuing the antagonist, consistent with its role in mediating adhesion formation. Mmp2, which contributes to repair site remodeling, increases steadily between 10 and 28 days post-repair in the EP4 antagonist group, consistent with the increased matrix and granulation zones requiring remodeling in these repairs. These findings suggest that systemic EP4 antagonism leads to increased adhesion formation and matrix deposition during flexor tendon healing. Counter to our hypothesis that EP4 antagonism would improve the

  7. Endoscopic-Assisted Flexor Hallucis Longus Transfer: Harvest of the Tendon at Zone 2 or Zone 3.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-12-01

    Flexor hallucis longus (FHL) tendon transfer is indicated for reconstruction of the Achilles tendon with a gap larger than 5 cm. The tendon can be harvested at zone 2 or zone 3 by minimally invasive techniques with the advantage of minimal soft-tissue dissection. The tendon can be harvested under the sustentaculum tali by zone 2 FHL tendoscopy. It is adequate for FHL transfer to the posterior calcaneal tubercle. If a double-thickness reconstruction of a huge gap of the Achilles tendon is indicated, the tendon can be harvested at the level of the hallux by means of a tendon stripper. However, the interconnection tendon of the master knot of Henry can be split together with the FHL or flexor digitorum longus tendon instead of being cut. Zone 2 FHL tendoscopy can be used to release the split tendon to complete the FHL harvest. PMID:27284516

  8. Enhanced flexor tendon healing through controlled delivery of PDGF-BB

    PubMed Central

    Thomopoulos, S; Das, R; Silva, MJ; Sakiyama-Elbert, S; Harwood, FL; Zampiakis, E; Kim, HM; Amiel, D; Gelberman, RH

    2010-01-01

    A fibrin/heparin-based delivery system was used to provide controlled delivery of PDGF-BB in an animal model of intrasynovial flexor tendon repair. We hypothesized that PDGF-BB, administered in this manner, would stimulate cell proliferation and matrix remodeling, leading to improvements in the sutured tendon’s functional and structural properties. Fifty-six flexor digitorum profundus tendons were injured and repaired in 28 dogs. Three groups were compared: 1) controlled delivery of PDGF-BB using a fibrin/heparin-based delivery system, 2) delivery system carrier control, and 3) repair only control. The operated forelimbs were treated with controlled passive motion rehabilitation. The animals were euthanized at 7, 14, and 42 days, at which time the tendons were assessed using histologic (hyaluronic acid content, cellularity, and inflammation), biochemical (total DNA and reducible collagen crosslink levels), and biomechanical (gliding and tensile properties) assays. We found that cell activity (as determined by total DNA, collagen crosslink analyses, and hyaluronic acid content) was accelerated due to PDGF-BB at 14 days. Proximal interphalangeal joint rotation and tendon excursion (i.e., tendon gliding properties) were significantly higher for the PDGF-BB treated tendons compared to the repair alone tendons at 42 days. Improvements in tensile properties were not achieved, possibly due to sub-optimal release kinetics or other factors. In conclusion, PDGF-BB treatment consistently improved the functional but not the structural properties of sutured intrasynovial tendons through 42 days following repair. PMID:19322789

  9. Relationship between joint motion and flexor tendon force in the canine forelimb.

    PubMed

    Lieber, R L; Amiel, D; Kaufman, K R; Whitney, J; Gelberman, R H

    1996-11-01

    To increase in vivo tendon force and gliding after flexor tendon repair, a variety of modifications to the methods by which protective passive motion is administered have been advocated. To determine the relationship between the prime variables, wrist and digital position, muscle activation, and in vivo tendon force, a clinically relevant canine model was developed. Force was measured in the flexor tendon during several joint manipulation paradigms: single-finger flexion-extension with the wrist flexed (group 1F), single-finger flexion-extension with the wrist extended (group 1E), four-finger flexion-extension with the wrist flexed (group 4F), four-finger flexion-extension with the wrist extended (group 4E), and synergistic wrist and finger motion where wrist extension and finger flexion were performed simultaneously, followed by wrist flexion and finger extension (group SYN). In addition, tendon force was measured during electric stimulation of the proximal flexor muscle mass. Passive tendon force with the wrist extended (groups 1E and 4E) was two to three times greater than that measured with the wrist flexed, independent of the number of digits moved. With the wrist extended, peak tendon force reached 1,997 g +/- 194 g during single-digit manipulation (group 1E), compared to only 853 g +/- 104 g with the wrist flexed during the same maneuver (group 1F). Statistical comparison between means revealed that groups 1E and 4E were significantly different from groups 1F, 4F, and SYN (p < .005). There were no significant differences between groups 1E and 4E or between groups 1F, 4F, and SYN (p > .200). Active muscle force elicited by electrical stimulation and passive force varied dramatically as the wrist was flexed from full extension 3460 g +/- 766 g to full flexion 427 g +/- 239 g (p < .001). Simultaneously, passive tension decreased from 940 g +/- 143 g with wrist extended to 76 g +/- 37 g with the wrist flexed. These data indicate that wrist position has the

  10. Comparison of the Thickness of Pulley and Flexor Tendon Between in Neutral and in Flexed Positions of Trigger Finger

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Junko; Ishii, Yoshinori; Noguchi, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to compare the morphology of the A1 pulley and flexor tendons in idiopathic trigger finger of digits other than the thumb between in neutral position and in the position with the interphalangeal joints full flexed and with the metacarpophalangeal (MP) joint 0° extended (hook grip position). Method: A total of 48 affected digits and 48 contralateral normal digits from 48 patients who initially diagnosed with idiopathic trigger finger were studied sonographically. Sonographic analysis was focused on the A1 pulley and flexor tendons at the level of the MP joint in the transverse plane. We measured the anterior-posterior thickness of A1 pulley and the sum of the flexor digitorum superficialis and profundus tendons, and also measured the maximum radialulnar width of the flexor tendon in neutral and hook grip positions, respectively. Each measurement was compared between in neutral and in hook grip positions, and also between the affected and contralateral normal digits in each position. Results: In all the digits, the anterior-posterior thickness of flexor tendons significantly increased in hook grip position as compared with in neutral position, whereas radial-ulnar width significantly decreased. Both the A1 pulley and flexor tendons were thicker in the affected digits as compared with contralateral normal digits. Conclusion: The thickness of flexor tendons was significantly increased anteroposteriorly in hook grip position as compared with in neutral position. In trigger finger, A1 pulley and flexor tendon were thickened, and mismatch between the volume of the flexor tendon sheath and the tendons, especially in anterior-posterior direction, might be a cause of repetitive triggering. PMID:27099639

  11. Avulsion Injuries of the Flexor Digitorum Profundus Tendon: An Unclassified Pattern of Injury.

    PubMed

    Abdul Azeem, Mokhtar; Marwan, Yousef; Esmaeel, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Closed avulsion of the flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) tendon is classified based on the impact of injury on the management plan. In this report, we present a case with unclassified pattern of FDP tendon avulsion. The injury involves an intra-articular fracture of the volar part of distal phalanx of the little finger resulting into two bony fragments, one attached to the retracted avulsed tendon and another separated and incarcerated at A4 pulley, and an intact dorsal cortex of the phalanx. Based on that, we recommend the development of a new classification scheme for this condition.

  12. Toe Flexor Strength, Flexibility and Function and Flexor Hallucis Longus Tendon Morphology in Dancers and Non-Dancers.

    PubMed

    Rowley, K Michael; Jarvis, Danielle N; Kurihara, Toshiyuki; Chang, Yu-Jen; Fietzer, Abbigail L; Kulig, Kornelia

    2015-09-01

    Tendinopathy of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL), colloquially referred to as "dancer's tendinitis," is a common condition in dancers and attributed to high demand on this muscle in positions of extreme ankle plantarflexion and metatarsophalangeal (MTP)) flexion and extension. Despite such a high prevalence, there has been little research into preventative or nonsurgical interventions. As a means to identify potential targets for prevention and intervention, this study aimed to characterize toe flexors in dancers by measuring strength, flexibility, function, and FHL tendon morphology. Dancers (n=25) were compared to non-dancers (n=25) in toe flexor isometric strength, first MTP joint range of motion, foot longitudinal arch flexibility, balance ability, endurance during modified heel raises without use of the toes, and FHL tendon thickness, cross-sectional area, and peak spatial frequency. Significant differences were found in functional first MTP joint extension (dancers 101.95°, non-dancers 91.15°, p<0.001), balance ability during single-leg stance on the toes (dancers 11.43 s, non-dancers 5.90 s, p=0.013), and during modified heel raises (dancers 22.20 reps, non-dancers 28.80 reps, p=0.001). Findings indicate that dancers rely on toe flexors more than non-dancers to complete balance and heel raise tasks. Efficacy of using this modified heel raise task with the toes off the edge of a block as a means to train larger plantarflexors and as a nonsurgical intervention should be studied in the future. Improving interventions for FHL tendinopathy will be impactful for dancers, in whom this condition is highly prevalent.

  13. The early inflammatory response after flexor tendon healing: A gene expression and histological analysis

    PubMed Central

    Manning, CN; Havlioglu, N; Knutsen, E; Sakiyama-Elbert, SE; Silva, MJ; Thomopoulos, S; Gelberman, RH

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances in surgical techniques over the past three decades, tendon repairs remain prone to poor clinical outcomes. Previous attempts to improve tendon healing have focused on the later stages of healing (i.e., proliferation and matrix synthesis). The early inflammatory phase of tendon healing, however, is not fully understood and its modulation during healing has not yet been studied. Therefore, the purpose of this work was to characterize the early inflammatory phase of flexor tendon healing with the goal of identifying inflammation-related targets for future treatments. Canine flexor tendons were transected and repaired using techniques identical to those used clinically. The inflammatory response was monitored for 9 days. Temporal changes in immune cell populations and gene expression of inflammation-, matrix degradation-, and extracellular matrix-related factors were examined. Gene expression patterns paralleled changes in repair-site cell populations. Of the observed changes, the most dramatic effect was a greater than 4000-fold up-regulation in the expression of the pro-inflammatory factor IL-1β. While an inflammatory response is likely necessary for healing to occur, high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines may result in collateral tissue damage and impaired tendon healing. These findings suggest that future tendon treatment approaches consider modulation of the inflammatory phase of healing. PMID:24464937

  14. Measurement of friction between pulley and flexor tendon.

    PubMed

    An, K N; Berglund, L; Uchiyama, S; Coert, J H

    1993-01-01

    When tendon excursion takes place through the pulley, friction and drag are encountered at the interface. Repetitive exposure to such friction and attrition of the tendon has been considered one of the important factors causing cumulative trauma and leading to disorders such as tendinitis and tenosynovitis. In this study, development of an experimental method to evaluate friction and drag between the pulley and tendon under different loading conditions and joint configurations is considered. Verification of the model under an ideal situation of sutures across a mechanical pulley was performed.

  15. Reconstruction of neglected patellar tendon ruptures using the quadriceps graft.

    PubMed

    Gomes, João Luiz Ellera; de Oliveira Alves, Jairo André; Zimmermann, José Mauro

    2014-08-01

    Several techniques using different grafts have been described for reconstruction of the patellar tendon after a neglected rupture. Retraction of the quadriceps tendon may compromise repair integrity due to progressive stretching of the graft. The authors present a surgical technique using the central one-third of the quadriceps tendon. This is supported by the fact that the resistance to traction of this segment of the quadriceps tendon equals that of a double-looped semitendinosus graft and that the harvesting of this specific graft promotes muscle inhibition, thus protecting the reconstruction during the recovery period.

  16. Restricted differentiation potential of progenitor cell populations obtained from the equine superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT).

    PubMed

    Williamson, Kate Ann; Lee, Katie Joanna; Humphreys, William James Edward; Comerford, Eithne Josephine Veronica; Clegg, Peter David; Canty-Laird, Elizabeth Gail

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize stem and progenitor cell populations from the equine superficial digital flexor tendon, an energy-storing tendon with similarities to the human Achilles tendon, which is frequently injured. Using published methods for the isolation of tendon-derived stem/progenitor cells by low-density plating we found that isolated cells possessed clonogenicity but were unable to fully differentiate towards mesenchymal lineages using trilineage differentiation assays. In particular, adipogenic differentiation appeared to be restricted, as assessed by Oil Red O staining of stem/progenitor cells cultured in adipogenic medium. We then assessed whether differential adhesion to fibronectin substrates could be used to isolate a population of cells with broader differentiation potential. However we found little difference in the stem and tenogenic gene expression profile of these cells as compared to tenocytes, although the expression of thrombospondin-4 was significantly reduced in hypoxic conditions. Tendon-derived stem/progenitor cells isolated by differential adhesion to fibronectin had a similar differentiation potential to cells isolated by low density plating, and when grown in either normoxic or hypoxic conditions. In summary, we have found a restricted differentiation potential of cells isolated from the equine superficial digital flexor tendon despite evidence for stem/progenitor-like characteristics. PMID:25877997

  17. Human ankle plantar flexor muscle-tendon mechanics and energetics during maximum acceleration sprinting.

    PubMed

    Lai, Adrian; Schache, Anthony G; Brown, Nicholas A T; Pandy, Marcus G

    2016-08-01

    Tendon elastic strain energy is the dominant contributor to muscle-tendon work during steady-state running. Does this behaviour also occur for sprint accelerations? We used experimental data and computational modelling to quantify muscle fascicle work and tendon elastic strain energy for the human ankle plantar flexors (specifically soleus and medial gastrocnemius) for multiple foot contacts of a maximal sprint as well as for running at a steady-state speed. Positive work done by the soleus and medial gastrocnemius muscle fascicles decreased incrementally throughout the maximal sprint and both muscles performed more work for the first foot contact of the maximal sprint (FC1) compared with steady-state running at 5 m s(-1) (SS5). However, the differences in tendon strain energy for both muscles were negligible throughout the maximal sprint and when comparing FC1 to SS5. Consequently, the contribution of muscle fascicle work to stored tendon elastic strain energy was greater for FC1 compared with subsequent foot contacts of the maximal sprint and compared with SS5. We conclude that tendon elastic strain energy in the ankle plantar flexors is just as vital at the start of a maximal sprint as it is at the end, and as it is for running at a constant speed. PMID:27581481

  18. Presence of a long accessory flexor tendon of the toes in surgical treatment for tendinopathy of the insertion of the calcaneal tendon: case report☆

    PubMed Central

    Gomes Júnior, Nelson Pelozo; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Pochini, Alberto de Castro; Raduan, Fernando Cipolini; Ejnisman, Benno; Cohen, Moisés

    2015-01-01

    The presence of accessory tendons in the foot and ankle needs to be recognized, given that depending on their location, they may cause disorders relating either to pain processes or to handling of the surgical findings. We describe the presence of an accessory flexor tendon of the toes, seen in surgical exposure for transferring the long flexor tendon of the hallux to the calcaneus, due to the presence of a disorder of tendinopathy of the insertion of the calcaneal tendon in association with Haglund's syndrome. PMID:26962495

  19. Efficacy of Low Level Laser Therapy After Hand Flexor Tendon Repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayad, K. E.; El Gohary, H. M.; Abd Elrahman, M.; Abd El Mejeed, S. F.; Bekheet, A. B.

    2009-09-01

    Flexor tendon injury is a common problem requiring suturing repair followed by early postoperative mobilization. Muscle atrophy, joint stiffness, osteoarthritis, infection, skin necrosis, ulceration of joint cartilage and tendocutaneous adhesion are familiar complications produced by prolonged immobilization of surgically repaired tendon ruptures. The purpose of this study was to clarify the importance of low level laser therapy after hand flexor tendon repair in zone II. Thirty patients aging between 20 and 40 years were divided into two groups. Patients in group A (n = 15) received a conventional therapeutic exercise program while patients in group B (n = 15) received low level laser therapy combined with the same therapeutic exercise program. The results showed a statistically significant increase in total active motion of the proximal and distal interphalangeal joints as well as maximum hand grip strength at three weeks and three months postoperative, but improvement was more significant in group B. It was concluded that the combination of low level laser therapy and early therapeutic exercises was more effective than therapeutic exercises alone in improving total active motion of proximal and distal interphalangeal joints and hand grip strength after hand flexor tendon repair.

  20. Gliding resistance of flexor tendon associated with carpal tunnel pressure: a biomechanical cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunfeng; Ettema, Anke M; Berglund, Lawrence J; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of carpal tunnel pressure on the gliding characteristics of flexor tendons within the carpal tunnel. Eight fresh human cadaver wrists and hands were used. A balloon was inserted into the carpal tunnel to elevate the pressure. The mean gliding resistance of the middle finger flexor digitorum superficialis tendon was measured with the following six conditions: (1) as a baseline, before balloon insertion; (2) balloon with 0 mmHg pressure; (3) 30 mmHg; (4) 60 mmHg; (5) 90 mmHg; (6) 120 mmHg. The gliding resistance of flexor tendon gradually increased as the carpal tunnel pressure was elevated. At pressures above 60 mmHg, the increase in gliding resistance became significant compared to the baseline condition. This study helps us to understand the relationship between carpal tunnel pressure, which is elevated in the patient with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and tendon gliding resistance, which is a component of the work of flexion. These findings suggest that patients with CTS may have to expend more energy to accomplish specific motions, which may in turn affect symptoms of hand pain, weakness and fatigue, seen commonly in such patients.

  1. Efficacy of Low Level Laser Therapy After Hand Flexor Tendon Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Ayad, K. E.; Abd El Mejeed, S. F.; El Gohary, H. M.; Abd Elrahman, M.; Bekheet, A. B.

    2009-09-27

    Flexor tendon injury is a common problem requiring suturing repair followed by early postoperative mobilization. Muscle atrophy, joint stiffness, osteoarthritis, infection, skin necrosis, ulceration of joint cartilage and tendocutaneous adhesion are familiar complications produced by prolonged immobilization of surgically repaired tendon ruptures. The purpose of this study was to clarify the importance of low level laser therapy after hand flexor tendon repair in zone II. Thirty patients aging between 20 and 40 years were divided into two groups. Patients in group A (n = 15) received a conventional therapeutic exercise program while patients in group B (n = 15) received low level laser therapy combined with the same therapeutic exercise program. The results showed a statistically significant increase in total active motion of the proximal and distal interphalangeal joints as well as maximum hand grip strength at three weeks and three months postoperative, but improvement was more significant in group B. It was concluded that the combination of low level laser therapy and early therapeutic exercises was more effective than therapeutic exercises alone in improving total active motion of proximal and distal interphalangeal joints and hand grip strength after hand flexor tendon repair.

  2. Delayed rupture of flexor tendons in zone V complicated by neuritis 18 years following Galeazzi fracture-dislocation.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Mathias Thomas; Ghosh, Sabyasachi; Shah, Bhavik; Sankar, Thangasamy

    2014-04-16

    We report a rare case of an 84-year-old woman who presented with delayed, complete rupture of superficial (flexor digitorum superficialis) and deep flexor tendons (flexor digitorum profundus) of the third, fourth and fifth digits of the right hand in zone V of the flexor tendons. The patient, who was otherwise healthy, active and independent, incurred a closed fracture of her right wrist 18 years ago, which was treated conservatively. Current X-rays and operative findings confirmed a malunited Galeazzi fracture-dislocation with volar dislocation of the ulna from the distal radioulnar joint. She underwent surgical treatment to improve her hand function and agonising neuritis symptoms, as she was unable to use her middle, ring and little fingers and had developed severe neuritis of the ulnar nerve. Exploration and repair of the flexor tendons, nerve decompressions and Darrach procedure were performed. On follow-up, the patient showed improvement in hand function with the neuritis completely resolved.

  3. Apparent Transverse Compressive Material Properties of the Digital Flexor Tendons and the Median Nerve in the Carpal Tunnel

    PubMed Central

    Main, Erin K; Goetz, Jessica E; Rudert, M James; Goreham-Voss, Curtis M; Brown, Thomas D

    2011-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is a frequently encountered peripheral nerve disorder caused by mechanical insult to the median nerve, which may in part be a result of impingement by the adjacent digital flexor tendons. Realistic finite element (FE) analysis to determine contact stresses between the flexor tendons and median nerve depends upon the use of physiologically accurate material properties. To assess the transverse compressive properties of the digital flexor tendons and median nerve, these tissues from ten cadaveric forearm specimens were compressed transversely while under axial load. The experimental compression data were used in conjunction with an FE-based optimization routine to determine apparent hyperelastic coefficients (μ and α) for a first-order Ogden material property definition. The mean coefficient pairs were μ=35.3kPa, α =8.5 for the superficial tendons, μ=39.4kPa, α=9.2 for the deep tendons, μ=24.9kPa, α=10.9 for the flexor pollicis longus (FPL) tendon, and μ=12.9kPa, α=6.5 for the median nerve. These mean Ogden coefficients indicate that the FPL tendon was more compliant at low strains than either the deep or superficial flexor tendons, and that there was no significant difference between superficial and deep flexor tendon compressive behavior. The median nerve was significantly more compliant than any of the flexor tendons. The material properties determined in this study can be used to better understand the functional mechanics of the carpal tunnel soft tissues and possible mechanisms of median nerve compressive insult, which may lead to the onset of carpal tunnel syndrome. PMID:21194695

  4. Focal Experimental Injury Leads to Widespread Gene Expression and Histologic Changes in Equine Flexor Tendons

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, Else; Dart, Andrew J.; Mondori, Takamitsu; Horadogoda, Neil; Jeffcott, Leo B.; Little, Christopher B.; Smith, Margaret M.

    2015-01-01

    It is not known how extensively a localised flexor tendon injury affects the entire tendon. This study examined the extent of and relationship between histopathologic and gene expression changes in equine superficial digital flexor tendon after a surgical injury. One forelimb tendon was hemi-transected in six horses, and in three other horses, one tendon underwent a sham operation. After euthanasia at six weeks, transected and control (sham and non-operated contralateral) tendons were regionally sampled (medial and lateral halves each divided into six 3cm regions) for histologic (scoring and immunohistochemistry) and gene expression (real time PCR) analysis of extracellular matrix changes. The histopathology score was significantly higher in transected tendons compared to control tendons in all regions except for the most distal (P ≤ 0.03) with no differences between overstressed (medial) and stress-deprived (lateral) tendon halves. Proteoglycan scores were increased by transection in all but the most proximal region (P < 0.02), with increased immunostaining for aggrecan, biglycan and versican. After correcting for location within the tendon, gene expression for aggrecan, versican, biglycan, lumican, collagen types I, II and III, MMP14 and TIMP1 was increased in transected tendons compared with control tendons (P < 0.02) and decreased for ADAMTS4, MMP3 and TIMP3 (P < 0.001). Aggrecan, biglycan, fibromodulin, and collagen types I and III expression positively correlated with all histopathology scores (P < 0.001), whereas lumican, ADAMTS4 and MMP14 expression positively correlated only with collagen fiber malalignment (P < 0.001). In summary, histologic and associated gene expression changes were significant and widespread six weeks after injury to the equine SDFT, suggesting rapid and active development of tendinopathy throughout the entire length of the tendon. These extensive changes distant to the focal injury may contribute to poor functional outcomes and re

  5. Focal experimental injury leads to widespread gene expression and histologic changes in equine flexor tendons.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Else; Jacobsen, Else; Dart, Andrew J; Mondori, Takamitsu; Horadogoda, Neil; Jeffcott, Leo B; Little, Christopher B; Smith, Margaret M

    2015-01-01

    It is not known how extensively a localised flexor tendon injury affects the entire tendon. This study examined the extent of and relationship between histopathologic and gene expression changes in equine superficial digital flexor tendon after a surgical injury. One forelimb tendon was hemi-transected in six horses, and in three other horses, one tendon underwent a sham operation. After euthanasia at six weeks, transected and control (sham and non-operated contralateral) tendons were regionally sampled (medial and lateral halves each divided into six 3 cm regions) for histologic (scoring and immunohistochemistry) and gene expression (real time PCR) analysis of extracellular matrix changes. The histopathology score was significantly higher in transected tendons compared to control tendons in all regions except for the most distal (P ≤ 0.03) with no differences between overstressed (medial) and stress-deprived (lateral) tendon halves. Proteoglycan scores were increased by transection in all but the most proximal region (P < 0.02), with increased immunostaining for aggrecan, biglycan and versican. After correcting for location within the tendon, gene expression for aggrecan, versican, biglycan, lumican, collagen types I, II and III, MMP14 and TIMP1 was increased in transected tendons compared with control tendons (P < 0.02) and decreased for ADAMTS4, MMP3 and TIMP3 (P < 0.001). Aggrecan, biglycan, fibromodulin, and collagen types I and III expression positively correlated with all histopathology scores (P < 0.001), whereas lumican, ADAMTS4 and MMP14 expression positively correlated only with collagen fiber malalignment (P < 0.001). In summary, histologic and associated gene expression changes were significant and widespread six weeks after injury to the equine SDFT, suggesting rapid and active development of tendinopathy throughout the entire length of the tendon. These extensive changes distant to the focal injury may contribute to poor functional outcomes and re

  6. Focal experimental injury leads to widespread gene expression and histologic changes in equine flexor tendons.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Else; Jacobsen, Else; Dart, Andrew J; Mondori, Takamitsu; Horadogoda, Neil; Jeffcott, Leo B; Little, Christopher B; Smith, Margaret M

    2015-01-01

    It is not known how extensively a localised flexor tendon injury affects the entire tendon. This study examined the extent of and relationship between histopathologic and gene expression changes in equine superficial digital flexor tendon after a surgical injury. One forelimb tendon was hemi-transected in six horses, and in three other horses, one tendon underwent a sham operation. After euthanasia at six weeks, transected and control (sham and non-operated contralateral) tendons were regionally sampled (medial and lateral halves each divided into six 3 cm regions) for histologic (scoring and immunohistochemistry) and gene expression (real time PCR) analysis of extracellular matrix changes. The histopathology score was significantly higher in transected tendons compared to control tendons in all regions except for the most distal (P ≤ 0.03) with no differences between overstressed (medial) and stress-deprived (lateral) tendon halves. Proteoglycan scores were increased by transection in all but the most proximal region (P < 0.02), with increased immunostaining for aggrecan, biglycan and versican. After correcting for location within the tendon, gene expression for aggrecan, versican, biglycan, lumican, collagen types I, II and III, MMP14 and TIMP1 was increased in transected tendons compared with control tendons (P < 0.02) and decreased for ADAMTS4, MMP3 and TIMP3 (P < 0.001). Aggrecan, biglycan, fibromodulin, and collagen types I and III expression positively correlated with all histopathology scores (P < 0.001), whereas lumican, ADAMTS4 and MMP14 expression positively correlated only with collagen fiber malalignment (P < 0.001). In summary, histologic and associated gene expression changes were significant and widespread six weeks after injury to the equine SDFT, suggesting rapid and active development of tendinopathy throughout the entire length of the tendon. These extensive changes distant to the focal injury may contribute to poor functional outcomes and re

  7. Effect of maturation and aging on material and ultrasonographic properties of equine superficial digital flexor tendon.

    PubMed

    Gillis, C; Sharkey, N; Stover, S M; Pool, R R; Meagher, D M; Willits, N

    1995-10-01

    Results of studies in human beings and other species have indicated that aging significantly influences the strength, modulus of elasticity, and energy storage ability of tendon. We wanted to determine the effects of aging on the material and ultrasonographic properties of equine superficial digital flexor (SDF) tendon. Ultrasonographic measurements of left forelimb SDF tendon cross-sectional area and mean echogenicity were made in 23 standing horses ranging in age from 2 to 23 years. All horses had not been in work for a minimum of 6 months prior to the study. After euthanasia, left forelimb bone-muscle-tendon-bone specimens were mounted in a materials testing system. The SDF tendon was cyclically loaded sinusoidally 100 times at 0.5 Hz from 1.5 to 5.0% strain, then was submitted to 10-minute creep-and-stress relaxation tests. Modulus of elasticity, load at 3% strain, and creep-and-stress relaxation were determined for each specimen. A significant positive correlation was found between elastic modulus and age. Correlation was not found between age and SDF tendon cross-sectional area or mean echogenicity. When 2-year-old horses were compared with older horses, the latter had tendons with a significantly (P = 0.007) greater modulus of elasticity. The authors conclude that increasing age through maturity is associated with a corresponding increase in equine SDF tendon elastic modulus.

  8. [Use of tissue engineering in the reconstruction of flexor tendon injuries of the hand].

    PubMed

    Bíró, Vilmos

    2015-02-01

    In his literary analysis, the author describes a novel method applied in the reconstruction of flexor tendon injuries of the hand. This procedure is named tissue engineering, and it is examined mainly under experimental circumstances. After definition of the method and descriptions of literary preliminaries the author discusses the healing process of the normal tendon tissue, then development of the scaffold, an important step of tissue engineering is described. After these topics the introduction of the pluripotent mesenchymal stem cells into the scaffold, and proliferation of these cells and development of the sliding systems are presented. The mechanical resisting ability of the formed tendon tissue is also discussed. Finally, the author concludes that as long as results of experimental research cannot be successfully applied into clinical practice, well-tried tendon reconstruction operations and high quality postoperative rehabilitation are needed.

  9. Development of a synthetic replacement for the flexor tendon pulleys--an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Peterson, W W; Manske, P R; Lesker, P A; Kain, C C; Schaefer, R K

    1986-05-01

    A method was developed to reconstruct the fibro-osseous pulleys with Nitex, a synthetic material. Nitex is a closely woven fabric constructed from monofilament nylon fibers. Six adult monkeys (24 digits) had excision of the A1 and A2 pulleys; this was followed by reconstruction of the A2 pulley with the Nitex synthetic material. The animals were killed, two at a time, at 4, 8, and 12 weeks to evaluate the effectiveness of the Nitex pulleys. Flexor tendon function was assessed by biomechanical methods with a tensile testing machine to measure the tendon excursion and the work of flexion (the area under the force-excursion curve) necessary to fully flex each digit; these parameters revealed that the Nitex pulleys were capable of preventing tendon bow-stringing and did not significantly impair tendon gliding. The breaking strength of the Nitex pulleys was comparable to that of normal A2 pulleys (for monkeys weighing less than 10 kg) and it was sufficient to allow immediate mobilization of the digits postoperatively without fear of pulley rupture. Histologic examination showed minimal foreign body reaction around the Nitex, and the gliding surface of a Nitex pulley was found to be covered with a smooth layer of fibrous tissue with minimal adhesions to the underlying flexor tendon. The synthetic Nitex pulley appears to have the potential to function as an effective fibro-osseous pulley replacement.

  10. Flexor tendon synovitis of the hand as first manifestation of atypical tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Krapohl, Björn D; Kömürcü, Fercan; Stöckl-Hiesleitner, Sabine; Deutinger, Maria

    2007-02-01

    We present the case of a 73-year old patient suffering from chronic flexor tendon synovitis of the wrist with carpal tunnel syndrome. He underwent synovectomy and median nerve release. Primary bacteriology was negative. Histology of the excised synovia revelead non-caseating granuloma as typical for sarcoidosis. Further screening for sarcoidosis was negative. Culture of a sample harvested from the poorly healing wound was finally positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Tuberculostatic treatment was started and the wound gradually healed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of atypical non-caseating and sarcoidosis-like granulomas of the flexor tendon synovia of the hand as first manifestation of tuberculosis.

  11. Enhanced Zone II Flexor Tendon Repair through a New Half Hitch Loop Suture Configuration

    PubMed Central

    Thomopoulos, Stavros; Gelberman, Richard H.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the impact of a new half hitch loop suture configuration on flexor tendon repair mechanics. Cadaver canine flexor digitorum profundus tendons were repaired with 4- or 8-strands, 4–0 or 3–0 suture, with and without half hitch loops. An additional group underwent repair with half hitch loops but without the terminal knot. Half hitch loops improved the strength of 8-strand repairs by 21% when 4–0, and 33% when 3–0 suture was used, and caused a shift in failure mode from suture pullout to suture breakage. 8-strand repairs with half hitch loops but without a terminal knot produced equivalent mechanical properties to those without half hitch loops but with a terminal knot. 4-strand repairs were limited by the strength of the suture in all groups and, as a result, the presence of half hitch loops did not alter the mechanical properties. Overall, half hitch loops improved repair mechanics, allowing failure strength to reach the full capability of suture strength. Improving the mechanical properties of flexor tendon repair with half hitch loops has the potential to reduce the postoperative risk of gap formation and catastrophic rupture in the early postoperative period. PMID:27101409

  12. Comparison of treatment outcomes for superficial digital flexor tendonitis in National Hunt racehorses.

    PubMed

    Witte, S; Dedman, C; Harriss, F; Kelly, G; Chang, Y-M; Witte, T H

    2016-10-01

    Superficial digital flexor (SDF) tendonitis is a common injury in Thoroughbred racehorses. Injuries require prolonged rehabilitation, with unpredictable outcomes and a high incidence of re-injury. This observational case-control study aimed to compare race outcomes after commonly advocated treatments for tendon healing. Clinical and racing records were evaluated for 127 National Hunt racehorses treated between 2007 and 2011 for an SDF tendon injury. Two age- and sex-matched control horses were selected for each case horse to analyse the effect on post-injury racing outcomes of pre-injury data, lesion severity and treatment group [controlled exercise alone, bar firing, intralesional platelet-rich plasma (PRP), tendon splitting, tendon splitting combined with bar firing]. Control horses raced more often than case horses, with higher maximum racing post rating (RPRmax) and longer racing distances. Pre-injury racing performance was not associated with treatment group. Rate of return to racing was not associated with lesion severity or treatment group. Number of races, total distance raced post-injury and RPRmax were not associated with lesion severity or treatment group. Controlled exercise alone offered similar post-injury racing outcomes in National Hunt racehorses with SDF tendonitis to the other treatment options examined. Bar firing, either alone or in conjunction with tendon splitting, provided no additional benefit in rate of return to racing and race performance. PMID:27687944

  13. Comparison of treatment outcomes for superficial digital flexor tendonitis in National Hunt racehorses.

    PubMed

    Witte, S; Dedman, C; Harriss, F; Kelly, G; Chang, Y-M; Witte, T H

    2016-10-01

    Superficial digital flexor (SDF) tendonitis is a common injury in Thoroughbred racehorses. Injuries require prolonged rehabilitation, with unpredictable outcomes and a high incidence of re-injury. This observational case-control study aimed to compare race outcomes after commonly advocated treatments for tendon healing. Clinical and racing records were evaluated for 127 National Hunt racehorses treated between 2007 and 2011 for an SDF tendon injury. Two age- and sex-matched control horses were selected for each case horse to analyse the effect on post-injury racing outcomes of pre-injury data, lesion severity and treatment group [controlled exercise alone, bar firing, intralesional platelet-rich plasma (PRP), tendon splitting, tendon splitting combined with bar firing]. Control horses raced more often than case horses, with higher maximum racing post rating (RPRmax) and longer racing distances. Pre-injury racing performance was not associated with treatment group. Rate of return to racing was not associated with lesion severity or treatment group. Number of races, total distance raced post-injury and RPRmax were not associated with lesion severity or treatment group. Controlled exercise alone offered similar post-injury racing outcomes in National Hunt racehorses with SDF tendonitis to the other treatment options examined. Bar firing, either alone or in conjunction with tendon splitting, provided no additional benefit in rate of return to racing and race performance.

  14. Digital flexion contracture and severe carpal tunnel syndrome due to tophaceus infiltration of wrist flexor tendon: first manifestation of gout.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Cortés, P; Caba, M; Gómez-Sánchez, R; Gómez-Morales, M

    2011-11-09

    The authors report an unusual case of flexor tenosynovitis, severe carpal tunnel syndrome, and triggering at the carpal tunnel as the first manifestation of gout. A 69-year-old man presented with digital flexion contracture and severe carpal tunnel syndrome of his right hand and was treated surgically. A flexor tenosynovectomy and a median nerve neurolysis were performed through an extended carpal tunnel approach. The sublimis and the profundus tendons were involved. Partial ruptures and multiple whitish lesions suggestive of tophacceous infiltration of the flexor tendons were seen. Macroscopically, the removed synovial tissue was involved by multiple whitish nodules that were milimetric in size and was suggestive of monosodium urate crystals deposits. By light microscopy examination, numerous nonnecrotizing granulomas of different sizes were observed that were compounded by large aggregations of acellular nonpolarized material, surrounded by epithelioid histiocytes, mononuclear cells, and foreign body multinucleated giant cells. Postoperatively, the patient recovered with resolution of the median nerve symptoms and a near-to-full range of motion of the affected digits.To the authors' knowledge, this patient is the first case report with flexor tendons tophacceous infiltration as the first clinical sign of gout. Gouty flexor tenosynovitis can occur in the absence of a long history of gout. A high index of suspicion is paramount to the initiation of proper management. Operative treatment of gouty flexor tenosynovitis is mandatory to debulk tophaceous deposits, improve tendon gliding, and decompress nerves. Routine uric acid determination could be helpful in the preoperative evaluation of patients with flexor tenosynovitis.

  15. Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath with simultaneous two tendon involvement of the foot treated with excision of the tumour and reconstruction of the flexor retinaculum using tibialis posterior tendon in a paediatric patient: A rare case report.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Vivek; Ansari, Tahir; Mittal, Samarth; Sharma, Pankaj; Nalwa, Aasma

    2015-12-01

    Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath is a benign soft tissue tumour arising from the tendon sheath. The involvement of foot and ankle by such tumours is relatively rare. Children are not commonly afflicted by this condition. All such tumours are reported to arise either from a single tendon sheath or one joint. We report a case of giant cell tumour of tendon sheath in a 12-year-old child, arising simultaneously from the tendon sheaths of tibialis posterior and flexor digitorum longus tendons, as well as extending into the ankle joint. It was treated by complete excision of the mass along with the tendon sheaths with reconstruction of the flexor retinaculum. The location of the tumour, age of the patient, diffuse nature of the tumour and novel technique of reconstruction of the flexor retinaculum make this case extremely rare and the first to be reported in literature.

  16. Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath with simultaneous two tendon involvement of the foot treated with excision of the tumour and reconstruction of the flexor retinaculum using tibialis posterior tendon in a paediatric patient: A rare case report.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Vivek; Ansari, Tahir; Mittal, Samarth; Sharma, Pankaj; Nalwa, Aasma

    2015-12-01

    Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath is a benign soft tissue tumour arising from the tendon sheath. The involvement of foot and ankle by such tumours is relatively rare. Children are not commonly afflicted by this condition. All such tumours are reported to arise either from a single tendon sheath or one joint. We report a case of giant cell tumour of tendon sheath in a 12-year-old child, arising simultaneously from the tendon sheaths of tibialis posterior and flexor digitorum longus tendons, as well as extending into the ankle joint. It was treated by complete excision of the mass along with the tendon sheaths with reconstruction of the flexor retinaculum. The location of the tumour, age of the patient, diffuse nature of the tumour and novel technique of reconstruction of the flexor retinaculum make this case extremely rare and the first to be reported in literature. PMID:26564735

  17. Restricted differentiation potential of progenitor cell populations obtained from the equine superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT)

    PubMed Central

    Humphreys, William James Edward; Comerford, Eithne Josephine Veronica; Clegg, Peter David; Canty‐Laird, Elizabeth Gail

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to characterize stem and progenitor cell populations from the equine superficial digital flexor tendon, an energy‐storing tendon with similarities to the human Achilles tendon, which is frequently injured. Using published methods for the isolation of tendon‐derived stem/progenitor cells by low‐density plating we found that isolated cells possessed clonogenicity but were unable to fully differentiate towards mesenchymal lineages using trilineage differentiation assays. In particular, adipogenic differentiation appeared to be restricted, as assessed by Oil Red O staining of stem/progenitor cells cultured in adipogenic medium. We then assessed whether differential adhesion to fibronectin substrates could be used to isolate a population of cells with broader differentiation potential. However we found little difference in the stem and tenogenic gene expression profile of these cells as compared to tenocytes, although the expression of thrombospondin‐4 was significantly reduced in hypoxic conditions. Tendon‐derived stem/progenitor cells isolated by differential adhesion to fibronectin had a similar differentiation potential to cells isolated by low density plating, and when grown in either normoxic or hypoxic conditions. In summary, we have found a restricted differentiation potential of cells isolated from the equine superficial digital flexor tendon despite evidence for stem/progenitor‐like characteristics. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Orthopaedic Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Orthopaedic Research Society. J Orthop Res 33:849–858, 2015. PMID:25877997

  18. Repetitive differential finger motion increases shear strain between the flexor tendon and subsynovial connective tissue.

    PubMed

    Tat, Jimmy; Kociolek, Aaron M; Keir, Peter J

    2013-10-01

    Non-inflammatory fibrosis and thickening of the subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT) are characteristic in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) patients. These pathological changes have been linked to repetitive hand tasks that create shear forces between the flexor tendons and SSCT. We measured the relative motion of the flexor digitorum superficialis tendon and SSCT during two repetitive finger tasks using color Doppler ultrasound. Twelve participants performed flexion-extension cycles for 30 min with the long finger alone (differential movement) and with all four fingers together (concurrent movement). Shear strain index (SSI, a relative measure of excursion in flexion and extension) and maximum velocity ratio (MVR, the ratio of SSCT versus tendon during flexion and extension) were used to represent shear. A linear effect of exertion time was significant and corresponded with larger tendon shear in differential motion. The flexion SSI increased 20.4% from the first to the 30th minute, while MVR decreased 8.9% in flexion and 8.7% in extension. No significant changes were found during concurrent motion. These results suggest that exposure to repetitive differential finger tasks may increase the risk of shear injury in the carpal tunnel.

  19. Gliding characteristics between flexor tendons and surrounding tissues in the carpal tunnel: a biomechanical cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunfeng; Ettema, Anke M; Osamura, Naoki; Berglund, Lawrence J; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the gliding characteristics of flexor tendons within the carpal tunnel with varied wrist positions and tendon motion styles, which may help us to understand the relationship between carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and repetitive hand motion. Eight fresh human cadaveric wrists and hands were used. The peak (PGR) and mean (MGR) gliding resistance of the middle finger flexor digitorum superficialis tendon were measured with the wrist in 0, 30, and 60 degrees of flexion and extension. While moving all three fingers together, the PGR at 60 degrees flexion was significantly higher than that at 0, 30, or 60 degrees extension. While moving the middle finger alone, the PGR at 60 and 30 degrees flexion was significantly higher than the PGR at 60 degrees extension. The PGR moving the middle finger FDS alone was significantly greater than that for all three digits moving together in 0, 30, and 60 degrees flexion. Differential finger motion with wrist flexion elevated the tendon gliding resistance in the carpal tunnel, which may be relevant in considering the possible role of wrist position and activity in the etiology of CTS.

  20. Layered chitosan-collagen hydrogel/aligned PLLA nanofiber construct for flexor tendon regeneration.

    PubMed

    Deepthi, S; Nivedhitha Sundaram, M; Deepti Kadavan, J; Jayakumar, R

    2016-11-20

    The aim of our study was to develop a tendon construct of electrospun aligned poly (l-lactic acid) (PLLA) nanofibers, to mimic the aligned collagen fiber bundles and layering PLLA fibers with chitosan-collagen hydrogel, to mimic the glycosaminoglycans of sheath ECM for tendon regeneration. The hydrogel coated electrospun membrane was rolled and an outer coating of alginate gel was given to prevent peritendinous adhesion. The developed constructs were characterized by SEM, FT-IR and tensile testing. Protein adsorption studies showed lower protein adsorption on coated scaffolds compared to uncoated scaffolds. The samples were proven to be non-toxic to tenocytes. The chitosan-collagen/PLLA uncoated scaffolds and alginate gel coated chitosan-collagen/PLLA scaffolds showed good cell proliferation. The tenocytes showed good attachment and spreading on the scaffolds. This study indicated that the developed chitosan-collagen/PLLA/alginate scaffold would be suitable for flexor tendon regeneration. PMID:27561521

  1. Structural changes of the carpal tunnel, median nerve and flexor tendons in MRI before and after endoscopic carpal tunnel release.

    PubMed

    Momose, Toshimitsu; Uchiyama, Shigeharu; Kobayashi, Seneki; Nakagawa, Hiroyuki; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the structural changes of the carpal tunnel, median nerve, and flexor tendons in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before and after endoscopic carpal tunnel release (ECTR). We studied 36 hands undergoing ECTR. In MRI, the cross-sectional area of the carpal tunnel and the median nerve at the hamate and the pisiform levels were measured. The distance from the volar side of carpal bone to the median nerve or tendons and the volar displacement were measured. In post-operative MRI, the transverse carpal ligament could not be well delineated and the carpal tunnel was significantly enlarged both at the hamate and pisiform levels. The median nerve was enlarged at the hamate level. The median nerve and flexor tendons significantly moved to the volar side. The volar displacement of the median nerve and flexor digitorum superficialis in the long and ring fingers was greater than the other tendons.

  2. Tendon elastic strain energy in the human ankle plantar-flexors and its role with increased running speed.

    PubMed

    Lai, Adrian; Schache, Anthony G; Lin, Yi-Chung; Pandy, Marcus G

    2014-09-01

    The human ankle plantar-flexors, the soleus and gastrocnemius, utilize tendon elastic strain energy to reduce muscle fiber work and optimize contractile conditions during running. However, studies to date have considered only slow to moderate running speeds up to 5 m s(-1). Little is known about how the human ankle plantar-flexors utilize tendon elastic strain energy as running speed is advanced towards maximum sprinting. We used data obtained from gait experiments in conjunction with musculoskeletal modeling and optimization techniques to calculate muscle-tendon unit (MTU) work, tendon elastic strain energy and muscle fiber work for the ankle plantar-flexors as participants ran at five discrete steady-state speeds ranging from jogging (~2 m s(-1)) to sprinting (≥8 m s(-1)). As running speed progressed from jogging to sprinting, the contribution of tendon elastic strain energy to the positive work generated by the MTU increased from 53% to 74% for the soleus and from 62% to 75% for the gastrocnemius. This increase was facilitated by greater muscle activation and the relatively isometric behavior of the soleus and gastrocnemius muscle fibers. Both of these characteristics enhanced tendon stretch and recoil, which contributed to the bulk of the change in MTU length. Our results suggest that as steady-state running speed is advanced towards maximum sprinting, the human ankle plantar-flexors continue to prioritize the storage and recovery of tendon elastic strain energy over muscle fiber work.

  3. ACL reconstruction: patellar tendon versus hamstring grafts--economical aspects.

    PubMed

    Forssblad, Magnus; Valentin, Anders; Engström, Björn; Werner, Suzanne

    2006-06-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to compare the costs for the use of patellar tendon versus hamstring tendons as grafts for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction including the different fixation methods. The background is that during recent years there has been a dramatic shift from patellar tendon to hamstring tendons in ACL reconstructions in Sweden. All our patients with ACL reconstructions performed during 1 year (2004) were included. Knee joints numbering 440 in 439 patients were primary ACL reconstructions. A hamstring graft was used in 345 knee joints (78.4%) and a patellar tendon graft in 95 (21.6%) of the patients (Table 2). On average 34 (SD 12.9; range 14-63) ACL reconstructions per surgeon were performed by a total of 14 surgeons. The average cost for patellar tendon procedure was 197 euros compared to 436 euros for the hamstring procedure. Mean time for surgery in primary reconstructions was 11.5 min shorter (P<0.001) for patellar tendon reconstructions (71.3+/-31 min) compared to hamstring reconstructions (83.2+/-27 min). This means a difference in cost of 90 euros. The total additional cost (fixation and surgery time) for the hamstring method compared to the patellar tendon method was on an average 329 euros. From a strict economic point of view we therefore recommend or at least consider the use of the patellar tendon as a graft in ACL reconstructions. PMID:16570193

  4. Neglected Achilles Tendon Rupture Treated with Flexor Hallucis Longus transfer with two turndown gastrocnemius fascia flap and reinforced with plantaris tendon.

    PubMed

    Mao, Haijiao; Shi, Zengyuan; Xu, Dachuan; Liu, Zhenxin

    2015-09-01

    Neglected Achilles Tendon Ruptures are commonly seen by orthopaedic surgeons. In cases resistant to conservative treatment, a variety of surgical procedures have been utilized in the past. The senior -surgeon at our institution has utilized a technique -employing two turndown fascia flaps fashioned from the proximal Achilles tendon augmented by a tenomyodesis of the flexor hallucis longus and plantaris tendon. The purpose of this study was to assess the clinical outcome of all patients who underwent this procedure. The medical records of 10 cases that underwent this procedure were retrospectively reviewed. We completed data collection sets using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hind foot scores, isokinetic evaluation, and postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 1 year of follow-up. The mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hind foot scores improved from 64.4±3.54. Isokinetic testing at 30º/sec and 120º/sec revealed an mean deficits of 24.5%, respectively, in the plantar flexion peak torque of the involved ankle than non-involved ankle. The flexor hallucis longus tendon, gastrocnemius fascia flap and plantaris were well -integrated into the Achilles tendon forming a homogenous tendon, which was confirmed in MRI. Our subjective and objective data indicate that the reconstructive technique using flexor hallucis longus transfer with two turndown gastrocnemius fascia flaps and plantaris tendon is a good option for repairing large gap defect of Achilles tendon.

  5. Rehabilitation outcomes in patients with early and two-stage reconstruction of flexor tendon injuries

    PubMed Central

    Sade, Ilgin; İnanir, Murat; Şen, Suzan; Çakmak, Esra; Kablanoğlu, Serkan; Selçuk, Barin; Dursun, Nigar

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The primary aim of this study was to assess rehabilitation outcomes for early and two-stage repair of hand flexor tendon injuries. The secondary purpose of this study was to compare the findings between treatment groups. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-three patients were included in this study. Early repair (n=14) and two-stage repair (n=9) groups were included in a rehabilitation program that used hand splints. This retrospective evaluated patients according to their demographic characteristics, including age, gender, injured hand, dominant hand, cause of injury, zone of injury, number of affected fingers, and accompanying injuries. Pain, range of motion, and grip strength were evaluated using a visual analog scale, goniometer, and dynamometer, respectively. [Results] Both groups showed significant improvements in pain and finger flexion after treatment compared with baseline measurements. However, no significant differences were observed between the two treatment groups. Similar results were obtained for grip strength and pinch grip, whereas gross grip was better in the early tendon repair group. [Conclusion] Early and two-stage reconstruction of patients with flexor tendon injuries can be performed with similarly favorable responses and effective rehabilitation programs.

  6. Rehabilitation outcomes in patients with early and two-stage reconstruction of flexor tendon injuries

    PubMed Central

    Sade, Ilgin; İnanir, Murat; Şen, Suzan; Çakmak, Esra; Kablanoğlu, Serkan; Selçuk, Barin; Dursun, Nigar

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The primary aim of this study was to assess rehabilitation outcomes for early and two-stage repair of hand flexor tendon injuries. The secondary purpose of this study was to compare the findings between treatment groups. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-three patients were included in this study. Early repair (n=14) and two-stage repair (n=9) groups were included in a rehabilitation program that used hand splints. This retrospective evaluated patients according to their demographic characteristics, including age, gender, injured hand, dominant hand, cause of injury, zone of injury, number of affected fingers, and accompanying injuries. Pain, range of motion, and grip strength were evaluated using a visual analog scale, goniometer, and dynamometer, respectively. [Results] Both groups showed significant improvements in pain and finger flexion after treatment compared with baseline measurements. However, no significant differences were observed between the two treatment groups. Similar results were obtained for grip strength and pinch grip, whereas gross grip was better in the early tendon repair group. [Conclusion] Early and two-stage reconstruction of patients with flexor tendon injuries can be performed with similarly favorable responses and effective rehabilitation programs. PMID:27630400

  7. Four-Strand Core Suture Improves Flexor Tendon Repair Compared to Two-Strand Technique in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Beyersdoerfer, Sascha Tobias; Vollmar, Brigitte; Mittlmeier, Thomas; Gierer, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. This study was designed to investigate the influence of the amount of suture material on the formation of peritendinous adhesions of intrasynovial flexor tendon repairs. Materials and Methods. In 14 rabbits, the flexor tendons of the third and the fourth digit of the right hind leg were cut and repaired using a 2- or 4-strand core suture technique. The repaired tendons were harvested after three and eight weeks. The range of motion of the affected toes was measured and the tendons were processed histologically. The distance between the transected tendon ends, the changes in the peritendinous space, and cellular and extracellular inflammatory reaction were quantified by different staining. Results. A 4-strand core suture resulted in significantly less gap formation. The 2-strand core suture showed a tendency to less adhesion formation. Doubling of the intratendinous suture material was accompanied by an initial increase in leukocyte infiltration and showed a greater amount of formation of myofibroblasts. From the third to the eighth week after flexor tendon repair, both the cellular and the extracellular inflammation decreased significantly. Conclusion. A 4-strand core suture repair leads to a significantly better tendon healing process with less diastasis between the sutured tendon ends despite initially pronounced inflammatory response. PMID:27446949

  8. The Effect of Suture Preloading on the Force to Failure and Gap Formation After Flexor Tendon Repair

    PubMed Central

    Vanhees, Matthias; Thoreson, Andrew R.; Larson, Dirk R.; Amadio, Peter C.; An, Kai-Nan; Zhao, Chunfeng

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Gap formation is a common and severe complication after flexor tendon repair that can affect the outcome and prolong tendon healing. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect that a pretensional force applied to the suture during tendon repair has on the repair strength and force that causes gap formation. Methods We used a total of 48 flexor digitorum profundus tendons from 12 human cadaver hands. We employed a core tendon suture, using the modified Pennington technique, and a running suture for flexor tendon repair. Before tying the knots of the core suture, we preloaded the sutures in each tendon end 0, 5, 10, or 15 N for 10 seconds to compare the effect of loading magnitude on repaired tendon peak force to failure and force causing gap formation. Results The force to form a gap of 2 mm in the 15-N preload group was significantly increased compared with the 0-N and 5-N preload groups. At the 3-mm gap formation, the force of all preload groups was significantly higher than the nonpreload group. The peak force with a preload of 10 N and 15 N was significantly higher than 0-N preload. Conclusions These findings suggest that pretensioning with 10 to 15 N at the suture–tendon interface before tying the knot has a beneficial effect on both the tendon gap formation and the peak force to failure. Clinical relevance When the surgeons perform tendon repair, pretensioning at the suture–tendon conjunction will increase the repair strength. PMID:23261189

  9. Flexor pulley reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Dy, Christopher J; Daluiski, Aaron

    2013-05-01

    Flexor pulley reconstruction is a challenging surgery. Injuries often occur after traumatic lacerations or forceful extension applied to an acutely flexed finger. Surgical treatment is reserved for patients with multiple closed pulley ruptures, persistent pain, or dysfunction after attempted nonoperative management of a single pulley rupture, or during concurrent or staged flexor tendon repair or reconstruction. If the pulley cannot be repaired primarily, pulley reconstruction can be performed using graft woven into remnant pulley rim or looping graft around the phalanx. Regardless of the reconstructive technique, the surgeon should emulate the length, tension, and glide of the native pulley. PMID:23660059

  10. Three-dimensional sonographic imaging of the equine superficial digital flexor tendon.

    PubMed

    Wood, A K; Sehgal, C M; Reef, V B

    1994-11-01

    In a feasability study, a technique for constructing 3-dimensional sonographic images of the superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) was established in 6 clinically normal horses and applied to 7 horses with injured SDFT. Two-dimensional B-mode sonographic images were recorded on videotape as the sonographic transducer was manually moved along the palmar aspect of the metacarpal region. Selected videofields were digitized, and 3-dimensional images were constructed, using a computer work station and dedicated software program. The 3-dimensional images were of high quality and presented qualitative clinical information in unique fashion. Indication of the extent of SDFT injuries was excellent. Such 3-dimensional images would be especially useful in explaining to owners and trainers the importance of the injury to their horse and would have a role in monitoring tendon healing and in the assessment of various treatments.

  11. Treatment of posterior tibial tendon dysfunction without flexor digitorum tendon transfer: a retrospective study of 34 patients.

    PubMed

    Didomenico, Lawrence; Stein, Dawn Y; Wargo-Dorsey, Mari

    2011-01-01

    A retrospective study of patients who underwent gastrocnemius recession, double calcaneal osteotomy (Evans osteotomy and percutaneous calcaneal displacement osteotomy), and medial column fusion for the treatment of posterior tibial tendon dysfunction was conducted. The senior author performed the procedures between November 2002 and January 2009 on 34 patients who displayed at least Johnson and Strom stage II deformity and had undergone 12 months of failed conservative treatment. The coauthors evaluated the patients' radiographs before and after the operation. At a mean of 14 (range 3 to 44) months after surgery, radiographic measurements demonstrated statistically significant changes in the structural alignment of the feet. Based on our experience with these patients, we believe that a double calcaneal osteotomy combined with a gastrocnemius recession and stabilization of the medial column for the treatment of posterior tibial tendon dysfunction provides satisfactory correction, stability, and realignment of the foot. Furthermore, we feel that the use of flexor digitorum longus transfer, as well as triple arthrodesis, can be avoided without compromising the outcome when surgically treating posterior tibial tendon dysfunction. PMID:21397524

  12. Effects of roxarsone and monensin on digital flexoral tendons of broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Rath, N C; Chapman, H D; Fitz-Coy, S H; Balog, J M; Huff, G R; Huff, W E

    1998-04-01

    Roxarsone and monensin are common poultry feed additives that are used alone or in combination with other drugs to improve growth and feed utilization in young birds. The effects of monensin and roxarsone on the physiology of flexoral tendons of broiler chickens were examined to understand their relationships to leg weakness that have been occasionally associated with these drugs. Day-old chickens were fed either roxarsone or monensin for a period of 6 wk with two regimens of each of the drugs (roxarsone, 45.4 or 90.8 g/ton feed; monensin, 100 or 150 g/ton feed). None of the treatments had any adverse effect on the growth of the birds or caused any significant leg problem. Roxarsone at 45.4 g/ton caused a significant gain in body weight. The biomechanical strength of digital flexoral tendons was measured in several ways. There were no statistical differences in load at break, the modulus of elasticity, or stress or strain levels between different treatment groups and birds that received no medication. There were no differences in collagen, proteoglycan, and pyridinoline content of tendons. Sequential extraction of tendons with different solvents revealed a significant increase in the percentage of guanidine HCl extractible collagens in monensin-treated birds, and a decrease in the acid extractible collagen in both roxarsone- and monensin-treated groups. The relative content of collagen in acid extractible collagens were significantly small relative to total collagen content. Majority of collagen (84 to 90%) was extractible with pepsin. About 8 to 11% of total collagen was resistant to pepsin that was extractible with collagenase; this did not differ between treatment groups. Roxarsone treatment had no effect on the guanidine soluble collagen pool. The effect of monensin on the increase in guanidine soluble pool of collagen may relate to its disruptive effects on cellular secretory processes, which may be of significance in modulating connective tissue function in

  13. A Barbed Suture Repair For Flexor Tendons: A Novel Technique With No Exposed Barbs

    PubMed Central

    Sugrue, Conor; Chan, Jeffrey C.; Delgado, Luis; Zeugolis, Dimitrios; Carroll, Seam M.; Kelly, Jack L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Barbed suture technology has shown promise in flexor tendon repairs, as there is an even distribution of load and the need for a knot is eliminated. We propose that a quick and simple, novel, barbed technique without any exposed barbs on the tendon surface has comparable strength and a smaller cross-sectional area at the repair site than traditional methods of repair. Methods: Forty porcine flexor tendons were randomized to polybutester 4-strand barbed repair or to 4-strand Adelaide monofilament repair. The cross-sectional area was measured before and after repair. Biomechanical testing was carried out and 2-mm gap formation force, ultimate strength of repair, and method of failure were recorded. Results: The mean ultimate strength of the barbed repairs was 54.51 ± 17.9 while that of the Adelaide repairs was 53.17 ± 16.35. The mean 2-mm gap formation force for the barbed group was 44.71 ± 17.86 whereas that of the Adelaide group was 20.25 ± 4.99. The postrepair percentage change in cross-sectional area at the repair site for the Adelaide group and barbed group was 12.0 ± 2.3 and 4.6 ± 2.8, respectively. Conclusions: We demonstrated that a 4-strand knotless, barbed method attained comparable strength to that of the traditional Adelaide repair technique. The barbed method had a significantly reduced cross-sectional area at the repair site compared with the Adelaide group. The 2-mm gap formation force was less in the barbed group than the Adelaide group. Barbed repairs show promise for tendon repairs; this simple method warrants further study in an animal model. PMID:25426354

  14. A rare complication of scaphoid nonunion: Multiple flexor tendon lesions. A case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Pierrart, J; Rétoré, J-Y; Leclercq, C

    2016-04-01

    This case report describes a patient who presented with a complete rupture of the flexor pollicis longus (FPL) tendon and partial rupture of the flexor digitorum profundus of the index finger, secondary to scaphoid nonunion. This is a rare, late complication that deserves to be described because of the potential diagnostic confusion with anterior interosseous nerve palsy. No case has been reported since 1999 in the literature. The mechanism was an attrition rupture due to sharp osteophytes. The scaphoid osteophytes were removed and the FPL was repaired by tendon transfer. The results were satisfactory at the last follow-up. PMID:27117128

  15. Repair of severe muscle belly lacerations using a tendon graft.

    PubMed

    Botte, M J; Gelberman, R H; Smith, D G; Silver, M A; Gellman, H

    1987-05-01

    Fourteen patients with 58 severe forearm muscle belly lacerations had muscle repair using tendon grafts. At mean follow-up of 14 months, results of manual muscle testing (N = 58) were: grade 5, 42%, grade 4, 14%, grade 3, 9%, grade 2, 9%, grade 1, 12%, and grade 0, 15%. Mean grip strength of the injured extremity, in pounds per square inch, was 33.5 compared with 83.4 on the noninjured side. Tendon excursion and joint mobility were maintained, and there were no postoperative complications. Tendon grafting of severe muscle lacerations is an effective method to overcome extensive defects.

  16. Parathyroid hormone 1-34 enhances extracellular matrix deposition and organization during flexor tendon repair.

    PubMed

    Lee, Daniel J; Southgate, Richard D; Farhat, Youssef M; Loiselle, Alayna E; Hammert, Warren C; Awad, Hani A; O'Keefe, Regis J

    2015-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) 1-34 is known to enhance fracture healing. Tendon repair is analogous to bone healing in its dependence on the proliferation and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells, matrix formation, and tissue remodeling.(1,2,3) We hypothesized that PTH 1-34 enhances tendon healing in a flexor digitorum longus (FDL) tendon repair model. C57Bl/6J mice were treated with either intraperitoneal PTH 1-34 or vehicle-control (PBS). Tendons were harvested at 3-28 days for histology, gene expression, and biomechanical testing. The metatarsophalangeal joint range of motion was reduced 1.5-2-fold in PTH 1-34 mice compared to control mice. The gliding coefficient, a measure of adhesion formation, was 2-3.5-fold higher in PTH 1-34 mice. At 14 days post-repair, the tensile strength was twofold higher in PTH 1-34 specimens, but at 28 days there were no differences. PTH 1-34 mice had increased fibrous tissue deposition that correlated with elevated expression of collagens and fibronectin as seen on quantitative PCR. PTH 1-34 accelerated the deposition of reparative tissue but increased adhesion formation.

  17. Flexor digitorum longus tendoscopy.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2012-01-01

    The flexor digitorum longus tendon is susceptible to injury along its entire course, and lacerations, ruptures, longitudinal tears, and stenosing tenosynovitis have all been reported. Moreover, this tendon is commonly used for reconstruction of dysfunctional posterior tibial and Achilles tendons. Traditionally, surgery involving the flexor digitorum longus tendon was performed via open incision. We describe a technique of flexor digitorum longus tendoscopy that may encourage the future development of a minimally invasive approach to flexor digitorum longus tendon procedures. PMID:22727339

  18. Full-thickness quadriceps tendon: An easy cruciate reconstruction graft.

    PubMed

    Slullitel, D; Blasco, A; Periotti, G

    2001-09-01

    Full-thickness quadriceps tendon strength has been found to be similar or higher than that of the patellar tendon. Current techniques spare the deep vastus intermedius to avoid piercing the suprapatellar pouch, which might result in loss of visualization. This approach mainly results in loss of graft thickness and surgical problems related to the dissection made through the tendon. We describe a technique where a full-thickness graft can be used, making tendon stripping easier. We also describe how to preserve visualization during surgery. A double anchorage of the tendinous part of the graft on the femoral side is used together with fixation of the bone end on the tibial side, allowing early motion and thereby avoiding suprapatellar pouch adhesions.

