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Sample records for flow constraining elements

  1. Laminated metal composite formed from low flow stress layers and high flow stress layers using flow constraining elements and making same

    DOEpatents

    Syn, Chol K.; Lesuer, Donald R.

    1995-01-01

    A laminated metal composite of low flow stress layers and high flow stress layers is described which is formed using flow constraining elements, preferably in the shape of rings, individually placed around each of the low flow stress layers while pressure is applied to the stack to bond the layers of the composite together, to thereby restrain the flow of the low flow stress layers from the stack during the bonding. The laminated metal composite of the invention is made by the steps of forming a stack of alternate layers of low flow stress layers and high flow stress layers with each layer of low flow stress material surrounded by an individual flow constraining element, such as a ring, and then applying pressure to the top and bottom surfaces of the resulting stack to bond the dissimilar layers together, for example, by compression rolling the stack. In a preferred embodiment, the individual flow constraining elements surrounding the layers of low flow stress material are formed of a material which may either be the same material as the material comprising the high flow stress layers, or have similar flow stress characteristics to the material comprising the high flow stress layers. Additional sacrificial layers may be added to the top and bottom of the stack to avoid damage to the stack during the bonding step; and these additional layers may then be removed after the bonding step.

  2. Laminated metal composite formed from low flow stress layers and high flow stress layers using flow constraining elements and making same

    DOEpatents

    Syn, C.K.; Lesuer, D.R.

    1995-07-04

    A laminated metal composite of low flow stress layers and high flow stress layers is described which is formed using flow constraining elements, preferably in the shape of rings, individually placed around each of the low flow stress layers while pressure is applied to the stack to bond the layers of the composite together, to thereby restrain the flow of the low flow stress layers from the stack during the bonding. The laminated metal composite of the invention is made by the steps of forming a stack of alternate layers of low flow stress layers and high flow stress layers with each layer of low flow stress material surrounded by an individual flow constraining element, such as a ring, and then applying pressure to the top and bottom surfaces of the resulting stack to bond the dissimilar layers together, for example, by compression rolling the stack. In a preferred embodiment, the individual flow constraining elements surrounding the layers of low flow stress material are formed of a material which may either be the same material as the material comprising the high flow stress layers, or have similar flow stress characteristics to the material comprising the high flow stress layers. Additional sacrificial layers may be added to the top and bottom of the stack to avoid damage to the stack during the bonding step; and these additional layers may then be removed after the bonding step. 5 figs.

  3. Constraining the amount of radiogenic elements in the interior of Mars from the HP3 heat flow measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grott, Matthias; Plesa, Ana-Catalina; Tosi, Nicola; Breuer, Doris

    2014-05-01

    The InSight mission (Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport) to be launched in 2016 will carry a seismometer (SEIS) and heat flow probe (HP3) to the martian surface, and address questions related to the size, physical state, and composition of the core and mantle, the thickness of the crust, and the thermal state of the interior. The heat flow measured at the surface depends on the amount of heat producing elements (HPE) present in the interior and offers a measurable quantity that can help to constrain the planetary heat budget. If the Urey ratio - the ratio between internal heat production and surface heat loss - is known, the heat production rate in the interior can be determined. We run thermal evolution models of increasing complexity and compared the obtained present-day Urey ratio for a set of different models/parameters. To this end, we used the 2D-3D mantle convection code Gaia [1], as well as 1D parameterized models [2]. We varied the initial amount of HPE [3, 4,5,6], used various viscosity formulations (temperature-, temperature- and depth-dependent viscosity, viscosity jump in the mid mantle), varied the size of the core, and considered models with and without phase transitions in the mantle. Additionally, we tested the effects of different partitioning of HPE between mantle and a fixed crust, different initial conditions (temperatures and boundary layer thicknesses) and reference viscosities. Our simulations show that, for a one-plate planet like Mars, the Urey ratio is mainly sensitive to the efficiency of mantle cooling, i.e. the mantle viscosity, and to the mean half-life of long-lived radiogenic isotopes. Given that models of the thermo-chemical evolution of Mars generally indicate reference viscosities below 1021 Pa s [3, 7], the martian Urey ratio is likely only a function of the Thorium concentration in the planetary interior. Surface radiogenic abundances determined from gamma-ray spectroscopy [8] are best

  4. Spectral finite-element methods for parametric constrained optimization problems.

    SciTech Connect

    Anitescu, M.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2009-01-01

    We present a method to approximate the solution mapping of parametric constrained optimization problems. The approximation, which is of the spectral finite element type, is represented as a linear combination of orthogonal polynomials. Its coefficients are determined by solving an appropriate finite-dimensional constrained optimization problem. We show that, under certain conditions, the latter problem is solvable because it is feasible for a sufficiently large degree of the polynomial approximation and has an objective function with bounded level sets. In addition, the solutions of the finite-dimensional problems converge for an increasing degree of the polynomials considered, provided that the solutions exhibit a sufficiently large and uniform degree of smoothness. Our approach solves, in the case of optimization problems with uncertain parameters, the most computationally intensive part of stochastic finite-element approaches. We demonstrate that our framework is applicable to parametric eigenvalue problems.

  5. Extracting electron transfer coupling elements from constrained density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qin; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2006-10-01

    Constrained density functional theory (DFT) is a useful tool for studying electron transfer (ET) reactions. It can straightforwardly construct the charge-localized diabatic states and give a direct measure of the inner-sphere reorganization energy. In this work, a method is presented for calculating the electronic coupling matrix element (Hab) based on constrained DFT. This method completely avoids the use of ground-state DFT energies because they are known to irrationally predict fractional electron transfer in many cases. Instead it makes use of the constrained DFT energies and the Kohn-Sham wave functions for the diabatic states in a careful way. Test calculations on the Zn2+ and the benzene-Cl atom systems show that the new prescription yields reasonable agreement with the standard generalized Mulliken-Hush method. We then proceed to produce the diabatic and adiabatic potential energy curves along the reaction pathway for intervalence ET in the tetrathiafulvalene-diquinone (Q-TTF-Q) anion. While the unconstrained DFT curve has no reaction barrier and gives Hab≈17kcal /mol, which qualitatively disagrees with experimental results, the Hab calculated from constrained DFT is about 3kcal /mol and the generated ground state has a barrier height of 1.70kcal/mol, successfully predicting (Q-TTF-Q)- to be a class II mixed-valence compound.

  6. Groundwater availability as constrained by hydrogeology and environmental flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watson, Katelyn A.; Mayer, Alex S.; Reeves, Howard W.

    2014-01-01

    Groundwater pumping from aquifers in hydraulic connection with nearby streams has the potential to cause adverse impacts by decreasing flows to levels below those necessary to maintain aquatic ecosystems. The recent passage of the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Basin Water Resources Compact has brought attention to this issue in the Great Lakes region. In particular, the legislation requires the Great Lakes states to enact measures for limiting water withdrawals that can cause adverse ecosystem impacts. This study explores how both hydrogeologic and environmental flow limitations may constrain groundwater availability in the Great Lakes Basin. A methodology for calculating maximum allowable pumping rates is presented. Groundwater availability across the basin may be constrained by a combination of hydrogeologic yield and environmental flow limitations varying over both local and regional scales. The results are sensitive to factors such as pumping time, regional and local hydrogeology, streambed conductance, and streamflow depletion limits. Understanding how these restrictions constrain groundwater usage and which hydrogeologic characteristics and spatial variables have the most influence on potential streamflow depletions has important water resources policy and management implications.

  7. Groundwater availability as constrained by hydrogeology and environmental flows.

    PubMed

    Watson, Katelyn A; Mayer, Alex S; Reeves, Howard W

    2014-01-01

    Groundwater pumping from aquifers in hydraulic connection with nearby streams has the potential to cause adverse impacts by decreasing flows to levels below those necessary to maintain aquatic ecosystems. The recent passage of the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Basin Water Resources Compact has brought attention to this issue in the Great Lakes region. In particular, the legislation requires the Great Lakes states to enact measures for limiting water withdrawals that can cause adverse ecosystem impacts. This study explores how both hydrogeologic and environmental flow limitations may constrain groundwater availability in the Great Lakes Basin. A methodology for calculating maximum allowable pumping rates is presented. Groundwater availability across the basin may be constrained by a combination of hydrogeologic yield and environmental flow limitations varying over both local and regional scales. The results are sensitive to factors such as pumping time, regional and local hydrogeology, streambed conductance, and streamflow depletion limits. Understanding how these restrictions constrain groundwater usage and which hydrogeologic characteristics and spatial variables have the most influence on potential streamflow depletions has important water resources policy and management implications.

  8. SHARAD Constrains on Lava Flow Properties at Southeastern Utopia Planitia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, D. C.

    2012-12-01

    The volcanic flows originated at the southwestern flanks of Elysium Mons extend over 1,000 km into Utopia Planitia and overlie the knobby and polygonally cracked Vastitas Borealis Formation (VBF). These flows display rough and smooth lobate morphologies (RL and SL) morphologies and occur in conjunction with sinuous channels (SC). Russell and Head [2003] described these morphologies and hypothesized that RL correspond to debris flows that arose as lahars from the interaction between magma and ground water or ice. The mapping of Tanaka et al. [2003] identified these features similarly, attributing them to volcanoclastic flows formed from magma-volatile interactions. Crater counts by Werner et al. [2011] support surface ages between 1 and 2 Gyr for these flows. Analysis of the radargrams acquired throughout this area o show unambiguous subsurface reflectors that, individually, are relatively short and laterally intermittent. As a group, however, these reflectors are distributed sparsely over the flow field and correlate very well with the SL units. Delays to reflectors beneath the surface are generally in the order of < ~1 μs. In one locale with a high concentration of subsurface reflectors, centered at 117.61°E and 31.31°N, a sequence of smooth lobate flows overlie a smooth volcanic unit. The lobate flow in immediate contact with the smooth unit possesses subsurface reflections that correlate well with the flow edges, and where this flow is overlain by another lobate flow these reflections vanish. We interpret these reflections as a reflector that corresponds to the interface between the lobate flow and smooth unit. The average delay to this reflector is 0.68 - 0.71 μs along its length. The thickness of this lobate flow, estimated from MOLA elevation data, ranges between 35 and 40 m. The thickness estimate from MOLA and the delay to reflector from SHARAD together constrain the relative permittivity of the flow to between 6.5 and 9.5. These values are consistent

  9. SUPG Finite Element Simulations of Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, Brnjamin, S.

    2006-01-01

    The Streamline-Upwind Petrov-Galerkin (SUPG) finite element simulations of compressible flows is presented. The topics include: 1) Introduction; 2) SUPG Galerkin Finite Element Methods; 3) Applications; and 4) Bibliography.

  10. Constraining neutrinoless double β decay matrix elements in 130Te

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAllister, S. A.; Kay, B. P.; Freeman, S. J.; Schiffer, J. P.; Diebel, C. M.; Bloxham, T.; Howard, A. M.; Parker, P. D.; Sharp, D. K.; Thomas, J. S.

    2012-09-01

    If a reliable measurement of a neutrinoless double beta decay (0v2β) rate is made, the effective neutrino masses can be determined from the nuclear matrix element. Theoretical calculations of nuclear matrix elements, however, show some disagreement. To test the suitability of various theoretical models, they should be benchmarked against experimentally measured nuclear properties, such as the ground-state distribution of nucleons in the parent-daughter nuclei, and how they change as a result of the decay process. Single neutron-adding reactions have been performed on the 0v2β candidate nucleus, 130Te. The Macfarlane-French sum rules have then been used to determine the single-particle vacancies. Some quasi-random phase approximations (QRPA) can greatly simplify theoretical calculations by describing the ground state of even-even nuclei using a BCS wavefunction. This assumption has been tested using two-neutron removal, (p,t) reactions. The BCS wavefunction appeared to be a valid approximation for valence neutrons.

  11. Finite element analysis of constrained total Condylar Knee Prosthesis

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-13

    Exactech, Inc., is a prosthetic joint manufacturer based in Gainesville, FL. The company set the goal of developing a highly effective prosthetic articulation, based on scientific principles, not trial and error. They developed an evolutionary design for a total knee arthroplasty system that promised improved performance. They performed static load tests in the laboratory with similar previous designs, but dynamic laboratory testing was both difficult to perform and prohibitively expensive for a small business to undertake. Laboratory testing also cannot measure stress levels in the interior of the prosthesis where failures are known to initiate. To fully optimize their designs for knee arthroplasty revisions, they needed range-of-motion stress/strain data at interior as well as exterior locations within the prosthesis. LLNL developed computer software (especially NIKE3D) specifically designed to perform stress/strain computations (finite element analysis) for complex geometries in large displacement/large deformation conditions. Additionally, LLNL had developed a high fidelity knee model for other analytical purposes. The analysis desired by Exactech could readily be performed using NIKE3D and a modified version of the high fidelity knee that contained the geometry of the condylar knee components. The LLNL high fidelity knee model was a finite element computer model which would not be transferred to Exactech during the course of this CRADA effort. The previously performed laboratory studies by Exactech were beneficial to LLNL in verifying the analytical capabilities of NIKE3D for human anatomical modeling. This, in turn, gave LLNL further entree to perform work-for-others in the prosthetics field. There were two purposes to the CRADA (1) To modify the LLNL High Fidelity Knee Model to accept the geometry of the Exactech Total Knee; and (2) To perform parametric studies of the possible design options in appropriate ranges of motion so that an optimum design could be

  12. Finite element modeling of nonisothermal polymer flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roylance, D.

    1981-01-01

    A finite element formulation designed to simulate polymer melt flows in which both conductive and convective heat transfer are important is described, and the numerical model is illustrated by means of computer experiments using extruder drag flow and entry flow as trial problems. Fluid incompressibility is enforced by a penalty treatment of the element pressures, and the thermal convective transport is modeled by conventional Galerkin and optimal upwind treatments.

  13. Triangular spectral elements for incompressible fluid flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, C.; Vanrosendale, John

    1993-01-01

    We discuss the use of triangular elements in the spectral element method for direct simulation of incompressible flow. Triangles provide much greater geometric flexibility than quadrilateral elements and are better conditioned and more accurate when small angles arise. We employ a family of tensor product algorithms for triangles, allowing triangular elements to be handled with comparable arithmetic complexity to quadrilateral elements. The triangular discretizations are applied and validated on the Poisson equation. These discretizations are then applied to the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and a laminar channel flow solution is given. These new triangular spectral elements can be combined with standard quadrilateral elements, yielding a general and flexible high order method for complex geometries in two dimensions.

  14. Finite element based stability-constrained weight minimization of sandwich composite ducts for airship applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khode, Urmi B.

    High Altitude Long Endurance (HALE) airships are platform of interest due to their persistent observation and persistent communication capabilities. A novel HALE airship design configuration incorporates a composite sandwich propulsive hull duct between the front and the back of the hull for significant drag reduction via blown wake effects. The sandwich composite shell duct is subjected to hull pressure on its outer walls and flow suction on its inner walls which result in in-plane wall compressive stress, which may cause duct buckling. An approach based upon finite element stability analysis combined with a ply layup and foam thickness determination weight minimization search algorithm is utilized. Its goal is to achieve an optimized solution for the configuration of the sandwich composite as a solution to a constrained minimum weight design problem, for which the shell duct remains stable with a prescribed margin of safety under prescribed loading. The stability analysis methodology is first verified by comparing published analytical results for a number of simple cylindrical shell configurations with FEM counterpart solutions obtained using the commercially available code ABAQUS. Results show that the approach is effective in identifying minimum weight composite duct configurations for a number of representative combinations of duct geometry, composite material and foam properties, and propulsive duct applied pressure loading.

  15. The Constrained Vapor Bubble Experiment - Interfacial Flow Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundan, Akshay; Wayner, Peter C., Jr.; Plawsky, Joel L.

    2015-01-01

    Internal heat transfer coefficient of the CVB correlated to the presence of the interfacial flow region. Competition between capillary and Marangoni flow caused Flooding and not a Dry-out region. Interfacial flow region growth is arrested at higher power inputs. 1D heat model confirms the presence of interfacial flow region. 1D heat model confirms the arresting phenomena of interfacial flow region Visual observations are essential to understanding.

  16. Finite element formulations for compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tezduyar, Tayfun E.

    1989-01-01

    Researchers started their studies on the development and application of computational methods for compressible flows. Particular attention was given to proper numerical treatment of sharp layers occurring in such problems and to general mesh generation capabilities for intricate computational geometries. Mainly finite element methods enhanced with several state-of-the art techniques (such as the streamline-upwind/Petrov-Galerkin, discontinuity capturing, adaptive implicit-explicit, and trouped element-by-element approximate factorization schemes) were employed.

  17. Complementary Constrains on Component based Multiphase Flow Problems, Should It Be Implemented Locally or Globally?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, H.; Huang, Y.; Kolditz, O.

    2015-12-01

    Multiphase flow problems are numerically difficult to solve, as it often contains nonlinear Phase transition phenomena A conventional technique is to introduce the complementarity constraints where fluid properties such as liquid saturations are confined within a physically reasonable range. Based on such constraints, the mathematical model can be reformulated into a system of nonlinear partial differential equations coupled with variational inequalities. They can be then numerically handled by optimization algorithms. In this work, two different approaches utilizing the complementarity constraints based on persistent primary variables formulation[4] are implemented and investigated. The first approach proposed by Marchand et.al[1] is using "local complementary constraints", i.e. coupling the constraints with the local constitutive equations. The second approach[2],[3] , namely the "global complementary constrains", applies the constraints globally with the mass conservation equation. We will discuss how these two approaches are applied to solve non-isothermal componential multiphase flow problem with the phase change phenomenon. Several benchmarks will be presented for investigating the overall numerical performance of different approaches. The advantages and disadvantages of different models will also be concluded. References[1] E.Marchand, T.Mueller and P.Knabner. Fully coupled generalized hybrid-mixed finite element approximation of two-phase two-component flow in porous media. Part I: formulation and properties of the mathematical model, Computational Geosciences 17(2): 431-442, (2013). [2] A. Lauser, C. Hager, R. Helmig, B. Wohlmuth. A new approach for phase transitions in miscible multi-phase flow in porous media. Water Resour., 34,(2011), 957-966. [3] J. Jaffré, and A. Sboui. Henry's Law and Gas Phase Disappearance. Transp. Porous Media. 82, (2010), 521-526. [4] A. Bourgeat, M. Jurak and F. Smaï. Two-phase partially miscible flow and transport modeling in

  18. Hypersonic viscous flow over large roughness elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2011-06-01

    Viscous flow over discrete or distributed surface roughness has great implications for hypersonic flight due to aerothermodynamic considerations related to laminar-turbulent transition. Current prediction capability is greatly hampered by the limited knowledge base for such flows. To help fill that gap, numerical computations are used to investigate the intricate flow physics involved. An unstructured mesh, compressible Navier-Stokes code based on the space-time conservation element, solution element (CESE) method is used to perform time-accurate Navier-Stokes calculations for two roughness shapes investigated in wind tunnel experiments at NASA Langley Research Center. It was found through 2D parametric study that at subcritical Reynolds numbers, spontaneous absolute instability accompanying by sustained vortex shedding downstream of the roughness is likely to take place at subsonic free-stream conditions. On the other hand, convective instability may be the dominant mechanism for supersonic boundary layers. Three-dimensional calculations for both a rectangular and a cylindrical roughness element at post-shock Mach numbers of 4.1 and 6.5 also confirm that no self-sustained vortex generation from the top face of the roughness is observed, despite the presence of flow unsteadiness for the smaller post-shock Mach number case.

  19. Hypersonic Viscous Flow Over Large Roughness Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2009-01-01

    Viscous flow over discrete or distributed surface roughness has great implications for hypersonic flight due to aerothermodynamic considerations related to laminar-turbulent transition. Current prediction capability is greatly hampered by the limited knowledge base for such flows. To help fill that gap, numerical computations are used to investigate the intricate flow physics involved. An unstructured mesh, compressible Navier-Stokes code based on the space-time conservation element, solution element (CESE) method is used to perform time-accurate Navier-Stokes calculations for two roughness shapes investigated in wind tunnel experiments at NASA Langley Research Center. It was found through 2D parametric study that at subcritical Reynolds numbers, spontaneous absolute instability accompanying by sustained vortex shedding downstream of the roughness is likely to take place at subsonic free-stream conditions. On the other hand, convective instability may be the dominant mechanism for supersonic boundary layers. Three-dimensional calculations for both a rectangular and a cylindrical roughness element at post-shock Mach numbers of 4.1 and 6.5 also confirm that no self-sustained vortex generation from the top face of the roughness is observed, despite the presence of flow unsteadiness for the smaller post-shock Mach number case.

  20. Thinning and flow of Tibetan crust constrained by seismic anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Nikolai M; Ritzwoller, Michael H; Molnar, Peter; Levin, Vadim

    2004-07-01

    Intermediate-period Rayleigh and Love waves propagating across Tibet indicate marked radial anisotropy within the middle-to-lower crust, consistent with a thinning of the middle crust by about 30%. The anisotropy is largest in the western part of the plateau, where moment tensors of earthquakes indicate active crustal thinning. The preferred orientation of mica crystals resulting from the crustal thinning can account for the observed anisotropy. The middle-to-lower crust of Tibet appears to have thinned more than the upper crust, consistent with deformation of a mechanically weak layer that flows as if confined to a channel.

  1. Hypersonic Viscous Flow Over Large Roughness Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2009-01-01

    Viscous flow over discrete or distributed surface roughness has great implications for hypersonic flight due to aerothermodynamic considerations related to laminar-turbulent transition. Current prediction capability is greatly hampered by the limited knowledge base for such flows. To help fill that gap, numerical computations are used to investigate the intricate flow physics involved. An unstructured mesh, compressible Navier-Stokes code based on the space-time conservation element, solution element (CESE) method is used to perform time-accurate Navier-Stokes calculations for two roughness shapes investigated in wind tunnel experiments at NASA Langley Research Center. It was found through 2D parametric study that at subcritical Reynolds numbers of the boundary layers, absolute instability resulting in vortex shedding downstream, is likely to weaken at supersonic free-stream conditions. On the other hand, convective instability may be the dominant mechanism for supersonic boundary layers. Three-dimensional calculations for a rectangular or cylindrical roughness element at post-shock Mach numbers of 4.1 and 6.5 also confirm that no self-sustained vortex generation is present.

  2. State-constrained booster trajectory solutions via finite elements and shooting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bless, Robert R.; Hodges, Dewey H.; Seywald, Hans

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents an extension of a FEM formulation based on variational principles. A general formulation for handling internal boundary conditions and discontinuities in the state equations is presented, and the general formulation is modified for optimal control problems subject to state-variable inequality constraints. Solutions which only touch the state constraint and solutions which have a boundary arc of finite length are considered. Suitable shape and test functions are chosen for a FEM discretization. All element quadrature (equivalent to one-point Gaussian quadrature over each element) may be done in closed form. The final form of the algebraic equations is then derived. A simple state-constrained problem is solved. Then, for a practical application of the use of the FEM formulation, a launch vehicle subject to a dynamic pressure constraint (a first-order state inequality constraint) is solved. The results presented for the launch-vehicle trajectory have some interesting features, including a touch-point solution.

  3. Glacial-interglacial Changes in Ocean Carbon Chemistry constrained by Boron Isotopes, Trace Elements, and Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rae, J. W. B.; Adkins, J. F.; Foreman, A. D.; Charles, C.

    2014-12-01

    Deep ocean carbon storage and release is commonly invoked to explain glacial-interglacial CO2 cycles, but records of the carbonate chemistry of the glacial ocean have, until recently, been scarce. Here we present new boron isotope (δ11B) and trace metal data from benthic foraminifera from a suite of 15 cores from the South Atlantic from depths ranging from 1500 to 4000 m. These records show distinct changes in the water column depth structure of these tracers between the last glacial maximum (LGM) and late Holocene. Comparison of these paired trace element and isotope ratios reveals new insights to the shared and individual controls on tracers including Li/Ca, Sr/Ca, U/Ca, Mg/Li and δ11B. We further examine these data using a recently developed tracer fields modelling approach (Lund et al. 2011). This has previously been applied to δ18O data to investigate changes in circulation at the LGM. Here we extend this method to non-conservative isotopic and trace elemental tracers, allowing us to constrain the roles of circulation, the biological pump of organic carbon and CaCO3, and carbonate compensation, in setting deep ocean carbon storage at the LGM. Lund, D. C., J. F. Adkins, and R. Ferrari (2011), Abyssal Atlantic circulation during the Last Glacial Maximum: Constraining the ratio between transport and vertical mixing, Paleoceanography, 26, PA1213, doi:10.1029/2010PA001938.

  4. Determination of poroelastic properties of cartilage using constrained optimization coupled with finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Chung, Chen-Yuan; Mansour, Joseph M

    2015-02-01

    The feasibility of determining biphasic material properties using a finite element model of stress relaxation coupled with two types of constrained optimization to match measured data was investigated. Comparison of these two approaches, a zero-order method and a gradient-based algorithm, validated the predicted material properties. Optimizations were started from multiple different initial guesses of material properties (design variables) to establish the robustness of the optimization. Overall, the optimal values are close to those found by Cohen et al. (1998) but these small differences produced a marked improvement in the fit to the measured stress relaxation. Despite the greater deviation in the optimized values obtained from the zero-order method, both optimization procedures produced material properties that gave equally good overall fits to the measured data. Furthermore, optimized values were all within the expected range of material properties. Modeling stress relaxation using the optimized material properties showed an excellent fit to the entire time history of the measured data.

  5. Constraining Poiseuille Flow in the Asthenosphere Using the Depth-Dependence of Azimuthal Seismic Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarov, S.; Conrad, C. P.

    2010-12-01

    Asthenospheric flow accommodates differential shear between plate motions and mantle flow (Couette flow) and hosts additional flow driven by horizontal pressure gradients (Poiseuille flow) that may be associated with mantle upwelling and subduction. The relative importance of Couette and Poiseuille flows in the asthenosphere is poorly constrained. Pure Couette flow should produce a uniform orientation of azimuthal seismic anisotropy with depth. However, observations show that azimuthal seismic anisotropy rotates with depth in many regions of the asthenosphere. To test whether these observations can be explained by the presence of Poiseuille flow, we employ a simple 1D Couette-Poiseuille flow model to compute the orientation of the strain axis, which approximates the orientation of azimuthal seismic anisotropy. We explore analytic solutions to a family of Couette-Poiseuille models with constant, depth-dependent, Newtonian, and non-Newtonian rheologies. Our results reveal that the Couette-Poiseuille flow does induce rotation of seismic anisotropy with depth provided that the pressure gradient has a component transverse to plate motion. For depth-dependent viscosity, most of the rotation is accommodated in the less-viscous portion of the layer. Our findings suggest that Poiseuille flow can explain variations in the orientation of azimuthal seismic anistoropy as a function of depth in the asthenosphere. Moreover, by utilizing observed rotations of global azimuthal seismic anisotropy, it is possible to create a global map of pressure gradients in the asthenosphere, which can be used to quantify the driving forces for mantle convection and plate motions.

  6. Constraining the Depth of the Martian Magma Ocean during Core Formation using Element Partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijbrans, Ineke; Tronche, Elodie; van Westrenen, Wim

    2010-05-01

    The depth of a planetary magma ocean places first order constraints on the thermal state of a young planet. For the Earth, the depth of the magma ocean is mostly constrained by the pressure-temperature conditions at which Fe-rich metal last equilibrated with the bulk silicate Earth (BSE). These equilibration conditions are thought to correspond to the conditions at the terrestrial magma ocean floor, as this is where the metal ponds before sinking to the core. This depth is estimated by combining the BSE contents of siderophile (iron-loving) elements with metal-silicate partition coefficients (D) at high temperatures and pressures [e.g. 1]. The extent and depth of a magma ocean on Mars are hotly debated. In the case of Mars, the sulphur content of the core is significantly higher than for Earth (10-16 wt% sulphur [2]). The presence of sulphur has been shown to have an effect on the metal-silicate partitioning of some siderophile elements [3], but the current data set is insufficient to be of use for direct application to Martian conditions. We have started an experimental programme to constrain siderophile element partition coefficients for Ni and Co between metal and silicate as a function of temperature, pressure and sulphur content in the metal-alloy. For the silicate composition we used a newly proposed bulk silicate Mars (BSM) [4]. We chose the above-mentioned siderophile elements because their BSM concentrations are reasonably known from studies of Martian meteorites. Our aim is to derive new constraints on the depth of the Martian magma ocean and the chemistry accompanying Martian core formation. Experimental methods: The starting material consisted of a 1:1 mixture of silicate glass + quench crystals in the FeO-CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 (FCMAS) system with a composition based on [4], and metal consisting of FeS, Fe, Ni, Co, FeP3. Four different metal compositions were used with sulphur contents of 0, 5, 15 and 25wt% respectively. Experiments were made in an end

  7. Constraining Poiseuille flow in the asthenosphere using depth-dependence of azimuthal seismic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarov, Svetlana I.

    Asthenospheric flow accommodates differential shear between plate and mantle motions (Couette flow) and hosts additional flow driven by horizontal pressure gradients (Poiseuille flow) that may be associated with mantle upwelling and subduction. Determining the relative importance and spatial distribution of Poiseuille flow in the asthenosphere could help discriminate among competing theories of asthenospheric origin and shed light on thermal history of the Earth. Large uncertainties in the flow field and rheological structure of the upper mantle have thus far hindered our ability to constrain the relative importance of Couette and Poiseuille flows in the asthenosphere. We propose a new method to quantify Poiseuille flow in the asthenosphere using observations of the depth-dependence of azimuthal seismic anisotropy. In particular, we employ a simple one-dimensional Couette-Poiseuille flow model and analytically solve for the depth-profiles of the strain axis orientation in the asthenosphere, which approximates the orientation of azimuthal seismic anisotropy. We find that Couette-Poiseuille flow induces rotation of azimuthal seismic anisotropy with depth provided that the horizontal pressure gradient has a component transverse to plate motion. We then construct an algorithm that utilizes observed rotations of azimuthal seismic anisotropy with depth and analytical depth-profiles of the strain axis to invert for the horizontal pressure gradients everywhere in the asthenosphere. We test our method on the output of a global numerical mantle flow model. A comparison of our predicted pressure gradients with those computed directly from the numerical model shows a high degree of agreement, indicating that our method is robust. We show that our algorithm is stable, except for the case in which the component of the pressure gradient transverse to plate motion is close to zero. We establish that Poiseuille flow drives about 40% of the total flow velocity amplitude in the

  8. Evaluation of Available Transfer Capability Using Transient Stability Constrained Line Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzoechi, Lazarus Okechukwu; Mahajan, Satish M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology to evaluate transient stability constrained available transfer capability (ATC). A linear and fast line flow-based (LFB) method was adopted to optimize the ATC values. This enabled the direct determination of the system source-sink locations. This paper formulated different market transactions considering bilateral and multilateral impacts in the stability constrained ATC. The proposed method was demonstrated on the WECC 9-bus and IEEE 39-bus systems. The critical energy performance index (CEPI) enabled the direct identification of candidates for contingency screening based on ranking. This index helped to reduce the list of credible contingencies for ATC evaluation and, therefore, the computation time. The results of the proposed ATC method are consistent with the literature and can be deployed for fast assessment of the impact of transactions in an electric power system.

  9. Constraining the Rheologic Properties of Channelized Basaltic Flows on Earth and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, M. S.; Harris, A. J. L.; Crown, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Basaltic volcanism is ubiquitous on the terrestrial planets and is the most common form of extrusive activity on Earth, with over half of the world's volcanoes consisting largely of basalt. Recently, new eruptions (or new phases of ongoing eruptions) have occurred at Tolbachik in Russia (2012-2013); Bardarbunga in Iceland (2014); Etna in Italy (2014); and Kilauea in Hawaii (2014-2015) emphasizing both the hazard potential and volumetric production of basaltic activity. Furthermore, new high-resolution data of flows on Arsia Mons volcano (Mars) show very similar features. Therefore, this style of effusive volcanism and especially its surface manifestation (lava flows) warrants continued study both from a fundamental science as well as a hazard mitigation point of view. Monitoring flow propagation direction and velocity are critical in these situations and a number of models have evolved over time focused on heat loss and down-flow topography to predict flow advance. In addition to topography, the dominant (internal) factors controlling flow propagation are the discharge rate combined with cooling and increasing viscosity. However, all these models rely on accurate temperature measurements derived from the cooling glassy surface using infrared (IR) non-contact instruments. New laboratory and field-based studies are attempting to characterize the cooling, formation, and dynamics of basaltic surfaces using IR data. Preliminary results are focused on resolving inconsistencies in the derived flow temperature, composition, texture and silicate structure, which can all impact the surface-leaving heat flux. Improved accuracy in these retrievals increases our ability to constrain and model flow surface and interior temperatures. The impact of this improved accuracy has now been assessed using flow model simulations of active terrestrial and well-preserved Martian flows, Results are improving our understanding of the initial eruption conditions of these channelized basaltic

  10. Using measurements of the cosmic bulk flow to constrain f(R) Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiler, Jacob; Parkinson, David

    2016-10-01

    As an alternate explanation for the cosmic acceleration, f(R) theories of gravity can predict an almost identical expansion history to standard Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM), yet make very different predictions for the growth of cosmological structures. Measurements of the cosmic bulk flow provide a method for determining the strength of gravity over the history of structure formation. We use the modified gravity N-body code ECOSMOG to simulate dark matter particles and make predictions for the bulk flow magnitude in both ΛCDM and f(R) gravity. With the peculiar velocities output by ECOSMOG, we determine the bulk flow at depths ranging from 20 to 50 h-1Mpc, following the redshift and sky distribution of the 2MASS Tully-Fisher survey (2MTF). At each depth, we find that the ΛCDM and fR0 = 10-5 simulations produce bulk flow measurements that are consistent with ΛCDM predictions and the 2MTF survey at a 1σ level. We also find that adopting an f(R) strength of fR0 = 10-3 predict a much larger value for the bulk flow, which disagree with ΛCDM predictions at all depths considered. We conclude that fR0 must be constrained to a level no greater than 10-4 to agree with bulk flow measurements.

  11. Constrained positive matrix factorization: Elemental ratios, spatial distinction, and chemical transport model source contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturtz, Timothy M.

    Source apportionment models attempt to untangle the relationship between pollution sources and the impacts at downwind receptors. Two frameworks of source apportionment models exist: source-oriented and receptor-oriented. Source based apportionment models use presumed emissions and atmospheric processes to estimate the downwind source contributions. Conversely, receptor based models leverage speciated concentration data from downwind receptors and apply statistical methods to predict source contributions. Integration of both source-oriented and receptor-oriented models could lead to a better understanding of the implications sources have on the environment and society. The research presented here investigated three different types of constraints applied to the Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) receptor model within the framework of the Multilinear Engine (ME-2): element ratio constraints, spatial separation constraints, and chemical transport model (CTM) source attribution constraints. PM10-2.5 mass and trace element concentrations were measured in Winston-Salem, Chicago, and St. Paul at up to 60 sites per city during two different seasons in 2010. PMF was used to explore the underlying sources of variability. Information on previously reported PM10-2.5 tire and brake wear profiles were used to constrain these features in PMF by prior specification of selected species ratios. We also modified PMF to allow for combining the measurements from all three cities into a single model while preserving city-specific soil features. Relatively minor differences were observed between model predictions with and without the prior ratio constraints, increasing confidence in our ability to identify separate brake wear and tire wear features. Using separate data, source contributions to total fine particle carbon predicted by a CTM were incorporated into the PMF receptor model to form a receptor-oriented hybrid model. The level of influence of the CTM versus traditional PMF was

  12. Finite Element Modelling of the Apollo Heat Flow Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platt, J.; Siegler, M. A.; Williams, J.

    2013-12-01

    The heat flow experiments sent on Apollo missions 15 and 17 were designed to measure the temperature gradient of the lunar regolith in order to determine the heat flux of the moon. Major problems in these experiments arose from the fact that the astronauts were not able to insert the probes below the thermal skin depth. Compounding the problem, anomalies in the data have prevented scientists from conclusively determining the temperature dependent conductivity of the soil, which enters as a linear function into the heat flow calculation, thus stymieing them in their primary goal of constraining the global heat production of the Moon. Different methods of determining the thermal conductivity have yielded vastly different results resulting in downward corrections of up to 50% in some cases from the original calculations. Along with problems determining the conductivity, the data was inconsistent with theoretical predictions of the temperature variation over time, leading some to suspect that the Apollo experiment itself changed the thermal properties of the localised area surrounding the probe. The average temperature of the regolith, according to the data, increased over time, a phenomenon that makes calculating the thermal conductivity of the soil and heat flux impossible without knowing the source of error and accounting for it. The changes, possibly resulting from as varied sources as the imprint of the Astronauts boots on the lunar surface, compacted soil around the bore stem of the probe or even heat radiating down the inside of the tube, have convinced many people that the recorded data is unusable. In order to shed some light on the possible causes of this temperature rise, we implemented a finite element model of the probe using the program COMSOL Multi-physics as well as Matlab. Once the cause of the temperature rise is known then steps can be taken to account for the failings of the experiment and increase the data's utility.

  13. Constrained simulations of flow in haemodynamic devices: towards a computational assistance of magnetic resonance imaging measurements.

    PubMed

    Cenova, Iva; Kauzlarić, David; Greiner, Andreas; Korvink, Jan G

    2011-06-28

    Cardiovascular diseases, mostly related to atherosclerosis, are the major cause of death in industrial countries. It is observed that blood flow dynamics play an important role in the aetiology of atherosclerosis. Especially, the blood velocity distribution is an important indicator for predisposition regions. Today magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) delivers, in addition to the morphology of the cardiovascular system, blood flow patterns. However, the spatial resolution of the data is slightly less than 1 mm and owing to severe restrictions in magnetic field gradient switching frequencies and intensities, this limit will be very hard to overcome. In this paper, constrained fluid dynamics is applied within the smoothed particle hydrodynamics formalism to enhance the MRI flow data. On the one hand, constraints based on the known volumetric flow rate are applied. They prove the plausibility of the order of magnitude of the measurements. On the other hand, the higher resolution of the simulation allows one to determine in detail the flow field between the coarse data points and thus to improve their spatial resolution. PMID:21576164

  14. Constraining Eruptive Conditions From Lava Flow Morphometry: A Case Study With Field Evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowles, Z. R.; Clarke, A.; Greeley, R.

    2007-12-01

    Volcanism is widely recognized as one of the primary factors affecting the surfaces of solid planets and satellites throughout the solar system. Basaltic lava is thought to be the most common composition based on observed features typical of basaltic eruptions found on Earth. Lava flows are one of the most easily recognizable landforms on planetary surfaces and their features may provide information about eruption dynamics, lava rheology, and potential hazards. More recently, researchers have taken a multi-faceted approach to combine remote sensing, field observations and quantitative modeling to constrain volcanic activity on Earth and other planets. Here we test a number of published models, including empirically derived relationships from Mt. Etna and Kilauea, models derived from laboratory experiments, and theoretical models previously applied to remote sensing of planetary surfaces, against well-documented eruptions from the literature and field observations. We find that the Graetz (Hulme and Felder, 1977, Phil.Trans., 285, 227 - 234) method for estimating effusion rates compares favorably with published eruption data, while, on the other hand, inverting lava flow length prediction models to estimate effusion rates leads to several orders of magnitude in error. The Graetz method also better constrains eruption duration. Simple radial spreading laws predict Hawaiian lava flow lengths quite well, as do using the thickness of the lava flow front and chilled crust. There was no observed difference between results from models thought to be exclusive to aa or pahoehoe flow fields. Interpreting historic conditions should therefore follow simple relationships to observable morphologies no matter the composition or surface texture. We have applied the most robust models to understand the eruptive conditions and lava rheology of the Batamote Mountains near Ajo, AZ, an eroded shield volcano in southern Arizona. We find effusion rates on the order of 100 - 200 cubic

  15. Constraining the parameters of the EAP sea ice rheology from satellite observations and discrete element model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsamados, Michel; Heorton, Harry; Feltham, Daniel; Muir, Alan; Baker, Steven

    2016-04-01

    The new elastic-plastic anisotropic (EAP) rheology that explicitly accounts for the sub-continuum anisotropy of the sea ice cover has been implemented into the latest version of the Los Alamos sea ice model CICE. The EAP rheology is widely used in the climate modeling scientific community (i.e. CPOM stand alone, RASM high resolution regional ice-ocean model, MetOffice fully coupled model). Early results from sensitivity studies (Tsamados et al, 2013) have shown the potential for an improved representation of the observed main sea ice characteristics with a substantial change of the spatial distribution of ice thickness and ice drift relative to model runs with the reference visco-plastic (VP) rheology. The model contains one new prognostic variable, the local structure tensor, which quantifies the degree of anisotropy of the sea ice, and two parameters that set the time scale of the evolution of this tensor. Observations from high resolution satellite SAR imagery as well as numerical simulation results from a discrete element model (DEM, see Wilchinsky, 2010) have shown that these individual floes can organize under external wind and thermal forcing to form an emergent isotropic sea ice state (via thermodynamic healing, thermal cracking) or an anisotropic sea ice state (via Coulombic failure lines due to shear rupture). In this work we use for the first time in the context of sea ice research a mathematical metric, the Tensorial Minkowski functionals (Schroeder-Turk, 2010), to measure quantitatively the degree of anisotropy and alignment of the sea ice at different scales. We apply the methodology on the GlobICE Envisat satellite deformation product (www.globice.info), on a prototype modified version of GlobICE applied on Sentinel-1 Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery and on the DEM ice floe aggregates. By comparing these independent measurements of the sea ice anisotropy as well as its temporal evolution against the EAP model we are able to constrain the

  16. A robust approach to chance constrained optimal power flow with renewable generation

    DOE PAGES

    Lubin, Miles; Dvorkin, Yury; Backhaus, Scott N.

    2015-11-20

    Optimal Power Flow (OPF) dispatches controllable generation at minimum cost subject to operational constraints on generation and transmission assets. The uncertainty and variability of intermittent renewable generation is challenging current deterministic OPF approaches. Recent formulations of OPF use chance constraints to limit the risk from renewable generation uncertainty, however, these new approaches typically assume the probability distributions which characterize the uncertainty and variability are known exactly. We formulate a robust chance constrained (RCC) OPF that accounts for uncertainty in the parameters of these probability distributions by allowing them to be within an uncertainty set. The RCC OPF is solved usingmore » a cutting-plane algorithm that scales to large power systems. We demonstrate the RRC OPF on a modified model of the Bonneville Power Administration network, which includes 2209 buses and 176 controllable generators. In conclusion, deterministic, chance constrained (CC), and RCC OPF formulations are compared using several metrics including cost of generation, area control error, ramping of controllable generators, and occurrence of transmission line overloads as well as the respective computational performance.« less

  17. A robust approach to chance constrained optimal power flow with renewable generation

    SciTech Connect

    Lubin, Miles; Dvorkin, Yury; Backhaus, Scott N.

    2015-11-20

    Optimal Power Flow (OPF) dispatches controllable generation at minimum cost subject to operational constraints on generation and transmission assets. The uncertainty and variability of intermittent renewable generation is challenging current deterministic OPF approaches. Recent formulations of OPF use chance constraints to limit the risk from renewable generation uncertainty, however, these new approaches typically assume the probability distributions which characterize the uncertainty and variability are known exactly. We formulate a robust chance constrained (RCC) OPF that accounts for uncertainty in the parameters of these probability distributions by allowing them to be within an uncertainty set. The RCC OPF is solved using a cutting-plane algorithm that scales to large power systems. We demonstrate the RRC OPF on a modified model of the Bonneville Power Administration network, which includes 2209 buses and 176 controllable generators. In conclusion, deterministic, chance constrained (CC), and RCC OPF formulations are compared using several metrics including cost of generation, area control error, ramping of controllable generators, and occurrence of transmission line overloads as well as the respective computational performance.

  18. Thermodynamically Constrained Averaging Theory (TCAT) Two-Phase Flow Model: Derivation, Closure, and Simulation Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigand, T. M.; Miller, C. T.; Dye, A. L.; Gray, W. G.; McClure, J. E.; Rybak, I.

    2015-12-01

    The thermodynamically constrained averaging theory (TCAT) has been usedto formulate general classes of porous medium models, including newmodels for two-fluid-phase flow. The TCAT approach provides advantagesthat include a firm connection between the microscale, or pore scale,and the macroscale; a thermodynamically consistent basis; explicitinclusion of factors such as interfacial areas, contact angles,interfacial tension, and curvatures; and dynamics of interface movementand relaxation to an equilibrium state. In order to render the TCATmodel solvable, certain closure relations are needed to relate fluidpressure, interfacial areas, curvatures, and relaxation rates. In thiswork, we formulate and solve a TCAT-based two-fluid-phase flow model. We detail the formulation of the model, which is a specific instancefrom a hierarchy of two-fluid-phase flow models that emerge from thetheory. We show the closure problem that must be solved. Using recentresults from high-resolution microscale simulations, we advance a set ofclosure relations that produce a closed model. Lastly, we solve the model using a locally conservative numerical scheme and compare the TCAT model to the traditional model.

  19. Quantifying the constraining influence of gene flow on adaptive divergence in the lake-stream threespine stickleback system.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jean-Sébastien; Gow, Jennifer L; Taylor, Eric B; Hendry, Andrew P

    2007-08-01

    The constraining effect of gene flow on adaptive divergence is often inferred but rarely quantified. We illustrate ways of doing so using stream populations of threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) that experience different levels of gene flow from a parapatric lake population. In the Misty Lake watershed (British Columbia, Canada), the inlet stream population is morphologically divergent from the lake population, and presumably experiences little gene flow from the lake. The outlet stream population, however, shows an intermediate phenotype and may experience more gene flow from the lake. We first used microsatellite data to demonstrate that gene flow from the lake is low into the inlet but high into the outlet, and that gene flow from the lake remains relatively constant with distance along the outlet. We next combined gene flow data with morphological and habitat data to quantify the effect of gene flow on morphological divergence. In one approach, we assumed that inlet stickleback manifest well-adapted phenotypic trait values not constrained by gene flow. We then calculated the deviation between the observed and expected phenotypes for a given habitat in the outlet. In a second approach, we parameterized a quantitative genetic model of adaptive divergence. Both approaches suggest a large impact of gene flow, constraining adaptation by 80-86% in the outlet (i.e., only 14-20% of the expected morphological divergence in the absence of gene flow was observed). Such approaches may be useful in other taxa to estimate how important gene flow is in constraining adaptive divergence in nature. PMID:17683442

  20. Mobile monolithic polymer elements for flow control in microfluidic devices

    DOEpatents

    Hasselbrink, Jr., Ernest F.; Rehm, Jason E.; Shepodd, Timothy J.

    2004-08-31

    A cast-in-place and lithographically shaped mobile, monolithic polymer element for fluid flow control in microfluidic devices and method of manufacture. Microfluid flow control devices, or microvalves that provide for control of fluid or ionic current flow can be made incorporating a cast-in-place, mobile monolithic polymer element, disposed within a microchannel, and driven by either fluid or gas pressure against a retaining or sealing surface. The polymer elements are made by the application of lithographic methods to monomer mixtures formulated in such a way that the polymer will not bond to microchannel walls. The polymer elements can seal against pressures greater than 5000 psi, and have a response time on the order of milliseconds. By the use of energetic radiation it is possible to depolymerize selected regions of the polymer element to form shapes that cannot be produced by conventional lithographic patterning and would be impossible to machine.

  1. Mobile Monolith Polymer Elements For Flow Control In Microfluidic Systems

    DOEpatents

    Hasselbrink, Jr., Ernest F.; Rehm, Jason E.; Shepodd, Timothy J.; Kirby, Brian J.

    2006-01-24

    A cast-in-place and lithographically shaped mobile, monolithic polymer element for fluid flow control in microfluidic devices and method of manufacture. Microfluid flow control devices, or microvalves that provide for control of fluid or ionic current flow can be made incorporating a cast-in-place, mobile monolithic polymer element, disposed within a microchannel, and driven by fluid pressure (either liquid or gas) against a retaining or sealing surface. The polymer elements are made by the application of lithographic methods to monomer mixtures formulated in such a way that the polymer will not bond to microchannel walls. The polymer elements can seal against pressures greater than 5000 psi, and have a response time on the order of milliseconds. By the use of energetic radiation it is possible to depolymerize selected regions of the polymer element to form shapes that cannot be produced by conventional lithographic patterning and would be impossible to machine.

  2. Mobile monolithic polymer elements for flow control in microfluidic devices

    DOEpatents

    Hasselbrink, Jr., Ernest F.; Rehm, Jason E.; Shepodd, Timothy J.; Kirby, Brian J.

    2005-11-11

    A cast-in-place and lithographically shaped mobile, monolithic polymer element for fluid flow control in microfluidic devices and method of manufacture. Microfluid flow control devices, or microvalves that provide for control of fluid or ionic current flow can be made incorporating a cast-in-place, mobile monolithic polymer element, disposed within a microchannel, and driven by fluid pressure (either liquid or gas) against a retaining or sealing surface. The polymer elements are made by the application of lithographic methods to monomer mixtures formulated in such a way that the polymer will not bond to microchannel walls. The polymer elements can seal against pressures greater than 5000 psi, and have a response time on the order of milliseconds. By the use of energetic radiation it is possible to depolymerize selected regions of the polymer element to form shapes that cannot be produced by conventional lithographic patterning and would be impossible to machine.

  3. High-order Finite Element Analysis of Boundary Layer Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Alvin; Sahni, Onkar

    2014-11-01

    Numerical analysis of boundary layer flows requires careful approximations, specifically the use of a mesh with layered and graded elements near the (viscous) walls. This is referred to as a boundary layer mesh, which for complex geometries is composed of triangular elements on the walls that are inflated or extruded into the volume along the wall-normal direction up to a desired height while the rest of the domain is filled with unstructured tetrahedral elements. Linear elements with C0 inter-element continuity are employed and in some situations higher order C0 elements are also used. However, these elements only enforce continuity whereas high-order smoothness is not attained as will be the case with C1 inter-element continuity and higher. As a result, C0 elements result in a poor approximation of the high-order boundary layer behavior. To achieve greater inter-element continuity in boundary layer region, we employ B-spline basis functions along the wall-normal direction (i.e., only in the layered portion of the mesh). In the rest of the fully unstructured mesh, linear or higher order C0 elements are used as appropriate. In this study we demonstrate the benefits of finite-element analysis based on such higher order and continuity basis functions for boundary layer flows.

  4. Some parametric flow analyses of a particle bed fuel element

    SciTech Connect

    Dobranich, D.

    1993-05-01

    Parametric calculations are performed, using the SAFSIM computer program, to investigate the fluid mechanics and heat transfer performance of a particle bed fuel element. Both steady-state and transient calculations are included, addressing such issues as flow stability, reduced thrust operation, transpiration drag, coolant conductivity enhancement, flow maldistributions, decay heat removal, flow perturbations, and pulse cooling. The calculations demonstrate the dependence of the predicted results on the modeling assumptions and thus provide guidance as to where further experimental and computational investigations are needed. The calculations also demonstrate that both flow instability and flow maldistribution in the fuel element are important phenomena. Furthermore, results are encouraging that geometric design changes to the element can significantly reduce problems related to these phenomena, allowing improved performance over a wide range of element power densities and flow rates. Such design changes will help to maximize the operational efficiency of space propulsion reactors employing particle bed fuel element technology. Finally, the results demonstrate that SAFSIM is a valuable engineering tool for performing quick and inexpensive parametric simulations addressing complex flow problems.

  5. Finite element analysis of inviscid subsonic boattail flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chima, R. V.; Gerhart, P. M.

    1981-01-01

    A finite element code for analysis of inviscid subsonic flows over arbitrary nonlifting planar or axisymmetric bodies is described. The code solves a novel primitive variable formulation of the coupled irrotationality and compressible continuity equations. Results for flow over a cylinder, a sphere, and a NACA 0012 airfoil verify the code. Computed subcritical flows over an axisymmetric boattailed afterbody compare well with finite difference results and experimental data. Interative coupling with an integral turbulent boundary layer code shows strong viscous effects on the inviscid flow. Improvements in code efficiency and extensions to transonic flows are discussed.

  6. CVB: the Constrained Vapor Bubble Capillary Experiment on the International Space Station MARANGONI FLOW REGION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wayner, Peter C., Jr.; Kundan, Akshay; Plawsky, Joel

    2014-01-01

    The Constrained Vapor Bubble (CVB) is a wickless, grooved heat pipe and we report on a full- scale fluids experiment flown on the International Space Station (ISS). The CVB system consists of a relatively simple setup a quartz cuvette with sharp corners partially filled with either pentane or an ideal mixture of pentane and isohexane as the working fluids. Along with temperature and pressure measurements, the two-dimensional thickness profile of the menisci formed at the corners of the quartz cuvette was determined using the Light Microscopy Module (LMM). Even with the large, millimeter dimensions of the CVB, interfacial forces dominate in these exceedingly small Bond Number systems. The experiments were carried out at various power inputs. Although conceptually simple, the transport processes were found to be very complex with many different regions. At the heated end of the CVB, due to a high temperature gradient, we observed Marangoni flow at some power inputs. This region from the heated end to the central drop region is defined as a Marangoni dominated region. We present a simple analysis based on interfacial phenomena using only measurements from the ISS experiments that lead to a predictive equation for the thickness of the film near the heated end of the CVB. The average pressure gradient for flow in the film is assumed due to the measured capillary pressure at the two ends of the liquid film and that the pressure stress gradient due to cohesion self adjusts to a constant value over a distance L. The boundary conditions are the no slip condition at the wall interface and an interfacial shear stress at the liquid- vapor interface due to the Marangoni stress, which is due to the high temperature gradient. Although the heated end is extremely complex, since it includes three- dimensional variations in radiation, conduction, evaporation, condensation, fluid flow and interfacial forces, we find that using the above simplifying assumptions, a simple successful

  7. Constrained pressure residual multiscale (CPR-MS) method for fully implicit simulation of multiphase flow in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cusini, Matteo; Lukyanov, Alexander A.; Natvig, Jostein; Hajibeygi, Hadi

    2015-10-01

    We develop the first multiscale method for fully implicit (FIM) simulations of multiphase flow in porous media, namely CPR-MS method. Built on the FIM Jacobian matrix, the pressure system is obtained by employing a Constrained Pressure Residual (CPR) operator. Multiscale Finite Element (MSFE) and Finite Volume (MSFV) methods are then formulated algebraically to obtain efficient and accurate solutions of this pressure equation. The multiscale prediction stage (first-stage) is coupled with a corrector stage (second-stage) employed on the full system residual. The converged solution is enhanced through outer GMRES iterations preconditioned by these first and second stage operators. While the second-stage FIM stage is solved using a classical iterative solver, the multiscale stage is investigated in full detail. Several choices for fine-scale pre- and post-smoothing along with different choices of coarse-scale solvers are considered for a range of heterogeneous three-dimensional cases with capillarity and three-phase systems. The CPR-MS method is the first of its kind, and extends the applicability of the so-far developed multiscale methods (both MSFE and MSFV) to displacements with strong coupling terms.

  8. Seismic anisotropy beneath South China Sea: using SKS splitting to constrain mantle flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, M.; Le, K.; Yang, T.

    2011-12-01

    The evolution of South China Sea is under debate and several hypotheses have been proposed: (1) The collision of India plate and Eurasia plate; (2) the backward movement of the Pacific subduction plate; (3) mantle upwelling; and (4) combinations of above hypotheses. All these causal mechanisms emphasize the contributions of deep structures to the evolution of South China Sea. In this study we use earthquake data recorded by seismic stations surrounding South China Sea to constrain mantle flow beneath. To fill the vacancy of seismic data in Viet Nam, we deployed 4 seismic stations (VT01-VT04) in a roughly north - south orientation in Viet Nam in Nov. 2009. We combine the VT dataset with the AD and MY datasets from IRIS and select 81 events for SKS splitting analysis. Measurements were made at 11 stations using Wolfe and Silver (1998)'s multi-event stacking procedure. Our observed splitting directions in Vietnam are generally consistent with those of Bai et. al. (2009) . In northern Vietnam, the splitting times are around 1 sec and the fast directions are NWW-SEE, parallel to the absolute plate motion as well as the motion of the Earth surface, implying the crust and the mantle are coupled in this region and is moving as a result of the collision of India and China. While in southern Vietnam and Malaya, the fast directions are NE-SW, almost perpendicular to the absolute plate motion as well as the surface motion of Eurasia plate. However, the observed NE-SW is parallel to the subduction direction of the Australian plate, which might be caused by the mantle flow along NE-SW induced by the subduction.

  9. Finite element solver for 3-D compressible viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, K. C.; Reddy, J. N.

    1986-01-01

    The space shuttle main engine (SSME) has extremely complex internal flow structure. The geometry of the flow domain is three-dimensional with complicated topology. The flow is compressible, viscous, and turbulent with large gradients in flow quantities and regions of recirculations. The analysis of the flow field in SSME involves several tedious steps. One is the geometrical modeling of the particular zone of the SSME being studied. Accessing the geometry definition, digitalizing it, and developing surface interpolations suitable for an interior grid generator require considerable amount of manual labor. There are several types of grid generators available with some general-purpose finite element programs. An efficient and robust computational scheme for solving 3D Navier-Stokes equations has to be implemented. Post processing software has to be adapted to visualize and analyze the computed 3D flow field. The progress made in a project to develop software for the analysis of the flow is discussed. The technical approach to the development of the finite element scheme and the relaxation procedure are discussed. The three dimensional finite element code for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations is listed.

  10. Power flows and Mechanical Intensities in structural finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hambric, Stephen A.

    1989-01-01

    The identification of power flow paths in dynamically loaded structures is an important, but currently unavailable, capability for the finite element analyst. For this reason, methods for calculating power flows and mechanical intensities in finite element models are developed here. Formulations for calculating input and output powers, power flows, mechanical intensities, and power dissipations for beam, plate, and solid element types are derived. NASTRAN is used to calculate the required velocity, force, and stress results of an analysis, which a post-processor then uses to calculate power flow quantities. The SDRC I-deas Supertab module is used to view the final results. Test models include a simple truss and a beam-stiffened cantilever plate. Both test cases showed reasonable power flow fields over low to medium frequencies, with accurate power balances. Future work will include testing with more complex models, developing an interactive graphics program to view easily and efficiently the analysis results, applying shape optimization methods to the problem with power flow variables as design constraints, and adding the power flow capability to NASTRAN.

  11. Constraining anomalous Higgs boson couplings to the heavy-flavor fermions using matrix element techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritsan, Andrei V.; Röntsch, Raoul; Schulze, Markus; Xiao, Meng

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate anomalous interactions of the Higgs boson with heavy fermions, employing shapes of kinematic distributions. We study the processes p p →t t ¯+H , b b ¯+H , t q +H , and p p →H →τ+τ- and present applications of event generation, reweighting techniques for fast simulation of anomalous couplings, as well as matrix element techniques for optimal sensitivity. We extend the matrix element likelihood approach (MELA) technique, which proved to be a powerful matrix element tool for Higgs boson discovery and characterization during Run I of the LHC, and implement all analysis tools in the JHU generator framework. A next-to-leading-order QCD description of the p p →t t ¯+H process allows us to investigate the performance of the MELA in the presence of extra radiation. Finally, projections for LHC measurements through the end of Run III are presented.

  12. Mathematical aspects of finite element methods for incompressible viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunzburger, M. D.

    1986-01-01

    Mathematical aspects of finite element methods are surveyed for incompressible viscous flows, concentrating on the steady primitive variable formulation. The discretization of a weak formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations are addressed, then the stability condition is considered, the satisfaction of which insures the stability of the approximation. Specific choices of finite element spaces for the velocity and pressure are then discussed. Finally, the connection between different weak formulations and a variety of boundary conditions is explored.

  13. The isotope composition of selenium in chondrites constrains the depletion mechanism of volatile elements in solar system materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollstaedt, Hauke; Mezger, Klaus; Leya, Ingo

    2016-09-01

    Solar nebula processes led to a depletion of volatile elements in different chondrite groups when compared to the bulk chemical composition of the solar system deduced from the Sun's photosphere. For moderately-volatile elements, this depletion primarily correlates with the element condensation temperature and is possibly caused by incomplete condensation from a hot solar nebula, evaporative loss from the precursor dust, and/or inherited from the interstellar medium. Element concentrations and interelement ratios of volatile elements do not provide a clear picture about responsible mechanisms. Here, the abundance and stable isotope composition of the moderately- to highly-volatile element Se are investigated in carbonaceous, ordinary, and enstatite chondrites to constrain the mechanism responsible for the depletion of volatile elements in planetary bodies of the inner solar system and to define a δ 82 / 78 Se value for the bulk solar system. The δ 82 / 78 Se of the studied chondrite falls are identical within their measurement uncertainties with a mean of - 0.20 ± 0.26 ‰ (2 s.d., n = 14, relative to NIST SRM 3149) despite Se abundance depletions of up to a factor of 2.5 with respect to the CI group. The absence of resolvable Se isotope fractionation rules out a kinetic Rayleigh-type incomplete condensation of Se from the hot solar nebula or partial kinetic evaporative loss on the precursor material and/or the parent bodies. The Se depletion, if acquired during partial condensation or evaporative loss, therefore must have occurred under near equilibrium conditions to prevent measurable isotope fractionation. Alternatively, the depletion and cooling of the nebula could have occurred simultaneously due to the continuous removal of gas and fine particles by the solar wind accompanied by the quantitative condensation of elements from the pre-depleted gas. In this scenario the condensation of elements does not require equilibrium conditions to avoid isotope

  14. Single element injector cold flow testing for STME swirl coaxial injector element design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulka, J.; Schneider, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    An oxidizer-swirled coaxial element injector is being investigated for application in the Space Transportation Main Engine (STME). Single element cold flow experiments were conducted to provide characterization of the STME injector element for future analysis, design, and optimization. All tests were conducted to quiescent, ambient backpressure conditions. Spray angle, circumferential spray uniformity, dropsize, and dropsize distribution were measured in water-only and water/nitrogen flows. Rupe mixing efficiency was measured using water/sucrose solution flows with a large grid patternator for simple comparative evaluation of mixing. Factorial designs of experiment were used for statistical evaluation of injector geometrical design features and propellant flow conditions on mixing and atomization. Increasing the free swirl angle of the liquid oxidizer had the greatest influence on increasing the mixing efficiency. The addition of gas assistance had the most significant effect on reducing oxidizer droplet size parameters and increasing droplet size distribution. Increasing the oxidizer injection velocity had the greatest influence for reducing oxidizer droplet size parameters and increasing size distribution for non-gas assisted flows. Single element and multi-element subscale hot fire testing are recommended to verify optimized designs before committing to the STME design.

  15. Experimental Impedance of Single Liner Elements with Bias Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Follet, J. I.; Betts, J. F.; Kelly, Jeffrey J.; Thomas, Russell H.

    2000-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to generate a high quality database, from which the effects of a mean bias flow on the acoustic impedance of lumped-element single-degree-of-freedom liners was determined. Acoustic impedance measurements were made using the standard two-microphone method in the NASA Langley Normal Incidence Tube. Each liner consisted of a perforated sheet with a constant-area cavity. Liner resistance was shown to increase and to become less frequency and sound pressure level dependent as the bias flow was increased. The resistance was also consistently lower for a negative bias flow (suction) than for a positive bias flow (blowing) of equal magnitude. The slope of the liner reactance decreased with increased flow.

  16. Multi-Objective Differential Evolution for Voltage Security Constrained Optimal Power Flow in Deregulated Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roselyn, J. Preetha; Devaraj, D.; Dash, Subhransu Sekhar

    2013-11-01

    Voltage stability is an important issue in the planning and operation of deregulated power systems. The voltage stability problems is a most challenging one for the system operators in deregulated power systems because of the intense use of transmission line capabilities and poor regulation in market environment. This article addresses the congestion management problem avoiding offline transmission capacity limits related to voltage stability by considering Voltage Security Constrained Optimal Power Flow (VSCOPF) problem in deregulated environment. This article presents the application of Multi Objective Differential Evolution (MODE) algorithm to solve the VSCOPF problem in new competitive power systems. The maximum of L-index of the load buses is taken as the indicator of voltage stability and is incorporated in the Optimal Power Flow (OPF) problem. The proposed method in hybrid power market which also gives solutions to voltage stability problems by considering the generation rescheduling cost and load shedding cost which relieves the congestion problem in deregulated environment. The buses for load shedding are selected based on the minimum eigen value of Jacobian with respect to the load shed. In the proposed approach, real power settings of generators in base case and contingency cases, generator bus voltage magnitudes, real and reactive power demands of selected load buses using sensitivity analysis are taken as the control variables and are represented as the combination of floating point numbers and integers. DE/randSF/1/bin strategy scheme of differential evolution with self-tuned parameter which employs binomial crossover and difference vector based mutation is used for the VSCOPF problem. A fuzzy based mechanism is employed to get the best compromise solution from the pareto front to aid the decision maker. The proposed VSCOPF planning model is implemented on IEEE 30-bus system, IEEE 57 bus practical system and IEEE 118 bus system. The pareto optimal

  17. Finite elements and finite differences for transonic flow calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafez, M. M.; Murman, E. M.; Wellford, L. C.

    1978-01-01

    The paper reviews the chief finite difference and finite element techniques used for numerical solution of nonlinear mixed elliptic-hyperbolic equations governing transonic flow. The forms of the governing equations for unsteady two-dimensional transonic flow considered are the Euler equation, the full potential equation in both conservative and nonconservative form, the transonic small-disturbance equation in both conservative and nonconservative form, and the hodograph equations for the small-disturbance case and the full-potential case. Finite difference methods considered include time-dependent methods, relaxation methods, semidirect methods, and hybrid methods. Finite element methods include finite element Lax-Wendroff schemes, implicit Galerkin method, mixed variational principles, dual iterative procedures, optimal control methods and least squares.

  18. Electronic coupling matrix elements from charge constrained density functional theory calculations using a plane wave basis set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberhofer, Harald; Blumberger, Jochen

    2010-12-01

    We present a plane wave basis set implementation for the calculation of electronic coupling matrix elements of electron transfer reactions within the framework of constrained density functional theory (CDFT). Following the work of Wu and Van Voorhis [J. Chem. Phys. 125, 164105 (2006)], the diabatic wavefunctions are approximated by the Kohn-Sham determinants obtained from CDFT calculations, and the coupling matrix element calculated by an efficient integration scheme. Our results for intermolecular electron transfer in small systems agree very well with high-level ab initio calculations based on generalized Mulliken-Hush theory, and with previous local basis set CDFT calculations. The effect of thermal fluctuations on the coupling matrix element is demonstrated for intramolecular electron transfer in the tetrathiafulvalene-diquinone (Q-TTF-Q-) anion. Sampling the electronic coupling along density functional based molecular dynamics trajectories, we find that thermal fluctuations, in particular the slow bending motion of the molecule, can lead to changes in the instantaneous electron transfer rate by more than an order of magnitude. The thermal average, ( {< {| {H_ab } |^2 } > } )^{1/2} = 6.7 {mH}, is significantly higher than the value obtained for the minimum energy structure, | {H_ab } | = 3.8 {mH}. While CDFT in combination with generalized gradient approximation (GGA) functionals describes the intermolecular electron transfer in the studied systems well, exact exchange is required for Q-TTF-Q- in order to obtain coupling matrix elements in agreement with experiment (3.9 mH). The implementation presented opens up the possibility to compute electronic coupling matrix elements for extended systems where donor, acceptor, and the environment are treated at the quantum mechanical (QM) level.

  19. Invariant TAD Boundaries Constrain Cell-Type-Specific Looping Interactions between Promoters and Distal Elements around the CFTR Locus

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Emily M.; Lajoie, Bryan R.; Jain, Gaurav; Dekker, Job

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional genome structure plays an important role in gene regulation. Globally, chromosomes are organized into active and inactive compartments while, at the gene level, looping interactions connect promoters to regulatory elements. Topologically associating domains (TADs), typically several hundred kilobases in size, form an intermediate level of organization. Major questions include how TADs are formed and how they are related to looping interactions between genes and regulatory elements. Here we performed a focused 5C analysis of a 2.8 Mb chromosome 7 region surrounding CFTR in a panel of cell types. We find that the same TAD boundaries are present in all cell types, indicating that TADs represent a universal chromosome architecture. Furthermore, we find that these TAD boundaries are present irrespective of the expression and looping of genes located between them. In contrast, looping interactions between promoters and regulatory elements are cell-type specific and occur mostly within TADs. This is exemplified by the CFTR promoter that in different cell types interacts with distinct sets of distal cell-type-specific regulatory elements that are all located within the same TAD. Finally, we find that long-range associations between loci located in different TADs are also detected, but these display much lower interaction frequencies than looping interactions within TADs. Interestingly, interactions between TADs are also highly cell-type-specific and often involve loci clustered around TAD boundaries. These data point to key roles of invariant TAD boundaries in constraining as well as mediating cell-type-specific long-range interactions and gene regulation. PMID:26748519

  20. Invariant TAD Boundaries Constrain Cell-Type-Specific Looping Interactions between Promoters and Distal Elements around the CFTR Locus.

