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Sample records for flow cell studies

  1. Performance Mapping Studies in Redox Flow Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoberecht, M. A.; Thaller, L. H.

    1981-01-01

    Pumping power requirements in any flow battery system constitute a direct parasitic energy loss. It is therefore useful to determine the practical lower limit for reactant flow rates. Through the use of a theoretical framework based on electrochemical first principles, two different experimental flow mapping techniques were developed to evaluate and compare electrodes as a function of flow rate. For the carbon felt electrodes presently used in NASA-Lewis Redox cells, a flow rate 1.5 times greater than the stoichiometric rate seems to be the required minimum.

  2. Cell-cell interaction in blood flow in patients with coronary heart disease (in vitro study)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinova, Lidia I.; Simonenko, Georgy V.; Denisova, Tatyana P.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2007-02-01

    Blood cell-cell and cell-vessel wall interactions are one of the key patterns in blood and vascular pathophysiology. We have chosen the method of reconstruction of pulsative blood flow in vitro in the experimental set. Blood flow structure was studied by PC integrated video camera with following slide by slide analysis. Studied flow was of constant volumetric blood flow velocity (1 ml/h). Diameter of tube in use was comparable with coronary arteries diameter. Glucose solution and unfractured heparin were used as the nonspecial irritants of studied flow. Erythrocytes space structure in flow differs in all groups of patients in our study (men with stable angina pectoris (SAP), myocardial infarction (MI) and practically healthy men (PHM). Intensity of erythrocytes aggregate formation was maximal in patients with SAP, but time of their "construction/deconstruction" at glucose injection was minimal. Phenomena of primary clotting formation in patients with SAP of high function class was reconstructed under experimental conditions. Heparin injection (10 000 ED) increased linear blood flow velocity both in patients with SAP, MI and PHP but modulated the cell profile in the flow. Received data correspond with results of animal model studies and noninvasive blood flow studies in human. Results of our study reveal differences in blood flow structure in patients with coronary heart disease and PHP under irritating conditions as the possible framework of metabolic model of coronary blood flow destabilization.

  3. Flow cytometry methods for the study of cell-cycle parameters of planarian stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hara; Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro

    2009-05-01

    Due to their characteristic inaccessibility and low numbers, little is known about the cell-cycle dynamics of most stem cells in vivo. A powerful, established methodology to study cell-cycle dynamics is flow cytometry, which is used routinely to study the cell-cycle dynamics of proliferating cells in vitro. Its use in heterogeneous mixtures of cells obtained from whole animals, however, is complicated by the relatively low abundance of cycling to non-cycling cells. We report on flow cytometric methods that take advantage of the abundance of proliferating stem cells in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea. The optimized protocols allow us to measure cell-cycle dynamics and follow BrdU-labeled cells specifically in complex mixtures of cells. These methods expand on the growing toolkit being developed to study stem cell biology in planarians, and open the door to detailed cytometric studies of a collectively totipotent population of adult stem cells in vivo.

  4. A novel planar flow cell for studies of biofilm heterogeneity and flow-biofilm interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Sileika, Tadas S; Chen, Cheng; Liu, Yang; Lee, Jisun; Packman, Aaron I

    2011-11-01

    Biofilms are microbial communities growing on surfaces, and are ubiquitous in nature, in bioreactors, and in human infection. Coupling between physical, chemical, and biological processes is known to regulate the development of biofilms; however, current experimental systems do not provide sufficient control of environmental conditions to enable detailed investigations of these complex interactions. We developed a novel planar flow cell that supports biofilm growth under complex two-dimensional fluid flow conditions. This device provides precise control of flow conditions and can be used to create well-defined physical and chemical gradients that significantly affect biofilm heterogeneity. Moreover, the top and bottom of the flow chamber are transparent, so biofilm growth and flow conditions are fully observable using non-invasive confocal microscopy and high-resolution video imaging. To demonstrate the capability of the device, we observed the growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms under imposed flow gradients. We found a positive relationship between patterns of fluid velocity and biofilm biomass due to faster microbial growth under conditions of greater local nutrient influx, but this relationship eventually reversed because high hydrodynamic shear leads to the detachment of cells from the surface. These results reveal that flow gradients play a critical role in the development of biofilm communities. By providing new capability for observing biofilm growth, solute and particle transport, and net chemical transformations under user-specified environmental gradients, this new planar flow cell system has broad utility for studies of environmental biotechnology and basic biofilm microbiology, as well as applications in bioreactor design, environmental engineering, biogeochemistry, geomicrobiology, and biomedical research. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. A novel planar flow cell for studies of biofilm heterogeneity and flow-biofilm interactions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Sileika, Tadas S.; Chen, Cheng; Liu, Yang; Lee, Jisun; Packman, Aaron I.

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms are microbial communities growing on surfaces, and are ubiquitous in nature, in bioreactors, and in human infection. Coupling between physical, chemical, and biological processes is known to regulate the development of biofilms; however, current experimental systems do not provide sufficient control of environmental conditions to enable detailed investigations of these complex interactions. We developed a novel planar flow cell that supports biofilm growth under complex two-dimensional fluid flow conditions. This device provides precise control of flow conditions and can be used to create well-defined physical and chemical gradients that significantly affect biofilm heterogeneity. Moreover, the top and bottom of the flow chamber are transparent, so biofilm growth and flow conditions are fully observable using non-invasive confocal microscopy and high-resolution video imaging. To demonstrate the capability of the device, we observed the growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms under imposed flow gradients. We found a positive relationship between patterns of fluid velocity and biofilm biomass because of faster microbial growth under conditions of greater local nutrient influx, but this relationship eventually reversed because high hydrodynamic shear leads to the detachment of cells from the surface. These results reveal that flow gradients play a critical role in the development of biofilm communities. By providing new capability for observing biofilm growth, solute and particle transport, and net chemical transformations under user-specified environmental gradients, this new planar flow cell system has broad utility for studies of environmental biotechnology and basic biofilm microbiology, as well as applications in bioreactor design, environmental engineering, biogeochemistry, geomicrobiology, and biomedical research. PMID:21656713

  6. A file of red blood cells in tube flow: A three-dimensional numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Ting; Phan-Thien, Nhan; Khoo, Boo Cheong; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2014-09-01

    The rheology of a file of red blood cells (RBCs) in a tube flow is investigated based on a three-dimensional (3D) computational model using the dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) method. The 3D model consists of a discrete RBC model to describe the RBC deformation, a Morse potential model to characterize the cell-cell interaction, and a DPD model to provide all the relevant information on the suspension flow. Three important features of the suspension flow are simulated and analyzed, (i) the effect of the tube hematocrit, (ii) the effect of the cell spacing, and (iii) the effect of the flow velocity. We first study the cell deformation and the rheology of suspension at different tube hematocrit. The results show that the cell deformation decreases with increasing tube hematocrit, and a good agreement between the simulation and available experiments is found for the discharge hematocrit and relative apparent viscosity of RBC suspension. We then analyze the effect of non-uniform cell spacing, where the cell-cell interaction goes into effect, showing that a non-uniform cell spacing has a slight effect on the cell deformation, and almost has no effect on the rheology of suspension. We finally study the effect of the flow velocity and show that a typical plug-flow velocity profile is observed. The results also show that the cell deformation increases with increasing flow velocity, as expected. The discharge hematocrit also increases, but the relative apparent viscosity decreases, with increasing flow velocity.

  7. Clinical utility of flow cytometry in the study of erythropoiesis and nonclonal red cell disorders.

    PubMed

    Chesney, Alden; Good, David; Reis, Marciano

    2011-01-01

    Erythropoiesis involves proliferation and differentiation of small population of hematopoietic stem cells resident in the bone marrow into mature red blood cells. The determination of the cellular composition of the blood is a valuable tool in the diagnosis of diseases and monitoring of therapy. Flow cytometric analysis is increasingly being used to characterize the heterogeneous cell populations present in the blood and the hematopoietic cell differentiation and maturation pathways of the bone marrow. Here we discuss the role of flow cytometry in the study of erythropoiesis and nonclonal red blood cell disorders. First, we discuss flow cytometric analysis of reticulocytes. Next, we review salient quantitative methods that can be used for detection of fetal-maternal hemorrhage (FMH). We also discuss flow cytometric analysis of high hemoglobin F (HbF) in Sickle Cell Disease (SCD), hereditary spherocytosis (HS), red cell survival and red cell volume. We conclude by discussing cell cycle of erythroid cells.

  8. Bivariate flow cytometric analysis of murine intestinal epithelial cells for cytokinetic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Pallavicini, M.G.; Ng, C.R.; Gray, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    The heterogeneous nature of the small intestine and the lack of methods to obtain pure crypt populations has, in the past, limited the application of standard flow cytometric analysis for cytokinetic studies of the proliferating crypts. The authors describe a flow cytometric technique to discriminate crypt and villus cells in an epithelial cell suspension on the basis of cell length, and to measure the DNA content of the discriminated subpopulations. These data indicate that bivariate analysis of a mixed epithelial cell suspension can be used to distinguish mature villus cells, G/sub 1/ crypt cells, and S-phase crypt cells. In addition, continuous labeling studies suggest that the position of a cell on the cell length axis reflects epithelial cell maturity. The authors applied this flow cytometric technique to determine the cytokinetic nature of epithelial cells obtained by sequential digestion of the small intestine. 22 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  9. Imaging Flow Cytometry for the Study of Erythroid Cell Biology and Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Samsel, Leigh; McCoy, J Philip

    2015-01-01

    Erythroid cell maturation and diseases affecting erythrocytes are frequently accompanied by morphologic and immunophenotypic changes to these cells. In the past, these changes have been assessed primarily through the use of manual microscopy, which substantially limits the statistical rigor, throughput, and objectivity of these studies. Imaging flow cytometry provides a technology to examine both the morphology of cells as well as to quantify the staining intensity and signal distribution of numerous fluorescent markers on a cell-by-cell basis with high throughput in a statistically robust manner, and thus is ideally suited to studying erythroid cell biology. To date imaging flow cytometry has been used to study erythrocytes in three areas: 1) erythroid cell maturation, 2) sickle cell disease, and 3) infectious diseases such as malaria. In the maturation studies, imaging flow cytometry can closely recapitulate known stages of maturation and has led to the identification of a new population of erythroid cell precursors. In sickle cell disease, imaging flow cytometry provides a robust method to quantify sickled erythrocytes and to identify cellular aggregates linked to morbidities, and in malaria, imaging flow cytometry has been used to screen for new chemotherapeutic agents. These studies have demonstrated the value of imaging flow cytometry for investigations of erythrocyte biology and pathology. PMID:25858229

  10. Analysis of cell flux in the parallel plate flow chamber: implications for cell capture studies.

    PubMed

    Munn, L L; Melder, R J; Jain, R K

    1994-08-01

    The parallel plate flow chamber provides a controlled environment for determinations of the shear stress at which cells in suspension can bind to endothelial cell monolayers. By decreasing the flow rate of cell-containing media over the monolayer and assessing the number of cells bound at each wall shear stress, the relationship between shear force and binding efficiency can be determined. The rate of binding should depend on the delivery of cells to the surface as well as the intrinsic cell-surface interactions; thus, only if the cell flux to the surface is known can the resulting binding curves be interpreted correctly. We present the development and validation of a mathematical model based on the sedimentation rate and velocity profile in the chamber for the delivery of cells from a flowing suspension to the chamber surface. Our results show that the flux depends on the bulk cell concentration, the distance from the entrance point, and the flow rate of the cell-containing medium. The model was then used in a normalization procedure for experiments in which T cells attach to TNF-alpha-stimulated HUVEC monolayers, showing that a threshold for adhesion occurs at a shear stress of about 3 dyn/cm2.

  11. Study of planarian stem cell proliferation by means of flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Ermakov, Artem M; Ermakova, Olga N; Kudravtsev, Andrei A; Kreshchenko, Natalia D

    2012-03-01

    The stem cells in freshwater flatworms (planarian) are called neoblasts. Neoblasts are capable of proliferation and differentiation into every cell type, including the gametes. For the investigation of the mechanisms of stem cells proliferation and differentiation the proper evaluation of changes in the cell cycle of neoblasts in different physiological conditions of planarian is necessary. In the present study the possibility of qualitative and quantitative characteristics of the neoblasts population were investigated using flow cytometry. In the cell suspension prepared from planarian tissue proliferating neoblasts have been observed in heterogenic cell population. Quantitative estimation of the cell cycle related changes of planarian stem cells system have been performed in various physiological conditions (intact and regenerating animals) and under the influence of physical (ionizing radiation) and chemical (melatonin and colchicine) factors. The modified protocol for planarian stem cells isolation proved to be effective and reproducible and can be recommended for flow cytometry analyses of human and animal proliferating cells.

  12. Feasibility study of red blood cell debulking by magnetic field-flow fractionation with step-programmed flow

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Lee R.; Williams, P. Stephen; Nehl, Franziska; Abe, Koji; Chalmers, Jeffrey J.; Zborowski, Maciej

    2013-01-01

    Emerging applications of rare cell separation and analysis, such as separation of mature red blood cells from hematopoietic cell cultures require efficient methods of red blood cell (RBC) debulking. We have tested the feasibility of magnetic RBC separation as an alternative to centrifugal separation using an approach based on the mechanism of magnetic field-flow fractionation (MgFFF). A specially designed permanent magnet assembly generated a quadrupole field having a maximum field of 1.68 T at the magnet pole tips, zero field at the aperture axis, and a nearly constant radial field gradient of 1.75 T/mm (with a negligible angular component) inside a cylindrical aperture of 1.9 mm (diameter) and 76 mm (length). The cell samples included high-spin hemoglobin RBCs obtained by chemical conversion of hemoglobin to methemoglobin (met RBC) or by exposure to anoxic conditions (deoxy RBC), low-spin hemoglobin obtained by exposure of RBC suspension to ambient air (oxy RBC), and mixtures of deoxy RBC and cells from a KG-1a white blood cell (WBC) line. The observation that met RBCs did not elute from the channel at the lower flow rate of 0.05 mL/min applied for 15 min but quickly eluted at the subsequent higher flow rate of 2.0 mL/min was in agreement with FFF theory. The well-defined experimental conditions (precise field and flow characteristics) and a well-established FFF theory verified by studies with model cell systems provided us with a strong basis for making predictions about potential practical applications of the magnetic RBC separation. PMID:24141316

  13. Feasibility study of red blood cell debulking by magnetic field-flow fractionation with step-programmed flow.

    PubMed

    Moore, Lee R; Williams, P Stephen; Nehl, Franziska; Abe, Koji; Chalmers, Jeffrey J; Zborowski, Maciej

    2014-02-01

    Emerging applications of rare cell separation and analysis, such as separation of mature red blood cells from hematopoietic cell cultures, require efficient methods of red blood cell (RBC) debulking. We have tested the feasibility of magnetic RBC separation as an alternative to centrifugal separation using an approach based on the mechanism of magnetic field-flow fractionation (MgFFF). A specially designed permanent magnet assembly generated a quadrupole field having a maximum field of 1.68 T at the magnet pole tips, zero field at the aperture axis, and a nearly constant radial field gradient of 1.75 T/mm (with a negligible angular component) inside a cylindrical aperture of 1.9 mm (diameter) and 76 mm (length). The cell samples included high-spin hemoglobin RBCs obtained by chemical conversion of hemoglobin to methemoglobin (met RBC) or by exposure to anoxic conditions (deoxy RBC), low-spin hemoglobin obtained by exposure of RBC suspension to ambient air (oxy RBC), and mixtures of deoxy RBC and cells from a KG-1a white blood cell (WBC) line. The observation that met RBCs did not elute from the channel at the lower flow rate of 0.05 mL/min applied for 15 min but quickly eluted at the subsequent higher flow rate of 2.0 mL/min was in agreement with FFF theory. The well-defined experimental conditions (precise field and flow characteristics) and a well-established FFF theory verified by studies with model cell systems provided us with a strong basis for making predictions about potential practical applications of the magnetic RBC separation.

  14. Study of Paclitaxel-Treated HeLa Cells by Differential Electrical Impedance Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Kirkegaard, Julie; Clausen, Casper Hyttel; Rodriguez-Trujillo, Romen; Svendsen, Winnie Edith

    2014-09-01

    This work describes the electrical investigation of paclitaxel-treated HeLa cells using a custom-made microfluidic biosensor for whole cell analysis in continuous flow. We apply the method of differential electrical impedance spectroscopy to treated HeLa cells in order to elucidate the changes in electrical properties compared with non-treated cells. We found that our microfluidic system was able to distinguish between treated and non-treated cells. Furthermore, we utilize a model for electrical impedance spectroscopy in order to perform a theoretical study to clarify our results. This study focuses on investigating the changes in the electrical properties of the cell membrane caused by the effect of paclitaxel. We observe good agreement between the model and the obtained results. This establishes the proof-of-concept for the application in cell drug therapy.

  15. Study of Paclitaxel-Treated HeLa Cells by Differential Electrical Impedance Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Kirkegaard, Julie; Clausen, Casper Hyttel; Rodriguez-Trujillo, Romen; Svendsen, Winnie Edith

    2014-01-01

    This work describes the electrical investigation of paclitaxel-treated HeLa cells using a custom-made microfluidic biosensor for whole cell analysis in continuous flow. We apply the method of differential electrical impedance spectroscopy to treated HeLa cells in order to elucidate the changes in electrical properties compared with non-treated cells. We found that our microfluidic system was able to distinguish between treated and non-treated cells. Furthermore, we utilize a model for electrical impedance spectroscopy in order to perform a theoretical study to clarify our results. This study focuses on investigating the changes in the electrical properties of the cell membrane caused by the effect of paclitaxel. We observe good agreement between the model and the obtained results. This establishes the proof-of-concept for the application in cell drug therapy. PMID:25587422

  16. A Case of Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm Extensively Studied by Flow Cytometry and Immunohistochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Cesana, Clara; Cittone, Micol Giulia; Bandiera, Laura; Scarpati, Barbara; Mancini, Valentina; Soriani, Silvia; Veronese, Silvio; Truini, Mauro; Rossini, Silvano; Cairoli, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN) is a rare hematologic malignancy with aggressive clinical course and poor prognosis. Diagnosis is based on detection of CD4+ CD56+, CD123high, TCL-1+, and blood dendritic cell antigen-2/CD303+ blasts, together with the absence of lineage specific antigens on tumour cells. In this report we present a case of BPDCN presenting with extramedullary and bone marrow involvement, extensively studied by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry, who achieved complete remission after acute lymphoblastic leukemia like chemotherapy and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:28409040

  17. Computational study of cell adhesion and rolling in flow channel by meshfree method.

    PubMed

    Lin, Liqiang; Zeng, Xiaowei

    2017-03-14

    Tethering and rolling of circulating leukocytes on the surface of endothelium are critical steps during an inflammatory response. A soft solid cell model was proposed to study monocytes tethering and rolling behaviors on substrate surface in shear flow. The interactions between monocytes and micro-channel surface were modeled by a coarse-grained molecular adhesive potential. The computational model was implemented in a Lagrange-type meshfree Galerkin formulation to investigate the monocyte tethering and rolling process with different flow rates. From the simulation results, it was found that the flow rate has profound effects on the rolling velocity, contact area and effective stress of monocytes. As the flow rate increased, the rolling velocity would increase linearly, whereas the contact area and average effective stress in monocyte showed nonlinear increase.

  18. An experimental study of mushroom shaped stall cells. [on finite wings with separated flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkelmann, A. E.

    1982-01-01

    Surface patterns characterized by a pair of counter-rotating swirls have been observed in connection with the conduction of surface flow visualization experiments involving test geometries with separated flows. An example of this phenomenon occurring on a finite wing with trailing edge stall has been referred to by Winkelmann and Barlow (1980) as 'mushroom shaped'. A description is presented of a collection of experimental results which show or suggest the occurrence of mushroom shaped stall cells on a variety of test geometries. Investigations conducted with finite wings, airfoil models, and flat plates are considered, and attention is given to studies involving the use of bluff models, investigations of shock induced boundary layer separation, and mushroom shaped patterns observed in a number of miscellaneous cases. It is concluded that the mushroom shaped stall cell appears commonly in separated flow regions.

  19. An Analytical Study on Periodically Changing Flow Cells in Groundwater Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, X.; Zhao, K. Y.; Wang, J. Z.; Wan, L.; Wang, H.

    2014-12-01

    Current understanding on basin-scale groundwater flow is mainly based on Tóth's (1962, 1963) pioneering study, which assumed that water table is a subdued replica of topography and the annual mean water table controls the pattern of groundwater flow. In fact, water table is driven by dynamic forcing and changes with time. This study modifies the conceptual model of basin-scale groundwater flow by taking the fluctuating water-table into account. For both unit basin and complex basin, water table fluctuates throughout the basin cross-section except for at basin valleys. By the method of separation of variables, we derive the analytical solution of hydraulics head and stream function in the unit basin and the complex basin, and discuss the characteristics of the time-dependent flow cells. For the unit basin, the change in amplitude of hydraulic head fluctuation with depth is studied. For the complex basin, the time-dependent distribution of internal stagnation points is discussed. In addition, the relationship between flowing artesian zone and the fluctuating water-table is discussed. The results of the current study enhance our understanding on the transient nature of basin-scale groundwater flow.

  20. Microelectrochemical Flow Cell for Studying Electrocatalytic Reactions on Oxide-Coated Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Morgan J; Ostojic, Nevena; Crooks, Richard M

    2017-10-02

    Here, we report a new kind of microelectrochemical flow system that is well suited for studying electrode modifications, like thin films prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD), that require substrates to have a two-dimensional form factor. The design provides a means for electrodes to be modified ex situ and then incorporated directly into the flow cell. The electrodes can be removed after testing and further modified or tested before being reincorporated into the flow cell. Using this cell, mass-transfer coefficients up to 0.011 cm/s and collection efficiencies up to 57 ± 10% have been achieved. Electrodes modified with an ultrathin layer of ALD Al2O3 and an overlayer of Pt dendrimer-encapsulated nanoparticles (DENs) have been incorporated into the flow cell and their electrocatalytic properties evaluated. Subsequently, the dendrimer was removed from the Pt DENs using a UV/O3 treatment, and this provided direct contact between the Al2O3 layer and the NPs. Finally, the product distribution for the oxygen reduction reaction (water vs H2O2) was evaluated in the presence and absence of Pt-Al2O3 support interactions.

  1. Experimental study of granular flows in a rough annular shear cell.

    PubMed

    Jasti, Venkata; Higgs, C Fred

    2008-10-01

    The study of granular flows in physics has always been important because of their recurring presence in nature and industry. However, the nonlinear and multiphase behavior exhibited by these particulate systems makes them hard to model and predict. Several experiments were conducted in the past to gain insight into granular flows. The current experimental work furthers this insight and specifically attempts to understand the effect of rough surfaces on granular flows, namely, their local flow behavior. Understanding this interaction can have implications on industrial-scale granular problems. In this work, a granular shear cell, a two-dimensional annular shear cell, was developed to conduct shear experiments where roughness is imposed on the driving surface and experimentally quantified. A digital particle tracking velocimetry data retrieval scheme was developed to extract solid fraction, velocity, and granular temperature data from the experiments as a function of the roughness factor and wheel rotation rate. In general, the steady-state results show the two distinct regions as expected-a high-velocity and dilute-gas-like kinetic region near the moving wall and a high-solid-fraction liquid-like frictional flow regime away from the moving wall. Parametric studies conducted show that the normalized slip near the moving wall decreases with increasing wall roughness and decreasing wall rotation rate. Slip is an important parameter which can be easily interpreted as momentum transfer or traction performance in granular systems related to wheel-terrain interaction, agricultural processing, and most notably granular lubrication.

  2. A flow-through hydrothermal cell for in situ neutron diffraction studies of phase transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, Brian; Tenailleau, Christophe; Nogthai, Yung; Studer, Andrew; Brugger, Joël; Pring, Allan

    2006-11-01

    A flow-through hydrothermal cell for the in situ neutron diffraction study of crystallisation and phase transitions has been developed. It can be used for kinetic studies on materials that exhibit structural transformations under hydrothermal conditions. It is specifically designed for use on the medium-resolution powder diffractometer (MRPD) at ANSTO, Lucas Heights, Sydney. But it is planned to adapt the design for the Polaris beamline at ISIS and the new high-intensity powder diffractometer (Wombat) at the new Australian reactor Opal. The cell will operate in a flow-through mode over the temperature range from 25-300 °C and up to pressures of 100 bar. The first results of a successful transformation of pentlandite (Fe,Ni) 9S 8 to violarite (Fe,Ni) 3S 4 under mild conditions (pH∼4) at 120 °C and 3 bar using in situ neutron diffraction measurements are presented.

  3. A microfluidic flow-cell for the study of the ultrafast dynamics of biological systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chauvet, Adrien Chergui, Majed; Tibiletti, Tania; Caffarri, Stefano

    2014-10-01

    The study of biochemical dynamics by ultrafast spectroscopic methods is often restricted by the limited amount of liquid sample available, while the high repetition rate of light sources can induce photodamage. In order to overcome these limitations, we designed a high flux, sub-ml, capillary flow-cell. While the 0.1 mm thin window of the 0.5 mm cross-section capillary ensures an optimal temporal resolution and a steady beam deviation, the cell-pump generates flows up to ~0.35 ml/s that are suitable to pump laser repetition rates up to ~14 kHz, assuming a focal spot-diameter of 100 μm. In addition, a decantation chamber efficiently removes bubbles and allows, via septum, for the addition of chemicals while preserving the closed atmosphere. The minimal useable amount of sample is ~250 μl.

  4. Myogenic progenitors and imaging single-cell flow analysis: a model to study commitment of adult muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Trapecar, Martin; Kelc, Robi; Gradisnik, Lidija; Vogrin, Matjaz; Rupnik, Marjan Slak

    2014-12-01

    Research on skeletal muscles suffers from a lack of appropriate human models to study muscle formation and regeneration on the regulatory level of single cells. This hampers both basic understanding and the development of new therapeutic approaches. The use of imaging multicolour flow cytometry and myogenic stem cells can help fill this void by allowing researchers to visualize and quantify the reaction of individual cultured cells to bioactives or other physiological impulses. As proof of concept, we subjected human CD56+ satellite cells to reference bioactives follistatin and Malva sylvestris extracts and then used imaging multicolor flow cytometry to visualize the stepwise activation of myogenic factors MyoD and myogenin in individual cells. This approach enabled us to evaluate the potency of these bioactives to stimulate muscle commitment. To validate this method, we used multi-photon confocal microscopy to confirm the potential of bioactives to stimulate muscle differentiation and expression of desmin. Imaging multicolor flow cytometry revealed statistically significant differences between treated and untreated groups of myogenic progenitors and we propose the utilization of this concept as an integral part of future muscle research strategies.

  5. Influence of nanostructural environment and fluid flow on osteoblast-like cell behavior: a model for cell-mechanics studies.

    PubMed

    Prodanov, L; Semeins, C M; van Loon, J J W A; te Riet, J; Jansen, J A; Klein-Nulend, J; Walboomers, X F

    2013-05-01

    Introducing nanoroughness on various biomaterials has been shown to profoundly effect cell-material interactions. Similarly, physical forces act on a diverse array of cells and tissues. Particularly in bone, the tissue experiences compressive or tensile forces resulting in fluid shear stress. The current study aimed to develop an experimental setup for bone cell behavior, combining a nanometrically grooved substrate (200 nm wide, 50 nm deep) mimicking the collagen fibrils of the extracellular matrix, with mechanical stimulation by pulsatile fluid flow (PFF). MC3T3-E1 osteoblast-like cells were assessed for morphology, expression of genes involved in cell attachment and osteoblastogenesis and nitric oxide (NO) release. The results showed that both nanotexture and PFF did affect cellular morphology. Cells aligned on nanotexture substrate in a direction parallel to the groove orientation. PFF at a magnitude of 0.7 Pa was sufficient to induce alignment of cells on a smooth surface in a direction perpendicular to the applied flow. When environmental cues texture and flow were interacting, PFF of 1.4 Pa applied parallel to the nanogrooves initiated significant cellular realignment. PFF increased NO synthesis 15-fold in cells attached to both smooth and nanotextured substrates. Increased collagen and alkaline phosphatase mRNA expression was observed on the nanotextured substrate, but not on the smooth substrate. Furthermore, vinculin and bone sialoprotein were up-regulated after 1 h of PFF stimulation. In conclusion, the data show that interstitial fluid forces and structural cues mimicking extracellular matrix contribute to the final bone cell morphology and behavior, which might have potential application in tissue engineering.

  6. Numerical Study of the Buoyancy-Driven Flow in a Four-Electrode Rectangular Electrochemical Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhanyu; Agafonov, Vadim; Rice, Catherine; Bindler, Jacob

    2009-11-01

    Two-dimensional numerical simulation is done on the buoyancy-driven flow in a four-electrode rectangular electrochemical cell. Two kinds of electrode layouts, the anode-cathode-cathode-anode (ACCA) and the cathode-anode-anode-cathode (CAAC) layouts, are studied. In the ACCA layout, the two anodes are placed close to the channel outlets while the two cathodes are located between the two anodes. The CAAC layout can be converted from the ACCA layout by applying higher electric potential on the two middle electrodes. Density gradient was generated by the electrodic reaction I3^-+2e^- =3I^-. When the electrochemical cell is accelerated axially, buoyancy-driven flow occurs. In our model, electro-neutrality is assumed except at the electrodes. The Navier-Stokes equations with the Boussinesq approximation and the Nernst-Planck equations are employed to model the momentum and mass transports, respectively. It is found that under a given axial acceleration, the electrolyte density between the two middle electrodes determines the bulk flow through the electrochemical cell. The cathodic current difference is found to be able to measure the applied acceleration. Other important electro-hydrodynamic characteristics are also discussed.

  7. Studying depletion kinetics of circulating prostate cancer cells by in vivo flow cytometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guangda; Gu, Zhengqin; Guo, Jin; Li, Yan; Chen, Yun; Chen, Tong; Wang, Cheng; Wei, Xunbin

    2011-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in American men and the second leading cause of deaths from cancer, after lung cancer. The tumor usually grows slowly and remains confined to the gland for many years. During this time, the tumor produces little or no symptoms or outward signs. As the cancer advances, however, it can metastasize throughout other areas of the body, such as the bones, lungs, and liver. Surgical resection, hormonal therapy, chemotherapy and radiation therapy are the foundation of current prostate cancer therapies. Treatments for prostate cause both short- and long-term side effects that may be difficult to accept. Molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer metastasis need to be understood better and new therapies must be developed to selectively target to unique characteristics of cancer cell growth and metastasis. We have developed the "in vivo microscopy" to study the mechanisms that govern prostate cancer cell spread through the microenvironment in vivo in real-time confocal near-infrared fluorescence imaging. A recently developed "in vivo flow cytometer" and optical imaging are used to assess prostate cancer cell spreading and the circulation kinetics of prostate cancer cells. A real- time quantitative monitoring of circulating prostate cancer cells by the in vivo flow cytometer will be useful to assess the effectiveness of the potential therapeutic interventions.

  8. Depletion kinetics of circulating prostate cancer cells studied by in vivo flow cytometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guangda; Guo, Jin; Li, Yan; Chen, Yun; Gu, Zhengqin; Chen, Tong; Wang, Cheng; Wei, Xunbin

    2010-11-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in American men and the second leading cause of deaths from cancer, after lung cancer. The tumor usually grows slowly and remains confined to the gland for many years. During this time, the tumor produces little or no symptoms or outward signs. As the cancer advances, however, it can metastasize throughout other areas of the body, such as the bones, lungs, and liver. Surgical resection, hormonal therapy, chemotherapy and radiation therapy are the foundation of current prostate cancer therapies. Treatments for prostate cause both short- and long-term side effects that may be difficult to accept. Molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer metastasis need to be understood better and new therapies must be developed to selectively target to unique characteristics of cancer cell growth and metastasis. We have developed the "in vivo microscopy" to study the mechanisms that govern prostate cancer cell spread through the microenvironment in vivo in real-time confocal nearinfrared fluorescence imaging. A recently developed "in vivo flow cytometer" and optical imaging are used to assess prostate cancer cell spreading and the circulation kinetics of prostate cancer cells. A real- time quantitative monitoring of circulating prostate cancer cells by the in vivo flow cytometer will be useful to assess the effectiveness of the potential therapeutic interventions.

  9. Steady and disturbed flow effects on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in vascular system: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Nurullah; Isik, Sevim; Uykan, Ozge

    2010-01-01

    Coronary artery disease is still one of the most important reasons of the death in the world. The endothelium is the membrane of special cells which lines the interior surface of blood vessels forming an interface between circulating blood in the lumen and the rest of the vessel wall. Endothelial cells (ECs) line the entire circulatory system, from the heart to the smallest capillary. ECs dysfunction has been linked with atherosclerosis through their response to fluid forces. ECs change their morphology when exposed to mechanical stresses. The morphological responses include reorientation, elongation, and rearrangement of adhering molecules. Atherosclerotic lesions are formed in specific arterial regions, where low and oscillatory endothelial shear stress (ESS) occur. In this study, the effects of steady and disturbed flow over human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) at different flow rates and periods were determined. Steady flow experiments were performed at flow rate of 1000 cm3/min for twenty four hours. Disturbed flow experiments simulating the flow in branching regions of arterial systems were carried out at flow rates of 250 cm3/min for five hours. The results obtained testified to the morphological changes easily observed. The directional alignment of the cells was determined in the steady flow experiments. Under disturbed flow conditions we observed not only the cell movement at the stagnation point but also the polygonal cell shape downstream the flow field.

  10. Studying circulating prostate cancer cells by in-vivo flow cytometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jin; Gu, Zhengqin; Chen, Tong; Wang, Cheng; Wei, Xunbin

    2011-11-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in American men and the second leading cause of deaths from cancer, after lung cancer. The tumor usually grows slowly and remains confined to the gland for many years. As the cancer advances, however, it can metastasize throughout other areas of the body, such as the bones, lungs, and liver. Surgical resection, hormonal therapy, chemotherapy and radiation therapy are the foundation of current prostate cancer therapies. Treatments for prostate cause both short- and long-term side effects that may be difficult to accept. Molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer metastasis need to be understood better and new therapies must be developed to selectively target to unique characteristics of cancer cell growth and metastasis. We have developed the "in vivo microscopy" to study the mechanisms that govern prostate cancer cell spread through the microenvironment in vivo in real-time confocal near-infrared fluorescence imaging. A recently developed "in vivo flow cytometer" and optical imaging are used to assess prostate cancer cell spreading and the circulation kinetics of prostate cancer cells. We have measured the depletion kinetics of cancer cells with different metastatic potential. Interestingly, more invasive PC-3 prostate cancer cells are depleted faster from the circulation than LNCaP cells.

  11. Studying circulating prostate cancer cells by in-vivo flow cytometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jin; Gu, Zhengqin; Chen, Tong; Wang, Cheng; Wei, Xunbin

    2012-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in American men and the second leading cause of deaths from cancer, after lung cancer. The tumor usually grows slowly and remains confined to the gland for many years. As the cancer advances, however, it can metastasize throughout other areas of the body, such as the bones, lungs, and liver. Surgical resection, hormonal therapy, chemotherapy and radiation therapy are the foundation of current prostate cancer therapies. Treatments for prostate cause both short- and long-term side effects that may be difficult to accept. Molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer metastasis need to be understood better and new therapies must be developed to selectively target to unique characteristics of cancer cell growth and metastasis. We have developed the "in vivo microscopy" to study the mechanisms that govern prostate cancer cell spread through the microenvironment in vivo in real-time confocal near-infrared fluorescence imaging. A recently developed "in vivo flow cytometer" and optical imaging are used to assess prostate cancer cell spreading and the circulation kinetics of prostate cancer cells. We have measured the depletion kinetics of cancer cells with different metastatic potential. Interestingly, more invasive PC-3 prostate cancer cells are depleted faster from the circulation than LNCaP cells.

  12. Studying the role of macrophages in circulating prostate cancer cells by in vivo flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xiaojun; Guo, Jin; Gu, Zhengqin; Wei, Xunbin

    2012-12-01

    Metastasis is a very complicated multi-step process and accounts for the low survival rate of the cancerous patients. To metastasize, the malignant cells must detach from the primary tumor and migrate to secondary sites in the body through either blood or lymph circulation. Macrophages appear to be directly involved in tumor progression and metastasis. However, the role of macrophages in affecting cancer metastasis has not been fully elucidated. Here, we have utilized an emerging technique, namely in vivo flow cytometry (IVFC) to study the depletion kinetics of circulating prostate cancer cells in mice and how depletion of macrophages by the liposome-encapsulated clodronate affects the depletion kinetics. Our results show different depletion kinetics of PC-3 cells between macrophage-deficient group and the control group. The number of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in macrophage-deficient group decreases in a slower manner compared to the control mice group. The differences in depletion kinetics indicate that the absence of macrophages facilitates the stay of prostate cancer cells in circulation. We speculate that macrophages might be able to arrest, phagocytose and digest PC-3 cells. Therefore, the phagocytosis may mainly contribute to the depletion kinetic differences. The developed methods here would be useful to study the relationship between macrophages and tumor metastasis in small animal cancer model.

  13. Artificial neural network study of whole-cell bacterial bioreporter response determined using fluorescence flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Busam, Sirisha; McNabb, Maia; Wackwitz, Anke; Senevirathna, Wasana; Beggah, Siham; Meer, Jan Roelof van der; Wells, Mona; Breuer, Uta; Harms, Hauke

    2007-12-01

    Genetically engineered bioreporters are an excellent complement to traditional methods of chemical analysis. The application of fluorescence flow cytometry to detection of bioreporter response enables rapid and efficient characterization of bacterial bioreporter population response on a single-cell basis. In the present study, intrapopulation response variability was used to obtain higher analytical sensitivity and precision. We have analyzed flow cytometric data for an arsenic-sensitive bacterial bioreporter using an artificial neural network-based adaptive clustering approach (a single-layer perceptron model). Results for this approach are far superior to other methods that we have applied to this fluorescent bioreporter (e.g., the arsenic detection limit is 0.01 microM, substantially lower than for other detection methods/algorithms). The approach is highly efficient computationally and can be implemented on a real-time basis, thus having potential for future development of high-throughput screening applications.

  14. Electrocapturing flow cell

    DOEpatents

    Morozov, Victor [Manassas, VA

    2011-04-05

    A flow cell for electrophoretically-assisted capturing analytes from a flow. The flow cell includes a specimen chamber, a first membrane, a second membrane, a first electrode chamber, and a second electrode chamber. The specimen chamber may have a sample inlet and a sample outlet. A first portion of the first membrane may be coupled to a first portion of the specimen chamber. A first portion of the second membrane may be coupled to a second portion of the specimen chamber. The first electrode chamber may be configured to accept a charge. A portion of the first electrode chamber may be coupled to a second portion of the first membrane. A second electrode chamber may be configured to accept an opposite charge. A portion of the second electrode chamber may be coupled to a second portion of the second membrane.

  15. Cell adhesion under flow.

    PubMed

    Ley, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Cell adhesion under flow is a central function of the microcirculation during inflammation, hemostasis, and immune regulation. This special issue of Microcirculation explores the common and distinct mechanisms that myeloid cells, lymphocytes, platelets, and sickle erythrocytes use to adhere to microvascular endothelium and the underlying basement membrane structures. A common theme in these processes is the need for rapid integrin activation, often initiated by binding of ligands to their cognate G protein-coupled receptors, followed by adhesion strengthening associated with integrin redistribution and outside-in signaling. These elements have been identified for all cells tested except sickle erythrocytes.

  16. Role of macrophages in circulating prostate cancer cells studied by in vivo flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rongrong; Guo, Jin; Gu, Zhengqin; Wei, Xunbin

    2013-02-01

    Macrophages appear to be directly involved in cancer progression and metastasis. However, the role of macrophages in influencing tumor metastasis has not been fully understood. Here, we have used an emerging technique, namely in vivo flow cytometry (IVFC) to study the depletion kinetics of circulating prostate cancer cells in mice and how depletion of macrophages by the liposome-encapsulated clodronate affects the depletion kinetics. Our results show different depletion kinetics of PC-3 prostate cancer cells between macrophage-deficient group and the control group. The number of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in macrophage-deficient group decreases in a slower manner compared to the control mice group. The differences in depletion kinetics indicate that the absence of macrophages might facilitate the stay of prostate tumor cells in circulation. We speculate that macrophages might be able to arrest, phagocytose and digest PC-3 cancer cells. Therefore, the phagocytosis may mainly contribute to the differences in depletion kinetics. The developed methods here would be useful to study the relationship between macrophages and cancer metastasis in small animal tumor model.

  17. Ellipsoidal cell flow system

    DOEpatents

    Salzman, Gary C.; Mullaney, Paul F.

    1976-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a system incorporating an ellipsoidal flow chamber having light reflective walls for low level light detection in practicing cellular analysis. The system increases signal-to-noise ratio by a factor of ten over prior art systems. In operation, laser light passes through the primary focus of the ellipsoid. A controlled flow of cells simultaneously passes through this focus so that the laser light impinges on the cells and is modulated by the cells. The reflective walls of the ellipsoid reflect the cell-modulated light to the secondary focus of the ellipsoid. A tapered light guide at the secondary focus picks up a substantial portion of modulated reflective light and directs it onto a light detector to produce a signal. The signal is processed to obtain the intensity distribution of the modulated light and hence sought after characteristics of the cells. In addition, cells may be dyed so as to fluoresce in response to the laser light and their fluorescence may be processed as cell-modulated light above described. A light discriminating filter would be used to distinguish reflected modulated laser light from reflected fluorescent light.

  18. flowFit: a Bioconductor package to estimate proliferation in cell-tracking dye studies.

    PubMed

    Rambaldi, Davide; Pece, Salvatore; Di Fiore, Pier Paolo

    2014-07-15

    Herein we introduce flowFit, a Bioconductor package designed to perform quantitative analysis of cell proliferation in tracking dye-based experiments. The software, distributed as an R Bioconductor library, is based on a mathematical model that takes into account the height of each peak, the size and position of the parental population (labeled but not proliferating) and the estimated distance between the brightness of a cell and the brightness of its daughter (in which the dye is assumed to undergo a 2-fold dilution). Although the algorithm does not make any inference on cell types, rates of cell divisions or rates of cell death, it deconvolutes the actual collected data into a set of peaks, whereby each peak corresponds to a subpopulation of cells that have divided N times. We validated flowFit by retrospective analysis of published proliferation-tracking experiments and demonstrated that the algorithm predicts the same percentage of cells/generation either in samples with discernible peaks (in which the peaks are visible in the collected raw data) or in samples with non-discernible peaks (in which the peaks are fused together). To the best of our knowledge, flowFit represents the first open-source algorithm in its category and might be applied to numerous areas of cell biology in which quantitative deconvolution of tracking dye-based experiments is desired, including stem cell research. http://www.bioconductor.org/packages/devel/bioc/html/flowFit.html (Bioconductor software page). http://www.bioconductor.org/packages/2.13/bioc/vignettes/flowFit/inst/doc/HowTo-flowFit.pdf (package vignette). http://rpubs.com/tucano/flowFit (online tutorial). © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Growth of Myxococcus xanthus in continuous-flow-cell bioreactors as a method for studying development.

    PubMed

    Smaldone, Gregory T; Jin, Yujie; Whitfield, Damion L; Mu, Andrew Y; Wong, Edward C; Wuertz, Stefan; Singer, Mitchell

    2014-04-01

    Nutrient sensors and developmental timers are two classes of genes vital to the establishment of early development in the social soil bacterium Myxococcus xanthus. The products of these genes trigger and regulate the earliest events that drive the colony from a vegetative state to aggregates, which ultimately leads to the formation of fruiting bodies and the cellular differentiation of the individual cells. In order to more accurately identify the genes and pathways involved in the initiation of this multicellular developmental program in M. xanthus, we adapted a method of growing vegetative populations within a constant controllable environment by using flow cell bioreactors, or flow cells. By establishing an M. xanthus community within a flow cell, we are able to test developmental responses to changes in the environment with fewer concerns for effects due to nutrient depletion or bacterial waste production. This approach allows for greater sensitivity in investigating communal environmental responses, such as nutrient sensing. To demonstrate the versatility of our growth environment, we carried out time-lapse confocal laser scanning microscopy to visualize M. xanthus biofilm growth and fruiting body development, as well as fluorescence staining of exopolysaccharides deposited by biofilms. We also employed the flow cells in a nutrient titration to determine the minimum concentration required to sustain vegetative growth. Our data show that by using a flow cell, M. xanthus can be held in a vegetative growth state at low nutrient concentrations for long periods, and then, by slightly decreasing the nutrient concentration, cells can be allowed to initiate the developmental program.

  20. Open, microfluidic flow cell for studies of interfacial processes at gas-liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Khanh C; Malakhov, Dmitry; Momsen, William E; Brockman, Howard L

    2006-03-01

    Interfacial processes involving peripheral proteins depend on the composition and packing density of the interfacial lipid molecules. As a biological membrane model, lipid monolayers at the gas-liquid interface allow independent control of these parameters. However, measuring protein adsorption to monolayers has been difficult. To aid in this and other studies of the interfacial processes, we have developed an open, microfluidic flow cell with which surface physical properties can be controlled and monitored in well-defined lipid monolayers while varying aqueous-phase composition. Using this apparatus, we implement a recently described fluorescence method (Momsen, W. E.; Mizuno, N. K.; Lowe, M. E.; Brockman, H. L. Anal. Biochem. 2005, 346, 139-49) to characterize the adsorption/desorption of glucagon to 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycerol monolayers at 27 mN/m. Analysis of the data gives reasonable and self-consistent results for kinetic and thermodynamic constants. Varying the packing density of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycerol does not alter the extent of glucagon adsorption, but comparable measurements with 1-steaoryl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine show a critical dependence. Because it allows a high degree of control of both lipid monolayer properties and aqueous-phase composition, this microfluidic flow cell should find wide applicability in many areas of research into interfacial processes.

  1. Flow cytometric evaluation of red blood cell chimerism after bone marrow transplantation in Iranian patients: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Shaiegan, Mojgan; Hadjati, Esmerdis; Aghaiipour, Mahnaz; Iravani, Masoud; David, Gaelle; Bernard, Daniel

    2006-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate mixed red cells population and red blood cell chimerism after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Red blood cell chimerism after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation was analyzed using a series of fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated monoclonal antibodies (BioAtlantic, France) directed against ABH, Rh (D, C, E, c, e), Kell, Duffy, Kidd, and Ss antigens on blood samples of 14 patients with hematologic disorders undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, by flow cytometric method on days 15, 30, and 60 after transplantation. All patients showed expression of donor red cell antigens within days 15 - 30 after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Graft versus host disease and ABO incompatibility did not affect the expression of chimerism. Flow cytometric analysis is a simple, accurate, and valuable test which is of significant help in monitoring chimerism in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  2. A flow cell for in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction studies of scale formation under Bayer processing conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Nathan A. S.; Madsen, Ian C.; Loan, Melissa J.; Scarlett, Nicola V. Y.; Wallwork, Kia S.

    2009-08-01

    The design, construction, and commissioning of a stainless steel flow cell for in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction studies of scale formation under Bayer processing conditions is described. The use of the cell is demonstrated by a study of Al(OH)3 scale formation on a mild steel substrate from synthetic Bayer liquor at 70 °C. The cell design allows for interchangeable parts and substrates and would be suitable for the study of scale formation in other industrial processes.

  3. Application Of Micro-Highspeed Flow Visualization In Study Of Blood Cells Rheology In Vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gui-shah, Li; Ni, Liang; Yu-ju, Lin; Jian, Zhang; Qiang, Wang

    1990-01-01

    A new experimental method has been developed in study of rheological behaviour of single red blood cell (RBC) in passing through the capillaries in vivo, using the technique of micro-highspeed cinecamera and micro-highspeed video system. It is one of the most important topics in the study of microcirculatory theories that fur-ther understand the deformability of RBC, flow states, velocities and dynamic mechanimi. A micro-highspeed flow visualization system consisted of essential elements: a biological microscope, a highspeed cinecmera with 35 mm film, a highspeed motion analysis system SP2000 (Kodak U.S.A) and a cold-light source etc. We have investigated the rheological parameters of single RBC in vivo in single capillaries which are about 3.3 to 6.9 um in diameters. The RBCs velocities are 0.1 to 0.25 mm/sec, and maximum shear stress on the outside surface of RBC is 13.8 dyn/cml, and maximum extension of RBC is 10.3 um. In aforementioned experiment, the highspeed flow visualization system frequency at 530 frames/sec and 200 frames/sec were used respectively. In addition, the vasomotion of precapillary sphincters have been measured and a complicated coupling phenomena between the RBC and sphincter have also been recorded and analysed. The experiment were performed with intravital hamsters and frogs. The results obtained by this system shown that the method designed by us are an effective tool in the study of rheological behaviour of single RBC in passing through the blood capillaries in vivoz.

  4. Studying circulation times of liver cancer cells by in vivo flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, G.; Li, Y.; Fan, Z.; Guo, J.; Tan, X.; Wei, X.

    2011-02-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) may metastasize to lung kidney and many other organs. The survival rate is almost zero for metastatic HCC patients. Molecular mechanisms of HCC metastasis need to be understood better and new therapies must be developed. A recently developed "in vivo flow cytometer" combined with real-time confocal fluorescence imaging are used to assess spreading and the circulation kinetics of liver tumor cells. The in vivo flow cytometer has the capability to detect and quantify continuously the number and flow characteristics of fluorescently labeled cells in vivo in real time without extracting blood sample. We have measured the depletion kinetics of two related human HCC cell lines high-metastatic HCCLM3 cells and low-metastatic HepG2 cells which were from the same origin and obtained by repetitive screenings in mice. >60% HCCLM3 cells are depleted within the first hour. Interestingly the low-metastatic HepG2 cells possess noticeably slower depletion kinetics. In comparison <40% HepG2 cells are depleted within the first hour. The differences in depletion kinetics might provide insights into early metastasis processes.

  5. Growth of Myxococcus xanthus in Continuous-Flow-Cell Bioreactors as a Method for Studying Development

    PubMed Central

    Smaldone, Gregory T.; Jin, Yujie; Whitfield, Damion L.; Mu, Andrew Y.; Wong, Edward C.; Wuertz, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Nutrient sensors and developmental timers are two classes of genes vital to the establishment of early development in the social soil bacterium Myxococcus xanthus. The products of these genes trigger and regulate the earliest events that drive the colony from a vegetative state to aggregates, which ultimately leads to the formation of fruiting bodies and the cellular differentiation of the individual cells. In order to more accurately identify the genes and pathways involved in the initiation of this multicellular developmental program in M. xanthus, we adapted a method of growing vegetative populations within a constant controllable environment by using flow cell bioreactors, or flow cells. By establishing an M. xanthus community within a flow cell, we are able to test developmental responses to changes in the environment with fewer concerns for effects due to nutrient depletion or bacterial waste production. This approach allows for greater sensitivity in investigating communal environmental responses, such as nutrient sensing. To demonstrate the versatility of our growth environment, we carried out time-lapse confocal laser scanning microscopy to visualize M. xanthus biofilm growth and fruiting body development, as well as fluorescence staining of exopolysaccharides deposited by biofilms. We also employed the flow cells in a nutrient titration to determine the minimum concentration required to sustain vegetative growth. Our data show that by using a flow cell, M. xanthus can be held in a vegetative growth state at low nutrient concentrations for long periods, and then, by slightly decreasing the nutrient concentration, cells can be allowed to initiate the developmental program. PMID:24509931

  6. Study of cell classification with a diffraction imaging flow cytometer method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ke; Jacobs, Kenneth M.; Sa, Yu; Feng, Yuanming; Lu, Jun Q.; Hu, Xin-Hua

    2011-02-01

    With a diffraction imaging flow cytometer, we have acquired and analyzed the diffraction imaging data from 5 types of cultured cells. A gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) algorithm was applied to extract the interference fringe related textures from the diffraction image data. Six GLCM parameters were chosen and imported into a support vector machine algorithm for automated classification of about 20 cells for each of the 5 cell types. We found that the GLCM based algorithm has the capacity for rapid processing of diffraction images and yield feature parameters for subsequent cell classification except the T- and B-lymphocytes.

  7. Numerical study of changing the geometry of the flow field of a PEM fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khazaee, I.; Sabadbafan, H.

    2016-05-01

    The geometry of channels of a PEM fuel cell is an important parameter that affects the performance of it that the lower voltage loss in polarization curve can indicate the better performance. In this study a complete three-dimensional and single phase model is used to investigate the effect of increasing the number of serpentine channels in the bipolar plates and also increasing the area (depth) of channels of a PEM fuel cell with rectangular, triangular and elliptical cross-section geometry. A single set of conservation equations which are valid for the flow channels, gas-diffusion electrodes, catalyst layers, and the membrane region is developed and numerically solved using a finite volume based computational fluid dynamics technique. The results show that there are good agreement with the numerical results and experimental results of the previous work of authors. Also the results show that by increasing the number of channels from one to four and eight, the performance improved about 18 % and by decreasing the area of channels from 2 to 1 mm2 the performance improved about 13 %.

  8. Study of flow channel geometry using current distribution measurement in a high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobato, Justo; Cañizares, Pablo; Rodrigo, Manuel A.; Pinar, F. Javier; Úbeda, Diego

    To improve fuel cell design and performance, research studies supported by a wide variety of physical and electrochemical methods have to be carried out. Among the different techniques, current distribution measurement owns the desired feature that can be performed during operation, revealing information about internal phenomena when the fuel cell is working. Moreover, short durability is one of the main problems that is hindering fuel cell wide implementation and it is known to be related to current density heterogeneities over the electrode surface. A good flow channel geometry design can favor a uniform current density profile, hence hypothetically extending fuel cell life. With this, it was thought that a study on the influence of flow channel geometry on the performance of a high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell using current distribution measurement should be a very solid work to optimize flow field design. Results demonstrate that the 4 step serpentine and pin-type geometries distribute the reactants more effectively, obtaining a relatively flat current density map at higher current densities than parallel or interdigitated ones and yielding maximum powers up to 25% higher when using oxygen as comburent. If air is the oxidant chosen, interdigitated flow channels perform almost as well as serpentine or pin-type due to that the flow conditions are very important for this geometry.

  9. A methodology to study the deformability of red blood cells flowing in microcapillaries in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tomaiuolo, Giovanna; Preziosi, Valentina; Simeone, Marino; Guido, Stefano; Ciancia, Rosanna; Martinelli, Vincenzo; Rinaldi, Ciro; Rotoli, Bruno

    2007-01-01

    The deformability of red blood cells flowing in microvessels is essential to maintain optimal blood circulation and to allow gas transfer between blood and tissues. Here, we report on an experimental methodology to investigate the deformability of RBCs flowing in microcapillaries having diameter close to the average cell size. The microcapillaries are placed in a rectangular flow cell, where a suspension of RBCs, properly diluted in albumin-additioned ACD, is fed through a syringe under the action of a liquid head in the physiological range. Video microscopy images of the flowing RBCs are acquired at high magnification and later processed by an automated image analysis macro. It was found that RBCs from healthy donors exhibit the classical parachute shape observed in vivo. Furthermore, all the data of healthy RBC velocity vs liquid head are well represented by the same linear regression, independently on the donor. Preliminary results on beta-thalassemia RBCs are also presented and show, on the average, a reduced velocity compared to healthy samples.

  10. Quantitative studies of endothelial cell adhesion. Directional remodeling of focal adhesion sites in response to flow forces.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, P F; Robotewskyj, A; Griem, M L

    1994-01-01

    Focal adhesion sites were observed in cultured endothelial cells by tandem scanning confocal microscopy and digitized image analysis, techniques that provide real-time images of adhesion site area and topography in living cells. Image subtraction demonstrated that in the presence of unidirectional steady laminar flow (shear stress [tau] = 10 dyn/cm2) a substantial fraction of focal adhesion sites remodeled in the direction of flow. In contrast, focal adhesions of control (no flow) cells remodeled without preferred direction. In confluent monolayers subjected to shear stresses of 10 dyn/cm2, cells began to realign in the direction of flow after 7-9 h. This was accompanied by redistribution of intracellular stress fibers, alignment of individual focal adhesion sites, and the coalescence of smaller sites resulting in fewer, but larger, focal adhesions per cell. Cell adhesion, repeatedly calculated in the same cells as a function of the areas of focal contact and the separation distances between membrane and substratum, varied by < 10% during both short (30 min), or prolonged (< or = 24 h), periods of exposure to flow. Consistent with these measurements, the gains and losses of focal adhesion area as each site remodeled were approximately equivalent. When the glass substratum was coated with gelatin, rates of remodeling were inhibited by 47% during flow (tau = 10 dyn/cm2). These studies: (a) reveal the dynamic nature of focal adhesion; (b) demonstrate that these sites at the ablumenal endothelial membrane are both acutely and chronically responsive to frictional shear stress forces applied to the opposite (lumenal) cell surface; and (c) suggest that components of the focal adhesion complex may be mechanically responsive elements coupled to the cytoskeleton. Images PMID:8182135

  11. A Miniature Couette to Generate Shear for Flow Cytometry: Studying Real-Time Modulation of Intracellular Calcium in Monocytic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zwartz, Gordon J.; Chigaev, Alexandre; Foutz, Terry D.; Edwards, Bruce; Sklar, Larry A.

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular hydrodynamic forces may be transmitted to the interior of cells through the alteration of integrin conformation and affinity. Integrin activation regulates leukocyte recruitment, cell activation, and transmigration. The cellular and molecular mechanisms for integrin activation are not precisely known, although intracellular calcium signaling is involved. Flow cytometry offers a versatile way to study intracellular calcium signaling in real-time. We report a novel method to generate defined shear by using a miniature Couette. Testing involved measuring shear induced intracellular calcium signals of human monoblastoid U937 cells in suspension. The Couette was connected externally to a flow cytometer and pressurized at 6 PSI (4.1 N/m2). Cells were subjected to well-defined shear between 0 and 1000 s−1 and delivered continuously within 10 s to a FACScan at 1 μl/s. Intracellular calcium levels and the percentage of cells activated increased as shear increased in duration and intensity. PMID:22045643

  12. Modeling studies of electrolyte flow and bubble behavior in advanced Hall cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekhar, R.; Evans, J. W.

    Much research was performed in recent years by corporations and university/government labs on materials for use in advanced Hall-Heroult cells. Attention has focussed on materials for use as wettable cathodes and inert anodes and much was achieved in terms of material development. Comparatively less attention was devoted to how these materials might be incorporated in new or existing cells, i.e., to how the cells should be designed and redesigned, to take full advantage of these materials. The effort, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, to address this issue, is described. The primary objectives are cell design where electrolyte flow can be managed to promote both the removal of the anode gas bubbles and the convection of dissolved alumina in the inter-electrode region, under conditions where the anode-cathode distance is small. The principal experimental tool was a water model consisting of a large tank in which simulated anodes can be suspended in either the horizontal or vertical configurations. Gas generation was by forcing compressed air through porous graphite and the fine bubbles characteristic of inert anodes were produced by adding butanol to the water. Velocities were measured using a laser Doppler velocimeter. Velocity measurements with two different anode designs (one that is flat and the other that has grooves) are presented. The results show that the electrode configuration has a significant effect on the fluid flow pattern in the inter-electrode region. Furthermore, it is shown that rapid fluid flow is obtained when the cell is operated with a submerged anode.

  13. A high precision gas flow cell for performing in situ neutron studies of local atomic structure in catalytic materials.

    PubMed

    Olds, Daniel; Page, Katharine; Paecklar, Arnold; Peterson, Peter F; Liu, Jue; Rucker, Gerald; Ruiz-Rodriguez, Mariano; Olsen, Michael; Pawel, Michelle; Overbury, Steven H; Neilson, James R

    2017-03-01

    Gas-solid interfaces enable a multitude of industrial processes, including heterogeneous catalysis; however, there are few methods available for studying the structure of this interface under operating conditions. Here, we present a new sample environment for interrogating materials under gas-flow conditions using time-of-flight neutron scattering under both constant and pulse probe gas flow. Outlined are descriptions of the gas flow cell and a commissioning example using the adsorption of N2 by Ca-exchanged zeolite-X (Na78-2xCaxAl78Si144O384,x ≈ 38). We demonstrate sensitivities to lattice contraction and N2 adsorption sites in the structure, with both static gas loading and gas flow. A steady-state isotope transient kinetic analysis of N2 adsorption measured simultaneously with mass spectrometry is also demonstrated. In the experiment, the gas flow through a plugged-flow gas-solid contactor is switched between N215 and N214 isotopes at a temperature of 300 K and a constant pressure of 1 atm; the gas flow and mass spectrum are correlated with the structure factor determined from event-based neutron total scattering. Available flow conditions, sample considerations, and future applications are discussed.

  14. A high precision gas flow cell for performing in situ neutron studies of local atomic structure in catalytic materials

    DOE PAGES

    Olds, Daniel; Page, Katharine; Paecklar, Arnold A.; ...

    2017-03-17

    Gas-solid interfaces enable a multitude of industrial processes, including heterogeneous catalysis; however, there are few methods available for studying the structure of this interface under operating conditions. Here, we present a new sample environment for interrogating materials under gas-flow conditions using time-of-flight neutron scattering under both constant and pulse probe gas flow. Outlined are descriptions of the gas flow cell and a commissioning example using the adsorption of N2 by Ca-exchanged zeolite-X (Na78–2xCaxAl78Si144O384,x ≈ 38). We demonstrate sensitivities to lattice contraction and N2 adsorption sites in the structure, with both static gas loading and gas flow. A steady-state isotope transientmore » kinetic analysis of N2 adsorption measured simultaneously with mass spectrometry is also demonstrated. In the experiment, the gas flow through a plugged-flow gas-solid contactor is switched between 15N2 and 14N2 isotopes at a temperature of 300 K and a constant pressure of 1 atm; the gas flow and mass spectrum are correlated with the structure factor determined from event-based neutron total scattering. As a result, available flow conditions, sample considerations, and future applications are discussed.« less

  15. A high precision gas flow cell for performing in situ neutron studies of local atomic structure in catalytic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olds, Daniel; Page, Katharine; Paecklar, Arnold; Peterson, Peter F.; Liu, Jue; Rucker, Gerald; Ruiz-Rodriguez, Mariano; Olsen, Michael; Pawel, Michelle; Overbury, Steven H.; Neilson, James R.

    2017-03-01

    Gas-solid interfaces enable a multitude of industrial processes, including heterogeneous catalysis; however, there are few methods available for studying the structure of this interface under operating conditions. Here, we present a new sample environment for interrogating materials under gas-flow conditions using time-of-flight neutron scattering under both constant and pulse probe gas flow. Outlined are descriptions of the gas flow cell and a commissioning example using the adsorption of N2 by Ca-exchanged zeolite-X (Na78-2xCaxAl78Si144O384,x ≈ 38). We demonstrate sensitivities to lattice contraction and N2 adsorption sites in the structure, with both static gas loading and gas flow. A steady-state isotope transient kinetic analysis of N2 adsorption measured simultaneously with mass spectrometry is also demonstrated. In the experiment, the gas flow through a plugged-flow gas-solid contactor is switched between 15N2 and 14N2 isotopes at a temperature of 300 K and a constant pressure of 1 atm; the gas flow and mass spectrum are correlated with the structure factor determined from event-based neutron total scattering. Available flow conditions, sample considerations, and future applications are discussed.

  16. Isolation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells and their use in the study of neutrophil transmigration under flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Anutosh; Zhang, Hong; Sharma, Ritu; Parsons, Sean; Patel, Kamala D

    2012-08-08

    Neutrophils are the most abundant type of white blood cell. They form an essential part of the innate immune system. During acute inflammation, neutrophils are the first inflammatory cells to migrate to the site of injury. Recruitment of neutrophils to an injury site is a stepwise process that includes first, dilation of blood vessels to increase blood flow; second, microvascular structural changes and escape of plasma proteins from the bloodstream; third, rolling, adhesion and transmigration of the neutrophil across the endothelium; and fourth accumulation of neutrophils at the site of injury. A wide array of in vivo and in vitro methods has evolved to enable the study of these processes. This method focuses on neutrophil transmigration across human endothelial cells. One popular method for examining the molecular processes involved in neutrophil transmigration utilizes human neutrophils interacting with primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Neutrophil isolation has been described visually elsewhere; thus this article will show the method for isolation of HUVEC. Once isolated and grown to confluence, endothelial cells are activated resulting in the upregulation of adhesion and activation molecules. For example, activation of endothelial cells with cytokines like TNF-α results in increased E-selectin and IL-8 expression. E-selectin mediates capture and rolling of neutrophils and IL-8 mediates activation and firm adhesion of neutrophils. After adhesion neutrophils transmigrate. Transmigration can occur paracellularly (through endothelial cell junctions) or transcellularly (through the endothelial cell itself). In most cases, these interactions occur under flow conditions found in the vasculature. The parallel plate flow chamber is a widely used system that mimics the hydrodynamic shear stresses found in vivo and enables the study of neutrophil recruitment under flow condition in vitro. Several companies produce parallel plate flow chambers and

  17. Isolation of Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells and Their Use in the Study of Neutrophil Transmigration Under Flow Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Anutosh; Zhang, Hong; Sharma, Ritu; Parsons, Sean; Patel, Kamala D.

