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Sample records for floating mass transducer

  1. Radiological Control of the Floating Mass Transducer Attached to the Round Window

    PubMed Central

    Rademacher, G.; Wagner, J.; Mittmann, P.; Basta, Dietmar; Ernst, Arne

    2013-01-01

    The surgical rehabilitation of mixed hearing losses can be performed by coupling the floating mass transducer of the Vibrant Soundbridge to the round window. The quality of coupling the floating mass transducer to the round window is crucial for the audiological outcome. It was the aim of this study to further observe the different patterns of floating mass transducer position at the round window. We compared twenty patients with mixed hearing loss implanted with a floating mass transducer attached to the round window and 24 surgeries between 5/2007 and 6/2010. An evaluation of the chronological observation of the flat panel angiography-controlled position of the floating mass transducer at the round window with relation to the surgical report and the audiological outcome was done. We observed no changes in the mean pre- and postbone conduction thresholds. The floating mass transducer position was variable and could be radiologically classified and correlated with the audiologically outcome. A learning curve was observed from the earlier to later implantations. Postoperative, radiological evaluation of the location and angle of the floating mass transducer by means of flat panel tomography allowed us to classify the floating mass transducer position at the round window into 4 groups. PMID:24327808

  2. Comparisons of electromagnetic and piezoelectric floating-mass transducers in human cadaveric temporal bones☆

    PubMed Central

    Park, Il-Yong; Shimizu, Yoshitaka; O’Connor, Kevin N.; Puria, Sunil; Cho, Jin-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Electromagnetic floating-mass transducers for implantable middle-ear hearing devices (IMEHDs) afford the advantages of a simple surgical implantation procedure and easy attachment to the ossicles. However, their shortcomings include susceptibility to interference from environmental electromagnetic fields, relatively high current consumption, and a limited ability to output high-frequency vibrations. To address these limitations, a piezoelectric floating-mass transducer (PFMT) has recently been developed. This paper presents the results of a comparative study of these two types of vibration transducer developed for IMEHDs. The differential electromagnetic floating-mass transducer (DFMT) and the PFMT were implanted in two different sets of three cadaveric human temporal bones. The resulting stapes displacements were measured and compared on the basis of the ASTM standard for describing the output characteristics of IMEHDs. The experimental results show that the PFMT can produce significantly higher equivalent sound pressure levels above 3 kHz, due to the flat response of the PFMT, than can the DFMT. Thus, it is expected that the PFMT can be utilized to compensate for high-frequency sensorineural hearing loss. PMID:21055459

  3. The Floating Mass Transducer on the Round Window Versus Attachment to an Ossicular Replacement Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Yoshitaka; Puria, Sunil; Goode, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    Hypothesis The Vibrant Soundbridge Floating Mass Transducer® (FMT) is part of a commercially available implantable hearing device in which the FMT can be placed in the round window niche (RW) or attached to a partial (V-PORP) or total ossicular replacement prosthesis (V-TORP) contacting the stapes head or footplate. The goal is to provide efficient transfer of sound vibration into the cochlea. The hypothesis is that the FMT location on the prosthesis is superior to the RW location. Background No direct comparisons of the three FMT sites have been performed using the same measurement location. Methods A new measurement method called the “Third Window” method (TW) was used in eleven fresh human temporal bones to compare the sites. A small hole was made into the scala tympani of the temporal bones preserving the endosteum. A reflective target was placed on the TW endosteum and displacement of the cochlear fluid was measured using a Polytec HLV-1000 laser Doppler vibrometer. The input to the FMT at all locations was a constant 316 millivolts (mV); the frequency range was 0.5 to 0.8 kHz. Results The V-PORP and V-TORP FMT locations both provided statistically significant better performance above 1.0 kHz than the RW site, but not below that frequency. The V-PORP and V-TORP responses were similar at all test frequencies. Conclusion In this temporal bone model, the FMT provided better higher frequency performance when attached to a PORP or TORP than in the RW niche. PMID:20930654

  4. Comparison of Alternative Coupling Methods of the Vibrant Soundbridge Floating Mass Transducer.

    PubMed

    Busch, Susan; Lenarz, Thomas; Maier, Hannes

    2017-01-10

    The active middle ear implant Vibrant Soundbridge© provides a variety of coupling modalities of the floating mass transducer (FMT) to various structures of the ossicular chain and the round window. A retrospective analysis was performed on 125 subjects (n = 137 ears) (1) to compare the efficacy of the different FMT coupling modalities with increasing degree of hearing loss, (2) to compare the performance in speech outcome and the effective gain between the coupling types, and (3) to evaluate the risk of additional hearing loss of each coupling procedure. The patients were grouped according to their type of FMT coupling into incus vibroplasty (incus group, n = 59), round window vibroplasty with coupler (RWC group, n = 23), round window vibroplasty without coupler (RW group, n = 22), and oval window vibroplasty with coupler (OWC group, n = 33). For each coupling group, pre- and postoperative thresholds, the results of the Freiburg monosyllable test at 65 dB SPL, and the effective gain across frequencies (0.5-6 kHz) were evaluated. A logistic regression function was used to describe the relationship between word recognition scores (WRS, in % correct) and the mean bone conduction (BC) hearing loss. The surgical procedure had no clinically relevant effect on BC thresholds of patients in each coupling group. The BC pure tone average (PTA4) for 50% WRS predicted by the model function was similar for the incus (48.2 dB nHL), RW (47.8 dB nHL), and OWC (49.0 dB nHL) groups, but higher for the RWC group (67.9 dB nHL). However, the median WRS was 80% or better with no significant differences in speech perception between coupling types (Kruskal-Wallis test, p = 0.229). The effective gain shows an advantage for the incus coupling between 0.5 and 2 kHz over the other coupling types. The performance of the FMT coupling modalities is equally good for patients with a mild-to-moderate hearing loss, but the efficacy of coupling types differs for patients with greater hearing loss

  5. Evaluation of Round Window Stimulation Using the Floating Mass Transducer by Intracochlear Sound Pressure Measurements in Human Temporal Bones

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Hideko Heidi; Dong, Wei; Olson, Elizabeth S.; Rosowski, John J.; Ravicz, Michael E.; Merchant, Saumil N.

    2009-01-01

    Hypothesis Round window (RW) stimulation with a floating mass transducer (FMT) can be studied experimentally and optimized to enhance auditory transduction. Background The FMT (MED-EL Vibrant Soundbridge) has been recently implanted in patients with refractory conductive or mixed hearing loss to stimulate the RW with varying degrees of success. The mechanics of RW stimulation with the FMT have not been studied in a systematic manner. Methods In cadaveric human temporal bones, measurements of stapes velocity with laser vibrometry in response to FMT-RW stimulation were used to optimize FMT insertion. The effect of RW stimulation on hearing was estimated using simultaneous measurements of intracochlear pressures in both perilymphatic scalae with micro-optical pressure transducers. This enabled calculation of the differential pressure across the cochlear partition, which is directly tied to auditory transduction. Results The best coupling between the FMT and RW was achieved with a piece of fascia placed between the RW and the FMT, and by "bracing" the free end of the FMT against the hypotympanic wall with dental impression material. FMT-RW stimulation provided differential pressures comparable to sound-induced oval window stimulation above 1 kHz. However, below 1 kHz the FMT was less capable. Conclusions Measurements of stapes velocity and intracochlear sound pressures in scala vestibuli and scala tympani enabled experimental evaluation of FMT stimulation of the RW. The efficacy of FMT-RW coupling was influenced significantly by technical and surgical factors, which can be optimized. This temporal bone preparation also lays the foundation for future studies to investigate multiple issues of relevance to both basic and clinical science such as RW stimulation in stapes fixation, non-aerated middle-ears and third-window lesions, and to answer basic questions regarding bone conduction. PMID:19841600

  6. MRI scanning in patients implanted with a round window or stapes coupled floating mass transducer of the Vibrant Soundbridge.

    PubMed

    Renninger, Daniel; Ernst, Arne; Todt, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion MRI examinations in patients with an alternatively coupled VSB can lead to unpleasant side-effects. However, the residual hearing was not impaired, whereas the hearing performance with the VSB was decreased in one patient which could be fixed by a surgical revision. Different experiences for the VSB 503 can be expected. Objective To investigate the in vivo effects of MRI scanning on the Vibrant Soundbridge system (VSB) with an alternatively coupled Floating Mass Transducer (FMT). Method Sixty-five VSB (502) implantees were included in this study. Of them, 42 questionnaires could be evaluated with the patients' statements about their medical, otological, and general condition before, during, and after an MRI scan which was indicated for different medical reasons, despite the previous implantation of an alternatively coupled Vibrant Soundbridge System. Results In four patients (9.5%), five MRI examinations were performed. These were done for different indications (e.g. knee and shoulder joint diagnostics). During the scanning, noise and subjectively perceived distortion of the implant were described. A deterioration of the hearing gain with the VSB in place was found in one patient. A decrease of the hearing threshold was not observed.

  7. Floating Ultrasonic Transducer Inspection System and Method for Nondestructive Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N. (Inventor); Johnston, Patrick H. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method for inspecting a structural sample using ultrasonic energy includes positioning an ultrasonic transducer adjacent to a surface of the sample, and then transmitting ultrasonic energy into the sample. Force pulses are applied to the transducer concurrently with transmission of the ultrasonic energy. A host machine processes ultrasonic return pulses from an ultrasonic pulser/receiver to quantify attenuation of the ultrasonic energy within the sample. The host machine detects a defect in the sample using the quantified level of attenuation. The method may include positioning a dry couplant between an ultrasonic transducer and the surface. A system includes an actuator, an ultrasonic transducer, a dry couplant between the transducer the sample, a scanning device that moves the actuator and transducer, and a measurement system having a pulsed actuator power supply, an ultrasonic pulser/receiver, and a host machine that executes the above method.

  8. "Zero-Mass" Noninvasive Pressure Transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T.

    2009-01-01

    Extremely lightweight, compact, noninvasive, rugged, relatively inexpensive strain-gauge transducers have been developed for use in measuring pressures of fluids in tubes. These gauges were originally intended for measuring pressures of spacecraft-propulsion fluids, but they are also attractive for use in numerous terrestrial applications especially those involving fluids that are extremely chemically reactive, fluids that must be isolated for hygienic purposes, fluids that must be allowed to flow without obstruction, and fluid-containing tubes exposed to severe environments. A basic pressure transducer of this type comprises one or more pair(s) of thin-film strain gauges integral with a tube that contains the fluid of interest. Following established strain-gauge practice, the gauges in each pair are connected into opposite arms of a Wheatstone bridge (see figure). Typically, each pressure transducer includes one pair (the active pair) of strain gauges for measuring the hoop stress proportional to the pressure of the fluid in the tube and another pair (the dummy pair) of strain gauges that are nominally unstrained: The dummy gauges are mounted on a substrate that is made of the same material as that of the tube. The substrate is welded to the tube at only one spot so that stresses and strains are not coupled from the tube into the substrate. The dummy strain gauges measure neutral strains (basically, strains associated with thermal expansion), so that the neutral-strain contribution can be subtracted out of the final gauge reading.

  9. Wideband Tonpilz Transducer with a Cavity Inside a Head Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saosometh Chhith,; Yongrae Roh,

    2010-07-01

    A multimode Tonpilz transducer is well-known for providing a wider bandwidth than a single-mode transducer. In this paper, a new structure for the head mass of a multimode Tonpilz transducer was designed to further widen the bandwidth. The mechanical quality factor of a Tonpilz transducer is proportional to the weight of its head mass. In that sense, making the cavity inside the head mass will surely lead to a much lighter head mass, which can lead to a lower mechanical quality factor, thus a wider bandwidth. Through finite element analyses, the effects of the void head mass structure on the transducer performance were analyzed, and the dimension of the cavity to achieve the widest bandwidth was determined within given structural variation ranges. The variation ranges were selected as those in which the coefficient of determination in regression analyses was larger than 0.95 over all the ranges. The structure of a tail mass was also designed using the same method to match the new head mass.

  10. Finescale Water-Mass Variability from ARGO Profiling Floats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Finescale Water -Mass Variability from ARGO Profiling...assessment of water -mass (aka thermohaline or spice) variability as a measure of stirring along isopycnals, as well as density ratio Rρ statistics, from the...global ARGO profiling float data set. APPROACH For the water -mass analysis, the profile data is transformed onto σθ density coordinates

  11. Energy harvesting potential of tuned inertial mass electromagnetic transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asai, Takehiko; Araki, Yoshikazu; Ikago, Kohju

    2017-02-01

    The demand for developing renewable energy technologies has been growing in today's society. As one of promising renewable energy sources, large-scale energy harvesting from structural vibrations employing electromagnetic transducers has recently been proposed and considerable effort has been devoted to increase the power generation capability. In this paper, we introduce the mechanism of a tuned inertial mass electromagnetic transducer (TIMET), which can absorb vibratory energy more efficiently by tuning the parameters to adjust the system. Then we propose a new vibratory energy harvester with the TIMET and determine the parameter values for the device with a simple static admittance (SA) control law to maximize the energy harvested from a stationary stochastic disturbance. To investigate the energy harvesting potential of the TIMET further, the performance-guaranteed (PG) control and the LQG control proposed in the literature are applied as well. Then the numerical simulation studies are carried out and the effectiveness of the proposed energy harvester is examined by comparing the traditional electromagnetic transducers.

  12. Using a floating-gate MOS transistor as a transducer in a MEMS gas sensing system.

    PubMed

    Barranca, Mario Alfredo Reyes; Mendoza-Acevedo, Salvador; Flores-Nava, Luis M; Avila-García, Alejandro; Vazquez-Acosta, E N; Moreno-Cadenas, José Antonio; Casados-Cruz, Gaspar

    2010-01-01

    Floating-gate MOS transistors have been widely used in diverse analog and digital applications. One of these is as a charge sensitive device in sensors for pH measurement in solutions or using gates with metals like Pd or Pt for hydrogen sensing. Efforts are being made to monolithically integrate sensors together with controlling and signal processing electronics using standard technologies. This can be achieved with the demonstrated compatibility between available CMOS technology and MEMS technology. In this paper an in-depth analysis is done regarding the reliability of floating-gate MOS transistors when charge produced by a chemical reaction between metallic oxide thin films with either reducing or oxidizing gases is present. These chemical reactions need temperatures around 200 °C or higher to take place, so thermal insulation of the sensing area must be assured for appropriate operation of the electronics at room temperature. The operation principle of the proposal here presented is confirmed by connecting the gate of a conventional MOS transistor in series with a Fe(2)O(3) layer. It is shown that an electrochemical potential is present on the ferrite layer when reacting with propane.

  13. Using a Floating-Gate MOS Transistor as a Transducer in a MEMS Gas Sensing System

    PubMed Central

    Barranca, Mario Alfredo Reyes; Mendoza-Acevedo, Salvador; Flores-Nava, Luis M.; Avila-García, Alejandro; Vazquez-Acosta, E. N.; Moreno-Cadenas, José Antonio; Casados-Cruz, Gaspar

    2010-01-01

    Floating-gate MOS transistors have been widely used in diverse analog and digital applications. One of these is as a charge sensitive device in sensors for pH measurement in solutions or using gates with metals like Pd or Pt for hydrogen sensing. Efforts are being made to monolithically integrate sensors together with controlling and signal processing electronics using standard technologies. This can be achieved with the demonstrated compatibility between available CMOS technology and MEMS technology. In this paper an in-depth analysis is done regarding the reliability of floating-gate MOS transistors when charge produced by a chemical reaction between metallic oxide thin films with either reducing or oxidizing gases is present. These chemical reactions need temperatures around 200 °C or higher to take place, so thermal insulation of the sensing area must be assured for appropriate operation of the electronics at room temperature. The operation principle of the proposal here presented is confirmed by connecting the gate of a conventional MOS transistor in series with a Fe2O3 layer. It is shown that an electrochemical potential is present on the ferrite layer when reacting with propane. PMID:22163478

  14. Molecular sensing using monolayer floating gate, fully depleted SOI MOSFET acting as an exponential transducer.

    PubMed

    Takulapalli, Bharath R

    2010-02-23

    Field-effect transistor-based chemical sensors fall into two broad categories based on the principle of signal transduction-chemiresistor or Schottky-type devices and MOSFET or inversion-type devices. In this paper, we report a new inversion-type device concept-fully depleted exponentially coupled (FDEC) sensor, using molecular monolayer floating gate fully depleted silicon on insulator (SOI) MOSFET. Molecular binding at the chemical-sensitive surface lowers the threshold voltage of the device inversion channel due to a unique capacitive charge-coupling mechanism involving interface defect states, causing an exponential increase in the inversion channel current. This response of the device is in opposite direction when compared to typical MOSFET-type sensors, wherein inversion current decreases in a conventional n-channel sensor device upon addition of negative charge to the chemical-sensitive device surface. The new sensor architecture enables ultrahigh sensitivity along with extraordinary selectivity. We propose the new sensor concept with the aid of analytical equations and present results from our experiments in liquid phase and gas phase to demonstrate the new principle of signal transduction. We present data from numerical simulations to further support our theory.

  15. Mass-spring matching layers for high-frequency ultrasound transducers: a new technique using vacuum deposition.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jeremy; Sharma, Srikanta; Leadbetter, Jeff; Cochran, Sandy; Adamson, Rob

    2014-11-01

    We have developed a technique of applying multiple matching layers to high-frequency (>30 MHz) imaging transducers, by using carefully controlled vacuum deposition alone. This technique uses a thin mass-spring matching layer approach that was previously described in a low-frequency (1 to 10 MHz) transducer design with epoxied layers. This mass- spring approach is more suitable to vacuum deposition in highfrequency transducers over the conventional quarter-wavelength resonant cavity approach, because thinner layers and more versatile material selection can be used, the difficulty in precisely lapping quarter-wavelength matching layers is avoided, the layers are less attenuating, and the layers can be applied to a curved surface. Two different 3-mm-diameter 45-MHz planar lithium niobate transducers and one geometrically curved 3-mm lithium niobate transducer were designed and fabricated using this matching layer approach with copper as the mass layer and parylene as the spring layer. The first planar lithium niobate transducer used a single mass-spring matching network, and the second planar lithium niobate transducer used a single mass-spring network to approximate the first layer in a dual quarter-wavelength matching layer system in addition to a conventional quarter-wavelength layer as the second matching layer. The curved lithium niobate transducer was press focused and used a similar mass-spring plus quarter-wavelength matching layer network. These transducers were then compared with identical transducers with no matching layers and the performance improvement was quantified. The bandwidth of the lithium niobate transducer with the single mass-spring layer was measured to be 46% and the insertion loss was measured to be -21.9 dB. The bandwidth and insertion loss of the lithium niobate transducer with the mass-spring network plus quarter-wavelength matching were measured to be 59% and -18.2 dB, respectively. These values were compared with the unmatched

  16. Finescale Water-Mass Variability from ARGO Profiling Floats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    characterize lateral stirring on O(100 km) lengthscales. This variability represents the low-wavenumber source for the submesoscale being studied under...produce a spectrum for water-mass variability on isopycnals over horizontal wavelengths of 0.03-30 km (Kunze et al. 2014). The submesoscale band...other. 4 REFERENCES D’Asaro, E.A., 1988: Geneation of submesoscale vortices – A new mechanism. J. Geophys. Res., 93, 6685-6693. Ferrari, R

  17. A generalised multiple-mass based method for the determination of the live mass of a force transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montalvão, Diogo; Baker, Thomas; Ihracska, Balazs; Aulaqi, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    Many applications in Experimental Modal Analysis (EMA) require that the sensors' masses are known. This is because the added mass from sensors will affect the structural mode shapes, and in particular its natural frequencies. EMA requires the measurement of the exciting forces at given coordinates, which is often made using piezoelectric force transducers. In such a case, the live mass of the force transducer, i.e. the mass as 'seen' by the structure in perpendicular directions must be measured somehow, so that compensation methods like mass cancelation can be performed. This however presents a problem on how to obtain an accurate measurement for the live mass. If the system is perfectly calibrated, then a reasonably accurate estimate can be made using a straightforward method available in most classical textbooks based on Newton's second law. However, this is often not the case (for example when the transducer's sensitivity changed over time, when it is unknown or when the connection influences the transmission of the force). In a self-calibrating iterative method, both the live mass and calibration factor are determined, but this paper shows that the problem may be ill-conditioned, producing misleading results if certain conditions are not met. Therefore, a more robust method is presented and discussed in this paper, reducing the ill-conditioning problems and the need to know the calibration factors beforehand. The three methods will be compared and discussed through numerical and experimental examples, showing that classical EMA still is a field of research that deserves the attention from scientists and engineers.

  18. Smart Novel Semi-Active Tuned Mass Damper for Fixed-Bottom and Floating Offshore Wind (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez Tsouroukdissian, Arturo

    2016-05-02

    The intention of this paper is to present the results of a novel smart semi-active tuned mass damper (SA-TMD), which mitigates unwanted loads for both fixed-bottom and floating offshore wind systems. (Presentation Format).

  19. Estimating the center of mass of a free-floating body in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Lejeune, L; Casellato, C; Pattyn, N; Neyt, X; Migeotte, P-F

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses the issue of estimating the position of the center of mass (CoM) of a free-floating object of unknown mass distribution in microgravity using a stereoscopic imaging system. The method presented here is applied to an object of known mass distribution for validation purposes. In the context of a study of 3-dimensional ballistocardiography in microgravity, and the elaboration of a physical model of the cardiovascular adaptation to weightlessness, the hypothesis that the fluid shift towards the head of astronauts induces a significant shift of their CoM needs to be tested. The experiments were conducted during the 57th parabolic flight campaign of the European Space Agency (ESA). At the beginning of the microgravity phase, the object was given an initial translational and rotational velocity. A 3D point cloud corresponding to the object was then generated, to which a motion-based method inspired by rigid body physics was applied. Through simulations, the effects of the centroid-to-CoM distance and the number of frames of the sequence are investigated. In experimental conditions, considering the important residual accelerations of the airplane during the microgravity phases, CoM estimation errors (16 to 76 mm) were consistent with simulations. Overall, our results suggest that the method has a good potential for its later generalization to a free-floating human body in a weightless environment.

  20. A Search for Host Stars of Free-Floating Planetary Mass Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tristan, Isaiah; Bowler, Brendan P.

    2017-01-01

    Over the past decade, the number of free-floating planetary-mass objects (FFPMOs) and imaged planets in widely-bound orbits (from hundreds to thousand of AU) have increased steadily, but the origin of these objects and the relationship between them is unclear. To test if known free-floating objects could actually be distant companions to stars, we searched for wide co-moving companions around a sample of 77 young brown dwarfs and FFPMOs using the PPMXL proper motion catalog. Contamination rates (the probability of field stars co-moving by chance) were then calculated using nearby but unrelated fields, and host star candidates were further vetted using their positions in color magnitude diagrams. Using this method, we recovered all previously known widely-bound host stars within our sample and identified several promising widely separated systems, with separations ranging from 10^4-10^5 AU. Follow up radial velocities are currently being obtained to validate the shared space motion of the most promising candidates; if confirmed, these will be the widest planetary systems known.

  1. Using Dynamical Models to Predict the Terrestrial-Mass Free-Floating Planet Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barclay, Thomas; Quintana, Elisa V.

    2016-10-01

    In the classical picture of planet formation, planets form within circumstellar disks as a product of star formation. The material in the disk either forms into a planet, remains bound to the star, falls into the star, or is ejected from the system. We explore the properties of this ejected material using N-body simulations of the late stages of terrestrial planet formation. We find that in planetary systems like ours (with Jupiter and Saturn) about half the ejected material is in bodies less massive than the Moon and half is in bodies more massive than Mars. No planets more massive than half an Earth-mass, however, were ejected, primarily because most of the ejections occur before the timescales needed to grow an Earth-mass body. Without giant planets present in the system, very little material is ever ejected. We predict that future space-borne microlensing searches for free-floating terrestrial-mass planets, such as WFIRST, will discover large numbers of Mars-mass planets but will not make significant detections of Earth-mass planets.

  2. Floating Offshore WTG Integrated Load Analysis & Optimization Employing a Tuned Mass Damper

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez Tsouroukdissian, Arturo; Lackner, Matt; Cross-Whiter, John; Ackers, Ben; Arora, Dhiraj; Park, Semiung

    2015-09-25

    Floating offshore wind turbines (FOWTs) present complex design challenges due to the coupled dynamics of the platform motion, mooring system, and turbine control systems, in response to wind and wave loading. This can lead to higher extreme and fatigue loads than a comparable fixed bottom or onshore system. Previous research[1] has shown the potential to reduced extreme and fatigue loads on FOWT using tuned mass dampers (TMD) for structural control. This project aims to reduce maximum loads using passive TMDs located at the tower top during extreme storm events, when grid supplied power for other controls systems may not be available. The Alstom Haliade 6MW wind turbine is modelled on the Glosten Pelastar tension-leg platform (TLP). The primary objectives of this project are to provide a preliminary assessment of the load reduction potential of passive TMDs on real wind turbine and TLP designs.

  3. Sub-glacier ocean properties and mass balance estimates of Petermann Gletscher's floating tongue in Northwestern Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, K.; Huff, R. D.; Cullen, N.; Rignot, E.; Bauder, A.

    2004-12-01

    Petermann Gletscher is the largest and most influential outlet glacier in central northern Greenland. Located at 81 N, 60 W, it drains an area of 71,580 km2, with a discharge of 12 cubic km of ice per year into the Arctic Ocean. We finished a third field season in spring 2004 collecting in situ data on local climate, ice velocity, ice thickness profiles and bottom melt rates of the floating ice tongue. In addition, water properties (salinity and temperature profiles) in large, channel-like bottom cavities beneath the floating ice tongue were measured. The melt rates in these "channels" are in excess of 10 m/y and probably responsible for most of the mass loss of the Petermann Gletscher. The ocean measurements will be discussed in comparison with other ocean-profile soundings in the region. The bottom topography of the floating ice tongue has been mapped for some regions using surface-based ground penetrating radar at 25 MHz frequency and NASA aircraft radar profiles. A new map showing these under-ice features will be presented. GPS tidal motion has been measured over one lunar cycle at the flex zone and on the free floating ice tongue. These results will be compared to historic measurements made at the beginning of last century. A "worm-like" sheer feature of 80 m in height and several km in length has been studied using differential GPS readings. The mean velocity of the floating tongue ice is 1.08 km/y in that region, whereas the ice along the margin has a 30%-reduced flow speed, resulting in this strange looking sheer feature. Finally, the mass balance of the floating ice tongue will be discussed based on in situ measurements, aircraft profiles, satellite data, and model approximations.

  4. Towards precise ages and masses of free floating planetary mass brown dwarfs.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canty, J. I.; Lucas, P. W.; Roche, P. F.; Pinfield, D. J.

    We use medium-resolution spectroscopy (R˜5000 Gemini/NIFS) to measure the pseudo-equivalent widths (pEWs) of the K band Na I lines of a set of brown dwarfs, ranging in age from ˜1 Myr to field dwarfs. We find a correlation between the pEWs and the surface gravities of these objects. We also find a correlation between surface gravity and the slope of the K band, and describe a simple, empirically-derived spectral index which can be used to make a statistical determination of the ages of brown dwarfs in very young clusters. The index verifies the low gravity of the planetary mass objects in the Orion Nebula Cluster, supporting their ˜1 Myr ages and planetary masses.

  5. SEARCH FOR VERY LOW-MASS BROWN DWARFS AND FREE-FLOATING PLANETARY-MASS OBJECTS IN TAURUS

    SciTech Connect

    Quanz, Sascha P.; Goldman, Bertrand; Henning, Thomas; Brandner, Wolfgang; Burrows, Adam; Hofstetter, Lorne W.

    2010-01-01

    The number of low-mass brown dwarfs and even free floating planetary-mass objects in young nearby star-forming (SF) regions and associations is continuously increasing, offering the possibility to study the low-mass end of the initial mass function in greater detail. In this paper, we present six new candidates for (very) low-mass objects in the Taurus SF region one of which was recently discovered in parallel by Luhman et al. The underlying data we use is part of a new database from a deep near-infrared survey at the Calar Alto observatory. The survey is more than 4 mag deeper than the Two Micron All Sky Survey and covers currently approx1.5 deg{sup 2}. Complementary optical photometry from Sloan Digital Sky Survey were available for roughly 1.0 deg{sup 2}. After selection of the candidates using different color indices, additional photometry from Spitzer/IRAC was included in the analysis. In greater detail, we focus on two very faint objects for which we obtained J-band spectra. Based on comparison with reference spectra, we derive a spectral type of L2 +- 0.5 for one object, making it the object with the latest spectral type in Taurus known today. From models, we find the effective temperature to be 2080 +- 140 K and the mass 5-15 Jupiter masses. For the second source, the J-band spectrum does not provide definite proof of the young, low-mass nature of the object, as the expected steep water vapor absorption at 1.33 mum is not present in the data. We discuss the probability that this object might be a background giant or carbon star. If it were a young Taurus member, however, a comparison to theoretical models suggests that it lies close to or even below the deuterium burning limit (<13 M{sub Jup}) as well. A first proper motion analysis for both objects shows that they are good candidates for being Taurus members.

  6. Search for Very Low-Mass Brown Dwarfs and Free-Floating Planetary-Mass Objects in Taurus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quanz, Sascha P.; Goldman, Bertrand; Henning, Thomas; Brandner, Wolfgang; Burrows, Adam; Hofstetter, Lorne W.

    2010-01-01

    The number of low-mass brown dwarfs and even free floating planetary-mass objects in young nearby star-forming (SF) regions and associations is continuously increasing, offering the possibility to study the low-mass end of the initial mass function in greater detail. In this paper, we present six new candidates for (very) low-mass objects in the Taurus SF region one of which was recently discovered in parallel by Luhman et al. The underlying data we use is part of a new database from a deep near-infrared survey at the Calar Alto observatory. The survey is more than 4 mag deeper than the Two Micron All Sky Survey and covers currently ~1.5 deg2. Complementary optical photometry from Sloan Digital Sky Survey were available for roughly 1.0 deg2. After selection of the candidates using different color indices, additional photometry from Spitzer/IRAC was included in the analysis. In greater detail, we focus on two very faint objects for which we obtained J-band spectra. Based on comparison with reference spectra, we derive a spectral type of L2 ± 0.5 for one object, making it the object with the latest spectral type in Taurus known today. From models, we find the effective temperature to be 2080 ± 140 K and the mass 5-15 Jupiter masses. For the second source, the J-band spectrum does not provide definite proof of the young, low-mass nature of the object, as the expected steep water vapor absorption at 1.33 μm is not present in the data. We discuss the probability that this object might be a background giant or carbon star. If it were a young Taurus member, however, a comparison to theoretical models suggests that it lies close to or even below the deuterium burning limit (<13 M Jup) as well. A first proper motion analysis for both objects shows that they are good candidates for being Taurus members. Based on observations made at the Calar Alto Observatory. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the Paranal Observatories under program ID 278.C-5043A. This

  7. Triple-resonant transducers.

    PubMed

    Butler, Stephen C

    2012-06-01

    A detailed analysis is presented of two novel multiple-resonant transducers which produce a wider transmit response than that of a conventional Tonpilz-type transducer. These multi-resonant transducers are Tonpilz-type longitudinal vibrators that produce three coupled resonances and are referred to as triple-resonant transducers (TRTs). One of these designs is a mechanical series arrangement of a tail mass, piezoelectric ceramic stack, central mass, compliant spring, second central mass, second compliant spring, and a piston-radiating head mass. The other TRT design is a mechanical series arrangement of a tail mass, piezoelectric ceramic stack, central mass, compliant spring, and head mass with a quarter-wave matching layer of poly(methyl methacrylate) on the head mass. Several prototype transducer element designs were fabricated that demonstrated proof-of-concept.

  8. Smart Novel Semi-Active Tuned Mass Damper for Fixed-Bottom and Floating Offshore Wind (Paper)

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez Tsouroukdissian, Arturo; Lackner, Mathew; Cross-Whiter, John; Park, Se Myung; Pourazarm, Pariya; La Cava, William; Lee, Sungho

    2016-05-02

    The intention of this paper is to present the results of a novel smart semi-active tuned mass damper (SA-TMD), which mitigates unwanted loads for both fixed-bottom and floating offshore wind systems. The paper will focus on the most challenging water depths for both fixed-bottom and floating systems. A close to 38m Monopile and 55m Tension Leg Platform (TLP) will be considered. A technical development and trade-off analysis will be presented comparing the new system with existing passive non-linear TMD (N-TMD) technology and semi-active. TheSATMD works passively and activates itself with low power source under unwanted dynamic loading in less than 60msec. It is composed of both variable stiffness and damping elements coupled to a central pendulum mass. The analysis has been done numerically in both FAST(NREL) and Orcaflex (Orcina), and integrated in the Wind Turbine system employing CAD/CAE. The results of this work will pave the way for experimental testing to complete the technology qualification process. The load reductions under extreme and fatigue cases reach up significant levels at tower base, consequently reducing LCOE for fixed-bottom to floating wind solutions. The nacelle acceleration is reduced substantially under severe random wind and sea states, reducing the risks of failure of electromechanical components and blades at the rotor nacelle assembly. The SA-TMD system isa new technology that has not been applied previously in wind solutions. Structural damping devices aim to increase offshore wind turbine system robustness and reliability, which eases multiple substructures installations and global stability.

  9. Therapeutic Array Transducer Element Using Coresonance between Hemispherical Piezoceramic Shell and Water Sphere: Effect of Load Masses of Support and Electric Contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsu, Kenji; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2012-07-01

    For therapeutic ultrasound array transducers, it is necessary to reduce the electrical impedance of their elements so that the transducer can produce high ultrasonic power at a relatively low drive voltage. For this purpose, a new concept of a breathing-mode piezoceramic transducer element has been proposed. Numerical simulation showed its low electric impedance as well as good acoustical coupling between the concave hemispherical piezoceramic shell, with a diameter on the order of a wavelength in water, and the volume of a water sphere half enclosed by the shell. In the preparation of a prototype transducer, the effect of additional load masses of the flange supporting the shell and the electric contact for driving the element was numerically analyzed in this paper.

  10. Kinetic energy transducing system

    SciTech Connect

    Danihel, M.

    1986-07-08

    A device is described for converting wave energy to mechanical motion comprising: a frame, at least one wave energy transducer each of which has a float to ride upon the undulating surface of a body of water, a rocker shaft rotatably mounted in the frame and connected to the float by a rocker arm to turn in response to movement of the float upon the undulating water surface, a pair of unidirectional clutch mechanisms coupled to the rocker shaft, a drive shaft rotatably mounted on the frame and connected to the clutch mechanisms to turn in a single direction of rotation responsive to alternative engagement of the clutch mechanisms therewith and turning movement of the rocker shaft in both directions of rotation, and a hydrofoil system for each float including a vertical shaft extending downwardly from the bottom of each float, a transverse rod which is rotatably coupled to the vertical shaft, a pair of hydrofoil wings secured to the transverse rod on opposite sides of the vertical shaft, and means for centering the hydrofoil wings acting between the vertical shaft and the transverse rod to urge the hydrofoil wings toward horizontal orientation.

  11. Biaxial Stretchability and Transparency of Ag Nanowire 2D Mass-Spring Networks Prepared by Floating Compression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byoung Soo; Pyo, Jun Beom; Son, Jeong Gon; Zi, Goangseup; Lee, Sang-Soo; Park, Jong Hyuk; Lee, Jonghwi

    2017-03-29

    Networks of silver nanowires (Ag NWs) have been considered as promising materials for stretchable and transparent conductors. Despite various improvements of their optoelectronic and electromechanical properties over the past few years, Ag NW networks with a sufficient stretchability in multiple directions that is essential for the accommodation of the multidirectional strains of human movement have seldom been reported. For this paper, biaxially stretchable, transparent conductors were developed based on 2D mass-spring networks of wavy Ag NWs. Inspired by the traditional papermaking process, the 2D wavy networks were produced by floating Ag NW networks on the surface of water and subsequently applying biaxial compression to them. It was demonstrated that this floating-compression process can reduce the friction between the Ag NW-water interfaces, providing a uniform and isotropic in-plane waviness for the networks without buckling or cracking. The resulting Ag NW networks that were transferred onto elastomeric substrates successfully acted as conductors with an excellent transparency, conductivity, and electromechanical stability under a biaxial strain of 30%. The strain sensors that are based on the prepared conductors demonstrated a great potential for the enhanced performances of future wearable devices.

  12. Transducer characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, B. T.; Eoff, J. M.; Schuetz, L. J.; Cunningham, K. R.

    1980-07-02

    This report has been prepared specifically for ultrasonic transducer users within the Nondestructive Testing Evaluation (NDE) community of the weapons complex. The purpose of the report is to establish an initial set of uniform procedures for measuring and recording transducer performance data, and to establish a common foundation on which more comprehensive transducer performance evaluations may be added as future transducer performance criteria expands. Transducer parameters and the problems with measuring them are discussed and procedures for measuring transducer performance are recommended with special precautionary notes regarding critical aspects of each measurement. An important consideration regarding the recommended procedures is the cost of implementation. There are two distinct needs for transducer performance characterization in the complex. Production oriented users need a quick, reliable means to check a transducer to ascertain its suitability for continued service. Development groups and the Transducer Center need a comprehensive characterization means to collect adequate data to evaluate theoretical concepts or to build exact replacement transducers. The instrumentation, equipment, and procedures recommended for monitoring production transducers are utilitarian and provide only that information needed to determine transducer condition.

  13. WISEA J114724.10-204021.3: A Free-floating Planetary Mass Member of the TW Hya Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Adam C.; Windsor, James; Cushing, Michael C.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Wright, Edward L.

    2016-05-01

    We present WISEA J114724.10-204021.3, a young, low-mass, high-probability member of the TW Hya association (TWA). WISEA J114724.10-204021.3 was discovered based on its red AllWISE color (W1 - W2 = 0.63 mag) and extremely red 2MASS J - K S color (>2.64 mag), the latter of which is confirmed with near-infrared photometry from the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy Hemisphere Survey (J - K S = 2.57 ± 0.03). Follow-up near-infrared spectroscopy shows a spectral type of L7 ± 1 as well as several spectroscopic indicators of youth. These include a peaked H-band shape and a steeper K-band slope, traits typically attributed to low surface gravity. The sky position, proper motion, and distance estimates of WISEA J114724.10-204021.3 are all consistent with membership in the ˜10 Myr old TWA. Using the age of the TWA and evolutionary models, we estimate the mass of WISEA J114724.10-204021.3 to be 5-13 M Jup, making it one of the youngest and lowest-mass free-floating objects yet discovered in the Solar neighborhood.

  14. The Influence of Static and Rotating Magnetic Fields on Heat and Mass Transfer in Silicon Floating Zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croll, A.; Dold, P.; Kaiser, Th.; Szofran, F. R.; Benz, K. W.

    1999-01-01

    Heat and mass transfer in float-zone processing are strongly influenced by convective flows in the zone. They are caused by buoyancy convection, thermocapillary (Marangoni) convection, or artificial sources such as rotation and radio-frequency heating. Flows in conducting melts can be controlled by the use of magnetic fields, either by damping fluid motion with static fields or by generating a defined flow with rotating fields. The possibilities of using static and rotating magnetic fields in silicon floating-zone growth have been investigated by experiments in axial static fields up to 5 T and in transverse rotating magnetic fields up to 7.5 mT. Static fields of a few 100 mT already suppress most striations but are detrimental to the radial segregation by introducing a coring effect. A complete suppression of dopant striations caused by time-dependent thermocapillary convection and a reduction of the coring to insignificant values, combined with a shift of the axial segregation profile toward a more diffusion-limited case, is possible with static fields greater than or equal to 1 T. However, under certain conditions the use of high axial magnetic fields can lead to the appearance of a new type of pronounced dopant striations, caused by thermoelectromagnetic convection. The use of a transverse rotating magnetic field influences the microscopic segregation at quite low inductions, of the order of a few millitesla. The field shifts time- dependent flows and the resulting striation patterns from a broad range of low frequencies at high amplitudes to a few high frequencies at low amplitudes.

  15. The Influence of Static and Rotating Magnetic Fields on Heat and Mass Transfer in Silicon Floating Zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croell, Arne; Dold, P.; Kaiser, Th.; Szofran, Frank; Benz, K. W.

    1999-01-01

    Hear and mass transfer in float-zone processing are strongly influenced by convective flows in the zone. They are caused by buoyancy convection, thermocapillary (Marangoni) convection, or artificial sources such as rotation and radio frequency heating. Flows in conducting melts can be controlled by the use of magnetic fields, either by damping fluid motion with static fields or by generating a def@ned flow with rotating fields. The possibilities of using static and rotating magnetic fields in silicon floating-zone growth have been investigated by experiments in axial static fields up to ST and in transverse rotating magnetic fields up to 7.S mT. Static fields of a few 100 MT already suppress most striations but are detrimental to the radial segregation by introducing a coring effect. A complete suppression of dopant striations caused by time-dependent thermocapillary convection and a reduction of the coring to insignificant values, combined with a shift of the axial segregation profile towards a more diffusion-limited case, is possible with static fields ? 1T. However, under certain conditions the use of high axial magnetic fields can lead to the appearance of a new type of pronounced dopant striations, caused by thermoelec:romagnetic convection. The use of a transverse rotating magnetic field influences the microscopic segregation at quite low inductions, of the order of a few mT. The field shifts time-dependent flows and the resulting striation patterns from a broad range of low frequencies at high amplitudes to a few high frequencies at low amplitudes

  16. An Extremely Rare Case of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms: Floating Benign Mesenchymal Mass in Abdomen

    PubMed Central

    Akin, Yigit; Yilmaz, Mehmet Ogur

    2017-01-01

    A 48-year-old man admitted to the urology outpatient clinic with major symptoms of right-side pain and intermittent lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTSs) such as low urine flow rate, dysuria, and frequency. Uroflowmetry showed low urine flow, and laboratory tests revealed no pathology. Ultrasound (US) showed a 7 cm calcific mass above the bladder and a kidney cyst with a diameter of 5.3 cm in the upper pole of the right kidney. Enhanced computed tomography confirmed the US findings. Laparoscopic transperitoneal renal cyst decortication was performed. There was no sign of additional tumors. An independent mass in the abdomen was diagnosed, and the mass was removed. Based on the pathology, the diagnosis was a benign mesenchymal calcific mass. This is the first report of LUTSs due to a free benign mesenchymal mass in the published literature. PMID:28326221

  17. Piezoelectric transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conragan, J.; Muller, R. S.

    1970-01-01

    Transducer consists of a hybrid thin film and a piezoelectric transistor that acts as a stress-sensitive device with built-in gain. It provides a stress/strain transducer that incorporates a signal amplification stage and sensor in a single package.

  18. Reducing float coal dust

    PubMed Central

    Patts, J.R.; Colinet, J.F.; Janisko, S.J.; Barone, T.L.; Patts, L.D.

    2016-01-01

    Controlling float coal dust in underground coal mines before dispersal into the general airstream can reduce the risk of mine explosions while potentially achieving a more effective and efficient use of rock dust. A prototype flooded-bed scrubber was evaluated for float coal dust control in the return of a continuous miner section. The scrubber was installed inline between the face ventilation tubing and an exhausting auxiliary fan. Airborne and deposited dust mass measurements were collected over three days at set distances from the fan exhaust to assess changes in float coal dust levels in the return due to operation of the scrubber. Mass-based measurements were collected on a per-cut basis and normalized on the basis of per ton mined by the continuous miner. The results show that average float coal dust levels measured under baseline conditions were reduced by more than 90 percent when operating the scrubber. PMID:28018004

  19. Microinterferometer transducer

    DOEpatents

    Corey, III, Harry S.

    1979-01-01

    An air-bearing microinterferometer transducer is provided for increased accuracy, range and linearity over conventional displacement transducers. A microinterferometer system is housed within a small compartment of an air-bearing displacement transducer housing. A movable cube corner reflector of the interferometer is mounted to move with the displacement gauging probe of the transducer. The probe is disposed for axial displacement by means of an air-bearing. Light from a single frequency laser is directed into an interferometer system within the transducer housing by means of a self-focusing fiber optic cable to maintain light coherency. Separate fringe patterns are monitored by a pair of fiber optic cables which transmit the patterns to a detecting system. The detecting system includes a bidirectional counter which counts the light pattern fringes according to the direction of movement of the probe during a displacement gauging operation.

  20. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    2000-01-01

    An active acoustic transducer tool for use down-hole applications. The tool includes a single cylindrical mandrel including a shoulder defining the boundary of a narrowed portion over which is placed a sandwich-style piezoelectric tranducer assembly. The piezoelectric transducer assembly is prestressed by being placed in a thermal interference fit between the shoulder of the mandrel and the base of an anvil which is likewise positioned over the narrower portion of the mandrel. In the preferred embodiment, assembly of the tool is accomplished using a hydraulic jack to stretch the mandrel prior to emplacement of the cylindrical sandwich-style piezoelectric transducer assembly and anvil. After those elements are positioned and secured, the stretched mandrel is allowed to return substantially to its original (pre-stretch) dimensions with the result that the piezoelectric transducer elements are compressed between the anvil and the shoulder of the mandrel.

