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  1. Florida Everglades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Spanning the southern tip of the Florida Peninsula and most of Florida Bay, Everglades National Park is the only subtropical preserve in North America. It contains both temperate and tropical plant communities, including sawgrass prairie, mangrove and cypress swamps, pinelands, and hardwood hammocks, as well as marine and estuarine environments. The park is known for its rich bird life, particularly large wading birds, such as the roseate spoonbill, wood stork, great blue heron, and a variety of egrets. It is also the only place in the world where alligators and crocodiles exist side by side. This image was acquired by Landsat 7's Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) sensor on May 2, 2000. This is a false-color composite image made using shortwave infrared, near infrared, and green wavelengths. The image has also been sharpened using the sensor's panchromatic band. Image provided by the USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch

  2. A geospatial framework for improving the vertical accuracy of elevation models in Florida's coastal Everglades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, H.; Zhang, C.; Sirianni, M.

    2016-12-01

    South Florida relies upon the health of the Everglades, the largest subtropical wetland in North America, as a vital source of water. Since the late 1800's, this imperiled ecosystem has been highly engineered to meet human needs of flood control and water use. The Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) was initiated in 2000 to restore original water flows to the Everglades and improve overall ecosystem health, while also aiming to achieve balance with human water usage. Due to subtle changes in the Everglades terrain, better vertical accuracy elevation data are needed to model groundwater and surface water levels that are integral to monitoring the effects of restoration under impacts such as sea-level rise. The current best available elevation datasets for the coastal Everglades include High Accuracy Elevation Data (HAED) and Florida Department of Emergency Management (FDEM) Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR). However, the horizontal resolution of the HAED data is too coarse ( 400 m) for fine scale mapping, and the LiDAR data does not contain an accuracy assessment for coastal Everglades' vegetation communities. The purpose of this study is to develop a framework for generating better vertical accuracy and horizontal resolution Digital Elevation Models in the Flamingo District of Everglades National Park. In the framework, field work is conducted to collect RTK GPS and total station elevation measurements for mangrove swamp, coastal prairies, and freshwater marsh, and the proposed accuracy assessment and elevation modeling methodology is integrated with a Geographical Information System (GIS). It is anticipated that this study will provide more accurate models of the soil substrate elevation that can be used by restoration planners to better predict the future state of the Everglades ecosystem.

  3. Visioning the Future: Scenarios Modeling of the Florida Coastal Everglades.

    PubMed

    Flower, Hilary; Rains, Mark; Fitz, Carl

    2017-08-04

    In this paper, we provide screening-level analysis of plausible Everglades ecosystem response by 2060 to sea level rise (0.50 m) interacting with macroclimate change (1.5 °C warming, 7% increase in evapotranspiration, and rainfall that either increases or decreases by 10%). We used these climate scenarios as input to the Ecological Landscape Model to simulate changes to seven interactive hydro-ecological metrics. Mangrove forest and other marine influences migrated up to 15 km inland in both scenarios, delineated by the saltwater front. Freshwater habitat area decreased by 25-30% under our two climate change scenarios and was largely replaced by mangroves and, in the increased rainfall scenario, open water as well. Significant mangroves drowned along northern Florida Bay in both climate change scenarios due to sea level rise. Increased rainfall of 10% provided significant benefits to the spatial and temporal salinity regime within the marine-influenced zone, providing a more gradual and natural adjustment for at-risk flora and fauna. However, increased rainfall also increased the risk of open water, due to water depths that inhibited mangrove establishment and reduced peat accumulation rates. We infer that ecological effects related to sea level rise may occur in the extreme front-edge of saltwater intrusion, that topography will control the incursion of this zone as sea level rises, and that differences in freshwater availability will have ecologically significant effects on ecosystem resilience through the temporal and spatial pattern of salinity changes.

  4. Land-margin ecosystem hydrologic data for the coastal Everglades, Florida, water years 1996-2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, Gordon H.; Smith, Thomas J.; Balentine, Karen M.

    2014-01-01

    Mangrove forests and salt marshes dominate the landscape of the coastal Everglades (Odum and McIvor, 1990). However, the ecological effects from potential sea-level rise and increased water flows from planned freshwater Everglades restoration on these coastal systems are poorly understood. The National Park Service (NPS) proposed the South Florida Global Climate Change Project (SOFL-GCC) in 1990 to evaluate climate change and the effect from rising sea levels on the coastal Everglades, particularly at the marsh/mangrove interface or ecotone (Soukup and others, 1990). A primary objective of SOFL-GCC project was to monitor and synthesize the hydrodynamics of the coastal Everglades from the upstream freshwater marsh to the downstream estuary mangrove. Two related hypotheses were set forward (Nuttle and Cosby, 1993): 1. There exists hydrologic conditions (tide, local rainfall, and upstream water deliveries), which characterize the location of the marsh/mangrove ecotone along the marine and terrestrial hydrologic gradient; and 2. The marsh/mangrove ecotone is sensitive to fluctuations in sea level and freshwater inflow from inland areas. Hydrologic monitoring of the SOFL-GCC network began in 1995 after startup delays from Hurricane Andrew (August 1992) and organizational transfers from the NPS to the National Biological Survey (October 1993) and the merger with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Biological Research Division in 1996 (Smith, 2004). As the SOFL-GCC project progressed, concern by environmental scientists and land managers over how the diversion of water from Everglades National Park would affect the restoration of the greater Everglades ecosystem. Everglades restoration scenarios were based on hydrodynamic models, none of which included the coastal zone (Fennema and others, 1994). Modeling efforts were expanded to include the Everglades coastal zone (Schaffranek and others, 2001) with SOFL-GCC hydrologic data assisting the ecological modeling needs. In 2002

  5. Florida Everglades

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Southern Florida's River of Grass     View Larger ... Okeechobee to the Gulf of Mexico. In places this remarkable 'river of grass' is 80 kilometers wide. These images from the Multi-angle ...

  6. Florida Everglades

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    A "river of grass" extending south of Lake Okeechobee shows how the area was modified by man with visible areas of dense agriculture, urban sprawl and water conservation areas delineated by a series of waterways that crisscross Southern Florida. The image was created March 18-24, 2013 from the Visible-Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership or Suomi NPP satellite, a partnership between NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, or NOAA. Credit: NASA/NOAA To read more go to: www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/NPP/news/vegetation.html NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  7. Spatial and Temporal Variations of Dissolved Organic Matter in Florida Coastal Everglades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, M.; Maie, N.; Jaffe, R.

    2010-12-01

    The Florida Everglades is a coastal wetland, which is characterized by a freshwater to marine gradient ranging from freshwater marshes, through mangrove fringe to the seagrass dominated Florida Bay estuary. Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in this system is am important biogeochemical component as most of the N and P are in an organic form. The dynamics of DOM in the Everglades is complex given its versatile sources and the effects of geomorphology, hydrology, water chemistry, and degradation processes on DOM composition and fate. Here we present long-term DOM characterization data (4 yrs) from monthly surface water samples collected at fourteen sampling stations within the Everglades. We applied a high throughput and sensitive spectroscopic method, namely Excitation Emission Matrix (EEM) fluorescence coupled with Parallel Factor Analysis (PARAFAC) in an attempt to assess quantitative and qualitative variations of DOM on both spatial and temporal scales. Eight fluorescence components were modeled through PARAFAC with six humic-like and two protein-like components being identified. The results presented clear spatial clustering and seasonal variations. For example, freshwater marsh DOM was enriched in higher plant and soil-derived humic-like compounds, while estuarine sites were more enriched in algae- and microbial-derived humic-like and protein-like inputs. Coastal estuarine sites were significantly controlled by hydrology, while DOM dynamics in Florida Bay were seasonally driven by both primary productivity and hydrology. Peat-based sites could be clearly differentiated from marl-based sites based on EEM-PARAFAC data. Bulk DOC data and proxies like FI, SR, and a (254nm m-1)* displayed clear spatial and seasonal variations as well. This study highlights the use of optical properties monitoring and in particular EEM-PARAFAC as an effective technique to investigate the DOM dynamics in the aquatic ecosystems.

  8. Molecular Families Associated with Optical Properties in the Florida Coastal Everglades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, S.; Jaffe, R.; Cawley, K.; Dittmar, T.; Stubbins, A.

    2016-02-01

    Optical properties are efficiently-measured proxies for dissolved organic matter (DOM) composition, source and/or reactivity. However, the molecular signature of DOM associated with such optical parameters remains poorly defined. The Florida coastal Everglades is a subtropical wetland with diverse vegetation (e.g., sawgrass prairies, mangrove forests, seagrass meadows, etc.) and DOM sources (e.g., terrestrial, microbial and marine). As such, the Everglades is an excellent model system from which to draw samples to allow classically-defined optical properties to be linked to molecular properties of the DOM pool. Here, we characterized a suite of seasonally- and spatially-collected DOM samples using optical measurements (EEM-PARAFAC, SUVA(254), S(275-295), S(350-400), SR, FI, freshness index and HIX) and ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS). Spearman's rank correlations between FTICR-MS signal intensities of individual molecular formulae and optical properties determined which molecular formulae were associated with each PARAFAC component and optical index. The molecular families that tracked with the optical indices were generally in agreement with conventional biogeochemical interpretations. Therefore, although they represent only a small portion of the bulk DOM pool, absorbance and fluorescence measurements are indeed appropriate proxies for the aquatic cycling of both optically-active and associated optically-inactive DOM in coastal wetlands.

  9. Sediment Surface Elevation Changes in Relation to Groundwater Hydrologic Variation in the Coastal Florida Everglades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith III, T. J.; Cahoon, D.

    2002-05-01

    Mangrove forests dominate the downstream end of the Greater Florida Everglades. Restoration of the Everglades has concentrated on surface water flow. We measured rates of sediment (surface) elevation change and soil accretion in relation to both surface and groundwater elevation at six sites in the lower Everglades, including freshwater marsh and mangrove habitats. Three sites were located along the two major distributaries of the Everglades: Shark River and Lostmans River. Accretion was negligible in upstream, freshwater marsh sites and greatest in downstream mangrove forest sites. Sediment elevation changes were substantial at all sites. More importantly, the pattern of sediment elevation change differed from upstream to downstream, and was different between downstream sites on each river. The rate of sediment elevation change was related to the rate of groundwater elevation change at many, but not all, sites. For freshwater sites, as groundwater elevation increased, sediment elevation decreased, an unexpected finding. For downstream, mangrove sites, a weak positive relationship was found whereby increasing groundwater elevations lead to increasing sediment surface elevation. Important seasonal patterns also appear to be present indicating that subsurface processes (root growth, decomposition, water storage) may play important roles in marsh / mangrove surface elevation. If restoration of freshwater sheetflow in the upstream Everglades leads to increased groundwater elevations in the downstream system, mangrove forests may be able to keep even with current rates of sea level rise.

  10. Characterizing the Sources and Sinks of Methyl Halides in the Florida Everglades and Coastal Waters by Isotopic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scully, N. M.; Jones, R. D.; Raffel, A.; Rice, A. L.

    2012-12-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the methyl halides, methyl chloride and methyl bromide, are produced in significant quantities by phytoplankton and by the photochemical oxidation of dissolved organic matter (DOM). However, we know little of the mechanisms responsible for the photochemical production of methyl halides and also the factors which affect the microbial formation and consumption in the surface waters. We are currently conducting laboratory experiments to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for the photochemical and microbial formation and consumption of methyl chloride and methyl bromide in the Florida Everglades and coastal waters. We present data from laboratory experiments using a stable isotope spiking tracer method to quantify photochemical flux rates of methyl chloride and methyl bromide from wetland and estuarine water samples collected at FCE-LTER sites located in Taylor Slough and Florida Bay. These photochemical experiments include waters that span a wide range of halide and DOM concentrations. We use these results to estimate the net photochemical flux of methyl chloride and methyl bromide from the Florida Everglades. We have also conducted stable carbon isotope analysis of the methyl chloride. These experiments are being conducted to determine the carbon isotopic ratios (d13C) of methyl chloride produced from the photolysis of organic matter in natural waters and will provide an inventory of d13C values from one of the sources within the studied Everglades ecotones. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation Chemical Oceanography Program Award No. 1029710.

  11. Component-specific dynamics of riverine mangrove CO2 efflux in the Florida coastal Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Troxler, Tiffany G.; Barr, Jordan G.; Fuentes, Jose D.; Engel, Victor C.; Anderson, Gordon H.; Sanchez, Christopher; Lagomosino, David; Price, Rene; Davis, Stephen E.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon cycling in mangrove forests represents a significant portion of the coastal wetland carbon (C) budget across the latitudes of the tropics and subtropics. Previous research suggests fluctuations in tidal inundation, temperature and salinity can influence forest metabolism and C cycling. Carbon dioxide (CO2) from respiration that occurs from below the canopy is contributed from different components. In this study, we investigated variation in CO2 flux among different below-canopy components (soil, leaf litter, course woody debris, soil including pneumatophores, prop roots, and surface water) in a riverine mangrove forest of Shark River Slough estuary, Everglades National Park (Florida, USA). The range in CO2 flux from different components exceeded that measured among sites along the oligohaline-saline gradient. Black mangrove (Avicennia germinans) pneumatophores contributed the largest average CO2 flux. Over a narrow range of estuarine salinity (25–35 practical salinity units (PSU)), increased salinity resulted in lower CO2 flux to the atmosphere. Tidal inundation reduced soil CO2 flux overall but increased the partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) observed in the overlying surface water upon flooding. Higher pCO2 in surface water is then subject to tidally driven export, largely as HCO3. Integration and scaling of CO2 flux rates to forest scale allowed for improved understanding of the relative contribution of different below-canopy components to mangrove forest ecosystem respiration (ER). Summing component CO2fluxes suggests a more significant contribution of below-canopy respiration to ER than previously considered. An understanding of below-canopy CO2 component fluxes and their contributions to ER can help to elucidate how C cycling will change with discrete disturbance events (e.g., hurricanes) and long-term change, including sea-level rise, and potential impact mangrove forests. As such, key controls on below-canopy ER must be taken into consideration when

  12. Effects of Hydrologic Restoration on the Residence Times and Water Quality of a Coastal Wetland in the Florida Everglades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandoval, E.; Price, R. M.; Melesse, A. M.; Whitman, D.

    2013-05-01

    The Everglades, located in southern Florida, is a dominantly freshwater coastal wetland ecosystem that has experienced many alterations and changes led by urbanization and water management practices with most cases resulting in decreased water flow across the system. The Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan, passed in 2000, has the final goal of restoring natural flow and clean water to the Everglades while also balancing flood control and water supply needs of the south Florida population with approximately 60 projects to be constructed and completed in the following 30 years. One way to assess the success of restoration projects is to observe long-term hydrological and geochemical changes as the projects undergo completion. The purpose of this research was to investigate the effects of restoration on the water balance, flushing time, and water chemistry of Taylor Slough; one of the main natural waterways located within the coastal Everglades. A water balance equation was used to solve for groundwater-surface water exchange. The major parameters for the water balance equation (precipitation, evapotranspiration (ET), surface water storage, inflow and outflow) were obtained from the U.S. Geological Survey and Everglades National Park databases via the Everglades Depth Estimation Network (EDEN). Watershed flushing times were estimated as the surface water volume divided by the total outputs from the watershed. Both the water balance equation and water flushing time were calculated on a monthly time step from 2001 - 2011. Water chemistry of major ions and Total Nitrogen (TN) and Total Phosphorus (TP) was analyzed on water samples, 3-day composites collected every 18 hours from 2008 - 2012, and correlated with water flushing times. Stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen of water samples were obtained to support the dominant inputs of water into Taylor Slough as identified by the water budget equation. Results for flushing times varied between 3 and 78 days, with

  13. Florida Everglades and Keys, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Though much of southern Florida is covered by clouds, the Florida Everglades and Keys (25.0N, 82.0W) remain relatively clear in this nearly vertical view. The view covers the Gulf of Mexico port city of Ft. Myers, and Lake Okeechobee, at the top of the scene, in the north, The Everglades, in the center and the entire Florida Key Chain at the bottom. Even with the many popcorn clouds, ground detail and the city of Miami is easily discerned.

  14. Associations Between the Molecular and Optical Properties of Dissolved Organic Matter in the Florida Everglades, a Model Coastal Wetland System

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Sasha; Jaffé, Rudolf; Cawley, Kaelin; Dittmar, Thorsten; Stubbins, Aron

    2015-01-01

    Optical properties are easy-to-measure proxies for dissolved organic matter (DOM) composition, source, and reactivity. However, the molecular signature of DOM associated with such optical parameters remains poorly defined. The Florida coastal Everglades is a subtropical wetland with diverse vegetation (e.g., sawgrass prairies, mangrove forests, seagrass meadows) and DOM sources (e.g., terrestrial, microbial, and marine). As such, the Everglades is an excellent model system from which to draw samples of diverse origin and composition to allow classically-defined optical properties to be linked to molecular properties of the DOM pool. We characterized a suite of seasonally- and spatially-collected DOM samples using optical measurements (EEM-PARAFAC, SUVA254, S275−295, S350−400, SR, FI, freshness index, and HIX) and ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS). Spearman's rank correlations between FTICR-MS signal intensities of individual molecular formulae and optical properties determined which molecular formulae were associated with each PARAFAC component and optical index. The molecular families that tracked with the optical indices were generally in agreement with conventional biogeochemical interpretations. Therefore, although they represent only a small portion of the bulk DOM pool, absorbance, and fluorescence measurements appear to be appropriate proxies for the aquatic cycling of both optically-active and associated optically-inactive DOM in coastal wetlands. PMID:26636070

  15. Associations between the molecular and optical properties of dissolved organic matter in the Florida Everglades, a model coastal wetland system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Sasha; Jaffe, Rudolf; Cawley, Kaelin; Dittmar, Thorsten; Stubbins, Aron

    2015-11-01

    Optical properties are easy-to-measure proxies for dissolved organic matter (DOM) composition, source and reactivity. However, the molecular signature of DOM associated with such optical parameters remains poorly defined. The Florida coastal Everglades is a subtropical wetland with diverse vegetation (e.g., sawgrass prairies, mangrove forests, seagrass meadows) and DOM sources (e.g., terrestrial, microbial and marine). As such, the Everglades is an excellent model system from which to draw samples of diverse origin and composition to allow classically-defined optical properties to be linked to molecular properties of the DOM pool. We characterized a suite of seasonally- and spatially-collected DOM samples using optical measurements (EEM-PARAFAC, SUVA254, S275-295, S350-400, SR, FI, freshness index and HIX) and ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS). Spearman’s rank correlations between FTICR-MS signal intensities of individual molecular formulae and optical properties determined which molecular formulae were associated with each PARAFAC component and optical index. The molecular families that tracked with the optical indices were generally in agreement with conventional biogeochemical interpretations. Therefore, although they represent only a small portion of the bulk DOM pool, absorbance and fluorescence measurements appear to be appropriate proxies for the aquatic cycling of both optically-active and associated optically-inactive DOM in coastal wetlands.

  16. Palynological reconstruction of environmental changes in coastal wetlands of the Florida Everglades since the mid-Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Qiang; Liu, Kam-biu; Platt, William J.; Rivera-Monroy, Victor H.

    2015-05-01

    Palynological, loss-on-ignition, and X-ray fluorescence data from a 5.25 m sediment core from a mangrove forest at the mouth of the Shark River Estuary in the southwestern Everglades National Park, Florida were used to reconstruct changes occurring in coastal wetlands since the mid-Holocene. This multi-proxy record contains the longest paleoecological history to date in the southwestern Everglades. The Shark River Estuary basin was formed 5700 cal yr BP in response to increasing precipitation. Initial wetlands were frequently-burned short-hydroperiod prairies, which transitioned into long-hydroperiod prairies with sloughs in which peat deposits began to accumulate continuously about 5250 cal yr BP. Our data suggest that mangrove communities started to appear after 3800 cal yr BP; declines in the abundance of charcoal suggested gradual replacement of fire-dominated wetlands by mangrove forest over the following 2650 yr. By 1150 cal yr BP, a dense Rhizophora mangle dominated mangrove forest had formed at the mouth of the Shark River. The mangrove-dominated coastal ecosystem here was established at least 2000 yr later than has been previously estimated.

  17. Associations Between the Molecular and Optical Properties of Dissolved Organic Matter in the Florida Everglades, a Model Coastal Wetland System.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Sasha; Jaffé, Rudolf; Cawley, Kaelin; Dittmar, Thorsten; Stubbins, Aron

    2015-01-01

    Optical properties are easy-to-measure proxies for dissolved organic matter (DOM) composition, source, and reactivity. However, the molecular signature of DOM associated with such optical parameters remains poorly defined. The Florida coastal Everglades is a subtropical wetland with diverse vegetation (e.g., sawgrass prairies, mangrove forests, seagrass meadows) and DOM sources (e.g., terrestrial, microbial, and marine). As such, the Everglades is an excellent model system from which to draw samples of diverse origin and composition to allow classically-defined optical properties to be linked to molecular properties of the DOM pool. We characterized a suite of seasonally- and spatially-collected DOM samples using optical measurements (EEM-PARAFAC, SUVA254, S275-295, S350-400, SR, FI, freshness index, and HIX) and ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS). Spearman's rank correlations between FTICR-MS signal intensities of individual molecular formulae and optical properties determined which molecular formulae were associated with each PARAFAC component and optical index. The molecular families that tracked with the optical indices were generally in agreement with conventional biogeochemical interpretations. Therefore, although they represent only a small portion of the bulk DOM pool, absorbance, and fluorescence measurements appear to be appropriate proxies for the aquatic cycling of both optically-active and associated optically-inactive DOM in coastal wetlands.

  18. Spatial variation in the accumulation of POPs and mercury in bottlenose dolphins of the Lower Florida Keys and the coastal Everglades (South Florida).

    PubMed

    Damseaux, France; Kiszka, Jeremy J; Heithaus, Michael R; Scholl, George; Eppe, Gauthier; Thomé, Jean-Pierre; Lewis, Jennifer; Hao, Wensi; Fontaine, Michaël C; Das, Krishna

    2017-01-01

    The bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) is an upper trophic level predator and the most common cetacean species found in nearshore waters of southern Florida, including the Lower Florida Keys (LFK) and the Florida Coastal Everglades (FCE). The objective of this study was to assess contamination levels of total mercury (T-Hg) in skin and persistent organic pollutants (PCBs, PBDEs, DDXs, HCHs, HCB, Σ PCDD/Fs and Σ DL-PCBs) in blubber samples of bottlenose dolphins from LFK (n = 27) and FCE (n = 24). PCBs were the major class of compounds found in bottlenose dolphin blubber and were higher in individuals from LFK (Σ 6 PCBs LFK males: 13,421 ± 7730 ng g(-1) lipids, Σ 6 PCBs LFK females: 9683 ± 19,007 ng g(-1) lipids) than from FCE (Σ 6 PCBs FCE males: 5638 ng g(-1) ± 3627 lipids, Σ 6 PCBs FCE females: 1427 ± 908 ng g(-1) lipids). These levels were lower than previously published data from the southeastern USA. The Σ DL-PCBs were the most prevalent pollutants of dioxin and dioxin like compounds (Σ DL-PCBs LFK: 739 ng g(-1) lipids, Σ DL-PCBs FCE: 183 ng g(-1) lipids) since PCDD/F concentrations were low for both locations (mean 0.1 ng g(-1) lipids for LFK and FCE dolphins). The toxicity equivalences of PCDD/Fs and DL-PCBs expressed as TEQ in LFK and FCE dolphins is mainly expressed by DL-PCBs (81% LFK - 65% FCE). T-Hg concentrations in skin were significantly higher in FCE (FCE median 9314 ng g(-1) dw) compared to LFK dolphins (LFK median 2941 ng g(-1) dw). These concentrations are the highest recorded in bottlenose dolphins in the southeastern USA, and may be explained, at least partially, by the biogeochemistry of the Everglades and mangrove sedimentary habitats that create favourable conditions for the retention of mercury and make it available at high concentrations for aquatic predators. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Changes in community structure of sediment bacteria along the Florida coastal everglades marsh-mangrove-seagrass salinity gradient.

    PubMed

    Ikenaga, Makoto; Guevara, Rafael; Dean, Amanda L; Pisani, Cristina; Boyer, Joseph N

    2010-02-01

    Community structure of sediment bacteria in the Everglades freshwater marsh, fringing mangrove forest, and Florida Bay seagrass meadows were described based on polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) patterns of 16S rRNA gene fragments and by sequencing analysis of DGGE bands. The DGGE patterns were correlated with the environmental variables by means of canonical correspondence analysis. There was no significant trend in the Shannon-Weiner index among the sediment samples along the salinity gradient. However, cluster analysis based on DGGE patterns revealed that the bacterial community structure differed according to sites. Not only were these salinity/vegetation regions distinct but the sediment bacteria communities were consistently different along the gradient from freshwater marsh, mangrove forest, eastern-central Florida Bay, and western Florida Bay. Actinobacteria- and Bacteroidetes/Chlorobi-like DNA sequences were amplified throughout all sampling sites. More Chloroflexi and members of candidate division WS3 were found in freshwater marsh and mangrove forest sites than in seagrass sites. The appearance of candidate division OP8-like DNA sequences in mangrove sites distinguished these communities from those of freshwater marsh. The seagrass sites were characterized by reduced presence of bands belonging to Chloroflexi with increased presence of those bands related to Cyanobacteria, gamma-Proteobacteria, Spirochetes, and Planctomycetes. This included the sulfate-reducing bacteria, which are prevalent in marine environments. Clearly, bacterial communities in the sediment were different along the gradient, which can be explained mainly by the differences in salinity and total phosphorus.

  20. Landscape Scale Hydrologic Performance Measures for the South Florida Everglades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, R. A.; Kotun, K.; Engel, V.

    2008-05-01

    Large scale drainage and land reclamation activities began in the south Florida Everglades around 1905. By 1920 four large canals were constructed across the Everglades to drain Lake Okeechobee to the Atlantic Ocean. In 1930, following two major hurricanes, construction began on a levee system around Lake Okeechobee, and two additional coastal outlets were created to the St. Lucie and Caloosahatchee Rivers. These activities significantly lowered water levels in the lake and reduced natural surface water flows to the downstream Everglades. Throughout the 1930s and early 1940s, a network of uncontrolled canals were excavated along the Atlantic Coastal Ridge that penetrated the permeable Biscayne Aquifer, further draining the Everglades and local groundwater to the ocean. Early hydrologic studies documented the detrimental affects of this over-drainage on urban and agricultural water supply, including the abandonment of wellfields because of saltwater intrusion. In the interior marshes the loss of soil moisture in the Everglades organic soils also caused widespread soil subsidence and increased fire frequency. Following a third major hurricane in 1947, which resulted in loss of life and widespread economic losses, the U.S. Congress authorized the Army Corps of Engineers to begin construction of the Central and Southern Florida Project. The C&SF Project was designed to correct the flooding and water supply problems in south Florida, as well as providing adequate water supply to protect fish and wildlife resources of the Everglades. By 1953 most of the major drainage canals had control structures added to prevent excessive drainage, and an East Coast Protective Levee was constructed from Lake Okeechobee to Everglades National Park, to reduce flooding along the Atlantic Coastal Ridge and retain water in the Everglades. By the late 1950's most of the northern Everglades was diked and drained to form the Everglades Agricultural Area, and by 1963 the central Everglades were

  1. 33 CFR 110.186 - Port Everglades, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Port Everglades, Florida. 110.186... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.186 Port Everglades, Florida. (a) The anchorage grounds. The... entrance to Port Everglades, is an area bounded by a line connecting points with the following North...

  2. 33 CFR 110.186 - Port Everglades, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Port Everglades, Florida. 110.186... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.186 Port Everglades, Florida. (a) The anchorage grounds. The... entrance to Port Everglades, is an area bounded by a line connecting points with the following North...

  3. Integrated Science: Florida Manatees and Everglades Hydrology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langtimm, Catherine A.; Swain, Eric D.; Stith, Bradley M.; Reid, James P.; Slone, Daniel H.; Decker, Jeremy; Butler, Susan M.; Doyle, Terry; Snow, R.W.

    2009-01-01

    Predicting and monitoring restoration effects on Florida manatees, which are known to make extended movements, will be incomplete if modeling and monitoring are limited to the smaller areas defined by the various res-toration components. U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) efforts, thus far, have focused on (1) collecting manatee movement data throughout the Ten Thousand Islands (TTI) region, and (2) developing an individual-based model for manatees to illustrate manatee responses to changes in hydrology related to the Picayune Strand Restoration Project (PSRP). In 2006, new regional research was begun to extend an Everglades hydrology model into the TTI region; extend the manatee movement model into the southern estuaries of Everglades National Park (ENP); and integrate hydrology and manatee data, models, and monitoring across the TTI region and ENP. Currently (2008), three research tasks are underway to develop the necessary modeling components to assess restoration efforts across the Greater Everglades Ecosystem.

  4. Hydrologic Restoration in the Florida Everglades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crisfield, E. A.; Van Lent, T.

    2002-05-01

    Wetland landscapes like the Florida Everglades are defined by hydrology. Within the ecosystem, distinct ecotones are distinguished by the depth and/or duration of inundation, the seasonal timing of water levels, and the water chemistry. Since 1900, efforts to manage surface water to support urban and agricultural development have altered the quantity, quality, timing, and distribution of water within the Everglades. A major restoration plan has been authorized to protect the natural system from the impacts of urban and agricultural water supply and flood protection. The success of this effort in restoring the natural system will depend upon the influence of science in the political process of finding solutions for contentious water management problems.

  5. 33 CFR 110.186 - Port Everglades, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Port Everglades, Florida. 110.186 Section 110.186 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.186 Port Everglades, Florida. (a) The anchorage grounds. The anchorage grounds, the center of...

  6. 33 CFR 110.186 - Port Everglades, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Port Everglades, Florida. 110.186 Section 110.186 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.186 Port Everglades, Florida. (a) The anchorage grounds. The anchorage grounds, the center of...

  7. 33 CFR 110.186 - Port Everglades, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Port Everglades, Florida. 110.186 Section 110.186 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.186 Port Everglades, Florida. (a) The anchorage grounds. The anchorage grounds, the center of...

  8. 76 FR 38592 - Phosphorus Water Quality Standards for Florida Everglades

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 131 Phosphorus Water Quality Standards for Florida Everglades AGENCY: Environmental... provisions of Florida's Water Quality Standards for Phosphorus in the Everglades Protection Area (Phosphorus... are not applicable water quality standards for purposes of the Clean Water Act. EPA is proposing...

  9. 77 FR 46298 - Phosphorus Water Quality Standards for Florida Everglades

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-03

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 131 RIN 2040-AF38 Phosphorus Water Quality Standards for Florida Everglades AGENCY... provisions of Florida's Water Quality Standards for Phosphorus in the Everglades Protection Area (Phosphorus... are not applicable water quality standards for purposes of the Clean Water Act. EPA is...

  10. The role of ocean tides on groundwater-surface water exchange in a mangrove-dominated estuary: Shark River Slough, Florida Coastal Everglades, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Christopher G.; Price, René M.; Swarzenski, Peter W.; Stalker, Jeremy C.

    2016-01-01

    Low-relief environments like the Florida Coastal Everglades (FCE) have complicated hydrologic systems where surface water and groundwater processes are intimately linked yet hard to separate. Fluid exchange within these lowhydraulic-gradient systems can occur across broad spatial and temporal scales, with variable contributions to material transport and transformation. Identifying and assessing the scales at which these processes operate is essential for accurate evaluations of how these systems contribute to global biogeochemical cycles. The distribution of 222Rn and 223,224,226Ra have complex spatial patterns along the Shark River Slough estuary (SRSE), Everglades, FL. High-resolution time-series measurements of 222Rn activity, salinity, and water level were used to quantify processes affecting radon fluxes out of the mangrove forest over a tidal cycle. Based on field data, tidal pumping through an extensive network of crab burrows in the lower FCE provides the best explanation for the high radon and fluid fluxes. Burrows are irrigated during rising tides when radon and other dissolved constituents are released from the mangrove soil. Flushing efficiency of the burrows—defined as the tidal volume divided by the volume of burrows— estimated for the creek drainage area vary seasonally from 25 (wet season) to 100 % (dry season) in this study. The tidal pumping of the mangrove forest soil acts as a significant vector for exchange between the forest and the estuary. Processes that enhance exchange of O2 and other materials across the sediment-water interface could have a profound impact on the environmental response to larger scale processes such as sea level rise and climate change. Compounding the material budgets of the SRSE are additional inputs from groundwater from the Biscayne Aquifer, which were identified using radium isotopes. Quantification of the deep groundwater component is not obtainable, but isotopic data suggest a more prevalent signal in the dry

  11. Freshwater and Nutrient Fluxes to Coastal Waters of Everglades National Park - A Synthesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McPherson, Benjamin F.; Torres, Arturo E.

    2006-01-01

    Freshwater in the Everglades and the Big Cypress Swamp drains south and southwest into coastal regions where it mixes with seawater to create the salinity gradients characteristic of productive estuarine and marine systems. Studies in Florida Bay have shown that over the last 100-200 years, salinity and seagrass distributions have fluctuated substantially in response to natural climatic cycles. The timing of this change coincides at least in part with the canal construction and landscape alterations in the Everglades that have altered the quantity, timing, distribution, and quality of surface water that flows south into the coastal waters. Federal and State agencies have undertaken a massive Everglades restoration project that will require changes in water management throughout the Everglades, and this will affect water flows to the coastal region. A major concern involves how changes in water flow could affect salinity and nutrient availability in coastal waters.

  12. Northern Everglades, Florida, satellite image map

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, Jean-Claude; Jones, John W.

    2002-01-01

    These satellite image maps are one product of the USGS Land Characteristics from Remote Sensing project, funded through the USGS Place-Based Studies Program with support from the Everglades National Park. The objective of this project is to develop and apply innovative remote sensing and geographic information system techniques to map the distribution of vegetation, vegetation characteristics, and related hydrologic variables through space and over time. The mapping and description of vegetation characteristics and their variations are necessary to accurately simulate surface hydrology and other surface processes in South Florida and to monitor land surface changes. As part of this research, data from many airborne and satellite imaging systems have been georeferenced and processed to facilitate data fusion and analysis. These image maps were created using image fusion techniques developed as part of this project.

  13. South Florida Everglades: satellite image map

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, John W.; Thomas, Jean-Claude; Desmond, G.B.

    2001-01-01

    These satellite image maps are one product of the USGS Land Characteristics from Remote Sensing project, funded through the USGS Place-Based Studies Program (http://access.usgs.gov/) with support from the Everglades National Park (http://www.nps.gov/ever/). The objective of this project is to develop and apply innovative remote sensing and geographic information system techniques to map the distribution of vegetation, vegetation characteristics, and related hydrologic variables through space and over time. The mapping and description of vegetation characteristics and their variations are necessary to accurately simulate surface hydrology and other surface processes in South Florida and to monitor land surface changes. As part of this research, data from many airborne and satellite imaging systems have been georeferenced and processed to facilitate data fusion and analysis. These image maps were created using image fusion techniques developed as part of this project.

  14. Hydrologic Monitoring and Water Balance Modeling in West and Seven Palm Lake Drainages in the Florida Everglades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, J.; Whitman, D.; Price, R.

    2016-02-01

    In the Florida Everglades, sea level rise and reduced freshwater inputs have altered the hydrologic and chemical conditions in coastal estuaries. Brackish coastal groundwater discharge, an inland intrusion of submarine groundwater discharge, has been shown to occur seasonally along the coastal wetlands of the Everglades. This brackish groundwater is enriched in total phosphorus, the limiting nutrient in the Everglades. A major component of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan is to increase freshwater delivery to the southern coastal Everglades and adjacent bays, in an effort to restore a salinity and nutrient regime conducive for the development of submerged aquatic vegetation. This study is being conducted in the estuarine lakes of the Everglades that are connected to Florida Bay. Water quality in these lakes has diminished over time, potentially due to increased nutrient deliveries from coastal groundwater discharge. Current hydrologic and chemical conditions are being established within the lakes in order to gain a better understanding of the effects of restoration efforts through time. Water budgets are being constructed on daily, monthly and annual time steps to estimate the groundwater-surface water interaction term. In addition, hydrologic and topographic data from the Everglades Depth Estimation Network is being utilized in order to calculate water budgets for the lakes region spanning ten years prior to the study period. Water chemistry in the lakes and groundwater is also being monitored to determine the influence of groundwater-surface water exchange on salinity and nutrient conditions in the lakes. The results of this study can be used to assess the influence of restoration efforts on the hydrochemical conditions of downstream coastal areas affected by coastal groundwater discharge and sea level rise.

  15. BACTERIAL METHYLMERCURY DEGRADATION IN FLORIDA EVERGLADES PEAT SEDIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methylmercury (MeHg) degradation was investigated along an eutrophication gradient in the Florida Everglades by quantifying 14CH4 and 14CO2 production after incubation of anaerobic sediments with [14C]MeHg. Degradation rate constants (k) were consistently <=0.1 d-1 and decreased ...

  16. Estimation of water surface elevations for the Everglades, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaseanu, Monica; Pearlstine, Leonard

    2008-07-01

    The Everglades Depth Estimation Network (EDEN) is an integrated network of real-time water-level monitoring gages and modeling methods that provides scientists and managers with current (2000-present) online water surface and water depth information for the freshwater domain of the Greater Everglades. This integrated system presents data on a 400-m square grid to assist in (1) large-scale field operations; (2) integration of hydrologic and ecologic responses; (3) supporting biological and ecological assessment of the implementation of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP); and (4) assessing trophic-level responses to hydrodynamic changes in the Everglades. This paper investigates the radial basis function multiquadric method of interpolation to obtain a continuous freshwater surface across the entire Everglades using radio-transmitted data from a network of water-level gages managed by the US Geological Survey (USGS), the South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD), and the Everglades National Park (ENP). Since the hydrological connection is interrupted by canals and levees across the study area, boundary conditions were simulated by linearly interpolating along those features and integrating the results together with the data from marsh stations to obtain a continuous water surface through multiquadric interpolation. The absolute cross-validation errors greater than 5 cm correlate well with the local outliers and the minimum distance between the closest stations within 2000-m radius, but seem to be independent of vegetation or season.

  17. Estimation of water surface elevations for the Everglades, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Palaseanu, Monica; Pearlstine, Leonard

    2008-01-01

    The Everglades Depth Estimation Network (EDEN) is an integrated network of real-time water-level monitoring gages and modeling methods that provides scientists and managers with current (2000–present) online water surface and water depth information for the freshwater domain of the Greater Everglades. This integrated system presents data on a 400-m square grid to assist in (1) large-scale field operations; (2) integration of hydrologic and ecologic responses; (3) supporting biological and ecological assessment of the implementation of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP); and (4) assessing trophic-level responses to hydrodynamic changes in the Everglades.This paper investigates the radial basis function multiquadric method of interpolation to obtain a continuous freshwater surface across the entire Everglades using radio-transmitted data from a network of water-level gages managed by the US Geological Survey (USGS), the South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD), and the Everglades National Park (ENP). Since the hydrological connection is interrupted by canals and levees across the study area, boundary conditions were simulated by linearly interpolating along those features and integrating the results together with the data from marsh stations to obtain a continuous water surface through multiquadric interpolation. The absolute cross-validation errors greater than 5 cm correlate well with the local outliers and the minimum distance between the closest stations within 2000-m radius, but seem to be independent of vegetation or season.

  18. Everglades restoration and water quality challenges in south Florida.

    PubMed

    Perry, William B

    2008-10-01

    This paper provides background information and a brief overview of water quality issues for the rest of the papers in this volume that are concerned with Everglades restoration. The Everglades of Florida have been diminished over 50% of their former extent. The Everglades are no longer a free-flowing wetland ecosystem, but are now subject to a complicated system of water management that is regulated primarily for flood control and consumptive use. Attempts to restore a more natural hydropattern to the remaining undeveloped Everglades are made more difficult by the natural extremes in rainfall, flat landscape, highly porous geology, and inaccessibility of the remaining natural areas. The Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) seeks ecosystem restoration by adding water storage capacity, reducing groundwater seepage, improving regulatory delivery and timing of water to avoid environmental damage, and where feasible, improving the quality of water to be used for Everglades restoration. Water quality issues that currently exist for south Florida include eutrophication (especially phosphorus), mercury, and contaminants from agricultural production and the urban environment. Lands once in agricultural production that will be converted back to wetlands or will become reservoirs may contribute to the water quality concerns. Stormwater runoff from managed lands that will be used for restoration purposes will also present water quality challenges. The state continues to seek water quality improvement with a number of pollution reduction programs, and CERP attempts to improve water quality without sacrificing even more natural areas; however providing water quality sufficient for use in recovery of remaining Everglades wetlands and estuaries will remain a daunting challenge.

  19. The Impact of Sea Level Rise on Florida's Everglades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senarath, S. U.

    2005-12-01

    Global warming and the resulting melting of polar ice sheets could increase global sea levels significantly. Some studies have predicted mean sea level increases in the order of six inches to one foot in the next 25 to 50 years. This could have severe irreversible impacts on low-lying areas of Florida's Everglades. The key objective of this study is to evaluate the effects of a one foot sea level rise on Cape Sable Seaside Sparrow (CSSS) nesting areas within the Everglades National Park (ENP). A regional-scale hydrologic model is used to assess the sensitivities of this sea-level rise scenario. Florida's Everglades supports a unique ecosystem. At present, about 50 percent of this unique ecosystem has been lost due to urbanization and farming. Today, the water flow in the remnant Everglades is also regulated to meet a variety of competing environmental, water-supply and flood-control needs. A 30-year, eight billion dollar (1999 estimate) project has been initiated to improve Everglades' water flows. The expected benefits of this restoration project will be short-lived if the predicted sea level rise causes severe impacts on the environmentally sensitive areas of the Everglades. Florida's Everglades is home to many threatened and endangered species of wildlife. The Cape Sable Seaside Sparrow population in the ENP is one such species that is currently listed as endangered. Since these birds build their nests close to the ground surface (the base of the nest is approximately six inches from the ground surface), they are directly affected by any sea level induced ponding depth, frequency or duration change. Therefore, the CSSS population serves as a good indicator species for evaluating the negative impacts of sea level rise on the Everglades' ecosystem. The impact of sea level rise on the CSSS habitat is evaluated using the Regional Simulation Model (RSM) developed by the South Florida Water Management District. The RSM is an implicit, finite-volume, continuous

  20. SEASAT radar altimeter measurements over the Florida Everglades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, R. L.; Norcross, G. A.

    1983-01-01

    The SEASAT satellite radar altimeter traversed the Florida Everglades on August 14, 1978. Analysis of the measurements disclosed that the altimeter pulses from 800 km above the Earth's surface penetrated the vegetation canopies to provide land and water surface elevations with accuracies better than + or - 50 cm. The altimeter waveforms required retracking over the specular Everglades surface. The altimeter-derived land elevations were correlated with large-scale topographic maps while the altimeter-derived water elevations were correlated with water gauge records of the U.S. Geological Survey. Examination of the altimeter waveforms also revealed reflections from the Everglades' surface occurring earlier than the surface reflections. These earlier surface reflections are interpreted to be from vegetation canopies, and may provide a measure of vegetation canopy heights. Future satellite radar altimeters could provide supplemental vertical control in relatively inaccessible swamp areas, could monitor water levels, and perhaps could monitor vegetation growth.

  1. Testate Amoebae as Paleohydrological Proxies in the Florida Everglades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, T.; Booth, R.; Bernhardt, C. E.; Willard, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    The largest wetland restoration effort ever attempted, the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP), is currently underway in the Florida Everglades, and a critical goal of CERP is reestablishment of the pre-drainage (pre-AD 1880) hydrology. Paleoecological research in the greater Everglades ecosystem is underway to reconstruct past water levels and variability throughout the system, providing a basis for restoration targets. Testate amoebae, a group of unicellular organisms that form decay-resistant tests, have been successfully used in northern-latitude bogs to reconstruct past wetland hydrology; however, their application in other peatland types, particularly at lower latitudes, has not been well studied. We assessed the potential use of testate amoebae as tools to reconstruct the past hydrology of the Everglades. Modern surface samples were collected from the Everglades National Park and Water Conservation Areas, across a water table gradient that included four vegetation types (tree island interior, tree island edge, sawgrass transition, slough). Community composition was quantified and compared to environmental conditions (water table, pH, vegetation) using ordination and gradient-analysis approaches. Results of nonmetric multidimensional scaling revealed that the most important pattern of community change, representing about 30% of the variance in the dataset, was related to water-table depth (r2=0.32). Jackknifed cross-validation of a transfer function for water table depth, based on a simple weighted average model, indicated the potential for testate amoebae in studies of past Everglades hydrology (RMSEP = 9 cm, r2=0.47). Although the performance of the transfer function was not as good as those from northern-latitude bogs, our results suggest that testate amoebae could be could be a valuable tool in paleohydrological studies of the Everglades, particularly when used with other hydrological proxies (e.g., pollen, plant macrofossils, diatoms).

  2. Occurrence of monoethylmercury in the Florida Everglades: identification and verification.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yuxiang; Yin, Yongguang; Li, Yanbin; Liu, Guangliang; Feng, Xinbin; Jiang, Guibin; Cai, Yong

    2010-11-01

    A few studies have reported the occurrence of monoethylmercury (CH(3)CH(2)Hg(+)) in the natural environment, but further verification is needed due to the lack of direct evidence and/or uncertainty in analytical procedures. Various analytical techniques were employed to verify the occurrence of CH(3)CH(2)Hg(+) in soil of the Florida Everglades. The identity of CH(3)CH(2)Hg(+) in Everglades soil was clarified, for the first time, by GC/MS. The employment of the recently developed aqueous phenylation-purge-and-trap-GC coupled with ICPMS confirmed that the detected CH(3)CH(2)Hg(+) was not a misidentification of CH(3)SHg(+). Stable isotope-tracer experiments further indicated that the detected CH(3)CH(2)Hg(+) indeed originated from Everglades soil and was not an analytical artifact. All these evidence clearly confirmed the occurrence of CH(3)CH(2)Hg(+) in Everglades soil, presumably as a consequence of ethylation occurring in this wetland. The prevalence of CH(3)CH(2)Hg(+) in Everglades soil suggests that ethylation could play an important role in the biogeochemical cycling of Hg. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Sulfur and Methylmercury in the Florida Everglades - the Biogeochemical Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orem, W. H.; Gilmour, C. C.; Krabbenhoft, D. P.; Aiken, G.

    2011-12-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a serious environmental problem in aquatic ecosystems worldwide because of its toxicity and tendency to bioaccumulate. The Everglades receives some of the highest levels of atmospheric mercury deposition and has some of the highest levels of MeHg in fish in the USA, posing a threat to pisciverous wildlife and people through fish consumption. USGS studies show that a combination of biogeochemical factors make the Everglades especially susceptible to MeHg production and bioaccumulation: (1) vast wetland area with anoxic soils supporting anaerobic microbial activity, (2) high rates of atmospheric mercury deposition, (3) high levels of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) that complexes and stabilizes mercury in solution for transport to sites of methylation, and (4) high sulfate loading in surface water that drives microbial sulfate reduction and mercury methylation. The high levels of sulfate in the Everglades represent an unnatural condition. Background sulfate levels are estimated to be <1 mg/L, but about 60% of the Everglades has surface water sulfate concentrations exceeding background. Highly sulfate-enriched marshes in the northern Everglades have average sulfate levels of 60 mg/L. Sulfate loading to the Everglades is principally a result of land and water management in south Florida. The highest concentrations of sulfate, averaging 60-70 mg/L, are in canal water in the Everglades Agricultural Area (EAA). Geochemical data and a preliminary sulfur mass balance for the EAA are consistent with sulfur currently used in agriculture, and sulfur released by oxidation of organic EAA soils (including legacy agricultural applications and natural sulfur) as the primary sources of sulfate enrichment to the canals and ecosystem. Sulfate loading increases microbial sulfate reduction and MeHg production in soils. The relationship between sulfate loading and MeHg production, however, is complex. Sulfate levels up to about 20-30 mg/L increase mercury

  4. The role of the everglades mangrove ecotone region (EMER) in regulating nutrient cycling and wetland productivity in South Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rivera-Monroy, V. H.; Twilley, R.R.; Davis, S.E.; Childers, D.L.; Simard, M.; Chambers, R.; Jaffe, R.; Boyer, J.N.; Rudnick, D.T.; Zhang, K.; Castaneda-Moya, E.; Ewe, S.M.L.; Price, R.M.; Coronado-Molina, C.; Ross, M.; Smith, T.J.; Michot, B.; Meselhe, E.; Nuttle, W.; Troxler, T.G.; Noe, G.B.

    2011-01-01

    The authors summarize the main findings of the Florida Coastal Everglades Long-Term Ecological Research (FCE-LTER) program in the EMER, within the context of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP), to understand how regional processes, mediated by water flow, control population and ecosystem dynamics across the EMER landscape. Tree canopies with maximum height <3 m cover 49% of the EMER, particularly in the SE region. These scrub/dwarf mangroves are the result of a combination of low soil phosphorus (P < 59 ??g P g dw-1) in the calcareous marl substrate and long hydroperiod. Phosphorus limits the EMER and its freshwater watersheds due to the lack of terrigenous sediment input and the phosphorus-limited nature of the freshwater Everglades. Reduced freshwater delivery over the past 50years, combined with Everglades compartmentalization and a 10 cm rise in coastal sea level, has led to the landward transgression (???1.5 km in 54 years) of the mangrove ecotone. Seasonal variation in freshwater input strongly controls the temporal variation of nitrogen and P exports (99%) from the Everglades to Florida Bay. Rapid changes in nutrient availability and vegetation distribution during the last 50years show that future ecosystem restoration actions and land use decisions can exert a major influence, similar to sea level rise over the short term, on nutrient cycling and wetland productivity in the EMER. Copyright ?? 2011 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  5. The role of the Everglades Mangrove Ecotone Region (EMER) in regulating nutrient cycling and wetland productivity in South Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rivera-Monroy, Victor H.; Twilley, Robert R.; Davis, Stephen E.; Childers, Daniel L.; Simard, Marc; Chambers, Randolph; Jaffe, Rudolf; Boyer, Joseph N.; Rudnick, David T.; Zhang, Keqi; Castañeda-Moya, Edward; Ewe, Sharon M.L.; Price, Rene M.; Coronado-Molina, Carlos; Ross, Michael; Smith, Thomas J.; Michot, Beatrice; Meselhe, Ehab; Nuttle, William; Troxler, Tiffany G.; Noe, Gregory B.

    2011-01-01

    The authors summarize the main findings of the Florida Coastal Everglades Long-Term Ecological Research (FCE-LTER) program in the EMER, within the context of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP), to understand how regional processes, mediated by water flow, control population and ecosystem dynamics across the EMER landscape. Tree canopies with maximum height -1) in the calcareous marl substrate and long hydroperiod. Phosphorus limits the EMER and its freshwater watersheds due to the lack of terrigenous sediment input and the phosphorus-limited nature of the freshwater Everglades. Reduced freshwater delivery over the past 50 years, combined with Everglades compartmentalization and a 10 cm rise in coastal sea level, has led to the landward transgression (~1.5 km in 54 years) of the mangrove ecotone. Seasonal variation in freshwater input strongly controls the temporal variation of nitrogen and P exports (99%) from the Everglades to Florida Bay. Rapid changes in nutrient availability and vegetation distribution during the last 50 years show that future ecosystem restoration actions and land use decisions can exert a major influence, similar to sea level rise over the short term, on nutrient cycling and wetland productivity in the EMER.

  6. Integrated carbon budget models for the Everglades terrestrial-coastal-oceanic gradient: Current status and needs for inter-site comparisons

    Treesearch

    T. G. Troxler; E. Gaiser; J. Barr; J. D. Fuentes; R. Jaffe; D. L. Childers; L. Collado-Vides; V. H. Rivera-Monroy; E. Castaneda-Moya; W. Anderson; R. Chambers; M. Chen; C. Coronado-Molina; S. E. Davis; V. Engel; C. Fitz; J. Fourqurean; T. Frankovich; J. Kominoski; C. Madden; S. L. Malone; S. F. Oberbauer; P. Olivas; J. Richards; C. Saunders; J. Schedlbauer; L. J. Scinto; F. Sklar; T. Smith; J. M. Smoak; G. Starr; R. R. Twilley; K. Whelan

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that coastal ecosystems can bury significantly more C than tropical forests, indicating that continued coastal development and exposure to sea level rise and storms will have global biogeochemical consequences. The Florida Coastal Everglades Long Term Ecological Research (FCE LTER) site provides an excellent subtropical system for examining...

  7. Serologic Evidence of Widespread Everglades Virus Activity in Dogs, Florida

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, Lark L.; Crawford, Cynda; Dee, James; Miller, Ryan; Freier, Jerome

    2006-01-01

    Everglades virus (EVEV), an alphavirus in the Venezuelan equine encephalitis complex, circulates among rodents and vector mosquitoes in Florida and occasionally infects humans. It causes febrile disease, sometimes accompanied by neurologic manifestations. Although previous surveys showed high seroprevalence in humans, EVEV infections may be underdiagnosed because the disease is not severe enough to warrant a clinic visit or the undifferentiated presentations complicate diagnosis. Documented EVEV activity, as recent as 1993, was limited to south Florida. Using dogs as sentinels, a serosurvey was conducted to evaluate whether EVEV circulated recently in Florida and whether EVEV's spatial distribution parallels that of the mosquito vector, Culex cedecei. Four percent of dog sera contained neutralizing EVEV antibodies, and many seropositive animals lived farther north than both recorded EVEV activity and the principal vector. These results indicate that EVEV is widespread in Florida and may be an important, unrecognized cause of human illness. PMID:17326938

  8. Empirical tools for simulating salinity in the estuaries in Everglades National Park, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, F. E.; Smith, D. T.; Nickerson, D. M.

    2011-12-01

    Salinity in a shallow estuary is affected by upland freshwater inputs (surface runoff, stream/canal flows, groundwater), atmospheric processes (precipitation, evaporation), marine connectivity, and wind patterns. In Everglades National Park (ENP) in South Florida, the unique Everglades ecosystem exists as an interconnected system of fresh, brackish, and salt water marshes, mangroves, and open water. For this effort a coastal aquifer conceptual model of the Everglades hydrologic system was used with traditional correlation and regression hydrologic techniques to create a series of multiple linear regression (MLR) salinity models from observed hydrologic, marine, and weather data. The 37 ENP MLR salinity models cover most of the estuarine areas of ENP and produce daily salinity simulations that are capable of estimating 65-80% of the daily variability in salinity depending upon the model. The Root Mean Squared Error is typically about 2-4 salinity units, and there is little bias in the predictions. However, the absolute error of a model prediction in the nearshore embayments and the mangrove zone of Florida Bay may be relatively large for a particular daily simulation during the seasonal transitions. Comparisons show that the models group regionally by similar independent variables and salinity regimes. The MLR salinity models have approximately the same expected range of simulation accuracy and error as higher spatial resolution salinity models.

  9. Elements of South Florida's Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan.

    PubMed

    Perry, William

    2004-04-01

    Approximately 70% less water flows through the Everglades ecosystem today compared with the historic Everglades, and the quality of the remaining water is often degraded. The regionally managed hydropattern does not follow the pre-drainage distribution, timing, and duration of the natural Everglades, nor can water move freely though the remaining Everglades. As a result, there have been significant reductions in wildlife and fish populations, their habitat, and the environmental services wetlands provide society. Both the problems of declining ecosystem health and the solutions to Everglades restoration center on restoring the quantity, quality, timing, and distribution of water. The Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan consists of over 60 civil works projects that will be designed and implemented over a 30 year period. At an estimated cost of 7.8 billion dollars, it seeks to correct an earlier attempt at water management in South Florida and improve water availability during the dry season and reduce flooding of urban and agricultural areas during the wet season. The plan calls for storage and controlled release from more than 217,000 acres of new reservoirs and wetland-based treatment areas and from over 300 underground aquifer storage and recovery wells. The plans assumes that during retention in stormwater treatment areas, the excess phosphorus, nitrogen, agrichemicals such as atrazine, diazinon, endosulfan, and other contaminants will be reduced before release into the natural areas. It also assumes that little or no change in water quality will occur during underground storage. To improve the hydraulic connectivity of natural areas, some of the extensive system of levees and canals within the Everglades will be removed in an effort to improve overland water flow. Most of the current planning has focused on water storage and restoring basic hydrology in the remnant natural areas and on phosphorus removal as a benchmark of water quality. The restoration

  10. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA-83-085-1757, Everglades National Park, Everglades, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, R.; Fidler, A.T.; Chrislip, D.

    1986-12-01

    Adverse health effects from exposure to N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide (DEET), and insect repellant, in employees of Everglades National Park, Florida were investigated in response to a request from the National Park Service. Neurobehavioral analysis showed significant correlations between DEET exposure and affective symptoms, insomnia, muscle cramps, and urinary hesitation. The authors conclude that skin rashes, daytime sleepiness, and impaired cognitive function are significantly associated with DEET exposure. Since a safe alternative is not available, it is recommended that exposure be minimized by using lower concentrations and making use of protective clothing.

  11. Biogeochemical classification of South Florida's estuarine and coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Briceño, Henry O; Boyer, Joseph N; Castro, Joffre; Harlem, Peter

    2013-10-15

    South Florida's watersheds have endured a century of urban and agricultural development and disruption of their hydrology. Spatial characterization of South Florida's estuarine and coastal waters is important to Everglades' restoration programs. We applied Factor Analysis and Hierarchical Clustering of water quality data in tandem to characterize and spatially subdivide South Florida's coastal and estuarine waters. Segmentation rendered forty-four biogeochemically distinct water bodies whose spatial distribution is closely linked to geomorphology, circulation, benthic community pattern, and to water management. This segmentation has been adopted with minor changes by federal and state environmental agencies to derive numeric nutrient criteria. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Mercury methylation in periphyton of the Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cleckner, L.B.; Gilmour, C.C.; Hurley, J.P.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.

    1999-01-01

    Trophic accumulation of mercury (Hg) in aquatic ecosystems is of global concern due to health effects associated with eating fish with elevated Hg levels. The methylated form of Hg bioaccumulates so it is important to understand how inorganic Hg is transformed to methylmercury in the environment. Here, a new site for Hg methylation, the periphyton communities that are prevalent in the Florida Everglades, is described. It is hypothesized that periphyton communities that support an active microbial sulfur cycle support Hg methylation. This new methylation site has implications for trophic transfer of methylmercury since periphyton can be the base of the food web in aquatic ecosystems.

  13. Potential Effects of Climate Change on Florida's Everglades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nungesser, M.; Saunders, C.; Coronado-Molina, C.; Obeysekera, J.; Johnson, J.; McVoy, C.; Benscoter, B.

    2015-04-01

    Restoration efforts in Florida's Everglades focus on preserving and restoring this unique wetland's natural landscape. Because most of the Everglades is a freshwater peatland, it requires surplus rainfall to remain a peatland. Restoration plans generally assume a stable climate, yet projections of altered climate over a 50-year time horizon suggest that this assumption may be inappropriate. Using a legacy regional hydrological model, we simulated combinations of a temperature rise of 1.5 °C, a ± 10 % change in rainfall, and a 0.46 m sea level rise relative to base conditions. The scenario of increased evapotranspiration and increased rainfall produced a slight increase in available water. In contrast, the more likely scenario of increased evapotranspiration and decreased rainfall lowered median water depths by 5-114 cm and shortened inundation duration periods by 5-45 %. Sea level rise increased stages and inundation duration in southern Everglades National Park. These ecologically significant decreases in water depths and inundation duration periods would greatly alter current ecosystems through severe droughts, peat loss and carbon emissions, wildfires, loss of the unique ridge and slough patterns, large shifts in plant and animal communities, and increased exotic species invasions. These results suggest using adaptive restoration planning, a method that explicitly incorporates large climatic and environmental uncertainties into long-term ecosystem restoration plans, structural design, and management. Anticipated water constraints necessitate alternative approaches to restoration, including maintaining critical landscapes and facilitating transitions in others. Accommodating these uncertainties may improve the likelihood of restoration success.

  14. Potential effects of climate change on Florida's Everglades.

    PubMed

    Nungesser, M; Saunders, C; Coronado-Molina, C; Obeysekera, J; Johnson, J; McVoy, C; Benscoter, B

    2015-04-01

    Restoration efforts in Florida's Everglades focus on preserving and restoring this unique wetland's natural landscape. Because most of the Everglades is a freshwater peatland, it requires surplus rainfall to remain a peatland. Restoration plans generally assume a stable climate, yet projections of altered climate over a 50-year time horizon suggest that this assumption may be inappropriate. Using a legacy regional hydrological model, we simulated combinations of a temperature rise of 1.5 °C, a ± 10% change in rainfall, and a 0.46 m sea level rise relative to base conditions. The scenario of increased evapotranspiration and increased rainfall produced a slight increase in available water. In contrast, the more likely scenario of increased evapotranspiration and decreased rainfall lowered median water depths by 5-114 cm and shortened inundation duration periods by 5-45%. Sea level rise increased stages and inundation duration in southern Everglades National Park. These ecologically significant decreases in water depths and inundation duration periods would greatly alter current ecosystems through severe droughts, peat loss and carbon emissions, wildfires, loss of the unique ridge and slough patterns, large shifts in plant and animal communities, and increased exotic species invasions. These results suggest using adaptive restoration planning, a method that explicitly incorporates large climatic and environmental uncertainties into long-term ecosystem restoration plans, structural design, and management. Anticipated water constraints necessitate alternative approaches to restoration, including maintaining critical landscapes and facilitating transitions in others. Accommodating these uncertainties may improve the likelihood of restoration success.

  15. Geochemistry of sulfur in the Florida Everglades; 1994 through 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bates, Anne L.; Orem, W.H.; Harvey, J.W.; Spiker, E. C.

    2000-01-01

    In this report, we present data on the geochemistry of sulfur in sediments and in surface water, groundwater, and rainwater in the Everglades region in south Florida. The results presented here are part of a larger study intended to determine the roles played by the cycling of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur in the ecology of the south Florida wetlands. The geochemistry of sulfur in the region is particularly important because of its link to the production of toxic methylmercury through processes mediated by sulfate reducing bacteria. Sediment cores were collected from the Everglades Agricultural Area (EAA), Water Conservation Areas (WCAs) 1A and 2A, from Lake Okeechobee, and from Taylor Slough in the southern Everglades. Water collection was more widespread and includes surface water from WCAs 1A, 2A, 3A, 2B, the EAA, Taylor Slough, Lake Okeechobee, and the Kissimmee River. Groundwater was collected from The Everglades Nutrient Removal Area (ENR) and from WCA 2A. Rainwater was collected at two month intervals over a period of one year from the ENR and from WCA 2A. Water was analyzed for sulfate concentration and sulfate sulfur stable isotopic ratio (34S/32S). Sediment cores were analyzed for total sulfur concentration and/or for concentrations of sulfur species (sulfate, organic sulfur, disulfides, and acid volatile sulfides (AVS)) and for their stable sulfur isotopic ratio. Results show a decrease in total sulfur content (1.57 to 0.61 percent dry weight) with depth in two sediment cores collected in WCA 2A, indicating that there has been an increase in total sulfur content in recent times. A sediment core from the center of Lake Okeechobee shows a decrease in total sulfur content with depth (0.28 to 0.08 percent dry weight). A core from the periphery of the lake (South Bay) likewise shows a decrease in total sulfur content with depth (1.00 to 0.69 percent dry weight), however, the overall sulfur content is greater than that near the center at all depths

  16. Chronology from sediment cores collected in southwestern Everglades National Park, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bernhardt, C.E.; Wingard, G.L.; Willard, D.A.; Marot, M.E.; Landacre, B.; Holmes, C.W.

    2013-01-01

    Age model data are presented for 10 cores from the southwestern coastal mangrove zone of Everglades National Park, Florida, collected in Common Era (CE) 2004 and 2005 and used for paleoecological analysis. Carbon-14 (14C), lead-210 (210Pb), cesium-137 (137Cs), radium-226 (226Ra), and pollen biostratigraphic information is included, and age models were generated for 6 of the 10 cores. Age reversals and sediment disturbance prevented construction of age models on the remaining four cores. Four cores present a continuous record of the last 50 to 100 years, making them useful for analyzing the impacts caused by changes in water management in south Florida. These cores are Harney River 2A and Harney River 1A, Shark River 2A, and Roberts River.

  17. Tree island pattern formation in the Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, Joel; D'Odorico, P.; Engel, Victor C.; Redwine, Jed

    2016-01-01

    The Florida Everglades freshwater landscape exhibits a distribution of islands covered by woody vegetation and bordered by marshes and wet prairies. Known as “tree islands”, these ecogeomorphic features can be found in few other low gradient, nutrient limited freshwater wetlands. In the last few decades, however, a large percentage of tree islands have either shrank or disappeared in apparent response to altered water depths and other stressors associated with human impacts on the Everglades. Because the processes determining the formation and spatial organization of tree islands remain poorly understood, it is still unclear what controls the sensitivity of these landscapes to altered conditions. We hypothesize that positive feedbacks between woody plants and soil accretion are crucial to emergence and decline of tree islands. Likewise, positive feedbacks between phosphorus (P) accumulation and trees explain the P enrichment commonly observed in tree island soils. Here, we develop a spatially-explicit model of tree island formation and evolution, which accounts for these positive feedbacks (facilitation) as well as for long range competition and fire dynamics. It is found that tree island patterns form within a range of parameter values consistent with field data. Simulated impacts of reduced water levels, increased intensity of drought, and increased frequency of dry season/soil consuming fires on these feedback mechanisms result in the decline and disappearance of tree islands on the landscape.

  18. Denitrification in Marl and Peat Sediments in the Florida Everglades

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, A. S.; Cooper, W. J.; Scheidt, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    The potential for denitrification in marl and peat sediments in the Shark River Slough in the Everglades National Park was determined by the acetylene blockage assay. The influence of nitrate concentration on denitrification rate and N2O yield from added nitrate was examined. The effects of added glucose and phosphate and of temperature on the denitrification potential were determined. The sediments readily denitrified added nitrate. N2O was released from the sediments both with and without added acetylene. The marl sediments had higher rates than the peat on every date sampled. Denitrification was nitrate limited; however, the yields of N2O amounted to only 10 to 34% of the added nitrate when 100 μM nitrate was added. On the basis of measured increases in ammonium concentration, it appears that the balance of added nitrate may be converted to ammonium in the marl sediment. The sediment temperature at the time of sampling greatly influenced the denitrification potential (15-fold rate change) at the marl site, indicating that either the number or the specific activity of the denitrifiers changed in response to temperature fluctuations (9 to 25°C) in the sediment. It is apparent from this study that denitrification in Everglades sediments is not an effective means of removing excess nitrogen which may be introduced as nitrate into the ecosystem with supply water from the South Florida watershed and that sporadic addition of nitrate-rich water may lead to nitrous oxide release from these wetlands. PMID:16347228

  19. 78 FR 13081 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement for General Management Plan, Everglades National Park, Florida

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-26

    ... National Park Service Draft Environmental Impact Statement for General Management Plan, Everglades National Park, Florida AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Availability. SUMMARY... National Park Service (NPS) announces the availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement...

  20. Observations of Daily Temperature Patterns in the Southern Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaffranek, R.W.; Jenter, H.L.; ,

    2001-01-01

    Temperature is an important factor affecting key hydrological and ecological processes within the subtropical wetlands of the Florida Everglades. Comprehensive measurements are being made to quantify the temporal and spatial variability of the water-temperature regime. Data collected in 2000 at a location near the central flow pathway of the ecosystem showed both daily repetitive cycles and dynamic fluctuations in response to meteorological forces. Time-series data collected at spatial intervals throughout the water column, in the air, and in the underlying plant-litter layer revealed the dynamic nature of the temperature structure, e.g., uniformly well-mixed periods, stratified conditions, inversions, changing vertical gradients, and other characteristics important to understanding ecosystem processes.

  1. Analysis for water level data for Everglades National Park, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchanan, T.J.; Hartwell, J.H.

    1972-01-01

    Stage-duration curves were developed for five gaging stations in Everglades National Park, Florida. Four of the five curves show similar characteristics with an increase in the slope when the water level is below land surface. Monthly stage-duration curves, developed for one of the stations, reflect the seasonal trends of the water level. Recession curves were prepared for the same five stations. These curves represent the average water-level decline during periods of little or no rainfall. They show the decline in level at the end of 10, 20, and 60 days for any given initial stage. A family of curves was also prepared to give the recession from various initial stages for any period up to 60 days.

  2. Analysis of changes in water-level dynamics at selected sites in the Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conrads, Paul A.; Benedict, Stephen T.

    2013-01-01

    The historical modification and regulation of the hydrologic patterns in the Florida Everglades have resulted in changes in the ecosystem of South Florida and the Florida Everglades. Since the 1970s, substantial focus has been given to the restoration of the Everglades ecosystem. The U.S. Geological Survey through its Greater Everglades Priority Ecosystem Science and National Water-Quality Assessment Programs has been providing scientific information to resource managers to assist in the Everglades restoration efforts. The current investigation included development of a simple method to identify and quantify changes in historical hydrologic behavior within the Everglades that could be used by researchers to identify responses of ecological communities to those changes. Such information then could be used by resource managers to develop appropriate water-management practices within the Everglades to promote restoration. The identification of changes in historical hydrologic behavior within the Everglades was accomplished by analyzing historical time-series water-level data from selected gages in the Everglades using (1) break-point analysis of cumulative Z-scores to identify hydrologic changes and (2) cumulative water-level frequency distribution curves to evaluate the magnitude of those changes. This analytical technique was applied to six long-term water-level gages in the Florida Everglades. The break-point analysis for the concurrent period of record (1978–2011) identified 10 common periods of changes in hydrologic behavior at the selected gages. The water-level responses at each gage for the 10 periods displayed similarity in fluctuation patterns, highlighting the interconnectedness of the Florida Everglades hydrologic system. While the patterns were similar, the analysis also showed that larger fluctuations in water levels between periods occurred in Water Conservation Areas 2 and 3 in contrast to those in Water Conservation Area 1 and the Everglades

  3. Sediment transport on Cape Sable, Everglades National Park, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zucker, Mark; Boudreau, Carrie

    2010-01-01

    The Cape Sable peninsula is located on the southwestern tip of the Florida peninsula within Everglades National Park (ENP). Lake Ingraham, the largest lake within Cape Sable, is now connected to the Gulf of Mexico and western Florida Bay by canals built in the early 1920's. Some of these canals breached a natural marl ridge located to the north of Lake Ingraham. These connections altered the landscape of this area allowing for the transport of sediments to and from Lake Ingraham. Saline intrusion into the formerly fresh interior marsh has impacted the local ecology. Earthen dams installed in the 1950's and 1960's in canals that breached the marl ridge have repeatedly failed. Sheet pile dams installed in the early 1990's subsequently failed resulting in the continued alteration of Lake Ingraham and the interior marsh. The Cape Sable Canals Dam Restoration Project, funded by ENP, proposes to restore the two failed dams in Lake Ingraham. The objective of this study was to collect discharge and water quality data over a series of tidal cycles and flow conditions to establish discharge and sediment surrogate relations prior to initiating the Cape Sable Canals Dam Restoration Project. A dry season synoptic sampling event was performed on April 27-30, 2009.