    PubMed

    Smith, Emily M; Lajoie, Bryan R; Jain, Gaurav; Dekker, Job

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional genome structure plays an important role in gene regulation. Globally, chromosomes are organized into active and inactive compartments while, at the gene level, looping interactions connect promoters to regulatory elements. Topologically associating domains (TADs), typically several hundred kilobases in size, form an intermediate level of organization. Major questions include how TADs are formed and how they are related to looping interactions between genes and regulatory elements. Here we performed a focused 5C analysis of a 2.8 Mb chromosome 7 region surrounding CFTR in a panel of cell types. We find that the same TAD boundaries are present in all cell types, indicating that TADs represent a universal chromosome architecture. Furthermore, we find that these TAD boundaries are present irrespective of the expression and looping of genes located between them. In contrast, looping interactions between promoters and regulatory elements are cell-type specific and occur mostly within TADs. This is exemplified by the CFTR promoter that in different cell types interacts with distinct sets of distal cell-type-specific regulatory elements that are all located within the same TAD. Finally, we find that long-range associations between loci located in different TADs are also detected, but these display much lower interaction frequencies than looping interactions within TADs. Interestingly, interactions between TADs are also highly cell-type-specific and often involve loci clustered around TAD boundaries. These data point to key roles of invariant TAD boundaries in constraining as well as mediating cell-type-specific long-range interactions and gene regulation. PMID:26748519

  1. Finite element method application for turbulent and transitional flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sváček, Petr

    2016-03-01

    This paper is interested in numerical simulations of the interaction of the fluid flow with an airfoil. Particularly, the problem of the turbulent flow around the airfoil with elastic support is considered. The main attention is paid to the numerical approximation of the flow problem using the finite element approximations. The laminar - turbulence transition of the flow on the surface airfoil is considered. The chois of the transition model is discussed. The transition model based on the two equation k-ω turbulence model is used. The structure motion is described with the aid of two degrees of freedom. The motion of the computational domain is treated with the aid of the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian method. Numerical results are shown.

  2. Using rare earth elements to constrain particulate organic carbon flux in the East China Sea

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chin-Chang; Chen, Ya-Feng; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Wang, Kui; Chen, Jian Feng; Burdige, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Fluxes of particulate organic carbon (POC) in the East China Sea (ECS) have been reported to decrease from the inner continental shelf towards the outer continental shelf. Recent research has shown that POC fluxes in the ECS may be overestimated due to active sediment resuspension. To better characterize the effect of sediment resuspension on particle fluxes in the ECS, rare earth elements (REEs) and organic carbon (OC) were used in separate two-member mixing models to evaluate trap-collected POC fluxes. The ratio of resuspended particles from sediments to total trap-collected particles in the ECS ranged from 82–94% using the OC mixing model, and 30–80% using the REEs mixing model, respectively. These results suggest that REEs may be better proxies for sediment resuspension than OC in high turbidity marginal seas because REEs do not appear to undergo degradation during particle sinking as compared to organic carbon. Our results suggest that REEs can be used as tracers to provide quantitative estimates of POC fluxes in marginal seas. PMID:27670426

  3. Using rare earth elements to constrain particulate organic carbon flux in the East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Chin-Chang; Chen, Ya-Feng; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Wang, Kui; Chen, Jian Feng; Burdige, David J.

    2016-09-01

    Fluxes of particulate organic carbon (POC) in the East China Sea (ECS) have been reported to decrease from the inner continental shelf towards the outer continental shelf. Recent research has shown that POC fluxes in the ECS may be overestimated due to active sediment resuspension. To better characterize the effect of sediment resuspension on particle fluxes in the ECS, rare earth elements (REEs) and organic carbon (OC) were used in separate two-member mixing models to evaluate trap-collected POC fluxes. The ratio of resuspended particles from sediments to total trap-collected particles in the ECS ranged from 82–94% using the OC mixing model, and 30–80% using the REEs mixing model, respectively. These results suggest that REEs may be better proxies for sediment resuspension than OC in high turbidity marginal seas because REEs do not appear to undergo degradation during particle sinking as compared to organic carbon. Our results suggest that REEs can be used as tracers to provide quantitative estimates of POC fluxes in marginal seas.

  4. Flow formed by spanwise gaps between roughness elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, E.; Lin, S. H.; Islam, O.

    1985-01-01

    Measurements of the three mean velocity components and the three Reynolds shear stresses were made in the region downstream of gaps between wall-mounted roughness elements of square cross section and high aspect ratio in a thick turbulent boundary layer. The effect of small and large gaps was studied in a wind tunnel at a Reynolds number of 3600, based on obstacle height and free-stream velocity. The small gap produces retardation of the gap flow as with a two-dimensional roughness element, but a definite interaction between gap and wake flows is observed. The interaction is more intense for the large gap than for the small. Both gaps generate a secondary crossflow which moves fluid away from the centerline in the wall region and toward the centerline in the outer (y greater than 1.5H) region.

  5. High speed inviscid compressible flow by the finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zienkiewicz, O. C.; Loehner, R.; Morgan, K.

    1984-01-01

    The finite element method and an explicit time stepping algorithm which is based on Taylor-Galerkin schemes with an appropriate artificial viscosity is combined with an automatic mesh refinement process which is designed to produce accurate steady state solutions to problems of inviscid compressible flow in two dimensions. The results of two test problems are included which demonstrate the excellent performance characteristics of the proposed procedures.

  6. Using noble gas tracers to constrain a groundwater flow model with recharge elevations: A novel approach for mountainous terrain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doyle, Jessica M.; Gleeson, Tom; Manning, Andrew H.; Mayer, K. Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Environmental tracers provide information on groundwater age, recharge conditions, and flow processes which can be helpful for evaluating groundwater sustainability and vulnerability. Dissolved noble gas data have proven particularly useful in mountainous terrain because they can be used to determine recharge elevation. However, tracer-derived recharge elevations have not been utilized as calibration targets for numerical groundwater flow models. Herein, we constrain and calibrate a regional groundwater flow model with noble-gas-derived recharge elevations for the first time. Tritium and noble gas tracer results improved the site conceptual model by identifying a previously uncertain contribution of mountain block recharge from the Coast Mountains to an alluvial coastal aquifer in humid southwestern British Columbia. The revised conceptual model was integrated into a three-dimensional numerical groundwater flow model and calibrated to hydraulic head data in addition to recharge elevations estimated from noble gas recharge temperatures. Recharge elevations proved to be imperative for constraining hydraulic conductivity, recharge location, and bedrock geometry, and thus minimizing model nonuniqueness. Results indicate that 45% of recharge to the aquifer is mountain block recharge. A similar match between measured and modeled heads was achieved in a second numerical model that excludes the mountain block (no mountain block recharge), demonstrating that hydraulic head data alone are incapable of quantifying mountain block recharge. This result has significant implications for understanding and managing source water protection in recharge areas, potential effects of climate change, the overall water budget, and ultimately ensuring groundwater sustainability.

  7. Finite-Element Analysis of Multiphase Immiscible Flow Through Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuppusamy, T.; Sheng, J.; Parker, J. C.; Lenhard, R. J.

    1987-04-01

    A finite-element model is developed for multiphase flow through soil involving three immiscible fluids: namely, air, water, and a nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL). A variational method is employed for the finite-element formulation corresponding to the coupled differential equations governing flow in a three-fluid phase porous medium system with constant air phase pressure. Constitutive relationships for fluid conductivities and saturations as functions of fluid pressures, which are derived in a companion paper by J. C. Parker et al. (this issue) and which may be calibrated from two-phase laboratory measurements, are employed in the finite-element program. The solution procedure uses backward time integration with iteration by a modified Picard method to handle the nonlinear properties. Laboratory experiments involving water displacement from soil columns by p cymene (a benzene-derivative hydrocarbon) under constant pressure were simulated by the finite-element program to validate the numerical model and formulation for constitutive properties. Transient water outflow predicted using independently measured saturation-capillary head data agreed with observed outflow data within the limits of precision of the predictions as estimated by a first-order Taylor series approximation considering parameter uncertainty due to experimental reproducability and constitutive model accuracy. Two-dimensional simulations are presented for a hypothetical field case involving introduction of NAPL near the soil surface due to leakage from an underground storage tank. Subsequent transport of NAPL in the variably saturated vadose and groundwater zones is analyzed.

  8. Discrete-element modeling of particulate aerosol flows

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, J.S.

    2009-03-20

    A multiple-time step computational approach is presented for efficient discrete-element modeling of aerosol flows containing adhesive solid particles. Adhesive aerosol particulates are found in numerous dust and smoke contamination problems, including smoke particle transport in the lungs, particle clogging of heat exchangers in construction vehicles, industrial nanoparticle transport and filtration systems, and dust fouling of electronic systems and MEMS components. Dust fouling of equipment is of particular concern for potential human occupation on dusty planets, such as Mars. The discrete-element method presented in this paper can be used for prediction of aggregate structure and breakup, for prediction of the effect of aggregate formation on the bulk fluid flow, and for prediction of the effects of small-scale flow features (e.g., due to surface roughness or MEMS patterning) on the aggregate formation. After presentation of the overall computational structure, the forces and torques acting on the particles resulting from fluid motion, particle-particle collision, and adhesion under van der Waals forces are reviewed. The effect of various parameters of normal collision and adhesion of two particles are examined in detail. The method is then used to examine aggregate formation and particle clogging in pipe and channel flow.

  9. A dual reciprocal boundary element formulation for viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lafe, Olu

    1993-01-01

    The advantages inherent in the boundary element method (BEM) for potential flows are exploited to solve viscous flow problems. The trick is the introduction of a so-called dual reciprocal technique in which the convective terms are represented by a global function whose unknown coefficients are determined by collocation. The approach, which is necessarily iterative, converts the governing partial differential equations into integral equations via the distribution of fictitious sources or dipoles of unknown strength on the boundary. These integral equations consist of two parts. The first is a boundary integral term, whose kernel is the unknown strength of the fictitious sources and the fundamental solution of a convection-free flow problem. The second part is a domain integral term whose kernel is the convective portion of the governing PDEs. The domain integration can be transformed to the boundary by using the dual reciprocal (DR) concept. The resulting formulation is a pure boundary integral computational process.

  10. A Finite element model of tactile flow for softness perception.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, Edoardo; Bianchi, Matteo; D'Angelo, Maria Laura; D'Imperio, Mariapaola; Cannella, Ferdinando; Scilingo, Enzo P; Bicchi, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Touch is an extremely dynamic sense. To take into account this aspect, it has been hypothesized that there are mechanisms in the brain that specialize in processing dynamic tactile stimuli, in a way not too dissimilar from what happens for optical flow in dynamic vision. The concept of tactile flow, related to the rate of expansion of isostrain volumes in the human fingerpad, was used to explain some perceptual illusions as well as mechanisms of human softness perception. In this paper we describe a computational model of tactile flow, and apply it to a finite element model of interaction between deformable bodies. The shape and material properties of the bodies are modeled from those of a human fingertip interacting with specimens with different softness properties. Results show that the rate of expansion of isostrain volumes can be used to discriminate different materials in terms of their softness characteristics.

  11. Geotherms and Thermal Parameters from the Curie Depth Constrained Solutions of the One-Dimensional Steady-State Heat-Flow Equation: A New Method and Its Applicability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravat, D.; Morgan, P.; Salem, A.; Lowry, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    We have developed a new method of constraining geotherms deep in the crust. Steady-state geotherms are most commonly derived by solving the heat flow differential equation with surface boundary conditions, and do not explicitly involve temperature constraints at depth. In a new method, we incorporate the magnetic Curie depth, derived from the spectral analysis of magnetic anomaly data, as an a posteriori condition into the solution of 1-D heat-flow equation to anchor geotherms at the Curie depth. The Curie depth is derived carefully from the Defractal Spectral Method where the fractal parameter of the field is also derived. The Curie depth constraint allows determination of an additional parameter: the ratio of radiogenic heat production (A) to thermal conductivity (K). When K is observed or can be estimated from geologic knowledge, A can be calculated. Furthermore, it is possible to renormalize the derived A to the value where radiogenic elements exponentially decrease with depth (the value of A at the surface denoted as As). The renormalization permits comparison of surface observed and computed values of As which we use to validate the method. We crosschecked observed values of As and K against the ratio As/K derived from the method in New Hampshire and across the border of Wyoming and Colorado. Excluding high heat-flow locations in these regions as anomalous, the difference between the observed and computed As in all these cases is less than 6-7%. There are also regions where both the derived parameters (As and K) are not within the acceptable range for the given reduced heat flow; these are generally the regions of complex active tectonics or anomalously high or low heat-flow values where the steady-state assumption is not valid. In the mid-oceanic ridge scenario of the Red Sea, the Curie depth corresponds to the Moho and reasonable values of K yield low values of A consistent with the expectation from mafic oceanic crust. There are many areas of the world

  12. Thermodynamically Constrained Averaging Theory Approach for Modeling Flow and Transport Phenomena in Porous Medium Systems: 4. Species Transport Fundamentals

    PubMed Central

    Gray, William G.

    2008-01-01

    This work is the fourth in a series of papers on the thermodynamically constrained averaging theory (TCAT) approach for modeling flow and transport phenomena in multiscale porous medium systems. The general TCAT framework and the mathematical foundation presented in previous works are built upon by formulating macroscale models for conservation of mass, momentum, and energy, and the balance of entropy for a species in a phase volume, interface, and common curve. In addition, classical irreversible thermodynamic relations for species in entities are averaged from the microscale to the macroscale. Finally, we comment on alternative approaches that can be used to connect species and entity conservation equations to a constrained system entropy inequality, which is a key component of the TCAT approach. The formulations detailed in this work can be built upon to develop models for species transport and reactions in a variety of multiphase systems. PMID:19255613

  13. Finite element simulation of flow in twin screw extruder mixing elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo (Sananes), Victor

    1998-12-01

    In the plastics industry, twin screw extruders are widely used for melting, dispersing and homogenizing polymers. There are a diversity of designs employed throughout the polymer industry, each one having different operating principles and applications. Among the different arrangements of twin screw systems, the intermeshing co-rotating configuration has been found to be one of the most efficient mixers and it is one of the most commonly used pieces of equipment among the continuous mixers due to its self wiping properties. The problem of mixing of polymers involves aspects of fluid dynamics and rheology. Mixing is usually obtained through a combination of mechanical motion of the mixing device and the resulting deformation induced in the flowing material. The quantitative description of the flow patterns is now feasible even in the most complicated geometries through the development of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools and the continuous increase in computer resources at lower costs. Intermeshing co-rotating twin screw extruders (ICRTSE) are usually built in a modular fashion to meet the diversity of tasks performed by this type of machine. There are two main types of elements: full flight conveying elements and kneading block mixing elements. The kneading blocks have been the focus of attention for the theoretical analysis of flow due to their significant contribution to the mixing performance of the extruder and the fact that kneading blocks normally work under a fully filled channel condition, which is one of the fundamental assumptions in CFD simulations. The objective of this thesis is to understand the flow mechanisms in the kneading disc section of co-rotating twin screw extruders. This is done by means of the 3D numerical simulation of the flow process within the complex geometry involving intricate passages and continuously moving surfaces. A quasi-steady state finite element model was developed assuming isothermal, non-Newtonian flow. The

  14. Finite element simulation of flow in twin screw extruder mixing elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo, Victor Sananes

    In the plastics industry, twin screw extruders are widely used for melting, dispersing and homogenizing polymers. There are a diversity of designs employed throughout the polymer industry, each one having different operating principles and applications. Among the different arrangements of twin screw systems, the intermeshing co- rotating configuration has been found to be one of the most efficient mixers and it is one of the most commonly used pieces of equipment among the continuous mixers due to its self wiping properties. The problem of mixing of polymers involves aspects of fluid dynamics and rheology. Mixing is usually obtained through a combination of mechanical motion of the mixing device and the resulting deformation induced in the flowing material. The quantitative description of the flow patterns is now feasible even in the most complicated geometries through the development of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools and the continuous increase in computer resources at lower costs. Intermeshing co-rotating twin screw extruders (ICRTSE) are usually built in a modular fashion to meet the diversity of tasks performed by this type of machine. There are two main types of elements: full flight conveying elements and kneading block mixing elements. The kneading blocks have been the focus of attention for the theoretical analysis of flow due to their significant contribution to the mixing performance of the extruder and the fact that kneading blocks normally work under a fully filled channel condition, which is one of the fundamental assumptions in CFD simulations. The objective of this thesis is to understand the flow mechanisms in the kneading disc section of co-rotating twin screw extruders. This is done by means of the 3D numerical simulation of the flow process within the complex geometry involving intricate passages and continuously moving surfaces. A quasi-steady state finite element model was developed assuming isothermal, non- Newtonian flow. The

  15. Shallow thermal structure constrained by seafloor temperature and heat flow estimated from BSRs in the Nankai subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohde, A.; Otsuka, H.; Kioka, A.; Ashi, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Nankai Trough is a plate convergent boundary where earthquakes with a magnitude of 8 take place repeatedly. Thermal structure in subduction zones affects pore pressure and diagenesis such as consolidation, dewatering and cementation, and constrains physical properties of a fault-slip plane. In the Nankai subduction zone, existence of methane hydrate is confirmed from acoustic reflectors called the Bottom Simulating Reflectors (BSRs) which parallel the seafloor on seismic reflection images with high-amplitude and reverse-polarity waveforms. As a depth of BSR is theoretically constrained by subseafloor profiles of temperature and pressure, the BSR depths effectively produce subseafloor geothermal information over a wide area without heat flow probe penetration or in-situ borehole temperature measurement that is fragmentary. In this study, we aim at calculating precise two-dimensional shallow thermal structure. First, we investigate detailed distribution of the BSRs in the Nankai area ranging from offshore Tokai to Hyuga using two-dimensional multi-channel seismic reflection data. The BSR depths are then forwarded to estimate heat flow values. Second, we use a simple two-dimensional thermal modeling of Blackwell et al. [1980] that takes into account topographical effects of the seafloor roughness. We also employ additional boundary conditions constrained by seafloor temperature and the heat flow estimated from BSR depths. In order to confirm reliability of the modeled thermal structure, we additionally estimate the base of gas hydrate stability zone which is proved to almost equal to observational BSR depths. We find in the modeled thermal structure that the convex portions that are subject to cooling by cold bottom water, while depressions are less subject to the cooling from observational BSRs and theoretical calculation. The thermal structure gained here provides essential data for seismic simulations in subduction zones and for laboratory experiments as

  16. Dynamic coupling of bulk chemistry, trace elements and mantle flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, J. H.; Heck, H. V.; Nowacki, A.; Wookey, J. M.; Elliott, T.; Porcelli, D.

    2015-12-01

    Fully dynamical models that not only track the evolution of chemical heterogeneities through the mantle, but also incorporate the effect of chemical heterogeneities on the dynamics of mantle convection are now emerging. Since in general analytical solutions to these complex problems are lacking, careful testing and investigations of the effect and usefulness of these models is needed. We extend our existing numerical mantle convection code that can track fluid flow in 3D spherical geometry and tracks both bulk chemical components (basal fraction) and different trace elements. The chemical components fractionate upon melting when and where the solidus is crossed. Now, the chemical information will effect the flow of the fluid in the following ways: The bulk composition will link to density and the (radioactive) trace element abundance to heat production. Results will be reported of the effect of different density structures; either starting with a primordial dense layer at the base of the mantle, having all density variation originate from melting (basalt production), or a combination between these two end-member scenarios. In particular we will focus on the connection between large scale bulk chemical structures in the (deep) mantle and the evolution of the distribution of noble gasses (He and Ar). The distribution of noble gasses depend upon 1) assumptions on the initial distributions in the mantle, 2) the mantle flow, 3) radioactive production and, 4) outgassing to the atmosphere upon melting close to the surface.

  17. FEWA: a Finite Element model of Water flow through Aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, G.T.; Huff, D.D.

    1983-11-01

    This report documents the implementation and demonstration of a Finite Element model of Water flow through Aquifers (FEWA). The particular features of FEWA are its versatility and flexibility to deal with as many real-world problems as possible. Point as well as distributed sources/sinks are included to represent recharges/pumpings and rainfall infiltrations. All sources/sinks can be transient or steady state. Prescribed hydraulic head on the Dirichlet boundaries and fluxes on Neumann or Cauchy boundaries can be time-dependent or constant. Source/sink strength over each element and node, hydraulic head at each Dirichlet boundary node, and flux at each boundary segment can vary independently of each other. Either completely confined or completely unconfined aquifers, or partially confined and partially unconfined aquifers can be dealt with effectively. Discretization of a compound region with very irregular curved boundaries is made easy by including both quadrilateral and triangular elements in the formulation. Large-field problems can be solved efficiently by including a pointwise iterative solution strategy as an optional alternative to the direct elimination solution method for the matrix equation approximating the partial differential equation of groundwater flow. FEWA also includes transient flow through confining leaky aquifers lying above and/or below the aquifer of interest. The model is verified against three simple cases to which analytical solutions are available. It is then demonstrated by two examples of how the model can be applied to heterogeneous and anisotropic aquifers with transient boundary conditions, time-dependent sources/sinks, and confining aquitards for a confined aquifer of variable thickness and for a free surface problem in an unconfined aquifer, respectively. 20 references, 25 figures, 8 tables.

  18. Finite element methods for non-Newtonian flows

    SciTech Connect

    Gartling, D.K.

    1992-10-01

    The application of the finite element method to problems in non-Newtonian fluid mechanics is described. The formulation of the basic equations is presented for both inelastic and viscoelastic constitutive models. Solution algorithms for treating the material nonlinearities associated with inelastic fluids are described; typical solution procedures for the implicit stress-rate equations of viscoelastic fluids are also presented. Methods for the simulation of various types of free-surface flows are also outlined. Simple example analyses are included for both types of fluid models.

  19. Convective Enhancement of Icing Roughness Elements in Stagnation Region Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Michael T.; McClain, Stephen T.; Vargas, Mario; Broeren, Andy

    2015-01-01

    To improve existing ice accretion simulation codes, more data regarding ice roughness and its effects on convective heat transfer are required. To build on existing research on this topic, this study used the Vertical Icing Studies Tunnel (VIST) at NASA Glenn Research to model realistic ice roughness in the stagnation region of a NACA 0012 airfoil. Using the VIST, a test plate representing the leading 2% chord of the airfoil was subjected to flows of 7.62 m/s (25 ft/s), 12.19 m/s (40 ft/s), and 16.76 m/s (55 ft/s). The test plate was fitted with 3 surfaces, each with a different representation of ice roughness: 1) a control surface with no ice roughness, 2) a surface with ice roughness with element height scaled by 10x and streamwise rough zone width from the stagnation point scaled by 10x, and 3) a surface with ice roughness with element height scaled by 10x and streamwise rough zone width from the stagnation point scaled by 25x. Temperature data from the tests were recorded using an infrared camera and thermocouples imbedded in the test plate. From the temperature data, a convective heat transfer coefficient map was created for each case. Additional testing was also performed to validate the VIST's flow quality. These tests included five-hole probe and hot-wire probe velocity traces to provide flow visualization and to study boundary layer formation on the various test surfaces. The knowledge gained during the experiments will help improve ice accretion codes by providing heat transfer coefficient validation data and by providing flow visualization data helping understand current and future experiments performed in the VIST.

  20. Boundary Element Microhydrodynamics: Stagnation of flow in protein cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragon, Sergio; Hahn, David

    2007-03-01

    A very precise boundary element solution of the exact Stokes flow surface integral equation has been implemented in our Fortan 90 program BEST. In our previous work (Aragon & Hahn, Biophys. J. 2006, 91: 1591-1603; J. Chem. Theory and Comput. 2006, 2: 1416-1428) we obtained very precise values of the tensorial transport properties (translation, rotation, and intrinsic viscosity) for a large set of proteins with a uniform water hydration thickness of 0.11 nm. In this work, we utilize the surface stress distribution thus obtained to evaluate the flow field as a function of distance away from the hydrodynamic surface for a variety of surface features in a dimpled sphere (test case) and for the proteins myoglobin, lysozyme, and human serum albumin. We demonstrate that solvent in small to large pockets on the hydrodynamic surface moves with the protein with distances up to 2 nm for deep pockets regardless of the direction of motion of the protein. On the other hand, the fluid flow pattern on protruding portions of the hydrodynamic surface decays much more rapidly with distance from the surface. The implications of these results with respect to the amount of water of associated with the surface and the rate of transport to active enzymatic sites in stirred solutions is discussed.

  1. FLASH: A finite element computer code for variably saturated flow

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, R.G.; Magnuson, S.O.

    1992-05-01

    A numerical model was developed for use in performance assessment studies at the INEL. The numerical model, referred to as the FLASH computer code, is designed to simulate two-dimensional fluid flow in fractured-porous media. The code is specifically designed to model variably saturated flow in an arid site vadose zone and saturated flow in an unconfined aquifer. In addition, the code also has the capability to simulate heat conduction in the vadose zone. This report presents the following: description of the conceptual frame-work and mathematical theory; derivations of the finite element techniques and algorithms; computational examples that illustrate the capability of the code; and input instructions for the general use of the code. The FLASH computer code is aimed at providing environmental scientists at the INEL with a predictive tool for the subsurface water pathway. This numerical model is expected to be widely used in performance assessments for: (1) the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study process and (2) compliance studies required by the US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A.

  2. Stabilized finite elements for 3D reactive flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braack, M.; Richter, Th.

    2006-07-01

    Objective of this work is the numerical solution of chemically reacting flows in three dimensions described by detailed reaction mechanism. The contemplated problems include, e.g. burners with 3D geometry. Contrary to the usual operator splitting method the equations are treated fully coupled with a Newton solver. This leads to the necessity of the solution of large linear non-symmetric, indefinite systems. Due to the complexity of the regarded problems we combine a variety of numerical methods, as there are goal-oriented adaptive mesh refinement, a parallel multigrid solver for the linear systems and economical stabilization techniques for the stiff problems.By blocking the solution components for every ansatz function and applying special matrix structures for each block of degrees of freedom, we can significantly reduce the required memory effort without worsening the convergence. Considering the Galerkin formulation of the regarded problems this is established by using lumping of the mass matrix and the chemical source terms. However, this technique is not longer feasible for standard stabilized finite elements as for instance Galerkin least squares techniques or streamline diffusion. Those stabilized schemes are well established for Navier-Stokes flows but for reactive flows, they introduce many further couplings into the system compared to Galerkin formulations. In this work, we discuss this issue in connection with combustion in more detail and propose the local projection stabilization technique for reactive flows. Beside the robustness of the arising linear systems we are able to maintain the problem-adapted matrix structures presented above. Finally, we will present numerical results for the proposed methods. In particular, we simulate a methane burner with a detailed reaction system involving 15 chemical species and 84 elementary reactions.

  3. An approach to the constrained design of natural laminar flow airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Bradford Earl

    1995-01-01

    A design method has been developed by which an airfoil with a substantial amount of natural laminar flow can be designed, while maintaining other aerodynamic and geometric constraints. After obtaining the initial airfoil's pressure distribution at the design lift coefficient using an Euler solver coupled with an integml turbulent boundary layer method, the calculations from a laminar boundary layer solver are used by a stability analysis code to obtain estimates of the transition location (using N-Factors) for the starting airfoil. A new design method then calculates a target pressure distribution that will increase the larninar flow toward the desired amounl An airfoil design method is then iteratively used to design an airfoil that possesses that target pressure distribution. The new airfoil's boundary layer stability characteristics are determined, and this iterative process continues until an airfoil is designed that meets the laminar flow requirement and as many of the other constraints as possible.

  4. An Approach to the Constrained Design of Natural Laminar Flow Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Bradford E.

    1997-01-01

    A design method has been developed by which an airfoil with a substantial amount of natural laminar flow can be designed, while maintaining other aerodynamic and geometric constraints. After obtaining the initial airfoil's pressure distribution at the design lift coefficient using an Euler solver coupled with an integral turbulent boundary layer method, the calculations from a laminar boundary layer solver are used by a stability analysis code to obtain estimates of the transition location (using N-Factors) for the starting airfoil. A new design method then calculates a target pressure distribution that will increase the laminar flow toward the desired amount. An airfoil design method is then iteratively used to design an airfoil that possesses that target pressure distribution. The new airfoil's boundary layer stability characteristics are determined, and this iterative process continues until an airfoil is designed that meets the laminar flow requirement and as many of the other constraints as possible.

  5. A Method for the Constrained Design of Natural Laminar Flow Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Bradford E.; Whitesides, John L.; Campbell, Richard L.; Mineck, Raymond E.

    1996-01-01

    A fully automated iterative design method has been developed by which an airfoil with a substantial amount of natural laminar flow can be designed, while maintaining other aerodynamic and geometric constraints. Drag reductions have been realized using the design method over a range of Mach numbers, Reynolds numbers and airfoil thicknesses. The thrusts of the method are its ability to calculate a target N-Factor distribution that forces the flow to undergo transition at the desired location; the target-pressure-N-Factor relationship that is used to reduce the N-Factors in order to prolong transition; and its ability to design airfoils to meet lift, pitching moment, thickness and leading-edge radius constraints while also being able to meet the natural laminar flow constraint. The method uses several existing CFD codes and can design a new airfoil in only a few days using a Silicon Graphics IRIS workstation.

  6. Headwater sediment dynamics in a debris flow catchment constrained by high-resolution topographic surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loye, Alexandre; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Theule, Joshua Isaac; Liébault, Frédéric

    2016-06-01

    Debris flows have been recognized to be linked to the amounts of material temporarily stored in torrent channels. Hence, sediment supply and storage changes from low-order channels of the Manival catchment, a small tributary valley with an active torrent system located exclusively in sedimentary rocks of the Chartreuse Massif (French Alps), were surveyed periodically for 16 months using terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) to study the coupling between sediment dynamics and torrent responses in terms of debris flow events, which occurred twice during the monitoring period. Sediment transfer in the main torrent was monitored with cross-section surveys. Sediment budgets were generated seasonally using sequential TLS data differencing and morphological extrapolations. Debris production depends strongly on rockfall occurring during the winter-early spring season, following a power law distribution for volumes of rockfall events above 0.1 m3, while hillslope sediment reworking dominates debris recharge in spring and autumn, which shows effective hillslope-channel coupling. The occurrence of both debris flow events that occurred during the monitoring was linked to recharge from previous debris pulses coming from the hillside and from bedload transfer. Headwater debris sources display an ambiguous behaviour in sediment transfer: low geomorphic activity occurred in the production zone, despite rainstorms inducing debris flows in the torrent; still, a general reactivation of sediment transport in headwater channels was observed in autumn without new debris supply, suggesting that the stored debris was not exhausted. The seasonal cycle of sediment yield seems to depend not only on debris supply and runoff (flow capacity) but also on geomorphic conditions that destabilize remnant debris stocks. This study shows that monitoring the changes within a torrent's in-channel storage and its debris supply can improve knowledge on recharge thresholds leading to debris flow.

  7. Ease of processing constrains the activation flow in the conceptual-lexical system during speech planning.

    PubMed

    Mädebach, Andreas; Jescheniak, Jörg D; Oppermann, Frank; Schriefers, Herbert

    2011-05-01

    In 3 picture-word interference experiments, speakers named a target object in the presence of an unrelated not-to-be-named context object. Distractor words, which were phonologically related or unrelated to the context object's name, were used to determine whether the context object had become phonologically activated. All objects had high frequency names, and the ease of processing of these objects was manipulated by a visual degradation technique. In Experiment 1, both objects were nondegraded; in Experiment 2, both objects were degraded; and in Experiment 3, either the target object or the context object was degraded. Distractor words, which were phonologically related to the context objects, interfered with the naming response when both objects were nondegraded, indicating that the context objects had become phonologically coactivated. The effect vanished when both objects were degraded, when only the context object was degraded, and when only the target object was degraded. These data demonstrate that the amount of available processing resources constrains the forward cascading of activation in the conceptual-lexical system. Context objects are likely to become phonologically coactivated if they are easily retrieved and if prioritized target processing leaves sufficient resources. PMID:21341927

  8. SIMULATING MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICAL FLOW WITH CONSTRAINED TRANSPORT AND ADAPTIVE MESH REFINEMENT: ALGORITHMS AND TESTS OF THE AstroBEAR CODE

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, Andrew J.; Frank, Adam; Varniere, Peggy; Mitran, Sorin; Jones, Thomas W.

    2009-06-15

    A description is given of the algorithms implemented in the AstroBEAR adaptive mesh-refinement code for ideal magnetohydrodynamics. The code provides several high-resolution shock-capturing schemes which are constructed to maintain conserved quantities of the flow in a finite-volume sense. Divergence-free magnetic field topologies are maintained to machine precision by collating the components of the magnetic field on a cell-interface staggered grid and utilizing the constrained transport approach for integrating the induction equations. The maintenance of magnetic field topologies on adaptive grids is achieved using prolongation and restriction operators which preserve the divergence and curl of the magnetic field across collocated grids of different resolutions. The robustness and correctness of the code is demonstrated by comparing the numerical solution of various tests with analytical solutions or previously published numerical solutions obtained by other codes.

  9. Using groundwater temperature data to constrain parameter estimation in a groundwater flow model of a wetland system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bravo, H.R.; Jiang, F.; Hunt, R.J.

    2002-01-01

    Parameter estimation is a powerful way to calibrate models. While head data alone are often insufficient to estimate unique parameters due to model nonuniqueness, flow-and-heat-transport modeling can constrain estimation and allow simultaneous estimation of boundary fluxes and hydraulic conductivity. In this work, synthetic and field models that did not converge when head data were used did converge when head and temperature were used. Furthermore, frequency domain analyses of head and temperature data allowed selection of appropriate modeling timescales. Inflows in the Wilton, Wisconsin, wetlands could be estimated over periods such as a growing season and over periods of a few days when heads were nearly steady and groundwater temperature varied during the day. While this methodology is computationally more demanding than traditional head calibration, the results gained are unobtainable using the traditional approach. These results suggest that temperature can efficiently supplement head data in systems where accurate flux calibration targets are unavailable.

  10. Improving Fiber Alignment in HARDI by Combining Contextual PDE Flow with Constrained Spherical Deconvolution

    PubMed Central

    Portegies, J. M.; Fick, R. H. J.; Sanguinetti, G. R.; Meesters, S. P. L.; Girard, G.; Duits, R.

    2015-01-01

    We propose two strategies to improve the quality of tractography results computed from diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) data. Both methods are based on the same PDE framework, defined in the coupled space of positions and orientations, associated with a stochastic process describing the enhancement of elongated structures while preserving crossing structures. In the first method we use the enhancement PDE for contextual regularization of a fiber orientation distribution (FOD) that is obtained on individual voxels from high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) data via constrained spherical deconvolution (CSD). Thereby we improve the FOD as input for subsequent tractography. Secondly, we introduce the fiber to bundle coherence (FBC), a measure for quantification of fiber alignment. The FBC is computed from a tractography result using the same PDE framework and provides a criterion for removing the spurious fibers. We validate the proposed combination of CSD and enhancement on phantom data and on human data, acquired with different scanning protocols. On the phantom data we find that PDE enhancements improve both local metrics and global metrics of tractography results, compared to CSD without enhancements. On the human data we show that the enhancements allow for a better reconstruction of crossing fiber bundles and they reduce the variability of the tractography output with respect to the acquisition parameters. Finally, we show that both the enhancement of the FODs and the use of the FBC measure on the tractography improve the stability with respect to different stochastic realizations of probabilistic tractography. This is shown in a clinical application: the reconstruction of the optic radiation for epilepsy surgery planning. PMID:26465600

  11. Improving Fiber Alignment in HARDI by Combining Contextual PDE Flow with Constrained Spherical Deconvolution.

    PubMed

    Portegies, J M; Fick, R H J; Sanguinetti, G R; Meesters, S P L; Girard, G; Duits, R

    2015-01-01

    We propose two strategies to improve the quality of tractography results computed from diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) data. Both methods are based on the same PDE framework, defined in the coupled space of positions and orientations, associated with a stochastic process describing the enhancement of elongated structures while preserving crossing structures. In the first method we use the enhancement PDE for contextual regularization of a fiber orientation distribution (FOD) that is obtained on individual voxels from high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) data via constrained spherical deconvolution (CSD). Thereby we improve the FOD as input for subsequent tractography. Secondly, we introduce the fiber to bundle coherence (FBC), a measure for quantification of fiber alignment. The FBC is computed from a tractography result using the same PDE framework and provides a criterion for removing the spurious fibers. We validate the proposed combination of CSD and enhancement on phantom data and on human data, acquired with different scanning protocols. On the phantom data we find that PDE enhancements improve both local metrics and global metrics of tractography results, compared to CSD without enhancements. On the human data we show that the enhancements allow for a better reconstruction of crossing fiber bundles and they reduce the variability of the tractography output with respect to the acquisition parameters. Finally, we show that both the enhancement of the FODs and the use of the FBC measure on the tractography improve the stability with respect to different stochastic realizations of probabilistic tractography. This is shown in a clinical application: the reconstruction of the optic radiation for epilepsy surgery planning.

  12. Improving Fiber Alignment in HARDI by Combining Contextual PDE Flow with Constrained Spherical Deconvolution.

    PubMed

    Portegies, J M; Fick, R H J; Sanguinetti, G R; Meesters, S P L; Girard, G; Duits, R

    2015-01-01

    We propose two strategies to improve the quality of tractography results computed from diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) data. Both methods are based on the same PDE framework, defined in the coupled space of positions and orientations, associated with a stochastic process describing the enhancement of elongated structures while preserving crossing structures. In the first method we use the enhancement PDE for contextual regularization of a fiber orientation distribution (FOD) that is obtained on individual voxels from high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) data via constrained spherical deconvolution (CSD). Thereby we improve the FOD as input for subsequent tractography. Secondly, we introduce the fiber to bundle coherence (FBC), a measure for quantification of fiber alignment. The FBC is computed from a tractography result using the same PDE framework and provides a criterion for removing the spurious fibers. We validate the proposed combination of CSD and enhancement on phantom data and on human data, acquired with different scanning protocols. On the phantom data we find that PDE enhancements improve both local metrics and global metrics of tractography results, compared to CSD without enhancements. On the human data we show that the enhancements allow for a better reconstruction of crossing fiber bundles and they reduce the variability of the tractography output with respect to the acquisition parameters. Finally, we show that both the enhancement of the FODs and the use of the FBC measure on the tractography improve the stability with respect to different stochastic realizations of probabilistic tractography. This is shown in a clinical application: the reconstruction of the optic radiation for epilepsy surgery planning. PMID:26465600

  13. Application of Crunch-Flow Routines to Constrain Present and Past Carbon Fluxes at Gas-Hydrate Bearing Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, Marta

    2014-01-31

    In November 2012, Oregon State University initiated the project entitled: Application of Crunch-Flow routines to constrain present and past carbon fluxes at gas-hydrate bearing sites. Within this project we developed Crunch-Flow based modeling modules that include important biogeochemical processes that need to be considered in gas hydrate environments. Our modules were applied to quantify carbon cycling in present and past systems, using data collected during several DOE-supported drilling expeditions, which include the Cascadia margin in US, Ulleung Basin in South Korea, and several sites drilled offshore India on the Bay of Bengal and Andaman Sea. Specifically, we completed modeling efforts that: 1) Reproduce the compositional and isotopic profiles observed at the eight drilled sites in the Ulleung Basin that constrain and contrast the carbon cycling pathways at chimney (high methane flux) and non-chimney sites (low methane, advective systems); 2) Simulate the Ba record in the sediments to quantify the past dynamics of methane flux in the southern Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia margin; and 3) Provide quantitative estimates of the thickness of individual mass transport deposits (MTDs), time elapsed after the MTD event, rate of sulfate reduction in the MTD, and time required to reach a new steady state at several sites drilled in the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) Basin off India. In addition we developed a hybrid model scheme by coupling a home-made MATLAB code with CrunchFlow to address the methane transport and chloride enrichment at the Ulleung Basins chimney sites, and contributed the modeling component to a study focusing on pore-scale controls on gas hydrate distribution in sediments from the Andaman Sea. These efforts resulted in two manuscripts currently under review, and contributed the modeling component of another pare, also under review. Lessons learned from these efforts are the basis of a mini-workshop to be held at Oregon State University (Feb 2014) to instruct

  14. Lower bounds on the mix norm of passive scalars advected by incompressible enstrophy-constrained flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Gautam; Kiselev, Alexander; Xu, Xiaoqian

    2014-05-01

    Consider a diffusion-free passive scalar θ being mixed by an incompressible flow u on the torus { T}^d . Our aim is to study how well this scalar can be mixed under an enstrophy constraint on the advecting velocity field. Our main result shows that the mix-norm ({\\Vert}{\\theta(t)}{\\Vert}_{H^{-1}}) is bounded below by an exponential function of time. The exponential decay rate we obtain is not universal and depends on the size of the support of the initial data. We also perform numerical simulations and confirm that the numerically observed decay rate scales similarly to the rigorous lower bound, at least for a significant initial period of time. The main idea behind our proof is to use the recent work of Crippa and De Lellis (2008 J. Reine Angew. Math. 616 15-46) making progress towards the resolution of Bressan's rearrangement cost conjecture.

  15. The Anisotropic Structure of South China Sea: Using OBS Data to Constrain Mantle Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Xue, M.; Yang, T.; Liu, C.; Hua, Q.; Xia, S.; Huang, H.; Le, B. M.; Huo, D.; Pan, M.

    2015-12-01

    The dynamic mechanism of the formation of South China Sea (SCS) has been debated for decades. The anisotropic structure can provide useful insight into the complex evolution of SCS by indicating its mantle flow direction and strength. In this study, we employ shear wave splitting methods on two half-year seismic data collected from 10 and 6 passive source Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBS) respectively. These OBSs were deployed along both sides of the extinct ridge in the central basin of SCS by Tongji University in 2012 and 2013 respectively, which were then successfully recovered in 2013 and 2015 respectively. Through processing and inspecting the global and regional earthquakes (with local events being processing) of the 2012 dataset, measurements are made for 2 global events and 24 regional events at 5 OBSs using the tangential energy minimization, the smallest eigenvalue minimization, as well as the correlation methods. We also implement cluster analysis on the splitting results obtained for different time windows as well as filtered at different frequency bands. For teleseismic core phases like SKS and PKS, we find the fast polarization direction beneath the central basin is approximately NE-SW, nearly parallel to the extinct ridge in the central basin of SCS. Whereas for regional events, the splitting analysis on S, PS and ScS phases shows much more complicated fast directions as the ray path varies for different phases. The fast directions observed can be divided into three groups: (1) for the events from the Eurasia plate, a gradual rotation of the fast polarization direction from NNE-SSW to NEE-SWW along the path from the inner Eurasia plate to the central SCS is observed, implying the mantle flow is controlled by the India-Eurasia collision; (2) for the events located at the junction of Pacific plate and Philippine plate, the dominant fast direction is NW-SE, almost perpendicular to Ryukyu Trench as well as sub-parallel to the absolute direction of

  16. Thermodynamically Constrained Averaging Theory Approach for Modeling Flow and Transport Phenomena in Porous Medium Systems: 7. Single-Phase Megascale Flow Models

    PubMed Central

    Gray, William G.; Miller, Cass T.

    2009-01-01

    This work is the seventh in a series that introduces and employs the thermodynamically constrained averaging theory (TCAT) for modeling flow and transport in multiscale porous medium systems. This paper expands the previous analyses in the series by developing models at a scale where spatial variations within the system are not considered. Thus the time variation of variables averaged over the entire system is modeled in relation to fluxes at the boundary of the system. This implementation of TCAT makes use of conservation equations for mass, momentum, and energy as well as an entropy balance. Additionally, classical irreversible thermodynamics is assumed to hold at the microscale and is averaged to the megascale, or system scale. The fact that the local equilibrium assumption does not apply at the megascale points to the importance of obtaining closure relations that account for the large-scale manifestation of small-scale variations. Example applications built on this foundation are suggested to stimulate future work. PMID:20436941

  17. Constraining {sup 13}C amounts in AGB stars through isotopic analysis of trace elements in presolar SiC.

    SciTech Connect

    Barzyk, J. G.; Savina, M. R.; Davis, A. M.; Gallino, R.; Gyngard, F.; Amari, S.; Zinner, E.; Pelliln, M. J.; Lewis, R. S.; Clayton, R. N.; Materials Science Division; Univ. Chicago; Chicago Ctr Cosmochem.; Universita di Torino; Washington Univ.

    2007-07-01

    Analyses of the isotopic compositions of multiple elements (Mo, Zr, and Ba) in individual mainstream presolar SiC grains were done by resonant ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS). While most heavy element compositions were consistent with model predictions for the slow neutron capture process (s-process) in low-mass (1.5-3 M{sub {circle_dot}}) asymptotic giant branch stars of solar metallicity when viewed on single-element three-isotope plots, grains with compositions deviating from model predictions were identified on multi-element plots. These grains have compositions that cannot result from any neutron capture process but can be explained by contamination in some elements with solar system material. Previous work in which only one heavy element per grain was examined has been unable to identify contaminated grains. The multi-element analyses of this study detected contaminated grains which were subsequently eliminated from consideration. The uncontaminated grains form a data set with a greatly reduced spread on the three-isotope plots of each element measured, corresponding to a smaller range of {sup 13}C pocket efficiencies in parent AGB stars. Furthermore, due to this reduced spread, the nature of the stellar starting material, previously interpreted as having solar isotopic composition, is uncertain. The constraint on {sup 13}C pocket efficiencies in parent stars of these grains may help uncover the mechanism responsible for formation of {sup 13}C, the primary neutron source for s-process nucleosynthesis in low-mass stars.

  18. 8.2% of the Human Genome Is Constrained: Variation in Rates of Turnover across Functional Element Classes in the Human Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Rands, Chris M.; Meader, Stephen; Ponting, Chris P.; Lunter, Gerton

    2014-01-01

    Ten years on from the finishing of the human reference genome sequence, it remains unclear what fraction of the human genome confers function, where this sequence resides, and how much is shared with other mammalian species. When addressing these questions, functional sequence has often been equated with pan-mammalian conserved sequence. However, functional elements that are short-lived, including those contributing to species-specific biology, will not leave a footprint of long-lasting negative selection. Here, we address these issues by identifying and characterising sequence that has been constrained with respect to insertions and deletions for pairs of eutherian genomes over a range of divergences. Within noncoding sequence, we find increasing amounts of mutually constrained sequence as species pairs become more closely related, indicating that noncoding constrained sequence turns over rapidly. We estimate that half of present-day noncoding constrained sequence has been gained or lost in approximately the last 130 million years (half-life in units of divergence time, d1/2 = 0.25–0.31). While enriched with ENCODE biochemical annotations, much of the short-lived constrained sequences we identify are not detected by models optimized for wider pan-mammalian conservation. Constrained DNase 1 hypersensitivity sites, promoters and untranslated regions have been more evolutionarily stable than long noncoding RNA loci which have turned over especially rapidly. By contrast, protein coding sequence has been highly stable, with an estimated half-life of over a billion years (d1/2 = 2.1–5.0). From extrapolations we estimate that 8.2% (7.1–9.2%) of the human genome is presently subject to negative selection and thus is likely to be functional, while only 2.2% has maintained constraint in both human and mouse since these species diverged. These results reveal that the evolutionary history of the human genome has been highly dynamic, particularly for its

  19. Grid Generator for Two, Three-dimensional Finite Element Subsurface Flow Models

    1993-04-28

    GRIDMAKER serves as a preprocessor for finite element models in solving two- and three-dimensional subsurface flow and pollutant transport problems. It is designed to generate three-point triangular or four-point quadrilateral elements for two-dimensional domains and eight-point hexahedron elements for three-dimensional domains. A two-dimensional domain of an aquifer with a variable depth layer is treated as a special case for depth-integrated two-dimensional, finite element subsurface flow models. The program accommodates the need for aquifers with heterogeneousmore » systems by identifying the type of material in each element.« less

  20. GRIDMAKER. Grid Generator for Two, Three-dimensional Finite Element Subsurface Flow Models

    SciTech Connect

    Tsay, T.K.; Yeh, G.T.; Wilson, G.V.; Toran, L.E.

    1990-06-01

    GRIDMAKER serves as a preprocessor for finite element models in solving two- and three-dimensional subsurface flow and pollutant transport problems. It is designed to generate three-point triangular or four-point quadrilateral elements for two-dimensional domains and eight-point hexahedron elements for three-dimensional domains. A two-dimensional domain of an aquifer with a variable depth layer is treated as a special case for depth-integrated two-dimensional, finite element subsurface flow models. The program accommodates the need for aquifers with heterogeneous systems by identifying the type of material in each element.

  1. A finite element method for the computation of transonic flow past airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberle, A.

    1980-01-01

    A finite element method for the computation of the transonic flow with shocks past airfoils is presented using the artificial viscosity concept for the local supersonic regime. Generally, the classic element types do not meet the accuracy requirements of advanced numerical aerodynamics requiring special attention to the choice of an appropriate element. A series of computed pressure distributions exhibits the usefulness of the method.

  2. Sand Production Modeling Using Superquadric Discrete Elements and Coupling of Fluid Flow and Particle Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Preece, D.S. Perkins, E.D.

    1999-02-10

    Techniques for modeling oil well sand production have been developed using the formulations for superquadric discrete elements and Darcy fluid flow. Discrete element models are generated using the new technique of particle cloning. Discrete element sources and sinks allow simulation of sand production from the initial state through the transition to an equilibrium state where particles are created and removed at the same rate.

  3. Numerical computation of transonic flows by finite-element and finite-difference methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafez, M. M.; Wellford, L. C.; Merkle, C. L.; Murman, E. M.

    1978-01-01

    Studies on applications of the finite element approach to transonic flow calculations are reported. Different discretization techniques of the differential equations and boundary conditions are compared. Finite element analogs of Murman's mixed type finite difference operators for small disturbance formulations were constructed and the time dependent approach (using finite differences in time and finite elements in space) was examined.

  4. Mixed fluid sources involved in diamond growth constrained by Sr-Nd-Pb-C-N isotopes and trace elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein-BenDavid, Ofra; Pearson, D. Graham; Nowell, Geoff M.; Ottley, Chris; McNeill, John C. R.; Cartigny, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Sub-micrometer inclusions in diamonds carry high-density fluids (HDF) from which the host diamonds have precipitated. The chemistry of these fluids is our best opportunity of characterizing the diamond-forming environment. The trace element patterns of diamond fluids vary within a limited range and are similar to those of carbonatitic/kimberlitic melts that originate from beneath the lithospheric mantle. A convecting mantle origin for the fluid is also implied by C isotopic compositions and by a preliminary Sr isotopic study (Akagi, T., Masuda, A., 1988. Isotopic and elemental evidence for a relationship between kimberlite and Zaire cubic diamonds. Nature 336, 665-667.). Nevertheless, the major element chemistry of HDFs is very different from that of kimberlites and carbonatites, varying widely and being characterized by extreme K enrichment (up to ˜ 39 wt.% on a water and carbonate free basis) and high volatile contents. The broad spectrum of major element compositions in diamond-forming fluids has been related to fluid-rock interaction and to immiscibility processes. Elemental signatures can be easily modified by a variety of mantle processes whereas radiogenic isotopes give a clear fingerprint of the time-integrated evolution of the fluid source region. Here we present the results of the first multi radiogenic-isotope (Sr, Nd, Pb) and trace element study on fluid-rich diamonds, implemented using a newly developed off-line laser sampling technique. The data are combined with N and C isotope analysis of the diamond matrix to better understand the possible sources of fluid involved in the formation of these diamonds. Sr isotope ratios vary significantly within single diamonds. The highly varied but unsupported Sr isotope ratios cannot be explained by immiscibility processes or fluid-mineral elemental fractionations occurring at the time of diamond growth. Our results demonstrate the clear involvement of a mixed fluid, with one component originating from ancient

  5. THE COMPOSITION OF INTERSTELLAR GRAINS TOWARD ζ OPHIUCHI: CONSTRAINING THE ELEMENTAL BUDGET NEAR THE DIFFUSE-DENSE CLOUD TRANSITION

    SciTech Connect

    Poteet, Charles A.; Whittet, Douglas C. B.; Draine, Bruce T.

    2015-03-10

    We investigate the composition of interstellar grains along the line of sight toward ζ Ophiuchi, a well-studied environment near the diffuse-dense cloud transition. A spectral decomposition analysis of the solid-state absorbers is performed using archival spectroscopic observations from the Spitzer Space Telescope and Infrared Space Observatory. We find strong evidence for the presence of sub-micron-sized amorphous silicate grains, principally comprised of olivine-like composition, with no convincing evidence of H{sub 2}O ice mantles. However, tentative evidence for thick H{sub 2}O ice mantles on large (a ≈ 2.8 μm) grains is presented. Solid-state abundances of elemental Mg, Si, Fe, and O are inferred from our analysis and compared to standard reference abundances. We find that nearly all of the Mg and Si atoms along the line of sight reside in amorphous silicate grains, while a substantial fraction of the elemental Fe resides in compounds other than silicates. Moreover, we find that the total abundance of elemental O is largely inconsistent with the adopted reference abundances, indicating that as much as ∼156 ppm of interstellar O is missing along the line of sight. After taking into account additional limits on the abundance of elemental O in other O-bearing solids, we conclude that any missing reservoir of elemental O must reside on large grains that are nearly opaque to infrared radiation.

  6. Finite element analysis of aeroacoustic jet-flap flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.; Manhardt, P. D.

    1977-01-01

    A computational analysis was performed on the steady, turbulent aerodynamic flowfields associated with a jet-blown flap. For regions devoid of flow separation, a parabolic approximation to the governing time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations was applied. Numerical results are presented for the symmetry plane flow of a slot-nozzle planar jet flap geometry, including prediction of flowfield evolution within the secondary mixing region immediately downstream of the trailing edge. Using a two equation turbulence kinetic energy closure model, rapid generation and decay of large spatial gradients in mean and correlated fluctuating velocity components within the immediate wake region were predicted. Modifications to the turbulent flow structure, as induced by porous surface treatment of the flap, were evaluated. The recirculating flow within a representative discrete slot in the surface was evaluated, using the two dimensional, time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations.

  7. Using chalcophile elements to constrain crustal contamination and xenolith-magma interaction in Cenozoic basalts of eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Gang; Huang, Xiao-Wen; Zhou, Mei-Fu; Chen, Li-Hui; Xu, Xi-Sheng

    2016-08-01

    Continental basalts have complicated petrogenetic processes, and their chemical compositions can be affected by multi-staged geological evolution. Compared to lithophile elements, chalcophile elements including Ni, platinum-group elements (PGEs) and Cu are sensitive to sulfide segregation and fractional crystallization during the evolution of mantle-derived magmas and can provide constraints on the genesis of continental basalts. Cenozoic intra-continental alkaline basalts in the Nanjing basaltic field, eastern China, include high-Ca and low-Ca varieties. All these basalts have poor PGE contents with Ir ranging from 0.016 ppb to 0.288 ppb and high Cu/Pd ratios from 0.7 × 105 to 4.7 × 105 (5.7 × 103 for DMM), indicating that they were derived from sulfide-saturated mantle sources with variable amounts of residual sulfide during melting or might undergo an early-sulfide segregation in the mantle. Relatively high Cu/Pd ratios along with high Pd concentrations for the high-Ca alkaline basalts indicate an additional removal of sulfide during magma ascent. Because these basalts have high, variable Pd/Ir ratios (2.8-16.8) with low Ce/Pb (9.9-19.7) ratios and εNd values (+ 3.6-+6.4), crustal contamination is proposed to be a potential process to induce the sulfide saturation and removal. Significantly increased Pd/Ir ratios for few high-Ca basalts can be explained by the fractionation of laurite or Ru-Os-Ir alloys with olivine or chromite. For low-Ca alkaline basalts, their PGE contents are well correlated with the MgO, Sc contents, incompatible element ratios (Lu/Hf, Na/Ti and Ca/Al) and Hf isotopes. Good correlations are also observed between Pd/Ir (or Rh/Ir) and Na/Ti (or Ca/Al) ratios. Variations of these elemental ratios and Hf isotopes is previously documented to be induced by the mixing of peridotite xenolith-released melts during ascent. Therefore, we suggest that such xenolith-magma interaction are also responsible for the variable PGE compositions of low

  8. Flow Applications of the Least Squares Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan

    1998-01-01

    The main thrust of the effort has been towards the development, analysis and implementation of the least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) for fluid dynamics and electromagnetics applications. In the past year, there were four major accomplishments: 1) special treatments in computational fluid dynamics and computational electromagnetics, such as upwinding, numerical dissipation, staggered grid, non-equal order elements, operator splitting and preconditioning, edge elements, and vector potential are unnecessary; 2) the analysis of the LSFEM for most partial differential equations can be based on the bounded inverse theorem; 3) the finite difference and finite volume algorithms solve only two Maxwell equations and ignore the divergence equations; and 4) the first numerical simulation of three-dimensional Marangoni-Benard convection was performed using the LSFEM.

  9. Simulation of large incompressible flows by the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercovier, M.; Engelman, M.

    Super computers together with low cost 32 bit machines with graphics render more actual the challenge of designing a general purpose Fluid Dynamic code. Such an approach was the key to the introduction of computational structural mechanics into the design cycle. There FEM codes have replaced experiments and are evaluation tools at every stage. Except for a very limited domain (low Reynolds numbers for instance) this "black box" concept cannot be aplied in fluid mechanics. Nevertheless the success of the modular approach of FIDAP, the addition of new models and the extension of its pre and post-processing capabilities bring a new bridge between the fluid mechanics engineer and the design floor shop. It is now the task of the scientific community to design acceptable models in domains like turbulent flows,multiphase flows slightly compressible flows and so on. At the same time faster and robust algorithms for highly non linear problems must be devised.

  10. Elements of an improved model of debris‐flow motion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, Richard M.

    2009-01-01

    A new depth‐averaged model of debris‐flow motion describes simultaneous evolution of flow velocity and depth, solid and fluid volume fractions, and pore‐fluid pressure. Non‐hydrostatic pore‐fluid pressure is produced by dilatancy, a state‐dependent property that links the depth‐averaged shear rate and volumetric strain rate of the granular phase. Pore‐pressure changes caused by shearing allow the model to exhibit rate‐dependent flow resistance, despite the fact that the basal shear traction involves only rate‐independent Coulomb friction. An analytical solution of simplified model equations shows that the onset of downslope motion can be accelerated or retarded by pore‐pressure change, contingent on whether dilatancy is positive or negative. A different analytical solution shows that such effects will likely be muted if downslope motion continues long enough, because dilatancy then evolves toward zero, and volume fractions and pore pressure concurrently evolve toward steady states.

  11. SUPG Finite Element Simulations of Compressible Flows for Aerothermodynamic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, Benjamin S.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Streamline-Upwind Petrov-Galerkin (SUPG) Finite Element Simulation. It covers the background, governing equations, weak formulation, shock capturing, inviscid flux discretization, time discretization, linearization, and implicit solution strategies. It also reviews some applications such as Type IV Shock Interaction, Forward-Facing Cavity and AEDC Sharp Double Cone.

  12. Applications of the Method of Space-Time Conservation Element and the Solution Element to Unsteady Chemically Reactive Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Sheng-Tao

    2001-01-01

    This document reports the conclusion and findings of our research activities for this grant. The goal of the project is the development and application of the method of Space-Time Conservation Element and Solution Element, or the CE/SE method, to simulate chemically reacting flows. The product of this project will be a high-fidelity, time-accurate flow solver analyzing unsteady flow fields advanced propulsion concepts, including the low-emission turbojet engine combustion and flow fields of the Pulse Detonation Engines (PDE). Based on the documents and computer software of the CE/SE method that we have received from the CE/SE working group at NASA Lewis, we have focused our research effort on addressing outstanding technical issues related to the extension of the CE/SE method for unsteady, chemically reactive flows. In particular, we have made progresses in the following three aspects: (1) Derivation of the governing equations for reacting flows; (2) Numerical treatments of stiff source terms; and (3) Detailed simulations of ZND detonation waves.

  13. Constrained Source Apportionment of Coarse Particulate Matter and Selected Trace Elements in Three Cities from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Sturtz, Timothy M.; Adar, Sara D.; Gould, Timothy; Larson, Timothy V.

    2016-01-01

    PM10-2.5 mass and trace element concentrations were measured in Winston-Salem, Chicago, and St. Paul at up to 60 sites per city during two different seasons in 2010. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) was used to explore the underlying sources of variability. Information on previously reported PM10-2.5 tire and brake wear profiles was used to constrain these features in PMF by prior specification of selected species ratios. We also modified PMF to allow for combining the measurements from all three cities into a single model while preserving city-specific soil features. Relatively minor differences were observed between model predictions with and without the prior ratio constraints, increasing confidence in our ability to identify separate brake wear and tire wear features. Brake wear, tire wear, fertilized soil, and re-suspended soil were found to be important sources of copper, zinc, phosphorus, and silicon respectively across all three urban areas. PMID:27468256

  14. The least-squares finite element method for low-mach-number compressible viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Sheng-Tao

    1994-01-01

    The present paper reports the development of the Least-Squares Finite Element Method (LSFEM) for simulating compressible viscous flows at low Mach numbers in which the incompressible flows pose as an extreme. Conventional approach requires special treatments for low-speed flows calculations: finite difference and finite volume methods are based on the use of the staggered grid or the preconditioning technique; and, finite element methods rely on the mixed method and the operator-splitting method. In this paper, however, we show that such difficulty does not exist for the LSFEM and no special treatment is needed. The LSFEM always leads to a symmetric, positive-definite matrix through which the compressible flow equations can be effectively solved. Two numerical examples are included to demonstrate the method: first, driven cavity flows at various Reynolds numbers; and, buoyancy-driven flows with significant density variation. Both examples are calculated by using full compressible flow equations.

  15. Persistent inflation at Aira caldera accompanying explosive activity at Sakurajima volcano: Constraining deformation source parameters from Finite Element inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickey, James; Gottsmann, Jo; Iguchi, Masato; Nakamichi, Haruhisa

    2015-04-01

    Aira caldera is located within Kagoshima Bay at the southern end of Kyushu, Japan. Sakurajima is an active post-caldera andesitic stratovolcano that sits on the caldera's southern rim. Despite frequent Vulcanian-type explosive activity, the area is experiencing continued uplift at a maximum rate of approximately 1.5 cm/yr with a footprint of 40 km, indicating that magma is being supplied faster than it is erupted. This is of particular concern as the amplitude of deformation is approaching the level inferred prior to the 1914 VEI 4 eruption. Using GPS data from 1996 - 2007 we explore causes for the uplift. To solve for the optimum deformation source parameters we use an inverse Finite Element method accounting for three-dimensional material heterogeneity (inferred from seismic tomography) and the surrounding topography of the region. The same inversions are also carried out using Finite Element models that incorporate simplified homogeneous or one-dimensional subsurface material properties, with and without topography. Results from the comparison of the six different models show statistically significant differences in the inferred deformation sources. This indicates that both subsurface heterogeneity and surface topography are essential in geodetic modelling to extract the most realistic deformation source parameters. The current best-fit source sits within a seismic low-velocity zone in the north-east of the caldera at a depth of approximately 14 km with a volume increase of 1.2 x 108 m3. The source location underlies a region of active underwater fumaroles within the Wakamiko crater and differs significantly from previous analytical modelling results. Seismic data further highlights areas of high seismic attenuation as well as large aseismic zones, both of which could allude to inelastic behaviour and a significant heat source at depth. To integrate these observations, subsequent forward Finite Element models will quantify the importance of rheology and

  16. Prediction of overall and blade-element performance for axial-flow pump configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serovy, G. K.; Kavanagh, P.; Okiishi, T. H.; Miller, M. J.

    1973-01-01

    A method and a digital computer program for prediction of the distributions of fluid velocity and properties in axial flow pump configurations are described and evaluated. The method uses the blade-element flow model and an iterative numerical solution of the radial equilbrium and continuity conditions. Correlated experimental results are used to generate alternative methods for estimating blade-element turning and loss characteristics. Detailed descriptions of the computer program are included, with example input and typical computed results.

  17. Finite element methods for non-Newtonian flows

    SciTech Connect

    Gartling, D.K.

    1986-01-01

    The application of the finite element method to problems in non-Newtonian fluid mechanics is described. The formulation of the basic equations is presented for both inelastic and viscoelastic constitutive models. Solution algorithms for treating the material nonlinearities associated with inealstic fluids are described; typical solution procedures for the implicit stress-rate equations of viscoelastic fluids are also presented. Simple example analyses are included for both types of fluid models. 65 refs., 21 figs.

  18. Enhanced finite element scheme for vibrational and flow induced sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaltenbacher, M.; Triebenbacher, S.; Wohlmuth, B.; Zörnre, S.

    2010-06-01

    The paper presents Finite Element (FE) methods for classical vibroacoustics as well as computational aeroacoustics. Therewith, we can handle different grid sizes in different regions and ensure a correct coupling at the interfaces by applying the Mortar FE method. Furthermore, we can fully take into account free radiation by a new Perfectly Matched Layer (PML) technique, which is stable even for long term computations. The applicability of our developed numerical methods will be demonstrated by simulation results of the human phonation.

  19. Laminar and turbulent incompressible fluid flow analysis with heat transfer by the finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    A study of the finite element method applied to two-dimensional incompressible fluid flow analysis with heat transfer is performed using a mixed Galerkin finite element method with the primitive variable form of the model equations. Four biquadratic, quadrilateral elements are compared in this study--the serendipity biquadratic element with bilinear continuous pressure interpolation (Q2(8)-Q1) and the Lagrangian biquadratic element with bilinear continuous pressure interpolation (Q2-Q1) of the Taylor-Hood form. A modified form of the Q2-Q1 element is also studied. The pressure interpolation is augmented by a discontinuous constant shape function for pressure (Q2-Q1+). The discontinuous pressure element formulation makes use of biquadratic shape functions and a discontinuous linear interpolation of the pressure (Q2-P1(3)). Laminar flow solutions, with heat transfer, are compared to analytical and computational benchmarks for flat channel, backward-facing step and buoyancy driven flow in a square cavity. It is shown that the discontinuous pressure elements provide superior solution characteristics over the continuous pressure elements. Highly accurate heat transfer solutions are obtained and the Q2-P1(3) element is chosen for extension to turbulent flow simulations. Turbulent flow solutions are presented for both low turbulence Reynolds number and high Reynolds number formulations of two-equation turbulence models. The following three forms of the length scale transport equation are studied; the turbulence energy dissipation rate ([var epsilon]), the turbulence frequency ([omega]) and the turbulence time scale (tau). It is shown that the low turbulence Reynolds number model consisting of the K - [tau] transport equations, coupled with the damping functions of Shih and Hsu, provides an optimal combination of numerical stability and solution accuracy for the flat channel flow.

  20. Elements of an improved model of debris-flow motion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, R.M.

    2009-01-01

    A new depth-averaged model of debris-flow motion describes simultaneous evolution of flow velocity and depth, solid and fluid volume fractions, and pore-fluid pressure. Non-hydrostatic pore-fluid pressure is produced by dilatancy, a state-dependent property that links the depth-averaged shear rate and volumetric strain rate of the granular phase. Pore-pressure changes caused by shearing allow the model to exhibit rate-dependent flow resistance, despite the fact that the basal shear traction involves only rate-independent Coulomb friction. An analytical solution of simplified model equations shows that the onset of downslope motion can be accelerated or retarded by pore-pressure change, contingent on whether dilatancy is positive or negative. A different analytical solution shows that such effects will likely be muted if downslope motion continues long enough, because dilatancy then evolves toward zero, and volume fractions and pore pressure concurrently evolve toward steady states. ?? 2009 American Institute of Physics.

  1. Mean and turbulent flow development through an array of rotating elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Anna; Dabiri, John; Koseff, Jeffrey

    2014-11-01

    The adjustment of an incoming boundary layer profile as it impacts and interacts with an array of elements has received significant attention in the context of terrestrial and aquatic canopies and more recently in the context of horizontal axis wind farms. The distance required for the mean flow profile to stabilize, the energy transport through the array, and the structure of the turbulence within the array are directly dependent upon such factors as the element height, density, rigidity/flexibility, frontal area distribution, element homogeneity, and underlying topography. In the present study, the mean and turbulent development of the flow through an array of rotating elements was examined experimentally. Element rotation has been shown to drastically alter wake dynamics of single and paired elements, but the possible extension of such rotation-driven dynamics had not previously been examined on larger groups of elements. Practically, such an array of rotating elements may provide insight into the flow dynamics of an array of vertical axis wind turbines. 2D particle image velocimetry was used along the length of the array in order to examine the effects of an increasing ratio of cylinder rotation speed to streamwise freestream velocity on flow development and structure. Work supported by a NSF Graduate Research Fellowship & Stanford Graduate Fellowship to A.E.C, by funding to J.O.D. from ONR N000141211047 and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation through Grant GBMF2645, and by funding from the EFML.

  2. ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH BRIEF : ANALYTIC ELEMENT MODELING OF GROUND-WATER FLOW AND HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several advances in the analytic element method have been made to enhance its performance and facilitate three-dimensional ground-water flow modeling in a regional aquifer setting. First, a new public domain modular code (ModAEM) has been developed for modeling ground-water flow ...

  3. Thermodynamically Constrained Averaging Theory Approach for Modeling Flow and Transport Phenomena in Porous Medium Systems: 5. Single-Fluid-Phase Transport

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Cass T.

