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Sample records for floating water bridge

  1. A floating water bridge produces water with excess charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Elmar C.; Sammer, Martina; Wexler, Adam D.; Kuntke, Philipp; Woisetschläger, Jakob

    2016-03-01

    Excess positive and negative Bjerrum-defect like charge (protonic and ‘aterprotonic’, from ancient Greek ἄ'τɛρ, ‘without’) in anolyte and catholyte of high voltage electrolysis of highly pure water was found during the so-called ‘floating water bridge’ experiment. The floating water bridge is a special case of an electrohydrodynamic liquid bridge and constitutes an intriguing phenomenon that occurs when a high potential difference (~kV cm-1) is applied between two beakers of water. To obtain such results impedance spectroscopy was used. This measurement technique allows the depiction and simulation of complex aqueous systems as simple electric circuits. In the present work we show that there is an additional small contribution from the difference in conductivity between anolyte and catholyte which cannot be measured with a conductivity meter, but is clearly visible in an impedance spectrum.

  2. Proton production, neutralisation and reduction in a floating water bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sammer, Martina; Wexler, Adam D.; Kuntke, Philipp; Wiltsche, Helmar; Stanulewicz, Natalia; Lankmayr, Ernst; Woisetschläger, Jakob; Fuchs, Elmar C.

    2015-10-01

    This work reports on proton production, transport, reduction and neutralization in floating aqueous bridges under the application of a high dc voltage (‘floating water bridge’). Recently possible mechanisms for proton transfer through the bridge were suggested. In this work we visualize and describe the production of protons in the anolyte and their neutralization in the catholyte. Apart from that, protons are reduced to hydrogen due to electrolysis. Microbubbles are detached instantly, due to the electrohydrodynamic flow at the electrode surface. No larger, visible bubbles are formed and the system degasses through the bridge due to its higher local temperature. A detailed analysis of trace elements originating from beaker material, anode or the atmosphere is presented, showing that their influence on the overall conduction compared to the contribution of protons is negligible. Finally, an electrochemical rationale of high voltage electrolysis of low ionic strength solutions is presented.

  3. Building water bridges in air: Electrohydrodynamics of the floating water bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marín, Álvaro G.; Lohse, Detlef

    2010-12-01

    The interaction of electrical fields and liquids can lead to a phenomenon that defies intuition. Some famous examples can be found in electrohydrodynamics as Taylor cones, whipping jets, or noncoalescing drops. A less famous example is the floating water bridge: a slender thread of water held between two glass beakers in which a high voltage difference is applied. Surprisingly, the water bridge defies gravity even when the beakers are separated at distances up to 2 cm. In this paper, experimental measurements and simple models are proposed and discussed for the stability of the bridge and the source of the flow, revealing an important role of polarization forces on the stability of the water bridge. On the other hand, the observed flow can only be explained due to the non-negligible free charge present in the surface. In this sense, the floating water bridge can be considered as an extreme case of a leaky dielectric liquid [J. R. Melcher and G. I. Taylor, Annu. Rev. Fluid Mech. 1, 111 (1969)].

  4. Floating liquid bridge charge dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teschke, Omar; Soares, David Mendez; Gomes, Whyllerson Evaristo; Valente Filho, Juracyr Ferraz

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of liquid with electric fields is investigated in a configuration where up to 13 kV are applied between electrodes resulting in a 106 V/m electric field in the capillaries and where there is the formation of a free-standing fluid bridge in the interelectrode gap. The Mott-Gurney equation was fitted to the measured ionization current vs applied voltage curve which indicates that the ionization rate at the high-voltage anode electrode dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) interface and space charging in the interelectrode gap determine the floating liquid bridge current for a given cathode-to-anode voltage. Space charge effects were measured in the cathode becker and also at the liquid bridge since the ionized charges at the anode migrate to the bridge outer surface and decrease the interfacial tension from 43 mJ/m2 to 29 mJ/m2. Two distinct structural regions then form the bridge, a charged plastic (bulk modulus ˜100 MPa) conducting outer layer with a surface conductivity of ˜10-9 Ω-1, which shapes and supports the floating fluid structure, and an inner liquid cylinder, where DMSO molecules flow.

  5. Copper ion fluxes through the floating water bridge under strong electric potential.

    PubMed

    Giuliani, Livio; D'Emilia, Enrico; Lisi, Antonella; Grimaldi, Settimio; Brizhik, Larissa; Del Giudice, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    We have performed a series of experiments applying high voltage between two electrodes, immersed in two beakers containing bidistilled water in a way similar to experiments conducted by Fuchs and collaborators, which showed that a water bridge can be formed between the two containers. We also observed the formation of water bridge. Moreover, choosing different pairs of electrodes depending on the material they are made up of, we observed that copper ions flow can pass along the bridge if the negative electrode is made up of copper. We show that the direction of the flux not only depends on the applied electrostatic field but on the relative electronegativity of the electrodes too. These results open new perspectives in understanding the properties of water. We suggest a possible explanation of the obtained results.

  6. Floating and flying ferrofluid bridges induced by external magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Rongchao; Zhou, Yixin; Liu, Jing

    2015-04-01

    A ferrofluid is a mixture that exhibits both magnetism and fluidity. This merit enables the ferrofluid to be used in a wide variety of areas. Here we show that a floating ferrofluid bridge can be induced between two separated boards under a balanced external magnetic field generated by two magnets, while a flying ferrofluid bridge can be induced under an unbalanced external magnetic field generated by only one magnet. The mechanisms of the ferrofluid bridges were discussed and the corresponding mathematical equations were also established to describe the interacting magnetic force between the ferro particles inside the ferrofluid. This work answered a basic question that, except for the well-known floating water bridges that are related to electricity, one can also build up a liquid bridge that is related to magnetism.

  7. 40. VAL CONNECTING BRIDGE AND BARGES FLOATING ON RESERVOIR (PREVIOUSLY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. VAL CONNECTING BRIDGE AND BARGES FLOATING ON RESERVOIR (PREVIOUSLY SUPPORTED MUZZLE END OF LAUNCHER BRIDGE). - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  8. Can water float on oil?

    PubMed

    Phan, Chi M; Allen, Benjamin; Peters, Luke B; Le, Thu N; Tade, Moses O

    2012-03-13

    The floatability of water on oil surface was studied. A numerical model was developed from the Young-Laplace equation on three interfaces (water/oil, water/air, and oil/air) to predict the theoretical equilibration conditions. The model was verified successfully with an oil/water system. The stability of the floating droplet depends on the combination of three interface tensions, oil density, and water droplet volume. For practical purposes, however, the equilibrium contact angle has to be greater than 5° so the water droplet can effectively float. This result has significant applications for biodegrading oil wastes. PMID:22352678

  9. 66. VAL BRIDGE AND BARGES FLOATING FROM ISLIP CANYON TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    66. VAL BRIDGE AND BARGES FLOATING FROM ISLIP CANYON TO THE VAL SITE, April 12, 1948. (Original photograph in possession of Dave Willis, San Diego, California.) - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  10. Electrowetting propulsion of water-floating objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Sang Kug; Ryu, Kyungjoo; Cho, Sung Kwon

    2009-07-01

    This letter describes a propulsion principle along with experimental verification of this principle by which an air-to-water interface vertically oscillated by ac electrowetting generates a quasisteady, "streaming" flow that can be utilized to propel water-floating objects. This propulsion does not require any mechanical moving parts. Using a centimeter-sized boat whose outer surfaces were covered with microfabricated electrowetting electrodes, linear, and rotational motions of the boat were achieved up to maximum speeds of 5 mm/s and 20 rpm, respectively. By combining the above two motions, the boat was successfully propelled and steered along a curvilinear pathline. A potential application of this principle is to propel and maneuver various water-floating mini/microrobots and boats used for water/air quality monitoring or surveillance/security purposes.

  11. Water-Pressure Distribution on Seaplane Float

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, F L

    1929-01-01

    The investigation presented in this report was conducted for the purpose of determining the distribution and magnitude of water pressures likely to be experienced on seaplane hulls in service. It consisted of the development and construction of apparatus for recording water pressures lasting one one-hundredth second or longer and of flight tests to determine the water pressures on a UO-1 seaplane float under various conditions of taxiing, taking off, and landing. The apparatus developed was found to operate with satisfactory accuracy and is suitable for flight tests on other seaplanes. The tests on the UO-1 showed that maximum pressures of about 6.5 pounds per square inch occur at the step for the full width of the float bottom. Proceeding forward from the step the maximum pressures decrease in magnitude uniformly toward the bow, and the region of highest pressures narrows toward the keel. Immediately abaft the step the maximum pressures are very small, but increase in magnitude toward the stern and there once reached a value of about 5 pounds per square inch. (author)

  12. 14 CFR 136.11 - Helicopter floats for over water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Helicopter floats for over water. 136.11... TOURS AND NATIONAL PARKS AIR TOUR MANAGEMENT National Air Tour Safety Standards § 136.11 Helicopter floats for over water. (a) A helicopter used in commercial air tours over water beyond the shoreline...

  13. 14 CFR 136.11 - Helicopter floats for over water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Helicopter floats for over water. 136.11... TOURS AND NATIONAL PARKS AIR TOUR MANAGEMENT National Air Tour Safety Standards § 136.11 Helicopter floats for over water. (a) A helicopter used in commercial air tours over water beyond the shoreline...

  14. 14 CFR 136.11 - Helicopter floats for over water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Helicopter floats for over water. 136.11... TOURS AND NATIONAL PARKS AIR TOUR MANAGEMENT National Air Tour Safety Standards § 136.11 Helicopter floats for over water. (a) A helicopter used in commercial air tours over water beyond the shoreline...

  15. 14 CFR 136.11 - Helicopter floats for over water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Helicopter floats for over water. 136.11... TOURS AND NATIONAL PARKS AIR TOUR MANAGEMENT National Air Tour Safety Standards § 136.11 Helicopter floats for over water. (a) A helicopter used in commercial air tours over water beyond the shoreline...

  16. 14 CFR 136.11 - Helicopter floats for over water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Helicopter floats for over water. 136.11... TOURS AND NATIONAL PARKS AIR TOUR MANAGEMENT National Air Tour Safety Standards § 136.11 Helicopter floats for over water. (a) A helicopter used in commercial air tours over water beyond the shoreline...

  17. 26. Mechanical float gages used to monitor level of water ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. Mechanical float gages used to monitor level of water in the filtration bed reservoir. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Filtration Plant, South side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  18. 16. EAST ELEVATION OF FLOAT HOUSE AND FISH WATER RELEASE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. EAST ELEVATION OF FLOAT HOUSE AND FISH WATER RELEASE OUTLET. PART OF ENERGY DISSIPATING BAFFLE PIER SYSTEM IS VISIBLE AT LEFT. - Pit 4 Diversion Dam, Pit River west of State Highway 89, Big Bend, Shasta County, CA

  19. 77 FR 44544 - Safety Zone; Gilmerton Bridge Center Span Float-In, Elizabeth River; Norfolk, Portsmouth, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-30

    ... River; Norfolk, Portsmouth, and Chesapeake, Virginia'' in the Federal Register (77 FR 43557). The... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Gilmerton Bridge Center Span Float-In...; withdrawal. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is withdrawing its proposed rule concerning the Gilmerton Bridge...

  20. Planted floating bed performance in treatment of eutrophic river water.

    PubMed

    Bu, Faping; Xu, Xiaoyi

    2013-11-01

    The objective of the study was to treat eutrophic river water using floating beds and to identify ideal plant species for design of floating beds. Four parallel pilot-scale units were established and vegetated with Canna indica (U1), Accords calamus (U2), Cyperus alternifolius (U3), and Vetiveria zizanioides (U4), respectively, to treat eutrophic river water. The floating bed was made of polyethylene foam, and plants were vegetated on it. Results suggest that the floating bed is a viable alternative for treating eutrophic river water, especially for inhibiting algae growth. When the influent chemical oxygen demand (COD) varied from 6.53 to 18.45 mg/L, total nitrogen (TN) from 6.82 to 12.25 mg/L, total phosphorus (TP) from 0.65 to 1.64 mg/L, and Chla from 6.22 to 66.46 g/m(3), the removal of COD, TN, TP, and Chla was 15.3%-38.4%, 25.4%-48.4%, 16.1%-42.1%, and 29.9 %-88.1%, respectively. Ranked by removal performance, U1 was best, followed by U2, U3, and U4. In the floating bed, more than 60% TN and TP were removed by sedimentation; plant uptake was quantitatively of low importance with an average removal of 20.2% of TN and 29.4% of TP removed. The loss of TN (TP) was of the least importance. Compared with the other three, U1 exhibited better dissolved oxygen (DO) gradient distributions, higher DO levels, higher hydraulic efficiency, and a higher percentage of nutrient removal attributable to plant uptake; in addition, plant development and the volume of nutrient storage in the C. indica tissues outperformed the other three species. C. indica thus could be selected when designing floating beds for the Three Gorges Reservoir region of P. R. China. PMID:23737127

  1. Water flow and solute transport in floating fen root mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stofberg, Sija F.; EATM van der Zee, Sjoerd

    2015-04-01

    Floating fens are valuable wetlands, found in North-Western Europe, that are formed by floating root mats when old turf ponds are colonized by plants. These terrestrialization ecosystems are known for their biodiversity and the presence of rare plant species, and the root mats reveal different vegetation zones at a small scale. The vegetation zones are a result of strong gradients in abiotic conditions, including groundwater dynamics, nutrients and pH. To prevent irreversible drought effects such as land subsidence and mineralization of peat, water management involves import of water from elsewhere to maintain constant surface water levels. Imported water may have elevated levels of salinity during dry summers, and salt exposure may threaten the vegetation. To assess the risk of exposure of the rare plant species to salinity, the hydrology of such root mats must be understood. Physical properties of root mats have scarcely been investigated. We have measured soil characteristics, hydraulic conductivity, vertical root mat movement and groundwater dynamics in a floating root mat in the nature reserve Nieuwkoopse Plassen, in the Netherlands. The root mat mostly consists of roots and organic material, in which the soil has a high saturated water content, and strongly varies in its stage of decomposition. We have found a distinct negative correlation between degree of decomposition and hydraulic conductivity, similar to observations for bogs in the literature. Our results show that the relatively young, thin edge of the root mat that colonizes the surface water has a high hydraulic conductivity and floats in the surface water, resulting in very small groundwater fluctuations within the root mat. The older part of the root mat, that is connected to the deeper peat layers is hydrologically more isolated and the material has a lower conductivity. Here, the groundwater fluctuates strongly with atmospheric forcing. The zones of hydraulic properties and vegetation, appear to

  2. Mathematical modeling of a hydrophilic cylinder floating on water.

    PubMed

    Mao, Zai-Sha; Yang, Chao; Chen, Jiayong

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, a hydrostatic model of the surface profile anchored to the upper edge of a vertical cylinder is proposed to explain why coins can float on water surface. The sharp edge of a cylinder is thus modeled as a round smooth surface on which the contact line may be anchored at a position according to the weight of the cylinder. The mathematical model of the surface profile is established based on the hydrostatics and a third order ordinary differential equation is resulted. Numerical solution of the model demonstrates under practical conditions the existence of the surface profiles that provide reasonable uplifting force at the contact line so that the force is available for floating coins on water surface. The proposed model explains the obviously enlarged apparent contact angle and the edge effect in the literature. The numerical simulation is found in very good agreement with the experimental data in the literature. PMID:22520711

  3. Water Pressure Distribution on a Twin-Float Seaplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, F L

    1930-01-01

    This is the second of a series of investigations to determine water pressure distribution on various types of seaplane floats and hulls, and was conducted on a twin-float seaplane. It consisted of measuring water pressures and accelerations on a TS-1 seaplane during numerous landing and taxiing maneuvers at various speeds and angles. The results show that water pressures as great as 10 lbs. per sq. in.may occur at the step in various maneuvers and that pressures of approximately the same magnitude occur at the stern and near the bow in hard pancake landings with the stern way down. At the other parts of the float the pressures are less and are usually zero or slightly negative for some distance abaft the step. A maximum negative pressure of 0.87 lb. Per square inch was measured immediately abaft the step. The maximum positive pressures have a duration of approximately one-twentieth to one-hundredth second at any given location and are distributed over a very limited area at any particular instant.

  4. Floating Probe Assembly for Measuring Temperature of Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Randy; Ruffin, Clyde

    2002-01-01

    A floating apparatus denoted a temperature probe aquatic suspension system (TPASS) has been developed for measuring the temperature of an ocean, lake, or other natural body of water at predetermined depths. Prior instruments built for the same purpose were found to give inaccurate readings because the apparatuses themselves significantly affected the temperatures of the water in their vicinities. The design of the TPASS is intended to satisfy a requirement to minimize the perturbation of the temperatures to be measured. The TPASS includes a square-cross-section aluminum rod 28 in. (=71 cm) long with floats attached at both ends. Each float includes five polystyrene foam disks about 3/4 in.(=1.9 cm) thick and 2.5 in. (=6.4 cm) in diameter. The disks are stacked to form cylinders, bolted to the rod, and covered with hollow plastic sleeves. A metal sleeve is clamped to the middle of the aluminum rod, from whence it hangs down into the water. Temperature probes (which can be thermocouples, thermistors, or resistance temperature devices) are placed within the sleeve at the desired measurement depths. Wires from the temperature probes are routed to the input terminals of a data logger.

  5. Floating Probe Assembly for Measuring Temperature of Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selinsky, T.; Stewart, Randy; Ruffin, Clyde

    2002-01-01

    A floating apparatus denoted a temperature probe aquatic suspension system (TPASS) has been developed for measuring the temperature of an ocean, lake, or other natural body of water at predetermined depths. Prior instruments built for the same purpose were found to give inaccurate readings because the apparatuses themselves significantly affected the temperatures of the water in their vicinities. The design of the TPASS is intended to satisfy a requirement to minimize the perturbation of the temperatures to be measured. The TPASS includes a square-cross-section aluminum rod 28 in. (approx. = 71 cm) long with floats attached at both ends. Each float includes five polystyrene foam disks about 3/4 in. (approx. = 1.9 cm) thick and 2.5 in. (approx. = 6.4 cm) in diameter. The disks are stacked to form cylinders, bolted to the rod, and covered with hollow plastic sleeves. A metal sleeve is clamped to the middle of the aluminum rod, from whence it hangs down into the water. Temperature probes (which can be thermocouples, thermistors, or resistance temperature devices) are placed within the sleeve at the desired measurement depths. Wires from the temperature probes are routed to the input terminals of a data logger. This work was done by Randy

  6. Floating Probe Assembly for Measuring Temperature of Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Randy; Ruffin, Clyde

    2003-01-01

    A floating apparatus denoted a temperature probe aquatic suspension system (TPASS) has been developed for measuring the temperature of an ocean, lake, or other natural body of water at predetermined depths. These types of measurements are used in computer models to relate remotely sensed water-surface temperature to bulkwater temperature. Prior instruments built for the same purpose were found to give inaccurate readings because the apparatuses themselves significantly affected the temperatures of the water in their vicinities. The design of the TPASS is intended to satisfy a requirement to minimize the perturbation of the temperatures to be measured.

  7. Apparatus for removing oil and other floating contaminants from a moving body of water

    DOEpatents

    Strohecker, J.W.

    1973-12-18

    The patent describes a process in which floating contaminants such as oil and solid debris are removed from a moving body of water by employing a skimming system which uses the natural gravitational flow of the water. A boom diagonally positioned across the body of water diverts the floating contaminants over a floating weir and into a retention pond where an underflow weir is used to return contaminant-free water to the moving body of water. The floating weir is ballasted to maintain the contaminant-receiving opening therein slightly below the surface of the water during fluctuations in the water level for skimming the contaminants with minimal water removal.

  8. A smart "strider" can float on both water and oils.

    PubMed

    Qin, Liming; Zhao, Jie; Lei, Shengbin; Pan, Qinmin

    2014-12-10

    Aquatic devices that can work on both water and oils have great scientific and practical significance, but the challenge remains in developing novel materials with excellent repellence to both water and oils. Here, we report that an artificial "strider" can float on both water and oils by using supporting legs with ultraviolet (UV) switchable wettability. The legs were fabricated by immobilizing TiO2 nanoparticles and n-dodecanethiol onto copper foams via a simple mussel-inspired process. At ambient conditions, the strider floated freely on a water surface, but it dived in water and then stood stably at the interface of water/CHCl3 after UV illumination for 2 h. The reason for this unique behavior is that the legs changed their wettability from superhydrophobicity to underwater superoleophobicity after the illumination. It was revealed that the micro/nanohierarchical structures and photosensitivity of the immobilized TiO2 nanoparticles accounted for the switchable wettability and large supporting force of the legs. The findings of this study offer an alternative strategy for fabricating smart aquatic devices that might be used for water environment protection, water resource surveillance, oil spill cleanup, and so on. PMID:25402567

  9. Performance of floating oil booms in unsheltered waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias, Gregorio; Castro, Alberte

    2013-04-01

    Oil booms are a fundamental tool to diminish the impact of an oil spill. They tend to perform reasonably well in sheltered waters, e.g. within a harbour. However, their performance is often inadequate in open water conditions, under waves, winds and currents. And it is precisely in those conditions that they are needed if oil slicks are to be prevented from reaching certain particularly sensitive areas, such as estuaries, rias, etc. (Castro et al., 2010; Iglesias et al., 2010). In this work the performance of floating oil booms under waves and currents is assessed on the basis of laboratory experiments carried out in a state-of-the-art wave-current flume. Different oil boom models are used, representative of booms with long and short skirts and with different weights. The results show that different booms behave very differently under waves and currents, hence the importance of selecting the boom design that is appropriate for the actual conditions under which it will have to contain the oil slick. Thus, different oil booms should be used for different areas. References A. Castro, G. Iglesias, R. Carballo, J.A. Fraguela, 2010. Floating boom performance under waves and currents, Journal of Hazardous Materials 174, 226-235 G. Iglesias, A.Castro, J.A.Fraguela, 2010. Artificial intelligence applied to floating boom behavior under waves and currents, Ocean Engineering 37, 1513-1521.

  10. Photo-active float for field water disinfection.

    PubMed

    Shwetharani, R; Balakrishna, R Geetha

    2016-03-01

    The present study investigates the antibacterial activity of a photoactive float fabricated with visible light active N-F-TiO2 for the disinfection of field water widely contaminated with Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria like, Salmonella typhimurium (Gram negative), Escherichia coli (Gram negative), Staphylococcus aureus (Gram positive), Bacillus species (Gram positive), and Pseudomonas species (Gram negative). The antibacterial activity can be attributed to the unique properties of the photocatalyst, which releases reactive oxygen species in aqueous solution, under the illumination of sunlight. N-F-TiO2 nanoparticles efficiently photocatalyse the destruction of all the bacteria present in the contaminated water, giving clean water. The inactivation of bacteria is confirmed by a standard plate count method, MDA, RNA and DNA analysis. The purity of water was further validated by SPC indicating nil counts of bacteria after two days of storing and testing. The photocatalysts were characterized by XRD, BET measurement, SEM, EDX, UV-Vis and PL analysis.

  11. Tasman Leakage of intermediate waters as inferred from Argo floats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosell-Fieschi, Miquel; Rintoul, Stephen R.; Gourrion, Jeröme; Pelegrí, Josep L.

    2013-10-01

    use Argo float trajectories to infer ocean current velocity at the sea surface and 1000 dbar near Australia. The East Australian Current flows southward along the east coast of Australia at both surface and intermediate levels, but only the intermediate waters leak round the southern tip of Tasmania and cross the Great Australian Bight. We calculate the transport of Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) between the southern Australian coast and the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) as the velocity at 1000 dbar times the layer thickness. Between March 2006 and December 2012, the Eulerian AAIW transport through 147°E ranges between 0 and 12.0 sverdrup (Sv). The mean Tasman Leakage of intermediate waters from the Pacific Ocean into the Indian Ocean, obtained using all Argo data until March 2013, is 3.8 ± 1.3 Sv. The mean intermediate water transport into the Indian Ocean through 115°E increases to 5.2 ± 1.8 Sv due to contributions from the westward recirculation of ACC waters.

  12. Photo-active float for field water disinfection.

    PubMed

    Shwetharani, R; Balakrishna, R Geetha

    2016-03-01

    The present study investigates the antibacterial activity of a photoactive float fabricated with visible light active N-F-TiO2 for the disinfection of field water widely contaminated with Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria like, Salmonella typhimurium (Gram negative), Escherichia coli (Gram negative), Staphylococcus aureus (Gram positive), Bacillus species (Gram positive), and Pseudomonas species (Gram negative). The antibacterial activity can be attributed to the unique properties of the photocatalyst, which releases reactive oxygen species in aqueous solution, under the illumination of sunlight. N-F-TiO2 nanoparticles efficiently photocatalyse the destruction of all the bacteria present in the contaminated water, giving clean water. The inactivation of bacteria is confirmed by a standard plate count method, MDA, RNA and DNA analysis. The purity of water was further validated by SPC indicating nil counts of bacteria after two days of storing and testing. The photocatalysts were characterized by XRD, BET measurement, SEM, EDX, UV-Vis and PL analysis. PMID:26924232

  13. Bridge over Troubled Water: Guidance Crosses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amundson, Norm

    2008-01-01

    This article is based on a keynote presentation at an international conference where the focus was cross-over career guidance. Simon and Garfunkel's popular song, "Bridge over troubled water", was used as a metaphor for exploring the cross-over theme. Some of the concepts under consideration included the working alliance, the importance of a…

  14. A Floating Bridge Disrupts Seaward Migration and Increases Mortality of Steelhead Smolts in Hood Canal, Washington State

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Megan; Berejikian, Barry A.; Tezak, Eugene P.

    2013-01-01

    Background Habitat modifications resulting from human transportation and power-generation infrastructure (e.g., roads, dams, bridges) can impede movement and alter natural migration patterns of aquatic animal populations, which may negatively affect survival and population viability. Full or partial barriers are especially problematic for migratory species whose life histories hinge on habitat connectivity. Methodology/Principal Findings The Hood Canal Bridge, a floating structure spanning the northern outlet of Hood Canal in Puget Sound, Washington, extends 3.6 meters underwater and forms a partial barrier for steelhead migrating from Hood Canal to the Pacific Ocean. We used acoustic telemetry to monitor migration behavior and mortality of steelhead smolts passing four receiver arrays and several single receivers within the Hood Canal, Puget Sound, and Strait of Juan de Fuca. Twenty-seven mortality events were detected within the vicinity of the Hood Canal Bridge, while only one mortality was recorded on the other 325 receivers deployed throughout the study area. Migrating steelhead smolts were detected at the Hood Canal Bridge array with greater frequency, on more receivers, and for longer durations than smolts migrating past three comparably configured arrays. Longer migration times and paths are likely to result in a higher density of smolts near the bridge in relation to other sites along the migration route, possibly inducing an aggregative predator response to steelhead smolts. Conclusions/Significance This study provides strong evidence of substantial migration interference and increased mortality risk associated with the Hood Canal Bridge, and may partially explain low early marine survival rates observed in Hood Canal steelhead populations. Understanding where habitat modifications indirectly increase predation pressures on threatened populations helps inform potential approaches to mitigation. PMID:24039937

  15. Electrowetting in a water droplet with a movable floating substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahzad, Amir; Masud, A. R.; Song, Jang-Kun

    2016-05-01

    Electrowetting (EW) enables facile manipulation of a liquid droplet on a hydrophobic surface. In this study, manipulation of an electrolyte droplet having a small floating object on it was investigated on a solid hydrophobic substrate under the EW process. Herein, the floating object exhibited a vertical motion under an applied electric field owing to the spreading and contraction of the droplet on its connecting substrates. The field-induced height variation of the floating object was significantly influenced by the thicknesses of the dielectric and hydrophobic materials. A small mass was also placed on the top floating object and its effect on the spreading of the droplet was observed. In this system, the height of the top floating object is precisely controllable under the application of an electric voltage. The proposed system is expected to be highly useful in the design of nano- and micro-oscillatory systems for microengineering.

  16. Electrowetting in a water droplet with a movable floating substrate.

    PubMed

    Shahzad, Amir; Masud, A R; Song, Jang-Kun

    2016-05-01

    Electrowetting (EW) enables facile manipulation of a liquid droplet on a hydrophobic surface. In this study, manipulation of an electrolyte droplet having a small floating object on it was investigated on a solid hydrophobic substrate under the EW process. Herein, the floating object exhibited a vertical motion under an applied electric field owing to the spreading and contraction of the droplet on its connecting substrates. The field-induced height variation of the floating object was significantly influenced by the thicknesses of the dielectric and hydrophobic materials. A small mass was also placed on the top floating object and its effect on the spreading of the droplet was observed. In this system, the height of the top floating object is precisely controllable under the application of an electric voltage. The proposed system is expected to be highly useful in the design of nano- and micro-oscillatory systems for microengineering. PMID:27300973

  17. Water-Floating Giant Nanosheets from Helical Peptide Pentamers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaehun; Choe, Ik Rang; Kim, Nak-Kyoon; Kim, Won-Je; Jang, Hyung-Seok; Lee, Yoon-Sik; Nam, Ki Tae

    2016-09-27

    One of the important challenges in the development of protein-mimetic materials is understanding the sequence-specific assembly behavior and dynamic folding change. Conventional strategies for constructing two-dimensional (2D) nanostructures from peptides have been limited to using β-sheet forming sequences as building blocks due to their natural tendency to form sheet-like aggregations. We have identified a peptide sequence (YFCFY) that can form dimers via a disulfide bridge, fold into a helix, and assemble into macroscopic flat sheets at the air/water interface. Due to the large driving force for 2D assembly and high elastic modulus of the resulting sheet, the peptide assembly induces flattening of the initially round water droplet. Additionally, we found that stabilization of the helix by dimerization is a key determinant for maintaining macroscopic flatness over a few tens of centimeters even with a uniform thickness of <10 nm. Furthermore, the ability to transfer the sheets from a water droplet to another substrate allows for multiple stacking of 2D peptide nanostructures, suggesting possible applications in biomimetic catalysis, biosensors, and 2D related electronic devices. PMID:27583783

  18. Water-Floating Giant Nanosheets from Helical Peptide Pentamers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaehun; Nam, Ki Tae

    One of the important challenges in the development of protein-mimetic materials is to understand the sequence specific assembly behavior and the dynamic folding change. Conventional strategies to construct two dimensional nanostructures from the peptides have been limited to beta-sheet forming sequences in use of basic building blocks because of their natural tendency to form sheet like aggregations. Here we identified a new peptide sequence, YFCFY that can form dimers by the disulfide bridge, fold into helix and assemble into macroscopic flat sheet at the air/water interface. Because of large driving force for two dimensional assembly and high elastic modulus of the resulting sheet, the peptide assembly induces the flattening of initially round water droplet. Additionally, we found that stabilization of helix by the dimerization is a key determinant for maintaining macroscopic flatness over a few tens centimeter even with a uniform thickness below 10 nm. Furthermore, the capability to transfer 2D film from water droplet to other substrates allows for the multiple stacking of 2D peptide nanostructure, suggesting possible applications in the biomimetic catalysts, biosensor and 2D related electronic devices. This work was supported by Samsung Research Funding Center of Samsung Electronics under Project Number SRFC-MA1401-01.

  19. Floating seaweed in the neustonic environment: A case study from Belgian coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandendriessche, Sofie; Vincx, Magda; Degraer, Steven

    2006-02-01

    Floating seaweeds form the most important natural component of all floating material found on the surface of oceans and seas. Notwithstanding the absence of natural rocky shores, ephemeral floating seaweed clumps are frequently encountered along the Belgian coast. From October 2002 to April 2003, seaweed samples and control samples (i.e. surface water samples from a seaweed-free area) were collected every other week. Multivariate analysis on neustonic macrofaunal abundances showed significant differences between seaweed and control samples in the fraction > 1 mm. Differences were less conspicuous in the 0.5-1 mm fraction. Seaweed samples were characterised by the presence of seaweed fauna e.g. Acari, Idotea baltica, Gammarus sp ., while control samples mainly contained Calanoida, Larvacea, Chaetognatha, and planktonic larvae of crustaceans and polychaetes. Seaweed samples (1 mm fraction) harboured considerably higher diversities (× 3), densities (× 18) and biomasses (× 49) compared to the surrounding water column (control samples). The impact of floating seaweeds on the neustonic environment was quantified by the calculation of the added values of seaweed samples considering biomass and density. These calculations resulted in mean added values of 311 ind m - 2 in density and 305 mg ADW m - 2 in biomass. The association degree per species was expressed as the mean percentage of individuals found in seaweed samples in proportion to the total density and biomass of that species (seaweed samples + control samples). Thirteen species showed an association percentage > 95%, and can therefore be considered members of the floating seaweed fauna.

  20. Nitrate removal from polluted water by using a vegetated floating system.

    PubMed

    Bartucca, Maria Luce; Mimmo, Tanja; Cesco, Stefano; Del Buono, Daniele

    2016-01-15

    Nitrate (NO3(-)) water pollution is one of the most prevailing and relevant ecological issues. For instance, the wide presence of this pollutant in the environment is dramatically altering the quality of superficial and underground waters. Therefore, we set up a floating bed vegetated with a terrestrial herbaceous species (Italian ryegrass) with the aim to remediate hydroponic solutions polluted with NO3(-). The floating bed allowed the plants to grow and achieve an adequate development. Ryegrass was not affected by the treatments. On the contrary, plant biomass production and total nitrogen content (N-K) increased proportionally to the amount of NO3(-) applied. Regarding to the water cleaning experiments, the vegetated floating beds permitted to remove almost completely all the NO3(-) added from the hydroponic solutions with an initial concentration of 50, 100 and 150 mg L(-1). Furthermore, the calculation of the bioconcentration factor (BCF) indicated this species as successfully applicable for the remediation of solutions polluted by NO3(-). In conclusion, the results highlight that the combination of ryegrass and the floating bed system resulted to be effective in the remediation of aqueous solutions polluted by NO3(-). PMID:26562338

  1. ASCAN Precourt floats on life raft during Elgin AFB water survival training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    1990 Group 13 Astronaut Candidate (ASCAN) Charles J. Precourt, wearing helmet and flight suit, floats in pool using an underarm flotation device and a single person life raft at Elgin Air Force Base (AFB) in Pensacola, Florida, during water survival exercises. The training familiarized the candidates with survival techniques necessary in the event of a water landing. ASCANs participated in the exercises from 08-14-90 through 08-17-90.

  2. Sacramento River Water Treatment Plant Intake Pier & Access Bridge, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Sacramento River Water Treatment Plant Intake Pier & Access Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River approximately 175 feet west of eastern levee on river; roughly .5 mile downstream from confluence of Sacramento & American Rivers, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  3. Bioinspired oil strider floating at the oil/water interface supported by huge superoleophobic force.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xueli; Gao, Jun; Xue, Zhongxin; Chen, Li; Lin, Ling; Jiang, Lei; Wang, Shutao

    2012-06-26

    Oil pollution to aquatic devices, especially to those oil-cleaning devices and equipment-repairing robots during oil spill accidents, has drawn great attention and remains an urgent problem to be resolved. Developing devices that can move freely in an oil/water system without contamination from oil has both scientific and practical importance. In nature, the insect water strider can float on water by utilizing the superhydrophobic supporting force received by its legs. Inspired by this unique floating phenomenon, in this article, we designed a model device named "oil strider" that could float stably at the oil/water interface without contamination by oil. The floating capability of the oil strider originated from the huge underwater superoleophobic supporting force its "legs" received. We prepared the micro/nanohierarchical structured copper-oxide-coated copper wires, acting as the artificial legs of oil strider, by a simple base-corrosion process. The surface structures and hydrophilic chemical components of the coatings on copper wires induced the huge superoleophobic force at the oil/water interface, to support the oil strider from sinking into the oil. Experimental results and theoretical analysis demonstrate that this supporting force is mainly composed of three parts: the buoyancy force, the curvature force, and the deformation force. We anticipate that this artificial oil strider will provide a guide for the design of smart aquatic devices that can move freely in an oil/water system with excellent oil repellent capability, and be helpful in practical situations such as oil handling and oil spill cleanup. PMID:22607241

  4. WindWaveFloat

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, Alla

    2011-11-01

    Presentation from the 2011 Water Peer Review includes in which principal investigator Alla Weinstein discusses project progress in development of a floating offshore wind structure - the WindFloat - and incorporation therin of a Spherical Wave Energy Device.

  5. ASCAN Ochoa floats in pool during Elgin AFB water survival training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    1990 Group 13 Astronaut Candidate (ASCAN) Ellen Ochoa, wearing helmet and flight suit, climbs into a single person life raft while floating in a pool at Elgin Air Force Base (AFB) in Pensacola, Florida, during water survival exercises. Ochoa's underarm flotation device holds her above the water as she pulls herself into the life raft. The training familiarized the candidates with survival techniques necessary in the event of a water landing. ASCANs participated in the exercises from 08-14-90 through 08-17-90.

  6. Ignition of a floating droplet of organic coal-water fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakoryakov, V. E.; Kuznetsov, G. V.; Strizhak, P. A.

    2016-06-01

    The results of experimental investigations are presented for the ignition of droplets (particles) of organic coal-water fuels (OCWFs) floating in a flow of an oxidizer using a special combustion chamber from high-temperature quartz glass. The temperature and the velocity of motion of the oxidizer vary in the ranges of 500-900 K and 0.5-3 m/s. The initial sizes (radii) of fuel droplets amounted to 0.3-1.5 mm. As the basic OCWF components, particles (of 80-100 µm in size) of brown coal "B2," water, mazut, and waste castor and compressor oils are used. With use of the system of high-velocity video registration, the conditions providing for floating of OCWF particles without initiation of burning and with the subsequent steady ignition are established. Four modes of OCWF-droplet ignition with different trajectories of their motion in the combustion chamber are singled out. The times of the OCWF-ignition delay in dependence on the size of fuel particles and oxidizer temperatures are determined. The deviations of the OCWF-ignition-delay times obtained under conditions of suspension of a droplet on the thermocouple junction and while floating in the oxidizer flow are established.

  7. Ultrafast vibrational energy relaxation of the water bridge.

    PubMed

    Piatkowski, Lukasz; Wexler, Adam D; Fuchs, Elmar C; Schoenmaker, Hinco; Bakker, Huib J

    2012-05-14

    We report the energy relaxation of the OH stretch vibration of HDO molecules contained in an HDO:D(2)O water bridge using femtosecond mid-infrared pump-probe spectroscopy. We found that the vibrational lifetime is shorter (~630 ± 50 fs) than for HDO molecules in bulk HDO:D(2)O (~740 ± 40 fs). In contrast, the thermalization dynamics following the vibrational relaxation are much slower (~1.5 ± 0.4 ps) than in bulk HDO:D(2)O (~250 ± 90 fs). These differences in energy relaxation dynamics strongly indicate that the water bridge and bulk water differ on a molecular scale.

  8. Measurements of salinity, temperature, and tides in south San Francisco Bay, California, at Dumbarton Bridge; 1990-93 water years

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schemel, Laurence E.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey measures salinity, temperature, and water levels (tides) in southern San Francisco Bay at Dumbarton Bridge as part of a cooperative program with the California State Department of Water Resources. During water years 1990-93, measurements were made at 15-minute intervals with electonic sensors located approximately one meter above the substrate in approximately six meters of water (at mean water level). During March and April of 1991 and 1992, salinity and temperature also were measured with a self-contained system floating one meter below the surface of the water. Sections of the data set were selected to illustrate influences of tidal currents, weather events, and seasonal and interannual variations in climate on salinity, temperature, and water levels at this location. The edited data are provided on high-density disks in comma-delimited, ASCII text files.

  9. Magnetically driven floating foams for the removal of oil contaminants from water.

    PubMed

    Calcagnile, Paola; Fragouli, Despina; Bayer, Ilker S; Anyfantis, George C; Martiradonna, Luigi; Cozzoli, P Davide; Cingolani, Roberto; Athanassiou, Athanassia

    2012-06-26

    In this study, we present a novel composite material based on commercially available polyurethane foams functionalized with colloidal superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and submicrometer polytetrafluoroethylene particles, which can efficiently separate oil from water. Untreated foam surfaces are inherently hydrophobic and oleophobic, but they can be rendered water-repellent and oil-absorbing by a solvent-free, electrostatic polytetrafluoroethylene particle deposition technique. It was found that combined functionalization of the polytetrafluoroethylene-treated foam surfaces with colloidal iron oxide nanoparticles significantly increases the speed of oil absorption. Detailed microscopic and wettability studies reveal that the combined effects of the surface morphology and of the chemistry of the functionalized foams greatly affect the oil-absorption dynamics. In particular, nanoparticle capping molecules are found to play a major role in this mechanism. In addition to the water-repellent and oil-absorbing capabilities, the functionalized foams exhibit also magnetic responsivity. Finally, due to their light weight, they float easily on water. Hence, by simply moving them around oil-polluted waters using a magnet, they can absorb the floating oil from the polluted regions, thereby purifying the water underneath. This low-cost process can easily be scaled up to clean large-area oil spills in water. PMID:22577733

  10. Magnetically driven floating foams for the removal of oil contaminants from water.

    PubMed

    Calcagnile, Paola; Fragouli, Despina; Bayer, Ilker S; Anyfantis, George C; Martiradonna, Luigi; Cozzoli, P Davide; Cingolani, Roberto; Athanassiou, Athanassia

    2012-06-26

    In this study, we present a novel composite material based on commercially available polyurethane foams functionalized with colloidal superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and submicrometer polytetrafluoroethylene particles, which can efficiently separate oil from water. Untreated foam surfaces are inherently hydrophobic and oleophobic, but they can be rendered water-repellent and oil-absorbing by a solvent-free, electrostatic polytetrafluoroethylene particle deposition technique. It was found that combined functionalization of the polytetrafluoroethylene-treated foam surfaces with colloidal iron oxide nanoparticles significantly increases the speed of oil absorption. Detailed microscopic and wettability studies reveal that the combined effects of the surface morphology and of the chemistry of the functionalized foams greatly affect the oil-absorption dynamics. In particular, nanoparticle capping molecules are found to play a major role in this mechanism. In addition to the water-repellent and oil-absorbing capabilities, the functionalized foams exhibit also magnetic responsivity. Finally, due to their light weight, they float easily on water. Hence, by simply moving them around oil-polluted waters using a magnet, they can absorb the floating oil from the polluted regions, thereby purifying the water underneath. This low-cost process can easily be scaled up to clean large-area oil spills in water.

  11. Video-Bubbles Inserted Into a Floating Drop of Water on the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Saturday Morning Science, the science of opportunity series of applied experiments and demonstrations, performed aboard the International Space Station (ISS) by Expedition 6 astronaut Dr. Don Pettit, revealed some remarkable findings. Inserting a bubble into a floating ball of water in space is difficult, as Pettit demonstrates in this video. Blowing the bubble is the easy part. Getting it to stay in the center of the ball of water is much more difficult. Watch the video to see the technique Dr. Pettit finally uses and see the resulting visual surprise offered by the ensuing optical properties.

  12. Particle and microorganism removal in floating plastic media coupled with microfiltration membrane for surface water treatment.

    PubMed

    Chiemchaisri, C; Chiemchaisri, W; Kornboonraksa, T; Dumrongsukit, C; Threedeach, S; Ngo, H H; Vigneswaran, S

    2005-01-01

    Floating plastic media followed by hollow fiber microfiltration membrane was applied for surface water treatment. The performance of the system in terms of particle and microorganisms was investigated. The floating filter was examined at different filtration rates of 5, 10 and 15 m3/m2 x h. Treated water was then fed into a microfiltration unit where different filtration rates were examined at 0.6, 1.0 and 1.4 m3/m2 x d. It was found that polyaluminum chloride was the best coagulant for the removal of particle, algae and coliform bacteria. Average turbidity in treated water from the floating plastic media filter was 3.3, 12.2 and 15.5 NTU for raw water of 80 NTU and 12.9, 11.7 and 31.2 NTU for raw water of 160 NTU after 6 hours at the filtration rates of 5, 10 and 15 m3/m2 x h, respectively. The microfiltration unit could further reduce the turbidity to 0.2-0.5 NTU with low transmembrane pressure development of 0.3-3.7 kPa. Microfiltration membrane could retain most of algae and coliform bacteria remaining in the effluent from the pretreatment unit. It was found that at higher turbidity, algae and coliform bacteria removal efficiencies were achieved at lower filtration rate of the system of 5 m3/m2 x h whereas a higher filtration rate of 15 m3/m2 x h yielded better coliphage removal.

  13. Floating bioplato for purification of waste quarry waters from mineral nitrogen compounds in the Arctic.

    PubMed

    Evdokimova, Galina A; Ivanova, Lyubov A; Mozgova, Natalia P; Myazin, Vladimir A; Fokina, Nadezhda V

    2016-08-23

    A bioplato was organized at Kirovogorskiy pond-settling of OLKON Company (the city of Olenegorsk, in Murmansk region) to reduce the content of nitrogen mineral compounds in water which come into the pond with the quarry waters after blasting operations using nitrogen compounds. The assortment of aboriginal plants was selected, a method of fixing and growing them on the water surface was developed, and observations of their vegetation were carried out. The dynamics of nitrogen compounds was determined in the laboratory and with full-scale tests. The coverage area pond by plants for the effective reduction of mineral nitrogen compounds was calculated. The use of floating bioplato helped to reduce content of ammonium and nitrite to maximum permissible levels or even lower in pond water. Also there was a tendency towards reduction of nitrate concentrations in water. The developmental technology can be used in any climatic zone with a specific assortment of plants-ameliorants.

  14. Flexural-gravity circumferential and radial oscillations of a plate floating in shallow water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shemelina, V. O.

    2016-05-01

    The natural and quasi-natural flexural-gravity oscillations of an elastic plate floating on a liquid surface have been studied numerically and analytically based on shallow-water long-wave theory. Dependences of the natural and quasi-natural frequencies on the geometrical parameters of the oscillation region have been investigated for the cases of bounded and unbounded basins. The effect of bottom irregularity in the form of a circular cylinder or a circular truncated cone on the natural and quasi-natural frequencies and functions has been examined.