  4. Ecological risk of methylmercury in Everglades National Park, Florida, USA.

    PubMed

    Rumbold, D G; Lange, T R; Axelrad, D M; Atkeson, T D

    2008-10-01

    Dramatic declines in mercury levels have been reported in Everglades biota in recent years. Yet, methylmercury (MeHg) hot spots remain. This paper summarizes a risk assessment of MeHg exposure to three piscivorous wildlife species (bald eagle, Haliaeetus leucocephalus; wood stork, Mycteria americana; and great egret, Ardea albus) foraging at a MeHg hot spot in northern Everglades National Park (ENP). Available data consisted of literature-derived life history parameters and tissue concentrations measured in 60 largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides), 60 sunfish (Lepomis spp.), and three composite samples of mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki) collected from 2003 to 2005. To assess risk, daily MeHg intake was estimated using Monte Carlo methods and compared to literature-derived effects thresholds. The results indicated the likelihood was very high, ranging from 98-100% probability, that these birds would experience exposures above the acceptable dose when foraging in northern ENP. Moreover, the likelihood that these birds would experience exposures above the lowest-observed-adverse-effect level (LOAEL) ranged from a 14% probability for the wood stork to 56% probability for the eagle. Data from this study, along with the results from several other surveys suggest that biota in ENP currently contain the highest MeHg levels in South Florida and that these levels are similar to or greater than other known MeHg hot spots in the United States. Given these findings, this paper also outlines a strategic plan to obtain additional measured and modeled information to support risk-based management decisions in ENP.

  5. Land Cover Trends in the Southern Florida Coastal Plain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kambly, Steven; Moreland, Thomas R.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents an assessment of land use and land cover change in the Southern Florida Coastal Plain ecoregion for the period from 1973 to 2000. The ecoregion is one of 84 level III ecoregions defined by the Environmental Protection Agency; ecoregions have been designed to serve as a spatial framework for environmental resource management and denote areas that contain a geographically distinct assemblage of biotic and abiotic phenomena, including geology, physiography, vegetation, climate, soils, land use, wildlife, and hydrology. The Southern Florida Coastal Plain ecoregion covers an area of approximately 22,407 square kilometers [8,651 square miles] across the lower portion of the Florida peninsula, from Lake Okeechobee southward through the Florida Keys. It comprises flat plains with wet soils, marshland and swamp land cover with Everglades and palmetto prairie vegetation types.

  6. Pollen assemblages as paleoenvironmental proxies in the Florida Everglades.

    PubMed

    Willard, D A.; Weimer, L M.; Riegel, W L.

    2001-04-01

    Analysis of 170 pollen assemblages from surface samples in eight vegetation types in the Florida Everglades indicates that these wetland sub-environments are distinguishable from the pollen record and that they are useful proxies for hydrologic and edaphic parameters. Vegetation types sampled include sawgrass marshes, cattail marshes, sloughs with floating aquatics, wet prairies, brackish marshes, tree islands, cypress swamps, and mangrove forests. The distribution of these vegetation types is controlled by specific environmental parameters, such as hydrologic regime, nutrient availability, disturbance level, substrate type, and salinity; ecotones between vegetation types may be sharp. Using R-mode cluster analysis of pollen data, we identified diagnostic species groupings; Q-mode cluster analysis was used to differentiate pollen signatures of each vegetation type. Cluster analysis and the modern analog technique were applied to interpret vegetational and environmental trends over the last two millennia at a site in Water Conservation Area 3A. The results show that close modern analogs exist for assemblages in the core and indicate past hydrologic changes at the site, correlated with both climatic and land-use changes. The ability to differentiate marshes with different hydrologic and edaphic requirements using the pollen record facilitates assessment of relative impacts of climatic and anthropogenic changes on this wetland ecosystem on smaller spatial and temporal scales than previously were possible.

  7. Importance of landscape heterogeneity to wood storks in Florida Everglades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, D. Martin; Wolff, Wilfried F.; Deangelis, Donald L.

    1994-09-01

    Declines in populations of and reproductive success of wood storks and other wading birds have occurred in the Florida Everglades over the past several decades. These declines have been concurrent with major changes in the Everglades’ landscape characteristics. Among the plausible hypotheses that relate to landscape change are the following: (1) general loss of habitat; (2) heavy loss of specific habitat, namely, short-hydroperiod wetlands that provide high prey availability early in the breeding season; and (3) an increase in frequency of major drying out of the central slough areas, which can affect prey availability late in the breeding season. These three hypotheses were compared using an individual-based model of wood stork ( Mycteria americana) reproduction. This model simulated the behavior and energetics of each individual wood stork in a breeding colony on 15-min time intervals. Changes in water depth and prey availability occurred on daily time steps. Simulation results showed a threshold response in reproductive success to reduction of wetland heterogeneity. Model comparisons in which (1) only short-hydroperiod wetlands were removed and (2) wetlands of both long and short hydroperiods were removed showed that, for the same loss of total area, the specific habitat removal caused a much greater reduction in wood stork reproduction, indicating hypothesis 2 may be a more likely explanation than hypothesis 1. Reduction of initial prey availability in the central slough areas (simulating frequent drying; hypothesis 3) reduced fledging success by an average of more than 90% in the model.

  8. Reproduction and demography of the Florida Everglade (Snail) Kite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snyder, N.F.R.; Beissinger, S.R.; Chandler, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    An 18-year study of reproduction and survival of the Florida Everglade (Snail) Kite (Rostrhamus sociabilis plumbeus) has revealed the following: extremely poor nesting success (only 13.6% of nests found at the nest-building stage successful); extremely long breeding seasons (some reproductive activity in almost all months in good years); frequent multiple brooding and frequent multiple brooding and frequent renesting after failure; low egg hatchability (81%); high failure rates due to nest collapse, desertion, and predation; extremely high survival of juveniles and adults under good water conditions; and high vulnerability to drought due to near total dependency on a single species of drought-sensitive snail for food. Despite low nesting success, the species has increased rapidly under good conditions, mainly because of multiple nesting attempts within long breeding seasons and high survival rates of free-flying birds. Nesting success varied significantly between regions and nest substrates, but not as a function of seasons or solitary vs. colonial nesting. While nesting success was reduced in low water years, this effect was at least partly due to heavy use of poor nest substrates under such conditions. Clutch size and numbers of young per successful nest varied with regions, but not as a function of seasons or water levels. The effects of coloniality on clutch size and numbers of young were inconsistent. Significant effects of nest-substrate types on clutch size and numbers of young were apparently artifacts of substrate differences between regions.

  9. Pollen assemblages as paleoenvironmental proxies in the Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Willard, D.A.; Weimer, L.M.; Riegel, W.L.

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of 170 pollen assemblages from surface samples in eight vegetation types in the Florida Everglades indicates that these wetland sub-environments are distinguishable from the pollen record and that they are useful proxies for hydrologic and edaphic parameters. Vegetation types sampled include sawgrass marshes, cattail marshes, sloughs with floating aquatics, wet prairies, brackish marshes, tree islands, cypress swamps, and mangrove forests. The distribution of these vegetation types is controlled by specific environmental parameters, such as hydrologic regime, nutrient availability, disturbance level, substrate type, and salinity; ecotones between vegetation types may be sharp. Using R-mode cluster analysis of pollen data, we identified diagnostic species groupings; Q-mode cluster analysis was used to differentiate pollen signatures of each vegetation type. Cluster analysis and the modern analog technique were applied to interpret vegetational and environmental trends over the last two millennia at a site in Water Conservation Area 3A. The results show that close modern analogs exist for assemblages in the core and indicate past hydrologic changes at the site, correlated with both climatic and land-use changes. The ability to differentiate marshes with different hydrologic and edaphic requirements using the pollen record facilitates assessment of relative impacts of climatic and anthropogenic changes on this wetland ecosystem on smaller spatial and temporal scales than previously were possible. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V.

  10. Status of the everglade kite in Florida--1968-1978

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sykes, P.W.

    1979-01-01

    The population status of the Everglade Kite (Rostrhamus sociabils plumbeus) was studied in Florida from 1968 through 1978. Sixty-four nestlings (40% of known fledged young) were leg-banded with unique color combinations, and of these, 17.2% were seen 1 or more years after they were banded. Kites were capable of breeding at 3 years of age or possibly younger. The population was nomadic; its sex ratio unknown. From 1968 through 1976 breeding success was determined for 175 nests, of which 48% were successful: 161 young were fledged, x = 20.1 per year, or 1.9 per successful nest (N = 84). The percentage of successful nests ranged from 17.1 (N = 35) in 1974 to 84.6 (N = 13) in 1968 (x= 54.1 per year). From 1968 through 1976 there was a significant increase (r = 0.685, P < 0.05) in the number of nests ohserved (excluding 1971, and reproduction was not studied in 1977 and 1978). The mortality rate for young in the nest was 41%. Some individuals live for at least 8+ years. The mean number of kites for 10 annual censuses was 120.2 with a range of 65 (1972) to 267 (1978). The severe drought of 1971 resulted in a significant decrease in the population for that year and 1972, with no nesting attempts being observed in the dry year. From 1974 through 1978 the population increased significantly (r = 0.92, P < 0.025), apparently the result of favorable water conditions and increased food supply. The loss of suitable habitat is the major problem facing the species in Florida. A high water level is essential, as this affects food supply and its availability, as well as nesting success.

  11. Tracing sources of sulfur in the Florida everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bates, A.L.; Orem, W.H.; Harvey, J.W.; Spiker, E. C.

    2002-01-01

    We examined concentrations and sulfur isotopic ratios (34S/32S, expressed as ??34S in parts per thousand [???] units) of sulfate in surface water, ground water, and rain water from sites throughout the northern Everglades to establish the sources of sulfur to the ecosystem. The geochemistry of sulfur is of particular interest in the Everglades because of its link, through processes mediated by sulfate -reducing bacteria, to the production of toxic methylmercury in this wetland ecosystem. Methylmercury, a neurotoxin that is bioaccumulated, has been found in high concentrations in freshwater fish from the Everglades, and poses a potential threat to fish-eating wildlife and to human health through fish consumption. Results show that surface water in large portions of the Everglades is heavily contaminated with sulfate, with the highest concentrations observed in canals and marsh areas receiving canal discharge. Spatial patterns in the range of concentrations and ??34S values of sulfate in surface water indicate that the major source of sulfate in sulfur-contaminated marshes is water from canals draining the Everglades Agricultural Area. Shallow ground water underlying the Everglades and rain water samples had much lower sulfate concentrations and ??34S values distinct from those found in surface water. The ??34S results implicate agricultural fertilizer as a major contributor to the sulfate contaminating the Everglades, but ground water under the Everglades Agricultural Area (EAA) may also be a contributing source. The contamination of the northern Everglades with sulfate from canal discharge may be a key factor in controlling the distribution and extent of methylmercury production in the Everglades.

  12. Tracing sources of sulfur in the Florida Everglades.

    PubMed

    Bates, Anne L; Orem, William H; Harvey, Judson W; Spiker, Elliott C

    2002-01-01

    We examined concentrations and sulfur isotopic ratios (34S/32S, expressed as delta34S in parts per thousand [/1000] units) of sulfate in surface water, ground water, and rain water from sites throughout the northern Everglades to establish the sources of sulfur to the ecosystem. The geochemistry of sulfur is of particular interest in the Everglades because of its link, through processes mediated by sulfate-reducing bacteria, to the production of toxic methylmercury in this wetland ecosystem. Methylmercury, a neurotoxin that is bioaccumulated, has been found in high concentrations in freshwater fish from the Everglades, and poses a potential threat to fish-eating wildlife and to human health through fish consumption. Results show that surface water in large portions of the Everglades is heavily contaminated with sulfate, with the highest concentrations observed in canals and marsh areas receiving canal discharge. Spatial patterns in the range of concentrations and delta34S values of sulfate in surface water indicate that the major source of sulfate in sulfur-contaminated marshes is water from canals draining the Everglades Agricultural Area. Shallow ground water underlying the Everglades and rain water samples had much lower sulfate concentrations and delta34S values distinct from those found in surface water. The delta34S results implicate agricultural fertilizer as a major contributor to the sulfate contaminating the Everglades, but ground water under the Everglades Agricultural Area (EAA) may also be a contributing source. The contamination of the northern Everglades with sulfate from canal discharge may be a key factor in controlling the distribution and extent of methylmercury production in the Everglades.

  13. Age, differential growth and mortality rates in unexploited populations of Florida gar, an apex predator in the Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murie, D.J.; Parkyn, D.C.; Nico, L.G.; Herod, J.J.; Loftus, W.F.

    2009-01-01

    Florida gar, Lepisosteus platyrhincus DeKay, were sampled in two canal systems in south Florida during 2000-2001 to estimate age, growth and mortality as part of the Everglades ecosystem-restoration effort. Tamiami (C-4) and L-31W canal systems had direct connections to natural wetlands of the Everglades and harboured large Florida gar populations. Of 476 fish aged, maximum ages were 19 and 10years for females and males, respectively. Maximum sizes were also larger for females compared with males (817 vs 602 mm total length). Overall, female Florida gar from both Tamiami and L-31W were larger at age than males from L-31W that, in turn, were larger at any given age than males from Tamiami. Females also had lower rates of annual mortality (Z = 0.21) than males from L-31W (Z = 0.31) or males from Tamiami (Z = 0.54). As a large and long-lived apex predator in the Everglades, Florida gar may structure lower trophic levels. Regional- and sex-specific population parameters for Florida gar will contribute to the simulation models designed to evaluate Everglades restoration alternatives. ?? 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Dissolved organic matter in the Florida everglades: Implications for ecosystem restoration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aiken, G.R.; Gilmour, C.C.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.; Orem, W.

    2011-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the Florida Everglades controls a number of environmental processes important for ecosystem function including the absorption of light, mineral dissolution/precipitation, transport of hydrophobic compounds (e.g., pesticides), and the transport and reactivity of metals, such as mercury. Proposed attempts to return the Everglades to more natural flow conditions will result in changes to the present transport of DOM from the Everglades Agricultural Area and the northern conservation areas to Florida Bay. In part, the restoration plan calls for increasing water flow throughout the Everglades by removing some of the manmade barriers to flow in place today. The land- and water-use practices associated with the plan will likely result in changes in the quality, quantity, and reactivity of DOM throughout the greater Everglades ecosystem. The authors discuss the factors controlling DOM concentrations and chemistry, present distribution of DOM throughout the Everglades, the potential effects of DOM on key water-quality issues, and the potential utility of dissolved organic matter as an indicator of success of restoration efforts. Copyright ?? 2011 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  15. Bacterial methylmercury degradation in Florida Everglades peat sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marvin-DiPasquale, M. C.; Oremland, R.S.

    1998-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) degradation was investigated along an eutrophication gradient in the Florida Everglades by quantifying 14CH4 and 14CO2 production after incubation of anaerobic sediments with [14C]MeHg. Degradation rate constants (k) were consistently ???0.1 d-1 and decreased with sediment depth. Higher k values were observed when shorter incubation times and lower MeHg amendment levels were used, and k increased 2-fold as in-situ MeHg concentrations were approached. The average floc layer k was 0.046 ?? 0.023 d-1 (n = 17) for 1-2 day incubations. In-situ degradation rates were estimated to be 0.02-0.5 ng of MeHg (g of dry sediment)-1 d-1, increasing from eutrophied to pristine areas. Nitrate-respiring bacteria did not demethylate MeHg, and NO3- addition partially inhibited degradation in some cases. MeHg degradation rates were not affected by PO43- addition. 14CO2 production in all samples indicated that oxidative demethylation (OD) was an important degradation mechanism. OD occurred over 5 orders of magnitude of applied MeHg concentration, with lowest limits [1-18 ng of MeHg (g of dry sediment)-1] in the range of in-situ MeHg levels. Sulfate reducers and methanogens were the primary agents of anaerobic OD, although it is suggested that methanogens dominate degradation at in-situ MeHg concentrations. Specific pathways of OD by these two microbial groups are proposed.Methylmercury (MeHg) degradation was investigated along an eutrophication gradient in the Florida Everglades by quantifying 14CH4 and 14CO2 production after incubation of anaerobic sediments with [14C]MeHg. Degradation rate constants (k) were consistently ???0.1 d-1 and decreased with sediment depth. Higher k values were observed when shorter incubation times and lower MeHg amendment levels were used, and k increased 2-fold as in-situ MeHg concentrations were approached. The average floc layer k was 0.046??0.023 d-1 (n = 17) for 1-2 day incubations. In-situ degradation rates were estimated to be 0

  16. Bacterial methylmercury degradation in Florida Everglades peat sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Marvin-Dipasquale, M.C.; Oremland, R.S.

    1998-09-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) degradation was investigated along an eutrophication gradient in the Florida Everglades by quantifying {sup 14}CH{sub 4} and {sup 14}CO{sub 2} production after incubation of anaerobic sediments with [{sup 14}C]MeHg. Degradation rate constants (k) were consistently {le}0.1 d{sup {minus}1} and decreased with sediment depth. Higher k values were observed when shorter incubation times and lower MeHg amendment levels were used, and k increased 2-fold as in-situ MeHg concentrations were approached. The average floc layer k was 0.046 {+-} 0.023 d{sup {minus}1} (n = 17) for 1--2 day incubations. In-situ degradation rates were estimated to be 0.02--0.5 ng of MeHg (g of dry sediment){sup {minus}1} d{sup {minus}1}, increasing from eutrophied to pristine areas. Nitrate-respiring bacteria did not demethylate MeHg, and NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} addition partially inhibited degradation in some cases. MeHg degradation rates were not affected by PO{sub 4}{sup 3{minus}} addition. {sup 14}CO{sub 2} production in all samples indicated that oxidative demethylation (OD) was an important degradation mechanism. OD occurred over 5 orders of magnitude of applied MeHg concentration, with lowest limits in the range of in-situ MeHg levels. Sulfate reducers and methanogens were the primary agents of anaerobic OD, although it is suggested that methanogens dominate degradation at in-situ MeHg concentrations. Specific pathways of OD by these two microbial groups are proposed.

  17. South Florida land-water use and its impact on the Everglades

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, C.J.

    1995-12-31

    The Everglades National Park (ENP) is the largest marsh in the United States and is the only subtropical wetland ecosystem in the U.S. that is enrolled in the international Ramsar Convention of wetland preserves. Because of its size, floral and faunal diversity, geological history and hydrological functions on the Florida landscape it is considered by many ecologists and conservationists as one of the most unique and important wetlands in the world. Unfortunately, the Everglades is surrounded by agricultural and urban development in a state whose population has increased by 33% in the last 10 years. Approximately 50% of the original 900,000 ha Everglades were historically a rainfall driven, nutrient poor (oligotrophic) phosphorous limited wetland ecosystem whose primary vegetation, - sawgrass (Cladium jamaicense Crantz) developed peat soils (Histosols) 0.2 to 6 m in depth over the past 5,000 years. Hydroperiod, nutrient additions, water quantity as well as water delivery schedules in the Everglades, have been altered significantly during the past four decades due primarily to the development of 1600 km of canals by 1967, and the pumping of nutrient enriched water from the Everglades Agricultural Area and Lake Okeechobee during certain portions of the year. Water pumping into and withdrawls from the Everglades during drought periods have altered the natural hydroperiod, but more importantly movement of water through the Everglades via canals to the ocean has removed almost all natural surface water flow across the marsh. Simply stated, the water regime of south Florida has been intensely managed for human uses but not for Everglades sustainability.

  18. Dissolved carbon biogeochemistry and export in mangrove-dominated rivers of the Florida Everglades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, David T.; Ferrón, Sara; Engel, Victor C.; Anderson, William T.; Swart, Peter K.; Price, René M.; Barbero, Leticia

    2017-05-01

    The Shark and Harney rivers, located on the southwest coast of Florida, USA, originate in the freshwater, karstic marshes of the Everglades and flow through the largest contiguous mangrove forest in North America. In November 2010 and 2011, dissolved carbon source-sink dynamics was examined in these rivers during SF6 tracer release experiments. Approximately 80 % of the total dissolved carbon flux out of the Shark and Harney rivers during these experiments was in the form of inorganic carbon, either via air-water CO2 exchange or longitudinal flux of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) to the coastal ocean. Between 42 and 48 % of the total mangrove-derived DIC flux into the rivers was emitted to the atmosphere, with the remaining being discharged to the coastal ocean. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) represented ca. 10 % of the total mangrove-derived dissolved carbon flux from the forests to the rivers. The sum of mangrove-derived DIC and DOC export from the forest to these rivers was estimated to be at least 18.9 to 24.5 mmol m-2 d-1, a rate lower than other independent estimates from Shark River and from other mangrove forests. Results from these experiments also suggest that in Shark and Harney rivers, mangrove contribution to the estuarine flux of dissolved carbon to the ocean is less than 10 %.

  19. Measuring and Mapping the Topography of the Florida Everglades for Ecosystem Restoration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Desmond, Gregory B.

    2003-01-01

    One of the major issues facing ecosystem restoration and management of the Greater Everglades is the availability and distribution of clean, fresh water. The South Florida ecosystem encompasses an area of approximately 28,000 square kilometers and supports a human population that exceeds 5 million and is continuing to grow. The natural systems of the Kissimmee-Okeechobee-Everglades watershed compete for water resources primarily with the region's human population and urbanization, and with the agricultural and tourism industries. Surface water flow modeling and ecological modeling studies are important means of providing scientific information needed for ecosystem restoration planning and modeling. Hydrologic and ecological models provide much-needed predictive capabilities for evaluating management options for parks, refuges, and land acquisition and for understanding the impacts of land management practices in surrounding areas. These models require various input data, including elevation data that very accurately define the topography of the Florida Everglades.

  20. ENVIRONMENTAL SCREENING MODELING OF MERCURY IN THE UPPER EVERGLADES OF SOUTH FLORIDA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This screening modeling analysis examines mercury sources and fate in the upper canals of the South Florida Everglades. Mass balance modeling techniques are applied along with available data to examine the relative importance of external sources and internal cycling of mercury an...

  1. 33 CFR 165.765 - Regulated Navigation Area; Port Everglades Harbor, Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Regulated Navigation Area; Port Everglades Harbor, Fort Lauderdale, Florida. 165.765 Section 165.765 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS AREAS...

  2. Compartment-based hydrodynamics and water quality modeling of a NorthernEverglades Wetland, Florida, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The last remaining large remnant of softwater wetlands in the US Florida Everglades lies within the Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge. However, Refuge water quality today is impacted by pumped stormwater inflows to the eutrophic and mineral-enriched 100-km c...

  3. Seasonal patterns in energy partitioning of two freshwater marsh ecosystems in the Florida Everglades

    Treesearch

    Sparkle L. Malone; Christina L. Staudhammer; Henry W. Loescher; Paulo Olivas; Steven F. Oberbauer; Michael G. Ryan; Jessica Schedlbauer; Gregory Starr

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed energy partitioning in short- and long-hydroperiod freshwater marsh ecosystems in the Florida Everglades by examining energy balance components (eddy covariance derived latent energy (LE) and sensible heat (H) flux). The study period included several wet and dry seasons and variable water levels, allowing us to gain better mechanistic information about the...

  4. THE DRY DEPOSITION OF SPECIATED MERCURY TO THE FLORIDA EVERGLADES: MEASUREMENTS AND MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Florida Everglades Dry-Deposition Study (FEDDS) was designed to test the viability of using new and existing measurement techniques in the estimation of the dry-depositional loading of speciated mercury (elemental gaseous, reactive gaseous and particulate) to a mixed sawgrass...

  5. Compartment-based hydrodynamics and water quality modeling of a NorthernEverglades Wetland, Florida, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The last remaining large remnant of softwater wetlands in the US Florida Everglades lies within the Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge. However, Refuge water quality today is impacted by pumped stormwater inflows to the eutrophic and mineral-enriched 100-km c...

  6. THE DRY DEPOSITION OF SPECIATED MERCURY TO THE FLORIDA EVERGLADES: MEASUREMENTS AND MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Florida Everglades Dry-Deposition Study (FEDDS) was designed to test the viability of using new and existing measurement techniques in the estimation of the dry-depositional loading of speciated mercury (elemental gaseous, reactive gaseous and particulate) to a mixed sawgrass...

  7. Application of FTLOADDS to Simulate Flow, Salinity, and Surface-Water Stage in the Southern Everglades, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, John D.; Swain, Eric D.; Wolfert, Melinda A.; Langevin, Christian D.; James, Dawn E.; Telis, Pamela A.

    2007-01-01

    The Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan requires numerical modeling to achieve a sufficient understanding of coastal freshwater flows, nutrient sources, and the evaluation of management alternatives to restore the ecosystem of southern Florida. Numerical models include a regional water-management model to represent restoration changes to the hydrology of southern Florida and a hydrodynamic model to represent the southern and western offshore waters. The coastal interface between these two systems, however, has complex surface-water/ground-water and freshwater/saltwater interactions and requires a specialized modeling effort. The Flow and Transport in a Linked Overland/Aquifer Density Dependent System (FTLOADDS) code was developed to represent connected surface- and ground-water systems with variable-density flow. The first use of FTLOADDS is the Southern Inland and Coastal Systems (SICS) application to the southeastern part of the Everglades/Florida Bay coastal region. The need to (1) expand the domain of the numerical modeling into most of Everglades National Park and the western coastal area, and (2) better represent the effect of water-delivery control structures, led to the application of the FTLOADDS code to the Tides and Inflows in the Mangroves of the Everglades (TIME) domain. This application allows the model to address a broader range of hydrologic issues and incorporate new code modifications. The surface-water hydrology is of primary interest to water managers, and is the main focus of this study. The coupling to ground water, however, was necessary to accurately represent leakage exchange between the surface water and ground water, which transfers substantial volumes of water and salt. Initial calibration and analysis of the TIME application produced simulated results that compare well statistically with field-measured values. A comparison of TIME simulation results to previous SICS results shows improved capabilities, particularly in the

  8. Variable growth and longevity of yellow bullhead (Ameiurus natalis) in the Everglades of south Florida, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murie, D.J.; Parkyn, D.C.; Loftus, W.F.; Nico, L.G.

    2009-01-01

    Yellow bullhead (Ictaluridae: Ameiurus natalis) is the most abundant ictalurid catfish in the Everglades of southern Florida, USA, and, as both prey and predator, is one of many essential components in the ecological-simulation models used in assessing restoration success in the Everglades. Little is known of its biology and life history in this southernmost portion of its native range; the present study provides the first estimates of age and growth from the Everglades. In total, 144 yellow bullheads of 97-312 mm total length (TL) were collected from canals and marshes of the Everglades between April 2000 and January 2001, and from October 2003 to February 2005. Fish were aged using cross-sections of pectoral spines and ranged from 1-12 years, with the maximum age almost twice that of any yellow bullhead previously reported. Yellow bullheads from south Florida grew relatively rapidly during their first 3 years, but after age 5 growth slowed and fish approached an asymptote of ???214 mm TL. Compared to other populations in the United States, yellow bullhead in the Everglades grew relatively slowly, were smaller at age overall, but survived to older ages. ?? 2009 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  9. Trophic transfer of methyl mercury in the northern Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cleckner, L.B.; Garrison, P.J.; Hurley, J.P.; Olson, M.L.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.

    1998-01-01

    There are spatial differences in methyl mercury (MeHg) concentrations in biota in Water Conservation Areas 2 and 3 in the Everglades, with higher concentrations generally found in the southern areas. Fish and hemipterans had the most MeHg on a wet weight basis, with levels exceeding 30 ng g-1. The magnitude of MeHg accumulation in biota varies seasonally and does not always appear to be associated with changes in water column concentration. This is exemplified by periphyton, the base of the foodweb in the Everglades, at a high nutrient sampling site. Although limited in scope, MeHg concentrations presented for biota provide insight into beginning to understand the dynamic nature of Hg transfer in the Everglades foodweb on a spatial and temporal basis.

  10. El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) enhances CO2 exchange rates in freshwater marsh ecosystems in the Florida Everglades

    Treesearch

    Sparkle L. Malone; Christina L. Staudhammer; Steven F. Oberbauer; Paulo Olivas; Michael G. Ryan; Jessica L. Schedlbauer; Henry W. Loescher; Gregory Starr

    2014-01-01

    This research examines the relationships between El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO), water level, precipitation patterns and carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange rates in the freshwater wetland ecosystems of the Florida Everglades. Data was obtained over a 5-year study period (2009–2013) from two freshwater marsh sites located in Everglades National Park that differ...

  11. Ecosystem resistance in the face of climate change: A case study from the freshwater marshes of the Florida Everglades

    Treesearch

    Sparkle L. Malone; Cynthia Keough; Christina L. Staudhammer; Michael G. Ryan; William J. Parton; Paulo Olivas; Steven F. Oberbauer; Jessica Schedlbauer; Gregory Starr

    2015-01-01

    Shaped by the hydrology of the Kissimmee-Okeechobee-Everglades watershed, the Florida Everglades is composed of a conglomerate of wetland ecosystems that have varying capacities to sequester and store carbon. Hydrology, which is a product of the region’s precipitation and temperature patterns combined with water management policy, drives community composition...

  12. Monitoring the inundation extent of the Florida Everglades with AVHRR data in a geographic information system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelletier, R. E.; Dow, D. D.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to develop a geographical information system capable of estimating methane and other greenhouse trace-gas fluxes from the wetlands of the Florida Everglades. Advanced very-high-resolution radiometer (AVHRR) data collected on a near-monthly basis for a year in order to monitor the seasonal dynamics of inundation extent across the Everglades is utilized in the analysis. It is noted that AVHRR data presents advantages over other remote-sensing data sources employed in covering large geographical regions due to its daily coverage with multiple opportunities during a day. This temporal resolution allows the realistic expectation of acquiring data on a frequent basis.

  13. Impact of Willow Invasion on Vegetation Water and Carbon Exchange in the Florida Everglades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budny, M. L.; Benscoter, B.

    2014-12-01

    Southern coastal willow (Salix caroliniana) is native to the Florida Everglades, commonly found on drier landforms like levees and tree islands. Shortened periods of inundation due to water management have led to the encroachment and expansion of these shrubs in sawgrass (Cladium jamaicense) marsh communities. The broadleaf willow is morphologically and physiologically different from the graminoid sedge sawgrass, with possible consequence for microhabitat conditions and ecosystem function. Willow is often assumed to have greater rates of transpiration, thereby affecting wetland water management, and may have concurrent differences in photosynthesis and carbon exchange. However, the ecophysiological impact of the willow invasion has not been quantified. We assessed differences in plant water and carbon exchange between willow and sawgrass at Blue Cypress Conservation Area, an impounded sawgrass peatland within the St. John's River Water Management District (SJRWMD). Plant transpiration and net CO2 exchange (photosynthesis and autotrophic respiration) were measured on fully expanded, non-damaged leaves of sawgrass and willow using a portable infrared gas analyzer (LI-6400XT, LI-COR, Lincoln, NE, U.S.A.). The results obtained from this study will provide a better understanding of ecophysiological changes that occur within marsh communities with shrub expansion, which will have cascading impacts on soil accretion and turnover, microclimate, and water quality Understanding the implications of willow expansion will improve landscape models of wetland water and carbon exchange as well as inform water management decisions.

  14. Five new species of yeasts from fresh water and marine habitats in the Florida Everglades.

    PubMed

    Fell, Jack W; Statzell-Tallman, Adele; Scorzetti, Gloria; Gutiérrez, Marcelo H

    2011-03-01

    Yeast populations in the Shark River Slough of the Florida Everglades, USA, were examined during a 3-year period (2002-2005) at six locations ranging from fresh water marshes to marine mangroves. Seventy-four described species (33 ascomycetes and 41 basidiomycetes) and an approximately equal number of undescribed species were isolated during the course of the investigation. Serious human pathogens, such as Candida tropicalis, were not observed, which indicates that their presence in coastal waters is due to sources of pollution. Some of the observed species were widespread throughout the fresh water and marine habitats, whereas others appeared to be habitat restricted. Species occurrence ranged from prevalent to rare. Five representative unknown species were selected for formal description. The five species comprise two ascomycetes: Candida sharkiensis sp. nov. (CBS 11368(T)) and Candida rhizophoriensis sp. nov. (CBS 11402(T)) (Saccharomycetales, Metschnikowiaceae), and three basidiomycetes: Rhodotorula cladiensis sp. nov. (CBS 10878(T)) in the Sakaguchia clade (Cystobasidiomycetes), Rhodotorula evergladiensis sp. nov. (CBS 10880(T)) in the Rhodosporidium toruloides clade (Microbotryomycetes, Sporidiobolales) and Cryptococcus mangaliensis sp. nov. (CBS 10870(T)) in the Bulleromyces clade (Agaricomycotina, Tremellales).

  15. Degradation of methylmercury and its effects on mercury distribution and cycling in the Florida Everglades.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanbin; Mao, Yuxiang; Liu, Guangliang; Tachiev, Georgio; Roelant, David; Feng, Xinbin; Cai, Yong

    2010-09-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is recognized as one of the major water quality concerns in the Florida Everglades. Degradation of MeHg in the water is thought to be one of the most important processes to the cycling of MeHg, but there is a lack of quantitative estimations of its effect on the distribution and cycling of MeHg in this ecosystem. Stable isotope (Me201Hg) addition method was implemented to investigate the degradation of MeHg in the Everglades. By combining these results with the field monitoring data, effects of photodegradation on MeHg distribution and its contribution to MeHg cycling were estimated. The results indicate that degradation of MeHg in Everglades water is mediated by sunlight and that UV-A and UV-B radiations are the principal driver. The spatial pattern of MeHg photodegradation potential (PPD) generally illustrated an increasing trend from north to south in the Everglades, which was opposite to the distribution of MeHg in water column. Correlation analysis shows that MeHg concentration in the water had a significant negative relation to PPD, suggesting that photodegradation could play an important role in controlling the distribution of MeHg in Everglades water. Furthermore, about 31.4% of MeHg input into the water body was removed by photodegradation, indicating its importance in the biogeochemical cycling of MeHg in the Everglades. This percent reduction is much lower than that reported for other ecosystems, which could be caused by the higher concentration of DOC in the Everglades. The relatively slower degradation of MeHg could be one of the main reasons for the high ratio of MeHg to total mercury (THg) in this ecosystem.

  16. Predicting Ecological Responses of the Florida Everglades to Possible Future Climate Scenarios: Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumen, Nicholas G.; Havens, Karl E.; Best, G. Ronnie; Berry, Leonard

    2015-04-01

    Florida's Everglades stretch from the headwaters of the Kissimmee River near Orlando to Florida Bay. Under natural conditions in this flat landscape, water flowed slowly downstream as broad, shallow sheet flow. The ecosystem is markedly different now, altered by nutrient pollution and construction of canals, levees, and water control structures designed for flood control and water supply. These alterations have resulted in a 50 % reduction of the ecosystem's spatial extent and significant changes in ecological function in the remaining portion. One of the world's largest restoration programs is underway to restore some of the historic hydrologic and ecological functions of the Everglades, via a multi-billion dollar Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan. This plan, finalized in 2000, did not explicitly consider climate change effects, yet today we realize that sea level rise and future changes in rainfall (RF), temperature, and evapotranspiration (ET) may have system-wide impacts. This series of papers describes results of a workshop where a regional hydrologic model was used to simulate the hydrology expected in 2060 with climate changes including increased temperature, ET, and sea level, and either an increase or decrease in RF. Ecologists with expertise in various areas of the ecosystem evaluated the hydrologic outputs, drew conclusions about potential ecosystem responses, and identified research needs where projections of response had high uncertainty. Resource managers participated in the workshop, and they present lessons learned regarding how the new information might be used to guide Everglades restoration in the context of climate change.

  17. Predicting ecological responses of the Florida Everglades to possible future climate scenarios: introduction.

    PubMed

    Aumen, Nicholas G; Havens, Karl E; Best, G Ronnie; Berry, Leonard

    2015-04-01

    Florida's Everglades stretch from the headwaters of the Kissimmee River near Orlando to Florida Bay. Under natural conditions in this flat landscape, water flowed slowly downstream as broad, shallow sheet flow. The ecosystem is markedly different now, altered by nutrient pollution and construction of canals, levees, and water control structures designed for flood control and water supply. These alterations have resulted in a 50% reduction of the ecosystem's spatial extent and significant changes in ecological function in the remaining portion. One of the world's largest restoration programs is underway to restore some of the historic hydrologic and ecological functions of the Everglades, via a multi-billion dollar Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan. This plan, finalized in 2000, did not explicitly consider climate change effects, yet today we realize that sea level rise and future changes in rainfall (RF), temperature, and evapotranspiration (ET) may have system-wide impacts. This series of papers describes results of a workshop where a regional hydrologic model was used to simulate the hydrology expected in 2060 with climate changes including increased temperature, ET, and sea level, and either an increase or decrease in RF. Ecologists with expertise in various areas of the ecosystem evaluated the hydrologic outputs, drew conclusions about potential ecosystem responses, and identified research needs where projections of response had high uncertainty. Resource managers participated in the workshop, and they present lessons learned regarding how the new information might be used to guide Everglades restoration in the context of climate change.

  18. Results of time-domain electromagnetic soundings in Everglades National Park, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fitterman, D.V.; Deszcz-Pan, Maria; Stoddard, C.E.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the collection, processing, and interpretation of time-domain electromagnetic soundings from Everglades National Park. The results are used to locate the extent of seawater intrusion in the Biscayne aquifer and to map the base of the Biscayne aquifer in regions where well coverage is sparse. The data show no evidence of fresh, ground-water flows at depth into Florida Bay.

  19. Targeting ecosystem features for conservation: Standing crops in the Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turner, A.M.; Trexler, J.C.; Jordan, C.F.; Slack, S.J.; Geddes, P.; Chick, J.H.; Loftus, W.F.

    1999-01-01

    The Everglades in southern Florida, U.S.A., is a major focus of conservation activities. The freshwater wetlands of the Everglades do not have high species richness, and no species of threatened aquatic animals or plants live there. We have, however, identified a distinctive ecological feature of the Everglades that is threatened by canal construction, draining, and nutrient enrichment from agricultural runoff compared to values reported from other freshwater systems, standing stocks of periphyton in relatively undisturbed areas of the Everglades were unusually high, and standing stocks of invertebrates and fish were unusually low. Averaging data gathered from nine sites and five sampling periods spanning I year, we found that periphyton standing crop was 88.2 g/m2 (ash-free dry mass), invertebrate standing stock was 0.64 g/m2 (dry mass), and fish standing stock was 1.2 g/m2 (dry mass of large and small species combined). We found that fish standing stocks were much higher in phosphorus-enriched sites than in nearby reference sites but that invertebrate standing stocks were similar in enriched and reference sites. Our results support the notion that oligotrophy is at least partially responsible for the low standing stocks of fish, but they also suggest that species interactions and a paucity of deep-water refugia are important. Anthropogenic eutrophication in Everglades marshes will lead to the loss of distinctive ecosystem features. A focus on species richness and 'hot spots' of threatened species provides no basis for conservation of ecosystems like the Everglades. If oligotrophic ecosystems often have low species richness, they will be underrepresented in preservation networks based on some common criteria for establishing conservation priorities.

  20. Integrated conceptual ecological model and habitat indices for the southwest Florida coastal wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wingard, Georgiana L.; Lorenz, J. L.

    2014-01-01

    The coastal wetlands of southwest Florida that extend from Charlotte Harbor south to Cape Sable, contain more than 60,000 ha of mangroves and 22,177 ha of salt marsh. These coastal wetlands form a transition zone between the freshwater and marine environments of the South Florida Coastal Marine Ecosystem (SFCME). The coastal wetlands provide diverse ecosystem services that are valued by society and thus are important to the economy of the state. Species from throughout the region spend part of their life cycle in the coastal wetlands, including many marine and coastal-dependent species, making this zone critical to the ecosystem health of the Everglades and the SFCME. However, the coastal wetlands are increasingly vulnerable due to rising sea level, changes in storm intensity and frequency, land use, and water management practices. They are at the boundary of the region covered by the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP), and thus are impacted by both CERP and marine resource management decisions. An integrated conceptual ecological model (ICEM) for the southwest coastal wetlands of Florida was developed that illustrates the linkages between drivers, pressures, ecological process, and ecosystem services. Five ecological indicators are presented: (1) mangrove community structure and spatial extent; (2) waterbirds; (3) prey-base fish and macroinvertebrates; (4) crocodilians; and (5) periphyton. Most of these indicators are already used in other areas of south Florida and the SFCME, and therefore will allow metrics from the coastal wetlands to be used in system-wide assessments that incorporate the entire Greater Everglades Ecosystem.

  1. Assessment of the peat resources of Florida, with a detailed survey of the northern everglades

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, G.M.; Wieland, C.C.; Hood, L.Q.; Goode, R.W. III; Sawyer, R.K.; McNeill, D.F.

    1982-01-01

    Available data, including previous publications, modern soil surveys, and detailed coring in the Northern Everglades for this project have been used to update information on Florida's peat resources. It is now estimated that Florida could, if no other constraints existed, produce 606 million tons of moisture-free fuel-grade peat, which may yield approximately 10.0 x 10/sup 15/ Btu of energy. These estimates are much lower than previously published projections for the state. The principal effort of this survey was in the largest peat region of the state, the Northern Everglades of Palm Beach and adjacent counties, where more than 800 core holes were drilled. Based on analyses of these cores, the Northern Everglades is now estimated to contain 191 million tons of moisture-free peat, with a potential energy yield of 2.98 x 10/sup 15/ Btu. These values are considerably less than previously published estimates, probably due to bacterial oxidation and other forms of drainage-induced subsidence in the Everglades agricultural areas. The present fuel-peat resources of the Northern Everglades occur in 19 separate deposits. Of these, the deposits in the Port Mayaca, Bryant, Six Mile Bend, and Loxahatchee Quadrangles comprise the highest concentration of the resource. These lands are generally privately owned and used for sugar cane and other crops, and the conversion of these lands to peat removal seems unlikely. It seems even less likely that the extensive peat deposits within the Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge will be available for fuel use, barring a dire national emergency. The utilization of peat as a fuel must be approached with caution and careful study; large scale use may require state or federal action. 34 references.

  2. Late Holocene vegetation, climate, and land-use impacts on carbon dynamics in the Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Miriam C.; Bernhardt, Christopher E.; Willard, Debra A.

    2014-01-01

    Tropical and subtropical peatlands are considered a significant carbon sink. The Florida Everglades includes 6000-km2 of peat-accumulating wetland; however, detailed carbon dynamics from different environments within the Everglades have not been extensively studied or compared. Here we present carbon accumulation rates from 13 cores and 4 different environments, including sawgrass ridges and sloughs, tree islands, and marl prairies, whose hydroperiods and vegetation communities differ. We find that the lowest rates of C accumulation occur in sloughs in the southern Everglades. The highest rates are found where hydroperiods are generally shorter, including near-tails of tree islands and drier ridges. Long-term average rates of 100 to >200 g C m−2 yr−1 are as high, and in some cases, higher than rates recorded from the tropics and 10–20 times higher than boreal averages. C accumulation rates were impacted by both the Medieval Climate Anomaly and the Little Ice Age, but the largest impacts to C accumulation rates over the Holocene record have been the anthropogenic changes associated with expansion of agriculture and construction of canals and levees to control movement of surface water. Water management practices in the 20th century have altered the natural hydroperiods and fire regimes of the Everglades. The Florida Everglades as a whole has acted as a significant carbon sink over the mid- to late-Holocene, but reduction of the spatial extent of the original wetland area, as well as the alteration of natural hydrology in the late 19th and 20th centuries, have significantly reduced the carbon sink capacity of this subtropical wetland.

  3. Surface water sulfate dynamics in the northern Florida Everglades.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongqing; Waldon, Michael G; Meselhe, Ehab A; Arceneaux, Jeanne C; Chen, Chunfang; Harwell, Matthew C

    2009-01-01

    Sulfate contamination has been identified as a serious environmental issue in the Everglades ecosystem. However, it has received less attention compared to P enrichment. Sulfate enters the Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge), a remnant of the historic Everglades, in pumped stormwater discharges with a mean concentration of approximately 50 mg L(-1), and marsh interior concentrations at times fall below a detection limit of 0.1 mg L(-1). In this research, we developed a sulfate mass balance model to examine the response of surface water sulfate in the Refuge to changes in sulfate loading and hydrological processes. Meanwhile, sulfate removal resulting from microbial sulfate reduction in the underlying sediments of the marsh was estimated from the apparent settling coefficients incorporated in the model. The model has been calibrated and validated using long-term monitoring data (1995-2006). Statistical analysis indicated that our model is capable of capturing the spatial and temporal variations in surface water sulfate concentrations across the Refuge. This modeling work emphasizes the fact that sulfate from canal discharge is impacting even the interior portions of the Refuge, supporting work by other researchers. In addition, model simulations suggest a condition of sulfate in excess of requirement for microbial sulfate reduction in the Refuge.

  4. A Population-Based Approach to Restore and Manage Ruppia Maritima (Wigeongrass) in the Highly Variable Everglades-Florida Bay Ecotone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strazisar, T. M.; Koch, M.; Madden, C. J.

    2016-02-01

    Seagrasses and submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) continue to decline globally from human-induced disturbance and habitat loss in estuarine and coastal ecosystems. The SAV Ruppia maritima historically created critical habitat at the Everglades-Florida Bay ecotone, but hydrological modifications and lower freshwater flows have resulted in significant declines in recent decades. We used a population-based approach to examine factors controlling Ruppia presence and abundance at the ecotone to expand the scientific base for management and restoration of SAV species in highly variable environments and examine factors required for Ruppia restoration in the Everglades. Life history transitions from seed through sexual reproduction were established under a range of field conditions critical to seagrass and SAV persistence, including salinity, temperature, light, sediment nutrients (P) and competitor SAV. We found multiple constraints to Ruppia life history development, including an ephemeral seed bank, low rates of successful germination and seedling survival and clonal reproduction limited by variable salinity, nutrients, light and competition with the macroalga Chara hornemannii. Because of low survival rates and limited clonal reproduction, Ruppia at the Evergaldes ecotone currently depends on high rates of viable seed production. However, development of large reproductive meadows requires high vegetative shoot densities. Thus, Everglades restoration should establish lower salinities to create higher seedling and adult survival and clonal reproduction to support successful sexual reproduction that can build up the seed bank for years when adult survival is limited. This population-based data from field experiments and surveys is being incorporated into a seagrass model to enable forecasting of population sustainability and evaluate Everglades restoration targets which includes restoring Ruppia to the southern Everglades-Florida Bay ecotone.

  5. Demography and ecology of mangrove diamondback terrapins in a wilderness area of Everglades National Park, Florida, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hart, K.M.; McIvor, C.C.

    2008-01-01

    Diamondback Terrapins (Malaclemys terrapin) are distributed in brackish water habitats along the U.S. east coast from Massachusetts to Texas, but many populations may be in decline. Whereas ample morphological, behavioral, and reproductive information has been collected for terrapins living in temperate salt marsh habitats, comparatively little is known about mangrove terrapins. To understand population structure of mangrove M. terrapin living in a wilderness area, we conducted a capture-recapture study in the remote, protected Big Sable Creek complex of Everglades National Park, Florida. The goals of the study were to collect baseline demographic data and to compare population structure and growth rates of mangrove terrapins with what is known for more well studied salt marsh terrapins in locations that experience human-imposed threats. We marked 300 terrapins; the sex ratio was 1 female:1.2 males. Considerable sexual size dimorphism was apparent, with reproductively mature females three times larger (by mass) than mature males. Eighty percent of females and 94% of males were classified as mature, based on straight plastron length (SPL). For a subset of terrapins not yet at maximum size (n = 39), we measured growth as a change in straight carapace length over time of 0.3-26.4 mm/yr for females (n = 26) and 0.9-14.5 mm/yr for males (n = 13). Our study presents the first demographic data on mangrove M. terrapin in the coastal Everglades. ?? 2008 by the American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists.

  6. Systematic vegetation change analysis of mangrove dieoff in Florida Bay and southern Everglades National Park

    SciTech Connect

    Colby, M.M.; Sargent, F.J.; Sargent, W.B.

    1997-06-01

    A very brief summary is provided of a project to link hydrological and ecological relationships of the Florida Everglades watershed and the Florida Bay estuary. The creation of vegetation maps and systematic spatial analysis of vegetation and hydrological features will provide information about the interaction between these two ecosystems. The distribution of mangroves, salt marshes, and related vegetative communities are being mapped using existing aerial photography. Historical photographic records are being used to create geographic information system data layers. Changes in the composition of wetlands and vegetative patterns will be compared over a 45-year period.

  7. Water-management models in Florida from ERTS-1 data. [Everglades National Park

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higer, A. L.; Coker, A. E.; Cordes, E. H.

    1974-01-01

    A prototype multiparameter data acquisition network, installed and operated by the U.S. Geological Survey is a viable approach for obtaining near real-time data needed to solve hydrologic problems confronting nearly 2.5 million residents of south Florida. Selected water quantity and quality data obtained from ground stations are transmitted for relay via ERTS-1 to NASA receiving stations in virtual real time. This data relay system has been very reliable and, by coupling the ground information with ERTS imagery, a modeling technique is available for water resource management in south Florida. An ecological model has been designed for the Shark River Slough in Everglades National Park.

  8. Movements of striped mullet, Mugil cephalus, tagged in Everglades National Park, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Funicelli, N.A.; Meineke, D.A.; Bryant, H.E.; Dewey, M.R.; Ludwig, G.M.; Mengel, L.S.

    1989-01-01

    The movements of striped mullet, Mugil cephalus, were studied from fish tagged in Everglades National Park. Florida. A total of 16,604 fish were tagged from March 1984 to September 1985. During the period December 1984 through February 1985 recaptured tagged fish moved significantly further and more northerly out of the Park's waters than they did the rest of the year. Tags were returned from 2.8% of the fish tagged along the west coast and from 0.3% of the fish tagged in Florida Bay and west coast mullet form a series of spatially overlapping stocks.

  9. Sulfur Contamination in the Florida Everglades: Initial Examination of Mitigation Strategies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orem, William H.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Sulfate contamination of the Everglades is a serious water quality issue facing restoration of this ecosystem. Sulfate concentrations in some marsh areas are more than 60 times background concentrations, and sulfate in excess of background levels covers an estimated 60% of the freshwater Everglades (Orem et al., 1997; Stober et al., 1996 and 2001; Orem et al., 2004). The excess sulfate enters the Everglades in the discharge of canal water from the Everglades Agricultural Area (EAA). Excess phosphorus also enters the ecosystem in EAA canal water discharge (Koch and Reddy, 1992; Craft and Richardson, 1993; DeBusk et al. 1994; Zielinski et al., 1999). Existing data suggest that sulfur in fertilizer and soil amendments used in the EAA (both new additions and legacy sulfur in the soil) is a major source of excess sulfate entering the ecosystem (Bates et al., 2001 and 2002). Other potential sources of sulfate (including groundwater), however, need further investigation. The report by Gilmour et al. (2007b) in the 2007 South Florida Environmental Report provides a complete examination of the current state of knowledge of the sulfur contamination issue in the Everglades. Sulfate discharged from canals or leaking through levees into the ecosystem spreads out over a large area since, unlike phosphorus, it is not removed to any great extent by plant uptake. Sulfate slowly diffuses into the anoxic soils (peats) underlying the Everglades and stimulates microbial sulfate reduction (MSR), producing toxic hydrogen sulfide as a byproduct (Goldhaber and Kaplan, 1974; Berner, 1980; Rheinheimer, 1994). Hydrogen sulfide at contaminated sites may build up in sediments to concentrations thousands of times background levels (Gilmour et al., 2007b). The excess sulfate and sulfide has numerous deleterious impacts on the Everglades. One of the more environmentally important impacts is the link between sulfate contamination and methylmercury (MeHg) production in the ecosystem

  10. Climate Change Projected Effects on Coastal Foundation Communities of the Greater Everglades Using a 2060 Scenario: Need for a New Management Paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, M. S.; Coronado, C.; Miller, M. W.; Rudnick, D. T.; Stabenau, E.; Halley, R. B.; Sklar, F. H.

    2015-04-01

    Rising sea levels and temperature will be dominant drivers of coastal Everglades' foundation communities (i.e., mangrove forests, seagrass/macroalgae, and coral reefs) by 2060 based on a climate change scenario of +1.5 °C temperature, +1.5 foot (46 cm) in sea level, ±10 % in precipitation and 490 ppm CO2. Current mangrove forest soil elevation change in South Florida ranges from 0.9 to 2.5 mm year-1 and would have to increase twofold to fourfold in order to accommodate a 2060 sea level rise rate. No evidence is available to indicate that coastal mangroves from South Florida and the wider Caribbean can keep pace with a rapid rate of sea level rise. Thus, particles and nutrients from destabilized coastlines could be mobilized and impact benthic habitats of southern Florida. Uncertainties in regional geomorphology and coastal current changes under higher sea levels make this prediction tentative without further research. The 2060 higher temperature scenario would compromise Florida's coral reefs that are already degraded. We suggest that a new paradigm is needed for resource management under climate change that manages coastlines for resilience to marine transgression and promotes active ecosystem management. In the case of the Everglades, greater freshwater flows could maximize mangrove peat accumulation, stabilize coastlines, and limit saltwater intrusion, while specific coral species may require propagation. Further, we suggest that regional climate drivers and oceanographic processes be incorporated into Everglades and South Florida management plans, as they are likely to impact coastal ecosystems, interior freshwater wetlands and urban coastlines over the next few decades.

  11. Climate change projected effects on coastal foundation communities of the Greater Everglades using a 2060 scenario: need for a new management paradigm.

    PubMed

    Koch, M S; Coronado, C; Miller, M W; Rudnick, D T; Stabenau, E; Halley, R B; Sklar, F H

    2015-04-01

    Rising sea levels and temperature will be dominant drivers of coastal Everglades' foundation communities (i.e., mangrove forests, seagrass/macroalgae, and coral reefs) by 2060 based on a climate change scenario of +1.5 °C temperature, +1.5 foot (46 cm) in sea level, ±10 % in precipitation and 490 ppm CO2. Current mangrove forest soil elevation change in South Florida ranges from 0.9 to 2.5 mm year(-1) and would have to increase twofold to fourfold in order to accommodate a 2060 sea level rise rate. No evidence is available to indicate that coastal mangroves from South Florida and the wider Caribbean can keep pace with a rapid rate of sea level rise. Thus, particles and nutrients from destabilized coastlines could be mobilized and impact benthic habitats of southern Florida. Uncertainties in regional geomorphology and coastal current changes under higher sea levels make this prediction tentative without further research. The 2060 higher temperature scenario would compromise Florida's coral reefs that are already degraded. We suggest that a new paradigm is needed for resource management under climate change that manages coastlines for resilience to marine transgression and promotes active ecosystem management. In the case of the Everglades, greater freshwater flows could maximize mangrove peat accumulation, stabilize coastlines, and limit saltwater intrusion, while specific coral species may require propagation. Further, we suggest that regional climate drivers and oceanographic processes be incorporated into Everglades and South Florida management plans, as they are likely to impact coastal ecosystems, interior freshwater wetlands and urban coastlines over the next few decades.

  12. Estimating methane gas production in peat soils of the Florida Everglades using hydrogeophysical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, William; Comas, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    The spatial and temporal variability in production and release of greenhouse gases (such as methane) in peat soils remains uncertain, particularly for low-latitude peatlands like the Everglades. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) is a hydrogeophysical tool that has been successfully used in the last decade to noninvasively investigate carbon dynamics in peat soils; however, application in subtropical systems is almost non-existent. This study is based on four field sites in the Florida Everglades, where changes in gas content within the soil are monitored using time-lapse GPR measurements and gas releases are monitored using gas traps. A weekly methane gas production rate is estimated using a mass balance approach, considering gas content estimated from GPR, gas release from gas traps and incorporating rates of diffusion, and methanotrophic consumption from previous studies. Resulting production rates range between 0.02 and 0.47 g CH4 m-2 d-1, falling within the range reported in literature. This study shows the potential of combining GPR with gas traps to monitor gas dynamics in peat soils of the Everglades and estimate methane gas production. We also show the enhanced ability of certain peat soils to store gas when compared to others, suggesting that physical properties control biogenic gas storage in the Everglades peat soils. Better understanding biogenic methane gas dynamics in peat soils has implications regarding the role of wetlands in the global carbon cycle, particularly under a climate change scenario.

  13. Drag coefficients for modeling flow through emergent vegetation in the Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, J.K.; Roig, L.C.; Jenter, H.L.; Visser, H.M.

    2004-01-01

    Hydraulic data collected in a flume fitted with pans of sawgrass were analyzed to determine the vertically averaged drag coefficient as a function of vegetation characteristics. The drag coefficient is required for modeling flow through emergent vegetation at low Reynolds numbers in the Florida Everglades. Parameters of the vegetation, such as the stem population per unit bed area and the average stem/leaf width, were measured for five fixed vegetation layers. The vertically averaged vegetation parameters for each experiment were then computed by weighted average over the submerged portion of the vegetation. Only laminar flow through emergent vegetation was considered, because this is the dominant flow regime of the inland Everglades. A functional form for the vegetation drag coefficient was determined by linear regression of the logarithmic transforms of measured resistance force and Reynolds number. The coefficients of the drag coefficient function were then determined for the Everglades, using extensive flow and vegetation measurements taken in the field. The Everglades data show that the stem spacing and the Reynolds number are important parameters for the determination of vegetation drag coefficient. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Ecological implications of Laurel Wilt infestation on Everglades Tree Islands, southern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snyder, James R.

    2014-01-01

    , laurel wilt disease also kills other native trees that are members of the laurel family, including swamp bay (Persea palustris), silk bay (Persea borbonia var. humilis), and sassafras (Sassafras albidum), as well as the economically important cultivated avocado (Persea americana) (Fraedrich and others, 2008). This paper is concerned primarily with swamp bay, an important component of Everglades tree islands.The spread of the redbay ambrosia beetle and its fungal symbiont has been very rapid, exceeding model predictions (Koch and Smith, 2008); by 2011, laurel wilt disease was found from the southern coastal plain of North Carolina to southern peninsular Florida. The first redbay ambrosia beetle was trapped in Miami-Dade County in March 2010, and laurel wilt disease was discovered in swamp bays in February 2011 and in commercial avocado groves about a year later (Kendra and others, 2013). By 2013, laurel wilt disease was seen in swamp bays throughout the southern Everglades in Everglades National Park, Big Cypress National Preserve, and Water Conservation Areas (WCAs) 3A and 3B (Rodgers and others, 2014).

  15. Phosphorus fractionation and distribution in sediments from wetlands and canals of a water conservation area in the Florida Everglades

    Treesearch

    Qingren Wang; Yuncong Li; Ying. Ouyang

    2011-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) fractionation and distribution in sediments are of great concern in the Florida Everglades ecosystem because potential eutrophication of surface waters usually results from P external loading and stability. Intact core sediment samples were collected to a depth of 35 cm from wetlands and canals across Water Conservation Area 3 (WCA‐3) of the Florida...

  16. Occurrence and distribution of novel botryococcene hydrocarbons in freshwater wetlands of the Florida Everglades.

    PubMed

    Gao, Min; Simoneit, Bernd R T; Gantar, Miroslav; Jaffé, Rudolf

    2007-12-01

    A high abundance of isoprenoid hydrocarbons, the botryococcenes, with carbon numbers from 32 to 34 were detected in the Florida Everglades freshwater wetlands. These compounds were present in varying amounts up to 106microg/gdw in periphyton, 278microg/gdw in floc, and 46microg/gdw in soils. Their structures were determined based on comparison to standards, interpretation of their mass spectra and those of their hydrogenation products, and comparison of Kovats indexes to those reported in the literature. A total of 26 cyclic and acyclic botryococcenes with 8 skeletons were identified, including those with fewer degrees of unsaturation, which are proposed as early diagenetic derivatives from the natural products. This is the first report that botryococcenes occur in the Everglades freshwater wetlands. Their potential biogenetic sources from green algae and cyanobacteria were examined, but neither contained botryococcenes. Thus, the source implication of botryococcenes in this ecosystem needs further study.

  17. Water-quality data for selected stations in the East Everglades, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waller, Bradley G.

    1981-01-01

    The results of water-quality samples collected from April 1978 through April 1980 from three canal stations, four marsh stations, and two ground-water stations within the East Everglades, Dade County, Florida, are tabulated in 37 tables. The major categories of parameters analyzed are field measurements, physical characteristics, macronutrients (carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus), major ions, trace elements, and algae. Chemical data for bulk-precipitation stations within and adjacent to the East Everglades are also given. The parameters analyzed include macronutrients, major ions, and trace elements. The period of record for these stations is October 1977 through April 1980. Bottom material at the canal and marsh stations was collected twice during the investigation. These data include analyses for macronutrients, trace elements, and chlorinated-hydrocarbon insecticides. (USGS)

  18. External threats and internal management: the hydrologic regulation of the Everglades, Florida, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushlan, James A.

    1987-01-01

    The ecological character of seasonal marshes is determined in large part by the pattern of water level fluctuation. As a result, the ecological health of a wetland reserve can be controlled by hydrologic regulation external to its boundaries. As an example, the Everglades marsh of Everglades National Park in Florida, USA, has been severely effected by management of the inflow of surface water. The Everglades occupies most of the interior of southern Florida, but only the lower 6% of the original marsh is contained in Everglades National Park. Shallow surface water reservoirs north of the park enclose 3600 km2 of Everglades. Their levee system confines surface water flow into the park to several structures. Historically this water flowed across the entire core of the natural drainage. Flows into the park have been on a congressionally mandated schedule of minimum deliveries that is supplemented by additional water released into the park in amounts determined solely by upstream water management needs. My research, aimed at evaluating the effects of water conditions, has shown that this regulatory system has adversely affected reproductive success, community structure, and population sizes of sensitive species whose population stability is tied to natural water level fluctuations. These adverse effects were caused by water levels that for over a decade have been maintained at unseasonably high levels. Mathematically deterministic models of water level effects can provide management options based on biologial criteria. Park managers must incorporate understanding gained from such models into internal management decisions. Modifications of water control structures and alternative policies for managing the distribution and amount of surface water flow into the park appear attainable, can improve biological conditions in the park, and need not be adverse to neighboring external interests. Thus far biological changes are severe, and to a large extent irreversible

  19. Surface water discharge and salinity monitoring of coastal estuaries in Everglades National Park, USA, in support of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woods, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    Discharge and salinity were measured along the southwest and the southeast coast of Florida in Everglades National Park (ENP) within several rivers and creeks from 1996 through 2008. Data were collected using hydro-acoustic instruments and continuous water-quality monitors at fixed monitoring stations. Water flowed through ENP within two distinct drainage basins; specifically, Shark Slough and Taylor Slough. Discharge to the southwest coast through Shark Slough was substantially larger than discharge to the southeast coast through Taylor Slough. Correlation analysis between coastal flows and regulated flows at water-management structures upstream from ENP suggests rainfall has a larger impact on discharge through Shark Slough than releases from the S-12 water management structures. In contrast, flow releases from water management structures upstream from Taylor Slough appear to be more closely related to discharge along the southeast coast. Salinity varied within a wide range (0 to 50 parts per thousand) along both coastlines. Periods of hypersalinity were greater along the southeast coast due to shallow compartmentalized basins within Florida Bay, which restrict circulation.

  20. Variation of total mercury concentrations in pig frogs (Rana grylio) across the Florida Everglades, USA.

    PubMed

    Ugarte, Cristina A; Rice, Kenneth G; Donnelly, Maureen A

    2005-06-01

    The Pig Frog (Rana grylio) is an aquatic frog that is an abundant component of the Everglades ecosystem. South Floridians recreationally and commercially hunt pig frogs in marshes throughout Water Conservation Areas (WCA) and Big Cypress National Preserve (BCNP) in South Florida. Most of these areas are under fish consumption advisories because of high levels of methylmercury present in game fish tissues. It is important to understand how mercury is distributed throughout Pig Frog populations because their consumption from certain areas may present a risk to human health. We sampled 88 pig frogs along a north-south transect through the Florida Everglades. There were substantial differences in total mercury (THg) concentrations from leg muscle tissue among sites. Total mercury in frog leg tissue was highest from areas protected from harvest in Everglades National Park (ENP), with a maximum concentration of 2051 ng/g wet mass. The THg levels in R. grylio leg tissue from most harvested areas are below Federal advisory limits. However, many pig frogs collected near Frog City, and one from WCA 3B and 3AN, harvested sites, had THg levels above the USEPA 0.3 mg/kg Fish Tissue Residue Criterion. Spatial patterns in the mercury found among pig frogs were similar to those of other wildlife species from the Everglades. We found frogs to have high THg levels in areas where alligators and mosquito fish also have high THg. THg in ENP frogs had an exponential relationship to SVL, we found no other relationship in frogs from other sites. Our data suggests that pig frogs should not be harvested or consumed from sites that exceed federal limits.

  1. Estimation of postfire nutrient loss in the Florida everglades.

    PubMed

    Qian, Y; Miao, S L; Gu, B; Li, Y C

    2009-01-01

    Postfire nutrient release into ecosystem via plant ash is critical to the understanding of fire impacts on the environment. Factors determining a postfire nutrient budget are prefire nutrient content in the combustible biomass, burn temperature, and the amount of combustible biomass. Our objective was to quantitatively describe the relationships between nutrient losses (or concentrations in ash) and burning temperature in laboratory controlled combustion and to further predict nutrient losses in field fire by applying predictive models established based on laboratory data. The percentage losses of total nitrogen (TN), total carbon (TC), and material mass showed a significant linear correlation with a slope close to 1, indicating that TN or TC loss occurred predominantly through volatilization during combustion. Data obtained in laboratory experiments suggest that the losses of TN, TC, as well as the ratio of ash total phosphorus (TP) concentration to leaf TP concentration have strong relationships with burning temperature and these relationships can be quantitatively described by nonlinear equations. The potential use of these nonlinear models relating nutrient loss (or concentration) to temperature in predicting nutrient concentrations in field ash appear to be promising. During a prescribed fire in the northern Everglades, 73.1% of TP was estimated to be retained in ash while 26.9% was lost to the atmosphere, agreeing well with the distribution of TP during previously reported wild fires. The use of predictive models would greatly reduce the cost associated with measuring field ash nutrient concentrations.

  2. Surface-Water and Ground-Water Interactions in the Central Everglades, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harvey, Judson W.; Newlin, Jessica T.; Krest, James M.; Choi, Jungyill; Nemeth, Eric A.; Krupa, Steven L.

    2004-01-01

    Recharge and discharge are hydrological processes that cause Everglades surface water to be exchanged for subsurface water in the peat soil and the underlying sand and limestone aquifer. These interactions are thought to be important to water budgets, water quality, and ecology in the Everglades. Nonetheless, relatively few studies of surface water and ground water interactions have been conducted in the Everglades, especially in its vast interior areas. This report is a product of a cooperative investigation conducted by the USGS and the South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD) aimed at developing and testing techniques that would provide reliable estimates of recharge and discharge in interior areas of WCA-2A (Water Conservation Area 2A) and several other sites in the central Everglades. The new techniques quantified flow from surface water to the subsurface (recharge) and the opposite (discharge) using (1) Darcy-flux calculations based on measured vertical gradients in hydraulic head and hydraulic conductivity of peat; (2) modeling transport through peat and decay of the naturally occurring isotopes 224Ra and 223Ra (with half-lives of 4 and 11 days, respectively); and (3) modeling transport and decay of naturally occurring and 'bomb-pulse' tritium (half-life of 12.4 years) in ground water. Advantages and disadvantages of each method for quantifying recharge and discharge were compared. In addition, spatial and temporal variability of recharge and discharge were evaluated and controlling factors identified. A final goal was to develop appropriately simplified (that is, time averaged) expressions of the results that will be useful in addressing a broad range of hydrological and ecological problems in the Everglades. Results were compared with existing information about water budgets from the South Florida Water Management Model (SFWMM), a principal tool used by the South Florida Water Management District to plan many of the hydrological aspects of the

  3. Coastal land loss in Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.R. )

    1990-09-01

    Florida has approximately 593 mi of shoreline fronting on the Atlantic Ocean and Straits of Florida and approximately 673 mi of shoreline fronting on the Gulf of Mexico with an additional 5,000 mi of bay and estuary shoreline. Of a statewide total of 818.9 mi of open coast sandy beaches, 337.2 mi or 41.2% of the beaches are identified as erosion problem areas. These erosion problem areas include those beaches with a moderate or low erosion rate, but with a narrow width fronting a highly developed area, and those restored beaches with an active maintenance nourishment program. Of these erosion problem areas, 217.8 mi or 26.6% of the statewide beach length are areas of critical erosion; that is, segments of the shoreline where substantial development or recreation interests are threatened by the erosion processes. On a shorewide basis, the Atlantic Ocean beaches of Florida typically have historical erosion rates of between 0 and {minus}3 ft per year, while the Gulf of Mexico beaches typically have historical erosion rates of between 0 and {minus}2 ft per year. Many of the problem areas have shoreline erosion rates in the magnitude of between {minus}3 and {minus}5 ft per year. The most extreme erosion rates are occurring along the southern portion of St. Joseph Peninsula at Cape San Bias where the annual shoreline recession exceeds {minus}20 ft. Erosion conditions in Florida are most apparent as a result of storm tides and storm wave activity. Extreme meteorological events inflict significant erosion conditions in all beach areas of the state. Historical shoreline changes are often the cumulative effect of a number of storm events and their cycles of poststorm recovery. Erosion and damage from recent storms as well as efforts to mitigate storm damage have heightened the erosion problems and incited a public response through coastal construction regulation and beach management planning.