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most abundant type of white blood cell. They form an essential part of the innate immune system1. During acute inflammation, neutrophils are the first inflammatory cells to migrate to the site of injury. Recruitment of neutrophils to an injury site is a stepwise process that includes first, dilation of blood vessels to increase blood flow; second, microvascular structural changes and escape of plasma proteins from the bloodstream; third, rolling, adhesion and transmigration of the neutrophil across the endothelium; and fourth accumulation of neutrophils at the site of injury2,3. A wide array of in vivo and in vitro methods has evolved to enable the study of these processes4. This method focuses on neutrophil transmigration across human endothelial cells. One popular method for examining the molecular processes involved in neutrophil transmigration utilizes human neutrophils interacting with primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC)5. Neutrophil isolation has been described visually elsewhere6; thus this article will show the method for isolation of HUVEC. Once isolated and grown to confluence, endothelial cells are activated resulting in the upregulation of adhesion and activation molecules. For example, activation of endothelial cells with cytokines like TNF-α results in increased E-selectin and IL-8 expression7. E-selectin mediates capture and rolling of neutrophils and IL-8 mediates activation and firm adhesion of neutrophils. After adhesion neutrophils transmigrate. Transmigration can occur paracellularly (through endothelial cell junctions) or transcellularly (through the endothelial cell itself). In most cases, these interactions occur under flow conditions found in the vasculature7,8. The parallel plate flow chamber is a widely used system that mimics the hydrodynamic shear stresses found in vivo and enables the study of neutrophil recruitment under flow condition in vitro9,10. Several companies produce parallel plate flow

  18. Analytical and numerical study on cooling flow field designs performance of PEM fuel cell with variable heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afshari, Ebrahim; Ziaei-Rad, Masoud; Jahantigh, Nabi

    2016-06-01

    In PEM fuel cells, during electrochemical generation of electricity more than half of the chemical energy of hydrogen is converted to heat. This heat of reactions, if not exhausted properly, would impair the performance and durability of the cell. In general, large scale PEM fuel cells are cooled by liquid water that circulates through coolant flow channels formed in bipolar plates or in dedicated cooling plates. In this paper, a numerical method has been presented to study cooling and temperature distribution of a polymer membrane fuel cell stack. The heat flux on the cooling plate is variable. A three-dimensional model of fluid flow and heat transfer in cooling plates with 15 cm × 15 cm square area is considered and the performances of four different coolant flow field designs, parallel field and serpentine fields are compared in terms of maximum surface temperature, temperature uniformity and pressure drop characteristics. By comparing the results in two cases, the constant and variable heat flux, it is observed that applying constant heat flux instead of variable heat flux which is actually occurring in the fuel cells is not an accurate assumption. The numerical results indicated that the straight flow field model has temperature uniformity index and almost the same temperature difference with the serpentine models, while its pressure drop is less than all of the serpentine models. Another important advantage of this model is the much easier design and building than the spiral models.

  19. Application of Population Dynamics to Study Heterotypic Cell Aggregations in the Near-Wall Region of a Shear Flow

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yanping; Wang, Jiakou; Liang, Shile; Dong, Cheng; Du, Qiang

    2010-01-01

    Our research focused on the polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) tethering to the vascular endothelial cells (EC) and the subsequent melanoma cell emboli formation in a shear flow, an important process of tumor cell extravasation from the circulation during metastasis. We applied population balance model based on Smoluchowski coagulation equation to study the heterotypic aggregation between PMNs and melanoma cells in the near-wall region of an in vitro parallel-plate flow chamber, which simulates in vivo cell-substrate adhesion from the vasculatures by combining mathematical modeling and numerical simulations with experimental observations. To the best of our knowledge, a multiscale near-wall aggregation model was developed, for the first time, which incorporated the effects of both cell deformation and general ratios of heterotypic cells on the cell aggregation process. Quantitative agreement was found between numerical predictions and in vitro experiments. The effects of factors, including: intrinsic binding molecule properties, near-wall heterotypic cell concentrations, and cell deformations on the coagulation process, are discussed. Several parameter identification approaches are proposed and validated which, in turn, demonstrate the importance of the reaction coefficient and the critical bond number on the aggregation process. PMID:20428326

  20. Minimal residual disease monitoring by 8-color flow cytometry in mantle cell lymphoma: an EU-MCL and LYSA study

    PubMed Central

    Cheminant, Morgane; Derrieux, Coralie; Touzart, Aurore; Schmit, Stéphanie; Grenier, Adrien; Trinquand, Amélie; Delfau-Larue, Marie-Hélène; Lhermitte, Ludovic; Thieblemont, Catherine; Ribrag, Vincent; Cheze, Stéphane; Sanhes, Laurence; Jardin, Fabrice; Lefrère, François; Delarue, Richard; Hoster, Eva; Dreyling, Martin; Asnafi, Vahid; Hermine, Olivier; Macintyre, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Quantification of minimal residual disease may guide therapeutic strategies in mantle cell lymphoma. While multiparameter flow cytometry is used for diagnosis, the gold standard method for minimal residual disease analysis is real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RQ-PCR). In this European Mantle Cell Lymphoma network (EU-MCL) pilot study, we compared flow cytometry with RQ-PCR for minimal residual disease detection. Of 113 patients with at least one minimal residual disease sample, RQ-PCR was applicable in 97 (86%). A total of 284 minimal residual disease samples from 61 patients were analyzed in parallel by flow cytometry and RQ-PCR. A single, 8-color, 10-antibody flow cytometry tube allowed specific minimal residual disease assessment in all patients, with a robust sensitivity of 0.01%. Using this cut-off level, the true-positive-rate of flow cytometry with respect to RQ-PCR was 80%, whereas the true-negative-rate was 92%. As expected, RQ-PCR frequently detected positivity below this 0.01% threshold, which is insufficiently sensitive for prognostic evaluation and would ideally be replaced with robust quantification down to a 0.001% (10-5) threshold. In 10 relapsing patients, the transition from negative to positive by RQ-PCR (median 22.5 months before relapse) nearly always preceded transition by flow cytometry (4.5 months), but transition to RQ-PCR positivity above 0.01% (5 months) was simultaneous. Pre-emptive rituximab treatment of 2 patients at minimal residual disease relapse allowed re-establishment of molecular and phenotypic complete remission. Flow cytometry minimal residual disease is a complementary approach to RQ-PCR and a promising tool in individual mantle cell lymphoma therapeutic management. PMID:26703963

  1. Minimal residual disease monitoring by 8-color flow cytometry in mantle cell lymphoma: an EU-MCL and LYSA study.

    PubMed

    Cheminant, Morgane; Derrieux, Coralie; Touzart, Aurore; Schmit, Stéphanie; Grenier, Adrien; Trinquand, Amélie; Delfau-Larue, Marie-Hélène; Lhermitte, Ludovic; Thieblemont, Catherine; Ribrag, Vincent; Cheze, Stéphane; Sanhes, Laurence; Jardin, Fabrice; Lefrère, François; Delarue, Richard; Hoster, Eva; Dreyling, Martin; Asnafi, Vahid; Hermine, Olivier; Macintyre, Elizabeth

    2016-03-01

    Quantification of minimal residual disease may guide therapeutic strategies in mantle cell lymphoma. While multiparameter flow cytometry is used for diagnosis, the gold standard method for minimal residual disease analysis is real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RQ-PCR). In this European Mantle Cell Lymphoma network (EU-MCL) pilot study, we compared flow cytometry with RQ-PCR for minimal residual disease detection. Of 113 patients with at least one minimal residual disease sample, RQ-PCR was applicable in 97 (86%). A total of 284 minimal residual disease samples from 61 patients were analyzed in parallel by flow cytometry and RQ-PCR. A single, 8-color, 10-antibody flow cytometry tube allowed specific minimal residual disease assessment in all patients, with a robust sensitivity of 0.01%. Using this cut-off level, the true-positive-rate of flow cytometry with respect to RQ-PCR was 80%, whereas the true-negative-rate was 92%. As expected, RQ-PCR frequently detected positivity below this 0.01% threshold, which is insufficiently sensitive for prognostic evaluation and would ideally be replaced with robust quantification down to a 0.001% (10-5) threshold. In 10 relapsing patients, the transition from negative to positive by RQ-PCR (median 22.5 months before relapse) nearly always preceded transition by flow cytometry (4.5 months), but transition to RQ-PCR positivity above 0.01% (5 months) was simultaneous. Pre-emptive rituximab treatment of 2 patients at minimal residual disease relapse allowed re-establishment of molecular and phenotypic complete remission. Flow cytometry minimal residual disease is a complementary approach to RQ-PCR and a promising tool in individual mantle cell lymphoma therapeutic management. (clinicaltrials identifiers: 00209209 and 00209222).

  2. [A contribution to a study of apoptosis of hematopoietic stem cells CD34+ by flow cytometry before and after cryopreservation].

    PubMed

    Ben Nasr, M; Jenhani, F

    2008-06-01

    Apoptosis represents a particular form of programmed cell death which appears in all the damaged cells and potentially hazardous. It plays a crucial role in the development of multicellular organisms by assuring and maintaining the cellular homeostasis. Thus, apoptosis intervenes not only in the normal process of organisms' development but also in immune defence and in cancerous cells detection. Indeed, any blockage in the program of the apoptotic machinery would be responsible of some neurodegenerative and auto-immune diseases and could play a crucial role in different steps of carcinogenesis. Some researchers were very interested in studying apoptosis in hematopoietic stem cells CD34+ which could be intended to be reinfused to patients suffering from malignant diseases. They have noted that kinetic study of apoptosis of the hematopoietic stem cells CD34+ after the process of cryoconservation is also necessary. Such study permits to quantify the real and exact number of the viable hematopoietic stem cells CD34+ and therefore to eliminate such risk which would be associated with the reinfusion of apoptotic cells to patients. In this paper, we describe our contribution to hematopoietic stem cells CD34+ study by flow cytometry before and after cryopreservation by using annexin V as a specific probe allowing detection of phosphatidyl serine, one of the major features of apoptosis. But, we have noted a pronounced induction of apoptosis in peripheral mobilized blood compared to cytapheresis (after cryopreservation: 29.79% of apoptotic HSC CD34+ in peripheral mobilized blood but only 11.67% apoptotic HSC CD34+ in cytapheresis). Besides, we have noticed that hematopoietic stem cells CD34+ have had a statute of viability better than other mononuclear cells. These results put in value the reliability, the simplicity and the efficiency of flow cytometry for the analysis of apoptosis in hematopoietic stem cells CD34+ by following the intensity of fluorescence of annexin V.

  3. Development of an electrochemically integrated SR-GIXRD flow cell to study FeCO3 formation kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkle, D.; De Motte, R.; Taleb, W.; Kleppe, A.; Comyn, T.; Vargas, S. M.; Neville, A.; Barker, R.

    2016-10-01

    An electrochemically integrated Synchrotron Radiation-Grazing Incidence X-Ray Diffraction (SR-GIXRD) flow cell for studying corrosion product formation on carbon steel in carbon dioxide (CO2)-containing brines typical of oil and gas production has been developed. The system is capable of generating flow velocities of up to 2 m/s at temperatures in excess of 80 °C during SR-GIXRD measurements of the steel surface, enabling flow to be maintained over the course of the experiment while diffraction patterns are being collected. The design of the flow cell is presented, along with electrochemical and diffraction pattern transients collected from an initial experiment which examined the precipitation of FeCO3 onto X65 carbon steel in a CO2-saturated 3.5 wt. % NaCl brine at 80 °C and 0.1 m/s. The flow cell is used to follow the nucleation and growth kinetics of FeCO3 using SR-GIXRD linked to the simultaneous electrochemical response of the steel surface which were collected in the form of linear polarisation resistance measurements to decipher in situ corrosion rates. The results show that FeCO3 nucleation could be detected consistently and well before its inhibitive effect on the general corrosion rate of the system. In situ measurements are compared with ex situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations showing the development of an FeCO3 layer on the corroding steel surface over time confirming the in situ interpretations. The results presented demonstrate that under the specific conditions evaluated, FeCO3 was the only crystalline phase to form in the system, with no crystalline precursors being apparent. The numerous capabilities of the flow cell are highlighted and presented in this paper.

  4. A flow cytometric study of chromosomes from rat kangaroo and Chinese hamster cells.

    PubMed

    Stöhr, M; Hutter, K J; Frank, M; Futterman, G; Goerttler, K

    1980-01-01

    Chromosomes from rat kangaroo (PTK) and chinese hamster (CHV 79) cells have been prepared for quantitative flow-cytometric analysis. The preparation time was otimized down to 30 (PTK) and 40 min (CHV 79). DAPI was used as a AT-sensitive fluorescent dye to stain for monoparameter DNA measurements. Simultaneous two-parameter DNA-protein analysis was carried out with DAPI and SR 101 (as a general protein fluorochrome) in combination. The karyotype of the PTK cells with 13 (14) chromosomes was separated into 10DNA peaks. The X-chromosome bearing the nucleolus organizer region generates a distinct peak. The karyotype of the CHV 79 cells with 22 chromosomes was separated inot 15 peaks. The DNA profile obtained indicates a geometric grading of the chromosomal amount of AT components in teh karyotype of this particular cell line. The simultaneous DNA-protein analysis performed show enough sensitivity of the instrument utilizing hihg power UV excitation illumination to discriminate the two color emission consisting of blue (DAPI) and red (SR 101) fluorescence. Color overlapping could be completely avoided. Additionally, the quality (number, location, and resolution of peaks) of the DNA distribution was not influences by the simultaneous application of a second fluorescent stain. Fluorescence activated electronic sorting applied on chromosomal fluorescence distributions providing purified fractions of chromosomes for subsequent biochemical and biological determinations is discussed.

  5. Flow cytometric identification and enumeration of photosynthetic sulfur bacteria and potential for ecophysiological studies at the single-cell level.

    PubMed

    Casamayor, Emilio O; Ferrera, Isabel; Cristina, Xavier; Borrego, Carles M; Gasol, Josep M

    2007-08-01

    We show the potential of flow cytometry as a fast tool for population identification and enumeration of photosynthetic sulfur bacteria. Purple (PSB) and green sulfur bacteria (GSB) oxidize hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur that can act as storage compound to be further oxidized to sulfate generating the reducing power required for growth. Both groups have different elemental sulfur allocation strategies: whereas PSB store elemental sulfur as intracellular inclusions, GSB allocate sulfur globules externally. We used well-characterized laboratory strains and complex natural photosynthetic populations developing in a sharply stratified meromictic lake to show that PSB and GSB could be detected, differentiated and enumerated in unstained samples using a blue laser-based flow cytometer. Variations in cell-specific pigment content and the dynamics of sulfur accumulation, both intra- and extracellularly, were also detected in flow cytometric plots as sulfur accumulation changed the light scatter characteristics of the cells. These data were used to show the potential for studies on the metabolic status and the rate of activity at the single-cell level. Flow cytometric identification and enumeration resulted in faster and more precise analyses than previous approaches, and may open the door to more complex ecophysiological experiments with photosynthetic sulfur bacteria in mixed cultures and natural environments.

  6. Standardized and flexible eight colour flow cytometry panels harmonized between different laboratories to study human NK cell phenotype and function.

    PubMed

    Veluchamy, John P; Delso-Vallejo, María; Kok, Nina; Bohme, Fenna; Seggewiss-Bernhardt, Ruth; van der Vliet, Hans J; de Gruijl, Tanja D; Huppert, Volker; Spanholtz, Jan

    2017-03-10

    Advancements in multi-colour fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) panel warrant harmonized procedures to obtain comparable data between various laboratories. The intensifying clinical exploration of Natural Killer (NK) cell-based immunotherapy demands standardized and harmonized NK cell FACS panels and acquisition protocols. Eight colour FACS panels were designed to study human NK cell phenotype and function within peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). The panels were designed around fixed backbone markers and channels, covering antigens for non-NK lineage exclusion (CD3, TCRγδ, CD19, CD14, SYTOX(®) Blue) and NK cell selection (CD45, CD56, CD16), complemented with variable drop-in markers/channels to study NK cell phenotype (NKG2A, NKG2C, NKG2D and KIR2D) or NK cell function and activation (CD25, NKp44 and CD107a). Harmonized FACS set-up and data analysis for three different flow cytometers has been established, leading to highly comparable and reproducible data sets using the same PBMC reference samples (n = 6). Further studies of NK cells in fresh or cryopreserved PBMC samples (n = 12) confirmed that freezing and thawing of PBMC samples did not significantly affect NK phenotype or function. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that cryopreserved PBMC samples analysed by standardized FACS panels and harmonized analysis protocols will generate highly reliable data sets for multi-center clinical trials under validated conditions.

  7. Standardized and flexible eight colour flow cytometry panels harmonized between different laboratories to study human NK cell phenotype and function

    PubMed Central

    Veluchamy, John P.; Delso-Vallejo, María; Kok, Nina; Bohme, Fenna; Seggewiss-Bernhardt, Ruth; van der Vliet, Hans J.; de Gruijl, Tanja D.; Huppert, Volker; Spanholtz, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Advancements in multi-colour fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) panel warrant harmonized procedures to obtain comparable data between various laboratories. The intensifying clinical exploration of Natural Killer (NK) cell-based immunotherapy demands standardized and harmonized NK cell FACS panels and acquisition protocols. Eight colour FACS panels were designed to study human NK cell phenotype and function within peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). The panels were designed around fixed backbone markers and channels, covering antigens for non-NK lineage exclusion (CD3, TCRγδ, CD19, CD14, SYTOX® Blue) and NK cell selection (CD45, CD56, CD16), complemented with variable drop-in markers/channels to study NK cell phenotype (NKG2A, NKG2C, NKG2D and KIR2D) or NK cell function and activation (CD25, NKp44 and CD107a). Harmonized FACS set-up and data analysis for three different flow cytometers has been established, leading to highly comparable and reproducible data sets using the same PBMC reference samples (n = 6). Further studies of NK cells in fresh or cryopreserved PBMC samples (n = 12) confirmed that freezing and thawing of PBMC samples did not significantly affect NK phenotype or function. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that cryopreserved PBMC samples analysed by standardized FACS panels and harmonized analysis protocols will generate highly reliable data sets for multi-center clinical trials under validated conditions. PMID:28281564

  8. Study of flow behaviors on single-cell manipulation and shear stress reduction in microfluidic chips using computational fluid dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Feng; Li, XiuJun; Li, Paul C. H.

    2014-01-01

    Various single-cell retention structures (SCRSs) were reported for analysis of single cells within microfluidic devices. Undesirable flow behaviors within micro-environments not only influence single-cell manipulation and retention significantly but also lead to cell damage, biochemical heterogeneity among different individual cells (e.g., different cell signaling pathways induced by shear stress). However, the fundamentals in flow behaviors for single-cell manipulation and shear stress reduction, especially comparison of these behaviors in different microstructures, were not fully investigated in previous reports. Herein, flow distribution and induced shear stress in two different single-cell retention structures (SCRS I and SCRS II) were investigated in detail to study their effects on single-cell trapping using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods. The results were successfully verified by experimental results. Comparison between these two SCRS shows that the wasp-waisted configuration of SCRS II has a better performance in trapping and manipulating long cylinder-shaped cardiac myocytes and provides a safer “harbor” for fragile cells to prevent cell damage due to the shear stress induced from strong flows. The simulation results have not only explained flow phenomena observed in experiments but also predict new flow phenomena, providing guidelines for new chip design and optimization, and a better understanding of the cell micro-environment and fundamentals of microfluidic flows in single-cell manipulation and analysis. PMID:24753729

  9. Preferential flow in heterogeneous forest-reclaimed lignitic mine soil I. Cell-lysimeter and multiple-tracer study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hangen, E.; Gerke, H. H.; Schaaf, W.; Hüttl, R. F.

    2003-04-01

    Flow and transport processes in forest-reclaimed lignitic mine soils are required to quantify water and element budgets, which are important for long-term predictions of restored ecosystem stability and development of mining area water quality. Soil water pressure head and solute concentration measurements using tensiometers and suction cups showed strong spatial heterogeneity possibly indicating preferential flow effects. Properties and spatial structures of the mostly sandy mine soils and transport processes, however, have not sufficiently been known for detailed assessments. The objective of this study was to quantitatively analyse flow paths and measure amount and spatial distribtion of leaching. Water and element fluxes were studied at a reclaimed mine spoil site, which was afforested in 1982 with Pinus nigra. At a 3.3 m2 plot, the total percolating water was collected in 110 cm soil depth by 45 squared suction cells of 27 cm edge length each. A multi-tracer solution containing deuterium, bromide, and terbuthylazine was applied evenly at the plot surface and imposed to natural infiltration. Leaching was measured for a period of about 2 years. One third of the cells never delivered any drainage water while few cells had large drainage rates which in one case even exceeded local infiltration rates. About 71 % of the drainage was through 9 % of the area. The spatial distribution of the leached bromide tracer did not always correspond with that of drainage. Relative concentrations of bromide and deuterium were similar. Terbuthylazine was observed only sporadically during the first drainage period and at relatively small concentrations just above the analytical detection limit. Leaching patterns of the sorptive herbicide indicate only relatively small nonequilibrium-type preferential flow. Sediment structures, water repellent regions, and tree root distributions seem to be important for funneling and flow path formation.

  10. Cell adhesion under hydrodynamic flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Gopalan, P K; Jones, D A; McIntire, L V; Smith, C W

    2001-05-01

    This unit describes a hydrodynamic assay to study the relative importance of various receptor/ligand interactions in cell-cell and cell-substrate adhesion and to quantitate the strength of their binding. The basic protocol describes how to assemble the single-chamber flow system with the substrate, add the cells in suspension, and record the experiment on videotape. Alternate protocols present assays to determine how monoclonal antibodies and stimulating and inhibiting agents affect the substrate and the perfusing cells in suspension. Another alternate protocol details the use of the double-chamber flow system. Support protocols describe how to construct the single- and double-chamber flow systems and how to analyze the data from an experiment. Recording and analyzing the flow experiment requires the use of video equipment and, optionally, a computer and imaging software.

  11. An ultra-high vacuum electrochemical flow cell for in situ/operando soft X-ray spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Bora, Debajeet K. E-mail: jguo@lbl.gov; Glans, Per-Anders; Pepper, John; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Guo, J.-H. E-mail: jguo@lbl.gov; Du, Chun; Wang, Dunwei

    2014-04-15

    An in situ flow electrochemical cell has been designed and fabricated to allow better seal under UHV chamber thus to achieve a good signal to noise ratio in fluorescence yield detection of X-ray absorption spectra for spectroelectrochemical study. The cell also stabilizes the thin silicon nitride membrane window in an effective manner so that the liquid cell remains intact during X-ray absorption experiments. With the improved design of the liquid cell, electrochemical experiments such as cyclic voltammetry have been performed for 10 cycles with a good stability of sample window. Also an operando electrochemical experiment during photoelectrochemistry has been performed on n-type hematite electrode deposited on silicon nitride window. The experiment allows us to observe the formation of two extra electronic transitions before pre edge of O K-edge spectra.

  12. Bypass Flow Study

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Schultz

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of the fluid dynamics experiments in the MIR (Matched Index of-Refraction) flow system at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is to develop benchmark databases for the assessment of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solutions of the momentum equations, scalar mixing, and turbulence models for the flow ratios between coolant channels and bypass gaps in the interstitial regions of typical prismatic standard fuel element (SFE) or upper reflector block geometries of typical Modular High-temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (MHTGR) in the limiting case of negligible buoyancy and constant fluid properties. The experiments use Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) to measure the velocity fields that will populate the bypass flow study database.

  13. Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Computer simulation of atmospheric flow corresponds well to imges taken during the second Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell (BFFC) mission. The top shows a view from the pole, while the bottom shows a view from the equator. Red corresponds to hot fluid rising while blue shows cold fluid falling. This simulation was developed by Anil Deane of the University of Maryland, College Park and Paul Fischer of Argorne National Laboratory. Credit: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

  14. Biofilm responses to smooth flow fields and chemical gradients in novel microfluidic flow cells

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jisun L.; Au, Kelly H.; Huynh, Kimberly T.

    2013-01-01

    We present two novel microfluidic flow cells developed to provide reliable control of flow distributions and chemical gradients in biofilm studies. We developed a single-inlet microfluidic flow cell to support biofilm growth under a uniform velocity field, and a double-inlet flow cell to provide a very smooth transverse concentration gradient. Both flow cells consist of a layer of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) bonded to glass cover slips and were fabricated using the replica molding technique. We demonstrate the capabilities of the flow cells by quantifying flow patterns before and after growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms through particle imaging velocimetry, and by evaluating concentration gradients within the double-inlet microfluidic flow cell. Biofilm growth substantially increased flow complexity by diverting flow around biomass, creating high- and low-velocity regions and surface friction. Under a glucose gradient in the double-inlet flow cell, P. aeruginosa biofilms grew in proportion to the local glucose concentration, producing distinct spatial patterns in biofilm biomass relative to the imposed glucose gradient. When biofilms were subjected to a ciprofloxacin gradient, spatial patterns of fractions of dead cells were also in proportion to the local antibiotic concentration. These results demonstrate that the microfluidic flow cells are suitable for quantifying flow complexities resulting from flow-biofilm interactions and investigating spatial patterns of biofilm growth under chemical gradients. These novel microfluidic flow cells will facilitate biofilm research that requires flow control and in situ imaging, particularly investigations of biofilm-environment interactions. PMID:24038055

  15. Potential therapeutic biomarkers in plasma cell myeloma: a flow cytometry study.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wenli; Liu, Dingshen; Fan, Xiangshan; Powers, Linda; Goswami, Maitrayee; Hu, Ying; Lin, Pei; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Wang, Sa A

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the expression profile of potential therapeutic biomarkers in plasma cell myeloma (PCM) by multicolor flow cytometry analysis. Bone marrow (BM) specimens were collected consecutively and analyzed using a routine PCM panel (CD38/CD138/CD45/CD19/CD20/CD28/CD56/CD117, cyto-kappa/lambda). The specimens were further assessed for CD30, CD44, CD49d, CD70, CD105, and CD184 expression in cases containing a substantial number of neoplastic plasma cells. Totally, 101 patient BM samples were assessed, including 58 men and 43 women, with a median age of 64 years (34-89). Twenty-nine patients had newly diagnosed/untreated PCM, 40 had persistent/residual disease undergoing various therapies and 32 had relapsed disease. CD49d was expressed brightly and uniformly in all 45 patients tested. Expression of CD44 and CD184 was more variable with a median percentage of 77% (1-100) and 65% (5-100) respectively. Using an arbitrary 20% cutoff, CD44 was positive in 74 (73%) and CD184 in 92 (91%) cases with a mean fluorescence intensity ratio of 42.8 and 21.4. A higher CD44 expression was observed in patients with recurrent/persistent disease (P = 0.028). Additionally, both CD44 (P = 0.002) and CD184 (P = 0.026) showed higher expressions in CD117-positive cases, but there was no correlation with cytogenetic groups. The CD30, CD70, and CD105 were expressed very infrequently in PCM, with a median expression of 0.2%, 0.2%, and 0.4% respectively. CD49d, CD44, and CD184, are highly expressed in PCM. CD49d expression is bright and uniform, whereas CD44 and CD184 are more heterogeneous. In contrast, surface CD30, CD70, and CD105 are infrequent. These data provide useful preclinical information for the design of potential novel targeted therapies in PCM patients. Copyright © 2013 International Clinical Cytometry Society.

  16. The effect of hypnosis on pain and peripheral blood flow in sickle-cell disease: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Ravi R; Martin, Sarah R; Evans, Subhadra; Lung, Kirsten; Coates, Thomas D; Zeltzer, Lonnie K; Tsao, Jennie C

    2017-01-01

    Vaso-occlusive pain crises (VOCs) are the "hallmark" of sickle-cell disease (SCD) and can lead to sympathetic nervous system dysfunction. Increased sympathetic nervous system activation during VOCs and/or pain can result in vasoconstriction, which may increase the risk for subsequent VOCs and pain. Hypnosis is a neuromodulatory intervention that may attenuate vascular and pain responsiveness. Due to the lack of laboratory-controlled pain studies in patients with SCD and healthy controls, the specific effects of hypnosis on acute pain-associated vascular responses are unknown. The current study assessed the effects of hypnosis on peripheral blood flow, pain threshold, tolerance, and intensity in adults with and without SCD. Fourteen patients with SCD and 14 healthy controls were included. Participants underwent three laboratory pain tasks before and during a 30-minute hypnosis session. Peripheral blood flow, pain threshold, tolerance, and intensity before and during hypnosis were examined. A single 30-minute hypnosis session decreased pain intensity by a moderate amount in patients with SCD. Pain threshold and tolerance increased following hypnosis in the control group, but not in patients with SCD. Patients with SCD exhibited lower baseline peripheral blood flow and a greater increase in blood flow following hypnosis than controls. Given that peripheral vasoconstriction plays a role in the development of VOC, current findings provide support for further laboratory and clinical investigations of the effects of cognitive-behavioral neuromodulatory interventions on pain responses and peripheral vascular flow in patients with SCD. Current results suggest that hypnosis may increase peripheral vasodilation during both the anticipation and experience of pain in patients with SCD. These findings indicate a need for further examination of the effects of hypnosis on pain and vascular responses utilizing a randomized controlled trial design. Further evidence may help

  17. The effect of hypnosis on pain and peripheral blood flow in sickle-cell disease: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Ravi R; Martin, Sarah R; Evans, Subhadra; Lung, Kirsten; Coates, Thomas D; Zeltzer, Lonnie K; Tsao, Jennie C

    2017-01-01

    Background Vaso-occlusive pain crises (VOCs) are the “hallmark” of sickle-cell disease (SCD) and can lead to sympathetic nervous system dysfunction. Increased sympathetic nervous system activation during VOCs and/or pain can result in vasoconstriction, which may increase the risk for subsequent VOCs and pain. Hypnosis is a neuromodulatory intervention that may attenuate vascular and pain responsiveness. Due to the lack of laboratory-controlled pain studies in patients with SCD and healthy controls, the specific effects of hypnosis on acute pain-associated vascular responses are unknown. The current study assessed the effects of hypnosis on peripheral blood flow, pain threshold, tolerance, and intensity in adults with and without SCD. Subjects and methods Fourteen patients with SCD and 14 healthy controls were included. Participants underwent three laboratory pain tasks before and during a 30-minute hypnosis session. Peripheral blood flow, pain threshold, tolerance, and intensity before and during hypnosis were examined. Results A single 30-minute hypnosis session decreased pain intensity by a moderate amount in patients with SCD. Pain threshold and tolerance increased following hypnosis in the control group, but not in patients with SCD. Patients with SCD exhibited lower baseline peripheral blood flow and a greater increase in blood flow following hypnosis than controls. Conclusion Given that peripheral vasoconstriction plays a role in the development of VOC, current findings provide support for further laboratory and clinical investigations of the effects of cognitive–behavioral neuromodulatory interventions on pain responses and peripheral vascular flow in patients with SCD. Current results suggest that hypnosis may increase peripheral vasodilation during both the anticipation and experience of pain in patients with SCD. These findings indicate a need for further examination of the effects of hypnosis on pain and vascular responses utilizing a randomized

  18. Microvasculature on a chip: study of the Endothelial Surface Layer and the flow structure of Red Blood Cells.

    PubMed

    Tsvirkun, Daria; Grichine, Alexei; Duperray, Alain; Misbah, Chaouqi; Bureau, Lionel

    2017-03-24

    Microvasculatures-on-a-chip, i.e. in vitro models that mimic important features of microvessel networks, have gained increasing interest in recent years. Such devices have allowed investigating pathophysiological situations involving abnormal biophysical interactions between blood cells and vessel walls. Still, a central question remains regarding the presence, in such biomimetic systems, of the endothelial glycocalyx. The latter is a glycosaminoglycans-rich surface layer exposed to blood flow, which plays a crucial role in regulating the interactions between circulating cells and the endothelium. Here, we use confocal microscopy to characterize the layer expressed by endothelial cells cultured in microfluidic channels. We show that, under our culture conditions, endothelial cells form a confluent layer on all the walls of the circuit and display a glycocalyx that fully lines the lumen of the microchannels. Moreover, the thickness of this surface layer is found to be on the order of 600 nm, which compares well with measurements performed ex or in vivo on microcapillaries. Furthermore, we investigate how the presence of endothelial cells in the microchannels affects their hydrodynamic resistance and the near-wall motion of red blood cells. Our study thus provides an important insight into the physiological relevance of in vitro microvasculatures.

  19. Microvasculature on a chip: study of the Endothelial Surface Layer and the flow structure of Red Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tsvirkun, Daria; Grichine, Alexei; Duperray, Alain; Misbah, Chaouqi; Bureau, Lionel

    2017-01-01

    Microvasculatures-on-a-chip, i.e. in vitro models that mimic important features of microvessel networks, have gained increasing interest in recent years. Such devices have allowed investigating pathophysiological situations involving abnormal biophysical interactions between blood cells and vessel walls. Still, a central question remains regarding the presence, in such biomimetic systems, of the endothelial glycocalyx. The latter is a glycosaminoglycans-rich surface layer exposed to blood flow, which plays a crucial role in regulating the interactions between circulating cells and the endothelium. Here, we use confocal microscopy to characterize the layer expressed by endothelial cells cultured in microfluidic channels. We show that, under our culture conditions, endothelial cells form a confluent layer on all the walls of the circuit and display a glycocalyx that fully lines the lumen of the microchannels. Moreover, the thickness of this surface layer is found to be on the order of 600 nm, which compares well with measurements performed ex or in vivo on microcapillaries. Furthermore, we investigate how the presence of endothelial cells in the microchannels affects their hydrodynamic resistance and the near-wall motion of red blood cells. Our study thus provides an important insight into the physiological relevance of in vitro microvasculatures. PMID:28338083

  20. Microvasculature on a chip: study of the Endothelial Surface Layer and the flow structure of Red Blood Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvirkun, Daria; Grichine, Alexei; Duperray, Alain; Misbah, Chaouqi; Bureau, Lionel

    2017-03-01

    Microvasculatures-on-a-chip, i.e. in vitro models that mimic important features of microvessel networks, have gained increasing interest in recent years. Such devices have allowed investigating pathophysiological situations involving abnormal biophysical interactions between blood cells and vessel walls. Still, a central question remains regarding the presence, in such biomimetic systems, of the endothelial glycocalyx. The latter is a glycosaminoglycans-rich surface layer exposed to blood flow, which plays a crucial role in regulating the interactions between circulating cells and the endothelium. Here, we use confocal microscopy to characterize the layer expressed by endothelial cells cultured in microfluidic channels. We show that, under our culture conditions, endothelial cells form a confluent layer on all the walls of the circuit and display a glycocalyx that fully lines the lumen of the microchannels. Moreover, the thickness of this surface layer is found to be on the order of 600 nm, which compares well with measurements performed ex or in vivo on microcapillaries. Furthermore, we investigate how the presence of endothelial cells in the microchannels affects their hydrodynamic resistance and the near-wall motion of red blood cells. Our study thus provides an important insight into the physiological relevance of in vitro microvasculatures.

  1. Flow through, immunomagnetic cell separation.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, J J; Zborowski, M; Sun, L; Moore, L

    1998-01-01

    A brief, process-oriented overview of immunologically based cell separation technology is presented. In addition, the design and preliminary experimental data of two unique flow-through immunomagnetic cell separation devices are presented. The first design is based on a dipole magnetic field, while the second design is basis on a quadrupole magnetic field. The dipole design can "fractionate" an inlet, magnetically labeled, cell stream into different outlet streams on the basis of the degree to which the cell is immunomagnetically labeled. The quadrupole separator splits an inlet, immunomagnetically labeled, cell stream into two outlet streams in which the purity, recovery, and potentially the degree to which the cells are immunomagnetically labeled is controlled by the flow rates in the inlet and outlet flows. A 99% purity and 86% recovery have been achieved with this system. Some distinct advantages of these two systems are the potential of high purity, recovery, and throughput at a cost which is potentially significantly lower than current, comparable technologies.

  2. Flow cytometric analysis of DNA content of living and fixed cells: a comparative study using various fixatives.

    PubMed

    Rousselle, C; Robert-Nicoud, M; Ronot, X

    1998-11-01

    The majority of studies dealing with DNA analyses are made on fixed cells. In this context, the efficiency as fixatives of ethanol, methanol, acetone, Carnoy, Boehm-Sprenger and aldehydes was determined using two different DNA fluorescent probes, Hoechst 33342 and propidium iodide. The purpose of our study was to find the fixative that would provide the best results with respect to the following parameters: aggregates, cell size and granularity, and DNA staining analysis. Using murine fibroblasts, we found that 68% ethanol, 85% methanol and aldehydes did not increase aggregate formation, whereas Carnoy, acetone or Boehm-Sprenger fixatives did. The results show that aldehydes seem to alter cell size least. All fixatives induce an increase in cell granularity, which is very pronounced with alcohols, but aldehydes alter morphology less than alcohols. We observed that the fixatives giving the best resolution with Hoechst 33342 staining lead to a lower measurement variability than with propidium iodide staining. This study leads us to conclude that 68% ethanol and 85% methanol can be considered as appropriate fixatives for flow cytometry studies of DNA content.

  3. A Comparative Study of Electrolyte Flow and Slime Particle Transport in a Newly Designed Copper Electrolytic Cell and a Laboratory-Scale Conventional Electrolytic Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Weizhi; Wang, Shijie; Free, Michael L.

    2016-08-01

    An innovative copper electrolytic cell was designed with its inlet at the cell top and its outlet near the cell bottom, in opposite to conventional electrolytic cells. It was modeled in COMSOL Multiphysics to simulate copper electrorefining process. Unlike conventional electrorefining cells, downward electrolyte flows are more dominant in the fluid flow field in this cell, which leads to faster settlement of slime particles and less contamination to the cathode. Copper concentration profiles, electrolyte flow velocity field, slime particle movements, and slime particle distributions were obtained as simulation results, which were compared with those in a laboratory-scale conventional electrolytic cell. Advantages of the newly designed electrolytic cell were found: copper ions are distributed more uniformly in the cell with a thinner diffusion layer near the cathode; stronger convection exists in the inter-electrode domain with dominant downward flows; and slime particles have larger possibilities to settle down and are less likely to reach the cathode.

  4. A Comparative Study of Electrolyte Flow and Slime Particle Transport in a Newly Designed Copper Electrolytic Cell and a Laboratory-Scale Conventional Electrolytic Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Weizhi; Wang, Shijie; Free, Michael L.

    2017-10-01

    An innovative copper electrolytic cell was designed with its inlet at the cell top and its outlet near the cell bottom, in opposite to conventional electrolytic cells. It was modeled in COMSOL Multiphysics to simulate copper electrorefining process. Unlike conventional electrorefining cells, downward electrolyte flows are more dominant in the fluid flow field in this cell, which leads to faster settlement of slime particles and less contamination to the cathode. Copper concentration profiles, electrolyte flow velocity field, slime particle movements, and slime particle distributions were obtained as simulation results, which were compared with those in a laboratory-scale conventional electrolytic cell. Advantages of the newly designed electrolytic cell were found: copper ions are distributed more uniformly in the cell with a thinner diffusion layer near the cathode; stronger convection exists in the inter-electrode domain with dominant downward flows; and slime particles have larger possibilities to settle down and are less likely to reach the cathode.

  5. Studies of Gas-Particle Interactions in a Microgravity Flow Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Louge, Michel Y.; Jenkins, James T.

    2002-01-01

    The ability to transport particulate materials predictably and efficiently using a flowing gas is likely to play an important role in the development of lunar and Martian environments that are hospitable to humans. Lunar soil contains significant amounts of oxygen, hydrogen and other critical materials that are chemically bound in various minerals. Through appropriate processing, these resources may be recovered for use in propulsion, life support systems and mining operations. Similarly, it is believed that Martian soil contains significant amounts of water which can be electrolyzed into oxygen and hydrogen, again for propellants and life support. The transport of such granular soils from where they are mined and between stages of their processing is likely to involve pneumatic transport carried out in systems of pipes using flows of the liberated gases. On earth, the transport and processing of solid materials are also crucial in a number of applications from the chemical, mining, power and oil industries. For these flows, an appreciation has recently developed for the influence of collisional interactions among particles, both in suspensions where the flow is laminar and turbulent. Collisions between such particles can transfer a significant amount of momentum within the flow and at the boundaries. This provides an additional resistance to the passage of the gas, but it also introduces a mechanism that promotes more homogeneous flows and, at least in small-diameter pipes, may forestall the development of clusters.

  6. Studies of Gas-Particle Interactions in a Microgravity Flow Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Louge, Michel Y.; Jenkins, James T.

    2002-01-01

    The ability to transport particulate materials predictably and efficiently using a flowing gas is likely to play an important role in the development of lunar and Martian environments that are hospitable to humans. Lunar soil contains significant amounts of oxygen, hydrogen and other critical materials that are chemically bound in various minerals. Through appropriate processing, these resources may be recovered for use in propulsion, life support systems and mining operations. Similarly, it is believed that Martian soil contains significant amounts of water which can be electrolyzed into oxygen and hydrogen, again for propellants and life support. The transport of such granular soils from where they are mined and between stages of their processing is likely to involve pneumatic transport carried out in systems of pipes using flows of the liberated gases. On earth, the transport and processing of solid materials are also crucial in a number of applications from the chemical, mining, power and oil industries. For these flows, an appreciation has recently developed for the influence of collisional interactions among particles, both in suspensions where the flow is laminar and turbulent. Collisions between such particles can transfer a significant amount of momentum within the flow and at the boundaries. This provides an additional resistance to the passage of the gas, but it also introduces a mechanism that promotes more homogeneous flows and, at least in small-diameter pipes, may forestall the development of clusters.

  7. Application of Dissipative Particle Dynamics to the Study of a Red Blood Cell in Simple Shear Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Ting; Phan-Thien, Nhan; Khoo, Boo Cheong; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2014-11-01

    The present work reports an attempt to apply the dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) method to study the dynamic behaviors of a red blood cell (RBC) in simple shear flow. The simulation system is discretized into four types of particles, namely wall particles, fluid particles, membrane particles and internal particles. The particle interaction is modeled by the DPD method, and the membrane particles are connected into a viscoelastic triangular network to represent the RBC membrane. As benchmarking tests, we simulate the deformation of a spherical capsule in shear flow and compare it with the past study, and also examine the effect of computational domain size. After that, we investigate the dynamics of a RBC in shear flow at different membrane shear and bending moduli. Our simulations reproduce the tank-treading, trembling and tumbling motions of the RBC at the shear modulus Es = 6, 60 and 600 μN/m, respectively. Moreover, we find that the RBC undergoes a trembling motion when its bending modulus is large enough, where the obvious stretching and smoothing of the RBC occur alternately in shape.

  8. Social Studies Flow Chart.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of General Education Curriculum Development.

    The flow chart outlines the division of content within social studies courses for each grade (K-12) in New York State public schools. It is strictly an outline of content; it does not reflect emphasis on concept development or use of the inductive mode which are stressed in state teacher's guides. In kindergarten and grade one, social studies…

  9. Perianal basal cell carcinoma: a comparative histologic, immunohistochemical, and flow cytometric study with basaloid carcinoma of the anus.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Cañas, M C; Fernández, F A; Rodilla, I G; Val-Bernal, J F

    1996-08-01

    Perianal basal cell carcinoma is a very rare tumor accounting for only 0.2% of the anorectal tumors. It must be distinguished from basaloid carcinoma of the anus, which resembles it histologically but shows a much more aggressive behavior, metastasizes early, and often proves fatal, thus requiring different therapy. Differential diagnosis of both entities by light microscopy may be difficult. Five cases of perianal basal cell carcinoma and five cases of basaloid carcinoma were studied by means of immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. Some immunohistochemical markers, such as epithelial membrane antigen, carcinoembrionic antigen, and keratins, as well as the lectin Ulex europaeus agglutinin I stained basaloid carcinoma and were negative for basal cell carcinoma. In contrast, the monoclonal antibody Ber-EP4 seems to be a good marker for perianal basal cell carcinoma and useful in differentiating it from basaloid carcinoma of the anus. Basaloid carcinomas are associated with a significantly higher S-phase fraction than are perianal basal cell carcinomas (p < 0.01).

  10. Whole cell quenched flow analysis.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Ya-Yu; Haeri, Sina; Gizewski, Carsten; Stewart, Joanna D; Ehrhard, Peter; Shrimpton, John; Janasek, Dirk; West, Jonathan

    2013-12-03

    This paper describes a microfluidic quenched flow platform for the investigation of ligand-mediated cell surface processes with unprecedented temporal resolution. A roll-slip behavior caused by cell-wall-fluid coupling was documented and acts to minimize the compression and shear stresses experienced by the cell. This feature enables high-velocity (100-400 mm/s) operation without impacting the integrity of the cell membrane. In addition, rotation generates localized convection paths. This cell-driven micromixing effect causes the cell to become rapidly enveloped with ligands to saturate the surface receptors. High-speed imaging of the transport of a Janus particle and fictitious domain numerical simulations were used to predict millisecond-scale biochemical switching times. Dispersion in the incubation channel was characterized by microparticle image velocimetry and minimized by using a horizontal Hele-Shaw velocity profile in combination with vertical hydrodynamic focusing to achieve highly reproducible incubation times (CV = 3.6%). Microfluidic quenched flow was used to investigate the pY1131 autophosphorylation transition in the type I insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R). This predimerized receptor undergoes autophosphorylation within 100 ms of stimulation. Beyond this demonstration, the extreme temporal resolution can be used to gain new insights into the mechanisms underpinning a tremendous variety of important cell surface events.

  11. Measuring sickle cell morphology during blood flow.

    PubMed

    Kviatkovsky, Inna; Zeidan, Adel; Yeheskely-Hayon, Daniella; Shabad, Eveline L; Dann, Eldad J; Yelin, Dvir

    2017-03-01

    During a sickle cell crisis in sickle cell anemia patients, deoxygenated red blood cells may change their mechanical properties and block small blood vessels, causing pain, local tissue damage, and possibly organ failure. Measuring the structural and morphological changes in sickle cells is important for understanding the factors contributing to vessel blockage and for developing an effective treatment. In this work, we image blood cells from sickle cell anemia patients using spectrally encoded flow cytometry, and analyze the interference patterns between reflections from the cell membranes. Using a numerical simulation for calculating the interference pattern obtained from a model of a red blood cell, we propose an analytical expression for the three-dimensional shape of characteristic sickle cells and compare our results to a previously suggested model. Our imaging approach offers new means for analyzing the morphology of sickle cells, and could be useful for studying their unique physiological and biomechanical properties.

  12. A 3D Culture Model to Study How Fluid Pressure and Flow Affect the Behavior of Aggregates of Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Piotrowski-Daspit, Alexandra S; Simi, Allison K; Pang, Mei-Fong; Tien, Joe; Nelson, Celeste M

    2017-01-01

    Cells are surrounded by mechanical stimuli in their microenvironment. It is important to determine how cells respond to the mechanical information that surrounds them in order to understand both development and disease progression, as well as to be able to predict cell behavior in response to physical stimuli. Here we describe a protocol to determine the effects of interstitial fluid flow on the migratory behavior of an aggregate of epithelial cells in a three-dimensional (3D) culture model. This protocol includes detailed methods for the fabrication of a 3D cell culture chamber with hydrostatic pressure control, the culture of epithelial cells as an aggregate in a collagen gel, and the analysis of collective cell behavior in response to pressure-driven flow.

  13. Free flow cell electrophoresis using zwitterionic buffer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodkey, R. Scott

    1990-01-01

    Studies of a zwitterionic buffer formulated for cell electrophoresis were done using the McDonnell-Douglas Continuous Flow Electrophoresis System. Standard buffers were analyzed for their stability in the electrical field and the results showed that both buffers tested were inherently unstable. Further, titration studies showed that the standards buffers buffered poorly at the pH employed for electrophoresis. The zwitterionic buffer buffered well at its nominal pH and was shown to be stable in the electrical field. Comparative studies of the buffer with standard cell separation buffers using formalin fixed rabbit and goose red blood cells showed that the zwitterionic buffer gave better resolution of the fixed cells. Studies with viable hybridoma cells showed that buffer Q supported cell viability equal to Hank's Balanced Salt Solution and that hybridoma cells in different stages of the growth cycle demonstrated reproducible differences in electrophoretic mobility.

  14. Free flow cell electrophoresis using zwitterionic buffer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodkey, R. Scott

    1990-01-01

    Studies of a zwitterionic buffer formulated for cell electrophoresis were done using the McDonnell-Douglas Continuous Flow Electrophoresis System. Standard buffers were analyzed for their stability in the electrical field and the results showed that both buffers tested were inherently unstable. Further, titration studies showed that the standards buffers buffered poorly at the pH employed for electrophoresis. The zwitterionic buffer buffered well at its nominal pH and was shown to be stable in the electrical field. Comparative studies of the buffer with standard cell separation buffers using formalin fixed rabbit and goose red blood cells showed that the zwitterionic buffer gave better resolution of the fixed cells. Studies with viable hybridoma cells showed that buffer Q supported cell viability equal to Hank's Balanced Salt Solution and that hybridoma cells in different stages of the growth cycle demonstrated reproducible differences in electrophoretic mobility.

  15. Characterization of flowing blood cells using a novel OCT technique: rigorous three-dimensional computational study (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ossowski, Pawel; Wojtkowski, Maciej; Munro, Peter R. T.

    2017-02-01

    We have developed a highly realistic, Maxwell-based, model of an existing experimental optical coherence tomography based approach for characterizing blood cells flowing through a microfluidic channel. The characterization technique is indirect as it relies upon the perturbation, by blood cells, of light back-scattered by specially designed highly scattering substrate. This is in contrast with characterization techniques which directly sense light back-scattered by the cells. Up until now, our hypothesis for distinguishing between different blood cell types has been based upon experimental measurements and knowledge of cell morphology. The absence of a mathematical model capable of modelling image formation, when the wave nature of light is integral, has impeded our ability to validate and optimize the characterization method. Recently, such a model has been developed and we have adapted it to simulate our experimental system and blood cells. The model has the following features: the field back scattered by the sample, for broadband and arbitrary profile beams, is calculated according to Maxwell's equations; the sample is a deterministic refractive index distribution; the scattered and reference electric fields are explicitly interfered; single and multiple scattering are implicitly modeled; most system parameters of practical significance (e.g. numerical aperture or wavefront aberration) are included the model. This model has been highly successful in replicating and allowing for interpretation of experimental results. We will present the key elements of the three-dimensional computational model, based upon Maxwell's equations, as well as the key findings of the computational study. We shall also provide comparison with experimental results.

  16. Numerical study of a novel micro-diaphragm flow channel with piezoelectric device for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, H. K.; Huang, S. H.; Chen, B. R.; Cheng, L. W.

    Previous studies have shown that the amplitude of the vibration of a piezoelectric (PZT) device produces an oscillating flow that changes the chamber volume along with a curvature variation of the diaphragm. In this study, an actuating micro-diaphragm with piezoelectric effects is utilized as an air-flow channel in proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) systems, called PZT-PEMFC. This newly designed gas pump, with a piezoelectric actuation structure, can feed air into the system of an air-breathing PEMFC. When the actuator moves outward to increase the cathode channel volume, the air is sucked into the chamber; moving inward decreases the channel's volume and thereby compresses air into the catalyst layer and enhancing the chemical reaction. The air-standard PZT-PEMFC cycle is proposed to describe an air-breathing PZT-PEMFC. A novel design for PZT-PEMFCs has been proposed and a three-dimensional, transitional model has been successfully built to account for its major phenomena and performance. Moreover, at high frequencies, PZT actuation leads to a more stable current output, more drained water, higher sucked air, higher hydrogen consumption, and also overcomes concentration losses.

  17. Measurement of Transient Permeability of Sp2/0 Myeloma Cells: Flow Cytometric Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novickij, Vitalij; Girkontaitė, Irutė; Grainys, Audrius; Zinkevičienė, Auksė; Lastauskienė, Eglė; Švedienė, Jurgita; Paškevičius, Algimantas; Markovskaja, Svetlana; Novickij, Jurij

    2016-12-01

    Electroporation is an electric field induced phenomenon occurring when the permeability of the cell membrane is increased due to the excess of critical transmembrane potential. Fluorescent dye assays are frequently used for evaluation of the permeabilization rate, however, the protocols vary, which negatively affects the repeatability of the results. In this work we have designed experiments to investigate the protocols and threshold concentrations of the Propidium Iodide (PI) and YO-PRO-1 (YP) fluorescent dyes for evaluation of mammalian cell permeabilization induced by electroporation. The Sp2/0 mouse myeloma cells were used and the bursts of 100 μs × 8 electrical pulses of 0.8-2 kV/cm were applied. It has been shown that the dye concentration has an influence on the detectable permeabilization, and the concentrations below 30 μM for PI and 1 μM for YP should be avoided for measurement of electropermeabilization efficacy due to unreliable fluorescence signals. Further, based on the experimental data, the permeabilization curve for the Sp2/0 myeloma cells in the 0.8-2 kV/cm range has been presented.

  18. Microconfined flow behavior of red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Tomaiuolo, Giovanna; Lanotte, Luca; D'Apolito, Rosa; Cassinese, Antonio; Guido, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) perform essential functions in human body, such as gas exchange between blood and tissues, thanks to their ability to deform and flow in the microvascular network. The high RBC deformability is mainly due to the viscoelastic properties of the cell membrane. Since an impaired RBC deformability could be found in some diseases, such as malaria, sickle cell anemia, diabetes and hereditary disorders, there is the need to provide further insight into measurement of RBC deformability in a physiologically relevant flow field. Here, RBCs deformability has been studied in terms of the minimum apparent plasma-layer thickness by using high-speed video microscopy of RBCs flowing in cylindrical glass capillaries. An in vitro systematic microfluidic investigation of RBCs in micro-confined conditions has been performed, resulting in the determination of the RBCs time recovery constant, RBC volume and surface area and RBC membrane shear elastic modulus and surface viscosity. It has been noticed that the deformability of RBCs induces cells aggregation during flow in microcapillaries, allowing the formation of clusters of cells. Overall, our results provide a novel technique to estimate RBC deformability and also RBCs collective behavior, which can be used for the analysis of pathological RBCs, for which reliable quantitative methods are still lacking.

  19. Feasibility Studies of Vortex Flow Impact On the Proliferation of Algae in Hydrogen Production for Fuel Cell Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miskon, Azizi; A/L Thanakodi, Suresh; Shiema Moh Nazar, Nazatul; Kit Chong, Marcus Wai; Sobri Takriff, Mohd; Fakir Kamarudin, Kamrul; Aziz Norzali, Abdul; Nooraya Mohd Tawil, Siti

    2016-11-01

    The instability of crude oil price in global market as well as the sensitivity towards green energy increases, more research works being carried out to find alternative energy replacing the depleting of fossil fuels. Photobiological hydrogen production system using algae is one of the promising alternative energy source. However, the yield of hydrogen utilizing the current photobioreactor (PBR) is still low for commercial application due to restricted light penetration into the deeper regions of the reactor. Therefore, this paper studies the feasibility of vortex flow impact utilizing magnetic stirring in hydrogen production for fuel cell applications. For comparison of results, a magnetic stirrer is placed under a PBR of algae to stir the algae to obtain an even distribution of sunlight to the algae while the controlled PBR of algae kept in static. The produced hydrogen level was measured using hydrogen sensor circuit and the data collected were communicated to laptop using Arduino Uno. The results showed more cell counts and hydrogen produced in the PBR under the influence of magnetic stirring compared to static PBR by an average of 8 percent in 4 days.

  20. A flexible gas flow reaction cell for in situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kroner, Anna B. Gilbert, Martin; Duller, Graham; Cahill, Leo; Leicester, Peter; Woolliscroft, Richard; Shotton, Elizabeth J.; Mohammed, Khaled M. H.

    2016-07-27

    A capillary-based sample environment with hot air blower and integrated gas system was developed at Diamond to conduct X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies of materials under time-resolved, in situ conditions. The use of a hot air blower, operating in the temperature range of 298-1173 K, allows introduction of other techniques e.g. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy for combined techniques studies. The flexibility to use either quartz or Kapton capillaries allows users to perform XAS measurement at energies as low as 5600 eV. To demonstrate performance, time-resolved, in situ XAS results of Rh catalysts during the process of activation (Rh K-edge, Ce L{sub 3}-edge and Cr K-edge) and the study of mixed oxide membrane (La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3−δ}) under various partial oxygen pressure conditions are described.

  1. Flow Cytometry Total Cell Counts: A Field Study Assessing Microbiological Water Quality and Growth in Unchlorinated Drinking Water Distribution Systems

    PubMed Central

    Liu, G.; Van der Mark, E. J.; Verberk, J. Q. J. C.; Van Dijk, J. C.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the application of flow cytometry total cell counts (TCCs) as a parameter to assess microbial growth in drinking water distribution systems and to determine the relationships between different parameters describing the biostability of treated water. A one-year sampling program was carried out in two distribution systems in The Netherlands. Results demonstrated that, in both systems, the biomass differences measured by ATP were not significant. TCC differences were also not significant in treatment plant 1, but decreased slightly in treatment plant 2. TCC values were found to be higher at temperatures above 15°C than at temperatures below 15°C. The correlation study of parameters describing biostability found no relationship among TCC, heterotrophic plate counts, and Aeromonas. Also no relationship was found between TCC and ATP. Some correlation was found between the subgroup of high nucleic acid content bacteria and ATP (R 2 = 0.63). Overall, the results demonstrated that TCC is a valuable parameter to assess the drinking water biological quality and regrowth; it can directly and sensitively quantify biomass, detect small changes, and can be used to determine the subgroup of active HNA bacteria that are related to ATP. PMID:23819117

  2. Flow cytometry total cell counts: a field study assessing microbiological water quality and growth in unchlorinated drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, G; Van der Mark, E J; Verberk, J Q J C; Van Dijk, J C

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the application of flow cytometry total cell counts (TCCs) as a parameter to assess microbial growth in drinking water distribution systems and to determine the relationships between different parameters describing the biostability of treated water. A one-year sampling program was carried out in two distribution systems in The Netherlands. Results demonstrated that, in both systems, the biomass differences measured by ATP were not significant. TCC differences were also not significant in treatment plant 1, but decreased slightly in treatment plant 2. TCC values were found to be higher at temperatures above 15°C than at temperatures below 15°C. The correlation study of parameters describing biostability found no relationship among TCC, heterotrophic plate counts, and Aeromonas. Also no relationship was found between TCC and ATP. Some correlation was found between the subgroup of high nucleic acid content bacteria and ATP (R (2) = 0.63). Overall, the results demonstrated that TCC is a valuable parameter to assess the drinking water biological quality and regrowth; it can directly and sensitively quantify biomass, detect small changes, and can be used to determine the subgroup of active HNA bacteria that are related to ATP.

  3. Mirrored serpentine flow channels for fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Rock, Jeffrey Allan

    2000-08-08

    A PEM fuel cell having serpentine flow field channels wherein the input/inlet legs of each channel border the input/inlet legs of the next adjacent channels in the same flow field, and the output/exit legs of each channel border the output/exit legs of the next adjacent channels in the same flow field. The serpentine fuel flow channels may be longer, and may contain more medial legs, than the serpentine oxidant flow channels.

  4. Cancer Cell Glycocalyx Mediates Mechanostransduction and Flow-Regulated Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Qazi, Henry; Palomino, Rocio; Shi, Zhong-Dong; Munn, Lance L.; Tarbell, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian cells are covered by a surface proteoglycan (glycocalyx) layer, and it is known that blood vessel-lining endothelial cells use the glycocalyx to sense and transduce the shearing forces of blood flow into intracellular signals. Tumor cells in vivo are exposed to forces from interstitial fluid flow that may affect metastatic potential but are not reproduced by most in vitro cell motility assays. We hypothesized that glycocalyx-mediated mechanotransduction of interstitial flow shear stress is an un-recognized factor that can significantly enhance metastatic cell motility and play a role in augmentation of invasion. Involvement of MMP levels, cell adhesion molecules (CD44, α3 integrin), and glycocalyx components (heparan sulfate and hyaluronan) were investigated in a cell/collagen gel suspension model designed to mimic the interstitial flow microenvironment. Physiologic levels of flow upregulated MMP levels and enhanced the motility of metastatic cells. Blocking the flow-enhanced expression of MMP actvity or adhesion molecules (CD44 and integrins) resulted in blocking the flow-enhanced migratory activity. The presence of a glycocalyx-like layer was verified around tumor cells, and the degradation of this layer by hyaluronidase and heparinase blocked the flow-regulated invasion. This study shows for the first time that interstitial flow enhancement of metastatic cell motility can be mediated by the cell surface glycocalyx – a potential target for therapeutics. PMID:24077103

  5. A new simple tubular flow cell for use with variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry: A high throughput in situ protein adsorption study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, T. M.; Trussler, S.; McArthur, M. A.; Lohstreter, L. B.; Bai, Zhijun; Filiaggi, M. J.; Dahn, J. R.

    2009-09-01

    A simple and novel flow cell design is presented here for use with variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry (VASE) to study the adsorption of liquid-borne species on reflective surfaces. The flow cell allows a sample as large as 6 mm × 75 mm to be probed point by point and at any common ellipsometric angle of incidence, unlike other designs. Using our flow cell system with VASE, combinatorial films of Al 1-xNb x, Al 1-xTa x, and Al 1-xTi x (0 ⩽ x ⩽ 1) were tested in situ for fibrinogen affinity along their 75 mm long compositional gradients. Fibrinogen adsorption on the films was found to be closely correlated to the various surface oxide fractions, with high alumina content at the surface leading to low amounts of adsorbed fibrinogen for each binary library. Adsorbed amounts measured in situ were in agreement with previously obtained values found using ex situ techniques.

  6. Study of self-consistent particle flows in a plasma blob with particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Hiroki Ishiguro, Seiji

    2015-10-15

    The self-consistent particle flows in a filamentary coherent structure along the magnetic field line in scrape-off layer (SOL) plasma (plasma blob) have been investigated by means of a three-dimensional electrostatic particle-in-cell simulation code. The presence of the spiral current system composed of the diamagnetic and parallel currents in a blob is confirmed by the particle simulation without any assumed sheath boundary models. Furthermore, the observation of the electron and ion parallel velocity distributions in a blob shows that those distributions are far from Maxwellian due to modification with the sheath formation and that the electron temperature on the higher potential side in a blob is higher than that on the lower potential side. Also, it is found that the ions on the higher potential side are accelerated more intensively along the magnetic field line than those on the lower potential side near the edge. This study indicates that particle simulations are able to provide an exact current closure to analysis of blob dynamics and will bring more accurate prediction of plasma transport in the SOL without any empirical assumptions.

  7. Numerical study of juncture flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Chung-Lung; Hung, Ching-Mao

    1991-01-01

    The present paper describes a computational study of laminar/turbulent and subsonic/supersonic horseshoe vortex systems generated by a cylindrical protuberance mounted on a flat plate. Various vortex structures are predicted and discussed. Low-speed laminar juncture flows are computed to determine the Reynolds number effect with the same incoming boundary-layer thickness. For a low subsonic laminar flow, the number of vortex arrays increases with the Reynolds number, in agreement with both experimental and numerical observations. Qualitative comparisons are made along with the computations, experimental observations, and analytical work. For incompressible flow, the relationships among pressure extrema, vorticity, and singular points in flow structure are discussed. A parametric study of the effect of the free-stream Mach number on the flow structure for laminar flow is conducted. The juncture flow when the incoming flow is turbulent and supersonic is computed.

  8. Intracellular fluid flow in rapidly moving cells.

    PubMed

    Keren, Kinneret; Yam, Patricia T; Kinkhabwala, Anika; Mogilner, Alex; Theriot, Julie A

    2009-10-01

    Cytosolic fluid dynamics have been implicated in cell motility because of the hydrodynamic forces they induce and because of their influence on transport of components of the actin machinery to the leading edge. To investigate the existence and the direction of fluid flow in rapidly moving cells, we introduced inert quantum dots into the lamellipodia of fish epithelial keratocytes and analysed their distribution and motion. Our results indicate that fluid flow is directed from the cell body towards the leading edge in the cell frame of reference, at about 40% of cell speed. We propose that this forward-directed flow is driven by increased hydrostatic pressure generated at the rear of the cell by myosin contraction, and show that inhibition of myosin II activity by blebbistatin reverses the direction of fluid flow and leads to a decrease in keratocyte speed. We present a physical model for fluid pressure and flow in moving cells that quantitatively accounts for our experimental data.