  15. Floating marine debris in coastal waters of the SE-Pacific (Chile).

    PubMed

    Thiel, M; Hinojosa, I; Vásquez, N; Macaya, E

    2003-02-01

    Herein we report on the abundance and composition of floating marine debris (FMD) in coastal waters of the SE-Pacific (off the Chilean coast) during the austral summer 2002. The observed FMD consisted mainly of plastic material (86.9%). Densities of FMD were highest between 20 degrees S and 40 degrees S, corresponding to the main concentrations of human population and activities. Low densities of FMD were found in the south between 40 degrees S and 50 degrees S (<1 item km(-2)). Generally, the highest densities were recorded in nearshore waters of major port cities (>20 items km(-2)), but occasionally high concentrations of debris were also found 50 km offshore. Densities of FMD in coastal waters of the SE-Pacific are of similar magnitudes as those found in coastal waters or inland seas of highly populated regions in the northern hemisphere, indicating the need for improved regulation and legislation in the countries of the SE-Pacific.

  16. 71. Route 34 & Water Street Bridges. New Haven, New ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    71. Route 34 & Water Street Bridges. New Haven, New Haven Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 72.47/.49. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  17. 70. Route 34 & Water Street Bridges. New Haven, New ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    70. Route 34 & Water Street Bridges. New Haven, New Haven Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 72.47/.49. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  18. Shockwave generation by a semiconductor bridge operation in water

    SciTech Connect

    Zvulun, E.; Toker, G.; Gurovich, V. Tz.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2014-05-28

    A semiconductor bridge (SCB) is a silicon device, used in explosive systems as the electrical initiator element. In recent years, SCB plasma has been extensively studied, both electrically and using fast photography and spectroscopic imaging. However, the value of the pressure buildup at the bridge remains unknown. In this study, we operated SCB devices in water and, using shadow imaging and reference beam interferometry, obtained the velocity of the shock wave propagation and distribution of the density of water. These results, together with a self-similar hydrodynamic model, were used to calculate the pressure generated by the exploding SCB. In addition, the results obtained showed that the energy of the water flow exceeds significantly the energy deposited into the exploded SCB. The latter can be explained by the combustion of the aluminum and silicon atoms released in water, which acts as an oxidizing medium.

  19. Enhanced load-carrying capacity of hairy surfaces floating on water.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yahui; Yuan, Huijing; Su, Weidong; Shi, Yipeng; Duan, Huiling

    2014-05-01

    Water repellency of hairy surfaces depends on the geometric arrangement of these hairs and enables different applications in both nature and engineering. We investigate the mechanism and optimization of a hairy surface floating on water to obtain its maximum load-carrying capacity by the free energy and force analyses. It is demonstrated that there is an optimum cylinder spacing, as a result of the compromise between the vertical capillary force and the gravity, so that the hairy surface has both high load-carrying capacity and mechanical stability. Our analysis makes it clear that the setae on water striders' legs or some insects' wings are in such an optimized geometry. Moreover, it is shown that surface hydrophobicity can further increase the capacity of a hairy surface with thick cylinders, while the influence is negligible when the cylinders are thin. PMID:24808757

  20. The reaction on a float bottom when making contact with water at high speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, H C

    1928-01-01

    Tests were conducted to investigate the possibility of a serious accident arising from unintentional contact with the water in substantially horizontal flight at high speed. Referring to vector diagrams on Figure 2, it will be seen that a very dangerous condition may arise if the float be allowed to come in contact with the water at high speeds as, for example, when flying at high speed just above the water. The initial diving moment due to suction and drag combined may be great enough to cause the seaplane to nose under before the pilot is able to control the motion. The same test data indicate clearly the existence of forces and moments tending to produce the phenomenon observed by Mr. Carroll (Technical Note No. 287) when the maneuver is carried out at lower speeds, as in a landing.

  1. Enhanced load-carrying capacity of hairy surfaces floating on water

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yahui; Yuan, Huijing; Su, Weidong; Shi, Yipeng; Duan, Huiling

    2014-01-01

    Water repellency of hairy surfaces depends on the geometric arrangement of these hairs and enables different applications in both nature and engineering. We investigate the mechanism and optimization of a hairy surface floating on water to obtain its maximum load-carrying capacity by the free energy and force analyses. It is demonstrated that there is an optimum cylinder spacing, as a result of the compromise between the vertical capillary force and the gravity, so that the hairy surface has both high load-carrying capacity and mechanical stability. Our analysis makes it clear that the setae on water striders' legs or some insects' wings are in such an optimized geometry. Moreover, it is shown that surface hydrophobicity can further increase the capacity of a hairy surface with thick cylinders, while the influence is negligible when the cylinders are thin. PMID:24808757

  2. Development of floating plastic media filtration system for water treatment and wastewater reuse.

    PubMed

    Chiemchaisri, C; Panchawaranon, C; Rutchatanunti, S; Kludpiban, A; Ngo, H H; Vigneswaran, S

    2003-01-01

    Floating plastic media coupled with sand filtration system was applied for treating surface water and secondary effluent from municipal sewage treatment plant. The system employed floating plastic media for the removal of suspended solids in surface water and precipitated phosphorus from secondary effluent of sewage treatment plant. Sand filtration was then used to remove further the suspended solids. For the purposes of wastewater reuse, a zeolite layer was used instead of sand filter to absorb ammonium nitrogen. Application of system for surface water treatment suggested appropriate filtration rate of 5 m3/m2 h. Polyaluminum chloride was found to be the best coagulant with an appropriate plastic and sand bed depth of 40 cm. The system could produce average effluent turbidity and suspended solids of 0.71 NTU and 0.94 mg/L respectively. Average turbidity and suspended solids removal efficiencies were 96.26% and 95.48% with low headloss development of 40.4 cm at the end of 6 h operation period. When applying 1.50 m. floating plastic media bed for the treatment of synthetic raw water, short and long-term turbidity removal efficiencies were 96.79-97.72% and 81.81-94.61% for raw water containing turbidity of 20 and 40 NTU. It could produce the effluent with turbidity less than 5NTU while having less than 1.0 m. headloss. The system was also applied for the secondary effluent treatment. An optimum filtration rate of 5 m3/m2 h was obtained when using plastic and sand bed depth of 60 and 20cm under direct filtration mode. Average turbidity removal was 60.3% and 59.6% after 6 and 48 h of operation. It was also found that 1 m3/m2 h filtration rate and 50:30 cm of plastic:zeolite bed could be used to achieve both ammonium nitrogen and phosphate removal. Suspended solids, turbidity, BOD5, NH4+, and PO4(3-) removal efficiencies were 91.9, 94.6, 95.4, 97.3, and 99.5% respectively after 24 h. As a result, the effluent from the system had average NH4+ and PO4(3-) of 0.5 mg N

  3. 77 FR 73541 - Safety Zone: Gilmerton Bridge Center Span Float-in, Elizabeth River; Norfolk, Portsmouth, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-11

    ... Gilmerton Bridge Area (77 FR 43557) on September 5-9, 2012. We received no comments on the proposed rule...-9826. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal... regarding our public dockets in the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). 4....

  4. 77 FR 35900 - Safety Zone; Gilmerton Bridge Center Span Float-in, Elizabeth River; Norfolk, Portsmouth, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-15

    ... INFORMATION: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed... regarding our public dockets in the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). 4. Public... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Gilmerton Bridge Center Span...

  5. 77 FR 43557 - Safety Zone; Gilmerton Bridge Center Span Float-in, Elizabeth River; Norfolk, Portsmouth, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-25

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice... Act notice regarding our public dockets in the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Gilmerton Bridge Center Span...

  6. 77 FR 75016 - Safety Zone: Gilmerton Bridge Center Span Float-in, Elizabeth River; Norfolk, Portsmouth, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-19

    ... around the Gilmerton Bridge center span barge (77 FR 73541). Inadvertently, this rule included an error... center span barge. Inadvertently, this rule included an error in the inclement weather date of the safety... January 11, 2013, with inclement weather dates of January 12, 2013 through January 16, 2013....

  7. Morphology-Induced Collective Behaviors: Dynamic Pattern Formation in Water-Floating Elements

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Kohei; Ngouabeu, Aubery Marchel Tientcheu; Miyashita, Shuhei; Göldi, Maurice; Füchslin, Rudolf Marcel; Pfeifer, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    Complex systems involving many interacting elements often organize into patterns. Two types of pattern formation can be distinguished, static and dynamic. Static pattern formation means that the resulting structure constitutes a thermodynamic equilibrium whose pattern formation can be understood in terms of the minimization of free energy, while dynamic pattern formation indicates that the system is permanently dissipating energy and not in equilibrium. In this paper, we report experimental results showing that the morphology of elements plays a significant role in dynamic pattern formation. We prepared three different shapes of elements (circles, squares, and triangles) floating in a water-filled container, in which each of the shapes has two types: active elements that were capable of self-agitation with vibration motors, and passive elements that were mere floating tiles. The system was purely decentralized: that is, elements interacted locally, and subsequently elicited global patterns in a process called self-organized segregation. We showed that, according to the morphology of the selected elements, a different type of segregation occurs. Also, we quantitatively characterized both the local interaction regime and the resulting global behavior for each type of segregation by means of information theoretic quantities, and showed the difference for each case in detail, while offering speculation on the mechanism causing this phenomenon. PMID:22715370

  8. Microbial mechanisms of using enhanced ecological floating beds for eutrophic water improvement.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qing; Hu, Yue; Li, Shuqun; Peng, Sen; Zhao, Huabing

    2016-07-01

    Enhanced ecological floating beds were implemented to reduce nutrient quantity and improve the water quality of a eutrophic lake. The results showed that average removal efficiencies of CODCr, total nitrogen, NH3-N and total phosphorus for Canna indica L. set-up were 23.1%, 15.3%, 18.1% and 19.4% higher, respectively, than that of the setup with only substrate, and 14.2%, 12.8%, 7.9% and 11.9% higher than Iris pseudacorus L. ecological floating bed. The microbial community structure had obvious differences between devices and low similarity; bacteria were mainly attached on the fiber filling. The microbial population was abundant at the start and end of the experiment. Shannon index of samples selected ranged from 0.85 to 1.05. The sequencing results showed that fiber filling collected most uncultured bacteria species and the majority of bacteria on the plant roots were β-Proteobacteria and α-Proteobacteria. The co-dominant species attaching to the filling and plant was Nitrosomonadaceae.

  9. Modeling the Formation of the North Water Polynya Ice Bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumont, D.; Gratton, Y.; Arbetter, T. E.

    2008-12-01

    The North Water (NOW) polynya, the largest polynya in the world located in northern Baffin Bay, owes its existence to an ice bridge that forms during later winter. The dynamical conditions and the general characteristics of the ice bridge are studied using an elastic-viscous-plastic (EVP) dynamical sea ice model with an elliptical rheology. The model resolves the ice edge and a stable ice bridge forms only if the yield curve is sufficiently cohesive, the level of cohesion being controlled by the major to minor axis ratio e of the elliptical yield curve. The model solution is robust and invariant with respect to the grid orientation. Results from a sensitivity study with respect to rheological parameters and sea ice thickness show that a minimum uniaxial tensile strength (cohesion) is needed to form a stable arch for a given wind stress. Analysis of the stationary stress state and flow characteristics compare well with theory and observations of granular materials in hoppers. When applied to a realistic representation of the NOW polynya together with the observed wind forcing, the simulated ice bridge form and location match the observations. As the horizontal thickness distribution in Kane Basin depend on sea ice properties and wind stress history, these data could be used as a proxy to validate or tune dynamical model parameters such as e. Adequately simulating sea ice behaviour in constraint areas will become crucial for operational forecasting as navigation increases in a context of rapid Arctic ice retreat and thinning.

  10. The NACA Impact Basin and Water Landing Tests of a Float Model at Various Velocities and Weights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batterson, Sidney A

    1944-01-01

    The first data obtained in the United States under the controlled testing conditions necessary for establishing relationships among the numerous parameters involved when a float having both horizontal and vertical velocity contacts a water surface are presented. The data were obtained at the NACA impact basin. The report is confined to a presentation of the relationship between resultant velocity and impact normal acceleration for various float weights when all other parameters are constant. Analysis of the experimental results indicated that the maximum impact normal acceleration was proportional to the square of the resultant velocity, that increases in float weight resulted in decreases in the maximum impact normal acceleration, and that an increase in the flight-path angle caused increased impact normal acceleration.

  11. How Does the Gibbs Inequality Condition Affect the Stability and Detachment of Floating Spheres from the Free Surface of Water?

    PubMed

    Feng, Dong-xia; Nguyen, Anh V

    2016-03-01

    Floating objects on the air-water interfaces are central to a number of everyday activities, from walking on water by insects to flotation separation of valuable minerals using air bubbles. The available theories show that a fine sphere can float if the force of surface tension and buoyancies can support the sphere at the interface with an apical angle subtended by the circle of contact being larger than the contact angle. Here we show that the pinning of the contact line at the sharp edge, known as the Gibbs inequality condition, also plays a significant role in controlling the stability and detachment of floating spheres. Specifically, we truncated the spheres with different angles and used a force sensor device to measure the force of pushing the truncated spheres from the interface into water. We also developed a theoretical modeling to calculate the pushing force that in combination with experimental results shows different effects of the Gibbs inequality condition on the stability and detachment of the spheres from the water surface. For small angles of truncation, the Gibbs inequality condition does not affect the sphere detachment, and hence the classical theories on the floatability of spheres are valid. For large truncated angles, the Gibbs inequality condition determines the tenacity of the particle-meniscus contact and the stability and detachment of floating spheres. In this case, the classical theories on the floatability of spheres are no longer valid. A critical truncated angle for the transition from the classical to the Gibbs inequality regimes of detachment was also established. The outcomes of this research advance our understanding of the behavior of floating objects, in particular, the flotation separation of valuable minerals, which often contain various sharp edges of their crystal faces. PMID:26837262

  12. How Does the Gibbs Inequality Condition Affect the Stability and Detachment of Floating Spheres from the Free Surface of Water?

    PubMed

    Feng, Dong-xia; Nguyen, Anh V

    2016-03-01

    Floating objects on the air-water interfaces are central to a number of everyday activities, from walking on water by insects to flotation separation of valuable minerals using air bubbles. The available theories show that a fine sphere can float if the force of surface tension and buoyancies can support the sphere at the interface with an apical angle subtended by the circle of contact being larger than the contact angle. Here we show that the pinning of the contact line at the sharp edge, known as the Gibbs inequality condition, also plays a significant role in controlling the stability and detachment of floating spheres. Specifically, we truncated the spheres with different angles and used a force sensor device to measure the force of pushing the truncated spheres from the interface into water. We also developed a theoretical modeling to calculate the pushing force that in combination with experimental results shows different effects of the Gibbs inequality condition on the stability and detachment of the spheres from the water surface. For small angles of truncation, the Gibbs inequality condition does not affect the sphere detachment, and hence the classical theories on the floatability of spheres are valid. For large truncated angles, the Gibbs inequality condition determines the tenacity of the particle-meniscus contact and the stability and detachment of floating spheres. In this case, the classical theories on the floatability of spheres are no longer valid. A critical truncated angle for the transition from the classical to the Gibbs inequality regimes of detachment was also established. The outcomes of this research advance our understanding of the behavior of floating objects, in particular, the flotation separation of valuable minerals, which often contain various sharp edges of their crystal faces.

  13. 75 FR 49408 - Navigation and Navigable Waters; Technical, Organizational, and Conforming Amendments, Bridges

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-13

    ... Waters; Technical, Organizational, and Conforming Amendments, Bridges AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION... this rule is to make conforming amendments and technical corrections to Coast Guard bridge and... regarding bridge matters, nor will it change the substance of the public's involvement in the process....

  14. Fasciola hepatica and Paramphistomum daubneyi: field observations on the transport and outcome of floating metacercariae in running water.

    PubMed

    Rondelaud, D; Vignoles, P; Vareille-Morel, C; Abrous, M; Mage, C; Mouzet, R; Dreyfuss, G

    2004-06-01

    Experimental investigations in eight open drainage ditches and furrows from central France were carried out to analyse the dispersal of floating metacercariae of two digenean species by running water and to determine the outcome of larvae which settled on Nasturtium officinale (watercress). The frequencies of larvae found after their transport by water ranged from 33% to 49.7%, thus indicating that more than half of the metacercariae used in this experiment had fallen to the bottom of the water during this transport. The nature of the site (furrow, or ditch supplied by a spring) had a significant effect on the distribution of floating larvae, while the digenean species had no effect. Low percentages of metacercariae on watercress were noted in furrows (3.5-4.3% of larvae) and ditches (0.8-1.3%). When the watercress grew, most larvae that had settled on leaves and stems died but there were always several living metacercariae on this plant (0.7-1.5% of larvae for Fasciola hepatica and 0.2-0.5% for Paramphistomum daubneyi). The weak buoyancy of these floating cysts on running water limited their dispersal and, consequently, led to a real diminution of risks incurred by definitive hosts towards these metacercariae.

  15. Floating-type microbial fuel cell (FT-MFC) for treating organic-contaminated water.

    PubMed

    An, Junyeong; Kim, Daehee; Chun, Youngpil; Lee, Soo-Jin; Ng, How Y; Chang, In Seop

    2009-03-01

    This study examines a floating-type microbial fuel cell (FT-MFC) that can be applied to treat organic-contaminated water without mechanical aid. The bottom of the anode compartment was left open to the aquatic environment and the cathode was exposed above the water surface. When four FT-MFCs were inoculated with anaerobic digest fluid (ADF) obtained from a brewery wastewater treatment system (Gwangju, Korea), the open circuit voltages were around 0.4-0.5 V. The initial chemical oxygen demand (COD) of ADF was 1700 ppm and decreased to 380 ppm over a 2-day period under the open circuit mode. Two of the four FT-MFCs were then switched to closed circuit mode to view the current production under batch operation. The current developed was around 0.25 mA and the COD value decreased to 230 ppm after 5 days. The acetate concentration used was varied from 5 to 50 mM to observe whether or notthe substrate was limited bythe growth of bacteria involved in current generation. It was found that the current was maximized at 0.67 mA when 5 mM of acetate was fed at a feeding rate of 0.08 mL/min. Maximum current density and maximum power density were 138 mA/m2 and 8 mW/m2, respectively. These results indicate that FT-MFCs could be applied in situ to treat organic-contaminated water in natural aquatic environments without mechanical aid. Further cathode operation optimization is expected to enhance the treatment of organic materials and corresponding current production.

  16. Assessment of floating plastic debris in surface water along the Seine River.

    PubMed

    Gasperi, Johnny; Dris, Rachid; Bonin, Tiffany; Rocher, Vincent; Tassin, Bruno

    2014-12-01

    This study is intended to examine the quality and quantity of floating plastic debris in the River Seine through use of an extensive regional network of floating debris-retention booms; it is one of the first attempts to provide reliable information on such debris at a large regional scale. Plastic debris represented between 0.8% and 5.1% of total debris collected by weight. A significant proportion consisted of food wrappers/containers and plastic cutlery, probably originating from voluntary or involuntary dumping, urban discharges and surface runoff. Most plastic items are made of polypropylene, polyethylene and, to a lesser extent, polyethylene terephthalate. By extrapolation, some 27 tons of floating plastic debris are intercepted annually by this network; corresponding to 2.3 g per Parisian inhabitant per year. Such data could serve to provide a first evaluation of floating plastic inputs conveyed by rivers.

  17. Assessment of floating plastic debris in surface water along the Seine River.

    PubMed

    Gasperi, Johnny; Dris, Rachid; Bonin, Tiffany; Rocher, Vincent; Tassin, Bruno

    2014-12-01

    This study is intended to examine the quality and quantity of floating plastic debris in the River Seine through use of an extensive regional network of floating debris-retention booms; it is one of the first attempts to provide reliable information on such debris at a large regional scale. Plastic debris represented between 0.8% and 5.1% of total debris collected by weight. A significant proportion consisted of food wrappers/containers and plastic cutlery, probably originating from voluntary or involuntary dumping, urban discharges and surface runoff. Most plastic items are made of polypropylene, polyethylene and, to a lesser extent, polyethylene terephthalate. By extrapolation, some 27 tons of floating plastic debris are intercepted annually by this network; corresponding to 2.3 g per Parisian inhabitant per year. Such data could serve to provide a first evaluation of floating plastic inputs conveyed by rivers. PMID:25240189

  18. Photoactive titania float for disinfection of water; evaluation of cell damage by bioanalytical techniques.

    PubMed

    Shwetharani, R; Jyothi, M S; Laveena, P D; Geetha Balakrishna, R

    2014-01-01

    A photoactive float was fabricated with the modified titania to cause a feasible disinfection of water, contaminated with E. coli. The commercially available titania was doped with neodymium by pulverization technique to enhance its activity in sunlight and a multiapproach technique was used to evaluate the extended efficiency of the doped sample. X-ray diffraction patterns depicted the retention of anatase phase on doping and the existence of neodymium was confirmed by the energy dispersive atomic X-ray analysis and the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Transmission electron microscopy and Bruner-Emmett-Teller analysis depicted a marginal increase in the particle size and a decrease in the surface area, respectively. Doping induces semiconductor behavior with lower band energy that could respond to visible light and exhibit better disinfection activity. The "f" and "d" transitions of the lanthanide in doped sample caused new electronic behavior of trapping/detrapping effect together with bandgap narrowing. The amount of malondialdehyde, protein, DNA and RNA released on destruction of E. coli was observed to be 0.915 × 10(-3) μg mL(-1), 859.912 μg mL(-1), 20.173 μg mL(-1) and 1146.073 μg mL(-1), respectively. The above analytical methods along with standard plate count method substantiated the enhanced disinfection efficiency of the doped sample in sunlight.

  19. Spatial distribution of floating marine debris in offshore continental Portuguese waters.

    PubMed

    Sá, Sara; Bastos-Santos, Jorge; Araújo, Hélder; Ferreira, Marisa; Duro, Virginia; Alves, Flávia; Panta-Ferreira, Bruno; Nicolau, Lídia; Eira, Catarina; Vingada, José

    2016-03-15

    This study presents data on abundance and density of macro-floating marine debris (FMD), including their composition, spatial distribution and potential sources off continental Portugal. FMD were assessed by shipboard visual surveys covering ±252,833 km(2) until the 220 nm limit. The FMD average density was 2.98 items/km(2) and abundance amounted to 752,740 items. Unidentified plastics constitute the major bulk of FMD (density=0.46 items/km(2); abundance=117,390 items), followed by styrofoam, derelict or lost materials from fisheries, paper/cardboard and wood material. The North sector of the area presents higher FMD diversity and abundances, probably as a result of the high number of navigation corridors and fisheries operating in that sector. Most FMD originate from local sources, namely discharges from vessels and derelict material from fisheries. Considering the identifiable items, cables and fishing lines were the only fishing related items among the top ten FMD items in Portuguese offshore waters. PMID:26778496

  20. Photoactive titania float for disinfection of water; evaluation of cell damage by bioanalytical techniques.

    PubMed

    Shwetharani, R; Jyothi, M S; Laveena, P D; Geetha Balakrishna, R

    2014-01-01

    A photoactive float was fabricated with the modified titania to cause a feasible disinfection of water, contaminated with E. coli. The commercially available titania was doped with neodymium by pulverization technique to enhance its activity in sunlight and a multiapproach technique was used to evaluate the extended efficiency of the doped sample. X-ray diffraction patterns depicted the retention of anatase phase on doping and the existence of neodymium was confirmed by the energy dispersive atomic X-ray analysis and the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Transmission electron microscopy and Bruner-Emmett-Teller analysis depicted a marginal increase in the particle size and a decrease in the surface area, respectively. Doping induces semiconductor behavior with lower band energy that could respond to visible light and exhibit better disinfection activity. The "f" and "d" transitions of the lanthanide in doped sample caused new electronic behavior of trapping/detrapping effect together with bandgap narrowing. The amount of malondialdehyde, protein, DNA and RNA released on destruction of E. coli was observed to be 0.915 × 10(-3) μg mL(-1), 859.912 μg mL(-1), 20.173 μg mL(-1) and 1146.073 μg mL(-1), respectively. The above analytical methods along with standard plate count method substantiated the enhanced disinfection efficiency of the doped sample in sunlight. PMID:24689654

  1. First Autonomous Bio-Optical Profiling Float in the Gulf of Mexico Reveals Dynamic Biogeochemistry in Deep Waters

    PubMed Central

    Green, Rebecca E.; Bower, Amy S.; Lugo-Fernández, Alexis

    2014-01-01

    Profiling floats equipped with bio-optical sensors well complement ship-based and satellite ocean color measurements by providing highly-resolved time-series data on the vertical structure of biogeochemical processes in oceanic waters. This is the first study to employ an autonomous profiling (APEX) float in the Gulf of Mexico for measuring spatiotemporal variability in bio-optics and hydrography. During the 17-month deployment (July 2011 to December 2012), the float mission collected profiles of temperature, salinity, chlorophyll fluorescence, particulate backscattering (bbp), and colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) fluorescence from the ocean surface to a depth of 1,500 m. Biogeochemical variability was characterized by distinct depth trends and local “hot spots”, including impacts from mesoscale processes associated with each of the water masses sampled, from ambient deep waters over the Florida Plain, into the Loop Current, up the Florida Canyon, and eventually into the Florida Straits. A deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM) occurred between 30 and 120 m, with the DCM depth significantly related to the unique density layer ρ = 1023.6 (R2 = 0.62). Particulate backscattering, bbp, demonstrated multiple peaks throughout the water column, including from phytoplankton, deep scattering layers, and resuspension. The bio-optical relationship developed between bbp and chlorophyll (R2 = 0.49) was compared to a global relationship and could significantly improve regional ocean-color algorithms. Photooxidation and autochthonous production contributed to CDOM distributions in the upper water column, whereas in deep water, CDOM behaved as a semi-conservative tracer of water masses, demonstrating a tight relationship with density (R2 = 0.87). In the wake of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, this research lends support to the use of autonomous drifting profilers as a powerful tool for consideration in the design of an expanded and integrated observing network

  2. First autonomous bio-optical profiling float in the Gulf of Mexico reveals dynamic biogeochemistry in deep waters.

    PubMed

    Green, Rebecca E; Bower, Amy S; Lugo-Fernández, Alexis

    2014-01-01

    Profiling floats equipped with bio-optical sensors well complement ship-based and satellite ocean color measurements by providing highly-resolved time-series data on the vertical structure of biogeochemical processes in oceanic waters. This is the first study to employ an autonomous profiling (APEX) float in the Gulf of Mexico for measuring spatiotemporal variability in bio-optics and hydrography. During the 17-month deployment (July 2011 to December 2012), the float mission collected profiles of temperature, salinity, chlorophyll fluorescence, particulate backscattering (bbp), and colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) fluorescence from the ocean surface to a depth of 1,500 m. Biogeochemical variability was characterized by distinct depth trends and local "hot spots", including impacts from mesoscale processes associated with each of the water masses sampled, from ambient deep waters over the Florida Plain, into the Loop Current, up the Florida Canyon, and eventually into the Florida Straits. A deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM) occurred between 30 and 120 m, with the DCM depth significantly related to the unique density layer ρ = 1023.6 (R2 = 0.62). Particulate backscattering, bbp, demonstrated multiple peaks throughout the water column, including from phytoplankton, deep scattering layers, and resuspension. The bio-optical relationship developed between bbp and chlorophyll (R2 = 0.49) was compared to a global relationship and could significantly improve regional ocean-color algorithms. Photooxidation and autochthonous production contributed to CDOM distributions in the upper water column, whereas in deep water, CDOM behaved as a semi-conservative tracer of water masses, demonstrating a tight relationship with density (R2 = 0.87). In the wake of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, this research lends support to the use of autonomous drifting profilers as a powerful tool for consideration in the design of an expanded and integrated observing network for

  3. Low internal pressure in femtoliter water capillary bridges reduces evaporation rates

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kun; Hwang, In Gyu; Kim, Yeseul; Lim, Su Jin; Lim, Jun; Kim, Joon Heon; Gim, Bopil; Weon, Byung Mook

    2016-01-01

    Capillary bridges are usually formed by a small liquid volume in a confined space between two solid surfaces. They can have a lower internal pressure than the surrounding pressure for volumes of the order of femtoliters. Femtoliter capillary bridges with relatively rapid evaporation rates are difficult to explore experimentally. To understand in detail the evaporation of femtoliter capillary bridges, we present a feasible experimental method to directly visualize how water bridges evaporate between a microsphere and a flat substrate in still air using transmission X-ray microscopy. Precise measurements of evaporation rates for water bridges show that lower water pressure than surrounding pressure can significantly decrease evaporation through the suppression of vapor diffusion. This finding provides insight into the evaporation of ultrasmall capillary bridges. PMID:26928329

  4. Low internal pressure in femtoliter water capillary bridges reduces evaporation rates.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kun; Hwang, In Gyu; Kim, Yeseul; Lim, Su Jin; Lim, Jun; Kim, Joon Heon; Gim, Bopil; Weon, Byung Mook

    2016-03-01

    Capillary bridges are usually formed by a small liquid volume in a confined space between two solid surfaces. They can have a lower internal pressure than the surrounding pressure for volumes of the order of femtoliters. Femtoliter capillary bridges with relatively rapid evaporation rates are difficult to explore experimentally. To understand in detail the evaporation of femtoliter capillary bridges, we present a feasible experimental method to directly visualize how water bridges evaporate between a microsphere and a flat substrate in still air using transmission X-ray microscopy. Precise measurements of evaporation rates for water bridges show that lower water pressure than surrounding pressure can significantly decrease evaporation through the suppression of vapor diffusion. This finding provides insight into the evaporation of ultrasmall capillary bridges.

  5. STS-46 MS PLC Hoffman floats in life raft during water egress training at JSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-46 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Mission Specialist (MS) and Payload Commander Jeffrey A. Hoffman floats in a one-person life raft during launch emergency egress (bailout) simulation conducted in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29 pool. Hoffman, who has just tumbled out a side hatch mockup, waits for his life raft to fully inflate as a SCUBA-equipped diver looks on. The long cylindrical object in the foreground serves as a prop for the crew escape system (CES) pole. In the background MS Franklin R. Chang-Diaz floats in a fully inflated life raft.

  6. Tank Tests of the Effect of Rivet Heads, etc., on the Water Performance of a Seaplane Float, Special Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, J. B.; Robertson, J. B., Jr.

    1936-01-01

    A 1/3.5 full-size model of the Mark V float of the Bureau of Aeronautics, Navy Department, was tested in the NACA tank both with smooth painted bottom surfaces and with roundhead rivets, plate laps, and keel plates fitted to simulate the actual bottom of a metal float. The augmentation in water resistance due to the added roughness was found to be from 10-12% at the hum speed and from 12-14% at high speeds. The effect of the roughness of the afterbody was found to be negligible except at high trims. The model data were extrapolated to full size by the usual method which assumes the forces to vary according to Froude's law, and in the case of the smooth model by a method of separation that takes into account the effect of scale on the frictional resistance. It was concluded that the effect of rivet heads on the takeoff performance of a relatively high-powered float seaplane is of little consequence but that it may be of greater importance in the case of more moderately powered flying boats.

  7. Tank Tests to Show the Effect Rivet Heads on the Water Performance of a Seaplane-Float

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, J B

    1938-01-01

    A 1/3.5 full-sized model of a seaplane float constructed from lines supplied by the Bureau of Aeronautics, Navy Department, was tested first with smooth painted bottom surfaces and then with round-head rivets, plate laps, and keel plates fitted to simulate the actual bottom of a metal float. A percentage increase in water resistance caused by the added roughness was found to be from 5 to 20 percent at the hump speed and from 15 to 40 percent at high speeds. The effect of the roughness of the afterbody was found to be negligible except at high trims. The model data were extrapolated to full size by the usual method that assumes the forces to vary according to Froude's law and, in the case of the smooth model, by a method of separation that takes into account the effect of scale on the frictional resistance. It was concluded that the effect of rivet heads on the take-off performance of a relatively high-powered float seaplane is of little consequence, but it may be of greater importance in the case of more moderately powered flying boats.

  8. Induced water condensation and bridge formation by electric fieldsin Atomic Force Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sacha, G.M.; Verdaguer, A.; Salmeron, M.

    2006-02-22

    We present an analytical model that explains how in humidenvironments the electric field near a sharp tip enhances the formationof water meniscii and bridges between tip and sample. The predictions ofthe model are compared with experimental measurements of the criticaldistance where the field strength causes bridge formation.

  9. 18. Photocopy of photograph of WalpoleWestminster bridge at high water ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Photocopy of photograph of Walpole-Westminster bridge at high water during flood of November, 1927; photograph from Walpole Historical Society scrapbook collection. View west: Walpole approach (railroad station and store) and Connecticut River at flood stage, November, 1927. - Walpole-Westminster Bridge, Spanning Connecticut River between Walpole, NH & Westminster, VT, Walpole, Cheshire County, NH

  10. Boring crustaceans damage polystyrene floats under docks polluting marine waters with microplastic.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Timothy M

    2012-09-01

    Boring isopods damage expanded polystyrene floats under docks and, in the process, expel copious numbers of microplastic particles. This paper describes the impacts of boring isopods in aquaculture facilities and docks, quantifies and discusses the implications of these microplastics, and tests if an alternate foam type prevents boring. Floats from aquaculture facilities and docks were heavily damaged by thousands of isopods and their burrows. Multiple sites in Asia, Australia, Panama, and the USA exhibited evidence of isopod damage. One isopod creates thousands of microplastic particles when excavating a burrow; colonies can expel millions of particles. Microplastics similar in size to these particles may facilitate the spread of non-native species or be ingested by organisms causing physical or toxicological harm. Extruded polystyrene inhibited boring, suggesting this foam may prevent damage in the field. These results reveal boring isopods cause widespread damage to docks and are a novel source of microplastic pollution. PMID:22763283

  11. Boring crustaceans damage polystyrene floats under docks polluting marine waters with microplastic.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Timothy M

    2012-09-01

    Boring isopods damage expanded polystyrene floats under docks and, in the process, expel copious numbers of microplastic particles. This paper describes the impacts of boring isopods in aquaculture facilities and docks, quantifies and discusses the implications of these microplastics, and tests if an alternate foam type prevents boring. Floats from aquaculture facilities and docks were heavily damaged by thousands of isopods and their burrows. Multiple sites in Asia, Australia, Panama, and the USA exhibited evidence of isopod damage. One isopod creates thousands of microplastic particles when excavating a burrow; colonies can expel millions of particles. Microplastics similar in size to these particles may facilitate the spread of non-native species or be ingested by organisms causing physical or toxicological harm. Extruded polystyrene inhibited boring, suggesting this foam may prevent damage in the field. These results reveal boring isopods cause widespread damage to docks and are a novel source of microplastic pollution.

  12. Exploring Floating Concrete and Beam Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snell, Billie G.; Snell, Luke M.

    2002-01-01

    Presents two construction activities that address both state and federal science standards and encourage students to consider career options in mathematics and science. Includes floating concrete and paper bridge activities. (YDS)

  13. Offshore Floating Wind Turbine-driven Deep Sea Water Pumping for Combined Electrical Power and District Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sant, T.; Buhagiar, D.; Farrugia, R. N.

    2014-06-01

    A new concept utilising floating wind turbines to exploit the low temperatures of deep sea water for space cooling in buildings is presented. The approach is based on offshore hydraulic wind turbines pumping pressurised deep sea water to a centralised plant consisting of a hydro-electric power system coupled to a large-scale sea water-cooled air conditioning (AC) unit of an urban district cooling network. In order to investigate the potential advantages of this new concept over conventional technologies, a simplified model for performance simulation of a vapour compression AC unit was applied independently to three different systems, with the AC unit operating with (1) a constant flow of sea surface water, (2) a constant flow of sea water consisting of a mixture of surface sea water and deep sea water delivered by a single offshore hydraulic wind turbine and (3) an intermittent flow of deep sea water pumped by a single offshore hydraulic wind turbine. The analysis was based on one year of wind and ambient temperature data for the Central Mediterranean that is known for its deep waters, warm climate and relatively low wind speeds. The study confirmed that while the present concept is less efficient than conventional turbines utilising grid-connected electrical generators, a significant portion of the losses associated with the hydraulic transmission through the pipeline are offset by the extraction of cool deep sea water which reduces the electricity consumption of urban air-conditioning units.

  14. Nanoscale, electric field-driven water bridges in vacuum gaps and lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Ho, Ming-Chak; Levine, Zachary A; Vernier, P Thomas

    2013-11-01

    Formation of a water bridge across the lipid bilayer is the first stage of pore formation in molecular dynamic (MD) simulations of electroporation, suggesting that the intrusion of individual water molecules into the membrane interior is the initiation event in a sequence that leads to the formation of a conductive membrane pore. To delineate more clearly the role of water in membrane permeabilization, we conducted extensive MD simulations of water bridge formation, stabilization, and collapse in palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine bilayers and in water-vacuum-water systems, in which two groups of water molecules are separated by a 2.8 nm vacuum gap, a simple analog of a phospholipid bilayer. Certain features, such as the exponential decrease in water bridge initiation time with increased external electric field, are similar in both systems. Other features, such as the relationship between water bridge lifetime and the diameter of the water bridge, are quite different between the two systems. Data such as these contribute to a better and more quantitative understanding of the relative roles of water and lipid in membrane electropore creation and annihilation, facilitating a mechanism-driven development of electroporation protocols. These methods can be extended to more complex, heterogeneous systems that include membrane proteins and intracellular and extracellular membrane attachments, leading to more accurate models of living cells in electric fields. PMID:23644990

  15. Nanoscale, electric field-driven water bridges in vacuum gaps and lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Ho, Ming-Chak; Levine, Zachary A; Vernier, P Thomas

    2013-11-01

    Formation of a water bridge across the lipid bilayer is the first stage of pore formation in molecular dynamic (MD) simulations of electroporation, suggesting that the intrusion of individual water molecules into the membrane interior is the initiation event in a sequence that leads to the formation of a conductive membrane pore. To delineate more clearly the role of water in membrane permeabilization, we conducted extensive MD simulations of water bridge formation, stabilization, and collapse in palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine bilayers and in water-vacuum-water systems, in which two groups of water molecules are separated by a 2.8 nm vacuum gap, a simple analog of a phospholipid bilayer. Certain features, such as the exponential decrease in water bridge initiation time with increased external electric field, are similar in both systems. Other features, such as the relationship between water bridge lifetime and the diameter of the water bridge, are quite different between the two systems. Data such as these contribute to a better and more quantitative understanding of the relative roles of water and lipid in membrane electropore creation and annihilation, facilitating a mechanism-driven development of electroporation protocols. These methods can be extended to more complex, heterogeneous systems that include membrane proteins and intracellular and extracellular membrane attachments, leading to more accurate models of living cells in electric fields.

  16. Stools - floating

    MedlinePlus

    ... absorption of nutrients ( malabsorption ) or too much gas (flatulence). Considerations Most causes of floating stools are harmless. ... Bailey J. FPIN's Clinical Inquiries: Effective management of flatulence. Am Fam Physician Ohge H, Levitt MD. Intestinal ...

  17. STS-32 MS Dunbar wearing LES floats in life raft during water egress training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-32 Mission Specialist (MS) Bonnie J. Dunbar, wearing a launch and entry suit (LES) and lauch and entry helmet (LEH), in a single-occupant (one man) lift raft enlists the aid of two SCUBA-equipped divers as she floats in 25 ft deep pool located in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29. During the exercises the crew practiced the procedures to follow in the event of an emergency aboard the Space Shuttle and familiarized themselves with post-Challenger pole system of emergency egress.

  18. Bridges over troubled waters: education and cognitive neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Daniel; Coch, Donna

    2006-04-01

    Recently there has been growing interest in and debate about the relation between cognitive neuroscience and education. Our goal is to advance the debate beyond both recitation of potentially education-related cognitive neuroscience findings and the claim that a bridge between fields is chimerical. In an attempt to begin a dialogue about mechanisms among students, educators, researchers and practitioner-scientists, we propose that multiple bridges can be built to make connections between education and cognitive neuroscience, including teacher training, researcher training and collaboration. These bridges--concrete mechanisms that can advance the study of mind, brain and education--will benefit both educators and cognitive neuroscientists, who will gain new perspectives for posing and answering crucial questions about the learning brain.

  19. LNAPLs do not Always Float: An Example Case of a Viscous LNAPL under Variable Water Table Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Oostrom, Mart; Hofstee , C; Wietsma, Thomas W.

    2006-03-20

    An intermediate-scale experiment was conducted to investigate the behavior of a viscous LNAPL under variable water table conditions. Two LNAPL volumes were released from a small source zone on top of the flow cell into a partly saturated, homogeneously packed porous medium. Following a 30-day redistribution period, the water table was increased 0.5 m in 50 minutes. After the water table rise, LNAPL behavior was monitored for an additional 45 days. Fluid saturation scans were obtained periodically with a fully automated dual-energy gamma radiation system. Results show that both spills follow similar paths downwards. LNAPL drainage from the unsaturated zone was relatively slow and a considerable residual LNAPL saturation was observed after 30 days of drainage. Most of the mobile LNAPL moved into the capillary fringe during this period. After the water table rise, LNAPL moved up in a delayed fashion. After 45 days, the LNAPL has moved up only approximately 0.2 m. Since the LNAPL has only moved up a limited amount, nonwetting fluid entrapment was also limited. The experiment was simulated using the STOMP multifluid flow simulator. A comparison indicates that the simulator is able to predict the observed phenomena well, including residual saturation formation in the vadose zone, and limited upward LNAPL movement after the water table rise. The results of this experiment show that viscous mobile LNAPL, subject to variable water table conditions, does not necessarily float on the water table and may not appear in an observation well.

  20. Bridge over Troubled Waters: Training for Department Level Supervisors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Gillian E.; Skipper, Barbara L.

    A clinical supervision training program has provided department level coordinators with support in their role as a bridge between administrators and teachers in six high schools and nine middle schools in a San Antonio, Texas, school district. This paper identifies major characteristics of the training program's model, describes the program, and…

  1. Atmospheric exchange of carbon dioxide and methane of a small water body and a floating mat in the Luther Marsh peatland, Ontario, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, Magdalena; Berger, Sina; Blodau, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Recent investigations have suggested that small water bodies cover larger areas in northern peatlands than previously assumed. Their role in the carbon cycle and gas exchange rates are poorly constrained so far. To address this issue we measured CO2 and CH4 fluxes on a small water body (ca. 700 m2) and the surrounding floating mat in the Luther Marsh peatland in Ontario, Canada from July to September 2014. To this end we used closed chambers combined with a portable Los Gatos high-resolution trace gas analyzer at different water depths and distances from the shore on the pond and with different dominating plant types on the floating mat surrounding the pond. In addition, CO2 concentrations were recorded in high temporal resolution using an infrared sensor system during selected periods. Air and water temperature, humidity and temperature of the floating mat, wind speed and direction, photosynthetically active radiation, air pressure and relative humidity were also recorded as auxiliary data at the study site. The results show that pond and floating mat were sources of methane throughout the whole measuring period. Methane emissions via the ebullition pathway occurred predominantly near the shore and on the floating mat. During the daytime measurements the floating mat acted as a net sink and the pond as a net source of CO2. The dynamics of CO2 exchange was also strongly time dependent, as CO2 emissions from the pond strongly increased after mid-August. This suggests that photosynthesis was more affected by seasonal decline than respiration process in the pond and that the allochthonous component of the CO2 flux increased in relative importance towards fall.

  2. Layers of air in the water beneath the floating fern Salvinia are exposed to fluctuations in pressure.

    PubMed

    Mayser, Matthias J; Barthlott, Wilhelm

    2014-12-01

    Superhydrophobic, hierarchically structured, technical surfaces (Lotus-effect) are of high scientific and economic interest because of their remarkable properties. Recently, the immense potential of air-retaining superhydrophobic surfaces, for example, for low-friction transport of fluids and drag-reducing coatings of ships has begun to be explored. A major problem of superhydrophobic surfaces mimicking the Lotus-effect is the limited persistence of the air retained, especially under rough conditions of flow. However, there are a variety of floating or diving plant and animal species that possess air-retaining surfaces optimized for durable water-repellency (Salvinia-effect). Especially floating ferns of the genus Salvinia have evolved superhydrophobic surfaces capable of maintaining layers of air for months. Apart from maintaining stability under water, the layer of air has to withstand the stresses of water pressure (up to 2.5 bars). Both of these aspects have an application to create permanent air layers on ships' hulls. We investigated the effect of pressure on air layers in a pressure cell and exposed the air layer to pressures of up to 6 bars. We investigated the suppression of the air layer at increasing pressures as well as its restoration during decreases in pressure. Three of the four examined Salvinia species are capable of maintaining air layers at pressures relevant to the conditions applying to ships' hulls. High volumes of air per surface area are advantageous for retaining at least a partial Cassie-Baxter-state under pressure, which also helps in restoring the air layer after depressurization. Closed-loop structures such as the baskets at the top of the "egg-beater hairs" (see main text) also help return the air layer to its original level at the tip of the hairs by trapping air bubbles.

