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Sample records for flow constraining elements

  1. Laminated metal composite formed from low flow stress layers and high flow stress layers using flow constraining elements and making same

    DOEpatents

    Syn, Chol K.; Lesuer, Donald R.

    1995-01-01

    A laminated metal composite of low flow stress layers and high flow stress layers is described which is formed using flow constraining elements, preferably in the shape of rings, individually placed around each of the low flow stress layers while pressure is applied to the stack to bond the layers of the composite together, to thereby restrain the flow of the low flow stress layers from the stack during the bonding. The laminated metal composite of the invention is made by the steps of forming a stack of alternate layers of low flow stress layers and high flow stress layers with each layer of low flow stress material surrounded by an individual flow constraining element, such as a ring, and then applying pressure to the top and bottom surfaces of the resulting stack to bond the dissimilar layers together, for example, by compression rolling the stack. In a preferred embodiment, the individual flow constraining elements surrounding the layers of low flow stress material are formed of a material which may either be the same material as the material comprising the high flow stress layers, or have similar flow stress characteristics to the material comprising the high flow stress layers. Additional sacrificial layers may be added to the top and bottom of the stack to avoid damage to the stack during the bonding step; and these additional layers may then be removed after the bonding step.

  2. Laminated metal composite formed from low flow stress layers and high flow stress layers using flow constraining elements and making same

    DOEpatents

    Syn, C.K.; Lesuer, D.R.

    1995-07-04

    A laminated metal composite of low flow stress layers and high flow stress layers is described which is formed using flow constraining elements, preferably in the shape of rings, individually placed around each of the low flow stress layers while pressure is applied to the stack to bond the layers of the composite together, to thereby restrain the flow of the low flow stress layers from the stack during the bonding. The laminated metal composite of the invention is made by the steps of forming a stack of alternate layers of low flow stress layers and high flow stress layers with each layer of low flow stress material surrounded by an individual flow constraining element, such as a ring, and then applying pressure to the top and bottom surfaces of the resulting stack to bond the dissimilar layers together, for example, by compression rolling the stack. In a preferred embodiment, the individual flow constraining elements surrounding the layers of low flow stress material are formed of a material which may either be the same material as the material comprising the high flow stress layers, or have similar flow stress characteristics to the material comprising the high flow stress layers. Additional sacrificial layers may be added to the top and bottom of the stack to avoid damage to the stack during the bonding step; and these additional layers may then be removed after the bonding step. 5 figs.

  3. Laminated metal composite formed from low flow stress layers and high flow stress layers using flow constraining elements and method of making same

    SciTech Connect

    Syn, C.K.; Lesuer, D.R.

    1994-12-31

    This invention relates to a laminated metal composite, comprising alternating layers of low flow stress material and high flow stress material, and formed using flow constraining elements around each low flow stress layer; and a method of making same. A composite is a combination of at least two chemically distinct materials with a distinct interface separating the two materials. A metal matrix composite (MMC) is a composite material composed of a metal and a nonmetallic reinforcing agent such as silicon carbide (SiC) or graphite in continuous or discontinuous fiber, whisker, or discrete particulate form. A laminate is a material composed of several bonded layers. It is possible to have a laminate composed of multi-layers of a single type of material bonded to each other. However, such a laminate would not be considered to be a composite. The term {open_quotes}laminated metal composite{close_quotes} (LMC), as used herein, is intended to include a structural material composed of: (1) layers of metal or metal alloys interleaved with (2) a different metal, a metal alloy, or a metal matrix composite (MMC) containing strengthening agents.

  4. Extracting electron transfer coupling elements from constrained density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qin; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2006-10-01

    Constrained density functional theory (DFT) is a useful tool for studying electron transfer (ET) reactions. It can straightforwardly construct the charge-localized diabatic states and give a direct measure of the inner-sphere reorganization energy. In this work, a method is presented for calculating the electronic coupling matrix element (Hab) based on constrained DFT. This method completely avoids the use of ground-state DFT energies because they are known to irrationally predict fractional electron transfer in many cases. Instead it makes use of the constrained DFT energies and the Kohn-Sham wave functions for the diabatic states in a careful way. Test calculations on the Zn2+ and the benzene-Cl atom systems show that the new prescription yields reasonable agreement with the standard generalized Mulliken-Hush method. We then proceed to produce the diabatic and adiabatic potential energy curves along the reaction pathway for intervalence ET in the tetrathiafulvalene-diquinone (Q-TTF-Q) anion. While the unconstrained DFT curve has no reaction barrier and gives Hab≈17kcal /mol, which qualitatively disagrees with experimental results, the Hab calculated from constrained DFT is about 3kcal /mol and the generated ground state has a barrier height of 1.70kcal/mol, successfully predicting (Q-TTF-Q)- to be a class II mixed-valence compound.

  5. Groundwater availability as constrained by hydrogeology and environmental flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watson, Katelyn A.; Mayer, Alex S.; Reeves, Howard W.

    2014-01-01

    Groundwater pumping from aquifers in hydraulic connection with nearby streams has the potential to cause adverse impacts by decreasing flows to levels below those necessary to maintain aquatic ecosystems. The recent passage of the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Basin Water Resources Compact has brought attention to this issue in the Great Lakes region. In particular, the legislation requires the Great Lakes states to enact measures for limiting water withdrawals that can cause adverse ecosystem impacts. This study explores how both hydrogeologic and environmental flow limitations may constrain groundwater availability in the Great Lakes Basin. A methodology for calculating maximum allowable pumping rates is presented. Groundwater availability across the basin may be constrained by a combination of hydrogeologic yield and environmental flow limitations varying over both local and regional scales. The results are sensitive to factors such as pumping time, regional and local hydrogeology, streambed conductance, and streamflow depletion limits. Understanding how these restrictions constrain groundwater usage and which hydrogeologic characteristics and spatial variables have the most influence on potential streamflow depletions has important water resources policy and management implications.

  6. Groundwater availability as constrained by hydrogeology and environmental flows.

    PubMed

    Watson, Katelyn A; Mayer, Alex S; Reeves, Howard W

    2014-01-01

    Groundwater pumping from aquifers in hydraulic connection with nearby streams has the potential to cause adverse impacts by decreasing flows to levels below those necessary to maintain aquatic ecosystems. The recent passage of the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Basin Water Resources Compact has brought attention to this issue in the Great Lakes region. In particular, the legislation requires the Great Lakes states to enact measures for limiting water withdrawals that can cause adverse ecosystem impacts. This study explores how both hydrogeologic and environmental flow limitations may constrain groundwater availability in the Great Lakes Basin. A methodology for calculating maximum allowable pumping rates is presented. Groundwater availability across the basin may be constrained by a combination of hydrogeologic yield and environmental flow limitations varying over both local and regional scales. The results are sensitive to factors such as pumping time, regional and local hydrogeology, streambed conductance, and streamflow depletion limits. Understanding how these restrictions constrain groundwater usage and which hydrogeologic characteristics and spatial variables have the most influence on potential streamflow depletions has important water resources policy and management implications.

  7. Constrained Large Eddy Simulation of Separated Turbulent Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Zhenhua; Shi, Yipeng; Wang, Jianchun; Xiao, Zuoli; Yang, Yantao; Chen, Shiyi

    2011-11-01

    Constrained Large-eddy Simulation (CLES) has been recently proposed to simulate turbulent flows with massive separation. Different from traditional large eddy simulation (LES) and hybrid RANS/LES approaches, the CLES simulates the whole flow domain by large eddy simulation while enforcing a RANS Reynolds stress constraint on the subgrid-scale (SGS) stress models in the near-wall region. Algebraic eddy-viscosity models and one-equation Spalart-Allmaras (S-A) model have been used to constrain the Reynolds stress. The CLES approach is validated a posteriori through simulation of flow past a circular cylinder and periodic hill flow at high Reynolds numbers. The simulation results are compared with those from RANS, DES, DDES and other available hybrid RANS/LES methods. It is shown that the capability of the CLES method in predicting separated flows is comparable to that of DES. Detailed discussions are also presented about the effects of the RANS models as constraint in the near-wall layers. Our results demonstrate that the CLES method is a promising alternative towards engineering applications.

  8. SHARAD Constrains on Lava Flow Properties at Southeastern Utopia Planitia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, D. C.

    2012-12-01

    The volcanic flows originated at the southwestern flanks of Elysium Mons extend over 1,000 km into Utopia Planitia and overlie the knobby and polygonally cracked Vastitas Borealis Formation (VBF). These flows display rough and smooth lobate morphologies (RL and SL) morphologies and occur in conjunction with sinuous channels (SC). Russell and Head [2003] described these morphologies and hypothesized that RL correspond to debris flows that arose as lahars from the interaction between magma and ground water or ice. The mapping of Tanaka et al. [2003] identified these features similarly, attributing them to volcanoclastic flows formed from magma-volatile interactions. Crater counts by Werner et al. [2011] support surface ages between 1 and 2 Gyr for these flows. Analysis of the radargrams acquired throughout this area o show unambiguous subsurface reflectors that, individually, are relatively short and laterally intermittent. As a group, however, these reflectors are distributed sparsely over the flow field and correlate very well with the SL units. Delays to reflectors beneath the surface are generally in the order of < ~1 μs. In one locale with a high concentration of subsurface reflectors, centered at 117.61°E and 31.31°N, a sequence of smooth lobate flows overlie a smooth volcanic unit. The lobate flow in immediate contact with the smooth unit possesses subsurface reflections that correlate well with the flow edges, and where this flow is overlain by another lobate flow these reflections vanish. We interpret these reflections as a reflector that corresponds to the interface between the lobate flow and smooth unit. The average delay to this reflector is 0.68 - 0.71 μs along its length. The thickness of this lobate flow, estimated from MOLA elevation data, ranges between 35 and 40 m. The thickness estimate from MOLA and the delay to reflector from SHARAD together constrain the relative permittivity of the flow to between 6.5 and 9.5. These values are consistent

  9. Parameterization of Finite-Element Cryo-Hydrologic Sand Dune Model to Constrain Debris-Flow-Initiating Subsurface Temperatures and Pore-Water Pressures, Great Kobuk Sand Dunes, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinwiddie, C. L.; Hooper, D. M.

    2015-05-01

    To explain how debris flows form at subfreezing air temperatures, we present meteorology-driven, numerical simulation-derived subsurface temperature and pore-water pressure profiles in the Great Kobuk Sand Dunes of Alaska, for incipient flow events.

  10. SUPG Finite Element Simulations of Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, Brnjamin, S.

    2006-01-01

    The Streamline-Upwind Petrov-Galerkin (SUPG) finite element simulations of compressible flows is presented. The topics include: 1) Introduction; 2) SUPG Galerkin Finite Element Methods; 3) Applications; and 4) Bibliography.

  11. Finite element modeling of nonisothermal polymer flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roylance, D.

    1981-01-01

    A finite element formulation designed to simulate polymer melt flows in which both conductive and convective heat transfer are important is described, and the numerical model is illustrated by means of computer experiments using extruder drag flow and entry flow as trial problems. Fluid incompressibility is enforced by a penalty treatment of the element pressures, and the thermal convective transport is modeled by conventional Galerkin and optimal upwind treatments.

  12. Finite element analysis of constrained total Condylar Knee Prosthesis

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-13

    Exactech, Inc., is a prosthetic joint manufacturer based in Gainesville, FL. The company set the goal of developing a highly effective prosthetic articulation, based on scientific principles, not trial and error. They developed an evolutionary design for a total knee arthroplasty system that promised improved performance. They performed static load tests in the laboratory with similar previous designs, but dynamic laboratory testing was both difficult to perform and prohibitively expensive for a small business to undertake. Laboratory testing also cannot measure stress levels in the interior of the prosthesis where failures are known to initiate. To fully optimize their designs for knee arthroplasty revisions, they needed range-of-motion stress/strain data at interior as well as exterior locations within the prosthesis. LLNL developed computer software (especially NIKE3D) specifically designed to perform stress/strain computations (finite element analysis) for complex geometries in large displacement/large deformation conditions. Additionally, LLNL had developed a high fidelity knee model for other analytical purposes. The analysis desired by Exactech could readily be performed using NIKE3D and a modified version of the high fidelity knee that contained the geometry of the condylar knee components. The LLNL high fidelity knee model was a finite element computer model which would not be transferred to Exactech during the course of this CRADA effort. The previously performed laboratory studies by Exactech were beneficial to LLNL in verifying the analytical capabilities of NIKE3D for human anatomical modeling. This, in turn, gave LLNL further entree to perform work-for-others in the prosthetics field. There were two purposes to the CRADA (1) To modify the LLNL High Fidelity Knee Model to accept the geometry of the Exactech Total Knee; and (2) To perform parametric studies of the possible design options in appropriate ranges of motion so that an optimum design could be

  13. Triangular spectral elements for incompressible fluid flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, C.; Vanrosendale, John

    1993-01-01

    We discuss the use of triangular elements in the spectral element method for direct simulation of incompressible flow. Triangles provide much greater geometric flexibility than quadrilateral elements and are better conditioned and more accurate when small angles arise. We employ a family of tensor product algorithms for triangles, allowing triangular elements to be handled with comparable arithmetic complexity to quadrilateral elements. The triangular discretizations are applied and validated on the Poisson equation. These discretizations are then applied to the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and a laminar channel flow solution is given. These new triangular spectral elements can be combined with standard quadrilateral elements, yielding a general and flexible high order method for complex geometries in two dimensions.

  14. The Constrained Vapor Bubble Experiment - Interfacial Flow Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundan, Akshay; Wayner, Peter C., Jr.; Plawsky, Joel L.

    2015-01-01

    Internal heat transfer coefficient of the CVB correlated to the presence of the interfacial flow region. Competition between capillary and Marangoni flow caused Flooding and not a Dry-out region. Interfacial flow region growth is arrested at higher power inputs. 1D heat model confirms the presence of interfacial flow region. 1D heat model confirms the arresting phenomena of interfacial flow region Visual observations are essential to understanding.

  15. Quadratic finite elements and incompressible viscous flows.

    SciTech Connect

    Dohrmann, Clark R.; Gartling, David K.

    2005-01-01

    Pressure stabilization methods are applied to higher-order velocity finite elements for application to viscous incompressible flows. Both a standard pressure stabilizing Petrov-Galerkin (PSPG) method and a new polynomial pressure projection stabilization (PPPS) method have been implemented and tested for various quadratic elements in two dimensions. A preconditioner based on relaxing the incompressibility constraint is also tested for the iterative solution of saddle point problems arising from mixed Galerkin finite element approximations to the Navier-Stokes equations. The preconditioner is demonstrated for BB stable elements with discontinuous pressure approximations in two and three dimensions.

  16. Complementary Constrains on Component based Multiphase Flow Problems, Should It Be Implemented Locally or Globally?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, H.; Huang, Y.; Kolditz, O.

    2015-12-01

    Multiphase flow problems are numerically difficult to solve, as it often contains nonlinear Phase transition phenomena A conventional technique is to introduce the complementarity constraints where fluid properties such as liquid saturations are confined within a physically reasonable range. Based on such constraints, the mathematical model can be reformulated into a system of nonlinear partial differential equations coupled with variational inequalities. They can be then numerically handled by optimization algorithms. In this work, two different approaches utilizing the complementarity constraints based on persistent primary variables formulation[4] are implemented and investigated. The first approach proposed by Marchand et.al[1] is using "local complementary constraints", i.e. coupling the constraints with the local constitutive equations. The second approach[2],[3] , namely the "global complementary constrains", applies the constraints globally with the mass conservation equation. We will discuss how these two approaches are applied to solve non-isothermal componential multiphase flow problem with the phase change phenomenon. Several benchmarks will be presented for investigating the overall numerical performance of different approaches. The advantages and disadvantages of different models will also be concluded. References[1] E.Marchand, T.Mueller and P.Knabner. Fully coupled generalized hybrid-mixed finite element approximation of two-phase two-component flow in porous media. Part I: formulation and properties of the mathematical model, Computational Geosciences 17(2): 431-442, (2013). [2] A. Lauser, C. Hager, R. Helmig, B. Wohlmuth. A new approach for phase transitions in miscible multi-phase flow in porous media. Water Resour., 34,(2011), 957-966. [3] J. Jaffré, and A. Sboui. Henry's Law and Gas Phase Disappearance. Transp. Porous Media. 82, (2010), 521-526. [4] A. Bourgeat, M. Jurak and F. Smaï. Two-phase partially miscible flow and transport modeling in

  17. A multi-moment constrained finite volume method on arbitrary unstructured grids for incompressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Bin; Xiao, Feng

    2016-12-01

    We proposed a multi-moment constrained finite volume method which can simulate incompressible flows of high Reynolds number in complex geometries. Following the underlying idea of the volume-average/point-value multi-moment (VPM) method (Xie et al. (2014) [71]), this formulation is developed on arbitrary unstructured hybrid grids by employing the point values (PV) at both cell vertex and barycenter as the prognostic variables. The cell center value is updated via an evolution equation derived from a constraint condition of finite volume form, which ensures the rigorous numerical conservativeness. Novel numerical formulations based on the local PVs over compact stencil are proposed to enhance the accuracy, robustness and efficiency of computations on unstructured meshes of hybrid and arbitrary elements. Numerical experiments demonstrate that the present numerical model has nearly 3-order convergence rate with numerical errors much smaller than the VPM method. The numerical dissipation has been significantly suppressed, which facilitates numerical simulations of high Reynolds number flows in complex geometries.

  18. Hypersonic Viscous Flow Over Large Roughness Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2009-01-01

    Viscous flow over discrete or distributed surface roughness has great implications for hypersonic flight due to aerothermodynamic considerations related to laminar-turbulent transition. Current prediction capability is greatly hampered by the limited knowledge base for such flows. To help fill that gap, numerical computations are used to investigate the intricate flow physics involved. An unstructured mesh, compressible Navier-Stokes code based on the space-time conservation element, solution element (CESE) method is used to perform time-accurate Navier-Stokes calculations for two roughness shapes investigated in wind tunnel experiments at NASA Langley Research Center. It was found through 2D parametric study that at subcritical Reynolds numbers, spontaneous absolute instability accompanying by sustained vortex shedding downstream of the roughness is likely to take place at subsonic free-stream conditions. On the other hand, convective instability may be the dominant mechanism for supersonic boundary layers. Three-dimensional calculations for both a rectangular and a cylindrical roughness element at post-shock Mach numbers of 4.1 and 6.5 also confirm that no self-sustained vortex generation from the top face of the roughness is observed, despite the presence of flow unsteadiness for the smaller post-shock Mach number case.

  19. Hypersonic Viscous Flow Over Large Roughness Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2009-01-01

    Viscous flow over discrete or distributed surface roughness has great implications for hypersonic flight due to aerothermodynamic considerations related to laminar-turbulent transition. Current prediction capability is greatly hampered by the limited knowledge base for such flows. To help fill that gap, numerical computations are used to investigate the intricate flow physics involved. An unstructured mesh, compressible Navier-Stokes code based on the space-time conservation element, solution element (CESE) method is used to perform time-accurate Navier-Stokes calculations for two roughness shapes investigated in wind tunnel experiments at NASA Langley Research Center. It was found through 2D parametric study that at subcritical Reynolds numbers of the boundary layers, absolute instability resulting in vortex shedding downstream, is likely to weaken at supersonic free-stream conditions. On the other hand, convective instability may be the dominant mechanism for supersonic boundary layers. Three-dimensional calculations for a rectangular or cylindrical roughness element at post-shock Mach numbers of 4.1 and 6.5 also confirm that no self-sustained vortex generation is present.

  20. Gauge finite element method for incompressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    E, Weinan; Liu, Jian-Guo

    2000-12-01

    A finite element method for computing viscous incompressible flows based on the gauge formulation introduced in [Weinan E, Liu J-G. Gauge method for viscous incompressible flows. Journal of Computational Physics (submitted)] is presented. This formulation replaces the pressure by a gauge variable. This new gauge variable is a numerical tool and differs from the standard gauge variable that arises from decomposing a compressible velocity field. It has the advantage that an additional boundary condition can be assigned to the gauge variable, thus eliminating the issue of a pressure boundary condition associated with the original primitive variable formulation. The computational task is then reduced to solving standard heat and Poisson equations, which are approximated by straightforward, piecewise linear (or higher-order) finite elements. This method can achieve high-order accuracy at a cost comparable with that of solving standard heat and Poisson equations. It is naturally adapted to complex geometry and it is much simpler than traditional finite element methods for incompressible flows. Several numerical examples on both structured and unstructured grids are presented. Copyright

  1. Thinning and flow of Tibetan crust constrained by seismic anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Nikolai M; Ritzwoller, Michael H; Molnar, Peter; Levin, Vadim

    2004-07-09

    Intermediate-period Rayleigh and Love waves propagating across Tibet indicate marked radial anisotropy within the middle-to-lower crust, consistent with a thinning of the middle crust by about 30%. The anisotropy is largest in the western part of the plateau, where moment tensors of earthquakes indicate active crustal thinning. The preferred orientation of mica crystals resulting from the crustal thinning can account for the observed anisotropy. The middle-to-lower crust of Tibet appears to have thinned more than the upper crust, consistent with deformation of a mechanically weak layer that flows as if confined to a channel.

  2. State-constrained booster trajectory solutions via finite elements and shooting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bless, Robert R.; Hodges, Dewey H.; Seywald, Hans

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents an extension of a FEM formulation based on variational principles. A general formulation for handling internal boundary conditions and discontinuities in the state equations is presented, and the general formulation is modified for optimal control problems subject to state-variable inequality constraints. Solutions which only touch the state constraint and solutions which have a boundary arc of finite length are considered. Suitable shape and test functions are chosen for a FEM discretization. All element quadrature (equivalent to one-point Gaussian quadrature over each element) may be done in closed form. The final form of the algebraic equations is then derived. A simple state-constrained problem is solved. Then, for a practical application of the use of the FEM formulation, a launch vehicle subject to a dynamic pressure constraint (a first-order state inequality constraint) is solved. The results presented for the launch-vehicle trajectory have some interesting features, including a touch-point solution.

  3. Glacial-interglacial Changes in Ocean Carbon Chemistry constrained by Boron Isotopes, Trace Elements, and Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rae, J. W. B.; Adkins, J. F.; Foreman, A. D.; Charles, C.

    2014-12-01

    Deep ocean carbon storage and release is commonly invoked to explain glacial-interglacial CO2 cycles, but records of the carbonate chemistry of the glacial ocean have, until recently, been scarce. Here we present new boron isotope (δ11B) and trace metal data from benthic foraminifera from a suite of 15 cores from the South Atlantic from depths ranging from 1500 to 4000 m. These records show distinct changes in the water column depth structure of these tracers between the last glacial maximum (LGM) and late Holocene. Comparison of these paired trace element and isotope ratios reveals new insights to the shared and individual controls on tracers including Li/Ca, Sr/Ca, U/Ca, Mg/Li and δ11B. We further examine these data using a recently developed tracer fields modelling approach (Lund et al. 2011). This has previously been applied to δ18O data to investigate changes in circulation at the LGM. Here we extend this method to non-conservative isotopic and trace elemental tracers, allowing us to constrain the roles of circulation, the biological pump of organic carbon and CaCO3, and carbonate compensation, in setting deep ocean carbon storage at the LGM. Lund, D. C., J. F. Adkins, and R. Ferrari (2011), Abyssal Atlantic circulation during the Last Glacial Maximum: Constraining the ratio between transport and vertical mixing, Paleoceanography, 26, PA1213, doi:10.1029/2010PA001938.

  4. Alaska Crustal Deformation: Finite Element Modeling Constrained by Geologic and Very Long Baseline Interferometry Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundgren, Paul; Saucier, Fraancois; Palmer, Randy; Langon, Marc

    1995-01-01

    We compute crustal motions in Alaska by calculating the finite element solution for an elastic spherical shell problem. The method we use allows the finite element mesh to include faults and very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) baseline rates of change. Boundary conditions include Pacific-North American (PA-NA) plate motions. The solution is constrained by the oblique orientation of the Fairweather-Queen Charlotte strike-slip faults relative to the PA-NA relative motion direction and the oblique orientation from normal convergence of the eastern Aleutian trench fault systems, as well as strike-shp motion along the Denali and Totschunda fault systems. We explore the effects that a range of fault slip constraints and weighting of VLBI rates of change has on the solution. This allows us to test the motion on faults, such as the Denali fault, where there are conflicting reports on its present-day slip rate. We find a pattern of displacements which produce fault motions generally consistent with geologic observations. The motion of the continuum has the general pattern of radial movement of crust to the NE away from the Fairweather-Queen Charlotte fault systems in SE Alaska and Canada. This pattern of crustal motion is absorbed across the Mackenzie Mountains in NW Canada, with strike-slip motion constrained along the Denali and Tintina fault systems. In south central Alaska and the Alaska forearc oblique convergence at the eastern Aleutian trench and the strike-shp motion of the Denali fault system produce a counterclockwise pattern of motion which is partially absorbed along the Contact and related fault systems in southern Alaska and is partially extruded into the Bering Sea and into the forearc parallel the Aleutian trench from the Alaska Peninsula westward. Rates of motion and fault slip are small in western and northern Alaska, but the motions we compute are consistent with the senses of strike-slip motion inferred geologically along the Kaltag, Kobuk Trench

  5. Sensitivity-based finite element model updating using constrained optimization with a trust region algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakir, Pelin Gundes; Reynders, Edwin; De Roeck, Guido

    2007-08-01

    The use of changes in dynamic system characteristics to detect damage has received considerable attention during the last years. Within this context, FE model updating technique, which belongs to the class of inverse problems in classical mechanics, is used to detect, locate and quantify damage. In this study, a sensitivity-based finite element (FE) model updating scheme using a trust region algorithm is developed and implemented in a complex structure. A damage scenario is applied on the structure in which the stiffness values of the beam elements close to the beam-column joints are decreased by stiffness reduction factors. A worst case and complex damage pattern is assumed such that the stiffnesses of adjacent elements are decreased by substantially different stiffness reduction factors. The objective of the model updating is to minimize the differences between the eigenfrequency and eigenmodes residuals. The updating parameters of the structure are the stiffness reduction factors. The changes of these parameters are determined iteratively by solving a nonlinear constrained optimization problem. The FE model updating algorithm is also tested in the presence of two levels of noise in simulated measurements. In all three cases, the updated MAC values are above 99% and the relative eigenfrequency differences improve substantially after model updating. In cases without noise and with moderate levels of noise; detection, localization and quantification of damage are successfully accomplished. In the case with substantially noisy measurements, detection and localization of damage are successfully realized. Damage quantification is also promising in the presence of high noise as the algorithm can still predict 18 out of 24 damage parameters relatively accurately in that case.

  6. Discrete Element Modeling of Complex Granular Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movshovitz, N.; Asphaug, E. I.

    2010-12-01

    Granular materials occur almost everywhere in nature, and are actively studied in many fields of research, from food industry to planetary science. One approach to the study of granular media, the continuum approach, attempts to find a constitutive law that determines the material's flow, or strain, under applied stress. The main difficulty with this approach is that granular systems exhibit different behavior under different conditions, behaving at times as an elastic solid (e.g. pile of sand), at times as a viscous fluid (e.g. when poured), or even as a gas (e.g. when shaken). Even if all these physics are accounted for, numerical implementation is made difficult by the wide and often discontinuous ranges in continuum density and sound speed. A different approach is Discrete Element Modeling (DEM). Here the goal is to directly model every grain in the system as a rigid body subject to various body and surface forces. The advantage of this method is that it treats all of the above regimes in the same way, and can easily deal with a system moving back and forth between regimes. But as a granular system typically contains a multitude of individual grains, the direct integration of the system can be very computationally expensive. For this reason most DEM codes are limited to spherical grains of uniform size. However, spherical grains often cannot replicate the behavior of real world granular systems. A simple pile of spherical grains, for example, relies on static friction alone to keep its shape, while in reality a pile of irregular grains can maintain a much steeper angle by interlocking force chains. In the present study we employ a commercial DEM, nVidia's PhysX Engine, originally designed for the game and animation industry, to simulate complex granular flows with irregular, non-spherical grains. This engine runs as a multi threaded process and can be GPU accelerated. We demonstrate the code's ability to physically model granular materials in the three regimes

  7. A methodology for constraining power in finite element modeling of radiofrequency ablation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yansheng; Possebon, Ricardo; Mulier, Stefaan; Wang, Chong; Chen, Feng; Feng, Yuanbo; Xia, Qian; Liu, Yewei; Yin, Ting; Oyen, Raymond; Ni, Yicheng

    2016-09-21

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive thermal therapy for the treatment of cancer, hyperopia, and cardiac tachyarrhythmia. In RFA, the power delivered to the tissue is a key parameter. The objective of this study was to establish a methodology for the finite element modeling of RFA with constant power. Because of changes in the electric conductivity of tissue with temperature, a nonconventional boundary value problem arises in the mathematic modeling of RFA: neither the voltage (Dirichlet condition) nor the current (Neumann condition), but the power, that is, the product of voltage and current was prescribed on part of boundary. We solved the problem using Lagrange multiplier: the product of the voltage and current on the electrode surface is constrained to be equal to the Joule heating. We theoretically proved the equality between the product of the voltage and current on the surface of the electrode and the Joule heating in the domain. We also proved the well-posedness of the problem of solving the Laplace equation for the electric potential under a constant power constraint prescribed on the electrode surface. The Pennes bioheat transfer equation and the Laplace equation for electric potential augmented with the constraint of constant power were solved simultaneously using the Newton-Raphson algorithm. Three problems for validation were solved. Numerical results were compared either with an analytical solution deduced in this study or with results obtained by ANSYS or experiments. This work provides the finite element modeling of constant power RFA with a firm mathematical basis and opens pathway for achieving the optimal RFA power.

  8. Determination of poroelastic properties of cartilage using constrained optimization coupled with finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Chen-Yuan; Mansour, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    The feasibility of determining biphasic material properties using a finite element model of stress relaxation coupled with two types of constrained optimization to match measured data was investigated. Comparison of these two approaches, a zero-order method and a gradient-based algorithm, validated the predicted material properties. Optimizations were started from multiple different initial guesses of material properties (design variables) to establish the robustness of the optimization. Overall, the optimal values are close to those found by Cohen et al., (1998), but these small differences produced a marked improvement in the fit to the measured stress relaxation. Despite the greater deviation in the optimized values obtained from the zero-order method, both optimization procedures produced material properties that gave equally good overall fits to the measured data. Furthermore, optimized values were all within the expected range of material properties. Modeling stress relaxation using the optimized material properties showed an excellent fit to the entire time history of the measured data. PMID:25460921

  9. Constraining the Rheologic Properties of Channelized Basaltic Flows on Earth and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, M. S.; Harris, A. J. L.; Crown, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Basaltic volcanism is ubiquitous on the terrestrial planets and is the most common form of extrusive activity on Earth, with over half of the world's volcanoes consisting largely of basalt. Recently, new eruptions (or new phases of ongoing eruptions) have occurred at Tolbachik in Russia (2012-2013); Bardarbunga in Iceland (2014); Etna in Italy (2014); and Kilauea in Hawaii (2014-2015) emphasizing both the hazard potential and volumetric production of basaltic activity. Furthermore, new high-resolution data of flows on Arsia Mons volcano (Mars) show very similar features. Therefore, this style of effusive volcanism and especially its surface manifestation (lava flows) warrants continued study both from a fundamental science as well as a hazard mitigation point of view. Monitoring flow propagation direction and velocity are critical in these situations and a number of models have evolved over time focused on heat loss and down-flow topography to predict flow advance. In addition to topography, the dominant (internal) factors controlling flow propagation are the discharge rate combined with cooling and increasing viscosity. However, all these models rely on accurate temperature measurements derived from the cooling glassy surface using infrared (IR) non-contact instruments. New laboratory and field-based studies are attempting to characterize the cooling, formation, and dynamics of basaltic surfaces using IR data. Preliminary results are focused on resolving inconsistencies in the derived flow temperature, composition, texture and silicate structure, which can all impact the surface-leaving heat flux. Improved accuracy in these retrievals increases our ability to constrain and model flow surface and interior temperatures. The impact of this improved accuracy has now been assessed using flow model simulations of active terrestrial and well-preserved Martian flows, Results are improving our understanding of the initial eruption conditions of these channelized basaltic

  10. Security Constrained Optimal Power Flow with FACTS Devices Using Modified Particle Swarm Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somasundaram, P.; Muthuselvan, N. B.

    This paper presents new computationally efficient improved Particle Swarm algorithms for solving Security Constrained Optimal Power Flow (SCOPF) in power systems with the inclusion of FACTS devices. The proposed algorithms are developed based on the combined application of Gaussian and Cauchy Probability distribution functions incorporated in Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO). The power flow algorithm with the presence of Static Var Compensator (SVC) Thyristor Controlled Series Capacitor (TCSC) and Unified Power Flow Controller (UPFC), has been formulated and solved. The proposed algorithms are tested on standard IEEE 30-bus system. The analysis using PSO and modified PSO reveals that the proposed algorithms are relatively simple, efficient, reliable and suitable for real-time applications. And these algorithms can provide accurate solution with fast convergence and have the potential to be applied to other power engineering problems.

  11. A generalized network flow model for the multi-mode resource-constrained project scheduling problem with discounted cash flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Miawjane; Yan, Shangyao; Wang, Sin-Siang; Liu, Chiu-Lan

    2015-02-01

    An effective project schedule is essential for enterprises to increase their efficiency of project execution, to maximize profit, and to minimize wastage of resources. Heuristic algorithms have been developed to efficiently solve the complicated multi-mode resource-constrained project scheduling problem with discounted cash flows (MRCPSPDCF) that characterize real problems. However, the solutions obtained in past studies have been approximate and are difficult to evaluate in terms of optimality. In this study, a generalized network flow model, embedded in a time-precedence network, is proposed to formulate the MRCPSPDCF with the payment at activity completion times. Mathematically, the model is formulated as an integer network flow problem with side constraints, which can be efficiently solved for optimality, using existing mathematical programming software. To evaluate the model performance, numerical tests are performed. The test results indicate that the model could be a useful planning tool for project scheduling in the real world.

  12. Grouped element-by-element iteration schemes for incompressible flow computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tezduyar, T. E.; Liou, J.

    1989-05-01

    Grouped element-by-element (GEBE) iteration schemes for incompressible flows are presented in the context of vorticity- stream function formulation. The GEBE procedure is a variation of the EBE procedure and is based on arrangement of the elements into groups with no inter-element coupling within each group. With the GEBE approach, vectorization and parallel implementation of the EBE method becomes more clear. The savings in storage and CPU time are demonstrated with two unsteady flow problems.

  13. Using measurements of the cosmic bulk flow to constrain f(R) Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiler, Jacob; Parkinson, David

    2016-10-01

    As an alternate explanation for the cosmic acceleration, f(R) theories of gravity can predict an almost identical expansion history to standard Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM), yet make very different predictions for the growth of cosmological structures. Measurements of the cosmic bulk flow provide a method for determining the strength of gravity over the history of structure formation. We use the modified gravity N-body code ECOSMOG to simulate dark matter particles and make predictions for the bulk flow magnitude in both ΛCDM and f(R) gravity. With the peculiar velocities output by ECOSMOG, we determine the bulk flow at depths ranging from 20 to 50 h-1Mpc, following the redshift and sky distribution of the 2MASS Tully-Fisher survey (2MTF). At each depth, we find that the ΛCDM and fR0 = 10-5 simulations produce bulk flow measurements that are consistent with ΛCDM predictions and the 2MTF survey at a 1σ level. We also find that adopting an f(R) strength of fR0 = 10-3 predict a much larger value for the bulk flow, which disagree with ΛCDM predictions at all depths considered. We conclude that fR0 must be constrained to a level no greater than 10-4 to agree with bulk flow measurements.

  14. Constrained positive matrix factorization: Elemental ratios, spatial distinction, and chemical transport model source contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturtz, Timothy M.

    Source apportionment models attempt to untangle the relationship between pollution sources and the impacts at downwind receptors. Two frameworks of source apportionment models exist: source-oriented and receptor-oriented. Source based apportionment models use presumed emissions and atmospheric processes to estimate the downwind source contributions. Conversely, receptor based models leverage speciated concentration data from downwind receptors and apply statistical methods to predict source contributions. Integration of both source-oriented and receptor-oriented models could lead to a better understanding of the implications sources have on the environment and society. The research presented here investigated three different types of constraints applied to the Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) receptor model within the framework of the Multilinear Engine (ME-2): element ratio constraints, spatial separation constraints, and chemical transport model (CTM) source attribution constraints. PM10-2.5 mass and trace element concentrations were measured in Winston-Salem, Chicago, and St. Paul at up to 60 sites per city during two different seasons in 2010. PMF was used to explore the underlying sources of variability. Information on previously reported PM10-2.5 tire and brake wear profiles were used to constrain these features in PMF by prior specification of selected species ratios. We also modified PMF to allow for combining the measurements from all three cities into a single model while preserving city-specific soil features. Relatively minor differences were observed between model predictions with and without the prior ratio constraints, increasing confidence in our ability to identify separate brake wear and tire wear features. Using separate data, source contributions to total fine particle carbon predicted by a CTM were incorporated into the PMF receptor model to form a receptor-oriented hybrid model. The level of influence of the CTM versus traditional PMF was

  15. Finite Element Modelling of the Apollo Heat Flow Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platt, J.; Siegler, M. A.; Williams, J.

    2013-12-01

    The heat flow experiments sent on Apollo missions 15 and 17 were designed to measure the temperature gradient of the lunar regolith in order to determine the heat flux of the moon. Major problems in these experiments arose from the fact that the astronauts were not able to insert the probes below the thermal skin depth. Compounding the problem, anomalies in the data have prevented scientists from conclusively determining the temperature dependent conductivity of the soil, which enters as a linear function into the heat flow calculation, thus stymieing them in their primary goal of constraining the global heat production of the Moon. Different methods of determining the thermal conductivity have yielded vastly different results resulting in downward corrections of up to 50% in some cases from the original calculations. Along with problems determining the conductivity, the data was inconsistent with theoretical predictions of the temperature variation over time, leading some to suspect that the Apollo experiment itself changed the thermal properties of the localised area surrounding the probe. The average temperature of the regolith, according to the data, increased over time, a phenomenon that makes calculating the thermal conductivity of the soil and heat flux impossible without knowing the source of error and accounting for it. The changes, possibly resulting from as varied sources as the imprint of the Astronauts boots on the lunar surface, compacted soil around the bore stem of the probe or even heat radiating down the inside of the tube, have convinced many people that the recorded data is unusable. In order to shed some light on the possible causes of this temperature rise, we implemented a finite element model of the probe using the program COMSOL Multi-physics as well as Matlab. Once the cause of the temperature rise is known then steps can be taken to account for the failings of the experiment and increase the data's utility.

  16. Constraining the parameters of the EAP sea ice rheology from satellite observations and discrete element model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsamados, Michel; Heorton, Harry; Feltham, Daniel; Muir, Alan; Baker, Steven

    2016-04-01

    The new elastic-plastic anisotropic (EAP) rheology that explicitly accounts for the sub-continuum anisotropy of the sea ice cover has been implemented into the latest version of the Los Alamos sea ice model CICE. The EAP rheology is widely used in the climate modeling scientific community (i.e. CPOM stand alone, RASM high resolution regional ice-ocean model, MetOffice fully coupled model). Early results from sensitivity studies (Tsamados et al, 2013) have shown the potential for an improved representation of the observed main sea ice characteristics with a substantial change of the spatial distribution of ice thickness and ice drift relative to model runs with the reference visco-plastic (VP) rheology. The model contains one new prognostic variable, the local structure tensor, which quantifies the degree of anisotropy of the sea ice, and two parameters that set the time scale of the evolution of this tensor. Observations from high resolution satellite SAR imagery as well as numerical simulation results from a discrete element model (DEM, see Wilchinsky, 2010) have shown that these individual floes can organize under external wind and thermal forcing to form an emergent isotropic sea ice state (via thermodynamic healing, thermal cracking) or an anisotropic sea ice state (via Coulombic failure lines due to shear rupture). In this work we use for the first time in the context of sea ice research a mathematical metric, the Tensorial Minkowski functionals (Schroeder-Turk, 2010), to measure quantitatively the degree of anisotropy and alignment of the sea ice at different scales. We apply the methodology on the GlobICE Envisat satellite deformation product (www.globice.info), on a prototype modified version of GlobICE applied on Sentinel-1 Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery and on the DEM ice floe aggregates. By comparing these independent measurements of the sea ice anisotropy as well as its temporal evolution against the EAP model we are able to constrain the

  17. Constraining Eruptive Conditions From Lava Flow Morphometry: A Case Study With Field Evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowles, Z. R.; Clarke, A.; Greeley, R.

    2007-12-01

    Volcanism is widely recognized as one of the primary factors affecting the surfaces of solid planets and satellites throughout the solar system. Basaltic lava is thought to be the most common composition based on observed features typical of basaltic eruptions found on Earth. Lava flows are one of the most easily recognizable landforms on planetary surfaces and their features may provide information about eruption dynamics, lava rheology, and potential hazards. More recently, researchers have taken a multi-faceted approach to combine remote sensing, field observations and quantitative modeling to constrain volcanic activity on Earth and other planets. Here we test a number of published models, including empirically derived relationships from Mt. Etna and Kilauea, models derived from laboratory experiments, and theoretical models previously applied to remote sensing of planetary surfaces, against well-documented eruptions from the literature and field observations. We find that the Graetz (Hulme and Felder, 1977, Phil.Trans., 285, 227 - 234) method for estimating effusion rates compares favorably with published eruption data, while, on the other hand, inverting lava flow length prediction models to estimate effusion rates leads to several orders of magnitude in error. The Graetz method also better constrains eruption duration. Simple radial spreading laws predict Hawaiian lava flow lengths quite well, as do using the thickness of the lava flow front and chilled crust. There was no observed difference between results from models thought to be exclusive to aa or pahoehoe flow fields. Interpreting historic conditions should therefore follow simple relationships to observable morphologies no matter the composition or surface texture. We have applied the most robust models to understand the eruptive conditions and lava rheology of the Batamote Mountains near Ajo, AZ, an eroded shield volcano in southern Arizona. We find effusion rates on the order of 100 - 200 cubic

  18. Dissipation Element Analysis of Reacting- and Non-Reacting Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denker, Dominik; Boschung, Jonas; Hennig, Fabian; Pitsch, Heinz

    2016-11-01

    Dissipation element analysis is a tried and tested method for analyzing scalar field in turbulent flows. Dissipation elements are defined as an ensemble of grid point whose gradient trajectories reach the same extremal points. Therefore, the scalar field can be compartmentalized in monotonous space filling regions. Dissipation elements can be described by two parameters, namely the Euclidean distance between their extremal points and their scalar difference in these points. The joint probability density function of these two parameters is expected to suffice for a statistical reconstruction of the scalar field. In addition, normalized dissipation element statistics show a remarkable invariance towards changes in Reynolds numbers. Dissipation element statistics of the passive scalar and the turbulent kinetic energy are compared for different flow configurations including reacting and non-reacting turbulent flows. Furthermore, the Reynolds number scaling of the dissipation element parameters is investigated.

  19. A robust approach to chance constrained optimal power flow with renewable generation

    SciTech Connect

    Lubin, Miles; Dvorkin, Yury; Backhaus, Scott N.

    2016-09-01

    Optimal Power Flow (OPF) dispatches controllable generation at minimum cost subject to operational constraints on generation and transmission assets. The uncertainty and variability of intermittent renewable generation is challenging current deterministic OPF approaches. Recent formulations of OPF use chance constraints to limit the risk from renewable generation uncertainty, however, these new approaches typically assume the probability distributions which characterize the uncertainty and variability are known exactly. We formulate a robust chance constrained (RCC) OPF that accounts for uncertainty in the parameters of these probability distributions by allowing them to be within an uncertainty set. The RCC OPF is solved using a cutting-plane algorithm that scales to large power systems. We demonstrate the RRC OPF on a modified model of the Bonneville Power Administration network, which includes 2209 buses and 176 controllable generators. In conclusion, deterministic, chance constrained (CC), and RCC OPF formulations are compared using several metrics including cost of generation, area control error, ramping of controllable generators, and occurrence of transmission line overloads as well as the respective computational performance.

  20. A robust approach to chance constrained optimal power flow with renewable generation

    DOE PAGES

    Lubin, Miles; Dvorkin, Yury; Backhaus, Scott N.

    2016-09-01

    Optimal Power Flow (OPF) dispatches controllable generation at minimum cost subject to operational constraints on generation and transmission assets. The uncertainty and variability of intermittent renewable generation is challenging current deterministic OPF approaches. Recent formulations of OPF use chance constraints to limit the risk from renewable generation uncertainty, however, these new approaches typically assume the probability distributions which characterize the uncertainty and variability are known exactly. We formulate a robust chance constrained (RCC) OPF that accounts for uncertainty in the parameters of these probability distributions by allowing them to be within an uncertainty set. The RCC OPF is solved usingmore » a cutting-plane algorithm that scales to large power systems. We demonstrate the RRC OPF on a modified model of the Bonneville Power Administration network, which includes 2209 buses and 176 controllable generators. In conclusion, deterministic, chance constrained (CC), and RCC OPF formulations are compared using several metrics including cost of generation, area control error, ramping of controllable generators, and occurrence of transmission line overloads as well as the respective computational performance.« less

  1. Mobile Monolith Polymer Elements For Flow Control In Microfluidic Systems

    DOEpatents

    Hasselbrink, Jr., Ernest F.; Rehm, Jason E.; Shepodd, Timothy J.; Kirby, Brian J.

    2006-01-24

    A cast-in-place and lithographically shaped mobile, monolithic polymer element for fluid flow control in microfluidic devices and method of manufacture. Microfluid flow control devices, or microvalves that provide for control of fluid or ionic current flow can be made incorporating a cast-in-place, mobile monolithic polymer element, disposed within a microchannel, and driven by fluid pressure (either liquid or gas) against a retaining or sealing surface. The polymer elements are made by the application of lithographic methods to monomer mixtures formulated in such a way that the polymer will not bond to microchannel walls. The polymer elements can seal against pressures greater than 5000 psi, and have a response time on the order of milliseconds. By the use of energetic radiation it is possible to depolymerize selected regions of the polymer element to form shapes that cannot be produced by conventional lithographic patterning and would be impossible to machine.

  2. Mobile monolithic polymer elements for flow control in microfluidic devices

    DOEpatents

    Hasselbrink, Jr., Ernest F.; Rehm, Jason E.; Shepodd, Timothy J.; Kirby, Brian J.

    2005-11-11

    A cast-in-place and lithographically shaped mobile, monolithic polymer element for fluid flow control in microfluidic devices and method of manufacture. Microfluid flow control devices, or microvalves that provide for control of fluid or ionic current flow can be made incorporating a cast-in-place, mobile monolithic polymer element, disposed within a microchannel, and driven by fluid pressure (either liquid or gas) against a retaining or sealing surface. The polymer elements are made by the application of lithographic methods to monomer mixtures formulated in such a way that the polymer will not bond to microchannel walls. The polymer elements can seal against pressures greater than 5000 psi, and have a response time on the order of milliseconds. By the use of energetic radiation it is possible to depolymerize selected regions of the polymer element to form shapes that cannot be produced by conventional lithographic patterning and would be impossible to machine.

  3. Mobile monolithic polymer elements for flow control in microfluidic devices

    DOEpatents

    Hasselbrink, Jr., Ernest F.; Rehm, Jason E.; Shepodd, Timothy J.

    2004-08-31

    A cast-in-place and lithographically shaped mobile, monolithic polymer element for fluid flow control in microfluidic devices and method of manufacture. Microfluid flow control devices, or microvalves that provide for control of fluid or ionic current flow can be made incorporating a cast-in-place, mobile monolithic polymer element, disposed within a microchannel, and driven by either fluid or gas pressure against a retaining or sealing surface. The polymer elements are made by the application of lithographic methods to monomer mixtures formulated in such a way that the polymer will not bond to microchannel walls. The polymer elements can seal against pressures greater than 5000 psi, and have a response time on the order of milliseconds. By the use of energetic radiation it is possible to depolymerize selected regions of the polymer element to form shapes that cannot be produced by conventional lithographic patterning and would be impossible to machine.

  4. High-order Finite Element Analysis of Boundary Layer Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Alvin; Sahni, Onkar

    2014-11-01

    Numerical analysis of boundary layer flows requires careful approximations, specifically the use of a mesh with layered and graded elements near the (viscous) walls. This is referred to as a boundary layer mesh, which for complex geometries is composed of triangular elements on the walls that are inflated or extruded into the volume along the wall-normal direction up to a desired height while the rest of the domain is filled with unstructured tetrahedral elements. Linear elements with C0 inter-element continuity are employed and in some situations higher order C0 elements are also used. However, these elements only enforce continuity whereas high-order smoothness is not attained as will be the case with C1 inter-element continuity and higher. As a result, C0 elements result in a poor approximation of the high-order boundary layer behavior. To achieve greater inter-element continuity in boundary layer region, we employ B-spline basis functions along the wall-normal direction (i.e., only in the layered portion of the mesh). In the rest of the fully unstructured mesh, linear or higher order C0 elements are used as appropriate. In this study we demonstrate the benefits of finite-element analysis based on such higher order and continuity basis functions for boundary layer flows.

  5. Nonlinear stochastic controllers for power-flow-constrained vibratory energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, Ian L.; Scruggs, Jeffrey T.

    2013-06-01

    This study addresses the formulation of nonlinear feedback controllers for stochastically excited vibratory energy harvesters. Maximizing the average power generated from such systems requires the transducer current to be regulated using a bi-directional power electronic converter. There are many applications where the implementation of these types of converters is infeasible, due to the higher parasitic losses they must sustain. If instead the transducer current is regulated using a converter capable of single-directional power-flow, then these parasitic losses can be reduced significantly. However, the constraint on the power-flow directionality restricts the domain of feasible feedback laws. The only feasible linear feedback law imposes a static relationship between current and voltage, i.e., a static admittance. In stochastic response, the power generation performance can be enhanced significantly beyond that of the optimal static admittance, using nonlinear feedback. In this paper, a general approach to nonlinear control synthesis for power-flow-constrained energy harvesters is presented, which is analytically guaranteed to outperform the optimal static admittance in stationary stochastic response. Simulation results are presented for a single-degree-of-freedom resonant oscillator with an electromagnetic transducer, as well as for a piezoelectric bimorph cantilever beam.

  6. Thermodynamically Constrained Averaging Theory (TCAT) Two-Phase Flow Model: Derivation, Closure, and Simulation Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigand, T. M.; Miller, C. T.; Dye, A. L.; Gray, W. G.; McClure, J. E.; Rybak, I.

    2015-12-01

    The thermodynamically constrained averaging theory (TCAT) has been usedto formulate general classes of porous medium models, including newmodels for two-fluid-phase flow. The TCAT approach provides advantagesthat include a firm connection between the microscale, or pore scale,and the macroscale; a thermodynamically consistent basis; explicitinclusion of factors such as interfacial areas, contact angles,interfacial tension, and curvatures; and dynamics of interface movementand relaxation to an equilibrium state. In order to render the TCATmodel solvable, certain closure relations are needed to relate fluidpressure, interfacial areas, curvatures, and relaxation rates. In thiswork, we formulate and solve a TCAT-based two-fluid-phase flow model. We detail the formulation of the model, which is a specific instancefrom a hierarchy of two-fluid-phase flow models that emerge from thetheory. We show the closure problem that must be solved. Using recentresults from high-resolution microscale simulations, we advance a set ofclosure relations that produce a closed model. Lastly, we solve the model using a locally conservative numerical scheme and compare the TCAT model to the traditional model.

  7. The Spectral Element Method for Geophysical Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Mark

    1998-11-01

    We will describe SEAM, a Spectral Element Atmospheric Model. SEAM solves the 3D primitive equations used in climate modeling and medium range forecasting. SEAM uses a spectral element discretization for the surface of the globe and finite differences in the vertical direction. The model is spectrally accurate, as demonstrated by a variety of test cases. It is well suited for modern distributed-shared memory computers, sustaining over 24 GFLOPS on a 240 processor HP Exemplar. This performance has allowed us to run several interesting simulations in full spherical geometry at high resolution (over 22 million grid points).

  8. Some parametric flow analyses of a particle bed fuel element

    SciTech Connect

    Dobranich, D.

    1993-05-01

    Parametric calculations are performed, using the SAFSIM computer program, to investigate the fluid mechanics and heat transfer performance of a particle bed fuel element. Both steady-state and transient calculations are included, addressing such issues as flow stability, reduced thrust operation, transpiration drag, coolant conductivity enhancement, flow maldistributions, decay heat removal, flow perturbations, and pulse cooling. The calculations demonstrate the dependence of the predicted results on the modeling assumptions and thus provide guidance as to where further experimental and computational investigations are needed. The calculations also demonstrate that both flow instability and flow maldistribution in the fuel element are important phenomena. Furthermore, results are encouraging that geometric design changes to the element can significantly reduce problems related to these phenomena, allowing improved performance over a wide range of element power densities and flow rates. Such design changes will help to maximize the operational efficiency of space propulsion reactors employing particle bed fuel element technology. Finally, the results demonstrate that SAFSIM is a valuable engineering tool for performing quick and inexpensive parametric simulations addressing complex flow problems.

  9. A 3-dimensional mass conserving element for compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fix, G.; Suri, M.

    1985-01-01

    A variety of finite element schemes has been used in the numerical approximation of compressible flows particularly in underwater acoustics. In many instances instabilities have been generated due to the lack of mass conservation. Two- and three-dimensional elements are developed which avoid these problems.

  10. ELEMENTAL MERCURY CAPTURE BY ACTIVATED CARBON IN A FLOW REACTOR

    EPA Science Inventory


    The paper gives results of bench-scale experiments in a flow reactor to simulate the entrained-flow capture of elemental mercury (Hgo) using solid sorbents. Adsorption of Hgo by a lignite-based activated carbon (Calgon FGD) was examined at different carbon/mercury (C/Hg) rat...

  11. Modeling of supersonic flows near flying vehicle elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovenya, V. M.; Slyunyaev, A. Yu.

    2009-03-01

    Supersonic flows near flying vehicle elements are calculated in the approximation of the full Navier-Stokes equations for a viscous compressible heat-conducting gas with different values of free-stream. Mach and Reynolds numbers and angles of attack. The main laws of the flow near the lifting surface. and in the inlet are obtained.

  12. A finite element-based constrained mixture implementation for arterial growth, remodeling, and adaptation: theory and numerical verification.

    PubMed

    Valentín, A; Humphrey, J D; Holzapfel, G A

    2013-08-01

    We implemented a constrained mixture model of arterial growth and remodeling in a nonlinear finite element framework to facilitate numerical analyses of diverse cases of arterial adaptation and maladaptation, including disease progression, resulting in complex evolving geometries and compositions. This model enables hypothesis testing by predicting consequences of postulated characteristics of cell and matrix turnover, including evolving quantities and orientations of fibrillar constituents and nonhomogenous degradation of elastin or loss of smooth muscle function. The nonlinear finite element formulation is general within the context of arterial mechanics, but we restricted our present numerical verification to cylindrical geometries to allow comparisons with prior results for two special cases: uniform transmural changes in mass and differential growth and remodeling within a two-layered cylindrical model of the human aorta. The present finite element model recovers the results of these simplified semi-inverse analyses with good agreement.

  13. A Finite Element Based Constrained Mixture Implementation for Arterial Growth, Remodeling, and Adaptation: Theory and Numerical Verification

    PubMed Central

    Valentín, A.; Humphrey, J. D.; Holzapfel, G. A.

    2013-01-01

    We implemented a constrained mixture model of arterial growth and remodeling (G&R) in a nonlinear finite element framework to facilitate numerical analyses of diverse cases of arterial adaptation and maladaptation, including disease progression, resulting in complex evolving geometries and compositions. This model enables hypothesis testing by predicting consequences of postulated characteristics of cell and matrix turnover, including evolving quantities and orientations of fibrillar constituents and non-homogenous degradation of elastin or loss of smooth muscle function. The non-linear finite element formulation is general within the context of arterial mechanics, but we restricted our present numerical verification to cylindrical geometries to allow comparisons to prior results for two special cases: uniform transmural changes in mass and differential G&R within a two-layered cylindrical model of the human aorta. The present finite element model recovers the results of these simplified semi-inverse analyses with good agreement. PMID:23713058

  14. CVB: the Constrained Vapor Bubble Capillary Experiment on the International Space Station MARANGONI FLOW REGION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wayner, Peter C., Jr.; Kundan, Akshay; Plawsky, Joel

    2014-01-01

    The Constrained Vapor Bubble (CVB) is a wickless, grooved heat pipe and we report on a full- scale fluids experiment flown on the International Space Station (ISS). The CVB system consists of a relatively simple setup a quartz cuvette with sharp corners partially filled with either pentane or an ideal mixture of pentane and isohexane as the working fluids. Along with temperature and pressure measurements, the two-dimensional thickness profile of the menisci formed at the corners of the quartz cuvette was determined using the Light Microscopy Module (LMM). Even with the large, millimeter dimensions of the CVB, interfacial forces dominate in these exceedingly small Bond Number systems. The experiments were carried out at various power inputs. Although conceptually simple, the transport processes were found to be very complex with many different regions. At the heated end of the CVB, due to a high temperature gradient, we observed Marangoni flow at some power inputs. This region from the heated end to the central drop region is defined as a Marangoni dominated region. We present a simple analysis based on interfacial phenomena using only measurements from the ISS experiments that lead to a predictive equation for the thickness of the film near the heated end of the CVB. The average pressure gradient for flow in the film is assumed due to the measured capillary pressure at the two ends of the liquid film and that the pressure stress gradient due to cohesion self adjusts to a constant value over a distance L. The boundary conditions are the no slip condition at the wall interface and an interfacial shear stress at the liquid- vapor interface due to the Marangoni stress, which is due to the high temperature gradient. Although the heated end is extremely complex, since it includes three- dimensional variations in radiation, conduction, evaporation, condensation, fluid flow and interfacial forces, we find that using the above simplifying assumptions, a simple successful

  15. Finite element solver for 3-D compressible viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, K. C.; Reddy, J. N.

    1986-01-01

    The space shuttle main engine (SSME) has extremely complex internal flow structure. The geometry of the flow domain is three-dimensional with complicated topology. The flow is compressible, viscous, and turbulent with large gradients in flow quantities and regions of recirculations. The analysis of the flow field in SSME involves several tedious steps. One is the geometrical modeling of the particular zone of the SSME being studied. Accessing the geometry definition, digitalizing it, and developing surface interpolations suitable for an interior grid generator require considerable amount of manual labor. There are several types of grid generators available with some general-purpose finite element programs. An efficient and robust computational scheme for solving 3D Navier-Stokes equations has to be implemented. Post processing software has to be adapted to visualize and analyze the computed 3D flow field. The progress made in a project to develop software for the analysis of the flow is discussed. The technical approach to the development of the finite element scheme and the relaxation procedure are discussed. The three dimensional finite element code for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations is listed.

  16. Spectral element methods for transitional flows, in complex geometries.

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, P. F.; Kruse, G. W.; Loth, F.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Juniata Coll.; Univ. of Illinois

    2002-01-01

    We describe the development and implementation of an efficient spectral element code for simulating transitional flows in complex three-dimensional domains. Critical to this effort is the use of geometrically nonconforming elements that allow localized refinement in regions of interest, coupled with a stabilized high-order time-split formulation of the semi-discrete Navier-Stokes equations. Simulations of transition in a model of an arteriovenous graft illustrate the potential of this approach in biomechanical applications.

  17. Predicting Rediated Noise With Power Flow Finite Element Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    Defence R&D Canada – Atlantic DEFENCE DÉFENSE & Predicting Rediated Noise With Power Flow Finite Element Analysis D. Brennan T.S. Koko L. Jiang J...PREDICTING RADIATED NOISE WITH POWER FLOW FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS D.P. Brennan T.S. Koko L. Jiang J.C. Wallace Martec Limited Martec Limited...model- or full-scale data before it is available for general use. Brennan, D.P., Koko , T.S., Jiang, L., Wallace, J.C. 2007. Predicting Radiated

  18. PC Windows finite element modeling of landfill gas flow

    SciTech Connect

    Mull, S.R.; Lang, R.J.; Vigil, S.A.; Cota, H.

    1996-09-01

    A two dimensional demonstration program, GAS, has been developed for the solution of landfill gas (LFG) flow problems on a personal computer (PC). The program combines a Windows{trademark} graphical user interface, object oriented programming (OOP) techniques, and finite element modeling (FEM) to demonstrate the practicality of performing LFG flow modeling on the PC. GAS is demonstrated on a sample LFG problem consisting of a landfill, one gas extraction well, the landfill liner, cap, and surrounding soil. Analyses of the program results are performed for successively finer grid resolutions. Element flux imbalance, execution time, and required memory are characterized as a function of grid resolution.

  19. Geometrically constrained isogeometric parameterized level-set based topology optimization via trimmed elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yingjun; Benson, David J.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, an approach based on the fast point-in-polygon (PIP) algorithm and trimmed elements is proposed for isogeometric topology optimization (TO) with arbitrary geometric constraints. The isogeometric parameterized level-set-based TO method, which directly uses the non-uniform rational basis splines (NURBS) for both level set function (LSF) parameterization and objective function calculation, provides higher accuracy and efficiency than previous methods. The integration of trimmed elements is completed by the efficient quadrature rule that can design the quadrature points and weights for arbitrary geometric shape. Numerical examples demonstrate the efficiency and flexibility of the method.

  20. The isotope composition of selenium in chondrites constrains the depletion mechanism of volatile elements in solar system materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollstaedt, Hauke; Mezger, Klaus; Leya, Ingo

    2016-09-01

    Solar nebula processes led to a depletion of volatile elements in different chondrite groups when compared to the bulk chemical composition of the solar system deduced from the Sun's photosphere. For moderately-volatile elements, this depletion primarily correlates with the element condensation temperature and is possibly caused by incomplete condensation from a hot solar nebula, evaporative loss from the precursor dust, and/or inherited from the interstellar medium. Element concentrations and interelement ratios of volatile elements do not provide a clear picture about responsible mechanisms. Here, the abundance and stable isotope composition of the moderately- to highly-volatile element Se are investigated in carbonaceous, ordinary, and enstatite chondrites to constrain the mechanism responsible for the depletion of volatile elements in planetary bodies of the inner solar system and to define a δ 82 / 78 Se value for the bulk solar system. The δ 82 / 78 Se of the studied chondrite falls are identical within their measurement uncertainties with a mean of - 0.20 ± 0.26 ‰ (2 s.d., n = 14, relative to NIST SRM 3149) despite Se abundance depletions of up to a factor of 2.5 with respect to the CI group. The absence of resolvable Se isotope fractionation rules out a kinetic Rayleigh-type incomplete condensation of Se from the hot solar nebula or partial kinetic evaporative loss on the precursor material and/or the parent bodies. The Se depletion, if acquired during partial condensation or evaporative loss, therefore must have occurred under near equilibrium conditions to prevent measurable isotope fractionation. Alternatively, the depletion and cooling of the nebula could have occurred simultaneously due to the continuous removal of gas and fine particles by the solar wind accompanied by the quantitative condensation of elements from the pre-depleted gas. In this scenario the condensation of elements does not require equilibrium conditions to avoid isotope

  1. A finite element solver for 3-D compressible viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, K. C.; Reddy, J. N.; Nayani, S.

    1990-01-01

    Computation of the flow field inside a space shuttle main engine (SSME) requires the application of state of the art computational fluid dynamic (CFD) technology. Several computer codes are under development to solve 3-D flow through the hot gas manifold. Some algorithms were designed to solve the unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations, either by implicit or explicit factorization methods, using several hundred or thousands of time steps to reach a steady state solution. A new iterative algorithm is being developed for the solution of the implicit finite element equations without assembling global matrices. It is an efficient iteration scheme based on a modified nonlinear Gauss-Seidel iteration with symmetric sweeps. The algorithm is analyzed for a model equation and is shown to be unconditionally stable. Results from a series of test problems are presented. The finite element code was tested for couette flow, which is flow under a pressure gradient between two parallel plates in relative motion. Another problem that was solved is viscous laminar flow over a flat plate. The general 3-D finite element code was used to compute the flow in an axisymmetric turnaround duct at low Mach numbers.

  2. Single element injector cold flow testing for STME swirl coaxial injector element design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulka, J.; Schneider, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    An oxidizer-swirled coaxial element injector is being investigated for application in the Space Transportation Main Engine (STME). Single element cold flow experiments were conducted to provide characterization of the STME injector element for future analysis, design, and optimization. All tests were conducted to quiescent, ambient backpressure conditions. Spray angle, circumferential spray uniformity, dropsize, and dropsize distribution were measured in water-only and water/nitrogen flows. Rupe mixing efficiency was measured using water/sucrose solution flows with a large grid patternator for simple comparative evaluation of mixing. Factorial designs of experiment were used for statistical evaluation of injector geometrical design features and propellant flow conditions on mixing and atomization. Increasing the free swirl angle of the liquid oxidizer had the greatest influence on increasing the mixing efficiency. The addition of gas assistance had the most significant effect on reducing oxidizer droplet size parameters and increasing droplet size distribution. Increasing the oxidizer injection velocity had the greatest influence for reducing oxidizer droplet size parameters and increasing size distribution for non-gas assisted flows. Single element and multi-element subscale hot fire testing are recommended to verify optimized designs before committing to the STME design.

  3. Experimental Impedance of Single Liner Elements with Bias Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Follet, J. I.; Betts, J. F.; Kelly, Jeffrey J.; Thomas, Russell H.

    2000-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to generate a high quality database, from which the effects of a mean bias flow on the acoustic impedance of lumped-element single-degree-of-freedom liners was determined. Acoustic impedance measurements were made using the standard two-microphone method in the NASA Langley Normal Incidence Tube. Each liner consisted of a perforated sheet with a constant-area cavity. Liner resistance was shown to increase and to become less frequency and sound pressure level dependent as the bias flow was increased. The resistance was also consistently lower for a negative bias flow (suction) than for a positive bias flow (blowing) of equal magnitude. The slope of the liner reactance decreased with increased flow.

  4. Beam shaping in flow cytometry with diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Weidong; Li, Derong; Jian, Peng

    2016-10-01

    Focusing elements are usually employed in the flow cytometry to focus the input laser beam into elliptically shaped Gaussian beam in order to increase power for excitation of fluorescence for high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). While in order to ensure repeatable and reliable signal generation for accurate population discrimination - despite slight deviations of the cell from the flow centre, the shaped beam should be a cubic diffraction region with uniform power intensity across the cell flow stream. However, it is hard for beam shaping with refractive optical elements. In this paper, we present a beam shaping system in flow cytometry with diffractive optical elements (DOEs) to shape the input laser beam to a cubic diffraction region with uniform power intensity. The phase distribution of the DOE is obtained by using the inverse Fresnel diffraction based layered holographic stereogram, and the cubic diffraction region with uniform power intensity within the cell flow channel is well reconstructed. Simulation results demonstrate the good performance of the new beam shaping system.

  5. Finite elements and finite differences for transonic flow calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafez, M. M.; Murman, E. M.; Wellford, L. C.