  4. Retrospective and current risks of mercury to panthers in the Florida Everglades.

    PubMed

    Barron, Mace G; Duvall, Stephanie E; Barron, Kyle J

    2004-04-01

    Florida panthers are an endangered species inhabiting south Florida. Hg has been suggested as a causative factor for low populations and some reported panther deaths, but a quantitative assessment of risks has never been performed. This study quantitatively evaluated retrospective (pre-1992) and current (2002) risks of chronic dietary Hg exposures to panthers in the Florida Everglades. A probabilistic assessment of Hg risks was performed using a dietary exposure model and Latin Hypercube sampling that incorporated the variability and uncertainty in ingestion rate, diet, body weight, and mercury exposure of panthers. Hazard quotients (HQs) for retrospective risks ranged from less than 0.1-20, with a 46% probability of exceeding chronic dietary thresholds for methylmercury. Retrospective risks of developing clinical symptoms, including ataxia and convulsions, had an HQ range of <0.1-5.4 with a 17% probability of exceeding an HQ of 1. Current risks were substantially lower (4% probability of exceedences; HQ range <0.1-3.5) because of an estimated 70-90% decline in Hg exposure to panthers over the last decade. Under worst case conditions of panthers consuming only raccoons from the most contaminated area of the Everglades, current risks of developing clinical symptoms that may lead to death was 4.6%. Current risks of mercury poisoning of panthers with a diversified diet was 0.1% (HQ range of <0.1-1.4). The results of this assessment indicate that past Hg exposures likely adversely affected panthers in the Everglades, but current risks of Hg are low.

  5. Holocene dynamics of the Florida Everglades with respect to climate, dustfall, and tropical storms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glaser, Paul H.; Hansen, Barbara C. S.; Donovan, Joseph J.; Givnish, Thomas J.; Stricker, Craig A.; Volin, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Aeolian dust is rarely considered an important source for nutrients in large peatlands, which generally develop in moist regions far from the major centers of dust production. As a result, past studies assumed that the Everglades provides a classic example of an originally oligotrophic, P-limited wetland that was subsequently degraded by anthropogenic activities. However, a multiproxy sedimentary record indicates that changes in atmospheric circulation patterns produced an abrupt shift in the hydrology and dust deposition in the Everglades over the past 4,600 y. A wet climatic period with high loadings of aeolian dust prevailed before 2800 cal BP (calibrated years before present) when vegetation typical of a deep slough dominated the principal drainage outlet of the Everglades. This dust was apparently transported from distant source areas, such as the Sahara Desert, by tropical storms according to its elemental chemistry and mineralogy. A drier climatic regime with a steep decline in dustfall persisted after 2800 cal BP maintaining sawgrass vegetation at the coring site as tree islands developed nearby (and pine forests covered adjacent uplands). The marked decline in dustfall was related to corresponding declines in sedimentary phosphorus, organic nitrogen, and organic carbon, suggesting that a close relationship existed between dustfall, primary production, and possibly, vegetation patterning before the 20th century. The climatic change after 2800 cal BP was probably produced by a shift in the Bermuda High to the southeast, shunting tropical storms to the south of Florida into the Gulf of Mexico.

  6. Holocene dynamics of the Florida Everglades with respect to climate, dustfall, and tropical storms

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Paul H.; Hansen, Barbara C. S.; Donovan, Joe J.; Givnish, Thomas J.; Stricker, Craig A.; Volin, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Aeolian dust is rarely considered an important source for nutrients in large peatlands, which generally develop in moist regions far from the major centers of dust production. As a result, past studies assumed that the Everglades provides a classic example of an originally oligotrophic, P-limited wetland that was subsequently degraded by anthropogenic activities. However, a multiproxy sedimentary record indicates that changes in atmospheric circulation patterns produced an abrupt shift in the hydrology and dust deposition in the Everglades over the past 4,600 y. A wet climatic period with high loadings of aeolian dust prevailed before 2800 cal BP (calibrated years before present) when vegetation typical of a deep slough dominated the principal drainage outlet of the Everglades. This dust was apparently transported from distant source areas, such as the Sahara Desert, by tropical storms according to its elemental chemistry and mineralogy. A drier climatic regime with a steep decline in dustfall persisted after 2800 cal BP maintaining sawgrass vegetation at the coring site as tree islands developed nearby (and pine forests covered adjacent uplands). The marked decline in dustfall was related to corresponding declines in sedimentary phosphorus, organic nitrogen, and organic carbon, suggesting that a close relationship existed between dustfall, primary production, and possibly, vegetation patterning before the 20th century. The climatic change after 2800 cal BP was probably produced by a shift in the Bermuda High to the southeast, shunting tropical storms to the south of Florida into the Gulf of Mexico. PMID:24101489

  7. Holocene dynamics of the Florida Everglades with respect to climate, dustfall, and tropical storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaser, Paul H.; Hansen, Barbara C. S.; Donovan, Joe J.; Givnish, Thomas J.; Stricker, Craig A.; Volin, John C.

    2013-10-01

    Aeolian dust is rarely considered an important source for nutrients in large peatlands, which generally develop in moist regions far from the major centers of dust production. As a result, past studies assumed that the Everglades provides a classic example of an originally oligotrophic, P-limited wetland that was subsequently degraded by anthropogenic activities. However, a multiproxy sedimentary record indicates that changes in atmospheric circulation patterns produced an abrupt shift in the hydrology and dust deposition in the Everglades over the past 4,600 y. A wet climatic period with high loadings of aeolian dust prevailed before 2800 cal BP (calibrated years before present) when vegetation typical of a deep slough dominated the principal drainage outlet of the Everglades. This dust was apparently transported from distant source areas, such as the Sahara Desert, by tropical storms according to its elemental chemistry and mineralogy. A drier climatic regime with a steep decline in dustfall persisted after 2800 cal BP maintaining sawgrass vegetation at the coring site as tree islands developed nearby (and pine forests covered adjacent uplands). The marked decline in dustfall was related to corresponding declines in sedimentary phosphorus, organic nitrogen, and organic carbon, suggesting that a close relationship existed between dustfall, primary production, and possibly, vegetation patterning before the 20th century. The climatic change after 2800 cal BP was probably produced by a shift in the Bermuda High to the southeast, shunting tropical storms to the south of Florida into the Gulf of Mexico.

  8. Methane emissions from the Florida Everglades: Patterns of variability in a regional wetland ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Bartlett, D.S.; Bartlett, K.B.; Hartman, J.M.; Harris, R.C.; Sebacher, D.I. )

    1989-12-01

    The spatial variability of methane flux was examined within a large regional wetland system, the Florida Everglades. Unit area methane flux to the atmosphere from water-saturated Everglades environments, measured in situ, varied over more than an order of magnitude (4.2 to 81.9 mg CH4/sq m/d) depending on which habitat component of the ecosystem was sampled. Use of high resolution, orbital remote sensing data helped reduce uncertainty in the emission inventory of the Everglades by directing in situ sampling efforts to important habitat types and by providing a means for calculating area-weighted mean flux for the system as a whole. The results indicated that spatial variability in flux within a major wetland ecosystem can introduce significant uncertainty in extrapolations to larger areas, even if the extent of the major ecosystem itself is well known. The results also suggested that the response of total ecosystem flux to changing water level is not a linear function of flooded area, but is damped, with regional flux at lowered water levels decreasing proportionally less than flooded area.

  9. Does sulphate enrichment promote the expansion of Typha domingensis (cattail) in the Florida Everglades?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Li, S.; Mendelssohn, I.A.; Chen, H.; Orem, W.H.

    2009-01-01

    1. The expansion of Typha domingensis into areas once dominated by Cladium jamaicense in the Florida Everglades has been attributed to altered hydrology and phosphorus enrichment, although increased concentrations of sulphate and phosphorus often coincide. The potential importance of hydrogen sulphide produced from sulphate in the expansion of Typha has received little attention. The present study aimed to quantify the comparative growth and photosynthetic responses of Cladium and Typha to sulphate/sulphide. 2. Laboratory experiments showed that Cladium is less tolerant of sulphide than Typha. Cladium was adversely affected at sulphide concentrations of approximately 0.22 mm, while Typha continued to grow well and appeared healthy up to 0.69 mm sulphide. 3. Experiments in field mesocosms provided strong support for species-specific differences in physiology and growth. Regardless of interstitial sulphide concentrations attained, Typha grew faster and had a higher photosynthetic capacity than Cladium. However, sulphide concentrations in the mesocosms reached only 0.18 mm which, based on the hydroponic study, was insufficient to affect the growth or photosynthetic responses of either species. Nevertheless, the upper range of sulphide (0.25-0.375 mm) in Everglades' soil is high enough, based on our results, to impact Cladium but not Typha. 4. This research supports the hypothesis that sulphide accumulation could affect plant species differentially and modify species composition. Consequently, the role of sulphate loading should be considered, in conjunction with hydroperiod, phosphorus availability and disturbances, in developing future management plans for the Everglades. ?? 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. System controls on the aqueous distribution of mercury in the northern Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hurley, J.P.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.; Cleckner, L.B.; Olson, M.L.; Aiken, G.R.; Rawlik, P.S.

    1998-01-01

    The forms and partitioning of aqueous mercury species in the canals and marshes of the Northern Florida Everglades exhibit strong spatial and temporal variability. In canals feeding Water Conservation Area (WCA) 2A, unfiltered total Hg (HgT(U)) is less than 3 ng L-1 and relatively constant. In contrast, methyl mercury (MeHg) exhibited a strong seasonal pattern, with highest levels entering WCA-2A marshes during July. Stagnation and reduced flows also lead to particle enrichment of MeHg. In the marshes of WCA-2A, 2B and 3A, HgT(U) is usually <5 ng L-1 with no consistent north-south patterns. However, for individual dates, aqueous unfiltered MeHg (MeHg(U)) levels increase from north to south with generally lowest levels in the eutrophied regions of northern WCA-2A. A strong relationship between filtered Hg species and dissolved organic carbon (DOC), evident for rivers draining wetlands in Wisconsin, was not apparent in the Everglades, suggesting either differences in the binding sites of DOC between the two regions, or non-organic Hg complexation in the Everglades.

  11. Assessing risks to humans from invasive Burmese pythons in Everglades National Park, Florida, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, Robert N.; Snow, Ray W.

    2014-01-01

    Invasive Burmese pythons (Python molurus bivittatus) are now established across a large area of southern Florida, USA, including all of Everglades National Park (NP). The presence of these large-bodied snakes in the continental United States has attracted intense media attention, including regular reference to the possibility of these snakes preying on humans. Over the course of a decade (2003–2012), we solicited reports of apparently unprovoked strikes directed at humans in Everglades NP. We summarize the circumstances surrounding each of the 5 reported incidents, which occurred between 2006 and 2012. All strikes were directed toward biologists moving through flooded wetlands; 2 strikes resulted in minor injury and none resulted in constriction. We consider most of these strikes to be cases of “mistaken identity,” in which the python initiated a strike at a potential prey item but aborted its predatory behavior prior to constriction and ingestion. No strikes are known to have been directed at park visitors despite visitation rates averaging over one million per year during this period. We conclude that while risks to humans should not be completely discounted, the relative risk of a human being killed by a python in Everglades NP appears to be extremely low.

  12. Holocene dynamics of the Florida Everglades with respect to climate, dustfall, and tropical storms.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Paul H; Hansen, Barbara C S; Donovan, Joe J; Givnish, Thomas J; Stricker, Craig A; Volin, John C

    2013-10-22

    Aeolian dust is rarely considered an important source for nutrients in large peatlands, which generally develop in moist regions far from the major centers of dust production. As a result, past studies assumed that the Everglades provides a classic example of an originally oligotrophic, P-limited wetland that was subsequently degraded by anthropogenic activities. However, a multiproxy sedimentary record indicates that changes in atmospheric circulation patterns produced an abrupt shift in the hydrology and dust deposition in the Everglades over the past 4,600 y. A wet climatic period with high loadings of aeolian dust prevailed before 2800 cal BP (calibrated years before present) when vegetation typical of a deep slough dominated the principal drainage outlet of the Everglades. This dust was apparently transported from distant source areas, such as the Sahara Desert, by tropical storms according to its elemental chemistry and mineralogy. A drier climatic regime with a steep decline in dustfall persisted after 2800 cal BP maintaining sawgrass vegetation at the coring site as tree islands developed nearby (and pine forests covered adjacent uplands). The marked decline in dustfall was related to corresponding declines in sedimentary phosphorus, organic nitrogen, and organic carbon, suggesting that a close relationship existed between dustfall, primary production, and possibly, vegetation patterning before the 20th century. The climatic change after 2800 cal BP was probably produced by a shift in the Bermuda High to the southeast, shunting tropical storms to the south of Florida into the Gulf of Mexico.

  13. Relationship between body condition of American alligators and water depth in the Everglades, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fujisaki, Ikuko; Rice, Kenneth G.; Pearlstine, Leonard G.; Mazzotti, Frank J.

    2009-01-01

    Feeding opportunities of American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) in freshwater wetlands in south Florida are closely linked to hydrologic conditions. In the Everglades, seasonally and annually fluctuating surface water levels affect populations of aquatic organisms that alligators consume. Since prey becomes more concentrated when water depth decreases, we hypothesized an inverse relationship between body condition and water depth in the Everglades. On average, condition of adult alligators in the dry season was significantly higher than in the wet season, but this was not the case for juveniles/subadults. The correlation between body condition and measured water depth at capture locations was weak; however, there was a significant negative correlation between the condition and predicted water depth prior to capture for all animals except for spring juveniles/subadults which had a weak positive condition-water depth relationship. Overall, a relatively strong inverse correlation occurred at 10-49 days prior to the capture day, suggesting that current body condition of alligators may depend on feeding opportunities during that period. Fitted regression of body condition on water depth (mean depth of 10 days when condition-water depth correlation was greatest) resulted in a significantly negative slope, except for spring adult females and spring juveniles/subadults for which slopes were not significantly different from zero. Our results imply that water management practices may be critical for alligators in the Everglades since water depth can affect animal condition in a relatively short period of time.

  14. Seasonal patterns in energy partitioning of two freshwater marsh ecosystems in the Florida Everglades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, Sparkle L.; Staudhammer, Christina L.; Loescher, Henry W.; Olivas, Paulo; Oberbauer, Steven F.; Ryan, Michael G.; Schedlbauer, Jessica; Starr, Gregory

    2014-08-01

    We analyzed energy partitioning in short- and long-hydroperiod freshwater marsh ecosystems in the Florida Everglades by examining energy balance components (eddy covariance derived latent energy (LE) and sensible heat (H) flux). The study period included several wet and dry seasons and variable water levels, allowing us to gain better mechanistic information about the control of and changes in marsh hydroperiods. The annual length of inundation is ~5 months at the short-hydroperiod site (25°26'16.5″N, 80°35'40.68″W), whereas the long-hydroperiod site (25°33'6.72″N, 80°46'57.36″W) is inundated for ~12 months annually due to differences in elevation and exposure to surface flow. In the Everglades, surface fluxes feed back to wet season precipitation and affect the magnitude of seasonal change in water levels through water loss as LE (evapotranspiration (ET)). At both sites, annual precipitation was higher than ET (1304 versus 1008 at the short-hydroperiod site and 1207 versus 1115 mm yr-1 at the long-hydroperiod site), though there were seasonal differences in the ratio of ET:precipitation. Results also show that energy balance closure was within the range found at other wetland sites (60 to 80%) and was lower when sites were inundated (60 to 70%). Patterns in energy partitioning covaried with hydroperiods and climate, suggesting that shifts in any of these components could disrupt current water and biogeochemical cycles throughout the Everglades region. These results suggest that the complex relationships between hydroperiods, energy exchange, and climate are important for creating conditions sufficient to maintain Everglades ecosystems.

  15. Methane flux and stable hydrogen and carbon isotope composition of sedimentary methane from the Florida Everglades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Roger A., Jr.; Barber, Timothy R.; Sackett, William M.

    1988-12-01

    Methane flux and the stable isotopic composition of sedimentary methane were measured at four locations in the Florida Everglades system. Individual estimates of methane flux ranged over more than 3 orders of magnitude, from about 0.001 to 2.6 g CH4 m-2 d-1. Significant interstation differences in total methane flux were also observed and are judged most likely attributable to differences in the size and spacing of emergent aquatic vegetation, and possibly differences in the type (i.e., vascular plant versus algal) of organic matter incorporated into the sediments. On the basis of measurements presented here and by other investigators, the Everglades system appears to be a relatively weak source of atmospheric methane, probably contributing less than 0.5 Tg CH4 yr-1. Emergent aquatic plants appear to be capable of indirectly affecting the stable isotopic composition of sedimentary methane by stimulating methane oxidation via root aeration. A significant positive correlation between δD-CH4 and δ13C-CH4 was observed for samples collected from sediments covered by tall, dense stands of emergent plants. In contrast, a significant negative correlation between the δD and δ13C of sedimentary methane was observed for samples collected at an open water site where ebullition dominated methane transfer to the atmosphere. The mean δ13C of sedimentary methane samples measured in the Everglades system (mean δ13C =-61.7‰, s.d. = 3.6‰, n = 51) is not significantly different from the estimated average δ13C of all natural sources (-58.3‰). The mean δD of Everglades sedimentary methane (mean δ D = -293‰, s.d. = 14‰, n = 50) appears to be slightly less D-depleted than the estimated average methane (δD =-360 ± 30‰) from all sources.

  16. Geologic impact of Hurricane Andrew on Everglades coast of southwest Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, R. A.

    1995-04-01

    Hurricane Andrew, one of the strongest storms of the century, crossed the southern part of the Florida peninsula on 24 August 1992. Its path crossed the Florida Everglades and exited in the national park across a mangrove-dominated coast onto the shallow, low-energy, inner shelf. The storm caused extensive breakage and defoliation in the mangrove community; full recovery will take decades. It produced no extensive sedimentation unit; only local and ephemeral ebb-surge deposits. The discontinuous shelly storm beach ridge was breached at multiple locations, and it moved landward a few meters. After seven months, there was little geologic indication that the storm had passed. It is likely that the stratigraphic record in this area will not contain any recognizable features of the passage of Hurricane Andrew.

  17. FROM RESTORING FLORIDA'S EVERGLADES TO ASSESSING OUR NATION'S ECOLOGICAL CONDITION: SCIENCE PROVIDES THE BASIS FOR UNDERSTANDING AND POLICY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Based on first hand experiences, Dr. Fontaine will provide a personal and insightful look at major environmental research and restoration programs he has been involved in. Starting with a visual tour through the Florida Everglades and a discussion of the $12 B science-based rest...

  18. SEDIMENT TOXICITY AND COMMUNITY COMPOSITION OF BENTHOS AND COLONIZED PERIPHYTON IN THE EVERGLADES - FLORIDA BAY TRANSITIONAL ZONE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lewis, Michael A., Larry R. Goodman, John M. Macauley and James C. Moore. 2004. Sediment Toxicity and Community Composition of Benthos and Colonized Periphyton in the Everglades-Florida Bay Transitional Zone. Ecotoxicology. 13(3):231-244. (ERL,GB 1164).

    This survey provid...

  19. FROM RESTORING FLORIDA'S EVERGLADES TO ASSESSING OUR NATION'S ECOLOGICAL CONDITION: SCIENCE PROVIDES THE BASIS FOR UNDERSTANDING AND POLICY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Based on first hand experiences, Dr. Fontaine will provide a personal and insightful look at major environmental research and restoration programs he has been involved in. Starting with a visual tour through the Florida Everglades and a discussion of the $12 B science-based rest...

  20. SEDIMENT TOXICITY AND COMMUNITY COMPOSITION OF BENTHOS AND COLONIZED PERIPHYTON IN THE EVERGLADES - FLORIDA BAY TRANSITIONAL ZONE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lewis, Michael A., Larry R. Goodman, John M. Macauley and James C. Moore. 2004. Sediment Toxicity and Community Composition of Benthos and Colonized Periphyton in the Everglades-Florida Bay Transitional Zone. Ecotoxicology. 13(3):231-244. (ERL,GB 1164).

    This survey provid...

  1. Fluctuating water depths affect American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) body condition in the Everglades, Florida, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brandt, Laura A.; Beauchamp, Jeffrey S.; Jeffery, Brian M.; Cherkiss, Michael S.; Mazzotti, Frank J.

    2016-01-01

    Successful restoration of wetland ecosystems requires knowledge of wetland hydrologic patterns and an understanding of how those patterns affect wetland plant and animal populations.Within the Everglades, Florida, USA restoration, an applied science strategy including conceptual ecological models linking drivers to indicators is being used to organize current scientific understanding to support restoration efforts. A key driver of the ecosystem affecting the distribution and abundance of organisms is the timing, distribution, and volume of water flows that result in water depth patterns across the landscape. American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) are one of the ecological indicators being used to assess Everglades restoration because they are a keystone species and integrate biological impacts of hydrological operations through all life stages. Alligator body condition (the relative fatness of an animal) is one of the metrics being used and targets have been set to allow us to track progress. We examined trends in alligator body condition using Fulton’s K over a 15 year period (2000–2014) at seven different wetland areas within the Everglades ecosystem, assessed patterns and trends relative to restoration targets, and related those trends to hydrologic variables. We developed a series of 17 a priori hypotheses that we tested with an information theoretic approach to identify which hydrologic factors affect alligator body condition. Alligator body condition was highest throughout the Everglades during the early 2000s and is approximately 5–10% lower now (2014). Values have varied by year, area, and hydrology. Body condition was positively correlated with range in water depth and fall water depth. Our top model was the “Current” model and included variables that describe current year hydrology (spring depth, fall depth, hydroperiod, range, interaction of range and fall depth, interaction of range and hydroperiod). Across all models, interaction

  2. Relation of water level and fish availability to wood stork reproduction in the southern Everglades, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kushlan, James A.; Ogden, John C.; Higer, Aaron L.

    1975-01-01

    The wood stork is a species of colonial wading bird in the Everglades that is most sensitive to changes in the availability of food. Previous studies have shown that the initiation and success of wood stork nesting depends on high densities of fish concentrated in ponds and other catchment basins during the dry season. The extreme dependence of the wood stork on the cyclic hydrologic regime of the southern Florida wetlands makes it an indicator of the well-being and ecological stability of the Everglades. The wood stork has declined in numbers over the last 25 years. One reason for the decline in wood stork population was the change in the hydrologic regimen of the Everglades which affected the feeding habitat and the food production. The fish on which the wood stork feeds increase in density during the dry season as water levels fall. In the Everglades marsh, densities were highest in front of the drying edge of surface water at a depth of about 0.3 m. Dry-season densities were greatest when a drought occurred the previous year. Historically wood stork nesting success was associated with high summer water levels, high rates of surface-water discharge and high rates of drying. Before the closure of the south side of Conservation Area 3 in 1962, years of successful and unsuccessful nesting were characterized by different patterns of drying. These patterns changed after 1962 and generally the predictability of successful nesting breaks down thereafter. Only two nesting years after 1962 were successful and in only one of these was the drying rate similar to years of successful nesting before 1962. Two other potentially successful years failed after 1962. This suggests that further changes in the hydrobiological relations occurred within the Everglades after 1962. Lack of successful nesting after 1962 can be attributed in large part to late colony formation and the interruption of nesting by winter rainfall. In this period (1962-72), colonies formed earlier in years of

  3. Endosulfan in the atmosphere of South Florida: Transport to Everglades and Biscayne National Parks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hapeman, Cathleen J.; McConnell, Laura L.; Potter, Thomas L.; Harman-Fetcho, Jennifer; Schmidt, Walter F.; Rice, Clifford P.; Schaffer, Bruce A.; Curry, Richard

    2013-02-01

    Nutrient inputs from urban encroachment and agricultural activities have been implicated in contributing to the environmental health decline and loss of organism diversity of South Florida ecosystems. Intensive agricultural pesticide use may also challenge these ecosystems. One possible mechanism is pesticide release to the atmosphere after application. The process is enhanced in this region due to the calcareous soils, frequent rainfall, and high humidity and temperatures. This study examined the atmospheric fate of the widely-used insecticide endosulfan. Air samples were collected over a five-year period (2001-2006) at a site within the agricultural community of Homestead, Florida and at sites located in nearby Biscayne and Everglades National Parks (NPs). Mean gas phase air concentrations of α-endosulfan were 17 ± 19 ng m-3 at Homestead, 2.3 ± 3.6 ng m-3 at Everglades NP, and 0.52 ± 0.69 ng m-3 at Biscayne NP. Endosulfan emissions from agricultural areas around Homestead appeared to influence air concentration observations at the NP sites. During an intensive sampling campaign, the highest total endosulfan concentrations at the NP sites were observed on days when air parcels were predicted to move from Homestead towards the sampling locations. The α-endosulfan fraction (α/(α + β)) was used to examine the contribution of pesticide drift versus volatilization to the overall residue level. The formulated product has an α fraction of approximately 0.7, whereas volatilization is predicted to have an α fraction of ≥0.9. The median α- fraction observed during periods of high agricultural activity at Homestead and Everglades NP was 0.84 and 0.88, respectively, and during periods of low agricultural activity the median at Homestead was 0.86, indicating contributions from drift. The median α fraction at Everglades NP was 1.0 during periods of low agricultural activity, while Biscayne NP was 1.0 year round indicating air concentrations are primarily

  4. Simulating coastal to offshore interactions around the South Florida coastal seas and implications on management issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, H.; Kourafalou, V. H.; Hogan, P. J.; Smedstad, O.

    2008-12-01

    The South Florida coastal seas include shelf areas and shallow water bodies around ecologically fragile environments and Marine Protected Areas, such as Florida Bay, the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary (around the largest coral reef system of the continental U.S.) and the Dry Tortugas Ecological Reserve. Man- made changes in the hydrology of the Everglades have caused dramatic degradation of the coastal ecosystem through discharge in Florida Bay. New management scenarios are under way to restore historical flows. The environmental impacts of the management propositions are examined with an inter-disciplinary, multi-nested modeling system. The HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) has been employed for the Regional Model for South Florida Coastal Seas (SoFLA-HYCOM, 1/25 degree resolution) and for the embedded, high resolution coastal Florida Keys model (FKEYS- HYCOM, 1/100 degree). Boundary conditions are extracted from GODAE products: the large scale North Atlantic model (ATL-HYCOM, 1/12 degree) and the intermediate scale Gulf of Mexico model (GOM-HYCOM, 1/25 degree). The study targets the impacts of large scale oceanic features on the coastal dynamics. Eddies that travel along the Loop Current/Florida Current front are known to be an important mechanism for the interaction of nearshore and offshore flows. The high resolution FKEYS simulations reveal both mescoscale and sub- mesoscale eddy passages during a targeted 2-year simulation period (2004-2005), forced with high resolution/high frequency atmospheric forcing. Eddies influence sea level changes in the vicinity of Florida Bay with possible implications on current and future flushing patterns. They also enable upwelling of cooler, nutrient-rich waters in the vicinity of the Reef Tract and they influence transport and recruitment pathways for coral fish larvae, as they carry waters of different properties (such as river-borne low-salinity/nutrient-rich waters from as far as the Mississippi River) and

  5. Levels of mercury in alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) collected along a transect through the Florida Everglades.

    PubMed

    Rumbold, D G; Fink, L E; Laine, K A; Niemczyk, S L; Chandrasekhar, T; Wankel, S D; Kendall, C

    2002-10-07

    As part of a multi-agency study of alligator health, 28 American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) were captured along a transect through the Florida Everglades in 1999. Liver and tail muscle tissues were sampled and analyzed on a wet weight basis for total mercury (THg) using cold-vapor atomic absorption spectrophotometry. All tissues had detectable concentrations of THg that ranged from 0.6 to 17 mg/kg in liver and from 0.1 to 1.8 mg/kg in tail muscle. THg was more concentrated in liver tissue than tail muscle, but levels were highly correlated between tissues. THg concentrations in tissue differed significantly among locations, with animals from Everglades National Park (ENP) having mean concentrations of THg in liver (10.4 mg/kg) and tail muscle (1.2 mg/kg) that were two-fold higher than basin-wide averages (4.9 and 0.64 mg/kg, respectively). The reasons for higher contamination of ENP alligators were unclear and could not be explained by differences in sex, length, weight or animal age. While delta15N values were positively correlated with THg concentrations in tail muscle, spatial patterns in isotopic composition did not explain the elevated THg levels in ENP alligators. Therefore, it appears that ENP alligators were more highly exposed to mercury in their environment than individuals in other areas. Comparisons to a previous survey by Yanochko et al. [Arch Environ Contam Toxicol 32 (1997) 323] suggest that mercury levels have declined in some Everglades alligators since 1994.

  6. Levels of mercury in alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) collected along a transect through the Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rumbold, D.G.; Fink, L.E.; Laine, K.A.; Niemczyk, S.L.; Chandrasekhar, T.; Wankel, Scott D.; Kendall, C.

    2002-01-01

    As part of a multi-agency study of alligator health, 28 American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) were captured along a transect through the Florida Everglades in 1999. Liver and tail muscle tissues were sampled and analyzed on a wet weight basis for total mercury (THg) using cold-vapor atomic absorption spectrophotometry. All tissues had detectable concentrations of THg that ranged from 0.6 to 17 mg/kg in liver and from 0.1 to 1.8 mg/kg in tail muscle. THg was more concentrated in liver tissue than tail muscle, but levels were highly correlated between tissues. THg concentrations in tissue differed significantly among locations, with animals from Everglades National Park (ENP) having mean concentrations of THg in liver (10.4 mg/kg) and tail muscle (1.2 mg/kg) that were two-fold higher than basin-wide averages (4.9 and 0.64 mg/kg, respectively). The reasons for higher contamination of ENP alligators were unclear and could not be explained by differences in sex, length, weight or animal age. While ??15N values were positively correlated with THg concentrations in tail muscle, spatial patterns in isotopic composition did not explain the elevated THg levels in ENP alligators. Therefore, it appears that ENP alligators were more highly exposed to mercury in their environment than individuals in other areas. Comparisons to a previous survey by Yanochko et al. [Arch Environ Contam Toxicol 32 (1997) 323] suggest that mercury levels have declined in some Everglades alligators since 1994. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Flow velocity, water temperature, and conductivity in Shark River Slough, Everglades National Park, Florida: June 2002-July 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riscassi, Ami L.; Schaffranek, Raymond W.

    2004-01-01

    The data described in this report were collected in the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) Priority Ecosystems Science project investigating Forcing Effects on Flow Structure in Vegetated Wetlands of the Everglades. Data collected at five locations in Shark River Slough, Everglades National Park, during the 2002-2003 wet season are documented in the report. Methods used to process the data are described. Daily mean flow velocities, water temperatures, and specific conductance values are presented in the appendices. The quality-checked and edited data have been compiled and stored on the USGS South Florida Information Access (SOFIA) website http://sofia.usgs.gov.

  8. Understanding sources of carbon from a coastal mangrove forest: Shark River - Everglades National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palya, A. P.; Anderson, W. T.; Jaffe, R.; Swart, P. K.

    2012-12-01

    enables us to analyze up to 24 samples per day, allowing for a more rapid sample throughput than alternative δ13C-DOC analytical methods including WCO-IRMS. This method was applied to marine samples collected from Shark River (SR) located on the western edge of Everglades National Park. DOC concentrations for water in this estuary typically fall between 2 and 18 ppm, with salinities that range from fresh to marine (~30) where SR empties into the Gulf of Mexico. Water samples were collected from Florida Coastal Everglades LTER sampling sites located in SR and analyzed for DOC concentration and δ13C-DOC composition. DOC concentration ranged from 6 to 15 ppm and δ13C-DOC values were between -32 and -27.8‰. These results are also compared to the δ13C-DIC data from the same samples. These results indicate that mangroves are the major contributor to the DOC pool in SR. The new WCO-CRDS method will enable us to continue analysis of DOC and δ13C-DOC in marine waters, such as the Shark River estuary, to better understand C dynamics. With this approach will be able to build a dataset to help identify spatial and temporal variations in and controls on DOC and δ13C-DOC in these coastal marine settings, which are an important interface between atmospheric and oceanic carbon reservoirs.

  9. Calcite crystal growth inhibition by humic substances with emphasis on hydrophobic acids from the Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoch, A.R.; Reddy, M.M.; Aiken, G.R.

    2000-01-01

    The crystallization of calcium carbonate minerals plays an integral role in the water chemistry of terrestrial ecosystems. Humic substances, which are ubiquitous in natural waters, have been shown to reduce or inhibit calcite crystal growth in experiments. The purpose of this study is to quantify and understand the kinetic effects of hydrophobic organic acids isolated from the Florida Everglades and a fulvic acid from Lake Fryxell, Antarctica, on the crystal growth of calcite (CaCO3). Highly reproducible calcite growth experiments were performed in a sealed reactor at constant pH, temperature, supersaturation (?? = 4.5), P(CO2) (10-3.5atm), and ionic strength (0.1 M) with various concentrations of organic acids. Higher plant-derived aquatic hydrophobic acids from the Everglades were more effective growth inhibitors than microbially derived fulvic acid from Lake Fryxell. Organic acid aromaticity correlated strongly with growth inhibition. Molecular weight and heteroatom content correlated well with growth inhibition, whereas carboxyl content and aliphatic nature did not. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  10. Interactions between dissolved organic matter and mercury in the Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aiken, G.; Haitzer, M.; Ryan, J.N.; Nagy, K.; ,

    2003-01-01

    Experiments were conducted using organic matter isolated from various surface waters in the Florida Everglades to study the interactions between dissolved organic matter (DOM) and Hg(II). Conditional distribution coefficients (KDOM???), obtained using an equilibrium dialysis ligand exchange method, were strongly affected by the Hg/DOM concentration ratio. Very strong interactions (KDOM??? = 1023.2??0.5 L kg-1), indicative of Hg-thiol bonds, were observed at Hg/DOM ratios below approximately 1 ??g per mg DOM. Above approximately 10 ??g Hg per mg DOM much lower KDOM??? values (1010.7??0.5 L kg-1) were obtained DOM-Hg interactions were also studied by HgS (log Ksp = -52.4) dissolution and precipitation experiments. In the dissolution experiments, a significant amount of Hg was released from cinnabar in the presence of DOM, suggesting strong interactions. Conversely, precipitation of HgS was strongly inhibited in the presence of low concentrations (???3 mg C/L) of DOM. In both the dissolution and precipitation experiments, organic matter rich in aromatic moieties was more reactive with HgS than less aromatic fractions and sulfur-containing model compounds. These results suggest that DOM can influence the geochemistry of inorganic complexes of Hg in the Everglades, especially HgS, by strong Hg-DOM binding and colloidal stabilization.

  11. Effects of land use on ground-water quality in the East Everglades, Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waller, B.G.

    1982-01-01

    Groundwater quality characteristics of the Biscayne aquifer from September 1978 through June 1979 were determined for seven land use areas within the East Everglades in Dade County, Florida. Four agricultural areas, two low-density residential areas, and Chekika Hammock State Park were investigated. The effects of land use on the groundwater were minimal in all areas; only iron , which occurs naturally in high concentrations in the Everglades, exceeded potable groundwater standards. Potassium and nitrate concentrations in certain samples increased over background concentrations in the agricultural areas. Groundwater at Chekika Hammock State Park and at a citrus grove is contaminated by brackish water flowing from an artesian well. The soil at the agricultural areas had higher concentrations of chromium, copper, and manganese than at the two residential areas or at Chekika Hammock State Park. One residential area (Coopertown) had the highest concentrations of lead and zinc and detectable polychlorinated biphenyls. Chlorinated-hydrocarbon insecticide residues in soil at three agricultural areas were higher than background concentrations. (Author 's abstract)

  12. Methane flux and stable hydrogen and carbon isotope composition of sedimentary methane from the Florida Everglades

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, R.A.; Barber, T.R.; Sackett, W.M. )

    1988-12-01

    Methane flux and the stable isotopic composition of sedimentary methane were measured at four locations in the Florida Everglades system. Individual estimates of methane flux ranged over more than 3 orders of magnitude, from about 0.001 to 2.6 g CH{sub 4}/sq m/day. Significant interstation differences in total methane flux were also observed and are judged most likely attributable to differences in the size and spacing of emergent aquatic vegetation, and possibly differences in the type of organic matter incorporated into the sediments. On the basis of measurements presented here and by other investigators, the Everglades system appears to be a relatively weak source of atmospheric methane, probably contributing less than 0.5 Tg CH{sub 4}/yr. Emergent aquatic plants appear to be capable of indirectly affecting the stable isotopic composition of sedimentary methane by stimulating methane oxidation via root aeration. A significant positive correlation between delta D-CH4 and delta C{sup 13}-CH{sub 4} was observed for samples collected from sediments covered by tall, dense stands of emergent plants. In contrast, a significant negative correlation between the delta D and delta C{sup 13} of sedimentary methane was observed for samples collected at an open water site where ebullition dominated methane transfer to the atmosphere. 63 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. NONPHOSPHORUS LIPIDS IN PERIPHYTON REFLECT AVAILABLE NUTRIENTS IN THE FLORIDA EVERGLADES, USA(1).

    PubMed

    Bellinger, Brent J; Van Mooy, Benjamin A S

    2012-04-01

    Algal and plant production of nonphosphorus lipids in place of phospholipids is a physiological response to low phosphorus (P) availability. This response has been shown in culture and in marine plankton studies, but examples from freshwater algae remain minimal. Herein, we analyzed the nutrient contents and lipid composition of periphyton communities across the Florida Everglades ecosystem. We hypothesized that in phosphate-poor areas, periphyton in high- and low-sulfate waters would vary the proportion of sulfolipids (SLs) and betaine lipids (BLs), respectively. In phosphate-enriched areas, periphyton would produce more phospholipids (PLs). We observed that at low-P sites, PLs were a minor lipid component. In cyanobacteria-dominated periphyton where sulfate was abundant, BLs were only slightly more abundant than SLs. However, in the low-P, low-sulfate area, periphyton were comprised to a greater degree green algae and diatoms, and BLs represented the majority of the total lipids. Even in a P-rich area, PLs were a small component of periphyton lipid profiles. Despite the phosphorus limitations of the Everglades, periphyton can develop tremendous biomass. Our results suggest a physiological response by periphyton to oligotrophic conditions whereby periphyton increase abundances of nonphosphorus lipids and have reduced proportions of PLs. © 2012 Phycological Society of America.

  14. Cellulolytic, fermentative, and methanogenic guilds in benthic periphyton mats from the Florida Everglades.

    PubMed

    Uz, Ilker; Chauhan, Ashvini; Ogram, Andrew V

    2007-08-01

    Phosphorus enrichment caused by runoff from agricultural areas has resulted in ecosystem-level changes in the northern Florida Everglades, including a loss of periphyton mats from nutrient-impacted areas. The potential for methanogenesis resulting from the anaerobic decomposition of cellulose and fermentation products, and the microorganisms responsible for these processes, were studied in mats from a region not impacted by nutrient enrichment. Methane was produced from periphyton incubated with cellulose, propionate, butyrate, and formate, with an accumulation of fatty acids in incubations. The accumulation of fatty acids may have been caused by the inhibition of syntrophic oxidation, a potentially significant route for methane production in soils. Sequence analysis of 16S rRNA genes characteristic of Clostridium, the primary genus responsible for anaerobic decomposition and fermentation in soils of the area, indicated that Clostridium Cluster I assemblages present in the mat differed from those in the soils of the area. Significantly, sequences characteristic of the Clostridium group that dominates the soils of the area, group XIV, were not detected in the mat. These results indicate that benthic periphyton is probably a significant source of methane in the Everglades, and the responsible microorganisms differ significantly from those in the soils of the area.

  15. Mercury mass budget estimates and cycling seasonality in the Florida Everglades.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangliang; Cai, Yong; Kalla, Peter; Scheidt, Daniel; Richards, Jennifer; Scinto, Leonard J; Gaiser, Evelyn; Appleby, Charlie

    2008-03-15

    We estimated the mass budget for mercury (Hg) seasonally deposited into the Florida Everglades and investigated seasonality of Hg cycling by analyzing data obtained for water, soil, flocculent detrital material (floc), periphyton, and mosquitofish collected throughout the Everglades freshwater marshes in the 2005 dry and wet seasons. Higher wet season total Hg (THg) in soil, floc, and periphyton agreed with greater Hg amounts entering these compartments during the wet season, probably owing to substantially greater Hg deposition in the wet season than in the dry season. Seasonal differences were absent for THg in surface water. Methylmercury (MeHg) showed mixed seasonal patterns, with higher water and soil MeHg and lower periphyton MeHg in the dry season but no seasonality for floc MeHg. Seasonal variations in Hg deposition, MeHg production and transport, and mass of ecosystem compartments could be responsible for the seasonality of MeHg cycling. Higher mosquitofish THg, higher bioaccumulation factors, and higher biomagnification factors from periphyton to mosquitofish were observed in the wet season than in the dry season, indicating that the wet season is more favorable for Hg bioaccumulation. The mass budget estimation agreed with this result.

  16. Effects of land use on groundwater quality in the East Everglades, Dade County, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Waller, B.G.

    1983-01-01

    Groundwater quality characteristics of the Biscayne aquifer from September 1978 through June 1979 were determined for seven land use areas within the East Everglades in Dade County, Florida. Four agricultural areas, two low-density residential areas, and Chekika Hammock State Park were investigated. The effects of land use on the groundwater were minimal in all areas; only iron, which occurs naturally in high concentrations in the Everglades, exceeded potable groundwater standards. Potassium and nitrate concentrations in certain samples increase over background concentrations in the agricultural areas. Groundwater at Chekika Hammock State Park and at a citrus grove is contaminated by brackish water flowing from an artesian well. The soil at the agricultural areas had higher concentrations of chromium, copper, and manganese than at the two residential areas or at Chekika Hammock State Park. One residential area (Coopertown) had the highest concentrations of lead and zinc and detectable polychlorinated biphenyls. Chlorinated-hydrocarbon insecticide residues in soil at three agricultural areas were higher than background concentrations. 15 refs., 15 figs., 35 tabs.

  17. The dry-deposition of speciated mercury to the Florida Everglades: Measurements and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsik, Frank J.; Keeler, Gerald J.; Landis, Matthew S.

    The Florida Everglades Dry-Deposition Study (FEDDS) was designed to test the viability of using new and existing measurement techniques in the estimation of the dry-depositional loading of speciated mercury (elemental gaseous, reactive gaseous and particulate) to a mixed sawgrass (Cladium jamaicense) and cattail (Typha domingensis) stand within the Florida Everglades. Measurement intensives were performed during 24 February-04 March 1999 and 05-21 June 2000, which corresponded to the climatological dry and wet seasons in South Florida, respectively. During these intensives, direct measurements of mercury dry-deposition were made using a newly developed surrogate water surface technique. These direct measurements were compared with modeled estimates of mercury dry-deposition to the site that were obtained through the use of an inferential or "bigleaf" model that was modified for use with speciated mercury. On-site measurements of ambient speciated mercury concentrations and numerous micrometeorological variables were used as input to the model. The average mercury dry-deposition measured during the 1999 FEDDS measurement intensive was 13.3±4.0 ng m -2 day -1, while the modeled deposition for this period was 3.4±2.3 ng m -2 day -1. The average mercury dry-deposition measured during the 2000 FEDDS measurement intensive was lower, 5.9±2.8 ng m -2 day -1, while the average modeled deposition for this period was 1.8±0.6 ng m -2 day -1. A least-squares linear regression suggests that the model was able to explain 74% and 73% of the variability in the datasets for the 1999 and 2000 FEDDS intensives, respectively. While reported reductions in total mercury emissions across South Florida between study periods could explain the reductions in both the measured and predicted mercury dry-deposition estimates, the increased presence of cumulus convection during the summer-intensive could have also resulted in a removal of reactive and particulate mercury species within the

  18. Chemical and biological quality of water in part of the Everglades, southeastern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waller, Bradley G.; Earle, James E.

    1975-01-01

    The quality of surface water in the agricultural area between Lake Okeechobee and the water conservation areas is markedly different from that of other surface water in southeastern Florida. Man has engaged in cultural activities, both agricultural and urban, which have affected the water quality in the northern and eastern segments of the area of investigation. The quality of the water improves, however, as it flows to the south and east because there is minimal input from man 's activities and many of the constituents are assimilated by plants, sorbed on organic material and clay in the bottom sediments, and entrapped within the sediments. Because of these processes, the water entering Everglades National Park is of better quality than that entering the conservation areas in the north. (Woodard-USGS)

  19. A Key to the Pupal Exuviae of the Midges (Diptera: Chironomidae) of Everglades National Park, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobsen, Richard E.

    2008-01-01

    A key has been developed for identifying the pupal exuviae of 132 taxa of chironomid midges collected in Everglades National Park, as well as 18 additional species from freshwater habitats adjacent to the Park. Descriptions and illustrations are based upon voucher specimens from extensive collections of chironomid pupal exuviae for faunal surveys and biomonitoring research conducted in ENP and surrounding freshwater areas from 1998 to 2007. The key includes taxonomic comments for confirming identifications, as well as brief summaries of the distribution and ecology of each species in southern Florida waters. Information is also provided on the morphology of chironomid pupal exuviae, recommended references for identifying pupal exuviae, techniques for making slides, and methods to confirm proper identification.

  20. Freshwater ascomycetes: Alascospora evergladensis, a new genus and species from the Florida Everglades.

    PubMed

    Raja, Huzefa A; Violi, Helen A; Shearer, Carol A

    2010-01-01

    Alascospora evergladensis, a freshwater ascomycete collected from submerged dead petioles of Nymphaea odorata during a survey of aquatic fungi along a phosphorus gradient in the Florida Everglades, is described and illustrated as a new genus and species in the Pleosporales (Pleosporomycetidae, Dothideomycetes). The new fungus is unique among genera in the Pleosporales based on a combination of morphological characters that include light brown, translucent, membranous, ostiolate ascomata with dark, amorphous material irregularly deposited on the peridium, especially around the ostiole; globose, fissitunicate, thick-walled asci; septate pseudoparaphyses; and 1-septate ascospores that are hyaline when young, and surrounded by a hyaline gelatinous sheath that is wing-shaped in outline on each side of the ascospore. The sheath is distinctive in that it first expands in water and is translucent, then condenses and darkens around older ascospores, giving them a dark brown, verruculose appearance.

  1. An Assessment of Aquifer Storage and Recovery and Mercury Methylation in the south Florida Everglades Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodo, R. M.; Krabbenhoft, D. P.; Anderson, M. P.

    2004-05-01

    In an attempt to restore natural hydroperiods, vital to the Everglades ecosystem, Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) technology is proposed in south Florida. ASR is used to store excess surface water and shallow groundwater during wet periods for recovery during seasonal or longer-term dry periods. Studies suggest methylmercury is formed in anoxic environments where there is active sulfate reduction; however, no known published studies have considered methylmercury formation in deep subsurface environments. Similarly, few studies evaluate ASR and water chemistry. The proposed storage zone is the Upper Floridan Aquifer, which is anaerobic, suggesting the potential for mercury methylation during storage periods. Additionally, the recovered water may stimulate mercury methylation when released to the Everglades. Using water samples from Florida municipal wells and cores from preexisting ASR wells to simulate ASR conditions, a series of 9 columns were set up using Floridan Aquifer materials, native surface water, and mercury isotopes. Five columns were set up as anaerobic by introducing nitrogen gas, and 4 columns aerobic with oxygen gas. Seven columns contain 500 mL by volume of aquifer core and 1,500 mL native surface water, 2 columns contain native surface water to serve as controls. Two columns contain sterilized core, and 1 column contains native core with deionized water. Each column was sampled at 2, 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks. The objectives of the experiments are to determine potential chemical reactions, to evaluate the potential for ASR injection to methylate mercury, to determine the time required for stored water to methylate mercury, and the conditions under which methylation may occur in ASR stored water.

  2. Integrated carbon budget models for the Everglades terrestrial-coastal-oceanic gradient: Current status and needs for inter-site comparisons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Troxler, Tiffany G.; Gaiser, Evelyn; Barr, Jordan; Fuentes, Jose D.; Jaffe, Rudolf; Childers, Daniel L.; Collado-Vides, Ligia; Rivera-Monroy, Victor H.; Castañeda-Moya, Edward; Anderson, William; Chambers, Randy; Chen, Meilian; Coronado-Molina, Carlos; Davis, Stephen E.; Engel, Victor C.; Fitz, Carl; Fourqurean, James; Frankovich, Tom; Kominoski, John; Madden, Chris; Malone, Sparkle L.; Oberbauer, Steve F.; Olivas, Paulo; Richards, Jennifer; Saunders, Colin; Schedlbauer, Jessica; Scinto, Leonard J.; Sklar, Fred; Smith, Thomas J.; Smoak, Joseph M.; Starr, Gregory; Twilley, Robert; Whelan, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that coastal ecosystems can bury significantly more C than tropical forests, indicating that continued coastal development and exposure to sea level rise and storms will have global biogeochemical consequences. The Florida Coastal Everglades Long Term Ecological Research (FCE LTER) site provides an excellent subtropical system for examining carbon (C) balance because of its exposure to historical changes in freshwater distribution and sea level rise and its history of significant long-term carbon-cycling studies. FCE LTER scientists used net ecosystem C balance and net ecosystem exchange data to estimate C budgets for riverine mangrove, freshwater marsh, and seagrass meadows, providing insights into the magnitude of C accumulation and lateral aquatic C transport. Rates of net C production in the riverine mangrove forest exceeded those reported for many tropical systems, including terrestrial forests, but there are considerable uncertainties around those estimates due to the high potential for gain and loss of C through aquatic fluxes. C production was approximately balanced between gain and loss in Everglades marshes; however, the contribution of periphyton increases uncertainty in these estimates. Moreover, while the approaches used for these initial estimates were informative, a resolved approach for addressing areas of uncertainty is critically needed for coastal wetland ecosystems. Once resolved, these C balance estimates, in conjunction with an understanding of drivers and key ecosystem feedbacks, can inform cross-system studies of ecosystem response to long-term changes in climate, hydrologic management, and other land use along coastlines

  3. Satellite tracking reveals habitat use by juvenile green sea turtles Chelonia mydas in the Everglades, Florida, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hart, Kristen M.; Fujisaki, Ikuko

    2010-01-01

    We tracked the movements of 6 juvenile green sea turtles captured in coastal areas of southwest Florida within Everglades National Park (ENP) using satellite transmitters for periods of 27 to 62 d in 2007 and 2008 (mean ± SD: 47.7 ± 12.9 d). Turtles ranged in size from 33.4 to 67.5 cm straight carapace length (45.7 ± 12.9 cm) and 4.4 to 40.8 kg in mass (16.0 ± 13.8 kg). These data represent the first satellite tracking data gathered on juveniles of this endangered species at this remote study site, which may represent an important developmental habitat and foraging ground. Satellite tracking results suggested that these immature turtles were resident for several months very close to capture and release sites, in waters from 0 to 10 m in depth. Mean home range for this springtime tracking period as represented by minimum convex polygon (MCP) was 1004.9 ± 618.8 km2 (range 374.1 to 2060.1 km2), with 4 of 6 individuals spending a significant proportion of time within the ENP boundaries in 2008 in areas with dense patches of marine algae. Core use areas determined by 50% kernel density estimates (KDE) ranged from 5.0 to 54.4 km2, with a mean of 22.5 ± 22.1 km2. Overlap of 50% KDE plots for 6 turtles confirmed use of shallow-water nearshore habitats =0.6 m deep within the park boundary. Delineating specific habitats used by juvenile green turtles in this and other remote coastal areas with protected status will help conservation managers to prioritize their efforts and increase efficacy in protecting endangered species.

  4. Preliminary Use of Uric Acid as a Biomarker for Wading Birds on Everglades Tree Islands, Florida, United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bates, Anne L.; Orem, William H.; Newman, Susan; Gawlik, Dale E.; Lerch, Harry E.; Corum, Margo D.; Van Winkle, Monica

    2010-01-01

    Concentrations of organic biomarkers and concentrations of phosphorus in soil cores can potentially be used as proxies for historic population densities of wading birds on tree islands in the Florida Everglades. This report focuses on establishing a link between the organic biomarker uric acid found in wading bird guano and the high phosphorus concentrations in tree island soils in the Florida Everglades. Uric acid was determined in soil core sections, in surface samples, and in bird guano by using a method of high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) developed for this purpose. Preliminary results show an overall correlation between uric acid and total phosphorus in three soil cores, with a general trend of decreasing concentrations of both uric acid and phosphorus with depth. However, we have also found no uric acid in a soil core having high concentrations of phosphorus. We believe that this result may be explained by different geochemical circumstances at that site.

  5. Flow Field and Nutrient Dynamics Control Over Formation of Parallel Vegetation Patterns in the Florida Everglades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, V.; Cheng, Y.; Stieglitz, M.

    2009-12-01

    Pattern formation in vegetated communities reflects the underlying mechanisms governing resource utilization and distribution across the landscape. An example of a patterned ecosystem is the Florida Everglades, which is characterized by parallel and slightly elevated peat "ridges" separated by deeper water "slough" communities (R&S). Ridges are dominated by sawgrass (Cladium jamaiscence). These patterns are thought to be aligned with and develop in response to the historic surface water flow direction, though the precise mechanisms which lead to their formation are poorly understood. Over the years this R&S habitat has degraded in areas where the natural flow regime, hydroperiod, and water depths have been impacted by human development. Managing and restoring this habitat has been an objective of the U.S. Federal and Florida State governments since the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) was authorized in 2000. It is imperative, however, to develop a mechanistic understanding of ridge-slough formation before the potential benefits of hydrologic forecasts associated with CERP can be evaluated. Recently, Cheng et al (see Cheng et al, session NG14) employed a simple 2D advection-diffusion model developed by Rietkerk et al (2004) to describe for the first time, the formation of parallel stripes from hydrologic interactions. To simulate parallel stripes, Cheng et al retained the basic equations of the Rietkerk model but allowed for constant advection of water and nutrient in one direction to simulate slope conditions, with evapotranspiration driven advection of water and nutrient perpendicular to the downhill flow direction. We employ this modeling framework and parameterize the model with Everglades field data to simulate ridge-slough formation. In this model, the relatively higher rates of evapotranspiration on the ridges compared to the sloughs create hydraulic gradients which carry dissolved nutrients from the sloughs to the faster growing ridges. With

  6. Consequences of Melaleuca quinquenervia Invasion on Soil Nematodes in the Florida Everglades

    PubMed Central

    Porazinska, Dorota L.; Pratt, Paul D.; Glblin-Davis, Robin M.

    2007-01-01

    The tree Melaleuca quinquenervia invades all types of habitats of South Florida leading to up to 80% loss of aboveground diversity. To examine impacts on the belowground ecosystem, we investigated the composition and diversity of nematodes from soils dominated by the invasive tree and compared them with soils supporting native plant communities at six locations across the Florida Everglades over three years. Despite the significant differences in soil type, hydrology, and native plant composition of the sites, there were consistent differences in nematode communities between soil environments under the native and invaded plant communities. The total abundance and diversity of nematodes in soils dominated by M. quinquenervia was 60% and 80% of adjacent soils under native plants. Fungal-feeding and plant-parasitic nematodes were twice as abundant under native plants as under M. quinquenervia. Nematode communities under M. quinquenervia were bacterivore-dominated, while under native vegetation plant-parasite dominated. The overall diversity of nematodes was 20% lower under the exotic than under native plants, with plant parasites being 36% and fungivores being 30% less diverse. Soil moisture, % of Ca, Mg, and clay particles and total soil C and N were greater in M. quinquenervia soils, but plant-available concentrations of P, K, Ca, and Mg as well as CEC were reduced. Overall, data suggests that the invasion process may modify soil biotic and abiotic conditions that in turn promote the advancement of the exotic M. quinquenervia and displacement of the native plants. PMID:19259503

  7. Landscape factors and hydrology influence mercury concentrations in wading birds breeding in the Florida Everglades, USA.

    PubMed

    Herring, Garth; Eagles-Smith, Collin A; Ackerman, Joshua T; Gawlik, Dale E; Beerens, James M

    2013-08-01

    The hydrology of wetland ecosystems is a key driver of both mercury (Hg) methylation and waterbird foraging ecology, and hence may play a fundamental role in waterbird exposure and risk to Hg contamination. However, few studies have investigated hydrological factors that influence waterbird Hg exposure. We examined how several landscape-level hydrological variables influenced Hg concentrations in great egret and white ibis adults and chicks in the Florida Everglades. The great egret is a visual "exploiter" species that tolerates lower prey densities and is less sensitive to hydrological conditions than is the white ibis, which is a tactile "searcher" species that pursues higher prey densities in shallow water. Mercury concentrations in adult great egrets were most influenced by the spatial region that they occupied in the Everglades (higher in the southern region); whereas the number of days a site was dry during the previous dry season was the most important factor influencing Hg concentrations in adult ibis (Hg concentrations increased with the number of days dry). In contrast, Hg concentrations in egret chicks were most influenced by calendar date (increasing with date), whereas Hg concentrations in ibis chicks were most influenced by chick age, region, and water recession rate (Hg concentrations decreased with age, were higher in the southern regions, and increased with positive water recession rates). Our results indicate that both recent (preceding two weeks) hydrological conditions, and those of the prior year, influence Hg concentrations in wading birds. Further, these results suggest that Hg exposure in wading birds is driven by complex relationships between wading bird behavior and life stage, landscape hydrologic patterns, and biogeochemical processes. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Constants for mercury binding by organic matter isolates from the Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benoit, J.M.; Mason, R.P.; Gilmour, C.C.; Aiken, G.R.

    2001-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) has been implicated as an important complexing agent for Hg that can affect its mobility and bioavailability in aquatic ecosystems. However, binding constants for natural Hg-DOM complexes are not well known. We employed a competitive ligand approach to estimate conditional stability constants for Hg complexes with DOM isolates collected from Florida Everglades surface waters. The isolates examined were the hydrophobic fraction of DOM from a eutrophic, sulfidic site (F1-HPoA) and the hydrophilic fraction from an oligotrophic, low-sulfide site (2BS-HPiA). Our experimental determinations utilized overall octanol-water partitioning coefficients (Dow) for 203Hg at 0.01 M chloride and across pH and DOM concentration gradients. Use of this radioisotope allowed rapid determinations of Hg concentrations in both water and octanol phases without problems of matrix interference. Conditional stability constants (1 = 0.06, 23??C) were log K??? = 11.8 for F1-HPoA and log K' = 10.6 for 2BS-HPiA. These are similar to previously published stability constants for Hg binding to low-molecular-weight thiols. Further, F1-HPoA showed a pH-dependent decline in Dow that was consistent with models of Hg complexation with thiol groups as the dominant Hg binding sites in DOM. These experiments demonstrate that the DOM isolates are stronger ligands for Hg than chloride ion or ethylenediamine-tetraacetic acid. Speciation calculations indicate that at the DOM concentrations frequently measured in Everglades, 20 to 40 ??M, significant complexation of Hg by DOM would be expected in aerobic (sulfide-free) surface waters. Copyright ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  9. Distribution, activities, and interactions of methanogens and sulfate-reducing prokaryotes in the Florida Everglades.

    PubMed

    Bae, Hee-Sung; Holmes, M Elizabeth; Chanton, Jeffrey P; Reddy, K Ramesh; Ogram, Andrew

    2015-11-01

    To gain insight into the mechanisms controlling methanogenic pathways in the Florida Everglades, the distribution and functional activities of methanogens and sulfate-reducing prokaryotes (SRPs) were investigated in soils (0 to 2 or 0 to 4 cm depth) across the well-documented nutrient gradient in the water conservation areas (WCAs) caused by runoff from the adjacent Everglades Agricultural Area. The methyl coenzyme M reductase gene (mcrA) sequences that were retrieved from WCA-2A, an area with relatively high concentrations of SO4 (2-) (≥39 μM), indicated that methanogens inhabiting this area were broadly distributed within the orders Methanomicrobiales, Methanosarcinales, Methanocellales, Methanobacteriales, and Methanomassiliicoccales. In more than 3 years of monitoring, quantitative PCR (qPCR) using newly designed group-specific primers revealed that the hydrogenotrophic Methanomicrobiales were more numerous than the Methanosaetaceae obligatory acetotrophs in SO4 (2-)-rich areas of WCA-2A, while the Methanosaetaceae were dominant over the Methanomicrobiales in WCA-3A (with relatively low SO4 (2-) concentrations; ≤4 μM). qPCR of dsrB sequences also indicated that SRPs are present at greater numbers than methanogens in the WCAs. In an incubation study with WCA-2A soils, addition of MoO4 (2-) (a specific inhibitor of SRP activity) resulted in increased methane production rates, lower apparent fractionation factors [αapp; defined as (amount of δ(13)CO2 + 1,000)/(amount of δ(13)CH4 + 1,000)], and higher Methanosaetaceae mcrA transcript levels compared to those for the controls without MoO4 (2-). These results indicate that SRPs play crucial roles in controlling methanogenic pathways and in shaping the structures of methanogen assemblages as a function of position along the nutrient gradient.

  10. Changes in Methane Production Pathway as a Function of Nutrient Input in the Florida Everglades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, M.; Chanton, J.; Bae, H.; Ogram, A.

    2011-12-01

    The relative importance of acetotrophic and hydrogenotrophic methanogenic pathways was evaluated at a study site along a nutrient gradient in the Florida Everglades. A better understanding of the impact of nutrient loading on methanogenesis in wetlands is critical because methane production in wetlands is an important part of the global methane budget. The isotopic composition of biogenic CH4 is affected by the relative contribution of each methanogenic pathway because a larger isotope effect is associated with hydrogenotrophic methane production than acetoclastic methanogenesis. δ13C of CH4 and CO2 in porewater from three sites in the northern Everglades indicated that a higher proportion of methane was produced via hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis at the nutrient-impacted site than at the oligotrophic site. δ13C- CH4 was -64%, on average, at the eutrophic site and was around -50% at the oligotrophic site. Likewise, the apparent fractionation factors between CH4 and CO2 were higher at the nutrient impacted sites than at the oligotrophic site, indicating that more of the CH4 produced at the eutrophic site came from hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. Soils from the same sites were incubated with methyl fluoride, an inhibitor of acetoclastic methanogenesis, and δ13C- CH4 and δ13C- CO2 in these soils was compared with soil incubated without the inhibitor. Apparent fractionation factors in soils where only the hydrogenotrophic pathway was active were higher and less CH4 was produced than in soils in which both pathways proceeded. Blocking the production of methane via acetate fermentation allowed us to estimate that about 70% of the methane produced in soils from the oligotrophic site was from acetate fermentation and 70 to 80% was from CO2 reduction in the most nutrient impacted soil. These results demonstrate the effect that nutrient levels can have on methane production in natural wetlands.

  11. Syntrophic-Methanogenic Associations along a Nutrient Gradient in the Florida Everglades

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Ashvini; Ogram, Andrew; Reddy, K. R.

    2004-01-01

    Nutrient runoff from the Everglades Agricultural Area resulted in a well-documented gradient of phosphorus concentrations in soil and water, with concomitant ecosystem-level changes, in the northern Florida Everglades. It was recently reported that sulfate-reducing prokaryote assemblage composition, numbers, and activities are dependent on position along the gradient (H. Castro, K. R. Reddy, and A. Ogram, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 68:6129-6137, 2002). The present study utilized a combination of culture- and non-culture-based approaches to study differences in composition of assemblages of syntrophic and methanogenic microbial communities in eutrophic, transition, and oligotrophic areas along the phosphorus gradient. Methanogenesis rates were much higher in eutrophic and transition regions, and sequence analysis of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries constructed from samples taken from these regions revealed differences in composition and activities of syntroph-methanogen consortia. Methanogens from eutrophic and transition regions were almost exclusively composed of hydrogenotrophic methanogens, with approximately 10,000-fold-greater most probable numbers of hydrogenotrophs than of acetotrophs. Most cultivable strains from eutrophic and transition regions clustered within novel lineages. In non-culture-based studies to enrich syntrophs, most bacterial and archaeal clones were either members of novel lineages or closely related to uncultivated environmental clones. Novel cultivable Methanosaeta sp. and fatty acid-oxidizing bacteria related to the genera Syntrophomonas and Syntrophobacter were observed in microcosms containing soil from eutrophic regions, and different lines of evidence indicated the existence of novel syntrophic association in eutrophic regions. PMID:15184146

  12. Distribution, Activities, and Interactions of Methanogens and Sulfate-Reducing Prokaryotes in the Florida Everglades

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Hee-Sung; Holmes, M. Elizabeth; Chanton, Jeffrey P.; Reddy, K. Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    To gain insight into the mechanisms controlling methanogenic pathways in the Florida Everglades, the distribution and functional activities of methanogens and sulfate-reducing prokaryotes (SRPs) were investigated in soils (0 to 2 or 0 to 4 cm depth) across the well-documented nutrient gradient in the water conservation areas (WCAs) caused by runoff from the adjacent Everglades Agricultural Area. The methyl coenzyme M reductase gene (mcrA) sequences that were retrieved from WCA-2A, an area with relatively high concentrations of SO42− (≥39 μM), indicated that methanogens inhabiting this area were broadly distributed within the orders Methanomicrobiales, Methanosarcinales, Methanocellales, Methanobacteriales, and Methanomassiliicoccales. In more than 3 years of monitoring, quantitative PCR (qPCR) using newly designed group-specific primers revealed that the hydrogenotrophic Methanomicrobiales were more numerous than the Methanosaetaceae obligatory acetotrophs in SO42−-rich areas of WCA-2A, while the Methanosaetaceae were dominant over the Methanomicrobiales in WCA-3A (with relatively low SO42− concentrations; ≤4 μM). qPCR of dsrB sequences also indicated that SRPs are present at greater numbers than methanogens in the WCAs. In an incubation study with WCA-2A soils, addition of MoO42− (a specific inhibitor of SRP activity) resulted in increased methane production rates, lower apparent fractionation factors [αapp; defined as (amount of δ13CO2 + 1,000)/(amount of δ13CH4 + 1,000)], and higher Methanosaetaceae mcrA transcript levels compared to those for the controls without MoO42−. These results indicate that SRPs play crucial roles in controlling methanogenic pathways and in shaping the structures of methanogen assemblages as a function of position along the nutrient gradient. PMID:26276115

  13. Landscape factors and hydrology influence mercury concentrations in wading birds breeding in the Florida Everglades, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herring, Garth; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Ackerman, Joshua T.; Gawlik, Dale E.; Beerens, James M.

    2013-01-01

    The hydrology of wetland ecosystems is a key driver of both mercury (Hg) methylation and waterbird foraging ecology, and hence may play a fundamental role in waterbird exposure and risk to Hg contamination. However, few studies have investigated hydrological factors that influence waterbird Hg exposure. We examined how several landscape-level hydrological variables influenced Hg concentrations in great egret and white ibis adults and chicks in the Florida Everglades. The great egret is a visual “exploiter” species that tolerates lower prey densities and is less sensitive to hydrological conditions than is the white ibis, which is a tactile “searcher” species that pursues higher prey densities in shallow water. Mercury concentrations in adult great egrets were most influenced by the spatial region that they occupied in the Everglades (higher in the southern region); whereas the number of days a site was dry during the previous dry season was the most important factor influencing Hg concentrations in adult ibis (Hg concentrations increased with the number of days dry). In contrast, Hg concentrations in egret chicks were most influenced by calendar date (increasing with date), whereas Hg concentrations in ibis chicks were most influenced by chick age, region, and water recession rate (Hg concentrations decreased with age, were higher in the southern regions, and increased with positive water recession rates). Our results indicate that both recent (preceding two weeks) hydrological conditions, and those of the prior year, influence Hg concentrations in wading birds. Further, these results suggest that Hg exposure in wading birds is driven by complex relationships between wading bird behavior and life stage, landscape hydrologic patterns, and biogeochemical processes.

  14. Comparison of the South Florida Natural System Model with Pre-canal Everglades Hydrology Estimated from Historical Sources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McVoy, Christopher; Park, Winifred A.; Obeysekera, Jayantha

    1996-01-01

    Preservation and restoration of the remaining Everglades ecosystem is focussed on two aspects: improving upstream water quality and improving 'hydropatterns' - the timing, depth and flow of surface water. Restoration of hydropatterns requires knowledge of the original pre-canal drainage conditions as well as an understanding of the soil, topo-graphic, and vegetation changes that have taken place since canal drainage began in the 1880's. The Natural System Model (NSM), developed by the South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD) and Everglades National Park, uses estimates of pre-drainage vegetation and topography to estimate the pre-drainage hydrologic response of the Everglades. Sources of model uncertainty include: (1) the algorithms, (2) the parameters (particularly those relating to vegetation roughness and evapotranspiration), and (3) errors in the assumed pre-drainage vegetation distribution and pre-drainage topography. Other studies are concentrating on algorithmic and parameter sources of uncertainty. In this study we focus on the NSM output -- predicted hydropattern -- and evaluate this by comparison with all available direct and indirect information on pre-drainage hydropatterns. The unpublished and published literature is being searched exhaustively for observations of water depth, flow direction, flow velocity and hydroperiod, during the period prior and just after drainage (1840-1920). Additionally, a comprehensive map of soils in the Everglades region, prepared in the 1940's by personnel from the University of Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, the U.S. Soil Conservation Service, the U.S. Geological Survey, and the Everglades Drainage District, is being used to identify wetland soils and to infer the spatial distribution of pre-drainage hydrologic conditions. Detailed study of this map and other early soil and vegetation maps in light of the history of drainage activities will reveal patterns of change and possible errors in the input to the

  15. Emissions of sulfur gases from marine and freshwater wetlands of the Florida Everglades: Rates and extrapolation using remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hines, Mark E.; Pelletier, Ramona E.; Crill, Patrick M.