  1. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1997-12-30

    An acoustic transducer is described comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2,000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers. 4 figs.

  2. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    1997-01-01

    An acoustic transducer comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers.

  3. Ultrasonic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Steven C.; Kraft, Nancy C.

    2007-03-13

    An ultrasonic transducer having an effective center frequency of about 42 MHz; a bandwidth of greater than 85% at 6 dB; a spherical focus of at least 0.5 inches in water; an F4 lens; a resolution sufficient to be able to detect and separate a 0.005 inch flat-bottomed hole at 0.005 inches below surface; and a beam size of approximately 0.006–0.008 inches measured off a 11/2 mm ball in water at the transducer's focal point.

  4. Stools - floating

    MedlinePlus

    ... absorption of nutrients ( malabsorption ) or too much gas (flatulence). Considerations Most causes of floating stools are harmless. ... Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 140. Read More Gas - flatulence Malabsorption Review Date 5/11/2016 Updated by: ...

  5. PRESSURE TRANSDUCER

    DOEpatents

    Sander, H.H.

    1959-10-01

    A pressure or mechanical force transducer particularly adaptable to miniature telemetering systems is described. Basically the device consists of a transistor located within a magnetic field adapted to change in response to mechanical force. The conduction characteristics of the transistor in turn vary proportionally with changes in the magnetic flux across the transistor such that the output (either frequency of amplitude) of the transistor circuit is proportional to mechanical force or pressure.

  6. Pressure transducer

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Thomas T.; Roop, Conard J.; Schmidt, Kenneth J.; Gunchin, Elmer R.

    1989-01-01

    A pressure transducer suitable for use in high temperature environments includes two pairs of induction coils, each pair being bifilarly wound together, and each pair of coils connected as opposite arms of a four arm circuit; an electrically conductive target moveably positioned between the coil pairs and connected to a diaphragm such that deflection of the diaphragm causes axial movement of the target and an unbalance in the bridge output.

  7. Pressure transducer

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, T.T.; Roop, C.J.; Schmidt, K.J.; Gunchin, E.R.

    1987-02-13

    A pressure transducer suitable for use in high temperature environments includes two pairs of induction coils, each pair being bifilarly wound together, and each pair of coils connected as opposite arms of a four arm circuit; an electrically conductive target moveably positioned between the coil pairs and connected to a diaphragm such that deflection of the diaphragm causes axial movement of the target and an unbalance in the bridge output. 7 figs.

  8. Ferrofluid Transducer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The patent discloses magnetic fluid transducer for producing a low-frequency sound field in a fluid medium. The device comprises a non-magnetic...cylindrical housing with end windows. The housing is surrounded by a magnetic-field-generator means and contains a magnetic fluid within the housing. The...magnetic field penetrates the housing and interacts with the magnetic fluid . A body force is developed within the fluid which produces an internal

  9. Multifunctional transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldstein, C.; Lewis, G. W.; Culler, V. H.; Merrbaum, S. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Several parameters of a small region of a muscle tissue or other object, can be simultaneously measured using with minimal traumatizing or damage of the object, a trifunctional transducer which can determine the force applied by a muscle fiber, the displacement of the fiber, and the change in thickness of the fiber. The transducer has three legs with inner ends joined together and outer ends formed to piece the tissue and remain within it. Two of the legs are relatively stiff, to measure force applied by the tissue, and a third leg is relatively flexible to measure displacement of the tissue relative to one or both stiff legs, and with the three legs lying in a common plane so that the force and displacement measurements all relate to the same direction of muscle movements. A flexible loop is attached to one of the stiff legs to measure changes in muscle thickness, with the upper end of the loop fixed to the leg and the lower end of the loop bearing against the surface of the tissue and being free to slide on the leg.

  10. Fluid mechanics and mass transfer in melt crystal growth: Analysis of the floating zone and vertical Bridgman processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    This research program focuses on analysis of the transport mechanisms in solidification processes, especially one of interest to the Microgravity Sciences and Applications Program of NASA. Research during the last year has focused on analysis of the dynamics of the floating zone process for growth of small-scale crystals, on studies of the effect of applied magnetic fields on convection and solute segregation in directional solidification, and on the dynamics of microscopic cell formation in two-dimensional solidification of binary alloys. Significant findings are given.

  11. On floats and float tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seewald, Friedrich

    1931-01-01

    The principal source of information on float resistance is the model test. In view of the insuperable difficulties opposing any attempt at theoretical treatment of the resistance problem, particularly at attitudes which tend toward satisfactory take-off, such as the transitory stage to planing, the towing test is and will remain the primary method for some time.

  12. SHORT-DURATION LENSING EVENTS. I. WIDE-ORBIT PLANETS? FREE-FLOATING LOW-MASS OBJECTS? OR HIGH-VELOCITY STARS?

    SciTech Connect

    Di Stefano, Rosanne

    2012-08-01

    Short-duration lensing events tend to be generated by low-mass lenses or by lenses with high transverse velocities. Furthermore, for any given lens mass and speed, events of short duration are preferentially caused by nearby lenses (mesolenses) that can be studied in detail, or else by lenses so close to the source star that finite-source-size effects may be detected, yielding information about both the Einstein ring radius and the surface of the lensed star. Planets causing short-duration events may be in orbits with any orientation, and may have semimajor axes smaller than 1 AU, or they may reach the outer limits of their planetary systems, in the region corresponding to the solar system's Oort Cloud. They can have masses larger than Jupiter's or smaller than Pluto's. Lensing therefore has a unique potential to expand our understanding of planetary systems. A particular advantage of lensing is that it can provide precision measurements of system parameters, including the masses of and projected separation between star and planet. We demonstrate how the parameters can be extracted and show that a great deal can be learned. For example, it is remarkable that the gravitational mass of nearby free-floating planet-mass lenses can be measured by complementing observations of a photometric event with deep images that detect the planet itself. A fraction of short events may be caused by high-velocity stars located within a kiloparsec. Many high-velocity lenses are likely to be neutron stars that received large natal kicks. Other high-speed stars may be members of the halo population. Still others may be hypervelocity stars that have been ejected from the Galactic center, or runaway stars escaped from close binaries, possibly including the progenitor binaries of Type Ia supernovae.

  13. Short-duration Lensing Events. I. Wide-orbit Planets? Free-floating Low-mass Objects? Or High-velocity Stars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Stefano, Rosanne

    2012-08-01

    Short-duration lensing events tend to be generated by low-mass lenses or by lenses with high transverse velocities. Furthermore, for any given lens mass and speed, events of short duration are preferentially caused by nearby lenses (mesolenses) that can be studied in detail, or else by lenses so close to the source star that finite-source-size effects may be detected, yielding information about both the Einstein ring radius and the surface of the lensed star. Planets causing short-duration events may be in orbits with any orientation, and may have semimajor axes smaller than 1 AU, or they may reach the outer limits of their planetary systems, in the region corresponding to the solar system's Oort Cloud. They can have masses larger than Jupiter's or smaller than Pluto's. Lensing therefore has a unique potential to expand our understanding of planetary systems. A particular advantage of lensing is that it can provide precision measurements of system parameters, including the masses of and projected separation between star and planet. We demonstrate how the parameters can be extracted and show that a great deal can be learned. For example, it is remarkable that the gravitational mass of nearby free-floating planet-mass lenses can be measured by complementing observations of a photometric event with deep images that detect the planet itself. A fraction of short events may be caused by high-velocity stars located within a kiloparsec. Many high-velocity lenses are likely to be neutron stars that received large natal kicks. Other high-speed stars may be members of the halo population. Still others may be hypervelocity stars that have been ejected from the Galactic center, or runaway stars escaped from close binaries, possibly including the progenitor binaries of Type Ia supernovae.

  14. Influence of gravitational and vibrational convection on the heat- and mass transfer in the melt during crystal growing by Bridgman and floating zone methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, Oleg

    2016-07-01

    Space materials science is one of the priorities of different national and international space programs. The physical processes of heat and mass transfer in microgravity (including effect of g-jitter) is far from complete clarity, especially for important practical technology for producing crystals from the melt. The idea of the impact on crystallizing melt by low frequency vibration includes not only the possibility to suppress unwanted microaccelerations, but also to actively influence the structure of the crystallization front. This approach is one of the most effective ways to influence the quality of materials produced in flight conditions. The subject of this work is the effect of vibrations on the thermal and hydrodynamic processes during crystal growth using Bridgman and floating zone techniques, which have the greatest prospect of practical application in space. In the present approach we consider the gravitational convection, Marangoni convection, as well as the effect of vibration on the melt for some special cases. The results of simulation were compared with some experimental data obtained by the authors using a transparent model substance - succinonitrile (Bridgman method), and silicon (floating zone method). Substances used, process parameters and characteristics of the experimental units correspond the equipment developed for onboard research and serve as a basis for selecting optimum conditions vibration exposure as a factor affecting the solidification pattern. The direction of imposing vibrations coincides with the axis of the crystal, the frequency is presented by the harmonic law, and the force of gravity was varied by changing its absolute value. Mathematical model considered axisymmetric approximation of joint convective-conductive energy transfer in the system crystal - melt. Upon application of low-frequency oscillations of small amplitude along the axis of growing it was found the suppression of the secondary vortex flows near the

  15. Finite Element Modeling for Ultrasonic Transducers (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-02-27

    virtual prototyping of transducers . Fig. 18 shows a 3D model of a Tonpilz device for low frequency sensing in air. This classical design is usually used...coupled Tonpilz transducer . A thick, flexible matching layer is bonded to the face of the conical head-mass. 7. CONCLUSIONS This paper was intended as a...This is a preprint of a paper published in Proc. SPIE Int. Symp. Medical Imaging 1998, San Diego, Feb 21-27, 1998 Ultrasonic Transducer Engineering

  16. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method based on solidification of floating organic drop combined with gas chromatography with electron-capture or mass spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Leong, Mei-I; Huang, Shang-Da

    2008-11-21

    A simple dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) method based on solidification of a floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO) technique combined with gas chromatography/electron-capture detection (GC/ECD) or gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) has been developed. The proposed method is simple, low in cost, and of high precision. It overcomes the most important problem in DLLME, the high-toxic solvent used. Halogenated organic compounds (HOCs) in water samples were determined as the model compounds. The parameters optimized for the DLLME-SFO technique were as follows: A mixture of 0.5 mL acetone, containing 10 microL 2-dodecanol (2-DD-OH), was rapidly injected by syringe into the 5 mL water sample. After centrifugation, the fine 2-DD-OH droplets (8+/-0.5 microL) were floated at the top of the screwcap test tube. The test tube was then cooled in an ice bath. After 5 min the 2-DD-OH solvent had solidified and was then transferred into a conical vial; it melted quickly at room temperature and 3 microL (for GC/ECD) or 2 microL (for GC/MS) of it was injected into a gas chromatograph for analysis. The limit of detection (LOD) for this technique was 0.005-0.05microgL(-1) for GC/ECD and was 0.005-0.047 microgL(-1) for GC/MS, respectively. The linear range of the calibration curve of DLLME-SFO was from 0.01 to 500 microgL(-1) with a coefficient of estimation (r2)>0.996 for GC/ECD and was from 0.02 to 500 microgL(-1) with a coefficient of estimation (r2)>0.996 for GC/MS.

  17. A tri-coil bellows-type round window transducer with improved frequency characteristics for middle-ear implants

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Dong Ho; Seong, Ki Woong; Puria, Sunil; Lee, Kyu-Yup

    2017-01-01

    A number of methods to drive the round window (RW) using a floating mass transducer (FMT) have been reported. This method has attracted attention because the FMT is relatively easy to implant in the RW niche. However, the use of an FMT to drive the RW has been proven to produce low outputs at frequencies below approximately 1 kHz. In this study, a new tri-coil bellows-type transducer (TCBT), which has excellent low frequency output and is easy to implant, is proposed. To design the frequency characteristics of the TCBT, mechanical and electrical simulations were performed, and then a comparative analysis was conducted between a floating mass type transducer (like the FMT) and a fixed type transducer (like the TCBT). The features of the proposed TCBT are as follows. First, the TCBT's housing is fixed to the RW niche so that it does not vibrate. Second, the internal end of a tiny bellows is connected to a vibrating three-pole permanent magnet located within three field coils. Finally, the rim of the bellows bottom is attached to the end of the housing that hermetically encloses the three field coils. In this design, the only vibrating element is the bellows itself, which efficiently drives the RW membrane. To evaluate the characteristics of this newly developed TCBT, the transducer was installed in the RW niche of temporal bones and the velocity of the stapes was measured using a laser Doppler vibrometer. The experimental results indicate that the TCBT can produce 100, 111, and 129 dB SPL equivalent pressure outputs at below 1 kHz, 1–3 kHz, and above 3 kHz, respectively. Thus, the TCBT with one side coupled to the RW via a bellows will be easy to implant and offer better performance than an FMT. PMID:27594098

  18. Development of a floating photobioreactor with internal partitions for efficient utilization of ocean wave into improved mass transfer and algal culture mixing.

    PubMed

    Kim, Z-Hun; Park, Hanwool; Hong, Seong-Joo; Lim, Sang-Min; Lee, Choul-Gyun

    2016-05-01

    Culturing microalgae in the ocean has potentials that may reduce the production cost and provide an option for an economic biofuel production from microalgae. The ocean holds great potentials for mass microalgal cultivation with its high specific heat, mixing energy from waves, and large cultivable area. Suitable photobioreactors (PBRs) that are capable of integrating marine energy into the culture systems need to be developed for the successful ocean cultivation. In this study, prototype floating PBRs were designed and constructed using transparent low-density polyethylene film for microalgal culture in the ocean. To improve the mixing efficiency, various types of internal partitions were introduced within PBRs. Three different types of internal partitions were evaluated for their effects on the mixing efficiency in terms of mass transfer (k(L)a) and mixing time in the PBRs. The partition type with the best mixing efficiency was selected, and the number of partitions was varied from one to three for investigation of its effect on mixing efficiency. When the number of partitions is increased, mass transfer increased in proportion to the number of partitions. However, mixing time was not directly related to the number of partitions. When a green microalga, Tetraselmis sp. was cultivated using PBRs with the selected partition under semi-continuous mode in the ocean, biomass and fatty acid productivities in the PBRs were increased by up to 50 % and 44% at high initial cell density, respectively, compared to non-partitioned ones. The results of internally partitioned PBRs demonstrated potentials for culturing microalgae by efficiently utilizing ocean wave energy into culture mixing in the ocean.

  19. Solidification of floating organic drop liquid-phase microextraction cell fishing with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for screening bioactive components from Amomum villosum Lour.

    PubMed

    Xue, Xue; Yang, Depo; Wang, Dongmei; Xu, Xinjun; Zhu, Longping; Zhao, Zhimin

    2015-04-01

    In this study, a novel solidification of floating organic drop liquid-phase microextraction cell fishing with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SFOD-LPME-CF-GC-MS) method was established and used to screen, isolate and analyze bioactive components from Amomum villosum Lour. extract. Through comparision of its effect on the models of normal cell and inflammatory cells, anti-inflammatory active components of essential oil from A. villosum Lour. were readily screened, and the components obtained are in agreement with related pharmacological articles. SFOD-LPME-CF-GC-MS was used to analyze the interaction of A. villosum Lour. extracts with normal and lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophage cells. The effect of A. villosum Lour. essential oil extracts in the LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 model were also assessed in terms of cytotoxicity and nitric oxide production as an indication of bioactivity. Three potentially bioactive components were identified, demonstrating that SFOD-LPME-CF-GC-MS can be used successfully in the drug-screening process. This approach avoids the requirement for protein precipitation, but more importantly, generates a high concentration ratio, allowing analysis of trace components in traditional Chinese medicines. SFOD-LPME-CF-GC-MS is a simple, fast, effective and reliable method for the screening and analysis of bioactive components, and it can be extended to screen other bioactive components from TCMs.

  20. Transducer characterization for Vibrothermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaddi, Jyani Somayajulu

    Vibrothermography, also known as Sonic IR and Thermosonics, is an NDE technique for finding cracks and flaws based on vibration-induced frictional rubbing of unbonded surfaces. The vibration is usually generated by a piezoelectric stack transducer which transduces electrical energy into large amplitude mechanical vibrations. The purpose of this study is to develop an understanding of the excitation process for vibrothermography so that optimal parameters and transducers for the testing can be selected. The amplitude and impedance transfer characteristics of the transducer system control the vibration of the sample. Within a linear contact (no tip chatter) model, the interaction between the transducer system and the specimen can be characterized using the theory of linear time-invariant (LTI) systems and electro-mechanical Norton equivalence. This work presents quantitative measurements of the performance of piezoelectric stack transducers in a vibrothermography excitation system and the effect of transducer performance and specimen characteristics on the induced vibration in the specimen. We show that with compliant coupling, the specimen vibration is directly proportional to the transducer open circuit velocity and that the system resonances generated because of metal-metal contact of specimen and transducer are disconnected by adding a couplant between specimen and transducer. We then give suggestions for transducer and couplant selection for vibrothermography and suggest methods to flatten the velocity spectrum of the transducer. We extend our analysis to high amplitude transducer behavior and elaborate on the effect of power amplifier saturation on the transducer behavior. The saturation effect negates the effect of adding an external inductance to flatten the transducer velocity spectrum. Finally, preliminary results are reported on the effect of transducer degradation phenomenon.

  1. PRESSURE TRANSDUCER RESEARCH.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    PIEZOELECTRIC TRANSDUCERS, PRESSURE), UNDERGROUND EXPLOSIONS, ELECTRICAL RESISTANCE, SEEBECK EFFECT , PRESSURE GAGES, SHOCK WAVES, STRESSES, COMPUTER PROGRAMMING, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS, NUCLEAR RADIATION.

  2. Transducer applications, a compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The characteristics and applications of transducers are discussed. Subjects presented are: (1) thermal measurements, (2) liquid level and fluid flow measurements, (3) pressure transducers, (4) stress-strain measurements, (5) acceleration and velocity measurements, (6) displacement and angular rotation, and (7) transducer test and calibration methods.

  3. Megahertz tonpilz transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Tol, Dave; Hughes, W. Jack

    1999-06-01

    The tonpilz configuration is applied to a transducer operating in the megahertz frequency range. The KLM model is used to design the transducer using readily available components. The construction techniques used are the same as those applied to standard high frequency transducers. Modeled and measured pulse-echo results display a high level of agreement, but impedance and sensitivity comparisons are less promising.

  4. Floating Boats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waugh, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a simple laboratory activity in which students collect a series of measurements and then use graphical analysis to determine the nature of the relationship between an object's mass and the volume of water it displaces. In this activity, students explore the relationships between the mass of a floating…

  5. Integrated transducer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syrzycki, Marek; Parameswaran, M.; Chapman, Glenn H.

    1995-06-01

    In the paper we discuss possible solutions to problems pertaining the implementation of integrated transducer systems, based on examples of WSI image transducers, magnetic field sensors and tactile sensors arrays, as well as arrays of chemical sensors. We also present the issues common to large area transducer arrays, such as building-in redundancy into WSI transducer arrays, and frequency domain circuits for the future communication pathway in integrated transducer systems. Advantages of standard CMOS technology, enhanced with various post-fabrication processes such as silicon micromachining and laser linking, are also stressed.

  6. Trielectrode capacitive pressure transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coon, G. W. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A capacitive transducer and circuit especially suited for making measurements in a high-temperature environment are described. The transducer includes two capacitive electrodes and a shield electrode. As the temperature of the transducer rises, the resistance of the insulation between the capacitive electrode decreases and a resistive current attempts to interfere with the capacitive current between the capacitive electrodes. The shield electrode and the circuit coupled there reduce the resistive current in the transducer. A bridge-type circuit coupled to the transducer ignores the resistive current and measures only the capacitive current flowing between the capacitive electrodes.

  7. "Floating shoulder" injuries.

    PubMed

    Heng, Kenneth

    2016-12-01

    "Floating shoulder" is a rare injury complex resulting from high-energy blunt force trauma to the shoulder, resulting in scapulothoracic dissociation. It is commonly associated with catastrophic neurovascular injury. Two cases of motorcyclists with floating shoulder injuries are described.

  8. WindWaveFloat

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, Alla

    2011-11-01

    Presentation from the 2011 Water Peer Review includes in which principal investigator Alla Weinstein discusses project progress in development of a floating offshore wind structure - the WindFloat - and incorporation therin of a Spherical Wave Energy Device.

  9. Floating: sink or swim.

    PubMed

    Pronger, L

    1995-12-01

    Budget restrictions, fewer human resources and fluctuating patient populations have combined to increase the practice of floating general duty nurses. Floating occurs when a nurse from an overstaffed unit, based on patient load, is required to work in another unit that is understaffed. Floating is not a new practice, but it has always been an emotionally charged issue. Today, with more float pool nurses seeking the security of a permanent position in a home unit, the issue has increased in intensity.

  10. The Design of Floats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sottorf, W

    1938-01-01

    Following a summary of the multiplicity of domestic and foreign floats and a brief enumeration of the requirements of floats, the essential form parameters and their effect on the qualities of floats are detailed. On this basis a standard float design is developed which in model families with varying length/beam ratio and angle of dead rise is analyzed by an experimental method which permits its best utilization on any airplane.

  11. Micromachined silicon seismic transducers

    SciTech Connect

    Barron, C.C.; Fleming, J.G.; Sniegowski, J.J.; Armour, D.L.; Fleming, R.P.

    1995-08-01

    Batch-fabricated silicon seismic transducers could revolutionize the discipline of CTBT monitoring by providing inexpensive, easily depolyable sensor arrays. Although our goal is to fabricate seismic sensors that provide the same performance level as the current state-of-the-art ``macro`` systems, if necessary one could deploy a larger number of these small sensors at closer proximity to the location being monitored in order to compensate for lower performance. We have chosen a modified pendulum design and are manufacturing prototypes in two different silicon micromachining fabrication technologies. The first set of prototypes, fabricated in our advanced surface- micromachining technology, are currently being packaged for testing in servo circuits -- we anticipate that these devices, which have masses in the 1--10 {mu}g range, will resolve sub-mG signals. Concurrently, we are developing a novel ``mold`` micromachining technology that promises to make proof masses in the 1--10 mg range possible -- our calculations indicate that devices made in this new technology will resolve down to at least sub-{mu}G signals, and may even approach to 10{sup {minus}10} G/{radical}Hz acceleration levels found in the low-earth-noise model.

  12. Surface acoustic wave unidirectional transducers for quantum applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekström, Maria K.; Aref, Thomas; Runeson, Johan; Björck, Johan; Boström, Isac; Delsing, Per

    2017-02-01

    The conversion efficiency of electric microwave signals into surface acoustic waves in different types of superconducting transducers is studied with the aim of quantum applications. We compare delay lines containing either conventional symmetric transducers (IDTs) or unidirectional transducers (UDTs) at 2.3 GHz and 10 mK. The UDT delay lines improve the insertion loss with 4.7 dB and a directivity of 22 dB is found for each UDT, indicating that 99.4% of the acoustic power goes in the desired direction. The power lost in the undesired direction accounts for more than 90% of the total loss in IDT delay lines, but only ˜3% of the total loss in the floating electrode unidirectional transducer delay lines.

  13. Development of a Floating Element Wall Shear Transducer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-01

    Stanford University Conference Proceedings, vol. 2, Stanford Univ., pp. 1-45. Cook, N.H., 1963 & Rabinowicz , E. Physical Measurement and...d T - 2_ (V - V ) . e o It is shown in Cook and Rabinowicz (1963) that if q = F(a^) (C.2) where F is a function of n independent variables a

  14. Development of a Floating Element Wall Shear Transducer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-01

    Proceedings, vol. 2, Stanford Univ., pp. 1-45. Cook, N.H., 1963 Physical Measurement and Analysis, & Rabinowicz , E. Addison-Wesley, Reading, MA...Cook and Rabinowicz (1963) that if q = F(a i ) (C.2) where F is a function of n independent variables ai , then the most probable mean square error...an order of magnitude smaller than eV . SSince k s- 3EI/L3.wt c3 3t 3 and A - w2 , equation C.3 obtains .ei.’ % . _r,~~ 102 E2 = C + e2 + 3c 2 + (3L

  15. Crossflow force transducer. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Mulcahy, T M

    1982-05-01

    A force transducer for measuring lift and drag coefficients for a circular cylinder in turbulent water flow is presented. In addition to describing the actual design and construction of the strain-gauged force- ring based transducer, requirements for obtained valid fluid force test data are discussed, and pertinent flow test experience is related.

  16. Experiments with Ultrasonic Transducers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas R., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the use of 40 kHz ultrasonic transducers to study wave phenomena. Determines that the resulting wavelength of 9 mm allows acoustic experiments to be performed on a tabletop. Includes transducer characteristics and activities on speed of sound, reflection, double- and single-slit diffraction, standing waves, acoustical zone plate, and…

  17. An accuracy statement for a facility used to calibrate static pressure transducers and differential pressure transducers at high base pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sindt, C. F.; Labrecque, J. F.

    1982-06-01

    A facility was developed to calibrate pressure transducers that are used in a gas mass flow facility. Both static and differential pressure transducers can be calibrated. An air dead weight tester is the standard for static transducers in the range from 3.8 to 4.5 MPa. An air dead weight tester is also the standard for the differential pressure transducers in the range of 2.5 kPa to 50 MPa; a cistern manometer. This, plus the uncertainties in the high pressure corrections to the cistern manometer and measurement of the mercury temperature, contributes plus or minus 690 ppm to the uncertainty of the differential pressure transducer calibrations.

  18. Compact Transducers and Arrays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    Soc. Am., 104, pp.64-71 44 25.Decarpigny, J.N., J.C. Debus, B. Tocquet & D. Boucher. 1985. "In-Air Analysis Of Piezoelectric Tonpilz Transducers In A... Transducers and Arrays Final Report May 2005 Contacts: Dr. Robert E. Newnham The Pennsylvania State University, 251 MRL, University Park, PA 16802 phone...814) 865-1612 fax: (814) 865-2326 email: ....c xx.....i.i.....ht.. .u a.p.u..c.e.du. Dr. Richard J. Meyer, Jr. Systems Engineering ( Transducers ), ARL

  19. Digital magnetic temperature transducer.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tchernev, D. I.; Collier, T. E.

    1971-01-01

    A new digital magnetic temperature transducer is reported. The device utilizes the discontinuous behavior of the initial permeability with temperature at the Curie temperature of some magnetic materials. Since the Curie temperature is determined by the chemical and crystallographic composition of the particular material only, the transducer requires no calibration and has extremely high stability and reproducibility with time. The output of the transducer is inherently digital and, therefore, is directly compatible with the digital information processing and control without A/D conversion. The temperature-sensing portion of the transducer consists only of magnetic cores and wire and, therefore, has extremely high reliability, is shock and radiation insensitive, small, and virtually indestructible.

  20. Improved myocardium transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culler, V. H.; Feldstein, C.; Lewis, G. W.

    1979-01-01

    Method of implanting myocardium transducer uses special indented pins that are caught and securely held by epicardial fibers. Pins are small enough to cause minimum of trauma to myocardium during implantation or removal.

  1. Multilayer ionic polymer transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akle, Barbar J.; Leo, Donald J.

    2003-07-01

    A transducer consisting of multiple layers of ionic polymer material is developed for applications in sensing, actuation, and control. The transducer consists of two to four individual layers each approximately 200 microns thick. The transducers are connected in parallel to minimize the electric field requirements for actuation. The tradeoff in deflection and force can be controlled by controlling the mechanical constraint at the interface. Packaging the transducer in an outer coating produces a hard constraint between layers and reduces the deflection with a force that increases linearly with the number of layers. This configuration also increases the bandwidth of the transducer. Removing the outer packaging produces an actuator that maintains the deflection of a single layer but has an increased force output. This is obtained by allowing the layers to slide relative to one another during bending. Experiments on transducers with one to three layers are performed and the results are compared to Newbury"s equivalent circuit model, which was modified to accommodate the multilayer polymers. The modification was performed on four different boundary conditions, two electrical the series and the parallel connection, and two mechanical the zero interfacial friction and the zero slip on the interface. Results demonstrate that the largest obstacle to obtaining good performance is water transport between the individual layers. Water crossover produces a near short circuit electrical condition and produces feedthrough between actuation layers and sensing layers. Electrical feedthrough due to water crossover eliminates the ability to produce a transducer that has combined sensing and actuation properties. Eliminating water crossover through good insulation enables the development of a small (5 mm x 30 mm) transducer that has sensing and actuation bandwidth on the order of 100 Hz.

  2. Float Zone Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    A summary of the Analytical Float Zone Experiment System (AFZES) concept is presented. The types of experiments considered for such a facility are discussed. Reports from various industrial producers and users of float zone material are presented. Special emphasis is placed on state-of-the-art developments in low gravity manufacturing and their applications to space processing.

  3. Floating emitter solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chih, Sah (Inventor); Cheng, Li-Jen (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A front surface contact floating emitter solar cell transistor is provided in a semiconductor body (n-type), in which floating emitter sections (p-type) are diffused or implanted in the front surface. Between the emitter sections, a further section is diffused or implanted in the front surface, but isolated from the floating emitter sections, for use either as a base contact to the n-type semiconductor body, in which case the section is doped n+, or as a collector for the adjacent emitter sections.

  4. Resonant acoustic transducer system for a well drilling string

    DOEpatents

    Kent, William H.; Mitchell, Peter G.

    1981-01-01

    For use in transmitting acoustic waves propagated along a well drilling string, a piezoelectric transducer is provided operating in the relatively low loss acoustic propagation range of the well drilling string. The efficiently coupled transmitting transducer incorporates a mass-spring-piezoelectric transmitter combination permitting resonant operation in the desired low frequency range.

  5. Resonant acoustic transducer system for a well drilling string

    DOEpatents

    Nardi, Anthony P.

    1981-01-01

    For use in transmitting acoustic waves propated along a well drilling string, a piezoelectric transducer is provided operating in the relatively low loss acoustic propagation range of the well drilling string. The efficiently coupled transmitting transducer incorporates a mass-spring-piezoelectric transmitter combination permitting a resonant operation in the desired low frequency range.

  6. Micromechanisms with floating pivot

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Ernest J.

    2001-03-06

    A new class of tilting micromechanical mechanisms have been developed. These new mechanisms use floating pivot structures to relieve some of the problems encountered in the use of solid flexible pivots.

  7. Floating Magnet Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wake, Masayoshi

    1990-01-01

    A room-temperature demonstration of a floating magnet using a high-temperature superconductor is described. The setup and operation of the apparatus are described. The technical details of the effect are discussed. (CW)

  8. THE EXTREMELY RED, YOUNG L DWARF PSO J318.5338–22.8603: A FREE-FLOATING PLANETARY-MASS ANALOG TO DIRECTLY IMAGED YOUNG GAS-GIANT PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Michael C.; Magnier, Eugene A.; Kotson, Michael C.; Aller, Kimberly M.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Hodapp, K. W.; Jedicke, R.; Kaiser, N.; Kudritzki, R.-P.; Morgan, J. S.; Tonry, J. L.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Deacon, Niall R.; Allers, Katelyn N.; Dupuy, Trent J.; Draper, P. W.; Price, P. A.; Metcalfe, N.

    2013-11-10

    We have discovered using Pan-STARRS1 an extremely red late-L dwarf, which has (J – K){sub MKO} = 2.78 and (J – K){sub 2MASS} = 2.84, making it the reddest known field dwarf and second only to 2MASS J1207–39b among substellar companions. Near-IR spectroscopy shows a spectral type of L7 ± 1 and reveals a triangular H-band continuum and weak alkali (K I and Na I) lines, hallmarks of low surface gravity. Near-IR astrometry from the Hawaii Infrared Parallax Program gives a distance of 24.6 ± 1.4 pc and indicates a much fainter J-band absolute magnitude than field L dwarfs. The position and kinematics of PSO J318.5–22 point to membership in the β Pic moving group. Evolutionary models give a temperature of 1160{sup +30}{sub -40} K and a mass of 6.5{sup +1.3}{sub -1.0} M {sub Jup}, making PSO J318.5–22 one of the lowest mass free-floating objects in the solar neighborhood. This object adds to the growing list of low-gravity field L dwarfs and is the first to be strongly deficient in methane relative to its estimated temperature. Comparing their spectra suggests that young L dwarfs with similar ages and temperatures can have different spectral signatures of youth. For the two objects with well constrained ages (PSO J318.5–22 and 2MASS J0355+11), we find their temperatures are ≈400 K cooler than field objects of similar spectral type but their luminosities are similar, i.e., these young L dwarfs are very red and unusually cool but not 'underluminous'. Altogether, PSO J318.5–22 is the first free-floating object with the colors, magnitudes, spectrum, luminosity, and mass that overlap the young dusty planets around HR 8799 and 2MASS J1207–39.

  9. Stabilized floating platforms

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, David G.

    1976-01-01

    The subject invention is directed to a floating platform for supporting nuclear reactors and the like at selected offshore sites. The platform is provided with a stabilizer mechanism which significantly reduces the effects of wave action upon the platform and which comprises a pair of relatively small floats attached by rigid booms to the platform at locations spaced therefrom for reducing wave pitch, acceleration, and the resonance period of the wave.

  10. The simulation model of planar electrochemical transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhevnenko, D. A.; Vergeles, S. S.; Krishtop, T. V.; Tereshonok, D. V.; Gornev, E. S.; Krishtop, V. G.

    2016-12-01

    Planar electrochemical systems are very perspective to build modern motion and pressure sensors. Planar microelectronic technology is successfully used for electrochemical transducer of motion parameters. These systems are characterized by an exceptionally high sensitivity towards mechanic exposure due to high rate of conversion of the mechanic signal to electric current. In this work, we have developed a mathematical model of this planar electrochemical system, which detects the mechanical signals. We simulate the processes of mass and charge transfer in planar electrochemical transducer and calculated its transfer function with different geometrical parameters of the system.

  11. Catheter transducer and circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, D. R.; Kerwin, W. J.

    1971-01-01

    Simple integrated circuit located at transducer, enables use of single coaxial cable for both input and output connections. Circuit is sensitive to changes in RC time constant, has much improved sensitivity characteristics, and is unaffected by changes in cable capacitance effects.

  12. Broadband Ultrasonic Transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyser, R. C.

    1986-01-01

    New geometry spreads out resonance region of piezoelectric crystal. In new transducer, crystal surfaces made nonparallel. One surface planar; other, concave. Geometry designed to produce nearly uniform response over a predetermined band of frequencies and to attenuate strongly frequencies outside band. Greater bandwidth improves accuracy of sonar and ultrasonic imaging equipment.

  13. Modeling of phased array transducers.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Rais; Kundu, Tribikram; Placko, Dominique

    2005-04-01

    Phased array transducers are multi-element transducers, where different elements are activated with different time delays. The advantage of these transducers is that no mechanical movement of the transducer is needed to scan an object. Focusing and beam steering is obtained simply by adjusting the time delay. In this paper the DPSM (distributed point source method) is used to model the ultrasonic field generated by a phased array transducer and to study the interaction effect when two phased array transducers are placed in a homogeneous fluid. Earlier investigations modeled the acoustic field for conventional transducers where all transducer points are excited simultaneously. In this research, combining the concepts of delayed firing and the DPSM, the phased array transducers are modeled semi-analytically. In addition to the single transducer modeling the ultrasonic fields from two phased array transducers placed face to face in a fluid medium is also modeled to study the interaction effect. The importance of considering the interaction effect in multiple transducer modeling is discussed, pointing out that neighboring transducers not only act as ultrasonic wave generators but also as scatterers.

  14. Curved PVDF airborne transducer.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Toda, M

    1999-01-01

    In the application of airborne ultrasonic ranging measurement, a partially cylindrical (curved) PVDF transducer can effectively couple ultrasound into the air and generate strong sound pressure. Because of its geometrical features, the ultrasound beam angles of a curved PVDF transducer can be unsymmetrical (i.e., broad horizontally and narrow vertically). This feature is desired in some applications. In this work, a curved PVDF air transducer is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. Two resonances were observed in this transducer. They are length extensional mode and flexural bending mode. Surface vibration profiles of these two modes were measured by a laser vibrometer. It was found from the experiment that the surface vibration was not uniform along the curvature direction for both vibration modes. Theoretical calculations based on a model developed in this work confirmed the experimental results. Two displacement peaks were found in the piezoelectric active direction of PVDF film for the length extensional mode; three peaks were found for the flexural bending mode. The observed peak positions were in good agreement with the calculation results. Transient surface displacement measurements revealed that vibration peaks were in phase for the length extensional mode and out of phase for the flexural bending mode. Therefore, the length extensional mode can generate a stronger ultrasound wave than the flexural bending mode. The resonance frequencies and vibration amplitudes of the two modes strongly depend on the structure parameters as well as the material properties. For the transducer design, the theoretical model developed in this work can be used to optimize the ultrasound performance.

  15. Future needs for biomedical transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooten, F. T.

    1971-01-01

    In summary there are three major classes of transducer improvements required: improvements in existing transducers, needs for unexploited physical science phenomena in transducer design, and needs for unutilized physiological phenomena in transducer design. During the next decade, increasing emphasis will be placed on noninvasive measurement in all of these areas. Patient safety, patient comfort, and the need for efficient utilization of the time of both patient and physician requires that noninvasive methods of monitoring be developed.

  16. Ionic electroactive hybrid transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akle, Barbar J.; Bennett, Matthew D.; Leo, Donald J.

    2005-05-01

    Ionic electroactive actuators have received considerable attention in the past ten years. Ionic electroactive polymers, sometimes referred to as artificial muscles, have the ability to generate large bending strain and moderate stress at low applied voltages. Typical types of ionic electroactive polymer transducers include ionic polymers, conducting polymers, and carbon nanotubes. Preliminary research combining multiple types of materials proved to enhance certain transduction properties such as speed of response, maximum strain, or quasi-static actuation. Recently it was demonstrated that ionomer-ionic liquid transducers can operate in air for long periods of time (>250,000 cycles) and showed potential to reduce or eliminate the back-relaxation issue associated with ionomeric polymers. In addition, ionic liquids have higher electrical stability window than those operated with water as the solvent thereby increasing the maximum strain that the actuator can produce. In this work, a new technique developed for plating metal particulates on the surface of ionomeric materials is applied to the development of hybrid transducers that incorporate carbon nanotubes and conducting polymers as electrode materials. The new plating technique, named the direct assembly process, consists of mixing a conducting powder with an ionomer solution. This technique has demonstrated improved response time and strain output as compared to previous methods. Furthermore, the direct assembly process is less costly to implement than traditional impregnation-reduction methods due to less dependence on reducing agents, it requires less time, and is easier to implement than other processes. Electrodes applied using this new technique of mixing RuO2 (surface area 45~65m2/g) particles and Nafion dispersion provided 5x the displacement and 10x the force compared to a transducer made with conventional methods. Furthermore, the study illustrated that the response speed of the transducer is optimized

  17. Nano-optomechanical transducer

    DOEpatents

    Rakich, Peter T; El-Kady, Ihab F; Olsson, Roy H; Su, Mehmet Fatih; Reinke, Charles; Camacho, Ryan; Wang, Zheng; Davids, Paul

    2013-12-03

    A nano-optomechanical transducer provides ultrabroadband coherent optomechanical transduction based on Mach-wave emission that uses enhanced photon-phonon coupling efficiencies by low impedance effective phononic medium, both electrostriction and radiation pressure to boost and tailor optomechanical forces, and highly dispersive electromagnetic modes that amplify both electrostriction and radiation pressure. The optomechanical transducer provides a large operating bandwidth and high efficiency while simultaneously having a small size and minimal power consumption, enabling a host of transformative phonon and signal processing capabilities. These capabilities include optomechanical transduction via pulsed phonon emission and up-conversion, broadband stimulated phonon emission and amplification, picosecond pulsed phonon lasers, broadband phononic modulators, and ultrahigh bandwidth true time delay and signal processing technologies.

  18. Three dimensional transducer

    DOEpatents

    Warren, Oden Lee; Asif, Syed Amanulla Syed; Oh, Yunje; Feng, Yuxin; Cyrankowski, Edward; Major, Ryan

    2014-09-30

    A testing instrument for mechanical testing at nano or micron scale includes a transducer body, and a coupling shaft coupled with a probe tip. A transducer body houses a capacitor. The capacitor includes first and second counter electrodes and a center electrode assembly interposed therebetween. The center electrode assembly is movable with the coupling shaft relative to the first and second counter electrodes, for instance in one or more of dimensions including laterally and normally. The center electrode assembly includes a center plate coupled with the coupling shaft and one or more springs extending from the center plate. Upper and lower plates are coupled with the center plate and cover the center plate and the one or more springs. A shaft support assembly includes one or more support elements coupled along the coupling shaft. The shaft support assembly provides lateral support to the coupling shaft.

  19. Fluid force transducer

    DOEpatents

    Jendrzejczyk, Joseph A.

    1982-01-01

    An electrical fluid force transducer for measuring the magnitude and direction of fluid forces caused by lateral fluid flow, includes a movable sleeve which is deflectable in response to the movement of fluid, and a rod fixed to the sleeve to translate forces applied to the sleeve to strain gauges attached to the rod, the strain gauges being connected in a bridge circuit arrangement enabling generation of a signal output indicative of the magnitude and direction of the force applied to the sleeve.

  20. Training Tree Transducers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    trees (similar to the role played by the finite- state acceptor FSA for strings). We describe the version (equivalent to TSG ( Schabes , 1990)) where...strictly contained in tree sets of tree adjoining gram- mars (Joshi and Schabes , 1997). 4 Extended-LHS Tree Transducers (xR) Section 1 informally described...changes without modifying the training procedure, as long as we stick to tree automata. 10 Related Work Tree substitution grammars or TSG ( Schabes , 1990

  1. Polymer film composite transducer

    DOEpatents

    Owen, Thomas E.

    2005-09-20

    A composite piezoelectric transducer, whose piezoeletric element is a "ribbon wound" film of piezolectric material. As the film is excited, it expands and contracts, which results in expansion and contraction of the diameter of the entire ribbon winding. This is accompanied by expansion and contraction of the thickness of the ribbon winding, such that the sound radiating plate may be placed on the side of the winding.

  2. Stress wave focusing transducers

    SciTech Connect

    Visuri, S.R., LLNL

    1998-05-15

    Conversion of laser radiation to mechanical energy is the fundamental process behind many medical laser procedures, particularly those involving tissue destruction and removal. Stress waves can be generated with laser radiation in several ways: creation of a plasma and subsequent launch of a shock wave, thermoelastic expansion of the target tissue, vapor bubble collapse, and ablation recoil. Thermoelastic generation of stress waves generally requires short laser pulse durations and high energy density. Thermoelastic stress waves can be formed when the laser pulse duration is shorter than the acoustic transit time of the material: {tau}{sub c} = d/c{sub s} where d = absorption depth or spot diameter, whichever is smaller, and c{sub s} = sound speed in the material. The stress wave due to thermoelastic expansion travels at the sound speed (approximately 1500 m/s in tissue) and leaves the site of irradiation well before subsequent thermal events can be initiated. These stress waves, often evolving into shock waves, can be used to disrupt tissue. Shock waves are used in ophthalmology to perform intraocular microsurgery and photodisruptive procedures as well as in lithotripsy to fragment stones. We have explored a variety of transducers that can efficiently convert optical to mechanical energy. One such class of transducers allows a shock wave to be focused within a material such that the stress magnitude can be greatly increased compared to conventional geometries. Some transducer tips could be made to operate regardless of the absorption properties of the ambient media. The size and nature of the devices enable easy delivery, potentially minimally-invasive procedures, and precise tissue- targeting while limiting thermal loading. The transducer tips may have applications in lithotripsy, ophthalmology, drug delivery, and cardiology.

  3. Thin film strain transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rand, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    Previous attempts to develop an appropriate sensor for measuring the stress or strain of high altitude balloons during flight are reviewed as well as the various conditions that must be met by such a device. The design, development and calibration of a transducer which promises to satisfy the necessary design constraints are described. The thin film strain transducer has a low effective modulus so as not to interfere with the strain that would naturally occur in the balloon. In addition, the transducer has a high sensitivity to longitudinal strain (7.216 mV/V/unit strain) which is constant for all temperature from room temperature to -80 C and all strains from 5 percent compression to 10 percent tensile strain. At the same time, the sensor is relatively insensitive (0.27 percent) to transverse forces. The device has a standard 350 ohm impedance which is compatible with available bridge balance, amplification and telemetry instrumentation now available for balloon flight. Recommendations are included for improved coatings to provide passive thermal control as well as model, tethered and full scale flight testing.

  4. Floating Versus Sinking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vella, Dominic

    2015-01-01

    Small objects that are more dense than water may still float at the air-water interface because of surface tension. Whether this is possible depends not only on the density and size of the object, but also on its shape and surface properties, whether other objects are nearby, and how gently the object is placed at the interface. This review surveys recent work to quantify when objects can float and when they must sink. Much interest in this area has been driven by studies of the adaptations of water-walking insects to life at interfaces. I therefore discuss these results in the context of this and other applications.