  9. Differences of reactivity to interferon gamma in HeLa and CaSki cells: a combined immunocytochemical and flow-cytometric study.

    PubMed

    Lizard, G; Chignol, M C; Chardonnet, Y; Schmitt, D

    1996-01-01

    We characterized the changes induced by treatment for 48 h with 100 U/ ml interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) on HeLa and CaSki cells, derived from human uterine carcinomas and containing human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 and HPV type 18 respectively, by studying cell growth, cell morphology, the cell cycle and expression of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor, filaggrin-profilaggrin and MHC class II antigen, HLA-DR. The response of the two cell lines to IFN gamma differed in some cases. In both cell lines, the cells remained viable; cell growth was similarly inhibited as shown by cell counts. Signs of morphological changes were essentially observed in HeLa cells. The cell cycle phases, analyzed by flow cytometry were more disturbed in CaSki than in HeLa cells; the proportion of CaSki cells in S phase increased and those in G2 + M decreased. Expression of EGF receptors related to proliferation increased only in CaSki cells while expression of filaggrin-profilaggrin, a marker of differentiation, and HLA-DR, a marker of epithelial cell immune response, was enhanced in both cell lines. The presence of filaggrin-profilaggrin being unexpected in these cells, the specificity of the reaction with the monoclonal antibody AKH1 was confirmed by immunoblotting. In conclusion, our results show that the two cell lines reacted differently to IFN gamma although they are of similar origin and the different antigens studied may be useful to predict the progression of lesions infected with HPV towards malignancy or the reactivity to IFN gamma of such lesions. However, enhanced synthesis of EGF receptors is probably independent of the antiproliferative effect of IFN gamma but an increase in HLA-DR antigen expression by epithelial cells, which corresponds to an immune response favored by IFN gamma, could act synergistically with cell growth inhibition and differentiation to exclude tumoral and/or HPV-infected cells.

  10. Fuel cell with internal flow control

    DOEpatents

    Haltiner, Jr., Karl J.; Venkiteswaran, Arun [Karnataka, IN

    2012-06-12

    A fuel cell stack is provided with a plurality of fuel cell cassettes where each fuel cell cassette has a fuel cell with an anode and cathode. The fuel cell stack includes an anode supply chimney for supplying fuel to the anode of each fuel cell cassette, an anode return chimney for removing anode exhaust from the anode of each fuel cell cassette, a cathode supply chimney for supplying oxidant to the cathode of each fuel cell cassette, and a cathode return chimney for removing cathode exhaust from the cathode of each fuel cell cassette. A first fuel cell cassette includes a flow control member disposed between the anode supply chimney and the anode return chimney or between the cathode supply chimney and the cathode return chimney such that the flow control member provides a flow restriction different from at least one other fuel cell cassettes.

  11. Particle-in-cell simulation study of the scaling of asymmetric magnetic reconnection with in-plane flow shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doss, C. E.; Cassak, P. A.; Swisdak, M.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate magnetic reconnection in systems simultaneously containing asymmetric (anti-parallel) magnetic fields, asymmetric plasma densities and temperatures, and arbitrary in-plane bulk flow of plasma in the upstream regions. Such configurations are common in the high-latitudes of Earth's magnetopause and in tokamaks. We investigate the convection speed of the X-line, the scaling of the reconnection rate, and the condition for which the flow suppresses reconnection as a function of upstream flow speeds. We use two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations to capture the mixing of plasma in the outflow regions better than is possible in fluid modeling. We perform simulations with asymmetric magnetic fields, simulations with asymmetric densities, and simulations with magnetopause-like parameters where both are asymmetric. For flow speeds below the predicted cutoff velocity, we find good scaling agreement with the theory presented in Doss et al. [J. Geophys. Res. 120, 7748 (2015)]. Applications to planetary magnetospheres, tokamaks, and the solar wind are discussed.

  12. Particle-in-cell simulation study of the scaling of asymmetric magnetic reconnection with in-plane flow shear

    SciTech Connect

    Doss, C. E.; Cassak, P. A.; Swisdak, M.

    2016-08-15

    We investigate magnetic reconnection in systems simultaneously containing asymmetric (anti-parallel) magnetic fields, asymmetric plasma densities and temperatures, and arbitrary in-plane bulk flow of plasma in the upstream regions. Such configurations are common in the high-latitudes of Earth's magnetopause and in tokamaks. We investigate the convection speed of the X-line, the scaling of the reconnection rate, and the condition for which the flow suppresses reconnection as a function of upstream flow speeds. We use two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations to capture the mixing of plasma in the outflow regions better than is possible in fluid modeling. We perform simulations with asymmetric magnetic fields, simulations with asymmetric densities, and simulations with magnetopause-like parameters where both are asymmetric. For flow speeds below the predicted cutoff velocity, we find good scaling agreement with the theory presented in Doss et al. [J. Geophys. Res. 120, 7748 (2015)]. Applications to planetary magnetospheres, tokamaks, and the solar wind are discussed.

  13. Cell-surface changes in cadmium-resistant Euglena: Studies using lectin-binding techniques and flow cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bonaly, J.; Brochiero, E.

    1994-01-01

    Most in vitro studies on contaminants focus on the short-term effects of pollutants on cells, without regard to long-term effects and the ability of cells or microorganisms to develop a specific resistance to a pollutant. Cadmium is ubiquitous environmental contaminant. This heavy metal enters the aquatic environment mainly through vapor emissions and fallout during smelting operations. Diverse mechanisms of algal resistance to toxic metals are known. Among these, the most general mechanism is the development of metal-binding proteins. In cadmium-resistant unicellular Euglena gracilis Z algae cells, the metal did not appear to be sequestered on soluble metal-binding ligands. Previous experiments have shown that resistance development is related to a diminution of cadmium penetration into cells, implicating cell surface or membrane alteration. This research investigates the mechanisms of development of cadmium resistance in Euglena cells at the cell-surface level. Sugar chains of glycoproteins and glycolipids are a predominant feature of the surface of cells. Moreover, the cell-response to environmental changes is often orchestrated through surface macromolecules such as glycoproteins. In this study, we applied this lectin method to investigate surface carbohydrate expression during and after resistance development. Our interest was twofold: (1) to learn more about the carbohydrate composition of the cell-surface of Euglena; and (2) to determine whether transition from wild cells to Cd-resistant cells changes the expression of cell-surface carbohydrates. 13 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. TV News Flow Studies Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hjarvard, Stig

    1995-01-01

    Compares different theoretical approaches to the study of international news. Finds many comparative studies of the foreign news output of national broadcasters and few studies analyzing the actual flow of television news between actors at the wholesale level and the flow between wholesale and retail level. Suggests a better framework for the…

  15. TV News Flow Studies Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hjarvard, Stig

    1995-01-01

    Compares different theoretical approaches to the study of international news. Finds many comparative studies of the foreign news output of national broadcasters and few studies analyzing the actual flow of television news between actors at the wholesale level and the flow between wholesale and retail level. Suggests a better framework for the…

  16. Blood Cell Interactions and Segregation in Flow

    PubMed Central

    Munn, Lance L.; Dupin, Michael M.

    2009-01-01

    For more than a century, pioneering researchers have been using novel experimental and computational approaches to probe the mysteries of blood flow. Thanks to their efforts, we know that blood cells generally prefer to migrate to the axis of flow, that red and white cells segregate in flow, and that cell deformability and their tendency to reversibly aggregate contribute to the non-Newtonian nature of this unique fluid. All of these properties have beneficial physiological consequences, allowing blood to perform a variety of critical functions. Our current understanding of these unusual flow properties of blood have been made possible by the ingenuity and diligence of a number of researchers, including Harry Goldsmith, who developed novel technologies to visualize and quantify the flow of blood at the level of individual cells. Here we summarize efforts in our lab to continue this tradition and to further our understanding of how blood cells interact with each other and with the blood vessel wall. PMID:18188702

  17. High-speed flow cytometric analysis of nanoparticle targeting to rare leukemic stem cells in peripheral human blood: preliminary in-vitro studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Christy L.; Leary, James F.

    2014-03-01

    Leukemic cancer stem cells are both stem-like and leukemic-like. This complicates their detection as rare circulating tumor cells in peripheral blood of leukemia patients. The leukemic stem cells are also highly resistant to standard chemotherapeutic regimens so new therapeutic strategies need to be designed to kill the leukemic stem cells without killing normal stem cells. In these initial studies we have designed an antibody-targeted and fluorescent (Cy5.5) nanoparticle for targeting these leukemic stem cells and then introducing new strategies for killing them. Multicolor flow cytometric analyses were performed on a BD FACS Aria III. Human leukemic stem cell-like cell line RS4;11 (with putative immunophenotype CD123+/CD24+/CD38-/CD10-/Flt-3-) was used as a model human leukemic stem cell systems and were spiked into normal human peripheral blood cells containing normal blood stem-progenitor cells (immunophenotype CD123-/CD34+/CD38-) and Cy5.5-labeled nanoparticles with targeting molecule anti-CD123 antibody. An irrelevant antibody (CD71) which should not bind to any live leukemic stem cell or normal stem cell (binds erythrocytes) was used as a way of distinguishing between true-positive live and false-positive damaged/dead cells, the latter occurring at much higher frequencies than the very rare (e.g. 0.001 to 0.0001 percent frequency true leukemic stem cells). These studies are designed to measure the targeting sensitivity and specificity of the fluorescent nanoparticles to the putative rare leukemic stem cells with the eventual design to use the nanoparticles to direct killing therapeutic doses to the leukemic stem cells but not to the normal stem-progenitor cells.

  18. Geophysical fluid flow cell experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    The primary purpose of the geophysical flow experiments is to simulate large-scale baroclinic (density-stratified) flows which occur naturally in the atmospheres of rotating planets and stars and to gain insights and obtain answers to crucial questions concerning the large-scale nonlinear mechanics of the global geophysical flows. Those external conditions related to fluid viscosity, rotation, gravity are identified, which allow qualitatively different modes of instability or waves in the model.

  19. Development of a dual cell, flow-injection sample holder, and NMR probe for comparative ligand-binding studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquardsen, Thorsten; Hofmann, Martin; Hollander, Johan G.; Loch, Caroline M. P.; Kiihne, Suzanne R.; Engelke, Frank; Siegal, Gregg

    2006-09-01

    NMR based ligand screening is becoming increasingly important for the very early stages of drug discovery. We have proposed a method that makes highly efficient use of a single sample of a scarce target, or one with poor or limited solubility, to screen an entire compound library. This comparative method is based on immobilizing the target for the screening procedure. In order to support the method, a dual cell, flow injection probe with a single receiver coil has been constructed. The flow injection probe has been mated to a single high performance pump and sample handling system to enable the automated analysis of large numbers of compound mixes for binding to the target. The probe, having an 8 mm 1H/ 2H dual tuned coil and triple axis gradients, is easily shimmed and yields NMR spectra of comparable quality to a standard 5 mm high-resolution probe. The lineshape in the presence of a solid support is identical to that in glass NMR tubes in a 5 mm probe. Control spectra of each cell are identical and well separated, while ligand binding in a complex mixture can be readily detected in 20-30 min, thus paving the way for use of the probe for actual drug discovery efforts.

  20. Recovery, Visualization, and Analysis of Actin and Tubulin Polymer Flow in Live Cells: A Fluorescent Speckle Microscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Vallotton, P.; Ponti, A.; Waterman-Storer, C. M.; Salmon, E. D.; Danuser, G.

    2003-01-01

    Fluorescent speckle microscopy (FSM) is becoming the technique of choice for analyzing in vivo the dynamics of polymer assemblies, such as the cytoskeleton. The massive amount of data produced by this method calls for computational approaches to recover the quantities of interest; namely, the polymerization and depolymerization activities and the motions undergone by the cytoskeleton over time. Attempts toward this goal have been hampered by the limited signal-to-noise ratio of typical FSM data, by the constant appearance and disappearance of speckles due to polymer turnover, and by the presence of flow singularities characteristic of many cytoskeletal polymer assemblies. To deal with these problems, we present a particle-based method for tracking fluorescent speckles in time-lapse FSM image series, based on ideas from operational research and graph theory. Our software delivers the displacements of thousands of speckles between consecutive frames, taking into account that speckles may appear and disappear. In this article we exploit this information to recover the speckle flow field. First, the software is tested on synthetic data to validate our methods. We then apply it to mapping filamentous actin retrograde flow at the front edge of migrating newt lung epithelial cells. Our results confirm findings from previously published kymograph analyses and manual tracking of such FSM data and illustrate the power of automated tracking for generating complete and quantitative flow measurements. Third, we analyze microtubule poleward flux in mitotic metaphase spindles assembled in Xenopus egg extracts, bringing new insight into the dynamics of microtubule assemblies in this system. PMID:12885672

  1. Receptor-mediated cell attachment and detachment kinetics. II. Experimental model studies with the radial-flow detachment assay.

    PubMed Central

    Cozens-Roberts, C; Quinn, J A; Lauffenburger, D A

    1990-01-01

    Quantitative information regarding the kinetics of receptor-mediated cell adhesion to a ligand-coated surface are crucial for understanding the role of certain key parameters in many physiological and biotechnology-related processes. Here, we use the probabilistic attachment and detachment models developed in the preceding paper to interpret transient data from well-defined experiments. These data are obtained with a simple model cell system that consists of receptor-coated latex beads (prototype cells) and a Radial-Flow Detachment Assay (RFDA) using a ligand-coated glass disc. The receptors and ligands used in this work are complementary antibodies. The beads enable us to examine transient behavior with particles that possess fairly uniform properties that can be varied systematically, and the RFDA is designed for direct observation of adhesion to the ligand-coated glass surface over a range of shear stresses. Our experiments focus on the effects of surface shear stress, receptor density, and ligand density. These data provide a crucial test of the probabilistic framework. We show that these data can be explained with the probabilistic analyses, whereas they cannot be readily interpreted on the basis of a deterministic analysis. In addition, we examine transient data on cell adhesion reported from other assays, demonstrating the consistency of these data with the predictions of the probabilistic models. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:2174272

  2. Traction Forces of Endothelial Cells under Slow Shear Flow

    PubMed Central

    Perrault, Cecile M.; Brugues, Agusti; Bazellieres, Elsa; Ricco, Pierre; Lacroix, Damien; Trepat, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cells are constantly exposed to fluid shear stresses that regulate vascular morphogenesis, homeostasis, and disease. The mechanical responses of endothelial cells to relatively high shear flow such as that characteristic of arterial circulation has been extensively studied. Much less is known about the responses of endothelial cells to slow shear flow such as that characteristic of venous circulation, early angiogenesis, atherosclerosis, intracranial aneurysm, or interstitial flow. Here we used a novel, to our knowledge, microfluidic technique to measure traction forces exerted by confluent vascular endothelial cell monolayers under slow shear flow. We found that cells respond to flow with rapid and pronounced increases in traction forces and cell-cell stresses. These responses are reversible in time and do not involve reorientation of the cell body. Traction maps reveal that local cell responses to slow shear flow are highly heterogeneous in magnitude and sign. Our findings unveil a low-flow regime in which endothelial cell mechanics is acutely responsive to shear stress. PMID:26488643

  3. Study of flow behavior in all-vanadium redox flow battery using spatially resolved voltage distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattarai, Arjun; Wai, Nyunt; Schweiss, Rüdiger; Whitehead, Adam; Scherer, Günther G.; Ghimire, Purna C.; Nguyen, Tam D.; Hng, Huey Hoon

    2017-08-01

    Uniform flow distribution through the porous electrodes in a flow battery cell is very important for reducing Ohmic and mass transport polarization. A segmented cell approach can be used to obtain in-situ information on flow behaviour, through the local voltage or current mapping. Lateral flow of current within the thick felts in the flow battery can hamper the interpretation of the data. In this study, a new method of segmenting a conventional flow cell is introduced, which for the first time, splits up both the porous felt as well as the current collector. This dual segmentation results in higher resolution and distinct separation of voltages between flow inlet to outlet. To study the flow behavior for an undivided felt, monitoring the OCV is found to be a reliable method, instead of voltage or current mapping during charging and discharging. Our approach to segmentation is simple and applicable to any size of the cell.

  4. A multi-component parallel-plate flow chamber system for studying the effect of exercise-induced wall shear stress on endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Xia; Xiang, Cheng; Liu, Bo; Zhu, Yong; Luan, Yong; Liu, Shu-Tian; Qin, Kai-Rong

    2016-12-28

    In vivo studies have demonstrated that reasonable exercise training can improve endothelial function. To confirm the key role of wall shear stress induced by exercise on endothelial cells, and to understand how wall shear stress affects the structure and the function of endothelial cells, it is crucial to design and fabricate an in vitro multi-component parallel-plate flow chamber system which can closely replicate exercise-induced wall shear stress waveforms in artery. The in vivo wall shear stress waveforms from the common carotid artery of a healthy volunteer in resting and immediately after 30 min acute aerobic cycling exercise were first calculated by measuring the inner diameter and the center-line blood flow velocity with a color Doppler ultrasound. According to the above in vivo wall shear stress waveforms, we designed and fabricated a parallel-plate flow chamber system with appropriate components based on a lumped parameter hemodynamics model. To validate the feasibility of this system, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) line were cultured within the parallel-plate flow chamber under abovementioned two types of wall shear stress waveforms and the intracellular actin microfilaments and nitric oxide (NO) production level were evaluated using fluorescence microscope. Our results show that the trends of resting and exercise-induced wall shear stress waveforms, especially the maximal, minimal and mean wall shear stress as well as oscillatory shear index, generated by the parallel-plate flow chamber system are similar to those acquired from the common carotid artery. In addition, the cellular experiments demonstrate that the actin microfilaments and the production of NO within cells exposed to the two different wall shear stress waveforms exhibit different dynamic behaviors; there are larger numbers of actin microfilaments and higher level NO in cells exposed in exercise-induced wall shear stress condition than resting wall shear stress condition

  5. Flow and Diffusion in Channel-Guided Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Marel, Anna-Kristina; Zorn, Matthias; Klingner, Christoph; Wedlich-Söldner, Roland; Frey, Erwin; Rädler, Joachim O.

    2014-01-01

    Collective migration of mechanically coupled cell layers is a notable feature of wound healing, embryonic development, and cancer progression. In confluent epithelial sheets, the dynamics have been found to be highly heterogeneous, exhibiting spontaneous formation of swirls, long-range correlations, and glass-like dynamic arrest as a function of cell density. In contrast, the flow-like properties of one-sided cell-sheet expansion in confining geometries are not well understood. Here, we studied the short- and long-term flow of Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells as they moved through microchannels. Using single-cell tracking and particle image velocimetry (PIV), we found that a defined averaged stationary cell current emerged that exhibited a velocity gradient in the direction of migration and a plug-flow-like profile across the advancing sheet. The observed flow velocity can be decomposed into a constant term of directed cell migration and a diffusion-like contribution that increases with density gradient. The diffusive component is consistent with the cell-density profile and front propagation speed predicted by the Fisher-Kolmogorov equation. To connect diffusion-mediated transport to underlying cellular motility, we studied single-cell trajectories and occurrence of vorticity. We discovered that the directed large-scale cell flow altered fluctuations in cellular motion at short length scales: vorticity maps showed a reduced frequency of swirl formation in channel flow compared with resting sheets of equal cell density. Furthermore, under flow, single-cell trajectories showed persistent long-range, random-walk behavior superimposed on drift, whereas cells in resting tissue did not show significant displacements with respect to neighboring cells. Our work thus suggests that active cell migration manifests itself in an underlying, spatially uniform drift as well as in randomized bursts of short-range correlated motion that lead to a diffusion-mediated transport

  6. Flow cytometric minimal residual disease monitoring in patients with multiple myeloma undergoing autologous stem cell transplantation: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Yuan, Constance; Heinerich, Jeremy; Braylan, Raul; Chang, Myron; Wingard, John; Moreb, Jan

    2008-02-01

    We retrospectively reviewed the flow cytometry (FCM) data from bone marrow aspirates of multiple myeloma (MM) patients before and after autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). Light scatter properties and CD38 expression were used to identify plasma cells, and CD19/CD45/CD56 further distinguished normal from abnormal plasma cells (NPC and APC, respectively), the latter defined as plasma cells with aberrant CD56, decreased or absent CD19 and/or CD45 expression. Forty-seven patients were screened. After ASCT, 66% (31/47) patients achieved complete remission (CR)/very good partial remission (VGPR), as compared to only 40% (19/47) prior to ASCT (P = 0.01). In 39 patients with data before and after ASCT, all 39 (100%) had a detectable APC population prior to ASCT. Twenty-six out of 39 patients (67%) also had detectable NPC. Following ASCT, the number of patients with detectable NPC increased to 35/39 (89%), while 3/39 (8%) had no detectable NPC and 1/39 (3%) had neither NPC nor APC. The proportion of APC decreased significantly after transplant from a median of 79% to 52% post-transplant (P < 0.001). The APC/total events ratio decreased significantly (P < 0.0001) after transplant. Prior to transplant, patients with less than 1.8% APC had significantly longer progression free survival (PFS) than patients with greater than 1.8% (P = 0.017, by log rank test), while the difference in overall survival did not achieve statistical significance (P = 0.081). Patients who achieved CR/VGPR after transplant had significantly longer PFS in comparison to all others (26 months vs. 11 months, P = 0.004). In conclusion, the detection of a significant population of APC by FCM prior to ASCT significantly correlates with poorer PFS in MM patients.

  7. Overhead Projection Cell for Streamline Flow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waage, Harold M.

    1969-01-01

    Describes the construction and operation of an overhead projection apparatus designed to demonstrate streamline flow of a liquid. The apparatus consists of a Plexiglass tank containing water in which plates forming the cell are submerged, a constant level reservoir, an overflow device and a system for marking the flow lines with a dye. (LC)

  8. Red blood cell tracking using optical flow methods.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dongmin; van de Ven, Anne L; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2014-05-01

    The investigation of microcirculation is an important task in biomedical and physiological research because the microcirculation information, such as flow velocity and vessel density, is critical to monitor human conditions and develop effective therapies of some diseases. As one of the tasks of the microcirculation study, red blood cell (RBC) tracking presents an effective approach to estimate some parameters in microcirculation. The common method for RBC tracking is based on spatiotemporal image analysis, which requires the image to have high qualification and cells should have fixed velocity. Besides, for in vivo cell tracking, cells may disappear in some frames, image series may have spatial and temporal distortions, and vessel distribution can be complex, which increase the difficulties of RBC tracking. In this paper, we propose an optical flow method to track RBCs. It attempts to describe the local motion for each visible point in the frames using a local displacement vector field. We utilize it to calculate the displacement of a cell in two adjacent frames. Additionally, another optical flow-based method, scale invariant feature transform (SIFT) flow, is also presented. The experimental results show that optical flow is quite robust to the case where the velocity of cell is unstable, while SIFT flow works well when there is a large displacement of the cell between two adjacent frames. Our proposed methods outperform other methods when doing in vivo cell tracking, which can be used to estimate the blood flow directly and help to evaluate other parameters in microcirculation.

  9. Experimental Studies of Coaxial Jet Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrouzi, Parviz; McGuirk, James J.

    An experimental study was carried out to investigate the effect of coaxial nozzle operating conditions on near-field jet plume development. The study was conducted in a low speed water tunnel as well as in a high-speed airflow nozzle test facility. Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA) and Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) techniques were employed to identify the flow structure as well as the mean velocity and turbulence structure of a coaxial nozzle under low speed flow conditions. Schlieren flow visualization, LDA and nozzle wall static pressure measurement surveys were performed in high speed flows. The effect of a nozzle shroud on jet development was studied and found very effective on suppression of the shock cells and on reduction of turbulence levels within the core region. The effect of the outer and inner Nozzle Pressure Ratios on shock cell structure and the nozzle internal wall pressure field were documented. LDA measurements in the water tunnel confirmed that the flow pattern produced of the Reynolds numbers and velocity ratios selected for this study was typical of practically occurring developing jet flow fields. Sufficient measured profiles of velocities, turbulence quantities and nozzle wall static pressures as well as jet plume images have been captured to serve as benchmark validation data for time-averaged turbulence-model-based RANS CFD predictions.

  10. Bistability of cell adhesion in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Efremov, Artem; Cao, Jianshu

    2011-09-07

    Cell adhesion plays a central role in multicellular organisms helping to maintain their integrity and homeostasis. This complex process involves many different types of adhesion proteins, and synergetic behavior of these proteins during cell adhesion is frequently observed in experiments. A well-known example is the cooperation of rolling and stationary adhesion proteins during the leukocytes extravasation. Despite the fact that such cooperation is vital for proper functioning of the immune system, its origin is not fully understood. In this study we constructed a simple analytic model of the interaction between a leukocyte and the blood vessel wall in shear flow. The model predicts existence of cell adhesion bistability, which results from a tug-of-war between two kinetic processes taking place in the cell-wall contact area-bond formation and rupture. Based on the model results, we suggest an interpretation of several cytoadhesion experiments and propose a simple explanation of the existing synergy between rolling and stationary adhesion proteins, which is vital for effective cell adherence to the blood vessel walls in living organisms.

  11. Viscoplastic flow in a Hele-Shaw cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balmforth, Neil; Hewitt, Duncan

    2015-11-01

    A theoretical study is presented of the flow of viscoplastic fluid through a Hele-Shaw cell that contains various kinds of obstructions. Circular and elliptical blockages of the cell are considered together with step-wise contractions or expansions in slot width, all within the simplifying approximation of a narrow gap. Specific attention is paid to the flow patterns that develop around the obstacles, particularly any stagnant plugged regions, and the asymptotic limits of relatively small or large yield stress. Periodic arrays of circular contractions or expansions are studied to explore the interference between obstructions. Finally, viscoplastic flow through a cell with randomly roughened walls is examined, and it is shown that constructive interferences of local contractions and expansions leads to a pronounced channelization of the flow. An optimization algorithm based on minimisation of the pressure drop is derived to construct the path of the channels in the limit of relatively large yield stress or, equivalently, relatively slow flow.

  12. Fluid flow in monolayers: Cells under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, Kyle; Zehnder, Steven; Sawyer, Greg; Angelini, Thomas

    Number density fluctuations are intimately tied to collective behavior in particulate soft matter and active matter systems, including tissue cell monolayers. In cell monolayers, there is no free space between cells, so density fluctuations must involve either out of plane motion, or cell volume fluctuations. Recent work has shown that cells fluctuate in volume to accommodate collective density fluctuations, and that fluid moves between cells in this process. However, measurements of the resistance to this flow with controlled applied pressures have never been performed. Here we apply pressure to local regions in cell monolayers with an indentation instrument mounted on an inverted microscope. While simultaneously measuring contact area, indentation depth, and applied force as a function of time we determine a compression modulus and a permeability of cells. We find that cells are highly permeable, and that cytoskeleton-generated stresses are large enough to drive fluid from cell to cell as they spontaneously fluctuate in volume.

  13. Gas-Particle Interactions in a Microgravity Flow Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Louge, Michel; Jenkins, James

    1999-01-01

    We are developing a microgravity flow cell in which to study the interaction of a flowing gas with relatively massive particles that collide with each other and with the moving boundaries of the cell. The absence of gravity makes possible the independent control of the relative motion of the boundaries and the flow of the gas. The cell will permit gas-particle interactions to be studied over the entire range of flow conditions over which the mixture is not turbulent. Within this range, we shall characterize the viscous dissipation of the energy of the particle fluctuations, measure the influence of particle-phase viscosity on the pressure drop along the cell, and observe the development of localized inhomogeneities that are likely to be associated with the onset of clusters. These measurements and observations should contribute to an understanding of the essential physics of pneumatic transport.

  14. Chaotic dynamics of red blood cells in oscillating shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, Prosenjit; Cordasco, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    A 3D computational study of deformable red blood cells in dilute suspension and subject to sinusoidally oscillating shear flow is considered. It is observed that the cell exhibits either a periodic motion or a chaotic motion. In the periodic motion, the cell reverses its orientation either about the flow direction or about the flow gradient, depending on the initial conditions. In certain parameter range, the initial conditions are forgotten and the cells become entrained in the same sequence of horizontal reversals. The chaotic dynamics is characterized by a nonperiodic sequence of horizontal and vertical reversals, and swings. The study provides the first conclusive evidence of the chaotic dynamics of fully deformable cells in oscillating flow using a deterministic numerical model without the introduction of any stochastic noise. An analysis of the chaotic dynamics shows that chaos is only possible in certain frequency bands when the cell membrane can rotate by a certain amount allowing the cells to swing near the maximum shear rate. We make a novel observation that the occurrence of the vertical or horizontal reversal depends only on whether a critical angle, that is independent of the flow frequency, is exceeded at the instant of flow reversal.

  15. Microfluidic flow cell for sequential digestion of immobilized proteoliposomes.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Erik T; Trkulja, Carolina L; Olofsson, Jessica; Millingen, Maria; Wikström, Jennie; Jesorka, Aldo; Karlsson, Anders; Karlsson, Roger; Davidson, Max; Orwar, Owe

    2012-07-03

    We have developed a microfluidic flow cell where stepwise enzymatic digestion is performed on immobilized proteoliposomes and the resulting cleaved peptides are analyzed with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The flow cell channels consist of two parallel gold surfaces mounted face to face with a thin spacer and feature an inlet and an outlet port. Proteoliposomes (50-150 nm in diameter) obtained from red blood cells (RBC), or Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, were immobilized on the inside of the flow cell channel, thus forming a stationary phase of proteoliposomes. The rate of proteoliposome immobilization was determined using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) which showed that 95% of the proteoliposomes bind within 5 min. The flow cell was found to bind a maximum of 1 μg proteoliposomes/cm(2), and a minimum proteoliposome concentration required for saturation of the flow cell was determined to be 500 μg/mL. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies showed an even distribution of immobilized proteoliposomes on the surface. The liquid encapsulated between the surfaces has a large surface-to-volume ratio, providing rapid material transfer rates between the liquid phase and the stationary phase. We characterized the hydrodynamic properties of the flow cell, and the force acting on the proteoliposomes during flow cell operation was estimated to be in the range of 0.1-1 pN, too small to cause any proteoliposome deformation or rupture. A sequential proteolytic protocol, repeatedly exposing proteoliposomes to a digestive enzyme, trypsin, was developed and compared with a single-digest protocol. The sequential protocol was found to detect ~65% more unique membrane-associated protein (p < 0.001, n = 6) based on peptide analysis with LC-MS/MS, compared to a single-digest protocol. Thus, the flow cell described herein is a suitable tool for shotgun proteomics on proteoliposomes, enabling more detailed characterization

  16. Electrically rechargeable REDOX flow cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaller, L. H. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A bulk energy storage system is designed with an electrically rechargeable reduction-oxidation (REDOX) cell divided into two compartments by a membrane, each compartment containing an electrode. An anode fluid is directed through the first compartment at the same time that a cathode fluid is directed through the second compartment. Means are provided for circulating the anode and cathode fluids, and the electrodes are connected to an intermittent or non-continuous electrical source, which when operating, supplies current to a load as well as to the cell to recharge it. Ancillary circuitry is provided for disconnecting the intermittent source from the cell at prescribed times and for circulating the anode and cathode fluids according to desired parameters and conditions.

  17. Partitioning of red blood cell aggregates in bifurcating microscale flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaliviotis, E.; Sherwood, J. M.; Balabani, S.

    2017-03-01

    Microvascular flows are often considered to be free of red blood cell aggregates, however, recent studies have demonstrated that aggregates are present throughout the microvasculature, affecting cell distribution and blood perfusion. This work reports on the spatial distribution of red blood cell aggregates in a T-shaped bifurcation on the scale of a large microvessel. Non-aggregating and aggregating human red blood cell suspensions were studied for a range of flow splits in the daughter branches of the bifurcation. Aggregate sizes were determined using image processing. The mean aggregate size was marginally increased in the daughter branches for a range of flow rates, mainly due to the lower shear conditions and the close cell and aggregate proximity therein. A counterintuitive decrease in the mean aggregate size was apparent in the lower flow rate branches. This was attributed to the existence of regions depleted by aggregates of certain sizes in the parent branch, and to the change in the exact flow split location in the T-junction with flow ratio. The findings of the present investigation may have significant implications for microvascular flows and may help explain why the effects of physiological RBC aggregation are not deleterious in terms of in vivo vascular resistance.

  18. Partitioning of red blood cell aggregates in bifurcating microscale flows

    PubMed Central

    Kaliviotis, E.; Sherwood, J. M.; Balabani, S.

    2017-01-01

    Microvascular flows are often considered to be free of red blood cell aggregates, however, recent studies have demonstrated that aggregates are present throughout the microvasculature, affecting cell distribution and blood perfusion. This work reports on the spatial distribution of red blood cell aggregates in a T-shaped bifurcation on the scale of a large microvessel. Non-aggregating and aggregating human red blood cell suspensions were studied for a range of flow splits in the daughter branches of the bifurcation. Aggregate sizes were determined using image processing. The mean aggregate size was marginally increased in the daughter branches for a range of flow rates, mainly due to the lower shear conditions and the close cell and aggregate proximity therein. A counterintuitive decrease in the mean aggregate size was apparent in the lower flow rate branches. This was attributed to the existence of regions depleted by aggregates of certain sizes in the parent branch, and to the change in the exact flow split location in the T-junction with flow ratio. The findings of the present investigation may have significant implications for microvascular flows and may help explain why the effects of physiological RBC aggregation are not deleterious in terms of in vivo vascular resistance. PMID:28303921

  19. Flow cytometric immunofluorescence of rat anterior pituitary cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatfield, J. Michael; Hymer, W. C.

    1985-01-01

    A flow cytometric immunofluorescence technique was developed for the quantification of growth hormone, prolactin, and luteinizing hormone producing cells. The procedure is based on indirect-immunofluorescence of intracellular hormone using an EPICS V cell sorter and can objectively count 50,000 cells in about 3 minutes. It can be used to study the dynamics of pituitary cell populations under various physiological and pharmacological conditions.

  20. Flow cytometric immunofluorescence of rat anterior pituitary cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatfield, J. Michael; Hymer, W. C.

    1985-01-01

    A flow cytometric immunofluorescence technique was developed for the quantification of growth hormone, prolactin, and luteinizing hormone producing cells. The procedure is based on indirect-immunofluorescence of intracellular hormone using an EPICS V cell sorter and can objectively count 50,000 cells in about 3 minutes. It can be used to study the dynamics of pituitary cell populations under various physiological and pharmacological conditions.

  1. Numerical study of a flat-tube high power density solid oxide fuel cell. Part I. Heat/mass transfer and fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yixin; Schaefer, Laura; Li, Peiwen

    The flat-tube high power density (HPD) solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is a new design developed by Siemens Westinghouse, based on their formerly developed tubular type SOFC. It has increased power density, but still maintains the beneficial feature of secure sealing of a tubular SOFC. In this paper, a three-dimensional numerical model to simulate the steady state heat/mass transfer and fluid flow of a flat-tube HPD-SOFC is developed. In the numerical computation, governing equations for continuity, momentum, mass, and energy conservation are solved simultaneously. The highly coupled temperature, concentration and flow fields of the air stream and the fuel stream inside and outside the different chambers of a flat-tube HPD-SOFC are investigated. The variation of the temperature, concentration and flow fields with the current output is studied. The heat/mass transfer and fluid flow modeling and results will be used to simulate the overall performance of a flat-tube HPD-SOFC, and to help optimize the design and operation of a SOFC stack in practical applications.

  2. Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor Induces Genes Associated with Inflammation and Gliosis in the Retina: A Gene Profiling Study of Flow-Sorted, Müller Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dudley, V. Joseph; Brooks, Matthew; Swaroop, Anand; Sarthy, Vijay P.

    2011-01-01

    Background Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), a member of the interleukin-6 cytokine family, has been implicated in the development, differentiation and survival of retinal neurons. The mechanisms of CNTF action as well as its cellular targets in the retina are poorly understood. It has been postulated that some of the biological effects of CNTF are mediated through its action via retinal glial cells; however, molecular changes in retinal glia induced by CNTF have not been elucidated. We have, therefore, examined gene expression dynamics of purified Müller (glial) cells exposed to CNTF in vivo. Methodology/Principal Findings Müller cells were flow-sorted from mgfap-egfp transgenic mice one or three days after intravitreal injection of CNTF. Microarray analysis using RNA from purified Müller cells showed differential expression of almost 1,000 transcripts with two- to seventeen-fold change in response to CNTF. A comparison of transcriptional profiles from Müller cells at one or three days after CNTF treatment showed an increase in the number of transcribed genes as well as a change in the expression pattern. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis showed that the differentially regulated genes belong to distinct functional types such as cytokines, growth factors, G-protein coupled receptors, transporters and ion channels. Interestingly, many genes induced by CNTF were also highly expressed in reactive Müller cells from mice with inherited or experimentally induced retinal degeneration. Further analysis of gene profiles revealed 20–30% overlap in the transcription pattern among Müller cells, astrocytes and the RPE. Conclusions/Significance Our studies provide novel molecular insights into biological functions of Müller glial cells in mediating cytokine response. We suggest that CNTF remodels the gene expression profile of Müller cells leading to induction of networks associated with transcription, cell cycle regulation and inflammatory response. CNTF also appears to

  3. Immobilized cell cross-flow reactor. [Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Chotani, G.K.; Constantinides, A.

    1984-01-01

    A cross-current flow reactor was operated using sodium alginate gel entrapped yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) under growth conditions. Micron-sized silica, incorporated into the biocatalyst particles (1 mm mean diameter) improved mechanical strength and internal surface adhesion. The process showed decreased productivity and stability at 35/sup 0/C compared to the normal study done at 30/sup 0/C. The increased number of cross flows diminish the product inhibition effect. The residence time distribution shows that the cross-flow bioreactor system can be approximated to either a train of backmixed fermentors in series or a plug flow fermentor with moderate axial dispersion.

  4. Flow of Red Blood Cells in Stenosed Microvessels

    PubMed Central

    Vahidkhah, Koohyar; Balogh, Peter; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2016-01-01

    A computational study is presented on the flow of deformable red blood cells in stenosed microvessels. It is observed that the Fahraeus-Lindqvist effect is significantly enhanced due to the presence of a stenosis. The apparent viscosity of blood is observed to increase by several folds when compared to non-stenosed vessels. An asymmetric distribution of the red blood cells, caused by geometric focusing in stenosed vessels, is observed to play a major role in the enhancement. The asymmetry in cell distribution also results in an asymmetry in average velocity and wall shear stress along the length of the stenosis. The discrete motion of the cells causes large time-dependent fluctuations in flow properties. The root-mean-square of flow rate fluctuations could be an order of magnitude higher than that in non-stenosed vessels. Several folds increase in Eulerian velocity fluctuation is also observed in the vicinity of the stenosis. Surprisingly, a transient flow reversal is observed upstream a stenosis but not downstream. The asymmetry and fluctuations in flow quantities and the flow reversal would not occur in absence of the cells. It is concluded that the flow physics and its physiological consequences are significantly different in micro- versus macrovascular stenosis. PMID:27319318

  5. Flow of Red Blood Cells in Stenosed Microvessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahidkhah, Koohyar; Balogh, Peter; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2016-06-01

    A computational study is presented on the flow of deformable red blood cells in stenosed microvessels. It is observed that the Fahraeus-Lindqvist effect is significantly enhanced due to the presence of a stenosis. The apparent viscosity of blood is observed to increase by several folds when compared to non-stenosed vessels. An asymmetric distribution of the red blood cells, caused by geometric focusing in stenosed vessels, is observed to play a major role in the enhancement. The asymmetry in cell distribution also results in an asymmetry in average velocity and wall shear stress along the length of the stenosis. The discrete motion of the cells causes large time-dependent fluctuations in flow properties. The root-mean-square of flow rate fluctuations could be an order of magnitude higher than that in non-stenosed vessels. Several folds increase in Eulerian velocity fluctuation is also observed in the vicinity of the stenosis. Surprisingly, a transient flow reversal is observed upstream a stenosis but not downstream. The asymmetry and fluctuations in flow quantities and the flow reversal would not occur in absence of the cells. It is concluded that the flow physics and its physiological consequences are significantly different in micro- versus macrovascular stenosis.

  6. Visualization study of flow in axial flow inducer.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakshminarayana, B.

    1972-01-01

    A visualization study of the flow through a three ft dia model of a four bladed inducer, which is operated in air at a flow coefficient of 0.065, is reported in this paper. The flow near the blade surfaces, inside the rotating passages, downstream and upstream of the inducer is visualized by means of smoke, tufts, ammonia filament, and lampblack techniques. Flow is found to be highly three dimensional, with appreciable radial velocity throughout the entire passage. The secondary flows observed near the hub and annulus walls agree with qualitative predictions obtained from the inviscid secondary flow theory.

  7. Theoretical and Experimental Flow Cell Studies of a Hydrogen-Bromine Fuel Cell, Part 1. M.S. Thesis. Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savinell, R. F.; Fritts, S. D.

    1986-01-01

    There is increasing interest in hydrogen-bromine fuel cells as both primary and regenerative energy storage systems. One promising design for a hydrogen-bromine fuel cell is a negative half cell having only a gas phase, which is separated by a cationic exchange membrane from a positive half cell having an aqueous electrolyte. The hydrogen gas and the aqueous bromide solution are stored external to the cell. In order to calculate the energy storage capacity and to predict and assess the performance of a single cell, the open circuit potential (OCV) must be estimated for different states of change, under various conditions. Theoretical expressions were derived to estimate the OCV of a hydrogen-bromine fuel cell. In these expressions temperature, hydrogen pressure, and bromine and hydrobromic acid concentrations were taken into consideration. Also included are the effects of the Nafion membrance separator and the various bromide complex species. Activity coefficients were taken into account in one of the expressions. The sensitivity of these parameters on the calculated OCV was studied.

  8. Measuring sickle cell morphology in flow using spectrally encoded flow cytometry (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kviatkovsky, Inna; Zeidan, Adel; Yeheskely-Hayon, Daniella; Dann, Eldad J.; Yelin, Dvir

    2017-02-01

    During a sickle cell crisis in sickle cell anemia patients, deoxygenated red blood cells may change their mechanical properties and block small blood vessels, causing pain, local tissue damage and even organ failure. Measuring these cellular structural and morphological changes is important for understanding the factors contributing to vessel blockage and developing an effective treatment. In this work, we use spectrally encoded flow cytometry for confocal, high-resolution imaging of flowing blood cells from sickle cell anemia patients. A wide variety of cell morphologies were observed by analyzing the interference patterns resulting from reflections from the front and back faces of the cells' membrane. Using numerical simulation for calculating the two-dimensional reflection pattern from the cells, we propose an analytical expression for the three-dimensional shape of a characteristic sickle cell and compare it to a previous from the literature. In vitro spectrally encoded flow cytometry offers new means for analyzing the morphology of sickle cells in stress-free environment, and could provide an effective tool for studying the unique physiological properties of these cells.

  9. Towards optical cell transfection inside a micro flow cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breunig, H. G.; Uchugonova, A.; König, K.

    2014-03-01

    For optical transfection, cells are shortly subjected to intense, focused laser radiation which leads to a temporary opening in the cell membrane. Although the method is very efficient and ensures high cell viability, the targeting of single cells with laser pulses is a tedious and slow approach. We present first measurements aiming at an experimental setup which is suitable for high throughput and automated optical cell transfection. In our setup, cells flow through a micro flow cell where they are spatially confined. The laser radiation is focused into the cell in a way that an elongated focal region is realized. This makes the time consuming aiming of the laser beam at individual cells unnecessary and opens the possibility to develop a completely automated system. The elongated laser focal region is realized by a quasi-Bessel beam which is generated by an axicon lens setup and continuously scanned from side to side of the cell. We present test measurements of the newly employed setup and discuss its suitability to be fully integrated into a flow cell sequencing system.

  10. Microtopography and flow modulate the direction of endothelial cell migration.

    PubMed

    Uttayarat, P; Chen, M; Li, M; Allen, F D; Composto, R J; Lelkes, P I

    2008-02-01

    The migration of vascular endothelial cells under flow can be modulated by the addition of chemical or mechanical stimuli. The aim of this study was to investigate how topographic cues derived from a substrate containing three-dimensional microtopography interact with fluid shear stress in directing endothelial cell migration. Subconfluent bovine aortic endothelial cells were seeded on fibronectin-coated poly(dimethylsiloxane) substrates patterned with a combinatorial array of parallel and orthogonal microgrooves ranging from 2 to 5 microm in width at a constant depth of 1 microm. During a 4-h time-lapse observation in the absence of flow, the majority of the prealigned cells migrated parallel to the grooves with the distribution of their focal adhesions (FAs) depending on the groove width. No change in this migratory pattern was observed after the cells were exposed to moderate shear stress (13.5 dyn/cm(2)), irrespective of groove direction with respect to flow. After 4-h exposure to high shear stress (58 dyn/cm(2)) parallel to the grooves, the cells continued to migrate in the direction of both grooves and flow. By contrast, when microgrooves were oriented perpendicular to flow, most cells migrated orthogonal to the grooves and downstream with flow. Despite the change in the migration direction of the cells under high shear stress, most FAs and actin microfilaments maintained their original alignment parallel to the grooves, suggesting that topographic cues were more effective than those derived from shear stress in guiding the orientation of cytoskeletal and adhesion proteins during the initial exposure to flow.

  11. Debris flow study in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrin Jaafar, Kamal

    2016-04-01

    The phenomenon of debris flow occurs in Malaysia occasionally. The topography of Peningsular Malysia is characterized by the central mountain ranges running from south to north. Several parts of hilly areas with steep slopes, combined with high saturation of soil strata that deliberately increase the pore water pressure underneath the hill slope. As a tropical country Malaysia has very high intensity rainfall which is triggered the landslide. In the study area where the debris flow are bound to occur, there are a few factors that contribute to this phenomenon such as high rainfall intensity, very steep slope which an inclination more than 35 degree and sandy clay soil type which is easily change to liquidity soil. This paper will discuss the study of rainfall, mechanism, modeling and design of mitigation measure to avoid repeated failure in future in same area.

  12. Pulsatile Flow Studies in Atherosclerotic Carotid Bifurcations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bale-Glickman, Jocelyn; Selby, Kathy; Saloner, David; Savas, Omer

    2001-11-01

    Particle image velocimetry and flow visualization techniques are used to study flows in models of atherosclerotic carotid bifurcations. The flow models exactly replicate the interior geometry of plaque excised from patients. The input flows are physiological wave forms derived from Doppler Ultrasound scans done on patients before surgery. The systolic and diastolic Reynolds numbers are 300 and 900. The complex internal geometry of the diseased artery combined with the pulsatile input flow results in exceedingly complex flow patterns. These flow patterns include internal jets, three-dimensional shear layers, stagnation lines, and multiple recirculation and separation regions. The physiological input flows are compared to flows when the wave form is sinusoidal.

  13. Artificial Hair Cells for Sensing Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Jack

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present additional information about the flow-velocity sensors described briefly in the immediately preceding article. As noted therein, these sensors can be characterized as artificial hair cells that implement an approximation of the sensory principle of flow-sensing cilia of fish: A cilium is bent by an amount proportional to the flow to which it is exposed. A nerve cell at the base of the cilium senses the flow by sensing the bending of the cilium. In an artificial hair cell, the artificial cilium is a microscopic cantilever beam, and the bending of an artificial cilium is measured by means of a strain gauge at its base (see Figure 1). Figure 2 presents cross sections of a representative sensor of this type at two different stages of its fabrication process. The process consists of relatively- low-temperature metallization, polymer-deposition, microfabrication, and surface-micromachining subprocesses, including plastic-deformation magnetic assembly (PDMA), which is described below. These subprocesses are suitable for a variety of substrate materials, including silicon, some glasses, and some polymers. Moreover, because it incorporates a polymeric supporting structure, this sensor is more robust, relative to its silicon-based counterparts.

  14. Influence of Flow Behavior of Alginate-Cell Suspensions on Cell Viability and Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Ning, Liqun; Guillemot, Arthur; Zhao, Jingxuan; Kipouros, Georges; Chen, Xiongbiao

    2016-07-01

    Tissue scaffolds with living cells fabricated by three-dimensional bioprinting/plotting techniques are becoming more prevalent in tissue repair and regeneration. In the bioprinting process, cells are subject to process-induced forces (such as shear force) that can result in cell damage and loss of cell function. The flow behavior of the biomaterial solutions that encapsulate living cells in this process plays an important role. This study used a rheometer to examine the flow behavior of alginate solution and alginate-Schwann cell (RSC96), alginate-fibroblast cell (NIH-3T3), and alginate-skeletal muscle cell (L8) suspensions during shearing with respect to effects on cell viability and proliferation. The flow behavior of all the alginate-cell suspensions varied with alginate concentration and cell density and had a significant influence on the viability and proliferation of the cells once sheared as well as on the recovery of the sheared cells. These findings provide a mean to preserve cell viability and/or retain cell proliferation function in the bioprinting process by regulating the flow behavior of cell-biomaterial suspensions and process parameters.

  15. High speed flow cytometric separation of viable cells

    DOEpatents

    Sasaki, Dennis T.; Van den Engh, Gerrit J.; Buckie, Anne-Marie

    1995-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell populations are separated to provide cell sets and subsets as viable cells with high purity and high yields, based on the number of original cells present in the mixture. High-speed flow cytometry is employed using light characteristics of the cells to separate the cells, where high flow speeds are used to reduce the sorting time.

  16. High speed flow cytometric separation of viable cells

    DOEpatents

    Sasaki, D.T.; Van den Engh, G.J.; Buckie, A.M.

    1995-11-14

    Hematopoietic cell populations are separated to provide cell sets and subsets as viable cells with high purity and high yields, based on the number of original cells present in the mixture. High-speed flow cytometry is employed using light characteristics of the cells to separate the cells, where high flow speeds are used to reduce the sorting time.

  17. A study of disequilibrium between 220Rn and 216Po for 220Rn measurements using a flow-through Lucas scintillation cell.

    PubMed

    Sathyabama, N; Datta, D; Gaware, J J; Mayya, Y S; Tripathi, R M

    2014-01-01

    Lucas-type scintillation cells (LSCs) are commonly used for rapid measurements of (220)Rn concentrations in flow-through mode in field and for calibration experiments in laboratories. However, in those measurements, equilibrium between (220)Rn and (216)Po is generally assumed and two alpha particles are considered to be emitted per (220)Rn decay due to very short half-life of (216)Po. In this paper, a small, yet significant disequilibrium existing between (220)Rn and (216)Po has been examined and shown that less than two alpha particles are actually emitted per (220)Rn decay in the cell when flow is maintained. A theoretical formula has been derived for the first time for a correction factor (CF) to be applied to this measured concentration to account for the disequilibrium. The existence of this disequilibrium has been verified experimentally and is found to increase with the increase in the ratio of flow rate to cell volume. The reason for the disequilibrium is attributed to the flushing out of (216)Po formed in the cell before its decay due to the flow. Uncertainties in measured concentrations have been estimated and the estimated CF values have been found to be significant for the flow rates considered above 5 dm(3) min(-1) for a cell of volume 0.125 dm(3). The calculated values of the CF are about 1.055 to 1.178 in the flow rate range of 4 to 15 dm(3) min(-1) for the cell of volume 0.125 dm(3), while the corresponding experimental values are 1.023 to 1.264. This is a systematic error introduced in (220)Rn measurements using a flow-through LSC, which can be removed either by correct formulation or by proper design of a measurement set-up.

  18. Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell (GFFC) Cross Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This drawing shows a cross-section view of the test cell at the heart of the Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell (GFFC) that flew on two Spacelab missions. The middle and lower drawings depict the volume of the silicone oil layer that served as the atmosphere as the steel ball rotated and an electrostatic field pulled the oil inward to mimic gravity's effects during the experiments. The GFFC thus produced flow patterns that simulated conditions inside the atmospheres of Jupiter and the Sun and other stars. The principal investigator was John Hart of the University of Colorado at Boulder. It was managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). An Acrobat PDF copy of this drawing is available at http://microgravity.nasa.gov/gallery. (Credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center)

  19. Detachment of captured cancer cells under flow acceleration in a bio-functionalized microchannel.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Luthur Siu Lun; Zheng, Xiangjun; Stopa, Ashley; Baygents, James C; Guzman, Roberto; Schroeder, Joyce A; Heimark, Ronald L; Zohar, Yitshak

    2009-06-21

    Attachment, deformation and detachment of N-cadherin expressing prostate and breast cancer cell lines in a functionalized microchannel under hydrodynamic loading have been studied. N-cadherin antibodies are immobilized on the microchannel surface to capture the target cancer cells, PC3N and MDA-MB-231-N, from a homogeneous cell suspension. Although difficult, a significant fraction of moving cells can be captured under a low flow rate. More than 90% of the target cells are captured after a certain incubation time under no flow condition. The mechanical response of a captured cancer cell to hydrodynamic flow field is investigated and, in particular, the effect of flow acceleration is examined. The observed cell deformation is dramatic under low acceleration, but is negligible under high acceleration. Consequently, the detachment of captured cells depends on both flow rate and flow acceleration. The flow rate required for cell detachment is a random variable that can be described by a log-normal distribution. Two flow acceleration limits have been identified for proper scaling of the flow rate required to detach captured cells. A time constant for the mechanical response of a captured cell, on the order of 1 min, has been identified for scaling the flow acceleration. Based on these acceleration limits and time constant, an exponential-like empirical model is proposed to predict the flow rate required for cell detachment as a function of flow acceleration.

  20. Microfluidic Device for Studying Controllable Hydrodynamic Flow Induced Cellular Responses.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chunhong; Zhang, Xiannian; Li, Chunmei; Pang, Yuhong; Huang, Yanyi

    2017-03-07

    Hydrodynamic flow is an essential stimulus in many cellular functions, regulating many mechanical sensitive pathways and closely associating with human health status and diseases. The flow pattern of blood in vessels is the key factor in causing atherosclerosis. Hemodynamics has great effect on endothelial cells' gene expression and biological functions. There are various tools that can be used for studying flow-induced cellular responses but most of them are either bulky or lack precise controllability. We develop an integrated microfluidic device that can precisely generate different flow patterns to human endothelial cells cultured on-chip. We monitored cell morphology and used small-input RNA-seq technology to depict the transcriptome profiles of human umbilical vein endothelial cells under uni- or bidirectional flow. Such integrated and miniatured device has greatly facilitated our understanding of endothelial functions with shear stimulus, not only providing new data on the transcriptomic scale but also building the connection between cell phenotypic changes and expression alternations.

  1. Blood Flow through an Open-Celled Foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Jason; Maitland, Duncan

    2011-11-01

    The Hazen-Dupuit-Darcy (HDD) equation is commonly used in engineering applications to model the pressure gradient of flow through a porous media. One major advantage of this equation is that it simplifies the complex geometric details of the porous media into two coefficients: the permeability, K, and form factor, C. However through this simplification, the flow details within the porous media are no longer accessible, making it difficult to study the phenomena that contribute to changes in K and C due to clotting of blood flow. To obtain a more detailed understanding of blood flow through a porous media, a direct assessment of the complex interstitial geometry and flow is required. In this study, we solve the Navier-Stokes equations for Newtonian and non-Newtonian blood flow through an open-celled foam geometry obtained from a micro-CT scan. The nominal strut size of the foam sample is of O(10e-5) m and the corresponding Reynolds number based upon this length ranges up to O(10). Fitting the pressure gradient vs. Darcy velocity data with the HDD equation demonstrates that both viscous and inertial forces play an important role in the flow through the foam at these Reynolds numbers. Recirculation zones are observed to form in the wake of the pore struts, producing regions of flow characterized by both low shear rates and long fluid residence times, factors of which have been shown in previous studies to promote blood clotting.

  2. Flow cytometric analysis of inflammatory cells in ischemic rat brain.

    PubMed

    Campanella, Marilena; Sciorati, Clara; Tarozzo, Glauco; Beltramo, Massimiliano

    2002-02-01

    Inflammation plays a key role in cerebral ischemia through activation of microglia and infiltration by leukocytes. Flow cytometry is a well-established method for quantitative and qualitative analysis of inflammatory cells. However, this technique has not been applied to the study of cerebral ischemia inflammation. The aim of this study was to establish a flow cytometric method to measure inflammatory cells in ischemic brain. To perform flow cytometry on brain tissue, we developed 2 cell-isolation methods based on different mechanical dissociation and Percoll gradient separation techniques. The methods were tested on a rat model of permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion. Morphological and immunophenotypic analyses, with the use of anti-CD11b, anti-CD45, and alphabeta T-cell receptor antibodies, were employed to identify and quantify inflammatory cells. Both methods gave consistent results in terms of yield and reproducibility. The cell suspension contained granulocytes, macrophages, lymphocytes, and neural cells. Morphological and immunophenotypic analyses enabled the identification of a cell-scatter gate (R1a) enriched in inflammatory cells. With both methods, a higher number of events in R1a were recorded in the ischemic hemisphere than in the nonischemic hemisphere (P< or =0.001). CD11b, CD45, and alphabeta T-cell receptor staining confirmed that this augmentation was a reflection of the increase in the number of granulocytes, cells of the monocytic lineage, and lymphocytes. Quantitative flow cytometric analysis of ischemic rat brain is feasible and provides a reliable and rapid assay to assess neuroinflammation in experimental models of brain ischemia.

  3. Deterministic Aperiodic Sickle Cell Blood Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atsaves, Louis; Harris, Wesley

    2013-11-01

    In this paper sickle cell blood flow in the capillaries is modeled as a hydrodynamical system. The hydrodynamical system consists of the axisymmetric unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and a set of constitutive equations for oxygen transport. Blood cell deformation is not considered in this paper. The hydrodynamical system is reduced to a system of non-linear partial differential equations that are then transformed into a system of three autonomous non-linear ordinary differential equations and a set of algebraic equations. We examine the hydrodynamical system to discern stable/unstable, periodic/nonperiodic, reversible/irreversible properties of the system. The properties of the solutions are driven in large part by the coefficients of the governing system of equations. These coefficients depend on the physiological properties of the sickle cell blood. The chaotic nature of the onset of crisis in sickle cell patients is identified. Research Assistant.

  4. Full cell study of Diels Alder poly(phenylene) anion and cation exchange membranes in vanadium redox flow batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Pezeshki, Alan M.; Fujimoto, Cy; Sun, Che -Nan; Mench, Matthew M.; Zawodzinski, Thomas A.; Tang, Z. J.

    2015-11-14

    In this paper, we report on the performance of Diels Alder poly(phenylene) membranes in vanadium redox flow batteries. The membranes were functionalized with quaternary ammonium groups to form an anion exchange membrane (QDAPP) and with sulfonic acid groups to form a cation exchange membrane (SDAPP). Both membrane classes showed similar conductivities in the battery environment, suggesting that the ion conduction mechanism in the material is not strongly affected by the moieties along the polymer backbone. The resistance to vanadium permeation in QDAPP was not improved relative to SDAPP, further suggesting that the polarity of the functional groups do not play a significant role in the membrane materials tested. Both QDAPP and SDAPP outperformed Nafion membranes in cycling tests, with both achieving voltage efficiencies above 85% while maintaining 95% coulombic efficiency while at a current density of 200 mA/cm2.

  5. Studies of planetary scale waves and instabilities in support of the geophysical fluid flow cell experiment on USML-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, J. E.

    1995-01-01

    High resolution numerical simulations of thermal convection in a rapidly rotating channel with gravity perpendicular to the rotation vector are described. The convecting columns are subject to a beta-effect resulting from cross-channel topographic vortex stretching. The symmetries of the problem allow many invariant wavenumber sets, and this property is associated with the existence of stable multiple-equilibria at modest supercriticality. The transition to chaotic behavior involves the production of intermittent unstable orbits off a two-torus in energy space. At very high Rayleigh number (of order 10(exp 6) to 10(exp 7)) the motion can be turbulent, depending on the size of beta. However, the turbulence is usually characterized by an almost-periodic formation of patches of small scale convection that cause regular pulsations in the accompanying strong zonal jets. The processes maintaining these flows may be related to those responsible for the zonal currents on Jupiter and for cyclic variability on the Sun.

  6. Full cell study of Diels Alder poly(phenylene) anion and cation exchange membranes in vanadium redox flow batteries

    DOE PAGES

    Pezeshki, Alan M.; Fujimoto, Cy; Sun, Che -Nan; ...

    2015-11-14

    In this paper, we report on the performance of Diels Alder poly(phenylene) membranes in vanadium redox flow batteries. The membranes were functionalized with quaternary ammonium groups to form an anion exchange membrane (QDAPP) and with sulfonic acid groups to form a cation exchange membrane (SDAPP). Both membrane classes showed similar conductivities in the battery environment, suggesting that the ion conduction mechanism in the material is not strongly affected by the moieties along the polymer backbone. The resistance to vanadium permeation in QDAPP was not improved relative to SDAPP, further suggesting that the polarity of the functional groups do not playmore » a significant role in the membrane materials tested. Both QDAPP and SDAPP outperformed Nafion membranes in cycling tests, with both achieving voltage efficiencies above 85% while maintaining 95% coulombic efficiency while at a current density of 200 mA/cm2.« less

  7. A dynamic plug flow reactor model for a vanadium redox flow battery cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yifeng; Skyllas-Kazacos, Maria; Bao, Jie

    2016-04-01

    A dynamic plug flow reactor model for a single cell VRB system is developed based on material balance, and the Nernst equation is employed to calculate cell voltage with consideration of activation and concentration overpotentials. Simulation studies were conducted under various conditions to investigate the effects of several key operation variables including electrolyte flow rate, upper SOC limit and input current magnitude on the cell charging performance. The results show that all three variables have a great impact on performance, particularly on the possibility of gassing during charging at high SOCs or inadequate flow rates. Simulations were also carried out to study the effects of electrolyte imbalance during long term charging and discharging cycling. The results show the minimum electrolyte flow rate needed for operation within a particular SOC range in order to avoid gassing side reactions during charging. The model also allows scheduling of partial electrolyte remixing operations to restore capacity and also avoid possible gassing side reactions during charging. Simulation results also suggest the proper placement for cell voltage monitoring and highlight potential problems associated with setting the upper charging cut-off limit based on the inlet SOC calculated from the open-circuit cell voltage measurement.

  8. Injectable Solid Peptide Hydrogel as Cell Carrier: Effects of Shear Flow on Hydrogel and Cell Payload

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Congqi; Mackay, Michael E.; Czymmek, Kirk; Nagarkar, Radhika P.; Schneider, Joel P.; Pochan, Darrin J.

    2012-01-01

    β-hairpin peptide-based hydrogels are a class of injectable solid hydrogels that can deliver encapsulated cells or molecular therapies to a target site via syringe or catheter injection as a carrier material. These physical hydrogels can shear-thin and consequently flow as a low-viscosity material under a sufficient shear stress but immediately recover back into a solid upon removal of the stress, allowing them to be injected as preformed gel solids. Hydrogel behavior during flow was studied in a cylindrical capillary geometry that mimicked the actual situation of injection through a syringe needle in order to quantify effects of shear-thin injection delivery on hydrogel flow behavior and encapsulated cell payloads. It was observed that all β-hairpin peptide hydrogels investigated displayed a promising flow profile for injectable cell delivery: a central wide plug flow region where gel material and cell payloads experienced little or no shear rate and a narrow shear zone close to the capillary wall where gel and cells were subject to shear deformation. The width of the plug flow region was found to be weakly dependent on hydrogel rigidity and flow rate. Live-dead assays were performed on encapsulated MG63 cells three hours after injection flow and revealed that shear-thin delivery through the capillary had little impact on cell viability and the spatial distribution of encapsulated cell payloads. These observations help us to fundamentally understand how the gels flow during injection through a thin catheter and how they immediately restore mechanically and morphologically relative to pre-flow, static gels. PMID:22390812

  9. Toward harmonized phenotyping of human myeloid-derived suppressor cells by flow cytometry: results from an interim study.