    2009-01-01

    This work is the fifth in a series of papers on the thermodynamically constrained averaging theory (TCAT) approach for modeling flow and transport phenomena in multiscale porous medium systems. The general TCAT framework and the mathematical foundation presented in previous works are used to develop models that describe species transport and single-fluid-phase flow through a porous medium system in varying physical regimes. Classical irreversible thermodynamics formulations for species in fluids, solids, and interfaces are developed. Two different approaches are presented, one that makes use of a momentum equation for each entity along with constitutive relations for species diffusion and dispersion, and a second approach that makes use of a momentum equation for each species in an entity. The alternative models are developed by relying upon different approaches to constrain an entropy inequality using mass, momentum, and energy conservation equations. The resultant constrained entropy inequality is simplified and used to guide the development of closed models. Specific instances of dilute and non-dilute systems are examined and compared to alternative formulation approaches. PMID:22563137

  4. Spectral Element Method for the Simulation of Unsteady Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diosady, Laslo Tibor; Murman, Scott M.

    2013-01-01

    This work uses a discontinuous-Galerkin spectral-element method (DGSEM) to solve the compressible Navier-Stokes equations [1{3]. The inviscid ux is computed using the approximate Riemann solver of Roe [4]. The viscous fluxes are computed using the second form of Bassi and Rebay (BR2) [5] in a manner consistent with the spectral-element approximation. The method of lines with the classical 4th-order explicit Runge-Kutta scheme is used for time integration. Results for polynomial orders up to p = 15 (16th order) are presented. The code is parallelized using the Message Passing Interface (MPI). The computations presented in this work are performed using the Sandy Bridge nodes of the NASA Pleiades supercomputer at NASA Ames Research Center. Each Sandy Bridge node consists of 2 eight-core Intel Xeon E5-2670 processors with a clock speed of 2.6Ghz and 2GB per core memory. On a Sandy Bridge node the Tau Benchmark [6] runs in a time of 7.6s.

  5. A robust, finite element model for hydrostatic surface water flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, R.A.; Casulli, V.

    1998-01-01

    A finite element scheme is introduced for the 2-dimensional shallow water equations using semi-implicit methods in time. A semi-Lagrangian method is used to approximate the effects of advection. A wave equation is formed at the discrete level such that the equations decouple into an equation for surface elevation and a momentum equation for the horizontal velocity. The convergence rates and relative computational efficiency are examined with the use of three test cases representing various degrees of difficulty. A test with a polar-quadrant grid investigates the response to local grid-scale forcing and the presence of spurious modes, a channel test case establishes convergence rates, and a field-scale test case examines problems with highly irregular grids.A finite element scheme is introduced for the 2-dimensional shallow water equations using semi-implicit methods in time. A semi-Lagrangian method is used to approximate the effects of advection. A wave equation is formed at the discrete level such that the equations decouple into an equation for surface elevation and a momentum equation for the horizontal velocity. The convergence rates and relative computational efficiency are examined with the use of three test cases representing various degrees of difficulty. A test with a polar-quadrant grid investigates the response to local grid-scale forcing and the presence of spurious modes, a channel test case establishes convergence rates, and a field-scale test case examines problems with highly irregular grids.

  6. Stress interaction at the Lazufre volcanic region, as constrained by InSAR, seismic tomography and boundary element modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkhoo, Mehdi; Walter, Thomas R.; Lundgren, Paul; Spica, Zack; Legrand, Denis

    2016-04-01

    The Azufre-Lastarria volcanic complex in the central Andes has been recognized as a major region of magma intrusion. Both deep and shallow inflating reservoirs inferred through InSAR time series inversions, are the main sources of a multi-scale deformation accompanied by pronounced fumarolic activity. The possible interactions between these reservoirs, as well as the path of propagating fluids and the development of their pathways, however, have not been investigated. Results from recent seismic noise tomography in the area show localized zones of shear wave velocity anomalies, with a low shear wave velocity region at 1 km depth and another one at 4 km depth beneath Lastarria. Although the inferred shallow zone is in a good agreement with the location of the shallow deformation source, the deep zone does not correspond to any deformation source in the area. Here, using the boundary element method (BEM), we have performed an in-depth continuum mechanical investigation of the available ascending and descending InSAR data. We modelled the deep source, taking into account the effect of topography and complex source geometry on the inversion. After calculating the stress field induced by this source, we apply Paul's criterion (a variation on Mohr-Coulomb failure) to recognize locations that are liable for failure. We show that the locations of tensile and shear failure almost perfectly coincide with the shallow and deep anomalies as identified by shear wave velocity, respectively. Based on the stress-change models we conjecture that the deep reservoir controls the development of shallower hydrothermal fluids; a hypothesis that can be tested and applied to other volcanoes.

  7. Evolutionarily conserved and conformationally constrained short peptides might serve as DNA recognition elements in intrinsically disordered regions.

    PubMed

    Tayal, Nitish; Choudhary, Preeti; Pandit, Shashi B; Sandhu, Kuljeet Singh

    2014-06-01

    Despite recent advances, it is yet not clear how intrinsically disordered regions in proteins recognize their targets without any defined structures. Short linear motifs had been proposed to mediate molecular recognition by disordered regions; however, the underlying structural prerequisite remains elusive. Moreover, the role of short linear motifs in DNA recognition has not been studied. We report a repertoire of short evolutionarily Conserved Recognition Elements (CoREs) in long intrinsically disordered regions, which have very distinct amino-acid propensities from those of known motifs, and exhibit a strong tendency to retain their three-dimensional conformations compared to adjacent regions. The majority of CoREs directly interact with the DNA in the available 3D structures, which is further supported by literature evidence, analyses of ΔΔG values of DNA-binding energies and threading-based prediction of DNA binding potential. CoREs were enriched in cancer-associated missense mutations, further strengthening their functional nature. Significant enrichment of glycines in CoREs and the preference of glycyl ϕ-Ψ values within the left-handed bridge range in the l-disallowed region of the Ramachandran plot suggest that Gly-to-nonGly mutations within CoREs might alter the backbone conformation and consequently the function, a hypothesis that we reconciled using available mutation data. We conclude that CoREs might serve as bait for DNA recognition by long disordered regions and that certain mutations in these peptides can disrupt their DNA binding potential and consequently the protein function. We further hypothesize that the preferred conformations of CoREs and of glycyl residues therein might play an important role in DNA binding. The highly ordered nature of CoREs hints at a therapeutic strategy to inhibit malicious molecular interactions using small molecules mimicking CoRE conformations.

  8. Adaptive Meshing Techniques for Viscous Flow Calculations on Mixed Element Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    An adaptive refinement strategy based on hierarchical element subdivision is formulated and implemented for meshes containing arbitrary mixtures of tetrahendra, hexahendra, prisms and pyramids. Special attention is given to keeping memory overheads as low as possible. This procedure is coupled with an algebraic multigrid flow solver which operates on mixed-element meshes. Inviscid flows as well as viscous flows are computed an adaptively refined tetrahedral, hexahedral, and hybrid meshes. The efficiency of the method is demonstrated by generating an adapted hexahedral mesh containing 3 million vertices on a relatively inexpensive workstation.

  9. Interpretation of Flow Logs from Nevada Test Site Boreholes to Estimate Hydraulic conductivity Using Numerical Simulations Constrained by Single-Well Aquifer Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, C. Amanda; Halford, Keith J.; Laczniak, Randell J.

    2010-02-12

    Hydraulic conductivities of volcanic and carbonate lithologic units at the Nevada Test Site were estimated from flow logs and aquifer-test data. Borehole flow and drawdown were integrated and interpreted using a radial, axisymmetric flow model, AnalyzeHOLE. This integrated approach is used because complex well completions and heterogeneous aquifers and confining units produce vertical flow in the annular space and aquifers adjacent to the wellbore. AnalyzeHOLE simulates vertical flow, in addition to horizontal flow, which accounts for converging flow toward screen ends and diverging flow toward transmissive intervals. Simulated aquifers and confining units uniformly are subdivided by depth into intervals in which the hydraulic conductivity is estimated with the Parameter ESTimation (PEST) software. Between 50 and 150 hydraulic-conductivity parameters were estimated by minimizing weighted differences between simulated and measured flow and drawdown. Transmissivity estimates from single-well or multiple-well aquifer tests were used to constrain estimates of hydraulic conductivity. The distribution of hydraulic conductivity within each lithology had a minimum variance because estimates were constrained with Tikhonov regularization. AnalyzeHOLE simulated hydraulic-conductivity estimates for lithologic units across screened and cased intervals are as much as 100 times less than those estimated using proportional flow-log analyses applied across screened intervals only. Smaller estimates of hydraulic conductivity for individual lithologic units are simulated because sections of the unit behind cased intervals of the wellbore are not assumed to be impermeable, and therefore, can contribute flow to the wellbore. Simulated hydraulic-conductivity estimates vary by more than three orders of magnitude across a lithologic unit, indicating a high degree of heterogeneity in volcanic and carbonate-rock units. The higher water transmitting potential of carbonate-rock units relative

  10. Interpretation of Flow Logs from Nevada Test Site Boreholes to Estimate Hydraulic Conductivity Using Numerical Simulations Constrained by Single-Well Aquifer Tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garcia, C. Amanda; Halford, Keith J.; Laczniak, Randell J.

    2010-01-01

    Hydraulic conductivities of volcanic and carbonate lithologic units at the Nevada Test Site were estimated from flow logs and aquifer-test data. Borehole flow and drawdown were integrated and interpreted using a radial, axisymmetric flow model, AnalyzeHOLE. This integrated approach is used because complex well completions and heterogeneous aquifers and confining units produce vertical flow in the annular space and aquifers adjacent to the wellbore. AnalyzeHOLE simulates vertical flow, in addition to horizontal flow, which accounts for converging flow toward screen ends and diverging flow toward transmissive intervals. Simulated aquifers and confining units uniformly are subdivided by depth into intervals in which the hydraulic conductivity is estimated with the Parameter ESTimation (PEST) software. Between 50 and 150 hydraulic-conductivity parameters were estimated by minimizing weighted differences between simulated and measured flow and drawdown. Transmissivity estimates from single-well or multiple-well aquifer tests were used to constrain estimates of hydraulic conductivity. The distribution of hydraulic conductivity within each lithology had a minimum variance because estimates were constrained with Tikhonov regularization. AnalyzeHOLE simulated hydraulic-conductivity estimates for lithologic units across screened and cased intervals are as much as 100 times less than those estimated using proportional flow-log analyses applied across screened intervals only. Smaller estimates of hydraulic conductivity for individual lithologic units are simulated because sections of the unit behind cased intervals of the wellbore are not assumed to be impermeable, and therefore, can contribute flow to the wellbore. Simulated hydraulic-conductivity estimates vary by more than three orders of magnitude across a lithologic unit, indicating a high degree of heterogeneity in volcanic and carbonate-rock units. The higher water transmitting potential of carbonate-rock units relative

  11. A New Finite Element Approach for Prediction of Aerothermal Loads: Progress in Inviscid Flow Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bey, K. S.; Thornton, E. A.; Dechaumphai, P.; Ramakrishnan, R.

    1985-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of finite element methodology for the prediction of aerothermal loads is described. Two dimensional, inviscid computations are presented, but emphasis is placed on development of an approach extendable to three dimensional viscous flows. Research progress is described for: (1) utilization of a commerically available program to construct flow solution domains and display computational results, (2) development of an explicit Taylor-Galerkin solution algorithm, (3) closed form evaluation of finite element matrices, (4) vector computer programming strategies, and (5) validation of solutions. Two test problems of interest to NASA Langley aerothermal research are studied. Comparisons of finite element solutions for Mach 6 flow with other solution methods and experimental data validate fundamental capabilities of the approach for analyzing high speed inviscid compressible flows.

  12. Response of hot element flush wall gauges in oscillating laminar flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giddings, T. A.; Cook, W. J.

    1986-01-01

    The time dependent response characteristics of flush-mounted hot element gauges used as instruments to measure wall shear stress in unsteady periodic air flows were investigated. The study was initiated because anomalous results were obtained from the gauges in oscillating turbulent flows for the phase relation of the wall shear stress variation, indicating possible gauge response problems. Flat plate laminar oscillating turbulent flows characterized by a mean free stream velocity with a superposed sinusoidal variation were performed. Laminar rather than turbulent flows were studied, because a numerical solution for the phase angle between the free stream velocity and the wall shear stress variation that is known to be correct can be obtained. The focus is on comparing the phase angle indicated by the hot element gauges with corresponding numerical prediction for the phase angle, since agreement would indicate that the hot element gauges faithfully follow the true wall shear stress variation.

  13. A package for 3-D unstructured grid generation, finite-element flow solution and flow field visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parikh, Paresh; Pirzadeh, Shahyar; Loehner, Rainald

    1990-01-01

    A set of computer programs for 3-D unstructured grid generation, fluid flow calculations, and flow field visualization was developed. The grid generation program, called VGRID3D, generates grids over complex configurations using the advancing front method. In this method, the point and element generation is accomplished simultaneously, VPLOT3D is an interactive, menudriven pre- and post-processor graphics program for interpolation and display of unstructured grid data. The flow solver, VFLOW3D, is an Euler equation solver based on an explicit, two-step, Taylor-Galerkin algorithm which uses the Flux Corrected Transport (FCT) concept for a wriggle-free solution. Using these programs, increasingly complex 3-D configurations of interest to aerospace community were gridded including a complete Space Transportation System comprised of the space-shuttle orbitor, the solid-rocket boosters, and the external tank. Flow solutions were obtained on various configurations in subsonic, transonic, and supersonic flow regimes.

  14. Calculation of compressible boundary layer flow about airfoils by a finite element/finite difference method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, Stuart L.; Meade, Andrew J., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented of a finite element/finite difference method (semidiscrete Galerkin method) used to calculate compressible boundary layer flow about airfoils, in which the group finite element scheme is applied to the Dorodnitsyn formulation of the boundary layer equations. The semidiscrete Galerkin (SDG) method promises to be fast, accurate and computationally efficient. The SDG method can also be applied to any smoothly connected airfoil shape without modification and possesses the potential capability of calculating boundary layer solutions beyond flow separation. Results are presented for low speed laminar flow past a circular cylinder and past a NACA 0012 airfoil at zero angle of attack at a Mach number of 0.5. Also shown are results for compressible flow past a flat plate for a Mach number range of 0 to 10 and results for incompressible turbulent flow past a flat plate. All numerical solutions assume an attached boundary layer.

  15. Bluff Body Flow Simulation Using a Vortex Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony Leonard; Phillippe Chatelain; Michael Rebel

    2004-09-30

    Heavy ground vehicles, especially those involved in long-haul freight transportation, consume a significant part of our nation's energy supply. it is therefore of utmost importance to improve their efficiency, both to reduce emissions and to decrease reliance on imported oil. At highway speeds, more than half of the power consumed by a typical semi truck goes into overcoming aerodynamic drag, a fraction which increases with speed and crosswind. Thanks to better tools and increased awareness, recent years have seen substantial aerodynamic improvements by the truck industry, such as tractor/trailer height matching, radiator area reduction, and swept fairings. However, there remains substantial room for improvement as understanding of turbulent fluid dynamics grows. The group's research effort focused on vortex particle methods, a novel approach for computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Where common CFD methods solve or model the Navier-Stokes equations on a grid which stretches from the truck surface outward, vortex particle methods solve the vorticity equation on a Lagrangian basis of smooth particles and do not require a grid. They worked to advance the state of the art in vortex particle methods, improving their ability to handle the complicated, high Reynolds number flow around heavy vehicles. Specific challenges that they have addressed include finding strategies to accurate capture vorticity generation and resultant forces at the truck wall, handling the aerodynamics of spinning bodies such as tires, application of the method to the GTS model, computation time reduction through improved integration methods, a closest point transform for particle method in complex geometrics, and work on large eddy simulation (LES) turbulence modeling.

  16. Supercomputer implementation of finite element algorithms for high speed compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, E. A.; Ramakrishnan, R.

    1986-01-01

    Prediction of compressible flow phenomena using the finite element method is of recent origin and considerable interest. Two shock capturing finite element formulations for high speed compressible flows are described. A Taylor-Galerkin formulation uses a Taylor series expansion in time coupled with a Galerkin weighted residual statement. The Taylor-Galerkin algorithms use explicit artificial dissipation, and the performance of three dissipation models are compared. A Petrov-Galerkin algorithm has as its basis the concepts of streamline upwinding. Vectorization strategies are developed to implement the finite element formulations on the NASA Langley VPS-32. The vectorization scheme results in finite element programs that use vectors of length of the order of the number of nodes or elements. The use of the vectorization procedure speeds up processing rates by over two orders of magnitude. The Taylor-Galerkin and Petrov-Galerkin algorithms are evaluated for 2D inviscid flows on criteria such as solution accuracy, shock resolution, computational speed and storage requirements. The convergence rates for both algorithms are enhanced by local time-stepping schemes. Extension of the vectorization procedure for predicting 2D viscous and 3D inviscid flows are demonstrated. Conclusions are drawn regarding the applicability of the finite element procedures for realistic problems that require hundreds of thousands of nodes.

  17. The effect of slot height and difference in gas densities for coaxial jets on jet mixing in constrained swirled flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishkin, N. E.

    2015-07-01

    Experiments were conducted about the effect of height of annular slot on efficiency of film cooling in a tube flow. Nonisothermal nature of flows was modelled by mixing of jets with different densities: air with argon or with helium: the concentration of foreign gas on wall was measured. The influence of nearwall jet swirling and of proportions of densities of gas flows as key factors for laminarization of mixing was considered.

  18. A two-dimensional adaptive spectral element method for the direct simulation of incompressible flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Li-Chieh

    The spectral element method is a high order discretization scheme for the solution of nonlinear partial differential equations. The method draws its strengths from the finite element method for geometrical flexibility and spectral methods for high accuracy. Although the method is, in theory, very powerful for complex phenomena such as transitional flows, its practical implementation is limited by the arbitrary choice of domain discretization. For instance, it is hard to estimate the appropriate number of elements for a specific case. Selection of regions to be refined or coarsened is difficult especially as the flow becomes more complex and memory limits of the computer are stressed. We present an adaptive spectral element method in which the grid is automatically refined or coarsened in order to capture underresolved regions of the domain and to follow regions requiring high resolution as they develop in time. The objective is to provide the best and most efficient solution to a time-dependent nonlinear problem by continually optimizing resource allocation. The adaptivity is based on an error estimator which determines which regions need more resolution. The solution strategy is as follows: compute an initial solution with a suitable initial mesh, estimate errors in the solution locally in each element, modify the mesh according to the error estimators, interpolate old mesh solutions onto the new elements, and resume the numerical solution process. A two-dimensional adaptive spectral element method for the direct simulation of incompressible flows has been developed. The adaptive algorithm effectively diagnoses and refines regions of the flow where complexity of the solution requires increased resolution. The method has been demonstrated on two-dimensional examples in heat conduction, Stokes and Navier-Stokes flows.

  19. Finite element analysis in fluids; Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on Finite Element Methods in Flow Problems, University of Alabama, Huntsville, Apr. 3-7, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, T. J. (Editor); Karr, Gerald R. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    Recent advances in computational fluid dynamics are examined in reviews and reports, with an emphasis on finite-element methods. Sections are devoted to adaptive meshes, atmospheric dynamics, combustion, compressible flows, control-volume finite elements, crystal growth, domain decomposition, EM-field problems, FDM/FEM, and fluid-structure interactions. Consideration is given to free-boundary problems with heat transfer, free surface flow, geophysical flow problems, heat and mass transfer, high-speed flow, incompressible flow, inverse design methods, MHD problems, the mathematics of finite elements, and mesh generation. Also discussed are mixed finite elements, multigrid methods, non-Newtonian fluids, numerical dissipation, parallel vector processing, reservoir simulation, seepage, shallow-water problems, spectral methods, supercomputer architectures, three-dimensional problems, and turbulent flows.

  20. Finite element analysis of transonic flows in cascades: Importance of computational grids in improving accuracy and convergence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ecer, A.; Akay, H. U.

    1981-01-01

    The finite element method is applied for the solution of transonic potential flows through a cascade of airfoils. Convergence characteristics of the solution scheme are discussed. Accuracy of the numerical solutions is investigated for various flow regions in the transonic flow configuration. The design of an efficient finite element computational grid is discussed for improving accuracy and convergence.

  1. Large-eddy simulation of turbulent flow using the finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    McCallen, R.C.

    1995-02-15

    The equations of motion describing turbulent flows (in both the low and high Reynolds-number regimes) are well established. However, present day computers cannot meet the enormous computational requirement for numerically solving the governing equations for common engineering flows in the high Reynolds number turbulent regime. The characteristics that make turbulent, high Reynolds number flows difficult to simulate is the extreme range of time and space scales of motion. Most current engineering calculations are performed using semi-empirical equations, developed in terms of the flow mean (average) properties. These turbulence{open_quote} models{close_quote} (semi-empirical/analytical approximations) do not explicitly account for the eddy structures and thus, the temporal and spatial flow fluctuations are not resolved. In these averaging approaches, it is necessary to approximate all the turbulent structures using semi-empirical relations, and as a result, the turbulence models must be tailored for specific flow conditions and geometries with parameters obtained (usually) from physical experiments. The motivation for this research is the development of a finite element turbulence modeling approach which will ultimately be used to predict the wind flow around buildings. Accurate turbulence models of building flow are needed to predict the dispersion of airborne pollutants. The building flow turbulence models used today are not capable of predicting the three-dimensional separating and reattaching flows without the manipulation of many empirical parameters. These empirical parameters must be set by experimental data and they may vary unpredictably with building geometry, building orientation, and upstream flow conditions.

  2. Computational Analysis of Enhanced Magnetic Bioseparation in Microfluidic Systems with Flow-Invasive Magnetic Elements

    PubMed Central

    Khashan, S. A.; Alazzam, A.; Furlani, E. P.

    2014-01-01

    A microfluidic design is proposed for realizing greatly enhanced separation of magnetically-labeled bioparticles using integrated soft-magnetic elements. The elements are fixed and intersect the carrier fluid (flow-invasive) with their length transverse to the flow. They are magnetized using a bias field to produce a particle capture force. Multiple stair-step elements are used to provide efficient capture throughout the entire flow channel. This is in contrast to conventional systems wherein the elements are integrated into the walls of the channel, which restricts efficient capture to limited regions of the channel due to the short range nature of the magnetic force. This severely limits the channel size and hence throughput. Flow-invasive elements overcome this limitation and enable microfluidic bioseparation systems with superior scalability. This enhanced functionality is quantified for the first time using a computational model that accounts for the dominant mechanisms of particle transport including fully-coupled particle-fluid momentum transfer. PMID:24931437

  3. Computational analysis of enhanced magnetic bioseparation in microfluidic systems with flow-invasive magnetic elements.

    PubMed

    Khashan, S A; Alazzam, A; Furlani, E P

    2014-01-01

    A microfluidic design is proposed for realizing greatly enhanced separation of magnetically-labeled bioparticles using integrated soft-magnetic elements. The elements are fixed and intersect the carrier fluid (flow-invasive) with their length transverse to the flow. They are magnetized using a bias field to produce a particle capture force. Multiple stair-step elements are used to provide efficient capture throughout the entire flow channel. This is in contrast to conventional systems wherein the elements are integrated into the walls of the channel, which restricts efficient capture to limited regions of the channel due to the short range nature of the magnetic force. This severely limits the channel size and hence throughput. Flow-invasive elements overcome this limitation and enable microfluidic bioseparation systems with superior scalability. This enhanced functionality is quantified for the first time using a computational model that accounts for the dominant mechanisms of particle transport including fully-coupled particle-fluid momentum transfer. PMID:24931437

  4. Three-dimensional finite element simulation of viscoelastic fluid flow using the EVSS-G

    SciTech Connect

    Benard, A.; Lovalenti, P.M.; Tullock, D.L.; Montalbano, E.D.; Guell, D.C.

    1996-10-01

    An implementation of the EVSS-G method in a finite element framework is presented for modeling three-dimensional viscoelastic flows. The extension from two to three dimensions is discussed, along with the use of the Picard and Newton-Raphson iterative techniques. A selection of benchmark problems, with known analytical solutions are presented as validation of the implementation as well as results for secondary flows in rectangular ducts. 7 refs.

  5. Simulation of Turbulent Flow in a Complex Passage with a Vibrating Structure by Finite Element Formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L. X.; Guo, Y.

    A modeling of the turbulent flow in a complex passage with dynamical fluid-structure interaction (FSI) is established on the generalized variational principle. A monolithic coupling method on the finite element formulations (FEM) is used to realize numerical computation of the flow with dynamical FSI. The comparisons with LES show that the results on the FEM formulations suggested in this paper are favorable, and the computing effort is economical.

  6. A FORTRAN computer code for calculating flows in multiple-blade-element cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfarland, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    A solution technique has been developed for solving the multiple-blade-element, surface-of-revolution, blade-to-blade flow problem in turbomachinery. The calculation solves approximate flow equations which include the effects of compressibility, radius change, blade-row rotation, and variable stream sheet thickness. An integral equation solution (i.e., panel method) is used to solve the equations. A description of the computer code and computer code input is given in this report.

  7. Efficient simulation of incompressible viscous flow over single and multi-element airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Stuart E.; Wiltberger, N. L.; Kwak, Dochan

    1992-01-01

    Incompressible viscous turbulent flows over single- and multiple-element airfoils are numerically simulated in an efficient manner by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The solution algorithm uses the method of pseudocompressibility with an upwind-differencing scheme for the convective fluxes and an implicit line-relaxation scheme to study high-lift take-off and landing configurations and to compute lift and drag at various angles of attack up to stall. Two different turbulence models are tested in computing the flow over an NACA 4412 airfoil. The approach used for multiple-element airfoils involves the use of multiple zones of structured grids fitted to each element. Two different approaches are compared: a patched system of grids and an overlaid Chimera system of grids. Computational results are presented for two-element, three-element, and four-element airfoil configurations. Excellent agreement with experimental surface-pressure coefficients is seen. The code converges in less than 200 iterations, requiring on the order of one minute of CPU time on a CRAY YMP per element in the airfoil configuration.

  8. Efficient simulation of incompressible viscous flow over multi-element airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Stuart E.; Wiltberger, N. Lyn; Kwak, Dochan

    1993-01-01

    The incompressible, viscous, turbulent flow over single and multi-element airfoils is numerically simulated in an efficient manner by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The solution algorithm employs the method of pseudo compressibility and utilizes an upwind differencing scheme for the convective fluxes, and an implicit line-relaxation scheme. The motivation for this work includes interest in studying high-lift take-off and landing configurations of various aircraft. In particular, accurate computation of lift and drag at various angles of attack up to stall is desired. Two different turbulence models are tested in computing the flow over an NACA 4412 airfoil; an accurate prediction of stall is obtained. The approach used for multi-element airfoils involves the use of multiple zones of structured grids fitted to each element. Two different approaches are compared; a patched system of grids, and an overlaid Chimera system of grids. Computational results are presented for two-element, three-element, and four-element airfoil configurations. Excellent agreement with experimental surface pressure coefficients is seen. The code converges in less than 200 iterations, requiring on the order of one minute of CPU time on a CRAY YMP per element in the airfoil configuration.

  9. Efficient simulation of incompressible viscous flow over multi-element airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Stuart E.; Wiltberger, N. Lyn; Kwak, Dochan

    1992-01-01

    The incompressible, viscous, turbulent flow over single and multi-element airfoils is numerically simulated in an efficient manner by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The computer code uses the method of pseudo-compressibility with an upwind-differencing scheme for the convective fluxes and an implicit line-relaxation solution algorithm. The motivation for this work includes interest in studying the high-lift take-off and landing configurations of various aircraft. In particular, accurate computation of lift and drag at various angles of attack, up to stall, is desired. Two different turbulence models are tested in computing the flow over an NACA 4412 airfoil; an accurate prediction of stall is obtained. The approach used for multi-element airfoils involves the use of multiple zones of structured grids fitted to each element. Two different approaches are compared: a patched system of grids, and an overlaid Chimera system of grids. Computational results are presented for two-element, three-element, and four-element airfoil configurations. Excellent agreement with experimental surface pressure coefficients is seen. The code converges in less than 200 iterations, requiring on the order of one minute of CPU time (on a CRAY YMP) per element in the airfoil configuration.

  10. A spectral element method for fluid dynamics - Laminar flow in a channel expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patera, A. T.

    1984-01-01

    A spectral element method that combines the generality of the finite element method with the accuracy of spectral techniques is proposed for the numerical solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. In the spectral element discretization, the computational domain is broken into a series of elements, and the velocity in each element is represented as a high-order Lagrangian interpolant through Chebyshev collocation points. The hyperbolic piece of the governing equations is then treated with an explicit collocation scheme, while the pressure and viscous contributions are treated implicitly with a projection operator derived from a variational principle. The implementation of the technique is demonstrated on a one-dimensional inflow-outflow advection-diffusion equation, and the method is then applied to laminar two-dimensional (separated) flow in a channel expansion. Comparisons are made with experiment and previous numerical work.

  11. Finite element calculations of viscoelastic fluid flow in a spinning and nutating cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenblat, S.; Gooding, A.; Engleman, M. S.

    1986-12-01

    An investigation has been performed of the flow of a non-Newtonian liquid in a spinning and nutating cylinder. An approximate analysis has been effected on the assumption that the ratio of coning rate to spin rate is small and applied to the case of a cylinder of infinite length. A numerical calculation has been performed for the actual flow of two specified non-Newtonian liquids, using the finite element code FIDAP. Results are presented in both graphical and tabular form showing flow fields and calculated values of the despin moment for ranges of parameters. The question of appropriate representation of the liquid's non-Newtonian behavior is discussed.

  12. Studies of flow separation and stalling on one- and two-element airfoils at low speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seetharam, H. C.; Wentz, W. H., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Research has been conducted on the nature of airfoil behavior at pre- and post-separated angles of attack. Detailed wind tunnel studies have been made of boundary layer and wake fields for the GA(W)-1 airfoil, and the airfoil with a 0.3 chord Fowler flap. Experimental data are compared with theoretical predictions from a multi-element viscous flow computer program. Theoretical predictions are reasonably accurate for unseparated flows, but have serious errors when separation is present. Some recent techniques for modeling post-separated flow behavior are discussed in light of the present experiments.

  13. Terrestrial Laser Scanning of Lava Flows to Constrain Fracture Models in Geothermal Reservoirs; a Case Study from the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massiot, C.; Garcia-Sélles, D.; Nicol, A., , Prof; Mcnamara, D. D.; Townend, J.; Archibald, G.; Siratovich, P. A.; Villeneuve, M.

    2015-12-01

    Geothermal reservoirs hosted in volcanic rocks, like the Rotokawa Geothermal Field in the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ), New Zealand, typically contain fracture networks that control fluid flow. Realistic discrete fracture network (DFN) models have the potential to improve geothermal resource management. However, the spatial distribution and geometries of fracture networks are often poorly understood due to limited data and complex deformation histories including lava emplacement, subsequent burial and faulting.To understand better the distribution of fractures formed during lava emplacement, we study andesitic flow exposures from Mt Ruapehu, at the southern end of the TVZ. Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS) acquisition on three 50-200 m2 outcrops provided large 3D point clouds of the shape of the outcrop. Delineation of thousands of individual fractures has been semi-automated using local geometrical constraints and a shape detection algorithm detecting planar and curved surfaces. Fracture orientation, length, area, linear (P10) and areal (P20) densities from the TLS data provide input parameters for the DFN models. Fracture detection is validated using high-resolution panoramic photographs (GigaPan) and manual scanline measurements. Cooling joints are highly connected via sub-horizontal joints that are aligned with vesicular layers. UCS tests show a mechanical anisotropy between vertical and horizontal samples. Most of the cooling joints terminate within or at the brecciated margins of individual flows which contrast mechanically with the massive flow interior. Thus, highly connected and curved fractures are mostly confined to lava flows.This study provides a framework for developing DFNs for geothermal reservoirs hosted in andesitic flows based on empirical observations of intrinsic fracturing and mechanical anisotropies of the host lithology. Fractures in individual lava flows may be interconnected in the reservoir by a combination of cooling joints, subsequent

  14. Applications of Taylor-Galerkin finite element method to compressible internal flow problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohn, Jeong L.; Kim, Yongmo; Chung, T. J.

    1989-01-01

    A two-step Taylor-Galerkin finite element method with Lapidus' artificial viscosity scheme is applied to several test cases for internal compressible inviscid flow problems. Investigations for the effect of supersonic/subsonic inlet and outlet boundary conditions on computational results are particularly emphasized.

  15. Finite element analysis in three-dimensional flow through a lateral saccular aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Matsuzawa, T

    1993-01-01

    The three-dimensional flow pattern in a lateral saccular aneurysm was investigated by a finite element method. The aneurysm model had a dome-shaped diverticulum arising from one side of the straight circular tube. The steady Navier-Stokes equations and the equation of continuity were applied. The finite element equations were derived from the Galerkin process with each hexahedral element, in which velocities were approximated by quadratic polynomials and pressures by linear polynomials. The non-linear finite element equations were solved by a Newton-Raphson method. Calculations were performed of the steady flow at various Reynolds numbers. The conclusions for flow patterns with a Reynolds number of 1000 is as follows: (i) a separation vortex occurred in the whole circumferential region of the aneurysm, (ii) the separation vortex was distorted by the geometrical shape of the aneurysm, and (iii) two other vortexes induced by the separation vortex existed at the proximal and the distal wall of the aneurysm. These disturbances of flow through an aneurysm are thought to play a significant role in the formation of thrombi and the rupture of an aneurysm. PMID:8241034

  16. 16 CFR Figure 7 to Part 1633 - Elements of Propane Flow Control for Each Burner

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Elements of Propane Flow Control for Each Burner 7 Figure 7 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt. 1633, Fig. 7 Figure...

  17. 16 CFR Figure 7 to Part 1633 - Elements of Propane Flow Control for Each Burner

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Elements of Propane Flow Control for Each Burner 7 Figure 7 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt.1633, Fig. 7 Figure...

  18. 16 CFR Figure 7 to Part 1633 - Elements of Propane Flow Control for Each Burner

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Elements of Propane Flow Control for Each Burner 7 Figure 7 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt. 1633, Fig. 7 Figure...

  19. 16 CFR Figure 7 to Part 1633 - Elements of Propane Flow Control for Each Burner

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Elements of Propane Flow Control for Each Burner 7 Figure 7 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt.1633, Fig. 7 Figure...

  20. 16 CFR Figure 7 to Part 1633 - Elements of Propane Flow Control for Each Burner

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Elements of Propane Flow Control for Each Burner 7 Figure 7 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt.1633, Fig. 7 Figure...

  1. Cross-flow vortex structure and transition measurements using multi-element hot films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agarwal, Naval K.; Mangalam, Siva M.; Maddalon, Dal V.; Collier, Fayette S., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    An experiment on a 45-degree swept wing was conducted to study three-dimensional boundary-layer characteristics using surface-mounted, micro-thin, multi-element hot-film sensors. Cross-flow vortex structure and boundary-layer transition were measured from the simultaneously acquired signals of the hot films. Spanwise variation of the root-mean-square (RMS) hot-film signal show a local minima and maxima. The distance between two minima corresponds to the stationary cross-flow vortex wavelength and agrees with naphthalene flow-visualization results. The chordwise and spanwise variation of amplified traveling (nonstationary) cross-flow disturbance characteristics were measured as Reynolds number was varied. The frequency of the most amplified cross-flow disturbances agrees with linear stability theory.

  2. A Streamline-Upwind Petrov-Galerkin Finite Element Scheme for Non-Ionized Hypersonic Flows in Thermochemical Nonequilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, Benjamin S.; Bova, Stephen W.; Bond, Ryan B.

    2011-01-01

    Presentation topics include background and motivation; physical modeling including governing equations and thermochemistry; finite element formulation; results of inviscid thermal nonequilibrium chemically reacting flow and viscous thermal equilibrium chemical reacting flow; and near-term effort.

  3. A numerical investigation of the finite element method in compressible primitive variable Navier-Stokes flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, C. H.

    1977-01-01

    The results of a comprehensive numerical investigation of the basic capabilities of the finite element method (FEM) for numerical solution of compressible flow problems governed by the two-dimensional and axis-symmetric Navier-Stokes equations in primitive variables are presented. The strong and weak points of the method as a tool for computational fluid dynamics are considered. The relation of the linear element finite element method to finite difference methods (FDM) is explored. The calculation of free shear layer and separated flows over aircraft boattail afterbodies with plume simulators indicate the strongest assets of the method are its capabilities for reliable and accurate calculation employing variable grids which readily approximate complex geometry and capably adapt to the presence of diverse regions of large solution gradients without the necessity of domain transformation.

  4. Discrete-Roughness-Element-Enhanced Swept-Wing Natural Laminar Flow at High Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, Mujeeb; Liao, Wei; Li, Fei; Choudhari, Meelan

    2015-01-01

    Nonlinear parabolized stability equations and secondary-instability analyses are used to provide a computational assessment of the potential use of the discrete-roughness-element technology for extending swept-wing natural laminar flow at chord Reynolds numbers relevant to transport aircraft. Computations performed for the boundary layer on a natural-laminar-flow airfoil with a leading-edge sweep angle of 34.6 deg, freestream Mach number of 0.75, and chord Reynolds numbers of 17 × 10(exp 6), 24 × 10(exp 6), and 30 × 10(exp 6) suggest that discrete roughness elements could delay laminar-turbulent transition by about 20% when transition is caused by stationary crossflow disturbances. Computations show that the introduction of small-wavelength stationary crossflow disturbances (i.e., discrete roughness element) also suppresses the growth of most amplified traveling crossflow disturbances.

  5. A finite element formulation of Euler equations for the solution of steady transonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ecer, A.; Akay, H. U.

    1982-01-01

    The main objective of the considered investigation is related to the development of a relaxation scheme for the analysis of inviscid, rotational, transonic flow problems. To formulate the equations of motion for inviscid flows in a fixed coordinate system, an Eulerian type variational principle is required. The derivation of an Eulerian variational principle which is employed in the finite element formulation is discussed. The presented numerical method describes the mathematical formulation and the application of a numerical process for the direct solution of steady Euler equations. The development of the procedure as an extension of existing potential flow formulations provides the applicability of previous procedures, e.g., proper application of the artificial viscosity for supersonic elements, and the accurate modeling of the shock.

  6. Gen Purpose 1-D Finite Element Network Fluid Flow Heat Transfer System Simulator

    1993-08-02

    SAFSIM (System Analysis Flow Simulator) is a FORTRAN computer program to simulate the integrated performance of systems involving fluid mechanics, heat transfer, and reactor dynamics. SAFSIM provides sufficient versatility to allow the engineering simulation of almost any system, from a backyard sprinkler system to a clustered nuclear reactor propulsion system. In addition to versatility, speed and robustness are primary SAFSIM development goals. SAFSIM contains three basic physics modules: (1) a one-dimensional finite element fluid mechanicsmore » module with multiple flow network capability; (2) a one-dimensional finite element structure heat transfer module with multiple convection and radiation exchange capability; and (3) a point reactor dynamics module with reactivity feedback and decay heat capability. SAFSIM can be used for compressible and incompressible, single-phase, multicomponent flow systems.« less

  7. Aerodynamic Design of Axial-Flow Compressors. VII - Blade-Element Flow in Annular Cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robbins, William H.; Jackson, Robert J.; Lieblein, Seymour

    1955-01-01

    Annular blade-element data obtained primarily from single-stage compressor installations are correlated over a range of inlet Mach numbers and cascade geometry. The correlation curves are presented in such a manner that they are related directly to the low-speed two-dimensional-cascade data of part VI of this series. Thus, the data serve as both an extension and a verification of the two-dimensional-cascade data. In addition, the correlation results are applied to compressor design.

  8. Visualization and finite element analysis of pulsatile flow in models of the abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, T; Matsuzawa, T; Homma, T

    1989-01-01

    Pulsatile flows in glass models simulating fusiform and lateral saccular aneurysms were investigated by a flow visualization method. When resting fluid starts to flow, the initial fluid motion is practically irrotational. After a short period of time, the flow began to separate from the proximal wall of the aneurysm. Then the separation bubble or vortex grew rapidly in size and filled the whole area of the aneurysm circumferentially. During this period of time, the center of the vortex moved from the proximal end to the distal point of the aneurysm. The transient reversal flow, for instance, which may occur at the end of the ejection period, passed between the wall of the aneurysm and the centrally located vortex. When the rate and pulsatile frequency of flow were high, the vortex broke down into highly disturbed flow (or turbulence) at the distal portion of the aneurysm. The same effect was observed when the length of the aneurysm was increased. A reduction in pulsatile amplitude made the flow pattern close to that in steady flow. A finite element analysis was made to obtain velocity and pressure fields in pulsatile flow through a tube with an axisymmetric expansion. Calculations were performed with the pulsatile flows used in the visualization experiment in order to study the effects of change in the pulsatile wave form by keeping the time-mean Reynolds number and Womersley's parameter unchanged. Calculated instantaneous patterns of velocity field and stream lines agreed well with the experimental results. The appearance and disappearance of the vortex in the dilated portion and its development resulted in complex distributions of pressure and shear fields. Locally minimum and maximum values of wall shear stress occurred at points just upstream and downstream of the distal end of the expansion when the flow rate reached its peak. PMID:2605323

  9. Simulation of two-phase flow through porous media using the finite-element method

    SciTech Connect

    Felton, G.K.

    1987-01-01

    A finite-element model of two-phase flow of air and water movement through porous media was developed. The formulation for radial flow used axisymmetric linear triangular elements. Due to the radial nature of the problem, a two-dimensional formulation was used to represent three-dimensional space. Governing equations were based on Darcy's equation and continuity. Air was treated as a compressible fluid by using the Ideal Gas Law. A gravity-driven saturated-flow problem was modeled and the predicted flow rate exactly matched the analytical solution. Comparisons of analytical and experimental results of one-phase radial and vertical flow were made in which capillary pressure distributions were almost exactly matched by the two-phase model (TPM). The effect of air compression on infiltration was simulated. It was concluded that the TPM modeled air compression and its inhibiting effect on infiltration even though air counter flow through the surface boundary was not permitted. The difficulty in describing the boundary conditions for air at a boundary where infiltration occurred was examined. The effect of erroneous input data for the soil moisture characteristic curve and the relative permeability curve was examined.

  10. Discontinuous finite volume element discretization for coupled flow-transport problems arising in models of sedimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bürger, Raimund; Kumar, Sarvesh; Ruiz-Baier, Ricardo

    2015-10-01

    The sedimentation-consolidation and flow processes of a mixture of small particles dispersed in a viscous fluid at low Reynolds numbers can be described by a nonlinear transport equation for the solids concentration coupled with the Stokes problem written in terms of the mixture flow velocity and the pressure field. Here both the viscosity and the forcing term depend on the local solids concentration. A semi-discrete discontinuous finite volume element (DFVE) scheme is proposed for this model. The numerical method is constructed on a baseline finite element family of linear discontinuous elements for the approximation of velocity components and concentration field, whereas the pressure is approximated by piecewise constant elements. The unique solvability of both the nonlinear continuous problem and the semi-discrete DFVE scheme is discussed, and optimal convergence estimates in several spatial norms are derived. Properties of the model and the predicted space accuracy of the proposed formulation are illustrated by detailed numerical examples, including flows under gravity with changing direction, a secondary settling tank in an axisymmetric setting, and batch sedimentation in a tilted cylindrical vessel.

  11. FEMWATER: a finite-element model of water flow through saturated-unsaturated porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, G.T.; Ward, D.S.

    1980-10-01

    Upon examining the Water Movement Through Saturated-Unsaturated Porous Media: A Finite-Element Galerkin Model, it was felt that the model should be modified and expanded. The modification is made in calculating the flow field in a manner consistent with the finite element approach, in evaluating the moisture-content increasing rate within the region of interest, and in numerically computing the nonlinear terms. With these modifications, the flow field is continuous everywhere in the flow regime, including element boundaries and nodal points, and the mass loss through boundaries is much reduced. Expansion is made to include four additional numerical schemes which would be more appropriate for many situations. Also, to save computer storage, all arrays pertaining to the boundary condition information are compressed to smaller dimension, and to ease the treatment of different problems, all arrays are variably dimensioned in all subroutines. This report is intended to document these efforts. In addition, in the derivation of finite-element equations, matrix component representation is used, which is believed more readable than the matrix representation in its entirety. Two identical sample problems are simulated to show the difference between the original and revised models.

  12. A spectral-element discontinuous Galerkin lattice Boltzmann method for incompressible flows.

    SciTech Connect

    Min, M.; Lee, T.; Mathematics and Computer Science; City Univ. of New York

    2011-01-01

    We present a spectral-element discontinuous Galerkin lattice Boltzmann method for solving nearly incompressible flows. Decoupling the collision step from the streaming step offers numerical stability at high Reynolds numbers. In the streaming step, we employ high-order spectral-element discontinuous Galerkin discretizations using a tensor product basis of one-dimensional Lagrange interpolation polynomials based on Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre grids. Our scheme is cost-effective with a fully diagonal mass matrix, advancing time integration with the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. We present a consistent treatment for imposing boundary conditions with a numerical flux in the discontinuous Galerkin approach. We show convergence studies for Couette flows and demonstrate two benchmark cases with lid-driven cavity flows for Re = 400-5000 and flows around an impulsively started cylinder for Re = 550-9500. Computational results are compared with those of other theoretical and computational work that used a multigrid method, a vortex method, and a spectral element model.

  13. Direct numerical simulation of instabilities in parallel flow with spherical roughness elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deanna, R. G.

    1992-01-01

    Results from a direct numerical simulation of laminar flow over a flat surface with spherical roughness elements using a spectral-element method are given. The numerical simulation approximates roughness as a cellular pattern of identical spheres protruding from a smooth wall. Periodic boundary conditions on the domain's horizontal faces simulate an infinite array of roughness elements extending in the streamwise and spanwise directions, which implies the parallel-flow assumption, and results in a closed domain. A body force, designed to yield the horizontal Blasius velocity in the absence of roughness, sustains the flow. Instabilities above a critical Reynolds number reveal negligible oscillations in the recirculation regions behind each sphere and in the free stream, high-amplitude oscillations in the layer directly above the spheres, and a mean profile with an inflection point near the sphere's crest. The inflection point yields an unstable layer above the roughness (where U''(y) is less than 0) and a stable region within the roughness (where U''(y) is greater than 0). Evidently, the instability begins when the low-momentum or wake region behind an element, being the region most affected by disturbances (purely numerical in this case), goes unstable and moves. In compressible flow with periodic boundaries, this motion sends disturbances to all regions of the domain. In the unstable layer just above the inflection point, the disturbances grow while being carried downstream with a propagation speed equal to the local mean velocity; they do not grow amid the low energy region near the roughness patch. The most amplified disturbance eventually arrives at the next roughness element downstream, perturbing its wake and inducing a global response at a frequency governed by the streamwise spacing between spheres and the mean velocity of the most amplified layer.

  14. Finite volume and finite element methods applied to 3D laminar and turbulent channel flows

    SciTech Connect

    Louda, Petr; Příhoda, Jaromír; Sváček, Petr; Kozel, Karel

    2014-12-10

    The work deals with numerical simulations of incompressible flow in channels with rectangular cross section. The rectangular cross section itself leads to development of various secondary flow patterns, where accuracy of simulation is influenced by numerical viscosity of the scheme and by turbulence modeling. In this work some developments of stabilized finite element method are presented. Its results are compared with those of an implicit finite volume method also described, in laminar and turbulent flows. It is shown that numerical viscosity can cause errors of same magnitude as different turbulence models. The finite volume method is also applied to 3D turbulent flow around backward facing step and good agreement with 3D experimental results is obtained.

  15. Chance-constrained overland flow modeling for improving conceptual distributed hydrologic simulations based on scaling representation of sub-daily rainfall variability.

    PubMed

    Han, Jing-Cheng; Huang, Guohe; Huang, Yuefei; Zhang, Hua; Li, Zhong; Chen, Qiuwen

    2015-08-15

    Lack of hydrologic process representation at the short time-scale would lead to inadequate simulations in distributed hydrological modeling. Especially for complex mountainous watersheds, surface runoff simulations are significantly affected by the overland flow generation, which is closely related to the rainfall characteristics at a sub-time step. In this paper, the sub-daily variability of rainfall intensity was considered using a probability distribution, and a chance-constrained overland flow modeling approach was proposed to capture the generation of overland flow within conceptual distributed hydrologic simulations. The integrated modeling procedures were further demonstrated through a watershed of China Three Gorges Reservoir area, leading to an improved SLURP-TGR hydrologic model based on SLURP. Combined with rainfall thresholds determined to distinguish various magnitudes of daily rainfall totals, three levels of significance were simultaneously employed to examine the hydrologic-response simulation. Results showed that SLURP-TGR could enhance the model performance, and the deviation of runoff simulations was effectively controlled. However, rainfall thresholds were so crucial for reflecting the scaling effect of rainfall intensity that optimal levels of significance and rainfall threshold were 0.05 and 10 mm, respectively. As for the Xiangxi River watershed, the main runoff contribution came from interflow of the fast store. Although slight differences of overland flow simulations between SLURP and SLURP-TGR were derived, SLURP-TGR was found to help improve the simulation of peak flows, and would improve the overall modeling efficiency through adjusting runoff component simulations. Consequently, the developed modeling approach favors efficient representation of hydrological processes and would be expected to have a potential for wide applications.

  16. A two element laminar flow airfoil optimized for cruise. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steen, Gregory Glen

    1994-01-01

    Numerical and experimental results are presented for a new two-element, fixed-geometry natural laminar flow airfoil optimized for cruise Reynolds numbers on the order of three million. The airfoil design consists of a primary element and an independent secondary element with a primary to secondary chord ratio of three to one. The airfoil was designed to improve the cruise lift-to-drag ratio while maintaining an appropriate landing capability when compared to conventional airfoils. The airfoil was numerically developed utilizing the NASA Langley Multi-Component Airfoil Analysis computer code running on a personal computer. Numerical results show a nearly 11.75 percent decrease in overall wing drag with no increase in stall speed at sailplane cruise conditions when compared to a wing based on an efficient single element airfoil. Section surface pressure, wake survey, transition location, and flow visualization results were obtained in the Texas A&M University Low Speed Wind Tunnel. Comparisons between the numerical and experimental data, the effects of the relative position and angle of the two elements, and Reynolds number variations from 8 x 10(exp 5) to 3 x 10(exp 6) for the optimum geometry case are presented.

  17. Experimental investigation of the modification of the flow field, past instream vegetation elements, for distinct bedsurface roughness.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valyrakis, Manousos; Yagci, Oral; Kitsikoudis, Vasileios; Koursari, Eftychia

    2015-04-01

    The presence of vegetation in rivers and estuaries has important implications for the modification of the flow field and sediment transport. In-stream vegetation has the potential to regulate the morphology and ecological health of a surface water body, and as such it finds a wide range of applications. Even though a number of controls influencing the local flow field past aquatic vegetation elements or patches of instream vegetation have been identified (such as shape, areal density, size and flexibility), conclusive evidence is lacking, particularly on how sediment transport processes are affected. Here, an experimental study is designed to identify how the flow field past different types of elements simulating in-stream emergent vegetation is modified. Two sets of experiments are conducted, each with a distinct value of high and low hydraulic roughness for the bed surface. In both experiments a rigid cylindrical element, a patch of rigid tubes and a plant shaped element (Cupressus Macrocarpa), simulating instream emergent vegetation are utilized. The flow field is measured at various locations downstream the element and average and turbulent flow statistics are obtained at near bed, mid-flow depth and near the water surface regions. It is found that different structural aspects of the elements, particularly the geometry, can significantly affect the flow field downstream the elements. Specifically, the average flow profiles are practically restored to near ambient flow conditions at about 5 diameters downstream the rigid element, while this happens at longer distances for the other elements. The flow structures shed past the elements are also very distinct, as confirmed via appropriately designed fluorescent dye flow visualizations. Potential ecosystem feedbacks and implications for formation of geospatial patterns are also discussed.

  18. Energy flow prediction in built-up structures through a hybrid finite element/wave and finite element approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Y.; Collet, M.; Ichchou, M.; Li, L.; Bareille, O.; Dimitrijevic, Z.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a rapid and accurate numerical tool for the energy flow evaluation in a periodic substructure from the near-field to the far-field domain. Here we suppose that the near-field part contains a point source characterized by the injected power in the structure. The near-field part is then modeled by Finite Element Method (FEM) while the periodic structure and the far-field part are regarded as waveguides and modeled by an enhanced Wave and Finite Element Method (WFEM). Enhancements are made on the eigenvalue scheme, the condensation of the unit cell and the consideration of a reduced wave basis. Efforts are made to adapt substructures modeled by different strategies in a multi-scale manner such that the final matrices dimensions of the built-up structure are largely reduced. The method is then validated numerically and theoretically. An application is presented, where a structural dynamical system coupled with periodic resistive piezoelectric shunts is discussed.

  19. Finite element approximations for quasi-Newtonian flows employing a multi-field GLS method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinani, Flávia; Frey, Sérgio

    2011-08-01

    This article concerns stabilized finite element approximations for flow-type sensitive fluid flows. A quasi-Newtonian model, based on a kinematic parameter of flow classification and shear and extensional viscosities, is used to represent the fluid behavior from pure shear up to pure extension. The flow governing equations are approximated by a multi-field Galerkin least-squares (GLS) method, in terms of strain rate, pressure and velocity ( D- p- u). This method, which may be viewed as an extension of the formulation for constant viscosity fluids introduced by Behr et al. (Comput Methods Appl Mech 104:31-48, 1993), allows the use of combinations of simple Lagrangian finite element interpolations. Mild Weissenberg flows of quasi-Newtonian fluids—using Carreau viscosities with power-law indexes varying from 0.2 to 2.5—are carried out through a four-to-one planar contraction. The performed physical analysis reveals that the GLS method provides a suitable approximation for the problem and the results are in accordance with the related literature.

  20. Interstitial fluid flow in tendons or ligaments: a porous medium finite element simulation.

    PubMed

    Butler, S L; Kohles, S S; Thielke, R J; Chen, C; Vanderby, R

    1997-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe interstitial fluid flow in axisymmetric soft connective tissue (ligaments or tendons) when they are loaded in tension. Soft hydrated tissue was modelled as a porous medium (using Darcy's Law), and the finite element method was used to solve the resulting equations governing fluid flow. A commercially available computer program (FiDAP) was used to create an axisymmetric model of a biomechanically tested rat ligament. The unknown variables at element nodes were pressure and velocity of the interstitial fluid (Newtonian and incompressible). The effect of variations in fluid viscosity and permeability of the solid matrix was parametrically explored. A transient loading state mimicking a rat ligament mechanical experiment was used in all simulations. The magnitude and distribution of pressure, stream lines, shear (stress) rate, vorticity and velocity showed regular patterns consistent with extension flow. Parametric changes of permeability and viscosity strongly affected fluid flow behaviour. When the radial permeability was 1000 times less than the axial permeability, shear rate and vorticity increased (approximately 5-fold). These effects (especially shear stress and pressure) suggested a strong interaction with the solid matrix. Computed levels of fluid flow suggested a possible load transduction mechanism for cells in the tissue.

  1. Prediction of fluid flow in curved pipe using the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maitin, Christopher B.

    1987-04-01

    An analysis of turbulent flow through curved pipes was attempted using the finite element method. A commercial finite element code, FIDAP, which employs the kappa-epsilon model was used. Mesh configurations were developed for three curved pipes with varying bend angles. A pipe with a 180 deg bend was modeled after an experiment to verify the results of the computer code. A 90 deg and 45 deg pipe were modeled at a bend radius of 1 pipe diameter, to simulate standard pipes in ventilation systems. The intent of the study was to examine the flow profiles exiting the bend. The results should give some explanation of the effect of bends on the poor performance of fans placed downstream of bends. The turbulent model failed to converge for a steady-state analysis of the curved pipe flow, so a laminar flow analysis was done. The results show the expected distortion in the velocity profiles exiting from the bends. Also some conclusions were drawn about attaining better convergence with curved pipe flow.

  2. Geological applications of automatic grid generation tools for finite elements applied to porous flow modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Gable, C.W.; Trease, H.E.; Cherry, T.A.

    1996-04-01

    The construction of grids that accurately reflect geologic structure and stratigraphy for computational flow and transport models poses a formidable task. Even with a complete understanding of stratigraphy, material properties, boundary and initial conditions, the task of incorporating data into a numerical model can be difficult and time consuming. Furthermore, most tools available for representing complex geologic surfaces and volumes are not designed for producing optimal grids for flow and transport computation. We have developed a modeling tool, GEOMESH, for automating finite element grid generation that maintains the geometric integrity of geologic structure and stratigraphy. The method produces an optimal (Delaunay) tetrahedral grid that can be used for flow and transport computations. The process of developing a flow and transport model can be divided into three parts: (1) Developing accurate conceptual models inclusive of geologic interpretation, material characterization and construction of a stratigraphic and hydrostratigraphic framework model, (2) Building and initializing computational frameworks; grid generation, boundary and initial conditions, (3) Computational physics models of flow and transport. Process (1) and (3) have received considerable attention whereas (2) has not. This work concentrates on grid generation and its connections to geologic characterization and process modeling. Applications of GEOMESH illustrate grid generation for two dimensional cross sections, three dimensional regional models, and adaptive grid refinement in three dimensions. Examples of grid representation of wells and tunnels with GEOMESH can be found in Cherry et al. The resulting grid can be utilized by unstructured finite element or integrated finite difference models.

  3. A Regularized Galerkin Boundary Element Method (RGBEM) for Simulating Potential Flow About Zero Thickness Bodies

    SciTech Connect

    GHARAKHANI,ADRIN; WOLFE,WALTER P.

    1999-10-01

    The prediction of potential flow about zero thickness membranes by the boundary element method constitutes an integral component of the Lagrangian vortex-boundary element simulation of flow about parachutes. To this end, the vortex loop (or the panel) method has been used, for some time now, in the aerospace industry with relative success [1, 2]. Vortex loops (with constant circulation) are equivalent to boundary elements with piecewise constant variation of the potential jump. In this case, extending the analysis in [3], the near field potential velocity evaluations can be shown to be {Omicron}(1). The accurate evaluation of the potential velocity field very near the parachute surface is particularly critical to the overall accuracy and stability of the vortex-boundary element simulations. As we will demonstrate in Section 3, the boundary integral singularities, which arise due to the application of low order boundary elements, may lead to severely spiked potential velocities at vortex element centers that are near the boundary. The spikes in turn cause the erratic motion of the vortex elements, and the eventual loss of smoothness of the vorticity field and possible numerical blow up. In light of the arguments above, the application of boundary elements with (at least) a linear variation of the potential jump--or, equivalently, piecewise constant vortex sheets--would appear to be more appropriate for vortex-boundary element simulations. For this case, two strategies are possible for obtaining the potential flow field. The first option is to solve the integral equations for the (unknown) strengths of the surface vortex sheets. As we will discuss in Section 2.1, the challenge in this case is to devise a consistent system of equations that imposes the solenoidality of the locally 2-D vortex sheets. The second approach is to solve for the unknown potential jump distribution. In this case, for commonly used C{sup o} shape functions, the boundary integral is singular at

  4. On current aspects of finite element computational fluid mechanics for turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    A set of nonlinear partial differential equations suitable for the description of a class of turbulent three-dimensional flow fields in select geometries is identified. On the basis of the concept of enforcing a penalty constraint to ensure accurate accounting of ordering effects, a finite element numerical solution algorithm is established for the equation set and the theoretical aspects of accuracy, convergence and stability are identified and quantized. Hypermatrix constructions are used to formulate the reduction of the computational aspects of the theory to practice. The robustness of the algorithm, and the computer program embodiment, have been verified for pertinent flow configurations.

  5. Finite element simulation of turbulent Couette-Poiseuille flows using a low Reynolds number k- model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemzadeh Hannani, Siamak; Stanislas, Michel

    1999-05-01

    Developing Couette-Poiseuille flows at Re=5000 are studied using a low Reynolds number k- two-equation model and a finite element formulation. Mesh-independent solutions are obtained using a standard Galerkin formulation and a Galerkin/least-squares stabilized method. The predictions for the velocity and turbulent kinetic energy are compared with available experimental results and to the DNS data. Second moment closure's solutions are also compared with those of the k- model. The deficiency of eddy viscosity models to predict dissymmetric low Reynolds number channel flows has been demonstrated. Copyright

  6. Three-dimensional inversion of self-potential data used to constrain the pattern of groundwater flow in geothermal fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardani, A.; Revil, A.; BolèVe, A.; Dupont, J. P.

    2008-09-01

    We propose an algorithm to invert self-potential signals measured at the ground surface of the Earth to localize hydromechanical disturbances or to the pattern of groundwater flow in geothermal systems. The self-potential signals result from the divergence of the streaming current density. Groundwater flow can be either driven by topography of the water table, free convection, or deformation of the medium. The algorithm includes the electrical resistivity distribution of the medium obtained independently by DC resistance tomography or electromagnetic methods or by coding the assumed geology in terms of distribution of the electrical resistivity accounting for the effect of the temperature and salinity distributions and possibly constraints from borehole measurements. Inversion of the distribution of the source current density from ground surface and borehole self-potential measurements is achieved by solving the inverse problem using Tikhonov regularization solutions that are compatible with the physics of the primary flow problem. By introducing assumptions regarding the smoothness or the compactness of the source and the three-dimensional distribution of the electrical resistivity of the system, the inverse problem can be solved in obtaining the three-dimensional distribution of the current source density in the ground. However, an annihilator can be added to the inverted source geometry without affecting the measured self-potential field. Annihilators can be obtained from boundary conditions. Synthetic models and a sandbox experiment are discussed to demonstrate the validity of the algorithm. An application is presented to the geothermal field of Cerro Prieto, Baja California, Mexico, using literature data. Inversion of the self-potential and resistivity data allows observing a plume of hot groundwater rising to the ground surface in the central part of the investigated area and discharging to the ground surface in the southwest part. The temperature anomaly

  7. An Immersed Boundary Finite-Element Solver for Flow-Induced Deformation of Soft Structures with Application in Cardiac Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, Rajneesh; Mittal, Rajat

    2011-11-01

    The modeling of complex biological phenomena such as cardiac mechanics is challenging. It involves complex three dimensional geometries, moving structure boundaries inside the fluid domain and large flow-induced deformations of the structure. We present a fluid-structure interaction solver (FSI) which couples a sharp-interface immersed boundary method for flow simulation with a powerful finite-element based structure dynamics solver. An implicit partitioned (or segregated) approach is implemented to ensure the stability of the solver. We validate the FSI solver with published benchmark for a configuration which involves a thin elastic plate attached to a rigid cylinder. The frequency and amplitude of the oscillations of the plate are in good agreement with published results and non-linear dynamics of the plate and its coupling with the flow field are discussed. The FSI solver is used to understand left-ventricular hemodynamics and flow-induced dynamics of mitral leaflets during early diastolic filling and results from this study are presented.

  8. Weak Galerkin finite element methods for Darcy flow: Anisotropy and heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Guang; Liu, Jiangguo; Mu, Lin; Ye, Xiu

    2014-10-11

    This paper presents a family of weak Galerkin finite element methods (WGFEMs) for Darcy flow computation. The WGFEMs are new numerical methods that rely on the novel concept of discrete weak gradients. The WGFEMs solve for pressure unknowns both in element interiors and on the mesh skeleton. The numerical velocity is then obtained from the discrete weak gradient of the numerical pressure. The new methods are quite different than many existing numerical methods in that they are locally conservative by design, the resulting discrete linear systems are symmetric and positive-definite, and there is no need for tuning problem-dependent penalty factors. We test the WGFEMs on benchmark problems to demonstrate the strong potential of these new methods in handling strong anisotropy and heterogeneity in Darcy flow.

  9. A p-version finite element method for steady incompressible fluid flow and convective heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winterscheidt, Daniel L.

    1993-01-01

    A new p-version finite element formulation for steady, incompressible fluid flow and convective heat transfer problems is presented. The steady-state residual equations are obtained by considering a limiting case of the least-squares formulation for the transient problem. The method circumvents the Babuska-Brezzi condition, permitting the use of equal-order interpolation for velocity and pressure, without requiring the use of arbitrary parameters. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the accuracy and generality of the method.

  10. A strongly conservative finite element method for the coupling of Stokes and Darcy flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanschat, G.; Rivière, B.

    2010-08-01

    We consider a model of coupled free and porous media flow governed by Stokes and Darcy equations with the Beavers-Joseph-Saffman interface condition. This model is discretized using divergence-conforming finite elements for the velocities in the whole domain. Discontinuous Galerkin techniques and mixed methods are used in the Stokes and Darcy subdomains, respectively. This discretization is strongly conservative in Hdiv( Ω) and we show convergence. Numerical results validate our findings and indicate optimal convergence orders.

  11. MP Salsa: a finite element computer program for reacting flow problems. Part 1--theoretical development

    SciTech Connect

    Shadid, J.N.; Moffat, H.K.; Hutchinson, S.A.; Hennigan, G.L.; Devine, K.D.; Salinger, A.G.

    1996-05-01

    The theoretical background for the finite element computer program, MPSalsa, is presented in detail. MPSalsa is designed to solve laminar, low Mach number, two- or three-dimensional incompressible and variable density reacting fluid flows on massively parallel computers, using a Petrov-Galerkin finite element formulation. The code has the capability to solve coupled fluid flow, heat transport, multicomponent species transport, and finite-rate chemical reactions, and to solver coupled multiple Poisson or advection-diffusion- reaction equations. The program employs the CHEMKIN library to provide a rigorous treatment of multicomponent ideal gas kinetics and transport. Chemical reactions occurring in the gas phase and on surfaces are treated by calls to CHEMKIN and SURFACE CHEMKIN, respectively. The code employs unstructured meshes, using the EXODUS II finite element data base suite of programs for its input and output files. MPSalsa solves both transient and steady flows by using fully implicit time integration, an inexact Newton method and iterative solvers based on preconditioned Krylov methods as implemented in the Aztec solver library.

  12. Large-scale computation of incompressible viscous flow by least-squares finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan; Lin, T. L.; Povinelli, Louis A.

    1993-01-01

    The least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) based on the velocity-pressure-vorticity formulation is applied to large-scale/three-dimensional steady incompressible Navier-Stokes problems. This method can accommodate equal-order interpolations and results in symmetric, positive definite algebraic system which can be solved effectively by simple iterative methods. The first-order velocity-Bernoulli function-vorticity formulation for incompressible viscous flows is also tested. For three-dimensional cases, an additional compatibility equation, i.e., the divergence of the vorticity vector should be zero, is included to make the first-order system elliptic. The simple substitution of the Newton's method is employed to linearize the partial differential equations, the LSFEM is used to obtain discretized equations, and the system of algebraic equations is solved using the Jacobi preconditioned conjugate gradient method which avoids formation of either element or global matrices (matrix-free) to achieve high efficiency. To show the validity of this scheme for large-scale computation, we give numerical results for 2D driven cavity problem at Re = 10000 with 408 x 400 bilinear elements. The flow in a 3D cavity is calculated at Re = 100, 400, and 1,000 with 50 x 50 x 50 trilinear elements. The Taylor-Goertler-like vortices are observed for Re = 1,000.

  13. Thermodynamically Constrained Averaging Theory Approach for Modeling Flow and Transport Phenomena in Porous Medium Systems: 8. Interface and Common Curve Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Gray, William G.; Miller, Cass T.

    2010-01-01

    This work is the eighth in a series that develops the fundamental aspects of the thermodynamically constrained averaging theory (TCAT) that allows for a systematic increase in the scale at which multiphase transport phenomena is modeled in porous medium systems. In these systems, the explicit locations of interfaces between phases and common curves, where three or more interfaces meet, are not considered at scales above the microscale. Rather, the densities of these quantities arise as areas per volume or length per volume. Modeling of the dynamics of these measures is an important challenge for robust models of flow and transport phenomena in porous medium systems, as the extent of these regions can have important implications for mass, momentum, and energy transport between and among phases, and formulation of a capillary pressure relation with minimal hysteresis. These densities do not exist at the microscale, where the interfaces and common curves correspond to particular locations. Therefore, it is necessary for a well-developed macroscale theory to provide evolution equations that describe the dynamics of interface and common curve densities. Here we point out the challenges and pitfalls in producing such evolution equations, develop a set of such equations based on averaging theorems, and identify the terms that require particular attention in experimental and computational efforts to parameterize the equations. We use the evolution equations developed to specify a closed two-fluid-phase flow model. PMID:21197134

  14. Modelling platelet–blood flow interaction using the subcellular element Langevin method

    PubMed Central

    Sweet, Christopher R.; Chatterjee, Santanu; Xu, Zhiliang; Bisordi, Katharine; Rosen, Elliot D.; Alber, Mark

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a new three-dimensional modelling approach is described for studying fluid–viscoelastic cell interaction, the subcellular element Langevin (SCEL) method, with cells modelled by subcellular elements (SCEs) and SCE cells coupled with fluid flow and substrate models by using the Langevin equation. It is demonstrated that: (i) the new method is computationally efficient, scaling as 𝒪(N) for N SCEs; (ii) cell geometry, stiffness and adhesivity can be modelled by directly relating parameters to experimentally measured values; (iii) modelling the fluid–platelet interface as a surface leads to a very good correlation with experimentally observed platelet flow interactions. Using this method, the three-dimensional motion of a viscoelastic platelet in a shear blood flow was simulated and compared with experiments on tracking platelets in a blood chamber. It is shown that the complex platelet-flipping dynamics under linear shear flows can be accurately recovered with the SCEL model when compared with the experiments. All experimental details and electronic supplementary material are archived at http://biomath.math.nd.edu/scelsupplementaryinformation/. PMID:21593027

  15. DNS of Flows over Periodic Hills using a Discontinuous-Galerkin Spectral-Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diosady, Laslo T.; Murman, Scott M.