  19. Attritional Rupture of the Little Finger Flexor Digitorum Profundus Tendon in the Carpal Tunnel in a Patient with Acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Lee, Munn Yi Tina; Jin, Yeo Chong

    2016-02-01

    Spontaneous rupture of flexor tendons within the carpal tunnel is rare in the absence of rheumatoid arthritis. Other predisposing conditions such as gout, infection, pisotriquetrial osteoarthritis, as well as hook of hamate fracture non-union, have previously been reported. However, tendon ruptures of the hand in the presence of acromegaly, as well as spontaneous ruptures within the carpal tunnel, have not been described in the literature. PMID:27454510

  20. Tendon grafts: their natural history, biology and future development.

    PubMed

    Wong, R; Alam, N; McGrouther, A D; Wong, J K F

    2015-09-01

    The use of tendon grafts has diminished as regimes of primary repairs and rehabilitation have improved, but they remain important in secondary reconstruction. Relatively little is known about the cellular biology of grafts, and the general perception is that they have little biological activity. The reality is that there is a wealth of cellular and molecular changes occurring with the process of engraftment that affect the quality of the repair. This review highlights the historical perspectives and modern concepts of graft take, reviews the different attachment techniques and revisits the biology of pseudosheath formation. In addition, we discuss some of the future directions in tendon reconstruction by grafting, which include surface modification, vascularized tendon transfer, allografts, biomaterials and cell-based therapies.

  1. INTRASYNOVIAL FLEXOR TENDON REPAIR: A BIOMECHANICAL STUDY OF VARIATIONS IN SUTURE APPLICATION IN HUMAN CADAVERA

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, GN; Potter, R; Ntouvali, E; Silva, MJ; Boyer, MI; Gelberman, RH; Thomopoulos, S

    2013-01-01

    To improve the functional outcomes of intrasynovial tendon suture, prior experiments evaluated individual technical modifications used in the repair process. Few studies, however, have assessed the combinatorial effects of those suture modifications in an integrated biomechanical manner, including a sample size sufficient to make definitive observations on repair technique. 256 flexor tendon repairs were performed in cadavera, and biomechanical properties were determined. The effects of five factors for flexor tendon repair were tested: core suture caliber (4-0 or 3-0), number of sutures crossing the repair site (4- or 8-strand), core suture purchase (0.75 cm or 1.2 cm), peripheral suture caliber (6-0 or 5-0), and peripheral suture purchase (superficial or 2 mm). Significant factors affecting the properties of the repair were the number of core suture strands and the peripheral suture purchase. The least significant factors were core suture purchase and peripheral suture caliber. The choice of core suture caliber affected the properties of repair marginally. Based on these results, we recommend that surgeons continue to focus on multi-strand repair methods, as the properties of 8-strand repairs were far better than those of 4-strand repairs. To resist gap formation and enhance repair strength, a peripheral suture with 2mm purchase is also recommended. Finally, since core suture caliber affected some biomechanical properties, including the failure mode, a 3-0 suture could be considered, provided that future in vivo studies can confirm that gliding properties are not adversely influenced. PMID:22457145

  2. Pseudotendon formation causing painful tethering of ruptured flexor carpi radialis tendons.

    PubMed

    Henry, Mark

    2013-06-01

    Six patients (five male, one female) between 51 and 64 years of age sustained ruptures of the right dominant flexor carpi radialis (FCR) tendon. Prior to rupture, within the past 3 months to 1 year, each had received one or two corticosteroid injections of the FCR tendon sheath for stenosing tenosynovitis. Three of six patients demonstrated radiographic findings but none had clinical symptoms of osteoarthritis at the scaphoid-trapezium-trapezoid joint. The pain and disability declared by these patients appeared out of proportion to the relatively innocuous nature of a ruptured FCR tendon, with an average pre-operative Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) score of 32. In all patients there was a palpable, tender mass of retracted, ruptured FCR tendon around 6 cm proximal to the wrist crease as well as a palpable cord of pseudotendon formed within the residual sheath. Pain along the course of the pseudotendon was consistently provoked by wrist extension and gripping. The patients were initially treated non-surgically with stretching, manual therapy, ultrasound, and oral medications for 2-4 months. None obtained sufficient relief, and the patients requested more definitive care. The painful tethering of the ruptured FCR was solved by complete excision of both pseudotendon and the retracted tendon stump, resulting in complete relief of symptoms with an average post-operative DASH score of 3. Pre-operative and post-operative DASH scores were analyzed with the paired Student's t-test, using a p-value of 0.05, and found to have a statistically significant difference. PMID:24426661

  3. Desmotomy for treatment of chronic desmitis of the accessory ligament of the deep digital flexor tendon in a horse.

    PubMed Central

    Todhunter, P G; Schumacher, J; Finn-Bodner, S T

    1997-01-01

    Chronic lameness was determined to be caused by desmitis of the accessory ligament of the deep digital flexor tendon and adhesions associated with these 2 structures. Desmotomy of the accessory ligament, resection of adhesions, and controlled exercise during convalescence resulted in return to normal use without apparent lameness. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. PMID:9332748

  4. Ultrasonographic diagnosis of porcupine quill foreign bodies in the plantar flexor tendon sheath region in a heifer.

    PubMed

    Mulon, Pierre-Yves; Achard, Damien; Babkine, Marie

    2010-08-01

    A 17-month-old Holstein heifer was presented for persistent enlargement above the right hind fetlock of 1-month's duration. Diffuse plantar soft tissue swelling was present on the radiographs and ultrasonography revealed the presence of multiple porcupine quill extremities embedded in the subcutaneous tissue within the flexor tendon sheath wall. Surgical removal was performed. PMID:21037892

  5. Digital oedema, adhesion formation and resistance to digital motion after primary flexor tendon repair.

    PubMed

    Cao, Y; Chen, C H; Wu, Y F; Xu, X F; Xie, R G; Tang, J B

    2008-12-01

    The development of digital oedema, adhesion formation, and resistance to digital motion at days 0, 3, 5, 7, 9 and 14 after primary flexor tendon repairs using 102 long toes of 51 Leghorn chickens was studied. Oedema presented as tissue swelling from days 3 to 7, which peaked at day 3. After day 7, oedema was manifest as hardening of subcutaneous tissue. The degree of digital swelling correlated with the resistance to tendon motion between days 3 and 7. At day 9, granulation tissues were observed around the tendon and loose adhesions were observed at day 14. Resistance to digital motion increased significantly from day 0 to day 3, but did not increase between days 3 and 9. The early postoperative changes appear to have three stages: initial (days 0-3, increasing resistance with development of oedema), delayed (days 4-7, higher resistance with continuing oedema) and late (after day 7-9, hardening of subcutaneous tissue with development of adhesions). PMID:18936126

  6. Interference screw fixation and short harvest using flexor digitorum longus (FDL) transfer for posterior tibial tendon dysfunction: a technique.

    PubMed

    Bussewitz, Bradly W; Hyer, Christopher F

    2010-01-01

    Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction is a common clinical entity treated by foot and ankle specialists, and numerous surgical treatments are available to the modern foot and ankle surgeon. Fixation methods are constantly evolving as new products are developed and new uses for existing products are attempted. Interference screw fixation is the gold standard fixation for tendon autograft and allograft in orthopedic sports medicine. The technique that we describe in this article uses a less extensive harvest of the flexor digitorum longus tendon and a sound fixation method using an interference screw positioned in the tarsal navicular. PMID:20797592

  7. Analysis of the gliding pattern of the canine flexor digitorum profundus tendon through the A2 pulley.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Shigeharu; Amadio, Peter C; Berglund, Lawrence J; An, Kai-Nan

    2008-01-01

    Friction between a tendon and its pulley was first quantified using the concept of the arc of contact. Studies of human tendons conformed closely to a theoretical nylon cable/nylon rod model. However, we observed differences in measured friction that depended on the direction of motion in the canine model. We hypothesized that fibrocartilaginous nodules in the tendon affected the measurements and attempted to develop a theoretical model to explain the observations we made. Two force transducers were connected to each end of the canine flexor digitorum profundus tendon and the forces were recorded when it was moved through the A2 pulley toward a direction of flexion by an actuator and then reversed a direction toward extension. The changes of a force as a function of tendon excursion were evaluated in 20 canine paws. A bead cable/rod model was developed to simulate the canine tendon-pulley complex. To interpret the results, a free-body diagram was developed. The two prominent fibrocartilaginous nodules in the tendon were found to be responsible for deviation from a theoretical nylon cable gliding around the rod model, in a fashion analogous to the effect of the patella on the quadriceps mechanism. A bead cable/rod model qualitatively reproduced the findings observed in the canine tendon-pulley complex. Frictional coefficient of the canine flexor tendon-pulley was 0.016+/-0.005. After accounting for the effect created by the geometry of two fibrocartilaginous nodules within the tendon, calculation of frictional force in the canine tendon was possible. PMID:18328488

  8. Histological and Immunohistochemical Evaluation of Autologous Cultured Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Bone Marrow Mononucleated Cells in Collagenase-Induced Tendinitis of Equine Superficial Digital Flexor Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Crovace, Antonio; Lacitignola, Luca; Rossi, Giacomo; Francioso, Edda

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare treatment with cultured bone marrow stromal cells (cBMSCs), bone marrow Mononucleated Cells (BMMNCs), and placebo to repair collagenase-induced tendinitis in horses. In six adult Standardbred horses, 4000 IU of collagenase were injected in the superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT). Three weeks after collagenase treatment, an average of either 5.5 × 106 cBMSCs or 1.2 × 108 BMMNCs, fibrin glue, and saline solution was injected intralesionally in random order. In cBMSC- and BMMNCS-treated tendons, a high expression of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) and type I collagen, but low levels of type III collagen were revealed by immunohistochemistry, with a normal longitudinally oriented fiber pattern. Placebo-treated tendons expressed very low quantities of COMP and type I collagen but large numbers of randomly oriented type III collagen fibers. Both cBMSC and BMMNCS grafts resulted in a qualitatively similar heling improvement of tendon extracellular matrix, in terms of the type I/III collagen ratio, fiber orientation, and COMP expression. PMID:20445779

  9. Knee extension and flexion muscle power after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with patellar tendon graft or hamstring tendons graft: a cross-sectional comparison 3 years post surgery.

    PubMed

    Ageberg, Eva; Roos, Harald P; Silbernagel, Karin Grävare; Thomeé, Roland; Roos, Ewa M

    2009-02-01

    Hamstring muscles play a major role in knee-joint stabilization after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Weakness of the knee extensors after ACL reconstruction with patellar tendon (PT) graft, and in the knee flexors after reconstruction with hamstring tendons (HT) graft has been observed up to 2 years post surgery, but not later. In these studies, isokinetic muscle torque was used. However, muscle power has been suggested to be a more sensitive and sport-specific measures of strength. The aim was to study quadriceps and hamstring muscle power in patients with ACL injury treated with surgical reconstruction with PT or HT grafts at a mean of 3 years after surgery. Twenty subjects with PT and 16 subjects with HT grafts (mean age at follow up 30 years, range 20-39, 25% women), who were all included in a prospective study and followed the same goal-based rehabilitation protocol for at least 4 months, were assessed with reliable, valid, and responsive tests of quadriceps and hamstring muscle power at 3 years (SD 0.9, range 2-5) after surgery. The mean difference between legs (injured minus uninjured), the hamstring to quadriceps (H:Q, hamstring divided by quadriceps) ratio, and the limb symmetry index (LSI, injured leg divided by uninjured and multiplied by 100) value, were used for comparisons between the groups (analysis of variance). The mean difference between the injured and uninjured legs was greater in the HT than in the PT group for knee flexion power (-21.3 vs. 7.7 W, p = 0.001). Patients with HT graft had lower H:Q ratio in the injured leg than the patients with PT graft (0.63 vs. 0.77, p = 0.012). They also had lower LSI for knee flexion power than those in the PT group (88 vs. 106%, p < 0.001). No differences were found between the groups for knee extension power. The lower hamstring muscle power, and the lower hamstring to quadriceps ratio in the HT graft group than in the PT graft group 3 years (range 2-5) after ACL reconstruction, reflect imbalance

  10. Acromioclavicular joint reconstruction using a tendon graft: a biomechanical study comparing a novel “sutured throughout” tendon graft to a standard tendon graft

    PubMed Central

    Naziri, Qais; Williams, Nadine; Hayes, Westley; Kapadia, Bhaveen H.; Chatterjee, Dipal; Urban, William P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: With a recurrence rate of over 30%, techniques that offer stronger acromioclavicular (AC) joint reconstruction through increased graft strength may provide longevity. The purpose of our study was to determine the biomechanical strength of a novel tendon graft sutured throughout compared to a native tendon graft in Grade 3 anatomical AC joint reconstruction. Methods: For this in vitro experiment, nine paired (n = 18) embalmed cadaveric AC joints of three males and six females (age 86 years, range 51–94 years) were harvested. Anatomic repair with fresh bovine Achilles tendon grafts without bone block was simulated. Specimens were divided into two groups; with group 1 using grafts with ultra-high molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) suture ran throughout the entire length. In group 2, reconstruction with only native allografts was performed. The distal scapula and humerus were casted in epoxy compound and mounted on the mechanical testing machine. Tensile tests were performed using a mechanical testing machine at the rate of 50 mm/min. Maximum load and displacement to failure were collected. Results: The average load to failure was significantly higher for group 1 compared to group 2, with mean values of 437.5 N ± 160.7 N and 94.4 N ± 43.6 N, (p = 0.001). The average displacement to failure was not significantly different, with 29.7 mm ± 10.6 mm in group 1 and 25 mm ± 9.1 mm in group 2 (p = 0.25). Conclusion: We conclude that a UHMWPE suture reinforced graft can provide a 3.6 times stronger AC joint reconstruction compared to a native graft. PMID:27163106

  11. Effects of a Lubricin-Containing Compound on the Results of Flexor Tendon Repair in a Canine Model in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chunfeng; Sun, Yu-Long; Kirk, Ramona L.; Thoreson, Andrew R.; Jay, Gregory D.; Moran, Steven L.; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Tendon surface modification with a synthetic biopolymer, carbodiimide-derivatized hyaluronic acid and gelatin with the addition of lubricin (CHL), has been shown to reduce gliding resistance after tendon repair in an in vitro model. The purpose of the study was to investigate whether CHL would reduce adhesion formation and improve digital function after flexor tendon repair in a canine model in vivo. Methods: Sixty dogs were randomly assigned to either a biopolymer-treated group (n = 30) or an untreated control group (n = 30). The second and fifth flexor digitorum profundus tendons from each dog were lacerated fully at the zone-II area and then repaired. Passive synergistic motion therapy was started on the fifth postoperative day and continued until the dogs were killed on day 10, day 21, or day 42. The repaired tendons were evaluated for adhesions, normalized work of flexion, gliding resistance, repair strength, stiffness, and histological characteristics. Results: The normalized work of flexion of the repaired tendons treated with CHL was significantly lower than that of the non-CHL-treated repaired tendons at all time points (p < 0.05), and the prevalence of severe adhesions was also significantly decreased in the CHL-treated tendons at day 42 (p < 0.05). However, the repair failure strength and stiffness of the CHL-treated group were also significantly reduced compared with those of the control group at days 21 and 42 (p < 0.05) and the rate of tendon rupture was significantly higher in the treated group than in the control group at day 42 (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Treatment with the lubricin-containing gel CHL appears to be an effective means of decreasing postoperative flexor tendon adhesions, but it is also associated with some impairment of tendon healing. Future studies will be necessary to determine if the positive effects of CHL on adhesion formation can be maintained while reducing its adverse effect on the structural integrity of the

  12. Prevention of peritendinous adhesions using a hyaluronan-derived hydrogel film following partial-thickness flexor tendon injury.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanchun; Skardal, Aleksander; Shu, Xiao Zheng; Prestwich, Glenn D

    2008-04-01

    Peritendinous adhesions are an important complication of flexor tendon injury. Three hyaluronan (HA)-derived biomaterials were evaluated for the reduction of peritendinous adhesions following partial-thickness tendon injury in rabbits. Rabbits (n = 24) were divided into three groups (n = 8 per group), which were used for gross evaluation, histologic assessment, or biomechanical testing. The fourth and third toes from both hindpaws of each rabbit were randomly assigned to one of four treatments: (i) untreated control, (ii) Seprafilm, (iii) Carbylan-SX in situ crosslinked hydrogel, and (iv) preformed Carbylan-SX film. Rabbits were sacrificed at 3 weeks postsurgery and evaluated anatomically, histologically, and mechanically. All materials used reduced adhesions relative to untreated controls for all three evaluations. Both the gross anatomic and histologic results revealed that Carbylan-SX film was statistically superior to Seprafilm and Carbylan-SX gel in preventing tendon adhesion formation. In biomechanical tests, the Carbylan-SX film-treated hindpaws required the least force to pull the tendon from the sheath. This force was statistically indistinguishable from that required to extrude an unoperated tendon (n = 8). Carbylan-SX gel was less effective than Carbylan-SX film but superior to Seprafilm for all evaluations. A crosslinked HA-derived film promoted healing of a flexor tendon injury without the formation of fibrosis at 3 weeks postoperatively.

  13. Development of the deep flexor tendons and lumbricalis muscle in the hand and foot: a histological study using human mid-term foetuses.

    PubMed

    Cho, K H; Kim, J H; Ha, Y S; Murakami, G; Cho, B H; Abe, S

    2012-08-01

    To revisit foetal development of the deep flexor tendons of the hand and foot, we examined the paraffin-embedded histology of 20 mid-term foetuses at 8-15 weeks of estimated gestational age (35-118 mm crown-rump length or CRL). At 8-9 weeks, in front of the metacarpal bones, the flexor pollicis longus and flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) muscles provided a plate-like, common tendon from which the lumbricalis muscles originated. However, in the foot, we had no evidence of such a common tendon. The flexor pollicis tendon was separated from the common tendon at 9-10 weeks possibly due to mechanical stress from the laterally growing thumb. Notably, at the lumbricalis muscle origins at 10-12 weeks, the FDP and flexor digitorum longus tendons remained undifferentiated and the primitive tenocytes were dispersed from them. The dispersed cells seemed to develop into an interface tissue between the lumbricalis muscle fibre and the deep tendon. In 3 of 5 specimens at 15 weeks, we found an excess number of the FDP tendons (5-7) in the proximal side of the lumbricalis muscle origin. However, the excess tendons dispersed in the lumbricalis muscle origin. The development of the lumbricalis muscle origin might follow the tendon splitting for four fingers. However, conversely, we hypothesised that the developing lumbricalis muscles re-arranged the deep flexor tendons to provide a configuration of one deep tendon per one finger (or toe). The quadrates plantae muscle seemed not to contribute on the re-arrangement.

  14. Flexor Carpi Radialis to Palmaris Longus Tendon Transfer for Spontaneous Rupture of the Flexor Carpi Radialis Tendon-A Review of an Uncommon Finding and Surgical Technique for Operative Correction.

    PubMed

    Shearin, Jonathan Winkworth; Walters, Brian; Yang, S Steven

    2016-10-01

    Spontaneous ruptures of the flexor carpi radialis tendon (FCR) are rare and associated with systemic inflammatory diseases, localized tendinopathy related to scaphotrapezial-trapezoidal arthritis, or chronic immunosuppression from corticosteroids. While most cases do not require operative intervention, some patients develop weakness, impaired range of motion, and persistent pain. Previously reported surgical options include synovectomy, tendon stump resection, and osteophyte removal. We describe a surgical technique for patients with persistent symptomatology following FCR rupture in which the FCR is transposed end-to-side to the palmaris longus tendon. Three cases using this technique are presented with follow-up of 4-9 months that were collected at Lenox Hill Hospital. All three patients did well regarding specific outcome measures: grip strength, range of motion, and functional activity. FCR transfer to palmaris is an alternative to other surgical options for the spontaneous rupture of the FCR tendon in patients who remain symptomatic despite a course of non-operative therapy. PMID:27595965

  15. Late quadriceps tendon rupture at the donor site following cruciate ligament reconstruction using central quadriceps tendon graft.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Vivek; Madi, Sandesh; Joseph, Amy; Acharya, Kiran

    2015-10-16

    Central quadriceps tendon (CQT) graft has been successfully used as a viable autograft option in cruciate ligament reconstruction of the knee. The prime emphasis in the majority of the literature is given to surgical details of quadriceps graft harvesting and outcome of cruciate ligament reconstruction. There is less discussion about donor site morbidity in CQT graft, and it is less frequent as compared to that in bone patellar tendon bone graft. We report an extremely unusual case of late quadriceps tendon rupture at the donor site following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using CQT graft.

  16. COMPARISON BETWEEN THE RESULTS ACHIEVED IN ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION WITH TWO KINDS OF AUTOLOGOUS GRAFTS: PATELLAR TENDON VERSUS SEMITENDINOUS AND GRACILIS

    PubMed Central

    Abdalla, Rene Jorge; Monteiro, Diego Antico; Dias, Leonardo; Correia, Dárcio Maurício; Cohen, Moisés; Forgas, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Objective: this study aims to compare the arthrometric and isokinetic examination results from two types of autologous grafts: the central third of the patellar ligament and a graft formed by the tendons of the semitendinosus and gracilis muscles, within the same rehabilitation protocol, six months after the surgery. Methods: the results from examinations carried out on 63 patients were analyzed. These patients were divided in two groups: one group of 30 patients who received a patellar tendon graft and another group of 33 patients who received a graft from the tendons of the semitendinosus and gracilis muscles. Both the grafts were attached in the same way, with Endobutton™ for suspensory fixation to the femur and a bioabsorbable interference screw for fixation in the tibial tunnel. Results: arthrometry 30 did not present any statistical difference between the two study groups. On the other hand, the isokinetic evaluation showed that the patellar tendon group had a larger mean peak torque of flexion and greater extension deficit, while the semitendinosus/gracilis group had a better mean flexion/extension ratio and greater percentage of flexion deficit. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups when measuring peak torque extension. Conclusion: therefore, when the patellar tendon was used, there was greater extensor deficit and, when the semitendinosus/gracilis tendons were used, there was greater flexor deficit. PMID:27004173

  17. [Symptomatic os trigonum with irritation of the flexor hallucis longus tendon - arthroscopic management via a dorsal approach].

    PubMed

    Pass, G; Hofstaetter, S G; Trieb, K

    2015-03-01

    Therapy-resistant pain in the region of the medial mallelous in the presence of an os trigonum is suggestive for irritation of the flexor hallucis longus tendon. Two patients were treated by arthroscopy in the prone position via a dorsal approach; the os trigonum was removed and the tendon released. Under the conditions of blunt dissection, dorsal arthroscopy of the os trigonum is a safe and expedient operation in our toolbox. After two weeks of partial load-bearing with 2 crutches, pain-free full load-bearing is already possible and after 3 weeks the patients can return to work.

  18. Closed Rupture of the Flexor Tendon Secondary to Sclerosis of the Hook of the Hamate: A Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Uchiyama, Shigeharu; Hosaka, Masato; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2016-10-01

    Closed flexor tendon ruptures in the little finger can be caused by fracture or nonunion of the hook of the hamate, but no case of the disorder secondary to the sclerosis and thinning of the hamate hook has been reported. We report two rare cases with this complication due to rough surface of the hamate hook. Carpal tunnel view radiographs and computed tomography showed the sclerosis and thinning of the hook. PMID:27595962

  19. Effects of gamma irradiation and repetitive freeze-thaw cycles on the biomechanical properties of human flexor digitorum superficialis tendons.

    PubMed

    Ren, Dejie; Sun, Kang; Tian, Shaoqi; Yang, Xu; Zhang, Cailong; Wang, Wenhao; Huang, Hongjie; Zhang, Jihua; Deng, Yujie

    2012-01-10

    An increasing number of tissue banks have begun to focus on gamma irradiation and freeze-thaw in the reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligaments using allografts. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical properties of human tendons after exposure to gamma radiation and repeated freeze-thaw cycles and to compare them with fresh specimens. Forty flexor digitorum superficialis tendons were surgically procured from five fresh cadavers and divided into four groups: fresh tendon, gamma irradiation, freeze-thaw and gamma irradiation+freeze-thaw. The dose of gamma irradiation was 25 kGy. Each freeze-thaw cycle consisted of freezing at -80 °C for 7 day and thawing at 25 °C for 6 h. These tendons underwent 4 freeze-thaw cycles. Biomechanical properties were analyzed during load-to-failure testing. The fresh tendons were found to be significantly different in ultimate load, stiffness and ultimate stress relative to the other three groups. The tendons of the gamma+freeze-thaw group showed a significant decrease in ultimate load, ultimate stress and stiffness compared with the other three groups. Gamma irradiation and repeated freezing-thawing (4 cycles) can change the biomechanical properties. However, no significant difference was found between these two processes on the effect of biomechanical properties. It is recommended that gamma irradiation (25 kGy) and repetitive freeze-thaw cycles (4 cycles) should not be adopted in the processing of the allograft tendons.

  20. The effect of age and spontaneous exercise on the biomechanical and biochemical properties of chicken superficial digital flexor tendon.

    PubMed

    Romero Nakagaki, Wilson; Rosa Pimentel, Edson; Pereira Benevides, Gustavo; Gomes, Laurecir

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate if spontaneous (nonforced active) exercise and age (maturation process) alter the biomechanical and biochemical properties of superficial digital flexor tendon. Chickens aged 1, 5, and 8 months were divided into two groups: caged and penned. The caged group was reared in an area of 0.5 m(2) (3 animals/cage), while the penned group was reared in an area of 60 m(2) (3 animals/area). For biochemical analysis, the tendon was divided into tensile and compressive regions for quantification of hydroxyproline and glycosaminoglycan content. Biomechanical properties were analyzed from tensile tests of intact tendons. The biomechanical measurements were taken at maximum load and maximum stress. In both the caged and penned groups, maximum load and energy absorption increased with maturation; however, the elastic modulus, maximum stress, and maximum strain did not increase with maturation. Exercise resulted in a higher load, stress, and elastic modulus in the fifth month. Collagen content increased with age in the penned group and with exercise in the fifth and eighth months. Exercise results in a higher expression of glycosaminoglycans in young tendons compared to mature tendons. Thus, low-intensity mechanical stimuli promote the synthesis and possible rearrangement of molecules in immature tendons, whereas inactivity leads to deleterious effects on the material properties (maximum stress and elastic modulus) during growth and maturation.

  1. Calcium phosphate-hybridized tendon graft to enhance tendon-bone healing two years after ACL reconstruction in goats

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background We developed a novel technique to improve tendon-bone attachment by hybridizing calcium phosphate (CaP) with a tendon graft using an alternate soaking process. However, the long-term result with regard to the interface between the tendon graft and the bone is unclear. Methods We analyzed bone tunnel enlargement by computed tomography and histological observation of the interface and the tendon graft with and without the CaP hybridization 2 years after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in goats using EndoButton and the postscrew technique (CaP, n = 4; control, n = 4). Results The tibial bone tunnel enlargement rates in the CaP group were lower than those in the control group (p < 0.05). In the CaP group, in the femoral and tibial bone tunnels at the anterior and posterior of the joint aperture site, direct insertion-like formation that contained a cartilage layer without tidemarks was more observed at the tendon-bone interface than in the control group (p < 0.05). Moreover, the gap area between the tendon graft and the bone was more observed at the femoral bone tunnel of the joint aperture site in the control group than in the CaP group (p < 0.05). The maturation of the tendon grafts determined using the ligament tissue maturation index was similar in both groups. Conclusions The CaP-hybridized tendon graft enhanced the tendon-bone healing 2 years after ACL reconstruction in goats. The use of CaP-hybridized tendon grafts can reduce the bone tunnel enlargement and gap area associated with the direct insertion-like formation in the interface near the joint. PMID:22166674

  2. Indian hedgehog signaling and the role of graft tension in tendon-to-bone healing: Evaluation in a rat ACL reconstruction model.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Andrew; Carballo, Camila; Ma, Richard; Wang, Hongsheng; Deng, Xianghua; Dahia, Chitra; Rodeo, Scott

    2016-04-01

    The structure and composition of the native enthesis is not recapitulated following tendon-to-bone repair. Indian Hedgehog (IHH) signaling has recently been shown to be important in enthesis development in a mouse model but no studies have evaluated IHH signaling in a healing model. Fourteen adult male rats underwent ACL reconstruction using a flexor tendon graft. Rats were assigned to two groups based on whether or not they received 0N or 10N of pre-tension of the graft. Specimens were evaluated at 3 and 6 weeks post-operatively using immunohistochemistry for three different protein markers of IHH signaling. Quantitative analysis of staining area and intensity using custom software demonstrated that IHH signaling was active in interface tissue formed at the healing tendon-bone interface. We also found increased staining area and intensity of IHH signaling proteins at 3 weeks in animals that received a pre-tensioned tendon graft. No significant differences were seen between the 3-week and 6-week time points. Our data suggests that the IHH signaling pathway is active during the tendon-bone healing process and appears to be mechanosensitive, as pre-tensioning of the graft at the time of surgery resulted in increased IHH signaling at three weeks. PMID:26447744

  3. Speckle-Tracking Sonographic Assessment of Longitudinal Motion of the Flexor Tendon and Subsynovial Tissue in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    van Doesburg, Margriet H. M.; Yoshii, Yuichi; Henderson, Jacqueline; Villarraga, Hector R.; Moran, Steven L.; Amadio, Peter C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to image both tendon and subsynovial connective tissue movement in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome and healthy control volunteers, using sonography with speckle tracking. To estimate accuracy of this tracking method, we used in vivo measurements during surgery to validate the motion estimated with sonography. Methods We recruited 22 healthy volunteers and 18 patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. Longitudinal sonograms of the middle finger flexor digitorum superficialis tendon and subsynovial connective tissue were obtained during finger flexion and extension. The images were analyzed with a speckle-tracking algorithm. The ratio of the sub-synovial connective tissue velocity to tendon velocity was calculated as the maximum velocity ratio, and the shear index, the ratio of tendon to subsynovial connective tissue motion, was calculated. For validation, we recorded flexor digitorum superficialis tendon motion during open carpal tunnel release. Results The shear index was higher in patients than controls (P < .05), whereas the maximum velocity ratio in extension was lower in patients than controls (P < .05). We found good intraclass correlation coefficients (>0.08) for shear index and maximum velocity ratio measurements between speckle-tracking and in vivo measurements. Bland-Altman analyses showed that all measurements remained within the limits of agreement. Conclusions Speckle tracking is a potentially useful method to assess the biomechanics within the carpal tunnel and to distinguish between healthy individuals and patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. This method, however, needs to be further developed for clinical use, with the shear index and maximum velocity ratio as possible differentiating parameters between patients with carpal tunnel syndrome and healthy individuals. PMID:22733858

  4. Development of Antisense Oligonucleotide (ASO) Technology Against Tgf-β Signaling to Prevent Scarring During Flexor Tendon Repair

    PubMed Central

    Loiselle, Alayna E.; Yukata, Kiminori; Geary, Michael B.; Kondabolu, Sirish; Shi, Shanshan; Jonason, Jennifer H.; Awad, Hani A.; O’Keefe, Regis J.

    2015-01-01

    Flexor tendons (FT) in the hand provide near frictionless gliding to facilitate hand function. Upon injury and surgical repair, satisfactory healing is hampered by fibrous adhesions between the tendon and synovial sheath. In the present study we used antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs), specifically targeted to components of Tgf-β signaling, including Tgf-β1, Smad3 and Ctgf, to test the hypothesis that local delivery of ASOs and suppression of Tgf-β1 signaling would enhance murine FT healing by suppressing adhesion formation while maintaining strength. ASOs were injected in to the FT repair site at 2, 6 and 12 days post-surgery. ASO treatment suppressed target gene expression through 21 days. Treatment with Tgf-β1, Smad3 or Ctgf ASOs resulted in significant improvement in tendon gliding function at 14 and 21 days, relative to control. Consistent with a decrease in adhesions, Col3a1 expression was significantly decreased in Tgf-β1, Smad3 and Ctgf ASO treated tendons relative to control. Smad3 ASO treatment enhanced the max load at failure of healing tendons at 14 days, relative to control. Taken together, these data support the use of ASO treatment to improve FT repair, and suggest that modulation of the Tgf-β1 signaling pathway can reduce adhesions while maintaining the strength of the repair. PMID:25761254

  5. Development of antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) technology against Tgf-β signaling to prevent scarring during flexor tendon repair.

    PubMed

    Loiselle, Alayna E; Yukata, Kiminori; Geary, Michael B; Kondabolu, Sirish; Shi, Shanshan; Jonason, Jennifer H; Awad, Hani A; O'Keefe, Regis J

    2015-06-01

    Flexor tendons (FT) in the hand provide near frictionless gliding to facilitate hand function. Upon injury and surgical repair, satisfactory healing is hampered by fibrous adhesions between the tendon and synovial sheath. In the present study we used antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs), specifically targeted to components of Tgf-β signaling, including Tgf-β1, Smad3 and Ctgf, to test the hypothesis that local delivery of ASOs and suppression of Tgf-β1 signaling would enhance murine FT healing by suppressing adhesion formation while maintaining strength. ASOs were injected in to the FT repair site at 2, 6 and 12 days post-surgery. ASO treatment suppressed target gene expression through 21 days. Treatment with Tgf-β1, Smad3 or Ctgf ASOs resulted in significant improvement in tendon gliding function at 14 and 21 days, relative to control. Consistent with a decrease in adhesions, Col3a1 expression was significantly decreased in Tgf-β1, Smad3 and Ctgf ASO treated tendons relative to control. Smad3 ASO treatment enhanced the maximum load at failure of healing tendons at 14 days, relative to control. Taken together, these data support the use of ASO treatment to improve FT repair, and suggest that modulation of the Tgf-β1 signaling pathway can reduce adhesions while maintaining the strength of the repair. PMID:25761254

  6. Ex vivo penetration of low-level laser light through equine skin and flexor tendons.

    PubMed

    Duesterdieck-Zellmer, Katja F; Larson, Maureen K; Plant, Thomas K; Sundholm-Tepper, Andrea; Payton, Mark E

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE To measure penetration efficiencies of low-level laser light energy through equine skin and to determine the fraction of laser energy absorbed by equine digital flexor tendons (superficial [SDFT] and deep [DDFT]). SAMPLE Samples of skin, SDFTs, and DDFTs from 1 metacarpal area of each of 19 equine cadavers. PROCEDURES A therapeutic laser with wavelength capabilities of 800 and 970 nm was used. The percentage of energy penetration for each wavelength was determined through skin before and after clipping and then shaving of hair, through shaved skin over SDFTs, and through shaved skin, SDFTs, and DDFTs (positioned in anatomically correct orientation). Influence of hair color; skin preparation, color, and thickness; and wavelength on energy penetration were assessed. RESULTS For haired skin, energy penetration was greatest for light-colored hair and least for dark-colored hair. Clipping or shaving of skin improved energy penetration. Light-colored skin allowed greatest energy penetration, followed by medium-colored skin and dark-colored skin. Greatest penetration of light-colored skin occurred with the 800-nm wavelength, whereas greatest penetration of medium- and dark-colored skin occurred with the 970-nm wavelength. As skin thickness increased, energy penetration of samples decreased. Only 1% to 20% and 0.1% to 4% of energy were absorbed by SDFTs and DDFTs, respectively, depending on skin color, skin thickness, and applied wavelength. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that most laser energy directed through equine skin was absorbed or scattered by the skin. To achieve delivery of energy doses known to positively affect cells in vitro to equine SDFTs and DDFTs, skin preparation, color, and thickness and applied wavelength must be considered. PMID:27580111

  7. The effect of tendon surface treatment on cell attachment for potential enhancement of tendon graft healing: an ex vivo model.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Takahiro; Sun, Yu-Long; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C; Zhao, Chunfeng

    2012-12-01

    For both tendon allografts and autografts, the surface, initially optimized for gliding, may not be ideal to facilitate tissue integration for graft healing to host tendon or bone. As a prelude to studying tendon-bone integration, we investigated the effect of surface treatments with trypsin or mechanical abrasion on cell attachment to the tendon surface in a canine ex vivo intrasynovial tendon tissue culture model. Intrasynovial tendon allograft surfaces were seeded with cells after the following treatments: (1) no treatment, (2) mechanical abrasion, (3) trypsin, and (4) abrasion and trypsin. The area covered by cells was determined using confocal laser microscopy at one and two weeks. Results were compared to untreated extrasynovial tendon. Additional tendons were characterized with scanning electron microscopy. Tendons with trypsin treatment had significantly more surface coverage with cells than the other groups, after both one and two weeks of culture. In terms of the cellular shape and size, cells on tendons with trypsin treatment spread more and were more polygonal in shape, whereas tendons with mechanical abrasion with/without trypsin treatment contained smaller, more spindle-like cells. Surface roughening can affect cell behavior with topographical stimulation. Trypsin surface digestion exposes a mesh-like structure on the tendon surface, which could enhance cell adherence and, possibly, tendon/bone healing.

  8. Bundles of Spider Silk, Braided into Sutures, Resist Basic Cyclic Tests: Potential Use for Flexor Tendon Repair

    PubMed Central

    Hennecke, Kathleen; Redeker, Joern; Kuhbier, Joern W.; Strauss, Sarah; Allmeling, Christina; Kasper, Cornelia; Reimers, Kerstin; Vogt, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    Repair success for injuries to the flexor tendon in the hand is often limited by the in vivo behaviour of the suture used for repair. Common problems associated with the choice of suture material include increased risk of infection, foreign body reactions, and inappropriate mechanical responses, particularly decreases in mechanical properties over time. Improved suture materials are therefore needed. As high-performance materials with excellent tensile strength, spider silk fibres are an extremely promising candidate for use in surgical sutures. However, the mechanical behaviour of sutures comprised of individual silk fibres braided together has not been thoroughly investigated. In the present study, we characterise the maximum tensile strength, stress, strain, elastic modulus, and fatigue response of silk sutures produced using different braiding methods to investigate the influence of braiding on the tensile properties of the sutures. The mechanical properties of conventional surgical sutures are also characterised to assess whether silk offers any advantages over conventional suture materials. The results demonstrate that braiding single spider silk fibres together produces strong sutures with excellent fatigue behaviour; the braided silk sutures exhibited tensile strengths comparable to those of conventional sutures and no loss of strength over 1000 fatigue cycles. In addition, the braiding technique had a significant influence on the tensile properties of the braided silk sutures. These results suggest that braided spider silk could be suitable for use as sutures in flexor tendon repair, providing similar tensile behaviour and improved fatigue properties compared with conventional suture materials. PMID:23613793

  9. Assessing Finger Joint Biomechanics by Applying Equal Force to Flexor Tendons In Vitro Using a Novel Simultaneous Approach

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tai-Hua; Lu, Szu-Ching; Lin, Wei-Jr; Zhao, Kristin; Zhao, Chunfeng; An, Kai-Nan; Jou, I-Ming; Lee, Pei-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Background The flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) and flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) are critical for finger flexion. Although research has recently focused on these tendons’ coactivity, their contributions in different tasks remain unclear. This study created a novel simultaneous approach to investigate the coactivity between the tendons and to clarify their contributions in different tasks. Methods Ten human cadaveric hands were mounted on our custom frame with the FDS and FDP of the third finger looped through a mechanical pulley connected to a force transducer. Joint range of motion, tendon excursion and loading force were recorded during individual joint motion and free joint movement from rest to maximal flexion. Each flexor tendon’s moment arm was then calculated. Results In individual motions, we found that the FDP contributed more than the FDS in proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint motion, with an overall slope of 1.34 and all FDP-to-FDS excursion (P/S) ratios greater than 1.0 with force increase. However, the FDP contributed less than the FDS in metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint motion, with an overall slope of 0.95 and P/S ratios smaller than 1.0 throughout the whole motion except between 1.9% and 13.1% force. In free joint movement, the FDP played a greater role than the FDS, with an overall ratio of 1.37 and all P/S ratios greater than 1.0. Conclusions The new findings include differences in finger performance and excursion amounts between the FDS and FDP throughout flexion. Such findings may provide the basis for new hand models and treatments. PMID:27513744

  10. Changes in the Flexor Digitorum Profundus Tendon Geometry in the Carpal Tunnel Due to Force Production and Posture of Metacarpophalangeal Joint of the Index Finger: an MRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Joel R.; Paclet, Florent; Latash, Mark. L.; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Carpal tunnel syndrome is a disorder caused by increased pressure in the carpal tunnel associated with repetitive, stereotypical finger actions. Little is known about in vivo geometrical changes in the carpal tunnel caused by motion at the finger joints and exerting a fingertip force. Methods The hands and forearms of five subjects were scanned using a 3.0T magnetic resonance imaging scanner. The metacarpophalangeal joint of the index finger was placed in: flexion, neutral and extension. For each joint posture subjects either produced no active force (passive condition) or exerted a flexion force to resist a load (~4.0 N) at the fingertip (active condition). Changes in the radii of curvature, position and transverse plane area of the flexor digitorum profundus tendons at the carpal tunnel level were measured. Results The radius of curvature of the flexor digitorum profundus tendons, at the carpal tunnel level, was significantly affected by posture of the index finger metacarpophalangeal joint (p<0.05) and the radii was significantly different between fingers (p<0.05). Actively producing force caused a significant shift (p<0.05) in the flexor digitorum profundus tendons in the ventral (palmar) direction. No significant change in the area of an ellipse containing the flexor digitorum profundus tendons was observed between conditions. Interpretation The results show that relatively small changes in the posture and force production of a single finger can lead to significant changes in the geometry of all the flexor digitorum profundus tendons in the carpal tunnel. Additionally, voluntary force production at the fingertip increases the moment arm of the FDP tendons about the wrist joint. PMID:23219762

  11. Development of an Acute Care Plastic Surgery Service in the Saskatoon Health Region: Effects on flexor tendon management

    PubMed Central

    Wilgenbusch, Chelsea S; Dust, Peter W; Sunderland, Ian R

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The acute care surgery model has gained favour in general surgery, but has yet to be widely adopted in other specialties. An Acute Care Plastic Surgery (ACS) Service was recently implemented in the Saskatoon Health Region in an effort to improve trauma care. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of ACS on the management of flexor tendon lacerations. The authors hypothesize that ACS has resulted in more timely intervention, improved outcomes and decreased ‘after hours’ surgery. METHODS: A retrospective review of patients treated for flexor tendon lacerations from 2007 to 2013 was performed. Patients were stratified into two groups based on whether they received treatment before (group A) or after (group B) ACS implementation. Variables included dates and times of patient referral, consultation and tendon repair; postoperative complications; and admissions. A surgeon survey was administered on the perceived impact of ACS. RESULTS: Group A was more likely to have surgery performed after hours (P=0.0019) and be admitted to hospital (P=0.0211) compared with group B. Time from referral to consultation and injury-to-surgery interval were slightly increased post-ACS (Group B). Surgeons were highly satisfied with the new system, citing benefits to patients and surgeons. CONCLUSION: ACS was designed to improve trauma care, while favourably impacting surgeon workload. Surprisingly, the injury-to-surgery interval was slightly increased. However, this was not clinically significant and did not lead to increased postoperative complications. This finding was likely due to a favourable change in practice patterns observed after ACS implementation. ACS has resulted in fewer hospital admissions, decreased after-hours surgeries and improved surgeon satisfaction. PMID:26361628

  12. Correlation between anthropometric data and length and thickness of the tendons of the semitendinosus and gracilis muscles used for grafts in reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament☆

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Rafael Noschang; Karam, Francisco Consoli; Schwanke, Roberto Luís; Millman, Rubens; Foletto, Zilmar Minetto; Schwanke, Carla Helena Augustin

    2016-01-01

    Objective Preoperative estimation of the length and diameter of the semitendinosus (ST) and gracilis (G) tendons can assist surgeons and allow them to have the opportunity to choose alternative grafts. The aim of this study was to investigate whether anthropometric measurements such as height, weight and body mass index (BMI) or the patient's age and sex have any correlation with the thickness and the length of ST and G tendons. Methods Data were gathered from 64 patients who underwent the surgical procedure of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using the tendons of the ST and G muscles as grafts, between June 2012 and August 2013. Variables such as age, sex, weight, height, body mass index (BMI) and length and diameter of the tendons of the ST and G muscles were analyzed. Results There was a positive correlation between the height and total diameter of the quadruple graft (r = 0.254; p = 0.043), total length of the ST tendon (r = 0.450; p < 0.01), diameter of the double ST (r = 0.270; p = 0.031), triple ST (r = 0.347; p = 0.005), length of G tendon (r = 0.249; p = 0.047) and diameter of the double-G (r = 0.258; p = 0.039). However, age (r = -0.015; p = 0.908), weight (r = 0.165; p = 0.193) and body mass index (r = 0.012; p = 0.926) showed no correlation. Conclusion Our results show that age, weight and BMI did not correlate with the diameter and length of the graft, while the height had a positive correlation with the total length of the flexor tendons and the diameter of the graft from the flexors (ST and G). PMID:27069886

  13. Comparison of a multifilament stainless steel suture with FiberWire for flexor tendon repairs--an in vitro biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    McDonald, E; Gordon, J A; Buckley, J M; Gordon, L

    2013-05-01

    Our goal was to investigate and compare the mechanical properties of multifilament stainless steel suture (MFSS) and polyethylene multi-filament core FiberWire in flexor tendon repairs. Flexor digitorum profundus tendons were repaired in human cadaver hands with either a 4-strand cruciate cross-lock repair or 6-strand modified Savage repair using 4-0 and 3-0 multifilament stainless steel or FiberWire. The multifilament stainless steel repairs were as strong as those performed with FiberWire in terms of ultimate load and load at 2 mm gap. This study suggests that MFSS provides as strong a repair as FiberWire. The mode of failure of the MFSS occurred by the suture pulling through the tendon, which suggests an advantage in terms of suture strength. PMID:22745156

  14. Relative motion between the flexor digitorum superficialis tendon and paratenon in zone V increases with wrist flexion angle.

    PubMed

    Kociolek, Aaron M; Keir, Peter J

    2016-07-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is characterized by non-inflammatory fibrosis of the subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT), a paratenon-like structure inside the carpal tunnel. This pathology suggests repetitive and/or excessive shear forces are involved in injury development. We assessed relative motion between the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) tendon and adjacent paratenon in Zone V using colour Doppler imaging as 16 healthy participants completed three long finger movements (metacarpophalangeal joint flexion, proximal and distal interphalangeal joint flexion, full finger flexion) in three wrist postures (30° extension, 0°, 30° flexion). While the type of finger movement did not affect tendon-paratenon relative motion, we found a significant main effect of wrist posture (p < 0.001). Relative displacement between the FDS tendon and paratenon (as a percentage of tendon displacement) increased from 27.2% (95%CI = 24.8-29.5%) in 30° wrist extension to 39.9% (95%CI = 37.3-42.4%) in 30° wrist flexion. Optical motion capture confirmed that wrist posture did not affect metacarpophalangeal joint range of motion (p = 0.265) or proximal interphalangeal joint range of motion (p = 0.582). These results indicate that relative motion increased due to paratenon strain when the wrist was flexed. While our findings agree with previous cadaveric research in wrist flexion, we found that relative displacement decreased in 30° wrist extension (compared to 0°). These results differ from cadaveric research, possibly due to challenges maintaining anatomic fidelity of the viscoelastic paratenon tissue in vitro. Overall, our study suggests a greater susceptibility to shear injury during repetitive finger movements, particularly when the wrist is flexed. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1248-1255, 2016. PMID:26686976

  15. IMPROVEMENT OF TENDON REPAIR USING MUSCLE GRAFTS TRANSDUCED WITH TGF-β1 cDNA

    PubMed Central

    Majewski, Martin; Porter, Ryan M.; Betz, Oliver B.; Betz, Volker M.; Clahsen, Harald; Flückiger, Rudolf; Evans, Christopher H.

    2015-01-01

    Tendon rupture is a common injury. Inadequate endogenous repair often leaves patients symptomatic, with tendons susceptible to re-rupture. Administration of certain growth factors improves tendon healing in animal models, but their delivery remains a challenge. Here we evaluated the delivery of TGF-β1 to tendon defects by the implantation of genetically modified muscle grafts. Rat muscle biopsies were transduced with recombinant adenovirus encoding TGF-β1 and grafted onto surgically transected Achilles tendons in recipient animals. Tissue regenerates were compared to those of controls by biomechanical testing as well as histochemical and immunohistochemical analyses. Healing was greatly accelerated when genetically modified grafts were implanted into tendon defects, with the resulting repair tissue gaining nearly normal histological appearance as early as 2 weeks postoperatively. This was associated with decreased deposition of type III collagen in favour of large fibre bundles indicative of type I collagen. These differences in tendon composition coincided with accelerated restoration of mechanical strength. Tendon thickness increased in gene-treated animals at weeks 1 and 2, but by week 8 became significantly lower than that of controls suggesting accelerated remodelling. Thus localised TGF-β1 delivery via adenovirus-modified muscle grafts improved tendon healing in this rat model and holds promise for clinical application. PMID:22354460

  16. The role of graft materials in suture augmentation for tendon repairs and reattachment.

    PubMed

    Kummer, Frederick J; Iesaka, Kazuho

    2005-08-01

    Various biomaterials have been used to augment sutures for the repair and reattachment of tendons. This study examined four different graft materials in a simple and reproducible model using chicken Achilles tendons to determine the strength and mechanism of suture reinforcement of tendon repairs. The graft materials tested were Gore-Tex(R) Soft Tissue Patch, Graftjacket, bovine pericardium, and an experimental graft material from Xylos Corporation. Testing was performed in shear to simulate forces on a torn tendon repair and pull-off to simulate those on a tendon reattachment to bone. Compared to unaugmented suture, grafts increased suture fixation strength from 10% to 60% in shear and from 0% to 36% in pull-off with the bovine pericardium graft, providing significant improvement in both tests. In no cases (even unaugmented) did the suture pull directly through the tendon, but instead sliced along it, demonstrating that the interface between the suture and the tendon determines fixation strength. Grafts function by increasing the area, friction, and nature of this interface, not by acting as a barrier for suture pull-through. PMID:15981174

  17. In Vivo Measurements of Flexor Tendon and Suspensory Ligament Forces During Trotting Using the Thoroughbred Forelimb Model

    PubMed Central

    TAKAHASHI, Toshiyuki; MUKAI, Kazutaka; OHMURA, Hajime; AIDA, Hiroko; HIRAGA, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to create a lower forelimb model of the Thoroughbred horse for measuring the force in the superficial and deep digital flexor tendons (SDFT and DDFT), and the suspensory ligament (SL) during a trot. The mass, centers of gravity, and inertial moments in the metacarpus, pastern, and hoof segments were measured in 4 Thoroughbred horses. The moment arms of the SDFT, DDFT, and SL in the metacarpophalangeal (fetlock) and distal interphalangeal (coffin) joints were measured in 7 Thoroughbred horses. The relationship between the fetlock joint angle and the force in the SL was assessed in 3 limbs of 2 Thoroughbred horses. The forces in the SDFT, DDFT, and SL during a trot were also measured in 7 Thoroughbred horses. The mass of the 3 segments, and the moment arms of the SDFT and DDFT in the fetlock joint of the Thoroughbred horses were smaller than those of the Warmblood horses, whereas the other values were almost the same in the 2 types. The calculated force in the SDFT with this Thoroughbred model reached a peak (4,615 N) at 39.3% of the stance phase, whereas that in the DDFT reached a peak (5,076 N) at 51.2% of the stance phase. The force in the SL reached a peak (11,957 N) at 49.4% of the stance phase. This lower forelimb model of the Thoroughbred can be applied to studying the effects of different shoe types and change of hoof angle for the flexor tendon and SL forces. PMID:24834009

  18. Achilles tendon vibration-induced changes in plantar flexor corticospinal excitability.

    PubMed

    Lapole, Thomas; Temesi, John; Gimenez, Philippe; Arnal, Pierrick J; Millet, Guillaume Y; Petitjean, Michel

    2015-02-01

    Daily Achilles tendon vibration has been shown to increase muscle force, likely via corticospinal neural adaptations. The aim of the present study was to determine the extent by which corticospinal excitability is influenced during direct Achilles tendon vibration. Motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) were elicited in the soleus (SOL), gastrocnemius medialis (GM) and tibialis anterior (TA) by transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortical area of the leg with and without Achilles tendon vibration at various frequencies (50, 80 and 110 Hz). Contralateral homologues were also investigated. SOL and GM MEP amplitude significantly increased by 226 ± 188 and 66 ± 39%, respectively, during Achilles tendon vibration, without any difference between the tested frequencies. No MEP changes were reported for TA or contralateral homologues. Increased SOL and GM MEP amplitude suggests increased vibration-induced corticospinal excitability independent of vibration frequency.

  19. A biomechanical characterisation of acellular porcine super flexor tendons for use in anterior cruciate ligament replacement: investigation into the effects of fat reduction and bioburden reduction bioprocesses.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Anthony; Jones, Gemma L; Ingham, Eileen; Fisher, John

    2015-01-01

    The decellularisation of xenogenic and allogeneic biological grafts offers a promising solution to replacement of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The purpose of this investigation was to determine the biomechanical effects of additional fat reduction and bioburden reduction steps in the decellularisation of porcine super flexor tendon (pSFT). Study 1 investigated the use of acetone or chloroform-methanol as a fat reduction agent. The most effective of these was then carried forward into Study 2, which investigated the use of antibiotics or peracetic acid (PAA) as a bioburden reduction agent. Stress relaxation data was analysed using a Maxwell-Wiechert viscoelastic model and, in addition to classical material properties, the tangent modulus of the toe-region was determined from strength testing data. In both studies, the majority of decellularised groups demonstrated no statistical differences for material properties such as tensile strength and Young's modulus compared to native controls. Different trends were observed for many of the viscoelastic parameters, but also for the tangent modulus in the toe-region indicating a change in performance at low strains. The most severe deviations from the profile of the native tangent modulus were found to occur in Study 2 when PAA was used for bioburden reduction. Classic material properties (E, UTS etc.) are often used to compare the characteristics of native and decellularised tissues, however they may not highlight changes occurring in the tissues at low strains. In this study, this represented the physiological strains encountered by substitute acellular ACL grafts. Acetone was chosen as the fat reduction step whereas, antibiotics was preferable over PAA as a bioburden reduction step. PMID:25443884

  20. Mechanical evaluation of a soft tissue interference screw in free tendon anterior cruciate ligament graft fixation.

    PubMed

    Nagarkatti, D G; McKeon, B P; Donahue, B S; Fulkerson, J P

    2001-01-01

    In this study of bioabsorbable screw fixation of free tendon grafts used in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, we performed load-to-failure and cyclic loading of tendon fixation in porcine bone. Bone density measurements from dual photon absorptometry scans were obtained to correlate bone density with fixation failure. The average density of porcine bone (1.42 g/cm2) was similar to that of young human bone (1.30 g/cm2) and significantly higher than that of elderly human cadaveric bone specimens (0.30 g/cm2). Cyclic loading was performed on free tendon grafts fixed with a bioabsorbable screw alone and on grafts fixed with a bioabsorbable screw and an anchor (polylactic acid ball or cortical bone disk). Stiffness of fixation increased substantially with the addition of a cortical bone disk anchor or polylactic acid ball compared with the interference screw alone. Tensile fixation strength of central quadriceps free tendon and hamstring tendon grafts were significantly superior in porcine bone of density similar to young human bone than in elderly human cadaveric bone. The bioabsorbable interference screw yielded loads at failure comparable with traditional bone-tendon-bone and hamstring tendon fixation when controlled for bone density. The addition of a cortical bone disk anchor provided the most optimal fixation of free tendon with the bioabsorbable screw and reduced slippage with cyclic loading to a very low level.

  1. Exposure-dependent increases in IL-1beta, substance P, CTGF, and tendinosis in flexor digitorum tendons with upper extremity repetitive strain injury.

    PubMed

    Fedorczyk, Jane M; Barr, Ann E; Rani, Shobha; Gao, Helen G; Amin, Mamta; Amin, Shreya; Litvin, Judith; Barbe, Mary F

    2010-03-01

    Upper extremity tendinopathies are associated with performance of forceful repetitive tasks. We used our rat model of repetitive strain injury to study changes induced in forelimb flexor digitorum tendons. Rats were trained to perform a high repetition high force (HRHF) handle-pulling task (12 reaches/min at 60 +/- 5% maximum pulling force [MPF]), or a low repetition negligible force (LRNF) reaching and food retrieval task (three reaches/min at 5 +/- 5% MPF), for 2 h/day in 30 min sessions, 3 days/week for 3-12 weeks. Forelimb grip strength was tested. Flexor digitorum tendons were examined at midtendon at the level of the carpal tunnel for interleukin (IL)-1beta, neutrophil, and macrophage influx, Substance P, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), and periostin-like factor (PLF) immunoexpression, and histopathological changes. In HRHF rats, grip strength progressively decreased, while IL-1beta levels progressively increased in the flexor digitorum peritendon (para- and epitendon combined) and endotendon with task performance. Macrophage invasion was evident in week 6 and 12 HRHF peritendon but not endotendon. Also in HRHF rats, Substance P immunoexpression increased in week 12 peritendon as did CTGF- and PLF-immunopositive fibroblasts, the increased fibroblasts contributing greatly to peritendon thickening. Endotendon collagen disorganization was evident in week 12 HRHF tendons. LRNF tendons did not differ from controls, even at 12 weeks. Thus, we observed exposure-dependent changes in flexor digitorum tendons within the carpal tunnel, including increased inflammation, nociceptor-related neuropeptide immunoexpression, and fibrotic histopathology, changes associated with grip strength decline.

  2. Age-related greater Achilles tendon compliance is not associated with larger plantar flexor muscle fascicle strains in senior women.

    PubMed

    Csapo, R; Malis, V; Hodgson, J; Sinha, S

    2014-04-15

    The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that the age-associated decrease of tendon stiffness would necessitate greater muscle fascicle strains to produce similar levels of force during isometric contraction. Greater fascicle strains could force sarcomeres to operate in less advantageous regions of their force-length and force-velocity relationships, thus impairing the capacity to generate strong and explosive contractions. To test this hypothesis, sagittal-plane dynamic velocity-encoded phase-contrast magnetic resonance images of the gastrocnemius medialis (GM) muscle and Achilles tendon (AT) were acquired in six young (YW; 26.1 ± 2.3 yr) and six senior (SW; 76.7 ± 8.3 yr) women during submaximal isometric contraction (35% maximum voluntary isometric contraction) of the plantar flexor muscles. Multiple GM fascicle lengths were continuously determined by automatically tracking regions of interest coinciding with the end points of muscle fascicles evenly distributed along the muscle's proximo-distal length. AT stiffness and Young's modulus were measured as the slopes of the tendon's force-elongation and stress-strain curves, respectively. Despite significantly lower AT stiffness at older age (YW: 120.2 ± 52.3 N/mm vs. SW: 53.9 ± 44.4 N/mm, P = 0.040), contraction-induced changes in GM fascicle lengths were similar in both age groups at equal levels of absolute muscular force (4-5% fascicle shortening in both groups), and even significantly larger in YW (YW: 11-12% vs. SW: 6-8% fascicle shortening) at equal percentage of maximum voluntary contraction. These results suggest that factors other than AT stiffness, such as age-associated changes in muscle composition or fascicle slack, might serve as compensatory adaptations, limiting the degree of fascicle strains upon contraction.

  3. Interference screw fixation of hamstring vs patellar tendon grafts for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Aune, A K; Ekeland, A; Cawley, P W

    1998-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the fixation strength of a quadruple semitendinosus-gracilis graft compared with a middle-third bone-patellar tendon-bone graft using a new interference screw developed to fix hamstrings grafts for ACL reconstructions (RCL Smith & Nephew Donjoy). Five pairs of human cadaveric knees from donors with a mean age of 43 (range 33-52) years were used. One knee of each pair was randomly allocated to be reconstructed on the femoral side with a semitendinosus-gracilis graft from the same donor using RCL screw fixation. As the control, the contralateral knee was correspondingly reconstructed with a bone-patellar tendon-bone graft using the same interference screw. The grafts were pulled out at a velocity of 30 mm/s by an axially applied load using a MTS machine. The mean (SD) failure load for the bone-patellar tendon-bone graft fixations was 505 (25) N, 110% stronger than the mean failure load for the semitendinosus-gracilis graft fixations, which was 240 (47) N (P = 0.003). The stiffness for the patellar tendon-bone graft fixations was 46 (11) N/mm, 120% stiffer than the semitendinosus-gracilis graft fixations, which was 22 (11) N/mm (P = 0.01). This study shows that the interference screw principle used for ACL reconstructions with hamstrings tendons is inferior to that for bone-patellar tendon-bone reconstructions although the screw was developed especially for soft-tissue fixation in bone tunnels. PMID:9604194

  4. Bilateral avulsion of ring finger flexor digitorum profundus tendons during contact sport: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lin, Frank; McDonald, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    We report on the case of a 14-year-old patient with bilateral avulsion of flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) in both ring fingers. This was noted four days after a basketball match. At surgical exploration both FDP were ruptured with the ends located at A2 and A3 pulleys. These were repaired with excellent functional results. While FDP avulsions can often occur affecting the ring finger this is the first reported case of a patient presenting with a bilateral injury affecting the ring finger on both sides.

  5. Small longitudinal S incision and page turning style of annular ligament partial resection to treat stenosing tenosynovitis of thumb flexor tendon

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu-ping; Du, Yan-ying; Wang, Ming-ming; Li, Ming; Liu, Shi-you; Liu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Background To present the treatment outcome for patients with stenosing tenosynovitis of thumb flexor tendon treated with a small S incision and page turning style of annular ligament partial resection. Material/Methods During a 2-year period between August 2011 and July 2013, 12 consecutive patients (mean age, 45.8 years) with stenosing tenosynovitis of the thumb flexor tendon were prospectively enrolled into this study. All 12 patients underwent longitudinal S skin incision to expose annular ligament and thumb flexor tendon, and with page turning style of annular ligament partial resection to finish the operation. The average range of motion of metacarpophalangeal thumb joint, Quick disability of arm, shoulder, and hand and Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment Dysfunction score of arm and hand were primary outcome measures. Results There were 9 cases of stiff metacarpophalangeal joint of thumb and 3 cases of snapping thumb for stenosing tenosynovitis. At 1-year follow-up, all stenosing tenosynovitis had healed by an average of 4 weeks. The average range of motion of the metacarpophalangeal joint was 37.1° (range, 34–40°). No patients had recurrence, cicatricial contraction, or postoperative infection. The average disability of arm, shoulder, and hand was 0.3 out of 100 (range, 0–1.67), and average Short Musculoskeletal Functional Assessment Dysfunction score of arm and hand was 6.9 out of 40 (range, 0–15.6). All 12 patients stated that they were highly satisfied. Conclusions Small S incision and page turning style of annular ligament partial resection for stenosing tenosynovitis of thumb flexor tendon is a safe, simple, and reliable alternative treatment with minimal soft-tissue irritation, good functional results and recovery can be expected. PMID:24759493

  6. Trigger finger following partial flexor tendon laceration: Magnetic resonance imaging-assisted diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Couceiro, Jose; Fraga, Javier; Sanmartin, Marcos

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Post-traumatic trigger finger is considerably rarer than normal trigger finger. The diagnosis is usually made on a clinical basis. This can be obscured; however, by concurrent pathological conditions. We report a case of post-traumatic trigger finger in which diagnosis was aided by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Presentation of case Our patient is a 32-year-old male who had a previous laceration with a subsequent surgery for infectious tenosynovitis. The MRI showed the impinging tendon tag. Surgical excision of the tag successfully solved the case. Discussion The use of imaging studies for the diagnosis of post-traumatic trigger finger has been previously reported, the authors described a variation on the contour of the pulley system. The full lacerated tendon tag can be seen on our patient's MRI. Conclusion On this case, the use of MRI was a useful aid for the differential diagnosis of post-traumattic trigger finger. PMID:25765739

  7. Fractionation of 50kGy electron beam irradiation: effects on biomechanics of human flexor digitorum superficialis tendons treated with ascorbate.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Liu, Yujie; Yang, Xu; Tian, Shaoqi; Liu, Chao; Zhang, Yang; Xu, Zhaoning; Hu, Baiqiang; Tian, Zhen; Sun, Kang

    2013-02-22

    The electron beam (Ebeam) irradiation has begun to be considered as an efficient alternative to gamma irradiation in the sterilization of allografts in the reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical properties of human tendons after exposure to electron beam and free radical scavenger ascorbate. Forty human flexor digitorum superficialis tendons were prepared from five fresh cadavers and divided randomly into four groups: A, fresh (0kGy); B, 50kGy Ebeam irradiation; C, fractionated 50kGy Ebeam irradiation; D, fractionated 50kGy Ebeam on ascorbate-treated tendons. The fractionation of 50kGy was achieved by repeated irradiation of 2.5kGy for 20 repetitions. Biomechanical properties were analyzed during load-to-failure testing. The fresh tendons were found to be significant different in ultimate load, ultimate elongation relative to tendons in group B. Statistical differences were found between group B and C in ultimate load. No differences were detected between group A and C in all the parameters. Compare tendons in group C and D, significant differences were found in ultimate load and ultimate stress. It is recommended that fractionated 50kGy electron beam irradiation and free radical scavenger ascorbate should be applied in the sterilization of allografts tendons.