    PubMed

    Mandruzzato, Susanna; Brandau, Sven; Britten, Cedrik M; Bronte, Vincenzo; Damuzzo, Vera; Gouttefangeas, Cécile; Maurer, Dominik; Ottensmeier, Christian; van der Burg, Sjoerd H; Welters, Marij J P; Walter, Steffen

    2016-02-01

    There is an increasing interest for monitoring circulating myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in cancer patients, but there are also divergences in their phenotypic definition. To overcome this obstacle, the Cancer Immunoguiding Program under the umbrella of the Association of Cancer Immunotherapy is coordinating a proficiency panel program that aims at harmonizing MDSC phenotyping. After a consultation period, a two-stage approach was designed to harmonize MDSC phenotype. In the first step, an international consortium of 23 laboratories immunophenotyped 10 putative MDSC subsets on pretested, peripheral blood mononuclear cells of healthy donors to assess the level of concordance and define robust marker combinations for the identification of circulating MDSCs. At this stage, no mandatory requirements to standardize reagents or protocols were introduced. Data analysis revealed a small intra-laboratory, but very high inter-laboratory variance for all MDSC subsets, especially for the granulocytic subsets. In particular, the use of a dead-cell marker altered significantly the reported percentage of granulocytic MDSCs, confirming that these cells are especially sensitive to cryopreservation and/or thawing. Importantly, the gating strategy was heterogeneous and associated with high inter-center variance. Overall, our results document the high variability in MDSC phenotyping in the multicenter setting if no harmonization/standardization measures are applied. Although the observed variability depended on a number of identified parameters, the main parameter associated with variation was the gating strategy. Based on these findings, we propose further efforts to harmonize marker combinations and gating parameters to identify strategies for a robust enumeration of MDSC subsets.

  10. Statistical mixture modeling for cell subtype identification in flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Chan, Cliburn; Feng, Feng; Ottinger, Janet; Foster, David; West, Mike; Kepler, Thomas B

    2008-08-01

    Statistical mixture modeling provides an opportunity for automated identification and resolution of cell subtypes in flow cytometric data. The configuration of cells as represented by multiple markers simultaneously can be modeled arbitrarily well as a mixture of Gaussian distributions in the dimension of the number of markers. Cellular subtypes may be related to one or multiple components of such mixtures, and fitted mixture models can be evaluated in the full set of markers as an alternative, or adjunct, to traditional subjective gating methods that rely on choosing one or two dimensions. Four color flow data from human blood cells labeled with FITC-conjugated anti-CD3, PE-conjugated anti-CD8, PE-Cy5-conjugated anti-CD4, and APC-conjugated anti-CD19 Abs was acquired on a FACSCalibur. Cells from four murine cell lines, JAWS II, RAW 264.7, CTLL-2, and A20, were also stained with FITC-conjugated anti-CD11c, PE-conjugated anti-CD11b, PE-Cy5-conjugated anti-CD8a, and PE-Cy7-conjugated-CD45R/B220 Abs, respectively, and single color flow data were collected on an LSRII. The data were fitted with a mixture of multivariate Gaussians using standard Bayesian statistical approaches and Markov chain Monte Carlo computations. Statistical mixture models were able to identify and purify major cell subsets in human peripheral blood, using an automated process that can be generalized to an arbitrary number of markers. Validation against both traditional expert gating and synthetic mixtures of murine cell lines with known mixing proportions was also performed. This article describes the studies of statistical mixture modeling of flow cytometric data, and demonstrates their utility in examples with four-color flow data from human peripheral blood samples and synthetic mixtures of murine cell lines.

  11. Porcine skin flow-through diffusion cell system.

    PubMed

    Baynes, R E

    2001-11-01

    Porcine Skin Flow-Through Diffusion Cell System (Ronald E. Baynes, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina). Porcine skin can be used in a diffusion cell apparatus to study the rate and extent of absorption of topically applied chemicals through the skin. Although the skin of a number of animals can be used in this system, that of the pig most closely approximates human skin anatomically and physiologically.

  12. The Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, J. E.; Ohlsen, D.; Kittleman, S.; Borhani, N.; Leslie, F.; Miller, T.

    1999-01-01

    The Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell (GFFC) experiment performed visualizations of thermal convection in a rotating differentially heated spherical shell of fluid. In these experiments dielectric polarization forces are used to generate a radially directed buoyancy force. This enables the laboratory simulation of a number of geophysically and astrophysically important situations in which sphericity and rotation both impose strong constraints on global scale fluid motions. During USML-2 a large set of experiments with spherically symmetric heating were carried out. These enabled the determination of critical points for the transition to various forms of nonaxisymmetric convection and, for highly turbulent flows, the transition latitudes separating the different modes of motion. This paper presents a first analysis of these experiments as well as data on the general performance of the instrument during the USML-2 flight.

  13. Models of flow-induced loading on blood cells in laminar and turbulent flow, with application to cardiovascular device flow.

    PubMed

    Quinlan, Nathan J; Dooley, Patrick N

    2007-08-01

    Viscous shear stress and Reynolds stress are often used to predict hemolysis and thrombosis due to flow-induced stress on blood elements in cardiovascular devices. These macroscopic stresses are distinct from the true stress on an individual cell, which is determined by the local microscale flow field. In this paper the flow-induced stress on blood cells is calculated for laminar and turbulent flow, using simplified models for cells and for turbulent eddies. The model is applied to estimate shear stress on red blood cells in flow through a prosthetic heart valve, using the energy spectral density measured by Liu et al. [J. Biomech. Eng. 122:118-124, 2000]. Results show that in laminar flow, the maximum stress on a cell is approximately equal to the macroscopic viscous shear stress. In turbulent flow through a prosthetic heart valve, the estimated root mean square of flow-induced stress on a cell is at least an order of magnitude less than the Reynolds stress. The results support the hypothesis that smaller turbulent eddies cause higher stress on cells. However, the stress due to an eddy depends on the velocity scale of the eddy as well as its length scale. For the heart valve flow investigated, turbulence contributes to flow-induced stress on cells almost equally across a broad range of the frequency spectrum. The model suggests that Reynolds stress alone is not an adequate predictor of cell damage in turbulent flow, and highlights the importance of the energy spectral density.

  14. Long waves in parallel flow in Hele-Shaw cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zeybek, M.; Yortsos, Y.C.

    1991-04-01

    During the past several years the flow of immiscible flow in Hele-Shaw cells and porous media has been investigated extensively. Of particular interest to most studies has been frontal displacement, specifically viscous fingering instabilities and finger growth. The practical ramifications regarding oil recovery, as well as many other industrial processes in porous media, have served as the primary driving force for most of these investigations. By contrast, little attention has been paid to the motion of lateral fluid interface, which are parallel to the main flow direction. Parallel flow is an often encountered, although much overlooked regime. The evolution of fluid interfaces in parallel flow in Hele-Shaw cells is studied both theoretically and experimentally in the large capillary number limit. It is shown that such interfaces support wave motion, the amplitude of which for long waves is governed by the KdV equation. Experiments are conducted in a long Hele-Shaw cell that validate the theory in the symmetric case. 35 refs., 16 figs.

  15. Cell cycle analysis by flow cytometry: principles and applications.

    PubMed

    Jayat, C; Ratinaud, M H

    1993-01-01

    Numerous flow cytometric analyses are based on DNA content studies. We have considered firstly monoparametric cell cycle analyses, which only take DNA content into account, but are sometimes of limited interest. Then, we have presented multiparametric analyses, which can be used to improve cycle phase identification by taking simultaneously into account DNA and other cellular components, or by considering some events occurring during cell cycle. Finally, we have discussed monoparametric and multiparametric cell cycle analysis interest in various application fields, particularly in pharmacology, toxicology, tumoral pathology and higher plant system studies.

  16. Black Tea Increases Circulating Endothelial Progenitor Cells and Improves Flow Mediated Dilatation Counteracting Deleterious Effects from a Fat Load in Hypertensive Patients: A Randomized Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Grassi, Davide; Draijer, Richard; Schalkwijk, Casper; Desideri, Giovambattista; D’Angeli, Anatolia; Francavilla, Sandro; Mulder, Theo; Ferri, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    (1) Background: Endothelial dysfunction predicts cardiovascular events. Circulating angiogenic cells (CACs) maintain and repair the endothelium regulating its function. Tea flavonoids reduce cardiovascular risk. We investigated the effects of black tea on the number of CACs and on flow-mediated dilation (FMD) before and after an oral fat in hypertensives; (2) Methods: In a randomized, double-blind, controlled, cross-over study, 19 patients were assigned to black tea (150 mg polyphenols) or a placebo twice a day for eight days. Measurements were obtained in a fasted state and after consuming whipping cream, and FMD was measured at baseline and after consumption of the products; (3) Results: Compared with the placebo, black tea ingestion increased functionally active CACs (36 ± 22 vs. 56 ± 21 cells per high-power field; p = 0.006) and FMD (5.0% ± 0.3% vs. 6.6% ± 0.3%, p < 0.0001). Tea further increased FMD 1, 2, 3, and 4 h after consumption, with maximal response 2 h after intake (p < 0.0001). Fat challenge decreased FMD, while tea consumption counteracted FMD impairment (p < 0.0001); (4) Conclusions: We demonstrated the vascular protective properties of black tea by increasing the number of CACs and preventing endothelial dysfunction induced by acute oral fat load in hypertensive patients. Considering that tea is the most consumed beverage after water, our findings are of clinical relevance and interest. PMID:27854314

  17. Black Tea Increases Circulating Endothelial Progenitor Cells and Improves Flow Mediated Dilatation Counteracting Deleterious Effects from a Fat Load in Hypertensive Patients: A Randomized Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Grassi, Davide; Draijer, Richard; Schalkwijk, Casper; Desideri, Giovambattista; D'Angeli, Anatolia; Francavilla, Sandro; Mulder, Theo; Ferri, Claudio

    2016-11-16

    (1) Background: Endothelial dysfunction predicts cardiovascular events. Circulating angiogenic cells (CACs) maintain and repair the endothelium regulating its function. Tea flavonoids reduce cardiovascular risk. We investigated the effects of black tea on the number of CACs and on flow-mediated dilation (FMD) before and after an oral fat in hypertensives; (2) Methods: In a randomized, double-blind, controlled, cross-over study, 19 patients were assigned to black tea (150 mg polyphenols) or a placebo twice a day for eight days. Measurements were obtained in a fasted state and after consuming whipping cream, and FMD was measured at baseline and after consumption of the products; (3) Results: Compared with the placebo, black tea ingestion increased functionally active CACs (36 ± 22 vs. 56 ± 21 cells per high-power field; p = 0.006) and FMD (5.0% ± 0.3% vs. 6.6% ± 0.3%, p < 0.0001). Tea further increased FMD 1, 2, 3, and 4 h after consumption, with maximal response 2 h after intake (p < 0.0001). Fat challenge decreased FMD, while tea consumption counteracted FMD impairment (p < 0.0001); (4) Conclusions: We demonstrated the vascular protective properties of black tea by increasing the number of CACs and preventing endothelial dysfunction induced by acute oral fat load in hypertensive patients. Considering that tea is the most consumed beverage after water, our findings are of clinical relevance and interest.

  18. Experimental design methodology applied to the study of channel dimensions on the elution of red blood cells in gravitational field flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Rasouli, S; Assidjo, E; Chianéa, T; Cardot, P J

    2001-04-15

    Field flow fractionation (FFF) separation techniques have gained considerable success with micron-sized species. Living red blood cells (RBCs) of any origin have emerged as ideal models for cell separation development. Their elution mode is now described as "Lift-Hyperlayer". Certain separator dimension parameters are known to play a key role in the separation and band spreading process. Systematic studies of channel dimensions effects on RBC retention, band spreading, peak capacity and on a novel parameter described as "Particle Selectivity" were set up by means of a two-level factorial experimental design. From experimental results and statistical calculations it is confirmed that channel thickness plays a major role in retention ratio, peak variance, peak capacity and particle selectivity. Channel breadth strongly influences plate height, with lower impact on peak capacity and particle selectivity. Retention ratio, peak variance and peak capacity observed results are modulated by second-order interactions between channel dimensions. Preliminary rules for channel configurations are therefore set up and depend on separation goals. It is shown that a very polydisperse population is best disentangled in a thin and narrow channel whatever its length. If a mixture of many different micron-sized species is considered (each of limited polydispersities); a thick and broad channel should be preferred, with length modulating peak capacity to disentangle this polymodal mixture.

  19. Cr(VI) induces DNA damage, cell cycle arrest and polyploidization: a flow cytometric and comet assay study in Pisum sativum.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Eleazar; Azevedo, Raquel; Fernandes, Pedro; Santos, Conceição

    2011-07-18

    Chromium(VI) is recognized as the most toxic valency of Cr, but its genotoxicity and cytostaticity in plants is still poorly studied. In order to analyze Cr(VI) cyto- and gentotoxicity, Pisum sativum L. plants were grown in soil and watered with solutions with different concentrations of Cr up to 2000 mg/L. After 28 days of exposure, leaves showed no significant variations in either cell cycle dynamics or ploidy level. As for DNA damage, flow cytometric (FCM) histograms showed significant differences in full peak coefficient of variation (FPCV) values, suggesting clastogenicity. This is paralleled by the Comet assay results, showing an increase in DNA damage for 1000 and 2000 mg/L. In roots, exposure to 2000 mg/L resulted in cell cycle arrest at the G(2)/M checkpoint. It was also verified that under the same conditions 40% of the individuals analyzed suffered polyploidization having both 2C and 4C levels. DNA damage analysis by the Comet assay and FCM revealed dose-dependent increases in DNA damage and FPCV. Through this, we have unequivocally demonstrated for the first time in plants that Cr exposure can result in DNA damage, cell cycle arrest, and polyploidization. Moreover, we critically compare the validity of the Comet assay and FCM in evaluating cytogenetic toxicity tests in plants and demonstrate that the data provided by both techniques complement each other and present high correlation levels. In conclusion, the data presented provides new insight on Cr effects in plants in general and supports the use of the parameters tested in this study as reliable endpoints for this metal toxicity in plants. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  20. On-line preferential solvation studies of polymers by coupled chromatographic-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic flow-cell technique.

    PubMed

    Malanin, M; Eichhorn, K-J; Lederer, A; Treppe, P; Adam, G; Fischer, D; Voigt, D

    2009-12-18

    Qualitative and quantitative comparison between liquid chromatography (LC) and LC coupled with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (LC-FTIR) to evaluate preferential solvation phenomenon of polymers in a mixed solvent has been performed. These studies show that LC-FTIR technique leads to detailed structural information without the requirement for determination of additional parameters for quantitative analysis except calibration. Appropriate experimental conditions for preferential solvation study have been established by variation of polymer concentration, molar mass and eluent content.

  1. Redox flow cell energy storage systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaller, L. H.

    1979-01-01

    NASA-Redox systems are electrochemical storage devices that use two fully soluble Redox couples, anode and cathode fluids, as active electrode materials separated by a highly selective ion exchange membrane. The reactants are contained in large storage tanks and pumped through a stack of Redox flow cells where the electrochemical reactions (reduction and oxidation) take place at porous carbon felt electrodes. A string or stack of these power producing cells is connected in series in a bipolar manner. Redox energy storage systems promise to be inexpensive and possess many features that provide for flexible design, long life, high reliability and minimal operation and maintenance costs. These features include independent sizing of power and storage capacity requirements and inclusion within the cell stack of a cell that monitors the state of charge of the system as a whole, and a rebalance cell which permits continuous correction to be made for minor side reactions that would tend to result in the anode fluid and cathode fluids becoming electrochemically out of balance. These system features are described and discussed.

  2. Schlieren System For Flow Studies In Round Glass Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costen, Robert C.; Rhodes, David B.; Jones, Stephen B.

    1990-01-01

    In schlieren system for studying flow of gas in transparent pipe of circular cross section, cylindrical lenses placed on opposite sides of pipe compensate for refraction caused by wall of pipe. Enables direct visualization of such phenomena as laminar or turbulent flow, shock waves, vortexes, and flow separations in systems having inherently cylindrical geometry; potentially unreliable extrapolations from results in flat-sided test cells no longer necessary.

  3. Numerical investigation of granular flow in a shear cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Zhu, H. P.; Yu, A. B.; Luding, S.

    2013-06-01

    Granular flow in a shear cell under conditions relevant to those in an annular cell is investigated based on the results obtained by using the Discrete Element Method. The distributions of porosity and coordination number are studied, and the relationship of these variables is established. The so-called I-rheology proposed by Jop et al. [Nature (London) 441, 727 (2006)] is tested. The results display that the I-rheology can effectively describe the intermediate flow regime, whereas significant deviations take place when it is applied to the quasi-static regime. The correlations between stresses and packing fraction are examined and the packing fraction values for the quasi-static/intermediate and intermediate/inertial regime transitions are identified. The force networks/structures for different scaled stiffness are analyzed to further understand the regime-transitions for the granular flow.

  4. Predicting dynamics and rheology of blood flow: A comparative study of multiscale and low-dimensional models of red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Wenxiao; Fedosov, Dmitry A.; Caswell, Bruce; Karniadakis, George Em

    2011-01-01

    We compare the predictive capability of two mathematical models for red blood cells (RBCs) focusing on blood flow in capillaries and arterioles. Both RBC models as well as their corresponding blood flows are based on the dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) method, a coarse-grained molecular dynamics approach. The first model employs a multiscale description of the RBC (MS-RBC), with its membrane represented by hundreds or even thousands of DPD-particles connected by springs into a triangular network in combination with out-of-plane elastic bending resistance. Extra dissipation within the network accounts for membrane viscosity, while the characteristic biconcave RBC shape is achieved by imposition of constraints for constant membrane area and constant cell volume. The second model is based on a low-dimensional description (LD-RBC) constructed as a closed torus-like ring of only 10 large DPD colloidal particles. They are connected into a ring by worm-like chain (WLC) springs combined with bending resistance. The LD-RBC model can be fitted to represent the entire range of nonlinear elastic deformations as measured by optical-tweezers for healthy and for infected RBCs in malaria. MS-RBCs suspensions model the dynamics and rheology of blood flow accurately for any vessel size but this approach is computationally expensive for vessel diameters above 100 microns. Surprisingly, the much more economical suspensions of LD-RBCs also capture the blood flow dynamics and rheology accurately except for small-size vessels comparable to RBC diameter. In particular, the LD-RBC suspensions are shown to properly capture the experimental data for the apparent viscosity of blood and its cell-free layer (CFL) in tube flow. Taken together, these findings suggest a hierarchical approach in modeling blood flow in the arterial tree, whereby the MS-RBC model should be employed for capillaries and arterioles below 100 microns, the LD-RBC model for arterioles, and the continuum description for

  5. Predicting dynamics and rheology of blood flow: A comparative study of multiscale and low-dimensional models of red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Wenxiao; Fedosov, Dmitry A.; Caswell, Bruce; Karniadakis, George E.

    2011-05-27

    In this work we compare the predictive capability of two mathematical models for red blood cells (RBCs) focusing on blood flow in capillaries and arterioles. Both RBC models as well as their corresponding blood flows are based on the dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) method, a coarse-grained molecular dynamics approach. The first model employs a multiscale description of the RBC (MS-RBC), with its membrane represented by hundreds or even thousands of DPD-particles connected by springs into a triangular network in combination with out-of-plane elastic bending resistance. Extra dissipation within the network accounts for membrane viscosity, while the characteristic biconcave RBC shape is achieved by imposition of constraints for constant membrane area and constant cell volume. The second model is based on a low-dimensional description (LD-RBC) constructed as a closed torus-like ring of only 10 large DPD colloidal particles. They are connected into a ring by worm-like chain (WLC) springs combined with bending resistance. The LD-RBC model can be fitted to represent the entire range of nonlinear elastic deformations as measured by optical-tweezers for healthy and for infected RBCs in malaria. MS-RBCs suspensions model the dynamics and rheology of blood flow accurately for any size vessel but this approach is computationally expensive above 100 microns. Surprisingly, the much more economical suspensions of LD-RBCs also capture the blood flow dynamics and rheology accurately except for vessels with sizes comparable to RBC diameter. In particular, the LD-RBC suspensions are shown to properly capture the experimental data for the apparent viscosity of blood and its cell-free layer (CFL) in tube flow. Taken together, these findings suggest a hierarchical approach in modeling blood flow in the arterial tree, whereby the MS-RBC model should be employed for capillaries and arterioles below 100 microns, the LD-RBC model for arterioles, and the continuum description for

  6. Estimating the efficiency of cell capture and arrest in flow chambers: study of neutrophil binding via E-selectin and ICAM-1.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Neelamegham, Sriram

    2002-01-01

    A mathematical model was developed to quantify the efficiency of cell-substrate attachment in the parallel-plate flow chamber. The model decouples the physical features of the system that affect cell-substrate collision rates from the biological features that influence cellular adhesivity. Thus, experimental data on cell rolling and adhesion density are converted into "frequency" parameters that quantify the "efficiency" with which cells in the flow chamber progress from the free stream to rolling, and transition from rolling to firm arrest. The model was partially validated by comparing simulation results with experiments where neutrophils rolled and adhered onto substrates composed of cotransfected cells bearing E-selectin and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). Results suggest that: 1) Neutrophils contact the E-selectin substrate on average for 4-8.5s before tethering. This contact duration is insensitive to applied shear stress. 2) At 2 dyn/cm(2), approximately 28% of the collisions between the cells and substrate result in primary capture. Also, approximately 5-7% of collisions between neutrophils in the free stream and previously recruited neutrophils bound on the substrate result in secondary capture. These percentages were higher at lower shears. 3) An adherent cell may influence the flow streams in its vicinity up to a distance of 2.5 cell diameters away. 4) Our estimates of selectin on-rate in cellular systems compare favorably with data from reconstituted systems with immobilized soluble E-selectin. In magnitude, the observed on-rates occur in the order, L-selectin > P-selectin > E-selectin. PMID:12324413

  7. Multiscale modeling of mechanosensing channels on vesicles and cell membranes in 3D constricted flows and shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhangli; Pak, On Shun; Young, Yuan-Nan; Liu, Allen; Stone, Howard

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the gating of mechanosensing channels (Mscls) on vesicles and cell membranes under different flow conditions using a multiscale approach. At the cell level (microns), the membrane tension is calculated using a 3D two-component whole-cell membrane model based on dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), including the cortex cytoskeleton and its interactions with the lipid bilayer. At the Mscl level (nanometers), we predict the relation between channel gating and the membrane tension obtained from a cell-level model using a semi-analytical model based on the bilayer hydrophobic mismatch energy. We systematically study the gating of Mscls of vesicles and cell membranes in constricted channel flows and shear flows, and explore the dependence of the gating on flow rate, cell shape and size. The results provide guidance for future experiments in inducing Mscl opening for various purposes such as drug delivery.

  8. Comparative release studies on suppositories using the basket, paddle, dialysis tubing and flow-through cell methods I. Acetaminophen in a lipophilic base suppository.

    PubMed

    Hori, Seiichi; Kawada, Tsubasa; Kogure, Sanae; Yabu, Shinako; Mori, Kenji; Akimoto, Masayuki

    2017-02-01

    The release characteristics of lipophilic suppositories containing acetaminophen (AAP) were examined using four types of dissolution methods: the basket, paddle, dialysis tubing (DT) and flow-through cell (FTC) methods. The suitability of each apparatus for quality control in AAP compounded suppositories was evaluated using statistical procedures. More than 80% of the drug was released over 60 min in all the release methods studied, with the exception of the basket method. Reproducible and faster release was achieved using the paddle method at 100 and 200 rpm, whereas poor release occurred with the basket method. The mean dissolution time (MDT), maximum dissolved quantity of AAP at the end of the sampling time (Q) and dissolution efficiency (DE) were calculated by model-independent methods. The FTC method with a single chamber used in this study was also appreciable for AAP suppositories (Q of 100%, MDT of 71-91 min and DE of 75-80%). The DT apparatus is considered similar to the FTC apparatus from a quality control perspective for judging the release properties of lipophilic base suppositories containing AAP. However, even the single chamber FTC used in this study has potential as an in vitro drug release test for suppositories. The comparative dissolution method is expected to become one of the valuable tools for selecting an adequate dissolution test.

  9. Pulsatile Flow Studies in Atherosclerotic Carotid Bifurcation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bale-Glickman, Jocelyn; Selby, Kathy; Saloner, David; Savas, Omer

    2002-11-01

    Particle image velocimetry and flow visualization techniques are used to study flow in models of atherosclerotic carotid bifurcations. The models exactly replicate the interior geometry of plaque excised from patients. The input flow is a physiological waveform derived from Doppler Ultrasound scans done on the patients before surgery. The systolic and diastolic Reynolds numbers are 200 and 900 respectively. The complex internal geometry of the diseased artery combined with the pulsatile input flows give exceedingly complex flow patterns. These flow patterns include internal jets, three-dimensional shear layers, stagnation lines, and multiple recirculation and separation regions. Ensemble averaged and instantaneous flow fields are compared. Wall shear stresses at the stenoses are estimated to be on the order of 10 PA. The physiological input flows are also compared to flows when the waveform is sinusoidal.

  10. Qualitative spectroscopic study of magnetic nozzle flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Umeki, T.; Turchi, P. J.

    1992-01-01

    The physics of the magnetic nozzle flow for a 100-kW-level quasi-steady MPD thruster was studied by photographic spectroscopy focusing on the plasma model in the flow and the acceleration mechanism. Spectroscopic visualization for the flow-species analysis indicates that the plasma-exhaust flow dominated by NII species were confined by the magnetic nozzle effect to collimate the flow for the better thruster performance. Inside the nozzle, the plasma flow was found to be in nonhomogeneous collisional-radiative condition. There appears to be a substantial flow acceleration from the magnetic nozzle inlet to the outlet with slight expansion. This suggests that the flow resembles that of constant area supersonic duct flow with cooling.

  11. Flow cytometric studies of human osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Mankin, H J; Gebhardt, M C; Springfield, D S; Litwak, G J; Kusazaki, K; Rosenberg, A E

    1991-09-01

    A number of recent studies have emphasized the potential value of flow cytometry as a "marker" to assess the malignity and therefore to help predict the biologic behavior of neoplasms, including bone tumors. Using propidium iodide and a home-built flow cytometer, the authors have studied the DNA distribution in 95 patients with osteosarcoma and determined the percentage of cells in diploidy, S-phase, tetraploidy, and aneuploidy. Using these values and a derived one, mean DNA concentration, it was possible to demonstrate the extent of the abnormalities observed in this group of neoplasms and show their severity as compared with the normal pattern. When the data are compared against disease-free survival and total survival, correlations were noted that, although weak, suggested that some patterns were predictive of increased risk of metastasis and death. The effect of treatment could also be assessed by evaluating the pattern before and after chemotherapy and correlating these with survival. It seems likely that with some improvement in technology, flow cytometry will be of value in the future in assessing the prognosis for osteosarcoma and predicting whether treatment has been effective.

  12. Migration dynamics of breast cancer cells in a tunable 3D interstitial flow chamber.

    PubMed

    Haessler, Ulrike; Teo, Jeremy C M; Foretay, Didier; Renaud, Philippe; Swartz, Melody A

    2012-04-01

    The migration of cells such as leukocytes, tumor cells, and fibroblasts through 3D matrices is critical for regulating homeostasis and immunity and for driving pathogenesis. Interstitial flow through the extracellular matrix, which can substantially increase during inflammation and in the tumor microenvironment, can influence cell migration in multiple ways. Leukocytes and tumor cells are heterogeneous in their migration responses to flow, yet most 3D migration studies use endpoint measurements representing average characteristics. Here we present a robust new microfluidic device for 3D culture with live imaging under well-controlled flow conditions, along with a comparison of analytical methods for describing the migration behavior of heterogeneous cell populations. We then use the model to provide new insight on how interstitial flow affects MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell invasion, phenomena that are not seen from averaged or endpoint measurements. Specifically, we find that interstitial flow increases the percentage of cells that become migratory, and increases migrational speed in about 20% of the cells. It also increases the migrational persistence of a subpopulation (5-10% of cells) in the positive or negative flow direction. Cells that migrated upstream moved faster but with less directedness, whereas cells that migrated in the direction of flow moved at slower speeds but with higher directedness. These findings demonstrate how fluid flow in the tumor microenvironment can enhance tumor cell invasion by directing a subpopulation of tumor cells in the flow direction; i.e., towards the draining lymphatic vessels, a major route of metastasis.

  13. Spatial response variations within biosensor flow cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cant, Nicola; Harrison, Sarah

    2012-02-01

    Biosensors are currently being developed for the detection of a wide range of analytes in a variety of scenarios. One such area is that of environmental monitoring for the presence of biological threats, from toxins through to viruses and bacteria. The varying nature, and in particular disparate size, of such a variety of analytes poses a significant challenge in the development of effective high confidence instruments. Many existing biosensors employ functionalised flow cells in which spatially defined arrays of surface immobilised recognition elements are present to specifically capture their analyte of interest. Experimental data obtained using a grating coupled SPR instrument, the BIAcore Flexchip, has revealed spatial dependency differences in response behaviours between proteinaceous and particulate analytes. In particular, the magnitude of responses seen with Bacillus anthracis spores across the instruments flow cell appear to be influenced by shear and gravitational effects whilst those from soluble proteins are more uniform. We have explored this dependence to understand its fundamental impact on the successful implementation of multi-analyte environmental biological detection systems.

  14. Co-flow planar SOFC fuel cell stack

    DOEpatents

    Chung, Brandon W.; Pham, Ai Quoc; Glass, Robert S.

    2004-11-30

    A co-flow planar solid oxide fuel cell stack with an integral, internal manifold and a casing/holder to separately seal the cell. This construction improves sealing and gas flow, and provides for easy manifolding of cell stacks. In addition, the stack construction has the potential for an improved durability and operation with an additional increase in cell efficiency. The co-flow arrangement can be effectively utilized in other electrochemical systems requiring gas-proof separation of gases.

  15. Studies of two phase flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, Larry C.

    1994-01-01

    The development of instrumentation for the support of research in two-phase flow in simulated microgravity conditions was performed. The funds were expended in the development of a technique for characterizing the motion and size distribution of small liquid droplets dispersed in a flowing gas. Phenomena like this occur in both microgravity and normal earth gravity situations inside of conduits that are carrying liquid-vapor mixtures at high flow rates. Some effort to develop a conductance probe for the measurement of liquid film thickness was also expended.

  16. Channel Flow Cell Studies of the Inhibiting Action of Gypsum on the Dissolution Kinetics of Calcite: A Laboratory Approach with Implications for Field Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Shelley J.; Compton, Richard G.; Taylor, Mark A.; Viles, Heather A.

    2001-04-15

    The rate of dissolution of surface-treated calcite crystals in aqueous acidic solution has been studied using an adaptation of the channel flow cell method with microdisc electrode detection. Surface treatments of calcite with sulfuric acid lead to the nucleation of gypsum overgrowths, which reduce the rate of dissolution of calcite. Rate constants for untreated calcite and calcite pretreated with sulfuric acid conditions of 0.01 M for 1 h, 0.05 M for 5 h, and 0.1 M for 21 h are found to be 0.035, 0.018, 0.006, and 0.004 cm s(-1), respectively. Deterioration of calcite materials caused by acid deposition was investigated by field exposure of untreated and sulfate pretreated calcite rocks under urban conditions for 12 months. The rate constant for both pretreated and untreated calcite exposed to weathering is 0.003 cm s(-1). This suggests that calcite self-passivates the surface from further reaction when exposed to acid deposition. However, surface studies indicate that the surface undergoes erosion and dissolution before passivation. Pretreatment of the surface with sulfate protects the surface from acid deposition so it remains less reactive toward acid compared with untreated calcite. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  17. A laminar flow-based single stack of flow-over planar microfluidic fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seoung Hwan; Ahn, Yoomin

    2017-05-01

    Power densities of microfluidic fuel cells are still not high enough for power source applications. In this study, we propose a novel planar stack to increase the total power of a microfluidic fuel cell. Electrical connections in serial or parallel are made within one channel by using multiple laminar flow. A planar structure with flow-over electrodes of platinum are adopted for easy integration with other planar micro devices. These structures are made by micromachining with a thin film process. Fuel cell performance and total ohmic resistances are measured experimentally with a formic acid-based fuel. The results show that the proposed single stacks provide more power density with a comparatively small total ohmic resistance and require less space than that of the fuel cell arrays. The peak volumetric power density improves by 97.5% and 39.3% using parallel and serial electrical connections, respectively, at a 300 μL min-1 flow rate. Utilizing this single stack, we believe that microfluidic fuel cells can be integrated into a compact planar configuration to achieve a power high enough for energy source applications.

  18. Infrared spectroscopic methods for the study of aerosol particles using White cell optics: Development and characterization of a new aerosol flow tube.

    PubMed

    Nájera, Juan J; Fochesatto, Javier G; Last, Deborah J; Percival, Carl J; Horn, Andrew B

    2008-12-01

    A description of a new aerosol flow tube apparatus for measurements in situ under atmospherically relevant conditions is presented here. The system consists of a laboratory-made nebulizer generation system and a flow tube with a White cell-based Fourier transform IR for the detection system. An assessment of the White cell coupled to the flow tube was carried out by an extensive set of experiments to ensure the alignment of the infrared beam and optimize the performance of this system. The detection limit for CO was established as (1.0+/-0.3) ppm and 16 passes was chosen as the optimum number of passes to be used in flow tube experiments. Infrared spectroscopy was used to characterize dry aerosol particles in the flow tube. Pure particles composed of ammonium sulfate or sodium chloride ranging between 0.8 and 2.1 mum for size diameter and (0.8-4.9)x10(6) particles/cm(3) for density number were generated by nebulization of aqueous solutions. Direct measurements of the aerosol particle size agree with size spectra retrieved from inversion of the extinction measurements using Mie calculations, where the difference residual value is in the order of 0.2%. The infrared detection limit for ammonium sulfate aerosol particles was determined as d(p)=0.9 mum and N=5x10(3) particles/cm(3) with sigma=1.1 by Mie calculation. Alternatively, Mie calculations were performed to determine the flexibility in varying the optical length when aerosol particles are sent by the injector. The very good agreement between the values retrieved for aerosol particles injected through the flow tube or through the injector clearly validates the estimation of the effective optical path length for the injector. To determine the flexibility in varying the reaction zone length, analysis of the extinction spectra as function of the position of the injector was carried out by monitoring the integrated area of different absorption modes of the ammonium sulfate. We conclude that the aerosol loss in the

  19. Infrared spectroscopic methods for the study of aerosol particles using White cell optics: Development and characterization of a new aerosol flow tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nájera, Juan J.; Fochesatto, Javier G.; Last, Deborah J.; Percival, Carl J.; Horn, Andrew B.

    2008-12-01

    A description of a new aerosol flow tube apparatus for measurements in situ under atmospherically relevant conditions is presented here. The system consists of a laboratory-made nebulizer generation system and a flow tube with a White cell-based Fourier transform IR for the detection system. An assessment of the White cell coupled to the flow tube was carried out by an extensive set of experiments to ensure the alignment of the infrared beam and optimize the performance of this system. The detection limit for CO was established as (1.0±0.3) ppm and 16 passes was chosen as the optimum number of passes to be used in flow tube experiments. Infrared spectroscopy was used to characterize dry aerosol particles in the flow tube. Pure particles composed of ammonium sulfate or sodium chloride ranging between 0.8 and 2.1 μm for size diameter and (0.8-4.9)×106 particles/cm3 for density number were generated by nebulization of aqueous solutions. Direct measurements of the aerosol particle size agree with size spectra retrieved from inversion of the extinction measurements using Mie calculations, where the difference residual value is in the order of 0.2%. The infrared detection limit for ammonium sulfate aerosol particles was determined as dp=0.9 μm and N =5×103 particles/cm3 with σ =1.1 by Mie calculation. Alternatively, Mie calculations were performed to determine the flexibility in varying the optical length when aerosol particles are sent by the injector. The very good agreement between the values retrieved for aerosol particles injected through the flow tube or through the injector clearly validates the estimation of the effective optical path length for the injector. To determine the flexibility in varying the reaction zone length, analysis of the extinction spectra as function of the position of the injector was carried out by monitoring the integrated area of different absorption modes of the ammonium sulfate. We conclude that the aerosol loss in the flow tube

  20. FlowSim/FlowRisk: A code system for studying risk associated with material process flows

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufman, A.M.

    1993-10-01

    The need to study and assess life-cycle risks of Pu release by nuclear warheads during peace time lead to the development of a code suite which could model day to day operations involving nuclear weapons and calculate the associated risk involved in these proceedings. The life-cycle study called LIONSHARE is described in Reference 1. The code that models the flow is called FlowSim. The code that evaluates the associated risk is called FlowRisk. We shall concentrate here on the methodology used by FlowSim in modeling material flows. FlowRisk, mainly a postprocessor of FlowSim runs, will be dealt with in less detail.

  1. The application of flow cytophotometry in measurements of cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, K; Watson, J V; Barnard, P J; Barnard, E A; Thomas, K; Freedman, L; de Stavola, B

    1986-01-01

    A common approach to the study of cell substrate interactions is the measurement of the attachment of cells to different substrates or to cultured cell layers. The evaluation of attachment is made either by scintillation counting of previously labelled adhering cells, or by light microscopy using the criterion of cell shape, sometimes refined by automatic image analysis. These methods have many drawbacks. This paper suggests the use of fluorescence-activated flow cytophotometry, (FC) which yields direct counts of the non-adhering cells. These "free" cells are removed after completion of the adhesion experiment from the microtitre plate wells. An internal standard, in the form of fluorescent polystyrene beads is added, allowing evaluation of the percentage of cells adhering to the well walls. Flow cytophotometry then produces data based on the analysis of large populations of cells. Unequivocal discrimination is obtained between the counted cells and counted fluorescent beads eliminating counting errors. The results can be processed on line by computer. A suspension of mouse splenocytes was used for the evaluation of the overall error of the method arising from inaccuracies in pipetting, interference of glutaraldehyde with ethidium bromide (EB) staining and instrumental error. Each adhesion experiment was terminated by staining and post-fixation and it was established that this introduces no change in cell counting, in comparison with the original unfixed cells. Prefixation, however, quenches the EB staining and would interfere with the counting procedure. The overall standard error of the technique was found to be 5%-10%.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Stream flow and analysis study

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, D.G.

    1983-11-04

    Lockwood Greene Engineers, Inc. (LGE) was retained by E.I. duPont de Nemours and Co., Inc., Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina, to conduct on-site flow measurements and sampling of tributaries and outfalls flowing into a portion of Tim`s Branch Creek. Water samples were analyzed for chemical characteristics. This report presents the results of the flow and analytical data collected during the 24 hour monitoring period, October 5 and 6, 1983. Tim`s Branch Creek is a tributary of the Upper Three Runs Creek which in turn is a tributary of the Savannah River. A map outlining the drainage area within the Savannah River Plant is included in this report.

  3. Hybrid laminar flow control study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Hybrid laminar flow control (HLFC) in which leading edge suction is used in conjunction with wing pressure distribution tailoring to postpone boundary layer transition and reduce friction drag was examined. Airfoil design characteristics required for laminar flow control (LFC) were determined. The aerodynamic design of the HLFC wing for a 178 passenger commercial turbofan transport was developed, and a drag was estimated. Systems changes required to install HLFC were defined, and weights and fuel economy were estimated. The potential for 9% fuel reduction for a 3926-km (2120-nmi) mission is identified.

  4. Breakthrough Flow Battery Cell Stack: Transformative Electrochemical Flow Storage System (TEFSS)

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-09

    GRIDS Project: UTRC is developing a flow battery with a unique design that provides significantly more power than today's flow battery systems. A flow battery is a cross between a traditional battery and a fuel cell. Flow batteries store their energy in external tanks instead of inside the cell itself. Flow batteries have traditionally been expensive because the battery cell stack, where the chemical reaction takes place, is costly. In this project, UTRC is developing a new stack design that achieves 10 times higher power than today’s flow batteries. This high power output means the size of the cell stack can be smaller, reducing the amount of expensive materials that are needed. UTRC’s flow battery will reduce the cost of storing electricity for the electric grid, making widespread use feasible.

  5. Characterizing blood cells by biophysical measurements in flow.

    PubMed

    Groner, W; Tycko, D

    1980-01-01

    One effect of automation in the hematology laboratory has been to introduce new characterizations of blood cells. Resistive pulse sensing (Coulter) and light scatter measurements in flow provide rapid and reproducible cell counts. They also provide information about red cell size, shape, and deformability. Thus, they have provided new characterization of these cells in terms of their biophysical properties. Leukocytes have been classified by optical scatter and absorption measurements in flow after being stained cytochemically. This provides rapid and precise WBC differential counts. However, here again, additional information about relative cell-enzyme content or activity is also accessible to provide a new characterization of the leukocytes. The ultimate range of utility of this expanding technology in the automated hematology laboratory of the future will, of course, depend upon establishing relations between the biophysical parameters and the functions of the cells. This, in turn, must depend upon the use of the technology by researchers and clinicians in studying cell function and the aberrations of these functions which define disease.

  6. Studies on best dose of X-ray for Hep-2 cells by using FTIR, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy and flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Renming; Tang, Weiyue; Kang, Yipu; Si, Minzhen

    2009-08-15

    We report here the use of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorption spectroscopy, and flow cytometry (FCM) to analysis the best dose of X-ray for human laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma cell lines (Hep-2). Our analysis indicates specific FTIR and UV-vis spectral differences between X-irradiated and normal Hep-2 cells. In addition, striking spectral differences are seen in FTIR spectra in the ratios at 2925/2958 and 1654/1542 cm(-1). These two ratios of the X-irradiated cells for 8 Gy dose group with value of 1.07+/-0.025 and 1.184+/-0.013, respectively, were more notable (mean+/-S.D., n=5, P<0.05) compared with that of the cells for the controls. UV-vis absorption spectra analysis shows X-ray irradiation disturbed the metabolism of phenylalanine and tyrosine intracellular, maybe, which was caused by cell cycle arrest. Spectroscopy analysis suggests 8 Gy is a better dose of X-ray for lowering the canceration degree of Hep-2 cells. Moreover, FCM analysis shows the apoptosis of X-irradiated cells depended on the radiation dose to some extent, but it was not linear. The total apoptosis ratio with value of (20.793+/-1.133)% (P<0.01, n=5) for the 12 Gy dose group was the maximum, however, the maximum apoptosis ratio per Gray (total apoptosis ratio/radiation dose) was the cells of the 2 Gy dose group with value of (4.887+/-0.211)% (P<0.05, n=5). Our data suggest that Hep-2 cells are given 2 Gy radiation of X-ray once a time, 8 Gy per week (accumulatively), the effect for lowering the canceration degree and restraining the proliferation of Hep-2 cells will be better.

  7. Alternative experiments using the geophysical fluid flow cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, J. E.

    1984-01-01

    This study addresses the possibility of doing large scale dynamics experiments using the Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell. In particular, cases where the forcing generates a statically stable stratification almost everywhere in the spherical shell are evaluated. This situation is typical of the Earth's atmosphere and oceans. By calculating the strongest meridional circulation expected in the spacelab experiments, and testing its stability using quasi-geostrophic stability theory, it is shown that strongly nonlinear baroclinic waves on a zonally symmetric modified thermal wind will not occur. The Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell does not have a deep enough fluid layer to permit useful studies of large scale planetary wave processes arising from instability. It is argued, however, that by introducing suitable meridional barriers, a significant contribution to the understanding of the oceanic thermocline problem could be made.

  8. Minimal residual disease studies by flow cytometry in acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Campana, Dario; Coustan-Smith, Elaine

    2004-01-01

    Minimal residual disease (MRD) assays are increasingly important in the clinical management of patients with acute leukemia. Among the methods available for monitoring MRD, flow cytometry holds great promise for clinical application because of its simplicity and wide availability. Several studies have demonstrated strong correlations between MRD levels by flow cytometry during clinical remission and treatment outcome, lending support to the reliability of this approach. Flow-cytometric detection of MRD is based on the identification of immunophenotypic combinations expressed on leukemic cells but not on normal hematopoietic cells. Its sensitivity depends on the specificity of the immunophenotypes used to track leukemic cells and on the number of cells available for study. Immunophenotypes that allow detection of 1 leukemic cell in 10,000 normal cells can be identified in at least 90% of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia; immunophenotypes that allow detection of 1 leukemic cell in 1,000-10,000 normal cells can be identified in at least 85% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Identification of new markers of leukemia by gene array technology should lead to the design of simple and reliable antibody panels for universal monitoring of MRD. Here we review the relative advantages and disadvantages of flow cytometry for MRD studies, as well as results obtained in correlative studies with treatment outcome. Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel

  9. A flow cytometric approach for studying alterations in the cytoplasmic concentration of calcium ions in immune cells following stimulation with thymic peptides.

    PubMed

    Papaioannou, Nikos E; Voutsas, Ioannis F; Samara, Pinelopi; Tsitsilonis, Ourania E

    2016-04-01

    [Ca(2+)]i alterations are vital in signaling pathways of cell activation. We tried to detect such changes, in intracellular signaling pathways downstream TLR4 in immune cells, following stimulation with prothymosin alpha (proTα) and its decapeptide proTα(100-109). Human leukocytes were activated with LPS, proTα or proTα(100-109), directly or after 24h stimulation, while neutrophils were directly challenged. Cells were loaded with Fluo-4 and cytoplasmic Ca(2+) alterations were recorded by flow cytometry. Direct challenge with 20 μg/mL LPS induced a measurable [Ca(2+)]i increase in macrophages and neutrophils. Monocytes and macrophages incubated for 24h with LPS, proTα or proTα(100-109) and challenged with LPS, displayed a robust response. Lymphocytes and iDCs exhibited no alterations. Conclusively, we assessed a flow cytometry-based method for monitoring Ca(2+) ion influx changes in immune cells. Their stimulation with proTα or proTα(100-109) generates an activating background, similar to LPS, allowing for the detection of [Ca(2+)]i alterations induced upon subsequent challenge. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Predicting dynamics and rheology of blood flow: A comparative study of multiscale and low-dimensional models of red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Pan, Wenxiao; Fedosov, Dmitry A; Caswell, Bruce; Karniadakis, George Em

    2011-09-01

    We compare the predictive capability of two mathematical models for red blood cells (RBCs) focusing on blood flow in capillaries and arterioles. Both RBC models as well as their corresponding blood flows are based on the dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) method, a coarse-grained molecular dynamics approach. The first model employs a multiscale description of the RBC (MS-RBC), with its membrane represented by hundreds or even thousands of DPD-particles connected by springs into a triangular network in combination with out-of-plane elastic bending resistance. Extra dissipation within the network accounts for membrane viscosity, while the characteristic biconcave RBC shape is achieved by imposition of constraints for constant membrane area and constant cell volume. The second model is based on a low-dimensional description (LD-RBC) constructed as a closed torus-like ring of only 10 large DPD colloidal particles. They are connected into a ring by worm-like chain (WLC) springs combined with bending resistance. The LD-RBC model can be fitted to represent the entire range of nonlinear elastic deformations as measured by optical-tweezers for healthy and for infected RBCs in malaria. MS-RBCs suspensions model the dynamics and rheology of blood flow accurately for any vessel size but this approach is computationally expensive for vessel diameters above 100μm. Surprisingly, the much more economical suspensions of LD-RBCs also capture the blood flow dynamics and rheology accurately except for small-size vessels comparable to RBC diameter. In particular, the LD-RBC suspensions are shown to properly capture the experimental data for the apparent viscosity of blood and its cell-free layer (CFL) in tube flow. Taken together, these findings suggest a hierarchical approach in modeling blood flow in the arterial tree, whereby the MS-RBC model should be employed for capillaries and arterioles below 100μm, the LD-RBC model for arterioles, and the continuum description for arteries.

  11. Flow-cell fibre-optic enzyme sensor for phenols

    SciTech Connect

    Papkovsky, D.B.; Ghindilis, A.L.; Kurochkin, I.N. )

    1993-07-01

    A solid-state fibre-optic luminescent oxygen sensor was used for flow-through measurements. It acts as a transducer in a new flow-cell enzyme sensor arrangement. This arrangement comprises a flow path, sample injector, microcolumn with the immobilized enzyme, oxygen membrane and fibre-optic connector joined together to form an integral unit. Laccase enzyme was used as a recognition system which provided specific oxidation of the substrates with the dissolved oxygen being monitored. The assay procedure was optimized and performance of the new system studied. The sensor was applied to the determination polyphenol content in tea, brandy, etc. (quality control test). The sensitivity to some important phenolic compounds was tested with the view of industrial wastewater control applications. 5 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Simulation of red blood cell aggregation in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Lim, B; Bascom, P A; Cobbold, R S

    1997-01-01

    A simulation model has been developed for red blood cell (RBC) aggregation in shear flow. It is based on a description of the collision rates of RBC, the probability of particles sticking together, and the breakage of aggregates by shear forces. The influence of shear rate, hematocrit, aggregate fractal dimension, and binding strength on aggregation kinetics were investigated and compared to other theoretical and experimental results. The model was used to simulate blood flow in a long large diameter tube under steady flow conditions at low Reynolds numbers. The time and spatial distribution of the state of aggregation are shown to be in qualitative agreement with previous B-mode ultrasound studies in which a central region of low echogenicity was noted. It is suggested that the model can provide a basis for interpreting prior measurements of ultrasound echogenicity and may help relate them to the local state of aggregation.

  13. Interstitial fluid flow: simulation of mechanical environment of cells in the interosseous membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Wei; Ding, Guang-Hong

    2011-08-01

    In vitro experiments have shown that subtle fluid flow environment plays a significant role in living biological tissues, while there is no in vivo practical dynamical measurement of the interstitial fluid flow velocity. On the basis of a new finding that capillaries and collagen fibrils in the interosseous membrane form a parallel array, we set up a porous media model simulating the flow field with FLUENT software, studied the shear stress on interstitial cells' surface due to the interstitial fluid flow, and analyzed the effect of flow on protein space distribution around the cells. The numerical simulation results show that the parallel nature of capillaries could lead to directional interstitial fluid flow in the direction of capillaries. Interstitial fluid flow would induce shear stress on the membrane of interstitial cells, up to 30 Pa or so, which reaches or exceeds the threshold values of cells' biological response observed in vitro. Interstitial fluid flow would induce nonuniform spacial distribution of secretion protein of mast cells. Shear tress on cells could be affected by capillary parameters such as the distance between the adjacent capillaries, blood pressure and the permeability coefficient of capillary's wall. The interstitial pressure and the interstitial porosity could also affect the shear stress on cells. In conclusion, numerical simulation provides an effective way for in vivo dynamic interstitial velocity research, helps to set up the vivid subtle interstitial flow environment of cells, and is beneficial to understanding the physiological functions of interstitial fluid flow.

  14. Defining human dendritic cell progenitors by multiparametric flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Breton, Gaëlle; Lee, Jaeyop; Liu, Kang; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2015-01-01

    Human dendritic cells (DCs) develop from progressively restricted bone marrow (BM) progenitors: these progenitor cells include granulocyte, monocyte and DC progenitor (GMDP) cells; monocyte and DC progenitor (MDP) cells; and common DC progenitor (CDP) and DC precursor (pre-DC) cells. These four DC progenitors can be defined on the basis of the expression of surface markers such as CD34 and hematopoietin receptors. In this protocol, we describe five multiparametric flow cytometry panels that can be used as a tool (i) to simultaneously detect or phenotype the four DC progenitors, (ii) to isolate DC progenitors to enable in vitro differentiation or (iii) to assess the in vitro differentiation and proliferation of DC progenitors. The entire procedure from isolation of cells to flow cytometry can be completed in 3–7 h. This protocol provides optimized antibody panels, as well as gating strategies, for immunostaining of BM and cord blood specimens to study human DC hematopoiesis in health, disease and vaccine settings. PMID:26292072

  15. Micro-PIV Measurements of Pulsatile Flow Over Endothelial Cells.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leong, Chiamin; Nackman, Gary; Wei, Timothy

    2007-11-01

    In both humans and mammals, endothelial cells remodel themselves according to mechanical loading by changing shape and orientation. Subsequently, these mechanical forces are transduced into chemical signals, mechanotransduction, involving changes in gene and protein expression. Alterations in mechanotransduction by endothelial cells to underlying smooth muscle cells is a key factor in human arterial disease. The goal of this study is to determine the importance of spatially and temporally varying mechanical loading and examine biological response under different flow conditions. In-vitro micro-PIV measurements are made in pulsatile flow over cultured endothelial cells flush mounted in a small rectangular channel. Cells are subjected to peak shear stress of 20 dynes/cm^2 corresponding to peak Re of 1000 and Womersley number of 1.4. Using multiple measurement planes, local surface height, surface pressure, and wall shear stress are extracted from the measurements. Simultaneous Raman spectroscopy is also being explored to investigate the bio-chemical response of live cultured human and bovine cells.

  16. Redox flow cell development and demonstration project, calendar year 1977

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Research and development on the redox flow cell conducted from January 1, 1977, to December 31, 1977, are described in this report. The major focus of the effort during 1977 was the key technology issues that directly influence the fundamental feasibility of the overall redox concept. These issues were the development of a suitable ion exchange membrane for the system, the screening and study of candidate redox couples to achieve optimum cell performance, and the carrying out of systems analysis and modeling to develop system performance goals and cost estimates.

  17. In vitro toxicological nanoparticle studies under flow exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambale, Franziska; Stahl, Frank; Bahnemann, Detlef; Scheper, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    The use of nanoparticles is becoming increasingly common in industry and everyday objects. Thus, extensive risk management concerning the potential health risk of nanoparticles is important. Currently, in vitro nanoparticle testing is mainly performed under static culture conditions without any shear stress. However, shear stress is an important biomechanical parameter. Therefore, in this study, a defined physiological flow to different mammalian cell lines such as A549 cells and NIH-3T3 cells has been applied. The effects of zinc oxide and titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NP), respectively, were investigated under both static and dynamic conditions. Cell viability, cell morphology, and adhesion were proven and compared to the static cell culture. Flow exposure had an impact on the cellular morphology of the cells. NIH-3T3 cells were elongated in the direction of flow and A549 cells exhibited vesicles inside the cells. Zinc oxide nanoparticles reduced the cell viability in the static and in the dynamic culture; however, the dynamic cultures were more sensitive. In the static culture and in the dynamic culture, TiO2-NP did not affect cell viability. In conclusion, dynamic culture conditions are important for further in vitro investigations and provide more relevant results than static culture conditions.

  18. A novel in vitro flow system for changing flow direction on endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chong; Lu, Hao; Schwartz, Martin Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerotic plaques localize to regions of flow disturbance, i.e. bifurcations, branch points and regions of high curvature. Shear stress in these regions can be multi-directional due to complex flow patterns such as time-varying vortices. However, commonly used in vitro flow models are incapable of changing flow orientation to any direction other than the reverse. We have developed a novel in vitro flow system to enable changes in flow direction to any angle. When cells were pre-aligned in laminar shear, then rotated 90°, cells re-aligned over 24 hours. Re-alignment involved actin remodeling by gradual rotation of actin stress fibers. This device will enable analysis of how endothelial cells sense changes in flow direction as occur in vivo. PMID:22386042

  19. Fluid Flow Induced Calcium Response in Bone Cell Network

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Bo; Lu, Xin L.; Hung, Clark T.; Costa, Kevin D.; Xu, Qiaobing; Whitesides, George M.; Guo, X. Edward

    2010-01-01

    In our previous work, bone cell networks with controlled spacing and functional intercellular gap junctions had been successfully established by using microcontact printing and self assembled monolayers technologies [Guo, X. E., E. Takai, X. Jiang, Q. Xu, G. M. Whitesides, J. T. Yardley, C. T. Hung, E. M. Chow, T. Hantschel, and K. D. Costa. Mol. Cell. Biomech. 3:95–107, 2006]. The present study investigated the calcium response and the underlying signaling pathways in patterned bone cell networks exposed to a steady fluid flow. The glass slides with cell networks were separated into eight groups for treatment with specific pharmacological agents that inhibit pathways significant in bone cell calcium signaling. The calcium transients of the network were recorded and quantitatively evaluated with a set of network parameters. The results showed that 18α-GA (gap junction blocker), suramin (ATP inhibitor), and thapsigargin (depleting intracellular calcium stores) significantly reduced the occurrence of multiple calcium peaks, which were visually obvious in the untreated group. The number of responsive peaks also decreased slightly yet significantly when either the COX-2/PGE2 or the NOS/nitric oxide pathway was disrupted. Different from all other groups, cells treated with 18α-GA maintained a high concentration of intracellular calcium following the first peak. In the absence of calcium in the culture medium, the intracellular calcium concentration decreased slowly with fluid flow without any calcium transients observed. These findings have identified important factors in the flow mediated calcium signaling of bone cells within a patterned network. PMID:20852730

  20. Parallel-plate Flow Chamber and Continuous Flow Circuit to Evaluate Endothelial Progenitor Cells under Laminar Flow Shear Stress

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Whitney O.; Jantzen, Alexandra E.; Carlon, Tim A.; Jamiolkowski, Ryan M.; Grenet, Justin E.; Ley, Melissa M.; Haseltine, Justin M.; Galinat, Lauren J.; Lin, Fu-Hsiung; Allen, Jason D.; Truskey, George A.; Achneck, Hardean E.

    2012-01-01

    The overall goal of this method is to describe a technique to subject adherent cells to laminar flow conditions and evaluate their response to well quantifiable fluid shear stresses1. Our flow chamber design and flow circuit (Fig. 1) contains a transparent viewing region that enables testing of cell adhesion and imaging of cell morphology immediately before flow (Fig. 11A, B), at various time points during flow (Fig. 11C), and after flow (Fig. 11D). These experiments are illustrated with human umbilical cord blood-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and porcine EPCs2,3. This method is also applicable to other adherent cell types, e.g. smooth muscle cells (SMCs) or fibroblasts. The chamber and all parts of the circuit are easily sterilized with steam autoclaving. In contrast to other chambers, e.g. microfluidic chambers, large numbers of cells (> 1 million depending on cell size) can be recovered after the flow experiment under sterile conditions for cell culture or other experiments, e.g. DNA or RNA extraction, or immunohistochemistry (Fig. 11E), or scanning electron microscopy5. The shear stress can be adjusted by varying the flow rate of the perfusate, the fluid viscosity, or the channel height and width. The latter can reduce fluid volume or cell needs while ensuring that one-dimensional flow is maintained. It is not necessary to measure chamber height between experiments, since the chamber height does not depend on the use of gaskets, which greatly increases the ease of multiple experiments. Furthermore, the circuit design easily enables the collection of perfusate samples for analysis and/or quantification of metabolites secreted by cells under fluid shear stress exposure, e.g. nitric oxide (Fig. 12)6. PMID:22297325

  1. Parallel-plate flow chamber and continuous flow circuit to evaluate endothelial progenitor cells under laminar flow shear stress.

    PubMed

    Lane, Whitney O; Jantzen, Alexandra E; Carlon, Tim A; Jamiolkowski, Ryan M; Grenet, Justin E; Ley, Melissa M; Haseltine, Justin M; Galinat, Lauren J; Lin, Fu-Hsiung; Allen, Jason D; Truskey, George A; Achneck, Hardean E

    2012-01-17

    The overall goal of this method is to describe a technique to subject adherent cells to laminar flow conditions and evaluate their response to well quantifiable fluid shear stresses. Our flow chamber design and flow circuit (Fig. 1) contains a transparent viewing region that enables testing of cell adhesion and imaging of cell morphology immediately before flow (Fig. 11A, B), at various time points during flow (Fig. 11C), and after flow (Fig. 11D). These experiments are illustrated with human umbilical cord blood-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and porcine EPCs. This method is also applicable to other adherent cell types, e.g. smooth muscle cells (SMCs) or fibroblasts. The chamber and all parts of the circuit are easily sterilized with steam autoclaving. In contrast to other chambers, e.g. microfluidic chambers, large numbers of cells (> 1 million depending on cell size) can be recovered after the flow experiment under sterile conditions for cell culture or other experiments, e.g. DNA or RNA extraction, or immunohistochemistry (Fig. 11E), or scanning electron microscopy. The shear stress can be adjusted by varying the flow rate of the perfusate, the fluid viscosity, or the channel height and width. The latter can reduce fluid volume or cell needs while ensuring that one-dimensional flow is maintained. It is not necessary to measure chamber height between experiments, since the chamber height does not depend on the use of gaskets, which greatly increases the ease of multiple experiments. Furthermore, the circuit design easily enables the collection of perfusate samples for analysis and/or quantification of metabolites secreted by cells under fluid shear stress exposure, e.g. nitric oxide (Fig. 12).

  2. Rapid flow-induced responses in endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stamatas, G. N.; McIntire, L. V.

    2001-01-01

    Endothelial cells alter their morphology, growth rate, and metabolism in response to fluid shear stress. To study rapid flow-induced responses in the 3D endothelial cell morphology and calcium distribution, coupled fluorescence microscopy with optical sectioning, digital imaging, and numerical deconvolution techniques have been utilized. Results demonstrate that within the first minutes of flow application nuclear calcium is increasing. In the same time frame whole cell height and nuclear height are reduced by about 1 microm. Whole cell height changes may facilitate reduction of shear stress gradients on the luminal surface, whereas nuclear structural changes may be important for modulating endothelial growth rate and metabolism. To study the role of the cytoskeleton in these responses, endothelial cells have been treated with specific disrupters (acrylamide, cytochalasin D, and colchicine) of each of the cytoskeleton elements (intermediate filaments, microfilaments, and microtubules, respectively). None of these compounds had any effect on the shear-induced calcium response. Cytochalasin D and acrylamide did not affect the shear-induced nuclear morphology changes. Colchicine, however, completely abrogated the response, indicating that microtubules may be implicated in force transmission from the plasma membrane to the nucleus. A pedagogical model based on tensegrity theory principles is presented that is consistent with the results on the 3D endothelial morphology.

  3. Rapid flow-induced responses in endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stamatas, G. N.; McIntire, L. V.

    2001-01-01

    Endothelial cells alter their morphology, growth rate, and metabolism in response to fluid shear stress. To study rapid flow-induced responses in the 3D endothelial cell morphology and calcium distribution, coupled fluorescence microscopy with optical sectioning, digital imaging, and numerical deconvolution techniques have been utilized. Results demonstrate that within the first minutes of flow application nuclear calcium is increasing. In the same time frame whole cell height and nuclear height are reduced by about 1 microm. Whole cell height changes may facilitate reduction of shear stress gradients on the luminal surface, whereas nuclear structural changes may be important for modulating endothelial growth rate and metabolism. To study the role of the cytoskeleton in these responses, endothelial cells have been treated with specific disrupters (acrylamide, cytochalasin D, and colchicine) of each of the cytoskeleton elements (intermediate filaments, microfilaments, and microtubules, respectively). None of these compounds had any effect on the shear-induced calcium response. Cytochalasin D and acrylamide did not affect the shear-induced nuclear morphology changes. Colchicine, however, completely abrogated the response, indicating that microtubules may be implicated in force transmission from the plasma membrane to the nucleus. A pedagogical model based on tensegrity theory principles is presented that is consistent with the results on the 3D endothelial morphology.

  4. Comparative in vitro dissolution study of carbamazepine immediate-release products using the USP paddles method and the flow-through cell system

    PubMed Central

    Medina, José Raúl; Salazar, Dulce Karina; Hurtado, Marcela; Cortés, Alma Rosa; Domínguez-Ramírez, Adriana Miriam

    2013-01-01

    Dissolution profiles of four carbamazepine immediate-release generic products (200 mg tablets) and the reference product Tegretol® were evaluated using the USP paddles method and an alternative method with the flow-through cell system, USP Apparatus 4. Under official conditions all products met the Q specification, dissolution profiles of generic products were similar to the dissolution profile of the reference product (f2 > 50) and model-independent parameters showed non significant differences to the reference product except mean dissolution time for product A (p < 0.05). On the other hand, when the flow-through cell system was used, none of the products met the pharmacopeial specification at 15 min and product A did not reach dissolution criteria at 60 min, dissolution profiles of all generic products were not similar to the reference product profile (f2 < 50) and all model-independent parameters showed significant differences compared to the reference product (p < 0.05). Weibull’s model was more useful for adjusting the dissolution data of all products in both USP apparatuses and Td values showed significant differences compared to the reference product (p < 0.05) when USP Apparatus 4 was used. These results indicate that the proposed method, using the flow-through cell system, is more discriminative in evaluating both, rate and extent of carbamazepine dissolution process from immediate-release generic products. PMID:24648826

  5. Shear flow-induced formation of tubular cell protrusions in multiple myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Porat, Ziv; Yaron, Itamar; Katz, Ben-Zion; Kam, Zvi; Geiger, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Exposure of live cells to shear flow induces major changes in cell shape, adhesion to the extracellular matrix, and migration. In the present study, we show that exposure of cultured multiple myeloma (MM) cells to shear flow of 4–36 dynes/cm2 triggers the extension of long tubular protrusions (denoted FLow-Induced Protrusions, or FLIPs) in the direction of the flow. These FLIPs were found to be rich in actin, contain few or no microtubules and, apart from endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-like membranal structures, are devoid of organelles. Studying the dynamics of this process revealed that FLIPs elongate at their tips in a shear force-dependent manner, and retract at their bases. Examination of this force dependence revealed considerable heterogeneity in the mechanosensitivity of individual cells, most likely reflecting the diversity of the malignant B-cell population. The mechanisms underlying FLIP formation following mechanical perturbation, and their relevance to the cellular trafficking of MM cells, are discussed. PMID:21344380

  6. M-82 Primer Flow Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-06-01

    indicate the location of the pressure transducers (Reference 9) • • • • 31 2. The development of the flow at the vent hole. (a) t = 0, 52.9 [vis]; (b...x 10Ŗ [m]. Photographs courtesy of Dr. K. J. White, Propulsion Division, BRL 32 3. Comparison of calculated and experimentally observed pressure ...function of time in [s] 36 6- Vent hole temperature in degrees [K] as a function of time expressed in [s] 37 7. Vent hole pressure in units

  7. [Immunophenotype in multiple myeloma cells detected by multiparameter flow cytometry].