  3. Layers of air in the water beneath the floating fern Salvinia are exposed to fluctuations in pressure.

    PubMed

    Mayser, Matthias J; Barthlott, Wilhelm

    2014-12-01

    Superhydrophobic, hierarchically structured, technical surfaces (Lotus-effect) are of high scientific and economic interest because of their remarkable properties. Recently, the immense potential of air-retaining superhydrophobic surfaces, for example, for low-friction transport of fluids and drag-reducing coatings of ships has begun to be explored. A major problem of superhydrophobic surfaces mimicking the Lotus-effect is the limited persistence of the air retained, especially under rough conditions of flow. However, there are a variety of floating or diving plant and animal species that possess air-retaining surfaces optimized for durable water-repellency (Salvinia-effect). Especially floating ferns of the genus Salvinia have evolved superhydrophobic surfaces capable of maintaining layers of air for months. Apart from maintaining stability under water, the layer of air has to withstand the stresses of water pressure (up to 2.5 bars). Both of these aspects have an application to create permanent air layers on ships' hulls. We investigated the effect of pressure on air layers in a pressure cell and exposed the air layer to pressures of up to 6 bars. We investigated the suppression of the air layer at increasing pressures as well as its restoration during decreases in pressure. Three of the four examined Salvinia species are capable of maintaining air layers at pressures relevant to the conditions applying to ships' hulls. High volumes of air per surface area are advantageous for retaining at least a partial Cassie-Baxter-state under pressure, which also helps in restoring the air layer after depressurization. Closed-loop structures such as the baskets at the top of the "egg-beater hairs" (see main text) also help return the air layer to its original level at the tip of the hairs by trapping air bubbles. PMID:24925548

  4. Biotransformation of arsenite and bacterial aox activity in drinking water produced from surface water of floating houses: Arsenic contamination in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jin-Soo

    2015-11-01

    The potential arsenite bioteansformation activity of arsenic was investigated by examining bacterial arsenic arsenite-oxidizing gene such as aoxS, aoxR, aoxA, aoxB, aoxC, and aoxD in high arsenic-contaminated drinking water produced from the surface water of floating houses. There is a biogeochemical cycle of activity involving arsenite oxidase aox system and the ars (arsenic resistance system) gene operon and aoxR leader gene activity in Alcaligenes faecalis SRR-11 and aoxS leader gene activity in Achromobacter xylosoxidans TSL-66. Batch experiments showed that SRR-11 and TSL-66 completely oxidized 1 mM of As (III) to As (V) within 35-40 h. The leaders of aoxS and aoxR are important for gene activity, and their effects in arsenic bioremediation and mobility in natural water has a significant ecological role because it allows arsenite oxidase in bacteria to control the biogeochemical cycle of arsenic-contaminated drinking water produced from surface water of floating houses.

  5. Temporal and spatial distribution of floating objects in coastal waters of central-southern Chile and Patagonian fjords

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinojosa, Iván A.; Rivadeneira, Marcelo M.; Thiel, Martin

    2011-03-01

    Floating objects are suggested to be the principal vector for the transport and dispersal of marine invertebrates with direct development as well as catalysts for carbon and nutrient recycling in accumulation areas. The first step in identifying the ecological relevance of floating objects in a specific area is to identify their spatio-temporal distribution. We evaluated the composition, abundance, distribution, and temporal variability of floating objects along the continental coast of central-southern Chile (33-42°S) and the Patagonian fjords (42-50°S) using ship surveys conducted in austral winter (July/August) and spring (November) of the years 2002-2005 and 2008. Potential sources of floating items were identified with the aid of publicly available databases and scientific reports. We found three main types of floating objects, namely floating marine debris (mainly plastic objects and Styrofoam), wood (trunks and branches), and floating kelps ( Macrocystis pyrifera and Durvillaea antarctica). Floating marine debris were abundant along most of the examined transects, with markedly lower abundances toward the southern fjord areas. Floating marine debris abundances generally corresponded to the distribution of human activities, and were highest in the Interior Sea of Chiloé, where aquaculture activities are intense. Floating wood appeared sporadically in the study area, often close to the main rivers. In accordance with seasonal river run-off, wood was more abundant along the continental coast in winter (rainy season) and in the Patagonian fjords during the spring surveys (snow melt). Densities of the two floating kelp species were similar along the continental coast, without a clear seasonal pattern. M. pyrifera densities increased towards the south, peaking in the Patagonian fjords, where it was dominant over D. antarctica. Densities of M. pyrifera in the Patagonian fjords were highest in spring. Correlation analyses between the abundances of floating

  6. Attraction of Two Floating Spheres at a Viscous Oil-Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dani, Archit; Keiser, Geoff; Yeganeh, Mohsen; Maldarelli, Charles

    2014-03-01

    The aggregation rate of floating particles at a fluid/fluid interface by capillary forces has drawn significant interest. This 2D phenomenon plays a critical role in self-assembly arrangement relevant to pollination processes in biological contexts, the formation of dense particle laden interfaces for stabilizing emulsions in colloid science and in the bottom up assembly of materials in nanotechnologies. We present the first experiments on the merging of two Teflon particles at an interface between a mineral oil and an aqueous phase for a series of particle pairs, interfacial tension and oil viscosity. The separation distance as a function of time and pair aggregation time are both measured by optically following the movement of the particles. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with our theoretical formulation in which a drag correction accounts for the variation in particle depth of immersion.

  7. Floating brine crusts, reduction of evaporation and possible replacement of fresh water to control dust from Owens Lake bed, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groeneveld, D. P.; Huntington, J. L.; Barz, D. D.

    2010-10-01

    SummaryOwens Lake, California, a saline terminal lake desiccated after diversion of its water source, was formerly the single largest anthropogenic source of fugitive dust in North America. Over 100 billion m -3 yr -1 of fresh water are projected to be used for mandated dust control in over 100 km 2 of constructed basins required to be wetted to curtail emissions. An extensive evaporite deposit is located at the lake's topographic low and adjacent to the dust control basins. Because this deposit is non-dust-emissive, it was investigated as a potential replacement for the fresh water used in dust control. The deposit consists of precipitated layers of sodium carbonate and sulfate bathed by, and covered with brine dominated by sodium chloride perennially covered with floating salt crust. Evaporation ( E) rates through this crust were measured using a static chamber during the period of highest evaporative demand, late June and early July, 2009. Annualized total E from these measurements was significantly below average annual precipitation, thus ensuring that such salt deposits naturally remain wet throughout the year, despite the arid climate. Because it remains wetted, the evaporite deposit may therefore have the potential to replace fresh water to achieve dust control at near zero water use.

  8. Bridging Water Resources Policy and Environmental Engineering in the Classroom at Cornell University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, M. T.; Shaw, S. B.; Seifert, S.; Schwarz, T.

    2006-12-01

    Current university undergraduate students in environmental sciences and engineering are the next generation of environmental protection practitioners. Recognizing this, Cornell's Biological and Environmental Engineering department has developed a popular class, Watershed Engineering (BEE 473), specifically designed to bridge the too-common gap between water resources policy and state-of-art science and technology. Weekly homework assignments are to design real-life solutions to actual water resources problems, often with the objective of applying storm water policies to local situations. Where appropriate, usually in conjunction with recent amendments to the Federal Clean Water Act, this course introduces water resource protection tools and concepts developed in the Cornell Soil and Water Lab. Here we present several examples of how we build bridges between university classrooms and the complex world of water resources policy.

  9. Peptide salt bridge stability: from gas phase via microhydration to bulk water simulations.

    PubMed

    Pluhařová, Eva; Marsalek, Ondrej; Schmidt, Burkhard; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2012-11-14

    The salt bridge formation and stability in the terminated lysine-glutamate dipeptide is investigated in water clusters of increasing size up to the limit of bulk water. Proton transfer dynamics between the acidic and basic side chains is described by DFT-based Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations. While the desolvated peptide prefers to be in its neutral state, already the addition of a single water molecule can trigger proton transfer from the glutamate side chain to the lysine side chain, leading to a zwitterionic salt bridge state. Upon adding more water molecules we find that stabilization of the zwitterionic state critically depends on the number of hydrogen bonds between side chain termini, the water molecules, and the peptidic backbone. Employing classical molecular dynamics simulations for larger clusters, we observed that the salt bridge is weakened upon additional hydration. Consequently, long-lived solvent shared ion pairs are observed for about 30 water molecules while solvent separated ion pairs are found when at least 40 or more water molecules hydrate the dipeptide. These results have implications for the formation and stability of salt bridges at partially dehydrated surfaces of aqueous proteins.

  10. Sub-canopy evapotranspiration from floating vegetation and open water in a swamp forest

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Among previous studies, there are large discrepancies in the difference between evapotranspiration from wetland vegetation and evaporation from open water. In this study, we investigate evapotranspiration differences between water and vegetation in a scenario that has otherwise not been extensively ...

  11. On floats and float tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seewald, Friedrich

    1931-01-01

    The principal source of information on float resistance is the model test. In view of the insuperable difficulties opposing any attempt at theoretical treatment of the resistance problem, particularly at attitudes which tend toward satisfactory take-off, such as the transitory stage to planing, the towing test is and will remain the primary method for some time.

  12. 33 CFR 144.01-1 - Life floats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Life floats. 144.01-1 Section 144... CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES LIFESAVING APPLIANCES Manned Platforms § 144.01-1 Life floats. Each manned platform shall be provided with at least two approved life floats. The life floats shall have...

  13. 33 CFR 144.01-1 - Life floats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Life floats. 144.01-1 Section 144... CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES LIFESAVING APPLIANCES Manned Platforms § 144.01-1 Life floats. Each manned platform shall be provided with at least two approved life floats. The life floats shall have...

  14. 33 CFR 144.01-1 - Life floats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Life floats. 144.01-1 Section 144... CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES LIFESAVING APPLIANCES Manned Platforms § 144.01-1 Life floats. Each manned platform shall be provided with at least two approved life floats. The life floats shall have...

  15. 33 CFR 144.01-1 - Life floats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Life floats. 144.01-1 Section 144... CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES LIFESAVING APPLIANCES Manned Platforms § 144.01-1 Life floats. Each manned platform shall be provided with at least two approved life floats. The life floats shall have...

  16. 33 CFR 144.01-1 - Life floats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Life floats. 144.01-1 Section 144... CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES LIFESAVING APPLIANCES Manned Platforms § 144.01-1 Life floats. Each manned platform shall be provided with at least two approved life floats. The life floats shall have...

  17. Quantum Calculations on Salt Bridges with Water: Potentials, Structure, and Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Sing; Green, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    Salt bridges are electrostatic links between acidic and basic amino acids in a protein; quantum calculations are used here to determine the energetics and other properties of one form of these species, in the presence of water molecules. The acidic groups are carboxylic acids (aspartic and glutamic acids); proteins have two bases with pK above physiological pH: one, arginine, with a guanidinium basic group, the other lysine, which is a primary amine. Only arginine is modeled here, by ethyl guanidinium, while propionic acid is used as a model for either carboxylic acid. The salt bridges are accompanied by 0-12 water molecules; for each of the 13 systems, the energy-bond distance relation, natural bond orbitals (NBO), frequency calculations allowing thermodynamic corrections to room temperature, and dielectric constant dependence, were all calculated. The water molecules were found to arrange themselves in hydrogen bonded rings anchored to the oxygens of the salt bridge components. This was not surprising in itself, but it was found that the rings lead to a periodicity in the energy, and to a 'water addition' rule. The latter shows that the initial rings, with four oxygen atoms, become five member rings when an additional water molecule becomes available, with the additional water filling in at the bond with the lowest Wiberg index, as calculated using NBO. The dielectric constant dependence is the expected hyperbola, and the fit of the energy to the inverse dielectric constant is determined. There is an energy periodicity related to ring formation upon addition of water molecules. When 10 water molecules have been added, all spaces near the salt bridge are filled, completing the first hydration shell, and a second shell starts to form. The potentials associated with salt bridges depend on their hydration, and potentials assigned without regard to local hydration are likely to cause errors as large as or larger than kBT, thus suggesting a serious problem if these

  18. Theoretical model for diffusive greenhouse gas fluxes estimation across water-air interfaces measured with the static floating chamber method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Shangbin; Wang, Chenghao; Wilkinson, Richard Jeremy; Liu, Defu; Zhang, Cheng; Xu, Wennian; Yang, Zhengjian; Wang, Yuchun; Lei, Dan

    2016-07-01

    Aquatic systems are sources of greenhouse gases on different scales, however the uncertainty of gas fluxes estimated using popular methods are not well defined. Here we show that greenhouse gas fluxes across the air-water interface of seas and inland waters are significantly underestimated by the currently used static floating chamber (SFC) method. We found that the SFC CH4 flux calculated with the popular linear regression (LR) on changes of gas concentration over time only accounts for 54.75% and 35.77% of the corresponding real gas flux when the monitoring periods are 30 and 60 min respectively based on the theoretical model and experimental measurements. Our results do manifest that nonlinear regression models can improve gas flux estimations, while the exponential regression (ER) model can give the best estimations which are close to true values when compared to LR. However, the quadratic regression model is proved to be inappropriate for long time measurements and those aquatic systems with high gas emission rate. The greenhouse gases effluxes emitted from aquatic systems may be much more than those reported previously, and models on future scenarios of global climate changes should be adjusted accordingly.

  19. Floating in hydrocarbons: Water-based recreation and the future of Tennessee`s waterways

    SciTech Connect

    Kocak, J.M.; Sirk, R.A.

    1996-10-01

    Careful environmental monitoring and preservation practices, when applied to surface water systems, provide necessary maintenance for aquatic ecosystem and human-needs satisfaction. For much of the state of Tennessee, recent history has seen a significant increase in the standard of living. Here, as elsewhere, increase in standard of living has often translated into increased leisure time and disposable income. Tennessee offers a wealth of recreational waters, and an increase in the number and duration of recreational boating experiences serves as a visible reminder of this affluence. With increasing access comes the potential for explosive growth in hydrocarbon-based air and water pollution. Given the increased emphasis in pollution control under Clean Air and Clean Water acts legislation, petroleum-based water recreation should be an issue for coordinated examination. Paradoxically, pollution from water-based recreation has remained almost wholly unregulated.

  20. Municipal landfill leachate treatment for metal removal using water hyacinth in a floating aquatic system.

    PubMed

    El-Gendy, A S; Biswas, N; Bewtra, J K

    2006-09-01

    Experiments were carried out to investigate the ability of water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) to remove five heavy metals (cadmium, chromium, copper, nickel, and lead) commonly found in leachate. All experiments were conducted in batch reactors in a greenhouse. It was found that living biomass of water hyacinth was a good accumulator for copper, chromium, and cadmium. The plants accumulated copper, chromium, and cadmium up to 0.96, 0.83, and 0.50%, respectively, of their dry root mass. However, lead and nickel were poorly accumulated in water hyacinth. Also, nonliving biomass of water hyacinth dry roots showed ability to accumulate all metals, except Cr(VI), which was added in anionic form. The highest total metal sorption by nonliving dry water hyacinth roots was found to take place at pH 6.4. The current research demonstrates the potential of using water hyacinth for the treatment of landfill leachate containing heavy metals. PMID:17120455

  1. STS-35 crewmembers watch a sphere of water float on OV-102's middeck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    STS-35 crewmembers perform a microgravity experiment using their drinking water while on the middeck of Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102. Mission Specialist (MS) Jeffrey A. Hoffman (left) has released some water from a drinking container which he holds in his hand. MS John M. Lounge (wearing glasses, center) and Payload Specialist Samuel T. Durrance along with Hoffman study the changing shape and movement of the sphere of water.

  2. Buoyant force and sinking conditions of a hydrophobic thin rod floating on water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian-Lin; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Wang, Gang-Feng

    2007-12-01

    Owing to the superhydrophobicity of their legs, such creatures as water striders and fisher spiders can stand effortlessly, walk and jump quickly on water. Directed toward understanding their superior repellency ability, we consider hydrophobic thin rods of several representative cross sections pressing a water surface. First, the shape function of the meniscus surrounding a circular rod is solved analytically, and thereby the maximal buoyant force is derived as a function of the Young’s contact angle and the rod radius. Then we discuss the critical conditions for a rod to sink into water, including the maximal volume condition and the meniscus-contact condition. Furthermore, we study the sinking conditions and the maximal buoyant forces of hydrophobic long rods with elliptical, triangular, or hexagonal cross-section shapes. The theoretical solutions are quantitatively consistent with existing experimental and numerical results. Finally, the optimized structures of water strider legs are analyzed to elucidate why they can achieve a very big buoyant force on water.

  3. Water vapor and air transport through ponds with floating aquatic plants.

    PubMed

    Kirzhner, F; Zimmels, Y

    2006-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to estimate the evaporation rate in the purification of wastewater by aquatic plants with aeration. Evaporation of surface water is important in dewatering processes. In particular, this is true in arid climates, where evaporation rates are high. Aeration is known to enhance the wastewater purification process, but it increases concurrently the water evaporation rates. Evaporation and evapotranspiration rates were tested under field and laboratory conditions. Batch experiments were performed to study the levels of evaporation and evapotranspiration in free-water-surface, aquatic-plant systems. The experiments verified that, in these systems, the rate of evaporation increased as a result of aeration in the presence and absence of the aquatic plants. The evaporation rates resulting from aeration were found to be significant in the water balance governing the purification process. A preliminary model for description of the effect of rising air bubbles on the transport of water vapors was formulated. It is shown that aeration may account for a significant part of water losses that include surface evaporation. PMID:17059143

  4. Benchmark calculations of excess electrons in water cluster cavities: balancing the addition of atom-centered diffuse functions versus floating diffuse functions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Changzhe; Bu, Yuxiang

    2016-09-14

    Diffuse functions have been proved to be especially crucial for the accurate characterization of excess electrons which are usually bound weakly in intermolecular zones far away from the nuclei. To examine the effects of diffuse functions on the nature of the cavity-shaped excess electrons in water cluster surroundings, both the HOMO and LUMO distributions, vertical detachment energies (VDEs) and visible absorption spectra of two selected (H2O)24(-) isomers are investigated in the present work. Two main types of diffuse functions are considered in calculations including the Pople-style atom-centered diffuse functions and the ghost-atom-based floating diffuse functions. It is found that augmentation of atom-centered diffuse functions contributes to a better description of the HOMO (corresponding to the VDE convergence), in agreement with previous studies, but also leads to unreasonable diffuse characters of the LUMO with significant red-shifts in the visible spectra, which is against the conventional point of view that the more the diffuse functions, the better the results. The issue of designing extra floating functions for excess electrons has also been systematically discussed, which indicates that the floating diffuse functions are necessary not only for reducing the computational cost but also for improving both the HOMO and LUMO accuracy. Thus, the basis sets with a combination of partial atom-centered diffuse functions and floating diffuse functions are recommended for a reliable description of the weakly bound electrons. This work presents an efficient way for characterizing the electronic properties of weakly bound electrons accurately by balancing the addition of atom-centered diffuse functions and floating diffuse functions and also by balancing the computational cost and accuracy of the calculated results, and thus is very useful in the relevant calculations of various solvated electron systems and weakly bound anionic systems.

  5. Benchmark calculations of excess electrons in water cluster cavities: balancing the addition of atom-centered diffuse functions versus floating diffuse functions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Changzhe; Bu, Yuxiang

    2016-09-14

    Diffuse functions have been proved to be especially crucial for the accurate characterization of excess electrons which are usually bound weakly in intermolecular zones far away from the nuclei. To examine the effects of diffuse functions on the nature of the cavity-shaped excess electrons in water cluster surroundings, both the HOMO and LUMO distributions, vertical detachment energies (VDEs) and visible absorption spectra of two selected (H2O)24(-) isomers are investigated in the present work. Two main types of diffuse functions are considered in calculations including the Pople-style atom-centered diffuse functions and the ghost-atom-based floating diffuse functions. It is found that augmentation of atom-centered diffuse functions contributes to a better description of the HOMO (corresponding to the VDE convergence), in agreement with previous studies, but also leads to unreasonable diffuse characters of the LUMO with significant red-shifts in the visible spectra, which is against the conventional point of view that the more the diffuse functions, the better the results. The issue of designing extra floating functions for excess electrons has also been systematically discussed, which indicates that the floating diffuse functions are necessary not only for reducing the computational cost but also for improving both the HOMO and LUMO accuracy. Thus, the basis sets with a combination of partial atom-centered diffuse functions and floating diffuse functions are recommended for a reliable description of the weakly bound electrons. This work presents an efficient way for characterizing the electronic properties of weakly bound electrons accurately by balancing the addition of atom-centered diffuse functions and floating diffuse functions and also by balancing the computational cost and accuracy of the calculated results, and thus is very useful in the relevant calculations of various solvated electron systems and weakly bound anionic systems. PMID:27522987

  6. 14 CFR 25.535 - Auxiliary float loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... follows: EC28SE91.043 where— ρ=mass density of water (slugs/ft.2); V=volume of float (ft.2); C x... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Water Loads § 25.535 Auxiliary float loads. (a..., the prescribed water loads may be distributed over the float bottom to avoid excessive local...

  7. Remediation of floating, open water oil spills: Comparative efficacy of commercially available polypropylene sorbent booms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, Ed L.

    1991-03-01

    Several complex methods of remediation are applied to open water oil spills. Sorbing the liquid hydrocarbons with polypropylene booms is an effective and less complex means of treating such events. There are, however, a variety of commercially available booms which display different performances in sorbing different viscosity hydrocarbons. There is no acceptable A.S.T.M. protocol to evaluate these booms for performance efficiency in various weather and hydrocarbon viscosity scenarios. The current paper proposes such a protocol and evaluates the most commonly used sorbent products with the new test procedures. Nine specific performance criteria, based on actual field applications, are demonstrated.

  8. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic droplet for the determination of triazine and triazoles in mineral water samples.

    PubMed

    Bolzan, Cátia M; Caldas, Sergiane S; Guimarães, Bruno S; Primel, Ednei G

    2016-09-01

    A simple, rapid, and sensitive method for the determination of atrazine, simazine, cyproconazole, tebuconazole, and epoxiconazole in mineral water employing the dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction with solidification of a floating organic drop with determination by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry has been developed. A mixed solution of 250 μL 1-dodecanol and 1250 μL methanol was injected rapidly into 10 mL aqueous solution (pH 7.0) with 2% w/v NaCl. After centrifugation for 5 min at 2000 rpm, the organic solvent droplets floated on the surface of the aqueous solution and the floating solvent solidified. The method limits of detection were between 3.75 and 37.5 ng/L and limits of quantification were between 12.5 and 125 ng/L. The recoveries ranged from 70 to 118% for repeatability and between 76 and 95% for intermediate precision with a relative standard deviation from 2 to 18% for all compounds. Low matrix effect was observed. The proposed method can be successfully applied in routine analysis for determination of pesticide residues in mineral water samples, allowing for monitoring of triazine and triazoles at levels below the regulatory limits set by international and national legislations. PMID:27391582

  9. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic droplet for the determination of triazine and triazoles in mineral water samples.

    PubMed

    Bolzan, Cátia M; Caldas, Sergiane S; Guimarães, Bruno S; Primel, Ednei G

    2016-09-01

    A simple, rapid, and sensitive method for the determination of atrazine, simazine, cyproconazole, tebuconazole, and epoxiconazole in mineral water employing the dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction with solidification of a floating organic drop with determination by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry has been developed. A mixed solution of 250 μL 1-dodecanol and 1250 μL methanol was injected rapidly into 10 mL aqueous solution (pH 7.0) with 2% w/v NaCl. After centrifugation for 5 min at 2000 rpm, the organic solvent droplets floated on the surface of the aqueous solution and the floating solvent solidified. The method limits of detection were between 3.75 and 37.5 ng/L and limits of quantification were between 12.5 and 125 ng/L. The recoveries ranged from 70 to 118% for repeatability and between 76 and 95% for intermediate precision with a relative standard deviation from 2 to 18% for all compounds. Low matrix effect was observed. The proposed method can be successfully applied in routine analysis for determination of pesticide residues in mineral water samples, allowing for monitoring of triazine and triazoles at levels below the regulatory limits set by international and national legislations.

  10. Evaluation of water uptake and mechanical properties of blended polymer films for preparing gas-generated multiple-unit floating drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Chen; Lee, Lin-Wen; Ho, Hsiu-O; Sha, Chen; Sheu, Ming-Thau

    2012-10-01

    Among various strategies of gastroretentive drug delivery systems (DDSs) developed to prolong the gastric residence time and to increase the overall bioavailability, effervescent multiple-unit floating DDSs (muFDDSs) were studied here. These systems consist of drug (losartan)- and effervescent (sodium bicarbonate)-containing pellets coated with a blended polymeric membrane, which was a mixture of gastrointestinal tract (GIT)-soluble and GIT-insoluble polymers. The addition of GIT-soluble polymers, such as hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, polyethylene glycol (PEG) 6000, PEG 600, and Kollicoat® IR, greatly increased the water uptake ability of the GIT-insoluble polymers (Eudragit® NE, RS, and RL; Surelease®; and Kollicoat® SR) and caused them to immediately initiate the effervescent reaction and float, but the hydrated films should also be impermeable to the generated CO(2) to maintain floatation and sufficiently flexible to withstand the pressure of carbon dioxide to avoid rupturing. The study demonstrated that the water uptake ability and mechanical properties could be applied as screening tools during the development of effervescent muFDDSs. The optimized system of SRT(5)P600(5) (i.e., a mixture of 5% Kollicoat® SR and 5% PEG 600) with a 20% coating level began to completely float within 15 min and maintained its buoyancy over a period of 12 h with a sustained-release effect. PMID:22833214

  11. [Environmental Effects of Algae Bloom Cluster: Impact on the Floating Plant Water Hyacinth Photosynthesis].

    PubMed

    Bao, Xian-ming; Gu, Dong-xiang; Wu, Ting-ting; Shi, Zu-liang; Liu, Guo-feng; Han Shi-qun; Zhou, Shi-qun; Zhou, Qing

    2015-06-01

    It is an efficient and effective ecological restoration method by using the adaptability, large biomass of aquatic plants to purify the polluted water at present. However, there is a lack of systematic research on the impact on the physiological ecology of aquatic plants and its environmental effects of algae blooms cluster in summer. The aim of this paper is to reveal the mechanism of macrophytes demise in a shallow ecosystem by studying the influence on photosynthesis of water hyacinth caused by the cynaobacterial blooms gathered, and also to provide the theoretical basis for full effects of purification function of macrophytes to reduce the negative effects on the aquatic plants after algae blooms gathered during the higher temperature (not lower 25 degrees C) through simulating experiments. Results showed the dissolved oxygen quickly consumed in root zone of aquatic plants after algae blooms gathered and showed a lack of oxygen (DO < 0.2 mg x L(-1)); and the ORP was lower than -100 mV after 1 d, and it declined to -200 mV at the end of the experiment, and pH declined 0. 7unit compared with that of control group ( CK). There were lots of nutrients releasing to the water after the algae cell died and the NH4+ -N concentration was 102 times higher than that of the control group root zone. And the macrophytes photosynthesis reduced quickly and the plant body damaged with the intimidation of higher NH4+ -N concentration (average content was 45.6 mg x L(-1)) and hypoxia after algae cell decomposed. The average net photosynthesis rate, leaf transpiration rate were 0.6 times, 0.55 times of the control group, and they reduced to 3.96 micromol x (m2 x s)(-1), 1.38 mmol x (m2 x s)(-1), respectively. At the end of the experiment, they were 22.0 micromol x (m2 x s)(-1) and 7.61 mmol x (m2 x s)(-1) for the control group. Results also showed the algae bloom together had the irreversible damage to the aquatic plants. So in the practice of ecological restoration, it should

  12. [Environmental Effects of Algae Bloom Cluster: Impact on the Floating Plant Water Hyacinth Photosynthesis].

    PubMed

    Bao, Xian-ming; Gu, Dong-xiang; Wu, Ting-ting; Shi, Zu-liang; Liu, Guo-feng; Han Shi-qun; Zhou, Shi-qun; Zhou, Qing

    2015-06-01

    It is an efficient and effective ecological restoration method by using the adaptability, large biomass of aquatic plants to purify the polluted water at present. However, there is a lack of systematic research on the impact on the physiological ecology of aquatic plants and its environmental effects of algae blooms cluster in summer. The aim of this paper is to reveal the mechanism of macrophytes demise in a shallow ecosystem by studying the influence on photosynthesis of water hyacinth caused by the cynaobacterial blooms gathered, and also to provide the theoretical basis for full effects of purification function of macrophytes to reduce the negative effects on the aquatic plants after algae blooms gathered during the higher temperature (not lower 25 degrees C) through simulating experiments. Results showed the dissolved oxygen quickly consumed in root zone of aquatic plants after algae blooms gathered and showed a lack of oxygen (DO < 0.2 mg x L(-1)); and the ORP was lower than -100 mV after 1 d, and it declined to -200 mV at the end of the experiment, and pH declined 0. 7unit compared with that of control group ( CK). There were lots of nutrients releasing to the water after the algae cell died and the NH4+ -N concentration was 102 times higher than that of the control group root zone. And the macrophytes photosynthesis reduced quickly and the plant body damaged with the intimidation of higher NH4+ -N concentration (average content was 45.6 mg x L(-1)) and hypoxia after algae cell decomposed. The average net photosynthesis rate, leaf transpiration rate were 0.6 times, 0.55 times of the control group, and they reduced to 3.96 micromol x (m2 x s)(-1), 1.38 mmol x (m2 x s)(-1), respectively. At the end of the experiment, they were 22.0 micromol x (m2 x s)(-1) and 7.61 mmol x (m2 x s)(-1) for the control group. Results also showed the algae bloom together had the irreversible damage to the aquatic plants. So in the practice of ecological restoration, it should

  13. Environmental radiation levels in soil and sediment samples collected from floating water from a land runway resulting from heavy rains in the Jeddah region, KSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohery, M.; Baz, Shadiah; Kelany, Adel M.; Abdallah, A. M.

    2014-04-01

    The natural radiation levels in soil and sediment samples collected from floating water from a land runway resulting from heavy rains in the Jeddah region as well as the activity in the population of its surrounding environments were studied. In the regions surrounding Jeddah, the movements of floating water may increase the concentration of radioactivity due to the movement of soil due to heavy rains. In addition, the technological development of industry, agriculture and other sources around the Jeddah region has increased environmental pollution, resulting in noticeable concentrations of radioactivity. The measured activity concentrations of 214Pb, 214Bi, 228Ac, 208Tl, 40K, 226Ra and 228Ra in the studied area suggest that they are within the world average for soils and sediments, except those for water sample no. 4; the concentration in this sample was five times higher than the world average concentration (this water is not consumable). Herein, the radioactivity concentrations that were obtained from the analysis of soil and sediment samples that were collected from the investigated area are discussed. Additionally, the absorbed dose rate (D), radium equivalent activity (Raeq), external hazard index (Hex), annual gonadal dose equivalent (AGDE) and annual effective dose equivalent (AEDE) were evaluated. For the soil and sediment samples, the average radioactivity concentrations were determined for each site and are expressed in Becquerels per kilogram (Bq/kg) of dry weight, while for the measurement of both the 226Ra and 228Ra isotopes in the water samples, the activity concentration is expressed in picoCuries per liter (pCi/l). The obtained results were compared with other measurements from different countries. The movement of floating water around the Jeddah region increases the concentration of radioactivity due to the movement of soils with heavy rains.

  14. Floating Point Control Library

    2007-08-02

    Floating Point Control is a Library that allows for the manipulation of floating point unit exception masking funtions control exceptions in both the Streaming "Single Instruction, Multiple Data" Extension 2 (SSE2) unit and the floating point unit simultaneously. FPC also provides macros to set floating point rounding and precision control.

  15. Flinking: Neither Floating nor Sinking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Roger B.

    1993-01-01

    Describes an activity that challenges students to make an object that, when released under water, does not float up or sink down. The main concept this activity investigates is the density of ordinary objects in comparison to the density of water. (PR)

  16. ICE911 Research: Floating Safe Inert Materials to Preserve Ice and Conserve Water in Order to Mitigate Climate Change Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, L. A.; Manzara, A.; Chetty, S.; Venkatesh, S.; Scholtz, A.

    2015-12-01

    bodies of water cooler using these floating materials could help avoid scenarios like the overheated lakes and streams that led to millions of fish killed this summer in Washington State. Third, Ice911's materials can later be removed if no longer needed, and could be repurposed to another area in need.

  17. Keto-enol tautomerization of a peptide group with proton transfer through a water bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaev, A. N.

    2015-08-01

    Calculations were performed for structures of the keto and enol forms of dipeptide N-glycylglycine and its complexes with water molecules using the quantum-chemical B3LYP/6-31+G** method. The barrier for the reactions of the dipeptide's keto-enol tautomerization that proceed by the mechanism of intramolecular proton transfer and proton transfer through water molecules connecting the oxygen and nitrogen atoms of the (-CONH-) peptide group was calculated. It was found that the barrier of the keto-enol tautomerization reaction with proton transfer by an exchange mechanism through water molecules is decreased halved compared to direct intramolecular transfer. It was shown that addition of a second water molecule in the transfer chain leads to linearization of the H-bonds bridges and increases hydrogen bonding between the peptide group and water molecules, but has virtually no influence on the calculated value of the keto-enol tautomerization barrier of about 20 kcal/mol. The structures of the transition states of the reaction indicate that the transfer of protons along the H-bonds chain is in both cases concerted but asynchronous. The order of the protons translocations along the water bridge is explained on the basis of NBO analysis of the relative strength of H-bonds in the transfer chain when the proton involved in the strongest H-bond is transferred first.

  18. A Comparison of Platform Options for Deep-water Floating Offshore Vertical Axis Wind Turbines: An Initial Study.

    SciTech Connect

    Bull, Diana L; Fowler, Matthew; Goupee, Andrew

    2014-08-01

    This analysis utilizes a 5 - MW VAWT topside design envelope created by Sandia National Laborator ies to compare floating platform options fo r each turbine in the design space. The platform designs are based on two existing designs, the OC3 Hywind spar - buoy and Principal Power's WindFloat semi - submersible. These designs are scaled using Froude - scaling relationships to determine an appropriately sized spar - buoy and semi - submersible design for each topside. Both the physical size of the required platform as well as mooring configurations are considered. Results are compared with a comparable 5 - MW HAWT in order to identify potential differences in the platform and mooring sizing between the VAWT and HAWT . The study shows that there is potential for cost savings due to reduced platform size requirements for the VAWT.

  19. 33 CFR 144.01-15 - Alternates for life floats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alternates for life floats. 144... for life floats. (a) Approved lifeboats, approved life rafts or approved inflatable life rafts may be used in lieu of approved life floats for either all or part of the capacity required. When...

  20. 33 CFR 144.01-15 - Alternates for life floats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alternates for life floats. 144... for life floats. (a) Approved lifeboats, approved life rafts or approved inflatable life rafts may be used in lieu of approved life floats for either all or part of the capacity required. When...

  1. 14 CFR 29.757 - Hull and auxiliary float strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... distributed water pressures over the hull and float bottom. Personnel and Cargo Accommodations ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hull and auxiliary float strength. 29.757... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Floats and...

  2. 14 CFR 29.757 - Hull and auxiliary float strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... distributed water pressures over the hull and float bottom. Personnel and Cargo Accommodations ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Hull and auxiliary float strength. 29.757... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Floats and...

  3. 14 CFR 29.757 - Hull and auxiliary float strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... distributed water pressures over the hull and float bottom. Personnel and Cargo Accommodations ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hull and auxiliary float strength. 29.757... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Floats and...

  4. 14 CFR 29.757 - Hull and auxiliary float strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... distributed water pressures over the hull and float bottom. Personnel and Cargo Accommodations ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Hull and auxiliary float strength. 29.757... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Floats and...

  5. Floating on oil.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jihua; Deng, Xu; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Vollmer, Doris

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate that disk-shaped steel meshes coated with a superamphiphobic layer are able to float on water and on organic liquids. A coated disk-shaped steel mesh of 1 cm radius has a loading capacity of 17 mN in water and still remarkable 9 mN in n-hexadecane. Experimentally measured supporting forces and loading capacities agree well with theoretical predictions. Inspired by the giant water lily, pan-shaped "oil lilies" with even higher loading capacity and artificial oil striders carrying more than 10 times their own weight are designed. Even after the artificial devices are fully immersed into different liquids, they show self-draining properties due to capillary forces.

  6. Floating on oil.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jihua; Deng, Xu; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Vollmer, Doris

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate that disk-shaped steel meshes coated with a superamphiphobic layer are able to float on water and on organic liquids. A coated disk-shaped steel mesh of 1 cm radius has a loading capacity of 17 mN in water and still remarkable 9 mN in n-hexadecane. Experimentally measured supporting forces and loading capacities agree well with theoretical predictions. Inspired by the giant water lily, pan-shaped "oil lilies" with even higher loading capacity and artificial oil striders carrying more than 10 times their own weight are designed. Even after the artificial devices are fully immersed into different liquids, they show self-draining properties due to capillary forces. PMID:25109826

  7. The Design of Floats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sottorf, W

    1938-01-01

    Following a summary of the multiplicity of domestic and foreign floats and a brief enumeration of the requirements of floats, the essential form parameters and their effect on the qualities of floats are detailed. On this basis a standard float design is developed which in model families with varying length/beam ratio and angle of dead rise is analyzed by an experimental method which permits its best utilization on any airplane.

  8. Characterization of water-quality and bed-sediment conditions in Currituck Sound, North Carolina, prior to the Mid-Currituck Bridge construction, 2011–15

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, Chad R.; Fitzgerald, Sharon; Antolino, Dominick

    2015-12-24

    The characterization of water-quality and bed-sediment chemistry in Currituck Sound along the proposed alignment of the Mid-Currituck Bridge summarized herein provides a baseline for determining the effect of bridge construction and bridge deck runoff on environmental conditions in Currituck Sound.

  9. Competition between Free-Floating Plants Is Strongly Driven by Previously Experienced Phosphorus Concentrations in the Water Column

    PubMed Central

    Peeters, Edwin T. H. M.; Neefjes, Rozemarijn E. M.; van Zuidam, Bastiaan G.

    2016-01-01

    Nutrients can determine the outcome of the competition between different floating plant species. The response of floating plants to current phosphorus levels may be affected by previously experienced phosphorus concentrations because some species have the ability to store excess phosphorus for later use. This might have an impact on their competition. Here, we investigate the effect of previous and actual phosphorus concentrations on the growth rate of free-floating plant species (Azolla filiculoides, Lemna minor/gibba and Ricciocarpus natans)and the effect of phosphorus history on the competition between L. minor/gibba and A. filiculoides and between L. minor/gibba and R. natans. As expected, plant growth was lower when previously kept at low instead of high phosphorus concentrations. Growth of L. minor/gibba and A. filiculoides with a phosphorus rich history was comparable for low and high actual phosphorus concentrations, however, internal phosphorus concentrations were significantly lower with low actual phosphorus concentration. This indicates that both species perform luxury phosphorus uptake. Furthermore, internal P concentration in Azolla and Lemna increased within two weeks after a period of P deficit without a strong increase in growth. A. filiculoides in a mixture with L. minor/gibba grew faster than its monoculture. Morphological differences may explain why A. filiculoides outcompeted L. minor/gibba and these differences may be induced by phosphorus concentrations in the past. Growth of L. minor/gibba was only reduced by the presence of A. filiculoides with a high phosphorus history. Growth of L. minor/gibba and R. natans in mixtures was positively affected only when they had a high phosphorus history themselves and their competitor a low phosphorus history. These observations clearly indicate that phosphorus history of competing plants is important for understanding the outcome of the competition. Therefore, actual and previously experienced phosphorus

  10. Competition between Free-Floating Plants Is Strongly Driven by Previously Experienced Phosphorus Concentrations in the Water Column.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Edwin T H M; Neefjes, Rozemarijn E M; Zuidam, Bastiaan G van

    2016-01-01

    Nutrients can determine the outcome of the competition between different floating plant species. The response of floating plants to current phosphorus levels may be affected by previously experienced phosphorus concentrations because some species have the ability to store excess phosphorus for later use. This might have an impact on their competition. Here, we investigate the effect of previous and actual phosphorus concentrations on the growth rate of free-floating plant species (Azolla filiculoides, Lemna minor/gibba and Ricciocarpus natans)and the effect of phosphorus history on the competition between L. minor/gibba and A. filiculoides and between L. minor/gibba and R. natans. As expected, plant growth was lower when previously kept at low instead of high phosphorus concentrations. Growth of L. minor/gibba and A. filiculoides with a phosphorus rich history was comparable for low and high actual phosphorus concentrations, however, internal phosphorus concentrations were significantly lower with low actual phosphorus concentration. This indicates that both species perform luxury phosphorus uptake. Furthermore, internal P concentration in Azolla and Lemna increased within two weeks after a period of P deficit without a strong increase in growth. A. filiculoides in a mixture with L. minor/gibba grew faster than its monoculture. Morphological differences may explain why A. filiculoides outcompeted L. minor/gibba and these differences may be induced by phosphorus concentrations in the past. Growth of L. minor/gibba was only reduced by the presence of A. filiculoides with a high phosphorus history. Growth of L. minor/gibba and R. natans in mixtures was positively affected only when they had a high phosphorus history themselves and their competitor a low phosphorus history. These observations clearly indicate that phosphorus history of competing plants is important for understanding the outcome of the competition. Therefore, actual and previously experienced phosphorus

  11. Bridging the Gap: The 'Soft Path' for Improving Resilience and Adaptability of Water Systems (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleick, P. H.

    2010-12-01

    The failure of traditional water management systems in the 20th century -- what I call the "hard path for water" -- is evident in several ways, including the persistent inability to meet basic human needs for safe water and adequate sanitation for vast populations, ongoing and accelerating aquatic ecosystem collapses , and growing political disputes over water allocation, management, and use, even in regions where substantial investment in water has been made. Progress in resolving these problems, especially in the face of unavoidable climate changes, growing populations, and constrained financial systems, will require bridging hydrologic and social sciences in new ways. Integrating social and cultural knowledge with new economic and technological tools and classical hydrologic and climatological sciences can produce a new “soft path for water” that offers the opportunity to move toward sustainable water systems. This talk will define the soft path for water and offer examples of innovative steps already being taken along that path in the western United States, South Africa, India, and elsewhere.

  12. Floating Boats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waugh, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a simple laboratory activity in which students collect a series of measurements and then use graphical analysis to determine the nature of the relationship between an object's mass and the volume of water it displaces. In this activity, students explore the relationships between the mass of a floating…

  13. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method based on solidification of floating organic drop for extraction of organochlorine pesticides in water samples.

    PubMed

    Leong, Mei-I; Huang, Shang-Da

    2009-11-01

    A new simple and rapid dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method has been developed for the extraction and analysis of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in water samples. The method is based on the solidification of a floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO) and is combined with gas chromatography/electron capture detection (GC/ECD). Very little solvent is required in this method. The disperser solvent (200microL acetonitrile) containing 10microL hexadecane (HEX) is rapidly injected by a syringe into the 5.0mL water sample. After centrifugation, the fine HEX droplets (6+/-0.5microL) float at the top of the screw-cap test tube. The test tube is then cooled in an ice bath. After 5min, the HEX solvent solidifies and is then transferred into a conical vial, where it melts quickly at room temperature, and 1microL of it is injected into a gas chromatograph for analysis. Under optimum conditions, the enrichment factors and extraction recoveries are high and range between 37-872 and 82.9-102.5%, respectively. The linear range is wide (0.025-20microgL(-1)), and the limits of detection are between 0.011 and 0.11microgL(-1) for most of the analytes. The relative standard deviation (RSD) for 1microgL(-1) of OCPs in water was in the range of 5.8-8.8%. The performance of the method was gauged by analyzing samples of lake and tap water.

  14. Vertical temperature dynamics in the Northern Baltic Sea based on 3D modelling and data from shallow-water Argo floats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerlund, Antti; Tuomi, Laura

    2016-06-01

    3D hydrodynamic models often produce errors in the depth of the mixed layer and the vertical density structure. We used the 3D hydrodynamic model NEMO to investigate the effect of vertical turbulence parameterisations on seasonal temperature dynamics in the Bothnian Sea, Baltic Sea for the years 2012 and 2013. We used vertical profiles from new shallow-water Argo floats, operational in the area since 2012, to validate our model. We found that NEMO was able to reproduce the general features of the seasonal temperature variations in the study area, when meteorological forcing was accurate. The k-ε and k-ω schemes were selected for a more detailed analysis. Both schemes showed clear differences, but neither proved superior. While sea surface temperature was better simulated with the k-ω scheme, thermocline depth was clearly better with the k-ε scheme. We investigated the effect of wave-breaking on the mixing of the surface layer. The Craig and Banner parameterisation clearly improved the representation of thermocline depth. However, further tuning of the mixing parameterisations for the Baltic Sea is needed to better simulate the vertical temperature structure. We found the autonomous Baltic Sea Argo floats valuable for model validation and performance evaluation.

  15. An improved understanding of the natural resonances of moonpools contained within floating rigid-bodies: Theory and application to oscillating water column devices

    SciTech Connect

    Bull, Diana L.

    2015-09-23

    The fundamental interactions between waves, a floating rigid-body, and a moonpool that is selectively open to atmosphere or enclosed to purposefully induce pressure fluctuations are investigated. The moonpool hydrodynamic characteristics and the hydrodynamic coupling to the rigid-body are derived implicitly through reciprocity relations on an array of field points. By modeling the free surface of the moonpool in this manner, an explicit hydrodynamic coupling term is included in the equations of motion. This coupling results in the migration of the moonpool's natural resonance frequency from the piston frequency to a new frequency when enclosed in a floating rigid-body. Two geometries that highlight distinct aspects of marine vessels and oscillating water column (OWC) renewable energy devices are analyzed to reveal the coupled natural resonance migration. The power performance of these two OWCs in regular waves is also investigated. The air chamber is enclosed and a three-dimensional, linear, frequency domain performance model that links the rigid-body to the moonpool through a linear resistive control strategy is detailed. Furthermore, an analytic expression for the optimal linear resistive control values in regular waves is presented.

  16. An improved understanding of the natural resonances of moonpools contained within floating rigid-bodies: Theory and application to oscillating water column devices

    DOE PAGES

    Bull, Diana L.