  5. Tethered float liquid level sensor

    DOEpatents

    Daily, III, William Dean

    2016-09-06

    An apparatus for sensing the level of a liquid includes a float, a tether attached to the float, a pulley attached to the tether, a rotation sensor connected to the pulley that senses vertical movement of said float and senses the level of the liquid.

  6. Floated gravity gradiometer and method

    SciTech Connect

    Lautzenhiser, T.V.; Eisner, M.

    1990-09-11

    This patent describes a gravity gradiometer. It comprises: a housing containing a fluid; a float buoyantly supported within the fluid; means for varying the metacentric height of the float; and means for obtaining a measure of the gravitational gradient acting on the float resulting from varying the metacentric height.

  7. Study on the broadband tonpilz transducer with a single hole.

    PubMed

    Xiping, He; Jing, Hu

    2009-05-01

    To get a wide-band transducer, the piezoelectric sandwiched transducer with a frustum hole in its head piece is presented in this paper. The equivalent circuit is derived, and the expressions of the equivalent mass and the equivalent impedance of the transducer are obtained by using one-dimensional (1D) design theory. Moreover, the expressions of the mechanical quality factor and the frequency bandwidth are obtained and the transmitting voltage response of the transducer is calculated by using finite element method. The theoretical results show that the frequency bandwidth of the transducer with a hole is wider than that without a hole when their resonant frequencies are almost equal. The tested results are in good agreement with the theoretical calculations.

  8. Compound floating pivot micromechanisms

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Ernest J.

    2001-04-24

    A new class of tilting micromechanical mechanisms have been developed. These new mechanisms use compound floating pivot structures to attain far greater tilt angles than are practical using other micromechanical techniques. The new mechanisms are also capable of bi-directional tilt about multiple axes.

  9. Why Do Things Float?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selley, Nicholas

    1993-01-01

    Combines two strands: one being an exposition of the variety of explanations which are given for the phenomenon of floating; the other being the pedagogical implications which arise from the use of alternative models in science. Attention is drawn to the ethical questions that may arise when primary science seems to conflict with accepted…

  10. Transducers for ultrasonic limb plethysmography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickell, W. T.; Wu, V. C.; Bhagat, P. K.

    1983-01-01

    The design, construction, and performance characteristics of ultasonic transducers suitable for limb plethysmography are presented. Both 3-mm-diameter flat-plate and 12-mm-diameter hemispheric ceramic transducers operating at 2 MHz were fitted in 1-mm thick epoxy-resin lens/acoustic-coupling structures and mounted in exercie-EKG electrode housings for placement on the calf using adhesive collars. The effects of transducer directional characteristics on performance under off-axis rotation and the electrical impedances of the transducers were measured: The flat transducer was found to be sensitive to rotation and have an impedance of 800 ohms; the hemispheric transducer, to be unaffected by rotation and have an impedance of 80 ohms. The use of hemispheric transducers as both transmitter and receiver, or of a flat transducer as transmitter and a hemispheric transducer as receiver, was found to produce adequate dimensional measurements, with minimum care in transducer placement, in short-term physiological experiments and long-term (up to 7-day) attachment tests.

  11. Thin film strain transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rand, J. L. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A strain transducer system and process for making the same is disclosed. A beryllium copper ring having four strain gages is electrically connected in Wheatstone bridge fashion to the output instrumentation. Tabs are bonded to a balloon or like surface with strain on the surface causing bending of a ring which provides an electrical signal through the gages proportional to the surface strain. A photographic pattern of a one half ring segment as placed on a sheet of beryllium copper for chem-mill etch formation is illustrated.

  12. Lithium tetraborate transducer cuts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosinski, John; Ballato, Arthur; Lukaszek, Theodore

    1990-03-01

    Lithium tetraborate is a tetragonal material of considerable promise for frequency control and signal processing applications. It exhibits piezoelectric coupling values that fall between those of lithium niobate and quartz, but possesses orientations for which the temperature coefficient of frequency and delay time is zero for bulk and surface acoustic waves. In this report, we discuss the properties of two doubly rotated bulk wave resonator orientations having both first- and second-order temperature coefficients equal to zero. These are suitable for shear and compressional wave transducers in applications where very low temperature sensitivity is required simultaneously with moderately strong piezocoupling coefficients.

  13. Lithium tetraborate transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballato, Arthur; Kosinski, John A.; Lukaszek, Ted J.

    1991-01-01

    Lithium tetraborate is a tetragonal material of considerable promise for frequency control and signal processing applications. It exhibits piezoelectric coupling values that fall between those of lithium niobate and quartz, but possesses orientations for which the temperature coefficient of frequency and delay time is zero for bulk and surface acoustic waves. The properties of two doubly rotated bulk wave resonator orientations having first- and second-order temperature coefficients equal to zero are discussed. These are suitable for shear and compressional wave transducers in applications where very low temperature sensitivity is required simultaneously with moderately strong piezocoupling coefficients.

  14. An electromechanical displacement transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villiers, Marius; Mahboob, Imran; Nishiguchi, Katsuhiko; Hatanaka, Daiki; Fujiwara, Akira; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    Two modes of an electromechanical resonator are coupled through the strain inside the structure with a cooperativity as high as 107, a state-of-the-art value for purely mechanical systems, which enables the observation of normal-mode splitting. This coupling is exploited to transduce the resonator’s fundamental mode into the bandwidth of the second flexural mode, which is 1.4 MHz higher in frequency. Thus, an all-mechanical heterodyne detection scheme is implemented that can be developed into a high-precision displacement sensor.

  15. Wellbore pressure transducer

    DOEpatents

    Shuck, Lowell Z.

    1979-01-01

    Subterranean earth formations containing energy values are subjected to hydraulic fracturing procedures to enhance the recovery of the energy values. These fractures are induced in the earth formation by pumping liquid into the wellbore penetrating the earth formation until the pressure of the liquid is sufficient to fracture the earth formation adjacent to the wellbore. The present invention is directed to a transducer which is positionable within the wellbore to generate a signal indicative of the fracture initiation useful for providing a timing signal to equipment for seismic mapping of the fracture as it occurs and for providing a measurement of the pressure at which the fracture is initiated.

  16. RADIO-ACTIVE TRANSDUCER

    DOEpatents

    Wanetick, S.

    1962-03-01

    ABS>ure the change in velocity of a moving object. The transducer includes a radioactive source having a collimated beam of radioactive particles, a shield which can block the passage of the radioactive beam, and a scintillation detector to measure the number of radioactive particles in the beam which are not blocked by the shield. The shield is operatively placed across the radioactive beam so that any motion normal to the beam will cause the shield to move in the opposite direction thereby allowing more radioactive particles to reach the detector. The number of particles detected indicates the acceleration. (AEC)

  17. Wall shear stress measurements using a new transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vakili, A. D.; Wu, J. M.; Lawing, P. L.

    1986-01-01

    A new instrument has been developed for direct measurement of wall shear stress. This instrument is simple and symmetric in design with small moving mass and no internal friction. Features employed in the design of this instrument eliminate most of the difficulties associated with the traditional floating element balances. Vibration problems associated with the floating element skin friction balances have been found to be minimized by the design features and optional damping provided. The unique design of this instrument eliminates or reduces the errors associated with conventional floating-element devices: such as errors due to gaps, pressure gradient, acceleration, heat transfer and temperature change. The instrument is equipped with various sensing systems and the output signal is a linear function of the wall shear stress. Measurement made in three different tunnels show good agreement with theory and data obtained by the floating element devices.

  18. Analysis of multifrequency langevin composite ultrasonic transducers.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shuyu

    2009-09-01

    The multimode coupled vibration of Langevin composite ultrasonic transducers with conical metal mass of large cross-section is analyzed. The coupled resonance and anti-resonance frequency equations are derived and the effective electromechanical coupling coefficient is analyzed. The effect of the geometrical dimensions on the resonance frequency, the anti-resonance frequency, and the effective electromechanical coupling coefficient is studied. It is illustrated that when the radial dimension is large compared with the longitudinal dimension, the vibration of the Langevin transducer becomes a multifrequency multimode coupled vibration. Numerical methods are used to simulate the coupled vibration; the simulated results are in good agreement with those from the analytical results. Some Langevin transducers of large cross-section are designed and manufactured and their resonance frequencies are measured. It can be seen that the resonance frequencies obtained from the coupled resonance frequency equations are in good agreement with the measured results. It is expected that by properly choosing the dimensions, multifrequency Langevin transducers can be designed and used in ultrasonic cleaning, ultrasonic sonochemistry, and other applications.

  19. Transducer of linear displacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malamed, Y. R.

    1984-02-01

    The basic PLP transducer is designed for a UIM-29 microscope and a 2-coordinate measuring instrument with electronic digital readout. Its optical system consists of an AL-107B light-emitting diode as light source, two condenser lenses, a special wedge carrying two pairs of joined receiver lenses, a prism-mirror, a photoreceiver, a wedge-shape transparent replica of a twin diffraction grating which prevents light reflected by the air-glass interface from focusing on the receiver photodiodes, and a reflective replica of a diffraction grating on a movable carriage. The already available three models of this transducer are PLP1-0.2, PLP1-0.5, and PLP1-1.0 with respectively 625, 250, 125 lines/mm on the transparent replica and respectively 312.5, 125, 62.5 lines/mm on the reflective replica. The scale of moire-interference fringes characterizing the shift between both diffraction gratings per grating period (9.16 mm in each model) is respectively 0.8, 2.0, 4.0 microns and the angle between the two arrays of grating lines on the transparent replica is respectively 36 + or - 4 deg, 90 + or - 10 deg, 190 + or - 20 deg.

  20. Improved Piezoelectric Loudspeakers And Transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regan, Curtis Randall; Jalink, Antony; Hellbaum, Richard F.; Rohrbach, Wayne W.

    1995-01-01

    Loudspeakers and related acoustic transducers of improved type feature both light weight and energy efficiency of piezoelectric transducers and mechanical coupling efficiency. Active component of transducer made from wafer of "rainbow" piezoelectric material, ceramic piezoelectric material chemically reduced on one face. Chemical treatment forms wafer into dishlike shallow section of sphere. Both faces then coated with electrically conductive surface layers serving as electrodes. Applications include high-fidelity loudspeakers, and underwater echo ranging devices.

  1. Investigation of Calibrating Force Transducer Using Sinusoidal Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Lizhe

    2010-05-01

    Sinusoidal force calibration method was studied several years before at Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). A similar dynamic force calibration system is developed at Changcheng Institute of Metrology and Measurement (CIMM). It uses electro-dynamic shakers to generate dynamic force in the range from 1 N to 20 kN, and heterodyne laser interferometers are used for acceleration measurement. The force transducer to be calibrated is mounted on the shaker, and a mass block is screwed on the top of force transducer, the sinusoidal forces realized by accelerated load masses are traceable to acceleration and mass according to the force definition. The methods of determining Spatial-dependent acceleration on mass block and measuring the end mass of force transducer in dynamic force calibration are discussed in this paper.

  2. Investigation of Calibrating Force Transducer Using Sinusoidal Force

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Li; Wang Yu; Zhang Lizhe

    2010-05-28

    Sinusoidal force calibration method was studied several years before at Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). A similar dynamic force calibration system is developed at Changcheng Institute of Metrology and Measurement (CIMM). It uses electro-dynamic shakers to generate dynamic force in the range from 1 N to 20 kN, and heterodyne laser interferometers are used for acceleration measurement. The force transducer to be calibrated is mounted on the shaker, and a mass block is screwed on the top of force transducer, the sinusoidal forces realized by accelerated load masses are traceable to acceleration and mass according to the force definition. The methods of determining Spatial-dependent acceleration on mass block and measuring the end mass of force transducer in dynamic force calibration are discussed in this paper.

  3. Ultrasonic Transducers for Fourier Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Describes an experiment that uses the ultrasonic transducer for demonstrating the Fourier components of waveshapes such as the square and triangular waves produced by laboratory function generators. (JRH)

  4. [Transducer hygiene -- an underrated topic?].

    PubMed

    Merz, E

    2005-02-01

    Transducers are medical products that are categorized as uncritical, semicritical and critical, depending on their applications and perceived risks. Uncritical medical products are transducers that solely come in contact with the intact skin, such as transducers used for sonography of the abdomen or breast. Semicritical medical products are transducers that come in contact with mucosal membranes or diseased skin, comprising transducers used for transesophageal, transvesical, transvaginal, transrectal and perineal sonography. Critical medical products are transducers that come in contact with blood, internal tissues or organs, such as transducers used for intraoperative sonography. Under the most unfavorable circumstances, sonographic transducers can become contaminated with pathogenic agents (e. g., MRSA, HBV, HCV, HIV, Herpes viruses) and turn into a not to be underrated source of infection. For this reason, correct handling as well as cleaning and disinfection of the transducers are indispensable. Depending on the application, the recommended handling of the transducers differs. Transducers counted to the uncritical medical products are adequately cleaned by removal of the applied ultrasound gel with subsequent wipe disinfection (e. g., foam spray). Transducers counted to the semicritical medical products, such as transvaginal or perineal transducers , should be exclusively used after a suitable cover has been applied. A Latex(R) allergy must be excluded before the examination. The cover is to be disposed after completion of the examination and the transducer itself cleaned and disinfected. The disinfecting agent must be antiviral but also compatible with the material (caution: damage to the transducer membrane when using an unsuited alcoholic disinfecting agent). In case of rupture of the protecting cover during the examination, the transducer is considered contaminated with secretion or even blood and must be thoroughly cleaned with subsequent disinfection

  5. Subtropical Productivity from Profiling Floats and Gliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, D. P.; Johnson, K. S.; Karl, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2007 profiling floats equipped with dissolved oxygen and nitrate sensors have been released from the Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT) and Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) sites and can be calibrated using time-series observations. More recent deployments have also included bio-optical and pH sensors. Gliders with oxygen sensors and bio-optics have been intermittently deployed near HOT Station ALOHA since 2008 and at BATS since 2014. While gliders maintain a restricted survey region near the time-series stations, profiling floats drifted widely across the subtropical gyres. Multiple floats and gliders enables a cotemporaneous comparison of biogeochemical processes across gyres. These platforms enable observations on spatial scales from submesoscale to basin scale and on temporal scales from diel to interannual. Here, I focus on the spatiotemporal variability of nitrate and oxygen mass balances in the North Pacific and North Atlantic subtropical gyres using a data-assimilating and float-tracking 1D upper ocean model.

  6. Characterization of cement float buoyancy in the stalked barnacle Dosima fascicularis (Crustacea, Cirripedia).

    PubMed

    Zheden, Vanessa; Kovalev, Alexander; Gorb, Stanislav N; Klepal, Waltraud

    2015-02-06

    Dosima fascicularis is the only barnacle which can drift autonomously at the water surface with a foam-like cement float. The cement secreted by the animal contains numerous gas-filled cells of different size. When several individuals share one float, their size and not their number is crucial for the production of both volume and mass of the float. The gas content within the cells of the foam gives positive static buoyancy to the whole float. The volume of the float, the gas volume and the positive static buoyancy are positively correlated. The density of the cement float without gas is greater than that of seawater. This study shows that the secreted cement consists of more than 90% water and the gas volume is on average 18.5%. Our experiments demonstrate that the intact foam-like cement float is sealed to the surrounding water.

  7. An opening electromagnetic transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yanhua; Kang, Yihua

    2013-12-01

    Tubular solenoids have been widely used without any change since an electrical wire was discovered to create magnetic fields by Hans Christian Oersted in 1820 and thereby the wire was first coiled as a helix into a solenoid coil by William Sturgeon in 1823 and was improved by Joseph Henry in 1829 [see http://www.myetymology.com/encyclopedia/History_of_the_electricity.html; J. M. D. Coey, Magnetism and Magnetic Materials (Cambridge University Press, New York, 2010); and F. Winterberg, Plasma Phys. 8, 541553 (1996)]. A magnetic control method of C-shaped carrying-current wire is proposed, and thereby a new opening electromagnetic transducer evidently differing from the traditional tubular solenoid is created, capable of directly encircling and centering the acted objects in it, bringing about convenient and innovative electromagnetic energy conversion for electromagnetic heating, electromagnetic excitation, physical information capture, and electro-mechanical motion used in science research, industry, and even biomedical activities.

  8. Electromagnetic acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Alers, George A.; Burns, Jr., Leigh R.; MacLauchlan, Daniel T.

    1988-01-01

    A noncontact ultrasonic transducer for studying the acoustic properties of a metal workpiece includes a generally planar magnetizing coil positioned above the surface of the workpiece, and a generally planar eddy current coil between the magnetizing coil and the workpiece. When a large current is passed through the magnetizing coil, a large magnetic field is applied to the near-surface regions of the workpiece. The eddy current coil can then be operated as a transmitter by passing an alternating current therethrough to excite ultrasonic waves in the surface of the workpiece, or operated as a passive receiver to sense ultrasonic waves in the surface by measuring the output signal. The geometries of the two coils can be varied widely to be effective for different types of ultrasonic waves. The coils are preferably packaged in a housing which does not interfere with their operation, but protects them from a variety of adverse environmental conditions.

  9. Optically transduced MEMS magnetometer

    DOEpatents

    Nielson, Gregory N; Langlois, Eric

    2014-03-18

    MEMS magnetometers with optically transduced resonator displacement are described herein. Improved sensitivity, crosstalk reduction, and extended dynamic range may be achieved with devices including a deflectable resonator suspended from the support, a first grating extending from the support and disposed over the resonator, a pair of drive electrodes to drive an alternating current through the resonator, and a second grating in the resonator overlapping the first grating to form a multi-layer grating having apertures that vary dimensionally in response to deflection occurring as the resonator mechanically resonates in a plane parallel to the first grating in the presence of a magnetic field as a function of the Lorentz force resulting from the alternating current. A plurality of such multi-layer gratings may be disposed across a length of the resonator to provide greater dynamic range and/or accommodate fabrication tolerances.

  10. Underwater Multimode Directional Transducer Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-12-01

    The work described in the present thesis is intended to establish a procedure for analyzing directional transducers for future underwater wireless...networks, as well as to carry out the performance evaluation of a multimode transducer prototype with respect to its main operational requirements

  11. FLOPAK: FLOATING POINT PROGRAMING PACKAGE,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    FLOPAK is a Packard-Bell 250 Computer semi-automatic, floating - point programing system which may be operated simultaneously in either of two modes...250 floating - point system available which may be used in real-time control. The system was originally designed to solve a real-time communication problem....The first is a non-time optimized mode which may be used by inex perienced coders; the second mode is a high-speed, fully time-optimized floating

  12. Long term performance of wearable transducer for motion energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGarry, Scott A.; Behrens, Sam

    2010-04-01

    Personal electronic devices such as cell phones, GPS and MP3 players have traditionally depended on battery energy storage technologies for operation. By harvesting energy from a person's motion, these devices may achieve greater run times without increasing the mass or volume of the electronic device. Through the use of a flexible piezoelectric transducer such as poly-vinylidene fluoride (PVDF), and integrating it into a person's clothing, it becomes a 'wearable transducer'. As the PVDF transducer is strained during the person's routine activities, it produces an electrical charge which can then be harvested to power personal electronic devices. Existing wearable transducers have shown great promise for personal motion energy harvesting applications. However, they are presently physically bulky and not ergonomic for the wearer. In addition, there is limited information on the energy harvesting performance for wearable transducers, especially under realistic conditions and for extended cyclic force operations - as would be experienced when worn. In this paper, we present experimental results for a wearable PVDF transducer using a person's measured walking force profile, which is then cycled for a prolonged period of time using an experimental apparatus. Experimental results indicate that after an initial drop in performance, the transducer energy harvesting performance does not substantially deteriorate over time, as less than 10% degradation was observed. Longevity testing is still continuing at CSIRO.

  13. Circuit for Driving Piezoelectric Transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randall, David P.; Chapsky, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    The figure schematically depicts an oscillator circuit for driving a piezoelectric transducer to excite vibrations in a mechanical structure. The circuit was designed and built to satisfy application-specific requirements to drive a selected one of 16 such transducers at a regulated amplitude and frequency chosen to optimize the amount of work performed by the transducer and to compensate for both (1) temporal variations of the resonance frequency and damping time of each transducer and (2) initially unknown differences among the resonance frequencies and damping times of different transducers. In other words, the circuit is designed to adjust itself to optimize the performance of whichever transducer is selected at any given time. The basic design concept may be adaptable to other applications that involve the use of piezoelectric transducers in ultrasonic cleaners and other apparatuses in which high-frequency mechanical drives are utilized. This circuit includes three resistor-capacitor networks that, together with the selected piezoelectric transducer, constitute a band-pass filter having a peak response at a frequency of about 2 kHz, which is approximately the resonance frequency of the piezoelectric transducers. Gain for generating oscillations is provided by a power hybrid operational amplifier (U1). A junction field-effect transistor (Q1) in combination with a resistor (R4) is used as a voltage-variable resistor to control the magnitude of the oscillation. The voltage-variable resistor is part of a feedback control loop: Part of the output of the oscillator is rectified and filtered for use as a slow negative feedback to the gate of Q1 to keep the output amplitude constant. The response of this control loop is much slower than 2 kHz and, therefore, does not introduce significant distortion of the oscillator output, which is a fairly clean sine wave. The positive AC feedback needed to sustain oscillations is derived from sampling the current through the

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Floating-Harbor syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Floating-Harbor syndrome Floating-Harbor syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Floating-Harbor syndrome is a disorder involving short stature, ...

  15. Floating-diffusion electrometer with adjustable sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tower, John R. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The effective capacitance of the floating diffusion in a floating-diffusion electrometer is modified to adjust electrometer sensitivity. This is done by changing the direct potential applied to a gate electrode proximate to the floating diffusion.

  16. Traceable dynamic calibration of force transducers by primary means

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlajic, Nicholas; Chijioke, Ako

    2016-08-01

    We describe an apparatus for traceable, dynamic calibration of force transducers using harmonic excitation, and report calibration measurements of force transducers using this apparatus. In this system, the force applied to the transducer is produced by the acceleration of an attached mass, and is determined according to Newton’s second law, F  =  ma. The acceleration is measured by primary means, using laser interferometry. The capabilities of this system are demonstrated by performing dynamic calibrations of two shear-web-type force transducers up to a frequency of 2 kHz, with an expanded uncertainty below 1.2%. We give an account of all significant sources of uncertainty, including a detailed consideration of the effects of dynamic tilting (rocking), which is a leading source of uncertainty in such harmonic force calibration systems.

  17. Passive wireless ultrasonic transducer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, C. H.; Croxford, A. J.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2014-02-01

    Inductive coupling and capacitive coupling both offer simple solutions to wirelessly probe ultrasonic transducers. This paper investigates the theory and feasibility of such system in the context of non-destructive evaluation (NDE) applications. Firstly, the physical principles and construction of an inductively coupled transducer system (ICTS) and a capacitively coupled transducer system (CCTS) are introduced. Then the development of a transmission line model with the measured impedance of a bonded piezoelectric ceramic disc representing a sensor attached to an arbitrary solid substrate for both systems is described. The models are validated experimentally. Several applications of CCTS are presented, such CCTS for the underwater and through-composite testing.

  18. BEST POSSIBLE FLOATING POINT ARITHMETIC.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The report presents an algorithm for floating point arithmetic, using single-length arithmetic registers, which yields the most accurate...approximation which can be expressed in the given floating point format, the greatest lower bound, or the least upper bound for the result of the operation

  19. Does It Sink or Float?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Judith Richards

    2012-01-01

    This activity is designed to teach prekindergarten to second grade students about the concept of sink or float through an inquiry activity. Students will use familiar objects to predict and test the properties of sink and float. Background information is offered to teachers to assist them with this activity. This lesson begins with an engaging…

  20. Fixture for holding testing transducer

    DOEpatents

    Wagner, T.A.; Engel, H.P.

    A fixture for mounting an ultrasonic transducer against the end of a threaded bolt or stud to test the same for flaws. A base means threadedly secured to the side of the bolt has a rotating ring thereon. A post rising up from the ring (parallel to the axis of the workpiece) pivotally mounts a variable length cross arm, on the inner end of which is mounted the transducer. A spring means acts between the cross arm and the base to apply the testing transducer against the workpiece at a constant pressure. The device maintains constant for successive tests the radial and circumferential positions of the testing transducer and its contact pressure against the end of the workpiece.

  1. Fixture for holding testing transducer

    DOEpatents

    Wagner, Thomas A.; Engel, Herbert P.

    1984-01-01

    A fixture for mounting an ultrasonic transducer against the end of a threaded bolt or stud to test the same for flaws. A base means threadedly secured to the side of the bolt has a rotating ring thereon. A post rising up from the ring (parallel to the axis of the workpiece) pivotally mounts a variable length cross arm, on the inner end of which is mounted the transducer. A spring means acts between the cross arm and the base to apply the testing transducer against the workpiece at a constant pressure. The device maintains constant for successive tests the radial and circumferential positions of the testing transducer and its contact pressure against the end of the workpiece.

  2. TRANSDUCER FIELD IMAGING USING ACOUSTOGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Jaswinder S.; Schoonover, Robert W.; Weber, Joshua I.; Tawiah, J.; Kunin, Vitaliy; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    A common current practice for transducer field mapping is to scan, point-by-point, a hydrophone element in a 2D raster at various distances from the transducer radiating surface. This approach is tedious, requiring hours of scanning time to generate full cross-sectional and/or axial field distributions. Moreover, the lateral resolution of the field distribution image is dependent on the indexing steps between data points. Acoustography is an imaging process in which an acousto-optical (AO) area sensor is employed to record the intensity of an ultrasound wavefield on a two-dimensional plane. This paper reports on the application of acoustography as a simple but practical method for assessing transducer field characteristics. A case study performed on a commercial transducer is reported, where the radiated fields are imaged using acoustography and compared to the corresponding quantities that are predicted numerically. PMID:23967016

  3. An enzyme logic bioprotonic transducer

    SciTech Connect

    Miyake, Takeo; Keene, Scott; Deng, Yingxin; Rolandi, Marco; Josberger, Erik E.

    2015-01-01

    Translating ionic currents into measureable electronic signals is essential for the integration of bioelectronic devices with biological systems. We demonstrate the use of a Pd/PdH{sub x} electrode as a bioprotonic transducer that connects H{sup +} currents in solution into an electronic signal. This transducer exploits the reversible formation of PdH{sub x} in solution according to PdH↔Pd + H{sup +} + e{sup −}, and the dependence of this formation on solution pH and applied potential. We integrate the protonic transducer with glucose dehydrogenase as an enzymatic AND gate for glucose and NAD{sup +}. PdH{sub x} formation and associated electronic current monitors the output drop in pH, thus transducing a biological function into a measurable electronic output.

  4. An enzyme logic bioprotonic transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, Takeo; Josberger, Erik E.; Keene, Scott; Deng, Yingxin; Rolandi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Translating ionic currents into measureable electronic signals is essential for the integration of bioelectronic devices with biological systems. We demonstrate the use of a Pd/PdHx electrode as a bioprotonic transducer that connects H+ currents in solution into an electronic signal. This transducer exploits the reversible formation of PdHx in solution according to PdH↔Pd + H+ + e-, and the dependence of this formation on solution pH and applied potential. We integrate the protonic transducer with glucose dehydrogenase as an enzymatic and gate for glucose and NAD+. PdHx formation and associated electronic current monitors the output drop in pH, thus transducing a biological function into a measurable electronic output.

  5. Acoustic transducer with damping means

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard W.; Adamson, Gerald E.

    1976-11-02

    An ultrasonic transducer specifically suited to high temperature sodium applications is described. A piezoelectric active element is joined to the transducer faceplate by coating the faceplate and juxtaposed active element face with wetting agents specifically compatible with the bonding procedure employed to achieve the joint. The opposite face of the active element is fitted with a backing member designed to assure continued electrical continuity during adverse operating conditions which can result in the fracturing of the active element. The fit is achieved employing a spring-loaded electrode operably arranged to electrically couple the internal transducer components, enclosed in a hermetically sealed housing, to accessory components normally employed in transducer applications. Two alternative backing members are taught for assuring electrical continuity. The first employs a resilient, discrete multipoint contact electrode in electrical communication with the active element face. The second employs a resilient, elastomeric, electrically conductive, damped member in electrical communication with the active element face in a manner to effect ring-down of the transducer. Each embodiment provides continued electrical continuity within the transducer in the event the active element fractures, while the second provides the added benefit of damping.

  6. Thermal Wick Cooling for Vibroacoustic Transducers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-25

    affecting vibrational characteristics of the transducer . (2) Description of the Prior Art [0004] Vibroacoustic transducers , such as piezoceramic tonpilz ...Distribution is unlimited 20091013084 Attorney Docket No. 84708 THERMAL WICK COOLING FOR VIBROACOUSTIC TRANSDUCERS STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST...INVENTION (1) Field of the Invention [0003] The present invention provides a device for cooling a vibroacoustic transducer without adversely

  7. Floating Silicon Method

    SciTech Connect

    Kellerman, Peter

    2013-12-21

    The Floating Silicon Method (FSM) project at Applied Materials (formerly Varian Semiconductor Equipment Associates), has been funded, in part, by the DOE under a “Photovoltaic Supply Chain and Cross Cutting Technologies” grant (number DE-EE0000595) for the past four years. The original intent of the project was to develop the FSM process from concept to a commercially viable tool. This new manufacturing equipment would support the photovoltaic industry in following ways: eliminate kerf losses and the consumable costs associated with wafer sawing, allow optimal photovoltaic efficiency by producing high-quality silicon sheets, reduce the cost of assembling photovoltaic modules by creating large-area silicon cells which are free of micro-cracks, and would be a drop-in replacement in existing high efficiency cell production process thereby allowing rapid fan-out into the industry.

  8. Floating into Deep Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Frenais, R.; Saraceno, T.; Powell, J.

    2014-04-01

    Is it possible for spaceflight to become more sustainable? Artist and architect Tomas Saraceno proposes a long-term artscience research project based on his initial work with solar balloons to join with the efforts of engineers such as John Powell, working on the Airship to Orbit experiments, which describe a three stage process of using airships to fly to a large suborbital "Dark Sky Station' then literally floating into orbit with additional electrical and chemical propulsion. (See: http://www.jpaerospace.com) In his artworks Tomás Saraceno proposes cell-like flying cities as possible architectonic living spaces in direct reference to Buckminster Fuller's Cloud Nine (circa 1960). The fantastic architectural utopia Cloud Nine consists of a freely floating sphere measuring one mile in diameter that offers living space to several autonomous communities encompassing thousands of inhabitants each. The notion of the cloud is essential to the artist's work. The cloud as metaphor stands for artistic intention, for the meaning of territory and border in today's (urban) society, and for exploring possibilities for the sustainable development of the human living environment. In Saraceno's work this environment is not limited to the earth, but is explicitly conceived to reach into outer space. (Biomimetic Constructions- On the works of Tomás Saraceno By Katharina Schlüter) Saraceno is also interested in human factors experiments using his existing constructions as analogue environments for living on Mars and is proposing carry out a series of workshops, experiments and solar balloon launces in White Sands desert in early 2016 in collaboration with the curator Dr Rob La Frenais, the Rubin Center at The University of Texas at El Paso and various scientific partners.

  9. Ultrasonic Transducer Irradiation Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Daw, Joshua; Palmer, Joe; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Keller, Paul; Montgomery, Robert; Chien, Hual-Te; Kohse, Gordon; Tittmann, Bernhard; Reinhardt, Brian; Rempe, Joy

    2015-02-01

    Ultrasonic technologies offer the potential for high-accuracy and -resolution in-pile measurement of a range of parameters, including geometry changes, temperature, crack initiation and growth, gas pressure and composition, and microstructural changes. Many Department of Energy-Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs are exploring the use of ultrasonic technologies to provide enhanced sensors for in-pile instrumentation during irradiation testing. For example, the ability of small diameter ultrasonic thermometers (UTs) to provide a temperature profile in candidate metallic and oxide fuel would provide much needed data for validating new fuel performance models. Other ongoing efforts include an ultrasonic technique to detect morphology changes (such as crack initiation and growth) and acoustic techniques to evaluate fission gas composition and pressure. These efforts are limited by the lack of identified ultrasonic transducer materials capable of long term performance under irradiation test conditions. For this reason, the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) was awarded an ATR NSUF project to evaluate the performance of promising magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducers in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR) up to a fast fluence of at least 1021 n/cm2. The goal of this research is to characterize and demonstrate magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducer operation during irradiation, enabling the development of novel radiation-tolerant ultrasonic sensors for use in Material Testing Reactors (MTRs). As such, this test is an instrumented lead test and real-time transducer performance data is collected along with temperature and neutron and gamma flux data. The current work bridges the gap between proven out-of-pile ultrasonic techniques and in-pile deployment of ultrasonic sensors by acquiring the data necessary to demonstrate the performance of ultrasonic transducers. To date, one piezoelectric

  10. Capacitive Ultrasonic Transducer Development for Acoustic Anemometry on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard-Pugh, Eurion; Wilson, C.; Calcutt, S.; Davis, L.

    2012-10-01

    Previous Mars missions have used either mechanical or thermal anemometry techniques. The moving parts of mechanical anemometers are prone to damage during launch and landing and their inertia makes them unsuited for turbulence studies. Thermal anemometers have been used successfully on Mars but are difficult to calibrate and susceptible to varying ambient temperatures. In ultrasonic anemometry, wind speed and sound speed are calculated from two-way time-of-flight measurements between pairs of transducers; three pairs of transducers are used to return a 3-D wind vector. These high-frequency measurements are highly reliable and immune from drift. Piezo-electric ultrasonic anemometers are widely used on Earth due to their full-range accuracy and high measurement frequency. However these transducers have high acoustic impedances and would not work on Mars. We are developing low-mass capacitive ultrasonic transducers for Mars missions which have significantly lower acoustic impedances and would therefore have a much stronger coupling to the Martian atmosphere. These transducers consist of a metallised polymer film pulled taught against a machined metal backplane. The film is drawn towards the backplane by a DC bias voltage. A varying signal is used on top of the DC bias to oscillate the film; generating acoustic waves. This poster will look at the operation of such sensors and the developments necessary to operate the devices under Martian conditions. Transducer performance is determined primarily by two elements; the front film and the backplane. The sensitivity of the transducer is affected by the thickness of the front film; as well as the diameter, curvature and roughness of the metal backplane. We present data on the performance of the sensors and instrument design considerations including signal shapes and transducer arrangements.

  11. Auto-positioning ultrasonic transducer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchanan, Randy K. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An ultrasonic transducer apparatus and process for determining the optimal transducer position for flow measurement along a conduit outer surface. The apparatus includes a transmitting transducer for transmitting an ultrasonic signal, said transducer affixed to a conduit outer surface; a guide rail attached to a receiving transducer for guiding movement of a receiving transducer along the conduit outer surface, wherein the receiving transducer receives an ultrasonic signal from the transmitting transducer and sends a signal to a data acquisition system; and a motor for moving the receiving transducer along the guide rail, wherein the motor is controlled by a controller. The method includes affixing a transmitting transducer to an outer surface of a conduit; moving a receiving transducer on the conduit outer surface, wherein the receiving transducer is moved along a guide rail by a motor; transmitting an ultrasonic signal from the transmitting transducer that is received by the receiving transducer; communicating the signal received by the receiving transducer to a data acquisition and control system; and repeating the moving, transmitting, and communicating along a length of the conduit.

  12. Radially sandwiched cylindrical piezoelectric transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shuyu; Fu, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Xiaoli; Wang, Yong; Hu, Jing

    2013-01-01

    A new type of radially sandwiched piezoelectric short cylindrical transducer is developed and its radial vibration is studied. The transducer is composed of a solid metal disk, a radially polarized piezoelectric ceramic short tube and a metal tube. The radial vibrations of the solid metal disk, the radially polarized piezoelectric tube and the metal tube are analyzed and their electromechanical equivalent circuits are introduced. Based on the mechanical boundary conditions among the metal disk, the piezoelectric tube and the metal tube, a three-port electromechanical equivalent circuit for the radially sandwiched transducer is obtained and the frequency equation is given. The theoretical relationship of the resonance and anti-resonance frequencies and the effective electromechanical coupling coefficient with the geometrical dimensions is analyzed. The radial vibration of the sandwiched transducer is simulated by using two different numerical methods. It is shown that the analytical resonance and anti-resonance frequencies are in good agreement with the numerically simulated results. The transducer is expected to be used in piezoelectric resonators, actuators and ultrasonic radiators in ultrasonic and underwater sound applications.

  13. Multiplexing Transducers Based on Tunnel-Diode Oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chui, Talso; Penanen, Konstantin; Young, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Multiplexing and differential transducers based on tunnel-diode oscillators (TDOs) would be developed, according to a proposal, for operation at very low and/or widely varying temperatures in applications that involve requirements to minimize the power and mass of transducer electronic circuitry. It has been known since 1975 that TDOs are useful for making high-resolution (of the order of 10(exp -9)) measurements at low temperatures. Since that time, TDO transducers have been found to offer the following additional advantages, which the present proposal is intended to exploit: TDO transducers can operate at temperatures ranging from 1 K to about 400 K. Most electronic components other than tunnel diodes do not operate over such a wide temperature range. TDO transducers can be made to operate at very low power - typically, <1 mW. Inasmuch as the response of a TDO transducer is a small change in an arbitrarily set oscillation frequency, the outputs of many TDOs operating at sufficiently different set frequencies can be multiplexed through a single wire. Inasmuch as frequencies can be easily subtracted by means of mixing circuitry, one can easily use two TDOs to make differential measurements. Differential measurements are generally more precise and less susceptible to environmental variations than are absolute measurements. TDO transducers are tolerant to ionizing radiation. Ultimately, the response of a TDO transducer is measured by use of a frequency counter. Because frequency counting can be easily implemented by use of clock signals available from most microprocessors, it is not necessary to incorporate additional readout circuitry that would, if included, add to the mass and power consumption of the transducer circuitry. In one example of many potential variations on the basic theme of the proposal, the figure schematically depicts a conceptual differential-pressure transducer containing a symmetrical pair of TDOs. The differential pressure would be exerted on

  14. Electrically floating, near vertical incidence, skywave antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Allen A.; Kaser, Timothy G.; Tremblay, Paul A.; Mays, Belva L.

    2014-07-08

    An Electrically Floating, Near Vertical Incidence, Skywave (NVIS) Antenna comprising an antenna element, a floating ground element, and a grounding element. At least part of said floating ground element is positioned between said antenna element and said grounding element. The antenna is separated from the floating ground element and the grounding element by one or more electrical insulators. The floating ground element is separated from said antenna and said grounding element by one or more electrical insulators.

  15. NULL convention floating point multiplier.

    PubMed

    Albert, Anitha Juliette; Ramachandran, Seshasayanan

    2015-01-01

    Floating point multiplication is a critical part in high dynamic range and computational intensive digital signal processing applications which require high precision and low power. This paper presents the design of an IEEE 754 single precision floating point multiplier using asynchronous NULL convention logic paradigm. Rounding has not been implemented to suit high precision applications. The novelty of the research is that it is the first ever NULL convention logic multiplier, designed to perform floating point multiplication. The proposed multiplier offers substantial decrease in power consumption when compared with its synchronous version. Performance attributes of the NULL convention logic floating point multiplier, obtained from Xilinx simulation and Cadence, are compared with its equivalent synchronous implementation.

  16. Control development for floating wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savenije, Feike; Peeringa, Johan

    2014-06-01

    Control of a floating wind turbine has proven to be challenging, but essential for lowering the cost of floating wind energy. Topic of a recent joint R&D project by GustoMSC, MARIN and ECN, is the concept design and verification with coupled simulations and model tests of the GustoMSC Tri-Floater. Only using an integral design approach, including mooring and control design, a cost effective system can be obtained. In this project, ECN developed a general floating wind turbine control strategy and applied this in a case study to the GustoMSC Tri-Floater and the OC3Hywind spar, both equipped with the NREL 5MW RWT. The designed controller ensures stable operation, while maintaining proper speed and power regulation. The motions of the floating support are reduced and substantial load reduction has been achieved.

  17. NULL Convention Floating Point Multiplier

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Seshasayanan

    2015-01-01

    Floating point multiplication is a critical part in high dynamic range and computational intensive digital signal processing applications which require high precision and low power. This paper presents the design of an IEEE 754 single precision floating point multiplier using asynchronous NULL convention logic paradigm. Rounding has not been implemented to suit high precision applications. The novelty of the research is that it is the first ever NULL convention logic multiplier, designed to perform floating point multiplication. The proposed multiplier offers substantial decrease in power consumption when compared with its synchronous version. Performance attributes of the NULL convention logic floating point multiplier, obtained from Xilinx simulation and Cadence, are compared with its equivalent synchronous implementation. PMID:25879069

  18. Floating orbital molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Perlt, Eva; Brüssel, Marc; Kirchner, Barbara

    2014-04-21

    We introduce an alternative ab initio molecular dynamics simulation as a unification of Hartree-Fock molecular dynamics and the floating orbital approach. The general scheme of the floating orbital molecular dynamics method is presented. Moreover, a simple but sophisticated guess for the orbital centers is provided to reduce the number of electronic structure optimization steps at each molecular dynamics step. The conservation of total energy and angular momentum is investigated in order to validate the floating orbital molecular dynamics approach with and without application of the initial guess. Finally, a water monomer and a water dimer are simulated, and the influence of the orbital floating on certain properties like the dipole moment is investigated.

  19. Calibration of a horizontally acting force transducer with the use of a simple pendulum

    SciTech Connect

    Taberner, Andrew J.; Hunter, Ian W.

    2006-12-15

    This article details the implementation of a method for calibrating horizontally measuring force transducers using a pendulum. The technique exploits the sinusoidal inertial force generated by a suspended mass as it pendulates about a point on the measurement axis of the force transducer. The method is used to calibrate a reconfigurable, custom-made force transducer based on exchangeable cantilevers with stiffness ranging from 10 to 10{sup 4} N/m. In this implementation, the relative combined standard uncertainty in the calibrated transducer stiffness is 0.41% while the repeatability of the calibration technique is 0.46%.

  20. Vibrations of a floating beam on marine waves

    SciTech Connect

    Sabaneev, Valentin S.; Tovstik, Petr E.; Tovstik, Tatiana M.; Shekhovtsov, Alexei S.

    2015-03-10

    Vertical vibrations of a floating pipe-concrete beam caused by a harmonic waves excitation are studied. The apparent additional mass of water, resisting force and the velocity of towing are considered. The vibration amplitude and the maximum deformations of concrete, caused by these fluctuations, are calculated.

  1. Model of a Piezoelectric Transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodenow, Debra

    2004-01-01

    It's difficult to control liquid and gas in propellant tanks in zero gravity. A possible a design would utilize acoustic liquid manipulation (ALM) technology which uses ultrasonic beams conducted through a liquid and solid media, to push gas bubbles in the liquid to desirable locations. We can propel and control the bubble with acoustic radiation pressure by aiming the acoustic waves on the bubble s surface. This allows us to design a so called smart tank in which the ALM devices transfer the gas to the outer wall of the tank and isolating the liquid in the center. Because the heat transfer rate of a gas is lower of that of the liquid it would substantially decrease boil off and provide of for a longer storage life. The ALM beam is composed of little wavelets which are individual waves that constructively interfere with each other to produce a single, combined acoustic wave front. This is accomplished by using a set of synchronized ultrasound transducers arranged in an array. A slight phase offset of these elements allows us to focus and steer the beam. The device that we are using to produce the acoustic beam is called the piezoelectric transducer. This device converts electrical energy to mechanical energy, which appears in the form of acoustic energy. Therefore the behavior of the device is dependent on both the mechanical characteristics, such as its density, cross-sectional area, and its electrical characteristics, such as, electric flux permittivity and coupling factor. These devices can also be set up in a number of modes which are determined by the way the piezoelectric device is arranged, and the shape of the transducer. For this application we are using the longitudinal or thickness mode for our operation. The transducer also vibrates in the lateral mode, and one of the goals of my project is to decrease the amount of energy lost to the lateral mode. To model the behavior of the transducers I will be using Pspice, electric circuit modeling tool, to

  2. Environmental control system transducer development study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brudnicki, M. J.

    1973-01-01

    A failure evaluation of the transducers used in the environmental control systems of the Apollo command service module, lunar module, and portable life support system is presented in matrix form for several generic categories of transducers to enable identification of chronic failure modes. Transducer vendors were contacted and asked to supply detailed information. The evaluation data generated for each category of transducer were compiled and published in failure design evaluation reports. The evaluation reports also present a review of the failure and design data for the transducers and suggest both design criteria to improve reliability of the transducers and, where necessary, design concepts for required redesign of the transducers. Remedial designs were implemented on a family of pressure transducers and on the oxygen flow transducer. The design concepts were subjected to analysis, breadboard fabrication, and verification testing.

