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Sample records for florida mediante cromtografia

  1. Florida Everglades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Spanning the southern tip of the Florida Peninsula and most of Florida Bay, Everglades National Park is the only subtropical preserve in North America. It contains both temperate and tropical plant communities, including sawgrass prairie, mangrove and cypress swamps, pinelands, and hardwood hammocks, as well as marine and estuarine environments. The park is known for its rich bird life, particularly large wading birds, such as the roseate spoonbill, wood stork, great blue heron, and a variety of egrets. It is also the only place in the world where alligators and crocodiles exist side by side. This image was acquired by Landsat 7's Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) sensor on May 2, 2000. This is a false-color composite image made using shortwave infrared, near infrared, and green wavelengths. The image has also been sharpened using the sensor's panchromatic band. Image provided by the USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch

  2. Florida, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Almost the entire state of Florida, USA (28.0N, 81.5W) can be seen in this single view from space. The large urban area on the SE coast is the greater Miami, Fort Lauderdale, Boca Raton and West Palm Beach complex. Half way up the coast is the Kennedy Space Center at Cape Canaveral where the space shuttle lifts off into space. Even at this great distance, the huge Vehicle Assembly Building, causeway and launch areas can still be easily seen.

  3. Mangos of Florida, country contribution: Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The book chapter presents a review of the historical importance of mango in Florida; geographical distribution of mangos in Florida; statistical data including total and seasonal production, main cultivars and their descriptors; cultural practices (i.e. propagation, fertilization, pruning); pests an...

  4. Florida Keys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Florida Keys are a chain of islands, islets and reefs extending from Virginia Key to the Dry Tortugas for about 309 kilometers (192 miles). The keys are chiefly limestone and coral formations. The larger islands of the group are Key West (with its airport), Key Largo, Sugarloaf Key, and Boca Chica Key. A causeway extends from the mainland to Key West.

    This image was acquired on October 28, 2001, by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, a long- term research effort to understand and protect our home planet. Through the study of Earth, NASA will help to provide sound science to policy and economic

  5. Central Florida, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    This view of central Florida, USA (28.0N, 81.5W) shows both coasts of the Florida peninsula with Cape Canaveral and the Kennedy Space Center readily visible in the center on the Atlantic coast. Other features on the Earth which are visible through the clouds include Tampa Bay, several lakes and the Gulf of Mexico on Florida's east coast. The space shuttle's tail fin and both orbital maneuvering systems (OMS) pods are seen in the foreground.

  6. Florida Energy Assurance Plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Niescja E.; Murtagh, William; Guthrie, Kevin; Nykyri, Katariina; Radasky, William A.; Senkowicz, Eric

    2012-08-01

    This spring, Florida held the nation's first statewide emergency preparedness training and exercises geared specifically to the aftermath of severe geomagnetic events. Funded by the State of Florida Division of Emergency Management (FDEM) via a Department of Energy grant and held in collaboration with Watch House International, Inquesta Corporation, and the Florida Institute of Technology, the 17-19 April 2012 workshop had 99 on-site attendees in an oceanfront hotel in Melbourne, Florida, as well as 16 over live Web streaming. The workshop was the capstone to a three-month season of 21 regional space weather training sessions and workshops serving 386 attendees in total.

  7. Springs of Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenau, Jack C.; Faulkner, Glen L.; Hendry, Charles W.; Hull, Robert W.

    1977-01-01

    The first comprehensive report of Florida's springs, which contains both a story of the springs and a collection of facts about them, was published thirty years ago (Ferguson and others, 1947). Since then, much additional data on springs have been gathered and the current report, Springs of Florida, makes a wealth of information on springs available to the public. Springs of Florida, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Bureau of Geology, Florida Department of Natural Resources, publishers, and the Bureau of Water Resources Management, Florida Department of Environmental Regulation, is intended to provide sufficient background information for a lucid understanding of the nature and occurrence of the springs in the State.

  8. Hydrologic almanac of Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heath, Richard C.; Conover, Clyde Stuart

    1981-01-01

    This first edition is a ready reference source of information on various facts and features about water in Florida. It is aimed primarily to help bust politicians, writers, agency officials, water managers, planners, consultants, educators, hydrologists, engineers, scientists, and the general public answer questions that arise on comparative and statistical aspects on the hydrology of Florida. It contains statistical comparative data, much of which was especially prepared for the almanac, a glossary of technical terms, tabular material, and conversion factors. Also included is a selective bibliography of 174 reports on water in Florida. (USGS)

  9. Pollution of Florida's rivers

    SciTech Connect

    Cromartie, R.S. 3d. )

    1991-12-01

    Pollution of Florida's waterways is a serious problem. Sources of pollution include sewage, storm water runoff, faulty septic tanks, improperly constructed landfills, and obstruction by causeway bridges. Some of the major causes and solutions are discussed.

  10. Hail Formation in Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, Matthew

    Hail poses a substantial threat to life and property in the state of Florida. These losses could be minimized through better understanding of the relationships between atmospheric variables that impact hail formation in Florida. Improving hail forecasting in Florida requires analyzing a number of meteorological parameters and synoptic data related to hail formation. NOAA archive data was retrieved to create a database that was used to categorize text files of hail days. The text files were entered into the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Earth System Research Laboratory website to create National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research Reanalysis maps of atmospheric variables for Florida hail days as well as days leading to the hail event. These data were then analyzed to determine the relationship between variables that affect hail formation, in general, across different regions and seasons in Florida using Statistical Product and Service Solutions. The reasoning for the differing factors affecting hail formation between regions, seasons and hail sizes were discussed, as well as forecasting suggestions relating to region and month in Florida. The study found that the majority of all hail that occurs in Florida is during the wet season. A low Lifted Index, high Precipitable Water and lower than average Sea Level Pressure, in most cases, is present during hail days in Florida. Furthermore, results show that Vector Wind magnitude increases as hail size increases. Additionally, several atmospheric variables useful to studying hail events, such as Lifted Index, Precipitable Water, Sea Level Pressure, Vector Wind and Temperature have significant correlations with each other depending on the region and season being observed. Strong correlations between low Lifted Index, high Precipitable Water values and the occurrence of hail events are discussed, as well as the relationship between temperature anomalies at various

  11. Florida From Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Taken during the STS-95 mission from a point over Cuba, this photo shows an oblique, foreshortened view of the Florida Peninsula, with the light blue, shallow seafloor of both the Florida Keys (curving across the bottom of the view) and the Bahama banks (right). 'Popcorn' cumulus cloud covers Miami and the Southern Everglades, although the built-up area from Ft. Lauderdale to West Palm Beach can be discerned. Lake Okeechobee is the prominent waterbody in Florida. Cape Canaveral is shown well, half way up the peninsula. Orlando appears as the lighter patch West (left) of Cape Canaveral, near the middle of the peninsula. Cape Hatteras appears top right, with the North part of Chesapeake Bay also visible. This is a visibility of 16 degrees of latitude (23 degrees N over Cuba to 39 degrees at Baltimore), showing unusual atmospheric clarity.

  12. Freshwater mussels of Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, James D.; Butler, Robert S.; Warren, Gary L.; Johnson, Nathan A.

    2014-01-01

    An exhaustive guide to all aspects of the freshwater mussel fauna in Florida,Freshwater Mussels of Florida covers the ecology, biology, distribution, and conservation of the many species of bivalve mollusks in the Sunshine State. In the past three decades, researchers, the public, businesses that depend on wildlife, and policy makers have given more attention to the threatened natural diversity of the Southeast, including freshwater mussels. This compendium meets the increasingly urgent need to catalog this imperiled group of aquatic organisms in the United States.

  13. Florida Educational Facilities, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Office of Educational Facilities.

    This document contains information, photographs, and floor plans of many of Florida's new elementary through high school facilities occupied in 1998. Each entry lists the facility's type, building size, student capacity, and general structural information. Also provided is information on the facility's total construction cost; the architects and…

  14. Florida Educational Facilities, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Office of Educational Facilities.

    This document contains information, photographs, and floor plans of many of Florida's new elementary through high school facilities occupied in 1997. Each entry lists the facility's type, building size, student capacity, and general structural information. Also provided is information on the facility's total construction cost; the architects and…

  15. Florida Educational Facilities, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Office of Educational Facilities.

    This document contains information, photographs, and floor plans of many of Florida's new elementary through high school facilities occupied in 1996. Each entry lists the facility's type, building size, student capacity, and general structural information. Also provided is information on the facility's total construction cost; the architects and…

  16. Conservation: saving Florida's manatees

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonde, Robert K.

    2008-01-01

    Robert K. Bonde of the U.S. Geological Survey writes about the protected population of manatees in Crystal River, Florida, including information about the threats they face as they migrate in and out of protected waters. Photographer Carol Grant shares images of "Angel," a newborn manatee she photographed early one winter morning.

  17. Florida Education Opinionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, Robert L.; Gordon, Ira J.

    The Florida Education Opinionnaire (FEO) was designed to determine the belief system of American educators. It consists of 24 statements of educational objectives and techniques to which the subject responds on a scale of 1 to 5, strongly agree to strongly disagree. The instrument requires no special skills for its administration or scoring and…

  18. Florida and SREB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Southern Regional Education Board is a nonprofit organization that works collaboratively with Florida and 15 other member states to improve education at every level-- from pre-K to postdoctoral study-- through many effective programs and initiatives. SREB's "Challenge to Lead Goals for Education", which call for the region to lead the nation…

  19. Florida Educational Facilities, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Office of Educational Facilities.

    This publication describes Florida school and community college facilities completed in 2000, including photographs and floor plans. The facilities profiled are:J. R. Arnold High School (Bay County); Falcon Cove Middle School (Broward); Floranada Elementary School (Broward); Lyons Creek Middle School (Broward); Parkside Elementary School…

  20. Adapting Bulls to Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The adaptation of bulls used for natural breeding purposes to the Gulf Coast region of the United States including all of Florida is an important topic. Nearly 40% of the U.S. cow/calf population resides in the Gulf Coast and Southeast. Thus, as A.I. is relatively rare, the number of bulls used for ...

  1. Florida Educational Facilities, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Office of Educational Facilities.

    This publication describes Florida school and community college facilities completed in 1999, including photographs and floor plans. The facilities profiled are: Buchholz High School (Alachua County); Gator Run Elementary School (Broward); Corkscrew Elementary School (Collier); The 500 Role Models Academy of Excellence (Miami-Dade); Caribbean…

  2. Florida Driver Education Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mick, Susan H.

    This student edition contains the same basic information as the official Florida Driver Handbook, but the reading difficulty of the material has been sharply reduced. It also provides activity-oriented exercises and review tests on this material. Introductory materials include a complete listing of all activities given, some vocabulary exercises…

  3. The Maya of Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Allan F.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the Maya people who fled Guatemala due to a civil war and illegally entered the U.S. and settled in Florida. Presents a picture of their living conditions, employment opportunities, cultural traditions, community development, and family organization. Discusses a Kanjobal Association and the CORN-MAYA program, and explains immigration…

  4. The Seminoles of Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Covington, James W.

    This book gives a complete account of the Florida Seminoles from their entrance into the state almost 300 years ago, through the great chiefdoms of Micanopy, Osceola, and Billy Bowlegs, to the current political reality of democratic tribal elections. After moving into the peninsula from Georgia and Alabama, the Seminoles fought three wars against…

  5. Discovering Florida through Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knowles, Liz; Smith, Martha

    Noting that a student's study of a state becomes more meaningful when children's and young adult literature is used as an enhancement, this book offers Florida-related works of literature to broaden the study of the state. The book is organized by category: history, historical fiction, biographies, plants, animals, fiction, geography, and travel.…

  6. Florida's Online Option

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Bill

    2009-01-01

    Education reform often appears a zero-sum battle, one that pits crusaders demanding accountability and choice against much of the traditional education establishment, including teachers unions. The political skirmishes in Florida, including court fights over vouchers and charter schools, and ongoing struggles over a parade of different merit pay…

  7. 78 FR 43197 - Duke Energy Florida, Inc.; Florida Power & Light Company; Tampa Electric Company; Orlando...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Duke Energy Florida, Inc.; Florida Power & Light Company; Tampa Electric..., Duke Energy Florida, Inc., Florida Power & Light Company, Tampa Electric Company, and Orlando...

  8. Teacher Education Program Reviews at University of North Florida, Florida State University, Florida Atlantic University, University of South Florida, March 1994-April 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    England, David A.

    This report offers the review of four joint teacher education reviews conducted in the Florida State University System (SUS). Institutions reviewed are: University of North Florida (UNF), Florida State University (FSU), Florida Atlantic University (FAU), and the University of South Florida (USF). Joint teams were composed of the National Council…

  9. Florida Hydrogen Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Block, David L

    2013-06-30

    The Florida Hydrogen Initiative (FHI) was a research, development and demonstration hydrogen and fuel cell program. The FHI program objectives were to develop Florida?s hydrogen and fuel cell infrastructure and to assist DOE in its hydrogen and fuel cell activities The FHI program funded 12 RD&D projects as follows: Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure and Rental Car Strategies -- L. Lines, Rollins College This project analyzes strategies for Florida's early stage adaptation of hydrogen-powered public transportation. In particular, the report investigates urban and statewide network of refueling stations and the feasibility of establishing a hydrogen rental-car fleet based in Orlando. Methanol Fuel Cell Vehicle Charging Station at Florida Atlantic University ? M. Fuchs, EnerFuel, Inc. The project objectives were to design, and demonstrate a 10 kWnet proton exchange membrane fuel cell stationary power plant operating on methanol, to achieve an electrical energy efficiency of 32% and to demonstrate transient response time of less than 3 milliseconds. Assessment of Public Understanding of the Hydrogen Economy Through Science Center Exhibits, J. Newman, Orlando Science Center The project objective was to design and build an interactive Science Center exhibit called: ?H2Now: the Great Hydrogen Xchange?. On-site Reformation of Diesel Fuel for Hydrogen Fueling Station Applications ? A. Raissi, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed an on-demand forecourt hydrogen production technology by catalytically converting high-sulfur hydrocarbon fuels to an essentially sulfur-free gas. The removal of sulfur from reformate is critical since most catalysts used for the steam reformation have limited sulfur tolerance. Chemochromic Hydrogen Leak Detectors for Safety Monitoring ? N. Mohajeri and N. Muradov, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed and demonstrated a cost-effective and highly selective chemochromic (visual) hydrogen leak detector for safety monitoring

  10. Hydrogen Research at Florida Universities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Block, David L.; T-Raissi, Ali

    2009-01-01

    This final report describes the R&D activities and projects conducted for NASA under the 6-year NASA Hydrogen Research at Florida Universities grant program. Contained within this report are summaries of the overall activities, one-page description of all the reports funded under this program and all of the individual reports from each of the 29 projects supported by the effort. The R&D activities cover hydrogen technologies related to production, cryogenics, sensors, storage, separation processes, fuel cells, resource assessments and education. In the span of 6 years, the NASA Hydrogen Research at Florida Universities program funded a total of 44 individual university projects, and employed more than 100 faculty and over 100 graduate research students in the six participating universities. Researchers involved in this program have filed more than 20 patents in all hydrogen technology areas and put out over 220 technical publications in the last 2 years alone. This 6 year hydrogen research program was conducted by a consortium of six Florida universities: Florida International University (FIU) in Miami, Florida State University (FSU) and Florida A&M University (FAMU) in Tallahassee, University of Central Florida (UCF) in Orlando, University of South Florida (USF) in Tampa, and University of Florida (UF) in Gainesville. The Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) of the University of Central Florida managed the research activities of all consortium member universities except those at the University of Florida. This report does not include any of the programs or activities conducted at the University of Florida, but can be found in NASA/CR-2008-215440-PART 1-3.

  11. Water withdrawals in Florida, 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marella, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    The largest percentage of freshwater withdrawals was from the South Florida Water Management District (46 percent), followed by the St. Johns River Water Management District (20 percent), Southwest Florida Water Management District (19 percent), Northwest Florida Water Management District (9 percent), and Suwannee River Water Management District (6 percent). The South Florida Water Management District accounted for the largest percentage of freshwater withdrawals for public-supply use (46 percent), commercial-industrial-mining self-supplied use (24 percent), agricultural self-supplied use (59 percent), and recreational-landscape irrigation use (63 percent). The Northwest Florida Water Management District accounted for the largest percentage of freshwater withdrawals for power-generation use (44 percent), and the Southwest Florida Water Management District accounted for the largest percentage of saline-water withdrawals for power-generation use (58 percent).

  12. Water withdrawals in Florida, 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marella, Richard L.

    2015-09-01

    The largest percentage of freshwater withdrawals was from the South Florida Water Management District (46 percent), followed by the St. Johns River Water Management District (20 percent), Southwest Florida Water Management District (19 percent), Northwest Florida Water Management District (9 percent), and Suwannee River Water Management District (6 percent). The South Florida Water Management District accounted for the largest percentage of freshwater withdrawals for public-supply use (46 percent), commercial-industrial-mining self-supplied use (24 percent), agricultural self-supplied use (59 percent), and recreational-landscape irrigation use (63 percent). The Northwest Florida Water Management District accounted for the largest percentage of freshwater withdrawals for power-generation use (44 percent), and the Southwest Florida Water Management District accounted for the largest percentage of saline-water withdrawals for power-generation use (58 percent).

  13. SAVANNAH ROADLESS AREA, FLORIDA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patterson, Sam H.; Crandall, Thomas M.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of a mineral survey the Savannah Roadless Area in Florida was appraised to offer little promise for the occurrence of mineral resources. The commodities identified in the area are deposits of sand and gravel; however, they are deeply buried, far from potential markets, and more readily accessible material exists outside the roadless area. The possibility that oil and gas might occur in the Jurassic Smackover Formation or in other formations at depth cannot be ruled out.

  14. Orlando, Florida, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Much of central Florida, including this detailed view of Orlando (28.5N, 81.0W) can be seen in this single photo. Disney World is at the top center of the scene and the crescent shaped Lake Tohopekaliga is near the bottom. The large round lakes are believed to be sinkholes formed during glacial times when ocean levels were several hundred feet lower than the present. Linear patterns east of Orlando are thought to be ancient shoreline ridges.

  15. Florida's propagation report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmken, Henry; Henning, Rudolf

    1994-01-01

    One of the key goals of the Florida Center is to obtain a maximum of useful information on propagation behavior unique to its subtropical weather and subtropical climate. Such weather data is of particular interest when it is (or has the potential to become) useful for developing and implementing techniques to compensate for adverse weather effects. Also discussed are data observations, current challenges, CDF's, sun movement, and diversity experiments.

  16. Educators' Attitudes Toward Nutrition Education in Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Farrell, Michael J.; Kendrick, Jean L.

    1972-01-01

    Study conducted by Florida Department of Education to determine the attitudes of teachers and administrators toward nutrition education in Florida. Defines problems and parameters of nutrition education, as perceived by Florida educators. (LK)

  17. The Florida Adult Literacy Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Div. of Vocational, Adult, and Community Education.

    This document presents the Adult Literacy Plan for the state of Florida. Section 1 provides a rationale for the plan. Section 2 sets forth goals and objectives. The statutory intent is described in Section 3, which focuses on the Florida Model Literacy Program Act of 1987 (FMLPA). Section 4 presents a statement of the problem. It provides…

  18. Inhalant Use in Florida Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siqueira, Lorena; Crandall, Lee A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To determine (1) the prevalence of use, (2) risk and protective factors for use of inhalants in Florida youth. Methods: The Florida Youth Substance Abuse Survey 2004 is a comprehensive assessment of youth substance abuse attitudes and practices obtained by sampling youth from sixty-five counties. Results: The sample consisted of 60,345…

  19. The Florida Library History Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jasper, Catherine; McCook, Kathleen de la Pena

    The Florida Library History Project (FLHP) began in January 1998. Letters requesting histories were sent to all public libraries in Florida with follow-up letters sent after an initial response was received from the libraries. E-mail messages were sent out to FL-LIB listservs encouraging participation in the project. A poster session was presented…

  20. Florida's Nurses Speak to Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCulloch, Etta S.

    A questionnaire was sent to 5000 Florida hospitals to obtain information from non-members of the Florida Nurses Association (FNA) and to compare the data with that of FNA members on questions relevant to nursing education. Among findings from the 22-item survey, 84 percent of which were returned, were that 80 percent disagreed that licensing…

  1. Biomass production in Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.H.; Dowd, M.L.

    1981-08-01

    Florida posseses climatic, land, and water resources favorable for abundant biomass production. Therefore, a statewide program has been initiated to determine adapted species for the available array of production sites. Plant resources under investigation include woody, aquatic, grasses, hydrocarbon, and root crop species. The goal is to produce a continuous stream of biomass for the various biofuel conversion options. Preliminary yields from energy cropping experiments range from about 10 to nearly 90 metric tons per hectare per year, depending on the crop and the production systems employed. (Refs. 15).

  2. MISR Views Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) images of Florida acquired on April 9, 2000 during Terra orbit 1650. The image at the top is a color view acquired by the vertical (nadir) camera. It has been reoriented so that the flight path is from left to right, to facilitate comparison with the lower image, a stereo 'anaglyph' generated using 275-m resolution red band data from the cameras viewing 45.6 degrees and 70.5 degrees aft of nadir. The anaglyph provides a three-dimensional effect when viewed using red/blue glasses with the red filter placed over the left eye. This stereoscopic 'depth perception' and the variation in brightness as a function of view angle enables scientists to assess the climate impact of different types of cloud fields. The plume from a large brush fire that burned about 15,000 acres is visible at the western edge of the Big Cypress Swamp in southern Florida. East is toward the top.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

    For more information: http://www-misr.jpl.nasa.gov

  3. FLORIDA TOWER FOOTPRINT EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    WATSON,T.B.; DIETZ, R.N.; WILKE, R.; HENDREY, G.; LEWIN, K.; NAGY, J.; LECLERC, M.

    2007-01-01

    The Florida Footprint experiments were a series of field programs in which perfluorocarbon tracers were released in different configurations centered on a flux tower to generate a data set that can be used to test transport and dispersion models. These models are used to determine the sources of the CO{sub 2} that cause the fluxes measured at eddy covariance towers. Experiments were conducted in a managed slash pine forest, 10 km northeast of Gainesville, Florida, in 2002, 2004, and 2006 and in atmospheric conditions that ranged from well mixed, to very stable, including the transition period between convective conditions at midday to stable conditions after sun set. There were a total of 15 experiments. The characteristics of the PFTs, details of sampling and analysis methods, quality control measures, and analytical statistics including confidence limits are presented. Details of the field programs including tracer release rates, tracer source configurations, and configuration of the samplers are discussed. The result of this experiment is a high quality, well documented tracer and meteorological data set that can be used to improve and validate canopy dispersion models.

  4. Dengue in Florida (USA)

    PubMed Central

    Rey, Jorge R.

    2014-01-01

    Florida (USA), particularly the southern portion of the State, is in a precarious situation concerning arboviral diseases. The geographic location, climate, lifestyle, and the volume of travel and commerce are all conducive to arbovirus transmission. During the last decades, imported dengue cases have been regularly recorded in Florida, and the recent re-emergence of dengue as a major public health concern in the Americas has been accompanied by a steady increase in the number of imported cases. In 2009, there were 28 cases of locally transmitted dengue in Key West, and in 2010, 65 cases were reported. Local transmission was also reported in Martin County in 2013 (29 cases), and isolated locally transmitted cases were also reported from other counties in the last five years. Dengue control and prevention in the future will require close cooperation between mosquito control and public health agencies, citizens, community and government agencies, and medical professionals to reduce populations of the vectors and to condition citizens and visitors to take personal protection measures that minimize bites by infected mosquitoes. PMID:26462955

  5. Dengue in Florida (USA).

    PubMed

    Rey, Jorge R

    2014-01-01

    Florida (USA), particularly the southern portion of the State, is in a precarious situation concerning arboviral diseases. The geographic location, climate, lifestyle, and the volume of travel and commerce are all conducive to arbovirus transmission. During the last decades, imported dengue cases have been regularly recorded in Florida, and the recent re-emergence of dengue as a major public health concern in the Americas has been accompanied by a steady increase in the number of imported cases. In 2009, there were 28 cases of locally transmitted dengue in Key West, and in 2010, 65 cases were reported. Local transmission was also reported in Martin County in 2013 (29 cases), and isolated locally transmitted cases were also reported from other counties in the last five years. Dengue control and prevention in the future will require close cooperation between mosquito control and public health agencies, citizens, community and government agencies, and medical professionals to reduce populations of the vectors and to condition citizens and visitors to take personal protection measures that minimize bites by infected mosquitoes. PMID:26462955

  6. State Education Finance and Governance Profile: Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the state education finance and governance profile of Florida. The state of Florida has 67 regular school districts as well as additional special districts comprised of developmental research schools and other schools that serve special populations. In 1973, the Florida Legislature adopted the Florida Education Finance…

  7. Florida Everglades and Keys, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Though much of southern Florida is covered by clouds, the Florida Everglades and Keys (25.0N, 82.0W) remain relatively clear in this nearly vertical view. The view covers the Gulf of Mexico port city of Ft. Myers, and Lake Okeechobee, at the top of the scene, in the north, The Everglades, in the center and the entire Florida Key Chain at the bottom. Even with the many popcorn clouds, ground detail and the city of Miami is easily discerned.

  8. Attitudes of Florida Academic Physicians toward the Florida Medical Association.

    PubMed

    Herold, A E

    1996-05-01

    An Ad Hoc Committee on Academic Physicians was given the charge in 1992 of studying Florida academic physician's participation in the Florida Medical Association. It was postulated that academic physicians may participate less in organized medicine than community physicians and, therefore, may be a group that should be selectively targeted during membership campaigns. Data was obtained from the American Medical Association Masterfiles about Florida academic and community physician membership in the FMA and AMA. Academic physicians at the four academic medical centers in Florida were surveyed about their attitudes toward organized medicine, especially the Florida Medical Association. Unlike any other state in the Federation, more academic physicians than community physicians were members of the state society (46.9% v 43.5%) p < 0.05, which was accounted for mainly women academic physicians. There were substantial differences across the academic medical centers with the University of Florida at Gainesville and Jacksonville being overrepresented, the University of South Florida having average membership, and the University of Miami being underrepresented. Florida academic and community physician membership in the AMA was 34.6% and 38.5% respectively, which was consistent with national trends. Academic physicians at the University of Florida campuses rated their relationship and communication with the FMA as being better than academic physicians at the University of South Florida and Miami. Academic physicians at all four medical centers rated membership dues as being too high relative to the benefits derived, but there was indirect evidence to suggest that this was an apparent and not real barrier. Also, academic physicians thought that the FMA represented community physicians more effectively than academic physicians. The state of Florida is unique in that more academic physicians than community physicians are members of the state medical society. The differences by

  9. Naturally cooled Florida house

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-07-01

    A 1750 ft/sup 2/ home in northern Florida is described, constructed at a cost of $35/ft/sup 2/ (comparable to conventional homes), yet incorporating a number of passive solar and active systems. The well-planned design (emphasizing cooling rather than heating) is explained and illustrated in some detail. Notable features described include: (1) earth burning; (2) south facing greenhouse-solarium; (3) hatch-equipped attic wells which admit light and let the heat out; (4) roof overhangs above skylights; (5) solar screening over the greenhouse windows; (6) insulated drapes; (7) thermal insulation at R-28; (8) use of post-tensioned concrete (floor slab and walls); and (9) 2'' styrofoam skirting extending eight feet into the bermed earth. Use of engineering known-how to cut costs is discussed. (MJJ)

  10. Teaching CPR to Florida's Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varnes, Jill W.; Crone, Ernest G.

    1980-01-01

    A program in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) instruction for Florida's school children is described. Program guidelines and support services are detailed for other schools wishing to implement such a program. (JN)

  11. Sunglint and Florida Peninsula, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The Gulf coast and the Florida peninsula (30.0N, 81.5W) seen in sunglint. The lakes of central Florida are highlighted in reflected light in this scene. The view extends up along the Georgia and South Carolina Coast and clouds cast shadows in the sunglint. The sunglint off the east coast also highlights shears in the Atlantic related to the Gulf Stream. To the south, Andros Island and the Grand Bahama Bank are visible.

  12. Spaceport Florida Authority: Business Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Spaceport Florida Authority (SFA) was established under Florida Statute by the Governor and Legislature to assist the development of our nation's space transportation industry and to generate new space-related jobs, investment and opportunities statewide. Included in the Authorities' business plan is the statement of work and list of team members involved in creating the report, SFA's current operating concept, market analysis, assessment of accomplishments, a sample operating concept and a "roadmap to success".

  13. 78 FR 43881 - Florida Petroleum Reprocessors Site, Davie, Broward County, Florida; Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-22

    ... AGENCY Florida Petroleum Reprocessors Site, Davie, Broward County, Florida; Notice of Settlement AGENCY... Protection Agency has entered into a settlement with Jap. Tech, Inc. concerning the Florida Petroleum... Ms. Paula V. Painter. Submit your comments by Site name Florida Petroleum Reprocesssors Site by...

  14. 77 FR 55207 - Florida Gas Transmission Company, LLC, Florida Gas Transmission Company, LLC; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-07

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Florida Gas Transmission Company, LLC, Florida Gas Transmission Company, LLC; Notice of Application Take notice that on August 16, 2012, Florida Gas Transmission Company, LLC (FGT... & Tariffs, Florida Gas Transmission Company, LLC, 5051 Westheimer Road, Houston, Texas, 77056, or call...

  15. Libraries in Florida: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/florida.html Libraries in Florida To use the sharing features on ... please enable JavaScript. Atlantis JFK Medical Center MEDICAL LIBRARY 5301 S. Congress Ave. Att: Karin H. Pancake Atlantis, ...

  16. Florida, National Space Club Embrace Commercial Endeavors

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Commercial Crew Program (CCP) Manager Ed Mango and Florida's Lt. Gov. Jennifer Carroll were guest speakers at the National Space Club Florida Committee's luncheon at the Radisson Resort at t...

  17. Epidemiology of Ciguatera in Florida

    PubMed Central

    Radke, Elizabeth G.; Reich, Andrew; Morris, John Glenn

    2015-01-01

    Ciguatera is the most commonly reported marine food-borne illness worldwide. Because there is a biological plausibility that ciguatera may be impacted by long-term climate variability and Florida is on the northern border of the geographic distribution of ciguatera, it is important to update our understanding of its epidemiology in Florida. We performed an analysis of 291 reports in Florida from 2000 to 2011 and an e-mail survey of 5,352 recreational fishers to estimate incidence and underreporting and identify high risk demographic groups, fish types, and catch locations. Incidence was 5.6 per 100,000 adjusted for underreporting. Hispanics had the highest incidence rate (relative risk [RR] = 3.4) and were more likely to eat barracuda than non-Hispanics. The most common catch locations for ciguatera-causing fish were the Bahamas and Florida Keys. Cases caused by fish from northern Florida were infrequent. These results indicate that ciguatera incidence is higher than estimated from public health reports alone. There is little evidence that incidence or geographic range has increased because of increased seawater temperatures since earlier studies. PMID:26123957

  18. Florida Library Directory with Statistics, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida Dept. of State, Tallahassee. Div. of Library and Information Services.

    This 49th annual Florida Library directory with statistics edition includes listings for over 1,000 libraries of all types in Florida, with contact named, phone numbers, addresses, and e-mail and web addresses. In addition, there is a section of library statistics, showing data on the use, resources, and financial condition of Florida's libraries.…

  19. 21 CFR 808.59 - Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Florida. 808.59 Section 808.59 Food and Drugs FOOD... EXEMPTIONS FROM FEDERAL PREEMPTION OF STATE AND LOCAL MEDICAL DEVICE REQUIREMENTS Listing of Specific State and Local Exemptions § 808.59 Florida. The following Florida medical device requirements are...

  20. 21 CFR 808.59 - Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Florida. 808.59 Section 808.59 Food and Drugs FOOD... EXEMPTIONS FROM FEDERAL PREEMPTION OF STATE AND LOCAL MEDICAL DEVICE REQUIREMENTS Listing of Specific State and Local Exemptions § 808.59 Florida. The following Florida medical device requirements are...

  1. 21 CFR 808.59 - Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Florida. 808.59 Section 808.59 Food and Drugs FOOD... EXEMPTIONS FROM FEDERAL PREEMPTION OF STATE AND LOCAL MEDICAL DEVICE REQUIREMENTS Listing of Specific State and Local Exemptions § 808.59 Florida. The following Florida medical device requirements are...

  2. 21 CFR 808.59 - Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Florida. 808.59 Section 808.59 Food and Drugs FOOD... EXEMPTIONS FROM FEDERAL PREEMPTION OF STATE AND LOCAL MEDICAL DEVICE REQUIREMENTS Listing of Specific State and Local Exemptions § 808.59 Florida. The following Florida medical device requirements are...

  3. 21 CFR 808.59 - Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Florida. 808.59 Section 808.59 Food and Drugs FOOD... EXEMPTIONS FROM FEDERAL PREEMPTION OF STATE AND LOCAL MEDICAL DEVICE REQUIREMENTS Listing of Specific State and Local Exemptions § 808.59 Florida. The following Florida medical device requirements are...

  4. Hydrology of Southeast Florida and Associated Topics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monsour, William, Comp.; Moyer, Maureen, Comp.

    This booklet deals with the hydrology of southeastern Florida. It is designed to provide the citizen, teacher, or student with hydrological information, to promote an understanding of water resources, and to initiate conservation practices within Florida communities. The collection of articles within the booklet deal with Florida water resources…

  5. Florida Dissemination Capacity Building Grant. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhn, G. Michael

    This report describes the goals, objectives, activities, and accomplishments of the Florida Capacity Building Project, which was undertaken to improve the information dissemination capabilities of the Florida educational community and which resulted in the establishment of the Florida Resources in Education Exchange (FREE). A detailed statement of…

  6. Troubled waters: a Florida nightmare

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, W.

    1984-12-01

    Results of studies of pollution of groundwater in Florida are reported. Vast amounts of the underground water were found to be polluted with ethylene dibromide (EDB) used by Florida farmers since the 1950s as an insecticide. Pollution levels of water in the middle of the citrus belt were found to be as high as 775 ppB when 0.02 ppB has been set by the Florida Agriculture Department as the level for concern. EDB can be removed using activated charcoal filters, or new wells can tap aquifers separated from contaminated ones by beds of impermeable clay. Evidences of contamination of water in specific sites by cresote, sulfuric acid, and heavy metals such as lead and arsenic are mentioned.

  7. Florida's Fit to Achieve Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sander, Allan N.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Describes Florida's "Fit to Achieve," a cardiovascular fitness education program for elementary students. Children are taught responsibility for their own cardiovascular fitness through proper exercise, personal exercise habits, and regular aerobic exercise. The program stresses collaborative effort between physical educators and classroom…

  8. Social Studies: The Florida Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaRoe, Margaret E.

    A survey of Florida's history comprises this quinmester general social studies course for grades seven through nine. The primary aim is to give students skills and knowledge necessary to understand issues and take part in their resolution, thereby helping students to prepare for effective citizenship in their own state. Objectives of the course…

  9. Emerging tomato viruses in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) causes crop losses worldwide. This tospovirus is well-known for disease epidemics in vegetable, ornamental and peanut crops in the southeastern U.S. Two other tospoviruses have recently emerged in south Florida. Groundnut ringspot virus (GRSV) was first detected in ...

  10. Public Health Education in Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee.

    This report documents issues related to the work of the Florida Comprehensive Health Professions Education Plan. Public health education prepares students for initial employment or advancement in a number of positions. While the public health work force is primarily employed in various units in local, state, and federal governments, industry also…

  11. Florida Health Professions Education Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Postsecondary Education Planning Commission, Tallahassee.

    This report presents the results of a review of health professions education in Florida and the social and economic forces affecting the supply and demand for health professionals in the state. Individual sections focus on medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, pharmacy, public health, nursing, physician assistantship, physical therapy,…

  12. State University System of Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Board of Governors, State University System of Florida, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents some information about the State University System of Florida. The following are presented in this paper: (1) University Work Plans and Annual Reports; (2) State University System 2009 Annual Report; (3) Quick Facts: Planned New Degree Programs--2010 to 2013; (4) State University System Tuition Differential Summary, FY…

  13. Miami, Florida: The Magic City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Phyllis

    2008-01-01

    With its subtropical climate and intimate ties to Latin America, Miami is like no other city in the United States. More than 65 percent of its population is Hispanic, and Spanish is the most commonly heard language. Situated at the southern tip of the 500-mile-long Florida peninsula, Miami is the largest urban area in the southeastern United…

  14. Florida Community Colleges Argentina Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holcombe, Willis; Greene, William

    1996-01-01

    Describes the origins of the Florida community colleges' Argentina Project, which sent a delegation of representatives to Argentina in 1992 to describe the community college system as a model for educational reform in the country. Describes changes in Argentina since 1989 regarding the political climate and reviews recent educational reforms in…

  15. Readability of Central Florida Newspapers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olmstead, Phyllis M.

    A study analyzed the readability of seven central Florida newspapers (one of which is a college newspaper) and "USA Today.""Rightwriter," a grammar checker and readability computer program, was used to evaluate front page articles for each of the eight newspapers. The readability formulas invoked in the readability program included the…

  16. Equalization among Florida School Districts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Kern; Shiver, Lee

    1983-01-01

    This statistical analysis of funding equalization from 1970 to 1981 evaluates the distributional equity achieved by Florida's school finance plan and examines the relationship between selected per pupil revenue measures and variables thought to influence school district spending, concluding that greater equity has not been attained. (MJL)

  17. Water quality in southern Florida; Florida, 1996-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McPherson, Benjamin F.; Miller, Ronald L.; Haag, Kim H.; Bradner, Anne

    2000-01-01

    Major influences and findings for water quality and biology in southern Florida, including the Everglades, are described and illustrated. Samples were collected to determine total phosphorus, dissolved organic carbon, pesticides, mercury, nitrate, volatile organic carbon compounds, and radon-222. Water-management, agricultural, and land-use practices are discussed. Sixty-three species of fish in 26 families were collected; 43 native species, 10 exotic or nonnative species, and 10 species of marine fish that periodically inhabit canals and rivers were identified.

  18. The Effectiveness of Florida Virtual School in Terms of Cost and Student Achievement in a Selected Florida School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNally, Susan R.

    2012-01-01

    Florida Virtual School was started in 1997. Since then, its presence and impact on public education in Florida has grown significantly. The Florida Virtual School was started by the Florida legislature and is funded through Florida's school funding program, receiving annual appropriations based on successful course completions. The Florida…

  19. Thunderstorm off Florida coast, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    This cumulonimbus thunderhead with its towering anvil was photographed just north of Cape Canaveral and the Kennedy Space Center, Florida (28.5N, 80.5W). Cumulonimbus clouds are the familiar thunderheads that can tower up to as much as 75,000 ft. producing thunderstorms and sometimes tornadoes as well. Inland from the cape, Orlando in the center of the state, can be seen.