    1978-01-01

    The paper reviews the chief finite difference and finite element techniques used for numerical solution of nonlinear mixed elliptic-hyperbolic equations governing transonic flow. The forms of the governing equations for unsteady two-dimensional transonic flow considered are the Euler equation, the full potential equation in both conservative and nonconservative form, the transonic small-disturbance equation in both conservative and nonconservative form, and the hodograph equations for the small-disturbance case and the full-potential case. Finite difference methods considered include time-dependent methods, relaxation methods, semidirect methods, and hybrid methods. Finite element methods include finite element Lax-Wendroff schemes, implicit Galerkin method, mixed variational principles, dual iterative procedures, optimal control methods and least squares.

  6. Electronic coupling matrix elements from charge constrained density functional theory calculations using a plane wave basis set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberhofer, Harald; Blumberger, Jochen

    2010-12-01

    We present a plane wave basis set implementation for the calculation of electronic coupling matrix elements of electron transfer reactions within the framework of constrained density functional theory (CDFT). Following the work of Wu and Van Voorhis [J. Chem. Phys. 125, 164105 (2006)], the diabatic wavefunctions are approximated by the Kohn-Sham determinants obtained from CDFT calculations, and the coupling matrix element calculated by an efficient integration scheme. Our results for intermolecular electron transfer in small systems agree very well with high-level ab initio calculations based on generalized Mulliken-Hush theory, and with previous local basis set CDFT calculations. The effect of thermal fluctuations on the coupling matrix element is demonstrated for intramolecular electron transfer in the tetrathiafulvalene-diquinone (Q-TTF-Q-) anion. Sampling the electronic coupling along density functional based molecular dynamics trajectories, we find that thermal fluctuations, in particular the slow bending motion of the molecule, can lead to changes in the instantaneous electron transfer rate by more than an order of magnitude. The thermal average, ( {< {| {H_ab } |^2 } > } )^{1/2} = 6.7 {mH}, is significantly higher than the value obtained for the minimum energy structure, | {H_ab } | = 3.8 {mH}. While CDFT in combination with generalized gradient approximation (GGA) functionals describes the intermolecular electron transfer in the studied systems well, exact exchange is required for Q-TTF-Q- in order to obtain coupling matrix elements in agreement with experiment (3.9 mH). The implementation presented opens up the possibility to compute electronic coupling matrix elements for extended systems where donor, acceptor, and the environment are treated at the quantum mechanical (QM) level.

  7. Highly Constrained Intergenic Drosophila Ultraconserved Elements Are Candidate ncRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Kern, Andrew D.; Barbash, Daniel A.; Chang Mell, Joshua; Hupalo, Daniel; Jensen, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotes contain short (∼80–200 bp) regions that have few or no substitutions among species that represent hundreds of millions of years of evolutionary divergence. These ultraconserved elements (UCEs) are candidates for containing essential functions, but their biological roles remain largely unknown. Here, we report the discovery and characterization of UCEs from 12 sequenced Drosophila species. We identified 98 elements ≥80 bp long with very high conservation across the Drosophila phylogeny. Population genetic analyses reveal that these UCEs are not present in mutational cold spots. Instead we infer that they experience a level of selective constraint almost 10-fold higher compared with missense mutations in protein-coding sequences, which is substantially higher than that observed previously for human UCEs. About one-half of these Drosophila UCEs overlap the transcribed portion of genes, with many of those that are within coding sequences likely to correspond to sites of ADAR-dependent RNA editing. For the remaining UCEs that are in nongenic regions, we find that many are potentially capable of forming RNA secondary structures. Among ten chosen for further analysis, we discovered that the majority are transcribed in multiple tissues of Drosophila melanogaster. We conclude that Drosophila species are rich with UCEs and that many of them may correspond to novel noncoding RNAs. PMID:25618141

  8. Investigating Alpine fissure rutilated quartz to constrain timing and conditions of post-metamorphic hydrothermal fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulaker, D. Z.; Schmitt, A. K.; Zack, T.; Bindeman, I. N.

    2013-12-01

    Rutilated quartz, aka Venus' hair, is finely-acicular rutile intergrown with host quartz generated by fluid-mediated co-crystallization. It is commonly found in hydrothermal veins, including the renown cleft mineral locations of the Swiss Alps. Previous studies of Alpine cleft mineralizations used rare hydrothermal monazite [1] and titanite [2] to constrain vein formation to ~13.5-15.2 Ma, postdating peak metamorphism by ~2-4 Ma. Temperature (T) estimates of 150-450°C are based on fluid inclusions and bulk quartz-mineral oxygen isotope exchange equilibria, and formation pressures (P) are 0.5-2.5 kbar (for a geothermal gradient of 30°C/km) [2]. The potential of rutilated quartz as a thermochronometer, however, has not been harnessed previously. Here, we present the first results of age and P-T determinations for rutilated quartz from six locations in the Swiss Alps (San Gottardo; Feldbach, Binntal; Pi Aul, Vals; Faido, Leventina; Elm, Steinbach; Binntal). Samples were cut and mounted in epoxy discs to expose rutile (0.03 to 1 mm in diameter) and its host quartz which was also imaged in cathodoluminescence (CL). CL images for half of the samples' host quartz exhibited strong sector zoning, while others reveal only weak CL zonation. Isotopic and trace element analyses were carried out by SIMS using a CAMECA ims1270 for U-Pb, O-isotopes, and Ti-in-quartz, and a LA-ICP-MS system (213 nm New Wave laser coupled to an Agilent 7500a) for Zr-in-rutile. U-Pb rutile ages average 15.5×2.0 Ma (2σ). T estimates are 352-575°C (rutile-quartz oxygen isotopes in touching domains), 470-530°C (Zr-in-rutile assuming P = 0.5 and equilibrium with host-rock zircon), and 251-391°C (Ti-in-quartz at assumed P = 0.5 kbar and aTiO2 = 1). CL zones are isotopically unzoned. Rutile-quartz oxygen isotopes are pressure insensitive, whereas Zr-in-rutile and Ti-in-quartz are minimum temperatures. These results demonstrate that rutilated quartz can constrain timing and conditions of post

  9. Multi-Objective Differential Evolution for Voltage Security Constrained Optimal Power Flow in Deregulated Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roselyn, J. Preetha; Devaraj, D.; Dash, Subhransu Sekhar

    2013-11-01

    Voltage stability is an important issue in the planning and operation of deregulated power systems. The voltage stability problems is a most challenging one for the system operators in deregulated power systems because of the intense use of transmission line capabilities and poor regulation in market environment. This article addresses the congestion management problem avoiding offline transmission capacity limits related to voltage stability by considering Voltage Security Constrained Optimal Power Flow (VSCOPF) problem in deregulated environment. This article presents the application of Multi Objective Differential Evolution (MODE) algorithm to solve the VSCOPF problem in new competitive power systems. The maximum of L-index of the load buses is taken as the indicator of voltage stability and is incorporated in the Optimal Power Flow (OPF) problem. The proposed method in hybrid power market which also gives solutions to voltage stability problems by considering the generation rescheduling cost and load shedding cost which relieves the congestion problem in deregulated environment. The buses for load shedding are selected based on the minimum eigen value of Jacobian with respect to the load shed. In the proposed approach, real power settings of generators in base case and contingency cases, generator bus voltage magnitudes, real and reactive power demands of selected load buses using sensitivity analysis are taken as the control variables and are represented as the combination of floating point numbers and integers. DE/randSF/1/bin strategy scheme of differential evolution with self-tuned parameter which employs binomial crossover and difference vector based mutation is used for the VSCOPF problem. A fuzzy based mechanism is employed to get the best compromise solution from the pareto front to aid the decision maker. The proposed VSCOPF planning model is implemented on IEEE 30-bus system, IEEE 57 bus practical system and IEEE 118 bus system. The pareto optimal

  10. A finite element formulation for supersonic flows around complex configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morino, L.

    1974-01-01

    The problem of small perturbation potential supersonic flow around complex configurations is considered. This problem requires the solution of an integral equation relating the values of the potential on the surface of the body to the values of the normal derivative, which is known from the small perturbation boundary conditions. The surface of the body is divided into small (hyperboloidal quadrilateral) surface elements which are described in terms of the Cartesian components of the four corner points. The values of the potential (and its normal derivative) within each element are assumed to be constant and equal to its value at the centroid of the element. This yields a set of linear algebraic equations whose coefficients are given by source and doublet integrals over the surface elements. Closed form evaluations of the integrals are presented.

  11. Finite element methods of studying mechanical factors in blood flow.

    PubMed

    Davids, N

    1981-01-01

    This paper reviews some biomechanical analyses of blood flow in large arteries based on a general computer modeling using the finite element method. We study the following question: What is the role played by the interrelated factors of mechanical stress, flow irregularities, and diffusion through the endothelium on the etiology of atherosclerosis or the aggravation of vascular injury. It presents the computational features of the method and stresses the physiological significance of the results, such as the effect of geometric complexities, material nonlinearities, and non-Newtonian rheology of the blood. The specific mechanical and fluid dynamic factors analyzed are wall shear stress, flow profiles, and pressure variations. After simulating tubes of circular cross section, we apply the analysis to a number of physiological situations of significance, including blood flow in the entrance region, at bifurcations, in the annular region between an inserted catheter of varying diameter and the vessel. A model study of pulsatile flow in a 60 degree bifurcated channel of velocity profiles provided corroborative measurements of these processes with special emphasis on reversed or distributed flow conditions. The corresponding analysis was extended to the situation in which flow separates and reverses in the neighborhood of stagnation points. This required developing the nonlinear expression for the convective velocity change in the medium. A computer algorithm was developed to handle simultaneous effects of pressure and viscous forces on velocity change across the element and applied to the canine prebranch arterial segment. For mean physiological flow conditions, low shear stresses (0-10 dynes/cm2) are predicted near the wall in the diverging plane, higher values (50 dynes/cm2) along the converging sides of the wall. Backflow is predicted along the outer wall, pressure recovery prior to and into the branches, and a peak shear at the divider lip.

  12. Invariant TAD Boundaries Constrain Cell-Type-Specific Looping Interactions between Promoters and Distal Elements around the CFTR Locus

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Emily M.; Lajoie, Bryan R.; Jain, Gaurav; Dekker, Job

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional genome structure plays an important role in gene regulation. Globally, chromosomes are organized into active and inactive compartments while, at the gene level, looping interactions connect promoters to regulatory elements. Topologically associating domains (TADs), typically several hundred kilobases in size, form an intermediate level of organization. Major questions include how TADs are formed and how they are related to looping interactions between genes and regulatory elements. Here we performed a focused 5C analysis of a 2.8 Mb chromosome 7 region surrounding CFTR in a panel of cell types. We find that the same TAD boundaries are present in all cell types, indicating that TADs represent a universal chromosome architecture. Furthermore, we find that these TAD boundaries are present irrespective of the expression and looping of genes located between them. In contrast, looping interactions between promoters and regulatory elements are cell-type specific and occur mostly within TADs. This is exemplified by the CFTR promoter that in different cell types interacts with distinct sets of distal cell-type-specific regulatory elements that are all located within the same TAD. Finally, we find that long-range associations between loci located in different TADs are also detected, but these display much lower interaction frequencies than looping interactions within TADs. Interestingly, interactions between TADs are also highly cell-type-specific and often involve loci clustered around TAD boundaries. These data point to key roles of invariant TAD boundaries in constraining as well as mediating cell-type-specific long-range interactions and gene regulation. PMID:26748519

  13. A boundary element method for steady incompressible thermoviscous flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dargush, G. F.; Banerjee, P. K.

    1991-01-01

    A boundary element formulation is presented for moderate Reynolds number, steady, incompressible, thermoviscous flows. The governing integral equations are written exclusively in terms of velocities and temperatures, thus eliminating the need for the computation of any gradients. Furthermore, with the introduction of reference velocities and temperatures, volume modeling can often be confined to only a small portion of the problem domain, typically near obstacles or walls. The numerical implementation includes higher order elements, adaptive integration and multiregion capability. Both the integral formulation and implementation are discussed in detail. Several examples illustrate the high level of accuracy that is obtainable with the current method.

  14. Cell-cooling in flow cytometry by Peltier elements.

    PubMed

    Göttlinger, C; Meyer, K L; Weichel, W; Müller, W; Raftery, B; Radbruch, A

    1986-05-01

    We have built a cooling device for cell suspensions in flow cytometry that makes use of the Peltier effect (Barnard RD, Thermo electricity in Metals and Alloys, Taylor and Francis, London; Siemens-Z 34:383-88, 1963). The prototype described here is used for cooling collection tubes during long-duration cell sorting and is capable of maintaining a temperature of 2-5 degrees C in a cell suspension of up to 3 ml. In general, Peltier element-based cooling is useful for equilibrating the temperature of small volumes of fluids. Furthermore, Peltier element-based cooling devices are easy to build and handle.

  15. Using rare earth elements to constrain particulate organic carbon flux in the East China Sea.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chin-Chang; Chen, Ya-Feng; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Wang, Kui; Chen, Jian Feng; Burdige, David J

    2016-09-27

    Fluxes of particulate organic carbon (POC) in the East China Sea (ECS) have been reported to decrease from the inner continental shelf towards the outer continental shelf. Recent research has shown that POC fluxes in the ECS may be overestimated due to active sediment resuspension. To better characterize the effect of sediment resuspension on particle fluxes in the ECS, rare earth elements (REEs) and organic carbon (OC) were used in separate two-member mixing models to evaluate trap-collected POC fluxes. The ratio of resuspended particles from sediments to total trap-collected particles in the ECS ranged from 82-94% using the OC mixing model, and 30-80% using the REEs mixing model, respectively. These results suggest that REEs may be better proxies for sediment resuspension than OC in high turbidity marginal seas because REEs do not appear to undergo degradation during particle sinking as compared to organic carbon. Our results suggest that REEs can be used as tracers to provide quantitative estimates of POC fluxes in marginal seas.

  16. Using rare earth elements to constrain particulate organic carbon flux in the East China Sea

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chin-Chang; Chen, Ya-Feng; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Wang, Kui; Chen, Jian Feng; Burdige, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Fluxes of particulate organic carbon (POC) in the East China Sea (ECS) have been reported to decrease from the inner continental shelf towards the outer continental shelf. Recent research has shown that POC fluxes in the ECS may be overestimated due to active sediment resuspension. To better characterize the effect of sediment resuspension on particle fluxes in the ECS, rare earth elements (REEs) and organic carbon (OC) were used in separate two-member mixing models to evaluate trap-collected POC fluxes. The ratio of resuspended particles from sediments to total trap-collected particles in the ECS ranged from 82–94% using the OC mixing model, and 30–80% using the REEs mixing model, respectively. These results suggest that REEs may be better proxies for sediment resuspension than OC in high turbidity marginal seas because REEs do not appear to undergo degradation during particle sinking as compared to organic carbon. Our results suggest that REEs can be used as tracers to provide quantitative estimates of POC fluxes in marginal seas. PMID:27670426

  17. Analysis of anelastic flow and numerical treatment via finite elements

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, M.J.

    1994-05-01

    In this report, we reconsider the various approximations made to the full equations of motion and energy transport for treating low-speed flows with significant temperature induced property variations. This entails assessment of the development of so-called anelastic for low-Mach number flows outside the range of validity of the Boussinesq equations. An integral part of this assessment is the development of a finite element-based numerical scheme for obtaining approximate numerical solutions to this class of problems. Several formulations were attempted and are compared.

  18. Flow formed by spanwise gaps between roughness elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, E.; Lin, S. H.; Islam, O.

    1985-01-01

    Measurements of the three mean velocity components and the three Reynolds shear stresses were made in the region downstream of gaps between wall-mounted roughness elements of square cross section and high aspect ratio in a thick turbulent boundary layer. The effect of small and large gaps was studied in a wind tunnel at a Reynolds number of 3600, based on obstacle height and free-stream velocity. The small gap produces retardation of the gap flow as with a two-dimensional roughness element, but a definite interaction between gap and wake flows is observed. The interaction is more intense for the large gap than for the small. Both gaps generate a secondary crossflow which moves fluid away from the centerline in the wall region and toward the centerline in the outer (y greater than 1.5H) region.

  19. Mixed Element Type Unstructured Grid Generation for Viscous Flow Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcum, David L.; Gaither, J. Adam

    2000-01-01

    A procedure is presented for efficient generation of high-quality unstructured grids suitable for CFD simulation of high Reynolds number viscous flow fields. Layers of anisotropic elements are generated by advancing along prescribed normals from solid boundaries. The points are generated such that either pentahedral or tetrahedral elements with an implied connectivity can be be directly recovered. As points are generated they are temporarily attached to a volume triangulation of the boundary points. This triangulation allows efficient local search algorithms to be used when checking merging layers, The existing advancing-front/local-reconnection procedure is used to generate isotropic elements outside of the anisotropic region. Results are presented for a variety of applications. The results demonstrate that high-quality anisotropic unstructured grids can be efficiently and consistently generated for complex configurations.

  20. Finite Element Formulation and Active Vibration Control Study on Beams Using Smart Constrained Layer Damping (scld) Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BALAMURUGAN, V.; NARAYANAN, S.

    2002-01-01

    This work deals with the active vibration control of beams with smart constrained layer damping (SCLD) treatment. SCLD design consists of viscoelastic shear layer sandwiched between two layers of piezoelectric sensors and actuator. This composite SCLD when bonded to a vibrating structure acts as a smart treatment. The sensor piezoelectric layer measures the vibration response of the structure and a feedback controller is provided which regulates the axial deformation of the piezoelectric actuator (constraining layer), thereby providing adjustable and significant damping in the structure. The damping offered by SCLD treatment has two components, active action and passive action. The active action is transmitted from the piezoelectric actuator to the host structure through the viscoelastic layer. The passive action is through the shear deformation in the viscoelastic layer. The active action apart from providing direct active control also adjusts the passive action by regulating the shear deformation in the structure. The passive damping component of this design eliminates spillover, reduces power consumption, improves robustness and reliability of the system, and reduces vibration response at high-frequency ranges where active damping is difficult to implement. A beam finite element model has been developed based on Timoshenko's beam theory with partially covered SCLD. The Golla-Hughes-McTavish (GHM) method has been used to model the viscoelastic layer. The dissipation co-ordinates, defined using GHM approach, describe the frequency-dependent viscoelastic material properties. Models of PCLD and purely active systems could be obtained as a special case of SCLD. Using linear quadratic regulator (LQR) optimal control, the effects of the SCLD on vibration suppression performance and control effort requirements are investigated. The effects of the viscoelastic layer thickness and material properties on the vibration control performance are investigated.

  1. Finite-Element Analysis of Multiphase Immiscible Flow Through Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuppusamy, T.; Sheng, J.; Parker, J. C.; Lenhard, R. J.

    1987-04-01

    A finite-element model is developed for multiphase flow through soil involving three immiscible fluids: namely, air, water, and a nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL). A variational method is employed for the finite-element formulation corresponding to the coupled differential equations governing flow in a three-fluid phase porous medium system with constant air phase pressure. Constitutive relationships for fluid conductivities and saturations as functions of fluid pressures, which are derived in a companion paper by J. C. Parker et al. (this issue) and which may be calibrated from two-phase laboratory measurements, are employed in the finite-element program. The solution procedure uses backward time integration with iteration by a modified Picard method to handle the nonlinear properties. Laboratory experiments involving water displacement from soil columns by p cymene (a benzene-derivative hydrocarbon) under constant pressure were simulated by the finite-element program to validate the numerical model and formulation for constitutive properties. Transient water outflow predicted using independently measured saturation-capillary head data agreed with observed outflow data within the limits of precision of the predictions as estimated by a first-order Taylor series approximation considering parameter uncertainty due to experimental reproducability and constitutive model accuracy. Two-dimensional simulations are presented for a hypothetical field case involving introduction of NAPL near the soil surface due to leakage from an underground storage tank. Subsequent transport of NAPL in the variably saturated vadose and groundwater zones is analyzed.

  2. A dual reciprocal boundary element formulation for viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lafe, Olu

    1993-01-01

    The advantages inherent in the boundary element method (BEM) for potential flows are exploited to solve viscous flow problems. The trick is the introduction of a so-called dual reciprocal technique in which the convective terms are represented by a global function whose unknown coefficients are determined by collocation. The approach, which is necessarily iterative, converts the governing partial differential equations into integral equations via the distribution of fictitious sources or dipoles of unknown strength on the boundary. These integral equations consist of two parts. The first is a boundary integral term, whose kernel is the unknown strength of the fictitious sources and the fundamental solution of a convection-free flow problem. The second part is a domain integral term whose kernel is the convective portion of the governing PDEs. The domain integration can be transformed to the boundary by using the dual reciprocal (DR) concept. The resulting formulation is a pure boundary integral computational process.

  3. A Finite element model of tactile flow for softness perception.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, Edoardo; Bianchi, Matteo; D'Angelo, Maria Laura; D'Imperio, Mariapaola; Cannella, Ferdinando; Scilingo, Enzo P; Bicchi, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Touch is an extremely dynamic sense. To take into account this aspect, it has been hypothesized that there are mechanisms in the brain that specialize in processing dynamic tactile stimuli, in a way not too dissimilar from what happens for optical flow in dynamic vision. The concept of tactile flow, related to the rate of expansion of isostrain volumes in the human fingerpad, was used to explain some perceptual illusions as well as mechanisms of human softness perception. In this paper we describe a computational model of tactile flow, and apply it to a finite element model of interaction between deformable bodies. The shape and material properties of the bodies are modeled from those of a human fingertip interacting with specimens with different softness properties. Results show that the rate of expansion of isostrain volumes can be used to discriminate different materials in terms of their softness characteristics.

  4. Using noble gas tracers to constrain a groundwater flow model with recharge elevations: A novel approach for mountainous terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Jessica M.; Gleeson, Tom; Manning, Andrew H.; Mayer, K. Ulrich

    2015-10-01

    Environmental tracers provide information on groundwater age, recharge conditions, and flow processes which can be helpful for evaluating groundwater sustainability and vulnerability. Dissolved noble gas data have proven particularly useful in mountainous terrain because they can be used to determine recharge elevation. However, tracer-derived recharge elevations have not been utilized as calibration targets for numerical groundwater flow models. Herein, we constrain and calibrate a regional groundwater flow model with noble-gas-derived recharge elevations for the first time. Tritium and noble gas tracer results improved the site conceptual model by identifying a previously uncertain contribution of mountain block recharge from the Coast Mountains to an alluvial coastal aquifer in humid southwestern British Columbia. The revised conceptual model was integrated into a three-dimensional numerical groundwater flow model and calibrated to hydraulic head data in addition to recharge elevations estimated from noble gas recharge temperatures. Recharge elevations proved to be imperative for constraining hydraulic conductivity, recharge location, and bedrock geometry, and thus minimizing model nonuniqueness. Results indicate that 45% of recharge to the aquifer is mountain block recharge. A similar match between measured and modeled heads was achieved in a second numerical model that excludes the mountain block (no mountain block recharge), demonstrating that hydraulic head data alone are incapable of quantifying mountain block recharge. This result has significant implications for understanding and managing source water protection in recharge areas, potential effects of climate change, the overall water budget, and ultimately ensuring groundwater sustainability.

  5. Using noble gas tracers to constrain a groundwater flow model with recharge elevations: A novel approach for mountainous terrain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doyle, Jessica M.; Gleeson, Tom; Manning, Andrew H.; Mayer, K. Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Environmental tracers provide information on groundwater age, recharge conditions, and flow processes which can be helpful for evaluating groundwater sustainability and vulnerability. Dissolved noble gas data have proven particularly useful in mountainous terrain because they can be used to determine recharge elevation. However, tracer-derived recharge elevations have not been utilized as calibration targets for numerical groundwater flow models. Herein, we constrain and calibrate a regional groundwater flow model with noble-gas-derived recharge elevations for the first time. Tritium and noble gas tracer results improved the site conceptual model by identifying a previously uncertain contribution of mountain block recharge from the Coast Mountains to an alluvial coastal aquifer in humid southwestern British Columbia. The revised conceptual model was integrated into a three-dimensional numerical groundwater flow model and calibrated to hydraulic head data in addition to recharge elevations estimated from noble gas recharge temperatures. Recharge elevations proved to be imperative for constraining hydraulic conductivity, recharge location, and bedrock geometry, and thus minimizing model nonuniqueness. Results indicate that 45% of recharge to the aquifer is mountain block recharge. A similar match between measured and modeled heads was achieved in a second numerical model that excludes the mountain block (no mountain block recharge), demonstrating that hydraulic head data alone are incapable of quantifying mountain block recharge. This result has significant implications for understanding and managing source water protection in recharge areas, potential effects of climate change, the overall water budget, and ultimately ensuring groundwater sustainability.

  6. Finite element simulation of flow in twin screw extruder mixing elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo (Sananes), Victor

    1998-12-01

    In the plastics industry, twin screw extruders are widely used for melting, dispersing and homogenizing polymers. There are a diversity of designs employed throughout the polymer industry, each one having different operating principles and applications. Among the different arrangements of twin screw systems, the intermeshing co-rotating configuration has been found to be one of the most efficient mixers and it is one of the most commonly used pieces of equipment among the continuous mixers due to its self wiping properties. The problem of mixing of polymers involves aspects of fluid dynamics and rheology. Mixing is usually obtained through a combination of mechanical motion of the mixing device and the resulting deformation induced in the flowing material. The quantitative description of the flow patterns is now feasible even in the most complicated geometries through the development of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools and the continuous increase in computer resources at lower costs. Intermeshing co-rotating twin screw extruders (ICRTSE) are usually built in a modular fashion to meet the diversity of tasks performed by this type of machine. There are two main types of elements: full flight conveying elements and kneading block mixing elements. The kneading blocks have been the focus of attention for the theoretical analysis of flow due to their significant contribution to the mixing performance of the extruder and the fact that kneading blocks normally work under a fully filled channel condition, which is one of the fundamental assumptions in CFD simulations. The objective of this thesis is to understand the flow mechanisms in the kneading disc section of co-rotating twin screw extruders. This is done by means of the 3D numerical simulation of the flow process within the complex geometry involving intricate passages and continuously moving surfaces. A quasi-steady state finite element model was developed assuming isothermal, non-Newtonian flow. The

  7. Finite element simulation of flow in twin screw extruder mixing elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo, Victor Sananes

    In the plastics industry, twin screw extruders are widely used for melting, dispersing and homogenizing polymers. There are a diversity of designs employed throughout the polymer industry, each one having different operating principles and applications. Among the different arrangements of twin screw systems, the intermeshing co- rotating configuration has been found to be one of the most efficient mixers and it is one of the most commonly used pieces of equipment among the continuous mixers due to its self wiping properties. The problem of mixing of polymers involves aspects of fluid dynamics and rheology. Mixing is usually obtained through a combination of mechanical motion of the mixing device and the resulting deformation induced in the flowing material. The quantitative description of the flow patterns is now feasible even in the most complicated geometries through the development of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools and the continuous increase in computer resources at lower costs. Intermeshing co-rotating twin screw extruders (ICRTSE) are usually built in a modular fashion to meet the diversity of tasks performed by this type of machine. There are two main types of elements: full flight conveying elements and kneading block mixing elements. The kneading blocks have been the focus of attention for the theoretical analysis of flow due to their significant contribution to the mixing performance of the extruder and the fact that kneading blocks normally work under a fully filled channel condition, which is one of the fundamental assumptions in CFD simulations. The objective of this thesis is to understand the flow mechanisms in the kneading disc section of co-rotating twin screw extruders. This is done by means of the 3D numerical simulation of the flow process within the complex geometry involving intricate passages and continuously moving surfaces. A quasi-steady state finite element model was developed assuming isothermal, non- Newtonian flow. The

  8. Finite element simulation of glottal flow and pressure.

    PubMed

    Guo, C G; Scherer, R C

    1993-08-01

    Computational studies of laryngeal aerodynamics should help clarify the relationships among configuration, air flow, surface pressure, and vocal fold movement within the larynx, and the acoustic consequences of the output glottal air flow. The penalty finite element method [S. W. Kim, Comput. Fluids 16(4), 429-444 (1988a); NASA CR-179357 (1988b); S. W. Kim and R. A. Decker, Int. J. Num. Meth. Fluids 9, 43-57 (1989)] was adopted to simulate steady air flow and air pressure through the larynx. A total of 133 conditions of different glottal configurations and inflow rates were studied. The computational results were compared to empirical data from earlier experiments. Two cases are reported (1) constant glottal divergence (42 degrees) but variable diameter and (2) constant glottal diameter (0.04 cm) but variable glottal angle. For case (1), the average discrepancy for translaryngeal pressure drop between the computational results and empirical data was 6.8% for pressures between 3 and 15 cm H2O. Flow separation occurred just downstream of the minimal glottal diameter. For case (2), the computational results for translaryngeal pressure drop differed from the empirically derived Scherer-Guo (S-G) equation predictions by an average of 8.9% for pressure between 3 and 13 cm H2O. Pressure recovery in the glottis suggested that the optimal glottal diffuser angle was near 10 degrees. Results suggest that the computational method should be sufficient to study glottal aerodynamics (assuming quasisteady flow).

  9. Massively parallel finite element computation of three dimensional flow problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tezduyar, T.; Aliabadi, S.; Behr, M.; Johnson, A.; Mittal, S.

    1992-12-01

    The parallel finite element computation of three-dimensional compressible, and incompressible flows, with emphasis on the space-time formulations, mesh moving schemes and implementations on the Connection Machines CM-200 and CM-5 are presented. For computation of unsteady compressible and incompressible flows involving moving boundaries and interfaces, the Deformable-Spatial-Domain/Stabilized-Space-Time (DSD/SST) formulation that previously developed are employed. In this approach, the stabilized finite element formulations of the governing equations are written over the space-time domain of the problem; therefore, the deformation of the spatial domain with respect to time is taken into account automatically. This approach gives the capability to solve a large class of problems involving free surfaces, moving interfaces, and fluid-structure and fluid-particle interactions. By using special mesh moving schemes, the frequency of remeshing is minimized to reduce the projection errors involved in remeshing and also to increase the parallelization ease of the computations. The implicit equation systems arising from the finite element discretizations are solved iteratively by using the GMRES update technique with the diagonal and nodal-block-diagonal preconditioners. These formulations have all been implemented on the CM-200 and CM-5, and have been applied to several large-scale problems. The three-dimensional problems in this report were all computed on the CM-200 and CM-5.

  10. FEWA: a Finite Element model of Water flow through Aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, G.T.; Huff, D.D.

    1983-11-01

    This report documents the implementation and demonstration of a Finite Element model of Water flow through Aquifers (FEWA). The particular features of FEWA are its versatility and flexibility to deal with as many real-world problems as possible. Point as well as distributed sources/sinks are included to represent recharges/pumpings and rainfall infiltrations. All sources/sinks can be transient or steady state. Prescribed hydraulic head on the Dirichlet boundaries and fluxes on Neumann or Cauchy boundaries can be time-dependent or constant. Source/sink strength over each element and node, hydraulic head at each Dirichlet boundary node, and flux at each boundary segment can vary independently of each other. Either completely confined or completely unconfined aquifers, or partially confined and partially unconfined aquifers can be dealt with effectively. Discretization of a compound region with very irregular curved boundaries is made easy by including both quadrilateral and triangular elements in the formulation. Large-field problems can be solved efficiently by including a pointwise iterative solution strategy as an optional alternative to the direct elimination solution method for the matrix equation approximating the partial differential equation of groundwater flow. FEWA also includes transient flow through confining leaky aquifers lying above and/or below the aquifer of interest. The model is verified against three simple cases to which analytical solutions are available. It is then demonstrated by two examples of how the model can be applied to heterogeneous and anisotropic aquifers with transient boundary conditions, time-dependent sources/sinks, and confining aquitards for a confined aquifer of variable thickness and for a free surface problem in an unconfined aquifer, respectively. 20 references, 25 figures, 8 tables.

  11. Shallow thermal structure constrained by seafloor temperature and heat flow estimated from BSRs in the Nankai subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohde, A.; Otsuka, H.; Kioka, A.; Ashi, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Nankai Trough is a plate convergent boundary where earthquakes with a magnitude of 8 take place repeatedly. Thermal structure in subduction zones affects pore pressure and diagenesis such as consolidation, dewatering and cementation, and constrains physical properties of a fault-slip plane. In the Nankai subduction zone, existence of methane hydrate is confirmed from acoustic reflectors called the Bottom Simulating Reflectors (BSRs) which parallel the seafloor on seismic reflection images with high-amplitude and reverse-polarity waveforms. As a depth of BSR is theoretically constrained by subseafloor profiles of temperature and pressure, the BSR depths effectively produce subseafloor geothermal information over a wide area without heat flow probe penetration or in-situ borehole temperature measurement that is fragmentary. In this study, we aim at calculating precise two-dimensional shallow thermal structure. First, we investigate detailed distribution of the BSRs in the Nankai area ranging from offshore Tokai to Hyuga using two-dimensional multi-channel seismic reflection data. The BSR depths are then forwarded to estimate heat flow values. Second, we use a simple two-dimensional thermal modeling of Blackwell et al. [1980] that takes into account topographical effects of the seafloor roughness. We also employ additional boundary conditions constrained by seafloor temperature and the heat flow estimated from BSR depths. In order to confirm reliability of the modeled thermal structure, we additionally estimate the base of gas hydrate stability zone which is proved to almost equal to observational BSR depths. We find in the modeled thermal structure that the convex portions that are subject to cooling by cold bottom water, while depressions are less subject to the cooling from observational BSRs and theoretical calculation. The thermal structure gained here provides essential data for seismic simulations in subduction zones and for laboratory experiments as

  12. Convective Enhancement of Icing Roughness Elements in Stagnation Region Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Michael T.; McClain, Stephen T.; Vargas, Mario; Broeren, Andy

    2015-01-01

    To improve existing ice accretion simulation codes, more data regarding ice roughness and its effects on convective heat transfer are required. To build on existing research on this topic, this study used the Vertical Icing Studies Tunnel (VIST) at NASA Glenn Research to model realistic ice roughness in the stagnation region of a NACA 0012 airfoil. Using the VIST, a test plate representing the leading 2% chord of the airfoil was subjected to flows of 7.62 m/s (25 ft/s), 12.19 m/s (40 ft/s), and 16.76 m/s (55 ft/s). The test plate was fitted with 3 surfaces, each with a different representation of ice roughness: 1) a control surface with no ice roughness, 2) a surface with ice roughness with element height scaled by 10x and streamwise rough zone width from the stagnation point scaled by 10x, and 3) a surface with ice roughness with element height scaled by 10x and streamwise rough zone width from the stagnation point scaled by 25x. Temperature data from the tests were recorded using an infrared camera and thermocouples imbedded in the test plate. From the temperature data, a convective heat transfer coefficient map was created for each case. Additional testing was also performed to validate the VIST's flow quality. These tests included five-hole probe and hot-wire probe velocity traces to provide flow visualization and to study boundary layer formation on the various test surfaces. The knowledge gained during the experiments will help improve ice accretion codes by providing heat transfer coefficient validation data and by providing flow visualization data helping understand current and future experiments performed in the VIST.

  13. Adjoint-based constrained topology optimization for viscous flows, including heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontoleontos, E. A.; Papoutsis-Kiachagias, E. M.; Zymaris, A. S.; Papadimitriou, D. I.; Giannakoglou, K. C.

    2013-08-01

    In fluid mechanics, topology optimization is used for designing flow passages, connecting predefined inlets and outlets, with optimal performance based on selected criteria. In this article, the continuous adjoint approach to topology optimization in incompressible ducted flows with heat transfer is presented. A variable porosity field, to be determined during the optimization, is the means to define the optimal topology. The objective functions take into account viscous losses and the amount of heat transfer. Turbulent flows are handled using the Spalart-Allmaras model and the proposed adjoint is exact, i.e. the adjoint to the turbulence model equation is formulated and solved, too. This is an important novelty in this article which extends the porosity-based method to account for heat transfer flow problems in turbulent flows. In problems such as the design of manifolds, constraints on the outlet flow direction, rates and mean outlet temperatures are imposed.

  14. FLASH: A finite element computer code for variably saturated flow

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, R.G.; Magnuson, S.O.

    1992-05-01

    A numerical model was developed for use in performance assessment studies at the INEL. The numerical model, referred to as the FLASH computer code, is designed to simulate two-dimensional fluid flow in fractured-porous media. The code is specifically designed to model variably saturated flow in an arid site vadose zone and saturated flow in an unconfined aquifer. In addition, the code also has the capability to simulate heat conduction in the vadose zone. This report presents the following: description of the conceptual frame-work and mathematical theory; derivations of the finite element techniques and algorithms; computational examples that illustrate the capability of the code; and input instructions for the general use of the code. The FLASH computer code is aimed at providing environmental scientists at the INEL with a predictive tool for the subsurface water pathway. This numerical model is expected to be widely used in performance assessments for: (1) the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study process and (2) compliance studies required by the US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A.

  15. Boundary Element Microhydrodynamics: Stagnation of flow in protein cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragon, Sergio; Hahn, David

    2007-03-01

    A very precise boundary element solution of the exact Stokes flow surface integral equation has been implemented in our Fortan 90 program BEST. In our previous work (Aragon & Hahn, Biophys. J. 2006, 91: 1591-1603; J. Chem. Theory and Comput. 2006, 2: 1416-1428) we obtained very precise values of the tensorial transport properties (translation, rotation, and intrinsic viscosity) for a large set of proteins with a uniform water hydration thickness of 0.11 nm. In this work, we utilize the surface stress distribution thus obtained to evaluate the flow field as a function of distance away from the hydrodynamic surface for a variety of surface features in a dimpled sphere (test case) and for the proteins myoglobin, lysozyme, and human serum albumin. We demonstrate that solvent in small to large pockets on the hydrodynamic surface moves with the protein with distances up to 2 nm for deep pockets regardless of the direction of motion of the protein. On the other hand, the fluid flow pattern on protruding portions of the hydrodynamic surface decays much more rapidly with distance from the surface. The implications of these results with respect to the amount of water of associated with the surface and the rate of transport to active enzymatic sites in stirred solutions is discussed.

  16. Constrained optimisation in granular network flows: Games with a loaded dice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Qun; Tordesillas, Antoinette

    2013-06-01

    Flows in real world networks are rarely the outcome of unconditional random allocations as, say, the roll of a dice. Think, for example, of force transmission through a contact network in a quasistatically deforming granular material. Forces `flow' through this network in a highly conditional manner. How much force is transmitted between two contacting particles is always conditional not only on all the other forces acting between the particles in question but also on those acting on the other particles in the system. Broadly, we are interested in the nature and extent to which flows through a contact network favour certain pathways over others, and how the mechanisms that govern such biased flows for a given imposed loading history determine the future evolution of the contact network. Our first step is to solve a selection of fundamental combinatorial optimisation problems on the contact network from the perspective of force transmission. Here we report on solutions to the Maximum Flow Minimum Cost Problem for a weighted contact network where the weights assigned to the links of the contact network are varied according to their contact types. We found that those pathways through which the maximum flow of force is transmitted, in the direction of the maximum principal stress, at minimum cost - pass through the great majority of the force chains. Although the majority of the contacts in these pathways are elastic, the plastic contacts bear an undue influence on the minimum cost.

  17. An Approach to the Constrained Design of Natural Laminar Flow Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Bradford E.

    1997-01-01

    A design method has been developed by which an airfoil with a substantial amount of natural laminar flow can be designed, while maintaining other aerodynamic and geometric constraints. After obtaining the initial airfoil's pressure distribution at the design lift coefficient using an Euler solver coupled with an integral turbulent boundary layer method, the calculations from a laminar boundary layer solver are used by a stability analysis code to obtain estimates of the transition location (using N-Factors) for the starting airfoil. A new design method then calculates a target pressure distribution that will increase the laminar flow toward the desired amount. An airfoil design method is then iteratively used to design an airfoil that possesses that target pressure distribution. The new airfoil's boundary layer stability characteristics are determined, and this iterative process continues until an airfoil is designed that meets the laminar flow requirement and as many of the other constraints as possible.

  18. An approach to the constrained design of natural laminar flow airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Bradford Earl

    1995-01-01

    A design method has been developed by which an airfoil with a substantial amount of natural laminar flow can be designed, while maintaining other aerodynamic and geometric constraints. After obtaining the initial airfoil's pressure distribution at the design lift coefficient using an Euler solver coupled with an integml turbulent boundary layer method, the calculations from a laminar boundary layer solver are used by a stability analysis code to obtain estimates of the transition location (using N-Factors) for the starting airfoil. A new design method then calculates a target pressure distribution that will increase the larninar flow toward the desired amounl An airfoil design method is then iteratively used to design an airfoil that possesses that target pressure distribution. The new airfoil's boundary layer stability characteristics are determined, and this iterative process continues until an airfoil is designed that meets the laminar flow requirement and as many of the other constraints as possible.

  19. A Method for the Constrained Design of Natural Laminar Flow Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Bradford E.; Whitesides, John L.; Campbell, Richard L.; Mineck, Raymond E.

    1996-01-01

    A fully automated iterative design method has been developed by which an airfoil with a substantial amount of natural laminar flow can be designed, while maintaining other aerodynamic and geometric constraints. Drag reductions have been realized using the design method over a range of Mach numbers, Reynolds numbers and airfoil thicknesses. The thrusts of the method are its ability to calculate a target N-Factor distribution that forces the flow to undergo transition at the desired location; the target-pressure-N-Factor relationship that is used to reduce the N-Factors in order to prolong transition; and its ability to design airfoils to meet lift, pitching moment, thickness and leading-edge radius constraints while also being able to meet the natural laminar flow constraint. The method uses several existing CFD codes and can design a new airfoil in only a few days using a Silicon Graphics IRIS workstation.

  20. Adaptive entropy-constrained discontinuous Galerkin method for simulation of turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Yu; Ihme, Matthias

    2015-11-01

    A robust and adaptive computational framework will be presented for high-fidelity simulations of turbulent flows based on the discontinuous Galerkin (DG) scheme. For this, an entropy-residual based adaptation indicator is proposed to enable adaptation in polynomial and physical space. The performance and generality of this entropy-residual indicator is evaluated through direct comparisons with classical indicators. In addition, a dynamic load balancing procedure is developed to improve computational efficiency. The adaptive framework is tested by considering a series of turbulent test cases, which include homogeneous isotropic turbulence, channel flow and flow-over-a-cylinder. The accuracy, performance and scalability are assessed, and the benefit of this adaptive high-order method is discussed. The funding from NSF CAREER award is greatly acknowledged.

  1. A Finite Element Method for Simulation of Compressible Cavitating Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shams, Ehsan; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Yu; Sahni, Onkar; Shephard, Mark; Oberai, Assad

    2016-11-01

    This work focuses on a novel approach for finite element simulations of multi-phase flows which involve evolving interface with phase change. Modeling problems, such as cavitation, requires addressing multiple challenges, including compressibility of the vapor phase, interface physics caused by mass, momentum and energy fluxes. We have developed a mathematically consistent and robust computational approach to address these problems. We use stabilized finite element methods on unstructured meshes to solve for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation is used to handle the interface motions. Our method uses a mesh adaptation strategy to preserve the quality of the volumetric mesh, while the interface mesh moves along with the interface. The interface jump conditions are accurately represented using a discontinuous Galerkin method on the conservation laws. Condensation and evaporation rates at the interface are thermodynamically modeled to determine the interface velocity. We will present initial results on bubble cavitation the behavior of an attached cavitation zone in a separated boundary layer. We acknowledge the support from Army Research Office (ARO) under ARO Grant W911NF-14-1-0301.

  2. Headwater sediment dynamics in a debris flow catchment constrained by high-resolution topographic surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loye, Alexandre; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Theule, Joshua Isaac; Liébault, Frédéric

    2016-06-01

    Debris flows have been recognized to be linked to the amounts of material temporarily stored in torrent channels. Hence, sediment supply and storage changes from low-order channels of the Manival catchment, a small tributary valley with an active torrent system located exclusively in sedimentary rocks of the Chartreuse Massif (French Alps), were surveyed periodically for 16 months using terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) to study the coupling between sediment dynamics and torrent responses in terms of debris flow events, which occurred twice during the monitoring period. Sediment transfer in the main torrent was monitored with cross-section surveys. Sediment budgets were generated seasonally using sequential TLS data differencing and morphological extrapolations. Debris production depends strongly on rockfall occurring during the winter-early spring season, following a power law distribution for volumes of rockfall events above 0.1 m3, while hillslope sediment reworking dominates debris recharge in spring and autumn, which shows effective hillslope-channel coupling. The occurrence of both debris flow events that occurred during the monitoring was linked to recharge from previous debris pulses coming from the hillside and from bedload transfer. Headwater debris sources display an ambiguous behaviour in sediment transfer: low geomorphic activity occurred in the production zone, despite rainstorms inducing debris flows in the torrent; still, a general reactivation of sediment transport in headwater channels was observed in autumn without new debris supply, suggesting that the stored debris was not exhausted. The seasonal cycle of sediment yield seems to depend not only on debris supply and runoff (flow capacity) but also on geomorphic conditions that destabilize remnant debris stocks. This study shows that monitoring the changes within a torrent's in-channel storage and its debris supply can improve knowledge on recharge thresholds leading to debris flow.

  3. Constraining Paleo-Hydrologic Flow Fields from Iron Oxide Cementation Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Chan, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    Fine-grained sandstone in Mesozoic sedimentary red beds of the Colorado Plateau (southwestern United States) contain iron oxides cements (e.g., hematite and goethite) that display spectacular pattern formation, including evenly spaced nodule formation and banding with nested scales spanning about two to three orders of magnitude (Fig. 1). These nodules are commonly referred to as concretions, which are cemented mineral masses. The size of concretions typically ranges from millimeters to centimeters, while the spacing of bands ranges from millimeters to sub-meters. Spatial transition of one pattern to another or one pattern superimposed on another is also observed. Such patterns may embed important information about paleo-environments of sediment diagenesis, especially regarding the fluid migration and geochemical conditions involved. Field evidence indicates that the formation of iron oxide bands in sandstone seems closely related to groundwater flows. Here we show that such patterns can autonomously emerge from a previously unrecognized Ostwald ripening mechanism and they capture rich information regarding ancient chemical and hydrologic environments. Using a linear stability analysis, we demonstrate that the pattern transition from nodules to bands results from symmetry breaking triggered by groundwater advection. Nodules tend to develop under nearly stagnant hydrologic conditions, while repetitive bands tend to form in the presence of persistent water flows. The banding is formed perpendicularly to the flow direction, and the flow rate is expected to be proportional to the square of banding spacing. Therefore, careful mapping of cementation patterns and banding spacing over rock outcrops will allow us to reconstruct a detail map of water flow field for a sandstone aquifer. Concretion nodules formed in Jurassic Navajo Sandstone have been proposed as a terrestrial analogue to hematite spherules detected by the rover Opportunity at the Meridiani Planum site on the

  4. 75 FR 42330 - Elemental Mercury Used in Flow Meters, Natural Gas Manometers, and Pyrometers; Significant New...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-21

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 721 RIN 2070-AJ36 Elemental Mercury Used in Flow Meters, Natural Gas Manometers, and... Substances Control Act (TSCA) for elemental mercury (CAS No. 7439-97-6) for use in flow meters, natural gas... elemental mercury for an activity that is designated as a significant new use by this rule to notify EPA...

  5. Using groundwater temperature data to constrain parameter estimation in a groundwater flow model of a wetland system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bravo, H.R.; Jiang, F.; Hunt, R.J.

    2002-01-01

    Parameter estimation is a powerful way to calibrate models. While head data alone are often insufficient to estimate unique parameters due to model nonuniqueness, flow-and-heat-transport modeling can constrain estimation and allow simultaneous estimation of boundary fluxes and hydraulic conductivity. In this work, synthetic and field models that did not converge when head data were used did converge when head and temperature were used. Furthermore, frequency domain analyses of head and temperature data allowed selection of appropriate modeling timescales. Inflows in the Wilton, Wisconsin, wetlands could be estimated over periods such as a growing season and over periods of a few days when heads were nearly steady and groundwater temperature varied during the day. While this methodology is computationally more demanding than traditional head calibration, the results gained are unobtainable using the traditional approach. These results suggest that temperature can efficiently supplement head data in systems where accurate flux calibration targets are unavailable.

  6. 8.2% of the Human genome is constrained: variation in rates of turnover across functional element classes in the human lineage.

    PubMed

    Rands, Chris M; Meader, Stephen; Ponting, Chris P; Lunter, Gerton

    2014-07-01

    Ten years on from the finishing of the human reference genome sequence, it remains unclear what fraction of the human genome confers function, where this sequence resides, and how much is shared with other mammalian species. When addressing these questions, functional sequence has often been equated with pan-mammalian conserved sequence. However, functional elements that are short-lived, including those contributing to species-specific biology, will not leave a footprint of long-lasting negative selection. Here, we address these issues by identifying and characterising sequence that has been constrained with respect to insertions and deletions for pairs of eutherian genomes over a range of divergences. Within noncoding sequence, we find increasing amounts of mutually constrained sequence as species pairs become more closely related, indicating that noncoding constrained sequence turns over rapidly. We estimate that half of present-day noncoding constrained sequence has been gained or lost in approximately the last 130 million years (half-life in units of divergence time, d1/2 = 0.25-0.31). While enriched with ENCODE biochemical annotations, much of the short-lived constrained sequences we identify are not detected by models optimized for wider pan-mammalian conservation. Constrained DNase 1 hypersensitivity sites, promoters and untranslated regions have been more evolutionarily stable than long noncoding RNA loci which have turned over especially rapidly. By contrast, protein coding sequence has been highly stable, with an estimated half-life of over a billion years (d1/2 = 2.1-5.0). From extrapolations we estimate that 8.2% (7.1-9.2%) of the human genome is presently subject to negative selection and thus is likely to be functional, while only 2.2% has maintained constraint in both human and mouse since these species diverged. These results reveal that the evolutionary history of the human genome has been highly dynamic, particularly for its noncoding yet

  7. Improving Fiber Alignment in HARDI by Combining Contextual PDE Flow with Constrained Spherical Deconvolution

    PubMed Central

    Portegies, J. M.; Fick, R. H. J.; Sanguinetti, G. R.; Meesters, S. P. L.; Girard, G.; Duits, R.

    2015-01-01

    We propose two strategies to improve the quality of tractography results computed from diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) data. Both methods are based on the same PDE framework, defined in the coupled space of positions and orientations, associated with a stochastic process describing the enhancement of elongated structures while preserving crossing structures. In the first method we use the enhancement PDE for contextual regularization of a fiber orientation distribution (FOD) that is obtained on individual voxels from high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) data via constrained spherical deconvolution (CSD). Thereby we improve the FOD as input for subsequent tractography. Secondly, we introduce the fiber to bundle coherence (FBC), a measure for quantification of fiber alignment. The FBC is computed from a tractography result using the same PDE framework and provides a criterion for removing the spurious fibers. We validate the proposed combination of CSD and enhancement on phantom data and on human data, acquired with different scanning protocols. On the phantom data we find that PDE enhancements improve both local metrics and global metrics of tractography results, compared to CSD without enhancements. On the human data we show that the enhancements allow for a better reconstruction of crossing fiber bundles and they reduce the variability of the tractography output with respect to the acquisition parameters. Finally, we show that both the enhancement of the FODs and the use of the FBC measure on the tractography improve the stability with respect to different stochastic realizations of probabilistic tractography. This is shown in a clinical application: the reconstruction of the optic radiation for epilepsy surgery planning. PMID:26465600

  8. Application of Crunch-Flow Routines to Constrain Present and Past Carbon Fluxes at Gas-Hydrate Bearing Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, Marta

    2014-01-31

    In November 2012, Oregon State University initiated the project entitled: Application of Crunch-Flow routines to constrain present and past carbon fluxes at gas-hydrate bearing sites. Within this project we developed Crunch-Flow based modeling modules that include important biogeochemical processes that need to be considered in gas hydrate environments. Our modules were applied to quantify carbon cycling in present and past systems, using data collected during several DOE-supported drilling expeditions, which include the Cascadia margin in US, Ulleung Basin in South Korea, and several sites drilled offshore India on the Bay of Bengal and Andaman Sea. Specifically, we completed modeling efforts that: 1) Reproduce the compositional and isotopic profiles observed at the eight drilled sites in the Ulleung Basin that constrain and contrast the carbon cycling pathways at chimney (high methane flux) and non-chimney sites (low methane, advective systems); 2) Simulate the Ba record in the sediments to quantify the past dynamics of methane flux in the southern Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia margin; and 3) Provide quantitative estimates of the thickness of individual mass transport deposits (MTDs), time elapsed after the MTD event, rate of sulfate reduction in the MTD, and time required to reach a new steady state at several sites drilled in the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) Basin off India. In addition we developed a hybrid model scheme by coupling a home-made MATLAB code with CrunchFlow to address the methane transport and chloride enrichment at the Ulleung Basins chimney sites, and contributed the modeling component to a study focusing on pore-scale controls on gas hydrate distribution in sediments from the Andaman Sea. These efforts resulted in two manuscripts currently under review, and contributed the modeling component of another pare, also under review. Lessons learned from these efforts are the basis of a mini-workshop to be held at Oregon State University (Feb 2014) to instruct

  9. Constraining a compositional flow model with flow-chemical data using an ensemble-based Kalman filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharamti, M. E.; Kadoura, A.; Valstar, J.; Sun, S.; Hoteit, I.

    2014-03-01

    Isothermal compositional flow models require coupling transient compressible flows and advective transport systems of various chemical species in subsurface porous media. Building such numerical models is quite challenging and may be subject to many sources of uncertainties because of possible incomplete representation of some geological parameters that characterize the system's processes. Advanced data assimilation methods, such as the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF), can be used to calibrate these models by incorporating available data. In this work, we consider the problem of estimating reservoir permeability using information about phase pressure as well as the chemical properties of fluid components. We carry out state-parameter estimation experiments using joint and dual updating schemes in the context of the EnKF with a two-dimensional single-phase compositional flow model (CFM). Quantitative and statistical analyses are performed to evaluate and compare the performance of the assimilation schemes. Our results indicate that including chemical composition data significantly enhances the accuracy of the permeability estimates. In addition, composition data provide more information to estimate system states and parameters than do standard pressure data. The dual state-parameter estimation scheme provides about 10% more accurate permeability estimates on average than the joint scheme when implemented with the same ensemble members, at the cost of twice more forward model integrations. At similar computational cost, the dual approach becomes only beneficial after using large enough ensembles.

  10. Late Cretaceous to Paleogene plate motion, mantle flow and polar wander constrained by paleomagnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarduno, J. A.; Bono, R.

    2011-12-01

    A wide range of investigations including plate circuit analyses, comparisons of the age progression of coeval hotspots on the Pacific plate and geodynamic modeling are consistent with paleomagnetic results that indicate motion of hotspots in Earth's mantle during Late Cretaceous to Paleogene times, with important changes in the rate of motion near 50 Ma. In the Pacific, the change has been hypothesized to reflect plume dynamics and hotspot-ridge capture; in the Cretaceous the two long-lived Pacific hotspots with well-defined age progressive tracks (Hawaii and Louisville) were near ridges that subsequently waned. In the case of the Hawaiian hotspot, the ridge in question appears to have become extinct close to the time of the bend in the hotspot track. Testing whether a deeper component of Pacific mantle flow also changed near 50 Ma requires a higher resolution investigation of reference frames for absolute plate motion. Here we use select paleomagnetic data prior to and after 50 Ma to test prior inferences about absolute plate motion changes and polar wander, and use these analyses to parse components of mantle flow.

  11. Upgraded viscous flow analysis of multi-element airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brune, G. W.; Manke, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    A description of an improved version of the NASA/Lockheed multi-element airfoil analysis computer program is presented. The improvements include several major modifications of the aerodynamic model as well as substantial changes of the computer code. The modifications of the aerodynamic model comprise the representation of the boundary layer and wake displacement effects with an equivalent source distribution, the prediction of wake parameters with Green's lag-entrainment method, the calculation of turbulent boundary layer separation with the method of Nash and Hicks, the estimation of the onset of confluent boundary layer separation with a modified form of Goradia's method, and the prediction of profile drag with the formula of Squire and Young. The modifications of the computer program for which the structured approach to computer software development was employed are also described. Important aspects of the structured program development such as the functional decomposition of the aerodynamic theory and its numerical implementation, the analysis of the data flow within the code, and the application of a pseudo code are discussed.

  12. A multi-agent technique for contingency constrained optimal power flows

    SciTech Connect

    Talukdar, S.; Ramesh, V.C. . Engineering Design Research Center)

    1994-05-01

    This paper does three things. First, it proposes that each critical contingency in a power system be represented by a correction time'' (the time required to eliminate the violations produced by the contingency), rather than by a set of hard constraints. Second, it adds these correction times to an optimal power flow and decomposes the resulting problem into a number of smaller optimization problems. Third, it proposes a multiagent technique for solving the smaller problems in parallel. The agents encapsulate traditional optimization algorithms as well as a new algorithm, called the voyager, that generates starting points for the traditional algorithms. All the agents communicate asynchronously, meaning that they can work in parallel without ever interrupting or delaying one another. The resulting scheme has potential for handling power system contingencies and other difficult global optimization problems.

  13. The Anisotropic Structure of South China Sea: Using OBS Data to Constrain Mantle Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Xue, M.; Yang, T.; Liu, C.; Hua, Q.; Xia, S.; Huang, H.; Le, B. M.; Huo, D.; Pan, M.

    2015-12-01

    The dynamic mechanism of the formation of South China Sea (SCS) has been debated for decades. The anisotropic structure can provide useful insight into the complex evolution of SCS by indicating its mantle flow direction and strength. In this study, we employ shear wave splitting methods on two half-year seismic data collected from 10 and 6 passive source Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBS) respectively. These OBSs were deployed along both sides of the extinct ridge in the central basin of SCS by Tongji University in 2012 and 2013 respectively, which were then successfully recovered in 2013 and 2015 respectively. Through processing and inspecting the global and regional earthquakes (with local events being processing) of the 2012 dataset, measurements are made for 2 global events and 24 regional events at 5 OBSs using the tangential energy minimization, the smallest eigenvalue minimization, as well as the correlation methods. We also implement cluster analysis on the splitting results obtained for different time windows as well as filtered at different frequency bands. For teleseismic core phases like SKS and PKS, we find the fast polarization direction beneath the central basin is approximately NE-SW, nearly parallel to the extinct ridge in the central basin of SCS. Whereas for regional events, the splitting analysis on S, PS and ScS phases shows much more complicated fast directions as the ray path varies for different phases. The fast directions observed can be divided into three groups: (1) for the events from the Eurasia plate, a gradual rotation of the fast polarization direction from NNE-SSW to NEE-SWW along the path from the inner Eurasia plate to the central SCS is observed, implying the mantle flow is controlled by the India-Eurasia collision; (2) for the events located at the junction of Pacific plate and Philippine plate, the dominant fast direction is NW-SE, almost perpendicular to Ryukyu Trench as well as sub-parallel to the absolute direction of

  14. Microfilament Orientation Constrains Vesicle Flow and Spatial Distribution in Growing Pollen Tubes

    PubMed Central

    Kroeger, Jens H.; Daher, Firas Bou; Grant, Martin; Geitmann, Anja

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The dynamics of cellular organelles reveals important information about their functioning. The spatio-temporal movement patterns of vesicles in growing pollen tubes are controlled by the actin cytoskeleton. Vesicle flow is crucial for morphogenesis in these cells as it ensures targeted delivery of cell wall polysaccharides. Remarkably, the target region does not contain much filamentous actin. We model the vesicular trafficking in this area using as boundary conditions the expanding cell wall and the actin array forming the apical actin fringe. The shape of the fringe was obtained by imposing a steady state and constant polymerization rate of the actin filaments. Letting vesicle flux into and out of the apical region be determined by the orientation of the actin microfilaments and by exocytosis was sufficient to generate a flux that corresponds in magnitude and orientation to that observed experimentally. This model explains how the cytoplasmic streaming pattern in the apical region of the pollen tube can be generated without the presence of actin microfilaments. PMID:19804712

  15. Mitral annulus segmentation from four-dimensional ultrasound using a valve state predictor and constrained optical flow.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Robert J; Perrin, Douglas P; Vasilyev, Nikolay V; Marx, Gerald R; del Nido, Pedro J; Howe, Robert D

    2012-02-01

    Measurement of the shape and motion of the mitral valve annulus has proven useful in a number of applications, including pathology diagnosis and mitral valve modeling. Current methods to delineate the annulus from four-dimensional (4D) ultrasound, however, either require extensive overhead or user-interaction, become inaccurate as they accumulate tracking error, or they do not account for annular shape or motion. This paper presents a new 4D annulus segmentation method to account for these deficiencies. The method builds on a previously published three-dimensional (3D) annulus segmentation algorithm that accurately and robustly segments the mitral annulus in a frame with a closed valve. In the 4D method, a valve state predictor determines when the valve is closed. Subsequently, the 3D annulus segmentation algorithm finds the annulus in those frames. For frames with an open valve, a constrained optical flow algorithm is used to the track the annulus. The only inputs to the algorithm are the selection of one frame with a closed valve and one user-specified point near the valve, neither of which needs to be precise. The accuracy of the tracking method is shown by comparing the tracking results to manual segmentations made by a group of experts, where an average RMS difference of 1.67±0.63mm was found across 30 tracked frames.

  16. Assessing SPO techniques to constrain magma flow: Examples from sills of the Karoo Igneous Province, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyer, Lauren; Watkeys, Michael K.

    2015-08-01

    Shape ellipsoids that define the petrofabrics of plagioclase in Jurassic Karoo dolerite sills in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa are rigorously constrained using the long axis lengths of plagioclase crystals and ellipse incompatibility. This has been undertaken in order to determine the most effective technique to determine petrofabrics when using the SPO-2003 programme (Launeau and Robin, 2005). The technique of segmenting an image for analysis is scrutinised and as a process is found redundant. A grain size threshold is defined to assist with the varying grain sizes observed within and between sills. Where grains exceed the 0.2 mm size threshold, images should be acquired at a high magnification (i.e., 10 × magnification). Petrofabrics are determined using the foliation and the lineation of the ellipsoid as defined by the maximum and minimum principal axes (respectively) of the resultant ellipsoid. Samples with strongly prolate fabrics are isolated allowing further constraint on the petrofabric to be made. Once the efficacy of the petrofabric determination process has been determined, the resultant foliations (and lineations) then elucidate the most accurate petrofabric attainable. The most accurate petrofabrics will be determined by using the correct magnification when the images are obtained and to run the analyses without segmenting the image. The fabrics of the upper and lower contacts of the Karoo dolerite sills are analysed in detail using these techniques and the fabrics are used as a proxy for magma flow.

  17. A finite element method for the computation of transonic flow past airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberle, A.

    1980-01-01

    A finite element method for the computation of the transonic flow with shocks past airfoils is presented using the artificial viscosity concept for the local supersonic regime. Generally, the classic element types do not meet the accuracy requirements of advanced numerical aerodynamics requiring special attention to the choice of an appropriate element. A series of computed pressure distributions exhibits the usefulness of the method.

  18. Numerical computation of transonic flows by finite-element and finite-difference methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafez, M. M.; Wellford, L. C.; Merkle, C. L.; Murman, E. M.

    1978-01-01

    Studies on applications of the finite element approach to transonic flow calculations are reported. Different discretization techniques of the differential equations and boundary conditions are compared. Finite element analogs of Murman's mixed type finite difference operators for small disturbance formulations were constructed and the time dependent approach (using finite differences in time and finite elements in space) was examined.

  19. Cellular Structures in the Flow Over the Flap of a Two-Element Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yon, Steven A.; Katz, Joseph

    1997-01-01

    Flow visualization information and time dependent pressure coefficients were recorded for the flow over a two-element wing. The investigation focused on the stall onset; particularly at a condition where the flow is attached on the main element but separated on the flap. At this condition, spanwise separation cells were visible in the flow over the flap, and time dependent pressure data was measured along the centerline of the separation cell. The flow visualizations indicated that the spanwise occurrence of the separation cells depends on the flap (and not wing) aspect ratio.

  20. THE COMPOSITION OF INTERSTELLAR GRAINS TOWARD ζ OPHIUCHI: CONSTRAINING THE ELEMENTAL BUDGET NEAR THE DIFFUSE-DENSE CLOUD TRANSITION

    SciTech Connect

    Poteet, Charles A.; Whittet, Douglas C. B.; Draine, Bruce T.

    2015-03-10

    We investigate the composition of interstellar grains along the line of sight toward ζ Ophiuchi, a well-studied environment near the diffuse-dense cloud transition. A spectral decomposition analysis of the solid-state absorbers is performed using archival spectroscopic observations from the Spitzer Space Telescope and Infrared Space Observatory. We find strong evidence for the presence of sub-micron-sized amorphous silicate grains, principally comprised of olivine-like composition, with no convincing evidence of H{sub 2}O ice mantles. However, tentative evidence for thick H{sub 2}O ice mantles on large (a ≈ 2.8 μm) grains is presented. Solid-state abundances of elemental Mg, Si, Fe, and O are inferred from our analysis and compared to standard reference abundances. We find that nearly all of the Mg and Si atoms along the line of sight reside in amorphous silicate grains, while a substantial fraction of the elemental Fe resides in compounds other than silicates. Moreover, we find that the total abundance of elemental O is largely inconsistent with the adopted reference abundances, indicating that as much as ∼156 ppm of interstellar O is missing along the line of sight. After taking into account additional limits on the abundance of elemental O in other O-bearing solids, we conclude that any missing reservoir of elemental O must reside on large grains that are nearly opaque to infrared radiation.

  1. Solving incompressible flow problems with parallel spectral element methods

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Hong

    1994-10-01

    Parallel spectral element models are built for the Navier-Stokes equations and the shallow water equations with nonstaggered grid formulations. The optimized computational efficiency of these parallel spectral element models comes not only from the exponential convergence of their numerical solutions, but also from their efficient usage of the powerful vector-processing units of the latest parallel architectures. Furthermore, the communication cost of the spectral element model is lower than that of the h-type finite element model, partly because many fewer redundant nodal values have to be stored. The nonstaggered grid formulations perform well in iterative procedures which are highly in parallel. Implementations of these models are carried out on the Connection Machine systems. The present work shows that the high-order domain decomposition methods can be efficiently applied in a data parallel programming environment.

  2. Computational analysis of enhanced magnetic bioseparation in microfluidic systems with flow-invasive magnetic elements.

    PubMed

    Khashan, S A; Alazzam, A; Furlani, E P

    2014-06-16

    A microfluidic design is proposed for realizing greatly enhanced separation of magnetically-labeled bioparticles using integrated soft-magnetic elements. The elements are fixed and intersect the carrier fluid (flow-invasive) with their length transverse to the flow. They are magnetized using a bias field to produce a particle capture force. Multiple stair-step elements are used to provide efficient capture throughout the entire flow channel. This is in contrast to conventional systems wherein the elements are integrated into the walls of the channel, which restricts efficient capture to limited regions of the channel due to the short range nature of the magnetic force. This severely limits the channel size and hence throughput. Flow-invasive elements overcome this limitation and enable microfluidic bioseparation systems with superior scalability. This enhanced functionality is quantified for the first time using a computational model that accounts for the dominant mechanisms of particle transport including fully-coupled particle-fluid momentum transfer.