  8. A Clinical Trial with Brazilian Arnica (Solidago chilensis Meyen) Glycolic Extract in the Treatment of Tendonitis of Flexor and Extensor Tendons of Wrist and Hand.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Ary Gomes; Machado, Elbe Rodrigues; de Almeida, Leonardo Mendes; Nunes, Ricardo Marcelo Menezes; Giesbrecht, Patrícia Caldeira Pena; Costa, Regina Mamed; Costa, Helber B; Romão, Wanderson; Kuster, Ricardo Machado

    2015-06-01

    One of the Brazilian arnicas, Solidago chilensis Meyen, is a species of the Asteraceae family. This plant is known by this common name because it shares remarkably similar organoleptic properties with the genus Arnica L., also within the family Asteraceae. We examined the effectiveness of the S. chilensis fluid extract used externally for treating tendinitis of flexor and extensor tendons of wrist and hand in placebo-controlled double-blind clinical pharmacological studies. This study was approved by the Ethical Committee for Scientific Research in Human Beings at University Vila Velha-UVV. Two daily skin applications on the arm skin of a gel cream containing a 5% glycolic plant extract were administered to eight volunteers for 21 days. Among the volunteers, one of their arms was used as the placebo group, and the other one was used as a test group. Statistical data analyses demonstrated a significant reduction in the perception of pain in the arms in the test group, when it was compared to those receiving only the placebo. PMID:25760389

  9. Arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using four-strand hamstring tendon graft and interference screws.

    PubMed

    Pinczewski, L A; Thuresson, P; Otto, D; Nyquist, F

    1997-10-01

    We describe an arthroscopic technique for reconstruction of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) using a four-strand hamstring tendon graft. The femoral tunnel is drilled via the anterolateral portal and the tibial tunnel through the skin incision from the graft harvest. The graft is pulled through the tunnels with pullout sutures and fastened with interference screws. The results to date are good and the procedure can often be performed as day surgery. PMID:9343661

  10. In vitro mechanical properties of the accessory ligament of the deep digital flexor tendon in horses in relation to age.

    PubMed

    Becker, C K; Savelberg, H H; Barneveld, A

    1994-11-01

    The material properties of the accessory ligament of the deep digital flexor tendon (AL) of 21 forelimbs from horses between ages one day and 15 years were determined. The force (634-11416 N), failure stress (45-138 N/mm2), failure strain (7-24%) and tangent modulus (33-1639 MPa) are presented in relation to age. Tangent modulus did not indicate changes in elasticity due to age. The results demonstrate that complete ligament failures (CLF) of ALs of older horses (mean 7835 N) occur at lower forces than ALs of young adult horses (mean 8894 N). Sudden decreases, 'dips', in the force-time curves were noticed in ligaments from foals and yearlings and in ligaments from horses > 10 years. They were interpreted as the failure of a number of fibres which either fail at lower forces or are subject to higher forces than the rest. These differences in mechanical properties could be the result of age related differences in the material properties of ALs of older horses similar to alterations in collagenous tissue in other species. When analysing the data of the proximal, middle and distal regions of the ligaments separately, higher strain and elasticity were found in the distal compared to the proximal parts. It is suggested that the clinical occurrence of desmitis of the AL of older horses could be due to fibrillar failure caused by differences in the material properties of the ligaments.

  11. The role of human ankle plantar flexor muscle-tendon interaction and architecture in maximal vertical jumping examined in vivo.

    PubMed

    Farris, Dominic James; Lichtwark, Glen A; Brown, Nicholas A T; Cresswell, Andrew G

    2016-02-01

    Humans utilise elastic tendons of lower limb muscles to store and return energy during walking, running and jumping. Anuran and insect species use skeletal structures and/or dynamics in conjunction with similarly compliant structures to amplify muscle power output during jumping. We sought to examine whether human jumpers use similar mechanisms to aid elastic energy usage in the plantar flexor muscles during maximal vertical jumping. Ten male athletes performed maximal vertical squat jumps. Three-dimensional motion capture and a musculoskeletal model were used to determine lower limb kinematics that were combined with ground reaction force data in an inverse dynamics analysis. B-mode ultrasound imaging of the lateral gastrocnemius (GAS) and soleus (SOL) muscles was used to measure muscle fascicle lengths and pennation angles during jumping. Our results highlighted that both GAS and SOL utilised stretch and recoil of their series elastic elements (SEEs) in a catapult-like fashion, which likely serves to maximise ankle joint power. The resistance of supporting of body weight allowed initial stretch of both GAS and SOL SEEs. A proximal-to-distal sequence of joint moments and decreasing effective mechanical advantage early in the extension phase of the jumping movement were observed. This facilitated a further stretch of the SEE of the biarticular GAS and delayed recoil of the SOL SEE. However, effective mechanical advantage did not increase late in the jump to aid recoil of elastic tissues.

  12. The effect of core suture flexor tendon repair techniques on gliding resistance during static cycle motion and load to failure: a human cadaver study

    PubMed Central

    Moriya, T.; Larson, M. C.; Zhao, C.; An, K.-N.; Amadio, P. C.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe a modification of the Massachusetts General Hospital (MMGH) tendon repair and to compare it with three other suture techniques. Twenty human flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) tendons were randomly assigned to the modified Pennington (MP) suture and the MMGH suture. These were compared to the modified Kessler (MK) and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) sutures, using data from a previous study. All tendons were repaired with a similar epitendinous stitch and core sutures of 4-0 FiberWire. There was no significant difference in the normalized gliding resistance within the two-strand or four-strand core repair groups. The MP suture had significantly higher 2 mm gap force and ultimate load to failure than the MK suture. The MMGH suture had significantly higher 2 mm gap force and maximum failure ultimate load than the MGH suture. All repairs failed by knot unravelling. PMID:21987278

  13. Arthroscopic Release of Flexor Hallucis Longus Tendon Sheath in Female Ballet Dancers: Dynamic Pathology, Surgical Technique, and Return to Dancing Performance.

    PubMed

    Funasaki, Hiroki; Hayashi, Hiroteru; Sakamoto, Kanako; Tsuruga, Rei; Marumo, Keishi

    2015-12-01

    Stenosing tenosynovitis of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL) tendon is known as a major overuse lesion in female dancers. We describe arthroscopic surgical techniques in relation to the dynamic pathology of the disease. Crepitus and pain on moving the great toe with the ankle in plantar flexion on preoperative examination confirm the diagnosis of FHL stenosing tenosynovitis even if the os trigonum is not evident. The ankle is approached through standard posterolateral and posteromedial portals. A 4.0-mm-diameter 30° arthroscope is used. Soft tissues around the talus are cleared with a motorized shaver and a radiofrequency device. The posterior aspects of the talus, os trigonum, and FHL tendon surrounded by the tendon sheath are visualized. The dynamic pathology of the FHL tendon is well observed on passive motion of the great toe. The prominent bone fragment of the talus is removed and the tendon sheath is cut with a retrograde knife and a motorized shaver from the superior border down to the entrance of the fibro-osseous tunnel. Arthroscopic release of the FHL tendon sheath is a useful and easy method to directly approach the dynamic pathology of FHL tenosynovitis in female ballet dancers. PMID:27284509

  14. Arthroscopic Release of Flexor Hallucis Longus Tendon Sheath in Female Ballet Dancers: Dynamic Pathology, Surgical Technique, and Return to Dancing Performance.

    PubMed

    Funasaki, Hiroki; Hayashi, Hiroteru; Sakamoto, Kanako; Tsuruga, Rei; Marumo, Keishi

    2015-12-01

    Stenosing tenosynovitis of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL) tendon is known as a major overuse lesion in female dancers. We describe arthroscopic surgical techniques in relation to the dynamic pathology of the disease. Crepitus and pain on moving the great toe with the ankle in plantar flexion on preoperative examination confirm the diagnosis of FHL stenosing tenosynovitis even if the os trigonum is not evident. The ankle is approached through standard posterolateral and posteromedial portals. A 4.0-mm-diameter 30° arthroscope is used. Soft tissues around the talus are cleared with a motorized shaver and a radiofrequency device. The posterior aspects of the talus, os trigonum, and FHL tendon surrounded by the tendon sheath are visualized. The dynamic pathology of the FHL tendon is well observed on passive motion of the great toe. The prominent bone fragment of the talus is removed and the tendon sheath is cut with a retrograde knife and a motorized shaver from the superior border down to the entrance of the fibro-osseous tunnel. Arthroscopic release of the FHL tendon sheath is a useful and easy method to directly approach the dynamic pathology of FHL tenosynovitis in female ballet dancers.

  15. BIOMECHANICS AND HISTOLOGICAL ANALYSIS IN RABBIT FLEXOR TENDONS REPAIRED USING THREE SUTURE TECHNIQUES (FOUR AND SIX STRANDS) WITH EARLY ACTIVE MOBILIZATION

    PubMed Central

    Severo, Antônio Lourenço; Arenhart, Rodrigo; Silveira, Daniela; Ávila, Aluísio Otávio Vargas; Berral, Francisco José; Lemos, Marcelo Barreto; Piluski, Paulo César Faiad; Lech, Osvandré Luís Canfield; Fukushima, Walter Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Analyzing suture time, biomechanics (deformity between the stumps) and the histology of three groups of tendinous surgical repair: Brazil-2 (4-strands) which the end knot (core) is located outside the tendon, Indiana (4-strands) and Tsai (6-strands) with sutures technique which the end knot (core) is inner of the tendon, associated with early active mobilization. Methods: The right calcaneal tendons (plantar flexor of the hind paw) of 36 rabbits of the New Zealand breed (Oryctolagus cuniculus) were used in the analysis. This sample presents similar size to human flexor tendon that has approximately 4.5 mm (varying from 2mm). The selected sample showed the same mass (2.5 to 3kg) and were male or female adults (from 8 ½ months). For the flexor tendons of the hind paws, sterile and driven techniques were used in accordance to the Committee on Animal Research and Ethics (CETEA) of the University of the State of Santa Catarina (UDESC), municipality of Lages, in Brazil (protocol # 1.33.09). Results: In the biomechanical analysis (deformity) carried out between tendinous stumps, there was no statistically significant difference (p>0.01). There was no statistical difference in relation to surgical time in all three suture techniques with a mean of 6.0 minutes for Tsai (6- strands), 5.7 minutes for Indiana (4-strands) and 5.6 minutes for Brazil (4-strands) (p>0.01). With the early active mobility, there was qualitative and quantitative evidence of thickening of collagen in 38.9% on the 15th day and in 66.7% on the 30th day, making the biological tissue stronger and more resistant (p=0.095). Conclusion: This study demonstrated that there was no histological difference between the results achieved with an inside or outside end knot with respect to the repaired tendon and the number of strands did not affect healing, vascularization or sliding of the tendon in the osteofibrous tunnel, which are associated with early active mobility, with the repair techniques

  16. Microstructural stress relaxation mechanics in functionally different tendons.

    PubMed

    Screen, H R C; Toorani, S; Shelton, J C

    2013-01-01

    Tendons experience widely varying loading conditions in vivo. They may be categorised by their function as either positional tendons, which are used for intricate movements and experience lower stress, or as energy storage tendons which act as highly stressed springs during locomotion. Structural and compositional differences between tendons are thought to enable an optimisation of their properties to suit their functional environment. However, little is known about structure-function relationships in tendon. This study adopts porcine flexor and extensor tendon fascicles as examples of high stress and low stress tendons, comparing their mechanical behaviour at the micro-level in order to understand their stress relaxation response. Stress-relaxation was shown to occur predominantly through sliding between collagen fibres. However, in the more highly stressed flexor tendon fascicles, more fibre reorganisation was evident when the tissue was exposed to low strains. By contrast, the low load extensor tendon fascicles appears to have less capacity for fibre reorganisation or shearing than the energy storage tendon, relying more heavily on fibril level relaxation. The extensor fascicles were also unable to sustain loads without rapid and complete stress relaxation. These findings highlight the need to optimise tendon repair solutions for specific tendons, and match tendon properties when using grafts in tendon repairs.

  17. Anatomic ACL reconstruction: rectangular tunnel/bone-patellar tendon-bone or triple-bundle/semitendinosus tendon grafting.

    PubMed

    Shino, Konsei; Mae, Tatsuo; Tachibana, Yuta

    2015-05-01

    Anatomic ACL reconstruction is the reasonable approach to restore stability without loss of motion after ACL tear. To mimic the normal ACL like a ribbon, our preferred procedures is the anatomic rectangular tunnel (ART) technique with a bone-patellar tendon-bone (BTB) graft or the anatomic triple bundle (ATB) procedure with a hamstring (HS) tendon graft. It is important to create tunnel apertures inside the attachment areas to lessen the tunnel widening. To identify the crescent-shaped ACL femoral attachment area, the upper cartilage margin, the posterior cartilage margin and the resident's ridge are used as landmarks. To delineate the C-shaped tibial insertion, medial intercondylar ridge, Parson's knob and anterior horn of the lateral meniscus are helpful. In ART-BTB procedure which is suitable for male patients engaged in contact sports, the parallelepiped tunnels with rectangular apertures are made within the femoral and tibial attachment areas. In ATB-HS technique which is mainly applied to female athletes engaged in non-contact sports including skiing or basketball, 2 femoral and 3 tibial round tunnels are created inside the attachment areas. These techniques make it possible for the grafts to run as the native ACL without impingement to the notch or PCL. After femoral fixation with an interference screw or cortical fixation devices including Endobutton, the graft is pretensioned in situ by repetitive manual pulls at 15-20° of flexion, monitoring the graft tension with tensioners on a tensioning boot installed on the calf. Tibial fixation with pullout sutures is achieved using Double Spike Plate and a screw at the pre-determined amount of tension of 10-20N. While better outcomes with less failure rate are being obtained compared to those in the past, higher graft tear rate remains a problem. Improved preventive training may be required to avoid secondary ACL injuries.

  18. Anatomic ACL reconstruction: rectangular tunnel/bone-patellar tendon-bone or triple-bundle/semitendinosus tendon grafting.

    PubMed

    Shino, Konsei; Mae, Tatsuo; Tachibana, Yuta

    2015-05-01

    Anatomic ACL reconstruction is the reasonable approach to restore stability without loss of motion after ACL tear. To mimic the normal ACL like a ribbon, our preferred procedures is the anatomic rectangular tunnel (ART) technique with a bone-patellar tendon-bone (BTB) graft or the anatomic triple bundle (ATB) procedure with a hamstring (HS) tendon graft. It is important to create tunnel apertures inside the attachment areas to lessen the tunnel widening. To identify the crescent-shaped ACL femoral attachment area, the upper cartilage margin, the posterior cartilage margin and the resident's ridge are used as landmarks. To delineate the C-shaped tibial insertion, medial intercondylar ridge, Parson's knob and anterior horn of the lateral meniscus are helpful. In ART-BTB procedure which is suitable for male patients engaged in contact sports, the parallelepiped tunnels with rectangular apertures are made within the femoral and tibial attachment areas. In ATB-HS technique which is mainly applied to female athletes engaged in non-contact sports including skiing or basketball, 2 femoral and 3 tibial round tunnels are created inside the attachment areas. These techniques make it possible for the grafts to run as the native ACL without impingement to the notch or PCL. After femoral fixation with an interference screw or cortical fixation devices including Endobutton, the graft is pretensioned in situ by repetitive manual pulls at 15-20° of flexion, monitoring the graft tension with tensioners on a tensioning boot installed on the calf. Tibial fixation with pullout sutures is achieved using Double Spike Plate and a screw at the pre-determined amount of tension of 10-20N. While better outcomes with less failure rate are being obtained compared to those in the past, higher graft tear rate remains a problem. Improved preventive training may be required to avoid secondary ACL injuries. PMID:25753837

  19. Addressing stage II posterior tibial tendon dysfunction: biomechanically repairing the osseous structures without the need of performing the flexor digitorum longus transfer.

    PubMed

    DiDomenico, Lawrence A; Thomas, Zachary M; Fahim, Ramy

    2014-07-01

    The clinical presentation of adult flatfoot can range from a flexible deformity with normal joint integrity to a rigid, arthritic flat foot. Debate still exists regarding the surgical management of stage II deformities, especially in the presence of medial column instability. This article reviews and discusses various surgical options for the correction of stage II flatfoot reconstructive procedures. The authors discuss their opinion that is not always necessary to transfer the flexor digitorum longus tendon to provide relief and stability in this patient population. The anatomy, diagnosis, and current treatments of flexible flatfoot deformity are discussed. PMID:24980929

  20. Modified arthroscopic excision of the symptomatic os trigonum and release of the flexor hallucis longus tendon: operative technique and case study.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, C M; Silhanek, A D; Connolly, F G

    1999-01-01

    This article presents an operative technique for modified arthroscopic excision of the symptomatic os trigonum and release of the flexor hallucis longus tendon sheath. The procedure uses two stacked posterolateral subtalar joint portals, rather than the customary anterolateral and posterolateral portal combination. By visualizing the os trigonum with an arthroscope positioned in a distal portal and introducing instrumentation through a proximal portal, the ossicle may be quickly exposed and excised with minimal dissection. A case study with a 22-month follow-up and a discussion of os trigonum syndrome are included to illustrate this procedure as an alternative to open excision or traditional arthroscopic excision.

  1. A Comparative Animal Study of Tendon Grafts Healing After Remnant-Preserving Versus Conventional Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Jiang, Kan; Chai, Hao; Zhou, Mei; Bai, Jingping

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to determine if anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction by remnant preservation promotes cell proliferation, vascularization, proprioception recovery, and improved biomechanical properties of the tendon grafts. Material/Methods 75 New Zealand rabbits were randomly assigned into the control group (group A), conventional ACL reconstruction group (group B), ACL reconstruction using remnant preservation and graft through remnant sleeve technique group (group C), and ACL reconstruction using remnant preservation and remnant tensioning technique group (group D). The remnant and healing of tendon grafts in groups C and D were observed at 3, 6, and 12 weeks after surgery, and the mRNA expression levels of VEGF, NT-3 and GAP-43 in ACL (group A) or tendon graft samples (groups B, C, and D) were determined by real-time PCR. Tendon graft cell count, microvessel density (MVD), and proprioceptors were determined by H&E staining, CD34, and S-100 immunohistochemical staining. The biomechanical properties of the tendon graft at week 12 in groups B, C, and D were examined by using a tensile strength test. Results Remnant and tendon grafts were not healed at 3, 6, and 12 weeks after the operation in groups C and D. VEGF, NT-3, and GAP-43 mRNA expressions in groups B, C, and D were higher than those in group A (P<0.05), but no significant difference was observed between groups B, C, and D (P>0.05). Furthermore, tendon graft cell count, MVD, proprioception, and biomechanical properties showed no significant differences (P>0.05) among groups B, C, and D at various time points. Conclusions There was no significant difference in cell proliferation, vascularization, proprioception recovery, or biomechanical properties of the tendon grafts between remnant-preserving and conventional ACL reconstruction methods. PMID:27669454

  2. Flexor Tendon Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety Pumpkin Carving Gardening Safety Turkey Carving Removing a Ring Español Artritis ... Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety Pumpkin Carving Gardening Safety Turkey Carving Removing a Ring Español Artritis ...

  3. Surgical reconstruction of posterior tibial tendon dysfunction: prospective comparison of flexor digitorum longus substitution combined with lateral column lengthening or medial displacement calcaneal osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Marks, Richard M; Long, Jason T; Ness, Mary Ellen; Khazzam, Michael; Harris, Gerald F

    2009-01-01

    Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD) may require surgical intervention when nonoperative measures fail. Different methods of bony reconstruction may supplement tendon substitution. This study compares two types of bony procedures used to reinforce reconstruction of the posterior tibial tendon-the lateral column lengthening (LCL), and the medial displacement calcaneal osteotomy (MDCO). Twenty patients with PTTD were evaluated before and after scheduled reconstruction comprised of either flexor digitorum longus (FDL) substitution combined with MDCO (MDCO group, 14 patients) or FDL substitution with LCL fusion or osteotomy (LCL group, 6 patients). Foot/ankle kinematics and temporal-spatial parameters were analyzed using the Milwaukee Foot Model, and results were compared to a previously evaluated normal population of 25 patients. Post-operatively, both patient groups demonstrated significantly improved stride length, cadence and walking speed, as well as improved hindfoot and forefoot position in the sagittal plane. The LCL group also demonstrated greater heel inversion. All post-operative subjects revealed significant improvement in the talo-MT1 angle in the A/P and lateral planes, calcaneal pitch and medial cuneiform-MT5 height. Surgical reconstruction of PTTD with either the LCL or MDCO shows comparable improvements in gait parameters, with better heel inversion seen with the LCL, but improved 1st ray plantarflexion and varus with the MDCO. Both procedures demonstrated comparable improvements in radiographic measurements. PMID:18603429

  4. Long-term follow-up of flexor digitorum longus transfer and calcaneal osteotomy for stage II posterior tibial tendon dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, C; Whitehouse, S L; Saxby, T S

    2015-03-01

    Flexor digitorum longus transfer and medial displacement calcaneal osteotomy is a well-recognised form of treatment for stage II posterior tibial tendon dysfunction. Although excellent short- and medium-term results have been reported, the long-term outcome is unknown. We reviewed the clinical outcome of 31 patients with a symptomatic flexible flat-foot deformity who underwent this procedure between 1994 and 1996. There were 21 women and ten men with a mean age of 54.3 years (42 to 70). The mean follow-up was 15.2 years (11.4 to 16.5). All scores improved significantly (p < 0.001). The mean American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score improved from 48.4 pre-operatively to 90.3 (54 to 100) at the final follow-up. The mean pain component improved from 12.3 to 35.2 (20 to 40). The mean function score improved from 35.2 to 45.6 (30 to 50). The mean visual analogue score for pain improved from 7.3 to 1.3 (0 to 6). The mean Short Form-36 physical component score was 40.6 (sd 8.9), and this showed a significant correlation with the mean AOFAS score (r = 0.68, p = 0.005). A total of 27 patients (87%) were pain free and functioning well at the final follow-up. We believe that flexor digitorum longus transfer and calcaneal osteotomy provides long-term pain relief and satisfactory function in the treatment of stage II posterior tibial tendon dysfunction. PMID:25737518

  5. Frequency of Penetration of the Digital Flexor Tendon Sheath and Distal Interphalangeal Joint Using a Direct Endoscopic Approach to the Navicular Bursa in Horses

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Sarah Elizabeth; García, Eugenio Cillán; Reardon, Richard J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the frequency of inadvertent penetration of the digital flexor tendon sheath (DFTS) and/or distal interphalangeal joint (DIPJ) when using a direct endoscopic approach to the navicular bursa, and to evaluate an alternate direct approach to the navicular bursa. Study Design Cadaveric study. Sample Population Equine cadaver limbs (n = 40 for direct; n = 12 for alternate approach). Methods Four surgeons performed the direct endoscopic approach to the navicular bursa on 10 limbs each. Frequencies of inadvertent synovial penetration and iatrogenic damage were compared between surgeons. Use of an alternate direct approach, adopting a straight parasagittal trajectory, was evaluated by 2 surgeons. Results Inadvertent synovial penetration occurred in 45% of limbs (DFTS 37.5%; DIPJ 17.5%; and both structures 10%). Successful bursa entry was achieved on the first attempt in 45% of limbs. Significant variation in frequency of inadvertent synovial penetration was observed between surgeons (range 10–80%). Inadvertent synovial penetration did not occur when using the alternate direct technique. Iatrogenic damage to navicular bone fibrocartilage and/or deep digital flexor tendon occurred in 55% of limbs using the direct endoscopic approach and in 0% of limbs using the alternate direct approach. Conclusion Because of the considerable risk of inadvertent penetration of the DFTS and/or the DIPJ when making a direct endoscopic approach to the navicular bursa, it is advisable to investigate for inadvertent penetration when treating navicular bursa sepsis using a direct approach. The alternate direct technique may reduce the risk of inadvertent penetration; however, the view within the bursa may be restricted. PMID:26971252

  6. Cyclic pull-out strength of hamstring tendon graft fixation with soft tissue interference screws. Influence of screw length.

    PubMed

    Stadelmaier, D M; Lowe, W R; Ilahi, O A; Noble, P C; Kohl, H W

    1999-01-01

    Blunt-threaded interference screws used for fixation of hamstring tendons in anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions provide aperture fixation and may provide a biomechanically more stable graft than a graft fixed further from the articular surface. It is unknown if soft tissue fixation strength using interference screws is affected by screw length. We compared the cyclic and time-zero pull-out forces of 7 x 25 mm and 7 x 40 mm blunt-threaded metal interference screws for hamstring graft tibial fixation in eight paired human cadaveric specimens. A four-stranded autologous hamstring tendon graft was secured by a blunt-threaded interference screw into a proximal tibial tunnel with a diameter corresponding to the graft width. Eight grafts were secured with a 25-mm length screw while the other eight paired grafts were secured with a 40-mm length screw. During cyclic testing, slippage of the graft occurred as the force of pull became greater with each cycle until the graft-screw complex ultimately failed. All grafts failed at the fixation site, with the tendon being pulled past the screw. There were no measurable differences in the mean cyclic failure strength, pull-out strength, or stiffness between the two sizes of screws. Although use of the longer screw would make removal technically easier should revision surgery be necessary, it did not provide stronger fixation strength than the shorter, standard screw as had been postulated. PMID:10569365

  7. Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament: a comparison between bone-patellar tendon-bone grafts and fourstrand hamstring grafts

    PubMed Central

    Razi, Mohammad; Sarzaeem, Mohammad Mahdi; Kazemian, Gholam Hossein; Najafi, Farideh; Najafi, Mohammad Amin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Disruption of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a common ligamentous injury of the knee. The choice of graft for (ACL) reconstruction remains controversial. This prospective, randomized clinical trial aimed to compare clinical results of bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) grafts and four-strand semitendinosus-gracilis (ST) grafts for ACL reconstruction over a 3-year follow-up interval. Methods: Seventy-one patients with an average age of 29± 4.5yearswere treated for torn ACL between 2008 and 2009. Forty-sixpatients underwent reconstruction with BPTB autograft, and 41 were treated with ST autograft. At the time of final follow-up, 37 patients in patella group and 34 patients in hamstring group were evaluated in terms of return to pre-injury activity level, pain, knee stability, range of motion, IKDC (International Knee Documentation Committee) score and complications. Results: At 36thmonth of follow-up, 34 (92%) and 28 (82%) patients in BPTB and ST group, respectively had good-to-excellent IKDC score (p > 0.05). The activity levels were higher in BPTB group (p> 0.05). At 3rd yearof follow up, the Lachman test was graded normal, for 23 (62%) and 11 (32%) patients in BPTB and ST group, respectively (p=0.019). Regarding the pivot-shift test, 29 (79%) and 15 (44%) patients in patella and hamstring group, respectively had normal test at the latest follow-up (p=0.021).There were no significant differences in terms of thigh circumference difference, effusion, knee range of motion, pain and complications. Conclusion: The results indicate a trend toward increased graft laxity and pivot-shift grades in patients undergoing reconstruction with hamstring autograft compared with patella tendon. However, the two groups had comparable results in terms of activity level and knee function. PMID:25694992

  8. The effects of multiple-strand suture techniques on the tensile properties of repair of the flexor digitorum profundus tendon to bone.

    PubMed

    Silva, M J; Hollstien, S B; Fayazi, A H; Adler, P; Gelberman, R H; Boyer, M I

    1998-10-01

    We examined the effects of multiple-strand suture techniques on the tensile properties of flexor digitorum profundus tendon-to-bone repairs in a human cadaver finger model. Forty-four fingers were obtained from the cadavera of fifteen donors who had been an average of seventy-four years old (range, fifty-four to eighty-nine years old) at the time of death. Four or eight-strand proximal grasping sutures were secured to the distal phalanx of each finger with use of either a suture anchor or a dorsally placed button. There were four subgroups of eleven fingers each. We found that repairs performed with use of a dorsally placed button had greater yield force, ultimate force, and rigidity than those performed with use of an anchor and that repairs performed with eight strands had greater ultimate force than those performed with four strands. These differences were significant (p < 0.05). We could detect no differences among the four types of repairs with regard to the amount of relative tendon-bone elongation at twenty newtons of force. The repairs performed with eight strands and a dorsally placed button had an average yield force (and 95 per cent confidence interval) of 50.0 +/- 14.1 newtons, an average ultimate force of 68.5 +/- 14.6 newtons, an average rigidity of 744 +/- 327 newton/(millimeter/millimeter), and an average tendon-bone elongation of 3.4 +/- 0.7 millimeters at twenty newtons of force. Multiple-comparison testing showed that the eight-strand repairs performed with a dorsally placed button had greater ultimate force than the other three types of repairs as well as greater yield force and rigidity than the four and eight-strand repairs performed with a suture anchor.

  9. Synthesis, development, characterization and effectiveness of bovine pure platelet gel-collagen-polydioxanone bioactive graft on tendon healing

    PubMed Central

    Moshiri, Ali; Oryan, Ahmad; Meimandi-Parizi, Abdolhamid

    2015-01-01

    Bovine platelet gel (BPG) is an accessible and cost-effective source of growth factors which may have a value in tendon regenerative medicine. We produced a collagen implant (CI) as a tendon proper, covered it with polydioxanone (PDS) sheath to simulate paratenon and finally embedded the BPG as an active source of growth factor within the bioimplant to test whether BPG would be able to accelerate and enhance tendon regeneration and repair. After in vitro characterization of the bioactive grafts, the grafts were implanted in rabbit large tendon defect model. Untreated tendons and tendons treated with either CI or CI-PDS were served as controls for the CI-PDS-BPG. The animals were investigated clinically, ultrasonographically and haematologically for 120 days. After euthanasia, dry matter content, water uptake and delivery characteristics and also gross morphological, histopathological and scanning electron microscopic features of the healing tendons were assessed. In vitro, the activated platelets in the scaffold, released their growth factors significantly more than the controls. BPG also increased cell viability, and enhanced cellular differentiation, maturation and proliferation inside the CI-PDS compared with the controls. In vivo, the BPG modulated inflammation, increased quality and rate of fibroplasia and produced a remodelled tendon that had significantly higher collagen content and superior collagen fibril and fibre differentiation than controls. Treatment also significantly improved tendon water uptake and delivery characteristics, animals’ serum PDGF level, CI-PDS biocompatibility and biodegradability and reduced peritendinous adhesions, muscle fibrosis and atrophy. BPG was effective on tendon healing and CI-PDS-BPG may be a valuable bioscaffold in tendon reconstructive surgery. PMID:25702535

  10. Synthesis, development, characterization and effectiveness of bovine pure platelet gel-collagen-polydioxanone bioactive graft on tendon healing.

    PubMed

    Moshiri, Ali; Oryan, Ahmad; Meimandi-Parizi, Abdolhamid

    2015-06-01

    Bovine platelet gel (BPG) is an accessible and cost-effective source of growth factors which may have a value in tendon regenerative medicine. We produced a collagen implant (CI) as a tendon proper, covered it with polydioxanone (PDS) sheath to simulate paratenon and finally embedded the BPG as an active source of growth factor within the bioimplant to test whether BPG would be able to accelerate and enhance tendon regeneration and repair. After in vitro characterization of the bioactive grafts, the grafts were implanted in rabbit large tendon defect model. Untreated tendons and tendons treated with either CI or CI-PDS were served as controls for the CI-PDS-BPG. The animals were investigated clinically, ultrasonographically and haematologically for 120 days. After euthanasia, dry matter content, water uptake and delivery characteristics and also gross morphological, histopathological and scanning electron microscopic features of the healing tendons were assessed. In vitro, the activated platelets in the scaffold, released their growth factors significantly more than the controls. BPG also increased cell viability, and enhanced cellular differentiation, maturation and proliferation inside the CI-PDS compared with the controls. In vivo, the BPG modulated inflammation, increased quality and rate of fibroplasia and produced a remodelled tendon that had significantly higher collagen content and superior collagen fibril and fibre differentiation than controls. Treatment also significantly improved tendon water uptake and delivery characteristics, animals' serum PDGF level, CI-PDS biocompatibility and biodegradability and reduced peritendinous adhesions, muscle fibrosis and atrophy. BPG was effective on tendon healing and CI-PDS-BPG may be a valuable bioscaffold in tendon reconstructive surgery.

  11. Arthroscopically assisted anatomical coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction using tendon graft.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Yon-Sik; Seo, Young-Jin; Noh, Kyu-Cheol; Patro, Bishu Prasad; Kim, Do-Young

    2011-07-01

    We describe a method of arthroscopically assisted, mini-open, anatomical reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligament. This method restores both components of the native ligament with the aim of achieving maximum stability with minimal disruption of the normal anatomy. Using the same principles of ligament reconstruction that are employed in other joints, transosseous tunnels are created following the native footprints of the conoid and trapezoid ligaments and an autologous graft is fixed using a PEEK screw. Adequate healing of the ligament occurs within the bone, to prevent stress risers with an appropriate working length. This procedure is unique, as it replaces the torn ligament with a natural substitute, in the appropriate location, through a minimally invasive procedure. This technique would be suitable for treatment of patients with either grade III or V acute acromioclavicular dislocations. Clinical outcomes for the first 13 consecutive patients treated with this procedure are reported, revealing excellent satisfaction rates with a Constant score of 96.6 at final follow-up.

  12. An endoscopic approach to longitudinal structures including muscle flaps and vein, tendon, and nerve grafts.

    PubMed

    Hallock, Geoffrey G; Rice, David C

    2008-02-01

    Anatomically favorable structures that have a longitudinal orientation are particularly amenable to endoscopic harvest. Typically, only a single portal is necessary for access, and an optical cavity can be maintained using a mechanical retraction device. As with all minimal invasive surgery, this can still allow rapid and often a safer tissue harvest with diminished morbidity, especially with respect to wound healing and non-aesthetic scar formation. Many plastic surgery applications have already been described facilitated by the endoscopic harvest of vein, tendon, and nerve grafts, as well as certain local or free muscle flaps.

  13. Cerebral Palsy Tendon Transfers: Flexor Carpi Ulnaris to Extensor Carpi Radialis Brevis and Extensor Pollicis Longus Reroutement.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Anchal; Wall, Lindley B; Goldfarb, Charles A

    2016-08-01

    The flexor carpi ulnaris to extensor carpi radialis brevis transfer and extensor pollicis longus rerouting combined with thenar release are 2 successful surgical interventions for children with spastic cerebral palsy. The goal of both procedures is to improve quality of life for patients who have previously failed conservative management, and the degree of expected improvement is predicated on several patient variables, making careful patient selection crucial for ensuring successful outcomes. Here, surgical technique is described; risk factors are discussed, and outcomes related to both procedures are presented. PMID:27387086

  14. Effect of Calcium Phosphate–Hybridized Tendon Graft in Anatomic Single-Bundle ACL Reconstruction in Goats

    PubMed Central

    Mutsuzaki, Hirotaka; Fujie, Hiromichi; Nakajima, Hiromi; Fukagawa, Makoto; Nomura, Shunsuke; Sakane, Masataka

    2016-01-01

    Background: We previously developed a novel technique using an alternate soaking process that improves tendon-bone healing by hybridizing the tendon graft with calcium phosphate (CaP). However, the effects of the CaP-hybridized tendon graft on anatomic single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction remain unclear. Purpose: To determine the effects of CaP-hybridized tendon grafts compared with untreated tendon grafts 6 months after anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction using a goat model. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Animals were divided into a CaP group (n = 5 goats) and a control group (n = 5 goats), and we analyzed (1) knee kinematics and in situ forces under applied anterior tibial loads of 50 N and internal tibial torque of 2.0 N·m in the grafts at full extension and at 60° and 90° of knee flexion, (2) the mean percentage of bone tunnel enlargement using computed tomography (CT), and (3) the histology of the tendon-bone interface. Results: The in situ forces under applied anterior tibial loads of 50 N at 60° and 90° of knee flexion in the CaP group were greater than those in the control group (P < .05). The red safranin-O–stained area, indicating glycosaminoglycans in the cartilage layers at the joint aperture sites of the anterior femoral and posterior tibial bone tunnel, was greater in the CaP group than that in the control group (P < .05). The lengths of the nonbonding gap area between the anterior femoral and posterior tibial bone tunnels in the control group were greater than those in the CaP group (P < .05). No significant difference could be detected in the mean percentage of bone tunnel enlargement between the 2 groups. Conclusion: The CaP-hybridized tendon graft enhanced tendon-bone healing at the joint aperture site in both anterior femoral and posterior tibial tunnels 6 months after anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction in goats. The in situ forces under applied anterior tibial loads at greater

  15. Effect of Calcium Phosphate–Hybridized Tendon Graft in Anatomic Single-Bundle ACL Reconstruction in Goats

    PubMed Central

    Mutsuzaki, Hirotaka; Fujie, Hiromichi; Nakajima, Hiromi; Fukagawa, Makoto; Nomura, Shunsuke; Sakane, Masataka

    2016-01-01

    Background: We previously developed a novel technique using an alternate soaking process that improves tendon-bone healing by hybridizing the tendon graft with calcium phosphate (CaP). However, the effects of the CaP-hybridized tendon graft on anatomic single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction remain unclear. Purpose: To determine the effects of CaP-hybridized tendon grafts compared with untreated tendon grafts 6 months after anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction using a goat model. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Animals were divided into a CaP group (n = 5 goats) and a control group (n = 5 goats), and we analyzed (1) knee kinematics and in situ forces under applied anterior tibial loads of 50 N and internal tibial torque of 2.0 N·m in the grafts at full extension and at 60° and 90° of knee flexion, (2) the mean percentage of bone tunnel enlargement using computed tomography (CT), and (3) the histology of the tendon-bone interface. Results: The in situ forces under applied anterior tibial loads of 50 N at 60° and 90° of knee flexion in the CaP group were greater than those in the control group (P < .05). The red safranin-O–stained area, indicating glycosaminoglycans in the cartilage layers at the joint aperture sites of the anterior femoral and posterior tibial bone tunnel, was greater in the CaP group than that in the control group (P < .05). The lengths of the nonbonding gap area between the anterior femoral and posterior tibial bone tunnels in the control group were greater than those in the CaP group (P < .05). No significant difference could be detected in the mean percentage of bone tunnel enlargement between the 2 groups. Conclusion: The CaP-hybridized tendon graft enhanced tendon-bone healing at the joint aperture site in both anterior femoral and posterior tibial tunnels 6 months after anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction in goats. The in situ forces under applied anterior tibial loads at greater

  16. Patellar tendon or hamstring graft anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions in patients aged above 50 years

    PubMed Central

    Bali, Tarun; Nagraj, Raghu; Kumar, Malhar N; Chandy, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background: The treatment of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury consists of arthroscopic ACL reconstruction with patellar tendon or hamstring graft. Satisfactory results have been reported so far in the younger age group. Dilemma arises regarding the suitability of ACL reconstruction in patients aged 50 years and above. This retrospective analyses the outcome of ACL reconstruction in patients aged 50 years and above. Materials and Methods: 55 patients aged 50 years and above presented to our institution with symptomatic ACL tear and were managed with arthroscopic reconstruction with patellar tendon/hamstring graft. 22 patients underwent ACL reconstruction with bone- patellar tendon-bone graft and the remaining 33 with a hamstring graft. Evaluation of functional outcome was performed using International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) and Lysholm scoring in the preoperative period, at the end of 1 year and at the final followup. Radiographic evaluation was performed using the Kellgren–Lawrence grading system. Results: The mean preoperative IKDC score was 39.7 ± 3.3. At the end of 1-year following the operation, the mean IKDC score was 73.6 ± 4.9 and at the final followup was 67.8 ± 7.7. The mean preoperative Lysholm score was 40.4 ± 10.3. At the end of 1-year following the intervention, the mean Lysholm score was 89.7 ± 2.1 and at final followup was 85.3 ± 2.5. Overall, 14 out of 42 patients who underwent radiographic assessment showed progression of osteoarthritis changes at the final followup after the intervention. Conclusion: In our study, there was a statistically significant improvement in the IKDC and Lysholm scores following the intervention. There was a slight deterioration in the scores at the final followup but the overall rate of satisfaction was still high and most of the patients were able to do their routine chores and light exercises suitable for their age group. Around one-third of patients show progression of radiographic changes

  17. A study of the distribution of color Doppler flows in the superficial digital flexor tendon of young Thoroughbreds during their training periods

    PubMed Central

    HATAZOE, Takashi; ENDO, Yoshiro; IWAMOTO, Yohei; KOROSUE, Kenji; KURODA, Taisuke; INOUE, Saemi; MURATA, Daiki; HOBO, Seiji; MISUMI, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim of this study was to evaluate the relationships of exercise and tendon injury with Doppler flows appearing in the superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) of young Thoroughbreds during training periods. The forelimb SDFTs of 24 one- to two-year-old Thoroughbreds clinically free of any orthopaedic disorders were evaluated using grey-scale (GS) and color Doppler (CD) images during two training periods between December 2013 to April 2015. Twelve horses per year were examined in December, February, and April in training periods that began in September and ended in April. The SDFT was evaluated in 3 longitudinal images of equal lengths (labelled 1, 2, 3 in order from proximal to distal), and 6 transversal images separated by equal lengths (labelled 1A, 1B, 2A, 2B, 3A and 3B in order from proximal to distal) of the metacarpus using both GS and CD. The running (canter and gallop) distance for 1 month before the date of the ultrasonographic examinations was increased in December, February, and April in both of the two training periods. CD flows defined as rhythmically blinking or pulsatory colored signals were found in 56 of 864 (6.4%) transversal CD images, in 28, 12, 13, and 3 images of 1A, 1B, 2A and 2B, respectively, and in 7, 14, and 35 images captured in December, February, and April, respectively. There were no longitudinal or transversal GS images indicating injury in the SDFTs in either of the two training periods. The increase of CD flows in the proximal regions of the SDFT are possibly related to the increase of the running distance during the training periods of the one- to two-year-old Thoroughbreds. Because no injury was diagnosed in the SDFTs by GS images during the training periods, the increase of CD flows in the proximal parts of SDFT is not necessarily predictive of tendon injury in the near future during the training period of young Thoroughbreds. PMID:26858574

  18. Compressive properties of cd-HA-gelatin modified intrasynovial tendon allograft in canine model in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Jun; Zhao, Chunfeng; Chen, Qingshan; Thoreson, Andrew R; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C

    2011-06-01

    Although we sometimes use the intrasynovial tendon allograft as a donor, the gliding ability of allograft prepared by lyophilization is significantly decreased. The gliding ability of the grafted tendon after tendon reconstruction is very important because the high gliding resistance causes more adhesion and leads to poor clinical results. We recently revealed that tendon surface treatment with a carbodiimide derivatized HA (cd-HA)-gelatin mixture for intrasynovial tendon allograft significantly improved its gliding ability. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether this cd-HA-gelatin treatment affects the tendon mechanical property or not. A total of 40 flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) tendons from canines were evaluated for compressive property by using indentation test. Indentation stiffness was measured for normal tendon, rehydrated tendon after lyophilization, rehydrated tendon after lyophilization that was implanted 6 weeks in vivo, and cd-HA treated rehydrated tendon after lyophilization that was implanted 6 weeks in vivo. The results for all groups showed no significant difference in the tendon compressive properties. The findings of these results demonstrate that cd-HA treatment for intrasynovial tendon allograft is an excellent method to improve the tendon gliding ability after lyophilization without changing the compressive property of donor tendon. PMID:21549380

  19. Gliding Resistance and Strength of a Braided Polyester/Monofilament Polyethylene Composite (FiberWire®) Suture in Human Flexor Digitorum Profundus Tendon Repair: An In-Vitro Biomechanical Study

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Jose M.; Zhao, Chunfeng; An, Kai-Nan; Zobitz, Mark E.; Amadio, Peter C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose While the strength of a tendon repair is clearly important, the friction of the repair is also a relevant consideration. The purpose of this study was to characterize the frictional coefficient, gliding resistance and breaking strength of suture materials and a suture construct commonly used for flexor tendon repair. Methods We measured the friction coefficients of 3-0 braided nylon enclosed in a smooth nylon outer shell (Supramid, S. Jackson, Alexandria, VA), 3-0 braided polyester coated with polybutilate (Ethibond, Ethicon, Somerville, NJ), and a 3-0 braided polyester/monofilament polyethylene composite (FiberWire, Arthrex, Naples, FL) sutures. We also measured the gliding resistance, linear breaking strength and resistance to gapping of zone 2 modified Pennington tendon repairs with the two lowest friction sutures in 20 human cadaveric flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) tendons. Results The braided polyester/monofilament polyethylene composite had a significantly lower friction coefficient (0.054) than either the coated polyester (0.076) or nylon (0.130) sutures (p<0.001). The gliding resistances of the repaired tendons with braided/monofilament polyethylene composite suture and coated, braided polyester were similar (p> 0.05). The strength of the two repairs, force to produce a 2mm gap, and resistance to gap formation than coated, braided polyester repairs were also not significantly different. Conclusion Braided polyester composite is a low friction suture material. However, when this suture was used for tendon repair with a locking suture technique, it did not show a significant effect on the gliding resistance and repair strength compared with the same repair using coated polyester suture. PMID:19121735

  20. Modified Weaver-Dunn Procedure Versus The Use of Semitendinosus Autogenous Tendon Graft for Acromioclavicular Joint Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Hegazy, Galal; Safwat, Hesham; Seddik, Mahmoud; Al-shal, Ehab A.; Al-Sebai, Ibrahim; Negm, Mohame

    2016-01-01

    Background: The optimal operative method for acromioclavicular joint reconstruction remains controversial. The modified Weaver-Dunn method is one of the most popular methods. Anatomic reconstruction of coracoclavicular ligaments with autogenous tendon grafts, widely used in treating chronic acromioclavicular joint instability, reportedly diminishes pain, eliminates sequelae, and improves function as well as strength. Objective: To compare clinical and radiologic outcomes between a modified Weaver-Dunn procedure and an anatomic coracoclavicular ligaments reconstruction technique using autogenous semitendinosus tendon graft. Methods: Twenty patients (mean age, 39 years) with painful, chronic Rockwood type III acromioclavicular joint dislocations were subjected to surgical reconstruction. In ten patients, a modified Weaver-Dunn procedure was performed, in the other ten patients; autogenous semitendinosus tendon graft was used. The mean time between injury and the index procedure was 18 month (range from 9 – 28). Clinical evaluation was performed using the Oxford Shoulder Score and Nottingham Clavicle Score after a mean follow-up time of 27.8 months. Preoperative and postoperative radiographs were compared. Results: In the Weaver-Dunn group the Oxford Shoulder Score improved from 25±4 to 40±2 points. While the Nottingham Clavicle Score increased from 48±7 to 84±11. In semitendinosus tendon graft group, the Oxford Shoulder Score improved from 25±3 points to 50±2 points and the Nottingham Clavicle Score from 48±8 points to 95±8, respectively. Conclusion: Acromioclavicular joint reconstruction using the semitendinosus tendon graft achieved better Oxford Shoulder Score and Nottingham Clavicle Score compared to the modified Weaver-Dunn procedure. PMID:27347245

  1. Influence of the crosshead rate on the mechanical properties of fixation systems of ACL tendon grafts.

    PubMed

    Martel, Oscar; Cárdenes, Juan F; Garcés, Gerardo; Carta, José A

    2009-11-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is one of the most important aspects of knee surgery. For this purpose, several fixation devices have been developed, although the interference screw is the most frequently used. The most typical biomechanical test of these devices consists of placing them in a testing machine and subjecting them to a pull-out test. However, insufficient attention has been paid to the influence of the displacement test rate on the mechanical properties of the fixation system. The aim of this study is to compare the influence of the crosshead rate in the biomechanical test of two different devices for the fixation of ACL tendon grafts. One hundred in vitro tests were performed using porcine tibiae and bovine tendons. The fixation devices used were (1) an interference screw and (2) a new expansion device. All ACL reconstructions were subjected to pull-out test to failure. Five crosshead rates were employed in a range from 30 mm/min to 4000 mm/min. Statistical analyses of the results show that, for the two devices, the rate has a significant effect on both maximum force and stiffness. Moreover, the new expansion device showed lesser dependency on the crosshead rate than the interference screw.

  2. Fifteen Year Prospective Comparison of Patellar & Hamstring Tendon Grafts for ACL Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Roe, Justin; Salmon, Lucy; Kok, Alison; Linklater, James; Pinczewski, Leo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This prospective longitudinal study compares isolated endoscopic ACL reconstruction utilizing 4-strand hamstring tendon (HT) or patellar tendon (PT) autograft over a 15-year period with respect to clinical outcomes and the development of osteoarthritis. Method: 90 consecutive patients with isolated ACL rupture were reconstructed with a PT autograft and 90 patients received HT autograft, with an identical surgical technique. Patients were assessed at 2, 5, 7, 10 and 15 years. Assessment included the IKDC Knee Ligament Evaluation including radiographic evaluation, KT1000, kneeling pain, and clinical outcomes. Results: Subjects who received the PT graft had significantly worse outcomes at 15 years for the variables of radiologically detectable osteoarthritis (p=0.001), motion loss (p=0.02), single leg hop test (p=0.002), participation in strenuous activity (p=0.03), knee related decrease in activity level (p=0.002) and kneeling pain (p=0.03). There was no significant difference between the HT and PT groups in overall IKDC grade (p=0.28). ACL graft rupture occurred in 16% of HT group and 8% of the PT group (p=0.10). Contralateral ACL rupture occurred in significantly more PT patients (24%) than HT patients (12%) (p=0.03). Conclusion: Significant differences have developed at 15 years after surgery which were not seen at earlier reviews. Compared to the HT Group, the PT group had significantly worse outcomes with respect to radiological osteoarthritis, range of motion and functional tests but no significant difference in laxity was identified. There was a high incidence of ACL injury after reconstruction, to both the reconstructed and the contralateral knee.

  3. Radial Nerve Tendon Transfers.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Andre Eu-Jin; Etcheson, Jennifer; Yao, Jeffrey

    2016-08-01

    Radial nerve palsy typically occurs as a result of trauma or iatrogenic injury and leads to the loss of wrist extension, finger extension, thumb extension, and a reduction in grip strength. In the absence of nerve recovery, reconstruction of motor function involves tendon transfer surgery. The most common donor tendons include the pronator teres, wrist flexors, and finger flexors. The type of tendon transfer is classified based on the donor for the extensor digitorum communis. Good outcomes have been reported for most methods of radial nerve tendon transfers as is typical for positional tendon transfers not requiring significant power. PMID:27387076

  4. Quadriceps tendon free graft augmentation for a midsubstance tear of the medial collateral ligament during total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kwang Am; Lee, Su Chan; Hwang, Seung Hyun; Jung, Soong Hyun

    2009-12-01

    Primary repair of a disrupted midsubstance MCL during TKA can provide satisfactory stability. However, in cases with poor soft tissue quality or a gap between the ligament ends, primary repair may not be feasible. In these cases, we have used an augmented repair. The purpose of this study is to describe the technique of augmented repair using a quadriceps tendon free graft and present our experience of five patients. A total of five patients underwent augmented repair of a transected MCL substance using a quadriceps tendon free graft. The patients were followed-up for a mean of 16 months. Augmented repair of the transected MCL substance was successful in all five patients, with a mean additional surgery time of 17 min, no coronal instability, a mean Knee Society Score of 87.0+/-2.7 (range, 85 to 90), and a mean function score of 85.0+/-3.5 (range, 80 to 90). There were no complications associated with the extensor mechanism. This data suggests that quadriceps tendon free graft augmentation might be a useful alternative for repairing midsubstance tears of the MCL in special situations, where the quality of the remaining tendon is poor, there is suspicion of stretching, and there is a small gap between both the repaired ligament ends resulting in late laxity.

  5. Lengthening osteotomy of the calcaneus and flexor digitorum longus tendon transfer in flexible flatfoot deformity improves talo-1st metatarsal-Index, clinical outcome and pedographic parameter.

    PubMed

    Richter, Martinus; Zech, Stefan

    2013-03-01

    Lengthening osteotomy of the calcaneus (LO) and flexor digitorum longus tendon (FDL) transfer to the navicular is one option for the treatment of flexible flatfoot deformity (FD). The aim of the study was to analyse the amount of correction and clinical outcome including pedographic assessment. In a prospective consecutive non-controlled clinical followup study, all patients with FD that were treated with LO and FDL from September 1st 2006 to August 31st, 2009 were included. Assessment was performed before surgery and at 2-year-followup including clinical examination (with staging of posterior tibialis insufficiency) weight bearing radiographs (Talo-1st metatarsal angles (TMT)), pedography (increased midfoot contact area and force) and Visual Analogue Scale Foot and Ankle (VAS FA). 112 feet in 102 patients were analysed (age, 57.6 (13-82), 42% male). In 12 feet (9%) wound healing delay without further surgical measures was registered. All patients achieved full weight bearing during the 7th postoperative week. Until followup, revision surgery was done in 3 patients (fusion calcaneocuboid joint (n=2), correction triple arthrodesis (n=1)). 101 feet (90%) completed 2-year-followup. TMT dorsoplantar/lateral/Index and VAS FA scores were increased, and posterior tibialis insufficiency stage, pedographic midfoot contact area and force percentage were decreased (each p<.05). All relevant parameters (stage of posterior tibialis insufficiency, TMT angles and Index, pedographic midfoot contact area and force percentage, VAS FA) were improved 2 years after LO and FDL transfer to the navicular in FD. The complication rate was low. This method allows safe and predictable correction.

  6. Synovial Mesenchymal Stem Cells Promote Meniscus Regeneration Augmented by an Autologous Achilles Tendon Graft in a Rat Partial Meniscus Defect Model

    PubMed Central

    Ozeki, Nobutake; Muneta, Takeshi; Matsuta, Seiya; Koga, Hideyuki; Nakagawa, Yusuke; Mizuno, Mitsuru; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Mabuchi, Yo; Akazawa, Chihiro; Kobayashi, Eiji; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sekiya, Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Although meniscus defects and degeneration are strongly correlated with the later development of osteoarthritis, the promise of regenerative medicine strategies is to prevent and/or delay the disease's progression. Meniscal reconstruction has been shown in animal models with tendon grafting and transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs); however, these procedures have not shown the same efficacy in clinical studies. Here, our aim was to investigate the ability of tendon grafts pretreated with exogenous synovial-derived MSCs to prevent cartilage degeneration in a rat partial meniscus defect model. We removed the anterior half of the medial meniscus and grafted autologous Achilles tendons with or without a 10-minute pretreatment of the tendon with synovial MSCs. The meniscus and surrounding cartilage were evaluated at 2, 4, and 8 weeks (n = 5). Tendon grafts increased meniscus size irrespective of synovial MSCs. Histological scores for regenerated menisci were better in the tendon + MSC group than in the other two groups at 4 and 8 weeks. Both macroscopic and histological scores for articular cartilage were significantly better in the tendon + MSC group at 8 weeks. Implanted synovial MSCs survived around the grafted tendon and native meniscus integration site by cell tracking assays with luciferase+, LacZ+, DiI+, and/or GFP+ synovial MSCs and/or GFP+ tendons. Flow cytometric analysis showed that transplanted synovial MSCs retained their MSC properties at 7 days and host synovial tissue also contained cells with MSC characteristics. Synovial MSCs promoted meniscus regeneration augmented by autologous Achilles tendon grafts and prevented cartilage degeneration in rats. Stem Cells 2015;33:1927–1938 PMID:25993981

  7. Plantar Fat Grafting and Tendon Balancing for the Diabetic Foot Ulcer in Remission.

    PubMed

    Luu, Cynthia A; Larson, Ethan; Rankin, Timothy M; Pappalardo, Jennifer L; Slepian, Marvin J; Armstrong, David G

    2016-07-01

    We report on the use of free fat grafting as a means of redistributing normal and shear stress after healing of plantar diabetic foot wounds. Although fat augmentation (lipofilling) has been described previously as an approach to supplement defects and prevent atrophy, including use as an adjunct to wound healing and to mitigate pain in the foot, we are unaware of any reports in the medical literature that have described its use in the high-risk diabetic foot in remission. An active 37-year-old man with type 2 diabetes and neuropathy presented with gangrene of his fifth ray, which was amputated. He subsequently developed a chronic styloid process ulceration that progressed despite treatment. We performed a tibialis anterior tendon transfer and total contact casting. He went on to heal but with residual fat pad atrophy and recalcitrant preulcerative lesions. We then used autologous fat grafting for the plantar atrophy. The patient was able to successfully transition to normal shoe gear after 4 weeks with successful engraftment without complication or recurrence of the wound at 6 weeks. This therapy may provide a promising adjunct to increase ulcer-free days to the patient in diabetic foot remission. PMID:27536489

  8. Plantar Fat Grafting and Tendon Balancing for the Diabetic Foot Ulcer in Remission

    PubMed Central

    Luu, Cynthia A.; Larson, Ethan; Rankin, Timothy M.; Pappalardo, Jennifer L.; Slepian, Marvin J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: We report on the use of free fat grafting as a means of redistributing normal and shear stress after healing of plantar diabetic foot wounds. Although fat augmentation (lipofilling) has been described previously as an approach to supplement defects and prevent atrophy, including use as an adjunct to wound healing and to mitigate pain in the foot, we are unaware of any reports in the medical literature that have described its use in the high-risk diabetic foot in remission. An active 37-year-old man with type 2 diabetes and neuropathy presented with gangrene of his fifth ray, which was amputated. He subsequently developed a chronic styloid process ulceration that progressed despite treatment. We performed a tibialis anterior tendon transfer and total contact casting. He went on to heal but with residual fat pad atrophy and recalcitrant preulcerative lesions. We then used autologous fat grafting for the plantar atrophy. The patient was able to successfully transition to normal shoe gear after 4 weeks with successful engraftment without complication or recurrence of the wound at 6 weeks. This therapy may provide a promising adjunct to increase ulcer-free days to the patient in diabetic foot remission. PMID:27536489

  9. Nonoperative management of a partial patellar tendon rupture after bone-patellar tendon-bone graft harvest for ACL reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Benner, Rodney W; Shelbourne, K Donald; Freeman, Heather

    2013-12-01

    This is a case report of a young athlete who sustained a partial tear of the patellar tendon after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with a bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) autograft. The injury, diagnostic workup, and decision-making process that lead to the choice of nonsurgical treatment are described. Furthermore, the rehabilitation process is described in detail. The patient returned to his previous level of sports activity and had a good clinical outcome as measured by range of motion, isokinetic quadriceps muscle strength testing, single leg hop testing, and the modified Noyes survey. In the absence of extensor mechanism incompetence or radiographic evidence of significant patella alta, partial ruptures of the patella tendon after ACL reconstruction using a BPTB autograft may be treated nonoperatively.

  10. Effects of Trypsinization and Mineralization on Intrasynovial Tendon Allograft Healing to Bone

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Jin; van Alphen, Nick A.; Thoreson, Andrew R.; Chen, Qingshan; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C.; Schmid, Thomas M.; Zhao, Chunfeng

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to develop a novel technology to enhance tendon-to-bone interface healing by trypsinizing and mineralizing (TM) an intrasynovial tendon allograft in a rabbit bone tunnel model. Eight rabbit flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) tendons were used to optimize the trypsinization process. An additional 24 FDP tendons were stratified into control and TM groups; in each group, 4 tendons were used for in vitro evaluation of TM and 8 were transplanted into proximal tibial bone tunnels in rabbits. The samples were evaluated histologically and with mechanical testing at postoperative week 8. Maximum failure strength and linear stiffness were not significantly different between the control and TM tendons. A thin fibrous band of scar tissue formed at the graft-to-bone interface in the control group. However, only the TM group showed obvious new bone formation inside the tendon graft and a visible fibrocartilage layer at the bone tunnel entrance. This study is the first to explore effects of TM on the intrasynovial allograft healing to a bone tunnel. TM showed beneficial effects on chondrogenesis, osteogenesis, and integration of the intrasynovial tendon graft, but mechanical strength was the same as the control tendons in this short-term in vivo study. PMID:25611186

  11. THE ROLE OF MECHANOBIOLOGY IN TENDON HEALING

    PubMed Central

    Killian, Megan L.; Cavinatto, Leonardo; Galatz, Leesa M.; Thomopoulos, Stavros

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical cues affect tendon healing, homeostasis, and development in a variety of settings. Alterations in the mechanical environment are known to result in changes in the expression of extracellular matrix proteins, growth factors, transcription factors, and cytokines that can alter tendon structure and cell viability. Loss of muscle force in utero or in the immediate postnatal period delays tendon and enthesis development. The response of healing tendons to mechanical load varies depending on anatomic location. Flexor tendons require motion to prevent adhesion formation, yet excessive force results in gap formation and subsequent weakening of the repair. Excessive motion in the setting of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction causes accumulation of macrophages, which are detrimental to tendon graft healing. Complete removal of load is detrimental to rotator cuff healing, yet large forces are also harmful. Controlled loading can enhance healing in most settings; however, a fine balance must be reached between loads that are too low (leading to a catabolic state) and too high (leading to micro-damage). This review will summarize existing knowledge of the mechanobiology of tendon development, homeostasis, and healing. PMID:22244066

  12. Structural mechanical properties of radiation-sterilized human Bone-Tendon-Bone grafts preserved by different methods.

    PubMed

    Gut, Grzegorz; Marowska, Joanna; Jastrzebska, Anna; Olender, Ewa; Kamiński, Artur

    2016-06-01

    To avoid the risk of infectious disease transmission from donor to recipient, allografts should be terminally sterilized. In the previous paper (Kaminski et al. in Cell Tissue Bank 10:215-219, 2009) we presented the effect of various methods of preservation (deep fresh freezing, glycerolization, lyophilization), followed by irradiation with different doses of electron beam (EB), on material (intrinsic) mechanical properties of human patellar tendons cut out as for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, obtained in failure tensile test. As structural mechanical properties are equally important to predict the behaviour of the graft as a whole functional unit, the purpose of the present paper was to show the results for failure load and elongation, obtained in the same experiment. Paired Bone-Tendon-Bone grafts (BTB) were prepared from cadaveric human patella tendons with both patellar and tibial attachments. They were preserved by deep freezing, glycerolization or lyophilization and subsequently EB-irradiated with the doses of 25, 35, 50 or 100 kGy (fresh-frozen grafts) or a single dose of 35 kGy (glycerolized and lyophilized grafts). Each experimental (irradiated) group was provided with control (non-irradiated), donor-matched group. The specimens from all groups were subjected to mechanical failure tensile test with the use of Instron system in order to measure their structural properties (failure load and elongation). All lyophilized grafts were rehydrated before mechanical testing. In our study we did not observe significant deterioration of structural mechanical properties of BTB grafts processed by fresh-freezing and then terminal sterilized with growing doses of EB up to 100 kGy. In contrast, BTB grafts processed by glycerolization or lyophilization and irradiated with 35 kGy showed significant decrease of failure load. Obtained results suggest that deep-frozen irradiated grafts retain their initial mechanical properties to an extent which does not

  13. Structural mechanical properties of radiation-sterilized human Bone-Tendon-Bone grafts preserved by different methods.