  20. Coastal land loss in Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.R. )

    1990-09-01

    Florida has approximately 593 mi of shoreline fronting on the Atlantic Ocean and Straits of Florida and approximately 673 mi of shoreline fronting on the Gulf of Mexico with an additional 5,000 mi of bay and estuary shoreline. Of a statewide total of 818.9 mi of open coast sandy beaches, 337.2 mi or 41.2% of the beaches are identified as erosion problem areas. These erosion problem areas include those beaches with a moderate or low erosion rate, but with a narrow width fronting a highly developed area, and those restored beaches with an active maintenance nourishment program. Of these erosion problem areas, 217.8 mi or 26.6% of the statewide beach length are areas of critical erosion; that is, segments of the shoreline where substantial development or recreation interests are threatened by the erosion processes. On a shorewide basis, the Atlantic Ocean beaches of Florida typically have historical erosion rates of between 0 and {minus}3 ft per year, while the Gulf of Mexico beaches typically have historical erosion rates of between 0 and {minus}2 ft per year. Many of the problem areas have shoreline erosion rates in the magnitude of between {minus}3 and {minus}5 ft per year. The most extreme erosion rates are occurring along the southern portion of St. Joseph Peninsula at Cape San Bias where the annual shoreline recession exceeds {minus}20 ft. Erosion conditions in Florida are most apparent as a result of storm tides and storm wave activity. Extreme meteorological events inflict significant erosion conditions in all beach areas of the state. Historical shoreline changes are often the cumulative effect of a number of storm events and their cycles of poststorm recovery. Erosion and damage from recent storms as well as efforts to mitigate storm damage have heightened the erosion problems and incited a public response through coastal construction regulation and beach management planning.

  1. Phage therapy for Florida corals?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kellogg, Christina A.

    2007-01-01

    Coral disease is a major cause of reef decline in the Florida Keys. Bacterium has been defined as the most common pathogen (disease-causing organism). Although much is being done to catalog coral diseases, map their locations, determine the causes of disease, or measure the rates of coral demise, very little research has been directed toward actually preventing or eliminating the diseases affecting coral and coral reef decline.

  2. The Impact of One Florida Initiative on Florida's Public Law Schools: A Critical Race Theory Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilton, Adriel A.; Gasman, Marybeth; Wood, J. Luke

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of the One Florida Initiative (OFI) on racial diversity in Florida's public law schools and legal profession using the lens of Critical Race Theory (CRT). This study seeks to determine what, if any, impact this event has had on recruitment, admissions, and enrollment of Florida's public schools of…

  3. Florida School Laws. Chapters 228-246 Florida Statutes. 1998 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee.

    This volume of Florida School Laws contains chapters 228 through 246 of the Florida Statutes, which comprise "The Florida School Code." The laws contain those statutes specifically applicable to public schools, community colleges, postsecondary institutions, all other institutions and agencies included as a part of the state system of education,…

  4. Variability in heavy precipitation over southern Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shein, K. A.

    2009-12-01

    Southern Florida is home to the unique Everglades ecosystem that feeds into the Florida Bay. Heavy precipitation events, either over the Everglades or the Bay can introduce pollutants and excessive fresh water into the bay, while prolonged drought reduces water levels in the wetlands and can contribute to hypersalinity events in the bay. Systematic changes in precipitation frequency and intensity can result in long-term negative impacts to these southern Florida ecosystems. This paper examines the historical in situ record of precipitation over southern Florida, with special emphasis on evaluating the behavior of heavy precipitation events and periods of deficit.

  5. Rotala rotundifolia (Lythraceae) new to Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burks, K.C.; Hall, D.W.; Vandiver, V.V.; Jacono, C.C.

    2003-01-01

    Naturalized populations of the Asian amphibious species Rotala rotundifolia are documented for three peninsular Florida counties. Distinguishing characters and a comment on invasive potential are also provided.

  6. Lessons for Tennessee from Florida's Education Revolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladner, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Jeb Bush campaigned for governor on a clear and bracing set of education reforms in 1998. Having won office, he immediately pursued a dual-track strategy for reforming Florida's K-12 education system: standards and accountability for public schools, choice and options for parents. Florida lawmakers followed those reforms with additional measures.…

  7. Telecommunications in Florida: Training Materials for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eason, Mike; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Describes the use of the Florida Information Resource Network (FIRN) in Florida public schools. Highlights include electronic mail exchanges; online conferences; remote research; classroom resources; training initiatives for teachers to learn about telecommunications; access to other systems and databases; and inservice, hands-on teacher training.…

  8. Collection Assessment: The Florida Community College Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrault, Anna H.; Dixon, Jeannie

    2007-01-01

    Beginning in 1994, a series of collection analysis and assessment projects of community college library/LRC collections in Florida has been conducted by the College Center for Library Automation (CCLA). The purpose of the assessments conducted through LINCC, the network for Florida community colleges, was to provide data for improvement of…

  9. Florida Has Power-Library Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds-Mixon, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about the Florida Power-Library School (FPLS) program. She describes the why, who, what and how of the Florida Power-Library School initiative, as well as the favorable results for schools. Schools successfully completing this process see relationships among staff and community members strengthened. Library media…

  10. Florida Library Directory with Statistics, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida Dept. of State, Tallahassee. Div. of Library and Information Services.

    This 48th annual edition includes listings for over 1,000 libraries of all types in Florida, with contact names, phone numbers, addresses, and e-mail and web addresses. In addition, there is a section of library statistics, showing data on the use, resources, and financial condition of Florida's libraries. The first section consists of listings…

  11. FLORIDA JUNIOR COLLEGE JOURNALISM CURRICULA, A REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    REID, RONALD JAMES

    A 1968 SURVEY OF FLORIDA JUNIOR COLLEGE JOURNALISM PROGRAMS GATHERED INFORMATION ABOUT THE NATURE OF COURSES OFFERED AND THE CREDIT GRANTED FOR SUCH COURSES. OF THE 26 JUNIOR COLLEGES IN THE STATE, 23 OFFERED JOURNALISM INSTRUCTION, WITH 14 PRESENTING A BASIC COURSE SIMILAR TO THAT OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA. ALTHOUGH THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA…

  12. Florida: State of the Foreign Language Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdes, Gabriel M.

    In Florida, foreign language teaching has consistently followed national trends. Currently, there is a renaissance in language study. Enrollment has increased dramatically at all educational levels, due to a mandated state university system entrance requirement and two programs, the Florida Academic Scholars Program and Foreign Languages in the…

  13. Budget Cuts Cast Shadow over Florida's Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fain, Paul

    2009-01-01

    While colleges across the nation are coping with the recession, public universities in Florida, a state with finances that resemble a Ponzi scheme, have spent years doing without. The recession hit Florida early, and in a big way. Without an income tax, state government has long depended on property and sales taxes. As real estate and tourism have…

  14. Lessons Learned from the Florida Teletraining Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Barbara L.; And Others

    The Florida Teletraining Project (FTP) was funded by the Department of Defense to test the feasibility of using a video teletraining network (VTT) (two-way audio/two-way compressed video) to present military instruction to reservists in Florida. The program was to be conducted by two-year community colleges in collaboration with armed forces…

  15. Systemwide Academic Program Review: The Florida Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Joan A.; And Others

    The Florida Plan for systemwide academic program review is detailed in this report. Factors leading to the initiation of systemwide review, including population changes and the changing role of the predominantly black Florida A&M University, are discussed. The design and scope of the review process are explained and selection of consultants to…

  16. Court Showdown over Florida Vouchers Nears

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richard, Alan

    2005-01-01

    This article reports on a nationally-watched case by educators and families which is scheduled to be heard by the Florida Supreme Court. The court is to decide whether Opportunity Scholarships, available to students enrolled in Florida's persistently lowest-rated public schools, run afoul of a prohibition on using public money in religious…

  17. Florida Red Tide Perception: Residents versus Tourists.

    PubMed

    Nierenberg, Kate; Byrne, Margaret; Fleming, Lora E; Stephan, Wendy; Reich, Andrew; Backer, Lorraine C; Tanga, Elvira; Dalpra, Dana R; Kirkpatrick, Barbara

    2010-09-01

    The west coast of Florida has annual blooms of the toxin-producing dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis with Sarasota, FL considered the epicenter for these blooms. Numerous outreach materials, including Frequently Asked Question (FAQ) cards, exhibits for local museums and aquaria, public beach signs, and numerous websites have been developed to disseminate information to the public about this natural hazard. In addition, during intense onshore blooms, a great deal of media attention, primarily via newspaper (print and web) and television, is focused on red tide. However to date, the only measure of effectiveness of these outreach methods has been counts of the number of people exposed to the information, e.g., visits to a website or number of FAQ cards distributed. No formal assessment has been conducted to determine if these materials meet their goal of informing the public about Florida red tide. Also, although local residents have the opinion that they are very knowledgeable about Florida red tide, this has not been verified empirically. This study addressed these issues by creating and administering an evaluation tool for the assessment of public knowledge about Florida red tide. A focus group of Florida red tide outreach developers assisted in the creation of the evaluation tool. The location of the evaluation was the west coast of Florida, in Sarasota County. The objective was to assess the knowledge of the general public about Florida red tide. This assessment identified gaps in public knowledge regarding Florida red tides and also identified what information sources people want to use to obtain information on Florida red tide. The results from this study can be used to develop more effective outreach materials on Florida red tide.

  18. Public perceptions of Florida red tide risks.

    PubMed

    Kuhar, Sara E; Nierenberg, Kate; Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Tobin, Graham A

    2009-07-01

    This research integrates theoretical frameworks of risk perception, social amplification of risk, and the role of place-specific contexts in order to explore the various perceptions surrounding Florida red tides. Florida red tides are naturally occurring events that are increasing in frequency, duration, and severity. This has implications for public health, the local economy, and ecosystem health. While many of the negative impacts of Florida red tides are not easily controlled, some of the secondary impacts may be mitigated through individuals' responses. However, public perception and consequent reactions to Florida red tides have not been investigated. This research uses questionnaire surveys, and semi-structured interviews, to explore the various perceptions of the risk surrounding red tides. Surveys and interviews were conducted along two Florida west coast beaches. The results indicate that the underlying foundations of the social amplification of the risk framework are applicable to understanding how individuals form perceptions of risk relative to red tide events. There are key differences between the spatial locations of individuals and corresponding perceptions, indicating that place-specific contexts are essential to understanding how individuals receive and interpret risk information. The results also suggest that individuals may be lacking efficient and up-to-date information about Florida red tides and their impacts because of inconsistent public outreach. Overall, social and spatial factors appear to be influential as to whether individuals amplify or attenuate the risks associated with Florida red tides.

  19. Mysterious Black Water off Florida's Gulf Coast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In mid-December last year, a mysterious black water overtook the normally bluish green waters of Florida Bay. Over the course of the winter, the extent of the water grew to encompass an area as big as Lake Okeechobee, Florida, before subsiding over the last few weeks. These images taken by the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS), flying aboard the Orbview-2 satellite, show the progression of the black water over the last three months. The affected water sits along the southeastern coast of Florida about fifty miles north of the Florida Keys. As of now, scientists do not know why the water appears black in satellite and aerial images or whether the water is harming the wildlife. They speculate that it could be due to an exotic algae bloom, an underwater fountain pushing up sediments from the ocean floor, or possibly chemical and sediment run-off from the nearby Shark River. Researchers at the Florida Marine Research Institute in St. Petersburg and the Mote Marine Research Institute in Sarasota are running tests to determine the chemical make-up of the water. No big fish kills have been reported in the area. But fishermen say the catch has been low this winter. In addition, the black water sits just north of the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, which is home to one of the largest coral reef habitats in the United States. Toxic run-off from the Florida coastline and motor boats in the area have already destroyed many of Florida's reefs. Scientists are concerned that if the extent of the black water grows again, it could endanger these reefs. Information provided by the Naples Daily News. For up-to-date images of the area, view these SeaWiFS Images of Florida Bay. Image courtesy the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  20. NRRI summary of Florida Public Service Commission: Fraud control policies of seven major Florida utilities

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The Florida Public Service Commission (PSC) Staff recently completed an audit of fraud control policies and programs at the State`s largest regulated electric and local telephone utilities. The purpose of the audit was to examine the ability of Florida`s largest regulated utilities to deter, detect, and resolve occurrences of fraud. The Staff audited the state`s seven largest regulated electric and local telephone utilities: Florida Power Corporation, Florida Power and Light, Gulf Power Corporation, Tampa Electric Company, GTE-Florida, BellSouth Telecommunications (Southern Bell), and Sprint United/Centel. The audit scope was limited to fraudulent acts committed by employees, contractors, suppliers, or agents of the seven utilities. Information regarding the utilities` fraud control policies and programs was obtained through surveys, document requests, and interviews with managers and officers.

  1. Florida

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... image is a natural color composite of blue, green, and red band imagery. On the bottom is a false color composite comprised of green, red, ... reflectance of plants in this part of the electromagnetic spectrum, displayed here in shades of red, is the basis of many satellite-based ...

  2. Florida

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... stereo "anaglyph" generated using 275-m resolution red band data from the cameras viewing 45.6 degrees and 70.5 degrees aft of nadir. The ... NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. The MISR data were obtained from the NASA Langley Research Center Atmospheric Science ...

  3. Parasailing fatalities in southwest Florida.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Barbara C; Harding, Brett E

    2009-12-01

    Parasailing is a recreational sport that is generally considered to be of little risk to the participants. Typically, the passenger launches from a motorboat with a specially designed winch that pulls him or her back to the boat at the end of the ride. The sport is not regulated at the federal, state, or county level. There have been few reports of injuries to parasailors. Additionally, there have been only 2 fatalities reported to the United States Coast Guard in a 10-year review. We report the details of these 2 deaths, those of a mother and daughter riding in a tandem parasail, which occurred on Fort Myers Beach in 2001, as well as an additional case of a parasailing fatality that occurred in southwest Florida in 1999. These cases illustrate the injuries seen in such fatalities and the hazards posed by adverse weather conditions and faulty equipment, as well as the impairment of passenger judgment by drugs and/or alcohol.

  4. Hydrology of Lake County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knochenmus, Darwin D.; Hughes, G.H.

    1976-01-01

    Lake County includes a 1,150 square-mile area consisting of ridges, uplands, and valleys in central-peninsular Florida. About 32 percent of the county is covered by lakes, swamps, and marshes. Water requirements in 1970 averaged about 54 million gallons per day. About 85 percent of the water was obtained from wells; about 15 percent from lakes. The Floridan aquifer supplies almost all the ground water used in Lake County. Annual recharge to the Floridan aquifer averages about 7 inches over the county; runoff average 8.5 inches. The quality of ground and surface water in Lake County is in general good enough for most uses; however, the poor quality of Floridan-aquifer water in the St. John River Valley probably results from the upward movement of saline water along a fault zone. Surface water in Lake County is usually less mineralized than ground water but is more turbid and colored. (Woodard-USGS)

  5. Hydrologic conditions: Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kohout, Francis Anthony; Klein, Howard; Sherwood, C.B.; Leach, Stanley D.

    1964-01-01

    Thin layers of dense limestone of low permeability that occur near the top of the Biscayne aquifer in the vicinity of the north end of Levee 30 in Dade County, Florida are of hydrologic importance because they retard the downward infiltration of ponded water in Conservation Area No. 3. This retarding effect frequently results in high head differentials across the levee. Tests made in a small area adjacent to Levee 30 indicate that the coefficient of transmissibility of the aquifer is 3,600,000 gpd (gallons per day) per foot, and the coefficient of vertical permeability of the dense limestones is 13 gpd per square foot. If ground-water flow beneath the levee is laminar, the total inflow to the Levee 30 Canal from Conservation Area No. 3 will be about 350 mgd (million gallons per day), or 540 cfs (cubic feet per second), per mile length of levee when the head difference across the levee is 10 feet.

  6. 78 FR 48763 - Florida Disaster #FL-00090

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Florida Disaster FL-00090 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... completed loan applications to: U.S. Small Business Administration, Processing and Disbursement...

  7. Hydrology of Central Florida Lakes - A Primer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schiffer, Donna M.

    1998-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Lakes are among the most valued natural resources of central Florida. The landscape of central Florida is riddled with lakeswhen viewed from the air, it almost seems there is more water than land. Florida has more naturally formed lakes than other southeastern States, where many lakes are created by building dams across streams. The abundance of lakes on the Florida peninsula is a result of the geology and geologic history of the State. An estimated 7,800 lakes in Florida are greater than 1 acre in surface area. Of these, 35 percent are located in just four counties (fig. 1): Lake, Orange, Osceola, and Polk (Hughes, 1974b). Lakes add to the aesthetic and commercial value of the area and are used by many residents and visitors for fishing, boating, swimming, and other types of outdoor recreation. Lakes also are used for other purposes such as irrigation, flood control, water supply, and navigation. Residents and visitors commonly ask questions such as Whyare there so many lakes here?, Why is my lake drying up (or flooding)?, or Is my lake spring-fed? These questions indicate that the basic hydrology of lakes and the interaction of lakes with ground water and surface water are not well understood by the general population. Because of the importance of lakes to residents of central Florida and the many questions and misconceptions about lakes, this primer was prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the St. Johns River Water Management District and the South Florida Water Management District. The USGS has been collecting hydrologic data in central Florida since the 1920s, obtaining valuable information that has been used to better understand the hydrology of the water resources of central Florida, including lakes. In addition to data collection, as of 1994, the USGS had published 66 reports and maps on central Florida lakes (Garcia and Hoy, 1995). The main purpose of this primer is to describe the hydrology of lakes in central

  8. South Florida Coastal Sediment Ecological Risk Assessment.

    PubMed

    Julian, Paul

    2015-08-01

    This study evaluated the degree of sediment contamination in several South Florida estuaries. During the 2010 National Condition Assessment, Florida Fish and Wildlife Research Institute collected water column, sediment and biotic data from estuaries across the entire state of Florida. Sediments were analyzed for arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, zinc and total polychlorinated biphenyls and were compared relative to empirically derived sediment quality guidelines. As a result of this data collection and assessment effort, it was determined that the degree of contamination with respect to sediment was low for all southern Florida estuaries assessed, except the Miami River which was determined to be considerably contaminated. However only one monitoring location was used to assess the Miami River, and as such should be viewed with caution. A low degree of contamination was determined for Biscayne Bay sediments, possibly indicating a recovery from its previously reported higher contaminant level. PMID:26084967

  9. 40 CFR 131.44 - Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... entitled “Florida Administrative Code, Chapter 62-302, Surface Water Quality Standards, Section 62-302.540...-566-2426), at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), and finally, on the EPA Web... following Web site...

  10. 40 CFR 131.43 - Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) State means the State of Florida, whose transactions with the U.S. EPA in matters related to 40 CFR 131... watershed geologies. For more detailed information on regionalization and which WBIDs pertain to each...

  11. 40 CFR 131.43 - Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) State means the State of Florida, whose transactions with the U.S. EPA in matters related to 40 CFR 131... watershed geologies. For more detailed information on regionalization and which WBIDs pertain to each...

  12. Florida Sunshine -- Natural Source for Heating Water

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2002-05-01

    This brochure, part of the State Energy Program (SEP) Stellar Project series, describes a utility solar hot water program in Lakeland, Florida. It is the first such utility-run solar hot water program in the country.

  13. Insecticide tolerance of Culex nigripalpus in Florida.

    PubMed

    Boike, A H; Rathburn, C B; Floore, T G; Rodriguez, H M; Coughlin, J S

    1989-12-01

    Larval susceptibility tests of Culex nigripalpus populations from various areas of Florida have shown resistance to several organophosphorus insecticides since 1984. Although the degree of resistance is low (2 to 7 times), it can be termed tolerance and appears to be the greatest for fenthion, followed by temephos, naled and malathion. It is suggested that pesticide runoff from lawns, golf courses and agricultural and urban areas may play a role in developing resistance in Florida mosquito populations. PMID:2614401

  14. Florida, Bahamas, Cuba and Gulf Stream, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This unique photo offers a view of the Florida peninsula, western Bahamas, north central Cuba and the deep blue waters of the Gulf Stream, that hugs the east coast of Florida (27.0N, 82.0W). In addition to being an excellent photograph for showing the geographical relationships between the variety of landforms in this scene, the typical effect of the land-sea breeze is very much in evidence as few clouds over water, cumulus build up over landmass.

  15. Jurassic hydrocarbon exploration of southern Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell-Tapping, H.J.

    1994-09-01

    South Florida Jurassic exploration has been overlooked as a viable exploration target due to lack of data and plate-tectonics application. In Florida, {open_quotes}basement{close_quotes} is defined as crystalline, igneous, metamorphic, and unmetamorphosed sediments of Paleozoic age. Age-dating of zircons has proven that the Florida lower Paleozoic terrane is not akin to that of North America but is part of the West African Guinean shield. Previous published reconstructions of late Paleozoic fits of crustal plates and continents have failed to account for the differences in peninsula Florida basement and the geologic and tectonic continuities of peninsula Florida, Yucatan, Cuba, Hispaniola, and Bahamas. Pre-Atlantic reconstruction of the Gulf of Mexico in this study proposes that there was a Florida connection to Yucatan-Cuba-Africa during the Triassic. This reconstruction also shows that the Jurassic sediments that are well known in the northern Gulf Coast should have been deposited in similar depositional environments in southern Florida. Deep drilling on the Florida peninsula has confirmed this hypothesis. By using plate tectonic reconstruction based on the rising of the North Atlantic Ocean and evidence from petrology of basement samples from deep wells together with petrographic analyses of Jurassic sediments, a Smackover-equivalent exploration play can be developed. Petrographic and petrophysical analysis of these wells that have encountered Jurassic marine shales, anhydrite, dolomite, carbonate, and elastic sediments has determined that these sediments are from shallow-water subtidal, tidal, intertidal, and supratidal environments. Excellent gas shows, oil stain in the pores and high TOC values in the marine shales, indicate that large accumulations of hydrocarbon are present.

  16. Florida Current: seasonal and interannual variability

    SciTech Connect

    Schott, F.; Zantopp, R.

    1985-01-18

    Annual and interannual variations in the Florida Current, Caribbean and subtropical Atlantic are investigated with the use of historical sea level differences and wind field data. Observational and model evidence suggests that the seasonal transport cycle of the Florida Current is locally forced, either upstream in the Caribbean or downstream over topography. Although at seasonal and shorter periods sea level or bottom pressure fluctuations on the left side of the Florida Current contribute almost all of the variance of sea level difference across the Florida Straits and hence transport, this relation does not seem to apply at interannual time scales. Using results from the Subtropical Atlantic Climate Studies, it is estimated from historical sea level data that interannual transport fluctuations of the Florida Current are only of order 1 x 10/sup 6/ cubic meters per second. Interannual fluctuations in the 2- to 3-year period range in the Florida Straits seem to be correlated with sea level differences across the Caribbean and the subtropical Atlantic but not with Sverdrup transport fluctuations in the subtropical Atlantic. 26 references, 2 figures.

  17. Geology and hydrogeology of the Florida Keys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halley, Robert B.; Vacher, H. L.; Shinn,

    1997-01-01

    This chapter discusses the geology and hydrogeology of the Florida Keys, and focuses on the islands formed of Pleistocene limestone. These islands, which are crossed when driving from Miami to Key West, are typically regarded as "the Florida Keys." The outstanding and fragile character of ecosystems on and around the Florida Keys has prompted State and Federal efforts to protect and preserve the remaining public portions of the region. The Florida Keys were largely ignored during the sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries, although the waters just offshore provided a major shipping thoroughfare to and from the New World. The Florida Keys are now recognized as one of the great recreational and environmental resources of the United States. The islands are outposts of a laid-back, tropical resort culture that has as its foundation warmth and clear water. A significant part of the attraction is fishing, diving, and boating around the area's coral reefs, which the islands protect. But the reefs were not always so highly valued. The Florida Keys that have protected the reefs for millennia, may now be the source of the agents that may accomplish what Agassiz thought was beyond man's power a century ago.

  18. Energy Efficiency for Florida Educational Facilities: The 1996 Energy Survey of Florida Schools. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callahan, Michael P.; Parker, Danny S.; Dutton, Wanda L.; McIlvaine, Janet E. R.

    Florida has recently completed a survey of energy use and related physical and operational characteristics of the state's public schools. This report presents results from 1,298 surveys received (680 providing matching utility data) revealing that total energy costs for the Florida school system totaled $205 million in 1995. Other data show that…

  19. Experiential Training in Florida and the Florida Keys. A Pretrip Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Claude D., Comp.; And Others

    This document is a pretrip instruction manual that can be used by secondary school and college teachers who are planning trips to visit the tropical habitats in South Florida. The material is divided into two parts: (1) several fact sheets on the various habitats in South Florida; and (2) a number of species lists for various areas. Factsheets on…

  20. Growth and Stability Characteristics of Selected Revenue Sources in Florida. Florida School Finance Study. Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee.

    This study assesses the adequacy of Florida's tax structure to meet future demands for government services through an analysis of Florida's major revenue sources (sales tax, gasoline tax, beverage tax and licenses, motor vehicle licenses, racing tax, and cigarette tax) to determine their stability and growth characteristics. The analysis involved…

  1. Hydrology of Polk County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spechler, Rick M.; Kroening, Sharon E.

    2007-01-01

    Local water managers usually rely on information produced at the State and regional scale to make water-resource management decisions. Current assessments of hydrologic and water-quality conditions in Polk County, Florida, commonly end at the boundaries of two water management districts (South Florida Water Management District and the Southwest Florida Water Management District), which makes it difficult for managers to determine conditions throughout the county. The last comprehensive water-resources assessment of Polk County was published almost 40 years ago. To address the need for current countywide information, the U.S. Geological Survey began a 3?-year study in 2002 to update information about hydrologic and water-quality conditions in Polk County and identify changes that have occurred. Ground-water use in Polk County has decreased substantially since 1965. In 1965, total ground-water withdrawals in the county were about 350 million gallons per day. In 2002, withdrawals totaled about 285 million gallons per day, of which nearly 95 percent was from the Floridan aquifer system. Water-conservation practices mainly related to the phosphate-mining industry as well as the decrease in the number of mines in operation in Polk County have reduced total water use by about 65 million gallons per day since 1965. Polk County is underlain by three principal hydrogeologic units. The uppermost water-bearing unit is the surficial aquifer system, which is unconfined and composed primarily of clastic deposits. The surficial aquifer system is underlain by the intermediate confining unit, which grades into the intermediate aquifer system and consists of up to two water-bearing zones composed of interbedded clastic and carbonate rocks. The lowermost hydrogeologic unit is the Floridan aquifer system. The Floridan aquifer system, a thick sequence of permeable limestone and dolostone, consists of the Upper Floridan aquifer, a middle semiconfining unit, a middle confining unit, and

  2. Florida lineament: Key tectonic element of eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Christenson, G. )

    1990-09-01

    The origin of the Florida lineament, a major basement lineament that strikes northwest-southeast across the West Florida Shelf and southern Florida, is a key to the history of the Gulf of Mexico. Regional magnetic and gravity trends are truncated along the Florida lineament. New geologic data from recent wells on the West Florida Shelf and magnetic anomaly data indicate that pre-Mesozoic basement terranes on opposite sides of the Florida lineament were contiguous prior to Triassic-Jurassic volcanism and exhibit only minimal lateral offset across the Florida lineament at present. The lack of major lateral offset of pre-Mesozoic basement terranes across the Florida lineament and lithologic and geophysical data suggest that the lineament represents a Triassic-Jurassic extensional rift margin. The Florida lineament is interpreted to be the southeastward continuation of the well-documented peripheral fault system, which delineates the rifted continental margin of the northern Gulf basin. The continuation of the peripheral fault system along the Florida lineament suggests that the tectonostratigraphic terranes associated with the Mesozoic producing trends of the northern Gulf basin may extend southeastward along the Florida lineament. The interpretation of the Florida lineament as an extensional rift margin places significant constraints on any tectonic model of the Gulf of Mexico region. A tectonic interpretation consistent with the constraints suggests that the West Florida Shelf and southern Florida region formed as the result of Triassic-Jurassic extension around a pole of rotation in central Florida. The central Florida pole of rotation is intermediate to the poles of rotation counterclockwise of Yucatan out of the northern Gulf basin. This suggests that the region south of the Florida lineament underwent extension synchronous with the rotation of the Yucatan block.

  3. NASA Hydrogen Research at Florida Universities, Program Year 2003

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Block, David L.; Raissi, Ali

    2006-01-01

    This document presents the final report for the NASA Hydrogen Research at Florida Universities project for program year 2003. This multiyear hydrogen research program has positioned Florida to become a major player in future NASA space and space launch projects. The program is funded by grants from NASA Glenn Research Center with the objective of supporting NASA's hydrogen-related space, space launch and aeronautical research activities. The program conducts over 40 individual projects covering the areas of cryogenics, storage, production, sensors, fuel cells, power and education. At the agency side, this program is managed by NASA Glenn Research Center and at the university side, co-managed by FSEC and the University of Florida with research being conducted by FSEC and seven Florida universities: Florida International University, Florida State University, Florida A&M University, University of Central Florida, University of South Florida, University of West Florida and University of Florida. For detailed information, see the documents section of www.hydrogenresearch.org. This program has teamed these universities with the nation's premier space research center, NASA Glenn, and the nation's premier space launch facility, NASA Kennedy Space Center. It should be noted that the NASA Hydrogen Research at Florida Universities program has provided a shining example and a conduit for seven Florida universities within the SUS to work collaboratively to address a major problem of national interest, hydrogen energy and the future of energy supply in the U.S.

  4. Impact of immigration on health and human services: Florida's experience.

    PubMed

    McNeece, C Aaron; Falconer, Mary Kay; Springer, David

    2002-01-01

    Florida has been the destination for large numbers of immigrants fleeing political persecution or economic hardships. Cubans and Haitians have been two of the largest immigrant groups arriving and settling in Florida. Both have received national and local attention. This article describes the immigration experience of Haitians and Cubans in Florida. The descriptions emphasize the differences between these two groups in their adjustment to life in south Florida. The article also addresses Florida's reaction to federal policies regarding immigration and highlights Florida's struggle to meet the service needs of these immigrant populations. Fiscal impacts of immigration are quantified in several service categories, including education, social services, health care, and criminal justice. Florida's action based on the documentation of the immigration fiscal impact is explained. Finally, how the state allocated the $18 million in federal funding provided as a response to Florida's documented impact is covered. PMID:12365756

  5. Florida Officials Announce New Zika Zone in Miami

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_161491.html Florida Officials Announce New Zika Zone in Miami News comes just weeks ... 2016 FRIDAY, Oct. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new Zika zone was declared Thursday by Florida health ...

  6. Cool & Dry: Dual-Path Approach for a Florida School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khattar, Mukesh; Shirey, Don, III; Raustad, Richard

    2003-01-01

    Describes how the Brevard County School District in Florida teamed with companies EPRI and Florida Power and Light to implement a dual-path, low temperature air-distribution system used in conjunction with thermal energy storage. (EV)

  7. University of Florida Campus, Plaza of the Americas, University of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    University of Florida Campus, Plaza of the Americas, University of Florida Campus Quad Bounded by West University Avenue, US 441/Southwest 13th Street, Stadium Road, and North-South Drive, Gainesville, Alachua County, FL

  8. West Florida shelf upwelling: Origins and pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisberg, Robert H.; Zheng, Lianyuan; Liu, Yonggang

    2016-08-01

    Often described as oligotrophic, the west Florida continental shelf supports abundant fisheries, experiences blooms of the harmful alga, Karenia brevis, and exhibits subsurface chlorophyll maxima evident in shipboard and glider surveys. Renewal of inorganic nutrients by the upwelling of deeper ocean water onto the shelf may account for this, but what are the origins and pathways by which such new water may broach the shelf break and advance toward the shoreline? We address these questions via numerical model simulations of pseudo-Lagrangian, isopycnic water parcel trajectories. Focus is on 2010, when the west Florida shelf was subjected to an anomalously protracted period of upwelling caused by Gulf of Mexico Loop Current interactions with the shelf slope. Origins and pathways are determined by integrating trajectories over successive 45 day intervals, beginning from different locations along the shelf break and at various locations and depths along the shelf slope. Waters upwelling across the shelf break are found to originate from relatively shallow depths along the shelf slope. Even for the anomalous 2010 year, much of this upwelling occurs from about 150 m and above, although waters may broach the shelf break from 300 m depth, particularly in the Florida Panhandle. Such interannual renewal of west Florida shelf waters appears to have profound effects on west Florida shelf ecology.

  9. 77 FR 74923 - Water Quality Standards for the State of Florida's Estuaries, Coastal Waters, and South Florida...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-18

    ... extends beyond three nautical miles. Florida's seaward boundary in Gulf of Mexico waters is 3 marine... for the State of Florida's Lakes and Flowing Waters (75 FR 4173) that are addressed in this...

  10. Florida's Labor History Symposium (November 18, 1989). Proceedings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Margaret Gibbons, Ed.

    This document contains the proceedings from a one-day symposium designed to illuminate the history of the labor movement in Florida. The proceedings are organized into two parts: Part 1 "Topics in Florida Labor History" features "Labor History in Florida: What Do We Know? Where Do We Go?" (R. Zieger); "Workers' Culture and Women's Culture in Cigar…

  11. The Perceptions of Administrators Concerning the One Florida Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilton, Adriel A.; Green-Powell, Patricia A.; Joseph, Crystal L.; Knight, Linda G.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to discover the perceptions of Florida law school administrators on the impact of the OFI (one Florida initiative) and the addition of two MSI (minority serving institution) law schools on diversity in Florida's legal profession. This research explored the impact of Governor Bush's EO (executive order) on diversity…

  12. Achieving Adult Literacy in Florida. 1990 Status Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Daniel L., Ed.; And Others

    The Florida Model Literacy Program Act of 1987, known as the Florida Adult Literacy Act, committed the state to an organized, systematic, and coordinated attack on adult illiteracy at the state and local levels. The Florida Adult Literacy Plan was developed to implement the provisions of the act and provide a basis for state and local planning…

  13. Fact Book 1981-82. State University System of Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Board of Regents, Tallahassee.

    Data presented on the State University System (SUS) of Florida are presented in the form of tabular displays, charts, graphs, and a glossary. Preliminary sections list members of the State Board of Education and the Florida Board of Regents, provide a description of the State University System of Florida, and list measures used for reporting…

  14. Fact Book 1984-1985. State University System of Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Board of Regents, Tallahassee.

    Data on the State University System (SUS) of Florida are presented in the form of tabular displays, charts, graphs, and a glossary. Preliminary sections list members of the State Board of Education and the Florida Board of Regents, provide a description of the State University System of Florida, and list measures used for reporting Florida…

  15. Fact Book 1985-1986. State University System of Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Board of Regents, Tallahassee.

    This color coded fact book presents data on the State University System (SUS) of Florida in the form of tabular displays, charts, and graphs. Preliminary sections list members of the State Board of Education and the Florida Board of Regents and provide a description of the State University System of Florida. The nine major sections cover the…

  16. Water Use in Florida, 2005 and Trends 1950-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marella, Richard L.

    2008-01-01

    Water is among Florida's most valued resources. The State has more than 1,700 streams and rivers, 7,800 freshwater lakes, 700 springs, 11 million acres of wetlands, and underlying aquifers yielding quantities of freshwater necessary for both human and environmental needs (Fernald and Purdum, 1998). Although renewable, these water resources are finite, and continued growth in population, tourism, and agriculture will place increased demands on these water supplies. The permanent population of Florida in 2005 totaled 17.9 million, ranking fourth in the Nation (University of Florida, 2006); nearly 86 million tourists visited the State (Orlando Business Journal, 2006). In 2005, Florida harvested two-thirds of the total citrus production in the United States and ranked fifth in the Nation net farm income (Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, 2006). Freshwater is vital for sustaining Florida's population, economy, and agricultural production. Accurate estimates reflecting water use and trends in Florida are compiled in 5-year intervals by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) and the Northwest Florida, St. Johns River, South Florida, Southwest Florida, and Suwannee River Water Management Districts (Marella, 2004). This coordinated effort provides the necessary data and information for planning future water needs and resource management. The purpose of this fact sheet is to present the highlights of water use in Florida for 2005 along with some significant trends in withdrawals since 1950.

  17. 7 CFR 915.305 - Florida Avocado Container Regulation 5.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Florida Avocado Container Regulation 5. 915.305... AVOCADOS GROWN IN SOUTH FLORIDA Container and Pack Regulations § 915.305 Florida Avocado Container Regulation 5. (a) No handler shall handle any avocados for the fresh market from the production area to...

  18. 7 CFR 915.305 - Florida Avocado Container Regulation 5.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Florida Avocado Container Regulation 5. 915.305... AVOCADOS GROWN IN SOUTH FLORIDA Container and Pack Regulations § 915.305 Florida Avocado Container Regulation 5. (a) No handler shall handle any avocados for the fresh market from the production area to...

  19. Analysis of State School Finance Reform Legislation in Florida, 1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mintz, Steven

    On June 26, 1973, the system for financing elementary and secondary education in Florida was radically altered when the Florida legislature passed the Florida Education Finance Program Act of 1973. Significant features of this act include (1) substantially increased fiscal equalization; (2) a systematic plan and substantial State commitment to…

  20. An Analysis of Florida Physical Educators' Knowledge of Bicycle Laws

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connaughton, Daniel P.; Egberts, John B.; Spengler, J. O.; Zhang, James J.; Jin, Liyan

    2012-01-01

    Bicycling among youth is a popular activity, but like all modes of travel it is not without risk. Florida has a particularly high rate of bicycle-related fatalities and injuries. To reduce such risks, the Florida Department of Transportation and Florida Department of Education have developed a youth bicycle safety educational program (Florida…

  1. 7 CFR 915.305 - Florida Avocado Container Regulation 5.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Florida Avocado Container Regulation 5. 915.305... AVOCADOS GROWN IN SOUTH FLORIDA Container and Pack Regulations § 915.305 Florida Avocado Container Regulation 5. (a) No handler shall handle any avocados for the fresh market from the production area to...

  2. Development of the Future Physicists of Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, A.; Weatherford, C.; Cottle, P.; Fannin, S.; Roberts, W.; Fauerbach, M.; Ponti, L.; Sear, J.

    2013-03-01

    We present the development of the ``Future Physicists of Florida'' (FPF) comprised of Florida university physics professors, middle and high school science teachers, and backed by the Florida Legislature. Our purpose is to address the lack of incoming college freshmen ready and willing to become physics majors. We will discuss the building of FPF and the development of a pipeline for middle and high school students predicted to produce the optimal number of bachelor's degrees in STEM. We will also discuss our use of community-building activities to educate the students, and their parents and teachers about the educational value of taking physics before going to college and potential careers in physics, to entertain them with fun physics related activities in order to peak their interest in physics, and to ultimately inspire the students to become physicists.

  3. Landscape Analysis of Adult Florida Panther Habitat

    PubMed Central

    Frakes, Robert A.; Belden, Robert C.; Wood, Barry E.