  3. Flow Applications of the Least Squares Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan

    1998-01-01

    The main thrust of the effort has been towards the development, analysis and implementation of the least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) for fluid dynamics and electromagnetics applications. In the past year, there were four major accomplishments: 1) special treatments in computational fluid dynamics and computational electromagnetics, such as upwinding, numerical dissipation, staggered grid, non-equal order elements, operator splitting and preconditioning, edge elements, and vector potential are unnecessary; 2) the analysis of the LSFEM for most partial differential equations can be based on the bounded inverse theorem; 3) the finite difference and finite volume algorithms solve only two Maxwell equations and ignore the divergence equations; and 4) the first numerical simulation of three-dimensional Marangoni-Benard convection was performed using the LSFEM.

  4. A new method for constructing analytic elements for groundwater flow.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strack, O. D.

    2007-12-01

    The analytic element method is based upon the superposition of analytic functions that are defined throughout the infinite domain, and can be used to meet a variety of boundary conditions. Analytic elements have been use successfully for a number of problems, mainly dealing with the Poisson equation (see, e.g., Theory and Applications of the Analytic Element Method, Reviews of Geophysics, 41,2/1005 2003 by O.D.L. Strack). The majority of these analytic elements consists of functions that exhibit jumps along lines or curves. Such linear analytic elements have been developed also for other partial differential equations, e.g., the modified Helmholz equation and the heat equation, and were constructed by integrating elementary solutions, the point sink and the point doublet, along a line. This approach is limiting for two reasons. First, the existence is required of the elementary solutions, and, second, the integration tends to limit the range of solutions that can be obtained. We present a procedure for generating analytic elements that requires merely the existence of a harmonic function with the desired properties; such functions exist in abundance. The procedure to be presented is used to generalize this harmonic function in such a way that the resulting expression satisfies the applicable differential equation. The approach will be applied, along with numerical examples, for the modified Helmholz equation and for the heat equation, while it is noted that the method is in no way restricted to these equations. The procedure is carried out entirely in terms of complex variables, using Wirtinger calculus.

  5. Using chalcophile elements to constrain crustal contamination and xenolith-magma interaction in Cenozoic basalts of eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Gang; Huang, Xiao-Wen; Zhou, Mei-Fu; Chen, Li-Hui; Xu, Xi-Sheng

    2016-08-01

    Continental basalts have complicated petrogenetic processes, and their chemical compositions can be affected by multi-staged geological evolution. Compared to lithophile elements, chalcophile elements including Ni, platinum-group elements (PGEs) and Cu are sensitive to sulfide segregation and fractional crystallization during the evolution of mantle-derived magmas and can provide constraints on the genesis of continental basalts. Cenozoic intra-continental alkaline basalts in the Nanjing basaltic field, eastern China, include high-Ca and low-Ca varieties. All these basalts have poor PGE contents with Ir ranging from 0.016 ppb to 0.288 ppb and high Cu/Pd ratios from 0.7 × 105 to 4.7 × 105 (5.7 × 103 for DMM), indicating that they were derived from sulfide-saturated mantle sources with variable amounts of residual sulfide during melting or might undergo an early-sulfide segregation in the mantle. Relatively high Cu/Pd ratios along with high Pd concentrations for the high-Ca alkaline basalts indicate an additional removal of sulfide during magma ascent. Because these basalts have high, variable Pd/Ir ratios (2.8-16.8) with low Ce/Pb (9.9-19.7) ratios and εNd values (+ 3.6-+6.4), crustal contamination is proposed to be a potential process to induce the sulfide saturation and removal. Significantly increased Pd/Ir ratios for few high-Ca basalts can be explained by the fractionation of laurite or Ru-Os-Ir alloys with olivine or chromite. For low-Ca alkaline basalts, their PGE contents are well correlated with the MgO, Sc contents, incompatible element ratios (Lu/Hf, Na/Ti and Ca/Al) and Hf isotopes. Good correlations are also observed between Pd/Ir (or Rh/Ir) and Na/Ti (or Ca/Al) ratios. Variations of these elemental ratios and Hf isotopes is previously documented to be induced by the mixing of peridotite xenolith-released melts during ascent. Therefore, we suggest that such xenolith-magma interaction are also responsible for the variable PGE compositions of low

  6. Finite element analysis and computer graphics visualization of flow around pitching and plunging airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bratanow, T.; Ecer, A.

    1973-01-01

    A general computational method for analyzing unsteady flow around pitching and plunging airfoils was developed. The finite element method was applied in developing an efficient numerical procedure for the solution of equations describing the flow around airfoils. The numerical results were employed in conjunction with computer graphics techniques to produce visualization of the flow. The investigation involved mathematical model studies of flow in two phases: (1) analysis of a potential flow formulation and (2) analysis of an incompressible, unsteady, viscous flow from Navier-Stokes equations.

  7. Velocity-pressure integrated versus penalty finite element methods for high Reynolds number flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Sang-Wook

    1988-01-01

    Velocity-pressure integrated and consistent penalty finite element computations of high Reynolds number, laminar flows are presented. In both of the methods, the pressure has been interpolated using linear shape functions for a triangular element. The triangular element is contained inside the bi-quadratic isoparametric element. It has been reported previously that the pressure interpolation method, when used in the velocity-pressure integrated method, yielded accurate computational results for high Reynolds number flows. It is shown that use of the same pressure interpolation method in the consistent penalty finite element method yielded accurate velocity and pressure fields which were comparable to those obtained using the velocity-pressure integrated method. Accuracy of the two finite element methods has been demonstrated by comparing the computational results with available experimental data and/or fine-grid finite difference computational results. Advantages and disadvantages of the two methods are discussed on the basis of accuracy and convergence nature. Example problems considered include a lid-driven cavity flow for Reynolds number of 10,000, a laminar backward-facing step flow, a laminar flow through a nest of cylinders, and a channel flow with an internal blockage. A finite element computer program (NSFLOW/P) for the 2-D, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations is also presented.

  8. Elements of an improved model of debris‐flow motion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, Richard M.

    2009-01-01

    A new depth‐averaged model of debris‐flow motion describes simultaneous evolution of flow velocity and depth, solid and fluid volume fractions, and pore‐fluid pressure. Non‐hydrostatic pore‐fluid pressure is produced by dilatancy, a state‐dependent property that links the depth‐averaged shear rate and volumetric strain rate of the granular phase. Pore‐pressure changes caused by shearing allow the model to exhibit rate‐dependent flow resistance, despite the fact that the basal shear traction involves only rate‐independent Coulomb friction. An analytical solution of simplified model equations shows that the onset of downslope motion can be accelerated or retarded by pore‐pressure change, contingent on whether dilatancy is positive or negative. A different analytical solution shows that such effects will likely be muted if downslope motion continues long enough, because dilatancy then evolves toward zero, and volume fractions and pore pressure concurrently evolve toward steady states.

  9. SUPG Finite Element Simulations of Compressible Flows for Aerothermodynamic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, Benjamin S.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Streamline-Upwind Petrov-Galerkin (SUPG) Finite Element Simulation. It covers the background, governing equations, weak formulation, shock capturing, inviscid flux discretization, time discretization, linearization, and implicit solution strategies. It also reviews some applications such as Type IV Shock Interaction, Forward-Facing Cavity and AEDC Sharp Double Cone.

  10. Applications of the Method of Space-Time Conservation Element and the Solution Element to Unsteady Chemically Reactive Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Sheng-Tao

    2001-01-01

    This document reports the conclusion and findings of our research activities for this grant. The goal of the project is the development and application of the method of Space-Time Conservation Element and Solution Element, or the CE/SE method, to simulate chemically reacting flows. The product of this project will be a high-fidelity, time-accurate flow solver analyzing unsteady flow fields advanced propulsion concepts, including the low-emission turbojet engine combustion and flow fields of the Pulse Detonation Engines (PDE). Based on the documents and computer software of the CE/SE method that we have received from the CE/SE working group at NASA Lewis, we have focused our research effort on addressing outstanding technical issues related to the extension of the CE/SE method for unsteady, chemically reactive flows. In particular, we have made progresses in the following three aspects: (1) Derivation of the governing equations for reacting flows; (2) Numerical treatments of stiff source terms; and (3) Detailed simulations of ZND detonation waves.

  11. The least-squares finite element method for low-mach-number compressible viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Sheng-Tao

    1994-01-01

    The present paper reports the development of the Least-Squares Finite Element Method (LSFEM) for simulating compressible viscous flows at low Mach numbers in which the incompressible flows pose as an extreme. Conventional approach requires special treatments for low-speed flows calculations: finite difference and finite volume methods are based on the use of the staggered grid or the preconditioning technique; and, finite element methods rely on the mixed method and the operator-splitting method. In this paper, however, we show that such difficulty does not exist for the LSFEM and no special treatment is needed. The LSFEM always leads to a symmetric, positive-definite matrix through which the compressible flow equations can be effectively solved. Two numerical examples are included to demonstrate the method: first, driven cavity flows at various Reynolds numbers; and, buoyancy-driven flows with significant density variation. Both examples are calculated by using full compressible flow equations.

  12. Constrained source apportionment of coarse particulate matter and selected trace elements in three cities from the multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturtz, Timothy M.; Adar, Sara D.; Gould, Timothy; Larson, Timothy V.

    2014-02-01

    PM10-2.5 mass and trace element concentrations were measured in Winston-Salem, Chicago, and St. Paul at up to 60 sites per city during two different seasons in 2010. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) was used to explore the underlying sources of variability. Information on previously reported PM10-2.5 tire and brake wear profiles was used to constrain these features in PMF by prior specification of selected species ratios. We also modified PMF to allow for combining the measurements from all three cities into a single model while preserving city-specific soil features. Relatively minor differences were observed between model predictions with and without the prior ratio constraints, increasing confidence in our ability to identify separate brake wear and tire wear features. Brake wear, tire wear, fertilized soil, and resuspended soil were found to be important sources of copper, zinc, phosphorus, and silicon, respectively, across all three urban areas.

  13. Constrained Source Apportionment of Coarse Particulate Matter and Selected Trace Elements in Three Cities from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Sturtz, Timothy M.; Adar, Sara D.; Gould, Timothy; Larson, Timothy V.

    2016-01-01

    PM10-2.5 mass and trace element concentrations were measured in Winston-Salem, Chicago, and St. Paul at up to 60 sites per city during two different seasons in 2010. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) was used to explore the underlying sources of variability. Information on previously reported PM10-2.5 tire and brake wear profiles was used to constrain these features in PMF by prior specification of selected species ratios. We also modified PMF to allow for combining the measurements from all three cities into a single model while preserving city-specific soil features. Relatively minor differences were observed between model predictions with and without the prior ratio constraints, increasing confidence in our ability to identify separate brake wear and tire wear features. Brake wear, tire wear, fertilized soil, and re-suspended soil were found to be important sources of copper, zinc, phosphorus, and silicon respectively across all three urban areas. PMID:27468256

  14. Constraining the Early Isotopic and Trace Element Signature of the Yellowstone Mantle Plume: Evidence from Imnaha Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, J. D.; Ramos, F. C.; Wolff, J. A.

    2007-12-01

    Characterizing the geochemical signatures of plumes is critical for evaluating the petrogenetic evolution of plume- related volcanic rocks. The main phase of Columbia River flood basalt activity (16.6 - 15.5 Ma), considered to represent the first clear manifestation of the Yellowstone hotspot on the North American continent, includes the Steens Mountain, Imnaha, Grande Ronde and Picture Gorge basalts. Isotopic and trace element covariations defined by Grande Ronde, Steens Mountains, and Picture Gorge basalts diverge radially from the field of Imnaha basalts, which retain signatures that most closely reflect the 'undiluted' geochemical characteristics of the Yellowstone mantle plume. Sr, Nd, Pb isotope ratios and incompatible trace element abundances and ratios of Imnaha basalts closely resemble those of some Pacific EM II OIB groups. Nonetheless, the compositions of some Imnaha lavas reflect mixing of the plume with different mantle types. Others have clearly been affected by interaction of plume-derived basalt with continental crust, although the latter process is much more significant in the genesis of the succeeding Grande Ronde basalts. We will review the geochemical characteristics of the Yellowstone plume as recorded in the Imnaha basalt in the context of later-erupted volcanic products of the Columbia - Snake - Yellowstone system, and Pacific mantle plumes more generally.

  15. Prediction of overall and blade-element performance for axial-flow pump configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serovy, G. K.; Kavanagh, P.; Okiishi, T. H.; Miller, M. J.

    1973-01-01

    A method and a digital computer program for prediction of the distributions of fluid velocity and properties in axial flow pump configurations are described and evaluated. The method uses the blade-element flow model and an iterative numerical solution of the radial equilbrium and continuity conditions. Correlated experimental results are used to generate alternative methods for estimating blade-element turning and loss characteristics. Detailed descriptions of the computer program are included, with example input and typical computed results.

  16. Spectral element simulations of laminar and turbulent flows in complex geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karniadakis, George EM

    1989-01-01

    Spectral element methods are high-order weighted residual techniques based on spectral expansions of variables and geometry for the Navier-Stokes (NS) and transport equations. Here, practical aspects of these methods and their efficient implementation are examined, and several examples of flows in truly complex geometries are presented. The spectral element discretization for NS equations is introduced, and the convergence of the method is addressed. An efficient data management scheme is discussed in the context of parallel processing computations. The method is validated by comparing the spectral element solutions with the exact eigensolutions for the Orr-Sommerfeld equations in two and three dimensions. Computer-aided flow visualizations are presented for an impulsive flow past a sharp edge wedge. Three-dimensional states of channel flow disrupted by an array of cylindrical eddy promoters are studied, and the results of a direct simulation of the turbulent flow in a plane channel are presented.

  17. Computational fluid flow in two dimensions using simple T4/C3 element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jan, Y. J.; Huang, S. J.; Lee, T. Y.

    2000-10-01

    The application of the four nodes for velocity and three nodes for pressure (T4/C3) element discretization technique for simulating two-dimensional steady and transitional flows is presented. The newly developed code has been validated by the application to three benchmark test cases: driven cavity flow, flow over a backward-facing step, and confined surface rib flow. In addition, a transitional flow with vortex shedding has been studied. The numerical results have shown excellent agreement with experimental results, as well as with those of other simulations. It should be pointed out that the advantages of the T4/C3 finite element over other higher-order elements lie in its computational simplicity, efficiency, and less computer memory requirement. Copyright

  18. Laminar and turbulent incompressible fluid flow analysis with heat transfer by the finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    A study of the finite element method applied to two-dimensional incompressible fluid flow analysis with heat transfer is performed using a mixed Galerkin finite element method with the primitive variable form of the model equations. Four biquadratic, quadrilateral elements are compared in this study--the serendipity biquadratic element with bilinear continuous pressure interpolation (Q2(8)-Q1) and the Lagrangian biquadratic element with bilinear continuous pressure interpolation (Q2-Q1) of the Taylor-Hood form. A modified form of the Q2-Q1 element is also studied. The pressure interpolation is augmented by a discontinuous constant shape function for pressure (Q2-Q1+). The discontinuous pressure element formulation makes use of biquadratic shape functions and a discontinuous linear interpolation of the pressure (Q2-P1(3)). Laminar flow solutions, with heat transfer, are compared to analytical and computational benchmarks for flat channel, backward-facing step and buoyancy driven flow in a square cavity. It is shown that the discontinuous pressure elements provide superior solution characteristics over the continuous pressure elements. Highly accurate heat transfer solutions are obtained and the Q2-P1(3) element is chosen for extension to turbulent flow simulations. Turbulent flow solutions are presented for both low turbulence Reynolds number and high Reynolds number formulations of two-equation turbulence models. The following three forms of the length scale transport equation are studied; the turbulence energy dissipation rate ([var epsilon]), the turbulence frequency ([omega]) and the turbulence time scale (tau). It is shown that the low turbulence Reynolds number model consisting of the K - [tau] transport equations, coupled with the damping functions of Shih and Hsu, provides an optimal combination of numerical stability and solution accuracy for the flat channel flow.

  19. Constraining the equation of state of nuclear matter from fusion hindrance in reactions leading to the production of superheavy elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselsky, M.; Klimo, J.; Ma, Yu-Gang; Souliotis, G. A.

    2016-12-01

    The mechanism of fusion hindrance, an effect preventing the synthesis of superheavy elements in the reactions of cold and hot fusion, is investigated using the Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck equation, where Coulomb interaction is introduced. A strong sensitivity is observed both to the modulus of incompressibility of symmetric nuclear matter, controlling the competition of surface tension and Coulomb repulsion, and to the stiffness of the density-dependence of symmetry energy, influencing the formation of the neck prior to scission. The experimental fusion probabilities were for the first time used to derive constraints on the nuclear equation of state. A strict constraint on the modulus of incompressibility of nuclear matter K0=240 -260 MeV is obtained while the stiff density-dependences of the symmetry energy (γ >1 ) are rejected.

  20. Elemental transport coefficients in viscous plasma flows near local thermodynamic equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Orsini, Alessio; Kustova, Elena V

    2009-05-01

    We propose a convenient formulation of elemental transport coefficients in chemically reacting and plasma flows locally approaching thermodynamic equilibrium. A set of transport coefficients for elemental diffusion velocities, heat flux, and electric current is introduced. These coefficients relate the transport fluxes with the electric field and with the spatial gradients of elemental fractions, pressure, and temperature. The proposed formalism based on chemical elements and fully symmetric with the classical transport theory based on chemical species, is particularly suitable to model mixing and demixing phenomena due to diffusion of chemical elements. The aim of this work is threefold: to define a simple and rigorous framework suitable for numerical implementation, to allow order of magnitude estimations and qualitative predictions of elemental transport phenomena, and to gain a deeper insight into the physics of chemically reacting flows near local equilibrium.

  1. Elements of an improved model of debris-flow motion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, R.M.

    2009-01-01

    A new depth-averaged model of debris-flow motion describes simultaneous evolution of flow velocity and depth, solid and fluid volume fractions, and pore-fluid pressure. Non-hydrostatic pore-fluid pressure is produced by dilatancy, a state-dependent property that links the depth-averaged shear rate and volumetric strain rate of the granular phase. Pore-pressure changes caused by shearing allow the model to exhibit rate-dependent flow resistance, despite the fact that the basal shear traction involves only rate-independent Coulomb friction. An analytical solution of simplified model equations shows that the onset of downslope motion can be accelerated or retarded by pore-pressure change, contingent on whether dilatancy is positive or negative. A different analytical solution shows that such effects will likely be muted if downslope motion continues long enough, because dilatancy then evolves toward zero, and volume fractions and pore pressure concurrently evolve toward steady states. ?? 2009 American Institute of Physics.

  2. Mean and turbulent flow development through an array of rotating elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Anna; Dabiri, John; Koseff, Jeffrey

    2014-11-01

    The adjustment of an incoming boundary layer profile as it impacts and interacts with an array of elements has received significant attention in the context of terrestrial and aquatic canopies and more recently in the context of horizontal axis wind farms. The distance required for the mean flow profile to stabilize, the energy transport through the array, and the structure of the turbulence within the array are directly dependent upon such factors as the element height, density, rigidity/flexibility, frontal area distribution, element homogeneity, and underlying topography. In the present study, the mean and turbulent development of the flow through an array of rotating elements was examined experimentally. Element rotation has been shown to drastically alter wake dynamics of single and paired elements, but the possible extension of such rotation-driven dynamics had not previously been examined on larger groups of elements. Practically, such an array of rotating elements may provide insight into the flow dynamics of an array of vertical axis wind turbines. 2D particle image velocimetry was used along the length of the array in order to examine the effects of an increasing ratio of cylinder rotation speed to streamwise freestream velocity on flow development and structure. Work supported by a NSF Graduate Research Fellowship & Stanford Graduate Fellowship to A.E.C, by funding to J.O.D. from ONR N000141211047 and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation through Grant GBMF2645, and by funding from the EFML.

  3. Mathematical Aspects of Finite Element Methods for Incompressible Viscous Flows.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    irteir-rt In element pa ir 1: is je Tnit’ by f i F-t mii iidi rig * % % % % % % - 4* % VV 4 ~ % - ~ * .. . * *. PA - 33- Q into rectangular prisms , or...mtr.o gerier-il Iv, lrit h.-t ,- For the prpsstirp sputi-P w’e choose~ pi.p’ievi so. -- u t subregions. We subdi vIde each rectangular prism into 24 tetr...8217 Unfortunately, these boundary conditions have no PhV.- tico . meaninq. Thus the choice (4.5.1), or equivalently (4.10.1,, can only be used in conjunction

  4. ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH BRIEF : ANALYTIC ELEMENT MODELING OF GROUND-WATER FLOW AND HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several advances in the analytic element method have been made to enhance its performance and facilitate three-dimensional ground-water flow modeling in a regional aquifer setting. First, a new public domain modular code (ModAEM) has been developed for modeling ground-water flow ...

  5. A robust, finite element model for hydrostatic surface water flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, R.A.; Casulli, V.

    1998-01-01

    A finite element scheme is introduced for the 2-dimensional shallow water equations using semi-implicit methods in time. A semi-Lagrangian method is used to approximate the effects of advection. A wave equation is formed at the discrete level such that the equations decouple into an equation for surface elevation and a momentum equation for the horizontal velocity. The convergence rates and relative computational efficiency are examined with the use of three test cases representing various degrees of difficulty. A test with a polar-quadrant grid investigates the response to local grid-scale forcing and the presence of spurious modes, a channel test case establishes convergence rates, and a field-scale test case examines problems with highly irregular grids.A finite element scheme is introduced for the 2-dimensional shallow water equations using semi-implicit methods in time. A semi-Lagrangian method is used to approximate the effects of advection. A wave equation is formed at the discrete level such that the equations decouple into an equation for surface elevation and a momentum equation for the horizontal velocity. The convergence rates and relative computational efficiency are examined with the use of three test cases representing various degrees of difficulty. A test with a polar-quadrant grid investigates the response to local grid-scale forcing and the presence of spurious modes, a channel test case establishes convergence rates, and a field-scale test case examines problems with highly irregular grids.

  6. Spectral Element Method for the Simulation of Unsteady Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diosady, Laslo Tibor; Murman, Scott M.

    2013-01-01

    This work uses a discontinuous-Galerkin spectral-element method (DGSEM) to solve the compressible Navier-Stokes equations [1{3]. The inviscid ux is computed using the approximate Riemann solver of Roe [4]. The viscous fluxes are computed using the second form of Bassi and Rebay (BR2) [5] in a manner consistent with the spectral-element approximation. The method of lines with the classical 4th-order explicit Runge-Kutta scheme is used for time integration. Results for polynomial orders up to p = 15 (16th order) are presented. The code is parallelized using the Message Passing Interface (MPI). The computations presented in this work are performed using the Sandy Bridge nodes of the NASA Pleiades supercomputer at NASA Ames Research Center. Each Sandy Bridge node consists of 2 eight-core Intel Xeon E5-2670 processors with a clock speed of 2.6Ghz and 2GB per core memory. On a Sandy Bridge node the Tau Benchmark [6] runs in a time of 7.6s.

  7. Adaptive Meshing Techniques for Viscous Flow Calculations on Mixed Element Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    An adaptive refinement strategy based on hierarchical element subdivision is formulated and implemented for meshes containing arbitrary mixtures of tetrahendra, hexahendra, prisms and pyramids. Special attention is given to keeping memory overheads as low as possible. This procedure is coupled with an algebraic multigrid flow solver which operates on mixed-element meshes. Inviscid flows as well as viscous flows are computed an adaptively refined tetrahedral, hexahedral, and hybrid meshes. The efficiency of the method is demonstrated by generating an adapted hexahedral mesh containing 3 million vertices on a relatively inexpensive workstation.

  8. Compressible seal flow analysis using the finite element method with Galerkin solution technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuk, J.

    1974-01-01

    High pressure gas sealing involves not only balancing the viscous force with the pressure gradient force but also accounting for fluid inertia--especially for choked flow. The conventional finite element method which uses a Rayleigh-Ritz solution technique is not convenient for nonlinear problems. For these problems, a finite element method with a Galerkin solution technique (FEMGST) was formulated. One example, a three-dimensional axisymmetric flow formulation has nonlinearities due to compressibility, area expansion, and convective inertia. Solutions agree with classical results in the limiting cases. The development of the choked flow velocity profile is shown.

  9. A global spectral element model for poisson equations and advective flow over a sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Huan; Wang, Faming; Zeng, Zhong; Qiu, Zhouhua; Yin, Linmao; Li, Liang

    2016-03-01

    A global spherical Fourier-Legendre spectral element method is proposed to solve Poisson equations and advective flow over a sphere. In the meridional direction, Legendre polynomials are used and the region is divided into several elements. In order to avoid coordinate singularities at the north and south poles in the meridional direction, Legendre-Gauss-Radau points are chosen at the elements involving the two poles. Fourier polynomials are applied in the zonal direction for its periodicity, with only one element. Then, the partial differential equations are solved on the longitude-latitude meshes without coordinate transformation between spherical and Cartesian coordinates. For verification of the proposed method, a few Poisson equations and advective flows are tested. Firstly, the method is found to be valid for test cases with smooth solution. The results of the Poisson equations demonstrate that the present method exhibits high accuracy and exponential convergence. Highprecision solutions are also obtained with near negligible numerical diffusion during the time evolution for advective flow with smooth shape. Secondly, the results of advective flow with non-smooth shape and deformational flow are also shown to be reasonable and effective. As a result, the present method is proved to be capable of solving flow through different types of elements, and thereby a desirable method with reliability and high accuracy for solving partial differential equations over a sphere.

  10. A new finite element approach for prediction of aerothermal loads - Progress in inviscid flow computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bey, K. S.; Thornton, E. A.; Dechaumphai, P.; Ramakrishnan, R.

    1985-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of finite element methodology for the prediction of aerothermal loads is described. Two dimensional, inviscid computations are presented, but emphasis is placed on development of an approach extendable to three dimensional viscous flows. Research progress is described for: (1) utilization of a commercially available program to construct flow solution domains and display computational results, (2) development of an explicit Taylor-Galerkin solution algorithm, (3) closed form evaluation of finite element matrices, (4) vector computer programming strategies, and (5) validation of solutions. Two test problems of interest to NASA Langley aerothermal research are studied. Comparisons of finite element solutions for Mach 6 flow with other solution methods and experimental data validate fundamental capabilities of the approach for analyzing high speed inviscid compressible flows.

  11. A New Finite Element Approach for Prediction of Aerothermal Loads: Progress in Inviscid Flow Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bey, K. S.; Thornton, E. A.; Dechaumphai, P.; Ramakrishnan, R.

    1985-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of finite element methodology for the prediction of aerothermal loads is described. Two dimensional, inviscid computations are presented, but emphasis is placed on development of an approach extendable to three dimensional viscous flows. Research progress is described for: (1) utilization of a commerically available program to construct flow solution domains and display computational results, (2) development of an explicit Taylor-Galerkin solution algorithm, (3) closed form evaluation of finite element matrices, (4) vector computer programming strategies, and (5) validation of solutions. Two test problems of interest to NASA Langley aerothermal research are studied. Comparisons of finite element solutions for Mach 6 flow with other solution methods and experimental data validate fundamental capabilities of the approach for analyzing high speed inviscid compressible flows.

  12. Response of hot element flush wall gauges in oscillating laminar flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giddings, T. A.; Cook, W. J.

    1986-01-01

    The time dependent response characteristics of flush-mounted hot element gauges used as instruments to measure wall shear stress in unsteady periodic air flows were investigated. The study was initiated because anomalous results were obtained from the gauges in oscillating turbulent flows for the phase relation of the wall shear stress variation, indicating possible gauge response problems. Flat plate laminar oscillating turbulent flows characterized by a mean free stream velocity with a superposed sinusoidal variation were performed. Laminar rather than turbulent flows were studied, because a numerical solution for the phase angle between the free stream velocity and the wall shear stress variation that is known to be correct can be obtained. The focus is on comparing the phase angle indicated by the hot element gauges with corresponding numerical prediction for the phase angle, since agreement would indicate that the hot element gauges faithfully follow the true wall shear stress variation.

  13. A package for 3-D unstructured grid generation, finite-element flow solution and flow field visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parikh, Paresh; Pirzadeh, Shahyar; Loehner, Rainald

    1990-01-01

    A set of computer programs for 3-D unstructured grid generation, fluid flow calculations, and flow field visualization was developed. The grid generation program, called VGRID3D, generates grids over complex configurations using the advancing front method. In this method, the point and element generation is accomplished simultaneously, VPLOT3D is an interactive, menudriven pre- and post-processor graphics program for interpolation and display of unstructured grid data. The flow solver, VFLOW3D, is an Euler equation solver based on an explicit, two-step, Taylor-Galerkin algorithm which uses the Flux Corrected Transport (FCT) concept for a wriggle-free solution. Using these programs, increasingly complex 3-D configurations of interest to aerospace community were gridded including a complete Space Transportation System comprised of the space-shuttle orbitor, the solid-rocket boosters, and the external tank. Flow solutions were obtained on various configurations in subsonic, transonic, and supersonic flow regimes.

  14. Interpretation of Flow Logs from Nevada Test Site Boreholes to Estimate Hydraulic conductivity Using Numerical Simulations Constrained by Single-Well Aquifer Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, C. Amanda; Halford, Keith J.; Laczniak, Randell J.

    2010-02-12

    Hydraulic conductivities of volcanic and carbonate lithologic units at the Nevada Test Site were estimated from flow logs and aquifer-test data. Borehole flow and drawdown were integrated and interpreted using a radial, axisymmetric flow model, AnalyzeHOLE. This integrated approach is used because complex well completions and heterogeneous aquifers and confining units produce vertical flow in the annular space and aquifers adjacent to the wellbore. AnalyzeHOLE simulates vertical flow, in addition to horizontal flow, which accounts for converging flow toward screen ends and diverging flow toward transmissive intervals. Simulated aquifers and confining units uniformly are subdivided by depth into intervals in which the hydraulic conductivity is estimated with the Parameter ESTimation (PEST) software. Between 50 and 150 hydraulic-conductivity parameters were estimated by minimizing weighted differences between simulated and measured flow and drawdown. Transmissivity estimates from single-well or multiple-well aquifer tests were used to constrain estimates of hydraulic conductivity. The distribution of hydraulic conductivity within each lithology had a minimum variance because estimates were constrained with Tikhonov regularization. AnalyzeHOLE simulated hydraulic-conductivity estimates for lithologic units across screened and cased intervals are as much as 100 times less than those estimated using proportional flow-log analyses applied across screened intervals only. Smaller estimates of hydraulic conductivity for individual lithologic units are simulated because sections of the unit behind cased intervals of the wellbore are not assumed to be impermeable, and therefore, can contribute flow to the wellbore. Simulated hydraulic-conductivity estimates vary by more than three orders of magnitude across a lithologic unit, indicating a high degree of heterogeneity in volcanic and carbonate-rock units. The higher water transmitting potential of carbonate-rock units relative

  15. Interpretation of Flow Logs from Nevada Test Site Boreholes to Estimate Hydraulic Conductivity Using Numerical Simulations Constrained by Single-Well Aquifer Tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garcia, C. Amanda; Halford, Keith J.; Laczniak, Randell J.

    2010-01-01

    Hydraulic conductivities of volcanic and carbonate lithologic units at the Nevada Test Site were estimated from flow logs and aquifer-test data. Borehole flow and drawdown were integrated and interpreted using a radial, axisymmetric flow model, AnalyzeHOLE. This integrated approach is used because complex well completions and heterogeneous aquifers and confining units produce vertical flow in the annular space and aquifers adjacent to the wellbore. AnalyzeHOLE simulates vertical flow, in addition to horizontal flow, which accounts for converging flow toward screen ends and diverging flow toward transmissive intervals. Simulated aquifers and confining units uniformly are subdivided by depth into intervals in which the hydraulic conductivity is estimated with the Parameter ESTimation (PEST) software. Between 50 and 150 hydraulic-conductivity parameters were estimated by minimizing weighted differences between simulated and measured flow and drawdown. Transmissivity estimates from single-well or multiple-well aquifer tests were used to constrain estimates of hydraulic conductivity. The distribution of hydraulic conductivity within each lithology had a minimum variance because estimates were constrained with Tikhonov regularization. AnalyzeHOLE simulated hydraulic-conductivity estimates for lithologic units across screened and cased intervals are as much as 100 times less than those estimated using proportional flow-log analyses applied across screened intervals only. Smaller estimates of hydraulic conductivity for individual lithologic units are simulated because sections of the unit behind cased intervals of the wellbore are not assumed to be impermeable, and therefore, can contribute flow to the wellbore. Simulated hydraulic-conductivity estimates vary by more than three orders of magnitude across a lithologic unit, indicating a high degree of heterogeneity in volcanic and carbonate-rock units. The higher water transmitting potential of carbonate-rock units relative

  16. Bluff Body Flow Simulation Using a Vortex Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony Leonard; Phillippe Chatelain; Michael Rebel

    2004-09-30

    Heavy ground vehicles, especially those involved in long-haul freight transportation, consume a significant part of our nation's energy supply. it is therefore of utmost importance to improve their efficiency, both to reduce emissions and to decrease reliance on imported oil. At highway speeds, more than half of the power consumed by a typical semi truck goes into overcoming aerodynamic drag, a fraction which increases with speed and crosswind. Thanks to better tools and increased awareness, recent years have seen substantial aerodynamic improvements by the truck industry, such as tractor/trailer height matching, radiator area reduction, and swept fairings. However, there remains substantial room for improvement as understanding of turbulent fluid dynamics grows. The group's research effort focused on vortex particle methods, a novel approach for computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Where common CFD methods solve or model the Navier-Stokes equations on a grid which stretches from the truck surface outward, vortex particle methods solve the vorticity equation on a Lagrangian basis of smooth particles and do not require a grid. They worked to advance the state of the art in vortex particle methods, improving their ability to handle the complicated, high Reynolds number flow around heavy vehicles. Specific challenges that they have addressed include finding strategies to accurate capture vorticity generation and resultant forces at the truck wall, handling the aerodynamics of spinning bodies such as tires, application of the method to the GTS model, computation time reduction through improved integration methods, a closest point transform for particle method in complex geometrics, and work on large eddy simulation (LES) turbulence modeling.

  17. A fully-coupled flow-reactive-transport formulation based on element conservation, with application to CO2 storage simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yaqing; Durlofsky, Louis J.; Tchelepi, Hamdi A.

    2012-06-01

    A numerical simulation framework for coupled multiphase flow, multicomponent transport and geochemical reactions in porous media is presented. The approach is an element-based formulation that combines the compositional modeling capabilities used in oil reservoir simulation with the treatment of chemical reactions used in groundwater modeling. The procedure employs a conservative finite-volume method with a fully-implicit treatment in time in order to preserve the nonlinear coupling of flow, transport, reactions, and mass transfer across phases. Phase behavior is described using cubic equations of state. In this framework, all the governing equations and associated constraints are cast in discrete residual form, such that any variable, or coefficient, can depend on any other variable in the problem. Prior to linearization, which is applied to construct the Jacobian matrix, no algebraic or analytic manipulation need be performed to reduce the nonlinear sets of equations and unknowns. Once the complete Jacobian matrix is assembled, a series of algebraic reductions (Schur complements), of the type used in compositional reservoir simulation, are performed to reduce the number of discrete equations that must be solved simultaneously. A GMRES solution strategy with CPR (Constrained Pressure Residual) preconditioning is applied to solve the reduced linear system. We demonstrate the formulation using two CO2 sequestration problems, one of which involves chemical reactions. The simulations demonstrate the efficiency and applicability of the overall procedure for modeling the long-term fate of sequestered CO2.

  18. Response of hot element wall shear stress gages in laminar oscillating flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, W. J.; Murphy, J. D.; Giddings, T. A.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the time-dependent response of hot element wall shear stress gages in unsteady periodic air flows is reported. The study has focused on wall shear stress in laminar oscillating flows produced on a flat plate by a free stream velocity composed of a mean component and a superposed sinusoidal variation. Two types of hot element gages, platinum film and flush wire, were tested for values of reduced frequency ranging from 0.14 to 2.36. Values of the phase angle of the wall shear stress variation relative to the free stream velocity, as indicated by the hot element gages, are compared with numerical prediction. The comparisons show that the gages indicate a wall shear stress variation that lags the true variation, and that the gages will also not indicate the correct wall shear stress variation in periodic turbulent flows.

  19. Finite element analysis in fluids; Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on Finite Element Methods in Flow Problems, University of Alabama, Huntsville, Apr. 3-7, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, T. J. (Editor); Karr, Gerald R. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    Recent advances in computational fluid dynamics are examined in reviews and reports, with an emphasis on finite-element methods. Sections are devoted to adaptive meshes, atmospheric dynamics, combustion, compressible flows, control-volume finite elements, crystal growth, domain decomposition, EM-field problems, FDM/FEM, and fluid-structure interactions. Consideration is given to free-boundary problems with heat transfer, free surface flow, geophysical flow problems, heat and mass transfer, high-speed flow, incompressible flow, inverse design methods, MHD problems, the mathematics of finite elements, and mesh generation. Also discussed are mixed finite elements, multigrid methods, non-Newtonian fluids, numerical dissipation, parallel vector processing, reservoir simulation, seepage, shallow-water problems, spectral methods, supercomputer architectures, three-dimensional problems, and turbulent flows.

  20. Finite element analysis of transonic flows in cascades: Importance of computational grids in improving accuracy and convergence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ecer, A.; Akay, H. U.

    1981-01-01

    The finite element method is applied for the solution of transonic potential flows through a cascade of airfoils. Convergence characteristics of the solution scheme are discussed. Accuracy of the numerical solutions is investigated for various flow regions in the transonic flow configuration. The design of an efficient finite element computational grid is discussed for improving accuracy and convergence.

  1. Internal flow measurements of the SSME fuel preburner injector element using real time neutron radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsay, John T.; Elam, Sandy; Koblish, Ted; Lee, Phil; Mcauliffe, Dave

    1990-01-01

    Due to observations of unsteady flow in the Space Shuttle Main Engine fuel preburner injector element, several flow studies have been performed. Real time neutron radiography tests were recently completed. This technique provided real time images of MiL-c-7024 and Freon-22 flow through an aluminum liquid oxygen post model at three back pressures (0, 150, and 545 psig) and pressure drops up to 1000 psid. Separated flow appeared only while operating at back pressures of 0 and 150 psig. The behavior of separated flow was similar to that observed for water in a 3x acrylic model of the LOX post. On the average, separated flow appeared to reattach near the exit of the post when the ratio of pressure drop to supply pressure was about 0.75.

  2. A new approach in cascade flow analysis using the finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baskharone, E.; Hamed, A.

    1980-01-01

    A new approach in analyzing the potential flow past cascades and single airfoils using the finite element method is developed. In this analysis the circulation around the airfoil is not externally imposed but is directly computed in the numerical solution. Different finite element discretization patterns, orders of piecewise approximation, and grid sizes are used in the solution. The results obtained are compared with existing experimental measurements and exact solutions in cascades and single airfoils.

  3. MARIAH: A finite-element computer program for incompressible porous flow problems. Theoretical background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gartling, D. K.; Hickox, C. E.

    1982-10-01

    The theoretical background for the finite element computer program MARIAH is presented. The MARIAH code is designed for the analysis of incompressible fluid flow and heat transfer in saturated porous media. A description of the fluid/thermal boundary value problem treated by the program is presented and the finite element method and associated numerical methods used in MARIAH are discussed. Instructions for use of the program are documented in the Sandia National Laboratories report, SAND79-1623.

  4. Application of Parallel Time-Implicit Discontinuous Galerkin Finite Element Methods to Hypersonic Nonequilibrium Flow Problems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    and finite element for a curved geometry . . . . 44 3-1 Parallel performance of Euclid +GMRES solver in Hypre . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 3-2 Parallel...MIG from HYPRE, DS (Diagonal scaling) + BiCGStab and Euclid (ILU preconditioner) + GMRES. Since the matrices for high speed flow problems and thermal...reflection problem) respectively are shown in Figure 3-1. Figure 3-1 A shows the performance plot of Euclid + GMRES for 2780 elements with different

  5. Computational Analysis of Enhanced Magnetic Bioseparation in Microfluidic Systems with Flow-Invasive Magnetic Elements

    PubMed Central

    Khashan, S. A.; Alazzam, A.; Furlani, E. P.

    2014-01-01

    A microfluidic design is proposed for realizing greatly enhanced separation of magnetically-labeled bioparticles using integrated soft-magnetic elements. The elements are fixed and intersect the carrier fluid (flow-invasive) with their length transverse to the flow. They are magnetized using a bias field to produce a particle capture force. Multiple stair-step elements are used to provide efficient capture throughout the entire flow channel. This is in contrast to conventional systems wherein the elements are integrated into the walls of the channel, which restricts efficient capture to limited regions of the channel due to the short range nature of the magnetic force. This severely limits the channel size and hence throughput. Flow-invasive elements overcome this limitation and enable microfluidic bioseparation systems with superior scalability. This enhanced functionality is quantified for the first time using a computational model that accounts for the dominant mechanisms of particle transport including fully-coupled particle-fluid momentum transfer. PMID:24931437

  6. Large-eddy simulation of turbulent flow using the finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    McCallen, Rose Clara

    1995-02-15

    The equations of motion describing turbulent flows (in both the low and high Reynolds-number regimes) are well established. However, present day computers cannot meet the enormous computational requirement for numerically solving the governing equations for common engineering flows in the high Reynolds number turbulent regime. The characteristics that make turbulent, high Reynolds number flows difficult to simulate is the extreme range of time and space scales of motion. Most current engineering calculations are performed using semi-empirical equations, developed in terms of the flow mean (average) properties. These turbulence "models" (semi-empirical/analytical approximations) do not explicitly account for the eddy structures and thus, the temporal and spatial flow fluctuations are not resolved. In these averaging approaches, it is necessary to approximate all the turbulent structures using semi-empirical relations, and as a result, the turbulence models must be tailored for specific flow conditions and geometries with parameters obtained (usually) from physical experiments. The motivation for this research is the development of a finite element turbulence modeling approach which will ultimately be used to predict the wind flow around buildings. Accurate turbulence models of building flow are needed to predict the dispersion of airborne pollutants. The building flow turbulence models used today are not capable of predicting the three-dimensional separating and reattaching flows without the manipulation of many empirical parameters. These empirical parameters must be set by experimental data and they may vary unpredictably with building geometry, building orientation, and upstream flow conditions.

  7. Laminar and turbulent incompressible fluid flow analysis with heat transfer by the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochran, Robert James

    A study of the finite element method applied to two-dimensional incompressible fluid flow analysis with heat transfer is performed using a mixed Galerkin finite element method with the primitive variable form of the model equations. Four biquadratic, quadrilateral elements are compared in this study--the serendipity biquadratic element with bilinear continuous pressure interpolation (Q2(8)-Q1) and the Lagrangian biquadratic element with bilinear continuous pressure interpolation (Q2-Q1) of the Taylor-Hood form. A modified form of the Q-2Q1 element is also studied. The pressure interpolation is augmented by a discontinuous constant shape function for pressure (Q2-Q1+). The discontinuous pressure element formulation makes use of biquadratic shape functions and a discontinuous linear interpolation of the pressure (Q2-P1(3)). Laminar flow solutions, with heat transfer, are compared to analytical and computational benchmarks for flat channel, backward-facing step and buoyancy driven flow in a square cavity. It is shown that the discontinuous pressure elements provide superior solution characteristics over the continuous pressure elements. Highly accurate heat transfer solutions are obtained and the Q2-P1(3) element is chosen for extension to turbulent flow simulations. Turbulent flow solutions are presented for both low turbulence Reynolds number and high Reynolds number formulations of two equation turbulence models. The following three forms of the length scale transport equation are studied: the turbulence energy dissipation rate (epsilon), the turbulence frequency (omega) and the turbulence time scale (tau). It is shown that the low turbulence Reynolds number model consisting of the k-tau transport equations, coupled with the damping functions of Shih and Hsu, provides an optimal combination of numerical stability and solution accuracy for the flat channel flow. Attempts to extend the formulation beyond the flat channel were not successful due to oscillatory

  8. Finite element and experimental analyses of unsteady hydrodynamic flows in lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Masaji; Numaguchi, Satoshi

    2005-01-01

    We present a numerical result in finite element analysis of flows in the water environment. We also present a result that we obtained experimentally utilizing the global positioning system (GPS). We show how the numerical result can be incorporated in analysis to simulate the experimental result. We describe our technique with an example in which an unsteady flow generated in Kojima Lake was analyzed numerically and experimentally.

  9. Efficient simulation of incompressible viscous flow over multi-element airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Stuart E.; Wiltberger, N. Lyn; Kwak, Dochan

    1993-01-01

    The incompressible, viscous, turbulent flow over single and multi-element airfoils is numerically simulated in an efficient manner by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The solution algorithm employs the method of pseudo compressibility and utilizes an upwind differencing scheme for the convective fluxes, and an implicit line-relaxation scheme. The motivation for this work includes interest in studying high-lift take-off and landing configurations of various aircraft. In particular, accurate computation of lift and drag at various angles of attack up to stall is desired. Two different turbulence models are tested in computing the flow over an NACA 4412 airfoil; an accurate prediction of stall is obtained. The approach used for multi-element airfoils involves the use of multiple zones of structured grids fitted to each element. Two different approaches are compared; a patched system of grids, and an overlaid Chimera system of grids. Computational results are presented for two-element, three-element, and four-element airfoil configurations. Excellent agreement with experimental surface pressure coefficients is seen. The code converges in less than 200 iterations, requiring on the order of one minute of CPU time on a CRAY YMP per element in the airfoil configuration.

  10. Numerical Simulation of Flow Over a Savonius Wind Turbine Using a Spectral Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandala, Sriharsha; Rempfer, Dietmar

    2009-11-01

    A parallel spectral element code, SpecSolve, is developed with the objective of modeling flows in complex geometries. This code supports both structured and unstructured meshes and allows exact representation of boundary surfaces which are particularly useful for modeling turbo machinery flows. In this talk we present the results from 2D Navier-Stokes simulations of flow over a Savonius turbine. The simulation uses a rotating mesh in regions surrounding the blade and a stationary mesh away from the rotor. Results of a 2D Optimization study involving overlap ratio and the number of blades are also presented. These results are compared with experimental data.

  11. 16 CFR Figure 7 to Part 1633 - Elements of Propane Flow Control for Each Burner

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Elements of Propane Flow Control for Each Burner 7 Figure 7 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt. 1633, Fig. 7 Figure...

  12. 16 CFR Figure 7 to Part 1633 - Elements of Propane Flow Control for Each Burner

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Elements of Propane Flow Control for Each Burner 7 Figure 7 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt.1633, Fig. 7 Figure...

  13. 16 CFR Figure 7 to Part 1633 - Elements of Propane Flow Control for Each Burner

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Elements of Propane Flow Control for Each Burner 7 Figure 7 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt.1633, Fig. 7 Figure...

  14. 16 CFR Figure 7 to Part 1633 - Elements of Propane Flow Control for Each Burner

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Elements of Propane Flow Control for Each Burner 7 Figure 7 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt. 1633, Fig. 7 Figure...

  15. 16 CFR Figure 7 to Part 1633 - Elements of Propane Flow Control for Each Burner

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Elements of Propane Flow Control for Each Burner 7 Figure 7 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt.1633, Fig. 7 Figure...

  16. Applications of Taylor-Galerkin finite element method to compressible internal flow problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohn, Jeong L.; Kim, Yongmo; Chung, T. J.

    1989-01-01

    A two-step Taylor-Galerkin finite element method with Lapidus' artificial viscosity scheme is applied to several test cases for internal compressible inviscid flow problems. Investigations for the effect of supersonic/subsonic inlet and outlet boundary conditions on computational results are particularly emphasized.

  17. Cross-flow vortex structure and transition measurements using multi-element hot films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agarwal, Naval K.; Mangalam, Siva M.; Maddalon, Dal V.; Collier, Fayette S., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    An experiment on a 45-degree swept wing was conducted to study three-dimensional boundary-layer characteristics using surface-mounted, micro-thin, multi-element hot-film sensors. Cross-flow vortex structure and boundary-layer transition were measured from the simultaneously acquired signals of the hot films. Spanwise variation of the root-mean-square (RMS) hot-film signal show a local minima and maxima. The distance between two minima corresponds to the stationary cross-flow vortex wavelength and agrees with naphthalene flow-visualization results. The chordwise and spanwise variation of amplified traveling (nonstationary) cross-flow disturbance characteristics were measured as Reynolds number was varied. The frequency of the most amplified cross-flow disturbances agrees with linear stability theory.

  18. A Streamline-Upwind Petrov-Galerkin Finite Element Scheme for Non-Ionized Hypersonic Flows in Thermochemical Nonequilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, Benjamin S.; Bova, Stephen W.; Bond, Ryan B.

    2011-01-01

    Presentation topics include background and motivation; physical modeling including governing equations and thermochemistry; finite element formulation; results of inviscid thermal nonequilibrium chemically reacting flow and viscous thermal equilibrium chemical reacting flow; and near-term effort.

  19. Discrete-Roughness-Element-Enhanced Swept-Wing Natural Laminar Flow at High Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, Mujeeb; Liao, Wei; Li, Fei; Choudhari, Meelan

    2015-01-01

    Nonlinear parabolized stability equations and secondary-instability analyses are used to provide a computational assessment of the potential use of the discrete-roughness-element technology for extending swept-wing natural laminar flow at chord Reynolds numbers relevant to transport aircraft. Computations performed for the boundary layer on a natural-laminar-flow airfoil with a leading-edge sweep angle of 34.6 deg, freestream Mach number of 0.75, and chord Reynolds numbers of 17 × 10(exp 6), 24 × 10(exp 6), and 30 × 10(exp 6) suggest that discrete roughness elements could delay laminar-turbulent transition by about 20% when transition is caused by stationary crossflow disturbances. Computations show that the introduction of small-wavelength stationary crossflow disturbances (i.e., discrete roughness element) also suppresses the growth of most amplified traveling crossflow disturbances.

  20. A numerical investigation of the finite element method in compressible primitive variable Navier-Stokes flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, C. H.

    1977-01-01

    The results of a comprehensive numerical investigation of the basic capabilities of the finite element method (FEM) for numerical solution of compressible flow problems governed by the two-dimensional and axis-symmetric Navier-Stokes equations in primitive variables are presented. The strong and weak points of the method as a tool for computational fluid dynamics are considered. The relation of the linear element finite element method to finite difference methods (FDM) is explored. The calculation of free shear layer and separated flows over aircraft boattail afterbodies with plume simulators indicate the strongest assets of the method are its capabilities for reliable and accurate calculation employing variable grids which readily approximate complex geometry and capably adapt to the presence of diverse regions of large solution gradients without the necessity of domain transformation.

  1. Combined AIE/EBE/GMRES approach to incompressible flows. [Adaptive Implicit-Explicit/Grouped Element-by-Element/Generalized Minimum Residuals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, J.; Tezduyar, T. E.

    1990-01-01

    Adaptive implicit-explicit (AIE), grouped element-by-element (GEBE), and generalized minimum residuals (GMRES) solution techniques for incompressible flows are combined. In this approach, the GEBE and GMRES iteration methods are employed to solve the equation systems resulting from the implicitly treated elements, and therefore no direct solution effort is involved. The benchmarking results demonstrate that this approach can substantially reduce the CPU time and memory requirements in large-scale flow problems. Although the description of the concepts and the numerical demonstration are based on the incompressible flows, the approach presented here is applicable to larger class of problems in computational mechanics.

  2. First Kinetic Reactive-Flow and Melting Calculations for Entropy Budget and Major Elements in Heterogeneous Mantle Lithologies (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asimow, P. D.

    2009-12-01

    The consequences of source heterogeneity and reactive flow during melt transport in the mantle can be classified by scale. At the smallest spatial and longest temporal scales, we can assume complete equilibrium and use batch melting of homogenized sources or equilibrium porous flow treatments. At large enough spatial scale or short enough temporal scale to prevent any thermal or chemical interaction between heterogeneities or between melt and matrix, we can assume perfectly fractional melting and transport and apply simple melt-mixing calculations. At a somewhat smaller spatial or longer temporal scale, thermal but not chemical interactions are significant and various lithologies and channel/matrix systems must follow common pressure-temperature paths, with energy flows between them. All these cases are tractable to model with current tools, whether we are interested in the energy budget, major elements, trace elements, or isotopes. There remains, however, the very important range of scales where none of these simple theories applies because of partial chemical interaction among lithologies or along the flow path. Such disequilibrium or kinetic cases have only been modeled, in the case of mantle minerals and melts, for trace elements and isotopes, with fixed melting rates instead of complete energy budgets. In order to interpret volumes of magma production and major element basalt and residue compositions that might emerge from a heterogeneous mantle in this last range of scales, we must develop tools that can combine a kinetic formulation with a major element and energy-constrained thermodynamic calculation. The kinetics can be handled either with a chemical kinetic approach with rate constants for various net transfer and exchange reactions, or with a physical diffusion-limited approach. A physical diffusion-limited approach can be built with the following elements. At grain scale, spherical grains of an arbitrary number of solid phases can evolve zoning profiles

  3. A Mixed Finite Volume Element Method for Flow Calculations in Porous Media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jim E.

    1996-01-01

    A key ingredient in the simulation of flow in porous media is the accurate determination of the velocities that drive the flow. The large scale irregularities of the geology, such as faults, fractures, and layers suggest the use of irregular grids in the simulation. Work has been done in applying the finite volume element (FVE) methodology as developed by McCormick in conjunction with mixed methods which were developed by Raviart and Thomas. The resulting mixed finite volume element discretization scheme has the potential to generate more accurate solutions than standard approaches. The focus of this paper is on a multilevel algorithm for solving the discrete mixed FVE equations. The algorithm uses a standard cell centered finite difference scheme as the 'coarse' level and the more accurate mixed FVE scheme as the 'fine' level. The algorithm appears to have potential as a fast solver for large size simulations of flow in porous media.

  4. Aerodynamic Design of Axial-Flow Compressors. VII - Blade-Element Flow in Annular Cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robbins, William H.; Jackson, Robert J.; Lieblein, Seymour

    1955-01-01

    Annular blade-element data obtained primarily from single-stage compressor installations are correlated over a range of inlet Mach numbers and cascade geometry. The correlation curves are presented in such a manner that they are related directly to the low-speed two-dimensional-cascade data of part VI of this series. Thus, the data serve as both an extension and a verification of the two-dimensional-cascade data. In addition, the correlation results are applied to compressor design.

  5. Comparing magnetic and magmatic fabrics to constrain the magma flow record in La Gloria pluton, central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payacán, Italo; Gutiérrez, Francisco; Gelman, Sarah E.; Bachmann, Olivier; Parada, Miguel Ángel

    2014-12-01

    This contribution illustrates a case study of a pluton (La Gloria pluton; LGP) where magnetic and magmatic fabrics are locally decoupled. We compare the magmatic fabric with the available magnetic fabric data to explore their abilities and elucidate the magma flow record of LGP. Results indicate that magnetic (controlled by multi-domain magnetite) and magmatic fabrics are generally consistent throughout LGP. Foliations define an axisymmetric pattern that gradually changes from vertical near lateral margins to less steep in the pluton interior, whereas lineations are subhorizontal following the elongation direction of the pluton. However, samples at the pluton center show marked differences between both fabrics: magnetic fabrics indicate subhorizontal magnetic lineations and foliations, and magmatic fabrics indicate subvertical lineations and foliations. Both magnetic and magmatic fabrics are interpreted to record strain caused by magma flow during thermal convection and lateral magma propagation at the transition between low and high crystallinity stages. We suggest that fabrics acquisition and consistency were determined by shear conditions (pure/simple shear rates ratio) and the orientation of the magma flow direction with respect to a rigid boundary (critical crystalline region) of the pluton. Magmatic fabric differs at the center of the pluton because pure shear is dominant and ascendant flows are orthogonal to the horizontal rigid boundary. LGP represents a whole-scale partly molten magma reservoir, where both thermal convection and lateral propagation of the magma are recorded simultaneously. This study highlights the importance of characterizing both fabrics to properly interpret magma flow recorded in plutons.

  6. A finite-element analysis for steady and oscillatory subsonic flow around complex configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, L. T.; Suciu, E. O.; Morino, L.

    1974-01-01

    The problem of potential subsonic flow around complex configurations is considered. The solution is given of an integral equation relating the values of the potential on the surface of the body to the values of the normal derivative, which is known from the boundary conditions. The surface of the body is divided into small (hyperboloidal quadrilateral) surface elements, which are described in terms of the Cartesian components of the four corner points. The values of the potential (and its normal derivative) within each element is assumed to be constant and equal to its value at the centroid of the element. The coefficients of the equation are given by source and doublet integrals over the surface elements. Closed form evaluations of the integrals are presented. The results obtained with the above formulation are compared with existing analytical and experimental results.

  7. A finite-element analysis for steady and oscillatory supersonic flows around complex configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morino, L.; Chen, L. T.

    1974-01-01

    The problem of small perturbation potential supersonic flow around complex configurations is considered. This problem requires the solution of an integral equation relating the values of the potential on the surface of the body to the values of the normal derivative, which is known from the small perturbation boundary conditions. The surface of the body is divided into small (hyperboloidal quadrilateral) surface elements, sigma sub i, which are described in terms of the Cartesian components of the four corner points. The values of the potential (and its normal derivative) within each element is assumed to be constant and equal to its value at the centroid of the element, and this yields a set of linear algebraic equations. The coefficients of the equation are given by source and doublet integrals over the surface elements, sigma sub i. The results obtained using the above formulation are compared with existing analytical and experimental results.

  8. A spectral-element discontinuous Galerkin lattice Boltzmann method for nearly incompressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Misun; Lee, Taehun

    2011-01-01

    We present a spectral-element discontinuous Galerkin lattice Boltzmann method for solving nearly incompressible flows. Decoupling the collision step from the streaming step offers numerical stability at high Reynolds numbers. In the streaming step, we employ high-order spectral-element discontinuous Galerkin discretizations using a tensor product basis of one-dimensional Lagrange interpolation polynomials based on Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre grids. Our scheme is cost-effective with a fully diagonal mass matrix, advancing time integration with the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. We present a consistent treatment for imposing boundary conditions with a numerical flux in the discontinuous Galerkin approach. We show convergence studies for Couette flows and demonstrate two benchmark cases with lid-driven cavity flows for Re = 400-5000 and flows around an impulsively started cylinder for Re = 550-9500. Computational results are compared with those of other theoretical and computational work that used a multigrid method, a vortex method, and a spectral element model.

  9. Development and applications of two finite element groundwater flow and contaminant transport models: FEWA and FEMA

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, G.T.; Wong, K.V.; Craig, P.M.; Davis, E.C.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents the construction, verification, and application of two groundwater flow and contaminant transport models: A Finite Element Model of Water Flow through Aquifers (FEWA) and A Finite Element Model of Material Transport through Aquifers (FEMA). The construction is based on the finite element approximation of partial differential equations of groundwater flow (FEWA) and of solute movement (FEMA). The particular features of FEWA and FEMA are their versatility and flexibility for dealing with nearly all vertically integrated two-dimensional problems. The models were verified against both analytical solutions and widely used US Geological Survey finite difference approximations. They were then applied for calibration and validation, using data obtained in experiments at the Engineering Test Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Results indicated that the models are valid for this specific site. To demonstrate the versatility anf flexibility of the models, they were applied to two hypothetical, but realistic, complex problems and three field sites across the United States. In these applications the models yielded good agreement with the field data for all three sites. Finally, the predictive capabilities of the models were demonstrated using data obtained at the Hialeah Preston site in Florida. This case illustrates the capability of FEWA and FEMA as predictive tools and their usefulness in the management of groundwater flow and contaminant transport. 25 refs.

  10. A spectral-element discontinuous Galerkin lattice Boltzmann method for incompressible flows.

    SciTech Connect

    Min, M.; Lee, T.; Mathematics and Computer Science; City Univ. of New York

    2011-01-01

    We present a spectral-element discontinuous Galerkin lattice Boltzmann method for solving nearly incompressible flows. Decoupling the collision step from the streaming step offers numerical stability at high Reynolds numbers. In the streaming step, we employ high-order spectral-element discontinuous Galerkin discretizations using a tensor product basis of one-dimensional Lagrange interpolation polynomials based on Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre grids. Our scheme is cost-effective with a fully diagonal mass matrix, advancing time integration with the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. We present a consistent treatment for imposing boundary conditions with a numerical flux in the discontinuous Galerkin approach. We show convergence studies for Couette flows and demonstrate two benchmark cases with lid-driven cavity flows for Re = 400-5000 and flows around an impulsively started cylinder for Re = 550-9500. Computational results are compared with those of other theoretical and computational work that used a multigrid method, a vortex method, and a spectral element model.

  11. Direct numerical simulation of instabilities in parallel flow with spherical roughness elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deanna, R. G.

    1992-01-01

    Results from a direct numerical simulation of laminar flow over a flat surface with spherical roughness elements using a spectral-element method are given. The numerical simulation approximates roughness as a cellular pattern of identical spheres protruding from a smooth wall. Periodic boundary conditions on the domain's horizontal faces simulate an infinite array of roughness elements extending in the streamwise and spanwise directions, which implies the parallel-flow assumption, and results in a closed domain. A body force, designed to yield the horizontal Blasius velocity in the absence of roughness, sustains the flow. Instabilities above a critical Reynolds number reveal negligible oscillations in the recirculation regions behind each sphere and in the free stream, high-amplitude oscillations in the layer directly above the spheres, and a mean profile with an inflection point near the sphere's crest. The inflection point yields an unstable layer above the roughness (where U''(y) is less than 0) and a stable region within the roughness (where U''(y) is greater than 0). Evidently, the instability begins when the low-momentum or wake region behind an element, being the region most affected by disturbances (purely numerical in this case), goes unstable and moves. In compressible flow with periodic boundaries, this motion sends disturbances to all regions of the domain. In the unstable layer just above the inflection point, the disturbances grow while being carried downstream with a propagation speed equal to the local mean velocity; they do not grow amid the low energy region near the roughness patch. The most amplified disturbance eventually arrives at the next roughness element downstream, perturbing its wake and inducing a global response at a frequency governed by the streamwise spacing between spheres and the mean velocity of the most amplified layer.

  12. Finite volume and finite element methods applied to 3D laminar and turbulent channel flows

    SciTech Connect

    Louda, Petr; Příhoda, Jaromír; Sváček, Petr; Kozel, Karel

    2014-12-10

    The work deals with numerical simulations of incompressible flow in channels with rectangular cross section. The rectangular cross section itself leads to development of various secondary flow patterns, where accuracy of simulation is influenced by numerical viscosity of the scheme and by turbulence modeling. In this work some developments of stabilized finite element method are presented. Its results are compared with those of an implicit finite volume method also described, in laminar and turbulent flows. It is shown that numerical viscosity can cause errors of same magnitude as different turbulence models. The finite volume method is also applied to 3D turbulent flow around backward facing step and good agreement with 3D experimental results is obtained.

  13. Evaluation of flow characteristics of perforations including nonlinear effects with the finite-element method

    SciTech Connect

    Tariq, S.M.

    1987-05-01

    This study presents results of finite-element modeling of steady-state flow in perforated natural completions. Use of a mesh chosen carefully by grid sensitivity analysis permits evaluation of flow with more precision than that achieved by previous investigators. Also, for the first time, flow characteristics of perforated completions are evaluated with the non-Darcy effect resulting form converging flow around the perforation taken into account. The results indicate confirmation of Locke's results qualitatively but 5 to 10% overprediction by the nomograph, the importance of angular phasing between adjacent perforations, the uncertainty in generally accepted severe permeability impairment in the compacted zone, and a significant reduction in productivity owing to a non-Darcy effect around the perforation for high-rate gas wells.

  14. Evaluation of flow characteristics of perforations including nonlinear effects using finite-element method

    SciTech Connect

    Tariq, S.M.

    1984-04-01

    This study presents results of finite element modelling of steady-state flow in perforated natural completions. Use of a carefully chosen mesh based on grid sensitivity analysis permits evaluation of flow with more precision than achieved by previous investigators. Also, for the first time, evaluation of flow characterstics of perforated completion is made taking into account the non-Darcy effect due to converging flow around the perforation. The results indicate: (1) confirmation of Locke's findings qualitatively but 5-10% overprediction by the nomograph (2) importance of angular phasing between adjacent perforations, (3) untenability of generally accepted severe permeability impairment in the compacted zone, and (4) significant reduction in productivity due to non-Darcy effect around the perforation for high-rate wells.

  15. Solution of groundwater-flow equations using an orthogonal finite-element scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, G.T.

    1983-01-01

    A new finite-element scheme is presented for approximating the groundwater-flow equation, that will result in a matrix having the properties of the positive type and diagonal dominance. Because of these properties, the matrix equation is amenable to the pointwise iteration solution strategies. This scheme differs from the standard Galerkin scheme in that discretization is performed using a general weighted residual procedure and weighting functions orthogonal to basis functions. Numerical results have been obtained for two verification examples and are compared with results using the conventional Galerkin scheme and with analytical solutions. It is shown that both the direct elimination and pointwise iteration solutions of the new orthogonal finite-element equation yield as accurate results as those obtained by the direct elimination solution of the Galerkin finite-element scheme. However, while the pointwise iteration solution of the Galerkin finite-element method converges for one example, it generated divergent solutions for the other. A demonstration example of steady-state flow in a homogeneous medium is used to compare the utility and versatility of the new scheme with the conventional Galerkin finite-element method.

  16. A Two Element Laminar Flow Airfoil Optimized for Cruise. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steen, Gregory Glen

    1994-01-01

    Numerical and experimental results are presented for a new two-element, fixed-geometry natural laminar flow airfoil optimized for cruise Reynolds numbers on the order of three million. The airfoil design consists of a primary element and an independent secondary element with a primary to secondary chord ratio of three to one. The airfoil was designed to improve the cruise lift-to-drag ratio while maintaining an appropriate landing capability when compared to conventional airfoils. The airfoil was numerically developed utilizing the NASA Langley Multi-Component Airfoil Analysis computer code running on a personal computer. Numerical results show a nearly 11.75 percent decrease in overall wing drag with no increase in stall speed at sailplane cruise conditions when compared to a wing based on an efficient single element airfoil. Section surface pressure, wake survey, transition location, and flow visualization results were obtained in the Texas A&M University Low Speed Wind Tunnel. Comparisons between the numerical and experimental data, the effects of the relative position and angle of the two elements, and Reynolds number variations from 8 x 10(exp 5) to 3 x 10(exp 6) for the optimum geometry case are presented.