    1993-05-01

    Rates of emissions of the biogenic sulfur (S) gases carbonyl sulfide (COS), methyl mercaptan (MSH), dimethyl sulfide (DMS), and carbon disulfide (CS2) were measured in a variety of marine and freshwater wetland habitats in the Florida Everglades during a short duration period in October using dynamic chambers, cryotrapping techniques, and gas chromatography. The most rapid emissions of >500 nmol m-2 h-1 occurred in red mangrove-dominated sites that were adjacent to open seawater and contained numerous crab burrows. Poorly drained red mangrove sites exhibited lower fluxes of ˜60 nmol m-2 h-1 which were similar to fluxes from the black mangrove areas which dominated the marine-influenced wetland sites in the Everglades. DMS was the dominant organo-S gas emitted especially in the freshwater areas. Spectral data from a scene from the Landsat thematic mapper were used to map habitats in the Everglades. Six vegetation categories were delineated using geographical information system software and S gas emissions were extrapolated for the entire Everglades National Park. The black mangrove-dominated areas accounted for the largest portion of S gas emissions to the area. The large area extent of the saw grass communities (42%) accounted for ˜24% of the total S emissions.

  16. Emissions of sulfur gases from marine and freshwater wetlands of the Florida Everglades - Rates and extrapolation using remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, Mark E.; Pelletier, Ramona E.; Crill, Patrick M.

    1993-01-01

    Rates of emissions of the biogenic sulfur (S) gases carbonyl sulfide (COS), methyl mercaptan (MSH), dimethyl sulfide (DMS), and carbon disulfide (CS2) were measured in a variety of marine and freshwater wetland habitats in the Florida Everglades during a short duration period in October using dynamic chambers, cryotrapping techniques, and gas chromatography. The most rapid emissions of over 500 nmol/sq m/h occurred in red mangrove-dominated sites that were adjacent to open seawater and contained numerous crab burrows. Poorly drained red mangrove sites exhibited lower fluxes of about 60 nmol/sq m/h, which were similar to fluxes from the black mangrove areas which dominated the marine-influenced wetland sites in the Everglades. DMS was the dominant organo-S gas emitted especially in the freshwater areas. Spectral data from a scene from the Landsat TM were used to map habitats in the Everglades. Six vegetation categories were delineated using geographical information system software and S gas emissions were extrapolated for the entire Everglades National Park. The black mangrove-dominated areas accounted for the largest portion of S gas emissions to the area. The large area extent of the saw grass communities accounted for about 24 percent of the total S emissions.

  17. Emissions of sulfur gases from marine and freshwater wetlands of the Florida Everglades - Rates and extrapolation using remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, Mark E.; Pelletier, Ramona E.; Crill, Patrick M.

    1993-01-01

    Rates of emissions of the biogenic sulfur (S) gases carbonyl sulfide (COS), methyl mercaptan (MSH), dimethyl sulfide (DMS), and carbon disulfide (CS2) were measured in a variety of marine and freshwater wetland habitats in the Florida Everglades during a short duration period in October using dynamic chambers, cryotrapping techniques, and gas chromatography. The most rapid emissions of over 500 nmol/sq m/h occurred in red mangrove-dominated sites that were adjacent to open seawater and contained numerous crab burrows. Poorly drained red mangrove sites exhibited lower fluxes of about 60 nmol/sq m/h, which were similar to fluxes from the black mangrove areas which dominated the marine-influenced wetland sites in the Everglades. DMS was the dominant organo-S gas emitted especially in the freshwater areas. Spectral data from a scene from the Landsat TM were used to map habitats in the Everglades. Six vegetation categories were delineated using geographical information system software and S gas emissions were extrapolated for the entire Everglades National Park. The black mangrove-dominated areas accounted for the largest portion of S gas emissions to the area. The large area extent of the saw grass communities accounted for about 24 percent of the total S emissions.

  18. Emissions of sulfur gases from marine and freshwater wetlands of the Florida Everglades: Rates and extrapolation using remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, Mark E.; Pelletier, Ramona E.; Crill, Patrick M.

    1992-01-01

    Rates of emissions of the biogenic sulfur (S) gases carbonyl sulfide (COS), methyl mercaptan (MSH), dimethyl sulfide (DMS), and carbon disulfide (CS2) were measured in a variety of marine and freshwater wetland habitats in the Florida Everglades during a short duration period in October using dynamic chambers, cryotrapping techniques, and gas chromatography. The most rapid emissions of greater than 500 nmol/m(sup -2)h(sup -1) occurred in red mangrove-dominated sites that were adjacent to open seawater and contained numerous crab burrows. Poorly drained red mangrove sites exhibited lower fluxes of approximately 60 nmol/m(sup -2)h(sup -1) which were similar to fluxes from the black mangrove areas which dominated the marine-influenced wetland sites in the Everglades. DMS was the dominant organo-S gas emitted especially in the freshwater areas. Spectral data from a scene from the Landsat thematic mapper were used to map habitats in the Everglades. Six vegetation categories were delineated using geographical information system software and S gas emission were extrapolated for the entire Everglades National Park. The black mangrove-dominated areas accounted for the largest portion of S gas emissions to the area. The large area extent of the saw grass communities (42 percent) accounted for approximately 24 percent of the total S emissions.

  19. Ecological characterization of the lower Everglades, Florida Bay, and the Florida Keys

    SciTech Connect

    Schomer, N.S.; Drew, R.D.

    1982-09-01

    A conceptual model of the study area identifies four major ecological zones: (1) terrestrial and freshwater wetlands, (2) estuarine and saltwater wetlands, (3) Florida Bay and mangrove islands, and (4) the Florida Keys. These zones are delineated by differences in basic physical-chemical background factors which in turn promote characteristic ecological communities. The terrestrial and freshwater wetlands support pinelands, sawgrass marshes, wet prairies, sloughs and occasional tree islands. The estuarine and saltwater wetlands support mangrove forests, salt marshes and oscillating salinity systems. Florida Bay exhibits oscillating meso- to hypersaline waters over grassbeds on marine lime mud sediments surrounding deeper lake areas. The exposed tips of the mud banks frequently support mangrove or salt prairie vegetation. The Florida Keys support almost all of the above communities to some small degree but are characterized by extensive offshore coral reefs. The productivity of these communities with regard to fish and wildlife reflects (1) the diversity and type of habitats available to species that are potentially capable of exploiting them, (2) the degree of alteration of these habitats by man and natural forces, and (3) historical, biogeographic and random factors that restrict organisms to specific environments or prohibit them from exploiting a potential habitat.

  20. Late Holocene Climate Variability and Land-use change impacts on fire disturbance and carbon dynamics in the Florida Everglades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, M.; Bernhardt, C. E.; Willard, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    Wetlands are an important component in the global carbon cycle because their waterlogged soils promote soil carbon storage as well as methane emissions. It has been established that boreal peatlands occupy only 3% of the terrestrial Earth's surface, but they store one-third to half of the global soil carbon, which has accumulated slowly as peat over thousands of years. However, the role of low latitude peat-accumulating wetlands in the global carbon cycle has not been thoroughly characterized. The Florida Everglades represent one of the major low-latitude peat accumulating systems. The Everglades occupy roughly 6,000 km2 in southern Florida, and consist of a matrix of tree islands, mangrove swamps, cypress domes, marl prairies, sawgrass marshes, sawgrass ridges, and sloughs. Peat has accumulated in much of the Everglades since inception ~7ka, and hydrologic fluctuations related to global- to regional- scale changes in sea level and climate have influenced vegetation patterns. Land-use change since the late 19th century, primarily through the installation of canals and levees and other water-control structures, has altered the hydrology and impacted distribution of native plant communities as well as the occurrence of wildfires. To determine differences in carbon stocks among the dominant ecosystem types and to examine how natural climate variability and land-use change impacts carbon dynamics and the occurrence of wildfires in these systems, we analyzed the carbon accumulation rates from 13 peat cores in four vegetation communities from the Florida Everglades. Although drainage has resulted in the subsidence and oxidation of Everglades peat in many locations, recently collected cores show distinct patterns in carbon storage related to habitat and both natural and anthropogenic changes in hydrology and vegetation community. To further evaluate shifts in wildfire regimes over the late Holocene, we analyzed charcoal records from 10 cores in four vegetation communities

  1. Use of thermal inertia determined by HCMM to predict nocturnal cold prone areas in Florida. [The Everglades agricultural area, Lake Okeechobee, and the Suwanee River basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, L. H., Jr. (Principal Investigator); Chen, E.; Martsolf, J. D.; Jones, P. H.

    1981-01-01

    Transparencies, prints, and computer compatible tapes of temperature differential and thermal inertia for the winter of 1978 to 1979 were obtained. Thermal inertial differences in the South Florida depicted include: drained organic soils of the Everglades agricultural area, undrained organic soils of the managed water conservation areas of the South Florida water management district, the urbanized area around Miami, Lake Okeechobee, and the mineral soil west of the Everglades agricultural area. The range of wetlands and uplands conditions within the Suwanee River basin was also identified. It is shown that the combination of wetlands uplands surface features of Florida yield a wide range of surface temperatures related to wetness of the surface features.

  2. Pharmacology and toxicology of pahayokolide A, a bioactive metabolite from a freshwater species of Lyngbya isolated from the Florida Everglades.

    PubMed

    Berry, John P; Gantar, Miroslav; Gawley, Robert E; Wang, Minglei; Rein, Kathleen S

    2004-12-01

    The genus of filamentous cyanobacteria, Lyngbya, has been found to be a rich source of bioactive metabolites. However, identification of such compounds from Lyngbya has largely focused on a few marine representatives. Here, we report on the pharmacology and toxicology of pahayokolide A from a freshwater isolate, Lyngbya sp. strain 15-2, from the Florida Everglades. Specifically, we investigated inhibition of microbial representatives and mammalian cell lines, as well as toxicity of the compound to both invertebrate and vertebrate models. Pahayokolide A inhibited representatives of Bacillus, as well as the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Interestingly, the compound also inhibited several representatives of green algae that were also isolated from the Everglades. Pahayokolide A was shown to inhibit a number of cancer cell lines over a range of concentrations (IC50 varied from 2.13 to 44.57 microM) depending on the cell-type. When tested against brine shrimp, pahayokolide was only marginally toxic at the highest concentrations tested (1 mg/mL). The compound was, however, acutely toxic to zebrafish embryos (LC50=2.15 microM). Possible biomedical and environmental health aspects of the pahayokolides remain to be investigated; however, the identification of bioactive metabolites such as these demonstrates the potential of the Florida Everglades as source of new toxins and drugs.

  3. Pharmacology and toxicology of pahayokolide A, a bioactive metabolite from a freshwater species of Lyngbya isolated from the Florida Everglades

    PubMed Central

    Berry, John P.; Gantar, Miroslav; Gawley, Robert E.; Wang, Minglei; Rein, Kathleen S.

    2008-01-01

    The genus of filamentous cyanobacteria, Lyngbya, has been found to be a rich source of bioactive metabolites. However, identification of such compounds from Lyngbya has largely focused on a few marine representatives. Here, we report on the pharmacology and toxicology of pahayokolide A from a freshwater isolate, Lyngbya sp. strain 15−2, from the Florida Everglades. Specifically, we investigated inhibition of microbial representatives and mammalian cell lines, as well as toxicity of the compound to both invertebrate and vertebrate models. Pahayokolide A inhibited representatives of Bacillus, as well as the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Interestingly, the compound also inhibited several representatives of green algae that were also isolated from the Everglades. Pahayokolide A was shown to inhibit a number of cancer cell lines over a range of concentrations (IC50 varied from 2.13 to 44.57 μM) depending on the cell-type. When tested against brine shrimp, pahayokolide was only marginally toxic at the highest concentrations tested (1 mg/mL). The compound was, however, acutely toxic to zebrafish embryos (LC50=2.15 μM). Possible biomedical and environmental health aspects of the pahayokolides remain to be investigated; however, the identification of bioactive metabolites such as these demonstrates the potential of the Florida Everglades as source of new toxins and drugs. PMID:15683832

  4. Measuring Taylor Slough Boundary and Internal Flows, Everglades National Park, Florida

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-01

    stricken wetlands, and saltwater intrusion in coastal areas. Taylor Slough (fig. 1), historically a major contributor of freshwater to Florida Bay, lies...populations of wading bird and animal species, and reduced habitat. Anthropogenic encroachment has placed the Cape Sable seaside sparrow, American crocodile ...cypress heads; saltwater influence is apparent by the transition to sawgrass and mangroves on the southern part of the slough. Precipitation

  5. Flow velocity, water temperature, and conductivity at selected locations in Shark River Slough, Everglades National Park, Florida; July 1999 - July 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaffranek, Raymond W.; Riscassi, Ami L.

    2005-01-01

    Flow-velocity, water-temperature, and conductivity data were collected at five locations in Shark River Slough, Everglades National Park (ENP), Florida, from 1999 to 2003. The data were collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey Priority Ecosystems Science Initiative in support of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan. This report contains digital files and graphical plots of the processed, quality-checked, and edited data. Information pertinent to the locations and monitoring strategy also is presented.

  6. Sources of variation in detection of wading birds from aerial surveys in the florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conroy, M.J.; Peterson, J.T.; Bass, O.L.; Fonnesbeck, C.J.; Howell, J.E.; Moore, C.T.; Runge, J.P.

    2008-01-01

    We conducted dual-observer trials to estimate detection probabilities (probability that a group that is present and available is detected) for fixed-wing aerial surveys of wading birds in the Everglades system, Florida. Detection probability ranged from <0.2 to similar to 0.75 and varied according to species, group size, observer, and the observer's position in the aircraft (front or rear seat). Aerial-survey simulations indicated that incomplete detection can have a substantial effect oil assessment of population trends, particularly river relatively short intervals (<= 3 years) and small annual changes in population size (<= 3%). We conclude that detection bias is an important consideration for interpreting observations from aerial surveys of wading birds, potentially limiting the use of these data for comparative purposes and trend analyses. We recommend that workers conducting aerial surveys for wading birds endeavor to reduce observer and other controllable sources of detection bias and account for uncontrollable sources through incorporation of dual-observer or other calibratior methods as part of survey design (e.g., using double sampling).

  7. Soil recovery across a chronosequence of restored wetlands in the Florida Everglades

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qibing; Li, Yuncong; Zhang, Min

    2015-01-01

    The restoration project in the Hole-in-the-Donut of Everglades National Park in Florida, USA is to reestablish native wetlands by complete removal of the invasive plants and the associated soil. However, there is little information available about changes in properties of the newly formed Marl soils in restored wetlands. In this study, we measured soil physicochemical properties, soil enzymatic activities, and stable isotopes of carbon (δ13C) in plants and soil organic carbon (SOC) in an undisturbed natural wetland (UNW) and three wetlands restored respectively in 1989, 1996 and 1999 (WR89, WR96 and WR99). The older restored wetlands (WR89 and WR96) are characterized by greater SOC and mineral nitrogen. The values of soil dehydrogenase and phosphatase activities in the four wetlands follow the order: UNW > WR89 > WR96 > WR99, and are consistent with changes in vegetation coverage. The principal component analysis shows that dehydrogenase and phosphatase activities are the vital variables contributing to the soil of UNW. The similar δ13C values of SOC and plants in the restored wetlands suggest the formation of SOC during restoration is mainly derived from the associated plants. These results indicate that the newly restored soils develop toward the soil in the UNW with time since restoration. PMID:26621209

  8. Wading bird guano enrichment of soil nutrients in tree islands of the Florida Everglades.

    PubMed

    Irick, Daniel L; Gu, Binhe; Li, Yuncong C; Inglett, Patrick W; Frederick, Peter C; Ross, Michael S; Wright, Alan L; Ewe, Sharon M L

    2015-11-01

    Differential distribution of nutrients within an ecosystem can offer insight of ecological and physical processes that are otherwise unclear. This study was conducted to determine if enrichment of phosphorus (P) in tree island soils of the Florida Everglades can be explained by bird guano deposition. Concentrations of total carbon, nitrogen (N), and P, and N stable isotope ratio (δ(15)N) were determined on soil samples from 46 tree islands. Total elemental concentrations and δ(15)N were determined on wading bird guano. Sequential chemical extraction of P pools was also performed on guano. Guano contained between 53.1 and 123.7 g-N kg(-1) and 20.7 and 56.7 g-P kg(-1). Most of the P present in guano was extractable by HCl, which ranged from 82 to 97% of the total P. Total P of tree islands classified as having low or high P soils averaged 0.71 and 40.6 g kg(-1), respectively. Tree island soil with high total P concentration was found to have a similar δ(15)N signature and total P concentration as bird guano. Phosphorus concentrations and δ(15)N were positively correlated in tree island soils (r = 0.83, p< 0.0001). Potential input of guano with elevated concentrations of N and P, and (15)N enriched N, relative to other sources suggests that guano deposition in tree island soils is a mechanism contributing to this pattern.

  9. Enhanced dissolution of cinnabar (mercuric sulfide) by dissolved organic matter isolated from the Florida Everglades

    SciTech Connect

    Ravichandran, M.; Ryan, J.N.; Aiken, G.R.; Reddy, M.M.

    1998-11-01

    Organic matter isolated from the Florida Everglades caused a dramatic increase in mercury release from cinnabar (HgS), a solid with limited solubility. Hydrophobic (a mixture of both humic and fulvic) acids dissolved more mercury than hydrophilic acids and other nonacid fractions of dissolved organic matter (DOM). Cinnabar dissolution by isolated organic matter and natural water samples was inhibited by cations such as Ca{sup 2+}. Dissolution was independent of oxygen content in experimental solutions. Dissolution experiments conducted in Dl water had no detectable dissolved mercury. The presence of various inorganic (chloride, sulfate, or sulfide) and organic ligands (salicylic acid, acetic acid, EDTA, or cysteine) did not enhance the dissolution of mercury from the mineral. Aromatic carbon content in the isolates correlated positively with enhanced cinnabar dissolution. {zeta}-potential measurements indicated sorption of negatively charged organic matter to the negatively charged cinnabar at pH 6.0. Possible mechanisms of dissolution include surface complexation of mercury and oxidation of surface sulfur species by the organic matter.

  10. Experimentally derived salinity tolerance of hatchling Burmese pythons (Python molurus bivittatus) from the Everglades, Florida (USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hart, K.M.; Schofield, P.J.; Gregoire, D.R.

    2012-01-01

    In a laboratory setting, we tested the ability of 24 non-native, wild-caught hatchling Burmese pythons (Python molurus bivittatus) collected in the Florida Everglades to survive when given water containing salt to drink. After a one-month acclimation period in the laboratory, we grouped snakes into three treatments, giving them access to water that was fresh (salinity of 0, control), brackish (salinity of 10), or full-strength sea water (salinity of 35). Hatchlings survived about one month at the highest marine salinity and about five months at the brackish-water salinity; no control animals perished during the experiment. These results are indicative of a "worst-case scenario", as in the laboratory we denied access to alternate fresh-water sources that may be accessible in the wild (e.g., through rainfall). Therefore, our results may underestimate the potential of hatchling pythons to persist in saline habitats in the wild. Because of the effect of different salinity regimes on survival, predictions of ultimate geographic expansion by non-native Burmese pythons that consider salt water as barriers to dispersal for pythons may warrant re-evaluation, especially under global climate change and associated sea-level-rise scenarios. ?? 2011.

  11. Experimentally derived salinity tolerance of hatchling Burmese pythons (Python molurus bivittatus) from the Everglades, Florida (USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hart, Kristen M.; Schofield, Pamela J.; Gregoire, Denise R.

    2012-01-01

    In a laboratory setting, we tested the ability of 24 non-native, wild-caught hatchling Burmese pythons (Python molurus bivittatus) collected in the Florida Everglades to survive when given water containing salt to drink. After a one-month acclimation period in the laboratory, we grouped snakes into three treatments, giving them access to water that was fresh (salinity of 0, control), brackish (salinity of 10), or full-strength sea water (salinity of 35). Hatchlings survived about one month at the highest marine salinity and about five months at the brackish-water salinity; no control animals perished during the experiment. These results are indicative of a "worst-case scenario", as in the laboratory we denied access to alternate fresh-water sources that may be accessible in the wild (e.g., through rainfall). Therefore, our results may underestimate the potential of hatchling pythons to persist in saline habitats in the wild. Because of the effect of different salinity regimes on survival, predictions of ultimate geographic expansion by non-native Burmese pythons that consider salt water as barriers to dispersal for pythons may warrant re-evaluation, especially under global climate change and associated sea-level-rise scenarios.

  12. Effects of land use on surface-water quality in the East Everglades, Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waller, Bradley G.

    1982-01-01

    Water-quality characteristics were determined at five developed areas in the East Everglades, Dade County, Florida, during the 1978 wet season (June through October). These areas are designated as: Coopertown; Chekika Hammock State Park; residential area; rock-plowed tomato field; and Cracker Jack Slough agricultural area. Data from the developed areas were compared with data from four baseline sites in undeveloped areas to determine the effects of land use on the surface-water quality. The rock-plowed tomato field was the only area where surface-water quality was affected. Water quality at this field is affected by agricultural activities and chemical applications as indicated by increased concentrations of orthophosphate, organic nitrogen, organic carbon, copper, manganese, mercury, and potassium. The remaining four areas of land use had water-quality characteristics typical of baseline sites in nearby Northeast Shark River Slough or Taylor Slough. Chemical analyses of soil indicated chlorinated-hydrocarbon insecticide residues at Coopertown and the two agricultural areas, Cracker Jack Slough and the rock-plowed tomato field. Trace elements in concentrations greater than base level occurred at both agricultural areas (manganese), Chekika Hammock State Park (manganese), and at Coopertown (lead and zinc). (USGS)

  13. Pyrite forms in recent peats and carbonates from the Florida Everglades

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.E.; Cohen, A.D. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1994-03-01

    The modern sediments of the Everglades area of southern Florida demonstrate a variety of conditions for the syngenetic formation of pyrite. These conditions relate to the overall stratigraphy of the area, which is a transgressive sequence in which fresh water peats and carbonates are overlain by brackish and marine peats and marine carbonates. The pyrite observed in microtome thin sections of these sediments occurs in three general forms: framboidal aggregates, minute euhedral crystals (<2 micrometers) often in clusters, and solitary euhedral crystals (>2 micrometers, but not larger than 20 micrometers). The relative percentages and forms of pyrite vary in occurrence within any individual depth interval depending upon parameters such as the ratio of organic to inorganic constituents, the proximity to marine water, and the types of organic constituents present (i.e. roots, leaves, fungi, algae, etc.). The relationships between pyrite forms and the various organic and inorganic constituents demonstrate the importance of microenvironments to the formation of pyrite. Overall, the relative percentages of pyrite present do not show a direct correlation with depth, with the exception of the general scarcity of pyrite in the top 12 inches of the sediment, which likely represent a redox boundary in the sediment.

  14. Philometrid nematodes infecting fishes from the Everglades National Park, Florida, U.S.A.

    PubMed

    Moravec, Frantisek; Bakenhaster, Micah

    2010-09-01

    The following three species of the Philometridae (Nematoda: Dracunculoidea) are described from marine perciform fishes of the Everglades National Park (northern Gulf of Mexico), Florida, U.S.A.: Philometra brevispicula sp. n. (male and females) from the subcutaneous tissue of mouth of the gray snapper Lutjanus griseus (Linnaeus) (Lutjanidae), Philometroides grandipapillatus sp. n. (only females) from pectoral fin muscle of the crevalle jack Caranx hippos (Linnaeus) (Carangidae), and Caranginema americanum Moravec, Montoya-Mendoza et Salgado-Maldonado, 2008 (females) from the subcutaneous fascia of trunk muscle in crevalle jack C. hippos. Philometra brevispicula is mainly characterized by small cephalic papillae of the external circle, the absence of oesophageal teeth and the presence of small caudal projections in gravid female, markedly short spicules (45 microm) in male, and by its location in the host. Philometroides grandipapillatus differs from congeners mainly in the shape of the cephalic region (narrow, conspicuously protruding), large cephalic papillae of the external circle and the absence of caudal projections in female, and by the site of infection in the host. Caranginema americanum is for the first time recorded from the northern Gulf of Mexico.

  15. Soil recovery across a chronosequence of restored wetlands in the Florida Everglades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qibing; Li, Yuncong; Zhang, Min

    2015-12-01

    The restoration project in the Hole-in-the-Donut of Everglades National Park in Florida, USA is to reestablish native wetlands by complete removal of the invasive plants and the associated soil. However, there is little information available about changes in properties of the newly formed Marl soils in restored wetlands. In this study, we measured soil physicochemical properties, soil enzymatic activities, and stable isotopes of carbon (δ13C) in plants and soil organic carbon (SOC) in an undisturbed natural wetland (UNW) and three wetlands restored respectively in 1989, 1996 and 1999 (WR89, WR96 and WR99). The older restored wetlands (WR89 and WR96) are characterized by greater SOC and mineral nitrogen. The values of soil dehydrogenase and phosphatase activities in the four wetlands follow the order: UNW > WR89 > WR96 > WR99, and are consistent with changes in vegetation coverage. The principal component analysis shows that dehydrogenase and phosphatase activities are the vital variables contributing to the soil of UNW. The similar δ13C values of SOC and plants in the restored wetlands suggest the formation of SOC during restoration is mainly derived from the associated plants. These results indicate that the newly restored soils develop toward the soil in the UNW with time since restoration.

  16. Sources of variation in detection of wading birds from aerial surveys in the Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conroy, M.J.; Peterson, J.T.; Bass, O.L.; Fonnesbeck, C.J.; Howell, J.E.; Moore, C.T.; Runge, J.P.

    2008-01-01

    We conducted dual-observer trials to estimate detection probabilities (probability that a group that is present and available is detected) for fixed-wing aerial surveys of wading birds in the Everglades system, Florida. Detection probability ranged from <0.2 to similar to 0.75 and varied according to species, group size, observer, and the observer's position in the aircraft (front or rear seat). Aerial-survey simulations indicated that incomplete detection can have a substantial effect oil assessment of population trends, particularly river relatively short intervals (<= 3 years) and small annual changes in population size (<= 3%). We conclude that detection bias is an important consideration for interpreting observations from aerial surveys of wading birds, potentially limiting the use of these data for comparative purposes and trend analyses. We recommend that workers conducting aerial surveys for wading birds endeavor to reduce observer and other controllable sources of detection bias and account for uncontrollable sources through incorporation of dual-observer or other calibratior methods as part of survey design (e.g., using double sampling).

  17. Soil recovery across a chronosequence of restored wetlands in the Florida Everglades.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qibing; Li, Yuncong; Zhang, Min

    2015-12-01

    The restoration project in the Hole-in-the-Donut of Everglades National Park in Florida, USA is to reestablish native wetlands by complete removal of the invasive plants and the associated soil. However, there is little information available about changes in properties of the newly formed Marl soils in restored wetlands. In this study, we measured soil physicochemical properties, soil enzymatic activities, and stable isotopes of carbon (δ(13)C) in plants and soil organic carbon (SOC) in an undisturbed natural wetland (UNW) and three wetlands restored respectively in 1989, 1996 and 1999 (WR89, WR96 and WR99). The older restored wetlands (WR89 and WR96) are characterized by greater SOC and mineral nitrogen. The values of soil dehydrogenase and phosphatase activities in the four wetlands follow the order: UNW > WR89 > WR96 > WR99, and are consistent with changes in vegetation coverage. The principal component analysis shows that dehydrogenase and phosphatase activities are the vital variables contributing to the soil of UNW. The similar δ(13)C values of SOC and plants in the restored wetlands suggest the formation of SOC during restoration is mainly derived from the associated plants. These results indicate that the newly restored soils develop toward the soil in the UNW with time since restoration.

  18. Tree island pattern formation and alternative equilibria in the Florida Everglades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, J. A.; D'Odorico, P.; Engel, V.

    2012-12-01

    The tree islands of the Florida Everglades are patterned ecogeomorphic features where elevated woody vegetation patches are surrounded by wet marsh filled with herbaceous vegetation. This wet savanna landscape exhibits an uneven distribution of soil resources with enhanced soil phosphorus concentrations underlying elevated tree islands. In contrast, the surrounding low lying marsh has low phosphorous availability. This patchy patterned landscape sustains high levels of biodiversity, but the processes determining the stability and resilience of the patterned tree island landscape remains poorly understood. In particular, it is unclear what controls the relation between individual form and processes within a tree island and the spatial organization of tree islands on the landscape. To this end, a process-based model that relates vegetation dynamics to nutrients and soil accretion/loss through ecogeomorphic feedbacks and interactions with hydrologic drivers was developed. The model reveals that the stable coexistence of tree islands and marshes emerges as an effect of their both being (meta-) stable states of the system. Self organization of patterns on the landscape occurs within a subset of the parameter space. As such, tree islands are found to have only a limited resilience. Change in hydroperiod and or vegetation cover can result in an rapid shift to a stable marsh state. Under certain hydrologic conditions this state can become destabilized and promote once again ontogenesis of tree islands. As such, the tree island susceptibility to a rapid (slow) transition between alternative equilibria needs to be accounted for while developing a plan for their management, conservation and restoration.

  19. Enhanced dissolution of cinnabar (mercuric sulfide) by dissolved organic matter isolated from the Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ravichandran, Mahalingam; Aiken, George R.; Reddy, Michael M.; Ryan, Joseph N.

    1998-01-01

    Organic matter isolated from the Florida Everglades caused a dramatic increase in mercury release (up to 35 μM total dissolved mercury) from cinnabar (HgS), a solid with limited solubility. Hydrophobic (a mixture of both humic and fulvic) acids dissolved more mercury than hydrophilic acids and other nonacid fractions of dissolved organic matter (DOM). Cinnabar dissolution by isolated organic matter and natural water samples was inhibited by cations such as Ca2+. Dissolution was independent of oxygen content in experimental solutions. Dissolution experiments conducted in DI water (pH = 6.0) had no detectable (<2.5 nM) dissolved mercury. The presence of various inorganic (chloride, sulfate, or sulfide) and organic ligands (salicylic acid, acetic acid, EDTA, or cysteine) did not enhance the dissolution of mercury from the mineral. Aromatic carbon content in the isolates (determined by 13C NMR) correlated positively with enhanced cinnabar dissolution. ζ-potential measurements indicated sorption of negatively charged organic matter to the negatively charged cinnabar (pHpzc = 4.0) at pH 6.0. Possible mechanisms of dissolution include surface complexation of mercury and oxidation of surface sulfur species by the organic matter.

  20. Determining the Hydrologic Impacts of Climate Variability on Florida's Everglades Through the Use of a Finite Volume Hydrologic Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senarath, S. U.; Novoa, R. J.; Niedzialek, J. M.; Zheng, F.

    2006-12-01

    A good understanding of climate variability and its impacts on the regional water budget are crucial for the restoration of Florida's Everglades. This is investigated by varying the two most sensitive climatic data sets, namely rainfall and evapotranspiration of a regional-scale hydrologic model. A 36-year long record, spanning from 1965 to 2000 is used in these assessments. Although not comprehensive, these data sets include several seasons with extremely high and low rainfall and evapotranspiration. The Everglades National Park, the Big Cypress National Preserve, and the Water Conservation Areas 3A and 3B are included in the study area. These watersheds jointly encompass an area of 10,158 square kilometers, and are home to many endangered and threatened species of fauna and flora. The Regional Simulation Model (RSM) developed by the South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD) is used in this study to evaluate and quantify the hydrologic responses caused due to climate variability. RSM is a finite-volume, regional-scale, distributed, continuous hydrologic model with fully coupled groundwater, canal and overland flow components. This model uses a variable triangular mesh that conforms to levees, canals and sub-basin boundaries. RSM can adequately simulate the low-relief topography, and high water tables, saturated hydraulic conductivities and surface roughnesses that exist in Florida's Everglades. The model uses the diffusive wave approximation of Saint-Venant's equation to simulate canal and overland flows. The Southern Everglades implementation of the RSM (hereafter, Southern Everglades Model or SEM) is calibrated and verified using stage data from 1988 to 1995, and 1996 to 2000, respectively. An irregular triangular mesh with 52,817 cells and a one-day time step are used in this implementation. For all simulations and assessments the model boundary conditions are obtained from the South Florida Water Management Model developed by the SFWMD. Two types of

  1. Tissue mercury concentrations in alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) from the Florida Everglades and the Savannah River Site, South Carolina.

    PubMed

    Yanochko, G M; Jagoe, C H; Brisbin, I L

    1997-04-01

    Mercury pollution is a serious problem in some areas of the southeastern United States. Due to biomagnification, long-lived predators should have high Hg concentrations in affected areas. American alligators(Alligator mississippiensis) are important predators in many southwestern wetlands, but little information is available on Hg concentrations in this species. We collected tissues from alligators inhabiting two sites in the Everglades, Florida (n = 18) and a manmade reservoir in South Carolina (Par Pond; n = 44), all with documented histories of Hg contamination, and analyzed them for total Hg. Mean concentrations in kidney, liver, muscle, and dermal scutes of alligators from the Everglades (expressed as mg Hg/kg dry mass +/- S.E.M.) were 36.42 +/- 5.23, 41.09 +/- 5.90, 5.57 +/- 0.47, and 5.83 +/- 1.04, respectively. Concentrations in liver, muscle, and scutes from Par Pond alligators were 17.73 +/- 2.56, 4.08 +/- 0.46, and 4.58 +/- 0.63,respectively. Blood from Par Pond alligators contained 2.20 +/- 0.38 mg Hg/kg wet mass. Mercury concentrations did not differ among sexes at any location. Tissue Hg levels did not differ significantly between Everglades locations,but were lower in Par Pond. In Everglades alligators, Hg concentrations in all tissues were positively correlated, as were tissue Hg and total length. Only total length and scute Hg were correlated in Par Pond alligators. Regression revealed a significant relationship between muscle and scute Hg concentrations in Everglades alligators, but not Par Pond alligators. Alligators living in polluted areas can accumulate substantial concentrations of Hg, but relationships among Hg concentrations in specific tissues may vary with location or age and size of the animals sampled.

  2. Flow Velocity, Water Temperature, and Conductivity in Shark River Slough, Everglades National Park, Florida: August 2001-June 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riscassi, Ami L.; Schaffranek, Raymond W.

    2003-01-01

    The data-collection effort described in this report is in support of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Place-Based Studies project investigating 'Forcing Effects on Flow Structure in Vegetated Wetlands of the Everglades.' Data collected at four locations in Shark River Slough, Everglades National Park, during the 2001-2002 wet season are documented in the report and methods used to process the data are described. Daily mean flow velocities, water temperatures, and specific conductance values are presented in the appendices of the report. The quality-checked and edited data have been compiled and stored on the USGS South Florida Information Access (SOFIA) website http://sofia.usgs.gov.

  3. Interactions Between Dissolved Organic Matter and Mercury in the Florida Everglades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiken, G.; Haitzer, M.; Ryan, J.; Nagy, K.

    2002-12-01

    Interactions of mercury (Hg) with dissolved organic matter (DOM) play important roles in controlling reactivity, bioavailability and transport of Hg in aquatic systems. To better define the nature and magnitude of these interactions, experiments were designed using organic matter isolated from various surface waters in the Florida Everglades to determine Hg-DOM binding constants and to study the interactions between DOM and cinnabar (HgS). The isolates, obtained using XAD resins, exhibited a wide range of elemental compositions, aromatic carbon contents, reduced sulfur contents, and molecular weights. Chemical composition of the DOM, especially aromatic carbon and reduced sulfur functional group content, was found to be important in controlling DOM interactions with Hg(II). Conditional distribution coefficients (KDOM'), measured using an equilibrium dialysis ligand exchange method, were strongly affected by the Hg/DOM concentration ratio. Very strong interactions (KDOM' = 1023.2 L kg-1 at pH = 7.0 and I = 0.1), indicative of Hg-thiol bonds, were observed at Hg/DOM ratios below approximately 1 μg Hg per mg DOM. Hg/DOM ratios above approximately 10 μg Hg per mg DOM gave much lower KDOM' values (10{10.7 }L kg-1 at pH 4.9 to 5.6 and I = 0.1), consistent with Hg binding mainly to oxygen functional groups. These results suggest that the binding of Hg to DOM under natural conditions (very low Hg/DOM ratios) is controlled by a small fraction of DOM molecules containing reactive thiol functional groups. DOM-Hg interactions were also studied by HgS (log Ksp = -52.4) dissolution and precipitation experiments. In the dissolution experiments, a significant amount of Hg was released from cinnabar in the presence of DOM, suggesting strong interactions. Conversely, precipitation of metacinnabar (black HgS) was strongly inhibited in the presence of low concentrations (<3 mg C/L) of DOM. In both the dissolution and precipitation experiments, organic matter rich in aromatic

  4. Geochemical and Textural Comparison of Modern and Ancient Freshwater Microbial Mud: A Direct Calibration in the Florida Everglades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pederson, C.; Klaus, J.; McNeill, D. F.; Swart, P. K.

    2015-12-01

    The goal of this study is to directly calibrate a freshwater microbial carbonate deposit currently forming in the Florida Everglades, to ancient deposits formed during Pleistocene marine transgressions of the South Florida platform. Through textural and geochemical analyses, this project tracks the deposition and early diagenesis of microbial carbonates and their associated organic content as an analogue study applicable to ancient microbialites. In the modern, fine-grained low-Mg calcite crystals are precipitated and buried on a low-lying coastal plain (Paurotis Pond). Geochemical parameters were measured to provide baseline characterization of the deposition and early diagenesis of the freshwater muds. Stable isotopic values of the precipitated muds range from d18O of -1.5 to -2.5‰ and d13C 0.5 to -0.5‰, showing slight increases with depth. This change is likely due to waters from the underlying Pleistocene bedrock, diffusing up and mixing with the surface water. Total organic carbon (TOC) is depleted with depth from 10.4 to 4.2% as a result of the degradation of highly labile organic matter (heavier in d13Corg), leaving the resulting pool of organics increasingly negative (-23‰ to -26‰ in the modern). Pleistocene freshwater limestones were observed in core borings ~20 km north of Paurotis Pond. These units closely resemble the modern muds, and allow us to assess the preservation potential of original microbial, geochemical, and textural signatures. Diagenesis has resulted in lighter d13C values relative to the adjacent altered marine units, as well as their modern equivalent. Organics in the Pleistocene are also characterized by more negative C and O isotopic compositions from interpreted original values, and TOC was reduced to <0.1%. Results suggest that both carbonate and organic fractions are pervasively altered during the burial process, and may not be effective paleoclimate indicators as some research suggests. However, these components may still

  5. Solutions Network Formulation Report. The Potential Contributions of the Global Precipitation Measurement Mission to Phosphorus Reduction Efforts in the Florida Everglades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Daniel; Hilbert, Kent; Lewis, David

    2009-01-01

    This candidate solution suggests the use of GPM precipitation observations to enhance the CERP. Specifically, GPM measurements could augment in situ precipitation data that are used to model agricultural phosphorus discharged into the Everglades. This solution benefits society by aiding water resource managers in identifying effective phosphorus reduction scenarios and thereby returning the Everglades to a more natural state. This solution supports the Water Management, Coastal Management, and Ecological Forecasting National Applications.

  6. A screening level probabilistic risk assessment of mercury in Florida Everglades food webs.

    PubMed

    Duvall, S E; Barron, M G

    2000-11-01

    A screening level probabilistic assessment of risks was performed on three species of piscivorous wildlife at the top of Everglades aquatic food webs: the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis), the great egret (Egretta alba), and the raccoon (Procyon lotor varius). Ranges of dietary exposure concentrations (and probability distribution functions) were derived for two general areas of the Everglades: Shark Slough and the southcentral Everglades (highly contaminated with Hg), and the northern Everglades (a lower Hg contaminated area in and near Water Conservation Area 1). Ranges of toxicity reference values and probability distribution functions were derived from literature on the toxicity of dietary methyl Hg to birds and mammals. Probability distributions of risk estimates for each receptor were generated using Monte Carlo simulations and indicated that piscivorous wildlife feeding in the south-central region of the Everglades are at high risk from consumption of Hg-contaminated prey. Alligators had 100% exceedences of chronic risk thresholds, and great egrets had 99% exceedences. In the northern Everglades, exceedences of chronic risk thresholds were substantially lower but were still present (6-34% exceedences). Results support previous studies suggesting that top predators of the Everglades may be at risk from Hg contamination and indicate that Hg risks are location-dependent.

  7. Helicopter electromagnetic data from Everglades National Park and surrounding areas, Florida: collected 9-14 December 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fitterman, David V.; Deszcz-Pan, Maria

    2002-01-01

    This report describes helicopter electromagnetic (HEM) data that were collected over portion of Everglades National Park and surrounding areas in south Florida. The survey was flown 9-14 December 1994. The original data set processed by the contractor, Dighem, are provided as an ASCII, xyz flight-line file. Apparent resistivity grids of the generated from the original data set and JPEG images of these grids are also provided. The data have been corrected by the U.S. Geological Survey to remove the effects of calibration errors and bird-height uncertainty. The corrected data set is included in this report as flight-line data only.

  8. Analysis of trends in water-quality data for water conservation area 3A, the Everglades, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mattraw, H.C.; Scheidt, D.J.; Federico, A.C.

    1987-01-01

    Rainfall and water quality data bases from the South Florida Water Management District were used to evaluate water quality trends at 10 locations near or in Water Conservation Area 3A in The Everglades. The Seasonal Kendall test was applied to specific conductance, orthophosphate-phosphorus, nitrate-nitrogen, total Kjeldahl nitrogen, and total nitrogen regression residuals for the period 1978-82. Residuals of orthophosphate and nitrate quadratic models, based on antecedent 7-day rainfall at inflow gate S-11B, were the only two constituent-structure pairs that showed apparent significant (p < 0.05) increases in constituent concentrations. Elimination of regression models with distinct residual patterns and data outlines resulted in 17 statistically significant station water quality combinations for trend analysis. No water quality trends were observed. The 1979 Memorandum of Agreement outlining the water quality monitoring program between the Everglades National Park and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers stressed collection four times a year at three stations, and extensive coverage of water quality properties. Trend analysis and other rigorous statistical evaluation programs are better suited to data monitoring programs that include more frequent sampling and that are organized in a water quality data management system. Pronounced areal differences in water quality suggest that a water quality monitoring system for Shark River Slough in Everglades National Park include collection locations near the source of inflow to Water Conservation Area 3A. (Author 's abstract)

  9. Using Scenario Planning to Evaluate the Impacts of Climate Change on Wildlife Populations and Communities in the Florida Everglades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catano, Christopher P.; Romañach, Stephanie S.; Beerens, James M.; Pearlstine, Leonard G.; Brandt, Laura A.; Hart, Kristen M.; Mazzotti, Frank J.; Trexler, Joel C.

    2015-04-01

    It is uncertain how climate change will impact hydrologic drivers of wildlife population dynamics in freshwater wetlands of the Florida Everglades, or how to accommodate this uncertainty in restoration decisions. Using projections of climate scenarios for the year 2060, we evaluated how several possible futures could affect wildlife populations (wading birds, fish, alligators, native apple snails, amphibians, threatened and invasive species) across the Everglades landscape and inform planning already underway. We used data collected from prior research and monitoring to parameterize our wildlife population models. Hydrologic data were simulated using a spatially explicit, regional-scale model. Our scenario evaluations show that expected changes in temperature, precipitation, and sea level could significantly alter important ecological functions. All of our wildlife indicators were negatively affected by scenarios with less rainfall and more evapotranspiration. Under such scenarios, habitat suitability was substantially reduced for iconic animals such as wading birds and alligators. Conversely, the increased rainfall scenario benefited aquatic prey productivity and apex predators. Cascading impacts on non-native species is speculative, but increasing temperatures could increase the time between cold events that currently limit expansion and abundance of non-native fishes, amphibians, and reptiles with natural ranges in the tropics. This scenario planning framework underscored the benefits of proceeding with Everglades restoration plans that capture and clean more freshwater with the potential to mitigate rainfall loss and postpone impacts of sea level rise.

  10. Using scenario planning to evaluate the impacts of climate change on wildlife populations and communities in the Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Catano, Christopher P.; Romañach, Stephanie S.; Beerens, James M.; Pearlstine, Leonard G.; Brandt, Laura A.; Hart, Kristen M.; Mazzotti, Frank J.; Trexler, Joel C.

    2015-01-01

    It is uncertain how climate change will impact hydrologic drivers of wildlife population dynamics in freshwater wetlands of the Florida Everglades, or how to accommodate this uncertainty in restoration decisions. Using projections of climate scenarios for the year 2060, we evaluated how several possible futures could affect wildlife populations (wading birds, fish, alligators, native apple snails, amphibians, threatened and invasive species) across the Everglades landscape and inform planning already underway. We used data collected from prior research and monitoring to parameterize our wildlife population models. Hydrologic data were simulated using a spatially explicit, regional-scale model. Our scenario evaluations show that expected changes in temperature, precipitation, and sea level could significantly alter important ecological functions. All of our wildlife indicators were negatively affected by scenarios with less rainfall and more evapotranspiration. Under such scenarios, habitat suitability was substantially reduced for iconic animals such as wading birds and alligators. Conversely, the increased rainfall scenario benefited aquatic prey productivity and apex predators. Cascading impacts on non-native species is speculative, but increasing temperatures could increase the time between cold events that currently limit expansion and abundance of non-native fishes, amphibians, and reptiles with natural ranges in the tropics. This scenario planning framework underscored the benefits of proceeding with Everglades restoration plans that capture and clean more freshwater with the potential to mitigate rainfall loss and postpone impacts of sea level rise.

  11. Groundwater's significance to changing hydrology, water chemistry, and biological communities of a floodplain ecosystem, Everglades, South Florida, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harvey, J.W.; McCormick, P.V.

    2009-01-01

    The Everglades (Florida, USA) is one of the world's larger subtropical peatlands with biological communities adapted to waters low in total dissolved solids and nutrients. Detecting how the pre-drainage hydrological system has been altered is crucial to preserving its functional attributes. However, reliable tools for hindcasting historic conditions in the Everglades are limited. A recent synthesis demonstrates that the proportion of surface-water inflows has increased relative to precipitation, accounting for 33% of total inputs compared with 18% historically. The largest new source of water is canal drainage from areas of former wetlands converted to agriculture. Interactions between groundwater and surface water have also increased, due to increasing vertical hydraulic gradients resulting from topographic and water-level alterations on the otherwise extremely flat landscape. Environmental solute tracer data were used to determine groundwater's changing role, from a freshwater storage reservoir that sustained the Everglades ecosystem during dry periods to a reservoir of increasingly degraded water quality. Although some of this degradation is attributable to increased discharge of deep saline groundwater, other mineral sources such as fertilizer additives and peat oxidation have made a greater contribution to water-quality changes that are altering mineral-sensitive biological communities. ?? Springer-Verlag 2008.

  12. Using scenario planning to evaluate the impacts of climate change on wildlife populations and communities in the Florida Everglades.

    PubMed

    Catano, Christopher P; Romañach, Stephanie S; Beerens, James M; Pearlstine, Leonard G; Brandt, Laura A; Hart, Kristen M; Mazzotti, Frank J; Trexler, Joel C

    2015-04-01

    It is uncertain how climate change will impact hydrologic drivers of wildlife population dynamics in freshwater wetlands of the Florida Everglades, or how to accommodate this uncertainty in restoration decisions. Using projections of climate scenarios for the year 2060, we evaluated how several possible futures could affect wildlife populations (wading birds, fish, alligators, native apple snails, amphibians, threatened and invasive species) across the Everglades landscape and inform planning already underway. We used data collected from prior research and monitoring to parameterize our wildlife population models. Hydrologic data were simulated using a spatially explicit, regional-scale model. Our scenario evaluations show that expected changes in temperature, precipitation, and sea level could significantly alter important ecological functions. All of our wildlife indicators were negatively affected by scenarios with less rainfall and more evapotranspiration. Under such scenarios, habitat suitability was substantially reduced for iconic animals such as wading birds and alligators. Conversely, the increased rainfall scenario benefited aquatic prey productivity and apex predators. Cascading impacts on non-native species is speculative, but increasing temperatures could increase the time between cold events that currently limit expansion and abundance of non-native fishes, amphibians, and reptiles with natural ranges in the tropics. This scenario planning framework underscored the benefits of proceeding with Everglades restoration plans that capture and clean more freshwater with the potential to mitigate rainfall loss and postpone impacts of sea level rise.

  13. Biological indicators of changes in water quality and habitats of the coastal and estuarine areas of the Greater Everglades Ecosystem; Chapter 11

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wachnicka, Anna; Wingard, Georgiana L.; Entry, James A.; Gottlieb, Andrew D.; Jayachandran, Krish; Ogram, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    This chapter summarizes the application of various biological indicators to studying the anthropogenic and natural changes in water quality and habitats that have occurred in the coastal and estuarine areas of the Greater Everglades ecosystem.

  14. Advection, dispersion, and filtration of fine particles within emergent vegetation of the Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huang, Y.H.; Saiers, J.E.; Harvey, J.W.; Noe, G.B.; Mylon, S.

    2008-01-01

    The movement of particulate matter within wetland surface waters affects nutrient cycling, contaminant mobility, and the evolution of the wetland landscape. Despite the importance of particle transport in influencing wetland form and function, there are few data sets that illuminate, in a quantitative way, the transport behavior of particulate matter within surface waters containing emergent vegetation. We report observations from experiments on the transport of 1 ??m latex microspheres at a wetland field site located in Water Conservation Area 3A of the Florida Everglades. The experiments involved line source injections of particles inside two 4.8-m-long surface water flumes constructed within a transition zone between an Eleocharis slough and Cladium jamaicense ridge and within a Cladium jamaicense ridge. We compared the measurements of particle transport to calculations of two-dimensional advection-dispersion model that accounted for a linear increase in water velocities with elevation above the ground surface. The results of this analysis revealed that particle spreading by longitudinal and vertical dispersion was substantially greater in the ridge than within the transition zone and that particle capture by aquatic vegetation lowered surface water particle concentrations and, at least for the timescale of our experiments, could be represented as an irreversible, first-order kinetics process. We found generally good agreement between our field-based estimates of particle dispersion and water velocity and estimates determined from published theory, suggesting that the advective-dispersive transport of particulate matter within complex wetland environments can be approximated on the basis of measurable properties of the flow and aquatic vegetation. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. Paleoecological insights on fixed tree island development in the Florida Everglades: I. environmental controls: Chapter 4

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Willard, Debra A.; Murray, James B.; Holmes, Charles W.; Korvela, Michael S.; Mason, Daniel; Orem, William H.; Towles, D. Timothy; Sklar, Fred H.; van der Valk, A.

    2002-01-01

    Palynological and geochemical analyses of sediment cores collected on two tree islands in the Florida Everglades indicate long-term hydrologic and chemical differences between tree islands and surrounding marshes and sloughs. Gumbo Limbo and Nuthouse tree islands are elongate, teardrop-shaped islands in Water Conservation Area 3B. Prior to tree island formation at both sites, pollen records indicate that sites on modern tree island heads were covered with sawgrass marshes with abundant weedy annuals. Such vegetation is characteristic of moderate water depths and hydroperiods with frequent droughts or disturbances. Contemporaneously deposited sediments on tree island tails indicate progressively deeper water conditions with increasing distance from the head; wetlands surrounding tree islands were covered by sloughs with deep water and long hydroperiods. Tree island formation occurred at about 1200 BC on Gumbo Limbo Island, with mature tree island vegetation established by about 800 AD. On Nuthouse Island, tree island formation occurred around 300 AD, shifting to mature tree island vegetation around 1400 AD. Thus, tree island formation began on these islands between 3.2 Ka and 1.7 Ka. Maturation of tree islands took between 1,000 and 2,000 years, and vegetation on these tree islands has been relatively stable for the last 600–1,200 years. Phosphorus levelson tree island heads have been extremely high (approximately six times greaterthan baseline levels in marshes) throughout the history of the sites, and phosphorus content in tree island tails began increasing when tree island formation occurred. Elevated phosphorus content may reflect the long-termpresence of wading birds at these sites and provide a proxy for reconstructing the historic distribution of wading bird populations.

  16. Diagnosing and Reconstructing Real-World Hydroclimatic Dynamics from Time Sequenced Data: The Case of Saltwater Intrusion into Coastal Wetlands in Everglades National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffaker, R.; Munoz-Carpena, R.

    2016-12-01

    There are increasing calls to audit decision-support models used for environmental policy to ensure that they correspond with the reality facing policy makers. Modelers can establish correspondence by providing empirical evidence of real-world dynamic behavior that their models skillfully simulate. We present a pre-modeling diagnostic framework—based on nonlinear dynamic analysis—for detecting and reconstructing real-world environmental dynamics from observed time-sequenced data. Phenomenological (data-driven) modeling—based on machine learning regression techniques—extracts a set of ordinary differential equations governing empirically-diagnosed system dynamics from a single time series, or from multiple time series on causally-interacting variables. We apply the framework to investigate saltwater intrusion into coastal wetlands in Everglades National Park, Florida, USA. We test the following hypotheses posed in the literature linking regional hydrologic variables with global climatic teleconnections: (1) Sea level in Florida Bay drives well level and well salinity in the coastal Everglades; (2) Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) drives sea level, well level and well salinity; and (3) AMO and (El Niño Southern Oscillation) ENSO bi-causally interact. The thinking is that salt water intrusion links ocean-surface salinity with salinity of inland water sources, and sea level with inland water; that AMO and ENSO share a teleconnective relationship (perhaps through the atmosphere); and that AMO and ENSO both influence inland precipitation and thus well levels. Our results support these hypotheses, and we successfully construct a parsimonious phenomenological model that reproduces diagnosed nonlinear dynamics and system interactions. We propose that reconstructed data dynamics be used, along with other expert information, as a rigorous benchmark to guide specification and testing of hydrologic decision support models corresponding with real-world behavior.

  17. River of Interests: Water Management in South Florida and the Everglades, 1948-2010

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    79, NARA II. 84 John H. Baker, "Time Is Running Out on the Everglades," Audubon Magazine 45 (May-June 1943): 177. Chapter One | Draining the Swamp... Audubon by environmentalist Paul Brooks con- demned the jetport, quoting Park Superintendent John C. Raftery as stating that the park faced "slow...File Everglades National Park 1958- 88, General/Resolutions and Agreements, Box 02161, SFWMDAR. 41 Alice Wainwright, National Audubon Society, to John

  18. Composition of methane-oxidizing bacterial communities as a function of nutrient loading in the Florida everglades.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Ashvini; Pathak, Ashish; Ogram, Andrew

    2012-10-01

    Agricultural runoff of phosphorus (P) in the northern Florida Everglades has resulted in several ecosystem level changes, including shifts in the microbial ecology of carbon cycling, with significantly higher methane being produced in the nutrient-enriched soils. Little is, however, known of the structure and activities of methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) in these environments. To address this, 0 to 10 cm plant-associated soil cores were collected from nutrient-impacted (F1), transition (F4), and unimpacted (U3) areas, sectioned in 2-cm increments, and methane oxidation rates were measured. F1 soils consumed approximately two-fold higher methane than U3 soils; additionally, most probable numbers of methanotrophs were 4-log higher in F1 than U3 soils. Metabolically active MOB containing pmoA sequences were characterized by stable-isotope probing using 10 % (v/v) (13)CH(4). pmoA sequences, encoding the alpha subunit of methane monooxygenase and related to type I methanotrophs, were identified from both impacted and unimpacted soils. Additionally, impacted soils also harbored type II methanotrophs, which have been shown to exhibit preferences for high methane concentrations. Additionally, across all soils, novel pmoA-type sequences were also detected, indicating presence of MOB specific to the Everglades. Multivariate statistical analyses confirmed that eutrophic soils consisted of metabolically distinct MOB community that is likely driven by nutrient enrichment. This study enhances our understanding on the biological fate of methane being produced in productive wetland soils of the Florida Everglades and how nutrient-enrichment affects the composition of methanotroph bacterial communities.

  19. Speciation and isotopic composition of sedimentary sulfur in the Everglades, Florida, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bates, A.L.; Spiker, E. C.; Holmes, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    We have studied the sulfur speciation and isotopic composition of two peat cores from Water Conservation Area 2A (WCA 2A) in the Florida Everglades. Core site E1 is affected by agricultural runoff from the Hillsboro Canal which drains the Everglades Agricultural Area; Core site U3 is distant from the canal and relatively unaffected by agricultural runoff. Depth profiles of the total sulfur content of both cores show fairly constant levels (??0.7 wt.%) below about 25-30 cm depth in Core E1 and below 40-45 cm in Core U3. Above these depths, total sulfur increases to as much as 1.52 wt.% in Core E1 and 1.74 wt.% in Core U3, suggesting that more sulfur has entered the sediments and/or that more sulfur is being retained in recent times at both sampling sites. These changes in total sulfur content with depth in Core E1 correlate with changes in total phosphorus that have been observed in other studies at core sites near the Hillsboro Canal. This correlation of total sulfur with phosphorus with depth is not seen in Core U3 located away from the canal, possibly because phosphorus is more effectively retained than sulfur in the organic sediment near the canal. Organic-sulfur (OS) concentrations are at least twice as high as the dusulfide-sulfur (DS) concentrations in the upper parts of both cores suggesting that iron is presently limiting the amount of dusulfide minerals formed in these sediments. The degree of pyritization (DOP) in the upper parts of the cores suggest that sulfide mineralization is limited by the availability of highly reactive iron during the earliest stages of diagenesis. Positive ??34S values for reduced sulfur forms in both cores indicate a relatively restricted sulfate reservoir, consistent with nearly complete reduction of the sulfate available in the sediment at any given time. Differences between the two core appear in the ??34S values for the near-surface sediments. The DS ??34S values in the upper 10.0 cm of sediment are more posotive at site E1

  20. Feather mercury concentrations and physiological condition of great egret and white ibis nestlings in the Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herring, G.; Gawlik, D.E.; Rumbold, D.G.

    2009-01-01

    Mercury contamination in the Florida Everglades has reportedly played a role in the recent decline of wading birds, although no studies have identified a mechanism leading to population-level effects. We assessed feather mercury levels in great egret (Ardea alba; n = 91) and white ibis (Eudocimus albus; n = 46) nestlings at breeding colonies in the Florida Everglades during a year (2006) with excellent breeding conditions (characterized by hydrology leading to concentrated prey) and a year with below average breeding conditions (2007). We also assessed the physiological condition of those nestlings based on levels of plasma and fecal corticosterone metabolites, and stress proteins 60 and 70. Mercury levels were higher in both species during the good breeding condition year (great egret = 6.25????g/g ?? 0.81 SE, white ibis = 1.47????g/g ?? 0.41 SE) and lower in the below average breeding year (great egret = 1.60????g/g ?? 0.11 SE, white ibis = 0.20????g/g ?? 0.03 SE). Nestlings were in better physiological condition in 2006, the year with higher feather mercury levels. These results support the hypothesis that nestlings are protected from the harmful effects of mercury through deposition of mercury in growing feathers. We found evidence to suggest shifts in diets of the two species, as a function of prey availability, thus altering their exposure profiles. However, we found no evidence to suggest they respond differently to mercury exposure. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Climate Sensitivity Runs and Regional Hydrologic Modeling for Predicting the Response of the Greater Florida Everglades Ecosystem to Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obeysekera, Jayantha; Barnes, Jenifer; Nungesser, Martha

    2015-04-01

    It is important to understand the vulnerability of the water management system in south Florida and to determine the resilience and robustness of greater Everglades restoration plans under future climate change. The current climate models, at both global and regional scales, are not ready to deliver specific climatic datasets for water resources investigations involving future plans and therefore a scenario based approach was adopted for this first study in restoration planning. We focused on the general implications of potential changes in future temperature and associated changes in evapotranspiration, precipitation, and sea levels at the regional boundary. From these, we developed a set of six climate and sea level scenarios, used them to simulate the hydrologic response of the greater Everglades region including agricultural, urban, and natural areas, and compared the results to those from a base run of current conditions. The scenarios included a 1.5 °C increase in temperature, ±10 % change in precipitation, and a 0.46 m (1.5 feet) increase in sea level for the 50-year planning horizon. The results suggested that, depending on the rainfall and temperature scenario, there would be significant changes in water budgets, ecosystem performance, and in water supply demands met. The increased sea level scenarios also show that the ground water levels would increase significantly with associated implications for flood protection in the urbanized areas of southeastern Florida.

  2. Feather mercury concentrations and physiological condition of great egret and white ibis nestlings in the Florida Everglades.

    PubMed

    Herring, Garth; Gawlik, Dale E; Rumbold, Darren G

    2009-04-01

    Mercury contamination in the Florida Everglades has reportedly played a role in the recent decline of wading birds, although no studies have identified a mechanism leading to population-level effects. We assessed feather mercury levels in great egret (Ardea alba; n=91) and white ibis (Eudocimus albus; n=46) nestlings at breeding colonies in the Florida Everglades during a year (2006) with excellent breeding conditions (characterized by hydrology leading to concentrated prey) and a year with below average breeding conditions (2007). We also assessed the physiological condition of those nestlings based on levels of plasma and fecal corticosterone metabolites, and stress proteins 60 and 70. Mercury levels were higher in both species during the good breeding condition year (great egret=6.25 microg/g+/-0.81 SE, white ibis=1.47 microg/g+/-0.41 SE) and lower in the below average breeding year (great egret=1.60 microg/g+/-0.11 SE, white ibis=0.20 microg/g+/-0.03 SE). Nestlings were in better physiological condition in 2006, the year with higher feather mercury levels. These results support the hypothesis that nestlings are protected from the harmful effects of mercury through deposition of mercury in growing feathers. We found evidence to suggest shifts in diets of the two species, as a function of prey availability, thus altering their exposure profiles. However, we found no evidence to suggest they respond differently to mercury exposure.

  3. Use of a simple simulation model to develop a spatial model of methane flux in the Florida Everglades

    SciTech Connect

    James, R.T. )

    1990-01-09

    A simple simulation model was created to aid a spatial analysis of methane flux in the Florida Everglades. The model simulated competition between sulfate reducing bacteria and methane producing bacteria in wetland sediments. Acetate was the sole source of energy for these bacteria. Acetate production was constant with depth. Standing stocks of acetate, sulfate, bacterial biomass, and methane flux were followed over time on a per hectare basis. Sediment depth as a model parameter was used to convert volumes to areas, and to calculate sulfate and methane flux rates. Sensitivity analysis determined which model parameters had the greatest influence on methane flux. The analysis calculated differences in methane flux between a nominal parameter set and a changes parameter set over a 400 day simulation run. The changed set was the nomial set with one parameter doubled or halved. The order from most to least sensitive parameter was depth, acetate production, sulfate concentration, sulfate diffusion, sulfate bacteria parameters, and methane bacteria parameters. The most sensitive parameters varied spatially and could be derived form spatial scale data (e.g. desiment type). This analysis indicated types of information needed to develop a spatial model of methane flux in the Florida Everglades.

  4. Climate sensitivity runs and regional hydrologic modeling for predicting the response of the greater Florida Everglades ecosystem to climate change.

    PubMed

    Obeysekera, Jayantha; Barnes, Jenifer; Nungesser, Martha

    2015-04-01

    It is important to understand the vulnerability of the water management system in south Florida and to determine the resilience and robustness of greater Everglades restoration plans under future climate change. The current climate models, at both global and regional scales, are not ready to deliver specific climatic datasets for water resources investigations involving future plans and therefore a scenario based approach was adopted for this first study in restoration planning. We focused on the general implications of potential changes in future temperature and associated changes in evapotranspiration, precipitation, and sea levels at the regional boundary. From these, we developed a set of six climate and sea level scenarios, used them to simulate the hydrologic response of the greater Everglades region including agricultural, urban, and natural areas, and compared the results to those from a base run of current conditions. The scenarios included a 1.5 °C increase in temperature, ±10 % change in precipitation, and a 0.46 m (1.5 feet) increase in sea level for the 50-year planning horizon. The results suggested that, depending on the rainfall and temperature scenario, there would be significant changes in water budgets, ecosystem performance, and in water supply demands met. The increased sea level scenarios also show that the ground water levels would increase significantly with associated implications for flood protection in the urbanized areas of southeastern Florida.

  5. Spatial variability in mercury cycling and relevant biogeochemical controls in the Florida Everglades.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangliang; Cai, Yong; Mao, Yuxiang; Scheidt, Daniel; Kalla, Peter; Richards, Jennifer; Scinto, Leonard J; Tachiev, Georgio; Roelant, David; Appleby, Charlie

    2009-06-15

    Spatial patterns in mercury cycling and bioaccumulation at the landscape level in the Everglades were investigated by collecting and analyzing multimedia samples for mercury species and biogeochemical characteristics from 228 randomly located stations. Higher total mercury (THg) in environmental compartments (surface water, soil, flocculent detrital material (floc), and periphyton) generally occurred in the northern and central Everglades, but higher THg in water and periphyton in the Everglades National Park was an exception. Multiple biogeochemical characteristics, such as surface water dissolved organic matter (DOC(sw)), pH, chloride, and compositional properties of solid compartments (soil and floc), were identified to be important factors controlling THg distribution. Methylmercury (MeHg) was also higher in the northern Everglades for water, soil, and floc, but not for periphyton. Higher mosquitofish THg and bioaccumulation factor were observed in the central and southern Everglades, partially in accordance with periphyton MeHg distribution, but not in the "hot spot" areas of water, soil, or floc MeHg. The discrepancy in mercury bioaccumulation and mercury distribution in environmental compartments suggests that in addition to MeHg production, biogeochemical controls that make MeHg available to aquatic organisms, such as DOC(sw) and compositional properties of soil and floc, are important in mercury bioaccumulation.

  6. Factors influencing phosphorus levels delivered to Everglades National Park, Florida, USA.

    PubMed

    Surratt, Donatto; Aumen, Nicholas G

    2014-08-01

    Everglades restoration is dependent on constructed wetlands to treat agricultural phosphorus (P)-enriched runoff prior to delivery to the Everglades. Over the last 5 years, P concentrations delivered to the northern boundary of Everglades National Park (Park) have remained higher than the 8 μg L(-1)-target identified to be protective of flora and fauna. Historically, Everglades hydrology was driven by rainfall that would then sheetflow through the system. The system is now divided into a number of large impoundments. We use sodium-to-calcium ratios as a water source discriminator to assess the influence of management and environmental conditions to understand why P concentrations in Park inflows remain higher than that of the target. Runoff from Water Conservation Area 3A (Area 3A) and canal water from areas north of Area 3A are two major sources of water to the Park, and both have distinct Na:Ca ratios. The P concentrations of Park inflows have decreased since the 1980s, and from June 1994 through May 2000, concentrations were the lowest when Area 3A water depths were the deepest. Area 3A depths declined following this period and P concentrations subsequently increased. Further, some water sources for the Park are not treated and are impeding concentration reductions. Promoting sheetflow over channelized flow and treating untreated water sources can work in conjunction with constructed wetlands to further reduce nutrient loading to the sensitive Everglades ecosystem.

  7. Factors Influencing Phosphorus Levels Delivered to Everglades National Park, Florida, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surratt, Donatto; Aumen, Nicholas G.

    2014-08-01

    Everglades restoration is dependent on constructed wetlands to treat agricultural phosphorus (P)-enriched runoff prior to delivery to the Everglades. Over the last 5 years, P concentrations delivered to the northern boundary of Everglades National Park (Park) have remained higher than the 8 μg L-1-target identified to be protective of flora and fauna. Historically, Everglades hydrology was driven by rainfall that would then sheetflow through the system. The system is now divided into a number of large impoundments. We use sodium-to-calcium ratios as a water source discriminator to assess the influence of management and environmental conditions to understand why P concentrations in Park inflows remain higher than that of the target. Runoff from Water Conservation Area 3A (Area 3A) and canal water from areas north of Area 3A are two major sources of water to the Park, and both have distinct Na:Ca ratios. The P concentrations of Park inflows have decreased since the 1980s, and from June 1994 through May 2000, concentrations were the lowest when Area 3A water depths were the deepest. Area 3A depths declined following this period and P concentrations subsequently increased. Further, some water sources for the Park are not treated and are impeding concentration reductions. Promoting sheetflow over channelized flow and treating untreated water sources can work in conjunction with constructed wetlands to further reduce nutrient loading to the sensitive Everglades ecosystem.