    2015-09-23

    The fundamental interactions between waves, a floating rigid-body, and a moonpool that is selectively open to atmosphere or enclosed to purposefully induce pressure fluctuations are investigated. The moonpool hydrodynamic characteristics and the hydrodynamic coupling to the rigid-body are derived implicitly through reciprocity relations on an array of field points. By modeling the free surface of the moonpool in this manner, an explicit hydrodynamic coupling term is included in the equations of motion. This coupling results in the migration of the moonpool's natural resonance frequency from the piston frequency to a new frequency when enclosed in a floating rigid-body. Two geometriesmore » that highlight distinct aspects of marine vessels and oscillating water column (OWC) renewable energy devices are analyzed to reveal the coupled natural resonance migration. The power performance of these two OWCs in regular waves is also investigated. The air chamber is enclosed and a three-dimensional, linear, frequency domain performance model that links the rigid-body to the moonpool through a linear resistive control strategy is detailed. Furthermore, an analytic expression for the optimal linear resistive control values in regular waves is presented.« less

  17. Floating assembly of diatom Coscinodiscus sp. microshells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Pan, Junfeng; Cai, Jun; Zhang, Deyuan

    2012-03-30

    Diatoms have silica frustules with transparent and delicate micro/nano scale structures, two dimensional pore arrays, and large surface areas. Although, the diatom cells of Coscinodiscus sp. live underwater, we found that their valves can float on water and assemble together. Experiments show that the convex shape and the 40 nm sieve pores of the valves allow them to float on water, and that the buoyancy and the micro-range attractive forces cause the valves to assemble together at the highest point of water. As measured by AFM calibrated glass needles fixed in manipulator, the buoyancy force on a single floating valve may reach up to 10 μN in water. Turning the valves over, enlarging the sieve pores, reducing the surface tension of water, or vacuum pumping may cause the floating valves to sink. After the water has evaporated, the floating valves remained in their assembled state and formed a monolayer film. The bonded diatom monolayer may be valuable in studies on diatom based optical devices, biosensors, solar cells, and batteries, to better use the optical and adsorption properties of frustules. The floating assembly phenomenon can also be used as a self-assembly method for fabricating monolayer of circular plates. PMID:22387476

  18. 33 CFR 149.550 - What are the requirements for lights on a floating hose string?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... lights on a floating hose string? 149.550 Section 149.550 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... EQUIPMENT Aids to Navigation Lights on Floating Hose Strings § 149.550 What are the requirements for lights on a floating hose string? Hose strings that are floating or supported on trestles must display...

  19. 33 CFR 149.550 - What are the requirements for lights on a floating hose string?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... lights on a floating hose string? 149.550 Section 149.550 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... EQUIPMENT Aids to Navigation Lights on Floating Hose Strings § 149.550 What are the requirements for lights on a floating hose string? Hose strings that are floating or supported on trestles must display...

  20. 33 CFR 149.550 - What are the requirements for lights on a floating hose string?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... lights on a floating hose string? 149.550 Section 149.550 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... EQUIPMENT Aids to Navigation Lights on Floating Hose Strings § 149.550 What are the requirements for lights on a floating hose string? Hose strings that are floating or supported on trestles must display...

  1. 40 CFR 63.1043 - Standards-Separator floating roof.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) National Emission Standards for Oil-Water Separators and Organic-Water Separators § 63.1043 Standards... controlling air emissions from an oil-water separator or organic-water separator using a floating roof....

  2. Analysis of Vertical Dynamics in the Northern Baltic Sea based on 3D Modelling and Data from Shallow-Water Argo Floats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerlund, Antti; Tuomi, Laura

    2016-04-01

    Vertical mixing is a challenge for ocean models. 3D hydrodynamic models often produce considerable errors in mixed layer depths and vertical temperature structure that can be related to the vertical turbulence parameterisation. These errors can be pronounced in areas with complex hydrography. In the Baltic Sea, for example, there are high horizontal and vertical salinity gradients. Furthermore, thermocline and halocline are located at different depths. This produces stratification conditions challenging for all ocean models. We studied vertical mixing with modelling experiments and new observational data. NEMO 3D ocean model has been set up at Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI) for the Baltic Sea, based on the NEMO Nordic configuration. The model has been discretized on a Baltic Sea - North Sea grid with 2 nautical mile resolution and 56 vertical layers, using FMI-HIRLAM atmospheric forcing. The observational data for Baltic Sea off-shore areas is sparse and new methods are needed to collect data for model validation and development. FMI has been testing Argo floats in the Baltic Sea since 2011 in order to increase the amount of observed vertical profiles of salinity and temperature. This is the first time Argo floats have been successfully used in the brackish, shallow waters of the Baltic Sea. This new data set is well suited for evaluating the capability of hydrodynamic models to produce the vertical structure of temperature. It provides a time series of profiles from the area of interest with good temporal resolution, showing the structure of temperature in the water column throughout the summer. We found that NEMO was able to reproduce the general features of the seasonal temperature variations in the study area, when meteorological forcing was accurate. We ran the model with different vertical turbulence parameterisations. The k-ɛ and k-ω schemes showed clear differences, but neither proved superior. While sea surface temperature was better simulated

  3. Discrete Element Modelling of Floating Debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahaffey, Samantha; Liang, Qiuhua; Parkin, Geoff; Large, Andy; Rouainia, Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    Flash flooding is characterised by high velocity flows which impact vulnerable catchments with little warning time and as such, result in complex flow dynamics which are difficult to replicate through modelling. The impacts of flash flooding can be made yet more severe by the transport of both natural and anthropogenic debris, ranging from tree trunks to vehicles, wheelie bins and even storage containers, the effects of which have been clearly evident during recent UK flooding. This cargo of debris can have wide reaching effects and result in actual flood impacts which diverge from those predicted. A build-up of debris may lead to partial channel blockage and potential flow rerouting through urban centres. Build-up at bridges and river structures also leads to increased hydraulic loading which may result in damage and possible structural failure. Predicting the impacts of debris transport; however, is difficult as conventional hydrodynamic modelling schemes do not intrinsically include floating debris within their calculations. Subsequently a new tool has been developed using an emerging approach, which incorporates debris transport through the coupling of two existing modelling techniques. A 1D hydrodynamic modelling scheme has here been coupled with a 2D discrete element scheme to form a new modelling tool which predicts the motion and flow-interaction of floating debris. Hydraulic forces arising from flow around the object are applied to instigate its motion. Likewise, an equivalent opposing force is applied to fluid cells, enabling backwater effects to be simulated. Shock capturing capabilities make the tool applicable to predicting the complex flow dynamics associated with flash flooding. The modelling scheme has been applied to experimental case studies where cylindrical wooden dowels are transported by a dam-break wave. These case studies enable validation of the tool's shock capturing capabilities and the coupling technique applied between the two numerical

  4. WATER QUALITY ISSUES AND EXPECTATIONS REGARDING RECONSTRUCTION OF THE HIX BRIDGE, WESTPORT, MA

    EPA Science Inventory

    At present there is a large deposit of rocks beneath and near the Hix Bridge located on the East Branch of the Westport River system. Following the 1938 hurricane, remnants of a 19th century bridge were apparently deposited into this constriction. The existing bridge, built in 19...

  5. Reviewing the circulation and mixing of Antarctic Intermediate Water in the South Pacific using evidence from geochemical tracers and Argo float trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostock, Helen C.; Sutton, Phil J.; Williams, Michael J. M.; Opdyke, Bradley N.

    2013-03-01

    Evidence from physical and geochemical tracers measured during the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) shows that there are four sub-types of Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) in the South Pacific. The main formation region of AAIW is the southeast Pacific, where fresh, cold, high oxygen, low nutrient, intermediate waters are created. This AAIW is transported north and mixes with Equatorial Pacific Intermediate Waters (EqPIW), themselves a combination of AAIW and nutrient rich, old North Pacific deep waters. 'Tasman' AAIW found in the Coral and Tasman Seas is more saline and warmer than the main subtropical gyre, and appears to have formed from mixing of AAIW with thermocline waters in the Tasman Gyre. Tasman AAIW leaks out of the Tasman basin to the north of New Zealand and along Chatham Rise, and also in the South Tasman Sea via the Tasman Leakage. Another source of relatively fresh, high oxygen, low nutrient, young AAIW comes directly from the Southern Ocean, flowing into the southwest and central South Pacific Basin, west of the East Pacific Rise. This 'Southern Ocean' (SO) AAIW is most likely a mixture of AAIW formed locally at the Subantarctic Front (SAF), and AAIW formed along the SAF in the southeast Pacific or Indian oceans and transported by the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). Interpreting physical and geochemical tracers, combined with velocity estimates from Argo floats, and previous research, has allowed us to refine the detailed circulation pattern of AAIW in the South Pacific, especially in the topographically complex southwest Pacific.

  6. Drift trajectories of a floating human body simulated in a hydraulic model of Puget Sound.

    PubMed

    Ebbesmeyer, C C; Haglund, W D

    1994-01-01

    After a young man jumped off a 221-foot (67 meters) high bridge, the drift of the body that beached 20 miles (32 km) away at Alki Point in Seattle, Washington was simulated with a hydraulic model. Simulations for the appropriate time period were performed using a small floating bead to represent the body in the hydraulic model at the University of Washington. Bead movements were videotaped and transferred to Computer Aided Drafting (AutoCAD) charts on a personal computer. Because of strong tidal currents in the narrow passage under the bridge (The Narrows near Tacoma, WA), small changes in the time of the jump (+/- 30 minutes) made large differences in the distance the body traveled (30 miles; 48 km). Hydraulic and other types of oceanographic models may be located by contacting technical experts known as physical oceanographers at local universities, and can be utilized to demonstrate trajectories of floating objects and the time required to arrive at selected locations. Potential applications for forensic death investigators include: to be able to set geographic and time limits for searches; determine potential origin of remains found floating or beached; and confirm and correlate information regarding entry into the water and sightings of remains. PMID:8113703

  7. Drift trajectories of a floating human body simulated in a hydraulic model of Puget Sound.

    PubMed

    Ebbesmeyer, C C; Haglund, W D

    1994-01-01

    After a young man jumped off a 221-foot (67 meters) high bridge, the drift of the body that beached 20 miles (32 km) away at Alki Point in Seattle, Washington was simulated with a hydraulic model. Simulations for the appropriate time period were performed using a small floating bead to represent the body in the hydraulic model at the University of Washington. Bead movements were videotaped and transferred to Computer Aided Drafting (AutoCAD) charts on a personal computer. Because of strong tidal currents in the narrow passage under the bridge (The Narrows near Tacoma, WA), small changes in the time of the jump (+/- 30 minutes) made large differences in the distance the body traveled (30 miles; 48 km). Hydraulic and other types of oceanographic models may be located by contacting technical experts known as physical oceanographers at local universities, and can be utilized to demonstrate trajectories of floating objects and the time required to arrive at selected locations. Potential applications for forensic death investigators include: to be able to set geographic and time limits for searches; determine potential origin of remains found floating or beached; and confirm and correlate information regarding entry into the water and sightings of remains.

  8. Water-quality data for the Rio Grande between Picacho Bridge near Las Cruces and Calle del Norte Bridge near Mesilla, New Mexico, 1996-97

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huff, G.F.

    1998-01-01

    The City of Las Cruces is concerned about water quality in a reach of the Rio Grande that receives outfall from the City of Las Cruces wastewater-treatment plant. Water-quality samples were collected from the Rio Grande at Picacho Bridge near Las Cruces, New Mexico; from the sampling site at the City of Las Cruces wastewater-treatment plant; and from the Rio Grande at Calle del Norte Bridge near Mesilla, New Mexico. The samples were collected on 12 days from August 6, 1996, to February 28, 1997, and were analyzed for a suite of dissolved and total constituents including trace metals. Instantaneous stream discharge was measured concurrently with collection of the Rio Grande samples. At the wastewater- treatment plant, the City of Las Cruces provided instantaneous discharge rates concurrent with sampling. Quality-control measures used in this study to ensure analytical accuracy included replicate sampling, replicate analysis of split samples, ambient blanks, equipment blanks, and analysis of standard reference water samples.

  9. Water quality of the Potomac River at Chain Bridge at Washington, D.C.; hydrologic-data report, 1978 water year

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blanchard, Stephen F.

    1983-01-01

    Water quality data are presented, measured at the Potomac River at Chain Bridge at Washington, D.C. for the 1978 water year. Samples were generally collected twice a week and more frequently during periods of high flow. The samples were analyzed for nitrogen, phosphorus, silica and suspended sediments. (USGS)

  10. Water2Invest: Global facility for calculating investments needed to bridge the climate-induced water gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straatsma, Menno; Droogers, Peter; Brandsma, Jairus; Buytaert, Wouter; Karssenberg, Derek; Meijer, Karen; van Aalst, Maaike; van Beek, Rens; Wada, Yoshihide; Bierkens, Marc

    2013-04-01

    Decision makers responsible for climate change adaptation investments are confronted with large uncertainties regarding future water availability and water demand, as well as the investment cost required to reduce the water gap. Moreover, scientists have worked hard to increase fundamental knowledge on climate change and its impacts (climate services), while practical use of this knowledge is limited due to a lack of tools for decision support under uncertain long term future scenarios (decision services). The Water2Invest project aims are to (i) assess the joint impact of climate change and socioeconomic change on water scarcity, (ii) integrate impact and potential adaptation in one flow, (iii) prioritize adaptation options to counteract water scarcity on their financial, regional socio-economic and environmental implications, and (iv) deliver all this information in an integrated user-friendly web-based service. Global water availability is computed between 2006 and 2100 using the PCR-GLOBWB water resources model at a 6 minute spatial resolution. Climate change scenarios are based on the fifth Assessment Report (AR5) of the IPCC Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) that defines four CO2 emission scenarios as representative concentration pathways. Water demand is computed for agriculture, industry, domestic, and environmental requirements based on socio-economic scenarios of increase in population and gross domestic product. Using a linear programming algorithm, water is allocated on a monthly basis over the four sectors. Based on these assessments, the user can evaluate various technological and infrastructural adaptation measures to assess the investments needed to bridge the future water gap. Regional environmental and socioeconomic effects of these investments are evaluated, such as environmental flows or downstream effects. A scheme is developed to evaluate the strategies on robustness and flexibility under climate change and scenario uncertainty

  11. Application of the Multi-Dimensional Surface Water Modeling System at Bridge 339, Copper River Highway, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brabets, Timothy P.; Conaway, Jeffrey S.

    2009-01-01

    The Copper River Basin, the sixth largest watershed in Alaska, drains an area of 24,200 square miles. This large, glacier-fed river flows across a wide alluvial fan before it enters the Gulf of Alaska. Bridges along the Copper River Highway, which traverses the alluvial fan, have been impacted by channel migration. Due to a major channel change in 2001, Bridge 339 at Mile 36 of the highway has undergone excessive scour, resulting in damage to its abutments and approaches. During the snow- and ice-melt runoff season, which typically extends from mid-May to September, the design discharge for the bridge often is exceeded. The approach channel shifts continuously, and during our study it has shifted back and forth from the left bank to a course along the right bank nearly parallel to the road. Maintenance at Bridge 339 has been costly and will continue to be so if no action is taken. Possible solutions to the scour and erosion problem include (1) constructing a guide bank to redirect flow, (2) dredging approximately 1,000 feet of channel above the bridge to align flow perpendicular to the bridge, and (3) extending the bridge. The USGS Multi-Dimensional Surface Water Modeling System (MD_SWMS) was used to assess these possible solutions. The major limitation of modeling these scenarios was the inability to predict ongoing channel migration. We used a hybrid dataset of surveyed and synthetic bathymetry in the approach channel, which provided the best approximation of this dynamic system. Under existing conditions and at the highest measured discharge and stage of 32,500 ft3/s and 51.08 ft, respectively, the velocities and shear stresses simulated by MD_SWMS indicate scour and erosion will continue. Construction of a 250-foot-long guide bank would not improve conditions because it is not long enough. Dredging a channel upstream of Bridge 339 would help align the flow perpendicular to Bridge 339, but because of the mobility of the channel bed, the dredged channel would

  12. A study to estimate the fate and transport of bacteria in river water from birds nesting under a bridge.

    PubMed

    Nayamatullah, M M M; Bin-Shafique, S; Sharif, H O

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the effect of input parameters, such as the number of bridge-dwelling birds, decay rate of the bacteria, flow at the river, water temperature, and settling velocity, a parametric study was conducted using a water quality model developed with QUAL2Kw. The reach of the bacterial-impaired section from the direct droppings of bridge-nesting birds at the Guadalupe River near Kerrville, Texas was estimated using the model. The concentration of Escherichia coli bacteria were measured upstream, below the bridge, and downstream of the river for one-and-a-half years. The decay rate of the indicator bacteria in the river water was estimated from the model using measured data, and was found to be 6.5/day. The study suggests that the number of bridge-dwelling birds, the decay rate, and flow at the river have the highest impact on the fate and transport of bacteria. The water temperature moderately affects the fate and transport of bacteria, whereas, the settling velocity of bacteria did not show any significant effect. Once the decay rates are estimated, the reach of the impaired section was predicted from the model using the average flow of the channel. Since the decay rate does not vary significantly in the ambient environment at this location, the length of the impaired section primarily depends on flow.

  13. Protonation of a hydroxide anion bridging two divalent magnesium cations in water probed by first-principles metadynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Mee; Boero, Mauro

    2010-09-01

    The protonation of a hydroxide anion (OH(-)) located between two magnesium cations (Mg(2+)) in aqueous solution has been investigated by first-principles metadynamics simulation. We observe that the complex Mg(2+)-OH(-)-Mg(2+) is stabilized by the coparticipation of the hydroxide anion to the first hydration shells of both the Mg(2+) cations. Contrary to the cases of OH(-) in pure water, the transfer of protons in the presence of the divalent metal ions turns out to be a slow chemical event. This can be ascribed to the decreased proton affinity of the bridging OH(-). Metadynamics simulation, used to overcome the difficulty of the long time scale required by the protonation of the bridging OH(-), has shown that the system possesses a great stability on the reactant state, characterized by a bioctahedral (6,6) solvation structure around the two Mg(2+) cations. The exploration of the free energy landscape shows that this stable bioctahedral configuration converts into a lower coordinated (5,6) structure, leading to a proton transfer from a water molecule belonging to the first solvation shell of the Mg(2+) ion having the lower coordination to the bridging OH(-); the free energy barrier for the protonation reaction is 11 kcal/mol, meaning that the bridging hydroxide is a weak base. During the proton transfer, the bridging OH(-) reverts to an H(2)O molecule, and this breaks the electrostatic coupling of the two Mg(2+) ions, which depart independently with their own hydration shells, one of which is entirely formed by water molecules. The second one carries the newly created OH(-). Our results show that the flexibility in the metal coordination plays a crucial role in both the protonation process of the bridging OH(-) and the separation of the metal cations, providing useful insight into the nature of proton transfer in binuclear divalent metal ions, with several biological implications, such as, for instance, transesterification of catalytic RNA.

  14. Determination of boron in water samples by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on the solidification of a floating organic drop coupled with a fluorimetric method.

    PubMed

    Peng, Guilong; He, Qiang; Li, Haifang; Mmereki, Daniel; Lu, Ying; Zheng, Yongzan; Zhong, Zhihui; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2016-04-01

    In this work, a new, rapid and reliable method for the determination of boron in water samples by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on the solidification of a floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO) prior to fluorescence spectra analysis was developed. As a result of its complexation with boric acid, the method relies on the enhancement of the fluorescence (λex = 350 nm, λem = 373 nm) of chromotropic acid. The influences of DLLME-SFO parameters, including the extraction solvent type and its volume, pH, the disperser solvent type and its volume, and salt effects were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, the limit of detection was 0.11 ng L(-1), with a preconcentration factor of 86 times. The calibration curve was linear in the range of 0-40 nM. The proposed method has also been successfully applied to analyze real water samples and the relative recoveries of water samples ranged from 86.9 to 93.2%. PMID:26911625

  15. Float Zone Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    A summary of the Analytical Float Zone Experiment System (AFZES) concept is presented. The types of experiments considered for such a facility are discussed. Reports from various industrial producers and users of float zone material are presented. Special emphasis is placed on state-of-the-art developments in low gravity manufacturing and their applications to space processing.

  16. Calculation and experiment for dynamic response of bridge in deep water under seismic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chun-guang; Sun, Guo-shuai

    2014-08-01

    The fluid-structure interaction under seismic excitation is very complicated, and thus the damage identification of the bridge in deep water is the key technique to ensure the safe service. Based on nonlinear Morison equation considering the added mass effect and the fluid-structure interaction effect, the effect of hydrodynamic pressure on the structure is analyzed. A series of underwater shaking table tests are conducted in the air and in water. The dynamic characteristics affected by hydrodynamic pressure are discussed and the distribution of hydrodynamic pressure is also analyzed. In addition, the damage of structure is distinguished through the natural frequency and the difference of modal curvature, and is then compared with the test results. The numerical simulation and test of this study indicate that the effect of hydrodynamic pressure on the structure should not be neglected. It is also found that the presence of the damage, the location of the damage and the degree of the severity can be judged through the variation of structure frequency and the difference of modal curvature.

  17. 22. Float located adjacent to entry stair in filtration bed. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Float located adjacent to entry stair in filtration bed. The float actuates a valve that maintains water level over the bed. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Filtration Plant, South side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  18. Floating patterns of metered dose inhalers.

    PubMed

    Wolf, B L; Cochran, K R

    1997-01-01

    As long as metered dose inhalers have existed, patients have sought a reliable method to determine if a given canister was still potent. Concerning beta agonists, the answer to this question may be lifesaving. Issues of compliance have made dating canisters or counting doses impractical. Likewise, previous claims of floating characteristics are unreliable. In tap water, we float-tested 13 commonly used inhalers three times each, observing variations as they were incrementally actuated, emptying their contents. One essential pattern was observed. Almost all prescription-size canisters sink when full; all float by the time one-third of their contents is gone. Orientation of prescription-size canisters changes in a distinct pattern especially near 90% depletion. Sample-size canisters showed some variance. Results suggest that the pharmaceutical industry should include individual floating characteristics as part of the package insert as they provide a reproducible means of gauging contents.

  19. Tank Tests of Two Floats for High-speed Seaplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Joe W

    1933-01-01

    At the request of the Bureau of Aeronautics, Navy Department, a study of the design of floats especially suitable for use on high-speed seaplanes was undertaken in the N.A.C.A. tank. This note give the results obtained in tests of one-quarter full-size models of two floats for high-speed seaplanes. One was a float similar to that used on the Macchi high-speed seaplane which competed in the 1926 Schneider Trophy races, and the other a float designed at the N.A.C.A. tank in an attempt to improve on the water performance of the Macchi float. The model of the latter showed considerably better water performance than the model of the Macchi float.

  20. Design, synthesis, and cercaricidal activity of novel high-efficient, low-toxic self-spreading PEG-N-salicylanilide derivatives against cercariae larvae of Schistosome Japonicum floating on the water surface.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei; Zheng, Lv-Yin; Wu, Ren-Miao; Fan, Xiao-Lin

    2015-05-01

    Novel cercaricides of PEG-N-salicylanilide derivatives that could self-spread and float on the water surface were designed and synthesized according to the particular habit of cercariae larvae of Schistosome japonicum. The structures of the cercaricides were characterized by the infrared spectra (IR), magnetic resonance ((1) H NMR), and mass spectrum (MS). The images of the floating cercaricides on the water surface were investigated by the Brewster angle microscopy (BAM). When the cercaricides were dropped on the water surface, they could spread along the air-water interface automatically and form thin membranes floating on the water surface immediately. The lethality rate of cercariae for 5a and 6a was more than 90% in 120 min at a surface concentration of 0.008 mg/cm(2) . The non-ionic surfactant-cercaricides not only showed strong cercaricidal activities against the cercariae larvae but also exhibited low toxicities, which offered an effective and environment-friendly approach for the reduction of population infection rate and the realization of schistosome control.

  1. Design, synthesis, and cercaricidal activity of novel high-efficient, low-toxic self-spreading PEG-N-salicylanilide derivatives against cercariae larvae of Schistosome Japonicum floating on the water surface.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei; Zheng, Lv-Yin; Wu, Ren-Miao; Fan, Xiao-Lin

    2015-05-01

    Novel cercaricides of PEG-N-salicylanilide derivatives that could self-spread and float on the water surface were designed and synthesized according to the particular habit of cercariae larvae of Schistosome japonicum. The structures of the cercaricides were characterized by the infrared spectra (IR), magnetic resonance ((1) H NMR), and mass spectrum (MS). The images of the floating cercaricides on the water surface were investigated by the Brewster angle microscopy (BAM). When the cercaricides were dropped on the water surface, they could spread along the air-water interface automatically and form thin membranes floating on the water surface immediately. The lethality rate of cercariae for 5a and 6a was more than 90% in 120 min at a surface concentration of 0.008 mg/cm(2) . The non-ionic surfactant-cercaricides not only showed strong cercaricidal activities against the cercariae larvae but also exhibited low toxicities, which offered an effective and environment-friendly approach for the reduction of population infection rate and the realization of schistosome control. PMID:25244005

  2. The relationship between water bridges and the polyproline II conformation: a large-scale analysis of molecular dynamics simulations and crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Law, Peter B; Daggett, Valerie

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that denatured proteins are predisposed toward the left-handed polyproline II (P(II)) conformation. One possible source of P(II) stability in the denatured state is water bridges. Water bridges are networks of water molecules that link nearby hydrogen bond acceptors and/or donors on proteins. On the basis of the proposed behavior of P(II) and water bridges, the propensity of a residue to participate in water bridges should be correlated with its P(II) propensity. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed the following data sets: 2351 high-resolution crystal structures, and the native and denatured states of 188 different proteins from all-atom, explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, which are part of our Dynameomics effort. We found that water bridges do not explain the high frequency of P(II) in denatured states; such bridges are less frequent around P(II) than around other conformations. Thus, this analysis casts doubt on water bridges as a dominant factor determining the residue-based P(II) propensities.

  3. Bridge-scour analysis using the water surface profile (WSPRO) model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, David S.

    1993-01-01

    A program was developed to extract hydraulic information required for bridge-scour computations, from the Water-Surface Profile computation model (WSPRO). The program is written in compiled BASIC and is menu driven. Using only ground points, the program can compute average ground elevation, cross-sectional area below a specified datum, or create a Drawing Exchange Format (DXF) fie of cross section. Using both ground points ad hydraulic information form the equal-conveyance tubes computed by WSPRO, the program can compute hydraulic parameters at a user-specified station or in a user-specified subsection of the cross section. The program can identify the maximum velocity in a cross section and the velocity and depth at a user-specified station. The program also can identify the maximum velocity in the cross section and the average velocity, average depth, average ground elevation, width perpendicular to the flow, cross-sectional area of flow, and discharge in a subsection of the cross section. This program does not include any help or suggestions as to what data should be extracted; therefore, the used must understand the scour equations and associated variables to the able to extract the proper information from the WSPRO output.

  4. The investigation of excited state proton transfer mechanism in water-bridged 7-azaindole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong-Jia; Zhao, Jin-Feng; Li, Yong-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Based on the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT), the excited-state intermolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) mechanism of water-bridged 7-azaindole has been investigated theoretically. The calculations of primary bond lengths and the IR vibrational spectra between the S0 state and the S1 state that verified the intramolecular hydrogen bond were strengthened. The fact that reproduced experimental absorbance and fluorescence emission spectra well theoretically demonstrate that the TDDFT theory we adopted is reasonable and effective. In addition, intramolecular charge transfer based on the frontier molecular orbitals demonstrated the indication of the ESIPT reaction. The constructed potential energy curves of ground state and the first excited state based on keeping the H2···O3 and H6···N7 distances fixed at a series of values have been used to illustrate the ESIPT process. A relative lower barrier of 5.94 kcal/mol in the S1 state potential energy curve for type II (lower than that of 9.82 kcal/mol in the S1 state for type I) demonstrates that type II ESIPT process occurs firstly in 7Al-2H2O complex.

  5. Submerged (under-liquid) floating of light objects.

    PubMed

    Bormashenko, Edward; Pogreb, Roman; Grynyov, Roman; Bormashenko, Yelena; Gendelman, Oleg

    2013-08-27

    A counterintuitive submerged floating of objects lighter than the supporting liquid was observed. Polymer plates with dimensions on the order of magnitude of the capillary length were hydrophilized with cold air plasma were floated in an "under-liquid" regime (totally covered by liquid) when immersed in water or glycerol. Profiles of liquid surfaces curved by polymer plates are measured. We propose a model explaining the phenomenon. The floating of Janus plates is reported.

  6. Floating emitter solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chih, Sah (Inventor); Cheng, Li-Jen (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A front surface contact floating emitter solar cell transistor is provided in a semiconductor body (n-type), in which floating emitter sections (p-type) are diffused or implanted in the front surface. Between the emitter sections, a further section is diffused or implanted in the front surface, but isolated from the floating emitter sections, for use either as a base contact to the n-type semiconductor body, in which case the section is doped n+, or as a collector for the adjacent emitter sections.

  7. 33 CFR 144.01-5 - Location and launching of life floats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Location and launching of life floats. 144.01-5 Section 144.01-5 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Location and launching of life floats. The life floats shall be distributed in accessible locations...

  8. 33 CFR 144.01-5 - Location and launching of life floats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Location and launching of life floats. 144.01-5 Section 144.01-5 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Location and launching of life floats. The life floats shall be distributed in accessible locations...

  9. 33 CFR 144.01-5 - Location and launching of life floats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Location and launching of life floats. 144.01-5 Section 144.01-5 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Location and launching of life floats. The life floats shall be distributed in accessible locations...

  10. 33 CFR 144.01-5 - Location and launching of life floats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Location and launching of life floats. 144.01-5 Section 144.01-5 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Location and launching of life floats. The life floats shall be distributed in accessible locations...

  11. Floating--A Key to Survival.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Norman

    1980-01-01

    Described are several activities to be used to help students grasp the concept of floating. The activities include the use of a spring scale to measure the weight of the objects in air, in water, and in salt water, and a discussion of why there are differences in these weights. (DS)

  12. Dragging a floating horizontal cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Duck-Gyu; Kim, Ho-Young

    2010-11-01

    A cylinder immersed in a fluid stream experiences a drag, and it is well known that the drag coefficient is a function of the Reynolds number only. Here we study the force exerted on a long horizontal cylinder that is dragged perpendicular to its axis while floating on an air-water interface with a high Reynolds number. In addition to the flow-induced drag, the floating body is subjected to capillary forces along the contact line where the three phases of liquid/solid/gas meet. We first theoretically predict the meniscus profile around the horizontally moving cylinder assuming the potential flow, and show that the profile is in good agreement with that obtained experimentally. Then we compare our theoretical predictions and experimental measurement results for the drag coefficient of a floating horizontal cylinder that is given by a function of the Weber number and the Bond number. This study can help us to understand the horizontal motion of partially submerged objects at air-liquid interface, such as semi-aquatic insects and marine plants.

  13. Floating Magnet Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wake, Masayoshi

    1990-01-01

    A room-temperature demonstration of a floating magnet using a high-temperature superconductor is described. The setup and operation of the apparatus are described. The technical details of the effect are discussed. (CW)

  14. Micromechanisms with floating pivot

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Ernest J.

    2001-03-06

    A new class of tilting micromechanical mechanisms have been developed. These new mechanisms use floating pivot structures to relieve some of the problems encountered in the use of solid flexible pivots.

  15. Intergeneric coaggregation among drinking water bacteria: evidence of a role for Acinetobacter calcoaceticus as a bridging bacterium.

    PubMed

    Simões, Lúcia Chaves; Simões, Manuel; Vieira, Maria João

    2008-02-01

    Intergeneric coaggregation of drinking water bacteria was tested. Acinetobacter calcoaceticus was found not only to autoaggregate but also to coaggregate with four of the five other isolates (Burkholderia cepacia, Methylobacterium sp., Mycobacterium mucogenicum, Sphingomonas capsulata, and Staphylococcus sp.). In its absence, no coaggregation was found. Interactions were lectin-saccharide mediated. The putative bridging function of A. calcoaceticus was evidenced by multispecies biofilm studies, through a strain exclusion process.

  16. Skylab floating ice experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, W. J. (Principal Investigator); Ramseier, R. O.; Weaver, R. J.; Weeks, W. F.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Coupling of the aircraft data with the ground truth observations proved to be highly successful with interesting results being obtained with IR and SLAR passive microwave techniques, and standard photography. Of particular interest were the results of the PMIS system which operated at 10.69 GHz with both vertical and horizontal polarizations. This was the first time that dual polarized images were obtained from floating ice. In both sea and lake ice, it was possible to distinguish a wide variety of thin ice types because of their large differences in brightness temperatures. It was found that the higher brightness temperature was invariably obtained in the vertically polarized mode, and as the age of the ice increases the brightness temperature increases in both polarizations. Associated with this change in age, the difference in temperature was observed as the different polarizations decreased. It appears that the horizontally polarized data is the most sensitive to variations in ice type for both fresh water and sea ice. The study also showed the great amount of information on ice surface roughness and deformation patterns that can be obtained from X-band SLAR observations.

  17. Floating wind turbine system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viterna, Larry A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A floating wind turbine system with a tower structure that includes at least one stability arm extending therefrom and that is anchored to the sea floor with a rotatable position retention device that facilitates deep water installations. Variable buoyancy for the wind turbine system is provided by buoyancy chambers that are integral to the tower itself as well as the stability arm. Pumps are included for adjusting the buoyancy as an aid in system transport, installation, repair and removal. The wind turbine rotor is located downwind of the tower structure to allow the wind turbine to follow the wind direction without an active yaw drive system. The support tower and stability arm structure is designed to balance tension in the tether with buoyancy, gravity and wind forces in such a way that the top of the support tower leans downwind, providing a large clearance between the support tower and the rotor blade tips. This large clearance facilitates the use of articulated rotor hubs to reduced damaging structural dynamic loads. Major components of the turbine can be assembled at the shore and transported to an offshore installation site.

  18. Stabilized floating platforms

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, David G.

    1976-01-01

    The subject invention is directed to a floating platform for supporting nuclear reactors and the like at selected offshore sites. The platform is provided with a stabilizer mechanism which significantly reduces the effects of wave action upon the platform and which comprises a pair of relatively small floats attached by rigid booms to the platform at locations spaced therefrom for reducing wave pitch, acceleration, and the resonance period of the wave.

  19. Hydrodynamic Tests of Models of Seaplane Floats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eula, Antonio

    1935-01-01

    This report contains the results of tank tests carried out at free trim on seventeen hulls and floats of various types. The data as to the weight on water, trim, and relative resistance for each model are plotted nondimensionally and are referenced both to the total weight and to the weight on water. Despite the fact that the experiments were not made systematically, a study of the models and of the test data permits nevertheless some general deductions regarding the forms of floats and their resistance. One specific conclusion is that the best models have a maximum relative resistance not exceeding 20 percent of the total weight.

  20. 33 CFR 115.40 - Bridge repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bridge repairs. 115.40 Section 115.40 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LOCATIONS AND CLEARANCES; ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES § 115.40 Bridge repairs. Repairs to a bridge which...

  1. 33 CFR 115.40 - Bridge repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bridge repairs. 115.40 Section 115.40 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LOCATIONS AND CLEARANCES; ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES § 115.40 Bridge repairs. Repairs to a bridge which...

  2. 33 CFR 115.40 - Bridge repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bridge repairs. 115.40 Section 115.40 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LOCATIONS AND CLEARANCES; ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES § 115.40 Bridge repairs. Repairs to a bridge which...

  3. 33 CFR 115.40 - Bridge repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bridge repairs. 115.40 Section 115.40 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LOCATIONS AND CLEARANCES; ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES § 115.40 Bridge repairs. Repairs to a bridge which...

  4. 33 CFR 115.40 - Bridge repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bridge repairs. 115.40 Section 115.40 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LOCATIONS AND CLEARANCES; ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES § 115.40 Bridge repairs. Repairs to a bridge which...

  5. 14 CFR 27.521 - Float landing conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ....473(b) or assumed to be equal to that determined for wheel landing gear): (a) Up-load conditions in... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Float landing conditions. 27.521 Section 27... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Water Loads § 27.521 Float...

  6. 14 CFR 27.521 - Float landing conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ....473(b) or assumed to be equal to that determined for wheel landing gear): (a) Up-load conditions in... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Float landing conditions. 27.521 Section 27... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Water Loads § 27.521 Float...

  7. 14 CFR 29.521 - Float landing conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... factor is determined under § 29.473(b) or assumed to be equal to that determined for wheel landing gear... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Float landing conditions. 29.521 Section 29... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Water Loads § 29.521 Float...

  8. 14 CFR 29.521 - Float landing conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Float landing conditions. 29.521 Section 29.521 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Water Loads § 29.521 Float landing conditions. If certification for...

  9. 14 CFR 27.521 - Float landing conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ....473(b) or assumed to be equal to that determined for wheel landing gear): (a) Up-load conditions in... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Float landing conditions. 27.521 Section 27... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Water Loads § 27.521 Float...

  10. 14 CFR 29.521 - Float landing conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... factor is determined under § 29.473(b) or assumed to be equal to that determined for wheel landing gear... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Float landing conditions. 29.521 Section 29... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Water Loads § 29.521 Float...

  11. 14 CFR 27.521 - Float landing conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Float landing conditions. 27.521 Section 27.521 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Water Loads § 27.521 Float landing conditions. If certification for...

  12. 14 CFR 29.521 - Float landing conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... factor is determined under § 29.473(b) or assumed to be equal to that determined for wheel landing gear... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Float landing conditions. 29.521 Section 29... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Water Loads § 29.521 Float...

  13. 14 CFR 25.535 - Auxiliary float loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Auxiliary float loads. 25.535 Section 25.535 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... follows: EC28SE91.043 where— ρ=mass density of water (slugs/ft.2); V=volume of float (ft.2); C...

  14. 14 CFR 25.535 - Auxiliary float loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    .... The resultant water load must be applied in the plane of symmetry of the float at a point three... r y=ratio of the lateral distance between the center of gravity and the plane of symmetry of the... the plane of symmetry of the float at a point one-fourth of the distance from the bow to the step...

  15. 14 CFR 25.535 - Auxiliary float loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    .... The resultant water load must be applied in the plane of symmetry of the float at a point three... r y=ratio of the lateral distance between the center of gravity and the plane of symmetry of the... the plane of symmetry of the float at a point one-fourth of the distance from the bow to the step...

  16. 14 CFR 25.535 - Auxiliary float loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    .... The resultant water load must be applied in the plane of symmetry of the float at a point three... r y=ratio of the lateral distance between the center of gravity and the plane of symmetry of the... the plane of symmetry of the float at a point one-fourth of the distance from the bow to the step...

  17. Apollo 9 spacecraft floats in Atlantic recovery area after splashdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Apollo 9 spacecraft floats in the Atlantic recovery area after splashdown to conclude a successful ten-day, earth-orbital space mission. Splashdown occurred at 12:00:53 p.m., March 13, 1969. Notice the spent parachutes floating on the water's surface near the capsule.

  18. Wave drag on floating bodies.

    PubMed

    Le Merrer, Marie; Clanet, Christophe; Quéré, David; Raphaël, Elie; Chevy, Frédéric

    2011-09-13

    We measure the deceleration of liquid nitrogen drops floating at the surface of a liquid bath. On water, the friction force is found to be about 10 to 100 times larger than on a solid substrate, which is shown to arise from wave resistance. We investigate the influence of the bath viscosity and show that the dissipation decreases as the viscosity is increased, owing to wave damping. The measured resistance is well predicted by a model imposing a vertical force (i.e., the drop weight) on a finite area, as long as the wake can be considered stationary. PMID:21876186

  19. Wave drag on floating bodies

    PubMed Central

    Le Merrer, Marie; Clanet, Christophe; Quéré, David; Raphaël, Élie; Chevy, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    We measure the deceleration of liquid nitrogen drops floating at the surface of a liquid bath. On water, the friction force is found to be about 10 to 100 times larger than on a solid substrate, which is shown to arise from wave resistance. We investigate the influence of the bath viscosity and show that the dissipation decreases as the viscosity is increased, owing to wave damping. The measured resistance is well predicted by a model imposing a vertical force (i.e., the drop weight) on a finite area, as long as the wake can be considered stationary. PMID:21876186

  20. Wave drag on floating bodies.

    PubMed

    Le Merrer, Marie; Clanet, Christophe; Quéré, David; Raphaël, Elie; Chevy, Frédéric

    2011-09-13

    We measure the deceleration of liquid nitrogen drops floating at the surface of a liquid bath. On water, the friction force is found to be about 10 to 100 times larger than on a solid substrate, which is shown to arise from wave resistance. We investigate the influence of the bath viscosity and show that the dissipation decreases as the viscosity is increased, owing to wave damping. The measured resistance is well predicted by a model imposing a vertical force (i.e., the drop weight) on a finite area, as long as the wake can be considered stationary.

  1. Recorded seismic response of a base-isolated steel bridge carrying a steel water pipe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, E.; Brady, A.G.

    1989-01-01

    A set of strong motion records was obtained from the base-isolated Santa Ana River Pipeline Bridge during the magnitude 5.9 Whittier Narrows, California, earthquake of October 1, 1987. The analysis of the records show that the level of excitation was not strong enough to fully activate the base isolators. The dominant modes of the response are the translations of the abutment-bridge-pipe system in the longitudinal and transverse directions, and the bending of the steel truss between supports in the vertical direction.

  2. Capabilities and limitations of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction with solidification of floating organic drop for the extraction of organic pollutants from water samples.

    PubMed

    Vera-Avila, Luz E; Rojo-Portillo, Tania; Covarrubias-Herrera, Rosario; Peña-Alvarez, Araceli

    2013-12-17

    Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction with solidification of floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO) is one of the most interesting sample preparation techniques developed in recent years. Although several applications have been reported, the potentiality and limitations of this simple and rapid extraction technique have not been made sufficiently explicit. In this work, the extraction efficiency of DLLME-SFO for pollutants from different chemical families was determined. Studied compounds include: 10 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, 5 pesticides (chlorophenoxy herbicides and DDT), 8 phenols and 6 sulfonamides, thus, covering a large range of polarity and hydrophobicity (LogKow 0-7, overall). After optimization of extraction conditions using 1-dodecanol as extractant, the procedure was applied for extraction of each family from 10-mL spiked water samples, only adjusting sample pH as required. Absolute recoveries for pollutants with LogKow 3-7 were >70% and recovery values within this group (18 compounds) were independent of structure or hydrophobicity; the precision of recovery was very acceptable (RSD<12%) and linear behavior was observed in the studied concentration range (r(2)>0.995). Extraction recoveries for pollutants with LogKow 1.46-2.8 were in the range 13-62%, directly depending on individual LogKow values; however, good linearity (r(2)>0.993) and precision (RSD<6.5%) were also demonstrated for these polar solutes, despite recovery level. DLLME-SFO with 1-dodecanol completely failed for extraction of compounds with LogKow≤1 (sulfa drugs), other more polar extraction solvents (ionic liquids) should be explored for highly hydrophilic pollutants.

  3. What determines water-bridge lifetimes at the surface of DNA? Insight from systematic molecular dynamics analysis of water kinetics for various DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Yonetani, Yoshiteru; Kono, Hidetoshi

    2012-01-01

    The lifetime during which a water molecule resides at the surface of a biomolecule varies according to the hydration site. What determines this variety of lifetimes? Despite many previous studies, there is still no uniform picture quantitatively explaining this phenomenon. Here we calculate the lifetime for a particular hydration pattern in the DNA minor groove, the water bridge, for various DNA sequences to show that the water-bridge lifetime varies from 1 to ~300ps in a sequence-dependent manner. We find that it follows 1/k(V(step))P(m), where P(m) and V(step) are two crucial factors, namely the probability of forming a specific hydrogen bond in which more than one donor atom participates, and the structural fluctuation of DNA, respectively. This relationship provides a picture of the water kinetics with atomistic detail and shows that water dissociation occurs when a particular hydrogen-bonding pattern appears. The rate constant of water dissociation k can be described as a function of the structural fluctuations of DNA. This picture is consistent with the model of Laage and Hynes proposing that hydrogen-bond switching occurs when an unusual number of hydrogen bonds are formed. The two new factors suggested here are discussed in the context of the surface's geometry and electrostatic nature, which were previously proposed as the determinants of water lifetimes.

  4. Structure and dynamics of a salt-bridge model system in water and DMSO.

    PubMed

    Lotze, S; Bakker, H J

    2015-06-01

    We study the interaction between the ions methylguanidinium and trifluoroacetate dissolved in D2O and dimethylsulfoxide with linear infrared spectroscopy and femtosecond two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy. These ions constitute model systems for the side chains of arginine and glutamic and aspartic acid that are known to form salt bridges in proteins. We find that the salt-bridge formation of methylguanidinium and trifluoroacetate leads to a significant acceleration of the vibrational relaxation dynamics of the antisymmetric COO stretching vibration of the carboxyl moiety of trifluoroacetate. Salt-bridge formation has little effect on the rate of the spectral fluctuations of the CN stretching vibrations of methylguanidinium. The anisotropy of the cross peaks between the antisymmetric COO stretching vibration of trifluoroacetate and the CN stretching vibrations of methylguanidinium reveals that the salt-bridge is preferentially formed in a bidentate end-on configuration in which the two C=O groups of the carboxylate moiety form strong hydrogen bonds with the two -NH2 groups of methylguanidinium.

  5. Structure and dynamics of a salt-bridge model system in water and DMSO.

    PubMed

    Lotze, S; Bakker, H J

    2015-06-01

    We study the interaction between the ions methylguanidinium and trifluoroacetate dissolved in D2O and dimethylsulfoxide with linear infrared spectroscopy and femtosecond two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy. These ions constitute model systems for the side chains of arginine and glutamic and aspartic acid that are known to form salt bridges in proteins. We find that the salt-bridge formation of methylguanidinium and trifluoroacetate leads to a significant acceleration of the vibrational relaxation dynamics of the antisymmetric COO stretching vibration of the carboxyl moiety of trifluoroacetate. Salt-bridge formation has little effect on the rate of the spectral fluctuations of the CN stretching vibrations of methylguanidinium. The anisotropy of the cross peaks between the antisymmetric COO stretching vibration of trifluoroacetate and the CN stretching vibrations of methylguanidinium reveals that the salt-bridge is preferentially formed in a bidentate end-on configuration in which the two C=O groups of the carboxylate moiety form strong hydrogen bonds with the two -NH2 groups of methylguanidinium. PMID:26049456

  6. Crossing the Water: Spiritual Growth in "Bridge to Terabithia" and "Lizzie Bright and the Buckminster Boy"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Trudelle

    2011-01-01

    The author analyses two award-winning juvenile novels, "Bridge to Terabithia" by Katherine Paterson and "Lizzie Bright and the Buckminster Boy" by Gary Schmidt. Each novel portrays a deep friendship between a boy and girl who cross a stream (or river) into a world that includes fantasy, play, closeness to nature and animals, and a sense of the…

  7. Floating nut retention system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, J. F.; Theakston, H. A. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A floating nut retention system includes a nut with a central aperture. An inner retainer plate has an opening which is fixedly aligned with the nut aperture. An outer retainer member is formed of a base plate having an opening and a surface adjacent to a surface of the inner retainer plate. The outer retainer member includes a securing mechanism for retaining the inner retainer plate adjacent to the outer retainer member. The securing mechanism enables the inner retainer plate to float with respect to the outer retainer number, while simultaneously forming a bearing surface for inner retainer plate.