    PubMed

    Gut, Grzegorz; Marowska, Joanna; Jastrzebska, Anna; Olender, Ewa; Kamiński, Artur

    2016-06-01

    To avoid the risk of infectious disease transmission from donor to recipient, allografts should be terminally sterilized. In the previous paper (Kaminski et al. in Cell Tissue Bank 10:215-219, 2009) we presented the effect of various methods of preservation (deep fresh freezing, glycerolization, lyophilization), followed by irradiation with different doses of electron beam (EB), on material (intrinsic) mechanical properties of human patellar tendons cut out as for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, obtained in failure tensile test. As structural mechanical properties are equally important to predict the behaviour of the graft as a whole functional unit, the purpose of the present paper was to show the results for failure load and elongation, obtained in the same experiment. Paired Bone-Tendon-Bone grafts (BTB) were prepared from cadaveric human patella tendons with both patellar and tibial attachments. They were preserved by deep freezing, glycerolization or lyophilization and subsequently EB-irradiated with the doses of 25, 35, 50 or 100 kGy (fresh-frozen grafts) or a single dose of 35 kGy (glycerolized and lyophilized grafts). Each experimental (irradiated) group was provided with control (non-irradiated), donor-matched group. The specimens from all groups were subjected to mechanical failure tensile test with the use of Instron system in order to measure their structural properties (failure load and elongation). All lyophilized grafts were rehydrated before mechanical testing. In our study we did not observe significant deterioration of structural mechanical properties of BTB grafts processed by fresh-freezing and then terminal sterilized with growing doses of EB up to 100 kGy. In contrast, BTB grafts processed by glycerolization or lyophilization and irradiated with 35 kGy showed significant decrease of failure load. Obtained results suggest that deep-frozen irradiated grafts retain their initial mechanical properties to an extent which does not

  14. A modified arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament double-bundle reconstruction technique with autogenous quadriceps tendon graft: remnant-preserving technique.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Jae; Jo, Seung-Bae; Kim, Tai-Won; Chang, Ji-Hoon; Choi, Heon-Sik; Oh, Kyung-Soo

    2009-03-01

    Several techniques of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) double-bundle reconstruction have been introduced to improve the functional outcome and restore normal kinematics of the knee. Meanwhile, a remnant-preserving technique was developed to preserve the proprioception and to enhance the revascularization of the reconstructed ACL. We developed double-bundle ACL reconstruction technique using autogenous quadriceps tendon graft while preserving the remnant. With this technique, two femoral sockets and one tibial tunnel are made. To preserve the remnant of the ACL, the rotational direction of the reamer was set to counterclockwise just before perforation of the tibial tunnel. To pass the graft more easily without disturbance of the remnant, the graft passage was achieved through the tibial tunnel. We suggest that the remnant-preserving technique could be an effective alternative considering its mechanical stability as well as the proprioception and vascularization recovery in arthroscopic double-bundle ACL reconstruction.

  15. BIOMECHANICAL STUDY OF TRANSCORTICAL OR TRANSTRABECULAR BONE FIXATION OF PATELLAR TENDON GRAFT WITH BIOABSORBABLE PINS IN ACL RECONSTRUCTION IN SHEEP

    PubMed Central

    Albano, Mauro Batista; Borges, Paulo César; Namba, Mario Massatomo; da Silva, João Luiz Vieira; de Assis Pereira Filho, Francisco; Filho, Edmar Stieven; Matias, Jorge Eduardo Fouto

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the initial resistance of fixation using the Rigid Fix® system, and compare it with traditional fixation methods using metal interference screws; and to evaluate the resistance of the fixation with the rigid fix system when the rotational position of the bone block is altered in the interior of the femoral tunnel. Methods: forty ovine knee specimens (stifle joints) were submitted to anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL) using a bone-tendon-bone graft. In twenty specimens, the Rigid Fix method was used; this group was subdivided into two groups: ten knees the pins transfixed only the spongious area of the bone block, and ten for fixation passing through the layer of cortical bone. In the twenty remaining specimens, the graft was fixed with 9mm metal interference screws. Results: comparison of the RIGIDFIX® method with the metal interference screw fixation method did not show any statistically significant differences in terms of maximum load and rigidity; also, there were no statistically significant differences when the rotational position of the bone block was altered inside the femoral tunnel. For these evaluations, a level of significance of p < 0.017 was considered. Conclusion: fixation of the bone-tendon-bone graft with 2 bioabsorbable pines, regardless of the rotational position inside the femoral tunnel, gave a comparable fixation in terms of initial resistance to the metal interference screw, in this experimental model. PMID:27027081

  16. Superficialis Sling (Flexor Digitorum Superficialis Tenodesis) for Swan Neck Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Wei, David H; Terrono, Andrew L

    2015-10-01

    Swan neck deformity, or hyperextension of the proximal interphalangeal joint, may occur secondary to trauma, rheumatoid arthritis, cerebral palsy, or Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and can be treated with tenodesis of one slip of the flexor digitorum sublimis tendon. This technique has several variations, differing primarily in the specific location and method that a single slip of the flexor digitorum sublimis tendon is secured, but they all serve to create a static volar restraint against hyperextension. Options include tunneling the tendon through the bone of the proximal phalanx, attaching the tendon to the A1 or A2 pulley, or securing the tendon with bone anchors in the proximal phalanx. PMID:26328902

  17. Tendon Transfers in the Rheumatoid Hand for Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Michael Brody; Singh, Hardeep; Wolf, Jennifer Moriatis

    2016-08-01

    Long-standing rheumatoid arthritis can result in spontaneous tendon rupture caused by attrition of the tendons. Ruptures of the ulnar-sided extensor tendons, flexor pollicis longus, and the flexor digitorum profundus can be seen. Primary repair of these tendon ruptures is frequently not possible because of delayed presentation and tendon damage by the disease process. Tendon transfers are the preferred method of treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. At surgery, it is critical to address the underlying cause of rupture to prevent future tendon ruptures. Rates of tendon rupture may decrease due to improved medications for rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27387084

  18. Hindfoot endoscopy for accessory flexor digitorum longus and flexor hallucis longus tenosynovitis.

    PubMed

    Ogut, Tahir; Ayhan, Egemen

    2011-03-01

    We present a case report involving the flexor digitorum accessorius longus (FDAL) tendon which travels through a fibro-osseous tunnel together with the flexor hallucis longus (FHL) tendon, causing a stenosing tenosynovitis. The patient was admitted with posteromedial ankle pain and diagnosed clinically as FHL tenosynovitis. We found two tendons in the tunnel during hindfoot endoscopy. The stenosis was relieved by endoscopic debridement. After the operation, we checked the MRI images and observed two tendons. We concluded that the accessory tendon was the FDAL. Two years later the patient was admitted with the same symptoms. We excised the FDAL muscle and the patient's symptoms resolved. The FDAL muscle is a cause of FHL tenosynovitis. Because of its variability and mostly asymptomatic nature, it may not be noticed it on an MRI scan. Hindfoot endoscopy is a safe tool for the diagnosis of this condition and curative treatment is afforded by excision of the FDAL muscle. PMID:21276556

  19. Comparison of viscoelastic, structural, and material properties of double-looped anterior cruciate ligament grafts made from bovine digital extensor and human hamstring tendons.

    PubMed

    Donahue, T L; Gregersen, C; Hull, M L; Howell, S M

    2001-04-01

    Due to ready availability, decreased cost, and freedom from transmissible diseases in humans such as hepatitis and AIDS, it would be advantageous to use tendon grafts from farm animals as a substitute for human tendon grafts in in vitro experiments aimed at improving the outcome of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructive surgery. Thus the objective of this study was to determine whether an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft composed of two loops of bovine common digital extensor tendon has the same viscoelastic, structural, and material properties as a graft composed of a double loop of semitendinosus and gracilis tendons from humans. To satisfy this objective, grafts were constructed from each tissue source. The cross-sectional area was measured using an area micrometer, and each graft was then pulled using a materials testing system while submerged in a saline bath. Using two groups of tendon grafts (n = 10), viscoelastic tests were conducted over a three-day period during which a constant displacement load relaxation test was followed by a constant amplitude, cyclic load creep test (first day), a constant load creep test (second day), and an incremental cyclic load creep test (third day). Load-to-failure tests were performed on two different groups of grafts (n = 8). When the viscoelastic behavior was compared, there were no significant differences in the rate of load decay or the final load (relaxation test) and rates of displacement increase or final displacements (creep tests) (p > 0.115). To compare both the structural and material properties in the toe region (i.e., < 250 N) of the load-elongation curve, the tangent stiffness and modulus functions were computed from parameters used in an exponential model fit to the load (stress)-elongation (strain) data. Although one of the two parameters in the functions was different statistically, this difference translated into a difference of only 0.03 mm in displacement at 250 N of load. In the linear

  20. Factors affecting return to sports after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with patellar tendon and hamstring graft: a prospective clinical investigation.

    PubMed

    Gobbi, Alberto; Francisco, Ramces

    2006-10-01

    In athletes, anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is recommended after injury to restore the normal knee function and allow subsequent return to sport. Successful ACL reconstruction with patellar tendon (PT) and hamstring tendon (HT) grafts combined with a well-structured rehabilitation program could bring athletes back to their previous level of sport activities. We prospectively followed-up 100 athletes who underwent ACL reconstruction with either PT (n=50) or HT grafts (n=50). Evaluation was done pre-operatively and post-operatively (3, 6, 12, and 24 months) using International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), Lysholm, Noyes, and Tegner scales. Subjective assessment numeric evaluation (SANE), knee activity rating scale (Marx) and a psychological profile questionnaire (psychovitality) were also utilized. Objective evaluations included isokinetic tests and computerized knee motion analysis. Data gathered were statistically analyzed using the Mann-Whitney non-parametric U-test. Among the 100 patients who have undergone ACL reconstruction, 65% returned to the same level of sports, 24% changed sports and 11% ceased sport activities. No significant difference (P>0.05) in outcome between PT and HT grafts were observed. No significant differences (P>0.05) were noted between athletes who "returned" to their previous sport and those who "did not return" to sports at the same level when using the IKDC, Lysholm, Noyes, and Tegner knee evaluation scales. However, significant difference was observed with the knee scores obtained by those who returned and those who completely ceased participation in sport activities. Computerized laxity test revealed that 90% of these patients have less than 3 mm side-to-side difference with no significant difference between HT and PT groups. Patients who "returned to sports" obtained significantly better scores with the Marx scale (P=0.001) and the psychovitality questionnaire (P=0.001) than those who did not. Conventional knee

  1. Comparative pull-out and cyclic-loading strength tests of anchorage of hamstring tendon grafts in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Giurea, M; Zorilla, P; Amis, A A; Aichroth, P

    1999-01-01

    This study examined four devices for anchorage of hamstring tendons used as anterior cruciate ligament grafts: a stirrup, a clawed washer and screw, and "soft" and round-headed interference screws. Ultimate strength tests were performed using bovine tendons and bones. The stirrup was significantly stronger than the other anchorage devices, failing at 898 N. The clawed washer failed at 502 N, the soft screw at 691 N, and the round-headed screw at 445 N. Cyclic loading to 150 N (to simulate walking) caused elongation of 2.1 mm with the stirrup by 1100 cycles, and 6.7 mm with the clawed washer by 300 cycles. Different hole and soft screw diameters and placements (inside-out versus outside-in) allowed 1-to 3-mm slippage (no significant differences) by 1100 cycles. The round-headed screw allowed 6.8-mm slippage by 1100 cycles, and a sharp edge below the screw head caused tendon damage. Cyclic loads to 450 N (to simulate jogging) were then imposed until failure, and all specimens failed rapidly; only stirrup fixation kept all specimens intact after 300 load cycles. We concluded that anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions using hamstring tendons will slacken if rehabilitation is too aggressive, so forces on the reconstructed ligament should be minimized until tendon-to-bone healing occurs. PMID:10496580

  2. Tendon Gradient Mineralization for Tendon to Bone Interface Integration

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Jin; Thoreson, Andrew R.; Chen, Qingshan; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C.; Zhao, Chunfeng

    2014-01-01

    Tendon-to-bone integration is a great challenge for tendon or ligament reconstruction regardless of use of autograft or allograft tendons. We mineralized the tendon, thus transforming the tendon-to-bone into a “bone-to-bone” interface for healing. Sixty dog flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) tendons were divided randomly into 5 groups: 1) normal FDP tendon, 2) CaP (Non-extraction and mineralization without fetuin), 3) CaPEXT (Extraction by Na2HPO4 and mineralization without fetuin), 4) CaPFetuin (Non-extraction and mineralization with fetuin), and 5) CaPEXTFetuin (Extraction and mineralization with fetuin). The calcium and phosphate content significantly increased in tendons treated with combination of extraction and fetuin compared to the other treatments. Histology also revealed a dense mineral deposition throughout the tendon outer layers and penetrated into the tendon to a depth of 200 μm in a graded manner. Compressive moduli were significantly lower in the four mineralized groups compared with normal control group. No significant differences in maximum failure strength or stiffness were found in the suture pull-out test among all groups. Mineralization of tendon alters the interface from tendon to bone into mineralized tendon to bone, which may facilitate tendon-to-bone junction healing following tendon or ligament reconstruction. PMID:23939935

  3. Tendon gradient mineralization for tendon to bone interface integration.

    PubMed

    Qu, Jin; Thoreson, Andrew R; Chen, Qingshan; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C; Zhao, Chunfeng

    2013-11-01

    Tendon-to-bone integration is a great challenge for tendon or ligament reconstruction regardless of use of autograft or allograft tendons. We mineralized the tendon, thus transforming the tendon-to-bone into a "bone-to-bone" interface for healing. Sixty dog flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) tendons were divided randomly into five groups: (1) normal FDP tendon, (2) CaP (non-extraction and mineralization without fetuin), (3) CaPEXT (Extraction by Na2 HPO4 and mineralization without fetuin), (4) CaPFetuin (non-extraction and mineralization with fetuin), and (5) CaPEXTFetuin (extraction and mineralization with fetuin). The calcium and phosphate content significantly increased in tendons treated with combination of extraction and fetuin compared to the other treatments. Histology also revealed a dense mineral deposition throughout the tendon outer layers and penetrated into the tendon to a depth of 200 µm in a graded manner. Compressive moduli were significantly lower in the four mineralized groups compared with normal control group. No significant differences in maximum failure strength or stiffness were found in the suture pull-out test among all groups. Mineralization of tendon alters the interface from tendon to bone into mineralized tendon to bone, which may facilitate tendon-to-bone junction healing following tendon or ligament reconstruction.

  4. Early versus late start of open kinetic chain quadriceps exercises after ACL reconstruction with patellar tendon or hamstring grafts: a prospective randomized outcome study.

    PubMed

    Heijne, Annette; Werner, Suzanne

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to evaluate physical outcome after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with early versus late initiation of open kinetic chain (OKC) exercises for the quadriceps in patients operated on either patellar tendon or hamstring grafts. Sixty-eight patients, 36 males and 32 females, with either patellar tendon graft (34 patients) or hamstring graft (34 patients) were enrolled in this study. All patients were randomly allocated to either early (the 4th postoperative week) or late (the 12th postoperative week) start of OKC exercises for the quadriceps, resulting in four subgroups: patellar tendon reconstruction, early start (P4) or late start (P12) of OKC quadriceps exercises, hamstring tendon reconstruction, early start (H4) or late start (H12) of quadriceps OKC exercises. Prior to surgery and 3, 5 and 7 months later, assessments of range of motion (goniometer), anterior knee laxity (KT-1000), postural sway (KAT 2000), thigh muscle torques (Kin-Com dynamometer) and anterior knee pain (anterior knee pain score) were evaluated. No significant group differences were found in terms of range of motion 3, 5 and 7 months postoperatively. The H4 group showed a significantly higher mean difference of laxity over time of 1.0 mm (CI: 0.18-1.86) than the P4 group (P=0.04). Within the same type of surgery, the H4 against the H12, the mean difference over time was 1.2 mm (0.37-2.1) higher in the H4 group than in the H12 group (P=0.01). There were no significant group differences in terms of postural sway or anterior knee pain at the different test occasions. Significant differences in trends (changes over time) were found when comparing the four groups, for both quadriceps muscle torques (P<0.001) and hamstring muscle torques (P<0.001). All groups, except the P4 group, reached preoperative values of quadriceps muscle torques at the 7 months follow-up. In the H4 and the H12 groups, significantly lower hamstring muscle torques at

  5. Reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament using autologous graft from quadriceps tendon to treat recurrent patellar dislocation☆

    PubMed Central

    Calapodopulos, Constantino Jorge; Nogueira, Marcelo Corvino; Eustáquio, José Martins Juliano; Calapodopulos Júnior, Constantino Jorge; Rodrigues, Oreston Alves

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the surgical technique using the quadriceps tendon as a graft in static reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament. Methods This was a prospective case series study in which the participants were 22 patients with a diagnosis of recurrent patellar dislocation without any other anatomical alterations that required surgical treatment. The functional results from the technique were evaluated using clinical data and the Lysholm questionnaire, one year after the operation. Results It was observed that the patients were predominantly female (86%) and under 21 years of age (73%), just like in the literature. At the first annual return after the surgery, there was no significant pain on medium efforts, no loss of range of motion and a positive apprehension test. According to the questionnaire used, the results were graded as good. The patients who reported having severe pain on greater effort were involved in employment-related legal disputes. Conclusion This technique showed low morbidity and good functional results over the short term. PMID:27069888

  6. Treatment of Rockwood type III acromioclavicular joint dislocation using autogenous semitendinosus tendon graft and endobutton technique

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Gang; Peng, Chao-An; Sun, Hua-Bin; Xiao, Jing; Zhu, Kang

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic effect of autogenous semitendinosus graft and endobutton technique, and compare with hook plate in treatment of Rockwood type III acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocation. Methods From April 2012 to April 2013, we treated 46 patients with Rockwood type III AC joint dislocation. Patients were randomly divided into two groups: Group A was treated using a hook plate and Group B with autogenous semitendinosus graft and endobutton technique. All participants were followed up for 12 months. Radiographic examinations were performed every 2 months postoperatively, and clinical evaluation was performed using the Constant–Murley score at the last follow-up. Results Results indicated that patients in Group B showed higher mean scores (90.3±5.4) than Group A (80.4±11.5) in terms of Constant–Murley score (P=0.001). Group B patients scored higher in terms of pain (P=0.002), activities (P=0.02), range of motion (P<0.001), and strength (P=0.004). In Group A, moderate pain was reported by 2 (8.7%) and mild pain by 8 (34.8%) patients. Mild pain was reported by 1 (4.3%) patient in Group B. All patients in Group B maintained complete reduction, while 2 (8.7%) patients in Group A experienced partial reduction loss. Two patients (8.7%) encountered acromial osteolysis on latest radiographs, with moderate shoulder pain and limited range of motion. Conclusion Autogenous semitendinosus graft and endobutton technique showed better results compared with the hook plate method and exhibited advantages of fewer complications such as permanent pain and acromial osteolysis. PMID:26811685

  7. Transverse Carpal Ligament and Forearm Fascia Release for the Treatment of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Change the Entrance Angle of Flexor Tendons to the A1 Pulley: The Relationship between Carpal Tunnel Surgery and Trigger Finger Occurence

    PubMed Central

    Karalezli, Nazım; Kütahya, Harun; Güleç, Ali; Toker, Serdar; Karabörk, Hakan; Ogun, Tunc C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. The appearance of trigger finger after decompression of the carpal tunnel without a preexisting symptom has been reported in a few articles. Although, the cause is not clear yet, the loss of pulley action of the transverse carpal ligament has been accused mostly. In this study, we planned a biomechanical approach to fresh cadavers. Methods. The study was performed on 10 fresh amputees of the arm. The angles were measured with (1) the transverse carpal ligament and the distal forearm fascia intact, (2) only the transverse carpal ligament incised, (3) the distal forearm fascia incised to the point 3 cm proximal from the most proximal part of the transverse carpal ligament in addition to the transverse carpal ligament. The changes between the angles produced at all three conditions were compared to each other. Results. We saw that the entrance angle increased in all of five fingers in an increasing manner from procedure 1 to 3, and it was seen that the maximal increase is detected in the middle finger from procedure 1 to procedure 2 and the minimal increase is detected in little finger. Discussion. Our results support that transverse carpal ligament and forearm fascia release may be a predisposing factor for the development of trigger finger by the effect of changing the enterance angle to the A1 pulley and consequently increase the friction in this anatomic area. Clinical Relevance. This study is a cadaveric study which is directly investigating the effect of a transverse carpal ligament release on the enterance angle of flexor tendons to A1 pulleys in the hand. PMID:23878529

  8. Electromechanical delay of the knee extensor muscles is not altered after harvesting the patellar tendon as a graft for ACL reconstruction: implications for sports performance.

    PubMed

    Georgoulis, A D; Ristanis, S; Papadonikolakis, A; Tsepis, E; Moebius, U; Moraiti, C; Stergiou, N

    2005-09-01

    Although the scar tissue, which heals the donor site defect, has different elasticity from the neighbouring patellar tissue, it remains unclear if this scar tissue can lead to the changes of the electromechanical delay (EMD) of the knee extensor muscles. If such changes do exist, they can possibly affect both the utilization of the stored energy in the series elastic component, as well as the optimal performance of the knee joint movement. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of harvesting the patellar tendon during anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and the associated patellar tendon scar tissue development on the EMD of the rectus femoris (RF) and vastus medialis (VM) muscles. Seventeen patients who underwent an ACL reconstruction using the medial third of the patellar tendon were divided in two groups based upon their post-operative time interval. Maximal voluntary contraction from the knee extensors, surface EMG activity, and ultrasonographic measurements of the patellar tendon cross-section area were obtained from both knees. Our results revealed that no significant changes for the maximal voluntary contraction of the knee extensors and for the EMD of the RF and the VM muscles due to patellar scar tissue development after harvesting the tendon for ACL reconstruction. The EMD, as a component of the stretch reflex, is important for the utilization of the stored energy in the series elastic component and thus, optimal sports performance. However, from our results, it can be implied that the ACL reconstruction using a patellar tendon graft would not impair sports performance as far as EMD is concerned.

  9. Flexor pulley system: anatomy, injury, and management.

    PubMed

    Zafonte, Brian; Rendulic, Dora; Szabo, Robert M

    2014-12-01

    Flexor pulley injuries are most commonly seen in avid rock climbers; however, reports of pulley ruptures in nonclimbers are increasing. In addition to traumatic disruption, corticosteroid-induced pulley rupture has been reported as a complication of treating stenosing tenosynovitis. Over the last decade, there have been 2 new developments in the way hand surgeons think about the flexor pulley system. First, the thumb pulley system has been shown to have 4 component constituents, in contrast to the classic teaching of 3 pulleys. Second, in cases of zone II flexor tendon injury, the intentional partial A2 and/or A4 pulley excision or venting is emerging as a component for successful treatment. This is challenging the once-held dogma that preserving the integrity of the entire A2 and A4 pulleys is indispensable for normal digit function. PMID:25459958

  10. Disorders of the Flexor Hallucis Longus and Os Trigonum.

    PubMed

    Rungprai, Chamnanni; Tennant, Joshua N; Phisitkul, Phinit

    2015-10-01

    Os trigonum syndrome with disease of the flexor hallucis longus tendon, so-called stenosing flexor tenosynovitis, is a common cause of posterior ankle impingement. Conservative treatment is the recommended first line of treatment, with secondary treatment options of either open or arthroscopic os trigonum excision with flexor hallucis longus retinaculum release. The arthroscopic approaches have gained popularity in the past decade because of less scarring, less postoperative pain, minimal overall morbidity, and earlier return to activities. However, comprehensive understanding of the anatomy of the posterior ankle is crucial to warrant successful outcomes and minimizing complications. PMID:26409593

  11. Disorders of the Flexor Hallucis Longus and Os Trigonum.

    PubMed

    Rungprai, Chamnanni; Tennant, Joshua N; Phisitkul, Phinit

    2015-10-01

    Os trigonum syndrome with disease of the flexor hallucis longus tendon, so-called stenosing flexor tenosynovitis, is a common cause of posterior ankle impingement. Conservative treatment is the recommended first line of treatment, with secondary treatment options of either open or arthroscopic os trigonum excision with flexor hallucis longus retinaculum release. The arthroscopic approaches have gained popularity in the past decade because of less scarring, less postoperative pain, minimal overall morbidity, and earlier return to activities. However, comprehensive understanding of the anatomy of the posterior ankle is crucial to warrant successful outcomes and minimizing complications.

  12. Effect of transosseous application of low-intensity ultrasound at the tendon graft-bone interface healing: gene expression and histological analysis in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Papatheodorou, Loukia K; Malizos, Konstantinos N; Poultsides, Lazaros A; Hantes, Michael E; Grafanaki, Katerina; Giannouli, Stamatina; Ioannou, Maria G; Koukoulis, Georgios K; Protopappas, Vasilios C; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I; Stathopoulos, Constantinos

    2009-04-01

    The present study investigates the effect of transosseous low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LiUS) on the healing at tendon graft-bone interface, in molecular and histological level. The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in both knees of 52 New Zealand White rabbits was excised and replaced with the long digital extensor. A custom-made ultrasound transducer was implanted onto the medial tibial condyle, adjacent to the surface of the bone tunnel at both knees of the rabbits. The LiUS-treated right knees received 200-mus bursts of 1 MHz sine waves at a pulse repetition rate of 1 kHz and with 30 mW/cm(2) spatial-average temporal-average intensity for 20 min daily (study group), while the left knee received no LiUS (control group). Thirty-six rabbits were used to perform semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis from both study and control groups for transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1), biglycan and collagen I. RT-PCR products showed statistically significant upregulation of biglycan and collagen I gene expression in the study group, while TGF-beta1 gene expression exhibited a bimodal profile. Histological examination performed in 16 rabbits from both groups supported the findings of the molecular analysis, indicating a faster healing rate and a more efficient ligamentization process after ultrasound treatment. These findings suggest that transosseous application of LiUS enhances the healing rate of the tendon graft-bone interface, possibly by affecting the expression levels of genes significant for the tendon to bone healing process.

  13. Isokinetic dynamometer evaluation of the effects of early thigh diameter difference on thigh muscle strength in patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with hamstring tendon graft.

    PubMed

    Kılınç, Bekir Eray; Kara, Adnan; Camur, Savas; Oc, Yunus; Celik, Haluk

    2015-04-01

    After anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, which muscle groups are more affected from frequently developing thigh muscle atrophy is a matter of debate. We evaluate the effect of thigh circumference difference between patients' knees who were administered the ACL reconstruction with hamstring tendon autograft and intact knees, on torque between the hamstring and quadriceps muscles. Fifty-five patients at least 6 months follow-up period available were included in our study. Power measurements of quadriceps and hamstring muscle groups in patients' extremities were done by using isokinetic dynamometer. The maximum torque values at 60°/sec, 240°/sec in frequency, positions of flexion and extension were determined. In accordance with our findings it is still possible to encounter the thigh atrophy in average 28 months after ACL reconstruction surgery even under physical rehabilitation programs and appropriate follow-up. It is inevitable for the clinician to consider these changes in diagnosis and rehabilitation stages. It can't be ignored that muscle weakness mechanisms developing in the thigh circumference vary according to the thigh muscle group and knee flexors play an important role in thigh atrophy when determining an appropriate rehabilitation program after reconstruction application.

  14. Isokinetic dynamometer evaluation of the effects of early thigh diameter difference on thigh muscle strength in patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with hamstring tendon graft

    PubMed Central

    Kılınç, Bekir Eray; Kara, Adnan; Camur, Savas; Oc, Yunus; Celik, Haluk

    2015-01-01

    After anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, which muscle groups are more affected from frequently developing thigh muscle atrophy is a matter of debate. We evaluate the effect of thigh circumference difference between patients’ knees who were administered the ACL reconstruction with hamstring tendon autograft and intact knees, on torque between the hamstring and quadriceps muscles. Fifty-five patients at least 6 months follow-up period available were included in our study. Power measurements of quadriceps and hamstring muscle groups in patients’ extremities were done by using isokinetic dynamometer. The maximum torque values at 60°/sec, 240°/sec in frequency, positions of flexion and extension were determined. In accordance with our findings it is still possible to encounter the thigh atrophy in average 28 months after ACL reconstruction surgery even under physical rehabilitation programs and appropriate follow-up. It is inevitable for the clinician to consider these changes in diagnosis and rehabilitation stages. It can’t be ignored that muscle weakness mechanisms developing in the thigh circumference vary according to the thigh muscle group and knee flexors play an important role in thigh atrophy when determining an appropriate rehabilitation program after reconstruction application. PMID:25960982

  15. Tendon repair

    MedlinePlus

    Repair of tendon ... Tendon repair can be performed using: Local anesthesia (the immediate area of the surgery is pain-free) ... a cut on the skin over the injured tendon. The damaged or torn ends of the tendon ...

  16. Tendon transfer options in managing the adult flexible flatfoot.

    PubMed

    Aronow, Michael S

    2012-06-01

    Patients undergoing surgery for posterior tibial tendon dysfunction may require tendon transfer. The flexor digitorum longus is most commonly transferred, although the flexor hallucis longus and peroneus brevis have also been described in the literature. This article discusses the advantages and disadvantages of the different tendons, the surgical techniques used to perform them, and their results in the literature, concentrating principally on studies in which additional bone procedures were not performed. This article will also discuss the potential role for isolated soft tissue procedures in the treatment of stage 2 posterior tibial tendon dysfunction. PMID:22541521

  17. [Quadriceps and patellar tendon ruptures].

    PubMed

    Grim, C; Lorbach, O; Engelhardt, M

    2010-12-01

    Ruptures of the quadriceps or patellar tendon are uncommon but extremely relevant injuries. Early diagnosis and surgical treatment with a stable suture construction are mandatory for a good postoperative clinical outcome. The standard methods of repair for quadriceps and patellar tendon injuries include the placement of suture loops through transpatellar tunnels. Reinforcement with either a wire cerclage or a PDS cord is used in patellar tendon repair. The PDS cord can also be applied as augmentation in quadriceps tendon repair. In secondary patellar tendon repair an autologous semitendinosus graft can be used. For chronic quadriceps tendon defects a V-shaped tendon flap with a distal footing is recommended. The different methods of repair should lead to early functional postoperative treatment. The clinical outcome after surgical treatment of patellar and quadriceps tendon ruptures is mainly good.

  18. The Epidemiology of Reoperation After Flexor Pulley Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Dy, Christopher J.; Lyman, Stephen; Schreiber, Joseph J.; Do, Huong T.; Daluiski, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We used a statewide database to determine the incidence of pulley reconstruction and to evaluate the influence of demographics on reoperation. We hypothesized that age, insurance status, and concomitant nerve or tendon procedure would influence the likelihood of reoperation. Methods We used the Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System ambulatory surgery database from New York, which represents all outpatient surgery in the state. Patients who had flexor pulley reconstruction from 1998 to 2009 were identified using Current Procedural Terminology 4 codes. Subsequent surgery records for these patients were identified through 2010, allowing at least 1 year follow-up. Concomitant nerve procedure and flexor tendon repair/reconstruction were identified. The type and timing of subsequent procedures, including tenolysis and repeat pulley reconstruction, were recorded. Univariate statistics were calculated to compare age, sex, and payer type between patients with and without reoperation. A multivariable, logistic regression model was used to evaluate the association of the demographics with the chances of having reoperation. Results There were 623 patients who had flexor pulley reconstruction from 1998 to 2009. The incidence of pulley reconstruction was 0.27 per 100,000 persons, with an annual frequency of 52 procedures. There were 39 (6%) reoperations. There was no difference in age, concomitant nerve or tendon repair, or workers’ compensation between patients with and without reoperation. Regression modeling showed a higher likelihood among men of having reoperation. Conclusions Flexor pulley reconstructions are rare. One-quarter of surgeons performed only one flexor pulley reconstruction over a 12-year period. The 6% reoperation rate is similar to our previous findings for flexor tendon repair using similar methodology. Our report provides information that may be useful in counseling patients. Type of study/level of evidence Prognostic II. PMID

  19. PLA-grafting of collagen chains leading to a biomaterial with mechanical performances useful in tendon regeneration.

    PubMed

    Bellini, Davide; Cencetti, Claudia; Sacchetta, Anna Cristina; Battista, Angela Maria; Martinelli, Andrea; Mazzucco, Laura; Scotto D'Abusco, Anna; Matricardi, Pietro

    2016-12-01

    With the aim to obtain a scaffold with improved mechanical properties with respect to collagen for tendon augmentation and regeneration, a novel collagen-based material was prepared via heterogeneous phase derivatization of type I collagen sponges using polylactic acid. Compared to the untreated collagen, the functionalized sponge (Coll-PLA) was characterized by higher tensile properties and lower swelling capability; the degradation rate of Coll-PLA, in the presence of collagenase, was lower than that of the untreated collagen sponge. These results are related to an increased hydrophobic character of the collagen matrix due to the presence of PLA chains. In vitro tests, performed with human primary fibroblasts, showed that cell adhesion and proliferation rate on Coll-PLA were comparable to those obtained with the non-functionalized collagen. These findings suggest that the new biomaterial could be suitable as scaffold in tendon augmentation and regeneration. PMID:27498425

  20. Runx2-Modified Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Promote Tendon Graft Integration in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xin; Ma, Yong; Fu, Xin; Liu, Qiang; Shao, Zhenxing; Dai, Linghui; Pi, Yanbin; Hu, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Jiying; Duan, Xiaoning; Chen, Wenqing; Chen, Ping; Zhou, Chunyan; Ao, Yingfang

    2016-01-01

    Runx2 is a powerful osteo-inductive factor and adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) are multipotent. However, it is unknown whether Runx2-overexpressing ADSCs (Runx2-ADSCs) could promote anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. We evaluated the effect of Runx2-ADSCs on ACL reconstruction in vitro and in vivo. mRNA expressions of osteocalcin (OCN), bone sialoprotein (BSP) and collagen I (COLI) increased over time in Runx2-ADSCs. Runx2 overexpression inhibited LPL and PPARγ mRNA expressions. Runx2 induced alkaline phosphatase activity markedly. In nude mice injected with Runx2-ADSCs, promoted bone formation was detected by X-rays 8 weeks after injection. The healing of tendon-to-bone in a rabbit model of ACL reconstruction treated with Runx2-ADSCs, fibrin glue only and an RNAi targeting Runx2, was evaluated with CT 3D reconstruction, histological analysis and biomechanical methods. CT showed a greater degree of new bone formation around the bone tunnel in the group treated with Runx2-ADSCs compared with the fibrin glue group and RNAi Runx2 group. Histology showed that treatment with Runx2-ADSCs led to a rapid and significant increase at the tendon-to-bone compared with the control groups. Biomechanical tests demonstrated higher tendon pullout strength in the Runx2-ADSCs group at early time points. The healing of the attachment in ACL reconstruction was enhanced by Runx2-ADSCs. PMID:26743583

  1. Use of a strontium-enriched calcium phosphate cement in accelerating the healing of soft-tissue tendon graft within the bone tunnel in a rabbit model of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kuang, G M; Yau, W P; Lu, W W; Chiu, K Y

    2013-07-01

    We investigated whether strontium-enriched calcium phosphate cement (Sr-CPC)-treated soft-tissue tendon graft results in accelerated healing within the bone tunnel in reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). A total of 30 single-bundle ACL reconstructions using tendo Achillis allograft were performed in 15 rabbits. The graft on the tested limb was treated with Sr-CPC, whereas that on the contralateral limb was untreated and served as a control. At timepoints three, six, nine, 12 and 24 weeks after surgery, three animals were killed for histological examination. At six weeks, the graft-bone interface in the control group was filled in with fibrovascular tissue. However, the gap in the Sr-CPC group had already been completely filled in with new bone, and there was evidence of the early formation of Sharpey fibres. At 24 weeks, remodelling into a normal ACL-bone-like insertion was found in the Sr-CPC group. Coating of Sr-CPC on soft tissue tendon allograft leads to accelerated graft healing within the bone tunnel in a rabbit model of ACL reconstruction using Achilles tendon allograft.

  2. Comparison of arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction by bone-patellar tendon-bone graft with or without using interferential screw in general population.

    PubMed

    Arifeen, K N; Chowdhury, A Z; Sakeb, N; Joarder, A I; Salek, A K; Selimullah, A M

    2015-01-01

    Rupture of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) is common, resulting reduced quality of life, increasing the meniscal injury risk, knee instability and early degenerative joint disease. Bone-Patellar Tendon-Bone (BPTB) became the gold standard surgery where conservative management failed. Adding interferential screw provides rigid fixation which is important for early accelerated rehabilitation program in athletes but we have carried out this prospective interventional study in Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU) and our private settings from January 2007 to December 2011 to assess whether interferential screws provide any clinical and functional advantage in general population. Sixty six male patients of 21-40 years age, with ACL deficient knees were reconstructed with BPTB graft where 40 cases were augmented by interferential screws and 26 cases without and followed up for minimum 2 years. The clinical and functional outcome (by Lysholm Knee Scoring), post-operative knee stability (by clinical tests) and complications were assessed and recorded. There was significant (p<0.05, paired 't' test) improvement of knee function (limp, walking, stair climbing, squatting, thigh atrophy) in both groups but no significant difference between them (p>0.05, chi squared test) regarding clinical, functional outcome and knee stability. The complications were insignificant (p>0.05, chi squared test) in both groups but there were few cases of screw related complications with augmentation and pronounced anterior knee laxity without it. So, ACL reconstruction by BPTB grafts with or without augmentation results consistent and comparable outcome in general population. PMID:25725669

  3. Arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with quadriceps tendon autograft: clinical outcome in 4-7 years.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Hwa; Chuang, Tai-Yuan; Wang, Kun-Chuang; Chen, Wen-Jer; Shih, Chun-Hsiung

    2006-11-01

    Surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is indicated in the ACL-deficient knee with symptomatic instability and multiple ligaments injuries. In the present study, we describe the clinical results of quadriceps tendon-patellar bone autograft for ACL reconstruction. From 1996 to 1998, the graft has been used in 38 patients. Thirty-four patients with complete final follow-up for 4-7 years were analyzed. The average follow-up time was 62 (48-84) months. Thirty-two patients (94%) achieved good or excellent results by Lysholm knee rating. Twenty-six patients (76%) could return to moderate or strenuous activity after reconstruction. Twenty-eight patients (82%) had ligament laxity of less than 2 mm. Finally; 31 patients (91%) were assessed as normal or nearly normal rating by IKDC guideline. Twenty-five patients (73%) had less than 10 mm difference in thigh girth between their reconstructed and normal limbs. Thirty-two (94%) and 31 (91%) patients could achieve recovery of the extensor and flexor muscle strength in the reconstructed knee to 80% or more of normal knee strength, respectively. A statistically significant difference exists in thigh girth difference, extensor strength ratio, and flexor strength ratio before and after reconstruction. Tunnel expansion with more than 1 mm was identified in 2 (6%) tibial tunnels. Our study revealed satisfactory clinical subjective and objective results at 4-7 years follow-up. Quadriceps tendon autograft has the advantage of being self-available, relatively easier arthroscopic technique, and having a suitable size, making it an acceptable graft choice for ACL reconstruction. There is little quadriceps muscle strength loss after quadriceps harvest. A quadriceps tendon-patellar autograft is an adequate graft choice to ACL reconstruction.

  4. Tribological characteristics of healthy tendon.

    PubMed

    Theobald, Peter S; Dowson, Duncan; Khan, Ilyas M; Jones, Michael D

    2012-07-26

    Tendons transfer muscular forces efficiently and painlessly, facilitating joint motion. Whilst the tribology of articular cartilage is constantly explored, a poorer understanding remains of tendon lubrication and friction. This study reports experimental data describing the tribological characteristics of tendon and its surrounding tissue, before presenting an arithmetic solution to facilitate numerical modelling. The experimental characteristics of the tensile (i.e. mid-substance) and compressive (i.e. fibrocartilaginous) regions of bovine flexor tendon were investigated using a pin-on-plate tribometer, with immunofluroscence analysis describing the relative intensity and distribution of surface-bound lubricin. Arithmetic analysis considering the digital extensor tendon determined that, in physiological conditions, the tensile tendon region was able to generate elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL). The equivalent region of compressive tendon exhibited a higher intensity of surface-bound lubricin which, it is hypothesised, serves to minimise the increased frictional resistance due to generating only mixed or boundary lubrication regimes. Arithmetic analysis indicates that, given a more favourable biomechanical environment, this region can also generate EHL. Whilst acknowledging the limitations of transferring data from an animal model to a clinical environment, by providing the first data and equations detailing the film thicknesses and lubrication regime for these two tendon regions it is hoped that clinicians, engineers and scientists can consider improved clinical strategies to tackle both tendinopathy and tendon rupture.

  5. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of semitendinosus tendon in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: Does this have an effect on graft choice?

    PubMed Central

    Cobanoglu, Mutlu; Ozgezmez, Ferit Tufan; Omurlu, Imran Kurt; Ozkan, Ilhan; Savk, Sevki Oner; Cullu, Emre

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with ST autograft is sometimes unsuccessful because of harvested thin graft. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be a useful tool to evaluate the thickness of the graft. This study is performed to evaluate whether there is any correlation between diameters and cross-sectional area (CSA) of the semitendinosus tendon (ST) on the preoperative magnetic MRI and the diameter of the 4-stranded ST autograft in ACL reconstruction. Materials and Methods: Seventy patients who underwent single-bundle ACL reconstruction with 4-stranded ST for full-thickness ACL ruptures were included in this study. Anteroposterior (AP) and mediolateral (ML) diameters of ST at the levels of the joint line (JL) and femoral physeal line (PL), and also CSA at these levels were measured on T2-weighted fat-suppressed MRI examinations. The data obtained were compared with intraoperatively measured diameters of 4-stranded ST autograft. Correlations between variables were evaluated using Spearman's rho. Receiver operating characteristic and area under the curve statistics were used to evaluate the cut-off value for the correlation between 4-stranded ST graft diameter of 8 mm and CSA (mm2) on MRI. Results: On MRI measurements, no correlation was found between AP diameters at the level of the JL and 4-stranded ST diameter (P = 0.180). However, correlations were found between diameter of 4-stranded ST and ML diameter at the level of JL (P = 0.003) and PL (P = 0.002), AP diameter at the level of the PL (P = 0.009), CSA at the level of the JL (P < 0.001) and at the level of PL (P < 0.001). Correlation between the diameter of 4-stranded ST and CSA at both levels was more significant than that between AP-ML diameters of ST and diameter of autograft. The cut-off value for the 8 mm diameter CSA of 4-stranded ST was 5.9 mm2 at the JL and 8.99 mm2 at the PL. Conclusion: Preoperative MRI evaluation of CSA at the JL of the ST is a reliable parameter to

  6. Flexor Digitorum Accessorius Longus: Importance of Posterior Ankle Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Batista, Jorge Pablo; Del Vecchio, Jorge Javier; Golanó, Pau; Vega, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopy for the posterior region of the ankle through two portals is becoming more widespread for the treatment of a large number of conditions which used to be treated with open surgery years ago. The tendon of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL) travels along an osteofibrous tunnel between the posterolateral and posteromedial tubercles of the talus. Chronic inflammation of this tendon may lead to painful stenosing tenosynovitis. The aim of this report is to describe two cases depicting an accessory tendon which is an anatomical variation of the flexor hallucis longus in patients with posterior friction syndrome due to posterior ankle impingement and associated with a posteromedial osteochondral lesion of the talus. The anatomical variation (FDAL) described was a finding during an endoscopy of the posterior region of the ankle, and we have spared it by sectioning the superior flexor retinaculum only. The accessory flexor digitorum longus is an anatomical variation and should be taken into account when performing an arthroscopy of the posterior region of the ankle. We recommend this treatment on this type of injury although we admit this does not make a definite conclusion. PMID:26060592

  7. Flexor Digitorum Accessorius Longus: Importance of Posterior Ankle Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Batista, Jorge Pablo; del Vecchio, Jorge Javier; Golanó, Pau; Vega, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopy for the posterior region of the ankle through two portals is becoming more widespread for the treatment of a large number of conditions which used to be treated with open surgery years ago. The tendon of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL) travels along an osteofibrous tunnel between the posterolateral and posteromedial tubercles of the talus. Chronic inflammation of this tendon may lead to painful stenosing tenosynovitis. The aim of this report is to describe two cases depicting an accessory tendon which is an anatomical variation of the flexor hallucis longus in patients with posterior friction syndrome due to posterior ankle impingement and associated with a posteromedial osteochondral lesion of the talus. The anatomical variation (FDAL) described was a finding during an endoscopy of the posterior region of the ankle, and we have spared it by sectioning the superior flexor retinaculum only. The accessory flexor digitorum longus is an anatomical variation and should be taken into account when performing an arthroscopy of the posterior region of the ankle. We recommend this treatment on this type of injury although we admit this does not make a definite conclusion. PMID:26060592

  8. Stenosing flexor tenosynovitis.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, B A; Young, V L; Arfken, C

    1990-07-01

    A review of 253 consecutive digits with stenosing flexor tenosynovitis was done to clarify the respective role of steroid injection and surgical release in the management of stenosing flexor tenosynovitis. Treatment selection was based on the patient's age and severity of presenting complaints. In patients aged 10 years or more, analysis showed no statistically significant difference between results with steroid injection and surgical release. Surgical treatment was associated with higher cost and more complications. Based on this review, we recommend up to three injections of 20 mg of triamcinolone into the digital flexor sheath as the initial management of nonlocking, stenosing flexor tenosynovitis in adults. Initial management by surgical release is reserved for children and patients with digits locked in flexion.

  9. Hip flexor strain - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... such as sprinting, kicking, and changing direction while running or moving, can stretch and tear the hip flexors. Runners, people who do martial arts, and football, soccer, and hockey players are more likely to have ...

  10. Tendonitis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... tendon. It can occur as a result of injury, overuse, or with aging as the tendon loses elasticity. Any action that places prolonged repetitive strain on the forearm muscles can cause tendonitis. The ...

  11. Secure fixation of femoral bone plug with a suspensory button in anatomical anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with bone-patellar tendon-bone graft

    PubMed Central

    TAKETOMI, SHUJI; INUI, HIROSHI; NAKAMURA, KENSUKE; YAMAGAMI, RYOTA; TAHARA, KEITARO; SANADA, TAKAKI; MASUDA, HIRONARI; TANAKA, SAKAE; NAKAGAWA, TAKUMI

    2015-01-01

    Purpose the efficacy and safety of using a suspensory button for femoral fixation in anatomical anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) graft have not been established. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate bone plug integration onto the femoral socket and migration of the bone plug and the EndoButton (EB) (Smith & Nephew, Andover, MA, USA) after rectangular tunnel ACL reconstruction with BPTB autograft. Methods thirty-four patients who underwent anatomical rectangular ACL reconstruction with BPTB graft using EB for femoral fixation and in whom three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) was performed one week and one year after surgery were included in this study. Bone plug integration onto the femoral socket, bone plug migration, soft tissue interposition, EB migration and EB rotation were evaluated on 3D CT. The clinical outcome was also assessed and correlated with the imaging outcomes. Results the bone plug was integrated onto the femoral socket in all cases. The incidence of bone plug migration, soft tissue interposition, EB migration and EB rotation was 15, 15, 9 and 56%, respectively. No significant association was observed between the imaging outcomes. The postoperative mean Lysholm score was 97.1 ± 5.0 points. The postoperative side-to-side difference, evaluated using a KT-2000 arthrometer, averaged 0.5 ± 1.3 mm. There were no complications associated with EB use. Imaging outcomes did not affect the postoperative KT side-to-side difference. Conclusions the EB is considered a reliable device for femoral fixation in anatomical rectangular tunnel ACL reconstruction with BPTB autograft. Level of evidence Level IV, therapeutic case series. PMID:26889465

  12. Persistent spontaneous synovial drainage from digital flexor sheath in proliferative tenosynovitis: Two case reports and a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Brian; Cheung, Kevin; Farhangkhoee, Hana; Thoma, Achilleas

    2015-01-01

    Proliferative flexor tenosynovitis of the hand is an inflammatory process involving the synovial sheaths surrounding the tendons. It is most commonly caused by infection, but may also be caused by overuse, diabetes and rheumatic conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and crystal arthropathies. The present report describes two patients with severe proliferative tenosynovitis, who developed a fistula between the tendon sheath and skin after instrumentation, resulting in persistent synovial drainage. After failing conservative management, both patients were managed with extensive flexor tenosynovectomy to prevent inoculation of bacteria into the flexor sheath. The presentation, management and outcome of each case is described in addition to a discussion of the literature on tenosynovial fistulas. PMID:26090353

  13. Tendon transfers in the treatment of the adult flatfoot.

    PubMed

    Backus, Jonathon D; McCormick, Jeremy J

    2014-03-01

    Tendon transfers are critical to successful surgical correction of adult flexible flatfoot deformity and may be beneficial in correcting rigid deformities as well. Patients with refractory stage I and II deformities often require selective osteotomies in addition to tendon transfer. Patients with stage III and IV deformities typically require hindfoot arthrodesis. One of several tendons can be used for transfer based on surgeon's preference. Flexor digitorum longus (FDL) and flexor hallucis longus (FHL) transfers have been shown to have good results. A peroneus brevis transfer is typically used to supplement small FDL or FHL transfer donors or in revision cases.

  14. Tendon transfers in the treatment of the adult flatfoot.

    PubMed

    Backus, Jonathon D; McCormick, Jeremy J

    2014-03-01

    Tendon transfers are critical to successful surgical correction of adult flexible flatfoot deformity and may be beneficial in correcting rigid deformities as well. Patients with refractory stage I and II deformities often require selective osteotomies in addition to tendon transfer. Patients with stage III and IV deformities typically require hindfoot arthrodesis. One of several tendons can be used for transfer based on surgeon's preference. Flexor digitorum longus (FDL) and flexor hallucis longus (FHL) transfers have been shown to have good results. A peroneus brevis transfer is typically used to supplement small FDL or FHL transfer donors or in revision cases. PMID:24548507

  15. Distribution of proteins within different compartments of tendon varies according to tendon type.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Chavaunne T; Karunaseelan, Kabelan J; Ng Chieng Hin, Jade; Riley, Graham P; Birch, Helen L; Clegg, Peter D; Screen, Hazel R C

    2016-09-01

    Although the predominant function of all tendons is to transfer force from muscle to bone and position the limbs, some tendons additionally function as energy stores, reducing the energetic cost of locomotion. To maximise energy storage and return, energy-storing tendons need to be more extensible and elastic than tendons with a purely positional function. These properties are conferred in part by a specialisation of a specific compartment of the tendon, the interfascicular matrix, which enables sliding and recoil between adjacent fascicles. However, the composition of the interfascicular matrix is poorly characterised and we therefore tested the hypothesis that the distribution of elastin and proteoglycans differs between energy-storing and positional tendons, and that protein distribution varies between the fascicular matrix and the interfascicular matrix, with localisation of elastin and lubricin to the interfascicular matrix. Protein distribution in the energy-storing equine superficial digital flexor tendon and positional common digital extensor tendon was assessed using histology and immunohistochemistry. The results support the hypothesis, demonstrating enrichment of lubricin in the interfascicular matrix in both tendon types, where it is likely to facilitate interfascicular sliding. Elastin was also localised to the interfascicular matrix, specifically in the energy-storing superficial digital flexor tendon, which may account for the greater elasticity of the interfascicular matrix in this tendon. A differential distribution of proteoglycans was identified between tendon types and regions, which may indicate a distinct role for each of these proteins in tendon. These data provide important advances into fully characterising structure-function relationships within tendon. PMID:27113131

  16. Arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament surgery: results of autogenous patellar tendon graft versus the Leeds-Keio synthetic graft five year follow-up of a prospective randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Ghalayini, S R A; Helm, A T; Bonshahi, A Y; Lavender, A; Johnson, D S; Smith, R B

    2010-10-01

    We conducted a prospective, randomised controlled trial comparing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using middle third patellar tendon graft (PT) to synthetic Leeds-Keio (LK) ligament. The patients were randomised (26 PT, 24 LK). Subjective knee function was classified (Lysholm, Tegner activity, IKDC scores), laxity was measured (Lachman test, Stryker laxometer), and functional ability was assessed (one-hop test). There were no significant differences between Lysholm or IKDC scores at any stage by 5 years. Significant differences were found between the groups at 2 years for Tegner activity scores, laxity and one-hop testing. By 5 years there were no significant differences. Clinical equivalence was demonstrated between the two groups for the Lysholm score and one-hop test but not for the Tegner activity score at 5 years. The use of the LK ligament has been largely abandoned due to reports of its insufficiency. Our results demonstrate that it is not as inferior as one might expect. We conclude that the results of LK ligament ACL reconstruction are as acceptable as those using PT. It may provide an additional means of reconstruction where no suitable alternative is present.

  17. Lubricin Surface Modification Improves Tendon Gliding After Tendon Repair in a Canine Model in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Manabu; Sun, Yu-Long; Zhao, Chunfeng; Zobitz, Mark E.; Cha, Chung-Ja; Jay, Gregory D.; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of lubricin on the gliding of repaired flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) tendons in vitro. Canine FDP tendons were completely lacerated, repaired with a modified Pennington technique, and treated with one of the following solutions: saline, carbodiimide derivatized gelatin/hyaluronic acid (cd-HA-gelatin), carbodiimide derivatized gelatin to which lubricin was added in a second step (cd-gelatin + lubricin), or carbodiimide derivatized gelatin/HA + lubricin (cd-HA-gelatin + lubricin). After treatment, gliding resistance was measured up to 1,000 cycles of simulated flexion/extension motion. The increase in average and peak gliding resistance in cd-HA-gelatin, cd-gelatin + lubricin, and cd-HA-gelatin + lubricin tendons was less than the control tendons after 1,000 cycles (p < 0.05). The increase in average gliding resistance of cd-HA-gelatin + lubricin treated tendons was also less than that of the cd-HA-gelatin treated tendons (p < 0.05). The surfaces of the repaired tendons and associated pulleys were assessed qualitatively with scanning electron microscopy and appeared smooth after 1,000 cycles of tendon motion for the cd-HA-gelatin, cd-gelatin + lubricin, and cd-HA-gelatin + lubricin treated tendons, while that of the saline control appeared roughened. These results suggest that tendon surface modification can improve tendon gliding ability, with a trend suggesting that lubricin fixed on the repaired tendon may provide additional improvement over that provided by HA and gelatin alone. PMID:18683890

  18. Functional results from reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament using the central third of the patellar ligament and flexor tendons☆

    PubMed Central

    de Souza Leao, Marcos George; Pampolha, Abelardo Gautama Moreira; Orlando Junior, Nilton

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate knee function in patients undergoing reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) using the central third of the patellar ligament or the medial flexor tendons of the knee, i.e. quadruple ligaments from the semitendinosus and gracilis (ST-G), by means of the Knee Society Score (KSS) and the Lysholm scale. Methods This was a randomized prospective longitudinal study on 40 patients who underwent arthroscopic ACL reconstruction between September 2013 and August 2014. They comprised 37 males and three females, with ages ranging from 16 to 52 years. The patients were numbered randomly from 1 to 40: the even numbers underwent surgical correction using the ST-G tendons and the odd numbers, using the patellar tendon. Functional evaluations were made using the KSS and Lysholm scale, applied in the evening before the surgical procedure and six months after the operation. Results From the statistical analysis, it could be seen that the patients’ functional capacity was significantly greater after the operation than before the operation. There was strong evidence that the two forms of therapy had similar results (p = >0.05), in all the comparisons. Conclusions The results from the ACL reconstructions were similar with regard to functional recovery of the knee and improvement of quality of life, independent of the type of graft. It was not possible to identify the best method of surgical treatment. The surgeon's clinical and technical experience and the patient are the factors that determine the choice of graft type for use in ACL surgery. PMID:27218084

  19. Elastographic characteristics of the metacarpal tendons in horses without clinical evidence of tendon injury.

    PubMed

    Lustgarten, Meghann; Redding, W Rich; Labens, Raphael; Morgan, Michel; Davis, Weston; Seiler, Gabriela S

    2014-01-01

    Tendon and ligament injuries are common causes of impaired performance in equine athletes. Gray-scale ultrasonography is the current standard method for diagnosing and monitoring these injuries, however this modality only provides morphologic information. Elastography is an ultrasound technique that allows detection and measurement of tissue strain, and may provide valuable mechanical information about equine tendon and ligament injuries. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility, reproducibility, and repeatability of elastography; and to describe elastographic characteristics of metacarpal tendons in sound horses. Nineteen legs for 17 clinically sound horses without evidence of musculoskeletal pathology were included. Elastographic images of the superficial and deep digital flexor tendons and the branches of the suspensory ligament (tendon of the interosseous muscle) were described quantitatively and qualitatively. There was no statistically significant difference between operators (P = 0.86) nor within operators (P = 0.93). For qualitative assessments, reproducibility (0.46) was moderate and repeatability (0.78) was good. Similar to human Achilles tendons, equine tendons were classified as predominantly hard using elastography. There was no statistically significant difference in stiffness of the flexor tendons (P = 0.96). No significant difference in stiffness was found with altered leg position during standing (P = 0.84) and while nonweight bearing (P = 0.61). The flexor tendons were softer when imaged in longitudinal versus transverse planes (P < 0.01) however, the suspensory branches were not (P = 0.67). Findings supported future clinical application of elastography as a noninvasive "stall-side" imaging modality for evaluation of the tendons and ligaments of the distal forelimb in horses.

  20. The clinical effect of tendon repair for tendon spontaneous rupture after corticosteroid injection in hands

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hui; Yang, Hu; Shen, Hui; Ye, Ganmin; Lin, Xiang-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Corticosteroid injections for hand tendinitis can lead to a rare significant complication of tendon spontaneous rupture. However, only sporadic cases were reported in the literature before. This study was designed to gauge the clinical effect of tendon repair in patients of tendon spontaneous rupture after corticosteroid injection and analyze our experience. This was a retrospective observational study of 13 patients (8 women and 5 men) operated between July 2011 and December 2015 for tendon spontaneous rupture after corticosteroid injection. Demographic data, clinical features, imaging data, and surgical treatments were carefully reviewed. The average age was 52.308 ± 15.381 years (range 29–71). The average injection times were 2.538 ± 1.664 times (range 1–6). The average rupture time (after last injection) was 10.923 ± 9.500 weeks (range 3–32). Nine patients were treated by tendon suture (69% of cases), and 4 patients were treated by tendon grafting (31% of cases). All patients received follow-up in our outpatient clinic. The sites of the tendon rupture (15 tendons of 13 patients had involved) include extensor pollicis longus (6 tendons, 40% of cases), extensor digiti quinti and extensor digiti minimi (4 tendons, 27% of cases), ring finger of extensor digitorum communis (3 tendons, 20% of cases), and middle finger of extensor digitorum communis (2 tendons, 13% of cases). Two patients who had tendon adhesion (15% of cases) were treated by tendon release. One patient who had tendon rerupture (8% of cases) was treated by tendon grafting. No patient had complications of infections, vascular, or nerve injury. Tendon spontaneous rupture is a serious complication after corticosteroid injection for tendinitis. Rigid standard of corticosteroid injection is very important. Magnetic resonance imaging was contributory to preoperative assess tendon defect and can be used to monitor healing quality of tendons during the follow-up. PMID:27741145

  1. [Research on minimally invasive release treatment of stenosing tenosynovitis of flexor digitorum].

    PubMed

    Luo, Tao; Liu, Jing

    2013-05-01

    The minimally invasive release treatment of TCM Small Needle-Knife for the stenosing tenosynovitis of flexor digtorum-"trigger finger" has a more satisfied efficacy. In recent years, many clinicians use self-made small sharp scalpels, iris knives, small sickles, push shear knives, and other improved alternatives to instead of the traditional small needle-knives. Changing the original small needle-knife vertical stabbed cutting method, take a mini-incision, along the traveling direction of flexor tendon make a vertical hook cut, pick cut, straight push cut and any other cuts, completely cut the stenosis of the tendon sheath pulley, to achieve the release therapeutic purposes. The experience of most scholars is: Detailed and thorough understanding refers to the anatomical level of the flexor tendon and surrounding tissue, the structural relationship; Strictly adhere to the indications of minimally invasive release therapy; Proficiency in a dedicated minimally invasive release needle-knives, scalpels, and standardized methods of operation; Accurate positioning before surgery, in surgery traveling direction along flexor tendon, continuous incision to release the middle along the tendon. It can achieve the same or even higher incision release efficacy than the traditional treatment, at the same time also avoids common adverse complications. PMID:23937042

  2. Extensive Loss of Tibialis Anterior Tendon: Surgical Repair With Split Tendon Transfer of Tibialis Posterior Tendon: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Tsuyoshi; Uchida, Kenzo; Kokubo, Yasuo; Inukai, Tomoo; Sakamoto, Takumi; Yamagishi, Atsushi; Kitade, Makoto; Baba, Hisatoshi

    2016-01-01

    Extensive damage of the tibialis anterior tendon is rare and mainly caused by trauma. Surgical treatment of these injuries can become challenging owing to the limited availability of autogenous graft resources for reconstruction of the defect. In the present case report, we describe a large defect in the midfoot soft tissue after a traffic injury, which included complete loss of the tibialis anterior tendon. The tendon was reconstructed by split tendon transfer of the tibialis posterior tendon without sacrificing function, which was confirmed by the follow-up examination at 6 years after injury. We believe split tendon transfer of the tibialis posterior tendon can be one of the treatment options for patients with extensive disruption of the tibialis anterior tendon. PMID:26213163

  3. Tendon Innervation.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Paul W; Salo, Paul; Hart, David A

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of tendon metabolism including the responses to loading is far from being well understood. During the last decade, however, accumulating data show that tendon innervation in addition to afferent functions, via efferent pathways has a regulatory role in tendon homeostasis via a wide range of neuromediators, which coordinate metabolic and neuro-inflammatory pathways.Innervation of intact healthy tendons is localized in the surrounding structures, i.e paratenon, endotenon and epitenon, whereas the tendon proper is practically devoid of neuronal supply. This anatomical finding reflects that the tendon metabolism is regulated from the tendon envelope, i.e. interfascicular matrix (see Chap. 1 ).Tendon innervation after injury and during repair, however, is found as extensive nerve ingrowth into the tendon proper, followed by a time-dependent emergence of different neuronal mediators, which amplify and fine-tune inflammatory and metabolic pathways in tendon regeneration. After healing nerve fibers retract to the tendon envelope.In tendinopathy innervation has been identified to consist of excessive and protracted nerve ingrowth in the tendon proper, suggesting pro-inflammatory, nociceptive and hypertrophic (degenerative) tissue responses.In metabolic disorders such as eg. diabetes impaired tendon healing has been established to be related to dysregulation of neuronal growth factors.Targeted approaches to the peripheral nervous system including neuronal mediators and their receptors may prove to be effective therapies for painful, degenerative and traumatic tendon disorders. PMID:27535247

  4. Morphological and mechanical properties of muscle and tendon in highly trained sprinters.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Keitaro; Ikebukuro, Toshihiro; Yata, Hideaki; Tomita, Minoru; Okada, Masaji

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate muscle and tendon properties in highly trained sprinters and their relations to running performance. Fifteen sprinters and 15 untrained subjects participated in this study. Muscle thickness and tendon stiffness of knee extensors and plantar flexors were measured. Sprinter muscle thickness was significantly greater than that of the untrained subjects for plantar flexors, but not for knee extensors (except for the medial side). Sprinter tendon stiffness was significantly lower than that of the untrained subjects for knee extensors, but not for plantar flexors. The best official record of a 100-m race was significantly correlated to the muscle thickness of the medial side for knee extensors. In conclusion, the tendon structures of highly trained sprinters are more compliant than those of untrained subjects for knee extensors, but not for plantar flexors. Furthermore, a thicker medial side of knee extensors was associated with greater sprinting performance.