  3. Design and development of a multi-hole broadband-based ultrasonic transducer.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hui-juan; Wu, Jian; Zhang, He; Zhang, Guang-yu

    2011-03-01

    In order to improve the efficiency of ultrasonic energy transformed from electricity for an ultrasonic transducer array, a novel 1/2 wavelength multi-hole broadband-based transducer was designed, developed and evaluated. The low equivalent mass of the transducer is realized in this work through drilling holes on the output end of the horn. In comparison with a traditional transducer, the developed transducer has demonstrated a lower mechanical quality coefficient and a wider broadband. As a result, an ultrasound treatment system for crude oil has been developed based on the new transducer design. Furthermore, we have demonstrated the effectiveness of the ultrasound treatment system on viscosity reduction of crude oil and paraffin.

  4. Skylab floating ice experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, W. J. (Principal Investigator); Ramseier, R. O.; Weaver, R. J.; Weeks, W. F.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Coupling of the aircraft data with the ground truth observations proved to be highly successful with interesting results being obtained with IR and SLAR passive microwave techniques, and standard photography. Of particular interest were the results of the PMIS system which operated at 10.69 GHz with both vertical and horizontal polarizations. This was the first time that dual polarized images were obtained from floating ice. In both sea and lake ice, it was possible to distinguish a wide variety of thin ice types because of their large differences in brightness temperatures. It was found that the higher brightness temperature was invariably obtained in the vertically polarized mode, and as the age of the ice increases the brightness temperature increases in both polarizations. Associated with this change in age, the difference in temperature was observed as the different polarizations decreased. It appears that the horizontally polarized data is the most sensitive to variations in ice type for both fresh water and sea ice. The study also showed the great amount of information on ice surface roughness and deformation patterns that can be obtained from X-band SLAR observations.

  5. Floating wind turbine system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viterna, Larry A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A floating wind turbine system with a tower structure that includes at least one stability arm extending therefrom and that is anchored to the sea floor with a rotatable position retention device that facilitates deep water installations. Variable buoyancy for the wind turbine system is provided by buoyancy chambers that are integral to the tower itself as well as the stability arm. Pumps are included for adjusting the buoyancy as an aid in system transport, installation, repair and removal. The wind turbine rotor is located downwind of the tower structure to allow the wind turbine to follow the wind direction without an active yaw drive system. The support tower and stability arm structure is designed to balance tension in the tether with buoyancy, gravity and wind forces in such a way that the top of the support tower leans downwind, providing a large clearance between the support tower and the rotor blade tips. This large clearance facilitates the use of articulated rotor hubs to reduced damaging structural dynamic loads. Major components of the turbine can be assembled at the shore and transported to an offshore installation site.

  6. Floating into Thin Air

    SciTech Connect

    Hazi, A U

    2007-02-06

    On May 18, 2005, a giant helium balloon carrying the High Energy Focusing Telescope (HEFT) sailed into the spring sky over the deserts of New Mexico. The spindly steel and aluminum gondola that houses the optics, detectors, and other components of the telescope floated for 25 hours after its launch from Fort Sumner, New Mexico. For 21 of those hours, the balloon was nearly 40 kilometers above Earth's surface--almost four times higher than the altitude routinely flown by commercial jet aircraft. In the upper reaches of Earth's atmosphere, HEFT searched the universe for x-ray sources from highly energetic objects such as binary stars, galaxy clusters, and supermassive black holes. Before landing in Arizona, the telescope observed and imaged a dozen scientific targets by capturing photons emitted from these objects in the high-energy (hard) x-ray range (above 10 kiloelectronvolts). Among these targets were the Crab synchrotron nebula, the black hole Cygnus X-1 (one of the brightest x-ray sources in the sky), and the blazar 3C454.3. The scientific data gathered from these targets are among the first focused hard x-ray images returned from high altitudes.

  7. Multi sensor transducer and weight factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Immer, Christopher D. (Inventor); Lane, John (Inventor); Eckhoff, Anthony J. (Inventor); Perotti, Jose M. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A multi-sensor transducer and processing method allow insitu monitoring of the senor accuracy and transducer `health`. In one embodiment, the transducer has multiple sensors to provide corresponding output signals in response to a stimulus, such as pressure. A processor applies individual weight factors to reach of the output signals and provide a single transducer output that reduces the contribution from inaccurate sensors. The weight factors can be updated and stored. The processor can use the weight factors to provide a `health` of the transducer based upon the number of accurate versus in-accurate sensors in the transducer.

  8. Pressure-Coupled Acoustic-Transducer Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, F. Raymond

    1993-01-01

    Improved acoustic-transducer assembly easy to assemble, relocatable, and used at high temperatures. In assembly, piezoelectric acoustic transducer pressure-coupled to delay line or fixture through soft metal like aluminum, copper or gold. Transducer subassembly includes layered structure of coupling material, transducer, thin disk of coupling material acting as cushion for transducer, electrode disk with coaxial cable lead attached, insulation/damping material, and pressure plate. Pressure coupling precludes problem of matching coefficients of thermal expansion of transducer, coupling material, and delay line.

  9. The planar silicon-based microelectronic technology for electrochemical transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, A. V.; Egorchikov, A. E.; Dolgov, A. N.; Gornev, E. S.; Popov, V. G.; Egorov, I. V.; Krishtop, V. G.

    2016-12-01

    We have developed the new technology for production of sensitive modules for electrochemical sensors of pressure and acceleration. The technology is applicable for mass production and scalable for high-volume production. In this work we demonstrate the new sensing module for electrochemical motion sensors, and its possibility of applying in geophones. We fabricated prototypes of electrochemical planar transducer chips, produced a laboratory prototype of a geophone based on our planar transducer chip, and tested them. This paper presents the preliminary results of the tests.

  10. Non-bonded ultrasonic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Eoff, J.M.

    1984-07-06

    A mechanically assembled non-bonded ultrasonic transducer includes a substrate, a piezoelectric film, a wetting agent, a thin metal electrode, and a lens held in intimate contact by a mechanical clamp. No epoxy or glue is used in the assembly of this device.

  11. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.; Chou, Ching H.

    1990-01-01

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens.

  12. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, B.T.; Chou, C.H.

    1990-03-20

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system is described in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens. 9 figs.

  13. Calibration apparatus for recess mounted pressure transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcolini, Michael A.; Miller, William T., Jr.; Baals, Robert A.; Martin, Ruth M.

    1992-04-01

    Measurement of surface pressure fluctuations is important in aerodynamic studies and is conventionally accomplished via thin surface mounted transducers. These transducers contaminate the airflow, leading to the use of transducers located beneath the surface and communicating thereto via a pipette. This solution creates its own problem of transducer calibration due to the structure of the pipette. A calibration apparatus and method for calibrating a pressure transducer are provided. The pressure transducer is located within a test structure having a pipette leading from an outer structure surface to the pressure transducer. The calibration apparatus defines an acoustic cavity. A first end of the acoustic cavity is adapted to fluidly communicate with the pipette leading to the pressure transducer, wherein a channel is formed from the acoustic cavity to the transducer. An acoustic driver is provided for acoustically exciting fluid in the acoustic cavity to generate pressure waves which propagate to the pressure transducer. A pressure sensing microphone is provided for sensing the pressure fluctuations in the cavity near the cavity end, whereby this sensed pressure is compared with a simultaneously pressure sensed by the pressure transducer to permit calibration of the pressure transducer sensings. Novel aspects of the present invention include its use of a calibration apparatus to permit in-situ calibration of recess mounted pressure transducers.

  14. Irradiation Testing of Ultrasonic Transducers

    SciTech Connect

    Daw, Joshua; Tittmann, Bernhard; Reinhardt, Brian; Kohse, Gordon E.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Montgomery, Robert O.; Chien, Hual-Te; Villard, Jean-Francois; Palmer, Joe; Rempe, Joy

    2014-07-30

    Ultrasonic technologies offer the potential for high accuracy and resolution in-pile measurement of a range of parameters, including geometry changes, temperature, crack initiation and growth, gas pressure and composition, and microstructural changes. Many Department of Energy-Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs are exploring the use of ultrasonic technologies to provide enhanced sensors for in-pile instrumentation during irradiation testing. For example, the ability of single, small diameter ultrasonic thermometers (UTs) to provide a temperature profile in candidate metallic and oxide fuel would provide much needed data for validating new fuel performance models. Other efforts include an ultrasonic technique to detect morphology changes (such as crack initiation and growth) and acoustic techniques to evaluate fission gas composition and pressure. These efforts are limited by the lack of existing knowledge of ultrasonic transducer material survivability under irradiation conditions. For this reason, the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) was awarded an Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) project to evaluate promising magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducer performance in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR) up to a fast fluence of at least 1021 n/cm2 (E> 0.1 MeV). The goal of this research is to characterize magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducer survivability during irradiation, enabling the development of novel radiation tolerant ultrasonic sensors for use in Material and Test Reactors (MTRs). As such, this test will be an instrumented lead test and real-time transducer performance data will be collected along with temperature and neutron and gamma flux data. The current work bridges the gap between proven out-of-pile ultrasonic techniques and in-pile deployment of ultrasonic sensors by acquiring the data necessary to demonstrate the performance of ultrasonic transducers.

  15. Irradiation Testing of Ultrasonic Transducers

    SciTech Connect

    Daw, Joshua; Tittmann, Bernhard; Reinhardt, Brian; Kohse, Gordon E.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Montgomery, Robert O.; Chien, Hual-Te; Villard, Jean-Francois; Palmer, Joe; Rempe, Joy

    2013-12-01

    Ultrasonic technologies offer the potential for high accuracy and resolution in-pile measurement of a range of parameters, including geometry changes, temperature, crack initiation and growth, gas pressure and composition, and microstructural changes. Many Department of Energy-Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs are exploring the use of ultrasonic technologies to provide enhanced sensors for in-pile instrumentation during irradiation testing. For example, the ability of single, small diameter ultrasonic thermometers (UTs) to provide a temperature profile in candidate metallic and oxide fuel would provide much needed data for validating new fuel performance models. Other efforts include an ultrasonic technique to detect morphology changes (such as crack initiation and growth) and acoustic techniques to evaluate fission gas composition and pressure. These efforts are limited by the lack of existing knowledge of ultrasonic transducer material survivability under irradiation conditions. For this reason, the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) was awarded an Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) project to evaluate promising magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducer performance in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR) up to a fast fluence of at least 1021 n/cm2 (E> 0.1 MeV). The goal of this research is to characterize magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducer survivability during irradiation, enabling the development of novel radiation tolerant ultrasonic sensors for use in Material and Test Reactors (MTRs). As such, this test will be an instrumented lead test and real-time transducer performance data will be collected along with temperature and neutron and gamma flux data. The current work bridges the gap between proven out-of-pile ultrasonic techniques and in-pile deployment of ultrasonic sensors by acquiring the data necessary to demonstrate the performance of ultrasonic transducers.

  16. Design of matching layers for high-frequency ultrasonic transducers

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Chunlong; Ma, Jianguo; Chiu, Chi Tat; Williams, Jay A.; Fong, Wayne; Chen, Zeyu; Zhu, BenPeng; Xiong, Rui; Shi, Jing; Hsiai, Tzung K.; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa

    2015-01-01

    Matching the acoustic impedance of high-frequency (≥100 MHz) ultrasound transducers to an aqueous loading medium remains a challenge for fabricating high-frequency transducers. The traditional matching layer design has been problematic to establish high matching performance given requirements on both specific acoustic impedance and precise thickness. Based on both mass-spring scheme and microwave matching network analysis, we interfaced metal-polymer layers for the matching effects. Both methods hold promises for guiding the metal-polymer matching layer design. A 100 MHz LiNbO3 transducer was fabricated to validate the performance of the both matching layer designs. In the pulse-echo experiment, the transducer echo amplitude increased by 84.4% and its −6dB bandwidth increased from 30.2% to 58.3% comparing to the non-matched condition, demonstrating that the matching layer design method is effective for developing high-frequency ultrasonic transducers. PMID:26445518

  17. Wideband Single Crystal Transducer for Bone Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sahul, Raffi

    2015-01-01

    Phase II objectives: Optimize the Phase I transducer for sensitivity; Test different transmit signals for optimum performance; Demonstrate compatibility with electronics; Confirm additional transducer capabilities over conventional systems by calibrating with other methods.

  18. Cooling Acoustic Transducer with Heat Pipes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-29

    0013] Most transducer packages involve a stack of active ceramic. A Tonpilz transducer 10 in the prior art, as depicted in FIG. 1, consists...or corresponding parts throughout the several views and wherein: [0023] FIG. 1 is a prior art depiction of a Tonpilz transducer design; [0024...Distribution is unlimited Attorney Docket No. 97001 COOLING ACOUSTIC TRANSDUCER WITH HEAT PIPES STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The

  19. Acoustic Emission Transducers: Calibration Activities and Transducer Development.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    transducer calibration and development activities -j at NBS is summiarized. DO Fo"� roiion or olv as is OBSOLETE DOS/N 0 102. LP.60 4. 6601...developed. This development was partially supported by the Electric Power Research Institute and the Office of Naval Research. The calibration subjects the...and tangential components of motion must be measured tb describe the dynamic displacement at a point on a surface. We previously have developed the NBS

  20. 21 CFR 882.1950 - Tremor transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tremor transducer. 882.1950 Section 882.1950 Food... DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Diagnostic Devices § 882.1950 Tremor transducer. (a) Identification. A tremor transducer is a device used to measure the degree of tremor caused by certain...

  1. 21 CFR 882.1950 - Tremor transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tremor transducer. 882.1950 Section 882.1950 Food... DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Diagnostic Devices § 882.1950 Tremor transducer. (a) Identification. A tremor transducer is a device used to measure the degree of tremor caused by certain...

  2. 21 CFR 882.1950 - Tremor transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tremor transducer. 882.1950 Section 882.1950 Food... DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Diagnostic Devices § 882.1950 Tremor transducer. (a) Identification. A tremor transducer is a device used to measure the degree of tremor caused by certain...

  3. 21 CFR 882.1950 - Tremor transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tremor transducer. 882.1950 Section 882.1950 Food... DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Diagnostic Devices § 882.1950 Tremor transducer. (a) Identification. A tremor transducer is a device used to measure the degree of tremor caused by certain...

  4. 21 CFR 882.1950 - Tremor transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tremor transducer. 882.1950 Section 882.1950 Food... DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Diagnostic Devices § 882.1950 Tremor transducer. (a) Identification. A tremor transducer is a device used to measure the degree of tremor caused by certain...

  5. 21 CFR 870.2880 - Ultrasonic transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ultrasonic transducer. 870.2880 Section 870.2880...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2880 Ultrasonic transducer. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic transducer is a device applied to the skin to transmit and...

  6. 21 CFR 870.2880 - Ultrasonic transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ultrasonic transducer. 870.2880 Section 870.2880...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2880 Ultrasonic transducer. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic transducer is a device applied to the skin to transmit and...

  7. Self-Calibrating Pressure Transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lueck, Dale E. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A self-calibrating pressure transducer is disclosed. The device uses an embedded zirconia membrane which pumps a determined quantity of oxygen into the device. The associated pressure can be determined, and thus, the transducer pressure readings can be calibrated. The zirconia membrane obtains oxygen .from the surrounding environment when possible. Otherwise, an oxygen reservoir or other source is utilized. In another embodiment, a reversible fuel cell assembly is used to pump oxygen and hydrogen into the system. Since a known amount of gas is pumped across the cell, the pressure produced can be determined, and thus, the device can be calibrated. An isolation valve system is used to allow the device to be calibrated in situ. Calibration is optionally automated so that calibration can be continuously monitored. The device is preferably a fully integrated MEMS device. Since the device can be calibrated without removing it from the process, reductions in costs and down time are realized.

  8. A silicon electrostatic ultrasonic transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Kenichiro; Higuchi, Kohei; Tanigawa, Hiroshi

    1989-11-01

    An electric ultrasonic transducer is developed by using a silicon IC process. Design considerations are first presented to obtain high sensitivity and the desired frequency responses in air. The measured transmitter sensitivity is 19.1 dB (0 dB = 1 microbar/V) at a point 50 cm away from the devices, when the devices are operated at 150 kHz. The receiving sensitivity is 0.47 mV/Pa in the 10-130-kHz range, with bias voltages as low as 30 V. An electronic sector scanning operation is also achieved by time-sequentially driving seven elements arranged in a linear array on the same chip. The results should be helpful in the design of phased-array transducers integrated with electronic scanning circuits.

  9. Advanced Geothermal Optical Transducer (AGOT)

    SciTech Connect

    2004-09-01

    Today's geothermal pressure-temperature measuring tools are short endurance, high value instruments, used sparingly because their loss is a major expense. In this project LEL offered to build and test a rugged, affordable, downhole sensor capable ofretuming an uninterrupted data stream at pressures and of 10,000 psi and temperatures up to 250 C, thus permitting continuous deep-well logging. It was proposed to meet the need by specializing LEL's patented 'Twin Column Transducer' technology to satisfy the demands of geothermal pressure/temperature measurements. TCT transducers have very few parts, none of which are moving parts, and all of which can be fabricated from high-temperature super alloys or from ceramics; the result is an extremely rugged device, essentially impervious to chemical attack and readily modified to operate at high pressure and temperature. To measure pressure and temperature they capitalize on the relative expansion of optical elements subjected to thermal or mechanical stresses; if one element is maintained at a reference pressure while the other is opened to ambient, the differential displacement then serves as a measure of pressure. A transducer responding to temperature rather than pressure is neatly created by 'inverting' the pressure-measuring design so that both deflecting structures see identical temperatures and temperature gradients, but whose thermal expansion coefficients are deliberately mismatched to give differential expansion. The starting point for development of a PT Tool was the company's model DPT feedback-stabilized 5,000 psi sensor (U.S. Patent 5,311,014, 'Optical Transducer for Measuring Downhole Pressure', claiming a pressure transducer capable of measuring static, dynamic, and true bi-directional differential pressure at high temperatures), shown in the upper portion of Figure 1. The DPT occupies a 1 x 2 x 4-inch volume, weighs 14 ounces, and is accurate to 1 percent of full scale. Employing a pair of identical, low

  10. Detection of Floating Inputs in Logic Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cash, B.; Thornton, M. G.

    1984-01-01

    Simple modification of oscilloscope probe allows easy detection of floating inputs or tristate outputs in digital-IC's. Oscilloscope probe easily modified with 1/4 W resistor and switch for detecting floating inputs in CMOS logic circuits.

  11. Strength Tests on Hulls and Floats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthaes, K

    1942-01-01

    The present report deals with strength tests on hulls and floats intended in part for the collection of construction data for the design of these components and in part for the stress analysis of the finished hulls and floats.

  12. Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, Chris

    2007-12-05

    In the classical physics we inherited from Isaac Newton, mass does not arise, it simply is. The mass of a classical object is the sum of the masses of its parts. Albert Einstein showed that the mass of a body is a measure of its energy content, inviting us to consider the origins of mass. The protons we accelerate at Fermilab are prime examples of Einsteinian matter: nearly all of their mass arises from stored energy. Missing mass led to the discovery of the noble gases, and a new form of missing mass leads us to the notion of dark matter. Starting with a brief guided tour of the meanings of mass, the colloquium will explore the multiple origins of mass. We will see how far we have come toward understanding mass, and survey the issues that guide our research today.

  13. Torquemeter With Variable Reluctance Transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Julio

    1987-01-01

    A new variable reluctance transducer is described. Two static coils constitute two branches of a Wheastone bridge. The magnetic circuit of each one of the windings is closed through two gear wheels attached to the shaft. These are related to each other in such a way as to leave two air gaps, each of these in front of one of the coils in the stator assambly. These gaps change with the torque.

  14. 40 CFR 65.45 - External floating roof converted into an internal floating roof.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false External floating roof converted into an internal floating roof. 65.45 Section 65.45 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... External floating roof converted into an internal floating roof. The owner or operator who elects...

  15. 40 CFR 65.45 - External floating roof converted into an internal floating roof.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false External floating roof converted into an internal floating roof. 65.45 Section 65.45 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... External floating roof converted into an internal floating roof. The owner or operator who elects...

  16. Acoustic transducer based on dielectric elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Christian; Maas, Jügen

    2012-04-01

    Dielectric electroactive polymers are thin films based on elastomeric material coated with compliant and conductive electrodes. By applying an electrical field, the polymer performs large deformations, which can be utilized to generate sound waves. When using such kind of electrostatic loudspeakers, no additional resonating sound boxes are required and the vibrating mass is very lightweight, resulting in an excellent impulse and wide-band frequency response. For the loudspeaker's operation both an electrical bias voltage and a mechanical bias stress have to be applied. In this contribution different possibilities are presented to generate the mechanical bias stress. The design of an appropriate power electronics for the acoustic transducer, which is build of standard components, is also described. Finally, the loudspeaker concepts are evaluated by experiments in an anechoic room.

  17. Acoustic transducer for nuclear reactor monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Ahlgren, Frederic F.; Scott, Paul F.

    1977-01-01

    A transducer to monitor a parameter and produce an acoustic signal from which the monitored parameter can be recovered. The transducer comprises a modified Galton whistle which emits a narrow band acoustic signal having a frequency dependent upon the parameter being monitored, such as the temperature of the cooling media of a nuclear reactor. Multiple locations within a reactor are monitored simultaneously by a remote acoustic receiver by providing a plurality of transducers each designed so that the acoustic signal it emits has a frequency distinct from the frequencies of signals emitted by the other transducers, whereby each signal can be unambiguously related to a particular transducer.

  18. Thermal model for piezoelectric transducers (L).

    PubMed

    Butler, John L; Butler, Alexander L; Butler, Stephen C

    2012-10-01

    A lumped parameter equivalent circuit basis for calculating and allocating heat power sources in a transducer is presented along with experimental results. The simple model allows heat power calculations at resonance based on readily attainable parameters for transducers with uniform fields. Measured and finite element analysis of steady state thermal results are compared for the monopole mode of the single crystal driven modal transducer projector. The model serves as a physical and computational aid in the evaluation of piezoelectric transducer heating and may be used for evaluating highly coupled single crystal as well as ceramic piezoelectric transducers.

  19. Characterization of HIFU transducers designed for sonochemistry application: Acoustic streaming.

    PubMed

    Hallez, L; Touyeras, F; Hihn, J-Y; Bailly, Y

    2016-03-01

    Cavitation distribution in a High Intensity Focused Ultrasound sonoreactors (HIFU) has been extensively described in the recent literature, including quantification by an optical method (Sonochemiluminescence SCL). The present paper provides complementary measurements through the study of acoustic streaming generated by the same kind of HIFU transducers. To this end, results of mass transfer measurements (electrodiffusional method) were compared to optical method ones (Particle Image Velocimetry). This last one was used in various configurations: with or without an electrode in the acoustic field in order to have the same perturbation of the wave propagation. Results show that the maximum velocity is not located at the focal but shifted near the transducer, and that this shift is greater for high powers. The two cavitation modes (stationary and moving bubbles) are greatly affect the hydrodynamic behavior of our sonoreactors: acoustic streaming and the fluid generated by bubble motion. The results obtained by electrochemical measurements show the same low hydrodynamic activity in the transducer vicinity, the same shift of the active focal toward the transducer, and the same absence of activity in the post-focal axial zone. The comparison with theoretical Eckart's velocities (acoustic streaming in non-cavitating media) confirms a very high activity at the "sonochemical focal", accounted for by wave distortion, which induced greater absorption coefficients. Moreover, the equivalent liquid velocities are one order of magnitude larger than the ones measured by PIV, confirming the enhancement of mass transfer by bubbles oscillation and collapse close to the surface, rather than from a pure streaming effect.

  20. New Directions in Floating-Point Arithmetic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beebe, Nelson H. F.

    2007-12-01

    This article briefly describes the history of floating-point arithmetic, the development and features of IEEE standards for such arithmetic, desirable features of new implementations of floating-point hardware, and discusses work-in-progress aimed at making decimal floating-point arithmetic widely available across many architectures, operating systems, and programming languages.

  1. 32 CFR 935.165 - Floating objects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Floating objects. 935.165 Section 935.165 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE TERRITORIAL AND INSULAR REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Public Safety § 935.165 Floating objects. No person may anchor, moor, or beach any boat, barge, or other floating object...

  2. Have Floating Rates Been a Success?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higham, David

    1983-01-01

    Floating exchange rates have not lived up to all expectations, but neither have they performed as badly as some critics have suggested. Examined are the impact of floating rates on balance of payments adjustment, domestic economic policy, and inflation and the claim that floating rates have displayed excessive fluctuations. (Author/RM)

  3. Characterization of dielectric electroactive polymer transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Dennis; Møller, Martin B.; Sarban, Rahimullah; Lassen, Benny; Knott, Arnold; Andersen, Michael A. E.

    2014-03-01

    Throughout this paper, a small-signal model of the Dielectric Electro Active Polymer (DEAP) transducer is analyzed. The DEAP transducer have been proposed as an alternative to the electrodynamic transducer in sound reproduction systems. In order to understand how the DEAP transducer works, and provide guidelines for design optimization, accurate characterization of the transducer must be established. A small signal model of the DEAP transducer is derived and its validity is investigated using impedance measurements. Impedance measurements are shown for a push-pull DEAP based loudspeaker, and the dependency of the biasing voltage is explained. A measuring setup is proposed, which allows the impedance to be measured, while the DEAP transducer is connected to its biasing source.

  4. Flinking: Neither Floating nor Sinking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Roger B.

    1993-01-01

    Describes an activity that challenges students to make an object that, when released under water, does not float up or sink down. The main concept this activity investigates is the density of ordinary objects in comparison to the density of water. (PR)

  5. Floating Ring-Groove Lapper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Robert L., Sr.; Williams, Robert L., Jr.; Chase, Timothy L.

    1992-01-01

    Tool fits out-of-round seal groove and laps it to fine finish without binding. Includes floating lapping pieces riding freely in groove, and are curved to match nominal diameter of groove. One lapping piece tightened so it does not move relative to disk.

  6. Float It Down the River.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brendzel, Sharon; Orfan, Lucy; Schuhmacher, Robert

    2000-01-01

    Presents an activity that involves students in a hands-on, creative project in which they use higher order thinking skills while designing and studying the basics of floating devices. Focuses on inquiry, a number of scientific principles, and the relationship between mathematics and science. (ASK)

  7. Designing seaplane hulls and floats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benoit,

    1926-01-01

    Experimental data, such as the results of tank tests of models, render it possible to predict, at least in principle, as to how a hull or float of a given shape will comport itself. We will see further along, however, how uncertain these methods are and how they leave room for empiricism, which will reign for a long time yet in seaplane research bureaus.

  8. "JCE" Classroom Activity #108. Using Archimedes' Principle to Explain Floating and Sinking Cans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanger, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    In this activity, students (working alone or in groups) measure the mass of several soda cans (diet and regular soda) along with the mass of water that each can displaces. The students are then asked to compare these two mass values for the sinking cans and for the floating cans. The purpose of this activity is for students to determine that the…

  9. A dual-piston ring-driven X-spring transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Alexander L.; Butler, John L.; Pendleton, Robert L.; Ead, Richard M.

    2004-05-01

    Tonpilz transducers generally consist of a stack of piezoelectric material sandwiched between a single piston and an inertial tail mass or between two pistons. The result is a transducer with a large length-to-diameter ratio. The X-spring transducer design, based on U.S. Patent 4845688, allows a means for a shorter transducer length through an orthogonal piezoelectric drive system coupled to the pistons by lever arms. We present here a low-frequency, dual-piston piezoelectric ceramic ring driven version with a length of only 10 in. and a diameter of 19 in. Both single-element and two-element array results are presented. The measured response is shown to be in agreement with the finite-element model with a smooth, wideband 300- to 550-Hz response for this dual-piston, ring-driven X-spring transducer. [Work supported by a Phase II SBIR, through NUWC, Newport, RI 02841.

  10. Electromechanical transduction in multilayer ionic transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akle, Barbar; Leo, Donald J.

    2004-10-01

    A transducer consisting of multiple layers of ionic polymer material is developed for applications in sensing, actuation and control. A multilayer transducer is fabricated by layering individual transducers on top of one another. Each multilayer transducer consists of two to four individual layers each approximately 200 µm thick. The electrical characteristics of the transducers can be varied by connecting the layers in either a parallel arrangement or a series arrangement. The tradeoff in deflection and force is obtained by controlling the mechanical constraint at the interface. Packaging the transducer in an outer coating produces a hard constraint between layers and reduces the deflection with a force that increases linearly with the number of layers. This configuration also increases the bandwidth of the transducer. Removing the outer packaging produces an actuator that maintains the deflection of a single layer with an increased force output. This is obtained by allowing the layers to slide relative to one another during bending. Experiments on transducers with one to three layers are performed and the results are compared to an equivalent circuit model which was modified to accommodate multilayer transducers. The modification is performed on four different boundary conditions: two electrical, the series and the parallel connection, and two mechanical, the zero interfacial friction and the zero slip on the interface. Expressions for blocked force, free deflection, and electrical impedance of the transducer are developed in terms of fundamental material parameters, transducer geometry, and the number of individual layers. The trends in the transducer response are validated using experiments on transducers with multiple polymer layers.

  11. Shear wave transducer for boreholes

    DOEpatents

    Mao, N.H.

    1984-08-23

    A technique and apparatus is provided for estimating in situ stresses by measuring stress-induced velocity anisotropy around a borehole. Two sets each of radially and tangentially polarized transducers are placed inside the hole with displacement directions either parallel or perpendicular to the principal stress directions. With this configuration, relative travel times are measured by both a pulsed phase-locked loop technique and a cross correlation of digitized waveforms. The biaxial velocity data are used to back-calculate the applied stress.

  12. Solar cell angular position transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, M. C.; Gray, D. L. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An angular position transducer utilizing photocells and a light source is disclosed. The device uses a fully rotatable baffle which is connected via an actuator shaft to the body whose rotational displacement is to be measured. The baffle blocks the light path between the light source and the photocells so that a constant semicircular beam of light reaches the photocells. The current produced by the photocells is fed through a resistor, a differential amplifier measures the voltage drop across the resistor which indicates the angular position of the actuator shaft and hence of the object.

  13. Tonpilz Underwater Acoustic Transducer Integrating Lead-free Piezoelectric Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouffaud, Rémi; Granger, Christian; Hladky-Hennion, Anne-Christine; Thi, Mai Pham; Levassort, Franck

    A Tonpilz transducer based on lead-free piezoelectric material was fabricated, modeled and characterized. The stack is composed of two rings of doped BaTiO3. This composition was initially chosen due to good electromechanical performance (kt at 40%) and high mechanical quality factor (Qm over 500). Comparison of the displacement at the center of the head mass was performed with a PZT-based Tonpilz with the same design for a center frequency at 22 kHz.

  14. Self-transducing silicon nanowire electromechanical systems at room temperature.

    PubMed

    He, Rongrui; Feng, X L; Roukes, M L; Yang, Peidong

    2008-06-01

    Electronic readout of the motions of genuinely nanoscale mechanical devices at room temperature imposes an important challenge for the integration and application of nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). Here, we report the first experiments on piezoresistively transduced very high frequency Si nanowire (SiNW) resonators with on-chip electronic actuation at room temperature. We have demonstrated that, for very thin (~90 nm down to ~30 nm) SiNWs, their time-varying strain can be exploited for self-transducing the devices' resonant motions at frequencies as high as approximately 100 MHz. The strain of wire elongation, which is only second-order in doubly clamped structures, enables efficient displacement transducer because of the enhanced piezoresistance effect in these SiNWs. This intrinsically integrated transducer is uniquely suited for a class of very thin wires and beams where metallization and multilayer complex patterning on devices become impractical. The 30 nm thin SiNW NEMS offer exceptional mass sensitivities in the subzeptogram range. This demonstration makes it promising to advance toward NEMS sensors based on ultrathin and even molecular-scale SiNWs, and their monolithic integration with microelectronics on the same chip.

  15. Analog circuit for controlling acoustic transducer arrays

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    1991-01-01

    A simplified ananlog circuit is presented for controlling electromechanical transducer pairs in an acoustic telemetry system. The analog circuit of this invention comprises a single electrical resistor which replaces all of the digital components in a known digital circuit. In accordance with this invention, a first transducer in a transducer pair of array is driven in series with the resistor. The voltage drop across this resistor is then amplified and used to drive the second transducer. The voltage drop across the resistor is proportional and in phase with the current to the transducer. This current is approximately 90 degrees out of phase with the driving voltage to the transducer. This phase shift replaces the digital delay required by the digital control circuit of the prior art.

  16. ERROR COMPENSATOR FOR A POSITION TRANSDUCER

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, A.H.

    1962-06-12

    A device is designed for eliminating the effect of leadscrew errors in positioning machines in which linear motion of a slide is effected from rotary motion of a leadscrew. This is accomplished by providing a corrector cam mounted on the slide, a cam follower, and a transducer housing rotatable by the follower to compensate for all the reproducible errors in the transducer signal which can be related to the slide position. The transducer has an inner part which is movable with respect to the transducer housing. The transducer inner part is coupled to the means for rotating the leadscrew such that relative movement between this part and its housing will provide an output signal proportional to the position of the slide. The corrector cam and its follower perform the compensation by changing the angular position of the transducer housing by an amount that is a function of the slide position and the error at that position. (AEC)

  17. Evaluation on Micro Cracks in Ceramic Bearing Balls by Using the Floating Resonance of Surface Acoustic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hideo; Komatsu, Kouichi; Ishikawa, Satoru; Tanimoto, Kiyoshi; Takii, Hirokazu; Yamanaka, Kazushi

    2003-05-01

    Although resonant ultrasound spectroscopy is useful for testing the surface and the inside of objects, the acoustic properties (resonance frequency, mode amplitude ratio, attenuation, etc.) are disturbed by the contact made with supports and transducers. To eliminate this disturbance, we developed the floating resonance (FR) method in which the acoustic properties of bulk and surface acoustic waves (SAWs) are evaluated using laser ultrasound after floating the objects, thus avoiding the contact with the supports and transducers. In this work we applied the FR method to detect artificial flaws on the surface of ceramic bearing balls and a slit as shallow as 50 μm was successfully detected from the attenuation of SAWs after multiple round trips with as many as 20 turns.

  18. Development and evaluation of gastroretentive norfloxacin floating tablets.

    PubMed

    Bomma, Ramesh; Swamy Naidu, Rongala Appala; Yamsani, Madhusudan Rao; Veerabrahma, Kishan

    2009-06-01

    Floating matrix tablets of norfloxacin were developed to prolong gastric residence time, leading to an increase in drug bioavailability. Tablets were prepared by the wet granulation technique, using polymers such as hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC K4M, HPMC K100M) and xanthan gum. Tablets were evaluated for their physical characteristics, viz., hardness, thickness, friability, and mass variation, drug content and floating properties. Further, tablets were studied for in vitro drug release characteristics for 9 hours. The tablets exhibited controlled and prolonged drug release profiles while floating over the dissolution medium. Non-Fickian diffusion was confirmed as the drug release mechanism from these tablets, indicating that water diffusion and polymer rearrangement played an essential role in drug release. The best formulation (F4) was selected based on in vitro characteristics and was used in vivo radiographic studies by incorporating BaSO4. These studies revealed that the tablets remained in the stomach for 180 +/- 30 min in fasting human volunteers and indicated that gastric retention time was increased by the floating principle, which was considered desirable for the absorption window drugs.

  19. Two-Element Transducer for Ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lecroissette, D. H.; Heyser, R. C.

    1986-01-01

    Separation of transmitting and receiving units improves probing of deep tissue. Ultrasonic transducer has dual elements to increase depth at which sonic images are made of biological tissue. Transducer uses separate transmitting and receiving elements, and frequency response of receiving element independently designed to accommodate attenuation of higher frequencies by tissue. New transducer intended for pulse-echo ultrasonic systems in which reflected sound pulses reveal features in tissue.

  20. Method for Transducer Transient Suppression. I. Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    Vol. 92, No. 3, September 1992 Method for transducer transient suppression. I: Theory Jean C. Piquette Naval Research Laboratory. Underwater Sound...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Method for transducer transient suppression. I: Theo:y PE - 61153N TA - RROII-08-42 WU - DN220-161 6. AUTHOR(S) Jean...STATEMENT 12b. DISTRIBUTION CODE Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. 13. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 words) The problem of driving a transducer in

  1. A CMOS floating point multiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uya, M.; Kaneko, K.; Yasui, J.

    1984-10-01

    This paper describes a 32-bit CMOS floating point multiplier. The chip can perform 32-bit floating point multiplication (based on the proposed IEEE Standard format) and 24-bit fixed point multiplication (two's complement format) in less than 78.7 and 71.1 ns, respectively, and the typical power dissipation is 195 mW at 10 million operations per second. High-speed multiplication techniques - a modified Booth's allgorithm, a carry save adder scheme, a high-speed CMOS full adder, and a modified carry select adder - are used to achieve the above high performance. The chip is designed for compatibility with 16-bit microcomputer systems, and is fabricated in 2 micron n-well CMOS technology; it contains about 23000 transistors of 5.75 x 5.67 sq mm in size.

  2. Measurement methods of ultrasonic transducer sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Dingguo; Fan, Qiong; Xu, Chunguang; Zhang, Xiuhua

    2016-05-01

    Sensitivity is an important parameter to describe the electro-acoustic energy conversion efficiency of ultrasonic transducer. In this paper, the definition of sensitivity and reciprocity of ultrasonic transducer is studied. The frequency response function of a transducer is the spectrum of its sensitivity, which reflects the response sensitivity of the transducer for input signals at different frequencies. Four common methods which are used to measure the disc-vibrator transducer sensitivity are discussed in current investigation. The reciprocity method and the pulse-echo method are based on the reciprocity of the transducer. In the laser vibrometer method measurement, the normal velocity on the transducer radiating surface is directly measured by a laser vibrometer. In the measurement process of the hydrophone method, a calibrated hydrophone is used to measure the transmitted field. The validity of these methods is checked by experimental test. All of the four methods described are sufficiently accurate for transducer sensitivity measurement, while each method has its advantages and limitations. In practical applications, the appropriate method to measure transducer sensitivity should be selected based on actual conditions.

  3. Accurate GPS measurement of the location and orientation of a floating platform. [for sea floor geodesy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purcell, G. H., Jr.; Young, L. E.; Wolf, S. K.; Meehan, T. K.; Duncan, C. B.; Fisher, S. S.; Spiess, F. N.; Austin, G.; Boegeman, D. E.; Lowenstein, C. D.

    1990-01-01

    This article describes the design and initial tests of the GPS portion of a system for making seafloor geodesy measurements. In the planned system, GPS antennas on a floating platform will be used to measure the location of an acoustic transducer, attached below the platform, which interrogates an array of transponders on the seafloor. Since the GPS antennas are necessarily some distance above the transducer, a short-baseline GPS interferometer consisting of three antennas is used to measure the platform's orientation. A preliminary test of several crucial elements of the system was performed. The test involved a fixed antenna on the pier and a second antenna floating on a buoy about 80 m away. GPS measurements of the vertical component of this baseline, analyzed independently by two groups using different software, agree with each other and with an independent measurement within a centimeter. The first test of an integrated GPS/acoustic system took place in the Santa Cruz Basin off the coast of southern California in May 1990. In this test a much larger buoy, designed and built at SIO, was equipped with three GPS antennas and an acoustic transducer that interrogated a transponder on the ocean floor. Preliminary analysis indicates that the horizontal position of the transponder can be determined with a precision of about a centimeter.

  4. Accurate GPS measurement of the location and orientation of a floating platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purcell, G. H., Jr.; Young, L. E.; Wolf, S. K.; Meehan, T. K.; Duncan, C. B.; Fisher, S. S.; Spiess, F. N.; Austin, G.; Boegeman, D. E.; Lowenstein, C. D.

    This article describes the design and initial tests of the GPS portion of a system for making seafloor geodesy measurements. In the planned system, GPS antennas on a floating platform will be used to measure the location of an acoustic transducer, attached below the platform, which interrogates an array of transponders on the seafloor. Since the GPS antennas are necessarily some distance above the transducer, a short-baseline GPS interferometer consisting of three antennas is used to measure the platform's orientation. A preliminary test of several crucial elements of the system was performed. The test involved a fixed antenna on the pier and a second antenna floating on a buoy about 80 m away. GPS measurements of the vertical component of this baseline, analyzed independently by two groups using different software, agree with each other and with an independent measurement within a centimeter. The first test of an integrated GPS/acoustic system took place in the Santa Cruz Basin off the coast of southern California in May 1990. In this test a much larger buoy, designed and built at SIO, was equipped with three GPS antennas and an acoustic transducer that interrogated a transponder on the ocean floor. Preliminary analysis indicates that the horizontal position of the transponder can be determined with a precision of about a centimeter.

  5. Float zone experiments in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verhoeven, J. D.; Noack, M. A.; Gill, W. N.; Hau, C. C.

    1984-01-01

    The molten zone/freezing crystal interface system and all the mechanisms were examined. If Marangoni convection produces oscillatory flows in the float zone of semiconductor materials, such as silicon, then it is unlikely that superior quality crystals can be grown in space using this process. The major goals were: (1) to determine the conditions for the onset of Marangoni flows in molten tin, a model system for low Prandtl number molten semiconductor materials; (2) to determine whether the flows can be suppressed by a thin oxide layer; and (3) based on experimental and mathematical analysis, to predict whether oscillatory flows will occur in the float zone silicon geometry in space, and if so, could it be suppressed by thin oxide or nitride films. Techniques were developed to analyze molten tin surfaces in a UHV system in a disk float zone geometry to minimize buoyancy flows. The critical Marangoni number for onset of oscillatory flows was determined to be greater than 4300 on atomically clean molten tin surfaces.

  6. Float Zone Experiments in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verhoeven, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this work has been to evaluate whether or not Marangoni flow could be suppressed in molten metals by the presence of very thin oxide films. Experimental work has been carried out on molten Sn under UHV conditions. A disk floating zone arrangement was developed to allow in situ Auger examination of molten surfaces. An electron energy loss technique was developed which allows detection of continuous tin oxide films of 6 A or greater. Experiments were planned to detect the effects of oxide formation upon Marangoni flow by measuring: (1) temperature profiles, (2) solid liquid interface shapes, (3) macrosegregation, and (4) the onset of oscillatory Marangoni flow by detecting oscillating temperature variations. Work on (4) showed that oscillatory temperature variations of frequency or = 10 Hz were not present in the disk float zone geometry under conditions of Ma = 4300 with an oxide free molten surface. The disk float zone geometry was modeled with a finite element analysis and temperature and velocity profiles were determined.

  7. Performance analysis of floating double-acting wave-energy pump

    SciTech Connect

    Ueki, H.; Kawaguty, K.; Kira, T.

    1994-12-31

    A double-acting wave-energy pump with floating caisson has been reported experimentally by the authors in a previous paper. This mobile device operates independently both tidal amplitude and incidence for wave propagation. A discharge pipe connects a pressure piston to the float which is the wave energy absorber. The cylinder and piston are set under the sea level in the middle of the caisson. Four hollow columns act as the float of the caisson. In order to investigate analytically the performance of the floating wave-energy pump, motions of both caisson and float-piston were analyzed by solving the equation of vertical motion in regular water waves. In-cylinder pressure was concerned with the external force acting to both float-piston and caisson, and was calculated by the equation for conservation of mass and the Bernoulli`s equation for an unsteady flow by a personal computer. The calculated performance of the flow rate to pump head, and the displacement of both caisson and float-piston were compared well with experimental results.

  8. Standards for dielectric elastomer transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpi, Federico; Anderson, Iain; Bauer, Siegfried; Frediani, Gabriele; Gallone, Giuseppe; Gei, Massimiliano; Graaf, Christian; Jean-Mistral, Claire; Kaal, William; Kofod, Guggi; Kollosche, Matthias; Kornbluh, Roy; Lassen, Benny; Matysek, Marc; Michel, Silvain; Nowak, Stephan; O'Brien, Benjamin; Pei, Qibing; Pelrine, Ron; Rechenbach, Björn; Rosset, Samuel; Shea, Herbert

    2015-10-01

    Dielectric elastomer transducers consist of thin electrically insulating elastomeric membranes coated on both sides with compliant electrodes. They are a promising electromechanically active polymer technology that may be used for actuators, strain sensors, and electrical generators that harvest mechanical energy. The rapid development of this field calls for the first standards, collecting guidelines on how to assess and compare the performance of materials and devices. This paper addresses this need, presenting standardized methods for material characterisation, device testing and performance measurement. These proposed standards are intended to have a general scope and a broad applicability to different material types and device configurations. Nevertheless, they also intentionally exclude some aspects where knowledge and/or consensus in the literature were deemed to be insufficient. This is a sign of a young and vital field, whose research development is expected to benefit from this effort towards standardisation.

  9. 14 CFR 29.753 - Main float design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Main float design. 29.753 Section 29.753... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Floats and Hulls § 29.753 Main float design. (a) Bag floats. Each bag float must be designed to withstand— (1) The maximum pressure...

  10. 14 CFR 27.753 - Main float design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Main float design. 27.753 Section 27.753... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Floats and Hulls § 27.753 Main float design. (a) Bag floats. Each bag float must be designed to withstand— (1) The maximum pressure...