    2014-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) of turbulent compressible flows is performed using a higher-order space-time discontinuous-Galerkin finite-element method. The numerical scheme is validated by performing DNS of the evolution of the Taylor-Green vortex and turbulent flow in a channel. The higher-order method is shown to provide increased accuracy relative to low-order methods at a given number of degrees of freedom. The turbulent flow over a periodic array of hills in a channel is simulated at Reynolds number 10,595 using an 8th-order scheme in space and a 4th-order scheme in time. These results are validated against previous large eddy simulation (LES) results. A preliminary analysis provides insight into how these detailed simulations can be used to improve Reynoldsaveraged Navier-Stokes (RANS) modeling

  16. Spectral element-Fourier method for unsteady conjugate heat transfer in complex geometry flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amon, Cristina H.

    1995-04-01

    A spectral-element Fourier method (SEFM) is presented for the direct numerical simulation of forced convective heat transfer and conjugate conduction/convection in transitional internal flows in complex geometries. The SEFM is employed for the spatial discretization of the unsteady, incompressible, three-dimensional Navier-Stokes and energy equations. The resulting discrete equations are solved by a semi-implicit method in time treating explicitly the convection operator and implicitly the remaining pressure and viscous contributions. This methodology is illustrated by performing direct numerical simulations to investigate forced convective heat transfer in supercritical self-sustained oscillatory flows and conjugate effects in multimaterial domains. Highly unsteady flows in complex geometries are considered, including modified channels with periodic inhomogeneities such as spanwise rectangular and triangular grooves encountered in electronic equipment and compact heat exchangers.

  17. Preprocessor and postprocessor computer programs for a radial-flow finite-element model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pucci, A.A.; Pope, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    Preprocessing and postprocessing computer programs that enhance the utility of the U.S. Geological Survey radial-flow model have been developed. The preprocessor program: (1) generates a triangular finite element mesh from minimal data input, (2) produces graphical displays and tabulations of data for the mesh , and (3) prepares an input data file to use with the radial-flow model. The postprocessor program is a version of the radial-flow model, which was modified to (1) produce graphical output for simulation and field results, (2) generate a statistic for comparing the simulation results with observed data, and (3) allow hydrologic properties to vary in the simulated region. Examples of the use of the processor programs for a hypothetical aquifer test are presented. Instructions for the data files, format instructions, and a listing of the preprocessor and postprocessor source codes are given in the appendixes. (Author 's abstract)

  18. Finite Element Analysis of Magnetic Damping Effects on G-Jitter Induced Fluid Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pan, Bo; Li, Ben Q.; deGroh, Henry C., III

    1997-01-01

    This paper reports some interim results on numerical modeling and analyses of magnetic damping of g-jitter driven fluid flow in microgravity. A finite element model is developed to represent the fluid flow, thermal and solute transport phenomena in a 2-D cavity under g-jitter conditions with and without an applied magnetic field. The numerical model is checked by comparing with analytical solutions obtained for a simple parallel plate channel flow driven by g-jitter in a transverse magnetic field. The model is then applied to study the effect of steady state g-jitter induced oscillation and on the solute redistribution in the liquid that bears direct relevance to the Bridgman-Stockbarger single crystal growth processes. A selection of computed results is presented and the results indicate that an applied magnetic field can effectively damp the velocity caused by g-jitter and help to reduce the time variation of solute redistribution.

  19. Computational flow simulation of liquid oxygen in a SSME preburner injector element LOX post

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rocker, Marvin

    1990-01-01

    Liquid oxygen (LOX) is simulated as an incompressible flow through a Space Shuttle main engine fuel preburner injector element LOX post for the full range of operating conditions. Axial profiles of axial velocity and static pressure are presented. For each operating condition analyzed, the minimum pressure downstream of the orifice is compared to the vapor pressure to determine if cavitation could occur. Flow visualization is provided by velocity vectors and stream function contours. The results indicate that the minimum pressure is too high for cavitation to occur. To establish confidence in the CFD analysis, the simulation is repeated with water flow through a superscaled LOX post and compared with experimental results. The agreement between calculated and experimental results is very good.

  20. A solution of two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic flow using the finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    Verardi, S.L.L.; Cardoso, J.R.; Motta, C.C.

    1998-09-01

    The problem of magnetohydrodynamic flow through channels has become important because of several engineering applications such as design of nuclear reactor cooling systems, electromagnetic pumps, MHD flowmeters, MHD generators, blood flow measurements, etc. A numerical code based on the Finite Element Method (FEM) was developed to solve the two-dimensional, steady-state magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow in a rectangular channel. In order to apply the FEM, the Galerkin Weak Formulation was used. In this analysis, in contrast with the previous works, the thickness of the duct wall is taken into account and the results are compared to those obtained in the limit case when the thickness is much smaller than a characteristic dimension of the duct. In this case, convergence behavior of several iterative methods, for high Hartmann numbers, was also investigated.

  1. Finite element methods of analysis for 3D inviscid compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peraire, Jaime

    1990-01-01

    The applicants have developed a finite element based approach for the solution of three-dimensional compressible flows. The procedure enables flow solutions to be obtained on tetrahedral discretizations of computational domains of complex form. A further development was the incorporation of a solution adaptive mesh strategy in which the adaptivity is achieved by complete remeshing of the solution domain. During the previous year, the applicants were working with the Advanced Aerodynamics Concepts Branch at NASA Ames Research Center with an implementation of the basic meshing and solution procedure. The objective of the work to be performed over this twelve month period was the transfer of the adaptive mesh technology and also the undertaking of basic research into alternative flow algorithms for the Euler equations on unstructured meshes.

  2. Constraining Groundwater Flow in the Michigan Basin Through Helium Concentrations and Isotopic Ratios in the Saginaw Aquifer, Southern Michigan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, T.; Castro, M.; Hall, C. M.

    2012-12-01

    We present helium concentrations and isotopic ratios from groundwater of the shallow Saginaw aquifer in southern Michigan. Saginaw helium data are interpreted in conjunction with data from the underlying Marshall aquifer in order to further our overall understanding of groundwater flow in the Michigan Basin, including cross-formational flow. For most samples, 3He and 4He concentrations are higher than those expected for water in solubility equilibrium with the atmosphere (ASW), with values of up to two and over three orders of magnitude with respect to ASW for 3He and 4He, respectively. He concentrations are particularly high in the Saginaw Lowlands, the main discharge area of the Michigan Basin. R/Ra values (where Ra is the 3He/4He ratio in the atmosphere) vary from 0.932 to 0.043 and are far greater for modern groundwaters as compared to older ones. Higher R/Ra values indicate mostly the presence of ASW recharge water. The observed decrease in R/Ra values with groundwater age and distance from the recharge area is accompanied by an increase in crustally produced 3He and 4He concentrations. Except for samples close to the recharge area, the average R/Ra value in the Saginaw aquifer is close to typical R/Ra crustal production values of 0.02~0.05. Some samples located in the recharge area suggest the presence of a bomb tritium component between ~5-15TU while the presence of a small mantle component of ~2% is clearly identified in some samples. He excesses in the Saginaw aquifer, in particular those in the Saginaw Lowlands discharge area are unusually high for such shallow depths and require a source external to the aquifer, partly supplied by underlying formations within the sedimentary sequence, partly from the crystalline basement. The similarity of the Saginaw and Marshall noble gas concentrations and isotopic signatures suggests that there is some level of vertical connection and mass exchange between these two aquifers, possibly through both advection and

  3. An extended pressure finite element space for two-phase incompressible flows with surface tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groß, Sven; Reusken, Arnold

    2007-05-01

    We consider a standard model for incompressible two-phase flows in which a localized force at the interface describes the effect of surface tension. If a level set (or VOF) method is applied then the interface, which is implicitly given by the zero level of the level set function, is in general not aligned with the triangulation that is used in the discretization of the flow problem. This non-alignment causes severe difficulties w.r.t. the discretization of the localized surface tension force and the discretization of the flow variables. In cases with large surface tension forces the pressure has a large jump across the interface. In standard finite element spaces, due to the non-alignment, the functions are continuous across the interface and thus not appropriate for the approximation of the discontinuous pressure. In many simulations these effects cause large oscillations of the velocity close to the interface, so-called spurious velocities. In this paper, for a simplified model problem, we give an analysis that explains why known (standard) methods for discretization of the localized force term and for discretization of the pressure variable often yield large spurious velocities. In the paper [S. Groß, A. Reusken, Finite element discretization error analysis of a surface tension force in two-phase incompressible flows, Preprint 262, IGPM, RWTH Aachen, SIAM J. Numer. Anal. (accepted for publication)], we introduce a new and accurate method for approximation of the surface tension force. In the present paper, we use the extended finite element space (XFEM), presented in [N. Moes, J. Dolbow, T. Belytschko, A finite element method for crack growth without remeshing, Int. J. Numer. Meth. Eng. 46 (1999) 131-150; T. Belytschko, N. Moes, S. Usui, C. Parimi, Arbitrary discontinuities in finite elements, Int. J. Numer. Meth. Eng. 50 (2001) 993-1013], for the discretization of the pressure. We show that the size of spurious velocities is reduced substantially, provided we

  4. Introducing variable-step topography (VST) coordinates within dynamically constrained nonhydrostatic modeling system (NMS). Part 2: VST performance on orthodox obstacle flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripoli, Gregory J.; Smith, Eric A.

    2014-06-01

    In this second part of a two-part sequence of papers, the performance metrics and quantitative advantages of a new VST surface coordinate system, implemented within a dynamically constrained, nonhydrostatic, cloud mesoscale atmospheric model, are evaluated in conjunction with seven orthodox obstacle flow problems. [The first part presented a full formulation of the VST model, prefaced by a description of the framework of the newly re-tooled nonhydrostatic modeling system (NMS) operating within integral constraints based on the conservation of the foremost quantities of mass, energy and circulation.] The intent behind VST is to create a vertical surface coordinate system boundary underpinning a nonhydrostatic atmosphere capable of reliable simulations of flows over both smooth and steep terrain without sacrificing dynamical integrity over either type of surface. Model simulation results are analyzed for six classical fluid dynamics problems involving flows relative to obstacles with known analytical or laboratory-simulated solutions, as well as for a seventh noteworthy mountain wave breaking problem that has well-studied numerical solutions. For cases when topography becomes excessively severe or poorly resolved numerically, atmospheric models using transform (terrain-following) coordinates produce noteworthy errors rendering a stable integration only if the topography is smoothed. For cases when topography is slowly varying (smooth or subtle), models using discrete-step coordinates also produce noteworthy errors relative to known solutions. Alternatively, the VST model demonstrates that both limitations of the two conventional approaches, for the entire range of slope severities, can be overcome. This means that VST is ideally suited for a scalable, nonhydrostatic atmospheric model, safeguarded with physically realistic dynamical constraints.

  5. Integration of remotely-sensed and ground-based measurements to constrain simulations of groundwater flow and land subsidence, San Joaquin Valley, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sneed, M.; Brandt, J.; Solt, M.

    2011-12-01

    Extensive groundwater withdrawal from the unconsolidated deposits in the San Joaquin Valley caused widespread aquifer-system compaction and resultant land subsidence between 1926 and 1970-locally exceeding 8 meters (m). To identify the extent of the subsidence, a monitoring network consisting of 31 extensometers was developed and maintained in the 1960s. The importation of surface water in the early 1970s resulted in decreased pumping and a steady recovery of water levels. This recovery reduced the rate of compaction, and consequently, the monitoring network deteriorated. However, lack of imported surface-water availability during 1976-77, 1986-92, and 2007-09 has caused groundwater pumping to increase, which has resulted in water levels to decline to near-historic lows and renewed compaction to occur. Land subsidence resulting from this compaction has reduced freeboard and flow capacity of the Delta-Mendota Canal, the California Aqueduct, and other canals that deliver irrigation water and transport floodwater, requiring expensive repairs. To identify existing and future subsidence, a monitoring network is being developed that includes resurrecting some of the extensometers and piezometers from the old network and augmenting these ground-based measurements with remotely-sensed measurements from Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar and continuous Global Positioning System stations. Preliminary results from the monitoring network indicate that subsidence is occurring in locations of known historical subsidence. These results are being used to develop groundwater-flow and subsidence models to help understand and effectively manage future subsidence. A 1-D model was developed to identify the depth of the compactable units near Oro Loma, where about 60 m of water-level decline is associated with about 3 m of subsidence. The subsurface geology is well-constrained by detailed descriptions of continuous core and by geophysical logs. Analysis indicates that the Corcoran

  6. Simulation of Fluid Flow and Collection Efficiency for an SEA Multi-element Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, David L.; Struk, Peter M.; Bidwell, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Numerical simulations of fluid flow and collection efficiency for a Science Engineering Associates (SEA) multi-element probe are presented. Simulation of the flow field was produced using the Glenn-HT Navier-Stokes solver. Three-dimensional unsteady results were produced and then time averaged for the heat transfer and collection efficiency results. Three grid densities were investigated to enable an assessment of grid dependence. Simulations were completed for free stream velocities ranging from 85-135 meters per second, and free stream total pressure of 44.8 and 93.1 kilopascals (6.5 and 13.5 pounds per square inch absolute). In addition, the effect of angle of attack and yaw were investigated by including 5 degree deviations from straight for one of the flow conditions. All but one of the cases simulated a probe in isolation (i.e. in a very large domain without any support strut). One case is included which represents a probe mounted on a support strut within a finite sized wind tunnel. Collection efficiencies were generated, using the LEWICE3D code, for four spherical particle sizes, 100, 50, 20, and 5 micron in diameter. It was observed that a reduction in velocity of about 20% occurred, for all cases, as the flow entered the shroud of the probe. The reduction in velocity within the shroud is not indicative of any error in the probe measurement accuracy. Heat transfer results are presented which agree quite well with a correlation for the circular cross section heated elements. Collection efficiency results indicate a reduction in collection efficiency as particle size is reduced. The reduction with particle size is expected, however, the results tended to be lower than the previous results generated for isolated two-dimensional elements. The deviation from the two-dimensional results is more pronounced for the smaller particles and is likely due to the reduced flow within the protective shroud. As particle size increases differences between the two

  7. Detached Eddy Simulations of Incompressible Turbulent Flows Using the Finite Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Laskowski, G M

    2001-08-01

    An explicit Galerkin finite-element formulation of the Spalart-Allmaras (SA) 1 - equation turbulent transport model was implemented into the incompressible flow module of a parallel, multi-domain, Galerkin finite-element, multi-physics code, using both a RANS formulation and a DES formulation. DES is a new technique for simulating/modeling turbulence using a hybrid RANSkES formulation. The turbulent viscosity is constructed from an intermediate viscosity obtained from the transport equation which is spatially discretized using Q1 elements and integrated in time via forward Euler time integration. Three simulations of plane channel flow on a RANS-type grid, using different turbulence models, were conducted in order to validate the implementation of the SA model: SA-RANS, SA-DES and Smagorinksy (without wall correction). Very good agreement was observed between the SA-RANS results and theory, namely the Log Law of the Wall (LLW), especially in the viscous sublayer region and, to a lesser extent, in the log-layer region. The results obtained using the SA-DES model did not agree as well with the LLW, and it is believed that this poor agreement can be attributed to using a DES model on a RANS grid, namely using an incorrect length-scale. It was observed that near the wall, the SA-DES model acted as an RANS model, and away from the wall it acted as an LES model.

  8. Adaptive finite element simulation of flow and transport applications on parallel computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, Benjamin Shelton

    The subject of this work is the adaptive finite element simulation of problems arising in flow and transport applications on parallel computers. Of particular interest are new contributions to adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) in this parallel high-performance context, including novel work on data structures, treatment of constraints in a parallel setting, generality and extensibility via object-oriented programming, and the design/implementation of a flexible software framework. This technology and software capability then enables more robust, reliable treatment of multiscale--multiphysics problems and specific studies of fine scale interaction such as those in biological chemotaxis (Chapter 4) and high-speed shock physics for compressible flows (Chapter 5). The work begins by presenting an overview of key concepts and data structures employed in AMR simulations. Of particular interest is how these concepts are applied in the physics-independent software framework which is developed here and is the basis for all the numerical simulations performed in this work. This open-source software framework has been adopted by a number of researchers in the U.S. and abroad for use in a wide range of applications. The dynamic nature of adaptive simulations pose particular issues for efficient implementation on distributed-memory parallel architectures. Communication cost, computational load balance, and memory requirements must all be considered when developing adaptive software for this class of machines. Specific extensions to the adaptive data structures to enable implementation on parallel computers is therefore considered in detail. The libMesh framework for performing adaptive finite element simulations on parallel computers is developed to provide a concrete implementation of the above ideas. This physics-independent framework is applied to two distinct flow and transport applications classes in the subsequent application studies to illustrate the flexibility of the

  9. Simulation of Fluid Flow and Collection Efficiency for an SEA Multi-element Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, David L.; Struk, Peter M.; Bidwell, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Numerical simulations of fluid flow and collection efficiency for a Science Engineering Associates (SEA) multi-element probe are presented. Simulation of the flow field was produced using the Glenn-HT Navier-Stokes solver. Three dimensional unsteady results were produced and then time averaged for the collection efficiency results. Three grid densities were investigated to enable an assessment of grid dependence. Collection efficiencies were generated for three spherical particle sizes, 100, 20, and 5 micron in diameter, using the codes LEWICE3D and LEWICE2D. The free stream Mach number was 0.27, representing a velocity of approximately 86 ms. It was observed that a reduction in velocity of about 15-20 occurred as the flow entered the shroud of the probe.Collection efficiency results indicate a reduction in collection efficiency as particle size is reduced. The reduction with particle size is expected, however, the results tended to be lower than previous results generated for isolated two-dimensional elements. The deviation from the two-dimensional results is more pronounced for the smaller particles and is likely due to the effect of the protective shroud.

  10. Power flow as a complement to statistical energy analysis and finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuschieri, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    Present methods of analysis of the structural response and the structure-borne transmission of vibrational energy use either finite element (FE) techniques or statistical energy analysis (SEA) methods. The FE methods are a very useful tool at low frequencies where the number of resonances involved in the analysis is rather small. On the other hand SEA methods can predict with acceptable accuracy the response and energy transmission between coupled structures at relatively high frequencies where the structural modal density is high and a statistical approach is the appropriate solution. In the mid-frequency range, a relatively large number of resonances exist which make finite element method too costly. On the other hand SEA methods can only predict an average level form. In this mid-frequency range a possible alternative is to use power flow techniques, where the input and flow of vibrational energy to excited and coupled structural components can be expressed in terms of input and transfer mobilities. This power flow technique can be extended from low to high frequencies and this can be integrated with established FE models at low frequencies and SEA models at high frequencies to form a verification of the method. This method of structural analysis using power flo and mobility methods, and its integration with SEA and FE analysis is applied to the case of two thin beams joined together at right angles.

  11. Flow tests of a single fuel element coolant channel for a compact fast reactor for space power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Springborn, R. H.

    1971-01-01

    Water flow tests were conducted on a single-fuel-element cooling channel for a nuclear concept to be used for space power. The tests established a method for measuring coolant flow rate which is applicable to water flow testing of a complete mockup of the reference reactor. The inlet plenum-to-outlet plenum pressure drop, which approximates the overall core pressure drop, was measured and correlated with flow rate. This information can be used for reactor coolant flow and heat transfer calculations. An analytical study of the flow characteristics was also conducted.

  12. A study of the rheology of planar granular flow of dumbbells using discrete element method simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Sandip; Khakhar, D. V.

    2016-10-01

    Granular materials handled in industries are typically non-spherical in shape and understanding the flow of such materials is important. The steady flow of mono-disperse, frictional, inelastic dumbbells in two-dimensions is studied by soft sphere, discrete element method simulations for chute flow and shear cell flow. The chute flow data are in the dense flow regime, while the shear cell data span a wide range of solid fractions. Results of a detailed parametric study for both systems are presented. In chute flow, increase in the aspect ratio of the dumbbells results in significant slowing of the flow at a fixed inclination and in the shear cell it results in increase in the shear stress and pressure for a fixed shear rate. The flow is well-described by the μ-I scaling for inertial numbers as high as I = 1, corresponding to solid fractions as low as ϕ = 0.3, where μ is the effective friction (the ratio of shear stress to pressure) and I is the inertial number (a dimensionless shear rate scaled with the time scale obtained from the local pressure). For a fixed inertial number, the effective friction increases by 60%-70% when aspect ratio is increased from 1.0 (sphere) to 1.9. At low values of the inertial number, there is little change in the solid fraction with aspect ratio of the dumbbells, whereas at high values of the inertial number, there is a significant increase in solid fraction with increase in aspect ratio. The dense flow data are well-described by the Jop-Forterre-Pouliquen model [P. Jop et al., Nature 441, 727-730 (2006)] with the model parameters dependent on the dumbbell aspect ratio. The variation of μ with I over the extended range shows a maximum in the range I ∈ (0.4, 0.5), while the solid fraction shows a faster than linear decrease with inertial number. A modified version of the JFP model for μ(I) and a power law model for ϕ(I) is shown to describe the combined data over the extended range of I.

  13. Finite element modeling of cracked bodies using the Bodner-Partom flow law

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholas, T.; Bohun, M.

    1985-01-01

    The Bodner-Partom flow law which models viscoplastic material behavior has been used to represent two nickel-base superalloys, Gatorized IN100 and Inconel 718 at elevated temperature. Procedures for the determination of the material parameters are presented along with a discussion of the physical significance of each parameter. The material model is then used in finite element computations to evaluate the response of cracked bodies to monotonic, sustained, or cyclic loading. Geometries investigated include the center cracked panel, the compact tension specimen, and the single cracked ring under tension. A Hybrid Experimental Numerical (HEN) procedure has been used to deduce crack growth rates from experimental displacement measurements which are input into finite element computations. The results of several studies conducted over the last several years are summarized.

  14. Computational Modeling For The Transitional Flow Over A Multi-Element Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, William W.; Liu, Feng-Jun; Rumsey, Chris L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The transitional flow over a multi-element airfoil in a landing configuration are computed using a two equation transition model. The transition model is predictive in the sense that the transition onset is a result of the calculation and no prior knowledge of the transition location is required. The computations were performed using the INS2D) Navier-Stokes code. Overset grids are used for the three-element airfoil. The airfoil operating conditions are varied for a range of angle of attack and for two different Reynolds numbers of 5 million and 9 million. The computed results are compared with experimental data for the surface pressure, skin friction, transition onset location, and velocity magnitude. In general, the comparison shows a good agreement with the experimental data.

  15. The accuracy of finite element solutions of Stokes's flow with strongly varying viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moresi, Louis; Zhong, Shijie; Gurnis, Michael

    1996-10-01

    We provide benchmark comparisons of two finite element (FE) mantle convection codes, CITCOM and CONMAN, against analytic solutions for Stokes' flow for strongly varying viscosity in the horizontal and vertical directions. The two codes use a similar FE formulation but different methods for solving the resulting equations. They both obtain accurate velocity, pressure and surface topography for viscosity structures which vary rapidly over a short distance, or discontinuously. The benchmarks help determine how many elements are needed to resolve a region of, for example, a convection simulation with high viscosity gradients. The overall accuracy does not depend on the global viscosity variation but on the gradients within individual elements. As a rule of thumb, accuracy can fall below 1% when there is a viscosity variation greater than a factor of two or three in an element. For iterative solution methods, necessary in three-dimensional modelling, these guidelines are required to determine the number of iterations to perform. We discuss a penalty based technique which improves the convergence of iterative solvers for general problems in which high viscosity gradients occurs spontaneously.

  16. A two-dimensional flow sensor with integrated micro thermal sensing elements and a back propagation neural network.

    PubMed

    Que, Ruiyi; Zhu, Rong

    2013-01-01

    This paper demonstrates a novel flow sensor with two-dimensional 360° direction sensitivity achieved with a simple structure and a novel data fusion algorithm. Four sensing elements with roundabout wires distributed in four quadrants of a circle compose the sensor probe, and work in constant temperature difference (CTD) mode as both Joule heaters and temperature detectors. The magnitude and direction of a fluid flow are measured by detecting flow-induced temperature differences among the four elements. The probe is made of Ti/Au thin-film with a diameter of 2 mm, and is fabricated using micromachining techniques. When a flow goes through the sensor, the flow-induced temperature differences are detected by the sensing elements that also serve as the heaters of the sensor. By measuring the temperature differences among the four sensing elements symmetrically distributed in the sensing area, a full 360° direction sensitivity can be obtained. By using a BP neural network to model the relationship between the readouts of the four sensor elements and flow parameters and execute data fusion, the magnitude and direction of the flow can be deduced. Validity of the sensor design was proven through both simulations and experiments. Wind tunnel experimental results show that the measurement accuracy of the airflow speed reaches 0.72 m/s in the range of 3 m/s-30 m/s and the measurement accuracy of flow direction angle reaches 1.9° in the range of 360°.

  17. A Two-Dimensional Flow Sensor with Integrated Micro Thermal Sensing Elements and a Back Propagation Neural Network

    PubMed Central

    Que, Ruiyi; Zhu, Rong

    2014-01-01

    This paper demonstrates a novel flow sensor with two-dimensional 360° direction sensitivity achieved with a simple structure and a novel data fusion algorithm. Four sensing elements with roundabout wires distributed in four quadrants of a circle compose the sensor probe, and work in constant temperature difference (CTD) mode as both Joule heaters and temperature detectors. The magnitude and direction of a fluid flow are measured by detecting flow-induced temperature differences among the four elements. The probe is made of Ti/Au thin-film with a diameter of 2 mm, and is fabricated using micromachining techniques. When a flow goes through the sensor, the flow-induced temperature differences are detected by the sensing elements that also serve as the heaters of the sensor. By measuring the temperature differences among the four sensing elements symmetrically distributed in the sensing area, a full 360° direction sensitivity can be obtained. By using a BP neural network to model the relationship between the readouts of the four sensor elements and flow parameters and execute data fusion, the magnitude and direction of the flow can be deduced. Validity of the sensor design was proven through both simulations and experiments. Wind tunnel experimental results show that the measurement accuracy of the airflow speed reaches 0.72 m/s in the range of 3 m/s–30 m/s and the measurement accuracy of flow direction angle reaches 1.9° in the range of 360°. PMID:24385032

  18. A Finite-Element Approach for Modeling Inviscid and Viscous Compressible Flows using Prismatic Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandya, S. A.; Hefez, M.

    2000-01-01

    The Galerkin finite-element method is used to solve the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations on prismatic meshes. It is shown that the prismatic grid is advantageous for correctly and efficiently capturing the boundary layers in high Reynolds number flows. It can be captured accurately because of the ability to cluster grid points normal to the body. The efficiency derives from the implicit treatment of the normal direction. To treat the normal direction implicitly, a semi-implicit Runge-Kutta time stepping scheme is developed. The semi-implicit algorithm is validated on simple geometries for inviscid and viscous flows and its convergence history is compared to that of the explicit Runge-Kutta scheme. The semi-implicit scheme is shown to be a factor of 3 to 4 faster in terms of CPU time to convergence.

  19. Helical swimming in Stokes flow using a novel boundary-element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Breuer, Kenneth S.; Powers, Thomas R.

    2013-06-01

    We apply the boundary-element method to Stokes flows with helical symmetry, such as the flow driven by an immersed rotating helical flagellum. We show that the two-dimensional boundary integral method can be reduced to one dimension using the helical symmetry. The computational cost is thus much reduced while spatial resolution is maintained. We review the robustness of this method by comparing the simulation results with the experimental measurement of the motility of model helical flagella of various ratios of pitch to radius, along with predictions from resistive-force theory and slender-body theory. We also show that the modified boundary integral method provides reliable convergence if the singularities in the kernel of the integral are treated appropriately.

  20. Generalized multiscale finite element method for non-Newtonian fluid flow in perforated domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, E. T.; Iliev, O.; Vasilyeva, M. V.

    2016-10-01

    In this work, we consider a non-Newtonian fluid flow in perforated domains. Fluid flow in perforated domains have a multiscale nature and solution techniques for such problems require high resolution. In particular, the discretization needs to honor the irregular boundaries of perforations. This gives rise to a fine-scale problems with many degrees of freedom which can be very expensive to solve. In this work, we develop a multiscale approach that attempt to solve such problems on a coarse grid by constructing multiscale basis functions. We follow Generalized Multiscale Finite Element Method (GMsFEM) [1, 2] and develop a multiscale procedure where we identify multiscale basis functions in each coarse block using snapshot space and local spectral problems [3, 4]. We show that with a few basis functions in each coarse block, one can accurately approximate the solution, where each coarse block can contain many small inclusions.

  1. A finite element algorithm for sound propagation in axisymmetric ducts containing compressible mean flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrahamson, A. L.

    1977-01-01

    An accurate mathematical model for sound propagation in axisymmetric aircraft engine ducts with compressible mean flow is reported. The model is based on the usual perturbation of the basic fluid mechanics equations for small motions. Mean flow parameters are derived in the absence of fluctuating quantities and are then substituted into the equations for the acoustic quantities which were linearized by eliminating higher order terms. Mean swirl is assumed to be zero from the restriction of axisymmetry. A linear rectangular serendipity element is formulated from these equations using a Galerkin procedure and assembled in a special purpose computer program in which the matrix map for a rectangular mesh was specifically coded. Representations of the fluctuating quantities, mean quantities and coordinate transformations are isoparametric. The global matrix is solved by foreward and back substitution following an L-U decomposition with pivoting restricted internally to the blocks. Results from the model were compared with results from several alternative analyses and yielded satisfactory agreement.

  2. Least-squares finite element solutions for three-dimensional backward-facing step flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan; Hou, Lin-Jun; Lin, Tsung-Liang

    1993-01-01

    Comprehensive numerical solutions of the steady state incompressible viscous flow over a three-dimensional backward-facing step up to Re equals 800 are presented. The results are obtained by the least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) which is based on the velocity-pressure-vorticity formulation. The computed model is of the same size as that of Armaly's experiment. Three-dimensional phenomena are observed even at low Reynolds number. The calculated values of the primary reattachment length are in good agreement with experimental results.

  3. Simulation of viscous flows using a multigrid-control volume finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    Hookey, N.A.

    1994-12-31

    This paper discusses a multigrid control volume finite element method (MG CVFEM) for the simulation of viscous fluid flows. The CVFEM is an equal-order primitive variables formulation that avoids spurious solution fields by incorporating an appropriate pressure gradient in the velocity interpolation functions. The resulting set of discretized equations is solved using a coupled equation line solver (CELS) that solves the discretized momentum and continuity equations simultaneously along lines in the calculation domain. The CVFEM has been implemented in the context of both FMV- and V-cycle multigrid algorithms, and preliminary results indicate a five to ten fold reduction in execution times.

  4. SAGUARO: a finite-element computer program for partially saturated porous flow problems

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, R.R.; Gartling, D.K.; Larson, D.E.

    1983-06-01

    SAGUARO is a finite element computer program designed to calculate two-dimensional flow of mass and energy through porous media. The media may be saturated or partially saturated. SAGUARO solves the parabolic time-dependent mass transport equation which accounts for the presence of partially saturated zones through the use of highly non-linear material characteristic curves. The energy equation accounts for the possibility of partially saturated regions by adjusting the thermal capacitances and thermal conductivities according to the volume fraction of water present in the local pores. Program capabilities, user instructions and a sample problem are presented in this manual.

  5. SAGUARO: A finite-element computer program for partially saturated porous flow problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Easton, R. R.; Gartling, D. K.; Larson, D. E.

    1983-11-01

    SAGUARO is finite element computer program designed to calculate two-dimensional flow of mass and energy through porous media. The media may be saturated or partially saturated. SAGUARO solves the parabolic time-dependent mass transport equation which accounts for the presence of partially saturated zones through the use of highly non-linear material characteristic curves. The energy equation accounts for the possibility of partially saturated regions by adjusting the thermal capacitances and thermal conductivities according to the volume fraction of water present in the local pores. Program capabilities, user instructions and a sample problem are presented in this manual.

  6. Characteristics of fluid flow in the combustion synthesis of TiC from the elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valone, S. M.; Behrens, R. G.

    1987-01-01

    The results of a numerical investigation of finite reservoir effects on capillary spreading at small reservoir dimensions are presently related to wave propagation phenomena in the combustion synthesis of TiC from its two elemental constituents. It is noted that gravitational forces can affect bubble coalescence by nonbuoyant means under the suitable conditions, although these conditions are expected to be rare in combustion synthesis. Finite-curved reservoirs can drive capillary flow due to surface tension and wall contact forces; these cause the wall and the metal to be completely reconfigured during combustion synthesis.

  7. Finite element modelling of a 3 dimensional dielectrophoretic flow separator device for optimal bioprocessing conditions.

    PubMed

    Fatoyinbo, H O; Hughes, M P

    2004-01-01

    Planar 2-dimensional dielectrophoresis electrode geometries are limited in only being capable of handling fluid volumes ranging from picolitres to hundreds of microliters per hour. A 3-dimensional electrode system has been developed capable of handling significantly larger volumes of fluid. Using finite element modeling the electric field distribution within various bore sizes was realized. From these simulations it is possible to optimize bioprocessing factors influencing the performance of a dielectrophoretic separator. Process calculations have shown that flow-rates of 25ml hr/sup -1/ or more can be attained for the separation of heterogeneous populations of bio-particles based on their dielectric properties.

  8. A least squares finite element scheme for transonic flow around harmonically oscillating airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, C. L.; Fix, G. J.; Gunzburger, M. D.

    1983-01-01

    The present investigation shows that a finite element scheme with a weighted least squares variational principle is applicable to the problem of transonic flow around a harmonically oscillating airfoil. For the flat plate case, numerical results compare favorably with the exact solution. The obtained numerical results for the transonic problem, for which an exact solution is not known, have the characteristics of known experimental results. It is demonstrated that the performance of the employed numerical method is independent of equation type (elliptic or hyperbolic) and frequency. The weighted least squares principle allows the appropriate modeling of singularities, which such a modeling of singularities is not possible with normal least squares.

  9. Simulation analysis of traffic flow elements for restricted truck lanes on interstate highways in Virginia. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hoel, L.A.; Peek, J.L.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze changes in traffic flow elements, (density, lane changes per vehicle, and speed differential) under conditions of restricted and unrestricted truck lane configurations.

  10. Analytic Element Modeling of Steady Interface Flow in Multilayer Aquifers Using AnAqSim.

    PubMed

    Fitts, Charles R; Godwin, Joshua; Feiner, Kathleen; McLane, Charles; Mullendore, Seth

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the analytic element modeling approach implemented in the software AnAqSim for simulating steady groundwater flow with a sharp fresh-salt interface in multilayer (three-dimensional) aquifer systems. Compared with numerical methods for variable-density interface modeling, this approach allows quick model construction and can yield useful guidance about the three-dimensional configuration of an interface even at a large scale. The approach employs subdomains and multiple layers as outlined by Fitts (2010) with the addition of discharge potentials for shallow interface flow (Strack 1989). The following simplifying assumptions are made: steady flow, a sharp interface between fresh- and salt water, static salt water, and no resistance to vertical flow and hydrostatic heads within each fresh water layer. A key component of this approach is a transition to a thin fixed minimum fresh water thickness mode when the fresh water thickness approaches zero. This allows the solution to converge and determine the steady interface position without a long transient simulation. The approach is checked against the widely used numerical codes SEAWAT and SWI/MODFLOW and a hypothetical application of the method to a coastal wellfield is presented.

  11. Numerical Modeling of Cavitating Venturi: A Flow Control Element of Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, Alok; Saxon, Jeff (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In a propulsion system, the propellant flow and mixture ratio could be controlled either by variable area flow control valves or by passive flow control elements such as cavitating venturies. Cavitating venturies maintain constant propellant flowrate for fixed inlet conditions (pressure and temperature) and wide range of outlet pressures, thereby maintain constant, engine thrust and mixture ratio. The flowrate through the venturi reaches a constant value and becomes independent of outlet pressure when the pressure at throat becomes equal to vapor pressure. In order to develop a numerical model of propulsion system, it is necessary to model cavitating venturies in propellant feed systems. This paper presents a finite volume model of flow network of a cavitating venturi. The venturi was discretized into a number of control volumes and mass, momentum and energy conservation equations in each control volume are simultaneously solved to calculate one-dimensional pressure, density, and flowrate and temperature distribution. The numerical model predicts cavitations at the throat when outlet pressure was gradually reduced. Once cavitation starts, with further reduction of downstream pressure, no change in flowrate is found. The numerical predictions have been compared with test data and empirical equation based on Bernoulli's equation.

  12. Transitional flow in the wake of a moderate to large height cylindrical roughness element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plogmann, B.; Würz, W.; Krämer, E.

    2015-12-01

    The effect of an isolated, cylindrical roughness on the stability of an airfoil boundary layer has been studied based on particle image velocimetry and hot-wire anemometry. The investigated roughness elements range from a sub-critical to a super-critical behavior with regard to the critical roughness Reynolds number. For the sub-critical case, the nonlinear disturbance growth in the near wake is governed by oblique Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) type modes. Further downstream, these disturbance modes are, however, damped with the mean flow stabilization and no dominant modes persist in the far wake. By contrast, in the transitional configuration the disturbance growth is increased, but still associated with a TS-type instability in the near-wake centerline region of the low-aspect (height-to-diameter) ratio element. That is, the disturbances in the centerline region show a similar behavior as known for 2D elements, whereas in the outer spanwise domain a Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) type, shear-layer instability is found, as previously reported for larger aspect ratio isolated elements. With increasing height and, thereby, aspect ratio of the roughness, the KH-type instability domain extends toward the centerline and, accordingly, the TS-type instability domain decreases. For high super-critical cases, transition is already triggered in the wall-normal and spanwise shear layers upstream and around the roughness. In the immediate wake, periodic shear-layer disturbances roll up into a—for isolated elements characteristic—shedding of vortices, which was not present at the lower roughness Reynolds number cases due to the decreased aspect ratio and, thereby, different instability mechanism.

  13. The semi-discrete Galerkin finite element modelling of compressible viscous flow past an airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meade, Andrew J., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A method is developed to solve the two-dimensional, steady, compressible, turbulent boundary-layer equations and is coupled to an existing Euler solver for attached transonic airfoil analysis problems. The boundary-layer formulation utilizes the semi-discrete Galerkin (SDG) method to model the spatial variable normal to the surface with linear finite elements and the time-like variable with finite differences. A Dorodnitsyn transformed system of equations is used to bound the infinite spatial domain thereby permitting the use of a uniform finite element grid which provides high resolution near the wall and automatically follows boundary-layer growth. The second-order accurate Crank-Nicholson scheme is applied along with a linearization method to take advantage of the parabolic nature of the boundary-layer equations and generate a non-iterative marching routine. The SDG code can be applied to any smoothly-connected airfoil shape without modification and can be coupled to any inviscid flow solver. In this analysis, a direct viscous-inviscid interaction is accomplished between the Euler and boundary-layer codes, through the application of a transpiration velocity boundary condition. Results are presented for compressible turbulent flow past NACA 0012 and RAE 2822 airfoils at various freestream Mach numbers, Reynolds numbers, and angles of attack. All results show good agreement with experiment, and the coupled code proved to be a computationally-efficient and accurate airfoil analysis tool.

  14. An adaptive multiscale finite element method for unsaturated flow problems in heterogeneous porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xinguang; Ren, Li

    2009-07-01

    SummaryIn this paper we present an adaptive multiscale finite element method for solving the unsaturated water flow problems in heterogeneous porous media spanning over many scales. The main purpose is to design a numerical method which is capable of adaptively capturing the large-scale behavior of the solution on a coarse-scale mesh without resolving all the small-scale details at each time step. This is accomplished by constructing the multiscale base functions that are adapted to the time change of the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity field. The key idea of our method is to use a criterion based on the temporal variation of the hydraulic conductivity field to determine when and where to update our multiscale base functions. As a consequence, these base functions are able to dynamically account for the spatio-temporal variability in the equation coefficients. We described the principle for constructing such a method in detail and gave an algorithm for implementing it. Numerical experiments were carried out for the unsaturated water flow equation with randomly generated lognormal hydraulic parameters to demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of the proposed method. The results show that throughout the adaptive simulation, only a very small fraction of the multiscale base functions needs to be recomputed, and the level of accuracy of the adaptive method is higher than that of the multiscale finite element technique in which the base functions are not updated with the time change of the hydraulic conductivity.

  15. Determination of hydralazine with flow injection chemiluminescence sensor using molecularly imprinted polymer as recognition element.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yan; Zhou, Houjiang; Zhang, Zhujun; He, Deyong; He, Chao

    2006-06-01

    A novel flow injection chemiluminescence (CL) sensor for hydralazine determination using molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) as recognition element is reported. Hydralazine-MIP was prepared through non-covalent copolymerization using methacrylic acid (MAA) monomer, hydralazine template and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) cross-linker. Particles of the MIP were packed into a v-shape glass tube for on-line adsorption of the analyte of hydralazine. The adsorbed hydralazine could be sensed by its great enhancing effect on the CL reaction between luminol and periodate. The CL intensity is linear to hydralazine concentration in the range from 2x10(-9) to 8x10(-7) g/mL. The detection limit is 6x10(-10) g/mL (3sigma) and the relative standard deviation is 2.8% (n=7) for 8x10(-9) g/mL hydralazine. The selective experiment showed that the selectivity and sensitivity of the CL method could be greatly improved when MIP was used as recognition element in the flow-injection CL sensor. The sensor was reversible and reusable. It could be used for more than 100 times. It has been used directly to determine the hydralazine in human urine.

  16. Adjustment of roughness sublayer in turbulent flows over two-dimensional idealised roughness elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HO, Yat-Kiu; LIU, Chun-Ho

    2015-04-01

    The atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) immediately above the urban canopy is the roughness sublayer (RSL). In this layer, flows and turbulence are strongly affected by the roughness elements beneath, e.g. building obstacles. The wind flows over urban areas could be represented by conventional logarithmic law of the wall (log-law) in the neutrally stratified ABL. However, in the RSL region, the vertical wind profile deviates from that predicted from log-law and the effect could be extended from ground level up to several canopy heights. As a result, the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (MOST) fails and an additional length scale is required to describe the flows. The key aim of this study is to introduce a simple wind profile model which accounts for the effect of the RSL in neutral stratification using wind tunnel experiments. Profile measurements of wind speeds and turbulence quantities over various two-dimensional (2D) idealised roughness elements are carried out in an open-circuit wind tunnel with test section of size 560 mm (width) × 560 mm (height) × 6 m (length). The separation between the roughness elements is varied systematically so that ten different types of surface forms are adopted. The velocity measurements are obtained by hot-wire anemometry using X-probe design (for UW- measurements) with a constant temperature anemometer. For each configuration, eight vertical profiles are collected over the canopy, including solid boundaries and cavities of the roughness elements. Firstly, we compute the measurement results using conventional MOST to determine different roughness parameters. Afterwards, we derive the RSL height from the Reynolds stress profiles. Since the profiles taken from different locations of the canopy are eventually converged with increasing height, we use this 'congregated height' to define the RSL height. Next, we introduce an alternative function, i.e. power-law function, instead of MOST, to describe the velocity profile in attempt to

  17. Turbulent Flow Structure Inside a Canopy with Complex Multi-Scale Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Kunlun; Katz, Joseph; Meneveau, Charles

    2015-06-01

    Particle image velocimetry laboratory measurements are carried out to study mean flow distributions and turbulent statistics inside a canopy with complex geometry and multiple scales consisting of fractal, tree-like objects. Matching the optical refractive indices of the tree elements with those of the working fluid provides unobstructed optical paths for both illuminations and image acquisition. As a result, the flow fields between tree branches can be resolved in great detail, without optical interference. Statistical distributions of mean velocity, turbulence stresses, and components of dispersive fluxes are documented and discussed. The results show that the trees leave their signatures in the flow by imprinting wake structures with shapes similar to the trees. The velocities in both wake and non-wake regions significantly deviate from the spatially-averaged values. These local deviations result in strong dispersive fluxes, which are important to account for in canopy-flow modelling. In fact, we find that the streamwise normal dispersive flux inside the canopy has a larger magnitude (by up to four times) than the corresponding Reynolds normal stress. Turbulent transport in horizontal planes is studied in the framework of the eddy viscosity model. Scatter plots comparing the Reynolds shear stress and mean velocity gradient are indicative of a linear trend, from which one can calculate the eddy viscosity and mixing length. Similar to earlier results from the wake of a single tree, here we find that inside the canopy the mean mixing length decreases with increasing elevation. This trend cannot be scaled based on a single length scale, but can be described well by a model, which considers the coexistence of multi-scale branches. This agreement indicates that the multi-scale information and the clustering properties of the fractal objects should be taken into consideration in flows inside multi-scale canopies.

  18. Modeling fluid flow in deformation bands with stabilized localization mixed finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, W.; Ostien, J. T.; Foulk, J. W.; Abdeljawad, F.

    2012-12-01

    Deformation bands in geological materials refer to narrow zones of inhomogeneous strain. Their onset and propagation may cause significant changes in microstructures and therefore profoundly enhance or suppress fluid flow and induce anisotropy. These changes in hydraulic properties have strong implications in geotechnical engineering, carbon dioxide sequestration and nuclear waste storage. The difficulty in modeling such multiphysics phenomena is threefold. 1. Monolithically coupled promechanics formulation may lead to non-physical oscillation in pore pressure near the undrained limit if identical mesh and basis functions are used for pore pressure and displacement. 2. Onsets of deformation bands may lead to non-converging mesh-dependent results if no length scale is introduced to the finite element formulation. 3. Modeling anisotropy induced by the deformation band may require a very fine mesh to capture the sharp pore pressure gradient and results in a computational intensive system. In this study, we introduce a projection-based technique to stabilize a large deformation finite element model that eliminates the non-physical oscillation in pore pressure. Using a 1D analytical solution as guideline, we introduce a simple scheme that can adaptively update the optimal value for the stabilization parameter that can restore stability without over-diffusing the system. This stabilized model is coupled with a localization element technique used to introduce proper length scale to regularize the governing equations and resolve the fluid flow jumps across the deformation bands. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the properties and performance of the proposed localized models. *Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000

  19. A spectral-element dynamic model for the Large-Eddy simulation of turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapelier, J.-B.; Lodato, G.

    2016-09-01

    A spectral dynamic modeling procedure for Large-Eddy simulation is introduced in the context of discontinuous finite element methods. The proposed sub-grid scale model depends on a turbulence sensor built from the computation of a polynomial energy spectrum in each of the discretization elements. The evaluation of the energy decay gives an estimation of the quality of the resolution in each element and allows for adapting the intensity of the sub-grid dissipation locally. This approach is simple, robust, efficient and it is shown that the sub-grid model adapts to the amount of numerical dissipation in order to provide an accurate representation of the true sub-grid stresses. The present approach is tested for the large-eddy simulation of transitional, fully-developed and wall-bounded turbulence. In particular, results are reported for the Taylor-Green vortex and periodic turbulent channel flows at moderate Reynolds number. For these configurations, the new model shows an accurate description of turbulent phenomena at relatively coarse resolutions.

  20. An extended validation of the last generation of particle finite element method for free surface flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimenez, Juan M.; González, Leo M.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a new generation of the particle method known as Particle Finite Element Method (PFEM), which combines convective particle movement and a fixed mesh resolution, is applied to free surface flows. This interesting variant, previously described in the literature as PFEM-2, is able to use larger time steps when compared to other similar numerical tools which implies shorter computational times while maintaining the accuracy of the computation. PFEM-2 has already been extended to free surface problems, being the main topic of this paper a deep validation of this methodology for a wider range of flows. To accomplish this task, different improved versions of discontinuous and continuous enriched basis functions for the pressure field have been developed to capture the free surface dynamics without artificial diffusion or undesired numerical effects when different density ratios are involved. A collection of problems has been carefully selected such that a wide variety of Froude numbers, density ratios and dominant dissipative cases are reported with the intention of presenting a general methodology, not restricted to a particular range of parameters, and capable of using large time-steps. The results of the different free-surface problems solved, which include: Rayleigh-Taylor instability, sloshing problems, viscous standing waves and the dam break problem, are compared to well validated numerical alternatives or experimental measurements obtaining accurate approximations for such complex flows.

  1. Numerical Simulation of Dry Granular Flow Impacting a Rigid Wall Using the Discrete Element Method.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fengyuan; Fan, Yunyun; Liang, Li; Wang, Chao

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a clump model based on Discrete Element Method. The clump model was more close to the real particle than a spherical particle. Numerical simulations of several tests of dry granular flow impacting a rigid wall flowing in an inclined chute have been achieved. Five clump models with different sphericity have been used in the simulations. By comparing the simulation results with the experimental results of normal force on the rigid wall, a clump model with better sphericity was selected to complete the following numerical simulation analysis and discussion. The calculation results of normal force showed good agreement with the experimental results, which verify the effectiveness of the clump model. Then, total normal force and bending moment of the rigid wall and motion process of the granular flow were further analyzed. Finally, comparison analysis of the numerical simulations using the clump model with different grain composition was obtained. By observing normal force on the rigid wall and distribution of particle size at the front of the rigid wall at the final state, the effect of grain composition on the force of the rigid wall has been revealed. It mainly showed that, with the increase of the particle size, the peak force at the retaining wall also increase. The result can provide a basis for the research of relevant disaster and the design of protective structures. PMID:27513661

  2. Numerical Simulation of Dry Granular Flow Impacting a Rigid Wall Using the Discrete Element Method

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fengyuan; Fan, Yunyun; Liang, Li; Wang, Chao

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a clump model based on Discrete Element Method. The clump model was more close to the real particle than a spherical particle. Numerical simulations of several tests of dry granular flow impacting a rigid wall flowing in an inclined chute have been achieved. Five clump models with different sphericity have been used in the simulations. By comparing the simulation results with the experimental results of normal force on the rigid wall, a clump model with better sphericity was selected to complete the following numerical simulation analysis and discussion. The calculation results of normal force showed good agreement with the experimental results, which verify the effectiveness of the clump model. Then, total normal force and bending moment of the rigid wall and motion process of the granular flow were further analyzed. Finally, comparison analysis of the numerical simulations using the clump model with different grain composition was obtained. By observing normal force on the rigid wall and distribution of particle size at the front of the rigid wall at the final state, the effect of grain composition on the force of the rigid wall has been revealed. It mainly showed that, with the increase of the particle size, the peak force at the retaining wall also increase. The result can provide a basis for the research of relevant disaster and the design of protective structures. PMID:27513661

  3. Development of a Cl-impregnated activated carbon for entrained-flow capture of elemental mercury.

    PubMed

    Ghorishi, S Behrooz; Keeney, Robert M; Serre, Shannon D; Gullett, Brian K; Jozewicz, Wojciech S

    2002-10-15

    Efforts to discern the role of an activated carbon's surface functional groups on the adsorption of elemental mercury (Hg0) and mercuric chloride demonstrated that chlorine (Cl) impregnation of a virgin activated carbon using dilute solutions of hydrogen chloride leads to increases (by a factor of 2-3) in fixed-bed capture of these mercury species. A commercially available activated carbon (DARCO FGD, NORITAmericas Inc. [FGD])was Cl-impregnated (Cl-FGD) [5 lb (2.3 kg) per batch] and tested for entrained-flow, short-time-scale capture of Hg0. In an entrained flow reactor, the Cl-FGD was introduced in Hg0-laden flue gases (86 ppb of Hg0) of varied compositions with gas/solid contact times of about 3-4 s, resulting in significant Hg0 removal (80-90%), compared to virgin FGD (10-15%). These levels of Hg0 removal were observed across a wide range of very low carbon-to-mercury weight ratios (1000-5000). Variation of the natural gas combustion flue gas composition, by doping with nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxide, and the flow reactor temperature (100-200 degrees C) had minimal effects on Hg0 removal bythe Cl-FGD in these carbon-to-mercury weight ratios. These results demonstrate significant enhancement of activated carbon reactivity with minimal treatment and are applicable to combustion facilities equipped with downstream particulate matter removal such as an electrostatic precipitator.

  4. MPSalsa a finite element computer program for reacting flow problems. Part 2 - user`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Salinger, A.; Devine, K.; Hennigan, G.; Moffat, H.

    1996-09-01

    This manual describes the use of MPSalsa, an unstructured finite element (FE) code for solving chemically reacting flow problems on massively parallel computers. MPSalsa has been written to enable the rigorous modeling of the complex geometry and physics found in engineering systems that exhibit coupled fluid flow, heat transfer, mass transfer, and detailed reactions. In addition, considerable effort has been made to ensure that the code makes efficient use of the computational resources of massively parallel (MP), distributed memory architectures in a way that is nearly transparent to the user. The result is the ability to simultaneously model both three-dimensional geometries and flow as well as detailed reaction chemistry in a timely manner on MT computers, an ability we believe to be unique. MPSalsa has been designed to allow the experienced researcher considerable flexibility in modeling a system. Any combination of the momentum equations, energy balance, and an arbitrary number of species mass balances can be solved. The physical and transport properties can be specified as constants, as functions, or taken from the Chemkin library and associated database. Any of the standard set of boundary conditions and source terms can be adapted by writing user functions, for which templates and examples exist.

  5. Weighted Least-Squares Finite Element Method for Cardiac Blood Flow Simulation with Echocardiographic Data

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Fei; Westerdale, John; McMahon, Eileen M.; Belohlavek, Marek; Heys, Jeffrey J.

    2012-01-01

    As both fluid flow measurement techniques and computer simulation methods continue to improve, there is a growing need for numerical simulation approaches that can assimilate experimental data into the simulation in a flexible and mathematically consistent manner. The problem of interest here is the simulation of blood flow in the left ventricle with the assimilation of experimental data provided by ultrasound imaging of microbubbles in the blood. The weighted least-squares finite element method is used because it allows data to be assimilated in a very flexible manner so that accurate measurements are more closely matched with the numerical solution than less accurate data. This approach is applied to two different test problems: a flexible flap that is displaced by a jet of fluid and blood flow in the porcine left ventricle. By adjusting how closely the simulation matches the experimental data, one can observe potential inaccuracies in the model because the simulation without experimental data differs significantly from the simulation with the data. Additionally, the assimilation of experimental data can help the simulation capture certain small effects that are present in the experiment, but not modeled directly in the simulation. PMID:22312412

  6. Accretionary wedge harzburgite serpentinization and rodingitization constrained by perovskite U/Pb SIMS age, trace elements and Sm/Nd isotopes: Case study from the Western Carpathians, Slovakia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xian-Hua; Putiš, Marián; Yang, Yue-Heng; Koppa, Matúš; Dyda, Marian

    2014-09-01

    Perovskite-bearing harzburgites occur in a “mélange” type blueschist-bearing accretionary wedge complex of the Inner Western Carpathians Meliata Unit in Slovakia. Although dark rounded, slightly hydrated relic “cores” of harzburgite boulders are perovskite-free, perovskite (Prv) occurrence in the surrounding serpentinites and rodingites enabled dating of hydration, resulting in two metamorphic-metasomatic Prv generations. Perovskite (1) grows parallel to relic clinopyroxene exsolution lamellae or forms randomly oriented grain clusters in serpentinized orthopyroxene (Opx1) porphyroclasts, often accompanied by tiny andradite lamellae clusters, or it is partly replaced by Ti-andradite. Perovskite crystallization indicates evolving rodingitization fluids pervading the boundary between the harzburgite “cores” and Prv-free serpentinite. This strictly limited occurrence of Prv (1) within a 1 to 20-cm across-zone implies slightly postponed Prv crystallization to serpentinization by LREE(Ce,La), Ca2+, Ti/Fe3+-enriched aqueous fluids. A grain scale metasomatic mechanism partitioned Ca and Ti from the host orthopyroxene porphyroclasts, spinel (Ti) and grain-boundary pervasive fluids to Prv. In contrast, Prv (2) occurs in a 1 to 3 cm across chlorite-rich blackwall zone between hosting serpentinite and rodingite veins, thus indicating channelled rodingitization fluid flow and accompanying hydraulic fracturing. Here, Prv (2) is ingrown by chlorite and apatite. Part of this Prv (2) formed in a rodingite vein mineral assemblage composed of diopside, andradite, vesuvianite, epidote/zoisite, apatite and chlorite. Both perovskite 1 and 2 are replaced by pyrophanite along the grain rims and interiors; most likely via fluid-aided coupled dissolution-reprecipitation at increased Si-Fe-Mn-Al element solubility in rodingitization fluids pervading serpentinized harzburgite. Both Prv generations, especially Prv (2), can be partly to almost totally replaced by (Ti-) Adr

  7. Better Strategies for Finite Element Solutions of Variable Viscosity Stokes Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasenclever, Jörg; Phipps Morgan, Jason; Shi, Chao

    2010-05-01

    Accurate numerical solution of variable viscosity Stokes Flow is one of the most important issues for better geodynamic understanding of mantle convection and mantle melting. While a good Stokes solver is usually an integral part of a good Navier-Stokes solver, typically Navier-Stokes equations are solved for flow of a fluid with uniform viscosity. The lumped-mass-matrix is an excellent and cheap preconditioner for uniform viscosity Stokes flow (cf. Maday and Patera, 1989), therefore for most applications to Navier-Stokes flow the ‘Stokes' part of the problem is viewed as well-resolved. Unfortunately, the inverse-viscosity-scaled lumped mass matrix does not work nearly as well to precondition Stokes flow in a fluid with strongly varying viscosity. This issue is already central to accurate numerical studies of convection in Earth's silicate-fluid mantle (May and Moresi, 2008; van Geenen et al., 2009; Burstedde et al., 2009) and may become central for researchers investigating Navier-Stokes problems with lateral variations in viscosity. Here we discuss several known computational hurdles to progress, and suggest strategies that offer promise in overcoming them. The choices for solving the discrete pressure equation arising from Stokes flow typically involve several tradeoffs between speed and storage requirements. In exact math, the discrete pressure matrix S is symmetric, so that it should be possible to use a symmetric preconditioned conjugate gradient (CG) Krylov algorithm instead of needing an asymmetric GMRES (cf. Saad, 2003) or GCR (Generalized Conjugate Residual, cf. Van der Vorst, 2003) that would require ~10-50 times more storage of past search directions. However, a CG-like method requires that the action of both S and any pressure preconditioner must be almost perfectly symmetric. This means that we must be very careful about the effects of roundoff in any iterative solver-based pressure preconditioner that may introduce numerically asymmetric operators

  8. Numerical investigations on flow dynamics of prismatic granular materials using the discrete element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, W.; Weatherley, D.; Wruck, B.; Chitombo, G. P.

    2012-04-01

    The flow dynamics of granular materials is of broad interest in both the geosciences (e.g. landslides, fault zone evolution, and brecchia pipe formation) and many engineering disciplines (e.g chemical engineering, food sciences, pharmaceuticals and materials science). At the interface between natural and human-induced granular media flow, current underground mass-mining methods are trending towards the induced failure and subsequent gravitational flow of large volumes of broken rock, a method known as cave mining. Cave mining relies upon the undercutting of a large ore body, inducement of fragmentation of the rock and subsequent extraction of ore from below, via hopper-like outlets. Design of such mines currently relies upon a simplified kinematic theory of granular flow in hoppers, known as the ellipsoid theory of mass movement. This theory assumes that the zone of moving material grows as an ellipsoid above the outlet of the silo. The boundary of the movement zone is a shear band and internal to the movement zone, the granular material is assumed to have a uniformly high bulk porosity compared with surrounding stagnant regions. There is however, increasing anecdotal evidence and field measurements suggesting this theory fails to capture the full complexity of granular material flow within cave mines. Given the practical challenges obstructing direct measurement of movement both in laboratory experiments and in-situ, the Discrete Element Method (DEM [1]) is a popular alternative to investigate granular media flow. Small-scale DEM studies (c.f. [3] and references therein) have confirmed that movement within DEM silo flow models matches that predicted by ellipsoid theory, at least for mono-disperse granular material freely outflowing at a constant rate. A major draw-back of these small-scale DEM studies is that the initial bulk porosity of the simulated granular material is significantly higher than that of broken, prismatic rock. In this investigation, more

  9. Progress on a Taylor weak statement finite element algorithm for high-speed aerodynamic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.; Freels, J. D.

    1989-01-01

    A new finite element numerical Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) algorithm has matured to the point of efficiently solving two-dimensional high speed real-gas compressible flow problems in generalized coordinates on modern vector computer systems. The algorithm employs a Taylor Weak Statement classical Galerkin formulation, a variably implicit Newton iteration, and a tensor matrix product factorization of the linear algebra Jacobian under a generalized coordinate transformation. Allowing for a general two-dimensional conservation law system, the algorithm has been exercised on the Euler and laminar forms of the Navier-Stokes equations. Real-gas fluid properties are admitted, and numerical results verify solution accuracy, efficiency, and stability over a range of test problem parameters.

  10. Finite-Element Modeling of Electrostatic Sensors for the Flow Measurement of Particles in Pneumatic Pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Krabicka, J.; Yan, Y.

    2009-08-15

    Electrostatic sensors are used in certain industries for the flow measurement of pneumatically conveyed solids. However, despite various advances that have been made in recent years, relatively little information is known about the exact nature of the electrostatic charge induced onto the sensor electrode due to moving particles, which is dependent on electrode geometry, particle distribution, and particle velocity. This paper presents a novel approach to the study of the charge induced onto electrostatic sensors based on fitting a Lorentzian curve to the results of a finite-element model of the electrostatic sensor and pipeline. The modeling method is validated by comparing the modeling results of a nonintrusive circular electrode with an established analytical solution. The modeling results are used for in-depth analysis and informed design of a particular sensor configuration.

  11. Output of acoustical sources. [effects of structural elements and background flow on immobile multipolar point radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, H.

    1980-01-01

    Acoustic radiation from a source, here viewed as an immobile point singularity with periodic strength and a given multipolar nature, is affected by the presence of nearly structural elements (e.g., rigid or impedance surfaces) as well as that of a background flow in the medium. An alternative to the conventional manner of calculating the net source output by integrating the energy flux over a distant control surface is described; this involves a direct evaluation of the secondary wavefunction at the position of the primary source and obviates the need for a (prospectively difficult) flux integration. Various full and half-planar surface configurations with an adjacent source are analyzed in detail, and the explicit results obtained, in particular, for the power factor of a dipole brings out a substantial rise in its output as the source nears the sharp edge of a half-plane.

  12. Discrete element simulation of dense granular flow in a modified Couette cell.

    SciTech Connect

    Lechman, Jeremy B.; Grest, Gary Stephen

    2005-02-01

    Large-scale three dimensional Discrete Element simulations of granular flow in a modified split-bottom Couette cell for packs of up to 180,000 mono-disperse spheres are presented and compared with experiments. We find that the velocity profiles collapse onto a universal curve not only at the surface but also in the bulk of the pack until slip between layers becomes significant. In agreement with experiment, we find similar relations between the cell geometry and parameters involved in rescaling the velocities at the surface and in the bulk. Likewise, a change in the shape of the shear zone is observed as predicted for tall packs once the center of the shear zone is correctly defined; although the transition does not appear to be first order. Finally, the effect of cohesion is considered as a means to test the theoretical predictions.

  13. Study of non-Newtonian fluid flow through a wavy channel using finite element technique

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmadi, A.R.; Javadpour, S.H.

    1995-12-31

    A theoretical study of non-Newtonian fluid bounded by a harmonically waved surface is made with the main objective being the calculation of fluid velocity using perturbation theory. The problem is formulated in terms of vorticity, stream function and appropriate rheological equations of state, P{sub ik} = P{prime}{sub ik} {minus} P{delta}{sub ik} in which P{sub ik} = total stress tensor, P{prime}{sub ik} = deformation induced stress tensor, P = arbitrary isotropic pressure, and {delta}{sub ik} = Kronecker delta. The flow considered is parallel in absence of waves and it is exemplified by a two dimensional boundary layer over a plane. The problem is ultimately reduced to a set of linear ordinary differential equations which are then properly combined to result a single fourth order ordinary differential equation. Then the resulting equation is then solved numerically by applying the finite element technique.

  14. Parallel Computations of Natural Convection Flow in a Tall Cavity Using an Explicit Finite Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, T.A.; McCallen, R.C.

    2000-10-17

    The Galerkin Finite Element Method was used to predict a natural convection flow in an enclosed cavity. The problem considered was a differentially heated, tall (8:1), rectangular cavity with a Rayleigh number of 3.4 x 10{sup 5} and Prandtl number of 0.71. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations were solved using a Boussinesq approximation for the buoyancy force. The algorithm was developed for efficient use on massively parallel computer systems. Emphasis was on time-accurate simulations. It was found that the average temperature and velocity values can be captured with a relatively coarse grid, while the oscillation amplitude and period appear to be grid sensitive and require a refined computation.

  15. Iterative and multigrid methods in the finite element solution of incompressible and turbulent fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavery, N.; Taylor, C.

    1999-07-01

    Multigrid and iterative methods are used to reduce the solution time of the matrix equations which arise from the finite element (FE) discretisation of the time-independent equations of motion of the incompressible fluid in turbulent motion. Incompressible flow is solved by using the method of reduce interpolation for the pressure to satisfy the Brezzi-Babuska condition. The k-l model is used to complete the turbulence closure problem. The non-symmetric iterative matrix methods examined are the methods of least squares conjugate gradient (LSCG), biconjugate gradient (BCG), conjugate gradient squared (CGS), and the biconjugate gradient squared stabilised (BCGSTAB). The multigrid algorithm applied is based on the FAS algorithm of Brandt, and uses two and three levels of grids with a V-cycling schedule. These methods are all compared to the non-symmetric frontal solver. Copyright

  16. Backflow length predictions during flow-controlled infusions using a nonlinear biphasic finite element model.

    PubMed

    Orozco, Gustavo A; Smith, Joshua H; García, José J

    2014-10-01

    A previously proposed finite element model that considers geometric and material nonlinearities and the free boundary problems that occur at the catheter tip and in the annular zone around the lateral surface of the catheter was revised and was used to fit a power-law formula to predict backflow length during infusions into brain tissue. Compared to a closed-form solution based on linear elasticity, the power-law formula for compliant materials predicted a substantial lower influence of the shear modulus and catheter radius on the backflow length, whereas the corresponding influence for stiffer materials was more consistent with the closed-form solution. The finite element model predicted decreases of the backflow length for reduction of the shear modulus for highly compliant materials (shear modulus less than 500 Pa) due to the increased area of infusion and the high fluid fraction near the infusion cavity that greatly increased the surface area available for fluid transfer and reduced the hydraulic resistance toward the tissue. These results show the importance of taking into account the material and geometrical nonlinearities that arise near the infusion surface as well as the change of hydraulic conductivity with strain for a proper characterization of backflow length during flow-controlled infusions into the brain. PMID:25154980

  17. Backflow length predictions during flow-controlled infusions using a nonlinear biphasic finite element model.

    PubMed

    Orozco, Gustavo A; Smith, Joshua H; García, José J

    2014-10-01

    A previously proposed finite element model that considers geometric and material nonlinearities and the free boundary problems that occur at the catheter tip and in the annular zone around the lateral surface of the catheter was revised and was used to fit a power-law formula to predict backflow length during infusions into brain tissue. Compared to a closed-form solution based on linear elasticity, the power-law formula for compliant materials predicted a substantial lower influence of the shear modulus and catheter radius on the backflow length, whereas the corresponding influence for stiffer materials was more consistent with the closed-form solution. The finite element model predicted decreases of the backflow length for reduction of the shear modulus for highly compliant materials (shear modulus less than 500 Pa) due to the increased area of infusion and the high fluid fraction near the infusion cavity that greatly increased the surface area available for fluid transfer and reduced the hydraulic resistance toward the tissue. These results show the importance of taking into account the material and geometrical nonlinearities that arise near the infusion surface as well as the change of hydraulic conductivity with strain for a proper characterization of backflow length during flow-controlled infusions into the brain.

  18. A comparison of turbulence models in computing multi-element airfoil flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Stuart E.; Menter, Florian; Durbin, Paul A.; Mansour, Nagi N.

    1994-01-01

    Four different turbulence models are used to compute the flow over a three-element airfoil configuration. These models are the one-equation Baldwin-Barth model, the one-equation Spalart-Allmaras model, a two-equation k-omega model, and a new one-equation Durbin-Mansour model. The flow is computed using the INS2D two-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes solver. An overset Chimera grid approach is utilized. Grid resolution tests are presented, and manual solution-adaptation of the grid was performed. The performance of each of the models is evaluated for test cases involving different angles-of-attack, Reynolds numbers, and flap riggings. The resulting surface pressure coefficients, skin friction, velocity profiles, and lift, drag, and moment coefficients are compared with experimental data. The models produce very similar results in most cases. Excellent agreement between computational and experimental surface pressures was observed, but only moderately good agreement was seen in the velocity profile data. In general, the difference between the predictions of the different models was less than the difference between the computational and experimental data.