  5. Relative Echogenicity of Tendons and Ligaments of the Palmar Metacarpal Region in Foals from Birth to 4 Months of Age: A Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Spinella, Giuseppe; Britti, Domenico; Loprete, Giovanni; Musella, Vincenzo; Romagnoli, Noemi; Vilar, Jose M; Valentini, Simona

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate relative echogenicity of superficial and deep digital flexor tendons, the accessory ligament of the deep digital flexor tendon and interosseous muscle of the metacarpal region in foals ages 1 week to 4 months; and assess the association between echogenicity and sex or side/laterality. Seven Standardbred trotter foals were examined. Right and left metacarpal regions (palmar surface) were ultrasonographically investigated, and four regions of interest were assessed. A significant increase in echogenicity was seen in superficial and deep digital flexor tendons, accessory ligament of deep digital flexor tendon, and interosseous muscle during growth from 1 week to 4 months of age. Echogenicity of examined tendons and ligaments was not influenced by gender nor laterality. Reference values for tendon and ligament echogenicity could function as a tool to discriminate between physiological and abnormal conditions such as congenital contractural conditions. PMID:27441630

  6. Relative Echogenicity of Tendons and Ligaments of the Palmar Metacarpal Region in Foals from Birth to 4 Months of Age: A Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Britti, Domenico; Loprete, Giovanni; Musella, Vincenzo; Romagnoli, Noemi; Vilar, Jose M.; Valentini, Simona

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate relative echogenicity of superficial and deep digital flexor tendons, the accessory ligament of the deep digital flexor tendon and interosseous muscle of the metacarpal region in foals ages 1 week to 4 months; and assess the association between echogenicity and sex or side/laterality. Seven Standardbred trotter foals were examined. Right and left metacarpal regions (palmar surface) were ultrasonographically investigated, and four regions of interest were assessed. A significant increase in echogenicity was seen in superficial and deep digital flexor tendons, accessory ligament of deep digital flexor tendon, and interosseous muscle during growth from 1 week to 4 months of age. Echogenicity of examined tendons and ligaments was not influenced by gender nor laterality. Reference values for tendon and ligament echogenicity could function as a tool to discriminate between physiological and abnormal conditions such as congenital contractural conditions. PMID:27441630

  7. Measuring force transfers in the deep flexors of the musician's hand: theoretical analysis, clinical examples.

    PubMed

    Leijnse, J N

    1997-09-01

    In the present paper the anatomical and functional interdependencies which regularly exist between the deep flexor tendons of the different fingers are modelled. The model results are validated by measurements on real hands. The results show that intertendinous force transfers may be caused by (i) coactivation of muscle fibres inserting in different tendons, and (ii) passive connections between tendons or muscle bellies. The coactivation is validated by the measuring results of a hand in which all intertendinous connections were surgically removed. The present models and measurements are currently used for diagnosis of hand problems in musicians at our hand clinic.

  8. Os trigonum syndrome with flexor hallucis longus tenosynovitis in a professional football referee.

    PubMed

    Cooper, M E; Wolin, P M

    1999-07-01

    The presentation of posterior ankle pain in any patient poses a diagnostic dilemma. The os trigonum syndrome and flexor hallucis longus stenosing tenosynovitis have been reported to occur in professional and amateur ballet dancers. It is important to consider these diagnoses in a patient who is not a dancer, as is shown in the case presented here. The patient in this case is a professional referee who injured his ankle while working on artificial turf. The treatment for os trigonum syndrome and flexor hallucis longus tenosynovitis is initially conservative, but in refractory cases, surgical removal of the os and release of the flexor hallucis longus tendon can be successfully performed. This is the first reported case of os trigonum syndrome and flexor hallucis longus tenosynovitis presenting simultaneously in a patient who is not a dancer.

  9. Parameters influencing prevalence and outcome of tendonitis in Thoroughbred and Arabian racehorses.

    PubMed

    Kalisiak, O

    2012-01-01

    Flexor tendonitis and suspensory desmitis are among most prevalent musculoskeletal injuries observed in racehorses. The aim of this study was to determine which horse and race-related parameters can help to diminish the possibility of injury or--when injury has occurred--to evaluate the potential for the horse to continue a successful career after convalescence. Special attention was given to the comparison of Arabian and Thoroughbred racehorses. 187 horses with ultrasonographically visible lesions were included in the study. Following parameters were analyzed: structure (Superficial Digital Flexor Tendon [SDFT], Deep Digital Flexor Tendon [DDFT], Suspensory Ligament [SL]); percentage of cross sectional area increase; hypoechogenic lesion character; in horses with SDF tendonitis - tendonitis grade according to Genovese. This study showed that Thoroughbreds are more at risk of musculoskeletal problems than Arabian racehorses. In both breeds, the most frequent injuries concern SDFT, then SL. Over 95% of tendonitis concern forelimbs. In Thoroughbreds, the prevalence of tendonitis is higher in bigger horses, in males when compared to females and in fence/steeple racehorses when compared to flat track racehorses. The inside limb is more at risk of SDF tendonitis, when the external limb - of SL desmitis. Tendonitis severity increases with age and is greater in steeplechasers when compared to flat track racehorses. The outcome of tendonitis without hypoechogenic lesion is much better than that with hypoechogenic lesion. Evaluation of hypoechogenic lesion length is an easy and accurate prognosis tool, as the chances of returning to racing drop dramatically with lesions longer than 12 cm.

  10. Parameters influencing prevalence and outcome of tendonitis in Thoroughbred and Arabian racehorses.

    PubMed

    Kalisiak, O

    2012-01-01

    Flexor tendonitis and suspensory desmitis are among most prevalent musculoskeletal injuries observed in racehorses. The aim of this study was to determine which horse and race-related parameters can help to diminish the possibility of injury or--when injury has occurred--to evaluate the potential for the horse to continue a successful career after convalescence. Special attention was given to the comparison of Arabian and Thoroughbred racehorses. 187 horses with ultrasonographically visible lesions were included in the study. Following parameters were analyzed: structure (Superficial Digital Flexor Tendon [SDFT], Deep Digital Flexor Tendon [DDFT], Suspensory Ligament [SL]); percentage of cross sectional area increase; hypoechogenic lesion character; in horses with SDF tendonitis - tendonitis grade according to Genovese. This study showed that Thoroughbreds are more at risk of musculoskeletal problems than Arabian racehorses. In both breeds, the most frequent injuries concern SDFT, then SL. Over 95% of tendonitis concern forelimbs. In Thoroughbreds, the prevalence of tendonitis is higher in bigger horses, in males when compared to females and in fence/steeple racehorses when compared to flat track racehorses. The inside limb is more at risk of SDF tendonitis, when the external limb - of SL desmitis. Tendonitis severity increases with age and is greater in steeplechasers when compared to flat track racehorses. The outcome of tendonitis without hypoechogenic lesion is much better than that with hypoechogenic lesion. Evaluation of hypoechogenic lesion length is an easy and accurate prognosis tool, as the chances of returning to racing drop dramatically with lesions longer than 12 cm. PMID:22708365

  11. Multi-Layer Electrospun Membrane Mimicking Tendon Sheath for Prevention of Tendon Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shichao; Yan, Hede; Fan, Dapeng; Song, Jialin; Fan, Cunyi

    2015-01-01

    Defect of the tendon sheath after tendon injury is a main reason for tendon adhesions, but it is a daunting challenge for the biomimetic substitute of the tendon sheath after injury due to its multi-layer membrane-like structure and complex biologic functions. In this study, a multi-layer membrane with celecoxib-loaded poly(l-lactic acid)-polyethylene glycol (PELA) electrospun fibrous membrane as the outer layer, hyaluronic acid (HA) gel as middle layer, and PELA electrospun fibrous membrane as the inner layer was designed. The anti-adhesion efficacy of this multi-layer membrane was compared with a single-layer use in rabbit flexor digitorum profundus tendon model. The surface morphology showed that both PELA fibers and celecoxib-loaded PELA fibers in multi-layer membrane were uniform in size, randomly arrayed, very porous, and smooth without beads. Multi-layer membrane group had fewer peritendinous adhesions and better gliding than the PELA membrane group and control group in gross and histological observation. The similar mechanical characteristic and collagen expression of tendon repair site in the three groups indicated that the multi-layer membrane did not impair tendon healing. Taken together, our results demonstrated that such a biomimetic multi-layer sheath could be used as a potential strategy in clinics for promoting tendon gliding and preventing adhesion without poor tendon healing. PMID:25822877

  12. Preliminary study of tendon biopsy in the horse.

    PubMed

    Webbon, P M

    1986-09-01

    A series of experimental tendon biopsies is described. Three biopsies were taken from the lateral digital extensor tendon (LDET) and three from the superficial flexor tendon (SFT). The LDET biopsies resulted in little discomfort whereas the SFT biopsies led to temporary lameness. The tendons were examined histologically up to 99 days after the biopsies were removed. In all of the tendons the defect filled with granulation tissue which subsequently became organised as a longitudinally orientated collagenous scar tissue. In this small series of biopsies the histological effects of the biopsy persisted longer in the SFT than in the LDET. It is concluded that tendon biopsy cannot be advocated for safe routine use in the horse.

  13. Morphological and biomechanical studies on the common calcaneal tendon in dogs.

    PubMed

    Jopp, I; Reese, S

    2009-01-01

    Spontaneous rupture at the distal part of the gastrocnemius tendon (GT) is the second most common non-traumatic tendon injury in dogs, whereas the other strands of the common calcaneal tendon do not seem to have a predisposition to rupture. In order to discover why we investigated the common calcaneal tendons of 63 dogs microscopically and biomechanically. Both the gastrocnemius and superficial digital flexor tendon (SFT) had multiple low vascularized fibrocartilaginous areas within their distal course as opposed to regular parallel fibered areas in the proximal tendon areas. Biomechanical testing revealed that the distal sections in both tendons show a 50% and 70% lower tensile strength (F(max)/kg BW) than the proximal sections (p<0.01), respectively. On the contrary, tensile load (F(max)/mm(2)) only differed minimally between proximal and distal sections in both tendons (8% and 9%, respectively), whereas the tensile load of the distal gastrocnemius tendon is 35% lower than of the distal superficial flexor tendon (p<0.01). To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study to experimentally show that there are different biomechanical properties within the same tendon. The maximum load to failure is lower in the GT compared to the SFT within the same dog which explains its higher incidence of rupture in the field. The avascular fibrocartilaginous structure in the distal gastrocnemius tendon seems to play a further role in the pathogenesis of spontaneous rupture.

  14. Considerations in the surgical use of the flexor sheath and pulley system.

    PubMed

    Lowrie, A G; Lees, V C

    2014-01-01

    The use of the digital flexor sheath to reconstruct damaged structures in the fingers is an intriguing but under-investigated subject. The sheath is anchored firmly to the phalanges and palmar plates and has well-vascularized outer and synovial inner layers. The middle layer is strong and fibrous and not all of it is required for its main biomechanical function of maintaining the moment arm of the flexor tendons. These characteristics have led to several descriptions of different reconstructive uses. In sheath reconstruction, flaps can be used to repair damaged A2 and A4 pulleys. As an anchor, the sheath is useful for tenodeses and tendon transfers. It has been used in the correction of ulnar claw and swan neck deformities. In ligament reconstruction, the A1 pulley has been used to reconstruct the transverse intermetacarpal ligament in cleft hand and ray amputations. The sheath has also been used to cover tendon repairs and periosteal defects with the aim of decreasing adhesions. There is potential for further use of the flexor sheath in reconstructive surgery. The digital flexor sheath can be used to restore various finger functions providing its physiological roles are recognized and preserved. This review considers the different techniques described and their potential uses. PMID:24170491

  15. Principles of tendon transfers.

    PubMed

    Coulet, B

    2016-04-01

    Tendon transfers are carried out to restore functional deficits by rerouting the remaining intact muscles. Transfers are highly attractive in the context of hand surgery because of the possibility of restoring the patient's ability to grip. In palsy cases, tendon transfers are only used when a neurological procedure is contraindicated or has failed. The strategy used to restore function follows a common set of principles, no matter the nature of the deficit. The first step is to clearly distinguish between deficient muscles and muscles that could be transferred. Next, the type of palsy will dictate the scope of the program and the complexity of the gripping movements that can be restored. Based on this reasoning, a surgical strategy that matches the means (transferable muscles) with the objectives (functions to restore) will be established and clearly explained to the patient. Every paralyzed hand can be described using three parameters. 1) Deficient segments: wrist, thumb and long fingers; 2) mechanical performance of muscles groups being revived: high energy-wrist extension and finger flexion that require strong transfers with long excursion; low energy-wrist flexion and finger extension movements that are less demanding mechanically, because they can be accomplished through gravity alone in some cases; 3) condition of the two primary motors in the hand: extrinsics (flexors and extensors) and intrinsics (facilitator). No matter the type of palsy, the transfer surgery follows the same technical principles: exposure, release, fixation, tensioning and rehabilitation. By performing an in-depth analysis of each case and by following strict technical principles, tendon transfer surgery leads to reproducible results; this allows the surgeon to establish clear objectives for the patient preoperatively. PMID:27117119

  16. Changes in the Achilles tendon reflexes following Skylab missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, J. T.; Nicogossian, A. E.; Hoffler, G. W.; Johnson, R. L.; Hordinsky, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    Postflight measurements of Achilles tendon reflex duration on Skylab crewmen indicate a state of disequilibrium between the flexor and extensor muscle groups with an initial decrease in reflex duration. As the muscles regain strength and mass there occurs an overcompensation reflected by increased reflex duration. Finally, when a normal neuromuscular state is reached the reflex duration returns to baseline value.

  17. Parachute technique: a complimentary method in zone II tendon repair.

    PubMed

    Mozafari, Naser; Hosseini, Seyed Nejat; Abdolzadeh, Madjid; Mozafari, Mohammed Ali

    2011-06-01

    Flexor tendon lacerations still represent a challenging problem for the hand and the plastic surgeon, particularly in zone II. Many techniques have been devised accordingly to make the surgery of this zone easier. Hence, we too have devised an added complementary technique (ie, the parachute technique) to the common surgical techniques of the tendon repair to ease the repairing process and improve the outcomes. In this study, 79 patients, from whom 21 patients had 2 injured fingers, with flexor tendon injury in zone II (ie, 100 fingers) underwent this new technique. Finally, the results were hopeful. Thus, this complementary parachute technique combined with an early active mobilization with almost full range of flexion and extension, starting on the first postoperative day, resulted in improved outcomes compared with both passive mobilization and gentle active mobilization with a limited range of motion (ie, "controlled"). The Strickland formula (total active motion) system was used to evaluate the functional results of the flexor tendon repair. Finally, this technique is applicable for tendon repairs, and is shown to produce good results in their hands.

  18. Salvage Flexor Hallucis Longus Transfer for a Failed Achilles Repair: Endoscopic Technique

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Sérgio; Caetano, Rubén; Corte-Real, Nuno

    2015-01-01

    Flexor hallucis longus (FHL) transfer is a well-established treatment option in failed Achilles tendon (AT) repair and has been routinely performed as an open procedure. We detail the surgical steps needed to perform an arthroscopic transfer of the FHL for a chronic AT rupture. The FHL tendon is harvested as it enters in its tunnel beneath the sustentaculum tali; a tunnel is then drilled in the calcaneus as near to the AT footprint as possible. By use of a suture-passing device, the free end of the FHL is advanced to the plantar aspect of the foot. After adequate tension is applied to the construct, the tendon is fixed in place with an interference screw in an inside-out fashion. This minimally invasive approach is a safe and valid alternative to classic open procedures with the obvious advantages of preserving the soft-tissue envelope and using a biologically intact tendon. PMID:26697296

  19. The cell biology of suturing tendons.

    PubMed

    Wong, J K F; Alyouha, S; Kadler, K E; Ferguson, M W J; McGrouther, D A

    2010-07-01

    Trauma by suturing tendon form areas devoid of cells termed "acellular zones" in the matrix. This study aimed to characterise the cellular insult of suturing and acellular zone formation in mouse tendon. Acellular zone formation was evaluated using single grasping sutures placed using flexor tendons with time lapse cell viability imaging for a period of 12h. Both tension and injury were required to induce cell death and cell movement in the formation of the acellular zone. DNA fragmentation studies and transmission electron microscopy indicated that cells necrosed. Parallel in vivo studies showed that cell-to-cell contacts were disrupted following grasping by the suture in tensioned tendon. Without tension, cell death was lessened and cell-to-cell contacts remained intact. Quantitative immunohistochemistry and 3D cellular profile mapping of wound healing markers over a one year time course showed that acellular zones arise rapidly and showed no evidence of healing whilst the wound healing response occurred in the surrounding tissues. The acellular zones were also evident in a standard modified "Kessler" clinical repair. In conclusion, the suture repair of injured tendons produces acellular zones, which may potentially cause early tendon failure. PMID:20600895

  20. Modified flexor digitorum superficialis slip technique for A4 pulley reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Odobescu, A; Radu, A; Brutus, J-P; Gilardino, M S

    2010-07-01

    We describe a variation in the A4 pulley reconstruction technique using one slip of the flexor digitorum superficialis insertion and report the results of a biomechanical analysis of this reconstruction in cadavers. While conserving the distal bony insertion, one slip of flexor digitorum superficialis is transferred over the flexor digitorum profundus tendon and sutured to the contralateral superficialis slip insertion. This creates a new pulley at the base of the original A4 pulley that can be adjusted to accommodate an FDP repair of increased bulk. We found a 57% reduction in excess excursion due to bowstringing when compared with no repair. Furthermore the repairs were sturdy, 94% of specimens maintaining their integrity when a proximally directed force of 50 N was applied. PMID:20427405

  1. Tendon Differentiation on Decellularized Extracellular Matrix Under Cyclic Loading.

    PubMed

    Youngstrom, Daniel W; Barrett, Jennifer G

    2016-01-01

    Tendon bioreactors combine cells, scaffold, and mechanical stimulation to drive tissue neogenesis ex vivo. Faithful recapitulation of the native tendon microenvironment is essential for stimulating graft maturation or modeling tendon biology. As the mediator between cells and mechanical stimulation, the properties of a scaffold constitute perhaps the most essential elements in a bioreactor system. One method of achieving native scaffold properties is to process tendon allograft in a manner that removes cells without modifying structure and function: "decellularization." This chapter describes (1) production of tendon scaffolds derived from native extracellular matrix, (2) preparation of cell-laden scaffolds prior to bioreactor culture, and (3) tissue processing post-harvest for gene expression analysis. These methods may be applied for a variety of applications including graft production, cell priming prior to transplantation and basic investigations of tendon cell biology. PMID:27062597

  2. Tendon Differentiation on Decellularized Extracellular Matrix Under Cyclic Loading.

    PubMed

    Youngstrom, Daniel W; Barrett, Jennifer G

    2016-01-01

    Tendon bioreactors combine cells, scaffold, and mechanical stimulation to drive tissue neogenesis ex vivo. Faithful recapitulation of the native tendon microenvironment is essential for stimulating graft maturation or modeling tendon biology. As the mediator between cells and mechanical stimulation, the properties of a scaffold constitute perhaps the most essential elements in a bioreactor system. One method of achieving native scaffold properties is to process tendon allograft in a manner that removes cells without modifying structure and function: "decellularization." This chapter describes (1) production of tendon scaffolds derived from native extracellular matrix, (2) preparation of cell-laden scaffolds prior to bioreactor culture, and (3) tissue processing post-harvest for gene expression analysis. These methods may be applied for a variety of applications including graft production, cell priming prior to transplantation and basic investigations of tendon cell biology.

  3. A 3-Dimensional Anatomic Study of the Distal Biceps Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Christine; Li, Zhi; Pennings, Amanda; Agur, Anne; Elmaraghy, Amr

    2015-01-01

    Background Complete rupture of the distal biceps tendon from its osseous attachment is most often treated with operative intervention. Knowledge of the overall tendon morphology as well as the orientation of the collagenous fibers throughout the musculotendinous junction are key to intraoperative decision making and surgical technique in both the acute and chronic setting. Unfortunately, there is little information available in the literature. Purpose To comprehensively describe the morphology of the distal biceps tendon. Study Design Descriptive laboratory study. Methods The distal biceps terminal musculature, musculotendinous junction, and tendon were digitized in 10 cadaveric specimens and data reconstructed using 3-dimensional modeling. Results The average length, width, and thickness of the external distal biceps tendon were found to be 63.0, 6.0, and 3.0 mm, respectively. A unique expansion of the tendon fibers within the distal muscle was characterized, creating a thick collagenous network along the central component between the long and short heads. Conclusion This study documents the morphologic parameters of the native distal biceps tendon. Reconstruction may be necessary, especially in chronic distal biceps tendon ruptures, if the remaining tendon morphology is significantly compromised compared with the native distal biceps tendon. Knowledge of normal anatomical distal biceps tendon parameters may also guide the selection of a substitute graft with similar morphological characteristics. Clinical Relevance A thorough description of distal biceps tendon morphology is important to guide intraoperative decision making between primary repair and reconstruction and to better select the most appropriate graft. The detailed description of the tendinous expansion into the muscle may provide insight into better graft-weaving and suture-grasping techniques to maximize proximal graft incorporation. PMID:26665092

  4. Use of a Hunter Rod for Staged Reconstruction of Peroneal Tendons.

    PubMed

    Raikin, Steven M; Schick, Faith A; Karanjia, Homyar N

    2016-01-01

    Peroneal tendon pathology is a commonly reported cause of lateral ankle pain. The causes include cavovarus foot type, overuse, chronic tendinosis, peroneal subluxation or dislocation, acute traumatic split tears, and traumatic rupture. The purpose of the present report is to describe an alternative approach for surgical reconstruction of the peroneal tendons in patients when repair might no longer be effective. The use of a Hunter rod was originally described by Hunter in 1971 for 2-stage reconstruction of tendons in the hand. We present a 2-stage surgical technique with the use of a Hunter rod as a temporary implant to stimulate generation of a healthy peroneal tendon sheath to host a flexor hallucis longus tendon transfer. This has proved to be a successful treatment option for patients with severe peroneal tendon damage and scarring along the peroneal tendon sheath. We offer a sample case to illustrate a patient with such indications.

  5. The interfascicular matrix enables fascicle sliding and recovery in tendon, and behaves more elastically in energy storing tendons

    PubMed Central

    Thorpe, Chavaunne T.; Godinho, Marta S.C.; Riley, Graham P.; Birch, Helen L.; Clegg, Peter D.; Screen, Hazel R.C.

    2015-01-01

    While the predominant function of all tendons is to transfer force from muscle to bone and position the limbs, some tendons additionally function as energy stores, reducing the cost of locomotion. Energy storing tendons experience extremely high strains and need to be able to recoil efficiently for maximum energy storage and return. In the equine forelimb, the energy storing superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) has much higher failure strains than the positional common digital extensor tendon (CDET). However, we have previously shown that this is not due to differences in the properties of the SDFT and CDET fascicles (the largest tendon subunits). Instead, there is a greater capacity for interfascicular sliding in the SDFT which facilitates the greater extensions in this particular tendon (Thorpe et al., 2012). In the current study, we exposed fascicles and interfascicular matrix (IFM) from the SDFT and CDET to cyclic loading followed by a test to failure. The results show that IFM mechanical behaviour is not a result of irreversible deformation, but the IFM is able to withstand cyclic loading, and is more elastic in the SDFT than in the CDET. We also assessed the effect of ageing on IFM properties, demonstrating that the IFM is less able to resist repetitive loading as it ages, becoming stiffer with increasing age in the SDFT. These results provide further indications that the IFM is important for efficient function in energy storing tendons, and age-related alterations to the IFM may compromise function and predispose older tendons to injury. PMID:25958330

  6. The interfascicular matrix enables fascicle sliding and recovery in tendon, and behaves more elastically in energy storing tendons.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Chavaunne T; Godinho, Marta S C; Riley, Graham P; Birch, Helen L; Clegg, Peter D; Screen, Hazel R C

    2015-12-01

    While the predominant function of all tendons is to transfer force from muscle to bone and position the limbs, some tendons additionally function as energy stores, reducing the cost of locomotion. Energy storing tendons experience extremely high strains and need to be able to recoil efficiently for maximum energy storage and return. In the equine forelimb, the energy storing superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) has much higher failure strains than the positional common digital extensor tendon (CDET). However, we have previously shown that this is not due to differences in the properties of the SDFT and CDET fascicles (the largest tendon subunits). Instead, there is a greater capacity for interfascicular sliding in the SDFT which facilitates the greater extensions in this particular tendon (Thorpe et al., 2012). In the current study, we exposed fascicles and interfascicular matrix (IFM) from the SDFT and CDET to cyclic loading followed by a test to failure. The results show that IFM mechanical behaviour is not a result of irreversible deformation, but the IFM is able to withstand cyclic loading, and is more elastic in the SDFT than in the CDET. We also assessed the effect of ageing on IFM properties, demonstrating that the IFM is less able to resist repetitive loading as it ages, becoming stiffer with increasing age in the SDFT. These results provide further indications that the IFM is important for efficient function in energy storing tendons, and age-related alterations to the IFM may compromise function and predispose older tendons to injury.

  7. Regional adaptations in three rat tendons.

    PubMed

    Covizi, D Z; Felisbino, S L; Gomes, L; Pimentel, E R; Carvalho, H F

    2001-10-01

    Although detailed histological and immunocytochemical studies have been published for the rat calcanear tendon (CT), little is known of the structure, composition and biomechanics of the deep (DFT) and superficial (SFT) flexor tendons. In this study, we examined the structural specialization of these three tendons in 90-day-old rats by applying histochemical and biochemical assays to different tendon regions (proximal, intermediate and distal regions of the DFT and SFT, and proximal and distal regions of the CT). There were regional differences in tissue structure, glycosaminoglycan type and content, swelling properties and in the amount and distribution of elastic fibers. Dermatan sulfate occurred in all regions, but chondroitin sulfate predominated in the intermediate region of the DFT and in the distal region of the CT. These two chondroitin sulfate-bearing regions showed swelling in water, while all other regions lost fluid in water. Fibrocartilaginous sites were observed on the CT, one at the insertion to the bone and another distally at the innermost area of the tendon. The intermediate region of the DFT showed round cells disposed in lacunae, while the proximal and distal regions were typically fibrous. The intermediate region of the SFT showed a wavy array of collagen bundles but neither toluidine blue staining in the matrix nor round cells. Elastic fibers were present in each region of the three tendons, but were more prominent in the intermediate zone of the SFT. These results demonstrate regional variation in the three tendons. Tendon differentiation may occur by an increase in the number of elastic fibers and by variations in the arrangement of collagen fibers, without fibrocartilage formation.

  8. Abductor pollicis longus tendon division with swan neck thumb deformity.

    PubMed

    Zacharia, Balaji; Puthezhath, Kishore

    2012-08-01

    Swan neck thumb deformity can be caused by osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, tendon transfers and paralytic diseases. Abductor pollicis longus is one of the major stabilizing tendon of the carpometacarpal joint of thumb. To the best of our knowledge, swan neck thumb deformity owing to division of abductor pollicis longus tendon is rare. In this article, we describe a case of isolated division of abductor pollicis longus tendon presenting with swan-neck deformity of thumb and discuss the mechanism, management and outcome. The patient was treated by repair of the divided tendon using palmaris longus tendon graft. At approximately 107 weeks following treatment, the patient was having full range of thumb movement and the deformity completely disappeared. We also describe the unusual mechanism whereby an isolated division of abductor pollicis longus tendon results in swan neck thumb deformity. Level of clinical evidence IV. PMID:22825877

  9. Augmentation of tendon-to-bone healing.

    PubMed

    Atesok, Kivanc; Fu, Freddie H; Wolf, Megan R; Ochi, Mitsuo; Jazrawi, Laith M; Doral, M Nedim; Lubowitz, James H; Rodeo, Scott A

    2014-03-19

    Tendon-to-bone healing is vital to the ultimate success of the various surgical procedures performed to repair injured tendons. Achieving tendon-to-bone healing that is functionally and biologically similar to native anatomy can be challenging because of the limited regeneration capacity of the tendon-bone interface. Orthopaedic basic-science research strategies aiming to augment tendon-to-bone healing include the use of osteoinductive growth factors, platelet-rich plasma, gene therapy, enveloping the grafts with periosteum, osteoconductive materials, cell-based therapies, biodegradable scaffolds, and biomimetic patches. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound and extracorporeal shockwave treatment may affect tendon-to-bone healing by means of mechanical forces that stimulate biological cascades at the insertion site. Application of various loading methods and immobilization times influence the stress forces acting on the recently repaired tendon-to-bone attachment, which eventually may change the biological dynamics of the interface. Other approaches, such as the use of coated sutures and interference screws, aim to deliver biological factors while achieving mechanical stability by means of various fixators. Controlled Level-I human trials are required to confirm the promising results from in vitro or animal research studies elucidating the mechanisms underlying tendon-to-bone healing and to translate these results into clinical practice.

  10. Accessory bands of the hamstring tendons: A clinical anatomical study.

    PubMed

    Yasin, M N; Charalambous, C P; Mills, S P; Phaltankar, P M

    2010-10-01

    Gracilis and semitendinosus tendons are commonly used as grafts in ligamentous reconstruction. Awareness of accessory bands of these tendons is essential in preventing inadvertent diversion of the tendon harvester into the main tendon resulting in premature tendon amputation and inadequate tendon graft. The aim of this study was to describe the characteristics of these accessory bands. Twenty five patients undergoing arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using hamstring tendons were included. The number of accessory bands and distance of the most proximal band from the distal periosteal insertion point on the tibial crest was recorded for both gracilis and semitendinosus. In most cases gracilis had two accessory bands; the average distance of the most proximal band from the tibial crest insertion being 5.1 cm. Semitendinosus had three bands in most cases, the average distance of the most proximal band from the tibial crest insertion being 8.1 cm. Five (20%) semitendinosus but no gracilis tendons had an accessory band originating greater than 10 cm from the tibial crest insertion. Semitendinosus had more accessory bands compared to gracilis. A significant proportion (20%) of semitendinosus and none of the gracilis tendons had bands originating greater than 10 cm proximal to the tibial crest insertion. This knowledge about the accessory bands of the hamstrings can guide toward safe harvesting of these tendons.

  11. Musculoskeletal modelling deconstructs the paradoxical effects of elastic ankle exoskeletons on plantar-flexor mechanics and energetics during hopping

    PubMed Central

    Farris, Dominic James; Hicks, Jennifer L.; Delp, Scott L.; Sawicki, Gregory S.

    2014-01-01

    Experiments have shown that elastic ankle exoskeletons can be used to reduce ankle joint and plantar-flexor muscle loading when hopping in place and, in turn, reduce metabolic energy consumption. However, recent experimental work has shown that such exoskeletons cause less favourable soleus (SO) muscle–tendon mechanics than is observed during normal hopping, which might limit the capacity of the exoskeleton to reduce energy consumption. To directly link plantar-flexor mechanics and energy consumption when hopping in exoskeletons, we used a musculoskeletal model of the human leg and a model of muscle energetics in simulations of muscle–tendon dynamics during hopping with and without elastic ankle exoskeletons. Simulations were driven by experimental electromyograms, joint kinematics and exoskeleton torque taken from previously published data. The data were from seven males who hopped at 2.5 Hz with and without elastic ankle exoskeletons. The energetics model showed that the total rate of metabolic energy consumption by ankle muscles was not significantly reduced by an ankle exoskeleton. This was despite large reductions in plantar-flexor force production (40–50%). The lack of larger metabolic reductions with exoskeletons was attributed to increases in plantar-flexor muscle fibre velocities and a shift to less favourable muscle fibre lengths during active force production. This limited the capacity for plantar-flexors to reduce activation and energy consumption when hopping with exoskeleton assistance. PMID:25278469

  12. Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... when the posterior tibial tendon becomes inflamed or torn. As a result, the tendon may not be ... repetitive use. Once the tendon becomes inflamed or torn, the arch will slowly fall (collapse) over time. ...

  13. Achilles tendon repair

    MedlinePlus

    Achilles tendon rupture-surgery; Percutaneous Achilles tendon rupture repair ... To fix your torn Achilles tendon, the surgeon will: Make a cut down the back of your heel Make several small cuts rather than one large cut ...

  14. Achilles tendon rupture - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Heel cord tear; Calcaneal tendon rupture ... MRI scan to see what type of Achilles tendon tear you have. An MRI is a type ... partial tear means at least some of the tendon is still OK. A full tear means your ...

  15. Tendon latch

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, B. J.

    1985-01-01

    A latch connects tendons run from a floating platform to a socket in a foundation on the sea floor. The latch includes a latch body having a plurality of dogs disposed within and urgible outward from the latch body. A piston is releasably disposed within the latch body above the dogs and moves downwardly when released to urge the dogs outwardly from the body into latching engagement with the socket. A trigger mechanism in the latch releases the piston when the latch body lands in the socket and contacts a trigger pin projecting upwardly from the bottom of the socket. A series of wedges are disposed exteriorally on the body and inhibit lateral movement of the body relative to the socket when the tendon is subjected to a cycle bending loads.

  16. Pitfalls during biomechanical testing - Evaluation of different fixation methods for measuring tendons endurance properties.

    PubMed

    Hangody, Gy; Pánics, G; Szebényi, G; Kiss, R; Hangody, L; Pap, K

    2016-03-01

    The goal of the study was to find a proper technique to fix tendon grafts into an INSTRON loading machine. From 8 human cadavers, 40 grafts were collected. We removed the bone-patella tendon-bone grafts, the semitendinosus and gracilis tendons, the quadriceps tendon-bone grafts, the Achilles tendons, and the peroneus longus tendons from each lower extremity. We tested the tendon grafts with five different types of fixation devices: surgical thread (Premicron 3), general mounting clamp, wire mesh, cement fixation, and a modified clamp for an INSTRON loading machine. The mean failure load in case of surgical thread fixation was (381N ± 26N). The results with the general clamp were (527N ± 45N). The wire meshes were more promising (750N ± 21N), but did not reach the outcomes we desired. Easy slippages of the ends of the tendons from the cement encasements were observed (253N ± 18N). We then began to use Shi's clamp that could produce 977N ± 416N peak force. We combined Shi's clamp with freezing of the graft and the rupture of the tendon itself demonstrated an average force of 2198 N ± 773N. We determined that our modified frozen clamp fixed the specimens against high tensile forces.

  17. Myofascial force transmission between transferred rat flexor carpi ulnaris muscle and former synergistic palmaris longus muscle

    PubMed Central

    Maas, Huub; Huijing, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary We investigated the extent of mechanical interaction between rat flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) and palmaris longus (PL) muscles following transfer of FCU to the distal tendons of extensor carpi radialis brevis and longus (ECRB/L) muscles. Five weeks after recovery from surgery, isometric forces exerted at the distal tendons of FCU and PL were quantified at various FCU lengths. PL was kept at a constant length. Changing the muscle-tendon complex length of transferred FCU (by maximally 3.5 mm) decreased PL force significantly (by 7%). A linear relationship was found between changes in FCU muscle belly length, being a measure of muscle relative positions, and PL force. These results indicate that despite transfer of FCU muscle to the extensor side of the forearm, changing FCU length still affects force transmission of its, now, antagonistic PL muscle. We conclude that a transferred muscle may still be mechanically linked to its former synergistic muscles. PMID:23738260

  18. Finger Tendon Travel Associated with Sequential Trigger Nail Gun Use

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Brian; Albers, James; Hudock, Stephen; Krieg, Edward

    2015-01-01

    TECHNICAL ABSTRACT Background Pneumatic nail guns used in wood framing are equipped with one of two triggering mechanisms. Sequential actuation triggers have been shown to be a safer alternative to contact actuation triggers because they reduce traumatic injury risk. However, the sequential actuation trigger must be depressed for each individual nail fired as opposed to the contact actuation trigger, which allows the trigger to be held depressed as nails are fired repeatedly by bumping the safety tip against the workpiece. As such, concerns have been raised about risks for cumulative trauma injury, and reduced productivity, due to repetitive finger motion with the sequential actuation trigger. Purpose This study developed a method to predict cumulative finger flexor tendon travel associated with the sequential actuation trigger nail gun from finger joint kinematics measured in the trigger actuation and productivity standards for wood-frame construction tasks. Methods Finger motions were measured from six users wearing an instrumented electrogoniometer glove in a simulation of two common framing tasks–wall building and flat nailing of material. Flexor tendon travel was calculated from the ensemble average kinematics for an individual nail fired. Results Finger flexor tendon travel was attributable mostly to proximal interphalangeal and distal interphalangeal joint motion. Tendon travel per nail fired appeared to be slightly greater for a wall-building task than a flat nailing task. The present study data, in combination with construction industry productivity standards, suggest that a high-production workday would be associated with less than 60 m/day cumulative tendon travel per worker (based on 1700 trigger presses/day). Conclusion and Applications These results suggest that exposure to finger tendon travel from sequential actuation trigger nail gun use may be below levels that have been previously associated with high musculoskeletal disorder risk. PMID

  19. Muscle-tendon glucose uptake in Achilles tendon rupture and tendinopathy before and after eccentric rehabilitation: Comparative case reports.

    PubMed

    Masood, Tahir; Kalliokoski, Kari; Bojsen-Møller, Jens; Finni, Taija

    2016-09-01

    Achilles tendon rupture (ATR) is the most common tendon rupture injury. The consequences of ATR on metabolic activity of the Achilles tendon and ankle plantarflexors are unknown. Furthermore, the effects of eccentric rehabilitation on metabolic activity patterns of Achilles tendon and ankle plantarflexors in ATR patients have not been reported thus far. We present a case study demonstrating glucose uptake (GU) in the Achilles tendon, the triceps surae, and the flexor hallucis longus of a post-surgical ATR patient before and after a 5-month eccentric rehabilitation. At baseline, three months post-surgery, all muscles and Achilles tendon displayed much higher GU in the ATR patient compared to a healthy individual despite lower plantarflexion force. After the rehabilitation, plantarflexion force increased in the operated leg while muscle GU was considerably reduced. The triceps surae muscles showed similar values to the healthy control. When compared to the healthy or a matched patient with Achilles tendon pain after 12 weeks of rehabilitation, Achilles tendon GU levels of ATR patient remained greater after the rehabilitation. Past studies have shown a shift in the metabolic fuel utilization towards glycolysis due to immobilization. Further research, combined with immuno-histological investigation, is needed to fully understand the mechanism behind excessive glucose uptake in ATR cases. PMID:27428528

  20. Informing Stem Cell-Based Tendon Tissue Engineering Approaches with Embryonic Tendon Development.

    PubMed

    Okech, William; Kuo, Catherine K

    2016-01-01

    Adult tendons fail to regenerate normal tissue after injury, and instead form dysfunctional scar tissue with abnormal mechanical properties. Surgical repair with grafts is the current standard to treat injuries, but faces significant limitations including pain and high rates of re-injury. To address this, we aim to regenerate new, normal tendons to replace dysfunctional tendons. A common approach to tendon tissue engineering is to design scaffolds and bioreactors based on adult tendon properties that can direct adult stem cell tenogenesis. Despite significant progress, advances have been limited due, in part, to a need for markers and potent induction cues. Our goal is to develop novel tendon tissue engineering approaches informed by embryonic tendon development. We are characterizing structure-property relationships of embryonic tendon to identify design parameters for three-dimensional scaffolds and bioreactor mechanical loading systems to direct adult stem cell tenogenesis. We will review studies in which we quantified changes in the mechanical and biochemical properties of tendon during embryonic development and elucidated specific mechanisms of functional property elaboration. We then examined the effects of these mechanical and biochemical factors on embryonic tendon cell behavior. Using custom-designed bioreactors, we also examined the effects of dynamic mechanical loading and growth factor treatment on embryonic tendon cells. Our findings have established cues to induce tenogenesis as well as metrics to evaluate differentiation. We finish by discussing how we have evaluated the tenogenic differentiation potential of adult stem cells by comparing their responses to that of embryonic tendon cells in these culture systems.

  1. Tendon Transfers for the Hypoplastic Thumb.

    PubMed

    Wall, Lindley B; Goldfarb, Charles A

    2016-08-01

    Thumb hypoplasia is a component of radial longitudinal deficiency. The severity of hypoplasia can range from a slightly smaller thumb to a complete absence. Types II and IIIA hypoplastic thumbs are candidates for reconstruction to improve function, stability, and strength. There are 2 commonly used tendon transfers that can augment thumb opposition strength: the Huber abductor digiti minimi muscle transfer and the flexor digitorum superficialis opposition transfer. Both transfers use ulnar-sided structures to augment the thenar musculature. The Huber opposition transfer increases thenar bulk, but does not provide additional tissue for metacarpophalangeal stability. PMID:27387085

  2. Adhesive bacterial colonization of exposed traumatized tendon.

    PubMed

    Webb, L X; Hobgood, C D; Meredith, J W; Gristina, A G

    1987-05-01

    Recent studies of compromised or damaged tissues, as well as biomaterials, have shown that they provide a particularly fertile substratum for bacterial colonization. Colonization in these environments is mediated by a process of microbial adhesion to surfaces of the substrata. In this report, we present electron microscopic studies of a portion of damaged and infected tendon. These studies demonstrate colonies of bacteria surrounded by a ruthenium red-staining exopolysaccharide biofilm and adhesion to the surface of the tendon by means of an exopolysaccharide polymer. We suggest that this adhesive form of bacterial colonization may partially explain the resistance of exposed tendon to effective debridement by simple mechanical measures and to coverage with granulation tissue, partial-thickness skin grafts, and vascularized tissue grafts.

  3. Local full-thickness skin graft of the donor arm--a novel technique for the reduction of donor site morbidity in radial forearm free flap.

    PubMed

    Riecke, B; Assaf, A T; Heiland, M; Al-Dam, A; Gröbe, A; Blessmann, M; Wikner, J

    2015-08-01

    A novel technique to reduce donor site morbidity after radial forearm free flap (RFFF) harvest, using a local full-thickness skin graft (FTSG), is described. Thirty consecutive patients undergoing RFFF for head and neck reconstruction were enrolled in a prospective study. Donor site defect closure was performed with spindle-shaped FTSGs excised from the wavelike skin incision made for the vascular pedicle. Both the removal site of the FTSG on the volar forearm and the covered RFFF donor site healed uneventfully in 29 cases, with no impairment of function related to the skin graft. No skin graft failure and no exposure, tenting, or adherence of the flexor tendons occurred. All patients expressed satisfaction with postoperative pain, the functional outcome, and cosmetic appearance. Primary donor site defect closure could be achieved in all cases with the use of a local FTSG. This graft can be gained at the access incision for the vascular pedicle, avoids expansion of the incision for a local flap technique, and does not prolong wound healing, and thus reduces both donor site and graft site morbidity of the RFFF. This technique leads to an inconspicuous aesthetic result with no apparent relevant functional deficits and avoids the need for a second donor site.

  4. Are the knee and ankle angles at contact related to the tendon properties of lower limbs in long distance runners?

    PubMed

    Kubo, Keitaro; Miyazaki, Daisuke; Yamada, Kenji; Shimoju, Shozo; Tsunoda, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the knee and ankle angles at contact during running were related to the elastic properties of tendon structures in knee extensors and plantar flexors and performance in trained long distance runners. Thirty-two highly trained male long distance runners participated in this study. Elongation of tendon structures in knee extensors and plantar flexors were measured using ultrasonography while subjects performed ramp isometric contractions up to the voluntary maximum. The relationship between estimated muscle force and tendon elongation was fit to a linear regression, the slope of which was defined as the stiffness of tendon structures. Knee and ankle angles at contact during running were determined at a speed of 18 km/h on a treadmill. Knee and ankle angles at contact were not correlated to the stiffness of tendon structures in knee extensors and plantar flexors. In addition, the best official record in a 5000-m race was not significantly correlated to knee and ankle joint angles at contact. In conclusion, knee and ankle angles at contact were not related to the elastic properties of tendon structures in knee extensors and plantar flexor and the performance of long distance running.

  5. Biomimetic scaffold design for functional and integrative tendon repair.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinzhi; Bogdanowicz, Danielle; Erisken, Cevat; Lee, Nancy M; Lu, Helen H

    2012-02-01

    Rotator cuff tears represent the most common shoulder injuries in the United States. The debilitating effect of this degenerative condition coupled with the high incidence of failure associated with existing graft choices underscores the clinical need for alternative grafting solutions. The 2 critical design criteria for the ideal tendon graft would require the graft to not only exhibit physiologically relevant mechanical properties but also be able to facilitate functional graft integration by promoting the regeneration of the native tendon-to-bone interface. Centered on these design goals, this review will highlight current approaches to functional and integrative tendon repair. In particular, the application of biomimetic design principles through the use of nanofiber- and nanocomposite-based scaffolds for tendon tissue engineering will be discussed. This review will begin with nanofiber-based approaches to functional tendon repair, followed by a section highlighting the exciting research on tendon-to-bone interface regeneration, with an emphasis on implementation of strategic biomimicry in nanofiber scaffold design and the concomitant formation of graded multi-tissue systems for integrative soft-tissue repair. This review will conclude with a summary and discussion of future directions.

  6. The musculoskeletal loading profile of the thumb during pipetting based on tendon displacement

    PubMed Central

    Wu, John Z.; Sinsel, Erik W.; Shroyer, Justin F.; Welcome, Daniel E.; Zhao, Kristin D.; An, Kai-Nan; Buczek, Frank L.

    2016-01-01

    Strong evidence indicates that highly repetitive manual work is associated with the development of upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). One of the occupational activities that involves highly repetitive and forceful hand work is manual pipetting in chemical or biological laboratories. In the current study, we quantified tendon displacement as a parameter to assess the cumulative loading exposure of the musculoskeletal system in the thumb during pipetting. The maximal tendon displacement was found in the flexor pollicis longus (FPL) tendon. Assuming that subjects’ pipetting rates were maintained constant during a period of 1 h, the average accumulated tendon displacement in the FPL reached 29 m, which is in the lower range of those observed in other occupational activities, such as typing and nail gun operations. Our results showed that tendon displacement data contain relatively small standard deviations, despite high variances in thumb kinematics, suggesting that the tendon displacements may be useful in evaluating the musculoskeletal loading profile. PMID:24018066

  7. Prevalence and influence of tibial tunnel widening after isolated anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using patella-bone-tendon-bone-graft: long-term follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Struewer, Johannes; Efe, Turgay; Frangen, Thomas Manfred; Schwarting, Tim; Buecking, Benjamin; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Schüttler, Karl Friedrich; Ziring, Ewgeni

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate incidence, degree and impact of tibial tunnel widening (TW) on patient-reported long-term clinical outcome, knee joint stability and prevalence of osteoarthritis (OA) after isolated anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. On average, 13.5 years after ACL reconstruction via patella-bone-tendon-bone autograft, 73 patients have been re-evaluated. Inclusion criteria consisted of an isolated anterior cruciate ligament rupture and reconstruction, a minimum of 10-year follow-up and no previous anterior cruciate ligament repair or associated intra-articular lesions. Clinical evaluation was performed via the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score and the Tegner and Lysholm scores. Instrumental anterior laxity testing was carried out with the KT-1000™ arthrometer. The degree of degenerative changes and the prevalence of osteoarthritis were assessed with the Kellgren-Lawrence score. Tibial tunnel enlargement was radiographically evaluated on both antero-posterior and lateral views under establishment of 4 degrees of tibial tunnel widening by measuring the actual tunnel diameters in mm on the sclerotic margins of the inserted tunnels on 3 different points (T1–T3). Afterwards, a conversion of the absolute values in mm into a 4 staged ratio, based on the comparison to the results of the initial drill-width, should provide a better quantification and statistical analysis. Evaluation was performed postoperatively as well as on 2 year follow-up and 13 years after ACL reconstruction. Minimum follow-up was 10 years. 75% of patients were graded A or B according to IKDC score. The mean Lysholm score was 90.2±4.8 (25–100). Radiological assessment on long-term follow-up showed in 45% a grade I, in 24% a grade II, in 17% a grade III and in additional 12% a grade IV enlargement of the tibial tunnel. No evident progression of TW was found in comparison to the 2 year results. Radiological evaluation revealed

  8. Biomechanical responses of different rat tendons to nandrolone decanoate and load exercise.

    PubMed

    Marqueti, R C; Prestes, J; Wang, C C; Ramos, O H P; Perez, S E A; Nakagaki, W R; Carvalho, H F; Selistre-de-Araujo, H S

    2011-12-01

    Androgenic-anabolic steroids (AAS) have been associated with an increased incidence of tendon rupture. The aim of this study was to compare the biomechanical properties of the rat calcaneal tendon (CT), superficial flexor tendon (SFT), and deep flexor tendon (DFT), and to determine the effect of jump training in association with AAS. Animals were separated into four groups: sedentary, trained, AAS-treated sedentary rats (AAS), and AAS-treated and trained animals. Mechanical testing showed that the CT differed from the DFT and SFT, which showed similar mechanical properties. Jump caused the CT to exhibit an extended toe region, an increased resistance to tensional load, and a decreased elastic modulus, characteristics of an elastic tendon capable of storing energy. AAS caused the tendons to be less compliant, and the effects were reinforced by simultaneous training. The DFT was the most affected by training, AAS, and the interaction of both, likely because of its involvement in the toe-off step of jumping, which we suggest is related to the rapid transmission of force as opposed to energy storage. In conclusion, tendons are differently adapted to exercise, but responded equally to AAS, showing reduced flexibility, which is suggested to increase the risk of tendon rupture in AAS consumers.

  9. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Graft Choices: A Review of Current Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Dheerendra, Sujay K; Khan, Wasim S; Singhal, Rohit; Shivarathre, Deepak G; Pydisetty, Ravi; Johnstone, David

    2012-01-01

    The graft choice for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction continues to be controversial. There are several options available for the treating surgeon, including Bone Patellar Tendon Bone (BPTB) grafts, Hamstring tendon (HT) grafts, allografts and synthetic grafts. Within the last decade there have been several comparative trials and meta-analysis, which have failed to provide an answer with regards to the best graft available. The aim of this review is to understand the current concepts in graft choices for ACL reconstruction. PMID:22888379

  10. Influence of autograft removal on rabbit patellar tendon length.

    PubMed

    Monllau, J C; Hinarejos, P; Alvarez, P; Alameda, F; Ballester, J

    2004-02-01

    Twelve adult New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into two groups. In group 1, 30% of the central mass of the right patellar tendon was removed. In group 2, 60% was removed. The left knees served as controls. The animals were killed 1 year later. The patella-patellar tendon-tibial tuberosity units of all knees were studied using histological and morphometric analysis. In both groups, the tendons had lengthened. Lengthening average was 2.50 mm in group 1 and 8.17 mm in group 2. In both groups, histology revealed poor alignment of the collagen fibres and high cellularity, although the findings in group 1 were nearer the normal histological pattern. The results suggest that removal of significant portions of the patellar tendon leads to lengthening of the resulting tendon. In clinical practice, it seems prudent to pay attention to the dimensions of the patellar tendon when harvesting a graft.

  11. Insulin-like growth factor-I improves cellular and molecular aspects of healing in a collagenase-induced model of flexor tendinitis.

    PubMed

    Dahlgren, Linda A; van der Meulen, Marjolein C H; Bertram, John E A; Starrak, Greg S; Nixon, Alan J

    2002-09-01

    Flexor tendinitis is a common and debilitating injury of elite and recreational athletes. Healing may be improved through intratendinous injection of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), which has been shown in vitro to stimulate mitogenesis and enhance tendon matrix production. This study investigated the effects of intratendinous injection of IGF-I on tendon healing in an equine model of flexor tendinitis. Collagenase-induced lesions were created in the tensile region of theflexor digitorum superficialis tendon of both forelimbs of eight horses. Treated tendons were injected with 2 microg rhlGF-I intralesionally every other day for 10 injections, while controls received 0.9% NaCl. Tendon fiber deposition and organization were evaluated serially using ultrasonography throughout the 8 week trial period. Following euthanasia, the tendons were harvested and DNA, hydroxyproline, and glycosaminoglycan content determined, mechanical strength and stiffness evaluated, gene expression and spatial arrangement of collagen types I and III assessed by northern blot and in situ hybridization, and tendon fiber architecture assessed by polarized light microscopy. Local soft tissue swelling was reduced in the IGF-I treated limbs. Similarly, lesion size in IGF-I treated tendons was smaller 3 and 4 weeks after initiation of treatment. Cell proliferation and collagen content of the IGF-I treated tendons were increased compared to controls. Mechanically, IGF-I treated tendons showed a trend toward increased stiffness compared to saline treated controls. Considered together with the decreased soft tissue swelling and improved sonographic healing, these data support the potential use of intralesional IGF-I for treatment of debilitating tendon injuries.

  12. Partial tendon tear as unusual cause of trigger finger: a case report.

    PubMed

    Calderaro, Cosma; Guzzini, Matteo; Pagnottelli, Marco; Fabbri, Mattia; Perugia, Dario

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of post-traumatic trigger finger due to a partial longitudinal tear of the flexor digitorum superficialis. The suspect came from the clinical history and the young age of the patient. It was successfully treated with tendon flap suture and pulley A1 release. PMID:27583273

  13. Partial tendon tear as unusual cause of trigger finger: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Calderaro, Cosma; Guzzini, Matteo; Pagnottelli, Marco; Fabbri, Mattia; Perugia, Dario

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We report a case of post-traumatic trigger finger due to a partial longitudinal tear of the flexor digitorum superficialis. The suspect came from the clinical history and the young age of the patient. It was successfully treated with tendon flap suture and pulley A1 release. PMID:27583273

  14. Targeted deletion of collagen V in tendons and ligaments results in a classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome joint phenotype.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mei; Connizzo, Brianne K; Adams, Sheila M; Freedman, Benjamin R; Wenstrup, Richard J; Soslowsky, Louis J; Birk, David E

    2015-05-01

    Collagen V mutations underlie classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and joint hypermobility is an important clinical manifestation. We define the function of collagen V in tendons and ligaments, as well as the role of alterations in collagen V expression in the pathobiology in classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. A conditional Col5a1(flox/flox) mouse model was bred with Scleraxis-Cre mice to create a targeted tendon and ligament Col5a1-null mouse model, Col5a1(Δten/Δten). Targeting was specific, resulting in collagen V-null tendons and ligaments. Col5a1(Δten/Δten) mice demonstrated decreased body size, grip weakness, abnormal gait, joint laxity, and early-onset osteoarthritis. These gross changes were associated with abnormal fiber organization, as well as altered collagen fibril structure with increased fibril diameters and decreased fibril number that was more severe in a major joint stabilizing ligament, the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), than in the flexor digitorum longus tendon. The ACL also had a higher collagen V content than did the flexor digitorum longus tendon. The collagen V-null ACL and flexor digitorum longus tendon both had significant alterations in mechanical properties, with ACL exhibiting more severe changes. The data demonstrate critical differential regulatory roles for collagen V in tendon and ligament structure and function and suggest that collagen V regulatory dysfunction is associated with an abnormal joint phenotype, similar to the hypermobility phenotype in classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

  15. Targeted deletion of collagen V in tendons and ligaments results in a classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome joint phenotype.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mei; Connizzo, Brianne K; Adams, Sheila M; Freedman, Benjamin R; Wenstrup, Richard J; Soslowsky, Louis J; Birk, David E

    2015-05-01

    Collagen V mutations underlie classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and joint hypermobility is an important clinical manifestation. We define the function of collagen V in tendons and ligaments, as well as the role of alterations in collagen V expression in the pathobiology in classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. A conditional Col5a1(flox/flox) mouse model was bred with Scleraxis-Cre mice to create a targeted tendon and ligament Col5a1-null mouse model, Col5a1(Δten/Δten). Targeting was specific, resulting in collagen V-null tendons and ligaments. Col5a1(Δten/Δten) mice demonstrated decreased body size, grip weakness, abnormal gait, joint laxity, and early-onset osteoarthritis. These gross changes were associated with abnormal fiber organization, as well as altered collagen fibril structure with increased fibril diameters and decreased fibril number that was more severe in a major joint stabilizing ligament, the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), than in the flexor digitorum longus tendon. The ACL also had a higher collagen V content than did the flexor digitorum longus tendon. The collagen V-null ACL and flexor digitorum longus tendon both had significant alterations in mechanical properties, with ACL exhibiting more severe changes. The data demonstrate critical differential regulatory roles for collagen V in tendon and ligament structure and function and suggest that collagen V regulatory dysfunction is associated with an abnormal joint phenotype, similar to the hypermobility phenotype in classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. PMID:25797646

  16. Decellularized and Engineered Tendons as Biological Substitutes: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Lovati, Arianna B.; Bottagisio, Marta; Moretti, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Tendon ruptures are a great burden in clinics. Finding a proper graft material as a substitute for tendon repair is one of the main challenges in orthopaedics, for which the requirement of a biological scaffold would be different for each clinical application. Among biological scaffolds, the use of decellularized tendon-derived matrix increasingly represents an interesting approach to treat tendon ruptures. We analyzed in vitro and in vivo studies focused on the development of efficient protocols for the decellularization and for the cell reseeding of the tendon matrix to obtain medical devices for tendon substitution. Our review considered also the proper tendon source and preclinical animal models with the aim of entering into clinical trials. The results highlight a wide panorama in terms of allogenic or xenogeneic tendon sources, specimen dimensions, physical or chemical decellularization techniques, and the cell type variety for reseeding from terminally differentiated to undifferentiated mesenchymal stem cells and their static or dynamic culture employed to generate implantable constructs tested in different animal models. We try to identify the most efficient approach to achieve an optimal biological scaffold for biomechanics and intrinsic properties, resembling the native tendon and being applicable in clinics in the near future, with particular attention to the Achilles tendon substitution. PMID:26880985

  17. Effect of cyclic strain on tensile properties of a naturally derived, decellularized tendon scaffold seeded with allogeneic tenocytes and associated messenger RNA expression.

    PubMed

    Whitlock, Patrick W; Seyler, Thorsten M; Northam, Casey N; Smith, Thomas L; Poehling, Gary G; Koman, L Andrew; Van Dyke, Mark E

    2013-01-01

    Naturally derived tendon scaffolds have the potential to improve the treatment of flexor tendon injuries. Seeded and unseeded tendon scaffolds were maintained in the presence or absence of physiologic strain for 7 days. After 7 days, the tensile properties and associated messenger RNA expression were compared. Seeded scaffolds maintained in the absence of strain had significantly lower tensile properties than unseeded tendons and fresh-frozen tendons. The loss of tensile properties was associated with elevated matrix metalloproteinase-2 and collagen III expression. Tensile properties of seeded scaffolds maintained in the presence of strain for 7 days after seeding did not differ from those of fresh-frozen tendons. This study demonstrates that the tensile properties of seeded, naturally derived tendon scaffolds will degrade rapidly in the absence of cyclic strain. Seeded scaffolds used for tendon reconstruction should be maintained under cyclic strain to maintain essential tensile properties.

  18. The Effect of Lubricin on the Gliding Resistance of Mouse Intrasynovial Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Masanori; Zhao, Chunfeng; Thoreson, Andrew R.; Chikenji, Takako; Jay, Gregory D.; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of lubricin on the gliding resistance of intrasynovial tendons by comparing lubricin knockout, heterozygous, and wild type mice. A total of thirty-six deep digital flexor (DDF) tendons in the third digits of each hind paw from eighteen adult mice were used, including six lubricin knockout mice (Prg4 –/–), six heterozygous mice (Prg4 +/–), and six wild type mice (Prg4 +/+). The tendon gliding resistance was measured using a custom-made device. Tendon structural changes were evaluated by scanning electron and light microscopy. The gliding resistance of intrasynovial tendons from lubricin knockout mice was significantly higher than the gliding resistance of either wild type or heterozygous mice. The surface of the lubricin knockout tendons appeared to be rougher, compared to the wild type and heterozygous tendons. Synovial hyperplasia was found in the lubricin knockout mice. Cartilage-like tissue was found in the tendon and pulley of the lubricin knockout mice. Our findings confirm the importance of lubricin in intrasynovial tendon lubrication. This knockout model may be useful in determining the effect of lubricin on tendon healing and the response to injury. PMID:24349551

  19. The effect of lubricin on the gliding resistance of mouse intrasynovial tendon.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Masanori; Zhao, Chunfeng; Thoreson, Andrew R; Chikenji, Takako; Jay, Gregory D; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of lubricin on the gliding resistance of intrasynovial tendons by comparing lubricin knockout, heterozygous, and wild type mice. A total of thirty-six deep digital flexor (DDF) tendons in the third digits of each hind paw from eighteen adult mice were used, including six lubricin knockout mice (Prg4 -/-), six heterozygous mice (Prg4 +/-), and six wild type mice (Prg4 +/+). The tendon gliding resistance was measured using a custom-made device. Tendon structural changes were evaluated by scanning electron and light microscopy. The gliding resistance of intrasynovial tendons from lubricin knockout mice was significantly higher than the gliding resistance of either wild type or heterozygous mice. The surface of the lubricin knockout tendons appeared to be rougher, compared to the wild type and heterozygous tendons. Synovial hyperplasia was found in the lubricin knockout mice. Cartilage-like tissue was found in the tendon and pulley of the lubricin knockout mice. Our findings confirm the importance of lubricin in intrasynovial tendon lubrication. This knockout model may be useful in determining the effect of lubricin on tendon healing and the response to injury.

  20. Laminar Tendon Composites with Enhanced Mechanical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Alberti, Kyle A.; Sun, Jeong-Yun; Illeperuma, Widusha R.; Suo, Zhigang; Xu, Qiaobing

    2015-01-01

    Purpose A strong isotropic material that is both biocompatible and biodegradable is desired for many biomedical applications, including rotator cuff repair, tendon and ligament repair, vascular grafting, among others. Recently, we developed a technique, called “bioskiving” to create novel 2D and 3D constructs from decellularized tendon, using a combination of mechanical sectioning, and layered stacking and rolling. The unidirectionally aligned collagen nanofibers (derived from sections of decellularized tendon) offer good mechanical properties to the constructs compared with those fabricated from reconstituted collagen. Methods In this paper, we studied the effect that several variables have on the mechanical properties of structures fabricated from tendon slices, including crosslinking density and the orientation in which the fibers are stacked. Results We observed that following stacking and crosslinking, the strength of the constructs is significantly improved, with crosslinked sections having an ultimate tens ile strength over 20 times greater than non-crosslinked samples, and a modulus nearly 50 times higher. The mechanism of the mechanical failure mode of the tendon constructs with or without crosslinking was also investigated. Conclusions The strength and fiber organization, combined with the ability to introduce transversely isotropic mechanical properties makes the laminar tendon composites a biocompatiable material that may find future use in a number of biomedical and tissue engineering applications. PMID:25691802

  1. Helical sub-structures in energy-storing tendons provide a possible mechanism for efficient energy storage and return.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Chavaunne T; Klemt, Christian; Riley, Graham P; Birch, Helen L; Clegg, Peter D; Screen, Hazel R C

    2013-08-01

    The predominant function of tendons is to position the limb during locomotion. Specific tendons also act as energy stores. Energy-storing (ES) tendons are prone to injury, the incidence of which increases with age. This is likely related to their function; ES tendons are exposed to higher strains and require a greater ability to recoil than positional tendons. The specialized properties of ES tendons are thought to be achieved through structural and compositional differences. However, little is known about structure-function relationships in tendons. This study uses fascicles from the equine superficial digital flexor (SDFT) and common digital extensor (CDET) as examples of ES and positional tendons. We hypothesized that extension and recoil behaviour at the micro-level would differ between tendon types, and would alter with age in the injury-prone SDFT. Supporting this, the results show that extension in the CDET is dominated by fibre sliding. By contrast, greater rotation was observed in the SDFT, suggesting a helical component to fascicles in this tendon. This was accompanied by greater recovery and less hysteresis loss in SDFT samples. In samples from aged SDFTs, the amount of rotation and the ability to recover decreased, while hysteresis loss increased. These findings indicate that fascicles in the ES SDFT may have a helical structure, enabling the more efficient recoil observed. Further, the helix structure appears to alter with ageing; this coincides with a reduction in the ability of SDFT fascicles to recoil. This may affect tendon fatigue resistance and predispose aged tendons to injury.