    PubMed

    Cao, Fang-Fang; Chen, Fang; Hu, Yan-Ping; Zhang, Ji-Hong

    2012-06-01

    This study was purposed to investigate the immunophenotypic characteristics in multiple myeloma (MM) cells and their significance. Thirty three cases of MM and 12 cases of reactive plasmacytosis (as control group) were enrolled in the study. The expressions of surface antigens in MM cells were detected with flow cytometry by using direct immunofluorescent technique and gating method of CD38/SSC and were confirmed with morphologic observation of myeloma cells. The results indicated that the proportion of myeloma cells detected by morphologic examination was 6.0% - 76.0%. With CD38/SSC gating method, a cluster of CD38 bright positive cells could be detected in their scatter plot, the proportion ranged from 0.99% to 57.54%. Most phenotype of MM was 38(st+)CD138(+)CD19(-)CD56(+) (78.8%). While the expressions of CD20, CD33, CD117, HLA-DR were seen in some MM patients, the positive rates were 12.1%, 15.2%, 30.3%, 9.1%, respectively; the expression of other antigens was negative. cκ or cλ monoclonal restriction was detected in 27 cases (81.8%) of MM, both cκ and cλ in the remaining cases of MM was negative. It is concluded that detecting the immunophenotype of MM patients by flow cytometry with CD38/SSC gating method and basing on the heterogeneity of cell antigens can discriminate myeloma cells from normal plasma cells, which provides evidence for targeted therapy and prognosis evaluation.

  8. Dynamical Modes of Deformed Red Blood Cells and Lipid Vesicles in Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, H.

    Red blood cells and lipid vesicles exhibit rich behaivor in flows.Their dynamics were studied using a particle-based hydrodynamic simulation method, multi-particle collision dynamics. Rupture of lipid vesicles in simple shear flow was simulated by meshless membrane model. Several shape transitions of lipid vesicles and red blood cells are induced by flows. Transition of a lipid vesicle from budded to prolate shapes with increasing shear rate and ordered alignments of deformed elastic vesicles in high density are presented.

  9. Flow cytometry detection of planktonic cells with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons sorbed to cell surfaces.

    PubMed

    Cerezo, Maria I; Linden, Matthew; Agustí, Susana

    2017-02-17

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are very important components of oil pollution. These pollutants tend to sorb to cell surfaces, exerting toxic effects on organisms. Our study developed a flow cytometric method for the detection of PAHs sorbed to phytoplankton by exploiting their spectral characteristics. We discriminated between cells with PAHs from cells free of PAHs. Clear discrimination was observed with flow cytometer provided with 375 or 405nm lasers in addition to the standard 488nm laser necessary to identify phytoplankton. Using this method, we measured the relationship between the percentages of phytoplankton organisms with PAHs, with the decrease in the growth rate. Moreover, the development of this method could be extended to facilitate the study of PAHs impact on cell cultures from a large variety of organisms.

  10. Streak Imaging Flow Cytometer for Rare Cell Analysis.

    PubMed

    Balsam, Joshua; Bruck, Hugh Alan; Ossandon, Miguel; Prickril, Ben; Rasooly, Avraham

    2017-01-01

    There is a need for simple and affordable techniques for cytology for clinical applications, especially for point-of-care (POC) medical diagnostics in resource-poor settings. However, this often requires adapting expensive and complex laboratory-based techniques that often require significant power and are too massive to transport easily. One such technique is flow cytometry, which has great potential for modification due to the simplicity of the principle of optical tracking of cells. However, it is limited in that regard due to the flow focusing technique used to isolate cells for optical detection. This technique inherently reduces the flow rate and is therefore unsuitable for rapid detection of rare cells which require large volume for analysis.To address these limitations, we developed a low-cost, mobile flow cytometer based on streak imaging. In our new configuration we utilize a simple webcam for optical detection over a large area associated with a wide-field flow cell. The new flow cell is capable of larger volume and higher throughput fluorescence detection of rare cells than the flow cells with hydrodynamic focusing used in conventional flow cytometry. The webcam is an inexpensive, commercially available system, and for fluorescence analysis we use a 1 W 450 nm blue laser to excite Syto-9 stained cells with emission at 535 nm. We were able to detect low concentrations of stained cells at high flow rates of 10 mL/min, which is suitable for rapidly analyzing larger specimen volumes to detect rare cells at appropriate concentration levels. The new rapid detection capabilities, combined with the simplicity and low cost of this device, suggest a potential for clinical POC flow cytometry in resource-poor settings associated with global health.

  11. Alternative flow cytometry strategies to analyze stem cells and cell death in planarians

    PubMed Central

    Peiris, Tanuja Harshani; García‐Ojeda, Marcos E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Planarians possess remarkable stem cell populations that continuously support cellular turnover and are instrumental in the regeneration of tissues upon injury. Cellular turnover and tissue regeneration in planarians rely on the proper integration of local and systemic signals that regulate cell proliferation and cell death. Thus, understanding the signals controlling cellular proliferation and cell death in planarians could provide valuable insights for maintenance of adult body homeostasis and the biology of regeneration. Flow cytometry techniques have been utilized widely to identify, isolate, and characterize planarian stem cell populations. We developed alternative flow cytometry strategies that reduce the number of reagents and the time of sample preparation to analyze stem cells and cell death in planarians. The sensitivity of these methods is validated with functional studies using RNA interference and treatment with  γ irradiation or stressful conditions that are known to trigger cell death. Altogether, we provide a community resource intended to minimize adverse effects during ex vivo studies of stem cells and cell death in planarians. PMID:27307993

  12. Evaluation of cytotoxicity of aqueous extract of Graviola leaves on squamous cell carcinoma cell-25 cell lines by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-Yl) -2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and determination of percentage of cell inhibition at G2M phase of cell cycle by flow cytometry: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Magadi, Visveswaraiah Paranjyothi; Ravi, Venkatadasappa; Arpitha, Anantharaju; Litha; Kumaraswamy, Kikkerilakshminarayana; Manjunath, Krishnappa

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Malignancies constitute a wide variety of disorders having high mortality and morbidity rates. Current protocols for management include surgical intervention, chemotherapy, and radiation which possess numerous adverse effects. Many phytochemicals are available with anticancer properties similar to anticancer drugs. Major benefit of these compounds is apparent lack of toxicity to normal tissues. Graviola (botanical name: Annona Muricata) contain bioactive compound “annonaceous acetogenins” known for anticancer activity on cancer cell lines. Aims: To determine cytotoxicity of Graviola and percentage cell inhibition at G2M phase of cell cycle. Settings and Design: The cytotoxicity of aqueous extract of Graviola leaves on squamous cell carcinoma (SCC-25) cell lines at various concentrations evaluated using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-Yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The percentage of SCC-25 cell inhibition at G2M phase of cell cycle determined using flow cytometry. Methods: Graviola Leaves, American Type Culture Collection SCC-25 cell lines were procured from Skanda Laboratories, Bengaluru. The cytotoxicity of aqueous extract of Graviola on SCC-25 cells at various concentrations evaluated using MTT assay. The percentage of SCC-25 cell inhibition at G2M phase of cell cycle determined using flow cytometry. Statistical Analysis: Statistical analysis was done using one-way ANOVA. Results: MTT assay showed statistically significant (P < 0.001) dose-dependent inhibition of SCC-25 cell lines by Graviola with IC50 value of 12.42 μg/ml. Flow cytometry revealed that Graviola at 25 and 50 g/ml arrested 53.39% and 52.09% cells in G2M phase of cell cycle respectively, which was statistically significant. Conclusion: Graviola showed significant cytotoxic activity and percentage of cell inhibition at G2M phase cell cycle against SCC-25 cell lines. PMID:26681860

  13. DETERMINANTS OF RESTING CEREBRAL BLOOD FLOW IN SICKLE CELL DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Adam M; Borzage, Matthew T; Choi, Soyoung; Václavů, Lena; Tamrazi, Benita; Nederveen, Aart J; Coates, Thomas D; Wood, John C

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is common in children with sickle cell disease and results from an imbalance in oxygen supply and demand. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) is increased in patients with sickle cell disease to compensate for their anemia, but adequacy of their oxygen delivery has not been systematically demonstrated. This study examined the physiological determinants of CBF in 37 patients with sickle cell disease, 38 ethnicity matched control subjects and 16 patients with anemia of non-sickle origin. Cerebral blood flow was measured using phase contrast MRI of the carotid and vertebral arteries. CBF increased inversely to oxygen content (r2 = 0.69, p < 0.0001). Brain oxygen delivery, the product of CBF and oxygen content, was normal in all groups. Brain composition, specifically the relative amounts of grey and white matter, was the next strongest CBF predictor, presumably by influencing cerebral metabolic rate. Grey matter/white matter ratio and CBF declined monotonically until the age of 25 in all subjects, consistent with known maturational changes in brain composition. Further CBF reductions were observed with age in subjects older than 35 years of age, likely reflecting microvascular aging. On multivariate regression, CBF was independent of disease state, hemoglobin S, hemoglobin F, reticulocyte count and cell free hemoglobin, suggesting that it is regulated similarly in patients and control subjects. In conclusion, sickle cell disease patients had sufficient oxygen delivery at rest, but accomplish this only by marked increases in their resting CBF, potentially limiting their ability to further augment flow in response to stress. PMID:27263497

  14. Flow field design development using the segmented cell approach

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, G.; Ramsey, J. C.

    2002-01-01

    We report on fuel cell flow-field development employing two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (2-D CFD). Simulation of the flow distribution of a parallel channel flow-field, with a simple one-channel manifold, predicted inhomogeneous performance distribution within the cell. Further modeling, focusing on modification of the inlet and outlet flow fields, was used to predict a more homogeneous flow distribution in the flow-field. Attempts were made to verify the theoretical predictions experimentally by application of the segmented cell system. Measurements of the current distribution and CO transient response supported the 2-D CFD predictions. However, the margin of error between predicted and experimental results was considered insufficient to be of practical use. Future work will involve the evaluation of 3-D CFD to achieve the appropriate level of accuracy.

  15. Connexin 36 mediates blood cell flow in mouse pancreatic islets

    PubMed Central

    Short, Kurt W.; Head, W. Steve

    2013-01-01

    The insulin-secreting β-cells are contained within islets of Langerhans, which are highly vascularized. Blood cell flow rates through islets are glucose-dependent, even though there are no changes in blood cell flow within in the surrounding exocrine pancreas. This suggests a specific mechanism of glucose-regulated blood flow in the islet. Pancreatic islets respond to elevated glucose with synchronous pulses of electrical activity and insulin secretion across all β-cells in the islet. Connexin 36 (Cx36) gap junctions between islet β-cells mediate this synchronization, which is lost in Cx36 knockout mice (Cx36−/−). This leads to glucose intolerance in these mice, despite normal plasma insulin levels and insulin sensitivity. Thus, we sought to investigate whether the glucose-dependent changes in intraislet blood cell flow are also dependent on coordinated pulsatile electrical activity. We visualized and quantified blood cell flow using high-speed in vivo fluorescence imaging of labeled red blood cells and plasma. With the use of a live animal glucose clamp, blood cell flow was measured during either hypoglycemia (∼50 mg/dl) or hyperglycemia (∼300 mg/dl). In contrast to the large glucose-dependent islet blood velocity changes observed in wild-type mice, only minimal differences are observed in both Cx36+/− and Cx36−/− mice. This observation supports a novel model where intraislet blood cell flow is regulated by the coordinated electrical activity in the islet β-cells. Because Cx36 expression and function is reduced in type 2 diabetes, the resulting defect in intraislet blood cell flow regulation may also play a significant role in diabetic pathology. PMID:24326425

  16. Connexin 36 mediates blood cell flow in mouse pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Short, Kurt W; Head, W Steve; Piston, David W

    2014-02-01

    The insulin-secreting β-cells are contained within islets of Langerhans, which are highly vascularized. Blood cell flow rates through islets are glucose-dependent, even though there are no changes in blood cell flow within in the surrounding exocrine pancreas. This suggests a specific mechanism of glucose-regulated blood flow in the islet. Pancreatic islets respond to elevated glucose with synchronous pulses of electrical activity and insulin secretion across all β-cells in the islet. Connexin 36 (Cx36) gap junctions between islet β-cells mediate this synchronization, which is lost in Cx36 knockout mice (Cx36(-/-)). This leads to glucose intolerance in these mice, despite normal plasma insulin levels and insulin sensitivity. Thus, we sought to investigate whether the glucose-dependent changes in intraislet blood cell flow are also dependent on coordinated pulsatile electrical activity. We visualized and quantified blood cell flow using high-speed in vivo fluorescence imaging of labeled red blood cells and plasma. With the use of a live animal glucose clamp, blood cell flow was measured during either hypoglycemia (∼50 mg/dl) or hyperglycemia (∼300 mg/dl). In contrast to the large glucose-dependent islet blood velocity changes observed in wild-type mice, only minimal differences are observed in both Cx36(+/-) and Cx36(-/-) mice. This observation supports a novel model where intraislet blood cell flow is regulated by the coordinated electrical activity in the islet β-cells. Because Cx36 expression and function is reduced in type 2 diabetes, the resulting defect in intraislet blood cell flow regulation may also play a significant role in diabetic pathology.

  17. Gyrotactic cells subject to imposed 3D flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Nicholas; Richardson, Scott; Baggaley, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    We examine the effect of imposed 3-dimensional test flows, specifically a Taylor-Green Vortex flow and an ABC flow, on the patterns and mixing of suspensions of gyrotactic swimming cells. Numerically solving the deterministic swimming trajectory equations for individual cells with random starting positions, we explore how the surrounding flow and the cell shape determine the long-time patterns. For certain parameter ranges these patterns often take the form of braided ``plume-lie'' structures, even when using the chaotic ABC flow. For various pattern configurations, analysis of the governing equations of motion reveals why they are formed, as analytical solutions of the equations for the swimming cell trajectories can be obtained. These patterns persist when small random perturbations (noise) are added to individual trajectories.

  18. Refinement Of Hexahedral Cells In Euler Flow Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, John E.; Cappuccio, Gelsomina; Thomas, Scott D.

    1996-01-01

    Topologically Independent Grid, Euler Refinement (TIGER) computer program solves Euler equations of three-dimensional, unsteady flow of inviscid, compressible fluid by numerical integration on unstructured hexahedral coordinate grid refined where necessary to resolve shocks and other details. Hexahedral cells subdivided, each into eight smaller cells, as needed to refine computational grid in regions of high flow gradients. Grid Interactive Refinement and Flow-Field Examination (GIRAFFE) computer program written in conjunction with TIGER program to display computed flow-field data and to assist researcher in verifying specified boundary conditions and refining grid.

  19. Single chamber fuel cells: Flow geometry, rate and composition considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan, Ionel C.; Jacobson, Craig P.; Visco, Steven J.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2003-11-17

    Four different single chamber fuel cell designs were compared using propane-air gas mixtures. Gas flow around the electrodes has a significant influence on the open circuit voltage and the power density of the cell. The strong influence of flow geometry is likely due to its effect on gas composition, particularly on the oxygen chemical potential at the two electrodes as a result of gas mixing. The chamber design which exposes the cathode first to the inlet gas was found to yield the best performance at lower flow rates, while the open tube design with the electrodes equally exposed to the inlet gas worked best at higher flow rates.

  20. Refinement Of Hexahedral Cells In Euler Flow Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, John E.; Cappuccio, Gelsomina; Thomas, Scott D.

    1996-01-01

    Topologically Independent Grid, Euler Refinement (TIGER) computer program solves Euler equations of three-dimensional, unsteady flow of inviscid, compressible fluid by numerical integration on unstructured hexahedral coordinate grid refined where necessary to resolve shocks and other details. Hexahedral cells subdivided, each into eight smaller cells, as needed to refine computational grid in regions of high flow gradients. Grid Interactive Refinement and Flow-Field Examination (GIRAFFE) computer program written in conjunction with TIGER program to display computed flow-field data and to assist researcher in verifying specified boundary conditions and refining grid.

  1. Transplantation of marrow stromal cells restores cerebral blood flow and reduces cerebral atrophy in rats with traumatic brain injury: in vivo MRI study.

    PubMed

    Li, Lian; Jiang, Quan; Qu, Chang Sheng; Ding, Guang Liang; Li, Qing Jiang; Wang, Shi Yang; Lee, Ji Hyun; Lu, Mei; Mahmood, Asim; Chopp, Michael

    2011-04-01

    Cell therapy promotes brain remodeling and improves functional recovery after various central nervous system disorders, including traumatic brain injury (TBI). We tested the hypothesis that treatment of TBI with intravenous administration of human marrow stromal cells (hMSCs) provides therapeutic benefit in modifying hemodynamic and structural abnormalities, which are detectable by in vivo MRI. hMSCs were labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles. Male Wistar rats (300-350 g, n=18) subjected to controlled cortical impact TBI were intravenously injected with 1 mL of saline (n=9) or hMSCs in suspension (n=9, approximately 3 × 10(6) SPIO-labeled hMSCs) 5 days post-TBI. In vivo MRI measurements consisting of cerebral blood flow (CBF), T2-weighted imaging, and 3D gradient echo imaging were performed for all animals 2 days post-TBI and weekly for 6 weeks. Functional outcome was evaluated with modified neurological severity score and Morris water maze test. Cell engraftment was detected in vivo by 3D MRI and confirmed by double staining. Ventricle and lesion volumetric alterations were measured using T2 maps, and hemodynamic abnormality was tracked by MRI CBF measurements. Our data demonstrate that treatment with hMSCs following TBI diminishes hemodynamic abnormalities by early restoration and preservation of CBF in the brain regions adjacent to and remote from the impact site, and reduces generalized cerebral atrophy, all of which may contribute to the observed improvement of functional outcome.

  2. Understanding Subsurface Flow Mechanisms by Studying Recession Flow Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    patnaik, S.; Biswal, B.; D, N.

    2013-12-01

    The recession flows offer valuable information on the subsurface systems of the drainage which cannot be observed due to technological limitations. Many analytical frameworks have been proposed in the past to analyze recession flow curves assess. Among them the most widely used one is Brutsaert-Neiber method of expressing negative time derivative of Q (discharge at the basin outlet at time t), -dQ/dt, as a function of Q itself, which eliminates the need of finding a reference time. Typically, basins across geographical regions display a power law relationship of the type: -dQ/dt = kQ^α. For a particular basin, the exponent α remains fairly constant recession events while the coefficient k varies greatly from one recession event to another, indicating the dynamic nature -dQ/dt-Q relationship. Recent observations show that subsurface storage in a basin mainly controls the dynamic parameter k. As subsurface water takes long time to fully drain, k of a recession event can also be influenced by the storage that occurred during the past rainfall events. We indirectly analyze the effect of past storage on recession flow by considering past streamflow as a proxy of past storage. A stronger relationship implies that the basin is able to store water for longer duration, and vice versa. In this study, we used streamflow data from 388 USGS basins that are relatively unaffected by human activities to find out the factors that affect the relationship between the power law correlation (R^2_PN) between past discharge and k, where the subscript N is the number of days of past streamflow observations considered for the recession event. For most of the basins R^2_PN decreases with N. We then selected 18 physical and climatological parameters for each study basin and investigated how they influence the value of R^2_PN for each N. We followed multiple linear regression method and found that R^2_PN is strongly influenced by the selected parameters (R^2 = 0.58) for N =30 days. We also

  3. Numerical Simulation of Sickle Cell Blood Flow in the Microcirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Stanley A.; Carlson, Brian E.

    2001-11-01

    A numerical simulation of normal and sickle cell blood flow through the transverse arteriole-capillary microcirculation is carried out to model the dominant mechanisms involved in the onset of vascular stasis in sickle cell disease. The transverse arteriole-capillary network is described by Strahler's network branching method, and the oxygen and blood transport in the capillaries is modeled by a Krogh cylinder analysis utilizing Lighthill's lubrication theory, as developed by Berger and King. Poiseuille's law is used to represent blood flow in the arterioles. Applying this flow and transport model and utilizing volumetric flow continuity at each network bifurcation, a nonlinear system of equations is obtained, which is solved iteratively using a steepest descent algorithm coupled with a Newton solver. Ten different networks are generated and flow results are calculated for normal blood and sickle cell blood without and with precapillary oxygen loss. We find that total volumetric blood flow through the network is greater in the two sickle cell blood simulations than for normal blood owing to the anemia associated with sickle cell disease. The percentage of capillary blockage in the network increases dramatically with decreasing pressure drop across the network in the sickle cell cases while there is no blockage when normal blood flows through simulated networks. It is concluded that, in sickle cell disease, without any vasomotor dilation response to decreasing oxygen concentrations in the blood, capillary blockage will occur in the microvasculature even at average pressure drops across the transverse arteriole-capillary networks.

  4. Lymphatic vessel development: fluid flow and valve-forming cells.

    PubMed

    Kume, Tsutomu

    2015-08-03

    Hemodynamic forces regulate many aspects of blood vessel disease and development, including susceptibility to atherosclerosis and remodeling of primary blood vessels into a mature vascular network. Vessels of the lymphatic circulatory system are also subjected to fluid flow-associated forces, but the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which these forces regulate the formation and maintenance of lymphatic vessels remain largely uncharacterized. This issue of the JCI includes two articles that begin to address how fluid flow influences lymphatic vessel development and function. Sweet et al. demonstrate that lymph flow is essential for the remodeling of primary lymphatic vessels, for ensuring the proper distribution of smooth muscle cells (SMCs), and for the development and maturation of lymphatic valves. Kazenwadel et al. show that flow-induced lymphatic valve development is initiated by the upregulation of GATA2, which has been linked to lymphedema in patients with Emberger syndrome. Together, these observations and future studies inspired by these results have potential to lead to the development of strategies for the treatment of lymphatic disorders.

  5. Tension of red blood cell membrane in simple shear flow.

    PubMed

    Omori, T; Ishikawa, T; Barthès-Biesel, D; Salsac, A-V; Imai, Y; Yamaguchi, T

    2012-11-01

    When a red blood cell (RBC) is subjected to an external flow, it is deformed by the hydrodynamic forces acting on its membrane. The resulting elastic tensions in the membrane play a key role in mechanotransduction and govern its rupture in the case of hemolysis. In this study, we analyze the motion and deformation of an RBC in a simple shear flow and the resulting elastic tensions on the membrane. The large deformation of the red blood cell is modelled by coupling a finite element method to solve the membrane mechanics and a boundary element method to solve the flows of the internal and external liquids. Depending on the capillary number Ca, ratio of the viscous to elastic forces, we observe three kinds of RBC motion: tumbling at low Ca, swinging at larger Ca, and breathing at the transitions. In the swinging regime, the region of the high principal tensions periodically oscillates, whereas that of the high isotropic tensions is almost unchanged. Due to the strain-hardening property of the membrane, the deformation is limited but the membrane tension increases monotonically with the capillary number. We have quantitatively compared our numerical results with former experimental results. It indicates that a membrane isotropic tension O(10{-6} N/m) is high enough for molecular release from RBCs and that the typical maximum membrane principal tension for haemolysis would be O(10{-4} N/m). These findings are useful to clarify not only the membrane rupture but also the mechanotransduction of RBCs.

  6. Continuous flow magnetic cell fractionation based on antigen expression level.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Thomas; Moore, Lee R; Jing, Ying; Haam, Seungjoo; Williams, P Stephen; Fleischman, Aaron J; Roy, Shuvo; Chalmers, Jeffrey J; Zborowski, Maciej

    2006-07-31

    Cell separation is important in medical and biological research and plays an increasingly important role in clinical therapy and diagnostics, such as rare cancer cell detection in blood. The immunomagnetic labeling of cells with antibodies conjugated to magnetic nanospheres gives rise to a proportional relationship between the number of magnetic nanospheres attached to the cell and the cell surface marker number. This enables the potential fractionation of cell populations by magnetophoretic mobility (MM). We exploit this feature with our apparatus, the Dipole Magnet Flow Fractionator (DMFF), which consists of an isodynamic magnetic field, an orthogonally-oriented thin ribbon of cell suspension in continuous sheath flow, and ten outlet flows. From a sample containing a 1:1 mixture of immunomagnetically labeled (label+) and unlabeled (label-) cells, we achieved an increase in enrichment of the label+ cell fraction with increasing outlet numbers in the direction of the magnetic field gradient (up to 10-fold). The total recovery of the ten outlet fractions was 90.0+/-7.7%. The mean MM of label+ cells increased with increasing outlet number by up to a factor of 2.3. The postulated proportionality between the number of attached magnetic beads and the number of cell surface markers was validated by comparison of MM measured by cell tracking velocimetry (CTV) with cell florescence intensity measured by flow cytometry.

  7. Laser rastering flow cytometry: fast cell counting and identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacca, G.; Junnarkar, M. R.; Goldblatt, N. R.; Yee, M. W.; Van Slyke, B. M.; Briese, T. C.

    2009-02-01

    We describe the concept of laser rastering flow cytometry, where a rapidly scanning laser beam allows counting and classification of cells at much higher rates than currently possible. Modifications to existing flow cytometers to implement the concept include an acousto-optic deflector, fast analog-to-digital conversion, and a two-step digital-signal-processing scheme that handles the high data rates and provides key assay information. Results are shown that prove the concept, demonstrating the ability to resolve closely spaced cells and to measure cells at rates more than an order of magnitude faster than on conventional flow-cytometer-based hematology analyzers.

  8. Image and flow cytometry: companion techniques for adherent and non-adherent cell analysis and sorting.

    PubMed

    Métézeau, P

    1993-01-01

    Flow cytometry (FMC) is an analytical and preparative technique whereas image analysis is only applied to cell analysis. Recently, image analysis has been adapted as a preparative method using a new technique: image cytometry for analysis and sorting (ICAS). FCM and ICAS are complementary. Flow cytometry allows rapid, quantitative and precise study of fluorescence and light scattering in a large number of cells in suspension, while ICAS analyses fewer cells (adherent cells or tissue) on the basis of fluorescence, morphology and size. ICAS can use these criteria to destroy unwanted cells and hence sort selected cells. ICAS can also be used for confocal microscopy and laser surgery.

  9. Detection of circulating immune complexes by Raji cell assay: comparison of flow cytometric and radiometric methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kingsmore, S.F.; Crockard, A.D.; Fay, A.C.; McNeill, T.A.; Roberts, S.D.; Thompson, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Several flow cytometric methods for the measurement of circulating immune complexes (CIC) have recently become available. We report a Raji cell flow cytometric assay (FCMA) that uses aggregated human globulin (AHG) as primary calibrator. Technical advantages of the Raji cell flow cytometric assay are discussed, and its clinical usefulness is evaluated in a method comparison study with the widely used Raji cell immunoradiometric assay. FCMA is more precise and has greater analytic sensitivity for AHG. Diagnostic sensitivity by the flow cytometric method is superior in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis, and vasculitis patients: however, diagnostic specificity is similar for both assays, but the reference interval of FCMA is narrower. Significant correlations were found between CIC levels obtained with both methods in SLE, rheumatoid arthritis, and vasculitis patients and in longitudinal studies of two patients with cerebral SLE. The Raji cell FCMA is recommended for measurement of CIC levels to clinical laboratories with access to a flow cytometer.

  10. Grand valley irrigation return flow case study

    SciTech Connect

    Keys, J.W.

    1981-06-01

    Irrigation water supply is furnished annually to about 71,500 acres of land in the Grand Valley of western Colorado. Return flows from that irrigation contribute about 780,000 tpy of salt to the Colorado River, causing an increase of 77 mg/l in the salinity concentration at Imperial Dam. A case study of water quality in this region is focused on: water quality data for irrigation and return flows/ identification of regulations that affect irrigation and return flows/ and a proposed program for controlling salinity levels. (1 map, 9 references, 8 tables)

  11. Activation of β-catenin signaling in MLO-Y4 osteocytic cells versus 2T3 osteoblastic cells by fluid flow shear stress and PGE2: Implications for the study of mechanosensation in bone.

    PubMed

    Kamel, Mohamed A; Picconi, Jason L; Lara-Castillo, Nuria; Johnson, Mark L

    2010-11-01

    The osteocyte is hypothesized to be the mechanosensory cell in bone. However, osteoblastic cell models have been most commonly used to investigate mechanisms of mechanosensation in bone. Therefore, we sought to determine if differences might exist between osteocytic and osteoblastic cell models relative to the activation of β-catenin signaling in MLO-Y4 osteocytic, 2T3 osteoblastic and primary neonatal calvarial cells (NCCs) in response to pulsatile fluid flow shear stress (PFFSS). β-catenin nuclear translocation was observed in the MLO-Y4 cells at 2 and 16 dynes/cm(2) PFFSS, but only at 16 dynes/cm(2) in the 2T3 or NCC cultures. The MLO-Y4 cells released high amounts of PGE(2) into the media at all levels of PFFSS (2-24 dynes/cm(2)) and we observed a biphasic pattern relative to the level of PFFSS. In contrast PGE(2) release by 2T3 cells was only detected during 16 and 24 dynes/cm(2) PFFSS starting at >1h and never reached the levels produced by the MLO-Y4 cells. Exogenously added PGE(2) was able to induce β-catenin nuclear translocation in all cells suggesting that the differences between the cell lines observed for β-catenin nuclear translocation were associated with the differences in PGE(2) production. To investigate a possible mechanism for the differences in PGE(2) release by the MLO-Y4 and 2T3 cells we examined the regulation of Ptgs2 (Cox-2) gene expression by PFFSS. 2T3 cell Ptgs2 mRNA levels at both 0 and 24h after 2h of PFFSS showed biphasic increases with peaks at 4 and 24 dynes/cm(2) and 24-hour levels were higher than zero-hour levels. MLO-Y4 cell Ptgs2 expression was similarly biphasic; however at 24-hour post-flow Ptgs2 mRNA levels were lower. Our data suggest significant differences in the sensitivity and kinetics of the response mechanisms of the 2T3 and neonatal calvarial osteoblastic versus MLO-Y4 osteocytic cells to PFFSS. Furthermore our data support a role for PGE(2) in mediating the activation of β-catenin signaling in response to the

  12. Myosin IIA dependent retrograde flow drives 3D cell migration.

    PubMed

    Shih, Wenting; Yamada, Soichiro

    2010-04-21

    Epithelial cell migration is an essential part of embryogenesis and tissue regeneration, yet their migration is least understood. Using our three-dimensional (3D) motility analysis, migrating epithelial cells formed an atypical polarized cell shape with the nucleus leading the cell front and a contractile cell rear. Migrating epithelial cells exerted traction forces to deform both the anterior and posterior extracellular matrix toward the cell body. The cell leading edge exhibited a myosin II-dependent retrograde flow with the magnitude and direction consistent with surrounding network deformation. Interestingly, on a two-dimensional substrate, myosin IIA-deficient cells migrated faster than wild-type cells, but in a 3D gel, these myosin IIA-deficient cells were unpolarized and immobile. In contrast, the migration rates of myosin IIB-deficient cells were similar to wild-type cells. Therefore, myosin IIA, not myosin IIB, is required for 3D epithelial cell migration.

  13. A bio-inspired aquatic flow sensor using an artificial cell membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Preston A.; Garrison, Kevin; Leo, Donald J.; Sarles, Stephen A.

    2012-04-01

    Receptors known as hair cells give many animals this ability to sense a wide range of stimuli, such as sound, orientation, vibration, and flow. Previous researchers have mimicked natural hair cells by building electromechanical sensor systems that produce an electric response due to the bending of artificial hairs. Inspired by the roles of sensory hairs in fish, this work builds on previous research by investigating the flow dependent electrical response of a 'skin'-encapsulated artificial hair cell in an aqueous flow. This study presents the design, fabrication, and characterization of a flow sensor that will help close the loop between the sensing mechanisms and control strategies that aquatic organisms employ for functions such as locomotion regulation, prey capture, and particulate capture. The system is fabricated with a durable, artificial bilayer that forms at the interface between lipid-encased aqueous volumes contained in a flexible encapsulated polyurethane substrate. Flow experiments are conducted by placing the bio-inspired sensor in a flow chamber and subjecting it to pulse-like flows. Specifically, through temporal responses of the measured current and power spectral density (PSD) analysis, our results show that the amplitude and frequency of the current response are related to the flow over the hair. This preliminary study demonstrates that the encapsulated artificial hair cell flow sensor is capable of sensing changes in flow through a mechanoelectrical response and that its sensing capabilities may be altered by varying its surface morphology.

  14. Mechanical Control of Cell flow in Multicellular Spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delarue, Morgan; Montel, Fabien; Caen, Ouriel; Elgeti, Jens; Siaugue, Jean-Michel; Vignjevic, Danijela; Prost, Jacques; Joanny, Jean-François; Cappello, Giovanni

    2013-03-01

    Collective cell motion is observed in a wide range of biological processes. In tumors, physiological gradients of nutrients, growth factors, or even oxygen give rise to gradients of proliferation. We show using fluorescently labeled particles that these gradients drive a velocity field resulting in a cellular flow in multicellular spheroids. Under mechanical stress, the cellular flow is drastically reduced. We describe the results with a hydrodynamic model that considers only convection of the particles by the cellular flow.

  15. Rapid Flow Analysis Studies with Spectroscopic Detectors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalib, Amlius

    A rapid flow analysis study based on segmented flow and flow injection principles is described in this thesis. The main objective of this study was to establish the response characteristics in continuous flow analysis systems in order to improve sampling rates with several types of spectroscopic detectors. It was found from flame photometric studies that non-segmented flowing streams are applicable to rapid flow analysis with automatic sample aspiration. Calcium was used as a typical example and determined at sampling rates up to 360 h('-1) with a detection limit of 0.05 mg L(' -1). A rapid flow system is reported using direct aspiration for AAS analysis with both manual injection and automatic aspiration techniques, and found to give sampling rates of up to 600-720 samples h('-1). Speed of analysis was reduced by about 50% when using an external peristaltic pump in the flow system design, due to increased sample dispersion. A novel aspect of a rapid flow injection approach reported with ICPAES detection includes the method of injecting samples via a peristaltic pump with simultaneous computer data processing. Determination of serum cations (Na, K, Ca, Mg and Fe) was demonstrated as an example of an application of the technique at sampling rates of 240 h('-1). Precision and detection limits for 13 elements in a single standard solution are reported. The use of automated aspiration sampling is also reported in this method for comparison. Further studies on flow characteristics were carried out by a combination of the rapid flow system with very short sampling times as low as 2 seconds using UV-visible spectrophotometric detection. Analysis of human blood serum samples was used as an example where total protein and inorganic phosphate were determined at sampling rates of 240 h('-1) and 360 h('-1) respectively. The novel aspects of the results from these studies include the very rapid sample throughput developed with simple and inexpensive experimental approaches in

  16. Code Validation Study for Base Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ascoli, Edward P.; Heiba, Adel H.; Lagnado, Ronald R.; Ungewitter, Ronald J.; Williams, Morgan

    1993-01-01

    New and old rocket launch concepts recommend the clustering of motors for improved lift capability. The flowfield of the base region of the rocket is very complex and can contain high temperature plume gases. These hot gases can cause catastrophic problems if not adequately designed for. To assess the base region characteristics, advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is being used. As a precursor to these calculations the CFD code requires validation on base flows. The primary objective of this code validation study was to establish a high level of confidence in predicting base flows with the USA CFD code. USA has been extensively validated for fundamental flows and other applications. However, base heating flows have a number of unique characteristics so it was necessary to extend the existing validation for this class of problems. In preparation for the planned NLS 1.5 Stage base heating analysis, six case sets were studied to extend the USA code validation data base. This presentation gives a cursive review of three of these cases. The cases presented include a 2D axi-symmetric study, a 3D real nozzle study, and a 3D multi-species study. The results of all the studies show good general agreement with data with no adjustments to the base numerical algorithms or physical models in the code. The study proved the capability of the USA code for modeling base flows within the accuracy of available data.

  17. Code validation study for base flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascoli, Edward P.; Heiba, Adel H.; Lagnado, Ronald R.; Ungewitter, Ronald J.; Williams, Morgan

    1993-07-01

    New and old rocket launch concepts recommend the clustering of motors for improved lift capability. The flowfield of the base region of the rocket is very complex and can contain high temperature plume gases. These hot gases can cause catastrophic problems if not adequately designed for. To assess the base region characteristics, advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is being used. As a precursor to these calculations the CFD code requires validation on base flows. The primary objective of this code validation study was to establish a high level of confidence in predicting base flows with the USA CFD code. USA has been extensively validated for fundamental flows and other applications. However, base heating flows have a number of unique characteristics so it was necessary to extend the existing validation for this class of problems. In preparation for the planned NLS 1.5 Stage base heating analysis, six case sets were studied to extend the USA code validation data base. This presentation gives a cursive review of three of these cases. The cases presented include a 2D axi-symmetric study, a 3D real nozzle study, and a 3D multi-species study. The results of all the studies show good general agreement with data with no adjustments to the base numerical algorithms or physical models in the code. The study proved the capability of the USA code for modeling base flows within the accuracy of available data.

  18. Cell exclusion in couette flow: evaluation through flow visualization and mechanical forces.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Laura J; Marshall, Lindsay J; Devitt, Andrew; Hilton, Andrew; Tansley, Geoff D

    2013-03-01

    Cell exclusion is the phenomenon whereby the hematocrit and viscosity of blood decrease in areas of high stress. While this is well known in naturally occurring Poiseuille flow in the human body, it has never previously been shown in Couette flow, which occurs in implantable devices including blood pumps. The high-shear stresses that occur in the gap between the boundaries in Couette flow are known to cause hemolysis in erythrocytes. We propose to mitigate this damage by initiating cell exclusion through the use of a spiral-groove bearing (SGB) that will provide escape routes by which the cells may separate themselves from the plasma and the high stresses in the gap. The force between two bearings (one being the SGB) in Couette flow was measured. Stained erythrocytes, along with silver spheres of similar diameter to erythrocytes, were visualized across a transparent SGB at various gap heights. A reduction in the force across the bearing for human blood, compared with fluids of comparable viscosity, was found. This indicates a reduction in the viscosity of the fluid across the bearing due to a lowered hematocrit because of cell exclusion. The corresponding images clearly show both cells and spheres being excluded from the gap by entering the grooves. This is the first time the phenomenon of cell exclusion has been shown in Couette flow. It not only furthers our understanding of how blood responds to different flows but could also lead to improvements in the future design of medical devices.

  19. Cerebral blood flow in sickle cell cerebrovascular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Huttenlocher, P.R.; Moohr, J.W.; Johns, L.; Brown, F.D.

    1984-05-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) has been studied by the xenon-133 (/sup 133/Xe) inhalation method in 16 children with suspected sickle cell cerebrovascular disease. Abnormalities consisting of decreases in total, hemispheral, or regional CBF were found in 17 of 26 studies. Eleven studies performed immediately after stroke, transient ischemic attack, or depression of state of alertness showed abnormalities. In addition to confirming regional cerebrovascular insufficiency in children with stroke due to major cerebral artery occlusion, the method detected diffuse decrease in CBF in children with stupor, coma, and seizures who had normal angiographic findings. In contrast, six of seven studies obtained after exchange transfusion or during maintenance on hypertransfusion therapy showed normal findings. The difference between results in patients with acute neurologic disturbances and those receiving transfusion therapy was statistically significant (P less than .005). The data indicate that the /sup 133/Xe method reliably demonstrates cerebrovascular impairment in sickle cell disease. They also suggest that CBF changes in patients with sickle cell disease can be reversed by exchange transfusion and by hypertransfusion therapy. The /sup 133/Xe CBF method may be useful for following up children with sickle cell disease who are at high risk for recurrent stroke.

  20. Piezoelectric Microvalve for Flow Control in Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bucci, B.A.; Vipperman, J.S.; Clark, W.; Hensel, J.P.; Thornton, J.D.; Kim. S.

    2006-11-01

    Maldistribution of fuel across the cells of a fuel cell stack is an issue that can contribute to poor cell performance and possible cell failure. It has been proposed that an array of microvalves could promote even distribution of fuel across a fuel cell stack. A piezoelectric microvalve has been developed for this purpose. This valve can be tuned to a nominal flow rate (and failure position) from which the actuator would either increase or decrease the flow rate and fuel. The valve can successfully regulate the flow of fuel from 0.7 to 1.1 slpm of hydrogen in the range of temperatures from 80° to 100°C and has been tested over pressure drops from 0.5 to 1 psi. A bank of these valves is currently being tested in a four-cell stack at the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory.

  1. Construction and evaluation of a flow-through cell adapted to a commercial static mercury drop electrode (SMDE) to study the adsorption of Cd(II) and Pb(II) on vermiculite.

    PubMed

    Abate, Gilberto; Lichtig, Jaim; Masini, Jorge C

    2002-09-12

    This paper describes the construction and application of a robust flow-through cell for use with the capillary of a commercial static mercury drop electrode. Linearity of peak current was observed up to 0.50 mumol l(-1) for Cd(II) or Pb(II) in anodic stripping voltammetry experiments performed under continuous flow during the deposition step, using 120 s of deposition time and flow rate of 4.0 ml min(-1). Under these conditions the limits of detection for Cd(II) and Pb(II) were 13 and 17 nmol l(-1), respectively. An analytical throughput of 20 analyses per h was possible using 10 s for cleaning the cell between two samples and including the time needed for the potential scan, which was performed with the flow stopped, using the differential pulse mode for current sampling. The linear dynamic range can be extended up to 5 mumol l(-1) for both cations if the deposition time is decreased to 30 s, a condition in which the sampling throughput is 35 analyses per h. The proposed manifold was used to study the adsorption rates of Cd(II) and Pb(II) onto vermiculite at different pHs, allowing one to perform high sensitivity measurements at high sampling frequency, using low cost instrumentation.

  2. Non-Newtonian fluid effects on surface reactions in a microfluidic flow cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akgül, M. Bahattin; Sarı, Gözde; Pakdemirli, Mehmet

    2012-11-01

    Mass transfer over a reactive surface in microfluidic flow cells plays a key role in understanding biomoleculer interactions and diagnosis of small molecules for biomedical and environmental applications. The effects of Non-Newtonian power law fluid on the binding reaction kinetic of immunoglobulin G in a flow cell are analyzed in this study. Governing equations for the fluid flow, mass transport and surface reaction are derived. The finite element method is employed to solve resulting equations. In addition, the effects of volumetric flow rate, fluid behavior index and reaction constants on the surface reaction are analyzed and presented graphically.

  3. Comparative Study of Airfoil Flow Separation Criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laws, Nick; Kahouli, Waad; Epps, Brenden

    2015-11-01

    Airfoil flow separation impacts a multitude of applications including turbomachinery, wind turbines, and bio-inspired micro-aerial vehicles. In order to achieve maximum performance, some devices operate near the edge of flow separation, and others use dynamic flow separation advantageously. Numerous criteria exist for predicting the onset of airfoil flow separation. This talk presents a comparative study of a number of such criteria, with emphasis paid to speed and accuracy of the calculations. We evaluate the criteria using a two-dimensional unsteady vortex lattice method, which allows for rapid analysis (on the order of seconds instead of days for a full Navier-Stokes solution) and design of optimal airfoil geometry and kinematics. Furthermore, dynamic analyses permit evaluation of dynamic stall conditions for enhanced lift via leading edge vortex shedding, commonly present in small flapping-wing flyers such as the bumblebee and hummingbird.

  4. A study of thin liquid sheet flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Calfo, Frederick D.; Mcconley, Marc W.; Mcmaster, Matthew S.; Afjeh, Abdollah A.

    1993-01-01

    This study was a theoretical and experimental investigation of thin liquid sheet flows in vacuum. A sheet flow created by a narrow slit of width, W, coalesces to a point at a distance, L, as a result of surface tension forces acting at the sheet edges. As the flow coalesces, the fluid accumulates in the sheet edges. The observed triangular shape of the sheet agrees with the calculated triangular result. Experimental results for L/W as a function of Weber number, We, agree with the calculated result, L/W = the sq. root of 8We. The edge cross sectional shape is found to oscillate from elliptic to 'cigar' like to 'peanut' like and then back to elliptic in the flow direction. A theoretical one-dimensional model was developed that yielded only elliptic solutions for the edge cross section. At the points where the elliptic shapes occur, there is agreement between theory and experiment.

  5. Electrochemical cell for rebalancing REDOX flow system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaller, L. H. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    An electrically rechargeable REDOX cell or battery system including one of more rebalancing cells is described. Each rebalancing cell is divided into two chambers by an ion permeable membrane. The first chamber is fed with gaseous hydrogen and a cathode fluid which is circulated through the cathode chamber of the REDOX cell is also passed through the second chamber of the rebalancing cell. Electrochemical reactions take place on the surface of insert electrodes in the first and second chambers to rebalance the electrochemical capacity of the anode and cathode fluids of the REDOX system.

  6. Microfluidic-based single cell trapping using a combination of stagnation point flow and physical barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Miao; Chen, Zongzheng; Xiang, Cheng; Liu, Bo; Xie, Handi; Qin, Kairong

    2016-06-01

    Single cell trapping in vitro by microfluidic device is an emerging approach for the study of the relationship between single cells and their dynamic biochemical microenvironments. In this paper, a hydrodynamic-based microfluidic device for single cell trapping is designed using a combination of stagnation point flow and physical barrier. The microfluidic device overcomes the weakness of the traditional ones, which have been only based upon either stagnation point flows or physical barriers, and can conveniently load dynamic biochemical signals to the trapped cell. In addition, it can connect with a programmable syringe pump and a microscope to constitute an integrated experimental system. It is experimentally verified that the microfluidic system can trap single cells in vitro even under flow disturbance and conveniently load biochemical signals to the trapped cell. The designed micro-device would provide a simple yet effective experimental platform for further study of the interactions between single cells and their microenvironments.

  7. Framework for morphometric classification of cells in imaging flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Gopakumar, G; Jagannadh, Veerendra Kalyan; Gorthi, Sai Siva; Subrahmanyam, Gorthi R K Sai

    2016-03-01

    Imaging flow cytometry is an emerging technology that combines the statistical power of flow cytometry with spatial and quantitative morphology of digital microscopy. It allows high-throughput imaging of cells with good spatial resolution, while they are in flow. This paper proposes a general framework for the processing/classification of cells imaged using imaging flow cytometer. Each cell is localized by finding an accurate cell contour. Then, features reflecting cell size, circularity and complexity are extracted for the classification using SVM. Unlike the conventional iterative, semi-automatic segmentation algorithms such as active contour, we propose a noniterative, fully automatic graph-based cell localization. In order to evaluate the performance of the proposed framework, we have successfully classified unstained label-free leukaemia cell-lines MOLT, K562 and HL60 from video streams captured using custom fabricated cost-effective microfluidics-based imaging flow cytometer. The proposed system is a significant development in the direction of building a cost-effective cell analysis platform that would facilitate affordable mass screening camps looking cellular morphology for disease diagnosis.

  8. Deoxygenation Reduces Sickle Cell Blood Flow at Arterial Oxygen Tension.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xinran; Wood, David K; Higgins, John M

    2016-06-21

    The majority of morbidity and mortality in sickle cell disease is caused by vaso-occlusion: circulatory obstruction leading to tissue ischemia and infarction. The consequences of vaso-occlusion are seen clinically throughout the vascular tree, from the relatively high-oxygen and high-velocity cerebral arteries to the relatively low-oxygen and low-velocity postcapillary venules. Prevailing models of vaso-occlusion propose mechanisms that are relevant only to regions of low oxygen and low velocity, leaving a wide gap in our understanding of the most important pathologic process in sickle cell disease. Progress toward understanding vaso-occlusion is further challenged by the complexity of the multiple processes thought to be involved, including, but not limited to 1) deoxygenation-dependent hemoglobin polymerization leading to impaired rheology, 2) endothelial and leukocyte activation, and 3) altered cellular adhesion. Here, we chose to focus exclusively on deoxygenation-dependent rheologic processes in an effort to quantify their contribution independent of the other processes that are likely involved in vivo. We take advantage of an experimental system that, to our knowledge, uniquely enables the study of pressure-driven blood flow in physiologic-sized tubes at physiologic hematocrit under controlled oxygenation conditions, while excluding the effects of endothelium, leukocyte activation, adhesion, inflammation, and coagulation. We find that deoxygenation-dependent rheologic processes are sufficient to increase apparent viscosity significantly, slowing blood flow velocity at arterial oxygen tension even without additional contributions from inflammation, adhesion, and endothelial and leukocyte activation. We quantify the changes in apparent viscosity and define a set of functional regimes of sickle cell blood flow personalized for each patient that may be important in further dissecting mechanisms of in vivo vaso-occlusion as well as in assessing risk of patient

  9. High-throughput magnetic flow sorting of human cells selected on the basis of magnetophoretic mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reece, Lisa M.; Sanders, Lehanna; Kennedy, David; Guernsey, Byron; Todd, Paul; Leary, James F.

    2010-02-01

    We have shown the potential of a new method for optimizing the separation of human stem cell subsets from peripheral blood based on a novel cell labeling technique that leverages the capabilities of a new commercially available high speed magnetic cell sorting system (IKOTECH LLC, New Albany, IN). This new system sorts cells in a continuously flowing manner using a Quadrupole Magnetic cell Sorter (QMS). The sorting mechanism is based upon the magnetophoretic mobility of the cells, a property related to the relative binding distributions of magnetic particles per cell, as determined by the utilization of a Magnetic Cell Tracking Velocimeter (MCTV). KG-1 cells were competitively labeled with anti-CD34 magnetic beads and anti-CD34 FITC to obtain an optimal level of magnetophoretic mobility as visualized by the MCTV for high throughput sort recovery in the QMS. In QMS sorting, the concept of split-flow thin channel (SPLITT) separation technology is applied by having a sample stream enter a vertical annular flow channel near the channel's interior wall followed by another sheath flow entering near the exterior wall. The two flows are initially separated by a flow splitter. They pass through the bore of a Halbach permanent quadrupole magnet assembly, which draws magnetized cells outward and deflects them into a positive outflow, while negative cells continue straight out via the inner flow lamina. QMS sorts cells based upon their magnetophoretic mobility, or the velocity of a cell per unit ponderomotive force, the counterpart of fluorescence intensity in flow cytometry. The magnetophoretic mobility distribution of a cell population, measured by automated MCTV, is used as input data for the algorithmic control of sample, sheath, and outlet flow velocities of the QMS. In this study, the relative binding distributions of magnetic particles per cell were determined by MCTV using novel sorting and sizing algorithms. The resulting mobility histograms were used to set the QMS

  10. Flow cytometry and cell sorting of heterogeneous microbial populations: the importance of single-cell analyses.

    PubMed Central

    Davey, H M; Kell, D B

    1996-01-01

    The most fundamental questions such as whether a cell is alive, in the sense of being able to divide or to form a colony, may sometimes be very hard to answer, since even axenic microbial cultures are extremely heterogeneous. Analyses that seek to correlate such things as viability, which is a property of an individual cell, with macroscopic measurements of culture variables such as ATP content, respiratory activity, and so on, must inevitably fail. It is therefore necessary to make physiological measurements on individual cells. Flow cytometry is such a technique, which allows one to analyze cells rapidly and individually and permits the quantitative analysis of microbial heterogeneity. It therefore offers many advantages over conventional measurements for both routine and more exploratory analyses of microbial properties. While the technique has been widely applied to the study of mammalian cells, is use in microbiology has until recently been much more limited, largely because of the smaller size of microbes and the consequently smaller optical signals obtainable from them. Since these technical barriers no longer hold, flow cytometry with appropriate stains has been used for the rapid discrimination and identification of microbial cells, for the rapid assessment of viability and of the heterogeneous distributions of a wealth of other more detailed physiological properties, for the analysis of antimicrobial drug-cell interactions, and for the isolation of high-yielding strains of biotechnological interest. Flow cytometric analyses provide an abundance of multivariate data, and special methods have been devised to exploit these. Ongoing advances mean that modern flow cytometers may now be used by nonspecialists to effect a renaissance in our understanding of microbial heterogeneity. PMID:8987359

  11. Flow field measurements in the cell culture unit.

    PubMed

    Walker, Stephen; Wilder, Mike; Dimanlig, Arsenio; Jagger, Justin; Searby, Nancy

    2002-10-01

    The cell culture unit (CCU) is being designed to support cell growth for long-duration life science experiments on the International Space Station (ISS). The CCU is a perfused loop system that provides a fluid environment for controlled cell growth experiments within cell specimen chambers (CSCs), and is intended to accommodate diverse cell specimen types. Many of the functional requirements depend on the fluid flow field within the CSC (e.g., feeding and gas management). A design goal of the CCU is to match, within experimental limits, all environmental conditions, other than the effects of gravity on the cells, whether the hardware is in microgravity ( micro g), normal Earth gravity, or up to 2g on the ISS centrifuge. In order to achieve this goal, two steps are being taken. The first step is to characterize the environmental conditions of current 1g cell biology experiments being performed in laboratories using ground-based hardware. The second step is to ensure that the design of the CCU allows the fluid flow conditions found in 1g to be replicated from microgravity up to 2g. The techniques that are being used to take these steps include flow visualization, particle image velocimetry (PIV), and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Flow visualization using the injection of dye has been used to gain a global perspective of the characteristics of the CSC flow field. To characterize laboratory cell culture conditions, PIV is being used to determine the flow field parameters of cell suspension cultures grown in Erlenmeyer flasks on orbital shakers. These measured parameters will be compared to PIV measurements in the CSCs to ensure that the flow field that cells encounter in CSCs is within the bounds determined for typical laboratory experiments. Using CFD, a detailed simulation is being developed to predict the flow field within the CSC for a wide variety of flow conditions, including microgravity environments. Results from all these measurements and analyses of the

  12. Flow field measurements in the cell culture unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Stephen; Wilder, Mike; Dimanlig, Arsenio; Jagger, Justin; Searby, Nancy

    2002-01-01

    The cell culture unit (CCU) is being designed to support cell growth for long-duration life science experiments on the International Space Station (ISS). The CCU is a perfused loop system that provides a fluid environment for controlled cell growth experiments within cell specimen chambers (CSCs), and is intended to accommodate diverse cell specimen types. Many of the functional requirements depend on the fluid flow field within the CSC (e.g., feeding and gas management). A design goal of the CCU is to match, within experimental limits, all environmental conditions, other than the effects of gravity on the cells, whether the hardware is in microgravity ( micro g), normal Earth gravity, or up to 2g on the ISS centrifuge. In order to achieve this goal, two steps are being taken. The first step is to characterize the environmental conditions of current 1g cell biology experiments being performed in laboratories using ground-based hardware. The second step is to ensure that the design of the CCU allows the fluid flow conditions found in 1g to be replicated from microgravity up to 2g. The techniques that are being used to take these steps include flow visualization, particle image velocimetry (PIV), and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Flow visualization using the injection of dye has been used to gain a global perspective of the characteristics of the CSC flow field. To characterize laboratory cell culture conditions, PIV is being used to determine the flow field parameters of cell suspension cultures grown in Erlenmeyer flasks on orbital shakers. These measured parameters will be compared to PIV measurements in the CSCs to ensure that the flow field that cells encounter in CSCs is within the bounds determined for typical laboratory experiments. Using CFD, a detailed simulation is being developed to predict the flow field within the CSC for a wide variety of flow conditions, including microgravity environments. Results from all these measurements and analyses of the

  13. Flow field measurements in the cell culture unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Stephen; Wilder, Mike; Dimanlig, Arsenio; Jagger, Justin; Searby, Nancy

    2002-01-01

    The cell culture unit (CCU) is being designed to support cell growth for long-duration life science experiments on the International Space Station (ISS). The CCU is a perfused loop system that provides a fluid environment for controlled cell growth experiments within cell specimen chambers (CSCs), and is intended to accommodate diverse cell specimen types. Many of the functional requirements depend on the fluid flow field within the CSC (e.g., feeding and gas management). A design goal of the CCU is to match, within experimental limits, all environmental conditions, other than the effects of gravity on the cells, whether the hardware is in microgravity ( micro g), normal Earth gravity, or up to 2g on the ISS centrifuge. In order to achieve this goal, two steps are being taken. The first step is to characterize the environmental conditions of current 1g cell biology experiments being performed in laboratories using ground-based hardware. The second step is to ensure that the design of the CCU allows the fluid flow conditions found in 1g to be replicated from microgravity up to 2g. The techniques that are being used to take these steps include flow visualization, particle image velocimetry (PIV), and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Flow visualization using the injection of dye has been used to gain a global perspective of the characteristics of the CSC flow field. To characterize laboratory cell culture conditions, PIV is being used to determine the flow field parameters of cell suspension cultures grown in Erlenmeyer flasks on orbital shakers. These measured parameters will be compared to PIV measurements in the CSCs to ensure that the flow field that cells encounter in CSCs is within the bounds determined for typical laboratory experiments. Using CFD, a detailed simulation is being developed to predict the flow field within the CSC for a wide variety of flow conditions, including microgravity environments. Results from all these measurements and analyses of the

  14. Upward swimming of a sperm cell in shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omori, Toshihiro; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2016-03-01

    Mammalian sperm cells are required to swim over long distances, typically around 1000-fold their own length. They must orient themselves and maintain a swimming motion to reach the ovum, or egg cell. Although the mechanism of long-distance navigation is still unclear, one possible mechanism, rheotaxis, was reported recently. This work investigates the mechanism of the rheotaxis in detail by simulating the motions of a sperm cell in shear flow adjacent to a flat surface. A phase diagram was developed to show the sperm's swimming motion under different shear rates, and for varying flagellum waveform conditions. The results showed that, under shear flow, the sperm is able to hydrodynamically change its swimming direction, allowing it to swim upwards against the flow, which suggests that the upward swimming of sperm cells can be explained using fluid mechanics, and this can then be used to further understand physiology of sperm cell navigation.

  15. Two-phase Flow Characteristics in a Gas-Flow Channel of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Sung Chan

    Fuel cells, converting chemical energy of fuels directly into electricity, have become an integral part of alternative energy and energy efficiency. They provide a power source of high energy-conversion efficiency and zero emission, meeting the critical demands of a rapidly growing society. The proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells, also called polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs), are the major type of fuel cells for transportation, portable and small-scale stationary applications. They provide high-power capability, work quietly at low temperatures, produce only water byproduct and no emission, and can be compactly assembled, making them one of the leading candidates for the next generation of power sources. Water management is one of the key issues in PEM fuel cells: appropriate humidification is critical for the ionic conductivity of membrane while excessive water causes flooding and consequently reduces cell performance. For efficient liquid water removal from gas flow channels of PEM fuel cells, in-depth understanding on droplet dynamics and two-phase flow characteristics is required. In this dissertation, theoretical analysis, numerical simulation, and experimental testing with visualization are carried out to understand the two-phase flow characteristics in PEM fuel cell channels. Two aspects of two-phase phenomena will be targeted: one is the droplet dynamics at the GDL surface; the other is the two-phase flow phenomena in gas flow channels. In the former, forces over a droplet, droplet deformation, and detachment are studied. Analytical solutions of droplet deformation and droplet detachment velocity are obtained. Both experiments and numerical simulation are conducted to validate analytical results. The effects of contact angle, channel geometry, superficial air velocity, properties of gas phase fluids are examined and criteria for the detachment velocity are derived to relate the Reynolds number to the Weber number. In the latter, two-phase flow

  16. Fluid flow plate for decreased density of fuel cell assembly

    DOEpatents

    Vitale, Nicholas G.

    1999-01-01

    A fluid flow plate includes first and second outward faces. Each of the outward faces has a flow channel thereon for carrying respective fluid. At least one of the fluids serves as reactant fluid for a fuel cell of a fuel cell assembly. One or more pockets are formed between the first and second outward faces for decreasing density of the fluid flow plate. A given flow channel can include one or more end sections and an intermediate section. An interposed member can be positioned between the outward faces at an interface between an intermediate section, of one of the outward faces, and an end section, of that outward face. The interposed member can serve to isolate the reactant fluid from the opposing outward face. The intermediate section(s) of flow channel(s) on an outward face are preferably formed as a folded expanse.

  17. The influence of flow cell geometry related shear stresses on the distribution, structure and susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa 01 biofilms.

    PubMed

    Salek, M Mehdi; Jones, Steven M; Martinuzzi, Robert J

    2009-11-01

    The effects of non-uniform hydrodynamic conditions resulting from flow cell geometry (square and rectangular cross-section) on Pseudomonas aeruginosa 01 (PAO1) biofilm formation, location, and structure were investigated for nominally similar flow conditions using a combination of confocal scanning laser microscope (CSLM) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The thickness and surface coverage of PAO1 biofilms were observed to vary depending on the location in the flow cell and thus also the local wall shear stress. The biofilm structure in a 5:1 (width to height) aspect ratio rectangular flow cell was observed to consist mainly of a layer of bacterial cells with thicker biofilm formation observed in the flow cell corners. For square cross-section (1:1 aspect ratio) flow cells, generally thicker and more uniform surface coverage biofilms were observed. Mushroom shaped structures with hollow centers and wall breaks, indicative of 'seeding' dispersal structures, were found exclusively in the square cross-section tubes. Exposure of PAO1 biofilms grown in the flow cells to gentamicin revealed a difference in susceptibility. Biofilms grown in the rectangular flow cell overall exhibited a greater susceptibility to gentamicin compared to those grown in square flow cells. However, even within a given flow cell, differences in susceptibility were observed depending on location. This study demonstrates that the spanwise shear stress distribution within the flow cells has an important impact on the location of colonization and structure of the resultant biofilm. These differences in biofilm structure have a significant impact on the susceptibility of the biofilms grown within flow channels. The impact of flow modification due to flow cell geometry should be considered when designing flow cells for laboratory investigation of bacterial biofilms.

  18. Dynamic modes of red blood cells in oscillatory shear flow.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2010-06-01

    The dynamics of red blood cells (RBCs) in oscillatory shear flow was studied using differential equations of three variables: a shape parameter, the inclination angle θ, and phase angle ϕ of the membrane rotation. In steady shear flow, three types of dynamics occur depending on the shear rate and viscosity ratio. (i) tank-treading (TT): ϕ rotates while the shape and θ oscillate. (ii) tumbling (TB): θ rotates while the shape and ϕ oscillate. (iii) intermediate motion: both ϕ and θ rotate synchronously or intermittently. In oscillatory shear flow, RBCs show various dynamics based on these three motions. For a low shear frequency with zero mean shear rate, a limit-cycle oscillation occurs, based on the TT or TB rotation at a high or low shear amplitude, respectively. This TT-based oscillation well explains recent experiments. In the middle shear amplitude, RBCs show an intermittent or synchronized oscillation. As shear frequency increases, the vesicle oscillation becomes delayed with respect to the shear oscillation. At a high frequency, multiple limit-cycle oscillations coexist. The thermal fluctuations can induce transitions between two orbits at very low shear amplitudes. For a high mean shear rate with small shear oscillation, the shape and θ oscillate in the TT motion but only one attractor exists even at high shear frequencies. The measurement of these oscillatory modes is a promising tool for quantifying the viscoelasticity of RBCs, synthetic capsules, and lipid vesicles.

  19. Dynamic modes of red blood cells in oscillatory shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2010-06-01

    The dynamics of red blood cells (RBCs) in oscillatory shear flow was studied using differential equations of three variables: a shape parameter, the inclination angle θ , and phase angle ϕ of the membrane rotation. In steady shear flow, three types of dynamics occur depending on the shear rate and viscosity ratio. (i) tank-treading (TT): ϕ rotates while the shape and θ oscillate. (ii) tumbling (TB): θ rotates while the shape and ϕ oscillate. (iii) intermediate motion: both ϕ and θ rotate synchronously or intermittently. In oscillatory shear flow, RBCs show various dynamics based on these three motions. For a low shear frequency with zero mean shear rate, a limit-cycle oscillation occurs, based on the TT or TB rotation at a high or low shear amplitude, respectively. This TT-based oscillation well explains recent experiments. In the middle shear amplitude, RBCs show an intermittent or synchronized oscillation. As shear frequency increases, the vesicle oscillation becomes delayed with respect to the shear oscillation. At a high frequency, multiple limit-cycle oscillations coexist. The thermal fluctuations can induce transitions between two orbits at very low shear amplitudes. For a high mean shear rate with small shear oscillation, the shape and θ oscillate in the TT motion but only one attractor exists even at high shear frequencies. The measurement of these oscillatory modes is a promising tool for quantifying the viscoelasticity of RBCs, synthetic capsules, and lipid vesicles.

