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Sample records for flow boiling conditions

  1. Flow regimes and mechanistic modeling of critical heat flux under subcooled flow boiling conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Corre, Jean-Marie

    Thermal performance of heat flux controlled boiling heat exchangers are usually limited by the Critical Heat Flux (CHF) above which the heat transfer degrades quickly, possibly leading to heater overheating and destruction. In an effort to better understand the phenomena, a literature review of CHF experimental visualizations under subcooled flow boiling conditions was performed and systematically analyzed. Three major types of CHF flow regimes were identified (bubbly, vapor clot and slug flow regime) and a CHF flow regime map was developed, based on a dimensional analysis of the phenomena and available data. It was found that for similar geometric characteristics and pressure, a Weber number (We)/thermodynamic quality (x) map can be used to predict the CHF flow regime. Based on the experimental observations and the review of the available CHF mechanistic models under subcooled flow boiling conditions, hypothetical CHF mechanisms were selected for each CHF flow regime, all based on a concept of wall dry spot overheating, rewetting prevention and subsequent dry spot spreading. It is postulated that a high local wall superheat occurs locally in a dry area of the heated wall, due to a cyclical event inherent to the considered CHF two-phase flow regime, preventing rewetting (Leidenfrost effect). The selected modeling concept has the potential to span the CHF conditions from highly subcooled bubbly flow to early stage of annular flow. A numerical model using a two-dimensional transient thermal analysis of the heater undergoing nucleation was developed to mechanistically predict CHF in the case of a bubbly flow regime. In this type of CHF two-phase flow regime, the high local wall superheat occurs underneath a nucleating bubble at the time of bubble departure. The model simulates the spatial and temporal heater temperature variations during nucleation at the wall, accounting for the stochastic nature of the boiling phenomena. The model has also the potential to evaluate

  2. Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment is another investigation that examines the flow of a mixture of liquids and the vapors they produce when in contact with hot space system equipment. Coo...

  3. An experimental study on sub-cooled flow boiling CHF of R134a at low pressure condition with atmospheric pressure (AP) plasma assisted surface modification

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Seung Jun; Zou, Ling; Jones, Barclay G.

    2015-02-01

    In this study, sub-cooled flow boiling critical heat flux tests at low pressure were conducted in a rectangular flow channel with one uniformly heated surface, using simulant fluid R-134a as coolant. The experiments were conducted under the following conditions: (1) inlet pressure (P) of 400-800 kPa, (2) mass flux (G) of 124-248 kg/m2s, (3) inlet sub-cooling enthalpy (ΔHi) of 12~ 26 kJ/kg. Parametric trends of macroscopic system parameters (G, P, Hi) were examined by changing inlet conditions. Those trends were found to be generally consistent with previous understandings of CHF behavior at low pressure condition (i.e. reduced pressure less than 0.2). A fluid-to-fluid scaling model was utilized to convert the test data obtained with the simulant fluid (R-134a) into the prototypical fluid (water). The comparison between the converted CHF of equivalent water and CHF look-up table with same operation conditions were conducted, which showed good agreement. Furthermore, the effect of surface wettability on CHF was also investigated by applying atmospheric pressure plasma (AP-Plasma) treatment to modify the surface characteristic. With AP-Plasma treatment, the change of microscopic surface characteristic was measured in terms of static contact angle. The static contact angle was reduced from 80° on original non-treated surface to 15° on treated surface. An enhancement of 18% on CHF values under flow boiling conditions were observed on AP-Plasma treated surfaces compared to those on non-treated heating surfaces.

  4. Thermodynamics of Flow Boiling Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collado, F. J.

    2003-05-01

    Convective boiling in sub-cooled water flowing through a heated channel is essential in many engineering applications where high heat flux needs to be accommodated. It has been customary to represent the heat transfer by the boiling curve, which shows the heat flux versus the wall-minus-saturation temperature difference. However it is a rather complicated problem, and recent revisions of two-phase flow and heat transfer note that calculated values of boiling heat transfer coefficients present many uncertainties. Quite recently, the author has shown that the average thermal gap in the heated channel (the wall temperature minus the average temperature of the coolant) was tightly connected with the thermodynamic efficiency of a theoretical reversible engine placed in this thermal gap. In this work, whereas this correlation is checked again with data taken by General Electric (task III) for water at high pressure, a possible connection between this wall efficiency and the reversible-work theorem is explored.

  5. Development of Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment on the International Space Station- Normal and Low Gravity Flow Boiling Experiment Development and Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry K.; Hall, Nancy R.; Hasan, Mohammad M.; Wagner, James D.; May, Rochelle L.; Mackey, Jeffrey R.; Kolacz, John S.; Butcher, Robert L.; Frankenfield, Bruce J.; Mudawar, Issam; Konichi, Chris; Hyounsoon, Lee

    2013-01-01

    Flow boiling and condensation have been identified as two key mechanisms for heat transport that are vital for achieving weight and volume reduction as well as performance enhancement in future space systems. Since inertia driven flows are demanding on power usage, lower flows are desirable. However, in microgravity, lower flows are dominated by forces other than inertia (like the capillary force). It is of paramount interest to investigate limits of low flows beyond which the flow is inertial enough to be gravity independent. One of the objectives of the Flow Boiling and Condensation Flight Experiment sets to investigate these limits for flow boiling and condensation. A two-phase flow loop consisting of a Flow Boiling Module and two Condensation Modules has been developed to experimentally study flow boiling condensation heat transfer in the reduced gravity environment provided by the reduced gravity platform. This effort supports the development of a flow boiling and condensation facility for the International Space Station (ISS). The closed loop test facility is designed to deliver the test fluid, FC-72 to the inlet of any one of the test modules at specified thermodynamic and flow conditions. The zero-g-aircraft tests will provide subcooled and saturated flow boiling critical heat flux and flow condensation heat transfer data over wide range of flow velocities. Additionally, these tests will verify the performance of all gravity sensitive components, such as evaporator, condenser and accumulator associated with the two-phase flow loop. We will present in this paper the breadboard development and testing results which consist of detailed performance evaluation of the heater and condenser combination in reduced and normal gravity. We will also present the design of the reduced gravity aircraft rack and the results of the ground flow boiling heat transfer testing performed with the Flow Boiling Module that is designed to investigate flow boiling heat transfer and

  6. Enhancements of Nucleate Boiling Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Nengli; Chao, David F.; Yang, W. J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents two means for enhancing nucleate boiling and critical heat flux under microgravity conditions: using micro-configured metal-graphite composites as the boiling surface and dilute aqueous solutions of long-chain alcohols as the working fluid. In the former, thermocapillary force induced by temperature difference between the graphite-fiber tips and the metal matrix plays an important role in bubble detachment. Thus boiling-heat transfer performance does not deteriorate in a reduced-gravity environment. In the latter cases, the surface tension-temperature gradient of the long-chain alcohol solutions turns positive as the temperature exceeds a certain value. Consequently, the Marangoni effect does not impede, but rather aids in bubble departure from the heating surface. This feature is most favorable in microgravity. As a result, the bubble size of departure is substantially reduced at higher frequencies. Based on the existing experimental data, and a two-tier theoretical model, correlation formulas are derived for nucleate boiling on the copper-graphite and aluminum-graphite composite surfaces, in both the isolated and coalesced bubble regimes. In addition, performance equations for nucleate boiling and critical heat flux in dilute aqueous solutions of long-chain alcohols are obtained.

  7. Design inputs document: Boiling behavior during flow instability

    SciTech Connect

    Coutts, D.A.

    1991-12-31

    The coolant flow in a nuclear reactor core under normal operating conditions is kept as a subcooled liquid. This coolant is evenly distributed throughout the multiple flow channels with a uniform pressure profile across each coolant flow channel. If the coolant flow is reduced, the flow through individual channels will also decrease. A decrease in coolant flow will result in higher coolant temperatures if the heat flux is not reduced. When flow is significantly decreased, localized boiling may occur. This localized boiling can restrict coolant flow and the ability to transfer heat out of the reactor system. The maximum operating power for the reactor may be limited by how the coolant system reacts to a flow instability. One of the methods to assure safe operation during a reducing flow instability, is to operate at a power level below that necessary to initiate a flow excursion. Several correlations have been used to predict the conditions which precede a flow excursion. These correlations rely on the steady state behavior of the coolant and are based on steady state testing. This task will evaluate if there are any deviations between the actual transient flow excursion behavior and the flow excursion behavior based on steady state correlations (ONB, OSV, and CHF). Correlations will be developed which will allow a comparison between the time to excursive behavior predicted using steady state techniques and the actual time to excursive behavior.

  8. Experimental investigation of flow-boiling heat transfer under microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lui, R. K.; Kawaji, M.; Ogushi, T.

    An experimental apparatus has been constructed and used to investigate one-component flow-boiling heat transfer under microgravity conditions. Freon-113 was injected at a constant rate between 35 cu cm/s and 75 cu cm/s into a cylindrical stainless steel test section (L 914.4 mm, O.D. 12.5 mm, I.D. 12.0 mm). The horizontal test section was heated externally up to 30 kW/sq m by a flexible strip heater. The subcooled freon was boiled within the length of the test section to produce two-phase flow. Thermocouples attached to the outer surface of the test section measured the steady tube wall temperature profiles. The resulting two-phase flow was then condensed and cooled before being recirculated in the flow loop. Experiments under microgravity were performed aboard NASA's KC-135 aircraft. Preliminary tests have indicated satisfactory operation of the experimental apparatus. Limited data showed that gravity has a small effect on subcooled boiling heat transfer at high mass velocities (G = 685 km/sq m.s). On the other hand, heat transfer coefficients increased slightly (5%) during microgravity for lower mass velocities (G = 468 kg/sq m.s.). Further experiments aboard the KC-135 are planned for June, 1992.

  9. Evaluation of correlations of flow boiling heat transfer of R22 in horizontal channels.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhanru; Fang, Xiande; Li, Dingkun

    2013-01-01

    The calculation of two-phase flow boiling heat transfer of R22 in channels is required in a variety of applications, such as chemical process cooling systems, refrigeration, and air conditioning. A number of correlations for flow boiling heat transfer in channels have been proposed. This work evaluates the existing correlations for flow boiling heat transfer coefficient with 1669 experimental data points of flow boiling heat transfer of R22 collected from 18 published papers. The top two correlations for R22 are those of Liu and Winterton (1991) and Fang (2013), with the mean absolute deviation of 32.7% and 32.8%, respectively. More studies should be carried out to develop better ones. Effects of channel dimension and vapor quality on heat transfer are analyzed, and the results provide valuable information for further research in the correlation of two-phase flow boiling heat transfer of R22 in channels.

  10. Evaluation of correlations of flow boiling heat transfer of R22 in horizontal channels.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhanru; Fang, Xiande; Li, Dingkun

    2013-01-01

    The calculation of two-phase flow boiling heat transfer of R22 in channels is required in a variety of applications, such as chemical process cooling systems, refrigeration, and air conditioning. A number of correlations for flow boiling heat transfer in channels have been proposed. This work evaluates the existing correlations for flow boiling heat transfer coefficient with 1669 experimental data points of flow boiling heat transfer of R22 collected from 18 published papers. The top two correlations for R22 are those of Liu and Winterton (1991) and Fang (2013), with the mean absolute deviation of 32.7% and 32.8%, respectively. More studies should be carried out to develop better ones. Effects of channel dimension and vapor quality on heat transfer are analyzed, and the results provide valuable information for further research in the correlation of two-phase flow boiling heat transfer of R22 in channels. PMID:23956695

  11. Boiling radial flow in fractures of varying wall porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Barnitt, Robb Allan

    2000-06-01

    The focus of this report is the coupling of conductive heat transfer and boiling convective heat transfer, with boiling flow in a rock fracture. A series of experiments observed differences in boiling regimes and behavior, and attempted to quantify a boiling convection coefficient. The experimental study involved boiling radial flow in a simulated fracture, bounded by a variety of materials. Nonporous and impermeable aluminum, highly porous and permeable Berea sandstone, and minimally porous and permeable graywacke from The Geysers geothermal field. On nonporous surfaces, the heat flux was not strongly coupled to injection rate into the fracture. However, for porous surfaces, heat flux, and associated values of excess temperature and a boiling convection coefficient exhibited variation with injection rate. Nucleation was shown to occur not upon the visible surface of porous materials, but a distance below the surface, within the matrix. The depth of boiling was a function of injection rate, thermal power supplied to the fracture, and the porosity and permeability of the rock. Although matrix boiling beyond fracture wall may apply only to a finite radius around the point of injection, higher values of heat flux and a boiling convection coefficient may be realized with boiling in a porous, rather than nonporous surface bounded fracture.

  12. Study on critical heat flux enhancement in flow boiling of SiC nano-fluids under low pressure and low flow conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. W.; Park, S. D.; Kang, S.; Kim, S. M.; Seo, H.; Lee, D. W.; Bang, I. C.

    2012-07-01

    Critical heat flux (CHF) is the thermal limit of a phenomenon in which a phase change occurs during heating (such as bubbles forming on a metal surface used to heat water), which suddenly decreases the heat transfer efficiency, thus causing localized overheating of the heating surface. The enhancement of CHF can increase the safety margins and allow operation at higher heat fluxes; thus, it can increase the economy. A very interesting characteristics of nano-fluids is their ability to significantly enhance the CHF. nano-fluids are nano-technology-based colloidal dispersions engineered through stable suspending of nanoparticles. All experiments were performed in round tubes with an inner diameter of 0.01041 m and a length of 0.5 m under low pressure and low flow (LPLF) conditions at a fixed inlet temperature using water, 0.01 vol. % Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/water and SiC/water nano-fluids. It was found that the CHF of the nano-fluids was enhanced and the CHF of the SiC/water nano-fluid was more enhanced than that of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/water nano-fluid. (authors)

  13. High heat flux burnout in subcooled flow boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celata, G. P.; Cumo, M.; Mariani, A.

    1995-09-01

    The paper reports the results of an experimental research carried out at the Heat Transfer Division of the Energy Department, C.R. Casaccia, on the thermal hydraulic characterization of subcooled flow boiling CHF under typical conditions of thermonuclear fusion reactors, i.e. high liquid velocity and subcooling. The experiment was carried out exploring the following parameters: channel diameter (from 2.5 to 8.0 mm), heated length (10 and 15 cm), liquid velocity (from 2 to 40 m/s), exit pressure (from atmospheric to 5.0 MPa), inlet temperature (from 30 to 80 °C), channel orientation (vertical and horizontal). A maximum CHF value of 60.6 MW/m2 has been obtained under the following conditions: T in=30°, p=2.5 MPa, u=40 m/s, D=2.5 mm (smooth channel) Turbulence promoters (helically coiled wires) have been employed to further enhance the CHF attainable with subcooled flow boiling. Helically coiled wires allow an increase of 50% of the maximum CHF obtained with smooth channels.

  14. Bubble Dynamical Behavior and Flow Boiling Characteristics of Slug Flow in Hairpin Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, M.; Peng, X. F.

    2010-03-01

    A series of experiments was conducted to investigate the flow boiling of R141b in hairpin tubes. A focus was addressed on visually observing flow boiling and two-phase flow in U-turn bends of a vertical upward hairpin tube with inner diameter of 6 mm at liquid velocities of 0.098, 0.147 and 0.196 m/s and heat fluxes in the range of 6191 W/m2 to 24763 W/m2, respectively. The bend could break up large vapor slugs in two ways, bubble tail fracture and bubble rupture, which induced significant effects on local heat and mass transfer. Under certain experimental conditions, small bubbles formed in the bend could not coalesce to be large vapor slugs but accumulate to form a unique flow pattern and greatly release thermal non-equilibrium in the rest part of hairpin the tube.

  15. Pool and flow boiling in variable and microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merte, Herman, Jr.

    1994-01-01

    As is well known, boiling is an effective mode of heat transfer in that high heat flux levels are possible with relatively small temperature differences. Its optimal application requires that the process be adequately understood. A measure of the understanding of any physical event lies in the ability to predict its behavior in terms of the relevant parameters. Despite many years of research the predictability of boiling is currently possible only for quite specialized circumstances, e.g., the critical heat flux and film boiling for the pool boiling case, and then only with special geometries. Variable gravity down to microgravity provides the opportunity to test this understanding, but possibly more important, by changing the dimensional and time scales involved permits more detailed observations of elements involved in the boiling process, and perhaps discloses phenomena heretofore unknown. The focus here is on nucleate boiling although, as will be demonstrated below, under but certain circumstances in microgravity it can take place concurrently with the dryout process. In the presence of earth gravity or forced convection effects, the latter process is usually referred to as film boiling. However, no vapor film as such forms with pool boiling in microgravity, only dryout. Initial results are presented here for pool boiling in microgravity, and were made possible at such an early date by the availability of the Get-Away-Specials (GAS). Also presented here are some results of ground testing of a flow loop for the study of low velocity boiling, eventually to take place also in microgravity. In the interim, variable buoyancy normal to the heater surface is achieved by rotation of the entire loop relative to earth gravity. Of course, this is at the expense of varying the buoyancy parallel to the heater surface. Two questions which must be resolved early in the study of flow boiling in microgravity are (1) the lower limits of liquid flow velocity where buoyancy

  16. Interface oscillation of subcooled flow boiling in locally heated microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J. T.; Peng, X. F.

    2009-02-01

    An investigation was conducted to understand flow boiling of subcooled de-ionized water in locally heated parallel microchannels. High-speed visualization technology was employed to visually observe the transient phase change process in an individual microchannel. Signal analysis method was employed in studying the interface movement and phase change process. The phase change at locally heated condition was different from those at entirely heated condition where elongated bubble(s) stayed quasi-stable for a long time without venting out. Diversified and intensive interface oscillation was observed occurring on both of the upstream and downstream bubble caps. Evaporation and condensation modes were characterized with distinguished oscillation frequencies. The film-driven oscillations of both evaporating and condensing interfaces generally operated at higher frequencies than the oscillations driven by nucleation or dropwise condensation.

  17. Diabatic flow boiling in circular transparent microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvério, V.; Moreira, A. L. N.

    2012-11-01

    The horizontally assembled circular microchannel (Dh= 543μm, LHT = 60mm) made of transparent borosilicate glass is kept under constant wall heat flux conditions by means of a transparent metallic thin film deposit at the channel external wall as in Silvério and Moreira [1]. Heat transfer and pressure drop measurements are achieved by measuring the temperature and pressure at the channel inlet and outlet. Temperature is also measured along the channel outer wall. Experiments are carried with two different fluids, ethanol and methanol. Inlet liquid subcooling is of 297K, mass fluxes, G, up to 689kg.m-2.s-1 and imposed heat fluxes, q"s, up to 12.5W.cm-2 at ΔTsub from 0.8 to 50K. Synchronized high-speed visualization and microscope optics are used to determine dominant two-phase flow patterns and characterize hydrodynamic instabilities. Vapor qualities, χ, of -0.1 (indicating a subcooled liquid state) to 0.5 are under investigation. Semi-periodic variation of the flow patterns is noticeable for different flow conditions.

  18. Experimental study on microscopic evolving process of boiling overheat liquor in boiler under microcracking condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sining; He, Xuechao; Sun, Jinhua

    2009-07-01

    Boilers are frequently used in agricultural engineering. After micro cracks appear on the wall of the boiler for high pressure saturated liquor, the containing liquid will be overheated, rapidly boiled and expanded, which may result in explosion of the whole container. The evolving processes differ greatly by cracking conditions. In the experiment conducted in the this article, we made a small sized experimental device and applied high speed photography technology observing the simulated fierce boiling process of the high temperature and high pressure saturated water under overheat condition when micro cracking appears on boiler wall. According to our study, lower depressurization rate will suppress the boiling intensity of the overheated liquid and slow the growth of bubbles, decelerating the expansion of the two-phase flow compared with the boiling liquid expanding vapor explosion. The magnitude of overpressure in the container is also relatively smaller than overpressure in BLEVE.

  19. Changes of enthalpy slope in subcooled flow boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collado, Francisco J.; Monné, Carlos; Pascau, Antonio

    2006-03-01

    Void fraction data in subcooled flow boiling of water at low pressure measured by General Electric in the 1960s are analyzed following the classical model of Griffith et al. (in Proceedings of ASME-AIChE heat transfer conference, #58-HT-19, 1958). In addition, a new proposal for analyzing one-dimensional steady flow boiling is used. This is based on the physical fact that if the two phases have different velocities, they cannot cover the same distance—the control volume length—in the same time. So a slight modification of the heat balance is suggested, i.e., the explicit inclusion of the vapor liquid velocity ratio or slip ratio as scaling time factor between the phases, which is successfully checked against the data. Finally, the prediction of void fraction using correlations of the net rate of change of vapor enthalpy in the fully developed regime of subcooled flow boiling is explored.

  20. A study of flow boiling phenomena using real time neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novog, David Raymond

    decreased with increasing radial distance. For swirling flow, the void concentration was highest in the center of each subchannel formed by the twisted tape insert, producing two local void maxima at each axial position. Furthermore, the instantaneous RTNR results show that the effects of bubble agglomeration change from one geometry to the next. To further examine the application of RTNR for void distribution measurement, both vertical and horizontal orientations were examined. These experimental results show similar cross sectional averaged axial distributions of the void fraction but significant differences in the local void behavior. The HS-XCT experiments were conducted on swirl-flow boiling of Refrigerant 123 at similar conditions as the RTNR experiments. These tests were conducted to qualitatively compare and verify the void distribution and behavior obtained using RTNR techniques. The HS-XCT results verify that during smooth flow boiling in a vertical tube the void tends to concentrate in the center of the channel and decrease outward to the channel walls. For swirl flow, the void tends to concentrate near the center of each subchannel formed by the twisted tape. Furthermore, wall region void fraction for smooth-flow boiling was significantly higher than swirling flow conditions due to the significant centrifugal forces present in swirl-flow. These centrifugal forces may improve the heat transfer and dryout behavior during swirl-flow conditions. This work contributes to the development of two-phase flow diagnostics based on penetrating radiative techniques, i.e., RTNR and HS-XCT for void distribution measurement, and enhances the knowledge of flow boiling systems. The application of HS-XCT and RTNR for the study of flow boiling phenomena using smooth and swirl-flow geometries has clearly demonstrated that differences in local void distribution result in differences in heat transfer behavior.

  1. Boils

    MedlinePlus

    ... the boil is very bad or comes back. Antibacterial soaps and creams cannot help much once a ... following may help prevent the spread of infection: Antibacterial soaps Antiseptic (germ-killing) washes Keeping clean (such ...

  2. The bubbly-slug transition in a boiling two-phase flow under microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiper, Ali M.; Swanson, T. D.

    1993-01-01

    A theory is presented to describe, in reduced gravity flow boiling, the transition from bubbly two-phase flow to slug flow. It is shown that characteristics of the bubbly flow and the transition were controlled by the mechanism of vapor bubble growth dynamics. By considering in nucleate boiling, behavior of vapor bubbles at departure from a heated surface a condition required for transition was determined. Although required, this condition alone could not ensure coalescence of bubbles to cause the transition to slug two-phase flow. The condition leading to coalescence, therefore, was obtained by examining oscillations of vapor bubbles following their departure from the heated surface. The predicted transition conditions were compared with the prediction and test data reported for adiabatic reduced gravity two-phase flow, and good qualitative agreement was found.

  3. Flow Boiling Critical Heat Flux in Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mudawar, Issam; Zhang, Hui; Hasan, Mohammad M.

    2004-01-01

    This study provides systematic method for reducing power consumption in reduced gravity systems by adopting minimum velocity required to provide adequate CHF and preclude detrimental effects of reduced gravity . This study proves it is possible to use existing 1 ge flow boiling and CHF correlations and models to design reduced gravity systems provided minimum velocity criteria are met

  4. A Mechanistic Study of Nucleate Boiling Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhir, V. K.; Warrier, G. R.; Hasan, M. M.

    2002-01-01

    The overall objective of this work is to study nucleate boiling heat transfer under microgravity conditions in such a way that while providing basic knowledge of the phenomena, it also leads to development of simulation models and correlations that can be used as design tools for a wide range of gravity levels. In the study a building block type of approach is used and both pool and low velocity flow boiling are investigated. Starting with experiments using a single bubble, the complexity of the experiments is increased to two or three inline bubbles, to five bubbles placed on a two-dimensional grid. Finally, experiments are conducted where a large number of prescribed cavities nucleate on the heater and when a commercial surface is used. So far experiments have been conducted at earth normal gravity and in the reduced gravity environment of the KC-135 aircraft whereas experiments on the space station are planned. Modeling/complete numerical simulation of the boiling process is an integral part of the total effort. Experiments conducted with single bubbles formed on a nucleation site microfabricated on a polished silicon wafer show that for gravity levels (g) varying from 1.5g(sub e) to 0.01g(sub e), the bubble diameter at departure varies approximately as (g(sub e)/g)(exp 1/2) and the growth period as (g(sub e)/g). When bubbles merge either inline or in a plane, the bubble diameter at departure is found to be smaller than that obtained for a single bubble and shows a weaker dependence on the level of gravity. The possible reason is that as the bubbles merge they create fluid circulation around the bubbles, which in turn induces a lift force that is responsible for the earlier departure of the bubbles. The verification of this proposition is being sought through numerical simulations. There is a merger of two inline, three inline, and several bubbles in a plane in the low gravity environment of the KC-135 aircraft. After merger and before departure, a mushroom type

  5. Simulation of steady-state and transient sodium boiling experiments in a seven-pin bundle under flow rundown conditions by using BODYFIT-1FE code

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, B.C.J.; Sha, W.T.

    1981-01-01

    A seven-pin rod bundle under flow rundown conditions was simulated by using the computer code BODYFIT-1FE (BOunDarY-FITted Coordinate System - 1 phase, Fully-Elliptic). In this code, the complicated rod bundle configuration is first transformed into rectangular geometry with uniform meshes. The transformed governing equations for all the thermal-hydraulic variables are then solved. The results of the simulation are presented here. All the predicted values agree favorably with the measured data. 7 refs., 20 figs.

  6. Theoretical modeling of CHF for near-saturated pool boiling and flow boiling from short heaters using the interfacial lift-off criterion

    SciTech Connect

    Mudawar, I.; Galloway, J.E.; Gersey, C.O.

    1995-12-31

    Pool boiling and flow boiling were examined for near-saturated bulk conditions in order to determine the critical heat flux (CHF) trigger mechanism for each. Photographic studies of the wall region revealed features common to both situations. At fluxes below CHF, the vapor coalesces into a wavy layer which permits wetting only in wetting fronts, the portions of the liquid-vapor interface which contact the wall as a result of the interfacial waviness. Close examination of the interfacial features revealed the waves are generated from the lower edge of the heater in pool boiling and the heater`s upstream region in flow boiling. Wavelengths follow predictions based upon the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability criterion. Critical heat flux in both cases occurs when the pressure force exerted upon the interface due to interfacial curvature, which tends to preserve interfacial contact with the wall prior to CHF, is overcome by the momentum of vapor at the site of the first wetting front, causing the interface to lift away from the wall. It is shown this interfacial lift-off criterion facilitates accurate theoretical modeling of CHF in pool boiling and in flow boiling in both straight and curved channels.

  7. Flow-Boiling Critical Heat Flux Experiments Performed in Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasan, Mohammad M.; Mudawar, Issam

    2005-01-01

    Poor understanding of flow boiling in microgravity has recently emerged as a key obstacle to the development of many types of power generation and advanced life support systems intended for space exploration. The critical heat flux (CHF) is perhaps the most important thermal design parameter for boiling systems involving both heatflux-controlled devices and intense heat removal. Exceeding the CHF limit can lead to permanent damage, including physical burnout of the heat-dissipating device. The importance of the CHF limit creates an urgent need to develop predictive design tools to ensure both the safe and reliable operation of a two-phase thermal management system under the reduced-gravity (like that on the Moon and Mars) and microgravity environments of space. At present, very limited information is available on flow-boiling heat transfer and the CHF under these conditions.

  8. Effects of dynamic load on flow and heat transfer of two-phase boiling water in a horizontal pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Qiu-Ping; Song, Bao-Yin; Zhao, Mei; Cao, Xi

    2009-07-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to obtain the flow and heat transfer characteristics of single-phase water flow and two-phase pipe boiling water flow under high gravity (Hi-G) in present work. The experiments were conducted on a rotating platform, and boiling two-phase flow state was obtained by means of electric heating. The data were collected specifically in the test section, which was a lucite pipe with inner diameter of 20 mm and length of 400 mm. By changing the parameters, such as rotation speed, inlet temperature, flow rate, and etc., and analyzing the fluid resistance, effective heat and heat transfer coefficient of the experimental data, the effects of dynamic load on the flow and heat transfer characteristics of single phase water and two-phase boiling water flow were investigated and obtained. The two-phase flow patterns under Hi-G condition were obtained with a video camera. The results show that the dynamic load significantly influences the flow characteristic and boiling heat transfer of the two-phase pipe flow. As the direction of the dynamic load and the flow direction are opposite, the greater the dynamic load, the higher the outlet pressure and the flow resistance, and the lower the flow rate, the void fraction, the wall inner surface temperature and the heat transfer capability. Therefore, the dynamic load will block the fluid flow, enhance heat dissipation toward the ambient environment and reduce the heat transfer to the two-phase boiling flow.

  9. Considerations in predicting burnout of cylinders in flow boiling

    SciTech Connect

    Sadasivan, P.; Lienhard, J.H. )

    1992-02-01

    Previous investigations of the critical heat flux in flow boiling have resulted in widely different hydrodynamic mechanisms for the occurrence of burnout. Results of the present study indicate that existing models are not completely realistic representations of the process. The present study sorts out the influences of the far-wake bubble breakoff and vapor sheet characteristics, gravity, surface wettability, and heater surface temperature distribution on the peak heat flux in flow boiling on cylindrical heaters. The results indicate that burnout is dictated by near-surface effects. The controlling factor appears to be the vapor escape pattern close to the heater surface. It is also shown that a deficiency of liquid at the downstream end of the heater surface is not the cause of burnout.

  10. Effect of Running Parameters on Flow Boiling Instabilities in Microchannels.

    PubMed

    Zong, Lu-Xiang; Xu, Jin-Liang; Liu, Guo-Hua

    2015-04-01

    Flow boiling instability (FBI) in microchannels is undesirable because they can induce the mechanical vibrations and disturb the heat transfer characteristics. In this study, the synchronous optical visualization experimental system was set up. The pure acetone liquid was used as the working fluid, and the parallel triangle silicon microchannel heat sink was designed as the experimental section. With the heat flux ranging from 0-450 kW/m2 the microchannel demand average pressure drop-heater length (Δp(ave)L) curve for constant low mass flux, and the demand pressure drop-mass flux (Δp(ave)G) curve for constant length on main heater surface were obtained and studied. The effect of heat flux (q = 188.28, 256.00, and 299.87 kW/m2), length of main heater surface (L = 4.5, 6.25, and 8.00 mm), and mass flux (G = 188.97, 283.45, and 377.94 kg/m2s) on pressure drops (Ap) and temperatures at the central point of the main heater surface (Twc) were experimentally studied. The results showed that, heat flux, length of the main heater surface, and mass flux were identified as the important parameters to the boiling instability process. The boiling incipience (TBI) and critical heat flux (CHF) were early induced for the lower mass flux or the main heater surface with longer length. With heat flux increasing, the pressure drops were linearly and slightly decreased in the single liquid region but increased sharply in the two phase flow region, in which the flow boiling instabilities with apparent amplitude and long period were more easily triggered at high heat flux. Moreover, the system pressure was increased with the increase of the heat flux.

  11. Effect of Running Parameters on Flow Boiling Instabilities in Microchannels.

    PubMed

    Zong, Lu-Xiang; Xu, Jin-Liang; Liu, Guo-Hua

    2015-04-01

    Flow boiling instability (FBI) in microchannels is undesirable because they can induce the mechanical vibrations and disturb the heat transfer characteristics. In this study, the synchronous optical visualization experimental system was set up. The pure acetone liquid was used as the working fluid, and the parallel triangle silicon microchannel heat sink was designed as the experimental section. With the heat flux ranging from 0-450 kW/m2 the microchannel demand average pressure drop-heater length (Δp(ave)L) curve for constant low mass flux, and the demand pressure drop-mass flux (Δp(ave)G) curve for constant length on main heater surface were obtained and studied. The effect of heat flux (q = 188.28, 256.00, and 299.87 kW/m2), length of main heater surface (L = 4.5, 6.25, and 8.00 mm), and mass flux (G = 188.97, 283.45, and 377.94 kg/m2s) on pressure drops (Ap) and temperatures at the central point of the main heater surface (Twc) were experimentally studied. The results showed that, heat flux, length of the main heater surface, and mass flux were identified as the important parameters to the boiling instability process. The boiling incipience (TBI) and critical heat flux (CHF) were early induced for the lower mass flux or the main heater surface with longer length. With heat flux increasing, the pressure drops were linearly and slightly decreased in the single liquid region but increased sharply in the two phase flow region, in which the flow boiling instabilities with apparent amplitude and long period were more easily triggered at high heat flux. Moreover, the system pressure was increased with the increase of the heat flux. PMID:26353523

  12. Droplet impingement dynamics: effect of surface temperature during boiling and non-boiling conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jian; Liburdy, James A.; Pence, Deborah V.; Narayanan, Vinod

    2009-11-01

    This study investigates the hydrodynamic characteristics of droplet impingement on heated surfaces and compares the effect of surface temperature when using water and a nanofluid on a polished and nanostructured surface. Results are obtained for an impact Reynolds number and Weber number of approximately 1700 and 25, respectively. Three discs are used: polished silicon, nanostructured porous silicon and gold-coated polished silicon. Seven surface temperatures, including single-phase (non-boiling) and two-phase (boiling) conditions, are included. Droplet impact velocity, transient spreading diameter and dynamic contact angle are measured. Results of water and a water-based single-wall carbon-nanotube nanofluid impinging on a polished silicon surface are compared to determine the effects of nanoparticles on impinging dynamics. The nanofluid results in larger spreading velocities, larger spreading diameters and an increase in early-stage dynamic contact angle. Results of water impinging on both polished silicon and nanostructured silicon show that the nanostructured surface enhances the heat transfer for evaporative cooling at lower surface temperatures, which is indicated by a shorter evaporation time. Using a nanofluid or a nanostructured surface can reduce the total evaporation time up to 20% and 37%, respectively. Experimental data are compared with models that predict dynamic contact angle and non-dimensional maximum spreading diameter. Results show that the molecular-kinetic theory's dynamic contact angle model agrees well with current experimental data for later times, but over-predicts at early times. Predictions of maximum spreading diameter based on surface energy analyses indicate that these models over-predict unless empirical coefficients are adjusted to fit the test conditions. This is a consequence of underestimates of the dissipative energy for the conditions studied.

  13. Development and Capabilities of ISS Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry; Hasan, Mohammad; Balasubramaniam, R.; Patania, Michelle; Hall, Nancy; Wagner, James; Mackey, Jeffrey; Frankenfield, Bruce; Hauser, Daniel; Harpster, George; Nawrocki, David; Clapper, Randy; Kolacz, John; Butcher, Robert; May, Rochelle; Chao, David; Mudawar, Issam; Kharangate, Chirag R.; O'Neill, Lucas E.

    2015-01-01

    An experimental facility to perform flow boiling and condensation experiments in long duration microgravity environment is being designed for operation on the International Space Station (ISS). This work describes the design of the subsystems of the FBCE including the Fluid subsystem modules, data acquisition, controls, and diagnostics. Subsystems and components are designed within the constraints of the ISS Fluid Integrated Rack in terms of power availability, cooling capability, mass and volume, and most importantly the safety requirements. In this work we present the results of ground-based performance testing of the FBCE subsystem modules and test module which consist of the two condensation modules and the flow boiling module. During this testing, we evaluated the pressure drop profile across different components of the fluid subsystem, heater performance, on-orbit degassing subsystem, heat loss from different modules and components, and performance of the test modules. These results will be used in the refinement of the flight system design and build-up of the FBCE which is manifested for flight in late 2017-early 2018.

  14. Transition from Pool to Flow Boiling: The Effect of Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhir, Vijay K.

    2004-01-01

    Applications of boiling heat transfer in space can be found in the areas of thermal management, fluid handling and control, power systems, on-orbit storage and supply systems for cryogenic propellants and life support fluids, and for cooling of electronic packages for power systems associated with various instrumentation and control systems. Recent interest in exploration of Mars and other planets, and the concepts of in-situ resource utiliLation on Mars highlights the need to understand the effect of gravity on boiling heat transfer at gravity levels varying from 1>= g/g(sub e) >=10(exp -6). The objective of the proposed work was to develop a mechanistic understanding of nucleate boiling and critical heat flux under low and micro-gravity conditions when the velocity of the imposed flow is small. For pool boiling, the effect of reduced gravity is to stretch both the length scale as well as the time scale for the boiling process. At high flow velocities, the inertia of the liquid determines the time and the length scales and as such the gravitational acceleration plays little role. However, at low velocities and at low gravity levels both liquid inertia and buoyancy are of equal importance. At present, we have little understanding of the interacting roles of gravity and liquid inertia on the nucleate boiling process. Little data that has been reported in the literature does not have much practical value in that it can not serve as a basis for design of heat exchange components to be used in space. Both experimental and complete numerical simulations of the low velocity, low-gravity nucleate boiling process were carried out. A building block type of approach was used in that first the growth and detachment process of a single bubble and flow and heat transfer associated with the sliding motion of the bubble over the heater surface after detachment was studied. Liquid subcooling and flow velocity were varied parametrically. The experiments were conducted at 1 g(sub e

  15. Pressure drop, heat transfer, critical heat flux, and flow stability of two-phase flow boiling of water and ethylene glycol/water mixtures - final report for project "Efficent cooling in engines with nucleate boiling."

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, W.; France, D. M.; Routbort, J. L.

    2011-01-19

    Because of its order-of-magnitude higher heat transfer rates, there is interest in using controllable two-phase nucleate boiling instead of conventional single-phase forced convection in vehicular cooling systems to remove ever increasing heat loads and to eliminate potential hot spots in engines. However, the fundamental understanding of flow boiling mechanisms of a 50/50 ethylene glycol/water mixture under engineering application conditions is still limited. In addition, it is impractical to precisely maintain the volume concentration ratio of the ethylene glycol/water mixture coolant at 50/50. Therefore, any investigation into engine coolant characteristics should include a range of volume concentration ratios around the nominal 50/50 mark. In this study, the forced convective boiling heat transfer of distilled water and ethylene glycol/water mixtures with volume concentration ratios of 40/60, 50/50, and 60/40 in a 2.98-mm-inner-diameter circular tube has been investigated in both the horizontal flow and the vertical flow. The two-phase pressure drop, the forced convective boiling heat transfer coefficient, and the critical heat flux of the test fluids were determined experimentally over a range of the mass flux, the vapor mass quality, and the inlet subcooling through a new boiling data reduction procedure that allowed the analytical calculation of the fluid boiling temperatures along the experimental test section by applying the ideal mixture assumption and the equilibrium assumption along with Raoult's law. Based on the experimental data, predictive methods for the two-phase pressure drop, the forced convective boiling heat transfer coefficient, and the critical heat flux under engine application conditions were developed. The results summarized in this final project report provide the necessary information for designing and implementing nucleate-boiling vehicular cooling systems.

  16. Microscale flow visualization of nucleate boiling in small channels: Mechanisms influencing heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Kasza, K.E.; Didascalou, T.; Wambsganss, M.W.

    1997-07-01

    This paper describes the use of a new test apparatus employing flow visualization via ultra-high-speed video and microscope optics to study microscale nucleate boiling in a small, rectangular, heated channel. The results presented are for water. Because of confinement effects produced by the channel cross section being of the same nominal size as the individual vapor bubbles nucleating at discrete wall sites, flow regimes and heat transfer mechanisms that occur in small channels are shown to be considerably different than those in large channels. Flow visualization data are presented depicting discrete bubble/bubble and bubble/wall interactions for moderate and high heat flux. Quantitative data are also presented on nucleate bubble growth behavior for a single nucleation site in the form of growth rates, bubble sizes, and frequency of generation in the presence and absence of a thin wall liquid layer. Mechanistic boiling behavior and trends are observed which support the use of this type of research as a powerful means to gain fundamental insights into why, under some conditions, nucleate boiling heat transfer coefficients are considerably larger in small channels than in large channels.

  17. Effects of structural parameters on flow boiling performance of reentrant porous microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Daxiang; Tang, Yong; Shao, Haoran; Zeng, Jian; Zhou, Wei; Liang, Dejie

    2014-06-01

    Flow boiling within advanced microchannel heat sinks provides an efficient and attractive method for the cooling of microelectronics chips. In this study, a series of porous microchannels with Ω-shaped reentrant configurations were developed for application in heat sink cooling. The reentrant porous microchannels were fabricated by using a solid-state sintering method under the replication of specially designed sintering modules. Micro wire electrical discharge machining was utilized to process the graphite-based sintering modules. Two types of commonly used copper powder in heat transfer devices, i.e., spherical and irregular powder, with three fractions of particle sizes respectively, were utilized to construct the porous microchannel heat sinks. The effects of powder type and size on the flow boiling performance of reentrant porous microchannels, i.e., two-phase heat transfer, pressure drop and flow instabilities, were examined under boiling deionized water conditions. The test results show that enhanced two-phase heat transfer was achieved with the increase of particle size for the reentrant porous microchannels with spherical powder, while the reversed trend existed for the counterparts with irregular powder. The reentrant porous microchannels with irregular powder of the smallest particle size presented the best heat transfer performance and lowest pressure drop.

  18. Heat transfer coefficient for flow boiling in an annular mini gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hożejowska, Sylwia; Musiał, Tomasz; Piasecka, Magdalena

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this paper was to present the concept of mathematical models of heat transfer in flow boiling in an annular mini gap between the metal pipe with enhanced exterior surface and the external glass pipe. The one- and two-dimensional mathematical models were proposed to describe stationary heat transfer in the gap. A set of experimental data governed both the form of energy equations in cylindrical coordinates and the boundary conditions. The models were formulated to minimize the number of experimentally determined constants. Known temperature distributions in the enhanced surface and in the fluid helped to determine, from the Robin condition, the local heat transfer coefficients at the enhanced surface - fluid contact. The Trefftz method was used to find two-dimensional temperature distributions for the thermal conductive filler layer, enhanced surface and flowing fluid. The method of temperature calculation depended on whether the area of single-phase convection ended with boiling incipience in the gap or the two-phase flow region prevailed, with either fully developed bubbly flow or bubbly-slug flow. In the two-phase flow, the fluid temperature was calculated by Trefftz method. Trefftz functions for the Laplace equation and for the energy equation were used in the calculations.

  19. Self-sustained hydrodynamic oscillations in a natural-circulation two-phase-flow boiling loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, K. C.

    1969-01-01

    Results of an experimental and theoretical study of factors affecting self-sustaining hydrodynamic oscillations in boiling-water loops are reported. Data on flow variables, and the effects of geometry, subcooling and pressure on the development of oscillatory behavior in a natural-circulation two-phase-flow boiling loop are included.

  20. Modeling and numerical simulation of oscillatory two-phase flows, with application to boiling water nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Rosa, M.P.; Podowski, M.Z.

    1995-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the analysis of dynamics and stability of boiling channels and systems. The specific objectives are two-fold. One of them is to present the results of a study aimed at analyzing the effects of various modeling concepts and numerical approaches on the transient response and stability of parallel boiling channels. The other objective is to investigate the effect of closed-loop feedback on stability of a boiling water reactor (BWR). Various modeling and computational issues for parallel boiling channels are discussed, such as: the impact of the numerical discretization scheme for the node containing the moving boiling boundary on the convergence and accuracy of computations, and the effects of subcooled boiling and other two-phase flow phenomena on the predictions of marginal stability conditions. Furthermore, the effects are analyzed of local loss coefficients around the recirculation loop of a boiling water reactor on stability of the reactor system. An apparent paradox is explained concerning the impact of changing single-phase losses on loop stability. The calculations have been performed using the DYNOBOSS computer code. The results of DYNOBOSS validation against other computer codes and experimental data are shown.

  1. Net vapor generation point in boiling flow of trichlorotrifluoroethane at high pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougall, R. S.; Lippert, T. E.

    1973-01-01

    The conditions at which the void in subcooled boiling starts to undergo a rapid increase were studied experimentally. The experiments were performed in a 12.7 x 9.5 mm rectangular channel. Heating was from a 3.2 mm wide strip embedded in one wall. The pressure ranged from 9.45 to 20.7 bar, mass velocity from 600 to 7000 kg/sq m sec, and subcooling from 16 to 67 C. Photographs were used to determine when detached bubbles first appeared in the bulk flow. Measurements of bubble layer thickness along the wall were also made. Results showed that the point of net vapor generation is close to the occurrence of fully-developed boiling.

  2. Prediction of Parameters Distribution of Upward Boiling Two-Phase Flow With Two-Fluid Models

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Wei; Morel, Christophe

    2002-07-01

    In this paper, a multidimensional two-fluid model with additional turbulence k - {epsilon} equations is used to predict the two-phase parameters distribution in freon R12 boiling flow. The 3D module of the CATHARE code is used for numerical calculation. The DEBORA experiment has been chosen to evaluate our models. The radial profiles of the outlet parameters were measured by means of an optical probe. The comparison of the radial profiles of void fraction, liquid temperature, gas velocity and volumetric interfacial area at the end of the heated section shows that the multidimensional two-fluid model with proper constitutive relations can yield reasonably predicted results in boiling conditions. Sensitivity tests show that the turbulent dispersion force, which involves the void fraction gradient, plays an important role in determining the void fraction distribution; and the turbulence eddy viscosity is a significant factor to influence the liquid temperature distribution. (authors)

  3. Comparative study of heat transfer and pressure drop during flow boiling and flow condensation in minichannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikielewicz, Dariusz; Andrzejczyk, Rafał; Jakubowska, Blanka; Mikielewicz, Jarosław

    2014-09-01

    In the paper a method developed earlier by authors is applied to calculations of pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient for flow boiling and also flow condensation for some recent data collected from literature for such fluids as R404a, R600a, R290, R32,R134a, R1234yf and other. The modification of interface shear stresses between flow boiling and flow condensation in annular flow structure are considered through incorporation of the so called blowing parameter. The shear stress between vapor phase and liquid phase is generally a function of nonisothermal effects. The mechanism of modification of shear stresses at the vapor-liquid interface has been presented in detail. In case of annular flow it contributes to thickening and thinning of the liquid film, which corresponds to condensation and boiling respectively. There is also a different influence of heat flux on the modification of shear stress in the bubbly flow structure, where it affects bubble nucleation. In that case the effect of applied heat flux is considered. As a result a modified form of the two-phase flow multiplier is obtained, in which the nonadiabatic effect is clearly pronounced.

  4. Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment (FBCE) for the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mudawar, Issam; Hasan, Mohammad M.; Kharangate, Chirag; O'Neill, Lucas; Konishi, Chris; Nahra, Henry; Hall, Nancy; Balasubramaniam, R.; Mackey, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    The proposed research aims to develop an integrated two-phase flow boiling/condensation facility for the International Space Station (ISS) to serve as primary platform for obtaining two-phase flow and heat transfer data in microgravity.

  5. Bubble dynamics, two-phase flow, and boiling heat transfer in a microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Jacob N.

    1994-01-01

    The two-phase bubbly flow and boiling heat transfer in microgravity represents a substantial challenge to scientists and engineers and yet there is an urgent need to seek fundamental understanding in this area for future spacecraft design and space missions. At Washington State University, we have successfully designed, built and tested a 2.1 second drop tower with an innovation airbag deceleration system. Microgravity boiling experiments performed in our 0.6 second Drop Tower produced data flow visualizations that agree with published results and also provide some new understanding concerning flow boiling and microgravity bubble behavior. On the analytical and numerical work, the edge effects of finite divergent electrode plates on the forces experienced by bubbles were investigated. Boiling in a concentric cylinder microgravity and an electric field was numerically predicted. We also completed a feasibility study for microgravity boiling in an acoustic field.

  6. Investigation of Body Force Effects on Flow Boiling Critical Heat Flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Hui; Mudawar, Issam; Hasan, Mohammad M.

    2002-01-01

    The bubble coalescence and interfacial instabilities that are important to modeling critical heat flux (CHF) in reduced-gravity systems can be sensitive to even minute body forces. Understanding these complex phenomena is vital to the design and safe implementation of two-phase thermal management loops proposed for space and planetary-based thermal systems. While reduced gravity conditions cannot be accurately simulated in 1g ground-based experiments, such experiments can help isolate the effects of the various forces (body force, surface tension force and inertia) which influence flow boiling CHF. In this project, the effects of the component of body force perpendicular to a heated wall were examined by conducting 1g flow boiling experiments at different orientations. FC-72 liquid was boiled along one wall of a transparent rectangular flow channel that permitted photographic study of the vapor-liquid interface at conditions approaching CHF. High-speed video imaging was employed to capture dominant CHF mechanisms. Six different CHF regimes were identified: Wavy Vapor Layer, Pool Boiling, Stratification, Vapor Counterflow, Vapor Stagnation, and Separated Concurrent Vapor Flow. CHF showed great sensitivity to orientation for flow velocities below 0.2 m/s, where very small CHF values where measured, especially with downflow and downward-facing heated wall orientations. High flow velocities dampened the effects of orientation considerably. Figure I shows representative images for the different CHF regimes. The Wavy Vapor Layer regime was dominant for all high velocities and most orientations, while all other regimes were encountered at low velocities, in the downflow and/or downward-facing heated wall orientations. The Interfacial Lift-off model was modified to predict the effects of orientation on CHF for the dominant Wavy Vapor Layer regime. The photographic study captured a fairly continuous wavy vapor layer travelling along the heated wall while permitting liquid

  7. Cryogenic two-phase flow during chilldown: Flow transition and nucleate boiling heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Jelliffe Kevin

    The recent interest in space exploration has placed a renewed focus on rocket propulsion technology. Cryogenic propellants are the preferred fuel for rocket propulsion since they are more energetic and environmentally friendly compared with other storable fuels. Voracious evaporation occurs while transferring these fluids through a pipeline that is initially in thermal equilibrium with the environment. This phenomenon is referred to as line chilldown. Large temperature differences, rapid transients, pressure fluctuations and the transition from the film boiling to the nucleate boiling regime characterize the chilldown process. Although the existence of the chilldown phenomenon has been known for decades, the process is not well understood. Attempts have been made to model the chilldown process; however the results have been fair at best. A major shortcoming of these models is the use of correlations that were developed for steady, non-cryogenic flows. The development of reliable correlations for cryogenic chilldown has been hindered by the lack of experimental data. An experimental facility was constructed that allows the flow structure, the temperature history and the pressure history to be recorded during the line chilldown process. The temperature history is then utilized in conjunction with an inverse heat conduction procedure that was developed, which allows the unsteady heat transfer coefficient on the interior of the pipe wall to be extracted. This database is used to evaluate present predictive models and correlations for flow regime transition and nucleate boiling heat transfer. It is found that by calibrating the transition between the stratified-wavy and the intermittent/annular regimes of the Taitel and Dukler flow regime map, satisfactory predictions are obtained. It is also found that by utilizing a simple model that includes the effect of flow structure and incorporating the enhancement provided by the local heat flux, significant improvement in the

  8. Investigation of Nucleate Boiling Mechanisms Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhir, V. K.; Qiu, D. M.; Ramanujapu, N.; Hasan, M. M.

    1999-01-01

    The present work is aimed at the experimental studies and numerical modeling of the bubble growth mechanisms of a single bubble attached to a heating surface and of a bubble sliding along an inclined heated plate. Single artificial cavity of 10 microns in diameter was made on the polished Silicon wafer which was electrically heated at the back side in order to control the surface nucleation superheat. Experiments with a sliding bubble were conducted at different inclination angles of the downward facing heated surface for the purpose of studying the effect of magnitude of components of gravity acting parallel to and normal to the heat transfer surface. Information on the bubble shape and size, the bubble induced liquid velocities as well as the surface temperature were obtained using the high speed imaging and hydrogen bubble techniques. Analytical/numerical models were developed to describe the heat transfer through the micro-macro layer underneath and around a bubble formed at a nucleation site. In the micro layer model the capillary and disjoining pressures were included. Evolution of the bubble-liquid interface along with induced liquid motion was modeled. As a follow-up to the studies at normal gravity, experiments are being conducted in the KC-135 aircraft to understand the bubble growth/detachment under low gravity conditions. Experiments have been defined to be performed under long duration of microgravity conditions in the space shuttle. The experiment in the space shuttle will provide bubble growth and detachment data at microgravity and will lead to validation of the nucleate boiling heat transfer model developed from the preceding studies conducted at normal and low gravity (KC-135) conditions.

  9. Investigation of Mechanisms Associated with Nucleate Boiling Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhir, Vijay K.

    1996-01-01

    The focus of the present work is to experimentally study and to analytically/numerically model the mechanisms of growth of bubbles attached to, and sliding along, a heated surface. To control the location of the active cavities, the number, the spacing, and the nucleation superheat, artificial cavities will be formed on silicon wafers. In order to study the effect of magnitude of components of gravitational acceleration acting parallel to, and normal to the surface, experiments will be conducted on surfaces inclined at different angles including a downward facing surface. Information on the temperature field around bubbles, bubble shape and size, and bubble induced liquid velocities will be obtained through the use of holography, video/high speed photography and hydrogen bubble techniques, respectively. Analytical/numerical models will be developed to describe the heat transfer including that through the micro-macro layer underneath and around a bubble. In the micro layer model capillary and disjoining pressures will be included. Evolution of the interface along with induced liquid motion will be modelled. Subsequent to the world at normal gravity, experiments will be conducted in the KC-135 or the Lear jet especially to learn about bubble growth/detachment under low gravity conditions. Finally, an experiment will be defined to be conducted under long duration of microgravity conditions in the space shuttle. The experiment in the space shuttle will provide microgravity data on bubble growth and detachment and will lead to a validation of the nucleate boiling heat transfer model developed from the preceding studies performed at normal and low gravity (KC-135 or Lear jet) conditions.

  10. Two dimensional heat transfer problem in flow boiling in a rectangular minichannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hożejowska, Sylwia; Piasecka, Magdalena; Hożejowski, Leszek

    2015-05-01

    The paper presents mathematical modelling of flow boiling heat transfer in a rectangular minichannel asymmetrically heated by a thin and one-sided enhanced foil. Both surfaces are available for observations due to the openings covered with glass sheets. Thus, changes in the colour of the plain foil surface can be registered and then processed. Plain side of the heating foil is covered with a base coat and liquid crystal paint. Observation of the opposite, enhanced surface of the minichannel allows for identification of the gas-liquid two-phase flow patterns and vapour quality. A two-dimensional mathematical model of heat transfer in three subsequent layers (sheet glass, heating foil, liquid) was proposed. Heat transfer in all these layers was described with the respective equations: Laplace equation, Poisson equation and energy equation, subject to boundary conditions corresponding to the observed physical process. The solutions (temperature distributions) in all three layers were obtained by Trefftz method. Additionally, the temperature of the boiling liquid was obtained by homotopy perturbation method (HPM) combined with Trefftz method. The heat transfer coefficient, derived from Robin boundary condition, was estimated in both approaches. In comparison, the results by both methods show very good agreement especially when restricted to the thermal sublayer.

  11. Boiling incipience and convective boiling of neon and nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papell, S. S.; Hendricks, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Forced convection and subcooled boiling heat transfer data for liquid nitrogen and liquid neon were obtained in support of a design study for a 30 tesla cryomagnet cooled by forced convection of liquid neon. This design precludes nucleate boiling in the flow channels as they are too small to handle vapor flow. Consequently, it was necessary to determine boiling incipience under the operating conditions of the magnet system. The cryogen data obtained over a range of system pressures, fluid flow rates, and applied heat fluxes were used to develop correlations for predicting boiling incipience and convective boiling heat transfer coefficients in uniformly heated flow channels. The accuracy of the correlating equations was then evaluated. A technique was also developed to calculate the position of boiling incipience in a uniformly heated flow channel. Comparisons made with the experimental data showed a prediction accuracy of plus or minus 15 percent

  12. Identification of flow patterns by neutron noise analysis during actual coolant boiling in thin rectangular channels

    SciTech Connect

    Kozma, R.; van Dam, H.; Hoogenboom, J.E. )

    1992-10-01

    The primary objective of this paper is to introduce results of coolant boiling experiments in a simulated materials test reactor-type fuel assembly with plate fuel in an actual reactor environment. The experiments have been performed in the Hoger Onderwijs Reactor (HOR) research reactor at the Interfaculty Reactor Institute, Delft, The Netherlands. In the analysis, noise signals of self-powered neutron detectors located in the neighborhood of the boiling region and thermocouple in the channel wall and in the coolant are used. Flow patterns in the boiling coolant have been identified by means of analysis of probability density functions and power spectral densities of neutron noise. It is shown that boiling has an oscillating character due to partial channel blockage caused by steam slugs generated periodically between the plates. The observed phenomenon can serve as a basis for a boiling detection method in reactors with plate-type fuels.

  13. Investigation of Minimum Film boiling Phenomena on Fuel Rods Under Blowdown Cooling Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen M. Bajorek; Michael Gawron; Timothy Etzel; Lucas Peterson

    2003-06-30

    Blowdon cooling heat transfer is an important process that occurs early in a hypothetical large break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) in a pressurized water reactor. During blowdown, the flow through the hot assembly is a post-critical heat flux dispersed droplet flow. The heat transfer mechanisms that occur in blowdown cooling are complex and depend on droplet and heated surface interaction. In a safety analysis, it is of considerable importance to determine the thermal-hydraulic conditions leading to the minimum film boiling temperature, Tmin. A flow boiling rig for measurement of blowdown cooling heat transfer and quench phenomena on a nuclear fuel rod simulator was designed and constructed for operation at up to 12.4 MPa. The test section consisted of a concentric annulus, with a 9.5 mm OD nuclear fuel rod simulator at the center. The rod was contained within a 0.85 mm thick, 19 mm OD 316 stainless steel tube, forming the flow channel. Two types of rods were tested; one type was sheathed with Inconel 600 while the other was clad with Zircaloy-2. Water was injected into the test section at the top of the heated length through an injection header. This header was an annular sign that fit around the fuel rod simulator and within the stainless steel tube. Small spacers aligned the injection header and prevented contract with either the heater rod or the tube. A series of small diameter holes at the bottom of the header caused the formation of droplets that became entrained with the steam flow. The test section design was such that quench would take place on the rod, and not along the channel outer annulus.

  14. New flow boiling heat transfer model for hydrocarbons evaporating inside horizontal tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, G. F.; Gong, M. Q.; Wu, J. F.; Zou, X.; Wang, S.

    2014-01-29

    Hydrocarbons have high thermodynamic performances, belong to the group of natural refrigerants, and they are the main components in mixture Joule-Thomson low temperature refrigerators (MJTR). New evaluations of nucleate boiling contribution and nucleate boiling suppression factor in flow boiling heat transfer have been proposed for hydrocarbons. A forced convection heat transfer enhancement factor correlation incorporating liquid velocity has also been proposed. In addition, the comparisons of the new model and other classic models were made to evaluate its accuracy in heat transfer prediction.

  15. An experimental investigation of transition boiling in subcooled Freon-113 forced flow

    SciTech Connect

    Passos, J.C. ); Gentile, D. )

    1991-05-01

    An experimental study of subcooled boiling in a Freon-113 forced flow is presented. The test section is a short tube (length 50 mm, inner diameter 8 mm, and wall thickness 0.3 mm) heated by the Joule effect. Wall temperature profiles along the tube are presented for different operating points and discussed in terms of the upstream propagation of a temperature front separating regions of nucleate and film boiling. This study emphasizes the effect of axial heat conduction on the boiling processes.

  16. Liquid-solid contact during flow film boiling of subcooled freon-11

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, K.H.; Witte, L.C. )

    1990-05-01

    Liquid-solid contacts were measured for flow film boiling of subcooled Freon-11 over an electrically heated cylinder equipped with a surface microthermocouple probe. No systematic variation of the extent of liquid-solid contact with wall superheat, liquid subcooling, or velocity was detected. Only random small-scale contacts that contribute negligibly to overall heat transfer were detected when the surface was above the homogenous nucleation temperature of the Freon-11. When large-scale contacts were detected, they led to an unexpected intermediate transition from local film boiling to local transition boiling. An explanation is proposed for these unexpected transitions. A comparison of analytical results that used experimentally determined liquid-solid contact parameters to experimental heat fluxes did not show good agreement. It was concluded that the available model for heat transfer accounting for liquid-solid contact is not adequate for flow film boiling.

  17. The Characteristics of Steam Bubbles in Subcooled Boiling Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Takatoshi Takemoto; Asi Bunyajitradulya; Mitsuo Matsuzaki; Hiroshige Kikura; Masanori Aritomi

    2002-07-01

    In two-fluid modeling and three-fluid modeling, the accurate prediction of the interfacial area concentration, interfacial heat transfer and interfacial shear stress, were required. In this works, the axial profiles of void fraction, interfacial area concentration and interfacial heat transfer coefficient along the flow direction could be measured. For the steam bubbles whose diameter were less than 8 mm, the interfacial area concentration and the mean bubble diameter had a correlation with void fraction despite the variation of liquid flow rate and subcooling. In case the steam bubble collapse occurred due to an irregular bubble condensation and a turbulence of liquid flow, interfacial heat transfer coefficient with the bubble collapse was about twice of that without a bubble collapse. And the interfacial heat transfer coefficient without bubble collapse showed a good agreement with the correlation proposed by Akiyama. In addition, the supposed image processing method could be applied to the present experimental condition. (authors)

  18. Experimental study of the boiling mechanism of a liquid film flowing on the surface of a rotating disc

    SciTech Connect

    Kolokotsa, D.; Yanniotis, S.

    2010-11-15

    The boiling mechanism of a liquid film formed on the surface of a smooth horizontal rotating disc was studied using de-ionised water at 2 l/min flow rate, boiling under vacuum at 40 C and 5-10 C wall superheat. Visualization experiments were carried out and video films were taken for rotational speeds from 0 to 1000 rpm. It was observed that nucleate flow boiling prevails in the case of 0 rpm (stationary disc). Nucleate boiling was also observed at 100 and 200 rpm with the number of bubbles and the diameter of the bubbles decreasing as the rotational speed was increasing. At 600 and 1000 rpm rotational speeds, vapor bubbles were not observed. The results of visual observation were in agreement with bubble growth analysis which showed that at heat flux values of 40 kW/m{sup 2}, conditions for bubble growth are favorable at low rotational speeds (<200 rpm) but are unfavorable at high rotational speeds (1000 rpm). (author)

  19. Film boiling on spheres in single- and two-phase flows. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Theofanous, T.G.

    1994-12-01

    Film boiling on spheres in single- and two-phase flows was studied experimentally and theoretically with an emphasis on establishing the film boiling heat transfer closure law, which is useful in the analysis of nuclear reactor core melt accidents. Systematic experimentation of film boiling on spheres in single-phase water flows was carried out to investigate the effects of liquid subcooling (from 0 to 40{degrees}C), liquid velocity (from 0 to 2 m/s), sphere superheat (from 200 to 900{degrees}C), sphere diameter (from 6 to 19 mm), and sphere material (stainless steel and brass) on film boiling heat transfer. Based on the experimental data a general film boiling heat transfer correlation is developed. Utilizing a two-phase laminar boundary-layer model for the unseparated front film region and a turbulent eddy model for the separated rear region, a theoretical model was developed to predict the film boiling heat transfer in all single-phase regimes. The film boiling from a sphere in two-phase flows was investigated both in upward two-phase flows (with void fraction from 0.2 to 0.65, water velocity from 0.6 to 3.2 m/s, and steam velocity from 3.0 to 9.0 m/s) and in downward two-phase flows (with void fraction from 0.7 to 0.95, water velocity from 1.9 to 6.5 m/s, and steam velocity from 1.1 to 9.0 m/s). The saturated single-phase heat transfer correlation was found to be applicable to the two-phase film boiling data by making use of the actual water velocity (water phase velocity), and an adjustment factor of (1-{alpha}){sup 1/4} (with {alpha} being the void fraction) for downward flow case only. Slight adjustments of the Reynolds number exponents in the correlation provided an even better interpretation of the two-phase data. Preliminary experiments were also conducted to address the influences of multisphere structure on the film boiling heat transfer in single- and two-phase flows.

  20. Film boiling on spheres in single- and two-phase flows.

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Theofanous, T. G.

    2000-08-29

    Film boiling on spheres in single- and two-phase flows was studied experimentally and theoretically with an emphasis on establishing the film boiling heat transfer closure law, which is useful in the analysis of nuclear reactor core melt accidents. Systematic experimentation of film boiling on spheres in single-phase water flows was carried out to investigate the effects of liquid subcooling (from 0 to 40 C), liquid velocity (from 0 to 2 m/s), sphere superheat (from 200 to 900 C), sphere diameter (from 6 to 19 mm), and sphere material (stainless steel and brass) on film boiling heat transfer. Based on the experimental data a general film boiling heat transfer correlation is developed. Utilizing a two-phase laminar boundary-layer model for the unseparated front film region and a turbulent eddy model for the separated rear region, a theoretical model was developed to predict the film boiling heat transfer in all single-phase regimes. The film boiling from a sphere in two-phase flows was investigated both in upward two-phase flows (with void fraction from 0.2 to 0.65, water velocity from 0.6 to 3.2 m/s, and steam velocity from 3.0 to 9.0 m/s) and in downward two-phase flows (with void fraction from 0.7 to 0.95, water velocity from 1.9 to 6.5 m/s, and steam velocity from 1.1 to 9.0 m/s). The saturated single-phase heat transfer correlation was found to be applicable to the two-phase film boiling data by making use of the actual water velocity (water phase velocity), and an adjustment factor of (1 - {alpha}){sup 1/4} (with a being the void fraction) for downward flow case only. Slight adjustments of the Reynolds number exponents in the correlation provided an even better interpretation of the two-phase data. Preliminary experiments were also conducted to address the influences of multi-sphere structure on the film boiling heat transfer in single- and two-phase flows.

  1. Cryogenic Boiling and Two-Phase Flow during Pipe Chilldown in Earth and Reduced Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Kun; Ji, Yan; Chung, J. N.; Shyy, Wei

    2008-01-01

    For many industrial, medical and space technologies, cryogenic fluids play indispensable roles. An integral part of the cryogenic transport processes is the chilldown of the system components during initial applications. In this paper, we report experimental results for a chilldown process that is involved with the unsteady two-phase vapor-liquid flow and boiling heat transfer of the cryogen coupled with the transient heat conduction inside pipe walls. We have provided fundamental understanding on the physics of the two-phase flow and boiling heat transfer during cryogenic quenching through experimental observation, measurement and analysis. Based on the temperature measurement of the tube wall, the terrestrial cryogenic chilldown process is divided into three stages of film boiling, nucleate boiling and single-phase convection that bears a close similarity to the conventional pool boiling process. In earth gravity, cooling rate is non-uniform circumferentially due to a stratified flow pattern that gives rise to more cooling on the bottom wall by liquid filaments. In microgravity, there is no stratified flow and the absence of the gravitational force sends liquid filaments to the central core and replaces them by low thermal conductivity vapor that significantly reduces the heat transfer from the wall. Thus, the chilldown process is axisymmetric, but longer in microgravity.

  2. Transport processes induced by metastable boiling water under Martian surface conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massé, M.; Conway, S. J.; Gargani, J.; Patel, M. R.; Pasquon, K.; McEwen, A.; Carpy, S.; Chevrier, V.; Balme, M. R.; Ojha, L.; Vincendon, M.; Poulet, F.; Costard, F.; Jouannic, G.

    2016-06-01

    Liquid water may exist on the Martian surface today, albeit transiently and in a metastable state under the low atmospheric surface pressure. However, the identification of liquid water on Mars from observed morphological changes is hampered by our limited understanding of how metastable liquids interact with sediments. Here, we present lab experiments in which a block of ice melts and seeps into underlying sediment, and the resulting downslope fluid propagation and sediment transport are tracked. In experiments at Martian surface pressure, we find that pure water boils as it percolates into the sediment, inducing grain saltation and leading to wholesale slope destabilization: a hybrid flow mechanism involving both wet and dry processes. For metastable brines, which are more stable under Martian conditions than pure water, saltation intensity and geomorphological impact are reduced; however, we observed channel formation in some briny flow experiments that may be analogous to morphologies observed on Mars. In contrast, under terrestrial-like experimental conditions, there is little morphological impact of seeping water or brine, which are both stable. We propose that the hybrid flow mechanism operating in our experiments under Martian surface pressure could explain observed Martian surface changes that were originally interpreted as the products of either dry or wet processes.