    2015-01-01

    Historically occurring throughout the southeastern United States, the Florida panther is now restricted to less than 5% of its historic range in one breeding population located in southern Florida. Using radio-telemetry data from 87 prime-aged (≥3 years old) adult panthers (35 males and 52 females) during the period 2004 through 2013 (28,720 radio-locations), we analyzed the characteristics of the occupied area and used those attributes in a random forest model to develop a predictive distribution map for resident breeding panthers in southern Florida. Using 10-fold cross validation, the model was 87.5 % accurate in predicting presence or absence of panthers in the 16,678 km2 study area. Analysis of variable importance indicated that the amount of forests and forest edge, hydrology, and human population density were the most important factors determining presence or absence of panthers. Sensitivity analysis showed that the presence of human populations, roads, and agriculture (other than pasture) had strong negative effects on the probability of panther presence. Forest cover and forest edge had strong positive effects. The median model-predicted probability of presence for panther home ranges was 0.81 (0.82 for females and 0.74 for males). The model identified 5579 km2 of suitable breeding habitat remaining in southern Florida; 1399 km2 (25%) of this habitat is in non-protected private ownership. Because there is less panther habitat remaining than previously thought, we recommend that all remaining breeding habitat in south Florida should be maintained, and the current panther range should be expanded into south-central Florida. This model should be useful for evaluating the impacts of future development projects, in prioritizing areas for panther conservation, and in evaluating the potential impacts of sea-level rise and changes in hydrology. PMID:26222526

  4. Landscape Analysis of Adult Florida Panther Habitat.

    PubMed

    Frakes, Robert A; Belden, Robert C; Wood, Barry E; James, Frederick E

    2015-01-01

    Historically occurring throughout the southeastern United States, the Florida panther is now restricted to less than 5% of its historic range in one breeding population located in southern Florida. Using radio-telemetry data from 87 prime-aged (≥3 years old) adult panthers (35 males and 52 females) during the period 2004 through 2013 (28,720 radio-locations), we analyzed the characteristics of the occupied area and used those attributes in a random forest model to develop a predictive distribution map for resident breeding panthers in southern Florida. Using 10-fold cross validation, the model was 87.5 % accurate in predicting presence or absence of panthers in the 16,678 km2 study area. Analysis of variable importance indicated that the amount of forests and forest edge, hydrology, and human population density were the most important factors determining presence or absence of panthers. Sensitivity analysis showed that the presence of human populations, roads, and agriculture (other than pasture) had strong negative effects on the probability of panther presence. Forest cover and forest edge had strong positive effects. The median model-predicted probability of presence for panther home ranges was 0.81 (0.82 for females and 0.74 for males). The model identified 5579 km2 of suitable breeding habitat remaining in southern Florida; 1399 km2 (25%) of this habitat is in non-protected private ownership. Because there is less panther habitat remaining than previously thought, we recommend that all remaining breeding habitat in south Florida should be maintained, and the current panther range should be expanded into south-central Florida. This model should be useful for evaluating the impacts of future development projects, in prioritizing areas for panther conservation, and in evaluating the potential impacts of sea-level rise and changes in hydrology. PMID:26222526

  5. Southern Florida's River of Grass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Florida's Everglades is a region of broad, slow-moving sheets of water flowing southward over low-lying areas from Lake Okeechobeeto the Gulf of Mexico. In places this remarkable 'river of grass' is 80 kilometers wide. These images from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer show the Everglades region on January 16, 2002. Each image covers an area measuring 191 kilometers x 205 kilometers. The data were captured during Terra orbit 11072.

    On the left is a natural color view acquired by MISR's nadir camera. A portion of Lake Okeechobee is visible at the top, to the right of image center. South of the lake, whose name derives from the Seminole word for 'big water,' an extensive region of farmland known as the Everglades Agricultural Area is recognizable by its many clustered squares. Over half of the sugar produced in United States is grown here. Urban areas along the east coast and in the northern part of the image extend to the boundaries of Big Cypress Swamp, situated north of Everglades National Park.

    The image on the right combines red-band data from the 46-degree backward, nadir and 46-degree forward-viewing camera angles to create a red, green, blue false-color composite. One of the interesting uses of the composite image is for detecting surface water. Wet surfaces appear blue in this rendition because sun glitter produces a greater signal at the forward camera's view angle. Wetlands visible in these images include a series of shallow impoundments called Water Conservation Areas which were built to speed water flow through the Everglades in times of drought. In parts of the Everglades, these levees and extensive systems such as the Miami and Tamiami Canals have altered the natural cycles of water flow. For example, the water volume of the Shark River Slough, a natural wetland which feeds Everglades National Park, is influenced by the Tamiami Canal. The unique and intrinsic value of the Everglades is now widely recognized, and efforts to restore

  6. An ecological characterization of the Florida Panhandle

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, S.H.; Reidenauer, J.A.; Means, D.B.

    1988-10-01

    The Florida Panhandle extends from the Ochlockonee River basin west to the Florida-Alabama border and north to the Georgia and Alabama borders; it contains some of the most rapidly developing regions in the entire State. Because of the damaging effects of development, some attention must be given to the region's estuaries, coast, wetlands, and to habitats of endemic species. Development has already damaged some of these areas as well as the seagrass beds and oyster reefs of the western panhandle area. Other potentially affected areas include native upland ecosystems, salt marshes, river floodplains, and steephead areas. Research, growth management legislation, and consideration of the Florida Panhandle ecosystem as a whole are all necessary to ensure the future of the different Florida Panhandle areas. No steps can be taken or decisions made for their longevity until certain data gaps are filled; the gaps range from biological baseline studies of estuaries to the local impacts of rising sea level. 38 refs., 95 figs., 49 tabs.

  7. Florida: The State and Its Educational System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgkinson, Harold L.

    For most of this century, Florida's economy has been one of the "boom or bust" variety; however, since the 1960s, the economy has diversified, bringing in a variety of "high tech" manufacturing and high-end service businesses to the state. Still, wages in agriculture and tourism are so low that the state suffers in terms of per capita income.…

  8. 75 FR 30870 - Florida Disaster #FL-00053

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-02

    ...: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Florida dated 05/25/2010. Incident: Freezing Temperatures and Sinkholes. Incident Period: 01/02/2010 through 02/01/2010. Effective Date: 05/25/2010. Physical Loan Application Deadline Date: 07/26/2010. Economic Injury (EIDL)...

  9. Year-Round Education: Florida Principals' Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pawlas, George E.

    1996-01-01

    Summarizes a survey focused on the job satisfaction/burnout of 97 Florida principals heading year-round schools. Principals most enjoyed school-improvement initiatives, contacts with students, and staff development activities. Major stressors included problems with personnel and parents, heavier workload, scheduling problems, lack of "down time,"…

  10. Reporting Manual for Florida Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Board of Community Colleges, Tallahassee.

    Uniform procedures, terminology, definitions, forms, and instructions are presented to aid individual Florida community colleges in completing state reporting requirements. Following introductory information concerning the Community College Management Information System (CCMIS) the manual explains the purpose and characteristics of the Community…

  11. Implementing Teacher Education Centers: The Florida Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Fleet, Alanson A.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    This monograph is an historical document portraying the problems of starting Florida's first ten teacher education centers (1974-75). Its aim is to provide information to individuals and groups considering active participation in teacher education centers. The document is organized as four sections followed by a bibliography and appendix. The…

  12. Improving Teaching Effectiveness: Florida Essential Competency Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Garfield

    The Florida Council on Teacher Education (COTE) planned and conducted statewide involvement studies to determine competencies that are essential and acceptable to the profession. This included systematic involvement procedures for gaining professional agreement on identification, assessment, implementation, and other development and research on…

  13. STANDARD MEASUREMENT PROTOCOLS - FLORIDA RADON RESEARCH PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The manual, in support of the Florida Radon Research Program, contains standard protocols for key measurements where data quality is vital to the program. t contains two sections. he first section, soil measurements, contains field sampling protocols for soil gas permeability and...

  14. New ilarvirus species in south Florida tomatoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tomato necrotic streak virus (TomNSV) is a novel ilarvirus discovered infecting tomatoes in south Florida starting in fall 2013. It was found during surveys of vegetable fields for Tomato spotted wilt virus, Groundnut ringspot virus and Tomato chlorotic spot virus because all four viruses induce sim...

  15. AECT Convention, Orlando, Florida 2008 Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vega, Eddie

    2009-01-01

    This article presents several reports that highlight the events at the 2008 Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) International Convention in Orlando, Florida. At the annual convention this year, the Multimedia Production Division goal was to continue to share information about the latest tools in multimedia production,…

  16. 40 CFR 81.310 - Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-Clearwater areas are maintenance areas for the 1-hour NAAQS for purposes of 40 CFR part 51 subpart X. Florida.... Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting § 81.310 see the List of CFR Sections Affected... bounded by a 1.5 km radius centered at UTM coordinates 364104 meters, 3093830 meters N, Zone 17,...

  17. 40 CFR 81.310 - Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-Clearwater areas are maintenance areas for the 1-hour NAAQS for purposes of 40 CFR part 51 subpart X. Florida.... Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting § 81.310 see the List of CFR Sections Affected.../92 Unclassifiable The area encompassed within a radius of (5) kilometers centered at UTM...

  18. Florida Community College Finance: Update. Report 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Postsecondary Education Planning Commission, Tallahassee.

    In Florida, community college enrollments have increased by 41% over the past 5 years. The use of a 3-year average to fund enrollment has penalized those colleges which have grown dramatically. This report analyzes the range of community college expenditures by instructional program; the relationship of instructional expenditures to support…

  19. Florida Residents' Preferred Approach to Sexuality Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard-Barr, Elissa M.; Moore, Michele Johnson

    2007-01-01

    Although there is widespread support for sexuality education, whether to use an abstinence-only or comprehensive approach is hotly debated. This study assessed Florida residents preferred approach to school-based sexuality education. The 641 respondents were selected by random digit dialing, using methods to ensure ethnic and geographic…

  20. Endangered Species of Florida Coloring Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Merlien W.

    This coloring book portrays endangered animal and plant species of Florida in their natural environment. Each picture is to be colored by the student. On the back of each page bearing the picture to be colored is a description of the animal or plant, its preferred habitat, and the reason the animal or plant is endangered. (RE)

  1. Domains of the Florida Performance Measurement System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee.

    This monograph sets forth in detail the concepts included in the five domains of teaching as identified by the Florida Coalition for the Development of a Performance Evaluation System. The first domain, planning, includes the concepts: (1) content coverage; (2) utilization of instructional materials; (3) activity structure; (4) goal focusing; and…

  2. 77 FR 42352 - Florida Disaster #FL-00072

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-18

    ... ADMINISTRATION Florida Disaster FL-00072 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the... Kingsport Road, Fort Worth, TX 76155. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Alan Escobar, Office of...

  3. 77 FR 66083 - Florida Disaster # FL-00076

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION Florida Disaster FL-00076 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the... Kingsport Road, Fort Worth, TX 76155. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of...

  4. Commercial Refrigeration Technology. Florida Vocational Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University of South Florida, Tampa. Dept. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    The program guide for commercial refrigeration technology courses in Florida identifies primary considerations for the organization, operation, and evaluation of a vocational education program. Following an occupational description for the job title for refrigeration mechanic, and its Dictionary of Occupational Titles code, are six sections…

  5. Florida Journal of Communication Disorders, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosa-Lugo, Linda I., Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This volume of the Florida Journal of Communication Disorders contains the following featured articles: (1) Using Descriptive Language Assessment Procedure with African-American English Preschool Child Speakers: Advantages and Limitations (Kenyatta O. Rivers and Linda J. Lombardino), which discusses best practices for using descriptive language…

  6. Cocaine Babies: Florida's Substance-Exposed Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harpring, Jayme

    This report is designed to provide Florida's school personnel with assistance in working with students prenatally exposed to cocaine or other toxic substances. The report offers background data, practical strategies for teaching and learning, and resources for networking. The first chapter outlines statistics on the incidence of the problem of…

  7. Black/Indian Interaction in Spanish Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landers, Jane

    The history of the lives of non-white peoples in the United States largely has been neglected although the Spanish bureaucrats kept meticulous records of the Spanish Mission period in Florida. These records represent an important source for the cultural history of these groups and offer new perspectives on the tri-racial nature of frontier…

  8. The Florida Survey of Newly Legalized Persons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilit, Jeffrey; Nimnicht, Glen

    This study was conducted to gather more definitive information about aliens who were newly legalized under the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986. Two groups of eligible legal aliens were interviewed in Florida: those residing in the United States before 1982 (PRE-82s) and special agricultural workers (SAWs). The 1,300 subjects were asked…

  9. Viruses infecting Passiflora species in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report documents multiple viruses in Passiflora spp. in Florida. It also reiterates the risk of movement of vegetatively-propagated plant material. This report provides an overview of this virus for growers, extension workers, crop consultants and research and regulatory scientists....

  10. Changing of the Guard in Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkel, Ed

    2011-01-01

    Before and during the tenure of Florida's former education commissioner, Eric J. Smith, the state made bold moves toward incorporating charter schools, began corporate "scholarship" programs that provide funding for students to attend private schools, implemented class-size caps that voters approved via referendum, and earned $700 million in…

  11. 40 CFR 131.44 - Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Federally Promulgated Water Quality Standards § 131.44 Florida. (a) Phosphorus Rule. (1) The document..., Water Quality Standards for Phosphorus Within the Everglades Protection Area, Amended May 25, 2005, as... Phosphorus Rule that EPA disapproved on December 3, 2009, and that are not applicable water quality...

  12. Naturalization of Dalechampia scandens in southern Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dalechampia scandens, a native to the American and African tropics, was recently found naturalized in two Broward County parks in southern Florida. This is the first occurrence of the plant in the continental United States. One of the populations may be an escape from a butterfly attraction where th...

  13. Florida Teachers' Attitudes about Teaching Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, Samantha R.; Meisels, Gerry G.

    2010-01-01

    A survey of Florida teachers reveals many differences in comfort level with teaching evolution according to the state's science teaching standards, general attitudes and beliefs about evolution, and the extent to which teachers are criticized, censured, disparaged, or reprehended for their beliefs about the teaching of evolution.

  14. Competency-Based Adult Education: Florida Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Elizabeth

    This compilation of program materials serves as an introduction to Florida's Brevard Community College's (BCC's) Competency-Based Adult High School Completion Project, a multi-year project designed to teach adult administrators, counselors, and teachers how to organize and implement a competency-based adult education (CBAE) program; to critique…

  15. Florida and Tennessee: Accountability in Civic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delander, Brady

    2014-01-01

    While most states require testing in social studies or civic education, two states attach consequences for students and schools based on required statewide civics exams. Lawmakers in Florida, in 2010, and in Tennessee, in 2012, approved legislation that holds students accountable for their civics knowledge. Students are taking the tests for the…

  16. Indicators and Costing of Florida's Education Goals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waggaman, John S.

    This paper is one of four related publications that are intended to identify and develop a set of indicators for monitoring educational activities in Florida from the state level. The central focus of this paper is on the specification of cost-finding concepts plus identification of a few cost indicators. Various sections of the paper discuss the…

  17. Activities Manual for Florida Language Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saint Lucie County Public Schools, Ft. Pierce, FL.

    The manual contains suggested activities to develop the language skills assessed by the Florida Language Profile, a screening instrument to help identify young learning disabled children. Three to ten activities are listed for each of the following categories: body parts; right and left; rote counting, naming and identifying numbers, and counting…

  18. Florida Language Profile: Booklet A. Experimental Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolking, William D.; And Others

    Presented is the experimental edition of the Florida Language Profile-Part A materials booklet, which is designed to measure the cognitive and language skills of children in kindergarten and first grade. Contents include pictures related to concepts such as size and quantity, shape, position and direction, similarity and difference, telling time,…

  19. A New State University in Jacksonville Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Board of Regents, Tallahassee.

    In 1965 the Florida State Legislature authorized the establishment of a new state university in Jacksonville. This report outlines various projections and preliminary plans for the institution. The expected enrollment in 1972, the proposed opening date, and the projected enrollment gains for several years thereafter are the basic data used in…

  20. Integrated Humanities in Florida Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Dion K.

    During October and November of 1975, course outlines were solicited from the sixteen Florida community colleges offering an integrated humanities course. Ten colleges provided outlines, which were subsequently reviewed in terms of the textual materials used, the teaching approach employed, and stated objectives. The review showed that all of the…

  1. Black Frontier Settlements in Spanish Colonial Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landers, Jane

    1988-01-01

    Addresses the much neglected area of Black frontier experience in the Spanish colonies. Concentrates on the role played by Black settlers and one Black township in defending the Spanish frontier in colonial Florida against the threat of growing English settlements to the north. Provides an introduction to the 18th century Southeastern Spanish…

  2. A Profile of Hardee County, Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaulieu, Lionel J.; Anderson, Deborah S.

    In 1977 leaders of Hardee County, Florida, listed relationships and attitudes of residents, rural atmosphere, environmental conditions, and economic potential among the county's strong points, and public service and facility improvements, developing economic potential, recreational and entertainment development, and planning and zoning as its most…

  3. Is Curriculum Quality Uniform? Evidence from Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatt, Rachana; Koedel, Cory; Lehmann, Douglas

    2013-01-01

    We construct a large panel dataset of schools and districts in Florida to evaluate curricular effectiveness in elementary mathematics. A key innovation of our study is that we allow for curriculum quality to be non-uniform across various mathematics subtopics. We find evidence of variability in curricular effectiveness across different subtopics…

  4. USGS research on Florida's isolated freshwater wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Torres, Arturo E.; Haag, Kim H.; Lee, Terrie M.; Metz, Patricia A.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has studied wetland hydrology and its effects on wetland health and ecology in Florida since the 1990s. USGS wetland studies in Florida and other parts of the Nation provide resource managers with tools to assess current conditions and regional trends in wetland resources. Wetland hydrologists in the USGS Florida Water Science Center (FLWSC) have completed a number of interdisciplinary studies assessing the hydrology, ecology, and water quality of wetlands. These studies have expanded the understanding of wetland hydrology, ecology, and related processes including: (1) the effects of cyclical changes in rainfall and the influence of evapotranspiration; (2) surface-water flow, infiltration, groundwater movement, and groundwater and surfacewater interactions; (3) the effects of water quality and soil type; (4) the unique biogeochemical components of wetlands required to maintain ecosystem functions; (5) the effects of land use and other human activities; (6) the influences of algae, plants, and invertebrates on environmental processes; and (7) the effects of seasonal variations in animal communities that inhabit or visit Florida wetlands and how wetland function responds to changes in the plant community.

  5. The Geology of the Florida Keys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shinn, Eugene A.

    1988-01-01

    Describes some of the ancient geologic history of the Florida Keys from Key Largo to Key West including the effects of glaciers, sea level rise, reef distribution, spurs and grooves, backstepping and ecological zonation, growth rates and erosion. Predicts future changes in this area. (CW)

  6. Factors Affecting School Quality in Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Barry; Arbogast, Gordon

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the factors that are theorized to be determinants of school quality in the 67 counties of Florida from 2000 to 2011. The model constructed for this purpose is comprised of a mix of independent variables that include county educational attainment (number of high school graduates and State University System enrollees) and…

  7. Endosulfan wet deposition in Southern Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vegetable and other crops are produced on about 25000 ha. in southern Florida in an area adjacent to Everglades and Biscayne Bay National Parks (NP). High pest pressures require high pesticide use rates. We recently reported that one mechanism for transport of the insecticide endosulfan from treated...

  8. Florida's Adult Education Programs. Challenges and Accomplishments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Bureau of Adult/Community Education.

    Florida supported a wide range of educational activities for adults through an extensive network of public and private agencies during fiscal year 1989-90. In 1990, 419,429 adults participated in adult education programs. Adult educational programs assisted adults in completing requirements for U.S. citizenship and getting off welfare. A total of…

  9. Florida's Centers of Excellence in English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deluzain, Edward, Ed.

    1986-01-01

    The eight English language arts programs in the six Florida public schools included among the 150 Centers of Excellence in English selected by the National Council of Teachers of English are described in this focused journal issue. Following an introductory essay by coeditor Edward Deluzain describing the Centers of Excellence selection procedure,…

  10. Hospitality Management. Florida Vocational Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Instructional Development and Services.

    This program guide is intended for the implementation of a hospitality management program in Florida secondary and postsecondary schools. The program guide describes the program content and structure, provides a program description, describes jobs under the program, and includes a curriculum framework and student performance standards for…

  11. Carbon Fluxes on the Florida shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins, L. L.; Knorr, P. O.; Liu, X. S.; Byrne, R.; Gledhill, D. K.

    2008-12-01

    Lack of baseline data on carbonate saturation state and pCO2 fluxes on the west Florida shelf, a low- gradient calcium carbonate platform, constrains the ability of managers and scientists to predict aspects of ecosystem change. Ecosystem change may result from a number of factors, such as climate change, ocean acidification, riverine and groundwater contribution, and biogeochemical cycling. Maps and models of pCO2 fluxes and carbonate saturation state are needed for the Florida shelf where significant decline of carbonate ecosystems, fishery habitats, and calcifying organisms are predicted over the next decade. To address critical information gaps and an incomplete understanding of nearshore carbon flux variability, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a field campaign with the University of South Florida (USF) and National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to acquire baseline pCO2, pH, total dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), and total alkalinity (TA) on the west Florida shelf. These data are being used to model nearshore to offshore regional pCO2 and carbonate saturation state and, in conjunction with acquired habitat data, will be used to describe and interpret habitat change over time. Using the Multiparameter Inorganic Carbon Analyzer (MICA) developed by USF, data on air and sea pCO2, pH, DIC, and TA were collected underway during July and August 2008 cruises on the west Florida shelf. Maps depicting carbonate saturation state of the marine water, underlying sediment, and habitat data show varying relations. An additional cruise is planned for winter 2009.

  12. Staghorn tempestites in the Florida Keys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shinn, E.A.; Reich, C.D.; Hickey, T.D.; Lidz, B.H.

    2003-01-01

    Thirty-one samples of transported Holocene Acropora cervicornis "sticks" sampled from carbonate sand tempestite accumulations at 19 sites along a 180-km-long stretch of the Florida reef tract were dated using the radiocarbon (14C) method. The "modern fossils" collected from just a few centimeters below the surface ranged in age from 0.5 to 6.4 ka. The majority lived between 3.5 and 5.5 ka. The time of transport and deposition is not known. There were no A. cervicornis samples centered around 4.5 ka. Acropora cervicornis is living on many Florida reefs, but the youngest tempestite sample was 500 years old. Two 500-year-long gaps in dated staghorn suggest that the documented decline in living A. cervicornis over the past 25 years may not be without precedent.

  13. Certification of solar products - The Florida experience

    SciTech Connect

    POST,HAROLD N.; ROLAND,JAMES D.; VENTRE,GERARD G.; HUGGINS,JAMES C.

    2000-02-02

    Florida legislation enacted in 1976 directed the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) to develop standards for solar energy systems manufactured or sold in the state, establish criteria for testing the performance of solar energy systems, and provide a means to display compliance with approved performance tests for these systems. This mandate has been effectively implemented for both solar domestic water heating and solar pool heating systems. With growing interest and markets for photovoltaic systems, plans are presently being developed to expand the scope of the mandate to include photovoltaic technology. This paper discusses four complementary facets of a photovoltaic (PV) system certification program. They include PV module performance characterization and rating; PV system design review and approval; examination and authorization of photovoltaic system installers; and inspection and acceptance testing of PV system installation. The suggested photovoltaic system process builds on lessons learned from over 20 years of testing, certifying and labeling of solar thermal collectors, and the certification of solar thermal systems.

  14. Genetic restoration of the Florida panther.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Warren E; Onorato, David P; Roelke, Melody E; Land, E Darrell; Cunningham, Mark; Belden, Robert C; McBride, Roy; Jansen, Deborah; Lotz, Mark; Shindle, David; Howard, JoGayle; Wildt, David E; Penfold, Linda M; Hostetler, Jeffrey A; Oli, Madan K; O'Brien, Stephen J

    2010-09-24

    The rediscovery of remnant Florida panthers (Puma concolor coryi) in southern Florida swamplands prompted a program to protect and stabilize the population. In 1995, conservation managers translocated eight female pumas (P. c. stanleyana) from Texas to increase depleted genetic diversity, improve population numbers, and reverse indications of inbreeding depression. We have assessed the demographic, population-genetic, and biomedical consequences of this restoration experiment and show that panther numbers increased threefold, genetic heterozygosity doubled, survival and fitness measures improved, and inbreeding correlates declined significantly. Although these results are encouraging, continued habitat loss, persistent inbreeding, infectious agents, and possible habitat saturation pose new dilemmas. This intensive management program illustrates the challenges of maintaining populations of large predators worldwide.

  15. Freshwater aquatic plant biomass production in Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, K.R.; Sutton, D.L.; Bowes, G.

    1983-01-01

    About 8% (1.2 million ha) of the total surface area of Florida is occupied by freshwater. Many of these water bodies are eutrophic. Nutrients present in these water bodies can be potentially used to culture aquatic plants as a possible feedstock for methane production. This paper summarizes the results of known research findings on biomass production potential of freshwater aquatic plants in Florida and identifies key research needs to improve the quality and quantity of biomass yields. Among floating aquatic plants, biomass yield potential was in the order of water-hyacinth > water lettuce > pennywort > salvinia > duckweed > azolla. Pennywort, duckweed, and azolla appear to perform well during the cooler months compared to other aquatic plants. Among emergent plants, biomass yield potential was in the order of southern wild rice > cattails > soft rush > bulrush. Cultural techniques, nutrient management, and environmental factors influencing the biomass yields were discussed. 68 references.

  16. Florida acid deposition study - an overview

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, C.D.; Hendrickson, E.R.

    1983-01-01

    Comprehensive literature searches were performed in the areas of source attribution and long-range transport and ecological and material effects. The literature searches were designed to determine the impacts of acid deposition that are specific to Florida. In January 1982 the results of Phase I programs were issued. These reports were: (1) Monitoring Program Phase I Summary Report; (2) Source Attribution Phase I Summary Report; and (3) A Literature Review of the Ecological and Materials Effects of Acid Deposition.

  17. Cape Canaveral, Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This overhead view of the central eastern shore of Florida shows the Cape Canaveral and Kennedy Space Center (28.5N, 80.5W), where all of the NASA manned space missions originate. Sprinkled along the jutting cape are a number of KSC launch pads and the nearby Space Shuttle Landing Facility. Merritt Island, just south of Kennedy Space Center is where the spacecraft liftoff tracking station is located. Orlando is on the left edge of photo.

  18. St. Petersburg, Sarasota, Tampa Bay, Florida, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Tampa Bay, Florida (27.5N, 82.5W) and its surrounding waterways were captured in partial sunglint. An extremely complex pattern of surface currents is displayed by differential reflecvtions of sunlight caused by diffrerences in surface roughness and slicks. A high concentration of boatwakes can be seen under the bridge connecting St. Petersburg and Sarasota. Marinas along the waterfront, major roads, airports and other details are easily seen.

  19. Cyclosporiasis associated with imported raspberries, Florida, 1996.

    PubMed Central

    Katz, D; Kumar, S; Malecki, J; Lowdermilk, M; Koumans, E H; Hopkins, R

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Until 1995, infection with Cyclospora cayetanenis, a parasite that causes gastroenteritis, was diagnosed in the US primarily in overseas travelers; its modes of transmission were largely unknown. In 1995, 45 cases of cyclosporiasis were diagnosed in Florida residents who had no history of recent foreign travel, but an investigation could not pinpoint a source for the parasite. In 1996, a North American outbreak of cyclosporiasis resulted in more than 1400 cases, 180 of them in Florida. The authors investigated the 1996 Florida outbreak to identify the vehicle of transmission. METHODS: The authors conducted a matched case-control study in which each of 86 laboratory-confirmed sporadic cases was matched with up to four controls. They also investigated nine clusters of cases associated with common meals and attempted to trace implicated foods to their countries of origin. RESULTS: In the case control study, eating raspberries was strongly associated with cyclosporiasis (matched odds ratio = 31.9; 95% confidence interval [CI] 7.4, 138.2). In the cluster investigation, raspberries were the only food common to all nine clusters of cases; a summary analysis showed a strong association between consumption of raspberries and confirmed or probable cyclosporiasis (risk ratio = 17.6; 95% CI 1.9, 188.8). Guatemala was the sole country of origin for raspberries served at six of nine events. CONCLUSIONS: Guatemalan raspberries were the vehicle for the 1996 Florida cyclosporiasis outbreak. Cyclospora is a foodborne pathogen that may play a growing role in the etiology of enteric disease in this country as food markets become increasingly international. PMID:10590765

  20. 77 FR 13589 - Seminole Electric Cooperative, Inc. and Florida Municipal Power Agency v.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-07

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Seminole Electric Cooperative, Inc. and Florida Municipal Power Agency v. Florida Power Corporation; Notice of Complaint Take notice that on February 29, 2012, pursuant to sections....206 (2011), Seminole Electric Cooperative, Inc. and Florida Municipal Power Agency...

  1. 76 FR 10088 - Sunshine Financial, Inc., Tallahassee Florida; Approval of Conversion Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-23

    ... Office of Thrift Supervision Sunshine Financial, Inc., Tallahassee Florida; Approval of Conversion... application of Sunshine Savings MHC, Tallahassee, Florida, the federal mutual holding company for Sunshine Savings Bank, Tallahassee, Florida, to convert to the stock form of organization. Copies of...

  2. An Update on the Florida State Twin Registry

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Jeanette E.; Hart, Sara A.; Mikolajewski, Amy J.

    2012-01-01

    The Florida State Twin Registry began in 2002 through a pilot study of personality disorders and executive cognitive functioning in adult twins. Since 2006, the registry has grown substantially as part of the Learning Disability Research Center at Florida State University that recently began its second funding cycle through the National Institute of Child Health and Development. An update on the Florida State Twin Registry sample, focus, and measures is provided as well as future directions. PMID:23067863

  3. Stratigraphic evolution of paleozoic erathem, northern Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, J.L. Jr.

    1985-02-01

    Unmetamorphosed Paleozoic sedimentary and volcanic rocks have been drilled in numerous wells throughout northern Florida and southern Georgia, in what is today a gently folded and block-faulted relict continental fragment of northwest Africa and northeast South America. Stratigraphic and lithologic equivalents of these North American Paleozoic units are prolific hydrocarbon producers in North Africa. The northern Florida Paleozoic sediments were deposited on Pan-African and Cadoman basement. Widespread continental glaciation from late Precambrian to Early Cambrian introduced a thick sequence of fine-grained marine sandstones (glacial flour), which overlie medium to coarse-grained glaciofluvial sandstones. Basinward of the sand shelf, the accretion of a volcanic island arc complex began during the Ordovician. A fluctuating transgression, accompanying a major glacial minimum, brought open-marine, graptolitic, black shales onto the sand shelf, producing an interbedded shoreface-shelf sand and black shale section during the Middle and Late Ordovician. At the Ordovician-Silurian boundary, renewed continental glaciation lowered sea level, producing a widespread unconformity. A Late Silurian major marine transgression returned black, graptolitic, highly organic shales onto the sand shelf. Devonian deltaic sands from Avalonia(.) to the north and the craton to the south closed the Paleozoic sedimentary record of northern Florida.

  4. Agkistrodon piscivorus conanti (Florida cottonmouth) Diet

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grajal-Puche, Alejandro; Josimovich, Jillian; Falk, Bryan; Reed, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Agkistrodon piscivorus is a generalist predator that feeds on a variety of prey, including snakes (Gloyd and Conant 1990. Snakes of the Agkistrodon Complex: A Monographic Review. Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles, Oxford, Ohio. 614 pp.; Lillywhite et al. 2002. Herpetol. Rev. 33:259–260; Hill and Beaupre 2008. Copeia 2008:105–114). Cemophora coccinea (Scarletsnake) is not known as one of the 26 species of snakes consumed by A. piscivorus (Ernst and Ernst 2011. Venomous Reptiles of the United States, Canada, and Northern Mexico: Volume 1. Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Maryland. 193 pp.). On 16 June 2015, at 2210 h, we found a dead-on-road A. piscivorus (total length [TL] = 51.0 cm) in Everglades National Park on Main Park Road, 1.88 km S Pa-hay-okee, Miami-Dade Co., Florida, USA (25.414085°N, 80.78183146°W, WGS84; elev. 3 m). The snake had been killed by a vehicle and some internal organs were exposed. Visible stomach contents included a small (TL ca. 15 cm) C. coccinea. Photographic vouchers of the A. piscivorus (UF-Herpetology 177194) and C. coccinea (UF-Herpetology 177195) were deposited in the Division of Herpetology, Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida. Despite the fact that these species are sympatric over large areas of the southeastern United States, this is the first known documented predation of C. coccinea by A. piscivorus.

  5. Masticophis flagellum selects florida scrub habitat at multiple spatial scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halstead, B.J.; Mushinsky, H.R.; McCoy, E.D.

    2009-01-01

    The use of space by individual animals strongly influences the spatial extent, abundance, and growth rates of their populations. We analyzed the spatial ecology and habitat selection of Masticophis flagellum (the coachwhip) at three different scales to determine which habitats are most important to this species. Home ranges and mean daily displacements of M. flagellum in Florida were large compared to individuals in other populations of this species. Home ranges contained a greater proportion of Florida scrub habitat than did the study site as a whole, and individuals selected Florida scrub habitat within their home ranges. For both selection of the home range within the study site and selection of habitats within the home range, mesic cutthroat and hydric swamp habitats were avoided. Standardized selection ratios of Florida scrub patches were positively correlated with lizard abundance. Several non-mutually exclusive mechanisms, including foraging success (prey abundance, prey vulnerability, and foraging efficiency), abundance of refugia, and thermoregulatory opportunity may underlie the selection of Florida scrub by M. flagellum. Historic rarity and anthropogenic loss and fragmentation of Florida scrub habitat, coupled with the long-distance movements, large home ranges, and selection of Florida scrub by M. flagellum, indicate that large contiguous tracts of land containing Florida scrub will be essential for the persistence of M. flagellum in central Florida. ?? 2009 by The Herpetologists' League, Inc.

  6. Florida Bay: A history of recent ecological changes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fourqurean, J.W.; Robblee, M.B.

    1999-01-01

    Florida Bay is a unique subtropical estuary at the southern tip of the Florida peninsula. Recent ecological changes (seagrass die-off, algal blooms, increased turbidity) to the Florida Bay ecosystem have focused the attention of the public, commercial interests, scientists, and resource managers on the factors influencing the structure and function of Florida Bay. Restoring Florida Bay to some historic condition is the goal of resource managers, but what is not clear is what an anthropogenically-unaltered Florida Bay would look like. While there is general consensus that human activities have contributed to the changes occurring in the Florida Bay ecosystem, a high degree of natural system variability has made elucidation of the links between human activity and Florida Bay dynamics difficult. Paleoecological analyses, examination of long-term datasets, and directed measurements of aspects of the ecology of Florida Bay all contribute to our understanding of the behavior of the bay, and allow quantification of the magnitude of the recent ecological changes with respect to historical variability of the system.

  7. Geochemistry of Florida Bay sediments: Nutrient history at five sites in eastern and central Florida Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orem, W.H.; Holmes, C.W.; Kendall, C.; Lerch, H.E.; Bates, A.L.; Silva, S.R.; Boylan, A.; Corum, M.; Marot, M.; Hedgman, C.

    1999-01-01

    Recent seagrass dieoff and massive microalgal blooms have focused attention on the health of the Florida Bay ecosystem. Changes in nutrient input and the nutrient dynamics of Florida Bay are hypothesized to be linked to these problems, but crucial baseline information is still lacking. Efforts to restore Florida Bay to its natural condition will require information on the nutrient history of the bay. The purpose of this study was to examine distributions of organic C, total N, and total P in carbonate sediments from sites of continuous and known sedimentation rate (210Pb and 137Cs dated), in eastern and central Florida Bay. These sediments provide a record of historical changes in the C, N, and P load to the eastern and central bay. Analyses were conducted on sediments from cores collected at five sites, and on buried seagrass fragments at two sites. At three of the sites, sediments from seagrass-covered and adjacent barren areas were examined to determine differences in sedimentary geochemistry. Stable isotope analyses (??13C and ??15N) of sedimentary organic C and total N and of buried seagrass fragments were also carried out at two sites to examine possible changes in nutrient sources to the estuary. Results were consistent with recent increases in N and P in eastern Florida Bay, beginning in the early to mid 1980's. The timing of the increase in nutrient load observed in the sediment data directly preceded the first observations of massive microalgal blooms and seagrass dieoff in Florida Bay in 1987. The observed nutrification was greater for P than N, and was most pronounced at the most northeasterly site sampled (Pass Key). Isotope data (??15N) suggested that an increase in algal production accompanied the increase in N load at the Pass Key site. Along record of organic C, total N, and total P distributions from Whipray Basin in central Florida Bay showed historical peaks (mid 1700's and late 1800's) in organic C and total N, but not total P; these

  8. South Florida Ecosystem Program: quantifying freshwater discharge for coastal hydraulic control structures in eastern Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kapadia, Amit; Swain, Eric D.

    1996-01-01

    The South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Program is an intergovernmental effort, involving a number of agencies, to reestablish and maintain the ecosystem of south Florida. One element of the restoration effort is the development of a firm scientific basis for resource decision making. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), one of the agencies, provides scientific information as part of the South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Program. The USGS began their ow program, called the South Florida Ecosystem Program, in fiscal year 1995 for the purpose of gathering hydrologic, cartographic, and geologic data that relate to the mainland of south Florida, Florida Bay, and the Florida Keys and Reef ecosystems. As part of the South Florida Ecosystem Program, the USGS, in cooperation with the South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD), has conducted a study to determine discharge ratings for 16 coastal hydraulic control structures in eastern Dade County, Fla. (fig. 1 ). Discharge data are needed to quantify water that can be made available for water supply and ecosystem restoration and to calibrate regional hydrologic models.

  9. Florida manatee avoidance technology: A pilot program by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, Katherine; Haubold, Elsa

    2003-10-01

    Since 1976, approximately 25% of the annual Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) mortality has been attributed to collisions with watercraft. In 2001, the Florida Legislature appropriated $200,000 in funds for research projects using technological solutions to directly address the problem of collisions between manatees and watercraft. The Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission initially funded seven projects for the first two fiscal years. The selected proposals were designed to explore technology that had not previously been applied to the manatee/boat collision problem and included many acoustic concepts related to voice recognition, sonar, and an alerting device to be put on boats to warn manatees. The most promising results to date are from projects employing voice-recognition techniques to identify manatee vocalizations and warn boaters of the manatees' presence. Sonar technology, much like that used in fish finders, is promising but has met with regulatory problems regarding permitting and remains to be tested, as has the manatee-alerting device. The state of Florida found results of the initial years of funding compelling and plans to fund further manatee avoidance technology research in a continued effort to mitigate the problem of manatee/boat collisions.

  10. Florida's Children at a Glance: The 1999 Statewide and County Update. Florida KIDS COUNT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weitzel, Susan L.; Shockley, Cindi C.; Miranda, Barbara

    This Kids Count report examines state and countywide trends in the well-being of Florida's children. Demographic information is presented along with a statistical portrait for the state and for each county based on the following indicators: (1) birth, including births to unwed mothers, teen births, early prenatal care, low birth weight, and infant…

  11. Ecological characterization of the lower Everglades, Florida Bay, and the Florida Keys

    SciTech Connect

    Schomer, N.S.; Drew, R.D.