  8. 14 CFR 23.757 - Auxiliary floats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Auxiliary floats. 23.757 Section 23.757 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS... fresh water, they provide a righting moment of at least 1.5 times the upsetting moment caused by...

  9. Floating plant can get uranium from seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-02-01

    A floating plant has been designed to extract uranium from seawater using solid adsorbents. Ore is removed from the adsorbent material by means of a solvent and concentrated in ion exchangers. Seawater is supplied to the adsorbent inside by wave energy and is based on the principle that waves will rush up a sloping plane that is partly submerged and fill a reservoir to a level higher than the still water level in the sea. The company projects that an offshore plant for recovering 600 tons of uranium/yr would comprise 22 floating concrete units, each measuring 430 x 75 meters.

  10. In Brief: Profiling floats fully deployed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2007-11-01

    The Argo network of sensor-bearing profiling floats, which allows scientists to observe the basic physical state of the world's oceans, reached its full deployment of 3000 units on 1 November, according to the Argo steering committee. With the full deployment of these floats-which measure ocean water temperature, salinity, and velocity-data from every ocean region are available with an average coverage of one sensor per 3 degrees of latitude and longitude. The floats drift on ocean currents for 10 days, descend to up to 2000 meters in depth, and return to the surface to beam results to passing satellites. ``The climate science objectives that drive the Argo array require that we observe the global oceans indefinitely, so achieving the global array is merely the beginning of the observation period,'' said Dean Roemmich, cochairman of the Argo program steering committee and a physical oceanographer at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography.

  11. Floating mechanism of a small liquid marble

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Chin Hong; Plackowski, Chris; Nguyen, Anh V.; Vadivelu, Raja K.; John, James A. St.; Dao, Dzung Viet; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2016-01-01

    Flotation of small solid objects and liquid droplets on water is critical to natural and industrial activities. This paper reports the floating mechanism of liquid marbles, or liquid droplets coated with hydrophobic microparticles. We used X-ray computed tomography (XCT) to acquire cross-sectional images of the floating liquid marble and interface between the different phases. We then analysed the shape of the liquid marble and the angles at the three-phase contact line (TPCL). We found that the small floating liquid marbles follow the mechanism governing the flotation of solid objects in terms of surface tension forces. However, the contact angles formed and deformation of the liquid marble resemble that of a sessile liquid droplet on a thin, elastic solid. For small liquid marbles, the contact angle varies with volume due to the deformability of the interface. PMID:26902930

  12. Floating mechanism of a small liquid marble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooi, Chin Hong; Plackowski, Chris; Nguyen, Anh V.; Vadivelu, Raja K.; John, James A. St.; Dao, Dzung Viet; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2016-02-01

    Flotation of small solid objects and liquid droplets on water is critical to natural and industrial activities. This paper reports the floating mechanism of liquid marbles, or liquid droplets coated with hydrophobic microparticles. We used X-ray computed tomography (XCT) to acquire cross-sectional images of the floating liquid marble and interface between the different phases. We then analysed the shape of the liquid marble and the angles at the three-phase contact line (TPCL). We found that the small floating liquid marbles follow the mechanism governing the flotation of solid objects in terms of surface tension forces. However, the contact angles formed and deformation of the liquid marble resemble that of a sessile liquid droplet on a thin, elastic solid. For small liquid marbles, the contact angle varies with volume due to the deformability of the interface.

  13. Floating mechanism of a small liquid marble.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Chin Hong; Plackowski, Chris; Nguyen, Anh V; Vadivelu, Raja K; St John, James A; Dao, Dzung Viet; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2016-02-23

    Flotation of small solid objects and liquid droplets on water is critical to natural and industrial activities. This paper reports the floating mechanism of liquid marbles, or liquid droplets coated with hydrophobic microparticles. We used X-ray computed tomography (XCT) to acquire cross-sectional images of the floating liquid marble and interface between the different phases. We then analysed the shape of the liquid marble and the angles at the three-phase contact line (TPCL). We found that the small floating liquid marbles follow the mechanism governing the flotation of solid objects in terms of surface tension forces. However, the contact angles formed and deformation of the liquid marble resemble that of a sessile liquid droplet on a thin, elastic solid. For small liquid marbles, the contact angle varies with volume due to the deformability of the interface.

  14. Tethered float liquid level sensor

    DOEpatents

    Daily, III, William Dean

    2016-09-06

    An apparatus for sensing the level of a liquid includes a float, a tether attached to the float, a pulley attached to the tether, a rotation sensor connected to the pulley that senses vertical movement of said float and senses the level of the liquid.

  15. Compound floating pivot micromechanisms

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Ernest J.

    2001-04-24

    A new class of tilting micromechanical mechanisms have been developed. These new mechanisms use compound floating pivot structures to attain far greater tilt angles than are practical using other micromechanical techniques. The new mechanisms are also capable of bi-directional tilt about multiple axes.

  16. Bridge permeameter

    DOEpatents

    Graf, Darin C.; Warpinski, Norman R.

    1996-01-01

    A system for single-phase, steady-state permeability measurements of porous rock utilizes a fluid bridge arrangement analogous to a Wheatstone bridge. The arms of the bridge contain the sample and calibrated flow resistors.

  17. Characterization of cement float buoyancy in the stalked barnacle Dosima fascicularis (Crustacea, Cirripedia).

    PubMed

    Zheden, Vanessa; Kovalev, Alexander; Gorb, Stanislav N; Klepal, Waltraud

    2015-02-01

    Dosima fascicularis is the only barnacle which can drift autonomously at the water surface with a foam-like cement float. The cement secreted by the animal contains numerous gas-filled cells of different size. When several individuals share one float, their size and not their number is crucial for the production of both volume and mass of the float. The gas content within the cells of the foam gives positive static buoyancy to the whole float. The volume of the float, the gas volume and the positive static buoyancy are positively correlated. The density of the cement float without gas is greater than that of seawater. This study shows that the secreted cement consists of more than 90% water and the gas volume is on average 18.5%. Our experiments demonstrate that the intact foam-like cement float is sealed to the surrounding water. PMID:25657839

  18. Characterization of cement float buoyancy in the stalked barnacle Dosima fascicularis (Crustacea, Cirripedia)

    PubMed Central

    Zheden, Vanessa; Kovalev, Alexander; Gorb, Stanislav N.; Klepal, Waltraud

    2015-01-01

    Dosima fascicularis is the only barnacle which can drift autonomously at the water surface with a foam-like cement float. The cement secreted by the animal contains numerous gas-filled cells of different size. When several individuals share one float, their size and not their number is crucial for the production of both volume and mass of the float. The gas content within the cells of the foam gives positive static buoyancy to the whole float. The volume of the float, the gas volume and the positive static buoyancy are positively correlated. The density of the cement float without gas is greater than that of seawater. This study shows that the secreted cement consists of more than 90% water and the gas volume is on average 18.5%. Our experiments demonstrate that the intact foam-like cement float is sealed to the surrounding water. PMID:25657839

  19. Pipe-type cable floated into place across river

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    In 1992, the 60-yr-old Portland Bridge across the Fore River in Maine had to be replaced with a completely new structure. Unfortunately for Central Maine Power Co, three 34.5-kV submarine cables and a 115-kV pipe-type cable (plus spare pipe), which paralleled the old structure, were directly in the path planned for the footing of the new bridge. Before construction could begin, these had to be relocated to the other side of the old bridge. Because of space limitations in the crossing area, the two 1200-ft replacement pipes were assembled one mile upstream and floated down to the bridge using specially made polystyrene floats. The trench, measuring 20 ft wide and 20 ft deep, was dredged across the river bottom and designed to accommodate both the submarine and pipe-type cables with adequate spacing. First, the two pipes were floated into position and sunk into the trench. Then the three submarine cables were laid simultaneously from a cable barge. Divers ensured that there was adequate spacing between the medium- and high-voltage cables. 10 figs.

  20. Valuing water quality in urban watersheds: A comparative analysis of Johnson Creek, Oregon, and Burnt Bridge Creek, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netusil, Noelwah R.; Kincaid, Michael; Chang, Heejun

    2014-05-01

    This study uses the hedonic price method to investigate the effect of five water quality parameters on the sale price of single-family residential properties in two urbanized watersheds in the Portland, Oregon-Vancouver, Washington metropolitan area. Water quality parameters include E. coli or fecal coliform, which can affect human health, decrease water clarity and generate foul odors; pH, dissolved oxygen, and stream temperature, which can impact fish and wildlife populations; and total suspended solids, which can affect water clarity, aquatic life, and aesthetics. Properties within ¼ mile, ½, mile, one mile, or more than one mile from Johnson Creek are estimated to experience an increase in sale price of 13.71%, 7.05%, 8.18%, and 3.12%, respectively, from a one mg/L increase in dissolved oxygen levels during the dry season (May-October). Estimates for a 100 count per 100 mL increase in E. coli during the dry season are -2.81% for properties within ¼ mile of Johnson Creek, -0.86% (½ mile), -1.19% (one mile), and -0.71% (greater than one mile). Results for properties in Burnt Bridge Creek include a significantly positive effect for a one mg/L increase in dissolved oxygen levels during the dry season for properties within ½ mile (4.49%), one mile (2.95%), or greater than one mile from the creek (3.17%). Results for other water quality parameters in Burnt Bridge Creek are generally consistent with a priori expectations. Restoration efforts underway in both study areas might be cost justified based on their estimated effect on property sale prices.

  1. Hydrodynamic and Aerodynamic Tests of Models of Floats for Single-float Seaplanes NACA Models 41-D, 41-E, 61-A, 73, and 73-A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, J B; HOUSE R O

    1938-01-01

    Tests were made in the NACA tank and in the NACA 7 by 10 foot wind tunnel on two models of transverse step floats and three models of pointed step floats considered to be suitable for use with single float seaplanes. The object of the program was the reduction of water resistance and spray of single float seaplanes without reducing the angle of dead rise believed to be necessary for the satisfactory absorption of the shock loads. The results indicated that all the models have less resistance and spray than the model of the Mark V float and that the pointed step floats are somewhat superior to the transverse step floats in these respects. Models 41-D, 61-A, and 73 were tested by the general method over a wide range of loads and speeds. The results are presented in the form of curves and charts for use in design calculations.

  2. Three Bridge Fryer's Ford Bridge, Nimrod Bridge, and Ward's ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Three Bridge - Fryer's Ford Bridge, Nimrod Bridge, and Ward's Crossing Bridge - Fryer's Ford Bridge, Spanning East Fork of Point Remove Creek at Fryer Bridge Road (CR 67), Solgohachia, Conway County, AR

  3. Freely floating smectic films.

    PubMed

    May, Kathrin; Harth, Kirsten; Trittel, Torsten; Stannarius, Ralf

    2014-05-19

    We have investigated the dynamics of freely floating smectic bubbles using high-speed optical imaging. Bubbles in the size range from a few hundred micrometers to several centimeters were prepared from collapsing catenoids. They represent ideal model systems for the study of thin-film fluid dynamics under well-controlled conditions. Owing to the internal smectic layer structure, the bubbles combine features of both soap films and vesicles in their unique shape dynamics. From a strongly elongated initial shape after pinch-off, they relax towards the spherical equilibrium, first by a slow redistribution of the smectic layers, and finally by weak, damped shape oscillations. In addition, we describe the rupture of freely floating smectic bubbles, and the formation and stability of smectic filaments. PMID:24692347

  4. Freely floating smectic films.

    PubMed

    May, Kathrin; Harth, Kirsten; Trittel, Torsten; Stannarius, Ralf

    2014-05-19

    We have investigated the dynamics of freely floating smectic bubbles using high-speed optical imaging. Bubbles in the size range from a few hundred micrometers to several centimeters were prepared from collapsing catenoids. They represent ideal model systems for the study of thin-film fluid dynamics under well-controlled conditions. Owing to the internal smectic layer structure, the bubbles combine features of both soap films and vesicles in their unique shape dynamics. From a strongly elongated initial shape after pinch-off, they relax towards the spherical equilibrium, first by a slow redistribution of the smectic layers, and finally by weak, damped shape oscillations. In addition, we describe the rupture of freely floating smectic bubbles, and the formation and stability of smectic filaments.

  5. 1D and 3D inversion of VES data to outline a fresh water zone floating over saline water body at the northwestern coast of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massoud, Usama; Soliman, Mamdouh; Taha, Ayman; Khozym, Ashraf; Salah, Hany

    2015-12-01

    Seawater intrusion is a widespread environmental problem in the Egyptian coastal aquifers. It affects the groundwater used in domestic and agricultural activities along these coasts. In this study, resistivity survey in the form of Vertical Electrical Sounding (VES) was conducted at ZAWYET EL HAWALA cultivated site, northwest coast of Egypt to outline a freshwater zone overlies the main saltwater body, and to determine the most suitable location for drilling water well for irrigation purposes. The VES data were measured at 11 stations in the studied site. After processing, the data were inverted in 1-D and 3-D schemes and the final model was presented as resistivity slices with depth. The results indicate that the effect of saltwater intrusion was observed, as low resistivity values, at 7.5 m below ground surface (bgs) at the northern part of the study area (toward the Mediterranean Sea), and extends southward with increasing depth covering the whole area at about 30 m bgs. The fresh water zone shows a minimum thickness of less than 7.5 m at the northern side and a maximum thickness of about 20 m at the southern side of the area. The proper site for drilling water well tap and the freshwater zone is the location of VES6 or VES9 with a maximum well depth of about 20 m bgs. The water withdrawal from the proposed well should be controlled not to raise the main saline water table in the well site. The main sources of the freshwater zone are the rainfall and surface runoff descending from the southern tableland. Excess rainfall and surface runoff can be avoided from direct discharge to the sea by collecting them in man-made outlined trenches and re-using the stored water in irrigation during the dry seasons.

  6. Floating point coprocessor upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, T.

    1987-04-01

    A method was developed to increase the throughput of the Hewlett Packard, 98635A floating point processor equipped, model 236C computer. The increase was carried out in three phases each with a clock and or chip change during the modification. Two programs were written to test the results and evaluate the increases in performance made to the computer. The first one shows reduction in processing times of 34.3%, while the other recorded 34.6%.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of cubic mesoporous bridged polysilsesquioxane for removing organic pollutants from water.

    PubMed

    Lin, Derong; Zhao, Qing; Hu, Lijiang; Xing, Baoshan

    2014-05-01

    Hexane, octane, phenyl, and biphenyl-bridged bis(triethoxysilyl) precursors were used in synthesizing cubic mesoporous bridged polysilsesquioxane (BPS) copolymers. Structural characterization was carried out by FTIR, small angle XRD, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller-N2 sorption, (1)H NMR, and TEM. We successfully synthesized both "rigid" and "soft" 3D cubic mesoporous BPS with high surface area and pore volume, as attested by the comprehensive characterization data. Adsorption of pyrene, phenanthrene, nitrobenzene, and 2,4-dichlorophenol on BPS was greatly affected by adsorbate properties, i.e., Kow, solvation properties and molecular size. Hydrophobic interaction dominantly controlled organic pollutants' sorption on BPS. Other interactions, e.g., π-π and H-bond interactions, also have effects on sorption as indicated by Kow normalized sorption isotherms. Rigid aromatic BPS (phenyl and biphenyl) showed a higher sorption capacity than soft aliphatic BPS (hexane and octane). A conceptual model was proposed to further explain the phenomena. This study suggests a promising application of cubic mesoporous BPS in wastewater treatment.

  8. Extra-long Float-zones Induced by Thermocapillary Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-Ju; Steen, Paul H.

    1996-11-01

    A model problem is posed to study the influence of flow on the interfacial stability of a nearly cylindrical liquid bridge for lengths near its circumference (the Plateau-Rayleigh limit). Zero gravity is assumed. The flow is generated by a shear stress imposed on the deformable interface. The symmetry of the imposed stress mimics the thermocapillary effect induced on a float-zone by a ring heater (i.e. a full zone). Numerical solutions, complemented by a bifurcation analysis, show that bridges substantially longer than the Plateau-Rayleigh limit are possible. An interaction of the first two capillary instabilities through the stress-induced pressure gradient is responsible. Time-periodic standing waves are also predicted in certain parameter ranges. Motivation comes from extra-long float-zones observed in MEPHISTO space lab experiments (June 1994).

  9. Float level switch for a nuclear power plant containment vessel

    DOEpatents

    Powell, J.G.

    1993-11-16

    This invention is a float level switch used to sense rise or drop in water level in a containment vessel of a nuclear power plant during a loss of coolant accident. The essential components of the device are a guide tube, a reed switch inside the guide tube, a float containing a magnetic portion that activates a reed switch, and metal-sheathed, ceramic-insulated conductors connecting the reed switch to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel. Special materials and special sealing techniques prevent failure of components and allow the float level switch to be connected to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel. 1 figures.

  10. Float level switch for a nuclear power plant containment vessel

    DOEpatents

    Powell, James G.

    1993-01-01

    This invention is a float level switch used to sense rise or drop in water level in a containment vessel of a nuclear power plant during a loss of coolant accident. The essential components of the device are a guide tube, a reed switch inside the guide tube, a float containing a magnetic portion that activates a reed switch, and metal-sheathed, ceramic-insulated conductors connecting the reed switch to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel. Special materials and special sealing techniques prevent failure of components and allow the float level switch to be connected to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel.

  11. Transparent and Dense Ladder-Like Alkylene-Bridged Polymethylsiloxane Coating with Enhanced Water Vapor Barrier Property.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ce; Zhang, Cong; Cui, Xinmin; Sun, Jinghua; Ding, Ruimin; Zhang, Qinghua; Xu, Yao

    2015-10-14

    Organic-inorganic hybrid composites have been well-studied as water vapor barrier materials for their long diffusion length of water vapor in coatings which can be realized by improving the aspect ratio of inorganic components and regularity of nanostructure in coatings. In this paper, dense organic-inorganic hybrid coating based on ladder-like alkylene-bridged polymethylsiloxane (ABPMS) was successfully fabricated through the hydrosilylation reaction between polymethylhydrosiloxane and diene (1,5-hexadiene or 1,7-octadiene) in toluene under Pt/C catalysis. Its ladder-like structure was verified by 29Si magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR, 13C MAS NMR, and in-plane and out-of-plane glance-incident X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) techniques. Its corresponding coating showed excellent water vapor barrier ability for a typical water-soluble crystal, potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP). When treated in 50% relative humidity (RH) condition at 25 °C for 8 months, the ABPMS coating with 100 nm thickness displayed a very low transmittance loss of 1.6% compared with the high transmittance loss of 10% for uncoated KDP. Moreover, the ABPMS coating showed good ultraviolet radiation resistance, thermal stability, low mechanical property, and excellent compatibility with hydrophobic antireflective (AR) coatings.

  12. Two water-bridged cobalt(II) chains with isomeric naphthoate spacers: from metamagnetic to single-chain magnetic behaviour.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhong-Yi; Xia, Yan-Fei; Jiao, Jiao; Yang, En-Cui; Zhao, Xiao-Jun

    2015-12-14

    The crystal structures and magnetic behaviours of two water-bridged one-dimensional (1D) cobalt(II) chains with different isomeric naphthoate (na(-)) terminals, [Co(H2O)3(2-na)2]n (1) and {[Co(H2O)3(1-na)2]·2H2O}n (2), were reported to investigate the effect of interchain distance on their magnetic properties. Complex 1 with trans-2-na(-) blocks and dense interchain separation exhibits a metamagnetic transition from antiferromagnetic ordering to a saturated paramagnetic phase. By contrast, complex 2 possessing cis-arranged 1-na(-) spacers and good interchain isolation shows unusual single-chain magnetic behavior under a zero dc field. Thus, completely different interchain packing by isomeric naphthoate ligands governs the ratio of intra- to inter-chain magnetic interactions and further results in different magnetic phenomena, which provide significant magnetostructural information on 1D magnetic systems. PMID:26514974

  13. Bridging the Gap: Ideas for water sustainability in the western United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tidwell, V. C.; Passell, H. D.; Roach, J. D.

    2012-12-01

    Incremental improvements in water sustainability in the western U.S. may not be able to close the growing gap between increasing freshwater demand, climate driven variability in freshwater supply, and growing environmental consciousness. Incremental improvements include municipal conservation, improvements to irrigation technologies, desalination, water leasing, and others. These measures, as manifest today in the western U.S., are successful in themselves but limited in their ability to solve long term water scarcity issues. Examples are plainly evident and range from the steady and long term decline of important aquifers and their projected inability to provide water for future agricultural irrigation, projected declines in states' abilities to meet legal water delivery obligations between states, projected shortages of water for energy production, and others. In many cases, measures that can close the water scarcity gap have been identified, but often these solutions simply shift the gap from water to some other sector, e.g., economics. Saline, brackish or produced water purification, for example, could help solve western water shortages in some areas, but will be extremely expensive, and so shift the gap from water to economics. Transfers of water out of agriculture could help close the water scarcity gap in other areas; however, loss of agriculture will shift the gap to regional food security. All these gaps, whether in water, economics, food security, or other sectors, will have a negative impact on the western states. Narrowing these future gaps requires both technical and policy solutions as well as tools to understand the tradeoffs. Here we discuss several examples from across the western U.S. that span differing scales and decision spaces. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear

  14. 33 CFR 118.100 - Retroreflective panels on bridge piers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Retroreflective panels on bridge... SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.100 Retroreflective panels on bridge piers. The... 12 inches square. (c) To mark bridge piers or channel sides on bridges not required to have...

  15. 33 CFR 118.100 - Retroreflective panels on bridge piers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Retroreflective panels on bridge... SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.100 Retroreflective panels on bridge piers. The... 12 inches square. (c) To mark bridge piers or channel sides on bridges not required to have...

  16. 33 CFR 118.100 - Retroreflective panels on bridge piers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Retroreflective panels on bridge... SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.100 Retroreflective panels on bridge piers. The... 12 inches square. (c) To mark bridge piers or channel sides on bridges not required to have...

  17. 33 CFR 118.100 - Retroreflective panels on bridge piers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Retroreflective panels on bridge... SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.100 Retroreflective panels on bridge piers. The... 12 inches square. (c) To mark bridge piers or channel sides on bridges not required to have...

  18. Bridging the gap between uncertainty analysis for complex watershed models and decision-making for watershed-scale water management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y.; Han, F.; Wu, B.

    2013-12-01

    Process-based, spatially distributed and dynamic models provide desirable resolutions to watershed-scale water management. However, their reliability in solving real management problems has been seriously questioned, since the model simulation usually involves significant uncertainty with complicated origins. Uncertainty analysis (UA) for complex hydrological models has been a hot topic in the past decade, and a variety of UA approaches have been developed, but mostly in a theoretical setting. Whether and how a UA could benefit real management decisions remains to be critical questions. We have conducted a series of studies to investigate the applicability of classic approaches, such as GLUE and Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods, in real management settings, unravel the difficulties encountered by such methods, and tailor the methods to better serve the management. Frameworks and new algorithms, such as Probabilistic Collocation Method (PCM)-based approaches, were also proposed for specific management issues. This presentation summarize our past and ongoing studies on the role of UA in real water management. Challenges and potential strategies to bridge the gap between UA for complex models and decision-making for management will be discussed. Future directions for the research in this field will also be suggested. Two common water management settings were examined. One is the Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) management for surface water quality protection. The other is integrated water resources management for watershed sustainability. For the first setting, nutrients and pesticides TMDLs in the Newport Bay Watershed (Orange Country, California, USA) were discussed. It is a highly urbanized region with a semi-arid Mediterranean climate, typical of the western U.S. For the second setting, the water resources management in the Zhangye Basin (the midstream part of Heihe Baisn, China), where the famous 'Silk Road' came through, was investigated. The Zhangye

  19. Floating-diffusion electrometer with adjustable sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tower, John R. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The effective capacitance of the floating diffusion in a floating-diffusion electrometer is modified to adjust electrometer sensitivity. This is done by changing the direct potential applied to a gate electrode proximate to the floating diffusion.

  20. BRIDGE OVER TROUBLED WATERS? THE MOST "CENTRAL" MEMBERS OF PSYCHOLOGY AND PHILOSOPHY ASSOCIATIONS CA. 1900.

    PubMed

    Green, Christopher D; Heidari, Crystal; Chiacchia, Daniel; Martin, Shane M

    2016-07-01

    There are many different ways to assess the significance of historical figures. Often we look at the influence of their writings, or at the important offices they held with disciplinary institutions such as universities, journals, and scholarly societies. In this study, however, we took a novel approach: we took the complete memberships, ca. 1900, of four organizations-the American Psychological Association, the Western Philosophical Association, the American Philosophical Association, and the Southern Society for Philosophy and Psychology-and visualized them as a network. We then identified individuals who "bridged" between two or more of these groups and considered what might be termed their "centrality" to the psychological-philosophical community of their time. First, we examined these figures qualitatively, briefly describing their lives and careers. Then we approached the problem mathematically, considering several alternative technical realizations of "centrality" and then explaining our reasons for choosing eigenvector centrality as the best for our purposes. We found a great deal of overlap among the results of the qualitative and quantitative approaches, but also some telling differences. J. Mark Baldwin, Edward Buchner, Christine Ladd Franklin, and Frank Thilly consistently emerged as highly central figures. Some more marginal figures such as Max Meyer, and Frederick J. E. Woodbridge, Edward A. Pace, Edward H. Griffin played interesting roles as well. PMID:27163795

  1. Floating intake reduces pump damage

    SciTech Connect

    Kronig, A.

    1993-12-31

    The solution to a costly sand erosion problem at the Grande Dixence hydroelectric project in Switzerland turned out to be as simple as a floating pump. The 726-MW Grande Dixence project drains a 350-square-kilometer reach of the Zermatt and Herens valleys in the southwestern Swiss Alps. About half of the drainage area is covered by active glaciers. Because the glaciers in Zermatt Valley are so low in altitude, their water is collected in Z`mutt Reservoir at the base of the Matterhorn, then pumped up 500 meters for transport to the main Grande Disence Reservoir near Sion. The glacier water is heavily laden with sand. In spite of a gravel pass and a desilter, the 700,000-acubic-meter Z`mutt Reservoir receives large quantities of sand. The sand tends to remain in solution because of the low water temperatures (1 to 2 degrees Centigrade). In the original intake system, the sand would be sucked into the pump intakes, causing extensive erosion to the pump wheels and an expensive yearly program of repair. (Pump damage averaged 200,000 Swiss Francs ($284,000 U.S.) per year between 1980 and 1985.)

  2. 27. Detail view of mechanical float gages used to monitor ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. Detail view of mechanical float gages used to monitor level of water in the filtration bed reservoir. Gage on left measures water head, gage on right monitors filtration rate. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Filtration Plant, South side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  3. 14 CFR 23.535 - Auxiliary float loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... are as follows: EC28SE91.011 where— P=mass density of water (slugs/ft.3) V=volume of float (ft.3); CX... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Water Loads § 23... paragraphs (b) through (e) of this section, the prescribed water loads may be distributed over the...

  4. 14 CFR 23.535 - Auxiliary float loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... are as follows: EC28SE91.011 where— P=mass density of water (slugs/ft.3) V=volume of float (ft.3); CX... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Water Loads § 23... paragraphs (b) through (e) of this section, the prescribed water loads may be distributed over the...

  5. 14 CFR 25.527 - Hull and main float load factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... float load factors. (a) Water reaction load factors n W must be computed in the following manner: (1... following values are used: (1) n W=water reaction load factor (that is, the water reaction divided...

  6. Does It Sink or Float?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Judith Richards

    2012-01-01

    This activity is designed to teach prekindergarten to second grade students about the concept of sink or float through an inquiry activity. Students will use familiar objects to predict and test the properties of sink and float. Background information is offered to teachers to assist them with this activity. This lesson begins with an engaging…

  7. Seabirds and floating plastic debris.

    PubMed

    Cadée, Gerhard C

    2002-11-01

    80% of floating plastic debris freshly washed ashore on a Dutch coast showed peckmarks made by birds at sea. They either mistake these debris for cuttlebones or simply test all floating objects. Ingestion of plastic is deleterious for marine organisms. It is urgent to set measures to plastic litter production.

  8. The melting of floating ice raises the ocean level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noerdlinger, Peter D.; Brower, Kay R.

    2007-07-01

    It is shown that the melting of ice floating on the ocean will introduce a volume of water about 2.6 per cent greater than that of the originally displaced sea water. The melting of floating ice in a global warming will cause the ocean to rise. If all the extant sea ice and floating shelf ice melted, the global sea level would rise about 4cm. The sliding of grounded ice into the sea, however, produces a mean water level rise in two parts; some of the rise is delayed. The first part, while the ice floats, is equal to the volume of displaced sea water. The second part, equal to 2.6 per cent of the first, is contributed as it melts. These effects result from the difference in volume of equal weights of fresh and salt water. This component of sea rise is apparently unrecognized in the literature to date, although it can be interpreted as a form of halosteric sea level change by regarding the displaced salt water and the meltwater (even before melting) as a unit. Although salinity changes are known to affect sea level, all existing analyses omit our calculated volume change. We present a protocol that can be used to calculate global sea level rise on the basis of the addition of meltwater from grounded and floating ice; of course thermosteric volume change must be added.

  9. Bridge permeameter

    DOEpatents

    Graf, D.C.; Warpinski, N.R.

    1996-08-13

    A system is described for single-phase, steady-state permeability measurements of porous rock which utilizes a fluid bridge arrangement analogous to a Wheatstone bridge. The arms of the bridge contain the sample and calibrated flow resistors. 8 figs.

  10. Inexpensive, floating, insect-emergence trap

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, R.M.

    1983-11-01

    The Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been investigating the usefulness of aquarium microcosms and ponds for the quantification and predictions of toxicant effects on freshwater systems. Ideally, concepts and methods applicable to both 150-L microcosms and 15,000-L ponds would bridge the gap between the two. The effort of processing the benthic samples, as well as the destructiveness of the sampling in small ponds, limited the number of samples that could be taken. Therefore, the author developed an inexpensive emergence trap appropriate for use in small outdoor ponds, as one method of increasing sampling efficiency and economy. To prevent the possibility of trapping adults from adjacent ponds, which would confound the results, the traps had to be designed such that they could only trap insects from the ponds upon which they were floating. The design of this trap is described.

  11. Hydration properties of ligands and drugs in protein binding sites: tightly-bound, bridging water molecules and their effects and consequences on molecular design strategies.

    PubMed

    García-Sosa, Alfonso T

    2013-06-24

    Some water molecules in binding sites are important for intermolecular interactions and stability. The way binding site explicit water molecules are dealt with affects the diversity and nature of designed ligand chemical structures and properties. The strategies commonly employed frequently assume that a gain in binding affinity will be achieved by their targeting or neglect. However, in the present work, 2332 high-resolution X-ray crystal structures of hydrated and nonhydrated, drug and nondrug compounds in biomolecular complexes with reported Ki or Kd show that compounds that use tightly bound, bridging water molecules are as potent as those that do not. The distribution of their energies, physicochemical properties, and ligand efficiency indices were compared for statistical significance, and the results were confirmed using 2000 permutation runs. Ligand cases were also split into agonists and antagonists, and crystal structure pairs with differing tightly bound water molecules were also compared. In addition, agonists and antagonists that use tightly bound water bridges are smaller, less lipophilic, and less planar; have deeper ligand efficiency indices; and in general, possess better physicochemical properties for further development. Therefore, tightly bound, bridging water molecules may in some cases be replaced and targeted as a strategy, though sometimes keeping them as bridges may be better from a pharmacodynamic perspective. The results suggest general indications on tightly hydrated and nontightly hydrated compounds in binding sites and practical considerations to adopt a strategy in drug and molecular design when faced with this special type of water molecules. There are also benefits of lower log P and better developability for tightly hydrated compounds, while stronger potency is not always required or beneficial. The hydrated binding site may be one of the many structure conformations available to the receptor, and different ligands will have a

  12. 33 CFR 115.50 - Application for bridge permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Application for bridge permits... BRIDGES BRIDGE LOCATIONS AND CLEARANCES; ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES § 115.50 Application for bridge permits. (a) Application. An application for authorization to construct a bridge across navigable waters...

  13. 33 CFR 115.50 - Application for bridge permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Application for bridge permits... BRIDGES BRIDGE LOCATIONS AND CLEARANCES; ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES § 115.50 Application for bridge permits. (a) Application. An application for authorization to construct a bridge across navigable waters...

  14. 33 CFR 115.50 - Application for bridge permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Application for bridge permits... BRIDGES BRIDGE LOCATIONS AND CLEARANCES; ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES § 115.50 Application for bridge permits. (a) Application. An application for authorization to construct a bridge across navigable waters...

  15. Underwater and Floating-Leaved Plants of the United States and Canada.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hotchkiss, Neil

    This is the third in a series of guides to the field identification of North American marsh and water plants. Described are plants which have foliage habitually under water or floating, or which have underwater or floating forms, and which have characteristics by which they can be distinguished with the naked eye. Where genera or species cannot be…

  16. Preparation of floating microspheres for fish farming.

    PubMed

    Nepal, Pushp R; Chun, Myung-Kwan; Choi, Hoo-Kyun

    2007-08-16

    The aim of this study was to develop floating microspheres with practical applications to fish farming. Each microsphere with a central hollow cavity was prepared using a solvent diffusion and evaporation method with Eudragit E100. Various manufacturing parameters were investigated by single factor method. The macrolide antibiotic josamycin was selected as a model drug. The loading efficiency of the drug in the microspheres was 64.7%. In the release study, virtually none of the drug was released into the fresh water whereas the entire drug was released from the josamycin-loaded microspheres into the simulated gastric fluid of rainbow trout (pH 2.7). The buoyancy was excellent with approximately 90% of the microspheres still floating after 24h.

  17. How to bridge the gap between local root water uptake processes and macroscopic hydrological models?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javaux, M.; Couvreur, V.; Vereecken, H.; Vanderborght, J.

    2013-12-01

    Modeling root water uptake in hydrological models remains challenging given the scale gap between the local uptake processes and the model resolutions. When Richards equation is used, root water uptake is modeled with a sink-term spatially resolved at the grid element scale (~cm...m), much larger than the root segment scale (~mm). Typically this sink-term contains four functions: (i) a root resistance function, (ii) a soil resistance function, (iii) a stress function and (iv) a compensation function. Thanks to novel detailed 3-D and 1-D models that contain the current knowledge on soil and root water flow, we propose improvements for the four functions used in macroscopic sink terms, which respect biophysical principles. We show that (1) root resistance may be well defined by the root length density but only for relatively wet soil and no limiting xylem conductance; (2) soil resistance cannot be neglected, in particular in the rhizosphere where specific process may occur, which alter the soil hydraulic properties and thereby affect uptake and the stress functions; (3) stress and compensation are two different processes not linked to each other; (4) compensation occurs as soon as there is a heterogeneous distribution of the soil water potential around the root system; (5) stress function should be defined as a maximal actual transpiration in function of an integrated or root-sensed averaged water head rather than in terms of local water heads; and (6) non linearity in the stress function is expected to arise from evolution with pressure heads or time of the hydraulic resistances in the soil-plant system.

  18. Floating Silicon Method

    SciTech Connect

    Kellerman, Peter

    2013-12-21

    The Floating Silicon Method (FSM) project at Applied Materials (formerly Varian Semiconductor Equipment Associates), has been funded, in part, by the DOE under a “Photovoltaic Supply Chain and Cross Cutting Technologies” grant (number DE-EE0000595) for the past four years. The original intent of the project was to develop the FSM process from concept to a commercially viable tool. This new manufacturing equipment would support the photovoltaic industry in following ways: eliminate kerf losses and the consumable costs associated with wafer sawing, allow optimal photovoltaic efficiency by producing high-quality silicon sheets, reduce the cost of assembling photovoltaic modules by creating large-area silicon cells which are free of micro-cracks, and would be a drop-in replacement in existing high efficiency cell production process thereby allowing rapid fan-out into the industry.

  19. Floating mirror mount

    SciTech Connect

    Koop, D.E.

    1989-01-03

    This patent describes a floating mirror mount for a mirror of a laser is described consisting of: a mirror having a front surface and a back surface, a keeper encircling the mirror and having a peripheral flange engaging the front surface of the mirror when the mirror is not installed in a laser, a retainer positioned rearwardly of the back surface of the mirror and connected to the keeper and having a spring seating surface, spring means engageable with the spring seating surface of the retainer for exerting a resilient biasing force on the mirror, and fastening means for connecting the retainer to the mirror positioning structure of the laser on installation of the mirror mount in the laser.

  20. Instantaneous stabilization of floating oils by surface application of natural granular materials (beach sand and limestone).

    PubMed

    Boglaienko, Daria; Tansel, Berrin

    2015-02-15

    When granular materials are applied to hydrophobic liquids floating over another liquid (i.e., water), particles form aggregates which can be separated from the floating phase. This concept can be used for controlling mobility of floating oils, especially after oil spills near coastal areas. The objectives of this research were to characterize oil capture efficiency and determine effectiveness of particles for converting the floating phase to a heavier phase for effective separation. Experiments were conducted with South Louisiana crude oil contaminated salt water, limestone and quartz sand. Although the oil removal efficiency increased with the increasing amount of granular material applied, it did not increase linearly. About 50% of the floating oil was removed by aggregates, regardless of the material used, when granular material to floating oil ratio was about 1 g/g. The aggregates separated had higher amounts of oil content when smaller amounts of granular materials were added.

  1. Instantaneous stabilization of floating oils by surface application of natural granular materials (beach sand and limestone).

    PubMed

    Boglaienko, Daria; Tansel, Berrin

    2015-02-15

    When granular materials are applied to hydrophobic liquids floating over another liquid (i.e., water), particles form aggregates which can be separated from the floating phase. This concept can be used for controlling mobility of floating oils, especially after oil spills near coastal areas. The objectives of this research were to characterize oil capture efficiency and determine effectiveness of particles for converting the floating phase to a heavier phase for effective separation. Experiments were conducted with South Louisiana crude oil contaminated salt water, limestone and quartz sand. Although the oil removal efficiency increased with the increasing amount of granular material applied, it did not increase linearly. About 50% of the floating oil was removed by aggregates, regardless of the material used, when granular material to floating oil ratio was about 1 g/g. The aggregates separated had higher amounts of oil content when smaller amounts of granular materials were added. PMID:25555617

  2. Floating into Deep Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Frenais, R.; Saraceno, T.; Powell, J.

    2014-04-01

    Is it possible for spaceflight to become more sustainable? Artist and architect Tomas Saraceno proposes a long-term artscience research project based on his initial work with solar balloons to join with the efforts of engineers such as John Powell, working on the Airship to Orbit experiments, which describe a three stage process of using airships to fly to a large suborbital "Dark Sky Station' then literally floating into orbit with additional electrical and chemical propulsion. (See: http://www.jpaerospace.com) In his artworks Tomás Saraceno proposes cell-like flying cities as possible architectonic living spaces in direct reference to Buckminster Fuller's Cloud Nine (circa 1960). The fantastic architectural utopia Cloud Nine consists of a freely floating sphere measuring one mile in diameter that offers living space to several autonomous communities encompassing thousands of inhabitants each. The notion of the cloud is essential to the artist's work. The cloud as metaphor stands for artistic intention, for the meaning of territory and border in today's (urban) society, and for exploring possibilities for the sustainable development of the human living environment. In Saraceno's work this environment is not limited to the earth, but is explicitly conceived to reach into outer space. (Biomimetic Constructions- On the works of Tomás Saraceno By Katharina Schlüter) Saraceno is also interested in human factors experiments using his existing constructions as analogue environments for living on Mars and is proposing carry out a series of workshops, experiments and solar balloon launces in White Sands desert in early 2016 in collaboration with the curator Dr Rob La Frenais, the Rubin Center at The University of Texas at El Paso and various scientific partners.

  3. The effects of g-jitter and surface tension induced convection on float zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Winter, C. A.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of g-jitter on nonencapsulated and encapsulated liquid bridges were investigated numerically, using fluid characteristics and parameters from three fluid systems: a silicone oil bridge, a methanol bridge, and a silicon melt. Results showed that complex flow patterns can arise in g-jitter environment which significantly modify the heat-transfer characteristics of the system. It was found that the nonencapsulated liquid bridges and float zone melts were dominated by surface-tension driven convection, with very little impact on the flows by residual and g-jitter accelerations. Zone encapsulation resulted in a sizeable drop in the maximum fluid velocities. The g-jitter computations on the encapsulated float zones resulted in significant augmentation of the maximum velocities and heat transfer, with the silicon melt being the least sensitive to g-jitter acceleration.

  4. Optimal plant water use across temporal scales: bridging eco-hydrological theories and plant eco-physiological responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzoni, S.; Vico, G.; Palmroth, S.; Katul, G. G.; Porporato, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    In terrestrial ecosystems, plant photosynthesis occurs at the expense of water losses through stomata, thus creating an inherent hydrologic constrain to carbon (C) gains and productivity. While such a constraint cannot be overcome, evolution has led to a number of adaptations that allow plants to thrive under highly variable and often limiting water availability. It may be hypothesized that these adaptations are optimal and allow maximum C gain for a given water availability. A corollary hypothesis is that these adaptations manifest themselves as coordination between the leaf photosynthetic machinery and the plant hydraulic system. This coordination leads to functional relations between the mean hydrologic state, plant hydraulic traits, and photosynthetic parameters that can be used as bridge across temporal scales. Here, optimality theories describing the behavior of stomata and plant morphological features in a fluctuating soil moisture environment are proposed. The overarching goal is to explain observed global patterns of plant water use and their ecological and biogeochemical consequences. The problem is initially framed as an optimal control problem of stomatal closure during drought of a given duration, where maximizing the total photosynthesis under limited and diminishing water availability is the objective function. Analytical solutions show that commonly used transpiration models (in which stomatal conductance is assumed to depend on soil moisture) are particular solutions emerging from the optimal control problem. Relations between stomatal conductance, vapor pressure deficit, and atmospheric CO2 are also obtained without any a priori assumptions under this framework. Second, the temporal scales of the model are expanded by explicitly considering the stochasticity of rainfall. In this context, the optimal control problem becomes a maximization problem for the mean photosynthetic rate. Results show that to achieve maximum C gains under these

  5. Bridging the Gap Between Climate Science and Water-resource Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, J. R.; Clark, M. P.; Wood, A.; Gutmann, E. D.; Nijssen, B.; Brekke, L. D.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2010, the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Climate Preparedness and Resilience Program has supported development of a coordinated system of products and tools to improve use of climate information in water-resource planning and management. The key products include: 1) a new understanding of the limitations of methods used to quantify impacts of climate change on water resources; 2) development and evaluation of national-domain climate downscaling and hydrologic simulation capabilities to provide information from climate model output relevant to the multiple scales of water resources decision-making with a spatially consistent assessment of the impacts of climate change on hydrologic conditions; and 3) development and evaluation of advanced streamflow forecasting methods. This will support USACE Districts and their stakeholders and partners with new data, new and newly evaluated model output, and specific tools in a framework to help with routine applications for managing water resources throughout the U.S., and to enhance considerations of climate preparedness and resilience in that work. This presentation will summarize the collaborative development of some of those products; describe current and planned future USACE capabilities for incorporating advanced climate information at multiple scales of analysis and decision; discuss uses of climate information in water-resources planning and management; and outline key unanswered science questions being addressed to increase utility and use of information in short- and longer-term planning. Specifically, we will describe the current suite and planned trajectory of new products, moving from capability development through to testing in limited pilot domains, on to product applications throughout the U.S., and, ultimately, into actual implementation at the level of USACE Districts to address climate change issues. Two key foci of this talk will be: 1) where climatological and hydrologic science is currently

  6. Influence of different types of low substituted hydroxypropyl cellulose on tableting, disintegration, and floating behaviour of floating drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Diós, Péter; Pernecker, Tivadar; Nagy, Sándor; Pál, Szilárd; Dévay, Attila

    2014-01-01

    The object of the present study is to evaluate the effect of application of low-substituted hydroxypropyl cellulose (L-HPC) 11 and B1 as excipients promoting floating in gastroretentive tablets. Directly compressed tablets were formed based on experimental design. Face-centred central composite design was applied with two factors and 3 levels, where amount of sodium alginate (X1) and L-HPC (X2) were the numerical factors. Applied types of L-HPCs and their 1:1 mixture were included in a categorical factor (X3). Studied parameters were floating lag time, floating time, floating force, swelling behaviour of tablets and dissolution of paracetamol, which was used as a model active substance. Due to their physical character, L-HPCs had different water uptake and flowability. Lower flowability and lower water uptake was observed after 60 min at L-HPC 11 compared to L-HPC B1. Shorter floating times were detected at L-HPC 11 and L-HPC mixtures with 0.5% content of sodium alginate, whereas alginate was the only significant factor. Evaluating results of drug release and swelling studies on floating tablets revealed correlation, which can serve to help to understand the mechanism of action of L-HPCs in the field development of gastroretentive dosage forms. PMID:26702261

  7. History of high-velocity impact water trauma at Letterman Army Medical Center: a 54-year experience with the Golden Gate Bridge.

    PubMed

    Lafave, M; LaPorta, A J; Hutton, J; Mallory, P L

    1995-04-01

    Three time frames were studied during the 54-year history of the Golden Gate Bridge from 1937 to 1991. During that period of time, there were 918 documented jumps from this majestic structure to the water 250 feet below. The last 15 years provided us with 297 consecutive patients, all brought to one institution, which were retrospectively reviewed and categorized as to site and type of injury for survivors and fatalities. This is the largest high-velocity water impact trauma series in the world. Certain unique characteristics of the Golden Gate Bridge and the San Francisco Bay lend itself to this extremely popular and successful form of suicide. These characteristics, as well as personal factors of free-fall water impact from each patient, are summarized and discussed in this paper.

  8. Transport of dissolved and suspended material by the Potomac River at Chain Bridge, at Washington, D.C., water years 1978-81

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blanchard, Stephen F.; Hahl, D.C.