  3. Flow boiling with enhancement devices for cold plate coolant channel design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Ronald D.; Turknett, Jerry C.; Smith, Alvin

    1989-01-01

    The effects of enhancement devices on flow boiling heat transfer in circular coolant channels, which are heated over a fraction of their perimeters, are studied. The variations were examined in both the mean and local (axial, and circumferential) heat transfer coefficients for a circular coolant channel with either smooth walls or with both a twisted tape and spiral finned walls. Improvements were initiated in the present data reduction analysis. These efforts should lead to the development of heat transfer correlations which include effects of single side heat flux and enhancement device configuration. It is hoped that a stage will be set for the study of heat transfer and pressure drop in single sided heated systems under zero gravity conditions.

  4. Flow boiling with enhancement devices for cold plate coolant channel design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Ronald D.

    1991-01-01

    Future space exploration and commercialization will require more efficient heat rejection systems. For the required heat transfer rates, such systems must use advanced heat transfer techniques. Forced two phase flow boiling heat transfer with enhancements falls in this category. However, moderate to high quality two phase systems tend to require higher pressure losses. This report is divided into two major parts: (1) Multidimensional wall temperature measurement and heat transfer enhancement for top heated horizontal channels with flow boiling; and (2) Improved analytical heat transfer data reduction for a single side heated coolant channel. Part 1 summarizes over forty experiments which involve both single phase convection and flow boiling in a horizontal channel heated externally from the top side. Part 2 contains parametric dimensionless curves with parameters such as the coolant channel radius ratio, the Biot number, and the circumferential coordinate.

  5. A Ghost Fluid/Level Set Method for boiling flows and liquid evaporation: Application to the Leidenfrost effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueda Villegas, Lucia; Alis, Romain; Lepilliez, Mathieu; Tanguy, Sébastien

    2016-07-01

    The development of numerical methods for the direct numerical simulation of two-phase flows with phase change, in the framework of interface capturing or interface tracking methods, is the main topic of this study. We propose a novel numerical method, which allows dealing with both evaporation and boiling at the interface between a liquid and a gas. Indeed, in some specific situations involving very heterogeneous thermodynamic conditions at the interface, the distinction between boiling and evaporation is not always possible. For instance, it can occur for a Leidenfrost droplet; a water drop levitating above a hot plate whose temperature is much higher than the boiling temperature. In this case, boiling occurs in the film of saturated vapor which is entrapped between the bottom of the drop and the plate, whereas the top of the water droplet evaporates in contact of ambient air. The situation can also be ambiguous for a superheated droplet or at the contact line between a liquid and a hot wall whose temperature is higher than the saturation temperature of the liquid. In these situations, the interface temperature can locally reach the saturation temperature (boiling point), for instance near a contact line, and be cooler in other places. Thus, boiling and evaporation can occur simultaneously on different regions of the same liquid interface or occur successively at different times of the history of an evaporating droplet. Standard numerical methods are not able to perform computations in these transient regimes, therefore, we propose in this paper a novel numerical method to achieve this challenging task. Finally, we present several accuracy validations against theoretical solutions and experimental results to strengthen the relevance of this new method.

  6. A flow boiling microchannel thermosyphon for fuel cell thermal management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrity, Patrick Thomas

    To provide a high power density thermal management system for proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell applications, a passively driven thermal management system was assembled to operate in a closed loop two-phase thermosyphon. The system has two major components; a microchannel evaporator plate and a condenser. The microchannel evaporator plate was fabricated with 56 square channels that have a 1 mm x 1 mm cross section and are 115 mm long. Experiments were conducted with a liquid cooled condenser with heat flux as the control variable. Measurements of mass flow rate, temperature field, and pressure drop have been made for the thermosyphon loop. A model is developed to predict the system characteristics such as the temperature and pressure fields, flow rate, flow regime, heat transfer coefficient, and maximum heat flux. When the system is subjected to a heat load that exceeds the maximum heat flux, an unstable flow regime is observed that causes flow reversal and eventual dryout near the evaporator plate wall. This undesirable phenomenon is modeled based on a quasi-steady state assumption, and the model is capable of predicting the heat flux at the onset of instability for quasi-steady two-phase flow. Another focus of this work is the performance of the condenser portion of the loop, which will be air cooled in practice. The aim is to reduce air side thermal resistance and increase the condenser performance, which is accomplished with extended surfaces. A testing facility is assembled to observe the air side heat transfer performance of three aluminum foam samples and three modified carbon foam samples, used as extended surfaces. The aluminum foam samples have a bulk density of 216 kilograms per cubic meter with pore sizes of 0.5, 1, and 2 mm. The modified carbon foam samples have bulk densities of 284, 317, and 400 kilograms per cubic meter and machined flow passages of 3.2 mm. in diameter. Each sample is observed under forced convection with air velocity as the

  7. A Study on Bubble Departure and Bubble Lift-Off in Sub-Cooled Nucleate Boiling Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Wen; Chen, Peipei; Jones, Barclay G.; Newell, Ty A.

    2006-07-01

    This research examines bubble departure and bubble lift-off phenomena under subcooled nucleate boiling condition, using a high fidelity digital imaging apparatus. Refrigerant R- 134a is chosen as a simulant fluid due to its merits of having smaller surface tension, reduced latent heat, and lower boiling temperature than water. Images at frame rates up to 4000 frames/s were obtained with varying experimental parameters e.g. pressure, inlet sub-cooled level, and flow rate, etc., showing characteristics of bubble behavior under different conditions. Bubble size and position information was calculated via Canny's algorithm for edge detection and Fitzgibbon's algorithm for ellipse fitting. Bubble departure and lift-off radiuses were obtained and compared with existing bubble forces and detachment models proposed by Thorncroft et al., with good agreement observed. (authors)

  8. Study on Fins' Effect of Boiling Flow in Millimeter Channel Heat Exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Satoshi

    2005-11-01

    Recently, a lot of researches about compact heat exchangers with mini-channels have been carried out with the hope of obtaining a high-efficiency heat transfer, due to the higher ratio of surface area than existing heat exchangers. However, there are many uncertain phenomena in fields such as boiling flow in mini-channels. Thus, in order to understand the boiling flow in mini-channels to design high-efficiency heat exchangers, this work focused on the visualization measurement of boiling flow in a millimeter channel. A transparent acrylic channel (heat exchanger form), high-speed camera (2000 fps at 1024 x 1024 pixels), and halogen lamp (backup light) were used as the visualization system. The channel's depth is 2 mm, width is 30 mm, and length is 400 mm. In preparation for commercial use, two types of channels were experimented on: a fins type and a normal slit type (without fins). The fins are circular cylindrical obstacles (diameter is 5 mm) to promote heat transfer, set in a triangular array (distance between each center point is 10 mm). Especially in this work, boiling flow and heat transfer promotion in the millimeter channel heat exchanger with fins was evaluated using a high-speed camera.

  9. Impact of boiling conditions on the molecular and sensory profile of a vegetable broth.

    PubMed

    Mougin, Alice; Mauroux, Olivier; Matthey-Doret, Walter; Barcos, Eugenia Maria; Beaud, Fernand; Bousbaine, Ahmed; Viton, Florian; Smarrito-Menozzi, Candice

    2015-02-11

    Low-pressure cooking has recently been identified as an alternative to ambient and high-pressure cooking to provide food with enhanced organoleptic properties. This work investigates the impact of the cooking process at different pressures on the molecular and sensory profile of a vegetable broth. Experimental results showed similar sensory and chemical profiles of vegetable broths when boiling at 0.93 and 1.5 bar, while an enhancement of sulfur volatile compounds correlated with a greater leek content and savory aroma was observed when boiling at low pressure (80 °C/0.48 bar). Thus, low-pressure cooking would allow preserving the most labile volatiles likely due to the lower water boiling temperature and the reduced level of oxygen. This study evidenced chemical and sensory impact of pressure during cooking and demonstrated that the flavor profile of culinary preparations can be enhanced by applying low-pressure conditions. PMID:25579390

  10. Impact of boiling conditions on the molecular and sensory profile of a vegetable broth.

    PubMed

    Mougin, Alice; Mauroux, Olivier; Matthey-Doret, Walter; Barcos, Eugenia Maria; Beaud, Fernand; Bousbaine, Ahmed; Viton, Florian; Smarrito-Menozzi, Candice

    2015-02-11

    Low-pressure cooking has recently been identified as an alternative to ambient and high-pressure cooking to provide food with enhanced organoleptic properties. This work investigates the impact of the cooking process at different pressures on the molecular and sensory profile of a vegetable broth. Experimental results showed similar sensory and chemical profiles of vegetable broths when boiling at 0.93 and 1.5 bar, while an enhancement of sulfur volatile compounds correlated with a greater leek content and savory aroma was observed when boiling at low pressure (80 °C/0.48 bar). Thus, low-pressure cooking would allow preserving the most labile volatiles likely due to the lower water boiling temperature and the reduced level of oxygen. This study evidenced chemical and sensory impact of pressure during cooking and demonstrated that the flavor profile of culinary preparations can be enhanced by applying low-pressure conditions.

  11. Natural Convection and Boiling for Cooling SRP Reactors During Loss of Circulation Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Buckner, M.R.

    2001-06-26

    This study investigated natural convection and boiling as a means of cooling SRP reactors in the event of a loss of circulation accident. These studies show that single phase natural convection cooling of SRP reactors in shutdown conditions with the present piping geometry is probably not feasible.

  12. AREVA NP Fuel Condition Index for Boiling Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Pop, Mike G.; Bell, Merl; Lockamon, Brian

    2007-07-01

    Three factors are considered paramount in fuel performance: heat flux, crud layer, and oxide thickness. Both the crud layer and the oxide thickness may be affected by plant chemistry. During the last two years, AREVA NP has developed a Fuel Condition Index (FCI) that provides a method to assign a single numerical value connecting chemistry conditions to observed or expected fuel performance. The FCI also includes a heat-flux factor to allow evaluation of the condition of a BWR core. The chemistry parameters and acceptable operating ranges selected consider AREVA NP knowledge and Industry consensus. This paper describes the FCI developed by AREVA NP (patent pending) and the results of parameter sensitivity calculations that support the AREVA approach. This will provide the basis for subsequent application and benchmarking at an operating plant. (authors)

  13. Correlation for the Prediction of Flow Boiling Heat Transfer in Small Diameter Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyata, Kazushi; Mori, Hideo; Hamamoto, Yoshinori

    The objective of the present study is to develop a correlation applicable to a prediction of an axially local heat transfer coefficient in flow boiling within small diameter tubes. From experimental data of authors obtained previously, it was found that, for the accurate prediction of the heat transfer in small diameter tubes, it was necessary to evaluate precisely the contribution of evaporation heat transfer of thin liquid film around vapor plugs in slug flow, adding to the forced convection heat transfer and nucleate boiling heat transfer. There are, however, only conventional heat transfer correlations which consider any two of the three contributions; forced convection and nucleate boiling in most cases. In this study, a new correlation considering all of three contributions was developed based on data of R 410A by authors and data of other Freons, water and CO2 by other researchers. In the new correlation, the liquid film evaporation heat transfer is evaluated using liquid film thickness correlated with the Capillary number, the forced convection heat transfer is calculated by use of the Dittus-Boelter correlation and the Lockhart-Martinelli parameter, and the nucleate boiling heat transfer is predicted from the Stephan-Abdelsalam correlation with the suppression factor. The new correlation showed higher prediction performance compared with conventional heat transfer correlations.

  14. Physical interpretation of geysering phenomena and periodic boiling instability at low flows

    SciTech Connect

    Duffey, R.B.; Rohatgi, U.S.

    1996-03-01

    Over 30 years ago, Griffith showed that unstable and periodic initial boiling occurred in stagnant liquids in heated pipes coupled to a cooler or condensing plenum volume. This was called ``geysering``, and is a similar phenomenon to the rapid nucleation and voiding observed in tubes filled with superheated liquid. It is also called ``bumping`` when non-uniformly heated water or a chemical suddenly boils in laboratory glassware. In engineering, the stability and predictability has importance to the onset of bulk boiling in a natural and forced circulation loops. The latest available data show the observed stability and periodicity of the onset of boiling flow when there is a plenum, multiple heated channels, and a sustained subcooling in a circulating loop. We examine the available data, both old and new, and develop a new theory to illustrate the simple physics causing the observed periodicity of the flow. We examine the validity of the theory by comparison to all the geysering data, and develop a useful and simple correlation. We illustrate the equivalence of the onset of geysering to the onset of static instability in subcooled boiling. We also derive the stability boundary for geysering, utilizing turbulent transport analysis to determine the effects of pressure and other key parameters. This new result explains the greater stability region observed at higher pressures. The paper builds on the 30 years of quite independent thermal hydraulic work that is still fresh and useful today. We discuss the physical interpretation of geysering onset with a consistent theory, and show where refinements would be useful to the data correlations.

  15. Direct Numerical Simulation of Boiling Multiphase Flows: State-of-the-Art, Modeling, Algorithmic and Computer Needs

    SciTech Connect

    Nourgaliev R.; Knoll D.; Mousseau V.; Berry R.

    2007-04-01

    The state-of-the-art for Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of boiling multiphase flows is reviewed, focussing on potential of available computational techniques, the level of current success for their applications to model several basic flow regimes (film, pool-nucleate and wall-nucleate boiling -- FB, PNB and WNB, respectively). Then, we discuss multiphysics and multiscale nature of practical boiling flows in LWR reactors, requiring high-fidelity treatment of interfacial dynamics, phase-change, hydrodynamics, compressibility, heat transfer, and non-equilibrium thermodynamics and chemistry of liquid/vapor and fluid/solid-wall interfaces. Finally, we outline the framework for the {\\sf Fervent} code, being developed at INL for DNS of reactor-relevant boiling multiphase flows, with the purpose of gaining insight into the physics of multiphase flow regimes, and generating a basis for effective-field modeling in terms of its formulation and closure laws.

  16. Active control of flow boiling oscillation amplitude and frequency using a transverse jet in crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vutha, Ashwin Kumar; Rao, Sameer Raghavendra; Houshmand, Farzad; Peles, Yoav

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate a technique to mitigate thermal oscillations in microchannel flow boiling and suppress the characteristic frequency associated with these oscillations. The method employs a transverse jet in crossflow that is fabricated along with the primary microchannel in a double-sided vinyl tape, using laser machining. Liquid at ambient temperature is injected into a flow boiling region at different momentum flux ratios to control the local temperature. A maximum reduction of 82% in temperature fluctuations was demonstrated and the dominant frequency of oscillations was completely suppressed within a particular range of momentum flux ratios. The observed phenomena are attributed to the replenishment of liquid into dryout regions, thereby preventing the large temperature rise and subsequent drop caused by dryout and rewetting, respectively.

  17. A model for fluid flow during saturated boiling on a horizontal cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kheyrandish, K.; Dalton, C.; Lienhard, J. H.

    1987-01-01

    A model has been developed to represent the vapor removal pattern in the vicinity of a cylinder during nucleate flow boiling across a horizontal cylinder. The model is based on a potential flow representation of the liquid and vapor regions and an estimate of the losses that should occur in the flow. Correlation of the losses shows a weak dependence on the Weber number and a slightly stronger dependence on the saturated liquid-to-vapor density ratio. The vapor jet thickness, which is crucial to the prediction of the burnout heat flux, and the shape of the vapor film are predicted. Both are verified by qualitative experimental observations.

  18. (Investigation of subcooled hydrothermal boiling in ground water flow channels as a source of harmonic tremors)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    As a first step toward assessing the ability of hydrothermal boiling to explain geothermal ground noise and volcanic tremor observations, we are investigating the acoustic power spectrum of boiling (the source'' spectrum in the above model). We simulate boiling in the lab by injecting high pressure steam from a boiler into a pressure vessel filled with water. The water pressure fluctuations that result from the repeated formation and collapse of steam bubbles at the steam inlet vents are recorded by a hydrophone whose output is digitized at 2 {times} 10{sup 4} samples/second by a computer. The range of pressure and temperature conditions attainable within the pressure vessel is limited to <3.5 bars, <139{degree}C, due to the finite strength of observation windows affixed to the pressure vessel. Therefore, dimensional analysis will be used to correlate the experimental results with the pertinent experimental variables. Besides the overall shape of the boiling power spectrum, we are investigating the absolute spectral levels in frequency bands typical of geothermal ground noise and volcanic tremor (0.5 Hz-10 Hz), and the ratio of acoustic power liberated to total available power. The values of these parameters are critical to hydrothermal boiling's ability to generate ground motion amplitudes in accordance with observation. If it can be shown that the range of observed ground noise/tremor amplitudes can be accounted for by hydrothermal boiling at reasonable heat transfer rates, this knowledge would be invaluable to designers of seismic monitoring experiments who are interested in geothermal resource exploration/evaluation and volcanic eruption prediction.

  19. Criteria for approximating certain microgravity flow boiling characteristics in Earth gravity.

    PubMed

    Merte, Herman; Park, Jaeseok; Shultz, William W; Keller, Robert B

    2002-10-01

    The forces governing flow boiling, aside from system pressure, are buoyancy, liquid momentum, interfacial surface tensions, and liquid viscosity. Guidance for approximating certain aspects of the flow boiling process in microgravity can be obtained in Earth gravity research by the imposition of a liquid velocity parallel to a flat heater surface in the inverted position, horizontal, or nearly horizontal, by having buoyancy hold the heated liquid and vapor formed close to the heater surface. Bounds on the velocities of interest are obtained from several dimensionless numbers: a two-phase Richardson number, a two-phase Weber number, and a Bond number. For the fluid used in the experimental work here, liquid velocities in the range U = 5-10cm/sec are judged to be critical for changes in behavior of the flow boiling process. Experimental results are presented for flow boiling heat transfer, concentrating on orientations that provide the largest reductions in buoyancy parallel to the heater surface, varying +/-5 degrees from facing horizontal downward. Results are presented for velocity, orientation, and subcooling effects on nucleation, dryout, and heat transfer. Two different heater surfaces were used: a thin gold film on a polished quartz substrate, acting as a heater and resistance thermometer, and a gold-plated copper heater. Both transient and steady measurements of surface heat flux and superheat were made with the quartz heater; only steady measurements were possible with the copper heater. R-113 was the fluid used; the velocity varied over the interval 4-16cm/sec; bulk liquid subcooling varied over 2-20 degrees C; heat flux varied over 4-8W/cm(2).

  20. Transient Pool Boiling Critical Heat Flux of FC-72 Under Saturated Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Fitri, Sutopo P.; Katsuya Fukuda; Qiusheng Liu; Jongdoc Park

    2006-07-01

    In this study, the steady-state and transient critical heat fluxes (CHFs) in pool boiling were measured on 1.0 mm diameter horizontal cylinders of gold and platinum heaters under saturated conditions due to transient heat inputs, Q{sub 0}exp(t/t), in a pool of Fluorinert FC-72. Heaters were heated by electric current with the periods, t, ranged from 10 ms to 20 s, and the pressures ranged from atmospheric up to around 1.2 MPa. The steady-state CHFs measured are dependent on pressure and almost agree with the values obtained by Kutateladze's correlation based on hydrodynamic instability (HI) model. It was considered that the boiling inception and the direct transition during the steady-state period occur by the pre-pressure of {approx}1.2 MPa. The trend of typical transient CHFs were clearly divided into the first, second, and third groups for long, short, and intermediate periods, respectively. The direct transition processes to film boiling without nucleate boiling for the short periods obtained from both heaters were confirmed due to the heterogeneous spontaneous nucleation (HSN) in flooded cavities on the cylinder surface. The empirical correlations to express each of corresponding CHFs measured on both heaters for the short periods are presented in this paper. (authors)

  1. Experimental Studies on Carbon Dioxide Flow Boiling Heat Transfer Coefficient in Horizontal Smooth Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Katsumi; Kiyotani, Akihiro; Sasaki, Naoe

    The CO2 heat pump water heater ”ECO CUTE” which was commercialized in 2001 has a high potential for energy conservation and greenhouse abatement. The most important element apparatus is always the evaporator in order to develop smaller and higher performance equipment. In this paper, an experimental study has been conducted to measure the pure CO2 flow boiling heat transfer coefficient (99.999 % purity, without oil) in a horizontal smooth tube (outer diameter 6 mm, thickness 0.4 mm). The measured mean heat transfer coefficients are compared with calculated value with using previous experimental heat transfer correlation equations. These two values are different from each other. Mean heat transfer coefficients are measured with varying mass velocity, pressure and heat transfer lengths. The tube length is varied to 3.0 m, 4.0 m and 5.0 m, to distinguish the influence of mass velocity and that of heat flux to the heat transfer coefficient. The test conditions were: CO2 mass velocity from about 150 to about 700 kg⁄(m2s) (heat flux from about 10 to about 40 kW⁄m2), quality at inlet of test section is 0.17, CO2 super heat at outlet of test section is 5 K and saturation temperature of CO2 ranges from 0 to 10 °C. As a result, it has been understood that heat flux has a greater influence on the heat transfer coefficient.

  2. An experimental investigation of flow boiling in an asymmetrically heated rectangular microchannel

    SciTech Connect

    Huh, Cheol; Kim, Moo Hwan

    2006-08-15

    By using unique experimental techniques and carefully constructed experimental apparatus, the characteristics of flow boiling of water in microscale were investigated using a single horizontal rectangular microchannel. A polydimethylsiloxane rectangular microchannel (D{sub h}=103.5 and 133{mu}m) was fabricated by using the replica molding technique, a kind of soft lithography. A piecewise serpentine platinum microheater array on a Pyrex substrate was fabricated with the surface micromachining MEMS technique. Real time flow visualization of the phase change phenomena inside the microchannel was performed using a high speed CCD camera with microscope. The experimental local boiling heat transfer coefficients were studied, and single bubble inception, growth, and departure, as well as elongated bubble behavior were analyzed to elucidate the microscale heat transfer mechanisms. Tests were performed for mass fluxes of 77.5, 154.9, and 309.8kg/m{sup 2}s and heat fluxes of 180-500kW/m{sup 2}. The effects of mass flux, heat flux, and vapor qualities on flow boiling heat transfer in a microchannel were studied. (author)

  3. Bubble confinement in flow boiling of FC-72 in a ''rectangular'' microchannel of high aspect ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, Jacqueline; Brutin, David; Tadrist, Lounes; Sefiane, Khellil

    2010-11-15

    Boiling in microchannels remains elusive due to the lack of full understanding of the mechanisms involved. A powerful tool in achieving better comprehension of the mechanisms is detailed imaging and analysis of the two-phase flow at a fundamental level. Boiling is induced in a single microchannel geometry (hydraulic diameter 727 {mu}m), using a refrigerant FC-72, to investigate the effect of channel confinement on bubble growth. A transparent, metallic, conductive deposit has been developed on the exterior of the rectangular microchannel, allowing simultaneous uniform heating and visualisation to be achieved. The data presented in this paper is for a particular case with a uniform heat flux applied to the microchannel and inlet liquid mass flowrate held constant. In conjunction with obtaining high-speed images and videos, sensitive pressure sensors are used to record the pressure drop across the microchannel over time. Bubble nucleation and growth, as well as periodic slug flow, are observed in the microchannel test section. The periodic pressure fluctuations evidenced across the microchannel are caused by the bubble dynamics and instances of vapour blockage during confined bubble growth in the channel. The variation of the aspect ratio and the interface velocities of the growing vapour slug over time, are all observed and analysed. We follow visually the nucleation and subsequent both 'free' and 'confined' growth of a vapour bubble during flow boiling of FC-72 in a microchannel, from analysis of our results, images and video sequences with the corresponding pressure data obtained. (author)

  4. Orientation and related buoyancy effects in low-velocity flow boiling.

    PubMed

    Merte, Herman; Schultz, William W; Liu, Quanyi; Keller, Robert B

    2009-04-01

    This work is an extension of experimental results reported previously, which might provide design guidance for approximating certain aspects of the flow boiling process in microgravity but taking place in Earth gravity. In that research the buoyancy effects on the bubble dynamics were minimized by the imposition of a liquid velocity parallel to a flat heater surface in the inverted horizontal position, or nearly horizontal (within +/-5 degrees ), thus holding the heated liquid and vapor formed close to the heater surface. For the fluid used, liquid velocities in the range U= 5-10 cm/s were judged to be critical for changes in the behavior of the flow boiling process. Using the hydraulic diameter of the rectangular duct used, with the heater surface embedded in one side, this velocity range gives rise to flow Reynolds numbers on the order of 4400-8800. It was subsequently judged to be of interest to extend the range of orientation of the flat heater surface relative to gravity to the full circular range of 0-360 degrees, in increments of 45 degrees, and the results of this work are presented here. A solid massive copper heater with a gold-plated boiling heat transfer surface 19 x 38 mm in size, previously used for critical heat flux measurements with boiling, provided a near-uniform surface temperature. Only steady measurements of heat flux and surface temperature were possible with the copper heater. R-113 was the fluid used; the velocity was varied over the interval of 4-28 cm/s; bulk liquid subcooling was varied over 5-11 degrees C; and heat flux varied over 0-10 w/cm(2).

  5. Effect of rolling motion on critical heat flux for subcooled flow boiling in vertical tube

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, J. S.; Park, I. U.; Park, M. Y.; Park, G. C.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents defining characteristics of the critical heat flux (CHF) for the boiling of R-134a in vertical tube operation under rolling motion in marine reactor. It is important to predict CHF of marine reactor having the rolling motion in order to increase the safety of the reactor. Marine Reactor Moving Simulator (MARMS) tests are conducted to measure the critical heat flux using R-134a flowing upward in a uniformly heated vertical tube under rolling motion. MARMS was rotated by motor and mechanical power transmission gear. The CHF tests were performed in a 9.5 mm I.D. test section with heated length of 1 m. Mass fluxes range from 285 to 1300 kg m{sup -2}s{sup -1}, inlet subcooling from 3 to 38 deg. C and outlet pressures from 13 to 24 bar. Amplitudes of rolling range from 15 to 40 degrees and periods from 6 to 12 sec. To convert the test conditions of CHF test using R-134a in water, Katto's fluid-to-fluid modeling was used in present investigation. A CHF correlation is presented which accounts for the effects of pressure, mass flux, inlet subcooling and rolling angle over all conditions tested. Unlike existing transient CHF experiments, CHF ratio of certain mass flux and pressure are different in rolling motion. For the mass fluxes below 500 kg m{sup -2}s{sup -1} at 13, 16 (region of relative low mass flux), CHF ratio was decreased but was increased above that mass flux (region of relative high mass flux). Moreover, CHF tend to enhance in entire mass flux at 24 bar. (authors)

  6. Bubble Dynamics, Two-Phase Flow, and Boiling Heat Transfer in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Jacob N.

    1998-01-01

    This report contains two independent sections. Part one is titled "Terrestrial and Microgravity Pool Boiling Heat Transfer and Critical heat flux phenomenon in an acoustic standing wave." Terrestrial and microgravity pool boiling heat transfer experiments were performed in the presence of a standing acoustic wave from a platinum wire resistance heater using degassed FC-72 Fluorinert liquid. The sound wave was created by driving a half wavelength resonator at a frequency of 10.15 kHz. Microgravity conditions were created using the 2.1 second drop tower on the campus of Washington State University. Burnout of the heater wire, often encountered with heat flux controlled systems, was avoided by using a constant temperature controller to regulate the heater wire temperature. The amplitude of the acoustic standing wave was increased from 28 kPa to over 70 kPa and these pressure measurements were made using a hydrophone fabricated with a small piezoelectric ceramic. Cavitation incurred during experiments at higher acoustic amplitudes contributed to the vapor bubble dynamics and heat transfer. The heater wire was positioned at three different locations within the acoustic field: the acoustic node, antinode, and halfway between these locations. Complete boiling curves are presented to show how the applied acoustic field enhanced boiling heat transfer and increased critical heat flux in microgravity and terrestrial environments. Video images provide information on the interaction between the vapor bubbles and the acoustic field. Part two is titled, "Design and qualification of a microscale heater array for use in boiling heat transfer." This part is summarized herein. Boiling heat transfer is an efficient means of heat transfer because a large amount of heat can be removed from a surface using a relatively small temperature difference between the surface and the bulk liquid. However, the mechanisms that govern boiling heat transfer are not well understood. Measurements of

  7. Enhanced Boiling on Micro-Configured Composite Surfaces Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Two experimental setups: High Heat Flux Pool Boiling Setup and Optical system of Measuring Contact Angle and Spreading Parameters were established and a series of experiments was conducted. The experimental work on the nucleate boiling performance of both Freon-113 and water on the composite surfaces has been finished and the results show that the composite surface with 25% volume fraction of graphite fibers in the copper matrix has the best enhancing performance. Stronger enhancement was obtained for water compared to Freon-113. The wall superheat initiating boiling was reduced 40% and 35% and the heat flux of the nucleate boiling was augmented up to ten times and 6.7 times, respectively. A bubble departure model has been presented to explain the enhancement mechanism of the boiling heat transfer on the composite surfaces. A powerful optical method to measure contact angle and spreading parameters of liquids on solid surfaces, including both transparent and non-transparent substrates, has been developed and successfully used in the measurements for various liquid-solid systems. The experimental work on identification of profiles near three-phase line by laser shadowgraphy method has been finished and the characteristics of the three-phase line for different liquid-solid systems were unveiled, which is very important to understand the mechanism of boiling under microgravity conditions. The four basic patterns of sessile profile were discovered through caustics and caustic-diffraction analysis by applying wave theory in shadowgraphy technology, which contributes to clearly explain the different characteristics of wetting and spreading of various liquids on a solid surface, and therefore to further understand the bubble departure mechanisms. A new working pattern of heat pipes using working fluids with positive surface-tension gradient against temperature was discovered and analyzed, and then the new heat pipe systems using this kind of working fluids have been

  8. Review of nucleation and incipient boiling under pool and forced convection conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merte, Herman, Jr.

    1987-01-01

    An overview of liquid-vapor nucleation is given. The result of thermodynamic equilibrium across curved liquid-vapor interfaces is presented. The extension of this to include the interaction with idealizations of surface cavities is made to demonstrate how superheat requirements for nucleation will be affected by surface roughness, flow velocity and buoyancy. Experimental measurements of high liquid superheats and nucleation delay times are presented as examples of homogeneous nucleation. Examples of nucleation and boiling on smooth glass substrates and on metal surfaces with various surface roughnesses are presented.

  9. Analysis and Measurement of Bubble Dynamics and Associated Flow Field in Subcooled Nucleate Boiling Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Barclay G. Jones

    2008-10-01

    In recent years, subooled nucleate boiling (SNB) has attrcted expanding research interest owing to the emergence of axial offset anomaly (AOA) or crud-induced power shigt (CIPS) in many operating US PWRs, which is an unexpected deviation in the core axial power distribution from the predicted power curves. Research indicates that the formation of the crud, which directly leads to AOA phenomena, results from the presence of the subcooled nucleate boiling, and is especially realted to bubble motion occurring in the core region.

  10. Trefftz method for solving two-dimensional temperature field of boiling fluid flowing along the minichannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hożejowska, S.; Piasecka, M.; Hożejowski, L.

    2013-04-01

    The paper focuses on the numerical solution to two-dimensional temperature field of boiling liquid flowing along a vertical, asymmetrically heated minichannel with a rectangular cross-section. One of the walls of a minichannel is a DC supplied heating foil. The parallel walls are made of glass panes for thermal insulation and for observation of the fluid flow and the void fraction. A thin layer of thermosensitive liquid crystal paint on the outer side of the heating foil enabled to record two-dimensional temperature distribution of outer foil surface. The paper presents computations based on Trefftz method for finding two-dimensional temperature field of boiling liquid flowing along the minichannel. The presented research is limited only to a liquid phase of the two-phase mixture observed in the minichannel. The velocity of liquid flowing through the minichannel is represented by a piecewise linear approximating function. To solve energy equation for liquid phase, Trefftz functions specially generated for this purpose were employed. Temperature field in the fluid was approximated by a linear combination of Trefftz functions. Temperature at the interface between working fluid and foil amounts to the saturation temperature. Temperature distribution in the foil and the glass pane was also computed using proper Trefftz functions.

  11. Technology of forced flow and once-through boiling: A survey. [pressure distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poppendieck, H. F.; Sabin, C. M.

    1975-01-01

    Representative boiling heat transfer and pressure drop information obtained primarily from past NASA and AEC programs is presented which is applicable to forced flow and once-through boiler systems. The forced convection boiler has a number of advantages: little possibility of flow mal-distribution; heat transfer characteristics are usually consistent; and conductances are predictable, so that higher heat fluxes may be employed with safety (which leads to more compact, lighter weight equipment). It was found that in gas-fired systems particularly, the controlling heat transfer resistance may be on the hot side, so that increased fluxes would require extended surfaces. If in a power generation system the working fluid is very expensive, a forced flow boiler can be designed especially for small holdup volume. If the fluid is temperature sensitive, the boiling side wall temperatures can be tailored to maintain maximum heat transfer rates without overheating the fluid. The forced flow and once-through configurations may be the only type which can satisfy a specific need (such as the automotive Rankine cycle power plant design having a very short time-response boiler).

  12. A mechanistic model for critical heat flux of subcooled flow boiling

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W.; Nariai, H.; Inasaka, F.

    1999-07-01

    This paper presents a mechanistic model for the prediction of CHF of subcooled flow boiling based on liquid sublayer dryout model. In the model, By writing critical wavelength of Helmholtz Instability to both left and right sides of vapor blanket and by assuming these two wavelengths are equal to each other, the vapor blanket velocity U{sub B} can be written as a simple function of average velocity of liquid bulk V{sub {ell}} which can be obtained by the knowledge they have known. Then, on the base of U{sub B}, other important parameters such as vapor blanket length L{sub B} and liquid sublayer thickness {delta} can be calculated easily. The model is simple with explicit physics nature, and is characterized by the absence of empirical constants. To verify the present model, two databases (include about 2,400 points) are used. One gathered by Celata used to verify his model is characterized by high mass velocity and low-medium system pressure. The other gathered by Pei is characterized by high pressure and low-medium mass velocity. The verification showed that present model could keep its validity in a wide range of operating conditions (mass velocity up to 70 Mg/m{sup 2}s, system pressure up to 17.5 MPa). Figure A-1 shows a comparison of calculated versus experimental CHF. About 89% of data points are predicted within {+-}30%. Comparison between Celata model and the present model shows that although present model shows a little worse prediction than Celata model with the data base collected by Eclat, it shows a much better prediction with the data base collected by Pei. A general better prediction than Celata model is obtained with both the databases collected by Celata and Pei.

  13. Flow boiling with enhancement devices for cold plate coolant channel design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Ronald D., Sr.

    1989-01-01

    A research program to study the effect of enhancement devices on flow boiling heat transfer in coolant channels, which are heated either from the top side or uniformly, is discussed. Freon 11 is the working fluid involved. The specific objectives are: (1) examine the variations in both the mean and local (axial and circumferential) heat transfer coefficients for a circular coolant channel with either smooth walls or with both a twisted tape and spiral finned walls, (2) examine the effect channel diameter (and the length-to-diameter aspect ratio) variations for the smooth wall channel, and (3) develop an improved data reduction analysis.

  14. Experimental investigation of forced convective boiling flow instabilities in horizontal helically coiled tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, L. J.; Feng, Z. P.; Chen, X. J.; Thomas, N. H.

    1996-07-01

    An experimental investigation is described for the characteristics of convective boiling flow instabilities in horizontally helically coiled tubes using a steam-water two-phase closed circulation test loop at pressure from 0.5 MPa to 3.5 MPa. Three kinds of oscillation are reported: density waves; pressure drop excursions; thermal fluctuations. We describe their dependence on main system parameters such as system pressure, mass flowrate, inlet subcooling, compressible volume and heat flux. Utilising the experimental data together with conservation constraints, a dimensionless correlation is proposed for the occurrence of density waves.

  15. Local pressure gradients due to incipience of boiling in subcooled flows

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggles, A.E.; McDuffee, J.L.

    1995-09-01

    Models for vapor bubble behavior and nucleation site density during subcooled boiling are integrated with boundary layer theory in order to predict the local pressure gradient and heat transfer coefficient. Models for bubble growth rate and bubble departure diameter are used to scale the movement of displaced liquid in the laminar sublayer. An added shear stress, analogous to a turbulent shear stress, is derived by considering the liquid movement normal to the heated surface. The resulting mechanistic model has plausible functional dependence on wall superheat, mass flow, and heat flux and agrees well with data available in the literature.

  16. Boiling heat transfer of refrigerant R-21 in upward flow in plate-fin heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, V. V.; Shamirzaev, A. S.

    2015-11-01

    The article presents the results of experimental investigation of boiling heat transfer of refrigerant R-21 in upward flow in a vertical plate-fin heat exchanger with transverse size of the channels that is smaller than the capillary constant. The heat transfer coefficients obtained in ranges of small mass velocities and low heat fluxes, which are typical of the industry, have been poorly studied yet. The characteristic patterns of the upward liquid-vapor flow in the heat exchanger channels and the regions of their existence are detected. The obtained data show a weak dependence of heat transfer coefficient on equilibrium vapor quality, mass flow rate, and heat flux density and do not correspond to calculations by the known heat transfer models. A possible reason for this behavior is a decisive influence of evaporation of thin liquid films on the heat transfer at low heat flux.

  17. Heating surface material’s effect on subcooled flow boiling heat transfer of R134a

    SciTech Connect

    Ling Zou; Barclay G. Jones

    2012-11-01

    In this study, subcooled flow boiling of R134a on copper (Cu) and stainless steel (SS) heating surfaces was experimentally investigated from both macroscopic and microscopic points of view. By utilizing a high-speed digital camera, bubble growth rate, bubble departure size, and nucleation site density, were able to be observed and analyzed from the microscopic point of view. Macroscopic characteristics of the subcooled flow boiling, such as heat transfer coefficient, were able to be measured as well. Experimental results showed that there are no obvious difference between the copper and the stainless surface with respect to bubble dynamics, such as contact angle, growth rate and departure size. On the contrary, the results clearly showed a trend that the copper surface had a better performance than the stainless steel surface in terms of heat transfer coefficient. It was also observed that wall heat fluxes on both surfaces were found highly correlated with nucleation site density, as bubble hydrodynamics are similar on these two surfaces. The difference between these two surfaces was concluded as results of different surface thermal conductivities.

  18. Subcooled flow film boiling across a horizontal cylinder. Part II. Comparison to experimental data

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, X.S.; Sankaran, S.; Witte, L.C. )

    1995-02-01

    In this paper, the results of a rigorous heat transfer analysis of subcooled flow film boiling over a heated cylinder are compared to experimental data. The analysis includes both the influence of the front part of the heater and the wake region behind the heater. Experiments using Freon-113 were conducted at subcooling levels up to 58[degree]C and at velocities up to 3.81 m/s. The configuration was upflowing Freon-113 in crossflow over a 0.635-cm electric heater. A comparison of these data as well as other available experimental data to the analysis of Chou and Witte showed good agreement as long as the subcooling level of the liquid was substantial - that is, for liquid Jakob numbers above about 0.04. This represents a considerable improvement over other models that have been developed to predict subcooled flow boiling heat transfer. A method using a temperature correction to a constant-property heat transfer solution that corresponds to the full variable-property solution is also presented, and applied to water and Freon-113. 11 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Local pressure measurements and heat transfer coefficients of flow boiling in a rectangular microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirmanto, M.

    2016-01-01

    Experiments to investigate local pressure distribution and local heat transfer coefficients during flow boiling of water in a microchannel were performed. The hydraulic diameter of the channel was 0.635 mm. The nominal mass fluxes used were varied from 200 to 700 kg/m2 s and heat fluxes ranging from 171 to 685 kW/m2 were applied. An inlet fluid temperature of 98 °C and pressure of 125 kPa were maintained at the microchannel entrance. There were six pressure tappings inserted into the channel to measure the local pressures and six thermocouple inserted into the channel block with equally distances to measure the wall local temperatures. The local pressure measurements during flow boiling show a non linear line connecting each local pressure, especially at higher heat fluxes or pressure drops. The non linear local pressure influences the value of the estimated local heat transfer coefficient. The effects of mass flux and heat flux on local heat transfer coefficient are also discussed.

  20. The Effect of Numerical Diffusion on Oscillatory Flow in Two-Phase Boiling Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Chaiwat Muncharoen; Tatchai Sumitra; Takatoshi Takemoto; Masanori Aritomi

    2002-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study the effect of numerical diffusion on the ill-posedness and the accuracy of the model simulated the thermal-hydraulic instabilities in boiling water reactor channels. The model of the upward flow system in two-phase boiling channel simulating BWR core was developed to investigate the oscillatory flow, which was caused by flow instabilities, by using the drift-flux model. The time step was fixed at 1 millisecond at all time and the mesh size was varied as follows: 400, 200, 100, 50 and 20 mm. Then the numerical diffusion in the conservation equations was analyzed in reference to spatial mesh size. The maximums of the absolute ratios of the first order and the second order approximations of the time derivative terms (A/B) and the convective terms (C/D), including the summations of the second power of the ratios of the second order and the first order approximations of the time derivative terms ({sigma}(B/A){sup 2}) and the convective terms ({sigma}(D/C){sup 2}) were calculated to investigate the ill-posedness and the accuracy of numerical calculation of this model. The results from the model showed that the numerical diffusion in the time derivative term and the convective term play the important role in the drift-flux model for the small mesh size and may cause the ill-posedness and degrade the accuracy of the model. It was found that the A/B, the C/D, the {sigma}(B/A){sup 2} and the {sigma}(D/C){sup 2} in the drift-flux model highly fluctuated at the small mesh size of 50 and 20 mm. More importantly, the numerical diffusion due to the oscillation flow and the mesh size variation may have an effect on the amplitude of the pressure drop of the oscillatory flow at the small mesh size. (authors)

  1. A New Computational Tool for Simulation of 3-D Flow and Heat Transfer in Boiling Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hudong

    2002-12-09

    This Phase I work has developed a novel hybrid Lattice Boltzmann Model for the simulation of nonideal fluid thermal dynamics and demonstrated that this model can be used to simulate fundamental two-phase flow processes including boiling initiation, bubble formation and coalescency, and flow-regime formation.

  2. Experimental study of static flow instability in subcooled flow boiling in parallel channels

    SciTech Connect

    Siman-Tov, M.; Felde, D.K.; McDuffee, J.L.; Yoder, G.L.

    1995-12-31

    Experimental data for static flow instability or flow excursion (FE) at conditions applicable to the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor are very limited. A series of FE tests with light water flowing vertically upward was completed covering a local exit heat flux range of 0.7--18 MW/m{sup 2}, exit velocity range of 2.8--28.4 m/s, exit pressure range of 0.117--1.7 MPa, and inlet temperature range of 40-- 50{degrees}C. Most of the tests were performed in a ``stiff`` (constant flow) system where the instability threshold was detected through the minimum of the pressure-drop curve. A few tests were also conducted using as ``soft`` (constant pressure drop) a system as possible to secure a true FE phenomenon (actual secondary burnout). True critical heat flux experiments under similar conditions were also conducted using a stiff system. The FE data reported in this study considerably extend the velocity range of data presently available worldwide, most of which were obtained at velocities below 10 m/s. The Saha and Zuber correlation had the best fit with the data out of the three correlations compared. However, a modification was necessary to take into account the demonstrated dependence of the St and Nu numbers on subcooling levels, especially in the low subcooling regime. Comparison of Thermal Hydraulic Test Loop (THTL) data, as well as extensive data from other investigators, led to a proposed modification to the Saha and Zuber correlation for onset of significant void, applied to FE prediction. The mean and standard deviation of the THTL data were 0.95 and 15%, respectively, when comparing the THTL data with the original Saha and Zuber correlation, and 0.93 and 10% when comparing them with the modification. Comparison with the worldwide database showed a mean and standard deviation of 1.37 and 53%, respectively, for the original Saha and Zuber correlation and 1.0 and 27% for the modification.

  3. Numerical investigation of water-based nanofluid subcooled flow boiling by three-phase Euler-Euler, Euler-Lagrange approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valizadeh, Ziba; Shams, Mehrzad

    2016-08-01

    A numerical scheme for simulating the subcooled flow boiling of water and water-based nanofluids was developed. At first, subcooled flow boiling of water was simulated by the Eulerian multiphase scheme. Then the simulation results were compared with previous experimental data and a good agreement was observed. In the next step, subcooled flow boiling of water-based nanofluid was modeled. In the previous studies in this field, the nanofluid assumed as a homogeneous liquid and the two-phase scheme was used to simulate its boiling. In the present study, a new scheme was used to model the nanofluid boiling. In this scheme, to model the nanofluid flow boiling, three phases, water, vapor and nanoparticles were considered. The Eulerian-Eulerian approach was used for modeling water-vapor interphase and Eulerian-Lagrangian scheme was selected to observe water-nanoparticle interphase behavior. The results from the nanofluid boiling modeling were validated with an experimental investigation. The results of the present work and experimental data were consistent. The addition of 0.0935 % volume fraction of nanoparticles in pure liquid boiling flow increases the vapor volume fraction at the outlet almost by 40.7 %. The results show the three-phase model is a good approach to simulate the nanofluid boiling flow.

  4. Experimental study on flow boiling heat transfer of LNG in a vertical smooth tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dongsheng; Shi, Yumei

    2013-10-01

    An experimental apparatus is set up in this work to study the upward flow boiling heat transfer characteristics of LNG (liquefied natural gas) in vertical smooth tubes with inner diameters of 8 mm and 14 mm. The experiments were performed at various inlet pressures from 0.3 to 0.7 MPa. The results were obtained over the mass flux range from 16 to 200 kg m-2 s-1 and heat fluxes ranging from 8.0 to 32 kW m-2. The influences of quality, heat flux and mass flux, tube diameter on the heat transfer characteristic are examined and discussed. The comparisons of the experimental heat transfer coefficients with the predicted values from the existing correlations are analyzed. The correlation by Zou et al. [16] shows the best accuracy with the RMS deviation of 31.7% in comparison with the experimental data.

  5. Complete Numerical Simulation of Subcooled Flow Boiling in the Presence of Thermal and Chemical Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    V.K. Dhir

    2003-04-28

    At present, guidelines for fuel cycle designs to prevent axial offset anomalies (AOA) in pressurized water reactor (PWR) cores are based on empirical data from several operating reactors. Although the guidelines provide an ad-hoc solution to the problem, a unified approach based on simultaneous modeling of thermal-hydraulics, chemical, and nuclear interactions with vapor generation at the fuel cladding surface does not exist. As a result, the fuel designs are overly constrained with a resulting economic penalty. The objective of present project is to develop a numerical simulation model supported by laboratory experiments that can be used for fuel cycle design with respect to thermal duty of the fuel to avoid economic penalty, as well as, AOA. At first, two-dimensional numerical simulation of the growth and departure of a bubble in pool boiling with chemical interaction is considered. A finite difference scheme is used to solve the equations governing conservation of mass, momentum, energy, and species concentration. The Level Set method is used to capture the evolving liquid-vapor interface. A dilute aqueous boron solution is considered in the simulation. From numerical simulations, the dynamic change in concentration distribution of boron during the bubble growth shows that the precipitation of boron can occur near the advancing and receding liquid-vapor interface when the ambient boron concentration level is 3,000 ppm by weight. Secondly, a complete three-dimensional numerical simulation of inception, growth and departure of a single bubble subjected to forced flow parallel to the heater surface was developed. Experiments on a flat plate heater with water and with boron dissolved in the water were carried out. The heater was made out of well-polished silicon wafer. Numbers of nucleation sites and their locations were well controlled. Bubble dynamics in great details on an isolated nucleation site were obtained while varying the wall superheat, liquid subcooling

  6. Combining liquid inertia with pressure recovery from bubble expansion for enhanced flow boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalani, A.; Kandlikar, S. G.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate using liquid inertia force in a taper gap microchannel geometry to provide a high level of heat dissipation capacity accompanied by a high heat transfer coefficient and low pressure drop during flow boiling. The high mass flux increases liquid inertia force and promotes vapor removal from the manifold, thereby increasing critical heat flux (CHF) and heat transfer coefficient. The tapered gap above the microchannels provides an increasing cross-sectional area in the flow direction. This gap allows bubbles to emerge from microchannels and expand within the gap along the flow direction. The bubble evaporation and expansion in tapered gap causes pressure recovery and reduces the total pressure drop. The pressure recovery increases with the increased evaporation rate at higher heat fluxes. Using a 6% taper and a moderately high inlet liquid flow Reynolds number of 1095, we have reached a CHF of 1.07 kW/cm2 with a heat transfer coefficient of 295 kW/m2 °C and a pressure drop of 30 kPa.

  7. Prediction of flow boiling heat transfer coefficient for carbon dioxide in minichannels and conventional channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikielewicz, Dariusz; Jakubowska, Blanka

    2016-06-01

    In the paper presented are the results of calculations using authors own model to predict heat transfer coefficient during flow boiling of carbon dioxide. The experimental data from various researches were collected. Calculations were conducted for a full range of quality variation and a wide range of mass velocity. The aim of the study was to test the sensitivity of the in-house model. The results show the importance of taking into account the surface tension as the parameter exhibiting its importance in case of the flow in minichannels as well as the influence of reduced pressure. The calculations were accomplished to test the sensitivity of the heat transfer model with respect to selection of the appropriate two-phase flow multiplier, which is one of the elements of the heat transfer model. For that purpose correlations due to Müller-Steinhagen and Heck as well as the one due to Friedel were considered. Obtained results show a good consistency with experimental results, however the selection of two-phase flow multiplier does not significantly influence the consistency of calculations.

  8. Local Heat Transfer and CHF for Subcooled Flow Boiling - Annual Report 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Ronald D. Boyd

    2000-07-01

    Subcooled flow boiling in heated coolant channels is an important heat transfer enhancement technique in the development of fusion reactor components, where high heat fluxes must be accommodated. As energy fluxes increase in magnitude, additional emphasis must be devoted to enhancing techniques such as sub cooling and enhanced surfaces. In addition to subcooling, other high heat flux alternatives such as high velocity helium and liquid metal cooling have been considered as serious contenders. Each technique has its advantages and disadvantages [1], which must be weighed as to reliability and reduced cost of fusion reactor components. Previous studies [2] have set the stage for the present work, which will concentrate on fundamental thermal hydraulic issues associated with the h-international Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the Engineering Design Activity (EDA). This proposed work is intended to increase our understanding of high heat flux removal alternatives as well as our present capabilities by: (1) including single-side heating effects in models for local predictions of heat transfer and critical heat flux; (2) inspection of the US, Japanese, and other possible data sources for single-side heating, with the aim of exploring possible correlations for both CHF and local heat transfer; and (3) assessing the viability of various high heat flux removal techniques. The latter task includes: (a) sub-cooled water flow boiling with enhancements such as twisted tapes, and hypervapotrons, (b) high velocity helium cooling, and (c) other potential techniques such as liquid metal cooling. This assessment will increase our understanding of: (1) hypervapotron heat transfer via fins, flow recirculation, and flow oscillation, and (2) swirl flow. This progress report contains selective examples of ongoing work. Section II contains an extended abstract, which is part of and evolving technical paper on single-side f heating. Section III describes additional details

  9. Cold neutron tomography of annular coolant flow in a double subchannel model of a boiling water reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kickhofel, J. L.; Zboray, R.; Damsohn, M.; Kaestner, A.; Lehmann, E. H.; Prasser, H.-M.

    2011-09-01

    Dryout of the liquid coolant film on fuel pins at the top of boiling water reactor (BWR) cores constitutes the type of heat transfer crisis relevant for the conditions of high void fractions. It is a limiting factor in the thermal power, and therefore the economy, of BWRs. Ongoing research on multiphase annular flow, specifically the liquid film thickness, is fundamental not only to nuclear reactor safety and operation but also to that of evaporators, condensers, and pipelines in a general industrial context. We have performed cold neutron tomography of adiabatic air water annular flow in a scaled up model of the subchannel geometry found in BWR fuel assemblies today. All imaging has been performed at the ICON beamline at the neutron spallation source SINQ at the Paul Scherrer Institut in Switzerland. Neutron tomography is shown to excel in investigating the interactions of air water two phase flows with spacer vanes of different geometry. The high resolution, high contrast measurements provide spatial distributions of the coolant on top of the surfaces of the spacer, including the vanes, and in the subchannel downstream of the spacers.

  10. An application of the non-continuous Trefftz method to the determination of heat transfer coefficient for flow boiling in a minichannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciejewska, Beata; Piasecka, Magdalena

    2016-08-01

    The paper presents an application of the semi-analytical method, called the non-continuous Trefftz method, to the calculation of the heat transfer coefficients. It is very effective method for solving direct and inverse problems. The results obtained by this method are consistent with the results obtained by using complicated methods: the FEM and Beck method. Sought local heat transfer coefficients between the heating surface and the boiling liquid flowing through 1 mm deep minichannel were calculated from the Robin boundary condition. The temperature of the heating surface and the derivative of the temperature were was found from solving the inverse problem. The study is limited to the identification of the heat transfer coefficient in the subcooled and the saturated nucleate boiling regions. The article presents also the measurement stand and methodology of conducting the experiment. Presented issues allows verification of state-of-the-art methods of solving the inverse problem by using the authors' empirical data from the experiment.

  11. The development of a non-equilibrium dispersed flow film boiling heat transfer modeling package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meholic, Michael J.

    The dispersed flow film boiling (DFFB) heat transfer regime is important to several applications including cryogenics, rocket engines, steam generators, and in the safety analysis of nuclear reactors. Most notably, DFFB is responsible for the heat transfer during the blowdown and reflood portions of the postulated loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA). Such analyses require the accurate predictions of the heat transfer resulting from the non-equilibrium conditions present in DFFB. A total of six, interrelated heat transfer paths need to be modeled accurately in order to quantify DFFB heat transfer. Within the nuclear industry, transient safety analysis codes, such as COBRA-TF, are used to ensure the safety of the reactor under various transient and accident scenarios. An extensive literature review of DFFB heat transfer highlighted a number of correlative, phenomenological, and mechanistic models. The Forslund-Rohsenow model is most commonly implemented throughout the nuclear industry. However, several of the models suggested by Forslund and Rohsenow to model DFFB phenomena are either inapplicable for nuclear reactors or do not provide an accurate physical representation of the true situation. Deficiencies among other DFFB heat transfer models in their applicability to nuclear reactors or in their computational expenses motivated the development of a mechanistically based DFFB model which accounted for each heat transfer mechanism explicitly. The heat transfer resulting from dispersed droplets contacting the heated wall in DFFB was often neglected in previous models. In this work, a first-principles approach was implemented to quantify the heat transfer attributed to direct contact. Lagrangian droplet trajectory calculations incorporating realistic radial vapor velocity and temperature profiles were performed to determine if droplets could contact the heated wall based upon the local conditions. These calculations were performed over a droplet size spectrum accounting

  12. Formation of Martian Gullies by the Flow of Simultaneously Freezing and Boiling Liquid Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heldmann, Jennifer L.; Mellon, Michael T.; Toon, Owen B.; Pollard, Wayne H.; Mellon, Michael T.; Pitlick, John; McKay, Christopher P.; Andersen, Dale T.

    2004-01-01

    Geomorphic evidence suggests that recent gullies on Mars were formed by fluvial activity. The Martian gully features are significant because their existence implies the presence of liquid water near the surface on Mars in geologically recent times. Irrespective of the ultimate source of the fluid carving the gullies, we seek to understand the behavior of this fluid after it reaches the Martian surface. We find that, contrary to popular belief, the fluvially-carved Martian gullies require formation conditions such as now occur on Mars, outside of the temperature-pressure stability regime of liquid water. Mars Global Surveyor observations of gully length and our modeling of water stability are consistent with gully formation from the action of pure liquid water that is simultaneously boiling and freezing.

  13. Heat transfer with nucleate boiling of liquids under weak mass force field conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirichenko, Y. A.

    1974-01-01

    The motion is examined of a vapor bubble growing and rising from a flat horizontal heater in the ideal fluid approximation and taking drag into account. Estimates are given of bubble lifetime, bubble radius at detachment, bubble detachment frequency, and time for the bubble to attain a constant rate of rise. The relations obtained for the microcharacteristics of the boiling process are used to determine the coefficients of heat transfer in developed nucleate boiling. A new form of the equations for describing heat transfer in nucleate boiling in dimensionless parameters is proposed.

  14. A novel 1D/2D model for simulating conjugate heat transfer applied to flow boiling in tubes with external fins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocłoń, Paweł; Łopata, Stanisław; Nowak, Marzena

    2014-09-01

    This study presents a novel, simplified model for the time-efficient simulation of transient conjugate heat transfer in round tubes. The flow domain and the tube wall are modeled in 1D and 2D, respectively and empirical correlations are used to model the flow domain in 1D. The model is particularly useful when dealing with complex physics, such as flow boiling, which is the main focus of this study. The tube wall is assumed to have external fins. The flow is vertical upwards. Note that straightforward computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis of conjugate heat transfer in a system of tubes, leads to 3D modeling of fluid and solid domains. Because correlation is used and dimensionality reduced, the model is numerically more stable and computationally more time-efficient compared to the CFD approach. The benefit of the proposed approach is that it can be applied to large systems of tubes as encountered in many practical applications. The modeled equations are discretized in space using the finite volume method, with central differencing for the heat conduction equation in the solid domain, and upwind differencing of the convective term of the enthalpy transport equation in the flow domain. An explicit time discretization with forward differencing was applied to the enthalpy transport equation in the fluid domain. The conduction equation in the solid domain was time discretized using the Crank-Nicholson scheme. The model is applied in different boundary conditions and the predicted boiling patterns and temperature fields are discussed.

  15. A novel 1D/2D model for simulating conjugate heat transfer applied to flow boiling in tubes with external fins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocłoń, Paweł; Łopata, Stanisław; Nowak, Marzena

    2015-04-01

    This study presents a novel, simplified model for the time-efficient simulation of transient conjugate heat transfer in round tubes. The flow domain and the tube wall are modeled in 1D and 2D, respectively and empirical correlations are used to model the flow domain in 1D. The model is particularly useful when dealing with complex physics, such as flow boiling, which is the main focus of this study. The tube wall is assumed to have external fins. The flow is vertical upwards. Note that straightforward computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis of conjugate heat transfer in a system of tubes, leads to 3D modeling of fluid and solid domains. Because correlation is used and dimensionality reduced, the model is numerically more stable and computationally more time-efficient compared to the CFD approach. The benefit of the proposed approach is that it can be applied to large systems of tubes as encountered in many practical applications. The modeled equations are discretized in space using the finite volume method, with central differencing for the heat conduction equation in the solid domain, and upwind differencing of the convective term of the enthalpy transport equation in the flow domain. An explicit time discretization with forward differencing was applied to the enthalpy transport equation in the fluid domain. The conduction equation in the solid domain was time discretized using the Crank-Nicholson scheme. The model is applied in different boundary conditions and the predicted boiling patterns and temperature fields are discussed.

  16. Strain-induced corrosion cracking behaviour of low-alloy steels under boiling water reactor conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, H. P.; Ritter, S.

    2008-09-01

    The strain-induced corrosion cracking (SICC) behaviour of different low-alloy reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and piping steels and of a RPV weld filler/weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) material was characterized under simulated boiling water reactor (BWR)/normal water chemistry (NWC) conditions by slow rising load (SRL) and very low-frequency fatigue tests with pre-cracked fracture mechanics specimens. Under highly oxidizing BWR/NWC conditions (ECP ⩾+50 mV SHE, ⩾0.4 ppm dissolved oxygen), the SICC crack growth rates were comparable for all materials (hardness <350 HV5) and increased (once initiated) with increasing loading rates and with increasing temperature with a possible maximum/plateau at 250 °C. A minimum KI value of 25 MPa m 1/2 had to be exceeded to initiate SICC in SRL tests. Above this value, the SICC rates increased with increasing loading rate d KI/d t, but were not dependent on the actual KI values up to 60 MPa m 1/2. A maximum in SICC initiation susceptibility occurred at intermediate temperatures around 200-250 °C and at slow strain rates in all materials. In contrast to crack growth, the SICC initiation susceptibility was affected by environmental and material parameters within certain limits.

  17. Pool boiling enhancement through bubble induced convective liquid flow in feeder microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaikumar, A.; Kandlikar, S. G.

    2016-01-01

    Bubbles departing from the nucleation sites induce a liquid flow from the bulk to the heated surface during pool boiling. Alternating the nucleating regions with non-nucleating regions facilitates separate liquid-vapor pathways for departing vapor bubbles and returning liquid. We explored an additional enhancement through liquid feeder channels on the heater surface directing the returning liquid towards the nucleating region. The nucleating bubbles were confined to the nucleating region as the returning liquid flow induced strong convective currents over the non-nucleating regions. In the best performing configuration, the nucleating regions were 0.5 mm wide, separated by non-nucleating regions of width 2.125 mm, which corresponded to the bubble departure diameter. The non-nucleating regions contained 0.5 mm wide feeder channels directing liquid towards the nucleating region. High speed images indicated distinct vapor columns over the nucleating regions with liquid channeled through the feeder channels. At higher heat fluxes, the strong liquid currents established over the feeder channels suppressed any undesirable nucleation in them keeping the separated vapor-liquid pathways functional. This enhancement technique resulted in a critical heat flux of 394 W/cm2 at a wall superheat of 5.5 °C which translated to a heat transfer coefficient of 713 kW/m2 °C. The additional surface area and high heat transfer coefficient due to microchannel flow in feeder channels, and the unobstructed surface available for the bubbles to expand over the prime heat transfer surface area before departing were seen to be responsible for their superior performance.

  18. Pool boiling of water on nano-structured micro wires at sub-atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arya, Mahendra; Khandekar, Sameer; Pratap, Dheeraj; Ramakrishna, S. Anantha

    2016-09-01

    Past decades have seen active research in enhancement of boiling heat transfer by surface modifications. Favorable surface modifications are expected to enhance boiling efficiency. Several interrelated mechanisms such as capillarity, surface energy alteration, wettability, cavity geometry, wetting transitions, geometrical features of surface morphology, etc., are responsible for change in the boiling behavior of modified surfaces. Not much work is available on pool boiling at low pressures on microscale/nanoscale geometries; low pressure boiling is attractive in many applications wherein low operating temperatures are desired for a particular working fluid. In this background, an experimental setup was designed and developed to investigate the pool boiling performance of water on (a) plain aluminum micro wire (99.999 % pure) and, (b) nano-porous alumina structured aluminum micro wire, both having diameter of 250 µm, under sub-atmospheric pressure. Nano-structuring on the plain wire surface was achieved via anodization. Two samples, A and B of anodized wires, differing by the degree of anodization were tested. The heater length scale (wire diameter) was much smaller than the capillary length scale. Pool boiling characteristics of water were investigated at three different sub-atmospheric pressures of 73, 123 and 199 mbar (corresponding to T sat = 40, 50 and 60 °C). First, the boiling characteristics of plain wire were measured. It was noticed that at sub-atmospheric pressures, boiling heat transfer performance for plain wire was quite low due to the increased bubble sizes and low nucleation site density. Subsequently, boiling performance of nano-structured wires (both Sample A and Sample B) was compared with plain wire and it was noted that boiling heat transfer for the former was considerably enhanced as compared to the plain wire. This enhancement is attributed to increased nucleation site density, change in wettability and possibly due to enhanced pore scale

  19. Pool boiling of water on nano-structured micro wires at sub-atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arya, Mahendra; Khandekar, Sameer; Pratap, Dheeraj; Ramakrishna, S. Anantha

    2015-10-01

    Past decades have seen active research in enhancement of boiling heat transfer by surface modifications. Favorable surface modifications are expected to enhance boiling efficiency. Several interrelated mechanisms such as capillarity, surface energy alteration, wettability, cavity geometry, wetting transitions, geometrical features of surface morphology, etc., are responsible for change in the boiling behavior of modified surfaces. Not much work is available on pool boiling at low pressures on microscale/nanoscale geometries; low pressure boiling is attractive in many applications wherein low operating temperatures are desired for a particular working fluid. In this background, an experimental setup was designed and developed to investigate the pool boiling performance of water on (a) plain aluminum micro wire (99.999 % pure) and, (b) nano-porous alumina structured aluminum micro wire, both having diameter of 250 µm, under sub-atmospheric pressure. Nano-structuring on the plain wire surface was achieved via anodization. Two samples, A and B of anodized wires, differing by the degree of anodization were tested. The heater length scale (wire diameter) was much smaller than the capillary length scale. Pool boiling characteristics of water were investigated at three different sub-atmospheric pressures of 73, 123 and 199 mbar (corresponding to T sat = 40, 50 and 60 °C). First, the boiling characteristics of plain wire were measured. It was noticed that at sub-atmospheric pressures, boiling heat transfer performance for plain wire was quite low due to the increased bubble sizes and low nucleation site density. Subsequently, boiling performance of nano-structured wires (both Sample A and Sample B) was compared with plain wire and it was noted that boiling heat transfer for the former was considerably enhanced as compared to the plain wire. This enhancement is attributed to increased nucleation site density, change in wettability and possibly due to enhanced pore scale

  20. Numerical investigation on boiling flow of liquid nitrogen in a vertical tube using bubble number density approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xuefeng; Li, Xiangdong; Wang, Rongshun

    2016-04-01

    An average bubble number density (ABND) model was formulated and numerically resolved for the subcooled flow boiling of liquid nitrogen. The effects of bubble coalescence and breakup were taken into account. Some new closure correlations describing bubble nucleation and departure on the heating surface were selected as well. For the purpose of comparison, flow boiling of liquid nitrogen was also numerically simulated using a modified two-fluid model. The results show that the simulations performed by using the ABND model achieve encouraging improvement in accuracy in predicting heat flux and wall temperature of a vertical tube. Moreover, the influence of the bubble coalescence and breakup is shown to be great on predicting overall pressure beyond the transition point.

  1. The development of a non-equilibrium dispersed flow film boiling heat transfer modeling package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meholic, Michael J.

    The dispersed flow film boiling (DFFB) heat transfer regime is important to several applications including cryogenics, rocket engines, steam generators, and in the safety analysis of nuclear reactors. Most notably, DFFB is responsible for the heat transfer during the blowdown and reflood portions of the postulated loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA). Such analyses require the accurate predictions of the heat transfer resulting from the non-equilibrium conditions present in DFFB. A total of six, interrelated heat transfer paths need to be modeled accurately in order to quantify DFFB heat transfer. Within the nuclear industry, transient safety analysis codes, such as COBRA-TF, are used to ensure the safety of the reactor under various transient and accident scenarios. An extensive literature review of DFFB heat transfer highlighted a number of correlative, phenomenological, and mechanistic models. The Forslund-Rohsenow model is most commonly implemented throughout the nuclear industry. However, several of the models suggested by Forslund and Rohsenow to model DFFB phenomena are either inapplicable for nuclear reactors or do not provide an accurate physical representation of the true situation. Deficiencies among other DFFB heat transfer models in their applicability to nuclear reactors or in their computational expenses motivated the development of a mechanistically based DFFB model which accounted for each heat transfer mechanism explicitly. The heat transfer resulting from dispersed droplets contacting the heated wall in DFFB was often neglected in previous models. In this work, a first-principles approach was implemented to quantify the heat transfer attributed to direct contact. Lagrangian droplet trajectory calculations incorporating realistic radial vapor velocity and temperature profiles were performed to determine if droplets could contact the heated wall based upon the local conditions. These calculations were performed over a droplet size spectrum accounting

  2. Bubble Dynamics, Two-Phase Flow, and Boiling Heat Transfer in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Jacob N.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of the research is to study the feasibility of employing an external force to replace the buoyancy force in order to maintain nucleate boiling in microgravity. We have found that a bulk velocity field, an electric field and an acoustic field could each play the role of the gravity field in microgravity. Nucleate boiling could be maintained by any one of the three external force fields in space.