  19. Assessment of a hybrid finite element and finite volume code for turbulent incompressible flows

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Yidong; Wang, Chuanjin; Luo, Hong; Christon, Mark; Bakosi, Jozsef

    2015-12-15

    Hydra-TH is a hybrid finite-element/finite-volume incompressible/low-Mach flow simulation code based on the Hydra multiphysics toolkit being developed and used for thermal-hydraulics applications. In the present work, a suite of verification and validation (V&V) test problems for Hydra-TH was defined to meet the design requirements of the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL). The intent for this test problem suite is to provide baseline comparison data that demonstrates the performance of the Hydra-TH solution methods. The simulation problems vary in complexity from laminar to turbulent flows. A set of RANS and LES turbulence models were used in the simulation of four classical test problems. Numerical results obtained by Hydra-TH agreed well with either the available analytical solution or experimental data, indicating the verified and validated implementation of these turbulence models in Hydra-TH. Where possible, we have attempted some form of solution verification to identify sensitivities in the solution methods, and to suggest best practices when using the Hydra-TH code.

  20. Infrared thermography of transition due to isolated roughness elements in hypersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avallone, F.; Schrijer, F. F. J.; Cardone, G.

    2016-02-01

    Boundary layer transition in high-speed flows is a phenomenon that despite extensive research over the years is still extremely hard to predict. The presence of protrusions or gaps can lead to an accelerated laminar-to-turbulent transition enhancing the thermal loads and the skin friction coefficient. In the current investigation, inverse heat transfer measurements using infrared thermography are performed on the flow past different roughness geometries in the form of cylinders and diamond at free stream Mach number equal to 7.5, h/δ ranging between 0.5 and 0.9 (where h is the roughness height and δ is the boundary layer thickness), and Reθ ranging between 1305 and 2450. The roughness elements are positioned on a 5° ramp placed at zero angle of attack. The measurements indicate that the roughness geometry influences the transitional pattern while the frontal area influences both the transition location and the maximum value of the Stanton number along the centreline. Moreover, there is a strong connection between the streamwise centreline Stanton number and the spreading of the wake width. In particular, the transition process is characterized by an approximately constant wake width. Differently, the wake width spreads at the location where the streamwise centreline Stanton number reaches the turbulent level. This point corresponds to a local maximum of the wake amplitude defined as one half of the maximum spanwise variation of the Stanton number.

  1. Parallel finite element simulations of incompressible viscous fluid flow by domain decomposition with Lagrange multipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, Christian A.; Heniche, Mourad; Glowinski, Roland; Tanguy, Philippe A.

    2010-07-01

    A parallel approach to solve three-dimensional viscous incompressible fluid flow problems using discontinuous pressure finite elements and a Lagrange multiplier technique is presented. The strategy is based on non-overlapping domain decomposition methods, and Lagrange multipliers are used to enforce continuity at the boundaries between subdomains. The novelty of the work is the coupled approach for solving the velocity-pressure-Lagrange multiplier algebraic system of the discrete Navier-Stokes equations by a distributed memory parallel ILU (0) preconditioned Krylov method. A penalty function on the interface constraints equations is introduced to avoid the failure of the ILU factorization algorithm. To ensure portability of the code, a message based memory distributed model with MPI is employed. The method has been tested over different benchmark cases such as the lid-driven cavity and pipe flow with unstructured tetrahedral grids. It is found that the partition algorithm and the order of the physical variables are central to parallelization performance. A speed-up in the range of 5-13 is obtained with 16 processors. Finally, the algorithm is tested over an industrial case using up to 128 processors. In considering the literature, the obtained speed-ups on distributed and shared memory computers are found very competitive.

  2. Assessment of a hybrid finite element and finite volume code for turbulent incompressible flows

    DOE PAGES

    Xia, Yidong; Wang, Chuanjin; Luo, Hong; Christon, Mark; Bakosi, Jozsef

    2015-12-15

    Hydra-TH is a hybrid finite-element/finite-volume incompressible/low-Mach flow simulation code based on the Hydra multiphysics toolkit being developed and used for thermal-hydraulics applications. In the present work, a suite of verification and validation (V&V) test problems for Hydra-TH was defined to meet the design requirements of the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL). The intent for this test problem suite is to provide baseline comparison data that demonstrates the performance of the Hydra-TH solution methods. The simulation problems vary in complexity from laminar to turbulent flows. A set of RANS and LES turbulence models were used in themore » simulation of four classical test problems. Numerical results obtained by Hydra-TH agreed well with either the available analytical solution or experimental data, indicating the verified and validated implementation of these turbulence models in Hydra-TH. Where possible, we have attempted some form of solution verification to identify sensitivities in the solution methods, and to suggest best practices when using the Hydra-TH code.« less

  3. Using binary optical elements (BOEs) to generate rectangular spots for illumination in micro flow cytometer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jingjing; You, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    This work introduces three rectangular quasi-flat-top spots, which are provided by binary optical elements (BOEs) and utilized for the illumination in a microflow cytometer. The three spots contain, respectively, one, two, and three rectangles (R1, R2, and R3). To test the performance of this mechanism, a microflow cytometer is established by integrating the BOEs and a three-dimensional hydrodynamic focusing chip. Through the experiments of detecting fluorescence microbeads, the three spots present good fluorescence coefficients of variation in comparison with those derived from commercial instruments. Benefiting from a high spatial resolution, when using R1 spot, the micro flow cytometer can perform a throughput as high as 20 000 events per second (eps). Illuminated by R2 or R3 spot, one bead emits fluorescence twice or thrice, thus the velocity can be measured in real time. Besides, the R3 spot provides a long-time exposure, which is conducive to improving fluorescence intensity and the measurement stability. In brief, using the spots shaped and homogenized by BOEs for illumination can increase the performance and the functionality of a micro flow cytometer. PMID:27733892

  4. Finite element analysis of flow in a gas filled rotating annulus

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, M.H.

    1985-09-01

    Linearized multi-dimensional flow in a gas centrifuge can be described away from the ends by Onsager's pancake equation. However, a rotating annulus results in a slightly different set of boundary conditions than the usual symmetry conditions at the axis of rotation. In this process the problem on an annulus becomes ill-posed and requires some special attention. We treat linear inner and outer rotor temperature distributions and velocity slip. An existence condition for a class of nontrivial, one-dimensional solutions is given. New exact solutions in the infinite bowl approximation have been derived containing terms that are important at finite gap width and nonvanishing velocity slip. The usual one-dimensional axially symmetric solution is obtained as a limit. Our previously reported finite element algorithm has been extended to treat this new class of problems. Effects of gap width, temperature, and slip conditions are illustrated. We report on the compressible, finite length, circular Couette flow for the first time. 21 refs.

  5. Discrete element modeling of boudinage: Insights on rock rheology, matrix flow, and evolution of geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Steffen; Urai, Janos L.

    2012-01-01

    We use discrete element model simulations to model the full boudinage process from initial fracturing of intact material to post-fracture flow of material into gaps between fragments and to investigate the role which the material properties of the weak and strong layers play in this process. The models are deformed in 2D plane strain under a range of confining stresses, in coaxial bulk flow. Results show that the material properties, i.e. Mohr-Coulomb or quasi-viscous for the matrix and elastic-brittle for the competent layer, lead to the development of natural looking boudin morphologies and deformation patterns in the matrix. The details of the matrix rheology only have a minor influence on the morphology of the boudins. By varying the material properties of the competent layer between fully brittle and semi-ductile we obtain a wide range of deformation patterns ranging from pinch-and-swell structures to a variety of boudin types including drawn, shear band and straight sided torn boudins. In a number of models we observe rotation of the boudin blocks despite the applied deformation being purely coaxial. These rotations are generally related to asymmetrical (rhombic) boudin shapes. Some features observed in natural boudins such as concave block faces or the formation of veins between fragments are not modeled because pore fluids are not yet included in our model.

  6. A novel technique of using a thyristor driven pump as the final control element and flow indicator of a flow control loop.

    PubMed

    Bera, S C; Mandal, N; Sarkar, R

    2011-07-01

    In the present paper, design of a flow control loop using a thyristor driven pump as final control element has been described. In this technique, the load current of a thyristor driven pump motor has been utilized as a mass flow sensing parameter of a fluid passing through a pipeline. This thyristor driven pump has been utilized as a final control element of a flow control loop and the speed of the pump has been selected as the manipulated variable. The non-linearity between the thyristor input signal and pump output has been eliminated by using a modified PID control technique with inverse derivative control action. Thus without using any conventional flow meter and control valve only the thyristor driven pump has been utilized both as the final control element and flow indicating device by using the proposed technique. The whole system has been designed, fabricated and tested by using tap water as the flowing liquid through a pipe line. The experimental results along with the theoretical analysis are compared and reported in the paper.

  7. Finite element analysis of current flowing patterns and AC loss in the multifilament strand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ta, Wurui; Li, Yingxu; Gao, Yuanwen

    2013-12-01

    Intrinsic current flow and field distribution scheme under the imposed low current injection and the applied weak field is meaningful to interpret Ic degradation and AC loss in a strand that performs as a normal composite conductor. A 2D finite element (FE) transport model is built in COMSOL to identify the various transverse resistance components and reveal the interrelation among them. Then the transverse resistivity components are taken as the basic electrical components in a 3D composite strand model. The 3D model follows the realistic trajectories of twisted filaments in strand composite and experimental material properties. To address the potential/current map in the stationary transport, the FE model is thoroughly analyzed for the short-sample and long-sample strand, imposed by two in-plane steady current injections and a potential boundary condition at one strand end with the other end grounded, respectively. The results show that the short-sample longitudinal current is uniform with little resistivity loss, and flows from the positive source and converges to the negative one in the cross section with different paths and current proportions between filaments and matrix. However, for the long-sample, there is a serious reduction in electric potential along the strand axis and the currents mostly concentrate on filaments. The time-varying problem is also implemented by computing AC loss induced by a relatively far-away alternating line current. It is discussed where appropriate that the effect of the twist pitch and contact resistivity on the pattern and magnitude of the current flow and AC loss.

  8. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of SSME phase 2 and phase 2+ preburner injector element hydrogen flow paths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, Joseph H.

    1992-01-01

    Phase 2+ Space Shuttle Main Engine powerheads, E0209 and E0215 degraded their main combustion chamber (MCC) liners at a faster rate than is normal for phase 2 powerheads. One possible cause of the accelerated degradation was a reduction of coolant flow through the MCC. Hardware changes were made to the preburner fuel leg which may have reduced the resistance and, therefore, pulled some of the hydrogen from the MCC coolant leg. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was performed to determine hydrogen flow path resistances of the phase 2+ fuel preburner injector elements relative to the phase 2 element. FDNS was implemented on axisymmetric grids with the hydrogen assumed to be incompressible. The analysis was performed in two steps: the first isolated the effect of the different inlet areas and the second modeled the entire injector element hydrogen flow path.

  9. Multiple stirred-flow chamber assembly for simultaneous automatic fractionation of trace elements in fly ash samples using a multisyringe-based flow system.

    PubMed

    Boonjob, Warunya; Miró, Manuel; Cerdà, Víctor

    2008-10-01

    There is a current trend in automation of leaching tests for trace elements in solid matrixes by use of flow injection based column approaches. However, as a result of the downscaled dimensions of the analytical manifold and execution of a single extraction at a time, miniaturized flow-through column approaches have merely found applications for periodic investigations of trace element mobility in highly homogeneous environmental solids. A novel flow-based configuration capitalized on stirred-flow cell extraction is proposed in this work for simultaneous fractionation of trace elements in three solid wastes with no limitation of sample amount up to 1.0 g. A two-step sequential extraction scheme involving water and acetic acid (or acetic acid/acetate buffer) is utilized for accurate assessment of readily mobilizable fractions of trace elements in fly ash samples. The fully automated extraction system features high tolerance to flow rates (< or = 6 mL min(-1)) and, as opposed to operationally defined batchwise methods, the solid to liquid ratio is not a critical parameter for determination of overall readily leachable trace elements provided that exhaustive extraction is ensured. Analytical performance of the dynamic extractor is evaluated for fractionation analysis of a real coal fly ash and BCR-176R fly ash certified reference material. No significant differences were found at the 0.05 significance level between summation of leached concentrations in each fraction plus residue and concentration values of BCR-176R, thus revealing the accuracy of the automated method. Overall extractable pools of trace metals in three samples are separated in less than 115 min, even for highly contaminated ashes, versus 18-24 h per fraction in equilibrium leaching tests. The multiple stirred-flow cell assembly is thus suitable for routine risk assessment studies of industrial solid byproduct.

  10. Petrologically-constrained thermo-chemical modelling of cratonic upper mantle consistent with elevation, geoid, surface heat flow, seismic surface waves and MT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A. G.; Afonso, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    The Earth comprises a single physio-chemical system that we interrogate from its surface and/or from space making observations related to various physical and chemical parameters. A change in one of those parameters affects many of the others; for example a change in velocity is almost always indicative of a concomitant change in density, which results in changes to elevation, gravity and geoid observations. Similarly, a change in oxide chemistry affects almost all physical parameters to a greater or lesser extent. We have now developed sophisticated tools to model/invert data in our individual disciplines to such an extent that we are obtaining high resolution, robust models from our datasets. However, in the vast majority of cases the different datasets are modelled/inverted independently of each other, and often even without considering other data in a qualitative sense. The LitMod framework of Afonso and colleagues presents integrated inversion of geoscientific data to yield thermo-chemical models that are petrologically consistent and constrained. Input data can comprise any combination of elevation, geoid, surface heat flow, seismic surface wave (Rayleigh and Love) data and receiver function data, and MT data. The basis of LitMod is characterization of the upper mantle in terms of five oxides in the CFMAS system and a thermal structure that is conductive to the LAB and convective along the adiabat below the LAB to the 410 km discontinuity. Candidate solutions are chosen from prior distributions of the oxides. For the crust, candidate solutions are chosen from distributions of crustal layering, velocity and density parameters. Those candidate solutions that fit the data within prescribed error limits are kept, and are used to establish broad posterior distributions from which new candidate solutions are chosen. Examples will be shown of application of this approach fitting data from the Kaapvaal Craton in South Africa and the Rae Craton in northern Canada. I

  11. An arbitrary lagrangian-eulerian finite element approach to non-steady state fluid flows. Application to mould filling

    SciTech Connect

    Gaston, L.; Glut, B.; Bellet, M.; Chenot, J.L.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents a two-dimensional lagrangian-eulerian finite element approach of non-steady state Navier-Stokes fluid flows with free surfaces, like those occurring during the mould filling stage in casting processes. The proposed model is based on a mixed velocity-pressure finite element formulation, including an augmented Lagrangian technique and an iterative solver of Uzawa type. Mesh updating is carried out through an arbitrary lagrangian-eulerian method in order to describe properly the free surface evolution. Heat transfer through the fluid flow is solved by a convection-diffusion splitting technique. The efficiency of the method is illustrated on an example of gravity casting.

  12. Effects of flow properties on the performance of a diffuser-nozzle element of a valveless micropump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Partha Kumar; Hasan, A. B. M. Toufique

    2016-07-01

    The flow behaviour and performance parameters of a diffuser-nozzle element of a valveless micropump have been investigated for different driving pressure frequencies. When a fluctuating pressure is imposed on the inlet boundary of a diffuser-nozzle element, there is a net flow in diffuser direction due to the dynamic effect. The variation of this net flow along with rectification capacity, and diffuser efficiency has been investigated for different frequencies of driving pressure. Flow behaviour and recirculation region due to dynamic effect have been studied as qualitative study. Pressure and velocity have been analyzed for quantitative analysis and for validation with results found in literature. 2-D geometry has been used in the present study. 3-D geometry has been modeled to justify the results obtained from 2-D analysis. Five different pressure frequencies ranging from 5 kHz to 50 kHz have been used to investigate their effects on the performance of diffuser-nozzle element in high frequency ranges. The net flow and performance of the nozzle-diffuser element are found to be decreasing with the increasing frequency. The performance is found to be less sensitive to frequency at high pressure range (above 30 kHz).

  13. Determination of optimal gains for constrained controllers

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, C.M.; Mestha, L.K.

    1993-08-01

    In this report, we consider the determination of optimal gains, with respect to a certain performance index, for state feedback controllers where some elements in the gain matrix are constrained to be zero. Two iterative schemes for systematically finding the constrained gain matrix are presented. An example is included to demonstrate the procedures.

  14. Improving a complex finite-difference ground water flow model through the use of an analytic element screening model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunt, R.J.; Anderson, M.P.; Kelson, V.A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that analytic element models have potential as powerful screening tools that can facilitate or improve calibration of more complicated finite-difference and finite-element models. We demonstrate how a two-dimensional analytic element model was used to identify errors in a complex three-dimensional finite-difference model caused by incorrect specification of boundary conditions. An improved finite-difference model was developed using boundary conditions developed from a far-field analytic element model. Calibration of a revised finite-difference model was achieved using fewer zones of hydraulic conductivity and lake bed conductance than the original finite-difference model. Calibration statistics were also improved in that simulated base-flows were much closer to measured values. The improved calibration is due mainly to improved specification of the boundary conditions made possible by first solving the far-field problem with an analytic element model.This paper demonstrates that analytic element models have potential as powerful screening tools that can facilitate or improve calibration of more complicated finite-difference and finite-element models. We demonstrate how a two-dimensional analytic element model was used to identify errors in a complex three-dimensional finite-difference model caused by incorrect specification of boundary conditions. An improved finite-difference model was developed using boundary conditions developed from a far-field analytic element model. Calibration of a revised finite-difference model was achieved using fewer zones of hydraulic conductivity and lake bed conductance than the original finite-difference model. Calibration statistics were also improved in that simulated base-flows were much closer to measured values. The improved calibration is due mainly to improved specification of the boundary conditions made possible by first solving the far-field problem with an analytic element model.

  15. Chemical cleaning of porous stainless steel cross-flow filter elements for nuclear waste applications

    SciTech Connect

    Billing, Justin M.; Daniel, Richard C.; Hallen, Richard T.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2011-05-10

    The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) currently under construction for treatment of High-Level Waste (HLW) at the Hanford Site will rely on cross-flow ultrafiltration to provide solids-liquid separation as a core part of the treatment process. To optimize process throughput, periodic chemical cleaning of the porous stainless steel filter elements has been incorporated into the design of the plant. It is currently specified that chemical cleaning with nitric acid will occur after significant irreversible membrane fouling is observed. Irreversible fouling is defined as fouling that cannot be removed by backpulsing the filter. PNNL has investigated chemical cleaning processes as part of integrated tests with HLW simulants and with actual Hanford tank wastes. To quantify the effectiveness of chemical cleaning, the residual membrane resistance after cleaning was compared against the initial membrane resistance for each test in a series of long-term fouling tests. The impact of the small amount of residual resistance in these tests could not be separated from other parameters and the historical benchmark of >1 GPM/ft2 for clean water flux was determined to be an adequate metric for chemical cleaning. Using the results from these tests, a process optimization strategy is presented suggesting that for the simulant material under test, the value of chemical cleaning may be suspect. The period of enhanced filtration may not be enough to offset the down time required for chemical cleaning, without respect to the other associated costs.

  16. Flow and Transport in Highly Heterogeneous Porous Formations: Numerical Experiments Performed Using the Analytic Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankovic, I.

    2002-05-01

    Flow and transport in porous formations are analyzed using numerical simulations. Hydraulic conductivity is treated as a spatial random function characterized by a probability density function and a two-point covariance function. Simulations are performed for a multi-indicator conductivity structure developed by Gedeon Dagan (personal communication). This conductivity structure contains inhomogeneities (inclusions) of elliptical and ellipsoidal geometry that are embedded in a homogeneous background. By varying the distribution of sizes and conductivities of inclusions, any probability density function and two-point covariance may be reproduced. The multi-indicator structure is selected since it yields simple approximate transport solutions (Aldo Fiori, personal communication) and accurate numerical solutions (based on the Analytic Element Method). The dispersion is examined for two conceptual models. Both models are based on the multi-indicator conductivity structure. The first model is designed to examine dispersion in aquifers with continuously varying conductivity. The inclusions in this model cover as much area/volume of the porous formation as possible. The second model is designed for aquifers that contain clay/sand/gravel lenses embedded in otherwise homogeneous background. The dispersion in both aquifer types is simulated numerically. Simulation results are compared to those obtained using simple approximate solutions. In order to infer transport statistics that are representative of an infinite domain using the numerical experiments, the inclusions are placed in a domain that was shaped as a large ellipse (2D) and a large spheroid (3D) that were submerged in an unbounded homogeneous medium. On a large scale, the large body of inclusions behaves like a single large inhomogeneity. The analytic solution for a uniform flow past the single inhomogeneity of such geometry yields uniform velocity inside the domain. The velocity differs from that at infinity and

  17. SIMULATIONS OF 2D AND 3D THERMOCAPILLARY FLOWS BY A LEAST-SQUARES FINITE ELEMENT METHOD. (R825200)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerical results for time-dependent 2D and 3D thermocapillary flows are presented in this work. The numerical algorithm is based on the Crank-Nicolson scheme for time integration, Newton's method for linearization, and a least-squares finite element method, together with a matri...

  18. THE EFFECT OF WATER (VAPOR-PHASE) AND CARBON ON ELEMENTAL MERCURY REMOVAL IN A FLOW REACTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of studying the effect of vapor-phase moisture on elemental mercury (Hgo) removal by activated carbon (AC) in a flow reactor. tests involved injecting AC into both a dry and a 4% moisture nitrogen (N2) /Hgo gas stream. A bituminous-coal-based AC (Calgon WP...

  19. Microstructural Analysis and Micromechanical Modeling of Flow Behaviour of Dual Phase Steels Using a Representative Volume Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirmaleki, Maedeh

    Micromechanical modeling of flow curves of DP500 and DP600 steels in uniaxial tension was carried out using the representative volume element (RVE) method. Digimat and ABAQUS software were coupled and used to provide the required RVE model parameters and to perform simulations. Modeling results were validated using the experimental flow curves of the steels. It was found that the flow curve of DP500 steel was accurately predicted from the onset of plastic deformation up to the onset of necking. In case of DP600 steel, the numerical flow curve accurately predicted the experimental flow curve of steel after 0.07 strain up to necking strain. The RVE size of 12.7x12.7x12.7 mum and 7.9x7.9x7.9 mum containing 26 martensite islands were found as the optimum RVE sizes for DP500 and DP600 steel, respectively. A mesh of C3D4 elements having a size of 0.050 mum was found to be the optimum element type and mesh size.

  20. Embedded MicroHeating Elements in Polymeric MicroChannels for Temperature Control and Fluid Flow Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Gaitan, Michael; Locascio, Laurie E.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the first demonstration of temperature control and flow sensing of fluids using integrated circuit (IC)-based microheating elements embedded in microchannels molded in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Fluid channels and connections to capillary tubing are molded in PDMS using a silicon wafer template. The PDMS film is then bonded to an IC that contains the micromachined microheating elements. Capillary tubes are inserted and fluids are externally pumped through the channels. Heating of the fluid is observed by the formation of bubbles on the microheating element. Sensing of fluid flow is demonstrated by measuring a change in the large signal resistance of the microheater analogous to a hot wire anemometer with a detection limit of ± 320 pL/s. PMID:27366617

  1. Seasonal dynamics of trace elements in tidal salt marsh soils as affected by the flow-sediment regulation regime.

    PubMed

    Bai, Junhong; Xiao, Rong; Zhao, Qingqing; Lu, Qiongqiong; Wang, Junjing; Reddy, K Ramesh

    2014-01-01

    Soil profiles were collected in three salt marshes with different plant species (i.e. Phragmites australis, Tamarix chinensis and Suaeda salsa) in the Yellow River Delta (YRD) of China during three seasons (summer and fall of 2007 and the following spring of 2008) after the flow-sediment regulation regime. Total elemental contents of As, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn were determined using inductively coupled plasma atomic absorption spectrometry to investigate temporal variations in trace elements in soil profiles of the three salt marshes, assess the enrichment levels and ecological risks of these trace elements in three sampling seasons and identify their influencing factors. Trace elements did not change significantly along soil profiles at each site in each sampling season. The highest value for each sampling site was observed in summer and the lowest one in fall. Soils in both P. australis and S. salsa wetlands tended to have higher trace element levels than those in T. chinensis wetland. Compared to other elements, both Cd and As had higher enrichment factors exceeding moderate enrichment levels. However, the toxic unit (TU) values of these trace elements did not exceed probable effect levels. Correlation analysis showed that these trace elements were closely linked to soil properties such as moisture, sulfur, salinity, soil organic matter, soil texture and pH values. Principal component analysis showed that the sampling season affected by the flow-sediment regulation regime was the dominant factor influencing the distribution patterns of these trace elements in soils, and plant community type was another important factor. The findings of this study could contribute to wetland conservation and management in coastal regions affected by the hydrological engineering. PMID:25216278

  2. Seasonal dynamics of trace elements in tidal salt marsh soils as affected by the flow-sediment regulation regime.

    PubMed

    Bai, Junhong; Xiao, Rong; Zhao, Qingqing; Lu, Qiongqiong; Wang, Junjing; Reddy, K Ramesh

    2014-01-01

    Soil profiles were collected in three salt marshes with different plant species (i.e. Phragmites australis, Tamarix chinensis and Suaeda salsa) in the Yellow River Delta (YRD) of China during three seasons (summer and fall of 2007 and the following spring of 2008) after the flow-sediment regulation regime. Total elemental contents of As, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn were determined using inductively coupled plasma atomic absorption spectrometry to investigate temporal variations in trace elements in soil profiles of the three salt marshes, assess the enrichment levels and ecological risks of these trace elements in three sampling seasons and identify their influencing factors. Trace elements did not change significantly along soil profiles at each site in each sampling season. The highest value for each sampling site was observed in summer and the lowest one in fall. Soils in both P. australis and S. salsa wetlands tended to have higher trace element levels than those in T. chinensis wetland. Compared to other elements, both Cd and As had higher enrichment factors exceeding moderate enrichment levels. However, the toxic unit (TU) values of these trace elements did not exceed probable effect levels. Correlation analysis showed that these trace elements were closely linked to soil properties such as moisture, sulfur, salinity, soil organic matter, soil texture and pH values. Principal component analysis showed that the sampling season affected by the flow-sediment regulation regime was the dominant factor influencing the distribution patterns of these trace elements in soils, and plant community type was another important factor. The findings of this study could contribute to wetland conservation and management in coastal regions affected by the hydrological engineering.

  3. Seasonal Dynamics of Trace Elements in Tidal Salt Marsh Soils as Affected by the Flow-Sediment Regulation Regime

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Junhong; Xiao, Rong; Zhao, Qingqing; Lu, Qiongqiong; Wang, Junjing; Reddy, K. Ramesh

    2014-01-01

    Soil profiles were collected in three salt marshes with different plant species (i.e. Phragmites australis, Tamarix chinensis and Suaeda salsa) in the Yellow River Delta (YRD) of China during three seasons (summer and fall of 2007 and the following spring of 2008) after the flow-sediment regulation regime. Total elemental contents of As, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn were determined using inductively coupled plasma atomic absorption spectrometry to investigate temporal variations in trace elements in soil profiles of the three salt marshes, assess the enrichment levels and ecological risks of these trace elements in three sampling seasons and identify their influencing factors. Trace elements did not change significantly along soil profiles at each site in each sampling season. The highest value for each sampling site was observed in summer and the lowest one in fall. Soils in both P. australis and S. salsa wetlands tended to have higher trace element levels than those in T. chinensis wetland. Compared to other elements, both Cd and As had higher enrichment factors exceeding moderate enrichment levels. However, the toxic unit (TU) values of these trace elements did not exceed probable effect levels. Correlation analysis showed that these trace elements were closely linked to soil properties such as moisture, sulfur, salinity, soil organic matter, soil texture and pH values. Principal component analysis showed that the sampling season affected by the flow-sediment regulation regime was the dominant factor influencing the distribution patterns of these trace elements in soils, and plant community type was another important factor. The findings of this study could contribute to wetland conservation and management in coastal regions affected by the hydrological engineering. PMID:25216278

  4. Interface control volume finite element method for modelling multi-phase fluid flow in highly heterogeneous and fractured reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abushaikha, Ahmad S.; Blunt, Martin J.; Gosselin, Olivier R.; Pain, Christopher C.; Jackson, Matthew D.

    2015-10-01

    We present a new control volume finite element method that improves the modelling of multi-phase fluid flow in highly heterogeneous and fractured reservoirs, called the Interface Control Volume Finite Element (ICVFE) method. The method drastically decreases the smearing effects in other CVFE methods, while being mass conservative and numerically consistent. The pressure is computed at the interfaces of elements, and the control volumes are constructed around them, instead of at the elements' vertices. This assures that a control volume straddles, at most, two elements, which decreases the fluid smearing between neighbouring elements when large variations in their material properties are present. Lowest order Raviart-Thomas vectorial basis functions are used for the pressure calculation and first-order Courant basis functions are used to compute fluxes. The method is a combination of Mixed Hybrid Finite Element (MHFE) and CVFE methods. Its accuracy and convergence are tested using three dimensional tetrahedron elements to represent heterogeneous reservoirs. Our new approach is shown to be more accurate than current CVFE methods.

  5. Modeling Three-Phase Compositional Flow on Complex 3D Unstructured Grids with Higher-Order Finite Element Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moortgat, J.; Firoozabadi, A.

    2013-12-01

    Most problems of interest in hydrogeology and subsurface energy resources involve complex heterogeneous geological formations. Such domains are most naturally represented in numerical reservoir simulations by unstructured computational grids. Finite element methods are a natural choice to describe fluid flow on unstructured meshes, because the governing equations can be readily discretized for any grid-element geometry. In this work, we consider the challenging problem of fully compositional three-phase flow in 3D unstructured grids, discretized by tetrahedra, prisms, or hexahedra, and compare to simulations on 3D structured grids. We employ a combination of mixed hybrid finite element methods to solve for the pressure and flux fields in a fractional flow formulation, and higher-order discontinuous Galerkin methods for the mass transport equations. These methods are well suited to simulate flow in heterogeneous and fractured reservoirs, because they provide a globally continuous pressure and flux field, while allowing for sharp discontinuities in the phase properties, such as compositions and saturations. The increased accuracy from using higher-order methods improves the modeling of highly non-linear flow, such as gravitational and viscous fingering. We present several numerical examples to study convergence rates and the (lack of) sensitivity to gridding/mesh orientation, and mesh quality. These examples consider gravity depletion, water and gas injection in oil saturated subsurface reservoirs with species exchange between up to three fluid phases. The examples demonstrate the wide applicability of our chosen finite element methods in the study of challenging multiphase flow problems in porous, geometrically complex, subsurface media.

  6. Plane shear flows of frictionless spheres: Kinetic theory and 3D soft-sphere discrete element method simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Vescovi, D.; Berzi, D.; Richard, P.

    2014-05-15

    We use existing 3D Discrete Element simulations of simple shear flows of spheres to evaluate the radial distribution function at contact that enables kinetic theory to correctly predict the pressure and the shear stress, for different values of the collisional coefficient of restitution. Then, we perform 3D Discrete Element simulations of plane flows of frictionless, inelastic spheres, sheared between walls made bumpy by gluing particles in a regular array, at fixed average volume fraction and distance between the walls. The results of the numerical simulations are used to derive boundary conditions appropriated in the cases of large and small bumpiness. Those boundary conditions are, then, employed to numerically integrate the differential equations of Extended Kinetic Theory, where the breaking of the molecular chaos assumption at volume fraction larger than 0.49 is taken into account in the expression of the dissipation rate. We show that the Extended Kinetic Theory is in very good agreement with the numerical simulations, even for coefficients of restitution as low as 0.50. When the bumpiness is increased, we observe that some of the flowing particles are stuck in the gaps between the wall spheres. As a consequence, the walls are more dissipative than expected, and the flows resemble simple shear flows, i.e., flows of rather constant volume fraction and granular temperature.

  7. Sources of granite magmatism in the Embu Terrane (Ribeira Belt, Brazil): Neoproterozoic crust recycling constrained by elemental and isotope (Sr-Nd-Pb) geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Adriana; Janasi, Valdecir de Assis; Campos Neto, Mario da Costa

    2016-07-01

    Whole rock elemental and Sr-Nd isotope geochemistry and in situ K-feldspar Pb isotope geochemistry were used to identify the sources involved in the genesis of Neoproterozoic granites from the Embu Terrane, Ribeira Belt, SE Brazil. Granite magmatism spanned over 200 Ma (810-580 Ma), and is dominated by crust-derived relatively low-T (850-750 °C, zircon saturation) biotite granites to biotite-muscovite granites. Two Cryogenian plutons show the least negative εNdt (-8 to -10) and highest mg# (30-40) of the whole set. Their compositions are strongly contrasted, implying distinct sources for the peraluminous (ASI ∼ 1.2) ∼660 Ma Serra do Quebra-Cangalha batholith (metasedimentary rocks from relatively young upper crust with high Rb/Sr and low Th/U) and the metaluminous (ASI = 0.96-1.00) ∼ 630 Ma Santa Catarina Granite. Although not typical, the geochemical signature of these granites may reflect a continental margin arc environment, and they could be products of a prolonged period of oceanic plate consumption started at ∼810 Ma. The predominant Ediacaran (595-580 Ma) plutons have a spread of compositions from biotite granites with SiO2 as low as ∼65% (e.g., Itapeti, Mauá, Sabaúna and Lagoinha granites) to fractionated muscovite granites (Mogi das Cruzes, Santa Branca and Guacuri granites; up to ∼75% SiO2). εNdT are characteristically negative (-12 to -18), with corresponding Nd TDM indicating sources with Paleoproterozoic mean crustal ages (2.0-2.5 Ga). The Guacuri and Santa Branca muscovite granites have the more negative εNdt, highest 87Sr/86Srt (0.714-0.717) and lowest 208Pb/206Pb and 207Pb/206Pb, consistent with an old metasedimentary source with low time-integrated Rb/Sr. However, a positive Nd-Sr isotope correlation is suggested by data from the other granites, and would be consistent with mixing between an older source predominant in the Mauá granite and a younger, high Rb/Sr source that is more abundant in the Lagoinha granite sample. The

  8. U-series Dating of Syntectonic Calcite Veins Constrains the Time Scales of the Elements of the Seismic Cycle in an Intraplate Normal Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, L. B.; Williams, R. T.; Mozley, P.; Sharp, W. D.

    2015-12-01

    The link between fluid overpressure and the earthquake cycle has been documented through previous studies of vein arrays associated with faults and carefully designed experimental work. In the interseismic period, elevated pore fluid pressure (overpressure) will reduce the effective fault-normal stress, weakening the fault and promoting seismic rupture. Fractures produced during faulting will serve as fluid migration pathways until they are sealed by either collapse or precipitation of cement. Following sealing, pore fluid pressure is inferred to progressively increase until it reaches a level sufficient to start the cycle again. Though the rock record of this overpressure-driven seismic cycle is clear, the timescales of the different elements of the cycle have not been quantified. We have addressed this problem by dating calcite veins in the hanging wall damage zone of the Loma Blanca fault zone of the Socorro Basin, Rio Grande rift, New Mexico. These veins exhibit crack-seal microstructures that record repeated episodes of fracture opening, fluid migration, and fracture sealing, suggesting a prolonged history of recurrent seismicity and post-failure fluid migration. Stable isotope analyses of these veins reveal distinct fluid chemistries associated with individual fluid migration events. Carbon isotope values as high as +6.00‰ suggest depressurization and degassing of CO2 charged fluids, supporting the interpretation that fracturing was associated with fault slip. Preliminary U-series dating of calcite veins show a well-defined periodicity of fault slip and fracture formation, with a slip recurrence interval of approximately 73 ± 17 ka, consistent with previous studies of other faults in the Rio Grande rift. Analyses of cements deposited during single crack-seal events record sealing times of approximately 16 ± 4 ka. These results suggest that the time required to re-establish sufficient pore fluid pressure for failure following sealing of damage zone

  9. The Finite Element Analysis for a Mini-Conductance Probe in Horizontal Oil-Water Two-Phase Flow

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Weihang; Kong, Lingfu; Li, Lei; Liu, Xingbin; Xie, Ronghua; Li, Jun; Tang, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    Oil-water two-phase flow is widespread in petroleum industry processes. The study of oil-water two-phase flow in horizontal pipes and the liquid holdup measurement of oil-water two-phase flow are of great importance for the optimization of the oil production process. This paper presents a novel sensor, i.e., a mini-conductance probe (MCP) for measuring pure-water phase conductivity of oil-water segregated flow in horizontal pipes. The MCP solves the difficult problem of obtaining the pure-water correction for water holdup measurements by using a ring-shaped conductivity water-cut meter (RSCWCM). Firstly, using the finite element method (FEM), the spatial sensitivity field of the MCP is investigated and the optimized MCP geometry structure is determined in terms of the characteristic parameters. Then, the responses of the MCP for the oil-water segregated flow are calculated, and it is found that the MCP has better stability and sensitivity to the variation of water-layer thickness in the condition of high water holdup and low flow velocity. Finally, the static experiments for the oil-water segregated flow were carried out and a novel calibration method for pure-water phase conductivity measurements was presented. The validity of the pure-water phase conductivity measurement with segregated flow in horizontal pipes was verified by experimental results. PMID:27563907

  10. The Finite Element Analysis for a Mini-Conductance Probe in Horizontal Oil-Water Two-Phase Flow.

    PubMed

    Kong, Weihang; Kong, Lingfu; Li, Lei; Liu, Xingbin; Xie, Ronghua; Li, Jun; Tang, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    Oil-water two-phase flow is widespread in petroleum industry processes. The study of oil-water two-phase flow in horizontal pipes and the liquid holdup measurement of oil-water two-phase flow are of great importance for the optimization of the oil production process. This paper presents a novel sensor, i.e., a mini-conductance probe (MCP) for measuring pure-water phase conductivity of oil-water segregated flow in horizontal pipes. The MCP solves the difficult problem of obtaining the pure-water correction for water holdup measurements by using a ring-shaped conductivity water-cut meter (RSCWCM). Firstly, using the finite element method (FEM), the spatial sensitivity field of the MCP is investigated and the optimized MCP geometry structure is determined in terms of the characteristic parameters. Then, the responses of the MCP for the oil-water segregated flow are calculated, and it is found that the MCP has better stability and sensitivity to the variation of water-layer thickness in the condition of high water holdup and low flow velocity. Finally, the static experiments for the oil-water segregated flow were carried out and a novel calibration method for pure-water phase conductivity measurements was presented. The validity of the pure-water phase conductivity measurement with segregated flow in horizontal pipes was verified by experimental results.

  11. The Finite Element Analysis for a Mini-Conductance Probe in Horizontal Oil-Water Two-Phase Flow.

    PubMed

    Kong, Weihang; Kong, Lingfu; Li, Lei; Liu, Xingbin; Xie, Ronghua; Li, Jun; Tang, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    Oil-water two-phase flow is widespread in petroleum industry processes. The study of oil-water two-phase flow in horizontal pipes and the liquid holdup measurement of oil-water two-phase flow are of great importance for the optimization of the oil production process. This paper presents a novel sensor, i.e., a mini-conductance probe (MCP) for measuring pure-water phase conductivity of oil-water segregated flow in horizontal pipes. The MCP solves the difficult problem of obtaining the pure-water correction for water holdup measurements by using a ring-shaped conductivity water-cut meter (RSCWCM). Firstly, using the finite element method (FEM), the spatial sensitivity field of the MCP is investigated and the optimized MCP geometry structure is determined in terms of the characteristic parameters. Then, the responses of the MCP for the oil-water segregated flow are calculated, and it is found that the MCP has better stability and sensitivity to the variation of water-layer thickness in the condition of high water holdup and low flow velocity. Finally, the static experiments for the oil-water segregated flow were carried out and a novel calibration method for pure-water phase conductivity measurements was presented. The validity of the pure-water phase conductivity measurement with segregated flow in horizontal pipes was verified by experimental results. PMID:27563907

  12. Mixed-hybrid and vertex-discontinuous-Galerkin finite element modeling of multiphase compositional flow on 3D unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moortgat, Joachim; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2016-06-01

    Problems of interest in hydrogeology and hydrocarbon resources involve complex heterogeneous geological formations. Such domains are most accurately represented in reservoir simulations by unstructured computational grids. Finite element methods accurately describe flow on unstructured meshes with complex geometries, and their flexible formulation allows implementation on different grid types. In this work, we consider for the first time the challenging problem of fully compositional three-phase flow in 3D unstructured grids, discretized by any combination of tetrahedra, prisms, and hexahedra. We employ a mass conserving mixed hybrid finite element (MHFE) method to solve for the pressure and flux fields. The transport equations are approximated with a higher-order vertex-based discontinuous Galerkin (DG) discretization. We show that this approach outperforms a face-based implementation of the same polynomial order. These methods are well suited for heterogeneous and fractured reservoirs, because they provide globally continuous pressure and flux fields, while allowing for sharp discontinuities in compositions and saturations. The higher-order accuracy improves the modeling of strongly non-linear flow, such as gravitational and viscous fingering. We review the literature on unstructured reservoir simulation models, and present many examples that consider gravity depletion, water flooding, and gas injection in oil saturated reservoirs. We study convergence rates, mesh sensitivity, and demonstrate the wide applicability of our chosen finite element methods for challenging multiphase flow problems in geometrically complex subsurface media.

  13. Local Modelling of Groundwater Flow Using Analytic Element Method Three-dimensional Transient Unconfined Groundwater Flow With Partially Penetrating Wells and Ellipsoidal Inhomogeneites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankovic, I.; Barnes, R. J.; Soule, R.

    2001-12-01

    The analytic element method is used to model local three-dimensional flow in the vicinity of partially penetrating wells. The flow domain is bounded by an impermeable horizontal base, a phreatic surface with recharge and a cylindrical lateral boundary. The analytic element solution for this problem contains (1) a fictitious source technique to satisfy the head and the discharge conditions along the phreatic surface, (2) a fictitious source technique to satisfy specified head conditions along the cylindrical boundary, (3) a method of imaging to satisfy the no-flow condition across the impermeable base, (4) the classical analytic solution for a well and (5) spheroidal harmonics to account for the influence of the inhomogeneities in hydraulic conductivity. Temporal variations of the flow system due to time-dependent recharge and pumping are represented by combining the analytic element method with a finite difference method: analytic element method is used to represent spatial changes in head and discharge, while the finite difference method represents temporal variations. The solution provides a very detailed description of local groundwater flow with an arbitrary number of wells of any orientation and an arbitrary number of ellipsoidal inhomogeneities of any size and conductivity. These inhomogeneities may be used to model local hydrogeologic features (such as gravel packs and clay lenses) that significantly influence the flow in the vicinity of partially penetrating wells. Several options for specifying head values along the lateral domain boundary are available. These options allow for inclusion of the model into steady and transient regional groundwater models. The head values along the lateral domain boundary may be specified directly (as time series). The head values along the lateral boundary may also be assigned by specifying the water-table gradient and a head value at a single point (as time series). A case study is included to demonstrate the application

  14. Compositionally Constraining Elysium Lava Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunatillake, S.; Button, N. E.; Skok, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    Chemical provinces of Mars defined recently [1-3] became possible with the maps of elemental mass fractions generated with Mars Odyssey Gamma and Neutron Spectrometer (GS) data [4,5]. These provide a unique perspective by representing compositional signatures distinctive of the regolith vertically at decimeter depths and laterally at hundreds of kilometer scale. Some provinces overlap compellingly with regions highlighted by other remote sensing observations, such as the Mars Radar Stealth area [3]. The spatial convergence of mutually independent data with the consequent highlight of a region provides a unique opportunity of insight not possible with a single type of remote sensing observation. Among such provinces, previous work [3] highlighted Elysium lava flows as a promising candidate on the basis of convergence with mapped geologic units identifying Elysium's lava fields generally, and Amazonian-aged lava flows specifically. The South Eastern lava flows of Elysium Mons, dating to the recent Amazonian epoch, overlap compellingly with a chemical province of K and Th depletion relative to the Martian midlatitudes. We characterize the composition, geology, and geomorphology of the SE Elysium province to constrain the confluence of geologic and alteration processes that may have contributed to its evolution. We compare this with the North Western lava fields, extending the discussion on chemical products from the thermal evolution of Martian volcanism as discussed by Baratoux et al. [6]. The chemical province, by regional proximity to Cerberus Fossae, may also reflect the influence of recently identified buried flood channels [7] in the vicinity of Orcus Patera. Despite the compelling chemical signature from γ spectra, fine grained unconsolidated sediment hampers regional VNTIR (Visible, Near, and Thermal Infrared) spectral analysis. But some observations near scarps and fresh craters allow a view of small scale mineral content. The judicious synthesis of

  15. Constraining Predicted Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation and Processing Using Real-Time Observations of Aging Urban Emissions in an Oxidation Flow Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, A. M.; Palm, B. B.; Hayes, P. L.; Day, D. A.; Cubison, M.; Brune, W. H.; Hu, W.; Graus, M.; Warneke, C.; Gilman, J.; De Gouw, J. A.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    To investigate atmospheric processing of urban emissions, we deployed an oxidation flow reactor with measurements of size-resolved chemical composition of submicron aerosol during CalNex-LA, a field study investigating air quality and climate change at a receptor site in the Los Angeles Basin. The reactor produces OH concentrations up to 4 orders of magnitude higher than in ambient air, achieving equivalent atmospheric aging of hours to ~2 weeks in 5 minutes of processing. The OH exposure (OHexp) was stepped every 20 min to survey the effects of a range of oxidation exposures on gases and aerosols. This approach is a valuable tool for in-situ evaluation of changes in organic aerosol (OA) concentration and composition due to photochemical processing over a range of ambient atmospheric conditions and composition. Combined with collocated gas-phase measurements of volatile organic compounds, this novel approach enables the comparison of measured SOA to predicted SOA formation from a prescribed set of precursors. Results from CalNex-LA show enhancements of OA and inorganic aerosol from gas-phase precursors. The OA mass enhancement from aging was highest at night and correlated with trimethylbenzene, indicating the importance of relatively short-lived VOC (OH lifetime of ~12 hrs or less) as SOA precursors in the LA Basin. Maximum net SOA production is observed between 3-6 days of aging and decreases at higher exposures. Aging in the reactor shows similar behavior to atmospheric processing; the elemental composition of ambient and reactor measurements follow similar slopes when plotted in a Van Krevelen diagram. Additionally, for air processed in the reactor, oxygen-to-carbon ratios (O/C) of aerosol extended over a larger range compared to ambient aerosol observed in the LA Basin. While reactor aging always increases O/C, often beyond maximum observed ambient levels, a transition from net OA production to destruction occurs at intermediate OHexp, suggesting a transition

  16. Elasto-plastic flow in cracked bodies using a new finite element model. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karabin, M. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Cracked geometries were studied by finite element techniques with the aid of a new special element embedded at the crack tip. This model seeked to accurately represent the singular stresses and strains associated with the elasto-plastic flow process. The present model was not restricted to a material type and did not predetermine a singularity. Rather the singularity was treated as an unknown. For each step of the incremental process the nodal degrees of freedom and the unknown singularity were found through minimization of an energy-like functional. The singularity and nodal degrees of freedom were determined by means of an iterative process.

  17. The combined effects of inlet fluid flow and temperature nonuniformity in cross flow plate-fin compact heat exchanger using finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranganayakulu, C.; Seetharamu, K. N.

    An analysis of a crossflow plate-fin heat exchanger accouning for the combined effects of inlet fluid flow nonuniformity and temperature nonuniformity on both hot and cold fluid sides is carried out using a Finite Element Model. A mathematical equation is developed to generate different types of fluid flow/temperature maldistribution models considering the possible deviations in inlet fluid flow. Using these fluid flow maldistribution models, the exchanger effectiveness and its deteriorations due to flow/temperature nonuniformity are calculated for entire range of design and operating conditions. It was found that the performance deteriorations are quite significant in some typical applications due to inlet fluid flow/temperature nonuniformity. Zusammenfassung Mit Hilfe der Finitelement-Methode wird der zusammenwirkende Einfluß ungleichförmiger Strömungs- und Temperaturverteilungen am Eintritt des kalten, wie des warmen Fluids eines kreuzstrombetriebenen, berippten Kompakt-Plattenwärmetauschers untersucht. Über eine mathematische Beziehung lassen sich verschiedene Arten ungleichmäßiger Strömungs bzw. Temperaturverteilungen in den Eintrittsquerschnitten generieren. Unter Verwendung dieser Fehlverteilungsmodelle wird deren Einfluß auf den Austauscher-Gütegrad im gesamten Auslegungs- und Betriebsbereich ermittelt. Es zeigte sich, daß diese Auswirkungen bei typischen Ungleichförmigkeiten der Strömungs- bzw. Temperaturfelder in den Eintrittsquerschnitten erheblich sein können.

  18. The effect of a small isolated roughness element on the forces on a sphere in uniform flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, A. K.; McKeon, B. J.

    2011-10-01

    The effect of an isolated roughness element on the forces on a sphere was examined for a Reynolds number range of 5 × 104 < Re < 5 × 105 using a novel sting-mounted sphere apparatus. The roughness element was a circular cylinder, and its width and height was varied to be 1, 2, and 4% of the sphere diameter. At subcritical Re, a lateral force is produced in the direction of the roughness, while at supercritical Re, the force is in the opposite direction. This is caused by asymmetric boundary layer separation, as shown using particle image velocimetry. At supercritical Re, a roughness element that is only 1% the sphere diameter produces a lift to drag ratio of almost one. It was found that the isolated roughness element has the largest effect on the lateral forces when it is located between a streamwise angle of about 40° and 80°. In addition to the mean forces, the unsteady forces were also measured. It was found that at subcritical Re, vortex shedding is aligned to the plane of the roughness element. In addition, the probability distribution of the forces was nearly Gaussian for subcritical Re, but for supercritical Re, the skewness and kurtosis deviate from Gaussian, and the details are dependent on the roughness size. A simple model developed for the vortical structure formed behind the roughness element can be extended to explain aspects of nominally smooth sphere flow, in which external disturbances perturb the sphere boundary layer in an azimuthally local sense. These results also form the basis of comparison for an investigation into the effectiveness of a moving isolated roughness element for manipulating sphere flow.

  19. The Conservation/Solution Element (STE) Method for Linear Potential Flow Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adeyeye, John O.; Attia, Naguib F.; Jackson, Joy; Hunter, Timothy

    1996-01-01

    The potential equation is discretized on rectangular domains using the Conservation/Solution Element Method (STE) approach. Computational examples with a discussion of numerical experience gained are given.

  20. VARSAT2D: Finite-element analysis of variably saturated two-dimensional flow. Information circular/1994

    SciTech Connect

    Nieber, J.L.; Friedel, M.J.; Munir, H.M.

    1994-01-01

    This information circular describes a computer program called VARSAT2D, a comprehensive unsaturated fluid flow simulator developed by the U.S. Bureau of Mines. VARSAT2D solves for either a vertical or horizontal, transient or steady-state solution in variably saturated, heterogeneous, anisotropic porous media using the Galerkin finite-element approach. Simplex triangular elements are used. Moisture retention characteristics are described by specifying either the Brooks and Corey, Brutsaert, or Van Genuchten power functions, with hysteresis described using the Maulem independent domain model. Boundary conditions may include any combination of time-varying seepage, pressure along solution domain boundaries and/or at internal node points, unit hydraulic gradient at the lower boundary, and a uniform source and/or sink. The program should be a welcome addition for mining and environmental hydrologists, researchers, and engineers interested in modeling unsaturated fluid flow.

  1. Simulation of flow over double-element airfoil and wind tunnel test for use in vertical axis wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chougule, Prasad; Nielsen, Søren R. K.

    2014-06-01

    Nowadays, small vertical axis wind turbines are receiving more attention due to their suitability in micro-electricity generation. There are few vertical axis wind turbine designs with good power curve. However, the efficiency of power extraction has not been improved. Therefore, an attempt has been made to utilize high lift technology for vertical axis wind turbines in order to improve power efficiency. High lift is obtained by double-element airfoil mainly used in aeroplane wing design. In this current work a low Reynolds number airfoil is selected to design a double-element airfoil blade for use in vertical axis wind turbine to improve the power efficiency. Double-element airfoil blade design consists of a main airfoil and a slat airfoil. Orientation of slat airfoil is a parameter of investigation in this paper and air flow simulation over double-element airfoil. With primary wind tunnel test an orientation parameter for the slat airfoil is initially obtained. Further a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been used to obtain the aerodynamic characteristics of double-element airfoil. The CFD simulations were carried out using ANSYS CFX software. It is observed that there is an increase in the lift coefficient by 26% for single-element airfoil at analysed conditions. The CFD simulation results were validated with wind tunnel tests. It is also observe that by selecting proper airfoil configuration and blade sizes an increase in lift coefficient can further be achieved.

  2. Incorporating autoregulatory mechanisms of the cardiovascular system in three-dimensional finite element models of arterial blood flow.

    PubMed

    Kim, H J; Jansen, K E; Taylor, C A

    2010-07-01

    The cardiovascular system is a closed-loop system in which billions of vessels interact with each other, and it enables the control of the systemic arterial pressure and varying organ flow through autoregulatory mechanisms. In this study, we describe the development of mathematical models of autoregulatory mechanisms for systemic arterial pressure and coronary flow and discuss the connection of these models to a hybrid numerical/analytic closed-loop model of the cardiovascular system. The closed-loop model consists of two lumped parameter heart models representing the left and right sides of the heart, a three-dimensional finite element model of the aorta with coronary arteries, three-element Windkessel models and lumped parameter coronary vascular models that represent the systemic circulation, and a three-element Windkessel model to approximate the pulmonary circulation. Using the connection between the systemic arterial pressure and coronary flow regulation systems, and the hybrid closed-loop model, we studied how the heart, coronary vascular beds, and arterial system respond to physiologic changes during light exercise and showed that these models can realistically simulate temporal behaviors of the heart, coronary vascular beds, and arterial system during exercise of healthy subjects. These models can be used to study temporal changes occurring in the heart, coronary vascular beds, and arterial system during cardiovascular intervention or changes in physiological states.

  3. MPSalsa Version 1.5: A Finite Element Computer Program for Reacting Flow Problems: Part 1 - Theoretical Development

    SciTech Connect

    Devine, K.D.; Hennigan, G.L.; Hutchinson, S.A.; Moffat, H.K.; Salinger, A.G.; Schmidt, R.C.; Shadid, J.N.; Smith, T.M.

    1999-01-01

    The theoretical background for the finite element computer program, MPSalsa Version 1.5, is presented in detail. MPSalsa is designed to solve laminar or turbulent low Mach number, two- or three-dimensional incompressible and variable density reacting fluid flows on massively parallel computers, using a Petrov-Galerkin finite element formulation. The code has the capability to solve coupled fluid flow (with auxiliary turbulence equations), heat transport, multicomponent species transport, and finite-rate chemical reactions, and to solve coupled multiple Poisson or advection-diffusion-reaction equations. The program employs the CHEMKIN library to provide a rigorous treatment of multicomponent ideal gas kinetics and transport. Chemical reactions occurring in the gas phase and on surfaces are treated by calls to CHEMKIN and SURFACE CHEMK3N, respectively. The code employs unstructured meshes, using the EXODUS II finite element database suite of programs for its input and output files. MPSalsa solves both transient and steady flows by using fully implicit time integration, an inexact Newton method and iterative solvers based on preconditioned Krylov methods as implemented in the Aztec. solver library.

  4. Spherical harmonic-based finite element meshing scheme for modelling current flow within the heart.

    PubMed

    Hopenfeld, B

    2004-11-01

    The paper describes a spherical harmonic-based finite element scheme for solving Poisson-type equations throughout volumes characterised by irregularly shaped inner and outer surfaces. The inner and outer surfaces are defined by spherical harmonics, and the volume in between these surfaces is divided into nested shells that are weighted averages of the inner and outer surfaces. The resulting mesh comprises hexahedral elements, wherein each hexahedral element is defined by inner and outer shells in the radial direction and divisions in the polar and azimuthal directions. The spacing between shells can be set to any desired value. Similarly, the size of the polar and azimuthal divisions can be specified. A test of the scheme on an anisotropic sphere, meshed with 720 nodes, yielded a relative error of 0.78% on the sphere's surface. As a comparison, a previously published combined finite element/boundary element scheme with a 946-node mesh produced a corresponding error of 3.57%.

  5. Computation of the velocity field and mass balance in the finite-element modeling of groundwater flow

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, G. T.

    1980-01-01

    Darcian velocity has been conventionally calculated in the finite-element modeling of groundwater flow by taking the derivatives of the computed pressure field. This results in discontinuities in the velocity field at nodal points and element boundaries. Discontinuities become enormous when the computed pressure field is far from a linear distribution. It is proposed in this paper that the finite element procedure that is used to simulate the pressure field or the moisture content field also be applied to Darcy's law with the derivatives of the computed pressure field as the load function. The problem of discontinuity is then eliminated, and the error of mass balance over the region of interest is much reduced. The reduction is from 23.8 to 2.2% by one numerical scheme and from 29.7 to -3.6% by another for a transient problem.

  6. Extractable sulphate-sulphur, total sulphur and trace-element determinations in plant material by flow injection analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Heanes, D.L. )

    1990-01-01

    A rapid, accurate and reproducible procedure for determining total sulphur(S) and trace elements (copper, zinc, manganese and iron) in plant material is described. Plant material is digested in culture tubes with a mixture of nitric and perchloric acids containing ammonium metavanadate and calcium chloride. In the acid digest, concentrations of total-S as sulphate are determined by turbidimetry and trace-elements by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry using flow injection analysis. The results for a range of plant materials compare well with those obtained by conventional procedures for the same elements. The microprocessor controlled digestion and multielement assay procedure described here offers improved laboratory efficiencies in materials, time and cost effectiveness. The techniques should be particularly useful when plant tissues are in limited supply.

  7. Coupled finite difference and boundary element methods for fluid flow through a vessel with multibranches in tumours.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiang; Wu, Guo Xiong

    2013-03-01

    A mathematical model and a numerical solution procedure are developed to simulate flow field through a 3D permeable vessel with multibranches embedded in a solid tumour. The model is based on Poisseuille's law for the description of the flow through the vessels, Darcy's law for the fluid field inside the tumour interstitium, and Starling's law for the flux transmitted across the vascular walls. The solution procedure is based on a coupled method, in which the finite difference method is used for the flow in the vessels and the boundary element method is used for the flow in the tumour. When vessels meet each other at a junction, the pressure continuity and mass conservation are imposed at the junction. Three typical representative structures within the tumour vasculature, symmetrical dichotomous branching, asymmetrical bifurcation with uneven radius of daughter vessels and trifurcation, are investigated in detail as case studies. These results have demonstrated the features of tumour flow environment by the pressure distributions and flow velocity field.

  8. Finite element and physical simulations of non-steady state metal flow and temperature distribution in twin roll strip casting

    SciTech Connect

    Shiomi, Masanori; Mori, Kenichiro; Osakada, Kozo

    1995-12-31

    Non-steady-state metal flow and temperature distribution in twin roll strip casting are simulated by the finite element method. In the present simulation, the viscoplastic finite element method is combined with that for heat conduction to calculate the metal flow and the temperature distribution during the casting process. The solid, mushy and liquid phases are assumed to be viscoplastic materials with individual flow stresses. In the temperature analysis, the latent heat due to solidification of the molten metal is taken into account by using the temperature recovery method. Since the metal flow and temperature distribution do not often attain to steady states, they are simulated by the stepwise calculation. To examine the accuracy of the calculated results, physical simulation of plane-strain twin roll strip casting is carried out by use of paraffin wax as a model material. The calculated profiles of the solid region agree qualitatively well with the experimental ones. Twin roll strip casting processes for stainless steel are also simulated. An optimum roll speed for obtaining a strip without a liquid zone under a minimum rolling load is obtained from the results of the simulation.

  9. Quantification of blood flow velocity in stenosed arteries by the use of finite elements: an observer-independent noninvasive method.

    PubMed

    Mühlthaler, Hannes; Quatember, Bernhard; Fraedrich, Gustav; Mühlthaler, Markus; Pfeifer, Bernhard; Greiner, Andreas; Schocke, Michael F H

    2008-10-01

    Interventions for peripheral arterial disease should be designed to treat a physiological rather than an anatomic defect. Thus, for vascular surgeons, functional information about stenoses is as important as the anatomic one. In case of finding a stenosis by the use of magnetic resonance angiography, it would be a matter of particular interest to derive automatically and directly objective information about the hemodynamic influence on blood flow, caused by patient-specific stenoses. We developed a methodology to noninvasively perform numerical simulations of a patient's hemodynamic state on the basis of magnetic resonance images and by the means of the finite element method. We performed patient-specific three-dimensional simulation studies of the increase in systolic blood flow velocity due to stenoses using the commercial computational fluid dynamic software package FIDAP 8.52. The generation of a mesh defining the flow domain with a stenosis and some simulation results are shown.

  10. Documentation of a finite-element two-layer model for simulation of ground-water flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mallory, Michael J.

    1979-01-01

    This report documents a finite-element model for simulation of ground-water flow in a two-aquifer system where the two aquifers are coupled by a leakage term that represents flow through a confining layer separating the two aquifers. The model was developed by Timothy J. Durbin (U.S. Geological Survey) for use in ground-water investigations in southern California. The documentation assumes that the reader is familiar with the physics of ground-water flow, numerical methods of solving partial-differential equations, and the FORTRAN IV computer language. It was prepared as part of the investigations made by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the San Bernardino Valley Municipal Water District. (Kosco-USGS)

  11. Mass flow prediction of the coriolis meter using C0 continuous beam elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binulal, B. R.; Rajan, Akash; Abhilash, Suryan R.; Kochupillai, Jayaraj; Kim, Heuy Dong

    2015-06-01

    A three node C0 continuous isoparametric beam element is formulated to model the curved pipe conveying fluid in three dimensional configuration. The equations of motion for the combined structure and fluid domain including added mass effect, Coriolis effect, centrifugal effect and the effect of pressure on the walls of pipe have been developed by Paidoussis. This equation is converted to finite element formulation using Galerkin technique and is validated with the results available from literature.

  12. Penalty-finite element analysis of time-dependent two-dimensional free surface film flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheshgi, H. S.; Scriven, L. E.

    The Navier-Stokes system with shear-free balanced normal stress and with kinematic boundary conditions at the free surface, which governs the flow of incompressible Newtonian liquid films, is presently solved by the penalty/Galerkin/FEM technique, employing both a tesselation that deforms with the free surface and an implicit time domain method. Results are given for the case of transient flow out of a coating slot, and a more brief presentation of results is made for the cases of the capillary leveling of a disturbed film, the damping of standing waves, and evolving disturbances in a film flowing down an inclined plane.

  13. Constrained Vapor Bubble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, J.; Karthikeyan, M.; Plawsky, J.; Wayner, P. C., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The nonisothermal Constrained Vapor Bubble, CVB, is being studied to enhance the understanding of passive systems controlled by interfacial phenomena. The study is multifaceted: 1) it is a basic scientific study in interfacial phenomena, fluid physics and thermodynamics; 2) it is a basic study in thermal transport; and 3) it is a study of a heat exchanger. The research is synergistic in that CVB research requires a microgravity environment and the space program needs thermal control systems like the CVB. Ground based studies are being done as a precursor to flight experiment. The results demonstrate that experimental techniques for the direct measurement of the fundamental operating parameters (temperature, pressure, and interfacial curvature fields) have been developed. Fluid flow and change-of-phase heat transfer are a function of the temperature field and the vapor bubble shape, which can be measured using an Image Analyzing Interferometer. The CVB for a microgravity environment, has various thin film regions that are of both basic and applied interest. Generically, a CVB is formed by underfilling an evacuated enclosure with a liquid. Classification depends on shape and Bond number. The specific CVB discussed herein was formed in a fused silica cell with inside dimensions of 3x3x40 mm and, therefore, can be viewed as a large version of a micro heat pipe. Since the dimensions are relatively large for a passive system, most of the liquid flow occurs under a small capillary pressure difference. Therefore, we can classify the discussed system as a low capillary pressure system. The studies discussed herein were done in a 1-g environment (Bond Number = 3.6) to obtain experience to design a microgravity experiment for a future NASA flight where low capillary pressure systems should prove more useful. The flight experiment is tentatively scheduled for the year 2000. The SCR was passed on September 16, 1997. The RDR is tentatively scheduled for October, 1998.

  14. Massively Parallel Boundary Integral Element Method Modeling of Particles in a Low Reynolds Number Mewtonian Fluid Flow

    SciTech Connect

    INGBER,M.S.; SUBIA,SAMUEL R.; MONDY,LISA ANN

    2000-01-18

    The analysis of many complex multiphase fluid flow systems is based on a scale decoupling procedure. At the macroscale continuum models are used to perform large-scale simulations. At the mesoscale statistical homogenization theory is used to derive continuum models based on representative volume elements (RVEs). At the microscale small-scale features, such as interfacial properties, are analyzed to be incorporated into mesoscale simulations. In this research mesoscopic simulations of hard particles suspended in a Newtonian fluid undergoing nonlinear shear flow are performed using a boundary element method. To obtain an RVE at higher concentrations, several hundred particles are included in the simulations, putting considerable demands on the computational resources both in terms of CPU and memory. Parallel computing provides a viable platform to study these large multiphase systems. The implementation of a portable, parallel computer code based on the boundary element method using a block-block data distribution is discussed in this paper. The code employs updated direct-solver technologies that make use of dual-processor compute nodes.

  15. Application of the flow-through time-resolved analysis technique to trace element determination in ostracod shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Börner, Nicole; De Baere, Bart; Francois, Roger; Frenzel, Peter; Schwalb, Antje

    2014-05-01

    Trace element analyses of ostracod shells are a vital tool for paleoenvironmental reconstructions from lake sediments (Börner et al., 2013). Conventional batch dissolution ICP-MS is the most common way for analyzing trace elements in ostracod shells. However, due to dissolution or secondary overgrowth the primary signal may be masked. Resulting variations in trace element composition have been identified to be in the order of a magnitude range. Therefore, the application of the newly developed flow-through technique will be assessed. The flow-through time-resolved analysis technique allows to chemically separate mineral phases of different solubility such as, in particular, original shell calcite from overgrowth calcite, and thus to correct the measurements for the biogenic signal. During a flow-through experiment, eluent is continuously pumped through a sample column, typically a filter in which the ostracod valves are loaded. The gradual dissolution of the substrate is controlled by a combination of eluent type, eluent temperature and eluent flow rate. The dissolved sample then flows directly to a mass spectrometer. The resulting data is a chromatogram, featuring different mineral phases dissolving as time progresses. Hence, the flow-through technique provides a detailed geochemical fingerprint of the substrate and therefore additional data relative to conventional methods. To calibrate this technique for the application to ostracods we use ostracod shells from Southern Tibetan Plateau lakes, which feature an alkaline environment but show highly diverse hydrochemistry. Cleaned as well as uncleaned ostracod shells show similarity in their trace element signals, allowing measurements without prior cleaning of the shells, and thus more time-efficient sample throughput. Measurements of unclean shells are corrected for the biogenic signal using an equation from Klinkhammer et al. (2004). Another advantage is that the measurements can be carried out on single ostracod

  16. Conservative behavior of arsenic and other oxyanion-forming trace elements in an oxic groundwater flow system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johannesson, Karen H.; Tang, Jianwu

    2009-11-01

    SummaryGroundwater samples were collected along a flow path in a shallow, fractured tuffaceous aquifer from the Oasis Valley-Beatty Wash region of southern Nevada, USA, and analyzed for a number of oxyanion-forming trace elements including arsenic (As), antimony (Sb), selenium (Se), molybdenum (Mo), and tungsten (W). In addition, ancillary geochemical parameters, including pH, major solute compositions, dissolved silica, dissolved oxygen, and iron and manganese concentrations were quantified in the groundwaters. Arsenic concentrations range from ˜70 nmol/kg up to 316 nmol/kg in groundwaters of the Oasis Valley-Beatty Wash flow system, and generally exhibit increasing concentrations with flow down-gradient along the flow path. Antimony, W, and to a lesser extent, Mo, exhibit similar increasing concentration trends with flow down-gradient in the aquifer, albeit, at lower concentrations levels (e.g., mean ± SD for Sb, W, and Mo are 2.3 ± 0.9 nmol/kg, 7.4 ± 3.7 nmol/kg, and 101 ± 19 nmol/kg, respectively). Selenium concentration, which range between ˜4 and 11 nmol/kg, generally decrease in groundwaters with flow down-gradients in the Oasis Valley-Beatty Wash groundwater flow systems. Inverse modeling of groundwater chemistry evolution from the lower reaches of the Oasis Valley flow path using PHREEQC indicate that the groundwater composition is consistent with mixing of nearly equal proportions of groundwater from upper reaches of Oasis Valley and Beatty Wash groundwater, along with dissolution of volcanic glass, potassium feldspar, and gypsum, followed by calcite precipitation, and formation of secondary zeolites (analcime), clay minerals (Ca-montmorillonite), and cristobalite. The geochemical modeling indicates that the concentrations of As and the other oxyanion-forming trace elements are controlled by dissolution of volcanic glass, water-rock interaction with mineralized zones within the aquifer (i.e., sulfide oxidation), desorption from aquifer surface sites

  17. A Runge-Kutta discontinuous finite element method for high speed flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bey, Kim S.; Oden, J. T.