  2. The 5-Strand Hamstring Graft in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Rushyuan Jay; Ganley, Theodore J.

    2014-01-01

    The use of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in the pediatric and adolescent population has been increasing in recent years. Autograft hamstring graft is favored in this population, but these patients often have smaller hamstring tendons that yield smaller final graft constructs. These smaller grafts are associated with an increased need for revision surgery. We describe a technique for obtaining a larger-diameter anterior cruciate ligament graft construct from autologous hamstring graft without allograft supplementation. PMID:25473619

  3. Injury induces a change in the functional characteristics of cells recovered from equine tendon.

    PubMed

    Kihara, Rina; Kasashima, Yoshinori; Arai, Katsuhiko; Miyamoto, Yasunori

    2011-01-01

    Injury initiates a repair process characterized by influx of fibroblasts and the rapid formation of fibrous scar tissue and subsequent tissue contraction. The response to injury and behavior of the different tendon fibroblast populations, however, has been poorly characterized. We hypothesized that the fibroblasts recovered from tendon with acute injury would exhibit different cell properties relating to adhesion, migration and tensegrity. To test this hypothesis we evaluated the ability of fibroblasts recovered from normal and injured equine superficial digital flexor tendons (SDFTs). The injured tendon-derived cells showed greater contraction of the collagen gel but poorer adhesion to pepsin-digested collagen, and migration over extracellular matrix proteins compared to normal SDFT-derived fibroblasts. Thus, the cells present within the tendon after injury display different behavior related to wound healing. PMID:24833988

  4. The modified bone-patellar tendon-bone allograft in single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kang, Huijun; Wang, Fei

    2011-06-01

    Bone-patellar tendon-bone graft has been an attractive option for single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in clinical practice. However, the graft-tunnel mismatch in the proximal part of the tibial tunnel and the ultimate strength after postoperative ligamentization process have been potential problems for the traditional 10-mm wide graft. We modified the traditional bone-patellar tendon-bone allograft to make it double-layer, as an ideal substitute graft for single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with better graft-tunnel match and higher initial graft strength.

  5. Transverse Compression of Tendons.

    PubMed

    Salisbury, S T Samuel; Buckley, C Paul; Zavatsky, Amy B

    2016-04-01

    A study was made of the deformation of tendons when compressed transverse to the fiber-aligned axis. Bovine digital extensor tendons were compression tested between flat rigid plates. The methods included: in situ image-based measurement of tendon cross-sectional shapes, after preconditioning but immediately prior to testing; multiple constant-load creep/recovery tests applied to each tendon at increasing loads; and measurements of the resulting tendon displacements in both transverse directions. In these tests, friction resisted axial stretch of the tendon during compression, giving approximately plane-strain conditions. This, together with the assumption of a form of anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive model proposed previously for tendon, justified modeling the isochronal response of tendon as that of an isotropic, slightly compressible, neo-Hookean solid. Inverse analysis, using finite-element (FE) simulations of the experiments and 10 s isochronal creep displacement data, gave values for Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of this solid of 0.31 MPa and 0.49, respectively, for an idealized tendon shape and averaged data for all the tendons and E = 0.14 and 0.10 MPa for two specific tendons using their actual measured geometry. The compression load versus displacement curves, as measured and as simulated, showed varying degrees of stiffening with increasing load. This can be attributed mostly to geometrical changes in tendon cross section under load, varying according to the initial 3D shape of the tendon. PMID:26833218

  6. Transverse Compression of Tendons.

    PubMed

    Salisbury, S T Samuel; Buckley, C Paul; Zavatsky, Amy B

    2016-04-01

    A study was made of the deformation of tendons when compressed transverse to the fiber-aligned axis. Bovine digital extensor tendons were compression tested between flat rigid plates. The methods included: in situ image-based measurement of tendon cross-sectional shapes, after preconditioning but immediately prior to testing; multiple constant-load creep/recovery tests applied to each tendon at increasing loads; and measurements of the resulting tendon displacements in both transverse directions. In these tests, friction resisted axial stretch of the tendon during compression, giving approximately plane-strain conditions. This, together with the assumption of a form of anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive model proposed previously for tendon, justified modeling the isochronal response of tendon as that of an isotropic, slightly compressible, neo-Hookean solid. Inverse analysis, using finite-element (FE) simulations of the experiments and 10 s isochronal creep displacement data, gave values for Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of this solid of 0.31 MPa and 0.49, respectively, for an idealized tendon shape and averaged data for all the tendons and E = 0.14 and 0.10 MPa for two specific tendons using their actual measured geometry. The compression load versus displacement curves, as measured and as simulated, showed varying degrees of stiffening with increasing load. This can be attributed mostly to geometrical changes in tendon cross section under load, varying according to the initial 3D shape of the tendon.

  7. Aging contributes to inflammation in upper extremity tendons and declines in forelimb agility in a rat model of upper extremity overuse.

    PubMed

    Kietrys, David M; Barr-Gillespie, Ann E; Amin, Mamta; Wade, Christine K; Popoff, Steve N; Barbe, Mary F

    2012-01-01

    We sought to determine if tendon inflammatory and histopathological responses increase in aged rats compared to young rats performing a voluntary upper extremity repetitive task, and if these changes are associated with motor declines. Ninety-six female Sprague-Dawley rats were used in the rat model of upper extremity overuse: 67 aged and 29 young adult rats. After a training period of 4 weeks, task rats performed a voluntary high repetition low force (HRLF) handle-pulling task for 2 hrs/day, 3 days/wk for up to 12 weeks. Upper extremity motor function was assessed, as were inflammatory and histomorphological changes in flexor digitorum and supraspinatus tendons. The percentage of successful reaches improved in young adult HRLF rats, but not in aged HRLF rats. Forelimb agility decreased transiently in young adult HRLF rats, but persistently in aged HRLF rats. HRLF task performance for 12 weeks lead to increased IL-1beta and IL-6 in flexor digitorum tendons of aged HRLF rats, compared to aged normal control (NC) as well as young adult HRLF rats. In contrast, TNF-alpha increased more in flexor digitorum tendons of young adult 12-week HRLF rats than in aged HRLF rats. Vascularity and collagen fibril organization were not affected by task performance in flexor digitorum tendons of either age group, although cellularity increased in both. By week 12 of HRLF task performance, vascularity and cellularity increased in the supraspinatus tendons of only aged rats. The increased cellularity was due to increased macrophages and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF)-immunoreactive fibroblasts in the peritendon. In conclusion, aged rat tendons were overall more affected by the HRLF task than young adult tendons, particularly supraspinatus tendons. Greater inflammatory changes in aged HRLF rat tendons were observed, increases associated temporally with decreased forelimb agility and lack of improvement in task success.

  8. Biology and augmentation of tendon-bone insertion repair

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Surgical reattachment of tendon and bone such as in rotator cuff repair, patellar-patella tendon repair and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction often fails due to the failure of regeneration of the specialized tissue ("enthesis") which connects tendon to bone. Tendon-to-bone healing taking place between inhomogenous tissues is a slow process compared to healing within homogenous tissue, such as tendon to tendon or bone to bone healing. Therefore special attention must be paid to augment tendon to bone insertion (TBI) healing. Apart from surgical fixation, biological and biophysical interventions have been studied aiming at regeneration of TBI healing complex, especially the regeneration of interpositioned fibrocartilage and new bone at the healing junction. This paper described the biology and the factors influencing TBI healing using patella-patellar tendon (PPT) healing and tendon graft to bone tunnel healing in ACL reconstruction as examples. Recent development in the improvement of TBI healing and directions for future studies were also reviewed and discussed. PMID:20727196

  9. Computed tomography-guided bupivacaine and corticosteroid injection for the treatment of symptomatic calcification in the great toe tendon

    PubMed Central

    Karatoprak, Omer; Karaca, Sinan; Erdem, Mehmet Nuri; Karaman, Ozgur; Hamzaoglu, Azmi

    2014-01-01

    Background Calcification in the great toe tendon is a rare disorder that is characterized by the deposition of calcium on degenerative collagen fibrils. Case presentations In this report, we present two cases of calcific tendonitis: one in the adductor hallucis and the other in the flexor hallucis longus tendon. We preferred computed tomography-guided steroid injection in our cases because of pain unresponsive to conservative treatment. Patients were free of symptoms at the follow-up visit, 4 weeks after injection. Conclusion Calcification of the hallux tendons is a rare disorder. Treatment of tendonitis consists of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Local anesthetic and steroid injection may be considered in cases unresponsive to conservative treatment. Because of the anatomic location of tendons, injection could be difficult. Computed tomography guidance may improve the success rate of injections. PMID:24872721

  10. Achilles tendon: US examination

    SciTech Connect

    Fornage, B.D.

    1986-06-01

    Real-time ultrasonography (US) using linear-array probes and a stand-off pad as a ''waterpath'' was performed to evaluate the Achilles tendon in 67 patients (including 24 athletes) believed to have acute or chronic traumatic or inflammatory pathologic conditions. Tendons in 23 patients appeared normal on US scans. The 44 abnormal tendons comprised five complete and four partial ruptures, seven instances of postoperative change, and 28 cases of tendonitis. US depiction of the inner structure of the tendon resulted in the diagnosis of focal abnormalities, including partial ruptures, nodules, and calcifications. Tendonitis was characterized by enlargement and decreased echogenicity of the tendon. The normal US appearance of the Achilles tendon is described.

  11. Outcome following addition of peroneus brevis tendon transfer to treatment of acquired posterior tibial tendon insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Song, S J; Deland, J T

    2001-04-01

    The flexor digitorum longus, the tendon most often used for transfer in posterior tibial tendon insufficiency, is one-half to one-third the size of the posterior tibial tendon. Occasionally it may be particularly small or may have been previously used for transfer. In these cases, the senior author has felt that the addition of a transfer of the Peroneus Brevis (PBr) tendon may be helpful in maintaining sufficient tendon and muscle mass to rebalance the foot. Thirteen patients who underwent this procedure were retrospectively identified and matched by age and length of follow-up to patients who underwent a more standard tendon transfer operation minus the addition of the PBr transfer. Pain and functional status were then assessed by the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society's ankle/hindfoot rating scale. Each patient was tested by an independent physical therapist to evaluate inversion and eversion strength. The mean duration of follow-up was 20.6 months (12 to 34 months). The average AOFAS score of the PBr group was 75.8 compared to 71.5 for the standard control group. There was no significant difference between the groups when inversion or eversion strengths were compared. Inversion strength and eversion strength was rated good or excellent (4 or 5) in 12 out of 13 of the PBr transfer group patients. No major complications were encountered in either group. Although it does not increase inversion strength, a PBr transfer can be used to augment a small FDL without causing significant eversion weakness. This can be useful when the FDL is particularly small or in revision surgery. PMID:11354442

  12. [The ACL tear from the pre-operative analysis to a 2-year follow-up, influence of the graft choice on the subjective and objective evaluation].

    PubMed

    Dejour, D; Potel, J-F; Gaudot, F; Panisset, J-C; Condouret, J

    2008-12-01

    This study is a synthesis of three series. The first study was prospective on 418 patients with an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear (group I). Two population of ACL ruptures were identified. One population with a postero-lateral bundle preserved in 16%, the mean medial anterior tibial translation side to side was 4.97 mm, the Lachman test was delayed in 40% with no or glide pivot shift in 73%. The second population with a complete ACL tear had a mean medial anterior tibial translation side to side of 7.93 mm, the Lachman test was soft in 98% with gross pivot shift in 80%. The second study was a retrospective study on 258 patients (group II) at 26 months follow-up, it correlated the impact of the type of graft on the clinical objective and subjective results. Twenty-eight percent had anterior knee pain, 33% for the patellar tendon and 25% for the hamstrings, the subjective IKDC was significantly lower for the painful knees, and 68% of the patellar tendon had a hypoesthesia and only 32% for the hamstrings. The ability to walk on the knee was 68% for the hamstrings and 35% for the patellar tendon. The third study was retrospective on 127 patients, 24 months after ACL reconstruction (group III), all were tested on a isokinetic machine for the extensor, the flexor and the internal rotator. In the total population, a 10% extensor and flexor deficit and a 5% rotator deficit was noted. A significant difference between patellar tendon and hamstrings in terms of muscular recovery was found. It pointed out that a more specific rehabilitation should be done on the hamstring group. The muscular recovery was correlated to the highest subjective score. This study allowed the surgeon to be more specific in the ACL tear definition, to adapt the graft choice to the type of sport activity but also to the type of work the patient does and finally to modify the rehabilitation protocol for the hamstring technique.

  13. Biomechanics of Tendon Transfers.

    PubMed

    Livermore, Andrew; Tueting, Jonathan L

    2016-08-01

    The transfer of tendons in the upper extremity is a powerful technique to restore function to a partially paralyzed hand. The biomechanical principles of muscle tension and tendon excursion dictate motor function both in the native as well as transferred states. Appropriately tensioning transferred tendons to maximize the function of the associated muscle remains an area of focused research. Newer methods of tendon coaptation have proven similar in strength to the standard Pulvertaft weave, affording more options to the surgeon. PMID:27387073

  14. Pyogenic Flexor Tenosynovitis Caused by Shewanella algae.

    PubMed

    Fluke, Erin C; Carayannopoulos, Nikoletta L; Lindsey, Ronald W

    2016-07-01

    Pyogenic flexor tenosynovitis is an orthopedic emergency most commonly caused by Staphylococcus aureus and streptococci and occasionally, when associated with water exposure, Mycobacterium marinum. Shewanella algae, a gram-negative bacillus found in warm saltwater environments, has infrequently been reported to cause serious soft tissue infections and necrosis. In this case, S. algae caused complicated flexor tenosynovitis requiring open surgical irrigation and debridement. Flexor tenosynovitis caused by S. algae rapidly presented with all 4 Kanavel cardinal signs as well as subcutaneous purulence, ischemia, and necrosis, thus meeting the requirements for Pang et al group III classification of worst prognosis. Because of its rarity and virulence, S. algae should always be considered in cases of flexor tenosynovitis associated with traumatic water exposure to treat and minimize morbidity appropriately.

  15. Musculoskeletal diseases—tendon

    PubMed Central

    Sakabe, Tomoya; Sakai, Takao

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Tendons establish specific connections between muscles and the skeleton by transferring contraction forces from skeletal muscle to bone thereby allowing body movement. Tendon physiology and pathology are heavily dependent on mechanical stimuli. Tendon injuries clinically represent a serious and still unresolved problem since damaged tendon tissues heal very slowly and no surgical treatment can restore a damaged tendon to its normal structural integrity and mechanical strength. Understanding how mechanical stimuli regulate tendon tissue homeostasis and regeneration will improve the treatment of adult tendon injuries that still pose a great challenge in today's medicine. Source of data This review summarizes the current status of tendon treatment and discusses new directions from the point of view of cell-based therapy and regenerative medicine approach. We searched the available literature using PubMed for relevant original articles and reviews. Growing points Identification of tendon cell markers has enabled us to study precisely tendon healing and homeostasis. Clinically, tissue engineering for tendon injuries is an emerging technology comprising elements from the fields of cellular source, scaffold materials, growth factors/cytokines and gene delivering systems. Areas timely for developing research The clinical settings to establish appropriate microenvironment for injured tendons with the combination of these novel cellular- and molecular-based scaffolds will be critical for the treatment. PMID:21729872

  16. Tendon development and diseases.

    PubMed

    Gaut, Ludovic; Duprez, Delphine

    2016-01-01

    Tendon is a uniaxial connective tissue component of the musculoskeletal system. Tendon is involved in force transmission between muscle and bone. Tendon injury is very common and debilitating but tendon repair remains a clinical challenge for orthopedic medicine. In vertebrates, tendon is mainly composed of type I collagen fibrils, displaying a parallel organization along the tendon axis. The tendon-specific spatial organization of type I collagen provides the mechanical properties for tendon function. In contrast to other components of the musculoskeletal system, tendon biology is poorly understood. An important goal in tendon biology is to understand the mechanisms involved in the production and assembly of type I collagen fibrils during development, postnatal formation, and healing processes in order to design new therapies for tendon repair. In this review we highlight the current understanding of the molecular and mechanical signals known to be involved in tenogenesis during development, and how development provides insights into tendon healing processes. WIREs Dev Biol 2016, 5:5-23. doi: 10.1002/wdev.201 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  17. Pressurized gas filled tendons

    SciTech Connect

    Silcox, W. H.

    1985-06-04

    Pressurized gas filled tubular tendons provide a means for detecting leaks therein. Filling the tendon with a gaseous fluid provides increased buoyancy and reduces the weight supported by the buoyant structure. The use of a corrosion inhibiting gaseous fluid reduces the corrosion of the interior tendon wall.

  18. Biologics for tendon repair☆

    PubMed Central

    Docheva, Denitsa; Müller, Sebastian A.; Majewski, Martin; Evans, Christopher H.

    2015-01-01

    Tendon injuries are common and present a clinical challenge to orthopedic surgery mainly because these injuries often respond poorly to treatment and require prolonged rehabilitation. Therapeutic options used to repair ruptured tendons have consisted of suture, autografts, allografts, and synthetic prostheses. To date, none of these alternatives has provided a successful long-term solution, and often the restored tendons do not recover their complete strength and functionality. Unfortunately, our understanding of tendon biology lags far behind that of other musculoskeletal tissues, thus impeding the development of new treatment options for tendon conditions. Hence, in this review, after introducing the clinical significance of tendon diseases and the present understanding of tendon biology, we describe and critically assess the current strategies for enhancing tendon repair by biological means. These consist mainly of applying growth factors, stem cells, natural biomaterials and genes, alone or in combination, to the site of tendon damage. A deeper understanding of how tendon tissue and cells operate, combined with practical applications of modern molecular and cellular tools could provide the long awaited breakthrough in designing effective tendon-specific therapeutics and overall improvement of tendon disease management. PMID:25446135

  19. The effect of enrofloxacin on cell proliferation and proteoglycans in horse tendon cells.

    PubMed

    Yoon, J H; Brooks, R L; Khan, A; Pan, H; Bryan, J; Zhang, J; Budsberg, S C; Mueller, P O E; Halper, J

    2004-02-01

    Fluoroquinolone antibiotics have been used widely in humans and domestic animals, including horses, because of their broad-spectrum bactericidal activity, and relative safety. The use of fluoroquinolones, however, is not without risk. Tendonitis and spontaneous tendon rupture have been reported in people during or following therapy with fluoroquinolones. We have studied the effects of enrofloxacin, a fluoroquinolone antibiotic used commonly in domestic animals, on tendon cell cultures established from equine superficial digital flexor tendons. Effects on cell proliferation and morphology were studied using cell counting and scanning electron microscopy. Monosaccharide content and composition was determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. Western and Northern blot analyses were utilized to evaluate the synthesis and expression of two proteoglycans, biglycan and decorin. Our data demonstrate that enrofloxacin inhibits cell proliferation, induces morphological changes, decreases total monosacharide content and alters small proteoglycan synthesis at the glycosylation level in equine tendon cell cultures. These effects are more pronounced in juvenile tendon cells than in adult equine tendon cells. We hypothesize that morphological changes and inhibition of cell proliferation are a result of impaired production of biglycan and decorin, proteoglycans involved in fibrillogenesis of collagen, the most important structural component of the tendon of enrofloxacin-treated tendon cells. Our findings suggest that fluoroquinolones should be used with caution in horses, especially in foals.

  20. Tendon structural adaptations to load exercise are inhibited by anabolic androgenic steroids.

    PubMed

    Marqueti, R C; Paulino, M G; Fernandes, M N; de Oliveira, E M; Selistre-de-Araujo, H S

    2014-02-01

    The present study investigated the structural changes in the rat calcaneal tendon (CT), superficial flexor tendon (SFT), and deep flexor tendon (DFT) in response to jump exercises and anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS). Animals were divided into four groups: sedentary, trained, AAS-treated sedentary rats, and AAS-treated trained animals. Training increased the volume density (Vv%) of blood vessels in all regions of the CT and DFT, cell Vv% in the peritendinous sheath of the proximal and distal regions of the SFT and proximal region of DFT, and cell Vv% in the tendon proper of the proximal and distal regions of the SFT and DFT. The combination of AAS and load exercises showed little increased blood vessel Vv% at the proximal region of the CT, intermediate region of the SFT, and all regions of the DFT as opposed to an increase in adipose cell Vv% in the CT proximal region. The AAS reduced the levels of hydroxyproline in the proximal region of the DFT and in the distal region of the STF. In conclusion, exercise promoted benefits to the adaptation of the tendons to overload. These effects were absent when load exercise was combined with AAS. The abusive consumption of AAS contributes to tendon inertness and rigidity, and increases the potential risk of injury.

  1. A new strategy for the decellularisation of large equine tendons as biocompatible tendon substitutes.

    PubMed

    Bottagisio, M; Pellegata, A F; Boschetti, F; Ferroni, M; Moretti, M; Lovati, A B

    2016-07-08

    Tendon ruptures and/or large losses remain to be a great clinical challenge and often require full replacement of the damaged tissue. The use of auto- and allografts or engineered scaffolds is an established approach to restore severe tendon injuries. However, these grafts are commonly related to scarce biocompatibility, site morbidity, chronic inflammation and poor biomechanical properties. Recently, the decellularisation techniques of allo- or xenografts using specific detergents have been studied and have been found to generate biocompatible substitutes that resemble the native tissue. This study aims to identify a novel decellularisation protocol for large equine tendons that would produce an extracellular matrix scaffold suitable for the regeneration of injured tendons in humans. Specifically, equine tendons were treated either with tri (n-butyl) phosphate alone, or associated to multiple concentrations of peracetic acid (1, 3 and 5 %), which has never before been tested in vitro.Samples were then analysed by histology and with biochemical, biomechanical, and cytotoxicity tests. The best decellularisation protocol, resulting from these examinations, was selected and the chosen scaffold was re-seeded with murine fibroblasts. Resulting grafts were tested for cell viability, histologic analysis, DNA and collagen content. The results identified 1 % tri (n-butyl) phosphate combined with 3 % peracetic acid as the most suitable decellularised matrix in terms of biochemical and biomechanical properties. Moreover, the non-cytotoxic nature of the decellularised matrix allowed for good fibroblast reseeding, thus demonstrating a biocompatible matrix that will be suitable for tendon tissue engineering and hopefully as substitutes in severe tendon damages.

  2. A new strategy for the decellularisation of large equine tendons as biocompatible tendon substitutes.

    PubMed

    Bottagisio, M; Pellegata, A F; Boschetti, F; Ferroni, M; Moretti, M; Lovati, A B

    2016-01-01

    Tendon ruptures and/or large losses remain to be a great clinical challenge and often require full replacement of the damaged tissue. The use of auto- and allografts or engineered scaffolds is an established approach to restore severe tendon injuries. However, these grafts are commonly related to scarce biocompatibility, site morbidity, chronic inflammation and poor biomechanical properties. Recently, the decellularisation techniques of allo- or xenografts using specific detergents have been studied and have been found to generate biocompatible substitutes that resemble the native tissue. This study aims to identify a novel decellularisation protocol for large equine tendons that would produce an extracellular matrix scaffold suitable for the regeneration of injured tendons in humans. Specifically, equine tendons were treated either with tri (n-butyl) phosphate alone, or associated to multiple concentrations of peracetic acid (1, 3 and 5 %), which has never before been tested in vitro.Samples were then analysed by histology and with biochemical, biomechanical, and cytotoxicity tests. The best decellularisation protocol, resulting from these examinations, was selected and the chosen scaffold was re-seeded with murine fibroblasts. Resulting grafts were tested for cell viability, histologic analysis, DNA and collagen content. The results identified 1 % tri (n-butyl) phosphate combined with 3 % peracetic acid as the most suitable decellularised matrix in terms of biochemical and biomechanical properties. Moreover, the non-cytotoxic nature of the decellularised matrix allowed for good fibroblast reseeding, thus demonstrating a biocompatible matrix that will be suitable for tendon tissue engineering and hopefully as substitutes in severe tendon damages. PMID:27386840

  3. Attritional rupture of the extensor pollicis longus tendon by an osseous spur more than 30 years after wrist injury: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kuriyama, Kohji; Murase, Tsuyoshi; Moritomo, Hisao; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2014-12-01

    A 46-year-old woman sustained a rupture of the extensor pollicis longus tendon more than 30 years after wrist injury. She was successfully treated with palmaris longus tendon graft and excision of the osseous spur. Attrition of the extensor pollicis longus tendon by a newly formed osseous spur was the major mechanism.

  4. Fibrillins in Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Giusti, Betti; Pepe, Guglielmina

    2016-01-01

    Tendons among connective tissue, mainly collagen, contain also elastic fibers (EF) made of fibrillin 1, fibrillin 2 and elastin that are broadly distributed in tendons and represent 1–2% of the dried mass of the tendon. Only in the last years, studies on structure and function of EF in tendons have been performed. Aim of this review is to revise data on the organization of EF in tendons, in particular fibrillin structure and function, and on the clinical manifestations associated to alterations of EF in tendons. Indeed, microfibrils may contribute to tendon mechanics; therefore, their alterations may cause joint hypermobility and contractures which have been found to be clinical features in patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS) and Beals syndrome. The two diseases are caused by mutations in genes FBN1 and FBN2 encoding fibrillin 1 and fibrillin 2, respectively. PMID:27812333

  5. Tendon Structure and Composition.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Chavaunne T; Screen, Hazel R C

    2016-01-01

    Tendons are soft, fibrous tissues that connect muscle to bone. Their main function is to transfer muscle generated force to the bony skeleton, facilitating movement around a joint, and as such they are relatively passive, inelastic structures, able to resist high forces. Tendons are predominantly composed of collagen, which is arranged in a hierarchical manner parallel to the long axis of the tendon, resulting in high tensile strength. Tendon also contains a range of non-collagenous proteins, present in low amounts, which nevertheless have important functional roles. In this chapter, we describe general tendon composition and structure, and discuss how variations in composition and structure at different levels of the tendon hierarchy confer specific mechanical properties, which are related to tendon function. PMID:27535244

  6. Ultrasound Echo is Related to Stress, Strain in Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Duenwald, Sarah; Kobayashi, Hirohito; Frisch, Kayt; Lakes, Roderic; Vanderby, Ray

    2010-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of tendons has been well studied in vitro. A noninvasive method to acquire mechanical data would be highly beneficial. Elastography has been a promising method of gathering in vivo tissue mechanical behavior, but it has inherent limitations. This study presents acoustoelasticity as an alternative ultrasound-based method of measuring tendon stress and strain by reporting a relationship between ultrasonic echo intensity (B mode ultrasound image brightness) and mechanical behavior of tendon in vitro. Porcine digital flexor tendons were cyclically loaded in a mechanical testing system while ultrasonic echo response was recorded. We report that echo intensity closely follows the applied cyclic strain pattern in time with higher strain protocols resulting in larger echo intensity changes. We also report that echo intensity is related nonlinearly to stress and nearly linearly to strain. This indicates that ultrasonic echo intensity is related to the mechanical behavior in a loaded tissue by an acoustoelastic response, as previously described in homogeneous, nearly incompressible materials. Acoustoelasticity is therefore able to relate strain-dependent stiffness and stress to the reflected echo, even in the processed B-mode signals reflected from viscoelastic, inhomogeneous material such as tendon, and is a promising metric to acquire in vivo mechanical data noninvasively. PMID:21030024

  7. Snapping Iliopsoas Tendon in a Recreational Athlete: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Keskula, Douglas R.; Lott, Jason; Duncan, Jewell B.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To describe the evaluation, diagnosis, and conservative treatment of a 31-year-old female recreational athlete with a snapping iliopsoas tendon. Background: The iliopsoas tendon has been implicated as an inflamed structure in this unique form of snapping hip. Hip pain, limitation of motion, or both may severely restrict vocational and recreational function and activities of daily living. Differential Diagnosis: Left snapping hip syndrome secondary to the iliopsoas tendon or the iliotibial band. Treatment: The treatment goal was to restore the athlete's pain-free, functional abilities. The primary focus of the treatment program was stretching of the left hip flexors. The patient demonstrated reduced pain and improved function following a 4-week stretching program and was fully functional and symptom free at 6 months. Uniqueness: Snapping hip syndrome is a clinical entity that may be described as hip pain associated with an audible snap of the hip during motion. The most common and well-known cause of this syndrome involves the snapping of the iliotibial band over the greater trochanter. A less common cause is the snapping of the iliopsoas tendon over the iliopectineal eminence. Conclusions: Understanding the anatomy and function of the iliopsoas tendon and related structures provides a basis for evaluation and treatment of this unique problem. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2. PMID:16558594

  8. Ultrasound echo is related to stress and strain in tendon.

    PubMed

    Duenwald, Sarah; Kobayashi, Hirohito; Frisch, Kayt; Lakes, Roderic; Vanderby, Ray

    2011-02-01

    The mechanical behavior of tendons has been well studied in vitro. A noninvasive method to acquire mechanical data would be highly beneficial. Elastography has been a promising method of gathering in vivo tissue mechanical behavior, but it has inherent limitations. This study presents acoustoelasticity as an alternative ultrasound-based method of measuring tendon stress and strain by reporting a relationship between ultrasonic echo intensity (B-mode ultrasound image brightness) and mechanical behavior of tendon in vitro. Porcine digital flexor tendons were cyclically loaded in a mechanical testing system while an ultrasonic echo response was recorded. We report that echo intensity closely follows the applied cyclic strain pattern in time with higher strain protocols resulting in larger echo intensity changes. We also report that echo intensity is related nonlinearly to stress and nearly linearly to strain. This indicates that ultrasonic echo intensity is related to the mechanical behavior in a loaded tissue by an acoustoelastic response, as previously described in homogeneous, nearly incompressible materials. Acoustoelasticity is therefore able to relate strain-dependent stiffness and stress to the reflected echo, even in the processed B-mode signals reflected from viscoelastic and inhomogeneous material such as tendon, and is a promising metric to acquire in vivo mechanical data noninvasively.

  9. Axial speed of sound for the monitoring of injured equine tendons: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Vergari, Claudio; Pourcelot, Philippe; Ravary-Plumioën, Bérangère; Dupays, Anne-Gaëlle; Jacquet, Sandrine; Audigié, Fabrice; Denoix, Jean-Marie; Laugier, Pascal; Mitton, David; Crevier-Denoix, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    Equine superficial digital flexor tendons (SDFT) are often injured, and they represent an excellent model for human sport tendinopathies. While lesions can be precisely diagnosed by clinical evaluation and ultrasonography, a prognosis is often difficult to establish; the knowledge of the injured tendon's mechanical properties would help in anticipating the outcome. The objectives of the present study were to compare the axial speed of sound (SOS) measured in vivo in normal and injured tendons and to investigate their relationship with the tendons' mechanical parameters, in order to assess the potential of quantitative axial ultrasound to monitor the healing of the injured tendons. SOS was measured in vivo in the right fore SDFTs of 12 horses during walk, before and 3.5 months after the surgical induction of a bilateral core lesion. The 12 horses were then euthanized, their SDFTs isolated and tested in tension to measure their elastic modulus and maximal load (and corresponding stress). SOS significantly decreased from 2179.4 ± 31.4 m/s in normal tendons to 2065.8 ± 67.1 m/s 3.5 months after the surgical induction, and the tendons' elastic modulus (0.90 ± 0.17 GPa) was found lower than what has been reported in normal tendons. While SOS was not correlated to tendon maximal load and corresponding stress, the SOS normalized on its value in normal tendons was correlated to the tendons' elastic modulus. These preliminary results confirm the potential of axial SOS in helping the functional assessment of injured tendon.

  10. Surgical reconstruction of end-stage ankle arthritis and concomitant stage II posterior tibial tendon insufficient flat foot.

    PubMed

    Desai, Sarang; Grierson, Randolph; Manoli, Arthur

    2011-01-01

    End-stage degenerative joint disease of the ankle and concomitant ipsilateral Stage II posterior tibial tendon insufficient flat foot is a well known entity. Despite this, treatment options have not been discussed in the orthopaedic literature. A case series consisting of five patients was conducted to determine the efficacy of our treatment proposal. Our surgical treatment included an ankle fusion and concomitant flat foot reconstruction with a medializing calcaneal osteotomy, lengthening calcaneal osteotomy, and flexor digitorum longus transfer. At the final followup visit all patients were content with the results of the procedure, and would have it performed again. Each patient had significant relief of ankle and foot pain, and believed they had improved quality of life and function. Complications included two ankle nonunions treated with revision bone grafting and internal fixation, painful hardware and iliac crest hematoma. We conclude that our method of treatment is a viable option for this complex problem. A long recovery period should be anticipated and patients should be counseled accordingly. PMID:22381416

  11. Anatomic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with quadriceps tendon autograft.

    PubMed

    Rabuck, Stephen J; Musahl, Volker; Fu, Freddie H; West, Robin V

    2013-01-01

    A multitude of graft options exist including both allograft and autograft sources for reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament. With recent concerns regarding the early graft failure and cost-effectiveness of allograft sources, more attention has been directed toward autograft options. However, autograft harvest has been associated with specific morbidity that can result in suboptimal outcomes. The quadriceps tendon is an excellent biomechanical and biologic option.

  12. Atraumatic quadriceps tendon tear associated with calcific tendonitis.

    PubMed

    Abram, Simon G F; Sharma, Akash D; Arvind, Chinnakonda

    2012-11-27

    Calcific tendonitis of the quadriceps tendon is an uncommon condition. We present the first case of a quadriceps tendon tear associated with calcific tendonitis. In this case, the patient presented with symptoms mimicking a rupture of the quadriceps tendon. This case illustrates that although calcific tendonitis of the quadriceps is a rare condition it is not benign and should be considered when investigating acute symptoms associated with the extensor mechanism of the knee.

  13. Coexistent digital gouty and infective flexor tenosynovitis.

    PubMed

    Akram, Qasim; Hughes, Michael; Muir, Lindsay

    2016-01-01

    Flexor tenosynovitis of the hand is often caused by trauma or infection. Gouty tenosynovitis is an uncommon presentation of the condition and is usually misdiagnosed as infection with the patient undergoing surgery. The coexistence of infection and gout causing flexor tenosynovitis has never been described before in the literature; we report the first ever case and emphasise the importance of its awareness for optimal treatment. A 54-year-old man was initially diagnosed and treated as having infective flexor tenosynovitis and, later, due to a lack of improvement in his symptoms, was discovered to also have gout. We review the literature and suggest management strategy for use in daily clinical practice, including an algorithm, for this presentation. PMID:27358092

  14. Femoral interference screw placement through the tibial tunnel: a novel method without graft damage.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yi-Sheng; Wang, Ching-Jen

    2006-11-01

    A frequently encountered problem in endoscopic 1-incision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is the difficulty involved in accurately inserting the femoral interference screw without significant and undesirable divergence between the screw and the graft when a femoral interference screw is fixed through the anteromedial portal. To minimize divergence, the authors demonstrated a modified, easy, and reproducible procedure that can be performed without causing graft injury or requiring special instrumentation. A ligament reconstruction route is created with the use of an ACL guide system. Lead graft sutures are pulled through the anteromedial portal by way of the femoral tunnel and out the anterolateral thigh first. The tendon graft is then inserted through the anteromedial portal and up into the femoral tunnel. A guidewire is introduced through the tibial tunnel into the femoral tunnel. An appropriately sized BioScrew (Linvatec, Largo, FL) is inserted, with the use of a guidewire inside the screw, through the tibial tunnel into the femoral tunnel. The graft is then retrieved through the anteromedial portal and is inserted through the tibial tunnel. Finally, the tendon graft in the tibial tunnel is similarly fixed with a BioScrew of the same size. Moreover, this novel approach is feasible for all tendon grafts (bone-patellar tendon-bone grafts, quadriceps tendon-patellar bone grafts, and hamstring tendon grafts). PMID:17084309

  15. Quadriceps tendon-patellar bone autograft for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a technical note.

    PubMed

    Franceschi, Francesco; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Ruzzini, Laura; Papalia, Rocco; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2008-01-01

    The quadriceps tendon autograft can be used for primary and revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Despite several successful clinical reports, graft fixation issues remain, and the ideal technique for fixation continues to be controversial. We present a technique of ACL reconstruction with quadriceps tendon autograft (QTA) using a patellar bone block. The tendon end is fixed in the femoral tunnel and the bone plug in the tibial tunnel using reabsorbable interference screws. The advantages of this technique are related to the increase in stiffness of the graft, the achievement of a more anatomic fixation, and a reduction in synovial fluid leakage.

  16. Principles of Tendon Transfer.

    PubMed

    Wilbur, Danielle; Hammert, Warren C

    2016-08-01

    Tendon transfers provide a substitute, either temporary or permanent, when function is lost due to neurologic injury in stroke, cerebral palsy or central nervous system lesions, peripheral nerve injuries, or injuries to the musculotendinous unit itself. This article reviews the basic principles of tendon transfer, which are important when planning surgery and essential for an optimal outcome. In addition, concepts for coapting the tendons during surgery and general principles to be followed during the rehabilitation process are discussed. PMID:27387072

  17. Model for assessment of mobility of toes and healing of tendons in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Olmarker, Kjell; Ekström, Lars; Håkansson, Joakim; Nilsson, Elin; Wiig, Monica; Mahlapuu, Margit

    2010-12-01

    Repair of a transected flexor tendon will, despite careful technique and early rehabilitation, usually result in a restricted range of movement. This is mainly because adhesions form between the tendon and the surrounding structures. Our aim was to establish an experimental model in rabbits for future studies on new techniques to reduce the formation of adhesions after zone II repair of flexor tendons. In rabbits' hind paws the metatarsal bones II, IV, and V were removed and the flexor tendon was freed to the metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint. The digits were secured in a specifically-designed biomechanical testing device comprising a servo-hydraulic actuator that was designed to apply controlled force or displacement. The tests were videotaped with a digital force-monitor behind the tested digit. Paper printouts from the recordings were obtained for 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 Newton (N) and metatarsophalangeal, proximal interphalangeal, and distal interphalangeal, angles and distances between metatarsophalangeal joints and claws were measured. The tensile strength of the tendon was evaluated by a load-to-failure test. The continuous data obtained from the experiments were used to calculate functional stiffness at the selected forces. The model allows for unique continuous recordings of mobility of toes, thereby indirectly quantifying the presence of adhesions and the assessment of tensile strength. The data are reproducible, and there is little variation between the digits tested. The model is primarily intended to compare data among treated and non-treated digits of methods to limit the formation of adhesions after tendons have been repaired. PMID:21446803

  18. Ultrasound of the elbow with emphasis on detailed assessment of ligaments, tendons, and nerves.

    PubMed

    De Maeseneer, Michel; Brigido, Monica Kalume; Antic, Marijana; Lenchik, Leon; Milants, Annemieke; Vereecke, Evie; Jager, Tjeerd; Shahabpour, Maryam

    2015-04-01

    The high resolution and dynamic capability of ultrasound make it an excellent tool for assessment of superficial structures. The ligaments, tendons, and nerves about the elbow can be fully evaluated with ultrasound. The medial collateral ligament consists of an anterior and posterior band that can easily be identified. The lateral ligament complex consists of the radial collateral ligament, ulnar insertion of the annular ligament, and lateral ulnar collateral ligament, easily identified with specialized probe positioning. The lateral ulnar collateral ligament can best be seen in the cobra position. On ultrasound medial elbow tendons can be followed nearly up to their common insertion. The pronator teres, flexor carpi radialis, palmaris longus, and flexor digitorum superficialis can be identified. The laterally located brachioradialis and extensor carpi radialis longus insert on the supracondylar ridge. The other lateral tendons can be followed up to their common insertion on the lateral epicondyle. The extensor digitorum, extensor carpi radialis brevis, extensor digiti minimi, and extensor carpi ulnaris can be differentiated. The distal biceps tendon is commonly bifid. For a complete assessment of the distal biceps tendon specialized views are necessary. These include an anterior axial approach, medial and lateral approach, and cobra position. In the cubital tunnel the ulnar nerve is covered by the ligament of Osborne. Slightly more distally the ulnar nerve courses between the two heads of the flexor carpi ulnaris. An accessory muscle, the anconeus epitrochlearis can cover the ulnar nerve at the cubital tunnel, and is easily identified on ultrasound. The radial nerve divides in a superficial sensory branch and a deep motor branch. The motor branch, the posterior interosseous nerve, courses under the arcade of Frohse where it enters the supinator muscle. At the level of the dorsal wrist the posterior interosseous nerve is located at the deep aspect of the extensor

  19. Riser and tendon management system

    SciTech Connect

    Devlin, P.V.

    1992-02-18

    This patent describes a riser and tendon management system. It comprises means to set nominal conditions for the risers and tendons; means to measure actual riser and tendon conditions; means to compare the actual and nominal conditions of the risers and tendons; and means responsive to a differential between the actual and nominal riser and tendon conditions, which difference exceeds specified limits, and recommending corrective action to bring the risers and tendons back to within nominal conditions.

  20. Tendon and ligament imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, R J; O'Connor, P J; Grainger, A J

    2012-01-01

    MRI and ultrasound are now widely used for the assessment of tendon and ligament abnormalities. Healthy tendons and ligaments contain high levels of collagen with a structured orientation, which gives rise to their characteristic normal imaging appearances as well as causing particular imaging artefacts. Changes to ligaments and tendons as a result of disease and injury can be demonstrated using both ultrasound and MRI. These have been validated against surgical and histological findings. Novel imaging techniques are being developed that may improve the ability of MRI and ultrasound to assess tendon and ligament disease. PMID:22553301

  1. Tendon Homeostasis in Hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Soslowsky, Louis J; Fryhofer, George W

    2016-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is a serious health problem that is associated not only with heart disease, but also tendon pathology. In high cholesterol environments (e.g. familial hyperlipidemia), lipids accumulate within the tendon extracellular matrix and form deposits called xanthomas. Lipid-related changes are known to affect several tendon mechanical properties, including stiffness and modulus, in uninjured and injured tendons, alike. Mechanisms to explain these cholesterol-related changes are multiple, including alterations in tenocyte gene and protein expression, matrix turnover, tissue vascularity, and cytokine production. Clinically, rotator cuff tear and Achilles tendon rupture are clearly associated with metabolic derangements, and elevated total cholesterol is often among the specific metabolic parameters implicated. Treatment of hypercholesterolemia using statin medications has also been shown to affect tendon properties, resulting in normalization of tendon thickness and improved tendon healing. Despite current work, the pathophysiology of lipid-related tendon pathology remains incompletely understood, and additional hypothesis-generating studies, including those incorporating whole-genome and whole-transcriptome technologies, will help to point the field in new directions. PMID:27535257

  2. Inflammation in Tendon Disorders.

    PubMed

    Speed, Cathy

    2016-01-01

    The role of inflammation in tendon disorders has long been a subject of considerable debate. Developments in our understanding of the basic science of inflammation have provided further insight into its potential role in specific forms of tendon disease, and the circumstances that may potentiate this. Such circumstances include excessive mechanical stresses on tendon and the presence of systemic inflammation associated with chronic diseases. In this chapter a brief review of the basic science of inflammation is provided and the influence that it may play on tendons is discussed. PMID:27535263

  3. The effect of tendon loading on in-vitro carpal kinematics of the wrist joint.

    PubMed

    Foumani, M; Blankevoort, L; Stekelenburg, C; Strackee, S D; Carelsen, B; Jonges, R; Streekstra, G J

    2010-06-18

    Measurements of in-vitro carpal kinematics of the wrist provide valuable biomechanical data. Tendon loading is often applied during cadaver experiments to simulate natural stabilizing joint compression in the wrist joint. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of tendon loading on carpal kinematics in-vitro. A cyclic movement was imposed on 7 cadaveric forearms while the carpal kinematics were acquired by a 4-dimensional rotational X-ray imaging system. The extensor- and flexor tendons were loaded with constant force springs of 50 N, respectively. The measurements were repeated without a load on the tendons. The effect of loading on the kinematics was tested statistically by using a linear mixed model. During flexion and extension, the proximal carpal bones were more extended with tendon loading. The lunate was on the average 2.0 degrees (p=0.012) more extended. With tendon loading the distal carpal bones were more ulnary deviated at each angle of wrist motion. The capitate was on the average 2.4 degrees (p=0.004) more ulnary deviated. During radioulnar deviation, the proximal carpal bones were more radially deviated with the lunate 0.7 degrees more into radial deviation with tendon loading (p<0.001). Conversely, the bones of distal row were more flexed and supinated with the capitate 1.5 degrees more into flexion (p=0.025) and 1.0 degrees more into supination (p=0.011). In conclusion, the application of a constant load onto the flexor and extensor tendons in cadaver experiments has a small but statistically significant effect on the carpal kinematics during flexion-extension and radioulnar deviation.

  4. Free Bone Plug Quadriceps Tendon Harvest and Suspensory Button Attachment for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Todor, Adrian; Caterev, Sergiu; Nistor, Dan Viorel; Khallouki, Youssef

    2016-06-01

    The most commonly used autografts for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction are the bone-patellar tendon-bone and hamstring tendons. Each has its advantages and limitations. The bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft can lead to more donor-site morbidity, and the hamstring autograft can be unpredictable in size. The quadriceps tendon, with or without a bone block, has been described as an alternative graft source and has been used especially in revision cases, but in recent years, it has attracted attention even for primary cases. We report a technique for harvesting a free bone quadriceps tendon graft and attaching an extracortical button for femoral fixation for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. PMID:27656375

  5. Abnormal tenocyte morphology is more prevalent than collagen disruption in asymptomatic athletes' patellar tendons.

    PubMed

    Cook, J L; Feller, J A; Bonar, S F; Khan, K M

    2004-03-01

    This study investigated the prevalence of each of the four features of patellar tendinosis in asymptomatic athletic subjects undergoing patellar tendon anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Fifty subjects (39 males and 11 females) undergoing ACL reconstruction using a patellar tendon graft were screened for previous tendon symptoms, training and playing history and had their patellar tendons examined with ultrasound prior to surgery. During surgery, a small piece of proximal posterocentral tendon was harvested, fixed and examined under light microscopy. Histopathological changes were graded for severity. Results demonstrate that 18 tendons were abnormal on light microscopy and 32 were normal. There were no differences between subjects with and without pathology in respect of training, recovery after surgery and basic anthropometric measures. Three tendons were abnormal on ultrasound but only one had proximal and central changes. Tendons showed a consistent series of changes. Tenocyte changes were found in all but one of the abnormal tendons. In all but one of the tendons with increased ground substance there were tenocyte changes, and collagen separation was always associated with both tenocyte changes and increased ground substance. No tendons demonstrated neovascularization. It appears that cellular changes must be present if there is an increase in ground substance, or collagen and vascular changes. Further research is required to confirm these findings.

  6. Repositioning forelimb superficialis muscles: tendon attachment and muscle activity enable active relocation of functional myofibers.

    PubMed

    Huang, Alice H; Riordan, Timothy J; Wang, Lingyan; Eyal, Shai; Zelzer, Elazar; Brigande, John V; Schweitzer, Ronen

    2013-09-16

    The muscles that govern hand motion are composed of extrinsic muscles that reside within the forearm and intrinsic muscles that reside within the hand. We find that the extrinsic muscles of the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) first differentiate as intrinsic muscles within the hand and then relocate as myofibers to their final position in the arm. This remarkable translocation of differentiated myofibers across a joint is dependent on muscle contraction and muscle-tendon attachment. Interestingly, the intrinsic flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) muscles of the foot are identical to the FDS in tendon pattern and delayed developmental timing but undergo limited muscle translocation, providing strong support for evolutionary homology between the FDS and FDB muscles. We propose that the intrinsic FDB pattern represents the original tetrapod limb and that translocation of the muscles to form the FDS is a mammalian evolutionary addition.

  7. Multiple Giant Cell Tumours of Tendon Sheath: A Rare Occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Pathade, Smita Charandas; Kurpad, Ramkumar; Tauheed, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Giant Cell Tumours Of Tendon Sheath (GCTTS) are the second most frequent soft tissue tumours affecting the hand with an overall incidence of 1 in 50,000 individuals. These tumours are usually localized and solitary, with multiple GCTTS occurring rarely. Multi-centric origin is considered unusual and very few cases of multiple GCTTS have been reported till date. Here, we report a rare case of a 26-year-old female who presented with multiple painless swellings on palmar aspect of little finger of right hand since six months. Clinical diagnosis of Dupuytren’s contracture was given. Intraoperative examination revealed multiple separate nodules, firmly attached to the flexor tendon synovial sheath. Histopathology showed features of GCTTS. PMID:24596760

  8. Multiple giant cell tumours of tendon sheath: a rare occurrence.

    PubMed

    Pathade, Smita Charandas; Kurpad, Ramkumar; Tauheed, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Giant Cell Tumours Of Tendon Sheath (GCTTS) are the second most frequent soft tissue tumours affecting the hand with an overall incidence of 1 in 50,000 individuals. These tumours are usually localized and solitary, with multiple GCTTS occurring rarely. Multi-centric origin is considered unusual and very few cases of multiple GCTTS have been reported till date. Here, we report a rare case of a 26-year-old female who presented with multiple painless swellings on palmar aspect of little finger of right hand since six months. Clinical diagnosis of Dupuytren's contracture was given. Intraoperative examination revealed multiple separate nodules, firmly attached to the flexor tendon synovial sheath. Histopathology showed features of GCTTS.

  9. Double tendon transfer for correction of drop-foot.

    PubMed

    Grauwin, M-Y; Wavreille, G; Fontaine, C

    2015-02-01

    Many conditions can cause foot drop, which makes walking difficult because the foot easily bumps into obstacles, or the knee must be kept more flexed than usual during the swing phase of gait, especially when going up stairs. Several techniques that have been described to correct foot drop rely on bone procedures or tendon transfer, with or without bone fixation. In this article, we describe a simple technique that is heavily used in leprosy-endemic countries and provides long-lasting results. It requires a double tendon transfer through the interosseous membrane of leg; the tibialis posterior and flexor digitorum longus are sutured to the tibialis anterior, and extensor hallucis longus and extensor digitorum longus, respectively, proximally to the extensor retinaculum. PMID:25623271

  10. Role of flexors in knee stability.

    PubMed

    Chen, C Y; Jiang, C C; Jan, M H; Lai, J S

    1995-05-01

    The muscle strength of knee extensors is commonly used as an indicator of a patient's functional recovery following reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The knee flexors are dynamic stabilizers that prevent tibial anterior displacement and may reinforce the function of the ACL. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of knee flexor performance assessed by isokinetic dynamometer and clinical evaluations including KT-1000 stability tests, shuttle run tests, thigh and calf circumference and range of motion of the knee joint. Ten patients who received ACL reconstruction over a 3- to 5-year period were included in this study, as were 15 normal controls who were tested for comparison. There was no significant difference in the time taken for the shuttle run test between normal controls and patients who underwent ACL, but there was a positive correlation between the shuttle run test and laxity of the knee joint. The knee laxity of ACL patients was significantly greater than that of the normal controls under passive anterior force. However, no significant difference was seen in the stability test under active contraction of the knee extensors. In addition, a positive correlation was seen between the KT-1000 knee ligament arthrometry test results and both torque acceleration energy and the average power of the flexors. These results suggest that physical therapy for patients following ACL reconstruction should emphasize the explosiveness of knee flexors to help strengthen the dynamic stability of the knee joint and motor performance.

  11. Flexor digitorum superficialis rupture: a case report.

    PubMed

    Culver, J E

    1976-04-01

    A rupture of the musculotendinous junction of the flexor digitorum superficialis to the index finger in a baseball pitcher is described. No underlying abnormality could be detected. Because of loss of strength and dexterity, repair of the rupture was accomplished with an improved result.

  12. Fatigue loading of tendon

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Jennifer H; Screen, Hazel R C

    2013-01-01

    Tendon injuries, often called tendinopathies, are debilitating and painful conditions, generally considered to develop as a result of tendon overuse. The aetiology of tendinopathy remains poorly understood, and whilst tendon biopsies have provided some information concerning tendon appearance in late-stage disease, there is still little information concerning the mechanical and cellular events associated with disease initiation and progression. Investigating this in situ is challenging, and numerous models have been developed to investigate how overuse may generate tendon fatigue damage and how this may relate to tendinopathy conditions. This article aims to review these models and our current understanding of tendon fatigue damage. We review the strengths and limitations of different methodologies for characterizing tendon fatigue, considering in vitro methods that adopt both viable and non-viable samples, as well as the range of different in vivo approaches. By comparing data across model systems, we review the current understanding of fatigue damage development. Additionally, we compare these findings with data from tendinopathic tissue biopsies to provide some insights into how these models may relate to the aetiology of tendinopathy. Fatigue-induced damage consistently highlights the same microstructural, biological and mechanical changes to the tendon across all model systems and also correlates well with the findings from tendinopathic biopsy tissue. The multiple testing routes support matrix damage as an important contributor to tendinopathic conditions, but cellular responses to fatigue appear complex and often contradictory. PMID:23837793

  13. Tendon Transfers for Tetraplegia.

    PubMed

    Bednar, Michael S

    2016-08-01

    It is estimated that 65% to 75% of patients with cervical spinal cord injuries could benefit from upper extremity tendon transfer surgery. The goals of surgery are to restore elbow extension, as well as hand pinch, grasp, and release. Patients who have defined goals, actively participate in therapy, and understand expected outcomes, appear to have the highest satisfaction following tendon transfer procedures. PMID:27387082

  14. Comparison of transfer sites for flexor digitorum longus in a cadaveric adult acquired flatfoot model.

    PubMed

    Vaudreuil, Nicholas J; Ledoux, William R; Roush, Grant C; Whittaker, Eric C; Sangeorzan, Bruce J

    2014-01-01

    Posterior tibialis tendon (PTT) dysfunction (PTTD) is associated with adult acquired flatfoot deformity. PTTD is commonly treated with a flexor digitorum longus (FDL) tendon transfer (FDLTT) to the navicular (NAV), medial cuneiform (CUN), or distal residuum of the degraded PTT (rPTT). We assessed the kinetic and kinematic outcomes of these three attachment sites using cadaveric gait simulation. Three transfer locations (NAV, CUN, rPTT) were tested on seven prepared flatfoot models using a robotic gait simulator (RGS). The FDLTT procedures were simulated by pulling on the PTT with biomechanically realistic FDL forces (rPTT) or by pulling on the transected FDL tendon after fixation to the navicular or medial cuneiform (NAV and CUN, respectively). Plantar pressure and foot bone motion were quantified. Peak plantar pressure significantly decreased from the flatfoot condition at the first metatarsal (NAV) and hallux (CUN). No difference was found in the medial-lateral center of pressure. Kinematic findings showed minimal differences between flatfoot and FDLTT specimens. The three locations demonstrated only minimal differences from the flatfoot condition, with the NAV and CUN procedures resulting in decreased medial pressures. Functionally, all three surgical procedures performed similarly.

  15. Comparison of transfer sites for flexor digitorum longus in a cadaveric adult acquired flatfoot model.

    PubMed

    Vaudreuil, Nicholas J; Ledoux, William R; Roush, Grant C; Whittaker, Eric C; Sangeorzan, Bruce J

    2014-01-01

    Posterior tibialis tendon (PTT) dysfunction (PTTD) is associated with adult acquired flatfoot deformity. PTTD is commonly treated with a flexor digitorum longus (FDL) tendon transfer (FDLTT) to the navicular (NAV), medial cuneiform (CUN), or distal residuum of the degraded PTT (rPTT). We assessed the kinetic and kinematic outcomes of these three attachment sites using cadaveric gait simulation. Three transfer locations (NAV, CUN, rPTT) were tested on seven prepared flatfoot models using a robotic gait simulator (RGS). The FDLTT procedures were simulated by pulling on the PTT with biomechanically realistic FDL forces (rPTT) or by pulling on the transected FDL tendon after fixation to the navicular or medial cuneiform (NAV and CUN, respectively). Plantar pressure and foot bone motion were quantified. Peak plantar pressure significantly decreased from the flatfoot condition at the first metatarsal (NAV) and hallux (CUN). No difference was found in the medial-lateral center of pressure. Kinematic findings showed minimal differences between flatfoot and FDLTT specimens. The three locations demonstrated only minimal differences from the flatfoot condition, with the NAV and CUN procedures resulting in decreased medial pressures. Functionally, all three surgical procedures performed similarly. PMID:24115238

  16. The tibialis posterior tendon.

    PubMed

    Lhoste-Trouilloud, A

    2012-02-01

    The tibialis posterior tendon is the largest and anteriormost tendon in the medial ankle. It produces plantar flexion and supination of the ankle and stabilizes the plantar vault. Sonographic assessment of this tendon is done with high-frequency, linear-array transducers; an optimal examination requires transverse retromalleolar, longitudinal retromalleolar, and distal longitudinal scans, as well as dynamic studies. Disorders of the posterior tibial tendon include chronic tendinopathy with progressive rupture, tenosynovitis, acute rupture, dislocation and instability, enthesopathies. The most common lesion is a progressive "chewing gum" lesion that develops in a setting of chronic tendinopathy; it is usually seen in overweight women over 50 years of age with valgus flat feet. Medial ankle pain must also be carefully investigated, and the presence of instability assessed with dynamic maneuvers (forced inversion, or dorsiflexion) of the foot. Sonography plays an important role in the investigation of disorders involving the posterior tibial tendon.

  17. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with allograft tendons.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Sabrina M; MacGillivray, John D; Warren, Russell F

    2003-01-01

    Allograft tissue allows reconstruction of the ACL without the donor site morbidity that can be caused by autograft harvesting. Patients who must kneel as a part of their occupation or chosen sport are particularly good candidates for allograft reconstruction. Patients over 45 years of age and those requiring revision ACL surgery can also benefit from the use and availability of allograft tendons. In some cases, patients or surgeons may opt for allograft tendons to maximize the result or morbidity ratio. Despite advances in cadaver screening and graft preparation, there remain risks of disease transmission and joint infection after allograft implantation. Detailed explanation and informed consent is vitally important in cases in which allograft tissue is used.

  18. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with allograft tendons.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Sabrina M; MacGillivray, John D; Warren, Russell F

    2003-01-01

    Allograft tissue allows reconstruction of the ACL without the donor site morbidity that can be caused by autograft harvesting. Patients who must kneel as a part of their occupation or chosen sport are particularly good candidates for allograft reconstruction. Patients over 45 years of age and those requiring revision ACL surgery can also benefit from the use and availability of allograft tendons. In some cases, patients or surgeons may opt for allograft tendons to maximize the result or morbidity ratio. Despite advances in cadaver screening and graft preparation, there remain risks of disease transmission and joint infection after allograft implantation. Detailed explanation and informed consent is vitally important in cases in which allograft tissue is used. PMID:12735200

  19. Bone Grafts

    MedlinePlus

    A bone graft transplants bone tissue. Surgeons use bone grafts to repair and rebuild diseased bones in your hips, knees, ... fractures or cancers. Once your body accepts the bone graft, it provides a framework for growth of new, ...

  20. The Use of Hyaluronic Acid after Tendon Surgery and in Tendinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Schiavone, Cosima; Salini, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Viscosupplementation with hyaluronic acid is safe and effective in the management of osteoarthritis, but its use in the treatment of tendon disorders has received less attention. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge on this topic, evaluating experimental and clinical trials. A search of English-language articles was performed using the key search terms “hyaluronic acid” or “viscosupplementation” combined with “tendon,” “tendinopathy,“ “adhesions,“ or “gliding,“ independently. In quite all the experimental studies, performed after surgical procedures for tendon injuries or in the treatment of chronic tendinopathies, using different hyaluronic acid compounds, positive results (reduced formation of scars and granulation tissue after tendon repair, less adhesions and gliding resistance, and improved tissue healing) were observed. In a limited number of cases, hyaluronic acid has been employed in clinical practice. After flexor tendon surgery, a greater total active motion and fingers function, with an earlier return to work and daily activities, were observed. Similarly, in patients suffering from elbow, patellar, and shoulder tendons disorders, pain was reduced, and function improved. The positive effect of hyaluronic acid can be attributed to the anti-inflammatory activity, enhanced cell proliferation, and collagen deposition, besides the lubricating action on the sliding surface of the tendon. PMID:24895610

  1. Direct-current electrical stimulation of tendon healing in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Nessler, J.P.; Mass, D.P.

    1987-04-01

    The intrinsic capacity of tendons to heal in response to injury has recently been demonstrated by many investigators. Electrical stimulation is often assumed to augment regeneration of various tissues. Using newly developed methods of whole-tendon culture, the authors examined the effect of direct-current electricity on healing in vitro. Deep flexor tendons of rabbits were excised, transected, repaired, and grown in an acellular culture medium for seven, 14, 21, or 42 days. Tendons through which a continuous 7-microAmp current was passed at the repair site were compared with nonstimulated controls. The incorporation of (/sup 14/C)proline and its conversion to (/sup 14/C)hydroxyproline was measured at seven days. The mean (/sup 14/C)proline and (/sup 14/C)hydroxyproline activities were 91% and 255% greater, respectively, in the stimulated group. The activity was also higher in the stimulated group, by 42 days. Histologic sections showed that intrinsic tenoblastic repair may be enhanced with electrical stimulation in vitro.

  2. Drug-Induced Tendon Disorders.

    PubMed

    Knobloch, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    Drug-induced tendon disorders are an often underestimated risk factor. The range from detrimental effects on the tendon include tendinopathy as well as potentially tendon rupture. As for today, four main drug classes have been reported to be associated with potentially deteriorated tendon properties: 1. Corticosteroids, 2. Chinolon antibiotics, 3. Aromatase inhbitors, 4. Statins as HMG-CoA-reductase inhibitors. Most often, the Achilles tendon is affected in terms of tendinopathy and/or subsequent tendon rupture. However, nearly every tendon of the entire body might be affected in a detrimental way by one or a combination of the aformentioned agents. PMID:27535265

  3. How Obesity Affects Tendons?

    PubMed

    Abate, Michele; Salini, Vincenzo; Andia, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Several epidemiological and clinical observations have definitely demonstrated that obesity has harmful effects on tendons. The pathogenesis of tendon damage is multi-factorial. In addition to overload, attributable to the increased body weight, which significantly affects load-bearing tendons, systemic factors play a relevant role. Several bioactive peptides (chemerin, leptin, adiponectin and others) are released by adipocytes, and influence tendon structure by means of negative activities on mesenchymal cells. The ensuing systemic state of chronic, sub-clinic, low-grade inflammation can damage tendon structure. Metabolic disorders (diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance, and dislipidemia), frequently associated with visceral adiposity, are concurrent pathogenetic factors. Indeed, high glucose levels increase the formation of Advanced Glycation End-products, which in turn form stable covalent cross-links within collagen fibers, modifying their structure and functionality.Sport activities, so useful for preventing important cardiovascular complications, may be detrimental for tendons if they are submitted to intense acute or chronic overload. Therefore, two caution rules are mandatory: first, to engage in personalized soft training program, and secondly to follow regular check-up for tendon pathology.