  3. Enhanced Boiling on Micro-Configured Composite Surfaces Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Nengli; Chai, An-Ti

    1999-01-01

    In order to accommodate the growing thermal management needs of future space platforms, several two-phase active thermal control systems (ATCSs) have evolved and were included in the designs of space stations. Compared to the pumped single-phase liquid loops used in the conventional Space Transportation System and Spacelab, ATCSs offer significant benefits that may be realized by adopting a two-phase fluid-loop system. Alternately, dynamic power systems (DPSs), based on the Rankine cycle, seem inevitably to be required to supply the electrical power requirements of expanding space activities. Boiling heat transfer is one of the key technologies for both ATCSs and DPSs. Nucleate boiling near critical heat flux (CHF) can transport very large thermal loads with much smaller device size and much lower pumping power. However, boiling performance deteriorates in a reduced gravity environment and operation in the CHF regime is precarious because any slight overload will cause the heat transfer to suddenly move to the film boiling regime, which in turn, will result in burnout of the heat transfer surfaces. New materials, such as micro-configured metal-graphite composites, can provide a solution for boiling enhancement. It has been shown experimentally that this type of material manifests outstanding boiling heat transfer performance and their CHF is also extended to higher values. Due to the high thermal conductivity of graphite fiber (up to 1,200 W/m-K in the fiber direction), the composite surfaces are non-isothermal during the boiling process. The composite surfaces are believed to have a much wider safe operating region (a more uniform boiling curve in the CHF regime) because non-isothermal surfaces have been found to be less sensitive to variations of wall superheat in the CHF regime. The thermocapillary forces formed by the temperature difference between the fiber tips and the metal matrix play a more important role than the buoyancy in the bubble detachment, for the

  4. Subcooled freon-11 flow boiling in top-heated finned coolant channels with and without a twisted tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Alvin; Boyd, Ronald D., Sr.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted in top-heated finned horizontal tubes to study the effect of enhancement devices on flow boiling heat transfer in coolant channels. The objectives are to examine the variations in both the mean and local (axial and circumferential) heat transfer coefficients for circular coolant channels with spiral finned walls and/or spiral fins with a twisted tape, and improve the data reduction technique of a previous investigator. The working fluid is freon-11 with an inlet temperature of 22.2 C (approximately 21 C subcooling). The coolant channel's exit pressure and mass velocity are 0.19 M Pa (absolute) and 0.21 Mg/sq. ms, respectively. Two tube configurations were examined; i.e., tubes had either 6.52 (small pitch) or 4.0 (large pitch) fins/cm of the circumferential length (26 and 16 fins, respectively). The large pitch fins were also examined with a twisted tape insert. The inside nominal diameter of the copper channels at the root of the fins was 1.0 cm. The results show that by adding enhancement devices, boiling occurs almost simultaneously at all axial locations. The case of spiral fins with large pitch resulted in larger mean (circumferentially averaged) heat transfer coefficients, h sub m, at all axial locations. Finally, when twisted tape is added to the tube with large-pitched fins, the power required for the onset of boiling is reduced at all axial and circumferential locations.

  5. Validation and Calibration of Nuclear Thermal Hydraulics Multiscale Multiphysics Models - Subcooled Flow Boiling Study

    SciTech Connect

    Anh Bui; Nam Dinh; Brian Williams

    2013-09-01

    In addition to validation data plan, development of advanced techniques for calibration and validation of complex multiscale, multiphysics nuclear reactor simulation codes are a main objective of the CASL VUQ plan. Advanced modeling of LWR systems normally involves a range of physico-chemical models describing multiple interacting phenomena, such as thermal hydraulics, reactor physics, coolant chemistry, etc., which occur over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. To a large extent, the accuracy of (and uncertainty in) overall model predictions is determined by the correctness of various sub-models, which are not conservation-laws based, but empirically derived from measurement data. Such sub-models normally require extensive calibration before the models can be applied to analysis of real reactor problems. This work demonstrates a case study of calibration of a common model of subcooled flow boiling, which is an important multiscale, multiphysics phenomenon in LWR thermal hydraulics. The calibration process is based on a new strategy of model-data integration, in which, all sub-models are simultaneously analyzed and calibrated using multiple sets of data of different types. Specifically, both data on large-scale distributions of void fraction and fluid temperature and data on small-scale physics of wall evaporation were simultaneously used in this work’s calibration. In a departure from traditional (or common-sense) practice of tuning/calibrating complex models, a modern calibration technique based on statistical modeling and Bayesian inference was employed, which allowed simultaneous calibration of multiple sub-models (and related parameters) using different datasets. Quality of data (relevancy, scalability, and uncertainty) could be taken into consideration in the calibration process. This work presents a step forward in the development and realization of the “CIPS Validation Data Plan” at the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LWRs to enable

  6. Boiling Heat Transfer Mechanisms in Earth and Low Gravity: Boundary Condition and Heater Aspect Ratio Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jungho

    2004-01-01

    Boiling is a complex phenomenon where hydrodynamics, heat transfer, mass transfer, and interfacial phenomena are tightly interwoven. An understanding of boiling and critical heat flux in microgravity environments is of importance to space based hardware and processes such as heat exchange, cryogenic fuel storage and transportation, electronic cooling, and material processing due to the large amounts of heat that can be removed with relatively little increase in temperature. Although research in this area has been performed in the past four decades, the mechanisms by which heat is removed from surfaces in microgravity are still unclear. Recently, time and space resolved heat transfer data were obtained in both earth and low gravity environments using an array of microheaters varying in size between 100 microns to 700 microns. These heaters were operated in both constant temperature as well as constant heat flux mode. Heat transfer under nucleating bubbles in earth gravity were directly measured using a microheater array with 100 m resolution operated in constant temperature mode with low and high subcooled bulk liquid along with images from below and from the side. The individual bubble departure diameter and energy transfer were larger with low subcooling but the departure frequency increased at high subcooling, resulting in higher overall heat transfer. The bubble growth for both subcoolings was primarily due to energy transfer from the superheated liquid layer relatively little was due to wall heat transfer during the bubble growth process. Oscillating bubbles and sliding bubbles were also observed in highly subcooled boiling. Transient conduction and/or microconvection was the dominant heat transfer mechanism in the above cases. A transient conduction model was developed and compared with the experimental data with good agreement. Data was also obtained with the heater array operated in a constant heat flux mode and measuring the temperature distribution across

  7. A Mechanistic Study of Nucleate Boiling Heat Transfer Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhir, V. K.; Hasan, M. M.

    2000-01-01

    bubble along the surface. The numerical simulation has been carried out by solving under the condition of axisymmetry, the mass, momentum, and energy equations for the vapor and the liquid phases. In the model the contribution of micro-layer has been included and instantaneous shape of the evolving vapor-liquid interface is determined from the analysis. Consistent with the experimental results, it is found that effect of reduced gravity is to stretch the growth period and bubble diameter It is found that effect of reduced gravity is to stretch the growth period and bubble diameter at departure. The numerical simulations are in good agreement with the experimental data for both the departure diameters and the growth periods. In the study on dynamics of multiple bubbles, horizontal merger of 2,3 4,and 5 bubbles was observed. It is found that after merger of 2 and 3 bubbles the equivalent diameter of the detached bubble is smaller than that of a single bubble departing at the same gravity level. During and after bubble merger, liquid still fills the space between the vapor stems so as to form mushroom type bubbles. The experimental and numerical studies conducted so far have brought us a step closer to prediction of nucleate boiling heat fluxes under low gravity conditions. Preparations for a space flight are continuing.

  8. An improved method for simultaneous determination of frictional pressure drop and vapor volume fraction in vertical flow boiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klausner, J. F.; Chao, B. T.; Soo, S. L.

    1990-01-01

    The two-phase frictional pressure drop and vapor volume fraction in the vertical boiling and adiabatic flow of the refrigerant, R11, have been simultaneously measured by a liquid balancing column and differential magnetic reluctance pressure transducers. An account is given of the experimental apparatus and procedure, data acquisition and analysis, and error estimation employed. All values of two-phase multipliers evaluated on the basis of the measured frictional pressure drop data in vertical upflow fall in the range bounded by the predictions of the Chisholm correlation and the homogeneous model.

  9. Combined buoyancy and flow direction effects on saturated boiling critical heat flux in liquid nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papell, S. S.

    1972-01-01

    Buoyancy effects on the critical heat flux and general data trends for a liquid nitrogen internal flow system were determined by comparison of upflow and downflow data under identical test conditions. The test section had a 1.28 cm diameter flow passage and a 30.5 cm heated length which was subjected to uniform heat fluxes through resistance heating. Test conditions covered a range of pressures from 3.4 to 10.2 atm, inlet velocities from 0.23 to 3.51 m/sec, with the liquid nitrogen temperature at saturated inlet conditions. Data comparisons showed that the critical heat flux for downflow could be up to 36 percent lower than for upflow. A nonmonotonic relationship between the critical heat flux and velocity was determined for upflow but not for downflow. A limiting inlet velocity of 4.12 m/sec was determined to be the minimum velocity required to completely suppress the influence of buoyancy on the critical heat flux for this saturated inlet flow system. A correlation of this limiting fluid velocity is presented that was developed from previously published subcooled liquid nitrogen data and the saturated data of this investigation.

  10. Boils (Furunculosis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... resulting from the deep infection of a hair follicle. The infection is usually caused by a type ... germ gain entry into and infect the hair follicle, resulting in a boil. Boils may resolve with ...

  11. Development of high-performance cooling devices for space application by using flow boiling in narrow channels.

    PubMed

    Miura, Shinichi; Inada, Yukihiro; Shinmoto, Yasuhisa; Ohta, Haruhiko

    2009-04-01

    Heat generation density from semiconductor devices has been increasing with the rapid development of electronic technology. The cooling system using boiling two-phase phenomena has attracted much attention because of its high heat removal potential. To develop compact and high-performance cooling systems, we conducted experiments on the increase of critical heat flux (CHF) for flow boiling in narrow channels by improved liquid supply. A large surface of 150 mm in heated length and 30 mm in width with grooves of an apex angle of 90 degrees , 0.5-mm depth, and 1 mm in pitch was employed. A structure of narrow heated channel between parallel plates with an unheated auxiliary channel was devised and tested by using water for different combinations of gap sizes and volumetric flow rates, where inlet of the main heated channel and the outlet of auxiliary unheated channel were closed to prevent the flow instability observed frequently at low flow rate for parallel two channels. For the total volumetric flow rate more than 4.5 x 10(-5) m(3)/s, higher values of CHF large than 2 x 10(6) W/m(2) were obtained for gap size of 2 mm. For gap sizes of 2 mm and 5 mm at high volumetric flow rate larger than 6.0 x 10(-5) m(3)/s, or mass velocity based on the cross section are of main heated channel 958.1 kg/m(2)s and 383.2 kg/m(2) s, respectively, the extension of dry patches was observed at the upstream location of the main heated channel resulting in burnout not at the downstream but at the upstream. By the increase in total volumetric flow rate, the pressure drop increased because of increasing in the flow rate passing through the sintered metal porous plates connecting both channels. The values of pressure drop for gap size of 2 mm were higher than that for gap size of 5 mm. When the performance of the cooling system was evaluated on the basis of pump power, ignoring its variation in the efficiency with volumetric flow rate, that is, the power defined as the product of the

  12. Analytic solution to verify code predictions of two-phase flow in a boiling water reactor core channel

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K.F.; Olson, C.A.

    1983-09-01

    One reliable method that can be used to verify the solution scheme of a computer code is to compare the code prediction to a simplified problem for which an analytic solution can be derived. An analytic solution for the axial pressure drop as a function of the flow was obtained for the simplified problem of homogeneous equilibrium two-phase flow in a vertical, heated channel with a cosine axial heat flux shape. This analytic solution was then used to verify the predictions of the CONDOR computer code, which is used to evaluate the thermal-hydraulic performance of boiling water reactors. The results show excellent agreement between the analytic solution and CONDOR prediction.

  13. Analytic solution to verify code predictions of two-phase flow in a boiling water reactor core channel. [CONDOR code

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K.F.; Olson, C.A.

    1983-09-01

    One reliable method that can be used to verify the solution scheme of a computer code is to compare the code prediction to a simplified problem for which an analytic solution can be derived. An analytic solution for the axial pressure drop as a function of the flow was obtained for the simplified problem of homogeneous equilibrium two-phase flow in a vertical, heated channel with a cosine axial heat flux shape. This analytic solution was then used to verify the predictions of the CONDOR computer code, which is used to evaluate the thermal-hydraulic performance of boiling water reactors. The results show excellent agreement between the analytic solution and CONDOR prediction.

  14. Dynamics of single and multiple bubbles and associated heat transfer in nucleate boiling under low gravity conditions.

    PubMed

    Qiu, D; Son, G; Dhir, V K; Chao, D; Logsdon, K

    2002-10-01

    Experimental studies and numerical simulation of growth and lift-off processes of single bubbles formed on designed nucleation sites have been conducted under low-gravity conditions. Merging of multiple bubbles and lift-off processes during boiling of water in the parabola flights of KC-135 aircraft were also experimentally studied. The heating area of the flat heater surface was discretized and equipped with a number of small heating elements that were separately powered in the temperature-control mode. As such, the wall superheat remained nearly constant during the growth and departure of the bubbles, whereas the local heat flux varied during the boiling process. From numerical calculation it is found that peak of heat flux occurs locally at the contact line of bubble and heater surface. Dry conditions exist inside the bubble base area, which is characterized through a zero heat flux region in the numerical calculation and a lower heat flux period in the experimental results. During the merger of multiple bubbles, dry-out continues. In both the numerical calculations and experimental results, the bubble lift-off is associated with an apparent increase in heat flux. Wall heat flux variation with time and spatial distribution during the growth of a single bubble from numerical simulations are compared with experimental data.

  15. Boiling incipience and convective boiling of neon and nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papell, S. S.; Hendricks, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Forced convection and subcooled boiling heat transfer data for liquid nitrogen and liquid neon were obtained in support of a design study for a 30 tesla cryomagnet cooled by forced convection of liquid neon. The cryogen data obtained over a range of system pressures, fluid flow rates, and applied heat fluxes were used to develop correlations for predicting boiling incipience and convective boiling heat transfer coefficients in uniformly heated flow channels. The accuracy of the correlating equations was then evaluated. A technique was also developed to calculate the position of boiling incipience in a uniformly heated flow channel. Comparisons made with the experimental data showed a prediction accuracy of + or - 15 percent.

  16. Mean Flow Boundary Conditions for Computational Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hixon, R.; Nallasamy, M.; Sawyer, S.; Dyson, R.

    2003-01-01

    In this work, a new type of boundary condition for time-accurate Computational Aeroacoustics solvers is described. This boundary condition is designed to complement the existing nonreflective boundary conditions while ensuring that the correct mean flow conditions are maintained throughout the flow calculation. Results are shown for a loaded 2D cascade, started with various initial conditions.

  17. Effects of oil on boiling of replacement refrigerants flowing normal to a tube bundle -- Part 2: R-134a

    SciTech Connect

    Tatara, R.A.; Payvar, P.

    2000-07-01

    Local, experimental heat transfer coefficients have been obtained for boiling refrigerant flowing up and across a tube bundle segment representing a full flooded evaporator tube bundle. R-134a data with a structured enhanced boiling tube are available. This tube has reentrant cavities designed for higher saturation pressure of refrigerants. The refrigerant enters at 15% vapor quality and exits at nearly 100% vapor in order to simulate an actual evaporator bundle. Both heat flux, 2,607 to 10,427 Btu/h{center_dot}f{sup 2} (8,224 to 32,893 W/m{sup 2}), and oil content, 0--12% (by weight), are varied; the mass flux is not an independent variable but determined by the heat flux. Local tube and bulk fluid temperatures are measured directly, by thermocouples, to calculate the refrigerant-side heat transfer coefficients. The bundle segment saturation temperature setpoint (taken at the top of the tube bundle) is 40 F (4.4 C).

  18. Modeling of dispersed flow film boiling with two flow, five field Eulerian-Eulerian approach and effects of spacer grids on heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ergun, Sule

    In the case of a postulated loss of coolant accident (LOCA) in a nuclear reactor, an accurate prediction of clad temperature is needed to determine the safety margins. The large break LOCA analyses can be divided in to three time periods. These periods are blowdown, refill and reflood. During the blowdown and reflood phases of the LOCA, when the local void fraction is greater than 80% and the wall is at a temperature above minimum film boiling temperature (Tmin), heat is transferred from the fuel rod to a continuous vapor flow with dispersed droplets. The high void fraction mixture of droplets and vapor provide cooling to prevent the clad temperature from exceeding the safety limit. The heat transfer process for high void fraction mixture is called dispersed flow film boiling (DFFB). This thesis has been modeled DFFB in the reflood phase of a LOCA in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) rod bundle. In this study, the modifications and modification requirements for the COBRA-TF code to obtain a five field Eulerian - Eulerian modeling for two-phase DFFB is described. COBRA-TF is a best estimate code developed for the rod bundle analysis and has four fields, namely, vapor, entrained drop and continuous liquid film. COBRA-TF has a detailed reflood package which takes effect of spacer grids on heat transfer into account. This study has a detailed description of code's solution scheme and the models used for dispersed flow film boiling. The dispersed flow film boiling heat transfer model of the COBRA-TF code has been modified by adding a small droplet field to the code as the fifth field. The effect of smaller, thermally more active droplets on heat, mass and momentum transfer during DFFB has been modeled. Since the large drop break up due to spacer grids is one of the reasons for small droplet generation, the spacer grid models of the COBRA-TF have been revised and modified. In addition to small droplet generation, the spacer grid rewet is an important aspect of heat

  19. Local heat transfer estimation in microchannels during convective boiling under microgravity conditions: 3D inverse heat conduction problem using BEM techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luciani, S.; LeNiliot, C.

    2008-11-01

    Two-phase and boiling flow instabilities are complex, due to phase change and the existence of several interfaces. To fully understand the high heat transfer potential of boiling flows in microscale's geometry, it is vital to quantify these transfers. To perform this task, an experimental device has been designed to observe flow patterns. Analysis is made up by using an inverse method which allows us to estimate the local heat transfers while boiling occurs inside a microchannel. In our configuration, the direct measurement would impair the accuracy of the searched heat transfer coefficient because thermocouples implanted on the surface minichannels would disturb the established flow. In this communication, we are solving a 3D IHCP which consists in estimating using experimental data measurements the surface temperature and the surface heat flux in a minichannel during convective boiling under several gravity levels (g, 1g, 1.8g). The considered IHCP is formulated as a mathematical optimization problem and solved using the boundary element method (BEM).

  20. Experimental investigation of certain internal condensing and boiling flows: Their sensitivity to pressure fluctuations and heat transfer enhancements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivisalu, Michael Toomas

    . Shear/pressure driven condensing and boiling flow experiments are carried out in horizontal mm-scale channels with heat exchange through the bottom surface. The sides and top of the flow channel are insulated. The fluid is FC-72 from 3M Corporation.

  1. Forced convection and flow boiling with and without enhancement devices for top-side-heated horizontal channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Ronald D., Sr.; Turknett, Jerry C.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of enhancement devices on flow boiling heat transfer in coolant channels, which are heated either from the top side or uniformly was studied. Studies are completed of the variations in the local (axial and circumferential) and mean heat transfer coefficients in horizontal, top-heated coolant channels with smooth walls and internal heat transfer enhancement devices. The working fluid is freon-11. The objectives are to: (1) examine the variations in both the mean and local (axial and circumferential) heat transfer coefficients for a circular coolant channel with either smooth walls or with both a twisted tape and spiral finned walls; (2) examine the effect of channel diameter (and the length-to-diameter aspect ratio) variations for the smooth wall channel; and (3) develop and improved data reduction analysis. The case of the top-heated, horizontal flow channel with smooth wall (1.37 cm inside diameter, and 122 cm heated length) was completed. The data were reduced using a preliminary analysis based on the heated hydraulic diameter. Preliminary examination of the local heat transfer coefficient variations indicated that there are significant axial and circumferential variations. However, it appears that the circumferential variation is more significant than the axial ones. In some cases, the circumferential variations were as much as a factor of ten. The axial variations rarely exceeded a factor of three.

  2. Quantifying the evolution of flow boiling bubbles by statistical testing and image analysis: toward a general model.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Qingtai; Xu, Jianxin; Wang, Hua

    2016-08-16

    A new index, the estimate of the error variance, which can be used to quantify the evolution of the flow patterns when multiphase components or tracers are difficultly distinguishable, was proposed. The homogeneity degree of the luminance space distribution behind the viewing windows in the direct contact boiling heat transfer process was explored. With image analysis and a linear statistical model, the F-test of the statistical analysis was used to test whether the light was uniform, and a non-linear method was used to determine the direction and position of a fixed source light. The experimental results showed that the inflection point of the new index was approximately equal to the mixing time. The new index has been popularized and applied to a multiphase macro mixing process by top blowing in a stirred tank. Moreover, a general quantifying model was introduced for demonstrating the relationship between the flow patterns of the bubble swarms and heat transfer. The results can be applied to investigate other mixing processes that are very difficult to recognize the target.

  3. Quantifying the evolution of flow boiling bubbles by statistical testing and image analysis: toward a general model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Qingtai; Xu, Jianxin; Wang, Hua

    2016-08-01

    A new index, the estimate of the error variance, which can be used to quantify the evolution of the flow patterns when multiphase components or tracers are difficultly distinguishable, was proposed. The homogeneity degree of the luminance space distribution behind the viewing windows in the direct contact boiling heat transfer process was explored. With image analysis and a linear statistical model, the F-test of the statistical analysis was used to test whether the light was uniform, and a non-linear method was used to determine the direction and position of a fixed source light. The experimental results showed that the inflection point of the new index was approximately equal to the mixing time. The new index has been popularized and applied to a multiphase macro mixing process by top blowing in a stirred tank. Moreover, a general quantifying model was introduced for demonstrating the relationship between the flow patterns of the bubble swarms and heat transfer. The results can be applied to investigate other mixing processes that are very difficult to recognize the target.

  4. Quantifying the evolution of flow boiling bubbles by statistical testing and image analysis: toward a general model.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Qingtai; Xu, Jianxin; Wang, Hua

    2016-01-01

    A new index, the estimate of the error variance, which can be used to quantify the evolution of the flow patterns when multiphase components or tracers are difficultly distinguishable, was proposed. The homogeneity degree of the luminance space distribution behind the viewing windows in the direct contact boiling heat transfer process was explored. With image analysis and a linear statistical model, the F-test of the statistical analysis was used to test whether the light was uniform, and a non-linear method was used to determine the direction and position of a fixed source light. The experimental results showed that the inflection point of the new index was approximately equal to the mixing time. The new index has been popularized and applied to a multiphase macro mixing process by top blowing in a stirred tank. Moreover, a general quantifying model was introduced for demonstrating the relationship between the flow patterns of the bubble swarms and heat transfer. The results can be applied to investigate other mixing processes that are very difficult to recognize the target. PMID:27527065

  5. Quantifying the evolution of flow boiling bubbles by statistical testing and image analysis: toward a general model

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Qingtai; Xu, Jianxin; Wang, Hua

    2016-01-01

    A new index, the estimate of the error variance, which can be used to quantify the evolution of the flow patterns when multiphase components or tracers are difficultly distinguishable, was proposed. The homogeneity degree of the luminance space distribution behind the viewing windows in the direct contact boiling heat transfer process was explored. With image analysis and a linear statistical model, the F-test of the statistical analysis was used to test whether the light was uniform, and a non-linear method was used to determine the direction and position of a fixed source light. The experimental results showed that the inflection point of the new index was approximately equal to the mixing time. The new index has been popularized and applied to a multiphase macro mixing process by top blowing in a stirred tank. Moreover, a general quantifying model was introduced for demonstrating the relationship between the flow patterns of the bubble swarms and heat transfer. The results can be applied to investigate other mixing processes that are very difficult to recognize the target. PMID:27527065

  6. Microwave-Assisted Superheating and/or Microwave-Specific Superboiling (Nucleation-Limited Boiling) of Liquids Occurs under Certain Conditions but is Mitigated by Stirring.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Anthony; Hunt, Jacob; Stiegman, Albert; Dudley, Gregory B

    2015-12-04

    Temporary superheating and sustained nucleation-limited "superboiling" of unstirred liquids above the normal atmospheric boiling point have been documented during microwave heating. These phenomena are reliably observed under prescribed conditions, although the duration (of superheating) and magnitude (of superheating and superboiling) vary according to system parameters such as volume of the liquid and the size and shape of the vessel. Both phenomena are mitigated by rapid stirring with an appropriate stir bar and/or with the addition of boiling chips, which provide nucleation sites to support the phase-change from liquid to gas. With proper experimental design and especially proper stirring, the measured temperature of typical organic reaction mixtures heated at reflux will be close to the normal boiling point temperature of the solvent, whether heated using microwave radiation or conventional convective heat transfer. These observations are important to take into consideration when comparing reaction rates under conventional and microwave heating.

  7. Microwave-Assisted Superheating and/or Microwave-Specific Superboiling (Nucleation-Limited Boiling) of Liquids Occurs under Certain Conditions but is Mitigated by Stirring.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Anthony; Hunt, Jacob; Stiegman, Albert; Dudley, Gregory B

    2015-01-01

    Temporary superheating and sustained nucleation-limited "superboiling" of unstirred liquids above the normal atmospheric boiling point have been documented during microwave heating. These phenomena are reliably observed under prescribed conditions, although the duration (of superheating) and magnitude (of superheating and superboiling) vary according to system parameters such as volume of the liquid and the size and shape of the vessel. Both phenomena are mitigated by rapid stirring with an appropriate stir bar and/or with the addition of boiling chips, which provide nucleation sites to support the phase-change from liquid to gas. With proper experimental design and especially proper stirring, the measured temperature of typical organic reaction mixtures heated at reflux will be close to the normal boiling point temperature of the solvent, whether heated using microwave radiation or conventional convective heat transfer. These observations are important to take into consideration when comparing reaction rates under conventional and microwave heating. PMID:26690096

  8. Experimental Investigation on the Effects of Coolant Concentration on Sub-Cooled Boiling and Crud Deposition on Reactor Cladding at Prototypical PWR Operating Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Schultis, J., Kenneth; Fenton, Donald, L.

    2006-10-20

    Increasing demand for energy necessitates nuclear power units to increase power limits. This implies significant changes in the design of the core of the nuclear power units, therefore providing better performance and safety in operations. A major hindrance to the increase of nuclear reactor performance especially in Pressurized Deionized water Reactors (PWR) is Axial Offset Anomaly (AOA)--the unexpected change in the core axial power distribution during operation from the predicted distribution. This problem is thought to be occur because of precipitation and deposition of lithiated compounds like boric acid (H{sub 2}BO{sub 3}) and lithium metaborate (LiBO{sub 2}) on the fuel rod cladding. Deposited boron absorbs neutrons thereby affecting the total power distribution inside the reactor. AOA is thought to occur when there is sufficient build-up of crud deposits on the cladding during subcooled nucleate boiling. Predicting AOA is difficult as there is very little information regarding the heat and mass transfer during subcooled nucleate boiling. An experimental investigation was conducted to study the heat transfer characteristics during subcooled nucleate boiling at prototypical PWR conditions. Pool boiling tests were conducted with varying concentrations of lithium metaborate (LiBO{sub 2}) and boric acid (H{sub 2}BO{sub 3}) solutions in deionized water. The experimental data collected includes the effect of coolant concentration, subcooling, system pressure and heat flux on pool the boiling heat transfer coefficient. The analysis of particulate deposits formed on the fuel cladding surface during subcooled nucleate boiling was also performed. The results indicate that the pool boiling heat transfer coefficient degrades in the presence of boric acid and lithium metaborate compared to pure deionized water due to lesser nucleation. The pool boiling heat transfer coefficients decreased by about 24% for 5000 ppm concentrated boric acid solution and by 27% for 5000 ppm

  9. Thermal-hydraulic issues of flow boiling and condensation in organic Rankine cycle heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikielewicz, Jarosław; Mikielewicz, Dariusz

    2012-08-01

    In the paper presented are the issues related to the design and operation of micro heat exchangers, where phase changes can occur, applicable to the domestic micro combined heat and power (CHP) unit. Analysed is the stability of the two-phase flow in such unit. A simple hydraulic model presented in the paper enables for the stability analysis of the system and analysis of disturbance propagation caused by a jump change of the flow rate. Equations of the system dynamics as well as properties of the working fluid are strongly non-linear. A proposed model can be applicable in designing the system of flow control in micro heat exchangers operating in the considered CHP unit.

  10. Numerical simulation and experimental validation of the dynamics of multiple bubble merger during pool boiling under microgravity conditions.

    PubMed

    Abarajith, H S; Dhir, V K; Warrier, G; Son, G

    2004-11-01

    Numerical simulation and experimental validation of the growth and departure of multiple merging bubbles and associated heat transfer on a horizontal heated surface during pool boiling under variable gravity conditions have been performed. A finite difference scheme is used to solve the equations governing mass, momentum, and energy in the vapor liquid phases. The vapor-liquid interface is captured by a level set method that is modified to include the influence of phase change at the liquid-vapor interface. Water is used as test liquid. The effects of reduced gravity condition and orientation of the bubbles on the bubble diameter, interfacial structure, bubble merger time, and departure time, as well as local heat fluxes, are studied. In the experiments, multiple vapor bubbles are produced on artificial cavities in the 2-10 micrometer diameter range, microfabricated on the polished silicon wafer with given spacing. The wafer was heated electrically from the back with miniature strain gage type heating elements in order to control the nucleation superheat. The experiments conducted in normal Earth gravity and in the low gravity environment of KC-135 aircraft are used to validate the numerical simulations.

  11. Development of neutron radiography facility for boiling two-phase flow experiment in Kyoto University Research Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Y.; Sekimoto, S.; Hino, M.; Kawabata, Y.

    2011-09-01

    To visualize boiling two-phase flow at high heat flux by using neutron radiography, a new neutron radiography facility was developed in the B-4 beam hole of KUR. The B-4 beam hole is equipped with a supermirror neutron guide tube with a characteristic wavelength of 1.2 Å, whose geometrical parameters of the guide tube are: 11.7 m total length and 10 mm wide ×74 mm high beam cross-section. The total neutron flux obtained from the KUR supermirror guide tube is about 5×10 7 n/cm 2 s with a nominal thermal output of 5 MW of KUR, which is about 100 times what is obtainable with the conventional KUR neutron radiography facility (E-2 beam hole). In this study a new imaging device, an electric power supply (1200 A, 20 V), and a thermal hydraulic loop were installed. The neutron source, the beam tube, and the radiography rooms are described in detail and the preliminary images obtained at the developed facility are shown.

  12. Critical heat flux on micro-structured zircaloy surfaces for flow boiling of water at low pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, C.; Miassoedov, A.; Schulenberg, T.; Wetzel, T.

    2012-07-01

    The influence of surface structure on critical heat flux for flow boiling of water was investigated for Zircaloy tubes in a vertical annular test section. The objectives were to find suitable surface modification processes for Zircaloy tubes and to test their critical heat flux performance in comparison to the smooth tube. Surface structures with micro-channels, porous layer, oxidized layer, and elevations in micro- and nano-scale were produced on a section of a Zircaloy cladding tube. These modified tubes were tested in an internally heated vertical annulus with a heated length of 326 mm and an inner and outer diameter of 9.5 and 18 mm. The experiments were performed with mass fluxes of 250 and 400 kg/(m{sup 2}s), outlet pressures between 120 and 300 kPa, and constant inlet subcooling enthalpy of 167 kJ/kg. Only a small influence of modified surface structures on critical heat flux was observed for the pressure of 120 kPa in the present test section geometry. However, with increasing pressure the critical heat flux could increase up to 29% using the surface structured tubes with micro-channels, porous and oxidized layers. Capillary effects and increased nucleation site density are assumed to improve the critical heat flux performance. (authors)

  13. High-intensity focused ultrasound monitoring using harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU) under boiling or slow denaturation conditions.

    PubMed

    Hou, Gary Y; Marquet, Fabrice; Wang, Shutao; Apostolakis, Iason-Zacharias; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2015-07-01

    Harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU) is a recently developed high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring method that utilizes an amplitude-modulated therapeutic ultrasound beam to induce an oscillatory radiation force at the HIFU focus and estimates the focal tissue displacement to monitor the HIFU thermal treatment. In this study, the performance of HMIFU under acoustic, thermal, and mechanical effects was investigated. The performance of HMIFU was assessed in ex vivo canine liver specimens (n = 13) under slow denaturation or boiling regimes. A passive cavitation detector (PCD) was used to assess the acoustic cavitation activity, and a bare-wire thermocouple was used to monitor the focal temperature change. During lesioning with slow denaturation, high quality displacements (correlation coefficient above 0.97) were observed under minimum cavitation noise, indicating the tissue initial-softening-then- stiffening property change. During HIFU with boiling, HMIFU monitored a consistent change in lesion-to-background displacement contrast (0.46 ± 0.37) despite the presence of strong cavitation noise due to boiling during lesion formation. Therefore, HMIFU effectively monitored softening-then-stiffening during lesioning under slow denaturation, and detected lesioning under boiling with a distinct change in displacement contrast under boiling in the presence of cavitation. In conclusion, HMIFU was shown under both boiling and slow denaturation regimes to be effective in HIFU monitoring and lesioning identification without being significantly affected by cavitation noise.

  14. On conditional sampling for turbulent flow studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, F. C.

    1974-01-01

    The conditional sampling technique is analyzed as a weighted time average for turbulent flow. The various conditional averages are obtained by using different types of weighting functions. A second averaging relation is obtained between the conventional averages and the conditional averages. A few examples are given in which simplified expressions are used.

  15. The boiling Twente Taylor-Couette (BTTC) facility: Temperature controlled turbulent flow between independently rotating, coaxial cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisman, Sander G.; van der Veen, Roeland C. A.; Bruggert, Gert-Wim H.; Lohse, Detlef; Sun, Chao

    2015-06-01

    A new Taylor-Couette system has been designed and constructed with precise temperature control. Two concentric independently rotating cylinders are able to rotate at maximum rates of fi = ± 20 Hz for the inner cylinder and fo = ± 10 Hz for the outer cylinder. The inner cylinder has an outside radius of ri = 75 mm, and the outer cylinder has an inside radius of ro = 105 mm, resulting in a gap of d = 30 mm. The height of the gap is L = 549 mm, giving a volume of V = 9.3 L. The geometric parameters are η = ri/ro = 0.714 and Γ = L/d = 18.3. With water as working fluid at room temperature, the Reynolds numbers that can be achieved are Rei = ωiri(ro - ri)/ν = 2.8 × 105 and Reo = ωoro(ro - ri)/ν = 2 × 105 or a combined Reynolds number of up to Re = (ωiri - ωoro)(ro - ri)/ν = 4.8 × 105. If the working fluid is changed to the fluorinated liquid FC-3284 with kinematic viscosity 0.42 cSt, the combined Reynolds number can reach Re = 1.1 × 106. The apparatus features precise temperature control of the outer and inner cylinders separately and is fully optically accessible from the side and top. The new facility offers the possibility to accurately study the process of boiling inside a turbulent flow and its effect on the flow.

  16. The boiling Twente Taylor-Couette (BTTC) facility: Temperature controlled turbulent flow between independently rotating, coaxial cylinders.

    PubMed

    Huisman, Sander G; van der Veen, Roeland C A; Bruggert, Gert-Wim H; Lohse, Detlef; Sun, Chao

    2015-06-01

    A new Taylor-Couette system has been designed and constructed with precise temperature control. Two concentric independently rotating cylinders are able to rotate at maximum rates of f(i) = ± 20 Hz for the inner cylinder and f(o) = ± 10 Hz for the outer cylinder. The inner cylinder has an outside radius of r(i) = 75 mm, and the outer cylinder has an inside radius of r(o) = 105 mm, resulting in a gap of d = 30 mm. The height of the gap is L = 549 mm, giving a volume of V = 9.3 L. The geometric parameters are η = r(i)/r(o) = 0.714 and Γ = L/d = 18.3. With water as working fluid at room temperature, the Reynolds numbers that can be achieved are Re(i) = ω(i)r(i)(r(o) - r(i))/ν = 2.8 × 10(5) and Re(o) = ω(o)r(o)(r(o) - r(i))/ν = 2 × 10(5) or a combined Reynolds number of up to Re = (ω(i)r(i) - ω(o)r(o))(r(o) - r(i))/ν = 4.8 × 10(5). If the working fluid is changed to the fluorinated liquid FC-3284 with kinematic viscosity 0.42 cSt, the combined Reynolds number can reach Re = 1.1 × 10(6). The apparatus features precise temperature control of the outer and inner cylinders separately and is fully optically accessible from the side and top. The new facility offers the possibility to accurately study the process of boiling inside a turbulent flow and its effect on the flow.

  17. Do Students Experience Flow Conditions Online?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Katrina A.; Jones, Stephanie J.

    2013-01-01

    This pilot study asked graduate students enrolled in higher education programs at two institutions to ascertain whether and to what extent they experienced nine flow-related conditions in two settings: (1) online courses or (2) surfing or gaming online. In both settings, flow was experienced "sometimes," although no significant…

  18. Local Heat Transfer and CHF for Subcooled Flow Boiling - Annual Report 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Ronald D. Boyd

    2000-07-01

    The Thermal Science Research Center (TSRC) at Prairie View A&M University is involved in an international fusion reactor technology development program aimed at demonstrating the technical feasibility of magnetic fusion energy. This report highlights: (1) Recent accomplishments and pinpoints thermal hydraulic problem areas of immediate concern to the development of plasma-facing components, and (2) Next generation thermal hydraulic problems which must be addressed to insure safety and reliability in component operation. More specifically, the near-term thermal hydraulic problem entails: (1) generating an appropriate data base to insure the development of single-side heat flux correlations, and (2) evaluating previously developed single-side/uniform heated transformations and correlations to determine which can be used to relate the vast two-phase heat transfer and critical heat flux (CHF) technical literature for uniformly heated flow channels to single-side heated channels.

  19. Non-invasive measurement of void fraction and liquid temperature in microchannel flow boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogg, David; David, Milnes; Goodson, Kenneth

    2009-04-01

    Past thermometry research for two-phase microfluidic systems made much progress regarding wall temperature distributions, yet the direct measurement of fluid temperature has received little attention. This paper uses a non-invasive two-dye/two-color fluorescent technique to capture fluid temperature along with local liquid fraction in a two-phase microflow generated by injecting air into a heated microchannel. The fluorescent emission of Rhodamine 110 and Rhodamine B, measured with photodiodes, is used to obtain local liquid temperature (±3°C) and void fraction (±2% full-scale) over a temperature range from 45 to 100°C. Arrays of these sensors can significantly expand the set of measurable flow parameters to include bubble/slug frequency, size, velocity, and growth rates in addition to mapping the local liquid temperature and void fraction.

  20. Analysis and Modeling of a Two-Phase Jet Pump of a Flow Boiling Test Facility for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherif, S. A.; Steadham, Justin M.

    1996-01-01

    research known to the authors apart from that of Anand (1992) which accounted for condensation shocks. One of the objectives of this research effort is to develop a comprehensive model in which the effects of phase slip and inter-phase heat transfer as well as the wall friction and shock waves are accounted for. While this modeling effort is predominantly analytical in nature and is primarily intended to provide a parametric understanding of the jet pump performance under different operating scenarios, another parallel effort employing a commercial CFD code is also implemented. The latter effort is primarily intended to model an axisymmetric counterpart of the problem in question. The viability of using the CFD code to model a two-phase flow jet pump will be assessed by attempting to recreate some of the existing performance data of similar jet pumps. The code will eventually be used to generate the jet pump performance characteristics of several scenarios involving jet pump geometries as well as flow regimes in order to be able to determine an optimum design which would be suitable for a two-phase flow boiling test facility at NASA-Marshall. Because of the extensive nature of the analytical model developed, the following section will only provide very brief highlights of it, while leaving the details to a more complete report submitted to the NASA colleague. This report will also contain some of the simulation results obtained using the CFD code.

  1. Preferential flow occurs in unsaturated conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nimmo, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Because it commonly generates high-speed, high-volume flow with minimal exposure to solid earth materials, preferential flow in the unsaturated zone is a dominant influence in many problems of infiltration, recharge, contaminant transport, and ecohydrology. By definition, preferential flow occurs in a portion of a medium – that is, a preferred part, whether a pathway, pore, or macroscopic subvolume. There are many possible classification schemes, but usual consideration of preferential flow includes macropore or fracture flow, funneled flow determined by macroscale heterogeneities, and fingered flow determined by hydraulic instability rather than intrinsic heterogeneity. That preferential flow is spatially concentrated associates it with other characteristics that are typical, although not defining: it tends to be unusually fast, to transport high fluxes, and to occur with hydraulic disequilibrium within the medium. It also has a tendency to occur in association with large conduits and high water content, although these are less universal than is commonly assumed. Predictive unsaturated-zone flow models in common use employ several different criteria for when and where preferential flow occurs, almost always requiring a nearly saturated medium. A threshold to be exceeded may be specified in terms of the following (i) water content; (ii) matric potential, typically a value high enough to cause capillary filling in a macropore of minimum size; (iii) infiltration capacity or other indication of incipient surface ponding; or (iv) other conditions related to total filling of certain pores. Yet preferential flow does occur without meeting these criteria. My purpose in this commentary is to point out important exceptions and implications of ignoring them. Some of these pertain mainly to macropore flow, others to fingered or funneled flow, and others to combined or undifferentiated flow modes.

  2. Unified slip boundary condition for fluid flows.

    PubMed

    Thalakkottor, Joseph John; Mohseni, Kamran

    2016-08-01

    Determining the correct matching boundary condition is fundamental to our understanding of several everyday problems. Despite over a century of scientific work, existing velocity boundary conditions are unable to consistently explain and capture the complete physics associated with certain common but complex problems, such as moving contact lines and corner flows. The widely used Maxwell and Navier slip boundary conditions make an implicit assumption that velocity varies only in the wall normal direction. This makes their boundary condition inapplicable in the vicinity of contact lines and corner points, where velocity gradient exists both in the wall normal and wall tangential directions. In this paper, by identifying this implicit assumption we are able to extend Maxwell's slip model. Here, we present a generalized velocity boundary condition that shows that slip velocity is a function of not only the shear rate but also the linear strain rate. In addition, we present a universal relation for slip length, which shows that, for a general flow, slip length is a function of the principal strain rate. The universal relation for slip length along with the generalized velocity boundary condition provides a unified slip boundary condition to model a wide range of steady Newtonian fluid flows. We validate the unified slip boundary for simple Newtonian liquids by using molecular dynamics simulations and studying both the moving contact line and corner flow problems. PMID:27627398

  3. Unified slip boundary condition for fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalakkottor, Joseph John; Mohseni, Kamran

    2016-08-01

    Determining the correct matching boundary condition is fundamental to our understanding of several everyday problems. Despite over a century of scientific work, existing velocity boundary conditions are unable to consistently explain and capture the complete physics associated with certain common but complex problems, such as moving contact lines and corner flows. The widely used Maxwell and Navier slip boundary conditions make an implicit assumption that velocity varies only in the wall normal direction. This makes their boundary condition inapplicable in the vicinity of contact lines and corner points, where velocity gradient exists both in the wall normal and wall tangential directions. In this paper, by identifying this implicit assumption we are able to extend Maxwell's slip model. Here, we present a generalized velocity boundary condition that shows that slip velocity is a function of not only the shear rate but also the linear strain rate. In addition, we present a universal relation for slip length, which shows that, for a general flow, slip length is a function of the principal strain rate. The universal relation for slip length along with the generalized velocity boundary condition provides a unified slip boundary condition to model a wide range of steady Newtonian fluid flows. We validate the unified slip boundary for simple Newtonian liquids by using molecular dynamics simulations and studying both the moving contact line and corner flow problems.

  4. Development of a model to predict flow oscillations in low-flow sodium boiling. [Loss-of-Piping Integrity accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, A.E.; Griffith, P.

    1980-04-01

    Tests performed in a small scale water loop showed that voiding oscillations, similar to those observed in sodium, were present in water, as well. An analytical model, appropriate for either sodium or water, was developed and used to describe the water flow behavior. The experimental results indicate that water can be successfully employed as a sodium simulant, and further, that the condensation heat transfer coefficient varies significantly during the growth and collapse of vapor slugs during oscillations. It is this variation, combined with the temperature profile of the unheated zone above the heat source, which determines the oscillatory behavior of the system. The analytical program has produced a model which qualitatively does a good job in predicting the flow behavior in the wake experiment. The amplitude discrepancies are attributable to experimental uncertainties and model inadequacies. Several parameters (heat transfer coefficient, unheated zone temperature profile, mixing between hot and cold fluids during oscillations) are set by the user. Criteria for the comparison of water and sodium experiments have been developed.

  5. In-vessel flow characterization under severe accident conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Nourbakhsh, H.P.; Kim, S.B.; Khatib-Rahbar, M.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide a parametric framework for characterization of flow and heat transfer regimes and their associated phenomenological uncertainties following severe accidents using a two dimensional, heterogenous, porous media formulation. This approach extends the understanding of buoyancy-induced flow characteristics in the uncovered region of the reactor core and the upper plenum of a PWR vessel. The results of this study can be used to augment the boil-off steam flow in integrated one-dimensional severe accident codes such as the Source Team Code Package (STCP).

  6. Downstream boundary conditions for viscous flow problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fix, G.; Gunzburger, M.

    1977-01-01

    The problem of the specification of artificial outflow conditions in flow problems is studied. It is shown that for transport type equations incorrect outflow conditions will adversely affect the solution only in a small region near the outflow boundary, while for elliptic equations, e.g. those governing the streamfunction or pressure, a correct boundary specification is essential. In addition, integral outflow boundary conditions for fluid dynamical problems are considered. It is shown that such conditions are well posed, and their effect on the solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations is also considered.

  7. Overland flow connectivity under different climate conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanoch, Lavee

    2015-04-01

    The effect of climate conditions on overland flow connectivity was investigated in arid (mean annual rainfall 120 mm), semi-arid (mean annual rainfall 280 mm) and sub-humid (mean annual rainfall 620 mm) regions. In each of these regions a hillslope reference plot was established, in which soil properties and hydrological variables were measured. The results show that at the regional scale soil organic matter content and aggregate stability decreased with increasing aridity. Infiltration rate also decreased with aridity but overland flow increased. At the hillslope scale, at each of the regions overland flow decreased with increasing hillslope length which means that overland flow is not continuous and water losses increases with hillslope length. In order to understand the controlling factors of overland flow continuity the spatial distribution of soil properties, vegetation cover and overland flow generation mechanisms were measured along hillslopes. The results show that water contributing (source) patches and water collecting (sink) patches exist along the hillslopes, in accordance with the spatial distribution of shrubs. The conclusion is that overland flow connectivity at the hillslope scale is affected mainly by the size, the density and by the spatial distribution of shrubs. An application for preventing soil erosion in urban areas (parks), along roads and in cultivated areas is that planting vegetation in patches or strips is more efficient than all over the hillslopes.

  8. Surface conditions of Nitinol wires, tubing, and as-cast alloys. The effect of chemical etching, aging in boiling water, and heat treatment.

    PubMed

    Shabalovskaya, S A; Anderegg, J; Laab, F; Thiel, P A; Rondelli, G

    2003-04-15

    The surface conditions of Nitinol wires and tubing were evaluated with the use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, high-resolution Auger spectroscopy, electron backscattering, and scanning-electron microscopy. Samples were studied in the as-received state as well as after chemical etching, aging in boiling water, and heat treatment, and compared to a mechanically polished 600-grit-finish Nitinol surface treated similarly. General regularities in surface behavior induced by the examined surface treatments are similar for wires, tubing, and studied as-cast alloy, though certain differences in surface Ni concentration were observed. Nitinol wires and tubing from various suppliers demonstrated great variability in Ni surface concentration (0.5-15 at.%) and Ti/Ni ratio (0.4-35). The wires in the as-received state, with the exception of those with a black oxide originating in the processing procedure, revealed nickel and titanium on the surface in both elemental and oxidized states, indicating a nonpassive surface. Shape-setting heat treatment at 500 degrees C for 15 min resulted in tremendous increase in the surface Ni concentration and complete Ni oxidation. Preliminary chemical etching and boiling in water successfully prevented surface enrichment in Ni, initially resulting from heat treatment. A stoichiometric uniformly amorphous TiO(2) oxide generated during chemical etching and aging in boiling water was reconstructed at 700 degrees C, revealing rutile structure.

  9. Bubble Augmented Propulsor Mixture Flow Simulation near Choked Flow Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jin-Keun; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung; Chahine, Georges

    2013-03-01

    The concept of waterjet thrust augmentation through bubble injection has been the subject of many patents and publications over the past several decades, and computational and experimental evidences of the augmentation of the jet thrust through bubble growth in the jet stream have been reported. Through our experimental studies, we have demonstrated net thrust augmentation as high as 70%for air volume fractions as high as 50%. However, in order to enable practical designs, an adequately validated modeling tool is required. In our previous numerical studies, we developed and validated a numerical code to simulate and predict the performance of a two-phase flow water jet propulsion system for low void fractions. In the present work, we extend the numerical method to handle higher void fractions to enable simulations for the high thrust augmentation conditions. At high void fractions, the speed of sound in the bubbly mixture decreases substantially and could be as low as 20 m/s, and the mixture velocity can approach the speed of sound in the medium. In this numerical study, we extend our numerical model, which is based on the two-way coupling between the mixture flow field and Lagrangian tracking of a large number of bubbles, to accommodate compressible flow regimes. Numerical methods used and the validation studies for various flow conditions in the bubble augmented propulsor will be presented. This work is supported by Office of Naval Research through contract N00014-11-C-0482 monitored by Dr. Ki-Han Kim.

  10. Stationary flow conditions in pulsed supersonic beams.

    PubMed

    Christen, Wolfgang

    2013-10-21

    We describe a generally applicable method for the experimental determination of stationary flow conditions in pulsed supersonic beams, utilizing time-resolved electron induced fluorescence measurements of high pressure jet expansions of helium. The detection of ultraviolet photons from electronically excited helium emitted very close to the nozzle exit images the valve opening behavior-with the decided advantage that a photon signal is not affected by beam-skimmer and beam-residual gas interactions; it thus allows to conclusively determine those operation parameters of a pulsed valve that yield complete opening. The studies reveal that a "flat-top" signal, indicating constant density and commonly considered as experimental criterion for continuous flow, is insufficient. Moreover, translational temperature and mean terminal flow velocity turn out to be significantly more sensitive in testing for the equivalent behavior of a continuous nozzle source. Based on the widely distributed Even-Lavie valve we demonstrate that, in principle, it is possible to achieve quasi-continuous flow conditions even with fast-acting valves; however, the two prerequisites are a minimum pulse duration that is much longer than standard practice and previous estimates, and a suitable tagging of the appropriate beam segment.

  11. Boundary Conditions for Unsteady Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariharan, S. I.; Johnson, D. K.

    1994-01-01

    This paper explores solutions to the spherically symmetric Euler equations. Motivated by the work of Hagstrom and Hariharan and Geer and Pope, we modeled the effect of a pulsating sphere in a compressible medium. The literature available on this suggests that an accurate numerical solution requires artificial boundary conditions which simulate the propagation of nonlinear waves in open domains. Until recently, the boundary conditions available were in general linear and based on nonreflection. Exceptions to this are the nonlinear nonreflective conditions of Thompson, and the nonlinear reflective conditions of Hagstrom and Hariharan. The former are based on the rate of change of the incoming characteristics; the latter rely on asymptotic analysis and the method of characteristics and account for the coupling of incoming and outgoing characteristics. Furthermore, Hagstrom and Hariharan have shown that, in a test situation in which the flow would reach a steady state over a long time, Thompson's method could lead to an incorrect steady state. The current study considers periodic flows and includes all possible types and techniques of boundary conditions. The technique recommended by Hagstrom and Hariharan proved superior to all others considered and matched the results of asymptotic methods that are valid for low subsonic Mach numbers.

  12. Liquid metal boiling inception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabin, C. M.; Poppendiek, H. F.; Mouritzen, G.; Meckel, P. T.; Cloakey, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental study of the inception of boiling in potassium in forced convection is reported. The boiler consisted of a 0.19-inch inside diameter, niobium-1% zirconium boiler tube approximately six feet long. Heating was accomplished by direct electrical tube wall conduction. Experiments were performed with both all-liquid fill and two-phase fill startup sequences and with a range of flow rates, saturation temperatures, inert gas levels, and fill liquid temperatures. Superheat of the liquid above the equilibrium saturation temperature was observed in all the experiments. Incipient boiling liquid superheat ranged from a few degrees to several hundred. Comparisons of these data with other data and with several analytical treatments are presented.

  13. Microwave reactions under continuous flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Baxendale, Ian R; Hayward, John J; Ley, Steven V

    2007-12-01

    Microwave chemistry has already impacted significantly on the everyday synthesis of organic molecules. The adoption and integration of this liberating technology has permitted a resurrection of many synthetic transformations that were previously considered too extreme in their conditions (temperatures, pressures, reaction times) to be synthetically useful. Furthermore, whole arrays of additional chemical transformations have been devised under microwave heating that allow access to more diverse chemical architectures via more expedient routes. Continuous flow processing of chemical intermediates taking advantage of the unique heating mechanism and characteristics of microwave irradiation will certainly be the next evolutionary step forward in this area. The synergistic combination afforded by the simultaneous application of these two core processing tools will enhance still further the synthetic capabilities of tomorrow's chemists. This short review aims to highlight the current developments and future potential offered by continuous flow microwave mediated synthesis.

  14. Lattice Boltzmann modeling of boiling heat transfer: The boiling curve and the effects of wettability

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Q.; Kang, Q. J.; Francois, M. M.; He, Y. L.; Luo, K. H.

    2015-03-03

    A hybrid thermal lattice Boltzmann (LB) model is presented to simulate thermal multiphase flows with phase change based on an improved pseudopotential LB approach (Li et al., 2013). The present model does not suffer from the spurious term caused by the forcing-term effect, which was encountered in some previous thermal LB models for liquid–vapor phase change. Using the model, the liquid–vapor boiling process is simulated. The boiling curve together with the three boiling stages (nucleate boiling, transition boiling, and film boiling) is numerically reproduced in the LB community for the first time. The numerical results show that the basic features and the fundamental characteristics of boiling heat transfer are well captured, such as the severe fluctuation of transient heat flux in the transition boiling and the feature that the maximum heat transfer coefficient lies at a lower wall superheat than that of the maximum heat flux. Moreover, the effects of the heating surface wettability on boiling heat transfer are investigated. It is found that an increase in contact angle promotes the onset of boiling but reduces the critical heat flux, and makes the boiling process enter into the film boiling regime at a lower wall superheat, which is consistent with the findings from experimental studies.

  15. Lattice Boltzmann modeling of boiling heat transfer: The boiling curve and the effects of wettability

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Q.; Kang, Q. J.; Francois, M. M.; He, Y. L.; Luo, K. H.

    2015-03-03

    A hybrid thermal lattice Boltzmann (LB) model is presented to simulate thermal multiphase flows with phase change based on an improved pseudopotential LB approach (Li et al., 2013). The present model does not suffer from the spurious term caused by the forcing-term effect, which was encountered in some previous thermal LB models for liquid–vapor phase change. Using the model, the liquid–vapor boiling process is simulated. The boiling curve together with the three boiling stages (nucleate boiling, transition boiling, and film boiling) is numerically reproduced in the LB community for the first time. The numerical results show that the basic featuresmore » and the fundamental characteristics of boiling heat transfer are well captured, such as the severe fluctuation of transient heat flux in the transition boiling and the feature that the maximum heat transfer coefficient lies at a lower wall superheat than that of the maximum heat flux. Moreover, the effects of the heating surface wettability on boiling heat transfer are investigated. It is found that an increase in contact angle promotes the onset of boiling but reduces the critical heat flux, and makes the boiling process enter into the film boiling regime at a lower wall superheat, which is consistent with the findings from experimental studies.« less

  16. Direct numerical simulations of EHD-enhanced film boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifi, Payam; Esmaeeli, Asghar

    2007-11-01

    Boiling is one of the most efficient modes of heat exchange. Yet, in applications involving boiling in micro-devices or under microgravity conditions it is extremely desirable to enhance the heat transfer rate even further to increase the efficiency of these systems. An enhancement mechanism that is particularly attractive is the one due to application of an electric field to the bulk of fluid. Here, the dielectric mismatch between the liquid and vapor phases results in convective flows and, therefore, a higher heat transfer coefficient. While the enhancement of heat and mass transfer by electric field has been known for decades, a fundamental understanding of the problem is still lacking primarily due to difficulties in conduct of experimental and theoretical studies. The current advances in development of numerical methods for direct simulations of multiphase flows, however, have opened up enormous possibilities for detailed understanding of this problem. Such simulations can make it possible to capture the highly unsteady dynamics of the boiling flows. Here, we present a front tracking algorithm in conjunction with a leaky-dielectric electrohydrodynamic (EHD) model to study EHD-enhanced film boiling on horizontal surfaces. The goal is to compare the average wall Nusselt number at different strengths of the electric field and to correlate the macroscopic behavior of the flow with the dynamics of the phase boundary.

  17. ATWS Analysis with an Advanced Boiling Curve Approach within COBRA 3-CP

    SciTech Connect

    Gensler, A.; Knoll, A.; Kuehnel, K.

    2007-07-01

    In 2005 the German Reactor Safety Commission issued specific requirements on core coolability demonstration for PWR ATWS (anticipated transients without scram). Thereupon AREVA NP performed detailed analyses for all German PWRs. For a German KONVOI plant the results of an ATWS licensing analysis are presented. The plant dynamic behavior is calculated with NLOOP, while the hot channel analysis is performed with the thermal hydraulic computer code COBRA 3-CP. The application of the fuel rod model included in COBRA 3-CP is essential for this type of analysis. Since DNB (departure from nucleate boiling) occurs, the advanced post DNB model (advanced boiling curve approach) of COBRA 3-CP is used. The results are compared with those gained with the standard BEEST model. The analyzed ATWS case is the emergency power case 'loss of main heat sink with station service power supply unavailable'. Due to the decreasing coolant flow rate during the transient the core attains film boiling conditions. The results of the hot channel analysis strongly depend on the performance of the boiling curve model. The BEEST model is based on pool boiling conditions whereas typical PWR conditions - even in most transients - are characterized by forced flow for which the advanced boiling curve approach is particularly suitable. Compared with the BEEST model the advanced boiling curve approach in COBRA 3-CP yields earlier rewetting, i.e. a shorter period in film boiling. Consequently, the fuel rod cladding temperatures, that increase significantly due to film boiling, drop back earlier and the high temperature oxidation is significantly diminished. The Baker-Just-Correlation was used to calculate the value of equivalent cladding reacted (ECR), i.e. the reduction of cladding thickness due to corrosion throughout the transient. Based on the BEEST model the ECR value amounts to 0.4% whereas the advanced boiling curve only leads to an ECR value of 0.2%. Both values provide large margins to the 17

  18. Dynamic characteristics of a VK-50 reactor operating under conditions of the loss of a normal feedwater flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semidotskiy, I. I.; Kurskiy, A. S.

    2013-12-01

    The paper describes the conditions of the ATWS type with virtually complete cessation of the feed-water flow at the operating power level of a reactor of the VK-50 type. Under these conditions, the role of spatial kinetics in the system of feedback between thermohydraulic and nuclear processes with bulk boiling of the coolant in the reactor core is clearly seen. This feature determines the specific character of experimental data obtained and the suitability of their use for verification of the associated codes used for calculating water-water reactors.

  19. ASTRID: A 3D Eulerian software for subcooled boiling modelling - comparison with experimental results in tubes and annuli

    SciTech Connect

    Briere, E.; Larrauri, D.; Olive, J.

    1995-09-01

    For about four years, Electricite de France has been developing a 3-D computer code for the Eulerian simulation of two-phase flows. This code, named ASTRID, is based on the six-equation two-fluid model. Boiling water flows, such as those encountered in nuclear reactors, are among the main applications of ASTRID. In order to provide ASTRID with closure laws and boundary conditions suitable for boiling flows, a boiling model has been developed by EDF and the Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse. In the fluid, the heat and mass transfer between a bubble and the liquid is being modelled. At the heating wall, the incipient boiling point is determined according to Hsu`s criterion and the boiling heat flux is split into three additive terms: a convective term, a quenching term and a vaporisation term. This model uses several correlations. EDF`s program in boiling two-phase flows also includes experimental studies, some of which are performed in collaboration with other laboratories. Refrigerant subcooled boiling both in tubular (DEBORA experiment, CEN Grenoble) and in annular geometry (Arizona State University Experiment) have been computed with ASTRID. The simulations show the satisfactory results already obtained on void fraction and liquid temperature. Ways of improvement of the model are drawn especially on the dynamical part.

  20. Marangoni Effects in the Boiling of Binary Fluid Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmed, Sayeed; Carey, Van P.; Motil, Brian

    1996-01-01

    Results of very recent experimental studies indicate that during nucleate boiling in some binary mixture, Marangoni effects augment the gravity driven flow of liquid towards the heated surface. With gravity present, it is impossible to separate the two effects. The reduced gravity environment gives an unique opportunity to explore th role of Marangoni effects on the boiling mechanisms free of gravitational body forces that obscure the role of such effects. However, recent experimental results suggest that under reduced gravity conditions, Marangoni effects is the dominant mechanism of vapor-liquid exchange at the surface for some binary mixture. To further explore such effects, experiments have been conducted with water/2-propanol mixtures at three different concentrations under normal gravity with different orientations of the heater surface and under reduce gravity aboard the DC-9 aircraft at NASA Lewis Research Center. The system pressure was sub atmospheric (approx. 8 kP at 1g(n)) and the bulk liquid temperature varied from low subcooling to near saturation. The molar concentrations of 2-propanol tested were 0.015, 0.025, and 0.1. Boiling curves were obtained both for high gravity (approx. 2g(n)) and reduce gravity (approx. 0.01g(n)). For each concentration of 2-propanol, the critical heat flux has been determined in the flight experiments only for reduced gravity conditions. Comparison of boiling curves and CHF obtained under l-g(n) an reduced gravity indicates that boiling mechanism in this mixtures is nearly independent of gravity. The results also indicate that the Marangoni mechanism is strong enough in these mixtures to sustain the boiling under reduced gravity conditions.

  1. Boiling significantly promotes photodegradation of perfluorooctane sulfonate.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Xian-Jin; Li, Wen-Wei; Lam, Paul K S; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-11-01

    The application of photochemical processes for perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) degradation has been limited by a low treatment efficiency. This study reports a significant acceleration of PFOS photodegradation under boiling condition compared with the non-boiling control. The PFOS decomposition rate increased with the increasing boiling intensity, but declined at a higher hydronium level or under oxygenation. These results suggest that the boiling state of solution resulted in higher effective concentrations of reactants at the gas-liquid interface and enhanced the interfacial mass transfer, thereby accelerating the PFOS decomposition. This study broadens our knowledge of PFOS photodegradation process and may have implications for development of efficient photodegradation technologies. PMID:26117498

  2. Boiling significantly promotes photodegradation of perfluorooctane sulfonate.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Xian-Jin; Li, Wen-Wei; Lam, Paul K S; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-11-01

    The application of photochemical processes for perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) degradation has been limited by a low treatment efficiency. This study reports a significant acceleration of PFOS photodegradation under boiling condition compared with the non-boiling control. The PFOS decomposition rate increased with the increasing boiling intensity, but declined at a higher hydronium level or under oxygenation. These results suggest that the boiling state of solution resulted in higher effective concentrations of reactants at the gas-liquid interface and enhanced the interfacial mass transfer, thereby accelerating the PFOS decomposition. This study broadens our knowledge of PFOS photodegradation process and may have implications for development of efficient photodegradation technologies.

  3. Studies on sodium boiling phenomena in out of pile rod bundles for various accidental situations in Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBR) experiments and interpretations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiler, J. M.; Rameau, B.

    Bundle sodium boiling in nominal geometry for different accident conditions is reviewed. Voiding of a subassembly is controlled by not only hydrodynamic effects but mainly by thermal effects. There is a strong influence of the thermal inertia of the bundle material compared to the sodium thermal inertia. Flow instability, during a slow transient, can be analyzed with numerical tools and estimated using simplified approximations. Stable boiling operational conditions under bundle mixed convection (natural convection in the reactor) can be predicted. Voiding during a fast transient can be approximated from single channel calculations. The phenomenology of boiling behavior for a subassembly with inlet completely blocked, submitted to decay heat and lateral cooling; two-phase sodium flow pressure drop in a tube of large hydraulic diameter under adiabatic conditions; critical flow phenomena and voiding rate under high power, slow transient conditions; and onset of dry out under local boiling remains problematical.

  4. Boiling Heat Transfer to Halogenated Hydrocarbon Refrigerants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Suguru; Fujita, Yasunobu

    The current state of knowledge on heat transfer to boiling refrigerants (halogenated hydrocarbons) in a pool and flowing inside a horizontal tube is reviewed with an emphasis on information relevant to the design of refrigerant evaporators, and some recommendations are made for future research. The review covers two-phase flow pattern, heat transfer characteristics, correlation of heat transfer coefficient, influence of oil, heat transfer augmentation, boiling from tube-bundle, influence of return bend, burnout heat flux, film boiling, dryout and post-dryout heat transfer.

  5. Zero Boil-Off Tank (ZBOT) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcquillen, John

    2016-01-01

    The Zero-Boil-Off Tank (ZBOT) experiment has been developed as a small scale ISS experiment aimed at delineating important fluid flow, heat and mass transport, and phase change phenomena that affect cryogenic storage tank pressurization and pressure control in microgravity. The experiments use a simulant transparent low boiling point fluid (PnP) in a sealed transparent Dewar to study and quantify: (a) fluid flow and thermal stratification during pressurization; (b) mixing, thermal destratification, depressurization, and jet-ullage penetration during pressure control by jet mixing. The experiment will provide valuable microgravity empirical two-phase data associated with the above-mentioned physical phenomena through highly accurate local wall and fluid temperature and pressure measurements, full-field phase-distribution and flow visualization. Moreover, the experiments are performed under tightly controlled and definable heat transfer boundary conditions to provide reliable high-fidelity data and precise input as required for validation verification of state-of-the-art two-phase CFD models developed as part of this research and by other groups in the international scientific and cryogenic fluid management communities.

  6. Formation of Martian Gullies by the Action of Liquid Water Flowing Under Current Martian Environmental Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heldmann, J. L.; Toon, O. B.; Pollard, W. H.; Mellon, M. T.; Pitlick, J.; McKay, C. P.; Andersen, D. T.

    2005-01-01

    Images from the Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) on the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft show geologically young small-scale features resembling terrestrial water-carved gullies. An improved understanding of these features has the potential to reveal important information about the hydrological system on Mars, which is of general interest to the planetary science community as well as the field of astrobiology and the search for life on Mars. The young geologic age of these gullies is often thought to be a paradox because liquid water is unstable at the Martian surface. Current temperatures and pressures are generally below the triple point of water (273 K, 6.1 mbar) so that liquid water will spontaneously boil and/or freeze. We therefore examine the flow of water on Mars to determine what conditions are consistent with the observed features of the gullies.

  7. Development of Design Technology on Thermal-Hydraulic Performance in Tight-Lattice Rod Bundles: II - Rod Bowing Effect on Boiling Transition under Transient Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Tamai, Hidesada; Kureta, Masatoshi; Ohnuki, Akira; Akimoto, Hajime

    A thermal-hydraulic feasibility project for an Innovative Water Reactor for Flexible fuel cycle (FLWR) has been performed since 2002. In this R&D project, large-scale thermal-hydraulic tests, several model experiments and development of advanced numerical analysis codes have been carried out. In this paper, we describe the critical power characteristics in a 37-rod tight-lattice bundle with rod bowing under transient states. It is observed that transient Boiling Transition (BT) always occurs axially at exit elevation of upper high-heat-flux region and transversely in the central area of the bundle, which is same as that under steady state. For the postulated power increase and flow decrease cases that may be possibly met in a normal operation of the FLWR, it is confirmed that no BT occurs when Initial Critical Power Ratio (ICPR) is 1.3. Moreover, when the transients are run under severer ICPR that causes BT, the transient critical powers are generally same as the steady ones. The experiments are analyzed with a modified TRAC-BFI code, where Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) newest critical power correlation is implemented for the BT judgement. The code shows good prediction for the occurrence or the non occurrence of the BT and predicts the BT starting time conservatively. Traditional quasi-steady state prediction of the transient BT is confirmed being applicable for the postulated abnormal transient processes in the tight-lattice bundle with rod bowing.

  8. Secondary pool boiling effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, C.; Tsubaki, A.; Zuhlke, C.; Anderson, T.; Alexander, D.; Gogos, G.; Ndao, S.

    2016-02-01

    A pool boiling phenomenon referred to as secondary boiling effects is discussed. Based on the experimental trends, a mechanism is proposed that identifies the parameters that lead to this phenomenon. Secondary boiling effects refer to a distinct decrease in the wall superheat temperature near the critical heat flux due to a significant increase in the heat transfer coefficient. Recent pool boiling heat transfer experiments using femtosecond laser processed Inconel, stainless steel, and copper multiscale surfaces consistently displayed secondary boiling effects, which were found to be a result of both temperature drop along the microstructures and nucleation characteristic length scales. The temperature drop is a function of microstructure height and thermal conductivity. An increased microstructure height and a decreased thermal conductivity result in a significant temperature drop along the microstructures. This temperature drop becomes more pronounced at higher heat fluxes and along with the right nucleation characteristic length scales results in a change of the boiling dynamics. Nucleation spreads from the bottom of the microstructure valleys to the top of the microstructures, resulting in a decreased surface superheat with an increasing heat flux. This decrease in the wall superheat at higher heat fluxes is reflected by a "hook back" of the traditional boiling curve and is thus referred to as secondary boiling effects. In addition, a boiling hysteresis during increasing and decreasing heat flux develops due to the secondary boiling effects. This hysteresis further validates the existence of secondary boiling effects.

  9. Development of a mechanistic model for forced convection subcooled boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaver, Dillon R.