  11. Floating Point Multiply-Add-Subtract Implementation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-07

    implementation receives two floating point numbers Ain and Bin. The floating point number is separated into component parts for processing. For this purpose...in FIG. 2 the mantissa of Ain is identified as Aman, and the mantissa of Bin is identified as Bman. The exponent of Ain is identified as Aexp, and...unit implementation 10 receives Ain and Bin in a floating point format that can be broken up into signs, mantissas, and exponents. These numbers

  12. Tank Tests of Twin Seaplane Floats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrman, H; Kempf, G; Kloess, H

    1928-01-01

    The following report contains the most essential data for the hydrodynamic portion of the twin-float problem. The following points were successfully investigated: 1) difference between stationary and nonstationary flow; 2) effect of the shape of the step; 3) effect of distance between floats; 4) effect of nose-heavy and tail-heavy moments; 5) effect of the shape of floats; 6) maneuverability.

  13. Acoustic Float for Marine Mammal Monitoring

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-30

    a matured technology, and is manufactured mainly by two companies, Webb Research (APEX) and Martec (PROVOR). Our original acoustic float, the...adding another microprocessor inside the float as originally planned, we have reprogrammed the APEX float processor board itself (apf9) by changing... echolocation clicks. The analysis revealed that by using ICI information, the ERMA detector was able to reduce the number of false positive detections to less

  14. The impact on seaplane floats during landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Karman, TH

    1929-01-01

    In order to make a stress analysis of seaplane floats, and especially of the members connecting the floats with the fuselage, it is of great importance to determine the maximum pressure acting on the floats during landing. Here, the author gives a formula for maximum pressures during landing that permits one to apply experimental results to different bodies and different velocities. The author notes that the formula checks very well with experimental results.

  15. 21 CFR 870.2880 - Ultrasonic transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... structures. This device includes phased arrays and two-dimensional scanning transducers. (b) Classification... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ultrasonic transducer. 870.2880 Section 870.2880...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2880 Ultrasonic...

  16. 21 CFR 870.2880 - Ultrasonic transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... structures. This device includes phased arrays and two-dimensional scanning transducers. (b) Classification... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ultrasonic transducer. 870.2880 Section 870.2880...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2880 Ultrasonic...

  17. 21 CFR 870.2880 - Ultrasonic transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... structures. This device includes phased arrays and two-dimensional scanning transducers. (b) Classification... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ultrasonic transducer. 870.2880 Section 870.2880...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2880 Ultrasonic...

  18. Opto-acoustic transducer for medical applications

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William; Celliers, Peter; Da Silva, Luiz; Glinsky, Michael; London, Richard; Maitland, Duncan; Matthews, Dennis; Krulevich, Peter; Lee, Abraham

    2002-01-01

    This invention is an optically activated transducer for generating acoustic vibrations in a biological medium. The transducer is located at the end of a fiber optic which may be located within a catheter. Energy for operating the transducer is provided optically by laser light transmitted through the fiber optic to the transducer. Pulsed laser light is absorbed in the working fluid of the transducer to generate a thermal pressure and consequent adiabatic expansion of the transducer head such that it does work against the ambient medium. The transducer returns to its original state by a process of thermal cooling. The motion of the transducer within the ambient medium couples acoustic energy into the medium. By pulsing the laser at a high repetition rate (which may vary from CW to 100 kHz) an ultrasonic radiation field can be established locally in the medium. This method of producing ultrasonic vibrations can be used in vivo for the treatment of stroke-related conditions in humans, particularly for dissolving thrombus. The catheter may also incorporate anti-thrombolytic drug treatments as an adjunct therapy and it may be operated in conjunction with ultrasonic detection equipment for imaging and feedback control.

  19. Opto-acoustic transducer for medical applications

    DOEpatents

    Benett, W.; Celliers, P.; Da Silva, L.; Glinsky, M.; London, R.; Maitland, D.; Matthews, D.; Krulevich, P.; Lee, A.

    1999-08-31

    This invention is an optically activated transducer for generating acoustic vibrations in a biological medium. The transducer is located at the end of a fiber optic which may be located within a catheter. Energy for operating the transducer is provided optically by laser light transmitted through the fiber optic to the transducer. Pulsed laser light is absorbed in the working fluid of the transducer to generate a thermal pressure and consequent adiabatic expansion of the transducer head such that it does work against the ambient medium. The transducer returns to its original state by a process of thermal cooling. The motion of the transducer within the ambient medium couples acoustic energy into the medium. By pulsing the laser at a high repetition rate (which may vary from CW to 100 kHz) an ultrasonic radiation field can be established locally in the medium. This method of producing ultrasonic vibrations can be used in vivo for the treatment of stroke-related conditions in humans, particularly for dissolving thrombus. The catheter may also incorporate anti-thrombolytic drug treatments as an adjunct therapy and it may be operated in conjunction with ultrasonic detection equipment for imaging and feedback control. 7 figs.

  20. Opto-acoustic transducer for medical applications

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William; Celliers, Peter; Da Silva, Luiz; Glinsky, Michael; London, Richard; Maitland, Duncan; Matthews, Dennis; Krulevich, Peter; Lee, Abraham

    1999-01-01

    This invention is an optically activated transducer for generating acoustic vibrations in a biological medium. The transducer is located at the end of a fiber optic which may be located within a catheter. Energy for operating the transducer is provided optically by laser light transmitted through the fiber optic to the transducer. Pulsed laser light is absorbed in the working fluid of the transducer to generate a thermal pressure and consequent adiabatic expansion of the transducer head such that it does work against the ambient medium. The transducer returns to its original state by a process of thermal cooling. The motion of the transducer within the ambient medium couples acoustic energy into the medium. By pulsing the laser at a high repetition rate (which may vary from CW to 100 kHz) an ultrasonic radiation field can be established locally in the medium. This method of producing ultrasonic vibrations can be used in vivo for the treatment of stroke-related conditions in humans, particularly for dissolving thrombus. The catheter may also incorporate anti-thrombolytic drug treatments as an adjunct therapy and it may be operated in conjunction with ultrasonic detection equipment for imaging and feedback control.

  1. Vibration Control via Stiffness Switching of Magnetostrictive Transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheidler, Justin J.; Asnani, Vivake M.; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a computational study of structural vibration control that is realized by switching a magnetostrictive transducer between high and low stiffness states. Switching is accomplished by either changing the applied magnetic field with a voltage excitation or changing the shunt impedance on the transducer's coil (i.e., the magnetostrictive material's magnetic boundary condition). Switched-stiffness vibration control is simulated using a lumped mass supported by a damper and the magnetostrictive transducer (mount), which is represented by a nonlinear, electromechanical model. Free vibration of the mass is calculated while varying the mount's stiffness according to a reference switched-stiffness vibration control law. The results reveal that switching the magnetic field produces the desired change in stiffness, but also an undesired actuation force that can significantly degrade the vibration control. Hence, a modified switched-stiffness control law that accounts for the actuation force is proposed and implemented for voltage-controlled stiffness switching. The influence of the magnetomechanical bias condition is also discussed. Voltage-controlled stiffness switching is found to introduce damping equivalent to a viscous damping factor up to about 0.25; this is shown to primarily result from active vibration reduction caused by the actuation force. The merit of magnetostrictive switched-stiffness vibration control is then quantified by comparing the results of voltage- and shunt-controlled stiffness switching to the performance of optimal magnetostrictive shunt damping.

  2. Modeling International Space Station (ISS) Floating Potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Dale C.; Gardner, Barbara

    2002-01-01

    The floating potential of the International Space Station (ISS) as a function of the electron current collection of its high voltage solar array panels is derived analytically. Based on Floating Potential Probe (FPP) measurements of the ISS potential and ambient plasma characteristics, it is shown that the ISS floating potential is a strong function of the electron temperature of the surrounding plasma. While the ISS floating potential has so far not attained the pre-flight predicted highly negative values, it is shown that for future mission builds, ISS must continue to provide two-fault tolerant arc-hazard protection for astronauts on EVA.

  3. Modeling International Space Station (ISS) Floating Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Dale C.; Gardner, Barbara

    2002-05-01

    The floating potential of the International Space Station (ISS) as a function of the electron current collection of its high voltage solar array panels is derived analytically. Based on Floating Potential Probe (FPP) measurements of the ISS potential and ambient plasma characteristics, it is shown that the ISS floating potential is a strong function of the electron temperature of the surrounding plasma. While the ISS floating potential has so far not attained the pre-flight predicted highly negative values, it is shown that for future mission builds, ISS must continue to provide two-fault tolerant arc-hazard protection for astronauts on EVA.

  4. Piezoelectric materials used in underwater acoustic transducers

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Huidong; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2012-07-07

    Piezoelectric materials have been used in underwater acoustic transducers for nearly a century. In this paper, we reviewed four different types of piezoelectric materials: piezoelectric ceramics, single crystals, composites, and polymers, which are widely used in underwater acoustic transducers nowadays. Piezoelectric ceramics are the most dominant material type and are used as a single-phase material or one of the end members in composites. Piezoelectric single crystals offer outstanding electromechanical response but are limited by their manufacturing cost. Piezoelectric polymers provide excellent acoustic impedance matching and transducer fabrication flexibility although their piezoelectric properties are not as good as ceramics and single crystals. Composites combined the merits of ceramics and polymers and are receiving increased attention. The typical structure and electromechanical properties of each type of materials are introduced and discussed with respect to underwater acoustic transducer applications. Their advantages and disadvantages are summarized. Some of the critical design considerations when developing underwater acoustic transducers with these materials are also touched upon.

  5. Thermodynamic Pressure/Temperature Transducer Health Check

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Immer, Christopher D. (Inventor); Eckhoff, Anthony (Inventor); Medelius, Pedro J. (Inventor); Deyoe, Richard T. (Inventor); Starr, Stanley O. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A device and procedure for checking the health of a pressure transducer in situ is provided. The procedure includes measuring a fixed change in pressure above ambient pressure and a fixed change in pressure below ambient pressure. This is done by first sealing an enclosed volume around the transducer with a valve. A piston inside the sealed volume is increasing the pressure. A fixed pressure below ambient pressure is obtained by opening the valve, driving the piston The output of the pressure transducer is recorded for both the overpressuring and the underpressuring. By comparing this data with data taken during a preoperative calibration, the health of the transducer is determined from the linearity, the hysteresis, and the repeatability of its output. The further addition of a thermometer allows constant offset error in the transducer output to be determined.

  6. Using Portable Transducers to Measure Tremor Severity

    PubMed Central

    Elble, Rodger J.; McNames, James

    2016-01-01

    Background Portable motion transducers, suitable for measuring tremor, are now available at a reasonable cost. The use of these transducers requires knowledge of their limitations and data analysis. The purpose of this review is to provide a practical overview and example software for using portable motion transducers in the quantification of tremor. Methods Medline was searched via PubMed.gov in December 2015 using the Boolean expression “tremor AND (accelerometer OR accelerometry OR gyroscope OR inertial measurement unit OR digitizing tablet OR transducer).” Abstracts of 419 papers dating back to 1964 were reviewed for relevant portable transducers and methods of tremor analysis, and 105 papers written in English were reviewed in detail. Results Accelerometers, gyroscopes, and digitizing tablets are used most commonly, but few are sold for the purpose of measuring tremor. Consequently, most software for tremor analysis is developed by the user. Wearable transducers are capable of recording tremor continuously, in the absence of a clinician. Tremor amplitude, frequency, and occurrence (percentage of time with tremor) can be computed. Tremor amplitude and occurrence correlate strongly with clinical ratings of tremor severity. Discussion Transducers provide measurements of tremor amplitude that are objective, precise, and valid, but the precision and accuracy of transducers are mitigated by natural variability in tremor amplitude. This variability is so great that the minimum detectable change in amplitude, exceeding random variability, is comparable for scales and transducers. Research is needed to determine the feasibility of detecting smaller change using averaged data from continuous long-term recordings with wearable transducers. PMID:27257514

  7. BLOCK-FLOATING-POINT REALIZATION OF DIGITAL FILTERS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A realization for digital filters using block- floating - point arithmetic is proposed. A statistical model for roundoff noise is presented and used to compare block- floating - point with fixed-point and floating - point realizations.

  8. 14 CFR 27.753 - Main float design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    .... (a) Bag floats. Each bag float must be designed to withstand— (1) The maximum pressure differential that might be developed at the maximum altitude for which certification with that float is...

  9. 14 CFR 27.753 - Main float design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .... (a) Bag floats. Each bag float must be designed to withstand— (1) The maximum pressure differential that might be developed at the maximum altitude for which certification with that float is...

  10. 14 CFR 29.753 - Main float design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    .... (a) Bag floats. Each bag float must be designed to withstand— (1) The maximum pressure differential that might be developed at the maximum altitude for which certification with that float is...

  11. 14 CFR 29.753 - Main float design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    .... (a) Bag floats. Each bag float must be designed to withstand— (1) The maximum pressure differential that might be developed at the maximum altitude for which certification with that float is...

  12. 14 CFR 27.753 - Main float design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    .... (a) Bag floats. Each bag float must be designed to withstand— (1) The maximum pressure differential that might be developed at the maximum altitude for which certification with that float is...

  13. 14 CFR 29.753 - Main float design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    .... (a) Bag floats. Each bag float must be designed to withstand— (1) The maximum pressure differential that might be developed at the maximum altitude for which certification with that float is...

  14. 14 CFR 29.753 - Main float design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .... (a) Bag floats. Each bag float must be designed to withstand— (1) The maximum pressure differential that might be developed at the maximum altitude for which certification with that float is...

  15. 14 CFR 27.753 - Main float design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    .... (a) Bag floats. Each bag float must be designed to withstand— (1) The maximum pressure differential that might be developed at the maximum altitude for which certification with that float is...

  16. Floating patella associated with lymphoedema

    PubMed Central

    Vun, Shen Hwa; Bayam, Levent; Drampalos, Efstathios; Jesry, Mohammed; Fadel, George

    2015-01-01

    Ipsilateral injury of more than one component of the knee extensor apparatus is rare. It is mostly associated with previous trauma, surgery, immunosuppression therapy and systemic disease. We present the first documented case of a spontaneous bifocal disruption of the knee extensor apparatus (i.e. floating patella) associated with lymphoedema. This case highlights the importance of considering lymphoedema as another risk factor for rupture of the knee extensor apparatus. It also highlights the importance of assessing all components of the knee extensor apparatus in patients presenting with acute knee injuries. PMID:25802253

  17. Self-stabilizing floating tower

    SciTech Connect

    Mougin, G.L.

    1980-12-30

    An offshore floating tower comprises two coaxial cylindrical enclosures interconnected by continuous radial bulkheads forming in the upper portion a ring of damping chambers and in the lower portion a ring of buoyancy tanksaround a bell-shaped chamber which is partially filled with air to produce pneumatic damping of vertical movement of the tower. The upper portion of the tower is separated from the lower portion by a horizontal slab. The upper portion of the internal enclosure is perforated in the vicinity of the horizontal slab.

  18. Glass-windowed ultrasound transducers.

    PubMed

    Yddal, Tostein; Gilja, Odd Helge; Cochran, Sandy; Postema, Michiel; Kotopoulis, Spiros

    2016-05-01

    In research and industrial processes, it is increasingly common practice to combine multiple measurement modalities. Nevertheless, experimental tools that allow the co-linear combination of optical and ultrasonic transmission have rarely been reported. The aim of this study was to develop and characterise a water-matched ultrasound transducer architecture using standard components, with a central optical window larger than 10 mm in diameter allowing for optical transmission. The window can be used to place illumination or imaging apparatus such as light guides, miniature cameras, or microscope objectives, simplifying experimental setups. Four design variations of a basic architecture were fabricated and characterised with the objective to assess whether the variations influence the acoustic output. The basic architecture consisted of a piezoelectric ring and a glass disc, with an aluminium casing. The designs differed in piezoelectric element dimensions: inner diameter, ID=10 mm, outer diameter, OD=25 mm, thickness, TH=4 mm or ID=20 mm, OD=40 mm, TH=5 mm; glass disc dimensions OD=20-50 mm, TH=2-4 mm; and details of assembly. The transducers' frequency responses were characterised using electrical impedance spectroscopy and pulse-echo measurements, the acoustic propagation pattern using acoustic pressure field scans, the acoustic power output using radiation force balance measurements, and the acoustic pressure using a needle hydrophone. Depending on the design and piezoelectric element dimensions, the resonance frequency was in the range 350-630 kHz, the -6 dB bandwidth was in the range 87-97%, acoustic output power exceeded 1 W, and acoustic pressure exceeded 1 MPa peak-to-peak. 3D stress simulations were performed to predict the isostatic pressure required to induce material failure and 4D acoustic simulations. The pressure simulations indicated that specific design variations could sustain isostatic pressures up to 4.8 MPa.The acoustic simulations were able to

  19. The trapped fluid transducer: modeling and optimization.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lei; Grosh, Karl

    2008-06-01

    Exact and approximate formulas for calculating the sensitivity and bandwidth of an electroacoustic transducer with an enclosed or trapped fluid volume are developed. The transducer is composed of a fluid-filled rectangular duct with a tapered-width plate on one wall emulating the biological basilar membrane in the cochlea. A three-dimensional coupled fluid-structure model is developed to calculate the transducer sensitivity by using a boundary integral method. The model is used as the basis of an optimization methodology seeking to enhance the transducer performance. Simplified formulas are derived from the model to estimate the transducer sensitivity and the fundamental resonant frequency with good accuracy and much less computational cost. By using the simplified formulas, one can easily design the geometry of the transducer to achieve the optimal performance. As an example design, the transducer achieves a sensitivity of around -200 dB (1 VmuPa) at 10 kHz frequency range with piezoelectric sensing. In analogy to the cochlea, a tapered-width plate design is considered and shown to have a more uniform frequency response than a similar plate with no taper.

  20. Modeling of functionally graded piezoelectric ultrasonic transducers.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Wilfredo Montealegre; Buiochi, Flávio; Adamowski, Julio Cezar; Silva, Emílio Carlos Nelli

    2009-05-01

    The application of functionally graded material (FGM) concept to piezoelectric transducers allows the design of composite transducers without interfaces, due to the continuous change of property values. Thus, large improvements can be achieved, as reduction of stress concentration, increasing of bonding strength, and bandwidth. This work proposes to design and to model FGM piezoelectric transducers and to compare their performance with non-FGM ones. Analytical and finite element (FE) modeling of FGM piezoelectric transducers radiating a plane pressure wave in fluid medium are developed and their results are compared. The ANSYS software is used for the FE modeling. The analytical model is based on FGM-equivalent acoustic transmission-line model, which is implemented using MATLAB software. Two cases are considered: (i) the transducer emits a pressure wave in water and it is composed of a graded piezoceramic disk, and backing and matching layers made of homogeneous materials; (ii) the transducer has no backing and matching layer; in this case, no external load is simulated. Time and frequency pressure responses are obtained through a transient analysis. The material properties are graded along thickness direction. Linear and exponential gradation functions are implemented to illustrate the influence of gradation on the transducer pressure response, electrical impedance, and resonance frequencies.

  1. Seismic transducer modeling using ABAQUS

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen R. Novascone

    2004-05-01

    A seismic transducer, known as an orbital vibrator, consists of a rotating imbalance driven by an electric motor. When suspended in a liquid-filled wellbore, vibrations of the device are coupled to the surrounding geologic media. In this mode, an orbital vibrator can be used as an efficient rotating dipole source for seismic imaging. Alternately, the motion of an orbital vibrator is affected by the physical properties of the surrounding media. From this point of view, an orbital vibrator can be used as a stand-alone sensor. The reaction to the surroundings can be sensed and recorded by geophones inside the orbital vibrator. These reactions are a function of the media’s physical properties such as modulus, damping, and density, thereby identifying the rock type. This presentation shows how the orbital vibrator and surroundings were modeled with an ABAQUS acoustic FEM. The FEM is found to compare favorably with theoretical predictions. A 2D FEM and analytical model are compared to an experimental data set. Each model compares favorably with the data set.

  2. Towards sensible floating-point arithmetic

    SciTech Connect

    Cody, W.J.

    1980-01-01

    Efforts to promote the development of high-quality transportable numerical software show that few, if any, of the floating-point arithmetic systems in existing computers are completely satisfactory for serious numerical computation. Examination of the defects in these systems leads to specifications for a sensible floating-point system from a numerical analyst's viewpoint. 1 table.

  3. 32 CFR 935.165 - Floating objects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Floating objects. 935.165 Section 935.165 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE TERRITORIAL AND INSULAR REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Public Safety § 935.165 Floating objects. No person may anchor, moor, or...

  4. 32 CFR 935.165 - Floating objects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Floating objects. 935.165 Section 935.165 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE TERRITORIAL AND INSULAR REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Public Safety § 935.165 Floating objects. No person may anchor, moor, or...

  5. 32 CFR 935.165 - Floating objects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Floating objects. 935.165 Section 935.165 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE TERRITORIAL AND INSULAR REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Public Safety § 935.165 Floating objects. No person may anchor, moor, or...

  6. 32 CFR 935.165 - Floating objects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Floating objects. 935.165 Section 935.165 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE TERRITORIAL AND INSULAR REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Public Safety § 935.165 Floating objects. No person may anchor, moor, or...

  7. Future float zone development in industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandfort, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    The present industrial requirements for float zone silicon are summarized. Developments desired by the industry in the future are reported. The five most significant problems faced today by the float zone crystal growth method in industry are discussed. They are economic, large diameter, resistivity uniformity, control of carbon, and swirl defects.

  8. Vertical pump with free floating check valve

    DOEpatents

    Lindsay, Malcolm

    1980-01-01

    A vertical pump with a bottom discharge having a free floating check valve isposed in the outlet plenum thereof. The free floating check valve comprises a spherical member with a hemispherical cage-like member attached thereto which is capable of allowing forward or reverse flow under appropriate conditions while preventing reverse flow under inappropriate conditions.

  9. Whatever Floats Your Boat: A Design Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kornoelje, Joanne; Roman, Harry T.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a simple design challenge, based on the PBS program "Design Squad's" "Watercraft" activity that will prove engaging to most technology and engineering students. In this floating boat challenge, students are to build a boat that can float and support 25 pennies for at least 10 seconds--without leaking, sinking, or tipping…

  10. Tonpilz Piezoelectric Transducer with a Bending Piezoelectric Disk on The Radiation Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Mitsuru; Shiba, Hiroshi; Fujii, Taro; Hama, Yoshinori; Hoshino, Takamichi; Inoue, Takeshi

    2003-05-01

    In recent years, it has become necessary to use wide-band signals in various kinds of signal processing and communication technology fields. One of these is the field of underwater acoustic technology, and therefore wide-band transducers are needed in this field. To address this need, we developed a Tonpilz piezoelectric transducer with a bending piezoelectric disk on the radiation surface of the front mass. This transducer was designed by providing a bending piezoelectric disk on the radiation surface of the front mass of a conventional Tonpilz piezoelectric transducer to enable it to generate in two resonance modes: the longitudinal vibration resonance mode and the bending vibration resonance mode of the bending disk. Coupling these two resonance modes makes it possible to achieve low-frequency transmission, and wide-band signals can be attained by adjusting the phase in the two modes. We obtained the optimum design dimensions of the transducer through analysis using the finite element method (FEM), and constructed a prototype based on the analysis. Experiments verified that the measured results for the prototype correspond well to the simulation results and that the bandwidth can be widened without changing the external size of the conventional transducer.

  11. A Miniaturized Class IV Flextensional Ultrasonic Transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feeney, Andrew; Tweedie, Andrew; Mathieson, Andrew; Lucas, Margaret

    The class V transducer has found popularity in a diverse range of applications such as surgical and underwater projection systems, where high vibration amplitude for relatively low piezoceramic volume is generated. The class IV transducer offers the potential to attain even higher performance per volume than the class V. In this research, a miniaturized class IV power ultrasonic flextensional transducer is proposed. Simulations were performed using PZFlex finite element analysis, and electrical impedance analysis and experimental modal analysis were conducted for validation, where a high correlation between simulation and experiment has been demonstrated.

  12. Hybrid piezoelectric energy harvesting transducer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Tian-Bing (Inventor); Jiang, Xiaoning (Inventor); Su, Ji (Inventor); Rehrig, Paul W. (Inventor); Hackenberger, Wesley S. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A hybrid piezoelectric energy harvesting transducer system includes: (a) first and second symmetric, pre-curved piezoelectric elements mounted separately on a frame so that their concave major surfaces are positioned opposite to each other; and (b) a linear piezoelectric element mounted separately on the frame and positioned between the pre-curved piezoelectric elements. The pre-curved piezoelectric elements and the linear piezoelectric element are spaced from one another and communicate with energy harvesting circuitry having contact points on the frame. The hybrid piezoelectric energy harvesting transducer system has a higher electromechanical energy conversion efficiency than any known piezoelectric transducer.

  13. Optimizing Piezoelectric Stack Preload Bolts in Ultrasonic Transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeAngelis, D. A.; Schulze, G. W.; Wong, K. S.

    The selection of the preload bolt is often an afterthought in the design of Langevin type "sandwich" transducers, but quite often it is the root cause of failure for power ultrasonic applications. The main role of the preload bolt is to provide a "prestress" in the piezo stack to prevent interface "gapping" or tension in glued joints which can result in delamination. But as an integral part of a highly tuned dynamic system, the resulting parasitic resonances in these preload bolts, such as bending or longitudinal modes, are often difficult to predict and control. This research investigates many aspects of preload bolt design for achieving optimal transducer performance, including basic size and strength determination based on drive amplitude, as well as ensuring adequate thread engagement to the mating horn. Other aspects such as rule-of-thumb configuration and length guidelines to reduce parasitic resonances are also investigated. Optimizing the uniformity of stress in the piezoceramics is also considered, which is affected by end mass length, counterbores and proximity to threading. The selection of the bolt material based on stiffness is also investigated as related to electromechanical coupling. The investigation focuses solely on Langevin type transducers used for semiconductor wire bonding, and which are comprised of the common Navy Types I and III (PZT4 and PZT8) piezoelectric materials. Several metrics are investigated such as impedance, displacement gain, and electromechanical coupling factor. The experimental and theoretical research methods include Bode plots, scanning laser vibrometry and finite element analysis.

  14. Fundamentals of heat measurement. [heat flux transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerashchenko, O. A.

    1979-01-01

    Various methods and devices for obtaining experimental data on heat flux density over wide ranges of temperature and pressure are examined. Laboratory tests and device fabrication details are supplemented by theoretical analyses of heat-conduction and thermoelectric effects, providing design guidelines and information relevant to further research and development. A theory defining the measure of correspondence between transducer signal and the measured heat flux is established for individual (isolated) heat flux transducers subject to space and time-dependent loading. An analysis of the properties of stacked (series-connected) transducers of various types (sandwich-type, plane, and spiral) is used to derive a similarity theory providing general governing relationships. The transducers examined are used in 36 types of derivative devices involving direct heat loss measurements, heat conduction studies, radiation pyrometry, calorimetry in medicine and industry and nuclear reactor dosimetry.

  15. Micromachined Tunneling Displacement Transducers for Physical Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, T. W.; Kaiser, W. J.; Podosek, J. A.; Rockstad, H. K.; Reynolds, J. K.; Vote, E. C.

    1993-01-01

    We have designed and constructed a series of tunneling sensors which take advantage of the extreme position sensitivity of electron tunneling. In these sensors, a tunneling displacement transducer, based on scanning tunneling microscopy principles, is used to detect the signal-induced motion of a sensor element. Through the use of high-resonant frequency mechanical elements for the transducer, sensors may be constructed which offer wide bandwidth, and are robust and easily operated. Silicon micromachining may be used to fabricate the transducer elements, allowing integration of sensor and control electronics. Examples of tunneling accelerometers and infrared detectors will be discussed. In each case, the use of the tunneling transducer allows miniaturization of the sensor as well as enhancement of the sensor performance.

  16. Guided wave applications of piezocomposite transducers

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, P.A.; Rose, J.L.

    1996-12-31

    The majority of ultrasonic nondestructive testing applications in use today utilize longitudinal wave techniques. These are very effective for flaw detection and thickness measurement in scanning applications. In sheet and tube type materials, however, a more rapid technique has been developed utilizing Guided Wave Inspection. This method is capable of interrogating large areas of the material without extensive transducer scanning. An important requirement in this method is the ability to utilize relatively broad bandwidth transducers in the test. This paper presents the concepts on which Guided Wave Inspection is based as well as piezocomposite transducer incorporate a combination of piezoelectric ceramics and polymers to enhance the ultrasonic performance of the device. Additionally, the transducer can be designed to match to non-planar surfaces increasing its versatility when a difficult shape is involved.

  17. Portable high precision pressure transducer system

    DOEpatents

    Piper, T.C.; Morgan, J.P.; Marchant, N.J.; Bolton, S.M.

    1994-04-26

    A high precision pressure transducer system is described for checking the reliability of a second pressure transducer system used to monitor the level of a fluid confined in a holding tank. Since the response of the pressure transducer is temperature sensitive, it is continually housed in an battery powered oven which is configured to provide a temperature stable environment at specified temperature for an extended period of time. Further, a high precision temperature stabilized oscillator and counter are coupled to a single board computer to accurately determine the pressure transducer oscillation frequency and convert it to an applied pressure. All of the components are powered by the batteries which during periods of availability of line power are charged by an on board battery charger. The pressure readings outputs are transmitted to a line printer and a vacuum fluorescent display. 2 figures.

  18. AUTOMATIC CALIBRATING SYSTEM FOR PRESSURE TRANSDUCERS

    DOEpatents

    Amonette, E.L.; Rodgers, G.W.

    1958-01-01

    An automatic system for calibrating a number of pressure transducers is described. The disclosed embodiment of the invention uses a mercurial manometer to measure the air pressure applied to the transducer. A servo system follows the top of the mercury column as the pressure is changed and operates an analog- to-digital converter This converter furnishes electrical pulses, each representing an increment of pressure change, to a reversible counterThe transducer furnishes a signal at each calibration point, causing an electric typewriter and a card-punch machine to record the pressure at the instant as indicated by the counter. Another counter keeps track of the calibration points so that a number identifying each point is recorded with the corresponding pressure. A special relay control system controls the pressure trend and programs the sequential calibration of several transducers.

  19. Portable high precision pressure transducer system

    DOEpatents

    Piper, Thomas C.; Morgan, John P.; Marchant, Norman J.; Bolton, Steven M.

    1994-01-01

    A high precision pressure transducer system for checking the reliability of a second pressure transducer system used to monitor the level of a fluid confined in a holding tank. Since the response of the pressure transducer is temperature sensitive, it is continually housed in an battery powered oven which is configured to provide a temperature stable environment at specified temperature for an extended period of time. Further, a high precision temperature stabilized oscillator and counter are coupled to a single board computer to accurately determine the pressure transducer oscillation frequency and convert it to an applied pressure. All of the components are powered by the batteries which during periods of availability of line power are charged by an on board battery charger. The pressure readings outputs are transmitted to a line printer and a vacuum florescent display.

  20. Development of an inherently digital transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, R. R.

    1972-01-01

    The term digital transducer normally implies the combination of conventional analog sensors with encoders or analog-to-digital converters. Because of the objectionable characteristics of most digital transducers, a program was instituted to investigate the possibility of producing a transducer that is inherently digital, instead of a transducer that is digital in the usual sense. Such a device would have improved accuracy and reliability and would have reduced power and bulk requirements because two processes, sensing and conditioning, would be combined into one processes. A Curie-point-temperature sensor is described that represents realization of the stated goal. Also, a metal-insulator semiconductor is described that does not conform precisely to the program goals but that appears to have applications as a new and interesting transduction device.

  1. Portable high precision pressure transducer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piper, T. C.; Morgan, J. P.; Marchant, N. J.; Bolton, S. M.

    A high precision pressure transducer system for checking the reliability of a second pressure transducer system used to monitor the level of a fluid confined in a holding tank is presented. Since the response of the pressure transducer is temperature sensitive, it is continually housed in a battery powered oven which is configured to provide a temperature stable environment at specified temperature for an extended period of time. Further, a high precision temperature stabilized oscillator and counter are coupled to a single board computer to accurately determine the pressure transducer oscillation frequency and convert it to an applied pressure. All of the components are powered by the batteries which during periods of availability of line power are charged by an on-board battery charger. The pressure readings outputs are transmitted to a line printer and a vacuum fluorescent display.

  2. Design considerations for piezoelectric polymer ultrasound transducers.

    PubMed

    Brown, L F

    2000-01-01

    Much work has been published on the design of ultrasound transducers using piezoelectric ceramics, but a great deal of this work does not apply when using the piezoelectric polymers because of their unique electrical and mechanical properties. The purpose of this paper is to review and present new insight into seven important considerations for the design of active piezoelectric polymer ultrasound transducers: piezoelectric polymer materials selection, transducer construction and packaging requirements, materials characterization and modeling, film thickness and active area design, electroding selection, backing material design, and front protection/matching layer design. Besides reviewing these design considerations, this paper also presents new insight into the design of active piezoelectric polymer ultrasonic transducers. The design and fabrication of an immersible ultrasonic transducer, which has no adhesive layer between the active element and backing layer, is included. The transducer features direct deposition of poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) [P(VDF-TrFE)] copolymer onto an insulated aluminum backing substrate. Pulse-echo tests indicated a minimum insertion loss of 37 dB and -6 dB bandwidth of 9.8 to 22 MHz (71%). The use of polymer wear-protection/quarter-wave matching layers is also discussed. Test results on a P(VDF-TrFE) transducer showed that a Mylar/sup TM/ front layer provided a slight increase in pulse-echo amplitude of 15% (or 1.2 dB) and an increase in -6 dB pulse-echo fractional bandwidth from 86 to 95%. Theoretical derivations are reported for optimizing the active area of the piezoelectric polymer element for maximum power transfer at resonance. These derivations are extended to the special case for a low profile (i.e., thin) shielded transducer. A method for modeling the non-linear loading effects of a commercial pulser-receiver is also included.

  3. Ultrasonic transducer for extreme temperature environments

    DOEpatents

    Light, Glenn M.; Cervantes, Richard A.; Alcazar, David G.

    1993-03-23

    An ultrasonic piezoelectric transducer that is operable in very high and very low temperatures. The transducer has a dual housing structure that isolates the expansion and contraction of the piezoelectric element from the expansion and contraction of the housing. Also, the internal components are made from materials having similar coefficients of expansion so that they do not interfere with the motion of the piezoelectric element.

  4. Resonant capacitive MEMS acoustic emission transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozevin, D.; Greve, D. W.; Oppenheim, I. J.; Pessiki, S. P.

    2006-12-01

    We describe resonant capacitive MEMS transducers developed for use as acoustic emission (AE) detectors, fabricated in the commercial three-layer polysilicon surface micromachining process (MUMPs). The 1 cm square device contains six independent transducers in the frequency range between 100 and 500 kHz, and a seventh transducer at 1 MHz. Each transducer is a parallel plate capacitor with one plate free to vibrate, thereby causing a capacitance change which creates an output signal in the form of a current under a dc bias voltage. With the geometric proportions we employed, each transducer responds with two distinct resonant frequencies. In our design the etch hole spacing was chosen to limit squeeze film damping and thereby produce an underdamped vibration when operated at atmospheric pressure. Characterization experiments obtained by capacitance and admittance measurements are presented, and transducer responses to physically simulated AE source are discussed. Finally, we report our use of the device to detect acoustic emissions associated with crack initiation and growth in weld metal.

  5. High energy, low frequency, ultrasonic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Albert E.

    2000-01-01

    A wide bandwidth, ultrasonic transducer to generate nondispersive, extensional, pulsed acoustic pressure waves into concrete reinforced rods and tendons. The wave propagation distance is limited to double the length of the rod. The transducer acoustic impedance is matched to the rod impedance for maximum transfer of acoustic energy. The efficiency of the transducer is approximately 60 percent, depending upon the type of active elements used in the transducer. The transducer input energy is, for example, approximately 1 mJ. Ultrasonic reflections will occur at points along the rod where there are changes of one percent of a wavelength in the rod diameter. A reduction in the rod diameter will reflect a phase reversed echo, as compared with the reflection from an incremental increase in diameter. Echo signal processing of the stored waveform permits a reconstruction of those echoes into an image of the rod. The ultrasonic transducer has use in the acoustic inspection of long (40+foot) architectural reinforcements and structural supporting members, such as in bridges and dams.

  6. Comparison of piezoresistive and capacitive ultrasonic transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, John J.; Greve, David W.; Oppenheim, Irving J.

    2004-07-01

    MEMS ultrasonic transducers for flaw detection have heretofore been built as capacitive diaphragm-type devices. A diaphragm forms a moveable electrode, placed at a short gap from a stationary electrode, and diaphragm movement has been detected by capacitance change. Although several research teams have successfully demonstrated that technology, the detection of capacitance change is adversely affected by stray and parasitic capacitances, limiting the sensitivity of such transducers and typically requiring relatively large diaphragm areas. We describe the design and fabrication of what to our knowledge is the first CMOS-MEMS ultrasonic phased array transducer using piezoresistive strain sensing. Piezoresistors have been patterned within the diaphragms, and diaphragm movement creates bending strain which is detected by a bridge circuit, for which conductor losses will be less significant. The prospective advantage of such piezoresistive transducers is that sufficient sensitivity may be achieved with very small diaphragms. We compare transducer response under fluid-coupled ultrasonic excitation and report the experimental gauge factor for the piezoresistors. We also discuss the phased array performance of the transducer in sensing the direction of an incoming wave.

  7. Optically transduced MEMS gyro device

    DOEpatents

    Nielson, Gregory N; Bogart, Gregory R; Langlois, Eric; Okandan, Murat

    2014-05-20

    A bulk micromachined vibratory gyro in which a proof mass has a bulk substrate thickness for a large mass and high inertial sensitivity. In embodiments, optical displacement transduction is with multi-layer sub-wavelength gratings for high sensitivity and low cross-talk with non-optical drive elements. In embodiments, the vibratory gyro includes a plurality of multi-layer sub-wavelength gratings and a plurality of drive electrodes to measure motion of the proof mass induced by drive forces and/or moments and induced by the Coriolis Effect when the gyro experiences a rotation. In embodiments, phase is varied across the plurality gratings and a multi-layer grating having the best performance is selected from the plurality.

  8. 21 CFR 870.2860 - Heart sound transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Heart sound transducer. 870.2860 Section 870.2860...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2860 Heart sound transducer. (a) Identification. A heart sound transducer is an external transducer that exhibits a change...

  9. 21 CFR 870.2860 - Heart sound transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Heart sound transducer. 870.2860 Section 870.2860...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2860 Heart sound transducer. (a) Identification. A heart sound transducer is an external transducer that exhibits a change...

  10. 21 CFR 870.2860 - Heart sound transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Heart sound transducer. 870.2860 Section 870.2860...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2860 Heart sound transducer. (a) Identification. A heart sound transducer is an external transducer that exhibits a change...

  11. 21 CFR 870.2860 - Heart sound transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Heart sound transducer. 870.2860 Section 870.2860...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2860 Heart sound transducer. (a) Identification. A heart sound transducer is an external transducer that exhibits a change...

  12. 21 CFR 870.2860 - Heart sound transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Heart sound transducer. 870.2860 Section 870.2860...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2860 Heart sound transducer. (a) Identification. A heart sound transducer is an external transducer that exhibits a change...

  13. 21 CFR 870.2890 - Vessel occlusion transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., sound, and ultrasonic transducers. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards). ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Vessel occlusion transducer. 870.2890 Section 870... transducer. (a) Identification. A vessel occlusion transducer is a device used to provide an...

  14. 21 CFR 870.2890 - Vessel occlusion transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., sound, and ultrasonic transducers. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards). ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vessel occlusion transducer. 870.2890 Section 870... transducer. (a) Identification. A vessel occlusion transducer is a device used to provide an...

  15. Floating point arithmetic in future supercomputers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, David H.; Barton, John T.; Simon, Horst D.; Fouts, Martin J.

    1989-01-01

    Considerations in the floating-point design of a supercomputer are discussed. Particular attention is given to word size, hardware support for extended precision, format, and accuracy characteristics. These issues are discussed from the perspective of the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Systems Division at NASA Ames. The features believed to be most important for a future supercomputer floating-point design include: (1) a 64-bit IEEE floating-point format with 11 exponent bits, 52 mantissa bits, and one sign bit and (2) hardware support for reasonably fast double-precision arithmetic.

  16. New CFOA-based floating immittance emulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taher Abuelma'atti, Muhammad; Dhar, Sagar Kumar

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents four new topologies for emulating floating immittance functions. Each circuit uses two or three current-feedback operational-amplifiers (CFOAs) and three passive elements. The proposed topologies can emulate positive/negative lossless and lossy floating inductances, and positive/negative capacitance, resistance and inductance multipliers in addition to floating frequency-dependent positive and negative resistances. The functionality of the proposed circuits is verified using the Advanced Design System software and the AD844 CFOA. The simulation results are in excellent agreement with the theoretical calculations.

  17. Used float shoe recovered and tested

    SciTech Connect

    Colvard, R.L.

    1986-02-01

    A cement float valve has been recovered after it was circulated through and cemented downhole. It was retrieved by coring as part of an investigation into a cementing failure. The float equipment was then analyzed for downhole performance. This is believed to be the first instance of intact recovery of full-scale cementing hardware after it has been cemented in place. In this instance, the valve performed as designed. Flash set proved to be the probable cause of job failure. This article documents the job and includes photographs of the used float shoe and its components.

  18. Program Converts VAX Floating-Point Data To UNIX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alves, Marcos; Chapman, Bruce; Chu, Eugene

    1996-01-01

    VAX Floating Point to Host Floating Point Conversion (VAXFC) software converts non-ASCII files to unformatted floating-point representation of UNIX machine. This is done by reading bytes bit by bit, converting them to floating-point numbers, then writing results to another file. Useful when data files created by VAX computer must be used on other machines. Written in C language.

  19. 33 CFR 144.01-1 - Life floats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Life floats. 144.01-1 Section 144... CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES LIFESAVING APPLIANCES Manned Platforms § 144.01-1 Life floats. Each manned platform shall be provided with at least two approved life floats. The life floats shall have...

  20. 33 CFR 144.01-1 - Life floats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Life floats. 144.01-1 Section 144... CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES LIFESAVING APPLIANCES Manned Platforms § 144.01-1 Life floats. Each manned platform shall be provided with at least two approved life floats. The life floats shall have...

  1. 33 CFR 144.01-1 - Life floats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Life floats. 144.01-1 Section 144... CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES LIFESAVING APPLIANCES Manned Platforms § 144.01-1 Life floats. Each manned platform shall be provided with at least two approved life floats. The life floats shall have...

  2. 33 CFR 144.01-1 - Life floats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Life floats. 144.01-1 Section 144... CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES LIFESAVING APPLIANCES Manned Platforms § 144.01-1 Life floats. Each manned platform shall be provided with at least two approved life floats. The life floats shall have...

  3. 14 CFR 23.753 - Main float design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Main float design. 23.753 Section 23.753... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Floats and Hulls § 23.753 Main float design. Each seaplane main float must meet the requirements of § 23.521....

  4. 14 CFR 27.751 - Main float buoyancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Main float buoyancy. 27.751 Section 27.751... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Floats and Hulls § 27.751 Main float buoyancy. (a) For main floats, the buoyancy necessary to support the maximum weight of the rotorcraft in...

  5. 14 CFR 27.751 - Main float buoyancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Main float buoyancy. 27.751 Section 27.751... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Floats and Hulls § 27.751 Main float buoyancy. (a) For main floats, the buoyancy necessary to support the maximum weight of the rotorcraft in...

  6. 14 CFR 27.751 - Main float buoyancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Main float buoyancy. 27.751 Section 27.751... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Floats and Hulls § 27.751 Main float buoyancy. (a) For main floats, the buoyancy necessary to support the maximum weight of the rotorcraft in...

  7. 14 CFR 27.751 - Main float buoyancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Main float buoyancy. 27.751 Section 27.751... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Floats and Hulls § 27.751 Main float buoyancy. (a) For main floats, the buoyancy necessary to support the maximum weight of the rotorcraft in...

  8. 14 CFR 27.751 - Main float buoyancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Main float buoyancy. 27.751 Section 27.751... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Floats and Hulls § 27.751 Main float buoyancy. (a) For main floats, the buoyancy necessary to support the maximum weight of the rotorcraft in...

  9. 14 CFR 23.753 - Main float design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Main float design. 23.753 Section 23.753... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Floats and Hulls § 23.753 Main float design. Each seaplane main float must meet the requirements of § 23.521....

  10. Floating-gated memory based on carbon nanotube field-effect transistors with Si floating dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seike, Kohei; Fujii, Yusuke; Ohno, Yasuhide; Maehashi, Kenzo; Inoue, Koichi; Matsumoto, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    We have fabricated a carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CNTFET)-based nonvolatile memory device with Si floating dots. The electrical characteristics of this memory device were compared with those of devices with a HfO2 charge storage layer or Au floating dots. For a sweep width of 6 V, the memory window of the devices with the Si floating dots increased twofold as compared with that of the devices with the HfO2 layer. Moreover, the retention characteristics revealed that, for the device with the Au floating dots, the off-state had almost the same current as the on-state at the 400th s. However, the devices with the Si floating dots had longer-retention characteristics. The results indicate that CNTFET-based devices with Si floating dots are promising candidates for low-power consumption nonvolatile memory devices.