  8. Molluscan fauna from core 25B, Whipray Basin, central Florida Bay, Everglades National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trappe, Carleigh A.; Brewster-Wingard, G. Lynn

    2001-01-01

    Molluscan assemblages preserved in an 80-cm core from Whipray Basin in central Florida Bay, Everglades National Park, illustrate changes in the environmental conditions within the basin over the last two centuries. Salinity remained polyhaline to euhaline throughout the time of deposition (1800-1997), with alternating periods of stability and increased fluctuations. Since 1800, a Brachidontes assemblage has characterized Whipray Basin and the dominant faunal components have remained the same in terms of presence and absence of species. However, patterns of dominance and diversity within the Brachidontes assemblage have changed and these changes indicate fluctuations in the environment. The period from 1815 to 1857 was distinguished by an abundance of molluscs dwelling on seagrass and sub-aquatic vegetation. Faunal richness and abundance were high and stable, and epiphytic molluscs flourished. Polyhaline conditions existed, although periods of slightly lower salinities occurred. The period from 1862 to 1894 appears unstable based on fluctuations in molluscan faunal richness, abundance, and dominant species. The epiphytic molluscs experienced significant shifts (? >30%) associated with changes in sub-aquatic vegetation. The changes in epiphytic molluscs from 1871 to 1913 may be indicative of a seagrass die-off. The period from 1899 to 1950 was the most stable section of the core in terms of changes in the molluscan fauna. Faunal richness and abundance reached highs of 31 groups and 726 individuals per sample during this period and epiphytic molluscs were prevalent. Beginning in 1955, faunal groups experienced high amplitude fluctuations in abundance; this pattern continued through the second half of the 20th century. Fluctuating salinity, changes in vegetation, and reduced water quality (low O2, increased nutrients and/or reduced clarity) oxygen supply) have characterized the past 50 years. These changes preceded a seagrass die-off in 1987-88 and may be related to

  9. Compartment-based hydrodynamics and water quality modeling of a northern Everglades wetland, Florida, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Hongqing; Meselhe, Ehab A.; Waldon, Michael G.; Harwell, Matthew C.; Chen, Chunfang

    2012-01-01

    The last remaining large remnant of softwater wetlands in the US Florida Everglades lies within the Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge. However, Refuge water quality today is impacted by pumped stormwater inflows to the eutrophic and mineral-enriched 100-km canal, which circumscribes the wetland. Optimal management is a challenge and requires scientifically based predictive tools to assess and forecast the impacts of water management on Refuge water quality. In this research, we developed a compartment-based numerical model of hydrodynamics and water quality for the Refuge. Using the numerical model, we examined the dynamics in stage, water depth, discharge from hydraulic structures along the canal, and exchange flow among canal and marsh compartments. We also investigated the transport of chloride, sulfate and total phosphorus from the canal to the marsh interior driven by hydraulic gradients as well as biological removal of sulfate and total phosphorus. The model was calibrated and validated using long-term stage and water quality data (1995-2007). Statistical analysis indicates that the model is capable of capturing the spatial (from canal to interior marsh) gradients of constituents across the Refuge. Simulations demonstrate that flow from the eutrophic and mineral-enriched canal impacts chloride and sulfate in the interior marsh. In contrast, total phosphorus in the interior marsh shows low sensitivity to intrusion and dispersive transport. We conducted a rainfall-driven scenario test in which the pumped inflow concentrations of chloride, sulfate and total phosphorus were equal to rainfall concentrations (wet deposition). This test shows that pumped inflow is the dominant factor responsible for the substantially increased chloride and sulfate concentrations in the interior marsh. Therefore, the present day Refuge should not be classified as solely a rainfall-driven or ombrotrophic wetland. The model provides an effective screening tool for

  10. Restoring the Everglades

    SciTech Connect

    Goforth, G.; Jackson, J.B.; Fink, L.

    1994-03-01

    In recent decades, increasing volumes of phosphorus-enriched water have been pumped into the Everglades and have upset the system's natural balance. Most of this water comes from the 700,000 acre Everglades Agricultural Area (EAA) situated between Lake Okeechobee and the Everglades. Between 1979 and 1988, approximately 220 tons of phosphorus was discharged annually into the Everglades water conservation area from the EAA. This article examines reconstructed wetlands as an effective management strategy for restoring and protecting Florida's Everglades from phosphorus overenrichment caused by agricultural storm-water runoff. A recently completed 4,000 acre project--the largest of its kind so far--could serve as the model for a much larger system, provided political, financial and legal obstacles stalling the Everglades Protection Project can be resolved.

  11. Detrital floc and surface soil microbial biomarker responses to active management of the nutrient impacted Florida everglades.

    PubMed

    Bellinger, Brent J; Hagerthey, Scot E; Newman, Susan; Cook, Mark I

    2012-11-01

    Alterations in microbial community composition, biomass, and function in the Florida Everglades impacted by cultural eutrophication reflect a new physicochemical environment associated with monotypic stands of Typha domingensis. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) biomarkers were used to quantify microbial responses in detritus and surface soils in an active management experiment in the eutrophic Everglades. Creation of open plots through removal of Typha altered the physical and chemical characteristics of the region. Mass of PLFA biomarkers increased in open plots, but magnitude of changes differed among microbial groups. Biomarkers indicative of Gram-negative bacteria and fungi were significantly greater in open plots, reflective of the improved oxic environment. Reduction in the proportion of cyclopropyl lipids and the ratio of Gram-positive to Gram-negative bacteria in open plots further suggested an altered oxygen environment and conditions for the rapid growth of Gram-negative bacteria. Changes in the PLFA composition were greater in floc relative to soils, reflective of rapid inputs of new organic matter and direct interaction with the new physicochemical environment. Created open plot microbial mass and composition were significantly different from the oligotrophic Everglades due to differences in phosphorus availability, plant community structure, and a shift to organic peat from marl-peat soils. PLFA analysis also captured the dynamic inter-annual hydrologic variability, notably in PLFA concentrations, but to a lesser degree content. Recently, use of concentration has been advocated over content in studies of soil biogeochemistry, and our results highlight the differential response of these two quantitative measures to similar pressures.

  12. Mangrove forest recovery in the Everglades following Hurricane Wilma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sarmiento, Daniel; Barr, Jordan; Engel, Vic; Fuentes, Jose D.; Smith, Thomas J.; Zieman, Jay C.

    2009-01-01

    On October 24th, 2005, Hurricane Wilma made landfall on the south western shore of the Florida peninsula. This major disturbance destroyed approximately 30 percent of the mangrove forests in the area. However, the damage to the ecosystem following the hurricane provided researchers at the Florida Coastal Everglades (FCE) LTER site with the rare opportunity to track the recovery process of the mangroves as determined by carbon dioxide (CO2) and energy exchanges, measured along daily and seasonal time scales.

  13. Fulvic acid-sulfide ion competition for mercury ion binding in the Florida everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, M.M.; Aiken, G.R.

    2001-01-01

    Negatively charged functional groups of fulvic acid compete with inorganic sulfide ion for mercury ion binding. This competition is evaluated here by using a discrete site-electrostatic model to calculate mercury solution speciation in the presence of fulvic acid. Model calculated species distributions are used to estimate a mercury-fulvic acid apparent binding constant to quantify fulvic acid and sulfide ion competition for dissolved inorganic mercury (Hg(II)) ion binding. Speciation calculations done with PHREEQC, modified to use the estimated mercury-fulvic acid apparent binding constant, suggest that mercury-fulvic acid and mercury-sulfide complex concentrations are equivalent for very low sulfide ion concentrations (about 10-11 M) in Everglades' surface water. Where measurable total sulfide concentration (about 10-7 M or greater) is present in Everglades' surface water, mercury-sulfide complexes should dominate dissolved inorganic mercury solution speciation. In the absence of sulfide ion (for example, in oxygenated Everglades' surface water), fulvic acid binding should dominate Everglades' dissolved inorganic mercury speciation.

  14. Legacy and fate of mercury and methylmercury in the Florida Everglades.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangliang; Naja, G Melodie; Kalla, Peter; Scheidt, Dan; Gaiser, Evelyn; Cai, Yong

    2011-01-15

    Mass inventories of total Hg (THg) and methylmercury (MeHg) and mass budgets of Hg newly deposited during the 2005 dry and wet seasons were constructed for the Everglades. As a sink for Hg, the Everglades has accumulated 914, 1138, 4931, and 7602 kg of legacy THg in its 4 management units, namely Water Conservation Area (WCA) 1, 2, 3, and the Everglades National Park (ENP), respectively, with most Hg being stored in soil. The current annual Hg inputs account only for 1-2% of the legacy Hg. Mercury transport across management units during a season amounts to 1% or less of Hg storage, except for WCA 2 where inflow inputs can contribute 4% of total MeHg storage. Mass budget suggests distinct spatiality for cycling of seasonally deposited Hg, with significantly lower THg fluxes entering water and floc in ENP than in the WCAs. Floc in WCAs can retain a considerable fraction (around 16%) of MeHg produced from the newly deposited Hg during the wet season. This work is important for evaluating the magnitude of legacy Hg contamination and for predicting the fate of new Hg in the Everglades, and provides a methodological example for large-scale studies on Hg cycling in wetlands.

  15. Applying time series Landsat data for vegetation change analysis in the Florida Everglades Water Conservation Area 2A during 1996-2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Caiyun; Smith, Molly; Lv, Jie; Fang, Chaoyang

    2017-05-01

    Mapping plant communities and documenting their changes is critical to the on-going Florida Everglades restoration project. In this study, a framework was designed to map dominant vegetation communities and inventory their changes in the Florida Everglades Water Conservation Area 2A (WCA-2A) using time series Landsat images spanning 1996-2016. The object-based change analysis technique was combined in the framework. A hybrid pixel/object-based change detection approach was developed to effectively collect training samples for historical images with sparse reference data. An object-based quantification approach was also developed to assess the expansion/reduction of a specific class such as cattail (an invasive species in the Everglades) from the object-based classifications of two dates of imagery. The study confirmed the results in the literature that cattail was largely expanded during 1996-2007. It also revealed that cattail expansion was constrained after 2007. Application of time series Landsat data is valuable to document vegetation changes for the WCA-2A impoundment. The digital techniques developed will benefit global wetland mapping and change analysis in general, and the Florida Everglades WCA-2A in particular.

  16. Estimation of the major source and sink of methylmercury in the Florida Everglades.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanbin; Yin, Yongguang; Liu, Guangliang; Tachiev, Georgio; Roelant, David; Jiang, Guibin; Cai, Yong

    2012-06-05

    Mercury methylation and/or demethylation have been observed in several compartments [soil (saturated soils covered by standing water), floc, periphyton, and water] of the Everglades, a wetland with mercury as one of the major water quality concerns. However, it is still unclear which compartment is the major source or sink due to the lack of estimation and comparison of the net methylmercury (MeHg) production or degradation in these compartments. The lack of this information has limited our understanding of Hg cycling in this ecosystem. This study adopted a double stable isotope ((199)Hg(2+) and Me(201)Hg) addition technique to determine the methylation/demethylation rate constants and the net MeHg production rates in each compartment. This study improved the previous models for estimating these parameters by (1) taking into account the difference between newly input and ambient mercury in methylation/demethylation efficiency and (2) correcting the contribution of photodemethylation to Me(199)Hg concentration when calculating methylation rates in water. The net MeHg production rate in each compartment was then estimated to identify the major sources and sinks of MeHg. The results indicate that these improvements in modeling are necessary, as a significant error would occur otherwise. Soil was identified to be the largest source of MeHg in the Everglades, while the floc and water column were identified as the major sinks. The role of periphyton varies, appearing to be a source in the northern Everglades and a sink in the southern Everglades. Soil could be the largest source for MeHg in the water column, while methylation in periphyton could also contribute significantly in the northern Everglades.

  17. South Florida Information Access (SOFIA) metadata for the U.S. Geological Survey Greater Everglades place-based studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stapleton, Jo Anne; Sonenshein, Roy

    2004-01-01

    Beginning in 1995 the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) funded scientific research to support the restoration of the Greater Everglades area and to supply decision makers and resource mangers with sound data on which to base their actions. However, none of the research and resulting data is useful if it can?t be discovered, can?t be assessed for utility in an application, can?t be accessed, or is in an undetermined format. The decision was made early in the USGS Place-Based Studies (PBS) program to create a ?one-stop? entry for information and data about USGS research results. To facilitate the discovery process some mechanism was needed to allow standardized queries about data. The FGDC metadata standard has been used to document the South Florida PBS data from the beginning.

  18. Resolution of matrix effects on analysis of total and methyl mercury in aqueous samples from the Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, M.L.; Cleckner, L.B.; Hurley, J.P.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.; Heelan, T.W.

    1997-01-01

    Aqueous samples from the Florida Everglades present several problems for the analysis of total mercury (HgT) and methyl mercury (MeHg). Constituents such as dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and sulfide at selected sites present particular challenges due to interferences with standard analytical techniques. This is manifested by 1) the inability to discern when bromine monochloride (BrCl) addition is sufficient for sample oxidation for HgT analysis; and 2) incomplete spike recoveries using the distillation/ethylation technique for MeHg analysis. Here, we suggest ultra-violet (UV) oxidation prior to addition of BrCl to ensure total oxidation of DOC prior to HgT analysis and copper sulfate (CuSO4) addition to aid in distillation in the presence of sulfide for MeHg analysis. Despite high chloride (Cl-) levels, we observed no effects on MeHg distillation/ethylation analyses. ?? Springer-Verlag 1997.

  19. Internet-based Modeling, Mapping, and Analysis for the Greater Everglades (IMMAGE; Version 1.0): web-based tools to assess the impact of sea level rise in south Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hearn, Paul; Strong, David; Swain, Eric; Decker, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    South Florida's Greater Everglades area is particularly vulnerable to sea level rise, due to its rich endowment of animal and plant species and its heavily populated urban areas along the coast. Rising sea levels are expected to have substantial impacts on inland flooding, the depth and extent of surge from coastal storms, the degradation of water supplies by saltwater intrusion, and the integrity of plant and animal habitats. Planners and managers responsible for mitigating these impacts require advanced tools to help them more effectively identify areas at risk. The U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Internet-based Modeling, Mapping, and Analysis for the Greater Everglades (IMMAGE) Web site has been developed to address these needs by providing more convenient access to projections from models that forecast the effects of sea level rise on surface water and groundwater, the extent of surge and resulting economic losses from coastal storms, and the distribution of habitats. IMMAGE not only provides an advanced geographic information system (GIS) interface to support decision making, but also includes topic-based modules that explain and illustrate key concepts for nontechnical users. The purpose of this report is to familiarize both technical and nontechnical users with the IMMAGE Web site and its various applications.

  20. Mercury accumulation in largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides Lacépède) within marsh ecosystems of the Florida Everglades, USA.

    PubMed

    Julian, Paul; Gu, Binhe

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates factors, particularly water quality related, that may influence mercury (Hg) bioaccumulation in largemouth bass (LMB, Micropterus salmoides Lacépède) within the Everglades marshes of South Florida. The investigation is an empirical analysis of ambient data from both long-term fish monitoring and marsh water quality monitoring sites across the Everglades Protection Area. Previous Hg studies of Everglade's marsh biota have focused on the role that sulfate plays in Hg bioaccumulation. While sulfate can be important under some environmental conditions, this empirical analysis in Everglades marshes showed that sulfate has little association with Hg concentrations in LMB. It is suggested that other water quality variables including water pH, alkalinity and specific conductance may have as much or more influence in the accumulation of Hg in LMB. Furthermore, tissue Hg concentration normalized to body-weight and age-specific growth rates were significantly correlated with Water Conservation Area (WCA)-1, WCA-2 and Everglades National Park (ENP) but not WCA-3. However, body condition was correlated negatively with Hg concentration only within WCA-2, WCA-3 and ENP; the relationship was not significant within WCA-1. This disparity between Hg concentration and body condition could be attributed to ecological effects including water quality and quantity conditions within each compartment of the system that are significant driving forces for biota abundance, trophic structure and distribution within the Everglades ecosystem. While water quality and quantity are important, trophic position of LMB has the potential to influence Hg accumulation dynamics. In spite of documented biogeochemical linkages to Hg accumulation, this empirical analysis did not demonstrate enough quantitative interaction to be useful for Hg management in the Everglades ecosystem.

  1. Development of allometric relations for three mangrove species in South Florida for use in the Greater Everglades Ecosystem restoration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, T. J.; Whelan, K.R.T.

    2006-01-01

    Mathematical relations that use easily measured variables to predict difficult-to-measure variables are important to resource managers. In this paper we develop allometric relations to predict total aboveground biomass and individual components of biomass (e.g., leaves, stems, branches) for three species of mangroves for Everglades National Park, Florida, USA. The Greater Everglades Ecosystem is currently the subject of a 7.8-billion-dollar restoration program sponsored by federal, state, and local agencies. Biomass and production of mangroves are being used as a measure of restoration success. A technique for rapid determination of biomass over large areas is required. We felled 32 mangrove trees and separated each plant into leaves, stems, branches, and for Rhizophora mangle L., prop roots. Wet weights were measured in the field and subsamples returned to the laboratory for determination of wet-to-dry weight conversion factors. The diameter at breast height (DBH) and stem height were also measured. Allometric equations were developed for each species for total biomass and components of biomass. We compared our equations with those from the same, or similar, species from elsewhere in the world. Our equations explained ???93% of the variance in total dry weight using DBH. DBH is a better predictor of dry weight than is stem height and DBH is much easier to measure. Furthermore, our results indicate that there are biogeographic differences in allometric relations between regions. For a given DBH, stems of all three species have less mass in Florida than stems from elsewhere in the world. ?? Springer 2006.

  2. Copper desorption in flooded agricultural soils and toxicity to the Florida apple snail (Pomacea paludosa): implications in Everglades restoration.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Tham C; Rogevich, Emily C; Rand, Gary M; Gardinali, Piero R; Frakes, Robert A; Bargar, Timothy A

    2008-07-01

    Copper (Cu) desorption and toxicity to the Florida apple snail were investigated from soils obtained from agricultural sites acquired under the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan. Copper concentrations in 11 flooded soils ranged from 5 to 234 mg/kg on day 0 and from 6.2 to 204 mg/kg on day 28 (steady-state). The steady-state Cu concentration in overlying water ranged from 9.1 to 308.2 microg/L. In a 28-d growth study, high mortality in snails occurred within 9 to 16 d in two of three soil treatments tested. Growth of apple snails over 28 d was affected by Cu in these two treatments. Tissue Cu concentrations by day 14 were 12-23-fold higher in snails exposed to the three soil treatments compared to controls. The endangered Florida snail kite and its main food source, the Florida apple snail, may be at risk from Cu exposure in these managed agricultural soil-water ecosystems.

  3. Diapause in copepods (Crustacea) from ephemeral habitats with different hydroperiods in Everglades National Park (Florida, U.S.A.)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bruno, M.C.; Loftus, W.F.; Reid, J.W.; Perry, S.A.

    2001-01-01

    Water management practices in the Everglades have severely stressed the natural system, particularly by reducing the hydroperiods of much of the region. During the dry season of 1999, we investigated the influence of hydroperiod on the species composition and dormancy patterns of freshwater copepod communities in seasonal wetlands of Everglades National Park, Florida, U.S.A. The habitats were characterized by an annual dry season, from December through June. We sampled at two locations: the Long Pine Key area of the Rocky Glades region (short hydroperiod, ca. 4-5 months), and western Taylor Slough (intermediate hydroperiod, ca. 8-10 months). Both areas have experienced a reduction in natural hydroperiods and an increase in the frequency of dry-down. We collected weekly plankton samples from Rocky Glades solution holes to assess the potential species pool of copepods. To document the taxa capable of surviving dry-down by resting, we performed three immersion trials in which we rehydrated, in laboratory aquaria, sediment patches from solution holes and surface soils from all stations. Only a subset of the planktonic species collected emerged from the dried sediments. The cyclopoids Microcyclops rubellus and Paracyclops poppei were dominant. This is the first record of diapause for P. poppei. Species distributions from the different hydroperiod soil patches indicated that more diapausing species occurred at the sites that dried for shorter periods. Emerging individuals of M. rubellus and P. poppei were mainly ovigerous females, demonstrating a resting strategy seldom before recorded. The cyclopoid Diacyclops nearcticus had not been previously reported to diapause, but they emerged from the dried sediments in our trials. Our collections included six new records for Florida: Diacyclops nearcticus, Megacyclops latipes, Orthocyclops modestus, Elaphoidella marjoryae, Bryocamptus sp. and Bryocamptus cf. newyorkensis. Paracyclops poppei, Macrocyclops fuscus and

  4. Hydroperiod affects nutrient accumulation in tree islands of the Florida Everglades: a stable isotope study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Sternberg, L. O.; Engel, V.; Ross, M. S.

    2009-12-01

    Tree islands are important and unique components of wetland ecosystems. In many cases they are the end product of self organizing vegetation systems, which are often characterized by uneven soil nutrient distributions. Tree islands in the Everglades are phosphorus rich in contrast to the phosphorus-poor surrounding vegetation matrix. Everglades tree islands occur in the ridge-slough habitat of Shark River Slough, which is characterized by deep organic soils, multi-year hydroperiods, and maximum water depths of ~ 1 m. Tree islands are also found in the drier marl prairie habitat of the Everglades, characterized by marl soils, shallow water (< 0.5 m) and short (< 180 day) hydroperiods. In this study we used stable isotopes to investigate dry season water limitation and soil and foliar nutrient status in upland hammock communities of 18 different tree islands located in the Shark River Slough and adjacent prairie landscapes. We observed that prairie tree islands suffer greater drought stress during the dry season than slough tree islands by examining shifts in foliar δ13C values. We also found that slough tree islands have higher soil total phosphorus concentration and lower foliar N/P ratio than prairie tree islands. Foliar δ15N values, which often increase with greater P availability, was also found to be higher in slough tree islands than in prairie tree islands. Both the elemental N and P and foliar δ15N results indicate that the upland hammock plant communities in slough tree islands have higher amount of P available than those in prairie tree islands. Our findings are consistent with the transpiration driven nutrient harvesting chemohydrodynamic model. Tree islands without drought stress hypothetically transpire more and harvest more P than tree islands that have drought stress during the dry season. These findings suggest that hydroperiod is important to nutrient accumulation of tree island habitats and to the self-organization of the Everglades landscape.

  5. Summary of hydrologic data for the East Everglades, Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schneider, James J.; Waller, Bradley G.

    1980-01-01

    The East Everglades area in south-central Dade County, Fla., occupies approximately 240 square miles. The area is flat and low lying with elevations ranging from sea level in the southeast part to 10 feet at Chekika Hammock with an average elevation of about 6 feet. Rainfall in the area averages 57.9 inches a year with about 80% of the total falling during the May to October wet season. There is some residential development and farming in the east-central part of the area where land elevations are slightly higher. Pressure by agricultural, commerical, and housing interests to develop the area is increasing. Historically, most of the area was flooded for extended periods of time. The construction of canals, levees, and controls has lowered the average water levels of the area. This has reduced the extent and decreased the time of flooding. Long-term hydrographs show graphically the effects that the water control works have had on the hydrologic system. The change in discharge into the north end of the East Everglades through the Tamiami Canal outlets, Levees 30 to 67A, due to construction is very pronounced. Maps showing the altitude of the water table for wet and dry periods indicate that Levee 67 Extended Canal greatly influences the water levels and shape of the water-table contours in the northwestern part of the East Everglades. (USGS)

  6. Mercury bio-concentration factor in mosquito fish (Gambusia spp.) in the Florida Everglades.

    PubMed

    Julian, Paul

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate Gambusia spp. (mosquito-fish) mercury bio-concentration factor in relation to marsh surface water sulfate concentration. As part of the everglades regional environmental monitoring and assessment marsh biogeochemical parameters were collected by the US Environmental Protection agency between 1995 and 2005 within the Everglades Protection Area and Everglades National Park (ENP). Surface water sulfate and methyl-mercury concentration data in combination with mosquito-fish total mercury concentration data was used to elucidate the gambusia mercury bio-concentration and surface water sulfate relationship. Previous studies hypothesized that the relationship of biota mercury and surface water sulfate concentrations is unimodal. However this study shows that the relationship of biota mercury and sulfate surface water concentrations in mosquito-fish adheres closely with a log-log relationship. Furthermore mosquito-fish bio-concentration factor were similar for Water Conservation Area (WCA) 1 and WCA2, while WCA3 and ENP were significantly different between all pairs throughout the study period. This difference in hypothesized relationships versus the relationship defined in this study could be the result of life span (extent of exposure) or life history of mosquito-fish.

  7. The Everglades: A regional watershed assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Gentile, J.H.; Harwell, M.; Harwell, C.; Myers, V.; Landers, A.; Bartuska, A.; Ogden, J.; Long, J.

    1995-12-31

    The Everglades and South Florida ecosystems are the focus of national and international attention because of their current degraded and threatened state. In 1990, the State Department, Man and the Biosphere (MAB), Human-Dominated Systems Directorate instituted a core project on the Everglades and South Florida. The purpose of this program was to develop a conceptual model for sustainability that integrated ecological risk principles and societal issues within an adaptive ecosystem management framework. The approach was to: (1) determine the defining physical, chemical and ecological characteristics of the natural unperturbed Everglades, (2) identify the appropriate stressors and ecological endpoints and indicators; and (3) use scenario consequence analyses to determine the ecological effects and social implications resulting from management options that altered land use and hydrology. The defining characteristics of a the historical, sustainable Everglades include: a diverse species composition, heterogeneous habitat and landscape mosaic, large spatial scale, natural patterns of fire, dynamic patterns of water storage and sheet flow, and low nutrient waters. Scenarios were aggregated according to land use. A GIS was used to project changes in land use patterns. Hydrological consequences of land use change were examined using hydrodynamic models. Initial scenarios, which add more land into core protective status provided sufficient spatial extent for sustaining populations and landscape characteristics. However, water storage and release capacity was insufficient to provide for the natural hydrological regime essential for recovery of the Everglades. A final scenario was developed that provided sufficient spatial extent to recover and sustain the population- and landscape-level characteristics and was sufficient for the storage and release of fresh water needed for the Everglades and coastal ecosystems.

  8. Florida Bay salinity and Everglades wetlands hydrology circa 1900 CE: A compilation of paleoecology-based statistical modeling analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marshall, F.E.; Wingard, G.L.

    2012-01-01

    The upgraded method of coupled paleosalinity and hydrologic models was applied to the analysis of the circa-1900 CE segments of five estuarine sediment cores collected in Florida Bay. Comparisons of the observed mean stage (water level) data to the paleoecology-based model's averaged output show that the estimated stage in the Everglades wetlands was 0.3 to 1.6 feet higher at different locations. Observed mean flow data compared to the paleoecology-based model output show an estimated flow into Shark River Slough at Tamiami Trail of 401 to 2,539 cubic feet per second (cfs) higher than existing flows, and at Taylor Slough Bridge an estimated flow of 48 to 218 cfs above existing flows. For salinity in Florida Bay, the difference between paleoecology-based and observed mean salinity varies across the bay, from an aggregated average salinity of 14.7 less than existing in the northeastern basin to 1.0 less than existing in the western basin near the transition into the Gulf of Mexico. When the salinity differences are compared by region, the difference between paleoecology-based conditions and existing conditions are spatially consistent.

  9. Impact of anthropogenic development on coastal ground-water hydrology in southeastern Florida, 1900-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Renken, Robert A.; Dixon, Joann; Koehmstedt, John A.; Ishman, Scott; Lietz, A.C.; Marella, Richard L.; Telis, Pamela A.; Rodgers, Jeff; Memberg, Steven

    2005-01-01

    Southeastern Florida is an area that has been subject to widely conflicting anthropogenic stress to the Everglades and coastal ecosystems. This stress is a direct consequence of the 20th century economic competition for limited land and water resources needed to satisfy agricultural development and its expansion, its displacement by burgeoning urban development, and the accompanying growth of the limestone mining industry. The development of a highly controlled water-management system designed to reclaim land for urban and agricultural development has severely impacted the extent, character, and vitality of the historic Everglades and coastal ecosystems. An extensive conveyance system of canals, levees, impoundments, surface- water control structures, and numerous municipal well fields are used to sustain the present-day Everglades hydrologic system, prevent overland flow from moving eastward and flooding urban and agricultural areas, maintain water levels to prevent saltwater intrusion, and provide an adequate water supply. Extractive mining activities expanded considerably in the latter part of the 20th century, largely in response to urban construction needs. Much of the present-day urban-agricultural corridor of southeastern Florida lies within an area that is no more than 15 feet above NGVD 1929 and formerly characterized by freshwater marsh, upland, and saline coastal wetland ecosystems. Miami- Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach Counties have experienced explosive population growth, increasing from less than 4,000 inhabitants in 1900 to more than 5 million in 2000. Ground-water use, the principal source of municipal supply, has increased from about 65 Mgal/d (million gallons per day) obtained from 3 well fields in 1930 to more than 770 Mgal/d obtained from 65 well fields in 1995. Water use for agricultural supply increased from 505 Mgal/d in 1953 to nearly 1,150 Mgal/d in 1988, but has since declined to 764 Mgal/d in 1995, partly as a result of displacement of the

  10. Quantifying time-varying ground-water discharge and recharge in wetlands of the northern Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Choi, J.; Harvey, J.W.

    2000-01-01

    Developing a more thorough understanding of water and chemical budgets in wetlands depends in part on our ability to quantify time-varying interactions between ground water and surface water. We used a combined water and solute mass balance approach to estimate time-varying ground-water discharge and recharge in the Everglades Nutrient Removal project (ENR), a relatively large constructed wetland (1544 hectare) built for removing nutrients from agricultural drainage in the norther Everglades in South Florida, USA. Over a 4-year period (1994 through 1998), ground-water recharge averaged 13.4 hectare-meter per day (ha-m/day) or 0.9 cm/day, which is approximately 31% of surface water pumped into the ENR for treatment. In contrast, ground-water discharge was much smaller (1.4 ha-m/day, or 0.09 cm/day, or 2.8% of water input to ENR for treatment). Using a water-balance approach alone only allowed net ground-water exchange (discharge - recharge) to be estimated (-12 ?? 2.4 ha-ma/day). Disharge and recharge were individually determined by combining a chloride mass balance with the water balance. For a variety of reasons, the ground-water discharge estimated by the combined mass balance approach was not reliable (1.4 ?? 37 ha-m/day). As a result, ground-water interactions could only be reliably estimated by comparing the mass-balance results with other independent approaches, including direct seepage-meter measurements and previous estimates using ground-water modeling. All three independent approaches provided similar estimates of average ground-water recharge, ranging from 13 to 14 ha-m/day. There was also relatively good agreement between ground-water discharge estimates for the mass balance and seepage meter methods, 1.4 and 0.9 ha-m/day, respectively. However, ground-water-flow modeling provided an average discharge estimate that was approximately a factor of four higher (5.4 ha-m/day) than the other two methods. Our study developed an initial understanding of how the

  11. Can differences in phosphorus uptake kinetics explain the distribution of cattail and sawgrass in the Florida Everglades?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cattail (Typha domingensis) has been spreading in phosphorus (P) enriched areas of the oligotrophic Florida Everglades at the expense of sawgrass (Cladium mariscus spp. jamaicense). Abundant evidence in the literature explains how the opportunistic features of Typha might lead to a complete dominance in P-enriched areas. Less clear is how Typha can grow and acquire P at extremely low P levels, which prevail in the unimpacted areas of the Everglades. Results Apparent P uptake kinetics were measured for intact plants of Cladium and Typha acclimated to low and high P at two levels of oxygen in hydroponic culture. The saturated rate of P uptake was higher in Typha than in Cladium and higher in low-P acclimated plants than in high-P acclimated plants. The affinity for P uptake was two-fold higher in Typha than in Cladium, and two- to three-fold higher for low-P acclimated plants compared to high-P acclimated plants. As Cladium had a greater proportion of its biomass allocated to roots, the overall uptake capacity of the two species at high P did not differ. At low P availability, Typha increased biomass allocation to roots more than Cladium. Both species also adjusted their P uptake kinetics, but Typha more so than Cladium. The adjustment of the P uptake system and increased biomass allocation to roots resulted in a five-fold higher uptake per plant for Cladium and a ten-fold higher uptake for Typha. Conclusions Both Cladium and Typha adjust P uptake kinetics in relation to plant demand when P availability is high. When P concentrations are low, however, Typha adjusts P uptake kinetics and also increases allocation to roots more so than Cladium, thereby improving both efficiency and capacity of P uptake. Cladium has less need to adjust P uptake kinetics because it is already efficient at acquiring P from peat soils (e.g., through secretion of phosphatases, symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, nutrient conservation growth traits). Thus, although

  12. Can differences in phosphorus uptake kinetics explain the distribution of cattail and sawgrass in the Florida Everglades?

    PubMed

    Brix, Hans; Lorenzen, Bent; Mendelssohn, Irving A; McKee, Karen L; Miao, Shili

    2010-02-08

    Cattail (Typha domingensis) has been spreading in phosphorus (P) enriched areas of the oligotrophic Florida Everglades at the expense of sawgrass (Cladium mariscus spp. jamaicense). Abundant evidence in the literature explains how the opportunistic features of Typha might lead to a complete dominance in P-enriched areas. Less clear is how Typha can grow and acquire P at extremely low P levels, which prevail in the unimpacted areas of the Everglades. Apparent P uptake kinetics were measured for intact plants of Cladium and Typha acclimated to low and high P at two levels of oxygen in hydroponic culture. The saturated rate of P uptake was higher in Typha than in Cladium and higher in low-P acclimated plants than in high-P acclimated plants. The affinity for P uptake was two-fold higher in Typha than in Cladium, and two- to three-fold higher for low-P acclimated plants compared to high-P acclimated plants. As Cladium had a greater proportion of its biomass allocated to roots, the overall uptake capacity of the two species at high P did not differ. At low P availability, Typha increased biomass allocation to roots more than Cladium. Both species also adjusted their P uptake kinetics, but Typha more so than Cladium. The adjustment of the P uptake system and increased biomass allocation to roots resulted in a five-fold higher uptake per plant for Cladium and a ten-fold higher uptake for Typha. Both Cladium and Typha adjust P uptake kinetics in relation to plant demand when P availability is high. When P concentrations are low, however, Typha adjusts P uptake kinetics and also increases allocation to roots more so than Cladium, thereby improving both efficiency and capacity of P uptake. Cladium has less need to adjust P uptake kinetics because it is already efficient at acquiring P from peat soils (e.g., through secretion of phosphatases, symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, nutrient conservation growth traits). Thus, although Cladium and Typha have qualitatively

  13. The tides and inflows in the mangroves of the Everglades (TIME) interdisciplinary project of the South Florida Ecosystem Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaffranek, R.W.

    2001-01-01

    The U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) has a prominent role in the Federal Government's comprehensive restoration plan for the south Florida ecosystem encompassing the Everglades-the largest remaining subtropical wilderness in the continental United States. USGS scientists, in collaboration with researchers from the National Park Service (NPS), other governmental agencies, and academia, are providing scientific information to land and resource managers for planning, executing, and evaluating restoration actions. One major thrust of the restoration effort is to restore the natural functioning of the ecosystem to predrainage conditions, an objective that requires knowledge of the hydrologic and hydraulic factors that affect the flow of water. A vast network of interlaced canals, rimmed with levees and fitted with hydraulic control structures, and highways, built on elevated embankments lined by borrow ditches and undercut by culverts, now act to control and direct the flow of water through the shallow low-gradient wetlands. As water flows south from Lake Okeechobee past the city of Miami and through Everglades National Park (ENP), it is diminished by canal diversions, augmented by seasonably variable precipitation, and depleted through evapotranspiration. Along its path, the shallow flowing water, referred to as sheet flow, interacts with surficial aquifers and is subject to the resistance effects of variably dense vegetation and forcing effects of winds. New scientific investigations are providing additional insight into the hydrologic and hydraulic processes governing the flow, and recent data-collection efforts are supplying more comprehensive data describing the flow behavior, both of which are benefiting development of improved numerical models to evaluate and restore the natural functioning of the ecosystem.

  14. The influence of vegetation on the hydrodynamics and geomorphology of a tree island in Everglades National Park (Florida, United States)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sullivan, Pamela L.; Engel, Victor C.; Ross, Michael S.; Price, René M.

    2013-01-01

    Transpiration-driven nutrient accumulation has been identified as a potential mechanism governing the creation and maintenance of wetland vegetation patterning. This process may contribute to the formation of nutrient-rich tree islands within the expansive oligotrophic marshes of the Everglades (Florida, United States). This study presents hydrogeochemical data indicating that tree root water uptake is a primary driver of groundwater ion accumulation across one of these islands. Sap flow, soil moisture, water level, water chemistry, and rainfall were measured to identify the relationships between climate, transpiration, and groundwater uptake by phreatophytes and to examine the effect this uptake has on groundwater chemistry and mineral formation in three woody plant communities of differing elevations. During the dry season, trees relied more on groundwater for transpiration, which led to a depressed water table and the advective movement of groundwater and dissolved ions, including phosphorus, from the surrounding marsh towards the centre of the island. Ion exclusion during root water uptake led to elevated concentrations of all major dissolved ions in the tree island groundwater compared with the adjacent marsh. Groundwater was predominately supersaturated with respect to aragonite and calcite in the lower-elevation woody communities, indicating the potential for soil formation. Elevated groundwater phosphorous concentrations detected in the highest-elevation woody community were associated with the leaching of inorganic sediments (i.e. hydroxyapatite) in the vadose zone. Understanding the complex feedback mechanisms regulating plant/groundwater/surface water interactions, nutrient dynamics, and potential soil formation is necessary to manage and restore patterned wetlands such as the Everglades.

  15. Cascading ecological effects of low-level phosphorus enrichment in the Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaiser, E.E.; Trexler, J.C.; Richards, J.H.; Childers, D.L.; Lee, D.; Edwards, A.L.; Scinto, L.J.; Jayachandran, K.; Noe, G.B.; Jones, R.D.

    2005-01-01

    Few studies have examined long-term ecological effects of sustained low-level nutrient enhancement on wetland biota. To determine sustained effects of phosphorus (P) addition on Everglades marshes we added P at low levels (5, 15, and 30 ??g L-1 above ambient) for 5 yr to triplicate 100-m flow-through channels in pristine marsh. A cascade of ecological responses occurred in similar sequence among treatments. Although the rate of change increased with dosing level, treatments converged to similar enriched endpoints, characterized most notably by a doubling of plant biomass and elimination of native, calcareous periphyton mats. The full sequence of biological changes occurred without an increase in water total P concentration, which remained near ambient levels until Year 5. This study indicates that Everglades marshes have a near-zero assimilative capacity for P without a state change, that ecosystem responses to enrichment accumulate over time, and that downstream P transport mainly occurs through biota rather than the water column.

  16. Copepod communities from surface and ground waters in the everglades, south Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bruno, M.C.; Cunningham, K.J.; Perry, S.A.

    2003-01-01

    We studied species composition and individual abundance of copepods in the surficial aquifer northeast of Everglades National Park. We identified the spatial distribution of subsurface habitats by assessing the depth of the high porosity layers in the limestone along a canal system, and we used copepods to assess the exchange between surface water and ground water along canal banks, at levels in the wells where high porosity connections to the canals exist. Surface- and ground-water taxa were defined, and species composition was related to areal position, sampling depth, and time. Subsurface copepod communities were dominated by surface copepods that disperse into the aquifer following the groundwater seepage along canal L-31N. The similarities in species composition between wells along canal reaches, suggest that copepods mainly enter ground water horizontally along canals via active and passive dispersal. Thus, the copepod populations indicate continuous connections between surface- and ground waters. The most abundant species were Orthocyclops modestus, Arctodiaptomus floridanus, Mesocyclops edax, and Thermocyclops parvus, all known in literature from surface habitats; however, these species have been collected in ground water in ENP. Only two stygophiles were collected: Diacylcops nearcticus and Diacyclops crassicaudis brachycercus. Restoration of the Everglades ecosystem requires a mosaic of data to reveal a complete picture of this complex system. The use of copepods as indicators of seepage could be a tool in helping to assess the direction and the duration of surface and ground water exchange.

  17. Enzyme-based resource allocated decomposition and landscape heterogeneity in the Florida Everglades.

    PubMed

    Penton, C Ryan; Newman, Susan

    2008-01-01

    Enzyme catalyzed reactions are generally considered the rate-limiting step in organic matter degradation and may be significantly influenced by the structure and composition of plant communities. Changes in these rates have the potential to effect long-term peat accumulation and influence the topography of a wetland ecosystem. To determine habitat influences on enzyme activities, we examined slough and sawgrass plots within enriched and reference phosphorus (P) sites in the Everglades. Assays were performed for the enzymes involved in carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and P cycling and lignin depolymerization. Enzyme activities were normalized and analyzed in terms of a resource allocation strategy. Plant composition was found to significantly alter the allocation of enzymatic resources due to varying substrate complexities. Potential decomposition in the slough was less influenced by lignin than in the sawgrass habitats. Additionally, an index relating hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes was significantly greater in the slough habitats, whereas C/N ratios were significantly lower. These indices suggest more favorable decomposition conditions and thus slower peat accretion within the slough communities, which may contribute to the development of elevation differences within the sawgrass ridge and slough topography of the Everglades.

  18. Dry years decrease abundance of American alligators in the Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waddle, J. Hardin; Brandt, Laura A.; Jeffery, Brian M.; Mazzotti, Frank J.

    2015-01-01

    The Everglades has been greatly reduced and is threatened by land use change and altered hydrology. The Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan calls for monitoring and assessment of key ecosystem attributes, one of which is abundance of American alligators. We examined 10 years of alligator night spotlight counts from Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge along two canals and in the interior marsh to determine trends and how dry years affect alligator abundance. Alligators showed population response to hydrologic conditions. In particular, there were declines in abundance after dry years followed by an apparent recovery in abundance in subsequent years. Increases in abundance were lower in the marsh than L-40 Canal. In addition, there was evidence that intensity of dry events affected population dynamics with greater declines observed in years with drier conditions. Results revealed that overall population of alligators increased from 2004 to 2013, but that increases varied by survey route. These results demonstrate that dry years cause a decline in alligator abundance proportional to the intensity of the dry event, and that it is important to make a distinction between canals and marsh when measuring alligator response to hydrology.

  19. Water and the Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schneider, William J.

    1966-01-01

    This fundamental element, whether profuse or scarce, rules the life and character of Florida's great park. But water, like living space, is a resource that civilization demands in ever increasing quantities. Examined here are the economics of water use by Florida's east coast cities and its effects on Everglades ecology.

  20. Water and the Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schneider, William J.

    1966-01-01

    This fundamental element, whether profuse or scarce, rules the life and character of Florida's great park. But water, like living space, is a resource that civilization demands in ever increasing quantities. Examined here are the economics of water use by Florida's east coast cities and its effects on Everglades ecology.

  1. Inhibition of precipitation and aggregation of metacinnabar (mercuric sulfide) by dissolved organic matter isolated from the Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ravichandran, M.; Aiken, G.R.; Ryan, J.N.; Reddy, M.M.

    1999-01-01

    Precipitation and aggregation of metacinnabar (black HgS) was inhibited in the presence of low concentrations (???3 mg C/L) of humic fractions of dissolved organic matter (DOM) isolated from the Florida Everglades. At low Hg concentrations (??? x 10-8 M), DOM prevented the precipitation of metacinnabar. At moderate Hg concentrations (5 x 10-5 M), DOM inhibited the aggregation of colloidal metacinnabar (Hg passed through a 0.1 ??m filter but was removed by centrifugation). At Hg concentrations greater than 5 x 10-4 M, mercury formed solid metacinnabar particles that were removed from solution by a 0.1 ??m filter. Organic matter rich in aromatic moleties was preferentially removed with the solid. Hydrophobic organic acids (humic and fulvic acids) inhibited aggregation better than hydrophilic organic acids. The presence of chloride, acetate, salicylate, EDTA, and cysteine did not inhibit the precipitation or aggregation of metacinnabar. Calcium enhanced metacinnabar aggregation even in the presence of DOM, but the magnitude of the effect was dependent on the concentrations of DOM, Hg, and Ca. Inhibition of metacinnabar precipitation appears to be a result of strong DOM-Hg binding. Prevention of aggregation of colloidal particles appears to be caused by adsorption of DOM and electrostatic repulsion.Precipitation and aggregation of metacinnabar (black HgS) was inhibited in the presence of low concentrations (???3 mg C/L) of humic fractions of dissolved organic matter (DOM) isolated from the Florida Everglades. At low Hg concentrations (???5??10-8 M), DOM prevented the precipitation of metacinnabar. At moderate Hg concentrations (5??10-5 M), DOM inhibited the aggregation of colloidal metacinnabar (Hg passed through a 0.1 ??m filter but was removed by centrifugation). At Hg concentrations greater than 5??10-4 M, mercury formed solid metacinnabar particles that were removed from solution by a 0.1 ??m filter. Organic matter rich in aromatic moieties was preferentially

  2. Competitive binding between mercury and copper for reduced sulfur binding sites on dissolved organic matter from the Florida Everglades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbig, C. A.; Aiken, G. R.; Ryan, J. N.

    2007-12-01

    The interaction of mercury and dissolved organic matter (DOM) strongly influences the biogeochemistry of mercury in the Florida Everglades. Previous laboratory-based studies of simple systems at environmentally relevant concentrations of mercury(II) (a soft Lewis acid) and DOM found strong conditional binding constants (log KHgL' = 28-31). These large constants result from the interaction of mercury(II) with reduced sulfur (a soft Lewis base) sites on DOM. Reported conditional binding constants for other metals with DOM (e.g. log KCuL' = 11-14), suggest that metals of borderline Lewis acidity would not compete with mercury(II) for the strongest binding sites at environmentally relevant concentrations. However, the small proportion of strong binding sites responsible for mercury(II) binding have proven to be susceptible to competitive effects from borderline metals. Equilibrium dialysis experiments using organic matter isolated from the Florida Everglades were designed to determine the effects of competitive binding between copper(II) and mercury(II) on DOM binding sites. These experiments demonstrated that copper(II), a borderline Lewis acid, effectively competed for strong DOM sites at concentrations only 1-2 orders of magnitude greater than experimental mercury(II) concentrations (which ranged from 0.05 to 0.2nM). Our results indicate that the reduced sulfur sites responsible for Hg(II) binding on DOM also have high affinities for borderline metals. Interactions of copper(II) and DOM were also investigated in the absence of mercury(II). These results further substantiate the significance of a small concentration of strong binding sites on DOM. At low copper(II) to DOM ratios, preliminary results indicate that the binding interactions between copper(II) and DOM are significantly greater than previously reported and are close to those measured for DOM-mercury(II) binding. We conclude that currently available binding constants for metals of interest (borderline

  3. Influence of hydroperiod on aquatic primary productivity between short- and long-hydroperiod Florida Everglades marshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, J.; Olivas, P. C.; Oberbauer, S. F.; Malone, S. L.; Starr, G.

    2014-12-01

    Everglades National Park (ENP) represents one of the largest wetlands in the United States, where carbon cycling and primary productivity are closely linked to hydroperiod. Only recently has an integrative assessment of the CO2balance been undertaken in ENP. Previous periphyton and marcrophyte clipping experiments suggest that aquatic primary productivity (APP) is generally low in the Everglades freshwater marsh ecosystems. However, few studies have quantified aquatic metabolism in ENP, which may have significant influence on the entire ecosystem carbon dynamics. Eddy covariance towers were installed at a long- and short-hydroperiod marsh (Shark River Slough, SRS and Taylor Slough; TS, respectively) within ENP and have been running since 2008 . Net ecosystem exchange of CO2, H2O, and energy between the ecosystem and the atmosphere were measured along with meteorological data. To address how interannual and habitat variations in APP influences overall CO2 flux dynamics, we installed a D-Opto dissolved oxygen sensor (Zebra-Tech LTD) at each site in March of 2011, which allowed us to collect percent dissolved oxygen (DO%), dissolved oxygen concentration (DO ppm), and water temperature (oC) data at half hourly intervals from March of 2011 until present. We calculated gross and net aquatic primary productivity (ANPP), and night time aquatic respiration (AR), and compare interannual and inter site variation in APP between SRS and TS from October 2011 through December 2013. Our results reveal that across all three years (2011 - 2013) ANPP and AR were significantly higher at TS. ANPP was 15%, 16%, and 20% higher, and AR was 96%, 55%, and 7% higher at TS than at SRS. These results indicate that APP is contributing to the ecosystem carbon dynamics and differs with hydroperiod. Along with meteorological and data collected at the flux towers, we were also able to relate APP to changes in water level, photosynthetically active radiation and water temperature. This is the first

  4. Carbon cycling in a mangrove-dominated estuary of Everglades National Park, Florida, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, David; Engel, Victor; Ferrón, Sara; Friederich, Gernot; Barr, Jordan; Wanninkhof, Rik

    2014-05-01

    Carbon source-sink dynamics across a land surface-aquatic continuum are difficult to quantify. Here, we use a combination of water column SF6 deliberate tracer releases, pCO2 mapping, discrete measurements of pH, TAlk, DIC, and DOC, and autonomous measurements of CDOM, pCO2, and pH to determine air-water CO2 exchange and the sources and sinks of DIC and DOC to investigate the carbon balance of Shark River, which originates in the freshwater marshes of Everglades National Park. Shark River is tidal in its lower reaches and passes through the largest continuous mangrove forest in North America before discharging to the Gulf of Mexico. Our measurements provide a means to determine the fate of mangrove-derived carbon in Shark River, and serve as a model for applying similar methods in other aquatic systems.

  5. Wading bird guano contributes to Hg accumulation in tree island soils in the Florida Everglades.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yingjia; Gu, Binhe; Irick, Daniel L; Ewe, Sharon; Li, Yuncong; Ross, Michael S; Ma, Lena Q

    2014-01-01

    Tree islands are habitat for wading birds and a characteristic landscape feature in the Everglades. A total of 93 surface soil and 3 soil core samples were collected from 7 degraded/ghost and 34 live tree islands. The mean Hg concentration in surface soils of ghost tree islands was low and similar to marsh soil. For live tree islands, Hg concentrations in the surface head region were considerably greater than those in mid and tail region, and marsh soils. Hg concentrations in bird guano (286 μg kg(-1)) were significantly higher than those in mammal droppings (105 μg kg(-1)) and plant leaves (53 μg kg(-1)). In addition, Hg concentrations and δ(15)N values displayed positive correlation in soils influenced by guano. During 1998-2010, estimated annual Hg deposition by guano was 148 μg m(-2) yr(-1) and ~8 times the atmospheric deposition.

  6. Distribution and rate of methane oxidation in sediments of the Florida everglades

    SciTech Connect

    King, G.M.; Roslev, P.; Skovgaard, H. )

    1990-09-01

    Rates of methane emission from intact cores were measured during anoxic dark and oxic light and dark incubations. Rates of methane oxidation were calculated on the basis of oxic incubations by using the anoxic emissions as an estimate of the maximum potential flux. This technique indicated that methane oxidation consumed up to 91% of the maximum potential flux in peat sediments but that oxidation was negligible in marl sediments. Oxygen microprofiles determined for intact cores were comparable to profiles measured in situ. Thus, the laboratory incubations appeared to provide a reasonable approximation of in situ activities. The magnitude of root-associated oxidation rates indicated that belowground plant surfaces may not markedly increase the total capacity for methane consumption. However, the data collectively support the notion that the distribution and activity of methane oxidation have a major impact on the magnitude of atmospheric fluxes from the Everglades.

  7. Data for herpetofaunal inventories of the national parks of South Florida and the Caribbean: Volume I, Everglades National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rice, Kenneth G.; Waddle, Hardin; Crockett, Marquette E.; Jeffery, Brian M.; Percival, H. Franklin

    2017-01-01

    The Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) requires the use of ecological indicators to measure the success of restoration efforts. The Everglades amphibian community is ideal because amphibians are present in all habitats and under all hydrologic regimes. During Everglades restoration, hydrologic patterns will change and the response of ecological indicators will determine success. Fourteen amphibian species were detected through visual encounter surveys, vocalization surveys and trapping methods throughout the study and the occurrence information collected in this project database.

  8. SICS: the Southern Inland and Coastal System interdisciplinary project of the USGS South Florida Ecosystem Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2011-01-01

    State and Federal agencies are working jointly on structural modifications and improved water-delivery strategies to reestablish more natural surface-water flows through the Everglades wetlands and into Florida Bay. Changes in the magnitude, duration, timing, and distribution of inflows from the headwaters of the Taylor Slough and canal C-111 drainage basins have shifted the seasonal distribution and extent of wetland inundation, and also contributed to the development of hypersaline conditions in nearshore embayments of Florida Bay. Such changes are altering biological and vegetative communities in the wetlands and creating stresses on aquatic habitat. Affected biotic resources include federally listed species such as the Cape Sable seaside sparrow, American crocodile, wood stork, and roseate spoonbill. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is synthesizing scientific findings from hydrologic process studies, collecting data to characterize the ecosystem properties and functions, and integrating the results of these efforts into a research tool and management model for this Southern Inland and Coastal System(SICS). Scientists from all four disciplinary divisions of the USGS, Biological Resources, Geology, National Mapping, and Water Resources are contributing to this interdisciplinary project.

  9. Evaluating effects of Everglades restoration on American crocodile populations in south Florida using a spatially-explicit, stage-based population model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Green, Timothy W.; Slone, Daniel H.; Swain, Eric D.; Cherkiss, Michael S.; Lohmann, Melinda; Mazzotti, Frank J.; Rice, Kenneth G.

    2014-01-01

    The distribution and abundance of the American crocodile (Crocodylus acutus) in the Florida Everglades is dependent on the timing, amount, and location of freshwater flow. One of the goals of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) is to restore historic freshwater flows to American crocodile habitat throughout the Everglades. To predict the impacts on the crocodile population from planned restoration activities, we created a stage-based spatially explicit crocodile population model that incorporated regional hydrology models and American crocodile research and monitoring data. Growth and survival were influenced by salinity, water depth, and density-dependent interactions. A stage-structured spatial model was used with discrete spatial convolution to direct crocodiles toward attractive sources where conditions were favorable. The model predicted that CERP would have both positive and negative impacts on American crocodile growth, survival, and distribution. Overall, crocodile populations across south Florida were predicted to decrease approximately 3 % with the implementation of CERP compared to future conditions without restoration, but local increases up to 30 % occurred in the Joe Bay area near Taylor Slough, and local decreases up to 30 % occurred in the vicinity of Buttonwood Canal due to changes in salinity and freshwater flows.

  10. Endosulfan in the atmosphere of South Florida: Transport to Everglades and Biscayne National Parks

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nutrient inputs from urban encroachment and agricultural activities have been implicated in contributing to the environmental health decline and loss of organism diversity of South Florida ecosystems. However, the frequent prophylactic application of pesticides is being examined as another possible...

  11. Inhibition of precipitation and aggregation of metacinnabar (mercuric sulfide) by dissolved organic matter isolated from the Florida Everglades

    SciTech Connect

    Ravichandran, M.; Ryan, J.N.; Aiken, G.R.; Reddy, M.M.

    1999-05-01

    Precipitation and aggregation of metacinnabar (black HgS) was inhibited in the presence of low concentrations of humic fractions of dissolved organic matter (DOM) isolated from the Florida Everglades. At low Hg concentrations, DOM prevented the precipitation of metacinnabar. At moderate Hg concentrations, DOM inhibited the aggregation of colloidal metacinnabar At Hg concentrations greater than 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} M, mercury formed solid metacinnabar particles that were removed from solution by a 0.1 {micro}m filter. Organic matter rich in aromatic moieties was preferentially removed with the solid. Hydrophobic organic acids inhibited aggregation better than hydrophilic organic acids. The presence of chloride, acetate, salicylate, EDTA, and cysteine did not inhibit the precipitation or aggregation of metacinnabar. Calcium enhanced metacinnabar aggregation even in the presence of DOM,m but the magnitude of the effect was dependent on the concentrations of DOM, Hg, and Ca. Inhibition of metacinnabar precipitation appears to be a result of strong DOM-Hg binding. Prevention of aggregation of colloidal particles appears to be caused by adsorption of DOM and electrostatic repulsion.

  12. Carbon isotopic composition of methane in Florida Everglades soils and fractionation during its transport to the troposphere

    SciTech Connect

    Chanton, J.P.; Pauly, G.G.; Martens, C.S.; Blair, N.E.; Dacey, J.W.H. )

    1988-09-01

    The delta-C{sup 13} stable carbon isotopic composition of methane collected in bubbles from the submerged soils of specific environments within the Everglades wetland in southern Florida varied from {minus}70{per thousand} to {minus}63{per thousand} across the system while organic carbon in the soils and dominant plants varied from {minus}28{per thousand} to {minus}25{per thousand}. A methane isotopic budget based upon the soil bubble isotope data and published methane flux measurements predicted a flux of isotopic composition {minus}65{per thousand}, a value 5-10{per thousand} more depleted in C{sup 13} than the isotopic composition of methane emanating to the atmosphere. Emergent aquatic plants, which are known to be active methane transporters between soil and atmosphere in this ecosystem, were found to transport methane of delta-C{sup 13} content up to 12{per thousand} different from the delta-C{sup 13} content of the soil methane bubble reservoir. Methane C{sup 13} content at one site was determined to be 108.6% modern (delta-C{sup 13} = 83 + or{minus}10{per thousand}). 47 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  13. Diversity of nifH genotypes in floating periphyton mats along a nutrient gradient in the Florida Everglades.

    PubMed

    Jasrotia, Puja; Ogram, Andrew

    2008-06-01

    Periphyton mats are an important component of many wetland ecosystems, performing a range of vital ecosystem functions, including nitrogen fixation. The composition and integrity of these mats are affected by nutrient additions, which might result in changes in their function. The overall objective of this study was to investigate the distribution of nifH sequences in floating periphyton mats collected along a nutrient gradient in the Florida Everglades. Distribution of nifH clone libraries indicated nutrient enrichment selected primarily for sequences branching deeply within the heterocystous cyanobacteria and within a novel group of cyanobacteria; sequences from low-nutrient sites were broadly distributed, with no clear dominance of sequences associated with heterocystous and nonheterocystous cyanobacteria and alpha-, gamma-, and delta-proteobacteria. The dominance of heterocystous cyanobacteria in nutrient-enriched sites and the lack of clear dominance by heterocystous cyanobacteria is consistent with previously reported diurnal cycles of nitrogen fixation rates in these systems. Sequences clustering with those harbored by methanotrophs were also identified; sequences from nutrient-impacted and transition regions clustered with those characteristic of type II methanotrophs, and sequences from oligotrophic regions clustered with type I methanotrophs.

  14. Preliminary paleontologic report on cores 19A and 19B, from Russell Bank, Everglades National Park, Florida Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brewster-Wingard, G. L.; Ishman, S.E.; Willard, D.A.; Edwards, L.E.; Holmes, C.W.

    1997-01-01

    The fauna and flora preserved in two cores, 19A and 19B, from the south side of Russell Bank (N 25 03.831', W 80 37.486') in north-central Florida Bay, Everglades National Park, Florida, record a history of environmental change over the last century. The benthic foraminifera and molluscs indicate fluctuating salinities with increasing average salinity upcore in core 19B. Shifts from low salinity (12-15 ppt) to higher average salinity (30 ppt) occurred at 70-66 cm and 24-18 cm in core 19B (approximately 1937-1940 and 1975-1980). The inverse, shifts from periods of higher average salinity to periods of lower salinity, occurred at 140 cm, 90 cm, and 42 cm (approximately 1880, 1921, and 1960). Significant changes in the molluscan fauna indicative of specific substrate types occur at 88 cm, 68 cm, and 22 cm. The lower portion of the core is dominated by a mixture of sediment and grass dwellers, the middle portion by sediment dwellers, and the upper portion of the core by grass and finally grass and algae dwellers. Changes occur in the floral assemblages in core 19A, but the significance of these changes is unclear. Three subtle shifts occur in the pollen assemblages indicating the onshore vegetation was responding to some environmental factor. Two peaks in dinocyst abundance occur in core 19A, but the composition of dinocyst assemblages remains relatively stable throughout the core. Correspondence between changes in salinity and onshore vegetation changes is consistent with results from previous cores. The pattern of increased salinity upcore is consistent with patterns seen in core T24 from the mouth of Taylor Creek and in core 6A from Bob Allen mudbank.

  15. Vegetative resistance to flow in South Florida; summary of vegetation sampling in Taylor Slough, Everglades National Park, September 1997-July 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rybicki, N.B.; Reel, J.T.; Ruhl, H.; Gammon, P.A.; Carter, Virginia

    2001-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is one of many agencies providing scientific support to the effort to restore the South Florida Everglades. In September and November 1997 and July 1998, vegetation was sampled at selected sites in the Everglades as part of a study to quantify vegetative resistance to flow. The objectives of the vegetation sampling are (1) to provide detailed information on species composition, vegetation characteristics, and biomass for quantification of the effect of vegetation on water flow, and (2) to use these data in the future to infer flow resistance from vegetation information. Forty-two vegetation quadrats were sampled in Taylor Slough to determine the number and width of stems and leaves and the biomass of live and dead standing sawgrass, rush, and other plants, and the biomass of dead litter and periphyton. The samples were grouped into ten vegetation classes based on species composition and total biomass minus periphyton biomass.

  16. Everglades Wildguide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Jean Craighead

    This handbook describes the various components of the ecology of the Everglades National Park. Numerous maps, charts, and drawings supplement the text. Topics discussed include the topography of the Everglades, plant and animal communities, specific species living in the Everglades, and the Indians that have hunted and lived in the Everglades. An…

  17. Solute transport and storage mechanisms in wetlands of the Everglades, south Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Judson W.; Saiers, James E.; Newlin, Jessica T.

    2005-05-01

    Solute transport and storage processes in wetlands play an important role in biogeochemical cycling and in wetland water quality functions. In the wetlands of the Everglades, there are few data or guidelines to characterize transport through the heterogeneous flow environment. Our goal was to conduct a tracer study to help quantify solute exchange between the relatively fast flowing water in the open part of the water column and much more slowly moving water in thick floating vegetation and in the pore water of the underlying peat. We performed a tracer experiment that consisted of a constant-rate injection of a sodium bromide (NaBr) solution for 22 hours into a 3 m wide, open-ended flume channel in Everglades National Park. Arrival of the bromide tracer was monitored at an array of surface water and subsurface samplers for 48 hours at a distance of 6.8 m downstream of the injection. A one-dimensional transport model was used in combination with an optimization code to identify the values of transport parameters that best explained the tracer observations. Parameters included dimensions and mass transfer coefficients describing exchange with both short (hours) and longer (tens of hours) storage zones as well as the average rates of advection and longitudinal dispersion in the open part of the water column (referred to as the ``main flow zone''). Comparison with a more detailed set of tracer measurements tested how well the model's storage zones approximated the average characteristics of tracer movement into and out of the layer of thick floating vegetation and the pore water in the underlying peat. The rate at which the relatively fast moving water in the open water column was exchanged with slowly moving water in the layer of floating vegetation and in sediment pore water amounted to 50 and 3% h-1, respectively. Storage processes decreased the depth-averaged velocity of surface water by 50% relative to the water velocity in the open part of the water column. As a

  18. Solute transport and storage mechanisms in wetlands of the Everglades, south Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Judson W.; Saiers, James E.; Newlin, Jessica T.

    2005-05-01

    Solute transport and storage processes in wetlands play an important role in biogeochemical cycling and in wetland water quality functions. In the wetlands of the Everglades, there are few data or guidelines to characterize transport through the heterogeneous flow environment. Our goal was to conduct a tracer study to help quantify solute exchange between the relatively fast flowing water in the open part of the water column and much more slowly moving water in thick floating vegetation and in the pore water of the underlying peat. We performed a tracer experiment that consisted of a constant-rate injection of a sodium bromide (NaBr) solution for 22 hours into a 3 m wide, open-ended flume channel in Everglades National Park. Arrival of the bromide tracer was monitored at an array of surface water and subsurface samplers for 48 hours at a distance of 6.8 m downstream of the injection. A one-dimensional transport model was used in combination with an optimization code to identify the values of transport parameters that best explained the tracer observations. Parameters included dimensions and mass transfer coefficients describing exchange with both short (hours) and longer (tens of hours) storage zones as well as the average rates of advection and longitudinal dispersion in the open part of the water column (referred to as the "main flow zone"). Comparison with a more detailed set of tracer measurements tested how well the model's storage zones approximated the average characteristics of tracer movement into and out of the layer of thick floating vegetation and the pore water in the underlying peat. The rate at which the relatively fast moving water in the open water column was exchanged with slowly moving water in the layer of floating vegetation and in sediment pore water amounted to 50 and 3% h-1, respectively. Storage processes decreased the depth-averaged velocity of surface water by 50% relative to the water velocity in the open part of the water column. As a

  19. Solute transport and storage mechanisms in wetlands of the Everglades, south Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harvey, J.W.; Saiers, J.E.; Newlin, J.T.

    2005-01-01

    Solute transport and storage processes in wetlands play an important role in biogeochemical cycling and in wetland water quality functions. In the wetlands of the Everglades, there are few data or guidelines to characterize transport through the heterogeneous flow environment. Our goal was to conduct a tracer study to help quantify solute exchange between the relatively fast flowing water in the open part of the water column and much more slowly moving water in thick floating vegetation and in the pore water of the underlying peat. We performed a tracer experiment that consisted of a constant-rate injection of a sodium bromide (NaBr) solution for 22 hours into a 3 m wide, open-ended flume channel in Everglades National Park. Arrival of the bromide tracer was monitored at an array of surface water and subsurface samplers for 48 hours at a distance of 6.8 m downstream of the injection. A one-dimensional transport model was used in combination with an optimization code to identify the values of transport parameters that best explained the tracer observations. Parameters included dimensions and mass transfer coefficients describing exchange with both short (hours) and longer (tens of hours) storage zones as well as the average rates of advection and longitudinal dispersion in the open part of the water column (referred to as the "main flow zone"). Comparison with a more detailed set of tracer measurements tested how well the model's storage zones approximated the average characteristics of tracer movement into and out of the layer of thick floating vegetation and the pore water in the underlying peat. The rate at which the relatively fast moving water in the open water column was exchanged with slowly moving water in the layer of floating vegetation and in sediment pore water amounted to 50 and 3% h-1, respectively. Storage processes decreased the depth-averaged velocity of surface water by 50% relative to the water velocity in the open part of the water column. As a

  20. Evaluation of the Possible Sources and Controlling Factors of Toxic Metals/Metalloids in the Florida Everglades and Their Potential Risk of Exposure.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanbin; Duan, Zhiwei; Liu, Guangliang; Kalla, Peter; Scheidt, Daniel; Cai, Yong

    2015-08-18

    The Florida Everglades is an environmentally sensitive wetland ecosystem with a number of threatened and endangered fauna species susceptible to the deterioration of water quality. Several potential toxic metal sources exist in the Everglades, including farming, atmospheric deposition, and human activities in urban areas, causing concerns of potential metal exposure risks. However, little is known about the pollution status of toxic metals/metalloids of potential concern, except for Hg. In this study, eight toxic metals/metalloids (Cd, Cr, Pb, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, and Hg) in Everglades soils were investigated in both dry and wet seasons. Pb, Cr, As, Cu, Cd, and Ni were identified to be above Florida SQGs (sediment quality guidelines) at a number of sampling sites, particularly Pb, which had a level of potential risk to organisms similar to that of Hg. In addition, a method was developed for quantitative source identification and controlling factor elucidation of toxic metals/metalloids by introducing an index, enrichment factor (EF), in the conventional multiple regression analysis. EFs represent the effects of anthropogenic sources on metals/metalloids in soils. Multiple regression analysis showed that Cr and Ni were mainly controlled by anthropogenic loading, whereas soil characteristics, in particular natural organic matter (NOM), played a more important role for Hg, As, Cd, and Zn. NOM may control the distribution of these toxic metals/metalloids by affecting their mobility in soils. For Cu and Pb, the effects of EFs and environmental factors are comparable, suggesting combined effects of loading and soil characteristics. This study is the first comprehensive research with a vast amount of sampling sites on the distribution and potential risks of toxic metals/metalloids in the Everglades. The finding suggests that in addition to Hg other metals/metalloids could also potentially be an environmental problem in this wetland ecosystem.

  1. Native Americans, regional drought and tree Island evolution in the Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bernhardt, C.

    2011-01-01

    This study uses palynologic data to determine the effects of regional climate variability and human activity on the formation and development of tree islands during the last ~4000 years. Although prolonged periods of aridity have been invoked as one mechanism for their formation, Native American land use has also been hypothesized as a driver of tree island development. Using pollen assemblages from head and near tail sediments collected on two tree islands and documented archeological data, the relative roles of Native Americans, climate variability, and recent water-management practices in forming and structuring Everglades tree islands are examined. The timing of changes recorded in the pollen record indicates that tree islands developed from sawgrass marshes ~3800 cal. yr BP, prior to human occupation. Major tree island expansion, recorded near tail sediments, occurred ~1000 years after initial tree island formation. Comparison of the timing of pollen assemblages with other proxy records indicates that tree island expansion is related to regional and global aridity correlated with southward migration of the Intertropical Convergence Zone. Local fire associated with droughts may also have influenced tree island expansion. This work suggests that Native American occupation did not significantly influence tree island formation and that the most important factors governing tree island expansion are extreme hydrologic events due to droughts and intense twentieth century water management.

  2. Occurrence and distribution of monomethylalkanes in the freshwater wetland ecosystem of the Florida Everglades.

    PubMed

    He, Ding; Simoneit, Bernd R T; Jara, Blanca; Jaffé, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    A series of mono-methylalkanes (MMAs) with carbon numbers from C10 to C23 and C29 were detected in freshwater wetlands of the Everglades. A decrease in concentration and molecular complexity was observed in the order from periphyton and floc, to surface soil and deeper soil horizons. These compounds were present in varying amounts up to 27 μg gdw(-1) in periphyton, 74 μg gdw(-1) in floc, 1.8 μg gdw(-1) in surface soil, <0.03 μg gdw(-1) in deeper soils (12-15 cm). A total of 46 MMAs, including three iso and three anteiso-alkanes, were identified. Compound specific carbon isotopes values were determined for some dominant MMAs, and suggest that they originate from microbial sources, including cyanobacteria. Potential decarboxylation from fatty acids could also potentially contribute to the MMAs detected. Early diagenetic degradation was suggested to affect the accumulation of MMAs in soils and further studies are needed to address their applications as biomarkers.

  3. Measuring Taylor Slough boundary and internal flows, Everglades National Park, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tillis, G.M.

    2001-01-01

    Four intensive data-collection efforts, intended to represent the spectrum of precipitation events and associated flow conditions, were conducted during 1997 and 1998 in the Taylor Slough Basin, Everglades National Park. Flow velocities were measured by newly developed, portable Acoustic Doppler Velocity meters along three transects bisecting the Taylor Slough Basin from east to west, roughly perpendicular to the centerline axis of the slough as well as a fourth transect along the slough's axis. These meters provided the required levels of accuracy in flow-velocity measurements while enabling the rapid collection of multiple time series of flow data at remote sites. Concurrently, flow measurements were made along bordering road culverts and under L-31W and Taylor Slough bridges. Flows across the study area's boundaries provided net flow of water into the system and transect measurements provided flow data within the basin. Collected data are available through the World Wide Web (http://sofia.usgs.gov/projects/flow_velocity/). The high-water and low-water events corresponded with the highest and lowest flow velocities, respectively. The July 1998 data had lower than expected flow velocities and, in some cases, strong winds reversed flow direction.

  4. Diel variability of mercury phase and species distributions in the Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krabbenhoft, D.P.; Hurley, J.P.; Olson, M.L.; Cleckner, L.B.