    The focus of this work is on the formulation, implementation, and testing of a mechanistic model of subcooled boiling. Subcooled boiling is the process of vapor generation on a heated wall when the bulk liquid temperature is still below saturation. This is part of a larger effort by the US DoE's CASL project to apply advanced computational tools to the simulation of light water reactors. To support this effort, the formulation of the dispersed field model is described and a complete model of interfacial forces is formulated. The model has been implemented in the NPHASE-CMFD computer code with a K-epsilon model of turbulence. The interfacial force models are built on extensive work by other authors, and include novel formulations of the turbulent dispersion and lift forces. The complete model of interfacial forces is compared to experiments for adiabatic bubbly flows, including both steady-state and unsteady conditions. The same model is then applied to a transient gas/liquid flow in a complex geometry of fuel channels in a sodium fast reactor. Building on the foundation of the interfacial force model, a mechanistic model of forced-convection subcooled boiling is proposed. This model uses the heat flux partitioning concept and accounts for condensation of bubbles attached to the wall. This allows the model to capture the enhanced heat transfer associated with boiling before the point of net generation of vapor, a phenomenon consistent with existing experimental observations. The model is compared to four different experiments encompassing flows of light water, heavy water, and R12 at different pressures, in cylindrical channels, an internally heated annulus, and a rectangular channel. The experimental data includes axial and radial profiles of both liquid temperature and vapor volume fraction, and the agreement can be considered quite good. The complete model is then applied to simulations of subcooled boiling in nuclear reactor subchannels consistent with the

  10. Computations of Boiling in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tryggvason, Gretar; Jacqmin, David

    1999-01-01

    The absence (or reduction) of gravity, can lead to major changes in boiling heat transfer. On Earth, convection has a major effect on the heat distribution ahead of an evaporation front, and buoyancy determines the motion of the growing bubbles. In microgravity, convection and buoyancy are absent or greatly reduced and the dynamics of the growing vapor bubbles can change in a fundamental way. In particular, the lack of redistribution of heat can lead to a large superheat and explosive growth of bubbles once they form. While considerable efforts have been devoted to examining boiling experimentally, including the effect of microgravity, theoretical and computational work is limited to very simple models. In this project, the growth of boiling bubbles is studied by direct numerical simulations where the flow field is fully resolved and the effects of inertia, viscosity, surface deformation, heat conduction and convection, as well as the phase change, are fully accounted for. The proposed work is based on previously funded NASA work that allowed us to develop a two-dimensional numerical method for boiling flows and to demonstrate the ability of the method to simulate film boiling. While numerical simulations of multi-fluid flows have been advanced in a major way during the last five years, or so, similar capability for flows with phase change are still in their infancy. Although the feasibility of the proposed approach has been demonstrated, it has yet to be extended and applied to fully three-dimensional simulations. Here, a fully three-dimensional, parallel, grid adaptive code will be developed. The numerical method will be used to study nucleate boiling in microgravity, with particular emphasis on two aspects of the problem: 1) Examination of the growth of bubbles at a wall nucleation site and the instabilities of rapidly growing bubbles. Particular emphasis will be put on accurately capturing the thin wall layer left behind as a bubble expands along a wall, on

  11. Transport processes in boiling and two-phase systems, including near-critical fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Y.-Y.; Graham, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    Aspects of pool boiling are considered, taking into account nucleate boiling, the nucleate boiling mechanism, film boiling, and the transition between nucleate and film boiling. The characteristics of two-phase flow are also investigated, giving attention to two-phase flow parameters and equations, the flow pattern in two-phase flow, the pressure drop in two-phase flow, heat transfer in two-phase flow, two-phase flow dynamics, the boiling crisis in two-phase flow, the critical flow rate, the propagation of the pressure pulse and the sonic velocity in two-phase media, instrumentation for two-phase flow, and geometry and field effects on boiling and two-phase flow. Near-critical fluids are also considered.

  12. Assessment of a magnet system combining the advantages of cable-in-conduit forced-flow and pool-boiling magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Slack, D.; Hassenzahl, W.; Felker, B.; Chaplin, M.

    1993-10-06

    This paper presents an idea for a magnet system that could be used to advantage in tokamaks and other fusion engineering devices. Higher performance designs, specifically newer tokamaks such as those for the international Tokamak Engineering Reactor (ITER) and Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) use Cable in Conduit Conductor (CICC) forced flow coils to advantage to meet field and current density requirements. Pool boiling magnets lack structural integrity to resist high magnetic forces since helium cooling areas must surround each conductor. A second problem is that any leak can threaten the voltage standoff integrity of the magnet system. This is because a leak can result in low-pressure helium gas becoming trapped by limited conductance in the magnet bundle and low-pressure helium has poor dielectric strength. The system proposed here is basically a CICC system, with it`s inherent advantages, but bathed in higher pressure supercritical helium to eliminate the leak and voltage break-down problems. Schemes to simplify helium coolant plumbing with the proposed system are discussed. A brief historical review of related magnet systems is included. The advantages and disadvantages of using higher pressure, supercritical helium in combination with solid electrical insulation in a CICC system are discussed. Related electrical data from some previous works are compiled and discussed.

  13. Vertical boil propagation from a submerged estuarine sill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chickadel, C. Chris; Horner-Devine, Alexander R.; Talke, Stefan A.; Jessup, Andrew T.

    2009-05-01

    Surface disruptions by boils during strong tidal flows over a rocky sill were observed in thermal infrared imagery collected at the Snohomish River estuary in Washington State. Locations of boil disruptions and boil diameters at the surface were quantified and are used to test an idealized model of vertical boil propagation. The model is developed as a two-dimensional approximation of a three-dimensional vortex loop, and boil vorticity is derived from the flow shear over the sill. Predictions of boil disruption locations were determined from the modeled vertical velocity, the sill depth, and the over-sill velocity. Predictions by the vertical velocity model agree well with measured locations (rms difference 3.0 m) and improve by using measured velocity and shear (rms difference 1.8 m). In comparison, a boil-surfacing model derived from laboratory turbulent mixed-layer wakes agrees with the measurements only when stratification is insignificant.

  14. A model for calculation of RCS pressure during reflux boiling under reduced inventory conditions and its assessment against PKL data

    SciTech Connect

    Palmrose, D.E.; Mandl, R.M.

    1991-12-31

    There has been recent interest in the United States concerning the loss of residual heat removal system (RHRS) under reduced coolant inventory conditions for pressurized water reactors. This issue is also of interest in the Federal Republic of Germany and an experiment was performed in the integral PKL-HI experimental facility at Siemens-KWU to supply applicable data. Recently, an NRC-sponsored effort has been undertaken at the Idaho-National Engineering Laboratory to identify and analyze the important thermal-hydraulic phenomena in pressurized water reactors following the long term loss-of-RHRS during reduced inventory operation. The thermal-hydraulic response of a closed reactor coolant system during such a transient is investigated in this report. Some of the specific processes investigated include: reflux condensation in the steam generators, the corresponding pressure increase in the reactor coolant system, and void fraction distributions on the primary side of the system. Mathematical models of these and other physical processes Experiment B4.5.

  15. Study of unsteady flow conditions for slurry fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Ekmann, J.M.; Wildman, D.J.; Klinzing, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    During the past three years, transport characteristics of coal-water mixtures (CWMs) have been studied at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center. The effort has concentrated predominantly on studying flow conditions in straight horizontal and vertical sections, and to a lesser extent on studying the flow patterns around elbows of a one-inch-diameter loop and a two-inch-diameter loop. Steady-state flow was characterized for in-house prepared slurries and commercially prepared slurries. For lower concentrated slurries (55 wt % to 60 wt %) and coarse particle size distributions (50% finer than 75 microns), nonhomogeneous flow conditions were encountered across horizontal test sections. Since nonhomogeneous conditions existed in straight sections during steady-state flow, it was decided to further investigate flow conditions during changes in velocity (magnitude and direction). This paper concentrates on nonuniform flow conditions of two types. The first nonuniform flow condition arises from sudden increases in the magnitude of the flow velocity. Pressure measurements recorded at a fixed position in the vertical section of the two-inch-diameter loop during sudden changes in velocity can be analyzed via classic control theory to evaluate the dynamic properties of the CWM. The second nonuniform flow condition occurs as the CWM passes through a bend. Both long-radius bends and 90-degree elbows made of glass and steel have been studied. Pressure-loss data around the long-radius bends and elbows were analyzed with a modified version of the model developed by Ito for single-phase flow around bends. Flow patterns around glass bends and elbows were observed for slurries prepared of vinyl coating powder and water. They are described in an effort to increase understanding of the pressure-loss data. 8 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  16. A Study of Nucleate Boiling with Forced Convection in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merte, Herman, Jr.

    1999-01-01

    bubble and the heater surface. The enhancement of the boiling process with low velocities in earth gravity for those orientations producing the formation of a liquid macrolayer described above, accompanied by "sliding" vapor bubbles, has been demonstrated. The enhancement was presented as a function of orientation, subcooling, and heated length, while a criterion for the heat transfer for mixed natural/forced convection nucleate boiling was given previously. A major unknown in the prediction and application of flow boiling heat transfer in microgravity is the upper limit of the heat flux for the onset of dryout (or critical heat flux - CHF), for given conditions of fluid-heater surfaces, including geometry, system pressure and bulk liquid subcooling. It is clearly understood that the behavior in microgravity will be no different than on earth with sufficiently high flow velocities, and would require no space experimentation. However, the boundary at which this takes place is still an unknown. Previous results of CHF measurements were presented for low velocity flow boiling at various orientations in earth gravity as a function of flow velocity and bulk liquid subcooling, along with preliminary measurements of bubble residence times on a flat heater surface. This showed promise as a parameter to be used in modeling the CHF, both in earth gravity and in microgravity. The objective of the work here is to draw attention to and show results of current modeling efforts for the CHF, with low velocities in earth gravity at different orientations and subcoolings. Many geometrical possibilities for a heater surface exist in flowing boiling, with boiling on the inner and outer surfaces of tubes perhaps being the most common. If the vapor bubble residence time on and departure size from the heater surface bear a relationship to the CHF, as results to be given indicate, it is important that visualization of and access to vapor bubble growth be conveniently available for research

  17. Numerical simulation of CO2 leakage from a geologic disposal reservoir including transitions from super- to sub-critical conditions, and boiling of liquid of CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, Karsten

    2003-03-31

    The critical point of CO{sub 2} is at temperature and pressure conditions of T{sub crit} = 31.04 C, P{sub crit} = 73.82 bar. At lower (subcritical) temperatures and/or pressures, CO{sub 2} can exist in two different phase states, a liquid and a gaseous state, as well as in two-phase mixtures of these states. Disposal of CO{sub 2} into brine formations would be made at supercritical pressures. However, CO{sub 2} escaping from the storage reservoir may migrate upwards towards regions with lower temperatures and pressures, where CO{sub 2} would be in subcritical conditions. An assessment of the fate of leaking CO{sub 2} requires a capability to model not only supercritical but also subcritical CO{sub 2}, as well as phase changes between liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2} in sub-critical conditions. We have developed a methodology for numerically simulating the behavior of water-CO{sub 2} mixtures in permeable media under conditions that may include liquid, gaseous, and supercritical CO{sub 2}. This has been applied to simulations of leakage from a deep storage reservoir in which a rising CO{sub 2} plume undergoes transitions from supercritical to subcritical conditions. We find strong cooling effects when liquid CO{sub 2} rises to elevations where it begins to boil and evolve a gaseous CO{sub 2} phase. A three-phase zone forms (aqueous - liquid - gas), which over time becomes several hundred meters thick as decreasing temperatures permit liquid CO{sub 2} to advance to shallower elevations. Fluid mobilities are reduced in the three-phase region from phase interference effects. This impedes CO{sub 2} upflow, causes the plume to spread out laterally, and gives rise to dispersed CO{sub 2} discharge at the land surface. Our simulation suggests that temperatures along a CO{sub 2} leakage path may decline to levels low enough so that solid water ice and CO{sub 2} hydrate phases may be formed.

  18. Evaporation, Boiling and Bubbles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Evaporation and boiling are both terms applied to the change of a liquid to the vapour/gaseous state. This article argues that it is the formation of bubbles of vapour within the liquid that most clearly differentiates boiling from evaporation although only a minority of chemistry textbooks seems to mention bubble formation in this context. The…

  19. Thermosyphon boiling in vertical channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Cohen, A.; Schweitzer, H.

    The thermal characteristics of ebullient cooling systems for VHSIC and VLSI microelectronic component thermal control are studied by experimentally and analytically investigating boiling heat transfer from a pair of flat, closely spaced, isoflux plates immersed in saturated water. A theoretical model for liquid flow rate through the channel is developed and used as a basis for correlating the rate of heat transfer from the channel walls. Experimental results for wall temperature as a function of axial location, heat flux, and plate spacing are presented. The finding that the wall superheat at constant imposed heat flux decreases as the channel is narrowed is explained with the aid of a boiling thermosiphon analysis which yields the mass flux through the channel.

  20. Conceptual design for spacelab pool boiling experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lienhard, J. H.; Peck, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    A pool boiling heat transfer experiment to be incorporated with a larger two-phase flow experiment on Spacelab was designed to confirm (or alter) the results of earth-normal gravity experiments which indicate that the hydrodynamic peak and minimum pool boiling heat fluxes vanish at very low gravity. Twelve small sealed test cells containing water, methanol or Freon 113 and cylindrical heaters of various sizes are to be built. Each cell will be subjected to one or more 45 sec tests in which the surface heat flux on the heaters is increased linearly until the surface temperature reaches a limiting value of 500 C. The entire boiling process will be photographed in slow-motion. Boiling curves will be constructed from thermocouple and electric input data, for comparison with the motion picture records. The conduct of the experiment will require no more than a few hours of operator time.

  1. A microgravity boiling and convective condensation experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kachnik, Leo; Lee, Doojeong; Best, Frederick; Faget, Nanette

    1987-01-01

    A boiling and condensing test article consisting of two straight tube boilers, one quartz and one stainless steel, and two 1.5 m long glass-in-glass heat exchangers, on 6 mm ID and one 10 mm ID, was flown on the NASA KC-135 0-G aircraft. Using water as the working fluid, the 5 kw boiler produces two phase mixtures of varying quality for mass flow rates between 0.005 and 0.1 kg/sec. The test section is instrumented at eight locations with absolute and differential pressure transducers and thermocouples. A gamma densitometer is used to measure void fraction, and high speed photography records the flow regimes. A three axis accelerometer provides aircraft acceleration data (+ or - 0.01G). Data are collected via an analog-to-digital conversion and data acquisition system. Bubbly, annular, and slug flow regimes were observed in the test section under microgravity conditions. Flow oscillations were observed for some operating conditions and the effect of the 2-G pullout prior to the 0-G period was observed by continuously recording data throughout the parabolas. A total fo 300 parabolas was flown.

  2. Phase relations and adiabats in boiling seafloor geothermal systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bischoff, J.L.; Pitzer, Kenneth S.

    1985-01-01

    Observations of large salinity variations and vent temperatures in the range of 380-400??C suggest that boiling or two-phase separation may be occurring in some seafloor geothermal systems. Consideration of flow rates and the relatively small differences in density between vapors and liquids at the supercritical pressures at depth in these systems suggests that boiling is occurring under closed-system conditions. Salinity and temperature of boiling vents can be used to estimate the pressure-temperature point in the subsurface at which liquid seawater first reached the two-phase boundary. Data are reviewed to construct phase diagrams of coexisting brines and vapors in the two-phase region at pressures corresponding to those of the seafloor geothermal systems. A method is developed for calculating the enthalpy and entropy of the coexisting mixtures, and results are used to construct adiabats from the seafloor to the P-T two-phase boundary. Results for seafloor vents discharging at 2300 m below sea level indicate that a 385??C vent is composed of a brine (7% NaCl equivalent) in equilibrium with a vapor (0.1% NaCl). Brine constitutes 45% by weight of the mixture, and the fluid first boiled at approximately 1 km below the seafloor at 415??C, 330 bar. A 400??C vent is primarily vapor (88 wt.%, 0.044% NaCl) with a small amount of brine (26% NaCl) and first boiled at 2.9 km below the seafloor at 500??C, 520 bar. These results show that adiabatic decompression in the two-phase region results in dramatic cooling of the fluid mixture when there is a large fraction of vapor. ?? 1985.

  3. Flow separation in rocket nozzles under high altitude condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, R.; Génin, C.

    2016-03-01

    The knowledge of flow separation in rocket nozzles is crucial for rocket engine design and optimum performance. Typically, flow separation is studied under sea-level conditions. However, this disregards the change of the ambient density during ascent of a launcher. The ambient flow properties are an important factor concerning the design of altitude-adaptive rocket nozzles like the dual bell nozzle. For this reason an experimental study was carried out to study the influence of the ambient density on flow separation within conventional nozzles.

  4. Transient analysis of containment heat removal at Prairie Island with boiling in the fan coil tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Elicson, T.; Fraser, B.; Anderson, D.; Thomas, S.

    1996-12-31

    An analysis has been performed to determine the equilibrium cooling water flow rates and heat removal rates through the Prairie Island Nuclear Generating Plant containment fan coil units (CFCUs) under postulated accident conditions which leads to boiling in the CFCUs. Key components of the analysis include a detailed fan coil heat exchanger model, mass and energy conservation in the cooling tubes, two-phase flow effects on heat transfer and pressure drop, and pipe network modeling.

  5. Gas liquid flow at microgravity conditions - Flow patterns and their transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dukler, A. E.; Fabre, J. A.; Mcquillen, J. B.; Vernon, R.

    1987-01-01

    The prediction of flow patterns during gas-liquid flow in conduits is central to the modern approach for modeling two phase flow and heat transfer. The mechanisms of transition are reasonably well understood for flow in pipes on earth where it has been shown that body forces largely control the behavior observed. This work explores the patterns which exist under conditions of microgravity when these body forces are suppressed. Data are presented which were obtained for air-water flow in tubes during drop tower experiments and Learjet trajectories. Preliminary models to explain the observed flow pattern map are evolved.

  6. Aspects of subcooled boiling

    SciTech Connect

    Bankoff, S.G.

    1997-12-31

    Subcooled boiling boiling refers to boiling from a solid surface where the bulk liquid temperature is below the saturation temperature (subcooled). Two classes are considered: (1) nucleate boiling, where, for large subcoolings, individual bubbles grow and collapse while remaining attached to the solid wall, and (2) film boiling, where a continuous vapor film separates the solid from the bulk liquid. One mechanism by which subcooled nucleate boiling results in very large surface heat transfer coefficient is thought to be latent heat transport within the bubble, resulting from simultaneous evaporation from a thin residual liquid layer at the bubble base, and condensation at the polar bubble cap. Another is the increased liquid microconvection around the oscillating bubble. Two related problems have been attacked. One is the rupture of a thin liquid film subject to attractive and repulsive dispersion forces, leading to the formation of mesoscopic drops, which then coalesce and evaporate. Another is the liquid motion in the vicinity of an oscillating contact line, where the bubble wall is idealized as a wedge of constant angle sliding on the solid wall. The subcooled film boiling problem has been attacked by deriving a general long-range nonlinear evolution equation for the local thickness of the vapor layer. Linear and weakly-nonlinear stability results have been obtained. A number of other related problems have been attacked.

  7. Low-flow analysis with a conditional Weilbull tail model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durrans, S. Rocky

    Estimates of low-flow quantiles, such as the 7-day, 10-year low flow, which are usually obtained by statistical modeling of observed data series, are widely used in water quality management. This paper presents a conditional modeling approach to low-flow analysis that employs only those data values which are less than or equal to a ceiling value. Modeling in this fashion has been motivated by the observation that annual low flows may derive from mixed processes and by the subjective nature of graphical methods, such as those employed by the U.S. Geological Survey, which are often employed in such cases. Results of Monte Carlo experiments demonstrate that the conditional modeling approach yields a low-flow quantile estimator whose bias and RMSE are comparable to more conventional modeling approaches of fitting a classical textbook probability distribution on the basis of all observed data values, even when the underlying population is of a ``well-behaved'' form. Since the complex forms of mixed low-flow data distributions are not capable of being represented by classical textbook distributions and since the conditional modeling approach performs comparably to those models even when the data derive from well-behaved probability distributions, these results imply that the conditional modeling approach is worthy of consideration for use by hydrologists. The conditional modeling approach also leads rather naturally to a scheme, much like that used in index flood methods, whereby a regional low-flow estimator might be devised. An application of the conditional modeling approach to 48 low-flow data series in Alabama is presented.

  8. Balanced Flow Metering and Conditioning: Technology for Fluid Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Anthony R.

    2006-01-01

    Revolutionary new technology that creates balanced conditions across the face of a multi-hole orifice plate has been developed, patented and exclusively licensed for commercialization. This balanced flow technology simultaneously measures mass flow rate, volumetric flow rate, and fluid density with little or no straight pipe run requirements. Initially, the balanced plate was a drop in replacement for a traditional orifice plate, but testing revealed substantially better performance as compared to the orifice plate such as, 10 times better accuracy, 2 times faster (shorter distance) pressure recovery, 15 times less acoustic noise energy generation, and 2.5 times less permanent pressure loss. During 2004 testing at MSFC, testing revealed several configurations of the balanced flow meter that match the accuracy of Venturi meters while having only slightly more permanent pressure loss. However, the balanced meter only requires a 0.25 inch plate and has no upstream or downstream straight pipe requirements. As a fluid conditioning device, the fluid usually reaches fully developed flow within 1 pipe diameter of the balanced conditioning plate. This paper will describe the basic balanced flow metering technology, provide performance details generated by testing to date and provide implementation details along with calculations required for differing degrees of flow metering accuracy.

  9. High flux film and transition boiling

    SciTech Connect

    Witte, L.C.

    1993-02-01

    An investigation was conducted on the potential for altering the boiling curve through effects of high velocity and high subcooling. Experiments using water and Freon-113 flowing over cylindrical electrical heaters in crossflow were made to see how velocity and subcooling affect the boiling curve, especially the film and transition boiling regions. We sought subcooling levels down to near the freezing points of these two liquids to prove the concept that the critical heat flux and the minimum heat flux could be brought together, thereby averting the transition region altogether. Another emphasis was to gain insight into how the various boiling regions could be represented mathematically on various parts of heating surface. Motivation for the research grew out of a realization that the effects of very high subcooling and velocity might be to avert the transition boiling altogether so that the unstable part of the boiling curve would not limit the application of high flux devices to temperatures less than the burnout temperatures. Summaries of results from the study are described. It shows that the potential for averting, the transition region is good, and points the way to further research that is needed to demonstrate the potential.

  10. High flux film and transition boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witte, L. C.

    1993-02-01

    An investigation was conducted on the potential for altering the boiling curve through effects of high velocity and high subcooling. Experiments using water and Freon-113 flowing over cylindrical electrical heaters in crossflow were made to see how velocity and subcooling affect the boiling curve, especially the film and transition boiling regions. We sought subcooling levels down to near the freezing points of these two liquids to prove the concept that the critical heat flux and the minimum heat flux could be brought together, thereby averting the transition region altogether. Another emphasis was to gain insight into how the various boiling regions could be represented mathematically on various parts of the heating surface. Motivation for the research grew out of a realization that the effects of very high subcooling and velocity might be to avert the transition boiling altogether so that the unstable part of the boiling curve would not limit the application of high flux devices to temperatures less than the burnout temperatures. Summaries of results from the study are described. It shows that the potential for averting the transition region is good and points the way to further research that is needed to demonstrate the potential.

  11. Verification of the karst flow model under laboratory controlled conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotovac, Hrvoje; Andric, Ivo; Malenica, Luka; Srzic, Veljko

    2016-04-01

    Karst aquifers are very important groundwater resources around the world as well as in coastal part of Croatia. They consist of extremely complex structure defining by slow and laminar porous medium and small fissures and usually fast turbulent conduits/karst channels. Except simple lumped hydrological models that ignore high karst heterogeneity, full hydraulic (distributive) models have been developed exclusively by conventional finite element and finite volume elements considering complete karst heterogeneity structure that improves our understanding of complex processes in karst. Groundwater flow modeling in complex karst aquifers are faced by many difficulties such as a lack of heterogeneity knowledge (especially conduits), resolution of different spatial/temporal scales, connectivity between matrix and conduits, setting of appropriate boundary conditions and many others. Particular problem of karst flow modeling is verification of distributive models under real aquifer conditions due to lack of above-mentioned information. Therefore, we will show here possibility to verify karst flow models under the laboratory controlled conditions. Special 3-D karst flow model (5.6*2.6*2 m) consists of concrete construction, rainfall platform, 74 piezometers, 2 reservoirs and other supply equipment. Model is filled by fine sand (3-D porous matrix) and drainage plastic pipes (1-D conduits). This model enables knowledge of full heterogeneity structure including position of different sand layers as well as conduits location and geometry. Moreover, we know geometry of conduits perforation that enable analysis of interaction between matrix and conduits. In addition, pressure and precipitation distribution and discharge flow rates from both phases can be measured very accurately. These possibilities are not present in real sites what this model makes much more useful for karst flow modeling. Many experiments were performed under different controlled conditions such as different

  12. Odd-Boiled Eggs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaminsky, Kenneth; Scheman, Naomi

    2010-01-01

    At a Shabbat lunch in Madrid not long ago, the conversation turned to the question of boiling eggs. One of the guests mentioned that a Dutch rabbi he knew had heard that in order to make it more likely that boiled eggs be kosher, you should add an egg to the pot if the number you began with was even. According to the laws of Kashruth, Jews may not…

  13. Nucleate boiling pressure drop in an annulus: Book 5

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    The application of the work described in this report is the production reactors at the Savannah River Site, and the context is nuclear reactor safety. The Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenario considered involves a double-ended break of a primary coolant pipe in the reactor. During a LOCA, the flow through portions of the reactor may reverse direction or be greatly reduced, depending upon the location of the break. The reduced flow rate of coolant (D{sub 2}O) through the fuel assembly channels of the reactor -- downflow in this situation -- can lead to boiling and to the potential for flow instabilities which may cause some of the fuel assembly channels to overheat and melt. That situation is to be avoided. The experimental approach is to provide a test annulus which simulates geometry, materials, and flow conditions in a Mark-22 fuel assembly (Coolant Channel 3) to the extent possible. The key analysis approaches are: To compare the minima in the measured demand curves with analytical criteria, in particular the Saha-Zuber (1974) model; and to compare the pressure and temperature as a function of length in the annulus with an integral model for flow boiling in a heated channel. Nineteen test series and a total of 178 tests were performed. Testing addressed the effects of: Heat flux; pressure; helium gas; power tilt; ribs; asymmetric heat flux. This document consists solely of the plato file index from 11/87 to 11/90.

  14. Thermal behavior of aqueous iron oxide nano-fluid as a coolant on a flat disc heater under the pool boiling condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salari, E.; Peyghambarzadeh, S. M.; Sarafraz, M. M.; Hormozi, F.; Nikkhah, V.

    2016-04-01

    This paper experimentally focuses on the pool boiling heat transfer characteristics of gamma Fe3O4 aqueous nano-fluids on a flat disc heater. The nano-fluid used in this research was prepared using two-step method and was stabilized using nonylphenol ethoxylate nonionic surfactant, pH setting, and sonication process as well. Influence of different operating parameters such as heat flux (0-1546 kW/m2), mass concentration of nano-fluids (weight concentration 0.1-0.3 %), bubble formation, critical heat flux (1170 kW/m2 for water, 1230 kW/m2 (wt% = 0.1), 1320 kW/m2 (wt% = 0.2), 1450 kW/m2 (wt% = 0.3) and fouling on pool boiling heat transfer coefficient of nano-fluid as a thermal performance index were experimentally investigated and briefly discussed. Results demonstrated that the pool boiling heat transfer coefficient increases with increasing the mass concentration and the applied heat flux. In addition, the rate of bubble formation is significantly intensified at higher heat fluxes and subsequently, larger bubbles detach the surface due to the intensification of bubble coalescence. In terms of fouling formation, it can be stated that fouling of nano-fluids is a strong function of time and rate of deposition is increased over the extended time while the pool boiling heat transfer coefficient was not decreased over the time, as porous deposited layer on the surface are detached from the surface by bubble interactions. In terms of critical heat flux, capillary action of the deposited layer was found to be the main reason responsible for increasing the critical heat flux as liquid is stored inside the porous deposited layer, which enhances the surface toleration against the critical heat flux crisis.

  15. CHIMNEY FOR BOILING WATER REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Petrick, M.

    1961-08-01

    A boiling-water reactor is described which has vertical fuel-containing channels for forming steam from water. Risers above the channels increase the head of water radially outward, whereby water is moved upward through the channels with greater force. The risers are concentric and the radial width of the space between them is somewhat small. There is a relatively low rate of flow of water up through the radially outer fuel-containing channels, with which the space between the risers is in communication. (AE C)

  16. Boundary conditions and the simulation of low Mach number flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagstrom, Thomas; Lorenz, Jens

    1993-01-01

    The problem of accurately computing low Mach number flows, with the specific intent of studying the interaction of sound waves with incompressible flow structures, such as concentrations of vorticity is considered. This is a multiple time (and/or space) scales problem, leading to various difficulties in the design of numerical methods. Concentration is on one of these difficulties - the development of boundary conditions at artificial boundaries which allow sound waves and vortices to radiate to the far field. Nonlinear model equations are derived based on assumptions about the scaling of the variables. Then these are linearized about a uniform flow and exact boundary conditions are systematically derived using transform methods. Finally, useful approximations to the exact conditions which are valid for small Mach number and small viscosity are computed.

  17. Stem sap flow in plants under low gravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokuda, Ayako; Hirai, Hiroaki; Kitaya, Yoshiaki

    2016-07-01

    A study was conducted to obtain a fundamental knowledge for plant functions in bio-regenerative life support systems in space. Stem sap flow in plants is important indicators for water transport from roots to atmosphere through leaves. In this study, stem sap flow in sweetpotato was assessed at gravity levels from 0.01 to 2 g for about 20 seconds each during parabolic airplane flights. Stem sap flow was monitored with a heat balance method in which heat generated with a tiny heater installed in the stem was transferred upstream and downstream by conduction and upstream by convection with the sap flow through xylems of the vascular tissue. Thermal images of stem surfaces near heated points were captured using infrared thermography and the internal heat convection corresponding to the sap flow was analyzed. In results, the sap flow in stems was suppressed more at lower gravity levels without forced air circulation. No suppression of the stem sap flow was observed with forced air circulation. Suppressed sap flow in stems would be caused by suppression of transpiration in leaves and would cause restriction of water and nutrient uptake in roots. The forced air movement is essential to culture healthy plants at a high growth rate under low gravity conditions in space.

  18. Study of the depression of incipient boiling temperature and the enhancement of critical heat flux induced by ultrasonic wave on horizontal plate facing upward and downward

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtake, Hiroyasu; Koizumi, Yasuo

    1999-07-01

    The effects of an ultrasonic wave on nucleate-boiling heat transfer, focusing on depression of the incipient boiling temperature and enhancement of the critical heat flux (CHF) on horizontal plate facing upward and downward, were examined. Experiments were conducted using a copper thin film and saturated R-113 liquid for a pool condition at 0.10 MPa. The incipient boiling temperature was depressed by the ultrasonic wave incidence up to 10K in reheating experiments where the heat transfer surface had been immersed in the liquid following the previous boiling experiment. On the other hand, it was minimally affected when the boiling experiment started immediately after the test surface was immersed into the liquid. These results were considered to be related to the number of active nucleation sites available. The decrease of the incipient boiling temperature as the power of the ultrasonic wave was increased, however, did not depend on the frequency. It was pointed out that the depression of the incipient boiling temperature was caused by the local pressure increase caused by the ultrasonic wave incidence. The CHF was increased by the ultrasonic wave incidence up to a factor of five and increased by the ultrasonic wave incidence up to a factor of five and increased with the power of the ultrasonic wave. The enhancement of the CHF was caused by acoustic flow near the heating surface: the coalesce bubble on the heating surface was collapsed by the acoustic flow.

  19. Measurement of Two-Phase Flow Characteristics Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keshock, E. G.; Lin, C. S.; Edwards, L. G.; Knapp, J.; Harrison, M. E.; Xhang, X.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the technical approach and initial results of a test program for studying two-phase annular flow under the simulated microgravity conditions of KC-135 aircraft flights. A helical coil flow channel orientation was utilized in order to circumvent the restrictions normally associated with drop tower or aircraft flight tests with respect to two-phase flow, namely spatial restrictions preventing channel lengths of sufficient size to accurately measure pressure drops. Additionally, the helical coil geometry is of interest in itself, considering that operating in a microgravity environment vastly simplifies the two-phase flows occurring in coiled flow channels under 1-g conditions for virtually any orientation. Pressure drop measurements were made across four stainless steel coil test sections, having a range of inside tube diameters (0.95 to 1.9 cm), coil diameters (25 - 50 cm), and length-to-diameter ratios (380 - 720). High-speed video photographic flow observations were made in the transparent straight sections immediately preceding and following the coil test sections. A transparent coil of tygon tubing of 1.9 cm inside diameter was also used to obtain flow visualization information within the coil itself. Initial test data has been obtained from one set of KC-135 flight tests, along with benchmark ground tests. Preliminary results appear to indicate that accurate pressure drop data is obtainable using a helical coil geometry that may be related to straight channel flow behavior. Also, video photographic results appear to indicate that the observed slug-annular flow regime transitions agree quite reasonably with the Dukler microgravity map.

  20. Importance of considering intraborehole flow in solute transport modeling under highly dynamic flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Ma, Rui; Zheng, Chunmiao; Tonkin, Matt; Zachara, John M

    2011-04-01

    Correct interpretation of tracer test data is critical for understanding transport processes in the subsurface. This task can be greatly complicated by the presence of intraborehole flows in a highly dynamic flow environment. At a new tracer test site (Hanford IFRC) a dynamic flow field created by changes in the stage of the adjacent Columbia River, coupled with a heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity distribution, leads to considerable variations in vertical hydraulic gradients. These variations, in turn, create intraborehole flows in fully-screened (6.5m) observation wells with frequently alternating upward and downward movement. This phenomenon, in conjunction with a highly permeable aquifer formation and small horizontal hydraulic gradients, makes modeling analysis and model calibration a formidable challenge. Groundwater head data alone were insufficient to define the flow model boundary conditions, and the movement of the tracer was highly sensitive to the dynamics of the flow field. This study shows that model calibration can be significantly improved by explicitly considering (a) dynamic flow model boundary conditions and (b) intraborehole flow. The findings from this study underscore the difficulties in interpreting tracer tests and understanding solute transport under highly dynamic flow conditions. PMID:21216023

  1. Importance of considering intraborehole flow in solute transport modeling under highly dynamic flow conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Rui; Zheng, Chunmiao; Tonkin, Matthew J.; Zachara, John M.

    2011-04-01

    Correct interpretation of tracer test data is critical for understanding transport processes in the subsurface. This task can be greatly complicated by the presence of intraborehole flows in a highly dynamic flow environment. At a new tracer test site (Hanford IFRC) a dynamic flow field created by changes in the stage of the adjacent Columbia River, coupled with a heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity distribution, leads to considerable variations in vertical hydraulic gradients. These variations, in turn, create intraborehole flows in fully-screened (6.5 m) observation wells with frequently alternating upward and downward movement. This phenomenon, in conjunction with a highly permeable aquifer formation and small horizontal hydraulic gradients, makes modeling analysis and model calibration a formidable challenge. Groundwater head data alone were insufficient to define the flow model boundary conditions, and the movement of the tracer was highly sensitive to the dynamics of the flow field. This study shows that model calibration can be significantly improved by explicitly considering (a) dynamic flow model boundary conditions and (b) intraborehole flow. The findings from this study underscore the difficulties in interpreting tracer tests and understanding solute transport under highly dynamic flow conditions.

  2. Fundamental Boiling and RP-1 Freezing Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goode, Brian

    2002-01-01

    The prestart thermal conditioning of the hardware in LOX (liquid oxygen) systems involve heat transfer between LOX and metal where boiling plays a large role. Information is easily found on nucleate boiling, maximum heat flux, minimum heat flux and film boiling for common fluids like water. After looking at these standard correlations it was felt more data was needed for the cool down side transition boiling for the LN2 and LOX. In particular interest is the film boiling values, the temperature at which transition begins and the slope as peak heat flux is approached. The ultimate goal is an array of boiling heat transfer coefficient as a function of surface temperature which can be used in the chilldown model of the feed system, engine and bleed system for X-34. The first experiment consisted of an actual MC-1 LOX Impeller which had been machined backwards, that was instrumented with 17 surface thermocouples and submerged in liquid nitrogen. The thermocouples were installed on metal thicknesses varying from the thin inducer to the thick hub.

  3. Eddy Current Minimizing Flow Plug for Use in Flow Conditioning and Flow Metering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, John Dwight (Inventor); Kelley, Anthony R. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An eddy-current-minimizing flow plug has open flow channels formed between the plug's inlet and outlet. Each open flow channel includes (i) a first portion that originates at the inlet face and converges to a location within the plug that is downstream of the inlet, and (ii) a second portion that originates within the plug and diverges to the outlet. The diverging second portion is approximately twice the length of the converging first portion. The plug is devoid of planar surface regions at its inlet and outlet, and in fluid flow planes of the plug that are perpendicular to the given direction of a fluid flowing therethrough.

  4. A Boundary Condition for Simulation of Flow Over Porous Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frink, Neal T.; Bonhaus, Daryl L.; Vatsa, Veer N.; Bauer, Steven X. S.; Tinetti, Ana F.

    2001-01-01

    A new boundary condition is presented.for simulating the flow over passively porous surfaces. The model builds on the prior work of R.H. Bush to eliminate the need for constructing grid within an underlying plenum, thereby simplifying the numerical modeling of passively porous flow control systems and reducing computation cost. Code experts.for two structured-grid.flow solvers, TLNS3D and CFL3D. and one unstructured solver, USM3Dns, collaborated with an experimental porosity expert to develop the model and implement it into their respective codes. Results presented,for the three codes on a slender forebody with circumferential porosity and a wing with leading-edge porosity demonstrate a good agreement with experimental data and a remarkable ability to predict the aggregate aerodynamic effects of surface porosity with a simple boundary condition.

  5. Trailing edge flow conditions as a factor in airfoil design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormsbee, A. I.; Maughmer, M. D.

    1984-01-01

    Some new developments relevant to the design of single-element airfoils using potential flow methods are presented. In particular, the role played by the non-dimensional trailing edge velocity in design is considered and the relationship between the specified value and the resulting airfoil geometry is explored. In addition, the ramifications of the unbounded trailing edge pressure gradients generally present in the potential flow solution of the flow over an airfoil are examined, and the conditions necessary to obtain a class of airfoils having finite trailing edge pressure gradients developed. The incorporation of these conditions into the inverse method of Eppler is presented and the modified scheme employed to generate a number of airfoils for consideration. The detailed viscous analysis of airfoils having finite trailing edge pressure gradients demonstrates a reduction in the strong inviscid-viscid interactions generally present near the trailing edge of an airfoil.

  6. Boiling water neutronic reactor incorporating a process inherent safety design

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1985-02-19

    A boiling-water reactor core is positioned within a prestressed concrete reactor vessel of a size which will hold a supply of coolant water sufficient to submerge and cool the reactor core by boiling for a period of at least one week after shutdown. Separate volumes of hot, clean (nonborated) water for cooling during normal operation and cool highly borated water for emergency cooling and reactor shutdown are separated by an insulated wall during normal reactor operation with contact between the two water volumes being maintained at interfaces near the top and bottom ends of the reactor vessel. Means are provided for balancing the pressure of the two water volumes at the lower interface zone during normal operation to prevent entry of the cool borated water into the reactor core region, for detecting the onset of excessive power to coolant flow conditions in the reactor core and for detecting low water levels of reactor coolant. Cool borated water is permitted to flow into the reactor core when low reactor coolant levels or excessive power to coolant flow conditions are encountered.

  7. Boiling water neutronic reactor incorporating a process inherent safety design

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, Charles W.

    1987-01-01

    A boiling-water reactor core is positioned within a prestressed concrete reactor vessel of a size which will hold a supply of coolant water sufficient to submerge and cool the reactor core by boiling for a period of at least one week after shutdown. Separate volumes of hot, clean (non-borated) water for cooling during normal operation and cool highly borated water for emergency cooling and reactor shutdown are separated by an insulated wall during normal reactor operation with contact between the two water volumes being maintained at interfaces near the top and bottom ends of the reactor vessel. Means are provided for balancing the pressure of the two volumes at the lower interface zone during normal operation to prevent entry of the cool borated water into the reactor core region, for detecting the onset of excessive power to coolant flow conditions in the reactor core and for detecting low water levels of reactor coolant. Cool borated water is permitted to flow into the reactor core when low reactor coolant levels or excessive power to coolant flow conditions are encountered.

  8. Nucleate pool boiling: High gravity to reduced gravity; liquid metals to cryogens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merte, Herman, Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Requirements for the proper functioning of equipment and personnel in reduced gravity associated with space platforms and future space station modules introduce unique problems in temperature control; power generation; energy dissipation; the storage, transfer, control and conditioning of fluids; and liquid-vapor separation. The phase change of boiling is significant in all of these. Although both pool and flow boiling would be involved, research results to date include only pool boiling because buoyancy effects are maximized for this case. The effective application of forced convection boiling heat transfer in the microgravity of space will require a well grounded and cogent understanding of the mechanisms involved. Experimental results are presented for pool boiling from a single geometrical configuration, a flat surface, covering a wide range of body forces from a/g = 20 to 1 to a/g = 0 to -1 for a cryogenic liquid, and from a/g = 20 to 1 for water and a liquid metal. Similarities in behavior are noted for these three fluids at the higher gravity levels, and may reasonably be expected to continue at reduced gravity levels.

  9. Boiling heat transfer in reduced gravity during quenching of a hot surface with R-113

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, J.J.; Adham-Khodaparast, K.; Kawaji, M.

    1995-12-31

    An experimental study of the flow boiling heat transfer characteristics under microgravity conditions is presented. The experiments were conducted using R-113 by rewetting a heated bottom plate of a rectangular channel, 40 mm wide, 5 mm high and 200 mm long, aboard the KC-135 parabolic aircraft. The local surface heat flux and temperature were measured by a 2-{micro}m thick micro sensor directly fabricated on the surface of the heated plate. The film boiling heat transfer coefficients in microgravity were 70% to 80% of the values in normal gravity, and the results in both gravity conditions showed reasonable agreement with the predictions of Bromley (1953) correlation. Under microgravity, the flow rate had less effect but subcooling had a significant effect on nucleate boiling heat transfer. The effect of microgravity is similar to that due to the absence of subcooling in normal gravity, because both result in a thicker and more stable vapor layer. Also, the nucleate boiling regime covered a wider range of wall superheat below the maximum heat flux in the absence of gravity or subcooling than in the case of high subcooling and normal gravity.

  10. What flow conditions are conducive to banner cloud formation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth, Volkmar; Prestel, Isabelle

    2016-04-01

    Banner clouds are clouds that are attached to the leeward slope of a steep mountain. Their formation is essentially due to strong Lagrangian uplift of air in the lee of the mountain. However, little is known about the flow regime in which banner clouds can be expected to occur. The present study addresses this question through numerical simulations of flow past an idealized mountain. Systematic sets of simulations are carried out exploring the parameter space spanned by two dimensionless numbers, which represent the aspect ratio of the mountain and the stratification of the flow. The simulations include both two-dimensional flow past a two-dimensional mountain and three-dimensional flow past a three-dimensional mountain. Regarding boundary layer separation, both the two- and the three-dimensional simulations show the characteristic regime behavior which has previously been found in laboratory experiments for two-dimensional flow. Boundary layer separation is observed in two of the three regimes, namely in the "leeside separation regime", which occurs preferably for steep mountains in weakly stratified flow, and in the "post-wave separation regime", which requires increased stratification. The physical mechanism for the former is boundary layer friction, while the latter may also occur for inviscid flow. However, boundary layer separation is only a necessary, not sufficient condition for banner cloud formation. Diagnosing the vertical uplift and its leeward-windward asymmetry it turns out that banner clouds cannot form in the two-dimensional simulations. In addition, even in the three-dimensional simulations they can only be expected in a small part of the parameter space corresponding to steep mountains in weakly stratified flow.

  11. CONTINUOUS ANALYZER UTILIZING BOILING POINT DETERMINATION

    DOEpatents

    Pappas, W.S.

    1963-03-19

    A device is designed for continuously determining the boiling point of a mixture of liquids. The device comprises a distillation chamber for boiling a liquid; outlet conduit means for maintaining the liquid contents of said chamber at a constant level; a reflux condenser mounted above said distillation chamber; means for continuously introducing an incoming liquid sample into said reflux condenser and into intimate contact with vapors refluxing within said condenser; and means for measuring the temperature of the liquid flowing through said distillation chamber. (AEC)

  12. Experimental study of choking flow of water at supercritical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muftuoglu, Altan

    Future nuclear reactors will operate at a coolant pressure close to 25 MPa and at outlet temperatures ranging from 500°C to 625°C. As a result, the outlet flow enthalpy in future Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactors (SCWR) will be much higher than those of actual ones which can increase overall nuclear plant efficiencies up to 48%. However, under such flow conditions, the thermal-hydraulic behavior of supercritical water is not fully known, e.g., pressure drop, forced convection and heat transfer deterioration, critical and blowdown flow rate, etc. Up to now, only a very limited number of studies have been performed under supercritical conditions. Moreover, these studies are conducted at conditions that are not representative of future SCWRs. In addition, existing choked flow data have been collected from experiments at atmospheric discharge pressure conditions and in most cases by using working fluids different than water which constrain researchers to analyze the data correctly. In particular, the knowledge of critical (choked) discharge of supercritical fluids is mandatory to perform nuclear reactor safety analyses and to design key mechanical components (e.g., control and safety relief valves, etc.). Hence, an experimental supercritical water facility has been built at Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal which allows researchers to perform choking flow experiments under supercritical conditions. The facility can also be used to carry out heat transfer and pressure drop experiments under supercritical conditions. In this thesis, we present the results obtained at this facility using a test section that contains a 1 mm inside diameter, 3.17 mm long orifice plate with sharp edges. Thus, 545 choking flow of water data points are obtained under supercritical conditions for flow pressures ranging from 22.1 MPa to 32.1 MPa, flow temperatures ranging from 50°C to 502°C and for discharge pressures from 0.1 MPa to 3.6 MPa. Obtained data are compared with the data given in

  13. Radiolysis of boiling water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shuang; Katsumura, Yosuke; Yamashita, Shinichi; Matsuura, Chihiro; Hiroishi, Daisuke; Lertnaisat, Phantira; Taguchi, Mitsumasa

    2016-06-01

    γ-radiolysis of boiling water has been investigated. The G-value of H2 evolution was found to be very sensitive to the purity of water. In high-purity water, both H2 and O2 gases were formed in the stoichiometric ratio of 2:1; a negligible amount of H2O2 remained in the liquid phase. The G-values of H2 and O2 gas evolution depend on the dose rate: lower dose rates produce larger yields. To clarify the importance of the interface between liquid and gas phase for gas evolution, the gas evolution under Ar gas bubbling was measured. A large amount of H2 was detected, similar to the radiolysis of boiling water. The evolution of gas was enhanced in a 0.5 M NaCl aqueous solution. Deterministic chemical kinetics simulation elucidated the mechanism of radiolysis in boiling water.

  14. Liquid crystal thermography in boiling heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Klausner, J.F.; Mei, R.; Chen, W.C.

    1995-12-31

    The utilization of liquid crystal thermography to study heterogeneous boiling phenomena has gained popularity in recent years. In order not to disturb the nucleation process, which occurs in the microstructure of the heating surface, the crystals are applied to the backside of a thin heater. This work critically examines the ability of liquid crystal thermography to quantitatively capture the thermal field on the boiling surface. The thermal field identified experimentally through liquid crystal thermography is compared against that computed in the vicinity of a growing vapor bubble using a simulation which considers the simultaneous heat transfer between three phases: the solid heater, the liquid microlayer, and the growing vapor bubble. The temperature history beneath a growing vapor bubble elucidates the high frequency response required to capture the transient thermal fields commonly encountered in boiling experiments. Examination of the governing equations and numerical results reveal that due to the heater thermal inertia, the temperature variation on the bottom of the heater is significantly different than that on the boiling surface. In addition, the crystals themselves have a finite spatial resolution and frequency response which filter out much of the microscale phenomenon associated with boiling heat transfer. Analysis of existing pool and flow boiling liquid crystal thermographs indicate that the typical spacial resolution is on the order of 0.25 mm and the response time is on the order of 5 ms which are insufficient to resolve the fine spacial and temporal details of the heating surface thermal field. Thus the data obtained from liquid crystal thermography applied to boiling heat transfer must be cautiously interpreted.

  15. Fluid dynamics in airway bifurcations: III. Localized flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Martonen, T B; Guan, X; Schreck, R M

    2001-04-01

    Localized flow conditions (e.g., backflows) in transition regions between parent and daughter airways of bifurcations were investigated using a computational fluid dynamics software code (FIDAP) with a Cray T90 supercomputer. The configurations of the bifurcations were based on Schreck s (1972) laboratory models. The flow intensities and spatial regions of reversed motion were simulated for different conditions. The effects of inlet velocity profiles, Reynolds numbers, and dimensions and orientations of airways were addressed. The computational results showed that backflow was increased for parabolic inlet conditions, larger Reynolds numbers, and larger daughter-to-parent diameter ratios. This article is the third in a systematic series addressed in this issue; the first addressed primary velocity patterns and the second discussed secondary currents.

  16. Low-level flow conditions hazardous to aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, M. B.; Camp, D. W.

    1983-01-01

    Low level flow conditions known to be hazardous to aircraft during takeoff/climbout and approach/landing operations are turbulence, wind shear, and vertical motion. These conditions can and frequently do occur separately and in combinations. The identification and selection were completed of representative data cases to determine magnitude, frequency, duration, and simultaneity of occurrence of turbulence (gustiness and gust factor), wind shear (speed and direction), and vertical motion (updraft and downdraft), along with temperature inversions. New representations of temporal and spatial variations in the atmospheric boundary layer were developed. Efforts continued relative to low level flow conditions where published results imply strong vertical shear with virtually no horizontal shear and where order of magnitude analyses of the equations of motion for an aircraft illustrates that low values of horizontal shear (along the flight path) are much more hazardous than larger values of vertical wind shear (altitude).

  17. Dielectrophoretic particle-particle interaction under AC electrohydrodynamic flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Doh-Hyoung; Yu, Chengjie; Papazoglou, Elisabeth; Farouk, Bakhtier; Noh, Hongseok M

    2011-09-01

    We used the Maxwell stress tensor method to understand dielectrophoretic particle-particle interactions and applied the results to the interpretation of particle behaviors under alternating current (AC) electrohydrodynamic conditions such as AC electroosmosis (ACEO) and electrothermal flow (ETF). Distinct particle behaviors were observed under ACEO and ETF. Diverse particle-particle interactions observed in experiments such as particle clustering, particles keeping a certain distance from each other, chain and disc formation and their rotation, are explained based on the numerical simulation data. The improved understanding of particle behaviors in AC electrohydrodynamic flows presented here will enable researchers to design better particle manipulation strategies for lab-on-a-chip applications. PMID:21823132

  18. Eddy Current Minimizing Flow Plug for Use in Flow Conditioning and Flow Metering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, John Dwight (Inventor); Kelley, Anthony R. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An eddy-current-minimizing flow plug has an outer radial wall with open flow channels formed between the plug's inlet and outlet. The plug has a central region coupled to the inner surface of the outer radial wall. Each open flow channel includes (i) a first portion originating at the inlet and converging to a location in the plug where convergence is contributed to by changes in thickness of the outer radial wall and divergence of the central region, and (ii) a second portion originating in the plug and diverging to the outlet where divergence is contributed to by changes in thickness of the outer radial wall and convergence of the central region. For at least a portion of the open flow channels, a central axis passing through the first and second portions is non-parallel with respect to the given direction of the flow.

  19. Electrically Driven Liquid Film Boiling Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Didion, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    This presentation presents the science background and ground based results that form the basis of the Electrically Driven Liquid Film Boiling Experiment. This is an ISS experiment that is manifested for 2021. Objective: Characterize the effects of gravity on the interaction of electric and flow fields in the presence of phase change specifically pertaining to: a) The effects of microgravity on the electrically generated two-phase flow. b) The effects of microgravity on electrically driven liquid film boiling (includes extreme heat fluxes). Electro-wetting of the boiling section will repel the bubbles away from the heated surface in microgravity environment. Relevance/Impact: Provides phenomenological foundation for the development of electric field based two-phase thermal management systems leveraging EHD, permitting optimization of heat transfer surface area to volume ratios as well as achievement of high heat transfer coefficients thus resulting in system mass and volume savings. EHD replaces buoyancy or flow driven bubble removal from heated surface. Development Approach: Conduct preliminary experiments in low gravity and ground-based facilities to refine technique and obtain preliminary data for model development. ISS environment required to characterize electro-wetting effect on nucleate boiling and CHF in the absence of gravity. Will operate in the FIR - designed for autonomous operation.

  20. Estimation of overland flow metrics at semiarid condition: Patagonian Monte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, M. J.; Ares, J. O.

    2012-05-01

    Water infiltration and overland flow (WIOF) processes are relevant in considering water partition among plant life forms, the sustainability of vegetation and the design of sustainable hydrological management. WIOF processes in arid and semiarid regions present regional characteristic trends imposed by the prevailing physical conditions of the upper soil as evolved under water-limited climate. A set of plot-scale field experiments at the semi-arid Patagonian Monte (Argentina) was performed in order to estimate infiltration-overland descriptive flow parameters. The micro-relief of undisturbed field plots at z-scale <1 mm was characterized through close-range stereo-photogrammetry and geo-statistical modelling. The overland flow areas produced by experimental runoff events were video-recorded and the runoff speed was measured with ortho-image processing software. Antecedent and post-inflow moisture were measured, and texture, bulk density and physical properties of the soil at the upper vadose zone were estimated. Field data were used to calibrate a physically-based, time explicit model of water balance in the upper soil and overland flows with a modified Green-Ampt (infiltration) and Chezy's (overland flow) algorithms. Modelling results satisfy validation criteria based on the observed overland flow areas, runoff-speed, water mass balance of the upper vadose zone, infiltration depth, slope along runoff-plume direction, and depression storage intensity. The experimental procedure presented supplies plot-scale estimates of overland flow and infiltration intensities at various intensities of water input which can be incorporated in larger-scale hydrological grid-models of arid regions. Findings were: (1) Overland flow velocities as well as infiltration-overland flow mass balances are consistently modelled by considering variable infiltration rates corresponding to depression storage and/or non-ponded areas. (2) The statistical relations presented allow the estimation

  1. Fluid flow in nanopores: Accurate boundary conditions for carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokhan, Vladimir P.; Nicholson, David; Quirke, Nicholas

    2002-11-01

    Steady-state Poiseuille flow of a simple fluid in carbon nanopores under a gravitylike force is simulated using a realistic empirical many-body potential model for carbon. Building on our previous study of slit carbon nanopores we show that fluid flow in a nanotube is also characterized by a large slip length. By analyzing temporal profiles of the velocity components of particles colliding with the wall we obtain values of the Maxwell coefficient defining the fraction of molecules thermalized by the wall and, for the first time, propose slip boundary conditions for smooth continuum surfaces such that they are equivalent in adsorption, diffusion, and fluid flow properties to fully dynamic atomistic models.

  2. Susceptibility and predictability of conditions for preferential flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi; Feyen, Jan; Ritsema, Coen J.

    1998-09-01

    Preferential flow in the field might be caused by various factors and is difficult to observe in situ. This experimental study was designed to identify the combined effects of air entrapment, surface desaturation (suction head), soil layering, and water repellency (hydrophobicity) of the porous media on unstable preferential flow (or fingering) in the vadose zone. The predictability of unstable flow was studied on the basis of two existing criteria for gravity fingering: (1) a velocity criterion proposed by Hill and Parlange [1972] and (2) a pressure head criterion by Raats [1973] and Philip [1975]. Two-dimensional transparent chambers (60 cm high, 41.5 cm wide, and 2.8 cm thick and 90 cm deep, 74.5 cm wide, and 1.8 cm thick) were used to visualize water infiltration into a water-wettable sand, a water-wettable loam, differently layered sand and loam, and a water-repellent sand. The results suggested that infiltration into the homogeneous sand and a sand-over-loam system, without the effects of air entrapment and surface desaturation, was unconditionally stable. Infiltration into the loam was also stable as observed in the limited chambers. The flow was unconditionally unstable in a fine-over-coarse stratified sublayer and conditionally unstable in the homogeneous sand under the effects of air entrapment and surface desaturation. In multiple-layered systems, infiltration flow was semiunstable; fingers developed in the sand layer and were stabilized in the loam. In the repellent sand the wetting front was unstable under low ponding conditions; however, it was stabilized when the ponding depth exceeded the water-bubbling (entry) value of the hydrophobic medium. Both the velocity and pressure head criteria predicted fingering in the sand (layers) with the effects of gravity. However, the criteria failed to predict stable flow in the loam, indicating that the capillary (stabilizing) effects on the flow need to be included in theoretical developments. Finally, the

  3. Magnetogasdynamic Power Extraction and Flow Conditioning for a Gas Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovich, Igor V.; Rich, J. William; Schneider, Steven; Blankson, Isaiah

    2003-01-01

    An extension of the Russian AJAX concept to a turbojet is being explored. This magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) energy bypass engine cycle incorporating conventional gas turbine technology has MHD flow conditioning at the inlet to electromagnetically extract part of the inlet air kinetic energy. The electrical power generated can be used for various on-board vehicle requirements including plasma flow control around the vehicle or it may be used for augmenting the expanding flow in the high speed nozzle by MHD forces to generate more thrust. In order to achieve this interaction, the air needs to be ionized by an external means even up to fairly high flight speeds, and the leading candidates may be classified as electrical discharge devices. The present kinetic modeling calculations suggest that the use of electron beams with characteristics close to the commercially available e-beam systems (electron energy approx. 60 keV, beam current approx. 0.2 mA/sq cm) to sustain ionization in intermediate pressure, low-temperature (P = 0.1 atm, T = 300 K) supersonic air flows allows considerable reduction of the flow kinetic energy (up to 10 to 20 percent in M = 3 flows). The calculations also suggest that this can be achieved at a reasonable electron beam efficiency (eta approx. 5), even if the e-beam window losses are taken into account. At these conditions, the exit NO and O atom concentrations due to e-beam initiated chemical reactions do not exceed 30 ppm. Increasing the beam current up to approx. 2 mA/sq cm, which corresponds to a maximum electrical conductivity of sigma(sub max) approx. 0.8 mho/m at the loading parameter of K = 0.5, would result in a much greater reduction of the flow kinetic energy (up to 30 to 40 percent). The MHD channel efficiency at these conditions would be greatly reduced (to eta approx. 1) due to increased electron recombination losses in the channel. At these conditions, partial energy conversion from kinetic energy to heat would result in a

  4. Artificial Boundary Conditions for Computation of Oscillating External Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsynkov, S. V.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new technique for the numerical treatment of external flow problems with oscillatory behavior of the solution in time. Specifically, we consider the case of unbounded compressible viscous plane flow past a finite body (airfoil). Oscillations of the flow in time may be caused by the time-periodic injection of fluid into the boundary layer, which in accordance with experimental data, may essentially increase the performance of the airfoil. To conduct the actual computations, we have to somehow restrict the original unbounded domain, that is, to introduce an artificial (external) boundary and to further consider only a finite computational domain. Consequently, we will need to formulate some artificial boundary conditions (ABC's) at the introduced external boundary. The ABC's we are aiming to obtain must meet a fundamental requirement. One should be able to uniquely complement the solution calculated inside the finite computational domain to its infinite exterior so that the original problem is solved within the desired accuracy. Our construction of such ABC's for oscillating flows is based on an essential assumption: the Navier-Stokes equations can be linearized in the far field against the free-stream back- ground. To actually compute the ABC's, we represent the far-field solution as a Fourier series in time and then apply the Difference Potentials Method (DPM) of V. S. Ryaben'kii. This paper contains a general theoretical description of the algorithm for setting the DPM-based ABC's for time-periodic external flows. Based on our experience in implementing analogous ABC's for steady-state problems (a simpler case), we expect that these boundary conditions will become an effective tool for constructing robust numerical methods to calculate oscillatory flows.

  5. Microheater Array Boiling Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jungho; McQuillen, John; Balombin, Joe

    2002-01-01

    By conducting pool boiling tests in microgravity, the effect of buoyancy on the overall boiling process and the relative magnitude of other phenomena can be assessed. Data from KC-135 and sounding rocket experiments indicate little effect of gravity on boiling heat transfer at wall superheats below 25 C, despite vast differences in bubble behavior between gravity levels. In microgravity, a large primary bubble, surrounded by smaller satellite bubbles, moved over the surface, occasionally causing nucleation. Once formed, the primary bubble size remained constant for a given superheat, indicating evaporation at the bubble base is balanced with condensation on the bubble cap. The primary bubble's size increased with wall superheat. Most heaters under the primary bubble had low heat transfer rates, suggesting liquid dryout. Strong Marangoni convection developed in microgravity, forming a 'jet' into the bulk liquid that forced the bubble onto the heater. An experiment is being designed for the. Microgravity Science Glovebox. This experiment uses two 96 element microheater arrays, 2.7 and 7.0 mm in size. These heaters are individually controlled to operate at a constant temperature, measuring local heat fluxes as a function of time and space. Most boiling experiments operate at constant wall heat flux with larger heaters, allowing only time and space-averaged measurements. Each heater is about the bubble departure size in normal gravity, but significantly smaller than the bubble departure size in reduced gravity.

  6. Simulations of a Liquid Hydrogen Inducer at Low-Flow Off-Design Flow Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosangadi, A.; Ahuja, V.; Ungewitter, R. J.

    2005-01-01

    The ability to accurately model details of inlet back flow for inducers operating a t low-flow, off-design conditions is evaluated. A sub-scale version of a three-bladed liquid hydrogen inducer tested in water with detailed velocity and pressure measurements is used as a numerical test bed. Under low-flow, off-design conditions the length of the separation zone as well as the swirl velocity magnitude was under predicted with a standard k-E model. When the turbulent viscosity coefficient was reduced good comparison was obtained a t all the flow conditions examined with both the magnitude and shape of the profile matching well with the experimental data taken half a diameter upstream of the leading edge. The velocity profiles and incidence angles a t the leading edge itself were less sensitive to the back flow length predictions indicating that single-phase performance predictions may be well predicted even if the details of flow separation modeled are incorrect. However, for cavitating flow situations the prediction of the correct swirl in the back flow and the pressure depression in the core becomes critical since it leads to vapor formation. The simulations have been performed using the CRUNCH CFD(Registered Trademark) code that has a generalized multi-element unstructured framework and a n advanced multi-phase formulation for cryogenic fluids. The framework has been validated rigorously for predictions of temperature and pressure depression in cryogenic fluid cavities and has also been shown to predict the cavitation breakdown point for inducers a t design conditions.

  7. A Conductivity Relationship for Steady-state Unsaturated Flow Processes under Optimal Flow Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H. H.

    2010-09-15

    Optimality principles have been used for investigating physical processes in different areas. This work attempts to apply an optimal principle (that water flow resistance is minimized on global scale) to steady-state unsaturated flow processes. Based on the calculus of variations, we show that under optimal conditions, hydraulic conductivity for steady-state unsaturated flow is proportional to a power function of the magnitude of water flux. This relationship is consistent with an intuitive expectation that for an optimal water flow system, locations where relatively large water fluxes occur should correspond to relatively small resistance (or large conductance). Similar results were also obtained for hydraulic structures in river basins and tree leaves, as reported in other studies. Consistence of this theoretical result with observed fingering-flow behavior in unsaturated soils and an existing model is also demonstrated.

  8. Conditions for one-dimensional supersonic flow of quantum gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovanazzi, S.; Farrell, C.; Kiss, T.; Leonhardt, U.

    2004-12-01

    One can use transsonic Bose-Einstein condensates of alkali atoms to establish the laboratory analog of the event horizon and to measure the acoustic version of Hawking radiation. We determine the conditions for supersonic flow and the Hawking temperature for realistic condensates on waveguides where an external potential plays the role of a supersonic nozzle. The transition to supersonic speed occurs at the potential maximum and the Hawking temperature is entirely determined by the curvature of the potential.

  9. Latent Heat storage characteristics of solid-liquid phase change Heat Storage Microcapsule Slurry by Boiling Heat Transfer under a Vacuum Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaba, Hideo; Horibe, Akihiko; Haruki, Naoto; Katayama, Masatoshi; Manabe, Ken

    Recently, the new heat transfer medium, which fulfills both functions of heat storage and heat transportation, has been developed in ah eat storage field. Solid-liquid latent heat microcapsule slurry would correspond to the topical medium, so-called functionally thermal fluid. The preset study has clarified the latent heat storage characteristics of microcapsule slurry by making heat transfer enlargement with the help of slurry water pool boiling phenomenon. The paraffin wax at a melting point of 62°C was used as a phase change material which was packed into the microcapsule. The heating surface temperature and concentration of paraffin in the microcapsule slurry was selected as experimental parameters. As a result, the non-dimensional correlation equations of heat storage completion time and heat transfer were derived in terms of non-dimensional parameters.

  10. Dynamics of AHL mediated quorum sensing under flow and non-flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Andrea; Megerle, Judith A.; Kuttler, Christina; Müller, Johannes; Aguilar, Claudio; Eberl, Leo; Hense, Burkhard A.; Rädler, Joachim O.

    2012-04-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) describes the capability of microbes to communicate with each other by the aid of small molecules. Here we investigate the dynamics of QS-regulated gene expression induced by acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) in Pseudomonas putida IsoF containing a green fluorescent protein-based AHL reporter. The fluorescence time course of individual colonies is monitored following the external addition of a defined AHL concentration to cells which had previously reached the QS-inactive state in AHL-free medium. Using a microfluidic setup the experiment is performed both under flow and non-flow conditions. We find that without supplying external AHL gene expression is induced without flow while flow suppresses the induction. Both without and with flow, at a low AHL concentration the fluorescence onset is significantly delayed while fluorescence starts to increase directly upon the addition of AHL at a high concentration. The differences between no flow and flow can be accounted for using a two-compartment model. This indicates AHL accumulation in a volume which is not affected by the flow. The experiments furthermore show significant cell-to-cell and colony-to-colony variability which is discussed in the context of a compartmentalized QS mechanism.

  11. Boiling Experiment Facility for Heat Transfer Studies in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delombard, Richard; McQuillen, John; Chao, David

    2008-01-01

    Pool boiling in microgravity is an area of both scientific and practical interest. By conducting tests in microgravity, it is possible to assess the effect of buoyancy on the overall boiling process and assess the relative magnitude of effects with regards to other "forces" and phenomena such as Marangoni forces, liquid momentum forces, and microlayer evaporation. The Boiling eXperiment Facility is now being built for the Microgravity Science Glovebox that will use normal perfluorohexane as a test fluid to extend the range of test conditions to include longer test durations and less liquid subcooling. Two experiments, the Microheater Array Boiling Experiment and the Nucleate Pool Boiling eXperiment will use the Boiling eXperiment Facility. The objectives of these studies are to determine the differences in local boiling heat transfer mechanisms in microgravity and normal gravity from nucleate boiling, through critical heat flux and into the transition boiling regime and to examine the bubble nucleation, growth, departure and coalescence processes. Custom-designed heaters will be utilized to achieve these objectives.