    1982-09-01

    A conceptual model of the study area identifies four major ecological zones: (1) terrestrial and freshwater wetlands, (2) estuarine and saltwater wetlands, (3) Florida Bay and mangrove islands, and (4) the Florida Keys. These zones are delineated by differences in basic physical-chemical background factors which in turn promote characteristic ecological communities. The terrestrial and freshwater wetlands support pinelands, sawgrass marshes, wet prairies, sloughs and occasional tree islands. The estuarine and saltwater wetlands support mangrove forests, salt marshes and oscillating salinity systems. Florida Bay exhibits oscillating meso- to hypersaline waters over grassbeds on marine lime mud sediments surrounding deeper lake areas. The exposed tips of the mud banks frequently support mangrove or salt prairie vegetation. The Florida Keys support almost all of the above communities to some small degree but are characterized by extensive offshore coral reefs. The productivity of these communities with regard to fish and wildlife reflects (1) the diversity and type of habitats available to species that are potentially capable of exploiting them, (2) the degree of alteration of these habitats by man and natural forces, and (3) historical, biogeographic and random factors that restrict organisms to specific environments or prohibit them from exploiting a potential habitat.

  12. Outdoor Recreation in Florida: A Comprehensive Program for Meeting Florida's Outdoor Recreation Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Natural Resources, Tallahassee.

    A comprehensive program for meeting outdoor recreational needs in Florida is described in this planning and reference document in terms of objectives for the program through the year 1975 (with projections to the year 2000). The scope and nature of outdoor recreation are defined, and a justification for an outdoor recreation program is presented.…

  13. Characteristic community structure of Florida's subtropical wetlands: the Florida wetland condition index

    EPA Science Inventory

    Depending upon the classification scheme applied, there are between 10 and 45 different wetland types in Florida. Land use and land cover change has a marked effect on wetland condition, and different wetland types are affected differentially depending on many abiotic and biotic ...

  14. California avocados in Florida? Finding the perfect avocado for production in East-Central Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avocado (Persea americana Mill.) is a high-value fruit where most U.S. consumption is supplied using imported product. Cultivars with good fruit quality and horticultural traits may provide a useful alternative crop in east-central Florida and possibly in other locations throughout the state. A port...

  15. Florida Department of Corrections' Distance Learning Program. Florida Corrections Commission 1999 Annual Report, Section 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Corrections Commission, Tallahassee.

    The Florida Department of Corrections Distance Learning Program consists of the Corrections Distance Learning Network; offender programming; staff development; and the Agency Strategic Plan. The Corrections Distance Learning Network offers academic, vocational training, and life management skills programs for offenders and staff development and…

  16. IDENTIFICATION OF CANDIDATE HOUSES FOR NORTH FLORIDA PORTION OF THE FLORIDA RADON MITIGATION PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study to locate candidate houses for a proposed radon mitigation research and demonstration project in North Florida. he effort involved: 1) identification of target geographical areas, 2) radon monitoring in identified clusters, and 3) house charact...

  17. Florida School Discipline Study: 1994 Juvenile Justice Reform Act. A Report to the Florida Legislature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee.

    This document contains findings of a study that examined the relationship between the use of disciplinary actions in Florida schools--in particular, out-of-school suspension, expulsion, and corporal punishment--and juvenile crime and delinquency. The primary data source was a random sample of 43,397 students in grades 6-12 enrolled in Florida…

  18. Community Resources Guide for Central Florida = Una Guia de Recursos en la Comunidad de Florida Central.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medina, Linda, Comp.

    Designed to orient Hispanic refugees to the services that are available in Central Florida, this bilingual guide consists of a section of general information on living and working in the United States and a section devoted to various public and private agencies. Provided first are addresses and phone numbers of various government agencies:…

  19. Florida Current meanders and gyre formation in the southern Straits of Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Thomas N.; Leaman, Kevin; Williams, Elizabeth; Berger, Thomas; Atkinson, Larry

    1995-05-01

    Moored current measurements, shipboard hydrography, and a time sequence of satellite-derived surface thermal images are used to show the formation and evolution of cold, cyclonic gyres coupled to large offshore meanders of the Florida Current in the southern Straits of Florida (SSF). Gyre formation is dependent upon the orientation of the Loop Current as it enters the SSF. With a well-developed Loop Current the flow overshoots the entry to the SSF causing the formation of a cold recirculation off the Dry Tortugas, approximately 200 km in size, that persists over timescales of about 100 days. The demise of the gyre occurs as it moves to the east at about 5 km d-1, reducing to half its original size off Big Pine and Marathon Keys and unobservable off the northern Keys. Previously observed local gyres between Key West and Islamorada, Florida (Lee et al., 1992), are identified as a latter stage in the downstream evolution of the gyres formed off the Tortugas. When the Loop Current is not developed, flow from the Yucatan Channel turns anticyclonically into the SSF, causing strong eastward flow over the slope off the Dry Tortugas and lower Florida Keys, and gyre formation does not occur.

  20. Ecology of common salvinia, Salvinia minima, in southern Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The floating macrophyte, Salvinia minima, grows in a variety of freshwater habitats in Florida. We conducted a 39-month study at four sites in southern Florida to elucidate the abiotic and biotic factors that influenced the density, nutritional profile, and size of S. minima. These factors include...

  1. 33 CFR 110.186 - Port Everglades, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Port Everglades, Florida. 110.186... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.186 Port Everglades, Florida. (a) The anchorage grounds. The... entrance to Port Everglades, is an area bounded by a line connecting points with the following...

  2. Recent advances in Florida pompano (Trachinotus carolinus) nutrition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Florida pompano Trachinotus carolinus is a euryhaline species representing a small marine fishery in Florida with an estimated 227,000 kg total annual catch; however, because of its highly prized taste and texture it continues to maintain a high market demand. Although Pompano culture began in the ...

  3. In the Eye of the Beholder: Waterhyacinth Management in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In Florida, herbicides are the primary tactic employed to control waterhyacinth, Eichhornia crassipes with little to no consideration given to the presence of the three biological control agents introduced intentionally during the 1970's. Field research conducted at four Florida sites quantified th...

  4. The oceanic influence on the rainy season of Peninsular Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Vasubandhu; Mishra, Akhilesh

    2016-07-01

    In this study we show that the robust surface ocean currents around Peninsular Florida, namely, the Loop and the Florida Currents, affect the terrestrial wet season of Peninsular Florida. We show this through two novel regional coupled ocean-atmosphere models with different bathymetries that dislocate and modulate the strength of these currents and thereby affect the overlying sea surface temperature (SST) and upper ocean heat content. This study show that a weaker current system produces colder coastal SSTs along the Atlantic coast of Florida that reduces the length of the wet season and the total seasonal accumulation of precipitation over Peninsular Florida relative to the regional climate model simulation, in which these currents are stronger. The moisture budget reveals that as a result of these forced changes to the temperature of the upper coastal Atlantic Ocean, overlying surface evaporation and atmospheric convection is modulated. This consequently changes the moisture flux convergence leading to the modulation of the terrestrial wet season rainfall over Peninsular Florida that manifests in changes in the length and distribution of daily rain rate of the wet season. The results of this study have implications on interpreting future changes to hydroclimate of Peninsular Florida owing to climate change and low-frequency changes to the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation that comprises the Loop and the Florida Currents as part of its upper branch.

  5. Fighting Back: The Fate of the State in Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jumonville, Neil

    2009-01-01

    Florida has been one of the states hit hardest by the recent financial crisis. Since 2007, Florida State University (FSU) administration says, the university's budget has been cut by over $38 million. The state budget approved by the legislature on May 8, 2009, requires FSU to make another cut of more than $43 million from the institution's…

  6. 75 FR 9591 - Florida Power & Light Company; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Florida Power & Light Company; Notice of Filing February 24, 2010. Take notice that on February 17, 2010, Florida Power & Light Company (FPL) filed a petition for...

  7. Florida's Adult Homeless Literacy Training & Basic Skills Assistance Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Div. of Vocational, Adult, and Community Education.

    Some facts about the homeless population in Florida are the following: (1) 40,000 persons in Florida are homeless on any given day, with 40 percent of the total being families; (2) 65 percent are new homeless (not chronic); (3) 30 percent of the homeless are addicted to drugs or alcohol and 20 percent are mentally ill; (4) causes of homelessness…

  8. An Assessment of Educational Needs for Learners in Florida, 1970.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee.

    This report, part of the Florida Department of Education Educational Needs Assessment Study, identifies eight critical learner needs and the target population most associated with each need. A first section is a selected statistical abstract that describes the Florida population, with a wide variety of information gathered from public and private…

  9. Philosophies of Educators in Twelve Florida School Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, Robert L.; Gordon, Ira J.

    To determine their professional opinion system, a questionnaire was administered to 3,252 school system personnel in twelve Florida counties and to 303 University of Florida sophomores, seniors, and graduate students. The subjects were classified as adherents of the cooperative or competitive democracy doctrines of education, according to their…

  10. Ecology of the south Florida coral reefs: a community profile

    SciTech Connect

    Jaap, W.C.

    1984-08-01

    An overview of coral reef research in southern Florida is provided as a prelude to a genuine description of the coral reef ecosystem in the Florida Keys and surrounding environments. Coral reef community types, reef benthos, plankton and reef fish are given specific treatment. Coral reef ecology and management are described. 27 figs., 31 tabs.

  11. Lakeland Senior High School, Lakeland, Florida. PLATO Evaluation Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannafin, Bob

    Lakeland Senior High School (LSHS), a suburban school in Lakeland, Florida, has used PLATO (registered) courseware from 1995 to meet a variety of student needs. They use their three dedicated PLATO labs to help students prepare for college placement tests such as the Stanford Achievement Test (SAT), prepare to retake the Florida High School…

  12. Florida Health Professions Education Profiles: 1991--Report 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Postsecondary Education Planning Commission, Tallahassee.

    This state-mandated report reviews the status of health professions education programs in Florida. Part 1 provides an overview of health professions education policy by describing special considerations for policymakers and program planning, reviewing outcomes of previous Florida Postsecondary Education Planning Commission recommendations, and…

  13. THE EPIZOOTIOLOGY OF CORAL DISEASES IN SOUTH FLORIDA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The condition of South Florida reefs was assessed to determine the prevalence of coral diseases. Ten surveys were conducted from 1997 until 2004 in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, Biscayne National Park, New Grounds, Dry Tortugas National Park, and Tortugas Ecologica...

  14. Financial Management: Cash Management Practices in Florida Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiwak, Rand S.

    A study was conducted to identify those variables appearing to affect cash management practices in Florida community colleges, and recommend prescriptive measures concerning these practices. The study methodology included informal discussions with the chief fiscal officers of each Florida community college and appropriate state board staff,…

  15. 33 CFR 110.183 - St. Johns River, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false St. Johns River, Florida. 110.183... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.183 St. Johns River, Florida. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1... anchor in the St. Johns River, as depicted on NOAA chart 11491, between the entrance buoy (STJ) and...

  16. 33 CFR 110.183 - St. Johns River, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false St. Johns River, Florida. 110.183... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.183 St. Johns River, Florida. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1... anchor in the St. Johns River, as depicted on NOAA chart 11491, between the entrance buoy (STJ) and...

  17. 33 CFR 110.183 - St. Johns River, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false St. Johns River, Florida. 110.183... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.183 St. Johns River, Florida. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1... anchor in the St. Johns River, as depicted on NOAA chart 11491, between the entrance buoy (STJ) and...

  18. New College of Florida Annual Accountability Report, 2013-14

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Board of Governors, State University System of Florida, 2014

    2014-01-01

    During 2013-14, national rankings continued to affirm the quality and reputation of New College of Florida's academic program. Princeton Review, Kiplinger's, U.S. News & World Report, Washington Monthly, Forbes, and Fiske Guide to Colleges each placed New College of Florida in their top rankings. Adding to their reputation, the percentage of…

  19. The Fact Book: Report for the Florida Community College System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Div. of Community Colleges.

    The Florida Community College System fact book includes statistical information for fall 2000-2001 about students, employees, and finances at Florida's 28 community colleges. This document contains statistics on headcount enrollment, full-time equivalent (FTE) enrollment, program enrollment, program completions, employment, and financial data.…

  20. Florida Public High School Class of 1993-94.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Windham, Patricia

    This report presents the results of a longitudinal study of 1993-94 graduates of Florida's public high schools who enrolled in the Florida Community College System (FCCS) between fall 1994 and spring 1999. The study focused on three questions: (1) how many members of the class of 1993-94 were enrolled in the FCCS from 1994 to 1999? (2) What did…

  1. Update on Sensory Evaluation of University of Florida Strawberry Selections

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The University of Florida strawberry breeding program has evaluated eating quality of fruit from advanced selections using sensory taste panels. Selections FL 05-107, FL 06-38 and FL 09-127 were compared with the commercial cultivars ‘Strawberry Festival’ and FLorida Radiance’ during two consecutive...

  2. 3. WEST SIDE OF FLORIDA MOUNTAIN UPSLOPE FROM CAMERA POINTED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. WEST SIDE OF FLORIDA MOUNTAIN UPSLOPE FROM CAMERA POINTED SOUTH SOUTHEAST. THE LOW POINT ON THE HORIZON LINE ON THE FAR RIGHT OF THE IMAGE IS THE GENERAL DIRECTION TO GO TO UPPER/LOWER NOTTINGHAM. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  3. 1. VIEW OF SILVER CITY WITH EAST SIDE OF FLORIDA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW OF SILVER CITY WITH EAST SIDE OF FLORIDA MOUNTAIN IN BACKGROUND. CAMERA POINTED WEST. (THE SNOW BANK IN THE SADDLE SERVES AS AN ORIENTATION/RELATIONSHIP POINT AND IS INCLUDED IN PHOTOGRAPH ID-31-G-1.) - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  4. Successful biological control of tropical soda apple in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tropical soda apple, Solanum viarum, is a small shrub native to tropical regions of Brazil, Paraguay, and Argentina. This weed was first found in Florida in 1988. In May 2003, a leaf feeding beetle, Gratiana boliviana, from South America was released in Florida as a biological control agent of tro...

  5. On Campus Study of Florida Wildlife: Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newcomb-Jones, Carol

    Ecosystem management is an integrated approach to managing Florida's biological and physical environments designed to maintain, protect, and improve the state's natural, managed, and human communities. This document contains activities designed for 4th-5th grade students that meet the guidelines of Florida's K-12 Science Framework to better…

  6. Avocado pests in Florida: Not what you expected

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avocado, Persea americana Mill., is Florida's second most important fruit crop after citrus. Until recently, the complex of spider mite and insect pests that affected avocado in south Florida was under a 20 year Integrated Pest Management (IPM) program. The recent invasion of avocado orchards by a...

  7. 7 CFR 1006.2 - Florida marketing area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Florida marketing area. 1006.2 Section 1006.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE FLORIDA MARKETING AREA Order...

  8. 7 CFR 1006.2 - Florida marketing area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Florida marketing area. 1006.2 Section 1006.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE FLORIDA MARKETING AREA Order...

  9. 78 FR 28120 - Tomatoes Grown in Florida; Decreased Assessment Rate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-14

    ... Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 966 Tomatoes Grown in Florida; Decreased Assessment Rate AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. ACTION: Affirmation of interim rule as final rule. SUMMARY: The... locally administers the marketing order which regulates the handling of tomatoes grown in Florida....

  10. The Evolution of Workforce Baccalaureate Degrees in Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilsky, Judith; Neuhard, Ian; Locke, Mary G.

    2012-01-01

    The State of Florida has been challenged to keep up with the demand for baccalaureate degree production for more than half a century. Fueled first by veterans of World War II and the Korean Conflict, and later by significant and sustained population growth over many decades, Florida's postsecondary infrastructure has struggled to keep pace with…

  11. Competency-Based Materials for the Florida Automotive Mechanics Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodson, Ludy; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Describes Florida's new automotive mechanics curriculum, an individualized, self-paced learning sequence that combines text material, review exercises and actual work activities. Development of the materials, including incorporation of Florida's V-TECS catalog of performance objectives in auto mechanics, is described. A field-test experience of a…

  12. Sphaeroma terebrans: A Threat to the Mangroves of Southwestern Florida.

    PubMed

    Rehm, A; Humm, H J

    1973-10-12

    Sphaeroma terebrans, a wood-boring isopod, is destroying the prop roots of red mangroves along the southwestern coast of Florida to such an extent that the Ten Thousand Islands and mangrove fringes of the mainland are steadily shrinking. Mangroves of the Florida Keys apparently are free of this wood borer.

  13. 75 FR 1803 - Lower Florida Keys Refuges, Monroe County, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-13

    ..., Big Pine Key, FL 33043. You may also access and download the document from the Service's Web site... process through a notice in the Federal Register on May 9, 2003 (68 FR 25058). The Lower Florida Keys..., Florida. These are a collection of low-lying, subtropical islands between the Gulf of Mexico and...

  14. 7 CFR 1006.2 - Florida marketing area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Florida marketing area. 1006.2 Section 1006.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE FLORIDA MARKETING AREA Order...

  15. 7 CFR 1006.2 - Florida marketing area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Florida marketing area. 1006.2 Section 1006.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MILK), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE FLORIDA MARKETING AREA Order...

  16. 7 CFR 1006.2 - Florida marketing area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Florida marketing area. 1006.2 Section 1006.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MILK), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE FLORIDA MARKETING AREA Order...

  17. Florida's Past and Future Roles in Education Finance Reform Litigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauries, Scott R.

    2006-01-01

    The state of Florida has since the time of "San Antonio v. Rodriguez" an education finance system called the Florida Education Finance Plan (FEFP), which makes substantial effort to equalize per-pupil spending in all of the state's school districts, while recognizing the local factors that may necessitate changes in that spending. Still, that…

  18. Geohydrologic reconnaissance of drainage wells in Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kimrey, J.O.; Fayard, L.D.

    1984-01-01

    Drainage wells are used to inject surface waters directly into an aquifer, or shallow ground waters directly into a deeper aquifer, primarily by gravity. Such wells in Florida may be grouped into two broad types: (1) surface-water injection wells, and (2) interaquifer connector wells. Drainage wells of the first type are further categorized as either Floridan aquifer drainage wells or Biscayne aquifer drainage wells. Floridan aquifer drainage wells are commonly used to supplement drainage for urban areas in karst terranes of central and north Florida. Data are available for 25 wells in the Ocala, Live Oak, and Orlando areas that allow comparison of the quality of water samples from these Floridan aquifer drainage wells with allowable contaminant levels. Comparison indicates that maximum contaminant levels for turbidity, color, and iron, manganese, and lead concentrations are equaled or exceeded in some drainage-well samples, and relatively high counts for coliform bacteria are present in most wells. Biscayne aquifer drainage wells are used locally to dispose of stormwater runoff and other surplus water in southeast Florida, where large numbers of these wells have been permitted in Dade and Broward Counties. The majority of these wells are used to dispose of water from swimming pools or to dispose of heated water from air-conditioning units. The use of Biscayne aquifer drainage wells may have minimal effect on aquifer potability so long as injection of runoff and industrial wates is restricted to zones where chloride concentrations exceed 1,500 milligrams per liter. Interaquifer connector wells are used in the phosphate mining areas of Polk and Hillsborough Counties, to drain mines and recharge the Floridan aquifer. Water-quality data available from 13 connector wells indicate that samples from most of these wells exceed standards values for iron concentration and turbidity. One well yielded a highly mineralized water, and samples from 6 of the other 12 wells exceed

  19. Local Data Integration in East Central Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, Jonathan L.; Manobianco, John T.

    1999-01-01

    The Applied Meteorology Unit has configured a Local Data Integration System (LDIS) for east central Florida which assimilates in-situ and remotely-sensed observational data into a series of high-resolution gridded analyses. The ultimate goal for running LDIS is to generate products that may enhance weather nowcasts and short-range (less than 6 h) forecasts issued in support of the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS), Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG), and the Melbourne National Weather Service (NWS MLB) operational requirements. LDIS has the potential to provide added value for nowcasts and short-ten-n forecasts for two reasons. First, it incorporates all data operationally available in east central Florida. Second, it is run at finer spatial and temporal resolutions than current national-scale operational models such as the Rapid Update Cycle and Eta models. LDIS combines all available data to produce grid analyses of primary variables (wind, temperature, etc.) at specified temporal and spatial resolutions. These analyses of primary variables can be used to compute diagnostic quantities such as vorticity and divergence. This paper demonstrates the utility of LDIS over east central Florida for a warm season case study. The evolution of a significant thunderstorm outflow boundary is depicted through horizontal and vertical cross section plots of wind speed, divergence, and circulation. In combination with a suitable visualization too], LDIS may provide users with a more complete and comprehensive understanding of evolving mesoscale weather than could be developed by individually examining the disparate data sets over the same area and time.

  20. Identifying suitable sites for Florida panther reintroduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thatcher, Cindy; van Manen, Frank T.; Clark, Joseph D.

    2006-01-01

    A major objective of the 1995 Florida Panther (Puma concolor cory) Recovery Plan is the establishment of 2 additional panther populations within the historic range. Our goal was to identify prospective sites for Florida panther reintroduction within the historic range based on quantitative landscape assessments. First, we delineated 86 panther home ranges using telemetry data collected from 1981 to 2001 in south Florida to develop a Mahalanobis distance (D2) habitat model, using 4 anthropogenic variables and 3 landscape variables mapped at a 500-m resolution. From that analysis, we identified 9 potential reintroduction sites of sufficient size to support a panther population. We then developed a similar D2 model at a higher spatial resolution to quantify the area of favorable panther habitat at each site. To address potential for the population to expand, we calculated the amount of favorable habitat adjacent to each prospective reintroduction site within a range of dispersal distances of female panthers. We then added those totals to the contiguous patches to estimate the total amount of effective panther habitat at each site. Finally, we developed an expert-assisted model to rank and incorporate potentially important habitat variables that were not appropriate for our empirical analysis (e.g., area of public lands, livestock density). Anthropogenic factors heavily influenced both the landscape and the expert-assisted models. Of the 9 areas we identified, the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge, Ozark National Forest, and Felsenthal National Wildlife Refuge regions had the highest combination of effective habitat area and expert opinion scores. Sensitivity analyses indicated that variability among key model parameters did not affect the high ranking of those sites. Those sites should be considered as starting points for the field evaluation of potential reintroduction sites.

  1. Tampa Bay, St. Petersburg, Florida, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This photo of the Tampa Bay, St. Petersburg, Florida (28.0N, 82.5W) is one of a pair (see STS049-92-017) to compare the differences between color film and color infrared film. In the color image above, the scene appears as it would to the human eye. The city of St. Petersburg can be seen even though there is atmospheric haze obscuring the image. Color infrared film filters out the haze and portrays vegetation as shades of red or pink.

  2. Cape Canaveral and Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This single view of Cape Canaveral and the Kennedy Space Center, Florida (28.5N, 80.5W), shows the layout of the entire Kennedy Space Center in minute detail. All of the early Mercury and Gemini series launch facilities can be seen at the hook of the Cape. At the north end of the space center where the newer Apollo, Skylab and Space Shuttle series facilities are located, the vehicle assembly building, two launch pads and landing strip are easily seen.

  3. Tampa Bay, St. Petersburg, Florida, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This photo of the Tampa Bay, St. Petersburg, Florida (28.0N, 82.5W) is one of a pair (see STS049-97-020) to compare the differences between color film and color infrared film. In the color image above, the scene appears as it would to the human eye. The city of St. Petersburg can be seen even though there is atmospheric haze obscuring the image. Color infrared film filters out the haze and portrays vegetation as shades of red or pink.

  4. Drainage basins in Duval County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, Roy B.; Largen, Joseph B.

    1983-01-01

    The drainage basins and subbasins in Duval County, Florida, are delineated on this atlas map. The county 's 840 square-mile area is drained by three major river systems; the St. Johns, 668 square miles; Nassau, 113 square miles; and St. Marys, 59 square miles. The remainder of the county is drained by a network of small streams that flow into either the Intracoastal Waterway or directly into the Atlantic Ocean. The sub-basins range in size from less than one square mile to more than 50 square miles. (USGS)

  5. Berloque dermatitis induced by "Florida water".

    PubMed

    Wang, Lena; Sterling, Barton; Don, Philip

    2002-07-01

    Phytophotodermatitis is a phototoxic dermatitis resulting from contact with psoralen-containing plants such as celery, limes, parsley, figs, and carrots. Berloque dermatitis is a variant of phytophotodermatitis and is caused by high concentrations of psoralen-containing fragrances, most commonly oil of bergamot. Berloque dermatitis is rarely seen today because of the removal of these fragrances from most cosmetic products in the United States. We report, however, a group of patients still at risk for berloque dermatitis. These patients use the colognes "Florida Water" and "Kananga Water," which are popular in Hispanic, African American, and Caribbean populations. These fragrant waters are used for spiritual blessing, treating headaches, and personal hygiene.

  6. Management case study: Tampa Bay, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrison, G.; Greening, H.S.; Yates, K.K.

    2012-01-01

    Tampa Bay, Florida,USA, is a shallow,subtropical estuary that experienced severe cultural eutrophication between the 1940s and 1980s, a period when the human population of its watershed quadrupled. In response, citizen action led to the formation of a public- and private-sector partnership (the Tampa Bay Estuary Program), which adopted a number of management objectives to support the restoration and protection of the bay’s living resources. These included numeric chlorophyll a and water-clarity targets, as well as long-term goals addressing the spatial extent of sea grasses and other selected habitat types, to support estuarine-dependent faunal guilds.

  7. Recasting Florida's insanity defense. Two modest proposals.

    PubMed

    Miller, E C

    1993-10-01

    Three states have established psychiatric security review boards mandated to primarily provide protection from the potentially destructive behavior of insanity acquitees. Each year in Florida there are 100 of these patients; 5% have been involved in capital offenses. These boards, as compared with the extant judiciary system, are more effective and parsimonious and serve the end of primary prevention. It is recommended that the plea, "not guilty by reason of insanity," be changed to "guilty but insane." The change is largely semantic but should result in greater prosecutorial and public acceptance of the insanity plea and be more in keeping with individual freedom for patients as provided under the Constitution.

  8. Wet deposition of phosphorus in Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollman, C. D.; Landing, W. M.; Perry, J. J.; Fitzpatrick, T.

    Wet deposition of phosphorus was measured at 10 sites across Florida originally established as part of the Florida Atmospheric Mercury Study conducted between 1992 and 1996. Monthly integrated samples were collected and analyzed using a total analytical protocol that incorporated "clean lab" conditions for sample equipment preparation and Aerochem Metrics collectors modified for suitability to use for ultra-trace elements. Samples also were collected aboard 15 m towers to minimize any influence on measured deposition by insects, etc., and locally originating particles that do not contribute to true net deposition. Extensive replication of samples in the field was conducted (ca. 83%). The average absolute difference between replicates was 16.2%, with a median absolute difference of 9.5%. Replicate precision was poorest for concentrations above 0.080 mg P l -1, suggesting that concentrations above this level are contaminated. The wet deposition concentrations and fluxes of phosphorus measured in this study are appreciably lower than those reported by previous investigators for wet deposition in Florida, and lie at the lower end of measurements reported in the recent literature. For example, the volume weighted mean concentration and flux for wet deposition across all our study sites averaged 0.005 mg P l -1 and 7.5 mg P m -2 yr -1, respectively, which is approximately 50% and 32% lower than that reported by Hendry et al. (1981 in Atmospheric Pollutants in Natural Waters. Ann Arbor Science, Ann Arbor. MI, pp. 199-215). Our lower measurements likely reflect three factors: (1) the ultra-trace element sampling and analytical protocols; (2) improved collector design to eliminate sampling artifacts (e.g., splash-off contamination and transfer of contaminants from the dry bucket); and (3) placement of collectors off the ground surface. Lower VWM concentrations were observed near the Florida coast; otherwise, strong spatial patterns across the state were absent. Seasonal

  9. Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Vanderhoff, Alex

    2013-07-15

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 6/1/13 to 6/30/13

  10. Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data 20130731

    DOE Data Explorer

    Vanderhoff, Alex

    2013-08-30

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 7/1/13 to 7/31/13.

  11. 20130416_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Vanderhoff, Alex

    2013-04-24

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 4/16/13.

  12. 20140430_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Thibedeau, Joe

    2014-05-05

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 April to 30 April 2014.

  13. Population biology of the Florida manatee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Shea, Thomas J.; Ackerman, Bruce B.; Percival, H. Franklin

    1995-01-01

    The Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) is a unique element of the U.S. fauna. It is a distinct subspecies of the West Indian manatee (Domning and Hayek 1986) and one of the largest inshore mammals of the continent, reaching weights to 1,650 kg (Rathbun et al. 1990). Annual migratory circuits of some individuals through the intracoastal waterways of the Atlantic Coast are 1,700 km round trips at seasonal travel rates as high as 50km/day (*3 Reid and O'Shea 1989; Reid et al. 1991), resulting in one of the longest remaining intact mammalian migrations in the eastern United States.

  14. Light O++ Mesons: Scalargators in Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennington, M. R.

    2010-08-01

    Light scalar mesons abound in hadron processes, like the alligators in the Florida Everglades. Moreover, scalars are intimately tied to the vacuum structure of QCD. They are the product of many decays. Consequently, a rich source of recent information about them has come from experiments producing heavy flavour mesons. Indeed, scalars will continue to dominate many of the processes to be studied at forthcoming facilities like BESIII in Beijing, FAIR at GSI Darmstadt and the GlueX experiment at JLab, making an understanding (or at least an excellent and theoretically consistent description) essential for the physics missions of these facilities.

  15. New Kinorhyncha from Florida coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herranz, María; Sánchez, Nuria; Pardos, Fernando; Higgins, Robert P.

    2014-03-01

    Four new species of Kinorhynchs are described from the West Atlantic coast off Fort Pierce, Florida, USA. They are the following: Antygomonas gwenae n. sp., Echinoderes riceae n. sp., Echinoderes adrianovi n. sp. and Pycnophyes norenburgi n. sp. All species were collected at the same locality called "20 miles station." Samples were processed for standard granulometric data, yielding an estimated average particle diameter of 250 μm. The diagnostic characters and the general morphology of the new species are discussed in depth as well as the diversity and distribution of Kinorhyncha in the area.

  16. Prevalence of Bartonella henselae antibody in Florida panthers.

    PubMed

    Rotstein, D S; Taylor, S K; Bradley, J; rieitschwerdt, E B

    2000-01-01

    Serum samples from 28 free-ranging Florida panthers (Puma concolor coryi) and seven mountain lions from Texas (P. concolor stanleyana) living in south Florida (USA) between 1997 to 1998 were tested for antibodies to Bartonella henselae. Twenty percent (7/35) of the samples were reactive to B. henselae antisera with a subspecies prevalence of 18% (5/ 28) for Florida panthers and 28% (2/7) for cougars from Texas (USA). There was not a significant sex related difference in infection rates among the Florida panthers. Antibody prevalence was higher in panthers <2-yr of age (40%) compared to panthers >2-yr (13%). Compared to studies of antibody prevalence in mountain lions (P. concolor) from California (USA), overall seroprevalence was lower as was prevalence in panthers >2-yr-old. However, the seroprevalence in animals <2-yr from southern Florida was similar to prevalences reported in mountain lions or domestic felids in California. PMID:10682759

  17. 33 CFR 334.620 - Straits of Florida and Florida Bay in vicinity of Key West, Fla.; operational training area...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Bay in vicinity of Key West, Fla.; operational training area, aerial gunnery range, and bombing and strafing target areas, Naval Air Station, Key West, Fla. 334.620 Section 334.620 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.620 Straits of Florida and Florida Bay in vicinity of Key West, Fla.; operational...

  18. Florida Satellite Network Study: Report and Recommendations of the Florida Postsecondary Education Planning Commission. 1985--Report 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Postsecondary Education Planning Commission, Tallahassee.

    Prepared in response to the 1984 General Appropriations Act (Chapter 84-220, Laws of Florida), this report examines the feasibility of establishing a community college satellite telecommunications network within Florida to allow for the reception of programming transmitted by satellite and for teleconferencing. Following an executive summary,…

  19. Endosulfan wet deposition in Southern Florida (USA).

    PubMed

    Potter, Thomas L; Hapeman, Cathleen J; McConnell, Laura L; Harman-Fetcho, Jennifer A; Schmidt, Walter F; Rice, Clifford P; Schaffer, Bruce

    2014-01-15

    The atmosphere is an important transport route for semi-volatile pesticides like endosulfan. Deposition, which depends on physical-chemical properties, use patterns, and climatic conditions, can occur at local, regional, and global scales. Adverse human and ecological impact may result. We measured endosulfan wet deposition in precipitation over a 4-year period within an area of high agricultural use in Southern Florida (USA) and in nearby Biscayne and Everglades National Parks. Endosulfan's two isomers and degradate, endosulfan sulfate, were detected at high frequency with the order of detection and concentration being β-endosulfan>α-endosulfan>endosulfan sulfate. Within the agricultural area, detection frequency (55 to 98%) mean concentrations (5 to 87 ng L(-1)) and total daily deposition (200 ng m(-2) day(-1)) exceeded values at other sites by 5 to 30-fold. Strong seasonal trends were also observed with values at all monitored sites significantly higher during peak endosulfan use periods when vegetable crops were produced. Relatively high deposition in the crop production area and observations that concentrations exceeded aquatic life toxicity thresholds at all sites indicated that endosulfan volatilization and wet deposition are of ecotoxicological concern to the region. This study emphasizes the need to include localized volatilization and deposition of endosulfan and other semi-volatile pesticides in risk assessments in Southern Florida and other areas with similar climatic and crop production profiles.

  20. Geochemical history of Lake Miccosukee, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Z.Q.; Donoghue, J.F.; Hess, D.W.; Ragland, P.C.; Milla, K. . Geology Dept.)

    1994-03-01

    Lake Miccosukee is a 2,500 hectare karst lake in northwest Florida. The lake draws water from a 65,000 hectare watershed, although groundwater seepage appears to be the principal water source to the lake. Like many of the large lakes of north Florida it periodically drains via sinkholes, becoming nearly dry in the process. The result of the natural drawdowns is a large reduction of the organic matter content of the bottom sediments. The water level in the lake was stabilized after 1954 with the construction of a dike and weir. Drawdowns have been managed since then and have been fewer and less drastic. The lake bottom has been exposed for only about six months since 1954. The result has been an increase in aquatic vegetation and a diminishment in fish populations. A set of two dozen sediment cores was analyzed for sedimentation rate (using lead-210 and Cs-137), percent organics, C, N, P and trace metals. The effect of the lake level stabilization appears to be an increase in organic matter deposited in the bottom sediments. Anthropogenic metals, including Hg, Zn, Pb, Cu and V have been found to increase considerably near the tops of the cores, by a factor of two or more over long-term background levels.

  1. EAARL topography: Gulf Islands National Seashore: Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Nayegandhi, Amar; Patterson, Matt; Wilson, Iris; Travers, Laurinda J.

    2007-01-01

    This Web site contains 33 lidar-derived bare earth topography maps and GIS files for the Gulf Islands National Seashore-Florida. These lidar-derived topography maps were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology Program, FISC St. Petersburg, Florida, the National Park Service (NPS), Gulf Coast Network, Network Inventory and Monitoring Program, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Wallops Flight Facility. One objective of this research is to create techniques to survey coral reefs and barrier islands for the purposes of geomorphic change studies, habitat mapping, ecological monitoring, change detection, and event assessment. As part of this project, data from an innovative instrument under development at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, the NASA Experimental Airborne Advanced Research Lidar (EAARL) are being used. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in this realm for measuring subaerial and submarine topography wthin cross-environment surveys. High spectral resolution, water-column correction, and low costs were found to be key factors in providing accurate and affordable imagery to costal resource managers.

  2. The surficial aquifer in Pinellas County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Causseaux, K.W.

    1985-01-01

    The surficial aquifer in Pinellas County, Florida, contains potable water throughout most of the county and is a potential source of water to augment the public supply that is presently imported from adjacent counties. The county accounts for 38 percent of the public supply consumption of ground water in the 11-county area of west-central Florida and 68 percent of this water is imported from two adjacent counties. The surficial aquifer has a saturated thickness of more than 30 feet throughout most of the county. Specific capacity per foot of screen for wells is less than 0.1 gallon per minute per foot of drawdown in some parts of the county, but yield is sufficient in most of the county for many small uses with shallow-well pumps. Minimum potential yield varies from 5 gallons per minute in the northern part of the county to more than 30 gallons per minute in the south. Concentrations of iron are high enough in parts of the county to cause staining. Chloride concentrations are less than 100 milligrams per liter in most of the county and do not pose a problem for many uses. (USGS)

  3. 7 CFR 915.306 - Florida avocado grade, pack, and container marking regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Standards for Florida Avocados (7 CFR 51.3050 through 51.3069). ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Florida avocado grade, pack, and container marking... AGRICULTURE AVOCADOS GROWN IN SOUTH FLORIDA Container and Pack Regulations § 915.306 Florida avocado...

  4. 7 CFR 915.306 - Florida avocado grade, pack, and container marking regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Standards for Florida Avocados (7 CFR 51.3050 through 51.3069). ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Florida avocado grade, pack, and container marking... AGRICULTURE AVOCADOS GROWN IN SOUTH FLORIDA Container and Pack Regulations § 915.306 Florida avocado...

  5. 7 CFR 915.306 - Florida avocado grade, pack, and container marking regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Standards for Florida Avocados (7 CFR 51.3050 through 51.3069). ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Florida avocado grade, pack, and container marking... AGRICULTURE AVOCADOS GROWN IN SOUTH FLORIDA Container and Pack Regulations § 915.306 Florida avocado...

  6. 7 CFR 915.306 - Florida avocado grade, pack, and container marking regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Standards for Florida Avocados (7 CFR 51.3050 through 51.3069). ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Florida avocado grade, pack, and container marking... AGRICULTURE AVOCADOS GROWN IN SOUTH FLORIDA Container and Pack Regulations § 915.306 Florida avocado...

  7. Bugaboo Fire Rages in Georgia and Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Subtropical Storm Andrea apparently did little to quench numerous large wildfires burning in the U.S. Southeast in early May 2007. On May 11, 2007, when the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Terra satellite captured this image, the remnants of the storm had dwindled to a small ball of clouds in the Atlantic Ocean, and huge plumes of smoke snaked across Georgia, Florida, and the Gulf of Mexico. Areas where MODIS detected actively burning fires are outlined in red. A huge fire is burning in and near the Okefenokee Swamp, which straddles the state line between Georgia and Florida. For logistical purposes, fire officials are calling the part of the fire in Florida the Florida Bugaboo Fire and the part in Georgia the Bugaboo Scrub Fire. The distinction is simply administrative, however; in reality, it is single, continuous swath of burning timber, swamp land, grass, and scrubland. The blaze was more than 133,000 thousand acres as of May 11, and it appeared to be spreading on virtually all perimeters at the time of the image, with active fire locations detected in a circle that surrounds an already burned (or partially burned) area. According to reports form the Southern Area Coordination Center, the fire grew by at least 20,000 acres on May 10. Numerous communities were threatened and hundreds of people were evacuated, while parts of Interstate 10 were closed to all but emergency vehicles. To the northeast of the Bugaboo Fire, other large wildfires were burning in Georgia as well. The Floyds Prairie Fire, to the immediate north, was threatening endangered species and their habitat, while farther north the 116,000-plus-acre Sweat Farm Road/Big Turnaround Complex Fire was still burning in the area south of the city of Waycross, nearly a month after the fires first started in mid-April. Southern Georgia and Florida are in the grip of moderate to extreme drought. The state line area where the Bugaboo Fire is burning is one of the areas in extreme drought. The

  8. Recent carbonate slope development on southwest Florida continental margin

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, G.R.; Holmes, C.W.