    1998-01-01

    Preliminary studies of mercury (Hg) cycling in the Everglades revealed that dissolved gaseous mercury (DGM), total mercury (Hg(T)), and reactive mercury (Hg(R)) show reproducible, diel trends. Peak water-column DGM concentrations were observed on or about noon, with a 3 to 7 fold increase over night-time concentrations. Production of DGM appears to cease during dark periods, with nearly constant water column concentrations that were at or near saturation with respect to the overlying air. A simple mass balance shows that the flux of Hg to the atmosphere from diel DGM production and evasion represents about 10% of the annual input from atmospheric deposition. Production of DGM is likely the result of an indirect photolysis reaction that involves the production of reductive species and/or reduction by electron transfer. Diel variability in Hg(T) and Hg(R) appears to be controlled by two factors: inputs from rainfall and photolytic sorption/desorption processes. A possible mechanism involves photolysis of chromophores on the surface of a solid substrate (e.g., the periphyton mat) giving rise to destabilization of sorbed mercury and net desorption during daylight. At night, the sorption reactions predominate and the water-column Hg(T) decreases. Methylmercury (MeHg) also showed diel trends in concentration but were not clearly linked to the solar cycle or rainfall at the study site.

  5. How Does the Burial Rate of Soil Organic Matter Relate to Salinity and Productivity in the Coastal Everglades?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breithaupt, J. L.; Smoak, J. M.; Sanders, C. J.; Troxler, T.

    2016-02-01

    Sea level rise (SLR) produces different types and magnitudes of change spatially within a coastal wetland. Differences in the coastal Everglades include inundation (frequency, duration & depth), salinity and phosphorous availability. Each of these affect mangrove productivity and biogeochemical cycling. To address how accelerated SLR will change the organic carbon (OC) burial rate of a wetland ecosystem it is first necessary to understand the changes at the site level throughout the ecosystem. The objective of this research is to compare site level burial rates in relation to ecosystem gradients in salinity, nutrient availability, and plant productivity in the coastal Everglades. We examined the 210Pb record of soil accumulation rates of OC, total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorous (TP), and calcium carbonate. Organic C and TN burial rates exhibit relatively small spatial variability over the 100-year timespan. The exception to this is evident in three cores near the oligohaline ecotone where both OC and TN rates decrease sharply compared to the rest of the region. These locations have seen increasing surface and groundwater salinities in the past decade, and our findings suggest an early form of "peat collapse" may be discernible in the soil core record. In contrast to OC and TN, there is substantial spatial variability in the burial rates of TP, with downstream rates that are 11 times higher than those at the oligohaline ecotone. These burial rates are highly correlated with those of CaCO3 whose provision via storm surge has been well documented, and is a driver of the ecosystem gradient in mangrove productivity. When stated as a fraction of net primary production, there are significant differences in OC burial efficiency throughout the ecosystem. The least efficient sites are at the oligohaline ecotone followed by the downstream sites. Mid-stream sites, that have theoretically experienced the least amount of SLR change in the past century, are the most efficient.

  6. South Florida Coastal Sediment Ecological Risk Assessment.

    PubMed

    Julian, Paul

    2015-08-01

    This study evaluated the degree of sediment contamination in several South Florida estuaries. During the 2010 National Condition Assessment, Florida Fish and Wildlife Research Institute collected water column, sediment and biotic data from estuaries across the entire state of Florida. Sediments were analyzed for arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, zinc and total polychlorinated biphenyls and were compared relative to empirically derived sediment quality guidelines. As a result of this data collection and assessment effort, it was determined that the degree of contamination with respect to sediment was low for all southern Florida estuaries assessed, except the Miami River which was determined to be considerably contaminated. However only one monitoring location was used to assess the Miami River, and as such should be viewed with caution. A low degree of contamination was determined for Biscayne Bay sediments, possibly indicating a recovery from its previously reported higher contaminant level.

  7. Definition and interpretation of Holocene shorelines in the south Atlantic coastal zone, southeast Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Finkl, C.W. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    There is a wide variety of contemporary shorelines in southeastern Florida. Distinctive types range from rocky platforms, tidal flats, mangroves and marshes, to sand and gravel beaches. Because the natural sequence of shorelines in the urban coastal corridor from Miami to Palm Beach is partly obscured by dredge and fill operations initiated in the early 1920's, some coastal segments are subject to re-interpretation. Analysis of early aerial photographs, old coastal charts and bore log data indicates a much more complicated sequence of Recent coastlines than is generally appreciated. Before development, much of the coastal zone contained complicated networks of fresh-water marshes and lakes with lagoons, bays, and sounds lying behind extensively developed spits. The larger spits prograded southward (downdrift) forming long coastwise sounds that eventually led into fresh-water marshes such as Lake Mabel (now Port Everglades). When new inlets were cut to link the ICW with the sea, the spits were beheaded to form what are now called barrier islands. After subsequent inlet stabilization with inadequate sand bypassing, some spits became welded to the shore and others eroded away. Extension of boundaries marking the back sides of barriers landward into the marshes, to the position of the ICW, is not only an erroneous definition of barrier island width but dangerous for emergency (storm surge) planning because the barriers were never this wide. Beach ridge plains, ridge and swale topography, dune-covered limestone ridges, and some fossil reefs such as Key Biscayne have in addition been mistakenly identified as barrier islands.

  8. Early diagenesis of organic matter in a Sawgrass peat from the Everglades, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orem, W.H.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1987-01-01

    The transformation of plant biopolymers to humic substances in peats during early diagenesis is a critical but poorly understood step in the formation of coal. This paper presents results concerning the structural interrelationships among various fractions of the organic matter in peat and the dissolved organic matter in the pore water from a site in The Everglades, relying primarily on elemental analysis and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance for structural elucidation. Our goal was to obtaine some insight into the sequence of steps involved in the formation of humic substances. Results show that the major change occurring in the whole peat during diagenesis is loss of carbohydrates. The components of the peat which are more resistant to microbial degradation become concentrated in the humin fraction. This resistant fraction of the organic matter includes aliphatic and aromatic components. The aromatic components are thought to be derived from lignin while the aliphatic moieties may represent decomposed algal remains. The carbohydrates lost from the whole peat appear to be concentrated in the fulvic acids and the dissolved organic matter in the pore water. The humic acids consist predominantly of aromatic and aliphatic structures, and may represent partially degraded lignin-like structures and aliphatic compounds from algae. The data presented here suggest that humic and fulvic acids are the partially degraded fractions of the peat while the humin contains the resistant or preserved portion of the organic matter. The proposition that humic substances are formed by the condensation of amino acids and sugars is not supported by the results of this study. ?? 1987.

  9. Changing land- and seascape environments at Cape Sable, a coastal wetland complex in south florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlaswinkel, B.; Wanless, H.; Rankey, E.

    2003-04-01

    Cape Sable, a large coastal wetland complex at the southern tip of the Florida peninsula (U.S.), is currently undergoing dramatic changes in land- and seascape in response to historical sea level rise. The rise in sea level is progressively inundating a low marl ridge that has separated interior freshwater marshes of the Everglades from marine waters, leading to rapid widening of both natural tidal creeks and constructed canals. The linear rate of widening (0.7 to 1.2 meter per year since 1922) reflects a system out of equilibrium, in which the channels are seeking to accommodate the volume of water in the tidal prism. Rising sea level has enlarged the tidal prism by expanding the intertidal zone into former low-lying uplands. Opening of the channels has resulted in the creation and erosive widening of secondary channels into adjacent wetlands, further enlarging the tidal prism and tendency to widening. In the vicinity of some tidal inlets, the shoreline has eroded over 310 meters (since 1922; an overall rate of 4.6 m/yr), although erosion occur in steps in response to hurricanes (category 5 hurricanes in 1935, 1960 and 1992). In addition to changing channel morphology and beach erosion, rising sea level has shifted the mangrove/ freshwater marsh ecotone boundary inland significantly. Continued sea-level rise will inundate the marl ridge and accelerate erosion and breakup of the Cape Sable beach shoreline. The coastal red mangrove wetland could possibly keep pace with accelerated sea level rise, but hurricane setbacks negate this effect in south Florida. Category 4 and 5 hurricanes devastate the red mangrove forests and set into motion a phase of root-peat substrate decay and subsidence which has caused stepwise loss of both coastal and interior forests during the past 70 years of rapidly rising sea level. Changes in the coastal wetland environments of south Florida, in which critical habitats are imminently threatened, are driven by nonlinear processes that

  10. Methane Dynamics in two South Florida Mangrove Estuaries: Water-Air Fluxes and Export to the Coastal Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, D. T.; Reid, M. C.; Ferron Smith, S.

    2016-02-01

    Mangroves and other coastal wetland ecosystems are among the most carbon-rich ecosystems in the world (Donato et al., 2011). An important uncertainty in the carbon balances of these systems is the lateral transport of methane (CH4), an important greenhouse gas, from the pore waters of vegetated zones to the estuarine water column and subsequent flux to the atmosphere and/or transport to the coastal ocean. In this study we report longitudinal distributions of dissolved CH4 in two rivers of a mangrove-dominated estuary in South Florida over five consecutive days, and determine air-water fluxes of CH4, and CH4 export to the coastal ocean. Mean near-surface CH4 concentrations in the Shark and Harney Rivers were 110±52 and 167±45 nM, respectively, and the CH4 source was a combination of lateral mangrove inputs and export from upstream freshwater wetlands. Integrated air-water CH4 fluxes from the Shark and Harney were determined to be 9.24±0.7 and 14.0±1.0 µmol m-2 h-1, respectively. Methane fluxes to the atmosphere and the coastal ocean will be discussed within the context of the overall carbon budget of the coastal Everglades mangrove ecosystem. ReferencesD.C. Donato et al., (2011). Mangroves among the most carbon-rich forests in the tropics. Nature Geoscience 4, 293-297.

  11. Sawgrass Density, Biomass, and Leaf Area Index: A Flume Study in Support of Research on Wind Sheltering Effects in the Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rybicki, Nancy B.; Reel, Justin T.; Ruhl, Henry A.; Gammon, Patricia T.; Carter, Virginia; Lee, Jonathan K.

    2000-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is studying the wind sheltering effects of vegetation in the Florida Everglades. In order to test both the flow resistance and wind sheltering effects of sawgrass, uniform dense stands of sawgrass were grown in a tilting flume at Stennis Space Center, Mississippi. In June, 1997, one end of the flume was covered with a wind cowling with a removable top, and a series of experiments were conducted between June, 1997 and July, 1998. During each set of experiments, the sawgrass was sampled for vegetative characteristics, biomass, and leaf area index. The results of the analyses of the vegetation samples are summarized in a series of appendixes.

  12. Summary of data from onsite and laboratory analyses of surface water and marsh porewater from South Florida Water Management District Water Conservation Areas, the Everglades, South Florida, March 1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, Michael M.; Gunther, Charmaine D.

    2012-01-01

    This report presents results of chemical analysis for samples collected during March, 1995, as part of a study to quantify the interaction of aquatic organic material (referred to here as dissolved organic carbon with dissolved metal ions). The work was done in conjunction with the South Florida Water Management District, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Geological Survey South Florida Ecosystems Initiative, and the South Florida National Water Quality Assessment Study Unit. Samples were collected from surface canals and from marsh sites. Results are based on onsite and laboratory measurements for 27 samples collected at 10 locations. The data file contains sample description, dissolved organic carbon concentration and specific ultraviolet absorbance, and additional analytical data for samples collected at several sites in the Water Conservation Areas, the Everglades, south Florida.

  13. Photo-reactivity of natural dissolved organic matter from fresh to marine waters in the Florida Everglades, USA.

    PubMed

    Timko, Stephen A; Romera-Castillo, Cristina; Jaffé, Rudolf; Cooper, William J

    2014-04-01

    Natural dissolved organic matter (DOM) is the major absorber of sunlight in most natural waters and a critical component of carbon cycling in aquatic systems. The combined effect of light absorbance properties and related photo-production of reactive species are essential in determining the reactivity of DOM. Optical properties and in particular excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy combined with parallel factor analysis (EEM-PARAFAC) have been used increasingly to track sources and fate of DOM. Here we describe studies conducted in water from two estuarine systems in the Florida Everglades, with a salinity gradient of 2 to 37 and dissolved organic carbon concentrations from 19.3 to 5.74 mg C L(-1), aimed at assessing how the quantity and quality of DOM is coupled to the formation rates and steady-state concentrations of reactive species including singlet oxygen, hydroxyl radical, and the triplet excited state of DOM. These species were related to optical properties and PARAFAC components of the DOM. The formation rate and steady-state concentration of the carbonate radical was calculated in all samples. The data suggests that formation rates, particularly for singlet oxygen and hydroxyl radicals, are strongly coupled to the abundance of terrestrial humic-like substances. A decrease in singlet oxygen, hydroxyl radical, and carbonate radical formation rates and steady-state concentration along the estuarine salinity gradient was observed as the relative concentration of terrestrial humic-like DOM decreased due to mixing with microbial humic-like and protein-like DOM components, while the formation rate of triplet excited-state DOM did not change. Fluorescent DOM was also found to be more tightly coupled to reactive species generation than chromophoric DOM.

  14. Effect of nutrient enrichment on δ13CH4 and the methane production pathway in the Florida Everglades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, M. Elizabeth; Chanton, Jeffrey P.; Bae, Hee-Sung; Ogram, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    Water Conservation Area 2A in the Florida Everglades is characterized by a nutrient gradient with high levels in the north from agricultural runoff and more oligotrophic conditions in the southern interior. Based on laboratory incubations and field studies, we found that the relative importance of methane (CH4) production mechanisms shifted along this gradient, with a greater contribution due to hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis at higher nutrient levels. The relative contributions of hydrogenotrophic and acetoclastic methanogenesis were determined from laboratory experiments and verified with field results. In the lab the relative contributions of the two pathways were determined from the differences in CH4 production rates in soil collected from sites along the nutrient gradient that was incubated with and without an inhibitor of acetoclastic methanogenesis (methyl fluoride, CH3F). In the nutrient-poor soil, most of the CH4 was formed via acetate fermentation and only 25% came from hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. At the nutrient-impacted site CH4 was produced at fourfold higher rates and the proportion of CH4 produced via hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis increased to 50%. Isotopic fractionation factors for hydrogenotrophic and acetoclastic methanogenesis were calculated from the soil incubations and applied to δ13C-CO2 and δ13C-CH4 measured in pore water from the same transect. The trend of increased hydrogenotrophic relative to acetoclastic CH4 production along the nutrient-impacted gradient was mirrored in the field data, which produced similar results to the lab incubation work, with up to 23% of the CH4 produced from hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis at the nutrient-poor site and nearly half at the nutrient-impacted site.

  15. Syntrophs Dominate Sequences Associated with the Mercury Methylation-Related Gene hgcA in the Water Conservation Areas of the Florida Everglades

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Hee-Sung; Dierberg, Forrest E.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms and rates of mercury methylation in the Florida Everglades are of great concern because of potential adverse impacts on human and wildlife health through mercury accumulation in aquatic food webs. We developed a new PCR primer set targeting hgcA, a gene encoding a corrinoid protein essential for Hg methylation across broad phylogenetic boundaries, and used this primer set to study the distribution of hgcA sequences in soils collected from three sites along a gradient in sulfate and nutrient concentrations in the northern Everglades. The sequences obtained were distributed in diverse phyla, including Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi, Firmicutes, and Methanomicrobia; however, hgcA clone libraries from all sites were dominated by sequences clustering within the order Syntrophobacterales of the Deltaproteobacteria (49 to 65% of total sequences). dsrB mRNA sequences, representing active sulfate-reducing prokaryotes at the time of sampling, obtained from these sites were also dominated by Syntrophobacterales (75 to 89%). Laboratory incubations with soils taken from the site low in sulfate concentrations also suggested that Hg methylation activities were primarily mediated by members of the order Syntrophobacterales, with some contribution by methanogens, Chloroflexi, iron-reducing Geobacter, and non-sulfate-reducing Firmicutes inhabiting the sites. This suggests that prokaryotes distributed within clades defined by syntrophs are the predominant group controlling methylation of Hg in low-sulfate areas of the Everglades. Any strategy for managing mercury methylation in the Everglades should consider that net mercury methylation is not limited to the action of sulfate reduction. PMID:25107983

  16. Syntrophs dominate sequences associated with the mercury methylation-related gene hgcA in the water conservation areas of the Florida Everglades.

    PubMed

    Bae, Hee-Sung; Dierberg, Forrest E; Ogram, Andrew

    2014-10-01

    The mechanisms and rates of mercury methylation in the Florida Everglades are of great concern because of potential adverse impacts on human and wildlife health through mercury accumulation in aquatic food webs. We developed a new PCR primer set targeting hgcA, a gene encoding a corrinoid protein essential for Hg methylation across broad phylogenetic boundaries, and used this primer set to study the distribution of hgcA sequences in soils collected from three sites along a gradient in sulfate and nutrient concentrations in the northern Everglades. The sequences obtained were distributed in diverse phyla, including Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi, Firmicutes, and Methanomicrobia; however, hgcA clone libraries from all sites were dominated by sequences clustering within the order Syntrophobacterales of the Deltaproteobacteria (49 to 65% of total sequences). dsrB mRNA sequences, representing active sulfate-reducing prokaryotes at the time of sampling, obtained from these sites were also dominated by Syntrophobacterales (75 to 89%). Laboratory incubations with soils taken from the site low in sulfate concentrations also suggested that Hg methylation activities were primarily mediated by members of the order Syntrophobacterales, with some contribution by methanogens, Chloroflexi, iron-reducing Geobacter, and non-sulfate-reducing Firmicutes inhabiting the sites. This suggests that prokaryotes distributed within clades defined by syntrophs are the predominant group controlling methylation of Hg in low-sulfate areas of the Everglades. Any strategy for managing mercury methylation in the Everglades should consider that net mercury methylation is not limited to the action of sulfate reduction. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Diatom paleoecology Pass Key core 37, Everglades National Park, Florida Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pyle, Laura; Cooper, S.R.; Huvane, J.K.

    1998-01-01

    During the 20th century, there have been large-scale anthropogenic modifications to the South Florida ecosystem. The effects of these changes on Florida Bay and its biological communities are currently of political and scientific interest. This study is part of a larger effort to reconstruct the history of environmental changes in the bay, using paleoecological techniques. We are using diatom indicators preserved in Florida Bay sediments to infer long-term water quality, productivity, nutrient, and salinity changes. We are also obtaining information concerning the natural variability of the ecosystem. Diatoms are microscopic algae, the remains of which are generally well preserved in sediments, and their distributions are closely linked to water quality. Diatoms were extracted from a 70-cm sediment core collected from the Pass Key mudbank of Florida Bay by the U.S. Geological Survey. Between 300-500 diatom valves from each of 15 core samples were identified and counted. Estimates of absolute abundance, species richness, Shannon-Wiener diversity, and centric:pennate ratios were calculated for each sample that was counted. Information on the ecology of the diatom species is presented, and changes in diatom community composition are evaluated. Samples contained an average of four million diatom valves per gram of sediment. Major changes in the diatom community are evident down core. These include increases in the percent abundance of marine diatoms in the time period represented by the core, probably the result of increasing salinity at Pass Key. Benthic diatoms become less abundant in the top half of the core. This may be related to a number of factors including the die-off of sea grass beds or increased turbidity of the water column. Once the chronology of the Pass Key core 37 is established, these down-core changes can be related to historical events and compared with other indicators in the sedimentary record that are currently being investigated by U.S Geological

  18. Effects of mineralized artesian water on the fresh-water biota of Taylor Slough, Everglades National Park, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolipinski, Milton C.; Higer, Aaron L.

    1969-01-01

    The feasibility of using water from the Floridian aquifer during periods of drought to maintain water levels in the aquatic communities at the Royal Palm Visitor Center in Everglades National Park was tested.

  19. Preliminary paleontologic report on core 37 from Pass Key, Everglades National Park, Florida Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brewster-Wingard, G. L.; Ishman, S.E.; Waibel, N.J.; Willard, D.A.; Edwards, L.E.; Holmes, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Sediments from Pass Key core 37, in eastern Florida Bay (N 25.1478?, W 80.5745?) record a history of rapid sedimentation during this century. The lowest portion of the core contains benthic fauna indicative of relatively low salinities and sparse seagrass coverage. This period is followed by an increase in salinity and seagrass. In the middle portion of the core, a slight decrease in salinity and an increase in seagrass occur. These shifts in the benthic fauna correspond to a period when the terrestrial flora change, and an increase in dinocyst absolute abundance occurs, indicating changes in factors affecting the entire South Florida ecosystem. These changes may represent a period of increased terrestrial flushing, due to rainfall, water management practices or a combination of both. The benthic faunas in the upper portion of the core indicate an increase in salinity and seagrass density. This report is preliminary and has not been reviewed for conformity with U.S. Geological Survey editorial standards or with the North American Stratigraphic Code. Any use of trade, product, or firm names is for descriptive purposes only and does not imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

  20. Understanding the Everglades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houck, Carol; Fulcher, Donna

    This manual focuses upon natural resources issues and biophysical characteristics of the Everglades and adjacent southern Florida. Topics of the seven units of study are: animal life, ecosystems, geology, land use, plant life, recreation, and water management. Preceeding the activities in each unit is background information intended for both…

  1. Investigation of Coastal Hydrogeology Utilizing Geophysical and Geochemical Tools along the Broward County Coast, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reich, Christopher D.; Swarzenski, Peter W.; Greenwood, W. Jason; Wiese, Dana S.

    2008-01-01

    Geophysical (CHIRP, boomer, and continuous direct-current resistivity) and geochemical tracer studies (continuous and time-series 222Radon) were conducted along the Broward County coast from Port Everglades to Hillsboro Inlet, Florida. Simultaneous seismic, direct-current resistivity, and radon surveys in the coastal waters provided information to characterize the geologic framework and identify potential groundwater-discharge sites. Time-series radon at the Nova Southeastern University National Coral Reef Institute (NSU/NCRI) seawall indicated a very strong tidally modulated discharge of ground water with 222Rn activities ranging from 4 to 10 disintegrations per minute per liter depending on tidal stage. CHIRP seismic data provided very detailed bottom profiles (i.e., bathymetry); however, acoustic penetration was poor and resulted in no observed subsurface geologic structure. Boomer data, on the other hand, showed features that are indicative of karst, antecedent topography (buried reefs), and sand-filled troughs. Continuous resistivity profiling (CRP) data showed slight variability in the subsurface along the coast. Subtle changes in subsurface resistivity between nearshore (higher values) and offshore (lower values) profiles may indicate either a freshening of subsurface water nearshore or a change in sediment porosity or lithology. Further lithologic and hydrologic controls from sediment or rock cores or well data are needed to constrain the variability in CRP data.

  2. The Role of Created and Restored Wetlands in Mitigating N and P Pollutants in Agricultural Landscapes: Case Studies in the Florida Everglades, Mississippi-Ohio-Missouri Basin, and Laurentian Great Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsch, W. J.

    2016-12-01

    On a global scale, we have lost half of our original wetlands to our current extent of 8 to 12 million km2, with most of that loss in the 20th century. In the United States, we lost 50% of our wetlands by the beginning of the 1970s. I am proposing here a sizeable increase in our wetland resources for solving the diminishing wetland habitat problem, but with the strategic purpose of minimizing the excess phosphorus and nitrogen in our aquatic ecosystems, with the added benefit of sometimes sequesting carbon from the atmosphere, in our rural, urban, and coastal landscapes in a sustainable fashion. Examples include attempts to minimize phosphorus inflows to the Florida Everglades with wetlands to quite low concentrations and a proposal to restore parts of the Black Swamp in NW Ohio to minimize eutrophication of Lake Erie in the Laurentian Great Lakes. Nitrogen retention by wetlands and riparian forests in the Mississippi-Ohio-Missouri Basin, especially in Midwestern USA, has been proposed for 15 years as a solution and endorsed by the Federal government to solve the seasonal hypoxia in the northern portion of the Gulf of Mexico, but there has been little if any progress over those 15 years. Solutions to recycle the nutrients retained in the wetlands back to agriculture to decrease fertilizer use will be presented as a solution to the multiple problems of wetland habitat loss, downstream lake, reservoir, river, and coastal nutrient pollution, diminishing supplies of phosphorus fertilizer, and fertilizer costs.

  3. Time-Lapse Geophysical Measurements targeting Spatial and Temporal Variability in Biogenic Gas Production from Peat Soils in a Hydrologically Controlled Wetland in the Florida Everglades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, W. J.; Shahan, T.; Sharp, N.; Comas, X.

    2015-12-01

    Peat soils are known to release globally significant amounts of methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere. However, uncertainties still remain regarding the spatio-temporal distribution of gas accumulations and triggering mechanisms of gas releasing events. Furthermore, most research on peatland gas dynamics has traditionally been focused on high latitude peatlands. Therefore, understanding gas dynamics in low-latitude peatlands (e.g. the Florida Everglades) is key to global climate research. Recent studies in the Everglades have demonstrated that biogenic gas flux values may vary when considering different temporal and spatial scales of measurements. The work presented here targets spatial variability in gas production and release at the plot scale in an approximately 85 m2 area, and targets temporal variability with data collected during the spring months of two different years. This study is located in the Loxahatchee Impoundment Landscape Assessment (LILA), a hydrologically controlled, landscape scale (30 Ha) model of the Florida Everglades. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) has been used in the past to investigate biogenic gas dynamics in peat soils, and is used in this study to monitor changes of in situ gas storage. Each year, a grid of GPR profiles was collected to image changes in gas distribution in 2d on a weekly basis, and several flux chambers outfitted with time-lapse cameras captured high resolution (hourly) gas flux measurements inside the GPR grid. Combining these methods allows us to use a mass balance approach to estimate spatial variability in gas production rates, and capture temporal variability in gas flux rates.

  4. New Kinorhyncha from Florida coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herranz, María; Sánchez, Nuria; Pardos, Fernando; Higgins, Robert P.

    2014-03-01

    Four new species of Kinorhynchs are described from the West Atlantic coast off Fort Pierce, Florida, USA. They are the following: Antygomonas gwenae n. sp., Echinoderes riceae n. sp., Echinoderes adrianovi n. sp. and Pycnophyes norenburgi n. sp. All species were collected at the same locality called "20 miles station." Samples were processed for standard granulometric data, yielding an estimated average particle diameter of 250 μm. The diagnostic characters and the general morphology of the new species are discussed in depth as well as the diversity and distribution of Kinorhyncha in the area.

  5. Chemical Results of Laboratory Dry/Rewet Experiments Conducted on Wetland Soils from Two Sites in the Everglades, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orem, William H.

    2008-01-01

    Drought and fire are natural environmental factors that have historically impacted and shaped the Everglades ecosystem. For example, drought and fire help to maintain the existing ecosystem biotic assemblage by periodically eradicating invading flora not adapted to living with this normal aspect of Everglades' ecology. Flora native to the Everglades are adapted to withstand normal drought cycles and all but the most intense fire conditions that burn into the peat substrate. Remobilization of nutrients and other elements from wetland soil following drought/fire and rewetting may actually stimulate plant re-growth, assisting in the recovery of the ecosystem from these events, and play a role in maintaining the geochemical balance of the ecosystem. Although drought/fire cycles occur naturally in the Everglades' ecosystem, the frequency, intensity, and duration of these events have been altered by anthropogenic activities. The hydrology of the ecosystem has been changed by the construction of water management structures starting around 1900 and continuing through the 1970s. These structures include canals, levees, and pumping stations around Lake Okeechobee and within the Everglades. In addition, water management practices have preferentially moved water toward agricultural and urban areas and away from the Everglades during periods of low rainfall. One result of these practices has been more severe drought and fire cycles within the ecosystem compared to pre-development activity. A major goal of restoration efforts in the Everglades is to restore a more natural flow of water into the ecosystem to alleviate some of the extreme drought and fire conditions witnessed during the past several decades.

  6. CDOM Distribution and Dynamics in a Mangrove Ecosystem along the Shark River, Florida Everglades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrew, A. A.; del Castillo, C. E.

    2016-02-01

    Mangrove forests, a fraction of tropical forest, are in general a disproportionately important component in the global carbon cycle. Mangroves are highly productive, sequestering CO2 at rates higher than many other ecosystems, however more than half of this fixed carbon cannot be accounted for. Additionally, as they sit at the intersection of land and ocean, it's hypothesized that a large fraction of DOC transformations occur in these ecosystems and represent a major sink of terrigenous DOM. These factors highlight the importance of understanding mangrove environments in terms of DOM optical signals as well as reactivity upon light absorption. Here, we present the CDOM dynamics and distribution for a mangrove ecosystem in the Shark River, along the Southwest coast of Florida, part of the largest contiguous mangrove forest in North America. Station sampling of the study area occurred over 4 cruises, approximately one week in length: October 2014, March 2015, July 2015 and September 2015. Most of the stations were along the Shark River, with a smaller number in the vicinity of Tarpon bay and Harney River. Optical measurements of CDOM absorption and fluorescence, fluorescence quantum yields, DOC and spectral slope were obtained for over 70 stations in the study area. The spatial distribution of these optical properties are presented including their relation to salinity and tidal patterns in the study area. Additionally, we present the wavelength dependent quantum photoproduction efficiencies of DIC obtained via irradiation experiments of selective samples in the study area.

  7. Mapping of Florida's Coastal and Marine Resources: Setting Priorities Workshop

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robbins, Lisa; Wolfe, Steven; Raabe, Ellen

    2008-01-01

    The importance of mapping habitats and bioregions as a means to improve resource management has become increasingly clear. Large areas of the waters surrounding Florida are unmapped or incompletely mapped, possibly hindering proper management and good decisionmaking. Mapping of these ecosystems is among the top priorities identified by the Florida Oceans and Coastal Council in their Annual Science Research Plan. However, lack of prioritization among the coastal and marine areas and lack of coordination of agency efforts impede efficient, cost-effective mapping. A workshop on Mapping of Florida's Coastal and Marine Resources was sponsored by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP), and Southeastern Regional Partnership for Planning and Sustainability (SERPPAS). The workshop was held at the USGS Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC) in St. Petersburg, FL, on February 7-8, 2007. The workshop was designed to provide State, Federal, university, and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) the opportunity to discuss their existing data coverage and create a prioritization of areas for new mapping data in Florida. Specific goals of the workshop were multifold, including to: * provide information to agencies on state-of-the-art technology for collecting data; * inform participants of the ongoing mapping programs in waters off Florida; * present the mapping needs and priorities of the State and Federal agencies and entities operating in Florida; * work with State of Florida agencies to establish an overall priority for areas needing mapping; * initiate discussion of a unified classification of habitat and bioregions; * discuss and examine the need to standardize terminology and data collection/storage so that data, in particular habitat data, can be shared; 9 identify opportunities for partnering and leveraging mapping efforts among agencies and entities; * identify impediments and organizational gaps that hinder collection

  8. Everglades Restoration Critiqued

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    The monitoring and assessment plan for the $7.8-billion effort to restore the hydrologic regime of the remaining wetlands of Florida's Everglades needs to be strengthened, according to a 2 April study by a committee of the National Academy of Sciences. The evolving monitoring and assessment plan of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan is grounded in current scientific theory and practice of adaptive management, according to the report. However, the least-developed aspects of the management are feedback mechanisms to connect monitoring to planning and management, the report notes.

  9. El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) enhances CO2 exchange rates in freshwater Marsh ecosystems in the Florida everglades.

    PubMed

    Malone, Sparkle L; Staudhammer, Christina L; Oberbauer, Steven F; Olivas, Paulo; Ryan, Michael G; Schedlbauer, Jessica L; Loescher, Henry W; Starr, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    This research examines the relationships between El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), water level, precipitation patterns and carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange rates in the freshwater wetland ecosystems of the Florida Everglades. Data was obtained over a 5-year study period (2009-2013) from two freshwater marsh sites located in Everglades National Park that differ in hydrology. At the short-hydroperiod site (Taylor Slough; TS) and the long-hydroperiod site (Shark River Slough; SRS) fluctuations in precipitation patterns occurred with changes in ENSO phase, suggesting that extreme ENSO phases alter Everglades hydrology which is known to have a substantial influence on ecosystem carbon dynamics. Variations in both ENSO phase and annual net CO2 exchange rates co-occurred with changes in wet and dry season length and intensity. Combined with site-specific seasonality in CO2 exchanges rates, El Niño and La Niña phases magnified season intensity and CO2 exchange rates at both sites. At TS, net CO2 uptake rates were higher in the dry season, whereas SRS had greater rates of carbon sequestration during the wet season. As La Niña phases were concurrent with drought years and extended dry seasons, TS became a greater sink for CO2 on an annual basis (-11 to -110 g CO2 m-2 yr-1) compared to El Niño and neutral years (-5 to -43.5 g CO2 m-2 yr-1). SRS was a small source for CO2 annually (1.81 to 80 g CO2 m-2 yr-1) except in one exceptionally wet year that was associated with an El Niño phase (-16 g CO2 m-2 yr-1). Considering that future climate predictions suggest a higher frequency and intensity in El Niño and La Niña phases, these results indicate that changes in extreme ENSO phases will significantly alter CO2 dynamics in the Florida Everglades.

  10. El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) Enhances CO2 Exchange Rates in Freshwater Marsh Ecosystems in the Florida Everglades

    PubMed Central

    Malone, Sparkle L.; Staudhammer, Christina L.; Oberbauer, Steven F.; Olivas, Paulo; Ryan, Michael G.; Schedlbauer, Jessica L.; Loescher, Henry W.; Starr, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    This research examines the relationships between El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), water level, precipitation patterns and carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange rates in the freshwater wetland ecosystems of the Florida Everglades. Data was obtained over a 5-year study period (2009–2013) from two freshwater marsh sites located in Everglades National Park that differ in hydrology. At the short-hydroperiod site (Taylor Slough; TS) and the long-hydroperiod site (Shark River Slough; SRS) fluctuations in precipitation patterns occurred with changes in ENSO phase, suggesting that extreme ENSO phases alter Everglades hydrology which is known to have a substantial influence on ecosystem carbon dynamics. Variations in both ENSO phase and annual net CO2 exchange rates co-occurred with changes in wet and dry season length and intensity. Combined with site-specific seasonality in CO2 exchanges rates, El Niño and La Niña phases magnified season intensity and CO2 exchange rates at both sites. At TS, net CO2 uptake rates were higher in the dry season, whereas SRS had greater rates of carbon sequestration during the wet season. As La Niña phases were concurrent with drought years and extended dry seasons, TS became a greater sink for CO2 on an annual basis (−11 to −110 g CO2 m−2 yr−1) compared to El Niño and neutral years (−5 to −43.5 g CO2 m−2 yr−1). SRS was a small source for CO2 annually (1.81 to 80 g CO2 m−2 yr−1) except in one exceptionally wet year that was associated with an El Niño phase (−16 g CO2 m−2 yr−1). Considering that future climate predictions suggest a higher frequency and intensity in El Niño and La Niña phases, these results indicate that changes in extreme ENSO phases will significantly alter CO2 dynamics in the Florida Everglades. PMID:25521299

  11. Coastal geophysical data collected in 2016 nearshore Cape Canaveral, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buster, Noreen A.; Miselis, Jennifer L.; Okano, Shinobu; Gayes, Paul T.; Hill, Jenna C.

    2017-01-01

    Geophysical data including multibeam bathymetry and backscatter, side scan sonar, and chirp subbottom were collected by Coastal Carolina University (CCU) Center for Marine and Wetland Studies (CMWS), Conway, South Carolina, in June 2016 in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center (SPCMSC) in the nearshore environment of Cape Canaveral, Florida. The goal of the effort was to broadly characterize the geology of the shelf to identify spatial linkages with previously measured coastal change and bathymetric variability (https://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/ofr20151180). This USGS Data Release includes the: 1) processed elevation point data (xyz) and digital elevation model (DEM), 2) processed images of backscatter and side scan sonar (SSS), and 3) chirp subbottom profile data (segy and jpg). For further information regarding data collection and/or processing please see the metadata associated with this data release.

  12. Methylmercury photodegradation in surface water of the Florida Everglades: importance of dissolved organic matter-methylmercury complexation.

    PubMed

    Tai, Chao; Li, Yanbin; Yin, Yongguang; Scinto, Leonard J; Jiang, Guibin; Cai, Yong

    2014-07-01

    Photodegradation is the major pathway of methylmercury (MeHg) degradation in many surface waters. However, the mechanism of MeHg photodegradation is still not completely understood. Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is expected to play a critical role in MeHg photodegradation. By using several techniques, including N2/O2 purging and the addition of stable isotope (Me(201)Hg), scavengers, competing ligands, and a singlet oxygen ((1)O2) generator, the role played by MeHg-DOM complexation in MeHg photodegradation of Everglades surface water was investigated. DOM appeared to be involved in MeHg photodegradation via the formation MeHg-DOM complexes based on three findings: (1) MeHg was quickly photodegraded in solutions containing DOM extracts; (2) degradation of MeHg did not occur in deionized water; and (3) addition of competing complexation reagents (dithiothreitol-DTT) dramatically prohibited the photodegradation of MeHg in Everglades water. Further experiments indicated that free radicals/reactive oxygen species, including hydroxyl radical (·OH), (1)O2, triplet excited state of DOM ((3)DOM*), and hydrated electron (e(-)aq), played a minor role in MeHg photodegradation in Everglades water, based on the results of scavenger addition, (1)O2 generator addition and N2/O2 purging. A pathway, involving direct photodegradation of MeHg-DOM complexes via intramolecular electron transfer, is proposed as the dominant mechanism for MeHg photodegradation in Everglades water.

  13. Interaction between ground water and surface water in Taylor Slough and vicinity, Everglades National Park, South Florida; study methods and appendixes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harvey, Judson W.; Jackson, J.M.; Mooney, R.H.; Choi, Jungyill

    2000-01-01

    The data presented in this report are products of an investigation that quantified interactions between ground water and surface water in Taylor Slough in Everglades National Park. Determining the extent of hydrologic interactions between wetland surface water and ground water in Taylor Slough is important because the balance of freshwater flow in the lower part of the Slough is uncertain. Although freshwater flows through Taylor Slough are quite small in comparison to Shark Slough (the larger of the two major sloughs in Everglades National Park), flows through Taylor Slough are especially important to the ecology of estuarine mangrove embayments of northeastern Florida Bay. Also, wetland and ground- water interactions must be quantified if their role in affecting water quality is to be determined. In order to define basic hydrologic characteristics of the wetland, depth of wetland peat was mapped, and hydraulic conductivity and vertical hydraulic gradients in peat were determined. During specific time periods representing both wet and dry conditions in the area, the distribution of major ions, nutrients, and water stable isotopes throughout the slough were determined. The purpose of chemical measurements was to identify an environmental tracer could be used to quantify ground-water discharge.

  14. Hurricane Properties for KSC and Mid-Florida Coastal Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Dale L.; Rawlins, Michael A.; Kross, Dennis A.

    2000-01-01

    Hurricane information and climatologies are needed at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Florida for launch operational planning purposes during the late summer and early fall Atlantic hurricane season. Also these results are needed to be used in estimating the potential magnitudes of hurricane and tropical storm impact on coastal Florida sites when passing within 50, 100 and 400 nm of that site. Roll-backs of the Space Shuttle and other launch vehicles, on pad, are very costly when a tropical storm approaches. A decision for the vehicle to roll-back or ride-out needs to be made. Therefore the historical Atlantic basin hurricane climatological properties were generated to be used for operational planning purposes and in the estimation of potential damage to launch vehicles, supporting equipment, buildings, etc.. The historical 1885-1998 Atlantic basin hurricane data were compiled and analyzed with respect to the coastal Florida site of KSC. Statistical information generated includes hurricane and tropical storm probabilities for path, maximum wind, and lowest pressure, presented for the areas within 50, 100 and 400 nm of KSC. These statistics are then compared to similar parametric statistics for the entire Atlantic basin.

  15. Herpetofaunal inventories of the National Parks of South Florida and the Caribbean: Volume I. Everglades National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rice, Kenneth G.; Waddle, J. Hardin; Crockett, Marquette E.; Jeffery, Brian M.; Percival, H. Frankin

    2004-01-01

    Amphibian declines and extinctions have been documented around the world, often in protected natural areas. Concern for this alarming trend has prompted the U.S. Geological Survey and the National Park Service to document all species of amphibians that occur within U.S. National Parks and to search for any signs that amphibians may be declining. This study, an inventory of amphibian species in Everglades National Park, was conducted during 2000 to 2003. The goals of the project were to create a georeferenced inventory of amphibian species, use new analytical techniques to estimate proportion of sites occupied by each species, look for any signs of amphibian decline (missing species, disease, die-offs, etc.), and to establish a protocol that could be used for future monitoring efforts. Several sampling methods were used to accomplish all of these goals. Visual encounter surveys and anuran vocalization surveys were conducted in all habitats throughout the park to estimate the proportion of sites or proportion of area occupied (PAO) by each amphibian species in each habitat. Opportunistic collections, as well as some drift fence and aquatic funnel trap data were used to augment the visual encounter methods for highly aquatic or cryptic species. A total of 562 visits to 118 sites were conducted for standard sampling alone, and 1788 individual amphibians and 413 reptiles were encountered. Data analysis was done in program PRESENCE to provide PAO estimates for each of the anuran species. All but one of the amphibian species thought to occur in Everglades National Park was detected during this project. That species, the Everglades dwarf siren (Pseudobranchus axanthus belli), is especially cryptic and probably geographically limited in its range in Everglades National Park. The other three species of salamanders and all of the anurans in the park were sampled adequately using standard herpetological sampling methods. PAO estimates were produced for each species of anuran

  16. Herpetofaunal Inventories of the National Parks of South Florida and the Caribbean: Volume I. Everglades National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rice, Kenneth G.; Waddle, J. Hardin; Crockett, Marquette E.; Jeffery, Brian M.; Percival, H. Frankin

    2004-01-01

    Amphibian declines and extinctions have been documented around the world, often in protected natural areas. Concern for this alarming trend has prompted the U.S. Geological Survey and the National Park Service to document all species of amphibians that occur within U.S. National Parks and to search for any signs that amphibians may be declining. This study, an inventory of amphibian species in Everglades National Park, was conducted during 2000 to 2003. The goals of the project were to create a georeferenced inventory of amphibian species, use new analytical techniques to estimate proportion of sites occupied by each species, look for any signs of amphibian decline (missing species, disease, die-offs, etc.), and to establish a protocol that could be used for future monitoring efforts. Several sampling methods were used to accomplish all of these goals. Visual encounter surveys and anuran vocalization surveys were conducted in all habitats throughout the park to estimate the proportion of sites or proportion of area occupied (PAO) by each amphibian species in each habitat. Opportunistic collections, as well as some drift fence and aquatic funnel trap data were used to augment the visual encounter methods for highly aquatic or cryptic species. A total of 562 visits to 118 sites were conducted for standard sampling alone, and 1788 individual amphibians and 413 reptiles were encountered. Data analysis was done in program PRESENCE to provide PAO estimates for each of the anuran species. All but one of the amphibian species thought to occur in Everglades National Park was detected during this project. That species, the Everglades dwarf siren (Pseudobranchus axanthus belli), is especially cryptic and probably geographically limited in its range in Everglades National Park. The other three species of salamanders and all of the anurans in the park were sampled adequately using standard herpetological sampling methods. PAO estimates were produced for each species of anuran

  17. Dynamics of marine bacterial community diversity of the coastal waters of the reefs, inlets, and wastewater outfalls of southeast Florida.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Alexandra M; Fleisher, Jay; Sinigalliano, Christopher; White, James R; Lopez, Jose V

    2015-06-01

    Coastal waters adjacent to populated southeast Florida possess different habitats (reefs, oceanic inlets, sewage outfalls) that may affect the composition of their inherent microbiomes. To determine variation according to site, season, and depth, over the course of 1 year, we characterized the bacterioplankton communities within 38 nearshore seawater samples derived from the Florida Area Coastal Environment (FACE) water quality survey. Six distinct coastal locales were profiled - the Port Everglades and Hillsboro Inlets, Hollywood and Broward wastewater outfalls, and associated reef sites using culture-independent, high-throughput pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA V4 region. More than 227,000 sequences helped describe longitudinal taxonomic profiles of marine bacteria and archaea. There were 4447 unique operational taxonomic units (OTUs) identified with a mean OTU count of 5986 OTUs across all sites. Bacterial taxa varied significantly by season and by site using weighted and unweighted Unifrac, but depth was only supported by weighted Unifrac, suggesting a change due to presence/absence of certain OTUs. Abundant microbial taxa across all samples included Synechococcus, Pelagibacteraceae, Bacteroidetes, and various Proteobacteria. Unifrac analysis confirmed significant differences at inlet sites relative to reef and outfalls. Inlet-based bacterioplankton significantly differed in greater abundances of Rhodobacteraceae and Cryomorphaceae, and depletion of SAR406 sequences. This study also found higher counts of Firmicutes, Chloroflexi, and wastewater associated SBR1093 bacteria at the outfall and reef sites compared to inlet sites. This study profiles local bacterioplankton populations in a much broader context, beyond culturing and quantitative PCR, and expands upon the work completed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration FACE program. © 2015 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Dynamics of marine bacterial community diversity of the coastal waters of the reefs, inlets, and wastewater outfalls of southeast Florida

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Alexandra M; Fleisher, Jay; Sinigalliano, Christopher; White, James R; Lopez, Jose V

    2015-01-01

    Coastal waters adjacent to populated southeast Florida possess different habitats (reefs, oceanic inlets, sewage outfalls) that may affect the composition of their inherent microbiomes. To determine variation according to site, season, and depth, over the course of 1 year, we characterized the bacterioplankton communities within 38 nearshore seawater samples derived from the Florida Area Coastal Environment (FACE) water quality survey. Six distinct coastal locales were profiled – the Port Everglades and Hillsboro Inlets, Hollywood and Broward wastewater outfalls, and associated reef sites using culture-independent, high-throughput pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA V4 region. More than 227,000 sequences helped describe longitudinal taxonomic profiles of marine bacteria and archaea. There were 4447 unique operational taxonomic units (OTUs) identified with a mean OTU count of 5986 OTUs across all sites. Bacterial taxa varied significantly by season and by site using weighted and unweighted Unifrac, but depth was only supported by weighted Unifrac, suggesting a change due to presence/absence of certain OTUs. Abundant microbial taxa across all samples included Synechococcus, Pelagibacteraceae, Bacteroidetes, and various Proteobacteria. Unifrac analysis confirmed significant differences at inlet sites relative to reef and outfalls. Inlet-based bacterioplankton significantly differed in greater abundances of Rhodobacteraceae and Cryomorphaceae, and depletion of SAR406 sequences. This study also found higher counts of Firmicutes, Chloroflexi, and wastewater associated SBR1093 bacteria at the outfall and reef sites compared to inlet sites. This study profiles local bacterioplankton populations in a much broader context, beyond culturing and quantitative PCR, and expands upon the work completed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration FACE program. PMID:25740409

  19. 77 FR 74923 - Water Quality Standards for the State of Florida's Estuaries, Coastal Waters, and South Florida...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-18

    ... proposing numeric water quality criteria to protect ecological systems, aquatic life, and human health from... December 18, 2012 Part II Environmental Protection Agency 40 CFR Part 131 Water Quality Standards for the State of Florida's Estuaries, Coastal Waters, and South Florida Inland Flowing Waters; Water Quality...

  20. Use of 234U and 238U isotopes to identify fertilizer-derived uranium in the Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zielinski, R.A.; Simmons, K.R.; Orem, W.H.

    2000-01-01

    Surface water and peat in the northern Everglades have very low natural concentrations of U and are therefore sensitive to the addition of small amounts of U from anthropogenic sources such as fertilizer. Peat samples collected along a nutrient gradient in the northern Everglades have unusually high concentrations of U (> 1 ??g/g, dry basis) and also have a distinctive 234U/238U activity ratio (AR). AR values for U-enriched peat fall in the narrow range of AR values for commercial phosphate fertilizer (1.00 ??0.05) In contrast, AR values for low-U peat from background sites exceed 1.05. The spatial distribution of anomalous U concentration, and of fertilizer-like AR values in peat, parallel a previously documented pattern of P enrichment These results strongly suggest that some of the U in nutrient-impacted peatlands is fertilizer-derived. Agricultural drainage water sampled in the northern Everglades has high concentrations of dissolved U (0.3-2.4 ??g/1) compared to surface water from background sites ( 1.05). Synoptic sampling of surface water along drainage canals indicate that Lake Okeechobee, and some drainage from agricultural fields, are sources of dissolved U, whereas wetlands farther downstream act as sinks for U. Historically cultivated agricultural soft has only a marginally elevated (+0.2 ??g/g) average concentration of U compared to nearby uncultivated soil and incorporates only 20% of the U from an aqueous solution that was slurried with the soil. In contrast, a similar experiment with fresh Everglades peat indicated uptake of 90% of the added U. These experiments support the proposed removal of U from agricultural fields and concentration of U in downstream peatlands. The methodology of this study can be used to describe the behavior of fertilizer-derived U in other low-U environments.

  1. Recent cattail expansion and possible relationships to water management: changes in Upper Taylor Slough (Everglades National Park, Florida, USA).

    PubMed

    Surratt, Donatto; Shinde, Dilip; Aumen, Nick

    2012-03-01

    Recent appearance of cattail (Typha domingensis) within a southern Everglades slough-Upper Taylor Slough (Everglades National Park)-suggests ecosystem eutrophication. We analyze water quality, nutrient enrichment, and water management operations as potential drivers of eutrophication in Upper Taylor Slough. Further, we attempt to determine why surface water phosphorus, a parameter used commonly to monitor ecosystem health in the Everglades, did not serve as an early warning for eutrophication, which has broader implication for other restoration efforts. We found that surface water total phosphorus concentrations generally were below a 0.01 mg L(-1) threshold determined to cause imbalances in flora and fauna, suggesting no ecosystem eutrophication. However, assessment of nutrient loads and loading rates suggest Upper Taylor Slough has experienced eutrophication and that continued total phosphorus loading through a point-source discharge was a major driver. These nutrient loads, combined with increases in hydroperiods, led to the expansion of cattail in Upper Taylor Slough. We recommend other metrics, such as nutrient loads, periphyton and arthropod community shifts, and sediment core analyses, for assessing ecosystem health. Monitoring surface water alone is not enough to indicate ecosystem stress.

  2. Recent Cattail Expansion and Possible Relationships to Water Management: Changes in Upper Taylor Slough (Everglades National Park, Florida, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surratt, Donatto; Shinde, Dilip; Aumen, Nick

    2012-03-01

    Recent appearance of cattail ( Typha domingensis) within a southern Everglades slough—Upper Taylor Slough (Everglades National Park)—suggests ecosystem eutrophication. We analyze water quality, nutrient enrichment, and water management operations as potential drivers of eutrophication in Upper Taylor Slough. Further, we attempt to determine why surface water phosphorus, a parameter used commonly to monitor ecosystem health in the Everglades, did not serve as an early warning for eutrophication, which has broader implication for other restoration efforts. We found that surface water total phosphorus concentrations generally were below a 0.01 mg L-1 threshold determined to cause imbalances in flora and fauna, suggesting no ecosystem eutrophication. However, assessment of nutrient loads and loading rates suggest Upper Taylor Slough has experienced eutrophication and that continued total phosphorus loading through a point-source discharge was a major driver. These nutrient loads, combined with increases in hydroperiods, led to the expansion of cattail in Upper Taylor Slough. We recommend other metrics, such as nutrient loads, periphyton and arthropod community shifts, and sediment core analyses, for assessing ecosystem health. Monitoring surface water alone is not enough to indicate ecosystem stress.

  3. 76 FR 28130 - Coastal Bank, Cocoa Beach, Florida; Notice of Appointment of Receiver

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Office of Thrift Supervision Coastal Bank, Cocoa Beach, Florida; Notice of Appointment of Receiver Notice... sole Receiver for Coastal Bank, Cocoa Beach, Florida, (OTS No. 15445) on May 6, 2011. Dated: May 10...

  4. Predicting future mangrove forest migration in the Everglades under rising sea level

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doyle, Thomas W.

    2003-01-01

    Mangroves are highly productive ecosystems that provide valued habitat for fish and shorebirds. Mangrove forests are universally composed of relatively few tree species and a single overstory strata. Three species of true mangroves are common to intertidal zones of the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico Coast, namely, black mangrove (Avicennia germinans), white mangrove (Laguncularia racemosa), and red mangrove (Rhizophora mangle). Mangrove forests occupy intertidal settings of the coastal margin of the Everglades along the southwest tip of the Florida peninsula (fig. 1).

  5. Water quality in the Georgia-Florida coastal plain, Georgia and Florida, 1992-96

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berndt, Marian P.; Hatzell, Hilda H.; Crandall, Christy A.; Turtora, Michael; Pittman, John R.; Oaksford, Edward T.

    1998-01-01

    This report is intended to summarize major findings that emerged between 1992 and 1995 from the water-quality assessment of the Georgia-Florida Coastal Plain Study Unit and to relate these findings to water-quality issues of regional and national concern. The information is primarily intended for those who are involved in water-resource management. Yet, the information contained here may also interest those who simply wish to know more about the quality of water in the rivers and aquifers in the area where they live.

  6. Development of a Long-term Sampling Network to Monitor Restoration Success in the Southwest Coastal Everglades: Vegetation, Hydrology, and Sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Thomas J.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction and History Hurricane Andrew, a Category 5 storm, crossed the southern Florida peninsula on the morning of August 24, 1992 (Fig. 1). Following the storm, the National Park Service conducted an environmental damage assessment to gauge the storm's impacts on the natural resources of south Florida Park Service holdings (Pimm et al., 1994). Although hurricanes have impacted Park Service lands such as the Everglades in the past (Houston and Powell, 2003), no systematic, permanent sampling scheme has been established to monitor long-term recovery (or lack thereof) following disturbance. In October 1992, vegetation monitoring plots were established in heavily damaged areas of mangrove forest on the southwest coast of the Everlgades, along the Lostmans and Broad Rivers (Smith et al., 1994, see Fig. 2). As the permanent plot network was being established, funding was awarded for the South Florida Global Climate Change project (SOFL-GCC). This led to the establishment of a network of hydrological monitoring stations (Anderson and Smith, 2004). Finally, sediment elevation tables (SETs) were installed at many locations. SETs provide the means to measure very small changes (2 mm) in the sediment surface elevation accurately over time (Cahoon et al., 2002). We also set up marker horizons to measure accretion of sediment at each site (Smith and Cahoon, 2003). Sampling sites were located along three transects extending from upstream freshwater wetlands to downstream saltwater wetlands along the Shark, Lostmans and Chatham Rivers in Everglades National Park (Fig. 2). While we were developing our sampling network for basic scientific research needs, concern mounted over the health of the Greater Everglades Ecosystem and in particular over the influence of decreased freshwater flows (Smith et al., 1989). Ecosystem restoration planning was begun, resulting in the multi-agency, $8 billion Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP). Our co-located sampling networks

  7. Towards understanding the impact of floating aquatic vegetation on farm phosphorus loads in the Everglades Agricultural Area, Florida, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhadha, J. H.; Daroub, S. H.; Lang, T. A.; Josan, M. S.; Gomez, S. M.

    2011-12-01

    For decades water from Lake Okeechobee is released into the Everglades Agricultural Area (EAA) for irrigation; and discharges from the EAA have been identified as contributors to the phosphors (P) enrichment of the Everglades. Despite the success of the Best Management Practice (BMP) program in the EAA, higher P concentrations and loads still exit the S5A and S6 sub-basins located east of Lake Okeechobee. Limiting the growth of floating aquatic vegetation (FAV) in farm canals should improve the conveyance of drainage and irrigation waters throughout the region. We believe that suppressing the growth of FAV could potentially change the aquatic plant community. It is hypothesized that with better light penetration into canal waters more P may be co-precipitated with Ca-carbonates and form cohesive sediments that are less likely to be re-suspended and transported off the farm during drainage events. This is a long-term study which will evaluate changes in sediment composition and drainage water P in EAA farms. Four farm pairs (two from S5A and S6 sub-basin) have been selected for this study. Each farm is experimental unit. Treatments imposed on a farm will include either complete control of FAV in canals via mechanical removal followed by spot spraying of herbicides, or typical control of FAV as currently practiced. Changes in P species composition in canal waters, and overall total P loads as influenced by treatment will be determined. The goal is to provide growers an additional tool in their efforts to reduce off-farm P loading in the Everglades Agricultural Area.

  8. The influence of disturbed habitat on the spatial ecology of Argentine black and white tegu (Tupinambis merianae), a recent invader in the Everglades ecosystem (Florida, USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klug, Page E.; Reed, Robert N.; Mazzotti, Frank J.; McEachern, Michelle A.; Vinci, Joy J.; Craven, Katelin K.; Yackel Adams, Amy A.

    2015-01-01

    The threat of invasive species is often intensified in disturbed habitat. To optimize control programs, it is necessary to understand how degraded habitat influences the behavior of invasive species. We conducted a radio telemetry study to characterize movement and habitat use of introduced male Argentine black and white tegus (Tupinambis merianae) in the Everglades of southern Florida from May to August 2012 at the core and periphery of the introduced range. Tegus at the periphery moved farther per day (mean 131.7 ± 11.6 m, n = 6) compared to tegus at the core (mean 50.3 ± 12.4 m, n = 6). However, activity ranges were not significantly smaller in the core (mean 19.4 ± 8.4 ha, n = 6) compared to periphery (mean 29.1 ± 5.2 ha, n = 6). Peripheral activity ranges were more linear due to activity being largely restricted to levee habitat surrounded by open water or marsh. Tegus were located in shrub or tree habitat (mean 96%) more often than expected based on random locations (mean 58%), and the percent cover of trees and shrubs was higher in activity ranges (mean 61%) than the general study area (17%). Our study highlighted the ability of tegus to spread across the Florida landscape, especially in linear disturbed habitats where increased movement occurred and in areas of altered hydrology where movement is not restricted by water.

  9. Salinity effects on behavioural response to hypoxia in the non-native Mayan cichlid Cichlasoma urophthalmus from Florida Everglades wetlands.

    PubMed

    Schofield, P J; Loftus, W F; Fontaine, J A

    2009-04-01

    This study quantified the hypoxia tolerance of the Mayan cichlid Cichlasoma urophthalmus over a range of salinities. The species was very tolerant of hypoxia, using aquatic surface respiration (ASR) and buccal bubble holding when oxygen tensions dropped to <20 mmHg (c. 1.0 mg l(-1)) and 6 mmHg, respectively. Salinity had little effect on the hypoxia tolerance of C. urophthalmus, except that bubble holding was more frequent at the higher salinities tested. Levels of aggression were greatest at the highest salinity. The ASR thresholds of C. urophthalmus were similar to native centrarchid sunfishes from the Everglades, however, aggression levels for C. uropthalmus were markedly higher.

  10. Geospatial characteristics of Florida's coastal and offshore environments: Administrative and political boundaries and offshore sand resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Demopoulos, Amanda W.J.; Foster, Ann M.; Jones, Michal L.; Gualtieri, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    The Geospatial Characteristics Geopdf of Florida's Coastal and Offshore Environments is a comprehensive collection of geospatial data describing the political and natural resources of Florida. This interactive map provides spatial information on bathymetry, sand resources, military areas, marine protected areas, cultural resources, locations of submerged cables, and shipping routes. The map should be useful to coastal resource managers and others interested in the administrative and political boundaries of Florida's coastal and offshore region. In particular, as oil and gas explorations continue to expand, the map may be used to explore information regarding sensitive areas and resources in the State of Florida. Users of this geospatial database will find that they have access to synthesized information in a variety of scientific disciplines concerning Florida's coastal zone. This powerful tool provides a one-stop assembly of data that can be tailored to fit the needs of many natural resource managers.

  11. Salinity effects on behavioural response to hypoxia in the non-native Mayan cichlid Cichlasoma urophthalmus from Florida Everglades wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schofield, P.J.; Loftus, W.F.; Fontaine, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    This study quantified the hypoxia tolerance of the Mayan cichlid Cichlasoma urophthalmus over a range of salinities. The species was very tolerant of hypoxia, using aquatic surface respiration (ASR) and buccal bubble holding when oxygen tensions dropped to <20 mmHg (c. 1??0 mg l-1) and 6 mmHg, respectively. Salinity had little effect on the hypoxia tolerance of C. urophthalmus, except that bubble holding was more frequent at the higher salinities tested. Levels of aggression were greatest at the highest salinity. The ASR thresholds of C. urophthalmus were similar to native centrarchid sunfishes from the Everglades, however, aggression levels for C. uropthalmus were markedly higher. ?? 2009 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  12. A simulation model for projecting changes in salinity concentrations and species dominance in the coastal margin habitats of the Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Teh, S.Y.; DeAngelis, D.L.; Sternberg, L.D.S.L.; Miralles-Wilhelm, F. R.; Smith, T.J.; Koh, H. L.

    2008-01-01

    Sharp boundaries typically separate the salinity tolerant mangroves from the salinity intolerant hardwood hammock species, which occupy the similar geographical areas of southern Florida. Evidence of strong feedback between tree community-type and the salinity of the unsaturated (vadose) zone of the soil suggests that a severe disturbance that significantly tilts the salinity in the vadose zone might cause a shift from one vegetation type to the other. In this study, a model based upon the feedback dynamics between vegetation and salinity of the vadose zone of the soil was used to take account of storm surge events to investigate the mechanisms that by which this large-scale disturbance could affect the spatial pattern of hardwood hammocks and mangroves. Model simulation results indicated that a heavy storm surge that completely saturated the vadose zone at 30 ppt for 1 day could lead to a regime shift in which there is domination by mangroves of areas previously dominated by hardwood hammocks. Lighter storm surges that saturated the vadose zone at less than 7 ppt did not cause vegetation shifts. Investigations of model sensitivity analysis indicated that the thickness of the vadose zone, coupled with precipitation, influenced the residence time of high salinity in the vadose zone and therefore determined the rate of mangrove domination. The model was developed for a southern Florida coastal ecosystem, but its applicability may be much broader. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Assigning Boundary Conditions to the Southern Inland and Coastal Systems (SICS) Model Using Results from the South Florida Water Management Model (SFWMM)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolfert, Melinda A.; Langevin, Christian D.; Swain, Eric D.

    2004-01-01

    The Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) requires the testing and evaluation of different water-management scenarios for southern Florida. As part of CERP, the South Florida Water Management District is using its regional hydrologic model, the South Florida Water Management Model (SFWMM), to evaluate different hydrologic scenarios. The SFWMM was designed specifically for the inland freshwater areas in southern Florida, and extends only slightly into Florida Bay. Thus, the U.S. Geological Survey developed the Southern Inland and Coastal Systems (SICS) model, which is an integrated surface-water and ground-water model designed to simulate flows, stages, and salinities in the southern Everglades and Florida Bay. Modifications to the SICS boundary conditions allow the local-scale SICS model to be linked to the regional-scale SFWMM. The linked model will be used to quantify the effects of restoration alternatives on flows, stages, and salinities in the SICS area. This report describes the procedure for linking the SICS model with the SFWMM. The linkage is shown to work by comparing the results of a linked 5-year simulation with the results from a simulation in which the model boundaries are assigned using field data. The surface-water module of the SICS model is driven by areal influences and lateral boundaries. The areal influences (wind, rainfall, and evapotranspiration) remain the same when the SICS model is modified to link to the SFWMM. Four types of lateral boundaries (discharge, water level, no flow, and salinity) are used in the SICS model. Two of three discharge boundaries (at Taylor Slough Bridge and C-111 Canal) in the current SICS model domain are converted to water-level boundaries to increase accuracy. The only change to the third discharge boundary (at Levee 31W) is that the flow data are derived from SFWMM model output instead of using measured field data flows. Three water-level boundaries are modified only by receiving their data from SFWMM

  14. Physiological Condition of Juvenile Wading Birds in Relation to Multiple Landscape Stressors in the Florida Everglades: Effects of Hydrology, Prey Availability, and Mercury Bioaccumulation

    PubMed Central

    Herring, Garth; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Gawlik, Dale E.; Beerens, James M.; Ackerman, Joshua T.

    2014-01-01

    The physiological condition of juvenile birds can be influenced by multiple ecological stressors, and few studies have concurrently considered the effects of environmental contaminants in combination with ecological attributes that can influence foraging conditions and prey availability. Using three temporally distinct indices of physiological condition, we compared the physiological response of nestling great egrets (Ardea alba) and white ibises (Eudocimus albus) to changing prey availability, hydrology (water depth, recession rate), and mercury exposure in the Florida Everglades. We found that the physiological response of chicks varied between species and among environmental variables. Chick body condition (short-term index) and fecal corticosterone levels (medium-term) were influenced by wetland water depth, prey availability, region, and age, but not by mercury contamination. However, mercury exposure did influence heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) in egret chicks, indicating a longer-term physiological response to contamination. Our results indicate that the physiological condition of egret and ibis chicks were influenced by several environmental stressors, and the time frame of the effect may depend on the specialized foraging behavior of the adults provisioning the chicks. PMID:25184221

  15. Comparison of diet, reproductive biology, and growth of the pig frog (Rana grylio) from harvested and protected areas of the Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ugarte, C.A.; Rice, K.G.; Donnelly, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Distinct differences in body size exist among three Rana grylio populations in areas of the Florida Everglades that differ in frog harvest pressure and hydroperiod. Frogs from two populations are harvested regularly throughout the year, while those in the third are protected from harvest. We compared seasonal and sex differences in diet, reproduction, and growth across these populations to examine life-history patterns. By volume, crayfish and anurans were the most abundant prey items for all adults across sites. Frogs from drier sites consumed more crayfish than frogs from the wettest site. Anurans were abundant in the diet during the wet season, while crayfish and fish were abundant during the dry season. More frogs with empty stomachs were captured during the wet season than the dry season. Feeding, growth, and fat deposition were greatest during the dry season across all sites. Although females were found in all reproductive stages throughout the year, the highest percentage of females had mature ova during the late dry season and spent ovaries during the early wet season. Individual patterns of growth were similar across all sites and matched historical growth data from the 1950s. Differences in body size among sites were most likely attributable to differential mortality (i.e., harvest pressure, predation) rather than to differences in food access or growth. ?? 2007 by the American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists.

  16. Kwoniella mangroviensis gen. nov., sp.nov. (Tremellales, Basidiomycota), a teleomorphic yeast from mangrove habitats in the Florida Everglades and Bahamas.

    PubMed

    Statzell-Tallman, Adele; Belloch, Carmela; Fell, Jack W

    2008-02-01

    Mangrove forests inhabit the shoreline regions of tropical and subtropical marine habitats, where they are the basis of a multi-trophic level food web that drives the shellfish and fisheries industries. Yeasts, and other fungi, have significant roles in these ecosystems as they decompose plant organic material and serve as a food source for small invertebrates. Studies designed to examine yeast communities of mangrove regions of the Florida Everglades and the Bahamas demonstrated the repeated presence of an undescribed teleomorphic basidiomycetous yeast. The yeast is heterothallic, with a sexual cycle that can be observed on artificial media. Mating between compatible pairs produces polymorphic basidia. Some basidia are globose, ovoid or lageniform, with longitudinal to oblique and transverse septa, whereas other basidia are navicular with one to three transverse septa. Basidiocarps and ballistoconidia are absent. Molecular sequence analysis of a partial region (D1/D2 domains) of the large subunit rRNA demonstrated that the yeast is phylogenetically distinct from other teleomorphic Tremellales with close relationships to the anamorphic species Cryptococcus dejecticola, Cryptococcus bestiolae and Bullera dendrophila. The molecular and phenotypic data indicate that this teleomorph should be classified in a novel genus. Therefore, Kwoniella mangroviensis gen. nov., sp. nov. (Type strain CBS 8507), is proposed.

  17. Hypoxia tolerance of two centrarchid sunfishes and an introduced cichlid from karstic Everglades wetlands of southern Florida, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schofield, P.J.; Loftus, W.F.; Brown, M.E.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the hypoxia tolerance of three Everglades fishes, two native centrarchids (Lepomis gulosus and Lepomis marginatus) and a recently introduced cichlid (Hemichromis letourneuxi), were documented. Aquatic surface respiration (ASR) thresholds were lowest for H. letourneuxi, followed by L. gulosus, then L. marginatus. The ASR thresholds for L. marginatus were within ranges reported for small, freshwater tropical fishes, while those for L. gulosus were similar to swamp-adapted fishes. For H. letourneuxi, ASR thresholds were some of the lowest reported. All three species showed excellent tolerance of low dissolved oxygen levels when allowed access to the surface. When denied surface access, L. marginatus lost equilibrium at a higher oxygen tension than the other species. Overall, although all species easily tolerated hypoxia, H. letourneuxi appeared to be best equipped to deal with hypoxia, followed by L. gulosus, then L. marginatus. Hemichromis letourneuxi also exhibited more aggressive behaviours than the centrarchids. These results suggest that hypoxia is not likely to prevent H. letourneuxi from exploiting the seasonally inundated wetlands of south Florida while expanding its range there.

  18. Physiological condition of juvenile wading birds in relation to multiple landscape stressors in the Florida Everglades: effects of hydrology, prey availability, and mercury bioaccumulation.

    PubMed

    Herring, Garth; Eagles-Smith, Collin A; Gawlik, Dale E; Beerens, James M; Ackerman, Joshua T

    2014-01-01

    The physiological condition of juvenile birds can be influenced by multiple ecological stressors, and few studies have concurrently considered the effects of environmental contaminants in combination with ecological attributes that can influence foraging conditions and prey availability. Using three temporally distinct indices of physiological condition, we compared the physiological response of nestling great egrets (Ardea alba) and white ibises (Eudocimus albus) to changing prey availability, hydrology (water depth, recession rate), and mercury exposure in the Florida Everglades. We found that the physiological response of chicks varied between species and among environmental variables. Chick body condition (short-term index) and fecal corticosterone levels (medium-term) were influenced by wetland water depth, prey availability, region, and age, but not by mercury contamination. However, mercury exposure did influence heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) in egret chicks, indicating a longer-term physiological response to contamination. Our results indicate that the physiological condition of egret and ibis chicks were influenced by several environmental stressors, and the time frame of the effect may depend on the specialized foraging behavior of the adults provisioning the chicks.