  12. RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT IN FRACTURED TUFF UNDER EPISODIC FLOW CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    O. Hu; Y. Sun; R.P. Ewing

    2005-09-19

    The current conceptual model of radionuclide transport in unsaturated fractured rock includes water movement in fractures, with migration of the entrained radionuclides being retarded by diffusion into and sorption within the rock matrix. Water infiltration and radionuclide transport through low-permeability unsaturated fractured rock are episodic and intermittent in nature, at least at local scales. Under episodic flow conditions, the matrix is constantly imbibing or draining, and this fluctuating wetness both drives two-way advective movement of radionuclides, and forces changes in the matrix diffusivity. This work is intended to examine, both experimentally and numerically, how radionuclide transport under episodic flow conditions is affected by the interacting processes of imbibition and drainage, diffusion, and matrix sorption. Using Topopah Spring welded volcanic tuff, collected from the potential repository geologic unit at Yucca Mountain for storing high-level nuclear waste, we prepared a saw-cut fracture core (length 10.2 cm, diameter 4.4 cm, and fracture aperture 100 {micro}m). The dry core was packed into a flow reactor, flushed with CO{sub 2}, then saturated via slow pumping (0.01 mL/min) of synthetic groundwater. The fractured core was then flushed with air at >97% relative humidity (to simulate in situ unsaturated fractured rock conditions at Yucca Mountain), then the episodic transport experiment was conducted. Episodic flow involved 4 cycles of tracer solution flow within the fracture, followed by flushing with high humidity air. Each flow episode contained a different suite of non-sorbing and sorbing tracers, which included {sup 3}H, ReO{sub 4}{sup -} (a chemical analog for {sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup -}), I{sup -} (for {sup 129}I{sup -}), Sr and Cs (for {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs), plus the radionuclides {sup 235}U, {sup 237}Np, and {sup 241}Pu. These radionuclides span a variety of sorption strengths and represent a large fraction of the radionuclides

  13. Does quantifying antecedent flow conditions improve stream phosphorus export estimation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Stuart; Kiely, Gerard; Morgan, Gerard; O'Halloran, John

    2009-11-01

    SummaryA reliable and economical method for the estimation of nutrient export (e.g. phosphorus) in stream flow from catchments is necessary to quantify the impact of land use or land use change upon aquatic systems. The transport of phosphorus (P) from soil to water is known to impact negatively on water quality. A key observation from studies is that most P export occurs during high stream flow. However, it is not yet clear how flood-antecedent conditions affect the P export during flood events. In this study, the P loss from soil to water as represented by soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) in stream waters from three different catchments, varying in land use, scale and location in Ireland was monitored over 1 year. This study examined the role of antecedent stream flow conditions on SRP export and identifies a catchment-specific relationship between SRP flood event load (EL) and a flow ratio (FR). The FR is defined as the ratio of the flood event volume (EV) to the pre-event volume (PEV). The latter is the cumulative flow volume for a number of days preceding the event. This PEV period was found to be longer (average 81 days) in the grassland catchments which were known to be saturated with soil P than in the forested catchments (average 21 days) with minimal soil P. This FR ratio is a measure of the antecedent hydrological state (wet or dry) of the catchment. For SRP for each catchment, a specific relationship between SRP EL and FR was identified. The annual SRP export was estimated, using this ratio and compared with the concentration/discharge ( C/ Q) method. The new flow ratio method was used with data from 12 flood events during the year to estimate an annual export of SRP. For the two grassland catchments in the study, using the FR method, we estimated an SRP export of 1.77 and 0.41 kg ha -1 yr -1. Using the C/ Q method, for the same sites, our estimate of SRP export was 1.70 and 0.50 kg ha -1 yr -1 respectively. The C/ Q method used SRP concentrations

  14. Optimal boiling temperature for ORC installation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikielewicz, Jarosław; Mikielewicz, Dariusz

    2012-09-01

    In the paper a research on cost-effective optimum design boiling temperature for Organic Rankine Cycle utilizing low-temperature heat sources is presented. The ratio of the heat exchanger area of the boiler to the power output is used as the objective function. Analytical relations for heat transfer area as well power of the cycle are formulated. Evaporation temperature and inlet temperature of the heat source medium as well its mass flow rate are varied in the optimization method. The optimization is carried out for three working fluids, i.e. R 134a, water and ethanol. The objective function (economics profitability, thermodynamic efficiency) leads to different optimal working conditions in terms of evaporating temperature. Maximum power generation in the near-critical conditions of subcritical ORC is the highest. The choice of the working fluid can greatly affect the objective function which is a measure of power plant cost. Ethanol exhibits a minimum objective function but not necessarily the maximum cycle efficiency.

  15. Investigation of the mixed flow turbine performance under inlet pulsating flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamel, Mohammed; Abidat, Miloud; Litim, Sid Ali

    2012-03-01

    Turbochargers are widely used in Diesel engines as a means of increasing the output power. Most of them are fitted with radial or mixed flow turbines. In applications where high boost pressure is required, radial turbines are replaced by mixed flow turbines which can achieve a maximum efficiency at a lower value of blade speed to isentropic expansion velocity ratio than the usual 0.7 (for radial turbines). This study, performed with the ANSYS-CFX software, presents a numerical performance prediction of a mixed flow turbine under inlet pulsating flow conditions. In addition, the influence of the pulse frequency is studied and the numerical results are compared with those of a one-dimensional model and experimental data.

  16. Unsteady Squeezing Flow of Carbon Nanotubes with Convective Boundary Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Tasawar; Muhammad, Khursheed; Farooq, Muhammad; Alsaedi, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Unsteady flow of nanofluids squeezed between two parallel plates is discussed in the presence of viscous dissipation. Heat transfer phenomenon is disclosed via convective boundary conditions. Carbon nanotubes (single-wall and multi-wall) are used as nanoparticles which are homogeneously distributed in the base fluid (water). A system of non-linear differential equations for the flow is obtained by utilizing similarity transformations through the conservation laws. Influence of various emerging parameters on the velocity and temperature profiles are sketched graphically and discussed comprehensively. Analyses of skin fraction coefficient and Nusselt number are also elaborated numerically. It is found out that velocity is smaller for squeezing parameter in the case of multi-wall carbon nanotubes when compared with single-wall carbon nanotubes. PMID:27149208

  17. Unsteady Squeezing Flow of Carbon Nanotubes with Convective Boundary Conditions.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Tasawar; Muhammad, Khursheed; Farooq, Muhammad; Alsaedi, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Unsteady flow of nanofluids squeezed between two parallel plates is discussed in the presence of viscous dissipation. Heat transfer phenomenon is disclosed via convective boundary conditions. Carbon nanotubes (single-wall and multi-wall) are used as nanoparticles which are homogeneously distributed in the base fluid (water). A system of non-linear differential equations for the flow is obtained by utilizing similarity transformations through the conservation laws. Influence of various emerging parameters on the velocity and temperature profiles are sketched graphically and discussed comprehensively. Analyses of skin fraction coefficient and Nusselt number are also elaborated numerically. It is found out that velocity is smaller for squeezing parameter in the case of multi-wall carbon nanotubes when compared with single-wall carbon nanotubes. PMID:27149208

  18. Lookup Tables for Predicting CHF and Film-Boiling Heat Transfer: Past, Present, and Future

    SciTech Connect

    Groeneveld, D.C.; Leung, L.K. H.; Guo, Y.; Vasic, A.; El Nakla, M.; Peng, S.W.; Yang, J.; Cheng, S.C.

    2005-10-15

    Lookup tables (LUTs) have been used widely for the prediction of critical heat flux (CHF) and film-boiling heat transfer for water-cooled tubes. LUTs are basically normalized data banks. They eliminate the need to choose between the many different CHF and film-boiling heat transfer prediction methods available.The LUTs have many advantages; e.g., (a) they are simple to use, (b) there is no iteration required, (c) they have a wide range of applications, (d) they may be applied to nonaqueous fluids using fluid-to-fluid modeling relationships, and (e) they are based on a very large database. Concerns associated with the use of LUTs include (a) there are fluctuations in the value of the CHF or film-boiling heat transfer coefficient (HTC) with pressure, mass flux, and quality, (b) there are large variations in the CHF or the film-boiling HTC between the adjacent table entries, and (c) there is a lack or scarcity of data at certain flow conditions.Work on the LUTs is continuing. This will resolve the aforementioned concerns and improve the LUT prediction capability. This work concentrates on better smoothing of the LUT entries, increasing the database, and improving models at conditions where data are sparse or absent.

  19. Film boiling heat transfer from a sphere in natural and forced convection of freon-113

    SciTech Connect

    Dix, D.; Orozco, J. )

    1990-01-01

    Boiling heat transfer fluxes were measured on a 3.84-cm hollow copper sphere, in both forced convection and pool boiling, as a function of angular position in Freon 113. This paper reports on forced-convection tests run at speeds of 0.5 to 1.9 m/s. These tests were conducted in the stable film boiling region of the boiling curve. Significant heat transfer rates were measured in the vapor wake region of the sphere for flow film boiling. Video observations of the boiling process revealed that the flow film boiling vapor removal mechanism consisted of periodic formation and detachment of a vapor wake in the rear of the sphere. For pool boiling it was found that the heated surface had a uniform rate of energy dissipation in the stable film boiling regime, whereas in forced convection the film boiling rate was dependent on angular position. Pool film boiling tests also showed multiple humps (more than one maximum heat flux) in the boiling curve when the liquid was subcooled.

  20. Geysering in boiling channels

    SciTech Connect

    Aritomi, Masanori; Takemoto, Takatoshi; Chiang, Jing-Hsien

    1995-09-01

    A concept of natural circulation BWRs such as the SBWR has been proposed and seems to be promising in that the primary cooling system can be simplified. The authors have been investigating thermo-hydraulic instabilities which may appear during the start-up in natural circulation BWRs. In our previous works, geysering was investigated in parallel boiling channels for both natural and forced circulations, and its driving mechanism and the effect of system pressure on geysering occurrence were made clear. In this paper, geysering is investigated in a vertical column and a U-shaped vertical column heated in the lower parts. It is clarified from the results that the occurrence mechanism of geysering and the dependence of system pressure on geysering occurrence coincide between parallel boiling channels in circulation systems and vertical columns in non-circulation systems.

  1. Boundary conditions for soft glassy flows: slippage and surface fluidization.

    PubMed

    Mansard, Vincent; Bocquet, Lydéric; Colin, Annie

    2014-09-28

    We explore the question of surface boundary conditions for the flow of a dense emulsion. We make use of microlithographic tools to create surfaces with well controlled roughness patterns and measure using dynamic confocal microscopy both the slip velocity and the shear rate close to the wall, which we relate to the notion of surface fluidization. Both slippage and wall fluidization depend non-monotonously on the roughness. We interpret this behavior within a simple model in terms of the building of a stratified layer and the activation of plastic events by the surface roughness.

  2. Revisiting Johnson and Jackson boundary conditions for granular flows

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tingwen; Benyahia, Sofiane

    2012-07-01

    In this article, we revisit Johnson and Jackson boundary conditions for granular flows. The oblique collision between a particle and a flat wall is analyzed by adopting the classic rigid-body theory and a more realistic semianalytical model. Based on the kinetic granular theory, the input parameter for the partial-slip boundary conditions, specularity coefficient, which is not measurable in experiments, is then interpreted as a function of the particle-wall restitution coefficient, the frictional coefficient, and the normalized slip velocity at the wall. An analytical expression for the specularity coefficient is suggested for a flat, frictional surface with a low frictional coefficient. The procedure for determining the specularity coefficient for a more general problem is outlined, and a working approximation is provided.

  3. Platelet adhesion to polyurethane urea under pulsatile flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Navitsky, Michael A; Taylor, Joshua O; Smith, Alexander B; Slattery, Margaret J; Deutsch, Steven; Siedlecki, Christopher A; Manning, Keefe B

    2014-12-01

    Platelet adhesion to a polyurethane urea surface is a precursor to thrombus formation within blood-contacting cardiovascular devices, and platelets have been found to adhere strongly to polyurethane surfaces below a shear rate of approximately 500 s(-1). The aim of the current work is to determine the properties of platelet adhesion to the polyurethane urea surface as a function of time-varying shear exposure. A rotating disk system was used to study the influence of steady and pulsatile flow conditions (e.g., cardiac inflow and sawtooth waveforms) for platelet adhesion to the biomaterial surface. All experiments were conducted with the same root mean square angular rotation velocity (29.63 rad/s) and waveform period. The disk was rotated in platelet-rich bovine plasma for 2 h, with adhesion quantified by confocal microscopy measurements of immunofluorescently labeled bovine platelets. Platelet adhesion under pulsating flow was found to decay exponentially with increasing shear rate. Adhesion levels were found to depend upon peak platelet flux and shear rate, regardless of rotational waveform. In combination with flow measurements, these results may be useful for predicting regions susceptible to thrombus formation within ventricular assist devices.

  4. Method and apparatus for measuring coupled flow, transport, and reaction processes under liquid unsaturated flow conditions

    DOEpatents

    McGrail, Bernard P.; Martin, Paul F.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for measuring coupled flow, transport and reaction processes under liquid unsaturated flow conditions. The method and apparatus of the present invention permit distinguishing individual precipitation events and their effect on dissolution behavior isolated to the specific event. The present invention is especially useful for dynamically measuring hydraulic parameters when a chemical reaction occurs between a particulate material and either liquid or gas (e.g. air) or both, causing precipitation that changes the pore structure of the test material.

  5. Boiling local heat transfer enhancement in minichannels using nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Chehade, Ali Ahmad; Gualous, Hasna Louahlia; Le Masson, Stephane; Fardoun, Farouk; Besq, Anthony

    2013-03-18

    This paper reports an experimental study on nanofluid convective boiling heat transfer in parallel rectangular minichannels of 800 μm hydraulic diameter. Experiments are conducted with pure water and silver nanoparticles suspended in water base fluid. Two small volume fractions of silver nanoparticles suspended in water are tested: 0.000237% and 0.000475%. The experimental results show that the local heat transfer coefficient, local heat flux, and local wall temperature are affected by silver nanoparticle concentration in water base fluid. In addition, different correlations established for boiling flow heat transfer in minichannels or macrochannels are evaluated. It is found that the correlation of Kandlikar and Balasubramanian is the closest to the water boiling heat transfer results. The boiling local heat transfer enhancement by adding silver nanoparticles in base fluid is not uniform along the channel flow. Better performances and highest effect of nanoparticle concentration on the heat transfer are obtained at the minichannels entrance.

  6. Boiling local heat transfer enhancement in minichannels using nanofluids

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports an experimental study on nanofluid convective boiling heat transfer in parallel rectangular minichannels of 800 μm hydraulic diameter. Experiments are conducted with pure water and silver nanoparticles suspended in water base fluid. Two small volume fractions of silver nanoparticles suspended in water are tested: 0.000237% and 0.000475%. The experimental results show that the local heat transfer coefficient, local heat flux, and local wall temperature are affected by silver nanoparticle concentration in water base fluid. In addition, different correlations established for boiling flow heat transfer in minichannels or macrochannels are evaluated. It is found that the correlation of Kandlikar and Balasubramanian is the closest to the water boiling heat transfer results. The boiling local heat transfer enhancement by adding silver nanoparticles in base fluid is not uniform along the channel flow. Better performances and highest effect of nanoparticle concentration on the heat transfer are obtained at the minichannels entrance. PMID:23506445

  7. Nucleate boiling pressure drop in an annulus: Book 2

    SciTech Connect

    Block, J.A.; Crowley, C.; Dolan, F.X.; Sam, R.G.; Stoedefalke, B.H.

    1992-11-01

    The application of the work described in this report is the production reactors at the Savannah River Site, and the context is nuclear reactor safety. The Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenario considered involves a double-ended break of a primary coolant pipe in the reactor. During a LOCA, the flow through portions of the reactor may reverse direction or be greatly reduced, depending upon the location of the break. The reduced flow rate of coolant (D{sub 2}O) through the fuel assembly channels of the reactor -- downflow in this situation -- can lead to boiling and to the potential for flow instabilities which may cause some of the fuel assembly channels to overheat and melt. That situation is to be avoided. The experimental approach is to provide a test annulus which simulates geometry, materials, and flow conditions in a Mark-22 fuel assembly (Coolant Channel 3) to the extent possible. The annulus has a full-scale geometry, and in fat uses SRL dummy hardware for the inner annulus wall in the ribbed geometry. The materials aluminum. The annulus is uniformly heated in the axial direction, but the circumferential heat flux can be varied to provide ``power tilt`` or asymmetric heating of the inner and outer annulus walls. The test facility uses H{sub 2}O rather than D{sub 2}O, but it includes the effects of dissolved helium gas present in the reactor. The key analysis approaches are: To compare the minima in the measured demand curves with analytical criteria, in particular the Saha-Zuber (1974) model; and to compare the pressure and temperature as a function of length in the annulus with an integral model for flow boiling in a heated channel. Nineteen test series and a total of 178 tests were performed. Testing addressed the effects of: Heat flux; pressure; helium gas; power tilt; ribs; asymmetric heat flux.

  8. Nucleate boiling pressure drop in an annulus: Book 3

    SciTech Connect

    Block, J.A.; Crowley, C.; Dolan, F.X.; Sam, R.G.; Stoedefalke, B.H.

    1992-11-01

    The application of the work described in this report is the production reactors at the Savannah River Site, and the context is nuclear reactor safety. The Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenario considered involves a double-ended break of a primary coolant pipe in the reactor. During a LOCA, the flow through portions of the reactor may reverse direction or be greatly reduced, depending upon the location of the break. The reduced flow rate of coolant (D{sub 2}O) through the fuel assembly channels of the reactor -- downflow in this situation -- can lead to boiling and to the potential for flow instabilities which may cause some of the fuel assembly channels to overheat and melt. That situation is to be avoided. The experimental approach is to provide a test annulus which simulates geometry, materials, and flow conditions in a Mark-22 fuel assembly (Coolant Channel 3) to the extent possible. The annulus has a full-scale geometry, and in fat uses SRL dummy hardware for the inner annulus wall in the ribbed geometry. The materials aluminum. The annulus is uniformly heated in the axial direction, but the circumferential heat flux can be varied to provide ``power tilt`` or asymmetric heating of the inner and outer annulus walls. The test facility uses H{sub 2}O rather than D{sub 2}O, but it includes the effects of dissolved helium gas present in the reactor. The key analysis approaches are: To compare the minima in the measured demand curves with analytical criteria, in particular the Saha-Zuber (1974) model; and to compare the pressure and temperature as a function of length in the annulus with an integral model for flow boiling in a heated channel. This document consists of data plots and summary files of temperature measurements.

  9. Nucleate boiling pressure drop in an annulus: Book 4

    SciTech Connect

    Block, J.A.; Crowley, C.; Dolan, F.X.; Sam, R.G.; Stoedefalke, B.H.

    1992-11-01

    The application of the work described in this report is the production reactors at the Savannah River Site, and the context is nuclear reactor safety. The Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenario considered involves a double-ended break of a primary coolant pipe in the reactor. During a LOCA, the flow through portions of the reactor may reverse direction or be greatly reduced, depending upon the location of the break. The reduced flow rate of coolant (D{sub 2}O) through the fuel assembly channels of the reactor -- downflow in this situation -- can lead to boiling and to the potential for flow instabilities which may cause some of the fuel assembly channels to overheat and melt. That situation is to be avoided. The experimental approach is to provide a test annulus which simulates geometry, materials, and flow conditions in a Mark-22 fuel assembly (Coolant Channel 3) to the extent possible. The annulus has a full-scale geometry, and in fat uses SRL dummy hardware for the inner annulus wall in the ribbed geometry. The materials aluminum. The annulus is uniformly heated in the axial direction, but the circumferential heat flux can be varied to provide ``power tilt`` or asymmetric heating of the inner and outer annulus walls. The test facility uses H{sub 2}O rather than D{sub 2}O, but it includes the effects of dissolved helium gas present in the reactor. The key analysis approaches are: To compare the minima in the measured demand curves with analytical criteria, in particular the Saha-Zuber (1974) model; and to compare the pressure and temperature as a function of length in the annulus with an integral model for flow boiling in a heated channel. This document consists of data plots and summary files of temperature measurements.

  10. Nucleate boiling pressure drop in an annulus: Book 8

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    The application of the work described in this report is the production reactors at the Savannah River Site, and the context is nuclear reactor safety. The Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenario considered involves a double-ended break of a primary coolant pipe in the reactor. During a LOCA, the flow through portions of the reactor may reverse direction or be greatly reduced, depending upon the location of the break. The reduced flow rate of coolant (D{sub 2}O) through the fuel assembly channels of the reactor -- downflow in this situation -- can lead to boiling and to the potential for flow instabilities which may cause some of the fuel assembly channels to overheat and melt. That situation is to be avoided. The experimental approach is to provide a test annulus which simulates geometry, materials, and flow conditions in a Mark-22 fuel assembly (Coolant Channel 3) to the extent possible. The annulus has a full-scale geometry, and in fat uses SRL dummy hardware for the inner annulus wall in the ribbed geometry. The materials aluminum. The annulus is uniformly heated in the axial direction, but the circumferential heat flux can be varied to provide ``power tilt`` or asymmetric heating of the inner and outer annulus walls. The test facility uses H{sub 2}O rather than D{sub 2}O, but it includes the effects of dissolved helium gas present in the reactor. The key analysis approaches are: To compare the minima in the measured demand curves with analytical criteria, in particular the Saha-Zuber (1974) model; and to compare the pressure and temperature as a function of length in the annulus with an integral model for flow boiling in a heated channel. This document consists of tables of temperature measurements.

  11. Compressible turbulent channel flow with impedance boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalo, Carlo; Bodart, Julien; Lele, Sanjiva K.

    2015-03-01

    We have performed large-eddy simulations of isothermal-wall compressible turbulent channel flow with linear acoustic impedance boundary conditions (IBCs) for the wall-normal velocity component and no-slip conditions for the tangential velocity components. Three bulk Mach numbers, Mb = 0.05, 0.2, 0.5, with a fixed bulk Reynolds number, Reb = 6900, have been investigated. For each Mb, nine different combinations of IBC settings were tested, in addition to a reference case with impermeable walls, resulting in a total of 30 simulations. The adopted numerical coupling strategy allows for a spatially and temporally consistent imposition of physically realizable IBCs in a fully explicit compressible Navier-Stokes solver. The IBCs are formulated in the time domain according to Fung and Ju ["Time-domain impedance boundary conditions for computational acoustics and aeroacoustics," Int. J. Comput. Fluid Dyn. 18(6), 503-511 (2004)]. The impedance adopted is a three-parameter damped Helmholtz oscillator with resonant angular frequency, ωr, tuned to the characteristic time scale of the large energy-containing eddies. The tuning condition, which reads ωr = 2πMb (normalized with the speed of sound and channel half-width), reduces the IBCs' free parameters to two: the damping ratio, ζ, and the resistance, R, which have been varied independently with values, ζ = 0.5, 0.7, 0.9, and R = 0.01, 0.10, 1.00, for each Mb. The application of the tuned IBCs results in a drag increase up to 300% for Mb = 0.5 and R = 0.01. It is shown that for tuned IBCs, the resistance, R, acts as the inverse of the wall-permeability and that varying the damping ratio, ζ, has a secondary effect on the flow response. Typical buffer-layer turbulent structures are completely suppressed by the application of tuned IBCs. A new resonance buffer layer is established characterized by large spanwise-coherent Kelvin-Helmholtz rollers, with a well-defined streamwise wavelength λx, traveling downstream with

  12. On the Physics of Flow Separation Along a Low Pressure Turbine Blade Under Unsteady Flow Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schobeiri, Meinhard T.; Ozturk, Burak; Ashpis, David E.

    2005-01-01

    The present study, which is the first of a series of investigations dealing with specific issues of low pressure turbine (LPT) boundary layer aerodynamics, is aimed at providing detailed unsteady boundary flow information to understand the underlying physics of the inception, onset, and extent of the separation zone. A detailed experimental study on the behavior of the separation zone on the suction surface of a highly loaded LPT-blade under periodic unsteady wake flow is presented. Experimental investigations were performed at Texas A&M Turbomachinery Performance and Flow Research Laboratory using a large-scale unsteady turbine cascade research facility with an integrated wake generator and test section unit. To account for a high flow deflection of LPT-cascades at design and off-design operating points, the entire wake generator and test section unit including the traversing system is designed to allow a precise angle adjustment of the cascade relative to the incoming flow. This is done by a hydraulic platform, which simultaneously lifts and rotates the wake generator and test section unit. The unit is then attached to the tunnel exit nozzle with an angular accuracy of better than 0.05 , which is measured electronically. Utilizing a Reynolds number of 110,000 based on the blade suction surface length and the exit velocity, one steady and two different unsteady inlet flow conditions with the corresponding passing frequencies, wake velocities and turbulence intensities are investigated using hot-wire anemometry. In addition to the unsteady boundary layer measurements, blade surface pressure measurements were performed at Re=50,000, 75,000, 100,000, and 125,000 at one steady and two periodic unsteady inlet flow conditions. Detailed unsteady boundary layer measurement identifies the onset and extent of the separation zone as well as its behavior under unsteady wake flow. The results presented in ensemble-averaged and contour plot forms contribute to understanding the

  13. Convective Melting of Particles in Flow Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, C.; Schrimpsher, K.; Sidiqqui, A.; Jiang, J.; Hao, Y.; Tao, Y.-X.; Singh, Bhim (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Study of melting of dispersed or packed solid particles in a fluid under gravity and microgravity conditions provides benchmark information for many engineering applications such as material processing, environmental assessment and protection and space fire protection. During such processes, packed or dispersed solid particles are interacting with fluid flow at above-melting temperatures. By unmasking the buoyancy effects in coupled flow, phase change and heat transport phenomena, a better understanding of melting rate in non-thermal equilibrium, convective conditions can be studied. A series of flight experiments were conducted onboard the NASA KC-135 Microgravity Research Airplane. The Particle Melting in Plow (PMF) module was designed to allow flow through the initially packed ice particles at controlled temperature and velocity. To achieve this, a close-loop flow system was designed. Video images were taken to record the visualization of the melting process, from which a time variation of packed particle thickness distribution at different times can be obtained by the image analysis method. The fluid temperature distribution within the melting zone is measured by thermocouples. An infrared camera was mounted from the top of the test section to record the ice-water thermal images at a given location. The results from thermal images yield local temperature variation between melting solid and liquid and local Stephan number. Typical results for a number of cases are presented. The mathematical model, describing mass, energy, and momentum balance equations for the liquid and solid phases, is presented. It is found that melting rate is influenced mainly by the ratio of Reynolds number (based on the initial particle diameter) to the Froud number, and Stephan number. At the absence of gravity, Froud number approaches zero, Reynolds number and Stephan number become dominant factors governing the melting rate. The numerically determined results are compared with the

  14. How Does Water Boil?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahn, Dirk

    2004-11-01

    Insight into the boiling of water is obtained from molecular dynamics simulations. The process is initiated by the spontaneous formation of small vacuum cavities in liquid water. By themselves, these defects are very short lived. If, however, several cavities occur at close distances, they are likely to merge into larger vacuum holes. At the liquid-vapor interfaces, single or small groups of water molecules tend to leave the liquid surface. Once the system is propagated beyond the transition state, these evaporation events outnumber the competing reintegration into the hydrogen-bonded network.

  15. Simulation Study of the Flow Boundary Condition for Rough Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Gang; Robbins, Mark O.

    2001-03-01

    In order to solve a flow problem with the continuum Navier-Stokes equation, a boundary condition must be assumed. In most cases, a no-slip condition is used, i.e. the velocity of the fluid is set equal to that of a bounding solid at their interface. Deviations from this condition can be quantified by a slip length S that represents the additional width of fluid that would be needed to accomodate any velocity difference at the interface. Previous simulations with atomically flat surfaces show that S can be very large in certain limits. (P. A. Thompson and M. O. Robbins, Phys. Rev. A, 41), 6830(1990). ( J.-L. Barrat and L. Bocquet, Phys. Rev. Lett., 82), 4671(1999). A dramatic divergence with S as shear rate increases has also been seen.( P. A. Thompson and S. M. Troian, Nature, 389), 360(1997) We have extended these simulations to surfaces with random roughness, steps, and angled facets typical of twin boundaries. In all cases, S decreases rapidly as the roughness increases. When peak-to-peak roughness is only two atomic diameters, values of S have dropped from more than 20 diameters to only one or two. In addition, the non-linear regime where S diverges with shear rate is supressed by surface roughness. These results suggest that the experimental behavior of atomically flat surfaces such as mica may be very different than that of more typical rough surfaces.

  16. Compressible turbulent channel flow with impedance boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalo, Carlo; Bodart, Julien; Lele, Sanjiva

    2014-11-01

    We have performed large-eddy simulations of compressible turbulent channel flow at one bulk Reynolds number, Reb = 6900, for bulk Mach numbers Mb = 0.05, 0.2, 0.5, with linear acoustic impedance boundary conditions (IBCs). The IBCs are formulated in the time domain following Fung and Ju (2004) and coupled with a Navier-Stokes solver. The impedance model adopted is a three-parameter Helmholtz oscillator with resonant frequency tuned to the outer layer eddies. The IBC's resistance, R, has been varied in the range, R = 0.01, 0.10, 1.00. Tuned IBCs result in a noticeable drag increase for sufficiently high Mb and/or low R, exceeding 300% for Mb = 0.5 and R = 0.01, and thus represents a promising passive control technique for delaying boundary layer separation and/or enhancing wall heat transfer. Alterations to the turbulent flow structure are confined to the first 15% of the boundary layer thickness where the classical buffer-layer coherent vortical structures are replaced by an array of Kelvin-Helmholtz-like rollers. The non-zero asymptotic value of the Reynolds shear stress gradient at the wall results in the disappearance of the viscous sublayer and very early departure of the mean velocity profiles from the law of the wall.

  17. Fluid flow in nanopores: An examination of hydrodynamic boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokhan, V. P.; Nicholson, D.; Quirke, N.

    2001-08-01

    Steady-state Poiseuille flow of a simple fluid in carbon slit pores under a gravity-like force is simulated using a realistic empirical many-body potential model for carbon. In this work we focus on the small Knudsen number regime, where the macroscopic equations are applicable, and simulate different wetting conditions by varying the strength of fluid-wall interactions. We show that fluid flow in a carbon pore is characterized by a large slip length even in the strongly wetting case, contrary to the predictions of Tolstoi's theory. When the surface density of wall atoms is reduced to values typical of a van der Waals solid, the streaming velocity profile vanishes at the wall, in accordance with earlier findings. From the velocity profiles we have calculated the slip length and by analyzing temporal profiles of the velocity components of particles colliding with the wall we obtained values of the Maxwell coefficient defining the fraction of molecules thermalized by the wall.

  18. Outflow boundary conditions for blood flow in arterial trees.

    PubMed

    Du, Tao; Hu, Dan; Cai, David

    2015-01-01

    In the modeling of the pulse wave in the systemic arterial tree, it is necessary to truncate small arterial crowns representing the networks of small arteries and arterioles. Appropriate boundary conditions at the truncation points are required to represent wave reflection effects of the truncated arterial crowns. In this work, we provide a systematic method to extract parameters of the three-element Windkessel model from the impedance of a truncated arterial tree or from experimental measurements of the blood pressure and flow rate at the inlet of the truncated arterial crown. In addition, we propose an improved three-element Windkessel model with a complex capacitance to accurately capture the fundamental-frequency time lag of the reflection wave with respect to the incident wave. Through our numerical simulations of blood flow in a single artery and in a large arterial tree, together with the analysis of the modeling error of the pulse wave in large arteries, we show that both a small truncation radius and the complex capacitance in the improved Windkessel model play an important role in reducing the modeling error, defined as the difference in dynamics induced by the structured tree model and the Windkessel models. PMID:26000782

  19. HAWT dynamic stall response asymmetries under yawed flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreck, S.; Robinson, M.; Hand, M.; Simms, D.

    2000-10-01

    Horizontal axis wind turbines can experience significant time-varying aerodynamic loads, potentially causing adverse effects on structures, mechanical components and power production. As designers attempt lighter and more flexible wind energy machines, greater accuracy and robustness will become even more critical in future aerodynamics models. Aerodynamics modelling advances, in turn, will rely on more thorough comprehension of the three-dimensional, unsteady, vortical flows that dominate wind turbine blade aerodynamics under high-load conditions. To experimentally characterize these flows, turbine blade surface pressures were acquired at multiple span locations via the NREL Phase IV Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment. Surface pressures and associated normal force histories were used to characterize dynamic stall vortex kinematics and normal force amplification. Dynamic stall vortices and normal force amplification were confirmed to occur in response to angle-of-attack excursions above the static stall threshold. Stall vortices occupied approximately one-half of the blade span and persisted for nearly one-fourth of the blade rotation cycle. Stall vortex convection varied along the blade, resulting in dramatic deformation of the vortex. Presence and deformation of the dynamic stall vortex produced corresponding amplification of normal forces. Analyses revealed consistent alterations to vortex kinematics in response to changes in reduced frequency, span location and yaw error. Finally, vortex structures and kinematics not previously documented for wind turbine blades were isolated. Published in 2000 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Outflow Boundary Conditions for Blood Flow in Arterial Trees

    PubMed Central

    Du, Tao; Hu, Dan; Cai, David

    2015-01-01

    In the modeling of the pulse wave in the systemic arterial tree, it is necessary to truncate small arterial crowns representing the networks of small arteries and arterioles. Appropriate boundary conditions at the truncation points are required to represent wave reflection effects of the truncated arterial crowns. In this work, we provide a systematic method to extract parameters of the three-element Windkessel model from the impedance of a truncated arterial tree or from experimental measurements of the blood pressure and flow rate at the inlet of the truncated arterial crown. In addition, we propose an improved three-element Windkessel model with a complex capacitance to accurately capture the fundamental-frequency time lag of the reflection wave with respect to the incident wave. Through our numerical simulations of blood flow in a single artery and in a large arterial tree, together with the analysis of the modeling error of the pulse wave in large arteries, we show that both a small truncation radius and the complex capacitance in the improved Windkessel model play an important role in reducing the modeling error, defined as the difference in dynamics induced by the structured tree model and the Windkessel models. PMID:26000782

  1. Magnetic targeting of microbubbles against physiologically relevant flow conditions

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Joshua; Rademeyer, Paul; Chung, Daniel; Cheng, Qian; Holroyd, David; Coussios, Constantin; Friend, Peter; Pankhurst, Quentin A.; Stride, Eleanor

    2015-01-01

    The localization of microbubbles to a treatment site has been shown to be essential to their effectiveness in therapeutic applications such as targeted drug delivery and gene therapy. A variety of different strategies for achieving localization has been investigated, including biochemical targeting, acoustic radiation force, and the incorporation of superparamagnetic nanoparticles into microbubbles to enable their manipulation using an externally applied magnetic field. The third of these strategies has the advantage of concentrating microbubbles in a target region without exposing them to ultrasound, and can be used in conjunction with biochemical targeting to achieve greater specificity. Magnetic microbubbles have been shown to be effective for therapeutic delivery in vitro and in vivo. Whether this technique can be successfully applied in humans however remains an open question. The aim of this study was to determine the range of flow conditions under which targeting could be achieved. In vitro results indicate that magnetic microbubbles can be retained using clinically acceptable magnetic fields, for both the high shear rates (approx. 104 s−1) found in human arterioles and capillaries, and the high flow rates (approx. 3.5 ml s−1) of human arteries. The potential for human in vivo microbubble retention was further demonstrated using a perfused porcine liver model. PMID:26442137

  2. Unsteady Validation of a Mean Flow Boundary Condition for Computational Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hixon, R.; Zhen, F.; Nallasamy, M.; Sawyer, S> ; Dyson, R.

    2004-01-01

    In this work, a previously developed mean flow boundary condition will be validated for unsteady flows. The test cases will be several reference benchmark flows consisting of vortical gusts convecting in a uniform mean flow, as well as the more realistic case of a vortical gust impinging on a loaded 2D cascade. The results will verify that the mean flow boundary condition both imposes the desired mean flow as well as having little or no effect on the instantaneous unsteady solution.

  3. Variational necessary and sufficient stability conditions for inviscid shear flow

    PubMed Central

    Hirota, M.; Morrison, P. J.; Hattori, Y.

    2014-01-01

    A necessary and sufficient condition for linear stability of inviscid parallel shear flow is formulated by developing a novel variational principle, where the velocity profile is assumed to be monotonic and analytic. It is shown that unstable eigenvalues of Rayleigh's equation (which is a non-self-adjoint eigenvalue problem) can be associated with positive eigenvalues of a certain self-adjoint operator. The stability is therefore determined by maximizing a quadratic form, which is theoretically and numerically more tractable than directly solving Rayleigh's equation. This variational stability criterion is based on the understanding of Kreĭn signature for continuous spectra and is applicable to other stability problems of infinite-dimensional Hamiltonian systems. PMID:25484600

  4. Attenuation of aqueous benzene in soils under saturated flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Kim, S-B; Kim, D-J; Yun, S-T

    2006-01-01

    The fate of aqueous benzene in subsurface was investigated in this study, focusing on the role of sorption and biodegradation on the benzene attenuation under dynamic flow conditions. Two sets of column tests were conducted in Plexiglass flow cells packed uniformly with sandy aquifer materials. The first set of the experiment was conducted with a step-type injection of benzene with different powder activated carbon (PAC) contents: (1) PAC = 0 %; (2) PAC = 0.5 %; (3) PAC = 2.0%. The second set was performed as a pulse-type with different test conditions: (4) benzene; (5) benzene and bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa); (6) benzene and bacteria (P. aeruginosa) with hydrogen peroxide. In addition, numerical experiments were performed to examine the role of sorption processes on the benzene attenuation. In the step mode experiments, the KCl breakthrough curves (BTCs) reached the input concentration while the benzene BTCs were considerably lower than those of KCl with slight retardation for all cases, indicating that both reversible/retardation and irreversible sorption occurred. The pulse type tests showed that attenuation of benzene increased in the presence of bacteria due to biodegradation. The benzene attenuation by microbial degradation increased furthermore in the presence of hydrogen peroxide owing to sufficient supply of dissolved oxygen in soil column. Numerical experiments demonstrated that retardation could not contribute to the attenuation of benzene in soils but could only extend its breakthrough time. Experimental results indicated that aqueous benzene could be attenuated by irreversible sorption and biodegradation during transport through the subsurface. Additionally, the attenuation of aqueous benzene is closely related to organic carbon content and oxygen level existing in contaminated aquifers.

  5. Experimental Investigation of Pool Boiling Heat Transfer Enhancement in Microgravity in the Presence of Electric Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Cila

    1996-01-01

    Boiling is an effective mode of heat transfer since high heat flux levels are possible driven by relatively small temperature differences. The high heat transfer coefficients associated with boiling have made the use of these processes increasingly attractive to aerospace engineering. Applications of this type include compact evaporators in the thermal control of aircraft avionics and spacecraft environments, heat pipes, and use of boiling to cool electronic equipment. In spite of its efficiency, cooling based on liquid-vapor phase change processes has not yet found wide application in aerospace engineering due to specific problems associated with the low gravity environment. After a heated surface has reached the superheat required for the initiation of nucleate boiling, bubbles will start forming at nucleation sites along the solid interface by evaporation of the liquid. Bubbles in contact with the wall will continue growing by this mechanism until they detach. In terrestrial conditions, bubble detachment is determined by the competition between body forces (e.g. buoyancy) and surface tension forces that act to anchor the bubble along the three phase contact line. For a given body force potential and a balance of tensions along the three phase contact line, bubbles must reach a critical size before the body force can cause them to detach from the wall. In a low gravity environment the critical bubble size for detachment is much larger than under terrestrial conditions, since buoyancy is a less effective means of bubble removal. Active techniques of heat transfer enhancement in single phase and phase change processes by utilizing electric fields have been the subject of intensive research during recent years. The field of electrohydrodynamics (EHD) deals with the interactions between electric fields, flow fields and temperature fields. Previous studies indicate that in terrestrial applications nucleate boiling heat transfer can be increased by a factor of 50 as

  6. Models and Stability Analysis of Boiling Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    John Dorning

    2002-04-15

    We have studied the nuclear-coupled thermal-hydraulic stability of boiling water reactors (BWRs) using a model that includes: space-time modal neutron kinetics based on spatial w-modes; single- and two-phase flow in parallel boiling channels; fuel rod heat conduction dynamics; and a simple model of the recirculation loop. The BR model is represented by a set of time-dependent nonlinear ordinary differential equations, and is studied as a dynamical system using the modern bifurcation theory and nonlinear dynamical systems analysis. We first determine the stability boundary (SB) - or Hopf bifurcation set- in the most relevant parameter plane, the inlet-subcooling-number/external-pressure-drop plane, for a fixed control rod induced external reactivity equal to the 100% rod line value; then we transform the SB to the practical power-flow map used by BWR operating engineers and regulatory agencies. Using this SB, we show that the normal operating point at 100% power is very stable, that stability of points on the 100% rod line decreases as the flow rate is reduced, and that operating points in the low-flow/high-power region are least stable. We also determine the SB that results when the modal kinetics is replaced by simple point reactor kinetics, and we thereby show that the first harmonic mode does not have a significant effect on the SB. However, we later show that it nevertheless has a significant effect on stability because it affects the basin of attraction of stable operating points. Using numerical simulations we show that, in the important low-flow/high-power region, the Hopf bifurcation that occurs as the SB is crossed is subcritical; hence, growing oscillations can result following small finite perturbations of stable steady-states on the 100% rod line at points in the low-flow/high-power region. Numerical simulations are also performed to calculate the decay ratios (DRs) and frequencies of oscillations for various points on the 100% rod line. It is

  7. Smolt Responses to Hydrodynamic Conditions in Forebay Flow Nets of Surface Flow Outlets, 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Gary E.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Hedgepeth, J. B.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Anderson, Michael G.; Deng, Zhiqun; Khan, Fenton; Mueller, Robert P.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Sather, Nichole K.; Serkowski, John A.; Steinbeck, John R.

    2009-04-01

    This study provides information on juvenile salmonid behaviors at McNary and The Dalles dams that can be used by the USACE, fisheries resource managers, and others to support decisions on long-term measures to enhance fish passage. We researched smolt movements and ambient hydrodynamic conditions using a new approach combining simultaneous acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) and acoustic imaging device (AID) measurements at surface flow outlets (SFO) at McNary and The Dalles dams on the Columbia River during spring and summer 2007. Because swimming effort vectors could be computed from the simultaneous fish and flow data, fish behavior could be categorized as passive, swimming against the flow (positively rheotactic), and swimming with the flow (negatively rheotactic). We present bivariate relationships to provide insight into fish responses to particular hydraulic variables that engineers might consider during SFO design. The data indicate potential for this empirical approach of simultaneous water/fish measurements to lead to SFO design guidelines in the future.

  8. Temporal Patterns in Bivalve Excurrent Flow Under Varying Ambient Flow Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delavan, S. K.; Webster, D. R.

    2008-11-01

    The predator-prey relationship between blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) and bivalve clams (Mercenaria mercenaria) is mediated by the transport of metabolites released by the prey (clams) and transported downstream as a passive scalar. This study focuses on how the prey behavior contributes to the information available within the odorant plume. Clams may modify factors such as excurrent flux, flow unsteadiness, and siphon height and diameter. A Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system has been used to quantify the temporal patterns in the excurrent jet of the bivalve siphon under varying ambient flow conditions. According to a spectral analysis of siphon excurrent velocity time records, there is a low frequency periodic component that could contribute to the mixing of clam metabolites through the generation of persistent jet vorticies. Also, fractal analysis of the velocity time records shows that as the ambient velocity increases the excurrent velocity becomes more correlated and less random. These results suggest that for high ambient flow a low frequency periodicity may be sufficient to promote the mixing and dilution of metabolites. In contrast, for low ambient flow more random siphon excurrent velocity may be required to reduce the amount of information available to predators in the downstream odorant plume.

  9. The flow field investigations of no load conditions in axial flow fixed-blade turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Gao, L.; Wang, Z. W.; Zhou, X. Z.; Xu, H. X.

    2014-03-01

    During the start-up process, the strong instabilities happened at no load operation in a low head axial flow fixed-blade turbine, with strong pressure pulsation and vibration. The rated speed can not reach until guide vane opening to some extent, and stable operation could not be maintained under the rated speed at some head, which had a negative impact on the grid-connected operation of the unit. In order to find the reason of this phenomenon, the unsteady flow field of the whole flow passage at no load conditions was carried out to analyze the detailed fluid field characteristics including the pressure pulsation and force imposed on the runner under three typical heads. The main hydraulic cause of no load conditions instability was described. It is recommended that the power station should try to reduce the no-load running time and go into the high load operation as soon as possible when connected to grid at the rated head. Following the recommendations, the plant operation practice proved the unstable degree of the unit was reduced greatly during start up and connect to the power grid.

  10. On the Physics of Flow Separation Along a Low Pressure Turbine Blade Under Unsteady Flow Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schobeiri, Meinhard T.; Ozturk, Burak; Ashpis, David E.

    2003-01-01

    The present study, which is the first of a series of investigations dealing with specific issues of low pressure turbine (LPT) boundary layer aerodynamics, is aimed at providing detailed unsteady boundary flow information to understand the underlying physics of the inception, onset, and extent of the separation zone. A detailed experimental study on the behavior of the separation zone on the suction surface of a highly loaded LPT-blade under periodic unsteady wake flow is presented. Experimental investigations were performed at Texas A&M Turbomachinery Performance and Flow Research Laboratory using a large-scale unsteady turbine cascade research facility with an integrated wake generator and test section unit. To account for a high flow deflection of LPT-cascades at design and off-design operating points, the entire wake generator and test section unit including the traversing system is designed to allow a precise angle adjustment of the cascade relative to the incoming flow. This is done by a hydraulic platform, which simultaneously lifts and rotates the wake generator and test section unit. The unit is then attached to the tunnel exit nozzle with an angular accuracy of better than 0.05 , which is measured electronically. Utilizing a Reynolds number of 110,000 based on the blade suction surface length and the exit velocity, one steady and two different unsteady inlet flowconditions with the corresponding passing frequencies, wake velocities and turbulence intensities are investigated using hot-wire anemometry. In addition to the unsteady boundary layer measurements, blade surface pressure measurements were performed at Re=50,000, 75,000, 100,000, and 125,000 at one steady and two periodic unsteady inlet flow conditions. Detailed unsteady boundary layer measurement identifies the onset and extent of the separation zone as well as its behavior under unsteady wake flow. The results presented in ensemble-averaged and contour plot forms contribute to understanding the

  11. Boiling Fluids Behave Quite Differently in Space

    NASA Video Gallery

    The boiling process is really different in space, since the vapor phase of a boiling liquid does not rise via buoyancy. Spacecraft and Earth-based systems use boiling to efficiently remove large am...

  12. Turbulance boundary conditions for shear flow analysis, using the DTNS flow solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizukami, M.

    1995-01-01

    The effects of different turbulence boundary conditions were examined for two classical flows: a turbulent plane free shear layer and a flat plate turbulent boundary layer with zero pressure gradient. The flow solver used was DTNS, an incompressible Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes solver with k-epsilon turbulence modeling, developed at the U.S. Navy David Taylor Research Center. Six different combinations of turbulence boundary conditions at the inflow boundary were investigated: In case 1, 'exact' k and epsilon profiles were used; in case 2, the 'exact' k profile was used, and epsilon was extrapolated upstream; in case 3, both k and epsilon were extrapolated; in case 4, the turbulence intensity (I) was 1 percent, and the turbulent viscosity (mu(sub t)) was equal to the laminar viscosity; in case 5, the 'exact' k profile was used and mu(sub t) was equal to the laminar viscosity; in case 6, the I was 1 percent, and epsilon was extrapolated. Comparisons were made with experimental data, direct numerical simulation results, or theoretical predictions as applicable. Results obtained with DTNS showed that turbulence boundary conditions can have significant impacts on the solutions, especially for the free shear layer.

  13. Behavior of a shallow water table under periodic flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, Nick; Nielsen, Peter; Perrochet, Pierre

    2009-03-01

    A new laboratory data set on the behavior of a shallow water table in a sand column aquifer subject to simple harmonic periodic forcing at its base is presented and discussed. The data are analyzed using the dynamic effective porosity, which is defined as the ratio of the rate of change in total moisture to the rate of change in water table elevation; thus, a reduction in this parameter means that the extent of moisture exchange has been reduced relative to a given water table fluctuation. The data show a clear decrease in the dynamic effective porosity with increasing proximity of the water table to the sand surface, which is consistent with previous research under a steadily rising or falling shallow water table. The observed reduction in moisture exchange due to shallowness of the water table has implications for periodic flow scenarios such as the propagation of water table waves in coastal and beach groundwater systems. That is, as moisture exchange is reduced, less work is being done by the flow, and thus, energy dissipation rates for shallow water tables will be reduced relative to the case of a deeper water table. At present no account of the influence of water table shallowness has been included in theories describing water table wave dispersion. The present experiments, in conjunction with the dynamic effective porosity concept, provide a framework in which this gap in knowledge can be further investigated. Additional experiments were designed such that the free surface transgressed the sand surface for part of the oscillation period to investigate the influence of meniscus formation and deformation at the sand surface on periodic flow dynamics. The observed behavior is consistent with previous observations of steady infiltration above shallow water tables, namely, a rapid drop (rise) in pore pressure with the onset of meniscus formation (deformation). A simple "wetting and drying" model is derived, accounting for the variation in effective porosity

  14. Stabilization of freon 113 subcooled boiling in forced convection

    SciTech Connect

    Gentile, D.; Benejean, R.; Llory, M.

    1985-09-01

    A simple electronic feedback system allowing to perform tests in subcooled boiling of Freon 113 in the transition region, where systems directly heated by Joule effect are unstable, is presented. A short, electrically heated tube is used where the current is controlled by the measure of the wall temperature. First experiments highlight a hysteresis phenomenon depending on whether the temperature difference between the wall and the boiling liquid is increased or decreased, and the influence of surface conditions on the shape of the boiling curve.

  15. 20. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 18761889. Boiling House Interior, 1878. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 1876-1889. Boiling House Interior, 1878. View: Remains of south wall. The molasses storage pits are below the floor in the foreground. The remaining piece of floor indicates the form of the entire floor. The sorghum pan and boiling range flue slope from left to right (east to west) and permitted batches of cane juice to flow through the boiling pan by gravity. The beams, joists, truss work are built of northwest pine. The sides and floor boards are built of redwood. The boiling range flue is built of fire-brick, masonry, and portland cement. The corrugated roof appears to be a later addition, not contemporary with mill operation. - R. W. Meyer Sugar Mill, State Route 47, Kualapuu, Maui County, HI

  16. Film Boiling on Downward Quenching Hemisphere of Varying Sizes

    SciTech Connect

    Chan S. Kim; Kune Y. Suh; Joy L. Rempe; Fan-Bill Cheung; Sang B. Kim

    2004-04-01

    Film boiling heat transfer coefficients for a downward-facing hemispherical surface are measured from the quenching tests in DELTA (Downward-boiling Experimental Laminar Transition Apparatus). Two test sections are made of copper to maintain low Biot numbers. The outer diameters of the hemispheres are 120 mm and 294 mm, respectively. The thickness of all the test sections is 30 mm. The effect of diameter on film boiling heat transfer is quantified utilizing results obtained from the test sections. The measured data are compared with the numerical predictions from laminar film boiling analysis. The measured heat transfer coefficients are found to be greater than those predicted by the conventional laminar flow theory on account of the interfacial wavy motion incurred by the Helmholtz instability. Incorporation of the wavy motion model considerably improves the agreement between the experimental and numerical results in terms of heat transfer coefficient. In addition, the interfacial wavy motion and the quenching process are visualized through a digital camera.

  17. HORIZONTAL BOILING REACTOR SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Treshow, M.

    1958-11-18

    Reactors of the boiling water type are described wherein water serves both as the moderator and coolant. The reactor system consists essentially of a horizontal pressure vessel divided into two compartments by a weir, a thermal neutronic reactor core having vertical coolant passages and designed to use water as a moderator-coolant posltioned in one compartment, means for removing live steam from the other compartment and means for conveying feed-water and water from the steam compartment to the reactor compartment. The system further includes auxiliary apparatus to utilize the steam for driving a turbine and returning the condensate to the feed-water inlet of the reactor. The entire system is designed so that the reactor is self-regulating and has self-limiting power and self-limiting pressure features.

  18. Heat transfer and crisis phenomena at boiling in Freon mixture films falling down the structured tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlenko, A. N.; Pecherkin, N. I.; Volodin, O. A.

    2012-03-01

    Investigation results on hydrodynamics, heat transfer, and crisis phenomena in laminar-wave liquid films falling down the surfaces of different geometry are presented in this study. Freon mixture R21/R114 with initial concentration of low-boiling component of 4-16.6 % was used as the working liquid. The film Reynolds number at the inlet to the experimental section varied from 60 to 700. The heat flux density was changed within 0-5 W/cm2. The images of wave surface of the falling liquid film and formation of dry spots were visualized and recorded by the high-speed video camera. Results of investigation of the wave structure of the film surface, measurements of heat transfer coefficients under the conditions of boiling, and critical heat fluxes in the film flow over the smooth and structured surfaces are presented.

  19. MRI of cerebral blood flow under hyperbaric conditions in rats.

    PubMed

    Cardenas, Damon P; Muir, Eric R; Duong, Timothy Q

    2016-07-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy has a number of clinical applications. However, the effects of acute HBO on basal cerebral blood flow (CBF) and neurovascular coupling are not well understood. This study explored the use of arterial spin labeling MRI to evaluate changes in baseline and forepaw stimulus-evoked CBF responses in rats (n = 8) during normobaric air (NB), normobaric oxygen (NBO) (100% O2 ), 3 atm absolute (ATA) hyperbaric air (HB) and 3 ATA HBO conditions. T1 was also measured, and the effects of changes in T1 caused by increasing oxygen on the CBF calculation were investigated. The major findings were as follows: (i) increased inhaled oxygen concentrations led to a reduced respiration rate; (ii) increased dissolved paramagnetic oxygen had significant effects on blood and tissue T1 , which affected the CBF calculation using the arterial spin labeling method; (iii) the differences in blood T1 had a larger effect than the differences in tissue T1 on CBF calculation; (iv) if oxygen-induced changes in blood and tissue T1 were not taken into account, CBF was underestimated by 33% at 3 ATA HBO, 10% at NBO and <5% at HB; (v) with correction, CBF values under HBO, HB and NBO were similar (p > 0.05) and all were higher than CBF under NB by ~40% (p < 0.05), indicating that hypercapnia from the reduced respiration rate masks oxygen-induced vasoconstriction, although blood gas was not measured; and (vi) substantial stimulus-evoked CBF increases were detected under HBO, similar to NB, supporting the notion that activation-induced CBF regulation in the brain does not operate through an oxygen-sensing mechanism. CBF MRI provides valuable insights into the effects of oxygen on basal CBF and neurovascular coupling under hyperbaric conditions. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27192391

  20. Flow conditions of fresh mortar and concrete in different pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsen, Stefan; Haugan, Lars; Hammer, Tor Arne; Kalogiannidis, Evangelos

    2009-11-15

    The variation in fresh concrete flow rate over the pipe cross section was investigated on differently coloured and highly flowable concrete mixes flowing through pipes of different materials (rubber, steel, acryl). First, uncoloured (gray) concrete was poured through the pipe and the pipe blocked. Similar but coloured (black) concrete was then poured into the pipe filled with gray concrete, flowing after the gray concrete for a while before being blocked and hardened. The advance of the colouring along the pipe wall (showing boundary flow rate) was observed on the moulded concrete surface appearing after removing the pipe from the hardened concrete. The shapes of the interfaces between uncoloured and coloured concrete (showing variation of flow rate over the pipe cross section) were observed on sawn surfaces of concrete half cylinders cut along the length axes of the concrete-filled pipe. Flow profiles over the pipe cross section were clearly seen with maximum flow rates near the centre of the pipe and low flow rate at the pipe wall (typically rubber pipe with reference concrete without silica fume and/or stabilizers). More plug-shaped profiles, with long slip layers and less variation of flow rate over the cross section, were also seen (typically in smooth acrylic pipes). Flow rate, amount of concrete sticking to the wall after flow and SEM-images of pipe surface roughness were observed, illustrating the problem of testing full scale pumping.

  1. When water does not boil at the boiling point.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hasok

    2007-03-01

    Every schoolchild learns that, under standard pressure, pure water always boils at 100 degrees C. Except that it does not. By the late 18th century, pioneering scientists had already discovered great variations in the boiling temperature of water under fixed pressure. So, why have most of us been taught that the boiling point of water is constant? And, if it is not constant, how can it be used as a 'fixed point' for the calibration of thermometers? History of science has the answers.

  2. Boundary conditions for gas flow problems from anisotropic scattering kernels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    To, Quy-Dong; Vu, Van-Huyen; Lauriat, Guy; Léonard, Céline

    2015-10-01

    The paper presents an interface model for gas flowing through a channel constituted of anisotropic wall surfaces. Using anisotropic scattering kernels and Chapman Enskog phase density, the boundary conditions (BCs) for velocity, temperature, and discontinuities including velocity slip and temperature jump at the wall are obtained. Two scattering kernels, Dadzie and Méolans (DM) kernel, and generalized anisotropic Cercignani-Lampis (ACL) are examined in the present paper, yielding simple BCs at the wall fluid interface. With these two kernels, we rigorously recover the analytical expression for orientation dependent slip shown in our previous works [Pham et al., Phys. Rev. E 86, 051201 (2012) and To et al., J. Heat Transfer 137, 091002 (2015)] which is in good agreement with molecular dynamics simulation results. More important, our models include both thermal transpiration effect and new equations for the temperature jump. While the same expression depending on the two tangential accommodation coefficients is obtained for slip velocity, the DM and ACL temperature equations are significantly different. The derived BC equations associated with these two kernels are of interest for the gas simulations since they are able to capture the direction dependent slip behavior of anisotropic interfaces.

  3. Stochastic estimation of conditional eddies in turbulent channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adrian, R. J.; Moin, P.; Moser, R. D.

    1987-01-01

    Several long-standing issues regarding linear estimation and coherent structures are addressed, and some questions that were addressed partially, but never with the benefit of full, three-dimensional information are answered. The objectives were to: determine how well linear estimates approximate the field obtained by true conditional averaging, using events such as those in quadrant analysis; determine the extent to which the three-dimensional linearly estimated fields correspond to coherent structures, and the degree and manner in which they differ; evaluate the type and nature of the structural information gained by employing several different types of events; and learn more about the 3-D structure of important coherent motions that occur in wall turbulence. The results indicate that linear stochastic estimation can be used effectively in the study of numerical data bases consisting of three-dimensional vector fields, both velocity and vorticity. Two-point stochastic estimation yields more structural information and more detail than single-point estimation. The structures observed occurred repeatedly within the flow, but much can not be said about their dominance or the probability of their occurrence without further systematic studies of their frequency.

  4. Effect of the load size on the efficiency of microwave heating under stop flow and continuous flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Patil, Narendra G; Rebrov, Evgeny V; Eränen, Kari; Benaskar, Faysal; Meuldijk, Jan; Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka; Hessel, Volker; Hulshof, Lumbertus A; Murzin, Dmitry Yu; Schouten, Jaap C

    2012-01-01

    A novel heating efficiency analysis of the microwave heated stop-flow (i.e. stagnant liquid) and continuous-flow reactors has been presented. The thermal losses to the surrounding air by natural convection have been taken into account for heating efficiency calculation of the microwave heating process. The effect of the load diameter in the range of 4-29 mm on the heating efficiency of ethylene glycol was studied in a single mode microwave cavity under continuous flow and stop-flow conditions. The variation of the microwave absorbing properties of the load with temperature was estimated. Under stop-flow conditions, the heating efficiency depends on the load diameter. The highest heating efficiency has been observed at the load diameter close to the half wavelength of the electromagnetic field in the corresponding medium. Under continuous-flow conditions, the heating efficiency increased linearly. However, microwave leakage above the propagation diameter restricted further experimentation at higher load diameters. Contrary to the stop-flow conditions, the load temperature did not raise monotonously from the inlet to outlet under continuous-flow conditions. This was due to the combined effect of lagging convective heat fluxes in comparison to volumetric heating. This severely disturbs the uniformity of the electromagnetic field in the axial direction and creates areas of high and low field intensity along the load Length decreasing the heating efficiency as compared to stop-flow conditions.

  5. Two Phase Flow Mapping and Transition Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parang, Masood; Chao, David F.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, recent microgravity two-phase flow data for air-water, air-water-glycerin, and air- water-Zonyl FSP mixtures are analyzed for transition from bubbly to slug and from slug to annular flow. It is found that Weber number-based maps are inadequate to predict flow-pattern transition, especially over a wide range of liquid flow rates. It is further shown that slug to annular flow transition is dependent on liquid phase Reynolds number at high liquid flow rate. This effect may be attributed to growing importance of liquid phase inertia in the dynamics of the phase flow and distribution. As a result a new form of scaling is introduced to present data using liquid Weber number based on vapor and liquid superficial velocities and Reynolds number based on liquid superficial velocity. This new combination of the dimensionless parameters seem to be more appropriate for the presentation of the microgravity data and provides a better flow pattern prediction and should be considered for evaluation with data obtained in the future. Similarly, the analysis of bubble to slug flow transition indicates a strong dependence on both liquid inertia and turbulence fluctuations which seem to play a significant role on this transition at high values of liquid velocity. A revised mapping of data using a new group of dimensionless parameters show a better and more consistent description of flow transition over a wide range of liquid flow rates. Further evaluation of the proposed flow transition mapping will have to be made after a wider range of microgravity data become available.

  6. Film boiling of mercury droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Schoessow, G. J.; Chmielewski, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    Vaporization times of mercury droplets in Leidenfrost film boiling on a flat horizontal plate are measured in an air atmosphere. Extreme care was used to prevent large amplitude droplet vibrations and surface wetting; therefore, these data can be compared to film boiling theory. Diffusion from the upper surface of the drop appears as a dominant mode of mass transfer from the drop. A closed-form analytical film boiling theory is developed to account for the diffusive evaporation. Reasonable agreement between data and theory is seen.

  7. Film boiling of mercury droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Schoessow, G. J.; Chmielewski, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    Vaporization times of mercury droplets in Leidenfrost film boiling on a flat horizontal plate are measured in an air atmosphere. Extreme care was used to prevent large amplitude droplet vibrations and surface wetting; therefore, these data can be compared to film boiling theory. For these data, diffusion from the upper surface of the drop is a dominant mode of mass transfer from the drop. A closed-form analytical film boiling theory is developed to account for the diffusive evaporation. Reasonable agreement between data and theory is seen.

  8. A fundamental study of nucleate pool boiling under microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ervin, Jamie S.; Merte, Herman, Jr.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental study of incipient boiling in short-term microgravity and with a/g = +/- 1 for pool boiling was performed. Calibrated thin gold films sputtered on a smoothly polished quartz surface were used simultaneously for thermal resistance measurements and heating of the boiling surface. The gold films were used for both transient and quasi-steady heating surface temperature measurements. Two test vessels were constructed for precise measurement and control of fluid temperature and pressure: a laboratory pool boiling vessel for the a/g = +/- experiments and a pool boiling vessel designed for the 131 m free-fall in the NASA Lewis Research Center Microgravity Research Facility for the microgravity tests. Measurements included the heater surface temperature, the pressure near the heating surface, and the bulk liquid temperatures. High speed photography was used in the experiments. With high quality microgravity and the measured initial temperature of the quiescent test fluid, R113, the temperature distribution in the liquid at the moment of boiling inception resulting from an imposed step in heat flux is known with a certainty not possible previously. The types of boiling propagation across the large flat heating surface are categorized; the conditions necessary for their occurrence are described. Explosive boiling propagation with a striking pattern of small scale protuberances over the entire vapor mass periphery not observed previously at low heat flux levels is described. For the heater surface with a/g = -1, a step in the heater surface temperature of short duration was imposed. The resulting liquid temperature distribution at the moment of boiling inception was different from that obtained with a step in heat flux.

  9. A Fundamental Study of Nucleate Pool Boiling Under Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ervin, Jamie S.; Merte, Herman, Jr.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental study of incipient boiling in short-term microgravity and with a/g = +/- 1 for pool boiling was performed. Calibrated thin gold films sputtered on a smoothly polished quartz surface were used simultaneously for thermal-resistance measurements and heating of the boiling surface. The gold films were used for both transient and quasi-steady heating surface temperature measurements. Two test vessels were constructed for precise measurement and control of fluid temperature and pressure: a laboratory pool boiling vessel for the a/g = +/- 1 experiments and a pool boiling vessel designed for the 131 m free-fall in the NASA Lewis Research Center Microgravity Research Facility for the microgravity tests. Measurements included the heater surface temperature, the pressure near the heating surface, the bulk liquid temperatures. High speed photography (up to 1,000 frames per second) was used in the experiments. With high quality microgravity and the measured initial temperature of the quiescent test fluid, R113, the temperature distribution in the liquid at the moment of boiling inception resulting from an imposed step in heat flux is known with a certainty not possible previously. The types of boiling propagation across the large flat heating surface, some observed here for the first time, are categorized; the conditions necessary for their occurrence are described. Explosive boiling propagation with a striking pattern of small scale protuberances over the entire vapor mass periphery not observed previously at low heat flux levels (on the order of 5 W/cm(exp 2)) is described. For the heater surface with a/g = -1, a step in the heater surface temperature of short duration was imposed. The resulting liquid temperature distribution at the moment of boiling inception was different from that obtained with a step in heat flux.

  10. Overland Flow Induced by Snowmelt and Partially Frozen Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolte, J.; French, H.

    2007-12-01

    The transport infrastructure is a vital part of the society, with high capital investments. Design of this system is therefore very important. Climate changes will increase the frequency of extreme precipitation events, floods and snow melt periods experienced by the infrastructure. According to initial analysis by the Norwegian transport sector these changes will affect road maintenance, emergency planning, design of new roads and infrastructure. Increased frequency of floods is expected to cause more closed roads because of insufficient and badly maintained drainage systems. Increased ground frost and ice formation on ground surface cause large increases in surface runoff during snowmelt. Recently, in Norway the ClimRunoff project has started with the focus on quantifying discharge of catchment areas draining towards roads. The first priority of the project is to create a model that can evaluate the run-off situations under spring situation (i.e. overland flow due to snowmelt and partially frozen soils). The model is tested on a well-defined catchment under autumn situation. Preliminary results of the model calculations will be presented, together with the challenges to alter the model to be able to calculate snowmelt and frozen soil conditions. In close cooperation with the Norwegian road authorities, areas with historical flooding events are selected, and current and future climate data will be used to analyse the infrastructure of the road construction. Together with a risk analysis of the vulnerability of the transport infrastructure the model will be used to create guidelines for road construction with respect to run-off and drainage that can account for changes in climate.

  11. Automatic air flow control in air conditioning ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obler, H. D.

    1972-01-01

    Device is designed which automatically selects air flow coming from either of two directions and which can be adjusted to desired air volume on either side. Device uses one movable and two fixed scoops which control air flow and air volume.

  12. Fundamental Boiling and RP-1 Freezing Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goode, Brian; Turner, Larry D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes results from experiments performed to help understand certain aspects of the MC-1 engine prestart thermal conditioning procedure. The procedure was constrained by the fact that the engine must chill long enough to get quality LOX at the LOX pump inlet but must be short enough to prevent freezing of RP-1 in the fuel pump. A chill test of an MC-1 LOX impeller was performed in LN2 to obtain data on film boiling, transition boiling and impeller temperature histories. The transition boiling data was important to the chill time so a subsequent experiment was performed chilling simple steel plates in LOX to obtain similar data for LOX. To address the fuel freezing concern, two experiments were performed. First, fuel was frozen in a tray and its physical characteristics were observed and temperatures of the fuel were measured. The result was physical characteristics as a function of temperature. Second was an attempt to measure the frozen thickness of RP-1 on a cold wall submerged in warm RP-1 and to develop a method for calculating that thickness for other conditions.

  13. Improvements in Predicting Void Fraction in Subcooled Boiling

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, Kwi Seok; Lee, Yong Bum; No, Hee Cheon

    2005-06-15

    A simple two-phase thermal-hydraulic tool with the drift-flux model has been used to develop a subcooled boiling model. The tool is composed of four governing equations: mixture mass, vapor mass, mixture momentum, and mixture enthalpy. Using the developed tool, various subcooled boiling models were investigated through the published experimental data. In the process of evaluation, two models were developed associated with the subcooled boiling. First, the Saha and Zuber correlation predicting the point of the net vapor generation was modified to consider the thermal and dynamic effects at the high-velocity region. Second, the pumping factor model was developed using the pi-theorem based on parameters related to the bubble generation mechanism, and it produced an additional parameter: the boiling number. The proposed models and several other models were evaluated against a series of subcooled flow boiling experiments at the pressure range of 1 to 146.8 bars. From the root-mean-square analysis for the predicted void fraction in the subcooled boiling region, the results of the proposed model presented the best predictions for the whole-pressure ranges. Also, the implementation of the developed models into RELAP5/MOD3.3 brought about improved results compared to those of the default model of the code.

  14. Micro-flow separation system using an open capillary tube that works under laminar flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Jinno, Naoya; Hashimoto, Masahiko; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhiko

    2009-02-01

    A micro-flow separation system was developed using an open capillary, fused-silica or polyethylene tube, and an aqueous-organic mixture (water-acetonitrile-ethyl acetate mixture) as a carrier solution. A model analyte solution containing 2,6-naphthalenedisulfonic acid and 1-naphthol was injected into the capillary tube by a gravity method. The analyte solution was subsequently delivered through the capillary tube with the carrier solution by a micro-syringe pump; the system worked under laminar flow conditions. The analytes were separated through the capillary tube and detected on-capillary by an absorption detector. 2,6-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid and 1-naphthol were detected in this order with a carrier solution of water-acetonitrile-ethyl acetate (15:3:2 volume ratio), while they were detected in the reverse order with a carrier solution of water-acetonitrile-ethyl acetate (2:5:9 volume ratio) using a fused-silica capillary tube. Similar separation behavior, i.e., that the elution times of the analytes could be easily reversed by changing the component ratio of the solvents in the carrier solution, was observed with a polyethylene capillary tube.