  11. Tests find hammering, fluid cutting, erosion cause float shoe failures

    SciTech Connect

    Stringfellow, B.

    1985-01-21

    The results of a systematic test program to evaluate float equipment performance are presented. The testing has destroyed, over an eightmonth period, 160 float valves, float shoes and float collars. A new float valve design with greater resistance to failure has been developed as a result of the testing. New float collars and float shoes are expected to provide the operator with a failure rate of less than 1 1/2% when used within design limits and under normal cementing conditions. Further testing objectives include: extension of operating temperature limits to include deep well and geothermal conditions, and evaluation of the effects of more abrasive mud and cement systems.

  12. Studying a new shape for mechanical impedance matchers in Mario Schenberg transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frajuca, Carlos; da Silva Bortoli, Fabio; Simao Magalhaes, Nadja

    2006-03-01

    ``Mario Schenberg'' is a spherical resonant-mass gravitational wave (GW) detector that is expected to be part of a GW detection array of two detectors. Another one is been built in The Netherlands. Their resonant frequencies will be around 3 kHz with a bandwidth of about 200 Hz. This range of frequencies is new in a field where the typical frequencies lay below 1 kHz, making the transducer development much more complex. Some studies indicated that the use of low mass mechanical resonators (used for impedance matching to the parametric transducer, in a cold damping regime) allows the detector to reach the standard quantum limit. In this work we describe the study of a new shape for the impedance matching resonator used to obtain a better coupling between the sphere and the transducers and a better use of the space inside the experimental chamber.

  13. Some Strip Contributions to Transducer Design and Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-04-28

    19951116 110 14. SUBJECT TERMS Sonar transducers , Tonpilz transducers , ku-mode transducers , 15. NUMBER OF PAGES Piezoelectric ceramic, Ceramic stack...PRACTICAL ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE SGM ANALYSIS ................. 149 B.1 THE IN-WATER SGM RESULTS OF THE STR-330A TONPILZ TRANSDUCER M O D E L...150 B.2 THE IN-WATER SGM RESULTS OF THE STR-330A TONPILZ TRANSDUCER MODEL: VARIABLE mH, FIXED mTAND com

  14. Vibration control via stiffness switching of magnetostrictive transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheidler, Justin J.; Asnani, Vivake M.; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a computational study is presented of structural vibration control that is realized by switching a magneto-strictive transducer between high and low stiffness states. Switching is accomplished by either changing the applied magnetic field with a voltage excitation or changing the shunt impedance on the transducer's coil (i.e., the magneto-strictive material's magnetic boundary condition). Switched-stiffness vibration control is simulated using a lumped mass supported by a damper and the magneto-strictive transducer (mount), which is represented by a nonlinear, electromechanical model. Free vibration of the mass is calculated while varying the mount's stiffness according to a reference switched-stiffness vibration control law. The results reveal that switching the magnetic field produces the desired change in stiffness, but also an undesired actuation force that can significantly degrade the vibration control. Hence, a modified switched-stiffness control law that accounts for the actuation force is proposed and implemented for voltage-controlled stiffness switching. The influence of the magneto-mechanical bias condition is also discussed. Voltage-controlled stiffness switching is found to introduce damping equivalent to a viscous damping factor up to about 0.13; this is shown to primarily result from active vibration reduction caused by the actuation force. The merit of magneto-strictive switched-stiffness vibration control is then quantified by comparing the results of voltage- and shunt-controlled stiffness switching to the performance of optimal magneto-strictive shunt damping. For the cases considered, optimal resistive shunt damping performed considerably better than both voltage- and shunt-controlled stiffness switching.

  15. Vibration Control via Stiffness Switching of Magnetostrictive Transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheidler, Justin J.; Asnani, Vivake M.; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a computational study is presented of structural vibration control that is realized by switching a magnetostrictive transducer between high and low stiffness states. Switching is accomplished by either changing the applied magnetic field with a voltage excitation or changing the shunt impedance on the transducer's coil (i.e., the magnetostrictive material's magnetic boundary condition). Switched-stiffness vibration control is simulated using a lumped mass supported by a damper and the magnetostrictive transducer (mount), which is represented by a nonlinear, electromechanical model. Free vibration of the mass is calculated while varying the mount's stiffness according to a reference switched-stiffness vibration control law. The results reveal that switching the magnetic field produces the desired change in stiffness, but also an undesired actuation force that can significantly degrade the vibration control. Hence, a modified switched-stiffness control law that accounts for the actuation force is proposed and implemented for voltage-controlled stiffness switching. The influence of the magneto-mechanical bias condition is also discussed. Voltage-controlled stiffness switching is found to introduce damping equivalent to a viscous damping factor up to about 0.13; this is shown to primarily result from active vibration reduction caused by the actuation force. The merit of magnetostrictive switched-stiffness vibration control is then quantified by comparing the results of voltage- and shunt-controlled stiffness switching to the performance of optimal magnetostrictive shunt damping. For the cases considered, optimal resistive shunt damping performed considerably better than both voltage- and shunt-controlled stiffness switching.

  16. Verification of floating-point software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Doug N.

    1990-01-01

    Floating point computation presents a number of problems for formal verification. Should one treat the actual details of floating point operations, or accept them as imprecisely defined, or should one ignore round-off error altogether and behave as if floating point operations are perfectly accurate. There is the further problem that a numerical algorithm usually only approximately computes some mathematical function, and we often do not know just how good the approximation is, even in the absence of round-off error. ORA has developed a theory of asymptotic correctness which allows one to verify floating point software with a minimum entanglement in these problems. This theory and its implementation in the Ariel C verification system are described. The theory is illustrated using a simple program which finds a zero of a given function by bisection. This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  17. Exploring Floating Concrete and Beam Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snell, Billie G.; Snell, Luke M.

    2002-01-01

    Presents two construction activities that address both state and federal science standards and encourage students to consider career options in mathematics and science. Includes floating concrete and paper bridge activities. (YDS)

  18. Floating patterns of metered dose inhalers.

    PubMed

    Wolf, B L; Cochran, K R

    1997-01-01

    As long as metered dose inhalers have existed, patients have sought a reliable method to determine if a given canister was still potent. Concerning beta agonists, the answer to this question may be lifesaving. Issues of compliance have made dating canisters or counting doses impractical. Likewise, previous claims of floating characteristics are unreliable. In tap water, we float-tested 13 commonly used inhalers three times each, observing variations as they were incrementally actuated, emptying their contents. One essential pattern was observed. Almost all prescription-size canisters sink when full; all float by the time one-third of their contents is gone. Orientation of prescription-size canisters changes in a distinct pattern especially near 90% depletion. Sample-size canisters showed some variance. Results suggest that the pharmaceutical industry should include individual floating characteristics as part of the package insert as they provide a reproducible means of gauging contents.

  19. Thumb polydactyly with a floating ulnar thumb.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Kenjiro; Namba, Yuzaburo; Kimata, Yoshihiro

    2013-01-01

    Thumb polydactyly is reported to be the most common congenital anomaly of the hand in Japan. The floating type is not particularly rare, accounting for 0.9 to 15% of all cases of thumb polydactyly. However, to the best of our knowledge, there has been only one case of thumb polydactyly with a floating ulnar thumb, reported by Onizuka. Herein, we report a case very similar to that reported by Onizuka. In our case, the vessels feeding the floating ulnar thumb branched from the superficial palmar arterial arch, and X-rays revealed triphalangism. In surgery, we not only reconstructed the morphology of the thumb, but also tried to preserve the sensation in the reconstructed thumb by transposing the digital nerve of the floating ulnar thumb to the radial thumb. In addition to thumb polydactyly, our case also showed hypoplasia of the thenar muscles.

  20. Preview of Mars Curiosity Parade Float

    NASA Video Gallery

    Jim Green, Director of the Science Mission Directorate Planetary Systems Division at NASA Headquarters, describes the replica of the Mars Curiosity Rover on the second NASA float in Monday's inaugu...

  1. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic droplet followed by high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for the determination of triclosan and 2,4-dichlorophenol in water samples.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Cao; Zhao, Jing; Bao, Peng; Gao, Jin; He, Jin

    2011-06-24

    A novel, simple and efficient dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic droplet (DLLME-SFO) technique coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection (HPLC-UV) and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was developed for the determination of triclosan and its degradation product 2,4-dichlorophenol in real water samples. The extraction solvent used in this work is of low density, low volatility, low toxicity and proper melting point around room temperature. The extractant droplets can be collected easily by solidifying it at a lower temperature. Parameters that affect the extraction efficiency, including type and volume of extraction solvent and dispersive solvent, salt effect, pH and extraction time, were investigated and optimized in a 5 mL sample system by HPLC-UV. Under the optimum conditions (extraction solvent: 12 μL of 1-dodecanol; dispersive solvent: 300 of μL acetonitrile; sample pH: 6.0; extraction time: 1 min), the limits of detection (LODs) of the pretreatment method combined with LC-MS/MS were in the range of 0.002-0.02 μg L(-1) which are lower than or comparable with other reported approaches applied to the determination of the same compounds. Wide linearities, good precisions and satisfactory relative recoveries were also obtained. The proposed technique was successfully applied to determine triclosan and 2,4-dichlorophenol in real water samples.

  2. Amorphous force transducers in ac applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meydan, T.; Overshott, K. J.

    1982-11-01

    The high stress sensitivity and high yield stress properties of amorphous ribbon materials make them suitable for magnetic sensors and tranducer applications. Recently the authors have shown that ac systems eliminate the offset voltage and drift problems of the previously published dc systems. Further investigations proved that these transducers could be operated with a linear characteristic up to 1000 g in multiwrap toroidal configurations. The cause of the transducing behavior of the materials was proved to be variation of permeability with stress. It was previously suggested that the optimum operating frequency of the ac transducers is dependent on the physical configuration of the core. Further investigations have shown that the optimum operating frequency is linearly dependent on the amplitude of the input signal to the transducer. Double-core systems have been previously described in the literature where one core acts as a dummy core and the force is applied to the active core. The disadvantage of the double-core system is that aging of the active core changes the performance of the transducer by as much as 10%. A new system will be presented which uses an accurate analog memory to reduce the ageing effect to a fraction of one percent.

  3. High temperature, high power piezoelectric composite transducers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeong Jae; Zhang, Shujun; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart

    2014-08-08

    Piezoelectric composites are a class of functional materials consisting of piezoelectric active materials and non-piezoelectric passive polymers, mechanically attached together to form different connectivities. These composites have several advantages compared to conventional piezoelectric ceramics and polymers, including improved electromechanical properties, mechanical flexibility and the ability to tailor properties by using several different connectivity patterns. These advantages have led to the improvement of overall transducer performance, such as transducer sensitivity and bandwidth, resulting in rapid implementation of piezoelectric composites in medical imaging ultrasounds and other acoustic transducers. Recently, new piezoelectric composite transducers have been developed with optimized composite components that have improved thermal stability and mechanical quality factors, making them promising candidates for high temperature, high power transducer applications, such as therapeutic ultrasound, high power ultrasonic wirebonding, high temperature non-destructive testing, and downhole energy harvesting. This paper will present recent developments of piezoelectric composite technology for high temperature and high power applications. The concerns and limitations of using piezoelectric composites will also be discussed, and the expected future research directions will be outlined.

  4. High Temperature, High Power Piezoelectric Composite Transducers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeong Jae; Zhang, Shujun; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, StewarT.

    2014-01-01

    Piezoelectric composites are a class of functional materials consisting of piezoelectric active materials and non-piezoelectric passive polymers, mechanically attached together to form different connectivities. These composites have several advantages compared to conventional piezoelectric ceramics and polymers, including improved electromechanical properties, mechanical flexibility and the ability to tailor properties by using several different connectivity patterns. These advantages have led to the improvement of overall transducer performance, such as transducer sensitivity and bandwidth, resulting in rapid implementation of piezoelectric composites in medical imaging ultrasounds and other acoustic transducers. Recently, new piezoelectric composite transducers have been developed with optimized composite components that have improved thermal stability and mechanical quality factors, making them promising candidates for high temperature, high power transducer applications, such as therapeutic ultrasound, high power ultrasonic wirebonding, high temperature non-destructive testing, and downhole energy harvesting. This paper will present recent developments of piezoelectric composite technology for high temperature and high power applications. The concerns and limitations of using piezoelectric composites will also be discussed, and the expected future research directions will be outlined. PMID:25111242

  5. Genetic Algorithms, Floating Point Numbers and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Yorick; Steeb, Willi-Hans; Stoop, Ruedi

    The core in most genetic algorithms is the bitwise manipulations of bit strings. We show that one can directly manipulate the bits in floating point numbers. This means the main bitwise operations in genetic algorithm mutations and crossings are directly done inside the floating point number. Thus the interval under consideration does not need to be known in advance. For applications, we consider the roots of polynomials and finding solutions of linear equations.

  6. Archimedes' floating bodies on a spherical Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rorres, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Archimedes was the first to systematically find the centers of gravity of various solid bodies and to apply this concept in determining stable configurations of floating bodies. In this paper, we discuss an error in a proof developed by Archimedes that involves determining whether a uniform, spherical cap will float stably with its base horizontal in a liquid on a spherical Earth. We present a simpler, corrected proof and discuss aspects of his proof regarding a spherical cap that is not uniform.

  7. Multiple valued floating potentials of Langmuir probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nam, Cheol-Hee; Hershkowitz, N.; Cho, M. H.; Intrator, T.; Diebold, D.

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that Langmuir probes can have three different floating potentials in plasmas produced by a hot filament discharge in a multi-dipole device when the primary and secondary electron currents are comparable. The measured floating potential depends on the probe's initial condition - the most negative and the least negative potentials are found to be stable and the in-between value is found to be unstable. Results are compared to a simple theoretical model.

  8. Floating assembly of diatom Coscinodiscus sp. microshells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Pan, Junfeng; Cai, Jun; Zhang, Deyuan

    2012-03-30

    Diatoms have silica frustules with transparent and delicate micro/nano scale structures, two dimensional pore arrays, and large surface areas. Although, the diatom cells of Coscinodiscus sp. live underwater, we found that their valves can float on water and assemble together. Experiments show that the convex shape and the 40 nm sieve pores of the valves allow them to float on water, and that the buoyancy and the micro-range attractive forces cause the valves to assemble together at the highest point of water. As measured by AFM calibrated glass needles fixed in manipulator, the buoyancy force on a single floating valve may reach up to 10 μN in water. Turning the valves over, enlarging the sieve pores, reducing the surface tension of water, or vacuum pumping may cause the floating valves to sink. After the water has evaporated, the floating valves remained in their assembled state and formed a monolayer film. The bonded diatom monolayer may be valuable in studies on diatom based optical devices, biosensors, solar cells, and batteries, to better use the optical and adsorption properties of frustules. The floating assembly phenomenon can also be used as a self-assembly method for fabricating monolayer of circular plates.

  9. Acoustooptic pulse-echo transducer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claus, R. O.; Wade, J. C.

    1983-01-01

    A pulse-echo transducer system which uses an ultrasonic generating element and an optical detection technique is described. The transmitting transducer consists of a concentric ring electrode pattern deposited on a circular, X-cut quartz substrate with a circular hole in the center. The rings are independently pulsed with a sequence high voltage signals phased in such a way that the ultrasonic waves generated by the separate rings superimpose to produce a composite field which is focused at a controllable distance below the surface of the specimen. The amplitude of the field reflected from this focus position is determined by the local reflection coefficient of the medium at the effective focal point. By processing the signals received for a range of ultrasonic transducer array focal lengths, the system can be used to locate and size anomalies within solids and liquids. Applications in both nondestructive evaluation and biomedical scanning are suggested.

  10. Torque transducer based on fiber Bragg grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tao; Jiang, Shu; Li, Jiang; Lin, Jiejun; Qi, Hongli

    2016-11-01

    In order to obtain the accurate torque measurements in harsh condition, such as marine environment, a torque transducer based on fiber Bragg grating is proposed in this paper. According to its optimized elastomer design and fiber Bragg grati ng patching tactics, the new proposed torque transducer realizes automatic compensations of temperature and bending moment which avoids influences from environment. The accuracy and stability of the torquetransducer, as well as its under water performance are tested by loading tests both in air and in underwater environment, which indicate the designed tor que transducer is not only able to realize highaccurate and robust measurements, but also can be applied in torque sensing in harsh environment. We believe the proposed design detailed illustrated in this paper provides important reference for studies and applications on torque measurements in marine environment.

  11. An improved calibration method for the drift of the conductivity sensor on autonomous CTD profiling floats by θ- S climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, W. Brechner; Wong, Annie P. S.

    2009-03-01

    An improved method to estimate the time-varying drift of measured conductivity from autonomous CTD profiling floats has been developed. This procedure extends previous methods developed by Wong, Johnson and Owens [2003. Delayed-mode calibration of autonomous CTD profiling float salinity data by θ- S climatology. Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology, 20, 308-318] and Böhme and Send [2005. Objective analyses of hydrographic data for referencing profiling float salinities in highly variable environments. Deep-Sea Research Part II, 52, 651-664]. It uses climatological salinity interpolated to the float positions and observed θ surfaces and chooses 10 'best' levels that are within well-mixed mode waters or deep homogeneous water masses. A piece-wise linear fit is used to estimate the temporally varying multiplicative adjustment to the float potential conductivities. An objective, statistical method is used to choose the breakpoints in the float time series where there are multiple drift trends. In the previous methods these breakpoints were chosen subjectively by manually splitting the time series into separate segments over which the fits were made. Our statistical procedure reduces the subjectivity by providing an automated way for doing the piece-wise linear fit. Uncertainties in this predicted adjustment are estimated using a Monte-Carlo simulation. Examples of this new procedure as applied to two Argo floats are presented.

  12. A novel high pressure, high temperature vessel used to conduct long-term stability measurements of silicon MEMS pressure transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisniewiski, David

    2014-03-01

    The need to quantify and to improve long-term stability of pressure transducers is a persistent requirement from the aerospace sector. Specifically, the incorporation of real-time pressure monitoring in aircraft landing gear, as exemplified in Tire Pressure Monitoring Systems (TPMS), has placed greater demand on the pressure transducer for improved performance and increased reliability which is manifested in low lifecycle cost and minimal maintenance downtime through fuel savings and increased life of the tire. Piezoresistive (PR) silicon MEMS pressure transducers are the primary choice as a transduction method for this measurement owing to their ability to be designed for the harsh environment seen in aircraft landing gear. However, these pressure transducers are only as valuable as the long-term stability they possess to ensure reliable, real-time monitoring over tens of years. The "heart" of the pressure transducer is the silicon MEMS element, and it is at this basic level where the long-term stability is established and needs to be quantified. A novel High Pressure, High Temperature (HPHT) vessel has been designed and constructed to facilitate this critical measurement of the silicon MEMS element directly through a process of mechanically "floating" the silicon MEMS element while being subjected to the extreme environments of pressure and temperature, simultaneously. Furthermore, the HPHT vessel is scalable to permit up to fifty specimens to be tested at one time to provide a statistically significant data population on which to draw reasonable conclusions on long-term stability. With the knowledge gained on the silicon MEMS element, higher level assembly to the pressure transducer envelope package can also be quantified as to the build-effects contribution to long-term stability in the same HPHT vessel due to its accommodating size. Accordingly, a HPHT vessel offering multiple levels of configurability and robustness in data measurement is presented, along

  13. Stability and chaotification of vibration isolation floating raft systems with time-delayed feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y. L.; Xu, D. L.; Fu, Y. M.; Zhou, J. X.

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents a systematic study on the stability of a two-dimensional vibration isolation floating raft system with a time-delayed feedback control. Based on the generalized Sturm criterion, the critical control gain for the delay-independent stability region and critical time delays for the stability switches are derived. The critical conditions can provide a theoretical guidance of chaotification design for line spectra reduction. Numerical simulations verify the correctness of the approach. Bifurcation analyses reveal that chaotification is more likely to occur in unstable region defined by these critical conditions, and the stiffness of the floating raft and mass ratio are the sensitive parameters to reduce critical control gain.

  14. Protein family classification using sparse Markov transducers.

    PubMed

    Eskin, E; Grundy, W N; Singer, Y

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we present a method for classifying proteins into families using sparse Markov transducers (SMTs). Sparse Markov transducers, similar to probabilistic suffix trees, estimate a probability distribution conditioned on an input sequence. SMTs generalize probabilistic suffix trees by allowing for wild-cards in the conditioning sequences. Because substitutions of amino acids are common in protein families, incorporating wildcards into the model significantly improves classification performance. We present two models for building protein family classifiers using SMTs. We also present efficient data structures to improve the memory usage of the models. We evaluate SMTs by building protein family classifiers using the Pfam database and compare our results to previously published results.

  15. Sonar Transducer Reliability Improvement Program FY 80

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-01

    Polyphenylene Sulfide 15,320 23,000 Nylon 6/10 14,070 26,000 High-Strength Nylon (ZYTEL) 11,270 24,000 Amorphous Nylon 14,139 25,000 PBT Polyester...transducer receiving sensitivity Goal -- less than ±1 dB variation from the specified value over operational frequency band . Threshold - less than ±2 dB...variation from the specified value over operational feequency band . rhe Sonar Transducer Reliability Impruvemen: Program (STRIP) is a part of Program

  16. Pressure transducer and system for cryogenic environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A silicon pressure die is bonded to a borosilicate substrate above the pneumatic port. A Wheatstone bridge circuit is formed on the silicon pressure die and has bridge elements of silicon doped with boron to a deposit density level of approximately 1 x 10(exp 19)-10(exp 21) boron/cc. A current source is provided to excite the Wheatstone bridge circuit. In addition, a temperature sensor is provided to provide temperature readings. An array may be formed of the resulting pressure transducers. This unique solution of materials permits operation of a pressure transducer in cryogenic environments.

  17. Ultrasonic transducer with laminated coupling wedge

    DOEpatents

    Karplus, Henry H. B.

    1976-08-03

    An ultrasonic transducer capable of use in a high-temperature environment incorporates a laminated metal coupling wedge including a reflecting edge shaped as a double sloping roof and a transducer crystal backed by a laminated metal sound absorber disposed so as to direct sound waves through the coupling wedge and into a work piece, reflections from the interface between the coupling wedge and the work piece passing to the reflecting edge. Preferably the angle of inclination of the two halves of the reflecting edge are different.

  18. Mechano-electric optoisolator transducer with hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciuruş, I. M.; Dimian, M.; Graur, A.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a theoretical and experimental study of designing a mechano-electric optoisolator transducer with hysteresis. Our research is centred upon designing transducers on the basis of optical sensors, as photoelectric conversions eliminate the influence of electromagnetic disturbances. Conversion of the rotation/translation motions into electric signals is performed with the help of a LED-photoresistor Polaroid optocoupler. The driver of the optocoupler's transmitter module is an independent current source. The signal conditioning circuit is a Schmitt trigger circuit. The device is designed to be applied in the field of automation and mechatronics.

  19. The Calibrations of Space Shuttle Main Engines High Pressure Transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steward, Christopher S.

    1995-01-01

    Previously, high pressure transducers that were used on the Space Shuttles Main Engine (SSME) exhibited a severe drift after being tested on the SSME. The Experimental Testing Technology Division (ETTD) designed some new transducers that would not exhibit a severe drift over a short period of time. These transducers were calibrated at the Test Bed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). After the high pressure transducers were calibrated, the transducers were placed on the SSME and fired. The transducers were then sent to the NASA LaRC to be recalibrated. The main objectives of the recalibrations was to make sure that the transducers possessed the same qualities as they did before they were fired on the SSME. Other objectives of the project were to determine the stability of the transducers and to determine whether the transducers exhibited a severe drift.

  20. Consideration of Design Parameters of Ultrasonic Transducer for Fruit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K. B.; Kim, M. S.; Lee, S. D.; Choi, M. Y.

    2005-04-01

    This study was conducted to develop the ultrasonic transducers for non-destructive contact measurement of fruits. The design parameters for ultrasonic transducer such as acoustical impedance of fruits, kinds of piezoelectric materials, ultrasonic wave frequency, and transducer diameter were investigated. In order to match the impedance between piezoelectric material and fruit, various materials were evaluated. And to control the bandwidth of ultrasonic wave of the transducer, various backing materials were fabricated and evaluated. Especially, the wear plate of the transducer was designed and fabricated considering curvature of fruit. Finally, the ultrasonic transducer having 100 kHz of central frequency were fabricated and tested.

  1. Applications of the Method for Transducer Transient Suppression to Various Transducer Types

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-01

    previously. These types are (i) flexural disk, (ii) Helmholtz resonator, (iii) moving coil, (iv) inductor-tuned Tonpilz , and (v)a dual transducer array of...previously. These types are (i) flexural disk. (ii) Helmholtz resonator, (iii) moving coil, (iv) inductor-tuned Tonpilz , and (v) a dual transducer array of...cycle case, we findV(O -- t-- +i, R (t;>r. even number of half-cycles), (3) FIG. 2. Equivalent circuit for an inductor-tuned Tonpilz transducer . The

  2. RANS Simulation of the Heave Response of a Two-Body Floating Point Wave Absorber: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Y.; Li, Y.

    2011-03-01

    A preliminary study on a two-body floating wave absorbers is presented in this paper. A Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes computational method is applied for analyzing the hydrodynamic heave response of the absorber in operational wave conditions. The two-body floating wave absorber contains a float section and a submerged reaction section. For validation purposes, our model is first assumed to be locked. The two sections are forced to move together with each other. The locked single body model is used in a heave decay test, where the RANS result is validated with the experimental measurement. For the two-body floating point absorber simulation, the two sections are connected through a mass-spring-damper system, which is applied to simulate the power take-off mechanism under design wave conditions. Overall, the details of the flow around the absorber and its nonlinear interaction with waves are investigated, and the power absorption efficiency of the two-body floating wave absorber in waves with a constant value spring-damper system is examined.

  3. Airship-floated wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, W. K.

    1985-01-01

    A wind turbine, by use of a tethered airship for support, may be designed for the economical recovery of power at heights of 2,000 feet or more above ground, at which height power density in the wind is typically three times the power density available to a conventionally supported wind turbine. Means can be added to such an airship-floated wind turbine which will permit its generators to be used to meet load demand even during periods of little or no wind. Described to this end is a wind turbine system which combines, among other novel features: a novel tether line system which provides access for men and materials to the supporting airship while in active service, a novel system for providing additional buoyant lift at the nose of the turbine-supporting airship to offset the vertical component of tension induced in the tether line by the downwind force exerted by the turbine blades, a novel bearing assembly at the nose of the supporting airship which permits the airship to rotate as a unit with the turbine it supports without causing a similar rotation of the tether line, a novel turbine airship structure which handles concentrated loads from the turbine efficiently and also permits the safe use of hydrogen for buoyancy, a novel ''space frame'' structure which supports the turbine blades and greatly reduces blade weight, a novel system for controlling turbine blade angle of incidence and for varying blade incidene in synchrony with blade angular position abut the turbine axis to provide greater control over airship movement, a novel system for locating propellor-driven generators out at the wind turbine perimeter and for using lightweight, high-RPM generators to produce electrical energy at a power line frequency, which greatly reduces the weight required to convert turbine blade torque into useful power, and a novel system for incorporating compressed air storage and combustion turbine components into the wind turbine's generator drive systems.

  4. Transducer Joint for Kidney-Stone Ultrasonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angulo, E. D.

    1983-01-01

    Ultrasonic therapy for kidney stones improved by new way of connecting wire-probe ultrasonic waveguide to transducer. Improved mounting allows joint to last long enough for effective treatment. Sheath and rubber dampers constrain lateral vibration of wire waveguide. Combination of V-shaped mounting groove, sheath, and rubber dampers increases life expectancy of wire 15 times or more.

  5. Broadband, High-Temperature Ultrasonic Transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, F. Raymond; Winfree, William P.; Barrows, Danny A.

    1995-01-01

    Materials chosen for endurance at high temperatures and acoustic coupling and damping. Acoustic transducer designed to exhibit broad frequency response and to survive temperatures close to melting points of brazing alloys. Attached directly and continuously to hot object monitored ultrasonically: for example, it can be attached to relatively cool spot on workpiece during brazing for taking ultrasonic quality-control measurements.

  6. Improved convergence of electromechanical transducer element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sattler, Robert; Wachutka, Gerhard

    2002-04-01

    Electrostatic attraction is a favored principle of actuation in MEMS (e.g. mirrors, relays, membrane devices). In this work we use an electrostatically actuated membrane as demonstrator. Physically based device models require the coupling of the electrostatic and the two domains. One way to reduce this expense consists in reduced order modeling by introducing a local approximation of the electric field using the Differential-Plate-Capacitor-Approximation (DPCA). This semi-analytical approximation can be directly (matrix coupled transducer element) or sequentially (load vector coupling) coupled with the mechanical solver. Both approaches yield results which agree well with those of coupled 3D-field solvers. It turns out that the transducer element converges much faster than the sequentially coupled relaxation scheme, as ong as the voltage is not close to the pull-in voltage. If this is the case then the transducer element has problems to find the equilibrium state at all. To avoid this difficulty we propose the use of a homotopy method to give the transducer element the same accuracy and robustness in the stable and the unstable regions of the operating area. The electrostatic charge and the electrostatic force turn out to be proper homotopy parameters for the given example.

  7. Non-bonded piezoelectric ultrasonic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Eoff, James M.

    1985-01-01

    A mechanically assembled non-bonded ultrasonic transducer includes a substrate, a piezoelectric film, a wetting agent, a thin metal electrode, and a lens held in intimate contact by a mechanical clamp. No epoxy or glue is used in the assembly of this device.

  8. Pressure compensated transducer system with constrained diaphragm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percy, Joseph L.

    1992-08-01

    An acoustic source apparatus has an acoustic transducer that is enclosed in a substantially rigid and watertight enclosure to resist the pressure of water on the transducer and to seal the transducer from the water. The enclosure has an opening through which acoustic signals pass and over which is placed a resilient, expandable and substantially water-impermeable diaphragm. A net stiffens and strengthens the diaphragm as well as constrains the diaphragm from overexpansion or from migrating due to buoyancy forces. Pressurized gas, regulated at slightly above ambient pressure, is supplied to the enclosure and the diaphragm to compensate for underwater ambient pressures. Gas pressure regulated at above ambient pressure is used to selectively tune the pressure levels within the enclosure and diaphragm so that diaphragm resonance can be achieved. Controls are used to selectively fill, as well as vent the enclosure and diaphragm during system descent and ascent, respectively. A signal link is used to activate these controls and to provide the driving force for the acoustic transducer.

  9. Myocardium wall thickness transducer and measuring method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldstein, C.; Lewis, G. W.; Silver, R. H.; Culler, V. H. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A miniature transducer for measuring changes of thickness of the myocardium is described. The device is easily implantable without traumatizing the subject, without affecting the normal muscle behavior, and is removable and implantable at a different muscle location. Operating features of the device are described.

  10. Unified Technical Concepts. Module 10: Transducers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Education Research Center, Waco, TX.

    This concept module on transducers is one of thirteen modules that provide a flexible, laboratory-based physics instructional package designed to meet the specialized needs of students in two-year, postsecondary technical schools. Each of the thirteen concept modules discusses a single physics concept and how it is applied to each energy system.…

  11. Electropneumatic transducer automatically limits motor current

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovitt, T. F.

    1966-01-01

    Pneumatic controller regulates the load on a centrifugal freon compressor in a water cooling system, thus limiting the current input to an electric motor driving it. An electromechanical transducer monitoring the motor input current sends out air signals which indicate changes in the current to the pneumatic controller.

  12. Instrument For Simulation Of Piezoelectric Transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnichol, Randal S.

    1996-01-01

    Electronic instrument designed to simulate dynamic output of integrated-circuit piezoelectric acceleration or pressure transducer. Operates in conjunction with external signal-conditioning circuit, generating square-wave signal of known amplitude for use in calibrating signal-conditioning circuit. Instrument also useful as special-purpose square-wave generator in other applications.

  13. Piezoelectric and electrostrictive materials for transducer applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, L. E.; Newnham, R. E.; Barsch, G. R.; Biggers, J. V.

    1985-05-01

    This report covers work accomplished on the second year of contract No. N00014-82-K0339 for the study of Piezoelectric and Electrostrictive Materials for Transducer Applications. The work accomplished covers a rather wide range of topics and for convenience, it is divided into four major sub-topics: (1) composite materials, (2) electrostriction, (3) conventional piezoelectrics, and (4) preparative studies.

  14. Thermoacoustic power conversion using a piezoelectric transducer.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Carl; Raspet, Richard

    2010-07-01

    The predicted efficiency of a simple thermoacoustic waste heat power conversion device has been investigated as part of a collaborative effort combining a thermoacoustic engine with a piezoelectric transducer. Symko et al. [Microelectron. J. 35, 185-191 (2004)] at the University of Utah built high frequency demonstration engines for this application, and Lynn [ASMDC report, accession number ADA491030 (2008)] at the University of Washington designed and built a high efficiency piezoelectric unimorph transducer for electroacoustic conversion. The design presented in this paper is put forward to investigate the potential of a simple high frequency, air filled, standing wave thermoacoustic device to be competitive with other small generator technologies such as thermoelectric devices. The thermoacoustic generator is simulated using a low-amplitude approximation for thermoacoustics and the acoustic impedance of the transducer is modeled using an equivalent circuit model calculated from the transducer's mechanical and electrical properties. The calculations demonstrate that a device performance of around 10% of Carnot efficiency could be expected from the design which is competitive with currently available thermoelectric generators.

  15. Floating seal system for rotary devices

    DOEpatents

    Banasiuk, Hubert A.

    1983-01-01

    This invention relates to a floating seal system for rotary devices to reduce gas leakage around the rotary device in a duct and across the face of the rotary device to an adjacent duct. The peripheral seal bodies are made of resilient material having a generally U-shaped cross section wherein one of the legs is secured to a support member and the other of the legs forms a contacting seal against the rotary device. The legs of the peripheral seal form an extended angle of intersection of about 10.degree. to about 30.degree. in the unloaded condition to provide even sealing forces around the periphery of the rotary device. The peripheral seal extends around the periphery of the support member except where intersected by radial seals which reduce gas leakage across the face of the rotary device and between adjacent duct portions. The radial seal assembly is fabricated from channel bars, the smaller channel bar being secured to the divider of the support member and a larger inverted rigid floating channel bar having its legs freely movable over the legs of the smaller channel bar forming therewith a tubular channel. A resilient flexible tube is positioned within the tubular channel for substantially its full length to reduce gas leakage across the tubular channel. A spacer extends beyond the face of the floating channel near each end of the floating channel a distance to provide desired clearance between the floating channel and the face of the rotary device.

  16. Battery charging in float vs. cycling environments

    SciTech Connect

    COREY,GARTH P.

    2000-04-20

    In lead-acid battery systems, cycling systems are often managed using float management strategies. There are many differences in battery management strategies for a float environment and battery management strategies for a cycling environment. To complicate matters further, in many cycling environments, such as off-grid domestic power systems, there is usually not an available charging source capable of efficiently equalizing a lead-acid battery let alone bring it to a full state of charge. Typically, rules for battery management which have worked quite well in a floating environment have been routinely applied to cycling batteries without full appreciation of what the cycling battery really needs to reach a full state of charge and to maintain a high state of health. For example, charge target voltages for batteries that are regularly deep cycled in off-grid power sources are the same as voltages applied to stand-by systems following a discharge event. In other charging operations equalization charge requirements are frequently ignored or incorrectly applied in cycled systems which frequently leads to premature capacity loss. The cause of this serious problem: the application of float battery management strategies to cycling battery systems. This paper describes the outcomes to be expected when managing cycling batteries with float strategies and discusses the techniques and benefits for the use of cycling battery management strategies.

  17. Floating seal system for rotary devices

    DOEpatents

    Banasiuk, H.A.

    1983-08-23

    This invention relates to a floating seal system for rotary devices to reduce gas leakage around the rotary device in a duct and across the face of the rotary device to an adjacent duct. The peripheral seal bodies are made of resilient material having a generally U-shaped cross section wherein one of the legs is secured to a support member and the other of the legs forms a contacting seal against the rotary device. The legs of the peripheral seal form an extended angle of intersection of about 10[degree] to about 30[degree] in the unloaded condition to provide even sealing forces around the periphery of the rotary device. The peripheral seal extends around the periphery of the support member except where intersected by radial seals which reduce gas leakage across the face of the rotary device and between adjacent duct portions. The radial seal assembly is fabricated from channel bars, the smaller channel bar being secured to the divider of the support member and a larger inverted rigid floating channel bar having its legs freely movable over the legs of the smaller channel bar forming therewith a tubular channel. A resilient flexible tube is positioned within the tubular channel for substantially its full length to reduce gas leakage across the tubular channel. A spacer extends beyond the face of the floating channel near each end of the floating channel a distance to provide desired clearance between the floating channel and the face of the rotary device. 5 figs.

  18. Evolvable Cryogenics (ECRYO) Pressure Transducer Calibration Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diaz, Carlos E., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides a summary of the findings of recent activities conducted by Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) In-Space Propulsion Branch and MSFC's Metrology and Calibration Lab to assess the performance of current "state of the art" pressure transducers for use in long duration storage and transfer of cryogenic propellants. A brief historical narrative in this paper describes the Evolvable Cryogenics program and the relevance of these activities to the program. This paper also provides a review of three separate test activities performed throughout this effort, including: (1) the calibration of several pressure transducer designs in a liquid nitrogen cryogenic environmental chamber, (2) the calibration of a pressure transducer in a liquid helium Dewar, and (3) the calibration of several pressure transducers at temperatures ranging from 20 to 70 degrees Kelvin (K) using a "cryostat" environmental chamber. These three separate test activities allowed for study of the sensors along a temperature range from 4 to 300 K. The combined data shows that both the slope and intercept of the sensor's calibration curve vary as a function of temperature. This homogeneous function is contrary to the linearly decreasing relationship assumed at the start of this investigation. Consequently, the data demonstrates the need for lookup tables to change the slope and intercept used by any data acquisition system. This ultimately would allow for more accurate pressure measurements at the desired temperature range. This paper concludes with a review of a request for information (RFI) survey conducted amongst different suppliers to determine the availability of current "state of the art" flight-qualified pressure transducers. The survey identifies requirements that are most difficult for the suppliers to meet, most notably the capability to validate the sensor's performance at temperatures below 70 K.

  19. Biasing of Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasonic Transducers.

    PubMed

    Caliano, Giosue; Matrone, Giulia; Savoia, Alessandro Stuart

    2017-02-01

    Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) represent an effective alternative to piezoelectric transducers for medical ultrasound imaging applications. They are microelectromechanical devices fabricated using silicon micromachining techniques, developed in the last two decades in many laboratories. The interest for this novel transducer technology relies on its full compatibility with standard integrated circuit technology that makes it possible to integrate on the same chip the transducers and the electronics, thus enabling the realization of extremely low-cost and high-performance devices, including both 1-D or 2-D arrays. Being capacitive transducers, CMUTs require a high bias voltage to be properly operated in pulse-echo imaging applications. The typical bias supply residual ripple of high-quality high-voltage (HV) generators is in the millivolt range, which is comparable with the amplitude of the received echo signals, and it is particularly difficult to minimize. The aim of this paper is to analyze the classical CMUT biasing circuits, highlighting the features of each one, and to propose two novel HV generator architectures optimized for CMUT biasing applications. The first circuit proposed is an ultralow-residual ripple (<5 [Formula: see text]) HV generator that uses an extremely stable sinusoidal power oscillator topology. The second circuit employs a commercially available integrated step-up converter characterized by a particularly efficient switching topology. The circuit is used to bias the CMUT by charging a buffer capacitor synchronously with the pulsing sequence, thus reducing the impact of the switching noise on the received echo signals. The small area of the circuit (about 1.5 cm(2)) makes it possible to generate the bias voltage inside the probe, very close to the CMUT, making the proposed solution attractive for portable applications. Measurements and experiments are shown to demonstrate the effectiveness of the new approaches

  20. Effect of contact angle on the orientation, stability, and assembly of dense floating cubes.

    PubMed

    Daniello, Robert; Khan, Kashan; Donnell, Michael; Rothstein, Jonathan P

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, the effect of contact angle, density, and size on the orientation, stability, and assembly of floating cubes was investigated. All the cubes tested were more dense than water. Floatation occurred as a result of capillary stresses induced by deformation of the air-water interface. The advancing contact angle of the bare acrylic cubes was measured to be 85°. The contact angle of the cubes was increased by painting the cubes with a commercially available superhydrophobic paint to reach an advancing contact angle of 150°. Depending on their size, density, and contact angle, the cubes were observed to float in one of three primary orientations: edge up, vertex up, and face up. An experimental apparatus was built such that the sum of the gravitational force, buoyancy force, and capillary forces could be measured using a force transducer as a function of cube position as it was lowered through the air-water interface. Measurements showed that the maximum capillary forces were always experienced for the face up orientation. However, when floatation was possible in the vertex up orientation, it was found to be the most stable cube orientation because it had the lowest center of gravity. A series of theoretical predictions were performed for the cubes floating in each of the three primary orientations to calculate the net force on the cube. The theoretical predictions were found to match the experimental measurements well. A cube stability diagram of cube orientation as a function of cube contact angle and size was prepared from the predictions of theory and found to match the experimental observations quite well. The assembly of cubes floating face up and vertex up were also studied for assemblies of two, three, and many cubes. Cubes floating face up were found to assemble face-to-face and form regular square lattice patterns with no free interface between cubes. Cubes floating vertex up were found to assemble in a variety of different arrangements

  1. PSPICE controlled-source models of analogous circuit for Langevin type piezoelectric transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yeongchin; Wu, Menqjiun; Liu, Weikuo

    2007-02-01

    The design and construction of wide-band and high efficiency acoustical projector has long been considered an art beyond the capabilities of many smaller groups. Langevin type piezoelectric transducers have been the most candidate of sonar array system applied in underwater communication. The transducers are fabricated, by bolting head mass and tail mass on both ends of stacked piezoelectric ceramic, to satisfy the multiple, conflicting design for high power transmitting capability. The aim of this research is to study the characteristics of Langevin type piezoelectric transducer that depend on different metal loading. First, the Mason equivalent circuit is used to model the segmented piezoelectric ceramic, then, the impedance network of tail and head masses is deduced by the Newton’s theory. To obtain the optimal solution to a specific design formulation, PSPICE controlled-source programming techniques can be applied. A valid example of the application of PSPICE models for Langevin type transducer analysis is presented and the simulation results are in good agreement with the experimental measurements.

  2. Transducer technology transfer to bio-engineering applications. [aerospace stress transducer for heart function analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duran, E. N.; Lewis, G. W.; Feldstein, C.; Corday, E.; Meerbaum, S.; Lang, T.

    1973-01-01

    The results of a technology transfer of a miniature unidirectional stress transducer, developed for experimental stress analysis in the aerospace field, to applications in bioengineering are reported. By modification of the basic design and innovations in attachment techniques, the transducer was successfully used in vivo on the myocardium of large dogs to record the change in contractile force due to coronary occlusion, reperfusion, and intervention.

  3. A high sensitivity sapphire transducer for vibration measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, H.; Blair, D.G.; Ivanov, E.

    1994-12-31

    In this report we describe an interferometric Sapphire Dielectric Resonator (SDR) transducer which avoids the need for an ultra low noise oscillator. An initial performance of the transducer is presented.

  4. Production of particulates from transducer erosion: implications on food safety.

    PubMed

    Mawson, Raymond; Rout, Manoj; Ripoll, Gabriela; Swiergon, Piotr; Singh, Tanoj; Knoerzer, Kai; Juliano, Pablo

    2014-11-01

    The formation of metallic particulates from erosion was investigated by running a series of transducers at various frequencies in water. Two low frequency transducer sonotrodes were run for 7.5h at 18kHz and 20kHz. Three high frequency plates operating at megasonic frequencies of 0.4MHz, 1MHz, and 2MHz were run over a 7days period. Electrical conductivity and pH of the solution were measured before and after each run. A portion of the non-sonicated and treated water was partially evaporated to achieve an 80-fold concentration of particles and then sieved through nano-filters of 0.1μm, 0.05μm, and 0.01μm. An aliquot of the evaporated liquid was also completely dried on strips of carbon tape to determine the presence of finer particles post sieving. An aliquot was analyzed for detection of 11 trace elements by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICPMS). The filters and carbon tapes were analyzed by FE-SEM imaging to track the presence of metals by EDS (Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy) and measure the particle size and approximate composition of individual particles detected. Light microscopy visualization was used to calculate the area occupied by the particles present in each filter and high resolution photography was used for visualization of sonotrode surfaces. The roughness of all transducers before and after sonication was tested through profilometry. No evidence of formation of nano-particles was found at any tested frequency. High amounts of metallic micron-sized particles at 18kHz and 20kHz formed within a day, while after 7day runs only a few metallic micro particles were detected above 0.4MHz. Erosion was corroborated by an increase in roughness in the 20kHz tip after ultrasound. The elemental analysis showed that metal leach occurred but values remained below accepted drinking water limits, even after excessively long exposure to ultrasound. With the proviso that the particles measured here were only characterized in two dimensions and could be

  5. Floating mechanism of a small liquid marble

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Chin Hong; Plackowski, Chris; Nguyen, Anh V.; Vadivelu, Raja K.; John, James A. St.; Dao, Dzung Viet; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2016-01-01

    Flotation of small solid objects and liquid droplets on water is critical to natural and industrial activities. This paper reports the floating mechanism of liquid marbles, or liquid droplets coated with hydrophobic microparticles. We used X-ray computed tomography (XCT) to acquire cross-sectional images of the floating liquid marble and interface between the different phases. We then analysed the shape of the liquid marble and the angles at the three-phase contact line (TPCL). We found that the small floating liquid marbles follow the mechanism governing the flotation of solid objects in terms of surface tension forces. However, the contact angles formed and deformation of the liquid marble resemble that of a sessile liquid droplet on a thin, elastic solid. For small liquid marbles, the contact angle varies with volume due to the deformability of the interface. PMID:26902930

  6. Floating zone melting of cadmium telluride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Wen-Ming; Regel, L. L.; Wilcox, W. R.