  19. Phase I and II liver enzyme activities in juvenile alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) collected from three sites in the Kissimmee-Everglades drainage, Florida (USA).

    PubMed

    Gunderson, M P; Oberdörster, E; Guillette, L J

    2004-10-01

    We examined CYP1A (measured using hepatic EROD and MROD activities) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activities in juvenile alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) collected from three sites with varying contamination in the Kissimmee-Everglades drainage in south Florida. We hypothesized that contaminants present in areas with intermediate or higher contaminant concentrations would alter hepatic enzyme activities in juvenile alligators from those sites when compared to hepatic enzyme activity in animals from the area with the least contamination. EROD activity was found to be higher in animals from the site with lower reported levels of contamination relative to those from the site with the highest reported contamination suggesting an inhibition of CYP1A expression or activity. No differences among animals from the three sites were observed for hepatic MROD and GST activities. A significant negative relationship between EROD, MROD, and GST activities and body size was exhibited in alligators from the site with the lowest contamination. No relationship between body size and hepatic enzyme activity was found in animals from the sites with intermediate and higher contamination, suggesting that contaminants present at these sites act to alter this relationship. No correlation was observed in this study between plasma steroid concentrations (estradiol-17 beta or testosterone) and hepatic EROD, MROD, or GST activities.

  20. Physiological condition of juvenile wading birds in relation to multiple landscape stressors in the Florida Everglades: effects of hydrology, prey availability, and mercury bioaccumulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herring, Garth; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Gawlik, Dale E.; Beerens, James M.; Ackerman, Joshua T.

    2014-01-01

    The physiological condition of juvenile birds can be influenced by multiple ecological stressors, and few studies have concurrently considered the effects of environmental contaminants in combination with ecological attributes that can influence foraging conditions and prey availability. Using three temporally distinct indices of physiological condition, we compared the physiological response of nestling great egrets (Ardea alba) and white ibises (Eudocimus albus) to changing prey availability, hydrology (water depth, recession rate), and mercury exposure in the Florida Everglades. We found that the physiological response of chicks varied between species and among environmental variables. Chick body condition (short-term index) and fecal corticosterone levels (medium-term) were influenced by wetland water depth, prey availability, region, and age, but not by mercury contamination. However, mercury exposure did influence heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) in egret chicks, indicating a longer-term physiological response to contamination. Our results indicate that the physiological condition of egret and ibis chicks were influenced by several environmental stressors, and the time frame of the effect may depend on the specialized foraging behavior of the adults provisioning the chicks.

  1. AmeriFlux US-Skr Shark River Slough (Tower SRS-6) Everglades

    DOE Data Explorer

    Barr, Jordan G. [Everglades National Park; Fuentes, Jose [Pennsylvania State University

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Skr Shark River Slough (Tower SRS-6) Everglades. Site Description - The Florida Everglades Shark River Slough Mangrove Forest site is located along the Shark River in the western region of Everglades National Park. Also referred to as site SRS6 of the Florida Coastal Everglades LTER program, freshwater in the mangrove riverine floods the forest floor under a meter of water twice per day. Transgressive discharge of freshwater from the Shark river follows annual rainfall distributions between the wet and dry seasons. Hurricane Wilma struck the site in October of 2005 causing significant damage. The tower was offline until the following October in order to continue temporally consistent measurements. In post-hurricane conditions, ecosystem respiration rates and solar irradiance transfer increased. 2007- 2008 measurements indicate that these factors led to an decline in both annual -NEE and daily NEE from pre-hurricane conditions in 2004-2005.

  2. Precipitation and groundwater evapotranspiration as hydraulic drivers of nutrient and ion accumulation in Everglades' tree islands, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, P. L.; Price, R. M.; Miralles-Wilhelm, F. R.; Ross, M. S.; Scinto, L. J.; Cline, E.; Dreschel, T. W.; Sklar, F. H.

    2010-12-01

    Many wetlands around the world contain raised ridges or islands dominated by higher order vegetation with elevated ion and nutrient groundwater concentrations, surrounded by low lying hollows and sloughs with low nutrient and ion concentrations. Similar to these wetlands, the Everglades are characterized by a ridge-slough-tree islands continuum where some of the highest soil and groundwater nutrient concentrations have been detected in tree islands. The goal of this study was to determine the role of precipitation (P) and groundwater evapotranspiration (ETg) as drivers of groundwater-surface water interactions and tree islands biogeochemistry. Groundwater and surface water levels and chemistry were monitored for eight constructed tree islands at Loxahatchee Impoundment Landscape Assessment from 2007-2010 and one natural tree island from 2009-2010. Groundwater and surface chemistry were measured on three additional natural tree islands across the Everglades from 2008-2010. Diurnal groundwater levels were used to determine ETg using the White method. The results suggested that the ratio of ETg/P dictated the groundwater flow patterns and the concentration of ions in the groundwater. When ETg/P was low, the shape of the groundwater table mimicked that of the land surface, and groundwater flowed from the center of the islands toward the edges. When ETg/P was high, a cone of depression formed in the center of the islands and groundwater flowed from the edges of the islands toward the center. The ion concentration in the groundwater in the center of the islands coincided with the dominant process: if ETg/P was low, the ionic concentration of the groundwater decreased, and conversely if the ratio was high, the concentration of ions increased. Concentrations of chloride, groundwater stable isotopes of oxygen-18 and deuterium indicated that the highest rates of transpiration were in the center of the island, which supported the ETg results. Furthermore, modeling results

  3. A simulation of historic hydrology and salinity in Everglades National Park: Coupling paleoecologic assemblage data with regression models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marshall, Frank E.; Wingard, G.L.; Pitts, Patrick A.

    2009-01-01

    Restoration of Florida's Everglades requires scientifically supportable hydrologic targets. This study establishes a restoration baseline by developing a method to simulate hydrologic and salinity conditions prior to anthropogenic changes. The method couples paleoecologic data on long-term historic ecosystem conditions with statistical models derived from observed meteorologic and hydrologic data that provide seasonal and annual variation. Results indicate that pre-drainage freshwater levels and hydroperiods in major sloughs of the Everglades were about 0.15 m higher and two to four times greater, respectively, on average compared to today's values. Pre-drainage freshwater delivered to the wetlands and estuaries is estimated to be 2.5 to four times greater than the modern-day flow, and the largest deficit is during the dry season. In Florida Bay, salinity has increased between 5.3 and 20.1 with the largest differences in the areas near freshwater outflow points. These results suggest that additional freshwater flows to the Everglades are needed for restoration of the freshwater marshes of the Everglades and estuarine environment of Florida Bay, particularly near the end of the dry season. ?? 2008 Coastal and Estuarine Research Federation.

  4. SEDIMENT AND PERIPHYTON ASSESSMENT AS INDICATORS OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITION IN THE FLORIDA BAY-EVERGLADES TRANSITIONAL ZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Florida Bay and its watershed are currently the focus of numerous investigations designed to assess the extent and cause of deterioration in environmental quality observed during recent years. Periphyton and sediment bioassessment were used in a multiyear study to compare the rel...

  5. SEDIMENT AND PERIPHYTON ASSESSMENT AS INDICATORS OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITION IN THE FLORIDA BAY-EVERGLADES TRANSITIONAL ZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Florida Bay and its watershed are currently the focus of numerous investigations designed to assess the extent and cause of deterioration in environmental quality observed during recent years. Periphyton and sediment bioassessment were used in a multiyear study to compare the rel...

  6. Ecology and management of Sheoak (Casuarina spp.), an invader of coastal Florida, U.S.A.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Casuarina spp. are invasive weeds in Florida that threaten biological diversity and beach integrity of coastal habitats. The trees include three species and their hybrids that aggressively invade riverine and coastal areas. Of the three species, C. equisetifolia and C. glauca are highly salt tol...

  7. Long-Term Observations of a Coastal Countercurrent on the Southeast Florida Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, A.

    2010-12-01

    Coastal circulation along the southeast Florida shelf is strongly related to the dynamics of the Florida Current as a part of the western boundary current system. We have conducted long-term observations with a mooring array deployed on the Ft. Lauderdale FL shelf. The array consists of a bottom ADCP mooring at 11 m isobath on the Dania Beach Shelf providing almost continuous observations since 1999 and a bottom ADCP mooring deployed on the Miami Terrace near Pompano Beach at 240 m isobath since 2007. There is a strong variability of the coastal current at this location on time scales ranging from hours to months, which is explained by the proximity to the Florida Current. An interesting feature revealed during these observations is an intermittent coastal countercurrent. This coastal countercurrent is seasonally modulated, reversing its direction during the summer season. The appearance of the countercurrent on the southeast Florida shelf and its relation to the Florida Current and undercurrent have not yet been completely understood. The possible physical mechanism behind this feature of the coastal circulation on the Southeast Florida shelf and practical applications are being discussed.

  8. Species Profiles: Life Histories and Environmental Requirements of Coastal Fishes and Invertebrates (South Florida). Reef-Building Corals.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-01

    Invertebrates (South Florida) ft ELECTELO DEG 16 � REEF -BUILDING CORALS I a11 00 Coastal Ecology Group Fish and Wildlife Service Waterways Experiment...Histories and Environmental Requirements of Coastal Fishes and Invertebrates (South Florida) REEF -BUILDING CORALS by James W. Porter Zoology...histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (south Florida)-- reef -building corals . U.S. Fish Wildl. Serv. Biol. Rep. 82

  9. Sediment toxicity and community composition of benthos and colonized periphyton in the Everglades-Florida Bay transitional zone.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Michael A; Goodman, Larry R; Macauley, John M; Moore, James C

    2004-04-01

    This survey provides information on sediment toxicity and structural characteristics of the macrobenthic and periphytic algal communities at 10 locations in northeast Florida Bay. Whole sediments were not acutely toxic to Mysidopsis bahia (marine invertebrate) and Hyalella azteca (freshwater invertebrate) relative to reference sediment. Survival was between 80% and 100%. Community structure of the macrobenthos and algal-periphyton varied spatially. A total of 116 benthic species were identified at the 10 locations; mean density was greater in Shell Creek (10,017 organisms/m2) and least in Canal C-103 (441 organisms/m2). Tubificids and the crustacean Halmyrapseudes bahamensis (Family: Apseudidae) dominated the benthos at 4 of 10 locations. One hundred and six species of periphytic algae representing 52 genera were identified on substrates colonized for 21 days. Mean algal density was greater in Florida Bay (19,440 cells/cm2) and least in Long Sound (10 cells/cm2). Diatoms and blue green algae dominated the algal-periphyton. Major diatom genera were Navicula, Brachysira and Nitzschia. The more abundant and widely occurring blue-green taxa were species of Oscillatoria, Polycystis and Lyngbya. Ash free dry weight and chlorophyll a were significantly greater for periphyton colonized in Canal C-111 and Florida Bay and the least in Long Sound. Spatial variation and the availability of reference areas are important issues that need consideration in future biomonitoring efforts conducted in this region to ensure relevancy of results.

  10. Characterization of the porosity distribution in the upper part of the karst Biscayne aquifer using common offset ground penetrating radar, Everglades National Park, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mount, Gregory J.; Comas, Xavier; Cunningham, Kevin J.

    2014-07-01

    The karst Biscayne aquifer is characterized by a heterogeneous spatial arrangement of porosity and hydraulic conductivity, making conceptualization difficult. The Biscayne aquifer is the primary source of drinking water for millions of people in south Florida; thus, information concerning the distribution of karst features that concentrate the groundwater flow and affect contaminant transport is critical. The principal purpose of the study was to investigate the ability of two-dimensional ground penetrating radar (GPR) to rapidly characterize porosity variability in the karst Biscayne aquifer in south Florida. An 800-m-long GPR transect of a previously investigated area at the Long Pine Key Nature Trail in Everglades National Park, collected in fast acquisition common offset mode, shows hundreds of diffraction hyperbolae. The distribution of diffraction hyperbolae was used to estimate electromagnetic (EM) wave velocity at each diffraction location and to assess both horizontal and vertical changes in velocity within the transect. A petrophysical model (complex refractive index model or CRIM) was used to estimate total bulk porosity. A set of common midpoint surveys at selected locations distributed along the common-offset transect also were collected for comparison with the common offsets and were used to constrain one-dimensional (1-D) distributions of porosity with depth. Porosity values for the saturated Miami Limestone ranged between 25% and 41% for common offset GPR surveys, and between 23% and 39% for common midpoint GPR surveys. Laboratory measurements of porosity in five whole-core samples from the saturated part of the aquifer in the study area ranged between 7.1% and 41.8%. GPR estimates of porosity were found to be valid only under saturated conditions; other limitations are related to the vertical resolution of the GPR signal and the volume of the material considered by the measurement methodology. Overall, good correspondence between GPR estimates and

  11. Characterization of the porosity distribution in the upper part of the karst Biscayne aquifer using common offset ground penetrating radar, Everglades National Park, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mountain, Gregory S.; Cunningham, Kevin J.; Comas, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    The karst Biscayne aquifer is characterized by a heterogeneous spatial arrangement of porosity and hydraulic conductivity, making conceptualization difficult. The Biscayne aquifer is the primary source of drinking water for millions of people in south Florida; thus, information concerning the distribution of karst features that concentrate the groundwater flow and affect contaminant transport is critical. The principal purpose of the study was to investigate the ability of two-dimensional ground penetrating radar (GPR) to rapidly characterize porosity variability in the karst Biscayne aquifer in south Florida. An 800-m-long GPR transect of a previously investigated area at the Long Pine Key Nature Trail in Everglades National Park, collected in fast acquisition common offset mode, shows hundreds of diffraction hyperbolae. The distribution of diffraction hyperbolae was used to estimate electromagnetic (EM) wave velocity at each diffraction location and to assess both horizontal and vertical changes in velocity within the transect. A petrophysical model (complex refractive index model or CRIM) was used to estimate total bulk porosity. A set of common midpoint surveys at selected locations distributed along the common-offset transect also were collected for comparison with the common offsets and were used to constrain one-dimensional (1-D) distributions of porosity with depth. Porosity values for the saturated Miami Limestone ranged between 25% and 41% for common offset GPR surveys, and between 23% and 39% for common midpoint GPR surveys. Laboratory measurements of porosity in five whole-core samples from the saturated part of the aquifer in the study area ranged between 7.1% and 41.8%. GPR estimates of porosity were found to be valid only under saturated conditions; other limitations are related to the vertical resolution of the GPR signal and the volume of the material considered by the measurement methodology. Overall, good correspondence between GPR estimates and

  12. EAARL Coastal Topography--Cape Canaveral, Florida, 2009: First Surface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonisteel-Cormier, J.M.; Nayegandhi, Amar; Plant, Nathaniel; Wright, C.W.; Nagle, D.B.; Serafin, K.S.; Klipp, E.S.

    2011-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of lidar-derived first-surface (FS) topography datasets were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center, St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Kennedy Space Center, FL. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of a portion of the eastern Florida coastline beachface, acquired on May 28, 2009. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural-resource managers. An innovative airborne lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multispectral color-infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for sub-meter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine aircraft, but the instrument was deployed on a Pilatus PC-6. A single pilot, a lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom-built processing system developed

  13. Variation in sex steroids and phallus size in juvenile American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) collected from 3 sites within the Kissimmee-Everglades drainage in Florida (USA).

    PubMed

    Gunderson, Mark P; Bermudez, Dieldrich S; Bryan, Teresa A; Degala, Satish; Edwards, Thea M; Kools, Stefan A E; Milnes, Matthew R; Woodward, Allan R; Guillette, Louis J

    2004-07-01

    This 3-year study was designed to examine variation in plasma sex steroids, phallus size, and the standard error (S.E.) associated with these endpoints in juvenile alligators collected from 3 sites within the Kissimmee-Everglades drainage (Florida, USA) with varying concentrations of sediment organochlorine contaminants. We hypothesized that decreased plasma sex steroid concentrations and phallus size would be observed in the higher contaminant site when compared to the intermediate and lower contaminant sites. Furthermore, we hypothesized that greater S.E. associated with these endpoints would be observed for the populations from more contaminated sites. We found that differences existed with females from the higher contaminant site exhibiting lower plasma estradiol-17beta (E2) and testosterone (T) concentrations. Males from the higher contaminant site exhibited smaller phallus sizes than males from the intermediate and lower contaminant sites. Smaller phallus size in this case differed from that reported in Lake Apopka male alligators [Gen. Comp. Endocrinol. 116 (1999) 356] in that a significant positive relationship between body size and phallus size existed. No difference among sites was observed in plasma T for males. Lower S.E. was associated with E2 and T concentrations in females from the higher contaminant site and in phallus size in males from the higher contaminant site. This pattern was opposite to what we had hypothesized. We concluded that variation in plasma E2 and T concentrations, phallus size, and the S.E. associated with these endpoints exists among the 3 sites with the patterns matching the patterns of organochlorine contamination, although S.E. patterns were opposite to what was predicted.

  14. Power Law Patch Scaling and Lack of Characteristic Wavelength Suggest "Scale-Free" Processes Drive Pattern Formation in the Florida Everglades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, D. A.; Casey, S. T.; Cohen, M. J.; Acharya, S.; Jawitz, J. W.

    2016-12-01

    A century of hydrologic modification has altered the physical and biological drivers of landscape processes in the Everglades (Florida, USA). Restoring the ridge-slough patterned landscape, a dominant feature of the historical system, is a priority, but requires an understanding of pattern genesis and degradation mechanisms. Physical experiments to evaluate alternative pattern formation mechanisms are limited by the long time scales of peat accumulation and loss, necessitating model-based comparisons, where support for a particular mechanism is based on model replication of extant patterning and trajectories of degradation. However, multiple mechanisms yield patch elongation in the direction of historical flow (a central feature of ridge-slough patterning), limiting the utility of that characteristic for discriminating among alternatives. Using data from vegetation maps, we investigated the statistical features of ridge-slough spatial patterning (ridge density, patch perimeter, elongation, patch-size distributions, and spatial periodicity) to establish more rigorous criteria for evaluating model performance and to inform controls on pattern variation across the contemporary system. Two independent analyses (2-D periodograms and patch size distributions) provide strong evidence against regular patterning, with the landscape exhibiting neither a characteristic wavelength nor a characteristic patch size, both of which are expected under conditions that produce regular patterns. Rather, landscape properties suggest robust scale-free patterning, indicating genesis from the coupled effects of local facilitation and a global negative feedback operating uniformly at the landscape-scale. This finding challenges widespread invocation of scale-dependent negative feedbacks for explaining ridge-slough pattern origins. These results help discern among genesis mechanisms and provide an improved statistical description of the landscape that can be used to compare among model

  15. Mercury(II) sorption to two Florida Everglades peat--Evidence for strong and weak binding and competition by dissolved organic matter released from the peat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drexel, R. Todd; Haitzer, Markus; Ryan, Joseph N.; Aiken, George R.; Nagy, Kathryn L.

    2002-01-01

    The binding of mercury(II) to two peats from Florida Everglades sites with different rates of mercury methylation was measured at pH 6.0 and 0.01 M ionic strength. The mercury(II) sorption isotherms, measured over a total mercury(II) range of 10-7.4 to 10-3.7 M, showed the competition for mercury(II) between the peat and dissolved organic matter released from the peat and the existence of strong and weak binding sites for mercury(II). Binding was portrayed by a model accounting for strong and weak sites on both the peat and the released DOM. The conditional binding constants (for which the ligand concentration was set as the concentration of reduced sulfur in the organic matter as measured by X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy) determined for the strong sites on the two peats were similar (Kpeat,s = 1021.8±0.1and 1022.0±0.1 M-1), but less than those determined for the DOM strong sites (Kdom,s = 1022.8±0.1and 1023.2±0.1 M-1), resulting in mercury(II) binding by the DOM at low mercury(II) concentrations. The magnitude of the strong site binding constant is indicative of mercury(II) interaction with organic thiol functional groups. The conditional binding constants determined for the weak peat sites (Kpeat,w = 1011.5±0.1 and 1011.8±0.1 M-1) and weak DOM sites (Kdom,w = 108.7±3.0 and 107.3±4.5 M-1) were indicative of mercury(II) interaction with carboxyl and phenol functional groups.

  16. 77 FR 21448 - Security Zone; 2012 Fleet Week, Port Everglades, Fort Lauderdale, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-10

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA87 Security Zone; 2012 Fleet Week, Port Everglades, Fort... establishing a temporary security zone on the waters of Port Everglades in Fort Lauderdale, Florida during 2012..., 2012. The security zone will encompass the main shipping channel into Port Everglades Harbor and the...

  17. Assessment of mineral concentration impacts from pumped stormwater on an Everglades Wetland, Florida, USA - Using a spatially-explicit model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chunfang; Meselhe, Ehab; Waldon, Michael

    2012-07-01

    SummaryThe Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge) overlays a 58,725 ha remnant of the Northern Everglades which is termed Water Conservation Area 1 (WCA-1). The Refuge is impacted by stormwater inflow from flood control pump stations which discharge to a perimeter canal system inside an impounding levee. These discharges contain elevated mineral and nutrient concentrations, with chloride concentration averaging well over 100 mg/L. It has long been established that the Refuge naturally has low mineral content softwater, and that this low-mineral condition affects the species composition of wetland periphyton that are at the base of much of the Refuge food chain. The interior marsh of the Refuge has today been termed rainfall-driven or ombrotrophic, with median chloride concentration averaging 20.5 mg/L. However, chloride concentration in rain water averages roughly 2 mg/L. The level of impact of exogenous pumped inflow on the concentration of chloride and other mineral constituents in the interior marsh has been unclear, and at times it has been debated whether atmospheric loading and evaporation can alone explain observed concentration of chloride in the interior. We applied a spatially explicit hydrodynamic and constituent transport model, MIKE FLOOD, to estimate the unimpacted condition of the interior. We compare this with simulated and monitored chloride concentrations under current conditions. The model was calibrated for a 5-year period (2000-2004), and validated for a 2-year period (2005-2006). We found that when pumped inflow concentration is reduced to an estimated rainfall chloride concentration, interior chloride concentration ranges typically below 5 mg/L. We therefore conclude that the interior chloride concentration is currently dominated by pumped inflows and should not be termed ombrotrophic. We also present initial modeling of one proposed remedial solution for reducing this impact. Our study demonstrates the feasibility

  18. Impacts of past climate and sea level change on Everglades wetlands: placing a century of anthropogenic change into a late-Holocene context

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Willard, D.A.; Bernhardt, C.E.

    2011-01-01

    We synthesize existing evidence on the ecological history of the Florida Everglades since its inception ~7 ka (calibrated kiloannum) and evaluate the relative impacts of sea level rise, climate variability, and human alteration of Everglades hydrology on wetland plant communities. Initial freshwater peat accumulation began between 6 and 7 ka on the platform underlying modern Florida Bay when sea level was ~6.2 m below its current position. By 5 ka, sawgrass and waterlily peats covered the area bounded by Lake Okeechobee to the north and the Florida Keys to the south. Slower rates of relative sea level rise ~3 ka stabilized the south Florida coastline and initiated transitions from freshwater to mangrove peats near the coast. Hydrologic changes in freshwater marshes also are indicated ~3 ka. During the last ~2 ka, the Everglades wetland was affected by a series of hydrologic fluctuations related to regional to global-scale fluctuations in climate and sea level. Pollen evidence indicates that regional-scale droughts lasting two to four centuries occurred ~1 ka and ~0.4 ka, altering wetland community composition and triggering development of characteristic Everglades habitats such as sawgrass ridges and tree islands. Intercalation of mangrove peats with estuarine muds ~1 ka indicates a temporary slowing or stillstand of sea level. Although sustained droughts and Holocene sea level rise played large roles in structuring the greater Everglades ecosystem, twentieth century reductions in freshwater flow, compartmentalization of the wetland, and accelerated rates of sea level rise had unprecedented impacts on oxidation and subsidence of organic soils, changes/loss of key Everglades habitats, and altered distribution of coastal vegetation.

  19. Use of Tritium and Helium to Define Groundwater Flow Conditions in a Coastal Aquifer Influenced by Seawater Intrusion: Everglades National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, R. M.; Top, Z.; Happell, J. D.; Swart, P. K.

    2002-05-01

    The concentrations of tritium (3H) and helium isotopes (3He, 4He) were used as tracers of groundwater flow in Everglades National Park, South Florida (USA). Both fresh and brackish groundwaters were collected from 47 wells completed at depths ranging from 2 m to 73 m within the Surficial Aquifer System (SAS). Ages as determined by 3H/3He techniques indicate that groundwater within the upper 28 m originated after the nuclear era (within the last 42 yr) and below 28 m before then with evidence of some mixing at the interface. Inter-annual variation of the 3H/3He ages within the upper 28 m was significant throughout the three year investigation, suggesting varying hydrologic conditions. The age of the shallow groundwater in the southern regions of ENP (Rocky Glades and Taylor Slough) tended to be younger following times of high water level when the dominant direction of groundwater flow water was to the southeast. In the same region, significantly older groundwater was observed following times of low water levels and a shift in the groundwater flow direction toward the southwest. Near the canals, the reverse occurred with the ages of shallow groundwater tending to be younger following times of low water levels, suggesting a greater influence of recharge water from the canals to the surrounding aquifer. Although water levels and the direction of hydrologic gradients vary greatly within a 3-month time period, the average age of the shallow (<28 m) fresh groundwaters was 17 +/- 9 years. In the region of Taylor Slough Bridge, younger groundwater was consistently detected below older groundwater in the Biscayne Aquifer suggesting a preferential flow path to the deeper formation. An increase in 4He with depth suggests that radiogenic 4He produced in the underlying Hawthorn Group is dispersed into the SAS. Higher Δ 4He values in brackish groundwaters compared to fresh waters from similar depths indicate an enhanced vertical transport of 4He in the seawater mixing zone

  20. Airborne Lidar Measurements of Below-canopy Surface Water Height , Slope and Optical Properties in the Florida Everglades Shark River Slough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabney, P.; Harding, D. J.; Valett, S. R.; Yu, A. W.; Feliciano, E. A.; Neuenschwander, A. L.; Pitts, K.

    2015-12-01

    with 8 cm ranging precision, the surface altimetry data is acquired with very high spatial and vertical resolution. Examples of these capabilities will be shown using data collected in 2011 along and across the flow axis of the Florida Everglades Shark River Slough, targeting the slough's Long Term Ecology Research (LTER) field sites.

  1. Pink shrimp as an indicator for restoration of everglades ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Browder, Joan A.; Robblee, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    The pink shrimp, Farfantepenaeus duorarum, familiar to most Floridians as either food or bait shrimp, is ubiquitous in South Florida coastal and offshore waters and is proposed as an indicator for assessing restoration of South Florida's southern estuaries: Florida Bay, Biscayne Bay, and the mangrove estuaries of the lower southwest coast. Relationships between pink shrimp and salinity have been determined in both field and laboratory studies. Salinity is directly relevant to restoration because the salinity regimes of South Florida estuaries, critical nursery habitat for the pink shrimp, will be altered by changes in the quantity, timing, and distribution of freshwater inflow planned as part of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Project (CERP). Here we suggest performance measures based on pink shrimp density (number per square meter) in the estuaries and propose a restoration assessment and scoring scheme using these performance measures that can readily be communicated to managers, policy makers, and the interested public. The pink shrimp is an appropriate restoration indicator because of its ecological as well as its economic importance and also because scientific interest in pink shrimp in South Florida has produced a wealth of information about the species and relatively long time series of data on both juveniles in estuarine nursery habitats and adults on the fishing grounds. We suggest research needs for improving the pink shrimp performance measure.

  2. Assessment of saltwater intrusion in southern coastal Broward County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merritt, M.L.

    1996-01-01

    Of the counties in southeastern Florida, Broward County has experienced some of the most severe effects of saltwater intrusion into the surficial Biscayne aquifer because, before 1950, most public water-supply well fields in the county were constructed near the principal early population centers located less than 5 miles from the Atlantic Ocean. The construction of major regional drainage canals in the early 20th century caused a lowering of the water table and a gradual inland movement of the saltwater front toward the well fields. The U.S. Geological Survey began field investigations of saltwater intrusion in the Biscayne aquifer of southeastern Broward County in 1939. As part of the present study, the positions of the saltwater front in 1945, 1969, and 1993 were estimated using chloride concentrations of water samples collected between 1939 and 1994 from various monitoring and exploratory wells. The data indicate that, between 1945 and 1993, the saltwater front has moved as much as 0.5 mile inland in parts of the study area. The position and movement of the saltwater front were simulated numerically to help determine which of the various hydrologic factors and water-management features characterizing the coastal subsurface environment and its alteration by man are of significance in increasing or decreasing the degree of saltwater intrusion. Two representational methods were applied by the selection and use of appropriate model codes. The SHARP code simulates the position of the saltwater front as a sharp interface, which implies that no transition zone (a zone in which a gradational change between freshwater and saltwater occurs) separates freshwater and saltwater. The Subsurface Waste Injection Program (SWIP) code simulates a two-fluid, variable-density system using a convective-diffusion approach that includes a representation of the transition zone that occurs between the freshwater and saltwater bodies. The models were applied to: (1) approximately

  3. Species Profiles. Life Histories and Environmental Requirements of Coastal Fishes and Invertebrates (South Florida). SNOOK,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    FISHES, *MARINE BIOLOGY , ADULTS, RECREATION, SEASONS, COMMERCIAL FISHING, ECOLOGY , ENVIRONMENTS, REQUIREMENTS, PRESSURE, BRACKISH WATER, INSHORE...AREAS, STREAMS, TIDES, COASTAL REGIONS, DEGRADATION, HABITATS, ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT, ESTUARIES, FRESH WATER, OCEANS, INVERTEBRATES, HISTORY, LIFE( BIOLOGY ...LIMITATIONS, LOW LEVEL, LOW TEMPERATURE, POPULATION, SALTS, SWAMPS, PROFILES, YOUTH, DOCUMENTS, WATER, FISHERIES, FLORIDA, SOUTH(DIRECTION), TAXONOMY , LIFE CYCLES, REPRODUCTION(PHYSIOLOGY)

  4. CDOM PRODUCTION BY MANGROVE LEAF LITTER AND SARGASSUM COLONIES IN FLORIDA KEYS COASTAL WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have investigated the importance of leaf litter from red mangroves (Rhizophora mangle) and living Sargassum plants as sources of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) to the coastal ocean waters and coral reef system of the Florida Keys. The magnitude of UVB exposure t...

  5. Assessment of satellite derived diffuse attenuation coefficients and euphotic depths in south Florida coastal waters

    EPA Science Inventory

    Optical data collected in coastal waters off South Florida and in the Caribbean Sea between January 2009 and December 2010 were used to evaluate products derived with three bio-optical inversion algorithms applied to MOIDS/Aqua, MODIS/Terra, and SeaWiFS satellite observations. Th...

  6. EAARL coastal topography—northwest Florida, post-Hurricane Katrina, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fredericks, Alexandra M.; Kranenburg, Christine; Doran, Kara

    2017-01-01

    These datasets, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center, provide lidar-derived first-surface and bare-earth topography for a portion of northwest Florida. Elevation measurements were acquired by the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL) in September 2005, immediately following Hurricane Katrina landfall.

  7. Assessment of satellite derived diffuse attenuation coefficients and euphotic depths in south Florida coastal waters

    EPA Science Inventory

    Optical data collected in coastal waters off South Florida and in the Caribbean Sea between January 2009 and December 2010 were used to evaluate products derived with three bio-optical inversion algorithms applied to MOIDS/Aqua, MODIS/Terra, and SeaWiFS satellite observations. Th...

  8. CDOM PRODUCTION BY MANGROVE LEAF LITTER AND SARGASSUM COLONIES IN FLORIDA KEYS COASTAL WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have investigated the importance of leaf litter from red mangroves (Rhizophora mangle) and living Sargassum plants as sources of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) to the coastal ocean waters and coral reef system of the Florida Keys. The magnitude of UVB exposure t...

  9. Cyanobacterial blooms and biomagnification of the neurotoxin BMAA in South Florida coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, L.; Mash, D.

    2008-12-01

    Blooms of cyanobacteria have developed in Florida Bay, Biscayne Bay and other coastal waters of South Florida. It has recently been shown that virtually all cyanobacteria produce the potent neurotoxin, beta-N- methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA). Studies in Guam indicate that BMAA can biomagnify up the food chain from cyanobacteria to human food and humans. Recent studies in Guam and on human brains in North America suggest an association between BMAA and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). A variety of organisms from South Florida coastal waters are being analyzed for BMAA content to determine if BMAA is biomagnifying in these food chains and if it is a potential human health hazard. Some have extremely high concentrations of BMAA.

  10. Geospatial characteristics of Florida's coastal and offshore environments: Coastal habitats, artificial reefs, wrecks, dumping grounds, harbor obstructions and offshore sand resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Demopoulos, Amanda W.J.; Foster, Ann M.; Jones, Michal L.; Gualtieri, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    The Geospatial Characteristics GeoPDF of Florida's Coastal and Offshore Environments is a comprehensive collection of geospatial data describing the political boundaries and natural resources of Florida. This interactive map provides spatial information on bathymetry, sand resources, coastal habitats, artificial reefs, shipwrecks, dumping grounds, and harbor obstructions. The map should be useful to coastal resource managers and others interested in marine habitats and submerged obstructions of Florida's coastal region. In particular, as oil and gas explorations continue to expand, the map may be used to explore information regarding sensitive areas and resources in the State of Florida. Users of this geospatial database will have access to synthesized information in a variety of scientific disciplines concerning Florida's coastal zone. This powerful tool provides a one-stop assembly of data that can be tailored to fit the needs of many natural resource managers. The map was originally developed to assist the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation, and Enforcement (BOEMRE) and coastal resources managers with planning beach restoration projects. The BOEMRE uses a systematic approach in planning the development of submerged lands of the Continental Shelf seaward of Florida's territorial waters. Such development could affect the environment. BOEMRE is required to ascertain the existing physical, biological, and socioeconomic conditions of the submerged lands and estimate the impact of developing these lands. Data sources included the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, BOEMRE, Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Florida Geographic Data Library, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, Florida Natural Areas Inventory, and the State of Florida, Bureau of Archeological Research. Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) compliant metadata are provided as attached xml files for all geographic information system (GIS) layers.

  11. Water quality of surficial aquifers in the Georgia-Florida Coastal Plain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crandall, C.A.; Berndt, M.P.

    1996-01-01

    The National Water Quality Assessment Program of the U.S. Geological Survey established the Georgia-Florida Coastal Plain study unit in 1991. The ground-water study-unit survey was conducted in 1993 to provide a broad over-view of water quality in surficial aquifers. Three land resource provinces were included in the Georgia-Florida Coastal Plain study-unit survey: the Central Florida Ridge, the Coastal Flatwoods, and the Southern Coastal Plain. The U.S. Geological Survey sampled 37 wells in surficial aquifers, 18 in the Coastal Flatwoods and 19 in the Southern Coastal Plain. The Florida Department of Environmental Protection sampled 27 wells tapping surficial aquifers in the Central Florida Ridge as part of the background ground-water quality monitoring network from 1985 through 1989. The data were used to characterize water quality in surficial aquifers of the Central Florida Ridge. Results of the study-unit survey indicated that dissolved solids concentrations in ground water were mostly less than 100 mg/L (milligrams per liter). Higher medians of pH, specific conductance, and concentrations of calcium, bicarbonate, and dissolved solids were measured in samples from the Central Florida Ridge compared to the Southern Coastal Plain and Coastal Flatwoods, probably because of a greater percentage of carbonate minerals in aquifer materials. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency secondary maximum contaminant level for iron of 300 ug/L (micrograms per liter) in drinking water was exceeded in 15 of 45 samples. Concentrations of nitrate as nitrogen were less than 3.0 mg/L in most samples (74 percent), indicating little or no influence from human activity. Only five samples (9 percent) had concentrations above 10 mg/L, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant level for nitrate concentration in drinking water. Significantly lower median concentrations of nitrate were measured in samples from polyvinyl chloride monitoring wells with diameters less

  12. Two-Dimensional Hydrodynamic Simulation of Surface-Water Flow and Transport to Florida Bay through the Southern Inland and Coastal Systems (SICS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swain, Eric D.; Wolfert, Melinda A.; Bales, Jerad D.; Goodwin, Carl R.

    2004-01-01

    Successful restoration of the southern Florida ecosystem requires extensive knowledge of the physical characteristics and hydrologic processes controlling water flow and transport of constituents through extremely low-gradient freshwater marshes, shallow mangrove-fringed coastal creeks and tidal embayments, and near-shore marine waters. A sound, physically based numerical model can provide simulations of the differing hydrologic conditions that might result from various ecosystem restoration scenarios. Because hydrology and ecology are closely linked in southern Florida, hydrologic model results also can be used by ecologists to evaluate the degree of ecosystem restoration that could be achieved for various hydrologic conditions. A robust proven model, SWIFT2D, (Surface-Water Integrated Flow and Transport in Two Dimensions), was modified to simulate Southern Inland and Coastal Systems (SICS) hydrodynamics and transport conditions. Modifications include improvements to evapotranspiration and rainfall calculation and to the algorithms that describe flow through coastal creeks. Techniques used in this model should be applicable to other similar low-gradient marsh settings in southern Florida and elsewhere. Numerous investigations were conducted within the SICS area of southeastern Everglades National Park and northeastern Florida Bay to provide data and parameter values for model development and testing. The U.S. Geological Survey and the National Park Service supported investigations for quantification of evapotranspiration, vegetative resistance to flow, wind-induced flow, land elevations, vegetation classifications, salinity conditions, exchange of ground and surface waters, and flow and transport in coastal creeks and embayments. The good agreement that was achieved between measured and simulated water levels, flows, and salinities through minimal adjustment of empirical coefficients indicates that hydrologic processes within the SICS area are represented properly

  13. EAARL Coastal Topography—Louisiana, Alabama, and Florida, June 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, Joseph W.; Morgan, Karen L. M.; Doran, Kara

    2016-01-01

    This dataset, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center, provides first and last return elevation data collected during a June 24, 2008 airborne lidar survey for the Chandeleur Islands, LA, Dauphin Island, AL, Santa Rosa Island, FL, and Bon Secour, AL. Elevation measurements were collected over the area using the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), a pulsed laser ranging system mounted onboard an aircraft to measure ground elevation, vegetation canopy, and coastal topography.

  14. Implications of Rising Sea Level on Everglades Restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanless, H. R.

    2008-05-01

    The strong likelihood of a significant rise in sea level during this century must be incorporated into the design of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) and its execution. With a warming Arctic and increased wind shear in the waters adjacent to Antarctica, accelerated ice melt of both Greenland and Antarctica has begun. With positive feedbacks, this melt appears irreversible on the century scale. Scientists of the Miami-Dade County Climate Change Task Force project that a global rise of sea level of at least 0.9-1.5 meters (3-5 feet) will occur by the end of the century. This anticipated rise will diminish the value of CERP unless (a) the design thoroughly incorporates a realistic sea level rise scenario and (b) there is a refocus of CERP's design to optimize water flow for wetland-community peat growth with the purpose of retarding saline encroachment. The goals of Everglades restoration must become (1) to provide an increase in water flowing at a gradually increasing elevation to permit rapid accumulation of robust organic peat beneath the freshwater wetland and (2) to actively manage the coastal mangrove wetland (e.g., aid hurricane recovery) to help it maintain a robust upwards-building peat margin. If this is done, the central and northern Everglades may survive as a healthy wetland habitat and provide fresh groundwater resources well into the next century. Actively building freshwater and mangrove peat and a dependable supply of freshwater are both critical to retarding saline encroachment up the Everglades depression. Without these, a 1.5 meter rise in sea level could move saline water nearly to Lake Okeechobee. Critical research questions and changes in management need to be addressed for this to succeed. The communities and conditions for optimal freshwater peat buildup must be documented and demonstrated. New management strategies must be designed and maintained to encourage rapid recovery of mangrove forests destroyed by hurricanes

  15. Geospatial characteristics of Florida's coastal and offshore environments: Distribution of important habitats for coastal and offshore biological resources and offshore sand resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Demopoulos, Amanda W.J.; Foster, Ann M.; Jones, Michal L.; Gualtieri, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    The Geospatial Characteristics GeoPDF of Florida's Coastal and Offshore Environments is a comprehensive collection of geospatial data describing the political boundaries and natural resources of Florida. This interactive map provides spatial information on bathymetry, sand resources, and locations of important habitats (for example, Essential Fish Habitats (EFH), nesting areas, strandings) for marine invertebrates, fish, reptiles, birds, and marine mammals. The map should be useful to coastal resource managers and others interested in marine habitats and submerged obstructions of Florida's coastal region. In particular, as oil and gas explorations continue to expand, the map can be used to explore information regarding sensitive areas and resources in the State of Florida. Users of this geospatial database will have access to synthesized information in a variety of scientific disciplines concerning Florida's coastal zone. This powerful tool provides a one-stop assembly of data that can be tailored to fit the needs of many natural resource managers. The map was originally developed to assist the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation, and Enforcement (BOEMRE) and coastal resources managers with planning beach restoration projects. The BOEMRE uses a systematic approach in planning the development of submerged lands of the Continental Shelf seaward of Florida's territorial waters. Such development could affect the environment. BOEMRE is required to ascertain the existing physical, biological, and socioeconomic conditions of the submerged lands and estimate the impact of developing these lands. Data sources included the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, BOEMRE, Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Florida Geographic Data Library, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, Florida Natural Areas Inventory, and the State of Florida, Bureau of Archeological Research. Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) compliant metadata are

  16. Hurricane disturbance and recovery of energy balance, CO2 fluxes and canopy structure in a mangrove forest of the Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barr, Jordan G.; Engel, Vic; Smith, Thomas J.; Fuentes, Jose D.

    2012-01-01

    Eddy covariance (EC) estimates of carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes and energy balance are examined to investigate the functional responses of a mature mangrove forest to a disturbance generated by Hurricane Wilma on October 24, 2005 in the Florida Everglades. At the EC site, high winds from the hurricane caused nearly 100% defoliation in the upper canopy and widespread tree mortality. Soil temperatures down to -50 cm increased, and air temperature lapse rates within the forest canopy switched from statically stable to statically unstable conditions following the disturbance. Unstable conditions allowed more efficient transport of water vapor and CO2 from the surface up to the upper canopy layer. Significant increases in latent heat fluxes (LE) and nighttime net ecosystem exchange (NEE) were also observed and sensible heat fluxes (H) as a proportion of net radiation decreased significantly in response to the disturbance. Many of these impacts persisted through much of the study period through 2009. However, local albedo and MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer) data (the Enhanced Vegetation Index) indicated a substantial proportion of active leaf area recovered before the EC measurements began 1 year after the storm. Observed changes in the vertical distribution and the degree of clumping in newly emerged leaves may have affected the energy balance. Direct comparisons of daytime NEE values from before the storm and after our measurements resumed did not show substantial or consistent differences that could be attributed to the disturbance. Regression analyses on seasonal time scales were required to differentiate the storm's impact on monthly average daytime NEE from the changes caused by interannual variability in other environmental drivers. The effects of the storm were apparent on annual time scales, and CO2 uptake remained approximately 250 g C m-2 yr-1 lower in 2009 compared to the average annual values measured in 2004–2005. Dry season CO2

  17. Hurricane disturbance and recovery of energy balance, CO 2 fluxes and canopy structure in a mangrove forest of the Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barr, J.G.; Engel, V.; Smith, T.J.; Fuentes, J.D.

    2012-01-01

    Eddy covariance (EC) estimates of carbon dioxide (CO 2) fluxes and energy balance are examined to investigate the functional responses of a mature mangrove forest to a disturbance generated by Hurricane Wilma on October 24, 2005 in the Florida Everglades. At the EC site, high winds from the hurricane caused nearly 100% defoliation in the upper canopy and widespread tree mortality. Soil temperatures down to -50cm increased, and air temperature lapse rates within the forest canopy switched from statically stable to statically unstable conditions following the disturbance. Unstable conditions allowed more efficient transport of water vapor and CO 2 from the surface up to the upper canopy layer. Significant increases in latent heat fluxes (LE) and nighttime net ecosystem exchange (NEE) were also observed and sensible heat fluxes (H) as a proportion of net radiation decreased significantly in response to the disturbance. Many of these impacts persisted through much of the study period through 2009. However, local albedo and MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer) data (the Enhanced Vegetation Index) indicated a substantial proportion of active leaf area recovered before the EC measurements began 1year after the storm. Observed changes in the vertical distribution and the degree of clumping in newly emerged leaves may have affected the energy balance. Direct comparisons of daytime NEE values from before the storm and after our measurements resumed did not show substantial or consistent differences that could be attributed to the disturbance. Regression analyses on seasonal time scales were required to differentiate the storm's impact on monthly average daytime NEE from the changes caused by interannual variability in other environmental drivers. The effects of the storm were apparent on annual time scales, and CO 2 uptake remained approximately 250gCm -2yr -1 lower in 2009 compared to the average annual values measured in 2004-2005. Dry season CO 2 uptake

  18. Hurricane disturbance and recovery of energy balance, CO2 fluxes and canopy structure in a mangrove forest of the Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barr, Jordan G.; Engel, Vic; Smith, Thomas J.; Fuentes, Jose D.

    2012-01-01

    Eddy covariance (EC) estimates of carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes and energy balance are examined to investigate the functional responses of a mature mangrove forest to a disturbance generated by Hurricane Wilma on October 24, 2005 in the Florida Everglades. At the EC site, high winds from the hurricane caused nearly 100% defoliation in the upper canopy and widespread tree mortality. Soil temperatures down to -50 cm increased, and air temperature lapse rates within the forest canopy switched from statically stable to statically unstable conditions following the disturbance. Unstable conditions allowed more efficient transport of water vapor and CO2 from the surface up to the upper canopy layer. Significant increases in latent heat fluxes (LE) and nighttime net ecosystem exchange (NEE) were also observed and sensible heat fluxes (H) as a proportion of net radiation decreased significantly in response to the disturbance. Many of these impacts persisted through much of the study period through 2009. However, local albedo and MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer) data (the Enhanced Vegetation Index) indicated a substantial proportion of active leaf area recovered before the EC measurements began 1 year after the storm. Observed changes in the vertical distribution and the degree of clumping in newly emerged leaves may have affected the energy balance. Direct comparisons of daytime NEE values from before the storm and after our measurements resumed did not show substantial or consistent differences that could be attributed to the disturbance. Regression analyses on seasonal time scales were required to differentiate the storm's impact on monthly average daytime NEE from the changes caused by interannual variability in other environmental drivers. The effects of the storm were apparent on annual time scales, and CO2 uptake remained approximately 250 g C m-2 yr-1 lower in 2009 compared to the average annual values measured in 2004–2005. Dry season CO2

  19. Stable isotopic and geochemical variability within shallow groundwater beneath a hardwood hammock and surface water in an adjoining slough (Everglades National Park, Florida, USA).

    PubMed

    Florea, Lee J; McGee, Dorien K

    2010-06-01

    Data from a 10-month monitoring study during 2007 in the Everglades ecosystem provide insight into the variation of delta(18)O, deltaD, and ion chemistry in surface water and shallow groundwater. Surface waters are sensitive to dilution from rainfall and input from external sources. Shallow groundwater, on the other hand, remains geochemically stable during the year. Surface water input from canals derived from draining agricultural areas to the north and east of the Everglades is evident in the ion data. delta(18)O and deltaD values in shallow groundwater remain near the mean of-2.4 and-12 per thousand, respectively. (18)O and D values are enriched in surface water compared with shallow groundwater and fluctuate in sync with those measured in rainfall. The local meteoric water line (LMWL) for precipitation is in close agreement with the global meteoric water line; however, the local evaporation line (LEL) for surface water and shallow groundwater is delta D=5.6 delta(18)O+1.5, a sign that these waters have experienced evaporation. The intercept of the LMWL and LEL indicates that the primary recharge to the Everglades is tropical cyclones or fronts. delta deuterium to delta(18)O excess (D(ex) values) generally reveal two moisture sources for precipitation, a maritime source during the fall and winter (D (ex)>10 per thousand) and a continental-influenced source (D (ex)<10 per thousand) in the spring and summer.

  20. Harmful algal toxins of the Florida red tide (Karenia brevis): natural chemical stressors in South Florida coastal ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Pierce, R H; Henry, M S

    2008-10-01

    The Florida red tide is a descriptive name for high concentrations of the harmful marine alga, Karenia brevis. Although most prevalent along the south-west Florida coast, periodic blooms have occurred throughout the entire US and Mexico Gulf coasts and the Atlantic coast to North Carolina. This dinoflagellate produces a suite of polyether neurotoxins, called brevetoxins, that cause severe impacts to natural resources, as well as public health. These naturally produced biotoxins may represent one of the most common chemical stressors impacting South Florida coastal and marine ecosystems. Impacts include massive fish kills, marine mammal, sea turtle and sea bird mortalities, benthic community die-off and public health effects from shellfish contamination and inhalation of air-borne toxins. The primary mode of action is binding to voltage-gated sodium channels causing depolarization of nerve cells, thus interfering with nerve transmission. Other effects include immune depression, bronchial constriction and haemolysis. Parent algal toxins are synthesized within the unicellular organism, others are produced as metabolic products. Recent studies into the composition of brevetoxins in cells, water, air and organisms have shown PbTx-2 to be the primary intracellular brevetoxin that is converted over time to PbTx-3 when the cells are ruptured, releasing extracellular brevetoxins into the environment. Brevetoxins become aerosolized by bubble-mediated transport of extracellular toxins, the composition of which varies depending on the composition in the source water. Bivalved molluscs rapidly accumulate brevetoxins as they filter feed on K. brevis cells. However, the parent algal toxins are rapidly metabolized to other compounds, some of which are responsible for neurotoxic shellfish poisoning (NSP). These results provide new insight into the distribution, persistence and impacts of red tide toxins to south-west Florida ecosystems.

  1. Harmful algal toxins of the Florida red tide (Karenia brevis): natural chemical stressors in South Florida coastal ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Henry, M. S.

    2009-01-01

    The Florida red tide is a descriptive name for high concentrations of the harmful marine alga, Karenia brevis. Although most prevalent along the south-west Florida coast, periodic blooms have occurred throughout the entire US and Mexico Gulf coasts and the Atlantic coast to North Carolina. This dinoflagellate produces a suite of polyether neurotoxins, called brevetoxins, that cause severe impacts to natural resources, as well as public health. These naturally produced biotoxins may represent one of the most common chemical stressors impacting South Florida coastal and marine ecosystems. Impacts include massive fish kills, marine mammal, sea turtle and sea bird mortalities, benthic community die-off and public health effects from shellfish contamination and inhalation of air-borne toxins. The primary mode of action is binding to voltage-gated sodium channels causing depolarization of nerve cells, thus interfering with nerve transmission. Other effects include immune depression, bronchial constriction and haemolysis. Parent algal toxins are synthesized within the unicellular organism, others are produced as metabolic products. Recent studies into the composition of brevetoxins in cells, water, air and organisms have shown PbTx-2 to be the primary intracellular brevetoxin that is converted over time to PbTx-3 when the cells are ruptured, releasing extracellular brevetoxins into the environment. Brevetoxins become aerosolized by bubble-mediated transport of extracellular toxins, the composition of which varies depending on the composition in the source water. Bivalved molluscs rapidly accumulate brevetoxins as they filter feed on K. brevis cells. However, the parent algal toxins are rapidly metabolized to other compounds, some of which are responsible for neurotoxic shellfish poisoning (NSP). These results provide new insight into the distribution, persistence and impacts of red tide toxins to south-west Florida ecosystems. PMID:18758951

  2. Winter mortality of common loons in Florida coastal waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Forrester, Donald J.; Davidson, W.R.; Lange, R.E.; Stroud, R.K.; Alexander, L.L.; Franson, J.C.; Haseltine, S.D.; Littell, R.C.; Nesbitt, S.A.

    1997-01-01

    Diagnostic findings are presented for 434 common loons (Gavia imrner) found sick or dead on Florida beaches from 1970 through 1994, primarily during the months of December to April. The most commonly recognized problem was an emaciation syndrome (66%), followed by oiling (18%), aspergillosis (7%), trauma (5%) and miscellaneous disease entities (1%). The cause-of-death for 3% of the birds was not determined. Many of the carcasses examined (n = 173) were obtained during an epizootic which occurred from January to March of 1983 in which more than 13,000 loons were estimated to have died. An emaciation syndrome, characterized by severe atrophy of pectoral muscles, loss of body fat and hemorrhagic enteritis, was the primary finding in this epizootic. It was postulated to have a complex etiologic basis involving synergistic effects and energy costs of migration, molting and replacement of flight feathers, food resource changes, salt-loading, intestinal parasitism, environmental contaminants, and inclement weather.

  3. Satellite applications to a coastal inlet study, Clearwater Beach, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Y. H.; Smutz, M.; Ruth, B. E.; Brooks, H. K.

    1977-01-01

    Two sets of LANDSAT magnetic tapes were obtained and displayed on the screen of an IMAGE 100 computer. Spectral analysis was performed to produce various signatures, their extent and location. Subsequent ground truth observations and measurements were gathered by means of hydrographic surveys and low-altitude aerial photography for interpretation and calibration of the LANDSAT data. Finally, a coastal engineering assessment based on the LANDSAT data was made. Recommendations to the City of Clearwater regarding the navigational channel alignment and dredging practice are presented in the light of the inlet stability.

  4. ATM Coastal Topography-Florida 2001: Western Panhandle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yates, Xan; Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Sallenger, A.H.; Bonisteel, Jamie M.; Klipp, Emily S.; Wright, C. Wayne

    2009-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived first surface (FS) topography were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of the western Florida panhandle coastline, acquired October 2-4 and 7-10, 2001. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative scanning Lidar instrument originally developed by NASA, and known as the Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), was used during data acquisition. The ATM system is a scanning Lidar system that measures high-resolution topography of the land surface and incorporates a green-wavelength laser operating at pulse rates of 2 to 10 kilohertz. Measurements from the laser-ranging device are coupled with data acquired from inertial navigation system (INS) attitude sensors and differentially corrected global positioning system (GPS) receivers to measure topography of the surface at accuracies of +/-15 centimeters. The nominal ATM platform is a Twin Otter or P-3 Orion aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the ATM system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom-built processing system developed in a NASA-USGS collaboration. ALPS supports the exploration and processing of Lidar data in an interactive or batch mode. Modules for presurvey flight line definition, flight path plotting, Lidar raster and waveform investigation, and digital camera image playback have been developed. Processing algorithms have been developed to extract the range to the first and last significant return within each waveform. ALPS is routinely used

  5. ATM Coastal Topography-Florida 2001: Eastern Panhandle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yates, Xan; Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Sallenger, A.H.; Bonisteel, Jamie M.; Klipp, Emily S.; Wright, C. Wayne

    2009-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived first surface (FS) topography were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of the eastern Florida panhandle coastline, acquired October 2, 2001. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative scanning Lidar instrument originally developed by NASA, and known as the Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), was used during data acquisition. The ATM system is a scanning Lidar system that measures high-resolution topography of the land surface and incorporates a green-wavelength laser operating at pulse rates of 2 to 10 kilohertz. Measurements from the laser-ranging device are coupled with data acquired from inertial navigation system (INS) attitude sensors and differentially corrected global positioning system (GPS) receivers to measure topography of the surface at accuracies of +/-15 centimeters. The nominal ATM platform is a Twin Otter or P-3 Orion aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the ATM system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom-built processing system developed in a NASA-USGS collaboration. ALPS supports the exploration and processing of Lidar data in an interactive or batch mode. Modules for presurvey flight line definition, flight path plotting, Lidar raster and waveform investigation, and digital camera image playback have been developed. Processing algorithms have been developed to extract the range to the first and last significant return within each waveform. ALPS is routinely used to create

  6. Derivation of Ground Surface and Vegetation in a Coastal Florida Wetland with Airborne Laser Technology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raabe, Ellen A.; Harris, Melanie S.; Shrestha, Ramesh L.; Carter, William E.

    2008-01-01

    The geomorphology and vegetation of marsh-dominated coastal lowlands were mapped from airborne laser data points collected on the Gulf Coast of Florida near Cedar Key. Surface models were developed using low- and high-point filters to separate ground-surface and vegetation-canopy intercepts. In a non-automated process, the landscape was partitioned into functional landscape units to manage the modeling of key landscape features in discrete processing steps. The final digital ground surface-elevation model offers a faithful representation of topographic relief beneath canopies of tidal marsh and coastal forest. Bare-earth models approximate field-surveyed heights by + 0.17 m in the open marsh and + 0.22 m under thick marsh or forest canopy. The laser-derived digital surface models effectively delineate surface features of relatively inaccessible coastal habitats with a geographic coverage and vertical detail previously unavailable. Coastal topographic details include tidal-creek tributaries, levees, modest topographic undulations in the intertidal zone, karst features, silviculture, and relict sand dunes under coastal-forest canopy. A combination of laser-derived ground-surface and canopy-height models and intensity values provided additional mapping capabilities to differentiate between tidal-marsh zones and forest types such as mesic flatwood, hydric hammock, and oak scrub. Additional derived products include fine-scale shoreline and topographic profiles. The derived products demonstrate the capability to identify areas of concern to resource managers and unique components of the coastal system from laser altimetry. Because the very nature of a wetland system presents difficulties for access and data collection, airborne coverage from remote sensors has become an accepted alternative for monitoring wetland regions. Data acquisition with airborne laser represents a viable option for mapping coastal topography and for evaluating habitats and coastal change on marsh

  7. Species Profiles. Life Histories and Environmental Requirements of Coastal Fishes and Invertebrates (South Florida). Southern, Gulf, and Summer Flounders.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-01

    caused by coastal development. Each profile has sections on taxonomy , life history, ecological role, environmental requirements, and economic importance...Florida)JU1998 E SOUTHERN, GULF, AND SUMMER FLO NDERS Coastal Ecology Group Fish and Wildlife Service Waterways Experiment Station U.S. Department of...Fish and Wildlife Service 1010 Gause Boulevard Slidell, LA 70458 Performed for Coastal Ecology Group U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment

  8. Climate change and coastal environmental risk perceptions in Florida.

    PubMed

    Carlton, Stuart J; Jacobson, Susan K

    2013-11-30

    Understanding public perceptions of climate change risks is a prerequisite for effective climate communication and adaptation. Many studies of climate risk perceptions have either analyzed a general operationalization of climate change risk or employed a case-study approach of specific adaptive processes. This study takes a different approach, examining attitudes toward 17 specific, climate-related coastal risks and cognitive, affective, and risk-specific predictors of risk perception. A survey of 558 undergraduates revealed that risks to the physical environment were a greater concern than economic or biological risks. Perceptions of greater physical environment risks were significantly associated with having more pro-environmental attitudes, being female, and being more Democratic-leaning. Perceptions of greater economic risks were significantly associated with having more negative environmental attitudes, being female, and being more Republican-leaning. Perceptions of greater biological risks were significantly associated with more positive environmental attitudes. The findings suggest that focusing on physical environment risks maybe more salient to this audience than communications about general climate change adaptation. The results demonstrate that climate change beliefs and risk perceptions are multifactorial and complex and are shaped by individuals' attitudes and basic beliefs. Climate risk communications need to apply this knowledge to better target cognitive and affective processes of specific audiences, rather than providing simple characterizations of risks. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Coastal Lake Record of Holocene Paleo-Storms from Northwest Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donoghue, J. F.; Coor, J. L.; Wang, Y.; Das, O.; Kish, S.; Elsner, J.; Hu, X. B.; Niedoroda, A. W.; Ye, M.

    2009-12-01

    The northwest Florida coast of the Gulf of Mexico has an unusually active storm history. Climate records for a study area in the mid-region of the Florida panhandle coast show that 29 hurricanes have made landfall within a 100-km radius during historic time. These events included 9 major storms (category 3 or higher). A longer-term geologic record of major storm impacts is essential for better understanding storm climatology and refining morphodynamic models. The Florida panhandle region contains a series of unique coastal lakes which are long-lived and whose bottom sediments hold a long-term record of coastal storm occurrence. The lakes are normally isolated from the open Gulf, protected behind a near-continuous dune barrier. Lake water is normally fresh to brackish. Lake bottom sediments consist of organic-rich muds. During major storms the dunes are breached and the lakes are temporarily open to marine water and the possibility of sandy overwash. Both a sedimentologic and geochemical signature is imparted to the lake sediments by storm events. Bottom sediment cores have been collected from the lakes. The cores have been subsampled and subjected to sedimentologic, stable isotopic and geochronologic analyses. The result is a sediment history of the lakes, and a record of storm occurrence during the past few millennia. The outcome is a better understanding of the long-term risk of major storms. The findings are being incorporated into a larger model designed to make reliable predictions of the effects of near-future climate change on natural coastal systems and on coastal infrastructure, and to enable cost-effective mitigation and adaptation strategies.

  10. Predicted Changes in Interannual Water-Level Fluctuations Due to Climate Change and Its Implications for the Vegetation of the Florida Everglades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Valk, Arnold G.; Volin, John C.; Wetzel, Paul R.

    2015-04-01

    The number of dominant vegetation types (wet prairies, sawgrass flats, ridges and sloughs, sloughs, and tree islands) historically and currently found in the Everglades, FL, USA, as with other wetlands with standing water, appears to be primarily a function of the magnitude of interannual water-level fluctuations. Analyses of 40 years of water-depth data were used to estimate the magnitude of contemporary (baseline) water-level fluctuations in undisturbed ridge and slough landscapes. Baseline interannual water-level fluctuations above the soil surface were at least 1.5 m. Predicted changes in interannual water-level fluctuations in 2060 were examined for seven climate change scenarios. When rainfall is predicted to increase by 10 %, the wettest scenario, the interannual range of water-level fluctuation increases to 1.8 m above the soil surface in sloughs. When rainfall is predicted to decrease by 10 % and temperatures to increase by 1.5 °C, the driest scenario, the range of interannual range of water-level fluctuations is predicted to decrease to 1.2 m above the soil surface in sloughs. A change of 25-30 cm in interannual water-level fluctuations is needed to change the number of vegetation types in a wetland. This suggests that the two most extreme climate change scenarios could have a significant impact on the overall structure of wetland vegetation, i.e., the number of vegetation types or zones, found in the Everglades.

  11. Predicted changes in interannual water-level fluctuations due to climate change and its implications for the vegetation of the Florida Everglades.

    PubMed

    van der Valk, Arnold G; Volin, John C; Wetzel, Paul R

    2015-04-01

    The number of dominant vegetation types (wet prairies, sawgrass flats, ridges and sloughs, sloughs, and tree islands) historically and currently found in the Everglades, FL, USA, as with other wetlands with standing water, appears to be primarily a function of the magnitude of interannual water-level fluctuations. Analyses of 40 years of water-depth data were used to estimate the magnitude of contemporary (baseline) water-level fluctuations in undisturbed ridge and slough landscapes. Baseline interannual water-level fluctuations above the soil surface were at least 1.5 m. Predicted changes in interannual water-level fluctuations in 2060 were examined for seven climate change scenarios. When rainfall is predicted to increase by 10 %, the wettest scenario, the interannual range of water-level fluctuation increases to 1.8 m above the soil surface in sloughs. When rainfall is predicted to decrease by 10 % and temperatures to increase by 1.5 °C, the driest scenario, the range of interannual range of water-level fluctuations is predicted to decrease to 1.2 m above the soil surface in sloughs. A change of 25-30 cm in interannual water-level fluctuations is needed to change the number of vegetation types in a wetland. This suggests that the two most extreme climate change scenarios could have a significant impact on the overall structure of wetland vegetation, i.e., the number of vegetation types or zones, found in the Everglades.

  12. Wading birds as bioindicators of mercury contamination in Florida, USA: annual and geographic variation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frederick, P.C.; Spalding, M.G.; Dusek, R.

    2002-01-01

    Mercury contamination in wetland biota is often dynamic, difficult to predict, and costly to track. In this paper, we present results from a six-year study of growing feathers of piscivorous birds as monitors of wetland Hg exposure in Florida, USA, wetlands. Between 1994 and 2000, we collected feathers of growing great egret (Ardea alba) nestlings from colonies in the freshwater Everglades of southern Florida, and during 1998, feathers were collected from chicks of both great egrets and white ibises (Eudocimus albus) at a variety of colonies throughout peninsular Florida. Coastal colonies showed significantly lower feather Hg concentrations than did inland sites. Within the Everglades, we found significant effects of both geographic location and year on age-adjusted mean total Hg concentrations in feathers. Over the course of our study, Everglades colonies maintained their Hg concentration rankings relative to one another, but all showed strongly declining Hg concentrations (mean of 73% averaged across colonies, between 1994 and 2000). Using a previously established predictive relationship between Hg consumption in food and feather Hg for great egrets, we estimated that Hg concentrations in the aggregate diet of egrets have been reduced by an average of 67%. We conclude that the Everglades has undergone a biologically significant decline in Hg availability in the wetland food web, possibly because of decreased local inputs.

  13. Environmental impacts on the southern Florida coastal waters: a history of change in Florida Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brewster-Wingard, G. L.; Ishman, S. E.; Holmes, C. W.

    1998-01-01

    Analyses of four cores located in the northern transitional, eastern, and central portions of Florida Bay reveal historical patterns of change in salinity and seagrass distribution. Salinity and the distribution of seagrass beds are two critical issues for the restoration of Florida Bay. The distribution of benthic fauna in Bob Allen 6A and Russell Bank 19B cores illustrates changes in environmental parameters prior to 1900. Natural fluctuations occur in salinity, but the amplitude of those fluctuations was limited to a 15–20% shift about the mean. Subtle changes occur in the benthic fauna around 1910, but beginning around 1940, the pattern of salinity fluctuation departs substantially from the pre-1900 pattern. Post-1940, the salinity oscillates 40–60% about the mean. This pattern is seen in all indicators measured. Around 1970, a significant but short term decline occurred in salinity. The Taylor Creek T24 core from the northern transitional zone reflects changes in freshwater flow that have occurred during this century. The upper portion of the core records a significant increase in salinity, with a slight decrease occurring in recent years. The Pass Key 37 core represents an area of very high sedimentation rates; an increase in salinity occurs in the upper portion of the core. Natural fluctuations in seagrass distribution are inferred from the shifts in relative abundance of epiphytal species preserved in the cores. All four cores show an increase in epiphytes and therefore in seagrass coverage during this century. An increase also occurs in epiphytal species that can dwell on either Thalassia or macro-algal mats associated with Thalassia beds. These data suggest an increase in algal-mats has occurred during this century. The Bob Allen 6A core records an extensive period during the 1800's of little to no vegetative cover of the substrate based on the near absence of epiphytic species in that segment of the core. Following this period, the epiphytal species

  14. Southern Florida River of Grass

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-04-17

    Florida Everglades is a region of broad, slow-moving sheets of water flowing southward over low-lying areas from Lake Okeechobeeto the Gulf of Mexico. These images fromNASA Terra satellite show the Everglades region on January 16, 2002.

  15. Effect of sea-level rise on future coastal groundwater resources in southern Florida, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langevin, Christian D.; Zygnerski, Michael R.; White, Jeremy T.; Hughes, Joseph D.

    2010-01-01

    An existing variable‐density groundwater flow and solute transport model, developed for the northern part of Broward County, Florida, was used to predict the effect of sealevel rise on future coastal groundwater resources. Using average annual conditions from 2005, simulations were performed for 100 years into the future using four different rates of sea‐level rise: 0, 24, 48, and 88 centimeters per century. Results from these predictive analyses suggest that the average concentration of groundwater withdrawn at the municipal well field will exceed the potable limit after 70, 60, 55, and 49 years, respectively, for the four simulations.

  16. Florida coastal ecological characterization: a socioeconomic study of the northwestern region. Volume I. Text

    SciTech Connect

    French, C.O.; Parsons, J.W.

    1983-08-01

    Data are compiled from existing sources on the social and economic characteristics of the Northwestern coastal region of Florida, which is made up of Escambia, Santa Rosa, Okaloosa, Walton, Bay, Gulf, and Franklin Counties. Described are the components and interrelationships among complex processes that include population and demographics characteristics, mineral production, multiple-use conflicts, recreation and tourism, agricultural production, sport and commercial fishing, transportation, industrial and residential development, and environmental issues and regulations. Energetics models of socioeconomic systems are also presented. 40 figures, 108 tables.

  17. Nutrient inputs from the watershed and coastal eutrophication in the Florida Keys

    SciTech Connect

    LaPointe, B.E. ); Clark, M.W. )

    1992-12-01

    Widespread use of septic tanks in the Florida Keys increase the nutrient concentrations of limestone ground waters that discharge into shallow nearshore waters, resulting in coastal eutrophication. This study characterizes watershed nutrient inputs, transformations, and effects along a land-sea gradient stratified into four ecosystems that occur with increasing distance from land: manmade canal systems, seagrass meadows, patch reefs, and offshore bank reefs. Soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP), the primary limiting nutrient, was significantly elevated in canal systems, while dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN; NH[sub 4][sup =] and NO[sub 3][sup [minus

  18. The Effect of Increased Salinity and Temperature in Peat Soils from the Everglades: Implications for Biogenic Gas Production and Release Under a Sea Level Rise Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirianni, M.; Comas, X.