  15. Sidewall flow instabilities in liquid metal MHD flow under blanket relevant conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, C.B.; Picologlou, B.F.

    1988-10-07

    A flow instability has been observed in a rectangular thin conducting wall duct in MHD experiments at ANL's ALEX facility. It developed in a side layer jet attached to a side wall parallel to the applied B-field. The nature of the instability resembles very strongly that of a classic laminar instability in ordinary fluid mechanics. The phenomenon is distinguished from ordinary turbulence by its strong periodicity and its lack of small scale structure. A preliminary identification of the factors which may influence the instability has been made. For the conditions and test section geometry reported here, the instability appears at an approximately constant critical Reynolds number 2650 < Re/sub cr/ < 5100, independent of Hartmann number in the range 2700 < M < 5400. 6 refs., 18 figs.

  16. Recharge and Lateral Groundwater Flow Boundary Conditions for the Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow and Transport Model

    SciTech Connect

    B. Arnold; T. Corbet

    2001-12-18

    The purpose of the flow boundary conditions analysis is to provide specified-flux boundary conditions for the saturated zone (SZ) site-scale flow and transport model. This analysis is designed to use existing modeling and analysis results as the basis for estimated groundwater flow rates into the SZ site-scale model domain, both as recharge at the upper (water table) boundary and as underflow at the lateral boundaries. The objective is to provide consistency at the boundaries between the SZ site-scale flow model and other groundwater flow models. The scope of this analysis includes extraction of the volumetric groundwater flow rates simulated by the SZ regional-scale flow model to occur at the lateral boundaries of the SZ site-scale flow model and the internal qualification of the regional-scale model for use in this analysis model report (AMR). In addition, the scope includes compilation of information on the recharge boundary condition taken from three sources: (1) distributed recharge as taken from the SZ regional-scale flow model, (2) recharge below the area of the unsaturated zone (UZ) site-scale flow model, and (3) focused recharge along the Fortymile Wash channel.

  17. Experimental investigation of nucleate boiling heat transfer mechanisms for cylinders in water and FC-72

    SciTech Connect

    Ammerman, C.N.; You, S.M.; Hong, Y.S.

    1995-12-31

    A recently developed photographic method is used to quantify vapor volumetric flow rate above a boiling wire. The volumetric flow rate is combined with additional analyses to determine the overall contributions to the total heat flux from four nucleate boiling heat transfer mechanisms (latent heat, natural convection, Marangoni flow, and micro-convection). This technique is used to quantify the boiling heat transfer mechanisms versus heat flux for a 510-{micro}m wire immersed in saturated water and in water with a small amount of liquid soap added. These data are compared with similar data taken for a 75-{micro}m wire boiling in saturated FC-72. For all cases, latent heat is the dominant heat transfer mechanism in the fully developed nucleate boiling regime. In addition, the latent heat component is significantly increased by the addition of small amounts of soap (surfactant).

  18. A model for calculation of RCS pressure during reflux boiling under reduced inventory conditions and its assessment against PKL data. [Reactor Cooling Systems (RCS)

    SciTech Connect

    Palmrose, D.E. ); Mandl, R.M. )

    1991-01-01

    There has been recent interest in the United States concerning the loss of residual heat removal system (RHRS) under reduced coolant inventory conditions for pressurized water reactors. This issue is also of interest in the Federal Republic of Germany and an experiment was performed in the integral PKL-HI experimental facility at Siemens-KWU to supply applicable data. Recently, an NRC-sponsored effort has been undertaken at the Idaho-National Engineering Laboratory to identify and analyze the important thermal-hydraulic phenomena in pressurized water reactors following the long term loss-of-RHRS during reduced inventory operation. The thermal-hydraulic response of a closed reactor coolant system during such a transient is investigated in this report. Some of the specific processes investigated include: reflux condensation in the steam generators, the corresponding pressure increase in the reactor coolant system, and void fraction distributions on the primary side of the system. Mathematical models of these and other physical processes Experiment B4.5.

  19. Fluid dynamic characterization of operating conditions for continuous flow blood pumps.

    PubMed

    Wu, Z J; Antaki, J F; Burgreen, G W; Butler, K C; Thomas, D C; Griffith, B P

    1999-01-01

    As continuous flow pumps become more prominent as long-term ventricular assist devices, the wide range of conditions under which they must be operated has become evident. Designed to operate at a single, best-efficiency, operating point, continuous flow pumps are required to perform at off-design conditions quite frequently. The present study investigated the internal fluid dynamics within two representative rotary fluid pumps to characterize the quality of the flow field over a full range of operating conditions. A Nimbus/UoP axial flow blood pump and a small centrifugal pump were used as the study models. Full field visualization of flow features in the two pumps was conducted using a laser based fluorescent particle imaging technique. Experiments were performed under steady flow conditions. Flow patterns at inlet and outlet sections were visualized over a series of operating points. Flow features specific to each pump design were observed to exist under all operating conditions. At off-design conditions, an annular region of reverse flow was commonly observed within the inlet of the axial pump, while a small annulus of backflow in the inlet duct and a strong disturbed flow at the outlet tongue were observed for the centrifugal pump. These observations were correlated to a critical nondimensional flow coefficient. The creation of a "map" of flow behavior provides an additional, important criterion for determining favorable operating speed for rotary blood pumps. Many unfavorable flow features may be avoided by maintaining the flow coefficient above a characteristic critical coefficient for a particular pump, whereas the intrinsic deleterious flow features can only be minimized by design improvement. Broadening the operating range by raising the band between the critical flow coefficient and the designed flow coefficient, is also a worthy goal for design improvement.

  20. [Kinetic theory and boundary conditions for flows of highly inelastic spheres: Application to gravity driven granular flows down bumpy inclines

    SciTech Connect

    Richman, M.W.

    1992-01-01

    In this quarter, we extended our study of the effects of isotropic boundary vibrations to steady, gravity driven, inclined granular flows. These flows are more complex than those considered last quarter because of the presence of slip and mean velocity gradients at the boundary. Consequently, it was first necessary to modify the boundary conditions derived by Richman (1992) to account for corrections to the flow particle velocity distribution function from velocity gradients. In what follows we only summarize the results obtained.

  1. Experimental study of a turbulent flow under transient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Shuisheng; Gorji, Sam; Seddighi, Mehdi; O'Donoghue, Tom; Pokrajac, Dubravka; Vardy, Alan

    2014-11-01

    Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is applied to investigate the behaviour of transient turbulent channel flows. During the experiments, the flowrate is accelerated from a lower Re turbulent flow to one at a higher Re. The investigations reveal novel insights into turbulence behaviour in the transient process. It is shown that the unsteady flows behave strikingly similar to the so-called boundary layer bypass transition due to free-stream-turbulence. Consistent with the DNS of He and Seddighi (J. Fluid Mech. 715, 60), the process begins with the elongation of streaks much similar to the Klebanoff modes in the buffeted laminar boundary layer in a bypass transition. During the second stage, the formation and propagation of isolated turbulent spots eventually lead to a complete breakdown of the organised streaky structures resulting in a new turbulent flow corresponding to the final Reynolds number. The present investigation covers a range of initial and final Reynolds numbers to elucidate the underlying mechanisms involved in transient flows.

  2. Boiling incipience in a reboiler tube

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, H.; Alam, S.S. )

    1991-03-01

    This heating surface and liquid temperature distributions were experimentally obtained to identify the boiling incipience conditions in a single vertical tube thermosiphon reboiler with water, acetone, ethanol, and ethylene glycol as test liquids. The test section was an electrically heated stainless steel tube of 25.56-mm i.d. and 1900 mm long. The uniform heat flux values were used in the range of 3800--40 000 W/m{sup 2}, while inlet liquid subcooling were varied from 0.2 to 45.5{degrees} C. The liquid submergence was maintained around 100, 75, 50 and 30%. All the data were generated at 1-atm pressure. The maximum superheats attained around boiling incipience were taken from the wall temperature distributions and correlated with heat flux and physical properties of liquids using the expression of Yin and Abdelmessih. The heated sections required for onset of fully developed boiling with net vapor generation were determined assuming a thermal equilibrium model. In this paper a dimensionless correlation relating these values with heat flux, liquid subcooling, and submergence is proposed.

  3. Effect of surface properties on nucleate pool boiling

    SciTech Connect

    Haze, Ikuya; Tomemori, Hideki; Motoya, Daiju; Osakabe, Masahiro

    1999-07-01

    A series of experiments on nucleate pool boiling was performed by use of an oxygen-free copper rod and platinum wires of different surface properties under both normal gravity condition and microgravity condition. As a result of the experiments, under normal gravity condition, the bubbling on thick cracked silicone-coated surfaces and that on scale surfaces were more vigorous than that on mirror-finished (copper) surfaces, that on bare (Pt) surfaces, that on thin silicone-coated surfaces and that on thick silicone-coated surfaces. The boiling curves on the mirror-finished surface, the bare surface, the thin silicone-coated surface and the thick cracked silicone-coated surface were equal to those predicted by the Rohsenow's correlation. The superheats on the thick silicone-coated surface and the scale surface were larger than those predicted by the Rohsenow's correlation. The boiling curves on the non-cracked silicone-coated surface and the scale surface corrected by those heat resistance were equal to those predicted by the Rohsenow's correlation. The superheat on the thick silicone-coated surface corrected by its heat resistance was smaller than that predicted by the Rohsenow's correlation. The thick cracked silicone-coated surface enhanced the nucleate boiling heat transfer. On the other hand, under microgravity condition, the bubbles stayed around heated surfaces except scale surfaces. The boiling curve on the bare surface under microgravity condition was equal to that under normal gravity condition. The effect of surface properties on the nucleate boiling heat transfer under microgravity condition was equal to that under normal gravity condition.

  4. A review on augmentation of heat transfer in boiling using surfactants/additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Anil; Pise, Ashok

    2016-09-01

    Studies of heat transfer enhancement in boiling under various conditions and configurations have given different results. Understanding the boiling behaviour from these studies, literature is reviewed in terms of surface texture, heater geometry and orientation, experimental and numerical studies in presence of surfactant/additives. After understanding different behaviour in boiling, the effect of environment friendly surfactant is studied through literature review. Benchmarking of experimental procedure is done by experimenting and comparing some surfactants studied in literature.

  5. Contaminant removal in septage treatment with vertical flow constructed wetlands operated under batch flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Jong, Valerie Siaw Wee; Tang, Fu Ee

    2016-01-01

    Individual septic tanks are the most common means of on-site sanitation in Malaysia, but they result in a significant volume of septage. A two-staged vertical flow constructed wetlands (VFCWs) system for the treatment of septage was constructed and studied in Sarawak, Malaysia. Raw septage was treated in the first stage wetlands, and the resulting percolate was fed onto the second stage wetlands for further treatment. Here, the effects of a batch loading regime on the contaminant removal efficiency at the second stage wetlands, which included palm kernel shell within their filter substrate, are presented. The batch loading regime with pond:rest (P:R) period of 1:1, 2:2 and 3:3 (day:day) was studied. The improvement of the effluent redox condition was evident with P:R = 3:3, resulting in excellent organic matters (chemical oxygen demand and biochemical oxygen demand) and nitrogen reduction. The bed operated with P:R = 1:1 experienced constant clogging, with a water layer observed on the bed surface. For the P:R = 3:3 regime, the dissolved oxygen profile was not found to decay drastically after 24 hours of ponding, suggesting that the biodegradation mainly occurred during the first day. The study results indicate that a suitable application regime with an adequate rest period is important in VFCWs to ensure efficient operation.

  6. Conditional statistics for passive-scalar mixing in confined turbulent shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, James; Feng, Hua; Olsen, Michael; Fox, Rodney

    2006-11-01

    The conditional moment closure is one of the fundamental closure models used for turbulent flows. Although there is a large body of literature on turbulent shear flows, conditional statistics of experimental data are scarce, despite their necessity for understanding turbulent flows and validating numerical models. In the present work, a combined particle image velocimetry (PIV) and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) system was employed to investigate turbulent mixing in a confined liquid-phase plane-wake flow and in a confined liquid-phase rectangular-jet flow. The Reynolds number based on bulk velocity and hydraulic diameter was 37,500 for the wake flow and 50,000 for the jet flow. The Schmidt number for the passive scalar was approximately 1,250. Velocity components conditioned on the scalar for both the wake and jet flows were evaluated. It was noticed that the β-PDF predicted the experimental data very well for all observed locations. Since the joint velocity-scalar PDF was not jointly Gaussian in these flows, the conditional mean velocity was found to agree with a linear model only when the mixture fraction is close to the local mean mixture fraction. The gradient PDF model was also tested against the experimental data. The model predicted the cross-stream conditional velocity very well, but gave poor predictions for the streamwise conditional velocity. Finally, the scalar fluctuations conditioned on velocity are analyzed using existing models.

  7. The source of elliptic flow and initial conditions for hydrodynamical calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Strottman, D.; Csernai, L.; Magas, V.

    2000-08-01

    A model for energy, pressure and flow velocity distributions at the beginning of relativistic heavy ion collisions is presented, which can be used as initial condition for hydrodynamical calculations. The results show that QGP forms a tilted disk, such that the direction of the largest pressure gradient stays in the reaction plane, but deviates from both the beam and the usual transverse flow directions. Such initial condition may lead to the creation of antiflow or third flow component.

  8. Gravity and Heater Size Effects on Pool Boiling Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jungho; Raj, Rishi

    2014-01-01

    The current work is based on observations of boiling heat transfer over a continuous range of gravity levels between 0g to 1.8g and varying heater sizes with a fluorinert as the test liquid (FC-72/n-perfluorohexane). Variable gravity pool boiling heat transfer measurements over a wide range of gravity levels were made during parabolic flight campaigns as well as onboard the International Space Station. For large heaters and-or higher gravity conditions, buoyancy dominated boiling and heat transfer results were heater size independent. The power law coefficient for gravity in the heat transfer equation was found to be a function of wall temperature under these conditions. Under low gravity conditions and-or for smaller heaters, surface tension forces dominated and heat transfer results were heater size dependent. A pool boiling regime map differentiating buoyancy and surface tension dominated regimes was developed along with a unified framework that allowed for scaling of pool boiling over a wide range of gravity levels and heater sizes. The scaling laws developed in this study are expected to allow performance quantification of phase change based technologies under variable gravity environments eventually leading to their implementation in space based applications.

  9. RUBI -a Reference mUltiscale Boiling Investigation for the Fluid Science Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweizer, Nils; Stelzer, Marco; Schoele-Schulz, Olaf; Picker, Gerold; Ranebo, Hans; Dettmann, Jan; Minster, Olivier; Toth, Balazs; Winter, Josef; Tadrist, Lounes; Stephan, Peter; Grassi, Walter; di Marco, Paolo; Colin, Catherine; Piero Celata, Gian; Thome, John; Kabov, Oleg

    Boiling is a two-phase heat transfer process where large heat fluxes can be transferred with small driving temperature differences. The high performance of boiling makes the process very interesting for heat transfer applications and it is widely used in industry for example in power plants, refrigeration systems, and electronics cooling. Nevertheless, due to the large number of involved phenomena and their often highly dynamic nature a fundamental understanding and closed theoretical description is not yet accomplished. The design of systems incorporating the process is generally based on empirical correlations, which are commonly accompanied by large uncertainties and, thus, has to be verified by expensive test campaigns. Hence, strong efforts are currently made to develop applicable numerical tools for a reliable prediction of the boiling heat transfer performance and limits. In order to support and validate this development and, in particular as a precondition, to enhance the basic knowledge about boiling the comprehensive multi-scale experiment RUBI (Reference mUlti-scale Boiling Investigation) for the Fluid Science Laboratory on board the ISS is currently in preparation. The scientific objectives and requirements of RUBI have been defined by the members of the ESA topical team "Boiling and Multiphase Flow" and addresses fundamental aspects of boiling phenomena. The main objectives are the measurement of wall temperature and heat flux distribution underneath vapour bubbles with high spatial and tem-poral resolution by means of IR thermography accompanied by the synchronized high-speed observation of the bubble shapes. Furthermore, the fluid temperature in the vicinity and inside of the bubbles will be measured by a micro sensor array. Additional stimuli are the generation of an electric field above the heating surface and a shear flow created by a forced convection loop. The objective of these stimuli is to impose forces on the bubbles and investigate the

  10. Combined effects of flow condition and parasitism on shoaling behaviour of female guppies Poecilia reticulata.

    PubMed

    Hockley, F A; Wilson, C A M E; Graham, N; Cable, J

    2014-01-01

    Group living in fish can provide benefits of protection from predators and some parasites, more efficient foraging for food, increased mating opportunities and enhanced energetic benefit when swimming. For riverine species, shoaling behaviour can be influenced by various environmental stressors, yet little is known how flow rate might influence the shoaling of diseased fish shoals. In view of the increasingly unpredictable flow rates in streams and rivers, this study aimed to assess the combined effect of flow condition and parasitism on the shoaling behaviour of a model fish species. Shoal size, shoal cohesion and time spent shoaling of female guppies Poecilia reticulata were compared when infected with the directly transmitted ectoparasite Gyrodactylus turnbulli under flow and static conditions. Flow condition was an important factor in influencing shoaling behaviour of guppies with the fish forming larger shoals in the absence of flow. When a shoal member was infected with G. turnbulli, shoal cohesion was reduced, but the magnitude of this effect was dependent on flow condition. In both flow and static conditions, bigger fish formed larger shoals than smaller counterparts. Future changes to stream hydrology with more frequent flooding and drought events will affect the shoaling tendency of fish. During high-flow events, diseased fish may not be able to keep up with shoal mates and therefore have a higher risk of predation. Additionally, these findings may be important for aquaria and farmed species where an increase in flow rate may reduce aggregation in fish.

  11. Combined effects of flow condition and parasitism on shoaling behaviour of female guppies Poecilia reticulata.

    PubMed

    Hockley, F A; Wilson, C A M E; Graham, N; Cable, J

    2014-01-01

    Group living in fish can provide benefits of protection from predators and some parasites, more efficient foraging for food, increased mating opportunities and enhanced energetic benefit when swimming. For riverine species, shoaling behaviour can be influenced by various environmental stressors, yet little is known how flow rate might influence the shoaling of diseased fish shoals. In view of the increasingly unpredictable flow rates in streams and rivers, this study aimed to assess the combined effect of flow condition and parasitism on the shoaling behaviour of a model fish species. Shoal size, shoal cohesion and time spent shoaling of female guppies Poecilia reticulata were compared when infected with the directly transmitted ectoparasite Gyrodactylus turnbulli under flow and static conditions. Flow condition was an important factor in influencing shoaling behaviour of guppies with the fish forming larger shoals in the absence of flow. When a shoal member was infected with G. turnbulli, shoal cohesion was reduced, but the magnitude of this effect was dependent on flow condition. In both flow and static conditions, bigger fish formed larger shoals than smaller counterparts. Future changes to stream hydrology with more frequent flooding and drought events will affect the shoaling tendency of fish. During high-flow events, diseased fish may not be able to keep up with shoal mates and therefore have a higher risk of predation. Additionally, these findings may be important for aquaria and farmed species where an increase in flow rate may reduce aggregation in fish. PMID:25152559

  12. Occurrence of turbulent flow conditions in supercritical fluid chromatography.

    PubMed

    De Pauw, Ruben; Choikhet, Konstantin; Desmet, Gert; Broeckhoven, Ken

    2014-09-26

    Having similar densities as liquids but with viscosities up to 20 times lower (higher diffusion coefficients), supercritical CO2 is the ideal (co-)solvent for fast and/or highly efficient separations without mass-transfer limitations or excessive column pressure drops. Whereas in liquid chromatography the flow remains laminar in both the packed bed and tubing, except in extreme cases (e.g. in a 75 μm tubing, pure acetonitrile at 5 ml/min), a supercritical fluid can experience a transition from laminar to turbulent flow in more typical operation modes. Due to the significant lower viscosity, this transition for example already occurs at 1.3 ml/min for neat CO2 when using connection tubing with an ID of 127 μm. By calculating the Darcy friction factor, which can be plotted versus the Reynolds number in a so-called Moody chart, typically used in fluid dynamics, higher values are found for stainless steel than PEEK tubing, in agreement with their expected higher surface roughness. As a result turbulent effects are more pronounced when using stainless steel tubing. The higher than expected extra-column pressure drop limits the kinetic performance of supercritical fluid chromatography and complicates the optimization of tubing ID, which is based on a trade-off between extra-column band broadening and pressure drop. One of the most important practical consequences is the non-linear increase in extra-column pressure drop over the tubing downstream of the column which leads to an unexpected increase in average column pressure and mobile phase density, and thus decrease in retention. For close eluting components with a significantly different dependence of retention on density, the selectivity can significantly be affected by this increase in average pressure. In addition, the occurrence of turbulent flow is also observed in the detector cell and connection tubing. This results in a noise-increase by a factor of four when going from laminar to turbulent flow (e.g. going

  13. Dissolved oxygen in the Tualatin River, Oregon, during winter flow conditions, 1991 and 1992

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelly, Valerie J.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the capacity of the Tualatin River to assimilate oxygen-demanding material during winter streamflow conditions, with an emphasis on peak-flow and winter base-flow conditions. The study examined major processes governing concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO) in the river under different streamflow conditions, as well as the effect of streamflow and temperature on these processes. Water-quality modeling was used to evaluate various wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) loading scenarios during winter based-flow conditions as an aid to management decisions in the basin.

  14. Conditions at the downstream boundary for simulations of viscous incompressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagstrom, Thomas

    1990-01-01

    The proper specification of boundary conditions at artificial boundaries for the simulation of time-dependent fluid flows has long been a matter of controversy. A general theory of asymptotic boundary conditions for dissipative waves is applied to the design of simple, accurate conditions at downstream boundary for incompressible flows. For Reynolds numbers far enough below the critical value for linear stability, a scaling is introduced which greatly simplifies the construction of the asymptotic conditions. Numerical experiments with the nonlinear dynamics of vortical disturbances to plane Poiseuille flow are presented which illustrate the accuracy of our approach. The consequences of directly applying the scalings to the equations are also considered.

  15. Drop-box Weir for Measuring Flow Rates Under Extreme Flow Conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sediment and large rocks often are transported in runoff during extreme events. The sediment can deposit in a runoff-measuring structure and give erroneous readings. The drop-box weir (DBW) is one of only a few flow-measuring devices capable of measuring sediment-laden flows. Recent studies have ...

  16. Enhanced boiling heat transfer in horizontal test bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Trewin, R.R.; Jensen, M.K.; Bergles, A.E.

    1994-08-01

    Two-phase flow boiling from bundles of horizontal tubes with smooth and enhanced surfaces has been investigated. Experiments were conducted in pure refrigerant R-113, pure R-11, and mixtures of R-11 and R-113 of approximately 25, 50, and 75% of R-113 by mass. Tests were conducted in two staggered tube bundles consisting of fifteen rows and five columns laid out in equilateral triangular arrays with pitch-to-diameter ratios of 1.17 and 1.5. The enhanced surfaces tested included a knurled surface (Wolverine`s Turbo-B) and a porous surface (Linde`s High Flux). Pool boiling tests were conducted for each surface so that reference values of the heat transfer coefficient could be obtained. Boiling heat transfer experiments in the tube bundles were conducted at pressures of 2 and 6 bar, heat flux values from 5 to 80 kW/m{sup 2}s, and qualities from 0% to 80%, Values of the heat transfer coefficients for the enhanced surfaces were significantly larger than for the smooth tubes and were comparable to the values obtained in pool boiling. It was found that the performance of the enhanced tubes could be predicted using the pool boiling results. The degradation in the smooth tube heat transfer coefficients obtained in fluid mixtures was found to depend on the difference between the molar concentration in the liquid and vapor.

  17. Inception of supraglacial channelization under turbulent flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantelli, E.; Camporeale, C.; Ridolfi, L.

    2013-12-01

    Glacier surfaces exhibit an amazing variety of meltwater-induced morphologies, ranging from small scale ripples and dunes on the bed of supraglacial channels to meandering patterns, till to large scale drainage networks. Even though the structure and geometry of these morphologies play a key role in the glacier melting processes, the physical-based modeling of such spatial patterns have attracted less attention than englacial and subglacial channels. In order to partially fill this gap, our work concerns the large scale channelization occurring on the ice slopes and focuses on the role of turbulence on the wavelength selection processes during the channelization inception. In a recent study[1], two of us showed that the morphological instability induced by a laminar film flowing over an ice bed is characterized by transversal length scales of order of centimeters. Being these scales much smaller than the spacing observed in the channelization of supraglacial drainage networks (that are of order of meters) and considering that the water films flowing on glaciers can exhibit Reynolds numbers larger than 104, we investigated the role of turbulence in the inception of channelization. The flow-field is modeled by means of two-dimensional shallow water equations, where Reynolds stresses are also considered. In the depth-averaged heat balance equation an incoming heat flux from air is assumed and forced convection heat exchange with the wall is taken into account, in addition to convection and diffusion in the liquid. The temperature profile in the ice is finally coupled to the liquid through Stefan equation. We then perform a linear stability analysis and, under the assumption of small Stefan number, we solve the differential eigenvalue problem analytically. As main outcome of such an analysis, the morphological instability of the ice-water interface is detected and investigated in a wide range of the independent parameters: longitudinal and transversal wavenumbers

  18. Effects of inlet flow conditions on crossflow jet mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liscinsky, D. S.; True, B.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the effects of mainstream turbulence, mainstream swirl and non-symmetric mass addition has been conducted for the isothermal mixing of multiple jets injected into a confined rectangular crossflow. Jet penetration and mixing in the near field was studied using planar Mie scattering to measure time-averaged mixture fraction distributions. Orifice configurations were used that were optimized for mixing performance based on previous experimental and computational results for a homogeneous approach flow. Mixing effectiveness, determined using a spatial unmixedness parameter based on the variance of the mean jet concentration distributions, was found to be minimally affected by free-stream turbulence but significantly influenced by the addition of swirl to the mainstream. The results for non-symmetric mass addition indicate that the concentration distribution of the flowfield can be tailored if desired.

  19. On fluid flow in a heterogeneous medium under nonisothermal conditions

    SciTech Connect

    D.W., Vasco

    2010-11-01

    An asymptotic technique, valid in the presence of smoothly-varying heterogeneity, provides explicit expressions for the velocity of a propagating pressure and temperature disturbance. The governing equations contain nonlinear terms due to the presence of temperature-dependent coefficients and due to the advection of fluids with differing temperatures. Two cases give well-defined expressions in terms of the parameters of the porous medium: the uncoupled propagation of a pressure disturbance and the propagation of a fully coupled temperature and pressure disturbance. The velocity of the coupled disturbance or front, depends upon the medium parameters and upon the change in temperature and pressure across the front. For uncoupled flow, the semi-analytic expression for the front velocity reduces to that associated with a linear diffusion equation. A comparison of the asymptotic travel time estimates with calculations from a numerical simulator indicates reasonably good agreement for both uncoupled and coupled disturbances.

  20. Variation in initiation condition of debris flows in the mountain regions surrounding Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chao; Wang, Yu-jie; Du, Cui; Wang, Yun-qi; Li, Yun-peng

    2016-11-01

    Debris flows in the mountain regions surrounding Beijing have been occurring for a long time and have resulted in great economic losses. In this study, 23 rainstorm events, surficial sediments, and debris flow deposits were analyzed to quantify the area's rainfall threshold and to investigate how such conditions may be used to predict debris flow in this region. Rainfall threshold of intensity-duration (I-D) functions after vegetation recovery was higher than before recovery and also higher than I-D levels in other regions where debris flows are closely associated with runoff. Field investigations revealed that surficial sediments were characterized by coarse-grained sediments and that debris flow deposits lacked fine particles. Local debris flows can be triggered by runoff; however, no single standard equation is used to predict the conditions that lead to runoff-triggered debris flow; and commonly used equations give different values. Here, we propose an empirical function that takes into account peak discharge per width and particle diameter. This model should be verified with further investigations so that it can be used as a reference to analyze the conditions that lead to debris flow in the study area. Finally, debris flows may have been related to occasional storms in the study area, which has been experiencing substantially increased temperatures and decreased annual precipitation. This work provides important information about the conditions that initiated debris flow in the Beijing mountain regions in the last few decades.

  1. Thermohydrodynamics of boiling in binary compressible fluids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiewei; Do-Quang, Minh; Amberg, Gustav

    2015-10-01

    We numerically study the thermohydrodynamics of boiling for a CO(2) + ethanol mixture on lyophilic and lyophobic surfaces in both closed and open systems, based on a diffuse interface model for a two-component system. The corresponding wetting boundary conditions for an isothermal system are proposed and verified in this paper. New phenomena due to the addition of another component, mainly the preferential evaporation of the more volatile component, are observed. In the open system and the closed system, the physical process shows very different characteristics. In the open system, except for the movement of the contact line, the qualitative features are rather similar for lyophobic and lyophilic surfaces. In the closed system, the vortices that are observed on a lyophobic surface are not seen on a lyophilic surface. More sophisticated wetting boundary conditions for nonisothermal, two-component systems might need to be further developed, taking into account the variations of density, temperature, and surface tension near the wall, while numerical results show that the boundary conditions proposed here also work well even in boiling, where the temperature is nonuniform.

  2. Transient nucleate pool boiling in microgravity: Some initial results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merte, Herman, Jr.; Lee, H. S.; Ervin, J. S.

    1994-01-01

    Variable gravity provides an opportunity to test the understanding of phenomena which are considered to depend on buoyancy, such as nucleate pool boiling. The active fundamental research in nucleate boiling has sought to determine the mechanisms or physical processes responsible for its high effectiveness, manifested by the high heat flux levels possible with relatively low temperature differences. Earlier research on nucleate pool boiling at high gravity levels under steady conditions demonstrated quantitatively that the heat transfer is degraded as the buoyancy normal to the heater surfaced increases. Correspondingly, it was later shown, qualitatively for short periods of time only, that nucleate boiling heat transfer is enhanced as the buoyancy normal to the heater surface is reduced. It can be deduced that nucleate pool boiling can be sustained as a quasi-steady process provided that some means is available to remove the vapor generated from the immediate vicinity of the heater surface. One of the objectives of the research, the initial results of which are presented here, is to quantify the heat transfer associated with boiling in microgravity. Some quantitative results of nucleate pool boiling in high quality microgravity (a/g approximately 10(exp -5)) of 5s duration, obtained in an evacuated drop tower, are presented here. These experiments were conducted as precursors of longer term space experiments. A transient heating technique is used, in which the heater surface is a transparent gold film sputtered on a qua rtz substrate, simultaneously providing the mean surface temperature from resistance thermometry and viewing of the boiling process both from beneath and across the surface. The measurement of the transient mean heater surface temperature permits the computation, by numerical means, of the transient mean heat transfer coefficient. The preliminary data obtained demonstrates that a quasi-steady boiling process can occur in microgravity if the bulk

  3. Characteristics of Transient Boiling Heat Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wei; Monde, Masanori; Mitsutake, Y.

    2002-07-01

    In this paper, one dimensional inverse heat conduction solution is used for a measurement of pool boiling curve. The experiments are performed under atmospheric pressure for copper, brass, carbon steel and gold. Boiling curves, including unsteady transition boiling region, are found can be traced fairly well from a simple experiment system by solving inverse heat conduction solution. Boiling curves for steady heating and transient heating, for heating process and cooling process are compared. Surface behavior around CHF point, transition boiling and film-boiling regions are observed by using a high-speed camera. The results show the practicability of the inverse heat conduction solution in tracing boiling curve and thereby supply us a new way in boiling heat transfer research. (authors)

  4. Critical heat flux for free convection boiling in thin rectangular channels

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Lap Y.; Tichler, P.R.

    1991-01-01

    A review of the experimental data on free convection boiling critical heat flux (CHF) in vertical rectangular channels reveals three mechanisms of burnout. They are the pool boiling limit, the circulation limit, and the flooding limit associated with a transition in flow regime from churn to annular flow. The dominance of a particular mechanism depends on the dimensions of the channel. Analytical models were developed for each free convection boiling limit. Limited agreement with data is observed. A CHF correlation, which is valid for a wide range of gap sizes, was constructed from the CHFs calculated according to the three mechanisms of burnout. 17 refs., 7 figs.

  5. A Robust Absorbing Boundary Condition for Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loh, Ching Y.; orgenson, Philip C. E.

    2005-01-01

    An absorbing non-reflecting boundary condition (NRBC) for practical computations in fluid dynamics and aeroacoustics is presented with theoretical proof. This paper is a continuation and improvement of a previous paper by the author. The absorbing NRBC technique is based on a first principle of non reflecting, which contains the essential physics that a plane wave solution of the Euler equations remains intact across the boundary. The technique is theoretically shown to work for a large class of finite volume approaches. When combined with the hyperbolic conservation laws, the NRBC is simple, robust and truly multi-dimensional; no additional implementation is needed except the prescribed physical boundary conditions. Several numerical examples in multi-dimensional spaces using two different finite volume schemes are illustrated to demonstrate its robustness in practical computations. Limitations and remedies of the technique are also discussed.

  6. Homogeneous-Heterogeneous Reactions in Peristaltic Flow with Convective Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Tasawar; Tanveer, Anum; Yasmin, Humaira; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    This article addresses the effects of homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions in peristaltic transport of Carreau fluid in a channel with wall properties. Mathematical modelling and analysis have been carried out in the presence of Hall current. The channel walls satisfy the more realistic convective conditions. The governing partial differential equations along with long wavelength and low Reynolds number considerations are solved. The results of temperature and heat transfer coefficient are analyzed for various parameters of interest. PMID:25460608

  7. Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Biofilm Formation Over A Separated Flow Region Under Steady And Pulsatile Flow Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salek, M. Mehdi; Martinuzzi, Robert

    2012-02-01

    Several researchers have observed that the formation, morphology and susceptibility of bacterial biofilms are affected by the local hydrodynamic condition and, in particular, shear stresses acting on the fluid-biofilm interface. A backwards facing step (BFS) experimental model has been widely utilized as an in vitro model to examine and characterize the effect of flow separation and recirculation zones comparable to those present within various medical devices as well as those observed in vivo. The specific geometry of BFS covers a vide range of flow features observed in physiological or environmental conditions. The hypothesis of this study is that the flow behavior and structures can effectively contribute to the transport and attachment of cells and affecting the morphology of adhered colonies as well as suspended structures (i.e. biofilm streamers). Hence, the formation of the recirculation region occurring within a backward facing step (BFS) under steady and pulsatile conditions as well as three-dimensional flow structures arising close to the side walls are investigated to correlate to biofilms behavior. This hypothesis is investigated using a backward facing step incorporated into a flow cell under steady and pulsatile flow regimes to study the growth of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) UC18 as the study microorganism.

  8. Flap survey test of a combined surface blowing model: Flow measurements at static flow conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fukushima, T.

    1978-01-01

    The Combined Surface Blowing (CSB) V/STOL lift/propulsion system consists of a blown flap system which deflects the exhaust from a turbojet engine over a system of flaps deployed at the trailing edge of the wing. Flow measurements consisting of velocity measurements using split film probes and total measure surveys using a miniature Kiel probe were made at control stations along the flap systems at two spanwise stations, the centerline of the nozzle and 60 percent of the nozzle span outboard of the centerline. Surface pressure measurements were made in the wing cove and the upper surface of the first flap element. The test showed a significant flow separation in the wing cove. The extent of the separation is so large that the flow into the first flap takes place only at the leading edge of the flap. The velocity profile measurements indicate that large spanwise (3 dimensional) flow may exist.

  9. Subcooled forced convection boiling of trichlorotrifluoroethane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougall, R. S.; Panian, D. J.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental heat-transfer data were obtained for the forced-convection boiling of trichlorotrifluoroethane (R-113 or Freon-113) in a vertical annular test annular test section. The 97 data points obtained covered heat transfer by forced convection, local boiling, and fully-developed boiling. Correlating methods were obtained which accurately predicted the heat flux as a function of wall superheat (boiling curve) over the range of parameters studied.

  10. THORAX pretest prediction of a sodium-boiling transient in a 19-pin simulated LMFBR driver bundle

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, S.D.

    1982-01-01

    Experiments will be conducted in the Thermal-Hydraulic Out-of-Reactor Safety-Shutdown Heat Removal System (THORS-SHRS) Assembly 1 loop at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to model the behavior of a reactor during degraded decay heat removal conditions. The test section is to consist of two parallel 19-pin electrically-heated driver bundles, typical of U.S. Large Developmental Plant (LDP) Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) design. Analysis of these experiments will include using THORAX, a two-dimensional boiling model which assumes an equilibrium mixture two-phase flow (with slip). A THORAX prediction is presented for a single-bundle forced convection boiling-to-dryout transient at 15.8 kW/pin.

  11. FLOWNET: A Computer Program for Calculating Secondary Flow Conditions in a Network of Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    The program requires the network parameters, the flow component parameters, the reservoir conditions, and the gas properties as input. It will then calculate all unknown pressures and the mass flow rate in each flow component in the network. The program can treat networks containing up to fifty flow components and twenty-five unknown network pressures. The types of flow components that can be treated are face seals, narrow slots, and pipes. The program is written in both structured FORTRAN (SFTRAN) and FORTRAN 4. The program must be run in an interactive (conversational) mode.

  12. Computational realizations of the entropy condition in modeling congested traffic flow. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bui, D.D.; Nelson, P.; Narasimhan, S.L.

    1992-04-01

    Existing continuum models of traffic flow tend to provide somewhat unrealistic predictions for conditions of congested flow. Previous approaches to modeling congested flow conditions are based on various types of special treatments at the congested freeway sections. Ansorge (Transpn. Res. B, 24B(1990), 133-143) has suggested that such difficulties might be substantially alleviated, even for the simple conservation model of Lighthill and Whitman, if the entropy condition were incorporated into the numerical schemes. In this report the numerical aspects and effects of incorporating the entropy condition in congested traffic flow problems are discussed. Results for simple scenarios involving dissipation of traffic jams suggest that Godnunov's method, which in a numerical technique that incorporates the entropy condition, is more accurate than two alternative methods. Similarly, numerical results for this method, applied to simple model problems involving formation of traffic jams, appear at least as realistic as those obtained from the well-known code of FREFLO.

  13. Flow characteristics past jellyfish and St. Vincent valves in the aortic position under physiological pulsatile flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Morsi, Y S; Sakhaeimanesh, A A

    2000-07-01

    Thrombus formation and hemolysis have been linked to the dynamic flow characteristics of heart valve prostheses. To enhance our understanding of the flow characteristics past the aortic position of a Jellyfish (JF) valve in the left ventricle, in vitro laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) measurements were carried out under physiological pulsatile flow conditions. The hemodynamic performance of the JF valve was then compared with that of the St. Vincent (SV) valve. The comparison was given in terms of mean systolic pressure drop, back flow energy losses, flow velocity, and shear stresses at various locations downstream of both valves and at cardiac outputs of 3.5 L/min, 4.5 L/min, and 6.5 L/min respectively. The results indicated that both valves created disturbed flow fields with elevated levels of turbulent shear stress as well as higher levels of turbulence in the immediate vicinity of the valve and up to 1 diameter of the pipe (D) downstream of the valve. At a location further downstream, the JF valve showed better flow characteristics than the SV in terms of velocity profiles and turbulent shear stresses. The closure volume of the SV valve was found to be 2.5 times higher than that of the JF valve. Moreover, the total back flow losses and mean systolic pressure drop also were found to be higher in the SV than the JF valve.

  14. Recharge and Lateral Groundwater Flow Boundary Conditions for the Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow and Transport Model

    SciTech Connect

    S. James

    2004-10-06

    This analysis is designed to use existing modeling and analysis results as the basis for estimated groundwater flow rates into the saturated zone (SZ) site-scale model domains, both as recharge (infiltration) at the upper boundary (water table), and as underflow at the lateral boundaries. Specifically, this work compiles information on the recharge boundary conditions supplied to the base-case and alternate SZ site-scale flow models taken from (1) distributed recharge from the 1997 (D'Agnese et al. 1997 [DIRS 100131]) or 2001 (D'Agnese et al. 2002 [DIRS 158876]) SZ regional-scale (Death Valley Regional Flow System [DVRFS]) model; (2) recharge below the area of the 1997 (Wu et al. 1997 [DIRS 156453]) or 2003 (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169861]) unsaturated zone (UZ) site-scale flow model; and (3) focused recharge along Fortymile Wash. In addition, this analysis includes extraction of the groundwater flow rates simulated by the 1997 and 2001 DVRFS models coincident with the lateral boundaries of the SZ site-scale flow models. The fluxes from the 1997 DVRFS were used to calibrate the base-case SZ site-scale flow model. The 2001 DVRFS fluxes are used in the alternate SZ site-scale flow model.

  15. Flow regimes of adiabatic gas-liquid two-phase under rolling conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Chaoxing; Yan, Changqi; Sun, Licheng; Xing, Dianchuan; Wang, Yang; Tian, Daogui

    2013-07-01

    Characteristics of adiabatic air/water two-phase flow regimes under vertical and rolling motion conditions were investigated experimentally. Test sections are two rectangular ducts with the gaps of 1.41 and 10 mm, respectively, and a circular tube with 25 mm diameter. Flow regimes were recorded by a high speed CCD-camera and were identified by examining the video images. The experimental results indicate that the characteristics of flow patterns in 10 mm wide rectangular duct under vertical condition are very similar to those in circular tube, but different from the 1.41 mm wide rectangular duct. Channel size has a significant influence on flow pattern transition, boundary of which in rectangular channels tends asymptotically towards that in the circular tube with increasing the width of narrow side. Flow patterns in rolling channels are similar to each other, nevertheless, the effect of rolling motion on flow pattern transition are significantly various. Due to the remarkable influences of the friction shear stress and surface tension in the narrow gap duct, detailed flow pattern maps of which under vertical and rolling conditions are indistinguishable. While for the circular tube with 25 mm diameter, the transition from bubbly to slug flow occurs at a higher superficial liquid velocity and the churn flow covers more area on the flow regime map as the rolling period decreases.

  16. Periodic boundary conditions for long-time nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of incompressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, Matthew

    2014-11-01

    This work presents a generalization of the Kraynik-Reinelt (KR) boundary conditions for nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. In the simulation of steady, homogeneous flows with periodic boundary conditions, the simulation box deforms with the flow, and it is possible for image particles to become arbitrarily close, causing a breakdown in the simulation. The KR boundary conditions avoid this problem for planar elongational flow and general planar mixed flow [T. A. Hunt, S. Bernardi, and B. D. Todd, J. Chem. Phys. 133, 154116 (2010)] through careful choice of the initial simulation box and by periodically remapping the simulation box in a way that conserves image locations. In this work, the ideas are extended to a large class of three-dimensional flows by using multiple remappings for the simulation box. The simulation box geometry is no longer time-periodic (which was shown to be impossible for uniaxial and biaxial stretching flows in the original work by Kraynik and Reinelt [Int. J. Multiphase Flow 18, 1045 (1992)]. The presented algorithm applies to all flows with nondefective flow matrices, and in particular, to uniaxial and biaxial flows.

  17. Initial adhesion of Listeria monocytogenes to fine polished stainless steel under flow conditions is determined by prior growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Skovager, Anne; Larsen, Marianne Halberg; Castro-Mejia, Josue Leonardo; Hecker, Michael; Albrecht, Dirk; Gerth, Ulf; Arneborg, Nils; Ingmer, Hanne

    2013-07-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne pathogen known to persist in food production environments, where it is able to attach and form biofilms, potentially contaminating food products ready for consumption. In this study the first step in the establishment of L. monocytogenes in a food-processing environment was examined, namely the initial adhesion to stainless steel under specific dynamic flow conditions. It was found that the intrinsic ability of L. monocytogenes to adhere to solid surfaces under flow conditions is dependent on nutrient availability. The addition of L-leucine to the growth medium altered the fatty acid composition of the L. monocytogenes cells and increased adhesion. The growth conditions resulting in the highest adhesion (growth medium with added glucose) had cells with the highest electron donating and lowest electron accepting properties, whereas growth conditions resulting in lowest adhesion (growth medium with added mannose) had cells with the lowest electron donating properties and highest electron accepting properties. The highest and lowest adhesion conditions correlated with differences in expression of cell surface protein of L. monocytogenes and among these the autolysin amidase (Ami). This study implies that food composition influences the adhesion of L. monocytogenes to solid surfaces during dynamic flow conditions.

  18. Heat Transfer in Boiling Dilute Emulsion with Strong Buoyancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeburg, Eric Thomas

    Little attention has been given to the boiling of emulsions compared to that of boiling in pure liquids. The advantages of using emulsions as a heat transfer agent were first discovered in the 1970s and several interesting features have since been studied by few researchers. Early research focuses primarily on pool and flow boiling and looks to determine a mechanism by which the boiling process occurs. This thesis looks at the boiling of dilute emulsions in fluids with strong buoyant forces. The boiling of dilute emulsions presents many favorable characteristics that make it an ideal agent for heat transfer. High heat flux electronics, such as those seen in avionics equipment, produce high heat fluxes of 100 W/cm2 or more, but must be maintained at low temperatures. So far, research on single phase convection and flow boiling in small diameter channels have yet to provide an adequate solution. Emulsions allow the engineer to tailor the solution to the specific problem. The fluid can be customized to retain the high thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity of the continuous phase while enhancing the heat transfer coefficient through boiling of the dispersed phase component. Heat transfer experiments were carried out with FC-72 in water emulsions. FC-72 has a saturation temperature of 56 °C, far below that of water. The parameters were varied as follows: 0% ≤ epsilon ≤ 1% and 1.82 x 1012 ≤ RaH ≤ 4.42 x 1012. Surface temperatures along the heated surface reached temperature that were 20 °C in excess of the dispersed phase saturation temperature. An increase of ˜20% was seen in the average Nusselt numbers at the highest Rayleigh numbers. Holography was used to obtain images of individual and multiple FC-72 droplets in the boundary layer next to the heated surface. The droplet diameters ranged from 0.5 mm to 1.3 mm. The Magnus effect was observed when larger individual droplets were injected into the boundary layer, causing the droplets to be pushed

  19. Effects of temporally varying inlet conditions on flow and particle deposition in the small bronchial tubes.

    PubMed

    Soni, Bela; Thompson, David

    2012-09-01

    The laminar flow in the small bronchial tubes is quite complex because of the presence of vortex-dominated, secondary flows. Factors contributing to this complexity are the unsteady nature of the inhale-exhale breathing cycle and the geometrical characteristics of the bronchial tubes. To investigate unsteady effects on flows and particle transport, unsteady inhalation flows at a 30-respiration-per-minute frequency, corresponding to a moderate activity level, were simulated for a three-generation, asymmetric, planar bronchial tube model. Ten-micron diameter water droplets were introduced at the inlet at different times during inhalation to develop particle destination maps. The differences in the flow fields and destination maps obtained at the unsteady peak flow and the comparable steady-state inflow condition were minimal. However, particles released at equivalent instantaneous off-peak inflow conditions produced different destination maps. The differences were attributed to the temporal variations of the fluid velocities and history effects.

  20. High-speed visualization of disturbed pathlines in axial flow ventricular assist device under pulsatile conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fang; Kormos, Robert L.; Antaki, James F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate potentially pro-thrombotic flow patterns within an axial flow ventricular assist device under clinically relevant pulsatile hemodynamic conditions. Methods A transparent replica of the HeartMate-II was visualized using a high speed camera at both low and high frame rates (125 and 3000 fps). Three steady-state conditions were studied: nominal (4.5 lpm), low flow (3.0 lpm) and high flow (6.0 lpm). Time-varying conditions were introduced with external pulsatile pump which modulated the flow rate by approximately +/−50% of the mean, corresponding to a pulsatility index of 1.0. Results At nominal and high flow rates, the path lines within the upstream region were generally stable, well attached, and streamlined. As the flow rate was reduced below 3.8 lpm, a rapid transition to a chaotic velocity field occurred exhibiting a large toroidal vortex adjacent to the upstream bearing. The pathlines in the downstream stator section were consistently chaotic for all hemodynamic conditions investigated. It was common to observe tracer particles trapped within recirculation bubbles and drawn retrograde, causing repeated contact with the bearing surfaces. The addition of pulsatility caused the flow field to become periodically chaotic during the diastolic portion of the cardiac cycle depending on the instantaneous flow rate and acceleration. Conclusion The contribution of pulsatility by the native heart may induce a periodic disturbance to an otherwise stable flow field within an axial flow VAD, particularly during the diastolic and decelerating portion of the cardiac cycle. Potentially pro-thrombotic flow features were found to occur periodically in the region of the upstream bearing. PMID:26208892

  1. Stationary flow of non-Newtonian fluid with nonmonotone frictional boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudek, Sylwia; Kalita, Piotr; Migórski, Stanisław

    2015-10-01

    We study the stationary two-dimensional incompressible flow of non-Newtonian fluid governed by a nonlinear constitutive law and with a multivalued nonmonotone subdifferential frictional boundary condition. We provide an abstract result on existence of solution to an operator inclusion modeling the flow phenomenon. We prove a theorem on existence and, under additional assumptions, also uniqueness of weak solution to the flow problem.

  2. An atmospheric pressure flow reactor: Gas phase kinetics and mechanism in tropospheric conditions without wall effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven L.; Davis, Dennis D.; Hansen, Merrill

    1988-01-01

    A new type of gas phase flow reactor, designed to permit the study of gas phase reactions near 1 atm of pressure, is described. A general solution to the flow/diffusion/reaction equations describing reactor performance under pseudo-first-order kinetic conditions is presented along with a discussion of critical reactor parameters and reactor limitations. The results of numerical simulations of the reactions of ozone with monomethylhydrazine and hydrazine are discussed, and performance data from a prototype flow reactor are presented.

  3. Endothelial biocompatibility and accumulation of SPION under flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matuszak, Jasmin; Zaloga, Jan; Friedrich, Ralf P.; Lyer, Stefan; Nowak, Johannes; Odenbach, Stefan; Alexiou, Christoph; Cicha, Iwona

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic targeting is considered a promising method to accumulate the nanoparticles at the sites of atherosclerotic lesions, but little is known about the biological effects of magnetic nanoparticles on the vascular wall. Here, we investigated endothelial cell growth and vitality upon treatment with SPION (0-60 μg/mL) using two complementing methods: real-time cell analysis and live-cell microscopy. Moreover, the uptake of circulating superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) was assessed in an in vitro model of arterial bifurcations. At the tested concentrations, SPIONs were well tolerated and had no major influence on endothelial cell growth. Our results further showed a uniform distribution of endothelial SPION uptake independent of channel geometry or hemodynamic conditions: In the absence of magnetic force, no increase in accumulation of SPIONs at non-uniform shear stress region at the outer walls of bifurcation was observed. Application of external magnet allowed enhanced accumulation of SPIONs at the regions of non-uniform shear stress. Increased uptake of SPIONs at non-uniform shear stress region was well tolerated by endothelial cells (ECs) and did not affect endothelial cell viability or attachment. These findings indicate that magnetic targeting can constitute a promising and safe technique for the delivery of imaging and therapeutic nanoparticles to atherosclerotic lesions.

  4. Flow plug with length-to-hole size uniformity for use in flow conditioning and flow metering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, John Dwight (Inventor); Kelley, Anthony R. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A flow plug of varying thickness has a plurality of holes formed therethrough. The plug fits in a conduit such that a fluid flow in the conduit passes through the plug's holes. Each hole is defined by a parameter indicative of size in terms of the cross-sectional area thereof. A ratio of hole length-to-parameter is approximately the same for all of the holes.

  5. The myth of the boiling point.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hasok

    2008-01-01

    Around 1800, many reputable scientists reported significant variations in the temperature of pure water boiling under normal atmospheric pressure. The reported variations included a difference of over 1 degree C between boiling in metallic and glass vessels (Gay-Lussac), and "superheating" up to 112 degrees C on extracting dissolved air out of water (De Luc). I have confirmed most of these observations in my own experiments, many of which are described in this paper. Water boils at the "boiling point" only under very particular circumstances. Our common-sense intuition about the fixedness of the boiling point is only sustained by our limited experience.

  6. Measurement of dielectric properties of pumpable food materials under static and continuous flow conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Continuous flow microwave sterilization is an emerging technology which has the potential to replace the conventional heating processes for viscous and pumpable food products. Dielectric properties of pumpable food products were measured by a new approach (under continuous flow conditions) at a temp...

  7. Ethyl alcohol boiling heat transfer on multilayer meshed surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dåbek, Lidia; Kapjor, Andrej; Orman, Łukasz J.

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents the problem of heat transfer enhancement with the application of multilayer metal mesh structures during boiling of ethyl alcohol at ambient pressure. The preparation of samples involved sintering fine copper meshes with the copper base in the reduction atmosphere in order to prevent oxidation of the samples. The experiments included testing up to 4 layers of copper meshes. Significant augmentation of boiling heat transfer is possible, however, considerable number of meshes actually hinders heat transfer conditions and leads to the reduction in the heat flux transferred from the heater surface.

  8. Enhanced photo-H₂ production by unsaturated flow condition in continuous culture.

    PubMed

    Guo, Cheng-Long; Cao, Hong-Xia; Guo, Fei-Qiang; Huang, Cong-Liang; Wang, Huan-Guang; Rao, Zhong-Hao

    2015-02-01

    A biofilm photobioreactor under unsaturated flow condition (BFPBR-U) is proposed using a polished optical fiber as the internal light source for photo-H2 production in continuous culture. The main chamber was filled with spherical glass beads to create the reaction bed and the cells were immobilized to form a biofilm under unsaturated flow condition obtained by pumping substrate solution over a packing bed at a rate to create a thin fluid film and injecting the argon to maintain the gas phase space. The effects of operational conditions, including flow rate and influent substrate concentration, on the photo-H2 production performance were investigated. The unsaturated flow conditions eliminated the inhibition caused by high organic loading rate and enhanced light transmission efficiency, leading to an improvement in the photo-H2 production performance. PMID:25257592

  9. Analysis of liposomes using asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation: separation conditions and drug/lipid recovery.

    PubMed

    Kuntsche, Judith; Decker, Christiane; Fahr, Alfred

    2012-08-01

    Liposomes composed of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol were analyzed by asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation coupled with multi-angle laser light scattering. In addition to evaluation of fractionation conditions (flow conditions, sample mass, carrier liquid), radiolabeled drug-loaded liposomes were used to determine the liposome recovery and a potential loss of incorporated drug during fractionation. Neither sample concentration nor the cross-flow gradient distinctly affected the size results but at very low sample concentration (injected mass 5 μg) the fraction of larger vesicles was underestimated. Imbalance in the osmolality between the inner and outer aqueous phase resulted in liposome swelling after dilution in hypoosmotic carrier liquids. In contrast, liposome shrinking under hyperosmotic conditions was barely visible. The liposomes themselves eluted completely (lipid recoveries were close to 100%) but there was a loss of incorporated drugs during separation with a strong dependence on the octanol-water partition coefficient of the drug. Whereas corticosterone (partition coefficient ~2) was washed out more or less completely (recovery about 2%), loss of temoporfin (partition coefficient ~9) was only minor (recovery about 80%). All fractionations were well repeatable under the experimental conditions applied in the present study.

  10. Model for boiling and dryout in particle beds. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Lipinski, R. J.

    1982-06-01

    Over the last ten years experiments and modeling of dryout in particle beds have produced over fifty papers. Considering only volume-heated beds, over 250 dryout measurements have been made, and are listed in this work. In addition, fifteen models to predict dryout have been produced and are discussed. A model is developed in this report for one-dimensional boiling and dryout in a porous medium. It is based on conservation laws for mass, momentum, and energy. The initial coupled differential equations are reduced to a single first-order differential equation with an algebraic equation for the upper boundary condition. The model includes the effects of both laminar and turbulent flow, two-phase friction, and capillary force. The boundary condition at the bed bottom includes the possibility of inflowing liquid and either an adiabatic or a bottom-cooled support structure. The top of the bed may be either channeled or subcooled. In the first case the channel length and the saturation at the base of the channels are predicted. In the latter case, a criterion for penetration of the subcooled zone by channels is obtained.

  11. Are gingival and periodontal conditions related to salivary gland flow rates in healthy individuals?

    PubMed

    Crow, H C; Ship, J A

    1995-11-01

    Some have suggested that gingival and periodontal health is related to salivary gland function; however, there are few data to support this hypothesis. The purpose of this study was to determine if correlations existed between major salivary gland flow rates and gingival and periodontal conditions in people of different ages. The results suggest that there is no consistent relationship between major salivary gland flow rates and gingival and periodontal conditions in healthy people. PMID:7499648

  12. Water quality sample origin in wells under ambient vertical flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Lindsay; Rivett, Michael; Tellam, John; Dumble, Peter; Sharp, Helen

    2013-04-01

    Sampling from wells remains the key technique for investigation of groundwater contamination. Research into low-flow (pump rate 0.1-0.5L/min) and passive sampling devices and methodologies has largely been driven by needs to minimise sample bias and reduce costs associated with well-volume purge sampling. Such techniques are primarily suited to short-screen (<3m) well sampling, however, their perceived cost/time savings means their use in longer screen wells is attractive. Ambient vertical flows that may perhaps be insignificant in short-screen wells are, however, likely prove increasingly significant as the screen length increases due to the increased probability of vertical flows in greater thicknesses of (layered) geological sequences monitored. The interpretation of sample results assuming idealised horizontal flow conditions may introduce significant bias and prove unsuitable in these conditions. Numerical modelling has been undertaken to investigate the bias introduced under ambient vertical flow conditions. Sampling scenarios were generated by varying partially penetrating screen length, well diameter, sampling device position, pump rate, aquifer thickness and hydraulic conductivity, and boundary head gradients. In well flow rates were based on literature data for relatively short (2-20m) wells. The degree of sampling bias was quantified by calculating the root mean square error between the simulated scenario under a vertical head gradient and ideal horizontal-flow scenario. Low-flow and passive sampling device position, pump rate and pump duration were all found to be important in determining the sample origin. The sample may not be drawn from the entire saturated screen interval even under ideal conditions. When considering vertical flow scenarios, measurable deviation from the ideal case and bias towards the zone of highest head begins with ambient in-well flow rates as little as 50% of the pump rate used. The sample may not predominately originate from

  13. Self-propelled film-boiling liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linke, Heiner; Taormina, Michael; Aleman, Benjamin; Melling, Laura; Dow-Hygelund, Corey; Taylor, Richard; Francis, Matthew

    2006-03-01

    We report that liquids perform self-propelled motion when they are placed in contact with hot surfaces with asymmetric (ratchet-like) topology. Millimeter-sized droplets or slugs accelerate at rates up to 0.1 g and reach terminal velocities of several cm/s, sustained over distances up to a meter. The pumping effect is observed when the liquid is in the film-boiling regime, for many liquids and over a wide temperature range. We propose that liquid motion is driven by a viscous force exerted by vapor flow between the solid and the liquid. This heat-driven pumping mechanism may be of interest in cooling applications, eliminating the need for an additional power source.

  14. Urban contribution of pharmaceuticals and other organic wastewater contaminants to streams during differing flow conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolpin, D.W.; Skopec, M.; Meyer, M.T.; Furlong, E.T.; Zaugg, S.D.

    2004-01-01

    During 2001, 76 water samples were collected upstream and downstream of select towns and cities in Iowa during high-, normal- and low-flow conditions to determine the contribution of urban centers to concentrations of pharmaceuticals and other organic wastewater contaminants (OWCs) in streams under varying flow conditions. The towns ranged in population from approximately 2000 to 200 000. Overall, one or more OWCs were detected in 98.7% of the samples collected, with 62 of the 105 compounds being found. The most frequently detected compounds were metolachlor (pesticide), cholesterol (plant and animal sterol), caffeine (stimulant), β-sitosterol (plant sterol) and 1,7-dimethylxanthine (caffeine degradate). The number of OWCs detected decreased as streamflow increased from low- (51 compounds detected) to normal- (28) to high-flow (24) conditions. Antibiotics and other prescription drugs were only frequently detected during low-flow conditions. During low-flow conditions, 15 compounds (out of the 23) and ten compound groups (out of 11) detected in more than 10% of the streams sampled had significantly greater concentrations in samples collected downstream than in those collected upstream of the urban centers. Conversely, no significant differences in the concentrations were found during high-flow conditions. Thus, the urban contribution of OWCs to streams became progressively muted as streamflow increased.

  15. Experimental analysis of nanofluid pool boiling heat transfer in copper bead packed porous layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Wang, Ji

    2016-07-01

    Coupling the nanofluid as working fluid and the copper beads packed porous structure on heating surface were employed to enhance the pool boiling heat transfer by changing the fluid properties with the adjunction of nanoparticles in liquid and altering the heating surface with a bead porous layer. Due to the higher thermal conductivity, the copper beads served as an extended heating surface and the boiling nucleation sites rose, but the flow resistance increased. The CuO-water and SiO2-water nanofluids as well as the pure water were respectively employed as working fluids in the pool boiling experiments. Comparing with the base fluid of water, the higher thermal conductivity and lower surface tension occur in the nanofluids and those favor the boiling heat transfer, but the higher viscosity and density of nanofluids serve as deteriorative factors. So, the concentration region of the nanofluids should be chosen properly. The maximum relative error between the collected experimental data of the pure water on a flat surface and the theoretical prediction of pool boiling using the Rohsenow correlation was less than 12 %. The comparisons of the pool boiling heat transfer characteristics were also conducted between the pure water and the nanofluids respectively on the horizontal flat surface and on the heating surface packed with a copper bead porous layer. Besides, the boiling bubble generation, integration and departure have a great affect on the pool boiling and were recorded with a camera in the bead stacked porous structures at different heat flux.

  16. Investigating in-stream nitrogen removal at variable flow conditions using new optical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rode, Michael; Knoeller, Kay; Kiwel, Uwe

    2013-04-01

    Most experimental studies on in-stream nitrogen removal concentrate on low flow conditions. Considerable knowledge gaps exist on nitrogen removal during high flow stages, especially for mid- sized streams. The objective of the study is quantify nitrogen removal during low and high flow conditions in the 4th order Bode river, which is part of the TERENO Hydrological Observatory of UFZ, Germany. To measure nitrogen removal at variable flow conditions we used new optical and conventional water quality multi-parameter sensors for continues measurements (10-15 min frequency) on electric conductivity, temperature, pH-value, nitrate-N, soluble oxygen, turbidity, chlorophyll a and SAC 254 (specific absorption coefficient) at two river stations. Additional automatic samplers were installed to conduct four low flow campaigns and to measure four high flow events at a 30km river reach from 2010 to 2012. Several nitrogen and phosphorus compounds as well as δ18O and δ15N isotopes at nitrate have been analyzed using a two hour sampling interval. The study river reach is an ideal system to investigate the impact of flow conditions on nitrogen removal by mass balances and natural abundance of nitrogen isotopes because upstream inflow is equal with downstream outflow with less the 3% deviation on a yearly basis. Continues sensor measurements show that nitrate removal is occurring throughout the year depending on primary production, temperature and nitrate concentrations. During low flow conditions in the vegetation period a clear diurnal variation of nitrate concentrations is observable. Nitrate-N concentrations, which range between 2 and 8 mgN l-1, can vary by 10% between day and night time during periods with high algae concentration. The nitrogen balance calculations for the four low flow sampling campaigns suggest a loss of nitrogen between 10 and 20 % in the 30km reach. Losses were highest in August 2011 and lowest in October 2010. Surprisingly also during high flow events

  17. Investigating in-stream nitrogen removal at variable flow conditions using new optical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rode, M.; Knoeller, K.; Kiwel, U.

    2012-12-01

    Most experimental studies on in-stream nitrogen removal concentrate on low flow conditions. Considerable knowledge gaps exist on nitrogen removal during high flow stages, especially for mid- sized streams. The objective of the study is quantify nitrogen removal during low and high flow conditions in the 4th order Bode river, which is part of the TERENO Hydrological Observatory of UFZ, Germany. To measure nitrogen removal at variable flow conditions we used new optical and conventional water quality multi-parameter sensors for continues measurements (10-15 min frequency) on electric conductivity, temperature, pH-value, nitrate-N, soluble oxygen, turbidity, chlorophyll a and SAC 254 (specific absorption coefficient) at two river stations. Additional automatic samplers were installed to conduct four low flow campaigns and to measure four high flow events at a 30km river reach from 2010 to 2012. Several nitrogen and phosphorus compounds as well as δ18O and δ15N isotopes at nitrate have been analysed using a two hour sampling interval. The study river reach is an ideal system to investigate the impact of flow conditions on nitrogen removal by mass balances and natural abundance of nitrogen isotops because upstream inflow is equal with downstream outflow with less the 3% deviation on a yearly basis. Continues sensor measurements show that nitrate removal if occurring throughout the year depending on primary production, temperature and nitrate concentrations. During low flow conditions in the vegetation period a clear diurnal variation of nitrate concentrations is observable. Nitrate-N concentrations, which range between 2 and 8 mgN l-1, can vary by 10% between day and night time during periods with high algae concentration. The nitrogen balance calculations for the four low flow sampling campaigns suggest a loss of nitrogen between 10 and 20 % in the 30km reach. Losses were highest in August 2011 and lowest in October 2010. Surprisingly also during high flow events

  18. LHe Flow Regime/Pressure Drop for D0 Solenoid at Steady State Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, R.; /Fermilab

    1993-03-03

    This paper describes in a note taking format what was learned from several sources on two phase liquid helium flow regimes and pressure drops as applied to the D-Zero solenoid upgrade project. Calculations to estimate the steady state conditions for the D-Zero solenoid at 5, 10 and 15 g/s are also presented. For the lower flow rates a stratified type regime can be expected with a pressure drop less than 0.5 psi. For the higher flow rate a more homogeneous flow regime can be expected with a pressure drop between 0.4 to 1.5 psi.

  19. Influence of heat and mass flux conditions in hydromagnetic flow of Jeffrey nanofluid

    SciTech Connect

    Abbasi, F. M.; Shehzad, S. A.; Hayat, T.; Alsaedi, A.; Obid, Mustafa A.

    2015-03-15

    This article explores the hydromagnetic steady flow of Jeffrey fluid in the presence of thermal radiation. The chosen nanofluid model takes into account the Brownian motion and thermophoresis effects. Flow and heat transfer characteristics are determined by a stretching surface with flux conditions. The nonlinear boundary layer flow through partial differential systems is converted into the ordinary differential systems. The resulting reduced systems are computed for the convergent solutions of velocity, temperature and nanoparticle concentration. Graphs of dimensionless temperature and nanoparticle concentration profiles are presented for different values of emerging parameters. Skin-friction coefficient are computed and analyzed in both hydrodynamic and hydromagnetic flow situations.

  20. Development boiling to sprinkled tube bundle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kracík, Petr; Pospíšil, Jiří

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents results of a studied heat transfer coefficient at the surface of a sprinkled tube bundle where boiling occurs. Research in the area of sprinkled exchangers can be divided into two major parts. The first part is research on heat transfer and determination of the heat transfer coefficient at sprinkled tube bundles for various liquids, whether boiling or not. The second part is testing of sprinkle modes for various tube diameters, tube pitches and tube materials and determination of individual modes' interface. All results published so far for water as the falling film liquid apply to one to three tubes for which the mentioned relations studied are determined in rigid laboratory conditions defined strictly in advance. The sprinkled tubes were not viewed from the operational perspective where there are more tubes and various modes may occur in different parts with various heat transfer values. The article focuses on these processes. The tube is located in a low-pressure chamber where vacuum is generated using an exhauster via ejector. The tube consists of smooth copper tubes of 12 mm diameter placed horizontally one above another.