  20. Lower Three Runs Instream Flow Study

    SciTech Connect

    del Carmen, B.R.; Paller, M.H.

    1993-12-31

    An Instream Flow Study was conducted to identify the minimum discharge from PAR Pond that will support a balanced biological fish community in Lower Three Runs. Hydraulic and habitat models of the Physical Habitat simulation System (PHABSIM), the major component of the US Fish and Wildlife Service`s Instream Flow Incremental Methodology (IFIM) were applied. Following calibration of the Water Surface Profile (WSP)Model for three study reaches, hydraulic data was input to the AVDEPTH habitat model to develop relationships between discharge and reaches, hydraulic data was input to the AVDEPTH habitat model to development relationship between discharge and available habitat.

  1. Combustor air flow control method for fuel cell apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Clingerman, Bruce J.; Mowery, Kenneth D.; Ripley, Eugene V.

    2001-01-01

    A method for controlling the heat output of a combustor in a fuel cell apparatus to a fuel processor where the combustor has dual air inlet streams including atmospheric air and fuel cell cathode effluent containing oxygen depleted air. In all operating modes, an enthalpy balance is provided by regulating the quantity of the air flow stream to the combustor to support fuel cell processor heat requirements. A control provides a quick fast forward change in an air valve orifice cross section in response to a calculated predetermined air flow, the molar constituents of the air stream to the combustor, the pressure drop across the air valve, and a look up table of the orifice cross sectional area and valve steps. A feedback loop fine tunes any error between the measured air flow to the combustor and the predetermined air flow.

  2. Selecting MODFLOW cell sizes for accurate flow fields.

    PubMed

    Haitjema, H; Kelson, V; de Lange, W

    2001-01-01

    Contaminant transport models often use a velocity field derived from a MODFLOW flow field. Consequently, the accuracy of MODFLOW in representing a ground water flow field determines in part the accuracy of the transport predictions, particularly when advective transport is dominant. We compared MODFLOW ground water flow rates and MODPATH particle traces (advective transport) for a variety of conceptual models and different grid spacings to exact or approximate analytic solutions. All of our numerical experiments concerned flow in a single confined or semiconfined aquifer. While MODFLOW appeared robust in terms of both local and global water balance, we found that ground water flow rates, particle traces, and associated ground water travel times are accurate only when sufficiently small cells are used. For instance, a minimum of four or five cells are required to accurately model total ground water inflow in tributaries or other narrow surface water bodies that end inside the model domain. Also, about 50 cells are needed to represent zones of differing transmissivities or an incorrect flow field and (locally) inaccurate ground water travel times may result. Finally, to adequately represent leakage through aquitards or through the bottom of surface water bodies it was found that the maximum allowable cell dimensions should not exceed a characteristic leakage length lambda, which is defined as the square root of the aquifer transmissivity times the resistance of the aquitard or stream bottom. In some cases a cell size of one-tenth of lambda is necessary to obtain accurate results.

  3. Fuel cell with metal screen flow-field

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Mahlon S.; Zawodzinski, Christine

    1998-01-01

    A polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell is provided with electrodes supplied with a reactant on each side of a catalyzed membrane assembly (CMA). The fuel cell includes a metal mesh defining a rectangular flow-field pattern having an inlet at a first corner and an outlet at a second corner located on a diagonal from the first corner, wherein all flow paths from the inlet to the outlet through the square flow field pattern are equivalent to uniformly distribute the reactant over the CMA. In a preferred form of metal mesh, a square weave screen forms the flow-field pattern. In a particular characterization of the present invention, a bipolar plate electrically connects adjacent fuel cells, where the bipolar plate includes a thin metal foil having an anode side and a cathode side; a first metal mesh on the anode side of the thin metal foil; and a second metal mesh on the cathode side of the thin metal foil. In another characterization of the present invention, a cooling plate assembly cools adjacent fuel cells, where the cooling plate assembly includes an anode electrode and a cathode electrode formed of thin conducting foils; and a metal mesh flow field therebetween for distributing cooling water flow over the electrodes to remove heat generated by the fuel cells.

  4. Fuel cell with metal screen flow-field

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Mahlon S.; Zawodzinski, Christine

    2001-01-01

    A polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell is provided with electrodes supplied with a reactant on each side of a catalyzed membrane assembly (CMA). The fuel cell includes a metal mesh defining a rectangular flow-field pattern having an inlet at a first corner and an outlet at a second corner located on a diagonal from the first corner, wherein all flow paths from the inlet to the outlet through the square flow field pattern are equivalent to uniformly distribute the reactant over the CMA. In a preferred form of metal mesh, a square weave screen forms the flow-field pattern. In a particular characterization of the present invention, a bipolar plate electrically connects adjacent fuel cells, where the bipolar plate includes a thin metal foil having an anode side and a cathode side; a first metal mesh on the anode side of the thin metal foil; and a second metal mesh on the cathode side of the thin metal foil. In another characterization of the present invention, a cooling plate assembly cools adjacent fuel cells, where the cooling plate assembly includes an anode electrode and a cathode electrode formed of thin conducting foils; and a metal mesh flow field therebetween for distributing cooling water flow over the electrodes to remove heat generated by the fuel cells.

  5. Fuel cell with metal screen flow-field

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, M.S.; Zawodzinski, C.

    1998-08-25

    A polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell is provided with electrodes supplied with a reactant on each side of a catalyzed membrane assembly (CMA). The fuel cell includes a metal mesh defining a rectangular flow-field pattern having an inlet at a first corner and an outlet at a second corner located on a diagonal from the first corner, wherein all flow paths from the inlet to the outlet through the square flow field pattern are equivalent to uniformly distribute the reactant over the CMA. In a preferred form of metal mesh, a square weave screen forms the flow-field pattern. In a particular characterization of the present invention, a bipolar plate electrically connects adjacent fuel cells, where the bipolar plate includes a thin metal foil having an anode side and a cathode side; a first metal mesh on the anode side of the thin metal foil; and a second metal mesh on the cathode side of the thin metal foil. In another characterization of the present invention, a cooling plate assembly cools adjacent fuel cells, where the cooling plate assembly includes an anode electrode and a cathode electrode formed of thin conducting foils; and a metal mesh flow field there between for distributing cooling water flow over the electrodes to remove heat generated by the fuel cells. 11 figs.

  6. Coupling gravitational and flow field-flow fractionation, and size-distribution analysis of whole yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Ramsés; Puignou, Lluís; Galceran, Maria Teresa; Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Zattoni, Andrea; Melucci, Dora

    2004-08-01

    This work continues the project on field-flow fractionation characterisation of whole wine-making yeast cells reported in previous papers. When yeast cells are fractionated by gravitational field-flow fractionation and cell sizing of the collected fractions is achieved by the electrosensing zone technique (Coulter counter), it is shown that yeast cell retention depends on differences between physical indexes of yeast cells other than size. Scanning electron microscopy on collected fractions actually shows co-elution of yeast cells of different size and shape. Otherwise, the observed agreement between the particle size distribution analysis obtained by means of the Coulter counter and by flow field-flow fractionation, which employs a second mobile phase flow as applied field instead of Earth's gravity, indicates that yeast cell density can play a major role in the gravitational field-flow fractionation retention mechanism of yeast cells, in which flow field-flow fractionation retention is independent of particle density. Flow field-flow fractionation is then coupled off-line to gravitational field-flow fractionation for more accurate characterisation of the doubly-fractionated cells. Coupling gravitational and flow field-flow fractionation eventually furnishes more information on the multipolydispersity indexes of yeast cells, in particular on their shape and density polydispersity.

  7. Improving Viability of Stem Cells During Syringe Needle Flow Through the Design of Hydrogel Cell Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Aguado, Brian A.; Mulyasasmita, Widya; Su, James; Lampe, Kyle J.

    2012-01-01

    Cell transplantation is a promising therapy for a myriad of debilitating diseases; however, current delivery protocols using direct injection result in poor cell viability. We demonstrate that during the actual cell injection process, mechanical membrane disruption results in significant acute loss of viability at clinically relevant injection rates. As a strategy to protect cells from these damaging forces, we hypothesize that cell encapsulation within hydrogels of specific mechanical properties will significantly improve viability. We use a controlled in vitro model of cell injection to demonstrate success of this acute protection strategy for a wide range of cell types including human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), human adipose stem cells, rat mesenchymal stem cells, and mouse neural progenitor cells. Specifically, alginate hydrogels with plateau storage moduli (G′) ranging from 0.33 to 58.1 Pa were studied. A compliant crosslinked alginate hydrogel (G′=29.6 Pa) yielded the highest HUVEC viability, 88.9%±5.0%, while Newtonian solutions (i.e., buffer only) resulted in 58.7%±8.1% viability. Either increasing or decreasing the hydrogel storage modulus reduced this protective effect. Further, cells within noncrosslinked alginate solutions had viabilities lower than media alone, demonstrating that the protective effects are specifically a result of mechanical gelation and not the biochemistry of alginate. Experimental and theoretical data suggest that extensional flow at the entrance of the syringe needle is the main cause of acute cell death. These results provide mechanistic insight into the role of mechanical forces during cell delivery and support the use of protective hydrogels in future clinical stem cell injection studies. PMID:22011213

  8. Full dynamics of a red blood cell in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Dupire, Jules; Socol, Marius; Viallat, Annie

    2012-12-18

    At the cellular scale, blood fluidity and mass transport depend on the dynamics of red blood cells in blood flow, specifically on their deformation and orientation. These dynamics are governed by cellular rheological properties, such as internal viscosity and cytoskeleton elasticity. In diseases in which cell rheology is altered genetically or by parasitic invasion or by changes in the microenvironment, blood flow may be severely impaired. The nonlinear interplay between cell rheology and flow may generate complex dynamics, which remain largely unexplored experimentally. Under simple shear flow, only two motions, "tumbling" and "tank-treading," have been described experimentally and relate to cell mechanics. Here, we elucidate the full dynamics of red blood cells in shear flow by coupling two videomicroscopy approaches providing multidirectional pictures of cells, and we analyze the mechanical origin of the observed dynamics. We show that contrary to common belief, when red blood cells flip into the flow, their orientation is determined by the shear rate. We discuss the "rolling" motion, similar to a rolling wheel. This motion, which permits the cells to avoid energetically costly deformations, is a true signature of the cytoskeleton elasticity. We highlight a hysteresis cycle and two transient dynamics driven by the shear rate: an intermittent regime during the "tank-treading-to-flipping" transition and a Frisbee-like "spinning" regime during the "rolling-to-tank-treading" transition. Finally, we reveal that the biconcave red cell shape is highly stable under moderate shear stresses, and we interpret this result in terms of stress-free shape and elastic buckling.

  9. Ground based studies of thermocapillary flows in levitated drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadhal, Satwindar Singh; Trinh, Eugene H.

    1994-01-01

    Analytical studies along with ground-based experiments are presently being carried out in connection with thermocapillary phenomena associated with drops and bubbles in a containerless environment. The effort here focuses on the thermal and the fluid phenomena associated with the local heating of acoustically levitated drops, both at 1-g and at low-g. In particular, the Marangoni effect on drops under conditions of local spot-heating and other types of heating are being studied. With the experiments conducted to date, fairly stable acoustic levitation of drops has been achieved and successful flow visualization by light scattering from smoke particles has been carried out. The results include situations with and without heating. As a preliminary qualitative interpretation of these experimental results, we consider the external flow pattern as a superposition of three discrete circulation cells operating on different spatial scales. The observations of the flow fields also indicate the existence of a steady state torque induced by the streaming flows. The theoretical studies have been concentrated on the analysis of streaming flows in a gaseous medium with the presence of a spherical particle undergoing periodic heating. A matched asymptotic analysis was carried out for small parameters derived from approximations in the high frequency range. The heating frequency being 'in tune' with the acoustic frequency results in a nonzero time-averaged thermal field. This leads to a steady heat flow across the equatorial plane of the sphere.

  10. Pockels-effect cell for gas-flow simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weimer, D.

    1982-01-01

    A Pockels effect cell using a 75 cu cm DK*P crystal was developed and used as a gas flow simulator. Index of refraction gradients were produced in the cell by the fringing fields of parallel plate electrodes. Calibration curves for the device were obtained for index of refraction gradients in excess of .00025 m.

  11. Design of a miniature flow cell for in situ x-ray imaging of redox flow batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jervis, Rhodri; Brown, Leon D.; Neville, Tobias P.; Millichamp, Jason; Finegan, Donal P.; Heenan, Thomas M. M.; Brett, Dan J. L.; Shearing, Paul R.

    2016-11-01

    Flow batteries represent a possible grid-scale energy storage solution, having many advantages such as scalability, separation of power and energy capabilities, and simple operation. However, they can suffer from degradation during operation and the characteristics of the felt electrodes are little understood in terms of wetting, compression and pressure drops. Presented here is the design of a miniature flow cell that allows the use of x-ray computed tomography (CT) to study carbon felt materials in situ and operando, in both lab-based and synchrotron CT. Through application of the bespoke cell it is possible to observe felt fibres, electrolyte and pore phases and therefore enables non-destructive characterisation of an array of microstructural parameters during the operation of flow batteries. Furthermore, we expect this design can be readily adapted to the study of other electrochemical systems.

  12. Ordered and chaotic flow of red blood cells flowing in a narrow tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beams, Natalie N.; Freund, Jonathan B.

    2013-11-01

    Red blood cells are well known to line up in an orderly arrangement when forced to flow through a narrow capillary-scale round tube (diameter <= 8 μ m). However, in slightly larger tubes, small perturbations from the center of the tube can cause this order to break down, resulting in apparently chaotic flow. Investigating this breakdown using a high-fidelity boundary integral solver for flowing blood cells, we show the existence of a bifurcation point for the appearance of this non-orderly behavior. The bifurcation point is found to be dependent on the diameter of the tube and the density of the cells, with more cells required to instigate chaotic behavior in smaller tubes (e.g., 27.5% cells by volume for a 11.28 μ m diameter tube, but only 5.63% for similar behavior in a tube twice that width). Increasing the cell interior viscosity is also observed to increase the amplification of perturbations. Additionally, as a counterpoint, we show that cells flowing chaotically in D = 12 μ m tubes, apparently indefinitely, will slowly organize into a regular single file if D is decreased to D = 10 μ m. Supported by NSF.

  13. Flow convergence flow rates from 3-dimensional reconstruction of color Doppler flow maps for computing transvalvular regurgitant flows without geometric assumptions: An in vitro quantitative flow study.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Shiota, T; Delabays, A; Teien, D; Zhou, X; Sinclair, B; Pandian, N G; Sahn, D J

    1999-12-01

    This study was designed to develop and test a 3-dimensional method for direct measurement of flow convergence (FC) region surface area and for quantitating regurgitant flows with an in vitro flow system. Quantitative methods for characterizing regurgitant flow events such as flow convergence with 2-dimensional color flow Doppler imaging systems have yielded variable results and may not be accurate enough to characterize those more complex spatial events. Four differently shaped regurgitant orifices were studied: 3 flat orifices (circular, rectangular, triangular) and a nonflat one mimicking mitral valve prolapse (all 4 orifice areas = 0.24 cm(2)) in a pulsatile flow model at 8 to 9 different regurgitant flow rates (10 to 50 mL/beat). An ultrasonic flow probe and meter were connected to the flow model to provide reference flow data. Video composite data from the color Doppler flow images of the FC were reconstructed after computer-controlled 180 degrees rotational acquisition was performed. FC surface area (S cm(2)) was calculated directly without any geometric assumptions by measuring parallel sliced flow convergence arc lengths through the FC volume and multiplying each by the slice thickness (2.5 to 3.2 mm) over 5 to 8 slices and then adding them together. Peak regurgitant flow rate (milliliters per second) was calculated as the product of 3-dimensional determined S (cm(2)) multiplied by the aliasing velocity (centimeters per second) used for color Doppler imaging. For all of the 4 shaped orifices, there was an excellent relationship between actual peak flow rates and 3-dimensional FC-calculated flow rates with the direct measurement of the surface area of FC (r = 0.99, mean difference = -7.2 to -0.81 mL/s, % difference = -5% to 0%), whereas a hemielliptic method implemented with 3 axial measurements of the flow convergence zone from 2-dimensional planes underestimated actual flow rate by mean difference = -39.8 to -18.2 mL/s, % difference = -32% to -17% for any

  14. Margination of White Blood Cells in Microcapillary Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedosov, Dmitry A.; Fornleitner, Julia; Gompper, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Margination of white blood cells (WBCs) towards vessel walls is an essential precondition for their efficient adhesion to the vascular endothelium. We perform numerical simulations with a two-dimensional blood flow model to investigate the dependence of WBC margination on hydrodynamic interactions of blood cells with the vessel walls, as well as on their collective behavior and deformability. We find WBC margination to be optimal in intermediate ranges of red blood cell (RBC) volume fractions and flow rates, while, beyond these ranges, it is substantially attenuated. RBC aggregation enhances WBC margination, while WBC deformability reduces it. These results are combined in state diagrams, which identify WBC margination for a wide range of flow and cell suspension conditions.

  15. Development of bipolar plates with different flow channel configurations for fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boddu, Rajesh; Marupakula, Uday Kumar; Summers, Benjamin; Majumdar, Pradip

    Bipolar plates include separate gas flow channels for anode and cathode electrodes of a fuel cell. These gases flow channels supply reactant gasses as well as remove products from the cathode side of the fuel cell. Fluid flow, heat and mass transport processes in these channels have significant effect on fuel cell performance, particularly to the mass transport losses. The design of the bipolar plates should minimize plate thickness for low volume and mass. Additionally, contact faces should provide a high degree of surface uniformity for low thermal and electrical contact resistances. Finally, the flow fields should provide for efficient heat and mass transport processes with reduced pressure drops. In this study, bipolar plates with different serpentine flow channel configurations are analyzed using computational fluid dynamics modeling. Flow characteristics including variation of pressure in the flow channel across the bipolar plate are presented. Pressure drop characteristics for different flow channel designs are compared. Results show that with increased number of parallel channels and smaller sizes, a more effective contact surface area along with decreased pressured drop can be achieved. Correlations of such entrance region coefficients will be useful for the PEM fuel cell simulation model to evaluate the affects of the bipolar plate design on mass transfer loss and hence on the total current and power density of the fuel cell.

  16. Liquid chromatography/Fourier transform IR spectrometry interface flow cell

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Charles C.; Taylor, Larry T.

    1986-01-01

    A zero dead volume (ZDV) microbore high performance liquid chromatography (.mu.HPLC)/Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) interface flow cell includes an IR transparent crystal having a small diameter bore therein through which a sample liquid is passed. The interface flow cell further includes a metal holder in combination with a pair of inner, compressible seals for directly coupling the thus configured spectrometric flow cell to the outlet of a .mu.HPLC column end fitting to minimize the transfer volume of the effluents exiting the .mu.HPLC column which exhibit excellent flow characteristics due to the essentially unencumbered, open-flow design. The IR beam passes transverse to the sample flow through the circular bore within the IR transparent crystal, which is preferably comprised of potassium bromide (KBr) or calcium fluoride (CaF.sub.2), so as to minimize interference patterns and vignetting encountered in conventional parallel-plate IR cells. The long IR beam pathlength and lensing effect of the circular cross-section of the sample volume in combination with the refractive index differences between the solvent and the transparent crystal serve to focus the IR beam in enhancing sample detection sensitivity by an order of magnitude.

  17. Liquid chromatography/Fourier transform IR spectrometry interface flow cell

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, C.C.; Taylor, L.T.

    1985-01-04

    A zero dead volume (ZDV) microbore high performance liquid chromatography (..mu.. HPLC)/Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) interface flow cell includes an IR transparent crystal having a small diameter bore therein through which a sample liquid is passed. The interface flow cell further includes a metal holder in combination with a pair of inner, compressible seals for directly coupling the thus configured spectrometric flow cell to the outlet of a ..mu.. HPLC column end fitting to minimize the transfer volume of the effluents exiting the ..mu.. HPLC column which exhibit excellent flow characteristics due to the essentially unencumbered, open-flow design. The IR beam passes transverse to the sample flow through the circular bore within the IR transparent crystal, which is preferably comprised of potassium bromide (KBr) or calcium fluoride (CaF/sub 2/), so as to minimize interference patterns and vignetting encountered in conventional parallel-plate IR cells. The long IR beam pathlength and lensing effect of the circular cross-section of the sample volume in combination with the refractive index differences between the solvent and the transparent crystal serve to focus the IR beam in enhancing sample detection sensitivity by an order of magnitude.

  18. Experimental study of double-cavity flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuerke, F.; Pastur, L. R.; Sciamarella, D.; Lusseyran, F.; Artana, G.

    2017-07-01

    The flow through two facing, identical cavities (double-cavity) is characterized experimentally, as the inflow velocity and the distance between the cavities is varied. Standard 2D2C particle image velocimetry measurements in the spanwise mid-plane provide information on the instantaneous and mean velocity flow fields. Laser Doppler velocimetry measurements at several points in the double-cavity domain reveal the global character of the streamwise fluctuating velocity spectra. The flow is characterized based on time series, recorded in the shear layer of one of the cavities, for a wide range of inflow velocities and intercavity distances. In a detailed spectral study, we show how the shear layer spectra get affected when the two cavities are brought closer together. Based on the experimental data, a temporal local linear stability analysis was carried out, which was able to explain why the frequency peaks for close intercavity distances broaden and move to higher Strouhal numbers.

  19. Visual study of the effect of grazing flow on the oscillatory flow in a resonator orifice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Rice, E. J.

    1975-01-01

    Grazing flow and oscillatory flow in an orifice were studied in a plexiglass flow channel with a single side branch Helmholtz resonator using water as the fluid medium. An oscillatory flow was applied to the resonatory cavity, and color dyes were injected in both the orifice and the grazing flow field to record the motion of the fluid. The flow regimes associated with linear and nonlinear (high sound pressure level) impedances with and without grazing flows were recorded by a high-speed motion-picture camera. Appreciable differences in the oscillatory flow field were seen in the various flow regimes. With high grazing flows, the outflow and inflow from the resonator cavity are found to be asymmetric. The visual study confirms that jet energy loss during flow into a resonator cavity is much larger than the loss for ejection from the cavity into the grazing flow. For inflow into the resonator cavity, the effective orifice area was significantly reduced.

  20. UDV study of a liquid metal vortex flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losev, G.; Khalilov, R.; Kolesnichenko, I.

    2017-06-01

    The characteristics of an oscillating vortex flow of liquid metal were studied experimentally using an ultrasound Doppler velocimeter (UDV). The flow was generated by a local alternating magnetic field induced in a rectangular thin cell filled with gallium eutectic. The influence of medium temperature change and stirring on the UDV measurements was considered. The best set of parameters providing the reliability of long-term measurements were determined. The non-monotonic behavior of dependence of the local kinetic energy on the external alternating magnetic field intensity was found.

  1. Kinetics of Colloidal Deposition and Release of Polystyrene Latex Particles in the Presence of Adsorbed beta-Lactoglobulin Studied Using a Flow Cell

    PubMed

    Joscelyne; Trägårdh

    1997-08-15

    The effect of adsorbed whey protein, beta-lactoglobulin, has been investigated on the attachment of polystyrene latex particles to an indium tin oxide (ITO) surface and the subsequent release in anionic surfactant SDS solution and distilled-deionized water at pH 6.0. Experiments were carried out using a wall-jet flow cell and particle attachment was measured in situ using the technique of evanescent wave microscopy. The deposition rate of particles increased as predicted up to a shear rate of approximately 1000 s-1, for deposition at a diffusion-limited rate. There was a reduction in the rate at higher shear rates indicating a decrease in sticking efficiency. As the shear rate increased, the ITO surface became saturated more quickly due predominantly to blocking of the surface by deposited particles. The presence of adsorbed beta-lactoglobulin on the ITO surface caused a large reduction in the subsequent deposition rate of protein-coated particles. This was due to an increase in electrostatic repulsion. Differences were found in both the extent of removal and in the release (cleaning) kinetics of particles in SDS and in distilled-deionized water for the different particle-protein-ITO surface conditions investigated. Release of particles was also independent of the shear rate. Results were interpreted by considering the roles of protein replacement and elution which occurs in SDS solutions; >90% removal of protein-coated particles from a coated ITO surface was observed in SDS when both processes play a role. This compared to 55% removal in distilled-deionized water where they were considered negligible. Copyright 1997Academic Press

  2. How cells flow in the spreading of cellular aggregates.

    PubMed

    Beaune, Grégory; Stirbat, Tomita Vasilica; Khalifat, Nada; Cochet-Escartin, Olivier; Garcia, Simon; Gurchenkov, Vasily Valérïévitch; Murrell, Michael P; Dufour, Sylvie; Cuvelier, Damien; Brochard-Wyart, Françoise

    2014-06-03

    Like liquid droplets, cellular aggregates, also called "living droplets," spread onto adhesive surfaces. When deposited onto fibronectin-coated glass or polyacrylamide gels, they adhere and spread by protruding a cellular monolayer (precursor film) that expands around the droplet. The dynamics of spreading results from a balance between the pulling forces exerted by the highly motile cells at the periphery of the film, and friction forces associated with two types of cellular flows: (i) permeation, corresponding to the entry of the cells from the aggregates into the film; and (ii) slippage as the film expands. We characterize these flow fields within a spreading aggregate by using fluorescent tracking of individual cells and particle imaging velocimetry of cell populations. We find that permeation is limited to a narrow ring of width ξ (approximately a few cells) at the edge of the aggregate and regulates the dynamics of spreading. Furthermore, we find that the subsequent spreading of the monolayer depends heavily on the substrate rigidity. On rigid substrates, the migration of the cells in the monolayer is similar to the flow of a viscous liquid. By contrast, as the substrate gets softer, the film under tension becomes unstable with nucleation and growth of holes, flows are irregular, and cohesion decreases. Our results demonstrate that the mechanical properties of the environment influence the balance of forces that modulate collective cell migration, and therefore have important implications for the spreading behavior of tissues in both early development and cancer.

  3. Adhesion of endothelial cells and endothelial progenitor cells on peptide-linked polymers in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Cooper, Stuart

    2013-05-01

    The initial adhesion of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), cord blood endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs), and human blood outgrowth endothelial cells (HBOECs) was studied under radial flow conditions. The surface of a variable shear-rate device was either coated with polymer films or covered by synthetic fibers. Spin-coating was applied to produce smooth polymer films, while fibrous scaffolds were generated by electrospinning. The polymer was composed of hexyl methacrylate, methyl methacrylate, poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate (PEGMA), and CGRGDS peptide. The peptide was incorporated into the polymer system by coupling to an acrylate-PEG-N-hydroxysuccinimide comonomer. A shear-rate-dependent increase of the attached cells with time was observed with all cell types. The adhesion of ECs increased on RGD-linked polymer surfaces compared to polymers without adhesive peptides. The number of attached ECFCs and HBOECs are significantly higher than that of HUVECs within the entire shear-rate range and surfaces examined, especially on RGD-linked polymers at low shear rates. Their superior adhesion ability of endothelial progenitor cells under flow conditions suggests they are a promising source for in vivo seeding of vascular grafts and shows the potential to be used for self-endothelialized implants.

  4. Flow Interactions with Cells and Tissues: Cardiovascular Flows and Fluid–Structure Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Morton H.; Krams, Rob; Chandran, Krishnan B.

    2010-01-01

    Interactions between flow and biological cells and tissues are intrinsic to the circulatory, respiratory, digestive and genitourinary systems. In the circulatory system, an understanding of the complex interaction between the arterial wall (a living multi-component organ with anisotropic, nonlinear material properties) and blood (a shear-thinning fluid with 45% by volume consisting of red blood cells, platelets, and white blood cells) is vital to our understanding of the physiology of the human circulation and the etiology and development of arterial diseases, and to the design and development of prosthetic implants and tissue-engineered substitutes. Similarly, an understanding of the complex dynamics of flow past native human heart valves and the effect of that flow on the valvular tissue is necessary to elucidate the etiology of valvular diseases and in the design and development of valve replacements. In this paper we address the influence of biomechanical factors on the arterial circulation. The first part presents our current understanding of the impact of blood flow on the arterial wall at the cellular level and the relationship between flow-induced stresses and the etiology of atherosclerosis. The second part describes recent advances in the application of fluid–structure interaction analysis to arterial flows and the dynamics of heart valves. PMID:20336826

  5. Cross-flow electrochemical reactor cells, cross-flow reactors, and use of cross-flow reactors for oxidation reactions

    DOEpatents

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Poeppel, Roger B.; Kleefisch, Mark S.; Kobylinski, Thaddeus P.; Udovich, Carl A.

    1994-01-01

    This invention discloses cross-flow electrochemical reactor cells containing oxygen permeable materials which have both electron conductivity and oxygen ion conductivity, cross-flow reactors, and electrochemical processes using cross-flow reactor cells having oxygen permeable monolithic cores to control and facilitate transport of oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas stream to oxidation reactions of organic compounds in another gas stream. These cross-flow electrochemical reactors comprise a hollow ceramic blade positioned across a gas stream flow or a stack of crossed hollow ceramic blades containing a channel or channels for flow of gas streams. Each channel has at least one channel wall disposed between a channel and a portion of an outer surface of the ceramic blade, or a common wall with adjacent blades in a stack comprising a gas-impervious mixed metal oxide material of a perovskite structure having electron conductivity and oxygen ion conductivity. The invention includes reactors comprising first and second zones seprated by gas-impervious mixed metal oxide material material having electron conductivity and oxygen ion conductivity. Prefered gas-impervious materials comprise at least one mixed metal oxide having a perovskite structure or perovskite-like structure. The invention includes, also, oxidation processes controlled by using these electrochemical reactors, and these reactions do not require an external source of electrical potential or any external electric circuit for oxidation to proceed.

  6. Detection of circulating breast cancer cells using photoacoustic flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Kiran

    According to the American Cancer Society, more than 200,000 new cases of breast cancer are expected to be diagnosed this year. Moreover, about 40,000 women died from breast cancer last year alone. As breast cancer progresses in an individual, it can transform from a localized state to a metastatic one with multiple tumors distributed through the body, not necessarily contained within the breast. Metastasis is the spread of cancer through the body by circulating tumor cells (CTCs) which can be found in the blood and lymph of the diagnosed patient. Diagnosis of a metastatic state by the discovery of a secondary tumor can often come too late and hence, significantly reduce the patient's chance of survival. There is a current need for a CTC detection method which would diagnose metastasis before the secondary tumor occurs or reaches a size resolvable by current imaging systems. Since earlier detection would improve prognosis, this study proposes a method of labeling of breast cancer cells for detection with a photoacoustic flow cytometry system as a model for CTC detection in human blood. Gold nanoparticles and fluorescent polystyrene nanoparticles are proposed as contrast agents for T47D, the breast cancer cell line of choice. The labeling, photoacoustic detection limit, and sensitivity are first characterized and then applied to a study to show detection from human blood.

  7. Flow dependent performance of microfluidic microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Vigolo, Daniele; Al-Housseiny, Talal T; Shen, Yi; Akinlawon, Fiyinfoluwa O; Al-Housseiny, Saif T; Hobson, Ronald K; Sahu, Amaresh; Bedkowski, Katherine I; DiChristina, Thomas J; Stone, Howard A

    2014-06-28

    The integration of Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs) in a microfluidic geometry can significantly enhance the power density of these cells, which would have more active bacteria per unit volume. Moreover, microfluidic MFCs can be operated in a continuous mode as opposed to the traditional batch-fed mode. Here we investigate the effect of fluid flow on the performance of microfluidic MFCs. The growth and the structure of the bacterial biofilm depend to a large extent on the shear stress of the flow. We report the existence of a range of flow rates for which MFCs can achieve maximum voltage output. When operated under these optimal conditions, the power density of our microfluidic MFC is about 15 times that of a similar-size batch MFC. Furthermore, this optimum suggests a correlation between the behaviour of bacteria and fluid flow.

  8. New optical configuration for flow cytometric sorting of aspherical cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharpe, John C.; Schaare, Peter N.; Kuennemeyer, Rainer

    1997-05-01

    The orthogonal axes of illumination, flow, and detection in conventional sorting flow cytometers can limit accuracy or throughput when making fluorescence measurements on a spherical cells. A new radially symmetric optical configuration has been designed to overcome these problems. Both illumination and fluorescence collection are performed by a single optical element which encircles the sample stream flow axis. Unlike existing epi-illumination flow cytometer designs, these optics are compatible with electrostatic sorting. The resolution of this system is currently being evaluated for DNA chromosome content measurement with an ultimate goal of separation of X- and Y- chromosome-bearing mammalian spermatozoa. We describe the new optical configuration and present preliminary results of instrument performance. Comparison with a conventional orthogonal optical geometry is made using fluorescent microspheres, chicken red blood cells and chinchilla sperm.

  9. A numerical study of blood flow using mixture theory

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei-Tao; Aubry, Nadine; Massoudi, Mehrdad; Kim, Jeongho; Antaki, James F.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the two dimensional flow of blood in a rectangular microfluidic channel. We use Mixture Theory to treat this problem as a two-component system: One component is the red blood cells (RBCs) modeled as a generalized Reiner–Rivlin type fluid, which considers the effects of volume fraction (hematocrit) and influence of shear rate upon viscosity. The other component, plasma, is assumed to behave as a linear viscous fluid. A CFD solver based on OpenFOAM® was developed and employed to simulate a specific problem, namely blood flow in a two dimensional micro-channel, is studied. Finally to better understand this two-component flow system and the effects of the different parameters, the equations are made dimensionless and a parametric study is performed. PMID:24791016

  10. Flow rate and humidification effects on a PEM fuel cell performance and operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guvelioglu, Galip H.; Stenger, Harvey G.

    A new algorithm is presented to integrate component balances along polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) channels to obtain three-dimensional results from a detailed two-dimensional finite element model. The analysis studies the cell performance at various hydrogen flow rates, air flow rates and humidification levels. This analysis shows that hydrogen and air flow rates and their relative humidity are critical to current density, membrane dry-out, and electrode flooding. Uniform current densities along the channels are known to be critical for thermal management and fuel cell life. This approach, of integrating a detailed two-dimensional across-the-channel model, is a promising method for fuel cell design due to its low computational cost compared to three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics models, its applicability to a wide range of fuel cell designs, and its ease of extending to fuel cell stack models.

  11. Numerical Study of Tip Vortex Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dacles-Mariani, Jennifer; Hafez, Mohamed

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents an overview and summary of the many different research work related to tip vortex flows and wake/trailing vortices as applied to practical engineering problems. As a literature survey paper, it outlines relevant analytical, theoretical, experimental and computational study found in literature. It also discusses in brief some of the fundamental aspects of the physics and its complexities. An appendix is also included. The topics included in this paper are: 1) Analytical Vortices; 2) Experimental Studies; 3) Computational Studies; 4) Wake Vortex Control and Management; 5) Wake Modeling; 6) High-Lift Systems; 7) Issues in Numerical Studies; 8) Instabilities; 9) Related Topics; 10) Visualization Tools for Vertical Flows; 11) Further Work Needed; 12) Acknowledgements; 13) References; and 14) Appendix.

  12. B-1 AFT Nacelle Flow Visualization Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Celniker, Robert

    1975-01-01

    A 2-month program was conducted to perform engineering evaluation and design tasks to prepare for visualization and photography of the airflow along the aft portion of the B-1 nacelles and nozzles during flight test. Several methods of visualizing the flow were investigated and compared with respect to cost, impact of the device on the flow patterns, suitability for use in the flight environment, and operability throughout the flight. Data were based on a literature search and discussions with the test personnel. Tufts were selected as the flow visualization device in preference to several other devices studied. A tuft installation pattern has been prepared for the right-hand aft nacelle area of B-1 air vehicle No.2. Flight research programs to develop flow visualization devices other than tufts for use in future testing are recommended. A design study was conducted to select a suitable motion picture camera, to select the camera location, and to prepare engineering drawings sufficient to permit installation of the camera. Ten locations on the air vehicle were evaluated before the selection of the location in the horizontal stabilizer actuator fairing. The considerations included cost, camera angle, available volume, environmental control, flutter impact, and interference with antennas or other instrumentation.

  13. Red blood cells flows in rectilinear microfluidic chip.

    PubMed

    Anandan, P; Ortiz, D; Intaglietta, M; Cabrales, P J; Bucolo, M

    2015-01-01

    The red blood cells flow in a controlled environment as a microfluidic chip with a rectilinear geometry was investigated. The optical monitoring performed by an automatic Particle Image Velocimetry procedure has allowed a quantitative analysis on flow features. Various parameters such as velocity, shear rate, strain rate, vorticity, divergence were extracted. The comparisons of the results obtained from the different experiments was used for the overall understanding of the RBC movements in different conditions and the establishment of the analysis procedure.

  14. Simultaneous measurement of flow over and transmigration through a cultured endothelial cell layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Lori; Pipinos, Iraklis; Baxter, Timothy; MacTaggart, Jason; Karniadakis, George; Moormeier, Derek; Bayles, Kenneth; Wei, Timothy

    2013-11-01

    This talk focuses on the methodologies associated with the integration of temporally and spatially resolved μPIV measurements of flow over live endothelial cells with measurements of chemical transport through and across the cells. The ultimate goal of the study is to examine and model the transport and transmigration of key agents responsible for the formation of atherosclerotic plaques. Flow over endothelial cells cultured in a microchannel was measured using μPIV. By making measurements in a number of planes parallel to the wall, key dynamic quantities such as shear and pressure distributions, along with surface topography could be computed from the flow measurements. Experiments were conducted in a 65 μm × 65 μm cross section microchannel at shear rates up to 20 dynes/cm2. Changes in cell conformation as a function of time after flow was started were examined. The deposition and transmigration of LDL was also examined using fluorescent-tagged LDL molecules.

  15. In Vivo Photoswitchable Flow Cytometry for Direct Tracking of Single Circulating Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Melerzanov, Alexander V.; Zharov, Vladimir P.; Galanzha, Ekaterina I.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Photoswitchable fluorescent proteins (PSFPs) that change their color in response to light have led to breakthroughs in studying static cells. However, using PSFPs to study cells in dynamic conditions is challenging. Here we introduce a method for in vivo ultrafast photoswitching of PSFPs that provides labeling and tracking of single circulating cells. Using in vivo multicolor flow cytometry, this method demonstrated the capability for studying recirculation, migration, and distribution of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) during metastasis progression. In tumor-bearing mice, it enabled monitoring of real-time dynamics of CTCs released from primary tumor, identifying dormant cells, and imaging of CTCs colonizing a primary tumor (self-seeding) or existing metastasis (reseeding). Integration of genetically encoded PSFPs, fast photoswitching, flow cytometry, and imaging makes in vivo single cell analysis in the circulation feasible to provide insights into the behavior of CTCs and potentially immune-related and bacterial cells in circulation. PMID:24816228

  16. Endothelial cell layer subjected to impinging flow mimicking the apex of an arterial bifurcation.

    PubMed

    Szymanski, Michael P; Metaxa, Eleni; Meng, Hui; Kolega, John

    2008-10-01

    Little is known about endothelial responses to the impinging flow hemodynamics that occur at arterial bifurcation apices, where intracranial aneurysms usually form. Such hemodynamic environments are characterized by high wall shear stress (WSS >40 dynes/cm(2)) and high wall shear stress gradients (WSSG >300 dynes/cm(3)). In this study, confluent bovine aortic endothelial cells were exposed to impinging flow in a T-shaped chamber designed to mimic a bifurcation. After 24-72 h under flow, cells around the stagnation point maintained polygonal shapes but cell density was reduced, whereas cells in adjacent downstream regions exposed to very high WSS and WSSG were elongated, aligned parallel to flow, and at higher density. Such behavior was not blocked by inhibiting proliferation, indicating that cells migrated downstream from the stagnation point in response to impinging flow. Furthermore, although the area of highest cell density moved downstream and away from the impingement point over time, it never moved beyond the WSS maximum. The accumulation of cells upstream of maximal WSS and downstream of maximal WSSG suggests that positive WSSG is responsible for the observed migration. These results demonstrate a unique endothelial response to aneurysm-promoting flow environments at bifurcation apices.

  17. Gradient isolator for flow field of fuel cell assembly

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, William D.

    1999-01-01

    Isolator(s) include isolating material and optionally gasketing material strategically positioned within a fuel cell assembly. The isolating material is disposed between a solid electrolyte and a metal flow field plate. Reactant fluid carried by flow field plate channel(s) forms a generally transverse electrochemical gradient. The isolator(s) serve to isolate electrochemically a portion of the flow field plate, for example, transversely outward from the channel(s), from the electrochemical gradient. Further, the isolator(s) serve to protect a portion of the solid electrolyte from metallic ions.

  18. Gradient isolator for flow field of fuel cell assembly

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, W.D.

    1999-06-15

    Isolator(s) include isolating material and optionally gasketing material strategically positioned within a fuel cell assembly. The isolating material is disposed between a solid electrolyte and a metal flow field plate. Reactant fluid carried by flow field plate channel(s) forms a generally transverse electrochemical gradient. The isolator(s) serve to isolate electrochemically a portion of the flow field plate, for example, transversely outward from the channel(s), from the electrochemical gradient. Further, the isolator(s) serve to protect a portion of the solid electrolyte from metallic ions. 4 figs.

  19. Flow properties of particles in a model annular shear cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Zhu, H. P.; Yu, A. B.

    2012-05-01

    In order to quantitatively investigate the mechanical and rheological properties of solid flow in a shear cell under conditions relevant to those in an annular cell, we performed a series of discrete particle simulations of slightly polydispersed spheres from quasi-static to intermediate flow regimes. It is shown that the average values of stress tensor components are uniformly distributed in the cell space away from the stationary walls; however, some degree of inhomogeneity in their spatial distributions does exist. A linear relationship between the (internal/external) shear and normal stresses prevails in the shear cell and the internal and external friction coefficients can compare well with each other. It is confirmed that annular shear cells are reasonably effective as a method of measuring particle flow properties. The so-called I-rheology proposed by Jop et al. [Nature (London) 441, 727 (2006)] is rigorously tested in this cell system. The results unambiguously display that the I-rheology can effectively describe the intermediate flow regime with a high correlation coefficient. However, significant deviations take place when it is applied to the quasi-static regime, which corresponds to very small values of inertial number.

  20. Cortical Flow-Driven Shapes of Nonadherent Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callan-Jones, A. C.; Ruprecht, V.; Wieser, S.; Heisenberg, C. P.; Voituriez, R.

    2016-01-01

    Nonadherent polarized cells have been observed to have a pearlike, elongated shape. Using a minimal model that describes the cell cortex as a thin layer of contractile active gel, we show that the anisotropy of active stresses, controlled by cortical viscosity and filament ordering, can account for this morphology. The predicted shapes can be determined from the flow pattern only; they prove to be independent of the mechanism at the origin of the cortical flow, and are only weakly sensitive to the cytoplasmic rheology. In the case of actin flows resulting from a contractile instability, we propose a phase diagram of three-dimensional cell shapes that encompasses nonpolarized spherical, elongated, as well as oblate shapes, all of which have been observed in experiment.

  1. Impact of standardization on clinical cell analysis by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Keeney, M; Barnett, D; Gratama, J W

    2004-01-01

    The evolution of flow cytometry from a research tool to a pivotal technology for clinical diagnostic purposes has required significant efforts to standardize methods. The great advantage of flow cytometry is that it's applications are highly amenable to standardization. Here, we review the efforts that have been made for flow cytometric applications in four major fields of clinical cell analysis: CD4+ T-cell enumeration, CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell enumeration, screening for the HLA-B27 antigen and leukemia/lymphoma immunophenotyping. These standardization efforts have been parallelled by the establishment of external quality assessment (EQA) schemes in many countries worldwide. The goal of these EQA exercises has been primarily educa-tional, but their results will increasingly serve as a basis for laboratory accreditation. This important development requires that the EQA schemes, in particular the quality of the distributed samples and the procedures for evaluating the results, meet the highest standards.

  2. Red blood cell clustering in Poiseuille microcapillary flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaiuolo, Giovanna; Lanotte, Luca; Ghigliotti, Giovanni; Misbah, Chaouqi; Guido, Stefano

    2012-05-01

    Red blood cells (RBC) flowing in microcapillaries tend to associate into clusters, i.e., small trains of cells separated from each other by a distance comparable to cell size. This process is usually attributed to slower RBCs acting to create a sequence of trailing cells. Here, based on the first systematic investigation of collective RBC flow behavior in microcapillaries in vitro by high-speed video microscopy and numerical simulations, we show that RBC size polydispersity within the physiological range does not affect cluster stability. Lower applied pressure drops and longer residence times favor larger RBC clusters. A limiting cluster length, depending on the number of cells in a cluster, is found by increasing the applied pressure drop. The insight on the mechanism of RBC clustering provided by this work can be applied to further our understanding of RBC aggregability, which is a key parameter implicated in clotting and thrombus formation.

  3. Conjugate Heat Transfer Study in Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Niranjan; Kulkarni, Vinayak; Peetala, Ravi Kumar

    2017-05-01

    Coupled and decoupled conjugate heat transfer (CHT) studies are carried out to imitate experimental studies for heat transfer measurement in hypersonic flow regime. The finite volume based solvers are used for analyzing the heat interaction between fluid and solid domains. Temperature and surface heat flux signals are predicted by both coupled and decoupled CHT analysis techniques for hypersonic Mach numbers. These two methodologies are also used to study the effect of different wall materials on surface parameters. Effectiveness of these CHT solvers has been verified for the inverse problem of wall heat flux recovery using various techniques reported in the literature. Both coupled and decoupled CHT techniques are seen to be equally useful for prediction of local temperature and heat flux signals prior to the experiments in hypersonic flows.

  4. Identification of inflammatory cells in bovine milk by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Redelman, D; Butler, S; Robison, J; Garner, D

    1988-09-01

    Cells recovered from normal or mastitic bovine milk were examined by flow cytometry. All milk samples contained particulate material that was heterogeneous in size and that produced a right-angle light-scatter signal equal to or greater than that produced by human or bovine neutrophils. Although this material labeled with Hoechst 33342, it produced fluorescence intensities below that of intact bovine cells, suggesting that it consisted of cell fragments. Mastitic milk additionally contained other populations of cells that were poorly resolved from the normal particulate material by size (electronic volume sensor) and right-angle light scatter. In order to improve this resolution, the milk cells were incubated with carboxydimethylfluorescein diacetate (CMFDA) to label intact cells. When milk samples labeled with CMFDA were examined by dual-parameter analysis using green fluorescence and right-angle light scatter, five or more populations of cells could be identified in mastitic milk. These populations included intact and degenerate neutrophils, lymphocytes, including both small and activated cells, monocytes, and large activated macrophages containing many vacuoles and phagocytosed particles. Using this procedure, all the animals in the University of Nevada-Reno Holstein dairy herd were tested once a month for 6 months. In addition, individual animals with mastitis were examined one or more times each day during the course of the inflammatory process. In the routine screening, the flow cytometric examination detected mastitis before overt symptoms developed. In cows identified to have mastitis, the flow cytometric examination provided prognostic information regarding the success of treatments.

  5. Circulation times of cancer cells by in vivo flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Li, Yan; Gu, Zhengqin; Chen, Tong; Wang, Cheng; Wei, Xunbin

    2012-03-01

    Liver cancer is one of the most common malignancies in the world, with approximately 1,000,000 cases reported every year. Hepatocellular carcinoma may metastasize to lung, bones, kidney, and many other organs. Surgical resection, liver transplantation, chemotherapy and radiation therapy are the foundation of current HCC therapies. However the outcomes are poor: the survival rate is almost zero for metastatic HCC patients. Molecular mechanisms of HCC metastasis need to be understood better and new therapies must be developed. A recently developed "in vivo flow cytometer" combined with real-time confocal fluorescence imaging are used to assess spreading and the circulation kinetics of liver tumor cells. The in vivo flow cytometer has the capability to detect and quantify continuously the number and flow characteristics of fluorescently labeled cells in vivo in real time without extracting blood sample. We have measured the depletion kinetics of two related human HCC cell lines, high-metastatic HCCLM3 cells and low-metastatic HepG2 cells, which were from the same origin and obtained by repetitive screenings in mice. >60% HCCLM3 cells are depleted within the first hour. Interestingly, the low-metastatic HepG2 cells possess noticeably slower depletion kinetics. In comparison, <40% HepG2 cells are depleted within the first hour. The differences in depletion kinetics might provide insights into early metastasis processes.

  6. Good Cell, Bad Cell: Flow Cytometry Reveals T-cell Subsets Important in HIV Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Pratip K.; Roederer, Mario

    2010-01-01

    Flow cytometry is a key technology in the study of HIV disease. In this article, we review various cellular markers that can be measured in the setting of pathogenesis or vaccination studies, including markers of activation, differentiation, senescence, immune suppression, and function. In addition, we discuss important considerations for making these measurements. Finally, we examine how flow cytometry studies have taught researchers about the disease process, and the potential for flow cytometry technology to guide treatment decisions and evaluate vaccine candidates in the future. PMID:20583275

  7. A three-dimensional flow control concept for single-cell experiments on a microchip. 1. Cell selection, cell retention, cell culture, cell balancing, and cell scanning.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xing Yue; Li, Paul C H

    2004-09-15

    An ideal microchip for single-cell experiments should be able to allow us to culture cells, to select any desired single cell from a group, to retain the cell for convenient cellular signal detection, and to deliver any buffer or reagent directly to the cell at any time during continual detection and observation. Most importantly, any negative impact on the live cell should be minimized. To accomplish all these functions, we developed a three-dimensional liquid flow control concept and employed special liquid flow fields to manipulate and retain a single yeast cell freely in the chip. A zero-speed point was controlled to retain the cell for three-dimensional cell balancing and cell scanning. A dispersive flow delivered reagents at a high speed to very near the cell and provided them to the cell at a low speed. No force stronger than its gravitational force was exerted on the cell, which could be balanced on different positions on an arc-sloping wall, thus minimizing any negative impact on the cell due to strong liquid flows. Specifically, we demonstrate on-chip single-cell culture, cell wall removal, and reagent delivery. Subsequently, single-cell fluorescence detection was performed, and noise filtering and background correction were applied for data processing.

  8. Performance study of a data flow architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, George

    1985-01-01

    Teams of scientists studied data flow concepts, static data flow machine architecture, and the VAL language. Each team mapped its application onto the machine and coded it in VAL. The principal findings of the study were: (1) Five of the seven applications used the full power of the target machine. The galactic simulation and multigrid fluid flow teams found that a significantly smaller version of the machine (16 processing elements) would suffice. (2) A number of machine design parameters including processing element (PE) function unit numbers, array memory size and bandwidth, and routing network capability were found to be crucial for optimal machine performance. (3) The study participants readily acquired VAL programming skills. (4) Participants learned that application-based performance evaluation is a sound method of evaluating new computer architectures, even those that are not fully specified. During the course of the study, participants developed models for using computers to solve numerical problems and for evaluating new architectures. These models form the bases for future evaluation studies.

  9. Biology and Flow Cytometry of Proangiogenic Hematopoietic Progenitors Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Jonathan A.; Erzurum, Serpil; Asosingh, Kewal

    2015-01-01

    During development hematopoiesis and neovascularization are closely linked to each other via a common bipotent stem cell called the hemangioblast that gives rise to both hematopoietic cells and endothelial cells. In postnatal life this functional connection between the vasculature and hematopoiesis is maintained by a subset of hematopoietic progenitor cells endowed with the capacity to differentiate into potent proangiogenic cells. These proangiogenic hematopoietic progenitors comprise a specific subset of bone marrow-derived cells that homes to sites of neovascularization and possess potent paracrine angiogenic activity. There is emerging evidence that this subpopulation of hematopoietic progenitors plays a critical role in vascular health and disease. Their angiogenic activity is distinct from putative “endothelial progenitor cells” that become structural cells of the endothelium by differentiation into endothelial cells. Proangiogenic hematopoietic progenitor cell research requires multi-disciplinary expertise in flow cytometry, hematology and vascular biology. This review provides a comprehensive overview of proangiogenic hematopoietic progenitor cell biology and flow cytometric methods to detect these cells in the peripheral blood circulation and bone marrow. PMID:25418030

  10. Gravitational field-flow fractionation of human hemopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Roda, Barbara; Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Alviano, Francesco; Lanzoni, Giacomo; Bagnara, Gian Paolo; Ricci, Francesca; Buzzi, Marina; Tazzari, Pier Luigi; Pagliaro, Pasqualepaolo; Michelini, Elisa; Roda, Aldo

    2009-12-25

    New cell sorting methodologies, which are simple, fast, non-invasive, and able to isolate homogeneous cell populations, are needed for applications ranging from gene expression analysis to cell-based therapy. In particular, in the forefront of stem cell isolation, progenitor cells have to be separated under mild experimental conditions from complex heterogeneous mixtures prepared from human tissues. Most of the methodologies now employed make use of immunological markers. However, it is widely acknowledged that specific markers for pluripotent stem cells are not as yet available, and cell labelling may interfere with the differentiation process. This work presents for the first time gravitational field-flow fractionation (GrFFF), as a tool for tag-less, direct selection of human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells from cell samples obtained by peripheral blood aphaeresis. These cells are responsible to repopulate the hemopoietic system and they are used in transplantation therapies. Blood aphaeresis sample were injected into a GrFFF system and collected fractions were characterized by flow cytometry for CD34 and CD45 expression, and then tested for viability and multi-differentiation potential. The developed GrFFF method allowed obtaining high enrichment levels of viable, multi-potent hematopoietic stem cells in specific fraction and it showed to fulfil major requirements of analytical performance, such as selectivity and reproducibility of the fractionation process and high sample recovery.

  11. Continuous flow two-dimensional acoustic orientation of nonspherical cells.

    PubMed

    Jakobsson, Ola; Antfolk, Maria; Laurell, Thomas

    2014-06-17

    Flow cytometry is a frequently used method when it comes to cell sorting and analysis. Nonspherical cells, such as red blood cells or sperm cells, however, pose a challenge as they reduce the precision of light scatter measurements which interfere with the analysis of these and other cell populations in the same sample. Here, we present a microfluidic chip for acoustophoresis utilizing ultrasonic standing waves to focus and orient red blood cells in two dimensions in the channel center. The cells can be oriented to show either their flat or up-ended side toward the optical axis and the observer. In an acoustic standing wave field the cells will be rotated until the direction of the smallest dimension is parallel with the direction where the acoustic energy is strongest. While keeping the cells focused in the channel center utilizing acoustic resonances in two dimensions, the orientation can be controlled by increasing the acoustic energy in either the horizontal or vertical resonance mode. It was shown that 87.8 ± 3.8% of the red blood cells could be horizontally oriented while 98.7 ± 0.3% could be vertically oriented. The ability to control the orientation of nonspherical cells with high accuracy is a beneficial feature and potential contribution to the rapidly growing field of flow and image cytometry.

  12. The use of flow cytometry to examine calcium signalling by TRPV1 in mixed cell populations.

    PubMed

    Assas, Bakri M; Abdulaal, Wesam H; Wakid, Majed H; Zakai, Haytham A; Miyan, J; Pennock, J L

    2017-03-31

    Flow cytometric analysis of calcium mobilisation has been in use for many years in the study of specific receptor engagement or isolated cell:cell communication. However, calcium mobilisation/signaling is key to many cell functions including apoptosis, mobility and immune responses. Here we combine multiplex surface staining of whole spleen with Indo-1 AM to visualise calcium mobilisation and examine calcium signaling in a mixed immune cell culture over time. We demonstrate responses to a TRPV1 agonist in distinct cell subtypes without the need for cell separation. Multi parameter staining alongside Indo-1 AM to demonstrate calcium mobilization allows the study of real time calcium signaling in a complex environment.

  13. Axial compressor middle stage secondary flow study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, J. H.; Dring, R. P.; Joslyn, H. D.

    1983-01-01

    This report describes an experimental investigation of the secondary flow within and aft of an axial compressor model with thick endwall boundary layers. The objective of the study was to obtain detailed aerodynamic and trace gas concentration traverse data aft of a well documented isolated rotor for the ultimate purpose of improving the design phases of compressor development based on an improved physical understanding of secondary flow. It was determined from the flow visualization, aerodynamic, and trace gas concentration results that the relative unloading of the midspan region of the airfoil inhibitied a fullspan separation at high loading preventing the massive radial displacement of the hub corner stall to the tip. Radial distribution of high and low total pressure fluid influenced the magnitude of the spanwise distribution of loss, such that, there was a general decreases in loss near the hub to the extent that for the least loaded case a negative loss (increase in total pressure) was observed. The ability to determine the spanwise distribution of blockage was demonstrated. Large blockage was present in the endwall regions due to the corner stall and tip leakage with little blockage in the core flow region. Hub blockage was found to increase rapidly with loading.

  14. Needleless connectors substantially reduce flow of crystalloid and red blood cells during rapid infusion.

    PubMed

    Lehn, Robert A; Gross, Jeffrey B; McIsaac, Joseph H; Gipson, Keith E

    2015-04-01

    Although needleless connectors (NC) are frequently used in the perioperative setting, the potential of modern NCs to slow delivery of IV fluids has not been thoroughly studied. We examined flow characteristics of 5 NC models during pressurized delivery of crystalloid and banked red blood cells from a Level 1 warmer through various IV catheters. Crystalloid flow rates were reduced by 29% to 85% from control in catheters >18 gauge, while red blood cell flow reductions ranged from 22% to 76% in these catheters (all P < 0.0050). We suggest that practitioners consider eliminating NCs when large IV catheters are inserted for rapid fluid administration.

  15. Experimental Study of Flow in a Bifurcation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fresconi, Frank; Prasad, Ajay

    2003-11-01

    An instability known as the Dean vortex occurs in curved pipes with a longitudinal pressure gradient. A similar effect is manifest in the flow in a converging or diverging bifurcation, such as those found in the human respiratory airways. The goal of this study is to characterize secondary flows in a bifurcation. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) experiments were performed in a clear, plastic model. Results show the strength and migration of secondary vortices. Primary velocity features are also presented along with dispersion patterns from dye visualization. Unsteadiness, associated with a hairpin vortex, was also found at higher Re. This work can be used to assess the dispersion of particles in the lung. Medical delivery systems and pollution effect studies would profit from such an understanding.

  16. Reactive T cells by flow cytometry distinguish Hodgkin lymphomas from T cell/histiocyte-rich large B cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Wu, David; Thomas, Anju; Fromm, Jonathan R

    2016-09-01

    Classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL), nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (NLPHL), and T-cell/histiocyte rich large B-cell lymphoma (T/HRLBCL) are B-cell lymphomas in which tumor cells are rare as compared with the background reactive infiltrate. We hypothesized that characterization of the reactive infiltrates can provide information to help diagnose these lymphomas. Lymphocyte subsets by flow cytometry were analyzed for 27 NLPHL, 20 T/HRLBCL, 34 CHL, and 49 reactive lymph nodes (RLN). CD4+ T cells with bright expression of CD7 and CD45 (CD3+CD4+CD7(bright) CD45(bright) ), CD4:CD8 ratio, and percentage of T cells, B cells, NK cells, CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, T cells coexpressing CD4, and CD8 (CD4+CD8+), and plasma cells were measured. The CD3+CD4+CD7(bright) CD45(bright) T-cell population was present in the reactive infiltrate of CHL (76.5%) and T/HRLBCL (92.3%) but not in NLPHL (8.3%) or RLN (4.1%). In a separate analysis of 387 samples, the CD3+CD4+CD7(bright) CD45(bright) T-cell population was also observed in some CD10+ B-NHL. The mean percentage of CD4+CD8+ T cells was highest for NLPHL (11.7%) and differed significantly from T/HRLBCL, CHL, and RLN. Interestingly, the highest CD4:CD8 ratios were seen with T/HRLBCL. Finally, the percentage of B cells is decreased in T/HRLBCL relative to CHL and NLPHL. Differences in the reactive inflammatory infiltrate of CHL, NLPHL, and T/HRLBCL and can suggest these diagnoses. Additionally, in contrast to published studies, T/HRLBCL demonstrates both low and very high CD4 to CD8 T-cell ratios. © 2015 International Clinical Cytometry Society. © 2015 International Clinical Cytometry Society.

  17. Advances in Complex Multiparameter Flow Cytometry Technology: Applications in Stem Cell Research

    PubMed Central

    Preffer, Frederic; Dombkowski, David

    2009-01-01

    Flow cytometry and cell sorting are critical tools in stem cell research. Recent advances in flow cytometric hardware, reagents and software have synergized to permit the stem cell biologist to more fully identify and isolate rare cells based on their immunofluorescent and light scatter characteristics. Some of these improvements include physically smaller air-cooled lasers, new designs in optics, new fluorescent conjugate-excitation pairs, and improved software to visualize data, all which combine to open up new horizons in the study of stem cells, by enhancing the resolution and specificity of inquiry. In this review, these recent improvements in technology will be outlined and important cell surface and functional antigenic markers useful for the study of stem cells described. PMID:19492350

  18. Dynamic deformability of sickle red blood cells in microphysiological flow.

    PubMed

    Alapan, Y; Matsuyama, Y; Little, J A; Gurkan, U A

    2016-06-01

    In sickle cell disease (SCD), hemoglobin molecules polymerize intracellularly and lead to a cascade of events resulting in decreased deformability and increased adhesion of red blood cells (RBCs). Decreased deformability and increased adhesion of sickle RBCs lead to blood vessel occlusion (vaso-occlusion) in SCD patients. Here, we present a microfluidic approach integrated with a cell dimensioning algorithm to analyze dynamic deformability of adhered RBC at the single-cell level in controlled microphysiological flow. We measured and compared dynamic deformability and adhesion of healthy hemoglobin A (HbA) and homozygous sickle hemoglobin (HbS) containing RBCs in blood samples obtained from 24 subjects. We introduce a new parameter to assess deformability of RBCs: the dynamic deformability index (DDI), which is defined as the time-dependent change of the cell's aspect ratio in response to fluid flow shear stress. Our results show that DDI of HbS-containing RBCs were significantly lower compared to that of HbA-containing RBCs. Moreover, we observed subpopulations of HbS containing RBCs in terms of their dynamic deformability characteristics: deformable and non-deformable RBCs. Then, we tested blood samples from SCD patients and analyzed RBC adhesion and deformability at physiological and above physiological flow shear stresses. We observed significantly greater number of adhered non-deformable sickle RBCs than deformable sickle RBCs at flow shear stresses well above the physiological range, suggesting an interplay between dynamic deformability and increased adhesion of RBCs in vaso-occlusive events.

  19. A spectral boundary integral method for flowing blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hong; Isfahani, Amir H. G.; Olson, Luke N.; Freund, Jonathan B.

    2010-05-01

    A spectral boundary integral method for simulating large numbers of blood cells flowing in complex geometries is developed and demonstrated. The blood cells are modeled as finite-deformation elastic membranes containing a higher viscosity fluid than the surrounding plasma, but the solver itself is independent of the particular constitutive model employed for the cell membranes. The surface integrals developed for solving the viscous flow, and thereby the motion of the massless membrane, are evaluated using an O(NlogN) particle-mesh Ewald (PME) approach. The cell shapes, which can become highly distorted under physiologic conditions, are discretized with spherical harmonics. The resolution of these global basis functions is, of course, excellent, but more importantly they facilitate an approximate de-aliasing procedure that stabilizes the simulations without adding any numerical dissipation or further restricting the permissible numerical time step. Complex geometry no-slip boundaries are included using a constraint method that is coupled into an implicit system that is solved as part of the time advancement routine. The implementation is verified against solutions for axisymmetric flows reported in the literature, and its accuracy is demonstrated by comparison against exact solutions for relaxing surface deformations. It is also used to simulate flow of blood cells at 30% volume fraction in tubes between 4.9 and 16.9 μm in diameter. For these, it is shown to reproduce the well-known non-monotonic dependence of the effective viscosity on the tube diameter.

  20. Detection of early changes in lung cell cytology by flow-systems analysis techniques. [Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Steinkamp, J.A.; Wilson, J.S.; Svitra, Z.V.

    1980-03-01

    Ongoing experiments designed to develop automated flow-analysis methods for assaying damage to pulmonary lavage cells in experimental animals exposed by inhalation to environmental pollutants are summarized. Pulmonary macrophages were characterized on their ability to phagocytize polystyrene latex fluorescent spheres. Lung cells consisting primarily of macrophages and leukocytes were analyzed for fluorescence (phagocytosis of spheres) and size using flow cytometric methods. Studies also concentrated on combining phagocytosis with other cellular parameters (DNA content, cell viability, and B-glucuronidase activity). As baseline studies are completed in normal animals, experimental animals will be exposed to gaseous and particulate environmental pollutants. (ERB

  1. Study of argon-oxygen flowing afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazánková, V.; Trunec, D.; Navrátil, Z.; Raud, J.; Krčma, F.