    1987-05-01

    The southwest Florida continental slope bordering the Florida Strait contains a thick sequence of seaward-prograding sediments. Sediments consist principally of a mixture of shallow water and pelagic carbonate sands and muds deposited rapidly on the upper slope. Sedimentary patterns are interpreted to be a function of high-frequency sea level fluctuations. Most vigorous off-shelf transport and highest sedimentation rates (exceeding 2.5 m/1000 years) occur during early transgressions and late regressions when water depths on the shelf are shallow. During sea level highstands, off-shelf transport is less vigorous and sedimentation rates decrease. During sea level lowstands, no off-shelf transport takes place and erosion of the previously deposited sequence occurs as a result of an increase in erosional capacity of the Florida Current. The presence of at least nine such sequences, all with similar characteristics, indicates that these processes have been occurring since at least the late Pleistocene in response to high-frequency glacial fluctuations. The location of the southwest Florida slope between the rimmed Bahama platform and the nonrimmed remainder of the west Florida margin, as well as similarities with ancient carbonate slope deposits formed during periods when shelf-edge reef-forming organisms were lacking, suggest that depositional patterns on the southwest Florida slope may be indicative of a transition between rimmed and nonrimmed carbonate platform environments. The southwest Florida slope may provide a valuable modern analog for identifying similar transitional environments in the geologic record.

  9. U.S. Geological Survey programs in Florida, 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1999-01-01

    The safety, health, and economic well-being of Florida?s citizens are important to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), which is involved in water-related, geologic, biological, land use, and mapping issues in many parts of the State. The USGS office in Tallahassee acts as the liaison for all studies conducted by USGS scientists in Florida. Water resources activities are conducted not only from the office in Tallahassee, but also from offices in Miami, Tampa, and Altamonte Springs (Orlando). Scientists in these offices investigate surface water, ground water and water quality in Florida, working in cooperation with other Federal, State and local agencies and organizations. The USGS Center for Coastal Geology and Regional Marine Studies was established in St. Petersburg in 1988, in cooperation with the University of South Florida. The Center conducts a wide variety of research on mineral resources and on coastal and regional marine problems, including coastal erosion, climate change, wetlands deterioration, and coastal pollution. A USGS mapping office is located in St. Petersburg. Also, the Earth Science Information Center (ESIC) in Tallahassee provides USGS information to customers and directs inquiries to the appropriate USGS office or State agency on earth science topics, particularly those related to cartography, geography, aerial photography, and digital data. Biologists at the USGS Florida Caribbean Science Center, located in Gainesville, conduct biological and ecosystem studies in Florida, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands.

  10. ASK Florida; a climate change education professional development program for middle school teachers in Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weihs, R. R.

    2012-12-01

    A series of professional development workshops covering the fundamentals of climate change have been developed and facilitated for two groups of middle school science teachers in three Florida counties. The NASA-supported joint venture between Florida State University's Center for Ocean-Atmospheric Prediction Studies (COAPS) and the University of South Florida's (USF's) Coalition for Science Literacy, ASK Florida, focuses on expanding and deepening teachers' content knowledge of a wide range of climate change topics, connecting local and regional changes to the global picture, and supporting classroom implementation and effective teaching practices. Education experts from USF, climate scientists from COAPS, and Hillsborough county teachers and science coaches coordinated and developed the workshop content, which is based on Florida's Next Generation Sunshine State Standards in science, science curriculum guides for 6th grade, and teacher interest. Several scientists have facilitated activities during the workshop, including professors in meteorology and climatology, research scientists in the field, a NOAA program manager, the state climatologists for Florida, and others. Having these climate scientists present during the workshop provides teachers an opportunity to interact directly with the scientists and gain insight into the climatology field. Additionally, we host an open-forum discussion panel during which teachers can ask the experts about any topics of interest. Activities are designed to enhance the scientific skill level of the teachers. Introductory activities reinforce teachers' abilities to distinguish facts from opinions and to evaluate sources. Other activities provide hands-on experience using actual scientific data from NASA and other agencies. For example, teachers analyze precipitation data to create distributions of Florida rainfall, examine sea level trends at various locations, identify Atlantic hurricane frequencies during the phases of ENSO

  11. USGS Science for Restoration of South Florida: The South Florida Ecosystem Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McPherson, Benjamin F.; Gerould, Sarah; Higer, Aaron L.

    1999-01-01

    As land and resource managers see the value of their resources diminish, and the public watches the environments they knew as children become degraded, there are increasing calls to restore what has been lost, or to build productive ecosystems that will be healthy and sustainable under the conditions of human use. The U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Placed-Based Studies Program was established to provide sound science for resource managers in critical ecosystems such as South Florida (fig. 1). The program, which began in south Florida in 1995, provides relevant information, high-quality data, and models to support decisions for ecosystem restoration and management. The program applies multi- and interdisciplinary science to address regional and subregional environmental resources issues.

  12. Researchers study impact of Hurricane Opal on Florida coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Gregory W.; Armbruster, Charles K.; Xu, J. P.; Grymes, John M., III; Huh, Oscar K.

    On October 4, 1995, over 2000 km of coast-line stretching from southwest Florida to Louisiana was struck by storm-generated waves as Hurricane Opal moved northward across the Gulf of Mexico toward landfall east of Pensacola Beach, Florida (Figure 1).Approximately 12 hours before landfall on October 4, Opal neared category 5 strength (measured on the Saffir/Simpson scale) with sustained wind speeds of over 65 m s-1. Storm surge levels of ˜5 m were estimated across the Northwest Florida shelf by the National Hurricane Center (NHC), resulting in the overwash of most of Santa Rosa Island, the most extensively affected section of coast in the Gulf.

  13. Florida's outpatient commitment law: a lesson in failed reform?

    PubMed

    Petrila, John; Christy, Annette

    2008-01-01

    An involuntary outpatient commitment law became effective in Florida in January 2005. However, only 71 orders for outpatient commitment have been issued in three years, even though during that period 41,997 adults had two or more 72-hour involuntary emergency examinations under Florida's civil commitment law. This column describes the criteria for outpatient commitment in the Florida statute and discusses possible reasons for its low rate of use, including additional statutory criteria that make filing a petition for outpatient commitment difficult, lack of community treatment resources, and lack of enforcement mechanisms.

  14. Biogeochemical classification of South Florida's estuarine and coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Briceño, Henry O; Boyer, Joseph N; Castro, Joffre; Harlem, Peter

    2013-10-15

    South Florida's watersheds have endured a century of urban and agricultural development and disruption of their hydrology. Spatial characterization of South Florida's estuarine and coastal waters is important to Everglades' restoration programs. We applied Factor Analysis and Hierarchical Clustering of water quality data in tandem to characterize and spatially subdivide South Florida's coastal and estuarine waters. Segmentation rendered forty-four biogeochemically distinct water bodies whose spatial distribution is closely linked to geomorphology, circulation, benthic community pattern, and to water management. This segmentation has been adopted with minor changes by federal and state environmental agencies to derive numeric nutrient criteria. PMID:23968989

  15. The absorption efficiency and respiration rate of the Florida lancelet, Branchiostoma floridae.

    PubMed

    Nash, Troy R; Ruppert, Edward E; Colacino, James M

    2009-12-01

    The present study investigates some aspects of the digestive biology and physiological energetics of the Florida lancelet, Branchiostoma floridae. Florida lancelets are able to remove 47.2-56.9% of the energy from a diet of mixed algae. The respiration rate is 0.100mL O(2) (STPD) h(-1) g(-1) (wet), which estimates a metabolic rate of 0.248 J h(-1), at an average body mass of 0.125 g (wet). Published values of the chlorophyll a concentration in its natural habitat indicate that a 125 mg lancelet would need to filter 0.018-0.031 L h(-1) to remove sufficient food to support its resting metabolism. The filtration rate of lancelets has been reported as 0.138 L h(-1), indicating that the actual filtration rate is 4-7 times greater than the filtration rate needed to meet resting metabolic demands. It appears that lancelets have the potential to be raised in aquaculture, because their absorption efficiency and respiration rate are comparable to suspension-feeding invertebrates that have been successfully aquacultured.

  16. Water Resources Data, Florida, Water Year 2001, Volume 3B. Southwest Florida Ground Water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoker, Y.E.; Kane, R.L.; Fletcher, W.L.

    2002-01-01

    Water resources data for the 2001 water year in Florida consist of continuous or daily discharges for 406 streams, periodic discharge for 12 streams, continuous daily stage for 142 streams, periodic stage for 12 streams, peak stage and discharge for 37 streams, continuous or daily elevations for 11 lakes, periodic elevations for 30 lakes; continuous ground-water levels for 424 wells, periodic ground-water levels for 1,426 wells, and quality-of-water data for 80 surface-water sites and 245 wells. The data for Southwest Florida include records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, water quality of lakes and reservoirs, and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. Volume 3B contains records for continuous ground-water elevations for 128 wells; periodic ground-water elevations at 33 wells; miscellaneous ground-water elevations at 347 wells; and water quality at 25 ground-water sites. These data represent the national Water Data System records collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating local, state, and federal agencies in Florida.

  17. Water Resources Data, Florida, Water Year 2003 Volume 2A: South Florida Surface Water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Price, C.; Woolverton, J.; Overton, K.

    2004-01-01

    Water resources data for 2003 water year in Florida consists of continuous or daily discharge for 385 streams, periodic discharge for 13 streams, continuous or daily stage for 255 streams, periodic stage for 13 stream, peak discharge for 36 streams, and peak stage for 36 streams, continuous or daily elevations for 13 lakes, periodic elevations for 46 lakes, continuous ground-water levels for 441 wells, periodic ground-water levels for 1227 wells, quality of water data for 133 surface-water sites, and 308 wells. The data for South Florida included continuous or daily discharge for 72 streams, continuous or daily stage for 50 streams, no peak stage discharge for streams, 1 continuous elevation for lake, continuous ground-water levels for 237 wells, periodic ground-water levels for 248 wells, water quality for 25 surface-water sites, and 161 wells. These data represent the National Water Data System records collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperation with local, state, and federal agencies in Florida.

  18. Water resources data-Florida water year 2004volume 2A: south Florida surface water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Price, C.; Woolverton, J.; Overton, K.

    2005-01-01

    Water resources data for 2004 water year in Florida consists of continuous or daily discharge for 405 streams, periodic discharge for 12 streams, continuous or daily stage for 159 streams, periodic stage for 19 stream, peak discharge for 30 streams, and peak stage for 30 streams, continuous or daily elevations for 14 lakes, periodic elevations for 23 lakes, continuous ground-water levels for 408 wells, periodic ground-water levels for 1188 wells, quality of water data for 140 surface-water sites, and 240 wells. The data for South Florida included continuous or daily discharge for 86 streams, continuous or daily stage for 54 streams, no peak stage discharge for streams, 1 continuous elevation for lake, continuous ground-water levels for 257 wells, periodic ground-water levels for 226 wells, water quality for 39 surface-water sites, and 149 wells. These data represent the National Water Data System records collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating local, State, and Federal agencies in Florida.

  19. Water Resources Data, Florida, Water Year 2001, Volume 2A. South Florida Surface Water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Price, C.; Woolverton, J.; Overton, K.

    2002-01-01

    Water resources data for 2001 water year in Florida consists of continuous or daily discharge for 404 streams, periodic discharge for 15 streams, continuous or daily stage for 154 streams, periodic stage for 12 stream, peak discharge for 37 streams, and peak stage for 37 streams, continuous or daily elevations for 12 lakes, periodic elevations for 50 lakes, continuous ground-water levels for 426 wells, periodic ground-water levels for 1251 wells, quality of water data for 112 surface-water sites, and 235 wells. The data for South Florida included continuous or daily discharge for 89 streams, continuous or daily stage for 64 streams, no peak stage discharge for streams, 1 continuous elevation for lake, continuous ground-water levels for 244 wells, periodic ground-water levels for 255 wells, water quality for 32 surface-water sites, and 166 wells. The data represent the National Water Data System records collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperation with local, state, and federal agencies in Florida.

  20. Water resources data, Florida, water year 2005. Volume 2A: south Florida surface water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Price, C.; Overton, K.

    2006-01-01

    Water resources data for 2005 water year in Florida consists of continuous or daily discharge for 429 streams, periodic discharge for 9 streams, continuous or daily stage for 218 streams, periodic stage for 5 stream, peak discharge for 28 streams, and peak stage for 28 streams, continuous or daily elevations for 15 lakes, periodic elevations for 23 lakes, continuous ground-water levels for 401 wells, periodic ground-water levels for 1,098 wells, quality of water data for 211 surface-water sites, and 208 wells. The data for South Florida included continuous or daily discharge for 91 streams, continuous or daily stage for 62 streams, no peak stage discharge for streams, 1 continuous elevation for lake, continuous ground-water levels for 248 wells, periodic ground-water levels for 187 wells, water quality for 54 surface-water sites, and 121 wells. These data represent the National Water Data System records collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating local, State, and Federal agencies in Florida.

  1. Water Resources Data, Florida, Water Year 2002, Volume 2A. South Florida Surface Water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Price, C.; Woolverton, J.; Overton, K.

    2003-01-01

    Water resources data for 2002 water year in Florida consists of continuous or daily discharge for 392 streams, periodic discharge for 15 streams, continuous or daily stage for 191 streams, periodic stage for 13 stream, peak discharge for 33 streams, and peak stage for 33 streams, continuous or daily elevations for 14 lakes, periodic elevations for 49 lakes, continuous ground-water levels for 418 wells, periodic ground-water levels for 1287 wells, quality of water data for 116 surface-water sites, and 291 wells. The data for South Florida included continuous or daily discharge for 71 streams, continuous or daily stage for 49 streams, no peak stage discharge for streams, 1 continuous elevation for lake, continuous ground-water levels for 238 wells, periodic ground-water levels for 260 wells, water quality for 24 surface-water sites, and 159 wells. The data represent the National Water Data System records collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperation with local, state, and federal agencies in Florida.

  2. Water resources data for Florida water year 2004volume 1A. northeast Florida surface water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herrett, Thomas A.; Hess, Glen W.; House, Jon G.; Ruppert, Gregory P.; Courts, Mary-Lorraine

    2005-01-01

    Water resources data for the 2004 water year in Florida consist of continuous or daily discharge for 405 streams, periodic discharge for 12 streams, continuous or daily stage for 159 streams, periodic stage for 19 streams, peak stage and discharge for 30 streams; continuous or daily elevations for 14 lakes, periodic elevations for 23 lakes; continuous ground-water levels for 408 wells, periodic ground-water levels for 1,157 wells; quality-of-water data for 140 surface-water sites and 239 wells. The data for northeast Florida include continuous or daily discharge for 140 streams, periodic discharge for 4 streams, continuous or daily stage for 58 streams, periodic stage for 3 streams; peak stage and discharge for 0 streams; continuous or daily elevations for 10 lakes, periodic elevations for 20 lakes; continuous ground water levels for 50 wells, periodic ground-water levels for 522 wells; quality-of-water data for 40 surface-water sites and 66 wells. These data represent the National Water Data System records collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating local, State and Federal agencies in Florida.

  3. Water Resources Data, Florida, Water Year 2003, Volume 1B: Northeast Florida Ground Water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    George, H.G.; Nazarian, A.P.; Dickerson, S.M.

    2004-01-01

    Water resources data for the 2003 water year in Florida consist of continuous or daily discharge for 385 streams, periodic discharge for 13 streams, continuous or daily stage for 255 streams, periodic stage for 13 streams, peak stage and discharge for 36 streams; continuous or daily elevations for 13 lakes, periodic elevations for 46 lakes; continuous ground-water levels for 441 wells, periodic ground-water levels for 1,227 wells; quality-of-water data for 133 surface-water sites and 308 wells. The data for northeast Florida include continuous or daily discharge for 138 streams, periodic discharge for 3 streams, continuous or daily stage for 61 streams, periodic stage for 0 streams; peak stage and discharge for 0 streams; continuous or daily elevations for 9 lakes, periodic elevations for 20 lakes; continuous ground water levels for 73 wells, periodic groundwater levels for 543 wells; quality-of-water data for 43 surface-water sites and 115 wells. These data represent the National Water Data System records collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating local, State and Federal agencies in Florida.

  4. Water resources data, Florida, water year 2005. Volume 3B: Southwest Florida ground water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kane, Richard L.

    2005-01-01

    Water resources data for the 2005 water year in Florida consist of continuous or daily discharges for 429 streams, periodic discharge for 9 streams, continuous or daily stage for 218 streams, periodic stage for 5 streams, peak stage for 28 streams and peak discharge for 28 streams, continuous or daily elevations for 15 lakes, periodic elevations for 23 lakes; continuous ground-water levels for 401 wells, periodic ground-water levels for 1,098 wells, and quality-of-water data for 211 surface-water sites and 208 wells. The data for Southwest Florida include records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, water quality of lakes and reservoirs, and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. Volume 3B contains records for continuous ground-water elevations for 108 wells; periodic ground-water elevations at 24 wells; miscellaneous ground-water elevations at 354 wells; and water quality at 2 ground-water sites. These data represent the national Water Data System records collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating local, state, and federal agencies in Florida.

  5. Water resources data Florida, water year 2004: Volume 3B: southwest Florida ground water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kane, Richard L.

    2004-01-01

    Water resources data for the 2004 water year in Florida consist of continuous or daily discharges for 405 streams, periodic discharge for 12 streams, continuous or daily stage for 159 streams, periodic stage for 19 streams, peak stage for 30 streams and peak discharge for 30 streams, continuous or daily elevations for 14 lakes, periodic elevations for 23 lakes; continuous ground-water levels for 408 wells, periodic ground-water levels for 1,188 wells, and quality-of-water data for 140 surface-water sites and 240 wells. The data for Southwest Florida include records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, water quality of lakes and reservoirs, and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. Volume 3B contains records for continuous ground-water elevations for 98 wells; periodic ground-water elevations at 56 wells; miscellaneous ground-water elevations at 374 wells; and water quality at 25 ground-water sites. These data represent the national Water Data System records collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating local, state, and federal agencies in Florida.

  6. Water Resources Data, Florida, Water Year 2002, Volume 3B. Southwest Florida Ground Water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kane, R.L.; Fletcher, W.L.

    2003-01-01

    Water resources data for the 2002 water year in Florida consist of continuous or daily discharges for 392 streams, periodic discharge for 15 streams, continuous daily stage for 191 streams, periodic stage for 13 streams, peak stage for 33 streams and peak discharge for 33 streams, continuous or daily elevations for 14 lakes, periodic elevations for 49 lakes; continuous ground-water levels for 418 wells, periodic ground-water levels for 1,287 wells, and quality-of-water data for 116 surface-water sites and 291 wells. The data for Southwest Florida include records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, water quality of lakes and reservoirs, and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. Volume 3B contains records for continuous ground-water elevations for 125 wells; periodic ground-water elevations at 31 wells; miscellaneous ground-water elevations at 377 wells; and water quality at 46 ground-water sites. These data represent the national Water Data System records collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating local, state, and federal agencies in Florida.

  7. Water Resources Data, Florida, Water Year 2003, Volume 3B: Southwest Florida Ground Water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kane, Richard L.; Fletcher, William L.; Lane, Susan L.

    2004-01-01

    Water resources data for the 2003 water year in Florida consist of continuous or daily discharges for 385 streams, periodic discharge for 13 streams, continuous daily stage for 255 streams, periodic stage for 13 streams, peak stage for 36 streams and peak discharge for 36 streams, continuous or daily elevations for 13 lakes, periodic elevations for 46 lakes; continuous ground-water levels for 441 wells, periodic ground-water levels for 1,227 wells, and quality-of-water data for 133 surface-water sites and 308 wells. The data for Southwest Florida include records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, water quality of lakes and reservoirs, and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. Volume 3B contains records for continuous ground-water elevations for 128 wells; periodic ground-water elevations at 31 wells; miscellaneous ground-water elevations at 405 wells; and water quality at 32 ground-water sites. These data represent the national Water Data System records collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating local, state, and federal agencies in Florida.

  8. Water Resources Data, Florida, Water Year 2003, Volume 3A: Southwest Florida Surface Water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kane, R.L.; Fletcher, W.L.

    2004-01-01

    Water resources data for the 2003 water year in Florida consist of continuous or daily discharges for 385 streams, periodic discharge for 13 streams, continuous daily stage for 255 streams, periodic stage for 13 streams, peak stage for 36 streams and peak discharge for 36 streams, continuous or daily elevations for 13 lakes, periodic elevations for 46 lakes; continuous ground-water levels for 441 wells, periodic ground-water levels for 1,227 wells, and quality-of-water data for 133 surface-water sites and 308 wells. The data for Southwest Florida include records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, water quality of lakes and reservoirs, and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. Volume 3A contains continuous or daily discharge for 103 streams, periodic discharge for 7 streams, continuous or daily stage for 67 streams, periodic stage for 13 streams, peak stage and discharge for 8 streams, continuous or daily elevations for 2 lakes, periodic elevations for 26 lakes, and quality-of-water data for 62 surface-water sites. These data represent the national Water Data System records collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating local, state, and federal agencies in Florida.

  9. Water Resources Data, Florida, Water Year 2001, Volume 3A. Southwest Florida Surface Water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoker, Y.E.; Kane, R.L.; Fletcher, W.L.

    2002-01-01

    Water resources data for the 2001 water year in Florida consist of continuous or daily discharges for 406 streams, periodic discharge for 12 streams, continuous daily stage for 142 streams, periodic stage for 12 streams, peak stage and discharge for 37 streams, continuous or daily elevations for 11 lakes, periodic elevations for 30 lakes; continuous ground-water levels for 424 wells, periodic ground-water levels for 1,426 wells, and quality-of-water data for 80 surface-water sites and 245 wells. The data for Southwest Florida include records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, water quality of lakes and reservoirs, and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. Volume 3A contains continuous or daily discharge for 83 streams, periodic discharge for 10 streams, continuous or daily stage for 43 streams, peak stage and discharge for 8 streams, continuous or daily elevations for 2 lakes, periodic elevations for 26 lakes, and quality-of-water data for 37 surface-water sites. These data represent the national Water Data System records collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating local, state, and federal agencies in Florida.

  10. Water Resources Data, Florida, Water Year 2002, Volume 3A. Southwest Florida Surface Water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kane, R.L.; Fletcher, W.L.

    2003-01-01

    Water resources data for the 2002 water year in Florida consist of continuous or daily discharges for 392 streams, periodic discharge for 15 streams, continuous daily stage for 191 streams, periodic stage for 13 streams, peak stage for 33 streams and peak discharge for 33 streams, continuous or daily elevations for 14 lakes, periodic elevations for 49 lakes; continuous ground-water levels for 418 wells, periodic ground-water levels for 1,287 wells, and quality-of-water data for 116 surface-water sites and 291 wells. The data for Southwest Florida include records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, water quality of lakes and reservoirs, and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. Volume 3A contains continuous or daily discharge for 99 streams, periodic discharge for 11 streams, continuous or daily stage for 63 streams, peak stage and discharge for 7 streams, continuous or daily elevations for 2 lakes, periodic elevations for 26 lakes, and quality-of-water data for 59 surface-water sites. These data represent the national Water Data System records collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating local, state, and federal agencies in Florida.

  11. Water resources data, Florida, water year 2004, volume 3A: southwest Florida surface water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kane, Richard L.

    2004-01-01

    Water resources data for the 2004 water year in Florida consist of continuous or daily discharges for 405 streams, periodic discharge for 12 streams, continuous daily stage for 159 streams, periodic stage for 19 streams, peak stage for 30 streams and peak discharge for 30 streams, continuous or daily elevations for 14 lakes, periodic elevations for 23 lakes; continuous ground-water levels for 408 wells, periodic ground-water levels for 1,188 wells, and quality-of-water data for 140 surface-water sites and 240 wells. The data for Southwest Florida include records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, water quality of lakes and reservoirs, and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. Volume 3A contains continuous or daily discharge for 104 streams, periodic discharge for 6 streams, continuous or daily stage for 36 streams, periodic stage for 14 streams, peak stage and discharge for 8 streams, continuous or daily elevations for 2 lakes, periodic elevations for 3 lakes, and quality-of-water data for 58 surface-water sites. These data represent the national Water Data System records collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating local, state, and federal agencies in Florida.

  12. Water resources data, Florida, water year 2005. Volume 3A: Southwest Florida surface water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kane, Richard L.; Dickman, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Water resources data for the 2005 water year in Florida consist of continuous or daily discharges for 429 streams, periodic discharge for 9 streams, continuous or daily stage for 218 streams, periodic stage for 5 streams, peak stage for 28 streams and peak discharge for 28 streams, continuous or daily elevations for 15 lakes, periodic elevations for 23 lakes; continuous ground-water levels for 401 wells, periodic ground-water levels for 1,098 wells, and quality-of-water data for 211 surface-water sites and 208 wells. The data for Southwest Florida include records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, water quality of lakes and reservoirs, and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. Volume 3A contains records for continuous or daily discharge for 113 streams, periodic discharge for 4 streams, continuous or daily stage for 80 streams, periodic stage for 2 stream, peak stage and discharge for 8 streams, continuous or daily elevations for 3 lakes, continous or daily elevations for 3 lakes, and quality of water for 75 surface water sites. These data represent the national Water Data System records collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating local, state, and federal agencies in Florida.

  13. Integrated Science: Florida Manatees and Everglades Hydrology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langtimm, Catherine A.; Swain, Eric D.; Stith, Bradley M.; Reid, James P.; Slone, Daniel H.; Decker, Jeremy; Butler, Susan M.; Doyle, Terry; Snow, R.W.

    2009-01-01

    Predicting and monitoring restoration effects on Florida manatees, which are known to make extended movements, will be incomplete if modeling and monitoring are limited to the smaller areas defined by the various res-toration components. U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) efforts, thus far, have focused on (1) collecting manatee movement data throughout the Ten Thousand Islands (TTI) region, and (2) developing an individual-based model for manatees to illustrate manatee responses to changes in hydrology related to the Picayune Strand Restoration Project (PSRP). In 2006, new regional research was begun to extend an Everglades hydrology model into the TTI region; extend the manatee movement model into the southern estuaries of Everglades National Park (ENP); and integrate hydrology and manatee data, models, and monitoring across the TTI region and ENP. Currently (2008), three research tasks are underway to develop the necessary modeling components to assess restoration efforts across the Greater Everglades Ecosystem.

  14. The American Crocodile in Biscayne Bay, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cherkiss, Michael S.; Romañach, Stephanie S.; Mazzotti, Frank J.

    2011-01-01

    Intensive crocodile monitoring programs conducted during the late 1970s and early 1980s in southern Florida resulted in an optimistic outlook for recovery of the protected species population. However, some areas with suitable crocodile habitat were not investigated, such as Biscayne Bay and the mainland shorelines of Barnes and Card Sounds. The objective of our study was to determine status and habitat use of crocodiles in the aforementioned areas. Spotlight and nesting surveys were conducted from September 1996 to December 2005. The results revealed annual increases in the number of crocodiles. Crocodiles preferred protected habitats such as canals and ponds. Fewer crocodiles were observed in higher salinity water. The distribution and abundance of crocodilians in estuaries is directly dependent on timing, amount, and location of freshwater delivery, providing an opportunity to integrate habitat enhancement with ongoing ecosystem restoration and management activities.

  15. Airborne radioactivity surveys for phosphate in Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moxham, Robert M.

    1954-01-01

    Airborne radioactivity surveys totaling 5, 600 traverse miles were made in 10 areas in Florida, which were thought to be geologically favorable for deposits of uraniferous phosphate. Abnormal radioactivity was recorded in 8 of the 10 areas surveyed. The anomalies are located in Bradford, Clay, Columbia, DeSoto, Dixie, Lake, Marion, Orange, Sumter, Taylor, and Union Counties. Two of the anomalies were investigated briefly on the ground. One resulted from a deposit of river-pebble phosphate in the Peace River valley; the river-pebble samples contain an average of 0.013 percent equivalent uranium. The other anomaly resulted from outcrops of leached phosphatic rock containing as much as 0. 016 percent equivalent uranium. Several anomalies in other areas were recorded at or near localities where phosphate deposits have been reported.

  16. Airborne radioactivity surveys for phosphate in Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moxham, Robert M.

    1953-01-01

    Airborne radioactivity surveys totalling 5,600 traverse miles were made in ten areas in Florida, which were thought to be geologically favorable for the occurrence of uraniferous phosphate deposits. Abnormal radioactivity was recorded in eight of the ten areas surveyed. The anomalies are located in Bradford, Clay, Columbia, DeSoto, Dixie, Lake, Marion, Orange, Sumter, Taylor, and Union Counties. Two of the anomalies were investigated briefly on the ground. One resulted from a deposit of river-pebble phosphate in the Peace River valley; samples of the river pebble contain an average of 0.013 percent equivalent uranium. The other anomaly resulted from outcrops of leached phosphate rock containing as much as 0.016 percent equivalent uranium. Several anomalies in other areas were recorded at or near localities where phosphate deposits have been reported to occur.

  17. Contaminant concentrations in manatees in Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Shea, T.J.; Moore, J.F.; Kochman, H.I.

    1984-01-01

    The status of the endangered manatee (Trichehus manatus) in relation to organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, mercury, lead, cadmium, copper, iron, and selenium was investigated in Florida from 1977 to 1981. Concentrations of organochlorines in blubber, mercury in muscle and liver, lead in liver, and lead and cadmium in kidneys did not indicate high exposure to these contaminants. Only cadmium in kidneys showed a positivde correlation with relative age. Copper concentrations in livers of these aquatic herbivores were significantly elevated in areas of high herbicidal copper usage after adjustment for significant age-related effects. Liver copper concentrations comparable to those associated with toxic effects in some domestic species were found in manatees from areas of high copper herbicide use. The use of copper herbicides for control of aquatic plants should be carefully managed in areas used intensively by manatees.

  18. Miocene vertebrates and North Florida shorelines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsen, S.J.

    1968-01-01

    Vertebrate fossils from ten localities, spread across northern Florida, give evidence of shorelines and deltas that have previously been established on geologic evidence or invertebrates alone. Terrestrial mammal remains, in association with shallow-water forms, indicate a deltaic assemblage and in several instances specific animals suggest restricted water depths at the time of sediment deposition. Fortunately diagnostic fragments of Miocene horses, Merychippus and Parahippus, are present in these beds, allowing for a rather close age evaluation of these sediments. Adequate fossil material has been collected from these localities to suggest the past environment and ecological conditions for the forms represented. By utilizing a suggested course of experiments with stream table apparatus it is possible to use the orientation of the fossil vertebrate remains as aids in determining past conditions of sediment accumulation. ?? 1968.

  19. Hydrologic description of Lake Jackson, Sebring, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hammett, K.M.

    1981-01-01

    Available data were evaluated to document hydrologic conditions in the Lake Jackson basin, Florida. Bathymetric data indicate numerous dredged holes around the perimeter of the lake. Away from the dredged holes, a firm sand bottom slopes gradually from the shore to a maximum depth of 22 feet. Lake Jackson 's stage declined 3 feet from 1970 to 1973 and has remained below normal since that time. Rainfall was below average from 1970 to 1973, but the lake-level decline did not result solely from deficient precipitation. A water-budget analysis of the lake indicates that channelization downstream and groundwater withdrawals contributed significantly to the decline. Lake Jackson is used extensively for recreation. Available water-quality data indicate suitable conditions for recreation and the propagation and management of fish and wildlife. (USGS)

  20. Northern Everglades, Florida, satellite image map

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, Jean-Claude; Jones, John W.

    2002-01-01

    These satellite image maps are one product of the USGS Land Characteristics from Remote Sensing project, funded through the USGS Place-Based Studies Program with support from the Everglades National Park. The objective of this project is to develop and apply innovative remote sensing and geographic information system techniques to map the distribution of vegetation, vegetation characteristics, and related hydrologic variables through space and over time. The mapping and description of vegetation characteristics and their variations are necessary to accurately simulate surface hydrology and other surface processes in South Florida and to monitor land surface changes. As part of this research, data from many airborne and satellite imaging systems have been georeferenced and processed to facilitate data fusion and analysis. These image maps were created using image fusion techniques developed as part of this project.

  1. South Florida Everglades: satellite image map

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, John W.; Thomas, Jean-Claude; Desmond, G.B.

    2001-01-01

    These satellite image maps are one product of the USGS Land Characteristics from Remote Sensing project, funded through the USGS Place-Based Studies Program (http://access.usgs.gov/) with support from the Everglades National Park (http://www.nps.gov/ever/). The objective of this project is to develop and apply innovative remote sensing and geographic information system techniques to map the distribution of vegetation, vegetation characteristics, and related hydrologic variables through space and over time. The mapping and description of vegetation characteristics and their variations are necessary to accurately simulate surface hydrology and other surface processes in South Florida and to monitor land surface changes. As part of this research, data from many airborne and satellite imaging systems have been georeferenced and processed to facilitate data fusion and analysis. These image maps were created using image fusion techniques developed as part of this project.

  2. Planning applications in East Central Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannah, J. W. (Principal Investigator); Thomas, G. L.; Esparza, F.; Millard, J. J.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. This is a study of applications of ERTS data to planning problems, especially as applicable to East Central Florida. The primary method has been computer analysis of digital data, with visual analysis of images serving to supplement the digital analysis. The principal method of analysis was supervised maximum likelihood classification, supplemented by density slicing and mapping of ratios of band intensities. Land-use maps have been prepared for several urban and non-urban sectors. Thematic maps have been found to be a useful form of the land-use maps. Change-monitoring has been found to be an appropriate and useful application. Mapping of marsh regions has been found effective and useful in this region. Local planners have participated in selecting training samples and in the checking and interpretation of results.

  3. Barriers to Medicaid Participation among Florida Dentists

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Henrietta L.; Catalanotto, Frank; Guo, Yi; Marks, John; Dharamsi, Shafik

    2015-01-01

    Background Finding dentists who treat Medicaid-enrolled children is a struggle for many parents. The purpose of this study was to identify non-reimbursement factors that influence the decision by dentists about whether or not to participate in the Medicaid program in Florida. Methods Data from a mailed survey was analyzed using a logistic regression model to test the association of Medicaid participation with the Perceived Barriers and Social Responsibility variables. Results General and pediatric dentists (n=882) who identified themselves as either Medicaid (14%) or Non-Medicaid (86%) participants responded. Five items emerged as significant predictors of Medicaid participation, with a final concordance index of 0.905. Two previously unreported barriers to participation in Medicaid emerged: 1) dentists’ perception of social stigma from other dentists for participating in Medicaid, and 2) the lack of specialists to whom Medicaid patients can be referred. Conclusions This study provides new information about non-reimbursement barriers to Medicaid participation. PMID:25702734

  4. Radium-226 accumulation in Florida freshwater mussels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brenner, M.; Smoak, J.M.; Leeper, D.A.; Streubert, M.; Baker, S.M.

    2007-01-01

    Selected lakes in Hillsborough County, Florida have been hydrologically augmented with groundwater to offset stage declines caused by excessive pumping of the Floridan Aquifer. Augmentation water can be relatively rich in 226Ra (>5 decays per minute [dpm] L-1). We measured 226Ra activities in shells and soft tissues of adult bivalve molluscs (Elliptio cf. buckleyi) from groundwater-augmented and nonaugmented lakes to assess bioaccumulation of 226Ra by mussels. Mussels from augmented lakes displayed higher 226Ra in both shells and tissues than did mussels from nonaugmented lakes. Within a sample, 226Ra activity in Elliptio tissues was higher than the value measured in shells. Highest activities were found in a composite mussel sample (n = 6) from an augmented lake; soft tissue activity was 619 ?? 33 dpm g-1 dry weight and shell activity was 147 ?? 7 dpm g-1 g dry weight. Large mussels displayed greater activities in soft tissues and shells than did small mussels. We transplanted animals from a nonaugmented lake into a groundwater-augmented water body. 226Ra activity in dry tissue rose from 32 ?? 1 to 196 ?? 2 dpm g-1 within 2 months. When 226Ra-rich mussels (232 ?? 2 dpm g-1) from the augmented lake were transferred to the nonaugmented lake, they showed no significant 226Ra loss over the 69-d experiment. Large Elliptio mussels concentrated 226Ra in their soft tissues to levels about 1,000 to 25,000 times concentrations in lake water. Pumping of groundwater in Florida for residential, agricultural, and industrial use contributes dissolved 226Ra to some surface water bodies, where it can be bioaccumulated by bivalve molluscs. ?? 2007, by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, Inc.

  5. Evolution of a Florida Cirrus Anvil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, T. J.; Navarro, B.C.; Twohy, C. H.; Jensen, E. J.; Bui, P. T.; Baumgardner, D. G.; Gerber, H.; Herman, R. L.; Heymsfield, A. J.; Lawson, P.; Minnis, P.; Nguyen, L.; Poellot, M.; Pope, S. K.; Valero, F. P. J.; Weinstock, E. M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a detailed study of a single thunderstorm anvil cirrus cloud measured on 21 July 2002 near southern Florida during the Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers--Florida Area Cirrus Experiment (CRYSTAL-FACE). NASA WB-57F and University of North Dakota Citation aircraft tracked the microphysical and radiative development of the anvil for 3 h. Measurements showed that the cloud mass that was advected downwind from the thunderstorm was separated vertically into two layers: a cirrus anvil with cloud-top temperatures of -45?C lay below a second, thin tropopause cirrus (TTC) layer with the same horizontal dimensions as the anvil and temperatures near -70?C. In both cloud layers, ice crystals smaller than 50 ?m across dominated the size distributions and cloud radiative properties. In the anvil, ice crystals larger than 50 ?m aggregated and precipitated while small ice crystals increasingly dominated the size distributions; as a consequence, measured ice water contents and ice crystal effective radii decreased with time. Meanwhile, the anvil thinned vertically and maintained a stratification similar to its environment. Because effective radii were small, radiative heating and cooling were concentrated in layers approximately 100 m thick at the anvil top and base. A simple analysis suggests that the anvil cirrus spread laterally because mixing in these radiatively driven layers created horizontal pressure gradients between the cloud and its stratified environment. The TTC layer also spread but, unlike the anvil, did not dissipate--perhaps because the anvil shielded the TTC from terrestrial infrared heating. Calculations of top-of-troposphere radiative forcing above the anvil and TTC showed strong cooling that tapered as the anvil evolved.

  6. Species profiles: life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (south Florida). Florida pompano. [Trachinotus carolinus

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, C.