    1991-01-01

    A Runge-Kutta discontinuous finite element method is developed for hyperbolic systems of conservation laws in two space variables. The discontinuous Galerkin spatial approximation to the conservation laws results in a system of ordinary differential equations which are marched in time using Runge-Kutta methods. Numerical results for the two-dimensional Burger's equation show that the method is (p+1)-order accurate in time and space, where p is the degree of the polynomial approximation of the solution within an element and is capable of capturing shocks over a single element without oscillations. Results for this problem also show that the accuracy of the solution in smooth regions is unaffected by the local projection and that the accuracy in smooth regions increases as p increases. Numerical results for the Euler equations show that the method captures shocks without oscillations and with higher resolution than a first-order scheme.

  18. A numerical study of the flow-induced vibration characteristics of a voice-producing element for laryngectomized patients.

    PubMed

    Thomson, S L; Tack, J W; Verkerke, G J

    2007-01-01

    A computational model for exploring the design of a voice-producing voice prosthesis, or voice-producing element (VPE), is presented. The VPE is intended for use by laryngectomized patients who cannot benefit from current speech rehabilitation techniques. Previous experiments have focused on the design of a double-membrane voice generator as a VPE. For optimization studies, a numerical model has been developed. The numerical model introduced incorporates the finite element (FE) method to solve for the flow-induced vibrations of the VPE system, including airflow coupled with a mass-loaded membrane. The FE model includes distinct but coupled fluid and solid domains. The flow solver is governed by the incompressible, laminar, unsteady Navier-Stokes equations. The solid solver allows for large deformation, large strain, and collision. It is first shown that the model satisfactorily represents previously published experimental results in terms of frequency and flow rate, enabling the model for use as a design tool. The model is then used to study the influence of geometric scaling, membrane thickness, membrane stiffness, and slightly convergent or divergent channel geometry on the model response. It is shown that physiological allowable changes in the latter three device parameters alone will not be sufficient to generate the desired reduction in fundamental frequency. However, their effects are quantified and it is shown that membrane stiffness and included angle should be considered in future designs. PMID:17662296

  19. H-P adaptive methods for finite element analysis of aerothermal loads in high-speed flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, H. J.; Bass, J. M.; Tworzydlo, W.; Oden, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    The commitment to develop the National Aerospace Plane and Maneuvering Reentry Vehicles has generated resurgent interest in the technology required to design structures for hypersonic flight. The principal objective of this research and development effort has been to formulate and implement a new class of computational methodologies for accurately predicting fine scale phenomena associated with this class of problems. The initial focus of this effort was to develop optimal h-refinement and p-enrichment adaptive finite element methods which utilize a-posteriori estimates of the local errors to drive the adaptive methodology. Over the past year this work has specifically focused on two issues which are related to overall performance of a flow solver. These issues include the formulation and implementation (in two dimensions) of an implicit/explicit flow solver compatible with the hp-adaptive methodology, and the design and implementation of computational algorithm for automatically selecting optimal directions in which to enrich the mesh. These concepts and algorithms have been implemented in a two-dimensional finite element code and used to solve three hypersonic flow benchmark problems (Holden Mach 14.1, Edney shock on shock interaction Mach 8.03, and the viscous backstep Mach 4.08).

  20. Simulation of an urban ground-water-flow system in the Menomonee Valley, Milwaukee, Wisconsin using analytic element modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dunning, C.P.; Feinstein, D.T.

    2004-01-01

    A single-layer, steady-state analytic element model was constructed to simulate shallow ground-water flow in the Menomonee Valley, an old industrial center southwest of downtown Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Project objectives were to develop an understanding of the shallow ground-water flow system and identify primary receptors of recharge to the valley. The analytic element model simulates flow in a 18.3 m (60 ft) thick layer of estuarine and alluvial sediments and man-made fill that comprises the shallow aquifer across the valley. The thin, laterally extensive nature of the shallow aquifer suggests horizontal-flow predominates, thus the system can appropriately be modeled with the Dupuit-Forchheimer approximation in an analytic element model. The model was calibrated to the measured baseflow increase between two USGS gages on the Menomonee River, 90 head measurements taken in and around the valley during December 1999, and vertical gradients measured at five locations under the river and estuary in the valley. Recent construction of the Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewer District Inline Storage System (ISS) in the Silurian dolomite under the Menomonee Valley has locally lowered heads in the dolomite appreciably, below levels caused by historic pumping. The ISS is a regional hydraulic sink which removes water from the bedrock even during dry weather. The potential effect on flow directions in the shallow aquifer of dry-weather infiltration to the ISS was evaluated by adjusting the resistance of the line-sink strings representing the ISS in the model to allow infiltration from 0 to 100% of the reported 9,500 m3/d. The best fit to calibration targets was found between 60% (5,700 m3/d) and 80% (7,600 m3/d) of the reported dry-weather infiltration. At 60% infiltration, 65% of the recharge falling on the valley terminates at the ISS and 35% at the Menomonee River and estuary. At 80% infiltration, 73% of the recharge terminates at the ISS, and 27% at the river and estuary. Model

  1. An explicit Lagrangian finite element method for free-surface weakly compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremonesi, Massimiliano; Meduri, Simone; Perego, Umberto; Frangi, Attilio

    2016-07-01

    In the present work, an explicit finite element approach to the solution of the Lagrangian formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations for weakly compressible fluids or fluid-like materials is investigated. The introduction of a small amount of compressibility is shown to allow for the formulation of a fast and robust explicit solver based on a particle finite element method. Newtonian and Non-Newtonian Bingham laws are considered. A barotropic equation of state completes the model relating pressure and density fields. The approach has been validated through comparison with experimental tests and numerical simulations of free surface fluid problems involving water and water-soil mixtures.

  2. Lubrication forces in dense granular flow with interstitial fluid: A simulation study with Discrete Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, Oleh; Ertas, Deniz; Halsey, Thomas; Zhou, Fuping

    2007-03-01

    Using three-dimensional molecular dynamics simulations, we study steady gravity-driven flows of frictional inelastic spheres of diameter d and density ρg down an incline, interacting through two-body lubrication forces in addition to granular contact forces. Scaling arguments suggest that, in 3D, these forces constitute the dominant perturbation of an interstitial fluid for small Reynolds number Re and low fluid densityρ. Two important parameters that characterize the strength of the lubrication forces are fluid viscosity and grain roughness. We observe that incline flows with lubrication forces exhibit a packing density that decreases with increasing distance from the surface. As the incline angle is increased, this results in a severely dilated basal layer that looks like ``hydroplaning'' similar to that observed in geological subaqueous debris flows. This is surprising since the model explicitly disallows any buildup of fluid pressure in the base of the flow, and suggests that hydroplaning might have other contributing factors besides this traditional explanation. The local packing density is still determined by the dimensionless strain rate I≡γ1ptd√ρg/p , where p is the average normal stress, obeying a ``dilatancy law'' similar to dry granular flows.

  3. Finite element analysis of magnetohydrodynamic effects on blood flow in an aneurysmal geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raptis, Anastasios; Xenos, Michalis; Tzirtzilakis, Efstratios; Matsagkas, Miltiadis

    2014-10-01

    Blood flow in an aneurysmal geometry, subjected to a static and uniform magnetic field, was studied. Blood was considered as a Newtonian, incompressible, and electrically conducting fluid. The nonlinear system of partial differential equations, describing the blood flow under the presence of a magnetic field, was discretized by the Galerkin weighted residual method. The transformation in generalized curvilinear coordinates facilitates the solution of the governing equations within arbitrary geometries. Pressure and velocity fields along with wall shear stress distributions were obtained for varying magnetic field intensities and directions. The visualization of the blood streamlines in the dilatation region highlights the effect of a magnetic field on the recirculation zones. The application of static magnetic fields can yield spatio-temporal description of blood flow patterns. The current study discusses implications of the hemodynamic properties estimated by respective screening techniques since the static magnetic field might cause alterations that possibly cannot be detected and thus eliminated.

  4. Turbulent separated flow over and downstream of a two-element airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adair, D.; Horne, W. C.

    1989-01-01

    Flow characteristics in the vicinity of the flap of a single-slotted airfoil are presented and analyzed. The flow remained attached over the model surfaces, except in the vicinity of the flap trailing edge where a small region of boundary-layer separation extended over the aft 7 percent of flap chord. The airfoil configuration was tested at a Mach number of 0.09 and a chord Reynolds number of 1.8 x 10 to the 6th in the NASA Ames Research Center 7- by 10-Foot Wind Tunnel. The flow was complicated by the presence of a strong, initially inviscid, jet, emanating from the slot between airfoil and flap, and a gradual merging of the main airfoil wake and flap suction-side boundary layer.

  5. Characteristics of fluid flow in the combustion synthesis of TiC from the elements

    SciTech Connect

    Valone, S.M.; Behrens, R.G.

    1986-01-01

    Finite reservoir effects on capillary spreading at small reservoir dimensions are explored numerically and related to wave propagation in combustion synthesis of TiC from elemental Ti and C. In addition a convective instability which may be activated by gravitational, surface tension or contact forces may cause void regions to coalesce thereby altering the void distribution in combustion synthesis products.

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF A CL-IMPREGNATED ACTIVATED CARBON FOR ENTRAINED-FLOW CAPTURE OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Efforts to discern the role of an activated carbon's surface functional groups on the adsorption of elemental mercury [Hg(0)] and mercuric chloride demonstrated that chlorine (Cl) impregnation of a virgin activated carbon using dilute solutions of hydrogen chloride leads to incre...

  7. Numerical investigations of solving unsteady, incompressible, viscous fluid flow by finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatanaka, K.; Hayashi, M.; Kawahara, M.

    A novel FEM scheme that is based on the fractional-step method for solving time-dependent, incompressible viscous flow is presented and employed in the solution of a free-surface flow. The equations are given in indicial notation, as well as in the summation convention for repeated indices. The numerical results obtained exhibit good stability without the specification of Neumann conditions, and are compared in tabular form with the solutions given by Laitone's (1960) approximation. The method is also applicable to problems with artificial, open boundaries.

  8. Parallel Finite Element Solution of 3D Rayleigh-Benard-Marangoni Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, G. F.; McLay, R.; Bicken, G.; Barth, B.; Pehlivanov, A.

    1999-01-01

    A domain decomposition strategy and parallel gradient-type iterative solution scheme have been developed and implemented for computation of complex 3D viscous flow problems involving heat transfer and surface tension effects. Details of the implementation issues are described together with associated performance and scalability studies. Representative Rayleigh-Benard and microgravity Marangoni flow calculations and performance results on the Cray T3D and T3E are presented. The work is currently being extended to tightly-coupled parallel "Beowulf-type" PC clusters and we present some preliminary performance results on this platform. We also describe progress on related work on hierarchic data extraction for visualization.

  9. Aerothermal modeling program. Phase 2, element A: Improved numerical methods for turbulent viscous recirculating flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karki, K. C.; Mongia, H. C.; Patankar, Suhas V.; Runchal, A. K.

    1987-01-01

    The objective of this effort is to develop improved numerical schemes for predicting combustor flow fields. Various candidate numerical schemes were evaluated, and promising schemes were selected for detailed assessment. The criteria for evaluation included accuracy, computational efficiency, stability, and ease of extension to multidimensions. The candidate schemes were assessed against a variety of simple one- and two-dimensional problems. These results led to the selection of the following schemes for further evaluation: flux spline schemes (linear and cubic) and controlled numerical diffusion with internal feedback (CONDIF). The incorporation of the flux spline scheme and direct solution strategy in a computer program for three-dimensional flows is in progress.

  10. Simulation of steady-state flow in three-dimensional fracture networks using the boundary-element method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shapiro, A.M.; Andersson, J.

    1985-01-01

    An efficient method for simulating steady-state flow in three-dimensional fracture networks is formulated with the use of the boundary-element method. The host rock is considered to be impervious, and the fractures can be of any orientation and areal extent. The fractures are treated as surfaces where fluid movement is essentially two-dimensional. Fracture intersections are regarded as one-dimensional fluid conduits. Hence, the three-dimensional geometric characteristics of the fracture geometry is retained in solutions of coupled sets of one- and two-dimentional equations. Use of the boundary-element method to evaluate the fluid responses in the fractures precludes the need to internally discretize the areal extent of the fractures. ?? 1985.

  11. DNS of Flow in a Low-Pressure Turbine Cascade Using a Discontinuous-Galerkin Spectral-Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garai, Anirban; Diosady, Laslo Tibor; Murman, Scott; Madavan, Nateri

    2015-01-01

    A new computational capability under development for accurate and efficient high-fidelity direct numerical simulation (DNS) and large eddy simulation (LES) of turbomachinery is described. This capability is based on an entropy-stable Discontinuous-Galerkin spectral-element approach that extends to arbitrarily high orders of spatial and temporal accuracy and is implemented in a computationally efficient manner on a modern high performance computer architecture. A validation study using this method to perform DNS of flow in a low-pressure turbine airfoil cascade are presented. Preliminary results indicate that the method captures the main features of the flow. Discrepancies between the predicted results and the experiments are likely due to the effects of freestream turbulence not being included in the simulation and will be addressed in the final paper.

  12. Numerical Simulations of Two-Phase Reacting Flow in a Single-Element Lean Direct Injection (LDI) Combustor Using NCC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Nan-Suey; Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Wey, C. Thomas

    2011-01-01

    A series of numerical simulations of Jet-A spray reacting flow in a single-element lean direct injection (LDI) combustor have been conducted by using the National Combustion Code (NCC). The simulations have been carried out using the time filtered Navier-Stokes (TFNS) approach ranging from the steady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS), unsteady RANS (URANS), to the dynamic flow structure simulation (DFS). The sub-grid model employed for turbulent mixing and combustion includes the well-mixed model, the linear eddy mixing (LEM) model, and the filtered mass density function (FDF/PDF) model. The starting condition of the injected liquid spray is specified via empirical droplet size correlation, and a five-species single-step global reduced mechanism is employed for fuel chemistry. All the calculations use the same grid whose resolution is of the RANS type. Comparisons of results from various models are presented.

  13. Development of single fluid volume element method for simulation of transient fluid flow in self-siphons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viridi, S.; Novitrian, Nurhayati, Hidayat, W.; Latief, F. D. E.; Zen, F. P.

    2014-09-01

    A simple model for transient flow in a narrow pipe is presented in this work. The model is simply derived from Newton's second law of motion. As an example it is used to predict flow occurrence in two forms of self-siphon, which are inverted-U and M-like forms. Simulation for system consists only a vertical pipe is also presented since it is actually part of the both siphon systems. For the simple systems the model can have good predictions but for the complex system it can only have 89.6 % good prediction. Its simplicity can be used to illustrate how the interface between fluid and air, single fluid volume element (SFVE) moves along the siphon. The method itself is named as SFVE method.

  14. Oxidation of element 102, nobelium, with flow electrolytic column chromatography on an atom-at-a-time scale.

    PubMed

    Toyoshima, Atsushi; Kasamatsu, Yoshitaka; Tsukada, Kazuaki; Asai, Masato; Kitatsuji, Yoshihiro; Ishii, Yasuo; Toume, Hayato; Nishinaka, Ichiro; Haba, Hiromitsu; Ooe, Kazuhiro; Sato, Wataru; Shinohara, Atsushi; Akiyama, Kazuhiko; Nagame, Yuichiro

    2009-07-01

    We report here on the successful oxidation of element 102, nobelium (No), on an atom-at-a-time scale in 0.1 M alpha-hydroxyisobutyric acid (alpha-HIB) solution using a newly developed technique, flow electrolytic column chromatography. It is found that the most stable ion, No(2+), is oxidized to No(3+) within 3 min and that the oxidized No complex with alpha-HIB holds the trivalent state in the column above an applied potential of 1.0 V.

  15. The effects of exercise on blood flow with reference to the human cardiovascular system: a finite element study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sud, V. K.; Srinivasan, R. S.; Charles, J. B.; Bungo, M. W.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on a theoretical investigation into the effects of vasomotion on blood through the human cardiovascular system. The finite element method has been used to analyse the model. Vasoconstriction and vasodilation may be effected either through the action of the central nervous system or autoregulation. One of the conditions responsible for vasomotion is exercise. The proposed model has been solved and quantitative results of flows and pressures due to changing the conductances of specific networks of arterioles, capillaries and venules comprising the arms, legs, stomach and their combinations have been obtained.

  16. Flow patterns and transport in Rayleigh surface acoustic wave streaming: combined finite element method and raytracing numerics versus experiments.

    PubMed

    Frommelt, Thomas; Gogel, Daniel; Kostur, Marcin; Talkner, Peter; Hänggi, Peter; Wixforth, Achim

    2008-10-01

    This work presents an approach for determining the streaming patterns that are generated by Rayleigh surface acoustic waves in arbitrary 3-D geometries by finite element method (FEM) simulations. An efficient raytracing algorithm is applied on the acoustic subproblem to avoid the unbearable memory demands and computational time of a conventional FEM acoustics simulation in 3-D. The acoustic streaming interaction is modeled by a body force term in the Stokes equation. In comparisons between experiments and simulated flow patterns, we demonstrate the quality of the proposed technique. PMID:18986877

  17. Heat production in an Archean crustal profile and implications for heat flow and mobilization of heat-producing elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashwal, L. D.; Morgan, P.; Kelley, S. A.; Percival, J. A.

    1987-01-01

    Concentrations of heat producing elements (Th, U, and K) in 58 samples representative of the main lithologies in a 100-km transect of the Superior Province of the Canadian Shield have been obtained. The relatively large variation in heat production found among the silicic plutonic rocks is shown to correlate with modal abundances of accessory minerals, and these variations are interpreted as premetamorphic. The present data suggest fundamental differences in crustal radioactivity distributions between granitic and more mafic terrains, and indicate that a previously determined apparently linear heat flow-heat production relationship for the Kapuskasing area does not relate to the distribution of heat production with depth.

  18. Oxidation of element 102, nobelium, with flow electrolytic column chromatography on an atom-at-a-time scale.

    PubMed

    Toyoshima, Atsushi; Kasamatsu, Yoshitaka; Tsukada, Kazuaki; Asai, Masato; Kitatsuji, Yoshihiro; Ishii, Yasuo; Toume, Hayato; Nishinaka, Ichiro; Haba, Hiromitsu; Ooe, Kazuhiro; Sato, Wataru; Shinohara, Atsushi; Akiyama, Kazuhiko; Nagame, Yuichiro

    2009-07-01

    We report here on the successful oxidation of element 102, nobelium (No), on an atom-at-a-time scale in 0.1 M alpha-hydroxyisobutyric acid (alpha-HIB) solution using a newly developed technique, flow electrolytic column chromatography. It is found that the most stable ion, No(2+), is oxidized to No(3+) within 3 min and that the oxidized No complex with alpha-HIB holds the trivalent state in the column above an applied potential of 1.0 V. PMID:19514720

  19. Flow cytometry of sputum: assessing inflammation and immune response elements in the bronchial airways**

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: The evaluation of sputum leukocytes by flow cytometry is an opportunity to assess characteristics of cells residing in the central airways, yet it is hampered by certain inherent properties of sputum including mucus and large amounts of contaminating cells and debris. ...

  20. ADAPTIVE FINITE-ELEMENT SIMULATION OF STOKES FLOW IN POROUS MEDIA. (R825689C068)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    The Stokes problem describes flow of an incompressible constant-viscosity fluid when the Reynolds number is small so that inertial and transient-time effects are negligible. The numerical solution of the Stokes problem requires special care, since classical fi...

  1. A fluid--structure interaction finite element analysis of pulsatile blood flow through a compliant stenotic artery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathe, M.; Kamm, R. D.

    1999-01-01

    A new model is used to analyze the fully coupled problem of pulsatile blood flow through a compliant, axisymmetric stenotic artery using the finite element method. The model uses large displacement and large strain theory for the solid, and the full Navier-Stokes equations for the fluid. The effect of increasing area reduction on fluid dynamic and structural stresses is presented. Results show that pressure drop, peak wall shear stress, and maximum principal stress in the lesion all increase dramatically as the area reduction in the stenosis is increased from 51 to 89 percent. Further reductions in stenosis cross-sectional area, however, produce relatively little additional change in these parameters due to a concomitant reduction in flow rate caused by the losses in the constriction. Inner wall hoop stretch amplitude just distal to the stenosis also increases with increasing stenosis severity, as downstream pressures are reduced to a physiological minimum. The contraction of the artery distal to the stenosis generates a significant compressive stress on the downstream shoulder of the lesion. Dynamic narrowing of the stenosis is also seen, further augmenting area constriction at times of peak flow. Pressure drop results are found to compare well to an experimentally based theoretical curve, despite the assumption of laminar flow.

  2. Non-Newtonian Study of Blood Flow in an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with a Stabilized Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrero, Victor; Sahni, Onkar; Jansen, Kenneth; Tichy, John; Taylor, Charles

    2008-11-01

    In recent years the methods of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) have been applied to the human cardiovascular system to better understand the relationship between arterial blood flow and the disease process, for example in an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Obviously, the technical challenges associated with such modeling are formidable. Among the many problems to be addressed, in this paper we add yet another complication -- the known non-Newtonian nature of blood. In this preliminary study, we used a patient-based AAA model with rigid walls. The pulsatile nature of the flow and the RCR outflow boundary condition are considered. We use the Carreau-Yasuda model to describe the non-Newtonian viscosity variation. Preliminary results for 200K, 2M, and 8M elements mesh are presented for the Newtonian and non-Newtonian cases. The broad fundamental issue we wish to eventually resolve is whether or not non-Newtonian effects in blood flow are sufficiently strong in unhealthy vessels that they must be addressed in meaningful simulations. Interesting differences during the flow cycle shed light on the problem, but further research is needed.

  3. Energy law preserving C{sup 0} finite element schemes for phase field models in two-phase flow computations

    SciTech Connect

    Hua Jinsong; Lin Ping; Liu Chun; Wang Qi

    2011-08-10

    Highlights: {yields} We study phase-field models for multi-phase flow computation. {yields} We develop an energy-law preserving C0 FEM. {yields} We show that the energy-law preserving method work better. {yields} We overcome unphysical oscillation associated with the Cahn-Hilliard model. - Abstract: We use the idea in to develop the energy law preserving method and compute the diffusive interface (phase-field) models of Allen-Cahn and Cahn-Hilliard type, respectively, governing the motion of two-phase incompressible flows. We discretize these two models using a C{sup 0} finite element in space and a modified midpoint scheme in time. To increase the stability in the pressure variable we treat the divergence free condition by a penalty formulation, under which the discrete energy law can still be derived for these diffusive interface models. Through an example we demonstrate that the energy law preserving method is beneficial for computing these multi-phase flow models. We also demonstrate that when applying the energy law preserving method to the model of Cahn-Hilliard type, un-physical interfacial oscillations may occur. We examine the source of such oscillations and a remedy is presented to eliminate the oscillations. A few two-phase incompressible flow examples are computed to show the good performance of our method.

  4. An adaptive extended finite element method for the analysis of agglomeration of colloidal particles in a flowing fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Young Joon; Jorshari, Razzi Movassaghi; Djilali, Ned

    2015-03-10

    Direct numerical simulations of the flow-nanoparticle interaction in a colloidal suspension are presented using an extended finite element method (XFEM) in which the dynamics of the nanoparticles is solved in a fully-coupled manner with the flow. The method is capable of accurately describing solid-fluid interfaces without the need of boundary-fitted meshes to investigate the dynamics of particles in complex flows. In order to accurately compute the high interparticle shear stresses and pressures while minimizing computing costs, an adaptive meshing technique is incorporated with the fluid-structure interaction algorithm. The particle-particle interaction at the microscopic level is modeled using the Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential and the corresponding potential parameters are determined by a scaling procedure. The study is relevant to the preparation of inks used in the fabrication of catalyst layers for fuel cells. In this paper, we are particularly interested in investigating agglomeration of the nanoparticles under external shear flow in a sliding bi-periodic Lees-Edwards frame. The results indicate that the external shear has a crucial impact on the structure formation of colloidal particles in a suspension.

  5. Numerical Simulation of 3D particulate flow by Coupling Multi-Fluid Model with Discrete Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Liancheng; Morita, Koji; Tagami, Hirotaka; Tobita, Yoshiharu

    2014-06-01

    The postulated core disruptive accidents (CDAs) are regarded as particular difficulties in the safety analysis of liquid-metal fast reactors (LMFRs). In CDAs, the motions and interactions of solid particles, such as refrozen fuels, disrupted pellets, etc., not only dominate fundamental behaviors of multiphase flows, but also drastically influence the process of CDAs. The fast reactor safety analysis code, SIMMER-IV, which is a 3D, multi-velocity-field, multiphase, multicomponent, Eulerian, fluid dynamics code coupled with a fuel-pin model and a space- and energy-dependent neutron kinetics model, was successfully applied to a series of CDA assessments. However, strong interactions among solid particles as well as particle characteristics in multiphase flows with rich solid particles were not taken into consideration for fluid-dynamics models of SIMMER-IV. In this article, a hybrid method for multiphase flow analysis is developed by coupling the discrete element method (DEM) with the multi-fluid model of SIMMER-IV. In the coupling algorithm, motions of liquid and gas phases are solved by a time-factorization (time-splitting) method. For the solid phases, contacts among particles and interactions with fluid phases are considered through DEM. Numerical simulations of dam-break behavior with rich solid particles show reasonable agreements with corresponding experimental results. It is expected that SIMMER-IV coupled with DEM could provide a promising and useful computational tool for complicated multiphase-flow phenomena with high concentration of solid particles.

  6. Numerical Simulations of Single Flow Element in a Nuclear Thermal Thrust Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Gary; Ito, Yasushi; Ross, Doug; Chen, Yen-Sen; Wang, Ten-See

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this effort is to develop an efficient and accurate computational methodology to predict both detailed and global thermo-fluid environments of a single now element in a hypothetical solid-core nuclear thermal thrust chamber assembly, Several numerical and multi-physics thermo-fluid models, such as chemical reactions, turbulence, conjugate heat transfer, porosity, and power generation, were incorporated into an unstructured-grid, pressure-based computational fluid dynamics solver. The numerical simulations of a single now element provide a detailed thermo-fluid environment for thermal stress estimation and insight for possible occurrence of mid-section corrosion. In addition, detailed conjugate heat transfer simulations were employed to develop the porosity models for efficient pressure drop and thermal load calculations.

  7. Towards transition modelling for supersonic laminar flow control based on spanwise periodic roughness elements.

    PubMed

    Choudhari, Meelan; Chang, Chau-Lyan; Jiang, Li

    2005-05-15

    Laminar flow control (LFC) is one of the key enabling technologies for quiet and efficient supersonic aircraft. Recent work at Arizona State University (ASU) has led to a novel concept for passive LFC, which employs distributed leading edge roughness to limit the growth of naturally dominant crossflow instabilities in a swept-wing boundary layer. Predicated on nonlinear modification of the mean boundary-layer flow via controlled receptivity, the ASU concept requires a holistic prediction approach that accounts for all major stages within transition in an integrated manner. As a first step in developing an engineering methodology for the design and optimization of roughness-based supersonic LFC, this paper reports on canonical findings related to receptivity plus linear and nonlinear development of stationary crossflow instabilities on a Mach 2.4, 73 degrees swept airfoil with a chord Reynolds number of 16.3 million.

  8. Application of Particle Image Velocimetry to a Study of Flow About a Multi-Element Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Stephen M.; Baganoff, Donald

    1996-01-01

    An experiment was performed on the flap tip vortex shed from a half span Fowler flap. This flap was mounted on a 5 foot span NACA 63(2)-215 Mod B airfoil in the 7 by 10 foot wind tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. Several noise reduction studies were performed with this model, and the addition of the Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) research discussed here served as a proof case of large scale PIV. The measurement plane investigated here was a cross plane region. This is cross plane relative to the freestream flow direction. The measurement plane was located at a position 18 inches downstream of the flap trailing edge. This served to prove that measurements could also be made in the more difficult cross plane direction rather than in the downstream flow direction. Lastly the PIV data was used as a practical research tool that yielded important results that could not otherwise be obtained. The flow field area measured was 40 cm by 40 cm square, and served to characterize the downstream flow characteristics of the flap tip vortex under three configurations: the baseline configuration which was the flap and the wing only; the baseline with the addition of a 3/4 span slat; and the baseline with a Flap Edge Device which was designed to reduce the noise generated at the flap. All configurations were tested at a freestream velocity of 64.84 m/s. The test resulted in average velocity fields for the three configurations tested. The velocity fields aided in verifying other testing methods on this particular experiment, and also yielded further insight into the characteristics of the flap tip vortex under the three configurations considered. The velocity data was reduced, and we were able to calculate the vorticity of the flow field. From the position of minimum vorticity the location of the center of the vortex was determined. The circulation was also calculated and aided in comparing the effects of the three configurations on the lifting characteristics of the flap.

  9. Element distribution patterns in the ordovician Galena group, Southeastern Minnesota: Indicators of fluid flow and provenance of terrigenous material

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lively, R.S.; Morey, G.B.; Mossler, J.H.

    1997-01-01

    As part of a regional geochemical investigation of lower Paleozoic strata in the Hollandale embayment of southeastern Minnesota, elemental concentrations in acid-insoluble residues were determined for carbonate rock in the Middle Ordovician Galena Group. Elemental distribution patterns within the insoluble residues, particularly those of Ti, Al, and Zr, show that the Wisconsin dome and the Wisconsin arch, which contributed sediment to the embayment prior to Galena time, continued as weak sources of sediment during this period. In contrast, trace metals commonly associated with Mississippi Valley-type lead-zinc mineralization, including Pb, Zn, Cu, Ag, Ni, Co, As, and Mo, show dispersal patterns that are independent of those associated with primary depositional phenomena. These trace metals are concentrated in southern Minnesota in carbonate rocks near the interface between limestone- and dolostone-dominated strata. Dispersal patterns imply that the metals were carried by a north-flowing regional ground-water system. The results show that the geochemical attributes of insoluble residues can be used to distinguish provenance and transport directions of primary sediments within a depositional basin from effects of subsequent regional ground-water flow systems.

  10. ANNOUNCEMENT FOR THE THIRD INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON THE ANALYTIC ELEMENT METHOD IN MODELING GROUNDWATER FLOW, BRAINERD, MN, APRIL 17-20, 2000

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brochure announcing the Third International Conference on the Analytic Element Method in Modeling Groundwater Flow which will be held in Brainerd, MN, April 17-19, 2000. .The 2000 ICAEM will bring together the academic and engineer perspectives in modeling groundwater flow for en...

  11. A modular finite-element model (MODFE) for areal and axisymmetric ground-water-flow problems, Part 2: Derivation of finite-element equations and comparisons with analytical solutions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooley, Richard L.

    1992-01-01

    MODFE, a modular finite-element model for simulating steady- or unsteady-state, area1 or axisymmetric flow of ground water in a heterogeneous anisotropic aquifer is documented in a three-part series of reports. In this report, part 2, the finite-element equations are derived by minimizing a functional of the difference between the true and approximate hydraulic head, which produces equations that are equivalent to those obtained by either classical variational or Galerkin techniques. Spatial finite elements are triangular with linear basis functions, and temporal finite elements are one dimensional with linear basis functions. Physical processes that can be represented by the model include (1) confined flow, unconfined flow (using the Dupuit approximation), or a combination of both; (2) leakage through either rigid or elastic confining units; (3) specified recharge or discharge at points, along lines, or areally; (4) flow across specified-flow, specified-head, or head-dependent boundaries; (5) decrease of aquifer thickness to zero under extreme water-table decline and increase of aquifer thickness from zero as the water table rises; and (6) head-dependent fluxes from springs, drainage wells, leakage across riverbeds or confining units combined with aquifer dewatering, and evapotranspiration. The matrix equations produced by the finite-element method are solved by the direct symmetric-Doolittle method or the iterative modified incomplete-Cholesky conjugate-gradient method. The direct method can be efficient for small- to medium-sized problems (less than about 500 nodes), and the iterative method is generally more efficient for larger-sized problems. Comparison of finite-element solutions with analytical solutions for five example problems demonstrates that the finite-element model can yield accurate solutions to ground-water flow problems.

  12. Finite element solution of double-diffusive boundary layer flow of viscoelastic nanofluids over a stretching sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, M.; Bhargava, R.

    2014-05-01

    This paper deals with the double-diffusive boundary layer flow of non-Newtonian nanofluid over a stretching sheet. In this model, where binary nanofluid is used, the Brownian motion and thermophoresis are classified as the main mechanisms which are responsible for the enhancement of the convection features of the nanofluid. The boundary layer equations governed by the partial differential equations are transformed into a set of ordinary differential equations with the help of group theory transformations. The variational finite element method (FEM) is used to solve these ordinary differential equations. We have examined the effects of different controlling parameters, namely, the Brownian motion parameter, the thermophoresis parameter, modified Dufour number, viscoelastic parameter, Prandtl number, regular Lewis number, Dufour Lewis number, and nanofluid Lewis number on the flow field and heat transfer characteristics. Graphical display of the numerical examine are performed to illustrate the influence of various flow parameters on the velocity, temperature, concentration, reduced Nusselt, reduced Sherwood and reduced nanofluid Sherwood number distributions. The present study has many applications in coating and suspensions, movement of biological fluids, cooling of metallic plate, melt-spinning, heat exchangers technology, and oceanography.

  13. The viscous curtain: General formulation and finite-element solution for the stability of flowing viscous sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perdigou, C.; Audoly, B.

    2016-11-01

    The stability of thin viscous sheets has been studied so far in the special case where the base flow possesses a direction of invariance: the linear stability is then governed by an ordinary differential equation. We propose a mathematical formulation and a numerical method of solution that are applicable to the linear stability analysis of viscous sheets possessing no particular symmetry. The linear stability problem is formulated as a non-Hermitian eigenvalue problem in a 2D domain and is solved numerically using the finite-element method. Specifically, we consider the case of a viscous sheet in an open flow, which falls in a bath of fluid; the sheet is mildly stretched by gravity and the flow can become unstable by 'curtain' modes. The growth rates of these modes are calculated as a function of the fluid parameters and of the geometry, and a phase diagram is obtained. A transition is reported between a buckling mode (static bifurcation) and an oscillatory mode (Hopf bifurcation). The effect of surface tension is discussed.

  14. Numerical investigations of passive flow control elements for vertical axis wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frunzulica, Florin; Dumitrache, Alexandru; Suatean, Bogdan

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we numerically investigate the possibilities to control the dynamic stall phenomenon, with application to vertical axis wind turbines. The dynamic stall appears at low tip speed ratio (TSR<4) and it has a great impact on structural integrity of the wind turbine and power performances. For this reason we performed a CFD 2D analysis of the dynamic stall phenomenon around NACA 0012 airfoil equipped with a passive flow control device, in pitching motion at relative low Reynolds number (˜105). Three passive flow control devices are numerically investigated: a turbulence promoter mounted on the leading edge, a thin channel and a step on the upper surface of the airfoil. For the present studies, the unsteady Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) model is the suitable approach to perform the dynamic stall simulations with an acceptable computational cost and reasonable accuracy. The results are compared to those of an existing experimental case test for unmodified NACA 0012 airfoil. The capability of this device was investigated numerically on a vertical axis wind turbine (2D model), where blades are generated with NACA 0018 airfoil.

  15. Constraining Galileon inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, Donough; Anderson, Gemma J.; Hull, Matthew; Seery, David E-mail: G.Anderson@sussex.ac.uk E-mail: D.Seery@sussex.ac.uk

    2015-02-01

    In this short paper, we present constraints on the Galileon inflationary model from the CMB bispectrum. We employ a principal-component analysis of the independent degrees of freedom constrained by data and apply this to the WMAP 9-year data to constrain the free parameters of the model. A simple Bayesian comparison establishes that support for the Galileon model from bispectrum data is at best weak.

  16. The human immunodeficiency virus epidemic: a race against time for millions and the role of flow cytometry. A Caribbean and resource-constrained country perspective.

    PubMed

    Abayomi, Akin

    2007-11-01

    There is a race against time for millions in the world today. Both the technology and the manpower are currently available to deliver the services that are required to meet the needs of the 40 million people currently living with HIV/AIDS, but at what price? The reality is therefore that we are a long shot away from this realization. What are the facts and why have we not achieved even the simplest deadlines set by the World Health Organization (WHO)? Are these objectives realistic? What role does hard science have to play in the search for cost-effective solutions and futuristic effective options? To stem this unrelenting epidemic and convert the natural history of the disorder in those already living with the virus into one of chronicity, rather than one characterized by a dehumanizing and stigmatized death, requires a global commitment at all levels. This discussion examines the reality and offers a snapshot of capacity and experiences in the developing world. Crucially, it looks at the immediate and long term role of flow cytometry in the expanded care and treatment programs for developing nations. PMID:17421027

  17. Review of literature on the finite-element solution of the equations of two-dimensional surface-water flow in the horizontal plane

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Jonathan K.; Froehlich, David C.

    1987-01-01

    Published literature on the application of the finite-element method to solving the equations of two-dimensional surface-water flow in the horizontal plane is reviewed in this report. The finite-element method is ideally suited to modeling two-dimensional flow over complex topography with spatially variable resistance. A two-dimensional finite-element surface-water flow model with depth and vertically averaged velocity components as dependent variables allows the user great flexibility in defining geometric features such as the boundaries of a water body, channels, islands, dikes, and embankments. The following topics are reviewed in this report: alternative formulations of the equations of two-dimensional surface-water flow in the horizontal plane; basic concepts of the finite-element method; discretization of the flow domain and representation of the dependent flow variables; treatment of boundary conditions; discretization of the time domain; methods for modeling bottom, surface, and lateral stresses; approaches to solving systems of nonlinear equations; techniques for solving systems of linear equations; finite-element alternatives to Galerkin's method of weighted residuals; techniques of model validation; and preparation of model input data. References are listed in the final chapter.

  18. A modular finite-element model (MODFE) for areal and axisymmetric ground-water-flow problems, Part 1: Model Description and User's Manual

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Torak, L.J.

    1993-01-01

    A MODular, Finite-Element digital-computer program (MODFE) was developed to simulate steady or unsteady-state, two-dimensional or axisymmetric ground-water flow. Geometric- and hydrologic-aquifer characteristics in two spatial dimensions are represented by triangular finite elements and linear basis functions; one-dimensional finite elements and linear basis functions represent time. Finite-element matrix equations are solved by the direct symmetric-Doolittle method or the iterative modified, incomplete-Cholesky, conjugate-gradient method. Physical processes that can be represented by the model include (1) confined flow, unconfined flow (using the Dupuit approximation), or a combination of both; (2) leakage through either rigid or elastic confining beds; (3) specified recharge or discharge at points, along lines, and over areas; (4) flow across specified-flow, specified-head, or bead-dependent boundaries; (5) decrease of aquifer thickness to zero under extreme water-table decline and increase of aquifer thickness from zero as the water table rises; and (6) head-dependent fluxes from springs, drainage wells, leakage across riverbeds or confining beds combined with aquifer dewatering, and evapotranspiration. The report describes procedures for applying MODFE to ground-water-flow problems, simulation capabilities, and data preparation. Guidelines for designing the finite-element mesh and for node numbering and determining band widths are given. Tables are given that reference simulation capabilities to specific versions of MODFE. Examples of data input and model output for different versions of MODFE are provided.

  19. Modeling of Interior Ballistic Gas-Solid Flow Using a Coupled Computational Fluid Dynamics-Discrete Element Method.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cheng; Zhang, Xiaobing

    2013-05-01

    In conventional models for two-phase reactive flow of interior ballistic, the dynamic collision phenomenon of particles is neglected or empirically simplified. However, the particle collision between particles may play an important role in dilute two-phase flow because the distribution of particles is extremely nonuniform. The collision force may be one of the key factors to influence the particle movement. This paper presents the CFD-DEM approach for simulation of interior ballistic two-phase flow considering the dynamic collision process. The gas phase is treated as a Eulerian continuum and described by a computational fluid dynamic method (CFD). The solid phase is modeled by discrete element method (DEM) using a soft sphere approach for the particle collision dynamic. The model takes into account grain combustion, particle-particle collisions, particle-wall collisions, interphase drag and heat transfer between gas and solid phases. The continuous gas phase equations are discretized in finite volume form and solved by the AUSM+-up scheme with the higher order accurate reconstruction method. Translational and rotational motions of discrete particles are solved by explicit time integrations. The direct mapping contact detection algorithm is used. The multigrid method is applied in the void fraction calculation, the contact detection procedure, and CFD solving procedure. Several verification tests demonstrate the accuracy and reliability of this approach. The simulation of an experimental igniter device in open air shows good agreement between the model and experimental measurements. This paper has implications for improving the ability to capture the complex physics phenomena of two-phase flow during the interior ballistic cycle and to predict dynamic collision phenomena at the individual particle scale.

  20. Using Comprehensive Biophysical Characterisation of Hydro-Geologic Landscapes to Constrain Surficial and Subsurface Fluid Flow and Solute Transport: An Example from Southern Rivers in Southeast Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, K.; Moore, C. L.

    2009-04-01

    salts deposited at the time of formation. In addition, many of the sedimentary units were formed in a fluvial environment and did not have associated marine salts at the time of formation. In lowland areas, where landscapes are dominated by unconsolidated sediments, salts can be deposited and redeposited as solid grains, they can crystallise in pore spaces in the sediments and they can be adsorbed onto iron oxides and clay minerals. These salts can also be dissolved and mobilised into surface and groundwater systems and move through the landscape in this manner. In upland areas, the processes of distribution, storage and mobilisation of salts are similar, however there is typically more rock outcrop and the structure of the landscape is influenced by distribution of weathering products and unconsolidated materials. To improve the understanding of the way in which salt is mobilised in different landscapes, it is important to understand the way in which water moves through the landscape, as it is the principle agent involved in the weathering of rocks to form regolith, and water mobilises salts contained in the regolith and fractured rock. Biophysical characterisation of the landscapes developed on each of these geological units allows the constraint of salt storage and distribution across these landscapes. This can be used to inform the development of conceptual models for saline fluid flow. Development of Hydro-Geologic Landscape polygons, a scaled and modified Groundwater Flow Systems approach, describes areas with like biophysical characteristics within a landscape, and hence like salt storage capacity and fluid flow parameters. Initially this work was used to characterise landscape areas for regional natural resource management (NRM) decision making, but at more detailed scale it has proven to be a useful applied tool for on-ground agricultural management and NRM at catchment and sub-catchment scale. Further, this work helps define a range of other NRM issues in

  1. Continuum flow sampling mass spectrometer for elemental analysis with an inductively coupled plasma ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Olivares, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    The sampling of ions from an atmospheric pressure inductively coupled plasma for mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) with a supersonic nozzle and skimmer is shown to follow similar behavior found for neutral beam studies and of ion extraction from other plasmas and flames. The dependence of count rates for metal oxide and doubly charged ions on ICP operating parameters, and sampling interface configuration are discussed for this instrument. A simple method is described for the approximate measurement of the ion energy distribution in ICP-MS. The average ion kinetic energy, kinetic energy spread, and maximum kinetic energy are evaluated from a plot of ion signal as a function of retarding voltage applied to the quadrupole mass analyzer. The effects of plasma operating parameters on ion signals and energies are described. The interference on the ionization of cobalt by five salts, NaCl, MgCl/sub 2/, NH/sub 4/I, NH/sub 4/Br and NH/sub 4/Cl, in an ICP is first considered theoretically and subsequently the theoretical trends are established experimentally by ICP-MS. The interference trends are found to be in the order of the most easily ionized element in the matrix salt, i.e., Na > Mg > I > Br > Cl.

  2. Computational Study of Laminar Flow Control on a Subsonic Swept Wing Using Discrete Roughness Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Fei; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Chang, Chau-Lyan; Streett, Craig L.; Carpenter, Mark H.

    2011-01-01

    A combination of parabolized stability equations and secondary instability theory has been applied to a low-speed swept airfoil model with a chord Reynolds number of 7.15 million, with the goals of (i) evaluating this methodology in the context of transition prediction for a known configuration for which roughness based crossflow transition control has been demonstrated under flight conditions and (ii) of analyzing the mechanism of transition delay via the introduction of discrete roughness elements (DRE). Roughness based transition control involves controlled seeding of suitable, subdominant crossflow modes, so as to weaken the growth of naturally occurring, linearly more unstable crossflow modes. Therefore, a synthesis of receptivity, linear and nonlinear growth of stationary crossflow disturbances, and the ensuing development of high frequency secondary instabilities is desirable to understand the experimentally observed transition behavior. With further validation, such higher fidelity prediction methodology could be utilized to assess the potential for crossflow transition control at even higher Reynolds numbers, where experimental data is currently unavailable.

  3. A stochastic mixed finite element heterogeneous multiscale method for flow in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Xiang; Zabaras, Nicholas

    2011-06-01

    A computational methodology is developed to efficiently perform uncertainty quantification for fluid transport in porous media in the presence of both stochastic permeability and multiple scales. In order to capture the small scale heterogeneity, a new mixed multiscale finite element method is developed within the framework of the heterogeneous multiscale method (HMM) in the spatial domain. This new method ensures both local and global mass conservation. Starting from a specified covariance function, the stochastic log-permeability is discretized in the stochastic space using a truncated Karhunen-Loeve expansion with several random variables. Due to the small correlation length of the covariance function, this often results in a high stochastic dimensionality. Therefore, a newly developed adaptive high dimensional stochastic model representation technique (HDMR) is used in the stochastic space. This results in a set of low stochastic dimensional subproblems which are efficiently solved using the adaptive sparse grid collocation method (ASGC). Numerical examples are presented for both deterministic and stochastic permeability to show the accuracy and efficiency of the developed stochastic multiscale method.

  4. The Effects of Chemically Distinct LLSVPs on the Geoid: the Results from Both 3-D Thermochemical Convection and Seismically Constrained Instantaneous Flow Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xi; Zhong, Shijie

    2015-04-01

    The long-wavelength geoid anomalies provide important constraints on mantle dynamics and mantle viscosity structure. Hager and Ricard and their colleagues successfully reproduced the observed geoid using seismically imaged mantle structure as buoyancy force in an isochemical, whole mantle convection model. However, it has been generally agreed that the seismically observed large low shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs) underneath the Pacific and the Africa in the lower mantle are chemically distinct and likely more dense than the ambient mantle. In this study, we investigate how chemically distinct LLSVPs or chemical piles affect the geoid using both time-dependent thermochemical convection model and instantaneous flow model driven by buoyancy derived from seismic models. First, by conducting a series of 3D spherical thermochemical convection calculations, we found that the chemically dense piles above the CMB have a compensation effect on the geoid, and as a result, the total geoid is only controlled by the upper ~1600 km of the mantle. Second, we use buoyancy structure derived from seismic models (e.g., Smean and other models) to study whether the observed geoid can be reproduced by considering the compensation effects of the LLSVPs. The geoid modeling requires a viscosity profile and a seismic velocity to density scaling f. We define a four-layer viscosity model with viscosities for lithosphere, the upper mantle, the transition zone, and the lower mantle . With a fixed non-dimensional lithospheric viscosity at 20, we compute the geoid and search for other three viscosity parameters and scaling parameter f that lead to the maximum variance reduction for the geoid. For the whole mantle, isochemical model, the best model with variance reduction of ~71% for degrees 2-9 has viscosities of 0.5, 0.5, and 35, for the upper mantle, transition zone, and lower mantle, respectively, and the scaling f is 0.24. For the thermochemical model with the bottom 1000 km of structure

  5. The Effects of Chemically Distinct LLSVPs on the Geoid: the Results from Both 3-D Thermochemical Convection and Seismically Constrained Instantaneous Flow Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Zhong, S.

    2014-12-01

    The long-wavelength geoid anomalies provide important constraints on mantle dynamics and mantle viscosity structure. Hager and Ricard and their colleagues successfully reproduced the observed geoid using seismically imaged mantle structure as buoyancy force in an isochemical, whole mantle convection model. However, it has been generally agreed that the seismically observed large low shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs) underneath the Pacific and the Africa in the lower mantle are chemically distinct and likely more dense than the ambient mantle. In this study, we investigate how chemically distinct LLSVPs or chemical piles affect the geoid using both time-dependent thermochemical convection model and instantaneous flow model driven by buoyancy derived from seismic models. First, by conducting a series of 3D spherical thermochemical convection calculations, we found that the chemically dense piles above the CMB have a compensation effect on the geoid, and as a result, the total geoid is only controlled by the upper ~1600 km of the mantle. Second, we use buoyancy structure derived from seismic model Smean to study whether the observed geoid can be reproduced by considering the compensation effects of the LLSVPs. The geoid modeling requires a viscosity profile η and a seismic velocity to density scaling f. We define a four-layer viscosity model with viscosities for lithosphere η_lt, the upper mantle η_um, the transition zone η_tz, and the lower mantle η_lm. With a fixed η_lt of 20, we compute the geoid and search for η_um, η_tz, η_lm, and f that lead to the maximum variance reduction for the geoid. For the whole mantle, isochemical model, the best model with variance reduction of ~71% for degrees 2-9 has viscosities of 20, 0.5, 0.5, 35, for η_lt, η_um, η_tz, and η_lm, respectively, and the scaling f is 0.24. For the thermochemical model with the bottom 1000 km of structure removed, the best model has a viscosity profile of 20, 0.5, 0.5, 30 for the four

  6. Mixed mimetic spectral element method for Stokes flow: A pointwise divergence-free solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreeft, Jasper; Gerritsma, Marc

    2013-05-01

    In this paper we apply the recently developed mimetic discretization method to the mixed formulation of the Stokes problem in terms of vorticity, velocity and pressure. The mimetic discretization presented in this paper and in Kreeft et al. [51] is a higher-order method for curvilinear quadrilaterals and hexahedrals. Fundamental is the underlying structure of oriented geometric objects, the relation between these objects through the boundary operator and how this defines the exterior derivative, representing the grad, curl and div, through the generalized Stokes theorem. The mimetic method presented here uses the language of differential k-forms with k-cochains as their discrete counterpart, and the relations between them in terms of the mimetic operators: reduction, reconstruction and projection. The reconstruction consists of the recently developed mimetic spectral interpolation functions. The most important result of the mimetic framework is the commutation between differentiation at the continuous level with that on the finite dimensional and discrete level. As a result operators like gradient, curl and divergence are discretized exactly. For Stokes flow, this implies a pointwise divergence-free solution. This is confirmed using a set of test cases on both Cartesian and curvilinear meshes. It will be shown that the method converges optimally for all admissible boundary conditions.

  7. A Galerkin finite-element flow model to predict the transient response of a radially symmetric aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reilly, Thomas E.

    1984-01-01

    A computer program developed to evaluate radial flow of ground water, such as at a pumping well, recharge basin, or injection well, is capable of simulating anisotropic, inhomogenous, confined, or pseudo-unconfined (constant saturated thickness) conditions. Results compare well with those calculated from published analytical and model solutions. The program is based on the Galerkin finite-element technique. A sample model run is presented to illustrate the use of the program; supplementary material provides the program listing as well as a sample problem data set and output. From the text and other material presented, one can use the program to predict drawdowns from pumping and ground-water buildups from recharge in a radially symmetric ground-water system.

  8. Novel, low-cost separator plates and flow-field elements for use in PEM fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Edlund, D.J.

    1996-12-31

    PEM fuel cells offer promise for a wide range of applications including vehicular (e.g., automotive) and stationary power generation. The performance and cost targets that must be met for PEM technology to be commercially successful varies to some degree with the application. However, in general the cost of PEM fuel cell stacks must be reduced substantially if they are to see widespread use for electrical power generation. A significant contribution to the manufactured cost of PEM fuel cells is the machined carbon plates that traditionally serve as bipolar separator plates and flow-field elements. In addition, carbon separator plates are inherently brittle and suffer from breakage due to shock, vibration, and improper handling. This report describes a bifurcated separator device with low resistivity, low manufacturing cost, compact size and durability.

  9. Rotor tip clearance effects on overall and blade-element performance of axial-flow transonic fan stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of tip clearance on the overall and blade-element performance of an axial-flow transonic fan stage are presented. The 50-centimeter-diameter fan was tested at four tip clearances (nonrotating) from 0.061 to 0.178 centimeter. The calculated radial growth of the blades was 0.040 centimeter at design conditions. The decrease in overall stage performance with increasing clearance is attributed to the loss in rotor performance. For the rotor the effects of clearance on performance parameters extended to about 70 percent of blade span from the tip. The stage still margin based on an assumed operating line decreased from 15.3 to 0 percent as the clearance increased from 0.061 to 0.178 centimeter.

  10. Finite-element analyses of blade and slot coating flows using an implicit pseudo-solid domain mapping technique coupled with unstructured grids

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K.S.; Schunk, P.R.; Sackinger, P.A.

    1994-12-04

    In coating processes (e.g. in blade coating) the flow domain inherently contains free surfaces and three-phase contact lines, and characteristic length scales of flow features in the dimension transverse to the web-movement vary by an order of magnitude or more from a fraction of a millimeter or more to tens of microns or less). The presence of free surfaces and three-phase contact lines, and the sudden changes of flow geometry and directions create difficulties in theoretical analyses of such flows. Though simulations of coating flows via finite-element methods using structured grids have been reportedly demonstrated in the literature, achieving high efficiency of such numerical experiments remains a grand challenge -- mainly due to difficulties in local mesh-refinement and in avoiding unacceptably distorted grids. High efficiency of computing steady flow fields under various process conditions is crucial in shortening turn-around time in design and optimization of coating-flow processes. In this paper we employ a fully-implicit, pseudo-solid, domain mapping technique coupled with unstructured meshes to analyze blade and slot coating flows using Galerkin`s method with finite element basis functions. We demonstrate the robustness and efficiency of our unique technique in circumventing shortcomings of mesh-motion schemes currently being used in the coating-flow research community. Our goal is to develop an efficient numerical tool, together with a suitable optimization toolkit, that can be used routinely in design and optimization of coating-flow processes.

  11. Space-time finite-element objects: Efficiently modeling physically complex flows

    SciTech Connect

    Dilts, G.A.

    1996-03-28

    Accurate modeling of high-explosive systems requires detailed consideration of many different physical properties and processes: These diverse processes generally occur in localized regions of the problem. Thus the very partial differential equations used to mathematically model the problem change from one region of space and time to another. The numerical algorithms generally used to solve these equations are frequently conceived in terms of data values for physical field variables u{sup i} defined at a number of spatial points indexed by multi-integer subscripts x{sub J}, resulting in a number of discrete state variables u{sup i}{sub J}. Instead of using as the fundamental object a physical field, which naturally maps to an array, the authors imagine a small piece of space modeled for a small amount of time, a space-time ``element``. Within it, various physical processes occur at various times. Self-contained, it gives account of what happens within its borders. It cooperates with a set of neighbors that organize into meshes, which organize into problems. The authors achieve in the software model a decoupling between the where and the how and the what, lack of which historically has been the source of a great deal of the software overhead of modelling continuum systems, and which is a necessary consequence of writing down u{sup i}{sub J}. An efficient implementation of this idea requires a reformulation of the discretization and solution of systems of conservation laws, and careful class design. A working prototype for systems in one space dimension using Mathematica and C++ is provided.

  12. FECWATER: user's manual of a Finite-Element Code for simulating WATER flow through saturated-unsaturated porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, G.T.; Strand, R.H.

    1982-08-01

    This report presents the user's manual of FECWATER, a Finite-Element code for simulating WATER flow through saturated-unsaturated porous media. The code is designed for generic application. For each site-specific application, 14 cards are required to specify the size of arrays and 6 cards are used to assign the control numbers in the main program. In addition, user's supply functions must be given to specify the soil property relationships between moisture content, water capacity, and hydraulic conductivity and pressure head, if they are not given in tabular form. Input data to the code includes the program control indices, properties of the porous media, the geometry in the form of elements and nodes, boundary and initial conditions, and rainfall information. Principal output includes the spatial distribution of pressure head, total head, moisture-content, and Darcy's velocity components at any desired time. Fluxes through various types of boundaries are output. In addition, diagnostic variables, such as the number of non-convergent nodes, residuals, and rainfall-seepage nodes, may be printed, if required. This user's manual should be used in conjunction with references listed in the bibliography.

  13. Simulations of Spray Reacting Flows in a Single Element LDI Injector With and Without Invoking an Eulerian Scalar PDF Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the numerical simulations of the Jet-A spray reacting flow in a single element lean direct injection (LDI) injector by using the National Combustion Code (NCC) with and without invoking the Eulerian scalar probability density function (PDF) method. The flow field is calculated by using the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations (RANS and URANS) with nonlinear turbulence models, and when the scalar PDF method is invoked, the energy and compositions or species mass fractions are calculated by solving the equation of an ensemble averaged density-weighted fine-grained probability density function that is referred to here as the averaged probability density function (APDF). A nonlinear model for closing the convection term of the scalar APDF equation is used in the presented simulations and will be briefly described. Detailed comparisons between the results and available experimental data are carried out. Some positive findings of invoking the Eulerian scalar PDF method in both improving the simulation quality and reducing the computing cost are observed.

  14. Finite-element simulation of ground-water flow in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, Nevada-California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Czarnecki, J.B.; Waddell, R.K.

    1984-01-01

    A finite-element model of the groundwater flow system in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain at the Nevada Test Site was developed using parameter estimation techniques. The model simulated steady-state ground-water flow occurring in tuffaceous, volcanic , and carbonate rocks, and alluvial aquifers. Hydraulic gradients in the modeled area range from 0.00001 for carbonate aquifers to 0.19 for barriers in tuffaceous rocks. Three model parameters were used in estimating transmissivity in six zones. Simulated hydraulic-head values range from about 1,200 m near Timber Mountain to about 300 m near Furnace Creek Ranch. Model residuals for simulated versus measured hydraulic heads range from -28.6 to 21.4 m; most are less than +/-7 m, indicating an acceptable representation of the hydrologic system by the model. Sensitivity analyses of the model 's flux boundary condition variables were performed to assess the effect of varying boundary fluxes on the calculation of estimated model transmissivities. Varying the flux variables representing discharge at Franklin Lake and Furnace Creek Ranch has greater effect than varying other flux variables. (Author 's abstract)

  15. A Comparative Analysis of Series And Finite Element Solutions For Flow In Multi-layer Aquifers With Contiguous Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, S.; Craig, J. R.

    2009-05-01

    Recently, Wong S. & J.R. Craig [Computational Methods in Water Resources XVII International Conference, 2008] have developed a semi-analytic series (SAS) solution method for simulating 2D steady-state groundwater flow in multi-layer aquifers with natural unconformity. The advantages of the approach include the capability to predict groundwater flow in aquifer systems with a geometrically complex structure, i.e., layers that are contiguous but vary (sometimes dramatically) in thickness across the modelled domain. The SAS approach is unorthodox compared to numerical scheme such as finite element (FE) method when handling an aquifer basin with contiguous layers. This research attempts to compare the robustness of the SAS solution with that of the FE solution under variety of different geometric conditions, including the increasing of system aspect ratios and the inclusion of pinching layers. It was found that the SAS approach is a useful benchmarking tool and that for contiguous layers, both FE methods continue to be highly accurate at even large aspect ratios. Based on the benchmarking experiments, some rules of thumb for mesh generation in FE models of regional aquifer systems with both contiguous and discontiguous layering are identified.

  16. Constraining the dark fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, Martin; Liddle, Andrew R.; Parkinson, David; Gao Changjun

    2009-10-15

    Cosmological observations are normally fit under the assumption that the dark sector can be decomposed into dark matter and dark energy components. However, as long as the probes remain purely gravitational, there is no unique decomposition and observations can only constrain a single dark fluid; this is known as the dark degeneracy. We use observations to directly constrain this dark fluid in a model-independent way, demonstrating, in particular, that the data cannot be fit by a dark fluid with a single constant equation of state. Parametrizing the dark fluid equation of state by a variety of polynomials in the scale factor a, we use current kinematical data to constrain the parameters. While the simplest interpretation of the dark fluid remains that it is comprised of separate dark matter and cosmological constant contributions, our results cover other model types including unified dark energy/matter scenarios.

  17. Choosing health, constrained choices.

    PubMed

    Chee Khoon Chan

    2009-12-01

    In parallel with the neo-liberal retrenchment of the welfarist state, an increasing emphasis on the responsibility of individuals in managing their own affairs and their well-being has been evident. In the health arena for instance, this was a major theme permeating the UK government's White Paper Choosing Health: Making Healthy Choices Easier (2004), which appealed to an ethos of autonomy and self-actualization through activity and consumption which merited esteem. As a counterpoint to this growing trend of informed responsibilization, constrained choices (constrained agency) provides a useful framework for a judicious balance and sense of proportion between an individual behavioural focus and a focus on societal, systemic, and structural determinants of health and well-being. Constrained choices is also a conceptual bridge between responsibilization and population health which could be further developed within an integrative biosocial perspective one might refer to as the social ecology of health and disease.

  18. A fast algorithm for non-Newtonian flow. An enhanced particle-tracking finite element code for solving boundary-valve problems in viscoelastic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkus, David S.

    1989-01-01

    This project concerned the development of a new fast finite element algorithm to solve flow problems of non-Newtonian fluids such as solutions or melts of polymers. Many constitutive theories for such materials involve single integrals over the deformation history of the particle at the stress evaluation point; examples are the Doi-Edwards and Curtiss-Bird molecular theories and the BKZ family derived from continuum arguments. These theories are believed to be among the most accurate in describing non-Newtonian effects important to polymer process design, effects such as stress relaxation, shear thinning, and normal stress effects. This research developed an optimized version of the algorithm which would run a factor of two faster than the pilot algorithm on scalar machines and would be able to take full advantage of vectorization on machines. Significant progress was made in code vectorization; code enhancement and streamlining; adaptive memory quadrature; model problems for the High Weissenberg Number Problem; exactly incompressible projection; development of multimesh extrapolation procedures; and solution of problems of physical interest. A portable version of the code is in the final stages of benchmarking and testing. It interfaces with the widely used FIDAP fluid dynamics package.

  19. Further finite element analyses of fully developed laminar flow of power-law non-Newtonian fluid in rectangular ducts: Heat transfer predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Syrjaelae, S.

    1996-10-01

    Forced convection heat transfer to hydrodynamically and thermally fully developed laminar flow of power-law non-Newtonian fluid in rectangular ducts has been studied for the H1 and T thermal boundary conditions. The solutions for the velocity and temperature fields were obtained numerically using the finite element method with quartic triangular elements. From these solutions, very accurate Nusselt number values were determined. Computations were performed over a range of power-law indices and duct aspect ratios.

  20. Optimum constrained image restoration filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riemer, T. E.; Mcgillem, C. D.

    1977-01-01

    The research described centered on development of an optimum image restoration filter (IRF) minimizing the radius of gyration of the corrected or composite system point-spread function (P-SF) subject to contraints, and reducing 2-dimensional spatial smearing or blurring of an image. The constraints are imposed on the radius of gyration of the IRF P-SF, the total restored image noise power, and the shape of the composite system frequency spectrum. The image degradation corresponds to mapping many points from the original image into a single resolution element. The P-SF is obtained as solution to a set of simultaneous differential equations obeying nonlinear integral constraints. Truncation errors due to edge effects are controlled by constraining the radius of gyration of the IRF P-SF. An iterative technique suppresses sidelobes of the composite system P-SF.

  1. Modelling of Thermal Advective Reactive Flow in Hydrothermal Mineral Systems Using an Implicit Time-stepped Finite Element Method.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornby, P. G.

    2005-12-01

    Understanding chemical and thermal processes taking place in hydrothermal mineral deposition systems could well be a key to unlocking new mineral reserves through improved targeting of exploration efforts. To aid in this understanding it is very helpful to be able to model such processes with sufficient fidelity to test process hypotheses. To gain understanding, it is often sufficient to obtain semi-quantitative results that model the broad aspects of the complex set of thermal and chemical effects taking place in hydrothermal systems. For example, it is often sufficient to gain an understanding of where thermal, geometric and chemical factors converge to precipitate gold (say) without being perfectly precise about how much gold is precipitated. The traditional approach is to use incompressible Darcy flow together with the Boussinesq approximation. From the flow field, the heat equation is used to advect-conduct the heat. The flow field is also used to transport solutes by solving an advection-dispersion-diffusion equation. The reactions in the fluid and between fluid and rock act as source terms for these advection-dispersion equations. Many existing modelling systems that are used for simulating such systems use explicit time marching schemes and finite differences. The disadvantage of this approach is the need to work on rectilinear grids and the number of time steps required by the Courant condition in the solute transport step. The second factor can be particularly significant if the chemical system is complex, requiring (at a minimum) an equilibrium calculation at each grid point at each time step. In the approach we describe, we use finite elements rather than finite differences, and the pressure, heat and advection-dispersion equations are solved implicitly. The general idea is to put unconditional numerical stability of the time integration first, and let accuracy assume a secondary role. It is in this sense that the method is semi-quantiative. However

  2. A Finite Element Method for Free-Surface Flows of Incompressible Fluids in Three Dimensions, Part II: Dynamic Wetting Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, T.A.; Cairncross, R.A.; Rao, R.R.; Sackinger, P.A.; Schunk, P.R.

    1999-01-29

    To date, few researchers have solved three-dimensional free-surface problems with dynamic wetting lines. This paper extends the free-surface finite element method described in a companion paper [Cairncross, R.A., P.R. Schunk, T.A. Baer, P.A. Sackinger, R.R. Rao, "A finite element method for free surface flows of incompressible fluid in three dimensions, Part I: Boundary-Fitted mesh motion.", to be published (1998)] to handle dynamic wetting. A generalization of the technique used in two dimensional modeling to circumvent double-valued velocities at the wetting line, the so-called kinematic paradox, is presented for a wetting line in three dimensions. This approach requires the fluid velocity normal to the contact line to be zero, the fluid velocity tangent to the contact line to be equal to the tangential component of web velocity, and the fluid velocity into the web to be zero. In addition, slip is allowed in a narrow strip along the substrate surface near the dynamic contact line. For realistic wetting-line motion, a contact angle which varies with wetting speed is required because contact lines in three dimensions typically advance or recede a different rates depending upon location and/or have both advancing and receding portions. The theory is applied to capillary rise of static fluid in a corner, the initial motion of a Newtonian droplet down an inclined plane, and extrusion of a Newtonian fluid from a nozzle onto a moving substrate. The extrusion results are compared to experimental visualization. Subject Categories

  3. Elemental analyses of goundwater: demonstrated advantage of low-flow sampling and trace-metal clean techniques over standard techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creasey, C. L.; Flegal, A. R.

    The combined use of both (1) low-flow purging and sampling and (2) trace-metal clean techniques provides more representative measurements of trace-element concentrations in groundwater than results derived with standard techniques. The use of low-flow purging and sampling provides relatively undisturbed groundwater samples that are more representative of in situ conditions, and the use of trace-element clean techniques limits the inadvertent introduction of contaminants during sampling, storage, and analysis. When these techniques are applied, resultant trace-element concentrations are likely to be markedly lower than results based on standard sampling techniques. In a comparison of data derived from contaminated and control groundwater wells at a site in California, USA, trace-element concentrations from this study were 2-1000 times lower than those determined by the conventional techniques used in sampling of the same wells prior to (5months) and subsequent to (1month) the collections for this study. Specifically, the cadmium and chromium concentrations derived using standard sampling techniques exceed the California Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCL), whereas in this investigation concentrations of both of those elements are substantially below their MCLs. Consequently, the combined use of low-flow and trace-metal clean techniques may preclude erroneous reports of trace-element contamination in groundwater. Résumé L'utilisation simultanée de la purge et de l'échantillonnage à faible débit et des techniques sans traces de métaux permet d'obtenir des mesures de concentrations en éléments en traces dans les eaux souterraines plus représentatives que les résultats fournis par les techniques classiques. L'utilisation de la purge et de l'échantillonnage à faible débit donne des échantillons d'eau souterraine relativement peu perturbés qui sont plus représentatifs des conditions in situ, et le recours aux techniques sans éléments en traces limite l

  4. Elemental analyses of goundwater: demonstrated advantage of low-flow sampling and trace-metal clean techniques over standard techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creasey, C. L.; Flegal, A. R.