    2016-06-01

    The reaction kinetics in argon-oxygen flowing afterglow (post-discharge) was studied using NO titration and optical emission spectroscopy. The flowing DC post-discharge in argon-oxygen mixture was created in a quartz tube at the total gas pressure of 1000 Pa and discharge power of 90 W. The O(3P) atom concentration was determined by NO titration at different places along the flow tube. The optical emission spectra were also measured along the flow tube. Argon spectral lines, oxygen lines at 777 nm and 844.6 nm and atmospheric A-band of {{\\text{O}}2} were identified in the spectra. Rotational temperature of {{\\text{O}}2} was determined from the oxygen atmospheric A-band and also the outer wall temperature of the flow tube was measured by a thermocouple and by an IR thermometer. A zero-dimensional kinetic model for the reactions in the afterglow was developed. This model allows the time dependencies of particle concentrations and of gas temperature to be calculated. The wall recombination probability for O(3P) atoms {γ\\text{O≤ft(\\text{P}\\right)}}=≤ft(1.63+/- 0.06\\right)× {{10}-3} and wall deactivation probability for {{\\text{O}}2} (b {{}1}Σ\\text{g}+ ) molecules {γ{{\\text{O}2}≤ft(\\text{b}\\right)}}=≤ft(1.7+/- 0.1\\right)× {{10}-3} were determined from the fit of model results to experimental data. Sensitivity analysis was applied for the analysis of kinetic model in order to reveal the most important reactions in the model. The calculated gas temperature increases in the afterglow and then decreases at later afterglow times after reaching the maximum. This behavior is in good agreement with the spatial rotational temperature dependence. A similar trend was also observed at outer wall temperature measurement.

  2. A study of intermittent flow in downward inclined pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J.; Sarica, C.; Chen, X.; Brill, J.P.

    1996-12-31

    The downward simultaneous flow of gas and liquid is often encountered in hilly terrain pipelines and steam injection wells. Most of the available methods for predicting the behavior of gas-liquid flow in pipes have been developed for horizontal and upward inclined pipes. In this study, co-current steady state slug flow in downward inclined pipes is investigated, experimentally and theoretically. A series of slug flow experiments are conducted with an air-kerosene system in a 2-in. diameter, 75-ft long pipe installed on an inclinable structure. Liquid holdup and pressure drop measurements are obtained for downward inclination angles from 0{degree} to {minus}90{degree} at different flow conditions. Correlations for slug flow characteristics are obtained based on the experimental data. A mechanistic model based on a unit cell approach has been proposed for the prediction of the detailed slug structure, and subsequently the pressure gradient. Fully developed slug flow could not be observed from {minus}50{degree} to {minus}90{degree}. A correlation was obtained for slug liquid holdup, and an analytical model and a correlation were developed for slug translational velocity. The lognormal distribution was found to best fit all the experimental slug length data. Equations for mean and design slug length were derived from the lognormal distribution function for inclination angles ranging from 0{degree} to {minus}30{degree}. A slug frequency correlation was also developed. The model can be used to predict intermittent flow behavior in downward inclined pipes. The correlations for slug liquid holdup, slug translational velocity, and slug length and frequency are closure relationships applicable to any model. Slug frequency information is also imperative for erosion and corrosion rate predictions.

  3. Sialosyl-fucosyl Poly-LacNAc without the sialosyl-Lex epitope as the physiological myeloid cell ligand in E-selectin-dependent adhesion: studies under static and dynamic flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Handa, K; Stroud, M R; Hakomori, S

    1997-10-14

    The majority of E- and P-selectin ligands in leukocytes and myelocytic or monocytic leukemia cells are carried by transmembrane glycoproteins having a tandem repeat mucin-like domain through which O-linked carbohydrate ligands are carried. However, determination of structure and adhesive function of carbohydrates in glycoproteins is extremely difficult because of the extensive structural heterogeneity and the scarcity of material for functional analysis. We have overcome this difficulty through use of poly-LacNAc gangliosides isolated from a large quantity of ( approximately 1.2 L packed) HL60 cells [Stroud, M. R., Handa, K., Salyan, M. E. K., Ito, K., Levery, S. B., Hakomori, S., Reinhold, B. B., & Reinhold, V. N. (1996) Biochemistry 35, 758-769, 770-778]. We identified two major types of poly-LacNAc gangliosides without the sialosyl-Lex epitope as being capable of binding to E-selectin: (i) those having a single alpha1-->3 fucosylation at internal GlcNAcs but not at the penultimate GlcNAc and (ii) those having double alpha1-->3 fucosylation at internal GlcNAcs, excluding the penultimate GlcNAc. Gangliosides from group i above did not show any adhesion under static conditions, but showed strong adhesion under dynamic flow conditions. Gangliosides from group ii above showed adhesion under both static and dynamic conditions, as did sialosyl-Lex (SLex)-containing structures in previous studies. However, SLex-containing poly-LacNAc gangliosides are virtually absent or present in only trace quantities in leukocytes and HL60 cells. Poly-LacNAc gangliosides from groups i and ii above, lacking SLex structure, are the major membrane components of leukocytes and HL60 cells. These carbohydrates, bound to lipid or to protein, may therefore be the physiological epitope for E-selectin-dependent binding of these cells, particularly under dynamic flow conditions.

  4. The flow of sickle-cell blood in the capillaries.

    PubMed Central

    Berger, S A; King, W S

    1980-01-01

    Oxygen tension levels and red cell velocities for the flow of sickle-cell blood in the capillaries are determined by using the Krogh model for oxygen transport and lubrication theory for the cell motion. The coupling and interaction between these arises from the red cell compliance, which is assumed to vary with the oxygen concentration. Microsieving data is used to establish an upper bound for this relationship. Calculations are carried out for a range of capillary sizes, taking into account the rightward shift of the oxyhemoglobin dissociation curve and the reduced hematocrit of sickle-cell blood, and are compared to, as a base case, the flow of normal blood under normal pressure gradient. The results indicate that under normal pressure gradients the oxygen tensions and cell velocities for sickle blood are considerably higher than for normal blood, thus acting against the tendency for cells to sickle, or significantly change their rheological properties, in the capillaries. Under reduced pressure gradients, however, the concentrations and velocities drop dramatically, adding to the likelihood of such shape or flow property changes. PMID:7260242

  5. An automated flow microfluorometer and cell sorter incorporating nuclear electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Stubblefield, F.W.

    1983-02-01

    A computer-automated flow microfluorometer and cell sorter is under development for the Medical Department of Brookhaven National Laboratory. The device will be capable of analyzing and sorting samples of biological cells based on measurements of laser-induced fluorescence and cell volume. The system incorporates the laser optics and droplet generation mechanics of a standard Becton-Dickinson FACS II cell sorter. The capabilities of the FACS II device are being upgraded, chiefly in the areas of data display and recording and, to a lesser extent, on-line data analysis.

  6. Automated flow microfluorometer and cell sorter incorporating nuclear electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Stubblefield, F.W.

    1982-10-01

    A computer-automated flow microfluorometer and cell sorter are under development for the Medical Department of Brookhaven National Laboratory. The device will be capable of analyzing and sorting samples of biological cells based on measurements of laser-induced fluorescence and cell volume. The system incorporates the laser optics and droplet generation mechanics of a standard Becton-Dickinson FACS II cell sorter. The capabilities of the FACS II device are being upgraded, chiefly in the areas of data display and recording and, to a lesser extent, on-line data analysis.

  7. Reduction of Europium in a Redox Flow Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Daluh; Horng, Jiin-Shiung; Tung, Chia-Pao

    1988-05-01

    An electrolytic cell similar to the iron I chromium redox flow cell was used to investigate the reduction of europium. The cell contains two compartments partitioned by an anion exchange membrane, which is permeable to chloride ions. The anolyte is ferrous chloride which is oxidized to ferric form at the anode. Rare-earth chloride prepared from Taiwan black monazite is fed as the catholyte. The reduction of europium was tested in two connected cells at 20 and 45°C. All of Eu3+ can be reduced at 45°C, and 72% of the europium can be recovered in sulfate form. In oxide form, purity is about 84%.

  8. Understanding and modeling alternating tangential flow filtration for perfusion cell culture.

    PubMed

    Kelly, William; Scully, Jennifer; Zhang, Di; Feng, Gang; Lavengood, Mathew; Condon, Jason; Knighton, John; Bhatia, Ravinder

    2014-01-01

    Alternating tangential flow (ATF) filtration has been used with success in the Biopharmaceutical industry as a lower shear technology for cell retention with perfusion cultures. The ATF system is different than tangential flow filtration; however, in that reverse flow is used once per cycle as a means to minimize fouling. Few studies have been reported in the literature that evaluates ATF and how key system variables affect the rate at which ATF filters foul. In this study, an experimental setup was devised that allowed for determination of the time it took for fouling to occur for given mammalian (PER.C6) cell culture cell densities and viabilities as permeate flow rate and antifoam concentration was varied. The experimental results indicate, in accordance with D'Arcy's law, that the average resistance to permeate flow (across a cycle of operation) increases as biological material deposits on the membrane. Scanning electron microscope images of the post-run filtration surface indicated that both cells and antifoam micelles deposit on the membrane. A unique mathematical model, based on the assumption that fouling was due to pore blockage from the cells and micelles in combination, was devised that allowed for estimation of sticking factors for the cells and the micelles on the membrane. This model was then used to accurately predict the increase in transmembane pressure during constant flux operation for an ATF cartridge used for perfusion cell culture.

  9. In situ visualization study of CO 2 gas bubble behavior in DMFC anode flow fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H.; Zhao, T. S.; Ye, Q.

    This paper reports on a visual study of the CO 2 bubble behavior in the anode flow field of an in-house fabricated transparent Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (DMFC), which consisted of a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) with an active area of 4.0 × 4.0 cm 2, two bipolar plates with a single serpentine channel, and a transparent enclosure. The study reveals that at low current densities, small discrete bubbles appeared in the anode flow field. At moderate current densities, a number of gas slugs formed, in addition to small discrete bubbles. And at high current densities, the flow field was predominated by rather long gas slugs. The experiments also indicate that the cell orientation had a significant effect on the cell performance, especially at low methanol flow rates; for the present flow field design the best cell performance could be achieved when the cell was orientated vertically. It has been shown that higher methanol solution flow rates reduced the average length and the number of gas slugs in the flow field, but led to an increased methanol crossover. In particular, the effect of methanol solution flow rates on the cell performance became more pronounced at low temperatures. The effect of temperature on the bubble behavior and the cell performance was also examined. Furthermore, for the present flow field consisting of a single serpentine channel, the channel-blocking phenomenon caused by CO 2 gas slugs was never encountered under all the test conditions in this work.

  10. Use of 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine labelling and flow cytometry to study cell cycle-dependent regulation of human cytomegalovirus gene expression.

    PubMed

    Wiebusch, Lüder; Hagemeier, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The cell cycle position at the time of infection has a profound influence on human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) gene expression and therefore needs consideration in the design and control of HCMV experiments. While G0/G1 cells support the immediate onset of viral transcription, cells progressing through the S and G2 cell cycle phases prevent HCMV from entering the lytic replication cycle. Here, we provide two fast and reliable protocols that allow one to determine the cell cycle distribution of the designated host cells and monitor viral protein expression as a function of the cell cycle state. Both protocols make use of the thymidine analogue 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine and "click" chemistry to label HCMV-non-permissive S phase cells in a gentle and sensitive way.

  11. Transient studies of capillary-induced flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reagan, M. K.; Bowman, W. J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the numerical and experimental results of a study performed on the transient rise of fluid in a capillary tube. The capillary tube problem provides an excellent mechanism from which to launch an investigation into the transient flow of a fluid in a porous wick structure where capillary forces must balance both adverse gravitational effects and frictional losses. For the study, a capillary tube, initially charged with a small volume of water, was lowered into a pool of water. The behavior of the column of fluid during the transient that followed as more water entered the tube from the pool was both numerically and experimentally studied.

  12. Performance of PEM fuel cells stack as affected by number of cell and gas flow-rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syampurwadi, A.; Onggo, H.; Indriyati; Yudianti, R.

    2017-03-01

    The proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is a promising technology as an alternative green energy due to its high power density, low operating temperatures, low local emissions, quiet operation and fast start up-shutdown. In order to apply fuel cell as portable power supply, the performance investigation of small number of cells is needed. In this study, PEMFC stacks consisting of 1, 3, 5 and 7-cells with an active area of 25 cm2 per cell have been designed and developed. Their was evaluated in variation of gas flow rate. The membrane electrode assembly (MEA) was prepared by hot-pressing commercial gas diffusion electrodes (Pt loading 0.5 mg/cm2) on pre-treated Nafion 117 membrane. The stacks were constructed using bipolar plates in serpentine pattern and Z-type gas flow configuration. The experimental results were presented as polarization and power output curves which show the effects of varying number of cells and H2/O2 flow-rates on the PEMFC performance. The experimental results showed that not only number of cells and gas flow-rates affected the fuel cells performance, but also the operating temperature as a result of electrochemistry reaction inside the cell.

  13. Performance on ETL 1 kW redox flow cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozaki, K.; Kaneko, H.; Negishi, A.; Ozawa, T.

    A 1 kW - 3 kWh redox flow cell, in which 96 bipolar cells with the apparent electrode area of 432 sq cm are involved, has been developed and tested in Electrotechnical Laboratory. The rated output current and voltage are 26 A and 43 V. To elucidate fundamental aspects of the anolyte, polarography and spectroscopy were applied as well as observations with a miniaturized redox flow cell, and influence of the complex species in the anolyte on the cell performance has been recognized. During the charge and discharge cycles the anolyte was continuously monitored by the spectroscopy or controlled potential coulometry, while a voltammetric detector was applied for monitoring the catholyte. Further screening of carbon fiber electrode materials has been continued after the previous presentation, and among more than 70 varieties were found a few kinds of carbon fiber, with which the target performance can be achieved.

  14. Factors influencing yield of plateletpheresis using intermittent flow cell separator.

    PubMed

    DAS, S S; Chaudhary, R K; Shukla, J S

    2005-10-01

    Platelet recovery in the recipient is influenced by the transfused dose of platelets, which in turn is dependent on the quality of single donor platelets (SDPs) in terms of platelet yield. Various donor factors such as predonation platelet count and Hemoglobin (Hb) concentration affect the platelet yield. A total of 61 plateletpheresis procedures performed on intermittent flow cell separator (MCS3p, Hemonetics) were evaluated for platelet yield. A relationship between predonation platelet count and Hb concentration with yield of platelets was studied using Pearson Correlation. The mean platelet yield was 2.9 +/- 0.64 x 10(11). While a direct relationship was observed between predonation platelet count and yield (r = 0.51, P < 0.001), no such correlation was noticed with donor Hb concentration (r = -0.05, P > 0.005). The yield was > or =3 x 10(11) in >80% of procedures when the predonation platelet count was > or =250 x 10(3)/mm. Optimization of platelet yield, which is influenced by predonation platelet count, is an emerging issue in blood transfusion services. However, further studies in this regard are needed using more advanced cell separators.

  15. Cell confluency analysis on microcarriers by micro-flow imaging.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Christopher J; Cicalese, Stephanie M; Davis, Harrison B; Dogdas, Belma; Shah, Tosha; Culp, Tim; Hoang, Van M

    2016-12-01

    The productivity of cell culture-derived vaccines grown in anchorage-dependent animal cells is limited by bioreactor surface area. One way to increase the available surface area is by growing cells as monolayers on small spheres called microcarriers, which are approximately 100-250 μm in diameter. In order for microcarrier-based cell culture to be a success, it is important to understand the kinetics of cell growth on the microcarriers. Micro-flow imaging (MFI) is a simple and powerful technique that captures images and analyzes samples as they are drawn through a precision flow cell. In addition to providing size distribution and defect frequency data to compare microcarrier lots, MFI was used to generate hundreds of images to determine cell coverage and confluency on microcarriers. Same-day manual classification of these images provided upstream cell culture teams with actionable data that informed in-process decision making (e.g. time of infection). Additionally, an automated cell coverage algorithm was developed to increase the speed and throughput of the analyses.

  16. Cell-cycle analysis of fission yeast cells by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Knutsen, Jon Halvor Jonsrud; Rein, Idun Dale; Rothe, Christiane; Stokke, Trond; Grallert, Beáta; Boye, Erik

    2011-02-28

    The cell cycle of the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, does not easily lend itself to analysis by flow cytometry, mainly because cells in G(1) and G(2) phase contain the same amount of DNA. This occurs because fission yeast cells under standard growth conditions do not complete cytokinesis until after G(1) phase. We have devised a flow cytometric method exploiting the fact that cells in G(1) phase contain two nuclei, whereas cells in G(2) are mononuclear. Measurements of the width as well as the total area of the DNA-associated fluorescence signal allows the discrimination between cells in G(1) and in G(2) phase and the cell-cycle progression of fission yeast can be followed in detail by flow cytometry. Furthermore, we show how this method can be used to monitor the timing of cell entry into anaphase. Fission yeast cells tend to form multimers, which represents another problem of flow cytometry-based cell-cycle analysis. Here we present a method employing light-scatter measurements to enable the exclusion of cell doublets, thereby further improving the analysis of fission yeast cells by flow cytometry.

  17. Flow Cytometric Analysis of Myeloid Cells in Human Blood, Bronchoalveolar Lavage, and Lung Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yen-Rei A.; Hotten, Danielle F.; Malakhau, Yuryi; Volker, Ellen; Ghio, Andrew J.; Noble, Paul W.; Kraft, Monica; Hollingsworth, John W.; Gunn, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Clear identification of specific cell populations by flow cytometry is important to understand functional roles. A well-defined flow cytometry panel for myeloid cells in human bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and lung tissue is currently lacking. The objective of this study was to develop a flow cytometry–based panel for human BAL and lung tissue. We obtained and performed flow cytometry/sorting on human BAL cells and lung tissue. Confocal images were obtained from lung tissue using antibodies for cluster of differentiation (CD)206, CD169, and E cadherin. We defined a multicolor flow panel for human BAL and lung tissue that identifies major leukocyte populations. These include macrophage (CD206+) subsets and other CD206− leukocytes. The CD206− cells include: (1) three monocyte (CD14+) subsets, (2) CD11c+ dendritic cells (CD14−, CD11c+, HLA-DR+), (3) plasmacytoid dendritic cells (CD14−, CD11c−, HLA-DR+, CD123+), and (4) other granulocytes (neutrophils, mast cells, eosinophils, and basophils). Using this panel on human lung tissue, we defined two populations of pulmonary macrophages: CD169+ and CD169− macrophages. In lung tissue, CD169− macrophages were a prominent cell type. Using confocal microscopy, CD169+ macrophages were located in the alveolar space/airway, defining them as alveolar macrophages. In contrast, CD169− macrophages were associated with airway/alveolar epithelium, consistent with interstitial-associated macrophages. We defined a flow cytometry panel in human BAL and lung tissue that allows identification of multiple immune cell types and delineates alveolar from interstitial-associated macrophages. This study has important implications for defining myeloid cells in human lung samples. PMID:26267148

  18. Integrated Microfluidic Flow-Through Microbial Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Huawei; Ali, Md. Azahar; Xu, Zhen; Halverson, Larry J.; Dong, Liang

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on a miniaturized microbial fuel cell with a microfluidic flow-through configuration: a porous anolyte chamber is formed by filling a microfluidic chamber with three-dimensional graphene foam as anode, allowing nutritional medium to flow through the chamber to intimately interact with the colonized microbes on the scaffolds of the anode. No nutritional media flow over the anode. This allows sustaining high levels of nutrient utilization, minimizing consumption of nutritional substrates, and reducing response time of electricity generation owing to fast mass transport through pressure-driven flow and rapid diffusion of nutrients within the anode. The device provides a volume power density of 745 μW/cm3 and a surface power density of 89.4 μW/cm2 using Shewanella oneidensis as a model biocatalyst without any optimization of bacterial culture. The medium consumption and the response time of the flow-through device are reduced by 16.4 times and 4.2 times, respectively, compared to the non-flow-through counterpart with its freeway space volume six times the volume of graphene foam anode. The graphene foam enabled microfluidic flow-through approach will allow efficient microbial conversion of carbon-containing bioconvertible substrates to electricity with smaller space, less medium consumption, and shorter start-up time. PMID:28120875

  19. Integrated Microfluidic Flow-Through Microbial Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Huawei; Ali, Md. Azahar; Xu, Zhen; Halverson, Larry J.; Dong, Liang

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on a miniaturized microbial fuel cell with a microfluidic flow-through configuration: a porous anolyte chamber is formed by filling a microfluidic chamber with three-dimensional graphene foam as anode, allowing nutritional medium to flow through the chamber to intimately interact with the colonized microbes on the scaffolds of the anode. No nutritional media flow over the anode. This allows sustaining high levels of nutrient utilization, minimizing consumption of nutritional substrates, and reducing response time of electricity generation owing to fast mass transport through pressure-driven flow and rapid diffusion of nutrients within the anode. The device provides a volume power density of 745 μW/cm3 and a surface power density of 89.4 μW/cm2 using Shewanella oneidensis as a model biocatalyst without any optimization of bacterial culture. The medium consumption and the response time of the flow-through device are reduced by 16.4 times and 4.2 times, respectively, compared to the non-flow-through counterpart with its freeway space volume six times the volume of graphene foam anode. The graphene foam enabled microfluidic flow-through approach will allow efficient microbial conversion of carbon-containing bioconvertible substrates to electricity with smaller space, less medium consumption, and shorter start-up time.

  20. Integrated Microfluidic Flow-Through Microbial Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Huawei; Ali, Md Azahar; Xu, Zhen; Halverson, Larry J; Dong, Liang

    2017-01-25

    This paper reports on a miniaturized microbial fuel cell with a microfluidic flow-through configuration: a porous anolyte chamber is formed by filling a microfluidic chamber with three-dimensional graphene foam as anode, allowing nutritional medium to flow through the chamber to intimately interact with the colonized microbes on the scaffolds of the anode. No nutritional media flow over the anode. This allows sustaining high levels of nutrient utilization, minimizing consumption of nutritional substrates, and reducing response time of electricity generation owing to fast mass transport through pressure-driven flow and rapid diffusion of nutrients within the anode. The device provides a volume power density of 745 μW/cm(3) and a surface power density of 89.4 μW/cm(2) using Shewanella oneidensis as a model biocatalyst without any optimization of bacterial culture. The medium consumption and the response time of the flow-through device are reduced by 16.4 times and 4.2 times, respectively, compared to the non-flow-through counterpart with its freeway space volume six times the volume of graphene foam anode. The graphene foam enabled microfluidic flow-through approach will allow efficient microbial conversion of carbon-containing bioconvertible substrates to electricity with smaller space, less medium consumption, and shorter start-up time.

  1. Sensing photosynthetic herbicides in an electrochemical flow cell.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Tibor; Csekő, Richárd; Hajdu, Kata; Nagy, Krisztina; Sipos, Orsolya; Galajda, Péter; Garab, Győző; Nagy, László

    2017-05-01

    Specific inhibitory reactions of herbicides with photosynthetic reaction centers bound to working electrodes were monitored in a conventional electrochemical cell and a newly designed microfluidic electrochemical flow cell. In both cases, the bacterial reaction centers were bound to a transparent conductive metal oxide, indium-tin-oxide, electrode through carbon nanotubes. In the conventional cell, photocurrent densities of up to a few μA/cm(2) could be measured routinely. The photocurrent could be blocked by the photosynthetic inhibitor terbutryn (I 50 = 0.38 ± 0.14 μM) and o-phenanthroline (I 50 = 63.9 ± 12.2 μM). The microfluidic flow cell device enabled us to reduce the sample volume and to simplify the electrode arrangement. The useful area of the electrodes remained the same (ca. 2 cm(2)), similar to the classical electrochemical cell; however, the size of the cell was reduced considerably. The microfluidic flow control enabled us monitoring in real time the binding/unbinding of the inhibitor and cofactor molecules at the secondary quinone site.

  2. Flow perfusion co-culture of human mesenchymal stem cells and endothelial cells on biodegradable polymer scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Dahlin, Rebecca L.; Gershovich, Julia G.; Kasper, F. Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of flow perfusion culture on the mineralization of co-cultures of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Osteogenically precultured hMSCs were seeded onto electrospun scaffolds in monoculture or a 1:1 ratio with HUVECs, cultured for 7 or 14 days in osteogenic medium under static or flow perfusion, and the resulting constructs were analyzed for cellularity, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and calcium content. In flow perfusion, constructs with monocultures of hMSCs demonstrated higher cellularity and calcium content, but lower ALP activity compared to corresponding static controls. ALP activity was enhanced in co-cultures under flow perfusion conditions, compared to hMSCs alone; however unlike the static controls, the calcium content of the co-cultures in flow perfusion was not different from the corresponding hMSC monocultures. The data suggest that co-cultures of hMSCs and HUVECs did not contribute to enhanced mineralization compared to hMSCs alone under the flow perfusion conditions investigated in this study. However, flow perfusion culture resulted in an enhanced spatial distribution of cells and matrix compared to static cultures, which were limited to a thin surface layer. PMID:23842695

  3. Axial dispersion in flowing red blood cell suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgorski, Thomas; Losserand, Sylvain; Coupier, Gwennou

    2016-11-01

    A key parameter in blood microcirculation is the transit time of red blood cells (RBCs) through an organ, which can influence the efficiency of gas exchange and oxygen availability. A large dispersion of this transit time is observed in vivo and is partly due to the axial dispersion in the flowing suspension. In the classic Taylor-Aris example of a solute flowing in a tube, the combination of molecular diffusion and parabolic velocity profile leads to enhanced axial dispersion. In suspensions of non-Brownian deformable bodies such as RBCs, axial dispersion is governed by a combination of shear induced migration and shear-induced diffusion arising from hydrodynamic interactions. We revisit this problem in the case of RBC pulses flowing in a microchannel and show that the axial dispersion of the pulse eventually saturates with a final extension that depends directly on RBC mechanical properties. The result is especially interesting in the dilute limit since the final pulse length depends only on the channel width, exponent of the migration law and dimensionless migration velocity. In continuous flow, the dispersion of transit times is the result of complex cell-cell and cell-wall interactions and is strongy influenced by the polydispersity of the blood sample. The authors acknowledge support from LabEx TEC21 and CNES.

  4. An analytical study of reduced-gravity flow dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradshaw, R. D.; Kramer, J. L.; Zich, J. L.

    1976-01-01

    Addition of surface tension forces to a marker-and-cell code and the performance of four incompressible fluid simulations in reduced gravity, were studied. This marker-and-cell code has a variable grid capability with arbitrary curved boundaries and time dependent acceleration fields. The surface tension logic includes a spline fit of surface marker particles as well as contact angle logic for straight and curved wall boundaries. Three types of flow motion were simulated with the improved code: impulsive settling in a model Centaur LH2 tank, continuous settling in a model and full scale Centaur LO2 tank and mixing in a Centaur LH2 tank. The impulsive settling case confirmed a drop tower analysis which indicated more orderly fluid collection flow patterns with this method providing a potential savings in settling propellants. In the LO2 tank, fluid collection and flow simulation into the thrust barrel were achieved. The mixing simulation produced good results indicating both the development of the flow field and fluid interface behavior.

  5. Design, evaluation, and application of continuous-flow cells for organic electrochemical synthesis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Nobe, K.

    1982-09-30

    Two examples of the oxidation and reduction of aldehydes as a paired synthesis have been studied. These are model systems for potential energy savings in organic electrochemical synthesis. Both are indirect processes; the reduction via alkali metal amalgam and the oxidation via hypobromite. One, using furfural as the substrate, has proved unsuccessful due to the oxidation of its reduction products with the electrogenerated oxidant, bromine. The other paired synthesis, using glucose, has been operated successfully in two types of parallel plate flow cells and two types of porous, packed bed flow cells. To date, the optimum electrode materials and operating conditions for the glucose paired reaction, as determined by product yields and current efficiencies, are an amalgamated zinc cathode, a graphite anode, an initial glucose concentration of 0.8M, a 0.8M NaBr supporting electrolyte and an electrolyte flow rate of 0.8 1/min. Both constant current (10 mA/cm/sup 2/) and constant cathode potential (-2.10V vs SCE) electrolyses were performed under the above conditions. Electrolyses carried out in the parallel plate flow cell and the packed bed flow cell in which the current and electrolyte flow are parallel to one another gave comparable results. Lower current efficiencies were obtained in the porous, packed bed flow cell with perpendicular current and flow. The reasons for the poorer results in the perpendicular configuration cell are not known at this time and further experimentation is required with this system. The current efficiencies and yields of both the oxidation reaction (the production of gluconic acid) and the reduction reaction (the formation of sorbitol) in the packed bed cells were found to be dependent on solution pH.

  6. The dynamic behavior of chemically "stiffened" red blood cells in microchannel flows.

    PubMed

    Forsyth, Alison M; Wan, Jiandi; Ristenpart, William D; Stone, Howard A

    2010-07-01

    The rigidity of red blood cells (RBCs) plays an important role in whole blood viscosity and is correlated with several cardiovascular diseases. Two chemical agents that are commonly used to study cell deformation are diamide and glutaraldehyde. Despite diamide's common usage, there are discrepancies in the literature surrounding diamide's effect on the deformation of RBCs in shear and pressure-driven flows; in particular, shear flow experiments have shown that diamide stiffens cells, while pressure-driven flow in capillaries did not give this result. We performed pressure-driven flow experiments with RBCs in a microfluidic constriction and quantified the cell dynamics using high-speed imaging. Diamide, which affects RBCs by cross-linking spectrin skeletal membrane proteins, did not reduce deformation and showed an unchanged effective strain rate when compared to healthy cells. In contrast, glutaraldehyde, which is a non-specific fixative that acts on all components of the cell, did reduce deformation and showed increased instances of tumbling, both of which are characteristic features of stiffened, or rigidified, cells. Because glutaraldehyde increases the effective viscosity of the cytoplasm and lipid membrane while diamide does not, one possible explanation for our results is that viscous effects in the cytoplasm and/or lipid membrane are a dominant factor in dictating dynamic responses of RBCs in pressure-driven flows. Finally, literature on the use of diamide as a stiffening agent is summarized, and provides supporting evidence for our conclusions. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Interstitial Fluid Flow: The Mechanical Environment of Cells and Foundation of Meridians

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Wei; Ding, Guanghong

    2012-01-01

    Using information from the deep dissection, microobservation, and measurement of acupoints in the upper and lower limbs of the human body, we developed a three-dimensional porous medium model to simulate the flow field using FLUENT software and to study the shear stress on the surface of interstitial cells (mast cells) caused by interstitial fluid flow. The numerical simulation results show the following: (i) the parallel nature of capillaries will lead to directional interstitial fluid flow, which may explain the long interstitial tissue channels or meridians observed in some experiments; (ii) when the distribution of capillaries is staggered, increases in the velocity alternate, and the velocity tends to be uniform, which is beneficial for substance exchange; (iii) interstitial fluid flow induces a shear stress, with magnitude of several Pa, on interstitial cell membranes, which will activate cells and lead to a biological response; (iv) capillary and interstitial parameters, such as capillary density, blood pressure, capillary permeability, interstitial pressure, and interstitial porosity, affect the shear stress on cell surfaces. The numerical simulation results suggest that in vivo interstitial fluid flow constitutes the mechanical environment of cells and plays a key role in guiding cell activities, which may explain the meridian phenomena and the acupuncture effects observed in experiments. PMID:23365601

  8. Fan Stall Flutter Flow Mechanism Studied

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, Jan

    2002-01-01

    Modern turbofan engines employ a highly loaded fan stage with transonic or low-supersonic velocities in the blade-tip region. The fan blades are often prone to flutter at off-design conditions. Flutter is a highly undesirable and dangerous self-excited mode of blade oscillations that can result in high-cycle fatigue blade failure. The origins of blade flutter are not fully understood yet. Experimental data that can be used to clarify the origins of blade flutter in modern transonic fan designs are very limited. The Transonic Flutter Cascade Facility at the NASA Glenn Research Center was developed to experimentally study the details of flow mechanisms associated with fan flutter. The cascade airfoils are instrumented to measure high-frequency unsteady flow variations in addition to the steady flow data normally recorded in cascade tests. The test program measures the variation in surface pressure in response to the oscillation of one or more of the cascade airfoils. However, during the initial phases of the program when all airfoils were in fixed positions, conditions were found where significant time variations in the pressures near the airfoil leading edges could be observed.

  9. Method for Studying Microbial Biofilms in Flowing-Water Systems

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Karsten

    1982-01-01

    A method for the study of microbial biofilms in flowing-water systems was developed with special reference to the flow conditions in electrochemical concentration cells. Seawater was circulated in a semiclosed flow system through biofilm reactors (3 cm s−1) with microscope cover slips arranged in lamellar piles parallel with the flow. At fixed time intervals cover slips with their biofilm were removed from the pile, stained with crystal violet, and mounted on microscope slides. The absorbances of the slides were measured at 590 nm and plotted against time to give microbial biofilm development. From calibration experiments a staining time of 1 min and a rinse time of 10 min in a tap water flow (3 cm s−1) were considered sufficient. When an analysis of variance was performed on biofilm development data, 78% of the total variance was found to be due to random natural effects; the rest could be explained by experimental effects. The absorbance values correlated well with protein N, dry weight, and organic weight in two biofilm experiments, one with a biofilm with a high (75%) and one with a low (∼25%, normal) inorganic content. Comparisons of regression lines revealed that the absorbance of the stained biofilms was an estimate closely related to biofilm dry weight. PMID:16345929

  10. Space shuttle orbiter flow visualization study. [water tunnel study of vortex flow during atmospheric entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorincz, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    The vortex flows generated at subsonic speed during the final portion of atmospheric reentry were defined using a 0.01 scale model of the orbiter in a diagnostic water tunnel. Flow visualization photographs were obtained over an angle-of-attack range to 40 deg and sideslip angles up to 10 deg. The vortex flow field development, vortex path, and vortex breakdown characteristics were determined as a function of angle-of-attack at zero sideslip. Vortex flows were found to develop on the highly swept glove, on the wing, and on the upper surface of the fuselage. No significant asymmetries were observed at zero sideslip in the water tunnel tests. The sensitivity of the upper surface vortex flow fields to variations in sideslip angle was also studied. The vortex formed on the glove remained very stable in position above the wing up through the 10 deg of sideslip tested. There was a change in the vortex lifts under sideslip due to effective change in leading-edge sweep angles. Asymmetric flow separation occurred on the upper surface of the fuselage at small sideslip angles. The influence of vortex flow fields in sideslip on the lateral/ directional characteristics of the orbiter is discussed.

  11. Interstitial flows promote an amoeboid cell phenotype and motility of breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Chih-Kuan; Huang, Yu Ling; Zheng, Angela; Wu, Mingming

    2015-03-01

    Lymph nodes, the drainage systems for interstitial flows, are clinically known to be the first metastatic sites of many cancer types including breast and prostate cancers. Here, we demonstrate that breast cancer cell morphology and motility is modulated by interstitial flows in a cell-ECM adhesion dependent manner. The average aspect ratios of the cells are significantly lower (or are more amoeboid like) in the presence of the flow in comparison to the case when the flow is absent. The addition of exogenous adhesion molecules within the extracellular matrix (type I collagen) enhances the overall aspect ratio (or are more mesenchymal like) of the cell population. Using measured cell trajectories, we find that the persistence of the amoeboid cells (aspect ratio less than 2.0) is shorter than that of mesenchymal cells. However, the maximum speed of the amoeboid cells is larger than that of mesenchymal cells. Together these findings provide the novel insight that interstitial flows promote amoeboid cell morphology and motility and highlight the plasticity of tumor cell motility in response to its biophysical environment. Supported by NIH Grant R21CA138366.

  12. Red Blood Cell Aggregation and Dissociation in Shear Flows Simulated by Lattice Boltzmann Method

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junfeng; Johnson, Paul C.; Popel, Aleksander S.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we develop a lattice Boltzmann algorithm to simulate red blood cell (RBC) behavior in shear flows. The immersed boundary method is employed to incorporate the fluid-membrane interaction between the flow field and deformable cells. The cell membrane is treated as a neo-Hookean viscoelastic material and a Morse potential is adopted to model the intercellular interaction. Utilizing the available mechanical properties of RBCs, multiple cells have been studied in shear flows using a two-dimensional approximation. These cells aggregate and form a rouleau under the action of intercellular interaction. The equilibrium configuration is related to the interaction strength. The end cells exhibit concave shapes under weak interaction and convex shapes under strong interaction. In shear flows, such a rouleau-like aggregate will rotate or be separated, depending on the relative strengths of the intercellular interaction and hydrodynamic viscous forces. These behaviors are qualitatively similar to experimental observations and show the potential of this numerical scheme for future studies of blood flow in microvessels. PMID:17888442

  13. Malignant human cell transformation of Marcellus shale gas drilling flow back water

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yixin; Chen, Tingting; Shen, Steven S.; Niu, Yingmei; DesMarais, Thomas L; Linn, Reka; Saunders, Eric; Fan, Zhihua; Lioy, Paul; Kluz, Thomas; Chen, Lung-Chi; Wu, Zhuangchun; Costa, Max

    2015-01-01

    The rapid development of high-volume horizontal hydraulic fracturing for mining natural gas from shale has posed potential impacts on human health and biodiversity. The produced flow back waters after hydraulic stimulation is known to carry high levels of saline and total dissolved solids. To understand the toxicity and potential carcinogenic effects of these waste waters, flow back water from five Marcellus hydraulic fracturing oil and gas wells were analyzed. The physicochemical nature of these samples was analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy / energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. A cytotoxicity study using colony formation as the endpoint was carried out to define the LC50 values of test samples using human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B). The BEAS-2B cell transformation assay was employed to assess the carcinogenic potential of the samples. Barium and strontium were among the most abundant metals in these samples and the same metals were found elevated in BEAS-2B cells after long-term treatment. BEAS-2B cells treated for 6 weeks with flow back waters produced colony formation in soft agar that was concentration dependant. In addition, flow back water-transformed BEAS-2B cells show a better migration capability when compared to control cells. This study provides information needed to assess the potential health impact of post-hydraulic fracturing flow back waters from Marcellus Shale natural gas mining. PMID:26210350

  14. Malignant human cell transformation of Marcellus Shale gas drilling flow back water.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yixin; Chen, Tingting; Shen, Steven S; Niu, Yingmei; DesMarais, Thomas L; Linn, Reka; Saunders, Eric; Fan, Zhihua; Lioy, Paul; Kluz, Thomas; Chen, Lung-Chi; Wu, Zhuangchun; Costa, Max; Zelikoff, Judith

    2015-10-01

    The rapid development of high-volume horizontal hydraulic fracturing for mining natural gas from shale has posed potential impacts on human health and biodiversity. The produced flow back waters after hydraulic stimulation are known to carry high levels of saline and total dissolved solids. To understand the toxicity and potential carcinogenic effects of these wastewaters, flow back waters from five Marcellus hydraulic fracturing oil and gas wells were analyzed. The physicochemical nature of these samples was analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. A cytotoxicity study using colony formation as the endpoint was carried out to define the LC50 values of test samples using human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B). The BEAS-2B cell transformation assay was employed to assess the carcinogenic potential of the samples. Barium and strontium were among the most abundant metals in these samples and the same metals were found to be elevated in BEAS-2B cells after long-term treatment. BEAS-2B cells treated for 6weeks with flow back waters produced colony formation in soft agar that was concentration dependent. In addition, flow back water-transformed BEAS-2B cells show better migration capability when compared to control cells. This study provides information needed to assess the potential health impact of post-hydraulic fracturing flow back waters from Marcellus Shale natural gas mining.

  15. Flow bioreactor design for quantitative measurements over endothelial cells using micro-particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leong, Chia Min; Voorhees, Abram; Nackman, Gary B.; Wei, Timothy

    2013-04-01

    Mechanotransduction in endothelial cells (ECs) is a highly complex process through which cells respond to changes in hemodynamic loading by generating biochemical signals involving gene and protein expression. To study the effects of mechanical loading on ECs in a controlled fashion, different in vitro devices have been designed to simulate or replicate various aspects of these physiological phenomena. This paper describes the design, use, and validation of a flow chamber which allows for spatially and temporally resolved micro-particle image velocimetry measurements of endothelial surface topography and stresses over living ECs immersed in pulsatile flow. This flow chamber also allows the study of co-cultures (i.e., ECs and smooth muscle cells) and the effect of different substrates (i.e., coverslip and/or polyethylene terepthalate (PET) membrane) on cellular response. In this report, the results of steady and pulsatile flow on fixed endothelial cells seeded on PET membrane and coverslip, respectively, are presented. Surface topography of ECs is computed from multiple two-dimensional flow measurements. The distributions of shear stress and wall pressure on each individual cell are also determined and the importance of both types of stress in cell remodeling is highlighted.

  16. Fluid flow releases fibroblast growth factor-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhoads, D. N.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.

    2000-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that fluid shear stress regulates the release of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 is a potent mitogen that is involved in the response to vascular injury and is expressed in a wide variety of cell types. FGF-2 is found in the cytoplasm of cells and outside cells, where it associates with extracellular proteoglycans. To test the hypothesis that shear stress regulates FGF-2 release, cells were exposed to flow, and FGF-2 amounts were measured from the conditioned medium, pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment), and cell lysate. Results from the present study show that after 15 minutes of shear stress at 25 dyne/cm(2) in a parallel-plate flow system, a small but significant fraction (17%) of the total FGF-2 was released from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 levels in the circulating medium increased 10-fold over medium from static controls (P<0.01). A 50% increase in FGF-2 content versus control (P<0.01) was found in the pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment). Furthermore, a significant decrease in FGF-2 was detected in the cell lysate, indicating that FGF-2 was released from inside the cell. Cell permeability studies with fluorescent dextran were performed to examine whether transient membrane disruption caused FGF-2 release. Flow cytometry detected a 50% increase in mean fluorescence of cells exposed to 25 dyne/cm(2) versus control cells. This indicates that the observed FGF-2 release from human aortic smooth muscle cells is likely due to transient membrane disruption on initiation of flow.

  17. Fluid flow releases fibroblast growth factor-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhoads, D. N.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.

    2000-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that fluid shear stress regulates the release of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 is a potent mitogen that is involved in the response to vascular injury and is expressed in a wide variety of cell types. FGF-2 is found in the cytoplasm of cells and outside cells, where it associates with extracellular proteoglycans. To test the hypothesis that shear stress regulates FGF-2 release, cells were exposed to flow, and FGF-2 amounts were measured from the conditioned medium, pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment), and cell lysate. Results from the present study show that after 15 minutes of shear stress at 25 dyne/cm(2) in a parallel-plate flow system, a small but significant fraction (17%) of the total FGF-2 was released from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 levels in the circulating medium increased 10-fold over medium from static controls (P<0.01). A 50% increase in FGF-2 content versus control (P<0.01) was found in the pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment). Furthermore, a significant decrease in FGF-2 was detected in the cell lysate, indicating that FGF-2 was released from inside the cell. Cell permeability studies with fluorescent dextran were performed to examine whether transient membrane disruption caused FGF-2 release. Flow cytometry detected a 50% increase in mean fluorescence of cells exposed to 25 dyne/cm(2) versus control cells. This indicates that the observed FGF-2 release from human aortic smooth muscle cells is likely due to transient membrane disruption on initiation of flow.

  18. Stress distributions and cell flows in a growing cell aggregate

    PubMed Central

    Delarue, Morgan; Joanny, Jean-François; Jülicher, Frank; Prost, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    We discuss the short-time response of a multicellular spheroid to an external pressure jump. Our experiments show that 5 min after the pressure jump, the cell density increases in the centre of the spheroid but does not change appreciably close to the surface of the spheroid. This result can be explained if the cells are polarized which we show to be the case. Motivated by the experimental results, we develop a theory for polarized spheroids where the cell polarity is radial (except in a thin shell close to the spheroid surface). The theory takes into account the dependence of cell division and apoptosis rates on the local stress, the cell polarity and active stress generated by the cells and the dependence of active stress on the local pressure. We find a short-time increase of the cell density after a pressure jump that decays as a power law from the spheroid centre, which is in reasonable agreement with the experimental results. By comparing our theory to experiments, we can estimate the isotropic compression modulus of the tissue. PMID:25485084

  19. Cell-cooling in flow cytometry by Peltier elements.

    PubMed

    Göttlinger, C; Meyer, K L; Weichel, W; Müller, W; Raftery, B; Radbruch, A

    1986-05-01

    We have built a cooling device for cell suspensions in flow cytometry that makes use of the Peltier effect (Barnard RD, Thermo electricity in Metals and Alloys, Taylor and Francis, London; Siemens-Z 34:383-88, 1963). The prototype described here is used for cooling collection tubes during long-duration cell sorting and is capable of maintaining a temperature of 2-5 degrees C in a cell suspension of up to 3 ml. In general, Peltier element-based cooling is useful for equilibrating the temperature of small volumes of fluids. Furthermore, Peltier element-based cooling devices are easy to build and handle.

  20. Fuel cell with interdigitated porous flow-field

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Mahlon S.

    1997-01-01

    A polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell is formed with an improved system for distributing gaseous reactants to the membrane surface. A PEM fuel cell has an ionic transport membrane with opposed catalytic surfaces formed thereon and separates gaseous reactants that undergo reactions at the catalytic surfaces of the membrane. The fuel cell may also include a thin gas diffusion layer having first and second sides with a first side contacting at least one of the catalytic surfaces. A macroporous flow-field with interdigitated inlet and outlet reactant channels contacts the second side of the thin gas diffusion layer for distributing one of the gaseous reactants over the thin gas diffusion layer for transport to an adjacent one of the catalytic surfaces of the membrane. The porous flow field may be formed from a hydrophilic material and provides uniform support across the backside of the electrode assembly to facilitate the use of thin backing layers.

  1. Fuel cell with interdigitated porous flow-field

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, M.S.

    1997-06-24

    A polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell is formed with an improved system for distributing gaseous reactants to the membrane surface. A PEM fuel cell has an ionic transport membrane with opposed catalytic surfaces formed thereon and separates gaseous reactants that undergo reactions at the catalytic surfaces of the membrane. The fuel cell may also include a thin gas diffusion layer having first and second sides with a first side contacting at least one of the catalytic surfaces. A macroporous flow-field with interdigitated inlet and outlet reactant channels contacts the second side of the thin gas diffusion layer for distributing one of the gaseous reactants over the thin gas diffusion layer for transport to an adjacent one of the catalytic surfaces of the membrane. The porous flow field may be formed from a hydrophilic material and provides uniform support across the backside of the electrode assembly to facilitate the use of thin backing layers. 9 figs.

  2. ATP release mediates fluid flow-induced proliferation of human bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Riddle, Ryan C; Taylor, Amanda F; Rogers, Jennifer R; Donahue, Henry J

    2007-04-01

    Oscillatory fluid flow induced the vesicular release of ATP from human BMSCs that directly contributes to the induction of BMSC proliferation. Degrading extracellular nucleotides prevents fluid flow-induced increases in intracellular calcium concentration, the activation of calcineurin, and the nuclear translocation of NFAT. Regulation of bone cell activity by autocrine/paracrine factors is a well-established mechanism by which skeletal homeostasis is regulated by mechanical signals. The release of extracellular nucleotides in particular has been shown to induce many of the responses thought to be necessary for load-induced bone formation. In these studies, we examined the effect of oscillatory fluid flow on the release of ATP from bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and the effect of ATP release on BMSC proliferation and intracellular calcium signaling pathways. BMSCs were exposed to oscillatory fluid flow, and the concentration of ATP in conditioned media samples was determined using a luciferin:luciferase-based reaction. Western blot analysis was used to examine the expression of purinergic receptors. Using pharmacological antagonists of gap junction hemichannels and vesicular trafficking, we studied the mechanism of ATP release from BMSCs. Apyrase was used to study the effect of extracellular nucleotides on intracellular calcium concentration, calcineurin activity, and nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) nuclear translocation. Fluid flow exposure induced the flow rate-dependent release of ATP from BMSCs that was attenuated by treatment with monensin and N-ethylmaleimide, suggesting a vesicular mechanism. Treating BMSCs with ATP, but not other nucleotides, increased cellular proliferation. Moreover, extracellular ATP was a prerequisite for fluid flow-induced increases in intracellular calcium concentration, activation of calcineurin, the nuclear translocation of NFATc1, and proliferation. These data indicate that ATP regulates not only osteoblastic and

  3. Optical tweezers for measuring the interaction of the two single red blood cells in flow condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kisung; Muravyov, Alexei; Semenov, Alexei; Wagner, Christian; Priezzhev, Alexander

    2017-03-01

    Aggregation of red blood cells (RBCs) is an intrinsic property of blood, which has direct effect on the blood viscosity and therefore affects overall the blood circulation throughout the body. It is attracting interest for the research in both fundamental science and clinical application. Despite of the intensive research, the aggregation mechanism is remaining not fully clear. Recent advances in methods allowed measuring the interaction between single RBCs in a well-defined configuration leading the better understanding of the mechanism of the process. However the most of the studies were made on the static cells. Thus, the measurements in flow mimicking conditions are missing. In this work, we aim to study the interaction of two RBCs in the flow conditions. We demonstrate the characterization of the cells interaction strength (or flow tolerance) by measuring the flow velocity to be applied to separate two aggregated cells trapped by double channel optical tweezers in a desired configuration. The age-separated cells were used for this study. The obtained values for the minimum flow velocities needed to separate the two cells were found to be 78.9 +/- 6.1 μm/s and 110 +/- 13 μm/s for old and young cells respectively. The data obtained is in agreement with the observations reported by other authors. The significance of our results is in ability for obtaining a comprehensible and absolute physical value characterizing the cells interaction in flow conditions (not like the Aggregation Index measured in whole blood suspensions by other techniques, which is some abstract parameter)

  4. Sequential CD34 cell fractionation by magnetophoresis in a magnetic dipole flow sorter.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Thomas; Karl, Stephan; Moore, Lee R; Chalmers, Jeffrey J; Williams, P Stephen; Zborowski, Maciej

    2010-01-01

    Cell separation and fractionation based on fluorescent and magnetic labeling procedures are common tools in contemporary research. These techniques rely on binding of fluorophores or magnetic particles conjugated to antibodies to target cells. Cell surface marker expression levels within cell populations vary with progression through the cell cycle. In an earlier work we showed the reproducible magnetic fractionation (single pass) of the Jurkat cell line based on the population distribution of CD45 surface marker expression. Here we present a study on magnetic fractionation of a stem and progenitor cell (SPC) population using the established acute myelogenous leukemia cell line KG-1a as a cell model. The cells express a CD34 cell surface marker associated with the hematopoietic progenitor cell activity and the progenitor cell lineage commitment. The CD34 expression level is approximately an order of magnitude lower than that of the CD45 marker, which required further improvements of the magnetic fractionation apparatus. The cells were immunomagnetically labeled using a sandwich of anti-CD34 antibody-phycoerythrin (PE) conjugate and anti-PE magnetic nanobead and fractionated into eight components using a continuous flow dipole magnetophoresis apparatus. The CD34 marker expression distribution between sorted fractions was measured by quantitative PE flow cytometry (using QuantiBRITE PE calibration beads), and it was shown to be correlated with the cell magnetophoretic mobility distribution. A flow outlet addressing scheme based on the concept of the transport lamina thickness was used to control cell distribution between the eight outlet ports. The fractional cell distributions showed good agreement with numerical simulations of the fractionation based on the cell magnetophoretic mobility distribution in the unsorted sample.

  5. Sequential CD34 cell fractionation by magnetophoresis in a magnetic dipole flow sorter

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Thomas; Karl, Stephan; Moore, Lee R.; Chalmers, Jeffrey J.; Williams, P. Stephen; Zborowski, Maciej

    2010-01-01

    Cell separation and fractionation based on fluorescent and magnetic labeling procedures are common tools in contemporary research. These techniques rely on binding of fluorophores or magnetic particles conjugated to antibodies to target cells. Cell surface marker expression levels within cell populations vary with progression through the cell cycle. In an earlier work we showed the reproducible magnetic fractionation (single pass) of the Jurkat cell line based on the population distribution of CD45 surface marker expression. Here we present a study on magnetic fractionation of a stem and progenitor cell (SPC) population using the established acute myelogenous leukemia cell line KG-1a as a cell model. The cells express a CD34 cell surface marker associated with the hematopoietic progenitor cell activity and the progenitor cell lineage commitment (related to the CD34 marker expression level). The CD34 expression level is approximately an order of magnitude lower than that of the CD45 marker, which required further improvements of the magnetic fractionation apparatus. The cells were immuno-magnetically labeled using a sandwich of anti CD34 antibody-phycoerythrin (PE) conjugate and anti PE magnetic nanobead and fractionated into eight components using a continuous flow dipole magnetophoresis apparatus. The CD34 marker expression distribution between sorted fractions was measured by quantitative PE flow cytometry (using QuantiBRITE™ PE calibration beads), and it was shown to be correlated with the cell magnetophoretic mobility distribution. A flow outlet addressing scheme based on the concept of the transport lamina thickness was used to control cell distribution between the eight outlet ports. The fractional cell distributions showed good agreement with numerical simulations of the fractionation based on the cell magnetophoretic mobility distribution in the unsorted sample. PMID:20024182

  6. Detection, isolation, and capture of circulating breast cancer cells with photoacoustic flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Kiran; Njoroge, Martin; Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Gaffigan, Brian; Rood, Kyle; Viator, John A.

    2013-03-01

    According to the CDC, breast cancer is the most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer related deaths among women. Metastasis, or the presence of secondary tumors caused by the spread of cancer cells via the circulatory or lymphatic systems, significantly worsens the prognosis of any breast cancer patient. In this study, a technique is developed to detect circulating breast cancer cells in human blood using a photoacoustic flow cytometry method. A Q-switched laser with a 5 ns pulse at 532 nm is used to interrogate thousands of cells with one pulse as they flow through the beam path. Cells which are pigmented, either naturally or artificially, emit an ultrasound wave as a result of the photoacoustic (PA) effect. Breast cancer cells are targeted with chromophores through immunochemistry in order to provide pigment. After which, the device is calibrated to demonstrate a single-cell detection limit. Cultured breast cancer cells are added to whole blood to reach a biologically relevant concentration of about 25-45 breast cancer cells per 1 mL of blood. An in vitro photoacoustic flow cytometer is used to detect and isolate these cells followed by capture with the use of a micromanipulator. This method can not only be used to determine the disease state of the patient and the response to therapy, it can also be used for genetic testing and in vitro drug trials since the circulating cell can be captured and studied.

  7. Dynamics of model blood cells in shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgorski, Thomas; Callens, Natacha; Minetti, Christophe; Coupier, Gwennou; Dubois, Frank; Misbah, Chaouqi

    The dynamics of a vesicle suspension in shear flow was investigated by digital holographic microscopy [1] in parabolic flights and in the MASER 11 sounding rocket. Vesicles are lipid membranes which mimic the mechanical behaviour of cells, such as red blood cells in flow. In a simple shear flow between parallel walls, a lift force of purely viscous origin pushes vesicles away from walls. Our parabolic flight experiments [2] reveal that the lift velocity in a dilute suspen-sion is well described by theoretical predictions by Olla. As vesicles gather near the center of the flow chamber due to lift forces from both walls, one expects hydrodynamic interactions of pairs of vesicles to result in shear induced diffusion in the suspension. The BIOMICS experi-ment in the MASER 11 sounding rocket revealed a complex spatial structure of a polydisperse vesicle suspension due to the interplay between lift forces from the walls and hydrodynamic interactions. These phenomena have a strong impact on the structure and rheology of blood in small vessels, and a precise knowledge of the dynamics of migration and diffusion of soft particles in flow can lead to alternative ways to separate and sort blood cells. 1. Dubois, F., Schockaert, C., Callens, N., Yourrassowsky, C., "Focus plane detection criteria in digital holography microscopy by amplitude analysis", Opt. Express, Vol. 14, pp 5895-5908, 2006 2. Callens, N., Minetti, C., Coupier, G., Mader, M.-A., Dubois, F., Misbah, C., Podgorski, T., "Hydrodynamics lift of vesicles under shear flow in microgravity", Europhys. Lett., Vol. 83, p. 24002, 2008

  8. Gold recycling; a materials flow study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amey, Earle B.

    2000-01-01

    This materials flow study includes a description of trends in consumption, loss, and recycling of gold-containing materials in the United States in 1998 in order to illustrate the extent to which gold is presently being recycled and to identify recycling trends. The quantity of gold recycled, as a percent of the apparent supply of gold, was estimated to be about 30 percent. Of the approximately 446 metric tons of gold refined in the United States in 1998, the fabricating and industrial use losses were 3 percent.

  9. Quantitative analysis of cell migration using optical flow.

    PubMed

    Boric, Katica; Orio, Patricio; Viéville, Thierry; Whitlock, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    Neural crest cells exhibit dramatic migration behaviors as they populate their distant targets. Using a line of zebrafish expressing green fluorescent protein (sox10:EGFP) in neural crest cells we developed an assay to analyze and quantify cell migration as a population, and use it here to characterize in detail the subtle defects in cell migration caused by ethanol exposure during early development. The challenge was to quantify changes in the in vivo migration of all Sox10:EGFP expressing cells in the visual field of time-lapse movies. To perform this analysis we used an Optical Flow algorithm for motion detection and combined the analysis with a fit to an affine transformation. Through this analysis we detected and quantified significant differences in the cell migrations of Sox10:EGFP positive cranial neural crest populations in ethanol treated versus untreated embryos. Specifically, treatment affected migration by increasing the left-right asymmetry of the migrating cells and by altering the direction of cell movements. Thus, by applying this novel computational analysis, we were able to quantify the movements of populations of cells, allowing us to detect subtle changes in cell behaviors. Because cranial neural crest cells contribute to the formation of the frontal mass these subtle differences may underlie commonly observed facial asymmetries in normal human populations.

  10. Analysis on the design and property of flow field plates of innovative direct methanol fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ho; Kao, Mu-Jung; Chen, Chih-Hao; Kuo, Chin-Guo; Lee, Kuang-Ying

    2014-10-01

    The paper uses technology of lithography process to etch flow fields on single side of a printed circuit board (PCB), and combines flow field plate with collector plate to make innovative anode flow field plates and cathode flow field plates required in direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC), and meanwhile makes membrane electrode assembly (MEA) and methanol fuel plate. The flow field plates are designed to be in the form of serpentine flow field. The paper measured the assembled DMFC to achieve the overall efficiency of DMFC under the conditions of different screw torques and different concentration, flow rate and temperature of methanol. Experimental results show that when the flow field width of flow field plate is 1 mm, the screw torque is 16 kgf/cm, and the concentration, flow rate and temperature of methanol-water are 1 M, 180 ml/h and 50 degrees C respectively, the prepared DMFC can have better power density of 5.5 mW/cm2, 5.4 mW/cm2, 11.2 mW/cm2 and 11.8 mW/cm2. Besides, the volume of the DMFC designed and assembled by the study is smaller than the generally existing DMFC by 40%.

  11. Unstructured Euler flow solutions using hexahedral cell refinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, John E.; Cappuccio, Gelsomina; Thomas, Scott D.

    1991-01-01

    An attempt is made to extend grid refinement into three dimensions by using unstructured hexahedral grids. The flow solver is developed using the TIGER (topologically Independent Grid, Euler Refinement) as the starting point. The program uses an unstructured hexahedral mesh and a modified version of the Jameson four-stage, finite-volume Runge-Kutta algorithm for integration of the Euler equations. The unstructured mesh allows for local refinement appropriate for each freestream condition, thereby concentrating mesh cells in the regions of greatest interest. This increases the computational efficiency because the refinement is not required to extend throughout the entire flow field.

  12. Hydrodynamic modeling of granular flows in a modified Couette cell.

    PubMed

    Jop, Pierre

    2008-03-01

    We present simulations of granular flows in a modified Couette cell, using a continuum model recently proposed for dense granular flows. Based on a friction coefficient, which depends on an inertial number, the model captures the positions of the wide shear bands. We show that a smooth transition in velocity-profile shape occurs when the height of the granular material is increased, leading to a differential rotation of the central part close to the surface. The numerical predictions are in qualitative agreement with previous experimental results. The model provides predictions for the increase of the shear band width when the rotation rate is increased.

  13. LBM study of flow-induced cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonnella, Giuseppe; Kaehler, Goetz; Bonelli, Francesco; Lamura, Antonio

    2014-11-01

    This work deals with the investigation of homogeneous cavitation, induced by a fast flow past a sack wall, by using the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). Cavitation occurs, in a liquid, because of a pressure drop, which falls below a certain threshold, with the consequent formation of vapor bubbles. The aim is to study the inception of cavitation by using LBM without any ``ad hoc'' cavitation model. A LBM with a body force term and redefined equilibrium distribution functions is employed for describing the continuity and Navier-Stokes equations for a fluid locally satisfying the van der Waals equation of state. In such a way, cavitation is directly described by the solution of the LB equation. The numerical study shows the formation of a depletion zone just under the obstacle, near its left edge, where the pressure reaches a minimum value. Cavitation occurs only when the pressure of this depletion zone reaches a value lower than the spinodal of the liquid branch, thus not confirming the Joseph's maximum tension criterion. A detailed study of the flow field, of the Reynolds number effects, and of the developed cavitation regime are presented.

  14. A Study of Blood Flow and of Aggregation of Blood Cells Under Conditions of Zero Gravity: Its Relevance to the Occlusive Diseases and Cancer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dintenfass, L.

    1985-01-01

    The objectives of this program are: (1) to determine whether the size of red cell aggregates, kinetics and morphology of these aggregates are influenced by near-zero gravity; (2) whether viscosity, especially at low shear rate, is afflicted by near-zero gravity (the latter preventing sedimentation of red cells); (3) whether the actual shape of red cells changes; and (4) whether blood samples obtained from different donors (normal and patients suffering from different disorders) react in the same manner to near-zero gravity.

  15. A study of grout flow pattern analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. Y.; Hyun, S.

    2013-01-10

    A new disposal unit, designated as Salt Disposal Unit no. 6 (SDU6), is being designed for support of site accelerated closure goals and salt nuclear waste projections identified in the new Liquid Waste System plan. The unit is cylindrical disposal vault of 380 ft diameter and 43 ft in height, and it has about 30 million gallons of capacity. Primary objective was to develop the computational model and to perform the evaluations for the flow patterns of grout material in SDU6 as function of elevation of grout discharge port, and slurry rheology. A Bingham plastic model was basically used to represent the grout flow behavior. A two-phase modeling approach was taken to achieve the objective. This approach assumes that the air-grout interface determines the shape of the accumulation mound. The results of this study were used to develop the design guidelines for the discharge ports of the Saltstone feed materials in the SDU6 facility. The focusing areas of the modeling study are to estimate the domain size of the grout materials radially spread on the facility floor under the baseline modeling conditions, to perform the sensitivity analysis with respect to the baseline design and operating conditions such as elevation of discharge port, discharge pipe diameter, and grout properties, and to determine the changes in grout density as it is related to grout drop height. An axi-symmetric two-phase modeling method was used for computational efficiency. Based on the nominal design and operating conditions, a transient computational approach was taken to compute flow fields mainly driven by pumping inertia and natural gravity. Detailed solution methodology and analysis results are discussed here.

  16. Progress Towards a Cartesian Cut-Cell Method for Viscous Compressible Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Marsha; Aftosmis, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    We present preliminary development of an approach for simulating high Reynolds number steady compressible flow in two space dimensions using a Cartesian cut-cell finite volume method. We consider both laminar and turbulent flow with both low and high cell Reynolds numbers near the wall. The approach solves the full Navier-Stokes equations in all cells, and uses a wall model to address the resolution requirements near boundaries and to mitigate mesh irregularities in cut cells. We present a quadratic wall model for low cell Reynolds numbers. At high cell Reynolds numbers, the quadratic is replaced with a newly developed analytic wall model stemming from solution of a limiting form of the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model which features a forward evaluation for flow velocity and exactly matches characteristics of the SA turbulence model in the field. We develop multigrid operators which attain convergence rates similar to inviscid multigrid. Investigations focus on preliminary verification and validation of the method. Flows over flat plates and compressible airfoils show good agreement with both theoretical results and experimental data. Mesh convergence studies on sub- and transonic airfoil flows show convergence of surface pressures with wall spacings as large as approx.0.1% chord. With the current analytic wall model, one or two additional refinements near the wall are required to obtain mesh converged values of skin friction.