    2015-12-01

    Sea level rise (SLR) is an increasingly important topic for many low-lying coastal areas such as South Florida. The United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) projects that sea level change in South Florida, over the next 50 years, will increase between 0.1 and 0.6 meters. Given the low elevation and its shallow slope, the Everglades region is highly susceptible to changes in sea level. Based on the USACE SLR projections it seems inevitable that previously unexposed freshwater areas of the southern Everglades will become increasingly exposed to saline water. The effects of such saline water intrusion into the current C dynamics of the Everglades (particularly in terms of biogenic gas production and emissions, i.e. CH4 and CO2) is however uncertain. As previously proposed by others, increases in salinity in peat soils will result in dilation of pore spaces and thus increases in hydraulic conductivity, while limiting methanogenesis. However, increases in temperature may induce the opposite effect, particularly in terms of methanogenic activity. Previous studies investigating the effects of increased salinity on freshwater peat soils in the Everglades are very limited, and to our knowledge none have intended to monitor the internal gas dynamics within the peat matrix using an array of geophysical and hydrological methods such as ground penetrating radar (GPR), time-lapse photography, gas chromatography, and constant head permeameter tests. Preliminary laboratory results showed (1) a progressive decrease in gas content within the peat matrix (i.e. production) and gas releases once fluid conductivity is increased; (2) a progressive increase in hydraulic conductivity once fluid conductivity is increased; and (3) maximum gas releases detected during early stages of pore dilation (after increasing salinity) followed by a progressive decrease in gas release as salinity increased. This study has implications for better understanding how C dynamics in the Everglades may be

  19. Investigation of Carbon, Nutrients, and Groundwater Inputs in Coastal Florida Using Colored Dissolved Organic Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arellano, A. R.; Coble, P. G.; Conmy, R. N.; Marine Spectrochemistry Group

    2010-12-01

    Very few studies of the exchange of water between aquifers and the ocean have been conducted along the Florida coast. Progression of residential and agricultural development in coastal areas is leading to increased nutrients from fertilizers and wastewaters to groundwater. A portion of these nutrients ultimately is released to coastal surface waters. Groundwater mining has increased salt water intrusions in coastal aquifers which may further enhance nutrient fluxes to coastal surface waters. Nutrient concentration in coastal groundwater is sometimes higher than those in river water, counterbalancing for the lower mass flux of groundwater relative to surface waters. Nutrient and carbon inputs through groundwater in certain areas may play an important role in cycling and primary productivity in the coastal ocean. King’s Bay is a spring-fed watershed and manatee sanctuary located on the West Florida Shelf. Over the past 25 years, springs supplying groundwater to King’s Bay have shown a three-fold increase in nitrate concentration and increased invasion of nuisance algae. It has been challenging to track sources of both nutrients and other water quality parameters because there are multiple water supplies to King’s Bay. The goal of this project is to improve the estimate of water, nutrients, and carbon from groundwater discharge into the coastal zone. This paper will present preliminary results of high resolution fluorescence spectroscopy analyses of the various source water types in the King's Bay watershed, including deep and shallow aquifers, wells, springs, and surface water sources. Samples were obtained from various sites--5 springs, 27 wells, 12 surface, and 9 lakes and rivers-- within the King’s Bay area during one dry season. Lakes and rivers had the highest fluorescence intensities and showed similar composition, with the most red-shifted emission maxima. Second highest concentration was seen in some of the wells which had wide range in both

  20. Brevetoxin persistence in sediments and seagrass epiphytes of east Florida coastal waters

    PubMed Central

    Hitchcock, Gary L.; Fourqurean, James W.; Drake, Jeana L.; Mead, Ralph N.; Heil, Cynthia A.

    2012-01-01

    A bloom of Karenia brevis Davis developed in September 2007 near Jacksonville, Florida and subsequently progressed south through east Florida coastal waters and the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (ICW). Maximum cell abundances exceeded 106 cells L−1 through October in the northern ICW between Jacksonville and the Indian River Lagoon. The bloom progressed further south during November, and terminated in December 2007 at densities of 104 cells L−1 in the ICW south of Jupiter Inlet, Florida. Brevetoxins were subsequently sampled in sediments and seagrass epiphytes in July and August 2008 in the ICW. Sediment brevetoxins occurred at concentrations of 11–15 ng PbTx-3 equivalents (g dry wt sediment)−1 in three of five basins in the northern ICW during summer 2008. Seagrass beds occur south of the Mosquito Lagoon in the ICW. Brevetoxins were detected in six of the nine seagrass beds sampled between the Mosquito Lagoon and Jupiter Inlet at concentrations of 6–18 ng (g dry wt epiphytes)−1. The highest brevetoxins concentrations were found in sediments near Patrick Air Force Base at 89 ng (g dry wt sediment)−1. In general, brevetoxins occurred in either seagrass epiphytes or sediments. Blades of the resident seagrass species have a maximum life span of less than six months, so it is postulated that brevetoxins could be transferred between epibenthic communities of individual blades in seagrass beds. The occurrence of brevetoxins in east Florida coast sediments and seagrass epiphytes up to eight months after bloom termination supports observations from the Florida west coast that brevetoxins can persist in marine ecosystems in the absence of sustained blooms. Furthermore, our observations show that brevetoxins can persist in sediments where seagrass communities are absent. PMID:23762030

  1. Brevetoxin persistence in sediments and seagrass epiphytes of east Florida coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Hitchcock, Gary L; Fourqurean, James W; Drake, Jeana L; Mead, Ralph N; Heil, Cynthia A

    2012-01-01

    A bloom of Karenia brevis Davis developed in September 2007 near Jacksonville, Florida and subsequently progressed south through east Florida coastal waters and the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (ICW). Maximum cell abundances exceeded 10(6) cells L(-1) through October in the northern ICW between Jacksonville and the Indian River Lagoon. The bloom progressed further south during November, and terminated in December 2007 at densities of 10(4) cells L(-1) in the ICW south of Jupiter Inlet, Florida. Brevetoxins were subsequently sampled in sediments and seagrass epiphytes in July and August 2008 in the ICW. Sediment brevetoxins occurred at concentrations of 11-15 ng PbTx-3 equivalents (g dry wt sediment)(-1) in three of five basins in the northern ICW during summer 2008. Seagrass beds occur south of the Mosquito Lagoon in the ICW. Brevetoxins were detected in six of the nine seagrass beds sampled between the Mosquito Lagoon and Jupiter Inlet at concentrations of 6-18 ng (g dry wt epiphytes)(-1). The highest brevetoxins concentrations were found in sediments near Patrick Air Force Base at 89 ng (g dry wt sediment)(-1). In general, brevetoxins occurred in either seagrass epiphytes or sediments. Blades of the resident seagrass species have a maximum life span of less than six months, so it is postulated that brevetoxins could be transferred between epibenthic communities of individual blades in seagrass beds. The occurrence of brevetoxins in east Florida coast sediments and seagrass epiphytes up to eight months after bloom termination supports observations from the Florida west coast that brevetoxins can persist in marine ecosystems in the absence of sustained blooms. Furthermore, our observations show that brevetoxins can persist in sediments where seagrass communities are absent.

  2. Neotropical coastal wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKee, Karen L.; Batzer, Darold P.; Baldwin, Andrew H.

    2012-01-01

    The Neotropical region, which includes the tropical Americas, is one of the world's eight biogeographic zones. It contains some of the most diverse and unique wetlands in the world, some of which are still relatively undisturbed by humans. This chapter focuses on the northern segment of the Neotropics (south Florida, the Caribbean islands, Mexico, and Central America), an area that spans a latitudinal gradient from about 7 N to 29 N and 60 W to 112 W. Examples of coastal wetlands in this realm include the Everglades (Florida, USA), Ten Thousand Islands (Florida, USA), Laguna de Terminos (Mexico), Twin Cays (Belize), and Zapata Swamp (Cuba). Coastal wetlands are dominated by mangroves, which will be emphasized here, but also include freshwater swamps and marshes, saline marshes, and seagrass beds. The aim of this chapter is to provide a broad overview of Neotropical coastal wetlands of the North American continent, with an emphasis on mangroves, since this is the dominant vegetation type and because in-depth coverage of all wetland types is impossible here. Instead, the goal is to describe the environmental settings, plant and animal communities, key ecological controls, and some conservation concerns, with specific examples. Because this book deals with wetlands of North America, this chapter excludes coastal wetlands of South America. However, much of the information is applicable to mangrove, marsh, and seagrass communities of other tropicaI regions.

  3. Diurnal and seasonal variation of coastal carbonate system parameters in South Florida and the Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, K.; Smiley, N. A.

    2010-12-01

    Assessing the impact of climate change and ocean acidification on coastal and marine ecosystems requires accurate characterization of its chemical and physical effects on the carbonate system in seawater. Very few data exist that characterize natural variations in coastal carbonate chemistry, limiting the development and validation of coastal climate change and ocean acidification models. We measured carbonate system parameters over diurnal cycles in shallow, coastal ecosystems of Florida Bay, Tampa Bay, Biscayne National Park, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Tobago, and the Bahamas. Salinity, temperature, and dissolved oxygen were measured continuously, and seawater samples were collected every 4 hours throughout multiple 24-hour time periods. Total alkalinity and pH were measured using spectrophotometric techniques, dissolved inorganic carbon was measured via carbon coulometry, and remaining carbonate system parameters were calculated using CO2SYS. Seasonal variability was either determined from existing data sets, or modeled using salinity and temperature data collected from CTDs deployed at study locations or long-term monitoring sites. Results indicate that all carbonate system parameters showed distinct variation over diurnal timescales primarily due to productivity, respiration, and precipitation and dissolution of calcium carbonate. The average range of diurnal variation was up to 102% of the seasonal range of variability in carbonate chemistry. Our data indicate that use of seasonal data sets without careful consideration of diurnal variability (or vice versa) may impart significant error in calculation of annual carbon budgets and modeling carbon cycling in coastal ecosystems. Implications for modeling long-term impacts of ocean acidification in coastal ecosystems will be discussed.

  4. Accelerated sea level rise and Florida Current transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Sweet, W.

    2015-04-01

    The Florida Current is the headwater of the Gulf Stream and is a component of the North Atlantic western boundary current from which a geostrophic balance between sea surface height and mass transport directly influence coastal sea levels along the Florida Straits. A linear regression of daily Florida Current transport estimates does not find a significant change in transport over the last decade, however, a nonlinear trend extracted from empirical mode decomposition suggests a 3 Sv decline in mean transport. This decline is consistent with observed tide gauge records in Florida Bay and the Straits, all exhibiting an acceleration of mean sea level rise over the decade. It is not known whether this recent change represents natural variability or the onset of the anticipated secular decline in Atlantic meridional overturning circulation, nonetheless, such changes have direct impacts on the sensitive ecological systems of the Everglades as well as the climate of western Europe and eastern North America.

  5. Accelerated sea level rise and Florida Current transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Sweet, W.

    2015-07-01

    The Florida Current is the headwater of the Gulf Stream and is a component of the North Atlantic western boundary current from which a geostrophic balance between sea surface height and mass transport directly influence coastal sea levels along the Florida Straits. A linear regression of daily Florida Current transport estimates does not find a significant change in transport over the last decade; however, a nonlinear trend extracted from empirical mode decomposition (EMD) suggests a 3 Sv decline in mean transport. This decline is consistent with observed tide gauge records in Florida Bay and the straits exhibiting an acceleration of mean sea level (MSL) rise over the decade. It is not known whether this recent change represents natural variability or the onset of the anticipated secular decline in Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC); nonetheless, such changes have direct impacts on the sensitive ecological systems of the Everglades as well as the climate of western Europe and eastern North America.

  6. FACILITATING PUBLIC ACCESS TO GOVERNMENT ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING DATA: THE LIVING EVERGLADES WEB SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Technology Transfer and Support Division of the USEPA, Office of Research and Development's (ORD) National Risk Management Research Laboratory has developed this handbook, in conjunction with the South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD), to document The Living Everglad...

  7. FACILITATING PUBLIC ACCESS TO GOVERNMENT ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING DATA: THE LIVING EVERGLADES WEB SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Technology Transfer and Support Division of the USEPA, Office of Research and Development's (ORD) National Risk Management Research Laboratory has developed this handbook, in conjunction with the South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD), to document The Living Everglad...

  8. Linkages between coastal runoff and the Florida Keys ecosystem: A study of a dark plume event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chuanmin; Muller-Karger, Frank E.; Vargo, Gabriel A.; Neely, Merrie Beth; Johns, Elizabeth

    2004-08-01

    Using data collected by satellite sensors, rain and river gauges, and ship surveys, we studied the development and wind-driven transport of a dark water plume from near Charlotte Harbor, Florida, to the Dry Tortugas in the Florida Keys in mid-October 2003. MODIS and SeaWiFS imagery showed that the patch contained an extensive (~5,500 km2) phytoplankton bloom that formed originally near the central coast of Florida. The data linked the bloom to high nutrient coastal runoff caused by heavy rainfall in June and August. Total N and P required for the bloom, which may contain some Karenia brevis cells, was estimated to be 2.3 × 107 and 1.5 × 106 moles, respectively. The dark color became increasingly dominated by colored dissolved organic matter, toward the Dry Tortugas, where CDOM absorption coefficients (0.08-0.12 m-1 at 400 nm) were 2-3 times higher than the surrounding shelf waters, while chlorophyll and inorganic nutrients decreased to negligible levels.

  9. Development and evaluation of sediment quality guidelines for Florida coastal waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacDonald, Donald D.; Carr, R. Scott; Calder, Fred D.; Long, Edward R.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.

    1996-01-01

    The weight-of-evidence approach to the development of sediment quality guidelines (SQGs) was modified to support the derivation of biological effects-based SQGs for Florida coastal waters. Numerical SQGs were derived for 34 substances, including nine trace metals, 13 individual polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), three groups of PAHs, total polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), seven pesticides and one phthalate ester. For each substance, a threshold effects level (TEL) and a probable effects level (PEL) was calculated. These two values defined three ranges of chemical concentrations, including those that were (1) rarely, (2) occasionally or (3) frequently associated with adverse effects. The SQGs were then evaluated to determine their degree of agreement with other guidelines (an indicator of comparability) and the percent incidence of adverse effects within each concentration range (an indicator of reliability). The guidelines also were used to classify (using a dichotomous system: toxic, with one or more exceedances of the PELs or non-toxic, with no exceedances of the TELs) sediment samples collected from various locations in Florida and the Gulf of Mexico. The accuracy of these predictions was then evaluated using the results of the biological tests that were performed on the same sediment samples. The resultant SQGs were demonstrated to provide practical, reliable and predictive tools for assessing sediment quality in Florida and elsewhere in the southeastern portion of the United States.

  10. Canine distemper epizootic in Everglades mink.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, M W; Shindle, D B; Allison, A B; Terrell, S P; Mead, D G; Owen, M

    2009-10-01

    Four free-ranging mink, Neovison vison, collected between June and September 2004 in the Fakahatchee Strand Preserve State Park (FSPSP, Florida, USA), were examined for canine distemper virus (CDV) infection. Microscopic lesions and viral inclusions consistent with CDV infection were observed in three mink. Virus isolation and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction performed on all mink were positive for CDV. Anecdotal records of mink observations in FSPSP suggest a postepizootic decline in the mink population followed by an apparent recovery. We recommend further research to assess the status of the Everglades mink and the impact of CDV on this and other American mink populations in Florida.

  11. Everglade kites feed on nonsnail prey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sykes, P.W.; Kale, H.W.

    1974-01-01

    The Everglade Kite (Rostrhamus sociabilis plumbeus) of Florida has been called snail hawk or snail kite because it was thought to feed exclusively on the soft parts of the freshwater apple snail (Pomacea paludosa) (Nicholson 1926, Howell 1932, Bent 1937, Snyder and Snyder 1969). Furthermore, the other three subspecies of this wide-ranging Neotropical raptor (Friedmann 1950) are known to feed only on species within the genus Pomacea (Haverschmidt 1962, 1970; Brown and Amadon 1968). We report here two different instances of kites feeding on nonsnail prey in Florida

  12. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers and polychlorinated biphenyls in a marine foodweb of coastal Florida.

    PubMed

    Johnson-Restrepo, Boris; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Addink, Rudolf; Adams, Douglas H

    2005-11-01

    Nine species of marine fish, including teleost fishes, sharks, and stingrays, and two species of marine mammals (dolphins) collected from Florida coastal waters were analyzed for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) to evaluate biomagnification factors (BMF) of these contaminants in a coastal foodweb. In addition, bottlenose dolphins and bull sharks collected from the Florida coast during the 1990s and the 2000s were analyzed for evaluation of temporal trends in PBDE and PCB levels in coastal ecosystems. Mean concentrations of PBDEs in muscle tissues of teleost fishes ranged from 8.0 ng/g, lipid wt (in silver perch), to 88 ng/g, lipid wt (in hardhead catfish), with an overall mean concentration of 43 +/- 30 ng/g, lipid wt. Mean concentrations of PBDEs in muscle of sharks ranged from 37.8 ng/g, lipid wt, in spiny dogfish to 1630 ng/g, lipid wt, in bull sharks. Mean concentrations of PBDEs in the blubber of bottlenose dolphins and striped dolphins were 1190 +/- 1580 and 660 ng/g, lipid wt, respectively. Tetra-BDE 47 (2,2',4,4'-) was the major congener detected in teleost fishes and dolphin samples, followed by BDE-99, BDE-153, BDE-100, and BDE-154. In contrast, BDE-209 was the most abundant congener in sharks. Concentrations of PBDEs and PCBs in dolphins and sharks were 1-2 orders of magnitude greater than those in lower trophic-level fish species, indicating biomagnification of both of these contaminants in the marine foodweb. Based on the analysis of sharks and dolphins collected over a 10-year period, an exponential increase in the concentrations of PBDEs and PCBs has occurred in these marine predators. The doubling time of PBDE and PCB concentrations was estimated to be 2-3 years for bull sharks and 3-4 years for bottlenose dolphin.

  13. Holocene peatland initiation in the Greater Everglades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, Stefan; de Boer, Hugo; Dermody, Brian; Wagner-Cremer, Friederike; Wassen, Martin; Eppinga, Maarten

    2015-04-01

    The mechanisms involved in the initiation and development of the Greater Everglades peatland ecosystems in South Florida (USA) remain a topic of discussion. In this study, we present an overview of basal ages of peat deposits in South Florida, which shows two major episodes of peatland initiation between 7.0-4.5 kyr and 3.5-2.0 kyr. Our analysis of regional climate proxy datasets led to three alternative hypotheses that may explain the timing and duration of these two peatland initiation episodes: (1) decreased drainage due to relative sea level (RSL) rise during the Holocene (2) gradual increase in precipitation throughout the Holocene, and (3) a combination of increasing precipitation, rising RSL and oscillations in the climate system. We test whether these three hypotheses can explain the pattern of initiation and development of the Greater Everglades peatlands using models that simulate the non-linear processes involved in peat production and decomposition in combination with the local drainage conditions of Southern Florida. The model results suggest that RSL-rise alone cannot predict the onset of peat initiation in the Greater Everglades using our model setup. The model also implies that the climate was wet enough for peat development also during the early Holocene. The first two hypothesized mechanisms in combination with climate oscillations may explain the onset of peat accumulation at 8.2 kyr BP. The two-phased character of peat land initiation may be explained by the spatial distribution of local drainage conditions. As peatland development is highly non-linear, our model uncovers a mechanistic way how peats can suddenly shift from a dry high equilibrium to a wet low equilibrium resulting in lake formation as observed in paleo-ecological studies in the Greater Everglades.

  14. Landscape modeling for Everglades ecosystem restoration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeAngelis, D.L.; Gross, L.J.; Huston, M.A.; Wolff, W.F.; Fleming, D.M.; Comiskey, E.J.; Sylvester, S.M.

    1998-01-01

    A major environmental restoration effort is under way that will affect the Everglades and its neighboring ecosystems in southern Florida. Ecosystem and population-level modeling is being used to help in the planning and evaluation of this restoration. The specific objective of one of these modeling approaches, the Across Trophic Level System Simulation (ATLSS), is to predict the responses of a suite of higher trophic level species to several proposed alterations in Everglades hydrology. These include several species of wading birds, the snail kite, Cape Sable seaside sparrow, Florida panther, white-tailed deer, American alligator, and American crocodile. ATLSS is an ecosystem landscape-modeling approach and uses Geographic Information System (GIS) vegetation data and existing hydrology models for South Florida to provide the basic landscape for these species. A method of pseudotopography provides estimates of water depths through time at 28 ?? 28-m resolution across the landscape of southern Florida. Hydrologic model output drives models of habitat and prey availability for the higher trophic level species. Spatially explicit, individual-based computer models simulate these species. ATLSS simulations can compare the landscape dynamic spatial pattern of the species resulting from different proposed water management strategies. Here we compare the predicted effects of one possible change in water management in South Florida with the base case of no change. Preliminary model results predict substantial differences between these alternatives in some biotic spatial patterns. ?? 1998 Springer-Verlag.

  15. The Everglades are still threatened by excess nutrients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Atreyee

    2012-10-01

    Since 1985, a Florida state agency constructed and maintained hundreds of square kilometers of wetlands built to regulate the amount of nutrients reaching the Everglades in southern Florida. However, Zapata-Rios et al. show that this is proving to be ineffective in controlling concentrations of phosphorous, a key nutrient, in the surface waters of the wetland. Historically, the Everglades has been a nutrient-poor environment, a characteristic that determines the delicate ecological balance and distinct flora and fauna in this region. Agricultural development and urbanization since the 1800s have not only claimed two- thirds of the natural Everglades (only 6000 square kilometers now exist in their natural form) but have also dramatically increased phosphorus levels in surface water, at times exceeding the acceptable limit of 10 micrograms per liter by severalfold.

  16. HYDROBIOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF THE COASTAL LAGOONS AT HUGH TAYLOR BIRCH STATE RECREATION AREA, FORT LAUDERDALE, FLORIDA: A HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brock, Robert J.

    1987-01-01

    The author presents initial results of an ongoing study of Southeast Florida coastal lagoon lakes. Objectives include presenting environmental conditions within and adjacent to the lagoons under a variety of hydrologic conditions and to determine water-quality changes in ground water and surface water and how these changes in water quality affect lagoonal biological communities within the lagoons.

  17. Temporal variability of carbon and nutrient burial, sediment accretion, and mass accumulation over the past century in a carbonate platform mangrove forest of the Florida Everglades.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breithaupt, Josh L.; Smoak, Joseph M.; Smith, Thomas J.; Sanders, Christian J.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this research was to measure temporal variability in accretion and mass sedimentation rates (including organic carbon (OC), total nitrogen (TN), and total phosphorous (TP)) from the past century in a mangrove forest on the Shark River in Everglades National Park, USA. The 210Pb Constant Rate of Supply model was applied to six soil cores to calculate annual rates over the most recent 10, 50, and 100 year time spans. Our results show that rates integrated over longer timeframes are lower than those for shorter, recent periods of observation. Additionally, the substantial spatial variability between cores over the 10 year period is diminished over the 100 year record, raising two important implications. First, a multiple-decade assessment of soil accretion and OC burial provides a more conservative estimate and is likely to be most relevant for forecasting these rates relative to long-term processes of sea level rise and climate change mitigation. Second, a small number of sampling locations are better able to account for spatial variability over the longer periods than for the shorter periods. The site average 100 year OC burial rate, 123 ± 19 (standard deviation) g m-2yr-1, is low compared with global mangrove values. High TN and TP burial rates in recent decades may lead to increased soil carbon remineralization, contributing to the low carbon burial rates. Finally, the strong correlation between OC burial and accretion across this site signals the substantial contribution of OC to soil building in addition to the ecosystem service of CO2 sequestration.

  18. Effects of burn temperature on ash nutrient forms and availability from cattail (Typha domingensis) and sawgrass (Cladium jamaicense) in the Florida Everglades.

    PubMed

    Qian, Y; Miao, S L; Gu, B; Li, Y C

    2009-01-01

    Plant ash derived from fire plays an important role in nutrient balance and cycling in ecosystems. Factors that determine the composition and availability of ash nutrients include fire intensity (burn temperature and duration), plant species, habitat nutrient enrichment, and leaf type (live or dead leaf). We used laboratory simulation methods to evaluate temperature effects on nutrient composition and metals in the residual ash of sawgrass (Cladium jamaicense) and cattail (Typha domingensis), particularly on post-fire phosphorus (P) availability in plant ash. Live and dead leaf samples were collected from Water Conservation Area 2A in the northern Everglades along a soil P gradient, where prescribed fire may be used to accelerate recovery of this unique ecosystem. Significant decreases in total carbon and total nitrogen were detected with increasing fire temperature. Organic matter combustion was nearly complete at temperatures > or = 450 degrees C. HCl-extractable P (average, 50% of total P in the ash) and NH(4)Cl-extractable P (average, 33% of total P in the ash) were the predominant P fractions for laboratory-burned ash. Although a low-intensity fire could induce an elevation of P availability, an intense fire generally resulted in decreased water-soluble P. Significant differences in nutrient compositions were observed between species, habitat nutrient status, and leaf types. More labile inorganic P remained in sawgrass ash than in cattail ash; hence, sawgrass ash has a greater potential to release available P than cattail. Fire intensity affected plant ash nutrient composition, particularly P availability, and the effects varied with plant species and leaf type. Therefore, it is important to consider fire intensity and vegetation community when using a prescribed fire for ecosystem management.

  19. Temporal variability of carbon and nutrient burial, sediment accretion, and mass accumulation over the past century in a carbonate platform mangrove forest of the Florida Everglades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breithaupt, Joshua L.; Smoak, Joseph M.; Smith, Thomas J.; Sanders, Christian J.

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this research was to measure temporal variability in accretion and mass sedimentation rates (including organic carbon (OC), total nitrogen (TN), and total phosphorous (TP)) from the past century in a mangrove forest on the Shark River in Everglades National Park, USA. The 210Pb Constant Rate of Supply model was applied to six soil cores to calculate annual rates over the most recent 10, 50, and 100 year time spans. Our results show that rates integrated over longer timeframes are lower than those for shorter, recent periods of observation. Additionally, the substantial spatial variability between cores over the 10 year period is diminished over the 100 year record, raising two important implications. First, a multiple-decade assessment of soil accretion and OC burial provides a more conservative estimate and is likely to be most relevant for forecasting these rates relative to long-term processes of sea level rise and climate change mitigation. Second, a small number of sampling locations are better able to account for spatial variability over the longer periods than for the shorter periods. The site average 100 year OC burial rate, 123 ± 19 (standard deviation) g m-2 yr-1, is low compared with global mangrove values. High TN and TP burial rates in recent decades may lead to increased soil carbon remineralization, contributing to the low carbon burial rates. Finally, the strong correlation between OC burial and accretion across this site signals the substantial contribution of OC to soil building in addition to the ecosystem service of CO2 sequestration.

  20. The ecological - Societal underpinnings of Everglades restoration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sklar, Fred H.; Chimney, M.J.; Newman, S.; McCormick, P.; Gawlik, D.; Miao, S.; McVoy, C.; Said, W.; Newman, J.; Coronado, C.; Crozier, G.; Korvela, M.; Rutchey, K.

    2005-01-01

    The biotic integrity of the Florida Everglades, a wetland of immense international importance, is threatened as a result of decades of human manipulation for drainage and development. Past management of the system only exacerbated the problems associated with nutrient enrichment and disruption of regional hydrology. The Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) now being implemented by Federal and State governments is an attempt to strike a balance between the needs of the environment with the complex management of water and the seemingly unbridled economic growth of southern Florida. CERP is expected to reverse negative environmental trends by "getting the water right", but successful Everglades restoration will require both geochemical and hydrologic intervention on a massive scale. This will produce ecological trade-offs and will require new and innovative scientific measures to (1) reduce total phosphorus concentrations within the remaining marsh to 10 ??g/L or lower; (2) quantify and link ecological benefits to the restoration of depths, hydroperiods, and flow velocities; and (3) compensate for ecological, economic, and hydrologic uncertainties in the CERP through adaptive management. ?? The Ecological Society of America.

  1. Origins and distribution of saline ground waters in the Floridan Aquifer in coastal southwest Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steinkampf, W.C.

    1982-01-01

    Twenty-three ground-water samples from the Floridan aquifer in coastal southwest Florida show that water quality deteriorates to the south and west. The waters grade from a fresh calcium magnesium bicarbonate sulfate type to a very saline sodium magnesium chloride type downgradient. Bromide-chloride and specific conductance ratios indicate that dilution of marine-like ground water is a signigicant mechanism in the evolution of the different water types found. Calcium, magnesium , and bicarbonate concentrations occur within a relatively narrow range and are primarily a function of mineral equilibria. Magnesium and strontium concentration distributions suggest several mineral-water interactions, including aragonite inversion, incongruent solution of magnesium calcite to a lower magnesian form, and dedolomitization. Sulfate concentrations increase downgradient and evince gypsum-anhydrite solution, particularly in the fresher waters. The extent to which each factor affects dissolved specie concentrations is a function of the location of the water in the flow system. (USGS)

  2. Modeling landscape dynamics and effects of sea-level rise on coastal wetlands of northwest Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, T.W.; Day, R.H.; Biagas, J.M.

    1997-06-01

    A research study to examine the ability to predict changes in coastal vegetation caused by sea level rise is very briefly summarized. A field survey was carried out on the northwest coast of Florida. A predictive elevation model was then generated from digitized US Geologic Survey 1:2400 hypsographic data using surface modeling techniques. Sea-level rise model simulations were generated to predict a likelihood index of habitat change and conversions under different scenarios. Maps were produced depicting location of the coastline and inland extent of salt marsh using a range of sea level rise rates through the year 2100. This modeling approach offers a technological tool to researchers and wetland managers for effective cumulative impact analysis of wetlands affected by sea-level rise.

  3. Waterbird use of coastal impoundments and management implications in east-central Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breininger, David R.; Smith, Rebecca B.

    1990-01-01

    Monthly surveys were conducted on Kennedy Space Center for one year to determine densities of waterbirds within impounded salt marshes that were predominantly open water with little emergent vegetation. The objective was to assess the importance of these impoundments to waterbirds, particularly wading birds, which are species of special conservation concern. Water-level management for mosquito control and waterfowl provided habitat for an abundance of ducks, shorebirds, coots, and wading birds. Average densities throughout the year for these groups were 5.26, 412, 2.80, and 2.20 birds/ha, respectively. The majority of waterfowl were present during the winter. Shorebirds were most common during spring migration. Wading bird densities increased with declining water level. Due to the extensive alteration and development of coastal wetlands in central Florida, properly managed impoundments may provide important feeding areas for maintaining certain waterbird populations.

  4. Remote sensing of ALGAL pigments to determine coastal phytoplankton dynamics in Florida Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, L.L.; Ambrosia, V.G.

    1997-06-01

    An important component of remote sensing of marine and coastal environments is the detection of phytoplankton to estimate biological activity. Traditionally the focus has been on detection of chlorophyll a, a photosynthetic pigment common to all algal groups. Recent advances in remote sensing instrumentation, in particular the development of hyperspectral imaging sensors, allow detection of additional algal pigments that include taxonomically significant photosynthetic and photoprotective accessory pigments. We are working with the hyperspectral imaging sensor AVIRIS (the Airborne Visible-Infrared Imaging Spectrometer) to characterize phytoplankton blooms in Florida Bay. Our data analysis focuses on intersection of image data (and image-derived spectral data) with our in-house library of algal pigment signatures.

  5. Monitoring Everglades freshwater marsh water level using L-band synthetic aperture radar backscatter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kim, Jin-Woo; Lu, Zhong; Jones, John W.; Shum, C.K.; Lee, Hyongki; Jia, Yuanyuan

    2014-01-01

    The Florida Everglades plays a significant role in controlling floods, improving water quality, supporting ecosystems, and maintaining biodiversity in south Florida. Adaptive restoration and management of the Everglades requires the best information possible regarding wetland hydrology. We developed a new and innovative approach to quantify spatial and temporal variations in wetland water levels within the Everglades, Florida. We observed high correlations between water level measured at in situ gages and L-band SAR backscatter coefficients in the freshwater marsh, though C-band SAR backscatter has no close relationship with water level. Here we illustrate the complementarity of SAR backscatter coefficient differencing and interferometry (InSAR) for improved estimation of high spatial resolution water level variations in the Everglades. This technique has a certain limitation in applying to swamp forests with dense vegetation cover, but we conclude that this new method is promising in future applications to wetland hydrology research.

  6. Biological control of Melaleuca quinquenervia: an Everglades invader

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A massive effort is underway to restore the Florida Everglades, mainly by re-engineering hydrology to supply more water to the system at appropriate times of the year. However, correcting water flow patterns alone will not restore the associated plant communities due to habitat-transforming effects...

  7. Long time-series of turbid coastal water using AVHRR: An example from Florida Bay, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stumpf, R.P.; Frayer, M.L.

    1997-01-01

    The AVHRR can provide information on the reflectance of turbid case II water, permitting examination of large estuaries and plumes from major rivers. The AVHRR has been onboard several NOAA satellites, with afternoon overpasses since 1981, offering a long time-series to examine changes in coastal water. We are using AVHRR data starting in December 1989, to examine water clarity in Florida Bay, which has undergone a decline since the late 1980's. The processing involves obtaining a nominal reflectance for red light with standard corrections including those for Rayleigh and aerosol path radiances. Established relationships between reflectance and the water properties being measured in the Bay provide estimates of diffuse attenuation and light limitation for phytoplankton and seagrass productivity studies. Processing also includes monthly averages of reflectance and attenuation. The AVHRR data set describes spatial and temporal patterns, including resuspension of bottom sediments in the winter, and changes in water clarity. The AVHRR also indicates that Florida Bay has much higher reflectivity relative to attenuation than other southeastern US estuaries. ??2005 Copyright SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering.

  8. Carbonate diagenesis in a high transmissivity coastal aquifer, Biscayne Aquifer, southeastern Florida, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maliva, R. G.; Missimer, T. M.; Walker, C. W.; Owosina, E. S.; Dickson, J. A. D.; Fallick, A. E.

    2001-09-01

    Cores collected through the Biscayne Aquifer (Plio-Pleistocene) in Hollywood, southeastern Florida, as part of the Hollywood Coastal Salinity Barrier Project provided an opportunity to examine the diagenesis of limestones and sandstones at the meteoric to marine water transition of one of the most transmissive aquifers in the world. The saline water front, and thus coastal mixing zone, has migrated landward approximately 1 km in the Hollywood area as the result of wellfield withdrawals. No changes in mineralogy (such as dolomitization), cement types and abundances, paragenetic sequence, or porosity are evident that can be correlated with the current or likely pre-development (wellfield withdrawals) location of the mixing zone. An approximately 2‰ downhole increase in calcite δ18O values is present in a core (HMW-6D) that penetrates the pre-development mixing zone, which may be related to either a down hole increase in salinity or to the interaction of meteoric waters with marine carbonate sediments during calcite cementation. The Biscayne Aquifer in Hollywood is currently a relatively quiescent diagenetic environment. The limited current diagenesis appears to consist of the dissolution of trace skeletal aragonite remaining in the aquifer, as suggested by a meteoric water Sr/Ca ratio similar to that of molluscan aragonite. It is proposed that a 'punctuated equilibria' model may be applicable to diagenesis in the Biscayne and other aquifers, in which limestones and sandstones entered a long period of diagenetic stasis after a period of relatively rapid textural and mineralogical stabilization.

  9. Everglades restoration and the search for a supermodel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell-Bruker, S.

    2004-12-01

    Integrated watershed management in South Florida has evolved over the past century as a necessity. The densely developed South Florida Coast and the Everglades are inextricably linked through hydrology. Agriculture and urban development were made possible by draining the Everglades. Ironically, without the vast store of water provided by the Everglades to the Biscayne Aquifer, the intense development of the South Florida Coast would not have been impossible. The impacts of early Everglades drainage were felt almost immediately and water managers in South Florida quickly learned that the management of Lake Okeechobee and the Everglades effected social, economic and natural systems throughout South Florida. South Florida Water Management District engineers were pioneers in integrated watershed management, developing a watershed management model for South Florida in the early 1970s. This model has evolved over the years and continues to be the only model available for integrating the complex dynamics of water management and hydrology from Lake Okeechobee to Florida Bay. With the authorization of an extensive 30 year project to restore the Everglades, the need for better and more sophisticated modeling approaches is apparent. Numerous efforts are underway to develop models that simulate all or part of the complex interactions between physical, biological and social systems that drive the management of the South Florida hydrology. What remains elusive is a unified vision for integrated modeling to meet the needs of the entire system. The key questions in reaching a unified vision relates to modeling strategy. Should there be a single model that addresses all of the management issues, i.e. a supermodel, or should there be an assortment of models that address individual management issues independently? Currently, efforts are underway following both approaches. Issues are explored that arise from these efforts including trade-offs between scale and detail, the dangers of

  10. Hydrocarbon Degradation and Sulfate Reduction in a Coastal Marsh of North Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Y.; Bugna, G. C.; Robinson, L.

    2001-05-01

    Hydrocarbon contamination of coastal waters has been an environmental concern for sometime. Coastal wetlands, which are rich in organic matter and microbial activities, have been considered natural systems that could degrade hydrocarbon in contaminated coastal waters. This study was initiated to investigate the potential of hydrocarbon degradation in a coastal salt marsh of North Florida with special reference to sulfate reduction. Freshly collected surface marsh sediments (0-20 cm) were incubated in a laboratory at ambient temperature (23.2° C) with the treatments of: 1) Control (i.e., no treatment), 2) +(crude) oil, 3) +NO3-1+oil, and 4) +MoO4-2+oil. Carbon dioxide evolution from the incubation was collected and analyzed for the total amount and the 13C signature. The NO3-1 and MoO4-2 treatments were intended to block the sulfate reduction activity. The results show that the indigenous organic matter and the crude oil have distinct δ 13C values of -19.8 and -27.6 \\permil, respectively, relative to PDB. Evolved CO2 concentrations and δ 13C values also indicate that microbial populations can adapt to the presence of anthropogenic hydrocarbons. Blocking of sulfate reducers by MoO4-2 addition started to reduce the carbon dioxide evolution rates after a 4-d incubation. After a 48-d incubation, the carbon dioxide evolution of the MoO4-2-treated samples was reduced to only 23 % of the non-MoO4-2-treated samples, indicating the increased significant role of sulfate reducers in digesting older soil organic matter and the hydrocarbons. T-tests also indicated that in NO3-1 treatment, δ 13C values significantly depleted (p=0.1) while CO2 concentration remained relatively constant. These indicate that while denitrifiers played a role in the degradation, the microbial population is predominantly composed of sulfate reducers. Salt marshes would be a much more significant source of CH4 if SO4-2 is suppressed. All MoO4-2-treated samples produced significant amount of methane

  11. Mapping Porewater Salinity with Electromagnetic Methods in Shallow Coastal Environments: Tampa Bay, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, W. J.; Kruse, S. E.; Swarzenski, P. W.; Meunier, J. K.

    2004-05-01

    The feasibility of predicting porewater salinity based on surface electromagnetic and resistivity methods was assessed in the shallow coastal waters and wetlands of Tampa Bay, Florida. The most successful method combined an initial core or surface resistivity measurement with pore water samples in order to determine formation factors in the shallow marine sediment. Data were collected over broader areas of interest using Geonics, Inc. EM-31 and EM-34 electromagnetic instruments and the Advanced Geosciences, Inc. SuperSting R8 marine resistivity instrument. To map coastal porewater conductivities, the EM instruments were adapted for use in shallow marine waters (<1 meter). In such high-conductivity environments, interpretation of EM readings requires processing with layered models of terrain conductivity that include direct sampling data. Typically, nearby marine resistivity readings are necessary to distinguish between equivalent EM model solutions. Porewater conductivities estimated from the layered EM models and the resistivity-derived formation factors show very good agreement with measured pore water conductivities. The use of EM systems in very shallow waters has potential application in locating prospective submarine groundwater discharge in areas that are difficult to reach with conventional towed marine resistivity arrays. Electromagnetic and direct sampling data show that salt exclusion by mangroves significantly increases pore water conductivities, and hence terrain conductivity readings within 10m of a mangrove shoreline. Terrain conductivities fall off to background values within 15m of the mangrove shoreline. The marine EM-31 measurements were effective at sensing the magnitude and lateral extent of high and low salinity porewaters within wetlands and mangrove lined ditches and ponds, which may be useful for interdisciplinary studies of coastal ecosystems.

  12. Water flow and nutrient flux from five estuarine rivers along the southwest coast of Everglades National Park, Florida, 1997-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levesque, V.A.

    2004-01-01

    Discharge and nutrient fluxes for five tidally affected streams were monitored and evaluated as a part of the U.S. Geological Survey Place-Based Studies Initiative and the U.S. Department of the Interior Critical Ecosystem Studies Initiative. Locations on Lostmans Creek, and Broad, Harney, Shark, and North Rivers were selected using the criterion that a large amount of the water that flows through Shark River Slough must pass these sites. Discharge and nutrient-concentration data collection started at the Broad, Harney, and Shark River stations in January 1997 and ended in early 2001. Discharge and nutrient-concentration data collection started at the Lostmans Creek and North River stations in April 1999 and ended in early 2001. Each station was equipped with a vertically oriented acoustic-velocity sensor, water-level pressure transducer, bottom water-temperature thermistor, and specific conductance four-electrode sensor. Data collected using a vessel-mounted acoustic discharge measurement system were used to calibrate regression models of the mean river velocities and the in-situ index velocities. Information from these stations, in conjunction with data from other ongoing studies, will help to determine environmental effects on the southwest coast estuaries as changes in water management of the Everglades National Park continue. Discharges from the Lostmans Creek, and Broad, Harney, Shark, and North River stations are influenced by semidiurnal tides, meteorological events, and surface- and ground-water inflow. Each of the five rivers is usually well mixed, having no greater than 500 microSiemens per centimeter at 25? Celsius difference in specific conductance from top to bottom during flood and ebb tides. Instantaneous flood discharges (water moving upstream) are typically of greater magnitude and shorter duration than instantaneous ebb discharges (water moving downstream). Instantaneous discharge data were filtered using a low-pass filter to remove predominant

  13. Species profiles: life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (south Florida). Florida pompano. [Trachinotus carolinus

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, C.

    1986-04-01

    Florida pompano is a marine species that is especially common along the Florida coast. Florida pompano is an excellent food fish, so it supports an important commercial and recreational fishery. Larvae live in the open sea, but juveniles use waters along beaches as nursery grounds. Juvenile pompano eat planktonic but mostly benthic invertebrates. Adults feed on invertebrates and fish. Pompano prefer temperatures of 28 to 32/sup 0/C, and adults apparently prefer salinities of 28 to 37 ppt. Pompano died at dissolved oxygen concentrations of 2.5 ppM.

  14. Florida

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Florida in Color and Stereo     View Larger ... 9, 2000 during Terra orbit 1650. The image at the top is a color view acquired by the vertical (nadir) camera. It has been reoriented so ... provides a three-dimensional effect when viewed using red/blue glasses with the red filter placed over the left eye. This stereoscopic ...

  15. EAARL coastal topography-western Florida, post-Hurricane Charley, 2004: seamless (bare earth and submerged.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Bonisteel, Jamie M.; Wright, C. Wayne; Sallenger, A.H.; Brock, John C.; Yates, Xan

    2010-01-01

    Project Description These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of lidar-derived seamless (bare-earth and submerged) topography were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Coastal and Marine Geology Program (CMGP), St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of a portion of the western Florida coastline beachface, acquired post-Hurricane Charley on August 17 and 18, 2004. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural-resource managers. An innovative airborne lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multispectral color infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for sub-meter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system, and the resulting data were then

  16. The Gulf of Mexico Coastal Ocean Observing System: Building an MBON for the Florida Keys.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, M.; Stoessel, M. M.; Currier, R. D.

    2016-02-01

    The Gulf of Mexico Coastal Ocean Observing System Regional Association (GCOOS-RA) Data Portal was designed to aggregate regional data and to serve it to the public through standards-based services in useful and desirable forms. These standards are established and sanctioned for use by the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) Program Office with inputs from experts on the Integrated Ocean Observation Committee and the RA informatics community. In 2012, with considerable input from staff from Ocean Biogeographical Information System USA (OBIS-USA), IOOS began to develop and adopt standards for serving biological datasets. GCOOS-RA applied these standards the following year and began serving fisheries independent data through an GCOOS ERDDAP server. In late 2014, GCOOS-RA partnered with the University of South Florida in a 5-year Marine Biodiversity Observing Network (MBON) Project sponsored by NOAA, NASA and BOEM. Work began in 2015. GCOOS' primary role is to aggregate, organize and serve data that are useful to an MBON for the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. GCOOS, in collaboration with Axiom Data Science, will produce a decision support system (DSS) for stakeholders such as NOAA National Marine Sanctuaries Program managers. The datasets to be managed include environmental observations from: field surveys, fixed platforms, and satellites; GIS layers of: bathymetry, shoreline, sanctuary boundaries, living marine resources and habitats; outputs from ocean circulation models and ecosystem models (e.g., Ecopath/Ecosim) and Environmental DNA. Additionally, the DSS may be called upon to perform analyses, compute indices of biodiversity and present results in tabular, graphic and fused forms in an interactive setting. This presentation will discuss our progress to date for this challenging work in data integration.

  17. Forms of mercury in Everglades agricultural soils

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick, W.H.; Parkpian, P.; Gambrell, R.P.

    1995-12-31

    Seventeen surface soils from the Florida Everglades Agricultural Area were subjected to selective extraction for water soluble, amorphous iron oxide bound, organic, and residual mercury. Organic bound mercury was the major fraction and represented 51% of the total mercury for the 17 soils studied. Iron oxide bound mercury and water soluble mercury accounted for only 5 percent each of the total mercury. Eight weeks incubation of the soils under aerobic and anaerobic conditions showed little effect of aeration status on the transformations among the various chemical forms.

  18. Lower survival probabilities for adult Florida manatees in years with intense coastal storms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langtimm, C.A.; Beck, C.A.

    2003-01-01

    The endangered Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) inhabits the subtropical waters of the southeastern United States, where hurricanes are a regular occurrence. Using mark-resighting statistical models, we analyzed 19 years of photo-identification data and detected significant annual variation in adult survival for a subpopulation in northwest Florida where human impact is low. That variation coincided with years when intense hurricanes (Category 3 or greater on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale) and a major winter storm occurred in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Mean survival probability during years with no or low intensity storms was 0.972 (approximate 95% confidence interval = 0.961-0.980) but dropped to 0.936 (0.864-0.971) in 1985 with Hurricanes Elena, Kate, and Juan; to 0.909 (0.837-0.951) in 1993 with the March "Storm of the Century"; and to 0.817 (0.735-0.878) in 1995 with Hurricanes Opal, Erin, and Allison. These drops in survival probability were not catastrophic in magnitude and were detected because of the use of state-of-the-art statistical techniques and the quality of the data. Because individuals of this small population range extensively along the north Gulf coast of Florida, it was possible to resolve storm effects on a regional scale rather than the site-specific local scale common to studies of more sedentary species. This is the first empirical evidence in support of storm effects on manatee survival and suggests a cause-effect relationship. The decreases in survival could be due to direct mortality, indirect mortality, and/or emigration from the region as a consequence of storms. Future impacts to the population by a single catastrophic hurricane, or series of smaller hurricanes, could increase the probability of extinction. With the advent in 1995 of a new 25- to 50-yr cycle of greater hurricane activity, and longer term change possible with global climate change, it becomes all the more important to reduce mortality and injury

  19. Interannual Variability in Carbon and Nitrogen Stable Isotopic Signatures of Size-Fractionated POM from the South Florida Coastal Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, S. L.; Anderson, W. T.; Jochem, F. J.; Fourqurean, J. W.

    2004-12-01

    Environmental conditions in South Florida coastal waters have been of local and national concern over the past 15 years. Attention has focused on the ecosystem impacts of salinity increases, seagrass die-off, increased algal bloom frequency, waste water influence, groundwater discharge, and exchange between Florida Bay, the Gulf of Mexico, and the Atlantic Ocean. Changes in water quality and productivity levels may be reflected in the isotopic signatures of coastal zone primary producers. Recent work with seagrasses in South Florida has demonstrated high seasonal and spatial variability in C and N isotopic signatures and decoupling between the two isotopic systems as they vary. To better understand the sources of seasonal and spatial fluctuation, size fractionated POM (particulate organic matter) samples have been collected on a quarterly basis since Sept. 2002. Fractions collected include >150μ m, 50-150μ m, and 0.1-50μ m using Nitex mesh sieves and a portable pump system deployed from a small boat at 10 sites around the Florida Keys and Florida Bay. It was hypothesized that planktonic groups respond more quickly to changes in water quality then seagrasses, and thus variations may be more clearly attributed to environmental parameters. Significant spatial and temporal variability is evident both within site between size fractions and between sites. Seasonal oscillations of up to 4‰ were observed in N isotopic values and 6‰ in C isotopic values of the 50-150μ m size fraction, which is dominated by diatoms and dinoflagellates. δ 13C values are depleted in the late winter/early spring sampling period possibly reflecting decreased productivity stress on available C pools. 13C depletion is generally coincident with δ 15N enrichment in the late winter/early spring, possibly demonstrating changes in DIN pools (NO3- and NH4+ concentrations) or changes in decomposition or denitrification rates. Broad groupings appear to separate Atlantic coral reef sites

  20. Geohydrologic evaluation of a landfill in a coastal area, St Petersburg, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutchinson, C.B.; Stewart, Joseph W.

    1978-01-01

    The 250-acre Toytown landfill site is in a poorly-drained area in coastal Pinellas County, Florida. Average altitude of land surface at the landfill is less than 10 feet. About 1000 tons of solid waste and about 200,000 gallons of digested sewage sludge are disposed of daily at the landfill. The velocity of ground-water flow through the 23-foot thick surficial aquifer northeast from the landfill toward Old Tampa Bay probably ranges from 1 to 10 feet per year, and downward velocity through the confining bed is about 0.00074 foot per day. The horizontal and vertical flow velocities indicate that leachate moves slowly downgradient, and that leachate has not yet seeped through the confining bed after 12 years of landfill operation. Untreated surface run-off from the site averages about 15 inches per year, and ground-water outflow averages about 3.3 inches per year. The Floridan aquifer is used as a limited source of water for domestic supply in this area. (Woodard-USGS)

  1. Chloride concentrations in the coastal margin of the Floridan Aquifer, southwest Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Causseaux, K.W.; Fretwell, J.D.

    1983-01-01

    The Floridan aquifer is the principal source of freshwater supply in southwest Florida. The freshwater part of the aquifer is underlain by saltwater in lower formations and is bounded on the west by saltwater in the coastal parts of the aquifer. A zone of mixing lies between the saltwater and freshwater. The saltwater and freshwater boundaries are defined by chloride concentrations of 19,000 milligrams per liter on the coastward side and 250 milligrams per liter on the landward side. Lateral intrusion of saltwater can occur along the coast in areas where the hydraulic gradient declines and upconing can occur in inland areas of heavy ground-water withdrawals. Safeguards against saltwater intrusion in these areas are necessary because flushing of the aquifer is a very slow process. A network of chloride monitor wells is proposed for the zone of mixing in the upper producing zone of the floridan aquifer. Seventy wells were selected at 54 sites to monitor chloride concentrations along the 250-milligram-per-liter line of equal chloride concentration. One-fourth of the wells are located in areas of increasing chloride concentrations or heavy ground-water withdrawals and the remaining wells are intended to improve delineation of the interface and to monitor long-term changes in chloride concentrations. (USGS)

  2. EAARL Coastal Topography-Eastern Florida, Post-Hurricane Jeanne, 2004: First Surface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fredericks, Xan; Nayegandhi, Amar; Bonisteel-Cormier, J.M.; Wright, C.W.; Sallenger, A.H.; Brock, J.C.; Klipp, E.S.; Nagle, D.B.

    2010-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of lidar-derived first-surface (FS) topography datasets were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center, St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of a portion of the eastern Florida coastline beachface, acquired post-Hurricane Jeanne (September 2004 hurricane) on October 1, 2004. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural-resource managers. An innovative airborne lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multispectral color-infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for sub-meter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system, and the resulting data were then processed using the

  3. Everglades Environmental Study Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Office of Environment Education.

    These environmental study units consist of four modules and a tape-slide presentation on the Everglades National Park. Although not required for completion of the modules, the slide-tape presentation provides a resource for orientation of teachers and parents to camping experience for school children in an environmental education program. The four…

  4. Determining discharge-coefficient ratings for selected coastal control structures in Broward and Palm Beach counties, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tillis, G.M.; Swain, E.D.

    1998-01-01

    Discharges through 10 selected coastal control structures in Broward and Palm Beach Counties, Florida, are presently computed using the theoretical discharge-coefficient ratings developed from scale modeling, theoretical discharge coefficients, and some field calibrations whose accuracies for specific sites are unknown. To achieve more accurate discharge-coefficient ratings for the coastal control structures, field discharge measurements were taken with an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler at the coastal control structures under a variety of flow conditions. These measurements were used to determine computed discharge-coefficient ratings for the coastal control structures under different flow regimes: submerged orifice flow, submerged weir flow, free orifice flow, and free weir flow. Theoretical and computed discharge-coefficient ratings for submerged orifice and weir flows were determined at seven coastal control structures, and discharge ratings for free orifice and weir flows were determined at three coastal control structures. The difference between the theoretical and computed discharge-coefficient ratings varied from structure to structure. The theoretical and computed dischargecoefficient ratings for submerged orifice flow were within 10 percent at four of seven coastal control structures; however, differences greater than 20 percent were found at two of the seven structures. The theoretical and computed discharge-coefficient ratings for submerged weir flow were within 10 percent at three of seven coastal control structures; however, differences greater than 20 percent were found at four of the seven coastal control structures. The difference between theoretical and computed discharge-coefficient ratings for free orifice and free weir flows ranged from 5 to 32 percent. Some differences between the theoretical and computed discharge-coefficient ratings could be better defined with more data collected over a greater distribution of measuring conditions.

  5. Environmental setting and factors that affect water quality in the Georgia-Florida Coastal Plain study unit

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berndt, M.P.; Oaksford, E.T.; Darst, M.R.; Marella, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    The Georgia-Florida Coastal Plain study unit covers an area of nearly 62,000 square miles in the southeastern United States, mostly in the Coastal Plain physiographic province. Land resource provinces have been designated based on generalized soil classifications. Land resource provinces in the study area include: the Coastal Flatwoods, the Southern Coastal Plain, the Central Florida Ridge, the Sand Hills, and the Southern Piedmont. The study area includes all or parts of seven hydrologic subregions: the Ogeechee-Savannah, the Altamaha- St.Marys, the Suwannee, the Ochlockonee, the St. Johns, the Peace-Tampa Bay, and the Southern Florida. The primary source of water for public supply in the study area is ground water from the Upper Floridan aquifer. In 1990, more than 90 percent of the 2,888 million gallons per day of ground water used came from this aquifer. The population of the study area was 9.3 million in 1990. The cities of Jacksonville, Orlando, St. Petersburg, Tallahassee, and Tampa, Florida, and parts of Atlanta and Savannah, Georgia, are located in the study area. Forest and agricultural areas are the most common land uses in the study area, accounting for 48 percent and 25 percent of the study area, respectively. Climatic conditions range from temperate in Atlanta, Georgia, where mean annual temperature is about 61.3 degrees Fahrenheit, to subtropical in Tampa, Florida, where mean annual temperature is about 72.4 degrees Fahrenheit. Long-term average precipitation (1961-90) ranges from 43.9 inches per year in Tampa, Florida, and 44.6 in Macon, Georgia, to 65.7 inches per year in Tallahassee, Florida. Floods in the study area result from frontal systems, hurricanes, tropical storms, or severe thunderstorms. Droughts are not common in the study area,especially in the Florida part of the study area due to extensive maritime exposure. The primary physical and cultural characteristics in the study area include physiography, soils and land resource provinces

  6. EAARL Coastal Topography and Imagery-Naval Live Oaks Area, Gulf Islands National Seashore, Florida, 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nagle, David B.; Nayegandhi, Amar; Yates, Xan; Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Bonisteel, Jamie M.; Klipp, Emily S.; Segura, Martha

    2010-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced color-infrared (CIR) imagery and elevation measurements of lidar-derived bare-earth (BE) topography, first-surface (FS) topography, and canopy-height (CH) datasets were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), St. Petersburg Science Center, St. Petersburg, FL; the National Park Service (NPS), Gulf Coast Network, Lafayette, LA; and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of the Naval Live Oaks Area in Florida's Gulf Islands National Seashore, acquired June 30, 2007. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural-resource managers. An innovative airborne lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multispectral CIR camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for sub-meter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area

  7. Landscape characteristics of Rhizophora mangle forests and propagule deposition in coastal environments of Florida (USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sengupta, R.; Middleton, B.; Yan, C.; Zuro, M.; Hartman, H.

    2005-01-01

    Field dispersal studies are seldom conducted at regional scales even though reliable information on mid-range dispersal distance is essential for models of colonization. The purpose of this study was to examine the potential distance of dispersal of Rhizophora mangle propagules by comparing deposition density with landscape characteristics of mangrove forests. Propagule density was estimated at various distances to mangrove sources (R. mangle) on beaches in southwestern Florida in both high-and low-energy environments, either facing open gulf waters vs. sheltered, respectively. Remote sensing and Geographic Information Systems were used to identify source forests and to determine their landscape characteristics (forest size and distance to deposition area) for the regression analyses. Our results indicated that increasing density of propagules stranded on beaches was related negatively to the distance of the deposition sites from the nearest stands of R. mangle and that deposition was greatly diminished 2 km or more from the source. Measures of fragmentation such as the area of the R. mangle forests were related to propagule deposition but only in low-energy environments. Our results suggest that geographic models involving the colonization of coastal mangrove systems should include dispersal dynamics at mid-range scales, i.e., for our purposes here, beyond the local scale of the forest and up to 5 km distant. Studies of mangrove propagule deposition at various spatial scales are key to understanding regeneration limitations in natural gaps and restoration areas. Therefore, our study of mid-range propagule dispersal has broad application to plant ecology, restoration, and modeling. ?? Springer 2005.

  8. The Effect of Coastal Development on Storm Surge Flooding in Biscayne Bay, Florida, USA (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, K.; Liu, H.; Li, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Barrier islands and associated bays along the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts are a favorite place for both living and visiting. Many of them are vulnerable to storm surge flooding because of low elevations and constantly being subjected to the impacts of storms. The population increase and urban development along the barrier coast have altered the shoreline configuration, resulting in a dramatic change in the coastal flooding pattern in some areas. Here we present such a case based on numerical simulations of storm surge flooding caused by the1926 hurricane in the densely populated area surrounding Biscayne Bay in Miami, Florida. The construction of harbor and navigation channels, and the development of real estate and the roads connecting islands along Biscayne Bay have changed the geometry of Biscayne Bay since 1910s. Storm surge simulations show that the Port of Miami and Dodge Island constructed by human after 1950 play an important role in changing storm surge inundation pattern along Biscayne Bay. Dodge Island enhances storm surge and increases inundation in the area south of the island, especially at the mouth of Miami River (Downtown of Miami), and reduces storm surge flooding in the area north of the island, especially in Miami Beach. If the Hurricane Miami of 1926 happened today, the flooding area would be reduced by 55% and 20% in the Miami Beach and North Miami areas, respectively. Consequently, it would prevent 400 million of property and 10 thousand people from surge flooding according to 2010 U.S census and 2007 property tax data. Meanwhile, storm water would penetrate further inland south of Dodge Island and increase the flooding area by 25% in the Miami River and Downtown Miami areas. As a result, 200 million of property and five thousand people would be impacted by storm surge.

  9. Stream habitat characteristics at selected sites in the Georgia-Florida coastal plain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewis, L.J.; Turtora, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Habitat characterization is part of a multidisciplinary approach to water-quality assessment implemented by the National Water-Quality Assessment Program. Habitat data were collected in the Georgia-Florida Coastal Plain study unit at 24 sites during 1993-95. Data were collected for habitat characteristics at three spatial scales: basin, segment, and reach. Basin data include physiography, land resource provinces, and land use, providing a description of the environmental setting at each site. Segment data include length, gradient, and sinuosity. A Kendall correlation analysis performed on segment characteristics and the log-of-basin area showed a correlation between segment gradient and the log-of-basin area and a correlation between sinuosity and segment length. Reach data consist of field-collected measurements of both instream and riparian habitats. Sand and detritus were the most common channel-bed substrates among the sampled sites. Measurements of channel width, water depth, and bank width and height were used to create cross-sectional profiles of each sampled area. Elevations of selected durations plotted on cross sections illustrated the percentage of time that the banks were inundated at each site. Sites were divided into two groups based on duration of bank inundation (less than or equal to 1 percent and greater than 1 percent). Bank woody vegetation was also sampled and a clustering algorithm known as Two-Way INdicator SPecies ANalysis (TWINSPAN) was used to analyze these data. TWINSPAN divided the sites into two groups based on their vegetation composition. A statistical comparison of the two types of site groups (duration of bank inundation and vegetation) was performed. The significant association between these groups was consistent with the hypothesis that inundation frequency affected riparian vegetation.

  10. Variability in heavy precipitation over southern Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shein, K. A.

    2009-12-01

    Southern Florida is home to the unique Everglades ecosystem that feeds into the Florida Bay. Heavy precipitation events, either over the Everglades or the Bay can introduce pollutants and excessive fresh water into the bay, while prolonged drought reduces water levels in the wetlands and can contribute to hypersalinity events in the bay. Systematic changes in precipitation frequency and intensity can result in long-term negative impacts to these southern Florida ecosystems. This paper examines the historical in situ record of precipitation over southern Florida, with special emphasis on evaluating the behavior of heavy precipitation events and periods of deficit.

  11. Species profiles: Life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (South Florida): Spiny lobster. [Panulirus argus

    SciTech Connect

    Marx, J.M.; Herrnkind, W.F.

    1986-08-01

    The Florida spiny lobster (Panulirus argus) supports major commercial fisheries in south Florida and the Caribbean Sea. Its life history includes several life stages that live in the open ocean, inshore bays, and coastal reefs. The Florida population spawns along deeper offshore reefs in spring and early summer. Fate of locally spawned larvae is uncertain, but significant postlarval recruitment may originate from larvae spawned in foreign waters. After settlement in inshore vegetated habitats, juveniles reach legal harvestable size in about 2 years. The onset of maturity is coincident with a marked emigration offshore. Subsequent seasonal movements cued by reproductive activity and weather disturbances are pronounced. Excessive fishing has caused a decline in the size of the south Florida population and a corresponding reduction in total spawn. The relevance of spawn reduction is uncertain because of questions regarding larval origins and stock-recruitment relations. Water temperatures probably regulate population distribution and the seasonal dynamics of growth and reproduction. Postlarval recruitment is limited to high salinity inshore environments. Hydrodynamic stimuli and water circulation patterns play critical roles throughout the life cycle.

  12. Species profiles: Life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (South Florida): Spotted seatrout. [Cynoscion nebulosus

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.R.; Seaman, W. Jr.

    1986-08-01

    The spotted seatrout (Cynoscion nebulosus) is an estuarine-dependent species of sport and commercial importance. Populations do not exhibit great movement and tend to be isolated from each other in coastal bays of south Florida. Depending on temperature and salinity, spotted seatrout may spawn in the spring, summer, or fall. They mature when 200 to 250 mm long (SL), during their second and third summers of life. Fecundity may exceed 1,000,000 eggs. The buoyant eggs sink when salinity falls to 25 ppt. In the summer yound seatrout inhabit shallow, vegetated bays. Older individuals move to deeper waters in winter. Strong schooling behavior is exhibited. Longevity is about 9 years. From 1953 to 1982 commercial landings fell from 3.6 million to 2.5 million pounds annually. The best data on sport harvest and population dynamics are for the populations in extreme south Florida.

  13. Sensitivity of bacterioplankton nitrogen metabolism to eutrophication in sub-tropical coastal waters of Key West, Florida.

    PubMed

    Hoch, Matthew P; Dillon, Kevin S; Coffin, Richard B; Cifuentes, Luis A

    2008-05-01

    Expression of intracellular ammonium assimilation enzymes were used to assess the response of nitrogen (N) metabolism in bacterioplankton to N-loading of sub-tropical coastal waters of Key West, Florida. Specific activities of glutamine synthetase (GS) and total glutamate dehydrogenase (GDHT) were measured on the bacterial size fraction (<0.8 microm) to assess N-deplete versus N-replete metabolic states, respectively. Enzyme results were compared to concentrations of dissolved organic matter and nutrients and to the biomass and production of phytoplankton and bacteria. Concentrations of dissolved inorganic N (DIN), dissolved organic N (DON), and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) positively correlated with specific activities of GDHT and negatively correlated with that of GS. Total dissolved N (TDN) concentration explained 81% of variance in bacterioplankton GDHT:GS activity ratio. The GDHT:GS ratio, TDN, DOC, and bacterial parameters decreased in magnitude along a tidally dynamic trophic gradient from north of Key West to south at the reef tract, which is consistent with the combined effects of localized coastal eutrophication and tidal exchange of seawater from the Southwest Florida Shelf and Florida Strait. The N-replete bacterioplankton north of Key West can regenerate ammonium which sustains primary production transported south to the reef. The range in GDHT:GS ratios was 5-30 times greater than that for commonly used indicators of planktonic eutrophication, which emphasizes the sensitivity of bacterioplankton N-metabolism to changes in N-bioavailability caused by nutrient pollution in sub-tropical coastal waters and utility of GDHT:GS ratio as an bioindicator of N-replete conditions.

  14. Florida coastal ecological characterization: a socioeconomic study of the Northwestern Region. Volume II. Data appendix. Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    French, C.O.; Parsons, J.W.

    1983-08-01

    Data are compiled from existing sources on the social and economic characteristics of the Northwestern coastal region of Florida, which is made up of Escambia, Santa Rosa, Okaloosa, Walton, Bay, Gulf, and Franklin Counties. Described are the components and interrelationships among complex processes that include population and demographics characteristics, mineral production, multiple-use conflicts, recreation and tourism, agricultural production, sport and commercial fishing, transportation, industrial and residential development, and environmental issues and regulations. Energetics models of socioeconomic systems are also presented. This volume contains appendices presenting data on public utilities, transportation, recreation and tourism, mineral and oil production, and environmental issues and regulations. 31 figures, 187 tables.

  15. Florida coastal ecological characterization: a socioeconomic study of the southwestern region. Volume II. Data appendix, Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    French, C.O.; Parsons, J.W.

    1983-08-01

    Data are compiled from existing sources on the social and economic characteristics of the southwestern coastal region of Florida, which is made up of Charlotte, Collier, DeSoto, Hillsborough, Lee, Manatee, Monroe, Pasco, Pinellas, and Sarasota Counties. Described are the components and interrelationships among complex processes that include population and demographics characteristics, mineral production, multiple-use conflicts, recreation and tourism, agricultural production, sport and commercial fishing, transportation, industrial and residential development, and environmental issues and regulations. Energetics models of socioeconomic systems are also presented. This volume contains appendices presenting data on land use, public utilities, transportation, recreation and tourism. 21 figures, 141 tables.

  16. Species profiles: Life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (South Florida): Reef-building tube worm

    SciTech Connect

    Zale, A.V.; Merrifield, S.G. )

    1989-12-01

    Species profiles are literature summaries of the taxonomy, morphology, distribution, life history, habitats, and environmental requirements of coastal species of fishes and aquatic invertebrates. They are designed to assist in environmental impact assessment. The reef-building tube worm is an ecologically and geologically significant invertebrate inhabiting the coastal zone of southeastern Florida. The reefs constructed by the worms retain beach sediments, protect shorelines from storm damage, and are the basis for an elaborate marine community of fishes and invertebrates. The reefs provide substrate, shelter, and food in the relatively inhospitable surf zone. Reef-building tube worms require stable settlement substrates within sandy beam habitats and intense turbulence to maintain suspension of sand grains and other particles for tube building. 37 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Detection of coastal and submarine discharge on the Florida Gulf Coast with an airborne thermal-infrared mapping system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raabe, Ellen; Stonehouse, David; Ebersol, Kristin; Holland, Kathryn; Robbins, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    Along the Gulf Coast of Florida north of Tampa Bay lies a region characterized by an open marsh coast, low topographic gradient, water-bearing limestone, and scattered springs. The Floridan aquifer system is at or near land surface in this region, discharging water at a consistent 70-72°F. The thermal contrast between ambient water and aquifer discharge during winter months can be distinguished using airborne thermal-infrared imagery. An airborne thermal-infrared mapping system was used to collect imagery along 126 miles of the Gulf Coast from Jefferson to Levy County, FL, in March 2009. The imagery depicts a large number of discharge locations and associated warm-water plumes in ponds, creeks, rivers, and nearshore waters. A thermal contrast of 6°F or more was set as a conservative threshold for identifying sites, statistically significant at the 99% confidence interval. Almost 900 such coastal and submarine-discharge locations were detected, averaging seven to nine per mile along this section of coast. This represents approximately one hundred times the number of previously known discharge sites in the same area. Several known coastal springs in Taylor and Levy Counties were positively identified with the imagery and were used to estimate regional discharge equivalent to one 1st-order spring, discharging 100 cubic feet per second or more, for every two miles of coastline. The number of identified discharge sites is a conservative estimate and may represent two-thirds of existing features due to low groundwater levels at time of overflight. The role of aquifer discharge in coastal and estuarine health is indisputable; however, mapping and quantifying discharge in a complex karst environment can be an elusive goal. The results of this effort illustrate the effectiveness of the instrument and underscore the influence of coastal springs along this stretch of the Florida coast.

  18. The west-central Florida inner shelf and coastal system: A geologic conceptual overview and introduction to the special issue

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hine, A.C.; Brooks, G.R.; Davis, R.A.; Duncan, D.S.; Locker, S.D.; Twichell, D.C.; Gelfenbaum, G.

    2003-01-01

    This paper provides an overview for this special publication on the geologic framework of the inner shelf and coastal zone of west-central Florida. This is a significant geologic setting in that it lies at the center of an ancient carbonate platform facing an enormous ramp that has exerted large-scale control on coastal geomorphology, the availability of sediments, and the level of wave energy. In order to understand the Holocene geologic history of this depositional system, a regional study defined by natural boundaries (north end of a barrier island to the apex of a headland) was undertaken by a group of government and university coastal geologists using a wide variety of laboratory and field techniques. It is the purpose of this introductory paper to define the character of this coastal/inner shelf system, provide a historical geologic perspective and background of environmental information, define the overall database, present the collective objectives of this regional study, and very briefly present the main aspects of each contribution. Specific conclusions are presented at the end of each paper composing this volume. ?? 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Uranium distribution in the coastal waters and pore waters of Tampa Bay, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swarzenski, P.W.; B