    The combined use of both (1) low-flow purging and sampling and (2) trace-metal clean techniques provides more representative measurements of trace-element concentrations in groundwater than results derived with standard techniques. The use of low-flow purging and sampling provides relatively undisturbed groundwater samples that are more representative of in situ conditions, and the use of trace-element clean techniques limits the inadvertent introduction of contaminants during sampling, storage, and analysis. When these techniques are applied, resultant trace-element concentrations are likely to be markedly lower than results based on standard sampling techniques. In a comparison of data derived from contaminated and control groundwater wells at a site in California, USA, trace-element concentrations from this study were 2-1000 times lower than those determined by the conventional techniques used in sampling of the same wells prior to (5months) and subsequent to (1month) the collections for this study. Specifically, the cadmium and chromium concentrations derived using standard sampling techniques exceed the California Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCL), whereas in this investigation concentrations of both of those elements are substantially below their MCLs. Consequently, the combined use of low-flow and trace-metal clean techniques may preclude erroneous reports of trace-element contamination in groundwater. Résumé L'utilisation simultanée de la purge et de l'échantillonnage à faible débit et des techniques sans traces de métaux permet d'obtenir des mesures de concentrations en éléments en traces dans les eaux souterraines plus représentatives que les résultats fournis par les techniques classiques. L'utilisation de la purge et de l'échantillonnage à faible débit donne des échantillons d'eau souterraine relativement peu perturbés qui sont plus représentatifs des conditions in situ, et le recours aux techniques sans éléments en traces limite l

  5. Simulation of Two-Fluid Flows by the Least-Squares Finite Element Method Using a Continuum Surface Tension Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jie; Yu, Sheng-Tao; Jiang, Bo-nan

    1996-01-01

    In this paper a numerical procedure for simulating two-fluid flows is presented. This procedure is based on the Volume of Fluid (VOF) method proposed by Hirt and Nichols and the continuum surface force (CSF) model developed by Brackbill, et al. In the VOF method fluids of different properties are identified through the use of a continuous field variable (color function). The color function assigns a unique constant (color) to each fluid. The interfaces between different fluids are distinct due to sharp gradients of the color function. The evolution of the interfaces is captured by solving the convective equation of the color function. The CSF model is used as a means to treat surface tension effect at the interfaces. Here a modified version of the CSF model, proposed by Jacqmin, is used to calculate the tension force. In the modified version, the force term is obtained by calculating the divergence of a stress tensor defined by the gradient of the color function. In its analytical form, this stress formulation is equivalent to the original CSF model. Numerically, however, the use of the stress formulation has some advantages over the original CSF model, as it bypasses the difficulty in approximating the curvatures of the interfaces. The least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) is used to discretize the governing equation systems. The LSFEM has proven to be effective in solving incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and pure convection equations, making it an ideal candidate for the present applications. The LSFEM handles all the equations in a unified manner without any additional special treatment such as upwinding or artificial dissipation. Various bench mark tests have been carried out for both two dimensional planar and axisymmetric flows, including a dam breaking, oscillating and stationary bubbles and a conical liquid sheet in a pressure swirl atomizer.

  6. 1DFEMWATER: A one-dimensional finite element model of WATER flow through saturated-unsaturated media

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, G.T.

    1988-08-01

    This report presents the development and verification of a one- dimensional finite element model of water flow through saturated- unsaturated media. 1DFEMWATER is very flexible and capable of modeling a wide range of real-world problems. The model is designed to (1) treat heterogeneous media consisting of many geologic formations; (2) consider distributed and point sources/sinks that are spatially and temporally variable; (3) accept prescribed initial conditions or obtain them from steady state simulations; (4) deal with transient heads distributed over the Dirichlet boundary; (5) handle time-dependent fluxes caused by pressure gradient on the Neumann boundary; (6) treat time-dependent total fluxes (i.e., the sum of gravitational fluxes and pressure-gradient fluxes) on the Cauchy boundary; (7) automatically determine variable boundary conditions of evaporation, infiltration, or seepage on the soil-air interface; (8) provide two options for treating the mass matrix (consistent and lumping); (9) provide three alternatives for approximating the time derivative term (Crank-Nicolson central difference, backward difference, and mid-difference); (10) give three options (exact relaxation, underrelaxation, and overrelaxation) for estimating the nonlinear matrix; (11) automatically reset the time step size when boundary conditions or source/sinks change abruptly; and (12) check mass balance over the entire region for every time step. The model is verified with analytical solutions and other numerical models for three examples.

  7. A cut-cell finite volume - finite element coupling approach for fluid-structure interaction in compressible flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquariello, Vito; Hammerl, Georg; Örley, Felix; Hickel, Stefan; Danowski, Caroline; Popp, Alexander; Wall, Wolfgang A.; Adams, Nikolaus A.

    2016-02-01

    We present a loosely coupled approach for the solution of fluid-structure interaction problems between a compressible flow and a deformable structure. The method is based on staggered Dirichlet-Neumann partitioning. The interface motion in the Eulerian frame is accounted for by a conservative cut-cell Immersed Boundary method. The present approach enables sub-cell resolution by considering individual cut-elements within a single fluid cell, which guarantees an accurate representation of the time-varying solid interface. The cut-cell procedure inevitably leads to non-matching interfaces, demanding for a special treatment. A Mortar method is chosen in order to obtain a conservative and consistent load transfer. We validate our method by investigating two-dimensional test cases comprising a shock-loaded rigid cylinder and a deformable panel. Moreover, the aeroelastic instability of a thin plate structure is studied with a focus on the prediction of flutter onset. Finally, we propose a three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction test case of a flexible inflated thin shell interacting with a shock wave involving large and complex structural deformations.

  8. Constrained Adaptive Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, Mark A.; Massimino, Andrew K.; Needell, Deanna; Woolf, Tina

    2016-10-01

    Suppose that we wish to estimate a vector $\\mathbf{x} \\in \\mathbb{C}^n$ from a small number of noisy linear measurements of the form $\\mathbf{y} = \\mathbf{A x} + \\mathbf{z}$, where $\\mathbf{z}$ represents measurement noise. When the vector $\\mathbf{x}$ is sparse, meaning that it has only $s$ nonzeros with $s \\ll n$, one can obtain a significantly more accurate estimate of $\\mathbf{x}$ by adaptively selecting the rows of $\\mathbf{A}$ based on the previous measurements provided that the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is sufficiently large. In this paper we consider the case where we wish to realize the potential of adaptivity but where the rows of $\\mathbf{A}$ are subject to physical constraints. In particular, we examine the case where the rows of $\\mathbf{A}$ are constrained to belong to a finite set of allowable measurement vectors. We demonstrate both the limitations and advantages of adaptive sensing in this constrained setting. We prove that for certain measurement ensembles, the benefits offered by adaptive designs fall far short of the improvements that are possible in the unconstrained adaptive setting. On the other hand, we also provide both theoretical and empirical evidence that in some scenarios adaptivity does still result in substantial improvements even in the constrained setting. To illustrate these potential gains, we propose practical algorithms for constrained adaptive sensing by exploiting connections to the theory of optimal experimental design and show that these algorithms exhibit promising performance in some representative applications.

  9. Geochemical behaviors of rare earth elements in groundwater along a flow path in the North China Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haiyan; Guo, Huaming; Xing, Lina; Zhan, Yanhong; Li, Fulan; Shao, Jingli; Niu, Hong; Liang, Xing; Li, Changqing

    2016-03-01

    Rare earth element (REE) geochemistry is a useful tool in delineating hydrogeochemical processes and tracing solute transport, which can be used to reveal groundwater chemical evolution in the complexed groundwater systems of the North China Plain (NCP). Groundwaters and sediments were collected approximately along a flow path in shallow and deep aquifers of the NCP to investigate REE geochemistry as a function of distance from the recharge zone. Groundwater REE concentrations are relatively low, with ranges from 81.2 to 163.6 ng/L in shallow groundwaters, and from 65.2 to 133.7 ng/L in deep groundwaters. Speciation calculation suggests that dissolved REEs mainly occur as dicarbonato (Ln(CO3)2-) and carbonato (LnCO3+) complexes. Although along the flow path groundwater REE concentrations do not vary substantially, relatively lower HREEs are observed in central plain (Zone II) compared to recharge area (Zone I) and discharge plain (Zone III). Shale-normalized REE patterns are characterized by different degrees of enrichment in the HREEs, as indicated by the variation in average (Er/Nd)NASC value. The similar REE compositions and shale-normalized REE patterns of shallow and deep groundwaters demonstrate that interactions of groundwaters between shallow and deep aquifers possibly occur, which is likely due to the long-term groundwater over-exploration. Cerium anomalies (Ce/Ce∗ = CeNASC/(LaNASC × PrNASC)0.5) generally increase from Zone I, through Zone II, to Zone III, with trends from 0.79 to 3.58, and from 1.22 to 2.43 in shallow groundwaters and deep groundwaters, respectively. This is consistent with the variations in oxidation-reduction potential and redox sensitive components (i.e., dissolved Fe, Mn, NO3- and As concentrations) along the flow path. Positive Ce anomaly and redox indicators suggest that redox conditions progressively evolve from oxic to moderate anaerobic in the direction of groundwater flow. In the recharge zone (Zone I), groundwater low

  10. Constraining primordial magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, J. Richard; Lewis, Antony

    2012-08-01

    Primordial magnetic fields could provide an explanation for the galactic magnetic fields observed today; in which case, they may leave interesting signals in the CMB and the small-scale matter power spectrum. We discuss how to approximately calculate the important nonlinear magnetic effects within the guise of linear perturbation theory and calculate the matter and CMB power spectra including the Sunyaev-Zel’dovich contribution. We then use various cosmological data sets to constrain the form of the magnetic field power spectrum. Using solely large-scale CMB data (WMAP7, QUaD, and ACBAR) we find a 95% C.L. on the variance of the magnetic field at 1 Mpc of Bλ<6.4nG. When we include South Pole Telescope data to constrain the Sunyaev-Zel’dovich effect, we find a revised limit of Bλ<4.1nG. The addition of Sloan Digital Sky Survey Lyman-α data lowers this limit even further, roughly constraining the magnetic field to Bλ<1.3nG.

  11. Pattern recognition constrains mantle properties, past and present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkins, S.; Rozel, A. B.; Valentine, A. P.; Tackley, P.; Trampert, J.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding and modelling mantle convection requires knowledge of many mantle properties, such as viscosity, chemical structure and thermal proerties such as radiogenic heating rate. However, many of these parameters are only poorly constrained. We demonstrate a new method for inverting present day Earth observations for mantle properties. We use neural networks to represent the posterior probability density functions of many different mantle properties given the present structure of the mantle. We construct these probability density functions by sampling a wide range of possible mantle properties and running forward simulations, using the convection code StagYY. Our approach is particularly powerful because of its flexibility. Our samples are selected in the prior space, rather than being targeted towards a particular observation, as would normally be the case for probabilistic inversion. This means that the same suite of simulations can be used for inversions using a wide range of geophysical observations without the need to resample. Our method is probabilistic and non-linear and is therefore compatible with non-linear convection, avoiding some of the limitations associated with other methods for inverting mantle flow. This allows us to consider the entire history of the mantle. We also need relatively few samples for our inversion, making our approach computationally tractable when considering long periods of mantle history. Using the present thermal and density structure of the mantle, we can constrain rheological and compositional parameters such as viscosity and yield stress. We can also use the present day mantle structure to make inferences about the initial conditions for convection 4.5 Gyr ago. We can constrain initial mantle conditions including the initial concentration of heat producing elements in the mantle and the initial thickness of primordial material at the CMB. Currently we use density and temperature structure for our inversions, but we can

  12. Study of heat transfer in a 7-element bundle cooled with the upward flow of supercritical Freon-12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Graham

    Experimental data on SuperCritical-Water (SCW) cooled bundles are very limited. Major problems with performing such experiments are: 1) small number of operating SCW experimental setups and 2) difficulties in testing and experimental costs at very high pressures, temperatures and heat fluxes. However, SuperCritical Water-cooled nuclear Reactor (SCWRs) designs cannot be finalized without such data. Therefore, as a preliminary approach experiments in SCW-cooled bare tubes and in bundles cooled with SC modeling fluids can be used. One of the SC modeling fluids typically used is Freon- 12 (R-12) where the critical pressure is 4.136 MPa and the critical temperature is 111.97ºC. These conditions correspond to a critical pressure of 22.064 MPa and critical temperature of 373.95ºC in water. A set of experimental data obtained in a Freon-12 cooled vertical bare bundle at the Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE, Obninsk, Russia) was analyzed. This set consisted of 20 cases of a vertically oriented 7-element bundle installed in a hexagonal flow channel. To secure the bundle in the flow channel 3 thin spacers were used. The dataset was obtained at equivalent parameters of the proposed SCWR concepts. Data was collected at pressures of about 4.65 MPa for several different combinations of wall and bulk-fluid temperatures that were below, at, or above the pseudocritical temperature. Heat fluxes ranged from 9 kW/m2 to 120 kW/m2 and mass fluxes ranged from 440 kg/m2s to 1320 kg/m2s. Also inlet temperatures ranged from 70ºC -- 120ºC. The test section consisted of fuel elements that were 9.5 mm in diameter with the total heated length of 1 m. Bulk-fluid and wall temperature profiles were recorded using a combination of 8 different thermocouples. The data was analyzed with respect to its temperature profile and heat transfer coefficient along the heated length of the test section. In a previous study it was confirmed that there is the existence of three distinct

  13. Development of crop-specific transposable element (SINE) markers for studying gene flow from oilseed rape to wild radish.

    PubMed

    Prieto, J L; Pouilly, N; Jenczewski, E; Deragon, J M; Chèvre, A M

    2005-08-01

    The screening of wild populations for evidence of gene flow from a crop to a wild related species requires the unambiguous detection of crop genes within the genome of the wild species, taking into account the intraspecific variability of each species. If the crop and wild relatives share a common ancestor, as is the case for the Brassica crops and their wild relatives (subtribe Brassiceae), the species-specific markers needed to make this unambiguous detection are difficult to identify. In the model oilseed rape (Brassica napus, AACC, 2n = 38)-wild radish (Raphanus raphanistrum, RrRr, 2n = 18) system, we utilized the presence or absence of a short-interspersed element (SINE) at a given locus to develop oilseed rape-specific markers, as SINE insertions are irreversible. By means of sequence-specific amplified polymorphism (SINE-SSAP) reactions, we identified and cloned 67 bands specific to the oilseed rape genome and absent from that of wild radish. Forty-seven PCR-specific markers were developed from three combinations of primers anchored either in (1) the 5'- and 3'-genomic sequences flanking the SINE, (2) the 5'-flanking and SINE internal sequences or (3) the SINE internal and flanking 3'-sequences. Seventeen markers were monomorphic whatever the oilseed rape varieties tested, whereas 30 revealed polymorphism and behaved either as dominant (17) or co-dominant (13) markers. Polymorphic markers were mapped on 19 genomic regions assigned to ten linkage groups. The markers developed will be efficient tools to trace the occurrence and frequency of introgressions of oilseed rape genomic region within wild radish populations. PMID:15942756

  14. Directionally adaptive finite element method for multidimensional Euler and Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, Zhiqiang; Varghese, Philip L.

    1993-01-01

    A directionally adaptive finite element method for multidimensional compressible flows is presented. Quadrilateral and hexahedral elements are used because they have several advantages over triangular and tetrahedral elements. Unlike traditional methods that use quadrilateral/hexahedral elements, our method allows an element to be divided in each of the three directions in 3D and two directions in 2D. Some restrictions on mesh structure are found to be necessary, especially in 3D. The refining and coarsening procedures, and the treatment of constraints are given. A new implementation of upwind schemes in the constrained finite element system is presented. Some example problems, including a Mach 10 shock interaction with the walls of a 2D channel, a 2D viscous compression corner flow, and inviscid and viscous 3D flows in square channels, are also shown.

  15. Numerical modeling of two-phase fluid flow in deformable fractured porous media using the extended finite element method and an equivalent continuum model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoei, A. R.; Hosseini, N.; Mohammadnejad, T.

    2016-08-01

    In the present paper, a numerical model is developed based on a combination of the extended finite element method and an equivalent continuum model to simulate the two-phase fluid flow through fractured porous media containing fractures with multiple length scales. The governing equations involve the linear momentum balance equation and the flow continuity equation for each fluid phase. The extended finite element method allows for an explicit and accurate representation of cracks by enriching the standard finite element approximation of the field variables with appropriate enrichment functions, and captures the mass transfer between the fracture and the matrix. Due to the high computational cost of X-FEM, this technique is only used to model large fractures. The pre-existing short fractures, which are distributed randomly in the porous medium, contribute to the increase of the effective permeability tensor and are modeled with an equivalent continuum model. Finally, the robustness of the proposed computational model is demonstrated through several numerical examples, and the effects of crack orientation, capillary pressure function, solid skeleton deformation, and existence of short cracks on the pattern of fluid flow are investigated. It is shown that the developed model provides a correct prediction of flow pattern for different crack configurations.

  16. A Two-dimensional finite-element model study of backwater and flow distribution at the I-10 crossing of the Pearl River near Slidell, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, J.K.; Froelich, D.C.; Gilbert, J.J.; Wiche, G.J.

    1982-01-01

    A two-dimensional finite-element surface-water flow modeling system was used to study the effect of Interstate Highway 10 on water-surface elevations and flow distribution during the flood on the Pearl River on April 2, 1980, near Slidell, La. A finite-element network was designed to represent the topography and vegetative cover of the study reach. Hydrographic data collected for the 1980 flood were used to calibrate the flow model. The finite-element network was then modified to represent conditions prior to roadway construction, and the hydraulic impact of I-10 was determined by comparing ' before ' and ' after ' results. Upstream from the roadway, maximum backwater at the west edge of the flood plain (1.5 ft) is greater than maximum backwater at the east edge (1.1 ft). Backwater ranging from 0.6 to 0.2 ft. extends more than a mile downstream from the Pearl River bridge opening in I-10 at the east edge of the flood plain, and drawdown of 0.2 ft. or more occurs along approximately 2 miles of the west edge of the flood plain downstream from I-10. The capability of the modeling system to simulate the significant features of steady-state flow in a complicated multi-channel river-flood-plain system with variable topography and vegetative was successfully demonstrated in this study. (USGS)

  17. A Coupled Sharp-Interface Immersed-Boundary-Finite-Element Method for Flow-Structure Interaction with Application to Human Phonation

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, X.; Xue, Qian; Mittal, R.; Bielamowicz, S.

    2010-01-01

    A new flow-structure interaction method is presented which couples a sharp-interface immersed boundary method (IBM) flow solver with a finite element method (FEM) based solid dynamics solver. The coupled method provides robust and high fidelity solution for complex fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problems, such as those involving three-dimensional flow and viscoelastic solids. The FSI solver is used to simulate flow-induced vibrations of the vocal folds during phonation. Both two- and three-dimensional models have been examined and qualitative as well as quantitative comparisons made with established results in order to validate the solver. The solver is use to study the onset of phonation in a two-dimensional laryngeal model and the dynamics of the glottal jet in a three-dimensional model and results from these studies are also presented. PMID:21034144

  18. The Achievement Flow Motive as an Element of the Autotelic Personality: Predicting Educational Attainment in Three Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busch, Holger; Hofer, Jan; Chasiotis, Athanasios; Campos, Domingo

    2013-01-01

    Human behavior is directed by an implicit and an explicit motivational system. The intrinsic form of the implicit achievement motive has been demonstrated to predict the experience of flow. Thus, this achievement flow motive can be considered an integral component of the autotelic personality, posited in Flow Theory as dispositional difference in…

  19. Numerical analysis of laminar and turbulent incompressible flows using the finite element Fluid Dynamics Analysis Package (FIDAP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Jeong L.

    1988-08-01

    The purpose of the study is the evaluation of the numerical accuracy of FIDAP (Fluid Dynamics Analysis Package). Accordingly, four test problems in laminar and turbulent incompressible flows are selected and the computational results of these problems compared with other numerical solutions and/or experimental data. These problems include: (1) 2-D laminar flow inside a wall-driven cavity; (2) 2-D laminar flow over a backward-facing step; (3) 2-D turbulent flow over a backward-facing step; and (4) 2-D turbulent flow through a turn-around duct.

  20. A finite element method for transmission in non-uniform ducts without flow Comparison with the method of weighted residuals. [sound transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Astley, R. J.; Eversman, W.

    1978-01-01

    A finite element method is derived for studying the transmission of sound in nonuniform ducts without flow. The method is based on a weighted residuals technique and eight noded isoparametric elements. The method employs two computational schemes: the Helmholtz equation found through conservation equations, and the conservation equations themselves. Solutions are found for transmission and reflection coefficients for both two-dimensional and circular geometries. Numerical solutions are compared with those for a method of weighted residuals in the form of a modified Galerkin method, showing good agreement.

  1. Constrained space camera assembly

    DOEpatents

    Heckendorn, Frank M.; Anderson, Erin K.; Robinson, Casandra W.; Haynes, Harriet B.

    1999-01-01

    A constrained space camera assembly which is intended to be lowered through a hole into a tank, a borehole or another cavity. The assembly includes a generally cylindrical chamber comprising a head and a body and a wiring-carrying conduit extending from the chamber. Means are included in the chamber for rotating the body about the head without breaking an airtight seal formed therebetween. The assembly may be pressurized and accompanied with a pressure sensing means for sensing if a breach has occurred in the assembly. In one embodiment, two cameras, separated from their respective lenses, are installed on a mounting apparatus disposed in the chamber. The mounting apparatus includes means allowing both longitudinal and lateral movement of the cameras. Moving the cameras longitudinally focuses the cameras, and moving the cameras laterally away from one another effectively converges the cameras so that close objects can be viewed. The assembly further includes means for moving lenses of different magnification forward of the cameras.

  2. Object-oriented Implementation of the Galerkin Finite Element Method and Its Application to the Numerical Study of Natural Convective Flows in Enclosures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Rafael; Ramaswamy, Balasubramaniam

    2003-01-01

    Using object-oriented programming (OOP) techniques and philosophies, a collection of C++ tools for the rapid development of finite element applications has been created. The object-oriented finite element analysis (OOFEA) toolkit provides both the geometrical and mathematical management tools necessary for this task in the form of useful class hierarchies. In particular, the OOFEA toolkit features methods for evaluating arbitrary weak forms provided by the user in order to solve particular problems of interest. A description of the underlying concepts, philosophies and techniques used to develop the toolkit are included. A strong effort has been made to concentrate on its possibly beneficial usage in the computational fluid dynamics area. In order to demonstrate the toolkit capabilities of managing complex projects, a simulator for laminar and turbulent natural convective flows in enclosures has been developed and a numerical study of some of these flows has been conducted.

  3. Analysis on flow field of the valveless piezoelectric pump with two inlets and one outlet and a rotating unsymmetrical slopes element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Qixiao; Zhang, Jianhui; Lei, Hong; Cheng, Wei

    2012-05-01

    Typically, liquid pump and liquids mixer are two separate devices. The invention of piezoelectric pump makes it possible to integrate the two devices. Hower, the existing piezoelectric mixing-pumps are larger because the need the space outside the chamber, and another shortcome of them is that they cannot adjust the mixing ratio of two liquids. In this paper, a new piezoelectric pump being capable of integrating mixer and pump is presented, based on the theory of the piezoelectric pump with the unsymmetrical slopes element (USE). Besides the features of two inlets and one outlet, the piezoelectric pump has a rotatable unsymmetrical slopes element(RUSE). When the pump works, two fluids flow into the inlet channels respectively. Then the RUSE controls the ratio of the two flows by adjusting the flow resistances of the two inlet channels. The fluids form a net flow due to the USE principle, while they are mixed into a homogeneous solution due to strong turbulence flow field and complex vortices generated by RUSE in the chamber. And then the solution flows through the outlet. Firstly, the theoretical analysis on this pump is performed. Meanwhile, the flow field in the chamber is calculated and simulated. And then, the relationship between the flows of the two channels and the rotating angle of the RUSE is set up and analyzed. Finally, experiment with the proposed pump is carried out to verify the numerical results. A RUSE with 20° slope angle is used in the experiment. Four sets of data are tested with the RUSE at the rotating angles of 0°, 6°, 11°, and 16°, respectively, corresponding to the numerical models. The experimental results show that the empirical data and the theoretical data share the same trend. The maximum error between the theoretical flow and the experimental flow is 11.14%, and the maximum error between the theoretical flow ratio of the two inlets and the experimental one is 2.5%. The experiment verified the theoretical analysis. The proposed

  4. Constrained orbital intercept-evasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatezalo, Aleksandar; Stipanovic, Dusan M.; Mehra, Raman K.; Pham, Khanh

    2014-06-01

    An effective characterization of intercept-evasion confrontations in various space environments and a derivation of corresponding solutions considering a variety of real-world constraints are daunting theoretical and practical challenges. Current and future space-based platforms have to simultaneously operate as components of satellite formations and/or systems and at the same time, have a capability to evade potential collisions with other maneuver constrained space objects. In this article, we formulate and numerically approximate solutions of a Low Earth Orbit (LEO) intercept-maneuver problem in terms of game-theoretic capture-evasion guaranteed strategies. The space intercept-evasion approach is based on Liapunov methodology that has been successfully implemented in a number of air and ground based multi-player multi-goal game/control applications. The corresponding numerical algorithms are derived using computationally efficient and orbital propagator independent methods that are previously developed for Space Situational Awareness (SSA). This game theoretical but at the same time robust and practical approach is demonstrated on a realistic LEO scenario using existing Two Line Element (TLE) sets and Simplified General Perturbation-4 (SGP-4) propagator.

  5. The method of space-time conservation element and solution element-applications to one-dimensional and two-dimensional time-marching flow problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Sin-Chung; Wang, Xiao-Yen; Chow, Chuen-Yen

    1995-01-01

    A nontraditional numerical method for solving conservation laws is being developed. The new method is designed from a physicist's perspective, i.e., its development is based more on physics than numerics. Even though it uses only the simplest approximation techniques, a 2D time-marching Euler solver developed recently using the new method is capable of generating nearly perfect solutions for a 2D shock reflection problem used by Helen Yee and others. Moreover, a recent application of this solver to computational aeroacoustics (CAA) problems reveals that: (1) accuracy of its results is comparable to that of a 6th order compact difference scheme even though nominally the current solver is only of 2nd-order accuracy; (2) generally, the non-reflecting boundary condition can be implemented in a simple way without involving characteristic variables; and (3) most importantly, the current solver is capable of handling both continuous and discontinuous flows very well and thus provides a unique numerical tool for solving those flow problems where the interactions between sound waves and shocks are important, such as the noise field around a supersonic over- or under-expansion jet.

  6. On the development of a three-dimensional finite-element groundwater flow model of the saturated zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Czarnecki, J.B.; Faunt, C.C.; Gable, C.W.; Zyvoloski, G.A.

    1996-12-31

    Development of a preliminary three-dimensional model of the saturated zone at Yucca Mountain, the potential location for a high-level nuclear waste repository, is presented. The development of the model advances the technology of interfacing: (1)complex three-dimensional hydrogeologic framework modeling; (2) fully three-dimensional, unstructured, finite-element mesh generation; and (3) groundwater flow, heat, and transport simulation. The three-dimensional hydrogeologic framework model is developed using maps, cross sections, and well data. The framework model data are used to feed an automated mesh generator, designed to discretize irregular three-dimensional solids,a nd to assign materials properties from the hydrogeologic framework model to the tetrahedral elements. The mesh generator facilitated the addition of nodes to the finite-element mesh which correspond to the exact three-dimensional position of the potentiometric surface based on water-levels from wells. A ground water flow and heat simulator is run with the resulting finite- element mesh, within a parameter-estimation program. The application of the parameter-estimation program is designed to provide optimal values of permeability and specified fluxes over the model domain to minimize the residual between observed and simulated water levels.

  7. Comparison of turbulence models for stage-discharge rating curve prediction in reach-scale compound channel flows using two-dimensional finite element methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, C. A. M. E.; Bates, P. D.; Hervouet, J.-M.

    2002-02-01

    This paper attempts to assess the accuracy of constant eddy viscosity, Elder and k- ɛ turbulence models in the numerical simulation of reach-scale compound channel flows using two-dimensional (2D) finite element methods. Assessment was conducted using benchmark stage-discharge data collected from straight and meandering compound channel configurations at the UK Engineering and Physical Science Research Council (EPSRC) Flood Channel Facility. For mesh resolutions and topologies used in reach-scale studies, all models were found to be adequate predictors (<5% error in predicted flow depth) of the stage-discharge relationship at moderate overbank flows ( Figs. 1 and 2) . However, at inbank and low overbank flows the Elder and k- ɛ turbulence models can reproduce stage-discharge points with much greater accuracy than the constant eddy viscosity model. Hence, for an unsteady simulation where low flows are relevant a constant eddy viscosity turbulence closure may prove problematic. In terms of computed lateral distributions of depth-averaged velocity for both channel configurations, at higher depths (Relative depth=0.666) all turbulence models predict the velocity with greater accuracy than at a lower depth (Relative depth=0.333). At this latter depth, all turbulence models predict the depth-averaged longitudinal velocity distribution with poor accuracy (>20% error). Also, sensitivity of the turbulence parameter calibration with respect to the predicted flow depth showed that the constant eddy viscosity model's performance can be highly dependent on the choice of turbulence parameter value.

  8. Constraining the braneworld with gravitational wave observations.

    PubMed

    McWilliams, Sean T

    2010-04-01

    Some braneworld models may have observable consequences that, if detected, would validate a requisite element of string theory. In the infinite Randall-Sundrum model (RS2), the AdS radius of curvature, l, of the extra dimension supports a single bound state of the massless graviton on the brane, thereby reproducing Newtonian gravity in the weak-field limit. However, using the AdS/CFT correspondence, it has been suggested that one possible consequence of RS2 is an enormous increase in Hawking radiation emitted by black holes. We utilize this possibility to derive two novel methods for constraining l via gravitational wave measurements. We show that the EMRI event rate detected by LISA can constrain l at the approximately 1 microm level for optimal cases, while the observation of a single galactic black hole binary with LISA results in an optimal constraint of l < or = 5 microm. PMID:20481929

  9. Constraining anisotropic baryon oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanabhan, Nikhil; White, Martin

    2008-06-01

    We present an analysis of anisotropic baryon acoustic oscillations and elucidate how a mis-estimation of the cosmology, which leads to incorrect values of the angular diameter distance, dA, and Hubble parameter, H, manifest themselves in changes to the monopole and quadrupole power spectrum of biased tracers of the density field. Previous work has focused on the monopole power spectrum, and shown that the isotropic dilation combination dA2H-1 is robustly constrained by an overall shift in the scale of the baryon feature. We extend this by demonstrating that the quadrupole power spectrum is sensitive to an anisotropic warping mode dAH, allowing one to break the degeneracy between dA and H. We describe a method for measuring this warping, explicitly marginalizing over the form of redshift-space distortions. We verify this method on N-body simulations and estimate that dAH can be measured with a fractional accuracy of ˜(3/V)% where the survey volume is estimated in h-3Gpc3.

  10. Constrained space camera assembly

    DOEpatents

    Heckendorn, F.M.; Anderson, E.K.; Robinson, C.W.; Haynes, H.B.

    1999-05-11

    A constrained space camera assembly which is intended to be lowered through a hole into a tank, a borehole or another cavity is disclosed. The assembly includes a generally cylindrical chamber comprising a head and a body and a wiring-carrying conduit extending from the chamber. Means are included in the chamber for rotating the body about the head without breaking an airtight seal formed therebetween. The assembly may be pressurized and accompanied with a pressure sensing means for sensing if a breach has occurred in the assembly. In one embodiment, two cameras, separated from their respective lenses, are installed on a mounting apparatus disposed in the chamber. The mounting apparatus includes means allowing both longitudinal and lateral movement of the cameras. Moving the cameras longitudinally focuses the cameras, and moving the cameras laterally away from one another effectively converges the cameras so that close objects can be viewed. The assembly further includes means for moving lenses of different magnification forward of the cameras. 17 figs.

  11. Continuous-flow leaching in a rotating coiled column for studies on the mobility of toxic elements in dust samples collected near a metallurgic plant.

    PubMed

    Fedotov, Petr S; Ermolin, Mikhail S; Ivaneev, Alexandr I; Fedyunina, Natalia N; Karandashev, Vasily K; Tatsy, Yury G

    2016-03-01

    Continuous-flow (dynamic) leaching in a rotating coiled column has been applied to studies on the mobility of Zn, Cd, Cu, Pb, Ni, Sb, As, S, and other potentially toxic elements in atmospherically deposited dust samples collected near a large copper smelter (Chelyabinsk region, Russia). Water and simulated "acid rain" (pH 4) were used as eluents. The technique enables not only the fast and efficient leaching of elements but as well time-resolved studies on the mobilization of heavy metals, sulphur, and arsenic in environmentally relevant forms to be made. It is shown that up to 1.5, 4.1, 1.9, 11.1, and 46.1% of Pb, As, Cu, Zn, and S, correspondingly, can be easily mobilized by water. Taking into consideration that the total concentrations of these elements in the samples under investigation are surprisingly high and vary in the range from 2.7 g/kg (for arsenic) to 15.5 g/kg (for sulphur), the environmental impact of the dust may be dramatic. The simulated acid rain results in somewhat higher recoveries of elements, except Cu and Pb. The proposed approach and the data obtained can very useful for the risk assessment related to the mobility of potentially toxic elements and their inclusion in the biogeochemical cycle.

  12. Continuous-flow leaching in a rotating coiled column for studies on the mobility of toxic elements in dust samples collected near a metallurgic plant.

    PubMed

    Fedotov, Petr S; Ermolin, Mikhail S; Ivaneev, Alexandr I; Fedyunina, Natalia N; Karandashev, Vasily K; Tatsy, Yury G

    2016-03-01

    Continuous-flow (dynamic) leaching in a rotating coiled column has been applied to studies on the mobility of Zn, Cd, Cu, Pb, Ni, Sb, As, S, and other potentially toxic elements in atmospherically deposited dust samples collected near a large copper smelter (Chelyabinsk region, Russia). Water and simulated "acid rain" (pH 4) were used as eluents. The technique enables not only the fast and efficient leaching of elements but as well time-resolved studies on the mobilization of heavy metals, sulphur, and arsenic in environmentally relevant forms to be made. It is shown that up to 1.5, 4.1, 1.9, 11.1, and 46.1% of Pb, As, Cu, Zn, and S, correspondingly, can be easily mobilized by water. Taking into consideration that the total concentrations of these elements in the samples under investigation are surprisingly high and vary in the range from 2.7 g/kg (for arsenic) to 15.5 g/kg (for sulphur), the environmental impact of the dust may be dramatic. The simulated acid rain results in somewhat higher recoveries of elements, except Cu and Pb. The proposed approach and the data obtained can very useful for the risk assessment related to the mobility of potentially toxic elements and their inclusion in the biogeochemical cycle. PMID:26741541

  13. Power-constrained supercomputing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Peter E.

    As we approach exascale systems, power is turning from an optimization goal to a critical operating constraint. With power bounds imposed by both stakeholders and the limitations of existing infrastructure, achieving practical exascale computing will therefore rely on optimizing performance subject to a power constraint. However, this requirement should not add to the burden of application developers; optimizing the runtime environment given restricted power will primarily be the job of high-performance system software. In this dissertation, we explore this area and develop new techniques that extract maximum performance subject to a particular power constraint. These techniques include a method to find theoretical optimal performance, a runtime system that shifts power in real time to improve performance, and a node-level prediction model for selecting power-efficient operating points. We use a linear programming (LP) formulation to optimize application schedules under various power constraints, where a schedule consists of a DVFS state and number of OpenMP threads for each section of computation between consecutive message passing events. We also provide a more flexible mixed integer-linear (ILP) formulation and show that the resulting schedules closely match schedules from the LP formulation. Across four applications, we use our LP-derived upper bounds to show that current approaches trail optimal, power-constrained performance by up to 41%. This demonstrates limitations of current systems, and our LP formulation provides future optimization approaches with a quantitative optimization target. We also introduce Conductor, a run-time system that intelligently distributes available power to nodes and cores to improve performance. The key techniques used are configuration space exploration and adaptive power balancing. Configuration exploration dynamically selects the optimal thread concurrency level and DVFS state subject to a hardware-enforced power bound

  14. Composite time-lapse computed tomography and micro finite element simulations: A new imaging approach for characterizing cement flows and mechanical benefits of vertebroplasty.

    PubMed

    Stadelmann, Vincent A; Zderic, Ivan; Baur, Annick; Unholz, Cynthia; Eberli, Ursula; Gueorguiev, Boyko

    2016-02-01

    Vertebroplasty has been shown to reinforce weak vertebral bodies and reduce fracture risks, yet cement leakage is a major problem that can cause severe complications. Since cement flow is nearly impossible to control during surgery, small volumes of cement are injected, but then mechanical benefits might be limited. A better understanding of cement flows within bone structure is required to further optimize vertebroplasty and bone augmentation in general. We developed a novel imaging method, composite time-lapse CT, to characterize cement flow during injection. In brief, composite-resolution time-lapse CT exploits the qualities of microCT and clinical CT. The method consists in overlaying low-resolution time-lapse CT scans acquired during injection onto pre-operative high-resolution microCT scans, generating composite-resolution time-lapse CT series of cement flow within bone. In this in vitro study, composite-resolution time-lapse CT was applied to eight intact and five artificially fractured cadaveric vertebrae during vertebroplasty. The time-lapse scans were acquired at one-milliliter cement injection steps until a total of 10 ml cement was injected. The composite-resolution series were then converted into micro finite element models to compute strains distribution under virtual axial loading. Relocation of strain energy density within bone structure was observed throughout the progression of the procedure. Interestingly, the normalized effect of cement injection on the overall stiffness of the vertebrae was similar between intact and fractured specimens, although at different orders of magnitude. In conclusion, composite time-lapse CT can picture cement flows during bone augmentation. The composite images can also be easily converted into finite element models to compute virtual strain distributions under loading at every step of an injection, providing deeper understanding on the biomechanics of vertebroplasty.

  15. Acoustic transmission in non-uniform ducts with mean flow. I - The method of weighted residuals. II - The finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eversman, W.; Astley, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The problem of acoustic transmission through nonuniform ducts containing a high-speed subsonic flow is studied by means of the method of weighted residuals in the form of a modified Galerkin method and a Galerkin formulation of the finite element method. The method of weighted residuals is shown to employ the basis functions generated from eigenvalue calculations for the case of no flow, and is verified by comparison with exact eigenvalue calculations in the uniform duct case and numerical solutions of the one-dimensional form of the equations in the nonuniform duct case. The finite element scheme based on both the Galerkin method and the residual least squares method and employing eight-noded isoparametric elements is presented and used to investigate multimodal propagation by the coupling of the solution in the duct nonuniform section to modal expansions in uniform sections. Comparison of the results of the two methods reveals them to be in substantial agreement, and predicts the importance of multimodal interactions at high Mach numbers.

  16. On the use of the stabilised Q1P0 element for geodynamical simulations and why this is a bad choice for buyoancy-driven flows.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thieulot, Cedric

    2016-04-01

    Many Finite Element geodynamical codes (Fullsack,1995; Zhong et al., 2000; Thieulot, 2011) are based on bi/tri­-linear velocity constant pressure element (commonly called Q1P0), because of its ease of programming and rather low memory footprint, despite the presence of (pressure) checker­board modes. However, it is long known that the Q1P0 is not inf­-sup stable and does not lend itself to the use of iterative solvers, which makes it a less­ than­ ideal candidate for high resolution 3D models. Other attempts were made more recently (Burstedde et al., 2013; Le Pourhiet et al., 2012) with the use of the stabilised Q1Q1 element (bi/tri­-linear velocity and pressure). This element, while also attractive from an implementation and memory standpoint, suffers a major drawback due to the artificial compressibility introduced by the polynomial projection stabilization. These observations have shifted part of the community towards the Finite Difference Method while the remaining part is now embracing inf­sup stable second­ order elements [May et al., 2015; Kronbichler,2012). Rather surprinsingly, a third option exists when it comes to first ­order elements in the form of the stabilised Q1P0 element, but virtually no literature exists concerning its use for geodynamical applications. I will then recall the specificity of the stabilisation and will carry out a series of benchmark experiments and geodynamical tests to assess its performance. While being shown to work as expected in benchmark experiments, the stabilised Q1P0 element turns out to introduce first-order numerical artefacts in the velocity and pressure solutions in the case of buoyancy-driven flows. Burstedde, C., Stadler, G., Alisic, L., Wilcox, L. C., Tan, E., Gurnis, M., & Ghattas, O. (2013). Large­scale adaptive mantle convection simulation. Geophysical Journal International, 192(3), 889­906. Fullsack, P. (1995). An arbitrary Lagrangian­Eulerian formulation for creeping flows and its application in

  17. Metasomatism and current state of the lithospheric mantle beneath the Nógrád-Gömör Volcanic Field constrained by trace element modelling and magnetotelluric survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klébesz, Rita; Patkó, Levente; Novák, Attila; Wesztergom, Viktor; Szabó, Csaba

    2016-04-01

    The Nógrád-Gömör Volcanic Field (NGVF) is one of the five mantle xenolith bearing alkali basalt locations in the Carpathian-Pannonian Region, where Plio-Pleistocene alkali basalt brought to the surface lherzolite and wehrlite xenoliths. Petrographic and geochemical signature (i.e. newly formed clinopyroxene and olivine grains, Ti, Al, Fe, Mn and LRRE enrichment in rock-forming minerals) of the wehrlite xenoliths suggest that a portion of the upper mantle was transformed to wehrlite beneath the NGVF by upward migrating mafic melt agents. Based on trace element modelling, we argue that the metasomatic agent had an OIB-like trace element composition, similar to the host alkali basalts. In order to study the current state of the lithospheric mantle and to test whether the spatial distribution of the metasomatism can be imaged, magnetotelluric (MT) survey was carried out. Long period MT data were collected at 14 locations along a ~50 km long NNW-SSE profile in the NGVF. The lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary was detected at 70-90 km of depth. A low resistivity anomaly (~5-10 Ωm) was observed at 30-45 km in depth below the central part of the NNW-SSE profile, indicating the presence of a conductive body barely below the Moho. We suggest that the low resistivity body is related to the presence of residual, connected melt and/or the conductivity differences between the lherzolitic and wehrlitic mantle domain due to different chemical composition and ratio of the rock-forming minerals.

  18. Establishment of a finite element model for extracting chemical reaction kinetics in a micro-flow injection system with high throughput sampling.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zeng-Qiang; Du, Wen-Bin; Li, Jin-Yi; Xia, Xing-Hua; Fang, Qun

    2015-08-01

    Numerical simulation can provide valuable insights for complex microfluidic phenomena coupling mixing and diffusion processes. Herein, a novel finite element model (FEM) has been established to extract chemical reaction kinetics in a microfluidic flow injection analysis (micro-FIA) system using high throughput sample introduction. To reduce the computation burden, the finite element mesh generation is performed with different scales based on the different geometric sizes of micro-FIA. In order to study the contribution of chemical reaction kinetics under non-equilibrium condition, a pseudo-first-order chemical kinetics equation is adopted in the numerical simulations. The effect of reactants diffusion on reaction products is evaluated, and the results demonstrate that the Taylor dispersion plays a determining role in the micro-FIA system. In addition, the effects of flow velocity and injection volume on the reaction product are also simulated. The simulated results agree well with the ones from experiments. Although gravity driven flow is used to the numerical model in the present study, the FEM model also can be applied into the systems with other driving forces such as pressure. Therefore, the established FEM model will facilitate the understanding of reaction mechanism in micro-FIA systems and help us to optimize the manifold of micro-FIA systems.

  19. A Very Large Eddy Simulation of the Nonreacting Flow in a Single-Element Lean Direct Injection Combustor Using PRNS with a Nonlinear Subscale Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2009-01-01

    Very large eddy simulation (VLES) of the nonreacting turbulent flow in a single-element lean direct injection (LDI) combustor has been successfully performed via the approach known as the partially resolved numerical simulation (PRNS/VLES) using a nonlinear subscale model. The grid is the same as the one used in a previous RANS simulation, which was considered as too coarse for a traditional LES simulation. In this study, we first carry out a steady RANS simulation to provide the initial flow field for the subsequent PRNS/VLES simulation. We have also carried out an unsteady RANS (URANS) simulation for the purpose of comparing its results with that of the PRNS/VLES simulation. In addition, these calculated results are compared with the experimental data. The present effort has demonstrated that the PRNS/VLES approach, while using a RANS type of grid, is able to reveal the dynamically important, unsteady large-scale turbulent structures occurring in the flow field of a single-element LDI combustor. The interactions of these coherent structures play a critical role in the dispersion of the fuel, hence, the mixing between the fuel and the oxidizer in a combustor.

  20. Trace elements in recent groundwater of an artesian flow system and comparison with snow: enrichments, depletions, and chemical evolution of the water.

    PubMed

    Shotyk, William; Krachler, Michael; Aeschbach-Hertig, Werner; Hillier, Stephen; Zheng, Jiancheng James

    2010-01-01

    Snow samples collected from hand-dug pits at two sites in Simcoe County, Ontario, Canada were analysed for major and trace elements using the clean lab methods established for polar ice. Potentially toxic, chalcophile elements are highly enriched in snow, relative to their natural abundance in crustal rocks, with enrichment factor (EF) values (calculated using Sc) in the range 107 to 1081 for Ag, As, Bi, Cd, Cu, Mo, Pb, Sb, Te, and Zn. Relative to M/Sc ratios in snow, water samples collected at two artesian flows in this area are significantly depleted in Ag, Al, Be, Bi, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Sb, Tl, V, and Zn at both sites, and in Co, Th and Tl at one of the sites. The removal from the waters of these elements is presumably due to such processes as physical retention (filtration) of metal-bearing atmospheric aerosols by organic and mineral soil components as well as adsorption and surface complexation of ionic species onto organic, metal oxyhydroxide and clay mineral surfaces. In the case of Pb, the removal processes are so effective that apparently "natural" ratios of Pb to Sc are found in the groundwaters. Tritium measurements show that the groundwater at one of the sites is modern (ie not more than 30 years old) meaning that the inputs of Pb and other trace elements to the groundwaters may originally have been much higher than they are today; the M/Sc ratios measured in the groundwaters today, therefore, represent a conservative estimate of the extent of metal removal along the flow path.Lithogenic elements significantly enriched in the groundwaters at both sites include Ba, Ca, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, Rb, S, Si, Sr, and Ti. The abundance of these elements can largely be explained in terms of weathering of the dominant silicate (plagioclase, potassium feldspar, amphibole and biotite) and carbonate minerals (calcite, dolomite and ankerite) in the soils and sediments of the watershed. Arsenic, Mo, Te, and especially U are also highly enriched in the groundwaters, due to

  1. Effects of human-induced alteration of groundwater flow on concentrations of naturally-occurring trace elements at water-supply wells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ayotte, J.D.; Szabo, Z.; Focazio, M.J.; Eberts, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of human-induced alteration of groundwater flow patterns on concentrations of naturally-occurring trace elements were examined in five hydrologically distinct aquifer systems in the USA. Although naturally occurring, these trace elements can exceed concentrations that are considered harmful to human health. The results show that pumping-induced hydraulic gradient changes and artificial connection of aquifers by well screens can mix chemically distinct groundwater. Chemical reactions between these mixed groundwaters and solid aquifer materials can result in the mobilization of trace elements such as U, As and Ra, with subsequent transport to water-supply wells. For example, in the High Plains aquifer near York, Nebraska, mixing of shallow, oxygenated, lower-pH water from an unconfined aquifer with deeper, confined, anoxic, higher-pH water is facilitated by wells screened across both aquifers. The resulting higher-O2, lower-pH mixed groundwater facilitated the mobilization of U from solid aquifer materials, and dissolved U concentrations were observed to increase significantly in nearby supply wells. Similar instances of trace element mobilization due to human-induced mixing of groundwaters were documented in: (1) the Floridan aquifer system near Tampa, Florida (As and U), (2) Paleozoic sedimentary aquifers in eastern Wisconsin (As), (3) the basin-fill aquifer underlying the California Central Valley near Modesto (U), and (4) Coastal Plain aquifers of New Jersey (Ra). Adverse water-quality impacts attributed to human activities are commonly assumed to be related solely to the release of the various anthropogenic contaminants to the environment. The results show that human activities including various land uses, well drilling, and pumping rates and volumes can adversely impact the quality of water in supply wells, when associated with naturally-occurring trace elements in aquifer materials. This occurs by causing subtle but significant changes in

  2. A stabilized mixed finite element method for shear-rate dependent non-Newtonian fluids: 3D benchmark problems and application to blood flow in bifurcating arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwack, JaeHyuk; Masud, Arif

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents a stabilized mixed finite element method for shear-rate dependent fluids. The nonlinear viscosity field is a function of the shear-rate and varies uniformly in space and in time. The stabilized form is developed via application of Variational Multiscale (VMS) framework to the underlying generalized Navier-Stokes equation. Linear and quadratic tetrahedral and hexahedral elements are employed with equal-order interpolations for the velocity and pressure fields. A variety of benchmark problems are solved to assess the stability and accuracy properties of the resulting method. The method is then applied to non-Newtonian shear-rate dependent flows in bifurcating artery geometry, and significant non-Newtonian fluid effects are observed. A comparative study of the proposed method shows that the additional computational costs due to the nonlinear shear-rate dependent viscosity are only ten percent more than the computational cost for a Newtonian model.

  3. Determination of elemental constituents in different matrix materials and flow injection studies by the electrolyte cathode glow discharge technique with a new design

    SciTech Connect

    Shekhar, R.; Karunasagar, D.; Ranjit, M.; Arunachalam, J.

    2009-10-15

    An open-to-air type electrolyte cathode discharge (ELCAD) has been developed with a new design. The present configuration leads to a stable plasma even at low flow rates (0.96 mL/min). Plasma fluctuations arising from the variations in the gap between solid anode and liquid cathode were eliminated by providing a V-groove to the liquid glass-capillary. Cathode (ground) connection is given to the solution at the V-groove itself. Interfaced to atomic emission spectrometry (AES), its analytical performance is evaluated. The optimized molarity of the solution is 0.2 M. The analytical response curves for Ca, Cu, Cd, Pb, Hg, Fe, and Zn demonstrated good linearity. The limit of detections of Ca, Cu, Cd, Pb, Hg, Fe, and Zn are determined to be 17, 11, 5, 45, 15, 28, and 3 ng mL{sup -1}. At an integration time of 0.3 s, the relative standard deviation (RSD) values of the acid blank solutions are found to be less than 10% for the elements Ca, Cu, Cd, Hg, Fe, and Zn and 18% for Pb. The method is applied for the determination of the elemental constituents in different matrix materials such as tuna fish (IAEA-350), oyster tissue (NIST SRM 1566a), and coal fly ash (CFA SRM 1633b). The obtained results are in good agreement with the certified values. The accuracy is found to be between 7% and 0.6% for major to trace levels of constituent elements and the precision between 11% and 0.6%. For the injection of 100 {mu} L of 200 ng mL{sup -1} mercury solution at the flow rate of 0.8 mL/min, the flow injection studies resulted in the relative standard deviation (RSD) of 8%, concentration detection limit of 10 ng/mL, and mass detection limit of 1 ng for mercury.

  4. Determination of elemental constituents in different matrix materials and flow injection studies by the electrolyte cathode glow discharge technique with a new design.

    PubMed

    Shekhar, R; Karunasagar, D; Ranjit, Manjusha; Arunachalam, J

    2009-10-01

    An open-to-air type electrolyte cathode discharge (ELCAD) has been developed with a new design. The present configuration leads to a stable plasma even at low flow rates (0.96 mL/min). Plasma fluctuations arising from the variations in the gap between solid anode and liquid cathode were eliminated by providing a V-groove to the liquid glass-capillary. Cathode (ground) connection is given to the solution at the V-groove itself. Interfaced to atomic emission spectrometry (AES), its analytical performance is evaluated. The optimized molarity of the solution is 0.2 M. The analytical response curves for Ca, Cu, Cd, Pb, Hg, Fe, and Zn demonstrated good linearity. The limit of detections of Ca, Cu, Cd, Pb, Hg, Fe, and Zn are determined to be 17, 11, 5, 45, 15, 28, and 3 ng mL(-1). At an integration time of 0.3 s, the relative standard deviation (RSD) values of the acid blank solutions are found to be less than 10% for the elements Ca, Cu, Cd, Hg, Fe, and Zn and 18% for Pb. The method is applied for the determination of the elemental constituents in different matrix materials such as tuna fish (IAEA-350), oyster tissue (NIST SRM 1566a), and coal fly ash (CFA SRM 1633b). The obtained results are in good agreement with the certified values. The accuracy is found to be between 7% and 0.6% for major to trace levels of constituent elements and the precision between 11% and 0.6%. For the injection of 100 microL of 200 ng mL(-1) mercury solution at the flow rate of 0.8 mL/min, the flow injection studies resulted in the relative standard deviation (RSD) of 8%, concentration detection limit of 10 ng/mL, and mass detection limit of 1 ng for mercury. PMID:19715301

  5. The transport behaviour of elemental mercury DNAPL in saturated porous media: analysis of field observations and two-phase flow modelling.

    PubMed

    Sweijen, Thomas; Hartog, Niels; Marsman, Annemieke; Keijzer, Thomas J S

    2014-06-01

    Mercury is a contaminant of global concern. The use of elemental mercury in various (former) industrial processes, such as chlorine production at chlor-alkali plants, is known to have resulted in soil and groundwater contaminations worldwide. However, the subsurface transport behaviour of elemental mercury as an immiscible dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) in porous media has received minimal attention to date. Even though, such insight would aid in the remediation effort of mercury contaminated sites. Therefore, in this study a detailed field characterization of elemental mercury DNAPL distribution with depth was performed together with two-phase flow modelling, using STOMP. This is to evaluate the dynamics of mercury DNAPL migration and the controls on its distribution in saturated porous media. Using a CPT-probe mounted with a digital camera, in-situ mercury DNAPL depth distribution was obtained at a former chlor-alkali-plant, down to 9 m below ground surface. Images revealing the presence of silvery mercury DNAPL droplets were used to quantify its distribution, characteristics and saturation, using an image analysis method. These field-observations with depth were compared with results from a one-dimensional two-phase flow model simulation for the same transect. Considering the limitations of this approach, simulations reasonably reflected the variability and range of the mercury DNAPL distribution. To further explore the impact of mercury's physical properties in comparison with more common DNAPLs, the migration of mercury and PCE DNAPL in several typical hydrological scenarios was simulated. Comparison of the simulations suggest that mercury's higher density is the overall controlling factor in controlling its penetration in saturated porous media, despite its higher resistance to flow due to its higher viscosity. Based on these results the hazard of spilled mercury DNAPL to cause deep contamination of groundwater systems seems larger than for any other

  6. Very Large Eddy Simulations of a Jet-A Spray Reacting Flow in a Single Element LDI Injector With and Without Invoking an Eulerian Scalar DWFDF Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the very large eddy simulations (VLES) of a Jet-A spray reacting flow in a single element lean direct injection (LDI) injector by using the National Combustion Code (NCC) with and without invoking the Eulerian scalar DWFDF method, in which DWFDF is defined as the density weighted time filtered fine grained probability density function. The flow field is calculated by using the time filtered compressible Navier-Stokes equations (TFNS) with nonlinear subscale turbulence models, and when the Eulerian scalar DWFDF method is invoked, the energy and species mass fractions are calculated by solving the equation of DWFDF. A nonlinear subscale model for closing the convection term of the Eulerian scalar DWFDF equation is used and will be briefly described in this paper. Detailed comparisons between the results and available experimental data are carried out. Some positive findings of invoking the Eulerian scalar DWFDF method in both improving the simulation quality and maintaining economic computing cost are observed.

  7. Solution strategies for finite elements and finite volumes methods applied to flow and heat transfer problem in U-shaped geothermal exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egidi, Nadaniela; Giacomini, Josephin; Maponi, Pierluigi

    2016-06-01

    Matter of this paper is the study of the flow and the corresponding heat transfer in a U-shaped heat exchanger. We propose a mathematical model that is formulated as a forced convection problem for incompressible and Newtonian fluids and results in the unsteady Navier-Stokes problem. In order to get a solution, we discretise the equations with both the Finite Elements Method and the Finite Volumes Method. These procedures give rise to a non-symmetric indefinite quadratic system of equations. Thus, three regularisation techniques are proposed to make approximations effective and ideas to compare their results are provided.

  8. Evaluation of the 34S/32S ratio of Soufre de Lacq elemental sulfur isotopic reference material by continuous flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Qi, H.P.; Coplen, T.B.

    2003-01-01

    Soufre de Lacq elemental sulfur reference material (IAEA-S-4) isotopically is homogeneous in amounts as small as 41 ??g as determined by continuous flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometry. The ??34S value for this reference material is +16.90 ?? 0.12??? (1??) on a scale (Vienna Can??on Diablo troilite, VCDT) where IAEA-S-1 Ag2S is -0.3??? and IAEA-S-2 Ag2S is +22.67???. Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  9. [Clinical usefulness of urine-formed elements' information obtained from bacteria detection by flow cytometry method that uses nucleic acid staining].

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Hiroko; Yuno, Tomoji; Itho, Kiichi

    2009-03-01

    Recently, specific detection method for Bacteria, by flow cytometry method using nucleic acid staining, was developed as a function of automated urine formed elements analyzer for routine urine testing. Here, we performed a basic study on this bacteria analysis method. In addition, we also have a comparison among urine sediment analysis, urine Gram staining and urine quantitative cultivation, the conventional methods performed up to now. As a result, the bacteria analysis with flow cytometry method that uses nucleic acid staining was excellent in reproducibility, and higher sensitivity compared with microscopic urinary sediment analysis. Based on the ROC curve analysis, which settled urine culture method as standard, cut-off level of 120/microL was defined and its sensitivity = 85.7%, specificity = 88.2%. In the analysis of scattergram, accompanied with urine culture method, among 90% of rod positive samples, 80% of dots were appeared in the area of 30 degrees from axis X. In addition, one case even indicated that analysis of bacteria by flow cytometry and scattergram of time series analysis might be helpful to trace the progress of causative bacteria therefore the information supposed to be clinically significant. Reporting bacteria information with nucleic acid staining flow cytometry method is expected to contribute to a rapid diagnostics and treatment of urinary tract infections. Besides, the contribution to screening examination of microbiology and clinical chemistry, will deliver a more efficient solution to urine analysis.

  10. Rn3D: A finite element code for simulating gas flow and radon transport in variably saturated, nonisothermal porous media. User`s manual, Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Holford, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    This document is a user`s manual for the Rn3D finite element code. Rn3D was developed to simulate gas flow and radon transport in variably saturated, nonisothermal porous media. The Rn3D model is applicable to a wide range of problems involving radon transport in soil because it can simulate either steady-state or transient flow and transport in one-, two- or three-dimensions (including radially symmetric two-dimensional problems). The porous materials may be heterogeneous and anisotropic. This manual describes all pertinent mathematics related to the governing, boundary, and constitutive equations of the model, as well as the development of the finite element equations used in the code. Instructions are given for constructing Rn3D input files and executing the code, as well as a description of all output files generated by the code. Five verification problems are given that test various aspects of code operation, complete with example input files, FORTRAN programs for the respective analytical solutions, and plots of model results. An example simulation is presented to illustrate the type of problem Rn3D is designed to solve. Finally, instructions are given on how to convert Rn3D to simulate systems other than radon, air, and water.

  11. Large-eddy simulation of a backward facing step flow using a least-squares spectral element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Daniel C.; Mittal, Rajat

    1996-01-01

    We report preliminary results obtained from the large eddy simulation of a backward facing step at a Reynolds number of 5100. The numerical platform is based on a high order Legendre spectral element spatial discretization and a least squares time integration scheme. A non-reflective outflow boundary condition is in place to minimize the effect of downstream influence. Smagorinsky model with Van Driest near wall damping is used for sub-grid scale modeling. Comparisons of mean velocity profiles and wall pressure show good agreement with benchmark data. More studies are needed to evaluate the sensitivity of this method on numerical parameters before it is applied to complex engineering problems.

  12. Limited Flow of Continental Crust at UHP Depths: Coupled Age and Trace-Element Analyses of Titanite in the Western Gneiss Region, Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garber, J. M.; Hacker, B. R.; Kylander-Clark, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    Coupled age and trace-element data from titanites in the Western Gneiss Region (WGR) of Norway suggest that continental crust underwent limited recrystallization and ductile flow through ~40 My of deep subduction and subsequent exhumation. Precambrian igneous titanites in granitic to tonalitic orthogneisses from the WGR were metastably preserved though Caledonian ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) metamorphism and variably recrystallized through subsequent amphibolite-facies metamorphism from ~420-385 Ma. The inherited Precambrian titanites are not present everywhere but rather cluster primarily in a cooler "southern domain" (peak T ~650oC) and a hotter "northern domain" (peak T ~750-800oC).Titanite data were collected using LASS (laser-ablation split stream inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry) at UCSB, and a principal component analysis (PCA) was used to define age and trace-element populations. These data indicate that inherited titanites are LREE-enriched, HFSE-enriched, and have higher Th/U, consistent with Precambrian neocrystallization from a granitic melt. In contrast, the recrystallized titanites have generally lower Th/U and flat, LREE-depleted, or hump-shaped trace-element patterns. These data suggest that (1) Caledonian titanite recrystallization occurred in the presence of LREE-depleted melts or fluids, or that (2) recrystallization was accompanied by a "typical" granitic melt, but that titanite/bulk-rock distribution coefficients are different for neo- and recrystallization; on-going whole-rock analyses will clarify these hypotheses. Critically, the geochemical signature of recrystallized titanite in felsic orthogneisses is comparable across the entire WGR - emphasizing that the petrologic process of titanite recrystallization was similar orogen-wide, but was less extensive in the domains where inherited titanite was preserved. In this case, large volumes of crust outside of the "old domains" may also have retained metastable titanite during subduction

  13. Application of Positron Emission Particle Tracking (PEPT) to validate a Discrete Element Method (DEM) model of granular flow and mixing in the Turbula mixer.

    PubMed

    Marigo, M; Davies, M; Leadbeater, T; Cairns, D L; Ingram, A; Stitt, E H

    2013-03-25

    The laboratory-scale Turbula mixer comprises a simple cylindrical vessel that moves with a complex, yet periodic 3D motion comprising of rotation, translation and inversion. Arising from this complexity, relatively few studies to obtain fundamental understanding of particle motion and mixing mechanisms have been reported. Particle motion within a cylindrical vessel of a Turbula mixer has been measured for 2mm glass spheres using Positron Emission Particle Tracking (PEPT) in a 2l blending mixing vessel at 50% fill level. These data are compared to results from Discrete Element Method (DEM) simulations previously published by the authors. PEPT mixing experiments, using a single particle tracer, gave qualitatively similar trends to the DEM predictions for axial and radial dispersion as well as for the axial displacement statistics at different operational speeds. Both experimental and simulation results indicate a minimum mixing efficiency at ca. 46 rpm. The occupancy plots also show a non-linear relationship with the operating speed. These results add further evidence to a transition between two flow and mixing regimes. Despite the similarity in overall flow and mixing behaviour measured and predicted, including the mixing speed at which the flow behaviour transition occurs, a systematic offset between measured and predicted result is observed. PMID:23376506

  14. Parallel block preconditioning techniques for the numerical simulation of the shallow water flow using finite element methods

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Navon, I.M.

    1995-11-01

    In this paper, the authors report their work on applying Krylov iterative methods, accelerated by parallelizable domain-decomposed (DD) preconditioners, to the solution of nonsymmetric linear algebraic equations arising from implicit time discretization of a finite element model of the shallow water equations on a limited-area domain. Two types of previously proposed DD preconditioners are employed and a novel one is advocated to accelerate, with post-preconditioning, the convergence of three popular and competitive Krylov iterative linear solvers. Performance sensitivities of these preconditioners to inexact subdomain solvers are also reported. Autotasking, the parallel processing capability representing the third phase of multitasking libraries on CRAY Y-MP, has been exploited and successfully applied to both loop and subroutine level parallelization. Satisfactory speedup results were obtained. On the other hand, automatic loop-level parallelization, made possible by the autotasking preprocessor, attained only a speedup smaller than a factor of two. 39 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. Simulation of underresolved turbulent flows by adaptive filtering using the high order discontinuous Galerkin spectral element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flad, David; Beck, Andrea; Munz, Claus-Dieter

    2016-05-01

    Scale-resolving simulations of turbulent flows in complex domains demand accurate and efficient numerical schemes, as well as geometrical flexibility. For underresolved situations, the avoidance of aliasing errors is a strong demand for stability. For continuous and discontinuous Galerkin schemes, an effective way to prevent aliasing errors is to increase the quadrature precision of the projection operator to account for the non-linearity of the operands (polynomial dealiasing, overintegration). But this increases the computational costs extensively. In this work, we present a novel spatially and temporally adaptive dealiasing strategy by projection filtering. We show this to be more efficient for underresolved turbulence than the classical overintegration strategy. For this novel approach, we discuss the implementation strategy and the indicator details, show its accuracy and efficiency for a decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence and the transitional Taylor-Green vortex and compare it to the original overintegration approach and a state of the art variational multi-scale eddy viscosity formulation.

  16. A hybrid reconstructed discontinuous Galerkin and continuous Galerkin finite element method for incompressible flows on unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandare, Aditya K.; Luo, Hong

    2016-10-01

    A hybrid reconstructed discontinuous Galerkin and continuous Galerkin method based on an incremental pressure projection formulation, termed rDG (PnPm) + CG (Pn) in this paper, is developed for solving the unsteady incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on unstructured grids. In this method, a reconstructed discontinuous Galerkin method (rDG (PnPm)) is used to discretize the velocity and a standard continuous Galerkin method (CG (Pn)) is used to approximate the pressure. The rDG (PnPm) + CG (Pn) method is designed to increase the accuracy of the hybrid DG (Pn) + CG (Pn) method and yet still satisfy Ladyženskaja-Babuška-Brezzi (LBB) condition, thus avoiding the pressure checkerboard instability. An upwind method is used to discretize the nonlinear convective fluxes in the momentum equations in order to suppress spurious oscillations in the velocity field. A number of incompressible flow problems for a variety of flow conditions are computed to numerically assess the spatial order of convergence of the rDG (PnPm) + CG (Pn) method. The numerical experiments indicate that both rDG (P0P1) + CG (P1) and rDG (P1P2) + CG (P1) methods can attain the designed 2nd order and 3rd order accuracy in space for the velocity respectively. Moreover, the 3rd order rDG (P1P2) + CG (P1) method significantly outperforms its 2nd order rDG (P0P1) + CG (P1) and rDG (P1P1) + CG (P1) counterparts: being able to not only increase the accuracy of the velocity by one order but also improve the accuracy of the pressure.

  17. Optimization of retinotopy constrained source estimation constrained by prior

    PubMed Central

    Hagler, Donald J.

    2015-01-01

    Studying how the timing and amplitude of visual evoked responses (VERs) vary between visual areas is important for understanding visual processing but is complicated by difficulties in reliably estimating VERs in individual visual areas using non-invasive brain measurements. Retinotopy constrained source estimation (RCSE) addresses this challenge by using multiple, retinotopically-mapped stimulus locations to simultaneously constrain estimates of VERs in visual areas V1, V2, and V3, taking advantage of the spatial precision of fMRI retinotopy and the temporal resolution of magnetoencephalography (MEG) or electroencephalography (EEG). Nonlinear optimization of dipole locations, guided by a group-constrained RCSE solution as a prior, improved the robustness of RCSE. This approach facilitated the analysis of differences in timing and amplitude of VERs between V1, V2, and V3, elicited by stimuli with varying luminance contrast in a sample of eight adult humans. The V1 peak response was 37% larger than that of V2 and 74% larger than that of V3, and also ~10–20 msec earlier. Normalized contrast response functions were nearly identical for the three areas. Results without dipole optimization, or with other nonlinear methods not constrained by prior estimates were similar but suffered from greater between-subject variability. The increased reliability of estimates offered by this approach may be particularly valuable when using a smaller number of stimulus locations, enabling a greater variety of stimulus and task manipulations. PMID:23868690

  18. Further study on a flow injection on-line multiplexed sorption preconcentration coupled with flame atomic absorption spectrometry for trace element determination.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Jiang, Yan; Yan, Xiu-Ping

    2004-10-20

    A further study on a newly developed flow injection (FI) on-line multiplexed sorption preconcentration (MSP) using a knotted reactor coupled with flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) was carried out to demonstrate its applicability and limitation for trace element determination. For this purpose, Cr(VI), Cu(II), Ni(II) and Co(II) were selected as the analytes, and detailed comparison was made between the MSP-FAAS and conventional FI on-line sorption preconcentration FAAS in respect to retention efficiency and linear ranges of absorbance versus sample loading flow rate and total preconcentration time. Introduction of an air-flow for removal of the residual solution in the KR after each sub-injection in the MSP procedure played a decisive role in the improvement of retention efficiency. The linearity of absorbance versus sample loading flow rate or total preconcentration time was extended to a more degree for the metal ions with less stability of their PDC (pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate) complexes than those with more stable PDC complexes. It seems that the MSP procedure behaves advantages beyond the inflection points in the diagrams of absorbance versus total preconcentration time and sample loading flow rate obtained by conventional (a single continuous) preconcentration procedure. With a sample loading flow rate of 6.0mlmin(-1) and a total preconcentration time of 180s, the retention efficiencies were increased from 25, 46, 41 and 63% with a single continuous sorption preconcentration to 44, 78, 65 and 75% with a six sub-injection preconcentration procedure for Cr(VI), Co(II), Ni(II), and Cu(II), respectively. The detection limits were 0.40, 0.33, 0.31 and 0.26mugl(-1) for Cr(VI), Co(II), Ni(II), and Cu(II), respectively. The precision (R.S.D.) for eleven replicate determination of 2mugl(-1) Cr(VI), Co(II) and Ni(II), and 1mugl(-1) Cu(II), was 2.1, 4.1, 2.6 and 1.7%, respectively. PMID:18969669

  19. An adaptable parallel algorithm for the direct numerical simulation of incompressible turbulent flows using a Fourier spectral/hp element method and MPI virtual topologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolis, A.; Cantwell, C. D.; Moxey, D.; Serson, D.; Sherwin, S. J.