  17. Experimental investigation of the modification of the flow field, past instream vegetation elements, for distinct bedsurface roughness.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valyrakis, Manousos; Yagci, Oral; Kitsikoudis, Vasileios; Koursari, Eftychia

    2015-04-01

    The presence of vegetation in rivers and estuaries has important implications for the modification of the flow field and sediment transport. In-stream vegetation has the potential to regulate the morphology and ecological health of a surface water body, and as such it finds a wide range of applications. Even though a number of controls influencing the local flow field past aquatic vegetation elements or patches of instream vegetation have been identified (such as shape, areal density, size and flexibility), conclusive evidence is lacking, particularly on how sediment transport processes are affected. Here, an experimental study is designed to identify how the flow field past different types of elements simulating in-stream emergent vegetation is modified. Two sets of experiments are conducted, each with a distinct value of high and low hydraulic roughness for the bed surface. In both experiments a rigid cylindrical element, a patch of rigid tubes and a plant shaped element (Cupressus Macrocarpa), simulating instream emergent vegetation are utilized. The flow field is measured at various locations downstream the element and average and turbulent flow statistics are obtained at near bed, mid-flow depth and near the water surface regions. It is found that different structural aspects of the elements, particularly the geometry, can significantly affect the flow field downstream the elements. Specifically, the average flow profiles are practically restored to near ambient flow conditions at about 5 diameters downstream the rigid element, while this happens at longer distances for the other elements. The flow structures shed past the elements are also very distinct, as confirmed via appropriately designed fluorescent dye flow visualizations. Potential ecosystem feedbacks and implications for formation of geospatial patterns are also discussed.

  18. On current aspects of finite element computational fluid mechanics for turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    A set of nonlinear partial differential equations suitable for the description of a class of turbulent three-dimensional flow fields in select geometries is identified. On the basis of the concept of enforcing a penalty constraint to ensure accurate accounting of ordering effects, a finite element numerical solution algorithm is established for the equation set and the theoretical aspects of accuracy, convergence and stability are identified and quantized. Hypermatrix constructions are used to formulate the reduction of the computational aspects of the theory to practice. The robustness of the algorithm, and the computer program embodiment, have been verified for pertinent flow configurations.

  19. Green element simulations of multiaquifer flows with a time-dependent Green's function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taigbenu, Akpofure E.

    2003-12-01

    A new formulation of the Green element method (GEM), based on the transient Green's function of the diffusion differential operator, is herein used to solve the problem of transient flow in multiply layered aquifers that are separated by aquitards (leaky strata) which provide hydraulic interactions between them. By adopting the commonly used hydraulic flow approximation, flow in the aquifers is considered to take place in two lateral dimensions and in one vertical direction in the aquitards. As with an earlier GE multiaquifer model, the current model solves the one-dimensional flow in the aquitards by the formulation of [Appl. Math. Model. 22 (1998) 687] but uses the transient Green's function of the diffusion operator to solve the two-dimensional aquifer flow instead of the logarithmic Green's function formulation of [Water Resour. Res. 36 (2000) 3631]. In essence, the current formulation uses the same form of Green's functions for both flows in the aquifers and aquitards. While this can be viewed as an advantage of the current formulation over the previous one, the former presents other computational challenges and intricacies that are discussed in this paper. Applying the current formulation, and incorporating a Picard-type iterative algorithm, solutions are provided for regional flows in heterogeneous multiaquifer systems of arbitrary geometries that are subjected to point and distributed recharge of arbitrary strengths.

  20. Cut-element based immersed boundary method for moving geometries in compressible liquid flows with cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Örley, Felix; Pasquariello, Vito; Hickel, Stefan; Adams, Nikolaus A.

    2015-02-01

    The conservative immersed interface method for representing complex immersed solid boundaries or phase interfaces on Cartesian grids is improved and extended to allow for the simulation of weakly compressible fluid flows through moving geometries. We demonstrate that an approximation of moving interfaces by a level-set field results in unphysical oscillations in the vicinity of sharp corners when dealing with weakly compressible fluids such as water. By introducing an exact reconstruction of the cut-cell properties directly based on a surface triangulation of the immersed boundary, we are able to recover the correct flow evolution free of numerical artifacts. The new method is based on cut-elements. It provides sub-cell resolution of the geometry and handles flows through narrow closing or opening gaps in a straightforward manner. We validate our method with canonical flows around oscillating cylinders. We demonstrate that the method allows for an accurate prediction of flows around moving obstacles in weakly compressible liquid flows with cavitation effects. In particular, we show that the cavitating flow through a closing fuel injector control valve, which is an example for a complex application with interaction of stationary and moving parts, can be predicted by the method.

  1. Constraining Age and Locations of Active and Paleofluid Flow Systems in Dixie Valley, Nevada, with Apatite (U-Th)/He Thermochronometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacNamee, A.; Stockli, D. F.

    2015-12-01

    We present the first constraints on transient fluid flow using the novel application of apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronometry (AHe) in the geothermally active Dixie Valley area of central Nevada, western United States. The valley is bound to the west by a high angle normal fault, along which the adjacent Stillwater Range has been recently exhumed in the footwall. Zones of elevated shallow geothermal gradients (geothermal anomalies) occur in dilational corners along the range front and therefore make Dixie Valley an ideal site to test the sensitivity of the AHe thermochonometer to fluid flow in the shallow crust. Apatites yield (U-Th)/He ages ca. 0.2-16 Ma and three elevation transects record advective cooling of the footwall during exhumation commencing at 3-5 Ma. Many AHe ages are significantly younger (<4 Ma) and do not overlap exhumational cooling ages within error. Consequently, the younger AHe ages are distinguishable as hydrothermally reset and demonstrate the ability of this method to resolve conductive cooling ages from overprinted, fluid-reheated cooling ages. Interpolation of AHe ages shows that the youngest ages correspond with remarkable accuracy to the spatial extents of previously mapped geothermal anomalies. The capability of the AHe thermochronometer to constrain the timing and location of paleofluid flow recommends this technique as a powerful and cost-effective tool in geothermal exploration and petroleum systems evaluations.

  2. Chance-constrained overland flow modeling for improving conceptual distributed hydrologic simulations based on scaling representation of sub-daily rainfall variability.

    PubMed

    Han, Jing-Cheng; Huang, Guohe; Huang, Yuefei; Zhang, Hua; Li, Zhong; Chen, Qiuwen

    2015-08-15

    Lack of hydrologic process representation at the short time-scale would lead to inadequate simulations in distributed hydrological modeling. Especially for complex mountainous watersheds, surface runoff simulations are significantly affected by the overland flow generation, which is closely related to the rainfall characteristics at a sub-time step. In this paper, the sub-daily variability of rainfall intensity was considered using a probability distribution, and a chance-constrained overland flow modeling approach was proposed to capture the generation of overland flow within conceptual distributed hydrologic simulations. The integrated modeling procedures were further demonstrated through a watershed of China Three Gorges Reservoir area, leading to an improved SLURP-TGR hydrologic model based on SLURP. Combined with rainfall thresholds determined to distinguish various magnitudes of daily rainfall totals, three levels of significance were simultaneously employed to examine the hydrologic-response simulation. Results showed that SLURP-TGR could enhance the model performance, and the deviation of runoff simulations was effectively controlled. However, rainfall thresholds were so crucial for reflecting the scaling effect of rainfall intensity that optimal levels of significance and rainfall threshold were 0.05 and 10 mm, respectively. As for the Xiangxi River watershed, the main runoff contribution came from interflow of the fast store. Although slight differences of overland flow simulations between SLURP and SLURP-TGR were derived, SLURP-TGR was found to help improve the simulation of peak flows, and would improve the overall modeling efficiency through adjusting runoff component simulations. Consequently, the developed modeling approach favors efficient representation of hydrological processes and would be expected to have a potential for wide applications.

  3. A velocity-pressure integrated, mixed interpolation, Galerkin finite element method for high Reynolds number laminar flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Sang-Wook

    1988-01-01

    A velocity-pressure integrated, mixed interpolation, Galerkin finite element method for the Navier-Stokes equations is presented. In the method, the velocity variables were interpolated using complete quadratic shape functions and the pressure was interpolated using linear shape functions. For the two dimensional case, the pressure is defined on a triangular element which is contained inside the complete biquadratic element for velocity variables; and for the three dimensional case, the pressure is defined on a tetrahedral element which is again contained inside the complete tri-quadratic element. Thus the pressure is discontinuous across the element boundaries. Example problems considered include: a cavity flow for Reynolds number of 400 through 10,000; a laminar backward facing step flow; and a laminar flow in a square duct of strong curvature. The computational results compared favorable with those of the finite difference methods as well as experimental data available. A finite elememt computer program for incompressible, laminar flows is presented.

  4. Flow transition with 2-D roughness elements in a 3-D channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Zhining; Liu, Chaoquin; Mccormick, Stephen F.

    1993-01-01

    We develop a new numerical approach to study the spatially evolving instability of the streamwise dominant flow in the presence of roughness elements. The difficulty in handling the flow over the boundary surface with general geometry is removed by using a new conservative form of the governing equations and an analytical mapping. The numerical scheme uses second-order backward Euler in time, fourth-order central differences in all three spatial directions, and boundary-fitted staggered grids. A three-dimensional channel with multiple two-dimensional-type roughness elements is employed as the test case. Fourier analysis is used to decompose different Fourier modes of the disturbance. The results show that surface roughness leads to transition at lower Reynolds number than for smooth channels.

  5. Weak Galerkin finite element methods for Darcy flow: Anisotropy and heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Guang; Liu, Jiangguo; Mu, Lin; Ye, Xiu

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a family of weak Galerkin finite element methods (WGFEMs) for Darcy flow computation. The WGFEMs are new numerical methods that rely on the novel concept of discrete weak gradients. The WGFEMs solve for pressure unknowns both in element interiors and on the mesh skeleton. The numerical velocity is then obtained from the discrete weak gradient of the numerical pressure. The new methods are quite different than many existing numerical methods in that they are locally conservative by design, the resulting discrete linear systems are symmetric and positive-definite, and there is no need for tuning problem-dependent penalty factors. We test the WGFEMs on benchmark problems to demonstrate the strong potential of these new methods in handling strong anisotropy and heterogeneity in Darcy flow.

  6. A p-version finite element method for steady incompressible fluid flow and convective heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winterscheidt, Daniel L.

    1993-01-01

    A new p-version finite element formulation for steady, incompressible fluid flow and convective heat transfer problems is presented. The steady-state residual equations are obtained by considering a limiting case of the least-squares formulation for the transient problem. The method circumvents the Babuska-Brezzi condition, permitting the use of equal-order interpolation for velocity and pressure, without requiring the use of arbitrary parameters. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the accuracy and generality of the method.

  7. Finite Element Program for Calculating Flows in Turbomachines with Results for NASA Task-1 Compressor.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-01

    7A1-Ai24 9877 FINITE ELEMENT PROGRRM FOR C ALCULATING FLOWS IN / 3 UN C((U) TURBOMACHINES WITH RESULTS FOR NASA TASK-i COMPRESSOR 98 IU) NAVAL...Aeronaut cs ean of Sdience and Engineering 3 C. ~% h~.c. c . .. . . . . ._ . . .. ABSTRACT A general mash generation code (MESHGEN) and finite ele...DESCRIPTION. ......... 36 B. SUBROUTINE DESCRIPTIONS . . . . . . . . . . 38 1. Subroutine INITI . . . . . . . . . . . 38 2. Subroutine INPUT ........... 39 3

  8. A strongly conservative finite element method for the coupling of Stokes and Darcy flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanschat, G.; Rivière, B.

    2010-08-01

    We consider a model of coupled free and porous media flow governed by Stokes and Darcy equations with the Beavers-Joseph-Saffman interface condition. This model is discretized using divergence-conforming finite elements for the velocities in the whole domain. Discontinuous Galerkin techniques and mixed methods are used in the Stokes and Darcy subdomains, respectively. This discretization is strongly conservative in Hdiv( Ω) and we show convergence. Numerical results validate our findings and indicate optimal convergence orders.

  9. Finite element solution of unsteady mixed convection flow of micropolar fluid over a porous shrinking sheet.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Diksha; Kumar, Lokendra; Singh, Bani

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to analyze the effect of unsteadiness on the mixed convection boundary layer flow of micropolar fluid over a permeable shrinking sheet in the presence of viscous dissipation. At the sheet a variable distribution of suction is assumed. The unsteadiness in the flow and temperature fields is caused by the time dependence of the shrinking velocity and surface temperature. With the aid of similarity transformations, the governing partial differential equations are transformed into a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations, which are solved numerically, using variational finite element method. The influence of important physical parameters, namely, suction parameter, unsteadiness parameter, buoyancy parameter and Eckert number on the velocity, microrotation, and temperature functions is investigated and analyzed with the help of their graphical representations. Additionally skin friction and the rate of heat transfer have also been computed. Under special conditions, an exact solution for the flow velocity is compared with the numerical results obtained by finite element method. An excellent agreement is observed for the two sets of solutions. Furthermore, to verify the convergence of numerical results, calculations are conducted with increasing number of elements.

  10. MP Salsa: a finite element computer program for reacting flow problems. Part 1--theoretical development

    SciTech Connect

    Shadid, J.N.; Moffat, H.K.; Hutchinson, S.A.; Hennigan, G.L.; Devine, K.D.; Salinger, A.G.

    1996-05-01

    The theoretical background for the finite element computer program, MPSalsa, is presented in detail. MPSalsa is designed to solve laminar, low Mach number, two- or three-dimensional incompressible and variable density reacting fluid flows on massively parallel computers, using a Petrov-Galerkin finite element formulation. The code has the capability to solve coupled fluid flow, heat transport, multicomponent species transport, and finite-rate chemical reactions, and to solver coupled multiple Poisson or advection-diffusion- reaction equations. The program employs the CHEMKIN library to provide a rigorous treatment of multicomponent ideal gas kinetics and transport. Chemical reactions occurring in the gas phase and on surfaces are treated by calls to CHEMKIN and SURFACE CHEMKIN, respectively. The code employs unstructured meshes, using the EXODUS II finite element data base suite of programs for its input and output files. MPSalsa solves both transient and steady flows by using fully implicit time integration, an inexact Newton method and iterative solvers based on preconditioned Krylov methods as implemented in the Aztec solver library.

  11. Constraining recharge and groundwater flow processes in hard-rock aquifers in temperate maritime climate using stable isotope signatures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilatova, Katarina; Ofterdinger, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    Recharge estimates and in understanding flow process in hard rock aquifers pose significant challenges. These arise from structural complexities of the hardrock aquifers and are further complicated by variability of the superficial cover. A comparative study of three metamorphic catchments situated in the North of Ireland is presented in this study, each with contrasting geology, glaciation history and consequently superficial cover. The presented study focusses on two main strains. Firstly, due to lack of existing records, stable water isotopes in precipitation (δ18O and δ2H) were monitored at the research sites and their temporal and spatial variability was examined. Secondly, flow processes and dynamics of groundwater recharge based on continuous records of stable isotopes in groundwater, collected along catchment transects from various depths, and its variability in relation to the acquired precipitation signal were studied. Each precipitation station exhibited distinct isotopic signatures, where weather effect and proximity to coastline are the main controlling factors governing the isotope signatures. Moreover, in each of the stations the isotopic signature varied seasonally and thus stable isotopes proved a useful tool for assessing the dynamics of groundwater recharge. The analysis of isotope signatures in precipitation and groundwater from various depths within the hard rock aquifers allowed to evaluate the timescale of recharge, with rapid responses varying from few days up to several months. In general, the recharge appeared continuous over the hydrological year within wetter catchments with higher annual precipitation amounts purging the hardrock aquifers throughout the year. However, within comparatively dryer catchments recharge has a more seasonal character, predominantly taking place during the winter half of the year. Spatially, the recharge is highly localised within the elevated catchment areas, where superficial deposits are scarce and the

  12. Three-dimensional inversion of self-potential data used to constrain the pattern of groundwater flow in geothermal fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardani, A.; Revil, A.; BolèVe, A.; Dupont, J. P.

    2008-09-01

    We propose an algorithm to invert self-potential signals measured at the ground surface of the Earth to localize hydromechanical disturbances or to the pattern of groundwater flow in geothermal systems. The self-potential signals result from the divergence of the streaming current density. Groundwater flow can be either driven by topography of the water table, free convection, or deformation of the medium. The algorithm includes the electrical resistivity distribution of the medium obtained independently by DC resistance tomography or electromagnetic methods or by coding the assumed geology in terms of distribution of the electrical resistivity accounting for the effect of the temperature and salinity distributions and possibly constraints from borehole measurements. Inversion of the distribution of the source current density from ground surface and borehole self-potential measurements is achieved by solving the inverse problem using Tikhonov regularization solutions that are compatible with the physics of the primary flow problem. By introducing assumptions regarding the smoothness or the compactness of the source and the three-dimensional distribution of the electrical resistivity of the system, the inverse problem can be solved in obtaining the three-dimensional distribution of the current source density in the ground. However, an annihilator can be added to the inverted source geometry without affecting the measured self-potential field. Annihilators can be obtained from boundary conditions. Synthetic models and a sandbox experiment are discussed to demonstrate the validity of the algorithm. An application is presented to the geothermal field of Cerro Prieto, Baja California, Mexico, using literature data. Inversion of the self-potential and resistivity data allows observing a plume of hot groundwater rising to the ground surface in the central part of the investigated area and discharging to the ground surface in the southwest part. The temperature anomaly

  13. Large-scale computation of incompressible viscous flow by least-squares finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan; Lin, T. L.; Povinelli, Louis A.

    1993-01-01

    The least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) based on the velocity-pressure-vorticity formulation is applied to large-scale/three-dimensional steady incompressible Navier-Stokes problems. This method can accommodate equal-order interpolations and results in symmetric, positive definite algebraic system which can be solved effectively by simple iterative methods. The first-order velocity-Bernoulli function-vorticity formulation for incompressible viscous flows is also tested. For three-dimensional cases, an additional compatibility equation, i.e., the divergence of the vorticity vector should be zero, is included to make the first-order system elliptic. The simple substitution of the Newton's method is employed to linearize the partial differential equations, the LSFEM is used to obtain discretized equations, and the system of algebraic equations is solved using the Jacobi preconditioned conjugate gradient method which avoids formation of either element or global matrices (matrix-free) to achieve high efficiency. To show the validity of this scheme for large-scale computation, we give numerical results for 2D driven cavity problem at Re = 10000 with 408 x 400 bilinear elements. The flow in a 3D cavity is calculated at Re = 100, 400, and 1,000 with 50 x 50 x 50 trilinear elements. The Taylor-Goertler-like vortices are observed for Re = 1,000.

  14. Simulation of flow in the microcirculation using a hybrid Lattice-Boltzman and Finite Element algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Mancera, Andres; Gonzalez Cardenas, Diego

    2014-11-01

    Flow in the microcirculation is highly dependent on the mechanical properties of the cells suspended in the plasma. Red blood cells have to deform in order to pass through the smaller sections in the microcirculation. Certain deceases change the mechanical properties of red blood cells affecting its ability to deform and the rheological behaviour of blood. We developed a hybrid algorithm based on the Lattice-Boltzmann and Finite Element methods to simulate blood flow in small capillaries. Plasma was modeled as a Newtonian fluid and the red blood cells' membrane as a hyperelastic solid. The fluid-structure interaction was handled using the immersed boundary method. We simulated the flow of plasma with suspended red blood cells through cylindrical capillaries and measured the pressure drop as a function of the membrane's rigidity. We also simulated the flow through capillaries with a restriction and identify critical properties for which the suspended particles are unable to flow. The algorithm output was verified by reproducing certain common features of flow int he microcirculation such as the Fahraeus-Lindqvist effect.

  15. Explicit discontinuous spectral element method with entropy generation based artificial viscosity for shocked viscous flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, A.; Jacobs, G. B.; Don, W. S.; Abbassi, H.; Mashayek, F.

    2017-03-01

    A spatio-temporal adaptive artificial viscosity (AV) based shock-capturing scheme is proposed for the solution of both inviscid and viscous compressible flows using a high-order parallel Discontinuous Spectral Element Method (DSEM). The artificial viscosity and artificial thermal conduction coefficients are proportional to the viscous and thermal entropy generating terms, respectively, in the viscous entropy conservation law. The magnitude of AV is limited based on the explicit stable CFL criterion, so that the stable artificial viscous time step size is greater than the convective stable time step size. To further ensure the stability of this explicit approach, an adaptive variable order exponential filter is applied, if necessary, in elements where the AV has been limited. In viscous flow computations a modified Jameson's sensor (Ducros et al., 1999 [61]) limits the AV to small values in viscous shear regions, so as to maintain a high-order resolution in smooth regions and an essentially non-oscillatory behavior near sharp gradients/shocks regions. We have performed a systematic and extensive validation of the algorithm with one-dimensional problems (inviscid moving shock and viscous shock-structure interaction), two-dimensional problems (inviscid steady and unsteady shocked flows and viscous shock-boundary layer interaction), and a three-dimensional supersonic turbulent flow over a ramped cavity. These examples demonstrate that the explicit DSEM scheme with adaptive artificial viscosity terms is stable, accurate and efficient.

  16. DNS of Flows over Periodic Hills using a Discontinuous-Galerkin Spectral-Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diosady, Laslo T.; Murman, Scott M.

    2014-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) of turbulent compressible flows is performed using a higher-order space-time discontinuous-Galerkin finite-element method. The numerical scheme is validated by performing DNS of the evolution of the Taylor-Green vortex and turbulent flow in a channel. The higher-order method is shown to provide increased accuracy relative to low-order methods at a given number of degrees of freedom. The turbulent flow over a periodic array of hills in a channel is simulated at Reynolds number 10,595 using an 8th-order scheme in space and a 4th-order scheme in time. These results are validated against previous large eddy simulation (LES) results. A preliminary analysis provides insight into how these detailed simulations can be used to improve Reynoldsaveraged Navier-Stokes (RANS) modeling

  17. Flow Dynamics of green sand in the DISAMATIC moulding process using Discrete element method (DEM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovad, E.; Larsen, P.; Walther, J. H.; Thorborg, J.; Hattel, J. H.

    2015-06-01

    The DISAMATIC casting process production of sand moulds is simulated with DEM (discrete element method). The main purpose is to simulate the dynamics of the flow of green sand, during the production of the sand mould with DEM. The sand shot is simulated, which is the first stage of the DISAMATIC casting process. Depending on the actual casting geometry the mould can be geometrically quite complex involving e.g. shadowing effects and this is directly reflected in the sand flow during the moulding process. In the present work a mould chamber with “ribs” at the walls is chosen as a baseline geometry to emulate some of these important conditions found in the real moulding process. The sand flow is simulated with the DEM and compared with corresponding video footages from the interior of the chamber during the moulding process. The effect of the rolling resistance and the static friction coefficient is analysed and discussed in relation to the experimental findings.

  18. Finite Element Analysis of Magnetic Damping Effects on G-Jitter Induced Fluid Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pan, Bo; Li, Ben Q.; deGroh, Henry C., III

    1997-01-01

    This paper reports some interim results on numerical modeling and analyses of magnetic damping of g-jitter driven fluid flow in microgravity. A finite element model is developed to represent the fluid flow, thermal and solute transport phenomena in a 2-D cavity under g-jitter conditions with and without an applied magnetic field. The numerical model is checked by comparing with analytical solutions obtained for a simple parallel plate channel flow driven by g-jitter in a transverse magnetic field. The model is then applied to study the effect of steady state g-jitter induced oscillation and on the solute redistribution in the liquid that bears direct relevance to the Bridgman-Stockbarger single crystal growth processes. A selection of computed results is presented and the results indicate that an applied magnetic field can effectively damp the velocity caused by g-jitter and help to reduce the time variation of solute redistribution.

  19. Finite element methods of analysis for 3D inviscid compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peraire, Jaime

    1990-01-01

    The applicants have developed a finite element based approach for the solution of three-dimensional compressible flows. The procedure enables flow solutions to be obtained on tetrahedral discretizations of computational domains of complex form. A further development was the incorporation of a solution adaptive mesh strategy in which the adaptivity is achieved by complete remeshing of the solution domain. During the previous year, the applicants were working with the Advanced Aerodynamics Concepts Branch at NASA Ames Research Center with an implementation of the basic meshing and solution procedure. The objective of the work to be performed over this twelve month period was the transfer of the adaptive mesh technology and also the undertaking of basic research into alternative flow algorithms for the Euler equations on unstructured meshes.

  20. Preprocessor and postprocessor computer programs for a radial-flow finite-element model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pucci, A.A.; Pope, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    Preprocessing and postprocessing computer programs that enhance the utility of the U.S. Geological Survey radial-flow model have been developed. The preprocessor program: (1) generates a triangular finite element mesh from minimal data input, (2) produces graphical displays and tabulations of data for the mesh , and (3) prepares an input data file to use with the radial-flow model. The postprocessor program is a version of the radial-flow model, which was modified to (1) produce graphical output for simulation and field results, (2) generate a statistic for comparing the simulation results with observed data, and (3) allow hydrologic properties to vary in the simulated region. Examples of the use of the processor programs for a hypothetical aquifer test are presented. Instructions for the data files, format instructions, and a listing of the preprocessor and postprocessor source codes are given in the appendixes. (Author 's abstract)

  1. Hydrothermal fluid flow models of Campi Flegrei caldera, Italy constrained by InSAR surface deformation time series observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundgren, P.; Lanari, R.; Manzo, M.; Sansosti, E.; Tizzani, P.; Hutnak, M.; Hurwitz, S.

    2008-12-01

    Campi Flegrei caldera, Italy, located along the Bay of Naples, has a long history of significant vertical deformation, with the most recent large uplift (>1.5m) occurring in 1983-1984. Each episode of uplift has been followed by a period of subsidence that decreases in rate with time and may be punctuated by brief episodes of lesser uplift. The large amplitude of the major uplifts that occur without volcanic activity, and the subsequent subsidence has been argued as evidence for hydrothermal amplification of any magmatic source. The later subsidence and its temporal decay have been argued as due to diffusion of the pressurized caldera fill material into the less porous surrounding country rock. We present satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry (InSAR) time series analysis of ERS and Envisat data from the European Space Agency, based on exploiting the Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) approach [Berardino et al., 2002]; this allows us to generate maps of relative surface deformation though time, beginning in 1992 through 2007, that are relevant to both ascending and descending satellite orbits. The general temporal behavior is one of subsidence punctuated by several lesser uplift episodes. The spatial pattern of deformation can be modeled through simple inflation/deflation sources in an elastic halfspace. Given the evidence to suggest that fluids may play a significant role in the temporal deformation of Campi Flegrei, rather than a purely magmatic or magma chamber-based interpretation, we model the temporal and spatial evolution of surface deformation as a hydrothermal fluid flow process. We use the TOUGH2-BIOT2 set of numerical codes [Preuss et al., 1999; Hsieh, 1996], which couple multi-phase (liquid-gas) and multi-component (H2O-CO2) fluid flow in a porous or fractured media with plane strain deformation and fluid flow in a linearly elastic porous medium. We explore parameters related to the depth and temporal history of fluid injection, fluid

  2. CONSTRAINING THE STRUCTURE OF SAGITTARIUS A*'s ACCRETION FLOW WITH MILLIMETER VERY LONG BASELINE INTERFEROMETRY CLOSURE PHASES

    SciTech Connect

    Broderick, Avery E.; Fish, Vincent L.; Doeleman, Sheperd S.; Loeb, Abraham

    2011-09-01

    Millimeter wave very long baseline interferometry (mm-VLBI) provides access to the emission region surrounding Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*), the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way, on sub-horizon scales. Recently, a closure phase of 0{sup 0} {+-} 40{sup 0} was reported on a triangle of Earth-sized baselines (SMT-CARMA-JCMT) representing a new constraint upon the structure and orientation of the emission region, independent from those provided by the previously measured 1.3 mm-VLBI visibility amplitudes alone. Here, we compare this to the closure phases associated with a class of physically motivated, radiatively inefficient accretion flow models and present predictions for future mm-VLBI experiments with the developing Event Horizon Telescope (EHT). We find that the accretion flow models are capable of producing a wide variety of closure phases on the SMT-CARMA-JCMT triangle and thus not all models are consistent with the recent observations. However, those models that reproduce the 1.3 mm-VLBI visibility amplitudes overwhelmingly have SMT-CARMA-JCMT closure phases between {+-}30{sup 0}, and are therefore broadly consistent with all current mm-VLBI observations. Improving station sensitivity by factors of a few, achievable by increases in bandwidth and phasing together multiple antennas at individual sites, should result in physically relevant additional constraints upon the model parameters and eliminate the current 180{sup 0} ambiguity on the source orientation. When additional stations are included, closure phases of order 45{sup 0}-90{sup 0} are typical. In all cases, the EHT will be able to measure these with sufficient precision to produce dramatic improvements in the constraints upon the spin of Sgr A*.

  3. Constraining the Structure of Sagittarius A*'s Accretion Flow with Millimeter Very Long Baseline Interferometry Closure Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broderick, Avery E.; Fish, Vincent L.; Doeleman, Sheperd S.; Loeb, Abraham

    2011-09-01

    Millimeter wave very long baseline interferometry (mm-VLBI) provides access to the emission region surrounding Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*), the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way, on sub-horizon scales. Recently, a closure phase of 0° ± 40° was reported on a triangle of Earth-sized baselines (SMT-CARMA-JCMT) representing a new constraint upon the structure and orientation of the emission region, independent from those provided by the previously measured 1.3 mm-VLBI visibility amplitudes alone. Here, we compare this to the closure phases associated with a class of physically motivated, radiatively inefficient accretion flow models and present predictions for future mm-VLBI experiments with the developing Event Horizon Telescope (EHT). We find that the accretion flow models are capable of producing a wide variety of closure phases on the SMT-CARMA-JCMT triangle and thus not all models are consistent with the recent observations. However, those models that reproduce the 1.3 mm-VLBI visibility amplitudes overwhelmingly have SMT-CARMA-JCMT closure phases between ±30°, and are therefore broadly consistent with all current mm-VLBI observations. Improving station sensitivity by factors of a few, achievable by increases in bandwidth and phasing together multiple antennas at individual sites, should result in physically relevant additional constraints upon the model parameters and eliminate the current 180° ambiguity on the source orientation. When additional stations are included, closure phases of order 45°-90° are typical. In all cases, the EHT will be able to measure these with sufficient precision to produce dramatic improvements in the constraints upon the spin of Sgr A*.

  4. A flow physics study of flap-mounted vortex generators on a multi-element airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klausmeyer, Steven Michael

    Vortex generators are a commonly used aerodynamic "fix" for flow separation problems. They are typically used to remedy flow separation due to design shortcomings or changes in operating conditions that exceed the original design point. Flow separation is often encountered with high lift systems. Flaps and slats can be difficult to design due to complicated flow phenomena and large Reynolds number effects. Previous research has indicated the effectiveness of vortex generators in correcting flow separation over a flap. In fact, significant aerodynamic performance improvements were predicted for high-lift systems that incorporate vortex generators in the original design. Before this may be attempted, a better understanding of vortex generator flow physics must be obtained for the development of appropriate design tools and analysis methods. The research contained herein is focused on a detailed flow physics study of vortex generators mounted to the flap of a three-element high-lift airfoil. Detailed velocity measurements taken using a three-component laser Doppler velocimeter were used to vortex/boundary layer interactions and global flowfield effects. The full Reynolds stress tensor and mean velocity field was measured in addition to surface pressures. Three basic vortex generator arrangements were studied: upflow, downflow, and corotating. Although not optimized, all three types of vortex generators were effective at eliminating boundary layer separation. The vortices demonstrated a tendency to rise from the flap surface regardless of orientation and decayed rapidly, with cross-stream vorticity dropping below measurable levels by 75% flap chord. However, the embedded vortices produced significant perturbations in the turbulence field and mean flow of the flap boundary layer that persisted to the flap trailing edge.

  5. Thermodynamically Constrained Averaging Theory Approach for Modeling Flow and Transport Phenomena in Porous Medium Systems: 8. Interface and Common Curve Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Gray, William G.; Miller, Cass T.

    2010-01-01

    This work is the eighth in a series that develops the fundamental aspects of the thermodynamically constrained averaging theory (TCAT) that allows for a systematic increase in the scale at which multiphase transport phenomena is modeled in porous medium systems. In these systems, the explicit locations of interfaces between phases and common curves, where three or more interfaces meet, are not considered at scales above the microscale. Rather, the densities of these quantities arise as areas per volume or length per volume. Modeling of the dynamics of these measures is an important challenge for robust models of flow and transport phenomena in porous medium systems, as the extent of these regions can have important implications for mass, momentum, and energy transport between and among phases, and formulation of a capillary pressure relation with minimal hysteresis. These densities do not exist at the microscale, where the interfaces and common curves correspond to particular locations. Therefore, it is necessary for a well-developed macroscale theory to provide evolution equations that describe the dynamics of interface and common curve densities. Here we point out the challenges and pitfalls in producing such evolution equations, develop a set of such equations based on averaging theorems, and identify the terms that require particular attention in experimental and computational efforts to parameterize the equations. We use the evolution equations developed to specify a closed two-fluid-phase flow model. PMID:21197134

  6. Thermodynamically Constrained Averaging Theory Approach for Modeling Flow and Transport Phenomena in Porous Medium Systems: 8. Interface and Common Curve Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Gray, William G; Miller, Cass T

    2010-12-01

    This work is the eighth in a series that develops the fundamental aspects of the thermodynamically constrained averaging theory (TCAT) that allows for a systematic increase in the scale at which multiphase transport phenomena is modeled in porous medium systems. In these systems, the explicit locations of interfaces between phases and common curves, where three or more interfaces meet, are not considered at scales above the microscale. Rather, the densities of these quantities arise as areas per volume or length per volume. Modeling of the dynamics of these measures is an important challenge for robust models of flow and transport phenomena in porous medium systems, as the extent of these regions can have important implications for mass, momentum, and energy transport between and among phases, and formulation of a capillary pressure relation with minimal hysteresis. These densities do not exist at the microscale, where the interfaces and common curves correspond to particular locations. Therefore, it is necessary for a well-developed macroscale theory to provide evolution equations that describe the dynamics of interface and common curve densities. Here we point out the challenges and pitfalls in producing such evolution equations, develop a set of such equations based on averaging theorems, and identify the terms that require particular attention in experimental and computational efforts to parameterize the equations. We use the evolution equations developed to specify a closed two-fluid-phase flow model.

  7. Constraining Groundwater Flow in the Michigan Basin Through Helium Concentrations and Isotopic Ratios in the Saginaw Aquifer, Southern Michigan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, T.; Castro, M.; Hall, C. M.

    2012-12-01

    We present helium concentrations and isotopic ratios from groundwater of the shallow Saginaw aquifer in southern Michigan. Saginaw helium data are interpreted in conjunction with data from the underlying Marshall aquifer in order to further our overall understanding of groundwater flow in the Michigan Basin, including cross-formational flow. For most samples, 3He and 4He concentrations are higher than those expected for water in solubility equilibrium with the atmosphere (ASW), with values of up to two and over three orders of magnitude with respect to ASW for 3He and 4He, respectively. He concentrations are particularly high in the Saginaw Lowlands, the main discharge area of the Michigan Basin. R/Ra values (where Ra is the 3He/4He ratio in the atmosphere) vary from 0.932 to 0.043 and are far greater for modern groundwaters as compared to older ones. Higher R/Ra values indicate mostly the presence of ASW recharge water. The observed decrease in R/Ra values with groundwater age and distance from the recharge area is accompanied by an increase in crustally produced 3He and 4He concentrations. Except for samples close to the recharge area, the average R/Ra value in the Saginaw aquifer is close to typical R/Ra crustal production values of 0.02~0.05. Some samples located in the recharge area suggest the presence of a bomb tritium component between ~5-15TU while the presence of a small mantle component of ~2% is clearly identified in some samples. He excesses in the Saginaw aquifer, in particular those in the Saginaw Lowlands discharge area are unusually high for such shallow depths and require a source external to the aquifer, partly supplied by underlying formations within the sedimentary sequence, partly from the crystalline basement. The similarity of the Saginaw and Marshall noble gas concentrations and isotopic signatures suggests that there is some level of vertical connection and mass exchange between these two aquifers, possibly through both advection and

  8. Analysis of periodic 3D viscous flows using a quadratic discrete Galerkin boundary element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chiu Y.; Beris, Antony N.; Advani, Suresh G.

    1994-05-01

    A discrete Galerkin boundary element technique with a quadratic approximation of the variables was developed to simulate the three-dimensional (3D) viscous flow established in periodic assemblages of particles in suspensions and within a periodic porous medium. The Batchelor's unit-cell approach is used. The Galerkin formulation effectively handles the discontinuity in the traction arising in flow boundaries with edges or corners, such as the unit cell in this case. For an ellipsoidal dilute suspension over the range of aspect ratio studied (1 to 54), the numerical solutions of the rotational velocity of the particles and the viscosity correction were found to agree with the analytic values within 0.2% and 2% respectively, even with coarse meshes. In a suspension of cylindrical particles the calculated period of rotation agreed with the experimental data. However, Burgers' predictions for the correction to the suspension viscosity were found to be 30% too low and therefore the concept of the equivalent ellipsoidal ratio is judged to be inadequate. For pressure-driven flow through a fixed bed of fibers, the prediction on the permeability was shown to deviate by as much as 10% from the value calculated based on approximate permeability additivity rules using the corresponding values for planar flow past a periodic array of parallel cylinders. These applications show the versatility of the technique for studying viscous flows in complicated 3D geometries.

  9. Phloem ultrastructure and pressure flow: Sieve-Element-Occlusion-Related agglomerations do not affect translocation.

    PubMed

    Froelich, Daniel R; Mullendore, Daniel L; Jensen, Kåre H; Ross-Elliott, Tim J; Anstead, James A; Thompson, Gary A; Pélissier, Hélène C; Knoblauch, Michael

    2011-12-01

    Since the first ultrastructural investigations of sieve tubes in the early 1960s, their structure has been a matter of debate. Because sieve tube structure defines frictional interactions in the tube system, the presence of P protein obstructions shown in many transmission electron micrographs led to a discussion about the mode of phloem transport. At present, it is generally agreed that P protein agglomerations are preparation artifacts due to injury, the lumen of sieve tubes is free of obstructions, and phloem flow is driven by an osmotically generated pressure differential according to Münch's classical hypothesis. Here, we show that the phloem contains a distinctive network of protein filaments. Stable transgenic lines expressing Arabidopsis thaliana Sieve-Element-Occlusion-Related1 (SEOR1)-yellow fluorescent protein fusions show that At SEOR1 meshworks at the margins and clots in the lumen are a general feature of living sieve tubes. Live imaging of phloem flow and flow velocity measurements in individual tubes indicate that At SEOR1 agglomerations do not markedly affect or alter flow. A transmission electron microscopy preparation protocol has been generated showing sieve tube ultrastructure of unprecedented quality. A reconstruction of sieve tube ultrastructure served as basis for tube resistance calculations. The impact of agglomerations on phloem flow is discussed.

  10. Simulation of Fluid Flow and Collection Efficiency for an SEA Multi-element Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, David L.; Struk, Peter M.; Bidwell, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Numerical simulations of fluid flow and collection efficiency for a Science Engineering Associates (SEA) multi-element probe are presented. Simulation of the flow field was produced using the Glenn-HT Navier-Stokes solver. Three-dimensional unsteady results were produced and then time averaged for the heat transfer and collection efficiency results. Three grid densities were investigated to enable an assessment of grid dependence. Simulations were completed for free stream velocities ranging from 85-135 meters per second, and free stream total pressure of 44.8 and 93.1 kilopascals (6.5 and 13.5 pounds per square inch absolute). In addition, the effect of angle of attack and yaw were investigated by including 5 degree deviations from straight for one of the flow conditions. All but one of the cases simulated a probe in isolation (i.e. in a very large domain without any support strut). One case is included which represents a probe mounted on a support strut within a finite sized wind tunnel. Collection efficiencies were generated, using the LEWICE3D code, for four spherical particle sizes, 100, 50, 20, and 5 micron in diameter. It was observed that a reduction in velocity of about 20% occurred, for all cases, as the flow entered the shroud of the probe. The reduction in velocity within the shroud is not indicative of any error in the probe measurement accuracy. Heat transfer results are presented which agree quite well with a correlation for the circular cross section heated elements. Collection efficiency results indicate a reduction in collection efficiency as particle size is reduced. The reduction with particle size is expected, however, the results tended to be lower than the previous results generated for isolated two-dimensional elements. The deviation from the two-dimensional results is more pronounced for the smaller particles and is likely due to the reduced flow within the protective shroud. As particle size increases differences between the two

  11. Effect of surface morphology on drag and roughness sublayer in flows over regular roughness elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Placidi, Marco; Ganapathisubramani, Bharathram

    2014-11-01

    The effects of systematically varied roughness morphology on bulk drag and on the spatial structure of turbulent boundary layers are examined by performing a series of wind tunnel experiments. In this study, rough surfaces consisting of regularly and uniformly distributed LEGO™ bricks are employed. Twelve different patterns are adopted in order to methodically examine the individual effects of frontal solidity (λF, frontal area of the roughness elements per unit wall-parallel area) and plan solidity (λP, plan area of roughness elements per unit wall-parallel area), on both the bulk drag and the turbulence structure. A floating element friction balance based on Krogstad & Efros (2010) was designed and manufactured to measure the drag generated by the different surfaces. In parallel, high resolution planar and stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was applied to investigate the flow features. This talk will focus on the effects of each solidity parameter on the bulk drag and attempt to relate the observed trends to the flow structures in the roughness sublayer. Currently at City University London.

  12. A Hybrid Boundary Element-Finite Volume Method for Unsteady Transonic Airfoil Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Hong; Kandil, Osama A.

    1996-01-01

    A hybrid boundary element finite volume method for unsteady transonic flow computation has been developed. In this method, the unsteady Euler equations in a moving frame of reference are solved in a small embedded domain (inner domain) around the airfoil using an implicit finite volume scheme. The unsteady full-potential equation, written in the same frame of reference and in the form of the Poisson equation. is solved in the outer domain using the integral equation boundary element method to provide the boundary conditions for the inner Euler domain. The solution procedure is a time-accurate stepping procedure, where the outer boundary conditions for the inner domain are updated using the integral equation -- boundary element solution over the outer domain. The method is applied to unsteady transonic flows around the NACA0012 airfoil undergoing pitching oscillation and ramp motion. The results are compared with those of an implicit Euler equation solver, which is used throughout a large computational domain, and experimental data.

  13. A 3D moving mesh Finite Element Method for two-phase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anjos, G. R.; Borhani, N.; Mangiavacchi, N.; Thome, J. R.

    2014-08-01

    A 3D ALE Finite Element Method is developed to study two-phase flow phenomena using a new discretization method to compute the surface tension forces. The computational method is based on the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation (ALE) and the Finite Element Method (FEM), creating a two-phase method with an improved model for the liquid-gas interface. An adaptive mesh update procedure is also proposed for effective management of the mesh to remove, add and repair elements, since the computational mesh nodes move according to the flow. The ALE description explicitly defines the two-phase interface position by a set of interconnected nodes which ensures a sharp representation of the boundary, including the role of the surface tension. The proposed methodology for computing the curvature leads to accurate results with moderate programming effort and computational cost. Static and dynamic tests have been carried out to validate the method and the results have compared well to analytical solutions and experimental results found in the literature, demonstrating that the new proposed methodology provides good accuracy to describe the interfacial forces and bubble dynamics. This paper focuses on the description of the proposed methodology, with particular emphasis on the discretization of the surface tension force, the new remeshing technique, and the validation results. Additionally, a microchannel simulation in complex geometry is presented for two elongated bubbles.

  14. Detached Eddy Simulations of Incompressible Turbulent Flows Using the Finite Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Laskowski, G M

    2001-08-01

    An explicit Galerkin finite-element formulation of the Spalart-Allmaras (SA) 1 - equation turbulent transport model was implemented into the incompressible flow module of a parallel, multi-domain, Galerkin finite-element, multi-physics code, using both a RANS formulation and a DES formulation. DES is a new technique for simulating/modeling turbulence using a hybrid RANSkES formulation. The turbulent viscosity is constructed from an intermediate viscosity obtained from the transport equation which is spatially discretized using Q1 elements and integrated in time via forward Euler time integration. Three simulations of plane channel flow on a RANS-type grid, using different turbulence models, were conducted in order to validate the implementation of the SA model: SA-RANS, SA-DES and Smagorinksy (without wall correction). Very good agreement was observed between the SA-RANS results and theory, namely the Log Law of the Wall (LLW), especially in the viscous sublayer region and, to a lesser extent, in the log-layer region. The results obtained using the SA-DES model did not agree as well with the LLW, and it is believed that this poor agreement can be attributed to using a DES model on a RANS grid, namely using an incorrect length-scale. It was observed that near the wall, the SA-DES model acted as an RANS model, and away from the wall it acted as an LES model.

  15. Adaptive finite element simulation of flow and transport applications on parallel computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, Benjamin Shelton

    The subject of this work is the adaptive finite element simulation of problems arising in flow and transport applications on parallel computers. Of particular interest are new contributions to adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) in this parallel high-performance context, including novel work on data structures, treatment of constraints in a parallel setting, generality and extensibility via object-oriented programming, and the design/implementation of a flexible software framework. This technology and software capability then enables more robust, reliable treatment of multiscale--multiphysics problems and specific studies of fine scale interaction such as those in biological chemotaxis (Chapter 4) and high-speed shock physics for compressible flows (Chapter 5). The work begins by presenting an overview of key concepts and data structures employed in AMR simulations. Of particular interest is how these concepts are applied in the physics-independent software framework which is developed here and is the basis for all the numerical simulations performed in this work. This open-source software framework has been adopted by a number of researchers in the U.S. and abroad for use in a wide range of applications. The dynamic nature of adaptive simulations pose particular issues for efficient implementation on distributed-memory parallel architectures. Communication cost, computational load balance, and memory requirements must all be considered when developing adaptive software for this class of machines. Specific extensions to the adaptive data structures to enable implementation on parallel computers is therefore considered in detail. The libMesh framework for performing adaptive finite element simulations on parallel computers is developed to provide a concrete implementation of the above ideas. This physics-independent framework is applied to two distinct flow and transport applications classes in the subsequent application studies to illustrate the flexibility of the

  16. Trajectory piecewise quadratic reduced-order model for subsurface flow, with application to PDE-constrained optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trehan, Sumeet; Durlofsky, Louis J.

    2016-12-01

    A new reduced-order model based on trajectory piecewise quadratic (TPWQ) approximations and proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) is introduced and applied for subsurface oil-water flow simulation. The method extends existing techniques based on trajectory piecewise linear (TPWL) approximations by incorporating second-derivative terms into the reduced-order treatment. Both the linear and quadratic reduced-order methods, referred to as POD-TPWL and POD-TPWQ, entail the representation of new solutions as expansions around previously simulated high-fidelity (full-order) training solutions, along with POD-based projection into a low-dimensional space. POD-TPWQ entails significantly more offline preprocessing than POD-TPWL as it requires generating and projecting several third-order (Hessian-type) terms. The POD-TPWQ method is implemented for two-dimensional systems. Extensive numerical results demonstrate that it provides consistently better accuracy than POD-TPWL, with speedups of about two orders of magnitude relative to high-fidelity simulations for the problems considered. We demonstrate that POD-TPWQ can be used as an error estimator for POD-TPWL, which motivates the development of a trust-region-based optimization framework. This procedure uses POD-TPWL for fast function evaluations and a POD-TPWQ error estimator to determine when retraining, which entails a high-fidelity simulation, is required. Optimization results for an oil-water problem demonstrate the substantial speedups that can be achieved relative to optimizations based on high-fidelity simulation.

  17. Simulation of Fluid Flow and Collection Efficiency for an SEA Multi-element Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, David L.; Struk, Peter M.; Bidwell, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Numerical simulations of fluid flow and collection efficiency for a Science Engineering Associates (SEA) multi-element probe are presented. Simulation of the flow field was produced using the Glenn-HT Navier-Stokes solver. Three dimensional unsteady results were produced and then time averaged for the collection efficiency results. Three grid densities were investigated to enable an assessment of grid dependence. Collection efficiencies were generated for three spherical particle sizes, 100, 20, and 5 micron in diameter, using the codes LEWICE3D and LEWICE2D. The free stream Mach number was 0.27, representing a velocity of approximately 86 ms. It was observed that a reduction in velocity of about 15-20 occurred as the flow entered the shroud of the probe.Collection efficiency results indicate a reduction in collection efficiency as particle size is reduced. The reduction with particle size is expected, however, the results tended to be lower than previous results generated for isolated two-dimensional elements. The deviation from the two-dimensional results is more pronounced for the smaller particles and is likely due to the effect of the protective shroud.

  18. Higher Order Finite Element Methods for Compositional Simulation in 3D Multiphase Multicomponent Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahraeeni, E.; Firoozabadi, A.

    2012-12-01

    We present a 3D model for fully compositional multi-phase multi-component flow in porous media with species transfer between the phases. Phase properties are modeled with the Peng-Robinson equation of state. Because phase properties may exhibit strong discontinuities, we approximate the mass transport update by the means of discontinuous Galerkin method. Pressure and velocity fields are continuous across the whole domain of solution, which is guaranteed by using the mixed hybrid finite element method. Complexity of the flow necessitates the use of either very fine mesh or higher-order schemes. The use of higher-order finite element methods significantly reduces numerical dispersion and grid orientation effects that plague traditional finite difference methods. We have shown that in 3D the convergence rate of our scheme is twice as first order method and the CPU time may improve up to three orders of magnitude for the same level of accuracy. Our numerical model facilitates accurate simulation of delicate feature of compositional flow like fingering and CO2 injection in complex reservoirs for a broad range of applications, including CO2 sequestration in finite aquifer and water flooded reservoirs with transfer of all species between the phases.

  19. An algebraic factorisation scheme for spectral element solution of incompressible flow and scalar transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ho J.; Beskok, Ali

    2010-03-01

    A spectral element algorithm for solution of the unsteady incompressible Navier-Stokes and scalar (species/heat) transport equations is developed using the algebraic factorisation scheme. The new algorithm utilises Nth order Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre points for velocity and the scalar, while (N-2)th order Gauss-Legendre points are used for pressure. As a result, the algorithm does not require inter-element continuity for pressure and pressure boundary conditions on solid surfaces. Implementations of the algorithm are performed for conforming and non-conforming grids. The latter is accomplished using both the point-wise matching and integral projection methods, and applied for grids with both polynomial and geometric non-conformities. Code validation cases include the unsteady scalar convection equation, and Kovasznay flow in two- and three-dimensional domains. Using cases with analytical solutions, the algorithm is shown to achieve spectral accuracy in space and second-order accuracy in time. The results for the Boussinesq approximation for buoyancy-driven flows, and the species mixing in a continuous flow micro-mixer are also included as examples of applications that require long-time integration of the scalar transport equations.

  20. Power flow as a complement to statistical energy analysis and finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuschieri, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    Present methods of analysis of the structural response and the structure-borne transmission of vibrational energy use either finite element (FE) techniques or statistical energy analysis (SEA) methods. The FE methods are a very useful tool at low frequencies where the number of resonances involved in the analysis is rather small. On the other hand SEA methods can predict with acceptable accuracy the response and energy transmission between coupled structures at relatively high frequencies where the structural modal density is high and a statistical approach is the appropriate solution. In the mid-frequency range, a relatively large number of resonances exist which make finite element method too costly. On the other hand SEA methods can only predict an average level form. In this mid-frequency range a possible alternative is to use power flow techniques, where the input and flow of vibrational energy to excited and coupled structural components can be expressed in terms of input and transfer mobilities. This power flow technique can be extended from low to high frequencies and this can be integrated with established FE models at low frequencies and SEA models at high frequencies to form a verification of the method. This method of structural analysis using power flo and mobility methods, and its integration with SEA and FE analysis is applied to the case of two thin beams joined together at right angles.

  1. Integration of remotely-sensed and ground-based measurements to constrain simulations of groundwater flow and land subsidence, San Joaquin Valley, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sneed, M.; Brandt, J.; Solt, M.

    2011-12-01

    Extensive groundwater withdrawal from the unconsolidated deposits in the San Joaquin Valley caused widespread aquifer-system compaction and resultant land subsidence between 1926 and 1970-locally exceeding 8 meters (m). To identify the extent of the subsidence, a monitoring network consisting of 31 extensometers was developed and maintained in the 1960s. The importation of surface water in the early 1970s resulted in decreased pumping and a steady recovery of water levels. This recovery reduced the rate of compaction, and consequently, the monitoring network deteriorated. However, lack of imported surface-water availability during 1976-77, 1986-92, and 2007-09 has caused groundwater pumping to increase, which has resulted in water levels to decline to near-historic lows and renewed compaction to occur. Land subsidence resulting from this compaction has reduced freeboard and flow capacity of the Delta-Mendota Canal, the California Aqueduct, and other canals that deliver irrigation water and transport floodwater, requiring expensive repairs. To identify existing and future subsidence, a monitoring network is being developed that includes resurrecting some of the extensometers and piezometers from the old network and augmenting these ground-based measurements with remotely-sensed measurements from Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar and continuous Global Positioning System stations. Preliminary results from the monitoring network indicate that subsidence is occurring in locations of known historical subsidence. These results are being used to develop groundwater-flow and subsidence models to help understand and effectively manage future subsidence. A 1-D model was developed to identify the depth of the compactable units near Oro Loma, where about 60 m of water-level decline is associated with about 3 m of subsidence. The subsurface geology is well-constrained by detailed descriptions of continuous core and by geophysical logs. Analysis indicates that the Corcoran

  2. Higher and lowest order mixed finite element approximation of subsurface flow problems with solutions of low regularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bause, Markus

    2008-02-01

    In this work we study mixed finite element approximations of Richards' equation for simulating variably saturated subsurface flow and simultaneous reactive solute transport. Whereas higher order schemes have proved their ability to approximate reliably reactive solute transport (cf., e.g. [Bause M, Knabner P. Numerical simulation of contaminant biodegradation by higher order methods and adaptive time stepping. Comput Visual Sci 7;2004:61-78]), the Raviart- Thomas mixed finite element method ( RT0) with a first order accurate flux approximation is popular for computing the underlying water flow field (cf. [Bause M, Knabner P. Computation of variably saturated subsurface flow by adaptive mixed hybrid finite element methods. Adv Water Resour 27;2004:565-581, Farthing MW, Kees CE, Miller CT. Mixed finite element methods and higher order temporal approximations for variably saturated groundwater flow. Adv Water Resour 26;2003:373-394, Starke G. Least-squares mixed finite element solution of variably saturated subsurface flow problems. SIAM J Sci Comput 21;2000:1869-1885, Younes A, Mosé R, Ackerer P, Chavent G. A new formulation of the mixed finite element method for solving elliptic and parabolic PDE with triangular elements. J Comp Phys 149;1999:148-167, Woodward CS, Dawson CN. Analysis of expanded mixed finite element methods for a nonlinear parabolic equation modeling flow into variably saturated porous media. SIAM J Numer Anal 37;2000:701-724]). This combination might be non-optimal. Higher order techniques could increase the accuracy of the flow field calculation and thereby improve the prediction of the solute transport. Here, we analyse the application of the Brezzi- Douglas- Marini element ( BDM1) with a second order accurate flux approximation to elliptic, parabolic and degenerate problems whose solutions lack the regularity that is assumed in optimal order error analyses. For the flow field calculation a superiority of the BDM1 approach to the RT0 one is

  3. Flow tests of a single fuel element coolant channel for a compact fast reactor for space power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Springborn, R. H.

    1971-01-01

    Water flow tests were conducted on a single-fuel-element cooling channel for a nuclear concept to be used for space power. The tests established a method for measuring coolant flow rate which is applicable to water flow testing of a complete mockup of the reference reactor. The inlet plenum-to-outlet plenum pressure drop, which approximates the overall core pressure drop, was measured and correlated with flow rate. This information can be used for reactor coolant flow and heat transfer calculations. An analytical study of the flow characteristics was also conducted.

  4. A study of the rheology of planar granular flow of dumbbells using discrete element method simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Sandip; Khakhar, D. V.

    2016-10-01

    Granular materials handled in industries are typically non-spherical in shape and understanding the flow of such materials is important. The steady flow of mono-disperse, frictional, inelastic dumbbells in two-dimensions is studied by soft sphere, discrete element method simulations for chute flow and shear cell flow. The chute flow data are in the dense flow regime, while the shear cell data span a wide range of solid fractions. Results of a detailed parametric study for both systems are presented. In chute flow, increase in the aspect ratio of the dumbbells results in significant slowing of the flow at a fixed inclination and in the shear cell it results in increase in the shear stress and pressure for a fixed shear rate. The flow is well-described by the μ-I scaling for inertial numbers as high as I = 1, corresponding to solid fractions as low as ϕ = 0.3, where μ is the effective friction (the ratio of shear stress to pressure) and I is the inertial number (a dimensionless shear rate scaled with the time scale obtained from the local pressure). For a fixed inertial number, the effective friction increases by 60%-70% when aspect ratio is increased from 1.0 (sphere) to 1.9. At low values of the inertial number, there is little change in the solid fraction with aspect ratio of the dumbbells, whereas at high values of the inertial number, there is a significant increase in solid fraction with increase in aspect ratio. The dense flow data are well-described by the Jop-Forterre-Pouliquen model [P. Jop et al., Nature 441, 727-730 (2006)] with the model parameters dependent on the dumbbell aspect ratio. The variation of μ with I over the extended range shows a maximum in the range I ∈ (0.4, 0.5), while the solid fraction shows a faster than linear decrease with inertial number. A modified version of the JFP model for μ(I) and a power law model for ϕ(I) is shown to describe the combined data over the extended range of I.

  5. Constraining the dynamical behavior of the western US lithosphere through computational modeling: Evidence that lower crustal flow plays a significant role in load accommodation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seunarine, L.; Lowry, A. R.

    2011-12-01

    and temperature so that compositional and thermal mass contributions are nearly negligible. These results suggest that load accommodation produces less Moho deflection than would be expected for a crème brulee style of deformation and that stresses are accommodated, at least in part, by significant flow in the lower crust. Based on these results, we design a new series of models to better constrain the nature of this channel flow in the lower crust in terms of its average properties across the Western US, including channel dimensions and viscosity structure.

  6. Computation of variably saturated subsurface flow by adaptive mixed hybrid finite element methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bause, M.; Knabner, P.

    2004-06-01

    We present adaptive mixed hybrid finite element discretizations of the Richards equation, a nonlinear parabolic partial differential equation modeling the flow of water into a variably saturated porous medium. The approach simultaneously constructs approximations of the flux and the pressure head in Raviart-Thomas spaces. The resulting nonlinear systems of equations are solved by a Newton method. For the linear problems of the Newton iteration a multigrid algorithm is used. We consider two different kinds of error indicators for space adaptive grid refinement: superconvergence and residual based indicators. They can be calculated easily by means of the available finite element approximations. This seems attractive for computations since no additional (sub-)problems have to be solved. Computational experiments conducted for realistic water table recharge problems illustrate the effectiveness and robustness of the approach.

  7. Convection from Hemispherical and Conical Model Ice Roughness Elements in Stagnation Region Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Michael T.; Shannon, Timothy A.; McClain, Stephen T.; Vargas, Mario; Broeren, Andy

    2016-01-01

    To improve ice accretion prediction codes, more data regarding ice roughness and its effects on convective heat transfer are required. The Vertical Icing Studies Tunnel (VIST) at NASA Glenn Research was used to model realistic ice roughness in the stagnation region of a NACA 0012 airfoil. In the VIST, a test plate representing the leading 2% chord of the airfoil was subjected to flows of 7.62 m/s (25 ft/s), 12.19 m/s (40 ft/s), and 16.76 m/s (55 ft/s). The test plate was fitted with multiple surfaces or sets of roughness panels, each with a different representation of ice roughness. The sets of roughness panels were constructed using two element distribution patterns that were created based on a laser scan of an iced airfoil acquired in the Icing Research Tunnel at NASA Glenn. For both roughness patterns, surfaces were constructed using plastic hemispherical elements, plastic conical elements, and aluminum conical elements. Infrared surface thermometry data from tests run in the VIST were used to calculate area averaged heat transfer coefficient values. The values from the roughness surfaces were compared to the smooth control surface, showing convective enhancement as high as 400% in some cases. The data gathered during this study will ultimately be used to improve the physical modeling in LEWICE or other ice accretion codes and produce predictions of in-flight ice accretion on aircraft surfaces with greater confidence.

  8. A two-dimensional flow sensor with integrated micro thermal sensing elements and a back propagation neural network.

    PubMed

    Que, Ruiyi; Zhu, Rong

    2013-12-31

    This paper demonstrates a novel flow sensor with two-dimensional 360° direction sensitivity achieved with a simple structure and a novel data fusion algorithm. Four sensing elements with roundabout wires distributed in four quadrants of a circle compose the sensor probe, and work in constant temperature difference (CTD) mode as both Joule heaters and temperature detectors. The magnitude and direction of a fluid flow are measured by detecting flow-induced temperature differences among the four elements. The probe is made of Ti/Au thin-film with a diameter of 2 mm, and is fabricated using micromachining techniques. When a flow goes through the sensor, the flow-induced temperature differences are detected by the sensing elements that also serve as the heaters of the sensor. By measuring the temperature differences among the four sensing elements symmetrically distributed in the sensing area, a full 360° direction sensitivity can be obtained. By using a BP neural network to model the relationship between the readouts of the four sensor elements and flow parameters and execute data fusion, the magnitude and direction of the flow can be deduced. Validity of the sensor design was proven through both simulations and experiments. Wind tunnel experimental results show that the measurement accuracy of the airflow speed reaches 0.72 m/s in the range of 3 m/s-30 m/s and the measurement accuracy of flow direction angle reaches 1.9° in the range of 360°.

  9. A Two-Dimensional Flow Sensor with Integrated Micro Thermal Sensing Elements and a Back Propagation Neural Network

    PubMed Central

    Que, Ruiyi; Zhu, Rong

    2014-01-01

    This paper demonstrates a novel flow sensor with two-dimensional 360° direction sensitivity achieved with a simple structure and a novel data fusion algorithm. Four sensing elements with roundabout wires distributed in four quadrants of a circle compose the sensor probe, and work in constant temperature difference (CTD) mode as both Joule heaters and temperature detectors. The magnitude and direction of a fluid flow are measured by detecting flow-induced temperature differences among the four elements. The probe is made of Ti/Au thin-film with a diameter of 2 mm, and is fabricated using micromachining techniques. When a flow goes through the sensor, the flow-induced temperature differences are detected by the sensing elements that also serve as the heaters of the sensor. By measuring the temperature differences among the four sensing elements symmetrically distributed in the sensing area, a full 360° direction sensitivity can be obtained. By using a BP neural network to model the relationship between the readouts of the four sensor elements and flow parameters and execute data fusion, the magnitude and direction of the flow can be deduced. Validity of the sensor design was proven through both simulations and experiments. Wind tunnel experimental results show that the measurement accuracy of the airflow speed reaches 0.72 m/s in the range of 3 m/s–30 m/s and the measurement accuracy of flow direction angle reaches 1.9° in the range of 360°. PMID:24385032

  10. A finite element algorithm for sound propagation in axisymmetric ducts containing compressible mean flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrahamson, A. L.

    1977-01-01

    An accurate mathematical model for sound propagation in axisymmetric aircraft engine ducts with compressible mean flow is reported. The model is based on the usual perturbation of the basic fluid mechanics equations for small motions. Mean flow parameters are derived in the absence of fluctuating quantities and are then substituted into the equations for the acoustic quantities which were linearized by eliminating higher order terms. Mean swirl is assumed to be zero from the restriction of axisymmetry. A linear rectangular serendipity element is formulated from these equations using a Galerkin procedure and assembled in a special purpose computer program in which the matrix map for a rectangular mesh was specifically coded. Representations of the fluctuating quantities, mean quantities and coordinate transformations are isoparametric. The global matrix is solved by foreward and back substitution following an L-U decomposition with pivoting restricted internally to the blocks. Results from the model were compared with results from several alternative analyses and yielded satisfactory agreement.

  11. Generalized multiscale finite element method for non-Newtonian fluid flow in perforated domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, E. T.; Iliev, O.; Vasilyeva, M. V.

    2016-10-01

    In this work, we consider a non-Newtonian fluid flow in perforated domains. Fluid flow in perforated domains have a multiscale nature and solution techniques for such problems require high resolution. In particular, the discretization needs to honor the irregular boundaries of perforations. This gives rise to a fine-scale problems with many degrees of freedom which can be very expensive to solve. In this work, we develop a multiscale approach that attempt to solve such problems on a coarse grid by constructing multiscale basis functions. We follow Generalized Multiscale Finite Element Method (GMsFEM) [1, 2] and develop a multiscale procedure where we identify multiscale basis functions in each coarse block using snapshot space and local spectral problems [3, 4]. We show that with a few basis functions in each coarse block, one can accurately approximate the solution, where each coarse block can contain many small inclusions.

  12. Numerical simulation in finite elements of turbulent flows of viscous incompressible fluids in air intakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begue, C.; Periaux, J.; Perrier, P.; Pouletty, C.

    1985-11-01

    A self-adaptive finite-element method, coupled to a homogenization model of turbulence, is presented for the numerical simulation of unsteady turbulent flow of viscous fluids in air intakes. The nonlinear subproblem due to the convection is solved by an iterative algorithm, and the linear Stokes subproblem due to the diffusion is solved by a Hood-Taylor type iterative algorithm. An efficient and precise minielement approximation is used, and the adaptive mesh procedure is automatic in the calculation, using the physical criteria of rotation and divergence to determine the submeshing zones. The numerical method is demonstrated for the example of three-dimensional laminar flow around and in air intake at a Reynolds number of 200.

  13. The application of general aerodynamic lifting surface elements to problems in unsteady transonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, A. M., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the feasibility of using combined subsonic and supersonic linear theory as a means for solving unsteady transonic flow problems in an economical and yet realistic manner. With some modification, existing linear theory methods are combined into a single program and a simple algorithm is derived for determining interference between lifting surface elements of different Mach number. The method is applied to a wide variety of problems for which measured unsteady pressure distributions and Mach number distributions are available. By comparing theory and experiment, the transonic method solutions show a significant improvement over uniform flow solutions. It is concluded that with these refinements the method will provide a means for performing realistic transonic flutter and dynamic response analyses at costs which are compatible with current linear theory based solutions.

  14. A case of elasto-plastic flow using a new special element. [crack tip analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swedlow, J. L.; Karabin, M. E., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Using a new special element for elasto-plastic flow, a nearly square, center-cracked plate of simulated A533 steel is analyzed. Selected results are examined locally to the crack's tip. It is found that a sharp transition in the distribution of deformation and stress occurs after the initial elastic response, and that this state is followed by fairly stable behavior over a considerable portion of the load range. Distribution of strain energy density is noted, and implications for use of the parameter J and for additional work are discussed briefly.

  15. A Poisson equation formulation for pressure calculations in penalty finite element models for viscous incompressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohn, J. L.; Heinrich, J. C.

    1990-01-01

    The calculation of pressures when the penalty-function approximation is used in finite-element solutions of laminar incompressible flows is addressed. A Poisson equation for the pressure is formulated that involves third derivatives of the velocity field. The second derivatives appearing in the weak formulation of the Poisson equation are calculated from the C0 velocity approximation using a least-squares method. The present scheme is shown to be efficient, free of spurious oscillations, and accurate. Examples of applications are given and compared with results obtained using mixed formulations.