  17. Cerebral blood flow abnormalities in children with sickle cell disease: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Behpour, Amir M; Shah, Prakesh S; Mikulis, David J; Kassner, Andrea

    2013-03-01

    A systematic review was performed to assess whether cerebral blood flow with different imaging modalities could identify brain abnormalities in children with sickle cell disease where structural magnetic resonance imaging and transcranial Doppler velocity appeared normal. A total of 11 studies were identified which reported cerebral blood flow abnormalities alongside structural magnetic resonance imaging or transcranial Doppler velocity abnormalities in patients with sickle cell disease. Potential for bias was assessed with the quality assessment of diagnostic accuracy studies scale in addition to treatment bias. Subjects of each study were categorized into patients with and without stroke. The prevalence of abnormalities for each modality was then separately calculated in each group. The included studies had mostly moderate degrees of bias. The prevalence of blood flow abnormalities compared with structural magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities was equal to or lower in patients with stroke and equal to or greater in patients without stroke. Blood flow abnormalities were more prevalent than transcranial Doppler abnormalities in four studies of patients without stroke and in one study of patients with stroke. The studies suggest that the assessment of cerebral blood flow in sickle cell disease can be of potential value in addressing brain abnormalities at the tissue level; however, further studies are warranted.

  18. Flow cytometric analysis of dengue virus-infected cells in peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Baclig, Michael O; Gervacio, Leonora T S; Suarez, Lady-Anne C; Buerano, Corazon C; Matias, Ronald R; Kumatori, Atsushi; Inoue, Shingo; Morita, Kouichi; Natividad, Filipinas F; Hasebe, Futoshi

    2010-11-01

    With the development of permeabilization techniques in flow cytometry and the availability of various monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that specifically bind with cell surface and intracellular antigens, it is now possible to use flow cytometric assay to identify dengue virus (DEN) infected cells in peripheral blood. Blood samples were analyzed using phycoerythrin (PE) labeled anti-CD3, anti-CD14, anti-CD16, and anti-CD19 antibodies and Alexa Fluor 488 labeled anti-flavivirus monoclonal antibody (MAb) 6B6C-1. The predominant DEN-infected cells were CD19+ in this study. There was dim partial to moderately bright partial expression of CD19 positive cells in the blood samples tested. Virus isolation and serotype-specific RT-PCR revealed the cells were infected with dengue serotype 3 (DEN3). Our results suggest B cells may play an important role in DEN1 and DEN3 replication, and dissemination in vivo.

  19. Bodies in flowing plasmas - Laboratory studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, N. H.; Samir, U.

    1981-01-01

    A brief review of early rudimentary laboratory studies of bodies in flowing, rarefied plasmas is presented (e.g., Birkeland, 1908), along with a discussion of more recent parametric studies conducted in steady plasma wind tunnels, which includes the study by Hall et al. (1964), in which a strong ion density enhancement in the center of the ion void created downstream from the body was observed. Good agreement was found between the experimental results and theoretical calculations which omit ion thermal motion. Examples in which in situ data on the interaction between satellites and the ionospheric plasma have been elucidated by the laboratory results are presented, and include evidence for a midwake axial ion peak, and ion current density in the near-wake region. The application of the ionospheric laboratory to basic space plasma physics is discussed, and its application to some types of solar system plasma phenomena is illustrated.

  20. Couette flows of a granular monolayer: An experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, K.E.; Ahmadi, G.; Kvasnak, W.

    1995-03-01

    An experimental study concerning rapid flows of granular materials in a two dimensional planar granular Couette flow apparatus is performed. The device is capable of generating particulate flows in grain-inertia regime at different shearing rates and solid volume fractions. Multi-color spherical glass particles are sheared across an annular test-section for several wall angular velocities. A video recorder is used to record the motion of particles, and consecutive images are stored and analyzed by an image processing technique for evaluating individual grain velocities. Experimental data for the mean velocity, the root mean-square fluctuation velocity components and the solid volume fraction profile are obtained. The resulting mean velocity profiles have a roughly linear variation for the range of solid volume fractions and shear rates studied. The solid volume fraction profiles exhibit nonuniform variations with the highest concentration occuring near the center of the shearing cell. The RMS-fluctuation velocities are roughly constant, with the streamwise fluctuation being somewhat larger than the cross-stream direction. The experimentally measured flow properties are in reasonable agreement with the earlier theoretical and simulation results.

  1. Direct demonstration of tubular fluid flow sensing by macula densa cells

    PubMed Central

    Sipos, Arnold; Vargas, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    Macula densa (MD) cells in the cortical thick ascending limb (cTAL) detect variations in tubular fluid composition and transmit signals to the afferent arteriole (AA) that control glomerular filtration rate [tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF)]. Increases in tubular salt at the MD that normally parallel elevations in tubular fluid flow rate are well accepted as the trigger of TGF. The present study aimed to test whether MD cells can detect variations in tubular fluid flow rate per se. Calcium imaging of the in vitro microperfused isolated JGA-glomerulus complex dissected from mice was performed using fluo-4 and fluorescence microscopy. Increasing cTAL flow from 2 to 20 nl/min (80 mM [NaCl]) rapidly produced significant elevations in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in AA smooth muscle cells [evidenced by changes in fluo-4 intensity (F); F/F0 = 1.45 ± 0.11] and AA vasoconstriction. Complete removal of the cTAL around the MD plaque and application of laminar flow through a perfusion pipette directly to the MD apical surface essentially produced the same results even when low (10 mM) or zero NaCl solutions were used. Acetylated α-tubulin immunohistochemistry identified the presence of primary cilia in mouse MD cells. Under no flow conditions, bending MD cilia directly with a micropipette rapidly caused significant [Ca2+]i elevations in AA smooth muscle cells (fluo-4 F/F0: 1.60 ± 0.12) and vasoconstriction. P2 receptor blockade with suramin significantly reduced the flow-induced TGF, whereas scavenging superoxide with tempol did not. In conclusion, MD cells are equipped with a tubular flow-sensing mechanism that may contribute to MD cell function and TGF. PMID:20719981

  2. Direct demonstration of tubular fluid flow sensing by macula densa cells.

    PubMed

    Sipos, Arnold; Vargas, Sarah; Peti-Peterdi, János

    2010-11-01

    Macula densa (MD) cells in the cortical thick ascending limb (cTAL) detect variations in tubular fluid composition and transmit signals to the afferent arteriole (AA) that control glomerular filtration rate [tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF)]. Increases in tubular salt at the MD that normally parallel elevations in tubular fluid flow rate are well accepted as the trigger of TGF. The present study aimed to test whether MD cells can detect variations in tubular fluid flow rate per se. Calcium imaging of the in vitro microperfused isolated JGA-glomerulus complex dissected from mice was performed using fluo-4 and fluorescence microscopy. Increasing cTAL flow from 2 to 20 nl/min (80 mM [NaCl]) rapidly produced significant elevations in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in AA smooth muscle cells [evidenced by changes in fluo-4 intensity (F); F/F(0) = 1.45 ± 0.11] and AA vasoconstriction. Complete removal of the cTAL around the MD plaque and application of laminar flow through a perfusion pipette directly to the MD apical surface essentially produced the same results even when low (10 mM) or zero NaCl solutions were used. Acetylated α-tubulin immunohistochemistry identified the presence of primary cilia in mouse MD cells. Under no flow conditions, bending MD cilia directly with a micropipette rapidly caused significant [Ca(2+)](i) elevations in AA smooth muscle cells (fluo-4 F/F(0): 1.60 ± 0.12) and vasoconstriction. P2 receptor blockade with suramin significantly reduced the flow-induced TGF, whereas scavenging superoxide with tempol did not. In conclusion, MD cells are equipped with a tubular flow-sensing mechanism that may contribute to MD cell function and TGF.

  3. Click Chemistry for Analysis of Cell Proliferation in Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Scott T; Calderon, Veronica; Bradford, Jolene A

    2017-10-02

    The measurement of cellular proliferation is fundamental to the assessment of cellular health, genotoxicity, and the evaluation of drug efficacy. Labeling, detection, and quantification of cells in the synthesis phase of cell cycle progression are not only important for characterizing basic biology, but also in defining cellular responses to drug treatments. Changes in DNA replication during S-phase can provide valuable insights into mechanisms of cell growth, cell cycle kinetics, and cytotoxicity. A common method for detection of cell proliferation is the incorporation of a thymidine analog during DNA synthesis. This chapter presents a pulse labeling method using the thymidine analog, 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU), with subsequent detection by click chemistry. EdU detection using click chemistry is bio-orthogonal to most living systems and does not non-specifically label other biomolecules. Live cells are first pulsed with EdU. After antibody labeling cell surface markers, fixation, and permeabilization, the incorporated EdU is covalently labeled using click chemistry thereby identifying proliferating cells. Improvements in click chemistry allow for labeling in the presence of fluorescent proteins and phycobiliproteins without quenching due to copper. Measuring DNA replication during cell cycle progression has cell health applications in flow cytometry, fluorescence microscopy, and high content imaging. This protocol has been developed and optimized for research use only and is not suitable for use in diagnostic procedures. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  4. Numerical analysis of cell adhesion in capillary flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeishi, Naoki; Imai, Yohsuke; Ishida, Shunichi; Omori, Toshihiro; Kamm, Roger; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2016-11-01

    Numerical simulation of cell adhesion was performed for capillaries whose diameter is comparable to or smaller than that of the cell. Despite a lot of works about leukocyte and tumor cell rolling, cell motion in capillaries has remained unclear. The solid and fluid mechanics of a cell in flow was coupled with a slip bond model of ligand-receptor interactions. When the size of a capillary was reduced, the cell always transitioned to "bullet-like" motion, with a consequent decrease in the velocity of the cell. A state diagram is obtained for various values of capillary diameter and receptor density. According to our numerical results, bullet motion enables firm adhesion of a cell to the capillary wall even for a weak ligand-receptor binding. We also quantified effects of various parameters, including the dissociation rate constant, the spring constant, and the reactive compliance on the characteristics of cell motion. Our results suggest that even under the interaction between PSGL-1 and P-selectin, which is mainly responsible for leukocyte rolling, a cell is able to show firm adhesion in a small capillary. These findings may help in understanding such phenomena as leukocyte plugging and cancer metastasis. This research was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Numbers 25000008, 26107703, 14J03967. We also acknowledge support from the Tohoku University Division for International Advanced Research and Education Organization.

  5. Water management in a single cell proton exchange membrane fuel cells with a serpentine flow field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Nik Suhaimi Mat; Daud, Wan Ramli Wan; Sopian, Kamaruzzaman; Sahari, Jaafar

    Gas and water management is the key to achieving good performance from a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stack. Imbalance between production and evaporation rates can result in either flooding of the electrodes or membrane dehydration, both of which severely limit fuel cell performance. In the present study, a mathematical model was developed to evaluate moisture profiles of hydrogen and air flows in the flow field channels of both the anode and the cathode. For model validation, a single fuel cell was designed with an active area of 200 cm 2. Six humidity sensors were installed in the flow fields of both the anode and the cathode at 457 mm, 1266 mm and 2532 mm from the inlets. The experiment was performed using an Arbin Fuel Cell Test Station. The temperature was varied (25 °C, 40 °C, 50 °C and 60 °C), while hydrogen and air velocities were fixed at 3 L min -1 and 6 L min -1, respectively, during the operation of the single cell. The feed relative humidity at the anode was fixed at 1.0, while the feed relative humidity at the cathode was fixed at 0.005 (dry air). All humidity sensor readings were taken at steady state after 2 h of operation. Model predictions were then compared with experimental results by using the least squares algorithm. The moisture content was found to decrease along the flow field at the anode, but to increase at the cathode. The moisture content profile at the anode was shown to depend on the moisture Peclet number, which decreased with temperature. On the other hand, the moisture profile at the cathode was shown to depend on both the Peclet number and the Damkohler number. The trend of the Peclet number in the cathode followed closely that of the anode. The Damkohler number decreased with temperature, indicating increasing moisture mass transfer with temperature. The moisture profile models were successfully validated by the published data of the estimated overall mass transfer coefficient and moisture effective

  6. Micro-flow visualization of red blood cell-enhanced platelet concentration at sudden expansion.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Rui; Marhefka, Joie N; Shu, Fangjun; Hund, Samuel J; Kameneva, Marina V; Antaki, James F

    2008-07-01

    Microscopic steps and crevices are inevitable features within prosthetic blood-contacting devices. This study aimed to elucidate the thrombogenicity of the associated microscopic flow features by studying the transport of fluorescent platelet-sized particles in a suspension of red blood cells (RBCs) flowing through a 100 microm:200 microm sudden expansion. Micro-flow visualization revealed a strong influence of hematocrit upon the path of RBCs and spatial concentration of particles. At all flow rates studied (Re = 8.3-41.7) and hematocrit 20% and lower, RBC streamlines were found to detach from the microchannel wall creating an RBC-depleted zone inside the step that was much larger than the cells themselves. However, the observed distribution of particles was relatively homogeneous. By contrast, the RBC streamlines of samples with hematocrit equal to or greater than 30% more closely followed the contour of the microchannel, yet exhibited enhanced concentration of particles within the corner. The corresponding size of the cell depletion layer was comparable with the size of the cells. This study implies that local platelet concentration in blood within the physiological range of hematocrit can be elevated within the flow separation region of a sudden expansion and implicates the role of RBCs in causing this effect.

  7. Modelling the damage potential of fluid flows for animal cells undergoing cultivation in bioreactors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanford Keen, Giles

    1996-11-01

    Mechanical disruption and injury sustained by animal cells undergoing cultivation in bioreactors is an important problem in biotechnology. Damage to cells is thought to be caused primarily by bubbles bursting at the free surface of the culture medium. Here we present computational studies applying a mathematical model for the cell damage rates experienced by cells in laminar flow. Two fluid dynamical systems are considered - namely a converging channel and a single bursting bubble. The flows are calculated using a fourth-order finite difference technique on a stretched grid, and a boundary integral method respectively. It is possible to obtain an estimate for the number of cells in a particular population which are likely to be disrupted by the forces they experience in the flow. This is done by calculating the maximum rate of strain experienced by fluid particles, and combining this with experimental data on the strength and size of cells, obtained by micromanipulation techniques. The resulting information is then used together with the cell damage model to produce a cell damage prediction. The computational results are compared with experimental measurements of cell death, to validate the model for cell damage.

  8. Detection and capture of breast cancer cells with photoacoustic flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Kiran; Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Viator, John A.

    2016-08-01

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, breast cancer is the most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer related deaths among women. Metastasis-the presence of secondary tumors caused by the spread of cancer cells via the circulatory or lymphatic systems-significantly worsens the prognosis of any breast cancer patient. A technique is developed to detect circulating breast cancer cells in human blood using a photoacoustic flow cytometry method. A Q-switched laser is used to interrogate thousands of blood cells with one pulse as they flow through the beam path. Cells that are optically absorbing, either naturally or artificially, emit an ultrasound wave as a result of the photoacoustic (PA) effect. Breast cancer cells are targeted with chromophores through immunochemistry in order to enhance optical absorption. After which, the PA cytometry device is calibrated to demonstrate the ability to detect single cells. Cultured breast cancer cells are added to whole blood to reach a biologically relevant concentration of about 25 to 45 breast cancer cells per 1 mL of blood. An in vitro PA flow cytometer is used to detect and isolate these cells followed by capture with the use of a micromanipulator. This method can not only be used to determine the disease state of the patient and the response to therapy but also it can be used for genetic testing and in vitro drug trials since the circulating cell can be captured and studied.

  9. Detection and capture of breast cancer cells with photoacoustic flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Kiran; Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Viator, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, breast cancer is the most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer related deaths among women. Metastasis—the presence of secondary tumors caused by the spread of cancer cells via the circulatory or lymphatic systems—significantly worsens the prognosis of any breast cancer patient. A technique is developed to detect circulating breast cancer cells in human blood using a photoacoustic flow cytometry method. A Q-switched laser is used to interrogate thousands of blood cells with one pulse as they flow through the beam path. Cells that are optically absorbing, either naturally or artificially, emit an ultrasound wave as a result of the photoacoustic (PA) effect. Breast cancer cells are targeted with chromophores through immunochemistry in order to enhance optical absorption. After which, the PA cytometry device is calibrated to demonstrate the ability to detect single cells. Cultured breast cancer cells are added to whole blood to reach a biologically relevant concentration of about 25 to 45 breast cancer cells per 1 mL of blood. An in vitro PA flow cytometer is used to detect and isolate these cells followed by capture with the use of a micromanipulator. This method can not only be used to determine the disease state of the patient and the response to therapy but also it can be used for genetic testing and in vitro drug trials since the circulating cell can be captured and studied. PMID:27580367

  10. Convective flows of colloidal suspension in an inclined closed cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smorodin, Boris; Cherepanov, Ivan; Ishutov, Sergey

    2016-12-01

    The nonlinear spatiotemporal evolution of convective flows is numerically investigated in the case of colloidal suspension filling an inclined closed cell heated from below. The bifurcation diagram (the dependency of the Nusselt number on the Rayleigh number) is obtained. The characteristics of the wave and steady patterns are investigated depending on heat intensity. The travelling wave changing travel direction and the non-regular oscillatory flow are found to be stable solutions within a certain interval of the Rayleigh number. Temporal Fourier decomposition is used together with other diagnostic tools to analyse the complex bifurcation and spatiotemporal properties caused by the interplay of the gravity-induced gradient of concentration and convective mixing of the fluid. It is shown that a more complex flow structure exists at a lower heating intensity (Rayleigh number).

  11. A Novel Counter Sheet-flow Sandwich Cell Culture Device for Mammalian Cell Growth in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shujin; Gao, Yuxin; Shu, Nanjiang; Tang, Zemei; Tao, Zulai; Long, Mian

    2008-08-01

    Cell culture and growth in space is crucial to understand the cellular responses under microgravity. The effects of microgravity were coupled with such environment restrictions as medium perfusion, in which the underlying mechanism has been poorly understood. In the present work, a customer-made counter sheet-flow sandwich cell culture device was developed upon a biomechanical concept from fish gill breathing. The sandwich culture unit consists of two side chambers where the medium flow is counter-directional, a central chamber where the cells are cultured, and two porous polycarbonate membranes between side and central chambers. Flow dynamics analysis revealed the symmetrical velocity profile and uniform low shear rate distribution of flowing medium inside the central culture chamber, which promotes sufficient mass transport and nutrient supply for mammalian cell growth. An on-orbit experiment performed on a recovery satellite was used to validate the availability of the device.

  12. Magnetic resonance microimaging and numerical simulations of velocity fields inside enlarged flow cells used for coupled NMR microseparations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaofeng; Webb, Andrew G

    2005-03-01

    The coupling of various chemical microseparation methods with small-scale NMR detection is a growing area in analytical chemistry. The formation of enlarged flow cells within the active volume of the NMR detector can significantly increase the coil filling factor and hence the signal-to-noise ratio of the NMR spectra. However, flow cells can also lead to deterioration of the separation efficiency due to the development of complex flow patterns, the form of which depend on the particular geometry of the flow cell and the flow rate used. In this study, we investigated the flow characteristics in different flow cell geometries relevant to the coupling of capillary liquid chromatography and NMR. Computational fluid dynamics was used to simulate fluid flow inside flow cells with a volume of approximately 1 microL. Magnetic resonance microimaging was used to measure experimentally the velocity fields inside these flow cells. The results showed good agreement between experiment and simulation and demonstrated that a relatively gradual expansion and contraction is necessary to avoid areas of weak recirculation and strong radial velocities, both of which can potentially compromise separation efficiency.

  13. Flow structures and red blood cell dynamics in arteriole of dilated or constricted cross section.

    PubMed

    Gambaruto, Alberto M

    2016-07-26

    Vessel with 'circular' or 'star-shaped' cross sections are studied, representing respectively dilated or constricted cases where endothelial cells smoothly line or bulge into the lumen. Computational haemodynamics simulations are carried out on idealised periodic arteriole-sized vessels, with red blood cell 'tube' hematocrit value=24%. A further simulation of a single red blood cell serves for comparison purposes. The bulk motion of the red blood cells reproduces well-known effects, including the presence of a cell-free layer and the apparent shear-thinning non-Newtonian rheology. The velocity flow field is analysed in a Lagrangian reference frame, relative to any given red blood cell, hence removing the bulk coaxial motion and highlighting instead the complex secondary flow patterns. An aggregate formation becomes apparent, continuously rearranging and dynamic, brought about by the inter-cellular fluid mechanics interactions and the deformability properties of the cells. The secondary flow field induces a vacillating radial migration of the red blood cells. At different radial locations, the red blood cells express different residence times, orientation and shape. The shear stresses exerted by the flow on the vessel wall are influenced by the motion of red blood cells, despite the presence of the cell-free layer. Spatial (and temporal) variations of wall shear stress patters are observed, especially for the 'circular' vessel. The 'star-shaped' vessel bears considerable stress at the protruding endothelial cell crests, where the stress vectors are coaxially aligned. The bulging endothelial cells hence regularise the transmission of stresses on the vessel wall.

  14. Measuring NAPL-Water Interfacial Areas to Evaluate the Effectiveness of In-Situ Chemical Oxidation for DNAPL-Contaminated Source Zones: A Two-Dimensional Flow Cell Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M.; Brusseau, M. L. L.; Yan, N.; Wan, L.

    2015-12-01

    In-situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) using persulfate was employed to remediate a flow cell contaminated with a model dense nonaqueous-phase liquid (DNAPL), trichloroethene (TCE). The flow cell was packed homogeneously with 359 μm diameter natural sand. Dyed TCE DNAPL was naturally distributed in the flow cell. Fe2+-activated persulfate (5 mM) was used for ISCO. Interfacial partitioning tracer tests (IPTT) were conducted before and after ISCO to measure NAPL-water interfacial area, using sodium dodecyl benzenesulfonate (SDBS, 35mg/L) as the tracer. The change in interfacial area was examined as influenced by ISCO remediation. The interfacial areas measured for this two-dimensional system are compared to previously reported values obtained from one-dimensional column experiments.

  15. Flow distribution and maximum current density studies in redox flow batteries with a single passage of the serpentine flow channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Xinyou; Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Prahl, Joseph M.; Savinell, Robert F.

    2014-12-01

    Flow batteries show promise for very large-scale stationary energy storage such as needed for the grid and renewable energy implementation. In recent years, researchers and developers of redox flow batteries (RFBs) have found that electrode and flow field designs of PEM fuel cell (PEMFC) technology can increase the power density and consequently push down the cost of flow battery stacks. In this paper we present a macroscopic model of a typical PEMFC-like RFB electrode-flow field design. The model is a layered system comprised of a single passage of a serpentine flow channel and a parallel underlying porous electrode (or porous layer). The effects of the inlet volumetric flow rate, permeability of the porous layer, thickness of the porous layer and thickness of the flow channel on the flow penetration into the porous layer are investigated. The maximum current density corresponding to stoichiometry is estimated to be 377 mA cm-2 and 724 mA cm-2, which compares favorably with experiments of ∼400 mA cm-2 and ∼750 mA cm-2, for a single layer and three layers of the carbon fiber paper, respectively.

  16. A study of temporal estaurine flow dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mairs, R. L.; Clark, D. K.

    1972-01-01

    Multispectral photography,infrared imagery, image enhancement, and oceanographic, radiometric, and meteorological data were used in the study of temporal estuarine flow dynamics, nearshore circulation, and the resulting dispersal of suspended and dissolved substances introduced from the continent. Repetitive multispectral photography, IR imagery, total radiance and irradiance, water surface temperatures, salinity, total suspended solids, visibility, current velocity, winds, dye implants, and high contrast image enhancement were used to observe and describe water mass boundaries in the nearshore zone and to attempt to establish on what repetitive scale these coastal features should be observed to better understand their behavior. Water mass variability patterns, seen naturally and with the use of dyes, along the North Carolina coast and in the Chesapeake Bay are being studied as synoptic data on the basic dynamics of circulation, flushing, and mixing in coastal waters.

  17. Quantitative analysis of gold and carbon nanoparticles in mammalian cells by flow cytometry light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Gang; Liu, Naicheng; Wang, Zhenheng; Shi, Tongguo; Gan, Jingjing; Wang, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Junfeng

    2017-02-01

    Nanoparticle-based applications for diagnostics and therapeutics have been extensively studied. These applications require a profound understanding of the fate of nanoparticles (NPs) in cellular environments. However, until now, few analytical methods are available and most of them rely on fluorescent properties or special elements of NPs; therefore, for NPs without observable optical properties or special elements, the existing methods are hardly applicable. In this study, we introduce a flow cytometry light scattering (FCLS)-based approach that quantifies in situ NPs accurately in mammalian cells. Continuous cells of heterogeneous human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2 cells), mouse peritoneal macrophages (MPM), and human adenocarcinomic alveolar basal epithelia (A549 cells) were cultured with NPs with certain concentrations and size. The intensity of the flow cytometric side scattered light, which indicates the quantity of NPs in the cells, was analyzed. The result shows an accurate size- and dose-dependent uptake of Au NPs (5, 30, 250 nm) in Caco-2 cells. The size- and dose- dependence of Au NPs (5, 30, 250 nm) and carbon NPs (50, 500 nm) in cells was validated by transmission electron microscope (TEM). This paper demonstrates the great potential of flow cytometry light scattering in the quantitative study of the size and dose effect on in situ metallic or non-metallic NPs in mammalian cells.

  18. Flow cytometry analysis of cell cycle and specific cell synchronization with butyrate

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Synchronized cells have been invaluable in many kinds of cell cycle and cell proliferation studies. Butyrate induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in MDBK cells. The possibility of using butyrate-blocked cells to obtain synchronized cells was explored and the properties of butyrate-induced cell ...

  19. Recent Development in Hot Flow Anomaly Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Wang, S.; Zong, Q.

    2013-05-01

    Hot flow anomalies (HFAs) are events observed near the bow shock that are characterized by greatly heated solar wind plasmas and substantial flow deflection from the Sun-Earth direction, with duration of a few minutes and scale size of the order of a few Re. HFAs are thought to be produced by the interaction of some very special interplanetary current sheets that satisfy several strict conditions with planetary bow shocks. When the current sheet (discontinuity) is connected to the bow shock and the motional electric fields point towards the discontinuity, ions reflected from the bow shock are trapped in the current sheet. The relative streaming energy of the original solar wind beam and the reflected beam is converted to the thermal energy. However, we found recently that HFAs can be generated spontaneously (in the absence of any current sheets) at quasi-parallel bow shocks where the interplanetary magnetic field lies nearly parallel to the shock normal. Statistical studies show that 60% of the HFAs are not associated with clear discontinuities. In addition, there are 13% of the HFAs with the motional electric fields on neither leading nor trailing edge pointing towards the discontinuity. These new results indicate that this phenomenon is still not well understood although it was discovered almost 30 years ago.

  20. Recent Development in Hot Flow Anomaly Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Wang, S.; Zong, Q.

    2013-12-01

    Hot flow anomalies (HFAs) are events observed near the bow shock that are characterized by greatly heated solar wind plasmas and substantial flow deflection from the Sun-Earth direction, with duration of a few minutes and scale size of the order of a few RE. HFAs are thought to be produced by the interaction of some very special interplanetary current sheets that satisfy several strict conditions with planetary bow shocks. When the current sheet (discontinuity) is connected to the bow shock and the motional electric fields point towards the discontinuity, ions reflected from the bow shock are trapped in the current sheet. The relative streaming energy of the original solar wind beam and the reflected beam is converted to the thermal energy. However, we found recently that HFAs can be generated spontaneously (in the absence of any current sheets) at quasi-parallel bow shocks where the interplanetary magnetic field lies nearly parallel to the shock normal. Statistical studies show that 60% of the HFAs are not associated with clear discontinuities. In addition, there are 13% of the HFAs with the motional electric fields on neither leading nor trailing edge pointing towards the discontinuity. These new results indicate that this phenomenon is still not well understood although it was discovered almost 30 years ago.

  1. Continuous cell sorting in a flow based on single cell resonance Raman spectra.

    PubMed

    McIlvenna, David; Huang, Wei E; Davison, Paul; Glidle, Andrew; Cooper, Jon; Yin, Huabing

    2016-04-21

    Single cell Raman spectroscopy measures a spectral fingerprint of the biochemistry of cells, and provides a powerful method for label-free detection of living cells without the involvement of a chemical labelling strategy. However, as the intrinsic Raman signals of cells are inherently weak, there is a significant challenge in discriminating and isolating cells in a flowing stream. Here we report an integrated Raman-microfluidic system for continuous sorting of a stream of cyanobacteria, Synechocystis sp. PCC6803. These carotenoid-containing microorganisms provide an elegant model system enabling us to determine the sorting accuracy using the subtly different resonance Raman spectra of microorganism cultured in a (12)C or (13)C carbon source. Central to the implementation of continuous flow sorting is the use of "pressure dividers" that eliminate fluctuations in flow in the detection region. This has enabled us to stabilise the flow profile sufficiently to allow automated operation with synchronisation of Raman acquisition, real-time classification and sorting at flow rates of ca. <100 μm s(-1), without the need to "trap" the cells. We demonstrate the flexibility of this approach in sorting mixed cell populations with the ability to achieve 96.3% purity of the selected cells at a speed of 0.5 Hz.

  2. Design and fabrication of novel anode flow-field for commercial size solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canavar, Murat; Timurkutluk, Bora

    2017-04-01

    In this study, nickel based woven meshes are tested as not only anode current collecting meshes but also anode flow fields instead of the conventional gas channels fabricated by machining. For this purpose, short stacks with different anode flow fields are designed and built by using different number of meshes with various wire diameters and widths of opening. A short stack with classical machined flow channels is also constructed. Performance and impedance measurements of the short stacks with commercial size cells of 81 cm2 active area are performed and compared. The results reveal that it is possible to create solid oxide fuel cell anode flow fields with woven meshes and obtain acceptable power with a proper selection of the mesh number, type and orientation.

  3. Novel flow cytometry approach to identify bronchial epithelial cells from healthy human airways

    PubMed Central

    Maestre-Batlle, Danay; Pena, Olga M.; Hirota, Jeremy A.; Gunawan, Evelyn; Rider, Christopher F.; Sutherland, Darren; Alexis, Neil E.; Carlsten, Chris

    2017-01-01

    Sampling various compartments within the lower airways to examine human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC) is essential for understanding numerous lung diseases. Conventional methods to identify HBEC in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and wash (BW) have throughput limitations in terms of efficiency and ensuring adequate cell numbers for quantification. Flow cytometry can provide high-throughput quantification of cell number and function in BAL and BW samples, while requiring low cell numbers. To date, a flow cytometric method to identify HBEC recovered from lower human airway samples is unavailable. In this study we present a flow cytometric method identifying HBEC as CD45 negative, EpCAM/pan-cytokeratin (pan-CK) double-positive population after excluding debris, doublets and dead cells from the analysis. For validation, the HBEC panel was applied to primary HBEC resulting in 98.6% of live cells. In healthy volunteers, HBEC recovered from BAL (2.3% of live cells), BW (32.5%) and bronchial brushing samples (88.9%) correlated significantly (p = 0.0001) with the manual microscopy counts with an overall Pearson correlation of 0.96 across the three sample types. We therefore have developed, validated, and applied a flow cytometric method that will be useful to interrogate the role of the respiratory epithelium in multiple lung diseases. PMID:28165060

  4. Analyzing the Effects of Stromal Cells on the Recruitment of Leukocytes from Flow

    PubMed Central

    Munir, Hafsa; Rainger, G. Ed; Nash, Gerard B.; McGettrick, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Stromal cells regulate the recruitment of circulating leukocytes during inflammation through cross-talk with neighboring endothelial cells. Here we describe two in vitro “vascular” models for studying the recruitment of circulating neutrophils from flow by inflamed endothelial cells. A major advantage of these models is the ability to analyze each step in the leukocyte adhesion cascade in order, as would occur in vivo. We also describe how both models can be adapted to study the role of stromal cells, in this case mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), in regulating leukocyte recruitment. Primary endothelial cells were cultured alone or together with human MSC in direct contact on Ibidi microslides or on opposite sides of a Transwell filter for 24 hr. Cultures were stimulated with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) for 4 hr and incorporated into a flow-based adhesion assay. A bolus of neutrophils was perfused over the endothelium for 4 min. The capture of flowing neutrophils and their interactions with the endothelium was visualized by phase-contrast microscopy. In both models, cytokine-stimulation increased endothelial recruitment of flowing neutrophils in a dose-dependent manner. Analysis of the behavior of recruited neutrophils showed a dose-dependent decrease in rolling and a dose-dependent increase in transmigration through the endothelium. In co-culture, MSC suppressed neutrophil adhesion to TNFα-stimulated endothelium. Our flow based-adhesion models mimic the initial phases of leukocyte recruitment from the circulation. In addition to leukocytes, they can be used to examine the recruitment of other cell types, such as therapeutically administered MSC or circulating tumor cells. Our multi-layered co-culture models have shown that MSC communicate with endothelium to modify their response to pro-inflammatory cytokines, altering the recruitment of neutrophils. Further research using such models is required to fully understand how stromal cells from different

  5. An experimental study of separated flow on a finite wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkelmann, A. E.

    1981-01-01

    The flow field associated with the formation of a mushroom shaped trailing edge stall cell on a low-aspect-ratio (AR = 4.0) wing was investigated in a series of low speed wind tunnel tests (Reynolds number based on 15.2 cm chord = 480,000). Flow field surveys of the separation bubble and wake of a partially stalled and fully stalled wing were completed using a hot-wire probe, a split-film probe, and a directional sensitive pressure probe. A new color video display technique was developed to display the flow field survey data. Photographs were obtained of surface oil flow patterns and smoke flow visualization

  6. Improved mesenchymal stem cell seeding on RGD-modified poly(L-lactic acid) scaffolds using flow perfusion.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Barreto, Jose F; Sikavitsas, Vassilios I

    2007-05-10

    Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) has been widely utilized to increase cell adhesion to three-dimensional scaffolds for tissue engineering. However, cell seeding on these scaffolds has only been carried out statically, which yields low cell seeding efficiencies. We have characterized, for the first time, the seeding of rat mesenchymal stem cells on RGD-modified poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) foams using oscillatory flow perfusion. The incorporation of RGD on the PLLA foams improves scaffold cellularity in a dose-dependent manner under oscillatory flow perfusion seeding. When compared to static seeding, oscillatory flow perfusion is the most efficient seeding technique. Cell detachment studies show that cell adhesion is dependent on the applied flow rate, and that cell attachment is strengthened at higher levels of RGD modification.

  7. Stimulated migration and penetration of vascular endothelial cells into poly (L-lactic acid) scaffolds under flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Koo, Min-Ah; Kang, Jae Kyeong; Lee, Mi Hee; Seo, Hyok Jin; Kwon, Byeong-Ju; You, Kyung Eun; Kim, Min Sung; Kim, Dohyun; Park, Jong-Chul

    2014-01-01

    The initial procedure of the development of engineered tissues is cell seeding into three-dimensional polymer scaffolds. However, it is hard to make the cells invade into scaffold due to the characteristic of pore and material. Electrospun poly (L-lactic acid) scaffold and flow perfusion system were used to overcome these seeding problems. Before starting the experiment, we set up the parallel plate chamber system to observe endothelial cell migration under flow condition. In individual cell migration model, human umbilical endothelial cells started to migrate in the direction of flow at 8 dyne/cm(2) and we observed the cytoskeleton alignment at 8 dyne/cm(2). This study has demonstrated the possibility to evaluate and analyze cell migration using the parallel plate chamber system and we may predict in vivo cell migration under flow condition based on these results. Also the flow perfusion system was established for the effective cell seeding into at three dimensional scaffolds. Moreover, shear stress induced by flow can enhance cell migration into PLLA scaffold that is in the form of cotton. Result indicated that cell penetration was achieved under flow condition better and more than under static condition throughout the matrix.

  8. Novel thin layer flow-cell screen-printed graphene electrode for enzymatic sensors.

    PubMed

    Kanso, Hussein; González García, María Begoña; Llano, Laura Fernández; Ma, Su; Ludwig, Roland; Fanjul Bolado, Pablo; Santos, David Hernández

    2017-07-15

    A new Screen-printed electrodes (SPE) integrated in one channel flow-cell was developed. The one channel flow-cell is attached and directly changeable with electrode. In the new flow-cell the injection is done through an "in-line luer injection port" which can be less aggressive than wall-jet flow cell for a biological recognition element immobilized on the surface of the electrode. The sample volume can be easily controlled by the operator through a syringe. In this novel thin layer flow-cell screen-printed electrodes, the working electrode was modified with graphene materials, and an enhancement of electroactive area to 388% over a standard electrode was found. This new configuration was applied to study the entrapped cellobiose dehydrogenase from the ascomycete Corynascus thermophilus (CtCDH) in a photocrosslinkable PVA-based polymer. The calibration curve of lactose using optimized parameters shows a wide linear measurement ranges between 0.25 and 5mM. A good operational stability of the CtCDH-PVA-modified graphene electrode is obtained, which keeps the same initial activity during 8h and exhibits a good storage stability with a decrease of only 9% in analytical response after 3 months storage at 4(◦)C. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Systematic misestimation of cell subpopulations by flow cytometry: a mathematical analysis.

    PubMed

    Petrunkina, A M; Harrison, R A P

    2010-04-15

    Various sources of variability in flow cytometric determination of cell concentration have previously been investigated with respect to andrologic applications. Although common aspects related to the variation between samples, variation between operators, and accuracy have been extensively studied, specific sources of false-count estimation have found less attention. In particular, a major and well-recognized source of misestimation of cell counts (i.e., contamination of the sample by non-sperm particles) has not to date been characterized in detail. We show here by means of original mathematical research that not only the cell counts but also the percentages of cells expressing different fluorescence patterns are affected by the presence of alien particles often neglected in studies involving flow cytometric characterization. We demonstrate that there is a systematic overestimation in the proportion of unstained (viable) cells detected by flow cytometry in cases where the non-sperm particles are not excluded from analysis by additional identification other than light-scatter characteristics. Moreover, we provide an exact mathematical estimate for the magnitude of this overestimation, and we discuss the consequences for diagnostic applications and studies on sperm physiology, specifically for studies on sperm capacitation and evaluation of cryopreserved semen. Finally, equations are derived for the correction of the flow cytometric values for use in practical applications. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A simple microfluidic device for the deformability assessment of blood cells in a continuous flow.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Raquel O; Pinho, Diana; Faustino, Vera; Lima, Rui

    2015-12-01

    Blood flow presents several interesting phenomena in microcirculation that can be used to develop microfluidic devices capable to promote blood cells separation and analysis in continuous flow. In the last decade there have been numerous microfluidic studies focused on the deformation of red blood cells (RBCs) flowing through geometries mimicking microvessels. In contrast, studies focusing on the deformation of white blood cells (WBCs) are scarce despite this phenomenon often happens in the microcirculation. In this work, we present a novel integrative microfluidic device able to perform continuous separation of a desired amount of blood cells, without clogging or jamming, and at the same time, capable to assess the deformation index (DI) of both WBCs and RBCs. To determine the DI of both WBCs and RBCs, a hyperbolic converging microchannel was used, as well as a suitable image analysis technique to measure the DIs of these blood cells along the regions of interest. The results show that the WBCs have a much lower deformability than RBCs when subjected to the same in vitro flow conditions, which is directly related to their cytoskeleton and nucleus contents. The proposed strategy can be easily transformed into a simple and inexpensive diagnostic microfluidic system to simultaneously separate and assess blood cells deformability.

  11. Endothelial cell alignment as a result of anisotropic strain and flow induced shear stress combinations

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Ravi; Le Gac, Séverine; Verdonschot, Nico; van den Berg, Albert; Koopman, Bart; Rouwkema, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are continuously exposed in vivo to cyclic strain and shear stress from pulsatile blood flow. When these stimuli are applied in vitro, ECs adopt an appearance resembling their in vivo state, most apparent in their alignment (perpendicular to uniaxial strain and along the flow). Uniaxial strain and flow perpendicular to the strain, used in most in vitro studies, only represent the in vivo conditions in straight parts of vessels. The conditions present over large fractions of the vasculature can be better represented by anisotropic biaxial strains at various orientations to flow. To emulate these biological complexities in vitro, we have developed a medium-throughput device to screen for the effects on cells of variously oriented anisotropic biaxial strains and flow combinations. Upon the application of only strains for 24 h, ECs (HUVECs) aligned perpendicular to the maximum principal strain and the alignment was stronger for a higher maximum:minimum principal strain ratio. A 0.55 Pa shear stress, when applied alone or with strain for 24 h, caused cells to align along the flow. Studying EC response to such combined physiological mechanical stimuli was not possible with existing platforms and to our best knowledge, has not been reported before. PMID:27404382

  12. Endothelial cell alignment as a result of anisotropic strain and flow induced shear stress combinations.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Ravi; Le Gac, Séverine; Verdonschot, Nico; van den Berg, Albert; Koopman, Bart; Rouwkema, Jeroen

    2016-07-12

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are continuously exposed in vivo to cyclic strain and shear stress from pulsatile blood flow. When these stimuli are applied in vitro, ECs adopt an appearance resembling their in vivo state, most apparent in their alignment (perpendicular to uniaxial strain and along the flow). Uniaxial strain and flow perpendicular to the strain, used in most in vitro studies, only represent the in vivo conditions in straight parts of vessels. The conditions present over large fractions of the vasculature can be better represented by anisotropic biaxial strains at various orientations to flow. To emulate these biological complexities in vitro, we have developed a medium-throughput device to screen for the effects on cells of variously oriented anisotropic biaxial strains and flow combinations. Upon the application of only strains for 24 h, ECs (HUVECs) aligned perpendicular to the maximum principal strain and the alignment was stronger for a higher maximum:minimum principal strain ratio. A 0.55 Pa shear stress, when applied alone or with strain for 24 h, caused cells to align along the flow. Studying EC response to such combined physiological mechanical stimuli was not possible with existing platforms and to our best knowledge, has not been reported before.

  13. Enhanced sensitivity in flow injection analysis using a long pathlength liquid waveguide capillary flow cell for spectrophotometric detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia-Zhong

    2006-01-01

    Incorporation of a liquid waveguide capillary flow cell into a flow injection instrument enhances the sensitivity of flow injection analysis with spectrophotometric detection by two orders of magnitude. Nitrite determination at nM levels has been used to demonstrate the feasibility of this novel technique for trace analysis. Combining the long pathlength spectrophotometry with flow injection analysis, this technique has advantages of low detection limit, good precision and high sample throughput.

  14. Coded illumination for motion-blur free imaging of cells on cell-phone based imaging flow cytometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Manish; Gorthi, Sai Siva

    2014-10-01

    Cell-phone based imaging flow cytometry can be realized by flowing cells through the microfluidic devices, and capturing their images with an optically enhanced camera of the cell-phone. Throughput in flow cytometers is usually enhanced by increasing the flow rate of cells. However, maximum frame rate of camera system limits the achievable flow rate. Beyond this, the images become highly blurred due to motion-smear. We propose to address this issue with coded illumination, which enables recovery of high-fidelity images of cells far beyond their motion-blur limit. This paper presents simulation results of deblurring the synthetically generated cell/bead images under such coded illumination.

  15. Structural analysis of red blood cell aggregates under shear flow.

    PubMed

    Chesnutt, J K W; Marshall, J S

    2010-03-01

    A set of measures of red blood cell (RBC) aggregates are developed and applied to examine the aggregate structure under plane shear and channel flows. Some of these measures are based on averages over the set of red blood cells which are in contact with each other at a given time. Other measures are developed by first fitting an ellipse to the planar projection of the aggregate, and then examining the area and aspect ratio of the fit ellipse as well as the orientations of constituent RBCs with respect to the fit ellipse axes. The aggregate structural measures are illustrated using a new mesoscale computational model for blood cell transport, collision and adhesion. The sensitivity of this model to change in adhesive surface energy density and shear rate on the aggregate structure is examined. It is found that the mesoscale model predictions exhibit reasonable agreement with experimental and theoretical data for blood flow in plane shear and channel flows. The new structural measures are used to examine the differences between predictions of two- and three-dimensional computations of the aggregate formation, showing that two-dimensional computations retain some of the important aspects of three-dimensional computations.

  16. Detection of Apoptotic Versus Autophagic Cell Death by Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Sica, Valentina; Maiuri, M Chiara; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Different modes of regulated cell death (RCD) can be initiated by distinct molecular machineries and their morphological manifestations can be difficult to discriminate. Moreover, cells responding to stress often activate an adaptive response centered around autophagy, and whether such a response is cytoprotective or cytotoxic cannot be predicted based on morphological parameters only. Molecular definitions are therefore important to understand various RCD subroutines from a mechanistic perspective. In vitro, various forms of RCD including apoptosis and autophagic cell death can be easily discriminated from each other with assays that involve chemical or pharmacological interventions targeting key components of either pathway. Here, we detail a straightforward method to discriminate apoptosis from autophagic cell death by flow cytometry, based on the broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk and the genetic inhibition of ATG5.

  17. Study of a downward bubbly flow in a vertical pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelik, R.S.; Kashinskii, O.N.; Nakoryakov, V.E.

    1987-07-01

    This paper reports on an experimental study of downward bubble-diffused concurrent flow in a vertical pipe. Two-phase flow was induced by introducing gas into a liquid with a special mixer which made it possible to obtain a gas-liquid flow with consistent bubble size. Visualization was performed by photography and flow rate was monitored by friction transducers. Shear stress and hydraulic conductivity were determined for various flow rates and Reynolds numbers. It was found that the stabilizing effect of the gas phase is determined by the fact that the flow rate pulsations introduced into the liquid flow have a negative sign; that the flow rate of the liquid near the bubbles, in other words, is lower than the mean flow rate of the liquid. This effect is not seen in ascending flows.

  18. High Throughput Label Free Measurement of Cancer Cell Adhesion Kinetics Under Hemodynamic Flow.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Adrianne; Baker, Aaron B

    2016-01-27

    The kinetics of receptor-mediated cell adhesion to extracellular matrix and adherent cell monolayers plays a key role in many physiological and pathological processes including cancer metastasis. Within this process the presence of fluidic shear forces is a key regulator of binding equilibrium and kinetics of cell adhesion. Current techniques to examine the kinetics of cell adhesion are either performed in the absence of flow or are low throughput, limiting their application to pharmacological compound screening or the high throughput investigation of biological mechanisms. We developed a high throughput flow device that applies flow in a multi-well format and interfaced this system with electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) system to allow label free detection of cell adhesion. We demonstrate that this combined system is capable of making real time measurements of cancer cell adhesion to extracellular matrix and immobilized platelets. In addition, we examined the dependence of the kinetics of binding of cancer cells on the level of shear stress and in the presence of small molecule inhibitors to adhesion-related pathways. This versatile system is broadly adaptable to the high throughput study of cell adhesion kinetics for many applications including drug screening and the investigation of the mechanisms of cancer metastasis.

  19. Chaos in an Eulerian Based Model of Sickle Cell Blood Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apori, Akwasi; Harris, Wesley

    2001-11-01

    A novel Eulerian model describing the manifestation of sickle cell blood flow in the capillaries has been formulated to study the apparently chaotic onset of sickle cell crises. This Eulerian model was based on extending previous models of sickle cell blood flow which were limited due to their Lagrangian formulation. Oxygen concentration, red blood cell velocity, cell stiffness, and plasma viscosity were modeled as system state variables. The governing equations of the system were expressed in canonical form. The non-linear coupling of velocity-viscosity and viscosity- stiffness proved to be the origin of chaos in the system. The system was solved with respect to a control parameter representing the unique rheology of the sickle cell erythrocytes. Results of chaos tests proved positive for various ranges of the control parameter. The results included con-tinuous patterns found in the Poincare section, spectral broadening of the Fourier power spectrum, and positive Lyapunov exponent values. The onset of chaos predicted by this sickle cell flow model as the control parameter was varied appeared to coincide with the change from a healthy state to a crisis state in a sickle cell patient. This finding that sickle cell crises may be caused from the well understood change of a solution from a steady state to chaotic could point to new ways in preventing and treating crises and should be validated in clinical trials.

  20. High Throughput Label Free Measurement of Cancer Cell Adhesion Kinetics Under Hemodynamic Flow

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Adrianne; Baker, Aaron B.

    2016-01-01

    The kinetics of receptor-mediated cell adhesion to extracellular matrix and adherent cell monolayers plays a key role in many physiological and pathological processes including cancer metastasis. Within this process the presence of fluidic shear forces is a key regulator of binding equilibrium and kinetics of cell adhesion. Current techniques to examine the kinetics of cell adhesion are either performed in the absence of flow or are low throughput, limiting their application to pharmacological compound screening or the high throughput investigation of biological mechanisms. We developed a high throughput flow device that applies flow in a multi-well format and interfaced this system with electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) system to allow label free detection of cell adhesion. We demonstrate that this combined system is capable of making real time measurements of cancer cell adhesion to extracellular matrix and immobilized platelets. In addition, we examined the dependence of the kinetics of binding of cancer cells on the level of shear stress and in the presence of small molecule inhibitors to adhesion-related pathways. This versatile system is broadly adaptable to the high throughput study of cell adhesion kinetics for many applications including drug screening and the investigation of the mechanisms of cancer metastasis. PMID:26816215

  1. Characterization of type II alveolar epithelial cells by flow cytometry and fluorescent markers.

    PubMed

    Rochat, T R; Casale, J M; Hunninghake, G W

    1988-10-01

    Type II alveolar epithelial cells play a crucial role in maintaining the structure and functions of pulmonary alveoli. A number of techniques have been described to isolate type II cells for in vitro studies; however, type II cell suspensions isolated by each technique are still contaminated by macrophages or monocytes. The present studies describe the use of flow cytometry to accurately characterize the composition of these cell suspensions. With freshly isolated type II cell suspensions, type II cells could be distinguished from macrophages and monocytes by two methods: (1) the combination of natural fluorescence and orthogonal light scatter, or (2) the use of monoclonal antibodies OX-1 (directed against a common leukocyte antigen present on rat macrophages and monocytes) and PKK-1 (directed against cytokeratin intermediate filaments present in type II cells). With cultured type II cells, the combination of natural fluorescence and orthogonal light scatter did not distinguish between type II cells and macrophages or monocytes; however, the monoclonal antibodies OX-I and PKK-1 continued to distinguish between these cell types. As an example of the use of these techniques, the methods were used to define the sequential expression of class I and II major histocompatibility antigens on both type II cells and on macrophages or monocytes in the same cell preparations. These methods are of potential value in isolating pure populations either of type II cells or of macrophages or monocytes by cell sorting and in accurately identifying the cells present in type II cell suspensions or cultures.

  2. Accurate Assessment of Cell Death by Imaging Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Rieger, Aja M; Barreda, Daniel R

    2016-01-01

    The number of investigators using cell death analysis applications has greatly expanded since the introduction of flow cytometry. The Annexin V/propidium iodide (PI) method is among the most commonly used procedures and allows users to determine if cells are viable, apoptotic, or necrotic, based on changes in membrane lipid composition, integrity, and permeability. Unfortunately, PI can intercalate into RNA, in addition to DNA, which contributes to a large number of events showing PI staining within the cytoplasmic compartment. We show that this occurs across a broad range of animal primary cells and commonly used cell lines, and is most prevalent in large cells (nuclear:cytoplasmic ratio <0.5). Any cellular system where RNA levels change throughout an experiment will be particularly affected, such as those that utilize virally infected cells. As two examples, we highlight our recent work on cells infected with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), an RNA virus, and herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1), a DNA virus. Similarly, these issues are relevant to experimental systems where cells have increased RNA content such as during genotoxic stress, following exposure to cell cycle arrest drugs such as thymidine or hydroxyurea, or where developmental progression promotes discrete changes in cellular RNA synthesis. This chapter outlines a modified Annexin V/PI method that addresses cytoplasmic RNA staining issues to allow for accurate assessment of cell death. This protocol takes advantage of an additional cellular permeability caused by fixation to promote RNase A entry into the cell. Based on our observations, cell morphological parameters are well maintained and less than 5 % of total cellular events exhibit cytoplasmic PI staining under this protocol.

  3. Mechanical response of tumor cells flowing through a microfluidic capillary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Zeina S.; Kamyabi, Nabiollah; Hussain, Fazle; Vanapalli, Siva A.

    2014-03-01

    Circulating tumor cells, the primary cause of cancer metastasis, are transported throughout the body to distant organs by blood flow. Despite the importance of cell transport and deformability in the vasculature for cancer metastasis, quantitative understanding of the hydrodynamic interactions between the cells and the blood vessel walls is lacking. Using a model microfluidic capillary of rectangular cross-section with an on-chip manometer coupled with high speed video imaging, we quantitatively investigate the hydrodynamic behavior via the cell excess pressure drop. By characterizing our device with simple model systems including viscous drops and soft elastic particles, we find that the excess pressure drop shows no apparent dependence on elastic modulus or interfacial tension, but depends significantly on internal viscosity for moderate confinements and shear stresses within the physiological range of 1-10 Pa. This suggests that the metastatic potential of circulating cells can be characterized by the effective viscosity. We test this hypothesis with several tumor cell lines and find that the effective cell viscosity determined from excess pressure drop measurements can be used to differentiate highly from lowly invasive cells.

  4. Tracking Immune Cell Proliferation and Cytotoxic Potential Using Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Tario, Joseph D.; Muirhead, Katharine A.; Pan, Dalin; Munson, Mark E.; Wallace, Paul K.

    2015-01-01

    In the second edition of this series, we described the use of cell tracking dyes in combination with tetramer reagents and traditional phenotyping protocols to monitor levels of proliferation and cytokine production in antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. In particular, we illustrated how tracking dye fluorescence profiles could be used to ascertain the precursor frequencies of different subsets in the T-cell pool that are able to bind tetramer, synthesize cytokines, undergo antigen-driven proliferation, and/or carry out various combinations of these functional responses. Analysis of antigen-specific proliferative responses represents just one of many functions that can be monitored using cell tracking dyes and flow cytometry. In this third edition, we address issues to be considered when combining two different tracking dyes with other phenotypic and viability probes for the assessment of cytotoxic effector activity and regulatory T-cell functions. We summarize key characteristics of and differences between general protein- and membrane-labeling dyes, discuss determination of optimal staining concentrations, and provide detailed labeling protocols for both dye types. Examples of the advantages of two-color cell tracking are provided in the form of protocols for (a) independent enumeration of viable effector and target cells in a direct cytotoxicity assay and (b) simultaneous monitoring of proliferative responses in effector and regulatory T cells. PMID:21116982

  5. Patterning of cell-instructive hydrogels by hydrodynamic flow focusing.

    PubMed

    Cosson, Steffen; Allazetta, Simone; Lutolf, Matthias P

    2013-06-07

    Microfluidic gradient systems offer a very precise means to probe the response of cells to graded biomolecular signals in vitro, for example to model how morphogen proteins affect cell fate during developmental processes. However, existing gradient makers are designed for non-physiological plastic or glass cell culture substrates that are often limited in maintaining the phenotype and function of difficult-to-culture mammalian cell types, such as stem cells. To address this bottleneck, we combine hydrogel engineering and microfluidics to generate tethered protein gradients on the surface of biomimetic poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels. Here we used software-assisted hydrodynamic flow focusing for exposing and rapidly capturing tagged proteins to gels in a step-wise fashion, resulting in immobilized gradients of virtually any desired shape and composition. To render our strategy amenable for high-throughput screening of multifactorial artificial cellular microenvironments, a dedicated microfluidic chip was devised for parallelization and multiplexing, yielding arrays of orthogonally overlapping gradients of up to 4 × 4 proteins. To illustrate the power of the platform for stem cell biology, we assessed how gradients of tethered leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) influence embryonic stem cell (ESC) behavior. ESC responded to LIF gradients in a binary manner, maintaining the pluripotency marker Rex1/Zfp42 and forming self-renewing colonies above a threshold concentration of 85 ng cm(-2). Our concept should be broadly applicable to probe how complex signaling microenvironments influence stem cell fate in culture.

  6. Monitoring circulating apoptotic cells by in-vivo flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xunbin; Tan, Yuan; Chen, Yun; Zhang, Li; Li, Yan; Liu, Guangda; Wu, Bin; Wang, Chen

    2008-02-01

    Chemotherapies currently constitute one main venue of cancer treatment. For a large number of adult and elderly patients, however, treatment options are poor. These patients may suffer from disease that is resistant to conventional chemotherapy or may not be candidates for curative therapies because of advanced age or poor medical conditions. To control disease in these patients, new therapies must be developed that are selectively targeted to unique characteristics of tumor cell growth and metastasis. A reliable early evaluation and prediction of response to the chemotherapy is critical to its success. Chemotherapies induce apoptosis in tumor cells and a portion of such apoptotic cancer cells may be present in the circulation. However, the fate of circulating tumor cells is difficult to assess with conventional methods that require blood sampling. We report the in situ measurement of circulating apoptotic cells in live animals using in vivo flow cytometry, a novel method that enables real-time detection and quantification of circulating cells without blood extraction. Apoptotic cells are rapidly cleared from the circulation with a half-life of ~10 minutes. Real-time monitoring of circulating apoptotic cells can be useful for detecting early changes in disease processes, as well as for monitoring response to therapeutic intervention.

  7. Studies on pressure losses and flow rate optimization in vanadium redox flow battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Ao; Bao, Jie; Skyllas-Kazacos, Maria

    2014-02-01

    Premature voltage cut-off in the operation of the vanadium redox flow battery is largely associated with the rise in concentration overpotential at high state-of-charge (SOC) or state-of-discharge (SOD). The use of high constant volumetric flow rate will reduce concentration overpotential, although potentially at the cost of consuming excessive pumping energy which in turn lowers system efficiency. On the other hand, any improper reduction in flow rate will also limit the operating SOC and lead to deterioration in battery efficiency. Pressure drop losses are further exacerbated by the need to reduce shunt currents in flow battery stacks that requires the use of long, narrow channels and manifolds. In this paper, the concentration overpotential is modelled as a function of flow rate in an effort to determine an appropriate variable flow rate that can yield high system efficiency, along with the analysis of pressure losses and total pumping energy. Simulation results for a 40-cell stack under pre-set voltage cut-off limits have shown that variable flow rates are superior to constant flow rates for the given system design and the use of a flow factor of 7.5 with respect to the theoretical flow rate can reach overall high system efficiencies for different charge-discharge operations.

  8. Studies of fluid instabilities in flows of lava and debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Jonathan H.

    1987-01-01

    At least two instabilities have been identified and utilized in lava flow studies: surface folding and gravity instability. Both lead to the development of regularly spaced structures on the surfaces of lava flows. The geometry of surface folds have been used to estimate the rheology of lava flows on other planets. One investigation's analysis assumed that lava flows have a temperature-dependent Newtonian rheology, and that the lava's viscosity decreased exponentially inward from the upper surface. The author reviews studies by other investigators on the analysis of surface folding, the analysis of Taylor instability in lava flows, and the effect of surface folding on debris flows.

  9. Tomographic Diffuse Fluorescence Flow Cytometry for Enumeration of Rare Circulating Cells in Vitro and in Vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zettergren, Eric William

    2011-12-01

    Accurate quantification of circulating cell populations is important in many areas of preclinical and clinical biomedical research including the study of metastasized cancers, T-Lymphotocyes and hematopoietic stem cells. Normally this is done either by extraction and analysis of small blood samples or more recently using microscopy-based in vivo fluorescence flow cytometry. In this thesis, a new technological approach to this problem is described using detection of diffuse fluorescent light from relatively large blood vessels in vivo. The 'tomographic diffuse fluorescence flow cytometer' (TDFFC) uses modulated lasers to illuminate a mouse limb and an array of optical fibers coupled to a high-sensitivity photomultiplier tube array operating in photon counting mode to detect weak fluorescence signals from cells. It is first demonstrated that the TDFFC instrument is capable of detecting fluorescent microspheres and Vybrant-DiD labeled cells with excellent accuracy in an optical flow phantom with similar size, optical properties, linear flow rates and autofluorescence as a mouse limb. Preliminary data demonstrating that the TDFFC is capable of detecting circulating cells in nude mice in vivo is also shown. Finally, a number of methods for performing coarse tomographic localization of fluorescent cells within the cross-section of a mouse limb using TDFFC data sets are described, and the feasibility of this approach is demonstrated using in vitro data sets. In principle, this device would allow interrogation of the whole blood volume of a mouse in minutes, with several orders of magnitude sensitivity improvement compared with current approaches.

  10. Measuring T Cell-to-T Cell HIV-1 Transfer, Viral Fusion, and Infection Using Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Durham, Natasha D; Chen, Benjamin K

    2016-01-01

    Direct T cell-to-T cell HIV-1 infection is a distinct mode of HIV-1 infection that requires physical contact between an HIV-1-infected "donor" cell and an uninfected, CD4-expressing "target" cell. In vitro studies indicate that HIV-1 cell-to-cell infection is much more efficient than infection by cell-free viral particles; however, the exact mechanisms of the enhanced efficiency of this infection pathway are still unclear. Several assays have been developed to study the mechanism of direct cell-to-cell HIV-1 transmission and to assess sensitivity to neutralizing antibodies and pharmacologic inhibitors. These assays are based on the coculture of donor and target cells. Here, we describe methods that utilize flow cytometry, which can discriminate donor and target cells and can assess different stages of entry and infection following cell-to-cell contact. HIV Gag-iGFP, a clone that makes fluorescent virus particles, can be used to measure cell-to-cell transfer of virus particles. HIV NL-GI, a clone that expresses GFP as an early gene, facilitates the measure of productive infection after cell-to-cell contact. Lastly, a variation of the β-lactamase (BlaM)-Vpr fusion assay can be used to measure the viral membrane fusion process after coculture of donor and target cells in a manner that is independent of cell-cell fusion. These assays can be performed in the presence of neutralizing antibodies/inhibitors to determine the 50 % inhibitory concentration (IC50) required to block infection specifically in the target cells.

  11. Flow cytometric data analysis of circulating progenitor cell stability.

    PubMed

    Mahar, Ernestine A; Mou, Liping; Hayek, Salim S; Quyyumi, Arshed A; Waller, Edmund K

    2017-02-01

    A recent publication by Mekonnen et al. demonstrated that among women with non-obstructive coronary artery disease, higher levels of circulating progenitor cells in the blood (CPC), were associated with impaired coronary flow reserve [1]. We performed a quality control assessment of the stability of circulating blood progenitor cells in blood samples stored at 4 °C, to determine the time period during which blood samples can be analyzed and yield consistent data for progenitor cell content. Healthy volunteers (n=6) were recruited and underwent phlebotomy, and blood was stored in EDTA tubes at 4 °C. Flow cytometry was performed to quantitate progenitor cell subsets at 0-4 h, 24 h, and 48 h post phlebotomy. All processed samples were fixed with 1% Paraformaldehyde and 1,000,000 total data events were collected. We found no significant differences in PC data for both CD34+ (P=0.68 for one-way ANOVA) and CD34+/CD133+ (P=0.74 for one-way ANOVA).

  12. Multireflection flow cooling cell for IR spectroscopy of supercooled gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauerecker, S.; Taucher, Fritz; Weitkamp, Klaus C. H.; Cammenga, H. K.

    1996-10-01

    For the simplification of molecular spectra and of the increase of spectral line intensity the enclosive-flow cooling technique was developed. The vertical cell arrangement needs only one warm window and proved to be robust and easy to handle. Compared with supersonic jet cooling, the present method provides an absorption efficiency higher by several orders of magnitude. In this paper, an improved flow cooling cell including a multireflection optics is described. Compared to the prototype cell, the multireflection cell has only 50 percent of the mass. Optical paths up to 20 m for FTIR applications and up to 40 m for TDLAS applications can be chosen. The pressure range extends from below 0.001 mbar up to 3 bar. The temperature is adjustable from 65 to 350 K. The new cooling technique offers promising applications in trace gas analysis, in the generation and spectroscopy of molecular clusters, especially of water, and in the simulation of the conditions and processes that occur in the atmosphere of Earth and other planets.

  13. A high-order adaptive Cartesian cut-cell method for simulation of compressible viscous flow over immersed bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muralidharan, Balaji; Menon, Suresh

    2016-09-01

    A new adaptive finite volume conservative cut-cell method that is third-order accurate for simulation of compressible viscous flows is presented. A high-order reconstruction approach using cell centered piecewise polynomial approximation of flow quantities, developed in the past for body-fitted grids, is now extended to the Cartesian based cut-cell method. It is shown that the presence of cut-cells of very low volume results in numerical oscillations in the flow solution near the embedded boundaries when standard small cell treatment techniques are employed. A novel cell clustering approach for polynomial reconstruction in the vicinity of the small cells is proposed and is shown to achieve smooth representation of flow field quantities and their derivatives on immersed interfaces. It is further shown through numerical examples that the proposed clustering me