    2016-09-01

    A hybrid parallelisation technique for distributed memory systems is investigated for a coupled Fourier-spectral/hp element discretisation of domains characterised by geometric homogeneity in one or more directions. The performance of the approach is mathematically modelled in terms of operation count and communication costs for identifying the most efficient parameter choices. The model is calibrated to target a specific hardware platform after which it is shown to accurately predict the performance in the hybrid regime. The method is applied to modelling turbulent flow using the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in an axisymmetric pipe and square channel. The hybrid method extends the practical limitations of the discretisation, allowing greater parallelism and reduced wall times. Performance is shown to continue to scale when both parallelisation strategies are used.

  20. CCM Continuity Constraint Method: A finite-element computational fluid dynamics algorithm for incompressible Navier-Stokes fluid flows

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, P.T.

    1993-09-01

    As the field of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) continues to mature, algorithms are required to exploit the most recent advances in approximation theory, numerical mathematics, computing architectures, and hardware. Meeting this requirement is particularly challenging in incompressible fluid mechanics, where primitive-variable CFD formulations that are robust, while also accurate and efficient in three dimensions, remain an elusive goal. This dissertation asserts that one key to accomplishing this goal is recognition of the dual role assumed by the pressure, i.e., a mechanism for instantaneously enforcing conservation of mass and a force in the mechanical balance law for conservation of momentum. Proving this assertion has motivated the development of a new, primitive-variable, incompressible, CFD algorithm called the Continuity Constraint Method (CCM). The theoretical basis for the CCM consists of a finite-element spatial semi-discretization of a Galerkin weak statement, equal-order interpolation for all state-variables, a 0-implicit time-integration scheme, and a quasi-Newton iterative procedure extended by a Taylor Weak Statement (TWS) formulation for dispersion error control. Original contributions to algorithmic theory include: (a) formulation of the unsteady evolution of the divergence error, (b) investigation of the role of non-smoothness in the discretized continuity-constraint function, (c) development of a uniformly H{sup 1} Galerkin weak statement for the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes pressure Poisson equation, (d) derivation of physically and numerically well-posed boundary conditions, and (e) investigation of sparse data structures and iterative methods for solving the matrix algebra statements generated by the algorithm.

  1. Fluid flow, element migration, and petrotectonic evolution of the Early Mesozoic central Klamath Island arc, northwesternmost California. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Ernst, W.G.

    1992-12-11

    Investigations in the central Klamath Mountains (KM) have documented the presence of a polymetamorphosed suite of highly magnesian basaltic rocks, the Yellow Dog greenstones, in the Sawyers Bar (SB) terrane of the western Triassic and Paleozoic belt. The assemblage was laid down, altered and metasomatized during the hypothesized collapse of a Phillipine Sea-type back-arc basin which brought the westerly SB oceanic arc terrane into juxtaposition with the inboard, pre-existing Stuart Fork subduction complex, and more easterly KM terranes in an immature island arc setting. Supporting research has concentrated on elucidating the areal extent and structural/stratigraphic relations of these mafic/ultramafic Yellow Dog metavolcanic units, and has documented the insignificant degree of crustal contamination of the melts by associated terrigenous metasediments. The thermal structure and its evolution in the central KM evidently reflects surfaceward advective transport of magmatic energy derived from the partly fused downgoing oceanic slab, as well as hydrothermal fluid circulation. Clarification of the thermal evolution of this crust-constructional event in the immature basaltic island arc are the goals of the research now underway, emptying both field and geochemical methods. Continuing work is documenting the flow and P-T history of aqueous fluids through the evolving KM arc, utilizing electron microprobe and oxygen isotopic data. The authors have nearly finished a regional reconnaissance map showing the distribution of the lavas throughout the California part of the KM. Application of the terrane concept to the central KM has also been reevaluated in the light of regional petrotectonic relationships. Investigations of the regional and contact metamorphism/metasomatism of the SB metasedimentary pile are in progress.

  2. Flows of elements, ions and abscisic acid in Ricinus communis and site of nitrate reduction under potassium limitation.

    PubMed

    Peuke, Andreas D; Jeschke, W Dieter; Hartung, Wolfram

    2002-02-01

    In a pot experiment Ricinus communis plants were cultivated in quartz sand and supplied daily with a nutrient solution which contained 4 mol m(-3) nitrate as the nitrogen source and either full strength potassium (1.3 mol m(-3), control) or 8% potassium (0.1 mol m(-3), K(+)-limitation). Although the final fresh weight of the whole plant was not affected by K(+)-limitation, the root-shoot ratio was increased due to a relatively increased root growth and inhibited development of younger shoot parts. Owing to K(+)-limitation, photosynthesis was slightly decreased, while dark respiration of the shoot markedly decreased and root respiration was nearly doubled. The transport of carbon in the phloem, and to some extent in the xylem, was greater and the root was favoured in the partitioning of carbon. This was also true for nitrogen and potassium which were both taken up at lower rates, particularly potassium. In these two cases a high remobilization and recycling from the old part of the shoot was observed. By contrast, uptake of sodium was 2.4-fold higher under K(+)-limitation and this resulted in increased flows in the plants, which was discussed generally as a means for charge balance (in combination with a slight increase in uptake of magnesium and calcium). Nitrate reduction took place in the same portion in the root and shoot. This was a shift to the root compared to the control and points to an inhibition of xylem transport caused by limitation of K(+) as an easily permeating countercation. Low K(+) supply also resulted in an increased biosynthesis of ABA in the roots (265%). This caused a slightly increased deposition of ABA in the roots (193%) and a 4.6-fold higher root-to-shoot and a doubled shoot-to-root ABA signal in the xylem or phloem, respectively. The high degradation of ABA in the shoots prevented ABA accumulation there. PMID:11807128

  3. A finite-element model for simulation of two-dimensional steady-state ground-water flow in confined aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuniansky, E.L.

    1990-01-01

    A computer program based on the Galerkin finite-element method was developed to simulate two-dimensional steady-state ground-water flow in either isotropic or anisotropic confined aquifers. The program may also be used for unconfined aquifers of constant saturated thickness. Constant head, constant flux, and head-dependent flux boundary conditions can be specified in order to approximate a variety of natural conditions, such as a river or lake boundary, and pumping well. The computer program was developed for the preliminary simulation of ground-water flow in the Edwards-Trinity Regional aquifer system as part of the Regional Aquifer-Systems Analysis Program. Results of the program compare well to analytical solutions and simulations .from published finite-difference models. A concise discussion of the Galerkin method is presented along with a description of the program. Provided in the Supplemental Data section are a listing of the computer program, definitions of selected program variables, and several examples of data input and output used in verifying the accuracy of the program.

  4. Improved Simulation of Subsurface Flow in Heterogeneous Reservoirs Using a Fully Discontinuous Control-Volume-Finite-Element Method, Implicit Timestepping and Dynamic Unstructured Mesh Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas, P.; Jackson, M.; Pavlidis, D.; Pain, C.; Adam, A.; Xie, Z.; Percival, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    We present a new, high-order, control-volume-finite-element (CVFE) method with discontinuous representation for pressure and velocity to simulate multiphase flow in heterogeneous porous media. Time is discretized using an adaptive, fully implicit method. Heterogeneous geologic features are represented as volumes bounded by surfaces. Within these volumes, termed geologic domains, the material properties are constant. A given model typically contains numerous such geologic domains. Our approach conserves mass and does not require the use of CVs that span domain boundaries. Computational efficiency is increased by use of dynamic mesh optimization, in which an unstructured mesh adapts in space and time to key solution fields, such as pressure, velocity or saturation, whilst preserving the geometry of the geologic domains. Up-, cross- or down-scaling of material properties during mesh optimization is not required, as the properties are uniform within each geologic domain. We demonstrate that the approach, amongst other features, accurately preserves sharp saturation changes associated with high aspect ratio geologic domains such as fractures and mudstones, allowing efficient simulation of flow in highly heterogeneous models. Moreover, accurate solutions are obtained at significantly lower computational cost than an equivalent fine, fixed mesh and conventional CVFE methods. The use of implicit time integration allows the method to efficiently converge using highly anisotropic meshes without having to reduce the time-step. The work is significant for two key reasons. First, it resolves a long-standing problem associated with the use of classical CVFE methods to model flow in highly heterogeneous porous media, in which CVs span boundaries between domains of contrasting material properties. Second, it reduces computational cost/increases solution accuracy through the use of dynamic mesh optimization and time-stepping with large Courant number.

  5. Noncircular orifice holes and advanced fabrication techniques for liquid rocket injectors. Phase 3: Analytical and cold-flow experimental evaluation of rectangular concentric tube injector elements for gas/liquid application. Phase 4: Analytical and experimental evaluation of noncircular injector elements for gas/liquid and liquid/liquid application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mchale, R. M.

    1974-01-01

    Results are presented of a cold-flow and hot-fire experimental study of the mixing and atomization characteristics of injector elements incorporating noncircular orifices. Both liquid/liquid and gas/liquid element types are discussed. Unlike doublet and triplet elements (circular orifices only) were investigated for the liquid/liquid case while concentric tube elements were investigated for the gas/liquid case. It is concluded that noncircular shape can be employed to significant advantage in injector design for liquid rocket engines.

  6. Planetary heat flow measurements.

    PubMed

    Hagermann, Axel

    2005-12-15

    The year 2005 marks the 35th anniversary of the Apollo 13 mission, probably the most successful failure in the history of manned spaceflight. Naturally, Apollo 13's scientific payload is far less known than the spectacular accident and subsequent rescue of its crew. Among other instruments, it carried the first instrument designed to measure the flux of heat on a planetary body other than Earth. The year 2005 also should have marked the launch of the Japanese LUNAR-A mission, and ESA's Rosetta mission is slowly approaching comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Both missions carry penetrators to study the heat flow from their target bodies. What is so interesting about planetary heat flow? What can we learn from it and how do we measure it?Not only the Sun, but all planets in the Solar System are essentially heat engines. Various heat sources or heat reservoirs drive intrinsic and surface processes, causing 'dead balls of rock, ice or gas' to evolve dynamically over time, driving convection that powers tectonic processes and spawns magnetic fields. The heat flow constrains models of the thermal evolution of a planet and also its composition because it provides an upper limit for the bulk abundance of radioactive elements. On Earth, the global variation of heat flow also reflects the tectonic activity: heat flow increases towards the young ocean ridges, whereas it is rather low on the old continental shields. It is not surprising that surface heat flow measurements, or even estimates, where performed, contributed greatly to our understanding of what happens inside the planets. In this article, I will review the results and the methods used in past heat flow measurements and speculate on the targets and design of future experiments. PMID:16286290

  7. Planetary heat flow measurements.

    PubMed

    Hagermann, Axel

    2005-12-15

    The year 2005 marks the 35th anniversary of the Apollo 13 mission, probably the most successful failure in the history of manned spaceflight. Naturally, Apollo 13's scientific payload is far less known than the spectacular accident and subsequent rescue of its crew. Among other instruments, it carried the first instrument designed to measure the flux of heat on a planetary body other than Earth. The year 2005 also should have marked the launch of the Japanese LUNAR-A mission, and ESA's Rosetta mission is slowly approaching comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Both missions carry penetrators to study the heat flow from their target bodies. What is so interesting about planetary heat flow? What can we learn from it and how do we measure it?Not only the Sun, but all planets in the Solar System are essentially heat engines. Various heat sources or heat reservoirs drive intrinsic and surface processes, causing 'dead balls of rock, ice or gas' to evolve dynamically over time, driving convection that powers tectonic processes and spawns magnetic fields. The heat flow constrains models of the thermal evolution of a planet and also its composition because it provides an upper limit for the bulk abundance of radioactive elements. On Earth, the global variation of heat flow also reflects the tectonic activity: heat flow increases towards the young ocean ridges, whereas it is rather low on the old continental shields. It is not surprising that surface heat flow measurements, or even estimates, where performed, contributed greatly to our understanding of what happens inside the planets. In this article, I will review the results and the methods used in past heat flow measurements and speculate on the targets and design of future experiments.

  8. A Fully-Coupled, Fully-Implicit, Finite Element Model for Solving Multiphase Fluid Flow, Heat Transport and Rock Deformation in Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, C.; Deng, S.; Podgorney, R. K.; Huang, H.

    2011-12-01

    Reliable reservoir performance predictions of enhanced geothermal reservoir systems require accurate and robust modeling for the coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical processes. Conventionally, in order to reduce computational cost, these types of problems are solved using operator splitting method, usually by sequentially coupling a subsurface flow and heat transport simulator with a solid mechanics simulator via input files. However, such operator splitting approaches are applicable only to loosely coupled problems and usually converge slowly. As in most enhanced geothermal systems (EGS), fluid flow, heat transport, and rock deformation are typically strongly nonlinearly coupled, an alternative is to solve the system of nonlinear partial differential equations that govern the system simultaneously using a fully coupled solution procedure for fluid flow, heat transport, and solid mechanics. This procedure solves for all solution variables (fluid pressure, temperature and rock displacement fields) simultaneously, which leads to one large nonlinear algebraic system that needs to be solved by a strongly convergent nonlinear solver. Development over the past 10 years in the area of physics-based conditioning, strongly convergent nonlinear solvers (such as Jacobian Free Newton methods) and efficient linear solvers (such as GMRES, AMG), makes such an approach competitive. In this presentation, we will introduce a continuum-scaled parallel physics-based, fully coupled, modeling tool for predicting the dynamics of fracture initiation and propagation, fluid flow, rock deformation, and heat transport in a single integrated code named FALCON (Fracturing And Liquid-steam CONvection). FALCON is built upon a parallel computing framework developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for solving coupled systems of nonlinear equations with finite element method with unstructured and adaptively refined/coarsened grids. Currently, FALCON contains poro- and thermal- elastic models

  9. Optimized planning of in-service inspections of local flow-accelerated corrosion of pipeline elements used in the secondary coolant circuit of the VVER-440-based units at the Novovoronezh NPP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomarov, G. V.; Povarov, V. P.; Shipkov, A. A.; Gromov, A. F.; Budanov, V. A.; Golubeva, T. N.

    2015-03-01

    Matters concerned with making efficient use of the information-analytical system on the flow-accelerated corrosion problem in setting up in-service examination of the metal of pipeline elements operating in the secondary coolant circuit of the VVER-440-based power units at the Novovoronezh NPP are considered. The principles used to select samples of pipeline elements in planning ultrasonic thickness measurements for timely revealing metal thinning due to flow-accelerated corrosion along with reducing the total amount of measurements in the condensate-feedwater path are discussed.

  10. A modular finite-element model (MODFE) for areal and axisymmetric ground-water-flow problems, Part 3: Design philosophy and programming details

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Torak, L.J.

    1993-01-01

    A MODular Finite-Element, digital-computer program (MODFE) was developed to simulate steady or unsteady-state, two-dimensional or axisymmetric ground-water-flow. The modular structure of MODFE places the computationally independent tasks that are performed routinely by digital-computer programs simulating ground-water flow into separate subroutines, which are executed from the main program by control statements. Each subroutine consists of complete sets of computations, or modules, which are identified by comment statements, and can be modified by the user without affecting unrelated computations elsewhere in the program. Simulation capabilities can be added or modified by either adding or modifying subroutines that perform specific computational tasks, and the modular-program structure allows the user to create versions of MODFE that contain only the simulation capabilities that pertain to the ground-water problem of interest. MODFE is written in a Fortran programming language that makes it virtually device independent and compatible with desk-top personal computers and large mainframes. MODFE uses computer storage and execution time efficiently by taking advantage of symmetry and sparseness within the coefficient matrices of the finite-element equations. Parts of the matrix coefficients are computed and stored as single-subscripted variables, which are assembled into a complete coefficient just prior to solution. Computer storage is reused during simulation to decrease storage requirements. Descriptions of subroutines that execute the computational steps of the modular-program structure are given in tables that cross reference the subroutines with particular versions of MODFE. Programming details of linear and nonlinear hydrologic terms are provided. Structure diagrams for the main programs show the order in which subroutines are executed for each version and illustrate some of the linear and nonlinear versions of MODFE that are possible. Computational aspects of

  11. ICEG2D (v2.0) - An Integrated Software Package for Automated Prediction of Flow Fields for Single-Element Airfoils With Ice Accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson David S.; Soni, Bharat K.

    2001-01-01

    An integrated geometry/grid/simulation software package, ICEG2D, is being developed to automate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations for single- and multi-element airfoils with ice accretions. The current version, ICEG213 (v2.0), was designed to automatically perform four primary functions: (1) generate a grid-ready surface definition based on the geometrical characteristics of the iced airfoil surface, (2) generate high-quality structured and generalized grids starting from a defined surface definition, (3) generate the input and restart files needed to run the structured grid CFD solver NPARC or the generalized grid CFD solver HYBFL2D, and (4) using the flow solutions, generate solution-adaptive grids. ICEG2D (v2.0) can be operated in either a batch mode using a script file or in an interactive mode by entering directives from a command line within a Unix shell. This report summarizes activities completed in the first two years of a three-year research and development program to address automation issues related to CFD simulations for airfoils with ice accretions. As well as describing the technology employed in the software, this document serves as a users manual providing installation and operating instructions. An evaluation of the software is also presented.

  12. Evaluation of flow injection-solution cathode glow discharge-atomic emission spectrometry for the determination of major elements in brines.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun; Wang, Lin; Zhu, Zhenli; Jin, Lanlan; Zheng, Hongtao; Belshaw, Nicholas Stanley; Hu, Shenghong

    2016-08-01

    A new method for the determination of major metal elements in high salinity brines was developed by solution cathode glow discharge (SCGD) with flow injection analysis (FIA). The matrix interferences of major cations and anions in brines have been evaluated. It was found that high concentration of Na(+) and K(+) could interfere each other, K(+) at a concentration of 400mgL(-1) enhanced the signal intensity of Na(+) more than 20%. The effect of the anions was observed and it was noted that the signal intensity of both Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) were suppressed significantly when the SO4(2-) reached 100mgL(-1). It was demonstrated that some low molecular weight organic substances such as formic acid, glycerol and ascorbic acid could eliminate interference of SO4(2-) even with volume percentages of 0.5%. Under the optimized condition, the proposed FIA-SCGD can determine K, Na, Ca and Mg with the limits of detection of 0.49 (K), 0.14 (Na), 11 (Ca) and 5.5 (Mg) ngmL(-1). The proposed method has been successfully applied to the analysis of 5 salt lake samples and compared with those obtained with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The advantages of small size, low energy consumption, good stability and repeatability indicated that the SCGD is promising for the determination of major ions in brine samples. PMID:27216688

  13. Moving Forward to Constrain the Shear Viscosity of QCD Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denicol, Gabriel; Monnai, Akihiko; Schenke, Björn

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate that measurements of rapidity differential anisotropic flow in heavy-ion collisions can constrain the temperature dependence of the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio η /s of QCD matter. Comparing results from hydrodynamic calculations with experimental data from the RHIC, we find evidence for a small η /s ≈0.04 in the QCD crossover region and a strong temperature dependence in the hadronic phase. A temperature independent η /s is disfavored by the data. We further show that measurements of the event-by-event flow as a function of rapidity can be used to independently constrain the initial state fluctuations in three dimensions and the temperature dependent transport properties of QCD matter.

  14. Moving Forward to Constrain the Shear Viscosity of QCD Matter.

    PubMed

    Denicol, Gabriel; Monnai, Akihiko; Schenke, Björn

    2016-05-27

    We demonstrate that measurements of rapidity differential anisotropic flow in heavy-ion collisions can constrain the temperature dependence of the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio η/s of QCD matter. Comparing results from hydrodynamic calculations with experimental data from the RHIC, we find evidence for a small η/s≈0.04 in the QCD crossover region and a strong temperature dependence in the hadronic phase. A temperature independent η/s is disfavored by the data. We further show that measurements of the event-by-event flow as a function of rapidity can be used to independently constrain the initial state fluctuations in three dimensions and the temperature dependent transport properties of QCD matter. PMID:27284652

  15. Constrained Stochastic Extended Redundancy Analysis.

    PubMed

    DeSarbo, Wayne S; Hwang, Heungsun; Stadler Blank, Ashley; Kappe, Eelco

    2015-06-01

    We devise a new statistical methodology called constrained stochastic extended redundancy analysis (CSERA) to examine the comparative impact of various conceptual factors, or drivers, as well as the specific predictor variables that contribute to each driver on designated dependent variable(s). The technical details of the proposed methodology, the maximum likelihood estimation algorithm, and model selection heuristics are discussed. A sports marketing consumer psychology application is provided in a Major League Baseball (MLB) context where the effects of six conceptual drivers of game attendance and their defining predictor variables are estimated. Results compare favorably to those obtained using traditional extended redundancy analysis (ERA). PMID:24327066

  16. Spacetime-constrained oblivious transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitalúa-García, Damián

    2016-06-01

    In 1-out-of-2 oblivious transfer (OT), Alice inputs numbers x0,x1 , Bob inputs a bit b and outputs xb. Secure OT requires that Alice and Bob learn nothing about b and xb ¯, respectively. We define spacetime-constrained oblivious transfer (SCOT) as OT in Minkowski spacetime in which Bob must output xb within Rb, where R0 and R1 are fixed spacelike separated spacetime regions. We show that unconditionally secure SCOT is impossible with classical protocols in Minkowski (or Galilean) spacetime, or with quantum protocols in Galilean spacetime. We describe a quantum SCOT protocol in Minkowski spacetime, and we show it unconditionally secure.

  17. Constrained Stochastic Extended Redundancy Analysis.

    PubMed

    DeSarbo, Wayne S; Hwang, Heungsun; Stadler Blank, Ashley; Kappe, Eelco

    2015-06-01

    We devise a new statistical methodology called constrained stochastic extended redundancy analysis (CSERA) to examine the comparative impact of various conceptual factors, or drivers, as well as the specific predictor variables that contribute to each driver on designated dependent variable(s). The technical details of the proposed methodology, the maximum likelihood estimation algorithm, and model selection heuristics are discussed. A sports marketing consumer psychology application is provided in a Major League Baseball (MLB) context where the effects of six conceptual drivers of game attendance and their defining predictor variables are estimated. Results compare favorably to those obtained using traditional extended redundancy analysis (ERA).

  18. Constraining relativistic viscous hydrodynamical evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Mauricio; Strickland, Michael

    2009-04-15

    We show that by requiring positivity of the longitudinal pressure it is possible to constrain the initial conditions one can use in second-order viscous hydrodynamical simulations of ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions. We demonstrate this explicitly for (0+1)-dimensional viscous hydrodynamics and discuss how the constraint extends to higher dimensions. Additionally, we present an analytic approximation to the solution of (0+1)-dimensional second-order viscous hydrodynamical evolution equations appropriate to describe the evolution of matter in an ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collision.

  19. Constrained layer damping of a tennis racket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harms, Michael R.; Gopal, H. S.; Lai, Ming-Lai; Cheng, Po-Jen

    1996-05-01

    When a tennis ball strikes a racket the impact causes vibrations which are distracting and undesirable to the player. In this work a passive damping system used to reduce vibration is described. The damping system uses a viscoelastic material along with a stiff composite constraining layer which is molded on the inner surface of the tennis racket frame. When a ball strikes a racket with this damping system the vibration causes shearing strain in the viscoelastic material. This strain energy is partially dissipated by the viscoelastic material, thereby increasing the racket damping. An analysis of the design was performed by creating a solid CAD model of the racket using Pro/Engineer. A finite element mesh was created and the mesh was then exported to ANSYS for the finite element modal analysis. The technique used to determine the damping ratio is the modal strain energy method. Experimental testing using accelerometers was conducted to determine the natural frequency and the damping ratio of rackets with and without the damping system. The natural frequency of the finite element model was benchmarked to the experimental data and damping ratios were compared. The modal strain energy method was found to be a very effective means of determining the damping ratio, and the frequencies and damping ratios correlated well with the experimental data. Using this analysis method, the effectiveness of the damping ratio to the change in key variables can be studied, minimizing the need for prototypes. This method can be used to determine an optimum design by maximizing the damping ratio with minimal weight addition.

  20. Reconstructing fluid-flow events in Lower-Triassic sandstones of the eastern Paris Basin by elemental tracing and isotopic dating of nanometric illite crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaise, Thomas; Clauer, Norbert; Cathelineau, Michel; Boiron, Marie-Christine; Techer, Isabelle; Boulvais, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    Lower- to Middle-Triassic sandstones from eastern Paris Basin were buried to a maximum depth of 2500 m at a paleo-temperature of about 100 °C. They contain extensive amounts of authigenic platy and filamentous illite particles similar to those reported in reservoirs generally buried at 3000 to -5000 m and subjected to temperatures of 120 to -150 °C. To evaluate this unexpected occurrence, such sandstones were collected from drill cores between 1825 and 2000 m depth, and nanometric-sized sub-fractions were separated. The illite crystals were identified by XRD, observed by SEM and TEM, analyzed for their major, trace, rare-earth elements and oxygen isotope compositions, and dated by K-Ar and Rb-Sr. Illite particles display varied growth features in the rock pore-space and on authigenic quartz and adularia that they postdate. TEM-EDS crystal-chemical in situ data show that the illite lath/fiber and platelet morphologies correspond at least to two populations with varied interlayer charges: between 0.7 and 0.9 for the former and between 0.8 and 1.0 for the latter, the Fe/Fe + Mg ratio being higher in the platelets. Except for the deeper conglomerate, the PAAS-normalized REE patterns of the illite crystals are bell-shaped, enriched in middle REEs. Ca-carbonates and Ca-phosphates were detected together with illite in the separates. These soluble components yield 87Sr/86Sr ratios that are not strictly in chemical equilibrium with the illite crystals, suggesting successive fluids flows with different chemical compositions. The K-Ar data of finer <0.05 μm illite separates confirm two crystallization events at 179.4 ± 4.5 and 149.4 ± 2.5 Ma during the Early and Late Jurassic. The slightly coarser fractions contain also earlier crystallized or detrital K-bearing minerals characterized by lower δ18O values. The δ18O of the finest authigenic illite separates tends to decrease slightly with depth, from 18.2 (±0.2) to 16.3 (±0.2)‰, suggesting different but

  1. Quasi-optical constrained lens amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenberg, Jon S.

    1995-09-01

    A major goal in the field of quasi-optics is to increase the power available from solid state sources by combining the power of individual devices in free space, as demonstrated with grid oscillators and grid amplifiers. Grid amplifiers and most amplifier arrays require a plane wave feed, provided by a far field source or at the beam waist of a dielectric lens pair. These feed approaches add considerable loss and size, which is usually greater than the quasi-optical amplifier gain. In addition, grid amplifiers require external polarizers for stability, further increasing size and complexity. This thesis describes using constrained lens theory in the design of quasi optical amplifier arrays with a focal point feed, improving the power coupling between the feed and the amplifier for increased gain. Feed and aperture arrays of elements, input/output isolation and stability, amplifier circuitry, delay lines and bias distribution are all contained on a single planar substrate, making monolithic circuit integration possible. Measured results of X band transmission lenses and a low noise receive lens are presented, including absolute power gain up to 13 dB, noise figure as low as 1.7 dB, beam scanning to +/-30 deg, beam forming and beam switching of multiple sources, and multiple level quasi-optical power combining. The design and performance of millimeter wave power combining amplifier arrays is described, including a Ka Band hybrid array with 1 watt output power, and a V Band 36 element monolithic array with a 5 dB on/off ratio.

  2. Laminar-flow airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somers, Dan M. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An airfoil having a fore airfoil element, an aft airfoil element, and a slot region in between them. These elements induce laminar flow over substantially all of the fore airfoil element and also provide for laminar flow in at least a portion of the slot region. The method of the invention is one for inducing natural laminar flow over an airfoil. In the method, a fore airfoil element, having a leading and trailing edge, and an aft airfoil element define a slot region. Natural laminar flow is induced over substantially all of the fore airfoil element, by inducing the pressures on both surfaces of the fore airfoil element to decrease to a location proximate the trailing edge of the fore airfoil element using pressures created by the aft airfoil element.

  3. Constrained Graph Optimization: Interdiction and Preservation Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Schild, Aaron V

    2012-07-30

    The maximum flow, shortest path, and maximum matching problems are a set of basic graph problems that are critical in theoretical computer science and applications. Constrained graph optimization, a variation of these basic graph problems involving modification of the underlying graph, is equally important but sometimes significantly harder. In particular, one can explore these optimization problems with additional cost constraints. In the preservation case, the optimizer has a budget to preserve vertices or edges of a graph, preventing them from being deleted. The optimizer wants to find the best set of preserved edges/vertices in which the cost constraints are satisfied and the basic graph problems are optimized. For example, in shortest path preservation, the optimizer wants to find a set of edges/vertices within which the shortest path between two predetermined points is smallest. In interdiction problems, one deletes vertices or edges from the graph with a particular cost in order to impede the basic graph problems as much as possible (for example, delete edges/vertices to maximize the shortest path between two predetermined vertices). Applications of preservation problems include optimal road maintenance, power grid maintenance, and job scheduling, while interdiction problems are related to drug trafficking prevention, network stability assessment, and counterterrorism. Computational hardness results are presented, along with heuristic methods for approximating solutions to the matching interdiction problem. Also, efficient algorithms are presented for special cases of graphs, including on planar graphs. The graphs in many of the listed applications are planar, so these algorithms have important practical implications.

  4. Global estimate of submarine groundwater discharge based on an observationally constrained radium isotope model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Eun Young; Kim, Guebuem; Primeau, Francois; Moore, Willard S.; Cho, Hyung-Mi; DeVries, Timothy; Sarmiento, Jorge L.; Charette, Matthew A.; Cho, Yang-Ki

    2014-12-01

    Along the continental margins, rivers and submarine groundwater supply nutrients, trace elements, and radionuclides to the coastal ocean, supporting coastal ecosystems and, increasingly, causing harmful algal blooms and eutrophication. While the global magnitude of gauged riverine water discharge is well known, the magnitude of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) is poorly constrained. Using an inverse model combined with a global compilation of 228Ra observations, we show that the SGD integrated over the Atlantic and Indo-Pacific Oceans between 60°S and 70°N is (12 ± 3) × 1013 m3 yr-1, which is 3 to 4 times greater than the freshwater fluxes into the oceans by rivers. Unlike the rivers, where more than half of the total flux is discharged into the Atlantic, about 70% of SGD flows into the Indo-Pacific Oceans. We suggest that SGD is the dominant pathway for dissolved terrestrial materials to the global ocean, and this necessitates revisions for the budgets of chemical elements including carbon.

  5. Thermally conductive porous element-based recuperators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Du, Jian Hua (Inventor); Chow, Louis C (Inventor); Lin, Yeong-Ren (Inventor); Wu, Wei (Inventor); Kapat, Jayanta (Inventor); Notardonato, William U. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A heat exchanger includes at least one hot fluid flow channel comprising a first plurality of open cell porous elements having first gaps there between for flowing a hot fluid in a flow direction and at least one cold fluid flow channel comprising a second plurality of open cell porous elements having second gaps therebetween for flowing a cold fluid in a countercurrent flow direction relative to the flow direction. The thermal conductivity of the porous elements is at least 10 W/mK. A separation member is interposed between the hot and cold flow channels for isolating flow paths associated these flow channels. The first and second plurality of porous elements at least partially overlap one another to form a plurality of heat transfer pairs which transfer heat from respective ones of the first porous elements to respective ones of the second porous elements through the separation member.

  6. Wavelet library for constrained devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlers, Johan Hendrik; Jassim, Sabah A.

    2007-04-01

    The wavelet transform is a powerful tool for image and video processing, useful in a range of applications. This paper is concerned with the efficiency of a certain fast-wavelet-transform (FWT) implementation and several wavelet filters, more suitable for constrained devices. Such constraints are typically found on mobile (cell) phones or personal digital assistants (PDA). These constraints can be a combination of; limited memory, slow floating point operations (compared to integer operations, most often as a result of no hardware support) and limited local storage. Yet these devices are burdened with demanding tasks such as processing a live video or audio signal through on-board capturing sensors. In this paper we present a new wavelet software library, HeatWave, that can be used efficiently for image/video processing/analysis tasks on mobile phones and PDA's. We will demonstrate that HeatWave is suitable for realtime applications with fine control and range to suit transform demands. We shall present experimental results to substantiate these claims. Finally this library is intended to be of real use and applied, hence we considered several well known and common embedded operating system platform differences; such as a lack of common routines or functions, stack limitations, etc. This makes HeatWave suitable for a range of applications and research projects.

  7. Constraining the Europa Neutral Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Howard T.; Mitchell, Donald; mauk, Barry; Johnson, Robert E.; clark, george

    2016-10-01

    "Neutral tori" consist of neutral particles that usually co-orbit along with their source forming a toroidal (or partial toroidal) feature around the planet. The distribution and composition of these features can often provide important, if not unique, insight into magnetospheric particles sources, mechanisms and dynamics. However, these features can often be difficult to directly detect. One innovative method for detecting neutral tori is by observing Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs) that are generally considered produced as a result of charge exchange interactions between charged and neutral particles.Mauk et al. (2003) reported the detection of a Europa neutral particle torus using ENA observations. The presence of a Europa torus has extremely large implications for upcoming missions to Jupiter as well as understanding possible activity at this moon and providing critical insight into what lies beneath the surface of this icy ocean world. However, ENAs can also be produced as a result of charge exchange interactions between two ionized particles and in that case cannot be used to infer the presence of neutral particle population. Thus, a detailed examination of all possible source interactions must be considered before one can confirm that likely original source population of these ENA images is actually a Europa neutral particle torus. For this talk, we examine the viability that the Mauk et al. (2003) observations were actually generated from a neutral torus emanating from Europa as opposed to charge particle interactions with plasma originating from Io. These results help constrain such a torus as well as Europa source processes.

  8. Constrained Allocation Flux Balance Analysis.

    PubMed

    Mori, Matteo; Hwa, Terence; Martin, Olivier C; De Martino, Andrea; Marinari, Enzo

    2016-06-01

    New experimental results on bacterial growth inspire a novel top-down approach to study cell metabolism, combining mass balance and proteomic constraints to extend and complement Flux Balance Analysis. We introduce here Constrained Allocation Flux Balance Analysis, CAFBA, in which the biosynthetic costs associated to growth are accounted for in an effective way through a single additional genome-wide constraint. Its roots lie in the experimentally observed pattern of proteome allocation for metabolic functions, allowing to bridge regulation and metabolism in a transparent way under the principle of growth-rate maximization. We provide a simple method to solve CAFBA efficiently and propose an "ensemble averaging" procedure to account for unknown protein costs. Applying this approach to modeling E. coli metabolism, we find that, as the growth rate increases, CAFBA solutions cross over from respiratory, growth-yield maximizing states (preferred at slow growth) to fermentative states with carbon overflow (preferred at fast growth). In addition, CAFBA allows for quantitatively accurate predictions on the rate of acetate excretion and growth yield based on only 3 parameters determined by empirical growth laws.

  9. Constrained Allocation Flux Balance Analysis.

    PubMed

    Mori, Matteo; Hwa, Terence; Martin, Olivier C; De Martino, Andrea; Marinari, Enzo

    2016-06-01

    New experimental results on bacterial growth inspire a novel top-down approach to study cell metabolism, combining mass balance and proteomic constraints to extend and complement Flux Balance Analysis. We introduce here Constrained Allocation Flux Balance Analysis, CAFBA, in which the biosynthetic costs associated to growth are accounted for in an effective way through a single additional genome-wide constraint. Its roots lie in the experimentally observed pattern of proteome allocation for metabolic functions, allowing to bridge regulation and metabolism in a transparent way under the principle of growth-rate maximization. We provide a simple method to solve CAFBA efficiently and propose an "ensemble averaging" procedure to account for unknown protein costs. Applying this approach to modeling E. coli metabolism, we find that, as the growth rate increases, CAFBA solutions cross over from respiratory, growth-yield maximizing states (preferred at slow growth) to fermentative states with carbon overflow (preferred at fast growth). In addition, CAFBA allows for quantitatively accurate predictions on the rate of acetate excretion and growth yield based on only 3 parameters determined by empirical growth laws. PMID:27355325

  10. BICEP2 constrains composite inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Channuie, Phongpichit

    2014-07-01

    In light of BICEP2, we re-examine single field inflationary models in which the inflation is a composite state stemming from various four-dimensional strongly coupled theories. We study in the Einstein frame a set of cosmological parameters, the primordial spectral index ns and tensor-to-scalar ratio r, predicted by such models. We confront the predicted results with the joint Planck data, and with the recent BICEP2 data. We constrain the number of e-foldings for composite models of inflation in order to obtain a successful inflation. We find that the minimal composite inflationary model is fully consistent with the Planck data. However it is in tension with the recent BICEP2 data. The observables predicted by the glueball inflationary model can be consistent with both Planck and BICEP2 contours if a suitable number of e-foldings are chosen. Surprisingly, the super Yang-Mills inflationary prediction is significantly consistent with the Planck and BICEP2 observations.

  11. Gyrification from constrained cortical expansion

    PubMed Central

    Tallinen, Tuomas; Chung, Jun Young; Biggins, John S.; Mahadevan, L.

    2014-01-01

    The exterior of the mammalian brain—the cerebral cortex—has a conserved layered structure whose thickness varies little across species. However, selection pressures over evolutionary time scales have led to cortices that have a large surface area to volume ratio in some organisms, with the result that the brain is strongly convoluted into sulci and gyri. Here we show that the gyrification can arise as a nonlinear consequence of a simple mechanical instability driven by tangential expansion of the gray matter constrained by the white matter. A physical mimic of the process using a layered swelling gel captures the essence of the mechanism, and numerical simulations of the brain treated as a soft solid lead to the formation of cusped sulci and smooth gyri similar to those in the brain. The resulting gyrification patterns are a function of relative cortical expansion and relative thickness (compared with brain size), and are consistent with observations of a wide range of brains, ranging from smooth to highly convoluted. Furthermore, this dependence on two simple geometric parameters that characterize the brain also allows us to qualitatively explain how variations in these parameters lead to anatomical anomalies in such situations as polymicrogyria, pachygyria, and lissencephalia. PMID:25136099

  12. Constrained Allocation Flux Balance Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Matteo; Hwa, Terence; Martin, Olivier C.

    2016-01-01

    New experimental results on bacterial growth inspire a novel top-down approach to study cell metabolism, combining mass balance and proteomic constraints to extend and complement Flux Balance Analysis. We introduce here Constrained Allocation Flux Balance Analysis, CAFBA, in which the biosynthetic costs associated to growth are accounted for in an effective way through a single additional genome-wide constraint. Its roots lie in the experimentally observed pattern of proteome allocation for metabolic functions, allowing to bridge regulation and metabolism in a transparent way under the principle of growth-rate maximization. We provide a simple method to solve CAFBA efficiently and propose an “ensemble averaging” procedure to account for unknown protein costs. Applying this approach to modeling E. coli metabolism, we find that, as the growth rate increases, CAFBA solutions cross over from respiratory, growth-yield maximizing states (preferred at slow growth) to fermentative states with carbon overflow (preferred at fast growth). In addition, CAFBA allows for quantitatively accurate predictions on the rate of acetate excretion and growth yield based on only 3 parameters determined by empirical growth laws. PMID:27355325

  13. Textural characterization, major and volatile element quantification and Ar-Ar systematics of spherulites in the Rocche Rosse obsidian flow, Lipari, Aeolian Islands: a temperature continuum growth model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clay, P. L.; O'Driscoll, B.; Gertisser, R.; Busemann, H.; Sherlock, S. C.; Kelley, S. P.

    2013-02-01

    Spherulitic textures in the Rocche Rosse obsidian flow (Lipari, Aeolian Islands, Italy) have been characterized through petrographic, crystal size distribution (CSD) and in situ major and volatile elemental analyses to assess the mode, temperature and timescales of spherulite formation. Bulk glass chemistry and spherulite chemistry analyzed along transects across the spherulite growth front/glass boundary reveal major-oxide and volatile (H2O, CO2, F, Cl and S) chemical variations and heterogeneities at a ≤5 μm scale. Numerous bulk volatile data in non-vesicular glass (spatially removed from spherulitic textures) reveal homogenous distributions of volatile concentrations: H2O (0.089 ± 0.012 wt%), F (950 ± 40 ppm) and Cl (4,100 ± 330 ppm), with CO2 and S consistently below detection limits suggesting either complete degassing of these volatiles or an originally volatile-poor melt. Volatile concentrations across the spherulite boundary and within the spherulitic textures are highly variable. These observations are consistent with diffusive expulsion of volatiles into melt, leaving a volatile-poor rim advancing ahead of anhydrous crystallite growth, which is envisaged to have had a pronounced effect on spherulite crystallization dynamics. Argon concentrations dissolved in the glass and spherulites differ by a factor of ~20, with Ar sequestered preferentially in the glass phase. Petrographic observation, CSD analysis, volatile and Ar data as well as diffusion modeling support continuous spherulite nucleation and growth starting at magmatic (emplacement) temperatures of ~790-825 °C and progressing through the glass transition temperature range ( T g ~ 750-620 °C), being further modified in the solid state. We propose that nucleation and growth rate are isothermally constant, but vary between differing stages of spherulite growth with continued cooling from magmatic temperatures, such that there is an evolution from a high to a low rate of crystallization and low

  14. Development and application of an information-analytic system on the problem of flow accelerated corrosion of pipeline elements in the secondary coolant circuit of VVER-440-based power units at the Novovoronezh nuclear power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomarov, G. V.; Povarov, V. P.; Shipkov, A. A.; Gromov, A. F.; Kiselev, A. N.; Shepelev, S. V.; Galanin, A. V.

    2015-02-01

    Specific features relating to development of the information-analytical system on the problem of flow-accelerated corrosion of pipeline elements in the secondary coolant circuit of the VVER-440-based power units at the Novovoronezh nuclear power plant are considered. The results from a statistical analysis of data on the quantity, location, and operating conditions of the elements and preinserted segments of pipelines used in the condensate-feedwater and wet steam paths are presented. The principles of preparing and using the information-analytical system for determining the lifetime to reaching inadmissible wall thinning in elements of pipelines used in the secondary coolant circuit of the VVER-440-based power units at the Novovoronezh NPP are considered.

  15. Constrained Peptides as Miniature Protein Structures

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hang

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the recent developments of protein engineering using both covalent and noncovalent bonds to constrain peptides, forcing them into designed protein secondary structures. These constrained peptides subsequently can be used as peptidomimetics for biological functions such as regulations of protein-protein interactions. PMID:25969758

  16. An approach to constrained aerodynamic design with application to airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Richard L.

    1992-01-01

    An approach was developed for incorporating flow and geometric constraints into the Direct Iterative Surface Curvature (DISC) design method. In this approach, an initial target pressure distribution is developed using a set of control points. The chordwise locations and pressure levels of these points are initially estimated either from empirical relationships and observed characteristics of pressure distributions for a given class of airfoils or by fitting the points to an existing pressure distribution. These values are then automatically adjusted during the design process to satisfy the flow and geometric constraints. The flow constraints currently available are lift, wave drag, pitching moment, pressure gradient, and local pressure levels. The geometric constraint options include maximum thickness, local thickness, leading-edge radius, and a 'glove' constraint involving inner and outer bounding surfaces. This design method was also extended to include the successive constraint release (SCR) approach to constrained minimization.

  17. Trace elemental and Nd-Sr-Pb isotopic compositional variation in 37 lava flows of the Mandla lobe and their chemical relation to the western Deccan stratigraphic succession, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrivastava, J. P.; Mahoney, J. J.; Kashyap, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    The Mandla lobe is a 900 m thick lava pile that forms a 29,400 km2 northeastern extension of the Deccan Traps. Earlier, combined field, petrographic, and major element studies have shown that this lobe comprises 37 lava flows. Using a combination of trace elements (Ba, Ti, Zr, Rb, Sr) and Nb/Zr values, we group the flows into six chemical types (A-F) that are separated stratigraphically. Combined trace element and Nd-Pb-Sr isotopic data, document the presence of lavas resembling those of the Poladpur Formation and less abundantly, the Ambenali Formation of the southwestern Deccan are in conformity with the earlier reconnaissance work. In addition, our data reveal several flows similar to those of the Mahabaleshwar Formation, the type sections of which are located ~ 900 km to the southwest. Based on the isotopic data the superposition of Mahabaleshwar-like flows over flows with Ambenali- and Poladpur-like characteristics is in the same stratigraphic order seen in the southwestern Deccan type section. However, from the stratigraphy indicated by the Discriminant Function Analysis (DFA) results and the serious discrepancy between the DFA and isotopic data, it seems that few Mandla lobe flows are different and not in the same stratigraphic order as in the southwestern part of the province. To some extent the differences may be explained by faulting along four large post-Deccan normal faults near Nagapahar, Kundam, Deori, and Dindori areas across which offsets of ~150 m have been measured. This post-emplacement faulting accounts for the presence of several chemically Mahabaleshwar-like lavas at the base of the ~900 m thick Mandla lobe pile, at a lower elevation than a thick sequence dominated by chemically Poladpur-like flows. However, presence of common signature lavas (similar to that in the northeastern Deccan) cannot be ruled out in this area. They are similar to Poladpur-type lavas both chemically and isotopically. They appear in different formations and erupted at

  18. Towards better constrained models of the solar magnetic cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz-Jaramillo, Andres

    2010-12-01

    The best tools we have for understanding the origin of solar magnetic variability are kinematic dynamo models. During the last decade, this type of models has seen a continuous evolution and has become increasingly successful at reproducing solar cycle characteristics. The basic ingredients of these models are: the solar differential rotation -- which acts as the main source of energy for the system by shearing the magnetic field; the meridional circulation -- which plays a crucial role in magnetic field transport; the turbulent diffusivity -- which attempts to capture the effect of convective turbulence on the large scale magnetic field; and the poloidal field source -- which closes the cycle by regenerating the poloidal magnetic field. However, most of these ingredients remain poorly constrained which allows one to obtain solar-like solutions by "tuning" the input parameters, leading to controversy regarding which parameter set is more appropriate. In this thesis we revisit each of those ingredients in an attempt to constrain them better by using observational data and theoretical considerations, reducing the amount of free parameters in the model. For the meridional flow and differential rotation we use helioseismic data to constrain free parameters and find that the differential rotation is well determined, but the available data can only constrain the latitudinal dependence of the meridional flow. For the turbulent magnetic diffusivity we show that combining mixing-length theory estimates with magnetic quenching allows us to obtain viable magnetic cycles and that the commonly used diffusivity profiles can be understood as a spatiotemporal average of this process. For the poloidal source we introduce a more realistic way of modeling active region emergence and decay and find that this resolves existing discrepancies between kinematic dynamo models and surface flux transport simulations. We also study the physical mechanisms behind the unusually long minimum of

  19. Ultraconservation identifies a small subset of extremely constrained developmental enhancers

    SciTech Connect

    Pennacchio, Len A.; Visel, Axel; Prabhakar, Shyam; Akiyama, Jennifer A.; Shoukry, Malak; Lewis, Keith D.; Holt, Amy; Plajzer-Frick, Ingrid; Afzal, Veena; Rubin, Edward M.; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2007-10-01

    While experimental studies have suggested that non-coding ultraconserved DNA elements are central nodes in the regulatory circuitry that specifies mammalian embryonic development, the possible functional relevance of their>200bp of perfect sequence conservation between human-mouse-rat remains obscure 1,2. Here we have compared the in vivo enhancer activity of a genome-wide set of 231 non-exonic sequences with ultraconserved cores to that of 206 sequences that are under equivalently severe human-rodent constraint (ultra-like), but lack perfect sequence conservation. In transgenic mouse assays, 50percent of the ultraconserved and 50percent of the ultra-like conserved elements reproducibly functioned as tissue-specific enhancers at embryonic day 11.5. In this in vivo assay, we observed that ultraconserved enhancers and constrained non-ultraconserved enhancers targeted expression to a similar spectrum of tissues with a particular enrichment in the developing central nervous system. A human genome-wide comparative screen uncovered ~;;2,600 non-coding elements that evolved under ultra-like human-rodent constraint and are similarly enriched near transcriptional regulators and developmental genes as the much smaller number of ultraconserved elements. These data indicate that ultraconserved elements possessing absolute human-rodent sequence conservation are not distinct from other non-coding elements that are under comparable purifying selection in mammals and suggest they are principal constituents of the cis-regulatory framework of mammalian development.

  20. An Efficient, Semi-implicit Pressure-based Scheme Employing a High-resolution Finitie Element Method for Simulating Transient and Steady, Inviscid and Viscous, Compressible Flows on Unstructured Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Richard C. Martineau; Ray A. Berry

    2003-04-01

    A new semi-implicit pressure-based Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) scheme for simulating a wide range of transient and steady, inviscid and viscous compressible flow on unstructured finite elements is presented here. This new CFD scheme, termed the PCICEFEM (Pressure-Corrected ICE-Finite Element Method) scheme, is composed of three computational phases, an explicit predictor, an elliptic pressure Poisson solution, and a semiimplicit pressure-correction of the flow variables. The PCICE-FEM scheme is capable of second-order temporal accuracy by incorporating a combination of a time-weighted form of the two-step Taylor-Galerkin Finite Element Method scheme as an explicit predictor for the balance of momentum equations and the finite element form of a time-weighted trapezoid rule method for the semi-implicit form of the governing hydrodynamic equations. Second-order spatial accuracy is accomplished by linear unstructured finite element discretization. The PCICE-FEM scheme employs Flux-Corrected Transport as a high-resolution filter for shock capturing. The scheme is capable of simulating flows from the nearly incompressible to the high supersonic flow regimes. The PCICE-FEM scheme represents an advancement in mass-momentum coupled, pressurebased schemes. The governing hydrodynamic equations for this scheme are the conservative form of the balance of momentum equations (Navier-Stokes), mass conservation equation, and total energy equation. An operator splitting process is performed along explicit and implicit operators of the semi-implicit governing equations to render the PCICE-FEM scheme in the class of predictor-corrector schemes. The complete set of semi-implicit governing equations in the PCICE-FEM scheme are cast in this form, an explicit predictor phase and a semi-implicit pressure-correction phase with the elliptic pressure Poisson solution coupling the predictor-corrector phases. The result of this predictor-corrector formulation is that the pressure Poisson

  1. Constrained hierarchical least square nonlinear equation solvers. [for indefinite stiffness and large structural deformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padovan, J.; Lackney, J.

    1986-01-01

    The current paper develops a constrained hierarchical least square nonlinear equation solver. The procedure can handle the response behavior of systems which possess indefinite tangent stiffness characteristics. Due to the generality of the scheme, this can be achieved at various hierarchical application levels. For instance, in the case of finite element simulations, various combinations of either degree of freedom, nodal, elemental, substructural, and global level iterations are possible. Overall, this enables a solution methodology which is highly stable and storage efficient. To demonstrate the capability of the constrained hierarchical least square methodology, benchmarking examples are presented which treat structure exhibiting highly nonlinear pre- and postbuckling behavior wherein several indefinite stiffness transitions occur.

  2. Constrained Deformable-Layer Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, H.

    2006-12-01

    The improvement on traveltime tomography depends on improving data coverage and tomographic methodology. The data coverage depends on the spatial distribution of sources and stations, as well as the extent of lateral velocity variation that may alter the raypaths locally. A reliable tomographic image requires large enough ray hit count and wide enough angular range between traversing rays over the targeted anomalies. Recent years have witnessed the advancement of traveltime tomography in two aspects. One is the use of finite frequency kernels, and the other is the improvement on model parameterization, particularly that allows the use of a priori constraints. A new way of model parameterization is the deformable-layer tomography (DLT), which directly inverts for the geometry of velocity interfaces by varying the depths of grid points to achieve a best traveltime fit. In contrast, conventional grid or cell tomography seeks to determine velocity values of a mesh of fixed-in-space grids or cells. In this study, the DLT is used to map crustal P-wave velocities with first arrival data from local earthquakes and two LARSE active surveys in southern California. The DLT solutions along three profiles are constrained using known depth ranges of the Moho discontinuity at 21 sites from a previous receiver function study. The DLT solutions are generally well resolved according to restoration resolution tests. The patterns of 2D DLT models of different profiles match well at their intersection locations. In comparison with existing 3D cell tomography models in southern California, the new DLT models significantly improve the data fitness. In comparison with the multi-scale cell tomography conducted for the same data, while the data fitting levels of the DLT and the multi-scale cell tomography models are compatible, the DLT provides much higher vertical resolution and more realistic description of the undulation of velocity discontinuities. The constraints on the Moho depth

  3. Free vibrations of a spherical drop constrained at an azimuth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramalingam, Santhosh; Ramkrishna, Doraiswami; Basaran, Osman A.

    2012-08-01

    Two droplets coupled through a liquid filled (a) hole in a plate or (b) tube is referred to as a double droplet system (DDS) or a capillary switch. Such capillary systems are gaining increasing attention due to their utility in applications. A particularly exciting application is one where a DDS is employed as a liquid lens, one flavor of which entails using a DDS as a variable focus lens by keeping it under sustained oscillations at its natural frequencies. The natural modes of oscillation of a DDS are determined analytically here in the limit in which the plate thickness (or tube length) is vanishingly small and when the effect of gravity is negligible compared to that of surface tension. In this limit, a DDS at rest reduces to two spherical caps that are pinned to and coupled along a common circular ring of contact of negligible thickness. Here, the caps are taken to be complementary pieces of a sphere so that the equilibrium state of the system is a sphere that is constrained by a ring of negligible thickness at an azimuthal angle with respect to the center of the sphere. Both the constrained drop and the fluid exterior to it are taken to be inviscid fluids undergoing irrotational flow. Similar to the linear oscillations of a free drop first studied by Rayleigh, the analytical formulation of the linear oscillations of the constrained drop results in a linear operator eigenvalue problem but with one additional boundary condition, i.e., that which accounts for zero shape perturbation along the circle of contact. Exploiting properties of linear operators, an implicit expression is obtained for the frequency of each mode of oscillation, a feat that appears not to have been accomplished to date in any problem involving oscillations of constrained drops. An extension of a method based on Green's functions that was developed to analyze the linear oscillations of a drop in contact with a spherical bowl [M. Strani and F. Sabetta, "Free-vibrations of a drop in partial

  4. Active constrained clustering by examining spectral Eigenvectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagstaff, Kiri L.; desJardins, Marie; Xu, Qianjun

    2005-01-01

    This work focuses on the active selection of pairwise constraints for spectral clustering. We develop and analyze a technique for Active Constrained Clustering by Examining Spectral eigenvectorS (ACCESS) derived from a similarity matrix.

  5. Constraining the nature of the asthenosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahy, E. H.; Hall, P.; Faul, U.

    2010-12-01

    Geophysical observations indicate that the oceanic upper mantle has relatively low seismic velocities, high seismic attenuation, and high electrical conductivity at depths of ~80-200km. These depths coincide with the rheologically weak layer known as the asthenosphere . Three hypotheses have been proposed to account for these observations: 1) the presence of volatiles, namely water, in the oceanic upper mantle; 2) the presence of small-degree partial melts in the oceanic upper mantle; and 3) variations in the physical properties of dry, melt-free peridotite with temperature and pressure. Each of these hypotheses suggests a characteristic distribution of volatiles and melt in the upper mantle, resulting in corresponding spatial variations in viscosity, density, seismic structure, and electrical conductivity. These viscosity and density scenarios can also lead to variations in the onset time and growth rate of thermal instabilities at the base of the overriding lithosphere, which can in turn affect heat flow, bathymetry, and seismic structure. We report on the results of a series of computational geodynamic experiments that evaluate the dynamical consequences of each of the three proposed scenarios. Experiments were conducted using the CitcomCU finite element package to model the evolution of the oceanic lithosphere and flow in the underlying mantle. Our model domain consists of 2048x256x64 elements corresponding, to physical dimensions of 12,800x1600x400km. These dimensions allow us to consider oceanic lithosphere to ages of ~150Ma. We adopt the composite rheology law from Billen & Hirth (2007), which combines both diffusion and dislocation creep mechanisms, and consider a range of rheological parameters (e.g., activation energy, activation volume, grain size) as obtained from laboratory deformation experiments [e.g. Hirth & Kohlstedt, 2003]. Melting and volatile content within the model domain are tracked using a Lagrangian particle scheme. Variations in depletion

  6. A network thermodynamic two-port element to represent the coupled flow of salt and current. Improved alternative for the equivalent circuit.

    PubMed Central

    Mikulecky, D C

    1979-01-01

    A two-port for coupled salt and current flow is created by using the network thermodynamic approach in the same manner as that for coupled solute and volume flow (Mikulecky et al., 1977b; Mikulecky, 1977). This electrochemical two-port has distinct advantages over the equivalent circuit representation and overcomes difficulties pointed out by Finkelstein and Mauro (1963). The electrochemical two-port is used to produce a schematic diagram of the coupled flows through a tissue. The network is superimposable on the tissue morphology and preserves the physical qualities of the flows and forces in each part of an organized structure (e.g., an epithelium). The topological properties are manipulated independently from the constitutive (flow-force) relations. The constitutive relations are chosen from a number of alternatives depending on the detail and rigor desired. With the topology and constitutive parameters specified, the steady-state behavior is simulated with a network simulation program. By using capacitance to represent the filling and depletion of compartments, as well as the traditional electrical capacitances, time-dependent behavior is also simulated. Nonlinear effects arising from the integration of equations describing local behavior (e.g., the Nernst-Planck equations) are dealt with explicitly. The network thermodynamic approach provides a simple, straightforward method for representing a system diagrammatically and then simulating the system's behavior from the diagram with a minimum of mathematical manipulation. PMID:262391

  7. Maximum Constrained Directivity of Oversteered End-Fire Sensor Arrays.

    PubMed

    Trucco, Andrea; Traverso, Federico; Crocco, Marco

    2015-01-01

    For linear arrays with fixed steering and an inter-element spacing smaller than one half of the wavelength, end-fire steering of a data-independent beamformer offers better directivity than broadside steering. The introduction of a lower bound on the white noise gain ensures the necessary robustness against random array errors and sensor mismatches. However, the optimum broadside performance can be obtained using a simple processing architecture, whereas the optimum end-fire performance requires a more complicated system (because complex weight coefficients are needed). In this paper, we reconsider the oversteering technique as a possible way to simplify the processing architecture of equally spaced end-fire arrays. We propose a method for computing the amount of oversteering and the related real-valued weight vector that allows the constrained directivity to be maximized for a given inter-element spacing. Moreover, we verify that the maximized oversteering performance is very close to the optimum end-fire performance. We conclude that optimized oversteering is a viable method for designing end-fire arrays that have better constrained directivity than broadside arrays but with a similar implementation complexity. A numerical simulation is used to perform a statistical analysis, which confirms that the maximized oversteering performance is robust against sensor mismatches.

  8. Maximum Constrained Directivity of Oversteered End-Fire Sensor Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Trucco, Andrea; Traverso, Federico; Crocco, Marco

    2015-01-01

    For linear arrays with fixed steering and an inter-element spacing smaller than one half of the wavelength, end-fire steering of a data-independent beamformer offers better directivity than broadside steering. The introduction of a lower bound on the white noise gain ensures the necessary robustness against random array errors and sensor mismatches. However, the optimum broadside performance can be obtained using a simple processing architecture, whereas the optimum end-fire performance requires a more complicated system (because complex weight coefficients are needed). In this paper, we reconsider the oversteering technique as a possible way to simplify the processing architecture of equally spaced end-fire arrays. We propose a method for computing the amount of oversteering and the related real-valued weight vector that allows the constrained directivity to be maximized for a given inter-element spacing. Moreover, we verify that the maximized oversteering performance is very close to the optimum end-fire performance. We conclude that optimized oversteering is a viable method for designing end-fire arrays that have better constrained directivity than broadside arrays but with a similar implementation complexity. A numerical simulation is used to perform a statistical analysis, which confirms that the maximized oversteering performance is robust against sensor mismatches. PMID:26066987

  9. It's elemental

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Periodic Table of the elements will now have to be updated. An international team of researchers has added element 110 to the Earth's armory of elements. Though short-lived—of the order of microseconds, element 110 bottoms out the list as the heaviest known element on the planet. Scientists at the Heavy Ion Research Center in Darmstadt, Germany, made the 110-proton element by colliding a lead isotope with nickel atoms. The element, which is yet to be named, has an atomic mass of 269.

  10. A Study of the Constrained Vapor Bubble Thermosyphon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wayner, Peter C., Jr.; Plawsky, J. L.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this effort is to better understand the physics of evaporation, condensation, and fluid flow as they affect the heat transfer processes in a constrained vapor bubble heat exchanger (CVBHX). This CVBHX consists of a small enclosed container with a square cross section (inside dimensions. 3 x 3 x 40 mm) partially filled with a liquid. The major portion of the liquid is in the corners, which act as arteries. When a temperature difference is applied to the ends of the CVBHX, evaporation occurs at the hot end and condensation at the cold end resulting in a very effective heat transfer device with great potential in space applications. Liquid is returned by capillary flow in the corners. A complete description of the system and the results obtained to date are given in the papers listed.

  11. Electroosmotic Flow Reversal Outside Glass Nanopores

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report observations of a striking reversal in the direction of electroosmotic flow (EOF) outside a conical glass nanopore as a function of salt concentration. At high ionic strengths (>100 mM), we observe EOF in the expected direction as predicted by classical electrokinetic theory, while at low salt concentrations (<1 mM) the direction of the flow is reversed. The critical crossover salt concentration depends on the pore diameter. Finite-element simulations indicate a competition between the EOF generated from the inner and outer walls of the pore, which drives flows in opposite directions. We have developed a simple analytical model which reveals that, as the salt concentration is reduced, the flow rates inside the pore are geometrically constrained, whereas there is no such limit for flows outside the pore. This model captures all of the essential physics of the system and explains the observed data, highlighting the key role the external environment plays in determining the overall electroosmotic behavior. PMID:25490120

  12. Injector element characterization methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, George B., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Characterization of liquid rocket engine injector elements is an important part of the development process for rocket engine combustion devices. Modern nonintrusive instrumentation for flow velocity and spray droplet size measurement, and automated, computer-controlled test facilities allow rapid, low-cost evaluation of injector element performance and behavior. Application of these methods in rocket engine development, paralleling their use in gas turbine engine development, will reduce rocket engine development cost and risk. The Alternate Turbopump (ATP) Hot Gas Systems (HGS) preburner injector elements were characterized using such methods, and the methodology and some of the results obtained will be shown.

  13. Low exchange element for nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Brogli, Rudolf H.; Shamasunder, Bangalore I.; Seth, Shivaji S.

    1985-01-01

    A flow exchange element is presented which lowers temperature gradients in fuel elements and reduces maximum local temperature within high temperature gas-cooled reactors. The flow exchange element is inserted within a column of fuel elements where it serves to redirect coolant flow. Coolant which has been flowing in a hotter region of the column is redirected to a cooler region, and coolant which has been flowing in the cooler region of the column is redirected to the hotter region. The safety, efficiency, and longevity of the high temperature gas-cooled reactor is thereby enhanced.

  14. NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Wheelock, C.W.; Baumeister, E.B.

    1961-09-01

    A reactor fuel element utilizing fissionable fuel materials in plate form is described. This fuel element consists of bundles of fuel-bearing plates. The bundles are stacked inside of a tube which forms the shell of the fuel element. The plates each have longitudinal fins running parallel to the direction of coolant flow, and interspersed among and parallel to the fins are ribs which position the plates relative to each other and to the fuel element shell. The plate bundles are held together by thin bands or wires. The ex tended surface increases the heat transfer capabilities of a fuel element by a factor of 3 or more over those of a simple flat plate.

  15. Self-compensating fiber optic flow sensor having an end of a fiber optics element and a reflective surface within a tube

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Wei; Qi, Bing; Wang, Anbo

    2006-05-16

    A flow rate fiber optic transducer is made self-compensating for both temperature and pressure by using preferably well-matched integral Fabry-Perot sensors symmetrically located around a cantilever-like structure. Common mode rejection signal processing of the outputs allows substantially all effects of both temperature and pressure to be compensated. Additionally, the integral sensors can individually be made insensitive to temperature.

  16. Inducing uniform single-crystal like orientation in natural rubber with constrained uniaxial stretch.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weiming; Meng, Lingpu; Lu, Jie; Wang, Zhen; Zhang, Wenhua; Huang, Ningdong; Chen, Liang; Li, Liangbin

    2015-07-01

    The effect of flow on crystallization is commonly attributed to entropic reduction, which is caused by stretch and orientation of polymer chains but overlooks the role of flow on final-state free energy. With the aid of in situ synchrotron radiation wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) and a homemade constrained uniaxial tensile testing machine, polycrystals possessing single-crystal-like orientation rather than uniaxial orientation are found during the constrained stretch of natural rubber, whereas the c-axis and a-axis align in the stretch direction (SD) and constrained direction (CD), respectively. Molecular dynamics simulation shows that aligning the a-axis of crystal nuclei in CD leads to the lowest free energy increase and favors crystal nucleation. This indicates that the nomenclature of strain-induced crystallization may not fully account for the nature of flow-induced crystallization (FIC) as strain mainly emphasizes the entropic reduction of initial melt, whereas stress rather than strain plays the dominant role in crystal deformation. The current work not only contributes to a comprehensive understanding of the mechanism of flow-induced crystallization but also demonstrates the potential application of constrained uniaxial tensile stretch for the creation of functional materials containing polycrystals that possess single-crystal-like orientation.

  17. Inverse problem to constrain the controlling parameters of large-scale heat transport processes: The Tiberias Basin example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goretzki, Nora; Inbar, Nimrod; Siebert, Christian; Möller, Peter; Rosenthal, Eliyahu; Schneider, Michael; Magri, Fabien

    2015-04-01

    Salty and thermal springs exist along the lakeshore of the Sea of Galilee, which covers most of the Tiberias Basin (TB) in the northern Jordan- Dead Sea Transform, Israel/Jordan. As it is the only freshwater reservoir of the entire area, it is important to study the salinisation processes that pollute the lake. Simulations of thermohaline flow along a 35 km NW-SE profile show that meteoric and relic brines are flushed by the regional flow from the surrounding heights and thermally induced groundwater flow within the faults (Magri et al., 2015). Several model runs with trial and error were necessary to calibrate the hydraulic conductivity of both faults and major aquifers in order to fit temperature logs and spring salinity. It turned out that the hydraulic conductivity of the faults ranges between 30 and 140 m/yr whereas the hydraulic conductivity of the Upper Cenomanian aquifer is as high as 200 m/yr. However, large-scale transport processes are also dependent on other physical parameters such as thermal conductivity, porosity and fluid thermal expansion coefficient, which are hardly known. Here, inverse problems (IP) are solved along the NW-SE profile to better constrain the physical parameters (a) hydraulic conductivity, (b) thermal conductivity and (c) thermal expansion coefficient. The PEST code (Doherty, 2010) is applied via the graphical interface FePEST in FEFLOW (Diersch, 2014). The results show that both thermal and hydraulic conductivity are consistent with the values determined with the trial and error calibrations. Besides being an automatic approach that speeds up the calibration process, the IP allows to cover a wide range of parameter values, providing additional solutions not found with the trial and error method. Our study shows that geothermal systems like TB are more comprehensively understood when inverse models are applied to constrain coupled fluid flow processes over large spatial scales. References Diersch, H.-J.G., 2014. FEFLOW Finite

  18. Elemental ZOO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helser, Terry L.

    2003-04-01

    This puzzle uses the symbols of 39 elements to spell the names of 25 animals found in zoos. Underlined spaces and the names of the elements serve as clues. To solve the puzzle, students must find the symbols that correspond to the elemental names and rearrange them into the animals' names.

  19. Constraining weak annihilation using semileptonic D decays

    SciTech Connect

    Ligeti, Zoltan; Luke, Michael; Manohar, Aneesh V.

    2010-08-01

    The recently measured semileptonic D{sub s} decay rate can be used to constrain weak annihilation (WA) effects in semileptonic D and B decays. We revisit the theoretical predictions for inclusive semileptonic D{sub (s)} decays using a variety of quark mass schemes. The most reliable results are obtained if the fits to B decay distributions are used to eliminate the charm quark mass dependence, without using any specific charm mass scheme. Our fit to the available data shows that WA is smaller than commonly assumed. There is no indication that the WA octet contribution (which is better constrained than the singlet contribution) dominates. The results constrain an important source of uncertainty in the extraction of |V{sub ub}| from inclusive semileptonic B decays.

  20. Towards weakly constrained double field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kanghoon

    2016-08-01

    We show that it is possible to construct a well-defined effective field theory incorporating string winding modes without using strong constraint in double field theory. We show that X-ray (Radon) transform on a torus is well-suited for describing weakly constrained double fields, and any weakly constrained fields are represented as a sum of strongly constrained fields. Using inverse X-ray transform we define a novel binary operation which is compatible with the level matching constraint. Based on this formalism, we construct a consistent gauge transform and gauge invariant action without using strong constraint. We then discuss the relation of our result to the closed string field theory. Our construction suggests that there exists an effective field theory description for massless sector of closed string field theory on a torus in an associative truncation.