  16. Characteristics of fluid flow in the combustion synthesis of TiC from the elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valone, S. M.; Behrens, R. G.

    1987-01-01

    The results of a numerical investigation of finite reservoir effects on capillary spreading at small reservoir dimensions are presently related to wave propagation phenomena in the combustion synthesis of TiC from its two elemental constituents. It is noted that gravitational forces can affect bubble coalescence by nonbuoyant means under the suitable conditions, although these conditions are expected to be rare in combustion synthesis. Finite-curved reservoirs can drive capillary flow due to surface tension and wall contact forces; these cause the wall and the metal to be completely reconfigured during combustion synthesis.

  17. A Global Interpolation Function (GIF) boundary element code for viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, D. R.; Lafe, O.; Cheng, A. H-D.

    1995-01-01

    Using global interpolation functions (GIF's), boundary element solutions are obtained for two- and three-dimensional viscous flows. The solution is obtained in the form of a boundary integral plus a series of global basis functions. The unknown coefficients of the GIF's are determined to ensure the satisfaction of the governing equations at selected collocation points. The values of the coefficients involved in the boundary integral equations are determined by enforcing the boundary conditions. Both primitive variable and vorticity-velocity formulations are examined.

  18. An hybrid finite volume finite element method for variable density incompressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calgaro, Caterina; Creusé, Emmanuel; Goudon, Thierry

    2008-04-01

    This paper is devoted to the numerical simulation of variable density incompressible flows, modeled by the Navier-Stokes system. We introduce an hybrid scheme which combines a finite volume approach for treating the mass conservation equation and a finite element method to deal with the momentum equation and the divergence free constraint. The breakthrough relies on the definition of a suitable footbridge between the two methods, through the design of compatibility condition. In turn, the method is very flexible and allows to deal with unstructured meshes. Several numerical tests are performed to show the scheme capabilities. In particular, the viscous Rayleigh-Taylor instability evolution is carefully investigated.

  19. Simulation of viscous flows using a multigrid-control volume finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    Hookey, N.A.

    1994-12-31

    This paper discusses a multigrid control volume finite element method (MG CVFEM) for the simulation of viscous fluid flows. The CVFEM is an equal-order primitive variables formulation that avoids spurious solution fields by incorporating an appropriate pressure gradient in the velocity interpolation functions. The resulting set of discretized equations is solved using a coupled equation line solver (CELS) that solves the discretized momentum and continuity equations simultaneously along lines in the calculation domain. The CVFEM has been implemented in the context of both FMV- and V-cycle multigrid algorithms, and preliminary results indicate a five to ten fold reduction in execution times.

  20. Least-squares finite element solutions for three-dimensional backward-facing step flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan; Hou, Lin-Jun; Lin, Tsung-Liang

    1993-01-01

    Comprehensive numerical solutions of the steady state incompressible viscous flow over a three-dimensional backward-facing step up to Re equals 800 are presented. The results are obtained by the least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) which is based on the velocity-pressure-vorticity formulation. The computed model is of the same size as that of Armaly's experiment. Three-dimensional phenomena are observed even at low Reynolds number. The calculated values of the primary reattachment length are in good agreement with experimental results.

  1. Analytic Element Modeling of Steady Interface Flow in Multilayer Aquifers Using AnAqSim.

    PubMed

    Fitts, Charles R; Godwin, Joshua; Feiner, Kathleen; McLane, Charles; Mullendore, Seth

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the analytic element modeling approach implemented in the software AnAqSim for simulating steady groundwater flow with a sharp fresh-salt interface in multilayer (three-dimensional) aquifer systems. Compared with numerical methods for variable-density interface modeling, this approach allows quick model construction and can yield useful guidance about the three-dimensional configuration of an interface even at a large scale. The approach employs subdomains and multiple layers as outlined by Fitts (2010) with the addition of discharge potentials for shallow interface flow (Strack 1989). The following simplifying assumptions are made: steady flow, a sharp interface between fresh- and salt water, static salt water, and no resistance to vertical flow and hydrostatic heads within each fresh water layer. A key component of this approach is a transition to a thin fixed minimum fresh water thickness mode when the fresh water thickness approaches zero. This allows the solution to converge and determine the steady interface position without a long transient simulation. The approach is checked against the widely used numerical codes SEAWAT and SWI/MODFLOW and a hypothetical application of the method to a coastal wellfield is presented.

  2. Transitional flow in the wake of a moderate to large height cylindrical roughness element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plogmann, B.; Würz, W.; Krämer, E.

    2015-12-01

    The effect of an isolated, cylindrical roughness on the stability of an airfoil boundary layer has been studied based on particle image velocimetry and hot-wire anemometry. The investigated roughness elements range from a sub-critical to a super-critical behavior with regard to the critical roughness Reynolds number. For the sub-critical case, the nonlinear disturbance growth in the near wake is governed by oblique Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) type modes. Further downstream, these disturbance modes are, however, damped with the mean flow stabilization and no dominant modes persist in the far wake. By contrast, in the transitional configuration the disturbance growth is increased, but still associated with a TS-type instability in the near-wake centerline region of the low-aspect (height-to-diameter) ratio element. That is, the disturbances in the centerline region show a similar behavior as known for 2D elements, whereas in the outer spanwise domain a Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) type, shear-layer instability is found, as previously reported for larger aspect ratio isolated elements. With increasing height and, thereby, aspect ratio of the roughness, the KH-type instability domain extends toward the centerline and, accordingly, the TS-type instability domain decreases. For high super-critical cases, transition is already triggered in the wall-normal and spanwise shear layers upstream and around the roughness. In the immediate wake, periodic shear-layer disturbances roll up into a—for isolated elements characteristic—shedding of vortices, which was not present at the lower roughness Reynolds number cases due to the decreased aspect ratio and, thereby, different instability mechanism.

  3. The semi-discrete Galerkin finite element modelling of compressible viscous flow past an airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meade, Andrew J., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A method is developed to solve the two-dimensional, steady, compressible, turbulent boundary-layer equations and is coupled to an existing Euler solver for attached transonic airfoil analysis problems. The boundary-layer formulation utilizes the semi-discrete Galerkin (SDG) method to model the spatial variable normal to the surface with linear finite elements and the time-like variable with finite differences. A Dorodnitsyn transformed system of equations is used to bound the infinite spatial domain thereby permitting the use of a uniform finite element grid which provides high resolution near the wall and automatically follows boundary-layer growth. The second-order accurate Crank-Nicholson scheme is applied along with a linearization method to take advantage of the parabolic nature of the boundary-layer equations and generate a non-iterative marching routine. The SDG code can be applied to any smoothly-connected airfoil shape without modification and can be coupled to any inviscid flow solver. In this analysis, a direct viscous-inviscid interaction is accomplished between the Euler and boundary-layer codes, through the application of a transpiration velocity boundary condition. Results are presented for compressible turbulent flow past NACA 0012 and RAE 2822 airfoils at various freestream Mach numbers, Reynolds numbers, and angles of attack. All results show good agreement with experiment, and the coupled code proved to be a computationally-efficient and accurate airfoil analysis tool.

  4. A high order accurate finite element algorithm for high Reynolds number flow prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.

    1978-01-01

    A Galerkin-weighted residuals formulation is employed to establish an implicit finite element solution algorithm for generally nonlinear initial-boundary value problems. Solution accuracy, and convergence rate with discretization refinement, are quantized in several error norms, by a systematic study of numerical solutions to several nonlinear parabolic and a hyperbolic partial differential equation characteristic of the equations governing fluid flows. Solutions are generated using selective linear, quadratic and cubic basis functions. Richardson extrapolation is employed to generate a higher-order accurate solution to facilitate isolation of truncation error in all norms. Extension of the mathematical theory underlying accuracy and convergence concepts for linear elliptic equations is predicted for equations characteristic of laminar and turbulent fluid flows at nonmodest Reynolds number. The nondiagonal initial-value matrix structure introduced by the finite element theory is determined intrinsic to improved solution accuracy and convergence. A factored Jacobian iteration algorithm is derived and evaluated to yield a consequential reduction in both computer storage and execution CPU requirements while retaining solution accuracy.

  5. Flow injection sample pretreatment in the determination of trace elements in waters by atomic spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Tyson, J.F.

    1995-12-31

    Flow injection (FI) techniques are a way of automating sampling pretreatment procedures with direct coupling to the instrument. For a variety of reasons, flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) would be the method of choice for the determination of trace elements in water samples were it not for some of the inherent limitations of this technique. These limitations are concerned with the various interferences that arise from matrix components and with the atom number density in the source. This together with the various noise sources sets detection limits which are not low enough for many applications. Thus many FI procedures are devised with the aim of overcoming these limitations and thus solid phase extraction (SPE) as a means of preconcentration features largely in recently published work. Results will be presented for the determination of trace elements in water samples (both fresh and saline) in which SPE procedures were used to (a) remove the potentially interfering sea-water matrix for determinations using ICP-MS and (b) preconcentrate cadmium from surface waters prior to determination by FAAS. Hydride generation methods have been applied for the determination of selenium and arsenic. In highly saline media the elevated recoveries of Se have been investigated and for the determination of As, an evaluation of the claim that the use of surfactants improves the performance of a flow based hydride generation system has critically evaluated.

  6. Finite element modeling of mass transport in high-Péclet cardiovascular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Kirk; Arzani, Amirhossein; Shadden, Shawn

    2016-11-01

    Mass transport plays an important role in many important cardiovascular processes, including thrombus formation and atherosclerosis. These mass transport problems are characterized by Péclet numbers of up to 108, leading to several numerical difficulties. The presence of thin near-wall concentration boundary layers requires very fine mesh resolution in these regions, while large concentration gradients within the flow cause numerical stabilization issues. In this work, we will discuss some guidelines for solving mass transport problems in cardiovascular flows using a stabilized Galerkin finite element method. First, we perform mesh convergence studies in a series of idealized and patient-specific geometries to determine the required near-wall mesh resolution for these types of problems, using both first- and second-order tetrahedral finite elements. Second, we investigate the use of several boundary condition types at outflow boundaries where backflow during some parts of the cardiac cycle can lead to convergence issues. Finally, we evaluate the effect of reducing Péclet number by increasing mass diffusivity as has been proposed by some researchers. This work was supported by the NSF GRFP and NSF Career Award #1354541.

  7. Adjustment of roughness sublayer in turbulent flows over two-dimensional idealised roughness elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HO, Yat-Kiu; LIU, Chun-Ho

    2015-04-01

    The atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) immediately above the urban canopy is the roughness sublayer (RSL). In this layer, flows and turbulence are strongly affected by the roughness elements beneath, e.g. building obstacles. The wind flows over urban areas could be represented by conventional logarithmic law of the wall (log-law) in the neutrally stratified ABL. However, in the RSL region, the vertical wind profile deviates from that predicted from log-law and the effect could be extended from ground level up to several canopy heights. As a result, the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (MOST) fails and an additional length scale is required to describe the flows. The key aim of this study is to introduce a simple wind profile model which accounts for the effect of the RSL in neutral stratification using wind tunnel experiments. Profile measurements of wind speeds and turbulence quantities over various two-dimensional (2D) idealised roughness elements are carried out in an open-circuit wind tunnel with test section of size 560 mm (width) × 560 mm (height) × 6 m (length). The separation between the roughness elements is varied systematically so that ten different types of surface forms are adopted. The velocity measurements are obtained by hot-wire anemometry using X-probe design (for UW- measurements) with a constant temperature anemometer. For each configuration, eight vertical profiles are collected over the canopy, including solid boundaries and cavities of the roughness elements. Firstly, we compute the measurement results using conventional MOST to determine different roughness parameters. Afterwards, we derive the RSL height from the Reynolds stress profiles. Since the profiles taken from different locations of the canopy are eventually converged with increasing height, we use this 'congregated height' to define the RSL height. Next, we introduce an alternative function, i.e. power-law function, instead of MOST, to describe the velocity profile in attempt to

  8. On the influence of a single roughness element on the flow in supersonic boundary layer on a blunted cone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirilovskiy, S. V.; Poplavskaya, T. V.

    2016-11-01

    The work presents the results of numerical modeling of a supersonic flow around a blunted cone with an isolated cylindrical roughness on the forebody surface in the three-dimensional formulation. The roughness element is shown to distort the mean flow and to give rise to small-amplitude disturbances with distinguished spectral peaks in the boundary layer.

  9. Merging elemental and macronutrient approaches for a comprehensive study of energy and nutrient flows.

    PubMed

    Wilder, Shawn M; Jeyasingh, Punidan D

    2016-11-01

    Global warming and predation risk can have important impacts on animal physiology and life histories that can have consequences for ecosystem function. Zhang et al. () recently tested the separate and interactive effects of warming and predation risk on the body composition of Daphnia magna. By measuring both the elemental and biochemical composition of individuals, they showed that D. magna body elemental composition responded opposite to theoretical predictions and previous studies but that these changes were explained by adaptive life-history shifts in allocation to protein in eggs versus body lipid reserves. Photograph by Joachim Mergeay. Zhang, C., Jansen, M., De Meester, L. & Stoks, R. (2016) Energy storage and fecundity explain deviations from ecological stoichiometry predictions under global warming and size-selective predation. Journal of Animal Ecology 85, 1431-1441. Understanding the mechanisms through which energy and nutrients flow through ecosystems is critical to predicting and mitigating the consequences of climate change and other ecological disturbances. Ecological stoichiometry and nutritional geometry, using data on elements and macromolecules, respectively, have independently made major contributions towards this goal. Zhang et al. () provide data demonstrating that these two major frameworks can provide complementary insight into the consequences of global warming and predation risk for the physiology and life-history traits of a key aquatic herbivore, Daphnia magna. This study should catalyse further work to unite these two parallel and complementary frameworks.

  10. A projection hybrid finite volume/element method for low-Mach number flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermúdez, A.; Ferrín, J. L.; Saavedra, L.; Vázquez-Cendón, M. E.

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to introduce a projection hybrid finite volume/element method for low-Mach number flows of viscous or inviscid fluids. Starting with a 3D tetrahedral finite element mesh of the computational domain, the equation of the transport-diffusion stage is discretized by a finite volume method associated with a dual mesh where the nodes of the volumes are the barycenters of the faces of the initial tetrahedra. The transport-diffusion stage is explicit. Upwinding of convective terms is done by classical Riemann solvers as the Q-scheme of van Leer or the Rusanov scheme. Concerning the projection stage, the pressure correction is computed by a piecewise linear finite element method associated with the initial tetrahedral mesh. Passing the information from one stage to the other is carefully made in order to get a stable global scheme. Numerical results for several test examples aiming at evaluating the convergence properties of the method are shown.

  11. 3D numerical modelling of the steady-state thermal regime constrained by surface heat flow data: a Monte Carlo approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mather, B.; Moresi, L. N.; Cruden, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    Uncertainty of the lithospheric thermal regime greatly increases with depth. Measurements of temperature gradient and crustal rheology are concentrated in the upper crust, whereas the majority of the lithospheric measurements are approximated using empirical depth-dependent functions. We have applied a Monte Carlo approach to test the variation of crustal heat flow with temperature-dependent conductivity and the redistribution of heat-producing elements. The dense population of precision heat flow data in Victoria, Southeast Australia offers the ideal environment to test the variation of heat flow. A stochastically consistent anomalous zone of impossibly high Moho temperatures in the 3D model (> 900°C) correlates well with a zone of low teleseismic velocity and high electrical conductivity. This indicates that transient heat transfer has perturbed the thermal gradient and therefore a steady-state approach to 3D modelling is inappropriate in this zone. A spatial correlation between recent intraplate volcanic eruption points (< 5 Ma) and elevated Moho temperatures is a potential origin for additional latent heat in the crust.

  12. Linkage Of A Finite Element Flow Model With A Soil Moisture Model: Challanges Under Semiarid Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roediger, T.; Siebert, C.; Krause, P.

    2008-12-01

    The arid to semiarid Middle East is a region of extreme growth of population. Hence, the rare and over- expoitated water resources in that region have to be more protected against antropogenic and geogenic pollution. One way to help solving that complex issue is to develop an intelligent and integrated strategy to manage all available water resources, which is the aim of the multilateral SMART-project in the Lower Jordan Valley. To generate such an IWRM, all water resources (groundwater, surface runoff, waste water) of the valley and its shoulders have to be quanti- and qualitatively evaluated. The strategy of SMART is to upscale knowledge, extracted from local catchment areas to the project scale, which covers the area between Sea of Galilee, Jerusalem, Dead Sea and Amman. The study areas of the here presented sub-project are the Wadis Qilt (Palestine) and Al Arab (Jordan). The aim of the sub-project is to evaluate natural resources on catchment scale by combining hydrochemical and hydraulical methods to develop a high precision model. Concerning the quantification of the system, two seperated models will be linked: a numerical finite element flow-model for the groundwater passage and a new devolped hydrological model JAMS, which is excellently prepared for humid conditions. The power of JAMS is the highly accurate assessment of soil moisture balance and consequently of surface runoff and groundwater recharge. However, the empirical equations and input parameters have to be adjusted onto the conditions of the semiarid Wadi Al Arab and the arid Wadi Qilt. After the adaption of JAMS, the spatially and temporarily differentiated calculation of runoff and groundwater recharge is possible. Beside climatic gradients, the key issue is, to correctly evaluate the evapotranspiration in respect to the different classes of landuse. In the study area Wadi Al Arab, the groundwater recharge was calculated as area-indicated output parameter of JAMS. This output was used to be the

  13. Finite Element Analysis of Material Flow in Mechanical Clinching with Extensible Dies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambiase, Francesco; Di Ilio, Antoniomaria

    2013-06-01

    An investigation of the material flow during the clinching process with extensible dies is carried out. Clinched joints were produced under different forming loads to evaluate the evolution of the joints' profile experimentally. Tensile-shear tests were conducted to evaluate the influence of the forming load on mechanical strength of the clinched joint. Since the joints' strength depends on the joints' profile, which in turn depends on the punch-die cavity volume, an analysis of the forces acting on the extensible dies was carried out. A finite element model was developed and validated by comparing the predicted and measured material flow and quality criteria (e.g., neck thickness and undercut). Therefore, the FE model was utilized to analyze the evolution of contact forces acting on the die sectors during the joining process. Furthermore, the main causes of the asymmetry in the cross section of such joints have been studied. It turned out that the axial asymmetry due to material flow within the gap between consecutive die sectors increases with the punch force and the sheet thickness.

  14. An ALE Finite Element Approach for Two-Phase Flow with Phase Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gros, Erik; Anjos, Gustavo; Thome, John; Ltcm Team; Gesar Team

    2016-11-01

    In this work, two-phase flow with phase change is investigated through the Finite Element Method (FEM) in the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) framework. The equations are discretized on an unstructured mesh where the interface between the phases is explicitly defined as a sub-set of the mesh. The two-phase interface position is described by a set of interconnected nodes which ensures a sharp representation of the boundary, including the role of the surface tension. The methodology proposed for computing the curvature leads to very accurate results with moderate programming effort and computational costs. Such a methodology can be employed to study accurately many two-phase flow and heat transfer problems in industry such as oil extraction and refinement, design of refrigeration systems, modelling of microfluidic and biological systems and efficient cooling of electronics for computational purposes. The latter is the principal aim of the present research. The numerical results are discussed and compared to analytical solutions and reference results, thereby revealing the capability of the proposed methodology as a platform for the study of two-phase flow with phase change.

  15. Numerical Simulation of Dry Granular Flow Impacting a Rigid Wall Using the Discrete Element Method.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fengyuan; Fan, Yunyun; Liang, Li; Wang, Chao

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a clump model based on Discrete Element Method. The clump model was more close to the real particle than a spherical particle. Numerical simulations of several tests of dry granular flow impacting a rigid wall flowing in an inclined chute have been achieved. Five clump models with different sphericity have been used in the simulations. By comparing the simulation results with the experimental results of normal force on the rigid wall, a clump model with better sphericity was selected to complete the following numerical simulation analysis and discussion. The calculation results of normal force showed good agreement with the experimental results, which verify the effectiveness of the clump model. Then, total normal force and bending moment of the rigid wall and motion process of the granular flow were further analyzed. Finally, comparison analysis of the numerical simulations using the clump model with different grain composition was obtained. By observing normal force on the rigid wall and distribution of particle size at the front of the rigid wall at the final state, the effect of grain composition on the force of the rigid wall has been revealed. It mainly showed that, with the increase of the particle size, the peak force at the retaining wall also increase. The result can provide a basis for the research of relevant disaster and the design of protective structures.

  16. MPSalsa a finite element computer program for reacting flow problems. Part 2 - user`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Salinger, A.; Devine, K.; Hennigan, G.; Moffat, H.

    1996-09-01

    This manual describes the use of MPSalsa, an unstructured finite element (FE) code for solving chemically reacting flow problems on massively parallel computers. MPSalsa has been written to enable the rigorous modeling of the complex geometry and physics found in engineering systems that exhibit coupled fluid flow, heat transfer, mass transfer, and detailed reactions. In addition, considerable effort has been made to ensure that the code makes efficient use of the computational resources of massively parallel (MP), distributed memory architectures in a way that is nearly transparent to the user. The result is the ability to simultaneously model both three-dimensional geometries and flow as well as detailed reaction chemistry in a timely manner on MT computers, an ability we believe to be unique. MPSalsa has been designed to allow the experienced researcher considerable flexibility in modeling a system. Any combination of the momentum equations, energy balance, and an arbitrary number of species mass balances can be solved. The physical and transport properties can be specified as constants, as functions, or taken from the Chemkin library and associated database. Any of the standard set of boundary conditions and source terms can be adapted by writing user functions, for which templates and examples exist.

  17. Membrane-less hybrid flow battery based on low-cost elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, P. K.; Martin, T.; Shah, A. A.; Mohamed, M. R.; Anderson, M. A.; Palma, J.

    2017-02-01

    The capital cost of conventional redox flow batteries is relatively high (>USD 200/kWh) due to the use of expensive active materials and ion-exchange membranes. This paper presents a membrane-less hybrid organic-inorganic flow battery based on the low-cost elements zinc (92.7% with the use of carbon felt electrodes. In the presence of a fully oxidized active species close to its solubility limit, dissolution of the deposited anode is relatively slow (<2.37 g h-1 cm-2) with an equivalent corrosion current density of <1.9 mA cm-2. In a parallel plate flow configuration, the resulting battery was charge-discharge cycled at 30 mA cm-2 with average coulombic and energy efficiencies of c.a. 71.8 and c.a. 42.0% over 20 cycles, respectively.

  18. Numerical Simulation of Dry Granular Flow Impacting a Rigid Wall Using the Discrete Element Method

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fengyuan; Fan, Yunyun; Liang, Li; Wang, Chao

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a clump model based on Discrete Element Method. The clump model was more close to the real particle than a spherical particle. Numerical simulations of several tests of dry granular flow impacting a rigid wall flowing in an inclined chute have been achieved. Five clump models with different sphericity have been used in the simulations. By comparing the simulation results with the experimental results of normal force on the rigid wall, a clump model with better sphericity was selected to complete the following numerical simulation analysis and discussion. The calculation results of normal force showed good agreement with the experimental results, which verify the effectiveness of the clump model. Then, total normal force and bending moment of the rigid wall and motion process of the granular flow were further analyzed. Finally, comparison analysis of the numerical simulations using the clump model with different grain composition was obtained. By observing normal force on the rigid wall and distribution of particle size at the front of the rigid wall at the final state, the effect of grain composition on the force of the rigid wall has been revealed. It mainly showed that, with the increase of the particle size, the peak force at the retaining wall also increase. The result can provide a basis for the research of relevant disaster and the design of protective structures. PMID:27513661

  19. Development of a Cl-impregnated activated carbon for entrained-flow capture of elemental mercury.

    PubMed

    Ghorishi, S Behrooz; Keeney, Robert M; Serre, Shannon D; Gullett, Brian K; Jozewicz, Wojciech S

    2002-10-15

    Efforts to discern the role of an activated carbon's surface functional groups on the adsorption of elemental mercury (Hg0) and mercuric chloride demonstrated that chlorine (Cl) impregnation of a virgin activated carbon using dilute solutions of hydrogen chloride leads to increases (by a factor of 2-3) in fixed-bed capture of these mercury species. A commercially available activated carbon (DARCO FGD, NORITAmericas Inc. [FGD])was Cl-impregnated (Cl-FGD) [5 lb (2.3 kg) per batch] and tested for entrained-flow, short-time-scale capture of Hg0. In an entrained flow reactor, the Cl-FGD was introduced in Hg0-laden flue gases (86 ppb of Hg0) of varied compositions with gas/solid contact times of about 3-4 s, resulting in significant Hg0 removal (80-90%), compared to virgin FGD (10-15%). These levels of Hg0 removal were observed across a wide range of very low carbon-to-mercury weight ratios (1000-5000). Variation of the natural gas combustion flue gas composition, by doping with nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxide, and the flow reactor temperature (100-200 degrees C) had minimal effects on Hg0 removal bythe Cl-FGD in these carbon-to-mercury weight ratios. These results demonstrate significant enhancement of activated carbon reactivity with minimal treatment and are applicable to combustion facilities equipped with downstream particulate matter removal such as an electrostatic precipitator.

  20. A single-element, thermal, flow-velocity sensor with wide dynamic range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Salaymeh, A.; Durst, F.; Gad-El-Hak, M.

    2001-11-01

    Thermal flow sensors with a wide dynamic range approaching 1:1000 are presently not available in spite of the large demand for such sensors in practical fluid flow measurements. During the last meeting (paper JG4, Bul. Am. Phys. Soc. 45, no. 9, p. 141, 2000), we described such a probe consisting of a minute wire heated using sinusoidal alternating current and two sensing wires acting as resistance thermometers and set parallel to, and at a small distance on either side of, the pulsed wire. Herein we detail the development of a single wire heated using square waves of electrical current. The elimination of the sensing wires reduces the complexity as well as the cost of the sensor and improves its spatial resolution. Unlike time-of-flight sensors, however, the present single-element sensor is sensitive to the physical properties and temperature of the ambient fluid. The present device is suited for measuring slowly-varying unidirectional flows over a very wide dynamic range. For a given current amplitude and frequency, the nominal output of the single sensor is the increase in wire temperature (or resistance) between times just before the leading edge of the current pulse and just after the trailing edge of the pulse. In practice, an integral of the resistance over the pulse duration is computed and averaged over several pulses. This output is a function of the wire’s time constant or thermal inertia and thus of the flow speed as well as the heat convected from the heated wire to the flow. We exploit the fact that the time constant decreases as the flow speed increases while the rate of heat transfer increases. At very low flow speeds, the response is determined almost entirely by the time constant whereas at high speeds the device acts almost like a constant-current hot-wire anemometer. At low speeds, therefore, the wire thermal inertia augments the output signal of the basic hot wire increasing its speed range and sensitivity above that of a conventional hot

  1. Finite element computation of a viscous compressible free shear flow governed by the time dependent Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, C. H.; Blanchard, D. K.

    1975-01-01

    A finite element algorithm for solution of fluid flow problems characterized by the two-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations was developed. The program is intended for viscous compressible high speed flow; hence, primitive variables are utilized. The physical solution was approximated by trial functions which at a fixed time are piecewise cubic on triangular elements. The Galerkin technique was employed to determine the finite-element model equations. A leapfrog time integration is used for marching asymptotically from initial to steady state, with iterated integrals evaluated by numerical quadratures. The nonsymmetric linear systems of equations governing time transition from step-to-step are solved using a rather economical block iterative triangular decomposition scheme. The concept was applied to the numerical computation of a free shear flow. Numerical results of the finite-element method are in excellent agreement with those obtained from a finite difference solution of the same problem.

  2. Better Strategies for Finite Element Solutions of Variable Viscosity Stokes Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasenclever, Jörg; Phipps Morgan, Jason; Shi, Chao

    2010-05-01

    Accurate numerical solution of variable viscosity Stokes Flow is one of the most important issues for better geodynamic understanding of mantle convection and mantle melting. While a good Stokes solver is usually an integral part of a good Navier-Stokes solver, typically Navier-Stokes equations are solved for flow of a fluid with uniform viscosity. The lumped-mass-matrix is an excellent and cheap preconditioner for uniform viscosity Stokes flow (cf. Maday and Patera, 1989), therefore for most applications to Navier-Stokes flow the ‘Stokes' part of the problem is viewed as well-resolved. Unfortunately, the inverse-viscosity-scaled lumped mass matrix does not work nearly as well to precondition Stokes flow in a fluid with strongly varying viscosity. This issue is already central to accurate numerical studies of convection in Earth's silicate-fluid mantle (May and Moresi, 2008; van Geenen et al., 2009; Burstedde et al., 2009) and may become central for researchers investigating Navier-Stokes problems with lateral variations in viscosity. Here we discuss several known computational hurdles to progress, and suggest strategies that offer promise in overcoming them. The choices for solving the discrete pressure equation arising from Stokes flow typically involve several tradeoffs between speed and storage requirements. In exact math, the discrete pressure matrix S is symmetric, so that it should be possible to use a symmetric preconditioned conjugate gradient (CG) Krylov algorithm instead of needing an asymmetric GMRES (cf. Saad, 2003) or GCR (Generalized Conjugate Residual, cf. Van der Vorst, 2003) that would require ~10-50 times more storage of past search directions. However, a CG-like method requires that the action of both S and any pressure preconditioner must be almost perfectly symmetric. This means that we must be very careful about the effects of roundoff in any iterative solver-based pressure preconditioner that may introduce numerically asymmetric operators

  3. Accretionary wedge harzburgite serpentinization and rodingitization constrained by perovskite U/Pb SIMS age, trace elements and Sm/Nd isotopes: Case study from the Western Carpathians, Slovakia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xian-Hua; Putiš, Marián; Yang, Yue-Heng; Koppa, Matúš; Dyda, Marian

    2014-09-01

    Perovskite-bearing harzburgites occur in a “mélange” type blueschist-bearing accretionary wedge complex of the Inner Western Carpathians Meliata Unit in Slovakia. Although dark rounded, slightly hydrated relic “cores” of harzburgite boulders are perovskite-free, perovskite (Prv) occurrence in the surrounding serpentinites and rodingites enabled dating of hydration, resulting in two metamorphic-metasomatic Prv generations. Perovskite (1) grows parallel to relic clinopyroxene exsolution lamellae or forms randomly oriented grain clusters in serpentinized orthopyroxene (Opx1) porphyroclasts, often accompanied by tiny andradite lamellae clusters, or it is partly replaced by Ti-andradite. Perovskite crystallization indicates evolving rodingitization fluids pervading the boundary between the harzburgite “cores” and Prv-free serpentinite. This strictly limited occurrence of Prv (1) within a 1 to 20-cm across-zone implies slightly postponed Prv crystallization to serpentinization by LREE(Ce,La), Ca2+, Ti/Fe3+-enriched aqueous fluids. A grain scale metasomatic mechanism partitioned Ca and Ti from the host orthopyroxene porphyroclasts, spinel (Ti) and grain-boundary pervasive fluids to Prv. In contrast, Prv (2) occurs in a 1 to 3 cm across chlorite-rich blackwall zone between hosting serpentinite and rodingite veins, thus indicating channelled rodingitization fluid flow and accompanying hydraulic fracturing. Here, Prv (2) is ingrown by chlorite and apatite. Part of this Prv (2) formed in a rodingite vein mineral assemblage composed of diopside, andradite, vesuvianite, epidote/zoisite, apatite and chlorite. Both perovskite 1 and 2 are replaced by pyrophanite along the grain rims and interiors; most likely via fluid-aided coupled dissolution-reprecipitation at increased Si-Fe-Mn-Al element solubility in rodingitization fluids pervading serpentinized harzburgite. Both Prv generations, especially Prv (2), can be partly to almost totally replaced by (Ti-) Adr

  4. Numerical investigations on flow dynamics of prismatic granular materials using the discrete element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, W.; Weatherley, D.; Wruck, B.; Chitombo, G. P.

    2012-04-01

    The flow dynamics of granular materials is of broad interest in both the geosciences (e.g. landslides, fault zone evolution, and brecchia pipe formation) and many engineering disciplines (e.g chemical engineering, food sciences, pharmaceuticals and materials science). At the interface between natural and human-induced granular media flow, current underground mass-mining methods are trending towards the induced failure and subsequent gravitational flow of large volumes of broken rock, a method known as cave mining. Cave mining relies upon the undercutting of a large ore body, inducement of fragmentation of the rock and subsequent extraction of ore from below, via hopper-like outlets. Design of such mines currently relies upon a simplified kinematic theory of granular flow in hoppers, known as the ellipsoid theory of mass movement. This theory assumes that the zone of moving material grows as an ellipsoid above the outlet of the silo. The boundary of the movement zone is a shear band and internal to the movement zone, the granular material is assumed to have a uniformly high bulk porosity compared with surrounding stagnant regions. There is however, increasing anecdotal evidence and field measurements suggesting this theory fails to capture the full complexity of granular material flow within cave mines. Given the practical challenges obstructing direct measurement of movement both in laboratory experiments and in-situ, the Discrete Element Method (DEM [1]) is a popular alternative to investigate granular media flow. Small-scale DEM studies (c.f. [3] and references therein) have confirmed that movement within DEM silo flow models matches that predicted by ellipsoid theory, at least for mono-disperse granular material freely outflowing at a constant rate. A major draw-back of these small-scale DEM studies is that the initial bulk porosity of the simulated granular material is significantly higher than that of broken, prismatic rock. In this investigation, more

  5. Output of acoustical sources. [effects of structural elements and background flow on immobile multipolar point radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, H.

    1980-01-01

    Acoustic radiation from a source, here viewed as an immobile point singularity with periodic strength and a given multipolar nature, is affected by the presence of nearly structural elements (e.g., rigid or impedance surfaces) as well as that of a background flow in the medium. An alternative to the conventional manner of calculating the net source output by integrating the energy flux over a distant control surface is described; this involves a direct evaluation of the secondary wavefunction at the position of the primary source and obviates the need for a (prospectively difficult) flux integration. Various full and half-planar surface configurations with an adjacent source are analyzed in detail, and the explicit results obtained, in particular, for the power factor of a dipole brings out a substantial rise in its output as the source nears the sharp edge of a half-plane.

  6. Finite-Element Modeling of Electrostatic Sensors for the Flow Measurement of Particles in Pneumatic Pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Krabicka, J.; Yan, Y.

    2009-08-15

    Electrostatic sensors are used in certain industries for the flow measurement of pneumatically conveyed solids. However, despite various advances that have been made in recent years, relatively little information is known about the exact nature of the electrostatic charge induced onto the sensor electrode due to moving particles, which is dependent on electrode geometry, particle distribution, and particle velocity. This paper presents a novel approach to the study of the charge induced onto electrostatic sensors based on fitting a Lorentzian curve to the results of a finite-element model of the electrostatic sensor and pipeline. The modeling method is validated by comparing the modeling results of a nonintrusive circular electrode with an established analytical solution. The modeling results are used for in-depth analysis and informed design of a particular sensor configuration.

  7. A novel finite element framework for numerical simulation of fluidization processes and multiphase granular flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percival, James; Xie, Zhihua; Pavlidis, Dimitrios; Gomes, Jefferson; Pain, Christopher; Matar, Omar

    2013-11-01

    We present results from a new formulation of a numerical model for direct simulation of bed fluidization and multiphase granular flow. The model is based on a consistent application of continuous-discontinuous mixed control volume finite element methods applied to fully unstructured meshes. The unstructured mesh framework allows for both a mesh adaptive capability, modifying the computational geometry in order to bound the error in the numerical solution while maximizing computational efficiency, and a simple scripting interface embedded in the model which allows fast prototyping of correlation models and parameterizations in intercomparison experiments. The model is applied to standard test problems for fluidized beds. EPSRC Programme Grant EP/K003976/1.

  8. Progress on a Taylor weak statement finite element algorithm for high-speed aerodynamic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.; Freels, J. D.

    1989-01-01

    A new finite element numerical Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) algorithm has matured to the point of efficiently solving two-dimensional high speed real-gas compressible flow problems in generalized coordinates on modern vector computer systems. The algorithm employs a Taylor Weak Statement classical Galerkin formulation, a variably implicit Newton iteration, and a tensor matrix product factorization of the linear algebra Jacobian under a generalized coordinate transformation. Allowing for a general two-dimensional conservation law system, the algorithm has been exercised on the Euler and laminar forms of the Navier-Stokes equations. Real-gas fluid properties are admitted, and numerical results verify solution accuracy, efficiency, and stability over a range of test problem parameters.

  9. Computational issues and applications of line-elements to model subsurface flow governed by the modified Helmholtz equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, Mark; Kuhlman, Kristopher L.

    2011-09-01

    Two new approaches are presented for the accurate computation of the potential due to line elements that satisfy the modified Helmholtz equation with complex parameters. The first approach is based on fundamental solutions in elliptical coordinates and results in products of Mathieu functions. The second approach is based on the integration of modified Bessel functions. Both approaches allow evaluation of the potential at any distance from the element. The computational approaches are applied to model transient flow with the Laplace transform analytic element method. The Laplace domain solution is computed using a combination of point elements and the presented line elements. The time domain solution is obtained through a numerical inversion. Two applications are presented to transient flow fields, which could not be modeled with the Laplace transform analytic element method prior to this work. The first application concerns transient single-aquifer flow to wells near impermeable walls modeled with line-doublets. The second application concerns transient two-aquifer flow to a well near a stream modeled with line-sinks.

  10. Transversally enriched pipe element method (TEPEM): An effective numerical approach for blood flow modeling.

    PubMed

    Mansilla Alvarez, Luis; Blanco, Pablo; Bulant, Carlos; Dari, Enzo; Veneziani, Alessandro; Feijóo, Raúl

    2017-04-01

    In this work, we present a novel approach tailored to approximate the Navier-Stokes equations to simulate fluid flow in three-dimensional tubular domains of arbitrary cross-sectional shape. The proposed methodology is aimed at filling the gap between (cheap) one-dimensional and (expensive) three-dimensional models, featuring descriptive capabilities comparable with the full and accurate 3D description of the problem at a low computational cost. In addition, this methodology can easily be tuned or even adapted to address local features demanding more accuracy. The numerical strategy employs finite (pipe-type) elements that take advantage of the pipe structure of the spatial domain under analysis. While low order approximation is used for the longitudinal description of the physical fields, transverse approximation is enriched using high order polynomials. Although our application of interest is computational hemodynamics and its relevance to pathological dynamics like atherosclerosis, the approach is quite general and can be applied in any internal fluid dynamics problem in pipe-like domains. Numerical examples covering academic cases as well as patient-specific coronary arterial geometries demonstrate the potentialities of the developed methodology and its performance when compared against traditional finite element methods. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. An adaptive control volume finite element method for simulation of multi-scale flow in heterogeneous porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostaghimi, P.; Percival, J. R.; Pavlidis, D.; Gorman, G.; Jackson, M.; Neethling, S.; Pain, C. C.

    2013-12-01

    Numerical simulation of multiphase flow in porous media is of importance in a wide range of applications in science and engineering. We present a novel control volume finite element method (CVFEM) to solve for multi-scale flow in heterogeneous geological formations. It employs a node centred control volume approach to discretize the saturation equation, while a control volume finite element method is applied for the pressure equation. We embed the discrete continuity equation into the pressure equation and assure that the continuity is exactly enforced. Anisotropic mesh adaptivity is used to accurately model the fine grained features of multiphase flow. The adaptive algorithm uses a metric tensor field based on solution error estimates to locally control the size and shape of elements in the metric. Moreover, it uses metric advection between adaptive meshes in order to predict the future required density of mesh thereby reducing numerical dispersion at the saturation front. The scheme is capable of capturing multi-scale heterogeneity such as those in fractured porous media through the use of several constraints on the element size in different regions of porous media. We show the application of our method for simulation of flow in some challenging benchmark problems. For flow in fractured reservoirs, the scheme adapts the mesh as the flow penetrates through the fracture and the matrix. The constraints for the element size within the fracture are smaller by several orders of magnitude than the generated mesh within the matrix. We show that the scheme captures the key multi-scale features of flow while preserving the geometry. We demonstrate that mesh adaptation can be used to accurately simulate flow in heterogeneous porous media at low computational cost.

  12. Infrared thermography of transition due to isolated roughness elements in hypersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avallone, F.; Schrijer, F. F. J.; Cardone, G.

    2016-02-01

    Boundary layer transition in high-speed flows is a phenomenon that despite extensive research over the years is still extremely hard to predict. The presence of protrusions or gaps can lead to an accelerated laminar-to-turbulent transition enhancing the thermal loads and the skin friction coefficient. In the current investigation, inverse heat transfer measurements using infrared thermography are performed on the flow past different roughness geometries in the form of cylinders and diamond at free stream Mach number equal to 7.5, h/δ ranging between 0.5 and 0.9 (where h is the roughness height and δ is the boundary layer thickness), and Reθ ranging between 1305 and 2450. The roughness elements are positioned on a 5° ramp placed at zero angle of attack. The measurements indicate that the roughness geometry influences the transitional pattern while the frontal area influences both the transition location and the maximum value of the Stanton number along the centreline. Moreover, there is a strong connection between the streamwise centreline Stanton number and the spreading of the wake width. In particular, the transition process is characterized by an approximately constant wake width. Differently, the wake width spreads at the location where the streamwise centreline Stanton number reaches the turbulent level. This point corresponds to a local maximum of the wake amplitude defined as one half of the maximum spanwise variation of the Stanton number.

  13. Assessment of a hybrid finite element and finite volume code for turbulent incompressible flows

    DOE PAGES

    Xia, Yidong; Wang, Chuanjin; Luo, Hong; ...

    2015-12-15

    Hydra-TH is a hybrid finite-element/finite-volume incompressible/low-Mach flow simulation code based on the Hydra multiphysics toolkit being developed and used for thermal-hydraulics applications. In the present work, a suite of verification and validation (V&V) test problems for Hydra-TH was defined to meet the design requirements of the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL). The intent for this test problem suite is to provide baseline comparison data that demonstrates the performance of the Hydra-TH solution methods. The simulation problems vary in complexity from laminar to turbulent flows. A set of RANS and LES turbulence models were used in themore » simulation of four classical test problems. Numerical results obtained by Hydra-TH agreed well with either the available analytical solution or experimental data, indicating the verified and validated implementation of these turbulence models in Hydra-TH. Where possible, we have attempted some form of solution verification to identify sensitivities in the solution methods, and to suggest best practices when using the Hydra-TH code.« less

  14. Assessment of a hybrid finite element and finite volume code for turbulent incompressible flows

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Yidong; Wang, Chuanjin; Luo, Hong; Christon, Mark; Bakosi, Jozsef

    2015-12-15

    Hydra-TH is a hybrid finite-element/finite-volume incompressible/low-Mach flow simulation code based on the Hydra multiphysics toolkit being developed and used for thermal-hydraulics applications. In the present work, a suite of verification and validation (V&V) test problems for Hydra-TH was defined to meet the design requirements of the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL). The intent for this test problem suite is to provide baseline comparison data that demonstrates the performance of the Hydra-TH solution methods. The simulation problems vary in complexity from laminar to turbulent flows. A set of RANS and LES turbulence models were used in the simulation of four classical test problems. Numerical results obtained by Hydra-TH agreed well with either the available analytical solution or experimental data, indicating the verified and validated implementation of these turbulence models in Hydra-TH. Where possible, we have attempted some form of solution verification to identify sensitivities in the solution methods, and to suggest best practices when using the Hydra-TH code.

  15. Using binary optical elements (BOEs) to generate rectangular spots for illumination in micro flow cytometer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jingjing; You, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    This work introduces three rectangular quasi-flat-top spots, which are provided by binary optical elements (BOEs) and utilized for the illumination in a microflow cytometer. The three spots contain, respectively, one, two, and three rectangles (R1, R2, and R3). To test the performance of this mechanism, a microflow cytometer is established by integrating the BOEs and a three-dimensional hydrodynamic focusing chip. Through the experiments of detecting fluorescence microbeads, the three spots present good fluorescence coefficients of variation in comparison with those derived from commercial instruments. Benefiting from a high spatial resolution, when using R1 spot, the micro flow cytometer can perform a throughput as high as 20 000 events per second (eps). Illuminated by R2 or R3 spot, one bead emits fluorescence twice or thrice, thus the velocity can be measured in real time. Besides, the R3 spot provides a long-time exposure, which is conducive to improving fluorescence intensity and the measurement stability. In brief, using the spots shaped and homogenized by BOEs for illumination can increase the performance and the functionality of a micro flow cytometer. PMID:27733892

  16. Assessment of a hybrid finite element and finite volume code for turbulent incompressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yidong; Wang, Chuanjin; Luo, Hong; Christon, Mark; Bakosi, Jozsef

    2016-02-01

    Hydra-TH is a hybrid finite-element/finite-volume incompressible/low-Mach flow simulation code based on the Hydra multiphysics toolkit being developed and used for thermal-hydraulics applications. In the present work, a suite of verification and validation (V&V) test problems for Hydra-TH was defined to meet the design requirements of the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL). The intent for this test problem suite is to provide baseline comparison data that demonstrates the performance of the Hydra-TH solution methods. The simulation problems vary in complexity from laminar to turbulent flows. A set of RANS and LES turbulence models were used in the simulation of four classical test problems. Numerical results obtained by Hydra-TH agreed well with either the available analytical solution or experimental data, indicating the verified and validated implementation of these turbulence models in Hydra-TH. Where possible, some form of solution verification has been attempted to identify sensitivities in the solution methods, and suggest best practices when using the Hydra-TH code.

  17. A comparison of turbulence models in computing multi-element airfoil flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Stuart E.; Menter, Florian; Durbin, Paul A.; Mansour, Nagi N.

    1994-01-01

    Four different turbulence models are used to compute the flow over a three-element airfoil configuration. These models are the one-equation Baldwin-Barth model, the one-equation Spalart-Allmaras model, a two-equation k-omega model, and a new one-equation Durbin-Mansour model. The flow is computed using the INS2D two-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes solver. An overset Chimera grid approach is utilized. Grid resolution tests are presented, and manual solution-adaptation of the grid was performed. The performance of each of the models is evaluated for test cases involving different angles-of-attack, Reynolds numbers, and flap riggings. The resulting surface pressure coefficients, skin friction, velocity profiles, and lift, drag, and moment coefficients are compared with experimental data. The models produce very similar results in most cases. Excellent agreement between computational and experimental surface pressures was observed, but only moderately good agreement was seen in the velocity profile data. In general, the difference between the predictions of the different models was less than the difference between the computational and experimental data.

  18. LES of turbulent boundary layer flow over urban-like roughness elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Tetsuro; Tsubokura, Makoto; Nozu, Tsuyoshi; Onishi, Keiji

    2014-11-01

    LES of turbulent boundary layer flow over urban-like roughness elements has been performed. Final goal of this paper is to elucidate the availability of LES on the wind flow within the canopy among buildings in cities. Firstly rectangular blocks, definitely larger than those on conventional rough wall such as grain or sand, are homogeneously arrayed and above-region equilibrium profiles of mean velocity and turbulent statistics are investigated. Also, in order to predict the fluctuating velocity characteristics of urban boundary layer, actual complicated-shaped buildings are used for reproducing the surface shape in cities. For numerical modeling, this study employs the unstructured-grid system where grid lines correctly fit to the building shape and BCM (Building Cube Method) which is formulated on very fine Cartesian mesh system. Based on the GIS data, BCM employs the external forcing technique named IBM (Immersed Boundary Method). Also, in BCM, computational process is so simple that the parallel algorithm and the memory access obtain the perfect efficiency. Using both the LES results, turbulence structures in the urban canopy are discussed. Appropriate 3D vortical structures can be recognized at inflow, along the street and among a pack of tall buildings.

  19. Assessment of a hybrid finite element and finite volume code for turbulent incompressible flows

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Yidong; Wang, Chuanjin; Luo, Hong; Christon, Mark; Bakosi, Jozsef

    2016-02-15

    Hydra-TH is a hybrid finite-element/finite-volume incompressible/low-Mach flow simulation code based on the Hydra multiphysics toolkit being developed and used for thermal-hydraulics applications. In the present work, a suite of verification and validation (V&V) test problems for Hydra-TH was defined to meet the design requirements of the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL). The intent for this test problem suite is to provide baseline comparison data that demonstrates the performance of the Hydra-TH solution methods. The simulation problems vary in complexity from laminar to turbulent flows. A set of RANS and LES turbulence models were used in the simulation of four classical test problems. Numerical results obtained by Hydra-TH agreed well with either the available analytical solution or experimental data, indicating the verified and validated implementation of these turbulence models in Hydra-TH. Where possible, some form of solution verification has been attempted to identify sensitivities in the solution methods, and suggest best practices when using the Hydra-TH code. -- Highlights: •We performed a comprehensive study to verify and validate the turbulence models in Hydra-TH. •Hydra-TH delivers 2nd-order grid convergence for the incompressible Navier–Stokes equations. •Hydra-TH can accurately simulate the laminar boundary layers. •Hydra-TH can accurately simulate the turbulent boundary layers with RANS turbulence models. •Hydra-TH delivers high-fidelity LES capability for simulating turbulent flows in confined space.

  20. A novel technique of using a thyristor driven pump as the final control element and flow indicator of a flow control loop.

    PubMed

    Bera, S C; Mandal, N; Sarkar, R

    2011-07-01

    In the present paper, design of a flow control loop using a thyristor driven pump as final control element has been described. In this technique, the load current of a thyristor driven pump motor has been utilized as a mass flow sensing parameter of a fluid passing through a pipeline. This thyristor driven pump has been utilized as a final control element of a flow control loop and the speed of the pump has been selected as the manipulated variable. The non-linearity between the thyristor input signal and pump output has been eliminated by using a modified PID control technique with inverse derivative control action. Thus without using any conventional flow meter and control valve only the thyristor driven pump has been utilized both as the final control element and flow indicating device by using the proposed technique. The whole system has been designed, fabricated and tested by using tap water as the flowing liquid through a pipe line. The experimental results along with the theoretical analysis are compared and reported in the paper.

  1. Spatio-temporal flow analysis in bileaflet heart valve hinge regions: potential analysis for blood element damage.

    PubMed

    Simon, Hélène A; Dasi, Lakshmi P; Leo, Hwa-Liang; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2007-08-01

    Point-wise velocity measurements have been traditionally acquired to estimate blood damage potential induced by prosthetic heart valves with emphasis on peak values of velocity magnitude and Reynolds stresses. However, the inherently Lagrangian nature of platelet activation and hemolysis makes such measurements of limited predictive value. This study provides a refined fluid mechanical analysis, including blood element paths and stress exposure times, of the hinge flows of a CarboMedics bileaflet mechanical heart valve placed under both mitral and aortic conditions and a St Jude Medical bileaflet valve placed under aortic conditions. The hinge area was partitioned into characteristic regions based on dominant flow structures and spatio-temporal averaging was performed on the measured velocities and Reynolds shear stresses to estimate the average bulk stresses acting on blood elements transiting through the hinge. A first-order estimate of viscous stress levels and exposure times were computed. Both forward and leakage flow phases were characterized in each partition by dynamic flows dependent on subtle leaflet movements and transvalvular pressure fluctuations. Blood elements trapped in recirculation regions may experience exposure times as long as the entire forward flow phase duration. Most calculated stresses were below the accepted blood damage threshold. Estimates of the stress levels indicate that the flow conditions within the boundary layers near the hinge and leaflet walls may be more detrimental to blood cells than bulk flow conditions, while recirculation regions may promote thrombus buildup.

  2. Multiple stirred-flow chamber assembly for simultaneous automatic fractionation of trace elements in fly ash samples using a multisyringe-based flow system

    SciTech Connect

    Boonjob, W.; Miro, M.; Cerda, V.

    2008-10-01

    There is a current trend in automation of leaching tests for trace elements in solid matrixes by use of flow injection based column approaches. However, as a result of the downscaled dimensions of the analytical manifold and execution of a single extraction at a time, miniaturized flow-through column approaches have merely found applications for periodic investigations of trace element mobility in highly homogeneous environmental solids. A novel flow-based configuration capitalized on stirred-flow cell extraction is proposed in this work for simultaneous fractionation of trace elements in three solid wastes with no limitation of sample amount up to 1.0 g. A two-step sequential extraction scheme involving water and acetic acid (or acetic acid/acetate buffer) is utilized for accurate assessment of readily mobilizable fractions of trace elements in fly ash samples. The W automated extraction system features high tolerance to flow rates ({<=} 6 mL min{sup -1}) and, as opposed to operationally defined batchwise methods, the solid to liquid ratio is not a critical parameter for, determination of overall readily leachable trace elements provided that exhaustive extraction is ensured. Analytical performance of the dynamic extractor is evaluated for fractionation analysis of a real coal fly ash and BCR-176R fly ash certified reference material. No significant differences were found at the 0.05 significance level between summation of leached concentrations in each fraction plus residue and concentration values of BCR-176R, thus revealing the accuracy of the automated method. Overall extractable pools of trace metals in three samples are separated in less than 115 min, even for highly contaminated ashes, versus 18-24 h per fraction in equilibrium leaching tests. The multiple stirred-flow cell assembly is thus suitable for routine risk assessment studies of industrial solid byproduct.

  3. Mantle source heterogeneity and magmatic evolution at Carlsberg Ridge (3.7°N): constrains from elemental and isotopic (Sr, Nd, Pb) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ling; Tang, Limei; Yu, Xing; Dong, Yanhui

    2016-12-01

    We present new major element, ICP-MS trace element, and Sr-Nd-Pb isotope data of basalts from four locations along the Carlsberg Ridge (CR), northern Indian Ocean. The basalts are low-K tholeiites with 7.52-9.51 wt% MgO, 49.40-50.60 wt% SiO2, 0.09-0.27 wt% K2O, 2.55-2.90 wt% Na2O, and 0.60-0.68 Mg#. Trace element contents of the basalts show characteristics similar to those of average normal MORB, such as LREE depleted patterns with (La/Sm)N ratio of 0.55-0.69; however, some samples are enriched in large-ion lithophile elements such as K and Rb, suggesting probable modification of the mantle source. Poor correlations between the compatible elements [e.g. Ni, Cr, and Sr (related to olivine, clinopyroxene and plagioclase, respectively)] and the incompatible elements (e.g. Zr and Y), and positive correlations in the Zr versus Zr/Y and Nb versus Nb/Y plots suggest a magmatic evolution controlled mainly by mantle melting rather than fractional crystallization. Our results extend the CR basalt range to higher radiogenic Pb isotopes and lower 143Nd/144Nd. These basalts and basalts from the northern Indian Ocean Ridge show lower 143Nd/144Nd and higher 87Sr/86Sr values than those of the depleted mantle (DM), defining a trend towards pelagic sediment composition. The Pb isotopic ratios of basalts from CR 3-4°N lie along the compositional mixing lines between the DM and the upper continental crust. However, the low radiogenic Pb of basalts from CR 9-10°N lie on the mixing line between the DM and lower continental crust. Since the Pb isotopic ratio of MORB would decrease if the source mantle was contaminated by continental lithospheric mantle, we suggest that CR contains continental lithospheric material, resulting in heterogeneous mantle beneath different ridge segments. The continental lithospheric material was introduced into the asthenosphere before or during the breakup of the Gondwana. These results support the long-term preservation of continental material in the

  4. Effects of flow properties on the performance of a diffuser-nozzle element of a valveless micropump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Partha Kumar; Hasan, A. B. M. Toufique

    2016-07-01

    The flow behaviour and performance parameters of a diffuser-nozzle element of a valveless micropump have been investigated for different driving pressure frequencies. When a fluctuating pressure is imposed on the inlet boundary of a diffuser-nozzle element, there is a net flow in diffuser direction due to the dynamic effect. The variation of this net flow along with rectification capacity, and diffuser efficiency has been investigated for different frequencies of driving pressure. Flow behaviour and recirculation region due to dynamic effect have been studied as qualitative study. Pressure and velocity have been analyzed for quantitative analysis and for validation with results found in literature. 2-D geometry has been used in the present study. 3-D geometry has been modeled to justify the results obtained from 2-D analysis. Five different pressure frequencies ranging from 5 kHz to 50 kHz have been used to investigate their effects on the performance of diffuser-nozzle element in high frequency ranges. The net flow and performance of the nozzle-diffuser element are found to be decreasing with the increasing frequency. The performance is found to be less sensitive to frequency at high pressure range (above 30 kHz).

  5. Generalized Roughness Effects on Turbulent Boundary Layer Heat Transfer. A Discrete Element Predictive Approach for Turbulent Flow Over Rough Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-11-01

    element u.-lei is readily applied to such flows. For lully developed flow V = 0, and U and H are functions of y only (i.e., J ■ U(y) and H ■ H(y...included, application of the basic momentum theorem yields T b |£| . / w+ Jb \\ T r ’dx’ I W < s,av where T is the average shear stress

  6. Petrologically-constrained thermo-chemical modelling of cratonic upper mantle consistent with elevation, geoid, surface heat flow, seismic surface waves and MT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A. G.; Afonso, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    The Earth comprises a single physio-chemical system that we interrogate from its surface and/or from space making observations related to various physical and chemical parameters. A change in one of those parameters affects many of the others; for example a change in velocity is almost always indicative of a concomitant change in density, which results in changes to elevation, gravity and geoid observations. Similarly, a change in oxide chemistry affects almost all physical parameters to a greater or lesser extent. We have now developed sophisticated tools to model/invert data in our individual disciplines to such an extent that we are obtaining high resolution, robust models from our datasets. However, in the vast majority of cases the different datasets are modelled/inverted independently of each other, and often even without considering other data in a qualitative sense. The LitMod framework of Afonso and colleagues presents integrated inversion of geoscientific data to yield thermo-chemical models that are petrologically consistent and constrained. Input data can comprise any combination of elevation, geoid, surface heat flow, seismic surface wave (Rayleigh and Love) data and receiver function data, and MT data. The basis of LitMod is characterization of the upper mantle in terms of five oxides in the CFMAS system and a thermal structure that is conductive to the LAB and convective along the adiabat below the LAB to the 410 km discontinuity. Candidate solutions are chosen from prior distributions of the oxides. For the crust, candidate solutions are chosen from distributions of crustal layering, velocity and density parameters. Those candidate solutions that fit the data within prescribed error limits are kept, and are used to establish broad posterior distributions from which new candidate solutions are chosen. Examples will be shown of application of this approach fitting data from the Kaapvaal Craton in South Africa and the Rae Craton in northern Canada. I

  7. Isotopic and trace element sensors for fluid flow, heat- and mass transport in fractured rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DePaolo, D. J.

    2012-12-01

    The flow of fluids through fractured rocks is critically important in hydrothermal systems associated with geothermal energy production, base metal ore deposits, and global geochemical cycles through the enormous volumes of fluids in mid-ocean ridge systems. The nature of heat and mass transport in hydrothermal systems is determined by the spacing and volume of fractures, the nature of chemical transport in matrix blocks between fractures, the dissolution and precipitation rates of minerals in the matrix blocks, and the rates of fluid flow. Directly measuring these properties in active systems is extremely difficult, but the chemical and isotopic composition of fluids, where they can be adequately sampled, provides this information in coded form. Deciphering the signals requires appropriate models for the mineral-fluid chemical reactions and transport in the inter-fracture rock matrix. Ultimately, numerical reactive transport models are required to properly account for coupling between mineral reaction kinetics and fluid phase transport, but it is surprisingly difficult to adequately represent isotopic exchange in these models. The difficulty comes partly from the additional bookkeeping that is necessary, but more fundamentally from limitations in the detailed molecular dynamics of the mineral-fluid interfaces and how they control isotopic exchange and partitioning. Nevertheless, relatively simple analytical models illustrate how the isotopic and trace element composition of fluids relates to fracture aperture and spacing, mineral dissolution kinetics, competition between diffusive and advective transport, and competition between chemical exchange and heat exchange. The large number of geochemical parameters that can be measured potentially allows for detailed characterization of the effective mass transport and system characteristics like average fracture spacing and mineral dissolution rates. Examples of useful analytical models and applications to available data

  8. Influence of movable test section elements configuration on its drag and flow field uniformity at transonic speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazkov, S. A.; Gorbushin, A. R.; Osipova, S. L.; Semenov, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    The report describes the results of flow field experimental research in TsAGI T-128 transonic wind tunnel. During the tests Mach number, stagnation pressure, test section wall perforation ratio, angles between the test section panels and mixing chamber flaps varied. Based on the test results one determined corrections to the free-stream Mach number related to the flow speed difference in the model location and in the zone of static pressure measurement on the test section walls, nonuniformity of the longitudinal velocity component in the model location, optimal position of the movable test section elements to provide flow field uniformity in the test section and minimize the test leg drag.

  9. Anisotropic poroelasticity and wave-induced fluid flow: harmonic finite-element simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carcione, J. M.; Santos, J. E.; Picotti, S.

    2011-09-01

    A dominant P-wave attenuation mechanism in reservoir rocks at seismic frequencies is due to wave-induced fluid flow (mesoscopic loss). The P-wave induces a fluid-pressure difference at mesoscopic-scale inhomogeneities (larger than the pore size but smaller than the wavelength), generating fluid flow and slow (diffusion) Biot waves. The theory has been developed in the 1970s for the symmetry axis of the equivalent transversely isotropic (TI) medium corresponding to a finely layered medium, and has recently been generalized to all propagation angles. The new theory states that the fluid-flow direction is perpendicular to the layering plane and it is independent of the loading direction. As a consequence, the relaxation behaviour can be described by a single relaxation function, since the medium consists of plane homogeneous layers. Besides P-wave losses, the coupling between the qP and qSV waves generates shear-wave anisotropic velocity dispersion and attenuation. In this work, we introduce a set of quasi-static numerical experiments to determine the equivalent viscoelastic TI medium to a finely layered poroelastic medium, which is validated using a recently developed analytical solution. The modelling technique is the finite-element (FE) method, where the equations of motion are solved in the space-frequency domain. Numerical rock physics may, in many circumstances, offer an alternative to laboratory measurements. Numerical experiments are inexpensive and informative since the physical process of wave propagation can be inspected during the experiment. Moreover, they are repeatable, essentially free from experimental errors, and may easily be run using alternative models of the rock and fluid properties. We apply the methodology to the Utsira aquifer of the North Sea, where carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected during the last 15 years. The tests consider alternating layers of the same rock saturated with gas and brine and a sequence of gas-saturated sandstone and

  10. Energy-Constrained Recharge, Assimilation, and Fractional Crystallization (EC-RAχFC): A Visual Basic computer code for calculating trace element and isotope variations of open-system magmatic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohrson, Wendy A.; Spera, Frank J.

    2007-11-01

    Volcanic and plutonic rocks provide abundant evidence for complex processes that occur in magma storage and transport systems. The fingerprint of these processes, which include fractional crystallization, assimilation, and magma recharge, is captured in petrologic and geochemical characteristics of suites of cogenetic rocks. Quantitatively evaluating the relative contributions of each process requires integration of mass, species, and energy constraints, applied in a self-consistent way. The energy-constrained model Energy-Constrained Recharge, Assimilation, and Fractional Crystallization (EC-RaχFC) tracks the trace element and isotopic evolution of a magmatic system (melt + solids) undergoing simultaneous fractional crystallization, recharge, and assimilation. Mass, thermal, and compositional (trace element and isotope) output is provided for melt in the magma body, cumulates, enclaves, and anatectic (i.e., country rock) melt. Theory of the EC computational method has been presented by Spera and Bohrson (2001, 2002, 2004), and applications to natural systems have been elucidated by Bohrson and Spera (2001, 2003) and Fowler et al. (2004). The purpose of this contribution is to make the final version of the EC-RAχFC computer code available and to provide instructions for code implementation, description of input and output parameters, and estimates of typical values for some input parameters. A brief discussion highlights measures by which the user may evaluate the quality of the output and also provides some guidelines for implementing nonlinear productivity functions. The EC-RAχFC computer code is written in Visual Basic, the programming language of Excel. The code therefore launches in Excel and is compatible with both PC and MAC platforms. The code is available on the authors' Web sites http://magma.geol.ucsb.edu/and http://www.geology.cwu.edu/ecrafc) as well as in the auxiliary material.

  11. MOFAT: A two-dimensional finite element program for multiphase flow and multicomponent transport. Program documentation and user's guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katyal, A. K.; Kaluarachchi, J. J.; Parker, J. C.

    1991-05-01

    The manual describes a two-dimensional finite element model for coupled multiphase flow and multicomponent transport in planar or radially symmetric vertical sections. Flow and transport of three fluid phases, including water, nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL), and gas are considered by the program. The program can simulate flow only or coupled flow and transport. The flow module can be used to analyze two phases, water and NAPL, with the gas phase held at constant pressure, or explicit three-phase flow of water, NAPL, and gas at various pressures. The transport module can handle up to five components which partition among water, NAPL, gas and solid phases assuming either local equilibrium or first-order mass transfer. Three phase permeability-saturation-capillary pressure relations are defined by an extension of the van Genuchten model. The governing equations are solved using an efficient upstream-weighted finite element scheme. The required inputs for flow and transport analysis are described. Detailed instructions for creating data files needed to run the program and examples of input and output files are given in appendices.

  12. Chemical cleaning of porous stainless steel cross-flow filter elements for nuclear waste applications

    SciTech Connect

    Billing, Justin M.; Daniel, Richard C.; Hallen, Richard T.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2011-05-10

    The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) currently under construction for treatment of High-Level Waste (HLW) at the Hanford Site will rely on cross-flow ultrafiltration to provide solids-liquid separation as a core part of the treatment process. To optimize process throughput, periodic chemical cleaning of the porous stainless steel filter elements has been incorporated into the design of the plant. It is currently specified that chemical cleaning with nitric acid will occur after significant irreversible membrane fouling is observed. Irreversible fouling is defined as fouling that cannot be removed by backpulsing the filter. PNNL has investigated chemical cleaning processes as part of integrated tests with HLW simulants and with actual Hanford tank wastes. To quantify the effectiveness of chemical cleaning, the residual membrane resistance after cleaning was compared against the initial membrane resistance for each test in a series of long-term fouling tests. The impact of the small amount of residual resistance in these tests could not be separated from other parameters and the historical benchmark of >1 GPM/ft2 for clean water flux was determined to be an adequate metric for chemical cleaning. Using the results from these tests, a process optimization strategy is presented suggesting that for the simulant material under test, the value of chemical cleaning may be suspect. The period of enhanced filtration may not be enough to offset the down time required for chemical cleaning, without respect to the other associated costs.

  13. Flow and Transport in Highly Heterogeneous Porous Formations: Numerical Experiments Performed Using the Analytic Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankovic, I.