    1986-04-01

    Florida pompano is a marine species that is especially common along the Florida coast. Florida pompano is an excellent food fish, so it supports an important commercial and recreational fishery. Larvae live in the open sea, but juveniles use waters along beaches as nursery grounds. Juvenile pompano eat planktonic but mostly benthic invertebrates. Adults feed on invertebrates and fish. Pompano prefer temperatures of 28 to 32/sup 0/C, and adults apparently prefer salinities of 28 to 37 ppt. Pompano died at dissolved oxygen concentrations of 2.5 ppM.

  7. 3 Zika-Carrying Mosquitoes Found in Florida

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160740.html 3 Zika-Carrying Mosquitoes Found in Florida A first for continental U.S.; 95 other tested mosquitoes Zika-free, officials say To use the sharing features ...

  8. Cutting Electricity Costs in Miami-Dade County, Florida

    ScienceCinema

    Alvarez, Carlos; Oliver, LeAnn; Kronheim, Steve; Gonzalez, Jorge; Woods-Richardson, Kathleen

    2016-07-12

    Miami-Dade County, Florida will be piping methane gas from their regional landfill to the adjacent wastewater plant to generate a significant portion of the massive facility's future electricity needs.

  9. MODIS water quality algorithms for northwest Florida estuaries

    EPA Science Inventory

    Synoptic and frequent monitoring of water quality parameters from satellite is useful for determining the health of aquatic ecosystems and development of effective management strategies. Northwest Florida estuaries are classified as optically-complex, or waters influenced by chlo...

  10. Land Cover Trends in the Southern Florida Coastal Plain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kambly, Steven; Moreland, Thomas R.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents an assessment of land use and land cover change in the Southern Florida Coastal Plain ecoregion for the period from 1973 to 2000. The ecoregion is one of 84 level III ecoregions defined by the Environmental Protection Agency; ecoregions have been designed to serve as a spatial framework for environmental resource management and denote areas that contain a geographically distinct assemblage of biotic and abiotic phenomena, including geology, physiography, vegetation, climate, soils, land use, wildlife, and hydrology. The Southern Florida Coastal Plain ecoregion covers an area of approximately 22,407 square kilometers [8,651 square miles] across the lower portion of the Florida peninsula, from Lake Okeechobee southward through the Florida Keys. It comprises flat plains with wet soils, marshland and swamp land cover with Everglades and palmetto prairie vegetation types.

  11. EVALUATION OF COLLIER COUNTY, FLORIDA LANDFILL MINING DEMONSTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes the landfill mining process as demonstrated under the U.S. EPA, Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory's Municipal Waste Innovative Technology Evaluation (MITE) Program by the Collier County (Florida) Solid Waste Management Department. Landfill mining is the ...

  12. Florida Investigates 2nd Possible Local Transmission of Zika Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Florida Investigates 2nd Possible Local Transmission of Zika Virus If confirmed, cases would be first instances ... investigating a second possible case of locally transmitted Zika infection. On Tuesday, the first possible case of ...

  13. Florida seagrass habitat evaluation: A comparative survey for chemical quality

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contaminant concentrations were determined for media associated with 13 Florida seagrass beds. Concentrations of 10 trace metals were more commonly detected in surface water, sediment and two seagrass species than PAHs, pesticides and PCBs. Concentrations of copper and arsenic ...

  14. Thrips-transmitted Viruses Infect a Number of Florida Crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ilarviruses Tomato necrotic streak virus and Tobacco streak virus are present in south Florida. Both species cause economically significant disease in vegetable crop. Control of these viruses makes use of integrated pest management approaches....

  15. New Case of Local Zika Infection Reported in Florida

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160624.html New Case of Local Zika Infection Reported in Florida ... most instances these did not amount to a new outbreak, Frieden explained. "For every nine or so ...

  16. Cutting Electricity Costs in Miami-Dade County, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, Carlos; Oliver, LeAnn; Kronheim, Steve; Gonzalez, Jorge; Woods-Richardson, Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    Miami-Dade County, Florida will be piping methane gas from their regional landfill to the adjacent wastewater plant to generate a significant portion of the massive facility's future electricity needs.

  17. 33 CFR 165.728 - Jacksonville, Florida-safety zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... zones contained in 33 CFR 165.23 apply. (d) The Captain of the Port Jacksonville, Florida will activate... end of Transit Shed #2 to the east shore of Alligator Creek at Blount Island Terminal,...

  18. 33 CFR 165.728 - Jacksonville, Florida-safety zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... zones contained in 33 CFR 165.23 apply. (d) The Captain of the Port Jacksonville, Florida will activate... end of Transit Shed #2 to the east shore of Alligator Creek at Blount Island Terminal,...

  19. POPS IN ALLIGATOR LIVERS FROM LAKE APOPKA, FLORIDA, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reproductive disorders in American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) inhabiting Lake Apopka, Florida, have been observed for several years. Such disorders are hypothesized to be caused by endocrine disrupting contaminants occurring in the Lake due to pesticide spills and ...

  20. 33 CFR 165.728 - Jacksonville, Florida-safety zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... zones contained in 33 CFR 165.23 apply. (d) The Captain of the Port Jacksonville, Florida will activate... end of Transit Shed #2 to the east shore of Alligator Creek at Blount Island Terminal,...

  1. 33 CFR 165.728 - Jacksonville, Florida-safety zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... zones contained in 33 CFR 165.23 apply. (d) The Captain of the Port Jacksonville, Florida will activate... end of Transit Shed #2 to the east shore of Alligator Creek at Blount Island Terminal,...

  2. The 47th annual Florida pesticide residue workshop

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is an introductory article to a special section of the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry consisting of publications from the 47th Annual Florida Pesticide Residue Workshop held in St. Pete Beach, FL in July of 2010....

  3. Euthyrhynchus floridanus (L.) (Hemiptera: pentatomidae), a predacious insect in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Euthryrhynchus floridanus is a predaceous stink bug that occurs in Florida. The purpose of this article is to present a good photograph of the insect along with a brief description of its life habits....

  4. REPRODUCTIVE SEASONALITY OF THE MALE FLORIDA GAR, LEPISOSTEUS PLATYRHINCUS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study was to characterize the reproductive seasonality of a wild population of male Florida gar, Lepisosteus platyrhincus. We measured the gonadosomatic index, reproductive stage of the testes, seminiferous tubule area, and plasma concentrations of testoster...

  5. FLORIDA "STATE" MIGRANT HEALTH PROJECT, ANNUAL PROGRESS REPORT 1964 - 1965.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Board of Health, Jacksonville.

    THE REPORT DISCUSSES THE HOUSING, HEALTH SERVICES, SANITATION, AND HEALTH EDUCATION PROGRAMS FOR MIGRANT AGRICULTURAL WORKERS IN FLORIDA. IT STATES THE OBJECTIVES OF EACH PROGRAM, PROGRAM ACCOMPLISHMENTS DURING THE YEAR, AND SUGGESTIONS FOR FUTURE PROGRAMS. (CL)

  6. SEASONAL DOMINANCE OF CYANOBACTERIA IN PENSACOLA BAY, FLORIDA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was conducted during 1999-2000 in Pensacola Bay, Florida, USA to characterize the seasonal dynamics of nutrients, phytoplankton, and bacterioplankton. Monthly samples were collected from 5 sites spanning the salinity gradient. Abundances of non-heterocystous chroococcoid...

  7. America's First Eco-Sustainable City Destiny, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatewood, Roz

    2009-07-01

    Destiny, Florida is a new large-scale eco-community based on the principles of sustainability to be located in the heart of Central Florida; a project of scale and scope and a clean slate that affords for a true paradigm shift to take place on how we develop sustainable communities for the future. The project involves 41,300 acres or 64 square miles.

  8. Croaking gourami, Trichopsis vittata (Cuvier, 1831), in Florida, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schofield, Pamela J.; Pecora, Darren J.

    2013-01-01

    The croaking gourami, Trichopsis vittata, is documented from wetland habitats in southern Florida. This species was previously recorded from the same area over 15 years ago, but was considered extirpated. The rediscovery of a reproducing population of this species highlights the dearth of information available regarding the dozens of non-native fishes in Florida, as well as the need for additional research and monitoring.

  9. Processes influencing rainfall deposition of mercury in Florida.

    PubMed

    Guentzel, J L; Landing, W M; Gill, G A; Pollman, C D

    2001-03-01

    The primary goal of the Florida Atmospheric Mercury Study (FAMS) was to quantify the atmospheric deposition of Hg throughout Florida. Monthly integrated precipitation and weekly integrated particulate samples were collected at 10 sites in Florida for periods ranging from 2 to 5 yr. The monthly rainfall across the state and the concentrations of Hg in wet-only and bulk deposition increased by a factor of 2-3 during the summertime "wet season" (May-October). These parallel increases in rainfall amount and Hg concentration resulted in 5-8-fold increases in rainfall Hg deposition during the wet season. The annual volume-weighted Hg concentrations ranged from 14 +/- 2 to 16 +/- 2 ng/L across southern Florida, and the annual rainfall Hg fluxes ranged from 20 +/- 3 to 23 +/- 3 micrograms m-2 yr-1. The weekly integrated particulate Hg concentrations in southern Florida were low (4.9-9.3 pg/m3) and did not exhibit strong seasonal variability. Considering the pronounced seasonal pattern in rainfall Hg deposition, the relatively uniform summertime rainfall Hg concentrations, and the low concentrations of particulate Hg, we conclude that processes other than particulate Hg transport and scavenging govern rainfall Hg deposition in southern Florida. We hypothesize that long-range transport of reactive gaseous Hg (RGM) species coupled with strong convective thunderstorm activity during the summertime represents > 50% of the Hg deposition in southern Florida. Model calculations indicate that local anthropogenic particulate Hg and RGM emissions account for 30-46% of the summertime rainfall Hg deposition across the southern Florida peninsula. PMID:11351528

  10. Gastrointestinal Emergency Room Admissions and Florida Red Tide Blooms.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Bean, Judy A; Fleming, Lora E; Kirkpatrick, Gary; Grief, Lynne; Nierenberg, Kate; Reich, Andrew; Watkins, Sharon; Naar, Jerome

    2010-01-01

    Human exposure to brevetoxins during Florida red tide blooms formed by Karenia brevis has been documented to cause acute gastrointestinal, neurologic, and respiratory health effects.. Traditionally, the routes of brevetoxin exposure have been through the consumption of contaminated bivalve shellfish and the inhalation of contaminated aerosols. However, recent studies using more sensitive methods have demonstrated the presence of brevetoxins in many components of the aquatic food web which may indicate potential alternative routes for human exposure.This study examined whether the presence of a Florida red tide bloom affected the rates of admission for a gastrointestinal diagnosis to a hospital emergency room in Sarasota, FL. The rates of gastrointestinal diagnoses admissions were compared for a 3-month time period in 2001 when Florida red tide bloom was present onshore to the same 3-month period in 2002 when no Florida red tide bloom occurred. A significant 40% increase in the total number of gastrointestinal emergency room admissions for the Florida red tide bloom period was found compared to the non red tide period.These results suggest that the healthcare community may experience a significant and unrecognized impact from patients needing emergency medical care for gastrointestinal illnesses during Florida red tide blooms. Thus, additional studies characterizing the potential sources of exposure to the toxins, as well as the dose/effect relationship of brevetoxin exposure, should be undertaken.

  11. Mercury concentrations in tissues of Florida bald eagles

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, P.B.; Wood, J.M.; White, J.H.

    1996-01-01

    We collected 48 blood and 61 feather samples from nestling bald eagles at 42 nests and adult feather samples from 20 nests in north and central Florida during 1991-93. We obtained 32 liver, 10 feather, and 5 blood samples from 33 eagle carcasses recovered in Florida during 1987-93. For nestlings, mercury concentrations in blood (GM = 0.16 ppm wet wt) and feather (GM = 3.23 ppm) samples were correlated (r = 0.69, P = 0.0001). Although nestlings had lower mercury concentrations in feathers than did adults (GM = 6.03 ppm), the feather mercury levels in nestlings and adults from the same nest were correlated (r = 0.63, P < 0.02). Mercury concentrations in blood of captive adult eagles (GM = 0.23 ppm) was similar to Florida nestlings but some Florida nestlings had blood mercury concentrations up to 0.61 ppm, more than twice as high as captive adults. Feather mercury concentrations in both nestlings and adults exceeded those in captive eagles, but concentrations in all tissues were similar to, or lower than, those in bald eagles from other wild populations. Although mercury concentrations in Florida eagles are below those that cause mortality, they are in the range of concentrations that can cause behavioral changes or reduce reproduction. We recommend periodic monitoring of mercury in Florida bald eagles for early detection of mercury increases before negative effects on reproduction occur. 26 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Water withdrawals, use, and trends in Florida, 1985

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marella, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    Total water withdrawn for use in Florida for 1985, in million gal/day, was 17,057 of which 6,259, or nearly 37%, was freshwater and 10,798 was saline. The majority of freshwater withdrawn was groundwater (64%) and the majority of saline water withdrawn was surface water (99%). Thermoelectric power generation accounted for more than 99% of saline water withdrawals. Agricultural irrigation accounted for the majority of freshwater withdrawals for both groundwater (41%) and surface water (60%) in 1985. Between 1975-85, Florida 's population increased by nearly 3 million people; tourism increased by nearly 13 million visitors; irrigated agricultural acreage increased by 70,000; freshwater used to support those activities increased by almost 388 million gal/day (excluding fresh surface-water withdrawals for thermoelectric power generation); and fresh groundwater withdrawals increased 718 million gal/day. Groundwater accounted for 64% of Florida 's total freshwater use , up from 51% in 1980 and 48% in 1975. Florida ranked sixth in the Nation in groundwater withdrawals for 1985 with more than 4 ,000 million gal/day withdrawn. Groundwater is the primary source of freshwater in Florida because it is readily available and generally is suitable for most uses. The Floridan aquifer system, which underlies the entire State, supplied the majority (62%) of groundwater in Florida for 1985. In contrast to groundwater, withdrawals of surface water declined between 1975-85. (USGS)

  13. Large-scale predation by river otters (Lontra canadensis) on Florida cooter (Pseudemys floridana) and Florida softshell turtles (Apalone ferox).

    PubMed

    Stacy, Brian A; Wolf, Dan A; Wellehan, James F X

    2014-10-01

    Abstract We observed predation by river otters (Lontra canadensis) on large numbers of Florida cooter (Pseudemys floridana) and Florida softshell turtles (Apalone ferox) in two small lakes in North Central Florida, USA during a period of unusually low water levels. Carcasses were strewn on the shoreline and accumulated around floating boat docks, where some residents observed turtles being killed. We found 76 carcasses, including predominantly skeletons, and two live, severely injured turtles from one lake; however, numerous remains undoubtedly were unrecovered. The otters frequently eviscerated the turtles and removed the head and one or more appendages, including the phallus of mature males. In skeletal remains, injuries inflicted by otters were nonspecific, indistinguishable from damage caused by scavengers, or easily missed in incomplete carcasses. This report of large-scale mortality of freshwater turtles in Florida suggests that otters could have a significant impact on local turtle populations.

  14. Large-scale predation by river otters (Lontra canadensis) on Florida cooter (Pseudemys floridana) and Florida softshell turtles (Apalone ferox).

    PubMed

    Stacy, Brian A; Wolf, Dan A; Wellehan, James F X

    2014-10-01

    Abstract We observed predation by river otters (Lontra canadensis) on large numbers of Florida cooter (Pseudemys floridana) and Florida softshell turtles (Apalone ferox) in two small lakes in North Central Florida, USA during a period of unusually low water levels. Carcasses were strewn on the shoreline and accumulated around floating boat docks, where some residents observed turtles being killed. We found 76 carcasses, including predominantly skeletons, and two live, severely injured turtles from one lake; however, numerous remains undoubtedly were unrecovered. The otters frequently eviscerated the turtles and removed the head and one or more appendages, including the phallus of mature males. In skeletal remains, injuries inflicted by otters were nonspecific, indistinguishable from damage caused by scavengers, or easily missed in incomplete carcasses. This report of large-scale mortality of freshwater turtles in Florida suggests that otters could have a significant impact on local turtle populations. PMID:25098299

  15. Florida Current meandering and evolution of cyclonic eddies along the Florida Keys Reef Tract: Are they interconnected?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourafalou, Vassiliki H.; Kang, Heesook

    2012-05-01

    The Florida Current (FC) is the branch of the Gulf Stream system within the Straits of Florida, connected to the Loop Current in the Gulf of Mexico. Cyclonic, cold-core eddies travel along this oceanic current system, entering the Straits of Florida in the vicinity of the Dry Tortugas and evolving along the Florida Keys island chain and coral reefs. The development of the high-resolution (˜900 m) hydrodynamic model Florida Straits, South Florida, and Florida Keys (FKeyS), nested within a Gulf of Mexico model (both based on the Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model), has enabled new findings in eddy variability. Together with high-resolution (˜1 km) ocean color imagery, multiyear model archives have been employed to study the changes in the position of the FC front and the relationship with eddy evolution. It was found that eddy interactions and transformations are common, with multiple eddy cells within individual eddies or new cells emerging from existing vortices. Features in the Dry Tortugas area previously thought to be semipermanent are shown to be frequently transformed and/or replenished. A mechanism of local cyclogenesis is also proposed. Incoming eddies interact with and influence the downstream propagation of previous eddies. Systems of eddies, rather than individual vortices, can form the elongated features observed between the FC front and the Atlantic Florida Keys Shelf. Topography plays an important role in eddy dissipation or growth. A close synergy between eddy evolution and FC meandering is revealed. The results have implications on the connectivity of remote coastal and reef ecosystems.

  16. Age, differential growth and mortality rates in unexploited populations of Florida gar, an apex predator in the Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murie, D.J.; Parkyn, D.C.; Nico, L.G.; Herod, J.J.; Loftus, W.F.

    2009-01-01

    Florida gar, Lepisosteus platyrhincus DeKay, were sampled in two canal systems in south Florida during 2000-2001 to estimate age, growth and mortality as part of the Everglades ecosystem-restoration effort. Tamiami (C-4) and L-31W canal systems had direct connections to natural wetlands of the Everglades and harboured large Florida gar populations. Of 476 fish aged, maximum ages were 19 and 10years for females and males, respectively. Maximum sizes were also larger for females compared with males (817 vs 602 mm total length). Overall, female Florida gar from both Tamiami and L-31W were larger at age than males from L-31W that, in turn, were larger at any given age than males from Tamiami. Females also had lower rates of annual mortality (Z = 0.21) than males from L-31W (Z = 0.31) or males from Tamiami (Z = 0.54). As a large and long-lived apex predator in the Everglades, Florida gar may structure lower trophic levels. Regional- and sex-specific population parameters for Florida gar will contribute to the simulation models designed to evaluate Everglades restoration alternatives. ?? 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Water-resources data for Alachua, Bradford, Clay, and Union Counties, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, William E.; Musgrove, Rufus H.; Menke, Clarence G.; Cagle, Joseph W.

    1964-01-01

    A study of the water resources of Alachua, Bradford, Clay, and Union counties, Florida (fig. 1), was made by the Water Resources Division of the U. S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Florida Geological Survey during the period 1957-61. The results of this study will be published by the Florida Geological Survey in the following reports by William E. Clark, Rufus H. Musgrove, Clarence G. Menke, and Joseph W. Cagle, Jr.: "Interim Report on the Water Resources of Alachua, Bradford, Clay, and Union Counties, Florida," "Water Resources of Alachua, Bradford, Clay, and Union Counties, Florida," and "Hydrology of Brooklyn Lake, near Keystone Heights, Florida."

  18. Hydrology of Hunters Lake, Hernando County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henderson, S.E.

    1986-01-01

    The size and shape of Hunters Lake, Florida has been significantly altered by development of the surrounding Spring Hill residential community. The lake is the largest in Hernando County, enlarged by lakeshore excavation and connection to nearby ponds to an area of 360 acres at an average stage of 17.2 ft above sea level. Hunters Lake is naturally a closed lake, but development of Spring Hill has resulted in a surface water outflow from the lake in its southwest corner. Inflow to the lake could occur on the east side during extreme high-water periods. The karst terrain of the Hunters Lake area is internally drained through permeable soils, depressions, and sinkholes, and natural surface drainage is absent. The underlying Floridan aquifer system is unconfined except locally near coastal springs. Flow in the groundwater system is to the west regionally and to the southwest in the immediate area of Hunters Lake. Water level gradients in the groundwater system increase from 1.4 ft/mi east of the lake to about 8 ft/mi southwest of the lake. Hunters Lake is hydraulically connected to the groundwater system, receiving groundwater on the northeast side and losing water to the groundwater system on the southwest side. This close relationship with the groundwater system is demonstrated by graphical and numerical comparison of Hunters Lake stage with water levels in nearby groundwater sites. During 1965-84, the stage of Hunters Lake fluctuated between 12.48 and 20.7 ft above sea level. Because area lakes are all directly affected by groundwater levels, they also show a close relationship with water levels in Hunters Lake. Analysis of water quality data for Hunters Lake indicates that the water of the lake is a soft calcium bicarbonate type with ionic concentrations higher than in water from nearby shallow wells and lower than in water from the Upper Floridan aquifer. Samples collected in 1981-1983 indicate slightly higher levels of ionic concentration than in 1965

  19. Deglacial climate variability in central Florida, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Willard, D.A.; Bernhardt, C.E.; Brooks, G.R.; Cronin, T. M.; Edgar, T.; Larson, R.

    2007-01-01

    Pollen and ostracode evidence from lacustrine sediments underlying modern Tampa Bay, Florida, document frequent and abrupt climatic and hydrological events superimposed on deglacial warming in the subtropics. Radiocarbon chronology on well-preserved mollusk shells and pollen residue from core MD02-2579 documents continuous sedimentation in a variety of non-marine habitats in a karst-controlled basin from 20 ka to 11.5 ka. During the last glacial maximum (LGM), much drier and cooler-than-modern conditions are indicated by pollen assemblages enriched in Chenopodiaceae and Carya, with rare Pinus (Pinus pollen increased to 20–40% during the warming of the initial deglaciation (∼ 17.2 ka), reaching near modern abundance (60–80%) during warmer, moister climates of the Bølling/Allerød interval (14.7–12.9 ka). Within the Bølling/Allerød, centennial-scale dry events corresponding to the Older Dryas and Intra-Allerød Cold Period indicate rapid vegetation response (

  20. Changing Salinity Patterns in Biscayne Bay, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2004-01-01

    Biscayne Bay, Fla., is a 428-square-mile (1,109-square-kilometer) subtropical estuarine ecosystem that includes Biscayne National Park, the largest marine park in the U.S. national park system (fig. 1). The bay began forming between 5,000 and 3,000 years ago as sea level rose and southern Florida was flooded. Throughout most of its history, the pristine waters of the bay supported abundant and diverse fauna and flora, and the bay was a nursery for the adjacent coral-reef and marine ecosystems. In the 20th century, urbanization of the Miami-Dade County area profoundly affected the environment of the bay. Construction of powerplants, water-treatment plants, and solid-waste sites and large-scale development along the shoreline stressed the ecosystem. Biscayne National Monument was established in 1968 to ?preserve and protect for the education, inspiration, recreation and enjoyment of present and future generations a rare combination of terrestrial, marine, and amphibious life in a tropical setting of great natural beauty? (Public Law 90?606). The monument was enlarged in 1980 and designated a national park.

  1. Low-flow characteristics of Florida streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rumenik, R.P.

    1996-01-01

    Knowledge of the low-flow characteristics of Florida streams and rivers is essential in planning for the availability of adequate quantities of water for commercial- and public-water supply, agricultural irrigation, artificial recharge, and the dilution of waste discharge. This report provides low-flow characteristics for 216 continuous-record gaging stations using frequency analysis techniques. Included are low-flow frequency characteristics for 143 unregulated, gaging stations; and sample percentiles for 32 stations that were subject to regulation or diversion, and sample percentiles for 41 stations, regulated and unregulated, that exhibited significant trends in the annual low-flow time series. Estimates of low-flow frequency characteristics are provided for 242 partial-record stations and miscellaneous sites based on correlations with daily mean discharges at continuous-record stations. Low-flow measurement data are available at approximately 1,300 continuous-record gaging stations, partial- record stations and miscellaneous sites. Historic low-flow measurement data are accessible through the U.S. Geological Survey Automatic Data Processing System.

  2. Microbial degradation of microcystin in Florida's freshwaters.

    PubMed

    Ramani, A; Rein, K; Shetty, K G; Jayachandran, K

    2012-02-01

    Presence of microcystin (MC), a predominant freshwater algal toxin and a suspected liver carcinogen, in Florida's freshwaters poses serious health threat to humans and aquatic species. Being recalcitrant to conventional physical and chemical water treatment methods, biological methods of MC removal is widely researched. Water samples collected from five sites of Lake Okeechobee (LO) frequently exposed to toxic Microcystis blooms were used as inoculum for enrichment with microcystin LR (MC-LR) supplied as sole C and N source. After 20 days incubation, MC levels were analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). A bacterial consortium consisting of two isolates DC7 and DC8 from the Indian Prairie Canal sample showed over 74% toxin degradation at the end of day 20. Optimal temperature requirement for biodegradation was identified and phosphorus levels did not affect the MC biodegradation. Based on 16S rRNA sequence similarity the isolate DC8 was found to have a match with Microbacterium sp. and the DC7 isolate with Rhizobium gallicum (AY972457). PMID:21611743

  3. Hydrology of Lake Tohopekaliga, Osceola County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phelps, G.G.

    1982-01-01

    Lake Tohopekaliga, one of the major lakes in central Florida, provides flood control in the upper Kissimmee River basin, recreation for fishermen and boaters, water for live-stock, esthetic surroundings for homesites, and serves as a receiving body for treated effluent from municipal sewage treatment plants. The purpose of this map report is to provide a general reconnaissance of the lake, based primarily on existing geologic , hydrologic and water-quality data. The lake has a surface area of about 30 square miles and a mean depth of about 5 feet. Maximum depth measured was about 13 feet. Inflow to the lake comes from Shingle Creek and St. Cloud canal and outflow is through the South-port canal. Regulation of lake levels for flood control began in the early 1960 's and has resulted in a decrease in the range of lake stage of about 3 feet. Concentrations of pesticide residues in lake bottom sediments do not appear to have increased from 1972 to 1980. The lake has abundant aquatic vegetation, the amount and extent of which varies with fluctuating water levels. Water-quality data collected between 1954-77 are summarized in the report and additional data collected in 1980 are also shown. The range of plant nutrient concentrations measured in May 1980 are: Total organic nitrogen 0.71-2.2 milligrams per liter. Most water-quality parameters vary from one area of the lake to another because of restricted areal circulation due to the shape of the lake. (USGS)

  4. Lungworms of feral swine in Florida.

    PubMed

    Forrester, D J; Porter, J H; Belden, R C; Frankenberger, W B

    1982-12-01

    Metastrongylus apri, M salmi, and M pudendotectus were found in 94%, 76%, and 64%, respectively, of 90 feral swine from a study area in southern Florida. The mean number of worms per infected animal was 155, with a range of 1-1,980 (1 or more species). Metastrongylus apri was found singly or in combination with 1 or both of the other species. Single or concurrent infections of M salmi and M pudendotectus were not found. Male hogs had significantly (P less than 0.05) higher intensities of M apri infection. Juvenile animals were infected with M apri only, but subadults and adults were infected with all 3 species. Hogs examined during October, November, and December had significantly (P less than 0.05) higher intensities of infection of all 3 species, compared with hogs examined at other times of the year. There were significant (P less than 0.05) interactions between host sex, host age, and season for intensities of infection with M pudendotectus.

  5. Estimated water use in Florida, 1977

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leach, Stanley D.; Healy, Henry G.

    1980-01-01

    During 1977, an average of 21,466 million gallons of water was withdrawn daily for use in Florida--an increase of 6,153 million gallons per day since 1970. The 1977 daily use was 14,812 million gallons of saline water and 6,654 million gallons of freshwater. Most of the saline water, largely surface water, was pumped from tidal estuaries. Only 107.6 million gallons per day of saline water--less than 1 percent--was obtained from wells. Thermoelectric power generation used virtually all the saline water, 14,738 million gallons per day, whereas all other industrial uses were only 73 million gallons of saline water per day. The freshwater supply was almost equally divided between ground water (53 percent) and surface water (47 percent). Of the total freshwater used, 43 percent was for irrigation--an average of 2,873 million gallons of freshwater daily on the average. The remaining daily use of freshwater was 21 percent for thermoelectric power generation, 19 percent for public supply; 14 percent for industrial use other than thermoelectric power generation; and 3 percent for domestic and rural use. Irrigation was also responsible for the greatest consumption during 1977, with 1,255 million gallons consumed daily which also includes 192 million gallons per day conveyance loss. (Kosco-USGS)

  6. Hydrologic conditions in Broward County, Florida, 1976

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beaven, T.R.

    1979-01-01

    During the 1976 water year, rainfall was 3.6 percent below average in Broward County, Fla. Water levels in the Pompano Beach and Dixie well fields were lower during the peak of the 1976 dry season than the peak of the record low dry season in 1971. Flow in the major canals was variable during the 1976 water year compared to 1962-75 averages. Flows in Cypress Creek, Middle River, and Snake Creek at S-29 were higher than the average. Flows in Plantation Canal and South New River were equal to the 1962-75 averages, while Hillsboro, North New River, and Snake Creek at N.W. 67th Avenue were below the long-term averages. The concentrations of principal mineral constituents in surface water in Broward County were within limits established by Florida State Water Standards, with the exception of iron at one station. Total coliforms were equal to or within permissible limits for class III water and waters for public supply in Broward canals at all sites during the 1976 water year. Fecal coliform did not exceed the permissible limit for public water supply at any of the sites during the 1976 water year. (Kosco-USGS)

  7. Trace gas emissions from burning Florida wetlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cofer, Wesley R., III; Levine, Joel S.; Lebel, Peter J.; Winstead, Edward L.; Koller, Albert M., Jr.; Hinkle, C. Ross

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of biomass burn-produced trace gases were obtained using a helicopter at low altitudes above burning Florida wetlands on November 9, 1987, and from both helicopter and light-aircraft samplings on November 7, 1988. Carbon dioxide normalized emission ratios for carbon monoxide, hydrogen, methane, total nonmethane hydrocarbons, and nitrous oxide were obtained over burning graminoid wetlands consisting primarily of Spartina bakeri and Juncus roemerianus. Some interspersed scrub oak and saw palmetto were also burned. No significant differences were observed in the emission ratios determined for these gases from samples collected over flaming, mixed, and smoldering phases of combustion during the 1987 fire. Combustion-categorized differences in emission ratios were small for the 1988 fire. Combustion efficiency was relatively good (low emission ratios for reduced gases) for both fires. It is believed that the consistently low emission ratios were a unique result of graminoid wetlands fires, in which the grasses and rushes burned rapidly down to standing water and were quickly extinguished. Consequently, the efficiency of the combustion was good and the amount and duration of smoldering combustion was greatly deminished.

  8. Hydrology of Lake Butler, Orange County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smoot, James L.; Schiffer, Donna M.

    1984-01-01

    Lake Butler is one of the lakes that collectively make up the Butler chain of lakes in the headwaters of the Kissimmee River, Florida. The bottom configuration of the lake is typical of relict karst features formed during lower stages in sea level. The top of the Floridan aquifer is 50 to 100 feet below the land surface. The drainage area of Lake Butler is approximately 14.5 sq mi and is comprised of sub-basins of other lakes in the vicinity. Surface outflow from Lake Butler is generally southward to Cypress Creek, a tributary of the Kissimmee River. The extremes in lake stage for the period 1933-81 are 94.67 ft on June 23, 1981 and 101.78 ft on September 13, 1960. The median lake stage for this period was 99.28 ft above sea level. The quality of water in Lake Butler is excellent, based on studies of physical, chemical, and biological conditions by the Orange County Pollution Control Department. The lake water is slightly acidic and soft (48 mg/L hardness as calcium carbonate). Pesticides in water were below detection levels at two sites sampled in the lake, but were detected in the bottom sediments. (USGS)

  9. Water-use computer programs for Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geiger, L.H.

    1984-01-01

    Using U.S. Geological Survey computer programs L149-L153, this report shows how to process water-use data for the functional water-use categories: public supply, rural supply, industrial self-supplied, irrigation, and thermo-electric power generation. The programs are used to selectively retrieve entries and list them in a format suitable for publication. Instructions are given for coding cards to produce tables of water-use data for each of the functional use categories. These cards contain entries that identify a particular water-use data-collection site in Florida. Entries on the cards include location information such as county code, water management district code, hydrologic unit code, and, where applicable, a site name and number. Annual and monthly pumpage is included. These entries are shown with several different headings; for example, surface water or ground water, freshwater or saline pumpages, or consumptive use. All the programs use a similar approach; however, the actual programs differ with each functional water-use category and are discussed separately. Data prepared for these programs can also be processed by the National Water-Use Data System. (USGS)

  10. Reassessment of tectonic style and crustal character in foundation of south Florida and western Florida shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, M.M.; Martin, R.G.; Foote, R.Q.; Applegate, V.

    1989-03-01

    Interpretation of seismic reflection data forces a number of constraints on their initial working hypothesis regarding the nature of the crust beneath the Western Florida Shelf. Rather than blocks of pre-Mesozoic continental crust separated by zones of extension or spreading underlain by extensively refitted, transitional, or Jurassic oceanic crust, seismic and well data indicate a vast expanse of paleozoic rock that essentially underlies the entire platform north of 26/degrees/N. Highs and lows (arches and basins) within this region do exist, but both positive and negative areas appear to be underlain by substantial thicknesses of predominantly sedimentary or metasedimentary Paleozoic rocks. It follows that if any oceanic crust is present in the foundation of the Western Florida Shelf, it must be Paleozoic or older in age and must lie below the depth of penetration of their 8-sec records. Rift-style faulting of pre-Jurassic rocks is most common in the Apalachicola basin and northern part of the Middle Ground arch. This style of faulting, consisting of half graben formation, is not restricted to basinal settings nor to Late Triassic-Early Jurassic age of formation. One of the best examples seen on their records appears to be Paleozoic in age. However, enough of the fault activity is identified as Late Triassic to Early Jurassic to justify the inference that this region was involved in the initiation of the Atlantic-Gulf sea-floor spreading event.

  11. Health-hazard evaluation report MHETA 88-020-1908, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Kullman, G.J.; Sanderson, W.T.

    1988-06-01

    In response to a request from the University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida, an investigation was made of complaints among workers of chemical odors and irritation of the eyes, nose, and throat in the MHH Building 104. A questionnaire was completed by 67% of the 61 employees in this building. The most-frequent complaints included headaches, sinus problems, and stuffy indoor air in addition to the other complaints noted above. Two distinct odors were noted in these areas, one of which was linked to the carpet and carpet glue used. The second odor, a musty smell, was not entirely pinned down, but may have resulted from an inadequate ventilation system. None of the gases or vapors sampled were above any of the occupational limits. The authors conclude that low-level indoor air pollutants from building materials and the suboptimal ventilation system may explain symptoms reported by workers. The authors recommend that changes should be made in the ventilation system, and replacing carpet and carpet glue in some areas should be considered. Water leaks should be repaired promptly, and water-damaged materials should be sanitized or replaced.

  12. A habitat assessment for Florida panther population expansion into central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thatcher, C.A.; Van Manen, F.T.; Clark, J.D.

    2009-01-01

    One of the goals of the Florida panther (Puma concolor coryi) recovery plan is to expand panther range north of the Caloosahatchee River in central Florida. Our objective was to evaluate the potential of that region to support panthers. We used a geographic information system and the Mahalanobis distance statistic to develop a habitat model based on landscape characteristics associated with panther home ranges. We used cross-validation and an independent telemetry data set to test the habitat model. We also conducted a least-cost path analysis to identify potential habitat linkages and to provide a relative measure of connectivity among habitat patches. Variables in our model were paved road density, major highways, human population density, percentage of the area permanently or semipermanently flooded, and percentage of the area in natural land cover. Our model clearly identified habitat typical of that found within panther home ranges based on model testing with recent telemetry data. We identified 4 potential translocation sites that may support a total of approximately 36 panthers. Although we identified potential habitat linkages, our least-cost path analyses highlighted the extreme isolation of panther habitat in portions of the study area. Human intervention will likely be required if the goal is to establish female panthers north of the Caloosahatchee in the near term.

  13. U.S. Geological Survey Program on the South Florida Ecosystem; proceedings of South Florida Restoration Science Forum, May 17-19, 1999, Boca Raton, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gerould, Sarah; Higer, Aaron

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the forum is to highlight the powerful connection between science and management decisions in restoration efforts. The public's investment in science is paying off in support of better management decisions and restoration of imperiled south Florida Ecosystems, including the internationally recognized, globally significant Everglades. The forum affords a unique opportunity for elected officials and other policy- and decision makers, along with the general public, to see--under one roof--highlights of the most significant restoration science and management efforts underway. The forum promotes the link between science and management. Scientists and decisionmakers will come together to discuss the needs of each in order to ensure that plans for restoration are based in science and are the most cost effective and highest quality possible. Continued vigilance over south Florida ecosystems is essential to prevent further harm and to restore them. Representatives from numerous federal, state, local, and nongovernmental entities are organizing the forum for the Science Coordination Team of the South Florida Ecosystem Working Group. The U.S. Geological Survey and the South Florida Water Management District are the primary hosts of the forum.

  14. CONTRIBUTIONS OF BUILDING MATERIALS TO INDOOR RADON LEVELS IN FLORIDA BUILDINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report documents work to characterize potential radon sources in concretes and recommend related changes to Florida's building materials radium standard. (NOTE: The Florida Standard for Radon-resistant Residential Building Construction originally contained a provision to limi...

  15. 77 FR 21093 - Seminole Electric Cooperative, Inc. v. Florida Power & Light Company; Notice of Complaint

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Seminole Electric Cooperative, Inc. v. Florida Power & Light Company; Notice... Cooperative, Inc. (Complainant) filed a complaint alleging that Florida Power & Light Company...

  16. 75 FR 3444 - Availability of Seats for the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-21

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Availability of Seats for the Florida Keys National Marine... Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council: Conservation and Environment (alternate), Fishing-- Commercial--Shell/Scale (alternate), Submerged Cultural Resources (alternate), and Tourism--Upper...

  17. Shifting Diagnostic Systems for Defining Intellectual Disability in Death Penalty Cases: Hall vs. Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mukherjee, Mina; Westphal, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The case of Hall vs. Florida tested Florida's so called "bright line rule" in determining intellectual disability in capital cases. The Supreme Court Decision reflects a more general trend from categorical to dimensional approaches in psychiatric diagnostic systems.

  18. 78 FR 57099 - Avocados Grown in South Florida; Increased Assessment Rate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-17

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 915 Avocados Grown in South Florida... proposed rule would increase the assessment rate established for the Avocado Administrative Committee... of Florida avocados handled. The Committee locally administers the marketing order, which...

  19. Shifting Diagnostic Systems for Defining Intellectual Disability in Death Penalty Cases: Hall vs. Florida.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Mina; Westphal, Alexander

    2015-07-01

    The case of Hall vs. Florida tested Florida's so called "bright line rule" in determining intellectual disability in capital cases. The Supreme Court Decision reflects a more general trend from categorical to dimensional approaches in psychiatric diagnostic systems.