  4. How Obesity Affects Tendons?

    PubMed

    Abate, Michele; Salini, Vincenzo; Andia, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Several epidemiological and clinical observations have definitely demonstrated that obesity has harmful effects on tendons. The pathogenesis of tendon damage is multi-factorial. In addition to overload, attributable to the increased body weight, which significantly affects load-bearing tendons, systemic factors play a relevant role. Several bioactive peptides (chemerin, leptin, adiponectin and others) are released by adipocytes, and influence tendon structure by means of negative activities on mesenchymal cells. The ensuing systemic state of chronic, sub-clinic, low-grade inflammation can damage tendon structure. Metabolic disorders (diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance, and dislipidemia), frequently associated with visceral adiposity, are concurrent pathogenetic factors. Indeed, high glucose levels increase the formation of Advanced Glycation End-products, which in turn form stable covalent cross-links within collagen fibers, modifying their structure and functionality.Sport activities, so useful for preventing important cardiovascular complications, may be detrimental for tendons if they are submitted to intense acute or chronic overload. Therefore, two caution rules are mandatory: first, to engage in personalized soft training program, and secondly to follow regular check-up for tendon pathology. PMID:27535258

  5. Sex Hormones and Tendon.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Mette; Kjaer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The risk of overuse and traumatic tendon and ligament injuries differ between women and men. Part of this gender difference in injury risk is probably explained by sex hormonal differences which are specifically distinct during the sexual maturation in the teenage years and during young adulthood. The effects of the separate sex hormones are not fully elucidated. However, in women, the presence of estrogen in contrast to very low estrogen levels may be beneficial during regular loading of the tissue or during recovering after an injury, as estrogen can enhance tendon collagen synthesis rate. Yet, in active young female athletes, physiological high concentration of estrogen may enhance the risk of injuries due to reduced fibrillar crosslinking and enhanced joint laxity. In men, testosterone can enhance tendon stiffness due to an enhanced tendon collagen turnover and collagen content, but testosterone has also been linked to a reduced responsiveness to relaxin. The present chapter will focus on sex difference in tendon injury risk, tendon morphology and tendon collagen turnover, but also on the specific effects of estrogen and androgens. PMID:27535256

  6. Gastrocnemius myotendinous flap for patellar or quadriceps tendon repair, or both.

    PubMed

    Rhomberg, M; Schwabegger, A H; Ninkovic, M; Bauer, T; Ninkovic, M

    2000-08-01

    The authors' experience with simultaneous reconstruction of the quadriceps femoris or patellar tendon or both and soft tissue defect using a musculotendinous unit of the gastrocnemius muscle is presented. Five patients with a partial or complete defect of the quadriceps or patellar tendon or both and additional large soft tissue defects underwent reconstruction applying this technique as a one-stage surgical procedure in different variations. In cases with a partial defect of the tendon or loss of tendon thickness, the thick aponeurosis from the deeper aspect of the gastrocnemius was dissected and transferred as a pedicled tendon flap to reconstruct the tendon defect. In cases with a complete defect of the tendon, the superficial layer of the Achilles tendon together with the deep aponeurotic layer of the gastrocnemius muscle served to reconstruct the tendon. In both procedures the gastrocnemius muscle belly provided soft tissue coverage and was covered with a split thickness skin graft. One patient had a marginal deep necrosis develop that had to be covered with the other gastrocnemius muscle in a second operation. One patient with chronic polyarthritis and infection of his knee prosthesis declined additional reconstruction surgery and had the leg amputated. The average followup was 3.5 years. All patients achieved good results in active extension of the knee with an extension deficit of only 5 degrees to 15 degrees. The range of flexion was at least 90 degrees. The surgical technique described in this report provides functional tendon reconstruction and adequate soft tissue repair simultaneously.

  7. The Effect of Surface Treatment Using Hyaluronic Acid and Lubricin on the Gliding Resistance of Human Extrasynovial Tendons In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Manabu; Zhao, Chunfeng; Sun, Yu-Long; Jay, Gregory D.; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the tendon surface treatment using hyaluronic acid (HA) and lubricin on the gliding resistance of human extrasynovial palmaris longus (PL) tendon in vitro. Methods Thirty two fresh-frozen human fingers and sixteen ipsilateral PL tendons were used. Each PL tendon was divided into two pieces which were randomly assigned into four experimental groups. After the gliding resistance of the normal PL tendon segments were measured, the tendons were treated with either saline, carbodiimide derivatized gelatin and hyaluronic acid (cd-HA-gelatin), carbodiimide derivatized gelatin with lubricin added (cd-gelatin+lubricin), or cd-HA-gelatin+lubricin. After treatment, tendon gliding resistance was measured up to 1000 cycles of simulated flexion/extension motion. Results The gliding resistance of the PL tendons in the cd-HA-gelatin, cd-gelatin+lubricin and cd-HA-gelatin+lubricin groups was significantly lower than that of the saline treated control after 1000 cycles (p<0.05). The gliding resistance in these treatment groups decreased within the first 50 cycles and then increased at a much more gradual rate over the 1000 cycles, with the cd-HA-gelatin+lubricin group being most stable. Conclusion The results suggest that tendon surface treatment using HA and lubricin can improve the gliding of human PL tendon in vitro. If validated in vivo, tendon surface treatment has the potential to improve the gliding ability of tendon grafts clinically. PMID:19556078

  8. Effects of the Index Finger Position and Force Production on the Flexor Digitorum Superficialis Moment Arms at the Metacarpophalangeal Joints- an Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Joel R.; Latash, Mark L.; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to use magnetic resonance imaging to measure the moment arm of the flexor digitorum superficialis tendon about the metacarpophalangeal joint of the index, middle, ring, and little fingers when the position and force production level of the index finger was altered. A secondary goal was to create regression models using anthropometric data to predict moment arms of the flexor digitorum superficialis about the metacarpophalangeal joint of each finger. Methods The hands of subjects were scanned using a 3.0T magnetic resonance imaging scanner. The metacarpophalangeal joint of the index finger was placed in: flexion, neutral, and extension. For each joint configuration subjects produced no active force (passive condition) and exerted a flexion force to resist a load at the fingertip (active condition). Results The following was found: (1) The moment arm of the flexor digitorum superficialis at the metacarpophalangeal joint of the index finger (a) increased with the joint flexion and stayed unchanged with finger extension; and (b) decreased with the increase of force at the neutral and extended finger postures and did not change at the flexed posture. (2) The moment arms of the flexor digitorum superficialis tendon of the middle, ring, and little fingers (a) did not change when the index metacarpophalangeal joint position changed (p > 0.20); and (b) The moment arms of the middle and little fingers increased when the index finger actively produced force at the flexed metacarpophalangeal joint posture. (4) The moment arms showed a high correlation with anthropometric measurements. Interpretation Moment arms of the flexor digitorum superficialis change due to both changes in joint angle and muscle activation; they scale with various anthropometric measures. PMID:22192658

  9. Tendon Reattachment to Bone in an Ovine Tendon Defect Model of Retraction Using Allogenic and Xenogenic Demineralised Bone Matrix Incorporated with Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Tendon-bone healing following rotator cuff repairs is mainly impaired by poor tissue quality. Demineralised bone matrix promotes healing of the tendon-bone interface but its role in the treatment of tendon tears with retraction has not been investigated. We hypothesized that cortical demineralised bone matrix used with minimally manipulated mesenchymal stem cells will result in improved function and restoration of the tendon-bone interface with no difference between xenogenic and allogenic scaffolds. Materials and Methods In an ovine model, the patellar tendon was detached from the tibial tuberosity and a complete distal tendon transverse defect measuring 1 cm was created. Suture anchors were used to reattach the tendon and xenogenic demineralised bone matrix + minimally manipulated mesenchymal stem cells (n = 5), or allogenic demineralised bone matrix + minimally manipulated mesenchymal stem cells (n = 5) were used to bridge the defect. Graft incorporation into the tendon and its effect on regeneration of the enthesis was assessed using histomorphometry. Force plate analysis was used to assess functional recovery. Results Compared to the xenograft, the allograft was associated with significantly higher functional weight bearing at 6 (P = 0.047), 9 (P = 0.028), and 12 weeks (P = 0.009). In the allogenic group this was accompanied by greater remodeling of the demineralised bone matrix into tendon-like tissue in the region of the defect (p = 0.015), and a more direct type of enthesis characterized by significantly more fibrocartilage (p = 0.039). No failures of tendon-bone healing were noted in either group. Conclusion Demineralised bone matrix used with minimally manipulated mesenchymal stem cells promotes healing of the tendon-bone interface in an ovine model of acute tendon retraction, with superior mechanical and histological results associated with use of an allograft. PMID:27606597

  10. Acceleration of tendon-bone healing in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using an enamel matrix derivative in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Kadonishi, Y; Deie, M; Takata, T; Ochi, M

    2012-02-01

    We examined whether enamel matrix derivative (EMD) could improve healing of the tendon-bone interface following reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) using a hamstring tendon in a rat model. ACL reconstruction was performed in both knees of 30 Sprague-Dawley rats using the flexor digitorum tendon. The effect of commercially available EMD (EMDOGAIN), a preparation of matrix proteins from developing porcine teeth, was evaluated. In the left knee joint the space around the tendon-bone interface was filled with 40 µl of EMD mixed with propylene glycol alginate (PGA). In the right knee joint PGA alone was used. The ligament reconstructions were evaluated histologically and biomechanically at four, eight and 12 weeks (n = 5 at each time point). At eight weeks, EMD had induced a significant increase in collagen fibres connecting to bone at the tendon-bone interface (p = 0.047), whereas the control group had few fibres and the tendon-bone interface was composed of cellular and vascular fibrous tissues. At both eight and 12 weeks, the mean load to failure in the treated specimens was higher than in the controls (p = 0.009). EMD improved histological tendon-bone healing at eight weeks and biomechanical healing at both eight and 12 weeks. EMD might therefore have a human application to enhance tendon-bone repair in ACL reconstruction.

  11. Inducement of tissue regeneration of harvested hamstring tendons in a rabbit model

    PubMed Central

    Soejima, T.; Murakami, H.; Noguchi, K.; Shiba, N.; Nagata, K.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to determine if the use of fascia lata as a tendon regeneration guide (placed into the tendon canal following harvesting the semitendinosus tendon) would improve the incidence of tissue regeneration and prevent fatty degeneration of the semitendinosus muscle. Materials and Methods Bilateral semitendinosus tendons were harvested from rabbits using a tendon stripper. On the inducing graft (IG) side, the tendon canal and semitendinosus tibial attachment site were connected by the fascia lata, which was harvested at the same width as the semitendinosus tendon. On the control side, no special procedures were performed. Two groups of six rabbits were killed at post-operative weeks 4 and 8, respectively. In addition, three healthy rabbits were killed to obtain normal tissue. We evaluated the incidence of tendon tissue regeneration, cross-sectional area of the regenerated tendon tissue and proportion of fatty tissue in the semitendinosus muscle. Results At post-operative week 8, the distal end of the regenerated tissue reached the vicinity of the tibial insertion on the control side in two of six specimens. On the IG side, the regenerated tissue maintained continuity with the tibial insertion in all specimens. The cross-sectional area of the IG side was significantly greater than that of the control side. The proportion of fatty tissue in the semitendinosus muscle on the IG side was comparable with that of the control side, but was significantly greater than that of the normal muscle. Conclusions Tendon tissue regenerated with the fascia lata graft was thicker than naturally occurring regenerated tissue. However, the proportion of fatty tissue in the semitendinosus muscle was greater than that of normal muscle. Cite this article: K. Tabuchi, T. Soejima, H. Murakami, K. Noguchi, N. Shiba, K. Nagata. Inducement of tissue regeneration of harvested hamstring tendons in a rabbit model. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:247–252. DOI: 10

  12. Functional characterization of detergent-decellularized equine tendon extracellular matrix for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Youngstrom, Daniel W; Barrett, Jennifer G; Jose, Rod R; Kaplan, David L

    2013-01-01

    Natural extracellular matrix provides a number of distinct advantages for engineering replacement orthopedic tissue due to its intrinsic functional properties. The goal of this study was to optimize a biologically derived scaffold for tendon tissue engineering using equine flexor digitorum superficialis tendons. We investigated changes in scaffold composition and ultrastructure in response to several mechanical, detergent and enzymatic decellularization protocols using microscopic techniques and a panel of biochemical assays to evaluate total protein, collagen, glycosaminoglycan, and deoxyribonucleic acid content. Biocompatibility was also assessed with static mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) culture. Implementation of a combination of freeze/thaw cycles, incubation in 2% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), trypsinization, treatment with DNase-I, and ethanol sterilization produced a non-cytotoxic biomaterial free of appreciable residual cellular debris with no significant modification of biomechanical properties. These decellularized tendon scaffolds (DTS) are suitable for complex tissue engineering applications, as they provide a clean slate for cell culture while maintaining native three-dimensional architecture.

  13. Synthetic grafts for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Rizzello, Giacomo; Berton, Alessandra; Fumo, Caterina; Maltese, Ludovica; Khan, Wasim S; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2013-11-01

    Several artificial biomaterials are available as ligament grafts. No ideal prosthesis mimicking natural human tissue have been found to date. The emerging field of tissue engineering holds the promise to use artificial ligaments as a viable alternative to the patellar or hamstring tendon autografts. Preliminary studies support the idea that these biomaterials have the ability to provide an alternative for autogenous grafts. However, no definitive conclusions have been found. Additionally, the incidence of postoperative complications varies within different studies. Prospective investigations are required to better understand the potential of artificial biomaterials as ligament grafts.

  14. Tendon Reconstruction with Tissue Engineering Approach--A Review.

    PubMed

    Verdiyeva, Gunay; Koshy, Kiron; Glibbery, Natalia; Mann, Haroon; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2015-09-01

    Tendon injuries are a common and rising occurrence, associated with significant impairment to quality of life and financial burden to the healthcare system. Clinically, they represent an unresolved problem, due to poor natural tendon healing and the inability of current treatment strategies to restore the tendon to its native state. Tissue engineering offers a promising alternative, with the incorporation of scaffolds, cells and growth factors to support the complete regeneration of the tendon. The materials used in tendon engineering to date have provided significant advances in structural integrity and biological compatibility and in many cases the results obtained are superior to those observed in natural healing. However, grafts fail to reproduce the qualities of the pre-injured tendon and each has weaknesses subject to its constituent parts. Furthermore, many materials and cell types are being investigated concurrently, with seemingly little association or comparison between research results. In this review the properties of the most-investigated and effective components have been appraised in light of the surrounding literature, with research from early in-vitro experiments to clinical trials being discussed. Extensive comparisons have been made between scaffolds, cell types and growth factors used, listing strengths and weaknesses to provide a stable platform for future research. Promising future endeavours are also described in the field of nanocomposite material science, stem cell sources and growth factors, which may bypass weaknesses found in individual elements. The future of tendon engineering looks bright, with growing understanding in material technology, cell and growth factor application and encouraging recent advances bringing us ever closer to regenerating the native tendon. PMID:26485923

  15. Tendon Reconstruction with Tissue Engineering Approach--A Review.

    PubMed

    Verdiyeva, Gunay; Koshy, Kiron; Glibbery, Natalia; Mann, Haroon; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2015-09-01

    Tendon injuries are a common and rising occurrence, associated with significant impairment to quality of life and financial burden to the healthcare system. Clinically, they represent an unresolved problem, due to poor natural tendon healing and the inability of current treatment strategies to restore the tendon to its native state. Tissue engineering offers a promising alternative, with the incorporation of scaffolds, cells and growth factors to support the complete regeneration of the tendon. The materials used in tendon engineering to date have provided significant advances in structural integrity and biological compatibility and in many cases the results obtained are superior to those observed in natural healing. However, grafts fail to reproduce the qualities of the pre-injured tendon and each has weaknesses subject to its constituent parts. Furthermore, many materials and cell types are being investigated concurrently, with seemingly little association or comparison between research results. In this review the properties of the most-investigated and effective components have been appraised in light of the surrounding literature, with research from early in-vitro experiments to clinical trials being discussed. Extensive comparisons have been made between scaffolds, cell types and growth factors used, listing strengths and weaknesses to provide a stable platform for future research. Promising future endeavours are also described in the field of nanocomposite material science, stem cell sources and growth factors, which may bypass weaknesses found in individual elements. The future of tendon engineering looks bright, with growing understanding in material technology, cell and growth factor application and encouraging recent advances bringing us ever closer to regenerating the native tendon.

  16. Gene expression in distinct regions of rat tendons in response to jump training combined with anabolic androgenic steroid administration.

    PubMed

    Marqueti, Rita Cássia; Marqueti, Rita de Cássia; Heinemeier, Katja Maria; Durigan, João Luiz Quaglioti; de Andrade Perez, Sérgio Eduardo; Schjerling, Peter; Kjaer, Michael; Carvalho, Hernandes Faustino; Selistre-de-Araujo, Heloisa Sobreiro

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of key genes responsible for tendon remodeling of the proximal and distal regions of calcaneal tendon (CT), intermediate and distal region of superficial flexor tendon (SFT) and proximal, intermediate and distal region of deep flexor tendon (DFT) submitted to 7 weeks of jumping water load exercise in combination with AAS administration. Wistar male rats were grouped as follows: sedentary (S), trained (jumping water load exercise) (T), sedentary animals treated with AAS (5 mg/kg, twice a week) and animals treated with AAS and trained (AAST). mRNA levels of COL1A1, COL3A1, TIMP-1, TIMP-2, MMP-2, IGF-IEa, GAPDH, CTGF and TGF-β-1 were evaluated by quantitative PCR. Our main results indicated that mRNA levels alter in different regions in each tendon of sedentary animals. The training did not alter the expression of COL1A1, COL3A, IGF-IEa and MMP-2 genes, while AAS administration or its combination with training reduced their expression. This study indicated that exercise did not alter the expression of collagen and related growth factors in different regions of rat tendon. Moreover, the pattern of gene expression was distinct in the different tendon regions of sedentary animals. Although, the RNA yield levels of CT, SFT and DFT were not distinct in each region, these regions possess not only the structural and biochemical difference, but also divergence in the expression of key genes involved in tendon adaptation.

  17. Gene expression in distinct regions of rat tendons in response to jump training combined with anabolic androgenic steroid administration.

    PubMed

    Marqueti, Rita Cássia; Marqueti, Rita de Cássia; Heinemeier, Katja Maria; Durigan, João Luiz Quaglioti; de Andrade Perez, Sérgio Eduardo; Schjerling, Peter; Kjaer, Michael; Carvalho, Hernandes Faustino; Selistre-de-Araujo, Heloisa Sobreiro

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of key genes responsible for tendon remodeling of the proximal and distal regions of calcaneal tendon (CT), intermediate and distal region of superficial flexor tendon (SFT) and proximal, intermediate and distal region of deep flexor tendon (DFT) submitted to 7 weeks of jumping water load exercise in combination with AAS administration. Wistar male rats were grouped as follows: sedentary (S), trained (jumping water load exercise) (T), sedentary animals treated with AAS (5 mg/kg, twice a week) and animals treated with AAS and trained (AAST). mRNA levels of COL1A1, COL3A1, TIMP-1, TIMP-2, MMP-2, IGF-IEa, GAPDH, CTGF and TGF-β-1 were evaluated by quantitative PCR. Our main results indicated that mRNA levels alter in different regions in each tendon of sedentary animals. The training did not alter the expression of COL1A1, COL3A, IGF-IEa and MMP-2 genes, while AAS administration or its combination with training reduced their expression. This study indicated that exercise did not alter the expression of collagen and related growth factors in different regions of rat tendon. Moreover, the pattern of gene expression was distinct in the different tendon regions of sedentary animals. Although, the RNA yield levels of CT, SFT and DFT were not distinct in each region, these regions possess not only the structural and biochemical difference, but also divergence in the expression of key genes involved in tendon adaptation. PMID:21842416

  18. Subject-Specific Tendon-Aponeurosis Definition in Hill-Type Model Predicts Higher Muscle Forces in Dynamic Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Gerus, Pauline; Rao, Guillaume; Berton, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Neuromusculoskeletal models are a common method to estimate muscle forces. Developing accurate neuromusculoskeletal models is a challenging task due to the complexity of the system and large inter-subject variability. The estimation of muscles force is based on the mechanical properties of tendon-aponeurosis complex. Most neuromusculoskeletal models use a generic definition of the tendon-aponeurosis complex based on in vitro test, perhaps limiting their validity. Ultrasonography allows subject-specific estimates of the tendon-aponeurosis complex’s mechanical properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of subject-specific mechanical properties of the tendon-aponeurosis complex on a neuromusculoskeletal model of the ankle joint. Seven subjects performed isometric contractions from which the tendon-aponeurosis force-strain relationship was estimated. Hopping and running tasks were performed and muscle forces were estimated using subject-specific tendon-aponeurosis and generic tendon properties. Two ultrasound probes positioned over the muscle-tendon junction and the mid-belly were combined with motion capture to estimate the in vivo tendon and aponeurosis strain of the medial head of gastrocnemius muscle. The tendon-aponeurosis force-strain relationship was scaled for the other ankle muscles based on tendon and aponeurosis length of each muscle measured by ultrasonography. The EMG-driven model was calibrated twice - using the generic tendon definition and a subject-specific tendon-aponeurosis force-strain definition. The use of subject-specific tendon-aponeurosis definition leads to a higher muscle force estimate for the soleus muscle and the plantar-flexor group, and to a better model prediction of the ankle joint moment compared to the model estimate which used a generic definition. Furthermore, the subject-specific tendon-aponeurosis definition leads to a decoupling behaviour between the muscle fibre and muscle-tendon unit in agreement with

  19. Subject-specific tendon-aponeurosis definition in Hill-type model predicts higher muscle forces in dynamic tasks.

    PubMed

    Gerus, Pauline; Rao, Guillaume; Berton, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Neuromusculoskeletal models are a common method to estimate muscle forces. Developing accurate neuromusculoskeletal models is a challenging task due to the complexity of the system and large inter-subject variability. The estimation of muscles force is based on the mechanical properties of tendon-aponeurosis complex. Most neuromusculoskeletal models use a generic definition of the tendon-aponeurosis complex based on in vitro test, perhaps limiting their validity. Ultrasonography allows subject-specific estimates of the tendon-aponeurosis complex's mechanical properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of subject-specific mechanical properties of the tendon-aponeurosis complex on a neuromusculoskeletal model of the ankle joint. Seven subjects performed isometric contractions from which the tendon-aponeurosis force-strain relationship was estimated. Hopping and running tasks were performed and muscle forces were estimated using subject-specific tendon-aponeurosis and generic tendon properties. Two ultrasound probes positioned over the muscle-tendon junction and the mid-belly were combined with motion capture to estimate the in vivo tendon and aponeurosis strain of the medial head of gastrocnemius muscle. The tendon-aponeurosis force-strain relationship was scaled for the other ankle muscles based on tendon and aponeurosis length of each muscle measured by ultrasonography. The EMG-driven model was calibrated twice - using the generic tendon definition and a subject-specific tendon-aponeurosis force-strain definition. The use of subject-specific tendon-aponeurosis definition leads to a higher muscle force estimate for the soleus muscle and the plantar-flexor group, and to a better model prediction of the ankle joint moment compared to the model estimate which used a generic definition. Furthermore, the subject-specific tendon-aponeurosis definition leads to a decoupling behaviour between the muscle fibre and muscle-tendon unit in agreement with

  20. Evaluation of tendon healing using fibroblast like synoviocytes in rabbits: A biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Azad-Tirgan, Mahboobeh; Sarrafzadeh-Rezaei, Farshid; Malekinejad, Hassan; Hobbenaghi, Rahim; Heshmatian, Behnam

    2016-01-01

    Tendon never restores the complete biological and mechanical properties after healing. Several techniques are available for tissue-engineered biological augmentation for tendon healing like stem cells. Recently, synovium has been investigated as a source of cells for tissue engineering. In the present study, we investigated potentials of fibroblast like synoviocytes (FLSs) in tendon healing. Sixteen rabbits were divided randomly into control and treatment groups. One rabbit was used as a donor of synovial membrane (synovium). The injury model was unilateral complete transection through the middle one third of deep digital flexor tendon (DDFT). Subsequently, the tendon stumps were sutured with 3/0 nylon. In treatment group, 0.1 mL phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution containing 1 × 10(6) nucleated cells of FLSs was injected intratendinously at both tendon stumps just next to incision line. In control group, 0.1 mL PBS without FLSs was used for intratendinous injection. Model animals were euthanized at eight weeks, DDFTs were harvested and prepared for biomechanical study. Results of study showed that, there was no significant differences in biomechanical parameters values between FLSs treated and control groups. In conclusion, intratendinous injection of FLSs did not improve biomechanical properties during eight weeks in rabbit. PMID:27226883

  1. Evaluation of tendon healing using fibroblast like synoviocytes in rabbits: A biomechanical study

    PubMed Central

    Azad-Tirgan, Mahboobeh; Sarrafzadeh-Rezaei, Farshid; Malekinejad, Hassan; Hobbenaghi, Rahim; Heshmatian, Behnam

    2016-01-01

    Tendon never restores the complete biological and mechanical properties after healing. Several techniques are available for tissue-engineered biological augmentation for tendon healing like stem cells. Recently, synovium has been investigated as a source of cells for tissue engineering. In the present study, we investigated potentials of fibroblast like synoviocytes (FLSs) in tendon healing. Sixteen rabbits were divided randomly into control and treatment groups. One rabbit was used as a donor of synovial membrane (synovium). The injury model was unilateral complete transection through the middle one third of deep digital flexor tendon (DDFT). Subsequently, the tendon stumps were sutured with 3/0 nylon. In treatment group, 0.1 mL phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution containing 1 × 106 nucleated cells of FLSs was injected intratendinously at both tendon stumps just next to incision line. In control group, 0.1 mL PBS without FLSs was used for intratendinous injection. Model animals were euthanized at eight weeks, DDFTs were harvested and prepared for biomechanical study. Results of study showed that, there was no significant differences in biomechanical parameters values between FLSs treated and control groups. In conclusion, intratendinous injection of FLSs did not improve biomechanical properties during eight weeks in rabbit. PMID:27226883

  2. [Simultaneous rupture of a patellar tendon and contralateral quadriceps tendon].

    PubMed

    Horas, U; Ernst, S; Meyer, C; Halbsguth, A; Herbst, U

    2006-09-01

    The simultaneous bilateral rupture of the quadriceps tendon is a rare injury; only occasional reports exist about the bilateral simultaneous rupture of the patellar tendon. Degenerative changes of the tendon due to drugs or diseases lead to the rupture. We describe two cases of simultaneous rupture of the patellar and contralateral quadriceps tendons; only one patient had special risks. We report the management of therapy and the functional results using the Lysholm score and Knee Rating Scale.

  3. Ultrastructural and morphological characteristics of human anterior cruciate ligament and hamstring tendons.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jingxian; Zhang, Xin; Ma, Yong; Zhou, Chunyan; Ao, Yingfang

    2012-09-01

    Hamstring tendons are a commonly used substitute for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Ligaments and tendons are similar in composition but the ACL is more complex than hamstring tendons in function and gross morphology, which are highly dependent on its structure and ultrastructure. The purpose of this study was to compare the morphology and ultrastructure of normal human ACL and hamstring tendons, including the cell type and arrangement, expression level of proteoglycans, diameter, and density of collagen fibrils. Twenty semitendinosus or gracilis tendons and 20 ACL specimens were harvested from patients with ACL rupture or osteoarthritis undergoing routine total knee arthroplasty. The specimens were examined histologically and the ultrastructure was observed using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Semitendinosus and gracilis tendons showed a homogeneous arrangement of collagen fibers and cell type. They had lower fibril density and more widely distributed fibril diameters. In the ACL, there was a more complex arrangement of collagen fibers, distribution of proteoglycans and different cell types. Electronic microscopy demonstrated a combination of parallel, helical and nonlinear networks of ACL fibrils, and fibril diameters were smaller and more nonuniform. This study compared the anatomy of normal human ACL and hamstring tendons, which may provide a standard for evaluating hamstring tendons grafts after ACL reconstruction and may facilitate the application of hamstring tendons in clinical applications.

  4. Autologous hamstring tendon used for revision of quadiceps tendon tears.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Frank; Nwachukwu, Benedict U; Kim, Jaehon; Martin, Scott D

    2013-04-01

    A paucity of literature exists on quadriceps tendon reruptures. Failed quadriceps tendon repair can cause significant morbidity and disability. Surgical management of quadriceps tendon rerupture can be challenging due to tissue degeneration, tendon retraction, muscle atrophy, and poor bone fixation. A lack of guidance in the literature exists on the appropriate surgical techniques for managing quadriceps tendon reruptures.This article describes the case of a male recreational athlete with a failed primary quadriceps tendon repair who presented 10 months after rerupture. Examination was significant for morbid obesity, assisted ambulation, and a significant defect at the superior pole of the patella on the affected side. Intraoperative findings were consistent with a 2.0- to 4.5-cm tendon defect across the extensor mechanism with complete retinaculi tears. The authors performed a novel surgical approach for revision of quadriceps tears using a bilateral hamstring autograft through a quadriceps tendon weave and a transosseous patellar repair. Tendon length was restored, and extensor mechanism tension was reapproximated. Postoperatively, the patient achieved a good outcome and had returned to full, painless, sport participation at 2-year follow-up.This surgical technique is suitable for revision quadriceps tendon repairs of large tendon gap defects, repairs desiring tendon-to-bone in-growth, and repairs requiring large-force transmission across the repair.

  5. Hyperuricemia in Tendons.

    PubMed

    Andia, Isabel; Abate, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Hyperuricemia, particularly gout, and the immune inflammatory response are highly integrated. Both, long standing hyperuricemia and monosodium urate (MSU) crystal deposition can challenge tendon homeostasis because of their potential to cause inflammation to the host. Knowledge is emerging from clinical imaging research depicting where MSU crystals deposit, including patellar tendon, triceps and quadriceps tendons. Remarkably, subclinical tendon inflammation and damage are also present in asymptomatic hyperuricemia. Monosodium urate crystals act as danger activating molecular patterns (DAMPs), activating the inflammasome and inducing the secretion of IL-1beta, a key mediator of the inflammatory response. The crucial role of IL-1beta in driving the inflammatory events during gout attacks is supported by the clinical efficacy of IL-1beta blockade. Some data implicating IL-1beta as an initiator of tendinopathy exist, but the link between hyperuricemia and the development of tendinopathy remains to be validated. Further knowledge about the interactions of uric acid with both innate immune and tendon cells, and their consequences may help to determine if there is a subclass of hyperuricemic-tendinopathy. PMID:27535254

  6. Surgical Treatment of Neglected Traumatic Quadriceps Tendon Rupture with Knee Ankylosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Hun; Song, Eun-Kyoo; Seon, Jong-Keun; Woo, Seong-Hwan

    2016-06-01

    Quadriceps tendon rupture is an uncommon injury. This disabling condition is the result of direct or indirect trauma. It requires surgical repair to avoid poor outcomes in cases of neglected or chronic rupture. In most acute cases, simple tendon suture or reinsertion is suitable for an extensor mechanism reconstruction of the knee joint. However, chronic lesions often require a tendon graft or flap reconstruction. We report a case of a 15-year-old male who was diagnosed with a chronic quadriceps rupture with a patellar superior pole fracture. We performed quadriceps reconstruction using tibialis anterior allograft tendon and additional screw fixation to reconstruct the extensor mechanism and recover knee joint range of motion to prevent a high-level functional restriction. The treatment was difficult and limited due to neglect for 9-months that led to ankylosis accompanied with nonunion of tibial fracture. Our surgical treatment using allograft tendon resulted in a very good outcome after 30 months of follow-up.

  7. Synergistic Co-activation Increases the Extent of Mechanical Interaction between Rat Ankle Plantar-Flexors

    PubMed Central

    Tijs, Chris; van Dieën, Jaap H.; Baan, Guus C.; Maas, Huub

    2016-01-01

    Force transmission between rat ankle plantar-flexors has been found for physiological muscle lengths and relative positions, but only with all muscles maximally activated. The aims of this study were to assess intermuscular mechanical interactions between ankle plantar-flexors during (i) fully passive conditions, (ii) excitation of soleus (SO), (iii) excitation of lateral gastrocnemius (LG), and (iv) during co-activation of SO, and LG (SO&LG). We assessed effects of proximal lengthening of LG and plantaris (PL) muscles (i.e., simulating knee extension) on forces exerted at the distal SO tendon (FSO) and on the force difference between the proximal and distal LG+PL tendons (ΔFLG+PL) of the rat. LG+PL lengthening increased FSO to a larger extent (p = 0.017) during LG excitation (0.0026 N/mm) than during fully passive conditions (0.0009 N/mm). Changes in FSO in response to LG+PL lengthening were lower (p = 0.002) during SO only excitation (0.0056 N/mm) than during SO&LG excitation (0.0101 N/mm). LG+PL lengthening changed ΔFLG+PL to a larger extent (p = 0.007) during SO excitation (0.0211 N/mm) than during fully passive conditions (0.0157 N/mm). In contrast, changes in ΔFLG+PL in response to LG+PL lengthening during LG excitation (0.0331 N/mm) were similar (p = 0.161) to that during SO&LG excitation (0.0370 N/mm). In all conditions, changes of FSO were lower than those of ΔFLG+PL. This indicates that muscle forces were transmitted not only between LG+PL and SO, but also between LG+PL and other surrounding structures. In addition, epimuscular myofascial force transmission between rat ankle plantar-flexors was enhanced by muscle activation. However, the magnitude of this interaction was limited. PMID:27708589

  8. Tendon Driven Finger Actuation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Reich, David M. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Linn, Douglas Martin (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Valvo, Michael C. (Inventor); Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); Permenter, Frank Noble (Inventor); Mehling, Joshua S. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A humanoid robot includes a robotic hand having at least one finger. An actuation system for the robotic finger includes an actuator assembly which is supported by the robot and is spaced apart from the finger. A tendon extends from the actuator assembly to the at least one finger and ends in a tendon terminator. The actuator assembly is operable to actuate the tendon to move the tendon terminator and, thus, the finger.

  9. Reconstruction of Kuwada grade IV chronic achilles tendon rupture by minimally invasive technique

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Xudong; Wu, Yongping; Tao, Huimin; Yang, Disheng; Huang, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Transfer of a flexor hallucis longus (FHL) tendon can not only reconstruct the Achilles tendon but also provide ischemic tendinous tissues with a rich blood supply to enhance wound healing. This retrospective study aims to investigate clinical outcomes in patients who underwent repair of Kuwada grade IV chronic Achilles tendon rupture with long hallucis longus tendons harvested using a minimally invasive technique. Materials and Methods: 35 patients who were treated for Kuwada grade IV Achilles tendon injuries from July 2006 to June 2011 were included in this retrospective study. The age ranged between 23 and 71 years. The duration from primary injury to surgery ranged from 29 days to 34 months (mean value, 137.6 days). All 35 patients had difficulties in lifting their calves. Thirty two were followed up for a mean 32.2 months (range 18–72 months), whereas three were lost to followup. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed that the tendon rupture gap ranged from 6.0 to 9.2 cm. During surgery, a 2.0 cm minor incision was made vertically in the medial plantar side of the midfoot, and a 1.5 cm minor transverse incision was made in the plantar side of the interphalangeal articulation of the great toe to harvest the FHL tendon, and the tendon was fixed to the calcaneus with suture anchors. Postoperative appearance and function were evaluated by physiotherapists based American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society-ankle and hindfoot score (AOFAS-AH), and Leppilahti Achilles tendon ratings. Results: Results were assessed in 32 patients. Except for one patient who suffered complications because of wound disruption 10 days after the operation, all other patients had primary wound healing, with 28 of 32 able to go up on their toes at last followup. The AOFAS-AH score was increased from preoperative (51.92 ± 7.08) points to (92.56 ± 6.71) points; Leppilahti Achilles tendon score was increased from preoperative (72.56 ± 7.43) to (92.58 ± 5.1). There were

  10. Neuronal regulation of tendon homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Paul W

    2013-08-01

    The regulation of tendon homoeostasis, including adaptation to loading, is still not fully understood. Accumulating data, however, demonstrates that in addition to afferent (sensory) functions, the nervous system, via efferent pathways which are associated with through specific neuronal mediators plays an active role in regulating pain, inflammation and tendon homeostasis. This neuronal regulation of intact-, healing- and tendinopathic tendons has been shown to be mediated by three major groups of molecules including opioid, autonomic and excitatory glutamatergic neuroregulators. In intact healthy tendons the neuromediators are found in the surrounding structures: paratenon, endotenon and epitenon, whereas the proper tendon itself is practically devoid of neurovascular supply. This neuroanatomy reflects that normal tendon homoeostasis is regulated from the tendon surroundings. After injury and during tendon repair, however, there is extensive nerve ingrowth into the tendon proper, followed by a time-dependent emergence of sensory, autonomic and glutamatergic mediators, which amplify and fine-tune inflammation and regulate tendon regeneration. In tendinopathic condition, excessive and protracted presence of sensory and glutamatergic neuromediators has been identified, suggesting involvement in inflammatory, nociceptive and hypertrophic (degenerative) tissue responses. Under experimental and clinical conditions of impaired (e.g. diabetes) as well as excessive (e.g. tendinopathy) neuromediator release, dysfunctional tendon homoeostasis develops resulting in chronic pain and gradual degeneration. Thus there is a prospect that in the future pharmacotherapy and tissue engineering approaches targeting neuronal mediators and their receptors may prove to be effective therapies for painful, degenerative and traumatic tendon disorders.

  11. Neuronal regulation of tendon homoeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, Paul W

    2013-01-01

    The regulation of tendon homoeostasis, including adaptation to loading, is still not fully understood. Accumulating data, however, demonstrates that in addition to afferent (sensory) functions, the nervous system, via efferent pathways which are associated with through specific neuronal mediators plays an active role in regulating pain, inflammation and tendon homeostasis. This neuronal regulation of intact-, healing- and tendinopathic tendons has been shown to be mediated by three major groups of molecules including opioid, autonomic and excitatory glutamatergic neuroregulators. In intact healthy tendons the neuromediators are found in the surrounding structures: paratenon, endotenon and epitenon, whereas the proper tendon itself is practically devoid of neurovascular supply. This neuroanatomy reflects that normal tendon homoeostasis is regulated from the tendon surroundings. After injury and during tendon repair, however, there is extensive nerve ingrowth into the tendon proper, followed by a time-dependent emergence of sensory, autonomic and glutamatergic mediators, which amplify and fine-tune inflammation and regulate tendon regeneration. In tendinopathic condition, excessive and protracted presence of sensory and glutamatergic neuromediators has been identified, suggesting involvement in inflammatory, nociceptive and hypertrophic (degenerative) tissue responses. Under experimental and clinical conditions of impaired (e.g. diabetes) as well as excessive (e.g. tendinopathy) neuromediator release, dysfunctional tendon homoeostasis develops resulting in chronic pain and gradual degeneration. Thus there is a prospect that in the future pharmacotherapy and tissue engineering approaches targeting neuronal mediators and their receptors may prove to be effective therapies for painful, degenerative and traumatic tendon disorders. PMID:23718724

  12. Treatment of chronic extensor tendons lesions of the fingers.

    PubMed

    Bellemère, P

    2015-09-01

    Chronic finger extensor apparatus injuries are the result of the initial acute treatment having failed or being flawed. Because of their chronic nature, these injuries present various amounts of tendon retraction, tendon callus lengthening, peritendinous scar adhesions, static and dynamic imbalances with the flexor apparatus and intrinsic muscles, and joint contractures. This article will review the anatomy of the extensor mechanism and then will outline by location, the various clinical pictures that are secondary to chronic tendon injury. The clinical presentation of these injuries can be highly variable but their symptomatology and treatment are very specific. Of the possible therapeutic strategies for chronic mallet finger with or without associated swan-neck deformity, chronic boutonniere deformity, chronic sagittal band injuries, old ruptures on the dorsum of the wrist and traumatic defects in multiple tissues, conservative treatment is often the main element. Secondary surgical repair is not free of complications, and the results are often lacking. Rehabilitation and orthotic bracing are an integral part of the management of these injuries, no matter which treatment method is being considered. PMID:26184651

  13. Tibialis Anterior Tendon Transfer.

    PubMed

    Mulhern, Jennifer L; Protzman, Nicole M; Brigido, Stephen A

    2016-01-01

    Tendon transfer procedures are used commonly for the correction of soft tissue imbalances and instabilities. The complete transfer and the split transfer of the tibialis anterior tendon are well-accepted methods for the treatment of idiopathic equinovarus deformity in children and adults. Throughout the literature, complete and split transfer have been shown to yield significant improvements in ankle and foot range of motion and muscle function. At present, there is insufficient evidence to recommend one procedure over the other, although the split procedure has been advocated for consistently achieving inversion to eversion muscle balance without overcorrection.

  14. Open Achilles tendon lacerations.

    PubMed

    Said, M Nader; Al Ateeq Al Dosari, Mohamed; Al Subaii, Nasser; Kawas, Alaa; Al Mas, Ali; Al Ser, Yaser; Abuodeh, Yousef; Shakil, Malik; Habash, Ali; Mukhter, Khalid

    2015-04-01

    In contrast to closed Achilles tendon ruptures, open injuries are rarely reported in the literature. This paper provides information about open Achilles tendon wounds that are eventually seen in the Middle East. The reporting unit, Hamad Medical Corporation, is one of the biggest trauma centers in the Gulf area and the major health provider in Qatar. This is a retrospective study including patients admitted and operated for open Achilles tendon injuries between January 2011 and December 2013. Two hundred and five cases of open Achilles tendon lacerations were operated in Hamad General Hospital in this period. Forty-eight cases showed partial injuries, and the remaining are complete tendons cut. In the same period, fifty-one closed ruptured Achilles tendons were operated in the same trauma unit. In the majority of cases, the open injury resulted from a slip in the floor-leveled traditional toilette seats. Local damage to the toilette seats resulted in sharp edges causing the laceration of the heel if the patient was slipping over the wet floor. This occurrence is the cause in the vast majority of the cases. Wounds were located 1-5 cm proximal to tendon insertion. Standard treatment principles were applied. This included thorough irrigation in the emergency room, intravenous antibiotics, surgical debridement and primary repair within 24 h. Patients were kept in the hospital 1-7 days for intravenous antibiotics and possible dressing changes. Postoperatively below knee slabs were applied in the majority of patients and were kept for about 4 weeks followed by gradual weight bearing and range of motion exercises. Outpatients follow up in 1-2 weeks. Further follow-up visits at around 2-, 4-, 8- and 12-week intervals until complete wound healing and satisfactory rehabilitation outcome. Sixteen cases needed a second procedure. A high incidence of Achilles tendon open injuries is reported. This seems to be related to partially damaged floor-level toilettes in the

  15. Posterior Tibial Tendon Transfer.

    PubMed

    Shane, Amber M; Reeves, Christopher L; Cameron, Jordan D; Vazales, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    When performed correctly with the right patient population, a tibialis posterior muscle/tendon transfer is an effective procedure. Many different methods have been established for fixating the tendon, each of which has its' own indications. Passing through the interosseous membrane is the preferred and recommended method and should be used unless this is not possible. Good surgical planning based on patient needs and expectations, along with excellent postoperative care including early range of motion and physical therapy minimizes risk of complications and allows for the optimal outcome to be achieved. PMID:26590722

  16. Distal Triceps Tendon Injuries.

    PubMed

    Keener, Jay D; Sethi, Paul M

    2015-11-01

    Acute triceps ruptures are an uncommon entity, occurring mainly in athletes, weight lifters (especially those taking anabolic steroids), and following elbow trauma. Accurate diagnosis is made clinically, although MRI may aid in confirmation and surgical planning. Acute ruptures are classified on an anatomic basis based on tear location and the degree of tendon involvement. Most complete tears are treated surgically in medically fit patients. Partial-thickness tears are managed according to the tear severity, functional demands, and response to conservative treatment. We favor an anatomic footprint repair of the triceps to provide optimal tendon to bone healing and, ultimately, functional outcome. PMID:26498552

  17. Stenosing flexor tenosynovitis following a rattlesnake bite.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lydia; Yao, Jeffrey

    2010-07-01

    Snakebite victims have been described previously in orthopedic literature in regard to complications such as compartment syndrome and carpal tunnel syndrome. We introduce a previously unreported complication of stenosing flexor tenosynovitis in a patient bitten by a rattlesnake. After being bitten in her right forearm, the patient experienced mild systemic symptoms of fever and nausea and was assessed at an outside hospital, where it was determined that she did not suffer from envenomation and therefore did not require antivenin therapy. She presented to our institution 1 week later with signs and symptoms of acute, new-onset right thumb flexor tenosynovitis, with pain and tenderness at the level of the A1 pulley of the thumb, with intermittent triggering. She also presented the following week with ipsilateral carpal tunnel syndrome. The patient reported no such symptoms prior to the snakebite. Given the recent development of these conditions after her snakebite, in addition to her history of endocrine disorders, we believe that our patient suffered from envenomation that led to these complications. Nonoperative measures including splinting and steroid injections were taken, with mixed results, and surgical intervention was necessary. While the proper management of snakebites is controversial, especially in regard to the administration of antivenin, we believe our patient would have benefitted from immediate evaluation and consideration for antivenin. PMID:20608624

  18. Magnesium inference screw supports early graft incorporation with inhibition of graft degradation in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Pengfei; Han, Pei; Zhao, Changli; Zhang, Shaoxiang; Zhang, Xiaonong; Chai, Yimin

    2016-01-01

    Patients after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery commonly encounters graft failure in the initial phase of rehabilitation. The inhibition of graft degradation is crucial for the successful reconstruction of the ACL. Here, we used biodegradable high-purity magnesium (HP Mg) screws in the rabbit model of ACL reconstruction with titanium (Ti) screws as a control and analyzed the graft degradation and screw corrosion using direct pull-out tests, microCT scanning, and histological and immunohistochemical staining. The most noteworthy finding was that tendon graft fixed by HP Mg screws exhibited biomechanical properties substantially superior to that by Ti screws and the relative area of collagen fiber at the tendon-bone interface was much larger in the Mg group, when severe graft degradation was identified in the histological analysis at 3 weeks. Semi-quantitative immunohistochemical results further elucidated that the MMP-13 expression significantly decreased surrounding HP Mg screws with relatively higher Collagen II expression. And HP Mg screws exhibited uniform corrosion behavior without displacement or loosening in the femoral tunnel. Therefore, our results demonstrated that Mg screw inhibited graft degradation and improved biomechanical properties of tendon graft during the early phase of graft healing and highlighted its potential in ACL reconstruction. PMID:27210585

  19. Magnesium inference screw supports early graft incorporation with inhibition of graft degradation in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Pengfei; Han, Pei; Zhao, Changli; Zhang, Shaoxiang; Zhang, Xiaonong; Chai, Yimin

    2016-05-01

    Patients after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery commonly encounters graft failure in the initial phase of rehabilitation. The inhibition of graft degradation is crucial for the successful reconstruction of the ACL. Here, we used biodegradable high-purity magnesium (HP Mg) screws in the rabbit model of ACL reconstruction with titanium (Ti) screws as a control and analyzed the graft degradation and screw corrosion using direct pull-out tests, microCT scanning, and histological and immunohistochemical staining. The most noteworthy finding was that tendon graft fixed by HP Mg screws exhibited biomechanical properties substantially superior to that by Ti screws and the relative area of collagen fiber at the tendon-bone interface was much larger in the Mg group, when severe graft degradation was identified in the histological analysis at 3 weeks. Semi-quantitative immunohistochemical results further elucidated that the MMP-13 expression significantly decreased surrounding HP Mg screws with relatively higher Collagen II expression. And HP Mg screws exhibited uniform corrosion behavior without displacement or loosening in the femoral tunnel. Therefore, our results demonstrated that Mg screw inhibited graft degradation and improved biomechanical properties of tendon graft during the early phase of graft healing and highlighted its potential in ACL reconstruction.

  20. Magnesium inference screw supports early graft incorporation with inhibition of graft degradation in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Pengfei; Han, Pei; Zhao, Changli; Zhang, Shaoxiang; Zhang, Xiaonong; Chai, Yimin

    2016-01-01

    Patients after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery commonly encounters graft failure in the initial phase of rehabilitation. The inhibition of graft degradation is crucial for the successful reconstruction of the ACL. Here, we used biodegradable high-purity magnesium (HP Mg) screws in the rabbit model of ACL reconstruction with titanium (Ti) screws as a control and analyzed the graft degradation and screw corrosion using direct pull-out tests, microCT scanning, and histological and immunohistochemical staining. The most noteworthy finding was that tendon graft fixed by HP Mg screws exhibited biomechanical properties substantially superior to that by Ti screws and the relative area of collagen fiber at the tendon-bone interface was much larger in the Mg group, when severe graft degradation was identified in the histological analysis at 3 weeks. Semi-quantitative immunohistochemical results further elucidated that the MMP-13 expression significantly decreased surrounding HP Mg screws with relatively higher Collagen II expression. And HP Mg screws exhibited uniform corrosion behavior without displacement or loosening in the femoral tunnel. Therefore, our results demonstrated that Mg screw inhibited graft degradation and improved biomechanical properties of tendon graft during the early phase of graft healing and highlighted its potential in ACL reconstruction. PMID:27210585

  1. Release of celecoxib from a bi-layer biomimetic tendon sheath to prevent tissue adhesion.

    PubMed

    Li, Laifeng; Zheng, Xianyou; Fan, Dapeng; Yu, Shiyang; Wu, Di; Fan, Cunyi; Cui, Wenguo; Ruan, Hongjiang

    2016-04-01

    Posttraumatic tendon adhesion limits the motion of the limbs greatly. Biomimetic tendon sheaths have been developed to promote tendon healing and gliding. However, after introduction of these biomaterials, the associated inflammatory responses can decrease the anti-adhesion effect. Celecoxib is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that can decrease inflammation responses. We blended hyaluronic acid and poly(l-lactic acid)-polyethylene glycol (PELA) with microgel electrospinning technology to form an inner layer of a bi-layer biomimetic sheath using sequential electrospinning of an outer celecoxib-PELA layer. Electrospun bi-layer fibrous membranes were mechanically tested and characterized by morphology, surface wettability, and drug release. The tensile strength showed a decreased trend and water contact angles were 114.7 ± 3.9°, 103.6 ± 4.4°, 116.3 ± 5.1°, 122.8 ± 4.7°, and 126.5 ± 4.2° for the surface of PELA, hyaluronic acid-PELA, 2, 6, and 10% celecoxib-PELA electrospun fibrous membranes, respectively. In vitro drug release studies confirmed burst release and then sustained release from the fibrous membranes containing celecoxib for 20 days. In a chicken model of flexor digitorum profundus tendon surgery, the outer celecoxib/PELA layer offered advanced anti-adhesion roles compared to the outer PELA layer and the inner hyaluronic acid-loaded PELA layer still offered tendon healing and gliding. Thus, celecoxib-loaded anti-adhesive tendon sheaths can continuously offer bi-layer biomimetic tendon sheath effects with celecoxib release from the outer layer to prevent tendon adhesion. PMID:26838844

  2. Mechanical properties of tendons: changes with sterilization and preservation.

    PubMed

    Smith, C W; Young, I S; Kearney, J N

    1996-02-01

    Tendon allografts are commonly used to replace damaged anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL). Some of the sterilization and preservation techniques used by tissue banks with tendon allografts are thought to impair the mechanical properties of graft tissues. The tensile mechanical properties of porcine toe extensor tendons were measured using a dynamic testing machine following either freezing, freeze-drying, freezing then irradiation at 25 kGy (2.5 MRad), freeze-drying then irradiation, or freeze-drying then ethylene oxide gas sterilization. There was a small but significant difference in Young's modulus between the frozen group (0.88 GPa + 0.09 SD) and both the fresh group (0.98 GPa 1 0.12 SD) and the frozen irradiated group (0.97 GPa 1 0.08 SD). No values of Young's modulus were obtained for the freeze-dried irradiated tendons. The ultimate tensile stress (UTS) of the freeze-dried irradiated group (4.7 MPa 1 4.8 SD) was significantly different from both the fresh and the frozen irradiated groups, being reduced by approximately 90 percent. There were no significant changes in UTS or Young's modulus between any of the other groups. If irradiation is to be used to sterilize a tendon replacement for an ACL it must take place after freeze-drying to maintain mechanical properties.

  3. Hallux saltans due to flexor hallucis longus entrapment at a previously unreported site in an unskilled manual laborer: a case report.

    PubMed

    Purushothaman, Rajesh; Karuppal, Raju; Inassi, Jojo; Valsalan, Rejith

    2012-01-01

    Triggering of the big toe, or hallux saltans, is commonly due to stenosing tenosynovitis of the flexor hallucis longus at the fibro-osseous tunnel below the sustentaculum tali. It is a rare condition described mainly in female ballet dancers. This is hypothesized to be due to the en pointe position used in ballet, which puts enormous supraphysiologic loads on the flexor hallucis longus, predisposing it to injury. Trigger hallux is extremely uncommon in the general population. We are reporting a case of hallux saltans in an unskilled manual laborer, with the site of tendon entrapment just proximal to the medial malleolus in the distal leg, a hitherto unreported location of stenosis. PMID:22459424

  4. Arthroscopic treatment of infrapatellar tendonitis.

    PubMed

    Romeo, A A; Larson, R V

    1999-04-01

    Infrapatellar tendonitis is a chronic overload lesion in the patellar ligament at the attachment to the lower pole of the patella. This lesion is found primarily in athletes who participate in jumping sports. Magnetic resonance imaging or ultrasound can show the extent of tendon pathology. Patellar tendonitis is treated with modification of activities, medications, and therapy. When conservative measures fail, operative debridement has been recommended. Previous reports have described a technique of open debridement of the patellar tendon, followed by an extended period of rehabilitation before returning to sports. Two athletes with persistent infrapatellar tendonitis were treated with an arthroscopic debridement. Both athletes returned to full activities without restrictions within 8 weeks of surgery. Arthroscopic treatment of infrapatellar tendonitis has not been previously described. This technical note describes the technique and two case reports of the arthroscopic treatment of infrapatellar tendonitis.

  5. Predicting Hamstring Graft Diameter Using MRI and Anthropometry

    PubMed Central

    Fritsch, Brett A; Mhaskar, Vikram A; An, Vincent Vinh Gia; Scholes, Corey

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Graft diameter is one variable that may affect outcome of ACL reconstruction. The ability to predict the size of a graft in a given patient pre-operatively may help guide graft selection and preparation technique. Various papers have correlated anthropometric data and MRI tendon measurements to intraoperative graft diameter, although no papers have investigated these together. The intra-operative diameter of a hamstring autograft will be influenced by graft preparation technique. Our study aimed to investigate the prediction of intraoperative graft diameter of 2 different graft construct techniques (4-strand semitendinosus versus quadrupled semitendinosus) using anthropometry and MRI measurements. Methods: Retrospective review of two groups of ACL reconstruction using different graft preparation techniques was performed. “Conventional” 4-strand gracilis + semitendinosus with fixed suspension at the femur and screw fixation at the tibia were compared with quadrupled semitendinosus grafts with adjustable suspensory fixation at each end (Graftlink). Cross-sectional areas (XSA) of the semitendinosus and gracilis tendons was measured in the axial slice of a T2 weighted MRI image using a region-of-interest tool. Stepwise linear regression using intraoperative graft diameter as the dependant variable was performed using MRI XSA of the semitendinosus and gracilis tendons, gender and height as predictors. Results: 129 ACL Reconstruction in 127 patients were done in the time period, 89 of which were done conventionally, and 40 which employed the Graftlink construct. The median graft diameter in the Graftlink group (8.5mm IQR8-9) was greater than that of the conventional group (8mm, IQR 7.5-8) (p < 0.001). MRI XSA of semitendinosus and height were statistically significant predictors of diameter in the Graftlink group (R2 = 51%), whilst MRI XSA of semitendinosus + gracilis and gender were predictors in the conventional group (R2 = 36%). Conclusion: Graftlink

  6. Plant grafting.

    PubMed

    Melnyk, Charles W; Meyerowitz, Elliot M

    2015-03-01

    Since ancient times, people have cut and joined together plants of different varieties or species so they would grow as a single plant - a process known as grafting (Figures 1 and 2). References to grafting appear in the Bible, ancient Greek and ancient Chinese texts, indicating that grafting was practised in Europe, the Middle East and Asia by at least the 5(th) century BCE. It is unknown where or how grafting was first discovered, but it is likely that natural grafting, the process by which two plants touch and fuse limbs or roots in the absence of human interference (Figure 3), influenced people's thinking. Such natural grafts are generally uncommon, but are seen in certain species, including English ivy. Parasitic plants, such as mistletoe, that grow and feed on often unrelated species may have also contributed to the development of grafting as a technique, as people would have observed mistletoe growing on trees such as apples or poplars. PMID:25734263

  7. Comparative Study on Functional Effects of Allotransplantation of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells and Adipose Derived Stromal Vascular Fraction on Tendon Repair: A Biomechanical Study in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Behfar, Mehdi; Javanmardi, Sara; Sarrafzadeh-Rezaei, Farshid

    2014-01-01

    Objective Tendon never returns to its complete biological and mechanical properties after repair. Bone marrow and, recently, adipose tissue have been used as sources of mesenchymal stem cells which have been proven to enhance tendon healing. In the present study, we compared the effects of allotransplantation of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) and adipose derived stromal vascular fraction (SVF) on tendon mechanical properties after experimentally induced flexor tendon transection. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, we used 48 adult male New Zealand white rabbits. Twelve of rabbits were used as donors of bone marrow and adipose tissue, the rest were divided into control and treatment groups. The injury model was a unilateral complete transection of the deep digital flexor tendon. Immediately after suture repair, 4×106cells of either fresh SVF from enzymatic digestion of adipose tissue or cultured BMSCs were intratendinously injected into tendon stumps in the treatment groups. Controls received phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Immobilization with a cast was continued for two weeks after surgery. Animals were sacrificed three and eight weeks after surgery and tendons underwent mechanical evaluations. The differences among the groups were analyzed using the analysis of variance (ANOVA) test followed by Tukey’s multiple comparisons test. Results Stromal cell transplantation resulted in a significant increase in ultimate and yield loads, energy absorption, and stress of repairs compared to the controls. However, there were no statistically significant changes detected in terms of stiffness. In comparison, we observed no significant differences at the third week between SVF and BMSCs treated tendons in terms of all load related properties. However, at the eighth week SVF transplantation resulted in significantly increased energy absorption, stress and stiffness compared to BMSCs. Conclusion The enhanced biomechanical properties of

  8. Engineering human neo-tendon tissue in vitro with human dermal fibroblasts under static mechanical strain.

    PubMed

    Deng, Dan; Liu, Wei; Xu, Feng; Yang, Yang; Zhou, Guangdong; Zhang, Wen Jie; Cui, Lei; Cao, Yilin

    2009-12-01

    Proper cell source is one of the key issues for tendon engineering. Our previous study showed that dermal fibroblasts could be used to successfully engineer tendon in vivo and tenocytes could engineer neo-tendon in vitro with static strain. This study further investigated the possibility of engineering human neo-tendon tissue in vitro using dermal fibroblasts. Human dermal fibroblasts were seeded on polyglycolic acid (PGA) fibers pre-fixed on a U-shape as a mechanical loading group, or simply cultured in a dish as a tension-free group. In addition, human tenocytes were also seeded on PGA fibers with tension as a comparison to human dermal fibroblasts. The results showed that human neo-tendon tissue could be generated using dermal fibroblasts during in vitro culture under static strain and the tissue structure became more mature with the increase of culture time. Longitudinally aligned collagen fibers and spindle shape cells were observed histologically and collagen fibril diameter and tensile strength increased with time and reached a peak at 14 weeks. In contrast, the dermal fibroblast-PGA constructs failed to form neo-tendon, but formed disorganized fibrous tissue in tension-free condition with significantly weaker strength and poor collagen fiber formation. Interestingly, neo-tendon tissues generated with human dermal fibroblasts were indistinguishable from the counterpart engineered with human tenocytes, which supports the viewpoint that human dermal fibroblasts is likely to replace tenocytes for future tendon graft development in vitro with dynamic mechanical loading in a bioreactor system.

  9. [Successive ruptures of patellar and Achilles tendons. Anabolic steroids in competitive sports].

    PubMed

    Isenberg, J; Prokop, A; Skouras, E

    2008-01-01

    Derivatives of testosterone or of 19-nor-testosterone are used as anabolics for the purpose of improving performance although the effect of anabolics is known still to be under discussion. The use of anabolic steroids continues among competitive athletes despite increased controls and increasingly frequent dramatic incidents connected with them. Whereas metabolic dysfunction during anabolic use is well documented, ruptures of the large tendons are rarely reported. Within 18 months, a 29-year-old professional footballer needed surgery for rupture of the patellar tendon and of both Achilles tendons. Carefully directed questioning elicited confirmation that he had taken different anabolic steroids regularly for 3 years with the intention of improving his strength. After each operation anabolic steroids were taken again at a high dosage during early convalescence and training. Minimally invasive surgery and open suturing techniques led to complete union of the Achilles tendons in good time. Training and anabolic use (metenolon 300 mg per week) started early after suturing of the patellar tendon including bone tunnels culminated in histologically confirmed rerupture after 8 weeks. After a ligament reconstruction with a semitendinosus tendon graft with subsequent infection, the tendon and reserve traction apparatus were lost. Repeated warnings of impaired healing if anabolic use was continued had been given without success. In view of the high number of unrecorded cases in competitive and athletic sports, we can assume that the use of anabolic steroids is also of quantitative relevance in the operative treatment of tendon ruptures.

  10. Pseudo-hyperelastic model of tendon hysteresis from adaptive recruitment of collagen type I fibrils.

    PubMed

    Ciarletta, Pasquale; Dario, Paolo; Micera, Silvestro

    2008-02-01

    Understanding the functional relationship between the viscoelasticity and the morphology of soft collagenous tissues is fundamental for many applications in bioengineering science. This work presents a pseudo-hyperelastic constitutive theory aiming at describing the time-dependant hysteretic response of tendons subjected to uniaxial tensile loads. A macroscopic tendon is modeled as a composite homogeneous tissue with the anisotropic reinforcement of collagen type I fibrils. The tissue microstructure is considered as an adaptive network of fibrillar units connected in temporary junctions. The processes of breakage and reformation of active fibrils are thermally activated, and are occurring at random times. An internal softening variable and a dissipation energy function account for the adaptive arrangement of the fibrillar network in the pseudo-hyperelastic model. Cyclic uniaxial tensile tests have been performed in vitro on porcine flexor digital tendons. The theoretical predictions fit accurately the experimental stress-strain data both for the loading and the unloading processes. The hysteresis behavior reflects the improvement in the efficiency and performance of the motion of the muscle-tendon unit at high strain rates. The results of the model demonstrate the microstructural importance of proteoglycans in determining the functional viscoelastic adaptability of the macroscopic tendon.

  11. Alcoholic extract of tarantula cubensis improves sharp ruptured tendon healing after primary repair in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Oryan, Ahmad; Moshiri, Ali; Meimandi Parizi, Abdolhamid

    2012-12-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of tarantula cubensis (TC) on the superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) rupture after surgical anastomosis, on day 84-postinjury (DPI) in rabbits. Forty white New Zealand, mature, male rabbits were randomly and evenly divided into treated and control groups. After tenotomy and primary repair, the injured legs were immobilized for 2 weeks. TC was injected subcutaneously over the lesion on 3, 7, and 10 DPI. The control animals received subcutaneous injections of normal saline similarly. Animal's weight, tendon diameter, clinical status, radiographic and ultrasonographic evaluations were recorded at weekly intervals. The animals were euthanized on 84 DPI and the injured tendons and their normal contralaterals were evaluated for histopathologic, histomorphometric, ultrastructural, biomechanical, and percentage dry weight parameters. Treatment significantly improved the clinical performance, cell, collagen and tissue maturation, tissue alignment and remodeling, ultimate strength, stiffness, maximum stress, and dry weight content and decreased the tendon diameter, inflammation, adhesions and degeneration of the injured treated tendons compared to the injured control ones. The present findings showed that TC is effective on sharp ruptured SDFT in rabbits and it could be one of the novel therapeutic options in clinical trial studies. PMID:23431525

  12. Freeze-thaw cycles enhance decellularization of large tendons.

    PubMed

    Burk, Janina; Erbe, Ina; Berner, Dagmar; Kacza, Johannes; Kasper, Cornelia; Pfeiffer, Bastian; Winter, Karsten; Brehm, Walter

    2014-04-01

    The use of decellularized tendon tissue as a scaffold for tendon tissue engineering provides great opportunities for future clinical and current research applications. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of repetitive freeze-thaw cycles and two different detergents, t-octyl-phenoxypolyethoxyethanol (Triton X-100) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), on decellularization effectiveness and cytocompatibility in large tendons. Freshly collected equine superficial and deep digital flexor tendons were subjected to decellularization according to four different protocols (1 and 2: freeze-thaw cycles combined with either Triton X-100 or SDS; 3 and 4: Triton X-100 or SDS). Decellularization effectiveness was assessed based on the reduction of vital cell counts, histologically visible nuclei, and DNA content. Transmission electron microscopy was performed to evaluate cellular and extracellular matrix integrity. Further, cytocompatibility of scaffolds that had been decellularized according to the protocols including freeze-thaw cycles (protocols 1 and 2) was assessed by seeding the scaffolds with superparamagnetic iron oxide labeled mesenchymal stromal cells and monitoring the cells histologically and by magnetic resonance imaging for two weeks. Decellularization was significantly more effective when using the protocols including freeze-thaw cycles, leaving only roughly 1% residual nuclei and 20% residual DNA, whereas samples that had not undergone additional freeze-thaw cycles contained roughly 20% residual nuclei and 40% residual DNA. No morphological extracellular matrix alterations due to decellularization could be observed. Scaffolds prepared by both protocols including freeze-thaw cycles were cytocompatible, but the cell distribution into the scaffold tended to be better in scaffolds that had been decellularized using freeze-thaw cycles combined with Triton X-100 instead of SDS.