    1987-01-01

    The measuring station Potomac River at Chain Bridge at Washington, D.C., is located at the upstream end of the tidal Potomac River. Water-quality data were collected intensively at this site from December 1977 through September 1981 as part of a study of the tidal Potomac River and Estuary. Analysis of water-discharge data from the long-term gage at Little Falls, just up stream from Chain Bridge, shows that streamflow for the 1979-81 water years had characteristics similar to the 51-year average discharge (1931-81). Loads were computed for various forms of phosphorus and nitrogen, major cations and anions, silica, biochemical oxygen demand, chlorophyll a and pheophytin, and suspended sediment. Load duration curves for the 1979-81 water years show that 50 percent of the time, water passing Chain Bridge carried at least 28 metric tons per day of total nitrogen, 1.0 metric tons per day of total phosphorus, 70 metric tons per day of silica, and 270 metric tons per day of suspended sediment. No consistent seasonal change in constituent concentrations was observed; however, a seasonal trend in loads due to seasonal changes in runoff was noted. Some storm runoff events transported as much dissolved and suspended material as is transported during an entire low-flow year.

  9. The UN Convention on International Watercourses and integrated water management: A bridge built

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzatzaki, Vasiliki-Maria

    2008-11-01

    The UN Convention on the Law of the Non Navigational Uses of International Watercourses incorporates principles regarding the management of international water resources. The most important principles are the duty of the riparian states to cooperate, not to cause significant harm, to protect the aquatic environment and to utilize the watercourses reasonably and equitably. The lack of hierarchy between these principles signifies that the necessary step for the sound management of shared natural resources is an integrated approach, which takes into account economic development, human needs and environmental protection. Moreover, the UN Convention proved to be useful for the International Court of Justice (hereinafter ICJ) in the settlement of the Gabcikovo- Nagymaros dispute between Hungary and Slovakia for the Danube River. The Court highlighted the importance of the Convention by reminding the riparian states of their obligation to abide by its principles. On the other hand, the ICJ has used the principles of the Convention in the pending case of Pulp Mills between Uruguay and Argentina. This paper is going to show that the UN Convention is an international legal framework with general guidelines in order to create regional conventions, which promotes integrated water management as a solution to the emerging challenges of international water law and potential future conflicts.

  10. Bridging the climate-induced water gap in the twenty-first century: adaptation support based on water supply, demand, adaptation and financing.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straatsma, Menno; Droogers, Peter; Brandsma, Jaïrus; Buytaert, Wouter; Karssenberg, Derek; Van Beek, Rens; Wada, Yoshihide; Sutanudjaja, Edwin; Vitolo, Claudia; Schmitz, Oliver; Meijer, Karen; Van Aalst, Maaike; Bierkens, Marc

    2014-05-01

    realistic combinations of a shared socio-economic pathways (SSPs) and RCPs. Our Water And Climate Adaptation Model (WatCAM) was used to compute the water gap based on reservoir capacity, water supply, and water demand. WatCam is based on the existing ModSim (Labadie, 2010) water allocation model, and facilitated the evaluation of nine technological and infrastructural adaptation measures to assess the investments needed to bridge the future water gap. Regional environmental and socio-economic effects of these investments, such as environmental flows or downstream effects, were evaluated. A scheme was developed to evaluate the strategies on robustness and flexibility under climate change and scenario uncertainty, and each measure was linked to possibilities for investment and financing mechanisms. The WatCAM is available as a web modeling service from www.water2invest.com, and enables user specified adaptation measures and the creation of an ensemble of water gap forecasts.

  11. Bridging Mediterranean cultures in the IYS: A documentary exhibition on irrigation techniques in water scarcity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barontini, Stefano; Louki, Amina; Ben Slima, Zied; Ezzahra Ghaouch, Fatima; Labaran, Raisa; Raffelli, Giulia; Peli, Marco; Vitale, Nicola

    2015-04-01

    Brescia, an industrial city in Northern Italy, is now experiencing a crucial change in its traditional structure. In recent years in fact it has been elected as living and working seat by many foreigners and it is now one of the cities with the greatest percentage of migrants in the Country. This is an important challenge for the city and an opportunity to merge, compare and integrate different cultures to build its future. In this context some students of different Courses (engineering and medicine), belonging both to the Arabian and local community, met together and with researchers in the study team 'Al-B¯i r¯u n¯i , for culture, science and society'. The team aims at organising cultural events in which, starting from the figure of the Persian scientist Ab¯u Raih. ¯a n Al-B¯i r¯u n¯i (about 973, 1051), the contribution of the Arabian and Islamic culture to the development of the European one in the middle ages is investigated. Moving from the initial idea of the study team Al-B¯i r¯u n¯i and from the suggestions of the World Soil Day 2014 and of the International Year of Soils 2015, we built a documentary exhibition entitled 'Irrigation techniques in water scarcity conditions'. The exhibition, which stresses the importance of the irrigation techniques for the soil conservation, is focused on the idea of disseminating two main concepts, i.e. (1) the technological continuity of some water supply systems in countries, around the Mediterranean Sea, affected by similar conditions of water availability, and (2) the possibility of building environments where, due to severe or extreme climatic conditions, the sustainability is reached when the man lives in equilibrium with the nature. The exhibition, which is written in Italian and will move around in the city during all 2015, consists of about twenty posters organized into three main chapters, corresponding to three main classes of water supply systems which are common in most of the countries surrounding

  12. Salinity and temperature in South San Francisco Bay, California, at Dumbarton Bridge: results from the 1999-2002 water years and an overview of previous data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schemel, Laurence E.; Brown, Randall L.; Bell, Norton W.

    2003-01-01

    Salinity and temperature were measured in near-surface waters at Dumbarton Bridge in South San Francisco Bay during the 1999?2002 water years (1999WY?2002WY). The complete data set from this site, which included 1990WY?1993WY and 1995WY?1998WY, provided a time?series of observations covering a wide range of hydrologic conditions. These conditions included critically dry years and years with above-normal and near?record precipitation and discharges from the major rivers and local streams. Data collection at 15?minute intervals allowed resolution of variability associated with daily tides and other short-term phenomena. Both local stream discharges to South San Francisco Bay and Sacramento?San Joaquin River discharges to North San Francisco Bay affected salinity at Dumbarton Bridge. Salinity at Dumbarton Bridge varied with the daily tides, and the lowest salinity values (annual) coincided with precipitation and freshwater inflows usually in winter. Short?term and seasonal variations in temperature at Dumbarton Bridge typically followed changes in air temperature and solar irradiance.

  13. Bridging Troubled Waters: Historians, Natural Resource Litigation, and the Expert Witness Phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Brescia, Michael M

    2015-02-01

    This special issue of The Public Historian examines the nature and scope of the historian's role as a consultant and expert witness in natural resource litigation. The introductory essay identifies the major issues and challenges that historians face when they bring their knowledge, skills, and professional best standards into law offices and courtrooms, while also positing a conceptual framework for public history practitioners to better understand and appreciate the larger stakes in conducting research for environmental litigation. The author delineates his own experience as an expert in certain water rights cases in the American Southwest where knowledge of the Spanish and Mexican civil law of property is essential.

  14. Bridging Troubled Waters: Historians, Natural Resource Litigation, and the Expert Witness Phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Brescia, Michael M

    2015-02-01

    This special issue of The Public Historian examines the nature and scope of the historian's role as a consultant and expert witness in natural resource litigation. The introductory essay identifies the major issues and challenges that historians face when they bring their knowledge, skills, and professional best standards into law offices and courtrooms, while also positing a conceptual framework for public history practitioners to better understand and appreciate the larger stakes in conducting research for environmental litigation. The author delineates his own experience as an expert in certain water rights cases in the American Southwest where knowledge of the Spanish and Mexican civil law of property is essential. PMID:26281237

  15. Tidal Energy Conversion Installation at an Estuarine Bridge Site: Resource Evaluation and Energy Production Estimate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wosnik, M.; Gagnon, I.; Baldwin, K.; Bell, E.

    2015-12-01

    The "Living Bridge" project aims to create a self-diagnosing, self-reporting "smart bridge" powered by a local renewable energy source, tidal energy - transforming Memorial Bridge, a vertical lift bridge over the tidal Piscataqua River connecting Portsmouth, NH and Kittery, ME, into a living laboratory for researchers, engineers, scientists, and the community. The Living Bridge project includes the installation of a tidal turbine at the Memorial Bridge. The energy converted by the turbine will power structural health monitoring, environmental and underwater instrumentation. Utilizing locally available tidal energy can make bridge operation more sustainable, can "harden" transportation infrastructure against prolonged grid outages and can demonstrate a prototype of an "estuarine bridge of the future". A spatio-temporal tidal energy resource assessment was performed using long term bottom-deployed Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP) at two locations: near the planned deployment location in 2013-14 for 123 days and mid-channel in 2007 for 35 days. Data were evaluated to determine the amount of available kinetic energy that can be converted into usable electrical energy on the bridge. Changes in available kinetic energy with ebb/flood and spring/neap tidal cycles and electrical energy demand were analyzed. The target deployment site exhibited significantly more energetic ebb tides than flood tides, which can be explained by the local bathymetry of the tidal estuary. A system model is used to calculate the net energy savings using various tidal generator and battery bank configurations. Different resource evaluation methodologies were also analyzed, e.g., using a representative ADCP "bin" vs. a more refined, turbine-geometry-specific methodology, and using static bin height vs. bin height that move w.r.t. the free surface throughout a tidal cycle (representative of a bottom-fixed or floating turbine deployment, respectively). ADCP operating frequencies and bin

  16. SOLERAS - Solar Energy Water Desalination Project: Chicago Bridge and Iron Company. System design final report. Volume 1. Design report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    Chicago Bridge and Iron Company (CBI), based on a demonstrated breakthrough in freeze desalination is proposing an indirect bulk freeze desalination process for seawater that is uniquely integrated with a stand alone solar cogeneration power plant. Working under SOLERAS auspices, CBI and Foster Miller Associates (FMA) have designed an integrated power system consisting of modular parabolic dish point focus solar energy collection, molten salt thermal energy storage, and a conventional steam turbine. The shaft power provides electrical energy needs via a generator and vapor compression energy needs via compressors. The vapor compression and turbine exhaust heat provide the refrigeration required for the unique freeze desalination process. Efficient energy utilization is achieved by using high grade heat to produce compression refrigeration. The flexibility of this system in making use of available energy and certain inherent advantages of the freeze desalination process make it very attractive. The desalination process includes seawater precooling and freezing, ice separation, washing, and melting to produce fresh water. Brine concentrate is rejected back to the sea after heat exchange with feed seawater.

  17. NULL Convention Floating Point Multiplier

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Seshasayanan

    2015-01-01

    Floating point multiplication is a critical part in high dynamic range and computational intensive digital signal processing applications which require high precision and low power. This paper presents the design of an IEEE 754 single precision floating point multiplier using asynchronous NULL convention logic paradigm. Rounding has not been implemented to suit high precision applications. The novelty of the research is that it is the first ever NULL convention logic multiplier, designed to perform floating point multiplication. The proposed multiplier offers substantial decrease in power consumption when compared with its synchronous version. Performance attributes of the NULL convention logic floating point multiplier, obtained from Xilinx simulation and Cadence, are compared with its equivalent synchronous implementation. PMID:25879069

  18. Control development for floating wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savenije, Feike; Peeringa, Johan

    2014-06-01

    Control of a floating wind turbine has proven to be challenging, but essential for lowering the cost of floating wind energy. Topic of a recent joint R&D project by GustoMSC, MARIN and ECN, is the concept design and verification with coupled simulations and model tests of the GustoMSC Tri-Floater. Only using an integral design approach, including mooring and control design, a cost effective system can be obtained. In this project, ECN developed a general floating wind turbine control strategy and applied this in a case study to the GustoMSC Tri-Floater and the OC3Hywind spar, both equipped with the NREL 5MW RWT. The designed controller ensures stable operation, while maintaining proper speed and power regulation. The motions of the floating support are reduced and substantial load reduction has been achieved.

  19. Bridging the Gaps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Netzer, Greg

    1995-01-01

    Discusses a model water quality monitoring project, Project Bridge, established to train minority girls about to enter eighth grade in scientific procedures followed by hands-on experimentation. Students spent a week monitoring water in an urban stream and analyzing results. (LZ)

  20. Myocardial Bridging

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shi-Min

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial bridging is rare. Myocardial bridges are most commonly localized in the middle segment of the left anterior descending coronary artery. The anatomic features of the bridges vary significantly. Alterations of the endothelial morphology and the vasoactive agents impact on the progression of atherosclerosis of myocardial bridging. Patients may present with chest pain, myocardial infarction, arrhythmia and even sudden death. Patients who respond poorly to the medical treatment with β-blockers warrant a surgical intervention. Myotomy is a preferred surgical procedure for the symptomatic patients. Coronary stent deployment has been in limited use due to the unsatisfactory long-term results. PMID:27074276

  1. Electrically floating, near vertical incidence, skywave antenna

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Allen A.; Kaser, Timothy G.; Tremblay, Paul A.; Mays, Belva L.

    2014-07-08

    An Electrically Floating, Near Vertical Incidence, Skywave (NVIS) Antenna comprising an antenna element, a floating ground element, and a grounding element. At least part of said floating ground element is positioned between said antenna element and said grounding element. The antenna is separated from the floating ground element and the grounding element by one or more electrical insulators. The floating ground element is separated from said antenna and said grounding element by one or more electrical insulators.

  2. Floating into Thin Air

    SciTech Connect

    Hazi, A U

    2007-02-06

    On May 18, 2005, a giant helium balloon carrying the High Energy Focusing Telescope (HEFT) sailed into the spring sky over the deserts of New Mexico. The spindly steel and aluminum gondola that houses the optics, detectors, and other components of the telescope floated for 25 hours after its launch from Fort Sumner, New Mexico. For 21 of those hours, the balloon was nearly 40 kilometers above Earth's surface--almost four times higher than the altitude routinely flown by commercial jet aircraft. In the upper reaches of Earth's atmosphere, HEFT searched the universe for x-ray sources from highly energetic objects such as binary stars, galaxy clusters, and supermassive black holes. Before landing in Arizona, the telescope observed and imaged a dozen scientific targets by capturing photons emitted from these objects in the high-energy (hard) x-ray range (above 10 kiloelectronvolts). Among these targets were the Crab synchrotron nebula, the black hole Cygnus X-1 (one of the brightest x-ray sources in the sky), and the blazar 3C454.3. The scientific data gathered from these targets are among the first focused hard x-ray images returned from high altitudes.

  3. Impact on floating membranes.

    PubMed

    Vandenberghe, Nicolas; Duchemin, Laurent

    2016-05-01

    When impacted by a rigid body, a thin elastic membrane with negligible bending rigidity floating on a liquid pool deforms. Two axisymmetric waves radiating from the impact point propagate. First, a longitudinal wave front, associated with in-plane deformation of the membrane and traveling at constant speed, separates an outward stress-free domain from a stretched domain. Then, in the stretched domain a dispersive transverse wave travels at a speed that depends on the local stretching rate. The dynamics is found to be self-similar in time. Using this property, we show that the wave dynamics is similar to the capillary waves that propagate at a liquid-gas interface but with a surface tension coefficient that depends on impact speed. During wave propagation, we observe the development of a buckling instability that gives rise to radial wrinkles. We address the dynamics of this fluid-body system, including the rapid deceleration of an impactor of finite mass, an issue that may have applications in the domain of absorption of impact energy. PMID:27300958

  4. Liquid mixing driven motions of floating macroscopic objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ming

    2007-04-01

    Dropping miscible and low-density organic solvents into water generates translational and rotational motions of floating objects including oil droplets, polymer half spheres, and model boats. The moving speed of the boat at different loads and the force produced by solvent drops are measured. In contrast to motions driven by surface tension of monolayer, the liquid mixing driven motion can be dynamically steered without restriction and continued provided the supply is maintained and the amount of water is large enough. Such motions are the result of Marangoni instability in binary liquid-liquid systems with intentionally produced concentration gradients behind the floating objects.

  5. Lightweight Floating-Point Arithmetic: Case Study of Inverse Discrete Cosine Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Fang; Chen, Tsuhan; Rutenbar, Rob A.

    2002-12-01

    To enable floating-point (FP) signal processing applications in low-power mobile devices, we propose lightweight floating-point arithmetic. It offers a wider range of precision/power/speed/area trade-offs, but is wrapped in forms that hide the complexity of the underlying implementations from both multimedia software designers and hardware designers. Libraries implemented in C++ and Verilog provide flexible and robust floating-point units with variable bit-width formats, multiple rounding modes and other features. This solution bridges the design gap between software and hardware, and accelerates the design cycle from algorithm to chip by avoiding the translation to fixed-point arithmetic. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme using the inverse discrete cosine transform (IDCT), in the context of video coding, as an example. Further, we implement lightweight floating-point IDCT into hardware and demonstrate the power and area reduction.

  6. Evaporation mitigation by floating modular devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, M. M.; Peirson, W. L.

    2016-05-01

    Prolonged periods of drought and consequent evaporation from open water bodies in arid parts of Australia continue to be a threat to water availability for agricultural production. Over many parts of Australia, the annual average evaporation exceeds the annual precipitation by more than 5 times. Given its significance, it is surprising that no evaporation mitigation technique has gained widespread adoption to date. High capital and maintenance costs of manufactured products are a significant barrier to implementation. The use of directly recycled clean plastic containers as floating modular devices to mitigate evaporation has been investigated for the first time. A six-month trial at an arid zone site in Australia of this potential cost effective solution has been undertaken. The experiment was performed using clean conventional drinking water bottles as floating modules on the open water surface of 240-L tanks with three varying degrees of covering (nil, 34% and 68%). A systematic reduction in evaporation is demonstrated during the whole study period that is approximately linearly proportional to the covered surface. These results provide a potential foundation for robust evaporation mitigation with the prospect of implementing a cost-optimal design.

  7. Clear-Water Contraction Scour at Selected Bridge Sites in the Black Prairie Belt of the Coastal Plain in Alabama, 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, K.G.; Hedgecock, T.S.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Alabama Department of Transportation, made observations of clear-water contraction scour at 25 bridge sites in the Black Prairie Belt of the Coastal Plain of Alabama. These bridge sites consisted of 54 hydraulic structures, of which 37 have measurable scour holes. Observed scour depths ranged from 1.4 to 10.4 feet. Theoretical clear-water contraction-scour depths were computed for each bridge and compared with observed scour. This comparison showed that theoretical scour depths, in general, exceeded the observed scour depths by about 475 percent. Variables determined to be important in developing scour in laboratory studies along with several other hydraulic variables were investigated to understand their influence within the Alabama field data. The strongest explanatory variables for clear-water contraction scour were channel-contraction ratio and velocity index. Envelope curves were developed relating both of these explanatory variables to observed scour. These envelope curves provide useful tools for assessing reasonable ranges of scour depth in the Black Prairie Belt of Alabama.

  8. 33 CFR 118.85 - Lights on vertical lift bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lights on vertical lift bridges... BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.85 Lights on vertical lift bridges. (a) Lift span lights. The vertical lift span of every vertical lift bridge shall be lighted so that the center of...

  9. 33 CFR 118.85 - Lights on vertical lift bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lights on vertical lift bridges... BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.85 Lights on vertical lift bridges. (a) Lift span lights. The vertical lift span of every vertical lift bridge shall be lighted so that the center of...

  10. 33 CFR 118.85 - Lights on vertical lift bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lights on vertical lift bridges... BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.85 Lights on vertical lift bridges. (a) Lift span lights. The vertical lift span of every vertical lift bridge shall be lighted so that the center of...

  11. Safer Bridges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Safer bridges are among a number of spinoff benefits from NASA procedures for testing 'cfracture toughness" of a structural part, meaning its ability to -siscracktsh at might cause failure. The New River Bridge in West Virginia, shown under construction, is the world's largest single span bridge. U.S. Steel fracture toughness requirements for such bridges include NASA-developed test procedures. Bridge materials and other metal structures may develop flaws during their service lifetimes. Such flaws can affect the structural integrity of the part. Thus, it is important to know the "fracture toughness" of a structural part, or its ability to resist cracks. NASA has long experience in developing fracture toughness tests for aerospace hardware. Since 1960, NASA-Lewis has worked closely with the American Society for Testing & Materials. Lewis and NASA-funded industrial contractors have made many important contributions to test procedures, now recommended by ASTM, for measuring fracture toughness.

  12. 14 CFR 25.533 - Hull and main float bottom pressures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hull and main float bottom pressures. 25.533 Section 25.533 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Water Loads § 25.533 Hull and main float bottom pressures. (a) General....

  13. 14 CFR 23.527 - Hull and main float load factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hull and main float load factors. 23.527 Section 23.527 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Water Loads § 23.527 Hull and main float...

  14. Students' Views of Floating & Sinking. Learning in Science Project (Primary). Working Paper No. 116.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biddulph, Fred

    This study investigated the meanings and ideas held and questions asked by children (ages 7-14) about floating and sinking (in water). Data were collected from interviews using "interview-about-instances" (IAI) cards (included in an appendix) and 10 objects which either floated or sank. Additional data were collected from classroom surveys and…

  15. 33 CFR 149.550 - What are the requirements for lights on a floating hose string?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) Two red lights at each end of the hose string, including the ends in a channel where the hose string... lights on a floating hose string? 149.550 Section 149.550 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... EQUIPMENT Aids to Navigation Lights on Floating Hose Strings § 149.550 What are the requirements for...

  16. 33 CFR 149.550 - What are the requirements for lights on a floating hose string?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Two red lights at each end of the hose string, including the ends in a channel where the hose string... lights on a floating hose string? 149.550 Section 149.550 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... EQUIPMENT Aids to Navigation Lights on Floating Hose Strings § 149.550 What are the requirements for...

  17. Bio-Conjugated CNT-Bridged 3D Porous Graphene Oxide Membrane for Highly Efficient Disinfection of Pathogenic Bacteria and Removal of Toxic Metals from Water.

    PubMed

    Nellore, Bhanu Priya Viraka; Kanchanapally, Rajashekhar; Pedraza, Francisco; Sinha, Sudarson Sekhar; Pramanik, Avijit; Hamme, Ashton T; Arslan, Zikri; Sardar, Dhiraj; Ray, Paresh Chandra

    2015-09-01

    More than a billion people lack access to safe drinking water that is free from pathogenic bacteria and toxic metals. The World Health Organization estimates several million people, mostly children, die every year due to the lack of good quality water. Driven by this need, we report the development of PGLa antimicrobial peptide and glutathione conjugated carbon nanotube (CNT) bridged three-dimensional (3D) porous graphene oxide membrane, which can be used for highly efficient disinfection of Escherichia coli O157:H7 bacteria and removal of As(III), As(V), and Pb(II) from water. Reported results demonstrate that versatile membrane has the capability to capture and completely disinfect pathogenic pathogenic E. coli O157:H7 bacteria from water. Experimentally observed disinfection data indicate that the PGLa attached membrane can dramatically enhance the possibility of destroying pathogenic E. coli bacteria via synergistic mechanism. Reported results show that glutathione attached CNT-bridged 3D graphene oxide membrane can be used to remove As(III), As(V), and Pb(II) from water sample at 10 ppm level. Our data demonstrated that PGLa and glutathione attached membrane has the capability for high efficient removal of E. coli O157:H7 bacteria, As(III), As(V), and Pb(II) simultaneously from Mississippi River water. PMID:26273843

  18. Bio-Conjugated CNT-Bridged 3D Porous Graphene Oxide Membrane for Highly Efficient Disinfection of Pathogenic Bacteria and Removal of Toxic Metals from Water.

    PubMed

    Nellore, Bhanu Priya Viraka; Kanchanapally, Rajashekhar; Pedraza, Francisco; Sinha, Sudarson Sekhar; Pramanik, Avijit; Hamme, Ashton T; Arslan, Zikri; Sardar, Dhiraj; Ray, Paresh Chandra

    2015-09-01

    More than a billion people lack access to safe drinking water that is free from pathogenic bacteria and toxic metals. The World Health Organization estimates several million people, mostly children, die every year due to the lack of good quality water. Driven by this need, we report the development of PGLa antimicrobial peptide and glutathione conjugated carbon nanotube (CNT) bridged three-dimensional (3D) porous graphene oxide membrane, which can be used for highly efficient disinfection of Escherichia coli O157:H7 bacteria and removal of As(III), As(V), and Pb(II) from water. Reported results demonstrate that versatile membrane has the capability to capture and completely disinfect pathogenic pathogenic E. coli O157:H7 bacteria from water. Experimentally observed disinfection data indicate that the PGLa attached membrane can dramatically enhance the possibility of destroying pathogenic E. coli bacteria via synergistic mechanism. Reported results show that glutathione attached CNT-bridged 3D graphene oxide membrane can be used to remove As(III), As(V), and Pb(II) from water sample at 10 ppm level. Our data demonstrated that PGLa and glutathione attached membrane has the capability for high efficient removal of E. coli O157:H7 bacteria, As(III), As(V), and Pb(II) simultaneously from Mississippi River water.

  19. A laboratory study of floating lenticular anticyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Gal, Patrice; de La Rosa, Hector; Cros, Anne; Cruz-Gomez, Raúl; Le Bars, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Oceanic vortices play an important role in the redistribution of heat, salt and momentum in the oceans. Among these vortices, floating lenses or rings are often met in the meanders of warm currents. For instance the North Brazil Current rings are among the most intense and large anticyclonic vortices on Earth. In order to better describe these vortices, we propose here a laboratory study of these floating anticyclonic lenses. A blob of fresh water is slowly injected near the surface of a rotating layer of homogeneous salted water. Because of the opposite effects of rotation that tends to generate columnar structures and density stratification that spreads light water on the surface, the vortices take a finite size three dimensionnal typical shape. Visualization and PIV measurements of the shape, aspect ratios and vorticity profiles are compared to analytical predictions that use first a simple solid body rotation model and then a more realistic isolated Gaussian vorticity field inside the anticyclones. This work was carried out within the framework of a bilateral cooperation between CNRS (France) and CONACYT (Mexico).

  20. Vortex-assisted surfactant-enhanced-emulsification liquid-liquid microextraction with solidification of floating organic droplet combined with flame atomic absorption spectrometry for the fast determination of cadmium in water samples.

    PubMed

    Peng, Guilong; Lu, Ying; He, Qiang; Mmereki, Daniel; Tang, Xiaohui; Zhong, Zhihui; Zhao, Xiaolong

    2016-01-01

    A novel vortex-assisted surfactant-enhanced-emulsification liquid-liquid microextraction with solidification of floating organic droplet (VSLLME-SFO) was developed for the fast, simple and efficient determination of cadmium (Cd) in water samples followed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). In the VSLLME-SFO process, the addition of surfactant (as an emulsifier), could enhance the mass transfer from the aqueous solution into the extraction solvent. The extraction solvent could be dispersed into the aqueous phase under vigorous shaking with the vortex. In this paper, we investigated the influences of analytical parameters, including pH, extraction solvent type and its volume, surfactant type and its volume, concentration of chelating agent, salt effect and vortex time, on the extraction efficiency of Cd. Under the optimized conditions, the limit of detection was 0.16 μg/L. The analyte enrichment factor was 37.68. The relative standard deviation was 3.2% (10 μg/L, n = 10) and the calibration graph was linear, ranging from 0.5 to 30 μg/L. The proposed method was successfully applied for the analysis of ultra-trace Cd in river water and wastewater samples.

  1. Vortex-assisted surfactant-enhanced-emulsification liquid-liquid microextraction with solidification of floating organic droplet combined with flame atomic absorption spectrometry for the fast determination of cadmium in water samples.

    PubMed

    Peng, Guilong; Lu, Ying; He, Qiang; Mmereki, Daniel; Tang, Xiaohui; Zhong, Zhihui; Zhao, Xiaolong

    2016-01-01

    A novel vortex-assisted surfactant-enhanced-emulsification liquid-liquid microextraction with solidification of floating organic droplet (VSLLME-SFO) was developed for the fast, simple and efficient determination of cadmium (Cd) in water samples followed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). In the VSLLME-SFO process, the addition of surfactant (as an emulsifier), could enhance the mass transfer from the aqueous solution into the extraction solvent. The extraction solvent could be dispersed into the aqueous phase under vigorous shaking with the vortex. In this paper, we investigated the influences of analytical parameters, including pH, extraction solvent type and its volume, surfactant type and its volume, concentration of chelating agent, salt effect and vortex time, on the extraction efficiency of Cd. Under the optimized conditions, the limit of detection was 0.16 μg/L. The analyte enrichment factor was 37.68. The relative standard deviation was 3.2% (10 μg/L, n = 10) and the calibration graph was linear, ranging from 0.5 to 30 μg/L. The proposed method was successfully applied for the analysis of ultra-trace Cd in river water and wastewater samples. PMID:27232416

  2. Climbing techniques for bridge inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaslan, Erol C.

    1998-03-01

    California has about 24,000 publicly owned bridges that require routine structural evaluations to comply with National Bridge Inspection Standard (NBIS) mandates. Of these, about 800 are identified as possessing fatigue prone or fracture critical details requiring thorough tactile investigations. Gaining access to bridge elements to perform these investigations has become increasingly difficult and costly. The traditional uses of under bridge inspection trucks, lift equipment and rigging are economically and practically limited by bridge size, structure type, traffic demands and support costs. In some cases, bridges that have become damaged by earthquakes cannot safely support the loads of heavy personnel lift equipment. The California Department of Transportation (Caltrans)'s Office of Structural Materials and Office of Structure Maintenance and Investigations evaluated the use of rock climbing and mountaineering techniques as an alternative means of gaining access for bridge inspections. Under a small research grant, a bridge climbing training course was developed through a local University of California outdoor recreation group and 7 engineers and technicians were initially trained. A comprehensive Code of Safe Practices was created and standards of training, procedures and equipment required for bridge inspections were established. A successful climb investigation on a large, previously inaccessible arch bridge was completed at the end of the training that proved the techniques safe, economical and effective. Within one year, 20 bridge maintenance engineers were trained, and a formal program was established to organize, schedule, equip and certify engineers and technicians for bridge climbing. Several other offices within Caltrans as well as the California Department of Water Resources have since adopted these techniques for specialized structural inspection tasks. Climbing techniques are now used routinely in California as an alterative means of gaining access

  3. Use of surface-geophysical methods to assess riverbed scour at bridge piers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gorin, S.R.; Haeni, F.P.

    1989-01-01

    A ground-penetrating-radar system, and three seismic systems--color fathometer, tuned transducer, and black-and-white fathometer--were used to evaluate river-bed scour at the Charter Oak, Founder 's and Bulkeley Bridges in Hartford, Connecticut. Cross-sections of the channel and some lateral sections were run at each bridge in June and July 1987, and significant scour at piers supporting each of these bridges was recorded. Each of the four geophysical systems proved to have advantages and limitations. The ground penetrating radar system used single and dual 80 megahertz antennae floating in the water to transmit and receive the signal. The method was successful in water less than 25 ft deep, and in resistive earth materials. The geometry of existing scour holes and the extent of post-scour sedimentation were clearly defined. The color fathometer, operating at a signal frequency of 20 kilohertz, delineated existing scour-hole geometry, detected infilling of scour holes, and provided qualitative information about the physical properties of sediments. The tuned transducer, operating at a signal frequency of 14 kilohertz, defined scour-hole geometry and the extent of post-scour sediment deposition. Both of these systems were effective in water greater than 5 ft deep. At a signal frequency of 200 kilohertz, the black-and-white fathometer could not penetrate post-scour deposits, but it was useful in defining existing scour-holed geometry in water of any depth. (USGS)

  4. Parallel finite element simulation of mooring forces on floating objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliabadi, S.; Abedi, J.; Zellars, B.

    2003-03-01

    The coupling between the equations governing the free-surface flows, the six degrees of freedom non-linear rigid body dynamics, the linear elasticity equations for mesh-moving and the cables has resulted in a fluid-structure interaction technology capable of simulating mooring forces on floating objects. The finite element solution strategy is based on a combination approach derived from fixed-mesh and moving-mesh techniques. Here, the free-surface flow simulations are based on the Navier-Stokes equations written for two incompressible fluids where the impact of one fluid on the other one is extremely small. An interface function with two distinct values is used to locate the position of the free-surface. The stabilized finite element formulations are written and integrated in an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian domain. This allows us to handle the motion of the time dependent geometries. Forces and momentums exerted on the floating object by both water and hawsers are calculated and used to update the position of the floating object in time. In the mesh moving scheme, we assume that the computational domain is made of elastic materials. The linear elasticity equations are solved to obtain the displacements for each computational node. The non-linear rigid body dynamics equations are coupled with the governing equations of fluid flow and are solved simultaneously to update the position of the floating object. The numerical examples includes a 3D simulation of water waves impacting on a moored floating box and a model boat and simulation of floating object under water constrained with a cable.

  5. Myocardial Bridge

    MedlinePlus

    ... artery. See also on this site: Ask a Texas Heart Institute Doctor: Search "myocardial bridge" Updated August ... comments. Terms of Use and Privacy Policy © Copyright Texas Heart Institute All rights reserved.

  6. Jointless bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuk, W.

    1981-06-01

    Various methods states are employing to reduce the number of joints in bridge decks are surveyed. The most common method is the use of integral abutments, where the superstructure is jointed to a flexible type of abutment. New methods of reducing the number of joints in a bridge are analyzed mathematically, and from the analysis conclusions are drawn as to the feasibility of these methods.

  7. Vibrations of a floating beam on marine waves

    SciTech Connect

    Sabaneev, Valentin S.; Tovstik, Petr E.; Tovstik, Tatiana M.; Shekhovtsov, Alexei S.

    2015-03-10

    Vertical vibrations of a floating pipe-concrete beam caused by a harmonic waves excitation are studied. The apparent additional mass of water, resisting force and the velocity of towing are considered. The vibration amplitude and the maximum deformations of concrete, caused by these fluctuations, are calculated.

  8. 33 CFR 118.140 - Painting bridge piers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Painting bridge piers. 118.140 Section 118.140 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.140 Painting bridge piers. The District Commander may...

  9. 33 CFR 118.140 - Painting bridge piers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Painting bridge piers. 118.140 Section 118.140 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.140 Painting bridge piers. The District Commander may...

  10. 33 CFR 118.90 - Bridges crossing channel obliquely.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bridges crossing channel obliquely. 118.90 Section 118.90 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.90 Bridges crossing channel obliquely....

  11. 33 CFR 118.90 - Bridges crossing channel obliquely.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bridges crossing channel obliquely. 118.90 Section 118.90 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.90 Bridges crossing channel obliquely....

  12. 33 CFR 118.90 - Bridges crossing channel obliquely.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bridges crossing channel obliquely. 118.90 Section 118.90 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.90 Bridges crossing channel obliquely....

  13. 33 CFR 118.140 - Painting bridge piers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Painting bridge piers. 118.140 Section 118.140 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.140 Painting bridge piers. The District Commander may...

  14. 33 CFR 118.90 - Bridges crossing channel obliquely.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bridges crossing channel obliquely. 118.90 Section 118.90 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.90 Bridges crossing channel obliquely....

  15. 33 CFR 118.90 - Bridges crossing channel obliquely.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bridges crossing channel obliquely. 118.90 Section 118.90 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.90 Bridges crossing channel obliquely....

  16. Evaporation mitigation using floating modular devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, M. Mahmudul; Peirson, William Leslie; Neyland, Bryce M.; Fiddis, Nicholas McQuistan

    2015-11-01

    Reducing evaporation losses from open water storages is of paramount importance in the improvement of water security in arid countries, including Australia. Widespread adoption of evaporation mitigation techniques has been prevented by their high capital and maintenance or operating costs. The use of clean, floating recycled materials to mitigate evaporation technique has been investigated systematically at sites within both the coastal and semi-arid zones of Australia. Evaporation reduction systematically increases with the proportion of covered surface. Evaporation is reduced by 43% at coastal site and 37% at arid zone site at the maximum packing densities achievable for a single layer of floating devices. The study highlights the importance of both long-term investigations and the climatic influences in the robust quantification of evaporation mitigation. The effects of solar radiation, temperature, wind speed and relative humidity on the evaporation rate at both study sites have been determined in terms of both the classical Penman model and FAO Penman Monteith model with corresponding pan coefficients quantified. FAO Penman Monteith model better estimates evaporation from the open reference tank.

  17. Numerical simulation of a floating buoy in surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altazin, Thomas; Golay, Frédéric; Fraunié, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    A numerical method based on volumic penalization is developed to track a floating body in a two phase flows (air and water). Fast computations on parallel computer are performed thanks to an adaptative mesh refinement following a numerical entropy criterion together with a variable time step depending on the mesh size. Applications concern the motion of a floating buoy in a surface wave field and the induced perturbation of the wave and atmospheric fields by the buoy. Presented cases concern a breaking wave and a second order Stokes wave as initial conditions. Acknowledgements : This research was supported by the Modtercom and CHEF projects of Region PACA, when applications on windage of floating buoys are related to the SUBCORAD LEFE-INSU project.

  18. 40 CFR 65.45 - External floating roof converted into an internal floating roof.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false External floating roof converted into an internal floating roof. 65.45 Section 65.45 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... External floating roof converted into an internal floating roof. The owner or operator who elects...

  19. 40 CFR 65.45 - External floating roof converted into an internal floating roof.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false External floating roof converted into an internal floating roof. 65.45 Section 65.45 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... External floating roof converted into an internal floating roof. The owner or operator who elects...

  20. 40 CFR 65.45 - External floating roof converted into an internal floating roof.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false External floating roof converted into an internal floating roof. 65.45 Section 65.45 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... External floating roof converted into an internal floating roof. The owner or operator who elects...

  1. The paradox of the floating candle that continues to burn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodorakis, Stavros; Aristidou, Charalambos

    2012-08-01

    What happens after lighting a paraffin candle that is barely floating in water and kept upright with the aid of an appropriately weighted nail attached to its bottom? Presumably, it should sink because the buoyant force will decrease more than the weight. Surprisingly, the candle will continue to burn, rising slowly above the surface of the water. The reason for this is that the flame forms a well around the wick filled with molten paraffin, while the water keeps the outer walls of the candle cool and unscathed. Thus, the buoyancy hardly changes while the weight is reduced through burning, resulting in a floating candle that will rise above water. We present a quantitative model that describes the formation of the well and verify it experimentally, examining first the case of a candle in the air and then the case of a candle immersed in water.

  2. Speciation of As(III) and As(V) in water samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry after solid phase extraction combined with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on the solidification of floating organic drop.

    PubMed

    Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Fattahi, Nazir; Assadi, Yaghoub; Sadeghi, Marzieh; Sharafi, Kiomars

    2014-12-01

    A solid phase extraction (SPE) coupled with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on the solidification of floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO) method, using diethyldithiphosphate (DDTP) as a proper chelating agent, has been developed as an ultra preconcentration technique for the determination of inorganic arsenic in water samples prior to graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). Variables affecting the performance of both steps were thoroughly investigated. Under optimized conditions, 100mL of As(ΙΙΙ) solution was first concentrated using a solid phase sorbent. The extract was collected in 2.0 mL of acetone and 60.0 µL of 1-undecanol was added into the collecting solvent. The mixture was then injected rapidly into 5.0 mL of pure water for further DLLME-SFO. Total inorganic As(III, V) was extracted similarly after reduction of As(V) to As(III) with potassium iodide and sodium thiosulfate and As(V) concentration was calculated by difference. A mixture of Pd(NO3)2 and Mg(NO3)2 was used as a chemical modifier in GFAAS. The analytical characteristics of the method were determined. The calibration graph was linear in the rage of 10-100 ng L(-1) with detection limit of 2.5 ng L(-1). Repeatability (intra-day) and reproducibility (inter-day) of method based on seven replicate measurements of 80 ng L(-1) of As(ΙΙΙ) were 6.8% and 7.5%, respectively. The method was successfully applied to speciation of As(III), As(V) and determination of the total amount of As in water samples and in a certified reference material (NIST RSM 1643e). PMID:25159375

  3. Speciation of As(III) and As(V) in water samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry after solid phase extraction combined with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on the solidification of floating organic drop.

    PubMed

    Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Fattahi, Nazir; Assadi, Yaghoub; Sadeghi, Marzieh; Sharafi, Kiomars

    2014-12-01

    A solid phase extraction (SPE) coupled with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on the solidification of floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO) method, using diethyldithiphosphate (DDTP) as a proper chelating agent, has been developed as an ultra preconcentration technique for the determination of inorganic arsenic in water samples prior to graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). Variables affecting the performance of both steps were thoroughly investigated. Under optimized conditions, 100mL of As(ΙΙΙ) solution was first concentrated using a solid phase sorbent. The extract was collected in 2.0 mL of acetone and 60.0 µL of 1-undecanol was added into the collecting solvent. The mixture was then injected rapidly into 5.0 mL of pure water for further DLLME-SFO. Total inorganic As(III, V) was extracted similarly after reduction of As(V) to As(III) with potassium iodide and sodium thiosulfate and As(V) concentration was calculated by difference. A mixture of Pd(NO3)2 and Mg(NO3)2 was used as a chemical modifier in GFAAS. The analytical characteristics of the method were determined. The calibration graph was linear in the rage of 10-100 ng L(-1) with detection limit of 2.5 ng L(-1). Repeatability (intra-day) and reproducibility (inter-day) of method based on seven replicate measurements of 80 ng L(-1) of As(ΙΙΙ) were 6.8% and 7.5%, respectively. The method was successfully applied to speciation of As(III), As(V) and determination of the total amount of As in water samples and in a certified reference material (NIST RSM 1643e).

  4. A Bridge over Troubling Waters: A Snapshot of Teacher Graduates' Perceptions of Their Ongoing Professional Learning Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosswell, Leanne; Beutel, Denise

    2013-01-01

    For graduating teachers, the bridging period between formal teacher preparation and joining the profession is a time of high anxiety and great excitement. While this transition influences efficacy, job satisfaction, career length and future teaching quality, it is widely recognised to be inconsistent, poorly planned and resourced and largely…

  5. 32 CFR 935.165 - Floating objects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Floating objects. 935.165 Section 935.165... REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Public Safety § 935.165 Floating objects. No person may anchor, moor, or beach any boat, barge, or other floating object on Wake Island in any location or manner other than...

  6. Have Floating Rates Been a Success?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higham, David

    1983-01-01

    Floating exchange rates have not lived up to all expectations, but neither have they performed as badly as some critics have suggested. Examined are the impact of floating rates on balance of payments adjustment, domestic economic policy, and inflation and the claim that floating rates have displayed excessive fluctuations. (Author/RM)

  7. 32 CFR 935.165 - Floating objects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Floating objects. 935.165 Section 935.165... REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Public Safety § 935.165 Floating objects. No person may anchor, moor, or beach any boat, barge, or other floating object on Wake Island in any location or manner other than...

  8. Designing seaplane hulls and floats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benoit,

    1926-01-01

    Experimental data, such as the results of tank tests of models, render it possible to predict, at least in principle, as to how a hull or float of a given shape will comport itself. We will see further along, however, how uncertain these methods are and how they leave room for empiricism, which will reign for a long time yet in seaplane research bureaus.

  9. Water-bridged hydrogen bond formation between 5-hydroxylmethylcytosine (5-hmC) and its 3'-neighbouring bases in A- and B-form DNA duplexes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Ranganathan, Srivathsan V; Valsangkar, Vibhav A; Magliocco, Stephanie M; Shen, Fusheng; Chen, Alan; Sheng, Jia

    2015-11-25

    5-Hydroxylmethylcytosine (5hmC) has been recognized as the sixth base with important biological functions in many tissues and cell types. We present here the high-resolution crystal structures and molecular simulation studies of both A-form and B-form DNA duplexes containing 5hmC. We observed that 5hmC interacts with its 3'-neighboring bases through water-bridged hydrogen bonds and these interactions may affect the further oxidation of 5hmC.

  10. The Aerodynamic Drag of Five Models of Side Floats N.A.C.A. Models 51-E, 51-F, 51-G, 51-H, 51-J

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    House, R O

    1938-01-01

    The drag of five models of side floats was measured in the N.A.C.A. 7- by 10-foot wind tunnel. The most promising method of reducing the drag of floats indicated by these tests is lowering the angle at which the floats are rigged. The addition of a step to a float does not always increase the drag in the flying range, floats with steps sometimes having lower drag than similar floats without steps. Making the bow chine no higher than necessary might result in a reduction in air drag because of the lower angle of pitch of the chines. Since side floats are used formally to obtain lateral stability when the seaplane is operating on the water at slow speeds or at rest, greater consideration can be given to factors affecting aerodynamic drag than is possible for other types of floats and hulls.

  11. Drilling and production from a floating spar

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, I.H.; Carroll, J.P.

    1994-12-31

    A deepwater drilling and production platform has been designed based on a floating spar. The spar is a catenary-moored cylindrical vessel having a deep draft which minimizes heave motions. The concept is an economic competitor with other deep water designs such as compliant towers and tension leg platforms. The spar`s oil storage capacity makes it particularly applicable for remote areas where pipeline infrastructure is unavailable and production is primarily from oil reservoirs. Without the need for a swivel, offloading of oil can be accomplished either directly from the spar, by use of a floating hose and support vessel, or by transfer to an offloading buoy. The concept is compatible with early production or phased development scenarios, permits surface completions of producing and injection wells, and allows for direct well intervention. The ability to reposition the spar by manipulations of the mooring lines favors a system of individual wellheads on the seafloor. Wells can be drilled, completed, and produced without pulling the drilling riser. When production from the field reaches its economic limit, the entire system can be towed to a new location and reused.

  12. Three floating metatarsals and a half-floating cuneiform.

    PubMed

    Madi, Sandesh; Vijayan, Sandeep; Naik, Monappa; Rao, Sharath

    2015-10-08

    Floating metatarsals are rare and complex injury patterns in the world of foot trauma. The injury is typically characterised by concomitant dislocations of the metatarsals from both articular ends ('bipolar dislocations'). Fascination arises from the fact that there have been only 15 cases reported in the English literature from 1964 to date. The first metatarsal has been more frequently reported than the lesser metatarsals. More than one floating metatarsal is also extremely uncommon. Inter-cuneiform diastasis is another rare entity seen in low velocity injuries and sports injuries; this condition is very difficult to diagnose clinically and radiologically. The occurrence of these two injury patterns in isolation is itself rare, making their combination even more unique.