    2002-05-01

    Flow and transport in porous formations are analyzed using numerical simulations. Hydraulic conductivity is treated as a spatial random function characterized by a probability density function and a two-point covariance function. Simulations are performed for a multi-indicator conductivity structure developed by Gedeon Dagan (personal communication). This conductivity structure contains inhomogeneities (inclusions) of elliptical and ellipsoidal geometry that are embedded in a homogeneous background. By varying the distribution of sizes and conductivities of inclusions, any probability density function and two-point covariance may be reproduced. The multi-indicator structure is selected since it yields simple approximate transport solutions (Aldo Fiori, personal communication) and accurate numerical solutions (based on the Analytic Element Method). The dispersion is examined for two conceptual models. Both models are based on the multi-indicator conductivity structure. The first model is designed to examine dispersion in aquifers with continuously varying conductivity. The inclusions in this model cover as much area/volume of the porous formation as possible. The second model is designed for aquifers that contain clay/sand/gravel lenses embedded in otherwise homogeneous background. The dispersion in both aquifer types is simulated numerically. Simulation results are compared to those obtained using simple approximate solutions. In order to infer transport statistics that are representative of an infinite domain using the numerical experiments, the inclusions are placed in a domain that was shaped as a large ellipse (2D) and a large spheroid (3D) that were submerged in an unbounded homogeneous medium. On a large scale, the large body of inclusions behaves like a single large inhomogeneity. The analytic solution for a uniform flow past the single inhomogeneity of such geometry yields uniform velocity inside the domain. The velocity differs from that at infinity and

  14. SIMULATIONS OF 2D AND 3D THERMOCAPILLARY FLOWS BY A LEAST-SQUARES FINITE ELEMENT METHOD. (R825200)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerical results for time-dependent 2D and 3D thermocapillary flows are presented in this work. The numerical algorithm is based on the Crank-Nicolson scheme for time integration, Newton's method for linearization, and a least-squares finite element method, together with a matri...

  15. THE EFFECT OF WATER (VAPOR-PHASE) AND CARBON ON ELEMENTAL MERCURY REMOVAL IN A FLOW REACTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of studying the effect of vapor-phase moisture on elemental mercury (Hgo) removal by activated carbon (AC) in a flow reactor. tests involved injecting AC into both a dry and a 4% moisture nitrogen (N2) /Hgo gas stream. A bituminous-coal-based AC (Calgon WP...

  16. Viscous/potential flow about multi-element two-dimensional and infinite-span swept wings: Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, L. E.; Dvorak, F. A.

    1975-01-01

    The viscous subsonic flow past two-dimensional and infinite-span swept multi-component airfoils is studied theoretically and experimentally. The computerized analysis is based on iteratively coupled boundary layer and potential flow analysis. The method, which is restricted to flows with only slight separation, gives surface pressure distribution, chordwise and spanwise boundary layer characteristics, lift, drag, and pitching moment for airfoil configurations with up to four elements. Merging confluent boundary layers are treated. Theoretical predictions are compared with an exact theoretical potential flow solution and with experimental measures made in the Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel for both two-dimensional and infinite-span swept wing configurations. Section lift characteristics are accurately predicted for zero and moderate sweep angles where flow separation effects are negligible.

  17. Modal element method for potential flow in non-uniform ducts: Combining closed form analysis with CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, Kenneth J.; Baumeister, Joseph F.

    1994-01-01

    An analytical procedure is presented, called the modal element method, that combines numerical grid based algorithms with eigenfunction expansions developed by separation of variables. A modal element method is presented for solving potential flow in a channel with two-dimensional cylindrical like obstacles. The infinite computational region is divided into three subdomains; the bounded finite element domain, which is characterized by the cylindrical obstacle and the surrounding unbounded uniform channel entrance and exit domains. The velocity potential is represented approximately in the grid based domain by a finite element solution and is represented analytically by an eigenfunction expansion in the uniform semi-infinite entrance and exit domains. The calculated flow fields are in excellent agreement with exact analytical solutions. By eliminating the grid surrounding the obstacle, the modal element method reduces the numerical grid size, employs a more precise far field boundary condition, as well as giving theoretical insight to the interaction of the obstacle with the mean flow. Although the analysis focuses on a specific geometry, the formulation is general and can be applied to a variety of problems as seen by a comparison to companion theories in aeroacoustics and electromagnetics.

  18. Embedded MicroHeating Elements in Polymeric MicroChannels for Temperature Control and Fluid Flow Sensing.

    PubMed

    Gaitan, Michael; Locascio, Laurie E

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the first demonstration of temperature control and flow sensing of fluids using integrated circuit (IC)-based microheating elements embedded in microchannels molded in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Fluid channels and connections to capillary tubing are molded in PDMS using a silicon wafer template. The PDMS film is then bonded to an IC that contains the micromachined microheating elements. Capillary tubes are inserted and fluids are externally pumped through the channels. Heating of the fluid is observed by the formation of bubbles on the microheating element. Sensing of fluid flow is demonstrated by measuring a change in the large signal resistance of the microheater analogous to a hot wire anemometer with a detection limit of ± 320 pL/s.

  19. Seasonal Dynamics of Trace Elements in Tidal Salt Marsh Soils as Affected by the Flow-Sediment Regulation Regime

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Junhong; Xiao, Rong; Zhao, Qingqing; Lu, Qiongqiong; Wang, Junjing; Reddy, K. Ramesh

    2014-01-01

    Soil profiles were collected in three salt marshes with different plant species (i.e. Phragmites australis, Tamarix chinensis and Suaeda salsa) in the Yellow River Delta (YRD) of China during three seasons (summer and fall of 2007 and the following spring of 2008) after the flow-sediment regulation regime. Total elemental contents of As, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn were determined using inductively coupled plasma atomic absorption spectrometry to investigate temporal variations in trace elements in soil profiles of the three salt marshes, assess the enrichment levels and ecological risks of these trace elements in three sampling seasons and identify their influencing factors. Trace elements did not change significantly along soil profiles at each site in each sampling season. The highest value for each sampling site was observed in summer and the lowest one in fall. Soils in both P. australis and S. salsa wetlands tended to have higher trace element levels than those in T. chinensis wetland. Compared to other elements, both Cd and As had higher enrichment factors exceeding moderate enrichment levels. However, the toxic unit (TU) values of these trace elements did not exceed probable effect levels. Correlation analysis showed that these trace elements were closely linked to soil properties such as moisture, sulfur, salinity, soil organic matter, soil texture and pH values. Principal component analysis showed that the sampling season affected by the flow-sediment regulation regime was the dominant factor influencing the distribution patterns of these trace elements in soils, and plant community type was another important factor. The findings of this study could contribute to wetland conservation and management in coastal regions affected by the hydrological engineering. PMID:25216278

  20. Seasonal dynamics of trace elements in tidal salt marsh soils as affected by the flow-sediment regulation regime.

    PubMed

    Bai, Junhong; Xiao, Rong; Zhao, Qingqing; Lu, Qiongqiong; Wang, Junjing; Reddy, K Ramesh

    2014-01-01

    Soil profiles were collected in three salt marshes with different plant species (i.e. Phragmites australis, Tamarix chinensis and Suaeda salsa) in the Yellow River Delta (YRD) of China during three seasons (summer and fall of 2007 and the following spring of 2008) after the flow-sediment regulation regime. Total elemental contents of As, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn were determined using inductively coupled plasma atomic absorption spectrometry to investigate temporal variations in trace elements in soil profiles of the three salt marshes, assess the enrichment levels and ecological risks of these trace elements in three sampling seasons and identify their influencing factors. Trace elements did not change significantly along soil profiles at each site in each sampling season. The highest value for each sampling site was observed in summer and the lowest one in fall. Soils in both P. australis and S. salsa wetlands tended to have higher trace element levels than those in T. chinensis wetland. Compared to other elements, both Cd and As had higher enrichment factors exceeding moderate enrichment levels. However, the toxic unit (TU) values of these trace elements did not exceed probable effect levels. Correlation analysis showed that these trace elements were closely linked to soil properties such as moisture, sulfur, salinity, soil organic matter, soil texture and pH values. Principal component analysis showed that the sampling season affected by the flow-sediment regulation regime was the dominant factor influencing the distribution patterns of these trace elements in soils, and plant community type was another important factor. The findings of this study could contribute to wetland conservation and management in coastal regions affected by the hydrological engineering.

  1. A hybrid computational approach for the interactions between river flow and porous sediment bed covered with large roughness elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.

    2013-12-01

    In many natural and human-impacted rivers, the porous sediment beds are either fully or partially covered by large roughness elements, such as gravels and boulders. The existence of these large roughness elements, which are in direct contact with the turbulent river flow, changes the dynamics of mass and momentum transfer across the river bed. It also impacts the overall hydraulics in the river channel and over time, indirectly influences the geomorphological evolution of the system. Ideally, one should resolve each of these large roughness elements in a computational fluid model. This approach is apparently not feasible due to the prohibitive computational cost. Considering a typical river bed with armoring, the distribution of sediment sizes usually shows significant vertical variations. Computationally, it poses great challenge to resolve all the size scales. Similar multiscale problem exists in the much broader porous media flow field. To cope with this, we propose a hybrid computational approach where the large surface roughness elements are resolved using immersed boundary method and sediment layers below (usually finer) are modeled by adding extra drag terms in momentum equations. Large roughness elements are digitized using a 3D laser scanner. They are put into the computational domain using the collision detection and rigid body dynamics algorithms which guarantees realistic and physically-correct spatial arrangement of the surface elements. Simulation examples have shown the effectiveness of the hybrid approach which captures the effect of the surface roughness on the turbulent flow as well as the hyporheic flow pattern in and out of the bed.

  2. Constraining late stage melt-peridotite interaction in the lithospheric mantle of southern Ethiopia: evidence from lithium elemental and isotopic compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alemayehu, Melesse; Zhang, Hong-Fu; Seitz, Hans-Michael

    2017-02-01

    Lithium (Li) elemental and isotopic compositions for mineral separates of coexisting olivine, orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene of mantle xenoliths from the Quaternary volcanic rocks of southern Ethiopian rift (Dillo and Megado) reveal the influence of late stage melt-peridotite interaction on the early depleted and variably metasomatized lithospheric mantle. Two types of lherzolites are reported (LREE-depleted La/Sm(N) = 0.11-0.37 × Cl and LREE-enriched, La/Sm(N) = 1.88-15.72 × Cl). The depleted lherzolites have variable range in Li concentration (olivine: 2.1-5.4 ppm; opx: 1.1-2.3 ppm; cpx: 1.0-1.8 ppm) and in Li isotopic composition (δ7Li in olivine: -9.4 to 1.5‰; in opx: -4.5 to 3.6‰; in cpx: -17.0 to 4.8‰), indicating strong disequilibrium in Li partitioning and Li isotope fractionation between samples. The enriched lherzolites have limited range in both Li abundances (olivine: 2.7-3.0 ppm; opx: 1.1-3.1 ppm; cpx: 1.1-2.3 ppm) and Li isotopic compositions (δ7Li in olivine: -1.3 to +1.3‰; in opx: -2.0 to +5.0‰; in cpx: -7.5 to +4.8‰), suggest that the earlier metasomatic event which lead to LREE enrichment could also homogenize the Li contents and its isotopes. The enriched harzburgite and clinopyroxenite minerals show limited variation in Li abundances and variable Li isotopic compositions. The Li enrichments of olivine and clinopyroxene correlate neither with the incompatible trace element enrichment nor with the Sr-Nd isotopic compositions of clinopyroxene. These observations indicate that the metasomatic events which are responsible for the LREE enrichment and for the Li addition are distinct, whereby the LREE-enrichment pre-dates the influx of Li. The presence of large Li isotopic disequilibria within and between minerals of depleted and enriched peridotites suggest that the lithospheric mantle beneath the southern Ethiopian rift has experienced recent melt-peridotite interaction. Thus, the Li data set reported in this study offer new

  3. Modeling Three-Phase Compositional Flow on Complex 3D Unstructured Grids with Higher-Order Finite Element Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moortgat, J.; Firoozabadi, A.

    2013-12-01

    Most problems of interest in hydrogeology and subsurface energy resources involve complex heterogeneous geological formations. Such domains are most naturally represented in numerical reservoir simulations by unstructured computational grids. Finite element methods are a natural choice to describe fluid flow on unstructured meshes, because the governing equations can be readily discretized for any grid-element geometry. In this work, we consider the challenging problem of fully compositional three-phase flow in 3D unstructured grids, discretized by tetrahedra, prisms, or hexahedra, and compare to simulations on 3D structured grids. We employ a combination of mixed hybrid finite element methods to solve for the pressure and flux fields in a fractional flow formulation, and higher-order discontinuous Galerkin methods for the mass transport equations. These methods are well suited to simulate flow in heterogeneous and fractured reservoirs, because they provide a globally continuous pressure and flux field, while allowing for sharp discontinuities in the phase properties, such as compositions and saturations. The increased accuracy from using higher-order methods improves the modeling of highly non-linear flow, such as gravitational and viscous fingering. We present several numerical examples to study convergence rates and the (lack of) sensitivity to gridding/mesh orientation, and mesh quality. These examples consider gravity depletion, water and gas injection in oil saturated subsurface reservoirs with species exchange between up to three fluid phases. The examples demonstrate the wide applicability of our chosen finite element methods in the study of challenging multiphase flow problems in porous, geometrically complex, subsurface media.

  4. Plane shear flows of frictionless spheres: Kinetic theory and 3D soft-sphere discrete element method simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Vescovi, D.; Berzi, D.; Richard, P.

    2014-05-15

    We use existing 3D Discrete Element simulations of simple shear flows of spheres to evaluate the radial distribution function at contact that enables kinetic theory to correctly predict the pressure and the shear stress, for different values of the collisional coefficient of restitution. Then, we perform 3D Discrete Element simulations of plane flows of frictionless, inelastic spheres, sheared between walls made bumpy by gluing particles in a regular array, at fixed average volume fraction and distance between the walls. The results of the numerical simulations are used to derive boundary conditions appropriated in the cases of large and small bumpiness. Those boundary conditions are, then, employed to numerically integrate the differential equations of Extended Kinetic Theory, where the breaking of the molecular chaos assumption at volume fraction larger than 0.49 is taken into account in the expression of the dissipation rate. We show that the Extended Kinetic Theory is in very good agreement with the numerical simulations, even for coefficients of restitution as low as 0.50. When the bumpiness is increased, we observe that some of the flowing particles are stuck in the gaps between the wall spheres. As a consequence, the walls are more dissipative than expected, and the flows resemble simple shear flows, i.e., flows of rather constant volume fraction and granular temperature.

  5. The Finite Element Analysis for a Mini-Conductance Probe in Horizontal Oil-Water Two-Phase Flow

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Weihang; Kong, Lingfu; Li, Lei; Liu, Xingbin; Xie, Ronghua; Li, Jun; Tang, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    Oil-water two-phase flow is widespread in petroleum industry processes. The study of oil-water two-phase flow in horizontal pipes and the liquid holdup measurement of oil-water two-phase flow are of great importance for the optimization of the oil production process. This paper presents a novel sensor, i.e., a mini-conductance probe (MCP) for measuring pure-water phase conductivity of oil-water segregated flow in horizontal pipes. The MCP solves the difficult problem of obtaining the pure-water correction for water holdup measurements by using a ring-shaped conductivity water-cut meter (RSCWCM). Firstly, using the finite element method (FEM), the spatial sensitivity field of the MCP is investigated and the optimized MCP geometry structure is determined in terms of the characteristic parameters. Then, the responses of the MCP for the oil-water segregated flow are calculated, and it is found that the MCP has better stability and sensitivity to the variation of water-layer thickness in the condition of high water holdup and low flow velocity. Finally, the static experiments for the oil-water segregated flow were carried out and a novel calibration method for pure-water phase conductivity measurements was presented. The validity of the pure-water phase conductivity measurement with segregated flow in horizontal pipes was verified by experimental results. PMID:27563907

  6. The Finite Element Analysis for a Mini-Conductance Probe in Horizontal Oil-Water Two-Phase Flow.

    PubMed

    Kong, Weihang; Kong, Lingfu; Li, Lei; Liu, Xingbin; Xie, Ronghua; Li, Jun; Tang, Haitao

    2016-08-24

    Oil-water two-phase flow is widespread in petroleum industry processes. The study of oil-water two-phase flow in horizontal pipes and the liquid holdup measurement of oil-water two-phase flow are of great importance for the optimization of the oil production process. This paper presents a novel sensor, i.e., a mini-conductance probe (MCP) for measuring pure-water phase conductivity of oil-water segregated flow in horizontal pipes. The MCP solves the difficult problem of obtaining the pure-water correction for water holdup measurements by using a ring-shaped conductivity water-cut meter (RSCWCM). Firstly, using the finite element method (FEM), the spatial sensitivity field of the MCP is investigated and the optimized MCP geometry structure is determined in terms of the characteristic parameters. Then, the responses of the MCP for the oil-water segregated flow are calculated, and it is found that the MCP has better stability and sensitivity to the variation of water-layer thickness in the condition of high water holdup and low flow velocity. Finally, the static experiments for the oil-water segregated flow were carried out and a novel calibration method for pure-water phase conductivity measurements was presented. The validity of the pure-water phase conductivity measurement with segregated flow in horizontal pipes was verified by experimental results.

  7. Sources of granite magmatism in the Embu Terrane (Ribeira Belt, Brazil): Neoproterozoic crust recycling constrained by elemental and isotope (Sr-Nd-Pb) geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Adriana; Janasi, Valdecir de Assis; Campos Neto, Mario da Costa

    2016-07-01

    Whole rock elemental and Sr-Nd isotope geochemistry and in situ K-feldspar Pb isotope geochemistry were used to identify the sources involved in the genesis of Neoproterozoic granites from the Embu Terrane, Ribeira Belt, SE Brazil. Granite magmatism spanned over 200 Ma (810-580 Ma), and is dominated by crust-derived relatively low-T (850-750 °C, zircon saturation) biotite granites to biotite-muscovite granites. Two Cryogenian plutons show the least negative εNdt (-8 to -10) and highest mg# (30-40) of the whole set. Their compositions are strongly contrasted, implying distinct sources for the peraluminous (ASI ∼ 1.2) ∼660 Ma Serra do Quebra-Cangalha batholith (metasedimentary rocks from relatively young upper crust with high Rb/Sr and low Th/U) and the metaluminous (ASI = 0.96-1.00) ∼ 630 Ma Santa Catarina Granite. Although not typical, the geochemical signature of these granites may reflect a continental margin arc environment, and they could be products of a prolonged period of oceanic plate consumption started at ∼810 Ma. The predominant Ediacaran (595-580 Ma) plutons have a spread of compositions from biotite granites with SiO2 as low as ∼65% (e.g., Itapeti, Mauá, Sabaúna and Lagoinha granites) to fractionated muscovite granites (Mogi das Cruzes, Santa Branca and Guacuri granites; up to ∼75% SiO2). εNdT are characteristically negative (-12 to -18), with corresponding Nd TDM indicating sources with Paleoproterozoic mean crustal ages (2.0-2.5 Ga). The Guacuri and Santa Branca muscovite granites have the more negative εNdt, highest 87Sr/86Srt (0.714-0.717) and lowest 208Pb/206Pb and 207Pb/206Pb, consistent with an old metasedimentary source with low time-integrated Rb/Sr. However, a positive Nd-Sr isotope correlation is suggested by data from the other granites, and would be consistent with mixing between an older source predominant in the Mauá granite and a younger, high Rb/Sr source that is more abundant in the Lagoinha granite sample. The

  8. U-series Dating of Syntectonic Calcite Veins Constrains the Time Scales of the Elements of the Seismic Cycle in an Intraplate Normal Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, L. B.; Williams, R. T.; Mozley, P.; Sharp, W. D.

    2015-12-01

    The link between fluid overpressure and the earthquake cycle has been documented through previous studies of vein arrays associated with faults and carefully designed experimental work. In the interseismic period, elevated pore fluid pressure (overpressure) will reduce the effective fault-normal stress, weakening the fault and promoting seismic rupture. Fractures produced during faulting will serve as fluid migration pathways until they are sealed by either collapse or precipitation of cement. Following sealing, pore fluid pressure is inferred to progressively increase until it reaches a level sufficient to start the cycle again. Though the rock record of this overpressure-driven seismic cycle is clear, the timescales of the different elements of the cycle have not been quantified. We have addressed this problem by dating calcite veins in the hanging wall damage zone of the Loma Blanca fault zone of the Socorro Basin, Rio Grande rift, New Mexico. These veins exhibit crack-seal microstructures that record repeated episodes of fracture opening, fluid migration, and fracture sealing, suggesting a prolonged history of recurrent seismicity and post-failure fluid migration. Stable isotope analyses of these veins reveal distinct fluid chemistries associated with individual fluid migration events. Carbon isotope values as high as +6.00‰ suggest depressurization and degassing of CO2 charged fluids, supporting the interpretation that fracturing was associated with fault slip. Preliminary U-series dating of calcite veins show a well-defined periodicity of fault slip and fracture formation, with a slip recurrence interval of approximately 73 ± 17 ka, consistent with previous studies of other faults in the Rio Grande rift. Analyses of cements deposited during single crack-seal events record sealing times of approximately 16 ± 4 ka. These results suggest that the time required to re-establish sufficient pore fluid pressure for failure following sealing of damage zone

  9. A balanced-force finite-element method for surface-tension-driven interfacial flows using interface-capturing approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhihua; Pavlidis, Dimitrios; Percival, James; Gomes, Jefferson; Pain, Christopher; Matar, Omar

    2013-11-01

    Interfacial flows with surface tension are often found in industrial and practical engineering applications, including bubbles, droplets, liquid film and jets. Accurate modelling of such flows is challenging due to their highly complex dynamics, which often involve changes of interfacial topology. We present a balanced-force finite-element method with adaptive unstructured meshes for interfacial flows. The method uses a mixed control-volume and finite element formulation, which ensures the surface tension forces, and the resulting pressure gradients, are exactly balanced, minimising the spurious velocities often found in numerical simulations of such flows. A volume-of-fluid-type method is employed for interface capturing based on a compressive control-volume advection method, and second-order finite element methods. A distance function is reconstructed from the volume fraction on the unstructured meshes, which provides accurate estimation of the curvature. Numerical examples of an equilibrium drop and dynamics of bubbles (droplets) are presented to demonstrate the capability of this method.

  10. A viscous/potential flow interaction analysis method for multi-element infinite swept wings, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dvorak, F. A.; Woodward, F. A.

    1974-01-01

    An analysis method and computer program have been developed for the calculation of the viscosity dependent aerodynamic characteristics of multi-element infinite swept wings in incompressible flow. The wing configuration consisting at the most of a slat, a main element and double slotted flap is represented in the method by a large number of panels. The inviscid pressure distribution about a given configuration in the normal chord direction is determined using a two dimensional potential flow program employing a vortex lattice technique. The boundary layer development over each individual element of the high lift configuration is determined using either integral or finite difference boundary layer techniques. A source distribution is then determined as a function of the calculated boundary layer displacement thickness and pressure distributions. This source distribution is included in the second calculation of the potential flow about the configuration. Once the solution has converged (usually after 2-5 iterations between the potential flow and boundary layer calculations) lift, drag, and pitching moments can be determined as functions of Reynolds number.

  11. Mixed-hybrid and vertex-discontinuous-Galerkin finite element modeling of multiphase compositional flow on 3D unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moortgat, Joachim; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2016-06-01

    Problems of interest in hydrogeology and hydrocarbon resources involve complex heterogeneous geological formations. Such domains are most accurately represented in reservoir simulations by unstructured computational grids. Finite element methods accurately describe flow on unstructured meshes with complex geometries, and their flexible formulation allows implementation on different grid types. In this work, we consider for the first time the challenging problem of fully compositional three-phase flow in 3D unstructured grids, discretized by any combination of tetrahedra, prisms, and hexahedra. We employ a mass conserving mixed hybrid finite element (MHFE) method to solve for the pressure and flux fields. The transport equations are approximated with a higher-order vertex-based discontinuous Galerkin (DG) discretization. We show that this approach outperforms a face-based implementation of the same polynomial order. These methods are well suited for heterogeneous and fractured reservoirs, because they provide globally continuous pressure and flux fields, while allowing for sharp discontinuities in compositions and saturations. The higher-order accuracy improves the modeling of strongly non-linear flow, such as gravitational and viscous fingering. We review the literature on unstructured reservoir simulation models, and present many examples that consider gravity depletion, water flooding, and gas injection in oil saturated reservoirs. We study convergence rates, mesh sensitivity, and demonstrate the wide applicability of our chosen finite element methods for challenging multiphase flow problems in geometrically complex subsurface media.

  12. [Study of laser energy in multi-element detection of pulverized coal flow with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jian-Ping; Lu, Ji-Dong; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Shi-He; Yao, Shun-Chun; Pan, Feng-Ping; Dong, Xuan; Zhang, Xi

    2014-01-01

    The logical range of laser power density and optimum laser power density were explored for multi-element analysis of pulverized coal flow with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in the present paper. The range of laser energy was chosen from 20 to 160 mJ in the experiment. Pulverized coal less than 200 microm in diameter of particles fell freely through feeder outlet and the rate of flow was controlled by screw feeder. Emissions were collected with pulse laser at 1 064 nm focusing on pulverized coal flow and plasma was generated. The intensity and cause of fluctuation of emission spectra at various laser energy levels were studied. A suitable range of laser power density is from 14.4 to 34.4 GW x cm(-2), and the optimum laser power density is 19.5 GW x cm(-2) for the determination of pulverized coal flow with LIBS.

  13. Investigation of Mixed Element Hybrid Grid-Based CFD Methods for Rotorcraft Flow Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    behave well for low speed flows with Mach number less than 0.1. OVERFLOW NASA’s OVERFLOW (2.1) code [63-65] solves the compressible RANS equations...Low- Mach number preconditioning is available to compute low-speed flows. FUN3D The FUN3D code has been developed at the NASA Langley Research...dependent manner. Inviscid, low Mach number flow and small flow angles are assumed thus allowing comparison to classical theories. Table 1: Fixed

  14. Local Modelling of Groundwater Flow Using Analytic Element Method Three-dimensional Transient Unconfined Groundwater Flow With Partially Penetrating Wells and Ellipsoidal Inhomogeneites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankovic, I.; Barnes, R. J.; Soule, R.

    2001-12-01

    The analytic element method is used to model local three-dimensional flow in the vicinity of partially penetrating wells. The flow domain is bounded by an impermeable horizontal base, a phreatic surface with recharge and a cylindrical lateral boundary. The analytic element solution for this problem contains (1) a fictitious source technique to satisfy the head and the discharge conditions along the phreatic surface, (2) a fictitious source technique to satisfy specified head conditions along the cylindrical boundary, (3) a method of imaging to satisfy the no-flow condition across the impermeable base, (4) the classical analytic solution for a well and (5) spheroidal harmonics to account for the influence of the inhomogeneities in hydraulic conductivity. Temporal variations of the flow system due to time-dependent recharge and pumping are represented by combining the analytic element method with a finite difference method: analytic element method is used to represent spatial changes in head and discharge, while the finite difference method represents temporal variations. The solution provides a very detailed description of local groundwater flow with an arbitrary number of wells of any orientation and an arbitrary number of ellipsoidal inhomogeneities of any size and conductivity. These inhomogeneities may be used to model local hydrogeologic features (such as gravel packs and clay lenses) that significantly influence the flow in the vicinity of partially penetrating wells. Several options for specifying head values along the lateral domain boundary are available. These options allow for inclusion of the model into steady and transient regional groundwater models. The head values along the lateral domain boundary may be specified directly (as time series). The head values along the lateral boundary may also be assigned by specifying the water-table gradient and a head value at a single point (as time series). A case study is included to demonstrate the application

  15. Continuous deflation and plate spreading at the Askja volcanic system, Iceland: Constrains on deformation processes from finite element models using temperature-dependent non-linear rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tariqul Islam, Md.; Sturkell, Erik; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Drouin, Vincent Jean Paul B.; Ófeigsson, Benedikt G.

    2014-05-01

    Iceland is located on the mid Atlantic ridge, where the spreading rate is nearly 2 cm/yr. The high rate of magmatism in Iceland is caused by the interaction between the Iceland hotspot and the divergent mid-Atlantic plate boundary. Iceland hosts about 35 volcanoes or volcanic systems that are active. Most of these are aliened along the plate boundary. The best studied magma chamber of central volcanoes (e.g., Askja, Krafla, Grimsvötn, Katla) have verified (suggested) a shallow magma chamber (< 5 km), which has been model successfully with a Mogi source, using elastic and/or elastic-viscoelastic half-space. Maxwell and Newtonian viscosity is mainly considered for viscoelastic half-space. Therefore, rheology may be oversimplified. Our attempt is to study deformation of the Askja volcano together with plate spreading in Iceland using temperature-dependent non-linear rheology. It offers continuous variation of rheology, laterally and vertically from rift axis and surface. To implement it, we consider thermo-mechanic coupling models where rheology follows dislocation flow in dry condition based on a temperature distribution. Continuous deflation of the Askja volcanic system is associated with solidification of magma in the magma chamber and post eruption relaxation. A long time series of levelling data show its subsidence trend to exponentially. In our preliminary models, a magma chamber at 2.8 km depth with 0.5 km radius is introduced at the ridge axis as a Mogi source. Simultaneously far field of rift axis stretching by 18.4 mm/yr (measured during 2007 to 20013) is applied to reproduce plate spreading. Predicted surface deformation caused of combined effect of tectonic-volcanic activities is evaluated with GPS during 2003-2009 and RADARSAT InSAR data during 2000 to 2010. During 2003-2009, data from the GPS site OLAF (close to the centre of subsidence) shows average rate of subsidence 19±1 mm/yr relative to the ITRF2005 reference frame. The MASK (Mid ASKJA) site is

  16. Elasto-plastic flow in cracked bodies using a new finite element model. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karabin, M. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Cracked geometries were studied by finite element techniques with the aid of a new special element embedded at the crack tip. This model seeked to accurately represent the singular stresses and strains associated with the elasto-plastic flow process. The present model was not restricted to a material type and did not predetermine a singularity. Rather the singularity was treated as an unknown. For each step of the incremental process the nodal degrees of freedom and the unknown singularity were found through minimization of an energy-like functional. The singularity and nodal degrees of freedom were determined by means of an iterative process.

  17. Summary of design and blade-element performance data for 12 axial-flow pump rotor configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M. J.; Okiishi, T. H.; Serovy, G. K.; Sandercock, D. M.; Britsch, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    A collection of noncavitating blade-element performance data for 12 axial-flow pump rotor configurations is presented in tabular form. Rotor design philosophy, test apparatus and procedure, and data reduction and evaluation are discussed. A data storage and recall computer program is described. All but one of the rotor configurations considered were composed of double-circular-arc blade sections and were designed for high inlet relative flow angles. Hub-tip radius ranged from 0.40 to 0.90.

  18. The effect of a small isolated roughness element on the forces on a sphere in uniform flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, A. K.; McKeon, B. J.

    2011-10-01

    The effect of an isolated roughness element on the forces on a sphere was examined for a Reynolds number range of 5 × 104 < Re < 5 × 105 using a novel sting-mounted sphere apparatus. The roughness element was a circular cylinder, and its width and height was varied to be 1, 2, and 4% of the sphere diameter. At subcritical Re, a lateral force is produced in the direction of the roughness, while at supercritical Re, the force is in the opposite direction. This is caused by asymmetric boundary layer separation, as shown using particle image velocimetry. At supercritical Re, a roughness element that is only 1% the sphere diameter produces a lift to drag ratio of almost one. It was found that the isolated roughness element has the largest effect on the lateral forces when it is located between a streamwise angle of about 40° and 80°. In addition to the mean forces, the unsteady forces were also measured. It was found that at subcritical Re, vortex shedding is aligned to the plane of the roughness element. In addition, the probability distribution of the forces was nearly Gaussian for subcritical Re, but for supercritical Re, the skewness and kurtosis deviate from Gaussian, and the details are dependent on the roughness size. A simple model developed for the vortical structure formed behind the roughness element can be extended to explain aspects of nominally smooth sphere flow, in which external disturbances perturb the sphere boundary layer in an azimuthally local sense. These results also form the basis of comparison for an investigation into the effectiveness of a moving isolated roughness element for manipulating sphere flow.

  19. Finite Element Simulation of Simple Three-Dimensional Fully Cavitating Flows.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-11-01

    the separation condition which must be enforced while keeping the Jacobian of the isoparametric transformation nonsingular. The free surface is shown...2.2 FINITE ELEMENT MODEL 9 2.2.1 Finite Element Approximation 10 2.2.2 Isoparametric Transformation and Numerical Integration 13 2.2.3 Implementation...uniform surface load F force on the foil J Jacobian matrix for the isoparametric transformation e K j elemental stiffness matrix Kij global stiffness

  20. Compositionally Constraining Elysium Lava Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunatillake, S.; Button, N. E.; Skok, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    Chemical provinces of Mars defined recently [1-3] became possible with the maps of elemental mass fractions generated with Mars Odyssey Gamma and Neutron Spectrometer (GS) data [4,5]. These provide a unique perspective by representing compositional signatures distinctive of the regolith vertically at decimeter depths and laterally at hundreds of kilometer scale. Some provinces overlap compellingly with regions highlighted by other remote sensing observations, such as the Mars Radar Stealth area [3]. The spatial convergence of mutually independent data with the consequent highlight of a region provides a unique opportunity of insight not possible with a single type of remote sensing observation. Among such provinces, previous work [3] highlighted Elysium lava flows as a promising candidate on the basis of convergence with mapped geologic units identifying Elysium's lava fields generally, and Amazonian-aged lava flows specifically. The South Eastern lava flows of Elysium Mons, dating to the recent Amazonian epoch, overlap compellingly with a chemical province of K and Th depletion relative to the Martian midlatitudes. We characterize the composition, geology, and geomorphology of the SE Elysium province to constrain the confluence of geologic and alteration processes that may have contributed to its evolution. We compare this with the North Western lava fields, extending the discussion on chemical products from the thermal evolution of Martian volcanism as discussed by Baratoux et al. [6]. The chemical province, by regional proximity to Cerberus Fossae, may also reflect the influence of recently identified buried flood channels [7] in the vicinity of Orcus Patera. Despite the compelling chemical signature from γ spectra, fine grained unconsolidated sediment hampers regional VNTIR (Visible, Near, and Thermal Infrared) spectral analysis. But some observations near scarps and fresh craters allow a view of small scale mineral content. The judicious synthesis of

  1. The Conservation/Solution Element (STE) Method for Linear Potential Flow Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adeyeye, John O.; Attia, Naguib F.; Jackson, Joy; Hunter, Timothy

    1996-01-01

    The potential equation is discretized on rectangular domains using the Conservation/Solution Element Method (STE) approach. Computational examples with a discussion of numerical experience gained are given.

  2. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry as an element-specific detector for field-flow fractionation particle separation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, Howard E.; Garbarino, John R.; Murphy, Deirdre M.; Beckett, Ronald

    1992-01-01

    An inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer was used for the quantitative measurement of trace elements In specific,submicrometer size-fraction particulates, separated by sedimentation field-flow fractionation. Fractions were collected from the eluent of the field-flow fractionation centrifuge and nebulized, with a Babington-type pneumatic nebulizer, into an argon inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer. Measured Ion currents were used to quantify the major, minor, and trace element composition of the size-separated colloidal (< 1-microm diameter) particulates. The composition of surface-water suspended matter collected from the Yarra and Darling rivers in Australia is presented to illustrate the usefulness of this tool for characterizing environmental materials. An adsorption experiment was performed using cadmium lon to demonstrate the utility for studying the processes of trace metal-suspended sediment interactions and contaminant transport in natural aquatic systems.

  3. Upper flow regime sheets, lenses and scour fills: Extending the range of architectural elements for fluvial sediment bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fielding, Christopher R.

    2006-08-01

    Fluvial strata dominated internally by sedimentary structures of interpreted upper flow regime origin are moderately common in the rock record, yet their abundance is not appreciated and many examples may go unnoticed. A spectrum of sedimentary structures is recognised, all of which occur over a wide range of scale: 1. cross-bedding with humpback, sigmoidal and ultimately low-angle cross-sectional foreset geometries (interpreted as recording the transition from dune to upper plane bed bedform stability field), 2. planar/flat lamination with parting lineation, characteristic of the upper plane bed phase, 3. flat and low-angle lamination with minor convex-upward elements, characteristic of the transition from upper plane bed to antidune stability fields, 4. convex-upward bedforms, down- and up-palaeocurrent-dipping, low-angle cross-bedding and symmetrical drapes, interpreted as the product of antidunes, and 5. backsets terminating updip against an upstream-dipping erosion surface, interpreted as recording chute and pool conditions. In some fluvial successions, the entirety or substantial portions of channel sandstone bodies may be made up of such structures. These Upper Flow Regime Sheets, Lenses and Scour Fills (UFR) are defined herein as an extension of Miall's [Miall, A.D., 1985. Architectural-element analysis: a new method of facies analysis applied to fluvial deposits. Earth Sci. Rev. 22: 261-308.] Laminated Sand Sheets architectural element. Given the conditions that favour preservation of upper flow regime structures (rapid changes in flow strength), it is suggested that the presence of UFR elements in ancient fluvial successions may indicate sediment accumulation under the influence of a strongly seasonal palaeoclimate that involves a pronounced seasonal peak in precipitation and runoff.

  4. Numerical and Analytical Study of Nonlinear Effects of Transonic Flow Past a Wing Airfoil in Oscillation of its Surface Element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aul'chenko, S. M.; Zamuraev, V. P.; Kalinina, A. P.

    2014-05-01

    The present work is devoted to a criterial analysis and mathematical modeling of the influence of forced oscillations of surface elements of a wing airfoil on the shock-wave structure of transonic flow past it. Parameters that govern the regimes of interaction of the oscillatory motion of airfoil sections with the breakdown compression shock have been established. The qualitative and quantitative influence of these parameters on the wave resistance of the airfoil has been investigated.

  5. MPSalsa Version 1.5: A Finite Element Computer Program for Reacting Flow Problems: Part 1 - Theoretical Development

    SciTech Connect

    Devine, K.D.; Hennigan, G.L.; Hutchinson, S.A.; Moffat, H.K.; Salinger, A.G.; Schmidt, R.C.; Shadid, J.N.; Smith, T.M.

    1999-01-01

    The theoretical background for the finite element computer program, MPSalsa Version 1.5, is presented in detail. MPSalsa is designed to solve laminar or turbulent low Mach number, two- or three-dimensional incompressible and variable density reacting fluid flows on massively parallel computers, using a Petrov-Galerkin finite element formulation. The code has the capability to solve coupled fluid flow (with auxiliary turbulence equations), heat transport, multicomponent species transport, and finite-rate chemical reactions, and to solve coupled multiple Poisson or advection-diffusion-reaction equations. The program employs the CHEMKIN library to provide a rigorous treatment of multicomponent ideal gas kinetics and transport. Chemical reactions occurring in the gas phase and on surfaces are treated by calls to CHEMKIN and SURFACE CHEMK3N, respectively. The code employs unstructured meshes, using the EXODUS II finite element database suite of programs for its input and output files. MPSalsa solves both transient and steady flows by using fully implicit time integration, an inexact Newton method and iterative solvers based on preconditioned Krylov methods as implemented in the Aztec. solver library.

  6. A fully-coupled discontinuous Galerkin spectral element method for two-phase flow in petroleum reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taneja, Ankur; Higdon, Jonathan

    2016-11-01

    A spectral element method (SEM) is presented to simulate two-phase fluid flow (oil and water phase) in petroleum reservoirs. Petroleum reservoirs are porous media with heterogeneous geologic features, and the flow of two immiscible phases involves sharp, moving interfaces. The governing equations of motion are time-dependent, non-linear PDEs with strong hyperbolic nature. A fully-coupled numerical scheme using discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method with nodal spectral element basis functions for spatial discretization, and an implicit Runge-Kutta type time-stepping is developed to solve the PDEs in a robust, stable manner. Isoparameteric mapping is used to generate grids for reservoir and well geometry. We present the performance capabilities of the DG scheme with high-order basis functions to accurately resolve sharp fluid interfaces and a variety of heterogeneous geologic features. High-order convergence of SEM is demonstrated. Numerical results are presented for reservoir flows with various injection-production patterns. Typical reservoir heterogeneities like low-permeable regions, impermeable shale barriers, etc. are included in the numerical tests. Comparisons with commonly used finite volume methods and linear and quadratic finite element methods are presented. ExxonMobil Upstream Research Co.

  7. Extractable sulphate-sulphur, total sulphur and trace-element determinations in plant material by flow injection analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Heanes, D.L. )

    1990-01-01

    A rapid, accurate and reproducible procedure for determining total sulphur(S) and trace elements (copper, zinc, manganese and iron) in plant material is described. Plant material is digested in culture tubes with a mixture of nitric and perchloric acids containing ammonium metavanadate and calcium chloride. In the acid digest, concentrations of total-S as sulphate are determined by turbidimetry and trace-elements by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry using flow injection analysis. The results for a range of plant materials compare well with those obtained by conventional procedures for the same elements. The microprocessor controlled digestion and multielement assay procedure described here offers improved laboratory efficiencies in materials, time and cost effectiveness. The techniques should be particularly useful when plant tissues are in limited supply.

  8. Combined effects of grain size, flow volume and channel width on geophysical flow mobility: three-dimensional discrete element modeling of dry and dense flows of angular rock fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagnoli, Bruno; Piersanti, Antonio

    2017-02-01

    We have carried out new three-dimensional numerical simulations by using a discrete element method (DEM) to study the mobility of dry granular flows of angular rock fragments. These simulations are relevant for geophysical flows such as rock avalanches and pyroclastic flows. The model is validated by previous laboratory experiments. We confirm that (1) the finer the grain size, the larger the mobility of the center of mass of granular flows; (2) the smaller the flow volume, the larger the mobility of the center of mass of granular flows and (3) the wider the channel, the larger the mobility of the center of mass of granular flows. The grain size effect is due to the fact that finer grain size flows dissipate intrinsically less energy. This volume effect is the opposite of that experienced by the flow fronts. The original contribution of this paper consists of providing a comparison of the mobility of granular flows in six channels with a different cross section each. This results in a new scaling parameter χ that has the product of grain size and the cubic root of flow volume as the numerator and the product of channel width and flow length as the denominator. The linear correlation between the reciprocal of mobility and parameter χ is statistically highly significant. Parameter χ confirms that the mobility of the center of mass of granular flows is an increasing function of the ratio of the number of fragments per unit of flow mass to the total number of fragments in the flow. These are two characteristic numbers of particles whose effect on mobility is scale invariant.

  9. Flow prediction over a transport multi-element high-lift system and comparison with flight measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vijgen, P. M. H. W.; Hardin, J. D.; Yip, L. P.

    1992-01-01

    Accurate prediction of surface-pressure distributions, merging boundary-layers, and separated-flow regions over multi-element high-lift airfoils is required to design advanced high-lift systems for efficient subsonic transport aircraft. The availability of detailed measurements of pressure distributions and both averaged and time-dependent boundary-layer flow parameters at flight Reynolds numbers is critical to evaluate computational methods and to model the turbulence structure for closure of the flow equations. Several detailed wind-tunnel measurements at subscale Reynolds numbers were conducted to obtain detailed flow information including the Reynolds-stress component. As part of a subsonic-transport high-lift research program, flight experiments are conducted using the NASA-Langley B737-100 research aircraft to obtain detailed flow characteristics for support of computational and wind-tunnel efforts. Planned flight measurements include pressure distributions at several spanwise locations, boundary-layer transition and separation locations, surface skin friction, as well as boundary-layer profiles and Reynolds stresses in adverse pressure-gradient flow.

  10. Quantification of blood flow velocity in stenosed arteries by the use of finite elements: an observer-independent noninvasive method.

    PubMed

    Mühlthaler, Hannes; Quatember, Bernhard; Fraedrich, Gustav; Mühlthaler, Markus; Pfeifer, Bernhard; Greiner, Andreas; Schocke, Michael F H

    2008-10-01

    Interventions for peripheral arterial disease should be designed to treat a physiological rather than an anatomic defect. Thus, for vascular surgeons, functional information about stenoses is as important as the anatomic one. In case of finding a stenosis by the use of magnetic resonance angiography, it would be a matter of particular interest to derive automatically and directly objective information about the hemodynamic influence on blood flow, caused by patient-specific stenoses. We developed a methodology to noninvasively perform numerical simulations of a patient's hemodynamic state on the basis of magnetic resonance images and by the means of the finite element method. We performed patient-specific three-dimensional simulation studies of the increase in systolic blood flow velocity due to stenoses using the commercial computational fluid dynamic software package FIDAP 8.52. The generation of a mesh defining the flow domain with a stenosis and some simulation results are shown.

  11. Documentation of a finite-element two-layer model for simulation of ground-water flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mallory, Michael J.

    1979-01-01

    This report documents a finite-element model for simulation of ground-water flow in a two-aquifer system where the two aquifers are coupled by a leakage term that represents flow through a confining layer separating the two aquifers. The model was developed by Timothy J. Durbin (U.S. Geological Survey) for use in ground-water investigations in southern California. The documentation assumes that the reader is familiar with the physics of ground-water flow, numerical methods of solving partial-differential equations, and the FORTRAN IV computer language. It was prepared as part of the investigations made by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the San Bernardino Valley Municipal Water District. (Kosco-USGS)

  12. A Least Square Finite Element Technique for Transonic Flow with Shock,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-08-22

    character of the hodograph equations. one-dimensional, transonic flow in a laval nozzle in the vicinity of the throat was obtained in the For such...state of development, the hodograph method has 2 limitations. It can only be applied to the design a (3) problem in plane flow and cannot be used in

  13. A Mechanical Power Flow Capability for the Finite Element Code NASTRAN

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-01

    perimental methods. statistical energy analysis , the finite element method, and a finite element analog-,y using heat conduction equations. Experimental...weights and inertias of the transducers attached to an experimental structure may produce accuracy problems. Statistical energy analysis (SEA) is a...405-422 (1987). 8. Lyon, R.L., Statistical Energy Analysis of Dynamical Sistems, The M.I.T. Press, (1975). 9. Mickol, J.D., and R.J. Bernhard, "An

  14. Phloem Ultrastructure and Pressure Flow: Sieve-Element-Occlusion-Related Agglomerations Do Not Affect Translocation[W

    PubMed Central

    Froelich, Daniel R.; Mullendore, Daniel L.; Jensen, Kåre H.; Ross-Elliott, Tim J.; Anstead, James A.; Thompson, Gary A.; Pélissier, Hélène C.; Knoblauch, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Since the first ultrastructural investigations of sieve tubes in the early 1960s, their structure has been a matter of debate. Because sieve tube structure defines frictional interactions in the tube system, the presence of P protein obstructions shown in many transmission electron micrographs led to a discussion about the mode of phloem transport. At present, it is generally agreed that P protein agglomerations are preparation artifacts due to injury, the lumen of sieve tubes is free of obstructions, and phloem flow is driven by an osmotically generated pressure differential according to Münch’s classical hypothesis. Here, we show that the phloem contains a distinctive network of protein filaments. Stable transgenic lines expressing Arabidopsis thaliana Sieve-Element-Occlusion-Related1 (SEOR1)–yellow fluorescent protein fusions show that At SEOR1 meshworks at the margins and clots in the lumen are a general feature of living sieve tubes. Live imaging of phloem flow and flow velocity measurements in individual tubes indicate that At SEOR1 agglomerations do not markedly affect or alter flow. A transmission electron microscopy preparation protocol has been generated showing sieve tube ultrastructure of unprecedented quality. A reconstruction of sieve tube ultrastructure served as basis for tube resistance calculations. The impact of agglomerations on phloem flow is discussed. PMID:22198148

  15. Using multivariate statistical analysis of groundwater major cation and trace element concentrations to evaluate groundwater flow in a regional aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stetzenbach, Klaus J.; Farnham, Irene M.; Hodge, Vernon F.; Johannesson, Kevin H.

    1999-12-01

    Groundwater samples were collected from 11 springs in Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge in southern Nevada and seven springs from Death Valley National Park in eastern California. Concentrations of the major cations (Ca, Mg, Na and K) and 45 trace elements were determined in these groundwater samples. The resultant data were subjected to evaluation via the multivariate statistical technique principal components analysis (PCA), to investigate the chemical relationships between the Ash Meadows and Death Valley spring waters, to evaluate whether the results of the PCA support those of previous hydrogeological and isotopic studies and to determine if PCA can be used to help delineate potential groundwater flow patterns based on the chemical compositions of groundwaters. The results of the PCA indicated that groundwaters from the regional Paleozoic carbonate aquifers (all of the Ash Meadows springs and four springs from the Furnace Creek region of Death Valley) exhibited strong statistical associations, whereas other Death Valley groundwaters were chemically different. The results of the PCA support earlier studies, where potentiometric head levels, 18O and D, geological relationships and rare earth element data were used to evaluate groundwater flow, which suggest groundwater flows from Ash Meadows to the Furnace Creek springs in Death Valley. The PCA suggests that Furnace Creek groundwaters are moderately concentrated Ash Meadows groundwater, reflecting longer aquifer residence times for the Furnace Creek groundwaters. Moreover, PCA indicates that groundwater may flow from springs in the region surrounding Scotty's Castle in Death Valley National Park, to a spring discharging on the valley floor. The study indicates that PCA may provide rapid and relatively cost-effective methods to assess possible groundwater flow regimes in systems that have not been previously investigated.

  16. The Flow of the Gibbon LAVA Element Is Facilitated by the LINE-1 Retrotransposition Machinery

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Thomas J.; Held, Ulrike; Nevonen, Kimberly A.; Klawitter, Sabine; Pirzer, Thomas; Carbone, Lucia; Schumann, Gerald G.

    2016-01-01

    LINE-Alu-VNTR-Alu-like (LAVA) elements comprise a family of non-autonomous, composite, non-LTR retrotransposons specific to gibbons and may have played a role in the evolution of this lineage. A full-length LAVA element consists of portions of repeats found in most primate genomes: CT-rich, Alu-like, and VNTR regions from the SVA retrotransposon, and portions of the AluSz and L1ME5 elements. To evaluate whether the gibbon genome currently harbors functional LAVA elements capable of mobilization by the endogenous LINE-1 (L1) protein machinery and which LAVA components are important for retrotransposition, we established a trans-mobilization assay in HeLa cells. Specifically, we tested if a full-length member of the older LAVA subfamily C that was isolated from the gibbon genome and named LAVAC, or its components, can be mobilized in the presence of the human L1 protein machinery. We show that L1 proteins mobilize the LAVAC element at frequencies exceeding processed pseudogene formation and human SVAE retrotransposition by > 100-fold and ≥3-fold, respectively. We find that only the SVA-derived portions confer activity, and truncation of the 3′ L1ME5 portion increases retrotransposition rates by at least 100%. Tagged de novo insertions integrated into intronic regions in cell culture, recapitulating findings in the gibbon genome. Finally, we present alternative models for the rise of the LAVA retrotransposon in the gibbon lineage. PMID:27635049

  17. The Flow of the Gibbon LAVA Element Is Facilitated by the LINE-1 Retrotransposition Machinery.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Thomas J; Held, Ulrike; Nevonen, Kimberly A; Klawitter, Sabine; Pirzer, Thomas; Carbone, Lucia; Schumann, Gerald G

    2016-10-30

    LINE-Alu-VNTR-Alu-like (LAVA) elements comprise a family of non-autonomous, composite, non-LTR retrotransposons specific to gibbons and may have played a role in the evolution of this lineage. A full-length LAVA element consists of portions of repeats found in most primate genomes: CT-rich, Alu-like, and VNTR regions from the SVA retrotransposon, and portions of the AluSz and L1ME5 elements. To evaluate whether the gibbon genome currently harbors functional LAVA elements capable of mobilization by the endogenous LINE-1 (L1) protein machinery and which LAVA components are important for retrotransposition, we established a trans-mobilization assay in HeLa cells. Specifically, we tested if a full-length member of the older LAVA subfamily C that was isolated from the gibbon genome and named LAVAC, or its components, can be mobilized in the presence of the human L1 protein machinery. We show that L1 proteins mobilize the LAVAC element at frequencies exceeding processed pseudogene formation and human SVAE retrotransposition by > 100-fold and ≥3-fold, respectively. We find that only the SVA-derived portions confer activity, and truncation of the 3' L1ME5 portion increases retrotransposition rates by at least 100%. Tagged de novo insertions integrated into intronic regions in cell culture, recapitulating findings in the gibbon genome. Finally, we present alternative models for the rise of the LAVA retrotransposon in the gibbon lineage.

  18. Application of the flow-through time-resolved analysis technique to trace element determination in ostracod shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Börner, Nicole; De Baere, Bart; Francois, Roger; Frenzel, Peter; Schwalb, Antje

    2014-05-01

    Trace element analyses of ostracod shells are a vital tool for paleoenvironmental reconstructions from lake sediments (Börner et al., 2013). Conventional batch dissolution ICP-MS is the most common way for analyzing trace elements in ostracod shells. However, due to dissolution or secondary overgrowth the primary signal may be masked. Resulting variations in trace element composition have been identified to be in the order of a magnitude range. Therefore, the application of the newly developed flow-through technique will be assessed. The flow-through time-resolved analysis technique allows to chemically separate mineral phases of different solubility such as, in particular, original shell calcite from overgrowth calcite, and thus to correct the measurements for the biogenic signal. During a flow-through experiment, eluent is continuously pumped through a sample column, typically a filter in which the ostracod valves are loaded. The gradual dissolution of the substrate is controlled by a combination of eluent type, eluent temperature and eluent flow rate. The dissolved sample then flows directly to a mass spectrometer. The resulting data is a chromatogram, featuring different mineral phases dissolving as time progresses. Hence, the flow-through technique provides a detailed geochemical fingerprint of the substrate and therefore additional data relative to conventional methods. To calibrate this technique for the application to ostracods we use ostracod shells from Southern Tibetan Plateau lakes, which feature an alkaline environment but show highly diverse hydrochemistry. Cleaned as well as uncleaned ostracod shells show similarity in their trace element signals, allowing measurements without prior cleaning of the shells, and thus more time-efficient sample throughput. Measurements of unclean shells are corrected for the biogenic signal using an equation from Klinkhammer et al. (2004). Another advantage is that the measurements can be carried out on single ostracod

  19. A new blade element method for calculating the performance of high and intermediate solidity axial flow fans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borst, H. V.

    1978-01-01

    A method is presented to design and predict the performance of axial flow rotors operating in a duct. The same method is suitable for the design of ducted fans and open propellers. The unified method is based on the blade element approach and the vortex theory for determining the three dimensional effects, so that two dimensional airfoil data can be used for determining the resultant force on each blade element. Resolution of this force in the thrust and torque planes and integration allows the total performance of the rotor, fan or propeller to be predicted. Three different methods of analysis, one based on a momentum flow theory; another on the vortex theory of propellers; and a third based on the theory of ducted fans, agree and reduce cascade airfoil data to single line as a function of the loading and induced angle of attack at values of constant inflow angle. The theory applies for any solidity from .01 to over 1 and any blade section camber. The effects of the duct and blade number can be determined so that the procedure applies over the entire range from two blade open propellers, to ducted helicopter tail rotors, to axial flow compressors with or without guide vanes, and to wind tunnel drive fans.

  20. H-P adaptive methods for finite element analysis of aerothermal loads in high-speed flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, H. J.; Bass, J. M.; Tworzydlo, W.; Oden, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    The commitment to develop the National Aerospace Plane and Maneuvering Reentry Vehicles has generated resurgent interest in the technology required to design structures for hypersonic flight. The principal objective of this research and development effort has been to formulate and implement a new class of computational methodologies for accurately predicting fine scale phenomena associated with this class of problems. The initial focus of this effort was to develop optimal h-refinement and p-enrichment adaptive finite element methods which utilize a-posteriori estimates of the local errors to drive the adaptive methodology. Over the past year this work has specifically focused on two issues which are related to overall performance of a flow solver. These issues include the formulation and implementation (in two dimensions) of an implicit/explicit flow solver compatible with the hp-adaptive methodology, and the design and implementation of computational algorithm for automatically selecting optimal directions in which to enrich the mesh. These concepts and algorithms have been implemented in a two-dimensional finite element code and used to solve three hypersonic flow benchmark problems (Holden Mach 14.1, Edney shock on shock interaction Mach 8.03, and the viscous backstep Mach 4.08).

  1. Modeling unsteady state leachate flow in a landfill using finite difference and boundary element methods

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, S.

    1992-01-01

    The physical processes involving leachate flow in a solid waste landfill are described by the unsaturated flow through the refuse to the saturated leachate mound at the bottom of a landfill. The moisture-flow in the unsaturated zone helps build up the saturated leachate mound at the bottom of a landfill. The moisture content in the unsaturated zone is obtained by solving the two-dimensional unsaturated moisture-flow equation using numerical techniques. A two-dimensional unsteady sate Flow Investigation for Landfill Leachate (FILL) model, based on the implicit finite-difference technique, has been developed to describe the leachate flow process in a landfill. To obtain accuracy and efficiency in numerical molding, it is important to investigate the numerical solution techniques suitable to solve the governing equations. Accuracy and efficiency of the boundary integral method over the finite-difference methods has been investigated. Two approaches, direct Green's function and perturbation Green's function formulations have been developed to solve the unsaturated flow problem. Direct Green's function and perturbation Green's function boundary integral solutions are found to be more accurate than both the Gauss-Seidel iteration and Gauss-Jordon elimination method of finite-difference solution. The efficiency of the boundary integral formulation for the computation of the moisture-flux is an advantage that is useful to estimate leachate of the moisture-flux is an advantage that is useful to estimate leachate accretion in a landfill. A close agreement of the internal fluxes with the exact solution shows the ability of the boundary integral methods to compute accurate recharge from the unsaturated zone to the saturated leachate mound.

  2. A Runge-Kutta discontinuous finite element method for high speed flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bey, Kim S.; Oden, J. T.

    1991-01-01

    A Runge-Kutta discontinuous finite element method is developed for hyperbolic systems of conservation laws in two space variables. The discontinuous Galerkin spatial approximation to the conservation laws results in a system of ordinary differential equations which are marched in time using Runge-Kutta methods. Numerical results for the two-dimensional Burger's equation show that the method is (p+1)-order accurate in time and space, where p is the degree of the polynomial approximation of the solution within an element and is capable of capturing shocks over a single element without oscillations. Results for this problem also show that the accuracy of the solution in smooth regions is unaffected by the local projection and that the accuracy in smooth regions increases as p increases. Numerical results for the Euler equations show that the method captures shocks without oscillations and with higher resolution than a first-order scheme.

  3. Simulation of an urban ground-water-flow system in the Menomonee Valley, Milwaukee, Wisconsin using analytic element modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dunning, C.P.; Feinstein, D.T.

    2004-01-01

    A single-layer, steady-state analytic element model was constructed to simulate shallow ground-water flow in the Menomonee Valley, an old industrial center southwest of downtown Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Project objectives were to develop an understanding of the shallow ground-water flow system and identify primary receptors of recharge to the valley. The analytic element model simulates flow in a 18.3 m (60 ft) thick layer of estuarine and alluvial sediments and man-made fill that comprises the shallow aquifer across the valley. The thin, laterally extensive nature of the shallow aquifer suggests horizontal-flow predominates, thus the system can appropriately be modeled with the Dupuit-Forchheimer approximation in an analytic element model. The model was calibrated to the measured baseflow increase between two USGS gages on the Menomonee River, 90 head measurements taken in and around the valley during December 1999, and vertical gradients measured at five locations under the river and estuary in the valley. Recent construction of the Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewer District Inline Storage System (ISS) in the Silurian dolomite under the Menomonee Valley has locally lowered heads in the dolomite appreciably, below levels caused by historic pumping. The ISS is a regional hydraulic sink which removes water from the bedrock even during dry weather. The potential effect on flow directions in the shallow aquifer of dry-weather infiltration to the ISS was evaluated by adjusting the resistance of the line-sink strings representing the ISS in the model to allow infiltration from 0 to 100% of the reported 9,500 m3/d. The best fit to calibration targets was found between 60% (5,700 m3/d) and 80% (7,600 m3/d) of the reported dry-weather infiltration. At 60% infiltration, 65% of the recharge falling on the valley terminates at the ISS and 35% at the Menomonee River and estuary. At 80% infiltration, 73% of the recharge terminates at the ISS, and 27% at the river and estuary. Model

  4. Constrained Vapor Bubble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, J.; Karthikeyan, M.; Plawsky, J.; Wayner, P. C., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The nonisothermal Constrained Vapor Bubble, CVB, is being studied to enhance the understanding of passive systems controlled by interfacial phenomena. The study is multifaceted: 1) it is a basic scientific study in interfacial phenomena, fluid physics and thermodynamics; 2) it is a basic study in thermal transport; and 3) it is a study of a heat exchanger. The research is synergistic in that CVB research requires a microgravity environment and the space program needs thermal control systems like the CVB. Ground based studies are being done as a precursor to flight experiment. The results demonstrate that experimental techniques for the direct measurement of the fundamental operating parameters (temperature, pressure, and interfacial curvature fields) have been developed. Fluid flow and change-of-phase heat transfer are a function of the temperature field and the vapor bubble shape, which can be measured using an Image Analyzing Interferometer. The CVB for a microgravity environment, has various thin film regions that are of both basic and applied interest. Generically, a CVB is formed by underfilling an evacuated enclosure with a liquid. Classification depends on shape and Bond number. The specific CVB discussed herein was formed in a fused silica cell with inside dimensions of 3x3x40 mm and, therefore, can be viewed as a large version of a micro heat pipe. Since the dimensions are relatively large for a passive system, most of the liquid flow occurs under a small capillary pressure difference. Therefore, we can classify the discussed system as a low capillary pressure system. The studies discussed herein were done in a 1-g environment (Bond Number = 3.6) to obtain experience to design a microgravity experiment for a future NASA flight where low capillary pressure systems should prove more useful. The flight experiment is tentatively scheduled for the year 2000. The SCR was passed on September 16, 1997. The RDR is tentatively scheduled for October, 1998.

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF A CL-IMPREGNATED ACTIVATED CARBON FOR ENTRAINED-FLOW CAPTURE OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Efforts to discern the role of an activated carbon's surface functional groups on the adsorption of elemental mercury [Hg(0)] and mercuric chloride demonstrated that chlorine (Cl) impregnation of a virgin activated carbon using dilute solutions of hydrogen chloride leads to incre...

  6. Aerothermal modeling program. Phase 2, element A: Improved numerical methods for turbulent viscous recirculating flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karki, K. C.; Mongia, H. C.; Patankar, Suhas V.; Runchal, A. K.

    1987-01-01

    The objective of this effort is to develop improved numerical schemes for predicting combustor flow fields. Various candidate numerical schemes were evaluated, and promising schemes were selected for detailed assessment. The criteria for evaluation included accuracy, computational efficiency, stability, and ease of extension to multidimensions. The candidate schemes were assessed against a variety of simple one- and two-dimensional problems. These results led to the selection of the following schemes for further evaluation: flux spline schemes (linear and cubic) and controlled numerical diffusion with internal feedback (CONDIF). The incorporation of the flux spline scheme and direct solution strategy in a computer program for three-dimensional flows is in progress.

  7. Parallel Finite Element Solution of 3D Rayleigh-Benard-Marangoni Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, G. F.; McLay, R.; Bicken, G.; Barth, B.; Pehlivanov, A.

    1999-01-01

    A domain decomposition strategy and parallel gradient-type iterative solution scheme have been developed and implemented for computation of complex 3D viscous flow problems involving heat transfer and surface tension effects. Details of the implementation issues are described together with associated performance and scalability studies. Representative Rayleigh-Benard and microgravity Marangoni flow calculations and performance results on the Cray T3D and T3E are presented. The work is currently being extended to tightly-coupled parallel "Beowulf-type" PC clusters and we present some preliminary performance results on this platform. We also describe progress on related work on hierarchic data extraction for visualization.

  8. Numerical Simulations of Two-Phase Reacting Flow in a Single-Element Lean Direct Injection (LDI) Combustor Using NCC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Nan-Suey; Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Wey, C. Thomas

    2011-01-01

    A series of numerical simulations of Jet-A spray reacting flow in a single-element lean direct injection (LDI) combustor have been conducted by using the National Combustion Code (NCC). The simulations have been carried out using the time filtered Navier-Stokes (TFNS) approach ranging from the steady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS), unsteady RANS (URANS), to the dynamic flow structure simulation (DFS). The sub-grid model employed for turbulent mixing and combustion includes the well-mixed model, the linear eddy mixing (LEM) model, and the filtered mass density function (FDF/PDF) model. The starting condition of the injected liquid spray is specified via empirical droplet size correlation, and a five-species single-step global reduced mechanism is employed for fuel chemistry. All the calculations use the same grid whose resolution is of the RANS type. Comparisons of results from various models are presented.

  9. DNS of Flow in a Low-Pressure Turbine Cascade Using a Discontinuous-Galerkin Spectral-Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garai, Anirban; Diosady, Laslo Tibor; Murman, Scott; Madavan, Nateri

    2015-01-01

    A new computational capability under development for accurate and efficient high-fidelity direct numerical simulation (DNS) and large eddy simulation (LES) of turbomachinery is described. This capability is based on an entropy-stable Discontinuous-Galerkin spectral-element approach that extends to arbitrarily high orders of spatial and temporal accuracy and is implemented in a computationally efficient manner on a modern high performance computer architecture. A validation study using this method to perform DNS of flow in a low-pressure turbine airfoil cascade are presented. Preliminary results indicate that the method captures the main features of the flow. Discrepancies between the predicted results and the experiments are likely due to the effects of freestream turbulence not being included in the simulation and will be addressed in the final paper.

  10. Finite element modeling of hydrothermal fluid flow in Peace River Arch of Western Canada Sedimentary Basin: implications for dolomitization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Y.; Yang, J.

    2009-05-01

    A finite element computer modeling approach, integrated with existing geological, geochemical and geophysical data, was used to address the diagenetic process of dolomitization in Western Canada Sedimentary Basin (WCSB). A 2-D conceptualized model was developed to simulate hydrothermal flow in particular for the packland play type dolomitization in Peace River Arch of WCSB. Our numerical results indicate that faults serve as important pathways for the ascending hydrothermal fluids driven by buoyancy force due to temporal and spatial changes in temperature. Both steady state and transient computations were conducted to reveal suitable hydraulic conditions under which the modeled temperature within the aquifer system is consistent with observed values in the targeted study area. A series of numerical case studies were carried out to investigate key factors controlling hydrothermal fluid flow, including fault penetration depth, width and permeability, and its connectivity with the host rock units.

  11. The effects of exercise on blood flow with reference to the human cardiovascular system: a finite element study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sud, V. K.; Srinivasan, R. S.; Charles, J. B.; Bungo, M. W.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on a theoretical investigation into the effects of vasomotion on blood through the human cardiovascular system. The finite element method has been used to analyse the model. Vasoconstriction and vasodilation may be effected either through the action of the central nervous system or autoregulation. One of the conditions responsible for vasomotion is exercise. The proposed model has been solved and quantitative results of flows and pressures due to changing the conductances of specific networks of arterioles, capillaries and venules comprising the arms, legs, stomach and their combinations have been obtained.

  12. Heat production in an Archean crustal profile and implications for heat flow and mobilization of heat-producing elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashwal, L. D.; Morgan, P.; Kelley, S. A.; Percival, J. A.