    1992-01-01

    To produce superior crystals of cadmium telluride, floating zone melting in space has been proposed. Techniques required for floating zone melting of cadmium telluride are being developed. We have successfully float-zoned cadmium telluride on earth using square rods. A resistance heater was constructed for forming the molten zone. Evaporation of the molten zone was controlled by adding excess cadmium to the growth ampoule combined with heating of the entire ampoule. An effective method to hold the feed rod was developed. Slow rotation of the growth ampoule was proven experimentally to be necessary to achieve a complete symmetric molten zone. Most of the resultant cylindrical rods were single crystals with twins. Still needed is a suitable automatic method to control the zone length. We tried a fiber optical technique to control the zone length, but experiments showed that application of this technique to automate zone length control is unlikely to be successful.

  7. Cephalometric floating norms for North American adults.

    PubMed

    Franchi, L; Baccetti, T; McNamara, J A

    1998-12-01

    Floating norms provide a method of analysis that uses the variability of the associations among suitable cephalometric measures, on the basis of a regression model combining both sagittal and vertical skeletal parameters. This study establishes floating norms for the description of the individual skeletal pattern in North American adults. The method is based on the correlations among the following craniofacial measurements: SNA, SNB, NL-NSL, ML-NSL, and NSBa. The results are given in a graphical box-like form. This easy, practical procedure allows for the identification of either individual harmonious craniofacial features or anomalous deviations from the individual norm. The use of cephalometric floating norms may be helpful for diagnosis and treatment planning in orthognathic surgery and dentofacial orthopedics.

  8. Length mode piezoelectric ultrasonic transducer for inspection of solid objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, R. B. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    The transducer is constructed from individual transducer elements arranged in an array and configured to exhibit a predominant, longitudinal mode transversely to the array. The elements are interconnected through thin flexible sheets. Each element is individually damped, and the transducer as a whole is electrically damped through resonance with the clamped capacitance and dissipation. Electrical control permits inphase operation of all transducer elements or control with preselected phase differences.

  9. A Thermal Analysis of High-Drive Ring Transducer Elements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-15

    transducers . The principles developed in this report may be extended to other sonar-type transducers , such as Tonpilz and flextensional. The analytical results...August 2001, pp. 1469-1479. Rouquerol, E. V., "Calculation of the Heating of a Tonpilz -Type Transducer Due to the Dissipation from the Ceramic and the...NUWC-NPT Technical Report 11,467 15 August 2005 A Thermal Analysis of High-Drive Ring Transducer Elements Stephen C. Butler John B. Blottman III

  10. Improvements in floating point addition/subtraction operations

    DOEpatents

    Farmwald, P.M.

    1984-02-24

    Apparatus is described for decreasing the latency time associated with floating point addition and subtraction in a computer, using a novel bifurcated, pre-normalization/post-normalization approach that distinguishes between differences of floating point exponents.

  11. Hydrodynamic Tests of Models of Seaplane Floats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eula, Antonio

    1935-01-01

    This report contains the results of tank tests carried out at free trim on seventeen hulls and floats of various types. The data as to the weight on water, trim, and relative resistance for each model are plotted nondimensionally and are referenced both to the total weight and to the weight on water. Despite the fact that the experiments were not made systematically, a study of the models and of the test data permits nevertheless some general deductions regarding the forms of floats and their resistance. One specific conclusion is that the best models have a maximum relative resistance not exceeding 20 percent of the total weight.

  12. Well casing float shoe or collar

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufman, H. J.

    1985-08-06

    A well casing float shoe which is adapted for a variety of well installations consists of a tubular metal shoe member filled with cementitious material having a longitudinal bore surrounding and securing in place a tubular metal sleeve. The metal sleeve is threaded at the top and bottom ends to receive a variety of sizes and types of check valves. A well casing float collar has the same construction, but the tubular shoe member is replaced with a tubular metal collar with threaded connections both above and below the cementitious filler material.

  13. Signal processing schemes for optical voltage transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jinling; Xie, Delin; Chen, Hongbin; Xie, Latang; Song, Jianhe; Luo, Xiaoni

    2006-02-01

    This paper describes an optical voltage transducer(OVT) for a 35kV system based on Pockels effect in a BGO(Bi 4Ge 3O 12) crystal. OVT used to measure the voltage of power are superior to conventional electromagnet-induced voltage transducer in many aspects, thus it has great potential to applications. It has some advantages. These advantages are: 1)Optics provides total galvanic separation between the measuring point at high voltage (HV) potential and the measuring equipment at ground potential. 2)Transmission of measuring signals in optical fibers is immune to induced electromagnetic noise even in EMI-environment of switchyards and other high voltage installations. 3)Optics and especially optical fibers make the insulation costs independent of voltage levels thus giving an economical advantage at voltage levels above 100kV. 4)The use of optics is expected to reduce the weight of the transducers. 5)Optical transducers are expected to have a large bandwidth than conventional transducers. 6)The output-signals from an optical transducer are easily interfaced with computers and electronically operated equipment such as digital relays. New techniques developed in electronics and optical field including fiber optic technology bring new contributions to the measurement of voltage and electric field. A Pockels voltage sensor has been widely introduced to electrical power transmission and distribution systems and some advantage of the optical voltage measuring techniques are reported. In this paper, a brief summary of electro-optic effects and the principle of OVT is proposed. The signal processing schemes of different optical path and features are analyzed. The basic principle of OVT is to modulate the irradiance of the light-directed to OVT by an optical fiber-according to the potential difference between the HV-line and the ground potential. The modulation of the light is accomplished by placing a material-that has an optical property (the birefringence), which is

  14. 21 CFR 868.2900 - Gas pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gas pressure transducer. 868.2900 Section 868.2900...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2900 Gas pressure transducer. (a) Identification. A gas pressure transducer is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to convert...

  15. 21 CFR 868.2885 - Gas flow transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gas flow transducer. 868.2885 Section 868.2885...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2885 Gas flow transducer. (a) Identification. A gas flow transducer is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to convert gas...

  16. 21 CFR 868.2885 - Gas flow transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gas flow transducer. 868.2885 Section 868.2885...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2885 Gas flow transducer. (a) Identification. A gas flow transducer is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to convert gas...

  17. 21 CFR 870.2060 - Transducer signal amplifier and conditioner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Transducer signal amplifier and conditioner. 870.2060 Section 870.2060 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Transducer signal amplifier and conditioner. (a) Identification. A transducer signal amplifier...

  18. 21 CFR 870.2060 - Transducer signal amplifier and conditioner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Transducer signal amplifier and conditioner. 870.2060 Section 870.2060 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Transducer signal amplifier and conditioner. (a) Identification. A transducer signal amplifier...

  19. 21 CFR 870.2060 - Transducer signal amplifier and conditioner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Transducer signal amplifier and conditioner. 870.2060 Section 870.2060 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Transducer signal amplifier and conditioner. (a) Identification. A transducer signal amplifier...

  20. 21 CFR 870.2060 - Transducer signal amplifier and conditioner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Transducer signal amplifier and conditioner. 870.2060 Section 870.2060 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Transducer signal amplifier and conditioner. (a) Identification. A transducer signal amplifier...

  1. 21 CFR 870.2060 - Transducer signal amplifier and conditioner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Transducer signal amplifier and conditioner. 870.2060 Section 870.2060 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Transducer signal amplifier and conditioner. (a) Identification. A transducer signal amplifier...

  2. 21 CFR 870.2850 - Extravascular blood pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Extravascular blood pressure transducer. 870.2850... blood pressure transducer. (a) Identification. An extravascular blood pressure transducer is a device used to measure blood pressure by changes in the mechanical or electrical properties of the device....

  3. 21 CFR 870.2850 - Extravascular blood pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Extravascular blood pressure transducer. 870.2850... blood pressure transducer. (a) Identification. An extravascular blood pressure transducer is a device used to measure blood pressure by changes in the mechanical or electrical properties of the device....

  4. 21 CFR 870.2870 - Catheter tip pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Catheter tip pressure transducer. 870.2870 Section... pressure transducer. (a) Identification. A catheter tip pressure transducer is a device incorporated into... change in relation to changes in blood pressure. These changes are transmitted to accessory equipment...

  5. 21 CFR 868.2875 - Differential pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Differential pressure transducer. 868.2875 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2875 Differential pressure transducer. (a) Identification. A differential pressure transducer is a two-chambered device intended...

  6. 21 CFR 890.1615 - Miniature pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Miniature pressure transducer. 890.1615 Section... Miniature pressure transducer. (a) Identification. A miniature pressure transducer is a device intended for medical purposes to measure the pressure between a device and soft tissue by converting mechanical...

  7. 21 CFR 868.2900 - Gas pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gas pressure transducer. 868.2900 Section 868.2900...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2900 Gas pressure transducer. (a) Identification. A gas pressure transducer is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to convert...

  8. 21 CFR 870.2850 - Extravascular blood pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Extravascular blood pressure transducer. 870.2850... blood pressure transducer. (a) Identification. An extravascular blood pressure transducer is a device used to measure blood pressure by changes in the mechanical or electrical properties of the device....

  9. 21 CFR 868.2900 - Gas pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gas pressure transducer. 868.2900 Section 868.2900...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2900 Gas pressure transducer. (a) Identification. A gas pressure transducer is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to convert...

  10. 21 CFR 870.2870 - Catheter tip pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Catheter tip pressure transducer. 870.2870 Section... pressure transducer. (a) Identification. A catheter tip pressure transducer is a device incorporated into... change in relation to changes in blood pressure. These changes are transmitted to accessory equipment...

  11. 21 CFR 890.1615 - Miniature pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Miniature pressure transducer. 890.1615 Section... Miniature pressure transducer. (a) Identification. A miniature pressure transducer is a device intended for medical purposes to measure the pressure between a device and soft tissue by converting mechanical...

  12. 21 CFR 870.2870 - Catheter tip pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Catheter tip pressure transducer. 870.2870 Section... pressure transducer. (a) Identification. A catheter tip pressure transducer is a device incorporated into... change in relation to changes in blood pressure. These changes are transmitted to accessory equipment...

  13. 21 CFR 868.2900 - Gas pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gas pressure transducer. 868.2900 Section 868.2900...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2900 Gas pressure transducer. (a) Identification. A gas pressure transducer is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to convert...

  14. 21 CFR 870.2850 - Extravascular blood pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Extravascular blood pressure transducer. 870.2850... blood pressure transducer. (a) Identification. An extravascular blood pressure transducer is a device used to measure blood pressure by changes in the mechanical or electrical properties of the device....

  15. 21 CFR 868.2900 - Gas pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gas pressure transducer. 868.2900 Section 868.2900...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2900 Gas pressure transducer. (a) Identification. A gas pressure transducer is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to convert...

  16. 21 CFR 870.2850 - Extravascular blood pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Extravascular blood pressure transducer. 870.2850... blood pressure transducer. (a) Identification. An extravascular blood pressure transducer is a device used to measure blood pressure by changes in the mechanical or electrical properties of the device....

  17. 21 CFR 868.2885 - Gas flow transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gas flow transducer. 868.2885 Section 868.2885...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2885 Gas flow transducer. (a) Identification. A gas flow transducer is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to convert gas...

  18. New developments in ultrasonic transducers and transducer systems; Proceedings of the Meeting, San Diego, CA, July 21, 22, 1992

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizzi, Frederic L.

    Attention is given to advances in materials and modeling transducer performance, the means to control ultrasonic beams and to measure their properties, the variety of array configurations, and novel transducer configurations and design considerations. Emphasis is placed on new developments in piezoelectric polymer ultrasound transducers and transducer systems; micromachined acoustic matching layers; a dual frequency piezoelectric transducer for medical applications; modeling refraction and attenuation effects in invasive ultrasound probes; design and evaluation of ultrasonic arrays using 1-3 connectivity composites; artifact reduction through the use of concave linear arrays; real-time 3D ultrasound imaging with a 1D fan-beam transducer array; some conceptual approaches to innovative medical ultrasound transducers; and enhanced bandwidth ultrasound transducers with multiple piezoelectric polymer layers. (No individual items are abstracted in this volume)

  19. Using Silver Nano-Particle Ink in Electrode Fabrication of High Frequency Copolymer Ultrasonic Transducers: Modeling and Experimental Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Decharat, Adit; Wagle, Sanat; Jacobsen, Svein; Melandsø, Frank

    2015-01-01

    High frequency polymer-based ultrasonic transducers are produced with electrodes thicknesses typical for printed electrodes obtained from silver (Ag) nano-particle inks. An analytical three-port network is used to study the acoustic effects imposed by a thick electrode in a typical layered transducer configuration. Results from the network model are compared to experimental findings for the implemented transducer configuration, to obtain a better understanding of acoustical effects caused by the additional printed mass loading. The proposed investigation might be supportive of identification of suitable electrode-depositing methods. It is also believed to be useful as a feasibility study for printed Ag-based electrodes in high frequency transducers, which may reduce both the cost and production complexity of these devices. PMID:25903552

  20. 40 CFR 65.44 - External floating roof (EFR).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false External floating roof (EFR). 65.44... (CONTINUED) CONSOLIDATED FEDERAL AIR RULE Storage Vessels § 65.44 External floating roof (EFR). (a) EFR... emissions by using an external floating roof shall comply with the design requirements listed in...

  1. 33 CFR 144.01-15 - Alternates for life floats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alternates for life floats. 144... for life floats. (a) Approved lifeboats, approved life rafts or approved inflatable life rafts may be used in lieu of approved life floats for either all or part of the capacity required. When...

  2. 33 CFR 144.01-10 - Equipment for life floats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Equipment for life floats. 144.01... for life floats. (a) Each lifefloat shall be provided with a painter. This painter shall be a manila... 1/2 inch in diameter. (b) Each life float must have a water light of an approved automatic...

  3. 33 CFR 144.01-15 - Alternates for life floats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alternates for life floats. 144... for life floats. (a) Approved lifeboats, approved life rafts or approved inflatable life rafts may be used in lieu of approved life floats for either all or part of the capacity required. When...

  4. 33 CFR 144.01-10 - Equipment for life floats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Equipment for life floats. 144.01... for life floats. (a) Each lifefloat shall be provided with a painter. This painter shall be a manila... 1/2 inch in diameter. (b) Each life float must have a water light of an approved automatic...

  5. 33 CFR 144.01-15 - Alternates for life floats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alternates for life floats. 144... for life floats. (a) Approved lifeboats, approved life rafts or approved inflatable life rafts may be used in lieu of approved life floats for either all or part of the capacity required. When...

  6. 33 CFR 144.01-15 - Alternates for life floats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alternates for life floats. 144... for life floats. (a) Approved lifeboats, approved life rafts or approved inflatable life rafts may be used in lieu of approved life floats for either all or part of the capacity required. When...

  7. 46 CFR 131.870 - Life floats and buoyant apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Life floats and buoyant apparatus. 131.870 Section 131... OPERATIONS Markings for Fire Equipment and Emergency Equipment § 131.870 Life floats and buoyant apparatus. (a) The name of the vessel must be plainly marked or painted on each life float or buoyant...

  8. 33 CFR 144.01-10 - Equipment for life floats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Equipment for life floats. 144.01... for life floats. (a) Each lifefloat shall be provided with a painter. This painter shall be a manila... 1/2 inch in diameter. (b) Each life float must have a water light of an approved automatic...

  9. 46 CFR 131.870 - Life floats and buoyant apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Life floats and buoyant apparatus. 131.870 Section 131... OPERATIONS Markings for Fire Equipment and Emergency Equipment § 131.870 Life floats and buoyant apparatus. (a) The name of the vessel must be plainly marked or painted on each life float or buoyant...

  10. 33 CFR 144.01-10 - Equipment for life floats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Equipment for life floats. 144.01... for life floats. (a) Each lifefloat shall be provided with a painter. This painter shall be a manila... 1/2 inch in diameter. (b) Each life float must have a water light of an approved automatic...

  11. 46 CFR 131.870 - Life floats and buoyant apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Life floats and buoyant apparatus. 131.870 Section 131... OPERATIONS Markings for Fire Equipment and Emergency Equipment § 131.870 Life floats and buoyant apparatus. (a) The name of the vessel must be plainly marked or painted on each life float or buoyant...

  12. 46 CFR 131.870 - Life floats and buoyant apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... OPERATIONS Markings for Fire Equipment and Emergency Equipment § 131.870 Life floats and buoyant apparatus. (a) The name of the vessel must be plainly marked or painted on each life float or buoyant apparatus... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Life floats and buoyant apparatus. 131.870 Section...

  13. 46 CFR 131.870 - Life floats and buoyant apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... OPERATIONS Markings for Fire Equipment and Emergency Equipment § 131.870 Life floats and buoyant apparatus. (a) The name of the vessel must be plainly marked or painted on each life float or buoyant apparatus... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Life floats and buoyant apparatus. 131.870 Section...

  14. Improving the performance of floating solar pool covers

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, M.A.; Lowrey, P. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1992-11-01

    Experimental and analytical analyses are presented for the evaluation of heat transfer through floating solar swimming pool covers. Two improved floating solar swimming pool cover designs are proposed and investigated in this paper. The results conclusively show that both new cover designs should have significantly better performance than conventional floating solar swimming pool covers.

  15. 14 CFR 25.753 - Main float design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Main float design. 25.753 Section 25.753 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Floats and Hulls § 25.753 Main float...

  16. 14 CFR 25.753 - Main float design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Main float design. 25.753 Section 25.753 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Floats and Hulls § 25.753 Main float...

  17. 14 CFR 29.757 - Hull and auxiliary float strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hull and auxiliary float strength. 29.757 Section 29.757 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... § 29.757 Hull and auxiliary float strength. The hull, and auxiliary floats if used, must withstand...

  18. Flow-induced oscillations of a floating moored cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Daniel; Modarres-Sadeghi, Yahya

    2016-11-01

    An experimental study of flow-induced oscillations of a floating model spar buoy was conducted. The model spar consisted of a floating uniform cylinder moored in a water tunnel test section, and free to oscillate about its mooring attachment point near the center of mass. For the bare cylinder, counter-clockwise (CCW) figure-eight trajectories approaching A* =1 in amplitude were observed at the lower part of the spar for a reduced velocity range of U* =4-11, while its upper part experienced clockwise (CW) orbits. It was hypothesized that the portion of the spar undergoing CCW figure eights is the portion within which the flow excites the structure. By adding helical strakes to the portion of the cylinder with CCW figure eights, the response amplitude was significantly reduced, while adding strakes to portions with clockwise orbital motion had a minimal influence on the amplitude of response. This work is partially supported by the NSF-sponsored IGERT: Offshore Wind Energy Engineering, Environmental Science, and Policy (Grant Number 1068864).

  19. Simple and sensitive strain gauge displacement transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramana, Y. V.; Sarma, L. P.

    1981-09-01

    We describe a simple and sensitive strain gauge displacement transducer. It is based on the linear movement of a shaft (with two cantilevers and four strain gauges) in a tapered chamber, resulting in a change in resistance proportional to the cantilever deformation. The transducer with its Wheatstone full bridge configuration is calibrated against a mechanical dial indicator of 0.002 mm accuracy for both ac and dc voltage excitations. Its output is linear for measurements of full range displacement up to 25 mm. It has a sensitivity of ±0.0082 mm for ac excitation with a strain indicator whose resolution is ±1 μɛ. It has a dc full range sensitivity of 1.5 mV/V for excitation levels up to 5 V. It can have varied field and laboratory applications wherever displacements are precisely read, recorded, or monitored.

  20. Electromechanical transducer for acoustic telemetry system

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1993-06-22

    An improved electromechanical transducer is provided for use in an acoustic telemetry system. The transducer of this invention comprises a stack of ferroelectric ceramic disks interleaved with a plurality of spaced electrodes which are used to electrically pole the ceramic disks. The ceramic stack is housed in a metal tubular drill collar segment. The electrodes are preferably alternatively connected to ground potential and driving potential. This alternating connection of electrodes to ground and driving potential subjects each disk to an equal electric field; and the direction of the field alternates to match the alternating direction of polarization of the ceramic disks. Preferably, a thin metal foil is sandwiched between electrodes to facilitate the electrical connection. Alternatively, a thicker metal spacer plate is selectively used in place of the metal foil in order to promote thermal cooling of the ceramic stack.

  1. New piezoelectric transducers for therapeutic ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Chapelon, J Y; Cathignol, D; Cain, C; Ebbini, E; Kluiwstra, J U; Sapozhnikov, O A; Fleury, G; Berriet, R; Chupin, L; Guey, J L

    2000-01-01

    Therapeutic ultrasound (US) has been of increasing interest during the past few years. However, the development of this technique depends on the availability of high-performance transducers. These transducers have to be optimised for focusing and steering high-power ultrasonic energy within the target volume. Recently developed high-power 1-3 piezocomposite materials bring to therapeutic US the exceptional electroacoustical properties of piezocomposite technology: these are high efficiency, large bandwidth, predictable beam pattern, more flexibility in terms of shaping and definition of sampling in annular arrays, linear arrays or matrix arrays. The construction and evaluation of several prototypes illustrates the benefit of this new approach that opens the way to further progress in therapeutic US.

  2. Piezoelectric radiofrequency transducers as passive buried sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rétornaz, T.; Friedt, J.-M.; Alzuaga, S.; Baron, T.; Lebrasseur, É.; Martin, G.; Laroche, T.; Ballandras, S.; Griselin, M.; Simonnet, J.-P.

    2012-09-01

    We demonstrate that single-piezoelectric substrate-based acoustic transducers act as ideal sensors for probing with various RADAR strategies. Because these sensors are intrinsically passive devices working in the radiofrequency range, they exhibit improved interrogation range and robustness with respect to silicon-based radio frequency identification tags. Both wideband (acoustic delay lines) and narrowband (acoustic resonators) transducers are shown to be compatible with pulse-mode and frequency-modulated continuous-wave RADAR strategies, respectively. We particularly focus on the ground-penetrating RADAR (GPR) application in which the lack of local energy source makes these sensors suitable candidates for buried applications in roads, building or civil engineering monitoring. A novel acoustic sensor concept - high-overtone bulk acoustic resonator - is especially suited as sensor interrogated by a wide range of antenna set, as demonstrated with GPR units working in the 100 and 200 MHz range.

  3. Electromechanical transducer for acoustic telemetry system

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    1993-01-01

    An improved electromechanical transducer is provided for use in an acoustic telemetry system. The transducer of this invention comprises a stack of ferroelectric ceramic disks interleaved with a plurality of spaced electrodes which are used to electrically pole the ceramic disks. The ceramic stack is housed in a metal tubular drill collar segment. The electrodes are preferably alternatively connected to ground potential and driving potential. This alternating connection of electrodes to ground and driving potential subjects each disk to an equal electric field; and the direction of the field alternates to match the alternating direction of polarization of the ceramic disks. Preferably, a thin metal foil is sandwiched between electrodes to facilitate the electrical connection. Alternatively, a thicker metal spacer plate is selectively used in place of the metal foil in order to promote thermal cooling of the ceramic stack.

  4. Bonded ultrasonic transducer and method for making

    DOEpatents

    Dixon, Raymond D.; Roe, Lawrence H.; Migliori, Albert

    1995-01-01

    An ultrasonic transducer is formed as a diffusion bonded assembly of piezoelectric crystal, backing material, and, optionally, a ceramic wear surface. The mating surfaces of each component are silver films that are diffusion bonded together under the application of pressure and heat. Each mating surface may also be coated with a reactive metal, such as hafnium, to increase the adhesion of the silver films to the component surfaces. Only thin silver films are deposited, e.g., a thickness of about 0.00635 mm, to form a substantially non-compliant bond between surfaces. The resulting transducer assembly is substantially free of self-resonances over normal operating ranges for taking resonant ultrasound measurements.

  5. Bonded ultrasonic transducer and method for making

    DOEpatents

    Dixon, R.D.; Roe, L.H.; Migliori, A.

    1995-11-14

    An ultrasonic transducer is formed as a diffusion bonded assembly of piezoelectric crystal, backing material, and, optionally, a ceramic wear surface. The mating surfaces of each component are silver films that are diffusion bonded together under the application of pressure and heat. Each mating surface may also be coated with a reactive metal, such as hafnium, to increase the adhesion of the silver films to the component surfaces. Only thin silver films are deposited, e.g., a thickness of about 0.00635 mm, to form a substantially non-compliant bond between surfaces. The resulting transducer assembly is substantially free of self-resonances over normal operating ranges for taking resonant ultrasound measurements. 12 figs.

  6. Acoustic transducer apparatus with reduced thermal conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lierke, Ernst G. (Inventor); Leung, Emily W. (Inventor); Bhat, Balakrishna T. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A horn is described for transmitting sound from a transducer to a heated chamber containing an object which is levitated by acoustic energy while it is heated to a molten state, which minimizes heat transfer to thereby minimize heating of the transducer, minimize temperature variation in the chamber, and minimize loss of heat from the chamber. The forward portion of the horn, which is the portion closest to the chamber, has holes that reduce its cross-sectional area to minimize the conduction of heat along the length of the horn, with the entire front portion of the horn being rigid and having an even front face to efficiently transfer high frequency acoustic energy to fluid in the chamber. In one arrangement, the horn has numerous rows of holes extending perpendicular to the length of horn, with alternate rows extending perpendicular to one another to form a sinuous path for the conduction of heat along the length of the horn.

  7. Gel-Filled Holders For Ultrasonic Transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Companion, John A.

    1992-01-01

    In new technique, ultrasonic transducer embedded in rubbery, castable, low-loss gel to enable transducer to "look" into surface of test object or human body at any desired angle. Composed of solution of water and ethylene glycol in collagen matrix. Provides total contact of water bath, also used on bodies or objects too large for water baths, even if moving. Also provides look angles of poly(methyl methacrylate) angle block with potential of reduced acoustic impedance and refraction. Custom-tailored to task at hand, and gel sufficiently inexpensive to be discarded upon completion. Easy to couple ultrasound in and out of gel, minimizing losses and artifacts of other types of standoffs employed in ultrasonic testing.

  8. Sonar Transducer Reliability Improvement Program (STRIP)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    and wet all of the surfaces of the transducer. This greatly conplicates bonding the components together. Polyalkylene glycol (PAG) ha:; the...ether of polypropylene oxide ; molecular weight, 600 g/mole with small amounts of the anticxidant dodecyl succinic anhydride REMARKS: ADVANTAGES - Cheap...STABILITY: OXIDATION - Good HYDROLYSIS - Very Good "[63] OTHERS: TOXICITY - .ontoxtc, no e/e or skin irritetion- *[631 EASE OF CLEAJP - Have re.dily

  9. Flutter spectral measurements using stationary pressure transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurkov, A. P.

    1980-01-01

    Engine-order sampling was used to eliminate the integral harmonics from the flutter spectra corresponding to a case-mounted static pressure transducer. Using the optical displacement data, it was demonstrated that the blade-order sampling of pressure data may yield erroneous results due to the interference caused by blade vibration. Two methods are presented which effectively eliminate this interference yielding the blade-pressure-difference spectra. The phase difference between the differential-pressure and the displacement spectra was evaluated.

  10. Low Voltage Piezoelectric Composite for Transducer Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-25

    Pillars 10 are supported in 10 panel 20 by insulating material 18. Insulating material 18 can 11 be a dielectric polymer matrix or an elastomeric ...Additionally, the field. 22 impressed on the surface doesn’t couple completely to the 23 internal volume of the active material . 9 1 In view of the above...The active layer of the transducer is either lead 16 zirconium-titanate or lead magnesium-niobate. This material is 17 incorporated in a polymer

  11. Sonar Transducer Reliability Improvement Program (STRIP).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-01

    surfaces of PZT ceramic. The ceramic surface tends to be the weakest part of the insulation system of a sonar transducer. The highest typical electrical...comparable value obtained with uncoated ceramic. Also, the breakdown voltage on the surface ( flashover ) was increased only a small amount, typically less...coating/ surface interface, and some were combinations. A coating material often touted as exceptionally 3ood is Parylene, which is vacuum deposited

  12. Robust Acoustic Transducers for Bubble Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    The PICO collaboration utilizes bubble chambers filled with various superheated liquids as targets for dark matter. Acoustic sensors have proved able to distinguish nuclear recoils from radioactive background on an event-by-event basis. We have recently produced a more robust transducer which should be able to operate for years, rather than months, in the challenging environment of a heated high pressure hydraulic fluid outside these chambers. Indiana University South Bend.

  13. Sonar Transducer Reliability Improvement Program FY80.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    band Threshold - less than ±2 dB variation from the specified value over operational frequency band The Sonar Transducer Reliability Improvement...were Qetiker preformed clamps, Band -It preformed clamps, and Band -It Scru-Loct retrofittable clamps. *TASK 5: Manufacture Instrumented Connectors Under...cycle 6 PRE-kORM 10 PU-U Cable bond failure, Remove from test after DSS-3 under gap in clamp cycle 5 OETIKER 11 N-G " ring leakage was Removed from

  14. Wheel Force Transducer Research and Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-02

    develop, validate and calibrate cost effective field test equipment for measuring tire characteristics on vehicles whilst driving off-road. The proposed... field test equipment for measuring tire characteristics on vehicles whilst driving off-road. The proposed wheel force transducer is an important...of simulating off-road terrain under laboratory conditions, field test equipment, that can determine tire characteristics on vehicles whilst driving

  15. Updated Results of Ultrasonic Transducer Irradiation Test

    SciTech Connect

    Daw, Joshua; Palmer, Joe; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Keller, Paul; Montgomery, Robert; Chien, Hual-Te; Tittmann, Bernhard; Reinhardt, Brian; Kohse, Gordon; Rempe, Joy; Villard, J.F.

    2015-07-01

    Ultrasonic technologies offer the potential for high accuracy and resolution in-pile measurement of a range of parameters, including geometry changes, temperature, crack initiation and growth, gas pressure and composition, and microstructural changes. Many Department of Energy-Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs are exploring the use of ultrasonic technologies to provide enhanced sensors for in-pile instrumentation during irradiation testing. For example, the ability of small diameter ultrasonic thermometers (UTs) to provide a temperature profile in candidate metallic and oxide fuel would provide much needed data for validating new fuel performance models. These efforts are limited by the lack of identified ultrasonic transducer materials capable of long term performance under irradiation test conditions. To address this need, the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) was awarded an Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) project to evaluate the performance of promising magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducers in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR) up to a fast fluence of at least 10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2}. A multi-National Laboratory collaboration funded by the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation (NEET-ASI) program also provided initial support for this effort. This irradiation, which started in February 2014, is an instrumented lead test and real-time transducer performance data are collected along with temperature and neutron and gamma flux data. The irradiation is ongoing and will continue to approximately mid-2015. To date, very encouraging results have been attained as several transducers continue to operate under irradiation. (authors)

  16. Ultrasonic transducer with Gaussian radial pressure distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claus, R. O.; Zerwekh, P. S. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An ultrasonic transducer that produces an output that is a symmetrical function comprises a piezoelectric crystal with several concentric ring electrodes on one side of the crystal. A resistor network applies different amplitudes of an ac source to each of the several electrodes. A plot of the different amplitudes from the outermost electrode to the innermost electrode is the first half of a Gaussian function. Consequently, the output of the crystal from the side opposite the electrodes has a Gaussian profile.

  17. Piezoelectric and Electrostrictive Materials for Transducer Applications.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-01

    University Park, PA 16802 USA (Received December 15, 1984) A phenomenological theory., based on the Landau -Ginsburg-Devonshire formalism is developed to...transducers was difficult. The electrical loading effects were corrected by using back-to- back zener diodes, inserted between the amplifier and the...product. The highest pulse-echo amplitude (2.25 V) with the 4 U back-to-back zener diode termination came from the composite sample with 20% PZT rods of

  18. DNA-programmed protein-nanoelectronic transducer array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withey, Gary; Kim, Jin Ho; Xu, Jimmy

    2008-08-01

    By incorporating DNA as addressable linkers, we can direct and coordinate the simultaneous, parallel self-assembling and binding of multiple different redox proteins to designated nanoelectrodes. As a result, we have formed a nanoelectronic-protein transducer array which is capable of real-time, multiplexed detection of several analytes in parallel. The sequence-specificity of DNA hybridization provides the means of encoding spatial address instruction to the otherwise random self-assembling process and enables the desired programmability, scalability, and renewability. Results of this study, under an AFOSR MURI program, demonstrate the feasibility of a new paradigm of biosensing: detection of not only the presence of target substances but also the real-time activities of multiple biomolecules. In this system, the conjugated biomolecules and nanoelectronic components provide the active monitoring and mediating functions in real time, and can be integrated en masse into large arrays in a silicon-based integrated circuit.

  19. Cross-fiber Bragg grating transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albin, Sacharia (Inventor); Zheng, Jianli (Inventor); Lavarias, Arnel (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A transducer has been invented that uses specially-oriented gratings in waveguide a manner that allows the simultaneous measurement of physical phenomena (such as shear force, strain and temperature) in a single sensing element. The invention has a highly sensitive, linear response and also has directional sensitivity with regard to strain. The transducer has a waveguide with a longitudinal axis as well as two Bragg gratings. The transducer has a first Bragg grating associated with the waveguide that has an angular orientation .theta..sub.a relative to a perpendicular to the longitudinal axis such that 0.degree.<.theta..sub.a <.theta..sub.max. The second Bragg grating is associated with the waveguide in such a way that the angular orientation .theta..sub.b of the grating relative to a perpendicular to the longitudinal axis is (360.degree.-.theta..sub.max)<.theta..sub.b <360.degree.. The first Bragg grating can have a periodicity .LAMBDA..sub.a and the second Bragg grating can have a periodicity .LAMBDA..sub.b such that the periodicity .LAMBDA..sub.a of the first Bragg grating does not equal the periodicity .LAMBDA..sub.b of the second Bragg grating. The angle of the gratings can be such that .theta..sub.a =360.degree.-.theta..sub.b. The waveguide can assume a variety of configurations, including an optical fiber, a rectangular waveguide and a planar waveguide. The waveguide can be fabricated of a variety of materials, including silica and polymer material.

  20. Simultaneous muscle force and displacement transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldstein, C.; Lewis, G. W.; Culler, V. H. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A myocardial transducer for simultaneously measuring force and displacement within a very small area of myocardium is disclosed. The transducer comprised of an elongated body forked at one end to form an inverted Y shaped beam with each branch of the beam constituting a low compliant tine for penetrating the myocardium to a predetermined depth. Bonded to one of the low compliance tines is a small piezoresistive element for converting a force acting on the beam into an electrical signal. A third high compliant tine of the transducer, which measures displacement of the myocardium in a direction in line with the two low compliant tines, is of a length that just pierces the surface membrane. A small piezoresistive element is bonded to the third tine at its upper end where its bending is greatest. Displacement of the myocardium causes a deformation in curvature of the third tine, and the second small piezoresistive element bonded to the surface of its curved end converts its deformation into an electrical signal.

  1. Language of Transducer Manipulation: Codifying Terms for Effective Teaching.

    PubMed

    Bahner, David P; Blickendorf, J Matthew; Bockbrader, Marcia; Adkins, Eric; Vira, Amar; Boulger, Creagh; Panchal, Ashish R

    2016-01-01

    There is a need for consistent, repetitive, and reliable terminology to describe the basic manipulations of the ultrasound transducer. Previously, 5 basic transducer motions have been defined and used in education. However, even with this effort, there is still a lack of consistency and clarity in describing transducer manipulation and motion. In this technical innovation, we describe an expanded definition of transducer motions, which include movements to change the transducer's angle of insonation to the target as well as the location on the body to optimize the ultrasound image. This new terminology may allow for consistent teaching and improved communication in the process of image acquisition.

  2. A Neoprene with Optimized Bondability for Sonar Transducer Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-05

    TR-317R TRANSDUCER The TR-317R is a tonpilz transducer mounted in a large spherical array on the front of U.S. Navy submarines of several classes... TRANSDUCER APPLICATIONS TASK NO. 59-0593-0 [SQ-ns«A-n WORK UNIT ACCESSION NO. )N880-326 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) "^ ^Zl!l ^’ ’^’^°"’P"°" ^"i... Transducer Applications tX: C. M. Thompson Materials Section Transducer Branch Underwater Sound Reference Detachment Naval Research Laboratory P.O

  3. Dealing with Human Death: The Floating Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenyon, Gary M.

    1991-01-01

    Explores approach to dealing with human death. Describes floating perspective, based on insights from Choron and Jaspers, as suggesting it is possible to deal with human death by refraining from taking ultimate position on the problem. Position encourages openness to death. Examines role of anxiety and describes possible meaningful outcomes of…

  4. Linear Array Ultrasonic Transducers: Sensitivity and Resolution Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kramb, V.A.

    2005-04-09

    The University of Dayton Research Institute (UDRI) under contract by the US Air Force has designed and integrated a fully automated inspection system for the inspection of turbine engines that incorporates linear phased array ultrasonic transducers. Phased array transducers have been successfully implemented into weld and turbine blade root inspections where the defect types are well known and characterized. Embedded defects in aerospace turbine engine components are less well defined, however. In order to determine the applicability of linear arrays to aerospace inspections the sensitivity of array transducers to embedded defects in engine materials must be characterized. In addition, the implementation of array transducers into legacy inspection procedures must take into account any differences in sensitivity between the array transducer and that of the single element transducer currently used. This paper discusses preliminary results in a study that compares the sensitivity of linear array and conventional single element transducers to synthetic hard alpha defects in a titanium alloy.

  5. Environmental control system transducer development study. [for space shuttles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brudnicki, M. J.

    1974-01-01

    A development test program of transducers for aerospace projects is described. Stability and performance of existing transducers, and improvements compatible with shuttle ECS requirements are investigated. These requirements incorporate design and development features into the transducers, and include the following: (1) improvement of overall transducer ruggedness and reliability; (2) common transducers for all ECS fluids that will be unaffected by long quiescent periods in the space environment, that will require no maintenance or refurbishing for at least 100 launches; and (3) appropriate self-check features that simplify checkout and maintenance. Models of three different transducers, a three-way valve for pressure transducers from closed liquid loops, surface-type platinum-wire resistance temperature sensors, and a nuclenics gaging system are evaluated. Tests and development improvements are described.

  6. New Methods and Transducer Designs for Ultrasonic Diagnostics and Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybyanets, A. N.; Naumenko, A. A.; Sapozhnikov, O. A.; Khokhlova, V. A.

    Recent advances in the field of physical acoustics, imaging technologies, piezoelectric materials, and ultrasonic transducer design have led to emerging of novel methods and apparatus for ultrasonic diagnostics, therapy and body aesthetics. The paper presents the results on development and experimental study of different high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) transducers. Technological peculiarities of the HIFU transducer design as well as theoretical and numerical models of such transducers and the corresponding HIFU fields are discussed. Several HIFU transducers of different design have been fabricated using different advanced piezoelectric materials. Acoustic field measurements for those transducers have been performed using a calibrated fiber optic hydrophone and an ultrasonic measurement system (UMS). The results of ex vivo experiments with different tissues as well as in vivo experiments with blood vessels are presented that prove the efficacy, safety and selectivity of the developed HIFU transducers and methods.

  7. Linear Array Ultrasonic Transducers: Sensitivity and Resolution Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramb, V. A.

    2005-04-01

    The University of Dayton Research Institute (UDRI) under contract by the US Air Force has designed and integrated a fully automated inspection system for the inspection of turbine engines that incorporates linear phased array ultrasonic transducers. Phased array transducers have been successfully implemented into weld and turbine blade root inspections where the defect types are well known and characterized. Embedded defects in aerospace turbine engine components are less well defined, however. In order to determine the applicability of linear arrays to aerospace inspections the sensitivity of array transducers to embedded defects in engine materials must be characterized. In addition, the implementation of array transducers into legacy inspection procedures must take into account any differences in sensitivity between the array transducer and that of the single element transducer currently used. This paper discusses preliminary results in a study that compares the sensitivity of linear array and conventional single element transducers to synthetic hard alpha defects in a titanium alloy.

  8. Performance of Transducers with Segmented Piezoelectric Stacks using Materials with High Electromechanical Coupling Coefficient

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-03

    transducers , particularly tonpilz transducer elements. Included is discussion of transducer designs using single crystal piezoelectric material with... tonpilz transducer elements. Included is discussion of transducer designs using single crystal piezoelectric material with high coupling coefficient...Conclusions 14 References 16 Appendix 18 v This page intentionally left blank. vi List of Figures Figure 1 The tonpilz transducer element used in this

  9. Illuminating Free-floating Planet Demographics with Keck AO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Calen B.

    2017-01-01

    The frequency and mass function of free-floating planets (FFPs) are unknown. Gravitational microlensing is able to explore the demographics of FFPs, which are identifiable as short-timescale microlensing events, lasting of-order 1 day for Jupiter-mass planets. In 2011, the MOA ground-based microlensing survey group announced the discovery of an excess of short-timescale microlensing events over what was expected from Galactic models that incorporate stellar densities and kinematics. They account for this excess by positing a population of Jupiter-mass FFPs that outnumbers stars by a ratio of nearly 2:1. However, there are several other possible astrophysical explanations for short-timescale microlensing events, including bound planets on wide orbits and high-velocity stars. Although the specific events identified by MOA lack mass measurements, high-resolution imaging can determine whether the lens systems are luminous, which would exclude the FFP conclusion through proof by contradiction. We have taken H-band adaptive optics (AO) observations of the MOA FFP candidates using NIRC2 on Keck II in order to test this result. Here I will present preliminary results from these AO observations, which will help inform our understanding of the demographics of FFPs.

  10. Measurement of electric field and gradient in the plasma sheath using clusters of floating microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Sheridan, T. E.; Katschke, M. R.; Wells, K. D.

    2007-02-15

    A method for measuring the time-averaged vertical electric field and its gradient in the plasma sheath using clusters with n=2 or 3 floating microspheres of known mass is described. The particle charge q is found by determining the ratio of the breathing frequency to the center-of-mass frequency for horizontal (in-plane) oscillations. The electric field at the position of the particles is then calculated using the measured charge-to-mass ratio, and the electric-field gradient is determined from the vertical resonance frequency. The Debye length is also found. Experimental results are in agreement with a simple sheath model.

  11. Safety Issues for HIFU Transducer Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, Gérard; Berriet, Rémi; Chapelon, Jean Yves; ter Haar, Gail; Lafon, Cyril; Le Baron, Olivier; Chupin, Laurent; Pichonnat, Fabrice; Lenormand, Jérôme

    2005-03-01

    In contrast with most ultrasound modalities for medical applications, (especially ultrasound imaging), High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) involves technologies and procedures which may present risk to the patient. These risks, resulting from the high power levels required for effective therapy, should be taken into account at the earliest stages in the design of a system dedicated to HIFU treatment. An understanding of these risks must thus be shared amongst the many players in the field of therapy using high power ultrasound. Moreover, since the number of applications of HIFU has increased appreciably over recent years and the technology is ready to move from the research to the industrial level, it is worth now considering solutions that should be put in place to guarantee the safety of the patient during HIFU treatment. This paper reports thoughts on this, identifies some risks to the patient that must be taken into consideration in the design of HIFU transducers, and proposes some solutions that could prevent the deleterious consequences of transducer misuse or failure. For the main risks identified, such as exceeding the desired acoustic power or poor control of tissue targeting, a description of transducer performance that could potentially result in problems is systematically sought. This allows proposals for precautions to be taken during operation to be made. Parameters which should be monitored to ensure safe use are also suggested. This type of approach, which should be undertaken for the different components of a therapeutic system, highlights the challenges that must be faced in the immediate future for the development and safe exploitation of HIFU systems. The necessity for standard definitions of the parameters to be checked or monitored during HIFU treatments is crucial in this approach, as is the availability of reliable dedicated measurement devices. Co-ordinated action on these topics in the HIFU community would contribute to the

  12. Electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs) for erosion monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Reimann, K.J.