  13. Bridges, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zito, Michael, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This document is comprised of the two issues in volume 4 of "Bridges," a publication produced by the California Head Start-State Collaboration Office to detail the activities of the educational partnership and to provide relevant information to programs participating in the partnership. The spring 1999 issue focuses on the service system for…

  14. Bridges, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver, Michael, Ed.; Zito, Michael, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This document is comprised of the one issue in volume 7 of "Bridges," a publication produced by the California Head Start-State Collaboration Office to detail the activities of the educational partnership and to provide relevant information to programs participating in the partnership. The Summer 2002 issue focuses on several topics of interest to…

  15. Software Bridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    I-Bridge is a commercial version of software developed by I-Kinetics under a NASA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract. The software allows users of Windows applications to gain quick, easy access to databases, programs and files on UNIX services. Information goes directly onto spreadsheets and other applications; users need not manually locate, transfer and convert data.

  16. Bridges, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, Bonita; Manear, John; Slifkin, Josh M.

    This volume contains articles about writing, best practice, portfolio assessment, and technology, as well as original poetry and book reviews. Articles in the volume are: "Teaching Writing: Making Connections" (Eric Schott); "Empowering Teachers: A Success Story" (Sandra L. Krivak); "Bridging the Gap between the Classroom and Employment" (Linda C.…

  17. Bridged graphite oxide materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrera-Alonso, Margarita (Inventor); McAllister, Michael J. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Prud'homme, Robert K. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Bridged graphite oxide material comprising graphite sheets bridged by at least one diamine bridging group. The bridged graphite oxide material may be incorporated in polymer composites or used in adsorption media.

  18. Float zone experiments in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verhoeven, J. D.; Noack, M. A.; Gill, W. N.; Hau, C. C.

    1984-01-01

    The molten zone/freezing crystal interface system and all the mechanisms were examined. If Marangoni convection produces oscillatory flows in the float zone of semiconductor materials, such as silicon, then it is unlikely that superior quality crystals can be grown in space using this process. The major goals were: (1) to determine the conditions for the onset of Marangoni flows in molten tin, a model system for low Prandtl number molten semiconductor materials; (2) to determine whether the flows can be suppressed by a thin oxide layer; and (3) based on experimental and mathematical analysis, to predict whether oscillatory flows will occur in the float zone silicon geometry in space, and if so, could it be suppressed by thin oxide or nitride films. Techniques were developed to analyze molten tin surfaces in a UHV system in a disk float zone geometry to minimize buoyancy flows. The critical Marangoni number for onset of oscillatory flows was determined to be greater than 4300 on atomically clean molten tin surfaces.

  19. Effect of interfibrillar PVA bridging on water stability and mechanical properties of TEMPO/NaClO2 oxidized cellulosic nanofibril films.

    PubMed

    Hakalahti, Minna; Salminen, Arto; Seppälä, Jukka; Tammelin, Tekla; Hänninen, Tuomas

    2015-08-01

    TEMPO/NaClO2 oxidized cellulosic nanofibrils (TCNF) were covalently bonded with poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) to render water stable films. Pure TCNF films and TCNF-PVA films in dry state showed similar humidity dependent behavior in the elastic region. However, in wet films PVA had a significant effect on stability and mechanical characteristics of the films. When soaked in water, pure TCNF films exhibited strong swelling behavior and poor wet strength, whereas covalently bridged TCNF-PVA composite films remained intact and could easily be handled even after 24h of soaking. Wet tensile strength of the films was considerably enhanced with only 10 wt% PVA addition. At 25% PVA concentration wet tensile strengths were decreased and films were more yielding. This behavior is attributed to the ability of PVA to reinforce and plasticize TCNF-based films. The developed approach is a simple and straightforward method to produce TCNF films that are stable in wet conditions.

  20. The Belizean Bridge Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murfin, Brian

    2000-01-01

    Describes the famous swing bridge in Belize. Students build bridges from a variety of materials and answer the questions, What are different types of bridges?, How do bridges work?, How can you tell if a bridge design will be safe?, and What is the best way to build a bridge over a river while still allowing boat traffic? (SAH)

  1. Bridge Inspector's Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Highway Administration (DOT), Washington, DC. Bureau of Public Roads.

    A guide for the instruction of bridge inspectors is provided in this manual as well as instructions for conducting and reporting on a bridge inspection. The chapters outline the qualifications necessary to become a bridge inspector. The subject areas covered are: The Bridge Inspector, Bridge Structures, Bridge Inspection Reporting System,…

  2. An assessment of streamflow, water quality, and the effects of constructing an impoundment on Bridge Creek at Augusta, Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    House, Leo B.

    1981-01-01

    Nutrient concentrations in Bridge Creek and comparisons with a similar impoundment at nearby Fall Creek indicate that the proposed impoundment would have nuisance weed growth. The impoundment would have a computed transit time of about 3 days, with a surface-level outlet, or 1 day with a bottom-draw outlet, assuming a normal pool elevation and a summer base flow of 7.5 cubic feet per second. Total storage in the proposed impoundment is estimated to be 48 acre-feet.

  3. Synthesis, characterization, and reactivity studies of a water-soluble bis(alkoxo)(carboxylato)-bridged diMn(III) complex modeling the active site in catalase.

    PubMed

    Palopoli, Claudia; Duhayon, Carine; Tuchagues, Jean-Pierre; Signorella, Sandra

    2014-12-01

    A new diMn(III) complex, Na[Mn2(5-SO3-salpentO)(μ-OAc)(μ-OMe)(H2O)]·4H2O, where 5-SO3-salpentOH = 1,5-bis(5-sulphonatosalicylidenamino)pentan-3-ol, has been prepared and characterized. ESI-mass spectrometry, paramagnetic (1)H NMR, EPR and UV-visible spectroscopic studies on freshly prepared solutions of the complex in methanol and 9 : 1 methanol-water mixtures showed that the compound retains the triply bridged bis(μ-alkoxo)(μ-acetato)Mn2(3+) core in solution. In the 9 : 1 methanol-water mixture, slow substitution of acetate by water molecules took place, and after one month, the doubly bridged diMn(III) complex, [Mn2(5-SO3-salpentO)(μ-OMe)(H2O)3]·5H2O, formed and could be characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis. In methanolic or aqueous basic media, acetate shifts from a bridging to a terminal coordination mode, affording the highly stable [Mn2(5-SO3-salpentO)(μ-OMe)(OAc)](-) anion. The efficiency of the complex in disproportionating H2O2 depends on the solvent and correlates with the stability of the complex (towards metal dissociation) in each medium: basic buffer > aqueous base > water. The buffer preserves the integrity of the catalyst and the rate of O2 evolution remains essentially constant after successive additions of excess of H2O2. Turnovers as high as 3000 mol H2O2 per mol of catalyst, without significant decomposition and with an efficiency of k(cat)/K(M) = 1028 M(-1) s(-1), were measured for the complex in aqueous buffers of pH 11. Kinetic and spectroscopic results suggest a catalytic cycle that runs between Mn(III)2 and Mn(IV)2 oxidation states, which is consistent with the low redox potential observed for the Mn(III)2/Mn(III)Mn(IV) couple of the catalyst in basic medium.

  4. Physiological relevant in vitro evaluation of polymer coats for gastroretentive floating tablets.

    PubMed

    Eisenächer, Friederike; Garbacz, Grzegorz; Mäder, Karsten

    2014-11-01

    Gastroretentive drug delivery systems are retained in the stomach for a sufficient time interval, releasing the drug in a controlled manner. According to literature, the floating principle is the most frequently used formulation approach for gastric retention. However, many publications lack information of the floating forces, the impact of different pH-values and almost no information exist concerning the resistance of the floating performance against physiological relevant stress. Therefore, we evaluated the performance of CO2-generating floating bilayer (drug and floating layer) tablets with respect to robustness, drug release profile, pH dependence and floating behaviour. Bilayer tablets were coated with a flexible and water permeable, but CO2-retaining polymer film of either polyvinyl acetate or ammonio-methacrylate copolymer type A. Metformin-HCl was used as a relevant model drug due to its dose-dependent and saturable absorption from the proximal part of the small intestine. To mimic physiological relevant mechanical stress conditions, recently developed dissolution stress tests with pulsed pressures were applied in addition to release studies according to the pharmacopeia. Bilayer tablets coated with polyvinyl acetate showed short floating lag times, reasonable floating strength values, floating durations of more than 24h in simulated gastric fluid and a robust and pH independent release of Metformin-HCl. Tablets coated with ammonio-methacrylate copolymer type A showed a higher permeability for the active ingredient combined with a decreased robustness of the inflated tablets. Both polymers can be used for balloon-like floating devices. The appropriate polymer has to be chosen dependent from the properties of the active ingredient and requested application of the delivery device. Furthermore, the dissolution stress test analysis is able to indicate possible safety issues of gastroretentive formulations as well as to characterise the robustness of

  5. Physiological relevant in vitro evaluation of polymer coats for gastroretentive floating tablets.

    PubMed

    Eisenächer, Friederike; Garbacz, Grzegorz; Mäder, Karsten

    2014-11-01

    Gastroretentive drug delivery systems are retained in the stomach for a sufficient time interval, releasing the drug in a controlled manner. According to literature, the floating principle is the most frequently used formulation approach for gastric retention. However, many publications lack information of the floating forces, the impact of different pH-values and almost no information exist concerning the resistance of the floating performance against physiological relevant stress. Therefore, we evaluated the performance of CO2-generating floating bilayer (drug and floating layer) tablets with respect to robustness, drug release profile, pH dependence and floating behaviour. Bilayer tablets were coated with a flexible and water permeable, but CO2-retaining polymer film of either polyvinyl acetate or ammonio-methacrylate copolymer type A. Metformin-HCl was used as a relevant model drug due to its dose-dependent and saturable absorption from the proximal part of the small intestine. To mimic physiological relevant mechanical stress conditions, recently developed dissolution stress tests with pulsed pressures were applied in addition to release studies according to the pharmacopeia. Bilayer tablets coated with polyvinyl acetate showed short floating lag times, reasonable floating strength values, floating durations of more than 24h in simulated gastric fluid and a robust and pH independent release of Metformin-HCl. Tablets coated with ammonio-methacrylate copolymer type A showed a higher permeability for the active ingredient combined with a decreased robustness of the inflated tablets. Both polymers can be used for balloon-like floating devices. The appropriate polymer has to be chosen dependent from the properties of the active ingredient and requested application of the delivery device. Furthermore, the dissolution stress test analysis is able to indicate possible safety issues of gastroretentive formulations as well as to characterise the robustness of

  6. Influence of cyclic fatigue in water on the load-bearing capacity of dental bridges made of zirconia.

    PubMed

    Kohorst, Philipp; Dittmer, Marc Philipp; Borchers, Lothar; Stiesch-Scholz, Meike

    2008-09-01

    The humid atmosphere and permanent occurrence of chewing forces in the oral environment lead to degradation of ceramics used for prosthetic restorations. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of artificial aging on the load-bearing capacity of four-unit bridges, with both undamaged and predamaged zirconia frameworks. Additionally, different parameters for chewing simulation have been investigated and a finite element analysis was made to predict the location of highest tensile stresses within the bridges. A total of 60 frameworks were milled from presintered zirconia and divided into six homogeneous groups. Prior to veneering, frameworks of two groups were "damaged" by a defined saw cut similar to an accidental flaw generated during shape cutting. After veneering, FPDs were subjected to thermal and mechanical cycling - with the exception of control groups. The load-bearing capacity of tested FPDs was significantly reduced by artificial aging. In comparison to unaged specimens, fracture resistance decreased by about 40%, whereas preliminary damage did not have a significant effect. Increasing number of cycles and increasing upper load limit failed to show any additional effect on fracture force. To predict the progression of degradation under the terms of in vitro simulation for even longer periods, further aging experiments are required.

  7. Experiment study of the motion of the floating offshore turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Tzu-Ching; Hsu, Wen-Yang; Yang, Ray-Yeng; Chen, Yang-Yi

    2016-04-01

    Recently the wind industry moved to offshore areas. The floating wind turbine combined the platform and the mooring system. This research focuses on studying the motion of the floating offshore turbine with a mooring system. The platform, which was developed by the Ship and Ocean Industries R&D Center, had been test in a wave-wind flume in the Tainan Hydraulics Laboratory by using a 1:50 Froude scaling model. In the experiment, the floating offshore turbine was placed in a water flume and exposed to periodic waves at frequencies ranging from 0.22 rad/s - 0.875 rad/s, the wave amplitude is about 2.5 meter, and with the different pretension of the mooring lines. The experiment includes the measurement of damping coefficient from the free decay test and the dynamic response in a sea state. This research compares the motion of the floating offshore turbine with the different pretension of the mooring lines, and the model provides comprehensive data for the operational, design, and survival seas states, as well as the calibration and improvement of the existing design and performance of numerical models.

  8. 14 CFR 27.753 - Main float design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Main float design. 27.753 Section 27.753... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Floats and Hulls § 27.753 Main float design. (a) Bag floats. Each bag float must be designed to withstand— (1) The maximum pressure...

  9. 14 CFR 29.753 - Main float design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Main float design. 29.753 Section 29.753... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Floats and Hulls § 29.753 Main float design. (a) Bag floats. Each bag float must be designed to withstand— (1) The maximum pressure...

  10. The impact on seaplane floats during landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Karman, TH

    1929-01-01

    In order to make a stress analysis of seaplane floats, and especially of the members connecting the floats with the fuselage, it is of great importance to determine the maximum pressure acting on the floats during landing. Here, the author gives a formula for maximum pressures during landing that permits one to apply experimental results to different bodies and different velocities. The author notes that the formula checks very well with experimental results.

  11. Tank Tests of Twin Seaplane Floats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrman, H; Kempf, G; Kloess, H

    1928-01-01

    The following report contains the most essential data for the hydrodynamic portion of the twin-float problem. The following points were successfully investigated: 1) difference between stationary and nonstationary flow; 2) effect of the shape of the step; 3) effect of distance between floats; 4) effect of nose-heavy and tail-heavy moments; 5) effect of the shape of floats; 6) maneuverability.

  12. Characteristics of a twin-float seaplane during take-off

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowley, John W , Jr; Ronan, K M

    1927-01-01

    This report presents the results of an investigation of the planing and get-away characteristics of three representative types of seaplanes, namely, single float, boat, and twin float. The experiments carried out on the single float and boat types have been reported on previously. This report covers the investigation conducted on the twin-float seaplane, the DT-2, and includes as an appendix, a brief summary of the results obtained on all three tests. At low-water speeds, 20 to 30 miles per hour, the seaplane trims by the stern and has a high resistance. Above these speeds the longitudinal control becomes increasingly effective until, with corresponding speeds of 56 to 46 miles per hour. It was further determined that an increase in the load caused little if any change in the water speed at which the maximum angle and resistance occurred, but that it did produce an increase in the maximum angle.

  13. 33 CFR 165.1187 - Security Zones; Golden Gate Bridge and the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, San Francisco Bay...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Bridge and the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, San Francisco Bay, California. 165.1187 Section 165.1187... San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, San Francisco Bay, California. (a) Location. All waters extending... Golden Gate Bridge and the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, in San Francisco Bay, California....

  14. 33 CFR 165.1187 - Security Zones; Golden Gate Bridge and the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, San Francisco Bay...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Bridge and the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, San Francisco Bay, California. 165.1187 Section 165.1187... San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, San Francisco Bay, California. (a) Location. All waters extending... Golden Gate Bridge and the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, in San Francisco Bay, California....

  15. Surface tension supported floating of heavy objects: Why elongated bodies float better?

    PubMed

    Bormashenko, Edward

    2016-02-01

    Floating of bodies heavier than the supporting liquid is discussed. Floating of cylindrical, ellipsoidal bodies and rectangular plates possessing lateral dimensions smaller than the capillary length is treated. It is demonstrated that more elongated bodies of a fixed volume are better supported by capillary forces, due to the increase in the perimeter of the triple line. Thus, floating of metallic needles obtains reasonable explanation.

  16. NREL Computer Models Integrate Wind Turbines with Floating Platforms (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-07-01

    Far off the shores of energy-hungry coastal cities, powerful winds blow over the open ocean, where the water is too deep for today's seabed-mounted offshore wind turbines. For the United States to tap into these vast offshore wind energy resources, wind turbines must be mounted on floating platforms to be cost effective. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are supporting that development with computer models that allow detailed analyses of such floating wind turbines.

  17. Floating patella associated with lymphoedema

    PubMed Central

    Vun, Shen Hwa; Bayam, Levent; Drampalos, Efstathios; Jesry, Mohammed; Fadel, George

    2015-01-01

    Ipsilateral injury of more than one component of the knee extensor apparatus is rare. It is mostly associated with previous trauma, surgery, immunosuppression therapy and systemic disease. We present the first documented case of a spontaneous bifocal disruption of the knee extensor apparatus (i.e. floating patella) associated with lymphoedema. This case highlights the importance of considering lymphoedema as another risk factor for rupture of the knee extensor apparatus. It also highlights the importance of assessing all components of the knee extensor apparatus in patients presenting with acute knee injuries. PMID:25802253

  18. Impact of anti-tacking agents on properties of gas-entrapped membrane and effervescent floating tablets.

    PubMed

    Kriangkrai, Worawut; Puttipipatkhachorn, Satit; Sriamornsak, Pornsak; Pongjanyakul, Thaned; Sungthongjeen, Srisagul

    2014-12-01

    Tackiness caused by the gas-entrapped membrane (Eudragit(®)RL 30D) was usually observed during storage of the effervescent floating tablets, leading to failure in floatation and sustained release. In this work, common anti-tacking agents (glyceryl monostearate (GMS) and talc) were used to solve this tackiness problem. The impact of anti-tacking agent on the properties of free films and corresponding floating tablets was investigated. GMS was more effective than talc in reducing tackiness of the film. Addition and increasing amount of anti-tacking agents lowered the film mechanical strength, but the coating films were still strong and flexible enough to resist the generated gas pressure inside the floating tablet. Wettability and water vapor permeability of the film decreased with increasing level of anti-tacking agents as a result of their hydrophobicity. No interaction between anti-tacking agents and polymer was observed as confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffractometry, and differential scanning calorimetry studies. Increasing amount of anti-tacking agents decreased time to float and tended to retard drug release of the floating tablets. Floating properties and drug release were also influenced by type of anti-tacking agents. The obtained floating tablets still possessed good floating properties and controlled drug release even though anti-tacking agent had some effects. The results demonstrated that the tackiness problem of the floating tablets could be solved by incorporating anti-tacking agent into the gas-entrapped membrane. PMID:24927669

  19. Impact of anti-tacking agents on properties of gas-entrapped membrane and effervescent floating tablets.

    PubMed

    Kriangkrai, Worawut; Puttipipatkhachorn, Satit; Sriamornsak, Pornsak; Pongjanyakul, Thaned; Sungthongjeen, Srisagul

    2014-12-01

    Tackiness caused by the gas-entrapped membrane (Eudragit(®)RL 30D) was usually observed during storage of the effervescent floating tablets, leading to failure in floatation and sustained release. In this work, common anti-tacking agents (glyceryl monostearate (GMS) and talc) were used to solve this tackiness problem. The impact of anti-tacking agent on the properties of free films and corresponding floating tablets was investigated. GMS was more effective than talc in reducing tackiness of the film. Addition and increasing amount of anti-tacking agents lowered the film mechanical strength, but the coating films were still strong and flexible enough to resist the generated gas pressure inside the floating tablet. Wettability and water vapor permeability of the film decreased with increasing level of anti-tacking agents as a result of their hydrophobicity. No interaction between anti-tacking agents and polymer was observed as confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffractometry, and differential scanning calorimetry studies. Increasing amount of anti-tacking agents decreased time to float and tended to retard drug release of the floating tablets. Floating properties and drug release were also influenced by type of anti-tacking agents. The obtained floating tablets still possessed good floating properties and controlled drug release even though anti-tacking agent had some effects. The results demonstrated that the tackiness problem of the floating tablets could be solved by incorporating anti-tacking agent into the gas-entrapped membrane.

  20. Differences in evaporation between a floating pan and class a pan on land

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masoner, J.R.; Stannard, D.I.; Christenson, S.C.

    2008-01-01

    Research was conducted to develop a method for obtaining floating pan evaporation rates in a small (less than 10,000 m2) wetland, lagoon, or pond. Floating pan and land pan evaporation data were collected from March 1 to August 31, 2005, at a small natural wetland located in the alluvium of the Canadian River near Norman, Oklahoma, at the U.S. Geological Survey Norman Landfill Toxic Substances Hydrology Research Site. Floating pan evaporation rates were compared with evaporation rates from a nearby standard Class A evaporation pan on land. Floating pan evaporation rates were significantly less than land pan evaporation rates for the entire period and on a monthly basis. Results indicated that the use of a floating evaporation pan in a small free-water surface better simulates actual physical conditions on the water surface that control evaporation. Floating pan to land pan ratios were 0.82 for March, 0.87 for April, 0.85 for May, 0.85 for June, 0.79 for July, and 0.69 for August. ?? 2008 American Water Resources Association.

  1. Future float zone development in industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandfort, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    The present industrial requirements for float zone silicon are summarized. Developments desired by the industry in the future are reported. The five most significant problems faced today by the float zone crystal growth method in industry are discussed. They are economic, large diameter, resistivity uniformity, control of carbon, and swirl defects.

  2. 32 CFR 935.165 - Floating objects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Floating objects. 935.165 Section 935.165 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE TERRITORIAL AND INSULAR REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Public Safety § 935.165 Floating objects. No person may anchor, moor, or...

  3. 32 CFR 935.165 - Floating objects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Floating objects. 935.165 Section 935.165 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE TERRITORIAL AND INSULAR REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Public Safety § 935.165 Floating objects. No person may anchor, moor, or...

  4. 32 CFR 935.165 - Floating objects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Floating objects. 935.165 Section 935.165 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE TERRITORIAL AND INSULAR REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Public Safety § 935.165 Floating objects. No person may anchor, moor, or...

  5. Whatever Floats Your Boat: A Design Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kornoelje, Joanne; Roman, Harry T.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a simple design challenge, based on the PBS program "Design Squad's" "Watercraft" activity that will prove engaging to most technology and engineering students. In this floating boat challenge, students are to build a boat that can float and support 25 pennies for at least 10 seconds--without leaking, sinking, or tipping…

  6. Towards sensible floating-point arithmetic

    SciTech Connect

    Cody, W.J.

    1980-01-01

    Efforts to promote the development of high-quality transportable numerical software show that few, if any, of the floating-point arithmetic systems in existing computers are completely satisfactory for serious numerical computation. Examination of the defects in these systems leads to specifications for a sensible floating-point system from a numerical analyst's viewpoint. 1 table.

  7. Vertical pump with free floating check valve

    DOEpatents

    Lindsay, Malcolm

    1980-01-01

    A vertical pump with a bottom discharge having a free floating check valve isposed in the outlet plenum thereof. The free floating check valve comprises a spherical member with a hemispherical cage-like member attached thereto which is capable of allowing forward or reverse flow under appropriate conditions while preventing reverse flow under inappropriate conditions.

  8. Seed Bank Contribution to Vascular Plant Richness on Temporary Floating Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherry, J. A.

    2005-05-01

    Fluctuating water levels create opportunities for recruitment of new individuals from wetland seed banks. In this study, floating island formation functioned similarly to drawdowns in water level by creating patches of sediment that were less inundated than the surrounding, undisturbed deep-water marsh. To examine if and how seed banks contributed to temporary formation of distinct plant assemblages on these islands, field surveys of plant percent cover on and off of islands were conducted over two years, along with a controlled greenhouse experiment in which inundation was manipulated. Plant assemblages differed significantly on and off of floating islands. Floating-leaved perennials dominated undisturbed deep-water marsh, while emergent species dominated floating islands. Moreover, species richness was greater on islands than in the undisturbed deep-water marsh. Plant assemblages in the greenhouse experiment also differed among inundation treatments in a manner consistent with differences observed in field surveys. These results demonstrate that floating island formation temporarily altered levels of inundation favoring the germination of a more species-rich, emergent plant assemblage. Because these islands persisted long enough for several species to set seed, their formation may contribute to the maintenance of the seed bank and help maintain populations of otherwise rare species within the deep-water marsh.

  9. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 25 (DANVTH00610025) on Town Highway 61, crossing Water Andric Brook, Danville, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flynn, Robert H.; Severance, Timothy

    1997-01-01

    Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.7 to 1.3 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 9.1 to 12.5 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein.

  10. Assessing Fatigue and Ultimate Load Uncertainty in Floating Offshore Wind Turbines Due to Varying Simulation Length

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, G.; Lackner, M.; Haid, L.; Matha, D.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.

    2013-07-01

    With the push towards siting wind turbines farther offshore due to higher wind quality and less visibility, floating offshore wind turbines, which can be located in deep water, are becoming an economically attractive option. The International Electrotechnical Commission's (IEC) 61400-3 design standard covers fixed-bottom offshore wind turbines, but there are a number of new research questions that need to be answered to modify these standards so that they are applicable to floating wind turbines. One issue is the appropriate simulation length needed for floating turbines. This paper will discuss the results from a study assessing the impact of simulation length on the ultimate and fatigue loads of the structure, and will address uncertainties associated with changing the simulation length for the analyzed floating platform. Recommendations of required simulation length based on load uncertainty will be made and compared to current simulation length requirements.

  11. 53. Photocopy of photograph (Plate XX, Modjeski report) WILLAMETTE BRIDGE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. Photocopy of photograph (Plate XX, Modjeski report) WILLAMETTE BRIDGE, WATER GAGE RECORD - Burlington Northern Railroad Bridge, Spanning Willamette River at River Mile 6.9, Portland, Multnomah County, OR

  12. 2. LONGITUDINAL VIEW OF THE CONCRETE ARCH (ONEWAY BRIDGE), LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. LONGITUDINAL VIEW OF THE CONCRETE ARCH (ONE-WAY BRIDGE), LOOKING NORTHEAST. - Washington Water Power Company Post Falls Power Plant, Concrete Arch Bridge, West of intersection of Spokane & Fourth Streets, Post Falls, Kootenai County, ID

  13. 18. DETAIL OF WEST (AMERICAN) APPROACH TO BRIDGE, SHOWING TWOLEG ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. DETAIL OF WEST (AMERICAN) APPROACH TO BRIDGE, SHOWING TWO-LEG BENT M32, VIEW TO NORTH. - Blue Water Bridge, Spanning St. Clair River at I-69, I-94, & Canadian Route 402, Port Huron, St. Clair County, MI

  14. 30. DETAIL OF EAST (CANADIAN) APPROACH TO BRIDGE, SHOWING TWOLEG ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. DETAIL OF EAST (CANADIAN) APPROACH TO BRIDGE, SHOWING TWO-LEG BENT C11. VIEW TO NORTH. - Blue Water Bridge, Spanning St. Clair River at I-69, I-94, & Canadian Route 402, Port Huron, St. Clair County, MI

  15. 2. CONTEXTUAL VIEW OF THE IRRIGATION BRIDGE LOOKING SOUTHEASTERLY. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. CONTEXTUAL VIEW OF THE IRRIGATION BRIDGE LOOKING SOUTHEASTERLY. - Washington Water Power Company Post Falls Power Plant, Irrigation Canal Bridge, West of intersection of Spokane & Fourth Streets, Post Falls, Kootenai County, ID

  16. 1. CONTEXTUAL VIEW OF THE IRRIGATION CANAL BRIDGE, LOOKING NORTHWESTERLY. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. CONTEXTUAL VIEW OF THE IRRIGATION CANAL BRIDGE, LOOKING NORTHWESTERLY. - Washington Water Power Company Post Falls Power Plant, Irrigation Canal Bridge, West of intersection of Spokane & Fourth Streets, Post Falls, Kootenai County, ID

  17. 33 CFR 116.30 - Chief, Office of Bridge Programs Review and Evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Chief, Office of Bridge Programs... HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES ALTERATION OF UNREASONABLY OBSTRUCTIVE BRIDGES § 116.30 Chief, Office of Bridge... Commander, the Chief, Office of Bridge Programs will review all the information and make a...

  18. 33 CFR 118.110 - Daymarks and lateral lighting on bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... bridges. 118.110 Section 118.110 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.110 Daymarks and lateral lighting on bridges. (a... through bridges with U.S. aids to navigation system lateral marks and lights installed on...

  19. 33 CFR 116.30 - Chief, Office of Bridge Programs Review and Evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Chief, Office of Bridge Programs... HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES ALTERATION OF UNREASONABLY OBSTRUCTIVE BRIDGES § 116.30 Chief, Office of Bridge... Commander, the Chief, Office of Bridge Programs will review all the information and make a...

  20. 33 CFR 118.110 - Daymarks and lateral lighting on bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... bridges. 118.110 Section 118.110 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.110 Daymarks and lateral lighting on bridges. (a... through bridges with U.S. aids to navigation system lateral marks and lights installed on...

  1. 33 CFR 118.110 - Daymarks and lateral lighting on bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... bridges. 118.110 Section 118.110 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.110 Daymarks and lateral lighting on bridges. (a... through bridges with U.S. aids to navigation system lateral marks and lights installed on...

  2. 33 CFR 118.110 - Daymarks and lateral lighting on bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... bridges. 118.110 Section 118.110 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.110 Daymarks and lateral lighting on bridges. (a... through bridges with U.S. aids to navigation system lateral marks and lights installed on...

  3. 33 CFR 118.110 - Daymarks and lateral lighting on bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... bridges. 118.110 Section 118.110 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.110 Daymarks and lateral lighting on bridges. (a... through bridges with U.S. aids to navigation system lateral marks and lights installed on...

  4. Free-floating atmospheric pressure ball plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurden, G. A.; Ticos, C.; Wang, Z.; Wurden, C. J. V.

    2007-11-01

    A long-lived (0.3 second, 10-20 cm diameter) ball plasma floating in the air above a water surface has been formed and studied in the laboratory. A 0.4 - 1 mF capacitor is charged to 4-5 kV, and subsequently discharged (30-60 Amps, 20-50 msec duration) into central copper cathode held fixed just below the surface of a bucket of water (with a weak solution of various salts in distilled water, such as CuSO4 or CuCl2, LiCl or NaCl). An underwater ring anode completes the circuit. A bubble of hot vapor from the water surface rises up in the first few milliseconds, and changes from a mushroom cloud with stalk, to a detached quasi-spherical object, finally evolving into a vortex ring. The plasma consists of ionized water vapor, with positive salts and OH- radicals, as well as molecular species, and it completely excludes nitrogen or oxygen from the rising plasma structure. A fine boundary layer is visible in orange, in contrast to a green ball interior when using Cu/CuSO4, and filamentary structures are visible at late times. Finally, a whisp of smoke ring is observed as a residue. A variety of visible and infrared imaging (both video and still cameras) are used, along with 200-800 nm time & space resolved spectroscopy, to identify features of this laboratory analog to ball lightning. Possible applications include a windowless ball- plasma powered pulsed copper vapor laser operating at 510 nm.

  5. Simulation of Water-Surface Elevations and Velocity Distributions at the U.S. Highway 13 Bridge over the Tar River at Greenville, North Carolina, Using One- and Two-Dimensional Steady-State Hydraulic Models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, Chad R.

    2007-01-01

    The use of one-dimensional hydraulic models currently is the standard method for estimating velocity fields through a bridge opening for scour computations and habitat assessment. Flood-flow contraction through bridge openings, however, is hydrodynamically two dimensional and often three dimensional. Although there is awareness of the utility of two-dimensional models to predict the complex hydraulic conditions at bridge structures, little guidance is available to indicate whether a one- or two-dimensional model will accurately estimate the hydraulic conditions at a bridge site. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the North Carolina Department of Transportation, initiated a study in 2004 to compare one- and two-dimensional model results with field measurements at complex riverine and tidal bridges in North Carolina to evaluate the ability of each model to represent field conditions. The field data consisted of discharge and depth-averaged velocity profiles measured with an acoustic Doppler current profiler and surveyed water-surface profiles for two high-flow conditions. For the initial study site (U.S. Highway 13 over the Tar River at Greenville, North Carolina), the water-surface elevations and velocity distributions simulated by the one- and two-dimensional models showed appreciable disparity in the highly sinuous reach upstream from the U.S. Highway 13 bridge. Based on the available data from U.S. Geological Survey streamgaging stations and acoustic Doppler current profiler velocity data, the two-dimensional model more accurately simulated the water-surface elevations and the velocity distributions in the study reach, and contracted-flow magnitudes and direction through the bridge opening. To further compare the results of the one- and two-dimensional models, estimated hydraulic parameters (flow depths, velocities, attack angles, blocked flow width) for measured high-flow conditions were used to predict scour depths at the U.S. Highway 13 bridge by

  6. The effect of floating vegetation on denitrification and greenhouse gas production in wetland mesocosms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, A. E.; Harrison, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    Anthropogenic intensification of nitrogen (N) loading to aquatic ecosystems is widespread and can lead to the degradation of these systems. Wetlands are important sites for N removal via denitrification, the microbially mediated reduction of reactive nitrate to inert N2 gas, but they can also produce high levels of greenhouse gases. Floating plants play an important role in encouraging denitrification, since they create low oxygen conditions that may favor denitrification. We investigated whether wetland sediments with floating plant cover had higher denitrification and greenhouse gas production rates than wetland sediments without floating plants. Replicate flow-through mesocosms with wetland sediment and water were constructed in a growth chamber to mimic the wetland where the sediment and water were collected. Mesocosm treatments were covered with floating vegetation (duckweed), an opaque tarp, or no cover to determine how cover type affects denitrification and greenhouse gas production and whether biotic or abiotic factors are likely responsible for observed differences. Denitrification and greenhouse gas production rates were calculated by measuring excess N2 gas, methane, and nitrous oxide concentrations in the water column and measuring the gas exchange rates between the water column and the atmosphere. Gas exchange rates were measured using an inert volatile tracer added to the water column and accumulation of gas in the mesocosm headspace. Additional mesocosm experiments were performed to determine how duckweed-dominated wetland systems respond to nitrogen loading and which mechanism for lowering dissolved oxygen concentrations is important in affecting denitrification under floating vegetation. Mesocosms with floating vegetation had lower dissolved oxygen than no cover or tarp-covered mesocosms, which is consistent with field and literature observations. Water flowing out of the mesocosms had statistically lower total nitrogen and nitrate concentrations

  7. Identification and characterization of microbial agents in a bloom of floating microorganisms in the Hailang River, China in 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Weili; Wang, Jinglin; Liu, Licheng; Jiang, Jun; Chen, Yan; Hu, Tao; Chen, Weijun

    2010-07-01

    In February 2006, a large amount of unknown floating microorganisms appeared in the Hailang River (HR) in the City of Hailin, Heilongjiang Province, China. The microorganisms caused the river water fouling and threatened the clean water supply of the city. To identify the unknown floating organisms, morphological and histological inspection, PCR, cloning and sequence analysis were conducted. The results revealed that the unknown floating organisms in the river were a novel species that likely belonged to oomycetes in Saprolegniales. The organisms were named Saprolegnia sp. HL0602.

  8. THE TRUSS BRIDGE SEGMENT OF THE TRIBOROUGH BRIDGE IN FOREGROUND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    THE TRUSS BRIDGE SEGMENT OF THE TRIBOROUGH BRIDGE IN FOREGROUND AND THE HELL GATE BRIDGE IN THE BACKGROUND ADJACENT TO THE SUSPENSION SEGMENT OF THE TRIBOROUGH BRIDGE. - Triborough Bridge, Passing through Queens, Manhattan & the Bronx, Queens (subdivision), Queens County, NY

  9. Nucleophilic Hydroxylation in Water Media Promoted by a Hexa-Ethylene Glycol-Bridged Dicationic Ionic Liquid.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Vinod H; Kim, Jin Gwan; Jeong, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Dong Wook

    2015-07-17

    Hexaethylene glycol bis(3-hexaethylene glycol imidazolium) dimesylate ionic liquid (hexaEG-DHIM) was designed and prepared as a highly efficient promoter for the nucleophilic hydroxylation of alkyl halides to the corresponding alcohol products in neat water media. It was observed that hexaEG-DHIM promoter enhanced the nucleophilicity of water significantly in the reaction. In addition, the hexaEG-DHIM could be reused several times without loss of activity. Moreover, the hydroxylation reactions of base-sensitive and/or polar alkyl halide substrates proceeded highly chemoselectively in excellent yields. PMID:26115388

  10. Floating point arithmetic in future supercomputers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, David H.; Barton, John T.; Simon, Horst D.; Fouts, Martin J.

    1989-01-01

    Considerations in the floating-point design of a supercomputer are discussed. Particular attention is given to word size, hardware support for extended precision, format, and accuracy characteristics. These issues are discussed from the perspective of the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Systems Division at NASA Ames. The features believed to be most important for a future supercomputer floating-point design include: (1) a 64-bit IEEE floating-point format with 11 exponent bits, 52 mantissa bits, and one sign bit and (2) hardware support for reasonably fast double-precision arithmetic.

  11. Cation-Dependent Emergence of Regular Motion of a Float.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Daisuke; Yamashita, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Daigo; Shioi, Akihisa

    2015-10-13

    We report a unique ion-dependent motion of a float at an oil/water interface. The type of motion depended on the cation species that was dissolved in the water. Irregular vibrations occurred when the water contained Ca(2+), back-and-forth motion occurred when the water contained Fe(2+), a type of motion intermediate between these occurred when the water contained Mn(2+), and intermittent long-distance travel occurred when the water contained Fe(3+). This is one of the simplest systems that can be used to show how macroscopic regular motion emerges depending on specific chemicals, which is one of the central issues in the study of biological and biomimetic motions. PMID:26393274

  12. 40 CFR 63.1043 - Standards-Separator floating roof.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) The separator shall be equipped with a floating roof designed to meet the following specifications: (1) The floating roof shall be designed to float on the liquid surface during normal operations. (2) The floating roof shall be equipped with two continuous seals, one above the other, between the wall of...

  13. Program Converts VAX Floating-Point Data To UNIX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alves, Marcos; Chapman, Bruce; Chu, Eugene

    1996-01-01

    VAX Floating Point to Host Floating Point Conversion (VAXFC) software converts non-ASCII files to unformatted floating-point representation of UNIX machine. This is done by reading bytes bit by bit, converting them to floating-point numbers, then writing results to another file. Useful when data files created by VAX computer must be used on other machines. Written in C language.

  14. 14 CFR 23.753 - Main float design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Main float design. 23.753 Section 23.753... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Floats and Hulls § 23.753 Main float design. Each seaplane main float must meet the requirements of § 23.521....

  15. 14 CFR 27.751 - Main float buoyancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Main float buoyancy. 27.751 Section 27.751... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Floats and Hulls § 27.751 Main float buoyancy. (a) For main floats, the buoyancy necessary to support the maximum weight of the rotorcraft in...

  16. 14 CFR 27.751 - Main float buoyancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Main float buoyancy. 27.751 Section 27.751... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Floats and Hulls § 27.751 Main float buoyancy. (a) For main floats, the buoyancy necessary to support the maximum weight of the rotorcraft in...

  17. 14 CFR 27.751 - Main float buoyancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Main float buoyancy. 27.751 Section 27.751... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Floats and Hulls § 27.751 Main float buoyancy. (a) For main floats, the buoyancy necessary to support the maximum weight of the rotorcraft in...

  18. 14 CFR 27.751 - Main float buoyancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Main float buoyancy. 27.751 Section 27.751... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Floats and Hulls § 27.751 Main float buoyancy. (a) For main floats, the buoyancy necessary to support the maximum weight of the rotorcraft in...

  19. 14 CFR 27.751 - Main float buoyancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Main float buoyancy. 27.751 Section 27.751... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Floats and Hulls § 27.751 Main float buoyancy. (a) For main floats, the buoyancy necessary to support the maximum weight of the rotorcraft in...

  20. Study of water adsorption and capillary bridge formation for SiO(2) nanoparticle layers by means of a combined in situ FT-IR reflection spectroscopy and QCM-D set-up.

    PubMed

    Torun, B; Kunze, C; Zhang, C; Kühne, T D; Grundmeier, G

    2014-04-28

    Water adsorption and capillary bridge formation within a layer of SiO2-nanoparticles were studied in situ by means of a combination of quartz crystal microbalance (QCM-D) with dissipation analysis and Fourier transformation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (FT-IRRAS). FT-IR data were employed to distinguish the "ice-like" and "liquid-like" contributions and to support the analysis of the QCM-D data concerning mass change and dissipation. Combined measurements show that for SiO2-nanoparticles with a diameter of about 250 nm, the formation of two adsorbed monolayers of water as well as bulk water leads to a rather linear increase in the dissipation for relative humidity values of up to 60% which is followed by a strong increase in dissipation during the actual liquid bridge formation. Subsequently, the dissipation drops again when the relative humidity is further increased to values >90%.

  1. Study of water adsorption and capillary bridge formation for SiO(2) nanoparticle layers by means of a combined in situ FT-IR reflection spectroscopy and QCM-D set-up.

    PubMed

    Torun, B; Kunze, C; Zhang, C; Kühne, T D; Grundmeier, G

    2014-04-28

    Water adsorption and capillary bridge formation within a layer of SiO2-nanoparticles were studied in situ by means of a combination of quartz crystal microbalance (QCM-D) with dissipation analysis and Fourier transformation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (FT-IRRAS). FT-IR data were employed to distinguish the "ice-like" and "liquid-like" contributions and to support the analysis of the QCM-D data concerning mass change and dissipation. Combined measurements show that for SiO2-nanoparticles with a diameter of about 250 nm, the formation of two adsorbed monolayers of water as well as bulk water leads to a rather linear increase in the dissipation for relative humidity values of up to 60% which is followed by a strong increase in dissipation during the actual liquid bridge formation. Subsequently, the dissipation drops again when the relative humidity is further increased to values >90%. PMID:24623070

  2. 33 CFR 144.01-5 - Location and launching of life floats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Location and launching of life floats. 144.01-5 Section 144.01-5 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES LIFESAVING APPLIANCES Manned Platforms §...

  3. Does the Concept of Density Develop? Judgments of Sinking and Floating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohn, Amy S.; Landau, Barbara

    Two experiments were conducted to assess the nature and extent of children's knowledge about the density of objects. In the first experiment, 18 children 3- to 5-years-old were shown 8 objects which were placed in water 1 at a time. The children were later asked to judge whether the objects would sink or float when placed in water. Findings…

  4. 18 CFR 1304.400 - Flotation devices and material, all floating structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Flotation devices and material, all floating structures. 1304.400 Section 1304.400 Conservation of Power and Water Resources... withstanding prolonged exposure to wave wash and weather conditions....

  5. 18 CFR 1304.400 - Flotation devices and material, all floating structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Flotation devices and material, all floating structures. 1304.400 Section 1304.400 Conservation of Power and Water Resources... withstanding prolonged exposure to wave wash and weather conditions....

  6. 18 CFR 1304.400 - Flotation devices and material, all floating structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Flotation devices and material, all floating structures. 1304.400 Section 1304.400 Conservation of Power and Water Resources... withstanding prolonged exposure to wave wash and weather conditions....

  7. 18 CFR 1304.400 - Flotation devices and material, all floating structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Flotation devices and material, all floating structures. 1304.400 Section 1304.400 Conservation of Power and Water Resources... withstanding prolonged exposure to wave wash and weather conditions....

  8. 18 CFR 1304.400 - Flotation devices and material, all floating structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Flotation devices and material, all floating structures. 1304.400 Section 1304.400 Conservation of Power and Water Resources... withstanding prolonged exposure to wave wash and weather conditions....

  9. Characteristics of a Single Float Seaplane During Take-off

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowley, J W , Jr; Ronan, K M

    1925-01-01

    At the request of the Bureau of Aeronautics, Navy Department, the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics at Langley Field is investigating the get-away characteristics of an N-9H, a DT-2, and an F-5l, as representing, respectively, a single float, a double float, and a boat type of seaplane. This report covers the investigation conducted on the N-9H. The results show that a single float seaplane trims aft in taking off. Until a planing condition is reached the angle of attack is about 15 degrees and is only slightly affected by controls. When planing it seeks a lower angle, but is controllable through a widening range, until at the take-off it is possible to obtain angles of 8 degrees to 15 degrees with corresponding speeds of 53 to 41 M. P. H. or about 40 per cent of the speed range. The point of greatest resistance occurs at about the highest angle of a pontoon planing angle of 9 1/2 degrees and at a water speed of 24 M. P. H.