    1987-01-01

    Concentrations of heat producing elements (Th, U, and K) in 58 samples representative of the main lithologies in a 100-km transect of the Superior Province of the Canadian Shield have been obtained. The relatively large variation in heat production found among the silicic plutonic rocks is shown to correlate with modal abundances of accessory minerals, and these variations are interpreted as premetamorphic. The present data suggest fundamental differences in crustal radioactivity distributions between granitic and more mafic terrains, and indicate that a previously determined apparently linear heat flow-heat production relationship for the Kapuskasing area does not relate to the distribution of heat production with depth.

  13. Flow cytometry of sputum: assessing inflammation and immune response elements in the bronchial airways**

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: The evaluation of sputum leukocytes by flow cytometry is an opportunity to assess characteristics of cells residing in the central airways, yet it is hampered by certain inherent properties of sputum including mucus and large amounts of contaminating cells and debris. ...

  14. ADAPTIVE FINITE-ELEMENT SIMULATION OF STOKES FLOW IN POROUS MEDIA. (R825689C068)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    The Stokes problem describes flow of an incompressible constant-viscosity fluid when the Reynolds number is small so that inertial and transient-time effects are negligible. The numerical solution of the Stokes problem requires special care, since classical fi...

  15. A fluid--structure interaction finite element analysis of pulsatile blood flow through a compliant stenotic artery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathe, M.; Kamm, R. D.

    1999-01-01

    A new model is used to analyze the fully coupled problem of pulsatile blood flow through a compliant, axisymmetric stenotic artery using the finite element method. The model uses large displacement and large strain theory for the solid, and the full Navier-Stokes equations for the fluid. The effect of increasing area reduction on fluid dynamic and structural stresses is presented. Results show that pressure drop, peak wall shear stress, and maximum principal stress in the lesion all increase dramatically as the area reduction in the stenosis is increased from 51 to 89 percent. Further reductions in stenosis cross-sectional area, however, produce relatively little additional change in these parameters due to a concomitant reduction in flow rate caused by the losses in the constriction. Inner wall hoop stretch amplitude just distal to the stenosis also increases with increasing stenosis severity, as downstream pressures are reduced to a physiological minimum. The contraction of the artery distal to the stenosis generates a significant compressive stress on the downstream shoulder of the lesion. Dynamic narrowing of the stenosis is also seen, further augmenting area constriction at times of peak flow. Pressure drop results are found to compare well to an experimentally based theoretical curve, despite the assumption of laminar flow.

  16. Finite element modeling of endovascular coiling and flow diversion enables hemodynamic prediction of complex treatment strategies for intracranial aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Damiano, Robert J; Ma, Ding; Xiang, Jianping; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Snyder, Kenneth V; Meng, Hui

    2015-09-18

    Endovascular interventions using coil embolization and flow diversion are becoming the mainstream treatment for intracranial aneurysms (IAs). To help assess the effect of intervention strategies on aneurysm hemodynamics and treatment outcome, we have developed a finite-element-method (FEM)-based technique for coil deployment along with our HiFiVS technique for flow diverter (FD) deployment in patient-specific IAs. We tested four clinical intervention strategies: coiling (1-8 coils), single FD, FD with adjunctive coils (1-8 coils), and overlapping FDs. By evaluating post-treatment hemodynamics using computational fluid dynamics (CFD), we compared the flow-modification performance of these strategies. Results show that a single FD provides more reduction in inflow rate than low packing density (PD) coiling, but less reduction in average velocity inside the aneurysm. Adjunctive coils add no additional reduction of inflow rate beyond a single FD until coil PD exceeds 11%. This suggests that the main role of FDs is to divert inflow, while that of coils is to create stasis in the aneurysm. Overlapping FDs decreases inflow rate, average velocity, and average wall shear stress (WSS) in the aneurysm sac, but adding a third FD produces minimal additional reduction. In conclusion, our FEM-based techniques for virtual coiling and flow diversion enable recapitulation of complex endovascular intervention strategies and detailed hemodynamics to identify hemodynamic factors that affect treatment outcome.

  17. Finite Element Modeling of Endovascular Intervention Enables Hemodynamic Prediction of Complex Treatment Strategies for Coiling and Flow Diversion

    PubMed Central

    Damiano, Robert J.; Ma, Ding; Xiang, Jianping; Siddiqui, Adnan H.; Snyder, Kenneth V.; Meng, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Endovascular interventions using coil embolization and flow diversion are becoming the mainstream treatment for intracranial aneurysms (IAs). To help assess the effect of intervention strategies on aneurysm hemodynamics and treatment outcome, we have developed a finite-element-method (FEM)-based technique for coil deployment along with our HiFiVS technique for flow diverter (FD) deployment in patient-specific IAs. We tested four clinical intervention strategies: coiling (1–8 coils), single FD, FD with adjunctive coils (1–8 coils), and overlapping FDs. By evaluating post-treatment hemodynamics using computational fluid dynamics (CFD), we compared the flow-modification performance of these strategies. Results show that a single FD provides more reduction in inflow rate than low PD coiling, but less reduction in average velocity inside the aneurysm. Adjunctive coils add no additional reduction of inflow rate beyond a single FD until coil PD exceeds 11%. This suggests that the main role of FDs is to divert inflow, while that of coils is to create stasis in the aneurysm. Overlapping FDs decreases inflow rate, average velocity, and average wall shear stress (WSS) in the aneurysm sac, but adding a third FD produces minimal additional reduction. In conclusion, our FEM-based techniques for virtual coiling and flow diversion enable recapitulation of complex endovascular intervention strategies and detailed hemodynamics to identify hemodynamic factors that affect treatment outcome. PMID:26169778

  18. An adaptive extended finite element method for the analysis of agglomeration of colloidal particles in a flowing fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Young Joon; Jorshari, Razzi Movassaghi; Djilali, Ned

    2015-03-10

    Direct numerical simulations of the flow-nanoparticle interaction in a colloidal suspension are presented using an extended finite element method (XFEM) in which the dynamics of the nanoparticles is solved in a fully-coupled manner with the flow. The method is capable of accurately describing solid-fluid interfaces without the need of boundary-fitted meshes to investigate the dynamics of particles in complex flows. In order to accurately compute the high interparticle shear stresses and pressures while minimizing computing costs, an adaptive meshing technique is incorporated with the fluid-structure interaction algorithm. The particle-particle interaction at the microscopic level is modeled using the Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential and the corresponding potential parameters are determined by a scaling procedure. The study is relevant to the preparation of inks used in the fabrication of catalyst layers for fuel cells. In this paper, we are particularly interested in investigating agglomeration of the nanoparticles under external shear flow in a sliding bi-periodic Lees-Edwards frame. The results indicate that the external shear has a crucial impact on the structure formation of colloidal particles in a suspension.

  19. Non-Newtonian Study of Blood Flow in an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with a Stabilized Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrero, Victor; Sahni, Onkar; Jansen, Kenneth; Tichy, John; Taylor, Charles

    2008-11-01

    In recent years the methods of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) have been applied to the human cardiovascular system to better understand the relationship between arterial blood flow and the disease process, for example in an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Obviously, the technical challenges associated with such modeling are formidable. Among the many problems to be addressed, in this paper we add yet another complication -- the known non-Newtonian nature of blood. In this preliminary study, we used a patient-based AAA model with rigid walls. The pulsatile nature of the flow and the RCR outflow boundary condition are considered. We use the Carreau-Yasuda model to describe the non-Newtonian viscosity variation. Preliminary results for 200K, 2M, and 8M elements mesh are presented for the Newtonian and non-Newtonian cases. The broad fundamental issue we wish to eventually resolve is whether or not non-Newtonian effects in blood flow are sufficiently strong in unhealthy vessels that they must be addressed in meaningful simulations. Interesting differences during the flow cycle shed light on the problem, but further research is needed.

  20. Numerical Simulations of Single Flow Element in a Nuclear Thermal Thrust Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Gary; Ito, Yasushi; Ross, Doug; Chen, Yen-Sen; Wang, Ten-See

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this effort is to develop an efficient and accurate computational methodology to predict both detailed and global thermo-fluid environments of a single now element in a hypothetical solid-core nuclear thermal thrust chamber assembly, Several numerical and multi-physics thermo-fluid models, such as chemical reactions, turbulence, conjugate heat transfer, porosity, and power generation, were incorporated into an unstructured-grid, pressure-based computational fluid dynamics solver. The numerical simulations of a single now element provide a detailed thermo-fluid environment for thermal stress estimation and insight for possible occurrence of mid-section corrosion. In addition, detailed conjugate heat transfer simulations were employed to develop the porosity models for efficient pressure drop and thermal load calculations.

  1. A Stochastic Mixed Finite Element Heterogeneous Multiscale Method for Flow in Porous Media

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    quickly. However, for reservoir simulation the most crucial factor is the transport prop- erties of a velocity field. That is, a large local error in the...streamline methods for reservoir simulation of large geomodels, Advances in Water Resources 28 (2005) 257 – 271. [11] P. Jenny, S. H. Lee, H. A. Tchelepi... Reservoir Simulation , 2003, pp. 23–27. [53] R. Ghanem, P. D. Spanos, Stochastic Finite Elements: A Spectral Approach, Springer - Verlag, New York

  2. Constraining the relative importance of raindrop- and flow-driven sediment transport mechanisms in postwildfire environments and implications for recovery time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, Luke A.; Kean, Jason W.; Staley, Dennis M.; Rengers, Francis K.; Wasklewicz, Thad A.

    2016-11-01

    Mountain watersheds recently burned by wildfire often experience greater amounts of runoff and increased rates of sediment transport relative to similar unburned areas. Given the sedimentation and debris flow threats caused by increases in erosion, more work is needed to better understand the physical mechanisms responsible for the observed increase in sediment transport in burned environments and the time scale over which a heightened geomorphic response can be expected. In this study, we quantified the relative importance of different hillslope erosion mechanisms during two postwildfire rainstorms at a drainage basin in Southern California by combining terrestrial laser scanner-derived maps of topographic change, field measurements, and numerical modeling of overland flow and sediment transport. Numerous debris flows were initiated by runoff at our study area during a long-duration storm of relatively modest intensity. Despite the presence of a well-developed rill network, numerical model results suggest that the majority of eroded hillslope sediment during this long-duration rainstorm was transported by raindrop-induced sediment transport processes, highlighting the importance of raindrop-driven processes in supplying channels with potential debris flow material. We also used the numerical model to explore relationships between postwildfire storm characteristics, vegetation cover, soil infiltration capacity, and the total volume of eroded sediment from a synthetic hillslope for different end-member erosion regimes. This study adds to our understanding of sediment transport in steep, postwildfire landscapes and shows how data from field monitoring can be combined with numerical modeling of sediment transport to isolate the processes leading to increased erosion in burned areas.

  3. Uranium Elemental and Isotopic Constraints on Groundwater Flow Beneath the Nopal I Uranium Deposit, Pena Blanca, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    S.J. Goldstein; M.T. Murrell; A.M. Simmons

    2005-07-11

    The Nopal I uranium deposit in Chihuahua, Mexico, is an excellent analogue for evaluating the fate of spent fuel, associated actinides, and fission products over long time scales for the proposed Yucca Mountain high-level nuclear waste repository. In 2003, three groundwater wells were drilled directly adjacent to (PB-1) and 50 m on either side of the uranium deposit (PB-2 and PB-3) in order to evaluate uranium-series transport in three dimensions. After drilling, uranium concentrations were elevated in all of the three wells (0.1-18 ppm) due to drilling activities and subsequently decreased to {approx}5-20% of initial values over the next several months. The {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios were similar for PB-1 and PB-2 (1.005 to 1.079) but distinct for PB-3 (1.36 to 1.83) over this time period, suggesting limited mixing between groundwater from these wells over these short time and length scales. Regional groundwater wells located up to several km from the deposit also have distinct uranium isotopic characteristics and constrain mixing over larger length and time scales. We model the decreasing uranium concentrations in the newly drilled wells with a simple one-dimensional advection-dispersion model, assuming uranium is introduced as a slug to each of the wells and transported as a conservative tracer. Using this model for our data, the relative uranium concentrations are dependent on both the longitudinal dispersion as well as the mean groundwater flow velocity. These parameters have been found to be correlated in both laboratory and field studies of groundwater velocity and dispersion (Klotz et al., 1980). Using typical relationships between velocity and dispersion for field and laboratory studies along with the relationship observed from our uranium data, both velocity (1-10 n/yr) and dispersion coefficient (1E-5 to 1E-2 cm{sup 2}/s) can be derived from the modeling. As discussed above, these relatively small flow velocities and dispersivities agree with

  4. Element distribution patterns in the ordovician Galena group, Southeastern Minnesota: Indicators of fluid flow and provenance of terrigenous material

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lively, R.S.; Morey, G.B.; Mossler, J.H.

    1997-01-01

    As part of a regional geochemical investigation of lower Paleozoic strata in the Hollandale embayment of southeastern Minnesota, elemental concentrations in acid-insoluble residues were determined for carbonate rock in the Middle Ordovician Galena Group. Elemental distribution patterns within the insoluble residues, particularly those of Ti, Al, and Zr, show that the Wisconsin dome and the Wisconsin arch, which contributed sediment to the embayment prior to Galena time, continued as weak sources of sediment during this period. In contrast, trace metals commonly associated with Mississippi Valley-type lead-zinc mineralization, including Pb, Zn, Cu, Ag, Ni, Co, As, and Mo, show dispersal patterns that are independent of those associated with primary depositional phenomena. These trace metals are concentrated in southern Minnesota in carbonate rocks near the interface between limestone- and dolostone-dominated strata. Dispersal patterns imply that the metals were carried by a north-flowing regional ground-water system. The results show that the geochemical attributes of insoluble residues can be used to distinguish provenance and transport directions of primary sediments within a depositional basin from effects of subsequent regional ground-water flow systems.

  5. Application of Particle Image Velocimetry to a Study of Flow About a Multi-Element Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Stephen M.; Baganoff, Donald

    1996-01-01

    An experiment was performed on the flap tip vortex shed from a half span Fowler flap. This flap was mounted on a 5 foot span NACA 63(2)-215 Mod B airfoil in the 7 by 10 foot wind tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. Several noise reduction studies were performed with this model, and the addition of the Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) research discussed here served as a proof case of large scale PIV. The measurement plane investigated here was a cross plane region. This is cross plane relative to the freestream flow direction. The measurement plane was located at a position 18 inches downstream of the flap trailing edge. This served to prove that measurements could also be made in the more difficult cross plane direction rather than in the downstream flow direction. Lastly the PIV data was used as a practical research tool that yielded important results that could not otherwise be obtained. The flow field area measured was 40 cm by 40 cm square, and served to characterize the downstream flow characteristics of the flap tip vortex under three configurations: the baseline configuration which was the flap and the wing only; the baseline with the addition of a 3/4 span slat; and the baseline with a Flap Edge Device which was designed to reduce the noise generated at the flap. All configurations were tested at a freestream velocity of 64.84 m/s. The test resulted in average velocity fields for the three configurations tested. The velocity fields aided in verifying other testing methods on this particular experiment, and also yielded further insight into the characteristics of the flap tip vortex under the three configurations considered. The velocity data was reduced, and we were able to calculate the vorticity of the flow field. From the position of minimum vorticity the location of the center of the vortex was determined. The circulation was also calculated and aided in comparing the effects of the three configurations on the lifting characteristics of the flap.

  6. A modular finite-element model (MODFE) for areal and axisymmetric ground-water-flow problems, Part 2: Derivation of finite-element equations and comparisons with analytical solutions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooley, Richard L.

    1992-01-01

    MODFE, a modular finite-element model for simulating steady- or unsteady-state, area1 or axisymmetric flow of ground water in a heterogeneous anisotropic aquifer is documented in a three-part series of reports. In this report, part 2, the finite-element equations are derived by minimizing a functional of the difference between the true and approximate hydraulic head, which produces equations that are equivalent to those obtained by either classical variational or Galerkin techniques. Spatial finite elements are triangular with linear basis functions, and temporal finite elements are one dimensional with linear basis functions. Physical processes that can be represented by the model include (1) confined flow, unconfined flow (using the Dupuit approximation), or a combination of both; (2) leakage through either rigid or elastic confining units; (3) specified recharge or discharge at points, along lines, or areally; (4) flow across specified-flow, specified-head, or head-dependent boundaries; (5) decrease of aquifer thickness to zero under extreme water-table decline and increase of aquifer thickness from zero as the water table rises; and (6) head-dependent fluxes from springs, drainage wells, leakage across riverbeds or confining units combined with aquifer dewatering, and evapotranspiration. The matrix equations produced by the finite-element method are solved by the direct symmetric-Doolittle method or the iterative modified incomplete-Cholesky conjugate-gradient method. The direct method can be efficient for small- to medium-sized problems (less than about 500 nodes), and the iterative method is generally more efficient for larger-sized problems. Comparison of finite-element solutions with analytical solutions for five example problems demonstrates that the finite-element model can yield accurate solutions to ground-water flow problems.

  7. Numerical simulation of a flow-like landslide using the particle finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xue; Krabbenhoft, Kristian; Sheng, Daichao; Li, Weichao

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, an actual landslide process that occurred in Southern China is simulated by a continuum approach, the particle finite element method (PFEM). The PFEM attempts to solve the boundary-value problems in the framework of solid mechanics, satisfying the governing equations including momentum conservation, displacement-strain relation, constitutive relation as well as the frictional contact between the sliding mass and the slip surface. To warrant the convergence behaviour of solutions, the problem is formulated as a mathematical programming problem, while the particle finite element procedure is employed to tackle the issues of mesh distortion and free-surface evolution. The whole procedure of the landslide, from initiation, sliding to deposition, is successfully reproduced by the continuum approach. It is shown that the density of the mass has little influence on the sliding process in the current landslide, whereas both the geometry and the roughness of the slip surface play important roles. Comparative studies are also conducted where a satisfactory agreement is obtained.

  8. The Analysis and Design of Two-Element Airfoil Configurations in Transonic Flow.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-01

    Experimental Surface Pressure Distribution: NACA 64A010 Airfoil With 18A Slat; M_,z 0.7, a = 6", Re = 7.8 x 106• 26 14 Computed and Experimental Surface...separated flow. In Fig. 13, the computed pressure distribution and the experimental data (Ref 17) for an NACA 64A010 airfoil with a slat at M = 0.7, 0 60 and...T) Fig. 13 Computed and Experimental Surface Pressure Distributions: NACA 64A010 Airfoil With 18A Slat; M = 0.7. c = 60, Re = 7.8 x 10 26 II The

  9. An investigation of deformation and fluid flow at subduction zones using newly developed instrumentation and finite element modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labonte, Alison Louise

    Detecting seafloor deformation events in the offshore convergent margin environment is of particular importance considering the significant seismic hazard at subduction zones. Efforts to gain insight into the earthquake cycle have been made at the Cascadia and Costa Rica subduction margins through recent expansions of onshore GPS and seismic networks. While these studies have given scientists the ability to quantify and locate slip events in the seismogenic zone, there is little technology available for adequately measuring offshore aseismic slip. This dissertation introduces an improved flow meter for detecting seismic and aseismic deformation in submarine environments. The value of such hydrologic measurements for quantifying the geodetics at offshore margins is verified through a finite element modeling (FEM) study in which the character of deformation in the shallow subduction zone is determined from previously recorded hydrologic events at the Costa Rica Pacific margin. Accurately sensing aseismic events is one key to determining the stress state in subduction zones as these slow-slip events act to load or unload the seismogenic zone during the interseismic period. One method for detecting seismic and aseismic strain events is to monitor the hydrogeologic response to strain events using fluid flow meters. Previous instrumentation, the Chemical Aqueous Transport (CAT) meter which measures flow rates through the sediment-water interface, can detect transient events at very low flowrates, down to 0.0001 m/yr. The CAT meter performs well in low flow rate environments and can capture gradual changes in flow rate, as might be expected during ultra slow slip events. However, it cannot accurately quantify high flow rates through fractures and conduits, nor does it have the temporal resolution and accuracy required for detecting transient flow events associated with rapid deformation. The Optical Tracer Injection System (OTIS) developed for this purpose is an

  10. A displacement-pressure finite element formulation for analyzing the sound transmission in ducted shear flows with finite poroelastic lining.

    PubMed

    Nennig, Benoit; Tahar, Mabrouk Ben; Perrey-Debain, Emmanuel

    2011-07-01

    In the present work, the propagation of sound in a lined duct containing sheared mean flow is studied. Walls of the duct are acoustically treated with absorbent poroelastic foams. The propagation of elasto-acoustic waves in the liner is described by Biot's model. In the fluid domain, the propagation of sound in a sheared mean flow is governed by the Galbrun's equation. The problem is solved using a mixed displacement-pressure finite element formulation in both domains. A 3D implementation of the model has been performed and is illustrated on axisymmetric examples. Convergence and accuracy of the numerical model are shown for the particular case of the modal propagation in a infinite duct containing a uniform flow. Practical examples concerning the sound attenuation through dissipative silencers are discussed. In particular, effects of the refraction effects in the shear layer as well as the mounting conditions of the foam on the transmission loss are shown. The presence of a perforate screen at the air-porous interface is also considered and included in the model.

  11. The viscous curtain: General formulation and finite-element solution for the stability of flowing viscous sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perdigou, C.; Audoly, B.

    2016-11-01

    The stability of thin viscous sheets has been studied so far in the special case where the base flow possesses a direction of invariance: the linear stability is then governed by an ordinary differential equation. We propose a mathematical formulation and a numerical method of solution that are applicable to the linear stability analysis of viscous sheets possessing no particular symmetry. The linear stability problem is formulated as a non-Hermitian eigenvalue problem in a 2D domain and is solved numerically using the finite-element method. Specifically, we consider the case of a viscous sheet in an open flow, which falls in a bath of fluid; the sheet is mildly stretched by gravity and the flow can become unstable by 'curtain' modes. The growth rates of these modes are calculated as a function of the fluid parameters and of the geometry, and a phase diagram is obtained. A transition is reported between a buckling mode (static bifurcation) and an oscillatory mode (Hopf bifurcation). The effect of surface tension is discussed.

  12. Finite element solution of double-diffusive boundary layer flow of viscoelastic nanofluids over a stretching sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, M.; Bhargava, R.

    2014-05-01

    This paper deals with the double-diffusive boundary layer flow of non-Newtonian nanofluid over a stretching sheet. In this model, where binary nanofluid is used, the Brownian motion and thermophoresis are classified as the main mechanisms which are responsible for the enhancement of the convection features of the nanofluid. The boundary layer equations governed by the partial differential equations are transformed into a set of ordinary differential equations with the help of group theory transformations. The variational finite element method (FEM) is used to solve these ordinary differential equations. We have examined the effects of different controlling parameters, namely, the Brownian motion parameter, the thermophoresis parameter, modified Dufour number, viscoelastic parameter, Prandtl number, regular Lewis number, Dufour Lewis number, and nanofluid Lewis number on the flow field and heat transfer characteristics. Graphical display of the numerical examine are performed to illustrate the influence of various flow parameters on the velocity, temperature, concentration, reduced Nusselt, reduced Sherwood and reduced nanofluid Sherwood number distributions. The present study has many applications in coating and suspensions, movement of biological fluids, cooling of metallic plate, melt-spinning, heat exchangers technology, and oceanography.

  13. Dynamic leaching and fractionation of trace elements from environmental solids exploiting a novel circulating-flow platform.

    PubMed

    Mori, Masanobu; Nakano, Koji; Sasaki, Masaya; Shinozaki, Haruka; Suzuki, Shiho; Okawara, Chitose; Miró, Manuel; Itabashi, Hideyuki

    2016-02-01

    A dynamic flow-through microcolumn extraction system based on extractant re-circulation is herein proposed as a novel analytical approach for simplification of bioaccessibility tests of trace elements in sediments. On-line metal leaching is undertaken in the format of all injection (AI) analysis, which is a sequel of flow injection analysis, but involving extraction under steady-state conditions. The minimum circulation times and flow rates required to determine the maximum bioaccessible pools of target metals (viz., Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb) from lake and river sediment samples were estimated using Tessier's sequential extraction scheme and an acid single extraction test. The on-line AIA method was successfully validated by mass balance studies of CRM and real sediment samples. Tessier's test in on-line AI format demonstrated to be carried out by one third of extraction time (6h against more than 17 h by the conventional method), with better analytical precision (<9.2% against >15% by the conventional method) and significant decrease in blank readouts as compared with the manual batch counterpart.

  14. Numerical investigations of passive flow control elements for vertical axis wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frunzulica, Florin; Dumitrache, Alexandru; Suatean, Bogdan

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we numerically investigate the possibilities to control the dynamic stall phenomenon, with application to vertical axis wind turbines. The dynamic stall appears at low tip speed ratio (TSR<4) and it has a great impact on structural integrity of the wind turbine and power performances. For this reason we performed a CFD 2D analysis of the dynamic stall phenomenon around NACA 0012 airfoil equipped with a passive flow control device, in pitching motion at relative low Reynolds number (˜105). Three passive flow control devices are numerically investigated: a turbulence promoter mounted on the leading edge, a thin channel and a step on the upper surface of the airfoil. For the present studies, the unsteady Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) model is the suitable approach to perform the dynamic stall simulations with an acceptable computational cost and reasonable accuracy. The results are compared to those of an existing experimental case test for unmodified NACA 0012 airfoil. The capability of this device was investigated numerically on a vertical axis wind turbine (2D model), where blades are generated with NACA 0018 airfoil.

  15. The Oscillating Component of the Internal Jugular Vein Flow: The Overlooked Element of Cerebral Circulation

    PubMed Central

    Sisini, Francesco; Toro, Eleuterio; Gambaccini, Mauro; Zamboni, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The jugular venous pulse (JVP) provides valuable information about cardiac haemodynamics and filling pressures and is an indirect estimate of the central venous pressure (CVP). Recently it has been proven that JVP can be obtained by measuring the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the IJV on each sonogram of an ultrasound B-mode sonogram sequence. It has also been proven that during its pulsation the IJV is distended and hence that the pressure gradient drives the IJV haemodynamics. If this is true, then it will imply the following: (i) the blood velocity in the IJV is a periodic function of the time with period equal to the cardiac period and (ii) the instantaneous blood velocity is given by a time function that can be derived from a flow-dynamics theory that uses the instantaneous pressure gradient as a parameter. The aim of the present study is to confirm the hypothesis that JVP regulates the IJV blood flow and that pressure waves are transmitted from the heart toward the brain through the IJV wall. PMID:26783380

  16. A modular finite-element model (MODFE) for areal and axisymmetric ground-water-flow problems, Part 1: Model Description and User's Manual

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Torak, L.J.

    1993-01-01

    A MODular, Finite-Element digital-computer program (MODFE) was developed to simulate steady or unsteady-state, two-dimensional or axisymmetric ground-water flow. Geometric- and hydrologic-aquifer characteristics in two spatial dimensions are represented by triangular finite elements and linear basis functions; one-dimensional finite elements and linear basis functions represent time. Finite-element matrix equations are solved by the direct symmetric-Doolittle method or the iterative modified, incomplete-Cholesky, conjugate-gradient method. Physical processes that can be represented by the model include (1) confined flow, unconfined flow (using the Dupuit approximation), or a combination of both; (2) leakage through either rigid or elastic confining beds; (3) specified recharge or discharge at points, along lines, and over areas; (4) flow across specified-flow, specified-head, or bead-dependent boundaries; (5) decrease of aquifer thickness to zero under extreme water-table decline and increase of aquifer thickness from zero as the water table rises; and (6) head-dependent fluxes from springs, drainage wells, leakage across riverbeds or confining beds combined with aquifer dewatering, and evapotranspiration. The report describes procedures for applying MODFE to ground-water-flow problems, simulation capabilities, and data preparation. Guidelines for designing the finite-element mesh and for node numbering and determining band widths are given. Tables are given that reference simulation capabilities to specific versions of MODFE. Examples of data input and model output for different versions of MODFE are provided.

  17. Review of literature on the finite-element solution of the equations of two-dimensional surface-water flow in the horizontal plane

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Jonathan K.; Froehlich, David C.

    1987-01-01

    Published literature on the application of the finite-element method to solving the equations of two-dimensional surface-water flow in the horizontal plane is reviewed in this report. The finite-element method is ideally suited to modeling two-dimensional flow over complex topography with spatially variable resistance. A two-dimensional finite-element surface-water flow model with depth and vertically averaged velocity components as dependent variables allows the user great flexibility in defining geometric features such as the boundaries of a water body, channels, islands, dikes, and embankments. The following topics are reviewed in this report: alternative formulations of the equations of two-dimensional surface-water flow in the horizontal plane; basic concepts of the finite-element method; discretization of the flow domain and representation of the dependent flow variables; treatment of boundary conditions; discretization of the time domain; methods for modeling bottom, surface, and lateral stresses; approaches to solving systems of nonlinear equations; techniques for solving systems of linear equations; finite-element alternatives to Galerkin's method of weighted residuals; techniques of model validation; and preparation of model input data. References are listed in the final chapter.

  18. Effects of continuous flow centrifugation on measurements of trace elements in river water: intrinsic contamination and particle fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossé, Patrick; Vignati, Davide; Dominik, Janusz

    2006-08-01

    Continuous flow centrifugation (CFC) is a well-established technique used in natural surface water studies to collect large amounts of suspended solids, thus allowing a broad spectrum of measurements. However, a potential contamination or changes in the particle size distribution during the centrifugation may restrain the use of CFC effluents for element analysis in the colloidal and dissolved fractions. In this paper we evaluate the possibility of using the effluent of a Westfalia centrifuge (type KA2-06-075, 9700 rpm) for such analysis. This evaluation is based on two laboratory experiments with deionized and tap water and two field experiments in rivers. Elemental concentration changes across the CFC were assessed from the CFC influent and effluent after a filtration at 0.45 μm. Significant increases were found, mainly in the field experiments at a high suspended solids level and a slightly acid pH. A hypothesis was made on the origin of these increases as a superposition of a centrifuge intrinsic contamination and a particle fragmentation effect. A numerical model based on elemental concentration measurements (inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry) gave a particle fragmentation level of 0.55% (mass percentage of particles broken up into smaller fragments during centrifugation). In another experiment, a direct particle counting (single particle counter) shows an excess of particles smaller than 500 nm in the CFC effluent, corresponding to a fragmentation level of 0.11%. In consequence, the use of CFC effluent for element analysis is possible in low-turbidity river or lake waters, but should be carefully considered in waters with high suspended matter contents.

  19. Direct Numerical Simulation of Instabilities in Parallel Flow with Spherical Roughness Elements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    Obremski, H . J ., Morkovin, M. V. & Landahl, M. 1969. A portfolio of stability characteristics of incompressible boundary layers. AGARDograph 134, AGARD. 33...of the effects of small protuberances on bounary-layer flows. AIAA Journal, 11(6). Singer, B., Reed, H . L., & Ferziger, J . H . 1986. Investigation of...density mesh 6 a H (V. V),n (V- V)a (-I stand. 5X5X5 1.85 .508 3.64 0.0200 -0.0176 2.62 stand. 7X7X7 1.88 .530 3.57 - - 2.64 high 5X5X5 1.80 .473 3.80

  20. Constraining Galileon inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, Donough; Anderson, Gemma J.; Hull, Matthew; Seery, David E-mail: G.Anderson@sussex.ac.uk E-mail: D.Seery@sussex.ac.uk

    2015-02-01

    In this short paper, we present constraints on the Galileon inflationary model from the CMB bispectrum. We employ a principal-component analysis of the independent degrees of freedom constrained by data and apply this to the WMAP 9-year data to constrain the free parameters of the model. A simple Bayesian comparison establishes that support for the Galileon model from bispectrum data is at best weak.

  1. Computational Study of Laminar Flow Control on a Subsonic Swept Wing Using Discrete Roughness Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Fei; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Chang, Chau-Lyan; Streett, Craig L.; Carpenter, Mark H.

    2011-01-01

    A combination of parabolized stability equations and secondary instability theory has been applied to a low-speed swept airfoil model with a chord Reynolds number of 7.15 million, with the goals of (i) evaluating this methodology in the context of transition prediction for a known configuration for which roughness based crossflow transition control has been demonstrated under flight conditions and (ii) of analyzing the mechanism of transition delay via the introduction of discrete roughness elements (DRE). Roughness based transition control involves controlled seeding of suitable, subdominant crossflow modes, so as to weaken the growth of naturally occurring, linearly more unstable crossflow modes. Therefore, a synthesis of receptivity, linear and nonlinear growth of stationary crossflow disturbances, and the ensuing development of high frequency secondary instabilities is desirable to understand the experimentally observed transition behavior. With further validation, such higher fidelity prediction methodology could be utilized to assess the potential for crossflow transition control at even higher Reynolds numbers, where experimental data is currently unavailable.

  2. A Galerkin finite-element flow model to predict the transient response of a radially symmetric aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reilly, Thomas E.

    1984-01-01

    A computer program developed to evaluate radial flow of ground water, such as at a pumping well, recharge basin, or injection well, is capable of simulating anisotropic, inhomogenous, confined, or pseudo-unconfined (constant saturated thickness) conditions. Results compare well with those calculated from published analytical and model solutions. The program is based on the Galerkin finite-element technique. A sample model run is presented to illustrate the use of the program; supplementary material provides the program listing as well as a sample problem data set and output. From the text and other material presented, one can use the program to predict drawdowns from pumping and ground-water buildups from recharge in a radially symmetric ground-water system.

  3. Simulation of heat and mass transfer in turbulent channel flow using the spectral-element method: effect of spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhenkov, V.; Ivashchenko, V.; Vinuesa, R.; Mullyadzhanov, R.

    2016-10-01

    We use the open-source code nek5000 to assess the accuracy of high-order spectral element large-eddy simulations (LES) of a turbulent channel flow depending on the spatial resolution compared to the direct numerical simulation (DNS). The Reynolds number Re = 6800 is considered based on the bulk velocity and half-width of the channel. The filtered governing equations are closed with the dynamic Smagorinsky model for subgrid stresses and heat flux. The results show very good agreement between LES and DNS for time-averaged velocity and temperature profiles and their fluctuations. Even the coarse LES grid which contains around 30 times less points than the DNS one provided predictions of the friction velocity within 2.0% accuracy interval.

  4. Novel, low-cost separator plates and flow-field elements for use in PEM fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Edlund, D.J.

    1996-12-31

    PEM fuel cells offer promise for a wide range of applications including vehicular (e.g., automotive) and stationary power generation. The performance and cost targets that must be met for PEM technology to be commercially successful varies to some degree with the application. However, in general the cost of PEM fuel cell stacks must be reduced substantially if they are to see widespread use for electrical power generation. A significant contribution to the manufactured cost of PEM fuel cells is the machined carbon plates that traditionally serve as bipolar separator plates and flow-field elements. In addition, carbon separator plates are inherently brittle and suffer from breakage due to shock, vibration, and improper handling. This report describes a bifurcated separator device with low resistivity, low manufacturing cost, compact size and durability.

  5. Spectrophotometric determination of rare earth elements by flow injection analysis based on their reaction with xylenol orange and cetylpyridinium bromide.

    PubMed

    Havel, J; Moreno, C; Hrdlicka, A; Valiente, M

    1994-08-01

    Individual rare earth elements (REE) and their mixtures were determined by a FIA method based on the reaction with Xylenol Orange (XO) in the presence of cetylpyridinium bromide (CPB). Volumes of 30 microl of 2.5-25 microM REE solutions were injected into a carrier stream of 0.1M acetate buffer of pH 4.5 or 5.5 that was 0.06 mM in XO and 0.6 mM in CPB. At 1.8 ml/min flow rate, a sampling frequency of up to 100 samples per hour was achieved. The detection limits were in the range of 0.1-0.4 microg/ml REE and relative standard deviation of the measurement was 0.88% rel.

  6. Space-time finite-element objects: Efficiently modeling physically complex flows

    SciTech Connect

    Dilts, G.A.

    1996-03-28

    Accurate modeling of high-explosive systems requires detailed consideration of many different physical properties and processes: These diverse processes generally occur in localized regions of the problem. Thus the very partial differential equations used to mathematically model the problem change from one region of space and time to another. The numerical algorithms generally used to solve these equations are frequently conceived in terms of data values for physical field variables u{sup i} defined at a number of spatial points indexed by multi-integer subscripts x{sub J}, resulting in a number of discrete state variables u{sup i}{sub J}. Instead of using as the fundamental object a physical field, which naturally maps to an array, the authors imagine a small piece of space modeled for a small amount of time, a space-time ``element``. Within it, various physical processes occur at various times. Self-contained, it gives account of what happens within its borders. It cooperates with a set of neighbors that organize into meshes, which organize into problems. The authors achieve in the software model a decoupling between the where and the how and the what, lack of which historically has been the source of a great deal of the software overhead of modelling continuum systems, and which is a necessary consequence of writing down u{sup i}{sub J}. An efficient implementation of this idea requires a reformulation of the discretization and solution of systems of conservation laws, and careful class design. A working prototype for systems in one space dimension using Mathematica and C++ is provided.

  7. Using Comprehensive Biophysical Characterisation of Hydro-Geologic Landscapes to Constrain Surficial and Subsurface Fluid Flow and Solute Transport: An Example from Southern Rivers in Southeast Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, K.; Moore, C. L.

    2009-04-01

    salts deposited at the time of formation. In addition, many of the sedimentary units were formed in a fluvial environment and did not have associated marine salts at the time of formation. In lowland areas, where landscapes are dominated by unconsolidated sediments, salts can be deposited and redeposited as solid grains, they can crystallise in pore spaces in the sediments and they can be adsorbed onto iron oxides and clay minerals. These salts can also be dissolved and mobilised into surface and groundwater systems and move through the landscape in this manner. In upland areas, the processes of distribution, storage and mobilisation of salts are similar, however there is typically more rock outcrop and the structure of the landscape is influenced by distribution of weathering products and unconsolidated materials. To improve the understanding of the way in which salt is mobilised in different landscapes, it is important to understand the way in which water moves through the landscape, as it is the principle agent involved in the weathering of rocks to form regolith, and water mobilises salts contained in the regolith and fractured rock. Biophysical characterisation of the landscapes developed on each of these geological units allows the constraint of salt storage and distribution across these landscapes. This can be used to inform the development of conceptual models for saline fluid flow. Development of Hydro-Geologic Landscape polygons, a scaled and modified Groundwater Flow Systems approach, describes areas with like biophysical characteristics within a landscape, and hence like salt storage capacity and fluid flow parameters. Initially this work was used to characterise landscape areas for regional natural resource management (NRM) decision making, but at more detailed scale it has proven to be a useful applied tool for on-ground agricultural management and NRM at catchment and sub-catchment scale. Further, this work helps define a range of other NRM issues in

  8. Sequential determination of multi-nutrient elements in natural water samples with a reverse flow injection system.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kunning; Ma, Jian; Yuan, Dongxing; Feng, Sichao; Su, Haitao; Huang, Yongming; Shangguan, Qipei

    2017-05-15

    An integrated system was developed for automatic and sequential determination of NO2(-), NO3(-), PO4(3-), Fe(2+), Fe(3+) and Mn(2+) in natural waters based on reverse flow injection analysis combined with spectrophotometric detection. The system operation was controlled by a single chip microcomputer and laboratory-programmed software written in LabVIEW. The experimental parameters for each nutrient element analysis were optimized based on a univariate experimental design, and interferences from common ions were evaluated. The upper limits of the linear range (along with detection limit, µmolL(-1)) of the proposed method was 20 (0.03), 200 (0.7), 12 (0.3), 5 (0.03), 5 (0.03), 9 (0.2) µmolL(-1), for NO2(-), NO3(-), PO4(3-), Fe(2+), Fe(3+) and Mn(2+), respectively. The relative standard deviations were below 5% (n=9-13) and the recoveries varied from 88.0±1.0% to 104.5±1.0% for spiked water samples. The sample throughput was about 20h(-1). This system has been successfully applied for the determination of multi-nutrient elements in different kinds of water samples and showed good agreement with reference methods (slope 1.0260±0.0043, R(2)=0.9991, n=50).

  9. Dissolved elemental mercury investigations in Long Island Sound using on-line Au amalgamation-flow injection analysis.

    PubMed

    Tseng, C M; Balcom, P H; Lamborg, C H; Fitzgerald, W F

    2003-03-15

    A novel semiautomatic dissolved elemental mercury analyzer (DEMA) was developed for investigating dissolved elemental Hg (DEM) in natural waters. This on-line setup couples the main analytical steps from sample introduction, gas-liquid separation, and Au amalgamation/separation to final detection/data acquisition using flow injection techniques. This approach provides ease of operation and high analytical performance and is suitable for shipboard use. The analyzer can be fully automated and also be modified to examine other Hg species (e.g., reactive and total Hg and monomethyl-Hg). Here, we present the results of laboratory performance tests and make a comparison with a traditional manual method. DEM measured by both manual and the DEMA show good agreement. Representative field DEM data from spring and summer 1999 in Long Island Sound, U.S.A. (LIS) are presented. Spatial and temporal DEM variations were evident. Rapid and accurate determinations of DEM are necessary to observe its distribution dynamics, evaluate emissions, and assess its role in the aquatic biogeochemical cycling of Hg.

  10. Simulations of Spray Reacting Flows in a Single Element LDI Injector With and Without Invoking an Eulerian Scalar PDF Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the numerical simulations of the Jet-A spray reacting flow in a single element lean direct injection (LDI) injector by using the National Combustion Code (NCC) with and without invoking the Eulerian scalar probability density function (PDF) method. The flow field is calculated by using the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations (RANS and URANS) with nonlinear turbulence models, and when the scalar PDF method is invoked, the energy and compositions or species mass fractions are calculated by solving the equation of an ensemble averaged density-weighted fine-grained probability density function that is referred to here as the averaged probability density function (APDF). A nonlinear model for closing the convection term of the scalar APDF equation is used in the presented simulations and will be briefly described. Detailed comparisons between the results and available experimental data are carried out. Some positive findings of invoking the Eulerian scalar PDF method in both improving the simulation quality and reducing the computing cost are observed.

  11. Finite-element simulation of ground-water flow in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, Nevada-California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Czarnecki, J.B.; Waddell, R.K.

    1984-01-01

    A finite-element model of the groundwater flow system in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain at the Nevada Test Site was developed using parameter estimation techniques. The model simulated steady-state ground-water flow occurring in tuffaceous, volcanic , and carbonate rocks, and alluvial aquifers. Hydraulic gradients in the modeled area range from 0.00001 for carbonate aquifers to 0.19 for barriers in tuffaceous rocks. Three model parameters were used in estimating transmissivity in six zones. Simulated hydraulic-head values range from about 1,200 m near Timber Mountain to about 300 m near Furnace Creek Ranch. Model residuals for simulated versus measured hydraulic heads range from -28.6 to 21.4 m; most are less than +/-7 m, indicating an acceptable representation of the hydrologic system by the model. Sensitivity analyses of the model 's flux boundary condition variables were performed to assess the effect of varying boundary fluxes on the calculation of estimated model transmissivities. Varying the flux variables representing discharge at Franklin Lake and Furnace Creek Ranch has greater effect than varying other flux variables. (Author 's abstract)

  12. An adaptive Lagrangian boundary element approach for three-dimensional transient free-surface Stokes flow as applied to extrusion, thermoforming, and rheometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khayat, Roger E.; Genouvrier, Delphine

    2001-05-01

    An adaptive (Lagrangian) boundary element approach is proposed for the general three-dimensional simulation of confined free-surface Stokes flow. The method is stable as it includes remeshing capabilities of the deforming free surface and thus can handle large deformations. A simple algorithm is developed for mesh refinement of the deforming free-surface mesh. Smooth transition between large and small elements is achieved without significant degradation of the aspect ratio of the elements in the mesh. Several flow problems are presented to illustrate the utility of the approach, particularly as encountered in polymer processing and rheology. These problems illustrate the transient nature of the flow during the processes of extrusion and thermoforming, the elongation of a fluid sample in an extensional rheometer, and the coating of a sphere. Surface tension effects are also explored. Copyright

  13. Constraining the dark fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, Martin; Liddle, Andrew R.; Parkinson, David; Gao Changjun

    2009-10-15

    Cosmological observations are normally fit under the assumption that the dark sector can be decomposed into dark matter and dark energy components. However, as long as the probes remain purely gravitational, there is no unique decomposition and observations can only constrain a single dark fluid; this is known as the dark degeneracy. We use observations to directly constrain this dark fluid in a model-independent way, demonstrating, in particular, that the data cannot be fit by a dark fluid with a single constant equation of state. Parametrizing the dark fluid equation of state by a variety of polynomials in the scale factor a, we use current kinematical data to constrain the parameters. While the simplest interpretation of the dark fluid remains that it is comprised of separate dark matter and cosmological constant contributions, our results cover other model types including unified dark energy/matter scenarios.

  14. Single-platform, volumetric, CD45-assisted pan-leucogating flow cytometry for CD4 T lymphocytes monitoring of HIV infection according to the WHO recommendations for resource-constrained settings

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Validation of new affordable CD4 T cell measurement technologies is crucial specifically in resource-poor countries for antiretroviral treatment eligibility and immunologic CD4 monitoring of HIV-infected patients. Methods The absolute and percentage CD4 T cell counts of 258 HIV-1-infected blood samples (182 adults and 76 children), living in N’Djamena, Chad, were performed by single-platform, volumetric, CD45-assisted pan-leucogating Auto40 flow cytometer (Apogee Flow Systems Ltd, Hemel Hempstead, UK) comparing to the FACSCalibur flow cytometer as a reference method. Results Absolute and percentage CD4 T cell counts obtained by Auto40 and FACSCalibur of 258 HIV-1-infected blood samples were highly correlated (r = 0.99 and r = 0.96, respectively). The mean absolute bias and percent bias between Apogee Auto40 and FACSCalibur absolute CD4 T cell counts, were −9.4 cells/μl with limits of agreement from −15 to 93 cells/μl, and +2.0% with limits of agreement from −0.9 to 4.9%, respectively. The mean of absolute bias and percent bias between Apogee Auto40 and FACSCalibur of CD4 percentage results were +0.4% (95% CI: -0.02 – 0.86) with limits of agreement from −2.4 to 0.3%, and +3.0% with limits of agreement from −6.6 to 0.6%, respectively. The Auto40 counting allowed to identify the majority of adults with CD4 T cells below 200 cells/μl (sensitivity: 89%; specificity: 99%) or below 350 cells/μl (sensitivity: 94%; specificity:98%); and of children below 750 cells/μl (sensitivity: 99%; specificity: 96%) or below 25% CD4+ (sensitivity: 94%; specificity: 98%). Conclusion The Auto40 analyzer is an alternative flow cytometer for CD4 T lymphocyte enumeration to be used in routine for immunological monitoring according to the current WHO recommendations in HIV-infected adults as well as children living in resource-constrained settings like Chad. PMID:23631664

  15. A Finite Element Method for Free-Surface Flows of Incompressible Fluids in Three Dimensions, Part II: Dynamic Wetting Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, T.A.; Cairncross, R.A.; Rao, R.R.; Sackinger, P.A.; Schunk, P.R.

    1999-01-29

    To date, few researchers have solved three-dimensional free-surface problems with dynamic wetting lines. This paper extends the free-surface finite element method described in a companion paper [Cairncross, R.A., P.R. Schunk, T.A. Baer, P.A. Sackinger, R.R. Rao, "A finite element method for free surface flows of incompressible fluid in three dimensions, Part I: Boundary-Fitted mesh motion.", to be published (1998)] to handle dynamic wetting. A generalization of the technique used in two dimensional modeling to circumvent double-valued velocities at the wetting line, the so-called kinematic paradox, is presented for a wetting line in three dimensions. This approach requires the fluid velocity normal to the contact line to be zero, the fluid velocity tangent to the contact line to be equal to the tangential component of web velocity, and the fluid velocity into the web to be zero. In addition, slip is allowed in a narrow strip along the substrate surface near the dynamic contact line. For realistic wetting-line motion, a contact angle which varies with wetting speed is required because contact lines in three dimensions typically advance or recede a different rates depending upon location and/or have both advancing and receding portions. The theory is applied to capillary rise of static fluid in a corner, the initial motion of a Newtonian droplet down an inclined plane, and extrusion of a Newtonian fluid from a nozzle onto a moving substrate. The extrusion results are compared to experimental visualization. Subject Categories

  16. Determination of size and element composition distributions of complex colloids by sedimentation field-flow fractionation—inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murphy, Deirdre M.

    1993-01-01

    Sedimentation field-flow fractionation (SdFFF) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) have been directly combined and the resulting SdFFF-ICP-MS instrument can be used to produce element based size distributions of colloidal samples. Using appropriate tracer elements the size distributions of specific components can be picked out from a complex mixture. Changes in chemical composition of mixtures as a function of particle size can be readily monitored by plotting appropriate element atomic ratio distributions. These applications have been illustrated using data obtained with samples of the clay minerals kaolinite and illite and a natural suspended particulate matter from the Darling River (Australia).

  17. Elemental analyses of goundwater: demonstrated advantage of low-flow sampling and trace-metal clean techniques over standard techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creasey, C. L.; Flegal, A. R.

    The combined use of both (1) low-flow purging and sampling and (2) trace-metal clean techniques provides more representative measurements of trace-element concentrations in groundwater than results derived with standard techniques. The use of low-flow purging and sampling provides relatively undisturbed groundwater samples that are more representative of in situ conditions, and the use of trace-element clean techniques limits the inadvertent introduction of contaminants during sampling, storage, and analysis. When these techniques are applied, resultant trace-element concentrations are likely to be markedly lower than results based on standard sampling techniques. In a comparison of data derived from contaminated and control groundwater wells at a site in California, USA, trace-element concentrations from this study were 2-1000 times lower than those determined by the conventional techniques used in sampling of the same wells prior to (5months) and subsequent to (1month) the collections for this study. Specifically, the cadmium and chromium concentrations derived using standard sampling techniques exceed the California Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCL), whereas in this investigation concentrations of both of those elements are substantially below their MCLs. Consequently, the combined use of low-flow and trace-metal clean techniques may preclude erroneous reports of trace-element contamination in groundwater. Résumé L'utilisation simultanée de la purge et de l'échantillonnage à faible débit et des techniques sans traces de métaux permet d'obtenir des mesures de concentrations en éléments en traces dans les eaux souterraines plus représentatives que les résultats fournis par les techniques classiques. L'utilisation de la purge et de l'échantillonnage à faible débit donne des échantillons d'eau souterraine relativement peu perturbés qui sont plus représentatifs des conditions in situ, et le recours aux techniques sans éléments en traces limite l

  18. Simulation of Two-Fluid Flows by the Least-Squares Finite Element Method Using a Continuum Surface Tension Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jie; Yu, Sheng-Tao; Jiang, Bo-nan

    1996-01-01

    In this paper a numerical procedure for simulating two-fluid flows is presented. This procedure is based on the Volume of Fluid (VOF) method proposed by Hirt and Nichols and the continuum surface force (CSF) model developed by Brackbill, et al. In the VOF method fluids of different properties are identified through the use of a continuous field variable (color function). The color function assigns a unique constant (color) to each fluid. The interfaces between different fluids are distinct due to sharp gradients of the color function. The evolution of the interfaces is captured by solving the convective equation of the color function. The CSF model is used as a means to treat surface tension effect at the interfaces. Here a modified version of the CSF model, proposed by Jacqmin, is used to calculate the tension force. In the modified version, the force term is obtained by calculating the divergence of a stress tensor defined by the gradient of the color function. In its analytical form, this stress formulation is equivalent to the original CSF model. Numerically, however, the use of the stress formulation has some advantages over the original CSF model, as it bypasses the difficulty in approximating the curvatures of the interfaces. The least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) is used to discretize the governing equation systems. The LSFEM has proven to be effective in solving incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and pure convection equations, making it an ideal candidate for the present applications. The LSFEM handles all the equations in a unified manner without any additional special treatment such as upwinding or artificial dissipation. Various bench mark tests have been carried out for both two dimensional planar and axisymmetric flows, including a dam breaking, oscillating and stationary bubbles and a conical liquid sheet in a pressure swirl atomizer.

  19. Evolution was chemically constrained.

    PubMed

    Williams, R J P; Fraústo Da Silva, J J R

    2003-02-07

    The objective of this paper is to present a systems view of the major features of biological evolution based upon changes in internal chemistry and uses of cellular space, both of which it will be stated were dependent on the changing chemical environment. The account concerns the major developments from prokaryotes to eukaryotes, to multi-cellular organisms, to animals with nervous systems and a brain, and finally to human beings and their uses of chemical elements in space outside themselves. It will be stated that the changes were in an inevitable progression, and were not just due to blind chance, so that "random searching" by a coded system to give species had a fixed overall route. The chemical sequence is from a reducing to an ever-increasingly oxidizing environment, while organisms retained reduced chemicals. The process was furthered recently by human beings who have also increased the range of reduced products trapped on Earth in novel forms. All the developments are brought about from the nature of the chemicals which organisms accumulate using the environment and its changes. The relationship to the manner in which particular species (gene sequences) were coincidentally changed, the molecular view of evolution, is left for additional examination. There is a further issue in that the changes of the chemistry of the environment developed largely at equilibrium due to the relatively fast reactions there of the available inorganic chemicals. Inside cells, some of these same chemicals also came to equilibrium within compounds. All such equilibria reduced the variance (degrees of freedom) of the total environmental/biological system and its possible development. However, the more sophisticated organic chemistry, almost totally inside cells until humans evolved, is kinetically controlled and limited by the demands of cellular reduction necessary to produce essential chemicals and by the availability of certain elements and energy. Hence the variability of

  20. 1DFEMWATER: A one-dimensional finite element model of WATER flow through saturated-unsaturated media

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, G.T.

    1988-08-01

    This report presents the development and verification of a one- dimensional finite element model of water flow through saturated- unsaturated media. 1DFEMWATER is very flexible and capable of modeling a wide range of real-world problems. The model is designed to (1) treat heterogeneous media consisting of many geologic formations; (2) consider distributed and point sources/sinks that are spatially and temporally variable; (3) accept prescribed initial conditions or obtain them from steady state simulations; (4) deal with transient heads distributed over the Dirichlet boundary; (5) handle time-dependent fluxes caused by pressure gradient on the Neumann boundary; (6) treat time-dependent total fluxes (i.e., the sum of gravitational fluxes and pressure-gradient fluxes) on the Cauchy boundary; (7) automatically determine variable boundary conditions of evaporation, infiltration, or seepage on the soil-air interface; (8) provide two options for treating the mass matrix (consistent and lumping); (9) provide three alternatives for approximating the time derivative term (Crank-Nicolson central difference, backward difference, and mid-difference); (10) give three options (exact relaxation, underrelaxation, and overrelaxation) for estimating the nonlinear matrix; (11) automatically reset the time step size when boundary conditions or source/sinks change abruptly; and (12) check mass balance over the entire region for every time step. The model is verified with analytical solutions and other numerical models for three examples.

  1. A cut-cell finite volume – finite element coupling approach for fluid–structure interaction in compressible flow

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquariello, Vito; Hammerl, Georg; Örley, Felix; Hickel, Stefan; Danowski, Caroline; Popp, Alexander; Wall, Wolfgang A.; Adams, Nikolaus A.

    2016-02-15

    We present a loosely coupled approach for the solution of fluid–structure interaction problems between a compressible flow and a deformable structure. The method is based on staggered Dirichlet–Neumann partitioning. The interface motion in the Eulerian frame is accounted for by a conservative cut-cell Immersed Boundary method. The present approach enables sub-cell resolution by considering individual cut-elements within a single fluid cell, which guarantees an accurate representation of the time-varying solid interface. The cut-cell procedure inevitably leads to non-matching interfaces, demanding for a special treatment. A Mortar method is chosen in order to obtain a conservative and consistent load transfer. We validate our method by investigating two-dimensional test cases comprising a shock-loaded rigid cylinder and a deformable panel. Moreover, the aeroelastic instability of a thin plate structure is studied with a focus on the prediction of flutter onset. Finally, we propose a three-dimensional fluid–structure interaction test case of a flexible inflated thin shell interacting with a shock wave involving large and complex structural deformations.

  2. Geochemical behaviors of rare earth elements in groundwater along a flow path in the North China Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haiyan; Guo, Huaming; Xing, Lina; Zhan, Yanhong; Li, Fulan; Shao, Jingli; Niu, Hong; Liang, Xing; Li, Changqing

    2016-03-01

    Rare earth element (REE) geochemistry is a useful tool in delineating hydrogeochemical processes and tracing solute transport, which can be used to reveal groundwater chemical evolution in the complexed groundwater systems of the North China Plain (NCP). Groundwaters and sediments were collected approximately along a flow path in shallow and deep aquifers of the NCP to investigate REE geochemistry as a function of distance from the recharge zone. Groundwater REE concentrations are relatively low, with ranges from 81.2 to 163.6 ng/L in shallow groundwaters, and from 65.2 to 133.7 ng/L in deep groundwaters. Speciation calculation suggests that dissolved REEs mainly occur as dicarbonato (Ln(CO3)2-) and carbonato (LnCO3+) complexes. Although along the flow path groundwater REE concentrations do not vary substantially, relatively lower HREEs are observed in central plain (Zone II) compared to recharge area (Zone I) and discharge plain (Zone III). Shale-normalized REE patterns are characterized by different degrees of enrichment in the HREEs, as indicated by the variation in average (Er/Nd)NASC value. The similar REE compositions and shale-normalized REE patterns of shallow and deep groundwaters demonstrate that interactions of groundwaters between shallow and deep aquifers possibly occur, which is likely due to the long-term groundwater over-exploration. Cerium anomalies (Ce/Ce∗ = CeNASC/(LaNASC × PrNASC)0.5) generally increase from Zone I, through Zone II, to Zone III, with trends from 0.79 to 3.58, and from 1.22 to 2.43 in shallow groundwaters and deep groundwaters, respectively. This is consistent with the variations in oxidation-reduction potential and redox sensitive components (i.e., dissolved Fe, Mn, NO3- and As concentrations) along the flow path. Positive Ce anomaly and redox indicators suggest that redox conditions progressively evolve from oxic to moderate anaerobic in the direction of groundwater flow. In the recharge zone (Zone I), groundwater low

  3. Constrained control allocation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durham, Wayne C.

    1992-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of the allocation of several flight controls to the generation of specified body-axis moments. The number of controls is greater than the number of moments being controlled, and the ranges of the controls are constrained to certain limits. The controls are assumed to be individually linear in their effect throughout their ranges of motion, and independent of one another in their effects. The geometries of the subset of the constrained controls and of its image in moment space are examined. A direct method of allocating these several controls is presented, that guarantees the maximum possible moment is generated within the constraints of the controls. The results are illustrated by an example problem involving three controls and two moments.

  4. Constrained noninformative priors

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, C.L.

    1994-10-01

    The Jeffreys noninformative prior distribution for a single unknown parameter is the distribution corresponding to a uniform distribution in the transformed model where the unknown parameter is approximately a location parameter. To obtain a prior distribution with a specified mean but with diffusion reflecting great uncertainty, a natural generalization of the noninformative prior is the distribution corresponding to the constrained maximum entropy distribution in the transformed model. Examples are given.

  5. Vibration control through passive constrained layer damping and active control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Margaretha J.; Inman, Daniel J.; Saunders, William R.

    1997-05-01

    To add damping to systems, viscoelastic materials (VEM) are added to structures. In order to enhance the damping effects of the VEM, a constraining layer is attached. When this constraining layer is an active element, the treatment is called active constrained layer damping (ACLD). Recently, the investigation of ACLD treatments has shown it to be an effective method of vibration suppression. In this paper, the treatment of a beam with a separate active element and passive constrained layer (PCLD) element is investigated. A Ritz- Galerkin approach is used to obtain discretized equations of motion. The damping is modeled using the GHM method and the system is analyzed in the time domain. By optimizing on the performance and control effort for both the active and passive case, it is shown that this treatment is capable of lower control effort with more inherent damping, and is therefore a better approach to damp vibration.

  6. Pattern recognition constrains mantle properties, past and present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkins, S.; Rozel, A. B.; Valentine, A. P.; Tackley, P.; Trampert, J.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding and modelling mantle convection requires knowledge of many mantle properties, such as viscosity, chemical structure and thermal proerties such as radiogenic heating rate. However, many of these parameters are only poorly constrained. We demonstrate a new method for inverting present day Earth observations for mantle properties. We use neural networks to represent the posterior probability density functions of many different mantle properties given the present structure of the mantle. We construct these probability density functions by sampling a wide range of possible mantle properties and running forward simulations, using the convection code StagYY. Our approach is particularly powerful because of its flexibility. Our samples are selected in the prior space, rather than being targeted towards a particular observation, as would normally be the case for probabilistic inversion. This means that the same suite of simulations can be used for inversions using a wide range of geophysical observations without the need to resample. Our method is probabilistic and non-linear and is therefore compatible with non-linear convection, avoiding some of the limitations associated with other methods for inverting mantle flow. This allows us to consider the entire history of the mantle. We also need relatively few samples for our inversion, making our approach computationally tractable when considering long periods of mantle history. Using the present thermal and density structure of the mantle, we can constrain rheological and compositional parameters such as viscosity and yield stress. We can also use the present day mantle structure to make inferences about the initial conditions for convection 4.5 Gyr ago. We can constrain initial mantle conditions including the initial concentration of heat producing elements in the mantle and the initial thickness of primordial material at the CMB. Currently we use density and temperature structure for our inversions, but we can

  7. Development of crop-specific transposable element (SINE) markers for studying gene flow from oilseed rape to wild radish.

    PubMed

    Prieto, J L; Pouilly, N; Jenczewski, E; Deragon, J M; Chèvre, A M

    2005-08-01

    The screening of wild populations for evidence of gene flow from a crop to a wild related species requires the unambiguous detection of crop genes within the genome of the wild species, taking into account the intraspecific variability of each species. If the crop and wild relatives share a common ancestor, as is the case for the Brassica crops and their wild relatives (subtribe Brassiceae), the species-specific markers needed to make this unambiguous detection are difficult to identify. In the model oilseed rape (Brassica napus, AACC, 2n = 38)-wild radish (Raphanus raphanistrum, RrRr, 2n = 18) system, we utilized the presence or absence of a short-interspersed element (SINE) at a given locus to develop oilseed rape-specific markers, as SINE insertions are irreversible. By means of sequence-specific amplified polymorphism (SINE-SSAP) reactions, we identified and cloned 67 bands specific to the oilseed rape genome and absent from that of wild radish. Forty-seven PCR-specific markers were developed from three combinations of primers anchored either in (1) the 5'- and 3'-genomic sequences flanking the SINE, (2) the 5'-flanking and SINE internal sequences or (3) the SINE internal and flanking 3'-sequences. Seventeen markers were monomorphic whatever the oilseed rape varieties tested, whereas 30 revealed polymorphism and behaved either as dominant (17) or co-dominant (13) markers. Polymorphic markers were mapped on 19 genomic regions assigned to ten linkage groups. The markers developed will be efficient tools to trace the occurrence and frequency of introgressions of oilseed rape genomic region within wild radish populations.

  8. A Coupled Sharp-Interface Immersed-Boundary-Finite-Element Method for Flow-Structure Interaction with Application to Human Phonation

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, X.; Xue, Qian; Mittal, R.; Bielamowicz, S.

    2010-01-01

    A new flow-structure interaction method is presented which couples a sharp-interface immersed boundary method (IBM) flow solver with a finite element method (FEM) based solid dynamics solver. The coupled method provides robust and high fidelity solution for complex fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problems, such as those involving three-dimensional flow and viscoelastic solids. The FSI solver is used to simulate flow-induced vibrations of the vocal folds during phonation. Both two- and three-dimensional models have been examined and qualitative as well as quantitative comparisons made with established results in order to validate the solver. The solver is use to study the onset of phonation in a two-dimensional laryngeal model and the dynamics of the glottal jet in a three-dimensional model and results from these studies are also presented. PMID:21034144

  9. Constraining QGP properties with CHIMERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garishvili, Irakli; Abelev, Betty; Cheng, Michael; Glenn, Andrew; Soltz, Ron

    2011-10-01

    Understanding essential properties of strongly interacting matter is arguably the most important goal of the relativistic heavy-ion programs both at RHIC and the LHC. In particular, constraining observables such as ratio of shear viscosity to entropy density, η/s, initial temperature, Tinit, and energy density is of critical importance. For this purpose we have developed CHIMERA, Comprehensive Heavy Ion Model Reporting and Evaluation Algorithm. CHIMERA is designed to facilitate global statistical comparison of results from our multi-stage hydrodynamics/hadron cascade model of heavy ion collisions to the key soft observables (HBT, elliptic flow, spectra) measured at RHIC and the LHC. Within this framework the data representing multiple different measurements from different experiments are compiled into single format. One of the unique features of CHIMERA is, that in addition to taking into account statistical errors, it also treats different types of systematic uncertainties. The hydrodynamics/hadron cascade model used in the framework incorporates different initial state conditions, pre-equilibrium flow, the UVH2+1 viscous hydro model, Cooper-Frye freezeout, and the UrQMD hadronic cascade model. The sensitivity of the observables to the equation of state (EoS) is explored using several EoS's in the hydrodynamic evolution. The latest results from CHIMERA, including data from the LHC, will be presented.

  10. The Achievement Flow Motive as an Element of the Autotelic Personality: Predicting Educational Attainment in Three Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busch, Holger; Hofer, Jan; Chasiotis, Athanasios; Campos, Domingo

    2013-01-01

    Human behavior is directed by an implicit and an explicit motivational system. The intrinsic form of the implicit achievement motive has been demonstrated to predict the experience of flow. Thus, this achievement flow motive can be considered an integral component of the autotelic personality, posited in Flow Theory as dispositional difference in…

  11. Numerical analysis of laminar and turbulent incompressible flows using the finite element Fluid Dynamics Analysis Package (FIDAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohn, Jeong L.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of the study is the evaluation of the numerical accuracy of FIDAP (Fluid Dynamics Analysis Package). Accordingly, four test problems in laminar and turbulent incompressible flows are selected and the computational results of these problems compared with other numerical solutions and/or experimental data. These problems include: (1) 2-D laminar flow inside a wall-driven cavity; (2) 2-D laminar flow over a backward-facing step; (3) 2-D turbulent flow over a backward-facing step; and (4) 2-D turbulent flow through a turn-around duct.

  12. Parallel performance of a lattice-Boltzmann/finite element cellular blood flow solver on the IBM Blue Gene/P architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausen, Jonathan R.; Reasor, Daniel A.; Aidun, Cyrus K.

    2010-06-01

    We discuss the parallel implementation and scaling results of a hybrid lattice-Boltzmann/finite element code for suspension flow simulations. This code allows the direct numerical simulation of cellular blood flow, fully resolving the two-phase nature of blood and the deformation of the suspended phase. A brief introduction to the numerical methods employed is given followed by an outline of the code structure. Scaling results obtained on Argonne National Laboratories IBM Blue Gene/P ( BG/P) are presented. Details include performance characteristics on 512 to 65,536 processor cores.