  20. Shifting Diagnostic Systems for Defining Intellectual Disability in Death Penalty Cases: Hall vs. Florida.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Mina; Westphal, Alexander

    2015-07-01

    The case of Hall vs. Florida tested Florida's so called "bright line rule" in determining intellectual disability in capital cases. The Supreme Court Decision reflects a more general trend from categorical to dimensional approaches in psychiatric diagnostic systems. PMID:25663625

  1. Scleria lacustris (Cyperaceae), an aquatic and wetland sedge introduced to Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacono, C.C.

    2001-01-01

    A non-native species of Scleria, S. lacustris is reported from six counties and three major hydrologic regions in Florida. Biogeography and habitat in Florida are addressed. A description, key features and illustration are presented.

  2. Genetic introgression and the survival of Florida panther kittens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hostetler, Jeffrey A.; Onorato, David P.; Nichols, James D.; Johnson, Warren E.; Roelke, Melody E.; O'Brien, Stephen J.; Jansen, Deborah; Oli, Madan K.

    2010-01-01

    Estimates of survival for the young of a species are critical for population models. These models can often be improved by determining the effects of management actions and population abundance on this demographic parameter. We used multiple sources of data collected during 1982-2008 and a live-recapture dead-recovery modeling framework to estimate and model survival of Florida panther (Puma concolor coryi) kittens (age 0-1 year). Overall, annual survival of Florida panther kittens was 0.323 + or - 0.071 (SE), which was lower than estimates used in previous population models. In 1995, female pumas from Texas (P. c. stanleyana) were released into occupied panther range as part of an intentional introgression program to restore genetic variability. We found that kitten survival generally increased with degree of admixture: F1 admixed and backcrossed to Texas kittens survived better than canonical Florida panther and backcrossed to canonical kittens. Average heterozygosity positively influenced kitten and older panther survival, whereas index of panther abundance negatively influenced kitten survival. Our results provide strong evidence for the positive population-level impact of genetic introgression on Florida panthers. Our approach to integrate data from multiple sources was effective at improving robustness as well as precision of estimates of Florida panther kitten survival, and can be useful in estimating vital rates for other elusive species with sparse data.

  3. Hurricanes accelerated the Florida-Bahamas lionfish invasion.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Matthew W; Purkis, Sam J

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we demonstrate how perturbations to the Florida Current caused by hurricanes are relevant to the spread of invasive lionfish from Florida to the Bahamas. Without such perturbations, this current represents a potential barrier to the transport of planktonic lionfish eggs and larvae across the Straits of Florida. We further show that once lionfish became established in the Bahamas, hurricanes significantly hastened their spread through the island chain. We gain these insights through: (1) an analysis of the direction and velocity of simulated ocean currents during the passage of hurricanes through the Florida Straits and (2) the development of a biophysical model that incorporates the tolerances of lionfish to ocean climate, their reproductive strategy, and duration that the larvae remain viable in the water column. On the basis of this work, we identify 23 occasions between the years 1992 and 2006 in which lionfish were provided the opportunity to breach the Florida Current. We also find that hurricanes during this period increased the rate of spread of lionfish through the Bahamas by more than 45% and magnified its population by at least 15%. Beyond invasive lionfish, we suggest that extreme weather events such as hurricanes likely help to homogenize the gene pool for all Caribbean marine species susceptible to transport.

  4. Serosurvey of leptospirosis in feral hogs (Sus scrofa) in Florida.

    PubMed

    Chatfield, Jenifer; Milleson, Michael; Stoddard, Robyn; Bui, Duy M; Galloway, Renee

    2013-06-01

    Leptospira is a global pathogen of emerging public health importance in both developing and industrialized nations and can infect almost all mammalian species, including humans. As suburbanization and the popularity of outdoor recreational activities increases, so do human-wildlife and companion animal-wildlife interfaces. Florida offers a tropical climate favorable for outdoor activities and a semirural landscape that sustains an abundant feral hog population. Because no survey ofleptospirosis in feral hogs (Sus scrofa) in Florida has been published to our knowledge, we sought to establish preliminary seroprevalence ofleptospirosis exposure in feral hogs in Florida. Blood samples were collected opportunistically from 158 male and 166 female feral hogs taken at managed hunts and by permitted trappers in the northern, central, and southern regions of Florida. Samples were then analyzed using the microscopic agglutination test (MAT) for antibody titers to 20 Leptospira serovars representing 17 serogroups. A titer of > 1:100 was considered positive; 33% (107/324 total samples) were positive to at least one serovar, and 46% of those were positive to multiple serovars. Antibodies to L. interrogans serovar Bratislava strain Jez Bratislava (serogroup Australis) was the most common, with 18% (58/324) testing positive for antibodies. These initial data indicate that there is a significant possibility of feral hogs having a larger role in the complex etiology of leptospirosis in Florida than historically estimated and that further investigation is warranted.

  5. Genetic Introgression and the Survival of Florida Panther Kittens.

    PubMed

    Hostetler, Jeffrey A; Onorato, David P; Nichols, James D; Johnson, Warren E; Roelke, Melody E; O'Brien, Stephen J; Jansen, Deborah; Oli, Madan K

    2010-11-01

    Estimates of survival for the young of a species are critical for population models. These models can often be improved by determining the effects of management actions and population abundance on this demographic parameter. We used multiple sources of data collected during 1982-2008 and a live recapture-dead recovery modeling framework to estimate and model survival of Florida panther (Puma concolor coryi) kittens (age 0 - 1 year). Overall, annual survival of Florida panther kittens was 0.323 ± 0.071 (SE), which was lower than estimates used in previous population models. In 1995, female pumas from Texas (P. c. stanleyana) were released into occupied panther range as part of an intentional introgression program to restore genetic variability. We found that kitten survival generally increased with degree of admixture: F(1) admixed and backcrossed to Texas kittens survived better than canonical Florida panther and backcrossed to canonical kittens. Average heterozygosity positively influenced kitten and older panther survival, whereas index of panther abundance negatively influenced kitten survival. Our results provide strong evidence for the positive population-level impact of genetic introgression on Florida panthers. Our approach to integrate data from multiple sources was effective at improving robustness as well as precision of estimates of Florida panther kitten survival, and can be useful in estimating vital rates for other elusive species with sparse data.

  6. Evaluation of Infiltration Basin Performance in Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bean, E.

    2012-12-01

    Infiltration basins are commonly utilized to reduce or eliminate urban runoff in Florida. For permitting purposes, basins are required to recover their design volume, runoff from a one inch rainfall event, within 72 hours to satisfy the design criteria and are not required to account for groundwater mounding if volume recovery can be accomplished by filling of soil porosity by vertical infiltration below the basin surface. Forty infiltration basins were included in a field study to determine whether basin hydraulic performance was significantly different from their designed performance. Basins ranged in age from less than one year to over twenty years and land uses were equally divided between Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) and residential developments. Six test sites within each basin were typically selected to measure infiltration rates using a double ring infiltrometer (DRI), a common method for infiltration basin sizing. Measured rates were statistically compared to designed infiltration rates, taking into account factors of safety. In addition, a surface soil boring was collected from each of the test sites for a series of analyses, including soil texture, bulk density, and organic matter content. Eleven of the 40 evaluated basins were monitored between March 2008 and January 2012 to evaluate whether basins recovered their volumes from one inch events within 72 hours and to evaluate the effectiveness of using DRI rates to evaluate basin performance. Based on DRI rates, 16 (40%) basins had rates less than their designed rates, 10 (25%) had rates equal to their designed rates, and 14 (35%) basins had rates greater than their designed rates. Additionally, basins with coarser soils were also more likely to have DRI rates greater than designs and FDOT basins were more likely than residential basins to have infiltration rates at or above their designed rates. Five of the eleven monitored basins were expected to function as designed by recovering their

  7. Holocene Infilling History of Tampa Bay, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, G. R.; Larson, R. A.; Cronin, T.; Willard, D.

    2007-05-01

    Tampa Bay is a shallow, sediment-starved estuary located along the central Florida Gulf coast. Based upon sedimentologic, biostratigraphic, and geochronologic analyses of 120 sediment cores and 190 surface sediment samples, karst-controlled basins located in the mid to upper estuary were found to contain a continuous sedimentary record documenting the Holocene sea-level rise and infilling history. The basal unit sampled in cores consists of organic-rich and/or carbonate-rich sediments containing freshwater fauna. Interpreted as lake deposits, the surficial sediments of these units were dated at approximately 8-9 ka suggesting that isolated sinkhole lakes occupied the region prior to being flooded by the Holocene sea-level rise. Overlying the lake deposits, dm-scale, organic-rich muds containing brackish water fauna, represent the transition from fresh to marine conditions as sea level flooded the region. The flooding surface itself is generally undefined, but sometimes represented by a mm-scale layer of shell fragments likely representing a lag deposit. Age dates bracketing this layer show that flooding occurred approximately 6-7 ka. Overlying sediments consist of 3-4 m of organic-rich, sandy muds with typical estuarine fauna. Age dates from the base of this unit indicate estuarine conditions became established approximately 5.5-6 ka. The modern expression of karst basins is a series of shallow, bathymetric depressions, likely reflecting the historically slow rate (0.030-0.065 cm/yr) of fine- grained sediment accumulation. These shallow depressions continue to function as fine-grained sediment sinks, but are now rapidly filling as the rate of accumulation has dramatically increased by approximately one order-of-magnitude (0.16-0.32 cm/yr) within the past 100 years, likely due to human activities.

  8. Abyssal seep site cementation: west Florida escarpment

    SciTech Connect

    Neumann, A.C.; Paull, C.K.; Commeau, R.; Commeau, J.; Chanton, J.; Martens, C.; Gardemal, M.; Trumbull, W.; Showers, W.

    1988-02-01

    The deepest submarine cements known so far occur along the 3300-m deep base of the Florida escarpment and are associated with methane-bearing brine seeps, which emanate there. These deep Holocene carbonates, which occur as surficial and buried crusts, burrow fillings, and friable horizons, were sampled via ALVIN. The carbonates form irregular halos extending up to 20 m from seeps colonized by chemosynthetic fauna. Mussels, gastropods, and clams, the carbonate components of the community, produce a shell hash that is locally cemented by coarsely crystalline low-Mg calcite. Halos of palisade calcite are reminiscent of ancient examples of marine cements. Also present are carbonate hemipelagics cemented by micrite into crusts and burrow fillings. The degree of cementation varies from pervasive to light. Slabs of cemented crust up to 30 cm thick contrast with typical shallow crusts and exhibit irregular tops and smooth bottoms indicating different chemical gradients and pathways. Bulk /delta//sup 13/C values of the carbonates are low, ranging from /minus/ 2.4 to /minus/ 48.5 /per thousand/ (PDB) and implicating as the carbonate source the biogenic methane that occurs in high concentrations at the seeps. The interaction of methane and sulfate in these cement reactions is still unclear. The presence of course mollusk-fragment hardgrounds overlying an eroded limestone and covered by hemipelagics, if encountered elsewhere, could be mistaken for a much shallower setting. The erosion of limestone scarps and the concurrent development of deep hardgrounds containing a fossil chemosynthetic fauna at the unconformity is a scenario that needs to be included in the growing list of limestone facies interpretations.

  9. Seeding cumulus in Florida: new 1970 results.

    PubMed

    Simpson, J; Woodley, W L

    1971-04-01

    In the Florida single cloud experiments, the main result of the statistical analyses is that the dynamic seeding effect on rainfall is large, positive, and significant. From all the 1968 and 1970 data together, the seeding effect is estimated to be larger than a factor of 3; that is, the seeded clouds rained more than three times as much as the controls after the seeding run. On fair days, defined objectively by percentage of area covered by showers, the seeding effect is shown to be larger than the overall average, but it may be negative on rainy days. Rainy days in the tropics are about 10 percent of the days with rain, but they produce about half the total rainfall. The applicability of our single cloud results to other areas is not established but seems hopeful for many tropical and subtropical regions. It can be assessed by cloud population studies together with our numerical model (25). Guidance for the next steps toward practical rainfall enhancement and toward the understanding and modification of cloud systems in storms may be provided by our study of merger clouds. Mergers are shown often to produce more than an order of magnitude more rain than isolated clouds on the same day, probably owing to dynamic invigoration of the merged cloud circulations. Results of our first small attempt toward inducing and documenting mergers in a multiple cloud seeding experiment appear promising. Although far from statistically conclusive, they have opened a new frontier in the science and technology of dynamic cloud modification. It is also hoped that the multiple cumulus seeding experiments will help to clarify the formation of "cloud clusters" and their role in large-scale circulations, thus contributing to the focal subject of the Global Atmospheric Research Program in the tropics.

  10. 78 FR 13339 - Florida Petroleum Reprocessors Site; Davie, Broward County, FL; Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-27

    ... AGENCY Florida Petroleum Reprocessors Site; Davie, Broward County, FL; Notice of Settlement AGENCY... Agency has entered into a settlement with 2238 NW. 86th Street Inc. concerning the Florida Petroleum... Ms. Paula V. Painter. Submit your comments by Site name Florida Petroleum Reprocesssors Site by...

  11. 77 FR 16548 - Florida Petroleum Reprocessors Superfund Site; Davie, Broward County, FL; Notice of Settlements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-21

    ...] Florida Petroleum Reprocessors Superfund Site; Davie, Broward County, FL; Notice of Settlements AGENCY... entered into four (4) settlements for past response costs concerning the Florida Petroleum Reprocessors... settlement are available from Ms. Paula V. Painter. Submit your comments by Site name Florida...

  12. A Descriptive Analysis of the Principal Workforce in Florida Schools. REL 2015-068

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Folsom, Jessica Sidler; Osborne-Lampkin, La'Tara; Herrington, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the results of a REL Southeast study using the Florida Department of Education staffing database to describe the demographic make-up, Florida Educator Certificate coverages, career paths from 2001/02 to 2011/12, and evaluation ratings of Florida's educational leaders (i.e., assistant principals and principals) in the 2011/12…

  13. Development of a Florida Seafood Program Using a Multi-Disciplinary Team

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abeels, Holly; Fluech, Bryan; Krimsky, Lisa; Saari, Brooke; Shephard, Elizabeth; Zamojski, Kendra

    2015-01-01

    The seafood industry in Florida is complex, with more than 80 varieties of Florida seafood commodities and an increasing number of imported products. This variety increases consumer confusion, especially with the growing concern about the origin, sustainability, and safety of seafood products. The objective of the Florida Seafood At Your…

  14. 78 FR 5779 - Availability of Seats for the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-28

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Availability of Seats for the Florida Keys National Marine... Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council: Boating Industry (alternate), and Fishing...: Application kits may be obtained from Beth Dieveney, Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, 33 East Quay...

  15. Ladybeetle predator, Delphastus catalinae, may control new invasive pest of Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ficus Whitefly (Singhiella simplex) was first reported in Miami-Dade County in August 2007. Since then, the whitefly has been found throughout southern Florida, as well as along both coasts of Florida up to central Florida. This invasive pest causes infested plants to exhibit leaf yellowing, followe...

  16. Florida Defeats the Skeptics: Test Scores Show Genuine Progress in the Sunshine State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winters, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Among the 50 states, Florida's gains on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) between 1992 and 2011 ranked second only to Maryland's. Florida's progress has been particularly impressive in the early grades. In 1998, Florida scored about one grade level below the national average on the 4th-grade NAEP reading test, but it was…

  17. Introduction to Ecology of South Florida Species, Science (Experimental): 5365.41.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miley, James F.

    This unit of instruction deals with a study of South Florida as an ecosystem. Consideration is given to meteorological features, geological foundations, chemical analyses, and biotic communities characteristic of South Florida. A major attribute is the development of monographs about the unique natural wealth of the lower South Florida peninsula.…

  18. 40 CFR 81.95 - Central Florida Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Regions § 81.95 Central Florida Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Central Florida Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed by the boundaries of the... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Central Florida Intrastate Air...

  19. 40 CFR 81.96 - West Central Florida Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false West Central Florida Intrastate Air... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.96 West Central Florida Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The West Central Florida Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area...

  20. Teacher Education Program Review in the State University System of Florida, Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stedman, Donald

    This program review examines the Colleges of Education in three of Florida's nine State University System (SUS) universities, as a follow-up to Program Review, Part 1 (1992), which examined the other six universities. Institutions reviewed are: the Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University (FAMU), University of West Florida (UWF), and Florida…

  1. Florida's Model of Nursing Home Medicaid Reimbursement for Disaster-Related Expenses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Kali S.; Hyer, Kathryn; Brown, Lisa M.; Polivka-West, LuMarie; Branch, Laurence G.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study describes Florida's model of Medicaid nursing home (NH) reimbursement to compensate NHs for disaster-related expenses incurred as a result of 8 hurricanes within a 2-year period. This Florida model can serve as a demonstration for a national model for disaster-related reimbursement. Design and Methods: Florida reimburses NHs…

  2. 7 CFR 915.306 - Florida avocado grade, pack, and container marking regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Avocados (7 CFR 51.3050 through 51.3069). ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Florida avocado grade, pack, and container marking... AGRICULTURE AVOCADOS GROWN IN SOUTH FLORIDA Container and Pack Regulations § 915.306 Florida avocado...

  3. Florida Public Health Training Center: Evidence-Based Online Mentor Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frahm, Kathryn A.; Alsac-Seitz, Biray; Mescia, Nadine; Brown, Lisa M.; Hyer, Kathy; Liburd, Desiree; Rogoff, David P.; Troutman, Adewale

    2013-01-01

    This article describes an Online Mentor Program (OMP) designed to support and facilitate mentorships among and between Florida Department of Health (FDOH) employees and USF College of Public Health students using a Web-based portal. The Florida Public Health Training Center (FPHTC) at the University of South Florida (USF) College of Public Health…

  4. Florida's Mandated Educational Leadership Program Redesign: The William Cecil Golden Touch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mountford, Meredith; Acker-Hocevar, Michele A.

    2013-01-01

    In 2007, educational leadership programs in Florida were notified by Florida's Department of Education of a law requiring all programs to align with new legislation, State Rule 6A-5.081. Previously, most state-approved preparation programs were based on Florida's Leadership Preparation Standards, a version of the 1996 Interstate School…

  5. 40 CFR 272.501 - Florida State-administered program: Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Florida State-administered program... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Florida § 272.501 Florida State-administered program: Final authorization. (a) Pursuant to section 3006(b) of RCRA, 42...

  6. The Evidence on the "Florida Formula" for Education Reform. Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Di Carlo, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    During the late 1990s and 2000s, the State of Florida enacted a set of education reforms spearheaded by Governor Jeb Bush. These policies, which emphasize test-based accountability, competition, and choice, have since become known as the "Florida Formula for education success," or, simply, the "Florida Formula." In recent…

  7. Race, Reward, and Reform: An Implicative Examination of the Florida School Recognition Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gayles, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    The Florida School Recognition Program (FSRP) was created by the Florida legislature in 1997 to provide an incentive to schools that achieve specific standards-based goals. Achievement is measured primarily through the state's high-stakes test, the Florida Comprehensive Achievement Test. Through analysis of FSRP awards, it is established that…

  8. 78 FR 28115 - Oranges, Grapefruit, Tangerines, and Tangelos Grown in Florida; Relaxing Size and Grade...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-14

    ... grown in Florida (order). The order is administered locally by the Citrus Administrative Committee... Florida citrus. Section 905.306 of the order's rules and regulations specifies the minimum grade and size requirements for different varieties of fresh Florida citrus. Such requirements for domestic shipments...

  9. 78 FR 22411 - Common Crop Insurance Regulations; Florida Citrus Fruit Crop Insurance Provisions; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-16

    ... Florida Citrus Fruit Crop Insurance Provisions that published on Friday, December 21, 2012, (74 FR 75509... Corporation 7 CFR Part 457 RIN 0563-AC39 Common Crop Insurance Regulations; Florida Citrus Fruit Crop... Friday, December 21, 2012. The regulation pertains to the insurance of Florida Citrus Fruit....

  10. The Florida Education Finance Program from 1981 to 2009: A Historical Review and Equity Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowden, Curtis Todd

    2009-01-01

    In 1973, the state of Florida implemented the Florida Education Finance Program (FEFP). The program was developed to distribute available funds to public school districts in a more equitable manner than the Minimum Foundation Plan it replaced. Almost immediately, the Florida Education Finance Program came under attack as less equitable and…

  11. NASA Applied Sciences' DEVELOP National Program: Summer 2010 Florida Agriculture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooley, Zachary C.; Billiot, Amanda; Lee, Lucas; McKee, Jake

    2010-01-01

    The main agricultural areas in South Florida are located within the fertile land surrounding Lake Okeechobee. The Atlantic Watershed monthly rainfall anomalies showed a weak but statistically significant correlation to the Oceanic Nino Index (ONI). No other watershed s anomalies showed significant correlations with ONI or the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI). During La Nina months, less sea breeze days and more disturbed days were found to occur compared to El Nino and neutral months. The increase in disturbed days can likely by attributed to the synoptic pattern during La Nina, which is known to be favorable for tropical systems to follow paths that affect South Florida. Overall, neither sea breeze rainfall patterns nor total rainfall patterns in South Florida s main agricultural areas were found to be strongly influenced by the El Nino Southern Oscillation during our study time.

  12. Mercury residues in south Florida apple snails (Pomacea paludosa)

    SciTech Connect

    Eisemann, J.D.; Beyer, W.N.; Morton, A.; Bennetts, R.E.

    1997-05-01

    Mercury concentrations in the sediments of south Florida wetlands have increased three fold in the last century. Because south Florida is home to many endemic and endangered species, it is important to understand the potential impacts of mercury in this ecosystem`s food web. Recent research by Malley et al. has shown mollusks to be sensitive indicators of methyl mercury which can reflect small differences in background methyl mercury concentrations. In this study, we attempted to determine if the apple snail (Pomacea paludosa) or its eggs are good indicators of bioavailable mercury. Then, using the apple snail as an indicator, we attempted to determine geographic differences in the concentrations of mercury in south Florida. 12 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  13. Mapping of Florida's Coastal and Marine Resources: Setting Priorities Workshop

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robbins, Lisa; Wolfe, Steven; Raabe, Ellen

    2008-01-01

    The importance of mapping habitats and bioregions as a means to improve resource management has become increasingly clear. Large areas of the waters surrounding Florida are unmapped or incompletely mapped, possibly hindering proper management and good decisionmaking. Mapping of these ecosystems is among the top priorities identified by the Florida Oceans and Coastal Council in their Annual Science Research Plan. However, lack of prioritization among the coastal and marine areas and lack of coordination of agency efforts impede efficient, cost-effective mapping. A workshop on Mapping of Florida's Coastal and Marine Resources was sponsored by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP), and Southeastern Regional Partnership for Planning and Sustainability (SERPPAS). The workshop was held at the USGS Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC) in St. Petersburg, FL, on February 7-8, 2007. The workshop was designed to provide State, Federal, university, and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) the opportunity to discuss their existing data coverage and create a prioritization of areas for new mapping data in Florida. Specific goals of the workshop were multifold, including to: * provide information to agencies on state-of-the-art technology for collecting data; * inform participants of the ongoing mapping programs in waters off Florida; * present the mapping needs and priorities of the State and Federal agencies and entities operating in Florida; * work with State of Florida agencies to establish an overall priority for areas needing mapping; * initiate discussion of a unified classification of habitat and bioregions; * discuss and examine the need to standardize terminology and data collection/storage so that data, in particular habitat data, can be shared; 9 identify opportunities for partnering and leveraging mapping efforts among agencies and entities; * identify impediments and organizational gaps that hinder collection

  14. Magnitude and Distribution of Flows into Northeastern Florida Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patino, Eduardo; Hittle, Clinton D.

    2000-01-01

    Changes in water-management practices have been made to accommodate a large and rapidly growing urban population along the Atlantic Coast and to meet the demand for intensive agricultural activities. These changes have resulted in a highly managed hydrologic system consisting of numerous canals, levees, control structures, and pumping stations that have altered the hydrology of the Everglades and Florida Bay ecosystems. Over the past decade, Florida Bay has experienced sea-grass die-off and algal blooms, which are indicators of ecological change attributed primarily to the increase in salinity and nutrient content of bay waters. Because plans are to restore sheetflow in the Everglades wetlands to its natural state, water managers anticipate a change in the magnitude and timing of freshwater exiting the mainland through the creeks that cut through the embankment or as sheetflow into Florida Bay.

  15. Overview of aerosolized Florida red tide toxins: exposures and effects.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Lora E; Backer, Lorraine C; Baden, Daniel G

    2005-05-01

    Florida red tide is caused by Karenia brevis, a dinoflagellate that periodically blooms, releasing its potent neurotoxin, brevetoxin, into the surrounding waters and air along the coast of the Gulf of Mexico. Exposure to Florida red tide toxins has been associated with adverse human health effects and massive fish and marine mammal deaths. The articles in this mini-monograph describe the ongoing interdisciplinary and interagency research program that characterizes the exposures and health effects of aerosolized Florida red tide toxins (brevetoxins). The interdisciplinary research program uses animal models and laboratory studies to develop hypotheses and apply these findings to in situ human exposures. Our ultimate goal is to develop appropriate prevention measures and medical interventions to mitigate or prevent adverse health effects from exposure to complex mixtures of aerosolized red tide toxins.

  16. The historical record of metal enrichment in two Florida estuaries

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, C.R.; Smith, R.G. ); Calder, F.D.; Schropp, S.J. ); Windom H.L. )

    1993-12-01

    Historical profiles of metal accumulation have been generated for the lower St. Johns River and Hillsborough Bay, Florida, in cores representing approximately 50 yr of sediment and metal accumulation. These profiles demonstrate that Cd, Pb, and Zn are enriched in these Florida estuarine sediments. Pb enrichment has decreased since the mid 1970s because of reduced use of leaded gasoline. In the St. Johns River, most metals exhibit a trend of increasing enrichment with time. Cd enrichment significantly decreased between 1970 and 1975 as a result of reduced discharges into the river and control of aquatic vegetation. In Hillsborough Bay, enrichment factors for most metals are relatively high and show little change downcore. Cr, Cu, and Ni border on enrichment and Pb, Cd, and Zn are enriched. The results of this study are consistent with other studies of surficial-sediment metal concentration in other Florida estuaries. 39 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Simulation of frontal eddies on the East Florida Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiechter, Jerome; Mooers, Christopher N. K.

    2003-11-01

    Frontal eddies are typical features on the cyclonic side of the Florida Current (FC) along the East Florida Shelf (EFS), producing characteristic ``shingle'' patterns in sea surface temperature. Intensive observations and idealized numerical analyses have described such eddies over the past three decades. Here, simulations from a high-resolution (2 to 10 km), curvilinear coastal ocean circulation model demonstrate their structure and evolution with realistic bottom topography and FC over an extended domain including the Straits of Florida and the entire EFS. Simulations agree with observations in estimating translation speed, recurrence period, strength, characteristic length-scales, and overall circulation patterns. In addition, the simulations demonstrate the interactions between the frontal eddies and the meander crests and bottom topography as they translate along the EFS. Overall, a first level of model validation has been established that will facilitate consideration of the forecast problem for frontal eddies associated with the FC on the EFS.

  18. Reinterpretation of the peninsular Florida oligocene: An integrated stratigraphic approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brewster-Wingard, G. L.; Scott, T.M.; Edwards, L.E.; Weedman, S.D.; Simmons, K.R.

    1997-01-01

    A very thick (> 300 m) nearly continuous Oligocene section exists in southern peninsular Florida, as revealed by lithostratigraphic, biostratigraphic (mollusks and dinocysts), chronostratigraphic (Sr isotopes) and petrographic analyses of twelve cores and two quarries. The Oligocene deposits in the subsurface of southern Florida are the thickest documented in the southeastern U.S., and they also may represent the most complete record of Oligocene deposition in this region. No major unconformities within the Oligocene section are detected in the southern portion of the peninsula; hiatuses at the Eocene-Oligocene boundary, the early Oligocene-late Oligocene boundary, and the late Oligocene-Miocene boundary, are of limited duration if they exist at all. No significant disconformity is recognized between the Suwannee Limestone and the Arcadia Formation in southern Florida. However, on the east coast of Florida a hiatus of more than 12 m.y., spanning from at least the middle of the early Oligocene to early Miocene is present. The Suwannee Limestone was deposited during the early Oligocene. The top of the Suwannee Limestone appears to be diachronous across the platform. The 'Suwannee' Limestone, previously identified incorrectly as a late Oligocene unit, is herein documented to be early Oligocene and is encompassed in the lower Oligocene Suwannee Limestone. An unnamed limestone, found on the east coast of the peninsula is, at least in part, correlative with the Suwannee Limestone. The Arcadia Formation, basal Hawthorn Group, accounts for a large portion of the Oligocene deposition in southern Florida, spanning the interval from the middle of the early Oligocene to at least the early Miocene. Comparisons of the depositional patterns, and the distribution of dolomite and phosphate within the Suwannee Limestone and the Arcadia Formation, suggest fluctuating sea levels and that the paleo-Gulf Stream played a role in determining the nature and extent of Oligocene deposition

  19. Volume transport variability through the Florida Keys tidal channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Thomas N.; Smith, Ned

    2002-06-01

    Shipboard measurements of volume transports through the passages of the middle Florida Keys are used together with time series of moored transports, cross-Key sea level slopes and local wind records to investigate the mechanisms controlling transport variability. Predicted tidal transport amplitudes ranged from ±6000 m 3/s in Long Key Channel to ±1500 m 3/s in Channel 2. Subtidal transport variations are primarily due to local wind driven cross-Key sea level slopes. Subtidal transports through Long Key Channel ranged from +1000 m 3/s inflow to Florida Bay to -2500 m 3/s outflow to the reef tract. Wind directions oriented toward 190-315° will cause a positive cross-Key sea level slope and inflow to Florida Bay. All other wind directions will tend to cause a negative cross-Key slope of sea level and Gulf to Atlantic outflow toward the reef tract. Seasonal variation in local wind forcing results in maximum outflows from Florida Bay in the winter when increased winds toward the SE and S occur following cold front passages. Minimum outflow occurs in fall when winds toward the SW and W are more frequent and inflows to Florida Bay can persist for several days. The long-term mean flow is toward the southeast and the reef tract and is estimated at -740 m 3/s for the combined flows of the major channels in the middle Keys, with 7-Mile Bridge Channel accounting for about 50% of this flow, Long Key Channel carries about 35% of the flow and Channels 5 and 2 account for about 7% each. The mean Gulf to Atlantic flow is supported by sea level standing higher in western Florida Bay and the eastern Gulf than in the Keys Atlantic coastal zone.

  20. Jurassic and triassic hydrocarbon exploration of southern Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell-Tapping, H.J.

    1994-12-31

    The Triassic and Jurassic of South Florida have been overlooked as a viable exploration target because of lack of data and plate tectonics application. In Florida {open_quotes}basement{close_quotes} is defined as crystalline, igneous, metamorphic and unmetamorphosed sediments of Paleozoic age. Age-dating of zircons has shown that the Florida lower Paleozoic terrain is not akin to that of North America but is part of the West African Guinean Shield. Pre-Atlantic reconstruction of the Gulf of Mexico in this study suggests that there was a Florida connection to Yucatan-Cuba-Africa during the Triassic. This reconstruction also shows that Jurassic rocks that are well known in the Northern Gulf Coast should have been deposited in similar depositional environments in southern Florida. Deep drilling on the Florida peninsula has confirmed this hypothesis. By using plate tectonic reconstruction based on the rifting of the North Atlantic Ocean and evidence from petrology of basement samples from deep wells, together with petrographic analyses of Jurassic sedimentary rocks, a Smackover-equivalent exploration play can be developed. Petrographic and petrophysical analysis of wells that have encountered Jurassic marine shales, anhydrite, dolomite, carbonate, and clastic sedimentary rocks has determined that they were deposited in shallow-water subtidal to supratidal environments. Excellent gas shows, oil stain in pores, and high TOC values in marine shales indicate that there are accumulations of hydrocarbon present. Application of analogous Gulf Coast Smackover stratigraphic models to this area, based on petrology and hydrogeology, should reduce risk and help define productive oil and gas reservoirs.

  1. Hydrochemistry of the surficial and intermediate aquifer systems in Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berndt, M.P.; Katz, B.G.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrochemistry of the surficial and intermediate aquifer systems in Florida reflects the lithology and mineralogy of units within each aquifer and sources of water to each aquifer. The surficial aquifer system consists of sand, sandstone, clay, limestone, and shell units that are recharged primarily by precipitation. Calcium bicarbonate was the major-ion water type for 53 percent of the surficial aquifer determinations; a mixed water type (no dominant ions) accounted for 37 percent of the determinations. The median dissolved-solids concentration for the surficial aquifer system was 341 milligrams per liter. The intermediate aquifer system consists of limestone, dolomite, sand, and sandstone, and sources of water include downward leakage from the surficial aquifer system and, in some areas, upward leakage from the Upper Floridan aquifer. In northeastern and panhandle areas of Florida, water from the intermediate aquifer system had major-ion and dissolved-solids concentrations similar to water from the surficial aquifer system. In southwestern Florida, the water type in 67 percent of analyses was mixed, and the median dissolved-solids concentration was 642 milligrams per liter. In a northern area of southwestern Florida, hydrochemistry in the limestone aquifer of the intermediate aquifer system is similar to downward leakage from the surficial aquifer system. In a southern area, downward leakage from the surficial aquifer system has calcium and bicarbonate concentrations five times higher than in the northern area, and upward leakage from the Upper Floridan aquifer contains sodium chloride type water from mixing with seawater. In southern southwest Florida, both the limestone aquifer and the overlying sandstone aquifer within the intermediate aquifer system had higher calcium, sodium, chloride, and bicarbonate concentrations than the limestone aquifer in northern southwest Florida.

  2. Estimated discharge of treated wastewater in Florida, 1990

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marella, R.L.

    1994-01-01

    According to the Florida Department of Environ- mental Protection, 5,100 wastewater treatment systems were in operation during 1990. Of this total, 72 percent were domestic wastewater facilities and 28 percent were industrial waste- water facilities. The number of wastewater systems inventoried for 1990 was 1,062 (systems that treated and discharged more than 0.01 Mgal/d or had a plant capacity of greater than 0.04 Mgal/d. Based on this inventory, the estimated discharge of treated wastewater in Florida during 1990 totaled 1,638 million gallons per day. Approxi- mately 65 percent of this water was discharged to surface water during 1990 and the remaining 35 percent was discharged to ground water. Discharge to surface water includes effluent outfalls into the Atlantic Ocean (32 percent), while the re- maining (68 percent) is discharged into the Gulf of Mexico, bays, rivers, wetlands, and other surface water bodies throughout Florida. Discharge to ground-water includes treated effluent outfalls to land application systems (reuse systems and spray fields), drain fields, percolation ponds (51 percent), and to injection wells (49 percent). An estimated 322 million gallons per day of the treated domestic and industrial wastewater was reused during 1990. Discharge of treated domestic wastewater from the 994 systems inventoried in Florida during 1990 totaled 1,353 million gallons per day and served an estimated 8.58 million people (66 percent of the population of Florida in 1990). The remaining 34 percent of the popu- lation (4.36 million) are served by the 2,700 smaller domestic wastewater systems or have individual septic tanks. In 1990, there were 1.56 million septic tanks in Florida. Discharge of industrial wastewater was inventoried for 68 systems in 1990 and totaled 285 million gallons per day. Discharge of domestic wastewater in- creased more than 20 percent and industrial wastewater discharge increased 5 percent from 1985 to 1990. (USGS)

  3. Wetlands: crop freezes and land-use change in Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marshall, C.H.; Pielke, R.A.; Steyaert, L.T.

    2003-01-01

    South Florida experienced a significant change in land usage during the twentieth century, including the conversion of natural wetlands into agricultural land for the cultivation of winter vegetable, sugar cane and citrus crops. This movement of agriculture from more northerly areas was intended partly to escape the risk of damaging winter freezes. Here we present evidence from a case study using a coupled atmosphere and land-surface computer-modelling system that suggests that the draining of wetlands may have inadvertently increased the frequency and severity of agriculturally damaging freezes in the south of Florida.  

  4. Winter habitat preferences for Florida manatees and vulnerability to cold.

    PubMed

    Laist, David W; Taylor, Cynthia; Reynolds, John E

    2013-01-01

    To survive cold winter periods most, if not all, Florida manatees rely on warm-water refuges in the southern two-thirds of the Florida peninsula. Most refuges are either warm-water discharges from power plant and natural springs, or passive thermal basins that temporarily trap relatively warm water for a week or more. Strong fidelity to one or more refuges has created four relatively discrete Florida manatee subpopulations. Using statewide winter counts of manatees from 1999 to 2011, we provide the first attempt to quantify the proportion of animals using the three principal refuge types (power plants, springs, and passive thermal basins) statewide and for each subpopulation. Statewide across all years, 48.5% of all manatees were counted at power plant outfalls, 17.5% at natural springs, and 34.9 % at passive thermal basins or sites with no known warm-water features. Atlantic Coast and Southwest Florida subpopulations comprised 82.2% of all manatees counted (45.6% and 36.6%, respectively) with each subpopulation relying principally on power plants (66.6% and 47.4%, respectively). The upper St. Johns River and Northwest Florida subpopulations comprised 17.8% of all manatees counted with almost all animals relying entirely on springs (99.2% and 88.6% of those subpopulations, respectively). A record high count of 5,076 manatees in January 2010 revealed minimum sizes for the four subpopulations of: 230 manatees in the upper St. Johns River; 2,548 on the Atlantic Coast; 645 in Northwest Florida; and 1,774 in Southwest Florida. Based on a comparison of carcass recovery locations for 713 manatees killed by cold stress between 1999 and 2011 and the distribution of known refuges, it appears that springs offer manatees the best protection against cold stress. Long-term survival of Florida manatees will require improved efforts to enhance and protect manatee access to and use of warm-water springs as power plant outfalls are shut down.

  5. Radium-226 in wetland birds from Florida phosphate mines

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, O.B.; Marion, W.R.; O'Meara, T.E.; Roessler, C.E. )

    1989-10-01

    Radium-226 is a naturally-occurring radionuclide found in enhanced levels at Florida phosphate mines. We inventoried levels of radium-226 in the tissues of 4 wetland bird species from 2 mined and 2 umined areas in Florida. Bone tissues of wood duck (Aix sponsa), mottled duck (Anas fulvigula), common moorhen (Gallinula chloropus), and double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) colleted at phosphate mines contained more radium-226 than tissues from unmined areas. Radium-226 concentrations in these birds were within guidelines inferred from radiological standards designed for human protection and should not adversely affect bird populations.

  6. Pilot Demonstration of Phased Retrofits in Florida Homes (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-08-01

    The Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) and Florida Power and Light are pursuing a collaborative energy research/utility partnership to retrofit a large number of homes using a phased approach. The project is creating detailed data on the energy and economic performance of two levels of home retrofit - simple and deep. Acting as a pilot, this project is expected to provide the information necessary to significantly reduce energy use through much larger community-scale projects in collaboration with utilities, program administrators and other market leader stakeholders.