  13. Repeated freeze-thaw cycles reduce the survival rate of osteocytes in bone-tendon constructs without affecting the mechanical properties of tendons.

    PubMed

    Suto, Kaori; Urabe, Ken; Naruse, Kouji; Uchida, Kentaro; Matsuura, Terumasa; Mikuni-Takagaki, Yuko; Suto, Mitsutoshi; Nemoto, Noriko; Kamiya, Kentaro; Itoman, Moritoshi

    2012-03-01

    Frozen bone-patellar tendon bone allografts are useful in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction as the freezing procedure kills tissue cells, thereby reducing immunogenicity of the grafts. However, a small portion of cells in human femoral heads treated by standard bone-bank freezing procedures survive, thus limiting the effectiveness of allografts. Here, we characterized the survival rates and mechanisms of cells isolated from rat bones and tendons that were subjected to freeze-thaw treatments, and evaluated the influence of these treatments on the mechanical properties of tendons. After a single freeze-thaw cycle, most cells isolated from frozen bone appeared morphologically as osteocytes and expressed both osteoblast- and osteocyte-related genes. Transmission electron microscopic observation of frozen cells using freeze-substitution revealed that a small number of osteocytes maintained large nuclei with intact double membranes, indicating that these osteocytes in bone matrix were resistant to ice crystal formation. We found that tendon cells were completely killed by a single freeze-thaw cycle, whereas bone cells exhibited a relatively high survival rate, although survival was significantly reduced after three freeze-thaw cycles. In patella tendons, the ultimate stress, Young's modulus, and strain at failure showed no significant differences between untreated tendons and those subjected to five freeze-thaw cycles. In conclusion, we identified that cells surviving after freeze-thaw treatment of rat bones were predominantly osteocytes. We propose that repeated freeze-thaw cycles could be applied for processing bone-tendon constructs prior to grafting as the treatment did not affect the mechanical property of tendons and drastically reduced surviving osteocytes, thereby potentially decreasing allograft immunogenecity.

  14. [Damage to large tendons: Achilles, patellar and quadriceps tendons].

    PubMed

    Amlang, M H; Zwipp, H

    2006-07-01

    The etiology and mechanisms of Achilles, patellar and quadriceps tendon ruptures are very similar. Age dependent changes in tendon structure and disorders such gout, diabetes, rheumatic diseases and chronic renal failure are associated causes. The main mechanism of rupture is indirect trauma. Although clinical diagnosis is easy, ruptures are still frequently missed. Sonography is the main standard diagnostic tool. MRI is indicated only in special cases. Open operative repair is the most common treatment for quadriceps and patellar tendon ruptures. Treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures is moving towards an individualized choice of therapy. Percutaneous and other "minimally invasive" techniques will play an increasingly important role.

  15. Effects of cyclic loading on the tensile properties of human patellar tendon.

    PubMed

    Chandrashekar, Naveen; Slauterbeck, James; Hashemi, Javad

    2012-01-01

    Bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) graft is a popular choice for ACL reconstruction. These grafts are subjected to cyclic loading during the activities of daily living. Significant knee laxity is observed in reconstructed knee shortly after reconstruction. The source of this laxity is not clear. The change in the tensile properties of the graft due to cyclic loading can be one of the reasons for the change in knee laxity. Twenty patellar tendons from fresh frozen cadaver knees were cyclically loaded at a stress amplitude equivalent to 33% of the failure strength of the contralateral patellar tendon for 5000 cycles at 1.4Hz. They were then tested in tension to failure. Failure properties and the low load properties such as toe-region modulus were calculated. The results were compared with those of contralateral patellar tendons that were not subjected to cyclic loading before testing to failure. Fatigue loading did not alter the failure and low load properties with the exception of failure strain which decreased by about 10% (P<.05). Cyclically loaded patellar tendons with higher tissue mass density possess higher strength, modulus of elasticity, toughness, and transition stress (P<.05). The results indicate that there is no significant change in graft properties because of cyclic loading with the above load magnitude. The change in knee laxity observed after reconstruction, hence, is not because of change in graft properties due to moderate cyclic loading. Other factors, such as plastic deformation (yielding) of the graft, might play a role in increased knee laxity after reconstruction.

  16. Scaffolds in Tendon Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Lamberti, Alfredo; Petrillo, Stefano; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Tissue engineering techniques using novel scaffold materials offer potential alternatives for managing tendon disorders. Tissue engineering strategies to improve tendon repair healing include the use of scaffolds, growth factors, cell seeding, or a combination of these approaches. Scaffolds have been the most common strategy investigated to date. Available scaffolds for tendon repair include both biological scaffolds, obtained from mammalian tissues, and synthetic scaffolds, manufactured from chemical compounds. Preliminary studies support the idea that scaffolds can provide an alternative for tendon augmentation with an enormous therapeutic potential. However, available data are lacking to allow definitive conclusion on the use of scaffolds for tendon augmentation. We review the current basic science and clinical understanding in the field of scaffolds and tissue engineering for tendon repair. PMID:22190961

  17. Peroneal tendons subluxation.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Francesco; Del Frate, Dario; Ferran, Nicholas Antonio; Maffulli, Nicola

    2009-06-01

    Subluxation of the peroneal tendons is uncommon. It occurs especially in skiing, soccer, basketball, rugby, ice skating, judo, sprint, water-skiing, mountaineering, and gymnastics. We present an overview of the injury, with the classification commonly used. Many surgical techniques have been described to manage recurrent subluxation of the peroneal tendons, but only Level IV/Grade C evidence has been produced. Thus, randomized controlled trials are necessary to determinate the best surgical management method. It appears that high-demand individuals should be primarily managed surgically, and retinaculoplasty seems to be, when indicated, the best surgical option: it affords less complications and a high rate of return to sports without reducing their activity levels.

  18. Functional results after surgical repair of quadriceps tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    De Baere, T; Geulette, B; Manche, E; Barras, L

    2002-04-01

    We present the long-term results of surgical repair of a traumatic rupture of the quadriceps tendon in a group of 24 patients with a mean age of 58 years. There were 21 male and 3 female patients. Fifteen patients were seen for clinical control after a mean follow-up of 75 months and they all presented with some quadriceps muscle atrophy. Twelve patients had normal knee mobility, three had a flexion deformity of 10 degrees and two had less than 120 degrees of knee flexion. Active knee extension was normal in all patients. Three patients experienced some decrease in stability of their knee joint. Subjectively all patients were satisfied with the result. Nine patients underwent a Cybex-test for evaluation of the isokinetic force of knee flexion and extension, with a comparison between the injured and the uninjured side. For concentric force there was a mean deficit at low speed of 36.1% for the quadriceps muscle; at high speed it was 28.2%. For the knee flexors, the deficits were 30.7% and 27.2% respectively. Regarding eccentric force, the mean deficit for knee extensors was 13.8% and 0.25% respectively and for knee flexors 6.5% and 5.5% respectively.

  19. Tendon motion and strain patterns evaluated with two-dimensional ultrasound elastography.

    PubMed

    Chernak, Laura A; Thelen, Darryl G

    2012-10-11

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of 2D ultrasound elastography to assess tendon tissue motion and strain under axial loading conditions. Four porcine flexor tendons were cyclically loaded to 4% peak strain using a servo hydraulic test system. An ultrasound transducer was positioned to image a longitudinal cross-section of the tendon during loading. Ultrasound radiofrequency (RF) data were collected at 63 frames per second simultaneously with applied force and crosshead displacement. A grid of nodes was manually positioned on an ultrasound image of the unloaded tendon. Small kernels (2×1 mm) centered at each node were then cross-correlated with search regions centered at corresponding nodal locations in the subsequent frame. Frame-to-frame nodal displacements were defined as the values that maximized the normalized cross-correlations. This process was repeated across all frames in the loading cycle, providing a measurement of the 2D trajectories of tissue motion throughout the loading cycle. The high resolution displacement measures along the RF beam direction were spatially differentiated to estimate the transverse (relative to tendon fibers) tissue strains. The nodal displacements obtained using this method were very repeatable, with average along-fiber trajectories that were highly correlated (average r=0.99) with the prescribed crosshead displacements. The elastography transverse strains were also repeatable and were consistent with average transverse strains estimated via changes in tendon width. The apparent Poisson's ratios (0.82-1.64) exceeded the incompressibility limit, but are comparable to values found for tendon in prior experimental and computational studies. The results demonstrate that 2D ultrasound elastography is a promising approach for noninvasively assessing localized tissue motion and strain patterns. PMID:22939179

  20. Isolated vastus lateralis tendon avulsion.

    PubMed

    Frank, Jonathan M; Riedel, Matthew D; McCormick, Frank M; Nho, Shane J

    2013-10-01

    Isolated avulsion of the vastus lateralis tendon is a very rare injury. To our knowledge, only 1 case has been reported in the literature. This tendon is crucial to knee stability and proper patellofemoral tracking. As isolated avulsion of the tendon tends to occur in young, active males, early surgical repair is recommended to allow them to maintain a high level of functional ability. We present the case of a 49-year-old man who sustained an isolated vastus lateralis tendon avulsion injury. The injury was successfully treated with suture anchor repair.

  1. Effects of Sacrificing Tensor Tympani Muscle Tendon When Manubrium of Malleus Is Foreshortened in Type I Tympanoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Vadiya, Sohil

    2015-01-01

    The current study aims at observing effects of sacrificing the tensor tympani tendon when manubrium of malleus is foreshortened or retracted on graft uptake, hearing improvement, and occurrence of complications if any during type I tympanoplasty surgery for central perforations. 42 patients were included in group A where the tensor tendon was sectioned and 42 patients were included in group B where the tensor tympani tendon was retained and kept intact. Graft uptake rates are very good in both groups but hearing improvement was found significantly better in group A than group B. No unusual or undesired complications were seen in any of the cases. Sectioning of tensor tympani tendon is safe and effective procedure in cases where manubrium is foreshortened. PMID:26697069

  2. Nomenclatural review of long digital forelimb flexors in carnivores.

    PubMed

    Spoor, C F; Badoux, D M

    1986-12-01

    A hitherto-unknown atavistic muscle in the dog initiated a review of the literature on the homologies and nomenclature of the forelimb flexors in carnivores and man. A consequence is that we recommend a revision of the nomenclature in the Nomina Anatomica Veterinaria (Ithaca, New York, 1983) so that it is in agreement with the Nomina Anatomica (Wilkins, Baltimore, 1983). This revision mainly consists of the incorporation of the terms M. palmaris longus and Mm. flexores breves manus.

  3. Contractile properties of muscle fibers from the deep and superficial digital flexors of horses.

    PubMed

    Butcher, M T; Chase, P B; Hermanson, J W; Clark, A N; Brunet, N M; Bertram, J E A

    2010-10-01

    Equine digital flexor muscles have independent tendons but a nearly identical mechanical relationship to the main joint they act upon. Yet these muscles have remarkable diversity in architecture, ranging from long, unipennate fibers ("short" compartment of DDF) to very short, multipennate fibers (SDF). To investigate the functional relevance of the form of the digital flexor muscles, fiber contractile properties were analyzed in the context of architecture differences and in vivo function during locomotion. Myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform fiber type was studied, and in vitro motility assays were used to measure actin filament sliding velocity (V(f)). Skinned fiber contractile properties [isometric tension (P(0)/CSA), velocity of unloaded shortening (V(US)), and force-Ca(2+) relationships] at both 10 and 30°C were characterized. Contractile properties were correlated with MHC isoform and their respective V(f). The DDF contained a higher percentage of MHC-2A fibers with myosin (heavy meromyosin) and V(f) that was twofold faster than SDF. At 30°C, P(0)/CSA was higher for DDF (103.5 ± 8.75 mN/mm(2)) than SDF fibers (81.8 ± 7.71 mN/mm(2)). Similarly, V(US) (pCa 5, 30°C) was faster for DDF (2.43 ± 0.53 FL/s) than SDF fibers (1.20 ± 0.22 FL/s). Active isometric tension increased with increasing Ca(2+) concentration, with maximal Ca(2+) activation at pCa 5 at each temperature in fibers from each muscle. In general, the collective properties of DDF and SDF were consistent with fiber MHC isoform composition, muscle architecture, and the respective functional roles of the two muscles in locomotion.

  4. Matrix metallopeptidase 2 activity in tendon regions: effects of mechanical loading exercise associated to anabolic-androgenic steroids.

    PubMed

    Marqueti, Rita C; Prestes, Jonato; Paschoal, Milena; Ramos, Oscar H P; Perez, Sérgio E A; Carvalho, Hernandes F; Selistre-de-Araujo, Heloisa S

    2008-12-01

    Matrix metallopeptidases (MMPs) are responsible for degradation of the extracellular matrix components and tissue remodeling. To achieve a better understanding of AAS effects in rat tendon, MMP-2 activity in the proximal and distal regions of the calcanear tendon (CT) and proximal, intermediate and distal region of superficial (SFT) and deep flexor tendons (DFT) after mechanical load exercise associated with AAS was investigated. Animals were grouped into four groups: sedentary animals (S); sedentary animals with ASS supplementation (S + A); trained animals (T) and trained animals with AAS supplementation (T + A). Analysis of MMP activity in tendon extracts was done by gelatin zymography. Both proximal and distal regions of the calcanear tendon showed the lowest MMP-2 concentration and the highest proportion in MMP-2 active form. The intermediate region of the SFT differed (P < 0.01) from the proximal and distal regions with higher % of active MMP-2 in the sedentary group. The proportion of active MMP-2 decreased in the proximal region of the CT. AAS treatment strongly decreased both MMP-2 concentration and active form in the three regions of the SFT and on the proximal region of the CT, but not on the DFT. The differences in the response to exercise and AAS treatment are a result of distinct metabolism and recruitment of these tendon regions in the exercise program employed in this study.

  5. Assessment of stem cell carriers for tendon tissue engineering in pre-clinical models

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Tendon injuries are prevalent and problematic, especially among young and otherwise healthy individuals. The inherently slow innate healing process combined with the inevitable scar tissue formation compromise functional recovery, imposing the need for the development of therapeutic strategies. The limited number of low activity/reparative capacity tendon-resident cells has directed substantial research efforts towards the exploration of the therapeutic potential of various stem cells in tendon injuries and pathophysiologies. Severe injuries require the use of a stem cell carrier to enable cell localisation at the defect site. The present study describes advancements that injectable carriers, tissue grafts, anisotropically orientated biomaterials, and cell-sheets have achieved in preclinical models as stem cell carriers for tendon repair. PMID:25157898

  6. Bilateral Spontaneous Midsubstance Patellar Tendon Rupture after Bilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Rajani, Amyn; Dash, Kumar Kaushik; Mahajan, Neetin P; Kumar, Ritesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Patellar tendon rupture can occur due to multiple causes ranging from inflammatory pathologies to episodes of trauma. Extensor mechanism rupture is a rare complication of total knee arthroplasty (TKA). In most of these cases, the failure occurs as avulsion of patellar tendon from tibial tuberosity. We report a rare case with bilateral mid-substance patellar tendon rupture one month after bilateral total knee arthroplasty. Case Presentation: A 69-year-old male was operated for bilateral grade 4 osteoarthritis. On day 30 post-operative, he sustained bilateral patellar tendon rupture while getting up from toilet. He had a history of multiple steroid injections in the knee, which could have affected the tendon. The other etiologies could be inherent weakness of tendon due to diabetes and old age and micro-trauma/stretch associated with sudden correction of previous deformity by TKA. The management in our case was done by primary repair along with augmentation by autologous semitendinosus graft and suture anchor. Conclusion: The operating surgeon must be aware of the possibility of patellar tendon rupture following total knee arthroplasty. This will help the surgeon in early recognition and preparedness to handle such complications, should they arise. Surgeons may consider advising caution to both patient and rehabilitation team in cases with old age, chronic diabetes mellitus, and with a history of steroid injections. PMID:27703942

  7. Effects of freezing on the biomechanical and structural properties of human posterior tibial tendons

    PubMed Central

    Giannini, Sandro; Buda, Roberto; Agati, Patrizia; Bigi, Adriana; De Pasquale, Viviana; Ruggeri, Alessandro

    2007-01-01

    This work analyzes the effects of storage by fresh-freezing at −80°C on the histological, structural and biomechanical properties of the human posterior tibial tendon (PTT), used for ACL reconstruction. Twenty-two PTTs were harvested from eleven donors. For each donor one tendon was frozen at −80°C and thawed in physiological solution at 37°C, and the other was tested without freezing (control). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and biomechanical analysis were performed. We found the following mean changes in frozen-thawed tendons compared to controls: TEM showed an increase in the mean diameter of collagen fibrils and in fibril non-occupation mean ratio, while the mean number of fibrils decreased; DSC showed a decrease in mean denaturation temperature and denaturation enthalpy. Biomechanical analysis showed a decrease in ultimate load and ultimate stress, an increase in stiffness and a decrease in ultimate strain of tendons. In conclusion fresh-freezing brings about significant changes in the biomechanical and structural properties of the human PTT. A high variability exists in the biophysical properties of tendons among individuals and in the effects of storage on tendons. Therefore, when choosing an allograft tendon, particular care is needed to choose a biomechanically suitable graft. PMID:17216243

  8. One-incision endoscopic technique for posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with quadriceps tendon-patellar bone autograft.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Hwa; Chen, Wen-Jer; Shih, Chun-Hsiung

    2001-03-01

    Quadriceps tendon-patellar bone autograft is an alternative graft choice for posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction. A 2-incision technique with outside-in fixation at the femoral condyle is generally used. In this article, we describe a 1-incision endoscopic technique for PCL reconstruction with quadriceps tendon-patellar bone autograft. The graft consists of a proximal patellar bone plug and central quadriceps tendon. The bone plug is trapezoidal, 20 mm long, 10 mm wide, and 8 mm thick. The tendon portion is 80 mm long, 10 mm wide, and 6 mm thick, including the full-thickness of the rectus femoris and partial thickness of the vastus intermedius. Three arthroscopic portals, including anteromedial, anterolateral, and posteromedial, are used. All procedures are performed in an endoscopic manner with only 1 incision at the proximal tibia. At the femoral side, the bone plug is fixed by an interference screw. At the tibial side, the tendon portion is fixed by a suture to a screw on the anterior cortex and an interference bioscrew in the posterior tibial tunnel opening. Quadriceps tendon autograft has the advantages of being self-available, allowing for easier arthroscopic technique, and providing comparable graft size. The 1-incision technique provides a simple reconstruction method for PCL insufficiency without a second incision at the medial femoral condyle.

  9. Hamstring graft fixation in MPFL reconstruction at the patella using a transosseous suture technique.

    PubMed

    Siebold, Rainer; Chikale, Shivanand; Sartory, Nico; Hariri, Nawid; Feil, Sven; Pässler, Hans H

    2010-11-01

    Controversy still exists about fixation methods of a hamstring graft to the patella in case of medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction. This article presents a surgical technique of hamstring tendon graft fixation to the anatomical MPFL insertion on the patella using transosseous sutures. A superficial bony sulcus is created at the anatomical MPFL insertion site on the medial patellar rim with a bur. A looped hamstring tendon graft is fixed to this superficial sulcus by a pair of nonresorbable transosseous sutures passed across the patella. The retinaculum is sutured on top of the hamstring tendon graft at the level of the patella for additional fixation. The technique avoids bone tunnels as well as hardware at the patella. It reduces the risk of intraoperative or postoperative patella fracture or implant-related complications. The stable transosseous fixation technique allows for early rehabilitation.

  10. Spontaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Vigneswaran, N; Lee, K; Yegappan, M

    2007-11-01

    Spontaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon ruptures are uncommon. We present a 30-year-old man with end-stage renal failure, who sustained this injury, and subsequently had surgical repair of both tendons on separate occasions. He has since regained full range of movement of both knees.

  11. Potential mechanisms of a periosteum patch as an effective and favourable approach to enhance tendon-bone healing in the human body.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Jiang, Jia; Wu, Yang; Chen, Shiyi

    2012-03-01

    Tendon-bone healing is a progressive and complex pathophysiological process after tendon graft transplantation into a bone tunnel. A fibrous scar tissue layer forms at the graft-bone interface, which means a weak bonding of the graft in the bone tunnel. Periosteum, a favourable autologous tissue, was confirmed to be effective in promoting tendon-bone healing in the human body. The advantages of a periosteum patch for tendon-bone repair include the fact that this tissue meets the three primary requirements for tissue engineering: a source of progenitor cells, a scaffold for recruiting cells and growth factors, and a source of local growth factors. Furthermore, the periosteum can prevent graft micromotion, alleviate inflammation and deter bone resorption. In this review, we highlight the role of progenitor cells in the periosteum, which contribute to the regeneration of new bone and/or fibrocartilage at the tendon-bone interface. In summary, the periosteum has shown significant potential for use in the enhancement of graft-bone healing. Our investigations may provoke further studies on the management of allograft-bone healing and artificial ligament graft healing using a periosteum patch in future.

  12. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using Hamstring Tendon Autograft With Preserved Insertions.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ravi; Bahadur, Raj; Malhotra, Anubhav; Masih, Gladson David; Gupta, Parmanand

    2016-04-01

    We present a technique for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using hamstring tendon autograft with preserved tibial insertions. The tendons, harvested with an open-ended tendon stripper while their tibial insertions are preserved, are looped around to prepare a quadrupled graft. The femoral tunnel is drilled independently through a transportal technique, whereas the tibial tunnel is drilled in a standard manner. The length of the quadrupled graft and loop of the RetroButton is adjusted so that it matches the calculated length of both tunnels and the intra-articular part of the proposed ACL graft. After the RetroButton is flipped, the graft is manually tensioned with maximal stretch on the free end, which is then sutured to the other end with preserved insertions. We propose that preserving the insertions is more biological and may provide better proprioception. The technique eliminates the need for a tibial-side fixation device, thus reducing the cost of surgery. Furthermore, tibial-side fixation of the free graft is the weakest link in the overall stiffness of the reconstructed ACL, and this technique circumvents this problem. Postoperative mechanical stability and functional outcome with this technique need to be explored and compared with those of ACL reconstruction using free hamstring autograft. PMID:27354946

  13. The effect of graft choice on functional outcome in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Sajovic, Matjaz; Strahovnik, Andrej; Komadina, Radko; Dernovsek, Mojca Z

    2008-08-01

    A prospective, randomised, 5-year follow-up study was designed to compare the functional results between patellar tendon and hamstring tendon autografts after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Primary reconstruction was performed in 32 patients using the central third of the patellar ligament and in 32 patients using double-looped semitendinosus and gracilis tendons. All reconstructions were performed by a single surgeon, with identical surgical technique and rehabilitation protocol. Of the total 64 patients in the study, 54 (85%) were available for the 5-year follow-up. No statistically significant differences were seen with respect to Lysholm score, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) classification, clinical and KT-2000 arthrometer laxity testing, single-legged hop test and anterior knee pain. Graft rupture occurred in two patients (8%) in the patellar tendon group and in two patients (7%) in the hamstring tendon group; 23 patients (88%) in the patellar tendon group and 23 patients (82%) in the hamstring tendon group returned to their pre-injury activity level. Good subjective outcome and stability can be obtained by using either graft; no statistically significant differences were found in functional outcome between the grafts.

  14. Anatomic study of the abductor pollicis longus: a source for grafting material of the hand.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Elena; Barco, Raul; Bullón, Adrian

    2010-05-01

    Interposition grafting material is used frequently to treat osteoarthritis of the base of the thumb or tendinous and ligamentous injuries of the hand. The observation of duplicated tendons in the first dorsal compartment of the hand prompted us to explore the possibility of using the accessory abductor pollicis longus (AAPL) tendon as grafting material. Based on dissections of 78 cadaveric upper limbs, we describe the number of tendons in the first dorsal compartment of the hand, the number of muscle bellies, their innervation, their insertion site, and the tendon dimensions to determine whether the AAPL can be considered a true tendon. The AAPL was present in 85% of the hands. Average length, width, and thickness (in millimeters) of the APL were of 69.3, 5.2, and 2.1, respectively. Average length, width, and thickness (in millimeters) of the AAPL were of 69.2, 3.3, and 1.6, respectively. No differences in dimension of the tendons were found between the APL and the AAPL. The dimensions of the tendinous portion of the AAPL are similar to those of the APL and can be considered a true tendon. When present, the AAPL is a suitable source of local grafting material.

  15. Anatomic Study of the Abductor Pollicis Longus: A Source for Grafting Material of the Hand

    PubMed Central

    Barco, Raul; Bullón, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    Interposition grafting material is used frequently to treat osteoarthritis of the base of the thumb or tendinous and ligamentous injuries of the hand. The observation of duplicated tendons in the first dorsal compartment of the hand prompted us to explore the possibility of using the accessory abductor pollicis longus (AAPL) tendon as grafting material. Based on dissections of 78 cadaveric upper limbs, we describe the number of tendons in the first dorsal compartment of the hand, the number of muscle bellies, their innervation, their insertion site, and the tendon dimensions to determine whether the AAPL can be considered a true tendon. The AAPL was present in 85% of the hands. Average length, width, and thickness (in millimeters) of the APL were of 69.3, 5.2, and 2.1, respectively. Average length, width, and thickness (in millimeters) of the AAPL were of 69.2, 3.3, and 1.6, respectively. No differences in dimension of the tendons were found between the APL and the AAPL. The dimensions of the tendinous portion of the AAPL are similar to those of the APL and can be considered a true tendon. When present, the AAPL is a suitable source of local grafting material. PMID:19760470

  16. Two cases of peroneus brevis tendon tear.

    PubMed

    Minoyama, O; Uchiyama, E; Iwaso, H; Hiranuma, K; Takeda, Y

    2002-02-01

    A longitudinal tear of the peroneal tendon is thought to be the result of repetitive peroneal subluxation. However, this report documents two cases of longitudinal split of the peroneus brevis tendon that had no peroneal tendon subluxation. Primary suture was performed. Subluxation of the peroneal tendons was not identified surgically in either case.

  17. Fascicles from energy-storing tendons show an age-specific response to cyclic fatigue loading.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Chavaunne T; Riley, Graham P; Birch, Helen L; Clegg, Peter D; Screen, Hazel R C

    2014-03-01

    Some tendons, such as the human Achilles and equine superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT), act as energy stores, stretching and recoiling to increase efficiency during locomotion. Our previous observations of rotation in response to applied strain in SDFT fascicles suggest a helical structure, which may provide energy-storing tendons with a greater ability to extend and recoil efficiently. Despite this specialization, energy-storing tendons are prone to age-related tendinopathy. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of cyclic fatigue loading (FL) on the microstructural strain response of SDFT fascicles from young and old horses. The data demonstrate two independent age-related mechanisms of fatigue failure; in young horses, FL caused low levels of matrix damage and decreased rotation. This suggests that loading causes alterations to the helix substructure, which may reduce their ability to recoil and recover. By contrast, fascicles from old horses, in which the helix is already compromised, showed greater evidence of matrix damage and suffer increased fibre sliding after FL, which may partially explain the age-related increase in tendinopathy. Elucidation of helix structure and the precise alterations occurring owing to both ageing and FL will help to develop appropriate preventative and repair strategies for tendinopathy.

  18. Comprehensive isokinetic knee measurements and quadriceps tendon evaluations in footballers for assessing functional performance

    PubMed Central

    Ozcakar, L; Kunduracyoolu, B; Cetin, A; Ulkar, B; Guner, R; Hascelik, Z

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To ascertain whether detailed isokinetic knee muscle testing reflects the results of other functional measurements in footballers and to look for any correlations between quadriceps tendon thickness and knee strength. Methods: Ultrasonographic evaluation of the quadriceps tendon (Hitachi EUB-405), isokinetic knee testing (Biodex System 3), and sprint measurements using telemetric photoelectric cells (Chronometre Prosport ESC TX02) were carried out on 29 elite footballers. Jumping capacity was evaluated using Bosco's jumping mat (Ergojump). Anaerobic fitness was assessed by auricular capillary blood lactate measurements (YSI Model 1500 Sport Lactate Analyzer). Results: Quadriceps tendon thickness correlated positively with jumping and sprint measurements and negatively with extensor and flexor strength. However, these correlations did not reach statistical significance. There were significant correlations between knee extensor strength at 60 °/s and jumping or sprint measurements and between the extension acceleration values of both knees during isokinetic tests at 240 °/s and the sprint measurements. No significant correlation was found between the fatigue ratio values of both knees at 240 °/s and the calculated fatigue ratios from the sprint measurements. Conclusions: Apart from a few variables which correlated with the performance tests, the isokinetic studies did not fully predict the various functional measurements. Neither was there any relation between the quadriceps tendon measurements and the knee strength values nor with the functional performance. PMID:14665589

  19. Fascicles from energy-storing tendons show an age-specific response to cyclic fatigue loading

    PubMed Central

    Thorpe, Chavaunne T.; Riley, Graham P.; Birch, Helen L.; Clegg, Peter D.; Screen, Hazel R. C.

    2014-01-01

    Some tendons, such as the human Achilles and equine superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT), act as energy stores, stretching and recoiling to increase efficiency during locomotion. Our previous observations of rotation in response to applied strain in SDFT fascicles suggest a helical structure, which may provide energy-storing tendons with a greater ability to extend and recoil efficiently. Despite this specialization, energy-storing tendons are prone to age-related tendinopathy. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of cyclic fatigue loading (FL) on the microstructural strain response of SDFT fascicles from young and old horses. The data demonstrate two independent age-related mechanisms of fatigue failure; in young horses, FL caused low levels of matrix damage and decreased rotation. This suggests that loading causes alterations to the helix substructure, which may reduce their ability to recoil and recover. By contrast, fascicles from old horses, in which the helix is already compromised, showed greater evidence of matrix damage and suffer increased fibre sliding after FL, which may partially explain the age-related increase in tendinopathy. Elucidation of helix structure and the precise alterations occurring owing to both ageing and FL will help to develop appropriate preventative and repair strategies for tendinopathy. PMID:24402919

  20. Regulatory role of collagen V in establishing mechanical properties of tendons and ligaments is tissue dependent.

    PubMed

    Connizzo, Brianne K; Freedman, Benjamin R; Fried, Joanna H; Sun, Mei; Birk, David E; Soslowsky, Louis J

    2015-06-01

    Patients with classic (type I) Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), characterized by heterozygous mutations in the Col5a1 and Col5a2 genes, exhibit connective tissue hyperelasticity and recurrent joint dislocations, indicating a potential regulatory role for collagen V in joint stabilizing soft tissues. This study asked whether the contribution of collagen V to the establishment of mechanical properties is tissue dependent. We mechanically tested four different tissues from wild type and targeted collagen V-null mice: the flexor digitorum longus (FDL) tendon, Achilles tendon (ACH), the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), and the supraspinatus tendon (SST). Area was significantly reduced in the Col5a1(ΔTen/ΔTen) group in the FDL, ACH, and SST. Maximum load and stiffness were reduced in the Col5a1(ΔTen/ΔTen) group for all tissues. However, insertion site and midsubstance modulus were reduced only for the ACL and SST. This study provides evidence that the regulatory role of collagen V in extracellular matrix assembly is tissue dependent and that joint instability in classic EDS may be caused in part by insufficient mechanical properties of the tendons and ligaments surrounding each joint. PMID:25876927

  1. Achilles Tendon Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Wertz, Jess; Galli, Melissa; Borchers, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Achilles tendon (AT) rupture in athletes is increasing in incidence and accounts for one of the most devastating sports injuries because of the threat to alter or end a career. Despite the magnitude of this injury, reliable risk assessment has not been clearly defined, and prevention strategies have been limited. The purpose of this review is to identify potential intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors for AT rupture in aerial and ground athletes stated in the current literature. Evidence Acquisition: A MEDLINE search was conducted on AT rupture, or “injury” and “risk factors” and “athletes” from 1980 to 2011. Emphasis was placed on epidemiology, etiology, and review articles focusing on the risk for lower extremity injury in runners and gymnasts. Thirty articles were reviewed, and 22 were included in this assessment. Results: Aerial and ground athletes share many intrinsic risk factors for AT rupture, including overuse and degeneration of the tendon as well as anatomical variations that mechanically put an athlete at risk. Older athletes, athletes atypical in size for their sport, high tensile loads, leg dominance, and fatigue also may increase risk. Aerial athletes tend to have more extrinsic factors that play a role in this injury due to the varying landing surfaces from heights and technical maneuvers performed at various skill levels. Conclusion: Risk assessment for AT rupture in aerial and ground athletes is multivariable and difficult in terms of developing prevention strategies. Quantitative measures of individual risk factors may help identify major contributors to injury. PMID:24427410

  2. Powered ankle exoskeletons reveal the metabolic cost of plantar flexor mechanical work during walking with longer steps at constant step frequency.

    PubMed

    Sawicki, Gregory S; Ferris, Daniel P

    2009-01-01

    We examined the metabolic cost of plantar flexor muscle-tendon mechanical work during human walking. Nine healthy subjects walked at constant step frequency on a motorized treadmill at speeds corresponding to 80% (1.00 m s(-1)), 100% (1.25 m s(-1)), 120% (1.50 m s(-1)) and 140% (1.75 m s(-1)) of their preferred step length (L(*)) at 1.25 m s(-1). In each condition subjects donned robotic ankle exoskeletons on both legs. The exoskeletons were powered by artificial pneumatic muscles and controlled using soleus electromyography (i.e. proportional myoelectric control). We measured subjects' metabolic energy expenditure and exoskeleton mechanics during both unpowered and powered walking to test the hypothesis that ankle plantarflexion requires more net metabolic power (W kg(-1)) at longer step lengths for a constant step frequency (i.e. preferred at 1.25 m s(-1)). As step length increased from 0.8 L(*) to 1.4 L(*), exoskeletons delivered approximately 25% more average positive mechanical power (P=0.01; +0.20+/-0.02 W kg(-1) to +0.25+/-0.02 W kg(-1), respectively). The exoskeletons reduced net metabolic power by more at longer step lengths (P=0.002; -0.21+/-0.06 W kg(-1) at 0.8 L(*) and -0.70+/-0.12 W kg(-1) at 1.4 L(*)). For every 1 J of exoskeleton positive mechanical work subjects saved 0.72 J of metabolic energy ('apparent efficiency'=1.39) at 0.8 L(*) and 2.6 J of metabolic energy ('apparent efficiency'=0.38) at 1.4 L(*). Declining ankle muscle-tendon ;apparent efficiency' suggests an increase in ankle plantar flexor muscle work relative to Achilles' tendon elastic energy recoil during walking with longer steps. However, previously stored elastic energy in Achilles' tendon still probably contributes up to 34% of ankle muscle-tendon positive work even at the longest step lengths we tested. Across the range of step lengths we studied, the human ankle muscle-tendon system performed 34-40% of the total lower-limb positive mechanical work but accounted for only 7-26% of

  3. Measurement of fatigue in knee flexor and extensor muscles.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Y; Senda, M; Oka, T; Yagata, Y; Takahara, Y; Nagashima, H; Inoue, H

    2000-04-01

    In order to examine fatigue of the knee flexor and extensor muscles and to investigate the characteristics of muscular fatigue in different sports, a Cybex machine was used to measure muscle fatigue and recovery during isokinetic knee flexion and extension. Eighteen baseball players, 12 soccer players and 13 marathon runners were studied. Each subject was tested in the sitting position and made to perform 50 consecutive right knee bends and stretches at maximum strength. This was done 3 times with an interval of 10 min between each series. The peak torque to body weight ratio and the fatigue rate were determined in each case. In all subjects, the peak torque to body weight ratio was higher for extensors than flexors. Over the 3 trials, the fatigue rate of extensors showed little change, while that of flexors had a tendency to increase. In each subject, knee extensors showed a high fatigue rate but a quick recovery, while knee flexors showed a low fatigue rate but a slow recovery. As the marathon runners had the smallest fatigue rates for both flexors and extensors, we concluded that marathon runners had more stamina than baseball players and soccer players.

  4. Interference screw position and hamstring graft location for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Simonian, P T; Sussmann, P S; Baldini, T H; Crockett, H C; Wickiewicz, T L

    1998-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with hamstring tendon graft and interference screw fixation has recently been considered. Concerns for the use of interference screws with soft tissue grafts include damage to the graft during screw insertion, decreased fixation strength, and a decrease in the bone-tendon contact area for healing within the tunnel when the screw is placed in an eccentric position. This last concern could be addressed by placing the interference screw centrally between the four limbs of the hamstring graft. The purpose of this study was to determine the mode of failure, the pullout force, and graft slippage before graft fixation failure of hamstring tendons fixed with an interference screw positioned eccentrically in relation to the hamstring tendons verses an interference screw positioned centrally between the four graft limbs. The semitendinosus and gracilis tendons were harvested from six, fresh cadaveric specimens. Each tendon was divided into two segments of equal length. Both the semitendinosus and gracilis tendon segments were looped to form four strands. The specimens were then fixed with a bioabsorbable interference screw in the two different positions and pulled from a standardized polyurethane foam. All tendons in both groups failed by pulling out from between the interference screw and tunnel, regardless of the screw position. No tendon was cut by the screw in either group. There was no significant difference between the forces required to produce specific amounts of graft slippage between the two fixation techniques tested. There was no significant difference between the average total slippage at maximum pullout, 11.8 mm for the screw placed in the eccentric position and 13.7 mm for the screw placed in the central position. The maximum pullout force averaged 265.3 N for the screw placed in the eccentric position, and 244.7 N for the screw placed in the central position; these values were not significantly different. Placement of

  5. Facilitation from flexor digitorum superficialis to extensor carpi radialis in humans.

    PubMed

    Nito, Mitsuhiro; Hashizume, Wataru; Miyasaka, Takuji; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Sato, Toshiaki; Fujii, Hiromi; Shindo, Masaomi; Naito, Akira

    2016-08-01

    Effects of low-threshold afferents from the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) to the extensor carpi radialis (ECR) motoneurons were examined using a post-stimulus time-histogram (PSTH) and electromyogram-averaging (EMG-A) methods in eight healthy human subjects. In the PSTH study in five of the eight subjects, electrical conditioning stimuli (ES) to the median nerve branch innervating FDS with the intensity below the motor threshold induced excitatory effects (facilitation) in 39 out of 92 ECR motor units. In 11 ECR motor units, the central synaptic delay of the facilitation was -0.1 ± 0.3 ms longer than that of the homonymous facilitation of ECR. Mechanical conditioning stimuli (MS) to FDS with the intensity below the threshold of the tendon(T)-wave-induced facilitation in 51 out of 51 ECR motor units. With the EMG-A method, early and significant peaks were produced by ES and MS in all the eight subjects. The difference between latencies of the peaks by ES and MS was almost equivalent to that of the Hoffmann- and T-waves of FDS by ES and MS. The peak was diminished by tonic vibration stimuli to FDS. These findings suggest that a facilitation from FDS to ECR exists in humans and group Ia afferents mediate the facilitation through a monosynaptic path. PMID:27010723

  6. Implantation of a Novel Biologic and Hybridized Tissue Engineered Bioimplant in Large Tendon Defect: An In Vivo Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Oryan, Ahmad; Moshiri, Ali; Parizi, Abdolhamid Meimandi

    2014-01-01

    Surgical reconstruction of large Achilles tendon defects is technically demanding. There is no standard method, and tissue engineering may be a valuable option. We investigated the effects of 3D collagen and collagen-polydioxanone sheath (PDS) implants on a large tendon defect model in rabbits. Ninety rabbits were divided into three groups: control, collagen, and collagen-PDS. In all groups, 2 cm of the left Achilles tendon were excised and discarded. A modified Kessler suture was applied to all injured tendons to retain the gap length. The control group received no graft, the treated groups were repaired using the collagen only or the collagen-PDS prostheses. The bioelectrical characteristics of the injured areas were measured at weekly intervals. The animals were euthanized at 60 days after the procedure. Gross, histopathological and ultrastructural morphology and biophysical characteristics of the injured and intact tendons were investigated. Another 90 pilot animals were also used to investigate the inflammatory response and mechanism of graft incorporation during tendon healing. The control tendons showed severe hyperemia and peritendinous adhesion, and the gastrocnemius muscle of the control animals showed severe atrophy and fibrosis, with a loose areolar connective tissue filling the injured area. The tendons receiving either collagen or collagen-PDS implants showed lower amounts of peritendinous adhesion, hyperemia and muscle atrophy, and a dense tendon filled the defect area. Compared to the control tendons, application of collagen and collagen-PDS implants significantly improved water uptake, water delivery, direct transitional electrical current and tissue resistance to direct transitional electrical current. Compared to the control tendons, both prostheses showed significantly increased diameter, density and alignment of the collagen fibrils and maturity of the tenoblasts at ultrastructure level. Both prostheses influenced favorably tendon healing

  7. Implantation of a novel biologic and hybridized tissue engineered bioimplant in large tendon defect: an in vivo investigation.

    PubMed

    Oryan, Ahmad; Moshiri, Ali; Parizi, Abdolhamid Meimandi; Maffulli, Nicola

    2014-02-01

    Surgical reconstruction of large Achilles tendon defects is technically demanding. There is no standard method, and tissue engineering may be a valuable option. We investigated the effects of 3D collagen and collagen-polydioxanone sheath (PDS) implants on a large tendon defect model in rabbits. Ninety rabbits were divided into three groups: control, collagen, and collagen-PDS. In all groups, 2 cm of the left Achilles tendon were excised and discarded. A modified Kessler suture was applied to all injured tendons to retain the gap length. The control group received no graft, the treated groups were repaired using the collagen only or the collagen-PDS prostheses. The bioelectrical characteristics of the injured areas were measured at weekly intervals. The animals were euthanized at 60 days after the procedure. Gross, histopathological and ultrastructural morphology and biophysical characteristics of the injured and intact tendons were investigated. Another 90 pilot animals were also used to investigate the inflammatory response and mechanism of graft incorporation during tendon healing. The control tendons showed severe hyperemia and peritendinous adhesion, and the gastrocnemius muscle of the control animals showed severe atrophy and fibrosis, with a loose areolar connective tissue filling the injured area. The tendons receiving either collagen or collagen-PDS implants showed lower amounts of peritendinous adhesion, hyperemia and muscle atrophy, and a dense tendon filled the defect area. Compared to the control tendons, application of collagen and collagen-PDS implants significantly improved water uptake, water delivery, direct transitional electrical current and tissue resistance to direct transitional electrical current. Compared to the control tendons, both prostheses showed significantly increased diameter, density and alignment of the collagen fibrils and maturity of the tenoblasts at ultrastructure level. Both prostheses influenced favorably tendon healing

  8. Joint infection unique to hamstring tendon harvester used during anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery.

    PubMed

    Tuman, Jeffrey; Diduch, David R; Baumfeld, Joshua A; Rubino, L Joseph; Hart, Joseph M

    2008-05-01

    Joint infection after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is a rare but important clinical issue that must be resolved quickly to prevent secondary joint damage and preserve the graft. After careful analysis, we observed 3 infection cases within a 12-month period after ACL reconstruction, which represented an abnormally elevated risk. All reconstructions were performed by the same surgeon and used hamstring tendon allograft. For each surgery, the Target Tendon Harvester (DePuy Mitek, Raynham, MA) was used to harvest hamstring tendons. Through our review, we learned that this instrument was sterilized while assembled. It is our belief that ineffective sterilization of this hamstring graft harvester served as the origin for these infections. We have determined that appropriate sterilization technique involves disassembly of this particular hamstring tendon harvester before sterilization because of the tube-within-a-tube configuration. We have since continued to use the Target Tendon Harvester, disassembling it before sterilization. There have been no infections in the ensuing 12 months during which the surgeon performed over 40 primary ACL reconstructions via hamstring autograft. The information from this report is intended to provide arthroscopists with information about potential sources of infection after ACL reconstruction surgery. PMID:18442698

  9. Joint infection unique to hamstring tendon harvester used during anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery.

    PubMed

    Tuman, Jeffrey; Diduch, David R; Baumfeld, Joshua A; Rubino, L Joseph; Hart, Joseph M

    2008-05-01

    Joint infection after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is a rare but important clinical issue that must be resolved quickly to prevent secondary joint damage and preserve the graft. After careful analysis, we observed 3 infection cases within a 12-month period after ACL reconstruction, which represented an abnormally elevated risk. All reconstructions were performed by the same surgeon and used hamstring tendon allograft. For each surgery, the Target Tendon Harvester (DePuy Mitek, Raynham, MA) was used to harvest hamstring tendons. Through our review, we learned that this instrument was sterilized while assembled. It is our belief that ineffective sterilization of this hamstring graft harvester served as the origin for these infections. We have determined that appropriate sterilization technique involves disassembly of this particular hamstring tendon harvester before sterilization because of the tube-within-a-tube configuration. We have since continued to use the Target Tendon Harvester, disassembling it before sterilization. There have been no infections in the ensuing 12 months during which the surgeon performed over 40 primary ACL reconstructions via hamstring autograft. The information from this report is intended to provide arthroscopists with information about potential sources of infection after ACL reconstruction surgery.

  10. Hydroxyapatite-doped polycaprolactone nanofiber membrane improves tendon-bone interface healing for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Han, Fei; Zhang, Peng; Sun, Yaying; Lin, Chao; Zhao, Peng; Chen, Jiwu

    2015-01-01

    Hamstring tendon autograft is a routine graft for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. However, ways of improving the healing between the tendon and bone is often overlooked in clinical practice. This issue can be addressed by using a biomimetic scaffold. Herein, a biomimetic nanofiber membrane of polycaprolactone/nanohydroxyapatite/collagen (PCL/nHAp/Col) is fabricated that mimics the composition of native bone tissue for promoting tendon-bone healing. This membrane has good cytocompatibility, allowing for osteoblast cell adhesion and growth and bone formation. As a result, MC3T3 cells reveal a higher mineralization level in PCL/nHAp/Col membrane compared with PCL membrane alone. Further in vivo studies in ACL reconstruction in a rabbit model shows that PCL/nHAp/Col-wrapped tendon may afford superior tissue integration to nonwrapped tendon in the interface between the tendon and host bone as well as improved mechanical strength. This study shows that PCL/nHAp/Col nanofiber membrane wrapping of autologous tendon is effective for improving tendon healing with host bone in ACL reconstruction.

  11. Hydroxyapatite-doped polycaprolactone nanofiber membrane improves tendon-bone interface healing for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Han, Fei; Zhang, Peng; Sun, Yaying; Lin, Chao; Zhao, Peng; Chen, Jiwu

    2015-01-01

    Hamstring tendon autograft is a routine graft for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. However, ways of improving the healing between the tendon and bone is often overlooked in clinical practice. This issue can be addressed by using a biomimetic scaffold. Herein, a biomimetic nanofiber membrane of polycaprolactone/nanohydroxyapatite/collagen (PCL/nHAp/Col) is fabricated that mimics the composition of native bone tissue for promoting tendon-bone healing. This membrane has good cytocompatibility, allowing for osteoblast cell adhesion and growth and bone formation. As a result, MC3T3 cells reveal a higher mineralization level in PCL/nHAp/Col membrane compared with PCL membrane alone. Further in vivo studies in ACL reconstruction in a rabbit model shows that PCL/nHAp/Col-wrapped tendon may afford superior tissue integration to nonwrapped tendon in the interface between the tendon and host bone as well as improved mechanical strength. This study shows that PCL/nHAp/Col nanofiber membrane wrapping of autologous tendon is effective for improving tendon healing with host bone in ACL reconstruction. PMID:26677323

  12. Regional molecular and cellular differences in the female rabbit Achilles tendon complex: potential implications for understanding responses to loading

    PubMed Central

    Huisman, Elise S; Andersson, Gustav; Scott, Alexander; Reno, Carol R; Hart, David A; Thornton, Gail M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was: (i) to analyze the morphology and expression of extracellular matrix genes in six different regions of the Achilles tendon complex of intact normal rabbits; and (ii) to assess the effect of ovariohysterectomy (OVH) on the regional expression of these genes. Female New Zealand White rabbits were separated into two groups: (i) intact normal rabbits (n = 4); and (ii) OVH rabbits (n = 8). For each rabbit, the Achilles tendon complex was dissected into six regions: distal gastrocnemius (DG); distal flexor digitorum superficialis; proximal lateral gastrocnemius (PLG); proximal medial gastrocnemius; proximal flexor digitorum superficialis; and paratenon. For each of the regions, hematoxylin and eosin staining was performed for histological evaluation of intact normal rabbit tissues and mRNA levels for proteoglycans, collagens and genes associated with collagen regulation were assessed by real-time reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction for both the intact normal and OVH rabbit tissues. The distal regions displayed a more fibrocartilaginous phenotype. For intact normal rabbits, aggrecan mRNA expression was higher in the distal regions of the Achilles tendon complex compared with the proximal regions. Collagen Type I and matrix metalloproteinase-2 expression levels were increased in the PLG compared to the DG in the intact normal rabbit tissues. The tendons from OVH rabbits had lower gene expressions for the proteoglycans aggrecan, biglycan, decorin and versican compared with the intact normal rabbits, although the regional differences of increased aggrecan expression in distal regions compared with proximal regions persisted. The tensile and compressive forces experienced in the examined regions may be related to the regional differences found in gene expression. The lower mRNA expression of the genes examined in the OVH group confirms a potential effect of systemic estrogen on tendon. PMID:24571598

  13. Evaluation of global load sharing and shear-lag models to describe mechanical behavior in partially lacerated tendons.

    PubMed

    Pensalfini, Marco; Duenwald-Kuehl, Sarah; Kondratko-Mittnacht, Jaclyn; Lakes, Roderic; Vanderby, Ray

    2014-09-01

    The mechanical effect of a partial thickness tear or laceration of a tendon is analytically modeled under various assumptions and results are compared with previous experimental data from porcine flexor tendons. Among several fibril-level models considered, a shear-lag model that incorporates fibril-matrix interaction and a fibril-fibril interaction defined by the contact area of the interposed matrix best matched published data for tendons with shallow cuts (less than 50% of the cross-sectional area). Application of this model to the case of many disrupted fibrils is based on linear superposition and is most successful when more fibrils are incorporated into the model. An equally distributed load sharing model for the fraction of remaining intact fibrils was inadequate in that it overestimates the strength for a cut less than half of the tendon's cross-sectional area. In a broader sense, results imply that shear-lag contributes significantly to the general mechanical behavior of tendons when axial loads are nonuniformly distributed over a cross section, although the predominant hierarchical level and microstructural mediators for this behavior require further inquiry. PMID:24845861

  14. Evaluation of global load sharing and shear-lag models to describe mechanical behavior in partially lacerated tendons.

    PubMed

    Pensalfini, Marco; Duenwald-Kuehl, Sarah; Kondratko-Mittnacht, Jaclyn; Lakes, Roderic; Vanderby, Ray

    2014-09-01

    The mechanical effect of a partial thickness tear or laceration of a tendon is analytically modeled under various assumptions and results are compared with previous experimental data from porcine flexor tendons. Among several fibril-level models considered, a shear-lag model that incorporates fibril-matrix interaction and a fibril-fibril interaction defined by the contact area of the interposed matrix best matched published data for tendons with shallow cuts (less than 50% of the cross-sectional area). Application of this model to the case of many disrupted fibrils is based on linear superposition and is most successful when more fibrils are incorporated into the model. An equally distributed load sharing model for the fraction of remaining intact fibrils was inadequate in that it overestimates the strength for a cut less than half of the tendon's cross-sectional area. In a broader sense, results imply that shear-lag contributes significantly to the general mechanical behavior of tendons when axial loads are nonuniformly distributed over a cross section, although the predominant hierarchical level and microstructural mediators for this behavior require further inquiry.

  15. Graft selection in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Miller, Suzanne L; Gladstone, James N

    2002-10-01

    Selecting the appropriate graft for ACL reconstruction depends on numerous factors including surgeon philosophy and experience, tissue availability (affected by anatomical anomalies or prior injury or surgery), and patient activity level and desires. Although the patella tendon autograft has the widest experience in the literature, and is probably the most commonly used graft source, this must be tempered with the higher reported incidences of potential morbidity and pitfalls associated with its use. The hamstring tendons are gaining increasing popularity, mostly due to reduced harvest morbidity and improved soft tissue fixation techniques, and many recent studies in the literature report equal results to BTB ACL reconstruction with respect to functional outcome and patient satisfaction. On the other hand, many of these studies report higher degrees of instrument (KT-100) tested laxity for hamstring reconstruction, and some have reported lower returns to preinjury levels of activity. One question that remains to be addressed is how closely objectively measured laxity tests correlate with subjectively assessed outcomes and ability to return to high levels of competitive sports. Allograft use, which decreased in popularity during the 1990s, appears to be undergoing a resurgence, with better sterilization processes and new graft sources (tibialis tendons), leading to increased availability and improved fixation techniques. The benefits of decreased surgical morbidity and easier rehabilitation must be weighed against the potential for greater failure of biologic incorporation, infection, and possibly slower return to activities. In our practice, for high-demand individuals (those playing cutting, pivoting, or jumping sports and skiing) BTB tends to be the graft of choice. For lower demand or older individuals, hamstring reconstructions will be performed. Allograft tissue will be used in older individuals (generally over 45 years old), those with signs of arthritis (and

  16. Graft selection in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Miller, Suzanne L; Gladstone, James N

    2002-10-01

    Selecting the appropriate graft for ACL reconstruction depends on numerous factors including surgeon philosophy and experience, tissue availability (affected by anatomical anomalies or prior injury or surgery), and patient activity level and desires. Although the patella tendon autograft has the widest experience in the literature, and is probably the most commonly used graft source, this must be tempered with the higher reported incidences of potential morbidity and pitfalls associated with its use. The hamstring tendons are gaining increasing popularity, mostly due to reduced harvest morbidity and improved soft tissue fixation techniques, and many recent studies in the literature report equal results to BTB ACL reconstruction with respect to functional outcome and patient satisfaction. On the other hand, many of these studies report higher degrees of instrument (KT-100) tested laxity for hamstring reconstruction, and some have reported lower returns to preinjury levels of activity. One question that remains to be addressed is how closely objectively measured laxity tests correlate with subjectively assessed outcomes and ability to return to high levels of competitive sports. Allograft use, which decreased in popularity during the 1990s, appears to be undergoing a resurgence, with better sterilization processes and new graft sources (tibialis tendons), leading to increased availability and improved fixation techniques. The benefits of decreased surgical morbidity and easier rehabilitation must be weighed against the potential for greater failure of biologic incorporation, infection, and possibly slower return to activities. In our practice, for high-demand individuals (those playing cutting, pivoting, or jumping sports and skiing) BTB tends to be the graft of choice. For lower demand or older individuals, hamstring reconstructions will be performed. Allograft tissue will be used in older individuals (generally over 45 years old), those with signs of arthritis (and

  17. Mechanical tensile properties of the quadriceps tendon and patellar ligament in young adults.

    PubMed

    Stäubli, H U; Schatzmann, L; Brunner, P; Rincón, L; Nolte, L P

    1999-01-01

    We analyzed mechanical tensile properties of 16 10-mm wide, full-thickness central parts of quadriceps tendons and patellar ligaments from paired knees of eight male donors (mean age, 24.9 years). Uniaxial tensile testing was performed in a servohydraulic materials testing machine at an extension rate of 1 mm/sec. Sixteen specimens were tested unconditioned and 16 specimens were tested after cyclic preconditioning (200 cycles between 50 N and 800 N at 0.5 Hz). Mean cross-sectional areas measured 64.6 +/- 8.4 mm2 for seven unconditioned and 61.9 +/- 9.0 mm2 for eight preconditioned quadriceps tendons and were significantly larger than those values of seven unconditioned and seven preconditioned patellar ligaments (36.8 +/- 5.7 mm2 and 34.5 +/- 4.4 mm2, respectively). Mean ultimate tensile stress values of unconditioned patellar ligaments were significantly larger than those values of unconditioned quadriceps tendons: 53.4 +/- 7.2 N/mm2 and 33.6 +/- 8.1 N/mm2, respectively. Strain at failure was 14.4% +/- 3.3% for preconditioned patellar ligaments and 11.2% +/- 2.2% for preconditioned quadriceps tendons (P = 0.0428). Preconditioned patellar ligaments exhibited significantly higher elastic modulus than preconditioned quadriceps tendons. Based on mechanical tensile properties analyses, the quadriceps tendon-bone construct may represent a versatile alternative graft in primary and revision anterior and posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

  18. Combined Reconstruction of the Medial Collateral Ligament and Anterior Cruciate Ligament Using Ipsilateral Quadriceps Tendon-Bone and Bone-Patellar Tendon-Bone Autografts.

    PubMed

    Hetsroni, Iftach; Mann, Gideon

    2016-06-01

    The exclusive autograft choice for medial collateral ligament (MCL) reconstruction that has been described until today is the semitendinosus tendon. However, this has some potential disadvantages in a knee with combined MCL-anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, including weakening of the hamstring's anterior restraining action in an already ACL-injured knee and nonanatomic distal MCL graft insertion when leaving the semitendinosus insertion intact at the pes anserinus during reconstruction. Moreover, because some surgeons prefer to use the hamstring for autologous ACL reconstruction, the contralateral uninjured knee hamstring needs to be harvested as a graft source for the MCL reconstruction if autografts and not allografts are the surgeons' preference. We describe a technique for performing combined reconstruction of the MCL and ACL using ipsilateral quadriceps tendon-bone and bone-patellar tendon-bone autografts. This technique of MCL reconstruction spares the hamstring tendons and benefits from the advantage provided by bone-to-bone healing on the femur with distal and proximal MCL tibial fixation that closely reproduces the native MCL tibia insertion. PMID:27656381

  19. Combined Reconstruction of the Medial Collateral Ligament and Anterior Cruciate Ligament Using Ipsilateral Quadriceps Tendon-Bone and Bone-Patellar Tendon-Bone Autografts.

    PubMed

    Hetsroni, Iftach; Mann, Gideon

    2016-06-01

    The exclusive autograft choice for medial collateral ligament (MCL) reconstruction that has been described until today is the semitendinosus tendon. However, this has some potential disadvantages in a knee with combined MCL-anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, including weakening of the hamstring's anterior restraining action in an already ACL-injured knee and nonanatomic distal MCL graft insertion when leaving the semitendinosus insertion intact at the pes anserinus during reconstruction. Moreover, because some surgeons prefer to use the hamstring for autologous ACL reconstruction, the contralateral uninjured knee hamstring needs to be harvested as a graft source for the MCL reconstruction if autografts and not allografts are the surgeons' preference. We describe a technique for performing combined reconstruction of the MCL and ACL using ipsilateral quadriceps tendon-bone and bone-patellar tendon-bone autografts. This technique of MCL reconstruction spares the hamstring tendons and benefits from the advantage provided by bone-to-bone healing on the femur with distal and proximal MCL tibial fixation that closely reproduces the native MCL tibia insertion.

  20. Hyaluronic acid and tendon lesions

    PubMed Central

    Kaux, Jean-François; Samson, Antoine; Crielaard, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    Summary Introduction recently, the viscoelastic properties of hyaluronic acid (HA) on liquid connective tissue have been proposed for the treatment of tendinopathies. Some fundamental studies show encouraging results on hyaluronic acid’s ability to promote tendon gliding and reduce adhesion as well as to improve tendon architectural organisation. Some observations also support its use in a clinical setting to improve pain and function. This literature review analyses studies relating to the use of hyaluronic acid in the treatment of tendinopathies. Methods this review was constructed using the Medline database via Pubmed, Scopus and Google Scholar. The key words hyaluronic acid, tendon and tendinopathy were used for the research. Results in total, 28 articles (in English and French) on the application of hyaluronic acid to tendons were selected for their relevance and scientific quality, including 13 for the in vitro part, 7 for the in vivo animal part and 8 for the human section. Conclusions preclinical studies demonstrate encouraging results: HA permits tendon gliding, reduces adhesions, creates better tendon architectural organisation and limits inflammation. These laboratory observations appear to be supported by limited but encouraging short-term clinical results on pain and function. However, controlled randomised studies are still needed. PMID:26958533

  1. Tendon Transfers for Combined Peripheral Nerve Injuries.

    PubMed

    Makarewich, Christopher A; Hutchinson, Douglas T

    2016-08-01

    Combined peripheral nerve injuries present a unique set of challenges to the hand surgeon when considering tendon transfers. They are often associated with severe soft tissue trauma, including lacerations to remaining innervated muscles and tendons, significant scar formation, and substantial sensory loss. In the case of combined nerve injuries, there are typically fewer options for tendon transfers due to fewer tendons of shared function that are expendable as well as associated injuries to tendon or muscle bellies. As such, careful preoperative planning must be performed to make the most of remaining muscle tendon units. PMID:27387081

  2. Bone Morphogenetic Protein 7 (BMP-7) Influences Tendon-Bone Integration In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Schwarting, Tim; Lechler, Philipp; Struewer, Johannes; Ambrock, Marius; Frangen, Thomas Manfred; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Ziring, Ewgeni; Frink, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Successful graft ingrowth following reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament is governed by complex biological processes at the tendon-bone interface. The aim of this study was to investigate in an in vitro study the effects of bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP-7) on tendon-bone integration. Materials and Methods To study the biological effects of BMP-7 on the process of tendon-bone-integration, two independent in vitro models were used. The first model involved the mono- and coculture of bovine tendon specimens and primary bovine osteoblasts with and without BMP-7 exposure. The second model comprised the mono- and coculture of primary bovine osteoblasts and fibroblasts. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), lactate and osteocalcin (OCN) were analyzed by ELISA. Histological analysis and electron microscopy of the tendon specimens were performed. Results In both models, positive effects of BMP-7 on ALP enzyme activity were observed (p<0.001). Additionally, similar results were noted for LDH activity and lactate concentration. BMP-7 stimulation led to a significant increase in OCN expression. Whereas the effects of BMP-7 on tendon monoculture peaked during an early phase of the experiment (p<0.001), the cocultures showed a maximal increase during the later stages (p<0.001). The histological analysis showed a stimulating effect of BMP-7 on extracellular matrix formation. Organized ossification zones and calcium carbonate-like structures were only observed in the BMP-stimulated cell cultures. Discussion This study showed the positive effects of BMP-7 on the biological process of tendon-bone integration in vitro. Histological signs of improved mineralization were paralleled by increased rates of osteoblast-specific protein levels in primary bovine osteoblasts and fibroblasts. Conclusion Our findings indicated a role for BMP-7 as an adjuvant therapeutic agent in the treatment of ligamentous injuries, and they emphasized the

  3. Tendon Tissue Engineering and Its Role on Healing of the Experimentally Induced Large Tendon Defect Model in Rabbits: A Comprehensive In Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Meimandi-Parizi, Abdolhamid; Oryan, Ahmad; Moshiri, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Healing of large tendon defects is challenging. We studied the role of collagen implant with or without polydioxanone (PDS) sheath on the healing of a large Achilles tendon defect model, in rabbits. Sixty rabbits were divided into three groups. A 2 cm gap was created in the left Achilles tendon of all rabbits. In the control lesions, no implant was used. The other two groups were reconstructed by collagen and collagen-PDS implants respectively. The animals were clinically examined at weekly intervals and their lesions were observed by ultrasonography. Blood samples were obtained from the animals and were assessed for hematological anal