    1984-05-01

    Early detection, measurement, and monitoring of erosive wear rates can alleviate problems of unpredictable shutdowns, costly downtimes, and improper process operation. The first generation of a nondestructive, noninvasive acoustic-based system was tested on pressure boundaries of fossil energy conversion plants, yielding the desired information. Multiple transducers and wave guides are needed for such a system in order to determine wear profiles in large components. The same information could, however, be obtained with a single, scanning electromagnetic transducer (EMAT). Advantages of such EMAT-based systems motivated this investigation in order to establish criteria and requirements needed for erosion monitoring at elevated (operating) temperatures. The effort concentrated on three areas: (a) development of EMAT design parameters, (b) material-EMAT interaction, and (c) signal processing. Prototype horizontal shearwave EMATs, based on design parameters selected from computer calculations of the static field, were evaluated, and their performance was compared to the performance of piezoelectric transducers. Input power requirements for a larger than 10-dB signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio were established for various structural and hardfacing materials. Effects of surface roughness and temperature were determined for different test conditions. The results indicate that accurate wall thickness measurement can be performed at elevated temperature on rough surfaces as encountered, for instance, in a cyclone. Modern data processing such as signal averaging on correlation improves the S/N ratio from 12 dB to 26 dB and enables wall thickness measurements with an accuracy of +-0.25% of total wall thickness. Additional efforts are needed to determine requirements of EMATs in scanning mode and pulsed static field operation.

  13. Piezoelectric and Electrostrictive Materials for Transducer Applications.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-01

    8217IIALMYH iEjn 4R2i 33 E I2/3N 1.0 I. I 1.85 PIZOLKCTRIC AND ELECTIOSTRICrIVE NATRIALS FOR TRANSDUCER APPLICATIONS Annual Report to OFFICE OF NAVAL...So UNCL.ASSIFIED SECURITY CLASSI FICATION OF THIS PAGE 1Wan Do#* ffnt.,.d) REPORT DOCUMENTATION...PAGE BEFRECMLEIN ORM 1REPORT NUMBER 2. oV ACCESSION NO 1. RECIPIENT*$ CATAL.OG NUMBER 4. TITY6 EHI Subtite.) S. TYPE OF REPORT a PERIOD COVERED

  14. Piezoelectric and electrostrictive materials for transducer applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, L. E.; Newnham, R. E.; Barsch, G. R.; Biggers, J. V.

    1984-05-01

    A wide range of materials and devices were covered, including composite materials for transducer applications, electrostriction, and conventional piezoelectrics. In piezoelectric composites, progress was made in 3:1 and 3:2 perforated PZT polymer composites, and in transverse reinforced composites. Finite element calculations of stress distributions in 1:3 PZT polymer composites were carried out. Fresnoite glass ceramics have exhibited extreme stability to hydrostatic pressure, and high sensitivity. A new water quenching technique was used to develop PbTiO3, and a detailed analysis of resonant modes of 1:3 PZT epoxy composites was carried out.

  15. A high-temperature wideband pressure transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.

    1975-01-01

    Progress in the development of a pressure transducer for measurement of the pressure fluctuations in the high temperature environment of a jet exhaust is reported. A condenser microphone carrier system was adapted to meet the specifications. A theoretical analysis is presented which describes the operation of the condenser microphone in terms of geometry, materials, and other physical properties. The analysis was used as the basis for design of a prototype high temperature microphone. The feasibility of connecting the microphone to a converter over a high temperature cable operating as a half-wavelength transmission line was also examined.

  16. On-chip RF-to-optical transducer (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonsen, Anders; Tsaturyan, Yeghishe; Seis, Yannick; Schmid, Silvan; Schliesser, Albert; Polzik, Eugene S.

    2016-04-01

    Recent advances in the fabrication of nano- and micromechanical elements enable the realization of high-quality mechanical resonators with masses so small that the forces from optical photons can have a significant impact on their motion. This facilitates a strong interaction between mechanical motion and light, or phonons and photons. This interaction is the corner stone of the field of optomechanics and allows, for example, for ultrasensitive detection and manipulation of mechanical motion using laser light. Remarkably, today these techniques can be extended into the quantum regime, in which fundamental fluctuations of light and mechanics govern the system's behavior. Micromechanical elements can also interact strongly with other physical systems, which is the central aspect of many micro-electro-mechanical based sensors. Micromechanical elements can therefore act as a bridge between these diverse systems, plus technologies that utilize them, and the mature toolbox of optical techniques that routinely operates at the quantum limit. In a previous work [1], we demonstrated such a bridge by realizing simultaneous coupling between an electronic LC circuit and a quantum-noise limited optical interferometer. The coupling was mediated by a mechanical oscillator forming a mechanically compliant capacitor biased with a DC voltage. The latter enhances the electromechanical interaction all the way to the strong coupling regime. That scheme allowed optical detection of electronic signals with effective noise temperatures far below the actual temperature of the mechanical element. On-chip integration of the electrical, mechanical and optical elements is necessary for an implementation of the transduction scheme that is viable for commercial applications. Reliable assembly of a strongly coupled electromechanical device, and inclusion of an optical cavity for enhanced optical readout, are key features of the new platform. Both can be achieved with standard cleanroom fabrication

  17. Separating Internal Waves and Vortical Motions: Analysis of LatMix -EM-APEX Float Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    observing processes that lead to lateral mixing of water properties. The exploitation of autonomous platforms is a long-term goal. OBJECTIVES...Primary conclusions of the experiment are • EM-APEX float array is a powerful tool in assessing the motion and water properties on small...Goodman. (2015). Submesoscale water -mass spectra in the Sargasso Sea, J. Phys. Oceanogr., 45, 1325-1338. Lien, R.-C. and P. Müller (1992). Normal mode

  18. Resonant acoustic transducer and driver system for a well drilling string communication system

    DOEpatents

    Chanson, Gary J.; Nicolson, Alexander M.

    1981-01-01

    The acoustic data communication system includes an acoustic transmitter and receiver wherein low frequency acoustic waves, propagating in relatively loss free manner in well drilling string piping, are efficiently coupled to the drill string and propagate at levels competitive with the levels of noise generated by drilling machinery also present in the drill string. The transmitting transducer incorporates a mass-spring piezoelectric transmitter and amplifier combination that permits self-oscillating resonant operation in the desired low frequency range.

  19. Floating behavior of hydrophobic glass spheres.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinjie; Wang, Xiaolong; Liang, Yongmin; Zhou, Feng

    2009-08-15

    When a hydrophobic solid sphere is floating on water or salt solutions with different concentrations, it is at equilibrium under the impact of gravity, buoyancy force, and curvature force, the component of surface tension in the vertical direction. We have changed the diameters of the spheres and the concentrations of the two selected salts, NaCl and NaNO(3), to study the floating behaviors of these spheres and the contributions of surface tension and buoyancy force to their floatation. Generally speaking, the surface tension plays a more important role than the buoyancy force when the gravity is small, but the buoyancy force plays an identical or a more important role when the spheres are big enough. The wettability of the spheres significantly influences the height below the contact perimeter especially in salt solutions. The theoretical calculation meniscus slope angles at the sphere three-phase contact line are in agreement with experimental results.

  20. Capillary deposition of advected floating particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dressaire, Emilie; Debaisieux, Aymeric; Gregori, Federico

    2016-11-01

    The deposition and aggregation of particles flowing through a confined environment can dramatically hinder the transport of suspensions. Yet, the mechanisms responsible for the deposition of particles in shear flow are not fully understood. Here, we use an experimental model system in which floating particles are advected on the surface of a water channel and deposited on fixed obstacles through attractive capillary effects. By varying the flow rate of the liquid, the wetting properties and size of the particles and obstacles, we can tune the magnitude of the capillary and hydrodynamic forces that determine the probability of deposition and the equilibrium position on the substrate. We show that arrays of obstacles can be designed to efficiently capture the floating particles advected by the flow.

  1. Floating production systems planned for Italy, Nigeria

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-05-01

    EMH has signed a contract to design, fabricate and install a permanent deepwater, gravity-based single-point mooring (SPM) system and floating oil storage facility in Societa Energio Montedison's (SEM) Vega field off Italy. The design of the system is described. The system is designed to accomodate production rates of 75,000 bpd. The oil will be loaded from the storage tanker into shuttle tankers which will take it to area refineries. The shuttle tankers can moor either in tandem or side-by-side for loading. Also described in this paper are three Nigerian offshore fields -- Akam, Adanga and Ebughu -- being developed by Ashland Oil. They will be brought onstream through the use of an integrated floating production, storage and offloading (FPSO) system. Production from all three fields will be piped to a central manifold platform to which a tanker will be permanently moored via a soft-yoke mooring system.

  2. Floating vs flying: A propulsion energy comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marbury, F.

    1975-01-01

    Floating craft are compared to those that fly. Drag/weight for floaters is shown to be proportional to v squared/L, while for flyers it is independent of size and speed. The transportation market will therefore assign airships to lower speeds than airplanes, and will favor large airship sizes. Drag of an airship is shown to be only 11 percent of submarine drag at equal displacement and speed, raising the possibility that airships can compete with some types of ships.

  3. Ships as future floating farm systems?

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Khaled

    2016-09-29

    Environmental and agriculture challenges such as severe drought, desertification, sprawling cities and shrinking arable lands in large regions in the world compel us to think about alternative and sustainable farming systems. Ongoing projects to build floating cities in the sea suggest that building specific ships for farming purposes (as farming ships or farming boats) would also be attainable to introduce new farming surfaces and boost food production worldwide to cope with food insecurity issues.

  4. Floating gate transistors as biosensors (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisbie, C. Daniel

    2016-11-01

    Electrolyte gated transistors (EGTs) are a sub-class of thin film transistors that are extremely promising for biological sensing applications. These devices employ a solid electrolyte as the gate insulator; the very large capacitance of the electrolyte results in low voltage operation and high transconductance or gain. This talk will describe the fabrication of floating gate EGTs and their use as ricin sensors. The critical performance metrics for EGTs compared with other types of TFTs will also be reviewed.

  5. Complete model of a spherical gravitational wave detector with capacitive transducers: Calibration and sensitivity optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Gottardi, Luciano

    2007-01-15

    We report the results of a detailed numerical analysis of a real resonant spherical gravitational wave antenna operating with six resonant two-mode capacitive transducers read out by superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUID) amplifiers. We derive a set of equations to describe the electromechanical dynamics of the detector. The model takes into account the effect of all the noise sources present in each transducer chain: the thermal noise associated with the mechanical resonators, the thermal noise from the superconducting impedance matching transformer, the backaction noise, and the additive current noise of the SQUID amplifier. Asymmetries in the detector signal-to-noise ratio and bandwidth, coming from considering the transducers not as pointlike objects but as a sensor with physically defined geometry and dimension, are also investigated. We calculate the sensitivity for an ultracryogenic, 30 ton, 2 m in diameter, spherical detector with optimal and nonoptimal impedance matching of the electrical readout scheme to the mechanical modes. The results of the analysis are useful not only to optimize existing smaller mass spherical detector like MiniGrail, in Leiden, but also as a technological guideline for future massive detectors. Furthermore we calculate the antenna patterns when the sphere operates with one, three, and six transducers. The sky coverage for two detectors based in The Netherlands and Brazil and operating in coincidence is also estimated. Finally, we describe and numerically verify a calibration and filtering procedure useful for diagnostic and detection purposes in analogy with existing resonant bar detectors.

  6. Analysis of acoustic impedance matching in dual-band ultrasound transducers.

    PubMed

    Myhre, Ola Finneng; Johansen, Tonni Franke; Johan Angelsen, Bjørn Atle

    2017-02-01

    Dual-frequency band probes are needed for ultrasound (US) reverberation suppression and are useful for image-guided US therapy. A challenge is to design transducer stacks that achieve high bandwidth and efficiency at both operating frequencies when the frequencies are widely separated with a frequency ratio ∼6:1-20:1. This paper studies the loading and backing conditions of transducers in such stacks. Three stack configurations are presented and analyzed using one-dimensional models. It is shown that a configuration with three layers of material separating the transducers is favorable, as it reduces high frequency ringing by ∼20 dB compared to other designs, and matches the low frequency (LF) transducer to the load at a lower frequency. In some cases, the LF load matching is governed by a simple mass-spring interaction in spite of having a complicated matching structure. The proposed design should yield improved performance of reverberation suppression algorithms. Its suitability for reduction of probe heating, also in single-band probes, should be investigated.

  7. Using FOCUS to determine the radiation impedance for square transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, Matthew R.; McGough, Robert J.

    2012-10-01

    The power radiated by an ultrasound transducer is calculated with the radiation resistance, which is the real part of the radiation impedance. For circular transducers, an analytical solution for the radiation impedance is known, but an analytical expression for the radiation impedance is not available for rectangular or square transducers. To determine the radiation resistance in FOCUS, the pressure on the surface of a square transducer is computed with the fast nearfield method, and then the force on the transducer face is computed by integrating the pressure. Results using this approach are numerically evaluated for a range of ka values from 0.1 to 16. The pressure on the transducer face is also computed with the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld integral, and the results are compared. The numerical value of the radiation resistance computed with FOCUS and with the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld integral converge to the same value, although FOCUS calculates the same result in about one-quarter of the time.

  8. Protein family classification using sparse markov transducers.

    PubMed

    Eskin, Eleazar; Noble, William Stafford; Singer, Yoram

    2003-01-01

    We present a method for classifying proteins into families based on short subsequences of amino acids using a new probabilistic model called sparse Markov transducers (SMT). We classify a protein by estimating probability distributions over subsequences of amino acids from the protein. Sparse Markov transducers, similar to probabilistic suffix trees, estimate a probability distribution conditioned on an input sequence. SMTs generalize probabilistic suffix trees by allowing for wild-cards in the conditioning sequences. Since substitutions of amino acids are common in protein families, incorporating wild-cards into the model significantly improves classification performance. We present two models for building protein family classifiers using SMTs. As protein databases become larger, data driven learning algorithms for probabilistic models such as SMTs will require vast amounts of memory. We therefore describe and use efficient data structures to improve the memory usage of SMTs. We evaluate SMTs by building protein family classifiers using the Pfam and SCOP databases and compare our results to previously published results and state-of-the-art protein homology detection methods. SMTs outperform previous probabilistic suffix tree methods and under certain conditions perform comparably to state-of-the-art protein homology methods.

  9. Orbital Angular Momentum-Entanglement Frequency Transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhi-Yuan; Liu, Shi-Long; Li, Yan; Ding, Dong-Sheng; Zhang, Wei; Shi, Shuai; Dong, Ming-Xin; Shi, Bao-Sen; Guo, Guang-Can

    2016-09-01

    Entanglement is a vital resource for realizing many tasks such as teleportation, secure key distribution, metrology, and quantum computations. To effectively build entanglement between different quantum systems and share information between them, a frequency transducer to convert between quantum states of different wavelengths while retaining its quantum features is indispensable. Information encoded in the photon's orbital angular momentum (OAM) degrees of freedom is preferred in harnessing the information-carrying capacity of a single photon because of its unlimited dimensions. A quantum transducer, which operates at wavelengths from 1558.3 to 525 nm for OAM qubits, OAM-polarization hybrid-entangled states, and OAM-entangled states, is reported for the first time. Nonclassical properties and entanglements are demonstrated following the conversion process by performing quantum tomography, interference, and Bell inequality measurements. Our results demonstrate the capability to create an entanglement link between different quantum systems operating in a photon's OAM degrees of freedom, which will be of great importance in building a high-capacity OAM quantum network.

  10. Acoustic lens for capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chienliu; Firouzi, Kamyar; Park, Kwan Kyu; Sarioglu, Ali Fatih; Nikoozadeh, Amin; Yoon, Hyo-Seon; Vaithilingam, Srikant; Carver, Thomas; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.

    2014-08-01

    Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) have great potential to compete with traditional piezoelectric transducers in therapeutic ultrasound applications. In this paper we have designed, fabricated and developed an acoustic lens formed on the CMUT to mechanically focus ultrasound. The acoustic lens was designed based on the paraxial theory and made of silicone rubber for acoustic impedance matching and encapsulation. The CMUT was fabricated based on the local oxidation of silicon (LOCOS) and fusion-bonding. The fabricated CMUT was verified to behave like an electromechanical resonator in air and exhibited wideband response with a center frequency of 2.2 MHz in immersion. The fabrication for the acoustic lens contained two consecutive mold castings and directly formed on the surface of the CMUT. Applied with ac burst input voltages at the center frequency, the CMUT with the acoustic lens generated an output pressure of 1.89 MPa (peak-to-peak) at the focal point with an effective focal gain of 3.43 in immersion. Compared to the same CMUT without a lens, the CMUT with the acoustic lens demonstrated the ability to successfully focus ultrasound and provided a viable solution to the miniaturization of the multi-modality forward-looking endoscopes without electrical focusing.

  11. Improved performance of the optically scanned transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, C. W.; Bolorforosh, M. S.

    1992-11-01

    The rapid increase in the use of ultrasound in both clinical and industrial applications requires more advanced and reliable imaging systems for calibrating and characterizing high performance ultrasonic transducers. The optically scanned hydrophone (OSH) is an alternative imaging system capable of quasi-real time imaging of broadband acoustic fields. The main application of the OSH is in the imaging and characterization of acoustic fields such as those emitted from clinical and therapeutic transducers. In this paper, the recent development of the OSH and its application to real time imaging of broadband acoustic fields are reported. Using improved fabrication techniques the optical sampling efficiency of the OSH has been considerably improved. This is achieved by adopting new assembly techniques and incorporating a novel differential electrode configuration. The improved optical sampling efficiency has provided a more competitive, versatile, and faster imaging system. The performance of the modified OSH is compared against the other types of hydrophone such as the spot poled and the needle types.

  12. Optical piezoelectric transducer for nano-ultrasonics.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kung-Hsuan; Chern, Gia-Wei; Yu, Cheng-Ta; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Pan, Chang-Chi; Chen, Guan-Ting; Chyi, Jen-Inn; Huang, Sheng-Wen; Li, Pai-Chi; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2005-08-01

    Piezoelectric semiconductor strained layers can be treated as piezoelectric transducers to generate nanometer-wavelength and THz-frequency acoustic waves. The mechanism of nano-acoustic wave (NAW) generation in strained piezoelectric layers, induced by femtosecond optical pulses, can be modeled by a macroscopic elastic continuum theory. The optical absorption change of the strained layers modulated by NAW through quantum-confined Franz-Keldysh (QCFK) effects allows optical detection of the propagating NAW. Based on these piezoelectric-based optical principles, we have designed an optical piezoelectric transducer (OPT) to generate NAW. The optically generated NAW is then applied to one-dimensional (1-D) ultrasonic scan for thickness measurement, which is the first step toward multidimensional nano-ultrasonic imaging. By launching a NAW pulse and resolving the returned acoustic echo signal with femtosecond optical pulses, the thickness of the studied layer can be measured with <1 nm resolution. This nano-structured OPT technique will provide the key toward the realization of nano-ultrasonics, which is analogous to the typical ultrasonic techniques but in a nanometer scale.

  13. Current transducers used in power line measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milcarz, Sz.; Gołebiowski, J.

    2014-08-01

    There are many solutions used for current measurements in power lines. The study shows a transducer consisting of a ferromagnetic core, a beam placed in an air-gap and a sensor for optical readout. The beam is made of silicon with a thin 50%Ni50%Fe film. The material of the core is permalloy. A distribution of magnetic field depends on current supplying the power line. The beam is deflected due to magnetic field in the air-gap. A deflection of the beam is measured by the optical fibre sensor. Its advantage is simple design, high precision of processing, non-electric transmission, low costs and ability of a non-contact measurement. Comsol Multiphysics 4.4 and Magnetic Fields Module (mef) were used for modeling. An influence of magnetic circuit's materials and dimensions of the ferromagnetic core and the air-gap were tested in order to determine the most sufficient distribution of magnetic field in the air-gap. The study shows results of the modeling of the transducer compared to practical results for a similar construction scaled down to lower current values.

  14. FPP [Floating Potential Probe] Results, Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Dale C.

    2007-01-01

    The Floating Potential Probe (FPP) operated on the International Space Station (ISS) from December 2000 to April 2001. During that time, it took many measurements of the ISS floating potential and the electron density and temperature. Those measurements were used as inputs to the Environments WorkBench (EWB) model of ISS potentials (originally developed by SAIC, but now sometimes called the Boeing model) that is used even today to predict charging levels for ISS. FPP is now completely defunct, having been removed and ejected from ISS. With the advent of the new Floating Potential Monitoring Unit (FPMU) on ISS, and the beginning of ISS operations with two large solar array panels instead of just one, a review of FPP measurements can offer comparisons with the new FPMU data and perhaps improve the accuracy of future ISS charging predictions. In particular, FPP measurements during times of low electron temperature and high electron density (the times of worst ISS charging) will be brought forward for comparison with the newly obtained FPMU data.

  15. Floating debris in the Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Suaria, Giuseppe; Aliani, Stefano

    2014-09-15

    Results from the first large-scale survey of floating natural (NMD) and anthropogenic (AMD) debris (>2 cm) in the central and western part of the Mediterranean Sea are reported. Floating debris was found throughout the entire study area with densities ranging from 0 to 194.6 items/km(2) and mean abundances of 24.9 AMD items/km(2) and 6.9 NMD items/km(2) across all surveyed locations. On the whole, 78% of all sighted objects were of anthropogenic origin, 95.6% of which were petrochemical derivatives (i.e. plastic and styrofoam). Maximum AMD densities (>52 items/km(2)) were found in the Adriatic Sea and in the Algerian basin, while the lowest densities (<6.3 items/km(2)) were observed in the Central Tyrrhenian and in the Sicilian Sea. All the other areas had mean densities ranging from 10.9 to 30.7 items/km(2). According to our calculations, more than 62 million macro-litter items are currently floating on the surface of the whole Mediterranean basin.

  16. Liquid encapsulated float zone process and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, Robert J. (Inventor); Frazier, Donald O. (Inventor); Lehoczky, Sandor L. (Inventor); Vlasse, Marcus (Inventor); Facemire, Barbara R. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    The process and apparatus for growing crystals using float zone techniques are described. A rod of crystalline materials is disposed in a cylindrical container, leaving a space between the rod and container walls. This space is filled with an encapsulant, selected to have a slightly lower melting point than the crystalline material. The rod is secured to a container end cap at one end and to a shaft at its other end. A piston slides over the rod and provides pressure to prevent loss of volatile components upon melting of the rod. Prior to melting the rod the container is first heated to melt the encapsulant, with any off-gas from this step being vented to a cavity behind the piston. The piston moves slightly forward owing to volume change upon melting of the encapsulant, and the vent passageway is closed. The container is then moved longitudinally through a heated zone to progressively melt sections of the rod as in conventional float zone processes. The float zone technique may be used in the microgravity environment of space.

  17. Borofloat and Starphire Float Glasses: A Comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Wereszczak, Andrew A.; Anderson Jr., Charles E.

    2014-10-28

    Borofloat® borosilicate float glass and Starphire® soda-lime silicate float glass are used in transparent protective systems. They are known to respond differently in some ballistic and triaxial loading conditions, and efforts are underway to understand the causes of those differences. Toward that, a suite of test and material characterizations were completed in the present study on both glasses so to identify what differences exist among them. Compositional, physical properties, elastic properties, flaw size distributions and concentrations, tensile/flexure strength, fracture toughness, spherical indentation and hardness, transmission electron microscopy, striae, high pressure responses via diamond anvil cell testing, laser shock differences, and internal porosity were examined. Differences between these two float glasses were identified for many of these properties and characteristics, and the role of three (striae, high pressures where permanent densification can initiate, and sub-micron-sized porosity) lack understanding and deserve further attention. Lastly, the contributing roles of any of those properties or characteristics to triaxial or ballistic loading responses are not definitive; however, they provide potential correlations that may lead to improved understanding and management of loading responses in glasses used in transparent protective systems.

  18. Borofloat and Starphire Float Glasses: A Comparison

    DOE PAGES

    Wereszczak, Andrew A.; Anderson Jr., Charles E.

    2014-10-28

    Borofloat® borosilicate float glass and Starphire® soda-lime silicate float glass are used in transparent protective systems. They are known to respond differently in some ballistic and triaxial loading conditions, and efforts are underway to understand the causes of those differences. Toward that, a suite of test and material characterizations were completed in the present study on both glasses so to identify what differences exist among them. Compositional, physical properties, elastic properties, flaw size distributions and concentrations, tensile/flexure strength, fracture toughness, spherical indentation and hardness, transmission electron microscopy, striae, high pressure responses via diamond anvil cell testing, laser shock differences, andmore » internal porosity were examined. Differences between these two float glasses were identified for many of these properties and characteristics, and the role of three (striae, high pressures where permanent densification can initiate, and sub-micron-sized porosity) lack understanding and deserve further attention. Lastly, the contributing roles of any of those properties or characteristics to triaxial or ballistic loading responses are not definitive; however, they provide potential correlations that may lead to improved understanding and management of loading responses in glasses used in transparent protective systems.« less

  19. Seven centuries of atmospheric Pb deposition recorded in a floating mire from Central Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaccone, Claudio; Lobianco, Daniela; D'Orazio, Valeria; Miano, Teodoro M.; Shotyk, William

    2016-04-01

    Floating mires generally consist of emergent vegetation rooted in highly organic buoyant mats that rise and fall with changes in water level. Generally speaking, the entire floating mass (mat) is divided into a mat root zone and an underlying mat peat zone. Floating mires are distributed world-wide; large areas of floating marsh occur along rivers and lakes in Africa, the Danube Delta in Romania, the Amazon River in South America, and in the Mississippi River delta in USA, whereas smaller areas occur also in The Netherlands, Australia and Canada. While peat cores from ombrotrophic bogs have been often (and successfully) used to reconstruct changes in the atmospheric deposition of several metals (including Pb), no studies are present in literature about the possibility to use peat profiles from floating mires. To test the hypothesis that peat-forming floating mires could provide an exceptional tool for environmental studies, a complete, 4-m deep peat profile was collected in July 2012 from the floating island of Posta Fibreno, a relic mire in the Central Italy. This floating island has a diameter of ca. 30 m, a submerged thickness of about 3 m, and the vegetation is organized in concentric belts, from the Carex paniculata palisade to the Sphagnum palustre centre. The whole core was frozen cut each 1-to-2 cm (n =231), and Pb determined by quadrupole ICP-MS (at the ultraclean SWAMP lab, University of Alberta, Canada) in each sample throughout the first 100 cm, and in each odd-numbered slice for the remaining 300 cm. The 14C age dating of organic sediments (silty peat) isolated from the sample at 385 cm of depth revealed that the island probably formed ca. 700 yrs ago. Lead concentration trend shows at least two main zones of interest, i.e., a clear peak (ranging from 200 to 1600 ppm) between 110-115 cm of depth, probably corresponding to early 1960's - late 1970's, and a broad band (80-160 ppm) between 295-320 cm of depth, corresponding to approximately AD 1480

  20. Low-cost ultrasonic lamb-wave transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kammerer, C. C.

    1978-01-01

    Transducer propagates Lamb wave through thin aluminum sheet material. Model includes two elements that measure effects of damping and loading which, in turn, are indirectly equated to bond integrity. Transducer has been used to evaluate bond integrity of aluminum facing adhesively bonded to aluminum facing. Because of versatility, it is now possible to inspect many objects of different configurations that could not be reached with earlier transducers.

  1. Electret Acoustic Transducer Array For Computerized Ultrasound Risk Evaluation System

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Thomas L.; Fisher, Karl A.

    2005-08-09

    An electret-based acoustic transducer array is provided and may be used in a system for examining tissue. The acoustic transducer array is formed with a substrate that has a multiple distinct cells formed therein. Within each of the distinct cells is positioned an acoustic transducing element formed of an electret material. A conductive membrane is formed over the distinct cells and may be flexible.

  2. Highly reproducible Bragg grating acousto-ultrasonic contact transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Indu Fiesler; Guzman, Narciso; Lieberman, Robert A.

    2014-09-01

    Fiber optic acousto-ultrasonic transducers offer numerous applications as embedded sensors for impact and damage detection in industrial and aerospace applications as well as non-destructive evaluation. Superficial contact transducers with a sheet of fiber optic Bragg gratings has been demonstrated for guided wave ultrasound based measurements. It is reported here that this method of measurement provides highly reproducible guided ultrasound data of the test composite component, despite the optical fiber transducers not being permanently embedded in it.

  3. An Algorithm for Selecting Transducer Element Array Positions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-01

    response. A lumped-parameter equivalent circuit of a tonpilz transducer is used to predict element amplitude and phase tolerances for different radiation...lumped-parameter equivalent circuit of a tonpilz transducer is used to predict element amplitude and phase tolerances for different radiation loadings...FIGURES p Figure Page : 2.1 A Tonpilz Type Transducer . . .............. . 6 % 2.2 The Equivalent Circuit .......... .................... 7 2.3 The

  4. MEMS acoustic emission transducers designed with high aspect ratio geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saboonchi, H.; Ozevin, D.

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, micro-electro-mechanic systems (MEMS) acoustic emission (AE) transducers are manufactured using an electroplating technique. The transducers use a capacitance change as their transduction principle, and are tuned to the range 50-200 kHz. Through the electroplating technique, a thick metal layer (20 μm nickel + 0.5 μm gold) is used to form a freely moving microstructure layer. The presence of the gold layer reduces the potential corrosion of the nickel layer. A dielectric layer is deposited between the two electrodes, thus preventing the stiction phenomenon. The transducers have a measured quality factor in the range 15-30 at atmospheric pressure and are functional without vacuum packaging. The transducers are characterized using electrical and mechanical tests to identify the capacitance, resonance frequency and damping. Ultrasonic wave generation using a Q-switched laser shows the directivity of the transducer sensitivity. The comparison of the MEMS transducers with similar frequency piezoelectric transducers shows that the MEMS AE transducers have better response characteristics and sensitivity at the resonance frequency and well-defined waveform signatures (rise time and decay time) due to pure resonance behavior in the out-of-plane direction. The transducers are sensitive to a unique wave direction, which can be utilized to increase the accuracy of source localization by selecting the correct wave velocity at the structures.

  5. High Temperature Ultrasonic Transducer for Real-time Inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Mohammad Hossein; Sinclair, Anthony N.; Coyle, Thomas W.

    A broadband ultrasonic transducer with a novel porous ceramic backing layer is introduced to operate at 700 °C. 36° Y-cut lithium niobate (LiNbO3) single crystal was selected for the piezoelectric element. By appropriate choice of constituent materials, porosity and pore size, the acoustic impedance and attenuation of a zirconia-based backing layer were optimized. An active brazing alloy with high temperature and chemical stability was selected to bond the transducer layers together. Prototype transducers have been tested at temperatures up to 700 °C. The experiments confirmed that transducer integrity was maintained.

  6. Focused high frequency needle transducer for ultrasonic imaging and trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Hsiu-Sheng; Zheng, Fan; Li, Ying; Lee, Changyang; Zhou, Qifa; Kirk Shung, K.

    2012-07-01

    A miniature focused needle transducer (<1 mm) was fabricated using the press-focusing technique. The measured pulse-echo waveform showed the transducer had center frequency of 57.5 MHz with 54% bandwidth and 14 dB insertion loss. To evaluate the performance of this type of transducer, invitro ultrasonic biomicroscopy imaging on the rabbit eye was obtained. Moreover, a single beam acoustic trapping experiment was performed using this transducer. Trapping of targeted particle size smaller than the ultrasonic wavelength was observed. Potential applications of these devices include minimally invasive measurements of retinal blood flow and single beam acoustic trapping of microparticles.

  7. Radiation endurance of piezoelectric ultrasonic transducers--a review.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, A N; Chertov, A M

    2015-03-01

    A literature survey is presented on the radiation endurance of piezoelectric ultrasonic transducer components and complete transducer assemblies, as functions of cumulative gamma dose and neutron fluence. The most extensive data on this topic has been acquired in CANDU electrical generating stations, which use piezoelectric ultrasonic transducers manufactured commercially with minor accommodation for high radiation fields. They have been found to be reliable for cumulative gamma doses of up to approximately 2 MegaGrays; a brief summary is made of the associated accommodations required to the transducer design, and the ultimate expected failure modes. Outside of the CANDU experience, endurance data have been acquired under a diverse spectrum of operating conditions; this can impede a direct comparison of the information from different sources. Much of this data is associated with transducers immersed in liquid metal coolants associated with advanced reactor designs. Significant modifications to conventional designs have led to the availability of custom transducers that can endure well over 100 MegaGrays of cumulative gamma dose. Published data on transducer endurance against neutron fluence are reviewed, but are either insufficient, or were reported with inadequate description of test conditions, to make general conclusions on transducer endurance with high confidence. Several test projects are planned or are already underway by major laboratories and research consortia to augment the store of transducer endurance data with respect to both gamma and neutron radiation.

  8. Float processing of high-temperature complex silicate glasses and float baths used for same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Reid Franklin (Inventor); Cook, Glen Bennett (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A float glass process for production of high melting temperature glasses utilizes a binary metal alloy bath having the combined properties of a low melting point, low reactivity with oxygen, low vapor pressure, and minimal reactivity with the silicate glasses being formed. The metal alloy of the float medium is exothermic with a solvent metal that does not readily form an oxide. The vapor pressure of both components in the alloy is low enough to prevent deleterious vapor deposition, and there is minimal chemical and interdiffusive interaction of either component with silicate glasses under the float processing conditions. Alloys having the desired combination of properties include compositions in which gold, silver or copper is the solvent metal and silicon, germanium or tin is the solute, preferably in eutectic or near-eutectic compositions.

  9. Floating Oil-Spill Containment Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.

    2012-01-01

    Previous oil containment booms have an open top that allows natural gas to escape, and have significant oil leakage due to wave action. Also, a subsea pyramid oil trap exists, but cannot move relative to moving oil plumes from deepsea oil leaks. The solution is to have large, moveable oil traps. One version floats on the sea surface and has a flexible tarp cover and a lower weighted skirt to completely entrap the floating oil and natural gas. The device must have at least three sides with boats pulling at each apex, and sonar or other system to track the slowly moving oil plume, so that the boats can properly locate the booms. The oil trap device must also have a means for removal of the oil and the natural gas. A second design version has a flexible pyramid cover that is attached by lines to ballast on the ocean floor. This is similar to fixed, metal pyramid oil capture devices in the Santa Barbara Channel off the coast of California. The ballast lines for the improved design, however, would have winches that can move the pyramid to always be located above the oil and gas plume. A third design is a combination of the first two. It uses a submerged pyramid to trap oil, but has no anchor and uses boats to locate the trap. It has ballast weights located along the bottom of the tarp and/or at the corners of the trap. The improved floating oil-spill containment device has a large floating boom and weighted skirt surrounding the oil and gas entrapment area. The device is triangular (or more than three sides) and has a flexible tarp cover with a raised gas vent area. Boats pull on the apex of the triangles to maintain tension and to allow the device to move to optimum locations to trap oil and gas. The gas is retrieved from a higher buoyant part of the tarp, and oil is retrieved from the floating oil layer contained in the device. These devices can be operated in relatively severe weather, since waves will break over the devices without causing oil leaking. Also, natural

  10. Electron Temperature Measurement by Floating Probe Method Using AC Voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoshi, Nodomi; Shuichi, Sato; Mikio, Ohuchi

    2016-11-01

    This study presents a novel floating probe method to measure electron temperatures using a hollow cathode-type discharge tube. The proposed method detects a shift in the floating potential when an AC voltage is applied to a probe through an intermediary blocking capacitor. The shift in the floating potential is described as a function of the electron temperature and the applied AC voltage. The floating probe method is simpler than the Langmuir probe method because it does not require the measurement of volt-ampere characteristics. As the input AC voltage increases, the electron temperature converges. The electron temperature measured using the floating probe method with an applied sinusoidal voltage shows a value close to the first (tail) electron temperature in the range of the floating potential.

  11. Tank Tests of Two Floats for High-speed Seaplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Joe W

    1933-01-01

    At the request of the Bureau of Aeronautics, Navy Department, a study of the design of floats especially suitable for use on high-speed seaplanes was undertaken in the N.A.C.A. tank. This note give the results obtained in tests of one-quarter full-size models of two floats for high-speed seaplanes. One was a float similar to that used on the Macchi high-speed seaplane which competed in the 1926 Schneider Trophy races, and the other a float designed at the N.A.C.A. tank in an attempt to improve on the water performance of the Macchi float. The model of the latter showed considerably better water performance than the model of the Macchi float.

  12. The effects of second-order hydrodynamics on a semisubmersible floating offshore wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayati, I.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.; Platt, A.

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this paper is to assess the second-order hydrodynamic effects on a semisubmersible floating offshore wind turbine. Second-order hydrodynamics induce loads and motions at the sum- and difference-frequencies of the incident waves. These effects have often been ignored in offshore wind analysis, under the assumption that they are significantly smaller than first-order effects. The sum- and difference-frequency loads can, however, excite eigenfrequencies of a floating system, leading to large oscillations that strain the mooring system or vibrations that cause fatigue damage to the structure. Observations of supposed second-order responses in wave-tank tests performed by the DeepCwind consortium at the Maritime Research Institute Netherlands (MARIN) offshore basin suggest that these effects might be more important than originally expected. These observations inspired interest in investigating how second-order excitation affects floating offshore wind turbines and whether second-order hydrodynamics should be included in offshore wind simulation tools like FAST. In this work, the effects of second-order hydrodynamics on a floating semisubmersible offshore wind turbine are investigated. Because FAST is currently unable to account for second-order effects, a method to assess these effects was applied in which linearized properties of the floating wind system derived from FAST (including the 6x6 mass and stiffness matrices) are used by WAMIT to solve the first- and second-order hydrodynamics problems in the frequency domain. The method was applied to the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration Continuation OC4-DeepCwind semisubmersible platform, supporting the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's 5-MW baseline wind turbine. In this paper, the loads and response of the system caused by the second-order hydrodynamics are analysed and compared to the first-order hydrodynamic loads and induced motions in the frequency domain. Further, the second-order loads

  13. When chromatin organisation floats astray: the Srcap gene and Floating-Harbor syndrome.

    PubMed

    Messina, Giovanni; Atterrato, Maria Teresa; Dimitri, Patrizio

    2016-12-01

    Floating-Harbor syndrome (FHS) is a rare human disease characterised by delayed bone mineralisation and growth deficiency, often associated with mental retardation and skeletal and craniofacial abnormalities. FHS was first described at Boston's Floating Hospital 42 years ago, but the causative gene, called Srcap, was identified only recently. Truncated SRCAP protein variants have been implicated in the mechanism of FHS, but the molecular bases underlying the disease must still be elucidated and investigating the molecular defects leading to the onset of FHS remains a challenge. Here we comprehensively review recent work and provide alterative hypotheses to explain how the Srcap truncating mutations lead to the onset of FHS.

  14. Highly reliable multisensor array (MSA) smart transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perotti, José; Lucena, Angel; Mackey, Paul; Mata, Carlos; Immer, Christopher

    2006-05-01

    Many developments in the field of multisensor array (MSA) transducers have taken place in the last few years. Advancements in fabrication technology, such as Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) and nanotechnology, have made implementation of MSA devices a reality. NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has been developing this type of technology because of the increases in safety, reliability, and performance and the reduction in operational and maintenance costs that can be achieved with these devices. To demonstrate the MSA technology benefits, KSC quantified the relationship between the number of sensors (N) and the associated improvement in sensor life and reliability. A software algorithm was developed to monitor and assess the health of each element and the overall MSA. Furthermore, the software algorithm implemented criteria on how these elements would contribute to the MSA-calculated output to ensure required performance. The hypothesis was that a greater number of statistically independent sensor elements would provide a measurable increase in measurement reliability. A computer simulation was created to answer this question. An array of N sensors underwent random failures in the simulation and a life extension factor (LEF equals the percentage of the life of a single sensor) was calculated by the program. When LEF was plotted as a function of N, a quasiexponential behavior was detected with marginal improvement above N = 30. The hypothesis and follow-on simulation results were then corroborated experimentally. An array composed of eight independent pressure sensors was fabricated. To accelerate sensor life cycle and failure and to simulate degradation over time, the MSA was exposed to an environmental tem-perature of 125°C. Every 24 hours, the experiment's environmental temperature was returned to ambient temperature (27°C), and the outputs of all the MSA sensor elements were measured. Once per week, the MSA calibration was verified at five different

  15. A Formalization of Floating Point Numeric Base Conversion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The process of converting arbitrary real numbers into a floating point format is formalized as a mapping of the reals into a specified subset of real...numbers. The structure of this subset, the set of a significant digit base beta floating point numbers, is analyzed and properties of conversion...implications of these results with regards to establishing goals and standards for floating point formats and conversion procedures are considered.

  16. Trident: An FPGA Compiler Framework for Floating-Point Algorithms.

    SciTech Connect

    Tripp J. L.; Peterson, K. D.; Poznanovic, J. D.; Ahrens, C. M.; Gokhale, M.

    2005-01-01

    Trident is a compiler for floating point algorithms written in C, producing circuits in reconfigurable logic that exploit the parallelism available in the input description. Trident automatically extracts parallelism and pipelines loop bodies using conventional compiler optimizations and scheduling techniques. Trident also provides an open framework for experimentation, analysis, and optimization of floating point algorithms on FPGAs and the flexibility to easily integrate custom floating point libraries.

  17. An Analysis of the Full-Floating Journal Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, M C; Nussdorfer, T J , Jr

    1947-01-01

    An analysis of the operating characteristics of a full-floating journal bearing, a bearing in which a floating sleeve is located between the journal and bearing surfaces, is presented together with charts from which the performance of such bearings may be predicted. Examples are presented to illustrate the use of these charts and a limited number of experiments conducted upon a glass full-floating bearing are reported to verify some results of the analysis.

  18. Environment parameters and basic functions for floating-point computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W. S.; Feldman, S. I.

    1978-01-01

    A language-independent proposal for environment parameters and basic functions for floating-point computation is presented. Basic functions are proposed to analyze, synthesize, and scale floating-point numbers. The model provides a small set of parameters and a small set of axioms along with sharp measures of roundoff error. The parameters and functions can be used to write portable and robust codes that deal intimately with the floating-point representation. Subject to underflow and overflow constraints, a number can be scaled by a power of the floating-point radix inexpensively and without loss of precision. A specific representation for FORTRAN is included.

  19. Surface Drift of RAFOS Floats in the California Current System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gates, D. C.; Collins, C. A.; Margolina, T.

    2011-12-01

    The patterns of surface drift of ninety RAFOS floats in the California Current System have been studied. The floats were launched in the California Undercurrent during 1992-2010 and were tracked by the ARGOS system when they surfaced at the end of their subsurface mission. The float hulls were glass cylinders which were 8.6 cm wide by 1.52 m long and floated with the upper 30 cm of the hull above water. The surface drift of these floats was typically equatorward in the California Current. However, some floats would flow poleward, others would drift westward into the North Pacific Gyre, and others with orbital cyclonic and/or anti-cyclonic motions. The duration of surface trajectories varied from as short as a period of days to approximately ten months. Forces on the floats included wind stress on the exposed hull and the drag of ocean currents on the subsurface hull. The latter included the Stokes drift associated with surface wind waves, Ekman flow caused by the stress of the wind on the ocean surface, and the currents associated with the general circulation of the ocean. Surface currents can be explained by calculating current direction and velocity from wind stress data. As a first step, the relationship between observed wind stress and the motion of the float is determined by assuming Ekman balance. Mesoscale effects, including eddies, are also considered in explaining the surface drift of the floats.

  20. Predicting the Displacement Gain from the Mechanical Quality Factor in Ultrasonic Transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeAngelis, Dominick A.

    The displacement gain is the most important performance parameter for power ultrasonic transducers typically used for welding or cutting: it controls the proportional relationship between the displacement of the tool and the voltage or current input to the transducer, a key process parameter. However, due to the aging effects of the PZT piezoceramics typically used in these transducers, and other variables such as gradual preload loss or tool clamp wear, this displacement gain can drift over time causing a shift in process, and loss of machine-to-machine portability in mass production environments. The "re-calibration" of the displacement gain usually involves a time consuming procedure of standardized controlled tests, and/or measurements using an expensive device such as a laser vibrometer. However, elementary engineering vibrations theory asserts that the displacement gain should be proportional to the static displacement (i.e., 0 Hz or DC) and the mechanical quality factor Qm at resonance, derived from a simple Bode plot, which is already familiar to most transducer designers. This research investigates the methods for obtaining the mechanical quality factor from Bode plots (e.g., constant current or constant voltage sweeps), and ring-down techniques using logarithmic decrement, based on their predictability for determining the displacement gain via the static displacement. The investigation focuses solely on welding transducers for semiconductor wire bonding which employ common hard PZT4 or PZT8 piezoelectric materials. Several other metrics are investigated such as impedance, capacitance and electro-mechanical coupling factor. The experimental and theoretical research methods include Bode plots, equivalent circuits, mechanical analogies and scanning laser vibrometry.