  1. Hyporheic exchange in heterogeneous streambeds under losing and gaining flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnon, S.; Fox, A.; Laube, G.; Schmidt, C.; Fleckenstein, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that stream-groundwater interactions (gaining or losing flow conditions) have a major impact on hyporheic exchange fluxes. However, the physical complexity of natural streams has limited our ability to study these types of interactions systematically in the field, and to evaluate their importance to biogeochemical processes and nutrient cycling. In this work we were able to quantify the effect of losing and gaining fluxes on hyporheic exchange in heterogeneous streambeds by combining experiments in a laboratory flume and modeling. Tracer experiments were conducted for measuring hyporheic exchange with using a dye and NaCl under various combinations of overlying water velocities and losing or gaining fluxes. The goal of the modeling was to extent and to supplement the hydraulic conditions covered by the flume experiments with a wide range of scenarios. In the model, the surface water domain was represented by a CFD model which generates the head distribution. Subsurface flow and transport is simulated in 3D using MIN3P. The flume experiments revealed that hyporheic exchange fluxes under losing and gaining flow conditions were similar, and became smaller in a comparable manner when the losing or gaining flux increases. Heterogeneity had little effect on hyporheic exchange under gaining flow conditions due to the compaction of the hyporheic zone. However, local hydraulic conductivity led to preferential flow paths of stream water under neutral conditions (strong horizontal flow component) and losing conditions (strong vertical flow component). Preferential flow paths were also evident under gaining conditions but affected mainly the upwelling groundwater. The model was set up to resemble the conditions in the flume, and reproduced the flume data very well. The propagation of dye fronts as observed in the flume is currently implemented into the model. The combination of experimental and modeling results enable us to systematically study the

  2. DSMC Simulation of Separated Flows About Flared Bodies at Hypersonic Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, James N.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a numerical study of interacting hypersonic flows at conditions that can be produced in ground-based test facilities. The computations are made with the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method of Bird. The focus is on Mach 10 flows about flared axisymmetric configurations, both hollow cylinder flares and double cones. The flow conditions are those for which experiments have been or will be performed in the ONERA R5Ch low-density wind tunnel and the Calspan-University of Buffalo Research Center (CUBRC) Large Energy National Shock (LENS) tunnel. The range of flow conditions, model configurations, and model sizes provides a significant range of shock/shock and shock/boundary layer interactions at low Reynolds number conditions. Results presented will highlight the sensitivity of the calculations to grid resolution, contrast the differences in flow structure for hypersonic cold flows and those of more energetic but still low enthalpy flows, and compare the present results with experimental measurements for surface heating, pressure, and extent of separation.

  3. Global Artificial Boundary Conditions for Computation of External Flow Problems with Propulsive Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsynkov, Semyon; Abarbanel, Saul; Nordstrom, Jan; Ryabenkii, Viktor; Vatsa, Veer

    1998-01-01

    We propose new global artificial boundary conditions (ABC's) for computation of flows with propulsive jets. The algorithm is based on application of the difference potentials method (DPM). Previously, similar boundary conditions have been implemented for calculation of external compressible viscous flows around finite bodies. The proposed modification substantially extends the applicability range of the DPM-based algorithm. In the paper, we present the general formulation of the problem, describe our numerical methodology, and discuss the corresponding computational results. The particular configuration that we analyze is a slender three-dimensional body with boat-tail geometry and supersonic jet exhaust in a subsonic external flow under zero angle of attack. Similarly to the results obtained earlier for the flows around airfoils and wings, current results for the jet flow case corroborate the superiority of the DPM-based ABC's over standard local methodologies from the standpoints of accuracy, overall numerical performance, and robustness.

  4. Investigation of an anomalous flow condition of the Langley pilot model expansion tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friesen, W. J.

    1974-01-01

    Free-stream flow velocity measurements were made in the Langley pilot model expansion tube during the test flow interval. During this interval, an anomalous dip in pitot pressure occurs for the expansion tube operating conditions employed. Within the test flow interval, the main conclusions reached from comparison of the measured flow velocity, pitot pressure, and tube wall pressure are: the variations which occur in velocity and wall pressure are small compared with the variations in pitot pressure; a corresponding dip in the derived flow density is associated with the dip in pitot pressure; and the value of the average density over the interval, which results from the expansion from the shocked intermediate chamber condition, is approximately one-half of the value that can result from only an isentropic process.

  5. Antecedent flow conditions and nitrate concentrations in the Mississippi River basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murphy, Jennifer C.; Hirsch, Robert M.; Sprague, Lori A.

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between antecedent flow conditions and nitrate concentrations was explored at eight sites in the 2.9 million square kilometers (km2) Mississippi River basin, USA. Antecedent flow conditions were quantified as the ratio between the mean daily flow of the previous year and the mean daily flow from the period of record (Qratio), and the Qratio was statistically related to nitrate anomalies (the unexplained variability in nitrate concentration after filtering out season, long-term trend, and contemporaneous flow effects) at each site. Nitrate anomaly and Qratio were negatively related at three of the four major tributary sites and upstream in the Mississippi River, indicating that when mean daily streamflow during the previous year was lower than average, nitrate concentrations were higher than expected. The strength of these relationships increased when data were subdivided by contemporaneous flow conditions. Five of the eight sites had significant negative relationships (p ≤ 0.05) at high or moderately high contemporaneous flows, suggesting nitrate that accumulates in these basins during a drought is flushed during subsequent high flows. At half of the sites, when mean daily flow during the previous year was 50 percent lower than average, nitrate concentration can be from 9 to 27 percent higher than nitrate concentrations that follow a year with average mean daily flow. Conversely, nitrate concentration can be from 8 to 21 percent lower than expected when flow during the previous year was 50 percent higher than average. Previously documented for small, relatively homogenous basins, our results suggest that relationships between antecedent flows and nitrate concentrations are also observable at a regional scale. Relationships were not observed (using all contemporaneous flow data together) for basins larger than 1 million km2, suggesting that above this limit the overall size and diversity within these basins may necessitate the use of more

  6. Effect of Coal Properties and Operation Conditions on Flow Behavior of Coal Slag in Entrained Flow Gasifiers: A Brief Review

    SciTech Connect

    Wang,Ping; Massoudi, Mehrdad

    2011-01-01

    Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) is a potentially promising clean technology with an inherent advantage of low emissions, since the process removes contaminants before combustion instead of from flue gas after combustion, as in a conventional coal steam plant. In addition, IGCC has potential for cost-effective carbon dioxide capture. Availability and high capital costs are the main challenges to making IGCC technology more competitive and fully commercial. Experiences from demonstrated IGCC plants show that, in the gasification system, low availability is largely due to slag buildup in the gasifier and fouling in the syngas cooler downstream of the gasification system. In the entrained flow gasifiers used in IGCC plants, the majority of mineral matter transforms to liquid slag on the wall of the gasifier and flows out the bottom. However, a small fraction of the mineral matter (as fly ash) is entrained with the raw syngas out of the gasifier to downstream processing. This molten/sticky fly ash could cause fouling of the syngas cooler. Therefore, it is preferable to minimize the quantity of fly ash and maximize slag. In addition, the hot raw syngas is cooled to convert any entrained molten fly slag to hardened solid fly ash prior to entering the syngas cooler. To improve gasification availability through better design and operation of the gasification process, better understanding of slag behavior and characteristics of the slagging process are needed. Slagging behavior is affected by char/ash properties, gas compositions in the gasifier, the gasifier wall structure, fluid dynamics, and plant operating conditions (mainly temperature and oxygen/carbon ratio). The viscosity of the slag is used to characterize the behavior of the slag flow and is the dominating factor to determine the probability that ash particles will stick. Slag viscosity strongly depends on the temperature and chemical composition of the slag. Because coal has varying ash content and

  7. Lysozyme fractionation from egg white at pilot scale by means of tangential flow membrane adsorbers: Investigation of the flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Brand, Janina; Voigt, Katharina; Zochowski, Bianca; Kulozik, Ulrich

    2016-03-18

    The application of membrane adsorbers instead of classical packed bed columns for protein fractionation is still a growing field. In the case of egg white protein fractionation, the application of classical chromatography is additionally limited due to its high viscosity that impairs filtration. By using tangential flow membrane adsorbers as stationary phase this limiting factor can be left out, as they can be loaded with particle containing substrates. The flow conditions existing in tangential flow membrane adsorbers are not fully understood yet. Thus, the aim of the present study was to gain a deeper understanding of the transport mechanisms in tangential flow membrane adsorbers. It was found that loading in recirculation mode instead of single pass mode increased the binding capacity (0.39 vs. 0.52 mg cm(-2)). Further, it was shown that either higher flow rates (0.39 mg cm(-2) vs. 0.57 mg cm(-2) at 1 CV min(-1) or 20 CV min(-1), respectively) or higher amounts of the target protein in the feed (0.24 mg cm(-2) vs. 0.85 mg cm(-2) for 2.5 or 39.0 g lysozyme, respectively) led to more protein binding. These results show that, in contrast to radial flow or flat sheet membrane adsorbers, the transport in tangential flow membrane adsorbers is not purely based on convection, but on a mix of convection and diffusion. Additionally, investigations concerning the influence of fouling formation were performed that can lead to transport limitations. It was found that this impact is neglectable. It can be concluded that the usage of tangential flow membrane adsorbers is very recommendable for egg white protein fractionations, although the transport is partly diffusion-limited. PMID:26898148

  8. Analysis of hydrodynamic conditions in adjacent free and heterogeneous porous flow domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, D. B.; Hanspal, N. S.; Nassehi, V.

    2005-09-01

    The existence of a free-flow domain (e.g. a liquid layer) adjacent to a porous medium is a common occurrence in many environmental and petroleum engineering problems. The porous media may often contain various forms of heterogeneity, e.g. layers, fractures, micro-scale lenses, etc. These heterogeneities affect the pressure distribution within the porous domain. This may influence the hydrodynamic conditions at the free-porous domain interface and, hence, the combined flow behaviour. Under steady-state conditions, the heterogeneities are known to have negligible effects on the coupled flow behaviour. However, the significance of the heterogeneity effects on coupled free and porous flow under transient conditions is not certain. In this study, numerical simulations have been carried out to investigate the effects of heterogeneous (layered) porous media on the hydrodynamics conditions in determining the behaviour of combined free and porous regimes. Heterogeneity in the porous media is introduced by defining a domain composed of two layers of porous media with different values of intrinsic permeability. The coupling of the governing equations of motion in free and porous domains has been achieved through the well-known Beavers and Joseph interfacial condition. Of special interest in this work are porous domains with flow-through ends. They represent the general class of problems where large physical domains are truncated to smaller sections for ease of mathematical analysis. However, this causes a practical difficulty in modelling such systems. This is because the information on flow behaviour, i.e. boundary conditions at the truncated sections, is usually not available. Use of artificial boundary conditions to solve these problems effectively implies the imposition of conditions that do not necessarily match with the solutions required for the interior of the domain. This difficulty is resolved in this study by employing stress-free boundary conditions at the open

  9. Comparative Studies of Silicon Dissolution in Molten Aluminum Under Different Flow Conditions, Part I: Single-Phase Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyed Ahmadi, Mehran; Argyropoulos, Stavros A.; Bussmann, Markus; Doutre, Don

    2015-02-01

    This manuscript presents research work related to the assimilation of Silicon (Si) in molten Aluminum (Al) under natural and forced convection conditions. The effects of impurity levels of solid Si, Al bath temperature, and fluid flow conditions were investigated. It was found that a polycrystalline metallurgical grade Si (MGSi) with higher levels of impurities dissolved more slowly than high purity polycrystalline MGSi, which showed a similar dissolution rate to monocrystalline electronic grade Si. For high-purity Si cylinders, the experimental data under natural convection conditions exhibit good agreement with a correlation for vertical cylinders: overline{Sh} = ( 0. 1 1 {{to}}0.129)(Gr_m Sc)^{1/3} . Under forced convection conditions, by rotating the molten Al, the mass transfer rate increased at higher liquid velocities, implying that the dissolution process is controlled by liquid phase diffusion. When the forced convection prevails, the experimental data are well predicted by a correlation for vertical cylinders in cross flow: overline{Sh} = 0.3 + {0.62{Re}^{1/2} Sc^{1/3} }/{[ {1 + (0.4/Sc)^{2/3 } ]^{1/4} }}[ {1 + ( {{Re} /282000} )^{5/8} } ]^{4/5} . Finally, at lower velocities of liquid Al, the combined effect of natural and forced convection must be considered, and a correlation is proposed based on the buoyancy force normal to the direction of the flow.

  10. Open boundary conditions for ISPH and their application to micro-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschler, Manuel; Kunz, Philip; Huber, Manuel; Hahn, Friedemann; Nieken, Ulrich

    2016-02-01

    Open boundary conditions for incompressible Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (ISPH) are rare. For stable simulations with open boundary conditions, one needs to specify all boundary conditions correctly in the pressure force as well as in the linear equation system for pressure calculation. Especially for homogeneous or non-homogeneous Dirichlet boundary conditions for pressure there exist several possibilities but only a few lead to stable results. However, this isn't trivial for open boundary conditions. We introduce a new approach for open boundary conditions for ISPH to enable stable simulations. In contrast to existing models for weakly-compressible SPH, we can specify open pressure boundary conditions because in ISPH, pressure can be calculated independently of the density. The presented approach is based on the mirror particle approach already introduced for solid wall boundary conditions. Here we divide the mirror axis in several segments with time-dependent positions. We validate the presented approach for the example of Poiseuille flow and flow around a cylinder at different Reynolds numbers and show that we get good agreement with references. Then, we demonstrate that the approach can be applied to free surface flows. Finally, we apply the new approach to micro-flow through a random porous medium with a different number of in- and outlets and demonstrate its benefits.

  11. On the far-field stream function condition for two-dimensional incompressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sa, Jong-Youb; Chang, Keun-Shik

    1990-01-01

    The present demonstration of the usefulness of the integral series expansion of the stream function as a far-field computational boundary condition shows the method to require only a 10-percent/time-step increase in computational effort over alternative boundary conditions, in the case of implementation of unsteady problems using a direct elliptic solver. So long as the vorticity was encompassed within the computational domain, the method proved sufficiently accurate to yield virtually identical results for two widely different domains. While the integral-series condition yielded the best results for periodic flow, the Neumann condition gave comparable accuracy with less computation time for the steady-flow case despite its inability to treat periodic flow with vortex shedding.

  12. Median and Low-Flow Characteristics for Streams under Natural and Diverted Conditions, Northeast Maui, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gingerich, Stephen B.

    2005-01-01

    Flow-duration statistics under natural (undiverted) and diverted flow conditions were estimated for gaged and ungaged sites on 21 streams in northeast Maui, Hawaii. The estimates were made using the optimal combination of continuous-record gaging-station data, low-flow measurements, and values determined from regression equations developed as part of this study. Estimated 50- and 95-percent flow duration statistics for streams are presented and the analyses done to develop and evaluate the methods used in estimating the statistics are described. Estimated streamflow statistics are presented for sites where various amounts of streamflow data are available as well as for locations where no data are available. Daily mean flows were used to determine flow-duration statistics for continuous-record stream-gaging stations in the study area following U.S. Geological Survey established standard methods. Duration discharges of 50- and 95-percent were determined from total flow and base flow for each continuous-record station. The index-station method was used to adjust all of the streamflow records to a common, long-term period. The gaging station on West Wailuaiki Stream (16518000) was chosen as the index station because of its record length (1914-2003) and favorable geographic location. Adjustments based on the index-station method resulted in decreases to the 50-percent duration total flow, 50-percent duration base flow, 95-percent duration total flow, and 95-percent duration base flow computed on the basis of short-term records that averaged 7, 3, 4, and 1 percent, respectively. For the drainage basin of each continuous-record gaged site and selected ungaged sites, morphometric, geologic, soil, and rainfall characteristics were quantified using Geographic Information System techniques. Regression equations relating the non-diverted streamflow statistics to basin characteristics of the gaged basins were developed using ordinary-least-squares regression analyses. Rainfall

  13. Experimental demonstration of contaminant removal from fractured rock by boiling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fei; Liu, Xiaoling; Falta, Ronald W; Murdoch, Lawrence C

    2010-08-15

    This study was conducted to experimentally demonstrate removal of a chlorinated volatile organic compound from fractured rock by boiling. A Berea sandstone core was contaminated by injecting water containing dissolved 1,2-DCA (253 mg/L) and sodium bromide (144 mg/L). During heating, the core was sealed except for one end, which was open to the atmosphere to simulate an open fracture. A temperature gradient toward the outlet was observed when boiling occurred in the core. This indicates that steam was generated and a pressure gradient developed toward the outlet, pushing steam vapor and liquid water toward the outlet. As boiling occurred, the concentration of 1,2-DCA in the condensed effluent peaked up to 6.1 times higher than the injected concentration. When 38% of the pore volume of condensate was produced, essentially 100% of the 1,2-DCA was recovered. Nonvolatile bromide concentration in the condensate was used as an indicator of the produced steam quality (vapor mass fraction) because it can only be removed as a solute, and not as a vapor. A higher produced steam quality corresponds to more concentrated 1,2-DCA removal from the core, demonstrating that the chlorinated volatile compound is primarily removed by partitioning into vapor phase flow. This study has experimentally demonstrated that boiling is an effective mechanism for CVOC removal from the rock matrix.

  14. Gas Flow Dynamics in Inlet Capillaries: Evidence for non Laminar Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wißdorf, Walter; Müller, David; Brachthäuser, Yessica; Langner, Markus; Derpmann, Valerie; Klopotowski, Sebastian; Polaczek, Christine; Kersten, Hendrik; Brockmann, Klaus; Benter, Thorsten

    2016-09-01

    In this work, the characteristics of gas flow in inlet capillaries are examined. Such inlet capillaries are widely used as a first flow restriction stage in commercial atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometers. Contrary to the common assumption, we consider the gas flow in typical glass inlet capillaries with 0.5 to 0.6 mm inner diameters and lengths about 20 cm as transitional or turbulent. The measured volume flow of the choked turbulent gas stream in such capillaries is 0.8 L·min-1 to 1.6 L·min-1 under typical operation conditions, which is in good agreement to theoretically calculated values. Likewise, the change of the volume flow in dependence of the pressure difference along the capillary agrees well with a theoretical model for turbulent conditions as well as with exemplary measurements of the static pressure inside the capillary channel. However, the results for the volume flow of heated glass and metal inlet capillaries are neither in agreement with turbulent nor with laminar models. The velocity profile of the neutral gas in a quartz capillary with an inner diameter similar to commercial inlet capillaries was experimentally determined with spatially resolved ion transfer time measurements. The determined gas velocity profiles do not contradict the turbulent character of the flow. Finally, inducing disturbances of the gas flow by placing obstacles in the capillary channel is found to not change the flow characteristics significantly. In combination the findings suggest that laminar conditions inside inlet capillaries are not a valid primary explanation for the observed high ion transparency of inlet capillaries under common operation conditions.

  15. Gas Flow Dynamics in Inlet Capillaries: Evidence for non Laminar Conditions.

    PubMed

    Wißdorf, Walter; Müller, David; Brachthäuser, Yessica; Langner, Markus; Derpmann, Valerie; Klopotowski, Sebastian; Polaczek, Christine; Kersten, Hendrik; Brockmann, Klaus; Benter, Thorsten

    2016-09-01

    In this work, the characteristics of gas flow in inlet capillaries are examined. Such inlet capillaries are widely used as a first flow restriction stage in commercial atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometers. Contrary to the common assumption, we consider the gas flow in typical glass inlet capillaries with 0.5 to 0.6 mm inner diameters and lengths about 20 cm as transitional or turbulent. The measured volume flow of the choked turbulent gas stream in such capillaries is 0.8 L·min(-1) to 1.6 L·min(-1) under typical operation conditions, which is in good agreement to theoretically calculated values. Likewise, the change of the volume flow in dependence of the pressure difference along the capillary agrees well with a theoretical model for turbulent conditions as well as with exemplary measurements of the static pressure inside the capillary channel. However, the results for the volume flow of heated glass and metal inlet capillaries are neither in agreement with turbulent nor with laminar models. The velocity profile of the neutral gas in a quartz capillary with an inner diameter similar to commercial inlet capillaries was experimentally determined with spatially resolved ion transfer time measurements. The determined gas velocity profiles do not contradict the turbulent character of the flow. Finally, inducing disturbances of the gas flow by placing obstacles in the capillary channel is found to not change the flow characteristics significantly. In combination the findings suggest that laminar conditions inside inlet capillaries are not a valid primary explanation for the observed high ion transparency of inlet capillaries under common operation conditions. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27245455

  16. Bubble Generation in a Flowing Liquid Medium and Resulting Two-Phase Flow in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamotani, Yasuhiro

    1996-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical research program is described herein to study bubble generation in a liquid flow in a pipe under reduced gravity conditions. The objective of the work is to study the bubble size and frequency of the generation and the resulting two-phase flow but it also concerns the fluid mechanical aspects of boiling in forced flow in microgravity. By injecting a gas into a liquid flow in a pipe through a small hole in the pipe wall we will investigate how the bubble expands and detaches from the wall, without involving the complexities of boiling. The experiments will be conducted both under isothermal conditions and with heat transfer from the wall. In the experiments with heat transfer the effect of thermocapillarity on the bubble formation and detachment will be the main subject.

  17. Pore-scale analysis of effects of electrode morphology and electrolyte flow conditions on performance of vanadium redox flow batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Gang; Dennison, C. R.; Knehr, K. W.; Kumbur, E. C.; Sun, Ying

    2012-12-01

    A 3D pore-scale transport resolved model is used to study the performance characteristics of a vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) with various electrode morphologies under different operating conditions. Three electrode structures are reconstructed from X-ray computed tomography (XCT) images of porous carbon felt electrode materials. The local vanadium concentration, overpotential, current density and overall cell voltage for the positive half cell are examined. The results indicate that the cell voltage increases with increasing electrolyte flow rate due to decreasing concentration gradients of vanadium species within the porous electrode. However, the marginal gain in cell voltage diminishes once the concentration field approaches uniformity under convection-dominated mass transport conditions at sufficiently high electrolyte flow rates. The model also predicts that electrode structures with low porosity (high surface area) result in more uniform and lower absolute current density and overpotential fields at the expense of increased pressure drop. Finally, poor cell performance is observed for simulations operated at low electrolyte flow rates and low states of charge due to the fuel starvation (i.e., insufficient amount of reactant in the cell).

  18. Analysis of boundary conditions for SSME subsonic internal viscous flow analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.

    1986-01-01

    A study was completed of mathematically proper boundary conditions for unique numerical solution of internal, viscous, subsonic flows in the space shuttle main engine. The study has concentrated on well posed considerations, with emphasis on computational efficiency and numerically stable boundary condition statements. The method of implementing the established boundary conditions is applicable to a wide variety of finite difference and finite element codes, as demonstrated.

  19. Dissolved oxygen in the Tualatin River, Oregon, during winter flow conditions, 1991 and 1992

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelly, V.J.

    1996-01-01

    Throughout the winter period, November through April, wastewater treatment plants in the Tualatin River Basin discharge from 10,000 to 15,000 pounds per day of biochemical oxygen demand to the river. These loads often increase substantially during storms when streamflow is high. During the early winter season, when streamflow is frequently less than the average winter flow, the treatment plants discharge about 2,000 pounds per day of ammonia. This study focused on the capacity of the Tualatin River to assimilat oxygen-demanding loads under winter streamflow conditions during the 1992 water year, with an emphasis on peak-flow conditions in the river, and winter-base-flow conditions during November 1992. Concentrations of dissolved oxygen throughout the main stem of the river during the winter remained generally high relative to the State standard for Oregon of 6 milligrams per liter. The most important factors controlling oxygen consumption during winter-low-flow conditions were carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand and input of oxygen-depleted waters from tributaries. During peak-flow conditions, reduced travel time and increased dilution associated with the increased streamflow minimized the effect of increased oxygen-demanding loads. During the base-flow period in November 1992, concentrations of dissolved oxygen were consistently below 6 milligrams per liter. A hydrodynamic water-quality model was used to identify the processes depleting dissolved oxygen, including sediment oxygen demand, nitrification, and carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand. Sediment oxygen demand was the most significant factor; nitrification was also important. Hypothetical scenarios were posed to evaluate the effect of different wastewater treatment plant loads during winter-base-flow conditions. Streamflow and temperature were significant factors governing concentrations of dissolved oxygen in the main-stem river.

  20. Triggering conditions and mobility of debris flows associated to complex earthflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malet, J.-P.; Laigle, D.; Remaître, A.; Maquaire, O.

    2005-03-01

    Landslides on black marl slopes of the French Alps are, in most cases, complex catastrophic failures in which the initial structural slides transform into slow-moving earthflows. Under specific hydrological conditions, these earthflows can transform into debris flows. Due to their sediment volume and their high mobility, debris flow induced by landslides are far much dangerous than these resulting from continuous erosive processes. A fundamental point to correctly delineate the area exposed to debris flows on the alluvial fans is therefore to understand why and how some earthflows transform into debris flow while most of them stabilize. In this paper, a case of transformation from earthflow to debris flow is presented and analysed. An approach combining geomorphology, hydrology, geotechnics and rheology is adopted to model the debris flow initiation (failure stage) and its runout (postfailure stage). Using the Super-Sauze earthflow (Alpes-de-Haute-Provence, France) as a case study, the objective is to characterize the hydrological and mechanical conditions leading to debris flow initiation in such cohesive material. Results show a very good agreement between the observed runout distances and these calculated using the debris flow modeling code Cemagref 1-D. The deposit thickness in the depositional area and the velocities of the debris flows are also well reproduced. Furthermore, a dynamic slope stability analysis shows that conditions in the debris source area under average pore water pressures and moisture contents are close to failure. A small excess of water can therefore initiate failure. Seepage analysis is used to estimate the volume of debris that can be released for several hydroclimatic conditions. The failed volumes are then introduced in the Cemagref 1-D runout code to propose debris flow hazard scenarios. Results show that clayey earthflow can transform under 5-year return period rainfall conditions into 1-km runout debris flow of volumes ranging

  1. Stability Analysis of a natural circulation flow loop under supercritical condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Rachna

    2005-11-01

    The stability of natural circulation flow loop geometry is under investigation in a specific thermo-dynamic region that encompasses the supercritical temperatures and pressures. This flow configuration is pertinent to the design of passive safety systems in some innovative reactor designs proposed for future generations of water-cooled nuclear reactors. Earlier studies employing both transient and linear stability approach considered supercritical natural circulation flow loop systems having a semi-closed boundary condition which required only the continuity in the pressure of the system around the loop. This is only true for loops that are connected to a large reservoir which theoretically can absorb any fluctuations in the flow velocity or temperatures and thus keep the inlet conditions fixed. A more realistic approach considered in the present study where a periodic boundary condition is imposed for such systems and requires continuity in the pressure, temperature and velocity as an essential boundary condition. With a highly non-linear equation of state specific to supercritical fluid and periodic boundary condition, the stability of this flow system is mathematically challenging to analyze.

  2. Buoyancy-driven flow excursions in fuel assemblies. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Laurinat, J.E.; Paul, P.K.; Menna, J.D.

    1995-07-01

    A power limit criterion was developed for a postulated Loss of Pumping Accident (LOPA) in one of the recently shut down heavy water production reactors at the Savannah River Site. These reactors were cooled by recirculating heavy water moderator downward through channels in cylindrical fuel tubes. Powers were limited to safeguard against a flow excursion in one or more of these parallel channels. During full-power operation, limits safeguarded against a boiling flow excursion. At low flow rates, during the addition of emergency cooling water, buoyant forces reverse the flow in one of the coolant channels before boiling occurs. As power increases beyond the point of flow reversal, the maximum wall temperature approaches the fluid saturation temperature, and a thermal excursion occurs. The power limit criterion for low flow rates was the onset of flow reversal. To determine conditions for flow reversal, tests were performed in a mock-up of a fuel assembly that contained two electrically heated concentric tubes surrounded by three flow channels. These tests were modeled using a finite difference thermal-hydraulic code. According to code calculations, flow reversed in the outer flow channel before the maximum wall temperature reached the local fluid saturation temperature. Thermal excursions occurred when the maximum wall temperature approximately equaled the saturation temperature. For a postulated LOPA, the flow reversal criterion for emergency cooling water addition was more limiting than the boiling excursion criterion for full power operation. This criterion limited powers to 37% of the limiting power for previous long-term reactor operations.

  3. Buoyancy-driven flow excursions in fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Laurinat, J.E.; Paul, P.K.; Menna, J.D.

    1995-09-01

    A power limit criterion was developed for a postulated Loss of Pumping Accident (LOPA) in one of the recently shut down heavy water production reactors at the Savannah River Site. These reactors were cooled by recirculating heavy water moderator downward through channels in cylindrical fuel tubes. Powers were limited to safeguard against a flow excursion in one of more of these parallel channels. During-full-power operation, limits safeguarded against a boiling flow excursion. At low flow rates, during the addition of emergency cooling water, buoyant forces reverse the flow in one of the coolant channels before boiling occurs. As power increased beyond the point of flow reversal, the maximum wall temperature approaches the fluid saturation temperature, and a thermal excursion occurs. The power limit criterion for low flow rates was the onset of flow reversal. To determine conditions for flow reversal, tests were performed in a mock-up of a fuel assembly that contained two electrically heated concentric tubes surrounded by three flow channels. These tests were modeled using a finite difference thermal-hydraulic code. According to code calculations, flow reversed in the outer flow channel before the maximum wall temperature reached the local fluid saturation temperature. Thermal excursions occurred when the maximum wall temperature approximately equaled the saturation temperature. For a postulated LOPA, the flow reversal criterion for emergency cooling water addition was more limiting than the boiling excursion criterion for full power operation. This criterion limited powers to 37% of the limiting power for previous long-term reactor operations.

  4. EHD enhancement of nucleate boiling. [Electrohydrodynamic

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, P. )

    1990-05-01

    This paper describes: (a) an experimental investigation into the effect of an electric field applied to pool boiling of Freon (R114) on a finned tube and (b) a theoretical model of electrically enhanced nucleate boiling applicable to simple surfaces only. Experimental results have shown electrohydrodynamic (EHD) enhancement of heat transfer to be manifest in two ways: (1) elimination of boiling hysteresis, (2) augmentation of nulceate boiling heat transfer coefficients by up to an order of magnitude. These effects were also observed in electrically enhanced boiling of Freon/oil mixtures. A new analytical model is described whereby EHD nucleate boiling data from previous studies (employing simple apparatus comprising heated wires with concentric cylinder electrodes) have been correlated for the first time using the concept of an electrical influence number. This dimensionless parameter is based upon the relationship between applied electric field intensity and changes in bubble departure diameter at a heat transfer surface.

  5. Effects of operation of Raccoon Mountain pumped-storage project on Nickajack Reservoir flow conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, J.; Price, J.T.

    1980-01-01

    The results from a study to determine the effects of Raccoon Mountain Pumped-Storage Plant operations on flow conditions within Nickajack Reservoir are presented. Computer simulations and field studies have shown that flow reversals occur in Nickajack Reservoir as a result of the power peaking operations of the Nickajack and Chickamauga hydroelectric plants, both situated on the Tennessee River. The primary cause of these reversals is attributable to shutdowns of the Chickamauga turbines. The focus of this study is on flow reversals near the Moccasin Bend sewage treatment plant and near the Tennessee American water treatment plant, both of which are located on the Tennessee River near Chattanooga. Results from the study show that, under normal and extreme operating conditions at Chickamauga and Nickajack Dams, operation of the Raccoon Mountain Pumped-Storage Plant has no appreciable influence on flow reversals at the two plant sites.

  6. Vapor pressure and boiling point elevation of slash pine black liquors: Predictive models with statistical approach

    SciTech Connect

    Zaman, A.A.; McNally, T.W.; Fricke, A.L.

    1998-01-01

    Vapor-liquid equilibria and boiling point elevation of slash pine kraft black liquors over a wide range of solid concentrations (up to 85% solids) has been studied. The liquors are from a statistically designed pulping experiment for pulping slash pine in a pilot scale digester with four cooking variables of effective alkali, sulfidity, cooking time, and cooking temperature. It was found that boiling point elevation of black liquors is pressure dependent, and this dependency is more significant at higher solids concentrations. The boiling point elevation data at different solids contents (at a fixed pressure) were correlated to the dissolved solids (S/(1 {minus} S)) in black liquor. Due to the solubility limit of some of the salts in black liquor, a change in the slope of the boiling point elevation as a function of the dissolved solids was observed at a concentration of around 65% solids. An empirical method was developed to describe the boiling point elevation of each liquor as a function of pressure and solids mass fraction. The boiling point elevation of slash pine black liquors was correlated quantitatively to the pulping variables, using different statistical procedures. These predictive models can be applied to determine the boiling point rise (and boiling point) of slash pine black liquors at processing conditions from the knowledge of pulping variables. The results are presented, and their utility is discussed.

  7. Boils

    MedlinePlus

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  8. Studies on effects of boundary conditions in confined turbulent flow predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nallasamy, M.; Chen, C. P.

    1985-09-01

    The differences in k epsilon model predictions of plane and axisymmetric expansion flows is investigated. The prediction of the coaxial jet for different velocity ratios of the annular to central jet is presented. The effects of inlet kinetic energy and the energy dissipation rate profiles are investigated for swirling and nonswirling flows. The effects of expansion ration and Reynolds number on the reattachment length are also presented. The results show that the inlet k and epsilon profiles have the most significant effect on the reattachment length and flow redevelopment for the case of coaxial jet of high velocity ratio. A comparison of k epsilon model predictions for the pipe expansion flow by the PHOENICS and TEACH codes reveals some discrepancies in the predicted results. TEACH prediction seems to produce unrealistic kinetic energy profiles in some regions of the flow. PHOENICS code produces a long tail in the recirculation region under certain conditions.

  9. Wall catalytic recombination and boundary conditions in nonequilibrium hypersonic flows - With applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Carl D.

    1992-01-01

    The meaning of catalysis and its relation to aerodynamic heating in nonequilibrium hypersonic flows are discussed. The species equations are described and boundary conditions for them are derived for a multicomponent gas and for a binary gas. Slip effects are included for application of continuum methods to low-density flows. Measurement techniques for determining catalytic wall recombination rates are discussed. Among them are experiments carried out in arc jets as well as flow reactors. Diagnostic methods for determining the atom or molecule concentrations in the flow are included. Results are given for a number of materials of interest to the aerospace community, including glassy coatings such as the RCG coating of the Space Shuttle and for high temperature refractory metals such as coated niobium. Methods of calculating the heat flux to space vehicles in nonequilibrium flows are described. These methods are applied to the Space Shuttle, the planned Aeroassist Flight Experiment, and a hypersonic slender vehicle such as a transatmospheric vehicle.

  10. Comparison of flow characteristics around refractive and right-angled groins in barotropic and baroclinic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omdehghiasi, Hamed; Mojtahedi, Alireza; Lotfollahi-Yaghin, Mohammad Ali

    2015-12-01

    Groins are employed to prevent nearshore areas from erosion and to control the direction of flow. However, the groin structure and its associated flow characteristics are the main causes of local erosion. In this study, we investigate the flow patterns around refractive and right-angle groins. In particular, we analytically compare the flow characteristics around a refractive groin and study the degree of accuracy that can be achieved by using a right-angle groin of various projected lengths. To compare the flow characteristics, we replaced the right-angle groin with an approximation of a refractive groin. This replacement had the least effect on the maximum velocity of flow in the channel. Moreover, we investigated the distribution of the density variables of temperature and salinity, and their effects on the flow characteristics around the right-angle groin. A comparison of the flow analysis results in baroclinic and barotropic conditions reveals that the flow characteristic values are very similar for both the refractive and right-angle groins. The geometry of the groin, i.e., right-angle or refractive, has little effect on the maximum speed to relative average speed. Apart from the angular separation, the arm length of the groin in downstream refractive groins has less effect on other flow characteristics than do upstream refractive groins. We also correlated a number of non-dimensional variables with respect to various flow characteristics and groin geometry. These comparisons indicate that the correlation between the thalweg height and width of the channel and groin arm's length to projection length have been approximated using linear and nonlinear formulas regardless of inner velocity in the subcritical flow.

  11. Effect of reference conditions on flow rate, modifier fraction and retention in supercritical fluid chromatography.

    PubMed

    De Pauw, Ruben; Shoykhet Choikhet, Konstantin; Desmet, Gert; Broeckhoven, Ken

    2016-08-12

    When using compressible mobile phases such as fluidic CO2, the density, the volumetric flow rates and volumetric fractions are pressure dependent. The pressure and temperature definition of these volumetric parameters (referred to as the reference conditions) may alter between systems, manufacturers and operating conditions. A supercritical fluid chromatography system was modified to operate in two modes with different definition of the eluent delivery parameters, referred to as fixed and variable mode. For the variable mode, the volumetric parameters are defined with reference to the pump operating pressure and actual pump head temperature. These conditions may vary when, e.g. changing the column length, permeability, flow rate, etc. and are thus variable reference conditions. For the fixed mode, the reference conditions were set at 150bar and 30°C, resulting in a mass flow rate and mass fraction of modifier definition which is independent of the operation conditions. For the variable mode, the mass flow rate of carbon dioxide increases with system pump operating pressure, decreasing the fraction of modifier. Comparing the void times and retention factor shows that the deviation between the two modes is almost independent of modifier percentage, but depends on the operating pressure. Recalculating the set volumetric fraction of modifier to the mass fraction results in the same retention behaviour for both modes. This shows that retention in SFC can be best modelled using the mass fraction of modifier. The fixed mode also simplifies method scaling as it only requires matching average column pressure. PMID:27401813

  12. An analytical study on artesian flow conditions in unconfined-aquifer drainage basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun-Zhi; Jiang, Xiao-Wei; Wan, Li; Wörman, Anders; Wang, Heng; Wang, Xu-Sheng; Li, Hailong

    2015-10-01

    Although it has been reported that flowing artesian wells could be topographically controlled, there is no quantitative research on artesian flow conditions in unconfined aquifers. In this study, the water table, which has a lower amplitude than the land surface, is damped from the topography and used as the boundary condition to obtain the analytical solution of hydraulic head of a unit basin with a single flow system. The term artesian head is defined to characterize the condition of flowing artesian wells. The zone with positive artesian head is called artesian zone while with negative artesian head is nonartesian zone. The maximum artesian head and the size of artesian zones are found to increase with the damping factor and the anisotropy ratio, and decrease with the ratio of basin width to depth and the depth-decay exponent of hydraulic conductivity. Moreover, the artesian head increases with depth nearby the valley and decreases with depth near by the divide, and the variation rates are influenced by the decay exponent and the anisotropy ratio. Finally, the distribution of flowing artesian wells and the artesian head measurements in different depths of a borehole in a small catchment in the Ordos Plateau, Northwestern China is used to illustrate the theoretical findings. The change in artesian head with depth was used to estimate the anisotropy ratio and the decay exponent. This study opens up a new door to analyze basin-scale groundwater flow.

  13. Experimental investigation on the flow-induced noise under variable conditions for centrifugal pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Shouqi; Yang, Jun; Yuan, Jianping; Luo, Yin; Pei, Ji

    2012-05-01

    With extensively using of centrifugal pumps, noise generation in these pumps is increasingly receiving research attention in recent years. The noise sources in centrifugal pumps are mainly composed of mechanical noise and flow-induced noise. And the study of flow-induced noise has become a hotspot and important domain in the field. The flow-induced noise closely related to the inner pressure pulses and vibration of volute in pumps, therefore, it is necessary to research the interaction and mechanism among them. To investigate the relationships, a test system is designed which includes a test loop and a measurement system. The hydrophones and pressure sensors are installed on the outlet of the pump and vibration acceleration sensors are disposed on the pump body. Via these instruments, the signals of noise, pressure pulses and vibration are collected and analyzed. The results show that the level of flow-induced noise becomes smaller as the flow increment during low flow rate operations, and it is steadily close to the design point, then it increases with the growing of flow rate in high flow rate conditions. Furthermore, there are some similar peak points in the power spectrum charts of noise, pressure pulses and vibration. The broadband noise at low flow rate is mostly focused on the region of 0-40 times shaft frequency, which is mostly made by rotating stall and vortex; while the noise at high flow rate conditions is focused on the region of 60-100 times shaft frequency, which may be mostly made by cavitations. The proposed research is of practical and academic significance to the study of noise reduction for centrifugal pumps.

  14. Characteristics of the Shuttle Orbiter Leeside Flow During A Reentry Condition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleb, William L.; Weilmuenster, K. James

    1992-01-01

    A study of the leeside flow characteristics of the Shuttle Orbiter is presented for a reentry flight condition. The flow is computed using a point-implicit, finite-volume scheme known as the Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA). LAURA is a second-order accurate, laminar Navier-Stokes solver, incorporating finite-rate chemistry with a radiative equilibrium wall temperature distribution and finite-rate wall catalysis. The resulting computational solution is analyzed in terms of salient flow features and the surface quantities are compared with flight data.

  15. Parachute gore shape and flow visualization during transient and steady-state conditions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dereng, V. G.

    1973-01-01

    Single parachute gore segments were tested in an experimental wind tunnel having a unique 'V' splitter plate test section with a glass panel on the near side and a grid of orifices for smoke injection on the back panel. The parachute gore shape and flow patterns were viewed in cross section during the inflation process and also during changing flow conditions as would occur with rapid reduction of payload weight. Observations of flow during inflation revealed a transient internal counterflow and the formation and degeneration of several trailing vortices. Gore shapes observed compared well with those of free flight.

  16. Length Scale and Gravity Effects on Microgravity Boiling Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jungho; McQuillen, John; Balombin, Joe

    2002-01-01

    ) and is the wavelength that amplifies most rapidly. The critical wavelength, lambda(sub c), is the wavelength below which a vapor layer underneath a liquid layer is stable. For heaters with Bo smaller than about 3 (heaters smaller than lambda(sub D)), the above model is not applicable, and surface tension effects dominate. Bubble coalescence is thought to be the mechanism for CHF under these conditions. Small Bo can result by decreasing the size of a heater in earth gravity, or by operating a large heater in a lower gravity environment. In the microgravity of space, even large heaters can have low Bo, and models based on Helmholtz instability should not be applicable. The macrolayer model of Haramura and Katto is dimensionally equivalent to Zuber's model and has the same dependence on gravity, so it should not be applicable as well. The goal of this work is to determine how boiling heat transfer mechanisms in a low-g environment are altered from those at higher gravity levels. Boiling data using a microheater array was obtained under gravity environments ranging from 1.8 g to 0.02 g with heater sizes ranging from 2.7 mm to 1 mm. The boiling behavior for 2.7 mm at 0.02 g looked quite similar to boiling on the 1 mm heater at 1 g-the formation of a large primary bubble surrounded by smaller satellite bubbles was observed under both conditions. The similarity suggests that for heaters smaller than some fraction of I(sub c), coalescence and surface tension dominate boiling heat transfer. It also suggests that microgravity boiling can be studied by studying boiling on very small heaters.

  17. Liquid sprays and flow studies in the direct-injection diesel engine under motored conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hung Lee; Carpenter, Mark H.; Ramos, Juan I.; Schock, Harold J.; Stegeman, James D.

    1988-01-01

    A two dimensional, implicit finite difference method of the control volume variety, a two equation model of turbulence, and a discrete droplet model were used to study the flow field, turbulence levels, fuel penetration, vaporization, and mixing in diesel engine environments. The model was also used to study the effects of engine speed, injection angle, spray cone angle, droplet distribution, and intake swirl angle on the flow field, spray penetration and vaporization, and turbulence in motored two-stroke diesel engines. It is shown that there are optimum conditions for injection, which depend on droplet distribution, swirl, spray cone angle, and injection angle. The optimum conditions result in good spray penetration and vaporization and in good fuel mixing. The calculation presented clearly indicates that internal combustion engine models can be used to assess, at least qualitatively, the effects of injection characteristics and engine operating conditions on the flow field and on the spray penetration and vaporization in diesel engines.

  18. Applications of a new wall-slip boundary condition to the computation of turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnik, R. E.; Marconi, F.; Flynn, G.

    1993-07-01

    In this paper we report on a new wall matching condition for use in the solution of the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations. The new matching conditions follows from a two-parameter asymptotic theory based on systematic asymptotic expansions of the RANS equations for the Reynolds number, R -- oo and a turbulence model constant, a -- O. The theory was originally developed for incompressible flow and a Baldwin-Lomax algebraic turbulence model. In this paper we describe the generalization of the theory to compressible flow and describe some modifications needed to apply the theory to separated flow. Numerical results are presented using the new wall matching condition in a compressible RANS code.

  19. Characterization of flow conditions in 2 L and 20 L wave bioreactors using computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Oncül, Alper A; Kalmbach, Andreas; Genzel, Yvonne; Reichl, Udo; Thévenin, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    Characterization of flow conditions is of great importance to control cell growth and cell damage in animal cell culture because cell viability is influenced by the flow properties in bioreactors. Alternative reactor types like Wave Bioreactors have been proposed in recent years, leading to markedly different results in cell growth and product formation. An advantage of Wave Bioreactors is the disposability of the Polyethylenterephthalet-bags after one single use (fast setup of new production facilities). Another expected advantage is a lower shear stress compared to classical stirred-tank reactors, due to the gentle liquid motion in the rocking cellbag. This property would considerably reduce possible cell damage. The purpose of the present study is to investigate in a quantitative manner the key flow properties in Wave Bioreactors, both numerically and experimentally. To describe accurately flow conditions and shear stress in Wave Bioreactors using numerical simulations, it is necessary to compute the unsteady flow applying Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Corresponding computations for two reactor scales (2 L and 20 L cellbags) are presented using the CFD code ANSYS-FLUENT. To describe correctly the free liquid surface, the present simulations employ the Volume of Fluid (VOF) method. Additionally, experimental measurements have been carried out to determine liquid level, flow velocity and liquid shear stress, which are used as a validation of the present CFD simulations. It is shown that the obtained flows stay in the laminar regime. Furthermore, the obtained shear stress levels are well below known threshold values leading to damage of animal cells.

  20. Conditioning of Flow Projections under Climate Change on Hydrologic Signatures within the GLUE Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorovic, Andrijana; Plavsic, Jasna; Despotovic, Jovan

    2016-04-01

    Climate change impact on water resources is generally quantified in terms of relative changes in characteristic flows (e.g. annual runoff, median annual flows, etc.) over a future period compared to the baseline one. These changes are estimated under the assumed emission scenarios and with one or more modelling chains (combinations of the Global and Regional Climate Models, and a hydrological model). Since different modelling chains yield different projections, estimates of these relative changes are uncertain. High prediction uncertainty is reflected in a wide 90 per cent prediction uncertainty band (90PPU) or in a distribution that resembles the uniform distribution. Therefore, research in robustness of the modelling chains has been conducted. The goal of the research is to appoint higher probabilities to the projections obtained by the more robust chains, and in that way reduce the uncertainty in flow projections under climate change. In this research, the hydrologic projections are conditioned on the hydrologic signatures within the GLUE framework. Namely, a relative change obtained with a modelling chain is assigned a likelihood depending on the performance of the chain in terms of the hydrologic signatures over the baseline period. High flow projections (2nd percentile of the daily flows) are conditioned on the high-segment of the flow duration curve (FDC), projections of the median flows are conditioned on the FDC mid-segment slope, and the projections of the low flows are conditioned on the FDC low-segment. The projections of total annual runoff are conditioned on the entire FDC. The likelihoods are quantified in terms of Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency coefficient (NSE) evaluated from the FDCs of the flows simulated by the modelling chains and the observed FDC. The methodology presented is applied to develop flow projections in the Kolubara River catchment in Serbia over the mid 21st century (2041-2070). Hydrologic projections are obtained by the HBV

  1. Tracing Nitrogen Sources in Forested Catchments Under Varying Flow Conditions: Seasonal and Event Scale Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebestyen, S. D.; Shanley, J. B.; Boyer, E. W.; Kendall, C.

    2004-12-01

    Our ability to assess how stream nutrient concentrations respond to biogeochemical transformations and stream flow dynamics is often limited by datasets that do not include all flow conditions that occur over event, monthly, seasonal, and yearly time scales. At the Sleepers River Research Watershed in northeastern Vermont, USA, nitrate, DOC (dissolved organic carbon), and major ion concentrations were measured on samples collected over a wide range of flow conditions from summer 2002 through summer 2004. Nutrient flushing occurred at the W-9 catchment and high-frequency sampling revealed critical insights into seasonal and event-scale controls on nutrient concentrations. In this seasonally snow-covered catchment, the earliest stage of snowmelt introduced nitrogen directly to the stream from the snowpack. As snowmelt progressed, the source of stream nitrate shifted to flushing of soil nitrate along shallow subsurface flow paths. In the growing season, nitrogen flushing to streams varied with antecedent moisture conditions. More nitrogen was available to flush to streams when antecedent moisture was lowest, and mobile nitrogen stores in the landscape regenerated under baseflow conditions on times scales as short as 7 days. Leaf fall was another critical time when coupled hydrological and biogeochemical processes controlled nutrient fluxes. With the input of labile organic carbon from freshly decomposing leaves, nitrate concentrations declined sharply in response to in-stream immobilization or denitrification. These high-resolution hydrochemical data from multiple flow regimes are identifying "hot spots" and "hot moments" of biogeochemical and hydrological processes that control nutrient fluxes in streams.

  2. Measurement of dielectric properties of pumpable food materials under static and continuous flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Kumar, P; Coronel, P; Simunovic, J; Truong, V D; Sandeep, K P

    2007-05-01

    Continuous flow microwave sterilization is an emerging technology that has the potential to replace the conventional heating processes for viscous and pumpable food products. Dielectric properties of pumpable food products were measured by a new approach (under continuous flow conditions) at a temperature range of 20 to 130 degrees C and compared with those measured by the conventional approach (under static conditions). The food products chosen for this study were skim milk, green pea puree, carrot puree, and salsa con queso. Second-order polynomial correlations for the dependence of dielectric properties at 915 MHz of the food products on temperature were developed. Dielectric properties measured under static and continuous flow conditions were similar for homogeneous food products such as skim milk and vegetable puree, but they were significantly different for salsa con queso, which is a multiphase food product. The results from this study suggest that, for a multiphase product, dielectric properties measured under continuous flow conditions should be used for designing a continuous flow microwave heating system.

  3. Defining boundary conditions for RANS predictions of urban flows using mesoscale simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Sanchez, Clara; Gorle, Catherine; van Beeck, Jeroen

    2015-11-01

    Pollutant dispersion and wind flows in urban canopies are major concerns for human health and energy, and the complex nature of the flow and transport processes remains a challenge when using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to predict wind flows. The definition of the inflow boundary condition in Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes simulations (RANS) is one of the uncertainties that will strongly influence the prediction of the flow field, and thus, the dispersion pattern. The goal of the work presented is to define a methodology that improves the level of realism in the inflow condition for RANS simulations by accounting for larger mesoscale effects. The Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) is used to forecast mesoscale flow patterns, and two different approaches are used to define inflow conditions for the RANS simulations performed with OpenFOAM: 1) WRF variables such as local velocity magnitude, ABL height and friction velocity are directly interpolated onto the boundaries of the CFD domain; 2) WRF predictions for the geostrophic wind and friction velocity are applied as a forcing boundary condition. Simulations of the Joint Urban 2003 experimental campaign in Oklahoma City have been performed using both approaches and a comparison of the results will be presented.

  4. Impact of magnetic field in three-dimensional flow of Sisko nanofluid with convective condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, T.; Muhammad, Taseer; Ahmad, B.; Shehzad, S. A.

    2016-09-01

    This communication addresses the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) three dimensional flow of Sisko nanofluid bounded by a surface stretched bidirectionally. Nanofluid model includes the Brownian motion and thermophoresis. Heat transfer through convective condition is discussed. Developed condition with the zero nanoparticles mass flux at the surface is implemented. The governing problems subject to boundary layer approximations are computed for the convergent series solutions. Effects of interesting flow parameters on the temperature and nanoparticles concentration distributions are studied and discussed. Skin friction coefficients and the local Nusselt number are computed and analyzed.

  5. Mass flows of endocrine disruptors in the Glatt River during varying weather conditions.

    PubMed

    Jonkers, Niels; Kohler, Hans-Peter E; Dammshäuser, Anna; Giger, Walter

    2009-03-01

    This study focused on the occurrence and behaviour in wastewater and surface waters of several phenolic endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) including parabens, alkylphenolic compounds, phenylphenol (PhP) and bisphenol A (BPA). Analytical procedures using solid-phase-extraction and LC-MS/MS techniques were applied to samples of influents and effluents of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) discharging into the Glatt River (Switzerland) as well as to river water samples. A mass flow analysis provided insight into the main sources and the fate of these contaminants during different weather conditions. Concentrations in influents were in the low microg/L range for most analytes. Removal of parabens in the WWTPs was mostly above 99%. Nonylphenol polyethoxylates (A(9)PEO) removal amounted to 98%, but in some cases nonylphenoxy acetic acid (A(9)PEC) or nonylphenols (NP) were formed. In effluents, concentrations were highest for the A(9)PEC, A(9)PEO and NP. Concentrations in river water were in the high ng/L range for alkylphenolic compounds and in the low ng/L range for BPA, PhP and the parabens. During the sampling period, in which several rain events occurred, both water flows and mass flows varied strongly. Mass flows in WWTP effluents and in the river increased with increasing water flows for most compounds indicating that higher water flows do not lead necessarily to a proportional dilution of the pollutants. Throughout the low water flow period, mass flows predicted from the known inputs were similar to the actual mass flows at the end of the river for most analytes. For none of the EDCs, significant in-stream removal could be observed. In the periods with high water flows, mass flows in the river were much higher than can be explained by the initially defined sources. Discharge of untreated wastewater influent into the river was assessed as an additional source. Adding this source improved the mass balance for some, but not all of the analytes.

  6. Mass flows of endocrine disruptors in the Glatt River during varying weather conditions.

    PubMed

    Jonkers, Niels; Kohler, Hans-Peter E; Dammshäuser, Anna; Giger, Walter

    2009-03-01

    This study focused on the occurrence and behaviour in wastewater and surface waters of several phenolic endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) including parabens, alkylphenolic compounds, phenylphenol (PhP) and bisphenol A (BPA). Analytical procedures using solid-phase-extraction and LC-MS/MS techniques were applied to samples of influents and effluents of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) discharging into the Glatt River (Switzerland) as well as to river water samples. A mass flow analysis provided insight into the main sources and the fate of these contaminants during different weather conditions. Concentrations in influents were in the low microg/L range for most analytes. Removal of parabens in the WWTPs was mostly above 99%. Nonylphenol polyethoxylates (A(9)PEO) removal amounted to 98%, but in some cases nonylphenoxy acetic acid (A(9)PEC) or nonylphenols (NP) were formed. In effluents, concentrations were highest for the A(9)PEC, A(9)PEO and NP. Concentrations in river water were in the high ng/L range for alkylphenolic compounds and in the low ng/L range for BPA, PhP and the parabens. During the sampling period, in which several rain events occurred, both water flows and mass flows varied strongly. Mass flows in WWTP effluents and in the river increased with increasing water flows for most compounds indicating that higher water flows do not lead necessarily to a proportional dilution of the pollutants. Throughout the low water flow period, mass flows predicted from the known inputs were similar to the actual mass flows at the end of the river for most analytes. For none of the EDCs, significant in-stream removal could be observed. In the periods with high water flows, mass flows in the river were much higher than can be explained by the initially defined sources. Discharge of untreated wastewater influent into the river was assessed as an additional source. Adding this source improved the mass balance for some, but not all of the analytes. PMID:19117654

  7. Bubble Generation in a Continuous Liquid Flow Under Reduced Gravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pais, Salvatore Cezar

    1999-01-01

    The present work reports a study of bubble generation under reduced gravity conditions for both co-flow and cross-flow configurations. Experiments were performed aboard the DC-9 Reduced Gravity Aircraft at NASA Glenn Research Center, using an air-water system. Three different flow tube diameters were used: 1.27, 1.9, and 2.54 cm. Two different ratios of air injection nozzle to tube diameters were considered: 0.1 and 0.2. Gas and liquid volumetric flow rates were varied from 10 to 200 ml/s. It was experimentally observed that with increasing superficial liquid velocity, the bubbles generated decreased in size. The bubble diameter was shown to increase with increasing air injection nozzle diameters. As the tube diameter was increased, the size of the detached bubbles increased. Likewise, as the superficial liquid velocity was increased, the frequency of bubble formation increased and thus the time to detach forming bubbles decreased. Independent of the flow configuration (for either single nozzle or multiple nozzle gas injection), void fraction and hence flow regime transition can be controlled in a somewhat precise manner by solely varying the gas and liquid volumetric flow rates. On the other hand, it is observed that uniformity of bubble size can be controlled more accurately by using single nozzle gas injection than by using multiple port injection, since this latter system gives rise to unpredictable coalescence of adjacent bubbles. A theoretical model, based on an overall force balance, is employed to study single bubble generation in the dynamic and bubbly flow regime. Under conditions of reduced gravity, the gas momentum flux enhances bubble detachment; however, the surface tension forces at the nozzle tip inhibits bubble detachment. Liquid drag and inertia can act either as attaching or detaching force, depending on the relative velocity of the bubble with respect to the surrounding liquid. Predictions of the theoretical model compare well with performed

  8. Influence of boundary condition types on unstable density-dependent flow.

    PubMed

    Ataie-Ashtiani, Behzad; Simmons, Craig T; Werner, Adrian D

    2014-01-01

    Boundary conditions are required to close the mathematical formulation of unstable density-dependent flow systems. Proper implementation of boundary conditions, for both flow and transport equations, in numerical simulation are critical. In this paper, numerical simulations using the FEFLOW model are employed to study the influence of the different boundary conditions for unstable density-dependent flow systems. A similar set up to the Elder problem is studied. It is well known that the numerical simulation results of the standard Elder problem are strongly dependent on spatial discretization. This work shows that for the cases where a solute mass flux boundary condition is employed instead of a specified concentration boundary condition at the solute source, the numerical simulation results do not vary between different convective solution modes (i.e., plume configurations) due to the spatial discretization. Also, the influence of various boundary condition types for nonsource boundaries was studied. It is shown that in addition to other factors such as spatial and temporal discretization, the forms of the solute transport equation such as divergent and convective forms as well as the type of boundary condition employed in the nonsource boundary conditions influence the convective solution mode in coarser meshes. On basis of the numerical experiments performed here, higher sensitivities regarding the numerical solution stability are observed for the Adams-Bashford/Backward Trapezoidal time integration approach in comparison to the Euler-Backward/Euler-Forward time marching approach. The results of this study emphasize the significant consequences of boundary condition choice in the numerical modeling of unstable density-dependent flow. PMID:23659688

  9. Granular Matter Transport in Vertical Pipes: The Influence of Pipe Outlet Conditions on Gravity-driven Granular Flow.

    PubMed

    Jaklič, Miha; Kočevar, Klemen; Srčič, Stanko; Dreu, Rok

    2016-01-01

    Gravity transport of granular materials in vertical pipes is one of the most fundamental steps in bulk powder handling and processing. Presented study investigates powder flow characteristics in vertical pipes with open and closed outlets and condition of free powder fall. Powder flow of pharmaceutical grade powders was observed in transparent, vertical pipe model. Description of flow structures was performed. Powder volume flow rate, acceleration, and dilatation were quantified and correlated with powder properties. The results show that in pipes with a closed outlet the escaping air slows down the powder flow, resulting in a much slower flow than in pipes with an open outlet. A dense granular flow was detected in an open outlet condition, whereas in a closed outlet condition two concurrent flow regimes were observed: a slow moving, dense powder bed, and a fast dilute powder flow. Differences in flow regimes may promote segregation, with important implications to industrial processes.

  10. Modeling acid-gas generation from boiling chloride brines

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background This study investigates the generation of HCl and other acid gases from boiling calcium chloride dominated waters at atmospheric pressure, primarily using numerical modeling. The main focus of this investigation relates to the long-term geologic disposal of nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, where pore waters around waste-emplacement tunnels are expected to undergo boiling and evaporative concentration as a result of the heat released by spent nuclear fuel. Processes that are modeled include boiling of highly concentrated solutions, gas transport, and gas condensation accompanied by the dissociation of acid gases, causing low-pH condensate. Results Simple calculations are first carried out to evaluate condensate pH as a function of HCl gas fugacity and condensed water fraction for a vapor equilibrated with saturated calcium chloride brine at 50-150°C and 1 bar. The distillation of a calcium-chloride-dominated brine is then simulated with a reactive transport model using a brine composition representative of partially evaporated calcium-rich pore waters at Yucca Mountain. Results show a significant increase in boiling temperature from evaporative concentration, as well as low pH in condensates, particularly for dynamic systems where partial condensation takes place, which result in enrichment of HCl in condensates. These results are in qualitative agreement with experimental data from other studies. Conclusion The combination of reactive transport with multicomponent brine chemistry to study evaporation, boiling, and the potential for acid gas generation at the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is seen as an improvement relative to previously applied simpler batch evaporation models. This approach allows the evaluation of thermal, hydrological, and chemical (THC) processes in a coupled manner, and modeling of settings much more relevant to actual field conditions than the distillation experiment considered. The actual and modeled distillation

  11. Modeling acid-gas generation from boiling chloride brines

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Guoxiang; Spycher, Nicolas; Sonnenthal, Eric; Steefel, Carl

    2009-11-16

    This study investigates the generation of HCl and other acid gases from boiling calcium chloride dominated waters at atmospheric pressure, primarily using numerical modeling. The main focus of this investigation relates to the long-term geologic disposal of nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, where pore waters around waste-emplacement tunnels are expected to undergo boiling and evaporative concentration as a result of the heat released by spent nuclear fuel. Processes that are modeled include boiling of highly concentrated solutions, gas transport, and gas condensation accompanied by the dissociation of acid gases, causing low-pH condensate. Simple calculations are first carried out to evaluate condensate pH as a function of HCl gas fugacity and condensed water fraction for a vapor equilibrated with saturated calcium chloride brine at 50-150 C and 1 bar. The distillation of a calcium-chloride-dominated brine is then simulated with a reactive transport model using a brine composition representative of partially evaporated calcium-rich pore waters at Yucca Mountain. Results show a significant increase in boiling temperature from evaporative concentration, as well as low pH in condensates, particularly for dynamic systems where partial condensation takes place, which result in enrichment of HCl in condensates. These results are in qualitative agreement with experimental data from other studies. The combination of reactive transport with multicomponent brine chemistry to study evaporation, boiling, and the potential for acid gas generation at the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is seen as an improvement relative to previously applied simpler batch evaporation models. This approach allows the evaluation of thermal, hydrological, and chemical (THC) processes in a coupled manner, and modeling of settings much more relevant to actual field conditions than the distillation experiment considered. The actual and modeled distillation experiments do not represent

  12. A study of forced convection boiling under reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merte, Herman, Jr.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents the results of activities conducted over the period 1/2/85-12/31/90, in which the study of forced convection boiling under reduced gravity was initiated. The study seeks to improve the understanding of the basic processes that constitute forced convection boiling by removing the buoyancy effects which may mask other phenomena. Specific objectives may also be expressed in terms of the following questions: (1) what effects, if any, will the removal of body forces to the lowest possible levels have on the forced convection boiling heat transfer processes in well-defined and meaningful circumstances? (this includes those effects and processes associated with the nucleation or onset of boiling during the transient increase in heater surface temperature, as well as the heat transfer and vapor bubble behaviors with established or steady-state conditions); and (2) if such effects are present, what are the boundaries of the relevant parameters such as heat flux, heater surface superheat, fluid velocity, bulk subcooling, and geometric/orientation relationships within which such effects will be produced?

  13. Influence of the Tool Shoulder Contact Conditions on the Material Flow During Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doude, Haley R.; Schneider, Judy A.; Nunes, Arthur C.

    2014-09-01

    Friction stir welding (FSWing) is a solid-state joining process of special interest in joining alloys that are traditionally difficult to fusion weld. In order to optimize the process, various numeric modeling approaches have been pursued. Of importance to furthering modeling efforts is a better understanding of the contact conditions between the workpiece and the weld tool. Both theoretical and experimental studies indicate the contact conditions between the workpiece and weld tool are unknown, possibly varying during the FSW process. To provide insight into the contact conditions, this study characterizes the material flow in the FSW nugget by embedding a lead (Pb) wire that melted at the FSWing temperature of aluminum alloy 2195. The Pb trace provided evidence of changes in material flow characteristics which were attributed to changes in the contact conditions between the weld tool and workpiece, as driven by temperature, as the tool travels the length of a weld seam.

  14. Fine powder flow under humid environmental conditions from the perspective of surface energy.

    PubMed

    Karde, Vikram; Ghoroi, Chinmay

    2015-05-15

    The influence of humidity on surface energetics and flow behavior of fine pharmaceutical powders was investigated. Amorphous and crystalline fine powders with hydrophilic (Corn starch and Avicel PH105) and hydrophobic (ibuprofen) nature were considered for this study. The surface energy was determined using surface energy analyzer and flow behavior was measured in terms of unconfined yield stress (UYS) using a shear tester. The study showed that unlike hydrophobic ibuprofen powder, surface energy and flow of hydrophilic excipient powders were affected by relative humidity (RH). The Lifshitz-van der Waals dispersive (γ(LW)) component of surface energy barely changed with varying RH for all pharmaceutical powders. For hydrophilic excipients, the specific component of surface energy (γ(SP)) was found to increase with increasing RH. Furthermore, for these excipients, flow deterioration at elevated RH was observed due to increased capillary bridge formation. Detailed analysis showed that γ(SP) component of surface energy can be an effective indicator for flow behavior of fine powders under varying humid conditions. The present study also brought out the existence of different regimes of probable interparticle forces which dictate the bulk flow behavior of fine hydrophilic powder under humid conditions.

  15. Microscale boundary conditions of the lattice Boltzmann equation method for simulating microtube flows.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lin; Guo, Zhaoli; Shi, Baochang

    2012-07-01

    The lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) method has been shown to be a promising tool for microscale gas flows. However, few works focus on the microtube flows, and there still are some fundamental problems for the LBE to such flows. In this paper, a recently proposed axisymmetric LBE with three kinetic boundary conditions, i.e., the combination of bounceback and specular reflection scheme, the combination of the Maxwell and specular-reflection scheme, and the combination of the Maxwell and bounceback scheme, have been investigated in detail. By analyzing the micro-Hagen-Poiseuille flow, we observed the discrete boundary condition effect and provided a revised boundary scheme to overcome such effect near the slip flow regime. Some numerical tests for the micro-Hagen-Poiseuille have been carried out to validate the analysis, and the numerical results of the revised boundary schemes agree well with the analytic solutions which confirmed our theoretical analysis. In addition, we also applied the revised combination of the Maxwell and bounceback scheme to microtube flow with sudden expansion and contraction, the numerical results of the pressure distribution and normalized slip velocity agree well with the theoretical ones. PMID:23005568

  16. Effect of Inlet and Outlet Flow Conditions on Natural Gas Parameters in Supersonic Separation Process

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yan; Wen, Chuang; Wang, Shuli; Feng, Yuqing

    2014-01-01

    A supersonic separator has been introduced to remove water vapour from natural gas. The mechanisms of the upstream and downstream influences are not well understood for various flow conditions from the wellhead and the back pipelines. We used a computational model to investigate the effect of the inlet and outlet flow conditions on the supersonic separation process. We found that the shock wave was sensitive to the inlet or back pressure compared to the inlet temperature. The shock position shifted forward with a higher inlet or back pressure. It indicated that an increasing inlet pressure declined the pressure recovery capacity. Furthermore, the shock wave moved out of the diffuser when the ratio of the back pressure to the inlet one was greater than 0.75, in which the state of the low pressure and temperature was destroyed, resulting in the re-evaporation of the condensed liquids. Natural gas would be the subsonic flows in the whole supersonic separator, if the mass flow rate was less than the design value, and it could not reach the low pressure and temperature for the condensation and separation of the water vapor. These results suggested a guidance mechanism for natural gas supersonic separation in various flow conditions. PMID:25338207

  17. Effect of inlet and outlet flow conditions on natural gas parameters in supersonic separation process.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; Wen, Chuang; Wang, Shuli; Feng, Yuqing

    2014-01-01

    A supersonic separator has been introduced to remove water vapour from natural gas. The mechanisms of the upstream and downstream influences are not well understood for various flow conditions from the wellhead and the back pipelines. We used a computational model to investigate the effect of the inlet and outlet flow conditions on the supersonic separation process. We found that the shock wave was sensitive to the inlet or back pressure compared to the inlet temperature. The shock position shifted forward with a higher inlet or back pressure. It indicated that an increasing inlet pressure declined the pressure recovery capacity. Furthermore, the shock wave moved out of the diffuser when the ratio of the back pressure to the inlet one was greater than 0.75, in which the state of the low pressure and temperature was destroyed, resulting in the re-evaporation of the condensed liquids. Natural gas would be the subsonic flows in the whole supersonic separator, if the mass flow rate was less than the design value, and it could not reach the low pressure and temperature for the condensation and separation of the water vapor. These results suggested a guidance mechanism for natural gas supersonic separation in various flow conditions.

  18. Experimental and analytical study of a boiling collector in thermal siphon operation

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, M. da; Eugenia, M.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analytically and experimentally evaluate the performance of a boiling solar collector in thermal siphon operation so that, in future work, solar collectors can be optimized for boiling operation. A new procedure, based on boiling heat transfer fundamentals, is developed to estimate the rate of energy gain in the collector. The temperature of the absorber plate is determined from the simultaneous solution of the rate of energy absorbed by the collector and the rate of energy used in boiling as a function of vapor bubble density, the energy required for bubble formation, and the volumetric flow rate through the collector. Since the volumetric flow rate could not be predicted theoretically, experimentally estimated values are used in the numerical calculation. This model is an improvement over previous models which assume that the total mass flow rate that flows through the collector boils, when in reality just a small percent of this mass flow boils and most of it is recirculated. To validate the analytical model, the thermal efficiency and the absorber plate temperature of two collector-condenser systems are experimentally determined. Measurements with both a conventional sheet with tube and a waffled flat plate collector indicate the importance of collector geometry. The two-phase thermal siphon system operates at practically the same thermal efficiency as the hydronic single-phase system, but it uses one less pump, the net rate of useful energy transfer in the two-phase system is higher than in the single-phase system. When boiling collectors are designed for two-phase operation, they may out-perform hydronic collectors.