  10. Floating Ice-Algal Aggregates below Melting Arctic Sea Ice

    PubMed Central

    Assmy, Philipp; Ehn, Jens K.; Fernández-Méndez, Mar; Hop, Haakon; Katlein, Christian; Sundfjord, Arild; Bluhm, Katrin; Daase, Malin; Engel, Anja; Fransson, Agneta; Granskog, Mats A.; Hudson, Stephen R.; Kristiansen, Svein; Nicolaus, Marcel; Peeken, Ilka; Renner, Angelika H. H.; Spreen, Gunnar; Tatarek, Agnieszka; Wiktor, Jozef

    2013-01-01

    During two consecutive cruises to the Eastern Central Arctic in late summer 2012, we observed floating algal aggregates in the melt-water layer below and between melting ice floes of first-year pack ice. The macroscopic (1-15 cm in diameter) aggregates had a mucous consistency and were dominated by typical ice-associated pennate diatoms embedded within the mucous matrix. Aggregates maintained buoyancy and accumulated just above a strong pycnocline that separated meltwater and seawater layers. We were able, for the first time, to obtain quantitative abundance and biomass estimates of these aggregates. Although their biomass and production on a square metre basis was small compared to ice-algal blooms, the floating ice-algal aggregates supported high levels of biological activity on the scale of the individual aggregate. In addition they constituted a food source for the ice-associated fauna as revealed by pigments indicative of zooplankton grazing, high abundance of naked ciliates, and ice amphipods associated with them. During the Arctic melt season, these floating aggregates likely play an important ecological role in an otherwise impoverished near-surface sea ice environment. Our findings provide important observations and measurements of a unique aggregate-based habitat during the 2012 record sea ice minimum year. PMID:24204642

  11. Floating ice-algal aggregates below melting arctic sea ice.

    PubMed

    Assmy, Philipp; Ehn, Jens K; Fernández-Méndez, Mar; Hop, Haakon; Katlein, Christian; Sundfjord, Arild; Bluhm, Katrin; Daase, Malin; Engel, Anja; Fransson, Agneta; Granskog, Mats A; Hudson, Stephen R; Kristiansen, Svein; Nicolaus, Marcel; Peeken, Ilka; Renner, Angelika H H; Spreen, Gunnar; Tatarek, Agnieszka; Wiktor, Jozef

    2013-01-01

    During two consecutive cruises to the Eastern Central Arctic in late summer 2012, we observed floating algal aggregates in the melt-water layer below and between melting ice floes of first-year pack ice. The macroscopic (1-15 cm in diameter) aggregates had a mucous consistency and were dominated by typical ice-associated pennate diatoms embedded within the mucous matrix. Aggregates maintained buoyancy and accumulated just above a strong pycnocline that separated meltwater and seawater layers. We were able, for the first time, to obtain quantitative abundance and biomass estimates of these aggregates. Although their biomass and production on a square metre basis was small compared to ice-algal blooms, the floating ice-algal aggregates supported high levels of biological activity on the scale of the individual aggregate. In addition they constituted a food source for the ice-associated fauna as revealed by pigments indicative of zooplankton grazing, high abundance of naked ciliates, and ice amphipods associated with them. During the Arctic melt season, these floating aggregates likely play an important ecological role in an otherwise impoverished near-surface sea ice environment. Our findings provide important observations and measurements of a unique aggregate-based habitat during the 2012 record sea ice minimum year.

  12. SOLERAS - Solar Energy Water Desalination Project: Chicago Bridge and Iron Company. Final report: system design extension. Volume 1. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    The design of a solar energy powered, sea water desalination pilot plant for installation at Yanbu, Saudi Arabia, on the shore of the Red Sea is presented. Earlier work is introduced and a description of the system is presented. Important design analyses and cost reduction considerations are reviewed. The pilot plant design is described in detail. Construction plans for and projected operation of the plant are discussed.

  13. Bridging Science and Public Understanding of Water-Energy Nexus: Opportunities for broader impact connections with InTeGrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orr, C. H.; Manduca, C. A.; Bruckner, M.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding trade-offs and interactions between water and energy is crucial in understanding many issues of sustainability faced by society in our changing environment. Increasing capcity through public literacy and preparing the future workforce to address these challenges are key goals of the NSF STEP Center InTeGrate. We connect teaching about the Earth to societal issues for undergraduates across the curriculum. Understanding the interaction between engineering, sustainability and the geosciences and the role engineering plays in building a sustainable future, in areas such resource and energy use is a major foci of our work. Connecting this knowledge to societal issues that undergraduates can relate to, and improving interdisciplinary problem-solving are needed in addressing the Grand Challenges facing society. The project features interdisciplinary materials that engage students in learning about the Earth by focusing on pressing topics and using evidence-based teaching practice. These materials are designed for both science and non-science majors at the undergraduate level and have been rigorously reviewed and tested in the classroom. Topics include Environmental Justice and Freshwater Resources, Interactions between Water, Earth's Surface and Human Activity, and Human's Dependence on Earth's Mineral Resources. Upcoming, new topics include modules on Energy Environment and Our Future, Global Energy and Atmosphere, Ecosystem Services Approach to Water Resources and course-length material on Grand Challenges of Interdisciplinary Water Sustainability and Gateway to Renewable Energy and Environmental Sustainability. We invite you to partner with the InTeGrate project as you think about broader impacts related to your work. Examples include creating a case study detailing your project and how faculty can use it in their classroom, contributing example activities that utilize your datasets, and more. Check out the site at: serc.carleton.edu/integrate/

  14. Spatial distributions of floating seaweeds in the East China Sea from late winter to early spring.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, S; Ajisaka, T; Lahbib, S; Kokubu, Y; Alabsi, M N; Komatsu, T

    2014-01-01

    Floating seaweeds play an important role as a habitat for many animals accompanying or attaching to them in offshore waters. It was in 2000 that the first report described abundant distributions of floating seaweeds in offshore waters in the East China Sea in spring. Young individuals of the yellowtail Seriola quinqueradiata are captured for aquaculture purposes from floating seaweeds in the East China Sea. Therefore, a sound understanding of the distributions of floating seaweeds in the East China Sea is needed. Detailed information is especially important during the late winter to early spring, which corresponds to the juvenile period of the yellowtail. Thus, field surveys using R/V Tansei-Maru were conducted in the Japanese Exclusive Economic Zone in the East China Sea from late winter to early spring in 2010 and 2011. We obtained positions of the vessel by GPS and transversal distances from the vessel to a raft by visual observation. Distance sampling method (Thomas et al. 2010) was applied to estimation of floating seaweed densities (rafts km(-2)). Seaweed rafts were also randomly sampled using nets during the research cruises. In the East China Sea, seaweed rafts were distributed mainly on the continental shelf west of the Kuroshio, especially in waters between 26° N and 30° N. Collected rafts consisted of only one species, Sargassum horneri (Turner) C. Agardh. Taking into account surface currents and geographical distribution of S. horneri, it is estimated that these floating seaweeds originated from natural beds along the coast between mid and south China. Considering the approximate travel times, it is suggested that floating patches are colonized by yellowtails early on during their trips, i.e., close to the Chinese coast. PMID:24771973

  15. Spatial distributions of floating seaweeds in the East China Sea from late winter to early spring.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, S; Ajisaka, T; Lahbib, S; Kokubu, Y; Alabsi, M N; Komatsu, T

    2014-01-01

    Floating seaweeds play an important role as a habitat for many animals accompanying or attaching to them in offshore waters. It was in 2000 that the first report described abundant distributions of floating seaweeds in offshore waters in the East China Sea in spring. Young individuals of the yellowtail Seriola quinqueradiata are captured for aquaculture purposes from floating seaweeds in the East China Sea. Therefore, a sound understanding of the distributions of floating seaweeds in the East China Sea is needed. Detailed information is especially important during the late winter to early spring, which corresponds to the juvenile period of the yellowtail. Thus, field surveys using R/V Tansei-Maru were conducted in the Japanese Exclusive Economic Zone in the East China Sea from late winter to early spring in 2010 and 2011. We obtained positions of the vessel by GPS and transversal distances from the vessel to a raft by visual observation. Distance sampling method (Thomas et al. 2010) was applied to estimation of floating seaweed densities (rafts km(-2)). Seaweed rafts were also randomly sampled using nets during the research cruises. In the East China Sea, seaweed rafts were distributed mainly on the continental shelf west of the Kuroshio, especially in waters between 26° N and 30° N. Collected rafts consisted of only one species, Sargassum horneri (Turner) C. Agardh. Taking into account surface currents and geographical distribution of S. horneri, it is estimated that these floating seaweeds originated from natural beds along the coast between mid and south China. Considering the approximate travel times, it is suggested that floating patches are colonized by yellowtails early on during their trips, i.e., close to the Chinese coast.

  16. Preview of Mars Curiosity Parade Float

    NASA Video Gallery

    Jim Green, Director of the Science Mission Directorate Planetary Systems Division at NASA Headquarters, describes the replica of the Mars Curiosity Rover on the second NASA float in Monday's inaugu...

  17. Thumb polydactyly with a floating ulnar thumb.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Kenjiro; Namba, Yuzaburo; Kimata, Yoshihiro

    2013-01-01

    Thumb polydactyly is reported to be the most common congenital anomaly of the hand in Japan. The floating type is not particularly rare, accounting for 0.9 to 15% of all cases of thumb polydactyly. However, to the best of our knowledge, there has been only one case of thumb polydactyly with a floating ulnar thumb, reported by Onizuka. Herein, we report a case very similar to that reported by Onizuka. In our case, the vessels feeding the floating ulnar thumb branched from the superficial palmar arterial arch, and X-rays revealed triphalangism. In surgery, we not only reconstructed the morphology of the thumb, but also tried to preserve the sensation in the reconstructed thumb by transposing the digital nerve of the floating ulnar thumb to the radial thumb. In addition to thumb polydactyly, our case also showed hypoplasia of the thenar muscles.

  18. Multilateral installation from a floating rig

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    The Troll Olje gas province is approximately 100 km northwest of Bergen, Norway, in the Norwegian sector of the North Sea at a water depth of approximately 315 to 340 m. Troll Olje is part of the Troll gas field, where Norsk Hydro is responsible for developing two areas with thin oil rims. Before spudding the multilateral well described in this paper, 17 wells had been drilled and completed in the Troll Olje oil province. The multilateral-well concept was introduced in the gas province primarily to increase the drainage area for each well. When producing from two separate laterals, a lower drawdown pressure exists throughout the horizontal section. Therefore, gas coning is less likely to occur, and higher production rates can be sustained for a longer period of time. In addition, cost savings are substantial because of reduced well-construction time for each horizontal reservoir-drainage section and because of the reduced number of completion strings, subsea wellheads, and pipelines required for total field development. The full-length paper details design, development, testing, and installation of the first successful multilateral well installed from a floating rig offshore Norway. The paper gives a synopsis.

  19. Archimedes' floating bodies on a spherical Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rorres, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Archimedes was the first to systematically find the centers of gravity of various solid bodies and to apply this concept in determining stable configurations of floating bodies. In this paper, we discuss an error in a proof developed by Archimedes that involves determining whether a uniform, spherical cap will float stably with its base horizontal in a liquid on a spherical Earth. We present a simpler, corrected proof and discuss aspects of his proof regarding a spherical cap that is not uniform.

  20. Multiple valued floating potentials of Langmuir probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nam, Cheol-Hee; Hershkowitz, N.; Cho, M. H.; Intrator, T.; Diebold, D.

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that Langmuir probes can have three different floating potentials in plasmas produced by a hot filament discharge in a multi-dipole device when the primary and secondary electron currents are comparable. The measured floating potential depends on the probe's initial condition - the most negative and the least negative potentials are found to be stable and the in-between value is found to be unstable. Results are compared to a simple theoretical model.

  1. Individual and combined suppressive effects of submerged and floating-leaved macrophytes on algal blooms.

    PubMed

    Seto, Mayumi; Takamura, Noriko; Iwasa, Yoh

    2013-02-21

    Shallow lakes and ponds are often characterised either by clear water with abundant submerged macrophytes or by turbid water with abundant phytoplankton. Blooms of toxic filamentous blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) often dominate the phytoplankton community in eutrophic lakes, which threatens ecological functions and biodiversity of freshwater ecosystems. We studied a simple lake model in order to evaluate individual and combined suppressive effects of rooted submerged and rooted floating-leaved macrophytes on algal blooms. Floating-leaved plants are superior competitors for light, whereas submerged plants absorb and reduce available phosphorus in a water column that rooted floating-leaved plants exploit to a lesser extent. We found that mixed vegetation that includes both submerged and floating-leaved plants is more resistant than vegetation comprised by a single plant type to algal invasion triggered by phosphorus loading. In addition, competitive exclusion of submerged plants by floating-leaved plants may promote an algal bloom. These predictions were confirmed by the decision tree analysis of field data from 35 irrigation ponds in Hyogo Prefecture, Japan. PMID:23219493

  2. Water volume and sediment volume and density in Lake Linganore between Boyers Mill Road Bridge and Bens Branch, Frederick County, Maryland, 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sekellick, Andrew J.; Banks, William S.L.; Myers, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    To assist in understanding sediment loadings and the management of water resources, a bathymetric survey was conducted in the part of Lake Linganore between Boyers Mill Road Bridge and Bens Branch in Frederick County, Maryland. The bathymetric survey was performed in January 2012 by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Frederick and Frederick County. A separate, but related, field effort to collect 18 sediment cores was conducted in March and April 2012. Depth and location data from the bathymetric survey and location data for the sediment cores were compiled and edited by using geographic information system (GIS) software. A three-dimensional triangulated irregular network (TIN) model of the lake bottom was created to calculate the volume of stored water in the reservoir. Large-scale topographic maps of the valley prior to inundation in 1972 were provided by the Frederick County Division of Utilities and Solid Waste Management and digitized for comparison with current (2012) conditions in order to calculate sediment volume. Cartographic representations of both water depth and sediment accumulation were produced, along with an accuracy assessment for the resulting bathymetric model. Vertical accuracies at the 95-percent confidence level for the collected data, the bathymetric surface model, and the bathymetric contour map were calculated to be 0.64 feet (ft), 1.77 ft, and 2.30 ft, respectively. A dry bulk sediment density was calculated for each of the 18 sediment cores collected during March and April 2012, and used to determine accumulated sediment mass. Water-storage capacity in the study area is 110 acre-feet (acre-ft) at a full-pool elevation 308 ft above the National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929, whereas total sediment volume in the study area is 202 acre-ft. These totals indicate a loss of about 65 percent of the original water-storage capacity in the 40 years since dam construction. This corresponds to an average rate of sediment

  3. Hydraulic analysis of the Schoharie Creek bridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Froehlich, David C.; Trent, Roy E.

    1989-01-01

    Ten people died on April 5, 1987 as a result of the collapse of two spans of a New York State Thruway bridge into the floodwaters of Schoharie Creek. The cause of the bridge failure was determined to be scour of bed material from under the foundations of piers supporting the bridge. To evaluate the hydraulic conditions that produced the scour, a two-dimensional finite element surface-water flow model was constructed. The model was used to obtain a detailed description of water-surface elevations and depth-averaged velocities within a reach that extends from about 4000 ft downstream of the bridge to about 6000 ft upstream of the bridge.

  4. An improved calibration method for the drift of the conductivity sensor on autonomous CTD profiling floats by θ- S climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, W. Brechner; Wong, Annie P. S.

    2009-03-01

    An improved method to estimate the time-varying drift of measured conductivity from autonomous CTD profiling floats has been developed. This procedure extends previous methods developed by Wong, Johnson and Owens [2003. Delayed-mode calibration of autonomous CTD profiling float salinity data by θ- S climatology. Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology, 20, 308-318] and Böhme and Send [2005. Objective analyses of hydrographic data for referencing profiling float salinities in highly variable environments. Deep-Sea Research Part II, 52, 651-664]. It uses climatological salinity interpolated to the float positions and observed θ surfaces and chooses 10 'best' levels that are within well-mixed mode waters or deep homogeneous water masses. A piece-wise linear fit is used to estimate the temporally varying multiplicative adjustment to the float potential conductivities. An objective, statistical method is used to choose the breakpoints in the float time series where there are multiple drift trends. In the previous methods these breakpoints were chosen subjectively by manually splitting the time series into separate segments over which the fits were made. Our statistical procedure reduces the subjectivity by providing an automated way for doing the piece-wise linear fit. Uncertainties in this predicted adjustment are estimated using a Monte-Carlo simulation. Examples of this new procedure as applied to two Argo floats are presented.

  5. 40. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS OLD ROAD BRIDGE End of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS OLD ROAD BRIDGE End of Main St., Columbus 'Aerial' view of 1878 bridge during flood. Taken from water tower in Columbus. Credit: Shenks Photography, Columbus, Ms, owner. O. Pruitt, photographer, Apr 1892. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  6. 33 CFR 115.70 - Advance approval of bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...; and 49 CFR 1.46(c)) ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Advance approval of bridges. 115... BRIDGES BRIDGE LOCATIONS AND CLEARANCES; ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES § 115.70 Advance approval of...

  7. 33 CFR 115.70 - Advance approval of bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...; 49 U.S.C. 1655(g); and 49 CFR 1.46(c)) ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Advance approval of bridges. 115... BRIDGES BRIDGE LOCATIONS AND CLEARANCES; ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES § 115.70 Advance approval of...

  8. 33 CFR 115.70 - Advance approval of bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...; and 49 CFR 1.46(c)) ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Advance approval of bridges. 115... BRIDGES BRIDGE LOCATIONS AND CLEARANCES; ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES § 115.70 Advance approval of...

  9. 33 CFR 401.51 - Signaling approach to a bridge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Signaling approach to a bridge... approach to a bridge. (a) Unless a vessel's approach has been recognized by a flashing signal, the master shall signal the vessel's presence to the bridge operator by VHF radio when it comes abreast of any...

  10. 33 CFR 115.70 - Advance approval of bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...; 49 U.S.C. 1655(g); and 49 CFR 1.46(c)) ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Advance approval of bridges. 115... BRIDGES BRIDGE LOCATIONS AND CLEARANCES; ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES § 115.70 Advance approval of...

  11. 33 CFR 401.51 - Signaling approach to a bridge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Signaling approach to a bridge... approach to a bridge. (a) Unless a vessel's approach has been recognized by a flashing signal, the master shall signal the vessel's presence to the bridge operator by VHF radio when it comes abreast of any...

  12. 33 CFR 401.51 - Signaling approach to a bridge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Signaling approach to a bridge... approach to a bridge. (a) Unless a vessel's approach has been recognized by a flashing signal, the master shall signal the vessel's presence to the bridge operator by VHF radio when it comes abreast of any...

  13. 33 CFR 401.51 - Signaling approach to a bridge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Signaling approach to a bridge... approach to a bridge. (a) Unless a vessel's approach has been recognized by a flashing signal, the master shall signal the vessel's presence to the bridge operator by VHF radio when it comes abreast of any...

  14. 33 CFR 115.70 - Advance approval of bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...; 49 U.S.C. 1655(g); and 49 CFR 1.46(c)) ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Advance approval of bridges. 115... BRIDGES BRIDGE LOCATIONS AND CLEARANCES; ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES § 115.70 Advance approval of...

  15. 8. VIEW OF ACCESS BRIDGE AND INTAKE PIER FROM THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF ACCESS BRIDGE AND INTAKE PIER FROM THE BRIDGE PIER ABUTMENT, LOOKING NORTHEAST. - Sacramento River Water Treatment Plant Intake Pier & Access Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River approximately 175 feet west of eastern levee on river; roughly .5 mile downstream from confluence of Sacramento & American Rivers, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  16. 33 CFR 118.70 - Lights on swing bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lights on swing bridges. 118.70... LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.70 Lights on swing bridges. (a) Swing span lights on through bridges. Each... an approaching vessel the swing span when closed will display three red lights on top of the...

  17. 33 CFR 118.65 - Lights on fixed bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lights on fixed bridges. 118.65... LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.65 Lights on fixed bridges. (a) Each fixed bridge span over a navigable... range of two green lights, and each margin of each navigable channel will be marked by a red...

  18. 33 CFR 118.70 - Lights on swing bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lights on swing bridges. 118.70... LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.70 Lights on swing bridges. (a) Swing span lights on through bridges. Each... an approaching vessel the swing span when closed will display three red lights on top of the...

  19. 33 CFR 118.65 - Lights on fixed bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lights on fixed bridges. 118.65... LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.65 Lights on fixed bridges. (a) Each fixed bridge span over a navigable... range of two green lights, and each margin of each navigable channel will be marked by a red...

  20. 33 CFR 118.65 - Lights on fixed bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lights on fixed bridges. 118.65... LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.65 Lights on fixed bridges. (a) Each fixed bridge span over a navigable... range of two green lights, and each margin of each navigable channel will be marked by a red...

  1. 33 CFR 118.70 - Lights on swing bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lights on swing bridges. 118.70... LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.70 Lights on swing bridges. (a) Swing span lights on through bridges. Each... an approaching vessel the swing span when closed will display three red lights on top of the...

  2. Characterization of stormwater runoff from bridges in North Carolina and the effects of bridge runoff on receiving streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, Chad; Fitzgerald, Sharon; Lauffer, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    The presentation will provide an overview of a collaborative study between USGS, NC Department of Transportation and URS Corporation to characterize stormwater runoff from bridges in North Carolina and the effects of bridge runoff on receiving streams. This investigation measured bridge deck runoff from 15 bridges for 12-15 storms, stream water-quality data for baseflow and storm conditions at four of the bridge deck sites and streambed sediment chemistry upstream and downstream of 30 bridges across North Carolina. Background on why the study was conducted, objectives and scope and a general summary of the major results and conclusions will be presented.

  3. Potential alteration of fjordal circulation due to a large floating structure—Numerical investigation with application to Hood Canal basin in Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect

    Khangaonkar, Tarang; Wang, Taiping

    2013-01-02

    Circulation in typical fjords is characterized by a shallow brackish layer at the surface over a deep long and narrow saltwater column. This surface layer is responsible for the outflow of water from the fjord, is easily disrupted by external forces, such as wind, and is influenced by freshwater inflow. In this paper, we postulate that the stability of fjordal circulation may also be vulnerable to impacts from anthropogenic alterations, such as floating structures, that could constrict the mixing and transport in the upper layers of the water column. The potential for alteration of circulation in Hood Canal, a silled-fjord located inside Puget Sound, Washington, has been examined. Using classical analytical treatments along the lines formulated by Hansen and Rattray [1965], Rattray [1967], Dyer [1973] and more recently, MacCready [2004], we develop a solution applicable to a range of estuary classifications varying from a partially mixed estuary regime to classical fjord conditions. Both estuary types exist in the Puget Sound system, and we compare our analytical solution with observed data. The analysis is based on an exponential variation of eddy viscosity with depth, and it has been extended further with modifications of the free surface boundary conditions to develop a solution representing the presence of a floating bridge at the estuary/fjord entrance. The model results show that tidally averaged mean circulation under the influence of such a constraint could reduce by as much as 30 to 50 percent. The overall water quality of fjords and narrow estuaries is dependent on net circulation and flushing. A potential decrease in residual flow or a corresponding increase in residence time of this magnitude merits further study.

  4. 33 CFR 165.1187 - Security Zones; Golden Gate Bridge and the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, San Francisco Bay...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Bridge and the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, San Francisco Bay, California. 165.1187 Section 165.1187... Limited Access Areas Eleventh Coast Guard District § 165.1187 Security Zones; Golden Gate Bridge and the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, San Francisco Bay, California. (a) Location. All waters...

  5. 33 CFR 165.1187 - Security Zones; Golden Gate Bridge and the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, San Francisco Bay...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Bridge and the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, San Francisco Bay, California. 165.1187 Section 165.1187... Limited Access Areas Eleventh Coast Guard District § 165.1187 Security Zones; Golden Gate Bridge and the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, San Francisco Bay, California. (a) Location. All waters...

  6. 33 CFR 165.1187 - Security Zones; Golden Gate Bridge and the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, San Francisco Bay...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Bridge and the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, San Francisco Bay, California. 165.1187 Section 165.1187... Limited Access Areas Eleventh Coast Guard District § 165.1187 Security Zones; Golden Gate Bridge and the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, San Francisco Bay, California. (a) Location. All waters...

  7. 40 CFR 65.45 - External floating roof converted into an internal floating roof.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false External floating roof converted into an internal floating roof. 65.45 Section 65.45 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONSOLIDATED FEDERAL AIR RULE Storage Vessels §...

  8. Rapid and medium setting high float bituminous emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Schilling, P.; Schreuders, H.G.

    1987-06-30

    This patent describes a rapid set high float aqueous bituminous emulsion-comprising bitumen, water, and from about 0.4% to about 0.6%, based on the weight of the emulsion, of an anionic emulsifier comprised of an alkaline solution of a combination of (1) 20% to 80% fatty acids selected from the group consisting of tall oil fatty acids, tallow fatty acids, and mixtures. (2) 20% to 80% of a product of the reaction of the fatty acids with a member of the group consists of acrylic acid, methacrylic acid, fumaric acid, and maleic anhydride.

  9. Scale Effect of Model in Seaplane-float Investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sottorf, W

    1933-01-01

    For the purpose of solving all the problems involved, an investigation was made with flat, rectangular planing surfaces. The investigation of a flat, rectangular planing surface, which can be considered as the portion of a flat float bottom lying in front of the step, has the advantage that the frictional resistance can be determined directly from the test results. Normal and tangential forces act on the lower side of the planing surface towed through still water, while the upper side and the lateral edges are under constant atmospheric pressure.

  10. Passive and Active Stabilization of Liquid Bridges in Low Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marston, Philip L.; Thiessen, David B.; Marr-Lyon, Mark J.; Wei, Wei; Niederhaus, Charles E.; Truong, Duc K.

    2001-01-01

    Tests are planned in the low gravity environment of the International Space Station (ISS) of new methods for the suppression of the capillary instability of liquid bridges. Our suppression methods are unusual in that they are not limited to liquid bridges having very special properties and may impact a variety of low-gravity and earth-based technologies. There are two main approaches to be investigated: (1) Passive Acoustic Stabilization (PAS); and (2) Active Electrostatic Stabilization (AES). In PAS, the suppression of the mode growth is accomplished by placing the bridge in an acoustic field having the appropriate properties such that the acoustic radiation pressure automatically pulls outward on the thinnest portion of the bridge. In AES, the bridge deformation is sensed optically and counteracted by actively adjusting the electrostatic Maxwell stresses via two ring electrodes concentric with the slightly conducting bridge to offset the growth of the unstable mode. While the present work emphasizes cylindrical bridges, the methods need not be restricted to that case. The methods to be explored are relevant to the suppression of capillary instabilities in floating zone crystal growth, breakup of liquid jets and columns, bubbles, and annular films as well as the management of coolants or propellants in low-gravity.

  11. Invasive floating macrophytes reduce greenhouse gas emissions from a small tropical lake

    PubMed Central

    Attermeyer, K.; Flury, S.; Jayakumar, R.; Fiener, P.; Steger, K.; Arya, V.; Wilken, F.; van Geldern, R.; Premke, K.

    2016-01-01

    Floating macrophytes, including water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes), are dominant invasive organisms in tropical aquatic systems, and they may play an important role in modifying the gas exchange between water and the atmosphere. However, these systems are underrepresented in global datasets of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This study investigated the carbon (C) turnover and GHG emissions from a small (0.6 km2) water-harvesting lake in South India and analysed the effect of floating macrophytes on these emissions. We measured carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) emissions with gas chambers in the field as well as water C mineralization rates and physicochemical variables in both the open water and in water within stands of water hyacinths. The CO2 and CH4 emissions from areas covered by water hyacinths were reduced by 57% compared with that of open water. However, the C mineralization rates were not significantly different in the water between the two areas. We conclude that the increased invasion of water hyacinths and other floating macrophytes has the potential to change GHG emissions, a process that might be relevant in regional C budgets. PMID:26846590

  12. Invasive floating macrophytes reduce greenhouse gas emissions from a small tropical lake.

    PubMed

    Attermeyer, K; Flury, S; Jayakumar, R; Fiener, P; Steger, K; Arya, V; Wilken, F; van Geldern, R; Premke, K

    2016-01-01

    Floating macrophytes, including water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes), are dominant invasive organisms in tropical aquatic systems, and they may play an important role in modifying the gas exchange between water and the atmosphere. However, these systems are underrepresented in global datasets of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This study investigated the carbon (C) turnover and GHG emissions from a small (0.6 km(2)) water-harvesting lake in South India and analysed the effect of floating macrophytes on these emissions. We measured carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) emissions with gas chambers in the field as well as water C mineralization rates and physicochemical variables in both the open water and in water within stands of water hyacinths. The CO2 and CH4 emissions from areas covered by water hyacinths were reduced by 57% compared with that of open water. However, the C mineralization rates were not significantly different in the water between the two areas. We conclude that the increased invasion of water hyacinths and other floating macrophytes has the potential to change GHG emissions, a process that might be relevant in regional C budgets. PMID:26846590

  13. Battery charging in float vs. cycling environments

    SciTech Connect

    COREY,GARTH P.

    2000-04-20

    In lead-acid battery systems, cycling systems are often managed using float management strategies. There are many differences in battery management strategies for a float environment and battery management strategies for a cycling environment. To complicate matters further, in many cycling environments, such as off-grid domestic power systems, there is usually not an available charging source capable of efficiently equalizing a lead-acid battery let alone bring it to a full state of charge. Typically, rules for battery management which have worked quite well in a floating environment have been routinely applied to cycling batteries without full appreciation of what the cycling battery really needs to reach a full state of charge and to maintain a high state of health. For example, charge target voltages for batteries that are regularly deep cycled in off-grid power sources are the same as voltages applied to stand-by systems following a discharge event. In other charging operations equalization charge requirements are frequently ignored or incorrectly applied in cycled systems which frequently leads to premature capacity loss. The cause of this serious problem: the application of float battery management strategies to cycling battery systems. This paper describes the outcomes to be expected when managing cycling batteries with float strategies and discusses the techniques and benefits for the use of cycling battery management strategies.

  14. Floating seal system for rotary devices

    DOEpatents

    Banasiuk, Hubert A.

    1983-01-01

    This invention relates to a floating seal system for rotary devices to reduce gas leakage around the rotary device in a duct and across the face of the rotary device to an adjacent duct. The peripheral seal bodies are made of resilient material having a generally U-shaped cross section wherein one of the legs is secured to a support member and the other of the legs forms a contacting seal against the rotary device. The legs of the peripheral seal form an extended angle of intersection of about 10.degree. to about 30.degree. in the unloaded condition to provide even sealing forces around the periphery of the rotary device. The peripheral seal extends around the periphery of the support member except where intersected by radial seals which reduce gas leakage across the face of the rotary device and between adjacent duct portions. The radial seal assembly is fabricated from channel bars, the smaller channel bar being secured to the divider of the support member and a larger inverted rigid floating channel bar having its legs freely movable over the legs of the smaller channel bar forming therewith a tubular channel. A resilient flexible tube is positioned within the tubular channel for substantially its full length to reduce gas leakage across the tubular channel. A spacer extends beyond the face of the floating channel near each end of the floating channel a distance to provide desired clearance between the floating channel and the face of the rotary device.

  15. Floating seal system for rotary devices

    DOEpatents

    Banasiuk, H.A.

    1983-08-23

    This invention relates to a floating seal system for rotary devices to reduce gas leakage around the rotary device in a duct and across the face of the rotary device to an adjacent duct. The peripheral seal bodies are made of resilient material having a generally U-shaped cross section wherein one of the legs is secured to a support member and the other of the legs forms a contacting seal against the rotary device. The legs of the peripheral seal form an extended angle of intersection of about 10[degree] to about 30[degree] in the unloaded condition to provide even sealing forces around the periphery of the rotary device. The peripheral seal extends around the periphery of the support member except where intersected by radial seals which reduce gas leakage across the face of the rotary device and between adjacent duct portions. The radial seal assembly is fabricated from channel bars, the smaller channel bar being secured to the divider of the support member and a larger inverted rigid floating channel bar having its legs freely movable over the legs of the smaller channel bar forming therewith a tubular channel. A resilient flexible tube is positioned within the tubular channel for substantially its full length to reduce gas leakage across the tubular channel. A spacer extends beyond the face of the floating channel near each end of the floating channel a distance to provide desired clearance between the floating channel and the face of the rotary device. 5 figs.

  16. Coupled Dynamic Modeling of Floating Wind Turbine Systems: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wayman, E. N.; Sclavounos, P. D.; Butterfield, S.; Jonkman, J.; Musial, W.

    2006-03-01

    This article presents a collaborative research program that the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have undertaken to develop innovative and cost-effective floating and mooring systems for offshore wind turbines in water depths of 10-200 m. Methods for the coupled structural, hydrodynamic, and aerodynamic analysis of floating wind turbine systems are presented in the frequency domain. This analysis was conducted by coupling the aerodynamics and structural dynamics code FAST [4] developed at NREL with the wave load and response simulation code WAMIT (Wave Analysis at MIT) [15] developed at MIT. Analysis tools were developed to consider coupled interactions between the wind turbine and the floating system. These include the gyroscopic loads of the wind turbine rotor on the tower and floater, the aerodynamic damping introduced by the wind turbine rotor, the hydrodynamic damping introduced by wave-body interactions, and the hydrodynamic forces caused by wave excitation. Analyses were conducted for two floater concepts coupled with the NREL 5-MW Offshore Baseline wind turbine in water depths of 10-200 m: the MIT/NREL Shallow Drafted Barge (SDB) and the MIT/NREL Tension Leg Platform (TLP). These concepts were chosen to represent two different methods of achieving stability to identify differences in performance and cost of the different stability methods. The static and dynamic analyses of these structures evaluate the systems' responses to wave excitation at a range of frequencies, the systems' natural frequencies, and the standard deviations of the systems' motions in each degree of freedom in various wind and wave environments. This article in various wind and wave environments. This article explores the effects of coupling the wind turbine with the floating platform, the effects of water depth, and the effects of wind speed on the systems' performance. An economic feasibility analysis of the two concepts

  17. Interactions of a water-soluble fullerene derivative with amyloid-β protofibrils: dynamics, binding mechanism, and the resulting salt-bridge disruption.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoying; Xi, Wenhui; Luo, Yin; Cao, Siqin; Wei, Guanghong

    2014-06-19

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with the pathological self-assembly of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides into β-sheet-rich oligomers and insoluble amyloid fibrils. Experimental studies reported that 1,2-(dimethoxymethano)fullerene (DMF), a water-soluble fullerene derivative, inhibits strongly Aβ peptide aggregation at the early stage. However, the interaction and binding mechanisms are not well understood. In this study, we have investigated the detailed interaction of a DMF molecule with a fibrillar hexamer of full-length Aβ42 and the resulting structural alterations by performing multiple all-atom explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Starting from different initial states with a minimum distance of 2 nm between the DMF and the Aβ protofibril, our MD simulations show that the DMF binds to the Aβ protofibril via both slow and fast binding processes. Three dominant binding sites are identified: the central hydrophobic core (CHC) site (17LVFFA21), the turn site (27NKGAI31), and the C-terminal β-sheet site consisting of the smallest side-chain residue glycine and hydrophobic residues (31IIGLMVGGVVI41). Binding energy analyses reveal the importance of π-stacking interactions, especially in the CHC site, hydrophobic interactions, and curvature matching. Strikingly, we find that the binding of DMF to the turn region can disrupt the D23-K28 salt-bridge that is important for the Aβ fibrillation. These results provide molecular insight into the binding mechanism of fullerene to Aβ protofibrils and offer new routes for the therapeutic drug design using fullerene derivatives against AD.

  18. A floating multiparticulate system for ofloxacin based on a multilayer structure: In vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chungang; Xu, Ming; Tao, Xiaoguang; Tang, Jingya; Liu, Zitong; Zhang, Yu; Lin, Xia; He, Haibing; Tang, Xing

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop a novel gastroretentive multiparticulate system with floating ability. This system was designed to provide drug-loaded pellets coated with three successive coatings-the retarding film (ethyl cellulose), the effervescent layer (sodium bicarbonate) and the gas-entrapped polymeric membrane (Eudragit RL 30D). The floating pellets were evaluated for SEM, floating characteristic parameters, in vitro release and bioavailability in New Zealand rabbits. The zero-order release theory model is designed to interpret the release processes. Due to the swelling property, high flexibility and high water permeability, Eudragit RL 30D was used as a gas-entrapped polymeric membrane. The obtained pellets exhibit excellent floating ability and release characteristics. Analysis of the release mechanism showed a zero-order release for the first 8h because of the osmotic pressure of the saturated solution inside of the membrane, which was in accordance with that predicted. Abdominal X-ray images showed that the gastroretention period of the floating barium sulfate-labeled pellets was no less than 6h. The relative bioavailability of the floating pellets compared with reference tablets was 113.06 ± 23.83%. All these results showed that the floating pellets are a feasible approach for the gastroretentive drug delivery system. PMID:22525085

  19. Vertically averaged velocities in the North Atlantic Current from field trials of a Lagrangian electric-field float

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szuts, Zoltan B.; Sanford, Thomas B.

    2013-01-01

    A subsurface Lagrangian float that utilizes motional induction to calculate vertically averaged velocities was tested in the North Atlantic Current (NAC), taking advantage of existing cruises and infrastructure. The Electric Field Float (EFF) is a RAFOS float with horizontal electrodes that measures its own velocity by RAFOS tracking and calculates vertically averaged velocities when merged with the electrode system. The observations showed depth-averaged velocities that were fast in the core of the NAC (0.6-0.9 m s -1) and moderate in adjacent recirculations and eddies (0.3-0.4 m s-1). A float at 850 dbar moved at close to the depth-averaged velocity, while shallower floats followed surface intensified flow on top of the depth-averaged motion. Integral time scales of depth-averaged velocity (1.3-1.6±0.4 d) are slightly shorter than time scales of float velocity (1.6-2.0±0.3 d), while integral length scales of depth-averaged water velocity (35±10 km for u, 18±6 km for v) are slightly shorter than length scales of float motion (53±12 km for u, 28±6 km for v). Velocity spectra of depth-averaged velocity show significant variance at inertial periods. Quantitative and qualitative validation with multiple independent data sets confirms the accuracy of the instrument and sampling strategy in the NAC, advancing the limited observational knowledge of depth-averaged circulation in subpolar regions.

  20. Floating zone melting of cadmium telluride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Wen-Ming; Regel, L. L.; Wilcox, W. R.

    1992-01-01

    To produce superior crystals of cadmium telluride, floating zone melting in space has been proposed. Techniques required for floating zone melting of cadmium telluride are being developed. We have successfully float-zoned cadmium telluride on earth using square rods. A resistance heater was constructed for forming the molten zone. Evaporation of the molten zone was controlled by adding excess cadmium to the growth ampoule combined with heating of the entire ampoule. An effective method to hold the feed rod was developed. Slow rotation of the growth ampoule was proven experimentally to be necessary to achieve a complete symmetric molten zone. Most of the resultant cylindrical rods were single crystals with twins. Still needed is a suitable automatic method to control the zone length. We tried a fiber optical technique to control the zone length, but experiments showed that application of this technique to automate zone length control is unlikely to be successful.

  1. 14 CFR 23.533 - Hull and main float bottom pressures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Hull and main float bottom pressures. 23.533 Section 23.533 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Water Loads § 23.533 Hull and main...

  2. 14 CFR 23.533 - Hull and main float bottom pressures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hull and main float bottom pressures. 23.533 Section 23.533 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Water Loads § 23.533 Hull and main...

  3. "JCE" Classroom Activity #108. Using Archimedes' Principle to Explain Floating and Sinking Cans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanger, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    In this activity, students (working alone or in groups) measure the mass of several soda cans (diet and regular soda) along with the mass of water that each can displaces. The students are then asked to compare these two mass values for the sinking cans and for the floating cans. The purpose of this activity is for students to determine that the…

  4. Sink or Float. Modified Primary. Revised. Anchorage School District Elementary Science Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defendorf, Jean, Ed.

    This publication provides information and activities for teaching about water, whether certain objects will sink or float, and process skills including observing, classifying, inferring, measuring, predicting, and collecting and interpreting data. There are 14 lessons in the unit. The first four lessons deal with the classification of objects and…

  5. STS-52 Commander Wetherbee floats in life raft during JSC bailout exercises

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-52 Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, Commander James D. Wetherbee, wearing launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), floats in single person life raft during emergency egress (bailout) training exercises in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29 pool. The bailout exercises utilize the WETF's 25-foot deep pool as the ocean for this water landing simulation.

  6. STS-39 MS Hieb floats in single person life raft in JSC's WETF Bldg 29 pool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    STS-39 Mission Specialist (MS) Richard J. Hieb, wearing launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), floats in single person life raft after landing in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29 pool. During emergency egress bailout procedures, Hieb practiced procedures necessary for a water landing. Divers monitor Hieb's activity.

  7. Building and Calibration of a FAST Model of the SWAY Prototype Floating Wind Turbine: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Koh, J. H.; Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.; Driscoll, F.; Ng, E. Y. K.

    2013-09-01

    Present efforts to verify and validate aero-hydro-servo-elastic numerical simulation tools that predict the dynamic response of a floating offshore wind turbine are primarily limited to code-to-code comparisons or code-to-data comparisons using data from wind-wave basin tests. In partnership with SWAY AS, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) installed scientific wind, wave, and motion measurement equipment on the 1/6.5th-scale prototype SWAY floating wind system to collect data to validate a FAST model of the SWAY design in an open-water condition. Nanyang Technological University (NTU), through a collaboration with NREL, assisted in this validation.

  8. Trapped modes around freely floating bodies in a two-layer fluid channel

    PubMed Central

    Cal, Filipe S.; Dias, Gonçalo A. S.; Videman, Juha H.

    2014-01-01

    Unlike the trapping of time-harmonic water waves by fixed obstacles, the oscillation of freely floating structures gives rise to a complex nonlinear spectral problem. Still, through a convenient elimination scheme the system simplifies to a linear spectral problem for a self-adjoint operator in a Hilbert space. Under symmetry assumptions on the geometry of the fluid domain, we present conditions guaranteeing the existence of trapped modes in a two-layer fluid channel. Numerous examples of floating bodies supporting trapped modes are given. PMID:25294970

  9. Trapped modes around freely floating bodies in a two-layer fluid channel.

    PubMed

    Cal, Filipe S; Dias, Gonçalo A S; Videman, Juha H

    2014-10-01

    Unlike the trapping of time-harmonic water waves by fixed obstacles, the oscillation of freely floating structures gives rise to a complex nonlinear spectral problem. Still, through a convenient elimination scheme the system simplifies to a linear spectral problem for a self-adjoint operator in a Hilbert space. Under symmetry assumptions on the geometry of the fluid domain, we present conditions guaranteeing the existence of trapped modes in a two-layer fluid channel. Numerous examples of floating bodies supporting trapped modes are given.

  10. Improvements in floating point addition/subtraction operations

    DOEpatents

    Farmwald, P.M.

    1984-02-24

    Apparatus is described for decreasing the latency time associated with floating point addition and subtraction in a computer, using a novel bifurcated, pre-normalization/post-normalization approach that distinguishes between differences of floating point exponents.

  11. Nonlinear dynamic behaviors of a floating structure in focused waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Fei-feng; Zhao, Xi-zeng

    2015-12-01

    Floating structures are commonly seen in coastal and offshore engineering. They are often subjected to extreme waves and, therefore, their nonlinear dynamic behaviors are of great concern. In this paper, an in-house CFD code is developed to investigate the accurate prediction of nonlinear dynamic behaviors of a two-dimensional (2-D) box-shaped floating structure in focused waves. Computations are performed by an enhanced Constrained Interpolation Profile (CIP)-based Cartesian grid model, in which a more accurate VOF (Volume of Fluid) method, the THINC/SW scheme (THINC: tangent of hyperbola for interface capturing; SW: Slope Weighting), is used for interface capturing. A focusing wave theory is used for the focused wave generation. The wave component of constant steepness is chosen. Comparisons between predictions and physical measurements show good agreement including body motions and free surface profiles. Although the overall agreement is good, some discrepancies are observed for impact pressure on the superstructure due to water on deck. The effect of grid resolution on the results is checked. With a fine grid, no obvious improvement is seen in the global body motions and impact pressures due to water on deck. It is concluded that highly nonlinear phenomena, such as distorted free surface, large-amplitude body motions, and violent impact flow, have been predicted successfully.

  12. Effect of Second-Order Hydrodynamics on Floating Offshore Wind Turbines: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Roald, L.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A,; Chokani, N.

    2013-07-01

    Offshore winds are generally stronger and more consistent than winds on land, making the offshore environment attractive for wind energy development. A large part of the offshore wind resource is however located in deep water, where floating turbines are the only economical way of harvesting the energy. The design of offshore floating wind turbines relies on the use of modeling tools that can simulate the entire coupled system behavior. At present, most of these tools include only first-order hydrodynamic theory. However, observations of supposed second-order hydrodynamic responses in wave-tank tests performed by the DeepCwind consortium suggest that second-order effects might be critical. In this paper, the methodology used by the oil and gas industry has been modified to apply to the analysis of floating wind turbines, and is used to assess the effect of second-order hydrodynamics on floating offshore wind turbines. The method relies on combined use of the frequency-domain tool WAMIT and the time-domain tool FAST. The proposed assessment method has been applied to two different floating wind concepts, a spar and a tension-leg-platform (TLP), both supporting the NREL 5-MW baseline wind turbine. Results showing the hydrodynamic forces and motion response for these systems are presented and analysed, and compared to aerodynamic effects.

  13. 33 CFR 401.52 - Limit of approach to a bridge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Limit of approach to a bridge... approach to a bridge. (a) No vessel shall pass the limit of approach sign at any movable bridge until the bridge is in a fully open position and the signal light shows green. (b) No vessel shall pass the...

  14. 33 CFR 116.30 - Administrator, Office of Bridge Programs Review and Evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Administrator, Office of Bridge..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES ALTERATION OF UNREASONABLY OBSTRUCTIVE BRIDGES § 116.30 Administrator, Office of Bridge Programs Review and Evaluation. (a) Upon receiving a Detailed Investigation Report...

  15. 33 CFR 401.52 - Limit of approach to a bridge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Limit of approach to a bridge... approach to a bridge. (a) No vessel shall pass the limit of approach sign at any movable bridge until the bridge is in a fully open position and the signal light shows green. (b) No vessel shall pass the...

  16. 33 CFR 118.95 - Lights on structures not part of a bridge or approach structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... a bridge or approach structure. 118.95 Section 118.95 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.95 Lights on structures not part of a bridge or approach structure. Lights on sheer booms, isolated piers, obstructions, and...

  17. 33 CFR 115.30 - Sufficiency of State authority for bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... for bridges. 115.30 Section 115.30 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LOCATIONS AND CLEARANCES; ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES § 115.30 Sufficiency of State authority for bridges. An opinion of the attorney general of the State as to the sufficiency of...

  18. 33 CFR 401.52 - Limit of approach to a bridge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Limit of approach to a bridge... approach to a bridge. (a) No vessel shall pass the limit of approach sign at any movable bridge until the bridge is in a fully open position and the signal light shows green. (b) No vessel shall pass the...

  19. 33 CFR 118.95 - Lights on structures not part of a bridge or approach structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... a bridge or approach structure. 118.95 Section 118.95 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.95 Lights on structures not part of a bridge or approach structure. Lights on sheer booms, isolated piers, obstructions, and...

  20. 33 CFR 118.95 - Lights on structures not part of a bridge or approach structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... a bridge or approach structure. 118.95 Section 118.95 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.95 Lights on structures not part of a bridge or approach structure. Lights on sheer booms, isolated piers, obstructions, and...