  13. Elemental ratios for characterization of quantum-dots populations in complex mixtures by asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation on-line coupled to fluorescence and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Menendez-Miranda, Mario; Fernandez-Arguelles, Maria T; Costa-Fernandez, Jose M; Encinar, Jorge Ruiz; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2014-08-11

    Separation and identification of nanoparticles of different composition, with similar particle diameter, coexisting in heterogeneous suspensions of polymer-coated CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) have been thoroughly assessed by asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) coupled on-line to fluorescence and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) detectors. Chemical characterization of any previously on-line separated nanosized species was achieved by the measurement of the elemental molar ratios of every element involved in the synthesis of the QDs, using inorganic standards and external calibration by flow injection analysis (FIA). Such elemental molar ratios, strongly limited so far to pure single nanoparticles suspensions, have been achieved with adequate accuracy by coupling for the first time an ICP-QQQ instrument to an AF4 system. This hyphenation turned out to be instrumental to assess the chemical composition of the different populations of nanoparticles coexisting in the relatively complex mixtures, due to its capabilities to detect the hardly detectable elements involved in the synthesis. Interestingly such information, complementary to that obtained by fluorescence, was very valuable to detect and identify unexpected nanosized species, present at significant level, produced during QDs synthesis and hardly detectable by standard approaches.

  14. An Application of the Finite Element Method to the Solution of Low Reynolds Number, Incompressible Flow Around a Joukowski Aerofoil, with Emphasis on Automatic Generation of Grids.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    Library Universities and Colleges Sydney Dr G.P. Steven, Dept. of Aeronautical Engineering SPARES (10 copies) TOTAL (50 copies) * 1’ Department of...ORGANISATION AERONAUTICAL RESEARCH LABORATORIES MELBOURNE, VICTORIA AsZodynaiLcs Tecbhical ismiro a 349 AN APPLICATION OF THE FINITE ELEMENT METHOD TO THE...SOLUTION OF LOW REYNOLDS NUMBER, INCOMPRESSIBLE FLOW AROUND A JOUIKOWSKI AEROFOIL , WITH EMPHASIS ON ALJTOMATIC GENERATION OF 6RIDS T. TDTIC SELECTED SEP29

  15. The method of space-time conservation element and solution element-applications to one-dimensional and two-dimensional time-marching flow problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Sin-Chung; Wang, Xiao-Yen; Chow, Chuen-Yen

    1995-01-01

    A nontraditional numerical method for solving conservation laws is being developed. The new method is designed from a physicist's perspective, i.e., its development is based more on physics than numerics. Even though it uses only the simplest approximation techniques, a 2D time-marching Euler solver developed recently using the new method is capable of generating nearly perfect solutions for a 2D shock reflection problem used by Helen Yee and others. Moreover, a recent application of this solver to computational aeroacoustics (CAA) problems reveals that: (1) accuracy of its results is comparable to that of a 6th order compact difference scheme even though nominally the current solver is only of 2nd-order accuracy; (2) generally, the non-reflecting boundary condition can be implemented in a simple way without involving characteristic variables; and (3) most importantly, the current solver is capable of handling both continuous and discontinuous flows very well and thus provides a unique numerical tool for solving those flow problems where the interactions between sound waves and shocks are important, such as the noise field around a supersonic over- or under-expansion jet.

  16. On the development of a three-dimensional finite-element groundwater flow model of the saturated zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Czarnecki, J.B.; Faunt, C.C.; Gable, C.W.; Zyvoloski, G.A.

    1996-12-31

    Development of a preliminary three-dimensional model of the saturated zone at Yucca Mountain, the potential location for a high-level nuclear waste repository, is presented. The development of the model advances the technology of interfacing: (1)complex three-dimensional hydrogeologic framework modeling; (2) fully three-dimensional, unstructured, finite-element mesh generation; and (3) groundwater flow, heat, and transport simulation. The three-dimensional hydrogeologic framework model is developed using maps, cross sections, and well data. The framework model data are used to feed an automated mesh generator, designed to discretize irregular three-dimensional solids,a nd to assign materials properties from the hydrogeologic framework model to the tetrahedral elements. The mesh generator facilitated the addition of nodes to the finite-element mesh which correspond to the exact three-dimensional position of the potentiometric surface based on water-levels from wells. A ground water flow and heat simulator is run with the resulting finite- element mesh, within a parameter-estimation program. The application of the parameter-estimation program is designed to provide optimal values of permeability and specified fluxes over the model domain to minimize the residual between observed and simulated water levels.

  17. Constrained space camera assembly

    DOEpatents

    Heckendorn, Frank M.; Anderson, Erin K.; Robinson, Casandra W.; Haynes, Harriet B.

    1999-01-01

    A constrained space camera assembly which is intended to be lowered through a hole into a tank, a borehole or another cavity. The assembly includes a generally cylindrical chamber comprising a head and a body and a wiring-carrying conduit extending from the chamber. Means are included in the chamber for rotating the body about the head without breaking an airtight seal formed therebetween. The assembly may be pressurized and accompanied with a pressure sensing means for sensing if a breach has occurred in the assembly. In one embodiment, two cameras, separated from their respective lenses, are installed on a mounting apparatus disposed in the chamber. The mounting apparatus includes means allowing both longitudinal and lateral movement of the cameras. Moving the cameras longitudinally focuses the cameras, and moving the cameras laterally away from one another effectively converges the cameras so that close objects can be viewed. The assembly further includes means for moving lenses of different magnification forward of the cameras.

  18. An efficient finite element technique for sound propagation in axisymmetric hard wall ducts carrying high subsonic Mach number flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tag, I. A.; Lumsdaine, E.

    1978-01-01

    The general non-linear three-dimensional equation for acoustic potential is derived by using a perturbation technique. The linearized axisymmetric equation is then solved by using a finite element algorithm based on the Galerkin formulation for a harmonic time dependence. The solution is carried out in complex number notation for the acoustic velocity potential. Linear, isoparametric, quadrilateral elements with non-uniform distribution across the duct section are implemented. The resultant global matrix is stored in banded form and solved by using a modified Gauss elimination technique. Sound pressure levels and acoustic velocities are calculated from post element solutions. Different duct geometries are analyzed and compared with experimental results.

  19. The constrained reinitialization equation for level set methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Daniel; Meinke, Matthias; Schröder, Wolfgang

    2010-03-01

    Based on the constrained reinitialization scheme [D. Hartmann, M. Meinke, W. Schröder, Differential equation based constrained reinitialization for level set methods, J. Comput. Phys. 227 (2008) 6821-6845] a new constrained reinitialization equation incorporating a forcing term is introduced. Two formulations for high-order constrained reinitialization (HCR) are presented combining the simplicity and generality of the original reinitialization equation [M. Sussman, P. Smereka, S. Osher, A level set approach for computing solutions to incompressible two-phase flow, J. Comput. Phys. 114 (1994) 146-159] in terms of high-order standard discretization and the accuracy of the constrained reinitialization scheme in terms of interface displacement. The novel HCR schemes represent simple extensions of standard implementations of the original reinitialization equation. The results evidence the significantly increased accuracy and robustness of the novel schemes.

  20. Conjugate Gradient Methods for Constrained Least Squares Problems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    TINO Hi!AGL . edi"o ar m m Conjugate Gradient Methods for Constrained Least Squares Problems by Douglas James A thesis 3ubmitted to the Graduate Faculty...Methods for Constrained Least uares Problems (directed by Robert J . Plemmons). Nreiw• 1\\ . ’iu 1988, Barlow, Nichols, and Plemmons proposed order...typical). The blocks 13 element j / F __- . F= %.GEi ,,,mo node Figure 2.4: Matrices for Static Structurem Prcblem associated with t’e planar square

  1. Constraining the Braneworld with Gravitational Wave Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McWilliams, Sean T.

    2011-01-01

    Some braneworld models may have observable consequences that, if detected, would validate a requisite element of string theory. In the infinite Randall-Sundrum model (RS2), the AdS radius of curvature, L, of the extra dimension supports a single bound state of the massless graviton on the brane, thereby reproducing Newtonian gravity in the weak-field limit. However, using the AdS/CFT correspondence, it has been suggested that one possible consequence of RS2 is an enormous increase in Hawking radiation emitted by black holes. We utilize this possibility to derive two novel methods for constraining L via gravitational wave measurements. We show that the EMRI event rate detected by LISA can constrain L at the approximately 1 micron level for optimal cases, while the observation of a single galactic black hole binary with LISA results in an optimal constraint of L less than or equal to 5 microns.

  2. Continuous-flow leaching in a rotating coiled column for studies on the mobility of toxic elements in dust samples collected near a metallurgic plant.

    PubMed

    Fedotov, Petr S; Ermolin, Mikhail S; Ivaneev, Alexandr I; Fedyunina, Natalia N; Karandashev, Vasily K; Tatsy, Yury G

    2016-03-01

    Continuous-flow (dynamic) leaching in a rotating coiled column has been applied to studies on the mobility of Zn, Cd, Cu, Pb, Ni, Sb, As, S, and other potentially toxic elements in atmospherically deposited dust samples collected near a large copper smelter (Chelyabinsk region, Russia). Water and simulated "acid rain" (pH 4) were used as eluents. The technique enables not only the fast and efficient leaching of elements but as well time-resolved studies on the mobilization of heavy metals, sulphur, and arsenic in environmentally relevant forms to be made. It is shown that up to 1.5, 4.1, 1.9, 11.1, and 46.1% of Pb, As, Cu, Zn, and S, correspondingly, can be easily mobilized by water. Taking into consideration that the total concentrations of these elements in the samples under investigation are surprisingly high and vary in the range from 2.7 g/kg (for arsenic) to 15.5 g/kg (for sulphur), the environmental impact of the dust may be dramatic. The simulated acid rain results in somewhat higher recoveries of elements, except Cu and Pb. The proposed approach and the data obtained can very useful for the risk assessment related to the mobility of potentially toxic elements and their inclusion in the biogeochemical cycle.

  3. Comparison of spectral and finite element methods applied to the study of the core-annular flow in an undulating tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouris, Charalampos; Dimakopoulos, Yannis; Georgiou, Georgios; Tsamopoulos, John

    2002-05-01

    A Galerkin/finite element and a pseudo-spectral method, in conjunction with the primitive (velocity-pressure) and streamfunction-vorticity formulations, are tested for solving the two-phase flow in a tube, which has a periodically varying, circular cross section. Two immiscible, incompressible, Newtonian fluids are arranged so that one of them is around the axis of the tube (core fluid) and the other one surrounds it (annular fluid). The physical and flow parameters are such that the interface between the two fluids remains continuous and single-valued. This arrangement is usually referred to as Core-Annular flow. A non-orthogonal mapping is used to transform the uneven tube shape and the unknown, time dependent interface to fixed, cylindrical surfaces. With both methods and formulations, steady states are calculated first using the Newton-Raphson method. The most dangerous eigenvalues of the related linear stability problem are calculated using the Arnoldi method, and dynamic simulations are carried out using the implicit Euler method. It is shown that with a smooth tube shape the pseudo-spectral method exhibits exponential convergence, whereas the finite element method exhibits algebraic convergence, albeit of higher order than expected from the relevant theory. Thus the former method, especially when coupled with the streamfunction-vorticity formulation, is much more efficient. The finite element method becomes more advantageous when the tube shape contains a cusp, in which case the convergence rate of the pseudo-spectral method deteriorates exhibiting algebraic convergence with the number of the axial spectral modes, whereas the convergence rate of the finite element method remains unaffected. Copyright

  4. Rare Earth Element Speciation Along Groundwater Flow Paths in Two Different Aquifer Types (i.e., Sand vs. Carbonate)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, J.; Johannesson, K. H.

    2003-12-01

    Groundwater samples were collected in two different types of aquifer (i.e., Carrizo sand aquifer, Texas and Upper Floridan carbonate aquifer, west-central Florida) to study the concentrations, fractionation, and speciation of rare earth elements (REE) along groundwater flow paths in each aquifer. The solution complexation of REEs in these two aquifers was modeled using Humic Ion-Binding Model V. The results of the REE speciation modeling indicate that the solution complexation of REEs is controlled by pH, alkalinity, and DOC concentration. Because DOC is low (less than 0.65 mg/L) in Carrizo aquifer, organic complexation of REEs is not significant in these groundwaters. For LREEs, LnCO3+ and/or Ln(CO3)2- are the dominant species when pH is above 7.0, but when pH is below 7.0, besides LnCO3+, Ln3+ and LnSO4+ are also significant and their importance increases with decreasing pH. For HREEs, LnCO3+ and/or Ln(CO3)2- are always the dominant species, however, LnPO4o is important in some groundwaters. The similar general patterns of inorganic solution complexation of the REEs are also observed in groundwaters from the Upper Floridan aquifer. However, because of the relatively high DOC concentrations measured in the Floridan groundwaters, organic complexation of REEs, especially LREEs, is also predicted to be significant in some groundwaters. Linear correlation coefficients for total REE, Nd, Gd, and Yb concentrations, and (Yb/Nd)SN vs. pH, CO3, DOC, SO4, Fe, and Mn indicate that for the Carrizo groundwaters, REE concentrations are not correlatd to any of these factors. However, (Yb/Nd)SN is inversely related to pH and the [CO32-] concentration of these groundwaters. Because REE speciation is strongly related to pH and the [CO32-] concentration, it is reasonable to expect that REE solution complexation plays a greater role in fractionating REE than controlling absolute concentrations in the Carrizo Sand aquifer. In Upper Floridan aquifer, LREE concentrations are positively

  5. Constrained space camera assembly

    DOEpatents

    Heckendorn, F.M.; Anderson, E.K.; Robinson, C.W.; Haynes, H.B.

    1999-05-11

    A constrained space camera assembly which is intended to be lowered through a hole into a tank, a borehole or another cavity is disclosed. The assembly includes a generally cylindrical chamber comprising a head and a body and a wiring-carrying conduit extending from the chamber. Means are included in the chamber for rotating the body about the head without breaking an airtight seal formed therebetween. The assembly may be pressurized and accompanied with a pressure sensing means for sensing if a breach has occurred in the assembly. In one embodiment, two cameras, separated from their respective lenses, are installed on a mounting apparatus disposed in the chamber. The mounting apparatus includes means allowing both longitudinal and lateral movement of the cameras. Moving the cameras longitudinally focuses the cameras, and moving the cameras laterally away from one another effectively converges the cameras so that close objects can be viewed. The assembly further includes means for moving lenses of different magnification forward of the cameras. 17 figs.

  6. On the use of the stabilised Q1P0 element for geodynamical simulations and why this is a bad choice for buyoancy-driven flows.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thieulot, Cedric

    2016-04-01

    Many Finite Element geodynamical codes (Fullsack,1995; Zhong et al., 2000; Thieulot, 2011) are based on bi/tri­-linear velocity constant pressure element (commonly called Q1P0), because of its ease of programming and rather low memory footprint, despite the presence of (pressure) checker­board modes. However, it is long known that the Q1P0 is not inf­-sup stable and does not lend itself to the use of iterative solvers, which makes it a less­ than­ ideal candidate for high resolution 3D models. Other attempts were made more recently (Burstedde et al., 2013; Le Pourhiet et al., 2012) with the use of the stabilised Q1Q1 element (bi/tri­-linear velocity and pressure). This element, while also attractive from an implementation and memory standpoint, suffers a major drawback due to the artificial compressibility introduced by the polynomial projection stabilization. These observations have shifted part of the community towards the Finite Difference Method while the remaining part is now embracing inf­sup stable second­ order elements [May et al., 2015; Kronbichler,2012). Rather surprinsingly, a third option exists when it comes to first ­order elements in the form of the stabilised Q1P0 element, but virtually no literature exists concerning its use for geodynamical applications. I will then recall the specificity of the stabilisation and will carry out a series of benchmark experiments and geodynamical tests to assess its performance. While being shown to work as expected in benchmark experiments, the stabilised Q1P0 element turns out to introduce first-order numerical artefacts in the velocity and pressure solutions in the case of buoyancy-driven flows. Burstedde, C., Stadler, G., Alisic, L., Wilcox, L. C., Tan, E., Gurnis, M., & Ghattas, O. (2013). Large­scale adaptive mantle convection simulation. Geophysical Journal International, 192(3), 889­906. Fullsack, P. (1995). An arbitrary Lagrangian­Eulerian formulation for creeping flows and its application in

  7. Establishment of a finite element model for extracting chemical reaction kinetics in a micro-flow injection system with high throughput sampling.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zeng-Qiang; Du, Wen-Bin; Li, Jin-Yi; Xia, Xing-Hua; Fang, Qun

    2015-08-01

    Numerical simulation can provide valuable insights for complex microfluidic phenomena coupling mixing and diffusion processes. Herein, a novel finite element model (FEM) has been established to extract chemical reaction kinetics in a microfluidic flow injection analysis (micro-FIA) system using high throughput sample introduction. To reduce the computation burden, the finite element mesh generation is performed with different scales based on the different geometric sizes of micro-FIA. In order to study the contribution of chemical reaction kinetics under non-equilibrium condition, a pseudo-first-order chemical kinetics equation is adopted in the numerical simulations. The effect of reactants diffusion on reaction products is evaluated, and the results demonstrate that the Taylor dispersion plays a determining role in the micro-FIA system. In addition, the effects of flow velocity and injection volume on the reaction product are also simulated. The simulated results agree well with the ones from experiments. Although gravity driven flow is used to the numerical model in the present study, the FEM model also can be applied into the systems with other driving forces such as pressure. Therefore, the established FEM model will facilitate the understanding of reaction mechanism in micro-FIA systems and help us to optimize the manifold of micro-FIA systems.

  8. A Very Large Eddy Simulation of the Nonreacting Flow in a Single-Element Lean Direct Injection Combustor Using PRNS with a Nonlinear Subscale Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2009-01-01

    Very large eddy simulation (VLES) of the nonreacting turbulent flow in a single-element lean direct injection (LDI) combustor has been successfully performed via the approach known as the partially resolved numerical simulation (PRNS/VLES) using a nonlinear subscale model. The grid is the same as the one used in a previous RANS simulation, which was considered as too coarse for a traditional LES simulation. In this study, we first carry out a steady RANS simulation to provide the initial flow field for the subsequent PRNS/VLES simulation. We have also carried out an unsteady RANS (URANS) simulation for the purpose of comparing its results with that of the PRNS/VLES simulation. In addition, these calculated results are compared with the experimental data. The present effort has demonstrated that the PRNS/VLES approach, while using a RANS type of grid, is able to reveal the dynamically important, unsteady large-scale turbulent structures occurring in the flow field of a single-element LDI combustor. The interactions of these coherent structures play a critical role in the dispersion of the fuel, hence, the mixing between the fuel and the oxidizer in a combustor.

  9. Metasomatism and current state of the lithospheric mantle beneath the Nógrád-Gömör Volcanic Field constrained by trace element modelling and magnetotelluric survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klébesz, Rita; Patkó, Levente; Novák, Attila; Wesztergom, Viktor; Szabó, Csaba

    2016-04-01

    The Nógrád-Gömör Volcanic Field (NGVF) is one of the five mantle xenolith bearing alkali basalt locations in the Carpathian-Pannonian Region, where Plio-Pleistocene alkali basalt brought to the surface lherzolite and wehrlite xenoliths. Petrographic and geochemical signature (i.e. newly formed clinopyroxene and olivine grains, Ti, Al, Fe, Mn and LRRE enrichment in rock-forming minerals) of the wehrlite xenoliths suggest that a portion of the upper mantle was transformed to wehrlite beneath the NGVF by upward migrating mafic melt agents. Based on trace element modelling, we argue that the metasomatic agent had an OIB-like trace element composition, similar to the host alkali basalts. In order to study the current state of the lithospheric mantle and to test whether the spatial distribution of the metasomatism can be imaged, magnetotelluric (MT) survey was carried out. Long period MT data were collected at 14 locations along a ~50 km long NNW-SSE profile in the NGVF. The lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary was detected at 70-90 km of depth. A low resistivity anomaly (~5-10 Ωm) was observed at 30-45 km in depth below the central part of the NNW-SSE profile, indicating the presence of a conductive body barely below the Moho. We suggest that the low resistivity body is related to the presence of residual, connected melt and/or the conductivity differences between the lherzolitic and wehrlitic mantle domain due to different chemical composition and ratio of the rock-forming minerals.

  10. Power-constrained supercomputing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Peter E.

    As we approach exascale systems, power is turning from an optimization goal to a critical operating constraint. With power bounds imposed by both stakeholders and the limitations of existing infrastructure, achieving practical exascale computing will therefore rely on optimizing performance subject to a power constraint. However, this requirement should not add to the burden of application developers; optimizing the runtime environment given restricted power will primarily be the job of high-performance system software. In this dissertation, we explore this area and develop new techniques that extract maximum performance subject to a particular power constraint. These techniques include a method to find theoretical optimal performance, a runtime system that shifts power in real time to improve performance, and a node-level prediction model for selecting power-efficient operating points. We use a linear programming (LP) formulation to optimize application schedules under various power constraints, where a schedule consists of a DVFS state and number of OpenMP threads for each section of computation between consecutive message passing events. We also provide a more flexible mixed integer-linear (ILP) formulation and show that the resulting schedules closely match schedules from the LP formulation. Across four applications, we use our LP-derived upper bounds to show that current approaches trail optimal, power-constrained performance by up to 41%. This demonstrates limitations of current systems, and our LP formulation provides future optimization approaches with a quantitative optimization target. We also introduce Conductor, a run-time system that intelligently distributes available power to nodes and cores to improve performance. The key techniques used are configuration space exploration and adaptive power balancing. Configuration exploration dynamically selects the optimal thread concurrency level and DVFS state subject to a hardware-enforced power bound

  11. Constraining Dark Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahamse, Augusta

    2010-12-01

    Future advances in cosmology will depend on the next generation of cosmological observations and how they shape our theoretical understanding of the universe. Current theoretical ideas, however, have an important role to play in guiding the design of such observational programs. The work presented in this thesis concerns the intersection of observation and theory, particularly as it relates to advancing our understanding of the accelerated expansion of the universe (or the dark energy). Chapters 2 - 4 make use of the simulated data sets developed by the Dark Energy Task Force (DETF) for a number of cosmological observations currently in the experimental pipeline. We use these forecast data in the analysis of four quintessence models of dark energy: the PNGB, Exponential, Albrecht-Skordis and Inverse Power Law (IPL) models. Using Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling techniques we examine the ability of each simulated data set to constrain the parameter space of these models. We examine the potential of the data for differentiating time-varying models from a pure cosmological constant. Additionally, we introduce an abstract parameter space to facilitate comparison between models and investigate the ability of future data to distinguish between these quintessence models. In Chapter 5 we present work towards understanding the effects of systematic errors associated with photometric redshift estimates. Due to the need to sample a vast number of deep and faint galaxies, photometric redshifts will be used in a wide range of future cosmological observations including gravitational weak lensing, baryon accoustic oscillations and type 1A supernovae observations. The uncertainty in the redshift distributions of galaxies has a significant potential impact on the cosmological parameter values inferred from such observations. We introduce a method for parameterizing uncertainties in modeling assumptions affecting photometric redshift calculations and for propagating these

  12. Effects of human-induced alteration of groundwater flow on concentrations of naturally-occurring trace elements at water-supply wells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ayotte, J.D.; Szabo, Z.; Focazio, M.J.; Eberts, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of human-induced alteration of groundwater flow patterns on concentrations of naturally-occurring trace elements were examined in five hydrologically distinct aquifer systems in the USA. Although naturally occurring, these trace elements can exceed concentrations that are considered harmful to human health. The results show that pumping-induced hydraulic gradient changes and artificial connection of aquifers by well screens can mix chemically distinct groundwater. Chemical reactions between these mixed groundwaters and solid aquifer materials can result in the mobilization of trace elements such as U, As and Ra, with subsequent transport to water-supply wells. For example, in the High Plains aquifer near York, Nebraska, mixing of shallow, oxygenated, lower-pH water from an unconfined aquifer with deeper, confined, anoxic, higher-pH water is facilitated by wells screened across both aquifers. The resulting higher-O2, lower-pH mixed groundwater facilitated the mobilization of U from solid aquifer materials, and dissolved U concentrations were observed to increase significantly in nearby supply wells. Similar instances of trace element mobilization due to human-induced mixing of groundwaters were documented in: (1) the Floridan aquifer system near Tampa, Florida (As and U), (2) Paleozoic sedimentary aquifers in eastern Wisconsin (As), (3) the basin-fill aquifer underlying the California Central Valley near Modesto (U), and (4) Coastal Plain aquifers of New Jersey (Ra). Adverse water-quality impacts attributed to human activities are commonly assumed to be related solely to the release of the various anthropogenic contaminants to the environment. The results show that human activities including various land uses, well drilling, and pumping rates and volumes can adversely impact the quality of water in supply wells, when associated with naturally-occurring trace elements in aquifer materials. This occurs by causing subtle but significant changes in

  13. Unsteady MHD Heat Transfer in Couette Flow of Water at 4°C in a Rotating System with Ramped Temperature via Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, G. J.; Raju, R. S.; Rao, J. A.; Gorla, R. S. R.

    2017-02-01

    An unsteady magnetohydromagnetic natural convection on the Couette flow of electrically conducting water at 4°C (Pr = 11.40) in a rotating system has been considered. A Finite Element Method (FEM) was employed to find the numerical solutions of the dimensionless governing coupled boundary layer partial differential equations. The primary velocity, secondary velocity and temperature of water at 4°C as well as shear stresses and rate of heat transfer have been obtained for both ramped temperature and isothermal plates. The results are independent of the mesh (grid) size and the present numerical solutions through the Finite Element Method (FEM) are in good agreement with the existing analytical solutions by the Laplace Transform Technique (LTT). These are shown in tabular and graphical forms.

  14. Determination of elemental constituents in different matrix materials and flow injection studies by the electrolyte cathode glow discharge technique with a new design

    SciTech Connect

    Shekhar, R.; Karunasagar, D.; Ranjit, M.; Arunachalam, J.

    2009-10-15

    An open-to-air type electrolyte cathode discharge (ELCAD) has been developed with a new design. The present configuration leads to a stable plasma even at low flow rates (0.96 mL/min). Plasma fluctuations arising from the variations in the gap between solid anode and liquid cathode were eliminated by providing a V-groove to the liquid glass-capillary. Cathode (ground) connection is given to the solution at the V-groove itself. Interfaced to atomic emission spectrometry (AES), its analytical performance is evaluated. The optimized molarity of the solution is 0.2 M. The analytical response curves for Ca, Cu, Cd, Pb, Hg, Fe, and Zn demonstrated good linearity. The limit of detections of Ca, Cu, Cd, Pb, Hg, Fe, and Zn are determined to be 17, 11, 5, 45, 15, 28, and 3 ng mL{sup -1}. At an integration time of 0.3 s, the relative standard deviation (RSD) values of the acid blank solutions are found to be less than 10% for the elements Ca, Cu, Cd, Hg, Fe, and Zn and 18% for Pb. The method is applied for the determination of the elemental constituents in different matrix materials such as tuna fish (IAEA-350), oyster tissue (NIST SRM 1566a), and coal fly ash (CFA SRM 1633b). The obtained results are in good agreement with the certified values. The accuracy is found to be between 7% and 0.6% for major to trace levels of constituent elements and the precision between 11% and 0.6%. For the injection of 100 {mu} L of 200 ng mL{sup -1} mercury solution at the flow rate of 0.8 mL/min, the flow injection studies resulted in the relative standard deviation (RSD) of 8%, concentration detection limit of 10 ng/mL, and mass detection limit of 1 ng for mercury.

  15. The transport behaviour of elemental mercury DNAPL in saturated porous media: Analysis of field observations and two-phase flow modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweijen, Thomas; Hartog, Niels; Marsman, Annemieke; Keijzer, Thomas J. S.

    2014-06-01

    Mercury is a contaminant of global concern. The use of elemental mercury in various (former) industrial processes, such as chlorine production at chlor-alkali plants, is known to have resulted in soil and groundwater contaminations worldwide. However, the subsurface transport behaviour of elemental mercury as an immiscible dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) in porous media has received minimal attention to date. Even though, such insight would aid in the remediation effort of mercury contaminated sites. Therefore, in this study a detailed field characterization of elemental mercury DNAPL distribution with depth was performed together with two-phase flow modelling, using STOMP. This is to evaluate the dynamics of mercury DNAPL migration and the controls on its distribution in saturated porous media. Using a CPT-probe mounted with a digital camera, in-situ mercury DNAPL depth distribution was obtained at a former chlor-alkali-plant, down to 9 m below ground surface. Images revealing the presence of silvery mercury DNAPL droplets were used to quantify its distribution, characteristics and saturation, using an image analysis method. These field-observations with depth were compared with results from a one-dimensional two-phase flow model simulation for the same transect. Considering the limitations of this approach, simulations reasonably reflected the variability and range of the mercury DNAPL distribution. To further explore the impact of mercury's physical properties in comparison with more common DNAPLs, the migration of mercury and PCE DNAPL in several typical hydrological scenarios was simulated. Comparison of the simulations suggest that mercury's higher density is the overall controlling factor in controlling its penetration in saturated porous media, despite its higher resistance to flow due to its higher viscosity. Based on these results the hazard of spilled mercury DNAPL to cause deep contamination of groundwater systems seems larger than for any other

  16. The transport behaviour of elemental mercury DNAPL in saturated porous media: analysis of field observations and two-phase flow modelling.

    PubMed

    Sweijen, Thomas; Hartog, Niels; Marsman, Annemieke; Keijzer, Thomas J S

    2014-06-01

    Mercury is a contaminant of global concern. The use of elemental mercury in various (former) industrial processes, such as chlorine production at chlor-alkali plants, is known to have resulted in soil and groundwater contaminations worldwide. However, the subsurface transport behaviour of elemental mercury as an immiscible dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) in porous media has received minimal attention to date. Even though, such insight would aid in the remediation effort of mercury contaminated sites. Therefore, in this study a detailed field characterization of elemental mercury DNAPL distribution with depth was performed together with two-phase flow modelling, using STOMP. This is to evaluate the dynamics of mercury DNAPL migration and the controls on its distribution in saturated porous media. Using a CPT-probe mounted with a digital camera, in-situ mercury DNAPL depth distribution was obtained at a former chlor-alkali-plant, down to 9 m below ground surface. Images revealing the presence of silvery mercury DNAPL droplets were used to quantify its distribution, characteristics and saturation, using an image analysis method. These field-observations with depth were compared with results from a one-dimensional two-phase flow model simulation for the same transect. Considering the limitations of this approach, simulations reasonably reflected the variability and range of the mercury DNAPL distribution. To further explore the impact of mercury's physical properties in comparison with more common DNAPLs, the migration of mercury and PCE DNAPL in several typical hydrological scenarios was simulated. Comparison of the simulations suggest that mercury's higher density is the overall controlling factor in controlling its penetration in saturated porous media, despite its higher resistance to flow due to its higher viscosity. Based on these results the hazard of spilled mercury DNAPL to cause deep contamination of groundwater systems seems larger than for any other

  17. Very Large Eddy Simulations of a Jet-A Spray Reacting Flow in a Single Element LDI Injector With and Without Invoking an Eulerian Scalar DWFDF Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the very large eddy simulations (VLES) of a Jet-A spray reacting flow in a single element lean direct injection (LDI) injector by using the National Combustion Code (NCC) with and without invoking the Eulerian scalar DWFDF method, in which DWFDF is defined as the density weighted time filtered fine grained probability density function. The flow field is calculated by using the time filtered compressible Navier-Stokes equations (TFNS) with nonlinear subscale turbulence models, and when the Eulerian scalar DWFDF method is invoked, the energy and species mass fractions are calculated by solving the equation of DWFDF. A nonlinear subscale model for closing the convection term of the Eulerian scalar DWFDF equation is used and will be briefly described in this paper. Detailed comparisons between the results and available experimental data are carried out. Some positive findings of invoking the Eulerian scalar DWFDF method in both improving the simulation quality and maintaining economic computing cost are observed.

  18. Evaluation of the 34S/32S ratio of Soufre de Lacq elemental sulfur isotopic reference material by continuous flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Qi, H.P.; Coplen, T.B.

    2003-01-01

    Soufre de Lacq elemental sulfur reference material (IAEA-S-4) isotopically is homogeneous in amounts as small as 41 ??g as determined by continuous flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometry. The ??34S value for this reference material is +16.90 ?? 0.12??? (1??) on a scale (Vienna Can??on Diablo troilite, VCDT) where IAEA-S-1 Ag2S is -0.3??? and IAEA-S-2 Ag2S is +22.67???. Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  19. Solution strategies for finite elements and finite volumes methods applied to flow and heat transfer problem in U-shaped geothermal exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egidi, Nadaniela; Giacomini, Josephin; Maponi, Pierluigi

    2016-06-01

    Matter of this paper is the study of the flow and the corresponding heat transfer in a U-shaped heat exchanger. We propose a mathematical model that is formulated as a forced convection problem for incompressible and Newtonian fluids and results in the unsteady Navier-Stokes problem. In order to get a solution, we discretise the equations with both the Finite Elements Method and the Finite Volumes Method. These procedures give rise to a non-symmetric indefinite quadratic system of equations. Thus, three regularisation techniques are proposed to make approximations effective and ideas to compare their results are provided.

  20. [Clinical usefulness of urine-formed elements' information obtained from bacteria detection by flow cytometry method that uses nucleic acid staining].

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Hiroko; Yuno, Tomoji; Itho, Kiichi

    2009-03-01

    Recently, specific detection method for Bacteria, by flow cytometry method using nucleic acid staining, was developed as a function of automated urine formed elements analyzer for routine urine testing. Here, we performed a basic study on this bacteria analysis method. In addition, we also have a comparison among urine sediment analysis, urine Gram staining and urine quantitative cultivation, the conventional methods performed up to now. As a result, the bacteria analysis with flow cytometry method that uses nucleic acid staining was excellent in reproducibility, and higher sensitivity compared with microscopic urinary sediment analysis. Based on the ROC curve analysis, which settled urine culture method as standard, cut-off level of 120/microL was defined and its sensitivity = 85.7%, specificity = 88.2%. In the analysis of scattergram, accompanied with urine culture method, among 90% of rod positive samples, 80% of dots were appeared in the area of 30 degrees from axis X. In addition, one case even indicated that analysis of bacteria by flow cytometry and scattergram of time series analysis might be helpful to trace the progress of causative bacteria therefore the information supposed to be clinically significant. Reporting bacteria information with nucleic acid staining flow cytometry method is expected to contribute to a rapid diagnostics and treatment of urinary tract infections. Besides, the contribution to screening examination of microbiology and clinical chemistry, will deliver a more efficient solution to urine analysis.

  1. Computer Simulation of Blood Flow, Left Ventricular Wall Motion and Their Interrelationship by Fluid-Structure Interaction Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Hiroshi; Hisada, Toshiaki; Sugiura, Seiryo; Okada, Jun-Ichi; Fukunari, Hiroshi

    To simulate fluid-structure interaction involved in the contraction of a human left ventricle, a 3D finite element based simulation program incorporating the propagation of excitation and excitation-contraction coupling mechanisms was developed. An ALE finite element method with automatic mesh updating was formulated for large domain changes, and a strong coupling strategy was taken. Under the assumption that the inertias of both fluid and structure are negligible and fluid-structure interaction is restricted to the pressure on the interface, the fluid dynamics part was eliminated from the FSI program, and a static structural FEM code corresponding to the cardiac muscles was also developed. The simulations of the contraction of the left ventricle in normal excitation and arrhythmia demonstrated the capability of the proposed method. Also, the results obtained by the two methods are compared. These simulators can be powerful tools in the clinical practice of heart disease.

  2. Modification of the composite multi-layer oxide ceramic coating on meteoroid shielding element by compression plasma flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astashinski, V. M.; Khramtsov, P. P.; Hryshchanka, U. M.; Chernik, M. Yu; Vasetskij, V. A.; Shikh, I. A.; Doroshko, M. V.; Makhnach, A. I.

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this work is investigation of the influence of high-energy plasma impact on composite multi-layer coating (NiAl as a sublayer and Al2O3 as a top coat) on meteoroid shielding element. In order to reach this goal qausi-stationary plasma accelerator with impulse gas feeding was used. Experiments were conducted with use of helium and hydrogen gas mixture and nitrogen as plasma forming substance. Plasma accelerator generates plasma jet with electron temperature ≈ 150 kK and electron density (2.5-4) × 1016 cm-3. Visual examination, photography and spectral measurements were made through special vacuum chamber optical windows.

  3. Large-eddy simulation of a backward facing step flow using a least-squares spectral element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Daniel C.; Mittal, Rajat

    1996-01-01

    We report preliminary results obtained from the large eddy simulation of a backward facing step at a Reynolds number of 5100. The numerical platform is based on a high order Legendre spectral element spatial discretization and a least squares time integration scheme. A non-reflective outflow boundary condition is in place to minimize the effect of downstream influence. Smagorinsky model with Van Driest near wall damping is used for sub-grid scale modeling. Comparisons of mean velocity profiles and wall pressure show good agreement with benchmark data. More studies are needed to evaluate the sensitivity of this method on numerical parameters before it is applied to complex engineering problems.

  4. Limited Flow of Continental Crust at UHP Depths: Coupled Age and Trace-Element Analyses of Titanite in the Western Gneiss Region, Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garber, J. M.; Hacker, B. R.; Kylander-Clark, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    Coupled age and trace-element data from titanites in the Western Gneiss Region (WGR) of Norway suggest that continental crust underwent limited recrystallization and ductile flow through ~40 My of deep subduction and subsequent exhumation. Precambrian igneous titanites in granitic to tonalitic orthogneisses from the WGR were metastably preserved though Caledonian ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) metamorphism and variably recrystallized through subsequent amphibolite-facies metamorphism from ~420-385 Ma. The inherited Precambrian titanites are not present everywhere but rather cluster primarily in a cooler "southern domain" (peak T ~650oC) and a hotter "northern domain" (peak T ~750-800oC).Titanite data were collected using LASS (laser-ablation split stream inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry) at UCSB, and a principal component analysis (PCA) was used to define age and trace-element populations. These data indicate that inherited titanites are LREE-enriched, HFSE-enriched, and have higher Th/U, consistent with Precambrian neocrystallization from a granitic melt. In contrast, the recrystallized titanites have generally lower Th/U and flat, LREE-depleted, or hump-shaped trace-element patterns. These data suggest that (1) Caledonian titanite recrystallization occurred in the presence of LREE-depleted melts or fluids, or that (2) recrystallization was accompanied by a "typical" granitic melt, but that titanite/bulk-rock distribution coefficients are different for neo- and recrystallization; on-going whole-rock analyses will clarify these hypotheses. Critically, the geochemical signature of recrystallized titanite in felsic orthogneisses is comparable across the entire WGR - emphasizing that the petrologic process of titanite recrystallization was similar orogen-wide, but was less extensive in the domains where inherited titanite was preserved. In this case, large volumes of crust outside of the "old domains" may also have retained metastable titanite during subduction

  5. Determination of rare earth elements in geological samples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry with flow injection liquid-liquid extraction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhifang; Liu, Congqiang; Zhang, Hongxiang; Ma, Yingjun; Lin, Soulin

    2003-12-01

    A direct sampling with organic solvent extracts for simultaneous multi-element determination implemented with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) associated with a flow injection liquid-liquid extraction (FI-LLE) sample preconcentration method was studied. The "robustness" of the plasma discharge with tributyl phosphate (TBP) loading was diagnosed by using the Mg II 279.55 nm and Mg I 285.21 nm lines intensity ratio. A FI-LLE preconcentration system for rare earth elements (REEs)-nitrate-TBP was established by using a laboratory-designed phase separator. For these elements, an average sensitivity enhancement factor of 64 was obtained with respect to ICP-AES sampling with aqueous solutions. The precision of the method was characterized by a relative standard deviation (%RSD) of 1.8 - 5.2%. A throughput of 27 samples per hour can be achieved with an organic solvent consumption of less than 200 microl per determination. Good results were obtained for the analysis of standard reference materials.

  6. A Stabilized Finite Element Method for Modified Poisson-Nernst-Planck Equations to Determine Ion Flow Through a Nanopore.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Jehanzeb Hameed; Comer, Jeffrey; Aksimentiev, Aleksei; Olson, Luke N

    2014-01-01

    The conventional Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations do not account for the finite size of ions explicitly. This leads to solutions featuring unrealistically high ionic concentrations in the regions subject to external potentials, in particular, near highly charged surfaces. A modified form of the Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations accounts for steric effects and results in solutions with finite ion concentrations. Here, we evaluate numerical methods for solving the modified Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations by modeling electric field-driven transport of ions through a nanopore. We describe a novel, robust finite element solver that combines the applications of the Newton's method to the nonlinear Galerkin form of the equations, augmented with stabilization terms to appropriately handle the drift-diffusion processes. To make direct comparison with particle-based simulations possible, our method is specifically designed to produce solutions under periodic boundary conditions and to conserve the number of ions in the solution domain. We test our finite element solver on a set of challenging numerical experiments that include calculations of the ion distribution in a volume confined between two charged plates, calculations of the ionic current though a nanopore subject to an external electric field, and modeling the effect of a DNA molecule on the ion concentration and nanopore current.

  7. Efficient triple-grid multiscale finite element method for 3D groundwater flow simulation in heterogeneous porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yifan; Wu, Jichun; Nan, Tongchao; Xue, Yuqun; Xie, Chunhong; Ji, Haifeng

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, an efficient triple-grid multiscale finite element method (ETMSFEM) is proposed for 3D groundwater simulation in heterogeneous porous media. The main idea of this method is to employ new 3D linear base functions and the domain decomposition technique to solve the local reduced elliptical problem, thereby simplifying the base function construction process and improving the efficiency. Furthermore, by using the ETMSFEM base functions, this method can solve Darcy's equation with high efficiency to obtain a continuous velocity field. Therefore, this method can considerably reduce the computational cost of solving for heads and velocities, which is crucial for large-scale 3D groundwater simulations. In the application section, we present numerical examples to compare the ETMSFEM with several classical methods to demonstrate its efficiency and effectiveness.

  8. Simulation of underresolved turbulent flows by adaptive filtering using the high order discontinuous Galerkin spectral element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flad, David; Beck, Andrea; Munz, Claus-Dieter

    2016-05-01

    Scale-resolving simulations of turbulent flows in complex domains demand accurate and efficient numerical schemes, as well as geometrical flexibility. For underresolved situations, the avoidance of aliasing errors is a strong demand for stability. For continuous and discontinuous Galerkin schemes, an effective way to prevent aliasing errors is to increase the quadrature precision of the projection operator to account for the non-linearity of the operands (polynomial dealiasing, overintegration). But this increases the computational costs extensively. In this work, we present a novel spatially and temporally adaptive dealiasing strategy by projection filtering. We show this to be more efficient for underresolved turbulence than the classical overintegration strategy. For this novel approach, we discuss the implementation strategy and the indicator details, show its accuracy and efficiency for a decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence and the transitional Taylor-Green vortex and compare it to the original overintegration approach and a state of the art variational multi-scale eddy viscosity formulation.

  9. A hybrid reconstructed discontinuous Galerkin and continuous Galerkin finite element method for incompressible flows on unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandare, Aditya K.; Luo, Hong

    2016-10-01

    A hybrid reconstructed discontinuous Galerkin and continuous Galerkin method based on an incremental pressure projection formulation, termed rDG (PnPm) + CG (Pn) in this paper, is developed for solving the unsteady incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on unstructured grids. In this method, a reconstructed discontinuous Galerkin method (rDG (PnPm)) is used to discretize the velocity and a standard continuous Galerkin method (CG (Pn)) is used to approximate the pressure. The rDG (PnPm) + CG (Pn) method is designed to increase the accuracy of the hybrid DG (Pn) + CG (Pn) method and yet still satisfy Ladyženskaja-Babuška-Brezzi (LBB) condition, thus avoiding the pressure checkerboard instability. An upwind method is used to discretize the nonlinear convective fluxes in the momentum equations in order to suppress spurious oscillations in the velocity field. A number of incompressible flow problems for a variety of flow conditions are computed to numerically assess the spatial order of convergence of the rDG (PnPm) + CG (Pn) method. The numerical experiments indicate that both rDG (P0P1) + CG (P1) and rDG (P1P2) + CG (P1) methods can attain the designed 2nd order and 3rd order accuracy in space for the velocity respectively. Moreover, the 3rd order rDG (P1P2) + CG (P1) method significantly outperforms its 2nd order rDG (P0P1) + CG (P1) and rDG (P1P1) + CG (P1) counterparts: being able to not only increase the accuracy of the velocity by one order but also improve the accuracy of the pressure.

  10. Which landscape elements support streamflow during low flow conditions? Lessons from field observations in the Swiss midlands in dry summer 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floriancic, Marius; Margreth, Michael; Naef, Felix

    2016-04-01

    Low flows can be very heterogeneous even on small scale. It is not well known which areas contribute to low flow during extended dry periods nor can we expect which challenges will arise with changing climate conditions. Therefore we need to improve our understanding of physical properties relevant for water storage and drainage during dry periods. We present a spatially resolved discharge dataset from the Swiss midlands during the extended dry summer 2015. On very small scales we found major differences in discharge: neighboring nested subcatchments varied by up to a factor of 5. These variations correspond to certain landscape elements. Required storage volumes are quite small, making up only about 1% of annual precipitation, but some features are more likely to support higher streamflow during dry periods due to slow drainage. We found significant evidence for differences in storage and drainage behavior, existence of sections of streambed infiltration and point sources of outstanding contribution along the stream networks of the Swiss midlands and Alps. Major differences can be traced back to different lithology, slope angles and connectivity of storage features to the network. Even though heterogeneity is high on small scale, spatial scale of the research is limited by point source contribution, subsurface flow paths and streambed infiltration and exfiltration. These findings show the significant extent to which different geological formations with certain physical properties contribute to low flow discharge in midland environments. Understanding the effects of physical landscape properties is a first step to get an insight of water storage capacity and the relevant drainage timescale supporting streamflow during extended dry periods. This helps to find areas that are either sensitive or resistant to changes towards a dryer climate.

  11. An adaptable parallel algorithm for the direct numerical simulation of incompressible turbulent flows using a Fourier spectral/hp element method and MPI virtual topologies.

    PubMed

    Bolis, A; Cantwell, C D; Moxey, D; Serson, D; Sherwin, S J

    2016-09-01

    A hybrid parallelisation technique for distributed memory systems is investigated for a coupled Fourier-spectral/hp element discretisation of domains characterised by geometric homogeneity in one or more directions. The performance of the approach is mathematically modelled in terms of operation count and communication costs for identifying the most efficient parameter choices. The model is calibrated to target a specific hardware platform after which it is shown to accurately predict the performance in the hybrid regime. The method is applied to modelling turbulent flow using the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in an axisymmetric pipe and square channel. The hybrid method extends the practical limitations of the discretisation, allowing greater parallelism and reduced wall times. Performance is shown to continue to scale when both parallelisation strategies are used.

  12. An adaptable parallel algorithm for the direct numerical simulation of incompressible turbulent flows using a Fourier spectral/hp element method and MPI virtual topologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolis, A.; Cantwell, C. D.; Moxey, D.; Serson, D.; Sherwin, S. J.

    2016-09-01

    A hybrid parallelisation technique for distributed memory systems is investigated for a coupled Fourier-spectral/hp element discretisation of domains characterised by geometric homogeneity in one or more directions. The performance of the approach is mathematically modelled in terms of operation count and communication costs for identifying the most efficient parameter choices. The model is calibrated to target a specific hardware platform after which it is shown to accurately predict the performance in the hybrid regime. The method is applied to modelling turbulent flow using the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in an axisymmetric pipe and square channel. The hybrid method extends the practical limitations of the discretisation, allowing greater parallelism and reduced wall times. Performance is shown to continue to scale when both parallelisation strategies are used.

  13. Optimization of retinotopy constrained source estimation constrained by prior

    PubMed Central

    Hagler, Donald J.

    2015-01-01

    Studying how the timing and amplitude of visual evoked responses (VERs) vary between visual areas is important for understanding visual processing but is complicated by difficulties in reliably estimating VERs in individual visual areas using non-invasive brain measurements. Retinotopy constrained source estimation (RCSE) addresses this challenge by using multiple, retinotopically-mapped stimulus locations to simultaneously constrain estimates of VERs in visual areas V1, V2, and V3, taking advantage of the spatial precision of fMRI retinotopy and the temporal resolution of magnetoencephalography (MEG) or electroencephalography (EEG). Nonlinear optimization of dipole locations, guided by a group-constrained RCSE solution as a prior, improved the robustness of RCSE. This approach facilitated the analysis of differences in timing and amplitude of VERs between V1, V2, and V3, elicited by stimuli with varying luminance contrast in a sample of eight adult humans. The V1 peak response was 37% larger than that of V2 and 74% larger than that of V3, and also ~10–20 msec earlier. Normalized contrast response functions were nearly identical for the three areas. Results without dipole optimization, or with other nonlinear methods not constrained by prior estimates were similar but suffered from greater between-subject variability. The increased reliability of estimates offered by this approach may be particularly valuable when using a smaller number of stimulus locations, enabling a greater variety of stimulus and task manipulations. PMID:23868690

  14. CCM Continuity Constraint Method: A finite-element computational fluid dynamics algorithm for incompressible Navier-Stokes fluid flows

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, P.T.

    1993-09-01

    As the field of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) continues to mature, algorithms are required to exploit the most recent advances in approximation theory, numerical mathematics, computing architectures, and hardware. Meeting this requirement is particularly challenging in incompressible fluid mechanics, where primitive-variable CFD formulations that are robust, while also accurate and efficient in three dimensions, remain an elusive goal. This dissertation asserts that one key to accomplishing this goal is recognition of the dual role assumed by the pressure, i.e., a mechanism for instantaneously enforcing conservation of mass and a force in the mechanical balance law for conservation of momentum. Proving this assertion has motivated the development of a new, primitive-variable, incompressible, CFD algorithm called the Continuity Constraint Method (CCM). The theoretical basis for the CCM consists of a finite-element spatial semi-discretization of a Galerkin weak statement, equal-order interpolation for all state-variables, a 0-implicit time-integration scheme, and a quasi-Newton iterative procedure extended by a Taylor Weak Statement (TWS) formulation for dispersion error control. Original contributions to algorithmic theory include: (a) formulation of the unsteady evolution of the divergence error, (b) investigation of the role of non-smoothness in the discretized continuity-constraint function, (c) development of a uniformly H{sup 1} Galerkin weak statement for the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes pressure Poisson equation, (d) derivation of physically and numerically well-posed boundary conditions, and (e) investigation of sparse data structures and iterative methods for solving the matrix algebra statements generated by the algorithm.

  15. Fluid flow, element migration, and petrotectonic evolution of the Early Mesozoic central Klamath Island arc, northwesternmost California. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Ernst, W.G.

    1992-12-11

    Investigations in the central Klamath Mountains (KM) have documented the presence of a polymetamorphosed suite of highly magnesian basaltic rocks, the Yellow Dog greenstones, in the Sawyers Bar (SB) terrane of the western Triassic and Paleozoic belt. The assemblage was laid down, altered and metasomatized during the hypothesized collapse of a Phillipine Sea-type back-arc basin which brought the westerly SB oceanic arc terrane into juxtaposition with the inboard, pre-existing Stuart Fork subduction complex, and more easterly KM terranes in an immature island arc setting. Supporting research has concentrated on elucidating the areal extent and structural/stratigraphic relations of these mafic/ultramafic Yellow Dog metavolcanic units, and has documented the insignificant degree of crustal contamination of the melts by associated terrigenous metasediments. The thermal structure and its evolution in the central KM evidently reflects surfaceward advective transport of magmatic energy derived from the partly fused downgoing oceanic slab, as well as hydrothermal fluid circulation. Clarification of the thermal evolution of this crust-constructional event in the immature basaltic island arc are the goals of the research now underway, emptying both field and geochemical methods. Continuing work is documenting the flow and P-T history of aqueous fluids through the evolving KM arc, utilizing electron microprobe and oxygen isotopic data. The authors have nearly finished a regional reconnaissance map showing the distribution of the lavas throughout the California part of the KM. Application of the terrane concept to the central KM has also been reevaluated in the light of regional petrotectonic relationships. Investigations of the regional and contact metamorphism/metasomatism of the SB metasedimentary pile are in progress.

  16. A finite-element model for simulation of two-dimensional steady-state ground-water flow in confined aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuniansky, E.L.

    1990-01-01

    A computer program based on the Galerkin finite-element method was developed to simulate two-dimensional steady-state ground-water flow in either isotropic or anisotropic confined aquifers. The program may also be used for unconfined aquifers of constant saturated thickness. Constant head, constant flux, and head-dependent flux boundary conditions can be specified in order to approximate a variety of natural conditions, such as a river or lake boundary, and pumping well. The computer program was developed for the preliminary simulation of ground-water flow in the Edwards-Trinity Regional aquifer system as part of the Regional Aquifer-Systems Analysis Program. Results of the program compare well to analytical solutions and simulations .from published finite-difference models. A concise discussion of the Galerkin method is presented along with a description of the program. Provided in the Supplemental Data section are a listing of the computer program, definitions of selected program variables, and several examples of data input and output used in verifying the accuracy of the program.

  17. A new Control Volume Finite Element Method with Discontinuous Pressure Representation for Multi-phase Flow with Implicit Adaptive time Integration and Dynamic Unstructured mesh Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas, Pablo; Pavlidis, Dimitrios; Percival, James; Adam, Alexander; Xie, Zhihua; Pain, Christopher; Jackson, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    We present a new, high-order, control-volume-finite-element (CVFE) method with discontinuous representation for pressure and velocity to simulate multiphase flow in heterogeneous porous media. Time is discretized using an adaptive, fully implicit method. Heterogeneous geologic features are represented as volumes bounded by surfaces. Our approach conserves mass and does not require the use of CVs that span domain boundaries. Computational efficiency is increased by use of dynamic mesh optimization. We demonstrate that the approach, amongst other features, accurately preserves sharp saturation changes associated with high aspect ratio geologic domains, allowing efficient simulation of flow in highly heterogeneous models. Moreover, accurate solutions are obtained at lower cost than an equivalent fine, fixed mesh and conventional CVFE methods. The use of implicit time integration allows the method to efficiently converge using highly anisotropic meshes without having to reduce the time-step. The work is significant for two key reasons. First, it resolves a long-standing problem associated with the use of classical CVFE methods. Second, it reduces computational cost/increases solution accuracy through the use of dynamic mesh optimization and time-stepping with large Courant number. Funding for Dr P. Salinas from ExxonMobil is gratefully acknowledged.

  18. Improved Simulation of Subsurface Flow in Heterogeneous Reservoirs Using a Fully Discontinuous Control-Volume-Finite-Element Method, Implicit Timestepping and Dynamic Unstructured Mesh Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas, P.; Jackson, M.; Pavlidis, D.; Pain, C.; Adam, A.; Xie, Z.; Percival, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    We present a new, high-order, control-volume-finite-element (CVFE) method with discontinuous representation for pressure and velocity to simulate multiphase flow in heterogeneous porous media. Time is discretized using an adaptive, fully implicit method. Heterogeneous geologic features are represented as volumes bounded by surfaces. Within these volumes, termed geologic domains, the material properties are constant. A given model typically contains numerous such geologic domains. Our approach conserves mass and does not require the use of CVs that span domain boundaries. Computational efficiency is increased by use of dynamic mesh optimization, in which an unstructured mesh adapts in space and time to key solution fields, such as pressure, velocity or saturation, whilst preserving the geometry of the geologic domains. Up-, cross- or down-scaling of material properties during mesh optimization is not required, as the properties are uniform within each geologic domain. We demonstrate that the approach, amongst other features, accurately preserves sharp saturation changes associated with high aspect ratio geologic domains such as fractures and mudstones, allowing efficient simulation of flow in highly heterogeneous models. Moreover, accurate solutions are obtained at significantly lower computational cost than an equivalent fine, fixed mesh and conventional CVFE methods. The use of implicit time integration allows the method to efficiently converge using highly anisotropic meshes without having to reduce the time-step. The work is significant for two key reasons. First, it resolves a long-standing problem associated with the use of classical CVFE methods to model flow in highly heterogeneous porous media, in which CVs span boundaries between domains of contrasting material properties. Second, it reduces computational cost/increases solution accuracy through the use of dynamic mesh optimization and time-stepping with large Courant number.

  19. Noncircular orifice holes and advanced fabrication techniques for liquid rocket injectors. Phase 3: Analytical and cold-flow experimental evaluation of rectangular concentric tube injector elements for gas/liquid application. Phase 4: Analytical and experimental evaluation of noncircular injector elements for gas/liquid and liquid/liquid application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mchale, R. M.

    1974-01-01

    Results are presented of a cold-flow and hot-fire experimental study of the mixing and atomization characteristics of injector elements incorporating noncircular orifices. Both liquid/liquid and gas/liquid element types are discussed. Unlike doublet and triplet elements (circular orifices only) were investigated for the liquid/liquid case while concentric tube elements were investigated for the gas/liquid case. It is concluded that noncircular shape can be employed to significant advantage in injector design for liquid rocket engines.

  20. Predation risk, stoichiometric plasticity and ecosystem elemental cycling.

    PubMed

    Leroux, Shawn J; Hawlena, Dror; Schmitz, Oswald J

    2012-10-22

    It is widely held that herbivore growth and production is limited by dietary nitrogen (N) that in turn constrains ecosystem elemental cycling. Yet, emerging evidence suggests that this conception of limitation may be incomplete, because chronic predation risk heightens herbivore metabolic rate and shifts demand from N-rich proteins to soluble carbohydrate-carbon (C). Because soluble C can be limiting, predation risk may cause ecosystem elemental cycling rates and stoichiometric balance to depend on herbivore physiological plasticity. We report on a stoichiometrically explicit ecosystem model that investigates this problem. The model tracks N, and soluble and recalcitrant C through ecosystem compartments. We evaluate how soluble plant C influences C and N stocks and flows in the presence and absence of predation risk. Without risk, herbivores are limited by N and respire excess C so that plant-soluble C has small effects only on elemental stocks and flows. With predation risk, herbivores are limited by soluble C and release excess N, so plant-soluble C critically influences ecosystem elemental stocks flows. Our results emphasize that expressing ecosystem stoichiometric balance using customary C:N ratios that do not distinguish between soluble and recalcitrant C may not adequately describe limitations on elemental cycling.

  1. Planetary heat flow measurements.

    PubMed

    Hagermann, Axel

    2005-12-15

    The year 2005 marks the 35th anniversary of the Apollo 13 mission, probably the most successful failure in the history of manned spaceflight. Naturally, Apollo 13's scientific payload is far less known than the spectacular accident and subsequent rescue of its crew. Among other instruments, it carried the first instrument designed to measure the flux of heat on a planetary body other than Earth. The year 2005 also should have marked the launch of the Japanese LUNAR-A mission, and ESA's Rosetta mission is slowly approaching comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Both missions carry penetrators to study the heat flow from their target bodies. What is so interesting about planetary heat flow? What can we learn from it and how do we measure it?Not only the Sun, but all planets in the Solar System are essentially heat engines. Various heat sources or heat reservoirs drive intrinsic and surface processes, causing 'dead balls of rock, ice or gas' to evolve dynamically over time, driving convection that powers tectonic processes and spawns magnetic fields. The heat flow constrains models of the thermal evolution of a planet and also its composition because it provides an upper limit for the bulk abundance of radioactive elements. On Earth, the global variation of heat flow also reflects the tectonic activity: heat flow increases towards the young ocean ridges, whereas it is rather low on the old continental shields. It is not surprising that surface heat flow measurements, or even estimates, where performed, contributed greatly to our understanding of what happens inside the planets. In this article, I will review the results and the methods used in past heat flow measurements and speculate on the targets and design of future experiments.

  2. Least-squares spectral element solution of incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with adaptive refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozcelikkale, Altug; Sert, Cuneyt

    2012-05-01

    Least-squares spectral element solution of steady, two-dimensional, incompressible flows are obtained by approximating velocity, pressure and vorticity variable set on Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre nodes. Constrained Approximation Method is used for h- and p-type nonconforming interfaces of quadrilateral elements. Adaptive solutions are obtained using a posteriori error estimates based on least squares functional and spectral coefficient. Effective use of p-refinement to overcome poor mass conservation drawback of least-squares formulation and successful use of h- and p-refinement together to solve problems with geometric singularities are demonstrated. Capabilities and limitations of the developed code are presented using Kovasznay flow, flow past a circular cylinder in a channel and backward facing step flow.

  3. Optimized planning of in-service inspections of local flow-accelerated corrosion of pipeline elements used in the secondary coolant circuit of the VVER-440-based units at the Novovoronezh NPP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomarov, G. V.; Povarov, V. P.; Shipkov, A. A.; Gromov, A. F.; Budanov, V. A.; Golubeva, T. N.

    2015-03-01

    Matters concerned with making efficient use of the information-analytical system on the flow-accelerated corrosion problem in setting up in-service examination of the metal of pipeline elements operating in the secondary coolant circuit of the VVER-440-based power units at the Novovoronezh NPP are considered. The principles used to select samples of pipeline elements in planning ultrasonic thickness measurements for timely revealing metal thinning due to flow-accelerated corrosion along with reducing the total amount of measurements in the condensate-feedwater path are discussed.

  4. Constrained fits with non-Gaussian distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frühwirth, R.; Cencic, O.

    2016-10-01

    Non-normally distributed data are ubiquitous in many areas of science, including high-energy physics. We present a general formalism for constrained fits, also called data reconciliation, with data that are not normally distributed. It is based on Bayesian reasoning and implemented via MCMC sampling. We show how systems of both linear and non-linear constraints can be efficiently treated. We also show how the fit can be made robust against outlying observations. The method is demonstrated on a couple of examples ranging from material flow analysis to the combination of non-normal measurements. Finally, we discuss possible applications in the field of event reconstruction, such as vertex fitting and kinematic fitting with non-normal track errors.

  5. Flow injection combined with ICP-MS for accurate high throughput analysis of elemental impurities in pharmaceutical products according to USP <232>/<233>.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Lisa; Zipfel, Barbara; Koellensperger, Gunda; Kovac, Jessica; Bilz, Susanne; Kunkel, Andrea; Venzago, Cornel; Hann, Stephan

    2014-07-01

    New guidelines of the United States Pharmacopeia (USP), European Pharmacopeia (EP) and international organization (ICH, International Conference on Harmonization) regulating elemental impurity limits in pharmaceuticals seal the end of unspecific analysis of metal(oid)s as outlined in USP <231> and EP 2.4.8. Chapter USP <232> and EP 5.20 as well as drafts from ICH Q3D specify both daily doses and concentration limits of metallic impurities in pharmaceutical final products and in active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) and excipients. In chapters USP <233> and EP 2.4.20 method implementation, validation and quality control during the analytical process are described. By contrast with the--by now--applied methods, substance specific quantitative analysis features new basic requirements, further, significantly lower detection limits ask for the necessity of a general changeover of the methodology toward sensitive multi element analysis by ICP-AES and ICP-MS, respectively. A novel methodological approach based on flow injection analysis and ICP-SFMS/ICP-QMS for the quick and accurate analysis of Cd, Pb, As, Hg, Ir, Os, Pd, Pt, Rh, Ru, Cr, Mo, Ni, V, Cu, Mn, Fe and Zn in drug products by prior dilution, dissolution or microwave assisted closed vessel digestion according to the regulations is presented. In comparison to the acquisition of continuous signals, this method is advantageous with respect to the unprecedented high sample throughput due to a total analysis time of approximately 30s and the low sample consumption of below 50 μL, while meeting the strict USP demands on detection/quantification limits, precision and accuracy.

  6. COBS: COnstrained B-Splines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Pin T.; Maechler, Martin

    2015-05-01

    COBS (COnstrained B-Splines), written in R, creates constrained regression smoothing splines via linear programming and sparse matrices. The method has two important features: the number and location of knots for the spline fit are established using the likelihood-based Akaike Information Criterion (rather than a heuristic procedure); and fits can be made for quantiles (e.g. 25% and 75% as well as the usual 50%) in the response variable, which is valuable when the scatter is asymmetrical or non-Gaussian. This code is useful for, for example, estimating cluster ages when there is a wide spread in stellar ages at a chosen absorption, as a standard regression line does not give an effective measure of this relationship.

  7. A modular finite-element model (MODFE) for areal and axisymmetric ground-water-flow problems, Part 3: Design philosophy and programming details

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Torak, L.J.

    1993-01-01

    A MODular Finite-Element, digital-computer program (MODFE) was developed to simulate steady or unsteady-state, two-dimensional or axisymmetric ground-water-flow. The modular structure of MODFE places the computationally independent tasks that are performed routinely by digital-computer programs simulating ground-water flow into separate subroutines, which are executed from the main program by control statements. Each subroutine consists of complete sets of computations, or modules, which are identified by comment statements, and can be modified by the user without affecting unrelated computations elsewhere in the program. Simulation capabilities can be added or modified by either adding or modifying subroutines that perform specific computational tasks, and the modular-program structure allows the user to create versions of MODFE that contain only the simulation capabilities that pertain to the ground-water problem of interest. MODFE is written in a Fortran programming language that makes it virtually device independent and compatible with desk-top personal computers and large mainframes. MODFE uses computer storage and execution time efficiently by taking advantage of symmetry and sparseness within the coefficient matrices of the finite-element equations. Parts of the matrix coefficients are computed and stored as single-subscripted variables, which are assembled into a complete coefficient just prior to solution. Computer storage is reused during simulation to decrease storage requirements. Descriptions of subroutines that execute the computational steps of the modular-program structure are given in tables that cross reference the subroutines with particular versions of MODFE. Programming details of linear and nonlinear hydrologic terms are provided. Structure diagrams for the main programs show the order in which subroutines are executed for each version and illustrate some of the linear and nonlinear versions of MODFE that are possible. Computational aspects of

  8. Two-stage fluid flow and element transfers in shear zones during collision burial-exhumation cycle: Insights from the Mont Blanc Crystalline Massif (Western Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolland, Y.; Rossi, M.

    2016-11-01

    The Mont-Blanc Massif was intensely deformed during the Alpine orogenesis: in a first stage of prograde underthrusting at c. 30 Ma and in a second stage of uplift and exhumation at 22-11 Ma. Mid-crustal shear zones of 1 mm-50 m size, neighbouring episyenites (quartz-dissolved altered granite) and alpine veins, have localised intense fluid flow, which produced substantial changes in mineralogy and whole-rock geochemistry. Four main metamorphic zones are oriented parallel to the strike of the massif: (i) epidote, (ii) chlorite, (iii) actinolite-muscovite ± biotite and (iv) muscovite ± biotite. In addition, phlogopite-bearing shear zones occur in the chlorite zone, and calcite-bearing shear zones are locally found in the muscovite zone. The initial chemical composition of the granitic protolith is relatively constant at massif scale, which allows investigating compositional changes related to shear zone activity, and subsequent volume change and elements mobility. The variations of whole-rock composition and mineral chemistry in shear zones reflect variations in fluid/rock ratios and fluid's chemistry, which have produced specific mineral reactions. Estimated time-integrated fluid fluxes are of the order of 106 m3/m2. The mineral assemblages that crystallised upon these fluid-P-T conditions are responsible for specific major and trace element enrichments. The XFe (Fe/Fe + Mg) pattern of shear zone phyllosilicates and the δ13C pattern of vein calcite both show a bell-type pattern across the massif with high values on the massif rims and low values in the centre of the massif. These low XFe and δ13C values are explained by down temperature up-flow of a Fe