  7. Winter habitat preferences for Florida manatees and vulnerability to cold.

    PubMed

    Laist, David W; Taylor, Cynthia; Reynolds, John E

    2013-01-01

    To survive cold winter periods most, if not all, Florida manatees rely on warm-water refuges in the southern two-thirds of the Florida peninsula. Most refuges are either warm-water discharges from power plant and natural springs, or passive thermal basins that temporarily trap relatively warm water for a week or more. Strong fidelity to one or more refuges has created four relatively discrete Florida manatee subpopulations. Using statewide winter counts of manatees from 1999 to 2011, we provide the first attempt to quantify the proportion of animals using the three principal refuge types (power plants, springs, and passive thermal basins) statewide and for each subpopulation. Statewide across all years, 48.5% of all manatees were counted at power plant outfalls, 17.5% at natural springs, and 34.9 % at passive thermal basins or sites with no known warm-water features. Atlantic Coast and Southwest Florida subpopulations comprised 82.2% of all manatees counted (45.6% and 36.6%, respectively) with each subpopulation relying principally on power plants (66.6% and 47.4%, respectively). The upper St. Johns River and Northwest Florida subpopulations comprised 17.8% of all manatees counted with almost all animals relying entirely on springs (99.2% and 88.6% of those subpopulations, respectively). A record high count of 5,076 manatees in January 2010 revealed minimum sizes for the four subpopulations of: 230 manatees in the upper St. Johns River; 2,548 on the Atlantic Coast; 645 in Northwest Florida; and 1,774 in Southwest Florida. Based on a comparison of carcass recovery locations for 713 manatees killed by cold stress between 1999 and 2011 and the distribution of known refuges, it appears that springs offer manatees the best protection against cold stress. Long-term survival of Florida manatees will require improved efforts to enhance and protect manatee access to and use of warm-water springs as power plant outfalls are shut down. PMID:23527063

  8. Winter Habitat Preferences for Florida Manatees and Vulnerability to Cold

    PubMed Central

    Laist, David W.; Taylor, Cynthia; Reynolds, John E.

    2013-01-01

    To survive cold winter periods most, if not all, Florida manatees rely on warm-water refuges in the southern two-thirds of the Florida peninsula. Most refuges are either warm-water discharges from power plant and natural springs, or passive thermal basins that temporarily trap relatively warm water for a week or more. Strong fidelity to one or more refuges has created four relatively discrete Florida manatee subpopulations. Using statewide winter counts of manatees from 1999 to 2011, we provide the first attempt to quantify the proportion of animals using the three principal refuge types (power plants, springs, and passive thermal basins) statewide and for each subpopulation. Statewide across all years, 48.5% of all manatees were counted at power plant outfalls, 17.5% at natural springs, and 34.9 % at passive thermal basins or sites with no known warm-water features. Atlantic Coast and Southwest Florida subpopulations comprised 82.2% of all manatees counted (45.6% and 36.6%, respectively) with each subpopulation relying principally on power plants (66.6% and 47.4%, respectively). The upper St. Johns River and Northwest Florida subpopulations comprised 17.8% of all manatees counted with almost all animals relying entirely on springs (99.2% and 88.6% of those subpopulations, respectively). A record high count of 5,076 manatees in January 2010 revealed minimum sizes for the four subpopulations of: 230 manatees in the upper St. Johns River; 2,548 on the Atlantic Coast; 645 in Northwest Florida; and 1,774 in Southwest Florida. Based on a comparison of carcass recovery locations for 713 manatees killed by cold stress between 1999 and 2011 and the distribution of known refuges, it appears that springs offer manatees the best protection against cold stress. Long-term survival of Florida manatees will require improved efforts to enhance and protect manatee access to and use of warm-water springs as power plant outfalls are shut down. PMID:23527063

  9. Biological communities at the Florida Escarpment resemble hydrothermal vent taxa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paull, C.K.; Hecker, Barbara; Commeau, R.; Freeman-Lynde, R. P.; Neumann, C.; Corso, W.P.; Golubic, S.; Hook, J.E.; Sikes, E.; Curray, J.

    1984-01-01

    Dense biological communities of large epifaunal taxa similar to those found along ridge crest vents at the East Pacific Rise were discovered in the abyssal Gulf of Mexico. These assemblages occur on a passive continental margin at the base of the Florida Escarpment, the interface between the relatively impermeable hemipelagic clays of the distal Mississippi Fan and the jointed Cretaceous limestone of the Florida Platform. The fauna apparently is nourished by sulfide rich hypersaline waters seeping out at near ambient temperatures onto the sea floor.

  10. Assessment of acreage and vegetation change in Florida`s Big Bend tidal wetlands using satellite imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Raabe, E.A.; Stumpf, R.P.

    1997-06-01

    Fluctuations in sea level and impending development on the west coast of Florida have aroused concern for the relatively pristine tidal marshes of the Big Bend. Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) images for 1986 and 1995 are processed and evaluated for signs of change. The images cover 250 km of Florida`s Big Bend Gulf Coast, encompassing 160,000 acres of tidal marshes. Change is detected using the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and land cover classification. The imagery shows negligible net loss or gain in the marsh over the 9-year period. However, regional changes in biomass are apparent and are due to natural disturbances such as low winter temperatures, fire, storm surge, and the conversion of forest to marsh. Within the marsh, the most prominent changes in NDVI and in land cover result from the recovery of mangroves from freezes, a decline of transitional upland vegetation, and susceptibility of the marsh edge and interior to variations in tidal flooding.

  11. Bathyal ostracodes from the Florida-Hatteras slope, the Straits of Florida, and the Blake Plateau

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, T. M.

    1983-01-01

    Epibathyal ostracodes from the Florida-Hatteras slope, the Blake Plateau and the Straits of Florida were studied to determine the relationship of numerous genera and species to bottom-water environmental conditions such as dissolved oxygen and bottom-water temperatures. From a total of 100 samples, 44 samples evenly distributed between 200 and 1100 m water depth and having an average of 325 specimens were examined in detail. Using occurrence data from the adjacent continental shelf, carapace preservation, Rose Bengal staining and population data, indigenous death assemblages were distinguished from transported or reworked fossil specimens. The percent of transported specimens varied as follows: Blake Plateau 90% of the samples and usually constitute 10 to 30% of each. Trachyleberidea, Bairdoppilata, Saida, Paranesidea, Ambocythere, Bythocypris, Cytherella, Bradleya, Henryhowella, and Polycopidae occur in 45 to 80% of the samples in varying percentages. The upper depth limits of 39 taxa occur at or just below the thermocline suggesting a relationship to temperature. Australoecia, Quasibuntonia, Cytheropteron, Ruggieriella, Saida, Ambocythere, Trachyleberidea, Macrocypris, Krithe, "Thalassocythere", and Cytherella are most common or restricted to the O2 minimum zone. Conversely, Anchistrocheles, Bradleya, Henryhowella, and Rockallia are most common below 750 m in well oxygenated water with temperatures below 8??C. The results show that: (1) ostracodes display a narrow depth zonation controlled by dissolved oxygen and water temperature; (2) species diversity is very high for a bathyal zone; (3) ostracodes can be used to identify the source of sediment that has been transported downslope; and (4) some taxa are useful in recognizing low oxygenated water in Cenozoic deposits. ?? 1983.

  12. South Florida wetlands ecosystem; biogeochemical processes in peat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orem, William; ,

    1996-01-01

    The South Florida wetlands ecosystem is an environment of great size and ecological diversity (figs. 1 and 2). The landscape diversity and subtropical setting of this ecosystem provide a habitat for an abundance of plants and wildlife, some of which are unique to South Florida. South Florida wetlands are currently in crisis, however, due to the combined effects of agriculture, urbanization, and nearly 100 years of water management. Serious problems facing this ecosystem include (1) phosphorus contamination producing nutrient enrichment, which is causing changes in the native vegetation, (2) methylmercury contamination of fish and other wildlife, which poses a potential threat to human health, (3) changes in the natural flow of water in the region, resulting in more frequent drying of wetlands, loss of organic soils, and a reduction in freshwater flow to Florida Bay, (4) hypersalinity, massive algal blooms, and seagrass loss in parts of Florida Bay, and (5) a decrease in wildlife populations, especially those of wading birds. This U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) project focuses on the role of organic-rich sediments (peat) of South Florida wetlands in regulating the concentrations and impact of important chemical species in the environment. The cycling of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur in peat is an important factor in the regulation of water quality in the South Florida wetlands ecosystem. These elements are central to many of the contamination issues facing South Florida wetlands, such as nutrient enrichment, mercury toxicity, and loss of peat. Many important chemical and biological reactions occur in peat and control the fate of chemical species in wetlands. Wetland scientists often refer to these reactions as biogeochemical processes, because they are chemical reactions usually mediated by microorganisms in a geological environment. An understanding of the biogeochemical processes in peat of South Florida wetlands will provide a basis for evaluating the

  13. Methodological Differentiation in Assessing the Value-Added of Florida's Interim Reading Assessment System to Predicting FCAT's Mean Proficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foorman, Barbara R.; Petscher, Yaacov

    2011-01-01

    In Florida, mean proficiency scores are reported on the Florida Comprehensive Achievement Test (FCAT) as well as recommended learning gains from the developmental scale score. Florida now has another within-year measure of growth in reading comprehension from the Florida Assessments for Instruction in Reading (FAIR). The FAIR reading…

  14. Marketing Fresh Produce to Local Schools: The North Florida Cooperative Experience [and] Cultivating Schools as Customers in a Local Market: The New North Florida Cooperative Experience [and] Acquiring Capital and Establishing a Credit History: The North Florida Cooperative Experience [and] Success of the New North Florida Cooperative: A Progress Report on Producer Direct Sales to School Districts. Small Farmer Success Story. Bulletins 1-4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC.

    These four bulletins describe how a group of limited-resource small farmers in northern Florida's Jackson County, the USDA, the West Florida Resource Conservation and Development Council, Florida A&M University, and the Federation of Southern Cooperatives organized the New North Florida Cooperative to increase farm income by introducing improved…

  15. The Status of School-Age Child Care in Florida: An Oversight Report Prepared for the Education K-12 Committee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida House of Representatives, Tallahassee. Committee on Education, K-12.

    This comprehensive report provides current information on the status of school age child care in Florida, an overview of Florida Statutes, a summary of benefits and problems with state involvement, and recommendations for action. An estimated 138,000 children ages 5 to 13 in Florida may be without care every day after school. Florida's school…

  16. Florida teenagers learn about AIDS, teach others.

    PubMed

    1993-05-01

    1 of every 7 people living in one 5-block area of Belle Glade, Florida, is seropositive for HIV. The town has a population of 17,000 which almost doubles during harvest season as migrant workers arrive to cut cane or harvest vegetables. 97% of HIV cases are among Blacks and people from the Caribbean; transmission is mostly through heterosexual intercourse; and about 25% of infections are among children born to HIV-infected mothers or among adolescents. The nearest movie theater or shopping mall in which adolescents might be amused lies 45 minutes away by buses which do not run on weekends. Belle Glade does not even have a recreation center. Drug use, prostitution, gang membership, and unprotected sexual intercourse are therefore commonly practiced. Providing a constructive alternative, the Health Education Research Team (HEART) peer education project was implemented with the support of the American Foundation for AIDS Research and Family Health International to reduce risky sex behavior among these adolescents aged 13-18. The project assumes that youth will listen to their peers and trains teens to teach other teens about HIV prevention. Teenage participants advance over the levels of trainee, educator, and mentor. 51 had been recruited into the program since it began in fall 1992; 15 had reached the educator level by early 1993. Participants meet twice weekly for formal sessions at the health center which tend to be fun and innovative learning sessions complemented by work in training manuals and periodic tests. Participants also congregate informally at a common youth hangout. More than working to prevent the transmission of HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases, HEART fosters the development of self-esteem, leadership, and communication skills. The program operates a condom distribution system and referral service for treatment which distributed more than 22,000 free condoms over 4 months in late 1992. Understanding their success in being culturally

  17. Seasonal variability on the West Florida Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yonggang; Weisberg, Robert H.

    2012-10-01

    The seasonal variations of the West Florida Continental Shelf (WFS) circulation and sea level are described using observations of velocity from an array of moored acoustic Doppler current profilers and various ancillary data. With record lengths ranging from 3 years to over a decade, a robust seasonal cycle in velocity is found, which varies across the shelf in a dynamically sensible way. Over most of the inner shelf these seasonal variations are primarily in response to local forcing, through Ekman-geostrophic spin-up, as previously found for the synoptic scale variability. Thus the inner shelf circulation is predominantly upwelling favorable from fall to spring months (October-April) and downwelling favorable during summer months (June-September). Seaward from about the 50 m isobath, where baroclinicity becomes of increasing importance, the seasonal variations are less pronounced. Over the outer shelf and near the southwestern end of the WFS, the seasonal variations are obscured by the deep ocean influences of the Gulf of Mexico Loop Current and its eddies. The seasonal variations in sea level are also robust. But unlike the velocity, these extend across the entire WFS and into the deep Gulf of Mexico. These seasonal sea level variations arise from two influences, one static, the other dynamic. The static influence projects onto the WFS by the static seasonal rise and fall of the Gulf of Mexico sea level due to heating and cooling (also occurring on the shelf). On climatological average, this ranges by about 0.12 m, with a minimum in February and a maximum in August and deriving primarily from the density variations over the upper 100 m of the water column. Such climatologically averaged variation due to temperature and salinity is also seen in satellite altimetry. An additional dynamic influence of about 0.06 m occurs over the inner shelf by the Ekman-geostrophic spin up to the seasonally varying winds. Together, the static and dynamic ocean responses result in

  18. Effects of the Gulf Oil Spill in Escambia County, Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killingsworth, Kelcey Ray

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of the British Petroleum Gulf Oil Spill on resource change, psychological stress, and resilience for business owners, residents, and workers in Escambia County, Florida. This study was based on Hobfoll's (1988, 1989) Conservation of Resources theory. All business owners, residents, and…

  19. Orange rust: A new surgarcane disease in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Orange rust of sugarcane was observed approximately 5 miles east of Belle Glade, Florida on CP 80-1743 (a complex hybrid of Sacharum L. species) during the lsat week of June 2007. Orange rust pustules are cinnamon-orange in color, oval and smaller than the darker brown elongate rust pustules of the ...

  20. Florida Master Plan and Action Guide for Energy Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, William; And Others

    This master plan for energy education consists of the following sections: (1) a rationale statement; (2) an energy policy statement; (3) general goals and objectives; (4) a status report for existing energy education programs in Florida; (5) an overview of alternative strategies for implementing an energy education program statewide; (6)…

  1. DESIGNING A COMPREHENSIVE, INTEGRATED WATER RESOURCES MONITORING PROGRAM FOR FLORIDA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Proceedings of the National Water Quality Monitoring Conference "Monitoring Critical Foundations to Protect Our Waters," 7-9 July 1998, Reno, NV.

    In late 1996, Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) initiated an effort to design a multi-tiered monitoring and...

  2. University of Central Florida Annual Accountability Report, 2013-14

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Board of Governors, State University System of Florida, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This statistical report provides data tables on University of Central Florida (UCF) financial resources, personnel, enrollment, undergraduate education, graduate education, and research & economic development. Highlighted achievements included: (1) "U.S. News & World Report" ranked UCF 14th as an "up and coming" school,…

  3. Leaner Class Sizes Add Fiscal Stress to Florida Districts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Michele

    2008-01-01

    With a total price tag pushing $10 billion, Florida's "class-size-reduction mandate"--the nation's toughest--is under fire, as school districts call on lawmakers to weaken the 2002 constitutional requirement before it is fully phased in later this year. Starting with the 2008-09 school year, individual districts must meet new size caps in each…

  4. Energy-Efficient Design for Florida Educational Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida Solar Energy Center, Cape Canaveral.

    This manual provides a detailed simulation analysis of a variety of energy conservation measures (ECMs) with the intent of giving educational facility design teams in Florida a basis for decision making. The manual's three sections cover energy efficiency design considerations that appear throughout the following design processes: schematic…

  5. A Study of Engineering and Engineering Technology Education in Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terman, F. E.; Higdon, Archie

    This study reviews engineering education in Florida and investigates programs and plans for engineering technology. A questionnaire was prepared to obtain statistical data on the engineering activities at individual institutions. Deans of engineering schools responded to the questionnaires and site visits were made by consultants to each school.…

  6. Dereliction of Duty: Florida's Failed Education Policy. Special Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pathak, Arohi

    2004-01-01

    Education is a fundamental value of the people of Florida, whose state constitution even calls for a "high-quality system of free public schools." But rather than live up to this commitment, the state--led by Governor Jeb Bush and a Republican legislature--has embarked on a series of programs that undermine public education. This report examines…

  7. Florida's high-speed rail and maglev projects

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.H. )

    1990-04-01

    The author discusses how the State of Florida has taken an innovative approach to meeting its future needs for an efficient transportation system that will complement its extensive highway network and aviation system. This new concept is a statewide, high-speed, fixed guideway ground transportation system. The technologies will include advanced electrified wheels-on-rail trains and magnetically levitated and propelled vehicles.

  8. Higher Educational Needs of the Lower West Coast [Florida].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Board of Regents, Tallahassee.

    This study reports the higher educational needs of the persons living in lower west Florida counties from Manatee to Collier, identifies the most feasible course of action to meet those needs and assesses the consequences ensuing from adding to the state university system. Chapters cover access to public higher education, expansion of the state…

  9. Florida's Manatee. An Educator's Guide. Third Edition Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fritz-Quincy, Debbie

    This revised and updated guide provides resources for teaching about the Florida manatee, a nearly hairless, thick-skinned marine mammal without hindlimbs and with paddle-like forelimbs. The manatee (an endangered species) is sometimes called a sea cow. The guide includes: (1) a vocabulary list; (2) a list of suggested readings; (3) an annotated…

  10. HIGH-ANGLE AEOLIAN CROSSBEDDING AT TRAIL RIDGE, FLORIDA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Force, Eric; Garnar, Tom

    1985-01-01

    This paper described new evidence concerning the origin of the Trail Ridge mineral sands deposit in Florida. Rarely exposed sections of the orebody exhibit structures indicative of sand dune formation rather than coastal beach sand accumulation. The implications for mineral sands exploration, and therefore resources, in the southeastern USA are highlighted.

  11. Controversy over Biomass Plant at Florida State Heats up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangan, Katherine

    2009-01-01

    This article reports that Florida State University officials are gearing up for what could be another bruising battle this month over a proposed biomass plant that could bring the campus cleaner, cheaper energy and monetary support for alternative-energy research. Or, it could bring noise and pollution to a nearby neighborhood, according to…

  12. Florida Library Services and Construction Act; FY 73 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Library, Tallahassee.

    The Florida 1973 annual report of programs under Title I and Title III of the Library Services and Construction Act gives an overview of expenditures and programs, followed by information on the specific projects including the objectives, accomplishments and failures, special problems or observations about the project and effectiveness of the…

  13. Troubled Lifestyles: High-Risk Youth in Florida. Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dembo, Richard; And Others

    Young people with records of involvement in the juvenile justice system were studied in Florida, primarily in the inner city of Tampa. The study is part of a longitudinal study of predictors of drug use, delinquency, and criminality. Overall, 32 percent of the 297 adolescents interviewed reported engaging in drug sales in the year preceding their…

  14. Vegetable viruses emerging in Florida and the Caribbean region

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tomato chlorotic spot virus (TCSV) and a natural Groundnut ringspot virus (GRSV) reassortant (LGMTSG) with GRSV S and L RNAs and a TCSV M RNA have recently emerged and joined previously established Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) as economically important vegetable pathogens in south Florida. TCSV...

  15. Fighting for physics and Earth science in Florida's high schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottle, Paul

    2009-11-01

    During its Spring 2009 session, the Florida Legislature considered a bill that would have suspended its comprehensive standardized test in high school science and substituted an end-of-course test in biology to satisfy the requirements of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act. By doing so, the bill would have further deemphasized high school physics and Earth science in a state where physics courses are sometimes not available in high schools (even in International Baccalaureate programs) and where the state's own statistics say that only 16% of high school graduates have taken a physics course. A group of about one hundred science faculty from thirteen colleges and universities in Florida responded with a letter to Governor Crist and visits to legislators asking that the biology-only provisions be defeated (and they were). The group has now produced a white paper on high school science requirements that has been distributed to government and business leaders and been publicized via op-ed pieces and news items in several media outlets statewide. This poster will describe the situation in Florida and the faculty group's efforts. It will also compare Florida's high school requirements in science with those in the other SESAPS states.

  16. Florida Preservice Agricultural Education Teachers' Mathematics Ability and Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stripling, Christopher T.; Roberts, T. Grady

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the mathematics ability and efficacy of Florida preservice agricultural education teachers. Results indicated that the preservice teachers were not proficient in solving agricultural mathematics problems. On the other hand, the preservice teachers were efficacious in personal teaching efficacy and personal…

  17. Optimizing Alternative Fumigant Applications for Ornamental Production in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In Florida, cut flower and other ornamental crop producers have a very limited number of alternatives to methyl bromide for several reasons including the lack of registered herbicides available for these crops, and the need to control previously planted cultivars volunteering as weeds within the sam...

  18. The Fact Book: Report for the Florida College System, 2015

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    This 2015 fact book for the Florida College System is divided into the following categories: (1) Student Information, which includes fall, annual, FTE, and program enrollment statistics, as well as credit program completion statistics; (2) Employee Information, which includes statistics regarding employee headcount by occupational activity, and…

  19. The Fact Book: Report for the Florida College System, 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida Department of Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This 2014 fact book for the Florida College System is divided into the following categories: (1) Student Information, which includes fall, annual, FTE, and program enrollment statistics, as well as credit program completion statistics; (2) Employee Information, which includes statistics regarding employee headcount by occupational activity, and…

  20. Integrating Sunflower Oil Seed Crops into Florida Horticultural Production Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Locally produced biodiesel feedstock plant oil creates a unique possibility to integrate multiple-goal oriented cover crops into Florida horticultural production systems. Typically, cover crops are planted to improve soil fertility and the natural suppression of soilborne pests at times when fields...

  1. Surviving Hurricane Ivan at Pensacola Junior College Pensacola, Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Sandra

    2005-01-01

    Hurricane Ivan struck the Gulf Coast of Florida on September 16, 2004, destroying waterfront homes, and damaging properties for miles. Pensacola Junior College (PJC), a two-year college with three campuses and a student population of approximately 26,000, was hit hard. In the Pensacola Campus Learning Resources Center (LRC), water and mold ruined…

  2. Identifying Heat Waves in Florida: Considerations of Missing Weather Data

    PubMed Central

    Leary, Emily; Young, Linda J.; DuClos, Chris; Jordan, Melissa M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Using current climate models, regional-scale changes for Florida over the next 100 years are predicted to include warming over terrestrial areas and very likely increases in the number of high temperature extremes. No uniform definition of a heat wave exists. Most past research on heat waves has focused on evaluating the aftermath of known heat waves, with minimal consideration of missing exposure information. Objectives To identify and discuss methods of handling and imputing missing weather data and how those methods can affect identified periods of extreme heat in Florida. Methods In addition to ignoring missing data, temporal, spatial, and spatio-temporal models are described and utilized to impute missing historical weather data from 1973 to 2012 from 43 Florida weather monitors. Calculated thresholds are used to define periods of extreme heat across Florida. Results Modeling of missing data and imputing missing values can affect the identified periods of extreme heat, through the missing data itself or through the computed thresholds. The differences observed are related to the amount of missingness during June, July, and August, the warmest months of the warm season (April through September). Conclusions Missing data considerations are important when defining periods of extreme heat. Spatio-temporal methods are recommended for data imputation. A heat wave definition that incorporates information from all monitors is advised. PMID:26619198

  3. Ticks associated with domestic dogs and cats in Florida, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Voluntary collections of ticks from domestic dogs and cats by veterinary practitioners across Florida were conducted over a 10 month period. Of the 1,337 ticks submitted, five species of ixodid ticks were identified and included Rhipicephalus sanguineus, Amblyomma americanum, A. maculatum, Dermacen...

  4. The Data Library in the University of Florida Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Ray

    1982-01-01

    Outline of the operation and services of the Data Library in the University of Florida Libraries includes a brief history, administration of the library system, development of collection of machine-readable data files, data users, technical services, reference services, funding, and staff recruitment, training, and development. Four references are…

  5. SOUTH FLORIDA MERCURY MONITORING AND MODELING PILOT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1995, the South Florida Atmospheric Mercury Monitoring Study was established to investigate several likely sources of Hg, as well as transport and deposition mechanisms. Field operations began on August 10, 1995, and ran continuously through September 6, 1995. Source sampl...

  6. Florida Gulf Coast University Annual Accountability Report, 2013-14

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Board of Governors, State University System of Florida, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This statistical report provides data tables on Florida Gulf Coast University's (FGCU's) financial resources, personnel, enrollment, undergraduate education, graduate education, and research & economic development. Highlighted data include: (1) Recent results (fall 2013) of FGCU's participation in the National Survey of Student Engagement…

  7. Inheritance of red foliage in flowering dogwood (Cornus florida L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flowering dogwood (Cornus florida L.) is an ornamental tree valued for its showy white, pink, or red spring bract display and red fall color. A ‘‘pseudo’’ F2 flowering dogwood population was recently developed from a honeybee mediated cross of ‘Cherokee Brave’ x ‘Appalachian Spring’. The foliage col...

  8. Florida Employer Opinion Survey. Annual Report, June 1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee.

    Each year the Florida Education and Training Placement Information Program (FETPIP) conducts surveys to determine the opinions of employers about the preparation of graduates of vocational programs. The 1992 survey focused on eight specific occupational training areas (i.e., child care services, computer programming and analysis, dental assisting,…

  9. Florida Keys Community College's College Reach-Out Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warfield, Deborah

    Because of its Reach-Out Program, Florida Keys Community College (FKCC) has been successful in recruiting black high school students to achieve its highest proportion of racial parity in first-time-in-college enrollments (i.e., 5.2%). Through its Eighth Grade Visitation Program, High School Recruitment Program, and other components, the Reach-Out…

  10. Classroom and Field Experiments for Florida's Environmental Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Jim

    This booklet is intended to help teachers in Florida manage the growing interest in environmental education. Fourteen experiments are grouped into the environmental areas of the water cycle, groundwater, water pollution, waste and water treatment, air pollution, and field experiments. Experiments include demonstrations of the water cycle, the…

  11. Selected Collective Bargaining Agreements of Florida Two-Year Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Education Association, Washington, DC.

    Eight collective bargaining agreements between the boards of trustees of selected community colleges in Florida and their respective faculty associations are presented, representing contracts in effect in 1987. Contracts for the following colleges are provided: Brevard Community College, Broward Community College, Chipola Junior College, Edison…

  12. Two new promising cultivars of mango for Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mango cultivars are mostly the result of random selections from open pollinated chance seedlings of indigenous or introduced germplasm. The National Germplasm Repository (genebank) at the Subtropical Horticulture Research Station (SHRS) in Miami, Florida is an important mango germplasm repository an...

  13. Justices Query Lawyers in Florida Court Showdown over Voucher Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richard, Alan

    2006-01-01

    Florida's Opportunity Scholarships faced their most crucial test in June 2005, as the state supreme court heard arguments in a case about the constitutionality of the voucher program. In more than an hour of oral arguments in "Bush v. Holmes," held June 7, in Tallahassee and shown live on the Internet, lawyers sparred over the implications for…

  14. Sewage in ground water in the Florida Keys

    SciTech Connect

    Shinn, E.A.

    1995-12-31

    More than 24,000 septic tanks, 5,000 cesspools, and greater than 600 shallow disposal wells introduce sewage effluents into porous and permeable limestone underlying the Florida Keys. To porous and permeable limestone underlying the Florida Keys. To assess the fate of sewage nutrients, 21 2- to 20-m-deep wells were core drilled and completed as water-monitoring wells. The wells were sampled quarterly and analyzed for 17 parameters. including nutrients and bacteria. Nutrients (mainly NH4, - which is 30 to 40 times higher than in surface sea water) were detected in ground water beneath the Keys and offshore coral reefs. Highest levels were beneath reefs 5 to 8 km offshore. Ground waters were generally hypersaline and fecal bacteria (fecal coliform and streptococci) were detected in ground water beneath living coral reefs. Higher sea level on the Florida Bay side of the Keys is proposed as the mechanism for forcing ground water toward offshore coral reefs. Tidal pumping, which is more pronounced near the Keys, causes leakage of ground water where the sediment is thin. Areas lacking sediment cover consist of bare limestone bedrock or permeable coral reefs. These are the areas where coral diseases and algal growth have increased in recent years. Pollutants entering the ground water beneath the Florida Keys are likely to be transported seaward beneath impermeable Holocene sediments and may be upwelling through coral reefs and other hardbottom communities.

  15. Hurricanes, submarine groundwater discharge, and Florida's red tides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hu, C.; Muller-Karger, F. E.; Swarzenski, P.W.

    2006-01-01

    A Karenia brevis Harmful Algal Bloom affected coastal waters shallower than 50 m off west-central Florida from January 2005 through January 2006, showing a sustained anomaly of ???1 mg chlorophyll m-3 over an area of up to 67,500 km2. Red tides occur in the same area (approximately 26-29??N, 82-83??W) almost every year, but the intense 2005 bloom led to a widespread hypoxic zone (dissolved oxygen <2 mg L-1) that caused mortalities of benthic communities, fish, turtles, birds, and marine mammals. Runoff alone provided insufficient nitrogen to support this bloom. We pose the hypothesis that submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) provides the missing nutrients, and indeed can trigger and support the recurrent red tides off west-central Florida. SGD inputs of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) in Tampa Bay alone are ???35% of that discharged by all central Florida rivers draining west combined. We propose that the unusual number of hurricanes in 2004 resulted in high runoff, and in higher than normal SGD emerging along the west Florida coast throughout 2005, initiating and fueling the persistent HAB. This mechanism may also explain recurrent red tides in other coastal regions of the Gulf of Mexico. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. Central Florida Film Production Technology Training Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valencia Community Coll., Orlando, FL.

    The Central Florida Film Production Technology Training program provided training to prepare persons for employment in the motion picture industry. Students were trained in stagecraft, sound, set construction, camera/editing, and post production. The project also developed a curriculum model that could be used for establishing an Associate in…

  17. Pyrethroid resistance is widespread among Florida populations of Aedes aegypti

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aedes aegypti is an efficient vector of a number of diseases that affect man and is of increasing concern because of the reemergence of dengue and recent identification of locally acquired chikungunya in Florida. Pesticide resistance in this species has been demonstrated in several neighboring coun...

  18. Sexuality Education in Florida: Content, Context, and Controversy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodge, Brian; Zachry, Kristina; Reece, Michael; Lopez, Ellen D. S.; Herbenick, Debby; Gant, Kristin; Tanner, Amanda; Martinez, Omar

    2008-01-01

    As with many states, Florida has official directives that are intended to influence what type of sexuality education, if any, takes place in public school classrooms. However, little is known about contextual factors that facilitate or challenge the ability of teachers to implement effective sexuality education initiatives. Levels of sexually…

  19. 77 FR 21492 - Tomatoes Grown in Florida; Increased Assessment Rate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-10

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 966 Tomatoes Grown in Florida; Increased... ``Act.'' The Department of Agriculture (USDA) is issuing this rule in conformance with Executive Order... would be applicable to all assessable tomatoes beginning on August 1, 2011, and continue until...

  20. Development of a University of South Florida Student Rating Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Follman, John

    The statistical results of administering a newly developed student rating scale of instructor effectiveness at the University of South Florida (USF) are analyzed, and the development and refinement of the scale are described. The scale was originally developed during the fall 1981 semester and was administered to 1,115 USF students. The scale…

  1. Florida and Illinois: Civics Initiatives, No Law Required

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millard, Maria; Delander, Brady

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1970s, public engagement has declined, generating great concern for some about the future of our nation's democracy. Some consider this decline a national crisis. Two states, Illinois and Florida, have made significant efforts--without legislation--to create a network of academic institutions committed to providing students with…

  2. REGIONAL MONITORING OF CORAL CONDITION IN THE FLORIDA KEYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fisher, William S. and Deborah L. Santavy. 2004. Regional Monitoring of Coral Condition in Florida Keys (Abstract). Presented at the Monitoring Science and Technology Symposium, 20-24 September 2004, Denver, CO. 1 p. (ERL,GB R1020).

    Coral reefs have experienced unpreceden...

  3. Resilience of Florida Keys coral communities following large scale disturbances

    EPA Science Inventory

    The decline of coral reefs in the Caribbean over the last 40 years has been attributed to multiple chronic stressors and episodic large-scale disturbances. This study assessed the resilience of coral communities in two different regions of the Florida Keys reef system between 199...

  4. TEMPORAL TRENDS IN THE HEALTH OF SOUTH FLORIDA CORAL REEFS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Barron, M.G., D.L. Santavy, L. MacLaughlin, E. Mueller, E. Peters, B. Quarles and J. Campbell. In press. Temporal Trends in the Health of South Florida Coral Reefs (Abstract). To be presented at the SETAC Fourth World Congress, 14-18 November 2004, Portland, OR. 1 p. (ERL,GB R100...

  5. Implementing Ninth Grade Academies in Broward County, Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legters, Nettie; Parise, Leigh; Rappaport, Shelley

    2013-01-01

    Researchers from MDRC and Johns Hopkins University partnered with Florida's Broward County Public Schools (BCPS) in 2009 to launch an independent evaluation of the district's initiative to implement Ninth Grade Academies (NGAs) in every district high school. An NGA is a self-contained learning community for ninth-graders that operates as…

  6. Babesia microti in rodents and raccoons from northeast Florida.

    PubMed

    Clark, Kerry; Savick, Kyla; Butler, Joseph

    2012-12-01

    Human babesiosis in the United States is caused most commonly by the intraerythrocytic protozoan parasite, Babesia microti . Although a few reports have described evidence of Babesia species in animals in Florida, to date Babesia microti specifically has not been reported from Florida or most other southern states. To determine if the organism is present in vertebrates in the region, small mammals were trapped and sampled at 2 sites in northeastern Florida, and DNA extracts from blood samples were screened for B. microti DNA via PCR assays targeting portions of the nuclear small subunit rRNA (18S rDNA) and beta-tubulin genes. Amplified fragments from representative samples of PCR-positive hosts were sequenced and compared phylogenetically to reference strains of Babesia species. The B. microti strains found in cotton rats ( Sigmodon hispidus ) most closely resembles B. microti sensu stricto strains that are pathogenic to humans, and strains found in raccoons ( Procyon lotor ) most closely resembles previously described raccoon-related strains of B. microti sensu lato. The results of this study suggest that B. microti is prevalent among cotton rats and raccoons at some sites in northeast Florida and may pose a risk to humans in the region.

  7. 50 CFR 654.23 - Southwest Florida seasonal trawl closure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Southwest Florida seasonal trawl closure. 654.23 Section 654.23 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE STONE CRAB FISHERY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO...

  8. Promising Practices in Florida: Integrating Academic and Vocational Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Betty, Comp.

    This document is a compilation of 90 successful interdisciplinary projects and activities and integrated academic and vocational curriculum ideas implemented in Florida during the past 3 years. The activities and projects have been submitted by teachers and have not been officially evaluated or reviewed. Each description provides this information:…

  9. University of Florida Annual Accountability Report, 2013-14

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Board of Governors, State University System of Florida, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This statistical report provides data tables on the University of Florida (UF's) financial resources, personnel, enrollment, undergraduate education, graduate education, and research & economic development. Highlights of UF's achievements in the 2013-2014 academic year include: (1) Upon being named the state's highest-achieving preeminent…

  10. Florida Polytechnic University Annual Accountability Report, 2013-14

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Board of Governors, State University System of Florida, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Florida Polytechnic University offers industry focused, cutting-edge STEM degree programs in the College of Engineering and the College of Innovation and Technology. As a new university, they have the ability to adapt and be responsive to their industry partners' needs in a timely manner. The curriculum is cross-discipline and includes lab and…

  11. Stories of Politics and Policy: Florida's Higher Education Governance Reorganization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Michael R.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates the changes in the structure of state-level governance for universities in Florida from 2000 to 2002, and examines three distinct narratives that explain the processes of and the reasons for the structural changes. The author presents three specific sets of literature which help set the framework for examining the recent…

  12. Florida's Public Education Spending. School Choice Issues in the State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aud, Susan

    2006-01-01

    This study analyzes and explains Florida's education finance system. It explains the sources of revenue and the expenditure of funds, reporting figures for each of the state's 67 districts. It also analyzes the trend in current expenditures --that is, the day-to-day operating costs of schools--to address the question of whether they have been…

  13. Tospo-Resistant Variety Outlook for South Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tomato chlorotic spot virus, Tomato spotted wilt virus and/or Groundnut ringspot virus have occurred every season since being introduced to south Florida. With each subsequent season disease severity has increased. Use of insecticides for management of the thrips vector has proven ineffective in p...

  14. The Fact Book: Report for the Florida Community College System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Div. of Community Colleges.

    This fact book for the Florida Community College System (FCCS) is divided into the fallowing categories: (1) Student Information, which includes fall, annual, FTE, and program enrollment statistics, as well as credit program completion statistics; (2) Employee Information, which includes statistics regarding employee headcount by occupational…

  15. Business. Revised Summary Report: Technical Employment in Northeast Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William E.; And Others

    The document is one of five summary reports, all part of a Pre-Technical Curriculum Planning Project for secondary students who aspire to technical employment or post secondary technical education. This report represents the results of an assessment of the northeast Florida areas technical occupations in business. A three-phase approach was…

  16. Florida Atlantic University Annual Accountability Report, 2013-14

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Board of Governors, State University System of Florida, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Florida Atlantic University (FAU) is furthering its multifaceted mission of research, scholarship, creative activity, teaching and community engagement in ways designed to support an organizational culture that is, first and foremost, dedicated to student success. By providing increased academic advising and career exploration services, removing…

  17. A Survey Assessment of Florida's Fit To Achieve Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sander, Allan N.; And Others

    This study examined the impact of a Florida State Department of Education project entitled Fit to Achieve--a cardiovascular fitness education program for elementary school children. Of the teachers implementing the program, 24 elementary physical educators and 134 elementary classroom teachers responded to a survey that asked for information on…

  18. Release and establishment of Megamelus scutellaris (Hemiptera: Delphacidae) in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Megamelus scutellaris (Berg) (Hemiptera: Delphacidae) was recently developed as a classical biological control agent for waterhyacinth, Eichhornia crassipes Mart. Solms, and released in Florida. Releases were conducted at 10 sites around the state every 4-6 weeks until late fall then halted until t...

  19. 77 FR 47814 - Florida National Forests Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-10

    ... to view comments. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Denise Rains, Public Affairs Officer, National... time for oral comments must be sent to Denise Rains, U.S. Forest Service, 325 John Knox Road, Suite F..., Attention: Denise Rains. A summary of the meeting will be posted at http://www.fs.usda.gov/florida within...

  20. Mt. Dioxin: "Clean Up" Action Threatens Florida Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, Lois

    1995-01-01

    Addresses citizen action taken by African American communities in Pensacola, Florida located in close proximity to a Superfund site. Discusses how the community is organizing to stop site clean-up efforts that residents claim have unjustly increased their already high exposure to toxins such as dioxin. (LZ)