  19. On the boundary conditions on a shock wave for hypersonic flow around a descent vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golomazov, M. M.; Ivankov, A. A.

    2013-12-01

    Stationary hypersonic flow around a descent vehicle is examined by considering equilibrium and nonequilibrium reactions. We study how physical-chemical processes and shock wave conditions for gas species influence the shock-layer structure. It is shown that conservation conditions of species on the shock wave cause high-temperature and concentration gradients in the shock layer when we calculate spacecraft deceleration trajectory in the atmosphere at 75 km altitude.

  20. Intraoral air pressure and oral air flow under different bleed and bite-block conditions.

    PubMed

    Putnam, A H; Shelton, R L; Kastner, C U

    1986-03-01

    Intraoral pressures and oral flows were measured as normal talkers produced /p lambda/ and /si/ under experimental conditions that perturbed the usual aeromechanical production characteristics of the consonants. A translabial pressure-release device was used to bleed off intraoral pressure during /p/. Bite-blocks were used to open the anterior bite artificially during /s/. For /p/, intraoral pressure decreased and translabial air leakage increased as bleed orifice area increased. For /s/, flow increased as the area of sibilant constriction increased, but differential pressure across the /s/ oral constriction did not vary systematically with changes in its area. Flow on postconsonantal vowels /lambda/ and /i/ did not vary systematically across experimental conditions. The data imply that maintenance of perturbed intraoral pressure was more effective when compensatory options included opportunity for increased respiratory drive and structural adjustments at the place of consonant articulation rather than increased respiratory drive alone.

  1. Air conditioning system and component therefore distributing air flow from opposite directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obler, H. D.; Bauer, H. B. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The air conditioning system comprises a plurality of separate air conditioning units coupled to a common supply duct such that air may be introduced into the supply duct in two opposite flow directions. A plurality of outlets such as registers or auxiliary or branch ducts communicate with the supply duct and valve means are disposed in the supply duct at at least some of the outlets for automatically channelling a controllable amount of air from the supply duct to the associated outlet regardless of the direction of air flow within the supply duct. The valve means comprises an automatic air volume control apparatus for distribution within the air supply duct into which air may be introduced from two opposite directions. The apparatus incorporates a freely swinging movable vane in the supply duct to automatically channel into the associated outlet only the deflected air flow which has the higher relative pressure.

  2. Elasto visco-plastic flow with special attention to boundary conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimazaki, Y.; Thompson, E. G.

    1981-01-01

    A simple but nontrivial steady-state creeping elasto visco-plastic (Maxwell fluid) radial flow problem is analyzed, with special attention given to the effects of the boundary conditions. Solutions are obtained through integration of a governing equation on stress using the Runge-Kutta method for initial value problems and finite differences for boundary value problems. A more general approach through the finite element method, an approach that solves for the velocity field rather than the stress field and that is applicable to a wide range of problems, is presented and tested using the radial flow example. It is found that steady-state flows of elasto visco-plastic materials are strongly influenced by the state of stress of material as it enters the region of interest. The importance of this boundary or initial condition in analyses involving materials coming into control volumes from unusual stress environments is emphasized.

  3. Flow Visualization at Cryogenic Conditions Using a Modified Pressure Sensitive Paint Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, A. Neal; Goad, William K.; Obara, Clifford J.; Sprinkle, Danny R.; Campbell, Richard L.; Carter, Melissa B.; Pendergraft, Odis C., Jr.; Bell, James H.; Ingram, JoAnne L.; Oglesby, Donald M.

    2005-01-01

    A modification to the Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) method was used to visualize streamlines on a Blended Wing Body (BWB) model at full-scale flight Reynolds numbers. In order to achieve these conditions, the tests were carried out in the National Transonic Facility operating under cryogenic conditions in a nitrogen environment. Oxygen is required for conventional PSP measurements, and several tests have been successfully completed in nitrogen environments by injecting small amounts (typically < 3000 ppm) of oxygen into the flow. A similar technique was employed here, except that air was purged through pressure tap orifices already existent on the model surface, resulting in changes in the PSP wherever oxygen was present. The results agree quite well with predicted results obtained through computational fluid dynamics analysis (CFD), which show this to be a viable technique for visualizing flows without resorting to more invasive procedures such as oil flow or minitufts.

  4. Permeability-dependent propagation of polyacrylamides under near-wellbore flow conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Zitha, P.; Chauveteau, G.; Zaitoun, A.

    1995-11-01

    A new type of polyacrylamide flow-induced retention has been observed in core experiments simulating near-wellbore flow conditions. The retention is due to the bridging of pore throats by adsorbed macromolecules previously stretched under elongational flow. It occurs in low-to-medium permeability granular packs (up to k = 1,000 mD in the test conditions) and leads to progressive but severe plugging. The present paper shows that polymer placement in the reservoir surrounding the wellbore can be very different from what is predicted from stable values of polymer mobility. In heterogeneous reservoirs, polymer penetration in low-permeability layers is expected to be strongly reduced, thus allowing a deeper penetration into higher permeability zones. The polymer can thus improve reservoir conformance around the wellbore when injected directly through the entire opened interval. Near-wellbore polymer or gel treatments may thus not require zone isolation to be efficient.

  5. Pool Boiling Experiment Has Five Successful Flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiaramonte, Fran

    1997-01-01

    The Pool Boiling Experiment (PBE) is designed to improve understanding of the fundamental mechanisms that constitute nucleate pool boiling. Nucleate pool boiling is a process wherein a stagnant pool of liquid is in contact with a surface that can supply heat to the liquid. If the liquid absorbs enough heat, a vapor bubble can be formed. This process occurs when a pot of water boils. On Earth, gravity tends to remove the vapor bubble from the heating surface because it is dominated by buoyant convection. In the orbiting space shuttle, however, buoyant convection has much less of an effect because the forces of gravity are very small. The Pool Boiling Experiment was initiated to provide insight into this nucleate boiling process, which has many earthbound applications in steamgeneration power plants, petroleum plants, and other chemical plants. In addition, by using the test fluid R-113, the Pool Boiling Experiment can provide some basic understanding of the boiling behavior of cryogenic fluids without the large cost of an experiment using an actual cryogen.

  6. Pool Boiling Experiment Has Successful Flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Pool Boiling Experiment (PBE) is designed to improve understanding of the fundamental mechanisms that constitute nucleate pool boiling. Nucleate pool boiling is a process wherein a stagnant pool of liquid is in contact with a surface that can supply heat to the liquid. If the liquid absorbs enough heat, a vapor bubble can be formed. This process occurs when a pot of water boils. On Earth, gravity tends to remove the vapor bubble from the heating surface because it is dominated by buoyant convection. In the orbiting space shuttle, however, buoyant convection has much less of an effect because the forces of gravity are very small. The Pool Boiling Experiment was initiated to provide insight into this nucleate boiling process, which has many Earthbound applications, such as steam-generation power plants, petroleum, and other chemical plants. Also, by using the test fluid R-113, the Pool Boiling Experiment can provide some basic understanding of the boiling behavior of cryogenic fluids without the large cost of an experiment using an actual cryogen.

  7. Boiling and nonboiling heat transfer to electrolyte solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Najibi, S.H.; Mueller-Steinhagen, H.; Jamialahmadi, M.

    1996-10-01

    Heat transfer to electrolyte solutions is a common engineering problem in the chemical and petrochemical industries. Nevertheless, only a few experimental investigations of heat transfer to electrolyte solutions can be found in the literature. To improve design of heat transfer equipment and to understand fouling characteristics, it is important to know the clean heat transfer coefficient of electrolyte solutions, and whether heat transfer to electrolyte solutions can be predicted with models found for less complicated fluids. A wide range of experiments were performed to determine the effects of various dissolved salts on forced-convective, pool boiling, and subcooled flow-boiling heat transfer. The effect of dissolved salts on bubble size and nucleation site density were also investigated. The measured heat transfer coefficients are compared with recommended correlations for the different heat transfer modes.

  8. Ground-water-flow conditions within a bottomland hardwood wetland, Eastern Arkansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gonthier, G.J.

    1996-01-01

    Water levels were measured monthly at 9 staff gages and 35 wells along two transects within the Black Swamp bottomland hardwood wetland and perpendicular to the Cache River in eastern Arkansas from December 1989 to September 1992 in order to (1) describe the ground-water-flow conditions at locations within a bottomland hardwood wetland and (2) determine the relation between the frequency of different ground-water-flow conditions and physical characteristics within the wetland. Three ground-water-flow conditions predominated at various times in the Black Swamp: (1) discharge of water from the alluvial aquifer to the wetland, (2) recharge of water from the wetland into the alluvial aquifer, and (3) flow of water from the wetland into the alluvial aquifer and then to the nearby Cache River (local flow). Analyses of hydraulic head differences between surface and ground water indicate that discharge occurred 31% of the measurement times at both transects. Recharge occurred 39% of the measurement times and tended to occur more often at locations that are far from the Cache River and that overlie low ground-water levels in the lower part of the alluvial aquifer. Local ground-water flow occurred 28% of the measurement times and tended to occur more often at locations close to the Cache River. Ground-water pumpage results in water-level declines in the lower part of the alluvial aquifer near the Black Swamp wetland. When compared with an area not affected by pumping, these lower ground-water levels increased the frequency of recharge of Black Swamp water into the alluvial aquifer by nearly a factor of 7, decreased the frequency of local ground-water flow to the Cache River to less than half, and decreased the frequency of discharge by about 22%.

  9. DSMC-LBM hybrid scheme for flows with variable rarefaction conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Staso, Gianluca; Succi, Sauro; Toschi, Federico; Clercx, Herman

    2015-11-01

    The kinetic description of gases, based on the Boltzmann equation, allows to cover flow regimes ranging from the rarefied to the continuum limit. The two limits are traditionally studied by numerically approximating the Boltzmann equation via Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method or the Lattice Boltzmann Equation method (LBM). While DSMC is suitable for rarefied flows, its computational cost makes it unpractical to study hydrodynamic flows. The LBM has instead proved itself to be an efficient and accurate method in the hydrodynamic limit even though simulation of rarefied flows requires additional modeling. Here, results on the development of a hybrid scheme capable of coupling the LBM and the DSMC methods and able to efficiently simulate flows with variable rarefaction conditions are presented. The coupling scheme is based on Grad's moment method approach and the local single particle distribution function at a given order of truncation is built by using the Hermite polynomials expansion approach and Gauss-Hermite quadratures. The capabilities of the hybrid approach for simulating flows in the transition regime are illustrated in the case of planar Couette and Poiseuille flows.

  10. Relationships Between Watershed Emergy Flow and Coastal New England Salt Marsh Structure, Function, and Condition

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study evaluated the link between watershed activities and salt marsh structure, function, and condition using spatial emergy flow density (areal empower density) in the watershed and field data from 10 tidal salt marshes in Narragansett Bay, RI. The field-collected data wer...

  11. Electromagnetic, heat and fluid flow phenomena in levitated metal droplets both under earthbound and microgravity conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szekely, Julian

    1988-01-01

    The purpose is to develop an improved understanding of the electromagnetic, heat, and fluid flow phenomena in electromagnetically levitated metal droplets, both under earthbound and microgravity conditions. The main motivation for doing this work, together with the past accomplishments, and the plans for future research are discussed.

  12. SEPARATED FLOW CONDITIONS AT PIPE WALLS OF WATER DISTRIBUTION MAINS - Project Summary

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objectives of this research project were to develop and evaluate a method for determining residence times for separated recirculation cavity flow conditions, and to determine the rate of growth and surface ramp contours developed from particulate deposits at obstacles that i...

  13. Waves on the surface of a boiling liquid at various medium stratifications

    SciTech Connect

    Sinkevich, O. A.

    2015-08-15

    The stability of relatively small perturbations of the stationary state consisting of a plane liquid layer and a vapor film is studied when no liquid evaporation or vapor condensation occurs in the stationary state. In this case, heat from a hot to cold wall is removed through a vapor–liquid layer via heat conduction. The boundary conditions that take into account liquid evaporation (appearance of a mass flux) at the vapor–liquid phase surface and the temperature dependence of the saturation pressure are derived. Dispersion equations are obtained. The wave processes for the stable (light vapor under a liquid layer) and unstable stratifications of the phases at rest and during their relative motion are studied. The deformation of the phase boundary results in liquid evaporation, changes in the boiling temperature and the saturation pressure, and generation of weakly damped low-amplitude waves of a new type. These waves ensure the stability of a vapor film under a liquid layer at rest or a liquid layer moving at a constant velocity in the gravity field. The velocities of these waves are much higher than the gravity wave velocities. The critical heat flows and wavelengths at which wave boiling regimes at normal pressure can exist are determined, and the calculated and experimental data are compared.

  14. Oxidation and formation of oxidation products of β-carotene at boiling temperature.

    PubMed

    Zeb, Alam

    2012-04-01

    β-Carotene is one of the most important lipid component extensively used in food industries as source of pro-vitamin A and colorant. During processing and storage β-carotene is oxidized and degraded to various oxidation compounds. Some of these compounds are also the key aroma compounds in certain flowers, vegetables and fruits. The methods for analysis and determination of these oxidized products formed during food boiling or preparation are key to the understanding the chemistry of these compounds. This paper presents a novel analytical method incorporating high performance liquid chromatography with diode array and mass spectrometric detection for the characterization of oxidation, isomerization and oxidation products of β-carotene in toluene at boiling temperature. HPLC and APCI-MS was optimized using oxidized sample and flow injection analysis of the standard β-carotene respectively. β-Carotene was oxidized in the Rancimat at 110°C for 30, 60 and 90 min. The oxidized samples were than analyzed by HPLC system at 450 nm and 350 nm as well as scanning and single ion monitoring mass spectrometry. A total of ten oxidation products and three Z-isomers were reported. Extensive isomerization was observed during treatment at the control accelerated conditions. The oxidation products include five apo-carotenals, three diepoxides, one mono-epoxide and one short chain species. Results show that the method was reproducible, accurate and reliable for the separation and identification of oxidation products of β-carotene.

  15. Boiling of the interface between two immiscible liquids below the bulk boiling temperatures of both components.

    PubMed

    Pimenova, Anastasiya V; Goldobin, Denis S

    2014-11-01

    We consider the problem of boiling of the direct contact of two immiscible liquids. An intense vapour formation at such a direct contact is possible below the bulk boiling points of both components, meaning an effective decrease of the boiling temperature of the system. Although the phenomenon is known in science and widely employed in technology, the direct contact boiling process was thoroughly studied (both experimentally and theoretically) only for the case where one of liquids is becoming heated above its bulk boiling point. On the contrary, we address the case where both liquids remain below their bulk boiling points. In this paper we construct the theoretical description of the boiling process and discuss the actualisation of the case we consider for real systems.

  16. Boiling of the interface between two immiscible liquids below the bulk boiling temperatures of both components.

    PubMed

    Pimenova, Anastasiya V; Goldobin, Denis S

    2014-11-01

    We consider the problem of boiling of the direct contact of two immiscible liquids. An intense vapour formation at such a direct contact is possible below the bulk boiling points of both components, meaning an effective decrease of the boiling temperature of the system. Although the phenomenon is known in science and widely employed in technology, the direct contact boiling process was thoroughly studied (both experimentally and theoretically) only for the case where one of liquids is becoming heated above its bulk boiling point. On the contrary, we address the case where both liquids remain below their bulk boiling points. In this paper we construct the theoretical description of the boiling process and discuss the actualisation of the case we consider for real systems. PMID:25403831

  17. Combining geoelectrical and advanced lysimeter methods to characterize heterogeneous flow and transport under unsaturated transient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehrer, M.; Skowronski, J.; Binley, A. M.; Slater, L. D.

    2013-12-01

    Our ability to predict flow and transport processes in the unsaturated critical zone is considerably limited by two characteristics: heterogeneity of flow and transience of boundary conditions. The causes of heterogeneous - or preferential - flow and transport are fairly well understood, yet the characterization and quantification of such processes in natural profiles remains challenging. This is due to current methods of observation, such as staining and isotope tracers, being unable to observe multiple events on the same profile and offering limited spatial information. In our study we demonstrate an approach to characterize preferential flow and transport processes applying a combination of geoelectrical methods and advanced lysimeter techniques. On an agricultural soil profile, which was transferred undisturbed into a lysimeter container, we applied systematically varied input flow boundary conditions, resembling natural precipitation events. We simultaneously measured the breakthrough of a conservative tracer. Flow and transport in the soil column were observed using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), tensiometers, water content probes and a multicompartment suction plate (MSP). These techniques allowed a direct ground-truthing of soil moisture and pore fluid resistivity changes estimated noninvasively using ERT. We were able to image both the advancing infiltration front and the advancing tracer front using time lapse ERT. Water content changes associated with the advancing infiltration front dominated over pore fluid conductivity changes during short term precipitation events. Conversely, long term displacement of the solute front was monitored during periods of constant water content in between infiltration events. We observed preferential flow phenomena through ERT and through the MSP, which agreed in general terms. The preferential flow fraction was observed to be independent of precipitation rate. This suggests the presence of a fingering process

  18. Study on Performance and Internal Flow Condition of Mini Turbo-Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shigemitsu, Toru; Fukutomi, Junichiro; Nasada, Ryoichi

    2010-06-01

    Mini turbo-pumps which have a diameter smaller than 100mm are utilized in many fields; automobile radiator pump, artificial heart pump, cooling pump for electric devices, washing machine pump and so on. And the needs for the mini turbo-pumps would become larger with the increase of the application of it for electrical machines. It is desirable that the mini turbo-pump design is as simple as possible due to the limitation of the precision for manufacture. But the design method for the mini turbo-pump is not established because the internal flow condition for these small-sized fluid machineries is not clarified and conventional theory is not conductive for small-sized pumps because of the low Reynolds number and the size effects. Therefore, we started the research of the mini turbo-pump for the purpose of development of high performance mini turbo-pump with simple structure. As a first step of this research, mini turbo-pump with the 46mm rotor diameter was designed based on the conventional design method in order to clarify the problems for the application of conventional method for mini turbo-pump in details. The three dimensional steady numerical flow analysis was conducted with the commercial code (Fluent6.3). The numerical flow analysis was also performed under the condition with and without a tip clearance because the tip clearance influence on the performance and internal flow condition is extremely large for mini turbo-pumps. It was clarified from the numerical results that head of the mini turbo-pump at the designed point without the tip clearance satisfied the designed value head H = 1.2m and the efficiency is about η = 60% which is acceptable value for the centrifugal pump. On the other hand, head and efficiency decreased drastically with the increase of the tip clearance. The flow condition near the tip region was influenced by the leakage flow from the blade tip. And it is observed by the results of the total pressure distributions that the total

  19. Review of blunt body wake flows at hypersonic low density conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, J. N.; Price, J. M.

    1996-01-01

    Recent results of experimental and computational studies concerning hypersonic flows about blunted cones including their near wake are reviewed. Attention is focused on conditions where rarefaction effects are present, particularly in the wake. The experiments have been performed for a common model configuration (70 deg spherically-blunted cone) in five hypersonic facilities that encompass a significant range of rarefaction and nonequilibrium effects. Computational studies using direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) and Navier-Stokes solvers have been applied to selected experiments performed in each of the facilities. In addition, computations have been made for typical flight conditions in both Earth and Mars atmospheres, hence more energetic flows than produced in the ground-based tests. Also, comparisons of DSMC calculations and forebody measurements made for the Japanese Orbital Reentry Experiment (OREX) vehicle (a 50 deg spherically-blunted cone) are presented to bridge the spectrum of ground to flight conditions.

  20. A far-field non-reflecting boundary condition for two-dimensional wake flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danowitz, Jeffrey S.; Abarbanel, Saul A.; Turkel, Eli

    1995-01-01

    Far-field boundary conditions for external flow problems have been developed based upon long-wave perturbations of linearized flow equations about a steady state far field solution. The boundary improves convergence to steady state in single-grid temporal integration schemes using both regular-time-stepping and local-time-stepping. The far-field boundary may be near the trailing edge of the body which significantly reduces the number of grid points, and therefore the computational time, in the numerical calculation. In addition the solution produced is smoother in the far-field than when using extrapolation conditions. The boundary condition maintains the convergence rate to steady state in schemes utilizing multigrid acceleration.

  1. Excitation condition analysis of guided wave on PFA tubes for ultrasonic flow meter.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuan; Xiao, Xufeng; Cao, Li

    2016-12-01

    Impurity accumulation, which decreases the accuracy of flow measurement, is a critical problem when applying Z-shaped or U-shaped ultrasonic flow meters on straight PFA tubes. It can be expected that the guided wave can be used to implement flow measurement on straight PFA tubes. In this paper, the propagation of guided wave is explained by finite element simulations for the flow meter design. Conditions of guided wave generation, including the excitation frequency and the wedge structure, are studied in the simulations. The wedge is designed as a cone which is friendly to be manufactured and installed. The cone angle, the piezoelectric wafer's resonant frequency and the vibration directions are studied in the simulations. The simulations shows that the propagation of guided wave in thin PFA tubes is influenced by the piezoelectric wafers' resonant frequency and the vibration direction when the mode is on the 'water line'. Based on the results of the simulations, an experiment is conducted to verify the principles of excitation conditions, which performs flow measurement on a straight PFA tube well. PMID:27529137

  2. A note on well boundary condition for flow through heterogeneous formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indelman, Peter; Dagan, Gedeon

    2004-03-01

    In modeling flow toward wells it is mathematically convenient to replace the well by a singularity line along its axis. In the case of homogeneous aquifers, confined flow, and fully penetrating wells the strength of the sources is constant, and the common condition of constant head on the well is satisfied exactly. It also leads to constant flux on the well envelope. In the case of aquifers of spatially variable conductivity the constant head boundary condition can be satisfied accurately, if the well radius is much smaller than the log conductivity horizontal integral scale, by selecting a variable source strength that is proportional to the local conductivity along the well [, 1996; , 1998; , 2003a, 2003b]. In this case the equivalent conductivity tends to the arithmetic mean near the well. It changes with distance, approaching from above the effective conductivity in uniform horizontal mean flow far from the well. Selecting inadvertently a constant source strength violates the condition of constant well head. The equivalent conductivity tends to the harmonic mean near the well and approaches from below the effective one in uniform mean flow. The equivalent conductivity is derived for both types of sources for stratified formations as well as for aquifers of a three-dimensional heterogeneous structure. The implications on interpretation of head measurements by the two models is illustrated by a few examples.

  3. Forced Convection Boiling and Critical Heat Flux of Ethanol in Electrically Heated Tube Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Michael L.; Linne, Diane L.; Rousar, Donald C.

    1998-01-01

    Electrically heated tube tests were conducted to characterize the critical heat flux (transition from nucleate to film boiling) of subcritical ethanol flowing at conditions relevant to the design of a regeneratively cooled rocket engine thrust chamber. The coolant was SDA-3C alcohol (95% ethyl alcohol, 5% isopropyl alcohol by weight), and tests were conducted over the following ranges of conditions: pressure from 144 to 703 psia, flow velocities from 9.7 to 77 ft/s, coolant subcooling from 33 to 362 F, and critical heat fluxes up to 8.7 BTU/in(exp 2)/sec. For the data taken near 200 psia, critical heat flux was correlated as a function of the product of velocity and fluid subcooling to within +/- 20%. For data taken at higher pressures, an additional pressure term is needed to correlate the critical heat flux. It was also shown that at the higher test pressures and/or flow rates, exceeding the critical heat flux did not result in wall burnout. This result may significantly increase the engine heat flux design envelope for higher pressure conditions.

  4. A New Theory of Nucleate Pool Boiling in Arbitrary Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buyevich, Y. A.; Webbon, Bruce W.

    1995-01-01

    Heat transfer rates specific to nucleate pool boiling under various conditions are determined by the dynamics of vapour bubbles that are originated and grow at nucleation sites of a superheated surface. A new dynamic theory of these bubbles has been recently developed on the basis of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes. In contrast to other existing models based on empirically postulated equations for bubble growth and motion, this theory does not contain unwarrantable assumptions, and both the equations are rigorously derived within the framework of a unified approach. The conclusions of the theory are drastically different from those of the conventional models. The bubbles are shown to detach themselves under combined action of buoyancy and a surface tension force that is proven to add to buoyancy in bubble detachment, but not the other way round as is commonly presumed. The theory ensures a sound understanding of a number of so far unexplained phenomena, such as effect caused by gravity level and surface tension on the bubble growth rate and dependence of the bubble characteristics at detachment on the liquid thermophysical parameters and relevant temperature differences. The theoretical predictions are shown to be in a satisfactory qualitative and quantitative agreement with observations. When being applied to heat transfer at nucleate pool boiling, this bubble dynamic theory offers an opportunity to considerably improve the main formulae that are generally used to correlate experimental findings and to design boiling heat removal in various industrial applications. Moreover, the theory makes possible to pose and study a great deal of new problems of essential impact in practice. Two such problems are considered in detail. One problem concerns the development of a principally novel physical model for the first crisis of boiling. This model allows for evaluating critical boiling heat fluxes under various conditions, and in particular at different

  5. Bubble and Slug Flow at Microgravity Conditions: State of Knowledge and Open Questions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colin, C.; Fabre, J.; McQuillen, J.

    1996-01-01

    Based on the experiments carried out over the past decade at microgravity conditions, an overview of our current knowledge of bubbly and slug flows is presented. The transition from bubble to slug flow, the void fraction and the pressure drop are discussed from the data collected in the literature. The transition from bubble to slug flow may be predicted by introducing a critical void fraction that depends on the fluid properties and the pipe diameter; however, the role of coalescence which controls this transition is not clearly understood. The void fraction may be accurately calculated using a drift-flux model. It is shown from local measurements that the drift of the gas with respect to the mixture is due to non-uniform radial distribution of void fraction. The pressure drop happens to be controlled by the liquid flow for bubbly flow whereas for slug flow the experimental results show that pressure drops is larger than expected. From this study, the guidelines for future research in microgravity are given.

  6. Rarefied hypersonic flow simulations using the Navier-Stokes equations with non-equilibrium boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenshields, Christopher J.; Reese, Jason M.

    2012-07-01

    This paper investigates the use of Navier-Stokes-Fourier equations with non-equilibrium boundary conditions (BCs) for simulation of rarefied hypersonic flows. It revisits a largely forgotten derivation of velocity slip and temperature jump by Patterson, based on Grad's moment method. Mach 10 flow around a cylinder and Mach 12.7 flow over a flat plate are simulated using both computational fluid dynamics using the temperature jump BCs of Patterson and Smoluchowski and the direct simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) method. These flows exhibit such strongly non-equilibrium behaviour that, following Patterson's analysis, they are strictly beyond the range of applicability of the BCs. Nevertheless, the results using Patterson's temperature jump BC compare quite well with the DSMC and are consistently better than those using the standard Smoluchowski temperature jump BC. One explanation for this better performance is that an assumption made by Patterson, based on the flow being only slightly non-equilibrium, introduces an additional constraint to the resulting BC model in the case of highly non-equilibrium flows.

  7. Hydromagnetic natural convection flow between vertical parallel plates with time-periodic boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adesanya, S. O.; Oluwadare, E. O.; Falade, J. A.; Makinde, O. D.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, the free convective flow of magnetohydrodynamic fluid through a channel with time periodic boundary condition is investigated by taking the effects of Joule dissipation into consideration. Based on simplifying assumptions, the coupled governing equations are reduced to a set of nonlinear boundary valued problem. Approximate solutions are obtained by using semi-analytical Adomian decomposition method. The effect of pertinent parameters on the fluid velocity, temperature distribution, Nusselt number and skin friction are presented graphically and discussed. The result of the computation shows that an increase in the magnetic field intensity has significant influence on the fluid flow.

  8. Some aspects regarding unsteady fluid flow with time dependent boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotaru, Constantin; Cîrciu, Ionicǎ

    2016-02-01

    This study explores the dynamic characteristics of the unsteady fluid flow around an airfoil where the time dependency is introduced through the boundary conditions. The models of the vortex wake's shape and strength were based on the time dependency history of the motion and the methods of solution that were developed for these models included the treatment of the zero normal flow on a solid surface. A numerical investigation has been performed using Maplesoft environment. As a result of the nonuniform motion, the path along which the airfoil moves was assumed to be prescribed. In the paper the wake shed from the trailing edge of the lifting surfaces was modeled by vortex distribution.

  9. Mixed convection nanofluid flow in a vertical channel with boundary conditions of the third kind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhatar, Nur Asiah Mohd; Siddheshwar, P. G.; Saleh, Habibis; Hashim, Ishak

    2015-09-01

    A numerical investigation is carried out into the heat transfer within a fully-developed mixed convection flow of Al2O3 - water, CuO - water and TiO2 - water nanoliquids in a vertical channel with boundary condition of third kind. The effects of Brinkman number, Br and mixed convection parameter, GR on the velocity distribution and temperature distribution are the focus of this study. The built-in routine, dsolve in MAPLE is applied for the numerical computation. It was found that, greater value of GR and lower value of Br greatly affected the heat transfer performance and resulted the occurrence of reversal flow.

  10. Sakiadis flow of Maxwell fluid considering magnetic field and convective boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Mustafa, M.; Khan, Junaid Ahmad; Hayat, T.; Alsaedi, A.

    2015-02-15

    In this paper we address the flow of Maxwell fluid due to constantly moving flat radiative surface with convective condition. The flow is under the influence of non-uniform transverse magnetic field. The velocity and temperature distributions have been evaluated numerically by shooting approach. The solution depends on various interesting parameters including local Deborah number De, magnetic field parameter M, Prandtl number Pr and Biot number Bi. We found that variation in velocity with an increase in local Deborah number De is non-monotonic. However temperature is a decreasing function of local Deborah number De.

  11. Limits and conditions of applicability of the experimental measurement methods of liquid flow rates through pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botezatu, N. P.

    1980-04-01

    Various flow measurement methods and their applications are reviewed in order to establish the best methods for rationalization and optimization of water consumption in a large industrial system. The methods discussed include volumetric and gravimetric techniques, Pitot and Venturi tubes, electromagnetic and ultrasonic flowmeters, counters, rotameters, and anemometers, as well as the use of classical and radioactive tracers. A comparative analysis of various methods and experimental results indicate that the method of radioactive tracers is the only universal method of measurement of fluid flows through pipes and channels for fluids of any physicochemical properties under any conditions.

  12. Influence of convective conditions on three dimensional mixed convective hydromagnetic boundary layer flow of Casson nanofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauf, A.; Siddiq, M. K.; Abbasi, F. M.; Meraj, M. A.; Ashraf, M.; Shehzad, S. A.

    2016-10-01

    The present work deals with the steady laminar three-dimensional mixed convective magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) boundary layer flow of Casson nanofluid over a bidirectional stretching surface. A uniform magnetic field is applied normal to the flow direction. Similarity variables are implemented to convert the non-linear partial differential equations into ordinary ones. Convective boundary conditions are utilized at surface of the sheet. A numerical technique of Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg (RFK45) is used to obtain the results of velocity, temperature and concentration fields. The physical dimensionless parameters are discussed through tables and graphs.

  13. Temporal Evolution of Magma Flow Conditions during Dome Growth, Insights from Numerical Modelling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevalier, L. A. C.; Collombet, M.; Pinel, V.

    2015-12-01

    Transitions from effusive to explosive regime at andesitic volcanoes are almost unpredictable at the moment. The reliability of empirical methods based on geophysical precursory patterns is still debated. A better understanding of the physical processes happening in the volcanic system before explosions and associated geophysical signals is needed. At andesitic volcanoes, dome building is often observed during the effusive phase. The weight of a forming dome is expected to have several effects: 1) It obviously induces a ground subsidence in the near field; 2) pressure increase at the top of the conduit causes magma properties and flow conditions evolution; 3) it increases pressure in the surrounding rock such decreasing rock permeability and thus gas loss through the conduit walls, possibly leading to gas pressurisation. Here we use numerical models that couple realistic magma flow conditions in the upper conduit with solid deformation, in 2D axisymmetry, to investigate all these effects. Subsiding effect due to the dome emplacement is simulated by a pressure loading of the rock surrounding the conduit. From realistic initial magma flow conditions in effusive regime (Collombet, 2009), we apply increasing pressure at the conduit top. Volatile solubility increases with pressure, then dome growth causes a decrease of magma porosity and permeability at the top of the conduit. This also causes a decrease of magma viscosity. From magma flow model, we extract pressure and shear stress conditions at the conduit wall, and apply them to the surrounding rock for ground deformation calculation . Darcy flow model is used to study the impacts of permeability decrease inside the conduit and in the surrounding rock on gas loss cinematics. Permeability decrease in the conduit and pressure increase in the surrounding rock cause gas pressurisation.

  14. A pre-conditioned implicit direct forcing based immersed boundary method for incompressible viscous flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyunwook; Pan, Xiaomin; Lee, Changhoon; Choi, Jung-Il

    2016-06-01

    A novel immersed boundary (IB) method based on an implicit direct forcing (IDF) scheme is developed for incompressible viscous flows. The key idea for the present IDF method is to use a block LU decomposition technique in momentum equations with Taylor series expansion to construct the implicit IB forcing in a recurrence form, which imposes more accurate no-slip boundary conditions on the IB surface. To accelerate the IB forcing convergence during the iterative procedure, a pre-conditioner matrix is introduced in the recurrence formulation of the IB forcing. A Jacobi-type parameter is determined in the pre-conditioner matrix by minimizing the Frobenius norm of the matrix function representing the difference between the IB forcing solution matrix and the pre-conditioner matrix. In addition, the pre-conditioning parameter is restricted due to the numerical stability in the recurrence formulation. Consequently, the present pre-conditioned IDF (PIDF) enables accurate calculation of the IB forcing within a few iterations. We perform numerical simulations of two-dimensional flows around a circular cylinder and three-dimensional flows around a sphere for low and moderate Reynolds numbers. The result shows that PIDF yields a better imposition of no-slip boundary conditions on the IB surfaces for low Reynolds number with a fairly larger time step than IB methods with different direct forcing schemes due to the implicit treatment of the diffusion term for determining the IB forcing. Finally, we demonstrate the robustness of the present PIDF scheme by numerical simulations of flow around a circular array of cylinders, flows around a falling sphere, and two sedimenting spheres in gravity.

  15. Criticality in the slowed-down boiling crisis at zero gravity.

    PubMed

    Charignon, T; Lloveras, P; Chatain, D; Truskinovsky, L; Vives, E; Beysens, D; Nikolayev, V S

    2015-05-01

    Boiling crisis is a transition between nucleate and film boiling. It occurs at a threshold value of the heat flux from the heater called CHF (critical heat flux). Usually, boiling crisis studies are hindered by the high CHF and short transition duration (below 1 ms). Here we report on experiments in hydrogen near its liquid-vapor critical point, in which the CHF is low and the dynamics slow enough to be resolved. As under such conditions the surface tension is very small, the experiments are carried out in the reduced gravity to preserve the conventional bubble geometry. Weightlessness is created artificially in two-phase hydrogen by compensating gravity with magnetic forces. We were able to reveal the fractal structure of the contour of the percolating cluster of the dry areas at the heater that precedes the boiling crisis. We provide a direct statistical analysis of dry spot areas that confirms the boiling crisis at zero gravity as a scale-free phenomenon. It was observed that, in agreement with theoretical predictions, saturated boiling CHF tends to zero (within the precision of our thermal control system) in zero gravity, which suggests that the boiling crisis may be observed at any heat flux provided the experiment lasts long enough. PMID:26066249

  16. Transient boiling heat transfer in saturated liquid nitrogen and F113 at standard and zero gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oker, E.; Merte, H., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Transient and steady state nucleate boiling in saturated LN2 and F113 at standard and near zero gravity conditions were investigated for the horizontal up, vertical and horizontal down orientations of the heating surface. Two distinct regimes of heat transfer mechanisms were observed during the interval from the step increase of power input to the onset of nucleate boiling: the conduction and convection dominated regimes. The time duration in each regime was considerably shorter with LN2 than with F113, and decreased as heat flux increased, as gravity was reduced, and as the orientation was changed from horizontal up to horizontal down. In transient boiling, boiling initiates at a single point following the step increase in power, and then spreads over the surface. The delay time for the inception of boiling at the first site, and the velocity of spread of boiling varies depending upon the heat flux, orientation, body force, surface roughness and liquid properties, and are a consequence of changes in boundary layer temperature levels associated with changes in natural convection. Following the step increase in power input, surface temperature overshoot and undershoot occur before the steady state boiling temperature level is established.

  17. Criticality in the slowed-down boiling crisis at zero gravity.

    PubMed

    Charignon, T; Lloveras, P; Chatain, D; Truskinovsky, L; Vives, E; Beysens, D; Nikolayev, V S

    2015-05-01

    Boiling crisis is a transition between nucleate and film boiling. It occurs at a threshold value of the heat flux from the heater called CHF (critical heat flux). Usually, boiling crisis studies are hindered by the high CHF and short transition duration (below 1 ms). Here we report on experiments in hydrogen near its liquid-vapor critical point, in which the CHF is low and the dynamics slow enough to be resolved. As under such conditions the surface tension is very small, the experiments are carried out in the reduced gravity to preserve the conventional bubble geometry. Weightlessness is created artificially in two-phase hydrogen by compensating gravity with magnetic forces. We were able to reveal the fractal structure of the contour of the percolating cluster of the dry areas at the heater that precedes the boiling crisis. We provide a direct statistical analysis of dry spot areas that confirms the boiling crisis at zero gravity as a scale-free phenomenon. It was observed that, in agreement with theoretical predictions, saturated boiling CHF tends to zero (within the precision of our thermal control system) in zero gravity, which suggests that the boiling crisis may be observed at any heat flux provided the experiment lasts long enough.

  18. Criticality in the slowed-down boiling crisis at zero gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charignon, T.; Lloveras, P.; Chatain, D.; Truskinovsky, L.; Vives, E.; Beysens, D.; Nikolayev, V. S.

    2015-05-01

    Boiling crisis is a transition between nucleate and film boiling. It occurs at a threshold value of the heat flux from the heater called CHF (critical heat flux). Usually, boiling crisis studies are hindered by the high CHF and short transition duration (below 1 ms). Here we report on experiments in hydrogen near its liquid-vapor critical point, in which the CHF is low and the dynamics slow enough to be resolved. As under such conditions the surface tension is very small, the experiments are carried out in the reduced gravity to preserve the conventional bubble geometry. Weightlessness is created artificially in two-phase hydrogen by compensating gravity with magnetic forces. We were able to reveal the fractal structure of the contour of the percolating cluster of the dry areas at the heater that precedes the boiling crisis. We provide a direct statistical analysis of dry spot areas that confirms the boiling crisis at zero gravity as a scale-free phenomenon. It was observed that, in agreement with theoretical predictions, saturated boiling CHF tends to zero (within the precision of our thermal control system) in zero gravity, which suggests that the boiling crisis may be observed at any heat flux provided the experiment lasts long enough.

  19. Sampling Point Compliance Tests for 325 Building at Set-Back Flow Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Glissmeyer, John A.; Barnett, J. Matthew; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Yokuda, Satoru T.

    2011-05-31

    The stack sampling system at the 325 Building (Radiochemical Processing Laboratory [RPL]) was constructed to comply with the American National Standards Institute’s (ANSI’s) Guide to Sampling Airborne Radioactive Materials in Nuclear Facilities (ANSI N13.1-1969). This standard provided prescriptive criteria for the location of radionuclide air-sampling systems. In 1999, the standard was revised (Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances From the Stacks and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities [ANSI/Health Physics Society [HPS] 13.1-1999]) to provide performance-based criteria for the location of sampling systems. Testing was conducted for the 325 Building stack to determine whether the sampling system would meet the updated criteria for uniform air velocity and contaminant concentration in the revised ANSI/HPS 13.1-1999 standard under normal operating conditions (Smith et al. 2010). Measurement results were within criteria for all tests. Additional testing and modeling was performed to determine whether the sampling system would meet criteria under set-back flow conditions. This included measurements taken from a scale model with one-third of the exhaust flow and computer modeling of the system with two-thirds of the exhaust flow. This report documents the results of the set-back flow condition measurements and modeling. Tests performed included flow angularity, uniformity of velocity, gas concentration, and particle concentration across the duct at the sampling location. Results are within ANSI/HPS 13.1-1999 criteria for all tests. These tests are applicable for the 325 Building stack under set-back exhaust flow operating conditions (980 - 45,400 cubic feet per minute [cfm]) with one fan running. The modeling results show that criteria are met for all tests using a two-fan configuration exhaust (flow modeled at 104,000 cfm). Combined with the results from the earlier normal operating conditions, the ANSI/HPS 13.1-1999 criteria for all tests

  20. Studies of Two-Phase Flow Dynamics and Heat Transfer at Reduced Gravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, Larry C.; Bousman, W. Scott; Fore, Larry B.

    1996-01-01

    The ability to predict gas-liquid flow patterns is crucial to the design and operation of two-phase flow systems in the microgravity environment. Flow pattern maps have been developed in this study which show the occurrence of flow patterns as a function of gas and liquid superficial velocities as well as tube diameter, liquid viscosity and surface tension. The results have demonstrated that the location of the bubble-slug transition is affected by the tube diameter for air-water systems and by surface tension, suggesting that turbulence-induced bubble fluctuations and coalescence mechanisms play a role in this transition. The location of the slug-annular transition on the flow pattern maps is largely unaffected by tube diameter, liquid viscosity or surface tension in the ranges tested. Void fraction-based transition criteria were developed which separate the flow patterns on the flow pattern maps with reasonable accuracy. Weber number transition criteria also show promise but further work is needed to improve these models. For annular gas-liquid flows of air-water and air- 50 percent glycerine under reduced gravity conditions, the pressure gradient agrees fairly well with a version of the Lockhart-Martinelli correlation but the measured film thickness deviates from published correlations at lower Reynolds numbers. Nusselt numbers, based on a film thickness obtained from standard normal-gravity correlations, follow the relation, Nu = A Re(sup n) Pr(exp l/3), but more experimental data in a reduced gravity environment are needed to increase the confidence in the estimated constants, A and n. In the slug flow regime, experimental pressure gradient does not correlate well with either the Lockhart-Martinelli or a homogeneous formulation, but does correlate nicely with a formulation based on a two-phase Reynolds number. Comparison with ground-based correlations implies that the heat transfer coefficients are lower at reduced gravity than at normal gravity under the same

  1. Discrete effects on boundary conditions for the lattice Boltzmann equation in simulating microscale gas flows.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhaoli; Shi, Baochang; Zhao, T S; Zheng, Chuguang

    2007-11-01

    The lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) has shown its promise in the simulation of microscale gas flows. One of the critical issues with this advanced method is to specify suitable slip boundary conditions to ensure simulation accuracy. In this paper we study two widely used kinetic boundary conditions in the LBE: the combination of the bounce-back and specular-reflection scheme and the discrete Maxwell's scheme. We show that (i) both schemes are virtually equivalent in principle, and (ii) there exist discrete effects in both schemes. A strategy is then proposed to adjust the parameters in the two kinetic boundary conditions such that an accurate slip boundary condition can be implemented. The numerical results demonstrate that the corrected boundary conditions are robust and reliable.

  2. Hyporheic exchange and oxygen consumption under losing and gaining flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnon, S.; Fox, A.; De Falco, N.; Boano, F.

    2013-12-01

    The exchange of water between the surface and subsurface environments plays a crucial role in hydrological, biogeochemical, and ecological processes. The exchange of water is driven by the local morphology of the streambed (hyporheic exchange) and regional forcing of the hydraulic gradient, which results in losing or gaining flow conditions. We measured the effects of losing and gaining flow conditions on hyporheic exchange fluxes by conducting tracer experiments using a novel laboratory flume system (640 cm long and 30 cm wide) under various combinations of overlying velocities and losing/gaining fluxes. Tracer experiments for measuring hyporheic exchange were done using NaCl as conservative tracer, and dye tracer to visualize the active region where water exchange processes occur. Hyporheic exchange fluxes were analyzed based on a new conceptual framework, which relies on a solute mass balance with sink/source terms due to losing/gaining fluxes to evaluate water exchange between surface flow and streambed sediments. This combination of experimental observations and modeling revealed that hyporheic exchange fluxes under losing and gaining flow conditions was similar. Interfacial transport increases proportional to the square of the overlying velocity, and linearly with increasing fluxes of losing and gaining conditions in the sand bed. When the regional hydraulic forcing becomes larger, the hyporheic exchange becomes smaller. Thus, losing and gaining flow conditions becomes the dominant mechanism of water exchange at a certain flux, which depends on the competitive interaction between the overlying velocity in the stream and the losing/gaining fluxes. This type of coupling is expected to regulate nutrient and contaminant transport and microbial activity in streams and rivers. Indeed, we demonstrated using oxygen distribution along the bedform, which was measured using microelectrodes, that the local hydraulic conditions have a strong influent on microbial activity

  3. Inflow/Outflow Conditions for Unsteady Aerodynamics and Aeroacoustics in Nonuniform Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atassi, Oliver V.; Grady, Joseph E. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The effect of a nonuniform mean flow on the normal modes; the inflow/outflow nonreflecting boundary conditions; and the sound power are studied. The normal modes in an annular duct are computed using a spectral method in combination with a shooting method. The swirl causes force imbalance which couples the acoustic and vortical modes. The acoustic modes are distinguished from the vortical modes by their large pressure and small vorticity content. The mean swirl also produces a Doppler shift in frequency. This results in more counter-spinning modes cut-on at a given frequency than modes spinning with the swirl. Nonreflecting boundary conditions are formulated using the normal mode solutions. The inflow/outflow boundary conditions are implemented in a linearized Euler scheme and validated by computing the propagation of acoustic and vortical waves in a duct for a variety of swirling mean flows. Numerical results show that the evolution of the vortical disturbances is sensitive to the inflow conditions and the details of the wake excitations. All three components of the wake velocity must be considered to correctly compute the wake evolution and the blade upwash. For high frequencies, the acoustic-vortical mode coupling is weak and a conservation equation for the acoustic energy can be derived. Sound power calculations show significant mean flow swirl effects, but mode interference effects are small.

  4. A Kinetic 13-Moment Boundary Conditions Method for Particle Simulations of Viscous Rarefied Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averkin, Sergey; Gatsonis, Nikolaos

    2015-11-01

    The kinetic 13-moment (Navier-Stokes-Fourrier) boundary condition method is developed for direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) simulations of rarefied gas flows. The particles are injected into the computational domain from the inlet and outlet following the first-order Chapman-Enskog distribution function. The unknown parameters of the Chapman-Enskog distribution function are reconstructed from the full 13-moment (Navier-Stokes-Fourier) equations discretized on the boundaries with the wave amplitudes calculated by the local one dimensional inviscid (LODI) formulation used in compressible (continuous) flow computations. The kinetic-moment boundary conditions are implemented in an unstructured 3D DSMC (U3DSMC) code and are supplemented with a neighboring-cell sampling approach and a time-average smoothing techniques to speed up convergence and reduce fluctuations. Simulations of a pressure-driven viscous subsonic flow in a circular tube are used for verification and validation of the boundary conditions. In addition, the present method is compared to the previously developed kinetic-moment boundary conditions derived from the five-moment (Euler) equations. AFOSR-FA9550-14-1-0366 Computational Mathematics Program.

  5. Investigation of wall bounded flows using SPH and the unified semi-analytical wall boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayrhofer, Arno; Rogers, Benedict D.; Violeau, Damien; Ferrand, Martin

    2013-11-01

    Semi-analytical wall boundary conditions present a mathematically rigorous framework to prescribe the influence of solid walls in smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) for fluid flows. In this paper they are investigated with respect to the skew-adjoint property which implies exact energy conservation. It will be shown that this property holds only in the limit of the continuous SPH approximation, whereas in the discrete SPH formulation it is only approximately true, leading to numerical noise. This noise, interpreted as a form of "turbulence", is treated using an additional volume diffusion term in the continuity equation which we show is equivalent to an approximate Riemann solver. Subsequently two extensions to the boundary conditions are presented. The first dealing with a variable driving force when imposing a volume flux in a periodic flow and the second showing a generalization of the wall boundary condition to Robin type and arbitrary-order interpolation. Two modifications for free-surface flows are presented for the volume diffusion term as well as the wall boundary condition. In order to validate the theoretical constructs numerical experiments are performed showing that the present volume flux term yields results with an error 5 orders of magnitude smaller then previous methods while the Robin boundary conditions are imposed correctly with an error depending on the order of the approximation. Furthermore, the proposed modifications for free-surface flows improve the behavior at the intersection of free surface and wall as well as prevent free-surface detachment when using the volume diffusion term. Finally, this paper is concluded by a simulation of a dam break over a wedge demonstrating the improvements proposed in this paper.

  6. Resistance coefficients for Stokes flow around a disk with a Navier slip condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherwood, J. D.

    2012-09-01

    The Stokes drag and couple acting on a disk of zero thickness as it moves through Newtonian fluid are investigated for the case when slip can occur at the surface of the disk. It is shown that when the disk translates parallel to its axis, the well-known velocity field for a no-slip boundary condition exerts zero shear stress on the surface of the disk. The flow is therefore unchanged if the boundary condition on the disk is modified to a stress-free or to a Navier slip boundary condition. This invariance also holds for a disk that rotates about a diameter. However, flow around a disk that rotates about its axis, or that translates in its own plane (edgewise), is modified when the no-slip boundary condition is changed to a Navier slip condition. The fluid velocity can be expressed in terms of Hankel transforms, and the resulting dual integral equations are solved numerically. Results for the torque and drag on the disk are presented as functions of the slip length in the Navier boundary condition.

  7. Outbreak of boils in an Alaskan village

    PubMed Central

    Landen, Michael G; McCumber, Barbara J; Asay, Elvin D; Egeland, Grace M

    2000-01-01

    Objective To determine whether taking steam baths was associated with furunculosis and to evaluate possible risk factors for the occurrence of boils during a large outbreak in Alaska. Design A cohort study of village residents, a case-control study, and assessment of environmental cultures taken from steam baths. Setting Village in southwestern Alaska. Participants 1 adult member from 77 of the 92 house-holds in the village was interviewed; 115 residents with at least one boil occurring between January 1 and December 12, 1996 were considered to be cases; 209 residents without a boil acted as the control group. All 459 village residents were included in the cohort study. Main outcome measure Rate of infection among all residents and residents who regularly took steam baths, risk factors for infection, and relative risk of infection. Results 115 people (25%) had had at least one boil. Men were more likely to have had a boil than women (relative risk 1.5; 95% confidence interval 1.1 to 2.2). The highest rate of infection was among people ages 25-34 years (32/76; 42%). No children younger than 2 years had had boils. Boils were associated with using a steam bath (odds ratio 8.1; 3.3 to 20.1). Among those who used a steam bath, the likelihood of developing boils was reduced by routinely sitting on a towel while bathing, which women were more likely to do, and bathing with fewer than 8 people. Of the 93 samples taken from steam baths, one Staphylococcus aureus isolate was obtained from a bench in an outer dressing room. Conclusion Using a steam bath was associated with developing boils in this outbreak in a village in Alaska. People should be advised to sit on towels while using steam baths. PMID:10778372

  8. MHD boundary layer flow of a power-law nanofluid with new mass flux condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Masood; Khan, Waqar Azeem

    2016-02-01

    An analysis is carried out to study the magnetohydrodynamic (" separators=" MHD ) boundary layer flow of power-law nanofluid over a non-linear stretching sheet. In the presence of a transverse magnetic field, the flow is generated due to non-linear stretching sheet. By using similarity transformations, the governing boundary layer equations are reduced into a system of ordinary differential equations. A recently proposed boundary condition requiring zero nanoparticle mass flux is employed in the flow analysis of power-law fluid. The reduced coupled differential equations are then solved numerically by the shooting method. The variations of dimensionless temperature and nanoparticle concentration with various parameters are graphed and discussed in detail. Numerical values of physical quantities such as the skin-friction coefficient and the reduced local Nusselt number are computed in tabular form.

  9. Flow Forecasting via Artificial Neural Networks - A Study for Input Variables conditioned on atmospheric circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panagoulia, D.; Trichakis, I.; Tsekouras, G. J.

    2012-04-01

    The paper compares the performance of different structures of Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) for flow forecasting of the next day in the Mesochora catchment in Northwestern Greece with respect to different input variables. The input variables are historical data of previous days, such as: (a) flows, (b) temperatures conditioned on atmospheric circulation, and (c) rainfalls conditioned on atmospheric circulation too. The training algorithm is the stochastic training back-propagation process with decreasing functions of learning rate and momentum term, for which a calibration process is conducted regarding the crucial parameters values, such as the number of neurons, the kind of activation functions, the initial values and time parameters of learning rate and momentum term etc. The performance of each structure has been evaluated by different criterions, such as (i) the root mean square error (RMSE), (ii) the correlation index (R), (iii) the mean absolute percentage error (MAPE), (iv) the mean percentage error (MPE), (v) the mean percentage error (ME), (vi) the percentage volume in errors (VE), (vii) the percentage error in peak (MF), (viii) the normalized mean bias error (NMBE), (ix) the normalized root mean bias error (NRMSE), (x) the Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency coefficient (E), (xi) the modified Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency coefficient (E1), (xii) the threshold statistics (TSp%) for a level of absolute relative error of p% (=1%, 2%, 5%, 25%, 50% and 100%). Here, the calibration process has been based on the voting analysis of the (i) to (xi) criterions. The time period of long-term falling flow (1972-77) is divided in two sets: one for ANN training with the 80% of data and the other for ANN parameters' calibration with the 20% data. The test set for the final verification of behaviour of ANN structures encompasses the following long-term time period with falling flow (1987-92). From the aforementioned analysis the nonlinear behaviour between forecasted

  10. Conditions for generation of fire-related debris flows, Capulin Canyon, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, S.H.; Reneau, S.L.

    2000-01-01

    Comparison of the responses of three drainage basins burned by the Dome fire of 1996 in New Mexico is used to identify the hillslope, channel and fire characteristics that indicate a susceptibility specifically to wildfire-related debris flow. Summer thunderstorms generated three distinct erosive responses from each of three basins. The Capulin Canyon basin showed widespread erosive sheetwash and rilling from hillslopes, and severe flooding occurred in the channel; the North Tributary basin exhibited extensive erosion of the mineral soil to a depth of 5 cm and downslope movement of up to boulder-sized material, and at least one debris flow occurred in the channel; negligible surface runoff was observed in the South Tributary basin. The negligible surface runoff observed in the South Tributary basin is attributed to the limited extent and severity of the fire in that basin. The factors that best distinguish between debris-flow producing and flood-producing drainages are drainage basin morphology and lithology. A rugged drainage basin morphology, an average 12 per cent channel gradient, and steep, rough hillslopes coupled with colluvium and soil weathered from volcaniclastic and volcanic rocks promoted the generation of debris flows. A less rugged basin morphology, an average gradient of 5 per cent, and long, smooth slopes mantled with pumice promoted flooding. Flood and debris-flow responses were produced without the presence of water-repellent soils. The continuity and severity of the burn mosaic, the condition of the riparian vegetation, the condition of the fibrous root mat, accumulations of dry ravel and colluvial material in the channel and on hillslopes, and past debris-flow activity, appeared to have little bearing on the distinctive responses of the basins. Published in 2000 by John Wiley and Sons, Ltd.

  11. Test Outline for Flutter Analysis of Rectangular Panels in Rarefied Flow Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akl, Fred A.

    1996-01-01

    Jet plume impingement forces acting on large flexible space structures may precipitate dynamically unstable behavior during space flights. Typical operating conditions in space involve rarefied gas flow regimes which are intrinsically distinct from continuum gas flow and are normally modeled using the kinetic theory of gas flow. Docking and undocking operations of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Mir space laboratory represent a scenario in which the stability boundaries of solar panels may be of interest. Extensive literature review of research work on the dynamic stability of rectangular panels in rarefied gas flow conditions indicated the lack of published reports dealing with this phenomenon. A recently completed preliminary study for NASA JSC dealing with the mathematical analysis of the stability of two-degree-of-freedom elastically supported rigid panels under the effect of rarefied gas flow was reviewed. A test plan outline is prepared for the purpose of conducting a series of experiments on four rectangular rigid test articles in a vacuum chamber under the effect of continuous and pulsating Nitrogen jet plumes. The purpose of the test plan is to gather enough data related to a number of key parameters to allow the validation of the two-degree-of-freedom mathematical model. The hardware required careful design to select a very lightweight material while satisfying rigidity and frequency requirements within the constraints of the test environment. The data to be obtained from the vacuum chamber tests can be compared with the predicted behavior of the theoretical two-degree-of-freedom model. Using the data obtained in this study, further research can identify the limitations of the mathematical model. In addition modifications to the mathematical model can be made, if warranted, to accurately predict the behavior of rigid panels under rarefied gas flow regimes.

  12. CFD Analysis of Mixing Characteristics of Several Fuel Injectors at Hypervelocity Flow Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drozda, Tomasz G.; Drummond, J. Philip; Baurle, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    CFD analysis is presented of the mixing characteristics and performance of three fuel injectors at hypervelocity flow conditions. The calculations were carried out using the VULCAN-CFD solver and Reynolds-Averaged Simulations (RAS). The high Mach number flow conditions match those proposed for the planned experiments conducted as a part of the Enhanced Injection and Mixing Project (EIMP) at the NASA Langley Research Center. The EIMP aims to investigate scramjet fuel injection and mixing physics, improve the understanding of underlying physical processes, and develop enhancement strategies and functional relationships relevant to flight Mach numbers greater than eight. Because of the high Mach number flow considered, the injectors consist of a fuel placement device, a strut; and a fluidic vortical mixer, a ramp. These devices accomplish the necessary task of distributing and mixing fuel into the supersonic cross-flow albeit via different strategies. Both of these devices were previously studied at lower flight Mach numbers where they exhibited promising performance in terms of mixing efficiency and total pressure recovery. For comparison, a flush-wall injector is also included. This type of injector generally represents the simplest method of introducing fuel into a scramjet combustor, however, at high flight Mach number conditions, the dynamic pressure needed to induce sufficient fuel penetration may be difficult to achieve along with other requirements such as achieving desired levels of fuel-to-air mixing at the required equivalence ratio. The three injectors represent the baseline configurations planned for the experiments. The current work discusses the mixing flow field behavior and differences among the three fuel injectors, mixing performance as described by the mixing efficiency and the total pressure recovery, and performance considerations based on the thrust potential.

  13. Inhibition of L-selectin binding by polyacrylamide-based conjugates under defined flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Enders, Sven; Bernhard, Gesche; Zakrzewicz, Andreas; Tauber, Rudolf

    2007-10-01

    Selectins mediate tethering and rolling of leukocytes along the endothelium in a shear force-dependent manner. This key step in the cellular immune response is a target for experimental anti-inflammatory therapies. In the present paper we have examined the inhibitory activity of the minimal selectin ligand sialyl Lewis x (SiaLe(x)), its isomer sialyl Lewis a (SiaLe(a)) and sulfated tyrosine (sTyr) residues under dynamic flow reflecting the rheological conditions in the blood stream. The monomeric ligands were compared to multivalent polyacrylamide (PAA)-based conjugates under defined flow conditions on the molecular level, using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology, and on the cellular level, using a parallel-plate flow chamber. SPR measurements showed that a spatial arrangement of binding epitopes mimicking the selectin binding motif of the natural ligand PSGL-1 inhibits L-selectin binding successfully with IC(50) values in the nanomolar range. Using a flow chamber adhesion assay it could be shown that the multivalent inhibitors efficiently blocked rolling and tethering of NALM-6 pre-B cells transfected with human L-selectin to activated endothelium and that the inhibitory activity increased with rising shear stress. While PAA-conjugates were almost not inhibitory at low shear stress, NALM-6 cell rolling was nearly completely inhibited at high shear stress. The results indicate that multimeric conjugates of SiaLe(x), SiaLe(a) and sTyr are highly effective inhibitors of L-selectin-mediated cell adhesion particularly under flow conditions. Consequently, SiaLe(x), SiaLe(a) and/or sTyr on macromolecular carriers may be promising candidates for anti-inflammatory therapy.

  14. Inhibition of L-selectin binding by polyacrylamide-based conjugates under defined flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Enders, Sven; Bernhard, Gesche; Zakrzewicz, Andreas; Tauber, Rudolf

    2007-10-01

    Selectins mediate tethering and rolling of leukocytes along the endothelium in a shear force-dependent manner. This key step in the cellular immune response is a target for experimental anti-inflammatory therapies. In the present paper we have examined the inhibitory activity of the minimal selectin ligand sialyl Lewis x (SiaLe(x)), its isomer sialyl Lewis a (SiaLe(a)) and sulfated tyrosine (sTyr) residues under dynamic flow reflecting the rheological conditions in the blood stream. The monomeric ligands were compared to multivalent polyacrylamide (PAA)-based conjugates under defined flow conditions on the molecular level, using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology, and on the cellular level, using a parallel-plate flow chamber. SPR measurements showed that a spatial arrangement of binding epitopes mimicking the selectin binding motif of the natural ligand PSGL-1 inhibits L-selectin binding successfully with IC(50) values in the nanomolar range. Using a flow chamber adhesion assay it could be shown that the multivalent inhibitors efficiently blocked rolling and tethering of NALM-6 pre-B cells transfected with human L-selectin to activated endothelium and that the inhibitory activity increased with rising shear stress. While PAA-conjugates were almost not inhibitory at low shear stress, NALM-6 cell rolling was nearly completely inhibited at high shear stress. The results indicate that multimeric conjugates of SiaLe(x), SiaLe(a) and sTyr are highly effective inhibitors of L-selectin-mediated cell adhesion particularly under flow conditions. Consequently, SiaLe(x), SiaLe(a) and/or sTyr on macromolecular carriers may be promising candidates for anti-inflammatory therapy. PMID:17707590

  15. Increasing Boiling Heat Transfer using Low Conductivity Materials

    PubMed Central

    Mahamudur Rahman, Md; Pollack, Jordan; McCarthy, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    We report the counterintuitive mechanism of increasing boiling heat transfer by incorporating low-conductivity materials at the interface between the surface and fluid. By embedding an array of non-conductive lines into a high-conductivity substrate, in-plane variations in the local surface temperature are created. During boiling the surface temperature varies spatially across the substrate, alternating between high and low values, and promotes the organization of distinct liquid and vapor flows. By systematically tuning the peak-to-peak wavelength of this spatial temperature variation, a resonance-like effect is seen at a value equal to the capillary length of the fluid. Replacing ~18% of the surface with a non-conductive epoxy results in a greater than 5x increase in heat transfer rate at a given superheat temperature. This drastic and counterintuitive increase is shown to be due to optimized bubble dynamics, where ordered pathways allow for efficient removal of vapor and the return of replenishing liquid. The use of engineered thermal gradients represents a potentially disruptive approach to create high-efficiency and high-heat-flux boiling surfaces which are naturally insensitive to fouling and degradation as compared to other approaches. PMID:26281890

  16. Increasing Boiling Heat Transfer using Low Conductivity Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahamudur Rahman, Md; Pollack, Jordan; McCarthy, Matthew

    2015-08-01

    We report the counterintuitive mechanism of increasing boiling heat transfer by incorporating low-conductivity materials at the interface between the surface and fluid. By embedding an array of non-conductive lines into a high-conductivity substrate, in-plane variations in the local surface temperature are created. During boiling the surface temperature varies spatially across the substrate, alternating between high and low values, and promotes the organization of distinct liquid and vapor flows. By systematically tuning the peak-to-peak wavelength of this spatial temperature variation, a resonance-like effect is seen at a value equal to the capillary length of the fluid. Replacing ~18% of the surface with a non-conductive epoxy results in a greater than 5x increase in heat transfer rate at a given superheat temperature. This drastic and counterintuitive increase is shown to be due to optimized bubble dynamics, where ordered pathways allow for efficient removal of vapor and the return of replenishing liquid. The use of engineered thermal gradients represents a potentially disruptive approach to create high-efficiency and high-heat-flux boiling surfaces which are naturally insensitive to fouling and degradation as compared to other approaches.

  17. Increasing Boiling Heat Transfer using Low Conductivity Materials.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Mahamudur; Pollack, Jordan; McCarthy, Matthew

    2015-08-18

    We report the counterintuitive mechanism of increasing boiling heat transfer by incorporating low-conductivity materials at the interface between the surface and fluid. By embedding an array of non-conductive lines into a high-conductivity substrate, in-plane variations in the local surface temperature are created. During boiling the surface temperature varies spatially across the substrate, alternating between high and low values, and promotes the organization of distinct liquid and vapor flows. By systematically tuning the peak-to-peak wavelength of this spatial temperature variation, a resonance-like effect is seen at a value equal to the capillary length of the fluid. Replacing ~18% of the surface with a non-conductive epoxy results in a greater than 5x increase in heat transfer rate at a given superheat temperature. This drastic and counterintuitive increase is shown to be due to optimized bubble dynamics, where ordered pathways allow for efficient removal of vapor and the return of replenishing liquid. The use of engineered thermal gradients represents a potentially disruptive approach to create high-efficiency and high-heat-flux boiling surfaces which are naturally insensitive to fouling and degradation as compared to other approaches.

  18. A Fundamental Study of Nucleate Pool Boiling Under Microgravity. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ervin, J.S.; Merte, H. Jr.

    1996-03-01

    An experimental study of incipient boiling in short-term microgravity and with a/g = {+-} 1 for pool boiling was performed. Calibrated thin gold films sputtered on a smoothly polished quartz surface were used simultaneously for thermal-resistance measurements and heating of the boiling surface. The gold films were used for both transient and quasi-steady heating surface temperature measurements. Two test vessels were constructed for precise measurement and control of fluid temperature and pressure: a laboratory pool boiling vessel for the a/g = {+-} 1 experiments and a pool boiling vessel designed for the 131 m free-fall in the NASA Lewis Research Center Microgravity Research Facility for the microgravity tests. Measurements included the heater surface temperature, the pressure near the heating surface, the bulk liquid temperatures. High speed photography (up to 1,000 frames per second) was used in the experiments. With high quality microgravity and the measured initial temperature of the quiescent test fluid, R113, the temperature distribution in the liquid at the moment of boiling inception resulting from an imposed step in heat flux is known with a certainty not possible previously. The types of boiling propagation across the large flat heating surface, some observed here for the first time, are categorized; the conditions necessary for their occurrence are described. Explosive boiling propagation with a striking pattern of small scale protuberances over the entire vapor mass periphery not observed previously at low heat flux levels (on the order of 5 W/cm(exp 2)) is described. For the heater surface with a/g = {minus}1, a step in the heater surface temperature of short duration was imposed. The resulting liquid temperature distribution at the moment of boiling inception was different from that obtained with a step in heat flux.

  19. Flowing versus Static Conditions for Measuring Multiple Exciton Generation in PbSe Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect

    Midgett, Aaron G.; Hillhouse, Hugh W.; Hughes, Barbara K.; Nozik, Arthur J.; Beard, Matthew C.

    2010-09-22

    Recent reports question the validity of pulsed fs-laser experiments for measuring the photon-to-exciton quantum yields (QYs) that result from multiple exciton generation (MEG). The repetitive nature of these experiments opens up an alternative relaxation pathway that may produce artificially high results. We present transient-absorption (TA) data for 4.6 and 6.6 nm diameter PbSe quantum dots (QDs) at a variety of pump photon energies. The data are collected under laminar flow conditions with volumetric flow rates ranging from 0 to 150 mL/min (resulting in Reynolds numbers up to 460). The results are modeled with a spatially resolved population balance of generation, recombination, convective replacement, and accumulation of long-lived excited QDs. By comparing the simulations and experiments, the steady-state population of the long-lived QD-excited states and their kinetics are determined for different experimental conditions. We also improve upon reported photon-to-exciton QYs for PbSe QDs. We find differences in the observed TA dynamics between flowing and static conditions that depend upon photon fluence, pump photon energy, and quality of the QD surfaces. For excitation energies below 2 Eg, independent of QD size or photon fluence, we observe no flow rate dependence in the TA dynamics. At excitation energies of hν > 3 Eg, we observe differences between static and flowing conditions that are most pronounced for high photon fluences. At 3.7 Eg and for 4.6 nm PbSe QDs we find a QY of 1.2 ± 0.1 and at 4.5 Eg the QY is 1.55 ± 0.05. With 6.6 nm QDs excited at 4.7 Eg we observe no difference between static and flowing conditions and find a QY of 1.61 ± 0.05. We also find that by treating the surface of QDs, we can decrease the charging probability (Pg ≈ 5 × 10-5) by a factor of 3-4. The observed variations suggest that different QD samples vary regarding their susceptibility to the

  20. The influence of upstream boun